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Sample records for ct wb ga

  1. Concurrent Diffuse Pyelonephritis and Prostatitis: Discordant Findings on Sequential FDG PET/CT and 67Ga SPECT/CT Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucaj, Robert; Achong, Dwight M

    2017-01-01

    A 45-year-old man underwent FDG PET/CT for initial imaging evaluation of recurrent Escherichia coli urinary tract infections, which demonstrated no significant FDG uptake in either kidney and subtle FDG uptake in the right prostate lobe. Subsequent Ga SPECT/CT demonstrated abnormal intense gallium uptake throughout the right kidney and entire prostate gland, clearly discordant with PET/CT findings and consistent with unexpected concurrent pyelonephritis and prostatitis. Although FDG has effectively replaced Ga in everyday clinical practice, the current case serves as a reminder that there is still a role for Ga in the evaluation of genitourinary infections.

  2. The utility of PET/CT with (68)Ga-DOTATOC in sarcoidosis: comparison with (67)Ga-scintigraphy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobashi, Tomomi; Nakamoto, Yuji; Kubo, Takeshi; Ishimori, Takayoshi; Handa, Tomohiro; Tanizawa, Kiminobu; Sano, Kohei; Mishima, Michiaki; Togashi, Kaori

    2016-10-01

    This study was designed to compare the clinical efficacy of (68)Ga-DOTA-Tyr-octreotide (DOTATOC)-positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) with that of conventional (67)Ga-scintigraphy (GS), and to correlate quantitative parameters on DOTATOC-PET/CT with clinical data, in patients with sarcoidosis. Twenty patients who were histologically and/or clinically diagnosed with sarcoidosis and underwent both DOTATOC-PET/CT and GS were analyzed in this study. The numbers of patients with positive findings for each organ were determined. The total numbers of involved nodal areas in the chest, as determined by DOTATOC-PET and gallium single-photon emission tomography (Ga-SPECT), were compared. The correlations between quantitative parameters on PET and clinical laboratory data were evaluated. DOTATOC-PET/CT was positive in 19 patients, being negative in only one patient with chronic inactive sarcoidosis, whereas GS was positive in 17 patients. DOTATOC-PET/CT visualized more lesions in lymph nodes, uvea, and muscles than did Ga-scintigraphy and identified more involved areas than did GS-SPECT (p sarcoidosis lesions, especially in lymph nodes, uvea, and muscles. Volumetric parameters in DOTATOC-PET/CT may be helpful in estimating the activity of sarcoidosis.

  3. The efficacy of (18)F-FDG PET/CT and (67)Ga SPECT/CT in diagnosing fever of unknown origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Bor-Tau; Wang, Pei-Wen; Su, Yu-Jih; Huang, Wen-Chi; Chang, Yen-Hsiang; Huang, Shu-Hua; Chang, Chiung-Chih

    2017-09-01

    Fever of unknown origin (FUO) is a diagnostic challenge. This study aimed to assess the efficacy of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ((18)F-FDG PET/CT) and gallium-67 single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography ((67)Ga SPECT/CT) in diagnosing FUO. A total of 68 patients with FUO underwent (18)F-FDG PET/CT and (67)Ga SPECT/CT from January 2013 through May 2016. Images were read independently. The imaging results were compared with the final diagnosis and categorized as helpful for diagnosis or non-contributory to diagnosis in the clinical setting. Associations between categorical variables were evaluated with the chi-square test or Fisher's exact test. Ten of the 68 patients were excluded. An infectious underlying disease was found in 23 patients. A malignant disorder was the cause of FUO in 10 patients. Non-infectious inflammatory disease was found in 11 patients. Adrenal insufficiency was the cause of FUO in two patients. The cause of FUO was not found for 12 patients. A high false-positive rate of 44% (7/16) was observed for (18)F-FDG PET/CT, while a high false-negative rate of 55% (23/42) was observed for (67)Ga SPECT/CT. (18)F-FDG PET/CT studies depicted all (67)Ga-avid lesions. The sensitivity (79% vs. 45%) and clinical contribution (72% vs. 55%) of (18)F-FDG PET/CT in diagnosing FUO were significantly higher than those of (67)Ga SPECT/CT (pPET/CT is superior to (67)Ga SPECT/CT in the work-up of patients with FUO. With its rapid results and superior sensitivity, (18)F-FDG PET/CT may replace (67)Ga SPECT/CT where this technique is available. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Diagnostic accuracy of {sup 68}Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT imaging in pheochromocytoma

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    Sharma, Punit; Dhull, Varun Singh; Arora, Saurabh; Kumar, Rajeev; Malhotra, Arun; Kumar, Rakesh; Bal, Chandrasekhar [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ansari Nagar, New Delhi (India); Gupta, Poonam; Ammini, Ariachery C. [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, New Delhi (India); Durgapal, Prashant [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Pathology, New Delhi (India); Chumber, Sunil [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Surgical Disciplines, New Delhi (India)

    2014-03-15

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of {sup 68}Ga-DOTANOC positron emission tomography (PET)/CT in patients with suspicion of pheochromocytoma. Data of 62 patients [age 34.3 ± 16.1 years, 14 with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 (MEN2)] with clinical/biochemical suspicion of pheochromocytoma and suspicious adrenal lesion on contrast CT (n = 70), who had undergone {sup 68}Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT, were retrospectively analyzed. PET/CT images were analyzed visually as well as semiquantitatively, with measurement of maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}), SUV{sub mean}, SUV{sub max}/SUV{sub liver}, and SUV{sub mean}/SUV{sub liver}. Results of PET/CT were compared with {sup 131}I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) imaging, which was available in 40 patients (45 lesions). Histopathology and/or imaging/clinical/biochemical follow-up (minimum 6 months) was used as reference standard. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of {sup 68}Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT was 90.4, 85, and 88.7 %, respectively, on patient-based analysis and 92, 85, and 90 %, respectively, on lesion-based analysis. {sup 68}Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT showed 100 % accuracy in patients with MEN2 syndrome and malignant pheochromocytoma. On direct comparison, lesion-based accuracy of {sup 68}Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT for pheochromocytoma was significantly higher than {sup 131}I-MIBG imaging (91.1 vs 66.6 %, p = 0.035). SUV{sub max} was higher for pheochromocytomas than other adrenal lesions (p = 0.005), MEN2-associated vs sporadic pheochromocytoma (p = 0.012), but no difference was seen between benign vs malignant pheochromocytoma (p = 0.269). {sup 68}Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT shows high diagnostic accuracy in patients with suspicion of pheochromocytoma and is superior to {sup 131}I-MIBG imaging for this purpose. Best results of {sup 68}Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT are seen in patients with MEN2-associated and malignant pheochromocytoma. (orig.)

  5. Rare Sites of Metastases in Prostate Cancer Detected on Ga-68 PSMA PET/CT Scan—A Case Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dureja, Sugandha; Thakral, Parul; Pant, Vineet; Sen, Ishita

    2017-01-01

    Ga-68 labeled prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) whole body PET/CT scan is a novel upcoming modality for the evaluation of prostate cancer. We present three cases of prostate cancer showing rare sites of metastases like brain, penis, and liver detected on Ga-68 PSMA PET/CT scan thus emphasizing its role in lesion detection and staging. PMID:28242977

  6. Endolymphatic Sac Tumor Showing Increased Activity on 68Ga DOTATATE PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, Georgios Z; Millo, Corina; Sadowski, Samira M; Bagci, Ulas; Patronas, Nicholas J

    2016-10-01

    Endolymphatic sac tumors (ELSTs) are rare tumors arising from the epithelium of the endolymphatic sac and duct that can be either sporadic or associated with von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease. We report a case of a VHL patient with histologically proven residual ELST who underwent Ga DOTATATE PET/CT showing increased activity (SUVmax, 6.29) by the ELST. The presented case of a VHL-associated ELST with increased Ga DOTATATE uptake indicates cell-surface expression of somatostatin receptors by this tumor, suggesting the potential application of somatostatin receptor imaging using Ga DOTA-conjugated peptides in the workup and management of these patients.

  7. ⁶⁸Ga-DOTA-TOC-PET/CT detects heart metastases from ileal neuroendocrine tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calissendorff, Jan; Sundin, Anders; Falhammar, Henrik

    2014-09-01

    Metastases from ileal neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) to the myocardium are rare and generally seen in patients with widespread metastatic NET disease. The objectives of this investigation were to describe the frequency of intracardiac metastases in ileal NET patients examined by (68)Ga-DOTA-TOC-PET/CT and to describe the cases in detail. All (68)Ga-DOTA-TOC-PET/CT examinations performed at the Karolinska University Hospital since 2010 until April 2012 were reviewed. In all, 128 out of 337 examinations were in patients with ileal NETs. Four patients had seven myocardiac metastases, yielding a frequency of 4.3 % in patients with ileal NETs. One patient had cardiac surgery while three were treated with somatostatin analogs. The cardiac metastases did not affect the patients' activity of daily life. (68)Ga-DOTA-TOC-PET/CT is an established imaging modality in identifying cardiac metastases in ileal NETs. Prospective studies are needed to confirm the true clinical value of (68)Ga-DOTA-TOC-PET/CT in detecting cardiac metastases in both ileal and non-ileal NETs.

  8. Breast Fibroadenoma With Increased Activity on 68Ga DOTATATE PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, Georgios Z; Millo, Corina; Sadowski, Samira M; Karantanas, Apostolos H; Bagci, Ulas; Patronas, Nicholas J

    2017-02-01

    Fibroadenoma is the most common benign breast tumor in women of reproductive age, carrying little to no risk of breast cancer development. We report on a case of a woman with history of neuroendocrine tumor who on follow-up imaging tests underwent whole-body PET/CT study using Ga DOTATATE. The scan showed increased focal activity in the right breast, which was biopsied revealing a fibroadenoma. The presented data suggests cell surface overexpression of somatostatin receptors by this benign breast tumor. Moreover, this finding emphasizes the need for cautious interpretation of Ga DOTATATE-avid breast lesions that could mimic malignancy in neuroendocrine tumor patients.

  9. Fibrous Dysplasia Mimicking Malignancy on 68Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, Georgios Z; Millo, Corina; Sadowski, Samira M; Karantanas, Apostolos H; Bagci, Ulas; Patronas, Nicholas J

    2017-03-01

    Fibrous dysplasia of the bone is a developmental benign skeletal disorder characterized by replacement of normal bone and normal bone marrow with abnormal fibro-osseous tissue. We report on a case of a biopsy-proven fibrous dysplasia lesion in the left temporal bone, with intensely increased activity (SUVmax, 56.7) on Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT. The presented data indicate cell surface overexpression of somatostatin receptors by fibrous dysplastic cells and highlight the need of cautious management of Ga-DOTATATE-avid bone lesions, which could mimic malignancy especially in patients with history of neuroendocrine tumors.

  10. Unusual Presentation of Bladder Paraganglioma: Comparison of (131)I MIBG SPECT/CT and (68)Ga DOTANOC PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Tarun Kumar; Basher, Rajender Kumar; Gupta, Nitin; Shukla, Jaya; Singh, Shrawan Kumar; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai

    2016-01-01

    Extraadrenal chromaffin cell-related tumors or paragangliomas are rare, especially in the bladder, accounting for less than 1% of cases. We report a 16-year-old boy who presented with hematuria and paroxysmal headache and was found to have a prostatic growth infiltrating the urinary bladder on anatomical imaging. Iodine-131 ((131)I) metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) whole-body scanning and subsequently gallium-68 ((68)Ga) DOTANOC positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) were performed. The MIBG scan revealed a non-tracer-avid soft-tissue mass, while DOTANOC PET/CT revealed a tracer-avid primary soft-tissue mass involving the urinary bladder and prostate with metastasis to the iliac lymph nodes. He underwent surgical management; histopathology of the surgical specimen revealed a bladder paraganglioma, whereas the prostate was found to be free of tumor.

  11. Molecular imaging for prostate cancer: Performance analysis of (68)Ga-PSMA PET/CT versus choline PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, L; Touijer, K A

    2017-06-01

    There is a need for a precise and reliable imaging to improve the management of prostate cancer. In recent years the PET/CT with choline has changed the handling of prostate cancer in Europe, and it is commonly used for initial stratification or for the diagnosis of a biochemical recurrence, although it does not lack limitations. Other markers are being tested, including the ligand of prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA), that seems to offer encouraging prospects. The goal of this piece of work was to critically review the role of choline and PSMA PET/CT in prostate cancer. A systematic literature review of databases PUBMED/MEDLINE and EMBASE was conducted searching for articles fully published in English on the PET marker in prostate cancer and its clinical application. It seems as 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT is better than PET/CT in prostate cancer to detect primary prostate lesions, initial metastases in the lymph nodes and recurrence. However, further research is required to obtain high-level tests. Also, other PET markers are studied. Moreover, the emergence of a new PET/MR camera could change the performance of PET imaging. Copyright © 2016 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Performance and applications of GaAs:Cr-based Medipix detector in X-ray CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozhevnikov, D.; Chelkov, G.; Demichev, M.; Gridin, A.; Smolyanskiy, P.; Zhemchugov, A.

    2017-01-01

    In the recent years, the method of single photon counting X-ray μ-CT is being actively developed and applied in various fields. Results of our studies carried out using the MARS μ-CT scanner equipped with GaAs Medipix-based camera are presented. The procedure of mechanical alignment of the scanner is described, including direct and indirect measurements of the spatial resolution. The software chain for data processing and reconstruction has been developed and reported. We demonstrate the possibility to apply the scanner for research in geology and medicine and provide demo images of geological samples (chrome spinellids, titanium magnetite ore) and medical samples (atherosclerotic plaque, abdominal aortic aneurysm). The first results of multi-energy scans using GaAs:Cr-based camera are shown.

  13. 68Ga DOTATATE PET/CT of Synchronous Meningioma and Prolactinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Sandip; Ranade, Rohit; Hazarika, Suman

    2016-03-01

    Ga DOTATATE PET/CT in noninvasive characterization of synchronous pituitary neoplasm and meningioma in a 38-year-old man is illustrated. The patient presented with an MRI-detected lobulated enhancing sellar-suprasellar mass with erosion of bony sella measuring 4.5 × 3.5 × 3.4 cm (with differential diagnosis with germ cell tumor) and a right parafalcine mass (2.7 × 2.6 cm) suggesting meningioma. Ga DOTATATE PET/CT demonstrated intense uptake in both lesions, suggesting the sellar mass to be pituitary macroadenoma. The finding of high serum prolactin and normal LH, FSH, cortisol, and testosterone levels suggested diagnosis of prolactinoma, and the patient was started on cabergoline.

  14. Detection of bone marrow and extramedullary involvement in patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma by whole-body MRI: comparison with bone and {sup 67}Ga scintigraphies

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    Iizuka-Mikami, Masami; Nagai, Kiyohisa; Yoshida, Koji; Tamada, Tsutomu; Imai, Shigeki; Kajihara, Yasumasa; Fukunaga, Masao [Department of Radiology, Kawasaki Medical School, 577 Matsushima, 701-0192, Kurashiki, Okayama (Japan); Sugihara, Takashi; Suetsugu, Yoshimasa; Mikami, Makoto [Department of Hematology, Kawasaki Medical School, 577 Matsushima, 701-0192, Kurashiki, Okayama (Japan)

    2004-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic potential of whole-body MRI (WB-MRI) for the detection of bone marrow and extramedullary involvement in patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. WB-MRI, which was performed on 34 patients, consisted of the recording of T1-weighted spin-echo images and a fast STIR sequence covering the entire skeleton. The WB-MRI findings for bone marrow and extramedullary involvement were compared with those from {sup 67}Ga and bone scintigraphies and bone marrow biopsy results. Two MRI specialists reviewed the WB-MRI results and two expert radiologists in the field of nuclear medicine reviewed the bone and {sup 67}Ga scintigraphy findings. Bone marrow and extramedullary involvement of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma were confirmed by follow-up radiographs and CT and/or a histological biopsy. The detection rate of WB-MRI was high. More bone marrow involvement was detected by biopsy, and more lesions were detected by scintigraphies. In total, 89 lesions were detected by WB-MRI, whereas 15 were found by biopsy, 5 by {sup 67}Ga scintigraphy, and 14 by bone scintigraphy. WB-MRI could also detect more extramedullary lesions than {sup 67}Ga scintigraphy; i.e., 72 lesions were detected by WB-MRI, whereas 54 were discovered by {sup 67}Ga scintigraphy. WB-MRI is useful for evaluating the involvement of bone marrow and extramedullary lesions throughout the skeleton in patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. (orig.)

  15. A dual tracer (68)Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT and (18)F-FDG PET/CT pilot study for detection of cardiac sarcoidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gormsen, Lars C; Haraldsen, Ate; Kramer, Stine; Dias, Andre H; Kim, Won Yong; Borghammer, Per

    2016-12-01

    Cardiac sarcoidosis (CS) is a potentially fatal condition lacking a single test with acceptable diagnostic accuracy. (18)F-FDG PET/CT has emerged as a promising imaging modality, but is challenged by physiological myocardial glucose uptake. An alternative tracer, (68)Ga-DOTANOC, binds to somatostatin receptors on inflammatory cells in sarcoid granulomas. We therefore aimed to conduct a proof-of-concept study using (68)Ga-DOTANOC to diagnose CS. In addition, we compared diagnostic accuracy and inter-observer variability of (68)Ga-DOTANOC vs. (18)F-FDG PET/CT. Nineteen patients (seven female) with suspected CS were prospectively recruited and dual tracer scanned within 7 days. PET images were reviewed by four expert readers for signs of CS and compared to the reference standard (Japanese ministry of Health and Welfare CS criteria). CS was diagnosed in 3/19 patients. By consensus, 11/19 (18)F-FDG scans and 0/19 (68)Ga-DOTANOC scans were rated as inconclusive. The sensitivity of (18)F-FDG PET for diagnosing CS was 33 %, specificity was 88 %, PPV was 33 %, NPV was 88 %, and diagnostic accuracy was 79 %. For (68)Ga-DOTANOC, accuracy was 100 %. Inter-observer agreement was poor for (18)F-FDG PET (Fleiss' combined kappa 0.27, NS) and significantly better for (68)Ga-DOTANOC (Fleiss' combined kappa 0.46, p = 0.001). Despite prolonged pre-scan fasting, a large proportion of (18)F-FDG PET/CT images were rated as inconclusive, resulting in low agreement among reviewers and correspondingly poor diagnostic accuracy. By contrast, (68)Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT had excellent diagnostic accuracy with the caveat that inter-observer variability was still significant. Nevertheless, (68)Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT looks very promising as an alternative CS PET tracer. Current Controlled Trials NCT01729169 .

  16. Dynamica 3-A: Lecture Notes wb1303

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijers, P.

    1997-01-01

    Lecture Notes for course wb 1303 Dynamica 3-A, Faculty 3me/Mechanical Engineering, TU Delft. Contents: Continuous systems; Dynamics of a reciprocating engine; Non-linear systems; Kinematics and dynamics of multi-body systems; Exercises.

  17. Role of (68)Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT in patients with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lastoria, Secondo; Marciello, Francesca; Faggiano, Antongiulio; Aloj, Luigi; Caracò, Corradina; Aurilio, Michela; D'Ambrosio, Laura; Di Gennaro, Francesca; Ramundo, Valeria; Camera, Luigi; De Luca, Leonardo; Fonti, Rosa; Napolitano, Vincenzo; Colao, Annamaria

    2016-06-01

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) is a hereditary syndrome predisposing to many endocrine and neuroendocrine tumors (NET). Conventional imaging (CI) cannot provide satisfactory results for all the different types of MEN1-related tumors. Objective of this prospective observational study was to evaluate the role of (68)Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT in MEN1 compared to CI. Diagnostic performance of (68)Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT for the detection of NET was evaluated as well as the prognostic role of SUVmax. Eighteen patients with genetically confirmed MEN1 were evaluated by (68)Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT, endoscopic ultrasounds, multidetector-row computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and hormone/markers serum measurements. Four MEN1-related tumor sites (pancreas, pituitary, parathyroids, adrenals) were considered. Sensitivity and specificity of (68)Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT for the detection of NET were calculated. There was (68)Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT uptake in 11/11 patients with pancreatic lesions, in 9/12 with pituitary adenoma, in 5/15 with parathyroid enlargements, and in 5/7 with adrenal lesions. (68)Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT showed sensitivity and specificity of 100 and 100 % in pancreas, 75 and 83 % in pituitary, 28 and 100 % in parathyroids, and 62.5 and 100 % in adrenals, respectively. Compared with CI, no significant difference in sensitivity for pancreas, pituitary, and adrenals was found, while CI had a better sensitivity for parathyroids (p = 0.002). On the ROC analysis, progression of pancreatic lesions was significantly associated to SUVmax 68)Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT is greatly helpful in the work-up of MEN1 providing a panoramic view of MEN1-related lesions. There is also a prognostic role of (68)Ga-PET in patients with MEN1-pancreatic lesions.

  18. {sup 67}Ga-SPECT/CT with a hybrid system in the clinical management of lymphoma

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    Palumbo, Barbara; Sivolella, Silvio; Palumbo, Renato [University of Perugia, Nuclear Medicine Section, Department of Radiological Sciences, Perugia (Italy); Palumbo, Isabella; Liberati, Anna Marina [University of Perugia, Internal Medicine and Oncology, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Perugia (Italy)

    2005-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the added value of co-registered fusion imaging using a hybrid system in patients with lymphoma. Twenty-four lymphoma patients underwent {sup 67}Ga-SPECT/CT using a hybrid tomograph consisting of a dual-head, variable-angle gamma camera and a low-dose X-ray tube. Results were compared with those of SPECT alone. Forty-five lesions were identified by SPECT alone, while 49 were detected by SPECT/CT. Forty out of the 45 lesions observed on SPECT were confirmed as lymphoma, but five were due to other causes (thoracic aorta blood pool activity, sialoadenitis in the submandibular gland, bowel activity, rib fracture and bone marrow activation due to radiotherapy). SPECT/CT identified nine more neoplastic lesions compared with SPECT alone: four areas of radiopharmaceutical accumulation were observed in para-aortic lymph nodes, three in the spleen, one in the liver and one in para-iliac lymph nodes. In five cases, SPECT/CT provided additional anatomical information over SPECT alone. In four patients, four large areas of {sup 67}Ga uptake (one mediastinal, two supraclavicular and one para-aortic) were better characterised; in one subject uptake was localised in the seventh thoracic vertebra only by SPECT/CT. Hybrid imaging provided additional data in 13 patients (54.2%), thus inducing oncologists to reconsider the therapeutic approach in eight subjects (33.2%): unnecessary treatment was avoided in four (16.6%) while therapy was altered in another four (16.6%). SPECT/CT hybrid system is able to provide information not obtained by SPECT alone. It allows the anatomical localisation of lymphoma and physiological radiopharmaceutical uptake, facilitates the diagnosis of tumours located in the abdomen (subdiaphragmatic lesions) and provides information that may cause a change in therapeutic strategy. (orig.)

  19. 68Ga-DOTA-NOC PET/CT detects somatostatin receptors expression in von hippel-lindau cerebellar disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosini, Valentina; Campana, Davide; Allegri, Vincenzo; Opocher, Giuseppe; Fanti, Stefano

    2011-01-01

    A case of Von-Hippel Lindau (VHL) disease has been studied using 68Ga-DOTA-NOC PET/CT. PET/CT demonstrated the presence of somatostatin receptors within 2 focal areas in the cerebellum corresponding to the lesions detected by MRI. Considering the heterogeneous lesions localizations in VHL disease, PET/CT may be a useful imaging modality for diagnosing lesions of central nervous system and neuroendocrine lesions and for direct demonstration of somatostatin receptors for targeted treatment.

  20. [68Ga]-DOTATOC-PET/CT for meningioma IMRT treatment planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bamberg Michael

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose The observation that human meningioma cells strongly express somatostatin receptor (SSTR 2 was the rationale to analyze retrospectively in how far DOTATOC PET/CT is helpful to improve target volume delineation for intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT. Patients and Methods In 26 consecutive patients with preferentially skull base meningioma, diagnostic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and planning-computed tomography (CT was complemented with data from [68Ga]-DOTA-D Phe1-Tyr3-Octreotide (DOTATOC-PET/CT. Image fusion of PET/CT, diagnostic computed tomography, MRI and radiotherapy planning CT as well as target volume delineation was performed with OTP-Masterplan®. Initial gross tumor volume (GTV definition was based on MRI data only and was secondarily complemented with DOTATOC-PET information. Irradiation was performed as EUD based IMRT, using the Hyperion Software package. Results The integration of the DOTATOC data led to additional information concerning tumor extension in 17 of 26 patients (65%. There were major changes of the clinical target volume (CTV which modify the PTV in 14 patients, minor changes were realized in 3 patients. Overall the GTV-MRI/CT was larger than the GTV-PET in 10 patients (38%, smaller in 13 patients (50% and almost the same in 3 patients (12%. Most of the adaptations were performed in close vicinity to bony skull base structures or after complex surgery. Median GTV based on MRI was 18.1 cc, based on PET 25.3 cc and subsequently the CTV was 37.4 cc. Radiation planning and treatment of the DOTATOC-adapted volumes was feasible. Conclusion DOTATOC-PET/CT information may strongly complement patho-anatomical data from MRI and CT in cases with complex meningioma and is thus helpful for improved target volume delineation especially for skull base manifestations and recurrent disease after surgery.

  1. {sup 68}Ga-PSMA PET/CT for restaging recurrent prostate cancer: which factors are associated with PET/CT detection rate?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ceci, Francesco [Medizinische Universitaet Innsbruck, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Innsbruck (Austria); University of Bologna, Service of Nuclear Medicine, Policlinico S. Orsola-Malpighi, Bologna (Italy); Uprimny, Christian; Nilica, Bernhard; Geraldo, Llanos; Kendler, Dorota; Kroiss, Alexander; Decristoforo, Clemens; Virgolini, Irene J. [Medizinische Universitaet Innsbruck, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Innsbruck (Austria); Bektic, Jasmin; Horninger, Wolfgang [Medizinische Universitaet Innsbruck, Department of Urology, Innsbruck (Austria); Lukas, Peter [Medizinische Universitaet Innsbruck, Department of Radiotherapy, Innsbruck (Austria); Castellucci, Paolo; Fanti, Stefano [University of Bologna, Service of Nuclear Medicine, Policlinico S. Orsola-Malpighi, Bologna (Italy)

    2015-07-15

    To assess the association between PSA levels, PSA kinetics and other factors and a pathological {sup 68}Ga-PSMA PET/CT scan in patients with recurrent prostate cancer (rPCa) with biochemical relapse (BR) after radical therapy. Seventy consecutive rPCA patients referred for {sup 68}Ga-PSMA PET/CT, matching all the following criteria, were retrospectively evaluated: (a) previous radical prostatectomy or primary radiotherapy with curative intent; (b) BR or persisting high PSA levels after primary treatment; and (c) complete clinical and imaging information. The mean ± SD PSA level was 3.5 ± 5.3 ng/mL (median 1.7, range 0.2 - 32.2 ng/mL), the mean ± SD PSA doubling time (PSAdt) was 6.5 ± 5.5 months (median 5.5, range 1.3 - 31.6 months), and the mean ± SD PSA velocity was 7.9 ± 20.5 (median 2.1, range 0.2 - 147.5 ng/mL/year). Statistical analysis was performed to assess which factors were associated with the detection of rPCa on {sup 68}Ga-PSMA PET/CT. {sup 68}Ga-PSMA PET/CT was positive in 52 of 70 patients (74.2 %). In 30 patients (42.8 %) lesions limited to the pelvis were detected. Distant lesions were observed in 8 of patients (11.4 %). Local plus systemic lesions were detected in 14 patients (20 %). PSA level (p = 0.017) and PSAdt (p = 0.0001) were significantly different between PET-positive patients (higher PSA level, shorter PSAdt) and PET-negative patients (lower PSA, longer PSAdt). ROC analysis showed that PSAdt 6.5 months and PSA 0.83 ng/mL were optimal cut-off values. In multivariate analysis PSAdt was associated with {sup 68}Ga-PSMA PET/CT positivity. {sup 68}Ga-PSMA PET/CT was positive in 17 of 20 patients (85 %) with PSA <2 ng/mL and PSAdt <6.5 months, and in 3 of 16 patients (18.7 %) with PSA <2 ng/mL and PSAdt ≥6.5 months. The great potential of {sup 68}Ga-PSMA PET/CT in patients with rPCa and BR was confirmed. PSA and PSAdt were valuable predictors of pathological {sup 68}Ga-PSMA PET/CT findings. (orig.)

  2. Diagnostic sensitivity of Tc-99m HYNIC PSMA SPECT/CT in prostate carcinoma: A comparative analysis with Ga-68 PSMA PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawal, Ismaheel O; Ankrah, Alfred O; Mokgoro, Neo P; Vorster, Mariza; Maes, Alex; Sathekge, Mike M

    2017-08-01

    Emerging data from published studies are demonstrating the superiority of Ga-68 PSMA PET/CT imaging in prostate cancer. However, the low yield of the Ge-68/Ga-68 from which Gallium-68 is obtained and fewer installed PET/CT systems compared to the SPECT imaging systems may limit its availability. We, therefore, evaluated in a head-to-head comparison, the diagnostic sensitivity of Ga-68 PSMA PET/CT and Tc-99m PSMA SPECT/CT in patients with prostate cancer. A total of 14 patients with histologically confirmed prostate cancer were prospectively recruited to undergo Ga-68 PSMA PET/CT and Tc-99m HYNIC PSMA SPECT/CT. The mean age of patients was 67.21 ± 8.15 years and the median PSA level was 45.18 ng/mL (range = 1.51-687 ng/mL). SUVmax of all lesions and the size of lymph nodes with PSMA avidity on Ga-68 PSMA PET/CT were determined. Proportions of these lesions detected on Tc-99m HYNIC PSMA SPECT/CT read independent of PET/CT findings were determined. A total of 46 lesions were seen on Ga-68 PSMA PET/CT localized to the prostate (n = 10), lymph nodes (n = 24), and bones (n = 12). Of these, Tc-99m HYNIC PSMA SPECT/CT detected 36 lesions: Prostate = 10/10 (100%), lymph nodes = 15/24 (62.5%), and bones = 11/12 (91.7%) with an overall sensitivity of 78.3%. Lesions detected on Tc-99m HYNIC PSMA SPECT/CT were bigger in size (P PET/CT compared to those lesions that were not detected. All lymph nodes greater than 10 mm in size were detected while only 28% of nodes less than 10 mm were detected by Tc-99m HYNIC PSMA SPECT/CT. In a univariate analysis, Lymph node size (P = 0.033) and the SUVmax of all lesions (P = 0.007) were significant predictors of lesion detection on Tc-99m HYNIC PSMA SPECT/CT. Tc-99m HYNIC PSMA may be a useful in imaging of prostate cancer although with a lower sensitivity for lesion detection compared to Ga-68 PSMA PET/CT. Its use is recommended when Ga-68 PSMA is not readily available, in planning radio

  3. {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT provides accurate tumour extent in patients with extraadrenal paraganglioma compared to {sup 123}I-MIBG SPECT/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroiss, Alexander; Uprimny, Christian; Madleitner, Ruth; Nilica, Bernhard; Virgolini, Irene Johanna [Innsbruck Medical University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Innsbruck (Austria); Shulkin, Barry Lynn [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Department of Radiological Sciences, Memphis, TN (United States); Frech, Andreas; Fraedrich, Gustav [Innsbruck Medical University, Department of Vascular Surgery, Innsbruck (Austria); Gasser, Rudolf Wolfgang [Innsbruck Medical University, Department of Internal Medicine I, Innsbruck (Austria); Url, Christoph [Innsbruck Medical University, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Innsbruck (Austria); Gautsch, Kurt [Innsbruck Medical University, Department of Radiology, Innsbruck (Austria); Sprinzl, Georg Mathias [State Clinic, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, St. Poelten (Austria); Gastl, Guenther [Innsbruck Medical University, Department of Internal Medicine V, Innsbruck (Austria)

    2015-01-15

    The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy of {sup 123}I-MIBG SPECT/CT with that of {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT for staging extraadrenal paragangliomas (PGL) using both functional and anatomical images (i.e. combined cross-sectional imaging) as the reference standards. The study included three men and seven women (age range 26 to 73 years) with anatomical and/or histologically proven disease. Three patients had either metastatic head and neck PGL (HNPGL) or multifocal extraadrenal PGL, and seven patients had nonmetastatic extraadrenal disease. Comparative evaluation included morphological imaging with CT, functional imaging with {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET, and {sup 123}I-MIBG imaging. The imaging results were analysed on a per-patient and on a per-lesion basis. On a per-patient basis, the detection rate of {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET was 100 %, whereas that of planar {sup 123}I-MIBG imaging was 10.0 % and with SPECT/CT 20.0 % for both nonmetastatic and metastatic/multifocal extraadrenal PGL. On a per-lesion basis, the overall sensitivity of {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET was 100 % (McNemar p < 0.5), that of planar {sup 123}I-MIBG imaging was 3.4 % (McNemar p < 0.001) and that of SPECT/CT was 6.9 % (McNemar p < 0.001). Both {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET and anatomical imaging identified 27 lesions. Planar {sup 123}I-MIBG imaging identified only one lesion, and SPECT/CT two lesions. Two additional lesions were detected by {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET but not by either {sup 123}I-MIBG or CT imaging. Our analysis in this patient cohort indicated that {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT is superior to {sup 123}I-MIBG SPECT/CT, particularly in head and neck and bone lesions, and provides valuable information for staging extraadrenal PGL, particularly in patients with surgically inoperable tumours or multifocal/malignant disease. (orig.)

  4. Detection of cranial meningiomas: comparison of {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT and contrast-enhanced MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afshar-Oromieh, Ali; Giesel, Frederik L.; Haberkorn, Uwe; Haufe, Sabine; Kratochwil, Clemens [University Hospital of Heidelberg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); Linhart, Heinz G. [DKFZ, National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT), Heidelberg (Germany); Combs, Stephanie E. [University Hospital of Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Oncology and Therapy, Heidelberg (Germany); Podlesek, Dino [University Hospital of Dresden, Department of Neurosurgery, Dresden (Germany); Eisenhut, Michael [DKFZ, Department of Radiopharmacy, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2012-09-15

    PET imaging with somatostatin receptor ligands, such as {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC, is a well-established method for detection and target volume definition of meningiomas prior to radiotherapy. Since DOTATOC PET delivers a higher contrast between meningiomas and surrounding tissues than MRI, we conducted a retrospective analysis to compare the diagnostic accuracy of contrast-enhanced MRI (CE-MRI) with {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT in patients with cranial meningiomas prior to radiotherapy. Over a period of 6 years, 134 patients (20-82 years of age, 107 women and 27 men) underwent cranial CE-MRI and {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT. To compare the two methods, the lesions considered typical of meningiomas visually were counted and analysed with respect to their location and SUVmax. In the 134 patients investigated by both modalities, 190 meningiomas were detected by {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT and 171 by CE-MRI. With knowledge of the PET/CT data, the MRI scans were reinvestigated, which led to the detection of 4 of the 19 incidental meningiomas, resulting in an overall detection rate of 92 % of the meningioma lesions that were found by PET/CT. Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT demonstrated an improved sensitivity in meningioma detection when compared to CE-MRI. Tumours adjacent to the falx cerebri, located at the skull base or obscured by imaging artefacts or calcification are particularly difficult to detect by MRI. Therefore {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT may provide additional information in patients with uncertain or equivocal results on MRI or could help to confirm a diagnosis of meningioma based on MRI or could help to confirm MRI-based diagnosis of meningiomas in cases of biopsy limitations. It is possible that not only radiotherapy and surgical planning, but also follow-up strategies would benefit from this imaging modality. (orig.)

  5. Avascular Necrosis of the Hips With Increased Activity on 68Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, Georgios Z; Millo, Corina; Karantanas, Apostolos H; Bagci, Ulas; Patronas, Nicholas J

    2017-03-01

    Prolonged exposure to cortisol is one of the major causes of avascular bone necrosis (AVN). We report on a case of a woman with Cushing syndrome attributed to ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone-secreting tumor who was evaluated with whole-body PET/CT study using Ga-DOTATATE. The scan showed increased activity by both femoral heads, corresponding to the margins of bilateral AVN seen on MRI. The presented data suggests AVN-induced reactive inflammatory alterations adjacent to the necrotic segment of the bone, which can be effectively targeted using radiolabeled somatostatin (SST) analogs.

  6. Potential impact of {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT on stereotactic radiotherapy planning of meningiomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nyuyki, Fonyuy; Plotkin, Michail; Michel, Roger; Steffen, Ingo; Fahdt, Daniel; Brenner, Winfried [Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department for Nuclear Medicine, Berlin (Germany); Graf, Reinhold [Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department for Radiation Therapy, Campus Virchow, Berlin (Germany); Denecke, Timm [Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department for Radiology, Campus Virchow, Berlin (Germany); Geworski, Lilli [Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department for Nuclear Medicine, Berlin (Germany); Medizinische Hochschule Hannover, Department for Radiation Safety and Medical Physics, Hannover (Germany); Wurm, Reinhard [Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department for Radiation Therapy, Campus Virchow, Berlin (Germany); Klinikum Frankfurt (Oder), Department for Radiation Therapy and Radiooncology, Frankfurt (Germany)

    2010-02-15

    Since meningiomas show a high expression of somatostatin receptor subtype 2, PET with {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC was proposed as an additional imaging modality beside CT and MRI for planning radiotherapy. We investigated the input of {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC-PET/CT on the definition of the ''gross tumour volume'' (GTV) in meningiomas, in order to assess the potential value of this method. Prior to radiotherapy, 42 patients with meningiomas (26 f, 16 m, mean age 55) underwent MRI and {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC-PET/CT examinations. History: operated n = 24, radiotherapy n = 1, operation and radiotherapy n = 8, no treatment n = 9. PET/CT and MRI data were co-registered using a BrainLAB workstation. For comparison, the GTV was defined first under consideration of CT and MRI data, then using PET data. 3/42 patients were excluded from the analysis (two with negative PET results, one with an extensive tumour, not precisely delineable by MRI or PET/CT). The average GTV{sub CT/MRI} was 22({+-}19)cm{sup 3}; GTV{sub PET} was 23({+-}20)cm{sup 3}. Additional GTV, obtained as a result of PET was 9({+-}10)cm{sup 3} and was observed in patients with osseous infiltration. In some pre-treated patients there were intratumoural areas (as identified in CT/MRI) without SR-expression (7({+-}11)cm{sup 3}). Common GTV as obtained by both CT/MRI and PET was 15({+-}14)cm{sup 3}. The mean bi-directional difference between the GTV{sub CT/MRI} and GTV{sub PET} accounted to 16({+-}15)cm{sup 3} (93%, p < 0.001). In a subgroup of seven patients with multiple meningiomas, PET showed a total of 19 lesions; nine of them were not recognizable by CT or MRI. {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC-PET enables delineation of SR-positive meningiomas and delivers additional information to both CT and MRI regarding the planning of stereotactic radiotherapy. The acquisition on a PET/CT scanner helps to estimate the relation of PET findings to anatomical structures and is especially useful for detection of osseous infiltration

  7. 68Ga DOTA-TATE PET/CT allows tumor localization in patients with tumor-induced osteomalacia but negative 111In-octreotide SPECT/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breer, Stefan; Brunkhorst, Thomas; Beil, F Timo; Peldschus, Kersten; Heiland, Max; Klutmann, Susanne; Barvencik, Florian; Zustin, Jozef; Gratz, Klaus-Friedrich; Amling, Michael

    2014-07-01

    Tumor-induced osteomalacia (TIO) is a paraneoplastic syndrome characterized by renal phosphate wasting, hypophosphatemia and low calcitriol levels as well as clinical symptoms like diffuse bone and muscle pain, fatigue fractures or increased fracture risk. Conventional imaging methods, however, often fail to detect the small tumors. Lately, tumor localization clearly improved by somatostatin-receptor (SSTR) imaging, such as octreotide scintigraphy or octreotide SPECT/CT. However, recent studies revealed that still a large number of tumors remained undetected by octreotide imaging. Hence, studies focused on different SSTR imaging methods such as 68Ga DOTA-NOC, 68Ga DOTA-TOC and 68Ga DOTA-TATE PET/CT with promising first results. Studies comparing different SSTR imaging methods for tumor localization in TIO are rare and thus little is known about diagnostic alternatives once a particular method failed to detect a tumor in patients with TIO. Here, we report the data of 5 consecutive patients suffering from TIO, who underwent both 111Indium-octreotide scintigraphy (111In-OCT) SPECT/CT as well as 68Ga DOTA-TATE PET/CT for tumor detection. While 111In-OCT SPECT/CT allowed tumor detection in only 1 of 5 patients, 68Ga DOTA-TATE PET/CT was able to localize the tumor in all patients. Afterwards, anatomical imaging of the region of interest was performed with CT and MRI. Thus, successful surgical resection of the tumor was achieved in all patients. Serum phosphate levels returned to normal and all patients reported relief of symptoms within weeks. Moreover, an iliac crest biopsy was obtained from every patient and revealed marked osteomalacia in all cases. Follow-up DXA revealed an increase in BMD of up to 34.5% 1-year postoperative, indicating remineralization. No recurrence was observed. In conclusion our data indicates that 68Ga DOTA-TATE PET/CT is an effective and promising diagnostic tool in the diagnosis of TIO, even in patients in whom 111In-OCT prior failed to detect

  8. {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-NOC PET/CT in comparison with CT for the detection of bone metastasis in patients with neuroendocrine tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambrosini, Valentina; Nanni, Cristina; Castellucci, Paolo; Allegri, Vincenzo; Montini, Giancarlo; Franchi, Roberto [S. Orsola-Malpighi University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Bologna (Italy); Zompatori, Maurizio [S. Orsola-Malpighi University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Bologna (Italy); Campana, Davide; Tomassetti, Paola [S. Orsola-Malpighi University Hospital, Department of Internal Medicine, Bologna (Italy); Rubello, Domenico [S. Maria della Misericordia Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rovigo (Italy); Fanti, Stefano [S. Orsola-Malpighi University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Bologna (Italy); Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria di Bologna, Unita Operativa di Medicina Nucleare, Padiglione 30, Policlinico S.Orsola-Malpighi, Bologna (Italy)

    2010-04-15

    To retrospectively evaluate the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-NOC PET/CT and CT alone for the evaluation of bone metastasis in patients with neuroendocrine tumour (NET). From among patients with NET who underwent {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-NOC PET/CT between April 2006 and November 2008 in our centre, 223 were included in the study. Criteria for inclusion were pathological confirmation of NET and a follow-up period of at least 10 months. PET and CT images were retrospectively reviewed by two nuclear medicine specialists and two radiologists, respectively, without knowledge of the patient history or the findings of other imaging modalities. PET data were compared with the CT findings. Interobserver agreement was evaluated in terms of the kappa score. Clinical and imaging follow-up were used as the standard of reference to evaluate the PET findings. PET was performed for staging (49/223), unknown primary tumour detection (24/223), restaging (32/223), restaging before radioimmunotherapy (1/223), evaluation during therapy (12/223), equivocal findings on conventional imaging (4/223 at the bone level; 61/223 at sites other than bone), and follow-up (40/223). A very high interobserver agreement was observed. CT detected at least one bone lesion in only 35 of 44 patients with a positive PET scan. In particular, PET showed more lesions in 20/35 patients, a lower number of lesions in 8/35, and the same number in 7/35. The characteristics of the lesions (sclerotic, lytic, mixed) on the basis of the CT report did not influence PET reading. PET revealed the presence of at least one bone metastasis in nine patients with a negative CT scan. Considering patients with a negative PET scan (179), CT showed equivocal findings at the bone level in three (single small sclerotic abnormality in two at the spine level, and bilateral small sclerotic abnormalities in the humeri, femurs and scapula). Clinical follow-up confirmed the PET findings in all patients; thus there

  9. Radiation exposure of patients during {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT examinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartmann, Holger; Freudenberg, R.; Oehme, L.; Andreeff, M.; Wunderlich, G. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Universitaetsklinikum Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany); Zoephel, K. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Universitaetsklinikum Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany); Oncoray, Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Medizinische Fakultaet Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany); Eisenhofer, G. [Medizinische Klinik III, Universitaetsklinikum Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany); Kotzerke, J. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Universitaetsklinikum Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany); PET-Zentrum, Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    Investigation of the biodistribution and calculation of dosimetry of Ga-68-DOTATOC-for patients imaged in the routine clinical setting for diagnosis or exclusion of neuroendocrine tumours. Patients methods: Dynamic PET/CT-imaging (Biograph 16) was performed over 20 min in 14 patients (8 men, 6 women) after injection of (112 {+-} 22) MBq {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC followed by whole body 3D-acquisition (8 bed positions, 3 or 4 min each) 30 min p.i. and 120 min p.i., Urinary tracer elimination was measured and blood activity was derived non-invasively from the blood pool of the heart. The relevant organs for dosimetry were spleen, kidneys, liver, adrenals, urinary bladder and pituitary gland. Dosimetry was performed using OLINDA/EXM 1.0 software and specific organ uptake was expressed as standardized uptake values (SUVs). Results Rapid physiological uptake of the radiotracer could be demonstrated in liver, spleen and kidneys, adrenals and pituitary gland (mean SUVs were 6, 20, 16, 10, and 4, respectively). Radiotracer elimination was exclusively via urine (16% of injected dose within 2h); no redistribution could be observed. The spleen and the kidneys received the highest radiation exposure (0.24 mSv/MBq, 0.22 mSv/MBq resp.), mean effective dose yielded 0.023 mSv/MBq. Conclusion: {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC is used extensively for diagnosis of somatostatin receptor positive tumours because it has several advantages over the {sup 111}In-labelled ligand. The derived dosimetric values are lower than first approximations from the biological data of OctreoScan. The use of CT for transmission correction of the PET data delivers radiation exposure up to 1 mSv (low dose). (orig.)

  10. Comparison of {sup 68}Ga-DOTATATE and {sup 68}Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT imaging in the same patient group with neuroendocrine tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabasakal, Levent [Istanbul University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty, Istanbul (Turkey); Cerrahpasa Tip Fakultesi, Nukleer Tip Anabilim Dali, Aksaray, Istanbul (Turkey); Demirci, Emre; Uslu, Ilhami; Kanmaz, Bedii [Istanbul University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty, Istanbul (Turkey); Ocak, Meltem; Araman, Ahmet; Ozsoy, Yildiz [Istanbul University, Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, Pharmacy Faculty, Istanbul (Turkey); Decristoforo, Clemens [Medical University of Innsbruck, Clinical Department of Nuclear Medicine, Innsbruck (Austria)

    2012-08-15

    Recent studies have suggested that positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with {sup 68}Ga-labelled DOTA-somatostatin analogues (SST) like octreotide and octreotate is useful in diagnosing neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) and has superior value over both CT and planar and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS). The aim of the present study was to evaluate the role of {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-1-NaI{sup 3}-octreotide ({sup 68}Ga-DOTANOC) in patients with SST receptor-expressing tumours and to compare the results of {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-D-Phe{sup 1}-Tyr{sup 3}-octreotate ({sup 68}Ga-DOTATATE) in the same patient population. Twenty SRS were included in the study. Patients' age (n = 20) ranged from 25 to 75 years (mean 55.4 {+-} 12.7 years). There were eight patients with well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumour (WDNET) grade1, eight patients with WDNET grade 2, one patient with poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma (PDNEC) grade 3 and one patient with mixed adenoneuroendocrine tumour (MANEC). All patients had two consecutive PET studies with {sup 68}Ga-DOTATATE and {sup 68}Ga-DOTANOC. All images were evaluated visually and maximum standardized uptake values (SUV{sub max}) were also calculated for quantitative evaluation. On visual evaluation both tracers produced equally excellent image quality and similar body distribution. The physiological uptake sites of pituitary and salivary glands showed higher uptake in {sup 68}Ga-DOTATATE images. Liver and spleen uptake values were evaluated as equal. Both {sup 68}Ga-DOTATATE and {sup 68}Ga-DOTANOC were negative in 6 (30 %) patients and positive in 14 (70 %) patients. In {sup 68}Ga-DOTANOC images only 116 of 130 (89 %) lesions could be defined and 14 lesions were missed because of lack of any uptake. SUV{sub max} values of lesions were significantly higher on {sup 68}Ga-DOTATATE images. Our study demonstrated that the images obtained by {sup 68}Ga-DOTATATE and {sup 68}Ga

  11. 18F-DOPA PET/CT but not 68Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT revealed the underlying cause of ectopic Cushing syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schalin-Jäntti, Camilla; Ahonen, Aapo; Seppänen, Marko

    2012-09-01

    F-DOPA PET/CT but not Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT revealed the cause of ectopic Cushing syndrome in a 61-year-old man. The patient presented with rapid weight gain, swollen legs, and sleep disturbances. Plasma potassium level was 2.7 mM (reference range, 3.3-4.9 mM), 24-hour urinary cortisol level was 13,124 nmol (reference range, 30-144 nmol), and plasma adrenocorticotropin level was 61 ng/L (reference range, TOC PET/CT, which is recommended as the first-line PET imaging, was performed, but it was not diagnostic. Imaging with F-DOPA PET/CT revealed the underlying cause.

  12. PSMA PET/CT with Glu-urea-Lys-(Ahx)-[{sup 68}Ga(HBED-CC)] versus 3D CT volumetric lymph node assessment in recurrent prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giesel, Frederik L.; Haberkorn, U. [University of Heidelberg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, INF 400, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); DKFZ, Cooperation Unit Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); Fiedler, H.; Stefanova, M.; Afshar-Oromieh, A.; Kratochwil, C. [University of Heidelberg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, INF 400, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Sterzing, F. [University of Heidelberg, Department of RadioOncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Rius, M. [European Commission, Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU), Karlsruhe (Germany); DKFZ, Cooperation Unit Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); Kopka, K.; Moltz, J.H. [German Cancer Research Center (dkfz), Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry, Heidelberg (Germany); Choyke, P.L. [National Cancer Institute, Molecular Imaging Program, Bethesda (United States)

    2015-11-15

    PET/CT with the PSMA ligand is a powerful new method for the early detection of nodal metastases in patients with biochemical relapse. The purpose of this retrospective investigation was to evaluate the volume and dimensions of nodes identified by Glu-urea-Lys-(Ahx)-[{sup 68}Ga(HBED-CC)] ({sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11) in the setting of recurrent prostate cancer. All PET/CT images were acquired 60 ± 10 min after intravenous injection of {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11 (mean dose 176 MBq). In 21 patients with recurrent prostate cancer and rising PSA, 49 PSMA-positive lymph nodes were identified. Using semiautomated lymph node segmentation software, node volume and short-axis and long-axis dimensions were measured and compared with the maximum standardized uptake values (SUVmax). Round nodes greater than or equal to 8 mm were considered positive by morphological criteria alone. The percentage of nodes identified by elevated SUVmax but not by conventional morphological criteria was determined. The mean volume of {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11-positive nodes was 0.5 ml (range 0.2 - 2.3 ml), and the mean short-axis diameter was 5.8 mm (range 2.4 - 13.3 mm). In 7 patients (33.3 %) with 31 PSMA-positive nodes only 11 (36 %) were morphologically positive based on diameters >8 mm on CT. In the remaining 14 patients (66.7 %), 18 (37 %) of PSMA positive lymph nodes had short-axis diameters <8 mm with a mean short-axis diameter of 5.0 mm (range 2.4 - 7.9 mm). Thus, in this population, {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11 PET/CT detected nodal recurrence in two-thirds of patients who would have been missed using conventional morphological criteria. {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11 PET/CT is more sensitive than CT based 3D volumetric lymph node evaluation in determining the node status of patients with recurrent prostate cancer, and is a promising method of restaging prostate cancers in this setting. (orig.)

  13. Molecular imaging of neuroendocrine tumors using {sup 68}Ga-labeled peptides (Somatostatin receptor PET/CT); Molekulare Bildgebung neuroendokriner Tumoren mit {sup 68}Ga-markierten Peptiden (Somatostatinrezeptor-PET/CT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baum, R.P.; Prasad, V. [Zentralklinik Bad Berka GmbH (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin/PET-Zentrum; Hoersch, D. [Zentralklinik Bad Berka GmbH (Germany). Klinik fuer Innere Medizin, Gastroenterologie, Onkologie, Endokrionologie

    2009-06-15

    Receptor PET/CT using {sup 68}Ga-labeled somatostatin analogues (DOTA-NOC, DOTA-TOC or DOTA-TATE) enables the highly sensitive molecular imaging of neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) based on the expression of somatostatin receptors and even the detection of receptor subtypes. Our experience after more than 3000 studies shows that receptor PET/CT has a significantly higher tumor detection rate than conventional scintigraphy (even in SPECT/CT technique), and that tumor lesions can be very accurately localized. By calculating standardized uptake values (SUV) - which are reproducible and investigator-independent - patients can be selected for peptide receptor radiotherapy and also the course after therapy can be controlled. Receptor-PET/CT is the most sensitive imaging modality for the detection of unknown primary tumors (CUP syndrome), which is especially true for the detection of neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas and small bowel; whole-body staging (''one stop shop'') as well as restaging and selection of patients for peptide receptor radiotherapy can be performed using a patient-friendly procedure (examination finished within one hour) exposing the patient to less radiation than whole-body CT scanning. The {sup 68}Ge/{sup 68}Ga generator has proved very reliable over the years - even in a hospital environment. The effective costs for {sup 68}Ga labeled somatostatin analogues might be less than for scintigraphic agents, provided a certain number of studies per year are performed. The development of new tumor-specific peptides as well as of other DOTA- or NOTA-coupled radiopharmaceuticals opens a new avenue into the future: finally, the {sup 68}Ga generator could play a similar important role for PET/CT as did the {sup 99m}Tc-Generator for conventional gamma camera imaging over the last decades. (orig.)

  14. Biphasic {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC-PET/CT in patients with recurrent and high-risk prostate carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahlmann, Carsten-Oliver; Meller, Birgit; Bouter, Caroline; Meller, Johannes [University Medical Center Goettingen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Goettingen (Germany); Ritter, Christian Oliver; Lotz, Joachim [University Medical Center Goettingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Goettingen (Germany); Stroebel, Philipp [University Medical Center Goettingen, Department of Pathology, Goettingen (Germany); Trojan, Lutz; Hijazi, Sameh [University Medical Center Goettingen, Department of Urology, Goettingen (Germany)

    2016-05-15

    Binding of {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC ({sup 68}Ga-PSMA) at prostate cancer (PC) cells increases over time. A biphasic protocol may help separating benign from tumor lesions. The aim of this study was the retrospective evaluation of a diagnostic incremental value of a dual-time point (biphasic) {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-PET/CT in patients with prostate cancer. Retrospective analysis of 35 consecutive patients (49-78 years, median 71) with newly diagnosed PC (12/35) or recurrence of PC (23/35). PET/CT (Gemini TF16, Philips) was acquired 1 h and 3 h p. i. of 140-392 MBq (300 MBq median) {sup 68}Ga-PSMA, followed by a diagnostic contrast CT. PET findings were correlated with histology or unequivocal CT findings. Semiquantitative PET data (SUVmax, SUV mean) were acquired and target-to-background-ratios (T/B-ratio) were calculated for benign and malign lesions for both time points. Size of lymph nodes (LN) on diagnostic CT was recorded. Statistical analysis was performed for assessment of significant changes of semiquantitative PET-parameters over time and for correlation of size and uptake of lymph nodes. One hundred and four lesions were evaluated. Sixty lesions were referenced by histology or unequivocal CT findings, including eight (13.3 %) histopathologically benign lymph nodes, 12 (20 %) histopathologically lymph node metastases, 12 (20 %) primary tumors, three (5 %) local recurrences, and 25 (41.7 %) bone metastases. Forty-four lesions were axillary LN with normal CT-appearance. Benign lesions had significantly lower SUVmax and T/B-ratios compared with malignant findings. Malign lesions showed a significant increase of both parameters over time compared to benign findings. There was no correlation between LN size and SUVmax. The sensitivity, specificity, the positive predictive value and negative predictive value of PET/CT regarding pelvic LN was 94 %, 99 %, 89 %, and 99.5 %, respectively. In contrast to benign tissues, the uptake of proven tumor lesions increases on {sup 68

  15. Evaluation of {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT for the detection of duodenopancreatic neuroendocrine tumors in patients with MEN1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgat, Clement; Mazere, Joachim; Hindie, Elif; Fernandez, Philippe [CNRS, INCIA, Bordeaux (France); University of Bordeaux, INCIA, Bordeaux (France); University Hospital of Bordeaux, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Bordeaux (France); Velayoudom-Cephise, Fritz-Line; Nunes, Marie-Laure; Tabarin, Antoine [USN Haut-Leveque, Department of Endocrinology, Pessac (France); Schwartz, Paul; Guyot, Martine [University Hospital of Bordeaux, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Bordeaux (France); Gaye, Delphine [University Hospital of Bordeaux, Department of Radiology, Pessac (France); Vimont, Delphine; Schulz, Juergen [CNRS, INCIA, Bordeaux (France); University of Bordeaux, INCIA, Bordeaux (France); Smith, Denis [University Hospital of Bordeaux, Department of Oncology, Bordeaux (France)

    2016-07-15

    Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy with {sup 111}In-pentetreotide (SRS) is used to detect duodenopancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (dpNETs) in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1). However, SRS has limited sensitivity for this purpose. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) with {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TOC has a higher rate of sporadic dpNETs detection than SRS but there is little data for dpNETs detection in MEN1. To compare the performances of {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT, SRS and contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CE-CT) to diagnose dpNETs in MEN1. Single-institution prospective comparative study Nineteen consecutive MEN1 patients (aged 47 ± 13 years) underwent {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT, SRS, and CE-CT within 2 months in random order. Blinded readings of images were performed separately by experienced physicians. Unblinded analysis of CE-CT, combined with additional magnetic resonance imaging, endoscopic-ultrasound, {sup 18}F-2-fluoro-deoxy-d-glucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) PET/CT or histopathology results served as reference standard for dpNETs diagnosis. The sensitivity of {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT, SRS, and CE-CT was 76, 20, and 60 %, respectively (p < 0.0001). All the true-positive lesions detected by SRS were also depicted on {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT. {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT detected lesions of smaller size than SRS (10.7 ± 7.6 and 15.2 ± 5.9 mm, respectively, p < 0.03). False negatives of {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT included small dpNETs (<10 mm) and {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT positive aggressive dpNETs. No false positives were recorded. In addition, whole-body mapping with {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT identified extra-abdominal MEN1-related tumors including one neuroendocrine thymic carcinoma identified by the three imaging procedures, one bronchial carcinoid undetected by CE-CT and three meningiomas undetected by SRS. Owing to higher diagnostic performance, {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT (or alternative {sup 68}Ga-labeled somatostatin analogues

  16. Prospective evaluation of {sup 68}Ga-DOTANOC PET-CT in differentiated thyroid cancer patients with raised thyroglobulin and negative {sup 131}I-whole body scan: comparison with {sup 18}F-FDG PET-CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kundu, Parveen; Lata, Sneh; Sharma, Punit; Singh, Harmandeep; Malhotra, Arun; Bal, Chandrasekhar [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ansari Nagar, New Delhi (India)

    2014-07-15

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the role of {sup 68}Ga-DOTANOC PET-CT in differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) patients with negative {sup 131}I-whole body scan (WBS) along with serially increasing serum thyroglobulin (Tg), and compare the same with {sup 18}F-FDG PET-CT. Sixty two DTC patients with serially rising Tg levels and negative {sup 131}I-WBS were prospectively enrolled. All patients underwent {sup 68}Ga-DOTANOC PET-CT and {sup 18}F-FDG PET-CT within an interval of two weeks. PET-CT analysis was done on a per-patient basis, location wise and lesion wise. All PET-CT lesions were divided into four categories-local, nodal, pulmonary and skeletal. Histopathology and/or serial serum Tg level, clinical and imaging follow up (minimum-1 year) were used as a reference standard. Ga-DOTANOC PET-CT demonstrated disease in 40/62 (65 %) patients and {sup 18}F-FDG PET-CT in 45/62 (72 %) patients, with no significant difference on McNemar analysis (p = 0.226). Per-patient sensitivity and specificity of {sup 68}Ga-DOTANOC PET-CT was 78.4 %, 100 %, and for {sup 18}F-FDG PET-CT was 86.3 %, 90.9 %, respectively. Out of 186 lesions detected by both PET-CTs, 121/186 (65 %) lesions were seen on {sup 68}Ga-DOTANOC PET-CT and 168/186 (90.3 %) lesions on {sup 18}F-FDG PET-CT (p < 0.0001). There were 103/186 (55 %) lesions concordant on both. Excellent agreement was noted between {sup 68}Ga-DOTANOC PET-CT and {sup 18}F-FDG PET-CT for detection of local disease (k = 0.92), while moderate agreement was noted for nodal and pulmonary disease (k = 0.67). {sup 68}Ga-DOTANOC PET-CT changed management in 21/62 (34 %) patients and {sup 18}F-FDG PET-CT in 17/62 (27 %) patients. Ga-DOTANOC PET-CT is inferior to {sup 18}F-FDG PET-CT on lesion based but not on patient based analysis for detection of recurrent/residual disease in DTC patients with negative WBS scan and elevated serum Tg levels. It can also help in selection of potential candidates for peptide receptor radionuclide therapy

  17. {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11 dynamic PET/CT imaging in biochemical relapse of prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sachpekidis, C. [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Clinical Cooperation Unit Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); German Cancer Research Center, Medical PET Group-Biological Imaging, Clinical Cooperation Unit Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); Eder, M. [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Division of Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry, Heidelberg (Germany); Kopka, K. [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Division of Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry, Heidelberg (Germany); German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Heidelberg (Germany); Mier, W. [University of Heidelberg, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); Hadaschik, B.A. [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Urology, Heidelberg (Germany); Haberkorn, U. [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Clinical Cooperation Unit Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Heidelberg (Germany); University of Heidelberg, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, A. [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Clinical Cooperation Unit Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2016-07-15

    We aim to investigate the pharmacokinetics and distribution of the recently clinically introduced radioligand {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11 in men with recurrent prostate cancer (PC) by means of dynamic and whole-body PET/CT. The correlation between PSA levels and {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11 PET parameters is also investigated. 31 patients with biochemical failure after primary PC treatment with curative intent (median age 71.0 years) were enrolled in the analysis. The median PSA value was 2.0 ng/mL (range = 0.1 - 130.0 ng/mL) and the median Gleason score was 7 (range = 5 - 9). 8/31 (25.8 %) of the included patients had a PSA value < 0.5 ng/ml. All patients underwent dynamic PET/CT (dPET/CT) scanning (60 min) of the pelvis and lower abdomen as well as whole-body PET/CT with {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11. dPET/CT assessment was based on qualitative evaluation, SUV calculation, and quantitative analysis based on a two-tissue compartment model and a non-compartmental approach leading to the extraction of fractal dimension (FD). 22/31 patients (71.0 %) were {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11-positive, while 9/31 (29.0 %) patients were {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11-negative. The median PSA value in the {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11-positive group was significantly higher (median = 2.35 ng/mL; range = 0.19 - 130.0 ng/mL) than in the {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11-negative group (median value: 0.34 ng/mL; range = 0.10 - 4.20 ng/mL). A total of 76 lesions were semi-quantitatively evaluated. PC recurrence-associated lesions demonstrated a mean SUV{sub average} = 12.4 (median = 9.0; range = 2.2 - 84.5) and mean SUV{sub max} = 18.8 (median = 14.1; range = 3.1 - 120.3). Dynamic PET/CT studies of the pelvis revealed the following mean values for the PC recurrence-suspicious lesions: K{sub 1} = 0.26, k{sub 3} = 0.30, influx = 0.14 and FD = 1.24. Time-activity curves derived from PC-recurrence indicative lesions revealed an increasing {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11 accumulation during dynamic PET acquisition. Correlation analysis revealed a moderate, but significant

  18. Preparation of [(68)Ga]PSMA-11 for PET-CT imaging using a manual synthesis module and organic matrix based (68)Ge/(68)Ga generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanabala, Raviteja; Anees, Muhammed K; Sasikumar, Arun; Joy, Ajith; Pillai, M R A

    2016-08-01

    [(68)Ga]PSMA-11 is a relatively recently introduced radiopharmaceutical for PET-CT imaging of prostate cancer patients. The availability of (68)Ge/(68)Ga generator and PSMA-11 ligand from commercial sources is facilitating the production of the radiopharmaceutical in-house. This paper describes our experience on the preparation of ~200 batches of [(68)Ga]PSMA-11 for conducting PET-CT imaging in patients suspected/suffering from prostate cancer. The radiosynthesis of [(68)Ga]PSMA-11 was done in a hospital based nuclear medicine department using (68)Ge/(68)Ga generator and a manual synthesis module, both supplied by Isotope Technologies Garching (ITG), Germany. The production involved the reaction of 5μg (5.3nmol) of PSMA-11 ligand in 1 ml of 0.25M sodium acetate buffer with 4ml of (68)GaCl3 in 0.05M HCl for 5min at 105°C; followed by purification in a C18 cartridge and collection through a 0.22μm pore size filter. The radiochemical yields obtained were consistently high, 93.19%±3.76%, and there was hardly any batch failure. The radiochemical purity of the product was >99% and the product was stable for over 2h; however it was used in patients immediately after preparation. About 200 batches of [(68)Ga]PSMA-11 were prepared during the period and more than 300 patients received the tracer during the 14months of study. No adverse reaction was observed in any of the patients and the image qualities were consistent with literature reports. [(68)Ga]PSMA-11 with high radiochemical and radionuclidic purity is conveniently prepared by using a (68)Ge/(68)Ga generator and manual synthesis module. The radiochemical yields are very high; and activity sufficient for 3-4 patients can be prepared in a single batch; multiple batches can be done on the same day and when needed after a gap of 1.5-2h. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Preparation and (68)Ga-radiolabeling of porous zirconia nanoparticle platform for PET/CT-imaging guided drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyak, Andras; Naszalyi Nagy, Lívia; Mihaly, Judith; Görres, Sebastian; Wittneben, Alexander; Leiter, Ina; Bankstahl, Jens P; Sajti, Laszlo; Kellermayer, Miklós; Zrínyi, Miklós; Ross, Tobias L

    2017-04-15

    This paper describes the preparation of gallium-68 ((68)Ga) isotope labeled porous zirconia (ZrO2) nanoparticle (NP) platform of nearly 100nm diameter and its first pharmacokinetic and biodistribution evaluation accomplished with a microPET/CT (μPet/CT) imaging system. Objectives of the investigations were to provide a nanoparticle platform which can be suitable for specific delivery of various therapeutic drugs using surface attached specific molecules as triggering agents, and at the same time, suitable for positron emission tomography (PET) tracing of the prospective drug delivery process. Radiolabeling was accomplished using DOTA bifunctional chelator. DOTA was successfully adsorbed onto the surface of nanoparticles, while the (68)Ga-radiolabeling method proved to be simple and effective. In the course of biodistribution studies, the (68)Ga-labeled DOTA-ZrNPs showed proper radiolabeling stability in their original suspension and in blood serum. μPet/CT imaging studies confirmed a RES-biodistribution profile indicating stable nano-sized labeled particles in vivo. Results proved that the new method offers the opportunity to examine further specifically targeted and drug payload carrier variants of zirconia NP systems using PET/CT imaging.

  20. 68Ga-NOTA-Aca-BBN(7–14) PET/CT in Healthy Volunteers and Glioma Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingjing; Li, Deling; Lang, Lixin; Zhu, Zhaohui; Wang, Ling; Wu, Peilin; Niu, Gang; Li, Fang; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2017-01-01

    This work was designed to study the safety, biodistribution, and radiation dosimetry of a gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR)– targeting, 68Ga-labeled bombesin (BBN) peptide derivative PET tracer, NOTA-Aca-BBN(7–14) (denoted as 68Ga-BBN) in healthy volunteers and to assess the level of receptor expression in glioma patients. Methods Four healthy volunteers (2 male and 2 female) underwent whole-body PET/CT at multiple time points after a bolus injection of 68Ga-BBN (111 ± 148 MBq). Regions of interest were drawn manually over major organs, and time–activity curves were obtained. Dosimetry was calculated using the OLINDA/EXM software. Twelve patients with glioma diagnosed by contrast-enhanced MRI underwent PET/CT at 30–45 min after 68Ga-BBN injection. Within 1 wk afterward, the tumor was surgically removed and immunohistochemical staining of tumor samples against GRPR was performed and correlated with the PET/CT results. Results 68Ga-BBN was well tolerated in all healthy volunteers, with no adverse symptoms being noticed or reported. 68Ga-BBN cleared rapidly from the circulation and was excreted mainly through the kidneys and urinary tract. The total effective dose equivalent and effective dose were 0.0335 ± 0.0079 and 0.0276 ± 0.0066 mSv/MBq, respectively. In glioma patients, all MRI-identified lesions showed high signal intensity on 68Ga-BBN PET/CT. SUVmax and SUVmean were 2.08 ± 0.58 and 1.32 ± 0.37, respectively. With normal brain tissue as background, tumor-to-background ratios were 24.0 ± 8.85 and 13.4 ± 4.54 based on SUVmax and SUVmean, respectively. The immunohistochemical staining confirmed a positive correlation between SUV and GRPR expression level (r2 = 0.71, P < 0.001). Conclusion 68Ga-BBN is a PET tracer with favorable pharmacokinetics and a favorable dosimetry profile. It has the potential to evaluate GRPR expression in glioma patients and guide GRPR-targeted therapy of glioma. PMID:26449838

  1. Epididymal Cystadenomas in von Hippel-Lindau Disease Showing Increased Activity on 68Ga DOTATATE PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, Georgios Z; Millo, Corina; Sadowski, Samira M; Bagci, Ulas; Patronas, Nicholas J

    2016-10-01

    von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease is a familial cancer syndrome characterized by the development of a variety of malignant and benign tumors, including epididymal cystadenomas. We report a case of a VHL patient with bilateral epididymal cystadenomas who was evaluated with Ga DOTATATE PET/CT, showing intensely increased activity (SUVmax, 21.6) associated with the epididymal cystadenomas, indicating cell-surface overexpression of somatostatin receptors. The presented case supports the usefulness of somatostatin receptor imaging using Ga DOTA-conjugated peptides for detection and follow-up of VHL manifestations, as well as surveillance of asymptomatic gene carriers.

  2. Polyostotic Fibrous Dysplasia in McCune-Albright Syndrome Demonstrated on 68Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennessy, Grace; Shetty, Deepa; Loh, Han; Bui, Chuong; Le, Ken; Mansberg, Robert

    2016-12-01

    A 33-year-old woman with McCune-Albright syndrome was referred for a Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT study for evaluation and staging of a biopsy-proven pancreatic tail neuroendocrine tumor. The scan demonstrated intense focal octreopeptide uptake corresponding to the known neuroendocrine tumor at the pancreatic tail/splenic hilum. There was no evidence of octreopeptide-avid metastases. Diffuse octreopeptide uptake was demonstrated in multiple bones involving the right side of the skeleton. The concurrent CT demonstrated corresponding expansile lucent changes consistent with the known fibrous dysplasia.

  3. Metastatic Neuroblastoma in Adult Patient, Presenting as a Super Scan on 68Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Dharmender; Jois, Abhiram; Singh, Harmandeep; Bora, Girdhar S; Basher, Rajender Kumar; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai

    2017-09-01

    We report a case of 23-year-old man who presented with complaints of progressive abdominal distension for the past 3 months along with the loss of appetite and weight and had a large solid cystic mass in the left half of the abdominal cavity revealed on ultrasonography and contrast-enhanced CT of the abdomen. Subsequent biopsy and histopathology revealed it to be neuroblastoma. Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT scan performed to rule out distant metastasis showed intense radiotracer uptake distributed throughout the skeleton, mimicking a super scan.

  4. Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma With High Radiotracer Uptake in 68Ga-Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahbai, Samine; Rieping, Petra; Pfannenberg, Christina; la Fougére, Christian; Reimold, Matthias

    2017-09-01

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen imaging with PET/CT is increasingly used in prostate cancer and was shown to have a high diagnostic performance. We report a clinical case of a 67-year-old man with previous history of operated prostate cancer and increasing prostate-specific antigen blood level. Ga-HBED-CC prostate-specific membrane antigen PET/CT imaging was indicated for the assessment of local recurrence and lymph node metastases of prostate cancer. In addition, a soft tissue mass in the body of the pancreas with high radiotracer uptake was detected. Histopathology confirmed a pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

  5. Gastroenteropancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors: Standardizing Therapy Monitoring with 68Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT Using the Example of Somatostatin Receptor Radionuclide Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Wolfgang Luboldt; Holger Hartmann; Bärbel Wiedemann; Klaus Zöphel; Hans-Joachim Luboldt

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to standardize therapy monitoring of hepatic metastases from gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs) during the course of somatostatin receptor radionuclide therapy (SRRT). In 21 consecutive patients with nonresectable hepatic metastases of GEP-NETs, chromogranin A (CgA) and 68Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT were compared before and after the last SRRT. On 68Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT, the maximum standard uptake values (SUVmax) of normal liver and hepatic metastases we...

  6. {sup 68}Ga-PSMA PET/CT: Joint EANM and SNMMI procedure guideline for prostate cancer imaging: version 1.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fendler, Wolfgang P. [UCLA, Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Eiber, Matthias [UCLA, Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Technical University of Munich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Klinikum Rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Beheshti, Mohsen [St. Vincent' s Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Endocrinology, PET-CT Center, Linz (Austria); Bomanji, Jamshed; Wan, Simon [UCL/UCLH, Institute of Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Ceci, Francesco; Fanti, Stefano [University of Bologna, S. Orsola Hospital Bologna, Nuclear Medicine Unit, Bologna (Italy); Cho, Steven [University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); Giesel, Frederik; Haberkorn, Uwe [University Hospital Heidelberg and DKFZ Heidelberg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); Hope, Thomas A. [University of California, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States); Kopka, Klaus [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) Heidelberg, Division of Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry, Heidelberg (Germany); Krause, Bernd J. [University Medical Center, University of Rostock, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rostock (Germany); Mottaghy, Felix M. [University Hospital RWTH Aachen University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Aachen (Germany); Maastricht University Medical Center (MUMC), Department of Nuclear Medicine, Maastricht (Netherlands); Schoeder, Heiko [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Sunderland, John [University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Department of Radiology, Iowa City, IA (United States); Wester, Hans-Juergen [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Pharmaceutical Radiochemistry, Garching (Germany); Herrmann, Ken [UCLA, Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Universitaetsklinikum Essen, Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Essen (Germany)

    2017-06-15

    The aim of this guideline is to provide standards for the recommendation, performance, interpretation and reporting of {sup 68}Ga-PSMA PET/CT for prostate cancer imaging. These recommendations will help to improve accuracy, precision, and repeatability of {sup 68}Ga-PSMA PET/CT for prostate cancer essentially needed for implementation of this modality in science and routine clinical practice. (orig.)

  7. Searching for primaries in patients with neuroendocrine tumors (NET of unknown primary and clinically suspected NET: Evaluation of Ga-68 DOTATOC PET/CT and In-111 DTPA octreotide SPECT/CT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schreiter Nils Friedemann

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. To evaluate the clinical efficacy of In-111 DTPA octreotide SPECT/CT and Ga-68 DOTATOC PET/CT for detection of primary tumors in patients with either neuroendocrine tumor of unknown primary (NETUP or clinically suspected primary NET (SNET.

  8. Comparison of the prognostic values of {sup 68}Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT and {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in patients with well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Punit; Naswa, Niraj; Kc, Sudhir Suman; Yadav, Yashwant; Kumar, Rakesh; Bal, Chandrasekhar [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ansari Nagar, New Delhi (India); Alvarado, Luis Andres; Dwivedi, Alok Kumar [Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Division of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, El Paso, TX (United States); Ammini, Ariachery C. [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, New Delhi (India)

    2014-12-15

    To determine the prognostic value of {sup 68}Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT in patients with well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumor (NET), and to compare the prognostic value with that of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and other conventional clinicopathological prognostic factors. Data from 37 consecutive patients (age 46.6 ± 13.5 years, 51 % men) with well-differentiated NET who underwent {sup 68}Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT and {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT were analyzed. All patients underwent a baseline visit with laboratory and radiological examinations. Clinical and imaging follow-up was performed in all patients. Progression-free survival (PFS) was measured from the date of the first PET/CT scan to the first documentation of progression of disease. {sup 68}Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT was positive in 37 of the 37 patients and {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT was positive in 21. During follow-up 10 patients (27 %) showed progression of disease and 27 (73 %) showed no progression (24 stable disease, 3 partial response). The median follow-up was 25 months (range 2 - 52 months). Among the variables evaluated none was significantly different between the progressive disease and nonprogressive disease groups, with only SUVmax on {sup 68}Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT being borderline significant (P = 0.073). In the univariate analysis for PFS outcome, SUVmax on {sup 68}Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT (HR 0.122, 95 % CI 0.019 - 0.779; P = 0.026) and histopathological tumor grade (HR 4.238, 95 % CI 1.058 - 16.976; P = 0.041) were found to be associated with PFS. Other factors including age, sex, primary site, Ki-67 index, TNM stage, {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT status (positive/negative), SUVmax on {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and type of treatment were not significant. In multivariable analysis, only SUVmax on {sup 68}Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT was found to be an independent positive predictor of PFS (HR 0.122, 95 % CI 0.019 - 0.779; P = 0.026). SUVmax measured on {sup 68}Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT is an independent, positive prognostic factor in patients with well-differentiated NET and

  9. Incidental detection of breast cancer by {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC-PET/CT in women suffering from neuroendocrine tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elgeti, F.; Denecke, T.; Steffen, I.; Stelter, L.; Ruf, J. [Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Berlin (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlenheilkunde; Amthauer, H. [Universitaetsklinikum Magdeburg (Germany). Klinik fuer Radilogie und Nuklearmedizin; Heuck, F. [Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Berlin (Germany). Medizinische Klinik m. S. Hepatologie und Gastroenterologie

    2008-07-01

    Aim: Somatostatin receptor (sstr) imaging using 68Ga- DOTATOC-PET/CT in neuroendocrine tumors (NET) is promising, suggesting a more sensitive detection of lesions with a low sstr-expression. This is also important for other sstr positive tumors, especially breast cancer whose incidence and age-range is similar to that of NET. Patients, methods: The PET/CT data of 33 consecutive women with NET (age: 33-78 years, mean 59) who underwent whole-body staging with {sup 6}8Ga-DOTATOC was retrospectively analyzed for breast lesions. The data was read separately, side-byside and as fused images. Focal tracer uptake in the breast was semiquantitatively analyzed by comparing the lesional SUV{sub max} to normal breast tissue using Wilcoxon's rank sum test. Breast cancer lesions were compared visually to concomitant NET- lesions. Results: In six of 33 patients (18%) breast lesions were observed on the CT-scans and classified in four patients (12%) as suspicious. The same lesions also showed a pathological tracer uptake on the corresponding PET-scan, visually and semiquantitatively (p<0.01). Histological reevaluation of the suspicious lesions revealed two patients with NET metastases. Two patients had primary breast cancer with lower tracer uptake than concomitant abdominal NET-lesions. Breast cancer diagnosis resulted in a change of the therapeutic regimen. Conclusion: {sup 68}Ga- DOTATOC-PET/CT not only improves the staging of NET-patients, but also increases the chance to detect sstr-positive breast cancer. Although these lesions may show a lower tracer uptake than NET, they must not be overlooked or misinterpreted as metastases. Further imaging and clarification by histopathology is warranted, as the confirmation of a secondary malignoma has great impact on further therapeutic proceedings. (orig.)

  10. {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11 PET/CT: a new technique with high potential for the radiotherapeutic management of prostate cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sterzing, Florian; Debus, Juergen [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Clinical Cooperation Unit Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Heidelberg Institute of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Kratochwil, Clemens; Fiedler, Hannah; Afshar-Oromieh, Ali [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); Katayama, Sonja [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Heidelberg Institute of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Habl, Gregor [Technical University Munich, Department of Radiation Oncology, Munich (Germany); Kopka, Klaus [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Department of Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry, Heidelberg (Germany); Haberkorn, Uwe; Giesel, Frederik L. [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Clinical Cooperation Unit Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    Radiotherapy is the main therapeutic approach besides surgery of localized prostate cancer. It relies on risk stratification and exact staging. This report analyses the potential of [{sup 68}Ga]Glu-urea-Lys(Ahx)-HBED-CC ({sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11), a new positron emission tomography (PET) tracer targeting prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) for prostate cancer staging and individualized radiotherapy planning. A cohort of 57 patients with prostate cancer scanned with {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11 PET/CT for radiotherapy planning was retrospectively reviewed; 15 patients were at initial diagnosis and 42 patients at time of biochemical recurrence. Staging results of conventional imaging, including bone scintigraphy, CT or MRI, were compared with {sup 68}Ga-PSMA ligand PET/CT results and the influence on radiotherapeutic management was quantified. {sup 68}Ga-PSMA ligand PET/CT had a dramatic impact on radiotherapy application in the presented cohort. In 50.8 % of the cases therapy was changed. The presented imaging technique of {sup 68}Ga-PSMA PET/CT could be a key technology for individualized radiotherapy management in prostate cancer. (orig.)

  11. 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT for the detection of bone metastasis in recurrent prostate cancer and a PSA level <2 ng/ml

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Lars J; Nielsen, Julie B; Dettmann, Katja

    2017-01-01

    /computed tomography ((68)Ga-PSMA PET/CT) is a novel and promising method for imaging in prostate cancer. The present study reports two cases of patients with prostate cancer with biochemical recurrence, with evidence of bone metastases on (68)Ga-PSMA PET/CT images and low prostate specific antigen PSA levels (.../ml) and PSA doubling time >6 months. The bone metastases were verified by supplementary imaging with (18)F-sodium fluoride PET/CT and magnetic resonance imaging as well as biochemical responses to androgen deprivation therapy. Therefore, (68)Ga-PSMA PET/CT is promising for the restaging of patients......Localization of prostate cancer recurrence, particularly in the bones, is a major challenge with standard of care imaging in patients with biochemical recurrence following curatively intended treatment. Gallium-68-labeled prostate specific membrane antigen positron emission tomography...

  12. (68)Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT in recurrent medullary thyroid carcinoma: a lesion-by-lesion comparison with (111)In-octreotide SPECT/CT and conventional imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaga, Lilian Yuri Itaya; Cunha, Marcelo L; Campos Neto, Guilherme C; Garcia, Marcio R T; Yang, Ji H; Camacho, Cleber P; Wagner, Jairo; Funari, Marcelo B G

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to prospectively compare the detection rate of (68)Ga-DOTATATE PET-CT with (111)In-octreotide SPECT-CT and conventional imaging (CI) in medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) patients with increased calcitonin (Ctn) levels but negative CI after thyroidectomy. Fifteen patients with raised Ctn levels and/or CI evidence of recurrence underwent (68)Ga-DOTATATE PET-CT, (111)In-octreotide SPECT-CT and CI. Histopathology, CI and biochemical/clinical/imaging follow-up were used as the reference standard. PET/CT, SPECT/CT and CI were compared in a lesion-based and organ-based analysis. PET/CT evidenced recurrence in 14 of 15 patients. There were 13 true positive (TP), 1 true negative (TN), 1 false positive (FP) and no false negative (FN) cases, resulting in a sensitivity and accuracy of 100% and 93%. SPECT/CT was positive in 6 of 15 cases. There were 6 TP, 2 TN, 7 FN and no FP cases, resulting in a sensitivity of 46% and accuracy of 53%. CI procedures detected tumor lesions in 14 of 15 patients. There were 13 TP, 1TN, 1 FP and no FN cases with a sensitivity of 100% and accuracy of 93%. A significantly higher number of lesions was detected by PET/CT (112 lesions, p = 0.005) and CI (109 lesions, p = 0.005) in comparison to SPECT/CT (16 lesions). There was no significant difference between PET/CT and CI for the total number of detected lesions (p = 0.734). PET/CT detected more lesions than SPECT/CT regardless of the organ. PET/CT detected more bone lesions but missed some neck nodal metastases evidenced by CI. The number of lesions per region demonstrated by PET/CT and CI were similar in the other sites. (68)Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT is superior to (111)In-octreotide SPECT/CT for the detection of recurrent MTC demonstrating a significantly higher number of lesions. (68)Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT showed a superior detection rate compared to CI in demonstrating bone metastases.

  13. Incidental Detection of Thyroid Metastases From Renal Cell Carcinoma Using 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT to Assess Prostate Cancer Recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacho, Helle D; Nielsen, Julie B; Dettmann, Katja; Haberkorn, Uwe; Petersen, Lars J

    2017-03-01

    Ga-PSMA PET/CT is increasingly used to assess prostate cancer. Avid Ga-PSMA uptake by thyroid cancer and renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has been reported in few cases. A 75-year-old man who received a diagnosis of RCC in 2006 and prostate cancer in 2009 presented with elevated prostate-specific antigen levels (0.7 ng/mL) following prostatectomy. Ga-PSMA PET/CT showed avid Ga-PSMA uptake in 1 pelvic and 1 retroperitoneal lymph node and focal Ga-PSMA accumulation in the thyroid. Excised retroperitoneal lymph node and thyroid tissues showed metastases from RCC, whereas the pelvic lymph node exhibited metastasis from prostate cancer.

  14. Incidental Detection of Thyroid Metastases From Renal Cell Carcinoma Using 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT to Assess Prostate Cancer Recurrence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zacho, Helle D; Nielsen, Julie B; Dettmann, Katja

    2017-01-01

    Ga-PSMA PET/CT is increasingly used to assess prostate cancer. Avid Ga-PSMA uptake by thyroid cancer and renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has been reported in few cases. A 75-year-old man who received a diagnosis of RCC in 2006 and prostate cancer in 2009 presented with elevated prostate-specific antigen...... levels (0.7 ng/mL) following prostatectomy. Ga-PSMA PET/CT showed avid Ga-PSMA uptake in 1 pelvic and 1 retroperitoneal lymph node and focal Ga-PSMA accumulation in the thyroid. Excised retroperitoneal lymph node and thyroid tissues showed metastases from RCC, whereas the pelvic lymph node exhibited...... metastasis from prostate cancer....

  15. The added value of {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TATE-PET to contrast-enhanced CT for primary site detection in CUP of neuroendocrine origin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazmierczak, Philipp M. [Klinikum der Universitaet Muenchen, Institut fuer Klinische Radiologie, Muenchen (Germany); Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Muenchen (Germany); Rominger, Axel; Wenter, Vera [Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Muenchen (Germany); Spitzweg, Christine; Auernhammer, Christoph [Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Department of Internal Medicine II, Muenchen (Germany); Angele, Martin K. [Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Department of General, Visceral, Transplantation, Vascular and Thoracic Surgery, Muenchen (Germany); Rist, Carsten; Cyran, Clemens C. [Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Muenchen (Germany)

    2017-04-15

    To quantify the additional value of {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TATE PET/CT in comparison with contrast-enhanced CT alone for primary tumour detection in neuroendocrine cancer of unknown primary (CUP-NET). In total, 38 consecutive patients (27 men, 11 women; mean age 62 years) with histologically proven CUP-NET who underwent a contrast-enhanced {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TATE PET/CT scan for primary tumour detection and staging between 2010 and 2014 were included in this IRB-approved retrospective study. Two blinded readers independently analysed the contrast-enhanced CT and {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TATE PET datasets separately and noted from which modality they suspected a primary tumour. Consensus was reached if the results were divergent. Postoperative histopathology (24 patients) and follow-up {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TATE PET/CT imaging (14 patients) served as the reference standards and statistical measures of diagnostic accuracy were calculated accordingly. The majority of confirmed primary tumours were located in the abdomen (ileum in 19 patients, pancreas in 12, lung in 2, small pelvis in 1). High interobserver agreement was noted regarding the suspected primary tumour site (Cohen's k 0.90, p < 0.001). {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TATE PET demonstrated a significantly higher sensitivity (94 % vs. 63 %, p = 0.005) and a significantly higher accuracy (87 % vs. 68 %, p = 0.003) than contrast-enhanced CT. Ga-DOTA-TATE PET/CT compared with contrast-enhanced CT alone provides an improvement in sensitivity of 50 % and an improvement in accuracy of 30 % in primary tumour detection in CUP-NET. (orig.)

  16. Cost comparison of 111In-DTPA-octreotide scintigraphy and 68Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT for staging enteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiter, Nils F; Brenner, Winfried; Nogami, Munenobu; Buchert, Ralph; Huppertz, Alexander; Pape, Ulrich-Frank; Prasad, Vikas; Hamm, Bernd; Maurer, Martin H

    2012-01-01

    Although somatostatin receptor positron emission tomography (PET)/CT is gaining increasing popularity and has shown its diagnostic superiority in several studies, (111)In-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA)-octreotide is still the current standard for diagnosis of neuroendocrine tumours (NET). The aim of this study was to compare the costs for the two diagnostic tests and the respective consequential costs. From January 2009 to July 2009, 51 consecutive patients with enteropancreatic NET who underwent contrast-enhanced (68)Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT (n = 29) or (111)In-DTPA-octreotide (mean 3 whole-body scans plus 1.6 low-dose single photon emission computed tomography/CT; n = 22) were included. For cost analysis, direct costs (equipment) and variable costs (material, labour) per examination were calculated. Additionally required CT and/or MRI examinations within the staging process were assessed as consequential costs. An additional deterministic sensitivity analysis was performed. A (68)Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT examination yielded total costs (equipment, personnel and material costs) of 548 euro. On the other hand, an (111)In-DTPA-octreotide examination resulted in 827 euro total costs. Costs for equipment and material had a share of 460 euro/720 euro for (68)Ga-DOTATOC/(111)In-DTPA-octreotide and labour costs of 89 euro/106 euro. With (68)Ga-DOTATOC additional MRI had to be performed in 7% of the patients resulting in a mean of 20 euro for supplementary imaging per patient; 82% of patients with (111)In-DTPA-octreotide needed additional MRI and/or CT resulting in mean additional costs of 161 euro per patient. (68)Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT was considerably cheaper than (111)In-DTPA-octreotide with respect to both material and personnel costs. Furthermore, by using (68)Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT considerably fewer additional examinations were needed reducing the consequential costs significantly.

  17. Assessment of Bone Metastases in Patients with Prostate Cancer—A Comparison between 99mTc-Bone-Scintigraphy and [68Ga]Ga-PSMA PET/CT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lena Thomas

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Bone scintigraphy is the standard of reference in bone metastases in prostate cancer patients. However, new radiotracers employed in prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA-ligands has led to the growing importance of PET/CT as diagnostic tool. The aim of our study was to investigate the difference between bone scan and PSMA-PET/CT for the detection of bone metastases in prostate cancer. Methods: Thirty patients with bone metastases originating from prostate cancer were examined by 99mTc-MDP bone scan and 68Ga-PSMA-PET/CT within an average of 21 days. Bone scans were analyzed visually according to the number of lesions and using the software package ExiniBONE by Exini Diagnostics. PET/CT data was analyzed visually. Numbers of detected lesions were compared for the different methods for the whole patient and for different regions. In addition, results were compared to serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA, alkaline phosphatase (ALP, bone alkaline phosphatase (bALP, pro gastrin releasing peptide (pGRP and eastern cooperative oncology group (ECOG performance status. Results: In the bone scans, visual and semiautomatic lesion detection showed similar results with an average of 19.4 and 17.8 detected bone lesion per patient. However, in PSMA-PET/CT, on average double the numbers of lesions (40.0 were detected. The largest differences were found in the thorax and pelvis, which can be explained by the advantages of tomographic imaging. Bland-Altman analysis showed greater differences in patients with large numbers of bone metastases. Conclusion: No significant difference was found when using semiautomatic analysis compared to visual reading for bone scans. Fewer bone metastases were detected in bone scans than in PSMA-PET/CT. However, in none of our patients would the difference have led to clinical consequences. Therefore, it seems that for patients undergoing PSMA-PET/CT, there is no need to perform additional bone scans if the appropriate

  18. Peculiar structure and tensile strength of WB4: nonstoichiometric origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiyang Gou

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Tungsten tetraboride (WB4 is experimentally considered as potentially superhard material and is therefore expected to have highly structural stability and enhanced resistance against plastic deformation and failure. The examinations of bond-deformation mechanism suggest a significantly soft bond-deformation pattern induced by ionic W-B bonding for nominal WB4 in experiments, largely responsible for the limitation of its strength and structural integrity. Computations on the structures and mechanical properties for WB4 show a novel thermodynamically favored MoB4-type phase with excellent mechanical properties and remarkable incompressibility along c direction. The illustrations of nonstoichiometry and x-ray diffraction spectra rationalize the experimental observation of nominal composition WB4 as defective tungsten borides (W1-xB3 (x0.25. The results provide new insight into the real structural and mechanical properties of tungsten borides.

  19. Development of standardized image interpretation for 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT to detect prostate cancer recurrent lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanti, Stefano; Minozzi, Silvia; Morigi, Joshua James; Giesel, Frederik; Ceci, Francesco; Uprimny, Christian; Hofman, Michael S; Eiber, Matthias; Schwarzenbock, Sarah; Castellucci, Paolo; Bellisario, Cristina; Chauvie, Stéphane; Bergesio, Fabrizio; Emmett, Louise; Haberkorn, Uwe; Virgolini, Irene; Schwaiger, Markus; Hicks, Rodney J; Krause, Bernd J; Chiti, Arturo

    2017-09-01

    After primary treatment, biochemical relapse (BCR) occurs in a substantial number of patients with prostate cancer (PCa). PET/CT imaging with prostate-specific membrane antigen based tracers (68Ga-PSMA) has shown promising results for BCR patients. However, a standardized image interpretation methodology has yet to be properly agreed. The aim of this study, which was promoted and funded by European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM), is to define standardized image interpretation criteria for 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT to detect recurrent PCa lesions in patients treated with primary curative intent therapy (radical prostatectomy or radiotherapy) who presented a biochemical recurrence. In the first phase inter-rater agreement between seven readers from seven international centers was calculated on the reading of 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT images of 49 patients with BCR. Each reader evaluated findings in five different sites of recurrence (local, loco-regional lymph nodes, distant lymph nodes, bone, and other). In the second phase the re-analysis was limited to cases with poor, slight, fair, or moderate agreement [Krippendorff's (K) alphaimproved and became substantial when readers had to judge whether the anomalous findings were suggestive for a pathologic, uncertain, or non-pathologic image (K's alpha: 0.64). K's alpha calculations for each of the five sites of recurrence were also performed and evaluated. First Delphi round was thus conducted. A more detailed definition of the criteria was proposed by the project coordinator, which was then discussed and finally agreed by the seven readers. After the second Delphi round only four cases of disagreement still remained. These were evaluated for a final round, allowing a final agreement table to be written. We hope that by developing these consensus guidelines on the interpretation of 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT, clinicians reporting these studies will be able to provide more consistent clinical reports and that within clinical trials

  20. Clinical Impact of 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT in a Patient With Biochemical Recurrence of Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiroz, Marcelo A; Viana, Publio; Santos, Allan; Bastos, Diogo; Etchebehere, Elba; Cerri, Giovanni

    2016-09-01

    A 64-year-old man with history of prostate adenocarcinoma underwent radical prostatectomy in 2003. He remained with undetectable prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels until 2014, when he then presented rising serum PSA levels and performed a Tc-MDP bone scan that was negative for metastases. In August 2015, his PSA was 4.89 ng/dL, and restaging images with pelvic MR and F-FDG PET/CT were both negative. Therefore, the patient underwent a Ga-PSMA PET/CT that showed marked tracer uptake in a single mediastinal lymph node. Histopathology demonstrated metastatic adenocarcinoma secondary to prostate cancer, altering patient management to hormone therapy instead of pelvic radiotherapy.

  1. Ectopic ACTH and CRH Co-secreting Tumor Localized by 68Ga-DOTA-TATE PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, Georgios Z; Bagci, Ulas; Sadowski, Samira M; Patronas, Nicholas J; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2015-07-01

    Diagnosis of ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) co-secreting tumors causing Cushing syndrome (CS) is challenging because these tumors are rare and their diagnosis is frequently confused with Cushing disease (CD), caused by the effect of CRH on the pituitary. We report a case of a 21-year-old male patient who was referred to our institution with persistent hypercortisolemia and CS after undergoing unnecessary transsphenoidal surgery (TSS). ⁶⁸Ga-DOTA-TATE PET/CT revealed increased tracer uptake in the thymus, which was histologically proven to be a neuroendocrine tumor (NET) that stained positive for ACTH and CRH. Imaging with ¹⁸F-FDG PET/CT was not diagnostic.

  2. Validating and improving CT ventilation imaging by correlating with ventilation 4D-PET/CT using {sup 68}Ga-labeled nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kipritidis, John, E-mail: john.kipritidis@sydney.edu.au; Keall, Paul J. [Radiation Physics Laboratory, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney NSW 2006 (Australia); Siva, Shankar [Department of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, and Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, University of Melbourne, Parkville VIC 3052 (Australia); Hofman, Michael S.; Callahan, Jason; Hicks, Rodney J. [Centre for Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre and Department of Medicine, University of Melbourne, Melbourne VIC 3002 (Australia)

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: CT ventilation imaging is a novel functional lung imaging modality based on deformable image registration. The authors present the first validation study of CT ventilation using positron emission tomography with{sup 68}Ga-labeled nanoparticles (PET-Galligas). The authors quantify this agreement for different CT ventilation metrics and PET reconstruction parameters. Methods: PET-Galligas ventilation scans were acquired for 12 lung cancer patients using a four-dimensional (4D) PET/CT scanner. CT ventilation images were then produced by applying B-spline deformable image registration between the respiratory correlated phases of the 4D-CT. The authors test four ventilation metrics, two existing and two modified. The two existing metrics model mechanical ventilation (alveolar air-flow) based on Hounsfield unit (HU) change (V{sub HU}) or Jacobian determinant of deformation (V{sub Jac}). The two modified metrics incorporate a voxel-wise tissue-density scaling (ρV{sub HU} and ρV{sub Jac}) and were hypothesized to better model the physiological ventilation. In order to assess the impact of PET image quality, comparisons were performed using both standard and respiratory-gated PET images with the former exhibiting better signal. Different median filtering kernels (σ{sub m} = 0 or 3 mm) were also applied to all images. As in previous studies, similarity metrics included the Spearman correlation coefficient r within the segmented lung volumes, and Dice coefficient d{sub 20} for the (0 − 20)th functional percentile volumes. Results: The best agreement between CT and PET ventilation was obtained comparing standard PET images to the density-scaled HU metric (ρV{sub HU}) with σ{sub m} = 3 mm. This leads to correlation values in the ranges 0.22 ⩽ r ⩽ 0.76 and 0.38 ⩽ d{sub 20} ⩽ 0.68, with r{sup ¯}=0.42±0.16 and d{sup ¯}{sub 20}=0.52±0.09 averaged over the 12 patients. Compared to Jacobian-based metrics, HU-based metrics lead to statistically significant

  3. Contribution of {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT to Target Volume Delineation of Skull Base Meningiomas Treated With Stereotactic Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graf, Reinhold, E-mail: reinhold.graf@charite.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Nyuyki, Fonyuy; Steffen, Ingo G.; Michel, Roger; Fahdt, Daniel [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Wust, Peter; Brenner, Winfried; Budach, Volker [Department of Radiation Oncology, Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Wurm, Reinhard [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum Frankfurt (Oder) (Germany); Plotkin, Michail [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Berlin (Germany)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the potential impact of {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC positron emission tomography ({sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC-PET) in addition to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) for retrospectively assessing the gross tumor volume (GTV) delineation of meningiomas of the skull base in patients treated with fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (FSRT). Methods and Materials: The study population consisted of 48 patients with 54 skull base meningiomas, previously treated with FSRT. After scans were coregistered, the GTVs were first delineated with MRI and CT data (GTV{sub MRI/CT}) and then by PET (GTV{sub PET}) data. The overlapping regions of both datasets resulted in the GTV{sub common}, which was enlarged to the GTV{sub final} by adding volumes defined by only one of the complementary modalities (GTV{sub MRI/CT-added} or GTV{sub PET-added}). We then evaluated the contribution of conventional imaging modalities (MRI, CT) and {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC-PET to the GTV{sub final}, which was used for planning purposes. Results: Forty-eight of the 54 skull base lesions in 45 patients showed increased {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC uptake and were further analyzed. The mean GTV{sub MRI/CT} and GTV{sub PET} were approximately 21 cm{sup 3} and 25 cm{sup 3}, with a common volume of approximately 15 cm{sup 3}. PET contributed a mean additional GTV of approximately 1.5 cm{sup 3} to the common volume (16% {+-} 34% of the GTV{sub common}). Approximately 4.5 cm{sup 3} of the GTV{sub MRI/CT} was excluded from the contribution to the common volume. The resulting mean GTV{sub final} was significantly smaller than both the GTV{sub MRI/CT} and the GTV{sub PET}. Compared with the initial GTV{sub MRI/CT}, the addition of {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC-PET resulted in more than 10% modification of the size of the GTV{sub final} in 32 (67%) meningiomas Conclusions: {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC-PET/CT seems to improve the target volume delineation in skull base meningiomas, often leading to a reduction of

  4. Detection rate of PET/CT in patients with biochemical relapse of prostate cancer using [{sup 68}Ga]PSMA I and T and comparison with published data of [{sup 68}Ga]PSMA HBED-CC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berliner, Christoph; Tienken, Milena; Kobayashi, Yuske; Helberg, Annabelle; Kirchner, Uve; Klutmann, Susanne; Mester, Janos; Bannas, Peter [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Hamburg (Germany); Frenzel, Thorsten [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Ambulatory Center, Department for Radiation Oncology, Hamburg (Germany); Beyersdorff, Dirk [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Hamburg (Germany); University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martini-Klinik, Hamburg (Germany); Budaeus, Lars [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martini-Klinik, Hamburg (Germany); Wester, Hans-Juergen [Technical University Munich, Pharmaceutical Radiochemistry, Garching (Germany)

    2017-04-15

    To determine the detection rate of PET/CT in biochemical relapse of prostate cancer using [{sup 68}Ga]PSMA I and T and to compare it with published detection rates of [{sup 68}Ga]PSMA HBED-CC. We performed a retrospective analysis in 83 consecutive patients with documented biochemical relapse after prostatectomy. All patients underwent whole body [{sup 68}Ga]PSMA I and T PET/CT. PET/CT images were evaluated for presence of local recurrence, lymph node metastases, and distant metastases. Proportions of positive PET/CT results were calculated for six subgroups with increasing prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels (<0.5 ng/mL, 0.5 to <1.0 ng/mL, 1.0 to <2.0 ng/mL, 2.0 to <5.0 ng/mL, 5.0 to <10.0, ≥10.0 ng/mL). Detection rates of [{sup 68}Ga]PSMA I and T were statistically compared with published detection rates of [{sup 68}Ga]PSMA HBED-CC using exact Fisher's test. Median PSA was 0.81 (range: 0.01 - 128) ng/mL. In 58/83 patients (70 %) at least one [{sup 68}Ga]PSMA I and T positive lesion was detected. Local recurrent cancer was present in 18 patients (22 %), lymph node metastases in 29 patients (35 %), and distant metastases in 15 patients (18 %). The tumor detection rate was positively correlated with PSA levels, resulting in detection rates of 52 % (<0.5 ng/mL), 55 % (0.5 to <1.0 ng/mL), 70 % (1.0 to <2.0 ng/mL), 93 % (2.0 to <5.0 ng/mL), 100 % (5.0 to <10.0 ng/mL), and 100 % (≥10.0 ng/mL). There was no significant difference between the detection rate of [{sup 68}Ga]PSMA I and T and published detection rates of [{sup 68}Ga]PSMA HBED-CC (all p>0.05). [{sup 68}Ga]PSMA I and T PET/CT has high detection rates of recurrent prostate cancer that are comparable to [{sup 68}Ga]PSMA HBED-CC. (orig.)

  5. Prospective evaluation of {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-NOC PET-CT in phaeochromocytoma and paraganglioma: preliminary results from a single centre study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naswa, Niraj; Sharma, Punit; Nazar, Aftab Hasan; Agarwal, Krishan Kant; Kumar, Rakesh; Malhotra, Arun; Bal, Chandrasekhar [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ansari Nagar, New Delhi (India); Ammini, Ariachery C. [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, New Delhi (India)

    2012-03-15

    To evaluate the role of {sup 68}Ga-labelled [1, 4, 7, 10-tetraazacyclododecane-1, 4, 7, 10-tetraacetic acid]-1-NaI{sup 3}-Octreotide ({sup 68}Ga-DOTA-NOC) whole body positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) as a functional imaging approach for phaeochromocytoma and paraganglioma. Thirty-five unrelated patients (Median age-34.4 years; range: 15-71) were evaluated in this prospective study. PET-CT was performed after injection of 132-222 MBq of {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-NOC. Images were evaluated by two experienced nuclear medicine physicians both qualitatively as well as quantitatively (standardised uptake value-SUVmax). In addition we compared the findings with {sup 131}I Metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scintigraphy, which was available for 25 patients. Histopathology and/or conventional imaging with biochemical markers were taken as the reference standard. 44 lesions were detected on {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-NOC PET-CT imaging with an additional detection of 12 lesions not previously known, leading to a change in management of 6 patients. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 100%, 85.7%, and 97.1% on a per patient basis and 100%, 85.7% and 98% on per lesion basis, respectively.{sup 131}I MIBG scintigraphy was concordant with {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-NOC PET-CT in 16 patients and false negative in 9 patients. {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-NOC PET-CT is highly sensitive and specific for the detection of phaeochromoctyomas and paragangliomas. It seems better than {sup 131}I MIBG scintigraphy for this purpose. (orig.)

  6. The diagnostic value of PET/CT imaging with the {sup 68}Ga-labelled PSMA ligand HBED-CC in the diagnosis of recurrent prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afshar-Oromieh, Ali; Giesel, Frederik L.; Kratochwil, Clemens; Haberkorn, Uwe [University Hospital of Heidelberg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); Clinical Cooperation Unit Nuclear Medicine, German Cancer Research Centre, Heidelberg (Germany); Avtzi, Eleni [University Hospital of Heidelberg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); Holland-Letz, Tim [German Cancer Research Center, Department of Biostatistics, Heidelberg (Germany); Linhart, Heinz G. [German Cancer Research Centre, Heidelberg, National Centre for Tumor Diseases (NCT), Heidelberg (Germany); Eder, Matthias; Eisenhut, Michael; Kopka, Klaus [German Cancer Research Center, Division of Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry, Heidelberg (Germany); Boxler, Silvan; Hadaschik, Boris A. [University Hospital of Heidelberg, Department of Urology, Heidelberg (Germany); Weichert, Wilko [University Hospital of Heidelberg, Department of Pathology, Heidelberg (Germany); Debus, Juergen [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Oncology and Therapy, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-11-20

    Since the introduction of positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC (={sup 68}Ga-DKFZ-PSMA-11), this method has been regarded as a significant step forward in the diagnosis of recurrent prostate cancer (PCa). However, published data exist for small patient cohorts only. The aim of this evaluation was to analyse the diagnostic value of {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-ligand PET/CT in a large cohort and the influence of several possibly interacting variables. We performed a retrospective analysis in 319 patients who underwent {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-ligand PET/CT from 2011 to 2014. Potential influences of several factors such as prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level and doubling time (DT), Gleason score (GSC), androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), age and amount of injected tracer were evaluated. Histological verification was performed in 42 patients after the {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-ligand PET/CT. Tracer uptake was measured in 901 representative tumour lesions. In 82.8 % of the patients at least one lesion indicative of PCa was detected. Tumor-detection was positively associated with PSA level and ADT. GSC and PSA-DT were not associated with tumor-detection. The average maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}) of tumour lesions was 13.3 ± 14.6 (0.7-122.5). Amongst lesions investigated by histology, 30 were false-negative in 4 different patients, and all other lesions (n = 416) were true-positive or true-negative. A lesion-based analysis of sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value (NPV) and positive predictive value (PPV) revealed values of 76.6 %, 100 %, 91.4 % and 100 %. A patient-based analysis revealed a sensitivity of 88.1 %. Of 116 patients available for follow-up, 50 received local therapy after {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-ligand PET/CT. {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-ligand PET/CT can detect recurrent PCa in a high number of patients. In addition, the radiotracer is highly specific for PCa. Tumour detection is positively associated with PSA and ADT. {sup 68}Ga

  7. Talc Pleurodesis With Intense 18F-FDG Activity But No 68Ga-DOTA-TATE Activity on PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, Georgios Z; Millo, Corina; Bagci, Ulas; Patronas, Nicholas J; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2015-10-01

    Talc pleurodesis (TP) is a technique, widely employed in the management of patients with persistent pleural effusions or pneumothoraces not amenable to other treatment options. It is well documented that talc deposits produce areas of highly increased F-FDG uptake, because of talc-induced inflammation. We present a case of a patient with history of TP who was evaluated with both F-FDG and Ga-DOTA-TATE. The hypermetabolic area seen on F-FDG-PET-CT in the region of talc placement showed no uptake by Ga-DOTA-TATE, suggesting the potential role of Ga-DOTA-TATE-PET-CT in elucidating F-FDG-postitive lesions in patients with history of both neuroendocrine malignancy and TP.

  8. Kidney Tumor in a von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) Patient With Intensely Increased Activity on 68Ga-DOTA-TATE PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, Georgios Z; Millo, Corina; Sadowski, Samira M; Bagci, Ulas; Patronas, Nicholas J

    2016-12-01

    Renal and pancreatic cysts and tumors are the most common visceral manifestations of von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease, a heritable multisystem cancer syndrome characterized by development of a variety of malignant and benign tumors. We report a case of a VHL patient with multiple renal cystic and complex cystic/solid lesions. The patient underwent Ga-DOTA-TATE-PET/CT showing intensely increased activity by a solid lesion which demonstrated enhancement on both CT and MRI scans, raising high suspicion for malignancy. The presented case indicates application of SSTR-imaging using Ga-DOTA-conjugated peptides in VHL-patients and emphasizes the need for cautious interpretation of renal parenchyma Ga-DOTATATE activity.

  9. Cost comparison of {sup 111}In-DTPA-octreotide scintigraphy and {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT for staging enteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schreiter, Nils F.; Brenner, Winfried; Buchert, Ralph; Prasad, Vikas [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Berlin (Germany); Nogami, Munenobu [University Hospital, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Nankoku, Kochi (Japan); Huppertz, Alexander [Imaging Science Institute Charite Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Pape, Ulrich-Frank [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department of Gastroenterology, Berlin (Germany); Hamm, Bernd; Maurer, Martin H. [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany)

    2012-01-15

    Although somatostatin receptor positron emission tomography (PET)/CT is gaining increasing popularity and has shown its diagnostic superiority in several studies, {sup 111}In-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA)-octreotide is still the current standard for diagnosis of neuroendocrine tumours (NET). The aim of this study was to compare the costs for the two diagnostic tests and the respective consequential costs. From January 2009 to July 2009, 51 consecutive patients with enteropancreatic NET who underwent contrast-enhanced {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT (n = 29) or {sup 111}In-DTPA-octreotide (mean 3 whole-body scans plus 1.6 low-dose single photon emission computed tomography/CT; n = 22) were included. For cost analysis, direct costs (equipment) and variable costs (material, labour) per examination were calculated. Additionally required CT and/or MRI examinations within the staging process were assessed as consequential costs. An additional deterministic sensitivity analysis was performed. A {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT examination yielded total costs (equipment, personnel and material costs) of 548 EUR. On the other hand, an {sup 111}In-DTPA-octreotide examination resulted in 827 EUR total costs. Costs for equipment and material had a share of 460 EUR/720 EUR for {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC/{sup 111}In-DTPA-octreotide and labour costs of 89 EUR/106 EUR. With {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC additional MRI had to be performed in 7% of the patients resulting in a mean of 20 EUR for supplementary imaging per patient; 82% of patients with {sup 111}In-DTPA-octreotide needed additional MRI and/or CT resulting in mean additional costs of 161 EUR per patient. {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT was considerably cheaper than {sup 111}In-DTPA-octreotide with respect to both material and personnel costs. Furthermore, by using {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT considerably fewer additional examinations were needed reducing the consequential costs significantly. (orig.)

  10. Schmorl’s Nodes can cause increased 68Ga-DOTA-TATE activity on PET/CT, mimicking metastasis in patients with neuroendocrine malignancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, Georgios Z.; Millo, Corina; Bagci, Ulas; Sadowski, Samira M.; Stratakis, Constatntine A.

    2015-01-01

    Schmorl’s node (SN) is the herniation of the nucleus pulposus (NP) through the cartilaginous and bony endplate into the adjacent vertebral body. It is documented that SNs produce areas of moderately increased 18F-FDG uptake. We present a case of a patient with history of neuroendocrine tumor (NET), who underwent 68Ga-DOTA-TATE- PET/CT for follow-up, showing increased focal vertebral uptake suggestive of bone metastasis. Computed tomography (CT) revealed typical findings of a SN. The presented case indicates that SNs should be considered when encountering focally increased skeletal uptake in 68Ga-DOTA-TATE-PET/CT studies, which can mimic metastasis in patients with history of NETs. PMID:26562580

  11. Molecular imaging with {sup 68}Ga-SSTR PET/CT and correlation to immunohistochemistry of somatostatin receptors in neuroendocrine tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaemmerer, Daniel; Haugvik, Sven-Petter; Hommann, Merten [Zentralklinik Bad Berka GmbH, Department of General and Visceral Surgery, Bad Berka (Germany); Peter, Luisa; Lupp, Amelie; Schulz, Stefan [University of Jena, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Jena (Germany); Saenger, Joerg [Laboratory of Pathology and Cytology, Bad Berka (Germany); Prasad, Vikas; Kulkarni, Harshad; Baum, Richard Paul [Zentralklinik Bad Berka, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Center for PET, Bad Berka (Germany)

    2011-09-15

    Somatostatin receptors (SSTR) are known for an overexpression in gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumours (GEP-NET). The aim of the present study was to find out if the receptor density predicted by the semi-quantitative parameters generated from the static positron emission tomography (PET/CT) correlated with the in vitro immunohistochemistry using a novel rabbit monoclonal anti-SSTR2A antibody (clone UMB-1) for specific SSTR2A immunohistochemistry and polyclonal antibodies for SSTR1 and 3-5. Overall 14 surgical specimens generated from 34 histologically documented GEP-NET patients were correlated with the preoperative {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-NOC PET/CT. Quantitative assessment of the receptor density was done using the immunoreactive score (IRS) of Remmele and Stegner; the additional 4-point IRS classification for immunohistochemistry and standardized uptake values (SUV{sub max} and SUV{sub mean}) were used for PET/CT. The IRS for SSTR2A and SSTR5 correlated highly significant with the SUV{sub max} on the PET/CT (p < 0.001; p < 0.05) and the IRS for SSTR2A with the SUV{sub mean} (p < 0.013). The level of SSTR2A score correlated significantly with chromogranin A staining and indirectly to the tumour grading. The highly significant correlation between SSTR2A and SSTR5 and the SUV{sub max} on the {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-NOC PET/CT scans is concordant with the affinity profile of {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-NOC to the SSTR subtypes and demonstrates the excellent qualification of somatostatin analogues in the diagnostics of NET. This study correlating somatostatin receptor imaging using {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-NOC PET/CT with immunohistochemically analysed SSTR also underlines the approval of therapy using somatostatin analogues, follow-up imaging as well as radionuclide therapy. (orig.)

  12. MRI versus {sup 68}Ga-PSMA PET/CT for gross tumour volume delineation in radiation treatment planning of primary prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zamboglou, Constantinos; Kirste, Simon; Fechter, Tobias; Grosu, Anca-Ligia [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Freiburg (Germany); German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Heidelberg (Germany); Wieser, Gesche [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Freiburg (Germany); Hennies, Steffen [University Medical Center Goettingen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Goettingen (Germany); Rempel, Irene; Soschynski, Martin; Langer, Mathias [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Radiology, Freiburg (Germany); Rischke, Hans Christian [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Freiburg (Germany); Jilg, Cordula A. [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Urology, Freiburg (Germany); Meyer, Philipp T. [German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Heidelberg (Germany); University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Freiburg (Germany); Bock, Michael [German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Heidelberg (Germany); University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Radiology, Freiburg (Germany)

    2016-05-15

    Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) is widely used in radiation treatment planning of primary prostate cancer (PCA). Focal dose escalation to the dominant intraprostatic lesions (DIPL) may lead to improved PCA control. Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is overexpressed in most PCAs. {sup 68}Ga-labelled PSMA inhibitors have demonstrated promising results in detection of PCA with PET/CT. The aim of this study was to compare {sup 68}Ga-PSMA PET/CT with MRI for gross tumour volume (GTV) definition in primary PCA. This retrospective study included 22 patients with primary PCA analysed after {sup 68}Ga-PSMA PET/CT and mpMRI. GTVs were delineated on MR images by two radiologists (GTV-MRIrad) and two radiation oncologists separately. Both volumes were merged leading to GTV-MRIint. GTVs based on PET/CT were delineated by two nuclear medicine physicians in consensus (GTV-PET). Laterality (left, right, and left and right prostate lobes) on mpMRI, PET/CT and pathological analysis after biopsy were assessed. Mean GTV-MRIrad, GTV-MRIint and GTV-PET were 5.92, 3.83 and 11.41 cm{sup 3}, respectively. GTV-PET was significant larger then GTV-MRIint (p = 0.003). The MRI GTVs GTV-MRIrad and GTV-MRIint showed, respectively, 40 % and 57 % overlap with GTV-PET. GTV-MRIrad and GTV-MRIint included the SUVmax of GTV-PET in 12 and 11 patients (54.6 % and 50 %), respectively. In nine patients (47 %), laterality on mpMRI, PET/CT and histopathology after biopsy was similar. Ga-PSMA PET/CT and mpMRI provided concordant results for delineation of the DIPL in 47 % of patients (40 % - 54 % of lesions). GTV-PET was significantly larger than GTV-MRIint. {sup 68}Ga-PSMA PET/CT may have a role in radiation treatment planning for focal radiation to the DIPL. Exact correlation of PET and MRI images with histopathology is needed. (orig.)

  13. High-resolution imaging of pulmonary ventilation and perfusion with {sup 68}Ga-VQ respiratory gated (4-D) PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callahan, Jason [Centre for Molecular Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Hofman, Michael S. [The University of Melbourne, Department of Medicine, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Centre for Molecular Imaging, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Siva, Shankar [The University of Melbourne, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); The University of Melbourne, Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Kron, Tomas [The University of Melbourne, Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); The University of Melbourne, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Department of Physical Sciences, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Schneider, Michal E. [Monash University, Department of Medical Imaging and Radiation Science, Clayton, VIC (Australia); Binns, David; Eu, Peter [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Centre for Cancer Imaging, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Hicks, Rodney J. [The University of Melbourne, Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Centre for Molecular Imaging, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia)

    2014-02-15

    Our group has previously reported on the use of {sup 68}Ga-ventilation/perfusion (VQ) PET/CT scanning for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism. We describe here the acquisition methodology for {sup 68}Ga-VQ respiratory gated (4-D) PET/CT and the effects of respiratory motion on image coregistration in VQ scanning. A prospective study was performed in 15 patients with non-small-cell lung cancer. 4-D PET and 4-D CT images were acquired using an infrared marker on the patient's abdomen as a surrogate for breathing motion following inhalation of Galligas and intravenous administration of {sup 68}Ga-macroaggregated albumin. Images were reconstructed with phase-matched attenuation correction. The lungs were contoured on CT and PET VQ images during free-breathing (FB) and at maximum inspiration (Insp) and expiration (Exp). The similarity between PET and CT volumes was measured using the Dice coefficient (DC) comparing the following groups; (1) FB-PET/CT, (2) InspPET/InspCT, (3) ExpPET/Exp CT, and (4) FB-PET/AveCT. A repeated measures one-way ANOVA with multiple comparison Tukey tests were performed to evaluate any difference between the groups. Diaphragmatic motion in the superior-inferior direction on the 4-D CT scan was also measured. 4-D VQ scanning was successful in all patients without additional acquisition time compared to the nongated technique. The highest volume overlap was between ExpPET and ExpCT and between FB-PET and AveCT with a DC of 0.82 and 0.80 for ventilation and perfusion, respectively. This was significantly better than the DC comparing the other groups (0.78-0.79, p < 0.05). These values agreed with a visual inspection of the images with improved image coregistration around the lung bases. The diaphragmatic motion during the 4-D CT scan was highly variable with a range of 0.4-3.4 cm (SD 0.81 cm) in the right lung and 0-2.8 cm (SD 0.83 cm) in the left lung. Right-sided diaphragmatic nerve palsy was observed in 3 of 15 patients. {sup 68}Ga-VQ 4-D

  14. Diagnostic performance of {sup 68}Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT, {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and {sup 131}I-MIBG scintigraphy in mapping metastatic pheochromocytoma nd paraganglioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Teik Hin [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, National Cancer Institute, Putrajaya (Malaysia); Hussein, Zanariah [Dept. of Endocrine, Hospital Putrajaya, Putrajaya (Malaysia); Sad, Fathinul Fikri Ahmad [Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, Serdang Hospital, Serdang (Malaysia); Shuaib, Ibrahim Lutfi [Dept. of Radiology, Advanced Medical and Dental Institute, University Sains Malaysia, Pulau Pinang (Malaysia)

    2015-06-15

    To evaluate the diagnostic performance of '6{sup 8}Ga-DOTATATE {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT), {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and {sup 131}I-MIBG scintigraphy in the mapping of metastatic pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma. Seventeen patients (male = 8, female = 9; age range, 13–68 years) with clinically proven or suspicious metastatic pheochromocytoma or paraganglioma were included in this prospective study. Twelve patients underwent all three modalities, whereas five patients underwent {sup 68}Ga-DOTATATE and {sup 131}I-MIBG without {sup 18}F-FDG. A composite reference standard derived from anatomical and functional imaging findings, along with histopathological information, was used to validate the findings. Results were analysed on a per-patient and on per-lesion basis. Sensitivity and accuracy were assessed using McNemar's test. On a per-patient basis, 14/17 patients were detected in {sup 68}Ga-DOTATATE, 7/17 patients in {sup 131}I-MIBG, and 10/12 patients in {sup 18}F-FDG. The sensitivity and accuracy of {sup 68}Ga-DOTATATE, {sup 131}I-MIBG and {sup 18}F-FDG were (93.3 %, 94.1 %), (46.7 %, 52.9 %) and (90.9 %, 91.7 %) respectively. On a per-lesion basis, an overall of 472 positive lesions were detected; of which 432/472 were identified by {sup 68}Ga-DOTATATE, 74/472 by {sup 131}I-MIBG, and 154/300 (patient, n = 12) by {sup 18}F-FDG. The sensitivity and accuracy of {sup 68}Ga-DOTATATE, {sup 131}I-MIBG and {sup 18}F-FDG were (91.5 %, 92.6 % p < 0.0001), (15.7 %, 26.0 % p < 0.0001) and (51.3 %, 57.8 % p < 0.0001) respectively. Discordant lesions were demonstrated on {sup 68}Ga-DOTATATE, {sup 131}I-MIBG and {sup 18}F-FDG. Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT shows high diagnostic accuracy than {sup 131}I-MIBG scintigraphy and {sup 18}F-FDG PET/ CT in mapping metastatic pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma.

  15. Frequency and association of 1691 (G>A FVL, 20210 (G>A PT and 677 (C>T MTHFR with deep vein thrombosis in the population of Bosnia and Herzegovina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jusić-Karić A

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The 1691 (G>A factor V Leiden (FVL and 20210 (G>A prothrombin (PT mutations are the two most common genetic risk factors in venous thromboembolism. The 677 (C>T methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR mutation is the most frequently mentioned as an independent genetic risk factor for venous thromboembolism. As there are limited published data on the prevalence of the 1691, 20210 and 677 mutations in our population, the aim of this study was to determine the frequencies and association of these deep vein thrombosis mutations in the Bosnian population.

  16. Early dynamic imaging in {sup 68}Ga- PSMA-11 PET/CT allows discrimination of urinary bladder activity and prostate cancer lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uprimny, Christian; Kroiss, Alexander Stephan; Decristoforo, Clemens; Warwitz, Boris; Scarpa, Lorenza; Roig, Llanos Geraldo; Kendler, Dorota; Guggenberg, Elisabeth von; Virgolini, Irene Johanna [Medical University Innsbruck, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Innsbruck (Austria); Fritz, Josef [Medical University Innsbruck, Department for Medical Statistics, Informatics and Health Economics, Innsbruck (Austria); Bektic, Jasmin; Horninger, Wolfgang [Medical University Innsbruck, Department of Urology, Innsbruck (Austria)

    2017-05-15

    PET/CT with {sup 68}Ga-labelled prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA)-ligands has been proven to establish a promising imaging modality in the work-up of prostate cancer (PC) patients with biochemical relapse. Despite a high overall detection rate, the visualisation of local recurrence may be hampered by high physiologic tracer accumulation in the urinary bladder on whole body imaging, usually starting 60 min after injection. This study sought to verify whether early dynamic {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11 (HBED-CC)PET/CT can differentiate pathologic PC-related tracer uptake from physiologic tracer accumulation in the urinary bladder. Eighty consecutive PC patients referred to {sup 68}Ga -PSMA-11 PET/CT were included in this retrospective analysis (biochemical relapse: n = 64; primary staging: n = 8; evaluation of therapy response/restaging: n = 8). In addition to whole-body PET/CT acquisition 60 min post injection early dynamic imaging of the pelvis in the first 8 min after tracer injection was performed. SUV{sub max} of pathologic lesions was calculated and time-activity curves were generated and compared to those of urinary bladder and areas of physiologic tracer uptake. A total of 55 lesions consistent with malignancy on 60 min whole body imaging exhibited also pathologic {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11 uptake during early dynamic imaging (prostatic bed/prostate gland: n = 27; lymph nodes: n = 12; bone: n = 16). All pathologic lesions showed tracer uptake within the first 3 min, whereas urinary bladder activity was absent within the first 3 min of dynamic imaging in all patients. Suv{sub max} was significantly higher in PC lesions in the first 6 min compared to urinary bladder accumulation (p < 0.001). In the subgroup of PC patients with biochemical relapse the detection rate of local recurrence could be increased from 20.3 to 29.7%. Early dynamic imaging in {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11 PET/CT reliably enables the differentiation of pathologic tracer uptake in PC lesions from physiologic

  17. Groundwater impact assessment report for the 284-WB Powerplant Ponds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, D.J.; Johnson, V.G.; Lindsey, K.A.

    1993-09-01

    As required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-17-00A), this report assesses the impact of wastewater discharged to the 284-WB Powerplant Ponds on groundwater quality. The assessment reported herein expands upon the initial analysis conducted between 1989 and 1990 for the Liquid Effluent Study Final Project Plan.

  18. Comparison of diagnostic sensitivity and quantitative indices between {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET and {sup 111}In-pentetreotide SPECT/CT in neuroendocrine tumors: A preliminary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, In Ki; Paeng, Jin Chul; Shin, Chan Soo; Lee, Soo Jin; Jang, Jin Young; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Lee, Dong Soo; Chung, June Key; Kang, Keon Wook [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    In-pentetreotide has been used for neuroendocrine tumors expressing somatostatin receptors. Recently, {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET has been used with the advantage of high image quality. In this study, we compared quantitative indices between {sup 111}In-pentetreotide SPECT/CT and {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT. Thirteen patients diagnosed with neuroendocrine tumors were prospectively recruited. Patients underwent {sup 111}In-pentetreotide scans with SPECT/CT and {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT before treatment. The number and location of lesions were analyzed on both imaging techniques to compare lesion detectability. Additionally, the maximal uptake count of each lesion and mean uptake count of the lungs were measured on both imagings, and target-to-normal lung ratios (TNR) were calculated as quantitative indices. Among 13 patients, 10 exhibited lesions with increased uptake on {sup 111}In-pentetreotide SPECT/CT and/or {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT. Scans with SPECT/CT detected 19 lesions, all of which were also detected on PET/CT. Moreover, 16 additional lesions were detected on PET/CT (6 in the liver, 9 in the pancreas and 1 in the spleen). PET/CT exhibited a significantly higher sensitivity than SPECT/CT (100 % vs. 54 %, P < 0.001). TNR was significantly higher on PET/CT than on SPECT/CT (99.9 ± 84.3 vs. 71.1 ± 114.9, P < 0.001) in spite of a significant correlation (r = 0.692, P = 0.01). Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT has a higher diagnostic sensitivity than {sup 111}In-pentetreotide scans with SPECT/CT. The TNR on PET/CT is higher than that of SPECT/CT, which also suggests the higher sensitivity of PET/CT. {sup 111}In-pentetreotide SPECT/CT should be used carefully if it is stead of {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT.

  19. Pre-operative ⁶⁸Ga-DOTANOC somatostatin receptor PET/CT imaging demonstrating multiple synchronous lesions in a patient with head and neck paraganglioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naswa, N; Karunanithi, S; Sharma, P; Soundararajan, R; Bal, C; Kumar, R

    2014-01-01

    Paragangliomas, or glomus tumors, are neoplasms arising from extra-adrenal chromaffin tissue. They frequently cause symptoms by over-production of catecholamines with known predilection to multicentricity. We describe the case of a patient with bilateral carotid body tumor who underwent a preoperative ⁶⁸Gallium labeled [1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid]-1-NaI3-Octreotide (⁶⁸Ga-DOTANOC) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging for staging. This is a unique case in which multiple paraganglioma and pheochromocytoma were demonstrated in a single patient using ⁶⁸Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  20. Potential role of {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT in screening for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumour in patients with von Hippel-Lindau disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prasad, Vikas; Brenner, Winfried [Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Berlin (Germany); Tiling, Nikolaus; Ploeckinger, Ursula [Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Interdisziplinaeren Stoffwechsel-Centrum, Campus Virchow Klinikum, Berlin (Germany); Denecke, Timm [Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany)

    2016-10-15

    Neuroendocrine tumours of the pancreas (pNET) are observed in 8 - 17 % of patients with von Hippel-Lindau disease (vHLD), and 11 - 20 % of these patients develop metastatic disease. MRI and CT have a very high resolution; however, their sensitivity and specificity for the detection of pNET amongst cystic lesions in the pancreas of vHLD patients are generally considered insufficient. In contrast, {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT demonstrates a high sensitivity for the diagnosis and staging of neuroendocrine tumours. In this study we investigated the potential role of {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT in screening of patients with vHLD. {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET/three-phase contrast-enhanced CT was performed according to guidelines in all consecutive vHLD patients between January 2012 and November 2015. All patients underwent additional MRI imaging of the abdomen, spine, and head. Chromogranin A (CgA) was determined at the time of the PET/CT examination. A lesion seen on {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET in the pancreas was defined as positive if the uptake was visually higher than in the surrounding tissues. Lesions were quantified using maximum SUV. Overall, 20 patients (8 men, 12 women; mean age 44.7 ± 11.1 years) were prospectively examined. Genetically, 12 patients had type 1 vHLD and 8 had type 2 vHLD. {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT detected more pNET than morphological imaging (CT or MRI): 11 patients (55 %; 8 type 1, 3 type 2) vs. 9 patients (45 %; 6 type 1, 3 type 2). The concentration of CgA was mildly elevated in 2 of 11 patients with pNET. The mean SUVmax of the pancreatic lesions was 18.9 ± 21.9 (range 5.0 - 65.6). Four patients (36.4 %) had multiple pNETs. The mean size of the lesions on CT and/or MRI was 10.4 ± 8.3 mm (range 4 - 38 mm), and 41.1 % were larger than 10 mm. In addition, somatostatin receptor-positive cerebellar and spinal haemangioblastomas were detected in three patients (SUVmax 2.1 - 10.1). One patient presented with a solitary somatostatin receptor-positive lymph

  1. Preclinical and first clinical experience with the gastrin-releasing peptide receptor-antagonist [{sup 68}Ga]SB3 and PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maina, Theodosia; Charalambidis, David; Nock, Berthold A. [INRASTES, NCSR ' ' Demokritos' ' , Molecular Radiopharmacy, Athens (Greece); Bergsma, Hendrik; Krenning, Eric P. [Erasmus MC, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Kulkarni, Harshad R.; Mueller, Dirk; Baum, Richard P. [Zentralklinik, Molecular Radiotherapy and Molecular Imaging, Bad Berka (Germany); Jong, Marion de [Erasmus MC, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Erasmus MC, Department of Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2016-05-15

    Gastrin-releasing peptide receptors (GRPR) represent attractive targets for tumor diagnosis and therapy because of their overexpression in major human cancers. Internalizing GRPR agonists were initially proposed for prolonged lesion retention, but a shift of paradigm to GRPR antagonists has recently been made. Surprisingly, radioantagonists, such as [{sup 99m}Tc]DB1 ({sup 99m}Tc-N{sub 4}'-DPhe{sup 6},Leu-NHEt{sup 13}BBN(6-13)), displayed better pharmacokinetics than radioagonists, in addition to their higher inherent biosafety. We introduce here [{sup 68}Ga]SB3, a [{sup 99m}Tc]DB1 mimic-carrying, instead of the {sup 99m}Tc-binding tetraamine, the chelator DOTA for labeling with the PET radiometal {sup 68}Ga. Competition binding assays of SB3 and [{sup nat}Ga]SB3 were conducted against [{sup 125}I-Tyr{sup 4}]BBN in PC-3 cell membranes. Blood samples collected 5 min postinjection (pi) of the [{sup 67}Ga]SB3 surrogate in mice were analyzed using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) for degradation products. Likewise, biodistribution was performed after injection of [{sup 67}Ga]SB3 (37 kBq, 100 μL, 10 pmol peptide) in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice bearing PC-3 xenografts. Eventually, [{sup 68}Ga]SB3 (283 ± 91 MBq, 23 ± 7 nmol) was injected into 17 patients with breast (8) and prostate (9) cancer. All patients had disseminated disease and had received previous therapies. PET/CT fusion images were acquired 60-115 min pi. SB3 and [{sup nat}Ga]SB3 bound to the human GRPR with high affinity (IC{sub 50}: 4.6 ± 0.5 nM and 1.5 ± 0.3 nM, respectively). [{sup 67}Ga]SB3 displayed good in vivo stability (>85 % intact at 5 min pi). [{sup 67}Ga]SB3 showed high, GRPR-specific and prolonged retention in PC-3 xenografts (33.1 ± 3.9%ID/g at 1 h pi - 27.0 ± 0.9%ID/g at 24 h pi), but much faster clearance from the GRPR-rich pancreas (∼160%ID/g at 1 h pi to <17%ID/g at 24 h pi) in mice. In patients, [{sup 68}Ga]SB3 elicited no adverse effects and

  2. 18F-FDG and 68Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT in von Hippel-Lindau Disease-Associated Retinal Hemangioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, Georgios Z; Millo, Corina; Jassel, Inderbir S; Bagci, Ulas; Sadowski, Samira M; Karantanas, Apostolos H; Patronas, Nicholas J

    2017-03-01

    Retinal hemangioblastomas are highly vascular benign tumors that can be encountered either sporadically or within the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) syndrome. We report a case of a VHL patient with retinal hemangioblastoma who underwent PET/CT scans using F-FDG and Ga-DOTATATE. The tumor showed low-level F-FDG and increased Ga-DOTATATE activity, suggesting cell-surface overexpression of somatostatin receptors. The presented case indicates the clinical applications of somatostatin receptor imaging with Ga-DOTA-conjugated peptides in detection and follow-up of VHL manifestations, screening of asymptomatic gene carriers, and in diagnosis of sporadic retinal hemangioblastomas, which may have similar features on MRI with other retinal tumors.

  3. Association Analysis between g.18873C>T and g.27522G>A Genetic Polymorphisms of OPG and Bone Mineral Density in Chinese Postmenopausal Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Several studies report that the OPG is an important candidate gene in the pathogenesis of osteoporosis. This study aimed to detect the potential association of OPG gene polymorphisms with osteoporosis in postmenopausal women. We recruited 928 subjects containing 463 with primary postmenopausal osteoporosis and 465 healthy volunteers as controls. The BMD of neck hip, lumbar spine (L2–4, and total hip were assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA. Through the created restriction site-polymerase chain reaction (CRS-PCR, PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP, and DNA sequencing methods, the g.18873C>T and g.27522G>A have been investigated. As for g.18873C>T, our data indicated that subjects with CC genotype have significantly higher BMD value than those of CT and TT genotypes (all P values A, the BMD values of subjects with GG genotype were significantly higher than those of GA and AA genotypes (all P values T and g.27522G>A genetic polymorphisms are associated with the decreased risk for osteoporosis in Chinese postmenopausal women.

  4. [68Ga]Pentixafor-PET/CT for imaging of chemokine receptor CXCR4 expression in multiple myeloma - Comparison to [18F]FDG and laboratory values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapa, Constantin; Schreder, Martin; Schirbel, Andreas; Samnick, Samuel; Kortüm, Klaus Martin; Herrmann, Ken; Kropf, Saskia; Einsele, Herrmann; Buck, Andreas K.; Wester, Hans-Jürgen; Knop, Stefan; Lückerath, Katharina

    2017-01-01

    Chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 4 (CXCR4) is a key factor for tumor growth and metastasis in several types of human cancer including multiple myeloma (MM). Proof-of-concept of CXCR4-directed radionuclide therapy in MM has recently been reported. This study assessed the diagnostic performance of the CXCR4-directed radiotracer [68Ga]Pentixafor in MM and a potential role for stratifying patients to CXCR4-directed therapies. Thirty-five patients with MM underwent [68Ga]Pentixafor-PET/CT for evaluation of eligibility for endoradiotherapy. In 19/35 cases, [18F]FDG-PET/CT for correlation was available. Scans were compared on a patient and on a lesion basis. Tracer uptake was correlated with standard clinical parameters of disease activity. [68Ga]Pentixafor-PET detected CXCR4-positive disease in 23/35 subjects (66%). CXCR4-positivity at PET was independent from myeloma subtypes, cytogenetics or any serological parameters and turned out as a negative prognostic factor. In the 19 patients in whom a comparison to [18F]FDG was available, [68Ga]Pentixafor-PET detected more lesions in 4/19 (21%) subjects, [18F]FDG proved superior in 7/19 (37%). In the remaining 8/19 (42%) patients, both tracers detected an equal number of lesions. [18F]FDG-PET positivity correlated with [68Ga]Pentixafor-PET positivity (p=0.018). [68Ga]Pentixafor-PET provides further evidence that CXCR4 expression frequently occurs in advanced multiple myeloma, representing a negative prognostic factor and a potential target for myeloma specific treatment. However, selecting patients for CXCR4 directed therapies and prognostic stratification seem to be more relevant clinical applications for this novel imaging modality, rather than diagnostic imaging of myeloma. PMID:28042328

  5. WB to Lend $441m for Energy Efficiency in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ The World Bank (WB) has approved loans of $441 million to improve energy efficiency and reduce emissions from power plants in China. The loans, which account for almost one third of planned loans for China in fiscal 2008, would go to three projects, according to the lender.The energy efficiency project, co-financed by the WB and the Global Environment Facility (GEF), would get a loan of $200 million. The project, which would also receive a grant of 13.5 million U.S. dollars from the GEF, aims to boost large-scale loans for energy efficiency programs in China. China's commercial banks are also reported to participate in the project, such as the Export-Import Bank of China and Huaxia Bank, to offer loans ranging from 5 million to 10 million U. S. dollars for energy conservation projects, especially in heavy industries.

  6. Complete genome analysis of Ketogulonigenium sp.WB0104

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Ketogulonigenium sp. may convert L-sorbose into 2-keto-L-gulonic acid, the vitamin C precursor. The genome of Ketogulonigenium sp. WB0104 consists of a circular 2765030 bp chromosome with 61.69% G+C content and two circular plasmids of 267968 and 242707 bp. The genome contains 2727 open reading frames (ORFs). The systems of replication, transcription, translation, carbohydrate and energy metabolism are intact, but the repair system is incomplete. About 640 predicted ORFs have been found to encode transporter proteins, which account for about one fourth of total predicted ORFs, noticeably higher than other documented bacteria. This may be due to the fact that WB0104 adapts to soil circumstance.

  7. UCP2 -866G/A, Ala55Val and UCP3 -55C/T polymorphisms in association with obesity susceptibility - a meta-analysis study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Qian

    Full Text Available AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Variants of UCP2 and UCP3 genes have been reported to be associated with obesity, but the available data on the relationship are inconsistent. A meta-analysis was performed to determine whether there are any associations between the UCP2 -866G/A, Ala55Val, and UCP3 -55C/T polymorphisms and obesity susceptibility. METHODS: The PubMed, Embase, Web of Science and CNKI, CBMdisc databases were searched for all relevant case-control studies. The fixed or random effect pooled measure was determined on the bias of heterogeneity test among studies. Publication bias was examined by the modified Begg's and Egger's test. RESULTS: Twenty-two published articles with thirty-two outcomes were included in the meta-analysis: 12 studies with a total of 7,390 cases and 9,860 controls were analyzed for UCP2 -866G/A polymorphism with obesity, 9 studies with 1,483 cases and 2,067 controls for UCP2 Ala55Val and 8 studies with 2,180 cases and 2,514 controls for UCP3 -55C/T polymorphism. Using an additive model, the UCP2 -866G/A polymorphism showed no significant association with obesity risk in Asians (REM OR = 0.81, 95% CI: 0.65-1.01. In contrast, a statistically significant association was observed in subjects of European descent (FEM OR = 1.06, 95% CI: 1.01-1.12. But neither the UCP2 Ala55Val nor the UCP3 -55C/T polymorphism showed any significant association with obesity risk in either subjects of Asian (REM OR = 0.84, 95% CI: 0.67-1.06 for Ala55Val; REM OR = 0.94, 95% CI: 0.55-1.28 for -55C/T or of European descent (REM OR = 1.04, 95% CI: 0.80-1.36 for Ala55Val; FEM OR = 1.08, 95% CI: 0.97-1.20 for -55C/T. CONCLUSIONS AND INTERPRETATION: Our meta-analysis revealed that the UCP2 -866G/A polymorphism may be a risk factor for susceptibility to obesity in subjects of European descent, but not in individuals of Asian descent. And our results did not support the association between UCP2 Ala55Val, UCP3 -55C/T polymorphisms and

  8. HIF-1α 1772 C/T and 1790 G/A polymorphisms are significantly associated with higher cancer risk: an updated meta-analysis from 34 case-control studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: HIF-1 activates various genes in cancer progression and metastasis. HIF-1α 1772 C/T and 1790 G/A polymorphisms are reportedly associated with cancer risk; however, the results are inconclusive. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A meta-analysis of 34 studies that involved 7522 cases and 9847 controls for 1772 C/T and 24 studies that involved 4884 cases and 8154 controls for 1790 G/A was conducted to identify the association of C/T and G/A polymorphisms with cancer risk. Odds ratio (OR and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI were used to assess the strength of association. HIF-1α 1772 C/T and 1790 G/A polymorphisms were associated with higher cancer risk in homozygote comparison (1772C/T: TT vs. CC: OR = 2.45, 95% CI: 1.52, 3.96; P heterogeneity = 0.028; 1790G/A: AA vs. GG: OR=4.74, 95% CI: 1.78, 12.6; P heterogeneity < 0.01, dominant model (1772C/T: TT/CT vs. CC: OR = 1.27, 95% CI: 1.04, 1.55; P heterogeneity < 0.01, 1790G/A: AA/GA vs. GG: OR = 1.65, 95% CI: 1.05, 2.60; P heterogeneity < 0.01, T allele versus C allele (T vs. C: OR = 1.42, 95% CI: 1.18, 1.70; P heterogeneity < 0.01, and A allele versus G allele (A vs. G: OR = 1.83, 95% CI: 1.13, 2.96; P heterogeneity < 0.01. On a subgroup analysis, the 1772 C/T polymorphism was significantly linked to higher risks for breast cancer, lung cancer, prostate cancer, and cervical cancer, whereas the 1790 G/A polymorphism was significantly linked to higher risks for lung cancer and prostate cancer. A significantly increased cancer risk was found in both Asians and Caucasians for 1772C/T polymorphism, whereas a significantly increased cancer risk was found in Caucasians in the heterozygote comparison and recessive model for 1790G/A polymorphism. CONCLUSIONS: HIF-1α 1772 C/T and 1790 G/A polymorphisms are significantly associated with higher cancer risk.

  9. Prospective comparison of {sup 68}Ga-DOTATATE and {sup 18}F-FDOPA PET/CT in patients with various pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas with emphasis on sporadic cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Archier, Aurelien; Taieb, David [Aix-Marseille University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, La Timone and North University Hospital, Marseille (France); Aix-Marseille University, European Center for Research in Medical Imaging, Marseille (France); Inserm UMR1068 Marseille Cancerology Research Center, Institut Paoli-Calmettes, Marseille (France); Varoquaux, Arthur; Beschmout, Eva [Aix-Marseille University, Department of Medical Imaging, Conception Hospital, Marseille (France); Garrigue, Philippe; Guillet, Benjamin [Aix-Marseille University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, La Timone and North University Hospital, Marseille (France); Aix-Marseille University, Department of Radiopharmacy, La Timone and North University Hospital, Marseille (France); Montava, Marion; Fakhry, Nicolas [Aix-Marseille University, Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Conception Hospital, Marseille (France); Guerin, Carole; Sebag, Frederic [Aix-Marseille University, Department of Endocrine Surgery, Conception Hospital, Marseille (France); Gabriel, Sophie [Aix-Marseille University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, La Timone and North University Hospital, Marseille (France); Aix-Marseille University, European Center for Research in Medical Imaging, Marseille (France); Morange, Isabelle; Castinetti, Frederic [Aix-Marseille University, Department of Endocrinology, Conception Hospital, Marseille (France); Barlier, Anne [Aix-Marseille, University, Laboratory of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Conception Hospital, Marseille (France); Loundou, Anderson [Aix-Marseille University, Department of Public Health, Marseille (France); Pacak, Karel [National Institutes of Health, Program in Reproductive and Adult Endocrinology, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2016-07-15

    Pheochromocytomas/paragangliomas (PHEOs/PGLs) overexpress somatostatin receptors and recent studies have already shown excellent results in the localization of these tumors using {sup 68}Ga-labeled somatostatin analogs ({sup 68}Ga-DOTA-SSA), especially in patients with germline succinate dehydrogenase subunit B gene (SDHB) mutations and head and neck PGLs (HNPGLs). The value of {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-SSA has to be established in sporadic cases, including PHEOs. Thus, the aim of this study was to compare {sup 68}Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT, {sup 18}F-FDOPA PET/CT, and conventional imaging in patients with various PHEOs/PGLs with a special emphasis on sporadic cases, including those located in the adrenal gland. {sup 68}Ga-DOTATATE, {sup 18}F-FDOPA PET/CT, and conventional imaging (contrast-enhanced CT and MRI with MR angiography sequences) were prospectively performed in 30 patients (8 with SDHD mutations, 1 with a MAX mutation and 21 sporadic cases) with PHEO/PGL at initial diagnosis or relapse. The patient-based sensitivities were 93 % (28/30), 97 % (29/30), and 93 % (28/30) for {sup 68}Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT, {sup 18}F-FDOPA PET/CT, and conventional imaging, respectively. The lesion-based sensitivities were 93 % (43/46), 89 % (41/46), and 76 % (35/46) for {sup 68}Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT, {sup 18}F-FDOPA PET/CT, and conventional imaging respectively (p = 0.042). {sup 68}Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT detected a higher number of HNPGLs (30/30) than {sup 18}F-FDOPA PET/CT (26/30; p = 0.112) and conventional imaging (24/30; p = 0.024). {sup 68}Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT missed two PHEOs of a few millimeters in size and a large recurrent PHEO. One lesion was considered false-positive on {sup 68}Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT and corresponded to a typical focal lesion of fibrous dysplasia on MRI. Among the 11 lesions missed by conventional imaging, 7 were detected by conventional imaging with knowledge of the PET results (4 HNPGLs, 2 LNs, and 1 recurrent PHEO). {sup 68}Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT is the most sensitive tool in the

  10. Whole-body MRI with diffusion-weighted sequence for staging of patients with suspected ovarian cancer: a clinical feasibility study in comparison to CT and FDG-PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michielsen, Katrijn; Op de beeck, Katya; Dymarkowski, Steven; Keyzer, Frederik de; Vandecaveye, Vincent [University Hospitals Leuven, Department of Radiology, Medical Imaging Research Centre, Leuven (Belgium); Vergote, Ignace; Amant, Frederic; Leunen, Karin [University Hospitals Leuven, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Leuven Cancer Institute, Leuven (Belgium); Moerman, Philippe [University Hospitals Leuven, Department of Morphology and Molecular Pathology, Leuven (Belgium); Deroose, Christophe [University Hospitals Leuven, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Medical Imaging Research Centre, Leuven (Belgium); Souverijns, Geert [Jessa Ziekenhuis - Campus Virga Jessa, Department of Radiology, Hasselt (Belgium)

    2014-04-15

    To evaluate whole-body MRI with diffusion-weighted sequence (WB-DWI/MRI) for staging and assessing operability compared with CT and FDG-PET/CT in patients with suspected ovarian cancer. Thirty-two patients underwent 3-T WB-DWI/MRI, {sup 18} F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) and CT before diagnostic open laparoscopy (DOL). Imaging findings for tumour characterisation, peritoneal and retroperitoneal staging were correlated with histopathology after DOL and/or open surgery. For distant metastases, FDG-PET/CT or image-guided biopsies were the reference standards. For tumour characterisation and peritoneal staging, WB-DWI/MRI was compared with CT and FDG-PET/CT. Interobserver agreement for WB-DWI/MRI was determined. WB-DWI/MRI showed 94 % accuracy for primary tumour characterisation compared with 88 % for CT and 94 % for FDG-PET/CT. WB-DWI/MRI showed higher accuracy of 91 % for peritoneal staging compared with CT (75 %) and FDG-PET/CT (71 %). WB-DWI/MRI and FDG-PET/CT showed higher accuracy of 87 % for detecting retroperitoneal lymphadenopathies compared with CT (71 %). WB-DWI/MRI showed excellent correlation with FDG-PET/CT (κ = 1.00) for detecting distant metastases compared with CT (κ = 0.34). Interobserver agreement was moderate to almost perfect (κ = 0.58-0.91). WB-DWI/MRI shows high accuracy for characterising primary tumours, peritoneal and distant staging compared with CT and FDG-PET/CT and may be valuable for assessing operability in ovarian cancer patients. (orig.)

  11. {sup 68}Ga-PSMA I and T PET/CT for assessment of prostate cancer: evaluation of image quality after forced diuresis and delayed imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derlin, Thorsten; Weiberg, Desiree; Ross, Tobias L.; Bengel, Frank M. [Hannover Medical School, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hannover (Germany); Klot, Christoph von [Hannover Medical School, Department of Urology and Urologic Oncology, Hannover (Germany); Wester, Hans-Juergen [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Pharmaceutical Radiochemistry, Garching (Germany); Henkenberens, Christoph; Christiansen, Hans [Hannover Medical School, Department of Radiation Oncology, Hannover (Germany); Merseburger, Axel S. [University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Department of Urology, Campus Luebeck, Luebeck (Germany)

    2016-12-15

    Urinary radiotracer excretion of {sup 68}Ga-Labelled prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) ligands may complicate the assessment of the prostate region and differentiation of lymph nodes from ureteral activity. The aim of this study was to assess the value of delayed imaging after forced diuresis. Sixty-six patients underwent {sup 68}Ga-PSMA I and T PET/CT for evaluation of prostate cancer at 60 min post-injection. In subgroups of patients, this was amended by delayed imaging after 180 min post-injection, preceded by furosemide and oral hydration early, at the time of tracer injection, or delayed, at 100 min post-injection. Urinary tracer activity within the bladder and focal ureteral activity was analyzed. After forced diuresis, linear and focal visualization of ureters was significantly reduced. After delayed furosemide, mean and peak bladder activity decreased (p < 0.001), and image quality of the prostate region improved on delayed images (p < 0.001). Early furosemide co-injection with tracer resulted in increased mean and peak bladder activity (p < 0.001) and in deteriorated image quality of the prostate region on delayed images (p = 0.008). Ga-PSMA I and T PET/CT delayed imaging after forced diuresis can improve the assessment of prostate region and pelvic lymph nodes by removing excreted tracer from the lower urinary tract. (orig.)

  12. Comparison of PET imaging with a {sup 68}Ga-labelled PSMA ligand and {sup 18}F-choline-based PET/CT for the diagnosis of recurrent prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afshar-Oromieh, Ali; Zechmann, Christian M.; Malcher, Anna; Giesel, Frederik L. [University Hospital of Heidelberg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); Eder, Matthias; Eisenhut, Michael [German Cancer Research Centre, Department of Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry, Heidelberg (Germany); Linhart, Heinz G. [National Centre for Tumor Diseases (NCT)/DKFZ, Heidelberg (Germany); Holland-Letz, Tim [German Cancer Research Center, Department of Biostatistics, Heidelberg (Germany); Hadaschik, Boris A. [University Hospital of Heidelberg, Department of Urology, Heidelberg (Germany); Debus, Juergen [University Hospital of Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Haberkorn, Uwe [University Hospital of Heidelberg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); German Cancer Research Centre, Clinical Cooperation Unit Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-01-15

    Positron emission tomography (PET) with choline tracers has found widespread use for the diagnosis of prostate cancer (PC). However, choline metabolism is not increased in a considerable number of cases, whereas prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is overexpressed in most PCs. Therefore, a {sup 68}Ga-labelled PSMA ligand could be superior to choline tracers by obtaining a high contrast. The aim of this study was to compare such a novel tracer with standard choline-based PET/CT. Thirty-seven patients with biochemical relapse of PC [mean prostate-specific antigen (PSA) 11.1 ± 24.1 ng/ml, range 0.01-116] were retrospectively analysed after {sup 18}F-fluoromethylcholine and {sup 68}Ga-PSMA PET/CT within a time window of 30 days. Radiotracer uptake that was visually considered as PC was semi-quantitatively analysed by measuring the maximum standardized uptake values (SUV{sub max}) of the scans acquired 1 h after injection of {sup 68}Ga-PSMA complex solution (median 132 MBq, range 59-263 MBq) and {sup 18}F-fluoromethylcholine (median 237 MBq, range 114-374 MBq), respectively. In addition, tumour to background ratios were calculated. A total of 78 lesions characteristic for PC were detected in 32 patients using {sup 68}Ga-PSMA PET/CT and 56 lesions were detected in 26 patients using choline PET/CT. The higher detection rate in {sup 68}Ga-PSMA PET/CT was statistically significant (p = 0.04). In five patients no lesion was found with both methods. All lesions detected by {sup 18}F-fluoromethylcholine PET/CT were also seen by {sup 68}Ga-PSMA PET/CT. In {sup 68}Ga-PSMA PET/CT SUV{sub max} was clearly (>10 %) higher in 62 of 78 lesions (79.1 %) and the tumour to background ratio was clearly (>10 %) higher in 74 of 78 lesions (94.9 %) when compared to {sup 18}F-fluoromethylcholine PET/CT. {sup 68}Ga-PSMA PET/CT can detect lesions characteristic for PC with improved contrast when compared to standard {sup 18}F-fluoromethylcholine PET/CT, especially at low PSA levels

  13. Comparison of {sup 68}Ga-labelled PSMA-11 and {sup 11}C-choline in the detection of prostate cancer metastases by PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwenck, Johannes [Eberhard Karls University, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Clinical Molecular Imaging, Tuebingen (Germany); Eberhard Karls University, Department of Preclinical Imaging and Radiopharmacy, Tuebingen (Germany); Rempp, Hansjoerg; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Pfannenberg, Christina [Eberhard Karls University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Reischl, Gerald [Eberhard Karls University, Department of Preclinical Imaging and Radiopharmacy, Tuebingen (Germany); Kruck, Stephan; Stenzl, Arnulf [Eberhard Karls University, Department of Urology, Tuebingen (Germany); La Fougere, Christian [Eberhard Karls University, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Clinical Molecular Imaging, Tuebingen (Germany); German Cancer Consortium, German Cancer Research Center Partner Site, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2017-01-15

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is expressed ubiquitously on the membrane of most prostate tumors and its metastasis. While PET/CT using {sup 11}C-choline was considered as the gold standard in the staging of prostate cancer, PET with radiolabelled PSMA ligands was introduced into the clinic in recent years. Our aim was to compare the PSMA ligand {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11 with {sup 11}C-choline in patients with primary and recurrent prostate cancer. 123 patients underwent a whole-body PET/CT examination using {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11 and {sup 11}C-choline. Suspicious lesions were evaluated visually and semiquantitatively (SUVavg). Out of these, 103 suffered from a confirmed biochemical relapse after prostatectomy and/or radiotherapy (mean PSA level of 4.5 ng/ml), while 20 patients underwent primary staging. In 67 patients with biochemical relapse, we detected 458 lymph nodes suspicious for metastasis. PET using {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11 showed a significantly higher uptake and detection rate than {sup 11}C-choline PET. Also {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11 PET identified significantly more patients with suspicious lymph nodes as well as affected lymph nodes regions especially at low PSA levels. Bone lesions suspicious for prostate cancer metastasis were revealed in 36 patients' biochemical relapse. Significantly more bone lesions were detected by {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11, but only 3 patients had only PSMA-positive bone lesions. Nevertheless, we detected also 29 suspicious lymph nodes and 8 bone lesions, which were only positive as per {sup 11}C-choline PET. These findings led to crucial differences in the TNM classification and the identification of oligometastatic patients. In the patients who underwent initial staging, all primary tumors showed uptake of both tracers. Although significantly more suspicious lymph nodes and bone lesions were identified, only 2 patients presented with bone lesions only detected by {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11 PET. Thus, PET using {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11 showed a higher

  14. Optimized production, quality control, biological evaluation and PET/CT imaging of {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-617 in breast adenocarcinoma model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharifi, Mehdi; Yousefnia, Hassan; Bahrami-Samani, Ali; Zolghadri, Samaneh; Alirezapour, Behrouz [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute (NSTRI), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jalilian, Amir Reza; Geramifa, Parham; Beiki, Davood [Tehran Univ. of Medical Sciences (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Research Center for Nuclear Medicine; Maus, Stephan [Univ. Medical Centre Mainz (Germany). Clinic of Nuclear Medicine

    2017-08-01

    Optimized production, quality control and preclinical evaluation of {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-617 as a PET radiotracer for PSMA-positive malignancies as well as successful application in imaging of breast adenocarcinomas are reported. {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-617 radiolabeling and QC optimization, stability, log P, biodistribution in breast adenocarcinomas-bearing mice (direct and blockade studies) and also PET/CT imaging was performed. {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-617 complex was prepared in high radiochemical purity (>96%, ITLC, HPLC) and specific activity of 300-310 GBq/mM at 95 C using 2-4 micrograms of the peptide in 10 min followed by solid phase purification. The tracer was stable in serum and final formulation for at least 120 min. The log P was -1.98. Western blot test on the tumor cell homogenates demonstrated distinct existence of the PSMA on the surface. The biodistribution of the tracer demonstrated specific kidney and tumor significant uptake using blocking study. Significant tumor:blood and tumor:muscle ratio uptake observed at 30 min post-injection (2.69 and 19.1, respectively). A reduction of 40-80% off tumor uptake in the study time period observed using blocking test. {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-617 can be proposing a possible tracer for PET imaging of breast adenocarcinomas and other breast malignancies.

  15. Meta-Analysis of the Relationship between TNF-α (-308G/A) and IL-10 (-819C/T) Gene Polymorphisms and Susceptibility to Dengue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Ana Caroline Melo Dos; de Moura, Edilson Leite; Ferreira, Jean Moisés; Santos, Barbara Rayssa Correia Dos; Alves, Verônica de Medeiros; de Farias, Karol Fireman; de Souza Figueiredo, Elaine Virgínia Martins

    2017-02-01

    This study determined whether tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and Interleukin-10 (IL-10) polymorphisms are associated with susceptibility to dengue. a systematic review with meta-analysis was conducted of the associations between the TNF-α (-308G/A) and IL-10 (-819C/T) polymorphisms and dengue. A total of eight case-controls studies involving 384 individuals with symptomatic dengue, 571 individuals with dengue hemorrhagic fever, and 995 healthy controls were considered in the meta-analysis. There was no significant association between TNF-α (-308G/A) and IL-10 (-819C/T) polymorphism and dengue in overall population. However, stratifying meta-analysis by groups, the meta-analysis revealed association between the TNF-α -308 G/G (OR: 1.62, CI: 1.02-2.57, p = 0.04) genotype and allele G (OR: 1.62, CI: 1.04-2.55, p = 0.03) that confers susceptibility to symptomatic dengue, while the TNF-α -308 G/A genotype (OR: 0.69, CI = 0.39-0.99, p = 0.04) and allele A (OR: 0.64, CI: 0.41-1.00, p = 0.05) confers protection to symptomatic dengue. No difference was observed for the TNF-α (-308) and IL-10 (-819C/T) polymorphisms in the comparisons of hemorrhagic dengue versus control and hemorrhagic dengue versus symptomatic dengue. This meta-analysis showed that TNF-α (-308) polymorphism is associated with dengue symptomatic susceptibility.

  16. Association of β-fibrinogen gene -148C/T and -455G/A polymorphisms and coronary artery disease in Chinese population: A Meta analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to evaluate the correlation between the β-fibrinogen gene –148C/T and –455G/A polymorphisms and susceptibility to coronary artery disease in the Chinese population using a meta–analytic approach. Eligible studies about this correlation were identified by searching the PubMed, EMBASE, and CNKI databases. Of the 13 identified, 7 (with 1488 cases and 1234 controls) involved the –148C/T polymorphism and 9 (with 1023 cases and 1081 controls) involved the –455G/A polymorphism. No publication bias was detectable and heterogeneity testing found significant differ-ences between the ORs for both groups of studies. The combined OR for the 7 studies on susceptibility to coronary artery disease in –148T allele carriers compared to the –148C/C wild-type homozygotes was 1.31 (95%CI: 0.94-1.84, P=0.11). The combined OR for the 9 studies on susceptibility to coronary artery disease in –455A allele carriers compared to the –455G/G wild-type homozygotes was 1.75 (95%CI: 1.24-2.46, P=0.001). Our results suggest the absence of an association between the β-fibrinogen gene –148C/T polymorphism and susceptibility to coronary artery disease and the possibility that –455G/A polymorphism (in particular, allele A) increases susceptibility to this disease in the Chinese population.

  17. Qualitative and quantitative image analysis of CT and MR imaging in patients with neuroendocrine liver metastases in comparison to (68)Ga-DOTATOC PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flechsig, Paul; Zechmann, Christian M; Schreiweis, Julian; Kratochwil, Clemens; Rath, Daniel; Schwartz, Lawrence H; Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Haberkorn, Uwe; Giesel, Frederik L

    2015-08-01

    To compare lesion conspicuity in patients with liver metastases arising from gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs) using MRI, PET and CT. 16 patients with GEP-NETs were evaluated using non-contrast MRI, contrast-enhanced (CE) MRI using Gd-EOB-DTPA and CE-(68)Ga-DOTATOC PET. Quantitative analyses were performed by two blinded readers using ROI-analyses quantifying contrast ratios (CR) between normal liver-tissue and GEP-NET-metastases. Qualitative analyses were performed evaluating primary visibility and spatial detectability of all lesions. 103 of the same liver metastases were detected on all modalities. Qualitatively, lesion conspicuity was superior on CE-MRI imaging compared to non-contrast MR-sequences (T2, DWI, fl2D, fl3D), as well as arterial- and portal-venous phase CT. Concerning detectability of lesions, CE-MRI was superior to all other modalities. The quantitative ROI-analysis demonstrated improved CR for DWI compared to all other non-contrast MR-sequences (p<0.001). CE-MRI presented with higher CR-values compared to CE-(68)Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT (p<0.001). Anatomic imaging using non contrast MRI with fl2D-and fl3D-sequences in combination with the molecular imaging modality (68)Ga-DOTATOC PET is optimal for the assessment of liver lesions in GEP-NET-patients. Even though CE-MRI was superior to non-contrast MRI, non-contrast MRI is sufficient to detect and quantify liver metastases in daily routine, especially in combination with DW-Imaging. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  18. Gastroenteropancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors: Standardizing Therapy Monitoring with 68Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT Using the Example of Somatostatin Receptor Radionuclide Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Luboldt

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to standardize therapy monitoring of hepatic metastases from gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs during the course of somatostatin receptor radionuclide therapy (SRRT. In 21 consecutive patients with nonresectable hepatic metastases of GEP-NETs, chromogranin A (CgA and 68Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT were compared before and after the last SRRT. On 68Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT, the maximum standard uptake values (SUVmax of normal liver and hepatic metastases were calculated. In addition, the volumes of hepatic metastases (volume of interest [VOI] were measured using four cut-offs to separate normal liver tissue from metastases (SUVmax of the normal liver plus 10% [VOIliver+10%], 20% [VOIliver+20%], 30% [VOIliver+30%] and SUV = 10 [VOI10SUV]. The SUVmaxof the normal liver was below 10 (7.2 ± 1.3 in all patients and without significant changes. Overall therapy changes (Δ per patient (mean [95% CI] were statistically significant with p < .01 for ΔCgA = −43 (−69 to −17, ΔSUVmax = −22 (−29 to −14, and ΔVOI10SUV = −53 (−68 to −38% and significant with p < .05 for ΔVOIliver+10% = −29 (−55 to −3%, ΔVOIliver+20% = −32 (−62 to −2 and ΔVOIliver+30% = −37 (−66 to −8. Correlations were found only between ΔCgA and ΔVOI10SUV (r = .595; p < .01, ΔSUVmax and ΔVOI10SUV (0.629, p < .01, and SUVmax and ΔSUVmax (r = .446; p < .05. 68Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT allows volumetric therapy monitoring via an SUV-based cut-off separating hepatic metastases from normal liver tissue (10 SUV recommended.

  19. Synthesis, 68Ga-Radiolabeling, and Preliminary In Vivo Assessment of a Depsipeptide-Derived Compound as a Potential PET/CT Infection Imaging Agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Botshelo B. Mokaleng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Noninvasive imaging is a powerful tool for early diagnosis and monitoring of various disease processes, such as infections. An alarming shortage of infection-selective radiopharmaceuticals exists for overcoming the diagnostic limitations with unspecific tracers such as 67/68Ga-citrate or 18F-FDG. We report here TBIA101, an antimicrobial peptide derivative that was conjugated to DOTA and radiolabeled with 68Ga for a subsequent in vitro assessment and in vivo infection imaging using Escherichia coli-bearing mice by targeting bacterial lipopolysaccharides with PET/CT. Following DOTA-conjugation, the compound was verified for its cytotoxic and bacterial binding behaviour and compound stability, followed by 68Gallium-radiolabeling. µPET/CT using 68Ga-DOTA-TBIA101 was employed to detect muscular E. coli-infection in BALB/c mice, as warranted by the in vitro results. 68Ga-DOTA-TBIA101-PET detected E. coli-infected muscle tissue (SUV = 1.3–2.4 > noninfected thighs (P=0.322 > forearm muscles (P=0.092 > background (P=0.021 in the same animal. Normalization of the infected thigh muscle to reference tissue showed a ratio of 3.0 ± 0.8 and a ratio of 2.3 ± 0.6 compared to the identical healthy tissue. The majority of the activity was cleared by renal excretion. The latter findings warrant further preclinical imaging studies of greater depth, as the DOTA-conjugation did not compromise the TBIA101’s capacity as targeting vector.

  20. Comparison of hybrid {sup 68}Ga-PSMA PET/MRI and {sup 68}Ga-PSMA PET/CT in the evaluation of lymph node and bone metastases of prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freitag, Martin T.; Roethke, Matthias; Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter [German Cancer Research Center, Department of Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Radtke, Jan P. [German Cancer Research Center, Department of Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Urology, Heidelberg (Germany); Hadaschik, Boris A. [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Urology, Heidelberg (Germany); Kopp-Schneider, A. [German Cancer Research Center, Department of Bioinformatics and Statistics, Heidelberg (Germany); Eder, Matthias; Kopka, Klaus [German Cancer Research Center, Division of Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry, Heidelberg (Germany); Haberkorn, Uwe [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); German Cancer Research Center, Clinical Cooperation Unit Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); Afshar-Oromieh, Ali [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    To evaluate the reproducibility of the combination of hybrid PET/MRI and the {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11 tracer in depicting lymph node (LN) and bone metastases of prostate cancer (PC) in comparison with that of PET/CT. A retrospective analysis of 26 patients who were subjected to {sup 68}Ga-PSMA PET/CT{sub low-dose} (1 h after injection) followed by PET/MRI (3 h after injection) was performed. MRI sequences included T1-w native, T1-w contrast-enhanced, T2-w fat-saturated and diffusion-weighted sequences (DWI{sub b800}). Discordant PET-positive and morphological findings were evaluated. Standardized uptake values (SUV) of PET-positive LNs and bone lesions were quantified and their morphological size and conspicuity determined. Comparing the PET components, the proportion of discordant PSMA-positive suspicious findings was very low (98.5 % of 64 LNs concordant, 100 % of 28 bone lesions concordant). Two PET-positive bone metastases could not be confirmed morphologically using CT{sub low-dose}, but could be confirmed using MRI. In 12 of 20 patients, 47 PET-positive LNs (71.9 %) were smaller than 1 cm in short axis diameter. There were significant linear correlations between PET/MRI SUVs and PET/CT SUVs in the 64 LN metastases (p < 0.0001) and in the 28 osseous metastases (p < 0.0001) for SUV{sub mean} and SUV{sub max}, respectively. The LN SUVs were significantly higher on PET/MRI than on PET/CT (p{sub SUVmax} < 0.0001; p{sub SUVmean} < 0.0001) but there was no significant difference between the bone lesion SUVs (p{sub SUVmax} = 0.495; p{sub SUVmean} = 0.381). Visibility of LNs was significantly higher on MRI using the T1-w contrast-enhanced fat-saturated sequence (p = 0.013), the T2-w fat-saturated sequence (p < 0.0001) and the DWI sequence (p < 0.0001) compared with CT{sub low-dose}. For bone lesions, only the overall conspicuity was higher on MRI compared with CT{sub low-dose} (p < 0.006). Nodal and osseous metastases of PC are accurately and reliably depicted by hybrid PET

  1. Failure Investigation of WB-57 Aircraft Engine Cowling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, J. E.; Gafka, T.; Figert, J.

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Houston, Texas is the home of the NASA WB-57 High Altitude Research Program. Three fully operational WB-57 aircraft are based near JSC at Ellington Field. The aircraft have been flying research missions since the early 1960's, and continue to be an asset to the scientific community with professional, reliable, customer-oriented service designed to meet all scientific objectives. The NASA WB-57 Program provides unique, high-altitude airborne platforms to US Government agencies, academic institutions, and commercial customers in order to support scientific research and advanced technology development and testing at locations around the world. Mission examples include atmospheric and earth science, ground mapping, cosmic dust collection, rocket launch support, and test bed operations for future airborne or spaceborne systems. During the return from a 6 hour flight, at 30,000 feet, in the clean configuration, traveling at 175 knots indicated airspeed, in un-accelerated flight with the auto pilot engaged, in calm air, the 2-man crew heard a mechanical bang and felt a slight shudder followed by a few seconds of high frequency vibration. The crew did not notice any other abnormalities leading up to, or for the remaining 1 hour of flight and made an uneventful landing. Upon taxi into the chocks, the recovery ground crew noticed the high frequency long wire antenna had become disconnected from the vertical stabilizer and was trailing over the left inboard wing, and that the left engine upper center removable cowling panel was missing, with noticeable damage to the left engine inboard cowling fixed structure. The missing cowling panel was never recovered. Each engine cowling panel is attached to the engine nacelle using six bushings made of 17-4 PH steel. The cylinder portions of four of the six bushings were found still attached to the aircraft (Fig 1). The other two bushings were lost with the panel. The other four bushings exhibited

  2. {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TOC uptake in neuroendocrine tumour and healthy tissue: differentiation of physiological uptake and pathological processes in PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroiss, A.; Putzer, D.; Decristoforo, C.; Uprimny, C.; Warwitz, B.; Nilica, B.; Gabriel, M.; Kendler, D.; Waitz, D.; Virgolini, I.J. [Innsbruck Medical University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Innsbruck (Austria); Widmann, G. [Innsbruck Medical University, Department of Radiology, Innsbruck (Austria)

    2013-04-15

    We wanted to establish the range of {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TOC uptake in liver and bone metastases of patients with neuroendocrine tumours (NET) and to establish the range of its uptake in pancreatic NET. This would allow differentiation between physiological uptake and tumour-related somatostatin receptor expression in the pancreas (including the uncinate process), liver and bone. Finally, we wanted to test for differences in patients with NET, either treated or not treated with peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT). In 249 patients, 390 {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT studies were performed. The clinical indications for PET/CT were gastroenteropancreatic NET (194 studies), nongastroenteropancreatic NET (origin in the lung and rectum; 46 studies), NET of unknown primary (111 studies), phaeochromocytoma/glomus tumours (18 studies), and radioiodine-negative metastatic thyroid carcinoma (21 studies). SUV{sub max} (mean {+-} standard deviation) values of {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TOC were 29.8 {+-} 16.5 in 162 liver metastases, 19.8 {+-} 18.8 in 89 bone metastases and 34.6 {+-} 17.1 in 43 pancreatic NET (33.6 {+-} 14.3 in 30 tumours of the uncinate process and 36.3 {+-} 21.5 in 13 tumours of the pancreatic tail). A significant difference in SUV{sub max} (p < 0.02) was found in liver metastases of NET patients treated with PRRT. There were significant differences in SUV{sub max} between nonmalignant and malignant tissue for both bone and liver metastases and for pancreatic NET including the uncinate process (p < 0.0001). At a cut-off value of 17.1 the specificity and sensitivity of SUV{sub max} for differentiating tumours in the uncinate process were 93.6 % and 90.0 %, respectively (p < 0.0001). {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TOC is an excellent tracer for the imaging of tumours expressing somatostatin receptors on the tumour cell surface, facilitating the detection of even small tumour lesions. The noninvasive PET/CT approach by measurement of regional SUV{sub max} can offer important clinical

  3. Qualitative and quantitative image analysis of CT and MR imaging in patients with neuroendocrine liver metastases in comparison to {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flechsig, Paul [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, INF 110, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); German Cancer Research Center (dkfz), Clinical Cooperations Unit Nuclear Medicine, INF 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Zechmann, Christian M. [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, INF 400, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Rinecker Proton Therapy Center, Schäftlarnstraße 133, 81371 Munich (Germany); Schreiweis, Julian; Kratochwil, Clemens; Rath, Daniel [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, INF 400, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Schwartz, Lawrence H. [Department of Radiology, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons (United States); New York Presbyterian Hospital, 630 West 168th Street, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter [German Cancer Research Center (dkfz), Department of Radiology, INF 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, INF 110, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); German Cancer Research Center (dkfz), Clinical Cooperations Unit Nuclear Medicine, INF 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Haberkorn, Uwe [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, INF 400, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); German Cancer Research Center (dkfz), Clinical Cooperations Unit Nuclear Medicine, INF 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Giesel, Frederik L., E-mail: frederik@egiesel.com [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, INF 400, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Radiology, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons (United States); New York Presbyterian Hospital, 630 West 168th Street, New York, NY 10032 (United States); German Cancer Research Center (dkfz), Clinical Cooperations Unit Nuclear Medicine, INF 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Qualitative analysis revealed significantly higher results for spatial lesion detectability of liver metastasis in CE-MRI as compared to DW-imaging (p < 0.05). • Primary visibility of liver metastases was scored equally in CE-MRI and DW-imaging. • Contrast-enhancement ratios in liver metastases reached highest values for DW-imaging (p < 0.05). • Staging of liver metastases in patients with GEP-NETs should rather be performed using a combination of PET and MRI than of PET and CT. • The combination of functional and morphologic native MR-sequences seems to be sufficient for follow-up imaging in clinical routine, especially in post-interventional follow-up. - Abstract: Purpose: To compare lesion conspicuity in patients with liver metastases arising from gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs) using MRI, PET and CT. Materials and methods: 16 patients with GEP-NETs were evaluated using non-contrast MRI, contrast-enhanced (CE) MRI using Gd-EOB-DTPA and CE-{sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET. Quantitative analyses were performed by two blinded readers using ROI-analyses quantifying contrast ratios (CR) between normal liver-tissue and GEP-NET-metastases. Qualitative analyses were performed evaluating primary visibility and spatial detectability of all lesions. Results: 103 of the same liver metastases were detected on all modalities. Qualitatively, lesion conspicuity was superior on CE-MRI imaging compared to non-contrast MR-sequences (T2, DWI, fl2D, fl3D), as well as arterial- and portal-venous phase CT. Concerning detectability of lesions, CE-MRI was superior to all other modalities. The quantitative ROI-analysis demonstrated improved CR for DWI compared to all other non-contrast MR-sequences (p < 0.001). CE-MRI presented with higher CR-values compared to CE-{sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Anatomic imaging using non contrast MRI with fl2D-and fl3D-sequences in combination with the molecular imaging modality {sup 68}Ga

  4. Sensitivity of whole-body CT and MRI versus projection radiography in the detection of osteolyses in patients with monoclonal plasma cell disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolf, Maya B., E-mail: m.mueller-wolf@dkfz.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 110, 69120 Heidelberg Germany (Germany); Department of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (Dkfz), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Murray, Fritz, E-mail: fritz.murray@hotmail.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 110, 69120 Heidelberg Germany (Germany); Kilk, Kerstin, E-mail: k_fechtner@hotmail.com [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 110, 69120 Heidelberg Germany (Germany); Hillengass, Jens, E-mail: jens.hillengass@med.uni-heidelberg.de [Department of Haematology, Oncology, Rheumatology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 410, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Delorme, Stefan, E-mail: s.delorme@dkfz-heidelberg.de [Department of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (Dkfz), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Heiss, Christiane, E-mail: c.heiss@dkfz-heidelberg.de [Department of Biostatistics, German Cancer Research Center (Dkfz), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Neben, Kai, E-mail: k.neben@klinikum-mittelbaden.de [Department of Haematology, Oncology, Rheumatology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 410, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Goldschmidt, Hartmut, E-mail: hartmut.goldschmidt@med.uni-heidelberg.de [Department of Haematology, Oncology, Rheumatology, University Hospital Heidelberg and National Center for Tumour Diseases, Im Neuenheimer Feld 410, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich, E-mail: hu.kauczor@med.uni-heidelberg.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 110, 69120 Heidelberg Germany (Germany); and others

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: To compare sensitivity of whole-body Computed Tomography (wb-CT) and whole-body Magnetic Resonance Imaging (wb-MRI) with Projection Radiography (PR) regarding each method's ability to detect osteolyses in patients with monoclonal plasma cell disease. Patients and methods: The bone status of 171 patients was evaluated. All patients presented with multiple myeloma (MM) of all stages, monoclonal gammopathy of unknown significance (MGUS) or solitary plasmacytoma. Two groups were formed. Group A consisted of 52 patients (26 females, 26 males) with an average age of 62 years (range, 45–89 years) who received, both, PR and wb-CT as part of their diagnostic work-up. Group B comprised 119 patients (58 females, 61 males) averaging 57 years of age (range, 20–80 years) who received, both, PR and wb-MRI. Two experienced radiologists were blinded regarding the disease status and assessed the number and location of osteolyses in consensus. A distinction was made between axial and extra-axial lesions. Results: In group A, wb-CT revealed osteolyses in 12 patients (23%) that were not detected in PR. CT was superior in detecting lesions in patients with osteopenia and osteoporosis. Compared with PR, wb-CT was significantly more sensitive in detecting osteolyses than PR (p < 0.001). This was particularly true for axial lesions. Additionally, CT revealed clinically relevant incidental findings in 33 patients (63%). In group B, wb-MRI revealed lesions in 19 patients (16%) that were not detected in PR. All lesions detected by PR were also detected by wb-MRI and wb-CT. Wb-MRI and wb-CT are each superior to PR in detecting axial lesions. Conclusion: Wb-CT can detect 23% more focal lesions than PR, especially in the axial skeleton. Therefore, this imaging method should be preferred over PR in the diagnostic work-up and staging of patients with monoclonal plasma cell disease.

  5. Genotype frequencies of C/T-13910 and G/A-22018 polymorphisms in a Colombian Caribbean population do not correspond with lactase persistence prevalence reported in the region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Antonio Villanueva

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The C/T-13910 and G/A-22018 polymorphisms located upstream of the lactase gene are reliable predictors of lactase persistence in Caucasian-derived populations. Assessing the presence and distribution of these polymorphisms in other populations is central to developing genotyping assays and understanding the evolutionary mechanism behind this trait in several human populations.Objective: Genotyping the C/T-13910 and G/A-22018 polymorphisms in a sample of Colombian Caribbean individuals.Materials and methods: The polymorphisms were identified through Polymerase Chain Reaction/Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism. Amplified fragments were digested using Hinf I and Hha I. Arlequin v. 3.1 was used to determine allelic and genotypic frequencies, Hardy Weinberg equilibrium, and linkage disequilibrium.Results: Genotypic frequencies were CC (81.4%, CT (18.6%, and TT (0% for the C/T-13910 polymorphism. Frequencies were AA (55.5%, GA (45.5%, and GG (0% for the G/A-22018 polymorphism. No linkage disequilibrium was found between the two loci. Only the locus containing the C/T-13910 polymorphism was found in Hardy Weinberg equilibrium.Conclusion: The allelic and genotypic distributions observed in this first genotyping study in a Colombian Caribbean population indicate a distribution pattern different from the one of the North European Caucasians and do not correspond to the lactase persistence prevalence reported for Caribbean populations.

  6. Genotype frequencies of C/T-13910 and G/A-22018 polymorphisms in a Colombian Caribbean population do not correspond with lactase persistence prevalence reported in the region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelyn Mendoza

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The C/T-13910 and G/A-22018 polymorphisms located upstream of the lactase gene are reliable predictors of lactase persistence in Caucasian-derived populations. Assessing the presence and distribution of these polymorphisms in other populations is central to developing genotyping assays and understanding the evolutionary mechanism behind this trait in several human populations. Objective: Genotyping the C/T-13910 and G/A-22018 polymorphisms in a sample of Colombian Caribbean individuals. Materials and methods: The polymorphisms were identified through Polymerase Chain Reaction/Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism. Amplified fragments were digested using Hinf I and Hha I. Arlequin v. 3.1 was used to determine allelic and genotypic frequencies, Hardy Weinberg equilibrium, and linkage disequilibrium. Results: Genotypic frequencies were CC (81.4%, CT (18.6%, and TT (0% for the C/T-13910 polymorphism. Frequencies were AA (55.5%, GA (45.5%, and GG (0% for the G/A-22018 polymorphism. No linkage disequilibrium was found between the two loci. Only the locus containing the C/T-13910 polymorphism was found in Hardy Weinberg equilibrium. Conclusion: The allelic and genotypic distributions observed in this first genotyping study in a Colombian Caribbean population indicate a distribution pattern different from the one of the North European Caucasians and do not correspond to the lactase persistence prevalence reported for Caribbean populations.

  7. Comparison of PET/CT and PET/MRI hybrid systems using a {sup 68}Ga-labelled PSMA ligand for the diagnosis of recurrent prostate cancer: initial experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afshar-Oromieh, A. [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Department of Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Haberkorn, U. [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Clinical Cooperation Unit of Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); Schlemmer, H.P.; Fenchel, M.; Roethke, M. [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Department of Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Eder, M.; Eisenhut, M. [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Department of Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry, Heidelberg (Germany); Hadaschik, B.A. [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Urology, Heidelberg (Germany); Kopp-Schneider, A. [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Department of Biostatistics, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-05-15

    {sup 68}Ga-labelled HBED-CC-PSMA is a highly promising tracer for imaging recurrent prostate cancer (PCa). The intention of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of PET/MRI with this tracer. Twenty patients underwent PET/CT 1 h after injection of the {sup 68}Ga-PSMA ligand followed by PET/MRI 3 h after injection. Data from the two investigations were first analysed separately and then compared with respect to tumour detection rate and radiotracer uptake in various tissues. To evaluate the quantification accuracy of the PET/MRI system, differences in SUVs between PET/CT and corresponding PET/MRI were compared with differences in SUVs between PET/CT 1 h and 3 h after injection in another patient cohort. This cohort was investigated using the same PET/CT system. With PET/MRI, different diagnostic sequences, higher contrast of lesions and higher resolution of MRI enabled a subjectively easier evaluation of the images. In addition, four unclear findings on PET/CT could be clarified as characteristic of PCa metastases by PET/MRI. However, in PET images of the PET/MRI, a reduced signal was observed at the level of the kidneys (in 11 patients) and around the urinary bladder (in 15 patients). This led to reduced SUVs in six lesions. SUV{sub mean} values provided by the PET/MRI system were different in muscles, blood pool, liver and spleen. PCa was detected more easily and more accurately with Ga-PSMA PET/MRI than with PET/CT and with lower radiation exposure. Consequently, this new technique could clarify unclear findings on PET/CT. However, scatter correction was challenging when the specific {sup 68}Ga-PSMA ligand was used. Moreover, direct comparison of SUVs from PET/CT and PET/MR needs to be conducted carefully. (orig.)

  8. Comparison of abdominal MRI with diffusion-weighted imaging to {sup 68}Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT in detection of neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmid-Tannwald, Christine; Schmid-Tannwald, Christoph M.; Neumann, Ralph; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Schramm, Nicolai; Reiser, Maximilian F.; Rist, Carsten [Ludwig Maximilians University Hospital Munich, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Morelli, John N. [Scott and White Hospital Temple, Department of Radiology, Temple, TX (United States); Haug, Alexander R.; Jansen, Nathalie [Ludwig Maximilians University Hospital Munich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany)

    2013-06-15

    The aim of the study was to evaluate contrast-enhanced MRI, diffusion-weighted MRI (DW MRI), and {sup 68}Ga-DOTATATE positron emission tomography (PET)/CT in the detection of intermediate to well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumors (NET) of the pancreas. Eighteen patients with pathologically proven pancreatic NET who underwent MRI including DW MRI and PET/CT within 6 weeks of each other were included in this retrospective study. Two radiologists evaluated T2-weighted (T2w), T2w + DW MRI, T2w + contrast-enhanced T1-weighted (CE T1w) MR images, and PET/CT for NET detection. The sensitivity and level of diagnostic confidence were compared among modalities using McNemar's test and a Wilcoxon signed rank test. Apparent diffusion coefficients (ADC) of pancreatic NETs and normal pancreatic tissue were compared with Student's t test. Of the NETs, 8/23 (34.8 %) and 9/23 (39.1 %) were detected on T2w images by observers 1 and 2, respectively. Detection rates improved significantly by combining T2w images with DW MRI (observer 1: 14/23 = 61 %; observer 2: 15/23 = 65.2 %; p < 0.05) or CE T1w images (observer 1: 14/23 = 61 %; observer 2: 15/23 = 65.2 %; p < 0.05). Detection rates of pancreatic NET with PET/CT (both observers: 23/23 = 100 %) were statistically significantly higher than with MRI (p < 0.05). The mean ADC value of NET (1.02 {+-} 0.26 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s) was statistically significantly lower than that of normal pancreatic tissue (1.48 {+-} 0.39 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s). DW MRI is a valuable adjunct to T2w imaging and comparable to CE T1w imaging in pancreatic NET detection, quantitatively differentiating between NET and normal pancreatic tissue with ADC measurements. {sup 68}Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT is more sensitive than MRI in the detection of pancreatic NET. (orig.)

  9. The reconstruction algorithm used for [{sup 68}Ga]PSMA-HBED-CC PET/CT reconstruction significantly influences the number of detected lymph node metastases and coeliac ganglia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krohn, Thomas [RWTH University Hospital Aachen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Aachen (Germany); Ulm University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ulm (Germany); Birmes, Anita; Winz, Oliver H.; Drude, Natascha I. [RWTH University Hospital Aachen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Aachen (Germany); Mottaghy, Felix M. [RWTH University Hospital Aachen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Aachen (Germany); Maastricht UMC+, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Maastricht (Netherlands); Behrendt, Florian F. [RWTH University Hospital Aachen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Aachen (Germany); Radiology Institute ' ' Aachen Land' ' , Wuerselen (Germany); Verburg, Frederik A. [RWTH University Hospital Aachen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Aachen (Germany); University Hospital Giessen and Marburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Marburg (Germany)

    2017-04-15

    To investigate whether the numbers of lymph node metastases and coeliac ganglia delineated on [{sup 68}Ga]PSMA-HBED-CC PET/CT scans differ among datasets generated using different reconstruction algorithms. Data were constructed using the BLOB-OS-TF, BLOB-OS and 3D-RAMLA algorithms. All reconstructions were assessed by two nuclear medicine physicians for the number of pelvic/paraaortal lymph node metastases as well the number of coeliac ganglia. Standardized uptake values (SUV) were also calculated in different regions. At least one [{sup 68}Ga]PSMA-HBED-CC PET/CT-positive pelvic or paraaortal lymph node metastasis was found in 49 and 35 patients using the BLOB-OS-TF algorithm, in 42 and 33 patients using the BLOB-OS algorithm, and in 41 and 31 patients using the 3D-RAMLA algorithm, respectively, and a positive ganglion was found in 92, 59 and 24 of 100 patients using the three algorithms, respectively. Quantitatively, the SUVmean and SUVmax were significantly higher with the BLOB-OS algorithm than with either the BLOB-OS-TF or the 3D-RAMLA algorithm in all measured regions (p < 0.001 for all comparisons). The differences between the SUVs with the BLOB-OS-TF- and 3D-RAMLA algorithms were not significant in the aorta (SUVmean, p = 0.93; SUVmax, p = 0.97) but were significant in all other regions (p < 0.001 in all cases). The SUVmean ganglion/gluteus ratio was significantly higher with the BLOB-OS-TF algorithm than with either the BLOB-OS or the 3D-RAMLA algorithm and was significantly higher with the BLOB-OS than with the 3D-RAMLA algorithm (p < 0.001 in all cases). The results of [{sup 68}Ga]PSMA-HBED-CC PET/CT are affected by the reconstruction algorithm used. The highest number of lesions and physiological structures will be visualized using a modern algorithm employing time-of-flight information. (orig.)

  10. Comparison of diagnostic accuracy of {sup 111}In-pentetreotide SPECT and {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT: A lesion-by-lesion analysis in patients with metastatic neuroendocrine tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Binnebeek, S. van; Vanbilloen, B.; Baete, K.; Terwinghe, C.; Koole, M.; Mortelmans, L. [KU Leuven, Nuclear Medicine, University Hospitals Leuven and Department of Imaging and Pathology, Leuven (Belgium); Mottaghy, F.M. [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Maastricht (Netherlands); University Hospital Aachen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Aachen (Germany); Clement, P.M. [KU Leuven, Medical Oncology, University Hospitals Leuven and Laboratory of Experimental Oncology, Leuven (Belgium); Bogaerts, K. [KU Leuven and UHasselt, Department of Public Health and Primary Care (I-BioStat), Leuven (Belgium); Haustermans, K. [KU Leuven, Radiation Oncology, University Hospitals Leuven and Department of Oncology, Leuven (Belgium); Nackaerts, K. [University Hospitals Leuven, Pulmonology, Leuven (Belgium); Cutsem, E. van; Verslype, C. [KU Leuven, Division of Digestive Oncology, University Hospitals Leuven and Department of Oncology, Leuven (Belgium); Verbruggen, A. [KU Leuven, Laboratory for Radiopharmacy, Leuven (Belgium); Deroose, C.M. [KU Leuven, Nuclear Medicine, University Hospitals Leuven and Department of Imaging and Pathology, Leuven (Belgium); University Hospitals Leuven, Nuclear Medicine, Leuven (Belgium)

    2016-03-15

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy of {sup 111}In-pentetreotide-scintigraphy with {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC-positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) in patients with metastatic-neuroendocrine tumour (NET) scheduled for peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT). Incremental lesions (ILs) were defined as lesions observed on only one modality. Fifty-three metastatic-NET-patients underwent {sup 111}In-pentetreotide-scintigraphy (24 h post-injection; planar+single-photon emission CT (SPECT) abdomen) and whole-body {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC-PET/CT. SPECT and PET were compared in a lesion-by-lesion and organ-by-organ analysis, determining the total lesions and ILs for both modalities. Significantly more lesions were detected on {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC-PET/CT versus {sup 111}In-pentetreotide-scintigraphy. More specifically, we observed 1,098 lesions on PET/CT (range: 1-105; median: 15) versus 660 on SPECT (range: 0-73, median: 9) (p<0.0001), with 439 PET-ILs (42/53 patients) and one SPECT-IL (1/53 patients). The sensitivity for PET/CT was 99.9 % (95 % CI, 99.3-100.0), for SPECT 60.0 % (95 % CI, 48.5-70.2). The organ-by-organ analysis showed that the PET-ILs were most frequently visualized in liver and skeleton. Ga-DOTATOC-PET/CT is superior for the detection of NET-metastases compared to {sup 111}In-pentetreotide SPECT. (orig.)

  11. Correlation between lactose absorption and the C/T-13910 and G/A-22018 mutations of the lactase-phlorizin hydrolase (LCT gene in adult-type hypolactasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.C. Bulhões

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The C/T-13910 mutation is the major factor responsible for the persistence of the lactase-phlorizin hydrolase (LCT gene expression. Mutation G/A-22018 appears to be only in co-segregation with C/T-13910. The objective of the present study was to assess the presence of these two mutations in Brazilian individuals with and without lactose malabsorption diagnosed by the hydrogen breath test (HBT. Ten milk-tolerant and 10 milk-intolerant individuals underwent the HBT after oral ingestion of 50 g lactose (equivalent to 1 L of milk. Analyses for C/T-13910 and G/A-22018 mutations were performed using a PCR-based method. Primers were designed for this study based on the GenBank sequence. The CT/GA, CT/AA, and TT/AA genotypes (lactase persistence were found in 10 individuals with negative HBT. The CC/GG genotype (lactase non-persistence was found in 10 individuals, 9 of them with positive HBT results. There was a significant agreement between the presence of mutations in the LCT gene promoter and HBT results (kappa = -0.9, P < 0.001. The CT/AA genotype has not been described previously and seems to be related to lactase persistence. The present study showed a significant agreement between the occurrence of mutations G/A-22018 and C/T-13910 and lactose absorption in Brazilian subjects, suggesting that the molecular test used here could be proposed for the laboratory diagnosis of adult-type primary hypolactasia.

  12. Relationship between the -455G/A and -148C/T polymorphisms in the beta-fibrinogen gene and cerebral infarction in the Xinjiang Uygur and Han Chinese populations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoning Zhang; Yanyun Li; Xuebing Guo; Lei Du; Jianhua Ma

    2012-01-01

    We sought to investigate the correlation between the -455G/A and -148C/T polymorphisms of the β-fibrinogen gene and plasma fibrinogen levels in patients with cerebral infarction and in healthy subjects among the Xinjiang Uygur and Han Chinese populations, by using polymerase chain reaction-restriction enzyme digestion analysis.Results showed that there were no statistically significant differences in the distributions of the -455G/A genotype and allele frequency between the Uygurs and the Han.Plasma fibrinogen levels in cerebral infarction patients among the Uygurs and the Han were higher than those among healthy subjects.In particular, the frequencies of the -455G/A AA and -148C/T TT genotypes were significantly higher than in healthy subjects.Individuals carrying the A or T allele had a higher incidence of cerebral infarction compared with those carrying the G or C allele.Our experimental findings indicate that the -148C/T and -455G/A polymorphisms are associated with cerebral infarction in Xinjiang Uygur and Han Chinese subjects.The susceptibility- conferring alleles are -148T and -455A, and the susceptibility-conferring genotype is -455G/A + AA.

  13. All’ombra del mago astuto W.B. Yeats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viola Papetti

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In 1949 Giorgio Manganelli published his first review of W.B. Yeats’s poetry in «La Fiera Letteraria». It was an impressive and enthusiastic appreciation of Yeats as the most intelligent and interesting poet among his contemporaries. In addition there was a very fine Italian translation of Sailing to Byzantium – at that time Manganelli himself was a young poet under the influence of the Symbolist Movement. In the late 1940s he had translated into Italian about 80 poems by Yeats, and was eager to publish them together with some of the Irish poet’s plays, but he was utterly disappointed. For the first time, here are published three typewritten letters to Manganelli’s friend, Oreste Macrì, in which he describes his attempts to publish his translations with Guanda and other companies. Also there are some interesting holographic pages from his cahier «9 aprile 1954-19 gennaio 1956/Roma», in which he discusses Yeats’s early poems with subtle critical acumen.

  14. Ga68-DOTA peptide PET/CT to detect occult mesenchymal tumor-inducing osteomalacia: A case series of three patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, Chi Long [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Singapore General Hospital, Singapore (Singapore)

    2015-09-15

    Tumor-induced osteomalacia (TIO) is a rare disease that manifests with paraneoplasic syndrome and overproduction of fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23), leading to renal phosphate wasting and hyperphosphaturia, eventually leading to acquired hypophosphatemic osteomalacia. Diagnosis of this disease is often challenging because of the small size of the lesion, which can be localized in bone or soft tissue anywhere in the body. Detecting these occult mesenchymal tumors (OMT) is of great importance as they are potentially curable after tumor resection. The purpose of this case series is to provide some insight into the diagnosis and localization of OMT associated with osteomalacia, particularly using functional imaging with Ga68-DOTA peptide PET/CT scans.

  15. Interleukin 10 (- 1082 G/A) and (- 819 C/T) gene polymorphisms in Egyptian women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talaat, Roba M; Mohamed, Yasmin A; Mohamad, Ehab H; Elsharkawy, Marwa; Guirgis, Adel A

    2016-09-01

    Cytokines play critical roles in the pathogenesis of Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS). This work was designed to study the implication of IL10 gene polymorphisms (- 1082 G/A and - 819 C/T) on the susceptibility of Egyptian women to have PCOS. Rotterdam consensus criteria were used to diagnose PCOS patients. Genotyping was performed by single-stranded polymorphism-polymerase chain reaction (SSP-PCR) in 61 PCOS patients and 80 healthy controls, and IL-10 serum levels were measured using Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The frequency of IL10 - 1082 G/G (46%) genotype was significantly increased (p PCOS patients compared to controls (14% and 35% for G/G and A/A genotypes; respectively). G allele (65%) is significantly increased (p PCOS patients while A allele (61%) is significantly increased (p PCOS group. G/G genotype (odd ratio (OR = 5.322) with confidence interval (CI = 2.364-11.982) and the G allele (OR = 2.828 with CI = 1.73-4.61) of - 1082 G/A and T/T genotype of - 819 C/T (OR = 4.18 with CI = 1.26-13.86) could be considered as risk factors for PCOS. IL-10 levels were significantly lower among PCOS patients (313.42 ± 30.10) compared to normal controls (4914.36 ± 303.72). Depending on our preliminary work, IL10 - 1082 G/G might be considered as a host genetic factor for PCOS susceptibility in Egyptian women. Studies concerning other cytokine gene polymorphisms are required to get a better understanding of the pathogenesis of PCOS disease.

  16. Child case of spinal epidural abscess with successful conservative treatment following early diagnosis by CT and /sup 67/Ga SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusunoki, T.; Tsuda, H.; Sumimoto, S.; Kasajima, Y.; Ojima, S.; Honda, M.; Kanao, K.; Hamamoto, T.

    1987-04-01

    Although early diagnosis and treatment of spinal epidural abscess are emphasized in children in view of its prognosis, these are very difficult because of the nonspecific symptoms of the disease. A 6-year-old boy complained of lumbar pain and difficulty in walking. Computed tomography, performed 6 days after the occurrence of complaints, revealed space occupying lesion in the spinal canal and epidural space at the level of L2-S1. Subsequent single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with Ga-67 clearly visualized active inflammation resulting from epidural abscess. The patient received intensive chemotherapy alone. Twenty-one days later, Ga-67 uptake disappeared on SPECT images. The finding indicates the usefulness of diagnostic imagings in the early diagnosis and treatment of spinal epidural abscess, thus avoiding surgery, the role of which has been under debate.

  17. Antigenic characterization of classical swine fever virus YC11WB isolates from wild boar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Seong-In; Kim, Yong Kwan; Lim, Ji-Ae; Han, Song-Hee; Hyun, Hee-Suk; Kim, Ki-Sun; Hyun, Bang-Hun; Kim, Jae-Jo; Cho, In-Soo; Song, Jae-Young; Choi, Sung-Hyun; Kim, Seung-Hoe; An, Dong-Jun

    2016-08-10

    Classical swine fever (CSF), a highly contagious disease that affects domestic pigs and wild boar, has serious economic implications. The present study examined the virulence and transmission of strain YC11WB (isolated from a wild boar in 2011) in breeding wild boar. Virulence in domestic pigs was also examined. Based on the severe clinical signs and high mortality observed among breeding wild boar, the pathogenicity of strain YC11WB resembled that of typical acute CSF. Surprisingly, in contrast to strain SW03 (isolated from breeding pigs in 2003), strain YC11WB also showed both acute and strong virulence in breeding pigs. None of three specific monoclonal antibodies (7F2, 7F83, and 6F65) raised against the B/C domain of the SW03 E2 protein bound to the B/C domain of strain YC11WB due to amino acid mutations ((720)K→R and (723)N→S) in the YC11WB E2 protein. Although strains YC11WB and SW03 belong to subgroup 2.1b, they showed different mortality rates in breeding pigs. Thus, if breeding pigs have not developed protective immunity against classical swine fever virus, they may be susceptible to YC11WB transmitted by wild boar, resulting in severe economic losses for the pig industry.

  18. Structural stability and elastic properties of WB4 under high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiao-Long; Zhou, Xiao-Lin; Chang, Jing

    2015-05-01

    A comparative study on the structure stability and elastic properties for various types of tungsten tetraboride (WB4) has been carried out with the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) and local density approximation (LDA) in the framework of density functional theory (DFT). Five types of WB4 are considered i.e., orthorhombic Immm, Pnnm, Pmmn, monoclinic C2/m and hexagonal P63/mmc structure. Our calculations indicate that the P63/mmc-4u structure of WB4 is unstable at both ambient and pressure conditions, but the other four types of WB4 are stable, in agreement with recent theoretical results. By eliminating mechanical calculations, we find that the four types (C2/m, Immm, Pnnm and Pmmn) of WB4 are potential candidates to be ultra-incompressible and hard materials. Moreover, the WB4 in C2/m type is the most ultra-incompressible among the considered structures due to its superior mechanical properties, and the P63/mmc-2u structure of WB4 is not considered to be hard material because of its low hardness. In addition, the calculated B/G ratio exhibits the positive pressure dependence, and four types show brittle nature within 100 GPa.

  19. Extent of disease in recurrent prostate cancer determined by [{sup 68}Ga]PSMA-HBED-CC PET/CT in relation to PSA levels, PSA doubling time and Gleason score

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verburg, Frederik A.; Mottaghy, Felix M. [RWTH University Hospital Aachen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Aachen (Germany); Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Maastricht (Netherlands); Pfister, David; Heidenreich, Axel [RWTH University Hospital Aachen, Department of Urology, Aachen (Germany); Vogg, Andreas; Drude, Natascha I.; Behrendt, Florian F. [RWTH University Hospital Aachen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Aachen (Germany); Voeoe, Stefan [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2016-03-15

    To examine the relationship between the extent of disease determined by [{sup 68}Ga]PSMA-HBED-CC-PET/CT and the important clinical measures prostate-specific antigen (PSA), PSA doubling time (PSAdt) and Gleason score. We retrospectively studied the first 155 patients with recurrent prostate cancer (PCA) referred to our university hospital for [{sup 68}Ga]PSMA-HBED-CC PET/CT. PET/CT was positive in 44 %, 79 % and 89 % of patients with PSA levels of ≤1, 1 - 2 and ≥2 ng/ml, respectively. Patients with high PSA levels showed higher rates of local prostate tumours (p < 0.001), and extrapelvic lymph node (p = 0.037) and bone metastases (p = 0.013). A shorter PSAdt was significantly associated with pelvic lymph node (p = 0.026), extrapelvic lymph node (p = 0.001), bone (p < 0.001) and visceral (p = 0.041) metastases. A high Gleason score was associated with more frequent pelvic lymph node metastases (p = 0.039). In multivariate analysis, both PSA and PSAdt were independent determinants of scan positivity and of extrapelvic lymph node metastases. PSAdt was the only independent marker of bone metastases (p = 0.001). Of 20 patients with a PSAdt <6 months and a PSA ≥2 ng/ml, 19 (95 %) had a positive scan and 12 (60 %) had M1a disease. Of 14 patients with PSA <1 ng/ml and PSAdt >6 months, only 5 (36 %) had a positive scan and 1 (7 %) had M1a disease. [{sup 68}Ga]PSMA-HBED-CC PET/CT will identify PCA lesions even in patients with very low PSA levels. Higher PSA levels and shorter PSAdt are independently associated with scan positivity and extrapelvic metastases, and can be used for patient selection for [{sup 68}Ga]PSMA-HBED-CC PET/CT. (orig.)

  20. Profile and laboratory analyses data collected in the North Atlantic Ocean on the OCEANUS cruises WB0409, WB0413, WB0506, and WB0508 as part of the EDDIES project from 2004-06-24 to 2005-08-25 (NODC Accession 0086575)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Total Thorium-234 and Uranium-238 from Niskin bottle samples taken on all EDDIES WB cruises dates: 24 June 2004 to 25 August 2004 (20040624-20050825) location: N:...

  1. Accuracy and Utility of Deformable Image Registration in {sup 68}Ga 4D PET/CT Assessment of Pulmonary Perfusion Changes During and After Lung Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardcastle, Nicholas, E-mail: nick.hardcastle@gmail.com [Department of Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong (Australia); Hofman, Michael S. [Molecular Imaging, Centre for Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia); Hicks, Rodney J. [Molecular Imaging, Centre for Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia); Department of Medicine, University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia); Callahan, Jason [Molecular Imaging, Centre for Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia); Kron, Tomas [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiation Sciences, Monash University, Clayton (Australia); The Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, Melbourne University, Victoria (Australia); MacManus, Michael P.; Ball, David L. [Division of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); The Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia); Jackson, Price [Department of Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Siva, Shankar [Division of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia)

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: Measuring changes in lung perfusion resulting from radiation therapy dose requires registration of the functional imaging to the radiation therapy treatment planning scan. This study investigates registration accuracy and utility for positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) perfusion imaging in radiation therapy for non–small cell lung cancer. Methods: {sup 68}Ga 4-dimensional PET/CT ventilation-perfusion imaging was performed before, during, and after radiation therapy for 5 patients. Rigid registration and deformable image registration (DIR) using B-splines and Demons algorithms was performed with the CT data to obtain a deformation map between the functional images and planning CT. Contour propagation accuracy and correspondence of anatomic features were used to assess registration accuracy. Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to determine statistical significance. Changes in lung perfusion resulting from radiation therapy dose were calculated for each registration method for each patient and averaged over all patients. Results: With B-splines/Demons DIR, median distance to agreement between lung contours reduced modestly by 0.9/1.1 mm, 1.3/1.6 mm, and 1.3/1.6 mm for pretreatment, midtreatment, and posttreatment (P<.01 for all), and median Dice score between lung contours improved by 0.04/0.04, 0.05/0.05, and 0.05/0.05 for pretreatment, midtreatment, and posttreatment (P<.001 for all). Distance between anatomic features reduced with DIR by median 2.5 mm and 2.8 for pretreatment and midtreatment time points, respectively (P=.001) and 1.4 mm for posttreatment (P>.2). Poorer posttreatment results were likely caused by posttreatment pneumonitis and tumor regression. Up to 80% standardized uptake value loss in perfusion scans was observed. There was limited change in the loss in lung perfusion between registration methods; however, Demons resulted in larger interpatient variation compared with rigid and B-splines registration

  2. Frequency of LCT-13910C/T and LCT-22018G/A single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with adult-type hypolactasia/lactase persistence among Israelis of different ethnic groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raz, Maytal; Sharon, Yael; Yerushalmi, Baruch; Birk, Ruth

    2013-04-25

    Primary lactase deficiency (PLD), the physiological decline of lactase, is associated with the LCT-13910C/T and LCT-22018G/A polymorphisms. PLD is the most common phenotype in humans and varies widely as a function of ethnicity. Israel is a multiethnic country. We analyzed the genetic frequencies of PLD in different Israeli ethnicities. Ethnicity-related frequencies were analyzed in 439 Israelis: Ashkenazi (n=96), Iraqi (n=96), Moroccan (n=96) Jews and Bedouin-Arabs (n=151). DNA was extracted from leukocytes; LCT-13910C/T, -22018G/A and -13915T/G (in Bedouin-Arabs) polymorphisms were analyzed by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. There was a significant association between ethnicity and genotype in both polymorphic LCT SNPs (-13910C/T and -22018). Prevalence of the CC (LCT-13910C/T) genotype associated with adult hypolactasia was 97%, 93%, 83% and 82% among Bedouin-Arabs and Iraqi, Ashkenazi and Moroccan Jews, respectively. The prevalence of the GG (LCT-22018G/A) adult hypolactasia genotype among those groups was identical to that of the CC genotype in each group, except for Iraqi-Jews, of which only 83% carried the GG genotype. The prevalence of heterozygous and homozygous genotypes associated with lactase persistence (CT, TT for -13910C/T and GA, AA for -22018G/A) was 3%, 7%, 17% and 18% and 3%, 17%, 17% and 18% for Bedouin-Arabs, Ashkenazi, Iraqi and Moroccan Jews, respectively. A significant correlation between SNPs was found. PLD prevalence is high among different ethnic groups in Israel and varies between ethnicities. The prevalence of the -13915*G allele, indicative of lactose persistence in African and Arab populations, was 41% in the Bedouin-Arabs group. Lactase persistence genotype prevalence was found to vary between Israeli ethnicities (4-18%). SNPs (-13910C/T and -22018) showed significant correlation in detecting genotype prevalence in Israeli Jews. We suggest adjusting nutritional recommendations accordingly.

  3. Comparison of standard and delayed imaging to improve the detection rate of [{sup 68}Ga]PSMA I and T PET/CT in patients with biochemical recurrence or prostate-specific antigen persistence after primary therapy for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmuck, Sebastian; Nordlohne, Stefan; Sohns, Jan M.; Ross, Tobias L.; Bengel, Frank M.; Derlin, Thorsten [Hannover Medical School, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hannover (Germany); Klot, Christoph A. von [Hannover Medical School, Department of Urology and Urologic Oncology, Hannover (Germany); Henkenberens, Christoph; Christiansen, Hans [Hannover Medical School, Department of Radiation Oncology, Hannover (Germany); Wester, Hans-Juergen [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Pharmaceutical Radiochemistry, Garching (Germany)

    2017-06-15

    The aim of this study was to assess the value of dual-time point imaging in PET/CT for detection of biochemically recurrent or persistent prostate cancer, using the prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) ligand [{sup 68}Ga]PSMA I and T. 240 patients who underwent a [{sup 68}Ga]PSMA I and T PET/CT in the context of biochemical relapse of prostate cancer were included in this retrospective analysis. Imaging consisted of a standard whole-body PET/CT (1 h p.i.), followed by delayed (3 h p.i.) imaging of the abdomen. PSA-stratified proportions of positive PET/CT results, standardized uptake values and target-to-background ratios were analyzed, and compared between standard and delayed imaging. The overall detection rates of [{sup 68}Ga]PSMA I and T PET/CT were 94.2, 71.8, 58.6, 55.9 and 38.9% for PSA levels of ≥2, 1 to <2, 0.5 to <1, >0.2 to <0.5, and 0.01 to 0.2 ng/mL, respectively. Although the target-to-background ratio improved significantly over time (P < 0.0001), the majority (96.6%) of all lesions suggestive of recurrent disease could already be detected in standard imaging. Delayed imaging at 3 h p.i. exclusively identified pathologic findings in 5.4% (10/184) of abnormal [{sup 68}Ga]PSMA I and T PET/CT scans, and exclusively detected 3.4% (38/1134) of all lesions suggestive of recurrent disease. [{sup 68}Ga]PSMA I and T PET/CT shows high detection rates in patients with prostate-specific antigen persistence or biochemical recurrence of prostate cancer. Delayed imaging can detect lesions with improved contrast compared to standard imaging. However, the impact on detection rates was limited in this study. (orig.)

  4. Correlation of breast cancer subtypes, based on estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and HER2, with functional imaging parameters from {sup 68}Ga-RGD PET/CT and {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Hai-Jeon [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, The Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ewha Womans University School of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Keon Wook; Jeong, Jae Min; Chung, June-Key [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Biomedical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, The Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University, Cancer Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chun, In Kook [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kangwon National University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Chuncheon, Kangwon-Do (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Nariya [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Jongno-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Im, Seock-Ah [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Sunjoo [Dankook University, Department of Molecular Biology, Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Song [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, The Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Kyeong Cheon [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yun-Sang [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Molecular Medicine and Biopharmaceutical Sciences, Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Dong Soo [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, The Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University, Department of Molecular Medicine and Biopharmaceutical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Woo Kyung [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Jongno-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Biomedical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, The Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-15

    Imaging biomarkers from functional imaging modalities were assessed as potential surrogate markers of disease status. Specifically, in this prospective study, we investigated the relationships between functional imaging parameters and histological prognostic factors and breast cancer subtypes. In total, 43 patients with large or locally advanced invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) were analyzed (47.6 ± 7.5 years old). {sup 68}Ga-Labeled arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) and {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) were performed. The maximum and average standardized uptake values (SUV{sub max} and SUV{sub avg}) from RGD PET/CT and SUV{sub max} and SUV{sub avg} from FDG PET/CT were the imaging parameters used. For histological prognostic factors, estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) expression was identified using immunohistochemistry (IHC) or fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). Four breast cancer subtypes, based on ER/PR and HER2 expression (ER/PR+,Her2-, ER/PR+,Her2+, ER/PR-,Her2+, and ER/PR-,Her2-), were considered. Quantitative FDG PET parameters were significantly higher in the ER-negative group (15.88 ± 8.73 vs 10.48 ± 6.01, p = 0.02 for SUV{sub max}; 9.40 ± 5.19 vs 5.92 ± 4.09, p = 0.02 for SUV{sub avg}) and the PR-negative group (8.37 ± 4.94 vs 4.79 ± 3.93, p = 0.03 for SUV{sub avg}). Quantitative RGD PET parameters were significantly higher in the HER2-positive group (2.42 ± 0.59 vs 2.90 ± 0.75, p = 0.04 for SUV{sub max}; 1.60 ± 0.38 vs 1.95 ± 0.53, p = 0.04 for SUV{sub avg}) and showed a significant positive correlation with the HER2/CEP17 ratio (r = 0.38, p = 0.03 for SUV{sub max} and r = 0.46, p < 0.01 for SUV{sub avg}). FDG PET parameters showed significantly higher values in the ER/PR-,Her2- subgroup versus the ER/PR+,Her2- or ER/PR+,Her2+ subgroups, while RGD PET parameters showed significantly lower values in the ER

  5. Metastatic neuroendocrine tumour in a renal transplant recipient: Dual-tracer PET-CT with {sup 18}F-FDG nd {sup 68}Ga-DOTANOC in this rare setting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karunaithi, Sellam; Roy, Shambo Guha; Shama, Punit; Bal, Chandrasejhar; Kumar, Rakesh [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, E-81, Ansari Nagar (East) AIIMS Campus, New Delhi (India); Yadav, Rajni [Dept. of Pathology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi (India)

    2015-03-15

    Recipients of renal transplant are at increased risk of developing various malignancies, especially post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) and skin cancers. Neuroendocrine tumours (NET) of the gastrointestinal tract have not been reported in this setting. Here we describe the case of a 75-year-old male who had undergone renal transplant 8 years back and now presented with significant weight loss and backache, clinically suspected as PTLD. {sup 18}F-Fluordeoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) showed hypermetabolic lesions in the liver and rectum, raising the suspicion of PTLD. However, biopsy from the liver lesion showed poorly differentiated NET. {sup 68}Ga-labelled [1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid]-1-NaI{sup 3}-octreotide ({sup 68}Ga-DOTANOC) PET-CT was then done, which confirmed the primary lesion in the rectum with liver metastases.

  6. A comparison of the performance of {sup 68}Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT and {sup 123}I-MIBG SPECT in the diagnosis and follow-up of phaeochromocytoma and paraganglioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maurice, J.B.; Troke, R.; Ramachandran, R.; Dhillo, W.; Meeran, K.; Goldstone, A.P.; Martin, N.M.; Todd, J.F.; Palazzo, F.; Tan, T. [Charing Cross and St Mary' s Hospitals, Imperial Centre for Endocrinology, Hammersmith, London (United Kingdom); Win, Z.; Al-Nahhas, A.; Naji, M. [Hammersmith Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom)

    2012-08-15

    To compare the sensitivity of {sup 123}I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) SPECT and {sup 68}Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT in detecting phaeochromocytomas (PCC) and paragangliomas (PGL) in the initial diagnosis and follow-up of patients with PCC and PGL disease. Retrospective analysis of 15 patients with PCC/PGL who had contemporaneous {sup 123}I-MIBG and {sup 68}Ga-DOTATATE imaging. Of the 15 patients in the series, 8 were concordant with both modalities picking up clinically significant lesions. There were no patients in whom both modalities failed to pick up clinically significant lesions. There was discordance in seven patients: 5 had positive {sup 68}Ga-DOTATATE and negative {sup 123}I-MIBG, and 2 (12 and 14) had negative {sup 68}Ga-DOTATATE and positive {sup 123}I-MIBG. Utilizing {sup 123}I-MIBG as the gold standard, {sup 68}Ga-DOTATATE had a sensitivity of 80 % and a positive predictive value of 62 %. The greatest discordance was in head and neck lesions, with the lesions in 4 patients being picked up by {sup 68}Ga-DOTATATE and missed by {sup 123}I-MIBG. On a per-lesion analysis, cross-sectional (CT and MRI) and {sup 68}Ga-DOTATATE was superior to {sup 123}I-MIBG in detecting lesions in all anatomical locations, and particularly bony lesions. First, {sup 68}Ga-DOTATATE should be considered as a first-line investigation in patients at high risk of PGL and metastatic disease, such as in the screening of carriers for mutations associated with familial PGL syndromes. Second, if {sup 123}I-MIBG does not detect lesions in patients with a high pretest probability of PCC or PGL, {sup 68}Ga-DOTATATE should be considered as the next investigation. Third, {sup 68}Ga-DOTATATE should be considered in preference to {sup 123}I-MIBG in patients in whom metastatic spread, particularly to the bone, is suspected. (orig.)

  7. Diagnostic potential of PET/CT using a {sup 68}Ga-labelled prostate-specific membrane antigen ligand in whole-body staging of renal cell carcinoma: initial experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawicki, Lino M.; Buchbender, Christian; Boos, Johannes; Antoch, Gerald [University Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Dusseldorf (Germany); Giessing, Markus [University Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Urology, Dusseldorf (Germany); Ermert, Johannes [Juelich Research Center, Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine, INM-5: Nuclear Chemistry, Juelich (Germany); Antke, Christina; Hautzel, Hubertus [University Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Dusseldorf (Germany)

    2017-01-15

    To evaluate the diagnostic potential of whole-body PET/CT using a {sup 68}Ga-labelled PSMA ligand in renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Six patients with histopathologically proven RCC underwent {sup 68}Ga-PSMA PET/CT. Each PET/CT scan was evaluated in relation to lesion count, location and dignity. SUVmax was measured in primary tumours and PET-positive metastases. Tumour-to-background SUVmax ratios (TBR{sub SUVmax}) were calculated for primary RCCs in relation to the surrounding normal renal parenchyma. Metastasis-to-background SUVmax ratios (MBR{sub SUVmax}) were calculated for PET-positive metastases in relation to gluteal muscle. Five primary RCCs and 16 metastases were evaluated. The mean SUVmax of the primary RCCs was 9.9 ± 9.2 (range 1.7 - 27.2). Due to high uptake in the surrounding renal parenchyma, the mean TBR{sub SUVmax} of the primary RCCs was only 0.2 ± 0.3 (range 0.02 - 0.7). Eight metastases showed focal {sup 68}Ga-PSMA uptake (SUVmax 9.9 ± 8.3, range 3.4 - 25.6). The mean MBR{sub SUVmax} of these PET-positive metastases was 11.7 ± 0.2 (range 4.4 - 28.1). All PET-negative metastases were subcentimetre lung metastases. {sup 68}Ga-PSMA PET/CT appears to be a promising method for detecting RCC metastases. However, no additional diagnostic value in assessing the primary tumour was found. (orig.)

  8. Head-to-head comparison of 64Cu-DOTATATE and 68Ga -DOTATOC PET/CT: a prospective study of 59 patients with neuroendocrine tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnbeck, C.B.; Knigge, U.; Loft, A.;

    2016-01-01

    a week (1-5 days apart). Results A total of 701 lesions were concordantly detected on both 64Cu-DOTATATE and 68Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT scans while additional 68 lesions were found by only one of the two scans. 64Cu-DOTATATE showed 42 discordant lesions of which 33 were found to be true positive on follow up....... 68Ga-DOTATOC showed 26 discordant lesions, but only 7 were found to be true positive on follow up. False positives were mainly lymph node lesions. Eighty-three percent of the additional true positive lesions were found by 64Cu-DOTATATE. 64Cu-DOTATATE and 68Ga-DOTATOC discovered additional true...

  9. Assessment of biochemical parameters and characterization of TNFα −308G/A and PTPN22 +1858C/T gene polymorphisms in the risk of obesity in adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    SALINAS-SANTANDER, MAURICIO ANDRÉS; LEÓN-CACHÓN, RAFAEL BALTAZAR; CEPEDA-NIETO, ANA CECILIA; SÁNCHEZ-DOMÍNGUEZ, CELIA NOHEMÍ; GONZÁLEZ-ZAVALA, MARÍA ANTONIA; GALLARDO-BLANCO, HUGO LEONID; ESPARZA-GONZÁLEZ, SANDRA CECILIA; GONZÁLEZ-MADRAZO, MIGUEL ÁNGEL

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is currently considered an inflammatory condition associated with autoimmune diseases, suggesting a common origin. Among other factors, candidate genes may explain the development of this disease. Polymorphisms in the tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) and lymphoid protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTPN22) genes lead to an increased risk to development of immune and inflammatory diseases. The aim of the present study was to analyze the biochemical parameters and the effect of the TNFα −308G/A and PTPN22 +1858C/T polymorphisms in the susceptibility of adolescents to obesity. A group of 253 adolescent subjects were recruited and classified as obese, overweight or normal weight according to their nutritional status. Anthropometric measurements, clinical and biochemical data were analyzed. DNA was extracted from peripheral blood samples by the phenol-chloroform method, and TNFα −308G/A and PTPN22 1858C/T polymorphisms were determined by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism assays. Clinical, genetic and biochemical parameters were analyzed to determine the existence of a possible association with the development of obesity. Statistically significant differences in body mass index, insulin, triglyceride levels and homeostatic model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) index were observed among the three groups analyzed (P≤0.05). The studied polymorphisms did not confer a risk for developing obesity in the analyzed population (P>0.05); however, significantly low levels of insulin and decreased rates of HOMA-IR were observed in the 1858 CT genotype carriers of the PTPN22 gene. In conclusion, no association between the TNFα −308G/A and PTPN22 +1858C/T polymorphisms and the risk to development of obesity in the adolescent population analyzed was observed. However, the 1858 CT genotype of the PTPN22 gene was associated with variations of certain biochemical parameters analyzed. PMID:26870345

  10. Enterococcus faecium WB2000 Inhibits Biofilm Formation by Oral Cariogenic Streptococci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nao Suzuki

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the inhibitory effect of probiotic Enterococcus faecium WB2000 on biofilm formation by cariogenic streptococci. The ability of E. faecium WB2000 and JCM5804 and Enterococcus faecalis JCM5803 to inhibit biofilm formation by seven laboratory oral streptococcal strains and 13 clinical mutans streptococcal strains was assayed. The Enterococcal strains inhibited biofilm formation in dual cultures with the mutans streptococcal strains Streptococcus mutans Xc and Streptococcus sobrinus JCM5176 (P<0.05, but not with the noncariogenic streptococcal strains. Enterococcus faecium WB2000 inhibited biofilm formation by 90.0% (9/10 of the clinical S. mutans strains and 100% (3/3 of the clinical S. sobrinus strains. After culturing, the pH did not differ between single and dual cultures. The viable counts of floating mutans streptococci were lower in dual cultures with E. faecium WB2000 than in single cultures. Enterococcus faecium WB2000 acted as a probiotic bacterial inhibitor of cariogenic streptococcal biofilm formation.

  11. Development of the wireless ultra-miniaturized inertial measurement unit WB-4: preliminary performance evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhuohua; Zecca, Massimiliano; Sessa, Salvatore; Bartolomeo, Luca; Ishii, Hiroyuki; Takanishi, Atsuo

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the preliminary performance evaluation of our new wireless ultra-miniaturized inertial measurement unit (IMU) WB-4 by compared with the Vicon motion capture system. The WB-4 IMU primarily contains a mother board for motion sensing, a Bluetooth module for wireless data transmission with PC, and a Li-Polymer battery for power supply. The mother board is provided with a microcontroller and 9-axis inertial sensors (miniaturized MEMS accelerometer, gyroscope and magnetometer) to measure orientation. A quaternion-based extended Kalman filter (EKF) integrated with an R-Adaptive algorithm for automatic estimation of the measurement covariance matrix is implemented for the sensor fusion to retrieve the attitude. The experimental results showed that the wireless ultra-miniaturized WB-4 IMU could provide high accuracy performance at the angles of roll and pitch. The yaw angle which has reasonable performance needs to be further evaluated.

  12. Long-term Durability of Cement-based Materials with Very Low w/b

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Youjun; LIU Yunhua; LONG Guangeheng

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the durability, especially the long-term stability of cement-based materials with very low w/b, the air permeability test, carbonation test, capillary absorption rate test and dilation Dotential test were adopted under long-term heat treatment condition. Microstructure of these materials is also analyzed by scannmg electronic microscopy (SEM) and mercury intrusion porosimeter (MIP) in order to further unveil its mechanism and interrelation between microstructure and its properties. The results indicate that in the area investigated, cement-based material with w/b 0.17, like RPC, possesses low porosity and excellent durability. Moreover, its porosity will further decrease under long-term heat treatment compared with normal heat treatment. Its long-term durability is much superior to that of other cement-based materials with w/b 0.25 or 0.35 as high strength concrete (HSC).

  13. Optical map of the genotype A1 WB C6 Giardia lamblia genome isolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, D Alexander; Morrison, Hilary G; Adam, Rodney D

    2011-12-01

    The Giardia lamblia genome consists of 12 Mb divided among 5 chromosomes ranging in size from approximately 1 to 4 Mb. The assembled contigs of the genotype A1 isolate, WB, were previously mapped along the 5 chromosomes on the basis of hybridization of plasmid clones representing the contigs to chromosomes separated by PFGE. In the current report, we have generated an MluI optical map of the WB genome to improve the accuracy of the physical map. This has allowed us to correct several assembly errors and to better define the extent of the subtelomeric regions that are not included in the genome assembly.

  14. Improved Frame Mode Selection for AMR-WB+ Based on Decision Tree

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong Kyu; Kim, Nam Soo

    In this letter, we propose a coding mode selection method for the AMR-WB+ audio coder based on a decision tree. In order to reduce computation while maintaining good performance, decision tree classifier is adopted with the closed loop mode selection results as the target classification labels. The size of the decision tree is controlled by pruning, so the proposed method does not increase the memory requirement significantly. Through an evaluation test on a database covering both speech and music materials, the proposed method is found to achieve a much better mode selection accuracy compared with the open loop mode selection module in the AMR-WB+.

  15. 苏云金芽胞杆菌菌株WB9编码活性因子的基因分析%ANALYSIS FOR THE ENCODING GENE OF ACTIVE FACTORS FROM BACILLUS THURINGIENSIS STRAIN WB9

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄志鹏; 关雄

    2003-01-01

    采用PCR-RFLP及PCR技术对苏云金芽胞杆菌新分离菌株WB9的ICP、VIP、几丁质酶和肠毒素4种活性因子的编码基因进行了分析.结果表明,该菌株含有编码ICP的cry1Aa、cry1Ab、cry1Cb、cry1Fa和cry1Ga5个cry1基因型,编码Vip3A蛋白的vip3A基因以及编码3种肠毒素的hblA、bceT和entS基因;不含编码几丁质酶的基因.将vip3A、hblA、bceT和entS基因PCR产物回收纯化后直接测序,经在线的BLAST软件进行同源性分析,前两个基因片段与Bt已公布基因序列的相应片段同源性分别为99%和96%~98%,bceT基因片段与蜡质芽孢杆菌bceT相应片段同源性为97%. 图6 表2 参16

  16. Three-minute SPECT/CT is sufficient for the assessment of bone metastasis as add-on to planar bone scintigraphy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zacho, Helle D; Manresa, José A Biurrun; Aleksyniene, Ramune

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study is to assess whether ultra-fast acquisition SPECT/CT (UF-SPECT/CT) can replace standard SPECT/CT (std-SPECT/CT) as "add-on" to whole-body bone scintigraphy (WB-BS) for the investigation of bone metastases. Consecutive cancer patients referred for WB-BS who...... diagnosis was reached by two observers for each set of images (WB-BS + standard SPECT/CT or WB-BS + UF-SPECT/CT) using a three-category evaluation scale: M0: no bone metastases; M1: bone metastases; and Me: equivocal findings. RESULTS: Among the 104 included patients, most presented with prostate cancer (n...... in observer agreement between cancer types was detected. SPECT/CT provided a definitive classification in 90 of 104 cases in which WB-BS was not entirely diagnostic. CONCLUSIONS: To investigate potential bone metastases, UF-SPECT/CT can be conducted as add-on to WB-BS to notably reduce the SPECT acquisition...

  17. MicroPET/CT imaging of {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} integrin via a novel {sup 68}Ga-NOTA-RGD peptidomimetic conjugate in rat myocardial infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menichetti, Luca; Kusmic, Claudia; Panetta, Daniele; Petroni, Debora; Salvadori, Piero A. [CNR-Institute of Clinical Physiology (IFC), Pisa (Italy); Arosio, Daniela; Manzoni, Leonardo [CNR-Institute of Molecular Science and Technologies (ISTM), Milan (Italy); Matteucci, Marco [Scuola Superiore Sant' Anna, Pisa (Italy); Casagrande, Cesare [University of Milan, Department of Chemistry, Milan (Italy); L' Abbate, Antonio [CNR-Institute of Clinical Physiology (IFC), Pisa (Italy); Scuola Superiore Sant' Anna, Pisa (Italy)

    2013-08-15

    The {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} integrin is expressed in angiogenic vessels and is a potential target for molecular imaging of evolving pathological processes. Its expression is upregulated in cancer lesions and metastases as well as in acute myocardial infarction (MI) as part of the infarct healing process. The purpose of our study was to determine the feasibility of a new imaging approach with a novel {sup 68}Ga-2,2',2''-(1,4,7-triazonane-1,4,7-triyl)triacetic acid (NOTA)-arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) construct to assess integrin expression in the evolving MI. A straightforward labelling chemistry to attach the radionuclide {sup 68}Ga to a NOTA-based chelating agent conjugated with a cyclic RGD peptidomimetic is described. Affinity for {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} integrin was assessed by in vitro receptor binding assay. The proof-of-concept in vivo studies combined the {sup 68}Ga-NOTA-RGD with the flow tracer {sup 13}N-NH{sub 3} imaging in order to obtain positron emission tomography (PET)/CT imaging of both integrin expression and perfusion defect at 4 weeks after infarction. Hearts were then processed for immunostaining of integrin {beta}{sub 3}. NOTA-RGD conjugate displayed a binding affinity for {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} integrin of 27.9 {+-} 6.8 nM. {sup 68}Ga-NOTA-RGD showed stability without detectable degradation or formation of by-products in urine up to 2 h following injection in the rat. MI hearts exhibited {sup 68}Ga-NOTA-RGD uptake in correspondence to infarcted and border zone regions. The tracer signal drew a parallel with vascular remodelling due to ischaemia-induced angiogenesis as assessed by immunohistochemistry. As compared to similar imaging approaches using the {sup 18}F-galacto-derivative, we documented for the first time with microPET/CT imaging the {sup 68}Ga-NOTA-RGD derivative that appears eligible for PET imaging in animal models of vascular remodelling during evolving MI. The simple chemistry employed to

  18. A Pedagogy of Poetry through the Poems of W.B. Yeats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, John

    2014-01-01

    Using eleven of W.B. Yeats's poems, John Gordon explores ways of thinking about and teaching poetry in secondary schools and at undergraduate level. He draws together commentary, research, and his own professional experience, to enable his readers to develop flexible pedagogical judgement that can respond to the requirements of a range of students…

  19. Data of evolutionary structure change: 1B4WB-2NOTA [Confc[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1B4WB-2NOTA 1B4W 2NOT B A HLLQFRKMIKKMTG--KEPVVSYAFYGCYCGSGGRGKPK... 2NOT A 2NOTA... 28.97100067138672 tion> 0.8460000157356262 0.4...550000190734863 0.531000018119812 -0.7149999737739563 -0.45399999618530273 ti...el> 1 2NOT A 2NOTA

  20. {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11 PET/CT in primary staging of prostate cancer: PSA and Gleason score predict the intensity of tracer accumulation in the primary tumour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uprimny, Christian; Kroiss, Alexander Stephan; Decristoforo, Clemens; Guggenberg, Elisabeth von; Kendler, Dorota; Scarpa, Lorenza; Di Santo, Gianpaolo; Roig, Llanos Geraldo; Maffey-Steffan, Johanna; Virgolini, Irene Johanna [Medical University Innsbruck, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Innsbruck (Austria); Fritz, Josef [Medical University Innsbruck, Department of Medical Statistics, Informatics and Health Economics, Innsbruck (Austria); Horninger, Wolfgang [Medical University Innsbruck, Department of Urology, Innsbruck (Austria)

    2017-06-15

    Prostate cancer (PC) cells typically show increased expression of prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA), which can be visualized by {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11 PET/CT. The aim of this study was to assess the intensity of {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11 uptake in the primary tumour and metastases in patients with biopsy-proven PC prior to therapy, and to determine whether a correlation exists between the primary tumour-related {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11 accumulation and the Gleason score (GS) or prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level. Ninety patients with transrectal ultrasound biopsy-proven PC (GS 6-10; median PSA: 9.7 ng/ml) referred for {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11 PET/CT were retrospectively analysed. PET images were analysed visually and semiquantitatively by measuring the maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}). The SUV{sub max} of the primary tumour and pathologic lesions suspicious for lymphatic or distant metastases were then compared to the physiologic background activity of normal prostate tissue and gluteal muscle. The SUV{sub max} of the primary tumour was assessed in relation to both PSA level and GS. Eighty-two patients (91.1%) demonstrated pathologic tracer accumulation in the primary tumour that exceeded physiologic tracer uptake in normal prostate tissue (median SUV{sub max}: 12.5 vs. 3.9). Tumours with GS of 6, 7a (3+4) and 7b (4+3) showed significantly lower {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11 uptake, with median SUV{sub max} of 5.9, 8.3 and 8.2, respectively, compared to patients with GS >7 (median SUV{sub max}: 21.2; p < 0.001). PC patients with PSA ≥10.0 ng/ml exhibited significantly higher uptake than those with PSA levels <10.0 ng/ml (median SUV{sub max}: 17.6 versus 7.7; p < 0.001). In 24 patients (26.7%), 82 lymph nodes with pathologic tracer accumulation consistent with metastases were detected (median SUV{sub max}: 10.6). Eleven patients (12.2%) revealed 55 pathologic osseous lesions suspicious for bone metastases (median SUV{sub max}: 11.6). The GS and PSA level correlated with

  1. False-Positive Results of 68ga-Dotatate and 11c-Cholıne Pet/CT in Patients with Hormone-Resistant Prostate Cancer at Biochemical Recurrence are Related to Inflamed Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Alonso

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: For an oncological tracer is relevant to know the uptake in inflamed/infected lesions. Thus, in the framework of a prospective trial aiming to compare the clinical value of 68Ga-DOTATATE and 11C-Choline PET/CT in patients with hormoneresistant prostate cancer at biochemical recurrence, we evaluated the false-positive findings of both techniques. Methods: The study group comprised 64 prostate cancer patients with PSA relapse under androgen deprivation therapy, with a median trigger PSA level of 4.25 ng/mL (range: 0.22-291 ng/mL. Within 1-2 weeks, a PET/CT study was performed with 68Ga-DOTATATE and 11C-Choline with an approximately dose of 100 MBq and 400 MBq, respectively, using a 64-slice PET/CT with time-of-flight correction. Correlative imaging, histopathology and/or clinical follow-up were considered as reference standard. Results: Both techniques showed positive local, regional and distant findings in 31 patients. Results were concordant in 57 cases (89%, with discordant findings observed in patients with bone (n=2 and regional lymph nodes lesions (n=5. On a per patient basis, sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values with their 95% confidence intervals were the same for both techniques: 0.82 (0.65-0.93, 0.90 (0.73-0.98, 0.90 (0.73-0.98 and 0.81 (0.65-0.93, respectively. False-positive lesions (n=5 were found, for both tracers, in 3 patients and were located in the prostate bed (n=1 and regional lymph nodes (n=4, being 3 discordant. In all cases, pathology revealed non-specific inflammatory lesions. Conclusion: This study demonstrates avid 68Ga-DOTATATE and 11C-Choline accumulation in inflammatory tissue, which may limit the specificity of these techniques for the detection of occult metastatic disease.

  2. Immune enhancing effects of WB365, a novel combination of Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera and Maitake (Grifola frondosa extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaclav Vetvicka

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Stress has been found to significantly reduce the abilities of the immune system to fight infections. One of the ways to overcome the defects of the immune system is the strengthening of the defense reactions by nutrition. Aims: To evaluate immune enhancing effects of the following material: WB365, a novel combination of Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera and Maitake (Grifola frondosa extracts. Results: We found that both glucan-rich maitake extract and WB365 caused a similar stimulation of phagocytic activity. Stress-induced increase of corticosterone production was blocked by feeding with Ashwagandha extract and even more by WB365. Cytokine experiments showed that feeding with WB365 helped overcome the stress-related inhibition of IL-6, IL-12 and IFN-γ production. Conclusion: This study clearly demonstrated that WB365, a combination of Maitake mushroom-derived glucan and Ashwagandha extracts, has strong pleiotropic biological effects related to immune health and stress reduction.

  3. Comparison of 68Ga-HBED-CC PSMA-PET/CT and multiparametric MRI for gross tumour volume detection in patients with primary prostate cancer based on slice by slice comparison with histopathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamboglou, Constantinos; Drendel, Vanessa; Jilg, Cordula A.; Rischke, Hans C.; Beck, Teresa I.; Schultze-Seemann, Wolfgang; Krauss, Tobias; Mix, Michael; Schiller, Florian; Wetterauer, Ulrich; Werner, Martin; Langer, Mathias; Bock, Michael; Meyer, Philipp T.; Grosu, Anca L.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The exact detection and delineation of the intraprostatic tumour burden is crucial for treatment planning in primary prostate cancer (PCa). We compared 68Ga-HBED-CC-PSMA PET/CT with multiparametric MRI (mpMRI) for diagnosis and tumour delineation in patients with primary PCa based on slice by slice correlation with histopathological reference material. Methodology: Seven patients with histopathologically proven primary PCa underwent 68Ga-HBED-CC-PSMA PET/CT and MRI followed by radical prostatectomy. Resected prostates were scanned by ex-vivo CT in a special localizer and prepared for histopathology. Invasive PCa was delineated on a HE stained histologic tissue slide and matched to ex-vivo CT to obtain gross tumor volume (GTV-)histo. Ex-vivo CT including GTV-histo and MRI data were matched to in-vivo CT(PET). Consensus contours based on MRI (GTV-MRI), PSMA PET (GTV-PET) or the combination of both (GTV-union/-intersection) were created. In each in-vivo CT slice the prostate was separated into 4 equal segments and sensitivity and specificity for PSMA PET and mpMRI were assessed by comparison with histological reference material. Furthermore, the spatial overlap between GTV-histo and GTV-PET/-MRI and the Sørensen-Dice coefficient (DSC) were calculated. In the case of multifocal PCa (4/7 patients), SUV values (PSMA PET) and ADC-values (diffusion weighted MRI) were obtained for each lesion. Results: PSMA PET and mpMRI detected PCa in all patients. GTV-histo was detected in 225 of 340 segments (66.2%). Sensitivity and specificity for GTV-PET, GTV-MRI, GTV-union and GTV-intersection were 75% and 87%, 70% and 82%, 82% and 67%, 55% and 99%, respectively. GTV-histo had on average the highest overlap with GTV-union (57±22%), which was significantly higher than overlap with GTV-MRI (p=0.016) and GTV-PET (p=0.016), respectively. The mean DSC for GTV-union, GTV-PET and GTV-MRI was 0.51 (±0.18), 0.45 (±0.17) and 0.48 (±0.19), respectively. In every patient with

  4. WB Advice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Despite the negative impact of the European debt crisis,the global growth outlook remains favorable,largely because of the strength of emerging markets. China,as the largest emerging economy,has contributed handsomely to the global economic recovery.In China,after a rapid start at the beginning of the year,growth is likely to ease,mainly because of a partial normalization of the macro policy stance and recent property measures,said the World Bank in its latest China Quarterly Update released on June 18. Edited excerpts follow:

  5. WB Advice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    @@ Despite the negative impact of the European debt crisis,the global growth outlook remains favorable,largely because of the strength of emerging markets.China,as the largest emerging economy,has contributed handsomely to the global economic recovery.In China,after a rapid start at the beginning of the year,growth is likely to ease,mainly because of a partial normalization of the macro policy stance and recent property measures,said the World Bank in its latest China Quarterly Update released on June 18.Edited excerpts follow:

  6. The Hydration of Blended Cement at Low W/B Ratio

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Shu-guang; LU Lin-nu; HE Yong-jia; LI Yue; DING Qing-jun

    2003-01-01

    The hydration process, hydration product and hydration heat of blended cement paste mixed with mineral admixture and expansive agent at low W/B ratio are studied by XRD , thermo analysis , and calorimetry instrument, and they were compared with those of pure cement paste. The results show that pure cement and blended cement at low W/B ratio have the same types of hydration products, but their respective amounts of hydration products of various blended cements at same ages and the vatiation law of the amount of same hydration products with ages are different; Tim joint effect of tumefaction of gel-ettringite due to water absorption and the expansive pressure on the pore and riff caused by the crystalloid ettringite is the impetus of the volume expansion of cement paste , and the former effect is much greater than the latter one .

  7. Grazing incidence Fe-line telescopes using W/B4C multilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joensen, K. D.; Gorenstein, P.; Christensen, Finn Erland;

    1995-01-01

    The loss of throughput observed at higher energies for traditional grazing-incidence X-ray telescopes coated with high-Z elements can be partly countered by employing multilayers on the outermost reflectors. Using 8-keV reflectivity data from a periodic W/B4C multilayer, the expected performance ...... reflectors required by the Kirkpatrick-Baez telescope exists, so that an Fe-line multilayer telescope could be built today...

  8. Atypical false negative results of {sup 67}Ga scintigraphy and {sup 18}F-F.D.G. PET-CT in a patient with sarcoidosis and bilateral breast cancer; Resultats atypiques et faux-negatifs de la scintigraphie au {sup 67}Ga et de la TEP-TDM au {sup 18}F-FDG chez une patiente avec sarcoidose et cancer du sein bilateral

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keomany, J.; Imperiale, A.; Constantinesco, A. [Hopital de Hautepierre, Hopitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, Service de Biophysique et de Medecine Nucleaire, 67 - Strasbourg (France); Thiriat, S. [Hopital de Hautepierre, Hopitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, Service de Radiologie, 67 - Strasbourg (France); Braun, J.J. [Hopital de Hautepierre, Hopitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, Service d' ORL, 67 - Strasbourg (France)

    2009-12-15

    We describe the case of a patient with biopsy proven sino-nasal sarcoidosis and a bilateral breast cancer that was unknown at the time of {sup 67}Ga scintigraphy and {sup 18}F-F.D.G. PET-CT. {sup 67}Ga scintigraphy showed low sensibility in the assessment of sarcoidosis localizations. Conversely, multiple foci of intense {sup 18}F-F.D.G. uptake were assessed suggesting the presence of active granulomatous disease in sino-nasal region, rhino pharynx, skin and several peripheral lymphadenopathy, which were not previously detected by conventional evaluation. On the other hand, an atypical focal accumulation of {sup 67}Ga uptake was showed in right breast parenchyma, proving to be a grade III infiltrating canalar carcinoma coexistent with pleomorphic type, without axillary metastatic lymphadenopathy. Surprisingly, no {sup 18}F-F.D.G. uptake abnormalities were detected in the right breast in correspondence of {sup 67}Ga pathological uptake. The whole of these results is discussed according to histological nature of the lesions and the data of the literature. (authors)

  9. [Association study between 834+7G/A and +1332C/T polymorphisms in the growth arrest specific 6 gene and risk of severe preeclampsia in Chinese population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Liyan; Guan, Linbo; Fan, Ping; Liu, Xinghui; Liu, Rui; Chen, Jinxin; Zhu, Yue; Wei, Xin; Liu, Yu; Bai, Huai

    2017-02-10

    To investigate the relationship between polymorphisms of the growth arrest specific 6 (GAS6) gene and severe preeclampsia in a South West Han Chinese population. Blood samples from 167 patients with severe preeclampsia and 312 normal pregnant women as controls from Han Chinese in Chengdu area were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphisms. C and T allele frequencies for +1332C/T site were 85.63% and 14.37% in the patient group, respectively, and 78.04% and 21.96% in control group, respectively. The TT genotype and variant T allelic frequencies of the +1332C/T polymorphism were significantly lower in patients with severe preeclampsia than in the control group (both Ppreeclampsia was 0.602 (95%CI: 0.401-0.904) in carriers for the variant T allele (χ(2)=6.045, P=0.014). G and A allele frequencies for 834+7G/A site were 72.75% and 27.25% in case group, respectively, and 74.36% and 25.64% in control group, respectively. The genotype and allele frequencies of the 834+7G/A polymorphism in patients with severe preeclampsia and controls showed no significant differences (both P>0.05). In addition, there was no significant association between the polymorphisms and blood pressure levels in the patient or control groups. The variant GAS6+1332 T allele is associated with a decreased risk for severe preeclampsia in a South West Han Chinese population. On the other hand, the 834+7G/A polymorphism has no effect on the severe preeclampsia.

  10. Dynamic measurement of patello-femoral joint alignment using weight-bearing magnetic resonance imaging (WB-MRI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariani, Silvia; La Marra, Alice; Arrigoni, Francesco; Necozione, Stefano; Splendiani, Alessandra; Di Cesare, Ernesto; Barile, Antonio; Masciocchi, Carlo

    2015-12-01

    Aim of our work was to compare standard and weight-bearing WB-MRI to define their contribution in unmasking patello-femoral (PF) maltracking and to define what measurement of patellar alignment is the most reliable. We prospectively collected 95 non consecutive patients, clinically divided into 2 groups: group A (the control group), including 20 patients (negative for patellar maltracking), and group B including 75 patients (positive for patellar maltracking). The patients underwent a dedicated 0.25 T MRI, in supine and WB position, with knee flexion of 12-15°. The following measurements were performed: Insall-Salvati index (IS), lateral patellar displacement (LPD), lateral patello-femoral angle (LPA) and lateral patellar tilt (LPT). Quantitative and qualitative statistical analyses were performed to compare the results obtained before and after WB-MRI. Measurements were subsequently performed on both groups. Group A patients showed no statistically significant variations at all measurements both on standard and WB-MRI. On the basis of measurements made on standard MRI, group B patients were divided into group B1 (23 patients) (negative or positive at 1 measurement) and group B2 (52 patients) (positive at 2 or more measurements). After WB-MRI, group B1 patients were divided into group B1a (6 patients), in case they remained positive at 0/1 measurement, and group B1b (17 patients), in case they became positive at 2 or more measurements. All group B2 patients confirmed to be positive at 2 or more measurements at WB-MRI. Quantitative statistical analysis showed that LPT and LPA were the most reproducible and clinically useful measurements. Qualitative statistical analysis performed on standard and WB-MRI demonstrated that LPT was the best predictive measurement. This study demonstrates both the high diagnostic value of WB-MRI in unmasking PF-maltracking and the best predictive value of LPT measurement. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Measurement of B(t --> Wb)/B(t--> Wq) at the collider detector at fermilab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, D; Adelman, J; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arisawa, T; Arguin, J-F; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Bacchetta, N; Bachacou, H; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barker, G J; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Ben-Haim, E; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bishai, M; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Bloom, K; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Bourov, S; Brau, B; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Casarsa, M; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carron, S; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chapman, J; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, I; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Chuang, S; Chung, K; Chung, W-H; Chung, Y S; Cijliak, M; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A G; Clark, D; Coca, M; Connolly, A; Convery, M; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cranshaw, J; Cuevas, J; Cruz, A; Culbertson, R; Currat, C; Cyr, D; Dagenhart, D; Da Ronco, S; D'Auria, S; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdecker, G; Dell'Orso, M; Demers, S; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; de Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Dionisi, C; Dittmann, J R; DiTuro, P; Dörr, C; Dominguez, A; Donati, S; Donega, M; Donini, J; D'Onofrio, M; Dorigo, T; Ebina, K; Efron, J; Ehlers, J; Erbacher, R; Erdmann, M; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H-C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Field, R D; Flanagan, G; Flores-Castillo, L R; Foland, A; Forrester, S; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Fujii, Y; Furic, I; Gajjar, A; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garcia-Sciveres, M; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D W; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, A; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C; Giolo, K; Giordani, M; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, D; Goldstein, J; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Y; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Griffiths, M; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; da Costa, J Guimaraes; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartmann, F; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Hayward, H; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Hennecke, M; Herndon, M; Hill, C; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hoffman, K D; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M A; Huffman, B T; Huang, Y; Hughes, R E; Huston, J; Ikado, K; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ishizawa, Y; Issever, C; Ivanov, A; Iwata, Y; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jensen, H; Jeon, E J; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T; Kamon, T; Kang, J; Unel, M Karagoz; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kemp, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, M S; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kirby, M; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kobayashi, H; Kong, D J; Kondo, K; Konigsberg, J; Kordas, K; Korn, A; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kovalev, A; Kraus, J; Kravchenko, I; Kreymer, A; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhlmann, S E; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lecci, C; Lecompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Li, K; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Liss, T M; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Liu, Y; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Loverre, P; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maksimovic, P; Manca, G; Margaroli, F; Marginean, R; Marino, C; Martin, A; Martin, M; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Maruyama, T; Matsunaga, H; Mattson, M; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McGivern, D; McIntyre, P M; McNamara, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, L; Miller, R; Miller, J S; Mills, C; Miquel, R; Miscetti, S; Mitselmakher, G; Miyamoto, A; Moggi, N; Mohr, B; Moore, R; Morello, M; Fernandez, P A Movilla; Muelmenstaedt, J; Mukherjee, A; Mulhearn, M; Muller, T; Mumford, R; Munar, A; Murat, P; Nachtman, J; Nahn, S; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Napora, R; Naumov, D; Necula, V; Nelson, T; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Ogawa, T; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Ohsugi, T; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Orejudos, W; Osterberg, K; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E

    2005-09-01

    We present a measurement of the ratio of top-quark branching fractions R = B(t --> Wb)/B(t --> Wq), where q can be a b, s, or a d quark, using lepton-plus-jets and dilepton data sets with an integrated luminosity of approximately 162 pb(-1) collected with the Collider Detector at Fermilab during Run II of the Tevatron. The measurement is derived from the relative numbers of tt events with different multiplicity of identified secondary vertices. We set a lower limit of R > 0.61 at 95% confidence level.

  12. The Early Love Poetry of W.B. Yeats-When You Are Old

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUE Man-man

    2016-01-01

    When you are old is one of the most famous love poetry written by Irish Poet, William Butler Yeats. The paper elabo-rates deeply on one of the early love poetry of William Butler Yeats:When you are old. It gives an introduction of W.B. Yeats and then discusses Yeats’s early love poetry and his muse as well as her influence in the love poetry;Then the poem When you are old is analyzed and in the meantime the original French version and the Chinese version were provided for readers’literary ap-preciation.

  13. Measurement of B(t->Wb)/B(t->Wq) at the Collider Detector at Fermilab

    CERN Document Server

    Acosta, D; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arisawa, T; Arguin, J F; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Bacchetta, N; Bachacou, H; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barker, G J; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Ben-Haim, E; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Berry, T; Bhatti, A A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bishai, M; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Bloom, K; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bölla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Bourov, S; Brau, B; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, Yu A; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Casarsa, M; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carron, S; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chapman, J; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, I; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Chuang, S; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Cijliak, M; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A G; Clark, D; Coca, M; Connolly, A; Convery, M; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cranshaw, J; Cuevas-Maestro, J; Cruz, A; Culbertson, R; Currat, C; Cyr, D; Dagenhart, D; Da Ronco, S; D'Auria, S; De Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdecker, G; Dell'Orso, Mauro; Demers, S; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Dionisi, C; Dittmann, J R; Di Turo, P; Dorr, C; Dominguez, A; Donati, S; Donega, M; Donini, J; D'Onofrio, M; Dorigo, T; Ebina, K; Efron, J; Ehlers, J; Erbacher, R; Erdmann, M; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernández, J P; Field, R D; Flanagan, G; Flores-Castillo, L R; Foland, A; Forrester, S; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Fujii, Y; Furic, I; Gajjar, A; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; García-Sciveres, M; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D W; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, A; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C; Giolo, K; Giordani, M; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D A; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, D; Goldstein, J; Gómez, G; Gómez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Yu; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Griffiths, M; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; Guimarães da Costa, J; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartmann, F; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Hayward, H; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Hennecke, M; Herndon, M; Hill, C; Hirschbuehl, D; Höcker, A; Hoffman, K D; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M A; Huffman, B T; Huang, Y; Hughes, R E; Huston, J; Ikado, K; Incandela, J R; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ishizawa, Y; Issever, C; Ivanov, A; Iwata, Y; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jensen, H; Jeon, E J; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kang, J; Karagoz-Unel, M; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kemp, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, M S; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kirby, M; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kobayashi, H; Kong, D J; Kondo, K; Konigsberg, J; Kordas, K; Korn, A; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kovalev, A; Kraus, J; Kravchenko, I; Kreymer, A; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhlmann, S E; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lecci, C; LeCompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Li, K; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Liss, T M; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Liu, Y; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Loverre, P F; Lu, R S; Lucchesi, D; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maksimovic, P; Manca, G; Margaroli, F; Marginean, R; Marino, C; Martin, A; Martin, M; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Maruyama, T; Matsunaga, H; Mattson, M; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McGivern, D; McIntyre, P M; McNamara, P; McNulty; Mehta, A; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, L; Miller, R; Miller, J S; Mills, C; Miquel, R; Miscetti, S; Mitselmakher, G; Miyamoto, A; Moggi, N; Mohr, B; Moore, R; Morello, M; Movilla-Fernández, P A; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Mulhearn, M; Müller, T; Mumford, R; Munar, A; Murat, P; Nachtman, J; Nahn, S; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Napora, R; Naumov, D; Necula, V; Nelson, T; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Ogawa, T; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Ohsugi, T; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Orejudos, W; Österberg, K; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Paoletti, R; Papadimitriou, V; Paramonov, A A; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D; Penzo, Aldo L; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pitts, K T; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Pope, G; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, M A; Rakitine, A; Rappoccio, S; Ratnikov, F; Ray, H; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; Renton, P B; Rescigno, M; Rimondi, F; Rinnert, K; Ristori, L; Robertson, W J; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossin, R; Rott, C; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Ruiz, A; Ryan, D; Saarikko, H; Sabik, S; Safonov, A; Saint-Denis, R; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Saltzberg, D; Sánchez, C; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sato, K; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Semeria, F; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfiligoi, I; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T G; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sill, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakian, A; Sjölin, J; Skiba, A; Slaughter, A J; Sliwa, K; Smirnov, D; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Söderberg, M; Soha, A; Somalwar, S V; Spalding, J; Spezziga, M; Spinella, F; Squillacioti, P; Stadie, H; Stanitzki, M; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sumorok, K; Sun, H; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Tafirout, R; Takano, H; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Takikawa, K; Tanaka, M; Tanaka, R; Tanimoto, N; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Tesarek, R J; Tether, S; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Tonnesmann, M; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tsuchiya, R; Tsuno, S; Tsybychev, D; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Unverhau, T; Uozumi, S; Usynin, D; Vacavant, L; Vaiciulis, A W; Varganov, A; Vejcik, S; Velev, G; Veszpremi, V; Veramendi, G; Vickey, T; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vollrath, I; Volobuev, I P; Von der Mey, M; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wallny, R; Walter, T; Wan, Z; Wang, M J; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Ward, B; Waschke, S; Waters, D; Watts, T; Weber, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wolter, M; Worcester, M; Worm, S; Wright, T; Wu, X; Würthwein, F; Wyatt, A; Yagil, A; Yamashita, T; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yao, W; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, I; Yu, S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zetti, F; Zhou, J; Zucchelli, S

    2005-01-01

    We present a measurement of the ratio of top-quark branching fractions R= B(t -> Wb)/B(t -> Wq) using lepton-plus-jets and dilepton data sets with integrated luminosity of ~162 pb^{-1} collected with the Collider Detector at Fermilab during Run II of the Tevatron. The measurement is derived from the relative numbers of t-tbar events with different multiplicity of identified secondary vertices. We set a lower limit of R > 0.61 at 95% confidence level.

  14. The value of Weight-Bearing CT scan in the evaluation of subtalar distraction bone block arthrodesis: Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welck, M J; Myerson, M S

    2015-12-01

    Subtalar distraction arthrodesis is performed in certain situations where there is loss of subtalar height, reduced talar declination and evidence of anterior tibiotalar impingement. Standard evaluation includes the assessment of the lateral talocalcaneal angle, calcaneal pitch, talocalcaneal height and talar declination angle on a weight bearing lateral radiograph. We present a case of erosive valgus subtalar osteoarthritis with subtalar collapse managed with a subtalar distraction arthrodesis. A weight bearing CT (WB-CT) scan was used in the assessment. The value of WB-CT for this indication is discussed, along with a discussion on surgical technique, complications and future directions. Copyright © 2015 European Foot and Ankle Society. All rights reserved.

  15. AT2R -1332 G:A polymorphism and its interaction with AT1R 1166 A:C, ACE I/D and MMP-9 -1562 C:T polymorphisms: risk factors for susceptibility to preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, Zohreh; Rahimi, Ziba; Aghaei, Amir; Vaisi-Raygani, Asad

    2014-03-15

    The possible association of angiotensin type 2 receptor (AT2R) -1332 G:A polymorphism with susceptibility to preeclampsia was studied in 252 women consisted of 155 women with preeclampsia and 97 healthy pregnant women. Also, the interaction of this polymorphism with angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1R) 1166 A:C, angiotensin converting enzyme insertion/deletion (ACE I/D) and also with matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) -1562 C:T polymorphism was investigated. The AT2R -1332 G:A polymorphism was detected using PCR-RFLP method. Significantly higher frequencies of GG+GA genotype and G allele of AT2R were observed in mild (80.2%, p=0.003 and 47.5%, p=0.012, respectively) and severe (77.8%, p=0.034 and 48.1%, p=0.026, respectively) preeclampsia compared to controls (60.8% and 35.1%, respectively). The presence of G allele was associated with 1.69-fold increased risk of preeclampsia (p=0.005). In severe preeclamptic women, systolic and diastolic blood pressures in the presence of GG+GA genotype were significantly higher compared to those in the presence of AA genotype. The concomitant presence of both alleles of AT2R G and AT1R C was associated with 1.3 times increased risk of mild preeclampsia (p=0.03). There was an interaction between AT2R G and ACE D alleles that significantly increased the risk of mild and severe preeclampsia by 1.38- and 1.3-fold, respectively. Also, interaction between MMP-9 T and AT2R G alleles increased the risk of severe preeclampsia 1.39-fold (p=0.028). Our study demonstrated that the G allele of AT2R -1332 G:A polymorphism is associated with an increased risk of preeclampsia. Also, epistatic interaction of G allele and each allele of the AT1R C, ACE D and MMP-9 T was associated with the risk of preeclampsia. Our findings suggest that the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) variants and gene-gene interactions affect the risk of preeclampsia.

  16. Study of Selected Properties of Thermally Sprayed Coatings Containing WC and WB Hard Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brezinová Janette

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of research of the essential characteristics of two kinds of advanced coatings applied by HVOF technology. One studied coating: WB-WC-Co (60-30-10% contains two types of hard particles (WC and WB, the second coating is eco-friendly alternative to the previously used WC-based coatings, called “green carbides” with the composition WC-FeCrAl (85-15%. In green carbides coating the heavy metals (Co, Ni, NiCr forming the binding matrix in conventional wear-resistant coatings are replaced by more environmentally friendly matrix based on FeCrAl alloy. On the coatings was carried out: metallographic analysis, measurement of thickness, micro-hardness, adhesion, resistance to thermal cyclic loading and adhesive wear resistance (pin-on-disk test. One thermal cycle consisted of heating the coatings to 600°C, dwell for 10 minutes, and subsequently cooling on the still air. The number of thermal cycles: 10. The base material was stainless steel AISI 316L, pretreatment prior to application of the coating: blasting with white corundum, application device JP-5000.

  17. WprA基因在Bacillus subtilis WB800中的克隆表达%Clonging and Expression of a WprA gene in Bacillus subtilis WB800

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柴海云; 崔堂兵

    2012-01-01

    A fibrinolytic enzyme gene (WprA) was cloned from Bacillus subtilis 168. To efficiently express WprA in Bacillus subtilis WB800, WprA gene was inserted into pBE3 to yield a nove vector pBE-WprA. Then the vector pBE-WprA was transformed and expressed in Bacillus subtilis WB800. Results showed WprA gene was efficiently expressed during the exponential and stationary growth stages, and WprA was secreted into the medium.%对源自Bacillus subtilis 168的具有纤溶活性的基因序列(WprA)进行克隆,然后将WprA基因克隆到大肠杆菌-枯草杆菌穿梭载体pBE3中,构建表达载体pBE-WprA,将重组载体转化到Bacillus subtilis WB800中,实现了WprA基因在Bacillus subtilis WB800中的表达.结果表明,WprA基因在Bacillus subtilis WB800中的对数生长期和平衡期均获得了表达,且产物被分泌到胞外.

  18. Gene transcript analysis blood values correlate with {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-somatostatin analog (SSA) PET/CT imaging in neuroendocrine tumors and can define disease status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodei, L. [European Institute of Oncology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Milan (Italy); Kidd, M.; Modlin, I.M.; Drozdov, I. [Wren Laboratories, Branford, CT (United States); Prasad, V. [Charite University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Berlin (Germany); Severi, S.; Paganelli, G. [Istituto Scientifico Romagnolo per lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori (IRST) IRCCS, Nuclear Medicine and Radiometabolic Units, Meldola (Italy); Ambrosini, V. [S. Orsola-Malpighi University Hospital, Nuclear Medicine, Bologna (Italy); Kwekkeboom, D.J.; Krenning, E.P. [Erasmus Medical Center Rotterdam, Nuclear Medicine Department, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Baum, R.P. [Zentralklinik Bad Berka, THERANOSTICS Center for Molecular Radiotherapy and Imaging, Bad Berka (Germany)

    2015-08-15

    Precise determination of neuroendocrine tumor (NET) disease status and response to therapy remains a rate-limiting concern for disease management. This reflects limitations in biomarker specificity and resolution capacity of imaging. In order to evaluate biomarker precision and identify if combinatorial blood molecular markers and imaging could provide added diagnostic value, we assessed the concordance between {sup 68}Ga-somatostatin analog (SSA) positron emission tomography (PET), circulating NET gene transcripts (NETest), chromogranin A (CgA), and Ki-67 in NETs. We utilized two independent patient groups with positive {sup 68}Ga-SSA PET: data set 1 ({sup 68}Ga-SSA PETs undertaken for peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT), as primary or salvage treatment, n = 27) and data set 2 ({sup 68}Ga-SSA PETs performed in patients referred for initial disease staging or restaging after various therapies, n = 22). We examined the maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}), circulating gene transcripts, CgA levels, and baseline Ki-67. Regression analyses, generalized linear modeling, and receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analyses were undertaken to determine the strength of the relationships. SUV{sub max} measured in two centers were mathematically evaluated (regression modeling) and determined to be comparable. Of 49 patients, 47 (96 %) exhibited a positive NETest. Twenty-six (54 %) had elevated CgA (χ{sup 2} = 20.1, p < 2.5 x 10{sup -6}). The majority (78 %) had Ki-67 < 20 %. Gene transcript scores were predictive of imaging with >95 % concordance and significantly correlated with SUV{sub max} (R {sup 2} = 0.31, root-mean-square error = 9.4). The genes MORF4L2 and somatostatin receptors SSTR1, 3, and 5 exhibited the highest correlation with SUV{sub max}. Progressive disease was identified by elevated levels of a quotient of MORF4L2 expression and SUV{sub max} [ROC-derived AUC (R {sup 2} = 0.7, p < 0.05)]. No statistical relationship was identified

  19. Clinical role of early dynamic FDG-PET/CT for the evaluation of renal cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakajima, Reiko; Abe, Koichiro; Sakai, Shuji [Tokyo Women' s Medical University, Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Kondo, Tsunenori; Tanabe, Kazunari [Tokyo Women' s Medical University, Department of Urology, Tokyo (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    We studied the usefulness of early dynamic (ED) and whole-body (WB) FDG-PET/CT for the evaluation of renal cell carcinoma (RCC). One hundred patients with 107 tumours underwent kidney ED and WB FDG-PET/CT. We visually and semiquantitatively evaluated the FDG accumulation in RCCs in the ED and WB phases, and compared the accumulation values with regard to histological type (clear cell carcinoma [CCC] vs. non-clear cell carcinoma [N-CCC]), the TNM stage (high stage [3-4] vs. low stage [1-2]), the Fuhrman grade (high grade [3-4] vs. low grade [1-2]) and presence versus absence of venous (V) and lymphatic (Ly) invasion. In the ED phase, visual evaluation revealed no significant differences in FDG accumulation in terms of each item. However, the maximum standardized uptake value and tumour-to-normal tissue ratios were significantly higher in the CCCs compared to the N-CCCs (p < 0.001). In the WB phase, in contrast, significantly higher FDG accumulation (p < 0.001) was found in RCCs with a higher TNM stage, higher Furman grade, and the presence of V and Ly invasion in both the visual and the semiquantitative evaluations. ED and WB FDG-PET/CT is a useful tool for the evaluation of RCCs. (orig.)

  20. A new turn on coumarin-based fluorescence probe for Ga3 + detection in aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Liqiang; Zhou, Yan; Du, Wenqi; Kong, Zhineng; Qi, Zhengjian

    2016-02-01

    The probe CT was synthesized and investigated as a novel label-free chemosensor for Ga3 + detection in water. Probe CT showed remarkable selectivity and sensitivity for Ga3 + in Tris-HCl aqueous buffer solution (pH 7.0). The chemosensor responded rapidly to Ga3 + with a 1:1 stoichiometry. Meanwhile, the unapparent changes of fluorescence lifetime decays suggest the turn-on process of probe CT by Ga3 + which appears to be a static mechanism.

  1. Thoracic CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lungs; CT scan - chest Images CT scan Thyroid cancer - CT scan Pulmonary nodule, solitary - CT scan Lung mass, right upper ... Chest Injuries and Disorders CT Scans Emphysema Lung Cancer Lung Diseases Pleural Disorders Pneumonia Pulmonary Embolism Tuberculosis Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A. ...

  2. Cloning and Expression of the γ-Polyglutamic Acid Synthetase Gene pgsBCA in Bacillus subtilis WB600

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biaosheng Lin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To clone and express the γ-polyglutamic acid (γ-PGA synthetase gene pgsBCA in Bacillus subtilis, a pWB980 plasmid was used to construct and transfect the recombinant expression vector pWB980-pgsBCA into Bacillus subtilis WB600. PgsBCA was expressed under the action of a P43 promoter in the pWB980 plasmid. Our results showed that the recombinant bacteria had the capacity to synthesize γ-PGA. The expression product was secreted extracellularly into the fermentation broth, with a product yield of 1.74 g/L or higher. γ-PGA samples from the fermentation broth were purified and characterized. Hydrolysates of γ-PGA presented in single form, constituting simple glutamic acid only, which matched the characteristics of the infrared spectra of the γ-PGA standard, and presented as multimolecular aggregates with a molecular weight within the range of 500–600 kDa. Expressing the γ-PGA synthetase gene pgsBCA in B. subtilis system has potential industrial applications.

  3. Local recurrence of prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy is at risk to be missed in {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11-PET of PET/CT and PET/MRI: comparison with mpMRI integrated in simultaneous PET/MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freitag, Martin T. [Department of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Clinical Cooperation Unit Nuclear Medicine, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Radtke, Jan P. [Department of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Urology, Heidelberg (Germany); Afshar-Oromieh, Ali; Flechsig, Paul; Giesel, Frederik; Haberkorn, Uwe [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); Roethke, Matthias C.; Bonekamp, David; Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter [Department of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Hadaschik, Boris A.; Hohenfellner, Markus [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Urology, Heidelberg (Germany); Gleave, Martin [University of British Columbia, The Vancouver Prostate Centre, Vancouver (Canada); Kopka, Klaus; Eder, Matthias [Division of Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Heusser, Thorsten; Kachelriess, Marc [Department of Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Wieczorek, Kathrin [University Hospital Heidelberg, Institute of Pathology, Heidelberg (Germany); Sachpekidis, Christos; Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, A. [Clinical Cooperation Unit Nuclear Medicine, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2017-05-15

    The positron emission tomography (PET) tracer {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11, targeting the prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA), is rapidly excreted into the urinary tract. This leads to significant radioactivity in the bladder, which may limit the PET-detection of local recurrence (LR) of prostate cancer (PC) after radical prostatectomy (RP), developing in close proximity to the bladder. Here, we analyze if there is additional value of multi-parametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) compared to the {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11-PET-component of PET/CT or PET/MRI to detect LR. One hundred and nineteen patients with biochemical recurrence after prior RP underwent both hybrid {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11-PET/CT{sub low-dose} (1 h p.i.) and -PET/MRI (2-3 h p.i.) including a mpMRI protocol of the prostatic bed. The comparison of both methods was restricted to the abdomen with focus on LR (McNemar). Bladder-LR distance and recurrence size were measured in axial T2w-TSE. A logistic regression was performed to determine the influence of these variables on detectability in {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11-PET. Standardized-uptake-value (SUV{sub mean}) quantification of LR was performed. There were 93/119 patients that had at least one pathologic finding. In addition, 18/119 Patients (15.1%) were diagnosed with a LR in mpMRI of PET/MRI but only nine were PET-positive in PET/CT and PET/MRI. This mismatch was statistically significant (p = 0.004). Detection of LR using the PET-component was significantly influenced by proximity to the bladder (p = 0.028). The PET-pattern of LR-uptake was classified into three types (1): separated from bladder; (2): fuses with bladder, and (3): obliterated by bladder. The size of LRs did not affect PET-detectability (p = 0.84), mean size was 1.7 ± 0.69 cm long axis, 1.2 ± 0.46 cm short-axis. SUV{sub mean} in nine men was 8.7 ± 3.7 (PET/CT) and 7.0 ± 4.2 (PET/MRI) but could not be quantified in the remaining nine cases (obliterated by bladder). The present study demonstrates

  4. Hydrogen peroxide stimulates cell motile activity through LPA receptor-3 in liver epithelial WB-F344 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shibata, Ayano; Tanabe, Eriko; Inoue, Serina; Kitayoshi, Misaho; Okimoto, Souta; Hirane, Miku; Araki, Mutsumi [Division of Cancer Biology and Bioinformatics, Department of Life Science, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Kinki University, 3-4-1, Kowakae, Higashiosaka, Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Fukushima, Nobuyuki [Division of Molecular Neurobiology, Department of Life Science, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Kinki University, 3-4-1, Kowakae, Higashiosaka, Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi, E-mail: ttujiuch@life.kindai.ac.jp [Division of Cancer Biology and Bioinformatics, Department of Life Science, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Kinki University, 3-4-1, Kowakae, Higashiosaka, Osaka 577-8502 (Japan)

    2013-04-12

    Highlights: •Hydrogen peroxide stimulates cell motility of WB-F344 cells. •LPA{sub 3} is induced by hydrogen peroxide in WB-F344 cells. •Cell motility by hydrogen peroxide is inhibited in LPA{sub 3} knockdown cells. •LPA signaling is involved in cell migration by hydrogen peroxide. -- Abstract: Hydrogen peroxide which is one of reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediates a variety of biological responses, including cell proliferation and migration. In the present study, we investigated whether lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) signaling is involved in cell motile activity stimulated by hydrogen peroxide. The rat liver epithelial WB-F344 cells were treated with hydrogen peroxide at 0.1 or 1 μM for 48 h. In cell motility assays, hydrogen peroxide treated cells showed significantly high cell motile activity, compared with untreated cells. To measure the expression levels of LPA receptor genes, quantitative real time RT-PCR analysis was performed. The expressions of LPA receptor-3 (Lpar3) in hydrogen peroxide treated cells were significantly higher than those in control cells, but not Lpar1 and Lpar2 genes. Next, to assess the effect of LPA{sub 3} on cell motile activity, the Lpar3 knockdown cells from WB-F344 cells were also treated with hydrogen peroxide. The cell motile activity of the knockdown cells was not stimulated by hydrogen peroxide. Moreover, in liver cancer cells, hydrogen peroxide significantly activated cell motility of Lpar3-expressing cells, but not Lpar3-unexpressing cells. These results suggest that LPA signaling via LPA{sub 3} may be mainly involved in cell motile activity of WB-F344 cells stimulated by hydrogen peroxide.

  5. The first family with Tay-Sachs disease in Cyprus: Genetic analysis reveals a nonsense (c.78G>A) and a silent (c.1305C>T) mutation and allows preimplantation genetic diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiou, Theodoros; Christopoulos, George; Anastasiadou, Violetta; Hadjiloizou, Stavros; Cregeen, David; Jackson, Marie; Mavrikiou, Gavriella; Kleanthous, Marina; Drousiotou, Anthi

    2014-12-01

    Tay-Sachs disease (TSD) is a recessively inherited neurodegenerative disorder caused by mutations in the HEXA gene resulting in β-hexosaminidase A (HEX A) deficiency and neuronal accumulation of GM2 ganglioside. We describe the first patient with Tay-Sachs disease in the Cypriot population, a juvenile case which presented with developmental regression at the age of five. The diagnosis was confirmed by measurement of HEXA activity in plasma, peripheral leucocytes and fibroblasts. Sequencing the HEXA gene resulted in the identification of two previously described mutations: the nonsense mutation c.78G>A (p.Trp26X) and the silent mutation c.1305C>T (p.=). The silent mutation was reported once before in a juvenile TSD patient of West Indian origin with an unusually mild phenotype. The presence of this mutation in another juvenile TSD patient provides further evidence that it is a disease-causing mutation. Successful preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) and prenatal follow-up were provided to the couple.

  6. Polifonia nelle antologie di W.B. Yeats: il dialogo complesso tra folklore e letteratura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vito Carrassi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Compiling and publishing a folk narrative anthology is anything but a trivial, neutral undertaking, especially if this is set in a period of great literary and cultural fervour as was the late XIX century in Ireland. With his Fairy and Folk Tales of the Irish Peasantry (1888 and Irish Fairy Tales (1892 W.B. Yeats gives rise to a complex narrative system in which, necessarily, heterogeneous, if not contradictory voices and points of view meet, and the editor’s task is precisely to make this polyphony work. In the anthologized stories one observes the overlapping and interweaving of narrative levels that reflect a wide range of ideas, beliefs, knowledge, values from which emerges a picture of cultural and social Irish stratification, as well as of relationships being established between the lower and ruling classes, folklore and literature, orality and literacy. After examining in general the folk narrative anthology as an inherently polyphonic object, I propose a specific reading of the Yeatsian collections, focusing in particular on the paratextual apparatus, namely on the borders, the frames of the text – where interactions take place between several narrative levels, as well as historical, cultural, and social meanings – in order to identify, if possible, elements of unity and coherence in a system constitutively plurivocal and open to a variety of interpretations.

  7. Whole-body MR imaging with the use of parallel imaging for detection of skeletal metastases in pediatric patients with small-cell neoplasms: comparison with skeletal scintigraphy and FDG PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Jyoti [Maulana Azad Medical College, Department of Radiology, New Delhi (India); Seith, Ashu; Kumar, Atin; Sharma, Raju [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Radiology, New Delhi (India); Bakhshi, Sameer [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Medical Oncology, New Delhi (India); Kumar, Rakesh [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Nuclear Medicine, New Delhi (India); Agarwala, Sandeep [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Pediatric Surgery, New Delhi (India)

    2008-09-15

    In pediatric patients with small-cell tumors, there is an increasing demand for accurate and early detection of skeletal, especially bone marrow, metastases as new treatment protocols are introduced. Whole-body MR imaging (WB-MR) and {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET/CT (FDG PET/CT) are new promising imaging methods that can detect metastases before osteoblastic host response occurs, which is the basis for detection of metastases by skeletal scintigraphy (SSC). To assess the ability of WB-MR to detect marrow metastases in children with small-cell neoplasms and compare its performance with that of FDG PET/CT and SSC. During a 16-month period, 26 children and adolescents with histopathologically proven small-cell neoplasms underwent WB-MR, FDG PET/CT and Tc-phosphonate-based SSC in a random order within a 25-day period. Metastases were localized in relation to eight regions of the body. WB-MR revealed metastases in 39 out of a total of 208 regions in 26 patients (sensitivity 97.5%, specificity 99.4%, positive predictive value 97.5%, negative predictive value 99.4%), SSC in 12 regions (sensitivity 30%, specificity 99.4%, PPV 92.3%, NPV 85.6%) and FDG PET/CT in 36 regions (sensitivity 90.0%, specificity 100%, PPV 100%, NPV 97.7%). Both WB-MR and FDG PET/CT showed excellent agreement (kappa) with the final diagnosis (96.9% and 93.6% respectively), whereas SSC showed only moderate agreement (39.6%). Our results suggest that WB-MR and FDG PET/CT studies are robust imaging modalities for screening for skeletal metastases, and are far more accurate than SSC. The lack of radiation is an additional advantage of WB-MR, especially in the pediatric population. (orig.)

  8. Can technical characteristics predict clinical performance in PET/CT imaging? A correlation study for thyroid cancer diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallergi, Maria; Menychtas, Dimitrios; Georgakopoulos, Alexandros; Pianou, Nikoletta; Metaxas, Marinos; Chatziioannou, Sofia

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether image characteristics could be used to predict the outcome of ROC studies in PET/CT imaging. Patients suspected for recurrent thyroid cancer underwent a standard whole body (WB) examination and an additional high-resolution head-and-neck (HN) F18-FDG PET/CT scan. The value of the latter was determined with an ROC study, the results of which showed that the WB+HN combination was better than WB alone for thyroid cancer detection and diagnosis. Following the ROC experiment, the WB and HN images of confirmed benign or malignant thyroid disease were analyzed and first and second order textural features were determined. Features included minimum, mean, and maximum intensity, as well as contrast in regions of interest encircling the thyroid lesions. Lesion size and standard uptake values (SUV) were also determined. Bivariate analysis was applied to determine relationships between WB and HN features and between observer ROC responses and the various feature values. The two sets showed significant associations in the values of SUV, contrast, and lesion size. They were completely different when the intensities were considered; no relationship was found between the WB minimum, maximum, and mean ROI values and their HN counterparts. SUV and contrast were the strongest predictors of ROC performance on PET/CT examinations of thyroid cancer. The high resolution HN images seem to enhance these relationships but without a single dramatic effect as was projected from the ROC results. A combination of features from both WB and HN datasets may possibly be a more robust predictor of ROC performance.

  9. Impact of BDNF -196 G>A and BDNF -270 C>T polymorphisms on stroke rehabilitation outcome: sex and age differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirowska-Guzel, Dagmara; Gromadzka, Grazyna; Mendel, Tadeusz; Janus-Laszuk, Barbara; Dzierka, Justyna; Sarzynska-Dlugosz, Iwona; Czlonkowski, Andrzej; Czlonkowska, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Genetic factors, including gene polymorphisms, are promising in determining stroke rehabilitation outcome. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is one of the most attractive because of its role in neuroplasticity and brain repair. The aim of present study was to assess the role of BDNF -196 G≯A (val66met) and -270 C≯T on clinical parameters and functional outcome in patients with ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. Additional analyses according to sex and age (≤55 and ≯55 years) were performed. Three hundred thirty-eight patients (287 with ischemic and 51 with hemorrhagic stroke) were evaluated in terms of neurological deficit (National Institute of Heath Stroke Scale [NIHSS]), activities of daily living (Barthel Index [BI]), and everyday functionality (Rankin score [RS]) before and after rehabilitation. BDNF polymorphism genotyping was performed by polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. In multivariative analysis, unfavorable outcome of stroke rehabilitation (RS ≥2) was associated with independent factors: ischemic stroke (odds ratio [OR], 2.59; 95% CI, 1.03-6.47), female gender (OR, 2.80; 95% CI, 1.39-5.64), depression (OR, 4.24; 95% CI, 1.45-12.35), falls (OR, 2.61; 95% CI, 1.16-5.87), and BDNF -196 GG polymorphism (OR, 2.18; 95% CI, 1.09-4.35). The differences of functional parameters measured with BI and RS on admission and at discharge are apparent only for comparisons between patients ≤55 and ≯55 years old carrying BDNF -196 GA+AA genotypes but not in those carrying -196 GG genotype; the differences were evident in women but not in men. BDNF -196 G≯A polymorphism might affect functional outcome of stroke rehabilitation, but this hypothesis needs further verification.

  10. Involvement of β-catenin in matrine-induced autophagy and apoptosis in WB-F344 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Bu-Shan; He, Xing-Xing; Ai, Zheng-Lin; Yao, Shu-Kun

    2014-06-01

    Matrine, one of the main components extracted from Sophora flavescens, has exhibited pharmacological effects on the differentiation in rat liver oval cells. However, its function and mechanism have not yet been fully elucidated. To further investigate them, an in vitro model was established using a rat liver oval cell line called WB-F344 and treated with matrine. Initially, a significant increase in the number of monodansylcadaverine-positive cells and in the levels of microtubule-associated protein 1A/1B-light chain 3 (LC3)-II, which is a specific marker for detecting autophagy, was observed in matrine-treated cells. This indicated that autophagy was stimulated by matrine, which was further confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. Additionally, the apoptotic oval cells were easily detected under matrine treatment using an Annexin-V-fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium iodide assay, indicating that autophagy and apoptosis were synchronously induced by matrine. A decrease in B-cell lymphoma (Bcl-2) mRNA expression, but an increase in Bcl2-associated X protein (Bax) mRNA expression were observed in matrine-treated cells, which led to an upregulation of the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, a molecular marker for determining the extent of apoptosis. Next, the molecular mechanism of matrine-induced autophagy and apoptosis was analyzed in WB-F344 cells. β-catenin degradation was downregulated by matrine and rapamycin, a foregone chemical agonist of autophagy, whereas it was upregulated by 3-methyladenine, a specific inhibitor of autophagy. Additionally, β-catenin activation induced an increase in LC3-II levels and reversed the Bax/Bcl-2 mRNA ratio under matrine treatment, whereas inhibition of β-catenin by RNA interference induced a decrease of the LC3-II amount and of the Bax/Bcl-2 mRNA ratio. Finally, matrine treatment attenuated p53; however, with little or no change in LC3-II levels, but a decrease in β-catenin levels occurred in WB-F344 cells upon treatment with pifithrin

  11. {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT and somatostatin receptor (sst1-sst5) expression in normal human tissue: correlation of sst2 mRNA and SUV{sub max}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boy, Christian; Poeppel, Thorsten D.; Jentzen, Walter; Brandau, Wolfgang; Bockisch, Andreas [University Hospital Essen, University of Duisburg-Essen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Essen (Germany); Heusner, Till A.; Antoch, Gerald [University Hospital Essen, University of Duisburg-Essen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany); Redmann-Bischofs, Anja; Unger, Nicole; Mann, Klaus; Petersenn, Stephan [University of Duisburg-Essen, Department of Endocrinology and Division of Laboratory Research, Essen (Germany)

    2011-07-15

    By targeting somatostatin receptors (sst) radiopeptides have been established for both diagnosis and therapy. For physiologically normal human tissues the study provides a normative database of maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}) and sst mRNA. A total of 120 patients were subjected to diagnostic {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC positron emission tomography (PET)/CT (age range 19-83 years). SUV{sub max} values were measured in physiologically normal tissues defined by normal morphology, absence of surgical intervention and absence of metastatic spread during clinical follow-up. Expression of sst subtypes (sst1-sst5) was measured independently in pooled adult normal human tissue by real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). SUV{sub max} revealed a region-specific pattern (e.g., mean {+-} SD, spleen 31.1 {+-} 10.9, kidney 16.9 {+-} 5.3, liver 12.8 {+-} 3.6, stomach 7.0 {+-} 3.1, head of pancreas 6.2 {+-} 2.3, small bowel 4.8 {+-} 1.8, thyroid 4.7 {+-} 2.2, bone 3.9 {+-} 1.3, large bowel 2.9 {+-} 0.8, muscle 2.1 {+-} 0.5, parotid gland 1.9 {+-} 0.6, axillary lymph node 0.8 {+-} 0.3 and lung 0.7 {+-} 0.3). SUV{sub max} was age independent. Gender differences were evident within the thyroid (female/male: 3.7 {+-} 1.6/5.5 {+-} 2.4, p < 0.001; Mann-Whitney U test) and the pancreatic head (5.5 {+-} 1.9/6.9 {+-} 2.2, p < 0.001). The sst mRNA was widely expressed and heterogeneous, showing sst1 to be most abundant. SUV{sub max} values exclusively correlated with sst2 expression (r = 0.846, p < 0.001; Spearman rank correlation analysis), whereas there was no correlation of SUV{sub max} with the expression of the other four subtypes. In normal human tissues {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC imaging has been related to the expression of sst2 at the level of mRNA. The novel normative database may improve diagnostics, monitoring and therapy of sst-expressing tumours or inflammation on a molecular basis. (orig.)

  12. Concerted evolution of the tandemly repeated genes encoding primate U2 small nuclear RNA (the RNU2 locus) does not prevent rapid diversification of the (CT){sub n} {center_dot} (GA){sub n} microsatellite embedded within the U2 repeat unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, D.; Weiner, A.M. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States)

    1995-12-10

    The RNU2 locus encoding human U2 small nuclear RNA (snRNA) is organized as a nearly perfect tandem array containing 5 to 22 copies of a 5.8-kb repeat unit. Just downstream of the U2 snRNA gene in each 5.8-kb repeat unit lies a large (CT){sub n}{center_dot}(GA){sub n} dinucleotide repeat (n {approx} 70). This form of genomic organization, in which one repeat is embedded within another, provides an unusual opportunity to study the balance of forces maintaining the homogeneity of both kinds of repeats. Using a combination of field inversion gel electrophoresis and polymerase chain reaction, we have been able to study the CT microsatellites within individual U2 tandem arrays. We find that the CT microsatellites within an RNU2 allele exhibit significant length polymorphism, despite the remarkable homogeneity of the surrounding U2 repeat units. Length polymorphism is due primarily to loss or gain of CT dinucleotide repeats, but other types of deletions, insertions, and substitutions are also frequent. Polymorphism is greatly reduced in regions where pure (CT){sub n} tracts are interrupted by occasional G residues, suggesting that irregularities stabilize both the length and the sequence of the dinucleotide repeat. We further show that the RNU2 loci of other catarrhine primates (gorilla, chimpanzee, ogangutan, and baboon) contain orthologous CT microsatellites; these also exhibit length polymorphism, but are highly divergent from each other. Thus, although the CT microsatellite is evolving far more rapidly than the rest of the U2 repeat unit, it has persisted through multiple speciation events spanning >35 Myr. The persistence of the CT microsatellite, despite polymorphism and rapid evolution, suggests that it might play a functional role in concerted evolution of the RNU2 loci, perhaps as an initiation site for recombination and/or gene conversion. 70 refs., 5 figs.

  13. A Search Complexity Improvement of Vector Quantization to Immittance Spectral Frequency Coefficients in AMR-WB Speech Codec

    OpenAIRE

    Bing-Jhih Yao; Cheng-Yu Yeh; Shaw-Hwa Hwang

    2016-01-01

    An adaptive multi-rate wideband (AMR-WB) code is a speech codec developed on the basis of an algebraic code-excited linear-prediction (ACELP) coding technique, and has a double advantage of low bit rates and high speech quality. This coding technique is widely used in modern mobile communication systems for a high speech quality in handheld devices. However, a major disadvantage is that a vector quantization (VQ) of immittance spectral frequency (ISF) coefficients occupies a significant compu...

  14. A Search Complexity Improvement of Vector Quantization to Immittance Spectral Frequency Coefficients in AMR-WB Speech Codec

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing-Jhih Yao

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available An adaptive multi-rate wideband (AMR-WB code is a speech codec developed on the basis of an algebraic code-excited linear-prediction (ACELP coding technique, and has a double advantage of low bit rates and high speech quality. This coding technique is widely used in modern mobile communication systems for a high speech quality in handheld devices. However, a major disadvantage is that a vector quantization (VQ of immittance spectral frequency (ISF coefficients occupies a significant computational load in the AMR-WB encoder. Hence, this paper presents a triangular inequality elimination (TIE algorithm combined with a dynamic mechanism and an intersection mechanism, abbreviated as the DI-TIE algorithm, to remarkably improve the complexity of ISF coefficient quantization in the AMR-WB speech codec. Both mechanisms are designed in a way that recursively enhances the performance of the TIE algorithm. At the end of this work, this proposal is experimentally validated as a superior search algorithm relative to a conventional TIE, a multiple TIE (MTIE, and an equal-average equal-variance equal-norm nearest neighbor search (EEENNS approach. With a full search algorithm as a benchmark for search load comparison, this work provides a search load reduction above 77%, a figure far beyond 36% in the TIE, 49% in the MTIE, and 68% in the EEENNS approach.

  15. Hydrogen peroxide stimulates cell motile activity through LPA receptor-3 in liver epithelial WB-F344 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Ayano; Tanabe, Eriko; Inoue, Serina; Kitayoshi, Misaho; Okimoto, Souta; Hirane, Miku; Araki, Mutsumi; Fukushima, Nobuyuki; Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi

    2013-04-12

    Hydrogen peroxide which is one of reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediates a variety of biological responses, including cell proliferation and migration. In the present study, we investigated whether lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) signaling is involved in cell motile activity stimulated by hydrogen peroxide. The rat liver epithelial WB-F344 cells were treated with hydrogen peroxide at 0.1 or 1 μM for 48 h. In cell motility assays, hydrogen peroxide treated cells showed significantly high cell motile activity, compared with untreated cells. To measure the expression levels of LPA receptor genes, quantitative real time RT-PCR analysis was performed. The expressions of LPA receptor-3 (Lpar3) in hydrogen peroxide treated cells were significantly higher than those in control cells, but not Lpar1 and Lpar2 genes. Next, to assess the effect of LPA3 on cell motile activity, the Lpar3 knockdown cells from WB-F344 cells were also treated with hydrogen peroxide. The cell motile activity of the knockdown cells was not stimulated by hydrogen peroxide. Moreover, in liver cancer cells, hydrogen peroxide significantly activated cell motility of Lpar3-expressing cells, but not Lpar3-unexpressing cells. These results suggest that LPA signaling via LPA3 may be mainly involved in cell motile activity of WB-F344 cells stimulated by hydrogen peroxide.

  16. Differences in Nanosecond Laser Ablation and Deposition of Tungsten, Boron, and WB2/B Composite due to Optical Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Moscicki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The first attempt to the deposition of WB3 films using nanosecond Nd:YAG laser demonstrated that deposited coatings are superhard. However, they have very high roughness. The deposited films consisted mainly of droplets. Therefore, in the present work, the explanation of this phenomenon is conducted. The interaction of Nd:YAG nanosecond laser pulse with tungsten, boron, and WB2/B target during ablation is investigated. The studies show the fundamental differences in ablation of those materials. The ablation of tungsten is thermal and occurs due to only evaporation. In the same conditions, during ablation of boron, the phase explosion and/or fragmentation due to recoil pressure is observed. The deposited films have a significant contribution of big debris with irregular shape. In the case of WB2/B composite, ablation is significantly different. The ablation seems to be the detonation in the liquid phase. The deposition mechanism is related mainly to the mechanical transport of the target material in the form of droplets, while the gaseous phase plays marginal role. The main origin of differences is optical properties of studied materials. A method estimating phase explosion occurrence based on material data such as critical temperature, thermal diffusivity, and optical properties is shown. Moreover, the effect of laser wavelength on the ablation process and the quality of the deposited films is discussed.

  17. Nerve Sheath Tumors in Neurofibromatosis Type 1: Assessment of Whole-Body Metabolic Tumor Burden Using F-18-FDG PET/CT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Salamon

    Full Text Available To determine the metabolically active whole-body tumor volume (WB-MTV on F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (F-18-FDG PET/CT in individuals with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1 using a three-dimensional (3D segmentation and computerized volumetry technique, and to compare PET WB-MTV between patients with benign and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (PNSTs.Thirty-six NF1 patients (18 patients with malignant PNSTs and 18 age- and sex-matched controls with benign PNSTs were examined by F-18-FDG PET/CT. WB-MTV, whole-body total lesion glycolysis (WB-TLG and a set of semi-quantitative imaging-based parameters were analyzed both on a per-patient and a per-lesion basis.On a per-lesion basis, malignant PNSTs demonstrated both a significantly higher MTV and TLG than benign PNSTs (p < 0.0001. On a per-patient basis, WB-MTV and WB-TLG were significantly higher in patients with malignant PNSTs compared to patients with benign PNSTs (p < 0.001. ROC analysis showed that MTV and TLG could be used to differentiate between benign and malignant tumors.WB-MTV and WB-TLG may identify malignant change and may have the potential to provide a basis for investigating molecular biomarkers that correlate with metabolically active disease manifestations. Further evaluation will determine the potential clinical impact of these PET-based parameters in NF1.

  18. Electroless deposition of NiWB alloy on p-type Si(1 0 0) for NiSi contact metallization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duhin, A. [Department of Physical Electronics, Engineer Faculty, Tel-Aviv University, Ramat-Aviv 69978 (Israel)], E-mail: alla.douhin@gmail.com; Sverdlov, Y. [Department of Physical Electronics, Engineer Faculty, Tel-Aviv University, Ramat-Aviv 69978 (Israel); Feldman, Y. [Department of Materials and Interfaces, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Shacham-Diamand, Y. [Department of Physical Electronics, Engineer Faculty, Tel-Aviv University, Ramat-Aviv 69978 (Israel)

    2009-10-30

    Recently, we have proposed a novel method to form NiSi contacts using electroless plating of Ni-alloys (NiP, NiWP, NiWB) on p-type Si(1 0 0) modified by aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTS) activated with Pd-citrate [A. Duhin, Y. Sverdlov, Yishay Feldman, Y. Shacham-Diamand, Microelectron. Eng. 84 (2007) 2506]. In this work we focus on NiWB thin films that were formed by this method. Alkali metal free electroless plating was developed using dimethylamine-borane (DMAB) and tungstatic acid (H{sub 2}WO{sub 4}) as a reducing agent and a source of tungsten ions, respectively. Using this method we succeeded to receive relatively high tungsten concentration (maximum value of 19-21 at%) in the electroless deposited NiWB films with good adhesion to the Si-substrate. In this paper, the advantages of using the APTS activated with Pd-citrate for NiWB alloy deposition on the Si substrate is discussed. The chemically deposited NiWB samples were annealed for 1-2 h in vacuum (<10{sup -6} Torr) forming the silicide layer. The annealing temperatures were 650 deg. C for NiWB alloys. X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurement confirmed the presence of NiSi phase after annealing. In addition the WSi{sub 2} phase was formed. The results are reported and summarized.

  19. Syphilis serology: Seroprevalence in a selected population and considerations on the Euroline WB test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Amodeo

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The clinical diagnosis of syphilis is always supported by appropriate laboratory tests and the test results are interpreted with reference to the patient’s history. In the diagnosis of syphilis, the use of tests based on antibody search that recognize both treponemal and reaginic antigens increases the diagnostic chances. Our study discusses the various serological and alternative tests currently available along with their limitations, and relates their results to the likely corresponding clinical stage of the disease. Methods: in our laboratory were analyzed 264 sera and 4 liquor (123 Females, 145 Males. 187 patients are subject at low risk for luetic infection, including pregnant woman, patient with organ transplant, outpatients or hospitalized undergoing routine serological, and 81 from patients with confirmed syphilis including 4 pregnant women in antibiotic treatment, patients with suspected disease, HIV positive and patients with autoimmune diseases with Cardiolipin positive. All sera were tested with ELISA Anti-Treponema pallidum Screen (IgG / IgM and in parallel with agglutination tests VDRL and TPHA. On all positive sera was tested Euroline-WB EUROIMMUN and reading done with the program EuroLineScan. Results: by ELISA Anti-Treponema pallidum Screen IgG / IgM 162 sera were negative and 106 sera positive (39.5%, distributed as follows: 45 (42% with a value greater than 200 RU / ml, 43 (41% with a value> 22 RU / ml and 18 (17% with a borderline value between> 16 to <22 RU / ml. The execution of the Blot IgG showed: 18 negative sera, 6 with borderline value with one only band of specific antigens (p15, p45, p47 or p17, while 82, including 4 liquor (neurolue, were certainly positive showing more than one band antibody to the treponemal antigens. Only one patient had in place at the time of screening, an initial infection; in fact, there was a single clear positivity in the IgM protein bands, while 7 sera was uncertain values

  20. Polimorfismos do gene da interleucina-13 nas posições -1055 C/T e +2044 G/A em pacientes com carcinoma espinocelular de cabeça e pescoço Interleukin-13 gene polymorphisms at -1055 C/T and +2044 G/A positions in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bijan Khademi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available O carcinoma espinocelular (CEC é a neoplasia mais comum do trato aerodigestivo superior. A interleucina-13 (IL-13 é uma citocina imunorreguladora com polimorfismos relatados para seu gene associados com a mesma doença, especialmente asma e alergia. O presente estudo investigou se os polimorfismos do gene da IL-13 (posições 1055C/T no gene promotor da 1L-13 e +2044G/T exon 4 podem distinguir os pacientes com CEC de cabeça e pescoço de controles saudáveis. MÉTODO: O estudo analisou pacientes com CEC de cabeça e pescoço (n = 137 pareados por idade e sexo com um grupo de controles saudáveis (n = 127. A genotipagem do polimorfismo do gene da IL-13 foi executada pelo método de polimorfismo no comprimento de fragmentos de restrição baseado em reação em cadeia da polimerase. RESULTADOS: Não foram identificadas diferenças estatisticamente significativas nas frequências dos genótipos e alelos entre pacientes e controles em ambas as posições (p = 0,16. Além disso, não foi observada associação entre os genótipos investigados e outros fatores prognósticos, como idade, sexo, localização do tumor primário, tamanho do tumor e tabagismo. CONCLUSÃO: O presente estudo sugere que não há associação entre os polimorfismos do gene da IL-13 (nas posições -1055C/T e +2044GI A e suscetibilidade dos pacientes a CEC de cabeça e pescoço.Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC is the most common malignancy that involves the upper aerodigestive tract. Interleukin-13 (IL-13 is an immunoregulatory cytokine that has been reported to have some polymorphisms in it gene associated with same disease especially asthma and allergy. The present study aimed to investigate whether the polymorphisms of IL-13 gene (at positions of 1055C/T in the promoter of1L-13 gene and +2044G/T exon-4 differ in patients with head and neck SCC from healthy controls. METHODS: This study was investigated in patient with head and neck SCC (n = 137 and age- and sex

  1. Precision measurement of the ratio B(t→Wb)/B(t→Wq) and extraction of V(tb).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Aoki, M; Arov, M; Askew, A; Åsman, B; Atramentov, O; Avila, C; BackusMayes, J; Badaud, F; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bazterra, V; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Blazey, G; Blessing, S; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brandt, O; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Brown, J; Bu, X B; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Calpas, B; Camacho-Pérez, E; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M A; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Chen, G; Chevalier-Théry, S; Cho, D K; Cho, S W; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clutter, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Croc, A; Cutts, D; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Deterre, C; DeVaughan, K; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Ding, P F; Dominguez, A; Dorland, T; Dubey, A; Dudko, L V; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dutt, S; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Facini, G; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fuess, S; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geng, W; Gerbaudo, D; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Ginther, G; Golovanov, G; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guillemin, T; Guo, F; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Han, L; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hauptman, J M; Hays, J; Head, T; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegab, H; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Heredia-De La Cruz, I; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hoang, T; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hohlfeld, M; Hubacek, Z; Huske, N; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Ilchenko, Y; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jamin, D; Jayasinghe, A; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, M; Johnston, D; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Joshi, J; Jung, A W; Juste, A; Kaadze, K; Kajfasz, E; Karmanov, D; Kasper, P A; Katsanos, I; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y N; Kirby, M H; Kohli, J M; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Kulikov, S; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kurča, T; Kuzmin, V A; Kvita, J; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lebrun, P; Lee, H S; Lee, S W; Lee, W M; Lellouch, J; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lietti, S M; Lim, J K; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lopes de Sa, R; Lubatti, H J; Luna-Garcia, R; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Madar, R; Magaña-Villalba, R; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Maravin, Y; Martínez-Ortega, J; McCarthy, R; McGivern, C L; Meijer, M M; Melnitchouk, A; Menezes, D; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Miconi, F; Mondal, N K; Muanza, G S; Mulhearn, M; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Nayyar, R; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; Obrant, G; Orduna, J; Osman, N; Osta, J; Otero y Garzón, G J; Padilla, M; Pal, A; Parashar, N; Parihar, V; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Petridis, K; Petrillo, G; Pétroff, P; Piegaia, R; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Polozov, P; Popov, A V; Prewitt, M; Price, D; Prokopenko, N; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rangel, M S; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Razumov, I; Renkel, P; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Rominsky, M; Ross, A; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Salcido, P; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Sanghi, B; Santos, A S; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schliephake, T; Schlobohm, S; Schwanenberger, C; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Smith, K J; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Soustruznik, K; Stark, J; Stolin, V; Stoyanova, D A; Strauss, M; Strom, D; Stutte, L; Suter, L; Svoisky, P; Takahashi, M; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tsai, Y-T; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Vesterinen, M; Vilanova, D; Vokac, P; Wahl, H D; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, M; Welty-Rieger, L; White, A; Wicke, D; Williams, M R J; Wilson, G W; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Xu, C; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yang, W-C; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Ye, Z; Yin, H; Yip, K; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Zelitch, S; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zivkovic, L

    2011-09-16

    We present a measurement of the ratio of top quark branching fractions R=B(t→Wb)/B(t→Wq), where q can be a d, s, or b quark, in the lepton+jets and dilepton tt final states. The measurement uses data from 5.4 fb(-1) of pp collisions collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. We measure R=0.90±0.04, and we extract the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix element |V(tb)| as |V(tb)|=0.95±0.02, assuming unitarity of the 3×3 CKM matrix.

  2. Head CT scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brain CT; Cranial CT; CT scan - skull; CT scan - head; CT scan - orbits; CT scan - sinuses; Computed tomography - cranial; CAT scan - brain ... hold your breath for short periods. A complete scan usually take only 30 seconds to a few ...

  3. Meningiomas: a comparative study of 68Ga-DOTATOC, 68Ga-DOTANOC and 68Ga-DOTATATE for molecular imaging in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Luisa Soto-Montenegro

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The goal of this study was to compare the tumor uptake kinetics and diagnostic value of three (68Ga-DOTA-labeled somatostatin analogues ((68Ga-DOTATOC, (68Ga-DOTANOC, and (68Ga-DOTATATE using PET/CT in a murine model with subcutaneous meningioma xenografts. METHODS: The experiment was performed with 16 male NUDE NU/NU mice bearing xenografts of a human meningioma cell line (CH-157MN. (68Ga-DOTATOC, (68Ga-DOTANOC, and (68Ga-DOTATATE were produced in a FASTLab automated platform. Imaging was performed on an Argus small-animal PET/CT scanner. The SUVmax of the liver and muscle, and the tumor-to-liver (T/L and tumor-to-muscle (T/M SUV ratios were computed. Kinetic analysis was performed using Logan graphical analysis for a two-tissue reversible compartmental model, and the volume of distribution (Vt was determined. RESULTS: Hepatic SUVmax and Vt were significantly higher with (68Ga-DOTANOC than with (68Ga-DOTATOC and (68Ga-DOTATATE. No significant differences between tracers were found for SUVmax in tumor or muscle. No differences were found in the T/L SUV ratio between (68Ga-DOTATATE and (68Ga-DOTATOC, both of which had a higher fraction than (68Ga-DOTANOC. The T/M SUV ratio was significantly higher with (68Ga-DOTATATE than with (68Ga-DOTATOC and (68Ga-DOTANOC. The Vt for tumor was higher with (68Ga-DOTATATE than with (68Ga-DOTANOC and relatively similar to that of (68Ga-DOTATOC. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates, for the first time, the ability of the three radiolabeled somatostatin analogues tested to image a human meningioma cell line. Although Vt was relatively similar with (68Ga-DOTATATE and (68Ga-DOTATOC, uptake was higher with (68Ga-DOTATATE in the tumor than with (68Ga-DOTANOC and (68Ga-DOTATOC, suggesting a higher diagnostic value of (68Ga-DOTATATE for detecting meningiomas.

  4. Wide-field wide-band interferometric imaging:The WB A-Projection and hybrid algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Bhatnagar, S; Golap, K

    2013-01-01

    Variations of the antenna primary beam (PB) pattern as a function of time, frequency and polarization form one of the dominant direction-dependent effects at most radio frequency bands. These gains may also vary from antenna to antenna. The A-Projection algorithm, published earlier, accounts for the effects of the narrow-band antenna PB in full polarization. In this paper we present the Wide-Band A-Projection algorithm (WB A-Projection) to include the effects of wide bandwidth in the A-term itself and show that the resulting algorithm simultaneously corrects for the time, frequency and polarization dependence of the PB. We discuss the combination of the WB A-Projection and the Multi-term Multi Frequency Synthesis (MT-MFS) algorithm for simultaneous mapping of the sky brightness distribution and the spectral index distribution across a wide field of view. We also discuss the use of the narrow-band A-Projection algorithm in hybrid imaging schemes that account for the frequency dependence of the PB in the image ...

  5. Relationship between simple obesity and fibrinogen Bβ-148C/T and Bβ448G/A gene polymorphism in children%儿童单纯性肥胖与纤维蛋白原Bβ-148C/T、Bβ448G/A基因多态性关系的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高捷; 赵凤珍; 张俊玲; 李宏芬; 元小冬

    2008-01-01

    Objective To study the correlation between simple obesity and flbrinogen Bβ-148C/T and Bβ448G/A gene polymorphism in children and to provide theoretical basis for children's imple obesity prevention.Methods 5ml fasting blood sample was taken from each patient.PCR and restriction enzyme digestion were used to detect the fibrinogen Bβ-148C/T and Bβ448G/A gene genotype.Results The genotype distribution of Bβ-148C/T was significantly different between simple obesity and normal controls(CC51/67, CT47/37 ,TT8/2, P =0.03 );The allele frequency in the children with simple obesity was higher than that of the healthy controls{ C 149/171 ,T63/41 ,P = 0.02).However, there was no significance between two groups in genotype distribution of Bβ 448G/A and allele frequency (GG61/69, AG41/32, AA4/5, G163/70, A49/42, P > 0.05 ). Conclusion There is significant cor-relation between simple obesity and fibrinogen Bβ-148 gene polymorphism in children but not between simple obesityand fibrinogen Bβ 448G/A gene polymorphism.%目的 研究纤维蛋白原Bβ-148C/T、Bβ448G/A 基因多态性与儿童单纯性肥胖的相关性,为防治儿童单纯性肥胖提供理论依据.方法 抽取空腹静脉血采用聚合酶链反应限制性酶切方法对纤维蛋白原Bβ-148C/T、Bβ448G/A位点的基因型进行测定.结果 发现Bβ-148C/T基因型的分布在单纯性肥胖组和正常体重组差异有统计学意义(CC 51/67,CT 47/37,TT 8/2,基因型分布P=0.03);儿童单纯性肥胖T等位基因频率明显高于健康对照组(C 149/171,T 63/41,等位基因频率P=0.02),而B13448G/A基因型及等位基因频率的分布在单纯性肥胖组和正常体重组差异无统计学意义(GG 61/69,AG41/32,AA4/5,G 163/70,A49/42,均为P0.05).结论 纤维蛋白原Bβ-148 C/T基因多态性与儿童单纯性肥胖有相关性.而Bβ448G/A基因多态性与儿童单纯性肥胖不相关.

  6. Cloning and Expression of cry2Ac4 Gene from Bacillus thuringiensis WB9%苏云金芽胞杆菌WB9菌株cry2Ac4基因的克隆及表达

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄天培; 潘洁茹; 黄张敏; 陈志; 庄浩瀚; 李今煜; 关雄

    2008-01-01

    苏云金芽胞杆菌(Bacillus thuringiensis,Bt)WB9是我国分离自武夷山的对多种重要农业害虫具有高毒力的菌株,经PCR-RFLP鉴定含有cry2Ac基因.根据cry2基因序列设计引物,以WB9质粒为模板扩增cry2Ac全长基因,与大肠杆菌(Es-chetichia cob)克隆载体pMD18-T连接获得含有cry2Ac全长基因的重组质粒pMD2Ac并测序.该基因在GenBank登录号为DQ361267.被Bt国际命名委员会正式命名为cry2Ac4.通过亚克隆方法将cry2Ac4基因插入穿梭表达载体pHT315获得重组表达质粒pHT2Ac,将其转化大肠杆菌SCS110和Bt无晶体突变株HD73 Cry,得到的工程菌能正常表达70 kD蛋白,形成方形晶体.生物测定结果表明,cry2Ae4基因表达产物对桔小实蝇(Bactrocera dorsalis Hendel)幼虫具有显著的毒杀作用,但对小菜蛾(Plutella xylostella)和致倦库蚊(Culex quinquefasciatus)幼虫基本没有效果.

  7. Measurement of B(t->Wb)/B(t->Wq) at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 1.96 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abazov, V M; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Agelou, M; Agram, J L; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Andeen, T; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Askew, A; Åsman, B; Assis-Jesus, A C S; Atramentov, O; Autermann, C; Avila, C; Ay, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barnes, C; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Bellavance, A; Benítez, J; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Berntzon, L; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Binder, M; Biscarat, C; Black, K M; Blackler, I; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Blumenschein, U; Böhnlein, A; Boeriu, O; Bolton, T A; Borcherding, F; Borissov, G; Bos, K; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Bühler, M; Büscher, V; Burdin, S; Burke, S; Burnett, T H; Busato, E; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Caron, S; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Cason, N M; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Chapin, D; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevallier, F; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Claes, D; Clement, B; Clément, C; Coadou, Y; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Coppage, D; Corcoran, M; Cousinou, M C; Cox, B; Crepe-Renaudin, S; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; Da Motta, H; Das, A; Das, M; Davies, B; Davies, G; Davis, G A; De, K; de Jong, P; De Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira-Martins, C; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Demine, P; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Doidge, M; Dong, H; Doulas, S; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Edwards, T; Ellison, J; Elmsheuser, J; Elvira, V D; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Estrada, J; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Fatakia, S N; Feligioni, L; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fleck, I; Ford, M; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Galyaev, E; García, C; García-Bellido, A; Gardner, J; Gavrilov, V; Gay, A; Gay, P; Gelé, D; Gelhaus, R; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Yu; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Golling, T; Gollub, N; Gómez, B; Gounder, K; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, P; Grivaz, J F; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, J; Gutíerrez, G; Gutíerrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Harder, K; Harel, A; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hooper, R; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jenkins, A; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Käfer, D; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J M; Kalk, J R; Karmanov, D; Kasper, J; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaur, R; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Kesisoglou, S; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A I; Kharzheev, Yu M; Khatidze, D; Kim, H; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J P; Kopal, M; Korablev, V M; Kotcher, J; Kothari, B; Koubarovsky, A; Kozelov, A V; Kozminski, J; Kryemadhi, A; Krzywdzinski, S; Kühl, T; Kumar, A; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kvita, J; Lager, S; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G L; Lazoflores, J; Le Bihan, A C; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lehner, F; Leonidopoulos, C; Lesne, V; Lévêque, J; Lewis, P; Li, J; Li, Q Z; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Lobo, L; Lobodenko, A; Lokajícek, M; Lounis, A; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Lynker, M; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Magnan, A M; Makovec, N; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martens, M; Mattingly, S E K; McCarthy, R; McCroskey, R; Meder, D; Melnitchouk, A; Mendes, A; Mendoza, L; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Michaut, M; Miettinen, H; Mitrevski, J; Molina, J; Mondal, N K; Monk, J; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mundim, L; Mutaf, Y D; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Nelson, S; Neustroev, P; Nöding, C; Nomerotski, A; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; Nurse, E; O'Dell, V; O'Neil, D C; Obrant, G; Oguri, V; Oliveira, N; Oshima, N; Otec, R; Oteroy-Garzon, G J; Owen, M; Padley, P; Parashar, N; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Perea, P M; Pérez, E; Petroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Pleier, M A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M E; Pompos, A; Pope, B G; Popov, A V; Prado da Silva, W L; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S D; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rani, K J; Ranjan, K; Rapidis, P A; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Reucroft, S; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F K; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Rud, V I; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santoro, A F S; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, A D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schieferdecker, P; Schmitt, C; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sen-Gupta, S; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shephard, W D; Shivpuri, R K; Shpakov, D; Siccardi, V; Sidwell, R A; Simák, V; Sirotenko, V I; Skubic, P L; Slattery, P F; Smith, R P; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Song, X; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Souza, M; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Steele, J; Stevenson, K; Stolin, V; Stone, A; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strang, M A; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Strovink, M; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Sznajder, A; Talby, M; Tamburello, P; Taylor, W; Telford, P; Temple, J; Tiller, B; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tomoto, M; Toole, T; Torchiani, I; Towers, S; Trefzger, T; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Turcot, A S; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; Vanden Berg, P J; Van Kooten, R; Van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vartapetian, A H; Vasilyev, I A; Vaupel, M; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Villeneuve-Séguier, F; Vlimant, J R; Von Törne, E; Voutilainen, M; Vreeswijk, M; Wahl, H D; Wang, L; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, M; Weerts, H; Wermes, N; Wetstein, M; White, A; White, V; Wicke, D; Wijngaarden, D A; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Womersley, J; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Xuan, N; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yan, M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yen, Y; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Yurkewicz, A; Zatserklyaniy, A; Zeitnitz, C; Zhang, D; Zhao, T; Zhao, Z; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zutshi, V

    2006-01-01

    We present the measurement of R = B(t->Wb)/B(t->Wq) in ppbar collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 1.96 TeV, using 230 pb-1 of data collected by the DO experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. We fit simultaneously R and the number of selected top quark pairs (ttbar), to the number of identified b-quark jets in events with one electron or one muon, three or more jets, and high transverse energy imbalance. To improve sensitivity, kinematical properties of events with no identified b-quark jets are included in the fit. We measure R = 1.03 +0.19 -0.17 (stat+syst), in good agreement with the standard model. We set lower limits of R > 0.61 and |V_tb| > 0.78 at 95% confidence level.

  8. Role of Ga-67 citrate imaging in pancreatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aburano, T.; Yokoyama, K.; Hisada, K.; Kakuma, K.; Ichiyanagi, K.

    1988-11-01

    Two patients with pancreatitis in whom an area of predominant uptake of Ga-67 citrate was demonstrated involving the entire pancreas are presented. Ultrasound and x-ray CT did not reveal any morphologic abnormalities in the pancreas, whereas Ga-67 citrate imaging indicated the presence of active inflammatory change. Ga-67 citrate imaging may be useful in confirming the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis or acute exacerbation of chronic pancreatitis based on clinical and laboratory data, especially when ultrasound and/or x-ray CT cannot reveal any morphologic abnormalities in the pancreas.

  9. Solid Phase Equilibria in the Pi-Ga-As and Pt-Ga-Sb Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-07-22

    OFFICE OF NAVAL RESEARCH Research Contract N00014-87-K-0014 R&T Code 413E026---01 AD-A 198 654 TECHNICAL REPORT No. 9 SOLID PHASE EQUILIBRIA IN THE...Classtcation) UNCLASSLFIED: Tech.Rept.#9 SOLID PHASE EQUILIBRIA IN T11: Pt-Ga-As AND Pt-Ga-Sb SYST’IS 12 PERSONAL AuTiOR(S) C.T. Tsai and R.S. Williats 13a TYPE

  10. Associations between UCP1 -3826A/G, UCP2 -866G/A, Ala55Val and Ins/Del, and UCP3 -55C/T polymorphisms and susceptibility to type 2 diabetes mellitus: case-control study and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca M de Souza

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Some studies have reported associations between five uncoupling protein (UCP 1-3 polymorphisms and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. However, other studies have failed to confirm the associations. This paper describes a case-control study and a meta-analysis conducted to attempt to determine whether the following polymorphisms are associated with T2DM: -3826A/G (UCP1; -866G/A, Ala55Val and Ins/Del (UCP2 and -55C/T (UCP3. METHODS: The case-control study enrolled 981 T2DM patients and 534 nondiabetic subjects, all of European ancestry. A literature search was run to identify all studies that investigated associations between UCP1-3 polymorphisms and T2DM. Pooled odds ratios (OR were calculated for allele contrast, additive, recessive, dominant and co-dominant inheritance models. Sensitivity analyses were performed after stratification by ethnicity. RESULTS: In the case-control study the frequencies of the UCP polymorphisms did not differ significantly between T2DM and nondiabetic groups (P>0.05. Twenty-three studies were eligible for the meta-analysis. Meta-analysis results showed that the Ala55Val polymorphism was associated with T2DM under a dominant model (OR = 1.27, 95% CI 1.03-1.57; while the -55C/T polymorphism was associated with this disease in almost all genetic models: allele contrast (OR = 1.17, 95% CI 1.02-1.34, additive (OR = 1.32, 95% CI 1.01-1.72 and dominant (OR = 1.18, 95% CI 1.02-1.37. However, after stratification by ethnicity, the UCP2 55Val and UCP3 -55C/T alleles remained associated with T2DM only in Asians (OR = 1.25, 95% CI 1.02-1.51 and OR = 1.22, 95% CI 1.04-1.44, respectively; allele contrast model. No significant association of the -3826A/G, -866G/A and Ins/Del polymorphisms with T2DM was observed. CONCLUSIONS: In our case-control study of people with European ancestry we were not able to demonstrate any association between the UCP polymorphisms and T2DM; however, our meta-analysis detected a significant

  11. Search for single production of vector-like quarks decaying into $Wb$ in $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s} =$ 13 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    A search for singly-produced vector-like quarks $Q$, where $Q$ can be either a $T$ quark with charge $2/3$ or a $Y$ quark with charge $4/3$, is performed in 3.2 $fb^{-1}$ of proton--proton collision data at a centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV recorded with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. The analysis targets $Q \\to Wb$ decays where the $W$ boson decays leptonically. No significant excess over Standard Model backgrounds is observed and upper limits on the $Q \\to Wb$ cross-section times branching ratio are set as a function of the vector-like quark mass. For a $QWb$ coupling strength of $\\sqrt{(c_{\\mathrm{L}}^{Wb})^2 + (c_{\\mathrm{R}}^{Wb})^2 }=1/\\sqrt{2}$, the observed (expected) 95 % confidence level lower limit on the $Y$-quark mass is 1.44 TeV (1.45 TeV). The results are also interpreted as limits on the $QWb$ coupling strength and the mixing with the Standard Model sector for a singlet $T$ quark or a $Y$ quark from a $(B,Y)$ doublet. The smallest excluded coupling-strength values are obtained for vector-like ...

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of Streptomyces sp. Strain Wb2n-11, a Desert Isolate with Broad-Spectrum Antagonism against Soilborne Phytopathogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Köberl, Martina; White, Richard A.; Erschen, Sabine; El-Arabi, Tarek F.; Jansson, Janet K.; Berg, Gabriele

    2015-08-06

    Streptomyces sp. strain Wb2n-11, isolated from native desert soil, exhibited broad-spectrum antagonism against plant pathogenic fungi, bacteria and nematodes. The 8.2 Mb draft genome reveals genes putatively responsible for its promising biocontrol activity and genes which enable the soil bacterium to directly interact beneficially with plants.

  13. TU-CD-207-11: Patient-Driven Automatic Exposure Control for Dedicated Breast CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez, A; Gazi, P [Biomedical Engineering Graduate Group, University of California Davis, Davis, CA (United States); Department of Radiology, UC Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Seibert, J; Boone, J [Department of Radiology, UC Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California Davis, Davis, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To implement automatic exposure control (AEC) in dedicated breast CT (bCT) on a patient-specific basis using only the pre-scan scout views. Methods: Using a large cohort (N=153) of bCT data sets, the breast effective diameter (D) and width in orthogonal planes (Wa,Wb) were calculated from the reconstructed bCT image and pre-scan scout views, respectively. D, Wa, and Wb were measured at the breast center-of-mass (COM), making use of the known geometry of our bCT system. These data were then fit to a second-order polynomial “D=F(Wa,Wb)” in a least squares sense in order to provide a functional form for determining the breast diameter. The coefficient of determination (R{sup 2}) and mean percent error between the measured breast diameter and fit breast diameter were used to evaluate the overall robustness of the polynomial fit. Lastly, previously-reported bCT technique factors derived from Monte Carlo simulations were used to determine the tube current required for each breast diameter in order to match two-view mammographic dose levels. Results: F(Wa,Wb) provided fitted breast diameters in agreement with the measured breast diameters resulting in R{sup 2} values ranging from 0.908 to 0.929 and mean percent errors ranging from 3.2% to 3.7%. For all 153 bCT data sets used in this study, the fitted breast diameters ranged from 7.9 cm to 15.7 cm corresponding to tube current values ranging from 0.6 mA to 4.9 mA in order to deliver the same dose as two-view mammography in a 50% glandular breast with a 80 kV x-ray beam and 16.6 second scan time. Conclusion: The present work provides a robust framework for AEC in dedicated bCT using only the width measurements derived from the two orthogonal pre-scan scout views. Future work will investigate how these automatically chosen exposure levels affect the quality of the reconstructed image.

  14. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and 3.0-T whole-body MRI for the detection of distant metastases and second primary tumours in patients with untreated oropharyngeal/hypopharyngeal carcinoma: a comparative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Sheng-Chieh; Yen, Tzu-Chen [Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taipei (China); Wang, Hung-Ming [Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taipei (China); Lin, Chien-Yu [Chang Gung University, Graduate Institute of Clinical Medical Sciences, Taoyuan (China); Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taipei (China); Chin, Shy-Chyi; Wai, Yau-Yau; Wang, Jiun-Jie; Ng, Shu-Hang [Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Linkou Medical Center, 5 Fu-Shin St, Kueishan, Taoyuan (China); Liao, Chun-Ta [Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taipei (China)

    2011-09-15

    The aim of this prospective study was to compare the diagnostic value of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and 3.0-T whole-body MRI (WB-MRI) for the assessment of distant metastases and second primary cancer (SPC) in patients with untreated oropharyngeal or hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OHSCC). A total of 103 patients were enrolled. All participants underwent 3.0-T WB-MRI and {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT. The diagnostic capabilities of the two imaging modalities were compared using the area under the receiver-operating-characteristic curve. Histology and follow-up data were used as the reference standard. Of the 103 patients, 18 (17.5%) were found to have either distant metastases or SPC. A total of 21 sites were involved. On a lesion-based analysis, {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT showed a trend toward a higher sensitivity than WB-MRI (81.0% vs. 61.9%, P = 0.125). The area under the curve (AUC) for PET/CT was also higher than for WB-MRI, although not significantly so (0.932 vs. 0.866, P = 0.189). On a patient-based analysis, the sensitivity of WB-MRI was lower than that of PET/CT (66.7% vs. 83.3%, P = 0.625). In terms of diagnostic capability, the AUC was higher for PET/CT than WB-MRI (0.886 vs. 0.813, P = 0.355). The maximal SUV of the regional lymph nodes (SUVn) above the median value (8.7 g/ml) was significantly associated with the occurrence of distant metastasis (P = 0.026). {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT showed a consistent trend toward higher sensitivity and diagnostic capability than 3.0-Tesla WB-MRI for the detection of distant metastases and SPCs in patients with untreated OHSCC. Our data also suggest that SUVn assessed by PET/CT can provide additional information for the prediction of distant metastases. (orig.)

  15. TES Carbon Monoxide Validation during the Two AVE Campaigns using the Argus and ALIAS Instruments on NASA's WB-57F

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Jinena P.; Luo, Ming; Christensen, Lance E.; Loewenstein, Max; Jost, Hansjurg; Webster, Christopher R.; Osterman, Greg

    2008-01-01

    The Aura Validation Experiment (AVE) focuses on validating Aura satellite measurements of important atmospheric trace gases using ground-based, aircraft, and balloon-borne instruments. Global satellite observations of CO from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) on the EOS Aura satellite have been ongoing since September 2004. This paper discusses CO validation experiments during the Oct-AVE (2004 Houston, Texas) and CR-AVE (2006 San Jose, Costa Rica) campaigns. The coincidences in location and time between the satellite observations and the available in situ profiles for some cases are not ideal. However, the CO distribution patterns in the two validation flight areas are shown to have very little variability in the aircraft and satellite . observations, thereby making them suitable for validation comparisons. TES CO profiles, which typically have a retrieval uncertainty of 10-20%, are compared with in situ CO measurements from NASA Ames Research Center's Argus instrument taken on board the WB-57F aircraft during Oct-AVE. TES CO retrievals during CR-AVE are compared with in situ measurements from Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Aircraft Laser Infrared Absorption Spectrometer (ALIAS) instrument as well as with the Argus instrument, both taken on board the WB-57F aircraft. During CR-AVE, the average overall difference between ALIAS and Argus CO was 4%, with the ALIAS measurement higher. During individual flights, 2-min time-averaged differences between the two in situ instruments had standard deviation of 14%. The TES averaging kernels and a priori constraint profiles for CO are applied to the in situ data for proper comparisons to account for the reduced vertical resolution and the influence of the a priori in the satellite-derived profile. In the TES sensitive pressure range, approx.700-200 hPa, the in situ profiles and TES profiles agree within 5-10%, less than the variability in CO distributions obtained by both TES and the aircraft instruments in the two

  16. CT Enterography

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... You may also be asked to remove hearing aids and removable dental work. Women will be asked to remove bras ... kind, unlike MRI. No radiation remains in a patient's body after a CT ... side effects. Risks There is always a slight chance of cancer ...

  17. Stability and normal incidence reflectivity of W/B4C multilayer mirror near the boron K absorption edge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, P N; Rai, S K; Nayak, M; Lodha, G S

    2013-09-01

    A multilayer structure consisting of alternate layers of W and B4C has been deposited using a magnetron sputtering system. The structure of the as-deposited and vacuum-annealed W/B4C multilayer sample has been characterized using grazing incidence x-ray reflectivity, grazing incidence diffraction, and the normal incidence reflectivity has been measured using synchrotron radiation. A two-layer model consisting of tungsten and boron carbide is presented. The multilayer structure was found to be stable after 800°C annealing. Grazing incidence x-ray diffraction measurements suggested that W is polycrystalline with small grain size. No signature of tungsten carbide or tungsten boride formation could be observed during the annealing treatments. A near normal incidence soft x-ray reflectivity (SXRR) of ~8.3% was obtained at 6.8 nm wavelength. A little drop (~1%) in SXRR after 800°C annealing suggested that there were no compositional changes within the layers during the annealing treatments.

  18. The Smart Wizard: Literature as a Lie, Theatre as a Rite (Giorgio Manganelli reads W.B. Yeats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Luppi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The present essay investigates the relationship between the literary critic and writer Giorgio Manganelli, and W.B. Yeats. It is composed of two parts. The first deals with the idea of literature as a lie presented by Manganelli in his famous book collecting several essays on literary figures, La letteratura come menzogna (1985 and focuses on the articles written by Manganelli on Yeats over the years, explaining why the Italian writer was so fond of the Irish poet. Whereas in his first essays Manganelli proposed an introductory reading of Yeats, though centered on peculiar aspects of his poetry, later he concentrated on the idea which lies beneath the conception of Yeats’s poetics. Yeats’s poetry suggests to Manganelli the deep meaning of literature providing the most correct interpretation for all fictional work. In the second part of this essay focus shifts from literature in generalf to the idea of theatre expressed by the two writers. The attempt is to find the similarities between their conceptions of the theatrical work and their experimental plays, considering Yeats’s plays as a fundamental model for Manganelli’s theatre. The keyword which joins together their poetics is the return to the rituals of the primitive stage and the ceremonial aspects of ancient times.

  19. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a stroke, especially with a new technique called Perfusion CT. brain tumors. enlarged brain cavities (ventricles) in ... X-Ray and CT Exams Blood Clots CT Perfusion of the Head CT Angiography (CTA) Stroke Brain ...

  20. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Head Computed tomography (CT) of the head uses special ... the Head? What is CT Scanning of the Head? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT ...

  1. The -308G/A of Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF-α and 825C/T of Guanidine Nucleotide Binding Protein 3 (GNB3 are Associated with the Onset of Acute Myocardial Infarction and Obesity in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu-Hsin Chang

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Acute myocardial infarction is a highly prevalent cardiovascular disease in Taiwan. Among several etiological risk factors, obesity and inflammation are strongly associated with the frequency of hypertension, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and myocardial infarction. To discriminate obesity- and inflammation-related genes and the onset of acute myocardial infarction (AMI, a case-control study was conducted to investigate the association of the -308G/A polymorphisms of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α and the C825T polymorphism of guanidine nucleotide binding protein 3 (GNB3 with the onset of AMI among Taiwanese cohorts. A total of 103 AMI patients and 163 matched normal control samples were enrolled in the present study. The genomic DNA was extracted and subjected into polymerase chain reaction-based restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP analysis. An association between the A homozygosity of the TNF-α-308G/A polymorphism and the onset of AMI was observed among the male subjects (p = 0.026; Spearman index = 0.200, p = 0.008. An association between the T homozygosity of GNB3 C825T polymorphism and obesity was also observed (Fisher’s exact, p = 0.009. The TT genotype has a protective effect against acquiring AMI among the obese female population in Taiwan (Fisher’s exact, p = 0.032. In conclusion, TNF-α-308G/A and the GNB3 C825T polymorphisms are associated with obesity and AMI in the Taiwanese population.

  2. WB-Styled Work

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI LI

    2010-01-01

    @@ The World Bank-sponsored Shanghai Conference on Scaling up Poverty Reduction in May 2004 brought together more than 1,000 people, most from developing countries, to share experiences and practices in poverty-reduction efforts. The conference. which included analysis of more than 100 case studies from around the globe, highlighted China's success in large-scale poverty reduction as well as the need for flexible approaches that engage the poor in finding solutions to poverty.

  3. SPECT/CT in neuroendocrine cancers; SPECT/CT bei neuroendokrinen Tumoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miederer, M. [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Nuklearmedizinische Klinik und Poliklinik; Mainz Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Castrop, C.; Scheidhauer, K. [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Nuklearmedizinische Klinik und Poliklinik; Buck, A.K. [Universitaetsklinikum Wuerzburg (Germany). Nuklearmedizinische Klinik und Poliklinik

    2011-03-15

    The accuracy of functional SPECT imaging has been significantly improved by addition of CT. This is especially relevant for functional imaging of neuroendocrine tumors using highly specific radiopharmaceuticals. Parathyroid adenomas can be detected by {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI SPECT/CT with very high sensitivity and specificity, playing an important role especially when minimally invasive techniques are used for surgical resection. With SPECT/CT, extra-adrenal manifestations of pheochromocytomas and tumors of the adrenal cortex can be detected with high accuracy. Because of the availability of PET radiopharmaceuticals such as {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC, the clinical relevance of {sup 111}In-Octreotide SPECT for detection of neuroendocrine cancers has been recently reduced. Because of the better availability, SPECT and SPECT/CT still represent standard tools for imaging neuroendocrine cancers. SPECT/CT represents the superior imaging modality for monitoring radiopeptide based therapies, which are now increasingly used for treatment of neuroendocrine cancers. (orig.)

  4. Ligand "Brackets" for Ga-Ga Bond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedushkin, Igor L; Skatova, Alexandra A; Dodonov, Vladimir A; Yang, Xiao-Juan; Chudakova, Valentina A; Piskunov, Alexander V; Demeshko, Serhiy; Baranov, Evgeny V

    2016-09-06

    The reactivity of digallane (dpp-Bian)Ga-Ga(dpp-Bian) (1) (dpp-Bian = 1,2-bis[(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)imino]acenaphthene) toward acenaphthenequinone (AcQ), sulfur dioxide, and azobenzene was investigated. The reaction of 1 with AcQ in 1:1 molar ratio proceeds via two-electron reduction of AcQ to give (dpp-Bian)Ga(μ2-AcQ)Ga(dpp-Bian) (2), in which diolate [AcQ](2-) acts as "bracket" for the Ga-Ga bond. The interaction of 1 with AcQ in 1:2 molar ratio proceeds with an oxidation of the both dpp-Bian ligands as well as of the Ga-Ga bond to give (dpp-Bian)Ga(μ2-AcQ)2Ga(dpp-Bian) (3). At 330 K in toluene complex 2 decomposes to give compounds 3 and 1. The reaction of complex 2 with atmospheric oxygen results in oxidation of a Ga-Ga bond and affords (dpp-Bian)Ga(μ2-AcQ)(μ2-O)Ga(dpp-Bian) (4). The reaction of digallane 1 with SO2 produces, depending on the ratio (1:2 or 1:4), dithionites (dpp-Bian)Ga(μ2-O2S-SO2)Ga(dpp-Bian) (5) and (dpp-Bian)Ga(μ2-O2S-SO2)2Ga(dpp-Bian) (6). In compound 5 the Ga-Ga bond is preserved and supported by dithionite dianionic bracket. In compound 6 the gallium centers are bridged by two dithionite ligands. Both 5 and 6 consist of dpp-Bian radical anionic ligands. Four-electron reduction of azobenzene with 1 mol equiv of digallane 1 leads to complex (dpp-Bian)Ga(μ2-NPh)2Ga(dpp-Bian) (7). Paramagnetic compounds 2-7 were characterized by electron spin resonance spectroscopy, and their molecular structures were established by single-crystal X-ray analysis. Magnetic behavior of compounds 2, 5, and 6 was investigated by superconducting quantum interference device technique in the range of 2-295 K.

  5. CT urography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korobkin, M. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2005-11-15

    With the advent of multidetector row CT scanners, evaluation of the urothelium of the entire urinary tract with high-resolution thin sections during a single breath-hold has become a reality. Multidetector CT urography (MDCTU) is a single examination that allows evaluation of potential urinary tract calculi, renal parenchymal masses, and both benign and malignant urothelial lesions. Initial results with this new technique are encouraging. Current investigations of MDCTU focus on methods to improve opacification and distension of the upper urinary tract - the collecting systems, pelvis, and ureters. The role of abdominal compression, infusion of saline and/or furosemide, and optimal time delay of excretory phase imaging is being explored. Upper tract urothelial malignancies, including small lesions less the 5 mmin diameter, can be detected with high sensitivity. Methods to reduce radiation exposure are being explored, including split-bolus contrast injection techniques that combine nephrographic and excretory phases into a single phase. It is likely that in the near future, radiological evaluation of significant unexplained hematuria or of known or prior urothelial malignancy will consist of a single examination - MDCTU. (orig.)

  6. Diffusive base transport in narrow base InP/Ga0.47In0.53As heterojunction bipolar transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, D.; Hamm, R. A.; Feygenson, A.; Panish, M. B.; Chandrasekhar, S.

    1991-12-01

    The common emitter current gain of InP/Ga0.47In0.53As heterojunction bipolar transitors having a base doping level of 7×1019 cm-3 is found to increase monotonically with decreasing base thickness in the range of 200-1000 Å. The variation of the gain with base thickness WB is proportional to 1×W2B, as expected for diffusive base transport, and a high injection efficiency.

  7. Whole-body staging of malignant melanoma. Advantages, limitations and current importance of PET-CT, whole-body MRI and PET-MRI; Ganzkoerperdiagnostik beim malignen Melanom. Vorteile, Grenzen und aktueller Stellenwert von PET-CT, GK-MRT und PET-MRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfannenberg, C.; Schwenzer, N. [Eberhard-Karls-Universitaet Tuebingen, Abteilung Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2015-01-16

    Cross-sectional imaging methods are currently the standard methods for staging of advanced melanoma. The former time-consuming and expensive multimodality approach is increasingly being replaced by novel whole-body (WB) staging methods, such as 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ({sup 18}F-FDG-PET-CT) and whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (WBMRI) because they offer a complete head-to-toe coverage of the patient in a single examination with an accurate and sensitive detection of tumor spread. Several studies in patients with advanced melanoma revealed that PET-CT is more sensitive and specific than conventional modalities, such as CT alone resulting in a change of management in up to 30 % of cases. Due to the limited sensitivity of PET for lesions smaller than 1 cm, PET-CT is not useful for the initial work-up of patients with stage I and II melanoma but has proven to be superior for detection of distant metastases, which is essential prior to surgical metastasectomy. If PET-CT is not available WB-CT or WB-MRI can alternatively be used and WB-MRI including diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) has become a real alternative for staging of melanoma patients. So far, however, only few reports suffering from small numbers of cases and heterogeneous design have compared the diagnostic performance of WB-MRI and PET-CT. The preliminary results indicate a high overall diagnostic accuracy of both methods; however, these methods differ in organ-based detection rates: PET-CT was more accurate in N-staging and detection of lung and soft tissue metastases whereas WB-MRI was superior in detecting liver, bone and brain metastases. The value of PET-MRI for staging of advanced melanoma is the subject of ongoing clinical studies. (orig.) [German] Schnittbildmethoden sind heute der Standard bei der Ausbreitungsdiagnostik ab Stadium III des malignen Melanoms. Das fruehere zeit- und kostenaufwendige multimodale Konzept wird heute durch Ganzkoerper

  8. First results from the NASA WB-57 airborne observations of the Great American 2017 Total Solar Eclipse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caspi, Amir; Tsang, Constantine; DeForest, Craig; Seaton, Daniel B.; Bryans, Paul; Tomczyk, Steven; Burkepile, Joan; Judge, Phil; DeLuca, Edward E.; Golub, Leon; Gallagher, Peter T.; Zhukov, Andrei; West, Matthew; Durda, Daniel D.; Steffl, Andrew J.

    2017-08-01

    Total solar eclipses present rare opportunities to study the complex solar corona, down to altitudes of just a few percent of a solar radius above the surface, using ground-based and airborne observatories that would otherwise be dominated by the intense solar disk and high sky brightness. Studying the corona is critical to gaining a better understanding of physical processes that occur on other stars and astrophysical objects, as well as understanding the dominant driver of space weather that affects human assets at Earth and elsewhere. For example, it is still poorly understood how the corona is heated to temperatures of 1-2 MK globally and up to 5-10 MK above active regions, while the underlying chromosphere is 100 times cooler; numerous theories abound, but are difficult to constrain due to the limited sensitivities and cadences of prior measurements. The origins and stability of coronal fans, and the extent of their reach to the middle and outer corona, are also not well known, limited in large part by sensitivities and fields of view of existing observations.Airborne observations during the eclipse provide unique advantages; by flying in the stratosphere at altitudes of 50 kft or higher, they avoid all weather, the seeing quality is enormously improved, and additional wavelengths such as near-IR also become available due to significantly reduced water absorption. For an eclipse, an airborne observatory can also follow the shadow, increasing the total observing time by 50% or more.We present the first results from airborne observations of the 2017 Great American Total Solar Eclipse using two of NASA's WB-57 research aircraft, each equipped with two 8.7" telescopes feeding high-sensitivity visible (green-line) and near-IR (3-5 µm) cameras operating at high cadence (30 Hz) with ~3 arcsec/pixel platescale and ±3 R_sun fields of view. The aircraft will fly along the eclipse path, separated by ~90 km, to observe a summed ~8 minutes of totality in both visible and

  9. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a relatively short time, especially when compared to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). CT scanning is painless, noninvasive and accurate. A ... CT is less sensitive to patient movement than MRI. CT can be performed if you have an ...

  10. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CT is less sensitive to patient movement than MRI. CT can be performed if you have an implanted medical device of any kind, unlike MRI. A diagnosis determined by CT scanning may eliminate ...

  11. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CT Scanning of the Abdomen and Pelvis? What is CT Scanning of the Abdomen/Pelvis? Computed tomography, ... the body being studied. top of page How is the CT scan performed? The technologist begins by ...

  12. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... additional view capabilities. Modern CT scanners are so fast that they can scan through large sections of ... after the procedure? CT exams are generally painless, fast and easy. With multidetector CT, the amount of ...

  13. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Abdomen and Pelvis Computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen ... and Pelvis? What is CT Scanning of the Abdomen/Pelvis? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a ...

  14. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Abdomen and Pelvis Computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen ... and Pelvis? What is CT Scanning of the Abdomen/Pelvis? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a ...

  15. Comparison of [(18)F]DCFPyL and [ (68)Ga]Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC for PSMA-PET Imaging in Patients with Relapsed Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietlein, Markus; Kobe, Carsten; Kuhnert, Georg; Stockter, Simone; Fischer, Thomas; Schomäcker, Klaus; Schmidt, Matthias; Dietlein, Felix; Zlatopolskiy, Boris D; Krapf, Philipp; Richarz, Raphael; Neubauer, Stephan; Drzezga, Alexander; Neumaier, Bernd

    2015-08-01

    Gallium-68 (Ga-68)-labeled tracers for imaging expression of the prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) such as the [(68)Ga]Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC have already demonstrated high potential for the detection of recurrent prostate cancer. However, compared to Ga-68, a labeling with fluorine-18 (F-18) would offer advantages with respect to availability, production amount, and image resolution. [(18)F]DCFPyL is a promising F-18-labeled candidate for PSMA-positron emission tomography (PET) imaging that has been recently introduced. In the current study, we aimed to compare [(68)Ga]Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC and [(18)F]DCFPyL for clinical use in biochemically relapsed prostate cancer. In 14 selected patients with PSA relapse of prostate cancer, [(18)F]DCFPyL PET/X-ray computed tomography (CT) was performed in addition to [(68)Ga]Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC PET/CT. A systematic comparison was carried out between results obtained with both tracers with regard to the number of detected PSMA-positive lesions, the standardized uptake value (SUV)max and the lesion to background ratios. All suspicious lesions identified by [(68)Ga]Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC were also detected with [(18)F]DCFPyL. In three patients, additional lesions were observed using [(18)F]DCFPyL PET/CT. The mean SUVmax in the concordant [(18)F]DCFPyL PSMA-positive lesions was significantly higher as compared to [(68)Ga]Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC (14.5 vs. 12.2, p = 0.028, n = 15). The mean tumor to background ratios (n = 15) were significantly higher for [(18)F]DCFPyL compared to [(68)Ga]Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC using kidney, spleen, or parotid as reference organs (p = 0.006, p = 0.002, p = 0.008), but no significant differences were found using the liver (p = 0.167) or the mediastinum (p = 0.363) as reference organs. [(18)F]DCFPyL PET/CT provided a high image quality and visualized small prostate lesions with excellent sensitivity. [(18)F]DCFPyL represents a highly promising alternative to [(68)Ga]Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC for PSMA-PET/CT

  16. Improving the quality of Laminaria japonica-based diet for Apostichopus japonicus through degradation of its algin content with Bacillus amyloliquefaciens WB1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xitao; Wang, Lili; Che, Jian; Li, Zhen; Zhang, Jiancheng; Li, Xiaoyu; Hu, Weiqing; Xu, Yongping

    2015-07-01

    Laminaria japonica feedstuff is used as a substitute for Sargassum thunbergii in the small-scale culturing of Apostichopus japonicus (sea cucumber) because of its abundant sources and low price in China. However, the difficulty associated with the degradation of algin by A. japonicus and, hence, its utilization have limited the practical value of L. japonica feedstuff in sea cucumber farming. In this study, A. japonicus individuals were fed with L. japonica feedstuff pretreated, via fermentation with the algin-degrading bacterial strain, Bacillus amyloliquefaciens WB1, and their growth performance, nonspecific immune responses, and resistance against Vibrio infection were then determined over a 60-day period. Growth performance of these individuals was similar to those fed with a commercial feedstuff made from S. thunbergii (mean weight gain of 5.79 versus 5.69 g on day 60), but was significantly (P < 0.05) increased compared to those fed with untreated L. japonica feedstuff (mean weight gain of 1.31 g). At the same time, they also showed significantly higher levels of amylase, protease, and alginate lyase activities than the other groups. These individuals and those fed with the commercial feedstuff or heat-inactivated but B. amyloliquefaciens WB1-treated L. japonicas feedstuff showed enhanced levels of activities for the immune enzymes nitric oxide synthase, lysozyme, peroxidase, and acid phosphatase, compared to those fed with nontreated L. japonica feedstuff. Furthermore, A. japonicus individuals fed with B. amyloliquefaciens WB1-treated L. japonica feedstuff exhibited greater resistance to disease following Vibrio splendidus challenge, as shown by the much lower cumulative symptom (10 %) compared to the rest, which showed as much as 73 % in the case of individuals fed with the untreated L. japonica feedstuff. Analysis of their intestinal tract revealed a much lower number of total Vibrio sp. These results demonstrated that L. japonica in which the algin

  17. First Measurement of the Ratio $B(t \\to Wb)/B(t \\to Wq)$ and Associated Limit on the CKM Element $|V_{tb}|$

    CERN Document Server

    Affolder, T; Akopian, A M; Albrow, Michael G; Amaral, P; Amendolia, S R; Amidei, D; Anikeev, K; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Arisawa, T; Asakawa, T; Ashmanskas, W J; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Bacchetta, N; Bailey, M W; Bailey, S; De Barbaro, P; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, Virgil E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Barone, M; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Belforte, S; Bell, W H; Bellettini, Giorgio; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Bensinger, J; Beretvas, A; Bergé, J P; Berryhill, J W; Bevensee, B; Bhatti, A A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bishai, M; Blair, R E; Blocker, C A; Bloom, K; Blumenfeld, B; Blusk, S R; Bocci, A; Bodek, Arie; Bokhari, W; Bölla, G; Bonushkin, Yu; Bortoletto, Daniela; Boudreau, J; Brandl, A; van den Brink, S C; Bromberg, C; Brozovic, M; Bruner, N L; Buckley-Geer, E; Budagov, Yu A; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Byon-Wagner, A; Byrum, K L; Calafiura, P; Campbell, M; Carithers, W C; Carlson, J; Carlsmith, D; Caskey, W; Cassada, J A; Castro, A; Cauz, D; Cerri, A; Chan, A W; Chang, P S; Chang, P T; Chapman, J; Chen, C; Chen, Y C; Cheng, M T; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chirikov-Zorin, I E; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F S; Christofek, L S; Chu, M L; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Clark, A G; Connolly, A; Conway, J; Cordelli, M; Cranshaw, J; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Cropp, R; Culbertson, R J; Dagenhart, D; D'Auria, S; De Jongh, F; Dell'Agnello, S; Dell'Orso, Mauro; Demortier, L; Deninno, M M; Derwent, P F; Devlin, T; Dittmann, J R; Donati, S; Done, J; Dorigo, T; Eddy, N; Einsweiler, Kevin F; Elias, J E; Engels, E; Erbacher, R D; Errede, D; Errede, S; Fan, Q; Feild, R G; Fernández, J P; Ferretti, C; Field, R D; Fiori, I; Flaugher, B L; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J; Friedman, J; Fukui, Y; Furic, I K; Galeotti, S; Gallinaro, M; Gao, T; García-Sciveres, M; Garfinkel, A F; Gatti, P; Gay, C; Gerdes, D W; Giannetti, P; Giromini, P; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D A; Gold, M; Goldstein, J; Gordon, A; Gorelov, I V; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Yu; Goulianos, K; Green, C; Grim, G P; Gris, P; Groer, L S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Günther, M; Guillian, G; Guimarães da Costa, J; Haas, R M; Haber, C; Hafen, E S; Hahn, S R; Hall, C; Handa, T; Handler, R; Hao, W; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hardman, A D; Harris, R M; Hartmann, F; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Heinrich, J; Heiss, A; Herndon, M; Hill, C; Hoffman, K D; Holck, C; Hollebeek, R J; Holloway, L E; Hughes, R; Huston, J; Huth, J E; Ikeda, H; Incandela, J R; Introzzi, G; Iwai, J; Iwata, Y; James, E; Jensen, H; Jones, M; Joshi, U; Kambara, H; Kamon, T; Kaneko, T; Karr, K M; Kasha, H; Kato, Y; Keaffaber, T A; Kelley, K; Kelly, M; Kennedy, R D; Kephart, R D; Khazins, D M; Kikuchi, T; Kilminster, B; Kim, B J; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, M J; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kirby, M; Kirk, M; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Koehn, P; Köngeter, A; Kondo, K; Konigsberg, J; Kordas, K; Korn, A J; Korytov, A V; Kovács, E; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Kuhlmann, S E; Kurino, K; Kuwabara, T; Laasanen, A T; Lai, N; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lamoureux, J I; Lancaster, J; Lancaster, M; Lander, R; Latino, G; LeCompte, T J; Lee, A M; Lee, K; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Lindgren, M; Liss, T M; Liu, J B; Liu, Y C; Litvintsev, D O; Lobban, O; Lockyer, N; Loken, J G; Loreti, M; Lucchesi, D; Lukens, P; Lusin, S; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maksimovic, P; Malferrari, L; Mangano, Michelangelo L; Mariotti, M; Martignon, G; Martin, A; Matthews, J A J; Mayer, J; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McKigney, E A; Menguzzato, M; Menzione, A; Mesropian, C; Meyer, A; Miao, T; Miller, R; Miller, J S; Minato, H; Miscetti, S; Mishina, M; Mitselmakher, G; Moggi, N; Moore, E; Moore, R; Morita, Y; Moulik, T; Mulhearn, M; Mukherjee, A; Müller, T; Munar, A; Murat, P; Murgia, S; Nachtman, J; Nagaslaev, V; Nahn, S; Nakada, H; Nakaya, T; Nakano, I; Nelson, C; Nelson, T; Neu, C; Neuberger, D; Newman-Holmes, C; Ngan, C Y P; Niu, H; Nodulman, L; Nomerotski, A; Oh, S H; Ohmoto, T; Ohsugi, T; Oishi, R; Okusawa, T; Olsen, J; Orejudos, W; Pagliarone, C; Palmonari, F; Paoletti, R; Papadimitriou, V; Pappas, S P; 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    2001-01-01

    We present the first measurement of the ratio of branching fraction R= B(t-->wb)/B(t-->Wq) from ppbar collisions at sqrt(s)=1.8 TeV. The data set corresponds to 109 pb-1 of data recorded by the Collider Detector at Fermilab during the 1992-1995 Tevatron run. We measure R=0.94+.31-.24 (stat+syst) or R>0.61 (0.56) at 90 (95) %C.L., in agreement with the standard model predictions. This measurement yields a limit of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa quark mixing matrix element Vtb under the assumption of three generation unitarity.

  18. Search for single production of vector-like quarks decaying into $Wb$ in $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s} =$ 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2069742; Abbott, Brad; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdinov, Ovsat; Abeloos, Baptiste; Aben, Rosemarie; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abreu, Ricardo; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adye, Tim; Affolder, Tony; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Agricola, Johannes; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Akerstedt, Henrik; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimov, Andrei; Alberghi, Gian Luigi; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alio, Lion; Alison, John; Alkire, Steven Patrick; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allen, Benjamin William; Allport, Phillip; Aloisio, Alberto; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Άlvarez Piqueras, Damián; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amadio, Brian Thomas; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Amidei, Dante; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amoroso, Simone; Amram, Nir; Amundsen, Glenn; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anders, John Kenneth; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Angelozzi, Ivan; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Arabidze, Giorgi; Arai, Yasuo; Araque, Juan Pedro; Arce, Ayana; Arduh, Francisco Anuar; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnold, Hannah; Arratia, Miguel; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Artz, Sebastian; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ashkenazi, Adi; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Augsten, Kamil; Avolio, Giuseppe; Axen, Bradley; Ayoub, Mohamad Kassem; Azuelos, Georges; Baak, Max; Baas, Alessandra; Baca, Matthew John; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Bagiacchi, Paolo; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bai, Yu; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baldin, Evgenii; Balek, Petr; Balestri, Thomas; Balli, Fabrice; Balunas, William Keaton; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Swagato; Bannoura, Arwa A E; Barak, Liron; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnes, Sarah Louise; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Barnovska, Zuzana; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barranco Navarro, Laura; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartos, Pavol; Basalaev, Artem; Bassalat, Ahmed; Basye, Austin; Bates, Richard; Batista, Santiago Juan; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Marco; Bauce, Matteo; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beacham, James Baker; Beattie, Michael David; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans~Peter; Becker, Kathrin; Becker, Maurice; Beckingham, Matthew; Becot, Cyril; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bedognetti, Matteo; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Beermann, Thomas; Begel, Michael; Behr, Janna Katharina; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bender, Michael; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Bensinger, James; Bentvelsen, Stan; Beresford, Lydia; Beretta, Matteo; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Beringer, Jürg; Bernard, Clare; Bernard, Nathan Rogers; Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Berta, Peter; Bertella, Claudia; Bertoli, Gabriele; Bertolucci, Federico; Bertsche, Carolyn; Bertsche, David; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Bessidskaia Bylund, Olga; Bessner, Martin Florian; Besson, Nathalie; Betancourt, Christopher; Bethke, Siegfried; Bevan, Adrian John; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianchini, Louis; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Biedermann, Dustin; Biesuz, Nicolo Vladi; Biglietti, Michela; Bilbao De Mendizabal, Javier; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Biondi, Silvia; Bjergaard, David Martin; Black, Curtis; Black, James; Black, Kevin; Blackburn, Daniel; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste; Blanco, Jacobo Ezequiel; Blazek, Tomas; Bloch, Ingo; Blocker, Craig; Blum, Walter; Blumenschein, Ulrike; Blunier, Sylvain; Bobbink, Gerjan; Bobrovnikov, Victor; Bocchetta, Simona Serena; Bocci, Andrea; Bock, Christopher; Boehler, Michael; Boerner, Daniela; Bogaerts, Joannes Andreas; Bogavac, Danijela; Bogdanchikov, Alexander; Bohm, Christian; Boisvert, Veronique; Bold, Tomasz; Boldea, Venera; Boldyrev, Alexey; Bomben, Marco; Bona, Marcella; Boonekamp, Maarten; Borisov, Anatoly; Borissov, Guennadi; Bortfeldt, Jonathan; Bortolotto, Valerio; Bos, Kors; Boscherini, Davide; Bosman, Martine; Boudreau, Joseph; Bouffard, Julian; Bouhova-Thacker, Evelina Vassileva; Boumediene, Djamel Eddine; Bourdarios, Claire; Bousson, Nicolas; Boutle, Sarah Kate; Boveia, Antonio; Boyd, James; Boyko, Igor; Bracinik, Juraj; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Gerhard; Brandt, Oleg; Bratzler, Uwe; Brau, Benjamin; Brau, James; Braun, Helmut; Breaden Madden, William Dmitri; Brendlinger, Kurt; Brennan, Amelia Jean; Brenner, Lydia; Brenner, Richard; Bressler, Shikma; Bristow, Timothy Michael; Britton, Dave; Britzger, Daniel; Brochu, Frederic; Brock, Ian; Brock, Raymond; Brooijmans, Gustaaf; Brooks, Timothy; Brooks, William; Brosamer, Jacquelyn; Brost, Elizabeth; Bruckman de Renstrom, Pawel; Bruncko, Dusan; Bruneliere, Renaud; Bruni, Alessia; Bruni, Graziano; Brunt, Benjamin; Bruschi, Marco; Bruscino, Nello; Bryant, Patrick; Bryngemark, Lene; Buanes, Trygve; Buat, Quentin; Buchholz, Peter; Buckley, Andrew; Budagov, Ioulian; Buehrer, Felix; Bugge, Lars; Bugge, Magnar Kopangen; Bulekov, Oleg; Bullock, Daniel; Burckhart, Helfried; Burdin, Sergey; Burgard, Carsten Daniel; Burghgrave, Blake; Burke, Stephen; Burmeister, Ingo; Busato, Emmanuel; Büscher, Daniel; Büscher, Volker; Bussey, Peter; Butler, John; Butt, Aatif Imtiaz; Buttar, Craig; Butterworth, Jonathan; Butti, Pierfrancesco; Buttinger, William; Buzatu, Adrian; Buzykaev, Aleksey; Cabrera Urbán, Susana; Caforio, Davide; Cairo, Valentina; Cakir, Orhan; Calace, Noemi; Calafiura, Paolo; Calandri, Alessandro; Calderini, Giovanni; Calfayan, Philippe; Caloba, Luiz; Calvet, David; Calvet, Samuel; Calvet, Thomas Philippe; Camacho Toro, Reina; Camarda, Stefano; Camarri, Paolo; Cameron, David; Caminal Armadans, Roger; Camincher, Clement; Campana, Simone; Campanelli, Mario; Campoverde, Angel; Canale, Vincenzo; Canepa, Anadi; Cano Bret, Marc; Cantero, Josu; Cantrill, Robert; Cao, Tingting; Capeans Garrido, Maria Del Mar; Caprini, Irinel; Caprini, Mihai; Capua, Marcella; Caputo, Regina; Carbone, Ryne Michael; Cardarelli, Roberto; Cardillo, Fabio; Carli, Tancredi; Carlino, Gianpaolo; Carminati, Leonardo; Caron, Sascha; Carquin, Edson; Carrillo-Montoya, German D; Carter, Janet; Carvalho, João; Casadei, Diego; Casado, Maria Pilar; Casolino, Mirkoantonio; Casper, David William; Castaneda-Miranda, Elizabeth; Castelli, Angelantonio; Castillo Gimenez, Victoria; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Catinaccio, Andrea; Catmore, James; Cattai, Ariella; Caudron, Julien; Cavaliere, Viviana; Cavalli, Donatella; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cavasinni, Vincenzo; Ceradini, Filippo; Cerda Alberich, Leonor; Cerio, Benjamin; Cerqueira, Augusto Santiago; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Cerutti, Fabio; Cerv, Matevz; Cervelli, Alberto; Cetin, Serkant Ali; Chafaq, Aziz; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chalupkova, Ina; Chan, Yat Long; Chang, Philip; Chapman, John Derek; Charlton, Dave; Chau, Chav Chhiv; Chavez Barajas, Carlos Alberto; Che, Siinn; Cheatham, Susan; Chegwidden, Andrew; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chelstowska, Magda Anna; Chen, Chunhui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Karen; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Shion; Chen, Xin; Chen, Ye; Cheng, Hok Chuen; Cheng, Yangyang; Cheplakov, Alexander; Cheremushkina, Evgenia; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Chernyatin, Valeriy; Cheu, Elliott; Chevalier, Laurent; Chiarella, Vitaliano; Chiarelli, Giorgio; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chisholm, Andrew; Chislett, Rebecca Thalatta; Chitan, Adrian; Chizhov, Mihail; Choi, Kyungeon; Chouridou, Sofia; Chow, Bonnie Kar Bo; Christodoulou, Valentinos; Chromek-Burckhart, Doris; Chudoba, Jiri; Chuinard, Annabelle Julia; Chwastowski, Janusz; Chytka, Ladislav; Ciapetti, Guido; Ciftci, Abbas Kenan; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Cioara, Irina Antonela; Ciocio, Alessandra; Cirotto, Francesco; Citron, Zvi Hirsh; Ciubancan, Mihai; Clark, Allan G; Clark, Brian Lee; Clark, Philip James; Clarke, Robert; Clement, Christophe; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H; Coffey, Laurel; Colasurdo, Luca; Cole, Brian; Cole, Stephen; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Collot, Johann; Colombo, Tommaso; Compostella, Gabriele; Conde Muiño, Patricia; Coniavitis, Elias; Connell, Simon Henry; Connelly, Ian; Consorti, Valerio; Constantinescu, Serban; Conta, Claudio; Conti, Geraldine; Conventi, Francesco; Cooke, Mark; Cooper, Ben; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Cornelissen, Thijs; Corradi, Massimo; Corriveau, Francois; Corso-Radu, Alina; Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; Cortiana, Giorgio; Costa, Giuseppe; Costa, María José; Costanzo, Davide; Cottin, Giovanna; Cowan, Glen; Cox, Brian; Cranmer, Kyle; Crawley, Samuel Joseph; Cree, Graham; Crépé-Renaudin, Sabine; Crescioli, Francesco; Cribbs, Wayne Allen; Crispin Ortuzar, Mireia; Cristinziani, Markus; Croft, Vince; Crosetti, Giovanni; Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Cummings, Jane; Curatolo, Maria; Cúth, Jakub; Cuthbert, Cameron; Czirr, Hendrik; Czodrowski, Patrick; D'Auria, Saverio; D'Onofrio, Monica; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, Mario Jose; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dafinca, Alexandru; Dai, Tiesheng; Dale, Orjan; Dallaire, Frederick; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dam, Mogens; Dandoy, Jeffrey Rogers; Dang, Nguyen Phuong; Daniells, Andrew Christopher; Danninger, Matthias; Dano Hoffmann, Maria; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darmora, Smita; Dassoulas, James; Dattagupta, Aparajita; Davey, Will; David, Claire; Davidek, Tomas; Davies, Eleanor; Davies, Merlin; Davison, Peter; Davygora, Yuriy; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; Daya-Ishmukhametova, Rozmin; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Benedetti, Abraham; De Castro, Stefano; De Cecco, Sandro; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; De la Torre, Hector; De Lorenzi, Francesco; De Pedis, Daniele; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; De Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; Dearnaley, William James; Debbe, Ramiro; Debenedetti, Chiara; Dedovich, Dmitri; Deigaard, Ingrid; Del Peso, Jose; Del Prete, Tarcisio; Delgove, David; Deliot, Frederic; Delitzsch, Chris Malena; Deliyergiyev, Maksym; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Dell'Orso, Mauro; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Delmastro, Marco; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; Deluca, Carolina; DeMarco, David; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Demilly, Aurelien; Denisov, Sergey; Denysiuk, Denys; Derendarz, Dominik; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Deterre, Cecile; Dette, Karola; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Domenico, Antonio; Di Donato, Camilla; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Di Girolamo, Beniamino; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Di Micco, Biagio; Di Nardo, Roberto; Di Simone, Andrea; Di Sipio, Riccardo; Di Valentino, David; Diaconu, Cristinel; Diamond, Miriam; Dias, Flavia; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Diehl, Edward; Dietrich, Janet; Diglio, Sara; Dimitrievska, Aleksandra; Dingfelder, Jochen; Dita, Petre; Dita, Sanda; Dittus, Fridolin; Djama, Fares; Djobava, Tamar; Djuvsland, Julia Isabell; do Vale, Maria Aline Barros; Dobos, Daniel; Dobre, Monica; Doglioni, Caterina; Dohmae, Takeshi; Dolejsi, Jiri; Dolezal, Zdenek; Dolgoshein, Boris; Donadelli, Marisilvia; Donati, Simone; Dondero, Paolo; Donini, Julien; Dopke, Jens; Doria, Alessandra; Dova, Maria-Teresa; Doyle, Tony; Drechsler, Eric; Dris, Manolis; Du, Yanyan; Duarte-Campderros, Jorge; Dubreuil, Emmanuelle; Duchovni, Ehud; Duckeck, Guenter; Ducu, Otilia Anamaria; Duda, Dominik; Dudarev, Alexey; Duflot, Laurent; Duguid, Liam; Dührssen, Michael; Dunford, Monica; Duran Yildiz, Hatice; Düren, Michael; Durglishvili, Archil; Duschinger, Dirk; Dutta, Baishali; Dyndal, Mateusz; Eckardt, Christoph; Ecker, Katharina Maria; Edgar, Ryan Christopher; Edson, William; Edwards, Nicholas Charles; Eifert, Till; Eigen, Gerald; Einsweiler, Kevin; Ekelof, Tord; El Kacimi, Mohamed; Ellajosyula, Venugopal; Ellert, Mattias; Elles, Sabine; Ellinghaus, Frank; Elliot, Alison; Ellis, Nicolas; Elmsheuser, Johannes; Elsing, Markus; Emeliyanov, Dmitry; Enari, Yuji; Endner, Oliver Chris; Endo, Masaki; Ennis, Joseph Stanford; Erdmann, Johannes; Ereditato, Antonio; Ernis, Gunar; Ernst, Jesse; Ernst, Michael; Errede, Steven; Ertel, Eugen; Escalier, Marc; Esch, Hendrik; Escobar, Carlos; Esposito, Bellisario; Etienvre, Anne-Isabelle; Etzion, Erez; Evans, Hal; Ezhilov, Alexey; Fabbri, Laura; Facini, Gabriel; Fakhrutdinov, Rinat; Falciano, Speranza; Falla, Rebecca Jane; Faltova, Jana; Fang, Yaquan; Fanti, Marcello; Farbin, Amir; Farilla, Addolorata; Farina, Christian; Farooque, Trisha; Farrell, Steven; Farrington, Sinead; Farthouat, Philippe; Fassi, Farida; Fassnacht, Patrick; Fassouliotis, Dimitrios; Faucci Giannelli, Michele; Favareto, Andrea; Fayard, Louis; Fedin, Oleg; Fedorko, Wojciech; Feigl, Simon; Feligioni, Lorenzo; Feng, Cunfeng; Feng, Eric; Feng, Haolu; Fenyuk, Alexander; Feremenga, Last; Fernandez Martinez, Patricia; Fernandez Perez, Sonia; Ferrando, James; Ferrari, Arnaud; Ferrari, Pamela; Ferrari, Roberto; Ferreira de Lima, Danilo Enoque; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferrere, Didier; Ferretti, Claudio; Ferretto Parodi, Andrea; Fiedler, Frank; Filipčič, Andrej; Filipuzzi, Marco; Filthaut, Frank; Fincke-Keeler, Margret; Finelli, Kevin Daniel; Fiolhais, Miguel; Fiorini, Luca; Firan, Ana; Fischer, Adam; Fischer, Cora; Fischer, Julia; Fisher, Wade Cameron; Flaschel, Nils; Fleck, Ivor; Fleischmann, Philipp; Fletcher, Gareth Thomas; Fletcher, Gregory; Fletcher, Rob Roy MacGregor; Flick, Tobias; Floderus, Anders; Flores Castillo, Luis; Flowerdew, Michael; Forcolin, Giulio Tiziano; Formica, Andrea; Forti, Alessandra; Fournier, Daniel; Fox, Harald; Fracchia, Silvia; Francavilla, Paolo; Franchini, Matteo; Francis, David; Franconi, Laura; Franklin, Melissa; Frate, Meghan; Fraternali, Marco; Freeborn, David; Fressard-Batraneanu, Silvia; Friedrich, Felix; Froidevaux, Daniel; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fullana Torregrosa, Esteban; Fusayasu, Takahiro; Fuster, Juan; Gabaldon, Carolina; Gabizon, Ofir; Gabrielli, Alessandro; Gabrielli, Andrea; Gach, Grzegorz; Gadatsch, Stefan; Gadomski, Szymon; Gagliardi, Guido; Gagnon, Pauline; Galea, Cristina; Galhardo, Bruno; Gallas, Elizabeth; Gallop, Bruce; Gallus, Petr; Galster, Gorm Aske Gram Krohn; Gan, KK; Gao, Jun; Gao, Yanyan; Gao, Yongsheng; Garay Walls, Francisca; García, Carmen; García Navarro, José Enrique; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; Gardner, Robert; Garelli, Nicoletta; Garonne, Vincent; Gatti, Claudio; Gaudiello, Andrea; Gaudio, Gabriella; Gaur, Bakul; Gauthier, Lea; Gavrilenko, Igor; Gay, Colin; Gaycken, Goetz; Gazis, Evangelos; Gecse, Zoltan; Gee, Norman; Geich-Gimbel, Christoph; Geisler, Manuel Patrice; Gemme, Claudia; Genest, Marie-Hélène; Geng, Cong; Gentile, Simonetta; George, Simon; Gerbaudo, Davide; Gershon, Avi; Ghasemi, Sara; Ghazlane, Hamid; Giacobbe, Benedetto; Giagu, Stefano; Giannetti, Paola; Gibbard, Bruce; Gibson, Stephen; Gignac, Matthew; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gillam, Thomas; Gillberg, Dag; Gilles, Geoffrey; Gingrich, Douglas; Giokaris, Nikos; Giordani, MarioPaolo; Giorgi, Filippo Maria; Giorgi, Francesco Michelangelo; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giromini, Paolo; Giugni, Danilo; Giuliani, Claudia; Giulini, Maddalena; Gjelsten, Børge Kile; Gkaitatzis, Stamatios; Gkialas, Ioannis; Gkougkousis, Evangelos Leonidas; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glaysher, Paul; Glazov, Alexandre; Goblirsch-Kolb, Maximilian; Goddard, Jack Robert; Godlewski, Jan; Goldfarb, Steven; Golling, Tobias; Golubkov, Dmitry; Gomes, Agostinho; Gonçalo, Ricardo; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, Joao; Gonella, Laura; González de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez Parra, Garoe; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorišek, Andrej; Gornicki, Edward; Goshaw, Alfred; Gössling, Claus; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Goudet, Christophe Raymond; Goujdami, Driss; Goussiou, Anna; Govender, Nicolin; Gozani, Eitan; Graber, Lars; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Gradin, Per Olov Joakim; Grafström, Per; Gramling, Johanna; Gramstad, Eirik; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Gratchev, Vadim; Gray, Heather; Graziani, Enrico; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Grefe, Christian; Gregersen, Kristian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Grevtsov, Kirill; Griffiths, Justin; Grillo, Alexander; Grimm, Kathryn; Grinstein, Sebastian; Gris, Philippe Luc Yves; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Groh, Sabrina; Grohs, Johannes Philipp; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Grossi, Giulio Cornelio; Grout, Zara Jane; Guan, Liang; Guenther, Jaroslav; Guescini, Francesco; Guest, Daniel; Gueta, Orel; Guido, Elisa; Guillemin, Thibault; Guindon, Stefan; Gul, Umar; Gumpert, Christian; Guo, Jun; Guo, Yicheng; Gupta, Shaun; Gustavino, Giuliano; Gutierrez, Phillip; Gutierrez Ortiz, Nicolas Gilberto; Gutschow, Christian; Guyot, Claude; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haber, Carl; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Haddad, Nacim; Hadef, Asma; Haefner, Petra; Hageböck, Stephan; Hajduk, Zbigniew; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Haleem, Mahsana; Haley, Joseph; Hall, David; Halladjian, Garabed; Hallewell, Gregory David; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamal, Petr; Hamano, Kenji; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamity, Guillermo Nicolas; Hamnett, Phillip George; Han, Liang; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hanawa, Keita; Hance, Michael; Haney, Bijan; Hanke, Paul; Hanna, Remie; Hansen, Jørgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Maike Christina; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hard, Andrew; Harenberg, Torsten; Hariri, Faten; Harkusha, Siarhei; Harrington, Robert; Harrison, Paul Fraser; Hartjes, Fred; Hasegawa, Makoto; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hasib, A; Hassani, Samira; Haug, Sigve; Hauser, Reiner; Hauswald, Lorenz; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hawkins, Anthony David; Hayashi, Takayasu; Hayden, Daniel; Hays, Chris; Hays, Jonathan Michael; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Head, Simon; Heck, Tobias; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heim, Sarah; Heim, Timon; Heinemann, Beate; Heinrich, Lukas; Hejbal, Jiri; Helary, Louis; Hellman, Sten; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, James; Henderson, Robert; Heng, Yang; Henkelmann, Steffen; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Herbert, Geoffrey Henry; Hernández Jiménez, Yesenia; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Hesketh, Gavin Grant; Hessey, Nigel; Hetherly, Jeffrey Wayne; Hickling, Robert; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hill, Ewan; Hill, John; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillier, Stephen; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hines, Elizabeth; Hinman, Rachel Reisner; Hirose, Minoru; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoenig, Friedrich; Hohlfeld, Marc; Hohn, David; Holmes, Tova Ray; Homann, Michael; Hong, Tae Min; Hooberman, Benjamin Henry; Hopkins, Walter; Horii, Yasuyuki; Horton, Arthur James; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Suen; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howard, Jacob; Howarth, James; Hrabovsky, Miroslav; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hrynevich, Aliaksei; Hsu, Catherine; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Hu, Diedi; Hu, Qipeng; Huang, Yanping; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Huhtinen, Mika; Hülsing, Tobias Alexander; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibragimov, Iskander; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Ideal, Emma; Idrissi, Zineb; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Iizawa, Tomoya; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikeno, Masahiro; Ilchenko, Iurii; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Ilic, Nikolina; Ince, Tayfun; Introzzi, Gianluca; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Iordanidou, Kalliopi; Ippolito, Valerio; Irles Quiles, Adrian; Isaksson, Charlie; Ishino, Masaya; Ishitsuka, Masaki; Ishmukhametov, Renat; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Iturbe Ponce, Julia Mariana; Iuppa, Roberto; Ivarsson, Jenny; Iwanski, Wieslaw; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jabbar, Samina; Jackson, Brett; Jackson, Matthew; Jackson, Paul; Jain, Vivek; Jakobi, Katharina Bianca; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakoubek, Tomas; Jamin, David Olivier; Jana, Dilip; Jansen, Eric; Jansky, Roland; Janssen, Jens; Janus, Michel; Jarlskog, Göran; Javadov, Namig; Javůrek, Tomáš; Jeanneau, Fabien; Jeanty, Laura; Jejelava, Juansher; Jeng, Geng-yuan; Jennens, David; Jenni, Peter; Jentzsch, Jennifer; Jeske, Carl; Jézéquel, Stéphane; Ji, Haoshuang; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Hai; Jiang, Yi; Jiggins, Stephen; Jimenez Pena, Javier; Jin, Shan; Jinaru, Adam; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Johansson, Per; Johns, Kenneth; Johnson, William Joseph; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Graham; Jones, Roger; Jones, Sarah; Jones, Tim; Jongmanns, Jan; Jorge, Pedro; Jovicevic, Jelena; Ju, Xiangyang; Juste Rozas, Aurelio; Köhler, Markus Konrad; Kaci, Mohammed; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kahn, Sebastien Jonathan; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalderon, Charles William; Kaluza, Adam; Kama, Sami; Kamenshchikov, Andrey; Kanaya, Naoko; Kaneti, Steven; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kaplan, Laser Seymour; Kapliy, Anton; Kar, Deepak; Karakostas, Konstantinos; Karamaoun, Andrew; Karastathis, Nikolaos; Kareem, Mohammad Jawad; Karentzos, Efstathios; Karnevskiy, Mikhail; Karpov, Sergey; Karpova, Zoya; Karthik, Krishnaiyengar; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kasahara, Kota; Kashif, Lashkar; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Yousuke; Kato, Chikuma; Katre, Akshay; Katzy, Judith; Kawade, Kentaro; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kazama, Shingo; Kazanin, Vassili; Keeler, Richard; Kehoe, Robert; Keller, John; Kempster, Jacob Julian; Keoshkerian, Houry; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerševan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Keyes, Robert; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khandanyan, Hovhannes; Khanov, Alexander; Kharlamov, Alexey; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kido, Shogo; Kim, Hee Yeun; Kim, Shinhong; Kim, Young-Kee; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver Maria; King, Barry; King, Matthew; King, Samuel Burton; Kirk, Julie; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kishimoto, Tomoe; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kiss, Florian; Kiuchi, Kenji; Kivernyk, Oleh; Kladiva, Eduard; Klein, Matthew Henry; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klimek, Pawel; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klinger, Joel Alexander; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Knapik, Joanna; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knoops, Edith; Knue, Andrea; Kobayashi, Aine; Kobayashi, Dai; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Kocian, Martin; Kodys, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Kogan, Lucy Anne; Kohlmann, Simon; Kohriki, Takashi; Koi, Tatsumi; Kolanoski, Hermann; Kolb, Mathis; Koletsou, Iro; Komar, Aston; Komori, Yuto; Kondo, Takahiko; Kondrashova, Nataliia; Köneke, Karsten; König, Adriaan; Kono, Takanori; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kopeliansky, Revital; Koperny, Stefan; Köpke, Lutz; Kopp, Anna Katharina; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kosek, Tomas; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotov, Vladislav; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Kourkoumeli-Charalampidi, Athina; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Koutsman, Alex; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasnopevtsev, Dimitriy; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Kraus, Jana; Kravchenko, Anton; Kretz, Moritz; Kretzschmar, Jan; Kreutzfeldt, Kristof; Krieger, Peter; Krizka, Karol; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krüger, Hans; Krumnack, Nils; Kruse, Amanda; Kruse, Mark; Kruskal, Michael; Kubota, Takashi; Kucuk, Hilal; Kuday, Sinan; Kuechler, Jan Thomas; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuger, Fabian; Kuhl, Andrew; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kukhtin, Victor; Kukla, Romain; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kuna, Marine; Kunigo, Takuto; Kupco, Alexander; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kus, Vlastimil; Kuwertz, Emma Sian; Kuze, Masahiro; Kvita, Jiri; Kwan, Tony; Kyriazopoulos, Dimitrios; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rosa Navarro, Jose Luis; La Rotonda, Laura; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacey, James; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Lacuesta, Vicente Ramón; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Remi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Lambourne, Luke; Lammers, Sabine; Lampen, Caleb; Lampl, Walter; Lançon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Lang, Valerie Susanne; Lange, J örn Christian; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Lanza, Agostino; Laplace, Sandrine; Lapoire, Cecile; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Lasagni Manghi, Federico; Lassnig, Mario; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavrijsen, Wim; Law, Alexander; Laycock, Paul; Lazovich, Tomo; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Menedeu, Eve; LeBlanc, Matthew Edgar; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne Agnes Marie; Lee, Claire Alexandra; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Guillaume; Lefebvre, Michel; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehan, Allan; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Lei, Xiaowen; Leight, William Axel; Leisos, Antonios; Leister, Andrew Gerard; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Lemmer, Boris; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatjana; Lenzi, Bruno; Leone, Robert; Leone, Sandra; Leonidopoulos, Christos; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Leroy, Claude; Lester, Christopher; Levchenko, Mikhail; Levêque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Levy, Mark; Lewis, Adrian; Leyko, Agnieszka; Leyton, Michael; Li, Bing; Li, Haifeng; Li, Ho Ling; Li, Lei; Li, Liang; Li, Shu; Li, Xingguo; Li, Yichen; Liang, Zhijun; Liao, Hongbo; Liberti, Barbara; Liblong, Aaron; Lichard, Peter; Lie, Ki; Liebal, Jessica; Liebig, Wolfgang; Limbach, Christian; Limosani, Antonio; Lin, Simon; Lin, Tai-Hua; Lindquist, Brian Edward; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipniacka, Anna; Lisovyi, Mykhailo; Liss, Tony; Lissauer, David; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Bo; Liu, Dong; Liu, Hao; Liu, Hongbin; Liu, Jian; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Kun; Liu, Lulu; Liu, Miaoyuan; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Yanlin; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Lleres, Annick; Llorente Merino, Javier; Lloyd, Stephen; Lo Sterzo, Francesco; Lobodzinska, Ewelina; Loch, Peter; Lockman, William; Loebinger, Fred; Loevschall-Jensen, Ask Emil; Loew, Kevin Michael; Loginov, Andrey; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Long, Brian Alexander; Long, Jonathan David; Long, Robin Eamonn; Looper, Kristina Anne; Lopes, Lourenco; Lopez Mateos, David; Lopez Paredes, Brais; Lopez Paz, Ivan; Lopez Solis, Alvaro; Lorenz, Jeanette; Lorenzo Martinez, Narei; Losada, Marta; Lösel, Philipp Jonathan; Lou, XinChou; Lounis, Abdenour; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lu, Haonan; Lu, Nan; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Luedtke, Christian; Luehring, Frederick; Lukas, Wolfgang; Luminari, Lamberto; Lundberg, Olof; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Lynn, David; Lysak, Roman; Lytken, Else; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Macdonald, Calum Michael; Maček, Boštjan; Machado Miguens, Joana; Madaffari, Daniele; Madar, Romain; Maddocks, Harvey Jonathan; Mader, Wolfgang; Madsen, Alexander; Maeda, Junpei; Maeland, Steffen; Maeno, Tadashi; Maevskiy, Artem; Magradze, Erekle; Mahlstedt, Joern; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maier, Andreas Alexander; Maier, Thomas; Maio, Amélia; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Malaescu, Bogdan; Malecki, Pawel; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Malone, Caitlin; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyshev, Vladimir; Malyukov, Sergei; Mamuzic, Judita; Mancini, Giada; Mandelli, Beatrice; Mandelli, Luciano; Mandić, Igor; Maneira, José; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, Luciano; Manjarres Ramos, Joany; Mann, Alexander; Mansoulie, Bruno; Mantifel, Rodger; Mantoani, Matteo; Manzoni, Stefano; Mapelli, Livio; March, Luis; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marjanovic, Marija; Marley, Daniel; Marroquim, Fernando; Marsden, Stephen Philip; Marshall, Zach; Marti, Lukas Fritz; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Brian; Martin, Tim; Martin, Victoria Jane; Martin dit Latour, Bertrand; Martinez, Mario; Martin-Haugh, Stewart; Martoiu, Victor Sorin; Martyniuk, Alex; Marx, Marilyn; Marzano, Francesco; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Massa, Ignazio; Massa, Lorenzo; Mastrandrea, Paolo; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Mättig, Peter; Mattmann, Johannes; Maurer, Julien; Maxfield, Stephen; Maximov, Dmitriy; Mazini, Rachid; Mazza, Simone Michele; Mc Fadden, Neil Christopher; Mc Goldrick, Garrin; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; McFarlane, Kenneth; Mcfayden, Josh; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; McMahon, Steve; McPherson, Robert; Medinnis, Michael; Meehan, Samuel; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meier, Karlheinz; Meineck, Christian; Meirose, Bernhard; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Meloni, Federico; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Meoni, Evelin; Mercurio, Kevin Michael; Mergelmeyer, Sebastian; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meyer, Carsten; Meyer, Christopher; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Meyer Zu Theenhausen, Hanno; Middleton, Robin; Miglioranzi, Silvia; Mijović, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikuž, Marko; Milesi, Marco; Milic, Adriana; Miller, David; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Minaenko, Andrey; Minami, Yuto; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mistry, Khilesh; Mitani, Takashi; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitsou, Vasiliki A; Miucci, Antonio; Miyagawa, Paul; Mjörnmark, Jan-Ulf; Moa, Torbjoern; Mochizuki, Kazuya; Mohapatra, Soumya; Mohr, Wolfgang; Molander, Simon; Moles-Valls, Regina; Monden, Ryutaro; Mondragon, Matthew Craig; Mönig, Klaus; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montalbano, Alyssa; Montejo Berlingen, Javier; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Morange, Nicolas; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Mori, Daniel; Mori, Tatsuya; Morii, Masahiro; Morinaga, Masahiro; Morisbak, Vanja; Moritz, Sebastian; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morris, John; Mortensen, Simon Stark; Morvaj, Ljiljana; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Josh; Motohashi, Kazuki; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Mouraviev, Sergei; Moyse, Edward; Muanza, Steve; Mudd, Richard; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Ralph Soeren Peter; Mueller, Thibaut; Muenstermann, Daniel; Mullen, Paul; Mullier, Geoffrey; Munoz Sanchez, Francisca Javiela; Murillo Quijada, Javier Alberto; Murray, Bill; Musheghyan, Haykuhi; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nachman, Benjamin Philip; Nackenhorst, Olaf; Nadal, Jordi; Nagai, Koichi; Nagai, Ryo; Nagai, Yoshikazu; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nagata, Kazuki; Nagel, Martin; Nagy, Elemer; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakamura, Tomoaki; Nakano, Itsuo; Namasivayam, Harisankar; Naranjo Garcia, Roger Felipe; Narayan, Rohin; Narrias Villar, Daniel Isaac; Naryshkin, Iouri; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Nayyar, Ruchika; Neal, Homer; Nechaeva, Polina; Neep, Thomas James; Nef, Pascal Daniel; Negri, Andrea; Negrini, Matteo; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nellist, Clara; Nelson, Andrew; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nepomuceno, Andre Asevedo; Nessi, Marzio; Neubauer, Mark; Neumann, Manuel; Neves, Ricardo; Nevski, Pavel; Newman, Paul; Nguyen, Duong Hai; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nicquevert, Bertrand; Nielsen, Jason; Nikiforov, Andriy; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsen, Jon Kerr; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya, Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; Nisius, Richard; Nobe, Takuya; Nodulman, Lawrence; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Nooney, Tamsin; Norberg, Scarlet; Nordberg, Markus; Novgorodova, Olga; Nowak, Sebastian; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nozka, Libor; Ntekas, Konstantinos; Nurse, Emily; Nuti, Francesco; O'grady, Fionnbarr; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Shea, Val; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Obermann, Theresa; Ocariz, Jose; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Ochoa, Ines; Ochoa-Ricoux, Juan Pedro; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Ogren, Harold; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohman, Henrik; Oide, Hideyuki; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olariu, Albert; Oleiro Seabra, Luis Filipe; Olivares Pino, Sebastian Andres; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Onofre, António; Onogi, Kouta; Onyisi, Peter; Oram, Christopher; Oreglia, Mark; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Orlando, Nicola; Orr, Robert; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Otero y Garzon, Gustavo; Otono, Hidetoshi; Ouchrif, Mohamed; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Oussoren, Koen Pieter; Ouyang, Qun; Ovcharova, Ana; Owen, Mark; Owen, Rhys Edward; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pachal, Katherine; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Pagáčová, Martina; Pagan Griso, Simone; Paige, Frank; Pais, Preema; Pajchel, Katarina; Palacino, Gabriel; Palestini, Sandro; Palka, Marek; Pallin, Dominique; Palma, Alberto; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Pandini, Carlo Enrico; Panduro Vazquez, William; Pani, Priscilla; Panitkin, Sergey; Pantea, Dan; Paolozzi, Lorenzo; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Papageorgiou, Konstantinos; Paramonov, Alexander; Paredes Hernandez, Daniela; Parker, Michael Andrew; Parker, Kerry Ann; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pascuzzi, Vincent; Pasqualucci, Enrico; Passaggio, Stefano; Pastore, Fernanda; Pastore, Francesca; Pásztor, Gabriella; Pataraia, Sophio; Patel, Nikhul; Pater, Joleen; Pauly, Thilo; Pearce, James; Pearson, Benjamin; Pedersen, Lars Egholm; Pedersen, Maiken; Pedraza Lopez, Sebastian; Pedro, Rute; Peleganchuk, Sergey; Pelikan, Daniel; Penc, Ondrej; Peng, Cong; Peng, Haiping; Penning, Bjoern; Penwell, John; Perepelitsa, Dennis; Perez Codina, Estel; Perini, Laura; Pernegger, Heinz; Perrella, Sabrina; Peschke, Richard; Peshekhonov, Vladimir; Peters, Krisztian; Peters, Yvonne; Petersen, Brian; Petersen, Troels; Petit, Elisabeth; Petridis, Andreas; Petridou, Chariclia; Petroff, Pierre; Petrolo, Emilio; Petrucci, Fabrizio; Pettersson, Nora Emilia; Peyaud, Alan; Pezoa, Raquel; Phillips, Peter William; Piacquadio, Giacinto; Pianori, Elisabetta; Picazio, Attilio; Piccaro, Elisa; Piccinini, Maurizio; Pickering, Mark Andrew; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pilcher, James; Pilkington, Andrew; Pin, Arnaud Willy J; Pina, João Antonio; Pinamonti, Michele; Pinfold, James; Pingel, Almut; Pires, Sylvestre; Pirumov, Hayk; Pitt, Michael; Plazak, Lukas; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Pleskot, Vojtech; Plotnikova, Elena; Plucinski, Pawel; Pluth, Daniel; Poettgen, Ruth; Poggioli, Luc; Pohl, David-leon; Polesello, Giacomo; Poley, Anne-luise; Policicchio, Antonio; Polifka, Richard; Polini, Alessandro; Pollard, Christopher Samuel; Polychronakos, Venetios; Pommès, Kathy; Pontecorvo, Ludovico; Pope, Bernard; Popeneciu, Gabriel Alexandru; Popovic, Dragan; Poppleton, Alan; Pospisil, Stanislav; Potamianos, Karolos; Potrap, Igor; Potter, Christina; Potter, Christopher; Poulard, Gilbert; Poveda, Joaquin; Pozdnyakov, Valery; Pozo Astigarraga, Mikel Eukeni; Pralavorio, Pascal; Pranko, Aliaksandr; Prell, Soeren; Price, Darren; Price, Lawrence; Primavera, Margherita; Prince, Sebastien; Proissl, Manuel; Prokofiev, Kirill; Prokoshin, Fedor; Protopapadaki, Eftychia-sofia; Protopopescu, Serban; Proudfoot, James; Przybycien, Mariusz; Puddu, Daniele; Puldon, David; Purohit, Milind; Puzo, Patrick; Qian, Jianming; Qin, Gang; Qin, Yang; Quadt, Arnulf; Quarrie, David; Quayle, William; Queitsch-Maitland, Michaela; Quilty, Donnchadha; Raddum, Silje; Radeka, Veljko; Radescu, Voica; Radhakrishnan, Sooraj Krishnan; Radloff, Peter; Rados, Pere; Ragusa, Francesco; Rahal, Ghita; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Rammensee, Michael; Rangel-Smith, Camila; Rauscher, Felix; Rave, Stefan; Ravenscroft, Thomas; Raymond, Michel; Read, Alexander Lincoln; Readioff, Nathan Peter; Rebuzzi, Daniela; Redelbach, Andreas; Redlinger, George; Reece, Ryan; Reeves, Kendall; Rehnisch, Laura; Reichert, Joseph; Reisin, Hernan; Rembser, Christoph; Ren, Huan; Rescigno, Marco; Resconi, Silvia; Rezanova, Olga; Reznicek, Pavel; Rezvani, Reyhaneh; Richter, Robert; Richter, Stefan; Richter-Was, Elzbieta; Ricken, Oliver; Ridel, Melissa; Rieck, Patrick; Riegel, Christian Johann; Rieger, Julia; Rifki, Othmane; Rijssenbeek, Michael; Rimoldi, Adele; Rinaldi, Lorenzo; Ristić, Branislav; Ritsch, Elmar; Riu, Imma; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rizvi, Eram; Robertson, Steven; Robichaud-Veronneau, Andree; Robinson, Dave; Robinson, James; Robson, Aidan; Roda, Chiara; Rodina, Yulia; Rodriguez Perez, Andrea; Roe, Shaun; Rogan, Christopher Sean; Røhne, Ole; Romaniouk, Anatoli; Romano, Marino; Romano Saez, Silvestre Marino; Romero Adam, Elena; Rompotis, Nikolaos; Ronzani, Manfredi; Roos, Lydia; Ros, Eduardo; Rosati, Stefano; Rosbach, Kilian; Rose, Peyton; Rosenthal, Oliver; Rossetti, Valerio; Rossi, Elvira; Rossi, Leonardo Paolo; Rosten, Jonatan; Rosten, Rachel; Rotaru, Marina; Roth, Itamar; Rothberg, Joseph; Rousseau, David; Royon, Christophe; Rozanov, Alexandre; Rozen, Yoram; Ruan, Xifeng; Rubbo, Francesco; Rubinskiy, Igor; Rud, Viacheslav; Rudolph, Matthew Scott; Rühr, Frederik; Ruiz-Martinez, Aranzazu; Rurikova, Zuzana; Rusakovich, Nikolai; Ruschke, Alexander; Russell, Heather; Rutherfoord, John; Ruthmann, Nils; Ryabov, Yury; Rybar, Martin; Rybkin, Grigori; Ryder, Nick; Ryzhov, Andrey; Saavedra, Aldo; Sabato, Gabriele; Sacerdoti, Sabrina; Sadrozinski, Hartmut; Sadykov, Renat; Safai Tehrani, Francesco; Saha, Puja; Sahinsoy, Merve; Saimpert, Matthias; Saito, Tomoyuki; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Sakurai, Yuki; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Salamon, Andrea; Salazar Loyola, Javier Esteban; Salek, David; Sales De Bruin, Pedro Henrique; Salihagic, Denis; Salnikov, Andrei; Salt, José; Salvatore, Daniela; Salvatore, Pasquale Fabrizio; Salvucci, Antonio; Salzburger, Andreas; Sammel, Dirk; Sampsonidis, Dimitrios; Sanchez, Arturo; Sánchez, Javier; Sanchez Martinez, Victoria; Sandaker, Heidi; Sandbach, Ruth Laura; Sander, Heinz Georg; Sanders, Michiel; Sandhoff, Marisa; Sandoval, Carlos; Sandstroem, Rikard; Sankey, Dave; Sannino, Mario; Sansoni, Andrea; Santoni, Claudio; Santonico, Rinaldo; Santos, Helena; Santoyo Castillo, Itzebelt; Sapp, Kevin; Sapronov, Andrey; Saraiva, João; Sarrazin, Bjorn; Sasaki, Osamu; Sasaki, Yuichi; Sato, Koji; Sauvage, Gilles; Sauvan, Emmanuel; Savage, Graham; Savard, Pierre; Sawyer, Craig; Sawyer, Lee; Saxon, James; Sbarra, Carla; Sbrizzi, Antonio; Scanlon, Tim; Scannicchio, Diana; Scarcella, Mark; Scarfone, Valerio; Schaarschmidt, Jana; Schacht, Peter; Schaefer, Douglas; Schaefer, Ralph; Schaeffer, Jan; Schaepe, Steffen; Schaetzel, Sebastian; Schäfer, Uli; Schaffer, Arthur; Schaile, Dorothee; Schamberger, R Dean; Scharf, Veit; Schegelsky, Valery; Scheirich, Daniel; Schernau, Michael; Schiavi, Carlo; Schillo, Christian; Schioppa, Marco; Schlenker, Stefan; Schmieden, Kristof; Schmitt, Christian; Schmitt, Sebastian; Schmitt, Stefan; Schmitz, Simon; Schneider, Basil; Schnellbach, Yan Jie; Schnoor, Ulrike; Schoeffel, Laurent; Schoening, Andre; Schoenrock, Bradley Daniel; Schopf, Elisabeth; Schorlemmer, Andre Lukas; Schott, Matthias; Schouten, Doug; Schovancova, Jaroslava; Schramm, Steven; Schreyer, Manuel; Schuh, Natascha; Schultens, Martin Johannes; Schultz-Coulon, Hans-Christian; Schulz, Holger; Schumacher, Markus; Schumm, Bruce; Schune, Philippe; Schwanenberger, Christian; Schwartzman, Ariel; Schwarz, Thomas Andrew; Schwegler, Philipp; Schweiger, Hansdieter; Schwemling, Philippe; Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Schwindling, Jerome; Schwindt, Thomas; Sciolla, Gabriella; Scuri, Fabrizio; Scutti, Federico; Searcy, Jacob; Seema, Pienpen; Seidel, Sally; Seiden, Abraham; Seifert, Frank; Seixas, José; Sekhniaidze, Givi; Sekhon, Karishma; Sekula, Stephen; Seliverstov, Dmitry; Semprini-Cesari, Nicola; Serfon, Cedric; Serin, Laurent; Serkin, Leonid; Sessa, Marco; Seuster, Rolf; Severini, Horst; Sfiligoj, Tina; Sforza, Federico; Sfyrla, Anna; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Shaikh, Nabila Wahab; Shan, Lianyou; Shang, Ruo-yu; Shank, James; Shapiro, Marjorie; Shatalov, Pavel; Shaw, Kate; Shaw, Savanna Marie; Shcherbakova, Anna; Shehu, Ciwake Yusufu; Sherwood, Peter; Shi, Liaoshan; Shimizu, Shima; Shimmin, Chase Owen; Shimojima, Makoto; Shiyakova, Mariya; Shmeleva, Alevtina; Shoaleh Saadi, Diane; Shochet, Mel; Shojaii, Seyedruhollah; Shrestha, Suyog; Shulga, Evgeny; Shupe, Michael; Sicho, Petr; Sidebo, Per Edvin; Sidiropoulou, Ourania; Sidorov, Dmitri; Sidoti, Antonio; Siegert, Frank; Sijacki, Djordje; Silva, José; Silverstein, Samuel; Simak, Vladislav; Simard, Olivier; Simic, Ljiljana; Simion, Stefan; Simioni, Eduard; Simmons, Brinick; Simon, Dorian; Simon, Manuel; Sinervo, Pekka; Sinev, Nikolai; Sioli, Maximiliano; Siragusa, Giovanni; Sivoklokov, Serguei; Sjölin, Jörgen; Sjursen, Therese; Skinner, Malcolm Bruce; Skottowe, Hugh Philip; Skubic, Patrick; Slater, Mark; Slavicek, Tomas; Slawinska, Magdalena; Sliwa, Krzysztof; Smakhtin, Vladimir; Smart, Ben; Smestad, Lillian; Smirnov, Sergei; Smirnov, Yury; Smirnova, Lidia; Smirnova, Oxana; Smith, Matthew; Smith, Russell; Smizanska, Maria; Smolek, Karel; Snesarev, Andrei; Snidero, Giacomo; Snyder, Scott; Sobie, Randall; Socher, Felix; Soffer, Abner; Soh, Dart-yin; Sokhrannyi, Grygorii; Solans Sanchez, Carlos; Solar, Michael; Soldatov, Evgeny; Soldevila, Urmila; Solodkov, Alexander; Soloshenko, Alexei; Solovyanov, Oleg; Solovyev, Victor; Sommer, Philip; Song, Hong Ye; Soni, Nitesh; Sood, Alexander; Sopczak, Andre; Sopko, Vit; Sorin, Veronica; Sosa, David; Sotiropoulou, Calliope Louisa; Soualah, Rachik; Soukharev, Andrey; South, David; Sowden, Benjamin; Spagnolo, Stefania; Spalla, Margherita; Spangenberg, Martin; Spanò, Francesco; Sperlich, Dennis; Spettel, Fabian; Spighi, Roberto; Spigo, Giancarlo; Spiller, Laurence Anthony; Spousta, Martin; St Denis, Richard Dante; Stabile, Alberto; Staerz, Steffen; Stahlman, Jonathan; Stamen, Rainer; Stamm, Soren; Stanecka, Ewa; Stanek, Robert; Stanescu, Cristian; Stanescu-Bellu, Madalina; Stanitzki, Marcel Michael; Stapnes, Steinar; Starchenko, Evgeny; Stark, Giordon; Stark, Jan; Staroba, Pavel; Starovoitov, Pavel; Staszewski, Rafal; Steinberg, Peter; Stelzer, Bernd; Stelzer, Harald Joerg; Stelzer-Chilton, Oliver; Stenzel, Hasko; Stewart, Graeme; Stillings, Jan Andre; Stockton, Mark; Stoebe, Michael; Stoicea, Gabriel; Stolte, Philipp; Stonjek, Stefan; Stradling, Alden; Straessner, Arno; Stramaglia, Maria Elena; Strandberg, Jonas; Strandberg, Sara; Strandlie, Are; Strauss, Michael; Strizenec, Pavol; Ströhmer, Raimund; Strom, David; Stroynowski, Ryszard; Strubig, Antonia; Stucci, Stefania Antonia; Stugu, Bjarne; Styles, Nicholas Adam; Su, Dong; Su, Jun; Subramaniam, Rajivalochan; Suchek, Stanislav; Sugaya, Yorihito; Suk, Michal; Sulin, Vladimir; Sultansoy, Saleh; Sumida, Toshi; Sun, Siyuan; Sun, Xiaohu; Sundermann, Jan Erik; Suruliz, Kerim; Susinno, Giancarlo; Sutton, Mark; Suzuki, Shota; Svatos, Michal; Swiatlowski, Maximilian; Sykora, Ivan; Sykora, Tomas; Ta, Duc; Taccini, Cecilia; Tackmann, Kerstin; Taenzer, Joe; Taffard, Anyes; Tafirout, Reda; Taiblum, Nimrod; Takai, Helio; Takashima, Ryuichi; Takeda, Hiroshi; Takeshita, Tohru; Takubo, Yosuke; Talby, Mossadek; Talyshev, Alexey; Tam, Jason; Tan, Kong Guan; Tanaka, Junichi; Tanaka, Reisaburo; Tanaka, Shuji; Tannenwald, Benjamin Bordy; Tapia Araya, Sebastian; Tapprogge, Stefan; Tarem, Shlomit; Tartarelli, Giuseppe Francesco; Tas, Petr; Tasevsky, Marek; Tashiro, Takuya; Tassi, Enrico; Tavares Delgado, Ademar; Tayalati, Yahya; Taylor, Aaron; Taylor, Geoffrey; Taylor, Pierre Thor Elliot; Taylor, Wendy; Teischinger, Florian Alfred; Teixeira-Dias, Pedro; Temming, Kim Katrin; Temple, Darren; Ten Kate, Herman; Teng, Ping-Kun; Teoh, Jia Jian; Tepel, Fabian-Phillipp; Terada, Susumu; Terashi, Koji; Terron, Juan; Terzo, Stefano; Testa, Marianna; Teuscher, Richard; Theveneaux-Pelzer, Timothée; Thomas, Juergen; Thomas-Wilsker, Joshuha; Thompson, Emily; Thompson, Paul; Thompson, Ray; Thompson, Stan; Thomsen, Lotte Ansgaard; Thomson, Evelyn; Thomson, Mark; Tibbetts, Mark James; Ticse Torres, Royer Edson; Tikhomirov, Vladimir; Tikhonov, Yury; Timoshenko, Sergey; Tiouchichine, Elodie; Tipton, Paul; Tisserant, Sylvain; Todome, Kazuki; Todorov, Theodore; Todorova-Nova, Sharka; Tojo, Junji; Tokár, Stanislav; Tokushuku, Katsuo; Tolley, Emma; Tomlinson, Lee; Tomoto, Makoto; Tompkins, Lauren; Toms, Konstantin; Tong, Baojia(Tony); Torrence, Eric; Torres, Heberth; Torró Pastor, Emma; Toth, Jozsef; Touchard, Francois; Tovey, Daniel; Trefzger, Thomas; Tremblet, Louis; Tricoli, Alessandro; Trigger, Isabel Marian; Trincaz-Duvoid, Sophie; Tripiana, Martin; Trischuk, William; Trocmé, Benjamin; Trofymov, Artur; Troncon, Clara; Trottier-McDonald, Michel; Trovatelli, Monica; Truong, Loan; Trzebinski, Maciej; Trzupek, Adam; Tseng, Jeffrey; Tsiareshka, Pavel; Tsipolitis, Georgios; Tsirintanis, Nikolaos; Tsiskaridze, Shota; Tsiskaridze, Vakhtang; Tskhadadze, Edisher; Tsui, Ka Ming; Tsukerman, Ilya; Tsulaia, Vakhtang; Tsuno, Soshi; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Tudorache, Alexandra; Tudorache, Valentina; Tuna, Alexander Naip; Tupputi, Salvatore; Turchikhin, Semen; Turecek, Daniel; Turgeman, Daniel; Turra, Ruggero; Turvey, Andrew John; Tuts, Michael; Tylmad, Maja; Tyndel, Mike; Ueda, Ikuo; Ueno, Ryuichi; Ughetto, Michael; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Unal, Guillaume; Undrus, Alexander; Unel, Gokhan; Ungaro, Francesca; Unno, Yoshinobu; Unverdorben, Christopher; Urban, Jozef; Urquijo, Phillip; Urrejola, Pedro; Usai, Giulio; Usanova, Anna; Vacavant, Laurent; Vacek, Vaclav; Vachon, Brigitte; Valderanis, Chrysostomos; Valencic, Nika; Valentinetti, Sara; Valero, Alberto; Valery, Loic; Valkar, Stefan; Vallecorsa, Sofia; Valls Ferrer, Juan Antonio; Van Den Wollenberg, Wouter; Van Der Deijl, Pieter; van der Geer, Rogier; van der Graaf, Harry; van Eldik, Niels; van Gemmeren, Peter; Van Nieuwkoop, Jacobus; van Vulpen, Ivo; van Woerden, Marius Cornelis; Vanadia, Marco; Vandelli, Wainer; Vanguri, Rami; Vaniachine, Alexandre; Vardanyan, Gagik; Vari, Riccardo; Varnes, Erich; Varol, Tulin; Varouchas, Dimitris; Vartapetian, Armen; Varvell, Kevin; Vazeille, Francois; Vazquez Schroeder, Tamara; Veatch, Jason; Veloce, Laurelle Maria; Veloso, Filipe; Veneziano, Stefano; Ventura, Andrea; Venturi, Manuela; Venturi, Nicola; Venturini, Alessio; Vercesi, Valerio; Verducci, Monica; Verkerke, Wouter; Vermeulen, Jos; Vest, Anja; Vetterli, Michel; Viazlo, Oleksandr; Vichou, Irene; Vickey, Trevor; Vickey Boeriu, Oana Elena; Viehhauser, Georg; Viel, Simon; Vigne, Ralph; Villa, Mauro; Villaplana Perez, Miguel; Vilucchi, Elisabetta; Vincter, Manuella; Vinogradov, Vladimir; Vivarelli, Iacopo; Vlachos, Sotirios; Vladoiu, Dan; Vlasak, Michal; Vogel, Marcelo; Vokac, Petr; Volpi, Guido; Volpi, Matteo; von der Schmitt, Hans; von Toerne, Eckhard; Vorobel, Vit; Vorobev, Konstantin; Vos, Marcel; Voss, Rudiger; Vossebeld, Joost; Vranjes, Nenad; Vranjes Milosavljevic, Marija; Vrba, Vaclav; Vreeswijk, Marcel; Vuillermet, Raphael; Vukotic, Ilija; Vykydal, Zdenek; Wagner, Peter; Wagner, Wolfgang; Wahlberg, Hernan; Wahrmund, Sebastian; Wakabayashi, Jun; Walder, James; Walker, Rodney; Walkowiak, Wolfgang; Wallangen, Veronica; Wang, Chao; Wang, Chao; Wang, Fuquan; Wang, Haichen; Wang, Hulin; Wang, Jike; Wang, Jin; Wang, Kuhan; Wang, Rui; Wang, Song-Ming; Wang, Tan; Wang, Tingting; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Wanotayaroj, Chaowaroj; Warburton, Andreas; Ward, Patricia; Wardrope, David Robert; Washbrook, Andrew; Watkins, Peter; Watson, Alan; Watson, Ian; Watson, Miriam; Watts, Gordon; Watts, Stephen; Waugh, Ben; Webb, Samuel; Weber, Michele; Weber, Stefan Wolf; Webster, Jordan S; Weidberg, Anthony; Weinert, Benjamin; Weingarten, Jens; Weiser, Christian; Weits, Hartger; Wells, Phillippa; Wenaus, Torre; Wengler, Thorsten; Wenig, Siegfried; Wermes, Norbert; Werner, Matthias; Werner, Per; Wessels, Martin; Wetter, Jeffrey; Whalen, Kathleen; Wharton, Andrew Mark; White, Andrew; White, Martin; White, Ryan; White, Sebastian; Whiteson, Daniel; Wickens, Fred; Wiedenmann, Werner; Wielers, Monika; Wienemann, Peter; Wiglesworth, Craig; Wiik-Fuchs, Liv Antje Mari; Wildauer, Andreas; Wilkens, Henric George; Williams, Hugh; Williams, Sarah; Willis, Christopher; Willocq, Stephane; Wilson, John; Wingerter-Seez, Isabelle; Winklmeier, Frank; Winter, Benedict Tobias; Wittgen, Matthias; Wittkowski, Josephine; Wollstadt, Simon Jakob; Wolter, Marcin Wladyslaw; Wolters, Helmut; Wosiek, Barbara; Wotschack, Jorg; Woudstra, Martin; Wozniak, Krzysztof; Wu, Mengqing; Wu, Miles; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, Xin; Wu, Yusheng; Wyatt, Terry Richard; Wynne, Benjamin; Xella, Stefania; Xu, Da; Xu, Lailin; Yabsley, Bruce; Yacoob, Sahal; Yakabe, Ryota; Yamaguchi, Daiki; Yamaguchi, Yohei; Yamamoto, Akira; Yamamoto, Shimpei; Yamanaka, Takashi; Yamauchi, Katsuya; Yamazaki, Yuji; Yan, Zhen; Yang, Haijun; Yang, Hongtao; Yang, Yi; Yang, Zongchang; Yao, Weiming; Yap, Yee Chinn; Yasu, Yoshiji; Yatsenko, Elena; Yau Wong, Kaven Henry; Ye, Jingbo; Ye, Shuwei; Yeletskikh, Ivan; Yen, Andy L; Yildirim, Eda; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Rikutaro; Yoshihara, Keisuke; Young, Charles; Young, Christopher John; Youssef, Saul; Yu, David Ren-Hwa; Yu, Jaehoon; Yu, Jiaming; Yu, Jie; Yuan, Li; Yuen, Stephanie P; Yusuff, Imran; Zabinski, Bartlomiej; Zaidan, Remi; Zaitsev, Alexander; Zakharchuk, Nataliia; Zalieckas, Justas; Zaman, Aungshuman; Zambito, Stefano; Zanello, Lucia; Zanzi, Daniele; Zeitnitz, Christian; Zeman, Martin; Zemla, Andrzej; Zeng, Jian Cong; Zeng, Qi; Zengel, Keith; Zenin, Oleg; Ženiš, Tibor; Zerwas, Dirk; Zhang, Dongliang; Zhang, Fangzhou; Zhang, Guangyi; Zhang, Huijun; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Ruiqi; Zhang, Xueyao; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zhao, Xiandong; Zhao, Yongke; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhemchugov, Alexey; Zhong, Jiahang; Zhou, Bing; Zhou, Chen; Zhou, Lei; Zhou, Li; Zhou, Mingliang; Zhou, Ning; Zhu, Cheng Guang; Zhu, Hongbo; Zhu, Junjie; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhuang, Xuai; Zhukov, Konstantin; Zibell, Andre; Zieminska, Daria; Zimine, Nikolai; Zimmermann, Christoph; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Zinonos, Zinonas; Zinser, Markus; Ziolkowski, Michael; Živković, Lidija; Zobernig, Georg; Zoccoli, Antonio; zur Nedden, Martin; Zurzolo, Giovanni; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2016-01-01

    A search for singly produced vector-like $Q$ quarks, where $Q$ can be either a $T$ quark with charge $+2/3$ or a $Y$ quark with charge $-4/3$, is performed in proton--proton collisions recorded with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. The dataset corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb$^{-1}$ and was produced with a centre-of-mass energy of $\\sqrt{s}=8$ TeV. This analysis targets $Q \\to Wb$ decays where the $W$ boson decays leptonically. A veto on massive large-radius jets is used to reject the dominant $t\\bar{t}$ background. The reconstructed $Q$-candidate mass, ranging from 0.4 to 1.2 TeV, is used in the search to discriminate signal from background processes. No significant deviation from the Standard Model expectation is observed, and limits are set on the $Q \\to Wb$ cross-section times branching ratio. The results are also interpreted as limits on the $QWb$ coupling and the mixing with the Standard Model sector for a singlet $T$ quark or a $Y$ quark from a doublet. $T$ quarks with masses below 0.95...

  19. Effective dose estimation for oncological and neurological PET/CT procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martí-Climent, Josep M; Prieto, Elena; Morán, Verónica; Sancho, Lidia; Rodríguez-Fraile, Macarena; Arbizu, Javier; García-Velloso, María J; Richter, José A

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the patient effective dose (ED) for different PET/CT procedures performed with a variety of PET radiopharmaceutical compounds. PET/CT studies of 210 patients were reviewed including Torso (n = 123), Whole body (WB) (n = 36), Head and Neck Tumor (HNT) (n = 10), and Brain (n = 41) protocols with (18)FDG (n = 170), (11)C-CHOL (n = 10), (18)FDOPA (n = 10), (11)C-MET (n = 10), and (18)F-florbetapir (n = 10). ED was calculated using conversion factors applied to the radiotracer activity and to the CT dose-length product. Total ED (mean ± SD) for Torso-(11)C-CHOL, Torso-(18)FDG, WB-(18)FDG, and HNT-(18)FDG protocols were 13.5 ± 2.2, 16.5 ± 4.5, 20.0 ± 5.6, and 15.4 ± 2.8 mSv, respectively, where CT represented 77, 62, 69, and 63% of the protocol ED, respectively. For (18)FDG, (18)FDOPA, (11)C-MET, and (18)F-florbetapir brain PET/CT studies, ED values (mean ± SD) were 6.4 ± 0.6, 4.6 ± 0.4, 5.2 ± 0.5, and 9.1 ± 0.4 mSv, respectively, and the corresponding CT contributions were 11, 14, 23, and 26%, respectively. In (18)FDG PET/CT, variations in scan length and arm position produced significant differences in CT ED (p PET/CT protocols with different radiopharmaceuticals ranged between 4.6 and 20.0 mSv. The major contributor to total ED for body protocols is CT, whereas for brain studies, it is the PET radiopharmaceutical.

  20. Gallium-68 EDTA PET/CT for Renal Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofman, Michael S; Hicks, Rodney J

    2016-09-01

    Nuclear medicine renal imaging provides important functional data to assist in the diagnosis and management of patients with a variety of renal disorders. Physiologically stable metal chelates like ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and diethylenetriamine penta-acetate (DTPA) are excreted by glomerular filtration and have been radiolabelled with a variety of isotopes for imaging glomerular filtration and quantitative assessment of glomerular filtration rate. Gallium-68 ((68)Ga) EDTA PET usage predates Technetium-99m ((99m)Tc) renal imaging, but virtually disappeared with the widespread adoption of gamma camera technology that was not optimal for imaging positron decay. There is now a reemergence of interest in (68)Ga owing to the greater availability of PET technology and use of (68)Ga to label other radiotracers. (68)Ga EDTA can be used a substitute for (99m)Tc DTPA for wide variety of clinical indications. A key advantage of PET for renal imaging over conventional scintigraphy is 3-dimensional dynamic imaging, which is particularly helpful in patients with complex anatomy in whom planar imaging may be nondiagnostic or difficult to interpret owing to overlying structures containing radioactive urine that cannot be differentiated. Other advantages include accurate and absolute (rather than relative) camera-based quantification, superior spatial and temporal resolution and integrated multislice CT providing anatomical correlation. Furthermore, the (68)Ga generator enables on-demand production at low cost, with no additional patient radiation exposure compared with conventional scintigraphy. Over the past decade, we have employed (68)Ga EDTA PET/CT primarily to answer difficult clinical questions in patients in whom other modalities have failed, particularly when it was envisaged that dynamic 3D imaging would be of assistance. We have also used it as a substitute for (99m)Tc DTPA if unavailable owing to supply issues, and have additionally examined the role of

  1. 3D SPECT/CT fusion using image data projection of bone SPECT onto 3D volume-rendered CT images: feasibility and clinical impact in the diagnosis of bone metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Yuji; Nakahara, Tadaki; Ode, Kenichi; Matsusaka, Yohji; Katagiri, Mari; Iwabuchi, Yu; Itoh, Kazunari; Ichimura, Akira; Jinzaki, Masahiro

    2017-05-01

    We developed a method of image data projection of bone SPECT into 3D volume-rendered CT images for 3D SPECT/CT fusion. The aims of our study were to evaluate its feasibility and clinical usefulness. Whole-body bone scintigraphy (WB) and SPECT/CT scans were performed in 318 cancer patients using a dedicated SPECT/CT systems. Volume data of bone SPECT and CT were fused to obtain 2D SPECT/CT images. To generate our 3D SPECT/CT images, colored voxel data of bone SPECT were projected onto the corresponding location of the volume-rendered CT data after a semi-automatic bone extraction. Then, the resultant 3D images were blended with conventional volume-rendered CT images, allowing to grasp the three-dimensional relationship between bone metabolism and anatomy. WB and SPECT (WB + SPECT), 2D SPECT/CT fusion, and 3D SPECT/CT fusion were evaluated by two independent reviewers in the diagnosis of bone metastasis. The inter-observer variability and diagnostic accuracy in these three image sets were investigated using a four-point diagnostic scale. Increased bone metabolism was found in 744 metastatic sites and 1002 benign changes. On a per-lesion basis, inter-observer agreements in the diagnosis of bone metastasis were 0.72 for WB + SPECT, 0.90 for 2D SPECT/CT, and 0.89 for 3D SPECT/CT. Receiver operating characteristic analyses for the diagnostic accuracy of bone metastasis showed that WB + SPECT, 2D SPECT/CT, and 3D SPECT/CT had an area under the curve of 0.800, 0.983, and 0.983 for reader 1, 0.865, 0.992, and 0.993 for reader 2, respectively (WB + SPECT vs. 2D or 3D SPECT/CT, p < 0.001; 2D vs. 3D SPECT/CT, n.s.). The durations of interpretation of WB + SPECT, 2D SPECT/CT, and 3D SPECT/CT images were 241 ± 75, 225 ± 73, and 182 ± 71 s for reader 1 and 207 ± 72, 190 ± 73, and 179 ± 73 s for reader 2, respectively. As a result, it took shorter time to read 3D SPECT/CT images than 2D SPECT/CT (p < 0.0001) or WB

  2. Comparison of the utility of whole-body MRI with and without contrast-enhanced Quick 3D and double RF fat suppression techniques, conventional whole-body MRI, PET/CT and conventional examination for assessment of recurrence in NSCLC patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohno, Yoshiharu, E-mail: yosirad@kobe-u.ac.jp [Advanced Biomedical Imaging Research Center, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Division of Functional and Diagnostic Imaging Research, Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan); Nishio, Mizuho [Advanced Biomedical Imaging Research Center, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Division of Functional and Diagnostic Imaging Research, Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan); Koyama, Hisanobu [Division of Radiology, Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan); Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Sumiaki [Advanced Biomedical Imaging Research Center, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Division of Functional and Diagnostic Imaging Research, Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan); Takenaka, Daisuke [Division of Radiology, Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan); Department of Radiology, Hyogo Cancer Center, Akashi (Japan); Seki, Shinichiro [Division of Radiology, Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan); Tsubakimoto, Maho [Division of Radiology, Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan); Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Science, University of the Ryukyus, Nishihara, Okinawa (Japan); Sugimura, Kazuro [Division of Radiology, Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan)

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare diagnostic capabilities for assessment of recurrence in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients by contrast-enhanced whole-body MRI (CE-WB-MRI) with and without CE-Quick 3D and double RF fat suppression technique (DFS), FDG-PET/CT and conventional radiological examinations. Materials and methods: A total of 134 pathologically proven and completely resected NSCLC patients (78 males, 56 females; mean age: 72 years) underwent FDG-PET/CT, CE-WB-MRI with and without Quick 3D and DFS at 3 T as well as conventional radiological examinations. The probability of recurrence was assessed with a 5-point scoring system on a per-patient basis, and final diagnosis was made by consensus between two readers. The capability for overall recurrence assessment by all the methods was compared by means of ROC analysis and their sensitivity, specificity and accuracy by means of McNemar's test. Results: Although areas under the curve did not show any significant differences, specificity (100%) and accuracy (95.5%) of CE-WB-MRI with CE-Quick 3D and DFS were significantly higher than those of FDG-PET/CT (specificity: 93.6%, p = 0.02; accuracy: 89.6%, p = 0.01) and conventional radiological examinations (specificity: 92.7%, p = 0.01; accuracy: 91.0%, p = 0.03). In addition, specificity of CE-WB-MRI without CE-Quick 3D and DFS (100%) was significantly higher than that of FDG-PET/CT (p = 0.02) and conventional radiological examinations (p = 0.01). Conclusion: Specificity and accuracy of CE-WB-MRI with CE-Quick 3D and DFS for assessment of recurrence in NSCLC patients are at least as high as, or higher than those of others.

  3. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... the scanner at one time such as with MRI. If an intravenous contrast material is used, you ... CT is less sensitive to patient movement than MRI. CT can be performed if you have an ...

  4. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... of the Head? What is CT Scanning of the Head? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? CT scanning of the head is typically ...

  5. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... the Sinuses? What is CT (Computed Tomography) of the Sinuses? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? CT of the sinuses is primarily used ...

  6. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple ... lives. CT has been shown to be a cost-effective imaging tool for a wide range of ...

  7. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple ... lives. CT has been shown to be a cost-effective imaging tool for a wide range of ...

  8. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple ... lives. CT has been shown to be a cost-effective imaging tool for a wide range of ...

  9. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... limitations of CT Scanning of the Head? What is CT Scanning of the Head? Computed tomography, more ... the body being studied. top of page How is the procedure performed? The technologist begins by positioning ...

  10. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... the limitations of CT of the Sinuses? What is CT (Computed Tomography) of the Sinuses? Computed tomography, ... the body being studied. top of page How is the procedure performed? The technologist begins by positioning ...

  11. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... the cause of unexplained pain. CT scanning is fast, painless, noninvasive and accurate. In emergency cases, it ... additional view capabilities. Modern CT scanners are so fast that they can scan through large sections of ...

  12. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple ... Neck Cancer X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety Images related to Computed Tomography (CT) - ...

  13. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple ... Neck Cancer X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety Images related to Computed Tomography (CT) - ...

  14. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... scanners to obtain multiple slices in a single rotation. These scanners, called multislice CT or multidetector CT, ... prescribed procedure with your doctor, the medical facility staff and/or your insurance provider to get a ...

  15. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... scanners to obtain multiple slices in a single rotation. These scanners, called multislice CT or multidetector CT, ... prescribed procedure with your doctor, the medical facility staff and/or your insurance provider to get a ...

  16. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... scanners to obtain multiple slices in a single rotation. These scanners, called multislice CT or multidetector CT, ... prescribed procedure with your doctor, the medical facility staff and/or your insurance provider to get a ...

  17. CT Grading of Otosclerosis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lee, T.C; Aviv, R.I; Chen, J.M; Nedzelski, J.M; Fox, A.J; Symons, S.P

    2009-01-01

    ...: The CT grading system for otosclerosis was proposed by Symons and Fanning in 2005. The purpose of this study was to determine if this CT grading system has high interobserver and intraobserver agreement...

  18. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... CT scanner technique will be adjusted to their size and the area of interest to reduce the ... Patient undergoing computed tomography (CT) scan View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and ...

  19. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... CT scanner technique will be adjusted to their size and the area of interest to reduce the ... Patient undergoing computed tomography (CT) scan. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and ...

  20. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... CT scanner technique will be adjusted to their size and the area of interest to reduce the ... Patient undergoing computed tomography (CT) scan. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and ...

  1. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... page How should I prepare for the CT scan? You should wear comfortable, loose-fitting clothing to ... studied. top of page How is the CT scan performed? The technologist begins by positioning you on ...

  2. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... be viewed on a computer monitor, printed on film or transferred to a CD or DVD. CT ... distinguished from one another on an x-ray film or CT electronic image. In a conventional x- ...

  3. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... be viewed on a computer monitor, printed on film or transferred to a CD or DVD. CT ... distinguished from one another on an x-ray film or CT electronic image. In a conventional x- ...

  4. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... be viewed on a computer monitor, printed on film or transferred to a CD or DVD. CT ... distinguished from one another on an x-ray film or CT electronic image. In a conventional x- ...

  5. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits CT scanning is painless, noninvasive and accurate. ... CT scans should have no immediate side effects. Risks There is always a slight chance of cancer ...

  6. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits Viewing a CT scan, an experienced radiologist ... CT scans should have no immediate side effects. Risks There is always a slight chance of cancer ...

  7. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits A CT scan is one of the ... CT scans should have no immediate side effects. Risks There is always a slight chance of cancer ...

  8. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... scanners to obtain multiple slices in a single rotation. These scanners, called multislice CT or multidetector CT, ... special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Magnetic Resonance Imaging ( ...

  9. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... scanners to obtain multiple slices in a single rotation. These scanners, called multislice CT or multidetector CT, ... special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Radiation Dose in ...

  10. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... scanners to obtain multiple slices in a single rotation. These scanners, called multislice CT or multidetector CT, ... special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Ultrasound - Abdomen X- ...

  11. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... CT scanning is fast, painless, noninvasive and accurate. In emergency cases, it can reveal internal injuries and ... generated during a CT scan can be reformatted in multiple planes, and can even generate three-dimensional ...

  12. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... to a CD or DVD. CT images of internal organs, bones, soft tissue and blood vessels provide ... clicking and whirring sounds as the CT scanner's internal parts, not usually visible to you, revolve around ...

  13. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... the cause of unexplained pain. CT scanning is fast, painless, noninvasive and accurate. In emergency cases, it ... additional view capabilities. Modern CT scanners are so fast that they can scan through large sections of ...

  14. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... which may be causing hearing problems. determine whether inflammation or other changes are present in the paranasal ... CT scans . CT is not sensitive in detecting inflammation of the meninges —the membranes covering the brain. ...

  15. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... a stroke. a stroke, especially with a new technique called Perfusion CT. brain tumors. enlarged brain cavities ( ... brain. assess aneurysms or arteriovenous malformations through a technique called CT angiography. For more information, see the ...

  16. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple ... to urinate; however, this is actually a contrast effect and subsides quickly. When you enter the CT ...

  17. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple ... to urinate; however, this is actually a contrast effect and subsides quickly. When you enter the CT ...

  18. Cardiac CT Scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... combine these pictures to create a three-dimensional (3D) model of the whole heart. This imaging test ... findings from earlier chest x rays. Different CT scanners are used for different purposes. A multidetector CT ...

  19. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... of the Head? What is CT Scanning of the Head? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? CT scanning of the head is typically ...

  20. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... the Sinuses? What is CT (Computed Tomography) of the Sinuses? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? CT of the sinuses is primarily used ...

  1. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... benefits vs. risks? Benefits A CT scan is one of the safest means of studying the sinuses. ... CT scanning provides very detailed images of many types of tissue as well as the lungs, bones, ...

  2. Gallstone ileus: CT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delabrousse, E.; Bartholomot, B.; Sohm, O.; Kastler, B. [Dept. of Radiology A, CHU Jean Minjoz, University of Besancon (France); Wallerand, H. [Dept. of Surgery, CHU Jean Minjoz, University of Besancon (France)

    2000-06-01

    Gallstone ileus is a rare complication of recurrent gallstone cholecystitis. The classic radiographic triad of small bowel obstruction, pneumobilia and ectopic gallstone on abdominal plain radiograph is described with CT imaging. Because of the better resolution of CT compared with abdominal radiography and its recent accession to emergency use, radiologists should be aware of CT findings of gallstone ileus. We report a case in which gallstone ileus was initially diagnosed by CT. (orig.)

  3. Measurement of B(t→Wb)/B(t→Wq) in top-quark-pair decays using dilepton events and the full CDF Run II data set.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, T; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Auerbach, B; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Bae, T; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartos, P; Bauce, M; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Bland, K R; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brucken, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Butti, P; Buzatu, A; Calamba, A; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Canelli, F; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Clark, A; Clarke, C; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Corbo, M; Cordelli, M; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Cremonesi, M; Cruz, D; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; d'Ascenzo, N; Datta, M; de Barbaro, P; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; D'Errico, M; Devoto, F; Di Canto, A; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; Donati, S; D'Onofrio, M; Dorigo, M; Driutti, A; Ebina, K; Edgar, R; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, S; Esham, B; Farrington, S; Fernández Ramos, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Frisch, H; Funakoshi, Y; Galloni, C; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giromini, P; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldin, D; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González López, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gramellini, E; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Hahn, S R; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Harrington-Taber, T; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hocker, A; Hong, Z; Hopkins, W; Hou, S; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kambeitz, M; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kasmi, A; Kato, Y; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S H; Kim, S B; Kim, Y J; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirby, M; Knoepfel, K; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Kuhr, T; Kurata, M; Laasanen, A T; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lannon, K; Latino, G; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Leo, S; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Limosani, A; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Liu, H; Liu, Q; Liu, T; Lockwitz, S; Loginov, A; Lucchesi, D; Lucà, A; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Madrak, R; Maestro, P; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Marchese, L; Margaroli, F; Marino, P; Martínez, M; Matera, K; Mattson, M E; Mazzacane, A; Mazzanti, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Mietlicki, D; Mitra, A; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Nett, J; Neu, C; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Noh, S Y; Norniella, O; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Ortolan, L; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Palni, P; Papadimitriou, V; Parker, W; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pilot, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poprocki, S; Potamianos, K; Pranko, A; Prokoshin, F; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Ranjan, N; Redondo Fernández, I; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodriguez, T; Rolli, S; Ronzani, M; Roser, R; Rosner, J L; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Sakumoto, W K; Sakurai, Y; Santi, L; Sato, K; Saveliev, V; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scuri, F; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sforza, F; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shreyber-Tecker, I; Simonenko, A; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Song, H; Sorin, V; St Denis, R; Stancari, M; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Sudo, Y; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Takemasa, K; Takeuchi, Y; Tang, J; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Thom, J; Thomson, E; Thukral, V; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Trovato, M; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vernieri, C; Vidal, M; Vilar, R; Vizán, J; Vogel, M; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Waters, D; Wester, W C; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wilbur, S; Williams, H H; Wilson, J S; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, H; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wu, Z; Yamamoto, K; Yamato, D; Yang, T; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W-M; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Zanetti, A M; Zeng, Y; Zhou, C; Zucchelli, S

    2014-06-06

    We present a measurement of the ratio of the top-quark branching fractions R=B(t→Wb)/B(t→Wq), where q represents any quark flavor, in events with two charged leptons, imbalance in total transverse energy, and at least two jets. The measurement uses proton-antiproton collision data at center-of-mass energy 1.96 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 8.7  fb^{-1} collected with the Collider Detector at Fermilab during Run II of the Tevatron. We measure R to be 0.87±0.07, and extract the magnitude of the top-bottom quark coupling to be |V_{tb}|=0.93±0.04, assuming three generations of quarks. Under these assumptions, a lower limit of |V_{tb}|>0.85(0.87) at 95% (90%) credibility level is set.

  4. Measurement of B(t→Wb)/B(t→Wq) in Top-Quark-Pair Decays Using Dilepton Events and the Full CDF Run II Data Set

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, T.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Butti, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Cremonesi, M.; Cruz, D.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; d'Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; D'Errico, M.; Devoto, F.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; Donati, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; Dorigo, M.; Driutti, A.; Ebina, K.; Edgar, R.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Esham, B.; Farrington, S.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Frisch, H.; Funakoshi, Y.; Galloni, C.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González López, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gramellini, E.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Harrington-Taber, T.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hocker, A.; Hong, Z.; Hopkins, W.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kambeitz, M.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Kruse, M.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lannon, K.; Latino, G.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucà, A.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Marchese, L.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, P.; Martínez, M.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Nigmanov, T.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Palni, P.; Papadimitriou, V.; Parker, W.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Pranko, A.; Prokoshin, F.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo Fernández, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodriguez, T.; Rolli, S.; Ronzani, M.; Roser, R.; Rosner, J. L.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Sakurai, Y.; Santi, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Song, H.; Sorin, V.; St. Denis, R.; Stancari, M.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thomson, E.; Thukral, V.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vernieri, C.; Vidal, M.; Vilar, R.; Vizán, J.; Vogel, M.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Waters, D.; Wester, W. C.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, J. S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamato, D.; Yang, T.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W.-M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Zanetti, A. M.; Zeng, Y.; Zhou, C.; Zucchelli, S.; CDF Collaboration

    2014-06-01

    We present a measurement of the ratio of the top-quark branching fractions R=B(t→Wb)/B(t→Wq), where q represents any quark flavor, in events with two charged leptons, imbalance in total transverse energy, and at least two jets. The measurement uses proton-antiproton collision data at center-of-mass energy 1.96 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 8.7 fb-1 collected with the Collider Detector at Fermilab during Run II of the Tevatron. We measure R to be 0.87±0.07, and extract the magnitude of the top-bottom quark coupling to be |Vtb|=0.93±0.04, assuming three generations of quarks. Under these assumptions, a lower limit of |Vtb|>0.85(0.87) at 95% (90%) credibility level is set.

  5. Measurement of R=B(t→Wb)/B(t→Wq) in top-quark-pair decays using lepton+jets events and the full CDF run II dataset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, T.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Butti, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Cremonesi, M.; Cruz, D.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; d'Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; De Barbaro, P.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; d'Errico, M.; Devoto, F.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D'Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dorigo, M.; Driutti, A.; Ebina, K.; Edgar, R.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Esham, B.; Eusebi, R.; Farrington, S.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Frisch, H.; Funakoshi, Y.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González López, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gramellini, E.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Harrington-Taber, T.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hocker, A.; Hong, Z.; Hopkins, W.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kambeitz, M.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Kruse, M.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lannon, K.; Latino, G.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, P.; Martínez, M.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Nigmanov, T.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Palni, P.; Papadimitriou, V.; Parker, W.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Pranko, A.; Prokoshin, F.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo Fernández, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodriguez, T.; Rolli, S.; Ronzani, M.; Roser, R.; Rosner, J. L.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Sakurai, Y.; Santi, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Song, H.; Sorin, V.; Stancari, M.; Denis, R. St.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thomson, E.; Thukral, V.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vernieri, C.; Vidal, M.; Vilar, R.; Vizán, J.; Vogel, M.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Wester, W. C., III; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, J. S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamato, D.; Yang, T.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W.-M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Zanetti, A. M.; Zeng, Y.; Zhou, C.; Zucchelli, S.

    2013-06-01

    We present a measurement of the ratio of the top-quark branching fractions R=B(t→Wb)/B(t→Wq), where q represents quarks of type b, s, or d, in the final state with a lepton and hadronic jets. The measurement uses s=1.96TeV proton-antiproton collision data from 8.7fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected with the Collider Detector at Fermilab during Run II of the Tevatron. We simultaneously measure R=0.94±0.09 (stat+syst) and the tt¯ production cross section σtt¯=7.5±1.0(stat+syst)pb. The magnitude of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element, |Vtb|=0.97±0.05 (stat+syst) is extracted assuming three generations of quarks, and a lower limit of |Vtb|>0.89 at 95% credibility level is set.

  6. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... microphone. top of page How does the procedure work? In many ways CT scanning works very much like other x-ray examinations. Different ... scanners to obtain multiple slices in a single rotation. These scanners, called multislice CT or multidetector CT, ...

  7. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... microphone. top of page How does the procedure work? In many ways CT scanning works very much like other x-ray examinations. Different ... scanners to obtain multiple slices in a single rotation. These scanners, called multislice CT or multidetector CT, ...

  8. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... microphone. top of page How does the procedure work? In many ways CT scanning works very much like other x-ray examinations. Different ... scanners to obtain multiple slices in a single rotation. These scanners, called multislice CT or multidetector CT, ...

  9. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a sudden severe headache. a blood clot or bleeding within the brain shortly after a patient exhibits symptoms of a stroke. a ... CT scanning may eliminate the need for exploratory surgery and surgical biopsy. No radiation remains in a patient's body after a CT examination. X-rays used in CT ...

  10. CT angiography and CT perfusion in acute ischemic stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seeters, T. van

    2016-01-01

    CT angiography and CT perfusion are used in patients with acute ischemic stroke for diagnostic purposes and to select patients for treatment. In this thesis, the reproducibility of CT angiography and CT perfusion is examined, the additional value of CT angiography and CT perfusion for stroke outcome

  11. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Pediatric computed tomography (CT) ... are the limitations of Children's CT? What is Children's CT? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a ...

  12. Your Radiologist Explains CT Colonography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CT Angiography Video: Myelography Video: CT of the Heart Video: Radioiodine I-131 Therapy Radiology and You ... CT Angiography Video: Myelography Video: CT of the Heart Video: Radioiodine I-131 Therapy Radiology and You ...

  13. Marketing cardiac CT programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Jason

    2010-01-01

    There are two components of cardiac CT discussed in this article: coronary artery calcium scoring (CACS) and coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA).The distinctive advantages of each CT examination are outlined. In order to ensure a successful cardiac CT program, it is imperative that imaging facilities market their cardiac CT practices effectively in order to gain a competitive advantage in this valuable market share. If patients receive quality care by competent individuals, they are more likely to recommend the facility's cardiac CT program. Satisfied patients will also be more willing to come back for any further testing.

  14. Study of the evolution of aortic atherosclerotic inflammatory plaques using {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT; Evolution temporelle des foyers inflammatoires d'atherome aortique avec le morphoTEP au {sup 18}F-FDG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertrand, A.C.; Netter, F.; Muller, M.A.; Djaballah, W.; Bruna, C.; Olivier, P.; Karcher, G.; Marie, P.Y. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, 54 - Nancy (France)

    2006-02-15

    PET allows focal uptake of {sup 18}F-FDG to be identified on aortic walls, and these foci might be linked to inflammatory atherosclerotic plaques. The goal of our study was to determine the temporal evolution of these foci. Material and methods: Twenty eight patients undergoing two {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT within a two month period (1.5{+-}0.5 months on average), were considered. {sup 18}F-FDG uptakes were visually detected on thoracic aorta walls and the maximum activity level of these foci was expressed by a ratio with blood aortic activity (W/B). Results: 35 parietal aortic foci were detected on the initial PET/CT among which 26 were still detected on the second PET/CT together with 5 new foci; therefore the agreement rate between the two examinations was 65% for the visual detection of parietal aortic foci. The ratio W/B was 1.48{+-}0.22 on average. Between the two examinations the evolution of the W/B ratio was only correlated to the initial activity (p=0.02), mainly because the most active foci (W/B>1.6) had a marked activity decrease. Conclusion: When 2 different PET/CT are carried out on the same patients within lower than a two month period, activity from parietal aortic foci seems generally stable, with a concordance rate of 65% between the 2 investigations, and this might relate to a chronic mode of the evolution of inflammation and atherosclerosis. A further decrease in activity was, however, consistently documented for the foci showing the highest activity at baseline, and this might relate to a more evolutive and acute inflammatory process. (author)

  15. PET/CT Artifacts

    OpenAIRE

    Blodgett, Todd M.; Mehta, Ajeet S.; Mehta, Amar S.; Laymon, Charles M; Carney, Jonathan; Townsend, David W.

    2011-01-01

    There are several artifacts encountered in PET/CT imaging, including attenuation correction (AC) artifacts associated with using CT for attenuation correction. Several artifacts can mimic a 2-deoxy-2-[18F] fluoro-D-glucose (FDG) avid malignant lesions and therefore recognition of these artifacts is clinically relevant. Our goal was to identify and characterize these artifacts and also discuss some protocol variables that may affect image quality in PET/CT.

  16. GA-Gammon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Irineo-Fuentes, Oscar; Cruz-Cortes, Nareli; Rodriguez-Henriquez, Francisco

    2006-01-01

    of the best board positions during a game. Best GA-Gammon individuals so obtained were tested in separated 5000-game tournaments against Pubeval itself, and Fuzzeval, a fuzzy controller-based player. Our experimental results indicate that the best individuals generated by GA-Gammon show similar performance...

  17. GaAs/GaSb nanowire heterostructures grown by MOVPE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppsson, Mattias; Dick, Kimberly A.; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal

    2008-01-01

    We report Au-assisted growth of GaAs/GaSb nanowire heterostructures on GaAs(1 1 1)B-substrates by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy. The growth is studied at various precursor molar fractions and temperatures, in order to optimize the growth conditions for the GaSb nanowire segment. In contrast t...

  18. SU-D-217A-06: Impact of Anterior-Posterior (AP) and Posterior-Anterior (PA) Scout Scans on the CT Radiation Dose in the Whole Body PET/CT Scan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, D; Pan, T

    2012-06-01

    CT can contribute over 50% of radiation dose in the whole body (WB) PET/CT scan. Tube current modulation (TCM) is a standard technique for reducing CT radiation dose to the patient by changing the tube current with the patient size, and is controlled by a very low-dose scoutscan, which assumes the patient is positioned at the center of the CT gantry opening. However, most patients are not positioned at the center due to practicality or to avoid claustrophobic or to reduce time of radiation exposure from the patient to the technologist. We study the impact of the AP and PA scout scans to the patient radiation exposure from CT. Ina retrospective study of 200 patients, each received two WB PET/CT scans: one with AP, and the other one with PA. The helical CT with TCM and PET acquisitions were identical in both scans. Separation of the two scans was about 10 months in average. The scans were performed on four GE PET/CT scanners: three 16- and one 64-slice with the same TCM settings. The 200patients were selected for the same scan coverage and similar body weight (difference = 3 kg). The tube current in each slice and average exposure tothe patient were recorded and compared. The AP scout caused lower radiation dose on 94% of the patients. Both the tube current, and radiation exposure were reduced by 46±30 mA and 1.6±1.0 mGy, respectively. The effective radiation dose is reduced by 1.7±1.2 mSv. These results were statistically significant (p<0.00001). The AP scout caused significantly less radiation dose than the PA scout in the CT scan of the whole-body PET/CT scan. Care should be taken to select theorientation of the scout scan to achieve appropriate radiation exposure to the patient when TCM is applied. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  19. Somatostatin receptor PET in neuroendocrine tumours: {sup 68}Ga-DOTA{sup 0},Tyr{sup 3}-octreotide versus {sup 68}Ga-DOTA{sup 0}-lanreotide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Putzer, Daniel; Kroiss, Alexander; Waitz, Dietmar; Gabriel, Michael; Uprimny, Christian; Guggenberg, Elisabeth von; Decristoforo, Clemens; Warwitz, Boris; Virgolini, Irene Johanna [Innsbruck Medical University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Innsbruck (Austria); Traub-Weidinger, Tatjana [Vienna Medical University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Vienna (Austria); Widmann, Gerlig [Innsbruck Medical University, Department of Radiology, Innsbruck (Austria)

    2013-03-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of {sup 68}Ga-labelled DOTA{sup 0}-lanreotide ({sup 68}Ga-DOTA-LAN) on the diagnostic assessment of neuroendocrine tumour (NET) patients with low to moderate uptake on planar somatostatin receptor (SSTR) scintigraphy or {sup 68}Ga-labelled DOTA{sup 0},Tyr{sup 3}-octreotide ({sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TOC) positron emission tomography (PET). Fifty-three patients with histologically confirmed NET and clinical signs of progressive disease, who had not qualified for peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) on planar SSTR scintigraphy or {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TOC PET (n = 38) due to lack of tracer uptake, underwent {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-LAN PET to evaluate a treatment option with {sup 90}Y-labelled lanreotide according to the MAURITIUS trial. The included patients received 150 {+-} 30 MBq of each radiopharmaceutical intravenously. PET scans were acquired 60-90 min after intravenous bolus injection. Image results from both PET scans were compared head to head, focusing on the intensity of tracer uptake in terms of treatment decision. CT was used for morphologic correlation of tumour lesions. To further evaluate the binding affinities of each tracer, quantitative and qualitative values were calculated for target lesions. {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-LAN and {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TOC both showed equivalent findings in 24/38 patients when fused PET/CT images were interpreted. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-LAN in comparison to CT were 0.63, 0.5 and 0.62 (n = 53; p < 0.0001) and for {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TOC in comparison to CT 0.78, 0.5 and 0.76 (n = 38; p < 0.013), respectively. {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TOC showed a significantly higher maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}) regarding the primary tumour in 25 patients (p < 0.003) and regarding the liver in 30 patients (p < 0.009) compared to {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-LAN. Corresponding values of both PET scans for tumour and liver did not show any significant correlation. {sup 68}Ga

  20. Somatostatin receptor PET in neuroendocrine tumours: 68Ga-DOTA0,Tyr3-octreotide versus 68Ga-DOTA0-lanreotide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putzer, Daniel; Kroiss, Alexander; Waitz, Dietmar; Gabriel, Michael; Traub-Weidinger, Tatjana; Uprimny, Christian; von Guggenberg, Elisabeth; Decristoforo, Clemens; Warwitz, Boris; Widmann, Gerlig; Virgolini, Irene Johanna

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of (68)Ga-labelled DOTA(0)-lanreotide ((68)Ga-DOTA-LAN) on the diagnostic assessment of neuroendocrine tumour (NET) patients with low to moderate uptake on planar somatostatin receptor (SSTR) scintigraphy or (68)Ga-labelled DOTA(0),Tyr(3)-octreotide ((68)Ga-DOTA-TOC) positron emission tomography (PET). Fifty-three patients with histologically confirmed NET and clinical signs of progressive disease, who had not qualified for peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) on planar SSTR scintigraphy or (68)Ga-DOTA-TOC PET (n = 38) due to lack of tracer uptake, underwent (68)Ga-DOTA-LAN PET to evaluate a treatment option with (90)Y-labelled lanreotide according to the MAURITIUS trial. The included patients received 150 ± 30 MBq of each radiopharmaceutical intravenously. PET scans were acquired 60-90 min after intravenous bolus injection. Image results from both PET scans were compared head to head, focusing on the intensity of tracer uptake in terms of treatment decision. CT was used for morphologic correlation of tumour lesions. To further evaluate the binding affinities of each tracer, quantitative and qualitative values were calculated for target lesions. (68)Ga-DOTA-LAN and (68)Ga-DOTA-TOC both showed equivalent findings in 24/38 patients when fused PET/CT images were interpreted. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of (68)Ga-DOTA-LAN in comparison to CT were 0.63, 0.5 and 0.62 (n = 53; p < 0.0001) and for (68)Ga-DOTA-TOC in comparison to CT 0.78, 0.5 and 0.76 (n = 38; p < 0.013), respectively. (68)Ga-DOTA-TOC showed a significantly higher maximum standardized uptake value (SUV(max)) regarding the primary tumour in 25 patients (p < 0.003) and regarding the liver in 30 patients (p < 0.009) compared to (68)Ga-DOTA-LAN. Corresponding values of both PET scans for tumour and liver did not show any significant correlation. (68)Ga-DOTA-TOC revealed more tumour sites than (68)Ga

  1. Dietary Supplementation with a Combination of Lactoferrin, Fish Oil, and Enterococcus faecium WB2000 for Treating Dry Eye: A Rat Model and Human Clinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawashima, Motoko; Nakamura, Shigeru; Izuta, Yusuke; Inoue, Sachiko; Tsubota, Kazuo

    2016-04-01

    To examine the effect of a combined dietary supplement containing fish oil, lactoferrin, zinc, vitamin C, lutein, vitamin E, γ-aminobutanoic acid, and Enterococcus faecium WB2000 on dry eye. A preliminary study in a rat model and a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study in humans were conducted. Forty Japanese volunteers aged 22 to 59 years were randomized into combined dietary supplement (2 capsules/day; 20 participants) and placebo (vehicle; 19 participants) groups and treated once daily for 8 weeks. Rats received the combined dietary supplement components (10 or 50 mg/kg orally) or vehicle (2% DMSO), and dry eye was mechanically induced for 2 days. Tear production was measured in rats after dry eye was induced. Humans were assessed at baseline and weeks 4 and 8 post-supplementation based on keratoconjunctival epithelial damage; fluorescein tear film breakup time; tear production; biochemical data; information regarding subjective dry eye symptoms by answering a questionnaire; and information regarding adverse events via medical interviews. Supplementation dose-dependently mitigated the decrease in tear production in rats. Among subjects with confirmed dry eye, clinical symptoms improved at weeks 4 and 8 more significantly in the supplementation group than in the placebo group (P<.05). The rate of increase in the Schirmer value was greater in the supplementation group. No adverse events occurred. Supplementation improved objective and subjective dry eye symptoms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Green synthesis of isomaltulose from cane molasses by Bacillus subtilis WB800-pHA01-palI in a biologic membrane reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lingtian; Wu, Shanshan; Qiu, Juanjuan; Xu, Chuanxue; Li, Sha; Xu, Hong

    2017-08-15

    A green process and environmentally benign process is highly desirable in the development of enzymatic catalysis. In this work, the shuttle plasmid pHA01 was constructed and the sucrose isomerase (SIase) was expressed in Bacillus subtilis WB800. The optimal nitrogen and carbon sources for SIase expression were yeast extract (15g/L) and un-pretreated cane molasses (UCM, 20g/L), respectively. After the UCM fed, the whole cell activity reached 5.2U/mL in a 7.5L fermentor. Optimum catalytic temperature and pH of whole cell were 35°C and 5.5, respectively. Although the biologic membrane reactor (BMR) system consecutively worked for 12 batches, the sucrose conversion remained higher than 90%, indicating the BMR system had a greater operational stability. Furthermore, isomaltulose production using the BMR system with low-cost cane molasses as its substrate not only reduces the production cost and mediates environmental pollution, but also solves the genetic background problem of the non-food-grade strains. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Measurement of the ratio $B(t \\to Wb)/B(t \\to Wq)$ in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Khachatryan, Vardan; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Bergauer, Thomas; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Fabjan, Christian; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hartl, Christian; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Kiesenhofer, Wolfgang; Knünz, Valentin; Krammer, Manfred; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Mikulec, Ivan; Rabady, Dinyar; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Herbert; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Taurok, Anton; Treberer-Treberspurg, Wolfgang; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Alderweireldt, Sara; Bansal, Monika; Bansal, Sunil; Cornelis, Tom; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Knutsson, Albert; Luyckx, Sten; Ochesanu, Silvia; Roland, Benoit; Rougny, Romain; Van De Klundert, Merijn; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Blekman, Freya; Blyweert, Stijn; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Daci, Nadir; Heracleous, Natalie; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Keaveney, James; Kim, Tae Jeong; Lowette, Steven; Maes, Michael; Olbrechts, Annik; Python, Quentin; Strom, Derek; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Villella, Ilaria; Caillol, Cécile; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Favart, Laurent; Gay, Arnaud; Grebenyuk, Anastasia; Léonard, Alexandre; Marage, Pierre Edouard; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Perniè, Luca; Reis, Thomas; Seva, Tomislav; Thomas, Laurent; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Wang, Jian; Adler, Volker; Beernaert, Kelly; Benucci, Leonardo; Cimmino, Anna; Costantini, Silvia; Crucy, Shannon; Dildick, Sven; Fagot, Alexis; Garcia, Guillaume; Klein, Benjamin; Mccartin, Joseph; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Salva Diblen, Sinem; Sigamani, Michael; Strobbe, Nadja; Thyssen, Filip; Tytgat, Michael; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Beluffi, Camille; Bruno, Giacomo; Castello, Roberto; Caudron, Adrien; Ceard, Ludivine; Da Silveira, Gustavo Gil; Delaere, Christophe; Du Pree, Tristan; Favart, Denis; Forthomme, Laurent; Giammanco, Andrea; Hollar, Jonathan; Jez, Pavel; Komm, Matthias; Lemaitre, Vincent; Liao, Junhui; Nuttens, Claude; Pagano, Davide; Pin, Arnaud; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Popov, Andrey; Quertenmont, Loic; Selvaggi, Michele; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Beliy, Nikita; Caebergs, Thierry; Daubie, Evelyne; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Alves, Gilvan; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; Dos Reis Martins, Thiago; Pol, Maria Elena; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Carvalho, Wagner; Chinellato, Jose; Custódio, Analu; Melo Da Costa, Eliza; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Malbouisson, Helena; Malek, Magdalena; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santaolalla, Javier; Santoro, Alberto; Sznajder, Andre; Tonelli Manganote, Edmilson José; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; De Almeida Dias, Flavia; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Mercadante, Pedro G; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Genchev, Vladimir; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Marinov, Andrey; Piperov, Stefan; Rodozov, Mircho; Sultanov, Georgi; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Glushkov, Ivan; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Kozhuharov, Venelin; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Chen, Mingshui; Du, Ran; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Liang, Dong; Liang, Song; Plestina, Roko; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Xianyou; Wang, Zheng; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Ban, Yong; Guo, Yifei; Li, Qiang; Li, Wenbo; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Wang, Dayong; Zhang, Linlin; Zou, Wei; Avila, Carlos; Chaparro Sierra, Luisa Fernanda; Florez, Carlos; Gomez, Juan Pablo; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Polic, Dunja; Puljak, Ivica; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Kadija, Kreso; Luetic, Jelena; Mekterovic, Darko; Morovic, Srecko; Sudic, Lucija; Attikis, Alexandros; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Bodlak, Martin; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Assran, Yasser; Ellithi Kamel, Ali; Mahmoud, Mohammed; Radi, Amr; Kadastik, Mario; Murumaa, Marion; Raidal, Martti; Tiko, Andres; Eerola, Paula; Fedi, Giacomo; Voutilainen, Mikko; Härkönen, Jaakko; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Kortelainen, Matti J; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Mäenpää, Teppo; Peltola, Timo; Tuominen, Eija; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Wendland, Lauri; Tuuva, Tuure; Besancon, Marc; Couderc, Fabrice; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Fabbro, Bernard; Faure, Jean-Louis; Favaro, Carlotta; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Givernaud, Alain; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Locci, Elizabeth; Malcles, Julie; Nayak, Aruna; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Titov, Maksym; Baffioni, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Busson, Philippe; Charlot, Claude; Dahms, Torsten; Dalchenko, Mykhailo; Dobrzynski, Ludwik; Filipovic, Nicolas; Florent, Alice; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Mastrolorenzo, Luca; Miné, Philippe; Mironov, Camelia; Naranjo, Ivo Nicolas; Nguyen, Matthew; Ochando, Christophe; Paganini, Pascal; Salerno, Roberto; Sauvan, Jean-baptiste; Sirois, Yves; Veelken, Christian; Yilmaz, Yetkin; Zabi, Alexandre; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Andrea, Jeremy; Aubin, Alexandre; Bloch, Daniel; Brom, Jean-Marie; Chabert, Eric Christian; Collard, Caroline; Conte, Eric; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Goetzmann, Christophe; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Van Hove, Pierre; Gadrat, Sébastien; Beauceron, Stephanie; Beaupere, Nicolas; Boudoul, Gaelle; Brochet, Sébastien; Carrillo Montoya, Camilo Andres; Chasserat, Julien; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Fan, Jiawei; Fay, Jean; Gascon, Susan; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Ille, Bernard; Kurca, Tibor; Lethuillier, Morgan; Mirabito, Laurent; Perries, Stephane; Ruiz Alvarez, José David; Sabes, David; Sgandurra, Louis; Sordini, Viola; Vander Donckt, Muriel; Verdier, Patrice; Viret, Sébastien; Xiao, Hong; Tsamalaidze, Zviad; Autermann, Christian; Beranek, Sarah; Bontenackels, Michael; Calpas, Betty; Edelhoff, Matthias; Feld, Lutz; Hindrichs, Otto; Klein, Katja; Ostapchuk, Andrey; Perieanu, Adrian; Raupach, Frank; Sammet, Jan; Schael, Stefan; Sprenger, Daniel; Weber, Hendrik; Wittmer, Bruno; Zhukov, Valery; Ata, Metin; Caudron, Julien; Dietz-Laursonn, Erik; Duchardt, Deborah; Erdmann, Martin; Fischer, Robert; Güth, Andreas; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Klingebiel, Dennis; Knutzen, Simon; Kreuzer, Peter; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Olschewski, Mark; Padeken, Klaas; Papacz, Paul; Reithler, Hans; Schmitz, Stefan Antonius; Sonnenschein, Lars; Teyssier, Daniel; Thüer, Sebastian; Weber, Martin; Cherepanov, Vladimir; Erdogan, Yusuf; Flügge, Günter; Geenen, Heiko; Geisler, Matthias; Haj Ahmad, Wael; Hoehle, Felix; Kargoll, Bastian; Kress, Thomas; Kuessel, Yvonne; Lingemann, Joschka; Nowack, Andreas; Nugent, Ian Michael; Perchalla, Lars; Pooth, Oliver; Stahl, Achim; Asin, Ivan; Bartosik, Nazar; Behr, Joerg; Behrenhoff, Wolf; Behrens, Ulf; Bell, Alan James; Bergholz, Matthias; Bethani, Agni; Borras, Kerstin; Burgmeier, Armin; Cakir, Altan; Calligaris, Luigi; Campbell, Alan; Choudhury, Somnath; Costanza, Francesco; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Dooling, Samantha; Dorland, Tyler; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Eichhorn, Thomas; Flucke, Gero; Garay Garcia, Jasone; Geiser, Achim; Gunnellini, Paolo; Hauk, Johannes; Hellwig, Gregor; Hempel, Maria; Horton, Dean; Jung, Hannes; Kasemann, Matthias; Katsas, Panagiotis; Kieseler, Jan; Kleinwort, Claus; Krücker, Dirk; Lange, Wolfgang; Leonard, Jessica; Lipka, Katerina; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Lutz, Benjamin; Mankel, Rainer; Marfin, Ihar; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Naumann-Emme, Sebastian; Novgorodova, Olga; Nowak, Friederike; Ntomari, Eleni; Perrey, Hanno; Pitzl, Daniel; Placakyte, Ringaile; Raspereza, Alexei; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Ron, Elias; Sahin, Mehmet Özgür; Salfeld-Nebgen, Jakob; Saxena, Pooja; Schmidt, Ringo; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Schröder, Matthias; Vargas Trevino, Andrea Del Rocio; Walsh, Roberval; Wissing, Christoph; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Blobel, Volker; Centis Vignali, Matteo; Erfle, Joachim; Garutti, Erika; Goebel, Kristin; Görner, Martin; Gosselink, Martijn; Haller, Johannes; Höing, Rebekka Sophie; Kirschenmann, Henning; Klanner, Robert; Kogler, Roman; Lange, Jörn; Lapsien, Tobias; Lenz, Teresa; Marchesini, Ivan; Ott, Jochen; Peiffer, Thomas; Pietsch, Niklas; Rathjens, Denis; Sander, Christian; Schettler, Hannes; Schleper, Peter; Schlieckau, Eike; Schmidt, Alexander; Seidel, Markus; Sibille, Jennifer; Sola, Valentina; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Troendle, Daniel; Usai, Emanuele; Vanelderen, Lukas; Barth, Christian; Baus, Colin; Berger, Joram; Böser, Christian; Butz, Erik; Chwalek, Thorsten; De Boer, Wim; Descroix, Alexis; Dierlamm, Alexander; Feindt, Michael; Guthoff, Moritz; Hartmann, Frank; Hauth, Thomas; Husemann, Ulrich; Katkov, Igor; Kornmayer, Andreas; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Lobelle Pardo, Patricia; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Müller, Thomas; Nürnberg, Andreas; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Ratnikov, Fedor; Röcker, Steffen; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Ulrich, Ralf; Wagner-Kuhr, Jeannine; Wayand, Stefan; Weiler, Thomas; Anagnostou, Georgios; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Giakoumopoulou, Viktoria Athina; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Markou, Athanasios; Markou, Christos; Psallidas, Andreas; Topsis-Giotis, Iasonas; Gouskos, Loukas; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Saoulidou, Niki; Stiliaris, Efstathios; Aslanoglou, Xenofon; Evangelou, Ioannis; Flouris, Giannis; Foudas, Costas; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Paradas, Evangelos; Bencze, Gyorgy; Hajdu, Csaba; Hidas, Pàl; Horvath, Dezso; Sikler, Ferenc; Veszpremi, Viktor; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Zsigmond, Anna Julia; Beni, Noemi; Czellar, Sandor; Karancsi, János; Molnar, Jozsef; Palinkas, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Swain, Sanjay Kumar; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Dhingra, Nitish; Gupta, Ruchi; Kalsi, Amandeep Kaur; Kaur, Manjit; Mittal, Monika; Nishu, Nishu; Singh, Jasbir; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Ahuja, Sudha; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Kumar, Ajay; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Ranjan, Kirti; Sharma, Varun; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Chatterjee, Kalyanmoy; Dutta, Suchandra; Gomber, Bhawna; Jain, Sandhya; Jain, Shilpi; Khurana, Raman; Modak, Atanu; Mukherjee, Swagata; Roy, Debarati; Sarkar, Subir; Sharan, Manoj; Abdulsalam, Abdulla; Dutta, Dipanwita; Kailas, Swaminathan; Kumar, Vineet; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Topkar, Anita; Aziz, Tariq; Chatterjee, Rajdeep Mohan; Ganguly, Sanmay; Ghosh, Saranya; Guchait, Monoranjan; Gurtu, Atul; Kole, Gouranga; Kumar, Sanjeev; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Parida, Bibhuti; Sudhakar, Katta; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Dewanjee, Ram Krishna; Dugad, Shashikant; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Behnamian, Hadi; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Fahim, Ali; Jafari, Abideh; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Naseri, Mohsen; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Felcini, Marta; Grunewald, Martin; Abbrescia, Marcello; Barbone, Lucia; Calabria, Cesare; Chhibra, Simranjit Singh; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Fiore, Luigi; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pacifico, Nicola; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Radogna, Raffaella; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Silvestris, Lucia; Singh, Gurpreet; Venditti, Rosamaria; Verwilligen, Piet; Zito, Giuseppe; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Benvenuti, Alberto; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Brigliadori, Luca; Campanini, Renato; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Codispoti, Giuseppe; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Grandi, Claudio; Guiducci, Luigi; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Perrotta, Andrea; Primavera, Federica; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gian Piero; Tosi, Nicolò; Travaglini, Riccardo; Albergo, Sebastiano; Cappello, Gigi; Chiorboli, Massimiliano; Costa, Salvatore; Giordano, Ferdinando; Potenza, Renato; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Gallo, Elisabetta; Gonzi, Sandro; Gori, Valentina; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Tropiano, Antonio; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Ferro, Fabrizio; Lo Vetere, Maurizio; Robutti, Enrico; Tosi, Silvano; Dinardo, Mauro Emanuele; Fiorendi, Sara; Gennai, Simone; Gerosa, Raffaele; Ghezzi, Alessio; Govoni, Pietro; Lucchini, Marco Toliman; Malvezzi, Sandra; Manzoni, Riccardo Andrea; Martelli, Arabella; Marzocchi, Badder; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Paganoni, Marco; Pedrini, Daniele; Ragazzi, Stefano; Redaelli, Nicola; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Buontempo, Salvatore; Cavallo, Nicola; Di Guida, Salvatore; Fabozzi, Francesco; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Lista, Luca; Meola, Sabino; Merola, Mario; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Azzi, Patrizia; Bacchetta, Nicola; Bisello, Dario; Branca, Antonio; Carlin, Roberto; Checchia, Paolo; Dorigo, Tommaso; Dosselli, Umberto; Galanti, Mario; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Gasparini, Ugo; Gonella, Franco; Gozzelino, Andrea; Kanishchev, Konstantin; Lacaprara, Stefano; Margoni, Martino; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Pazzini, Jacopo; Pozzobon, Nicola; Ronchese, Paolo; Simonetto, Franco; Torassa, Ezio; Tosi, Mia; Zotto, Pierluigi; Zucchetta, Alberto; Zumerle, Gianni; Gabusi, Michele; Ratti, Sergio P; Riccardi, Cristina; Salvini, Paola; Vitulo, Paolo; Biasini, Maurizio; Bilei, Gian Mario; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Menichelli, Mauro; Romeo, Francesco; Saha, Anirban; Santocchia, Attilio; Spiezia, Aniello; Androsov, Konstantin; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bernardini, Jacopo; Boccali, Tommaso; Broccolo, Giuseppe; Castaldi, Rino; Ciocci, Maria Agnese; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Donato, Silvio; Fiori, Francesco; Foà, Lorenzo; Giassi, Alessandro; Grippo, Maria Teresa; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Martini, Luca; Messineo, Alberto; Moon, Chang-Seong; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzi, Andrea; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Serban, Alin Titus; Spagnolo, Paolo; Squillacioti, Paola; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Vernieri, Caterina; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; Del Re, Daniele; Diemoz, Marcella; Grassi, Marco; Jorda, Clara; Longo, Egidio; Margaroli, Fabrizio; Meridiani, Paolo; Micheli, Francesco; Nourbakhsh, Shervin; Organtini, Giovanni; Paramatti, Riccardo; Rahatlou, Shahram; Rovelli, Chiara; Santanastasio, Francesco; Soffi, Livia; Traczyk, Piotr; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Bellan, Riccardo; Biino, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Casasso, Stefano; Costa, Marco; Degano, Alessandro; Demaria, Natale; Finco, Linda; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Musich, Marco; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Ortona, Giacomo; Pacher, Luca; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Pinna Angioni, Gian Luca; Potenza, Alberto; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Tamponi, Umberto; Belforte, Stefano; Candelise, Vieri; Casarsa, Massimo; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Gobbo, Benigno; La Licata, Chiara; Marone, Matteo; Montanino, Damiana; Schizzi, Andrea; Umer, Tomo; Zanetti, Anna; Chang, Sunghyun; Nam, Soon-Kwon; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kim, Min Suk; Kong, Dae Jung; Lee, Sangeun; Oh, Young Do; Park, Hyangkyu; Sakharov, Alexandre; Son, Dong-Chul; Kim, Jae Yool; Song, Sanghyeon; Choi, Suyong; Gyun, Dooyeon; Hong, Byung-Sik; Jo, Mihee; Kim, Hyunchul; Kim, Yongsun; Lee, Byounghoon; Lee, Kyong Sei; Park, Sung Keun; Roh, Youn; Choi, Minkyoo; Kim, Ji Hyun; Park, Inkyu; Park, Sangnam; Ryu, Geonmo; Ryu, Min Sang; Choi, Young-Il; Choi, Young Kyu; Goh, Junghwan; Kwon, Eunhyang; Lee, Jongseok; Seo, Hyunkwan; Yu, Intae; Juodagalvis, Andrius; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-de La Cruz, Ivan; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Martínez-Ortega, Jorge; Sánchez Hernández, Alberto; Villasenor-Cendejas, Luis Manuel; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Pedraza, Isabel; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Casimiro Linares, Edgar; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Krofcheck, David; Butler, Philip H; Reucroft, Steve; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahmad, Muhammad; Hassan, Qamar; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Khalid, Shoaib; Khan, Wajid Ali; Khurshid, Taimoor; Shah, Mehar Ali; Shoaib, Muhammad; Bialkowska, Helena; Bluj, Michal; Boimska, Bożena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Romanowska-Rybinska, Katarzyna; Szleper, Michal; Zalewski, Piotr; Brona, Grzegorz; Bunkowski, Karol; Cwiok, Mikolaj; Dominik, Wojciech; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Misiura, Maciej; Olszewski, Michał; Wolszczak, Weronika; Bargassa, Pedrame; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, Cristóvão; Faccioli, Pietro; Ferreira Parracho, Pedro Guilherme; Gallinaro, Michele; Nguyen, Federico; Rodrigues Antunes, Joao; Seixas, Joao; Varela, Joao; Vischia, Pietro; Afanasiev, Serguei; Bunin, Pavel; Gavrilenko, Mikhail; Golutvin, Igor; Gorbunov, Ilya; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavin, Vladimir; Konoplyanikov, Viktor; Lanev, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexander; Matveev, Viktor; Moisenz, Petr; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Shmatov, Sergey; Skatchkov, Nikolai; Smirnov, Vitaly; Zarubin, Anatoli; Golovtsov, Victor; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Levchenko, Petr; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Smirnov, Igor; Sulimov, Valentin; Uvarov, Lev; Vavilov, Sergey; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Andrey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Tlisov, Danila; Toropin, Alexander; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Safronov, Grigory; Semenov, Sergey; Spiridonov, Alexander; Stolin, Viatcheslav; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Leonidov, Andrey; Mesyats, Gennady; Rusakov, Sergey V; Vinogradov, Alexey; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Dubinin, Mikhail; Dudko, Lev; Ershov, Alexander; Gribushin, Andrey; Klyukhin, Vyacheslav; Kodolova, Olga; Lokhtin, Igor; Obraztsov, Stepan; Petrushanko, Sergey; Savrin, Viktor; Snigirev, Alexander; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Kachanov, Vassili; Kalinin, Alexey; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Krychkine, Victor; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Tourtchanovitch, Leonid; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Dordevic, Milos; Ekmedzic, Marko; Milosevic, Jovan; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Battilana, Carlo; Calvo, Enrique; Cerrada, Marcos; Chamizo Llatas, Maria; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Domínguez Vázquez, Daniel; Escalante Del Valle, Alberto; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Merino, Gonzalo; Navarro De Martino, Eduardo; Pérez Calero Yzquierdo, Antonio María; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Quintario Olmeda, Adrián; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Senghi Soares, Mara; Albajar, Carmen; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Missiroli, Marino; Brun, Hugues; Cuevas, Javier; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Folgueras, Santiago; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Duarte Campderros, Jordi; Fernandez, Marcos; Gomez, Gervasio; Gonzalez Sanchez, Javier; Graziano, Alberto; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Marco, Rafael; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Matorras, Francisco; Munoz Sanchez, Francisca Javiela; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Rodrigo, Teresa; Rodríguez-Marrero, Ana Yaiza; Ruiz-Jimeno, Alberto; Scodellaro, Luca; Vila, Ivan; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Abbaneo, Duccio; Auffray, Etiennette; Auzinger, Georg; Bachtis, Michail; Baillon, Paul; Ball, Austin; Barney, David; Benaglia, Andrea; Bendavid, Joshua; Benhabib, Lamia; Benitez, Jose F; Bernet, Colin; Bianchi, Giovanni; Bloch, Philippe; Bocci, Andrea; Bonato, Alessio; Bondu, Olivier; Botta, Cristina; Breuker, Horst; Camporesi, Tiziano; Cerminara, Gianluca; Christiansen, Tim; Colafranceschi, Stefano; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; D'Enterria, David; Dabrowski, Anne; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; De Guio, Federico; De Roeck, Albert; De Visscher, Simon; Dobson, Marc; Dupont-Sagorin, Niels; Elliott-Peisert, Anna; Eugster, Jürg; Franzoni, Giovanni; Funk, Wolfgang; Giffels, Manuel; Gigi, Dominique; Gill, Karl; Giordano, Domenico; Girone, Maria; Glege, Frank; Guida, Roberto; Hammer, Josef; Hansen, Magnus; Harris, Philip; Hegeman, Jeroen; Innocente, Vincenzo; Janot, Patrick; Karavakis, Edward; Kousouris, Konstantinos; Krajczar, Krisztian; Lecoq, Paul; Lourenco, Carlos; Magini, Nicolo; Malgeri, Luca; Mannelli, Marcello; Masetti, Lorenzo; Meijers, Frans; Mersi, Stefano; Meschi, Emilio; Moortgat, Filip; Mulders, Martijn; Musella, Pasquale; Orsini, Luciano; Pape, Luc; Perez, Emmanuelle; Perrozzi, Luca; Petrilli, Achille; Petrucciani, Giovanni; Pfeiffer, Andreas; Pierini, Maurizio; Pimiä, Martti; Piparo, Danilo; Plagge, Michael; Racz, Attila; Rolandi, Gigi; Rovere, Marco; Sakulin, Hannes; Schäfer, Christoph; Schwick, Christoph; Sekmen, Sezen; Sharma, Archana; Siegrist, Patrice; Silva, Pedro; Simon, Michal; Sphicas, Paraskevas; Spiga, Daniele; Steggemann, Jan; Stieger, Benjamin; Stoye, Markus; Treille, Daniel; Tsirou, Andromachi; Veres, Gabor Istvan; Vlimant, Jean-Roch; Wöhri, Hermine Katharina; Zeuner, Wolfram Dietrich; Bertl, Willi; Deiters, Konrad; Erdmann, Wolfram; Horisberger, Roland; Ingram, Quentin; Kaestli, Hans-Christian; König, Stefan; Kotlinski, Danek; Langenegger, Urs; Renker, Dieter; Rohe, Tilman; Bachmair, Felix; Bäni, Lukas; Bianchini, Lorenzo; Bortignon, Pierluigi; Buchmann, Marco-Andrea; Casal, Bruno; Chanon, Nicolas; Deisher, Amanda; Dissertori, Günther; Dittmar, Michael; Donegà, Mauro; Dünser, Marc; Eller, Philipp; Grab, Christoph; Hits, Dmitry; Lustermann, Werner; Mangano, Boris; Marini, Andrea Carlo; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, Pablo; Meister, Daniel; Mohr, Niklas; Nägeli, Christoph; Nef, Pascal; Nessi-Tedaldi, Francesca; Pandolfi, Francesco; Pauss, Felicitas; Peruzzi, Marco; Quittnat, Milena; Rebane, Liis; Ronga, Frederic Jean; Rossini, Marco; Starodumov, Andrei; Takahashi, Maiko; Theofilatos, Konstantinos; Wallny, Rainer; Weber, Hannsjoerg Artur; Amsler, Claude; Canelli, Maria Florencia; Chiochia, Vincenzo; De Cosa, Annapaola; Hinzmann, Andreas; Hreus, Tomas; Ivova Rikova, Mirena; Kilminster, Benjamin; Millan Mejias, Barbara; Ngadiuba, Jennifer; Robmann, Peter; Snoek, Hella; Taroni, Silvia; Verzetti, Mauro; Yang, Yong; Cardaci, Marco; Chen, Kuan-Hsin; Ferro, Cristina; Kuo, Chia-Ming; Lin, Willis; Lu, Yun-Ju; Volpe, Roberta; Yu, Shin-Shan; Chang, Paoti; Chang, You-Hao; Chang, Yu-Wei; Chao, Yuan; Chen, Kai-Feng; Chen, Po-Hsun; Dietz, Charles; Grundler, Ulysses; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Kao, Kai-Yi; Lei, Yeong-Jyi; Liu, Yueh-Feng; Lu, Rong-Shyang; Majumder, Devdatta; Petrakou, Eleni; Shi, Xin; Tzeng, Yeng-Ming; Wilken, Rachel; Asavapibhop, Burin; Srimanobhas, Norraphat; Suwonjandee, Narumon; Adiguzel, Aytul; Bakirci, Mustafa Numan; Cerci, Salim; Dozen, Candan; Dumanoglu, Isa; Eskut, Eda; Girgis, Semiray; Gokbulut, Gul; Gurpinar, Emine; Hos, Ilknur; Kangal, Evrim Ersin; Kayis Topaksu, Aysel; Onengut, Gulsen; Ozdemir, Kadri; Ozturk, Sertac; Polatoz, Ayse; Sogut, Kenan; Sunar Cerci, Deniz; Tali, Bayram; Topakli, Huseyin; Vergili, Mehmet; Akin, Ilina Vasileva; Bilin, Bugra; Bilmis, Selcuk; Gamsizkan, Halil; Karapinar, Guler; Ocalan, Kadir; Surat, Ugur Emrah; Yalvac, Metin; Zeyrek, Mehmet; Gülmez, Erhan; Isildak, Bora; Kaya, Mithat; Kaya, Ozlem; Bahtiyar, Hüseyin; Barlas, Esra; Cankocak, Kerem; Vardarlı, Fuat Ilkehan; Yücel, Mete; Levchuk, Leonid; Sorokin, Pavel; Brooke, James John; Clement, Emyr; Cussans, David; Flacher, Henning; Frazier, Robert; Goldstein, Joel; Grimes, Mark; Heath, Greg P; Heath, Helen F; Jacob, Jeson; Kreczko, Lukasz; Lucas, Chris; Meng, Zhaoxia; Newbold, Dave M; Paramesvaran, Sudarshan; Poll, Anthony; Senkin, Sergey; Smith, Vincent J; Williams, Thomas; Bell, Ken W; Belyaev, Alexander; Brew, Christopher; Brown, Robert M; Cockerill, David JA; Coughlan, John A; Harder, Kristian; Harper, Sam; Olaiya, Emmanuel; Petyt, David; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Thea, Alessandro; Tomalin, Ian R; Womersley, William John; Worm, Steven; Baber, Mark; Bainbridge, Robert; Buchmuller, Oliver; Burton, Darren; Colling, David; Cripps, Nicholas; Cutajar, Michael; Dauncey, Paul; Davies, Gavin; Della Negra, Michel; Dunne, Patrick; Ferguson, William; Fulcher, Jonathan; Futyan, David; Gilbert, Andrew; Guneratne Bryer, Arlo; Hall, Geoffrey; Hatherell, Zoe; Iles, Gregory; Jarvis, Martyn; Karapostoli, Georgia; Kenzie, Matthew; Lane, Rebecca; Lucas, Robyn; Lyons, Louis; Magnan, Anne-Marie; Malik, Sarah; Marrouche, Jad; Mathias, Bryn; Nandi, Robin; Nash, Jordan; Nikitenko, Alexander; Pela, Joao; Pesaresi, Mark; Petridis, Konstantinos; Raymond, David Mark; Rogerson, Samuel; Rose, Andrew; Seez, Christopher; Sharp, Peter; Sparrow, Alex; Tapper, Alexander; Vazquez Acosta, Monica; Virdee, Tejinder; Wakefield, Stuart; Cole, Joanne; Hobson, Peter R; Khan, Akram; Kyberd, Paul; Leggat, Duncan; Leslie, Dawn; Martin, William; Reid, Ivan; Symonds, Philip; Teodorescu, Liliana; Turner, Mark; Dittmann, Jay; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Kasmi, Azeddine; Liu, Hongxuan; Scarborough, Tara; Charaf, Otman; Cooper, Seth; Henderson, Conor; Rumerio, Paolo; Avetisyan, Aram; Bose, Tulika; Fantasia, Cory; Heister, Arno; Lawson, Philip; Richardson, Clint; Rohlf, James; Sperka, David; St John, Jason; Sulak, Lawrence; Alimena, Juliette; Bhattacharya, Saptaparna; Christopher, Grant; Cutts, David; Demiragli, Zeynep; Ferapontov, Alexey; Garabedian, Alex; Heintz, Ulrich; Jabeen, Shabnam; Kukartsev, Gennadiy; Laird, Edward; Landsberg, Greg; Luk, Michael; Narain, Meenakshi; Segala, Michael; Sinthuprasith, Tutanon; Speer, Thomas; Swanson, Joshua; Breedon, Richard; Breto, Guillermo; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, Manuel; Chauhan, Sushil; Chertok, Maxwell; Conway, John; Conway, Rylan; Cox, Peter Timothy; Erbacher, Robin; Gardner, Michael; Ko, Winston; Kopecky, Alexandra; Lander, Richard; Miceli, Tia; Mulhearn, Michael; Pellett, Dave; Pilot, Justin; Ricci-Tam, Francesca; Rutherford, Britney; Searle, Matthew; Shalhout, Shalhout; Smith, John; Squires, Michael; Tripathi, Mani; Wilbur, Scott; Yohay, Rachel; Cousins, Robert; Everaerts, Pieter; Farrell, Chris; Hauser, Jay; Ignatenko, Mikhail; Rakness, Gregory; Takasugi, Eric; Valuev, Vyacheslav; Weber, Matthias; Babb, John; Clare, Robert; Ellison, John Anthony; Gary, J William; Hanson, Gail; Heilman, Jesse; Jandir, Pawandeep; Lacroix, Florent; Liu, Hongliang; Long, Owen Rosser; Luthra, Arun; Malberti, Martina; Nguyen, Harold; Shrinivas, Amithabh; Sturdy, Jared; Sumowidagdo, Suharyo; Wimpenny, Stephen; Andrews, Warren; Branson, James G; Cerati, Giuseppe Benedetto; Cittolin, Sergio; D'Agnolo, Raffaele Tito; Evans, David; Holzner, André; Kelley, Ryan; Lebourgeois, Matthew; Letts, James; Macneill, Ian; Padhi, Sanjay; Palmer, Christopher; Pieri, Marco; Sani, Matteo; Sharma, Vivek; Simon, Sean; Sudano, Elizabeth; Tadel, Matevz; Tu, Yanjun; Vartak, Adish; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avraham; Yoo, Jaehyeok; Barge, Derek; Bradmiller-Feld, John; Campagnari, Claudio; Danielson, Thomas; Dishaw, Adam; Flowers, Kristen; Franco Sevilla, Manuel; Geffert, Paul; George, Christopher; Golf, Frank; Incandela, Joe; Justus, Christopher; Mccoll, Nickolas; Richman, Jeffrey; Stuart, David; To, Wing; West, Christopher; Apresyan, Artur; Bornheim, Adolf; Bunn, Julian; Chen, Yi; Di Marco, Emanuele; Duarte, Javier; Mott, Alexander; Newman, Harvey B; Pena, Cristian; Rogan, Christopher; Spiropulu, Maria; Timciuc, Vladlen; Wilkinson, Richard; Xie, Si; Zhu, Ren-Yuan; Azzolini, Virginia; Calamba, Aristotle; Carroll, Ryan; Ferguson, Thomas; Iiyama, Yutaro; Paulini, Manfred; Russ, James; Vogel, Helmut; Vorobiev, Igor; Cumalat, John Perry; Drell, Brian Robert; Ford, William T; Gaz, Alessandro; Luiggi Lopez, Eduardo; Nauenberg, Uriel; Smith, James; Stenson, Kevin; Ulmer, Keith; Wagner, Stephen Robert; Alexander, James; Chatterjee, Avishek; Chu, Jennifer; Eggert, Nicholas; Hopkins, Walter; Khukhunaishvili, Aleko; Kreis, Benjamin; Mirman, Nathan; Nicolas Kaufman, Gala; Patterson, Juliet Ritchie; Ryd, Anders; Salvati, Emmanuele; Skinnari, Louise; Sun, Werner; Teo, Wee Don; Thom, Julia; Thompson, Joshua; Tucker, Jordan; Weng, Yao; Winstrom, Lucas; Wittich, Peter; Winn, Dave; Abdullin, Salavat; Albrow, Michael; Anderson, Jacob; Apollinari, Giorgio; Bauerdick, Lothar AT; Beretvas, Andrew; Berryhill, Jeffrey; Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Burkett, Kevin; Butler, Joel Nathan; Cheung, Harry; Chlebana, Frank; Cihangir, Selcuk; Elvira, Victor Daniel; Fisk, Ian; Freeman, Jim; Gottschalk, Erik; Gray, Lindsey; Green, Dan; Grünendahl, Stefan; Gutsche, Oliver; Hanlon, Jim; Hare, Daryl; Harris, Robert M; Hirschauer, James; Hooberman, Benjamin; Jindariani, Sergo; Johnson, Marvin; Joshi, Umesh; Kaadze, Ketino; Klima, Boaz; Kwan, Simon; Linacre, Jacob; Lincoln, Don; Lipton, Ron; Liu, Tiehui; Lykken, Joseph; Maeshima, Kaori; Marraffino, John Michael; Martinez Outschoorn, Verena Ingrid; Maruyama, Sho; Mason, David; McBride, Patricia; Mishra, Kalanand; Mrenna, Stephen; Musienko, Yuri; Nahn, Steve; Newman-Holmes, Catherine; O'Dell, Vivian; Prokofyev, Oleg; Sexton-Kennedy, Elizabeth; Sharma, Seema; Soha, Aron; Spalding, William J; Spiegel, Leonard; Taylor, Lucas; Tkaczyk, Slawek; Tran, Nhan Viet; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Vaandering, Eric Wayne; Vidal, Richard; Whitmore, Juliana; Yang, Fan; Acosta, Darin; Avery, Paul; Bourilkov, Dimitri; Cheng, Tongguang; Das, Souvik; De Gruttola, Michele; Di Giovanni, Gian Piero; Dobur, Didar; Field, Richard D; Fisher, Matthew; Furic, Ivan-Kresimir; Hugon, Justin; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Korytov, Andrey; Kropivnitskaya, Anna; Kypreos, Theodore; Low, Jia Fu; Matchev, Konstantin; Milenovic, Predrag; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Muniz, Lana; Rinkevicius, Aurelijus; Shchutska, Lesya; Skhirtladze, Nikoloz; Snowball, Matthew; Yelton, John; Zakaria, Mohammed; Gaultney, Vanessa; Hewamanage, Samantha; Linn, Stephan; Markowitz, Pete; Martinez, German; Rodriguez, Jorge Luis; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Bochenek, Joseph; Diamond, Brendan; Haas, Jeff; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Johnson, Kurtis F; Prosper, Harrison; Veeraraghavan, Venkatesh; Weinberg, Marc; Baarmand, Marc M; Hohlmann, Marcus; Kalakhety, Himali; Yumiceva, Francisco; Adams, Mark Raymond; Apanasevich, Leonard; Bazterra, Victor Eduardo; Betts, Russell Richard; Bucinskaite, Inga; Cavanaugh, Richard; Evdokimov, Olga; Gauthier, Lucie; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Hofman, David Jonathan; Khalatyan, Samvel; Kurt, Pelin; Moon, Dong Ho; O'Brien, Christine; Silkworth, Christopher; Turner, Paul; Varelas, Nikos; Albayrak, Elif Asli; Bilki, Burak; Clarida, Warren; Dilsiz, Kamuran; Duru, Firdevs; Haytmyradov, Maksat; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mermerkaya, Hamit; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Moeller, Anthony; Nachtman, Jane; Ogul, Hasan; Onel, Yasar; Ozok, Ferhat; Penzo, Aldo; Rahmat, Rahmat; Sen, Sercan; Tan, Ping; Tiras, Emrah; Wetzel, James; Yetkin, Taylan; Yi, Kai; Barnett, Bruce Arnold; Blumenfeld, Barry; Fehling, David; Gritsan, Andrei; Maksimovic, Petar; Martin, Christopher; Swartz, Morris; Baringer, Philip; Bean, Alice; Benelli, Gabriele; Gray, Julia; Kenny III, Raymond Patrick; Murray, Michael; Noonan, Daniel; Sanders, Stephen; Sekaric, Jadranka; Stringer, Robert; Wang, Quan; Wood, Jeffrey Scott; Barfuss, Anne-Fleur; Chakaberia, Irakli; Ivanov, Andrew; Khalil, Sadia; Makouski, Mikhail; Maravin, Yurii; Saini, Lovedeep Kaur; Shrestha, Shruti; Svintradze, Irakli; Gronberg, Jeffrey; Lange, David; Rebassoo, Finn; Wright, Douglas; Baden, Drew; Calvert, Brian; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Gomez, Jaime; Hadley, Nicholas John; Kellogg, Richard G; Kolberg, Ted; Lu, Ying; Marionneau, Matthieu; Mignerey, Alice; Pedro, Kevin; Skuja, Andris; Tonjes, Marguerite; Tonwar, Suresh C; Apyan, Aram; Barbieri, Richard; Bauer, Gerry; Busza, Wit; Cali, Ivan Amos; Chan, Matthew; Di Matteo, Leonardo; Dutta, Valentina; Gomez Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim; Gulhan, Doga; Klute, Markus; Lai, Yue Shi; Lee, Yen-Jie; Levin, Andrew; Luckey, Paul David; Ma, Teng; Paus, Christoph; Ralph, Duncan; Roland, Christof; Roland, Gunther; Stephans, George; Stöckli, Fabian; Sumorok, Konstanty; Velicanu, Dragos; Veverka, Jan; Wyslouch, Bolek; Yang, Mingming; Zanetti, Marco; Zhukova, Victoria; Dahmes, Bryan; De Benedetti, Abraham; Gude, Alexander; Kao, Shih-Chuan; Klapoetke, Kevin; Kubota, Yuichi; Mans, Jeremy; Pastika, Nathaniel; Rusack, Roger; Singovsky, Alexander; Tambe, Norbert; Turkewitz, Jared; Acosta, John Gabriel; Oliveros, Sandra; Avdeeva, Ekaterina; Bloom, Kenneth; Bose, Suvadeep; Claes, Daniel R; Dominguez, Aaron; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Keller, Jason; Knowlton, Dan; Kravchenko, Ilya; Lazo-Flores, Jose; Malik, Sudhir; Meier, Frank; Snow, Gregory R; Dolen, James; Godshalk, Andrew; Iashvili, Ia; Kharchilava, Avto; Kumar, Ashish; Rappoccio, Salvatore; Alverson, George; Barberis, Emanuela; Baumgartel, Darin; Chasco, Matthew; Haley, Joseph; Massironi, Andrea; Morse, David Michael; Nash, David; Orimoto, Toyoko; Trocino, Daniele; Wood, Darien; Zhang, Jinzhong; Hahn, Kristan Allan; Kubik, Andrew; Mucia, Nicholas; Odell, Nathaniel; Pollack, Brian; Pozdnyakov, Andrey; Schmitt, Michael Henry; Stoynev, Stoyan; Sung, Kevin; Velasco, Mayda; Won, Steven; Berry, Douglas; Brinkerhoff, Andrew; Chan, Kwok Ming; Drozdetskiy, Alexey; Hildreth, Michael; Jessop, Colin; Karmgard, Daniel John; Kellams, Nathan; Lannon, Kevin; Luo, Wuming; Lynch, Sean; Marinelli, Nancy; Pearson, Tessa; Planer, Michael; Ruchti, Randy; Valls, Nil; Wayne, Mitchell; Wolf, Matthias; Woodard, Anna; Antonelli, Louis; Bylsma, Ben; Durkin, Lloyd Stanley; Flowers, Sean; Hill, Christopher; Hughes, Richard; Kotov, Khristian; Ling, Ta-Yung; Puigh, Darren; Rodenburg, Marissa; Smith, Geoffrey; Vuosalo, Carl; Winer, Brian L; Wolfe, Homer; Wulsin, Howard Wells; Berry, Edmund; Elmer, Peter; Hebda, Philip; Hunt, Adam; Koay, Sue Ann; Lujan, Paul; Marlow, Daniel; Medvedeva, Tatiana; Mooney, Michael; Olsen, James; Piroué, Pierre; Quan, Xiaohang; Saka, Halil; Stickland, David; Tully, Christopher; Werner, Jeremy Scott; Zenz, Seth Conrad; Zuranski, Andrzej; Brownson, Eric; Mendez, Hector; Ramirez Vargas, Juan Eduardo; Alagoz, Enver; Barnes, Virgil E; Benedetti, Daniele; Bolla, Gino; Bortoletto, Daniela; De Mattia, Marco; Everett, Adam; Hu, Zhen; Jha, Manoj; Jones, Matthew; Jung, Kurt; Kress, Matthew; Leonardo, Nuno; Lopes Pegna, David; Maroussov, Vassili; Merkel, Petra; Miller, David Harry; Neumeister, Norbert; Radburn-Smith, Benjamin Charles; Shipsey, Ian; Silvers, David; Svyatkovskiy, Alexey; Wang, Fuqiang; Xie, Wei; Xu, Lingshan; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Zablocki, Jakub; Zheng, Yu; Parashar, Neeti; Stupak, John; Adair, Antony; Akgun, Bora; Ecklund, Karl Matthew; Geurts, Frank JM; Li, Wei; Michlin, Benjamin; Padley, Brian Paul; Redjimi, Radia; Roberts, Jay; Zabel, James; Betchart, Burton; Bodek, Arie; Covarelli, Roberto; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demina, Regina; Eshaq, Yossof; Ferbel, Thomas; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Goldenzweig, Pablo; Han, Jiyeon; Harel, Amnon; Miner, Daniel Carl; Petrillo, Gianluca; Vishnevskiy, Dmitry; Ciesielski, Robert; Demortier, Luc; Goulianos, Konstantin; Lungu, Gheorghe; Mesropian, Christina; Arora, Sanjay; Barker, Anthony; Chou, John Paul; Contreras-Campana, Christian; Contreras-Campana, Emmanuel; Duggan, Daniel; Ferencek, Dinko; Gershtein, Yuri; Gray, Richard; Halkiadakis, Eva; Hidas, Dean; Lath, Amitabh; Panwalkar, Shruti; Park, Michael; Patel, Rishi; Rekovic, Vladimir; Salur, Sevil; Schnetzer, Steve; Seitz, Claudia; Somalwar, Sunil; Stone, Robert; Thomas, Scott; Thomassen, Peter; Walker, Matthew; Rose, Keith; Spanier, Stefan; York, Andrew; Bouhali, Othmane; Eusebi, Ricardo; Flanagan, Will; Gilmore, Jason; Kamon, Teruki; Khotilovich, Vadim; Krutelyov, Vyacheslav; Montalvo, Roy; Osipenkov, Ilya; Pakhotin, Yuriy; Perloff, Alexx; Roe, Jeffrey; Rose, Anthony; Safonov, Alexei; Sakuma, Tai; Suarez, Indara; Tatarinov, Aysen; Akchurin, Nural; Cowden, Christopher; Damgov, Jordan; Dragoiu, Cosmin; Dudero, Phillip Russell; Faulkner, James; Kovitanggoon, Kittikul; Kunori, Shuichi; Lee, Sung Won; Libeiro, Terence; Volobouev, Igor; Appelt, Eric; Delannoy, Andrés G; Greene, Senta; Gurrola, Alfredo; Johns, Willard; Maguire, Charles; Mao, Yaxian; Melo, Andrew; Sharma, Monika; Sheldon, Paul; Snook, Benjamin; Tuo, Shengquan; Velkovska, Julia; Arenton, Michael Wayne; Boutle, Sarah; Cox, Bradley; Francis, Brian; Goodell, Joseph; Hirosky, Robert; Ledovskoy, Alexander; Li, Hengne; Lin, Chuanzhe; Neu, Christopher; Wood, John; Gollapinni, Sowjanya; Harr, Robert; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, Chamath; Lamichhane, Pramod; Belknap, Donald; Carlsmith, Duncan; Cepeda, Maria; Dasu, Sridhara; Duric, Senka; Friis, Evan; Hall-Wilton, Richard; Herndon, Matthew; Hervé, Alain; Klabbers, Pamela; Klukas, Jeffrey; Lanaro, Armando; Lazaridis, Christos; Levine, Aaron; Loveless, Richard; Mohapatra, Ajit; Ojalvo, Isabel; Perry, Thomas; Pierro, Giuseppe Antonio; Polese, Giovanni; Ross, Ian; Sarangi, Tapas; Savin, Alexander; Smith, Wesley H; Woods, Nathaniel

    2014-09-07

    The ratio of the top-quark branching fractions $R = B(t \\to Wb)/B(t \\to Wq)$, where the denominator includes the sum over all down-type quarks (q = b, s, d), is measured in the $t\\bar{t}$ dilepton final state with proton-proton collision data at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV from an integrated luminosity of 19.7 inverse-femtobarns, collected with the CMS detector. In order to quantify the purity of the signal sample, the cross section is measured by fitting the observed jet multiplicity, thereby constraining the signal and background contributions. By counting the number of b jets per event, an unconstrained value of R = 1.014 $\\pm$ 0.003 (stat) $\\pm$ 0.032 (syst) is measured, in good agreement with the standard model prediction. A lower limit R greater than 0.955 at the 95% confidence level is obtained after requiring R lower than one, and a lower limit on the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element |$V_tb$| greater than 0.975 is set at 95% confidence level. The result is combined with a previous CMS measurement of th...

  4. CT of Gastric Emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guniganti, Preethi; Bradenham, Courtney H; Raptis, Constantine; Menias, Christine O; Mellnick, Vincent M

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting are common presenting symptoms among adult patients seeking care in the emergency department, and, with the increased use of computed tomography (CT) to image patients with these complaints, radiologists will more frequently encounter a variety of emergent gastric pathologic conditions on CT studies. Familiarity with the CT appearance of emergent gastric conditions is important, as the clinical presentation is often nonspecific and the radiologist may be the first to recognize gastric disease as the cause of a patient's symptoms. Although endoscopy and barium fluoroscopy remain important tools for evaluating patients with suspected gastric disease in the outpatient setting, compared with CT these modalities enable less comprehensive evaluation of patients with nonspecific complaints and are less readily available in the acute setting. Endoscopy is also more invasive than CT and has greater potential risks. Although the mucosal detail of CT is relatively poor compared with barium fluoroscopy or endoscopy, CT can be used with the appropriate imaging protocols to identify inflammatory conditions of the stomach ranging from gastritis to peptic ulcer disease. In addition, CT can readily demonstrate the various complications of gastric disease, including perforation, obstruction, and hemorrhage, which may direct further clinical, endoscopic, or surgical management. We will review the normal anatomy of the stomach and discuss emergent gastric disease with a focus on the usual clinical presentation, typical imaging appearance, and differentiating features, as well as potential imaging pitfalls.

  5. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... images or pictures of the inside of the body. The cross-sectional images generated during a CT scan can be reformatted ... of data to create two-dimensional cross-sectional images of your body, which are then displayed on a monitor. CT ...

  6. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... images or pictures of the inside of the body. The cross-sectional images generated during a CT scan can be reformatted ... of data to create two-dimensional cross-sectional images of your body, which are then displayed on a monitor. CT ...

  7. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... images or pictures of the inside of the body. The cross-sectional images generated during a CT scan can be reformatted ... of data to create two-dimensional cross-sectional images of your body, which are then displayed on a monitor. CT ...

  8. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the best way to see if treatment is working or if a finding is stable or changed over time. top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits A CT scan is one of the safest means of studying the sinuses. CT is the most reliable imaging ...

  9. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... you have a hard time staying still, are claustrophobic or have chronic pain, you may find a CT exam to be stressful. The technologist or nurse, under the direction of a physician, may offer you some medication to help you tolerate the CT scanning procedure. If an ...

  10. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... you have a hard time staying still, are claustrophobic or have chronic pain, you may find a CT exam to be stressful. The technologist or nurse, under the direction of a physician, may offer you some medication to help you tolerate the CT scanning procedure. If an ...

  11. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of a stroke. a stroke, especially with a new technique called Perfusion CT. brain tumors. enlarged brain ... be asked to remove hearing aids and removable dental work. Women will be asked to remove bras ... does the equipment look like? The CT scanner is typically a ...

  12. CT of tracheal agenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strouse, Peter J.; Hernandez, Ramiro J. [C.S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Newman, Beverley [Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Department of Pediatric Radiology; Afshani, Ehsan [Children' s Hospital of Buffalo, NY (United States). Departments of Radiology and Pediatrics; Bommaraju, Mahesh [Women' s and Children' s Hospital of Buffalo, Division of Neonatology, University Pediatrics Associates, Buffalo, NY (United States)

    2006-09-15

    Tracheal agenesis is a rare and usually lethal anomaly. In the past, opaque contrast medium was injected via the esophagus to demonstrate the anatomy. To demonstrate the utility of helical and multidetector CT in delineating the aberrant anatomy in newborns with tracheal agenesis. Four newborns with tracheal agenesis were identified from three institutions. Imaging studies and medical records were reviewed. Each child was imaged with chest radiography. One child was imaged on a single-detector helical CT scanner and the other three on multidetector scanners. Helical and multidetector CT with 2D and 3D reconstructions clearly delineated the aberrant tracheobronchial and esophageal anatomy in each infant. Minimum intensity projection reformatted CT images were particularly helpful. One infant each had type I and type II tracheal agenesis. Two infants had type III tracheal agenesis. All four infants died. CT is a useful tool for delineating the aberrant anatomy of newborns with tracheal agenesis and thus helps in making rational clinical decisions. (orig.)

  13. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CT is less sensitive to patient movement than MRI. CT can be performed if you have an implanted medical device of any kind, unlike MRI. CT imaging provides real-time imaging, making it ...

  14. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Pediatric computed tomography (CT) is ... a CT scan. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special ...

  15. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? CT is used to help diagnose a ... the CT examination. top of page What does the equipment look like? The CT scanner is typically ...

  16. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Pediatric computed tomography (CT) is ... a CT scan. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special ...

  17. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... scanner. top of page How does the procedure work? In many ways, CT scanning is like other ... scanners to obtain multiple slices in a single rotation. These scanners, called "multislice CT" or "multidetector CT," ...

  18. GA-SVM Based Lungs Nodule Detection and Classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffar, M. Arfan; Hussain, Ayyaz; Jabeen, Fauzia; Nazir, M.; Mirza, Anwar M.

    In this paper we have proposed a method for lungs nodule detection from computed tomography (CT) scanned images by using Genetic Algorithms (GA) and morphological techniques. First of all, GA has been used for automated segmentation of lungs. Region of interests (ROIs) have been extracted by using 8 directional searches slice by slice and then features extraction have been performed. Finally SVM have been used to classify ROI that contain nodule. The proposed system is capable to perform fully automatic segmentation and nodule detection from CT Scan Lungs images. The technique was tested against the 50 datasets of different patients received from Aga Khan Medical University, Pakistan and Lung Image Database Consortium (LIDC) dataset.

  19. 68Ga-PSMA Expression in Pseudoangiomatous Stromal Hyperplasia of the Breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Dharmender; Basher, Rajender K; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai; Jain, Tarun Kumar; Bal, Amanjit; Singh, Shrawan Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Ga-labeled prostate-specific membrane antigen ligand PET-CT has emerged as a promising technique to evaluate the extent of disease in patients with prostate carcinoma. We are reporting a 63-year-old man with prostatic carcinoma subjected to Ga-prostate-specific membrane antigen ligand PET-CT for initial staging. In addition to the radiotracer uptake in known primary site (prostate), focal increased radiotracer uptake was also noticed in the left breast. Subsequent biopsy of the breast lesion revealed PASH (pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia), which is a benign mesenchymal proliferative lesion that may present clinically as palpable mass requiring further evaluation to rule out malignancy.

  20. 葡枝根霉TP-02中的内切葡聚糖苷酶基因在枯草芽胞杆菌WB600中的克隆和表达%Cloning and Expression of Endoglucanase Gene from Rhizopus stolonifer var.reflexus TP-02 in Bacillus subtilis WB600

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄辉; 汤斌

    2012-01-01

    Using cDNA library screening method endoglucanase genes eg2 and egi from Rhizopus stoloni/er var. Re-flexus TP-02 were successfully cloned and expressed in Bacillus subtilis WB600. The endoglucanase activities reached to the maximum when positive clone cultured in CMC-Na medium for 36 hours at 1.034 IU/mL and 1.174 IU/mL respectively, the fermentation time was 54 hours shorter than that of the starting strain. After isolated and purified the fermented supernatant using Sephadex G100, the molecular weights of EG II and EG III were measured by SDS-PAGE and they were 44 ku and 46 ku, respectively.%利用cDNA文库筛选的方法将葡枝根霉TP-02中的内切葡聚糖苷酶基因(eg2和eg3)在枯草芽胞杆菌WB600中成功地克隆和表达.阳性克隆在羧甲基纤维素钠(CMC-Na)培养基中发酵36 h内切葡聚糖酶活达到最大值,分别为1.174和1.034 IU/mL,相比出发菌株发酵时间缩短了54 b.用G100分离纯化其发酵上清波后,用SDS-PAGE电泳方法,测得EG Ⅱ和EG Ⅲ分子量分别为44、46 ku.

  1. {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC PET imaging in breast carcinoma patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sathekge, Mike; Lengana, Thabo; Modiselle, Moshe; Vorster, Mariza; Zeevaart, JanRijn; Ebenhan, Thomas [University of Pretoria and Steve Biko Academic Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Pretoria (South Africa); Maes, Alex [University of Pretoria and Steve Biko Academic Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Pretoria (South Africa); AZ Groeninge, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Kortrijk (Belgium); Wiele, Christophe van de [University of Pretoria and Steve Biko Academic Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Pretoria (South Africa); University Ghent, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Ghent (Belgium)

    2017-04-15

    To report on imaging findings using {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC PET in a series of 19 breast carcinoma patients. {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC PET imaging results obtained were compared to routinely performed staging examinations and analyzed as to lesion location and progesterone receptor status. Out of 81 tumor lesions identified, 84% were identified on {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC PET. {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC SUVmean values of distant metastases proved significantly higher (mean, 6.86, SD, 5.68) when compared to those of primary or local recurrences (mean, 2.45, SD, 2.55, p = 0.04) or involved lymph nodes (mean, 3.18, SD, 1.79, p = 0.011). SUVmean values of progesterone receptor-positive lesions proved not significantly different from progesterone receptor-negative lesions. SUV values derived from FDG PET/CT, available in seven patients, and {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC PET/CT imaging proved weakly correlated (r = 0.407, p = 0.015). {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC PET/CT imaging in breast carcinoma confirms the reported considerable variation of PSMA expression on human solid tumors using immunohistochemistry. (orig.)

  2. (68)Ga-DOTATATE-positron emission tomography imaging in spinal meningioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slotty, Philipp Jörg; Behrendt, Florian Friedrich; Langen, Karl-Josef; Cornelius, Jan Frederick

    2014-01-01

    Imaging with positron emission tomography (PET) and (68)Ga-DOTA peptides is a promising method in intracranial meningiomas. Especially in recurrent meningioma discrimination between scar tissue and recurrent tumor tissue in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is often difficult. We report the first case of (68)Ga-DOTATATE-PET/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging in recurrent spinal meningioma. A 64-year-old Caucasian female patient was referred to our department with the second recurrence of thoracic meningothelial meningioma. In MRI, it remained unclear if the multiple enhancements seen represented scar tissue or vital tumor. We offered (68)Ga-DOTATATE-PET/CT imaging in order to evaluate the best strategy. (68)Ga-DOTATATE-PET/CT imaging revealed strong tracer uptake in parts of the lesions. The pattern did distinctly differ from MRI enhancement. Multiple biopsies were performed in the PET-positive and PET-negative regions. Histological results confirmed the prediction of (68)Ga-DOTATATE-PET with vital tumor in PET-positive regions and scar tissue in PET-negative regions. Differentiating scar tissue from tumor can be challenging in recurrent spinal meningioma with MRI alone. In the presented case, (68)Ga-DOTATATE-PET imaging was able to differentiate noninvasively between tumor and scar.

  3. 68Ga-DOTATATE-positron emission tomography imaging in spinal meningioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Jorg Slotty

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Imaging with positron emission tomography (PET and 68 Ga-DOTA peptides is a promising method in intracranial meningiomas. Especially in recurrent meningioma discrimination between scar tissue and recurrent tumor tissue in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is often difficult. We report the first case of 68 Ga-DOTATATE-PET/computed tomography (PET/CT imaging in recurrent spinal meningioma. A 64-year-old Caucasian female patient was referred to our department with the second recurrence of thoracic meningothelial meningioma. In MRI, it remained unclear if the multiple enhancements seen represented scar tissue or vital tumor. We offered 68 Ga-DOTATATE-PET/CT imaging in order to evaluate the best strategy. 68 Ga-DOTATATE-PET/CT imaging revealed strong tracer uptake in parts of the lesions. The pattern did distinctly differ from MRI enhancement. Multiple biopsies were performed in the PET-positive and PET-negative regions. Histological results confirmed the prediction of 68 Ga-DOTATATE-PET with vital tumor in PET-positive regions and scar tissue in PET-negative regions. Differentiating scar tissue from tumor can be challenging in recurrent spinal meningioma with MRI alone. In the presented case, 68 Ga-DOTATATE-PET imaging was able to differentiate noninvasively between tumor and scar.

  4. Preparation of ⁶⁸Ga-labelled DOTA-peptides using a manual labelling approach for small-animal PET imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Eduardo; Martínez, Alfonso; Oteo, Marta; García, Angel; Morcillo, Miguel Angel

    2016-01-01

    (68)Ga-DOTA-peptides are a promising PET radiotracers used in the detection of different tumours types due to their ability for binding specifically receptors overexpressed in these. Furthermore, (68)Ga can be produced by a (68)Ge/(68)Ga generator on site which is a very good alternative to cyclotron-based PET isotopes. Here, we describe a manual labelling approach for the synthesis of (68)Ga-labelled DOTA-peptides based on concentration and purification of the commercial (68)Ga/(68)Ga generator eluate using an anion exchange-cartridge. (68)Ga-DOTA-TATE was used to image a pheochromocytoma xenograft mouse model by a microPET/CT scanner. The method described provides satisfactory results, allowing the subsequent (68)Ga use to label DOTA-peptides. The simplicity of the method along with its implementation reduced cost, makes it useful in preclinical PET studies.

  5. GaN HEMTs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Jonathan W.; Lee, Kyoung-Keun; Piner, Edwin L.

    2012-03-01

    Gallium nitride (GaN) has enormous potential for applications in high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) used in RF and power devices. Intrinsic device properties such as high electron mobility, high breakdown voltage, very high current density, electron confinement in a narrow channel, and high electron velocity in the 2-dimensional electron gas of the HEMT structure are due in large part to the wide band gap of this novel semiconductor material system. This presentation discusses the properties of GaN that make it superior to other semiconductor materials, and outlines the research that will be undertaken in a new program at Texas State University to advance GaN HEMT technology. This program's aim is to further innovate the exceptional performance of GaN through improved material growth processes and epitaxial structure design.

  6. Metabolomics Workbench (MetWB)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Metabolomics Program's Data Repository and Coordinating Center (DRCC), housed at the San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC), University of California, San Diego,...

  7. Dynamically simulating the interaction of midazolam and the CYP3A4 inhibitor itraconazole using individual coupled whole-body physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (WB-PBPK models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jang In-Jin

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Drug-drug interactions resulting from the inhibition of an enzymatic process can have serious implications for clinical drug therapy. Quantification of the drugs internal exposure increase upon administration with an inhibitor requires understanding to avoid the drug reaching toxic thresholds. In this study, we aim to predict the effect of the CYP3A4 inhibitors, itraconazole (ITZ and its primary metabolite, hydroxyitraconazole (OH-ITZ on the pharmacokinetics of the anesthetic, midazolam (MDZ and its metabolites, 1' hydroxymidazolam (1OH-MDZ and 1' hydroxymidazolam glucuronide (1OH-MDZ-Glu using mechanistic whole body physiologically-based pharmacokinetic simulation models. The model is build on MDZ, 1OH-MDZ and 1OH-MDZ-Glu plasma concentration time data experimentally determined in 19 CYP3A5 genotyped adult male individuals, who received MDZ intravenously in a basal state. The model is then used to predict MDZ, 1OH-MDZ and 1OH-MDZ-Glu concentrations in an CYP3A-inhibited state following ITZ administration. Results For the basal state model, three linked WB-PBPK models (MDZ, 1OH-MDZ, 1OH-MDZ-Glu for each individual were elimination optimized that resulted in MDZ and metabolite plasma concentration time curves that matched individual observed clinical data. In vivo Km and Vmax optimized values for MDZ hydroxylation were similar to literature based in vitro measures. With the addition of the ITZ/OH-ITZ model to each individual coupled MDZ + metabolite model, the plasma concentration time curves were predicted to greatly increase the exposure of MDZ as well as to both increase exposure and significantly alter the plasma concentration time curves of the MDZ metabolites in comparison to the basal state curves. As compared to the observed clinical data, the inhibited state curves were generally well described although the simulated concentrations tended to exceed the experimental data between approximately 6 to 12 hours following

  8. WholeBbody Positron-Emission-Tomography (WB-PET) in oncology; Ganzkoerper-Positronen-Emissions-Tomographie (GK-PET) in der Onkologie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feine, U. [Nuklearmedizinische Abt., Tuebingen Univ. (Germany); Lietzenmayer, R. [Nuklearmedizinische Abt., Tuebingen Univ. (Germany); Mueller-Schauenburg, W. [Nuklearmedizinische Abt., Tuebingen Univ. (Germany); Geiger, L. [Nuklearmedizinische Abt., Tuebingen Univ. (Germany); Hanke, J.P. [Nuklearmedizinische Abt., Tuebingen Univ. (Germany); Weisser, G. [Nuklearmedizinische Abt., Tuebingen Univ. (Germany); Woehrle, H. [Nuklearmedizinische Abt., Tuebingen Univ. (Germany)

    1996-02-01

    The new generation of high sensitive PET-Scanners with an FOV of about 15 cm allows to recognize with high sensitivity and good spezificity malign tumors and their metastases with 18F-FDG in a Whole-Body-Scan in 35 to 50 min scan time. 357 FDG-WB-PET-Scans have been performed in Tuebingen during 1 1/2 years since January 1994 in tumor patients and have been compared and evaluated to the results of other imaging methods performed in the same time together with clinics and in follow-up. In 4 groups of tumors - Melanoma - malign Lymphoma - Breast Cancer - Thyroid Cancer - and a fifth group of 24 various types of malign tumors we found a sensitivity of 88%, a specificity of 80% and an accuracy of 90%. Foci smaller than 6-8 mm diametre - mostly lung metastases or lymphomas - and also tumors of low malignancy such as 131l-trapping Tyroid Carcinomas and Ganglioneuroblastomas have been found false negative. Flase positive we found inflammated lymph nodes, abscesses and also benign thyroid adenomas. This high sensitivity makes 18F-FDG-WB-PET an important method for tumor searching and diagnosis of tumor spreading, esp. for primary and secondary staging in the future, but also as the unique imaging method which allows determination of resting tumor vitality after therapy. Further multi-center studies will be necessary before this method can be introduced to routine, that also is limited by the high costs of the procedure. (orig.) [Deutsch] Die neue Generation der hochaufloesenden PET-Scanner mit einer axialen Feldbreite von 15 cm ermoeglicht es, mit hoher Sensitivitaet und guter Spezifitaet maligne Tumoren und ihre Metastasen mit 18F-Fluordeoxyglukose in einem Ganzkoerper-Scan mit 35-50 min Scan-Zeit zu erkennen. 357 FDG-GK-PET Scans wurden in 1 1/2 Jahren ab Januar 1994 in Tuebingen bei Tumor-Patienten durchgefuehrt und mit gleichzeitig erstellten anderen bildgebenden Verfahren zusammen mit der Klinik und im Follow Up ausgewertet. Bei den vier Tumorgruppen Melanom

  9. CT scan of choristoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moriki, A.; Morimoto, M.; Sada, Y.; Kurisaka, M.; Mori, K.

    1987-02-01

    Choristoma is a rare tumor that occurs in the pituitary gland. The case presented here is a 44-year-old male. A plain CT scan demonstrated a slight high-density mass near the posterior clinoid of the sella turcica, while a moderate and homogeneous enhancing effect and a clear borderline were shown by an enhanced CT scan. A cornal CT scan study showed that the tumor extended from the intrasellar to the suprasellar region. The diagnosis of choristoma was made by means of histology.

  10. High quality draft genome sequence of Flavobacterium rivuli type strain WB 3.3-2(T) (DSM 21788(T)), a valuable source of polysaccharide decomposing enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahnke, Richard L; Stackebrandt, Erko; Meier-Kolthoff, Jan P; Tindall, Brian J; Huang, Sixing; Rohde, Manfred; Lapidus, Alla; Han, James; Trong, Stephan; Haynes, Matthew; Reddy, T B K; Huntemann, Marcel; Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, Natalia N; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Markowitz, Victor; Woyke, Tanja; Göker, Markus; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2015-01-01

    Flavobacterium rivuli Ali et al. 2009 emend. Dong et al. 2013 is one of about 100 species in the genus Flavobacterium (family Flavobacteriacae, phylum Bacteroidetes) with a validly published name, and has been isolated from the spring of a hard water rivulet in Northern Germany. Including all type strains of the genus Myroides and Flavobacterium into the 16S rRNA gene sequence phylogeny revealed a clustering of members of the genus Myroides as a monophyletic group within the genus Flavobacterium. Furthermore, F. rivuli WB 3.3-2(T) and its next relatives seem more closely related to the genus Myroides than to the type species of the genus Flavobacterium, F. aquatile. The 4,489,248 bp long genome with its 3,391 protein-coding and 65 RNA genes is part of the G enomic E ncyclopedia of B acteria and A rchaea project. The genome of F. rivuli has almost as many genes encoding carbohydrate active enzymes (151 CAZymes) as genes encoding peptidases (177). Peptidases comprised mostly metallo (M) and serine (S) peptidases. Among CAZymes, 30 glycoside hydrolase families, 10 glycosyl transferase families, 7 carbohydrate binding module families and 7 carbohydrate esterase families were identified. Furthermore, we found four polysaccharide utilization loci (PUL) and one large CAZy rich gene cluster that might enable strain WB 3.3-2(T) to decompose plant and algae derived polysaccharides. Based on these results we propose F. rivuli as an interesting candidate for further physiological studies and the role of Bacteroidetes in the decomposition of complex polymers in the environment.

  11. GaSbBi/GaSb quantum well laser diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delorme, O.; Cerutti, L.; Luna, E.; Narcy, G.; Trampert, A.; Tournié, E.; Rodriguez, J.-B.

    2017-05-01

    We report on the structural and optical properties of GaSbBi single layers and GaSbBi/GaSb quantum well heterostructures grown by molecular beam epitaxy on GaSb substrates. Excellent crystal quality and room-temperature photoluminescence are achieved in both cases. We demonstrate laser operation from laser diodes with an active zone composed of three GaSb0.885Bi0.115/GaSb quantum wells. These devices exhibit continuous-wave lasing at 2.5 μm at 80 K, and lasing under pulsed operation at room-temperature near 2.7 μm.

  12. Genome sequencing of Giardia lamblia genotypes A2 and B isolates (DH and GS) and comparative analysis with the genomes of genotypes A1 and E (WB and Pig).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Rodney D; Dahlstrom, Eric W; Martens, Craig A; Bruno, Daniel P; Barbian, Kent D; Ricklefs, Stacy M; Hernandez, Matthew M; Narla, Nirmala P; Patel, Rima B; Porcella, Stephen F; Nash, Theodore E

    2013-01-01

    Giardia lamblia (syn G. intestinalis, G. duodenalis) is the most common pathogenic intestinal parasite of humans worldwide and is a frequent cause of endemic and epidemic diarrhea. G. lamblia is divided into eight genotypes (A-H) which infect a wide range of mammals and humans, but human infections are caused by Genotypes A and B. To unambiguously determine the relationship among genotypes, we sequenced GS and DH (Genotypes B and A2) to high depth coverage and compared the assemblies with the nearly completed WB genome and draft sequencing surveys of Genotypes E (P15; pig isolate) and B (GS; human isolate). Our results identified DH as the smallest Giardia genome sequenced to date, while GS is the largest. Our open reading frame analyses and phylogenetic analyses showed that GS was more distant from the other three genomes than any of the other three were from each other. Whole-genome comparisons of DH_A2 and GS_B with the optically mapped WB_A1 demonstrated substantial synteny across all five chromosomes but also included a number of rearrangements, inversions, and chromosomal translocations that were more common toward the chromosome ends. However, the WB_A1/GS_B alignment demonstrated only about 70% sequence identity across the syntenic regions. Our findings add to information presented in previous reports suggesting that GS is a different species of Giardia as supported by the degree of genomic diversity, coding capacity, heterozygosity, phylogenetic distance, and known biological differences from WB_A1 and other G. lamblia genotypes.

  13. Influence of a combined CT/C-arm system on periprocedural workflow and procedure times in mechanical thrombectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaff, Johannes; Schönenberger, Silvia; Herweh, Christian; Pham, Mirko; Nagel, Simon; Ringleb, Peter Arthur; Heiland, Sabine; Bendszus, Martin; Möhlenbruch, Markus Alfred

    2017-09-01

    To achieve the fastest possible workflow in ischaemic stroke, we developed a CT/C-arm system, which allows imaging and endovascular treatment on the same patient table. This prospective, monocentric trial was conducted between October 2014 and August 2016. Patients received stroke imaging and mechanical thrombectomy under general anaesthesia (GA) or conscious sedation (CS) using our combined setup comprising a CT-scanner and a mobile C-arm X-ray device. Primary endpoint was time between stroke imaging and groin puncture. We compared periprocedural workflow and procedure times with the literature and a matched patient cohort treated with a biplane angiographic system before installation of the CT/C-arm system. In 50 patients with acute ischaemic stroke due to large-vessel occlusion in the anterior circulation, comparable recanalization rates were achieved by using the CT/C-arm setup (TICI2b-3:CT/C-arm-GA: 85.7%; CT/C-arm-CS: 90.9%; Angiosuite: 78.6%; p = 0.269) without increasing periprocedural complications. Elimination of patient transport resulted in a significant reduction of the time between stroke imaging and groin puncture: median, min (IQR): CT/C-arm-GA: 43 (35-52); CT/C-arm-CS: 39 (28-49); Angiosuite: 64 (48-74); p C-arm system allows comparable recanalization rates as a biplane angiographic system and accelerates the start of the endovascular stroke treatment. • The CT/C-arm setup reduces median time from stroke imaging to groin puncture. • Mechanical thrombectomy using a C-arm device is feasible without increasing peri-interventional complications. • The CT/C-arm setup might be a valuable fallback solution for emergency procedures. • The CT/C-arm setup allows immediate control CT images during and after treatment.

  14. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... is done because a potential abnormality needs further evaluation with additional views or a special imaging technique. ... need for exploratory surgery and surgical biopsy. No radiation remains in a patient's body after a CT ...

  15. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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  16. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple ... for guiding minimally invasive procedures such as needle biopsies and needle aspirations of many areas of the ...

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  19. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... CT scanning procedure. For exams (excluding head and neck) your head will remain outside the hole in ... type your comment or suggestion into the following text box: Comment: E-mail: Area code: Phone no: ...

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  1. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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  2. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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  3. CT Angiography (CTA)

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    ... during the procedure. Metal objects, including jewelry, eyeglasses, dentures and hairpins, may affect the CT images and ... of the procedure, you may be asked to complete a questionnaire to ensure your safety during this ...

  4. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... visibility of certain tissues or blood vessels. A nurse or technologist will insert an intravenous (IV) line ... CT exam to be stressful. The technologist or nurse, under the direction of a physician, may offer ...

  5. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Radiation Dose in X-Ray and CT ...

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    Full Text Available ... time staying still, are claustrophobic or have chronic pain, you may find a CT exam to be stressful. The technologist or nurse, under the direction of a physician, may offer ...

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    Full Text Available ... time staying still, are claustrophobic or have chronic pain, you may find a CT exam to be stressful. The technologist or nurse, under the direction of a physician, may offer ...

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    Full Text Available ... Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Radiation Dose in X-Ray and CT Exams Contrast Materials Head and Neck Cancer X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation ...

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    Full Text Available ... hours prior to your exam. Leave jewelry at home and wear loose, comfortable clothing. You may be ... the CT images and should be left at home or removed prior to your exam. You may ...

  12. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... liver, shows up in shades of gray, and air appears black. With CT scanning, numerous x-ray ... cause blurring of the images and degrade the quality of the examination the same way that it ...

  16. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... tomography (CT) scan View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. ...

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    Full Text Available ... tomography (CT) scan. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. ...

  18. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... tomography (CT) scan. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. ...

  19. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... Abdomen and Pelvis? What is CT Scanning of the Abdomen/Pelvis? Computed tomography, more commonly known as ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? This procedure is typically used to help ...

  20. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... your exam. You should inform your physician of all medications you are taking and if you have ... body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple slices in a ...

  1. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... your exam. You should inform your physician of all medications you are taking and if you have ... body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple slices in a ...

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    Full Text Available ... your exam. You should inform your physician of all medications you are taking and if you have ... body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple slices in a ...

  3. CT- and MR colonography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Achiam, Michael Patrick; Bülow, Steffen; Rosenberg, J

    2002-01-01

    . Lately, CT- and MR colonography have emerged as non-invasive methods for colon imaging. METHODS: At present, CTC and MRC require bowel preparation. However, preliminary studies have been carried out without colon preparation. After the colon has been filled with air or contrast, the patient is scanned....... CONCLUSIONS: With the exponential development in computer processing power, CT- and MR colonography holds the promise for future colon examination with the advantages of non-invasiveness, no need for sedation, and probably no bowel preparation. A major disadvantage, however, is the radiation dose during CT...... colonography. Future developments with the use of "intelligent" computers, better resolution and faster examinations will make CT and/or MR colonography realistic options to replace conventional diagnostic colonoscopy....

  4. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... or thyroid problems. Any of these conditions may increase the risk of an unusual adverse effect. Women ... view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple ...

  5. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... or thyroid problems. Any of these conditions may increase the risk of an unusual adverse effect. The ... view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple ...

  6. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... or thyroid problems. Any of these conditions may increase the risk of an unusual adverse effect. Women ... view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple ...

  7. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... additional view capabilities. Modern CT scanners are so fast that they can scan through large sections of ... remain still during the exam. Many scanners are fast enough that children can be scanned without sedation. ...

  8. Pediatric CT Scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Radiation Epidemiology Branch and collaborators have initiated a retrospective cohort study to evaluate the relationship between radiation exposure from CT scans conducted during childhood and adolescence and the subsequent development of cancer.

  9. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... or liver cirrhosis. cancers of the liver, kidneys, pancreas, ovaries and bladder as well as lymphoma. kidney ... and organs such as the liver, kidneys and pancreas. When you enter the CT scanner, special light ...

  10. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... an image on a special electronic image recording plate. Bones appear white on the x-ray; soft ... which are then displayed on a monitor. CT imaging is sometimes compared to looking into a loaf ...

  11. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... an image on a special electronic image recording plate. Bones appear white on the x-ray; soft ... which are then displayed on a monitor. CT imaging is sometimes compared to looking into a loaf ...

  12. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    ... an image on a special electronic image recording plate. Bones appear white on the x-ray; soft ... which are then displayed on a monitor. CT imaging is sometimes compared to looking into a loaf ...

  13. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... an image on a special electronic image recording plate. Bones appear white on the x-ray; soft ... which are then displayed on a monitor. CT imaging is sometimes compared to looking into a loaf ...

  14. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    ... an image on a special electronic image recording plate. Bones appear white on the x-ray; soft ... which are then displayed on a monitor. CT imaging is sometimes compared to looking into a loaf ...

  15. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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  16. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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  17. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... to arriving. top of page What will I experience during and after the procedure? CT exams are ... at most a minute or two. You may experience a sensation like you have to urinate; however, ...

  18. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... 10 minutes. top of page What will I experience during and after the procedure? CT exams are ... at most a minute or two. You may experience a sensation like you have to urinate; however, ...

  19. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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  20. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... cavity. CT scanning is painless, noninvasive and accurate. It’s also the most reliable imaging technique for determining ... parts absorb the x-rays in varying degrees. It is this crucial difference in absorption that allows ...

  1. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... See the Safety page for more information about pregnancy and x-rays. top of page What does ... See the Safety page for more information about pregnancy and x-rays. CT scanning is, in general, ...

  2. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... See the Safety page for more information about pregnancy and x-rays. top of page What does ... See the Safety page for more information about pregnancy and x-rays. CT scanning is, in general, ...

  3. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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  4. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... Radiation Therapy for Bladder Cancer Radiation Therapy for Colorectal Cancer top of page This page was reviewed on ... GI Tract X-ray (Radiography) - Upper GI Tract Colorectal Cancer Images related to Computed Tomography (CT) - Abdomen and ...

  5. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... rays used in CT scans should have no immediate side effects. Risks There is always a slight ... possible charges you will incur. Web page review process: This Web page is reviewed regularly by a ...

  6. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... rays used in CT scans should have no immediate side effects. Risks There is always a slight ... possible charges you will incur. Web page review process: This Web page is reviewed regularly by a ...

  7. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... rays used in CT scans should have no immediate side effects. Risks There is always a slight ... possible charges you will incur. Web page review process: This Web page is reviewed regularly by a ...

  8. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... traditional x-rays, particularly of soft tissues and blood vessels. CT scanning provides more detailed information on head injuries, stroke , brain tumors and other brain diseases than ...

  9. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... tissue as well as the lungs, bones, and blood vessels. CT examinations are fast and simple; in emergency cases, they can reveal internal injuries and bleeding quickly enough to help save lives. ...

  10. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... tissue as well as the lungs, bones, and blood vessels. CT examinations are fast and simple; in emergency cases, they can reveal internal injuries and bleeding quickly enough to help save lives. ...

  11. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... during the procedure. Metal objects, including jewelry, eyeglasses, dentures and hairpins, may affect the CT images and ... may increase the risk of an unusual adverse effect. Women should always inform their physician and the ...

  12. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... during the procedure. Metal objects, including jewelry, eyeglasses, dentures and hairpins, may affect the CT images and ... may increase the risk of an unusual adverse effect. The radiologist also should know if you have ...

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    Full Text Available ... during the procedure. Metal objects, including jewelry, eyeglasses, dentures and hairpins, may affect the CT images and ... may increase the risk of an unusual adverse effect. Women should always inform their physician and the ...

  14. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... is reduced. Though the scanning itself causes no pain, there may be some discomfort from having to ... time staying still, are claustrophobic or have chronic pain, you may find a CT exam to be ...

  15. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... is reduced. Though the scanning itself causes no pain, there may be some discomfort from having to ... time staying still, are claustrophobic or have chronic pain, you may find a CT exam to be ...

  16. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... often used to determine the cause of unexplained pain. CT scanning is fast, painless, noninvasive and accurate. ... help diagnose the cause of abdominal or pelvic pain and diseases of the internal organs, small bowel ...

  17. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... generated during a CT scan can be reformatted in multiple planes, and can even generate three-dimensional ... hours beforehand, as contrast material will be used in your exam. You should inform your physician of ...

  18. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... or to plan radiation therapy for brain cancer. In emergency cases, it can reveal internal injuries and ... generated during a CT scan can be reformatted in multiple planes, and can even generate three-dimensional ...

  19. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT scan, is a diagnostic medical test that, like ... contrast materials and a metallic taste in your mouth that lasts for at most a minute or ...

  20. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT scan, is a diagnostic medical test that, like ... contrast materials and a metallic taste in your mouth that lasts for at most a minute or ...

  1. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT scan, is a diagnostic medical test that, like ... contrast materials and a metallic taste in your mouth that lasts for at most a minute or ...

  2. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... have a history of heart disease, asthma, diabetes, kidney disease or thyroid problems. Any of these conditions may ... particularly the lungs, abdomen, pelvis and bones. A diagnosis determined by CT scanning may eliminate the need ...

  3. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... have a history of heart disease, asthma, diabetes, kidney disease or thyroid problems. Any of these conditions may ... medical device of any kind, unlike MRI. A diagnosis determined by CT scanning may eliminate the need ...

  4. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... have a history of heart disease, asthma, diabetes, kidney disease or thyroid problems. Any of these conditions may ... particularly the lungs, abdomen, pelvis and bones. A diagnosis determined by CT scanning may eliminate the need ...

  5. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... preferable over CT scanning. top of page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org: Radiation Therapy for Bladder ... Send us your feedback Did you find the information you were looking for? Yes No Please type ...

  6. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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  7. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... When the image slices are reassembled by computer software, the result is a very detailed multidimensional view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple ...

  8. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... When the image slices are reassembled by computer software, the result is a very detailed multidimensional view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple ...

  9. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... When the image slices are reassembled by computer software, the result is a very detailed multidimensional view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple ...

  10. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... quickly. When you enter the CT scanner, special light lines may be seen projected onto your body, ... and its references. The risk of serious allergic reaction to contrast materials that contain iodine is extremely ...

  11. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... pancreas. When you enter the CT scanner, special light lines may be seen projected onto your body, ... in the womb. The risk of serious allergic reaction to contrast materials that contain iodine is extremely ...

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    Full Text Available ... quickly. When you enter the CT scanner, special light lines may be seen projected onto your body, ... and its references. The risk of serious allergic reaction to contrast materials that contain iodine is extremely ...

  13. CT head in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, Padma, E-mail: padma.rao@rch.org.au [Royal Children' s Hospital and the University of Melbourne, Medical Imaging Department, Flemington Road, Parkville, Melbourne, Victoria 3052 (Australia); Bekhit, Elhamy, E-mail: elhamy.bekhit@rch.org.au [Royal Children' s Hospital and the University of Melbourne, Medical Imaging Department, Flemington Road, Parkville, Melbourne, Victoria 3052 (Australia); Ramanauskas, Fiona, E-mail: fiona.ramanauskas@rch.org.au [Royal Children' s Hospital and the University of Melbourne, Medical Imaging Department, Flemington Road, Parkville, Melbourne, Victoria 3052 (Australia); Kumbla, Surekha, E-mail: surekha.kumbla@rch.org.au [Royal Children' s Hospital and the University of Melbourne, Medical Imaging Department, Flemington Road, Parkville, Melbourne, Victoria 3052 (Australia)

    2013-07-15

    The advances in computerized technology (CT) technique over the last few decades have greatly modified imaging protocols in children. The range of pathologies that can now be demonstrated has broadened with the advent of newer techniques such as CT perfusion and the ability to perform complex reconstructions. Increasing speed of scanning and reduction in scan time have influenced the need for sedation and general anaesthetic as well as impacting on motion artefact. Additionally, concerns about radiation safety and avoidance of unnecessary radiation have further impacted on the inclusion of CT in the imaging armamentarium. Justification and image optimisation are essential. It is important to familiarize oneself with the appearances of normal variants or age related developmental changes. CT does however remain an appropriate investigation in a number of conditions.

  14. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... modality for sinusitis. CT of the sinuses is now widely available and is performed in a relatively short time, especially when compared to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). ...

  15. Lumbosacral spine CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... More Broken bone CT scan Cyst Herniated disk Osteoarthritis Osteomalacia Tumor Review Date 9/8/2014 Updated by: C. Benjamin Ma, MD, Assistant Professor, Chief, Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service, UCSF Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, San Francisco, ...

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    Full Text Available ... view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple ... data suggest that it is safe to continue breastfeeding after receiving intravenous contrast. For further information please ...

  17. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... cavity and sinuses. plan for surgery by defining anatomy. top of page How should I prepare? You ... pregnancy and x-rays. CT scanning is, in general, not recommended for pregnant women unless medically necessary ...

  18. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... and accurate. It’s also the most reliable imaging technique for determining if the sinuses are obstructed and ... to obtain images. For children, the CT scanner technique will be adjusted to their size and the ...

  19. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... to obtain images. For children, the CT scanner technique will be adjusted to their size and the ... evaluation with additional views or a special imaging technique. A follow-up examination may also be necessary ...

  20. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... of electronic x-ray detectors rotate around you, measuring the amount of radiation being absorbed throughout your ... pancreas. When you enter the CT scanner, special light lines may be seen projected onto your body, ...

  1. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... of electronic x-ray detectors rotate around you, measuring the amount of radiation being absorbed throughout your ... quickly. When you enter the CT scanner, special light lines may be seen projected onto your body, ...

  2. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... lives. CT has been shown to be a cost-effective imaging tool for a wide range of ... accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The costs for specific medical imaging tests, ...

  3. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... lives. CT has been shown to be a cost-effective imaging tool for a wide range of ... accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The costs for specific medical imaging tests, ...

  4. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... lives. CT has been shown to be a cost-effective imaging tool for a wide range of ... accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The costs for specific medical imaging tests, ...

  5. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... emergency cases, it can reveal internal injuries and bleeding quickly enough to help save lives. Tell your ... emergency cases, they can reveal internal injuries and bleeding quickly enough to help save lives. CT has ...

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    Full Text Available ... to remove hearing aids and removable dental work. Women will be asked to remove bras containing metal ... have diabetes —particularly if you are taking Glucophage . Women should always inform their physician and the CT ...

  8. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... to remove hearing aids and removable dental work. Women will be asked to remove bras containing metal ... increase the risk of an unusual adverse effect. Women should always inform their physician and the CT ...

  9. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... Leave jewelry at home and wear loose, comfortable clothing. You may be asked to wear a gown. ... CT scan? You should wear comfortable, loose-fitting clothing to your exam. You may be given a ...

  10. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to wear a lead apron to minimize radiation exposure. After a CT exam, the intravenous line used ... always a slight chance of cancer from excessive exposure to radiation. However, the benefit of an accurate ...

  11. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to wear a lead apron to minimize radiation exposure. After a CT exam, the intravenous line used ... always a slight chance of cancer from excessive exposure to radiation. However, the benefit of an accurate ...

  12. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... to wear a lead apron to minimize radiation exposure. After a CT exam, the intravenous line used ... always a slight chance of cancer from excessive exposure to radiation. However, the benefit of an accurate ...

  13. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple ... to urinate; however, this is actually a contrast effect and subsides quickly. If the contrast material is ...

  14. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... microphone. top of page How does the procedure work? In many ways CT scanning works very much ... these links. About Us | Contact Us | FAQ | Privacy | Terms of Use | Links | Site Map Copyright © 2017 Radiological ...

  15. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... microphone. top of page How does the procedure work? In many ways CT scanning works very much ... these links. About Us | Contact Us | FAQ | Privacy | Terms of Use | Links | Site Map Copyright © 2017 Radiological ...

  16. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... microphone. top of page How does the procedure work? In many ways CT scanning works very much ... these links. About Us | Contact Us | FAQ | Privacy | Terms of Use | Links | Site Map Copyright © 2017 Radiological ...

  17. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... painless, noninvasive and accurate. In emergency cases, it can reveal internal injuries and bleeding quickly enough to ... cross-sectional images generated during a CT scan can be reformatted in multiple planes, and can even ...

  18. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... therapy for brain cancer. In emergency cases, it can reveal internal injuries and bleeding quickly enough to ... cross-sectional images generated during a CT scan can be reformatted in multiple planes, and can even ...

  19. Chest CT Scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can combine these pictures to create three-dimensional (3D) models to help show the size, shape, and ... a medical imaging facility or hospital. The CT scanner is a large, tunnel-like machine that has ...

  20. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... you are pregnant and discuss any recent illnesses, medical conditions, medications you’re taking, and allergies. You ... a CT or CAT scan, is a diagnostic medical test that, like traditional x-rays, produces multiple ...

  1. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... you are pregnant and discuss any recent illnesses, medical conditions, medications you’re taking, and allergies. You ... a CT or CAT scan, is a diagnostic medical test that, like traditional x-rays, produces multiple ...

  2. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... you are pregnant and discuss any recent illnesses, medical conditions, medications you’re taking, and allergies. You ... a CT or CAT scan, is a diagnostic medical test that, like traditional x-rays, produces multiple ...

  3. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... scanning is fast, painless, noninvasive and accurate. In emergency cases, it can reveal internal injuries and bleeding ... vessels. CT examinations are fast and simple; in emergency cases, they can reveal internal injuries and bleeding ...

  4. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to plan radiation therapy for brain cancer. In emergency cases, it can reveal internal injuries and bleeding ... vessels. CT examinations are fast and simple; in emergency cases, they can reveal internal injuries and bleeding ...

  5. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... images of internal organs, bones, soft tissue and blood vessels provide greater detail than traditional x-rays, particularly of soft tissues and blood vessels. CT scanning provides more detailed information on head ...

  6. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... images of internal organs, bones, soft tissue and blood vessels provide greater detail than traditional x-rays, particularly of soft tissues and blood vessels. A CT scan of the face produces images ...

  7. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CT) of the abdomen and pelvis is a diagnostic imaging test used to help detect diseases of the ... a radiologist or other physician. To locate a medical imaging or radiation oncology provider in your community, you ...

  8. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... of the nasal cavity and sinuses. plan for surgery by defining anatomy. top of page How should ... CT scanning may eliminate the need for exploratory surgery and surgical biopsy. No radiation remains in a ...

  9. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... treatments. plan for and assess the results of surgery, such as organ transplants. stage, plan and properly ... CT scanning may eliminate the need for exploratory surgery and surgical biopsy. No radiation remains in a ...

  10. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... as: infections such as appendicitis , pyelonephritis or infected fluid collections, also known as abscesses. inflammatory bowel disease ... caused by a burst appendix or an infected fluid collection and the subsequent spread of infection. CT ...

  11. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... cavity. CT scanning is painless, noninvasive and accurate. It’s also the most reliable imaging technique for determining ... parts absorb the x-rays in varying degrees. It is this crucial difference in absorption that allows ...

  12. Lumbar spine CT scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    CAT scan - lumbar spine; Computed axial tomography scan - lumbar spine; Computed tomography scan - lumbar spine; CT - lower back ... your breath for short periods of time. The scan should take only 10 to 15 minutes.

  13. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Abdomen and Pelvis? What is CT Scanning of the Abdomen/Pelvis? Computed tomography, more commonly known as ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? This procedure is typically used to help ...

  14. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... entire body will be "inside" the scanner at one time such as with MRI. If an intravenous ... CT scanning provides very detailed images of many types of tissue as well as the lungs, bones, ...

  15. Cervical spine CT scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... defects of the cervical spine Bone problems Fracture Osteoarthritis Disc herniation Risks Risks of CT scans include: ... Ma, MD, Assistant Professor, Chief, Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service, UCSF Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, San Francisco, ...

  16. CT- and MR colonography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Achiam, Michael Patrick; Bülow, Steffen; Rosenberg, J

    2002-01-01

    . Lately, CT- and MR colonography have emerged as non-invasive methods for colon imaging. METHODS: At present, CTC and MRC require bowel preparation. However, preliminary studies have been carried out without colon preparation. After the colon has been filled with air or contrast, the patient is scanned...... colonography. Future developments with the use of "intelligent" computers, better resolution and faster examinations will make CT and/or MR colonography realistic options to replace conventional diagnostic colonoscopy....

  17. CT of pituitary abscess

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fong, T.C.; Johns, R.D.; Long, M.; Myles, S.T.

    1985-06-01

    Pituitary abscess is a rare condition, with only 50 cases reported in the literature. Of those, 29 cases were well documented for analysis. Preoperative diagnosis of pituitary abscess is difficult. The computed tomographic (CT) appearance of pituitary abscess was first described in 1983; the abscess was depicted by axial images with coronal reconstruction. The authors recently encountered a case of pituitary abscess documented by direct coronal CT of the sella turcica.

  18. Comprehensive strain and band gap analysis of PA-MBE grown AlGaN/GaN heterostructures on sapphire with ultra thin buffer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihir Kumar Mahata

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In this work, cluster tool (CT Plasma Assisted Molecular Beam Epitaxy (PA-MBE grown AlGaN/GaN heterostructure on c-plane (0 0 0 1 sapphire (Al2O3 were investigated by High Resolution X-ray Diffraction (HRXRD, Room Temperature Raman Spectroscopy (RTRS, and Room Temperature Photoluminescence (RTPL. The effects of strain and doping on GaN and AlGaN layers were investigated thoroughly. The out-of-plane (‘c’ and in-plane (‘a’ lattice parameters were measured from RTRS analysis and as well as reciprocal space mapping (RSM from HRXRD scan of (002 and (105 plane. The in-plane (out-of plane strain of the samples were found to be −2.5 × 10−3(1 × 10−3, and −1.7 × 10−3(2 × 10−3 in GaN layer and 5.1 × 10−3 (−3.3 × 10−3, and 8.8 × 10−3(−1.3 × 10−3 in AlGaN layer, respectively. In addition, the band structures of AlGaN/GaN interface were estimated by both theoretical (based on elastic theory and experimental observations of the RTPL spectrum.

  19. Comprehensive strain and band gap analysis of PA-MBE grown AlGaN/GaN heterostructures on sapphire with ultra thin buffer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahata, Mihir Kumar; Ghosh, Saptarsi; Jana, Sanjay Kumar; Bag, Ankush; Kumar, Rahul [Advanced Technology Development Center, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, 721302 (India); Chakraborty, Apurba; Biswas, Dhrubes [Department of Electronics and Electrical Communication Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, 721302 (India); Mukhopadhyay, Partha [Rajendra Mishra School of Engineering Entrepreneurship, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, 721302 (India)

    2014-11-15

    In this work, cluster tool (CT) Plasma Assisted Molecular Beam Epitaxy (PA-MBE) grown AlGaN/GaN heterostructure on c-plane (0 0 0 1) sapphire (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) were investigated by High Resolution X-ray Diffraction (HRXRD), Room Temperature Raman Spectroscopy (RTRS), and Room Temperature Photoluminescence (RTPL). The effects of strain and doping on GaN and AlGaN layers were investigated thoroughly. The out-of-plane (‘c’) and in-plane (‘a’) lattice parameters were measured from RTRS analysis and as well as reciprocal space mapping (RSM) from HRXRD scan of (002) and (105) plane. The in-plane (out-of plane) strain of the samples were found to be −2.5 × 10{sup −3}(1 × 10{sup −3}), and −1.7 × 10{sup −3}(2 × 10{sup −3}) in GaN layer and 5.1 × 10{sup −3} (−3.3 × 10{sup −3}), and 8.8 × 10{sup −3}(−1.3 × 10{sup −3}) in AlGaN layer, respectively. In addition, the band structures of AlGaN/GaN interface were estimated by both theoretical (based on elastic theory) and experimental observations of the RTPL spectrum.

  20. Ventilation-perfusion-lungscintigraphy using PET and {sup 68}Ga-labeled radiopharmaceuticals; Ventilations-Perfusions-Lungenszintigraphie mit der PET und {sup 68}Ga-markierten Radiopharmaka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotzerke, J. [Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany). OncoRay - Zentrum fuer Innovationskompetenz Strahlenforschung in der Onkologie; Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V. (FZR) (Germany). PET-Zentrum; Andreeff, M.; Wunderlich, G.; Zoephel, K. [Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Wiggermann, P. [Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany). Inst. und Poliklinik fuer Diagnostische Radiologie

    2010-07-01

    Aim: Imaging of lung perfusion with positron emission tomography (PET) is already possible with {sup 68}Ga labeled denaturized albumin. The purpose of our study was to produce and test a {sup 68}Ga labeled aerosol (Galligas {sup registered}) for ventilation and {sup 68}Ga labeled albumin particles (microspheres) for perfusion imaging with PET. Patients, methods: Galligas was produced by simmering and burning generator eluted {sup 68}Ga solution (100 MBq/0.1ml) in an ordinary technegas generator. Fifteen patients with suspicion on pulmonary embolism underwent PET/CT (Biograph 16) after inhalation of Galligas and application of {sup 68}Ga labeled microspheres. A low dose CT was acquired for attenuation correction (AC). Images were reconstructed with and without AC. The inhaled activity was calculated compared to the activity injected. Results: Inhaled radioaerosol Galligas demonstrated typical distribution as known from {sup 99m}Tc-labeled technegas with homogeneous distribution in lung without hilar deposits. Attenuation corrected images resulted in artefacts in the lung base. Therefore, non-corrected images were used for making the results. Three out of fifteen patients showed a deficient perfusion whereas ventilation was normal corresponding to pulmonary embolism. Conclusion: Lung scintigraphy with PET is feasible. Galligas is simple to produce (analogously to technegas). {sup 68}Ga labeled microspheres are available. The method is applicable to daily routine and rendered clinically relevant informations. (orig.)

  1. Highly Polarized Electrons from GaAs-GaAsP and InGaAs-AlGaAs Strained Layer Superlattice Photocathodes

    CERN Document Server

    Nakanishi, T; Kuwahara, M; Naniwa, K; Nishitani, T; Okumi, S; Yamamoto, N; Yasui, K

    2004-01-01

    GaAs-GaAsP strained layer superlattice photocathode has been developed for highly polarized electron beams. This cathode achieved a maximum polarization of 92% with a quantum efficiency of 0.5%. Criteria for achieving the highest polarization together with high quantum efficiency using superlattice photocathodes are discussed based on experimental spin-resolved quantum efficiency spectra of GaAs-AlGaAs, InGaAs-AlGaAs and GaAs-GaAsP superlattice structures.

  2. Role of Combined 68Ga-DOTATOC and 18F-FDG Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography in the Diagnostic Workup of Pancreas Neuroendocrine Tumors: Implications for Managing Surgical Decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cingarlini, Sara; Ortolani, Silvia; Salgarello, Matteo; Butturini, Giovanni; Malpaga, Anna; Malfatti, Veronica; DʼOnofrio, Mirko; Davì, Maria Vittoria; Vallerio, Paola; Ruzzenente, Andrea; Capelli, Paola; Citton, Elia; Grego, Elisabetta; Trentin, Chiara; De Robertis, Riccardo; Scarpa, Aldo; Bassi, Claudio; Tortora, Giampaolo

    2017-01-01

    Ga-DOTATOC (Ga) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) is recommended in the workup of pancreas neuroendocrine tumors (PanNETs); evidence suggests that F-FDG (F) PET/CT can also provide prognostic information. Aims of this study were to assess the role of combined Ga- and F-PET/CT in the evaluation of grade (G) 1-2 PanNETs and to test the correlation between F-PET/CT positivity and tumor grade. Preoperative Ga- and F-PET/CT of 35 patients with surgically resected G1-2 PanNETs were evaluated. For grading, the 2010 World Health Organization Classification was used; an ancillary analysis with Ki67 cutoffs at 5% to 20% was conducted. Correlation between F-PET/CT positivity (SUVmax > 3.5) and grade was assessed. Of 35 PanNETs, 28.6% and 71.4% were G1 and G2 as per World Health Organization. Ga-PET/CT showed high sensitivity (94.3%) in detecting G1-2 PanNETs. F-PET/CT was positive in 20% and 76% G1 and G2 tumors (P = 0.002). F-PET/CT identified G2 PanNETs with high positive predictive value (PPV, 90.5%). F-PET/CT correlated with tumor grade also in the ancillary analysis (P = 0.009). The high sensitivity of Ga-PET/CT in NET detection is known. The high PPV of F-PET/CT in the identification of G2 forms suggests its potential role in PanNETs prognostication and risk stratification.

  3. 2015 Lowndes County (GA) Lidar

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TASK NAME: NOAA OCM Lidar for Lowndes County, GA with the option to Collect Lidar in Cook and Tift Counties, GA Lidar Data Acquisition and Processing Production Task...

  4. Measurement of OCS, CO2, CO and H2O aboard NASA's WB-57 High Altitude Platform Using Off-Axis Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy (OA-ICOS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leen, J. B.; Owano, T. G.; Du, X.; Gardner, A.; Gupta, M.

    2014-12-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (OCS) is the most abundant sulfur gas in the atmosphere and has been implicated in controlling the sulfur budget and aerosol loading of the stratosphere. In the troposphere, OCS is irreversibly consumed during photosynthesis and may serve as a tracer for gross primary production (GPP). Its primary sources are ocean outgassing, industrial processes, and biomass burning. Its primary sinks are vegetation and soils. Despite the importance of OCS in atmospheric processes, the OCS atmospheric budget is poorly determined and has high uncertainty. OCS is typically monitored using either canisters analyzed by gas chromatography or integrated atmospheric column measurements. Improved in-situ terrestrial flux and airborne measurements are required to constrain the OCS budget and further elucidate its role in stratospheric aerosol formation and as a tracer for biogenic volatile organics and photosynthesis. Los Gatos Research has developed a flight capable mid-infrared Off-Axis Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy (OA-ICOS) analyzer to simultaneously quantify OCS, CO2, CO, and H2O in ambient air at up to 2 Hz. The prototype was tested on diluted, certified samples and found to be precise (OCS, CO2, CO, and H2O to better than ±4 ppt, ±0.2 ppm, ±0.31 ppb, and ±3.7 ppm respectively, 1s in 1 sec) and linear (R2 > 0.9997 for all gases) over a wide dynamic range (OCS, CO2, CO, and H2O ranging from 0.2 - 70 ppb, 500 - 3000 ppm, 150 - 480 ppb, and 7000 - 21000 ppm respectively). Cross-interference measurements showed no appreciable change in measured OCS concentration with variations in CO2 (500 - 3500 ppm) or CO. We report on high altitude measurements made aboard NASA's WB-57 research aircraft. Two research flights were conducted from Houston, TX. The concentration of OCS, CO2, CO, and H2O were continuously recorded from sea level to approximately 60,000 feet. The concentration of OCS was observed to increase with altitude through the troposphere due to the

  5. Coulomb excitation of Ga-73

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diriken, J.; Stefanescu, I.; Balabanski, D.; Blasi, N.; Blazhev, A.; Bree, N.; Cederkaell, J.; Cocolios, T. E.; Davinson, T.; Eberth, J.; Ekstrom, A.; Fedorov, D. V.; Fedosseev, V. N.; Fraile, L. M.; Franchoo, S.; Georgiev, G.; Gladnishki, K.; Huyse, M.; Ivanov, O. V.; Ivanov, V. S.; Iwanicki, J.; Jolie, J.; Konstantinopoulos, T.; Kroell, Th.; Kruecken, R.; Koester, U.; Lagoyannis, A.; Lo Bianco, G.; Maierbeck, P.; Marsh, B. A.; Napiorkowski, P.; Patronis, N.; Pauwels, D.; Reiter, P.; Seliverstov, M.; Sletten, G.; Van de Walle, J.; Van Duppen, P.; Voulot, D.; Walters, W. B.; Warr, N.; Wenander, F.; Wrzosek, K.

    2010-01-01

    The B(E2; I-i -> I-f) values for transitions in Ga-71(31)40 and Ga-73(31)42 were deduced from a Coulomb excitation experiment at the safe energy of 2.95 MeV/nucleon using post-accelerated beams of Ga-71,Ga-73 at the REX-ISOLDE on-line isotope mass separator facility. The emitted gamma rays were dete

  6. PET-CT; PET-CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schober, O. [Univeritaetsklinikum Muenster (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Heindel, W. [Univeritaetsklinikum Muenster (Germany). Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie

    2008-07-01

    Positron emission tomography - computerized tomography (PET-CT) is the fusion of two modern imaging techniques. The book includes the following chapters: 1. fundamentals: radiation protection aspects, radionuclide production, contrast agents, patient preparation, image interpretation; 2. diagnostics of carcinomas: carcinomas in brain, head-throat, thyroid, lungs, intestinal tract, gynecological carcinomas, urinary tract and bladder carcinomas, prostate carcinomas, malignant lymphomas, malignant malinomas, carcinomas in the skeletal system; 3. infections; 4. diagnostics of cardiovascular diseases; 5. diagnostics of neurodegenerative diseases; 6. developments and perspectives, 7. attachments: internet links, glossary, abbreviations.

  7. 68Ga-DOTATATE uptake in pineal gland, a rare physiological variant: case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riaz, Saima; Syed, Rizwan; Skoura, Evangelia; Alshammari, Alshaima; Gaze, Mark; Sajjan, Rakesh; Halsey, Richard; Bomanji, Jamshed

    2015-11-01

    (68)Ga-DOTATATE PET-CT is widely used for the evaluation of neuroendocrine tumours. Knowledge of the physiological distribution of the radiotracer is of critical importance in characterizing focal areas of uptake. In this case series, we report three paediatric cases (average age 4.7 years ± 0.6 SD) with diagnosed advanced stage IV Neuroblastoma. Two had (68)Ga-DOTATATE PET-CT scans and one underwent (68)Ga-DOTATATE PET-MRI scan to assess for suitability of molecular therapy. Focal increased tracer uptake in the pineal gland was noted in all cases with no morphological abnormality on the corresponding CT and MRI scans. The uptake within the gland was thought to be a physiological variant rather than metastases owing to the heterogeneity of somatostatin receptors expression. The pineal gland has been reported to express somatostatin receptors. The physiological distribution of (68)Ga-DOTATATE uptake in the pineal gland is not routinely seen. Furthermore, the possibility of pineal meningioma is very unlikely as pineal meningiomas are very rare and there was no convincing morphological evidence of meningiomas on CT/MRI scan.

  8. CT of thymoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sone, S.; Higashihara, T.; Morimoto, S.; Ikezoe, J.; Arisawa, J. (Osaka Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1982-08-01

    Based on 17 patients with thymoma (8 with myasthenia gravis and 9 free from it); 1. The effectiveness of CT, conventional radiography and pneumomediastinography in the detection of thymomas was determined and the results compared. 2. The CT findings of thymomas were discussed and the CT features which seemed to suggest malignant thymomas were evaluated. The results were as follows: 1. Of the 17 cass with thymomas, 13 were diagnosed from p-a films, 13 from lateral films, and 16 from CT. Of the 16 thymomas, 14 were diagnosed from lateral tomography. Mass densities were shown in all 15 cases in which pneumomediastinography were performed. 2. Benign thymomas showed round or oval smoothly marginated mass. The fatty plane between the mass and the mediastinal structures was nicely preserved. 3. Malignant thymoma frequently showed a plaque-like mass with more or less irregular or lobulated contours with obliteration of the fatty planes of the cardiovascular structures. Tumor calcification was shown in 4 of 10 malignant thymomas. 4. Slight tumor invasion to the mediastinal pleura and lung was difficult to predict from the CT images.

  9. CT images of gossypiboma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Hae Jeong; Lim, Jong Nam; Choi, Young Chil; Park, Jeong Hee [College of Medicine, Kon-Kuk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-04-15

    Surgical sponges retained after laparotomy can cause serious problem if they were not be identified in early state. In these circumstances abdominal CT yields the accurate diagnostic images. The purpose of this report is to present highly indicative findings permitting correct preoperative diagnosis of the gossypiboma. We experienced three cases in which CT showed the images sufficiently characteristic to suggest the correct preoperative diagnosis. We evaluated retrospectively the radiological images of gossypiboma confirmed by operation. Three patients were admitted due to palpable masses. Two female patients had medical histories of cesarean sections and a male patient had been operated due to malignant fibrous histiocytoma, previously. Abdominal CT scan of one case revealed huge ovoid hypodense mass with enhanced peripheral rim. Calcific spots and whirl-like stripes were noted within the lesion. Towel was found in pathologic specimen. CT images of two patients showed well-encapsulated, mixed fluid and soft tissue density mass with several gas bubbles. Surgical sponges were found within abscesses. The authors conclude that these characteristic CT findings and careful histories of surgery are very useful for correct pre-operative diagnosis and permit the guideline for the optimal plan of the surgical treatment.

  10. CT findings of fibromatoses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hak Nam; Choi, Yeon Hwa; Shin, Hyun Jun [Lee Rha Hospital, Chung Ju (Korea, Republic of)

    1991-03-15

    Fibromatoses constitute a group of benign fibroblastic soft tissue tumors with a tendency for local invasion and recurrence. CT provides excellent anatomic detail of soft tissue tumors and precise location, size, and extent of the tumors. The authors evaluated 7 CT scans of 6 pathologically proven aggressive fibromatoses during the last 4 years. Five lesions arose in the lower extremities: 4 in the buttocks and 1 in the thigh. One lesion arose in the upper back. The tumors were lobulated in contour and varied in size from 3.7 cm to 10.7 cm. Fibromatosis tumors were usually hypodense with muscle when no contrast medium was used and hyperdense with better delineation during infusion of the contrast medium. Three patients had recurrent disease after surgical removal. Fibromatosis may infiltrate the surrounding tissue beyond the margins, indicated on CT scans and by palpation at operation. Therefore the surgeon should plan a wide resection around the apparent limits of the fibromatosis.