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Sample records for ct wb ga

  1. 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT in the evaluation of bone metastases in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachpekidis, Christos; Bäumer, P; Kopka, K; Hadaschik, B A; Hohenfellner, M; Kopp-Schneider, A; Haberkorn, U; Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, A

    2018-06-01

    The aims of this retrospective analysis were to compare 68 Ga-PSMA PET findings and low-dose CT findings (120 kV, 30 mA), and to obtain semiquantitative and quantitative 68 Ga-PSMA PET data in patients with prostate cancer (PC) bone metastases. In total, 152 PET/CT scans from 140 patients were evaluated. Of these patients, 30 had previously untreated primary PC, and 110 had biochemical relapse after treatment of primary PC. All patients underwent dynamic PET/CT scanning of the pelvis and lower abdomen as well as whole-body PET/CT with 68 Ga-PSMA-11. The PET/CT scans were analysed qualitatively (visually), semiquantitatively (SUV), and quantitatively based on a two-tissue compartment model and a noncompartmental approach leading to the extraction of the fractal dimension. Differences were considered significant for p values PET-positive and CT-positive, 65 were only 68 Ga-PSMA-positive, and 10 were only CT-positive. The Yang test showed that there were significantly more 68 Ga-PSMA PET-positive lesions than CT-positive lesions. Association analysis showed that PSA plasma levels were significantly correlated with several 68 Ga-PSMA-11-associated parameters in bone metastases, including the degree of tracer uptake (SUV average and SUV max ), its transport rate from plasma to the interstitial/intracellular compartment (K 1 ), its rate of binding to the PSMA receptor and its internalization (k 3 ), its influx rate (K i ), and its distribution heterogeneity. 68 Ga-PSMA PET/CT is a useful diagnostic tool in the detection of bone metastases in PC. 68 Ga-PSMA PET visualizes more bone metastases than low-dose CT. PSA plasma levels are significantly correlated with several 68 Ga-PSMA PET parameters.

  2. Adenocarcinoma Prostate With Neuroendocrine Differentiation: Potential Utility of 18F-FDG PET/CT and 68Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT Over 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parida, Girish Kumar; Tripathy, Sarthak; Datta Gupta, Shreya; Singhal, Abhinav; Kumar, Rakesh; Bal, Chandrasekhar; Shamim, Shamim Ahmed

    2018-04-01

    Ga-PSMA PET/CT is the upcoming imaging modality for staging, restaging and response assessment of prostate cancer. However, due to neuroendocrine differentiation in some of patients with prostate cancer, they express somatostatin receptors instead of prostate specific membrane antigen. This can be exploited and other modalities like Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT and F-FDG PET/CT should be used in such cases for guiding management. We hereby discuss a similar case of 67-year-old man of adenocarcinoma prostate with neuroendocrine differentiation, which shows the potential pitfall of Ga-PSMA PET/CT imaging and benefit of Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT and F-FDG PET/CT in such cases.

  3. Comparison of the 68Ga-DOTATATA PET/CT, FDG PET/CT, and MIBG SPECT/CT in the Evaluation of Suspected Primary Pheochromocytomas and Paragangliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Hongli; Li, Fang; Wang, Ling; Wang, Zhenghua; Li, Wei; Huo, Li; Zhang, Jingjing

    2017-07-01

    Anatomical imaging modalities including CT and MRI are the mainstay of evaluation of primary pheochromocytoma or paraganglioma. However, nuclear medicine imaging is frequently necessary to determine the nature of the lesions. The purpose of this investigation is to assess which commonly used nuclear medicine modality might have a better diagnostic value in this clinical setting. Eight patients who had been suspected of having either primary pheochromocytoma or primary paraganglioma and 1 patient with known pheochromocytoma were included in the analysis. Among the 8 patients without known diagnosis, 7 had been suggested by anatomical imaging modalities, whereas one of them presented with initial negative anatomical imaging interpretation. All of 9 patients underwent Ga-DOTATATA PET/CT, FDG PET/CT, and MIBG SPECT/CT for further evaluation. The imaging findings were compared with postsurgical pathology and follow-up. Both Ga-DOTATATA PET/CT and MIBG SPECT/CT accurately identified 9 primary tumors, whereas FDG PET/CT showed increased activity in 8 of 9 primary tumors. Both Ga-DOTATATA and FDG PET/CT are able to detect associated extra-adrenal lesions not shown on MIBG study in patients with multiple endocrine neoplasia syndrome. Ga-DOTATATA PET/CT could be the nuclear medicine imaging choice to evaluate suspected primary pheochromocytoma or paraganglioma, especially in the situation of multiple endocrine neoplasia syndrome.

  4. Preliminary PET/CT Imaging with Somatostatin Analogs [68Ga]DOTAGA-TATE and [68Ga]DOTAGA-TOC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satpati, Drishty; Shinto, Ajit; Kamaleshwaran, K K; Sarma, Haladhar Dev; Dash, Ashutosh

    2017-12-01

    Somatostatin receptor positron emission tomography/X-ray computed tomography (SSTR-PET/CT) is a well-established technique for staging and detection of neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). Ga-68-labeled DOTA-conjugated octreotide analogs are the privileged radiotracers for diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring of NETs. Hence, we were interested in assessing the influence of promising, newer variant DOTAGA on the hydrophilicity, pharmacokinetics, and lesion pick-up of somatostatin analogs. Herein, the potential of ([ 68 Ga]DOTAGA, Tyr 3 , Thr 8 ) octreotide ([ 68 Ga]DOTAGA-TATE) and ([ 68 Ga]DOTAGA, Tyr 3 ) octreotide ([ 68 Ga]DOTAGA-TOC) as NET imaging agents has been investigated. Amenability of [ 68 Ga]DOTAGA-(TATE/TOC) to kit-type formulation has been demonstrated. Biodistribution studies were carried out in normal rats at 1 h post-injection (p.i.). [ 68 Ga]DOTAGA-(TATE/TOC) PET/CT scans were carried out in patients (70-170 MBq, 1 h p.i.) with histologically confirmed well-differentiated NETs. [ 68 Ga]DOTAGA-TATE exhibited hydrophilicity similar to [ 68 Ga]DOTA-TATE (log P = -3.51 vs -3.69) whereas [ 68 Ga]DOTAGA-TOC was more hydrophilic than [ 68 Ga]DOTA-TOC (log P = -3.27 vs -2.93). [ 68 Ga]DOTAGA-TATE and [ 68 Ga]DOTA-TATE showed almost identical blood and kidney uptake in normal rats whereas significantly fast clearance (p TOC also demonstrated rapid clearance from blood and kidneys (p TOC. The metastatic lesions in NET patients were well identified by [ 68 Ga]DOTAGA-TATE and [ 68 Ga]DOTAGA-TOC. The phenomenal analogy was observed between [ 68 Ga]DOTAGA-TATE and [ 68 Ga]DOTA-TATE as well as between [ 68 Ga]DOTAGA-TOC and [ 68 Ga]DOTA-TOC in biodistribution studies in rats. The good lesion detection ability of the two radiotracers indicates their potential as NET imaging radiotracers.

  5. Usefulness of emission CT in 67Ga tumor and inflammation scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koizumi, Kiyoshi; Tada, Akira; Bunko, Hisashi; Tonami, Norihisa; Hisada, Kinichi.

    1983-01-01

    67 Ga-citrate widely used for tumor imaging has some drawbacks. Poor blood elearance of 67 Ga is sometimes a cause of poor visualization of the abnormal uptake in lesions. Physiological accumulations of 67 Ga (e. g. liver, colon, pulmonary hilus, etc.) also conceal the abnormal 67 Ga uptake in lesions. We have evaluated the usefulness of 67 Ga SPECT (single photon emission CT) to overcome these drawbacks inherent in conventional gamma-camera images. 67 Ga SPECT was more useful to recognize the location and the extension of lesions in transaxial planes, therefore, comparison of the lesions with transmission CT was easily made. Abnormal accumulation in or near the liver was easily discriminated from the physiological accumulation of 67 Ga in the liver. Further evaluation of the lesions which had been detected by other imaging methods (e. g. transmission CT, ultrasonography, etc.), 67 Ga SPECT was more useful than conventional gamma-camera imaging. In conclusion, 67 Ga SPECT was useful in selected cases when performed after conventiond 67 Ga imaging. (author)

  6. False Positive Uptake in Bilateral Gynecomastia on 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT Scan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasikumar, Arun; Joy, Ajith; Nair, Bindu P; Pillai, M R A; Madhavan, Jayaprakash

    2017-09-01

    A 66-year-old man on hormonal therapy with prostate cancer was referred for Ga-PSMA PET/CT scan for biochemical recurrence. Ga-PSMA PET/CT scan detected moderate heterogeneous tracer concentration in bilateral breast parenchyma, in addition to the abnormal tracer concentration in enlarged prostate gland, right external iliac lymph node, and sclerotic lesion in L4 vertebra. On clinical examination, he was found to have bilateral gynecomastia. Abnormal concentration of Ga-PSMA in breast cancer is now well known, and in this context, it is important to know that tracer localization can occur in gynecomastia as well, as evidenced in this case.

  7. Dual tracer functional imaging of gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors using 68Ga-DOTA-NOC PET-CT and 18F-FDG PET-CT: competitive or complimentary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naswa, Niraj; Sharma, Punit; Gupta, Santosh Kumar; Karunanithi, Sellam; Reddy, Rama Mohan; Patnecha, Manish; Lata, Sneh; Kumar, Rakesh; Malhotra, Arun; Bal, Chandrasekhar

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the diagnostic performance of Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT with F-FDG PET/CT in the patients with gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs). Data of 51 patients with definite histological diagnosis of GEP-NET who underwent both Ga-DOTA-NOC PET-CT and F-FDG PET-CT within a span of 15 days were selected for this retrospective analysis. Sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values were calculated for Ga-DOTA-NOC PET-CT and F-FDG PET-CT, and results were compared both on patientwise and regionwise analysis. Ga-DOTA-NOC PET-CT is superior to F-FDG PET-CT on patientwise analysis (P DOTA-NOC PET-CT is superior to F-FDG PET-CT only for lymph node metastases (P DOTA-NOC PET-CT detected more liver and skeletal lesions compared with F-FDG PET-CT, the difference was not statistically significant. In addition, the results of combined imaging helped in selecting candidates who would undergo the appropriate mode of treatment, whether octreotide therapy or conventional chemotherapy Ga-DOTA-NOC PET-CT seems to be superior to F-FDG PET-CT for imaging GEP-NETs. However, their role seems to be complementary because combination of Ga-DOTA-NOC PET-CT and F-FDG PET-CT in such patients helps demonstrate the total disease burden and segregate them to proper therapeutic groups.

  8. Role of {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET-CT in the diagnosis and staging of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Rakesh; Sharma, Punit; Karunanithi, Sellam; Naswa, Niraj; Lata, Sneh; Malhotra, Arun [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Nuclear Medicine, New Delhi (India); Garg, Pramod [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Gastroenterology and Human Nutrition, New Delhi (India); Sharma, Raju; Thulkar, Sanjay [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Radiodiagnosis, New Delhi (India)

    2011-11-15

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the role of {sup 68}Ga-DOTA(0)-Phe(1)-Tyr(3)-octreotide ({sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC) positron emission tomography computed tomography (PET-CT) for detection and staging of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours (NETs). Twenty patients with clinically suspected and/or histopathologically proven pancreatic NET underwent {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET-CT imaging for staging and /or localisation of primary lesion. They also underwent contrast enhanced CT (CECT) and 8 patients underwent {sup 18}F-FDG PET-CT. SUVmax of primary and metastatic lesions were measured. Results were verified with histopathology for primary tumour and with clinical follow up/MRI and /or biopsy for metastatic disease. Results of {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET-CT were compared to CECT and {sup 18}F-FDG PET-CT. {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET-CT correctly localised primary in all 20, CECT in 15 and {sup 18}F-FDG PET-CT in 2 patients. {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET-CT demonstrated metastases in 13 patients, CECT in 7 and {sup 18}F-FDG PET-CT in 2. {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET-CT emerged as the best investigation with 100% sensitivity and PPV for detecting primary tumour and metastatic disease. The detection rate of CECT was lower than {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET-CT, both for primary tumour (20vs.15) or metastatic disease (13vs.7). {sup 18}F-FDG PET-CT performed poorly for primary and metastasis. Ga-DOTATOC PET-CT is a very useful imaging investigation for diagnosing and staging pancreatic NET. (orig.)

  9. Ga-68-DOTA-TATE PET/CT for discrimination of tumors of the optic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingenstein, Annemarie; Haug, Alexander R; Miller, Christina; Hintschich, Christoph

    2015-02-01

    Symptomatic tumors of the optic nerve pathway may endanger vision. They are difficult to classify by imaging alone and biopsy may damage visual function. Tumor pathology influences treatment decision and a diagnostic tool with a high sensitivity and specificity would therefore be invaluable. We hypothesized that Ga-68-DOTA-TATE PET/CT may help in discriminating optic nerve tumors as uptake of somatostatin is elevated in meningiomas. Ga-68-DOTA-TATE PET/CT was used to examine 13 patients with ambiguous, symptomatic lesions of the optic pathway for treatment planning. The presence or absence of meningioma was validated by histopathology or supplementary diagnostic work-up. Ga-68-DOTA-TATE PET/CT identified 10 meningiomas (en plaque = 1, optic nerve sheath = 4, sphenoidal = 5) correctly via increased SSTR (somatostatin receptor) expression (mean SUVmax (maximum standardized uptake value) = 14.3 ± 15.4). 3 tumors did not show elevated Ga-68-DOTA-TATE uptake (SUVmax = 2.1 ± 1.0). Subsumizing all clinical-radiological follow-up tools available, these lesions were classified as an intracerebral metastasis of an advanced gastric carcinoma, histologically proven inflammatory collagenous connective tissue and presumed leukemic infiltration of a newly diagnosed chronic lymphocytic leukemia. In this case series, Ga-68-DOTA-TATE PET/CT demonstrated both a sensitivity and specificity of 100%. Yet, the golden standard of histopathology was only available in a subset of patients included. Ga-68-DOTA-TATE PET/CT proved to be a valuable diagnostic tool for the correct classification of equivocal, symptomatic tumors of the anterior optic pathway requiring therapy. PET/CT results influenced therapy decision essentially in all cases.

  10. Potential impact of 68Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT on stereotactic radiotherapy planning of meningiomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyuyki, Fonyuy; Plotkin, Michail; Michel, Roger; Steffen, Ingo; Fahdt, Daniel; Brenner, Winfried; Graf, Reinhold; Denecke, Timm; Geworski, Lilli; Wurm, Reinhard

    2010-01-01

    Since meningiomas show a high expression of somatostatin receptor subtype 2, PET with 68 Ga-DOTATOC was proposed as an additional imaging modality beside CT and MRI for planning radiotherapy. We investigated the input of 68 Ga-DOTATOC-PET/CT on the definition of the ''gross tumour volume'' (GTV) in meningiomas, in order to assess the potential value of this method. Prior to radiotherapy, 42 patients with meningiomas (26 f, 16 m, mean age 55) underwent MRI and 68 Ga-DOTATOC-PET/CT examinations. History: operated n = 24, radiotherapy n = 1, operation and radiotherapy n = 8, no treatment n = 9. PET/CT and MRI data were co-registered using a BrainLAB workstation. For comparison, the GTV was defined first under consideration of CT and MRI data, then using PET data. 3/42 patients were excluded from the analysis (two with negative PET results, one with an extensive tumour, not precisely delineable by MRI or PET/CT). The average GTV CT/MRI was 22(±19)cm 3 ; GTV PET was 23(±20)cm 3 . Additional GTV, obtained as a result of PET was 9(±10)cm 3 and was observed in patients with osseous infiltration. In some pre-treated patients there were intratumoural areas (as identified in CT/MRI) without SR-expression (7(±11)cm 3 ). Common GTV as obtained by both CT/MRI and PET was 15(±14)cm 3 . The mean bi-directional difference between the GTV CT/MRI and GTV PET accounted to 16(±15)cm 3 (93%, p 68 Ga-DOTATOC-PET enables delineation of SR-positive meningiomas and delivers additional information to both CT and MRI regarding the planning of stereotactic radiotherapy. The acquisition on a PET/CT scanner helps to estimate the relation of PET findings to anatomical structures and is especially useful for detection of osseous infiltration. 68 Ga-DOTATOC-PET also allows detection of additional lesions in patients with multiple meningiomas. (orig.)

  11. Imaging benign pathology and variants with uptake in 68ga-Dotatate PET/CT studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Servente, L.; Bianco, C.; Gigirey, V.; Alonso, O.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the physiological, anatomical variants and benign lesions in positron emission computed tomography (PET/CT) studies with 68Ga-DOTATATE.Materials and methods: We retrospectively reviewed PET/CT reports scanned with 68Ga-DOTATATE and selected those that contained words in the report related to anatomical, physiological variants and benign tumors. The degree of 68Ga-DOTATATE uptake was evaluated qualitatively and quantitatively by measuring the standarized uptake max value (SUVmax value). The anatomical location, SUVmax value and morphological CT image findings were recorded. All cases had clinical and imaging follow-up. Results: From a total of 772 PET/CT reports, 28 patients were obtained with 33 benign variants or tumors, 14 females and 14 males with a median age of 63 years. Uptake patterns were classified into four groups: anatomic and physiological variants (15), dependent on osteoblastic activity (4), dependent on inflammatory activity (10) and non-neuro-endocrine benign tumors (4).Discussion: Somatostatin receptors are overexpressed not only in the neuroendocrine system but also in other tissues. Physiological, anatomical variants and benign tumors expressing these receptors may be misleading. In the present work the frequency of this finding is 5.1%.Conclusion: Physiological variants and benign lesions (tumor and inflammatory) can accumulate 68Ga-DOTATATE since their tissues can express somatostatin receptors. The semiologic analysis of the tomographic component of this hybrid method enhances the diagnostic efficacy, optimizing PET/CT study performance. (authors) [es

  12. ⁶⁸Ga-DOTA-TOC-PET/CT detects heart metastases from ileal neuroendocrine tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calissendorff, Jan; Sundin, Anders; Falhammar, Henrik

    2014-09-01

    Metastases from ileal neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) to the myocardium are rare and generally seen in patients with widespread metastatic NET disease. The objectives of this investigation were to describe the frequency of intracardiac metastases in ileal NET patients examined by (68)Ga-DOTA-TOC-PET/CT and to describe the cases in detail. All (68)Ga-DOTA-TOC-PET/CT examinations performed at the Karolinska University Hospital since 2010 until April 2012 were reviewed. In all, 128 out of 337 examinations were in patients with ileal NETs. Four patients had seven myocardiac metastases, yielding a frequency of 4.3 % in patients with ileal NETs. One patient had cardiac surgery while three were treated with somatostatin analogs. The cardiac metastases did not affect the patients' activity of daily life. (68)Ga-DOTA-TOC-PET/CT is an established imaging modality in identifying cardiac metastases in ileal NETs. Prospective studies are needed to confirm the true clinical value of (68)Ga-DOTA-TOC-PET/CT in detecting cardiac metastases in both ileal and non-ileal NETs.

  13. 68Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT imaging of indeterminate pulmonary nodules and lung cancer.

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    Ronald Walker

    Full Text Available 18F-FDG PET/CT is widely used to evaluate indeterminate pulmonary nodules (IPNs. False positive results occur, especially from active granulomatous nodules. A PET-based imaging agent with superior specificity to 18F-FDG for IPNs, is badly needed, especially in areas of endemic granulomatous nodules. Somatostatin receptors (SSTR are expressed in many malignant cells including small cell and non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs. 68Ga-DOTATATE, a positron emitter labeled somatostatin analog, combined with PET/CT imaging, may improve the diagnosis of IPNs over 18F-FDG by reducing false positives. Our study purpose was to test this hypothesis in our region with high endemic granulomatous IPNs.We prospectively performed 68Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT and 18F-FDG PET/CT scans in the same 30 patients with newly diagnosed, treatment-naïve lung cancer (N = 14 or IPNs (N = 15 and one metastatic nodule. 68Ga-DOTATATE SUVmax levels at or above 1.5 were considered likely malignant. We analyzed the scan results, correlating with ultimate diagnosis via biopsy or 2-year chest CT follow-up. We also correlated 68Ga-DOTATATE uptake with immunohistochemical (IHC staining for SSTR subtype 2A (SSTR2A in pathological specimens.We analyzed 31 lesions in 30 individuals, with 14 (45% being non-neuroendocrine lung cancers and 1 (3% being metastatic disease. McNemar's result comparing the two radiopharmaceuticals (p = 0.65 indicates that their accuracy of diagnosis in this indication are equivalent. 68Ga-DOTATATE was more specific (94% compared to 81% and less sensitive 73% compared to 93% than 18F-FDG. 68Ga-DOTATATE uptake correlated with SSTR2A expression in tumor stroma determined by immunohistochemical (IHC staining in 5 of 9 (55% NSCLCs.68Ga-DOTATATE and 18F-FDG PET/CT had equivalent accuracy in the diagnosis of non-neuroendocrine lung cancer and 68Ga-DOTATATE was more specific than 18F-FDG for the diagnosis of IPNs. IHC staining for SSTR2A receptor expression correlated with

  14. Localization of Hidden Insulinomas with ⁶⁸Ga-DOTA-Exendin-4 PET/CT: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antwi, Kwadwo; Fani, Melpomeni; Nicolas, Guillaume; Rottenburger, Christof; Heye, Tobias; Reubi, Jean Claude; Gloor, Beat; Christ, Emanuel; Wild, Damian

    2015-07-01

    (111)In-DOTA-exendin-4 SPECT/CT has been shown to be highly efficient in the detection of insulinomas. We aimed at determining whether novel PET/CT imaging with [Nle(14),Lys(40)(Ahx-DOTA-(68)Ga)NH2]exendin-4 ((68)Ga-DOTA-exendin-4) is feasible and sensitive in detecting benign insulinomas. (68)Ga-DOTA-exendin-4 PET/CT and (111)In-DOTA-exendin-4 SPECT/CT were performed in a randomized cross-over order on 5 patients with endogenous hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia. The gold standard for comparison was the histologic diagnosis after surgery. In 4 patients histologic diagnosis confirmed a benign insulinoma, whereas one patient refused surgery despite a positive (68)Ga-DOTA-exendin-4 PET/CT scan. In 4 of 5 patients, previously performed conventional imaging (CT or MR imaging) was not able to localize the insulinoma. (68)Ga-DOTA-exendin-4 PET/CT correctly identified the insulinoma in 4 of 4 patients, whereas (111)In-DOTA-exendin-4 SPECT/CT correctly identified the insulinoma in only 2 of 4 patients. These preliminary data suggest that the use of (68)Ga-DOTA-exendin-4 PET/CT in detecting hidden insulinomas is feasible. © 2015 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  15. Molecular imaging of neuroendocrine tumors using 68Ga-labeled peptides (Somatostatin receptor PET/CT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baum, R.P.; Prasad, V.; Hoersch, D.

    2009-01-01

    Receptor PET/CT using 68 Ga-labeled somatostatin analogues (DOTA-NOC, DOTA-TOC or DOTA-TATE) enables the highly sensitive molecular imaging of neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) based on the expression of somatostatin receptors and even the detection of receptor subtypes. Our experience after more than 3000 studies shows that receptor PET/CT has a significantly higher tumor detection rate than conventional scintigraphy (even in SPECT/CT technique), and that tumor lesions can be very accurately localized. By calculating standardized uptake values (SUV) - which are reproducible and investigator-independent - patients can be selected for peptide receptor radiotherapy and also the course after therapy can be controlled. Receptor-PET/CT is the most sensitive imaging modality for the detection of unknown primary tumors (CUP syndrome), which is especially true for the detection of neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas and small bowel; whole-body staging (''one stop shop'') as well as restaging and selection of patients for peptide receptor radiotherapy can be performed using a patient-friendly procedure (examination finished within one hour) exposing the patient to less radiation than whole-body CT scanning. The 68 Ge/ 68 Ga generator has proved very reliable over the years - even in a hospital environment. The effective costs for 68 Ga labeled somatostatin analogues might be less than for scintigraphic agents, provided a certain number of studies per year are performed. The development of new tumor-specific peptides as well as of other DOTA- or NOTA-coupled radiopharmaceuticals opens a new avenue into the future: finally, the 68 Ga generator could play a similar important role for PET/CT as did the 99m Tc-Generator for conventional gamma camera imaging over the last decades. (orig.)

  16. Ga-67 tumor scan in malignant diffuse mesothelioma. Comparison with CT and pathological findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Shoji; Fukumoto, Mitsutaka; Motohara, Tomofumi; Oobayashi, Kayoko; Takada, Yoshiki; Tsubota, Noriaki; Sashikata, Terumasa

    1999-01-01

    Malignant diffuse mesothelioma is characterized by more difficult diagnosis and worse prognosis than other pleural tumors. In the Department of Thoracic Surgery, Hyogo Medical Center for Adults, 11 patients underwent panpleuropneumonectomy for this disease between January, 1988 and March, 1993. In 7 of these cases, Ga-67 scans were obtained before the operation. To clarify the factors affecting Ga-67 uptake in the pleural tumor, we compared Ga-67 uptake on the involved side of the thorax with CT and the pathological findings of the tumor. Regarding the use of Ga-67 scan imaging for the diagnosis of this disease, a number of related findings must be considered, such as an encircled wide Ga-67 uptake in the thickened pleural involvement and a diffuse slight Ga-67 uptake on the affected side with very slight involvement of the pleura. When the involved pleural thickness was over 6 mm, a definite correlation was found between the degree of Ga-67 uptake and the macroscopic thickness of mesothelioma in resected specimens. Thickness of the pleura on CT images demonstrates the real tumor thickness in the case of thickened involvement but in the case of thin involvement the real thickness of active mesothelioma could not be identified. No definite correlation was found between the degree of Ga-67 uptake and the histological type, or among microscopic findings, such as the extent of tumor parenchyma, interstitial volume and tumor vascularity. Our results suggest that the Ga-67 scan is very useful for revealing the extent of pleural involvement, especially when this involvement is more than 6 mm thick. (author)

  17. Ga-67 tumor scan in malignant diffuse mesothelioma. Comparison with CT and pathological findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Shoji; Fukumoto, Mitsutaka [Kochi Medical School, Nankoku (Japan); Motohara, Tomofumi; Oobayashi, Kayoko; Takada, Yoshiki; Tsubota, Noriaki; Sashikata, Terumasa

    1999-02-01

    Malignant diffuse mesothelioma is characterized by more difficult diagnosis and worse prognosis than other pleural tumors. In the Department of Thoracic Surgery, Hyogo Medical Center for Adults, 11 patients underwent panpleuropneumonectomy for this disease between January, 1988 and March, 1993. In 7 of these cases, Ga-67 scans were obtained before the operation. To clarify the factors affecting Ga-67 uptake in the pleural tumor, we compared Ga-67 uptake on the involved side of the thorax with CT and the pathological findings of the tumor. Regarding the use of Ga-67 scan imaging for the diagnosis of this disease, a number of related findings must be considered, such as an encircled wide Ga-67 uptake in the thickened pleural involvement and a diffuse slight Ga-67 uptake on the affected side with very slight involvement of the pleura. When the involved pleural thickness was over 6 mm, a definite correlation was found between the degree of Ga-67 uptake and the macroscopic thickness of mesothelioma in resected specimens. Thickness of the pleura on CT images demonstrates the real tumor thickness in the case of thickened involvement but in the case of thin involvement the real thickness of active mesothelioma could not be identified. No definite correlation was found between the degree of Ga-67 uptake and the histological type, or among microscopic findings, such as the extent of tumor parenchyma, interstitial volume and tumor vascularity. Our results suggest that the Ga-67 scan is very useful for revealing the extent of pleural involvement, especially when this involvement is more than 6 mm thick. (author)

  18. Associations of TNFα -308G>A, TNFα -238G>A, IL-1α -889C>T and IL-10 -1082G>A Genetic Polymorphisms with Atopic Diseases: Asthma, Rhinitis and Dermatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Babić, Željka; Sabolić Pipinić, Ivana; Varnai, Veda Marija; Kežić, Sanja; Macan, Jelena

    2016-01-01

    Polymorphisms of cytokine genes are an interesting focus for association studies involving atopic diseases due to their role in immune cell communications during inflammation. The aim of this study was to investigate associations of TNFα -308G>A, TNFα -238G>A, IL-1α -889C>T and IL-10 -1082G>A

  19. Diagnostic sensitivity of Tc-99m HYNIC PSMA SPECT/CT in prostate carcinoma: A comparative analysis with Ga-68 PSMA PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawal, Ismaheel O; Ankrah, Alfred O; Mokgoro, Neo P; Vorster, Mariza; Maes, Alex; Sathekge, Mike M

    2017-08-01

    Emerging data from published studies are demonstrating the superiority of Ga-68 PSMA PET/CT imaging in prostate cancer. However, the low yield of the Ge-68/Ga-68 from which Gallium-68 is obtained and fewer installed PET/CT systems compared to the SPECT imaging systems may limit its availability. We, therefore, evaluated in a head-to-head comparison, the diagnostic sensitivity of Ga-68 PSMA PET/CT and Tc-99m PSMA SPECT/CT in patients with prostate cancer. A total of 14 patients with histologically confirmed prostate cancer were prospectively recruited to undergo Ga-68 PSMA PET/CT and Tc-99m HYNIC PSMA SPECT/CT. The mean age of patients was 67.21 ± 8.15 years and the median PSA level was 45.18 ng/mL (range = 1.51-687 ng/mL). SUVmax of all lesions and the size of lymph nodes with PSMA avidity on Ga-68 PSMA PET/CT were determined. Proportions of these lesions detected on Tc-99m HYNIC PSMA SPECT/CT read independent of PET/CT findings were determined. A total of 46 lesions were seen on Ga-68 PSMA PET/CT localized to the prostate (n = 10), lymph nodes (n = 24), and bones (n = 12). Of these, Tc-99m HYNIC PSMA SPECT/CT detected 36 lesions: Prostate = 10/10 (100%), lymph nodes = 15/24 (62.5%), and bones = 11/12 (91.7%) with an overall sensitivity of 78.3%. Lesions detected on Tc-99m HYNIC PSMA SPECT/CT were bigger in size (P Tc-99m HYNIC PSMA SPECT/CT. In a univariate analysis, Lymph node size (P = 0.033) and the SUVmax of all lesions (P = 0.007) were significant predictors of lesion detection on Tc-99m HYNIC PSMA SPECT/CT. Tc-99m HYNIC PSMA may be a useful in imaging of prostate cancer although with a lower sensitivity for lesion detection compared to Ga-68 PSMA PET/CT. Its use is recommended when Ga-68 PSMA is not readily available, in planning radio-guided surgery or the patient is being considered for radio-ligand therapy with Lu-177 PSMA. It performs poorly in detecting small-sized lesions hence its use is not recommended

  20. (68)Ga-PSMA-11 dynamic PET/CT imaging in biochemical relapse of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachpekidis, C; Eder, M; Kopka, K; Mier, W; Hadaschik, B A; Haberkorn, U; Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, A

    2016-07-01

    We aim to investigate the pharmacokinetics and distribution of the recently clinically introduced radioligand (68)Ga-PSMA-11 in men with recurrent prostate cancer (PC) by means of dynamic and whole-body PET/CT. The correlation between PSA levels and (68)Ga-PSMA-11 PET parameters is also investigated. 31 patients with biochemical failure after primary PC treatment with curative intent (median age 71.0 years) were enrolled in the analysis. The median PSA value was 2.0 ng/mL (range = 0.1 - 130.0 ng/mL) and the median Gleason score was 7 (range = 5 - 9). 8/31 (25.8 %) of the included patients had a PSA value dynamic PET/CT (dPET/CT) scanning (60 min) of the pelvis and lower abdomen as well as whole-body PET/CT with (68)Ga-PSMA-11. dPET/CT assessment was based on qualitative evaluation, SUV calculation, and quantitative analysis based on a two-tissue compartment model and a non-compartmental approach leading to the extraction of fractal dimension (FD). 22/31 patients (71.0 %) were (68)Ga-PSMA-11-positive, while 9/31 (29.0 %) patients were (68)Ga-PSMA-11-negative. The median PSA value in the (68)Ga-PSMA-11-positive group was significantly higher (median = 2.35 ng/mL; range = 0.19 - 130.0 ng/mL) than in the (68)Ga-PSMA-11-negative group (median value: 0.34 ng/mL; range = 0.10 - 4.20 ng/mL). A total of 76 lesions were semi-quantitatively evaluated. PC recurrence-associated lesions demonstrated a mean SUVaverage = 12.4 (median = 9.0; range = 2.2 - 84.5) and mean SUVmax = 18.8 (median = 14.1; range = 3.1 - 120.3). Dynamic PET/CT studies of the pelvis revealed the following mean values for the PC recurrence-suspicious lesions: K1 = 0.26, k3 = 0.30, influx = 0.14 and FD = 1.24. Time-activity curves derived from PC-recurrence indicative lesions revealed an increasing (68)Ga-PSMA-11 accumulation during dynamic PET acquisition. Correlation analysis revealed a moderate, but significant, correlation between PSA

  1. Evaluation of 68Ga-DOTATOC PET/MRI for whole-body staging of neuroendocrine tumours in comparison with 68Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawicki, Lino M; Deuschl, Cornelius; Beiderwellen, Karsten; Ruhlmann, Verena; Poeppel, Thorsten D; Heusch, Philipp; Lahner, Harald; Führer, Dagmar; Bockisch, Andreas; Herrmann, Ken; Forsting, Michael; Antoch, Gerald; Umutlu, Lale

    2017-10-01

    To compare the diagnostic performance of 68 Ga-DOTATOC PET/MRI and 68 Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT in the whole-body staging of patients with neuroendocrine tumours (NET). Thirty patients with histopathologically confirmed NET underwent PET/CT and PET/MRI in a single-injection protocol. PET/CT and PET/MRI scans were prospectively evaluated with regard to lesion count, localization, nature (NET/non-NET), and conspicuity (four-point scale). Histopathology and follow-up imaging served as the reference standards. The proportions of NET and non-NET lesions rated correctly were compared using McNemar's chi-squared test. The Wilcoxon test was used to assess differences in SUVmax and lesion conspicuity. The correlation between the SUVmax for the same lesions from each modality was analysed using Pearson's correlation coefficient (r). According to the reference standard, there were 197 lesions (142 NET, 55 non-NET). Lesion-based analysis showed a higher proportion of correctly rated NET lesions on PET/MRI than on PET/CT (90.8% vs. 86.7%, p = 0.031), whereas on PET/CT there was a higher proportion of correctly rated non-NET lesions (94.5% vs. 83.6%, p = 0.031). SUVmax was strongly correlated (r = 0.86; p PET/MRI (both p PET/MRI yielded a higher proportion of correctly rated NET lesions and should be regarded as a valuable alternative to 68 Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT in whole-body staging of NET patients. • 68 Ga-DOTATOC PET/MRI correctly identified more NET lesions than 68 Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT. • 68 Ga-DOTATOC PET/MRI provides better NET lesion conspicuity than 68 Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT. • SUVmax values from the two modalities are strongly correlated and do not differ significantly.

  2. 68Ga-PSMA-11 Dynamic PET/CT Imaging in Primary Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachpekidis, Christos; Kopka, Klaus; Eder, Matthias; Hadaschik, Boris A; Freitag, Martin T; Pan, Leyun; Haberkorn, Uwe; Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, Antonia

    2016-11-01

    The aim of our study is to assess the pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of Ga-PSMA-11 in patients suffering from primary prostate cancer (PC) by means of dynamic and whole-body PET/CT. Twenty-four patients with primary, previously untreated PC were enrolled in the study. All patients underwent dynamic PET/CT (dPET/CT) scanning of the pelvis and whole-body PET/CT studies with Ga-PSMA-11. The evaluation of dPET/CT studies was based on qualitative evaluation, SUV calculation, and quantitative analysis based on two-tissue compartment modeling and a noncompartmental approach leading to the extraction of fractal dimension (FD). A total of 23/24 patients (95.8%) were Ga-PSMA-11 positive. In 9/24 patients (37.5%), metastatic lesions were detected. PC-associated lesions demonstrated the following mean values: SUVaverage = 14.3, SUVmax = 23.4, K1 = 0.24 (1/min), k3 = 0.34 (1/min), influx = 0.15 (1/min), and FD = 1.27. The parameters SUVaverage, SUVmax, k3, influx, and FD derived from PC-associated lesions were significantly higher than respective values derived from reference prostate tissue. Time-activity curves derived from PC-associated lesions revealed an increasing Ga-PSMA-11 accumulation during dynamic PET acquisition. Correlation analysis revealed a moderate but significant correlation between PSA levels and SUVaverage (r = 0.60) and SUVmax (r = 0.57), and a weak but significant correlation between Gleason score and SUVaverage (r = 0.33) and SUVmax (r = 0.28). Ga-PSMA-11 PET/CT confirmed its capacity in detecting primary PC with a detection rate of 95.8%. Dynamic PET/CT studies of the pelvis revealed an increase in tracer uptake in PC-associated lesions during the 60 minutes of dynamic PET acquisition, a finding with potential applications in anti-PSMA approaches.

  3. Breast Fibroadenoma With Increased Activity on 68Ga DOTATATE PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, Georgios Z; Millo, Corina; Sadowski, Samira M; Karantanas, Apostolos H; Bagci, Ulas; Patronas, Nicholas J

    2017-02-01

    Fibroadenoma is the most common benign breast tumor in women of reproductive age, carrying little to no risk of breast cancer development. We report on a case of a woman with history of neuroendocrine tumor who on follow-up imaging tests underwent whole-body PET/CT study using Ga DOTATATE. The scan showed increased focal activity in the right breast, which was biopsied revealing a fibroadenoma. The presented data suggests cell surface overexpression of somatostatin receptors by this benign breast tumor. Moreover, this finding emphasizes the need for cautious interpretation of Ga DOTATATE-avid breast lesions that could mimic malignancy in neuroendocrine tumor patients.

  4. A Comparative 68Ga-Citrate and 68Ga-Chloride PET/CT Imaging of Staphylococcus aureus Osteomyelitis in the Rat Tibia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petteri Lankinen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available There may be some differences in the in vivo behavior of 68Ga-chloride and 68Ga-citrate leading to different accumulation profiles. This study compared 68Ga-citrate and 68Ga-chloride PET/CT imaging under standardized experimental models. Methods. Diffuse Staphylococcus aureus tibial osteomyelitis and uncomplicated bone healing rat models were used (n=32. Two weeks after surgery, PET/CT imaging was performed on consecutive days using 68Ga-citrate or 68Ga-chloride, and tissue accumulation was confirmed by ex vivo analysis. In addition, peripheral quantitative computed tomography and conventional radiography were performed. Osteomyelitis was verified by microbiological analysis and specimens were also processed for histomorphometry. Results. In PET/CT imaging, the SUVmax of 68Ga-chloride and 68Ga-citrate in the osteomyelitic tibias (3.6 ± 1.4 and 4.7 ± 1.5, resp. were significantly higher (P=0.0019 and P=0.0020, resp. than in the uncomplicated bone healing (2.7 ± 0.44 and 2.5 ± 0.49, resp.. In osteomyelitic tibias, the SUVmax of 68Ga-citrate was significantly higher than the uptake of 68Ga-chloride (P=0.0017. In animals with uncomplicated bone healing, no difference in the SUVmax of 68Ga-chloride or 68Ga-citrate was seen in the operated tibias. Conclusions. This study further corroborates the use of 68Ga-citrate for PET imaging of osteomyelitis.

  5. Long Distance Endovascular Growth of Jugulotympanic Paraganglioma Evident in 68Ga-DOTATATE PET but Concealed on CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avramovic, Nemanja; Weckesser, Matthias; Velasco, Aglaé; Stenner, Markus; Noto, Benjamin

    2017-02-01

    A 60-year-old woman was referred to contrast-enhanced CT for evaluation of jugular vein thrombosis incidentally detected by ultrasound. Contrast-enhanced CT showed an enhanced tumor of the right skull base highly suspicious of jugulotympanic paraganglioma. However, the jugular veins showed a nearly symmetric contrast enhancement without clear evidence of thrombosis. Consecutive Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT depicted high tumor uptake, which comprised the entire internal jugular vein. Endovascular growth of paraganglioma might be missed on contrast-enhanced CT because of high vascularization of the lesion. Ga-DOTATATE PET is suited for accurate determination of tumor extent.

  6. 68Ga DOTATATE PET/CT of Synchronous Meningioma and Prolactinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Sandip; Ranade, Rohit; Hazarika, Suman

    2016-03-01

    Ga DOTATATE PET/CT in noninvasive characterization of synchronous pituitary neoplasm and meningioma in a 38-year-old man is illustrated. The patient presented with an MRI-detected lobulated enhancing sellar-suprasellar mass with erosion of bony sella measuring 4.5 × 3.5 × 3.4 cm (with differential diagnosis with germ cell tumor) and a right parafalcine mass (2.7 × 2.6 cm) suggesting meningioma. Ga DOTATATE PET/CT demonstrated intense uptake in both lesions, suggesting the sellar mass to be pituitary macroadenoma. The finding of high serum prolactin and normal LH, FSH, cortisol, and testosterone levels suggested diagnosis of prolactinoma, and the patient was started on cabergoline.

  7. {sup 67}Ga-SPECT/CT with a hybrid system in the clinical management of lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palumbo, Barbara; Sivolella, Silvio; Palumbo, Renato [University of Perugia, Nuclear Medicine Section, Department of Radiological Sciences, Perugia (Italy); Palumbo, Isabella; Liberati, Anna Marina [University of Perugia, Internal Medicine and Oncology, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Perugia (Italy)

    2005-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the added value of co-registered fusion imaging using a hybrid system in patients with lymphoma. Twenty-four lymphoma patients underwent {sup 67}Ga-SPECT/CT using a hybrid tomograph consisting of a dual-head, variable-angle gamma camera and a low-dose X-ray tube. Results were compared with those of SPECT alone. Forty-five lesions were identified by SPECT alone, while 49 were detected by SPECT/CT. Forty out of the 45 lesions observed on SPECT were confirmed as lymphoma, but five were due to other causes (thoracic aorta blood pool activity, sialoadenitis in the submandibular gland, bowel activity, rib fracture and bone marrow activation due to radiotherapy). SPECT/CT identified nine more neoplastic lesions compared with SPECT alone: four areas of radiopharmaceutical accumulation were observed in para-aortic lymph nodes, three in the spleen, one in the liver and one in para-iliac lymph nodes. In five cases, SPECT/CT provided additional anatomical information over SPECT alone. In four patients, four large areas of {sup 67}Ga uptake (one mediastinal, two supraclavicular and one para-aortic) were better characterised; in one subject uptake was localised in the seventh thoracic vertebra only by SPECT/CT. Hybrid imaging provided additional data in 13 patients (54.2%), thus inducing oncologists to reconsider the therapeutic approach in eight subjects (33.2%): unnecessary treatment was avoided in four (16.6%) while therapy was altered in another four (16.6%). SPECT/CT hybrid system is able to provide information not obtained by SPECT alone. It allows the anatomical localisation of lymphoma and physiological radiopharmaceutical uptake, facilitates the diagnosis of tumours located in the abdomen (subdiaphragmatic lesions) and provides information that may cause a change in therapeutic strategy. (orig.)

  8. [68Ga]-DOTATOC-PET/CT for meningioma IMRT treatment planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bamberg Michael

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose The observation that human meningioma cells strongly express somatostatin receptor (SSTR 2 was the rationale to analyze retrospectively in how far DOTATOC PET/CT is helpful to improve target volume delineation for intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT. Patients and Methods In 26 consecutive patients with preferentially skull base meningioma, diagnostic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and planning-computed tomography (CT was complemented with data from [68Ga]-DOTA-D Phe1-Tyr3-Octreotide (DOTATOC-PET/CT. Image fusion of PET/CT, diagnostic computed tomography, MRI and radiotherapy planning CT as well as target volume delineation was performed with OTP-Masterplan®. Initial gross tumor volume (GTV definition was based on MRI data only and was secondarily complemented with DOTATOC-PET information. Irradiation was performed as EUD based IMRT, using the Hyperion Software package. Results The integration of the DOTATOC data led to additional information concerning tumor extension in 17 of 26 patients (65%. There were major changes of the clinical target volume (CTV which modify the PTV in 14 patients, minor changes were realized in 3 patients. Overall the GTV-MRI/CT was larger than the GTV-PET in 10 patients (38%, smaller in 13 patients (50% and almost the same in 3 patients (12%. Most of the adaptations were performed in close vicinity to bony skull base structures or after complex surgery. Median GTV based on MRI was 18.1 cc, based on PET 25.3 cc and subsequently the CTV was 37.4 cc. Radiation planning and treatment of the DOTATOC-adapted volumes was feasible. Conclusion DOTATOC-PET/CT information may strongly complement patho-anatomical data from MRI and CT in cases with complex meningioma and is thus helpful for improved target volume delineation especially for skull base manifestations and recurrent disease after surgery.

  9. 18F-DOPA PET/CT and 68Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT scans as diagnostic tools in focal congenital hyperinsulinism: a blinded evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, Charlotte Dahl; Petersen, Henrik; Nielsen, Anne Lerberg; Detlefsen, Sönke; Brusgaard, Klaus; Rasmussen, Lars; Melikyan, Maria; Ekström, Klas; Globa, Evgenia; Rasmussen, Annett Helleskov; Hovendal, Claus; Christesen, Henrik Thybo

    2018-02-01

    Focal congenital hyperinsulinism (CHI) is curable by surgery, which is why identification of the focal lesion is crucial. We aimed to determine the use of 18F-fluoro-dihydroxyphenylalanine (18F-DOPA) PET/CT vs. 68Ga-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic-acid-1-Nal3-octreotide (68Ga-DOTANOC) PET/CT as diagnostic tools in focal CHI. PET/CT scans of children with CHI admitted to Odense University Hospital between August 2005 and June 2016 were retrospectively evaluated visually and by their maximal standardized uptake values (SUV max ) by two independent examiners, blinded for clinical, surgical and pathological data. Pancreatic histology was used as the gold standard. For patients without surgery, the genetic profile served as the gold standard. Fifty-five CHI patients were examined by PET/CT (18F-DOPA n = 53, 68Ga-DOTANOC n = 18). Surgery was performed in 34 patients, no surgery in 21 patients. Fifty-one patients had a classifiable outcome, either by histology (n = 33, 22 focal lesions, 11 non-focal) or by genetics (n = 18, all non-focal). The predictive performance of 18F-DOPA PET/CT to identify focal CHI was identical by visual- and cut-off-based evaluation: sensitivity (95% CI) of 1 (0.85-1); specificity of 0.96 (0.82-0.99). The optimal 18F-DOPA PET SUV max ratio cut-off was 1.44 and the optimal 68Ga-DOTANOC PET SUV max cut-off was 6.77 g/ml. The area under the receiver operating curve was 0.98 (0.93-1) for 18F-DOPA PET vs. 0.71 (0.43-0.95) for 68Ga-DOTANOC PET (p PET/CT and 68Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT, respectively. 18F-DOPA PET/CT was excellent in predicting focal CHI and superior compared to 68Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT. Further use of 68GA-DOTANOC PET/CT in predicting focal CHI is discouraged.

  10. 18F-DOPA PET/CT and 68Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT scans as diagnostic tools in focal congenital hyperinsulinism. A blinded evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahl Christiansen, Charlotte; Helleskov Rasmussen, Annett; Petersen, Henrik; Lerberg Nielsen, Anne; Detlefsen, Soenke; Brusgaard, Klaus; Rasmussen, Lars; Hovendal, Claus; Melikyan, Maria; Ekstroem, Klas; Globa, Evgenia; Christesen, Henrik Thybo

    2018-01-01

    Focal congenital hyperinsulinism (CHI) is curable by surgery, which is why identification of the focal lesion is crucial. We aimed to determine the use of 18F-fluoro-dihydroxyphenylalanine (18F-DOPA) PET/CT vs. 68Ga-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic-acid-1-Nal3 -octreotide (68Ga-DOTANOC) PET/CT as diagnostic tools in focal CHI. PET/CT scans of children with CHI admitted to Odense University Hospital between August 2005 and June 2016 were retrospectively evaluated visually and by their maximal standardized uptake values (SUV max ) by two independent examiners, blinded for clinical, surgical and pathological data. Pancreatic histology was used as the gold standard. For patients without surgery, the genetic profile served as the gold standard. Fifty-five CHI patients were examined by PET/CT (18F-DOPA n = 53, 68Ga-DOTANOC n = 18). Surgery was performed in 34 patients, no surgery in 21 patients. Fifty-one patients had a classifiable outcome, either by histology (n = 33, 22 focal lesions, 11 non-focal) or by genetics (n = 18, all non-focal). The predictive performance of 18F-DOPA PET/CT to identify focal CHI was identical by visual- and cut-off-based evaluation: sensitivity (95% CI) of 1 (0.85-1); specificity of 0.96 (0.82-0.99). The optimal 18F-DOPA PET SUV max ratio cut-off was 1.44 and the optimal 68Ga-DOTANOC PET SUV max cut-off was 6.77 g/ml. The area under the receiver operating curve was 0.98 (0.93-1) for 18F-DOPA PET vs. 0.71 (0.43-0.95) for 68Ga-DOTANOC PET (p < 0.03). In patients subjected to surgery, localization of the focal lesion was correct in 91%, and 100%, by 18F-DOPA PET/CT and 68Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT, respectively. 18F-DOPA PET/CT was excellent in predicting focal CHI and superior compared to 68Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT. Further use of 68GA-DOTANOC PET/CT in predicting focal CHI is discouraged. (orig.)

  11. 18F-DOPA PET/CT and 68Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT scans as diagnostic tools in focal congenital hyperinsulinism. A blinded evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahl Christiansen, Charlotte; Helleskov Rasmussen, Annett [Hans Christian Andersen Children' s Hospital, Odense University Hospital, Odense (Denmark); University of Southern Denmark, Department of Clinical Research, Odense (Denmark); Petersen, Henrik; Lerberg Nielsen, Anne [Odense University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Odense (Denmark); Detlefsen, Soenke [University of Southern Denmark, Department of Clinical Research, Odense (Denmark); Odense University Hospital, Department of Pathology, Odense (Denmark); Brusgaard, Klaus [Odense University Hospital, Department of Clinical Genetics, Odense (Denmark); Rasmussen, Lars; Hovendal, Claus [Odense University Hospital, Department of Abdominal Surgery, Odense (Denmark); Melikyan, Maria [Endocrine Research Centre, Moscow (Russian Federation); Ekstroem, Klas [Karolinska Hospital, Astrid Lindgren Children' s Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden); Globa, Evgenia [MOH of Ukraine, Ukrainian Center of Endocrine Surgery, Endocrine Organs and Tissue Transplantation, Kyiv (Ukraine); Christesen, Henrik Thybo [Hans Christian Andersen Children' s Hospital, Odense University Hospital, Odense (Denmark); University of Southern Denmark, Department of Clinical Research, Odense (Denmark); Odense University Hospital, Odense Pancreas Center (OPAC), Odense (Denmark); Odense University Hospital, Department of Paediatrics, Odense C (Denmark)

    2018-02-15

    Focal congenital hyperinsulinism (CHI) is curable by surgery, which is why identification of the focal lesion is crucial. We aimed to determine the use of 18F-fluoro-dihydroxyphenylalanine (18F-DOPA) PET/CT vs. 68Ga-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic-acid-1-Nal3 -octreotide (68Ga-DOTANOC) PET/CT as diagnostic tools in focal CHI. PET/CT scans of children with CHI admitted to Odense University Hospital between August 2005 and June 2016 were retrospectively evaluated visually and by their maximal standardized uptake values (SUV{sub max}) by two independent examiners, blinded for clinical, surgical and pathological data. Pancreatic histology was used as the gold standard. For patients without surgery, the genetic profile served as the gold standard. Fifty-five CHI patients were examined by PET/CT (18F-DOPA n = 53, 68Ga-DOTANOC n = 18). Surgery was performed in 34 patients, no surgery in 21 patients. Fifty-one patients had a classifiable outcome, either by histology (n = 33, 22 focal lesions, 11 non-focal) or by genetics (n = 18, all non-focal). The predictive performance of 18F-DOPA PET/CT to identify focal CHI was identical by visual- and cut-off-based evaluation: sensitivity (95% CI) of 1 (0.85-1); specificity of 0.96 (0.82-0.99). The optimal 18F-DOPA PET SUV{sub max} ratio cut-off was 1.44 and the optimal 68Ga-DOTANOC PET SUV{sub max} cut-off was 6.77 g/ml. The area under the receiver operating curve was 0.98 (0.93-1) for 18F-DOPA PET vs. 0.71 (0.43-0.95) for 68Ga-DOTANOC PET (p < 0.03). In patients subjected to surgery, localization of the focal lesion was correct in 91%, and 100%, by 18F-DOPA PET/CT and 68Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT, respectively. 18F-DOPA PET/CT was excellent in predicting focal CHI and superior compared to 68Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT. Further use of 68GA-DOTANOC PET/CT in predicting focal CHI is discouraged. (orig.)

  12. A case of positive 68Ga-DOTATOC-PET/CT pancreatic heterotopia mimicking an intestinal neuroendocrine tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilli, Alessandra; Fanetti, Ilaria; Conte, Dario; Massironi, Sara

    Gallium-68 DOTA-peptide positron emission tomography/computed tomography ( 68 Ga-PET/CT) has emerged as a promising tool for the diagnosis and staging of gastro-entero-pancreatic neoplasms, thanks to its high sensitivity and specificity. Heterotopic pancreas, which is relatively rare, has never been reported as a possible cause of false positives of 68 Ga-PET/CT. We report on the first case of a heterotopic pancreas showing pathological uptake at 68 Ga-PET/CT, thus mimicking an intestinal neuroendocrine tumor. The present case suggests that heterotopic pancreas should be included among the possible causes of false positives at 68 Ga PET. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. PET/CT comparing 68Ga-DOTATATE and other radiopharmaceuticals and in comparison with CT/MRI for the localization of sporadic metastatic pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janssen, Ingo; Chen, Clara C.; Millo, Corina M.; Herscovitch, Peter; Ling, Alexander; Taieb, David; Lin, Frank I.; Adams, Karen T.; Wolf, Katherine I.; Pacak, Karel; Fojo, Antonio T.; Buchmann, Inga; Kebebew, Electron

    2016-01-01

    Pheochromocytomas/paragangliomas (PPGLs) and their metastases are tumors that predominantly express somatostatin receptor 2 (SSR2). 68 Ga-DOTA(0)-Tyr(3)-octreotate ( 68 Ga-DOTATATE) is a PET radiopharmaceutical with both high and selective affinity for SSRs. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the utility of 68 Ga-DOTATATE in comparison with other specific and nonspecific radiopharmaceuticals recommended in the current guidelines for the localization of metastatic sporadic PPGL by PET/CT. This prospective study included 22 patients (15 men, 7 women; aged 50.0 ± 13.9 years) with confirmed metastatic PPGL, a negative family history for PPGL, and negative genetic testing, who underwent 68 Ga-DOTATATE, 18 F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ( 18 F-FDG) PET/CT, and CT/MRI. Only 12 patients underwent an additional 18 F-fluorodihydroxyphenylalanine ( 18 F-FDOPA) PET/CT scan and only 11 patients underwent an additional 18 F-fluorodopamine ( 18 F-FDA) PET/CT scan. The rates of detection of metastatic lesions were compared among all the imaging studies. A composite of all functional and anatomical imaging studies served as the imaging comparator. 68 Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT showed a lesion-based detection rate of 97.6 % (95 % confidence interval, CI, 95.8 - 98.7 %). 18 F-FDG PET/CT, 18 F-FDOPA PET/CT, 18 F-FDA PET/CT, and CT/MRI showed detection rates of 49.2 % (CI 44.5 - 53.6 %; p < 0.01), 74.8 % (CI 69.0 - 79.9 %; p < 0.01), 77.7 % (CI 71.5 - 82.8 %; p < 0.01), and 81.6 % (CI 77.8 - 84.8 %; p < 0.01), respectively. The results of this study demonstrate the superiority of 68 Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT in the localization of sporadic metastatic PPGLs compared to all other functional and anatomical imaging modalities, and suggest modification of future guidelines towards this new imaging modality. (orig.)

  14. Multicenter comparison of 18F-FDG and 68Ga-DOTA-peptide PET/CT for pulmonary carcinoid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lococo, Filippo; Perotti, Germano; Cardillo, Giuseppe; De Waure, Chiara; Filice, Angelina; Graziano, Paolo; Rossi, Giulio; Sgarbi, Giorgio; Stefanelli, Antonella; Giordano, Alessandro; Granone, Pierluigi; Rindi, Guido; Versari, Annibale; Rufini, Vittoria

    2015-03-01

    The aims of this study were to retrospectively evaluate and compare the detection rate (DR) of 68Ga-DOTA-peptide and 18F-FDG PET/CT in the preoperative workup of patients with pulmonary carcinoid (PC) and to assess the utility of various functional indices obtained with the 2 tracers in predicting the histological characterization of PC, that is, typical versus atypical. Thirty-three consecutive patients with confirmed PC referred for 18F-FDG and 68Ga-DOTA-peptide PET/CT in 2 centers between January 2009 and April 2013 were included. The semiquantitative evaluation included the SUV max, the SUV of the tumor relative to the maximal liver uptake for 18F-FDG (SUV T/L) or the maximal spleen uptake for 68Ga-DOTA-peptides (SUV T/S), the ratio between SUV max of 68Ga-DOTA-peptides PET/CT, and the SUV max of 18F-FDG PET/CT (SUV max ratio). Histology was used as reference standard. Definitive diagnosis consisted of 23 typical carcinoids (TCs) and 10 atypical carcinoids. 18F-FDG PET/CT was positive in 18 cases and negative in 15 (55% DR). 68Ga-DOTA-peptide PET/CT was positive in 26 cases and negative in 7 (79% DR). In the subgroup analysis, 68Ga-DOTA-peptide PET/CT was superior in detecting TC (91% DR; P DOTA-peptide PET/CT findings. In the subgroup analysis, the SUV max ratio seems to be the most accurate index in predicting TC. Both methods should be performed when PC is suspected or when the histological subtype is undefined.

  15. Ga-68 Somatostatin Receptor PET/CT in von Hippel-Lindau Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Jong-Ryool; Min, Jung-Joon [Chonnam National Univ. Hwasun Hospital, Hwasun (Korea, Republic of); Kulkarui, Harshad; Carreras, Cecilia; Schalch, Georg; Baum, Richard P. [Nuclear Medicine and Center for PET/CT, Zentralk Bad Berka, Bad Verka (Germany)

    2012-06-15

    Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease is a dominantly inherited familial cancer syndrome with a variety of benign and malignant tumors such as retinal and central nervous system hemangioblastomas, endolymphatic sac tumors, renalcysts and tumors, pancreatic cysts and tumors, pheochromo-cytomas, and epididymal cystadenomas. Cross-sectional mo-dalities (computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging) as well as ultrasound play a major role in the initial evaluation and follow-up of the various manifestations of VHL disease. Ga-68-labeled somatostatin receptor analogs already have a significant role in the diagnosis, staging, and therapy management of neuroendocrine neoplasms and neural crest tumors. Herein, we report a case presenting a variety of malignancies in VHL and showing the usefulness of Ga-68 somatostatin receptor PET/CT as a one-stop-shop imaging modality in the management of VHL disease.

  16. Ga-68 Somatostatin Receptor PET/CT in von Hippel-Lindau Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Jong-Ryool; Min, Jung-Joon; Kulkarui, Harshad; Carreras, Cecilia; Schalch, Georg; Baum, Richard P.

    2012-01-01

    Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease is a dominantly inherited familial cancer syndrome with a variety of benign and malignant tumors such as retinal and central nervous system hemangioblastomas, endolymphatic sac tumors, renalcysts and tumors, pancreatic cysts and tumors, pheochromo-cytomas, and epididymal cystadenomas. Cross-sectional mo-dalities (computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging) as well as ultrasound play a major role in the initial evaluation and follow-up of the various manifestations of VHL disease. Ga-68-labeled somatostatin receptor analogs already have a significant role in the diagnosis, staging, and therapy management of neuroendocrine neoplasms and neural crest tumors. Herein, we report a case presenting a variety of malignancies in VHL and showing the usefulness of Ga-68 somatostatin receptor PET/CT as a one-stop-shop imaging modality in the management of VHL disease

  17. Breast fibroadenoma with increased activity on 68Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, Georgios Z.; Millo, Corina; Sadowski, Samira M.; Karantanas, Apostolos H.; Bagci, Ulas; Patronas, Nicholas J.

    2016-01-01

    Fibroadenoma is the most common benign breast tumor in women of reproductive age, carrying little to no risk of breast cancer development. We report on a case of a woman with history of neuroendocrine tumor (NET), who on follow-up imaging tests underwent whole-body PET/CT study using 68Ga-DOTATATE. The scan showed increased focal activity in the right breast, which was biopsied revealing a fibroadenoma. The presented data suggests cell surface over-expression of somatostatin receptors (SSTRs) by this benign breast tumor. Moreover, this finding emphasizes the need for cautious interpretation of 68Ga-DOTATATE avid breast lesions which could mimic malignancy in NET patients. PMID:27879489

  18. 18F-DOPA PET/CT and 68Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT scans as diagnostic tools in focal congenital hyperinsulinism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Charlotte Dahl; Petersen, Henrik; Nielsen, Anne Lerberg

    2018-01-01

    (68Ga-DOTANOC) PET/CT as diagnostic tools in focal CHI. Methods: PET/CT scans of children with CHI admitted to Odense University Hospital between August 2005 and June 2016 were retrospectively evaluated visually and by their maximal standardized uptake values (SUVmax) by two independent examiners......, blinded for clinical, surgical and pathological data. Pancreatic histology was used as the gold standard. For patients without surgery, the genetic profile served as the gold standard. Results: Fifty-five CHI patients were examined by PET/CT (18F-DOPA n = 53, 68Ga-DOTANOC n = 18). Surgery was performed...... in 34 patients, no surgery in 21 patients. Fifty-one patients had a classifiable outcome, either by histology (n = 33, 22 focal lesions, 11 non-focal) or by genetics (n = 18, all non-focal). The predictive performance of 18F-DOPA PET/CT to identify focal CHI was identical by visual- and cut...

  19. Automatic delineation of functional lung volumes with 68Ga-ventilation/perfusion PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Roux, Pierre-Yves; Siva, Shankar; Callahan, Jason; Claudic, Yannis; Bourhis, David; Steinfort, Daniel P; Hicks, Rodney J; Hofman, Michael S

    2017-10-10

    Functional volumes computed from 68 Ga-ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) PET/CT, which we have shown to correlate with pulmonary function test parameters (PFTs), have potential diagnostic utility in a variety of clinical applications, including radiotherapy planning. An automatic segmentation method would facilitate delineation of such volumes. The aim of this study was to develop an automated threshold-based approach to delineate functional volumes that best correlates with manual delineation. Thirty lung cancer patients undergoing both V/Q PET/CT and PFTs were analyzed. Images were acquired following inhalation of Galligas and, subsequently, intravenous administration of 68 Ga-macroaggreted-albumin (MAA). Using visually defined manual contours as the reference standard, various cutoff values, expressed as a percentage of the maximal pixel value, were applied. The average volume difference and Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) were calculated, measuring the similarity of the automatic segmentation and the reference standard. Pearson's correlation was also calculated to compare automated volumes with manual volumes, and automated volumes optimized to PFT indices. For ventilation volumes, mean volume difference was lowest (- 0.4%) using a 15%max threshold with Pearson's coefficient of 0.71. Applying this cutoff, median DSC was 0.93 (0.87-0.95). Nevertheless, limits of agreement in volume differences were large (- 31.0 and 30.2%) with differences ranging from - 40.4 to + 33.0%. For perfusion volumes, mean volume difference was lowest and Pearson's coefficient was highest using a 15%max threshold (3.3% and 0.81, respectively). Applying this cutoff, median DSC was 0.93 (0.88-0.93). Nevertheless, limits of agreement were again large (- 21.1 and 27.8%) with volume differences ranging from - 18.6 to + 35.5%. Using the 15%max threshold, moderate correlation was demonstrated with FEV1/FVC (r = 0.48 and r = 0.46 for ventilation and perfusion images, respectively

  20. Avascular necrosis of the hips with increased activity on 68Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, Georgios Z.; Millo, Corina; Karantanas, Apostolos H.; Bagci, Ulas; Patronas, Nicholas J.

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged exposure to cortisol is one of the major causes of avascular bone necrosis (AVN). We report on a case of a woman with Cushing’s syndrome attributed to ectopic ACTH secreting tumor who was evaluated with whole body PET/CT study using 68Ga-DOTATATE. The scan showed increased activity by both femoral heads, corresponding to the margins of bilateral AVN seen on MRI. The presented data suggests AVN-induced reactive inflammatory alterations adjacent to the necrotic segment of the bone which can be effectively targeted using radiolabeled somatostatin (SST) analogues. PMID:28033218

  1. Molecular imaging with 68Ga-SSTR PET/CT and correlation to immunohistochemistry of somatostatin receptors in neuroendocrine tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaemmerer, Daniel; Haugvik, Sven-Petter; Hommann, Merten; Peter, Luisa; Lupp, Amelie; Schulz, Stefan; Saenger, Joerg; Prasad, Vikas; Kulkarni, Harshad; Baum, Richard Paul

    2011-01-01

    Somatostatin receptors (SSTR) are known for an overexpression in gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumours (GEP-NET). The aim of the present study was to find out if the receptor density predicted by the semi-quantitative parameters generated from the static positron emission tomography (PET/CT) correlated with the in vitro immunohistochemistry using a novel rabbit monoclonal anti-SSTR2A antibody (clone UMB-1) for specific SSTR2A immunohistochemistry and polyclonal antibodies for SSTR1 and 3-5. Overall 14 surgical specimens generated from 34 histologically documented GEP-NET patients were correlated with the preoperative 68 Ga-DOTA-NOC PET/CT. Quantitative assessment of the receptor density was done using the immunoreactive score (IRS) of Remmele and Stegner; the additional 4-point IRS classification for immunohistochemistry and standardized uptake values (SUV max and SUV mean ) were used for PET/CT. The IRS for SSTR2A and SSTR5 correlated highly significant with the SUV max on the PET/CT (p mean (p max on the 68 Ga-DOTA-NOC PET/CT scans is concordant with the affinity profile of 68 Ga-DOTA-NOC to the SSTR subtypes and demonstrates the excellent qualification of somatostatin analogues in the diagnostics of NET. This study correlating somatostatin receptor imaging using 68 Ga-DOTA-NOC PET/CT with immunohistochemically analysed SSTR also underlines the approval of therapy using somatostatin analogues, follow-up imaging as well as radionuclide therapy. (orig.)

  2. Comparison of 68Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT and contrast-enhanced CT in localisation of tumours in ectopic ACTH syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadhav, Swati S; Lila, Anurag R; Kasaliwal, Rajeev; Khare, Shruti; Yerawar, Chaitanya G; Hira, Priya; Phadke, Uday; Shah, Hina; Lele, Vikram R; Malhotra, Gaurav; Bandgar, Tushar; Shah, Nalini S

    2016-01-01

    Background Localising ectopic adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) syndrome (EAS) tumour source is challenging. Somatostatin receptor-based PET imaging has shown promising results, but the data is limited to case reports and small case series. We reviewed here the performance of 68Ga-DOTANOC positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) and contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) in our cohort of 12 consecutive EAS patients. Materials and methods Retrospective data analysis of 12 consecutive patients of EAS presenting to a single tertiary care centre in a period between January 2013 and December 2014 was done. CECT and 68Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT were reported (blinded) by an experienced radiologist and a nuclear medicine physician, respectively. The performance of CECT and 68Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT was compared. Results Tumours could be localised in 11 out of 12 patients at initial presentation (overt cases), whereas in one patient, tumour remained occult. Thirteen lesions were identified in 11 patients as EAS source (true positives). CECT localised 12 out of these 13 lesions (sensitivity 92.3%) and identified five false-positive lesions (positive predictive value (PPV) 70.5%). Compared with false-positive lesions, true-positive lesions had greater mean contrast enhancement at 60s (33.2 vs 5.6 Hounsfield units (HU)). 68Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT was able to identify 9 out of 13 lesions (sensitivity 69.2%) and reported no false-positive lesions (PPV 100%). Conclusion CECT remains the first-line investigation in localisation of EAS. The contrast enhancement pattern on CECT can further aid in characterisation of the lesions. 68Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT can be added to CECT, to enhance positive prediction of the suggestive lesions. PMID:27006371

  3. Potential impact of {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT on stereotactic radiotherapy planning of meningiomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nyuyki, Fonyuy; Plotkin, Michail; Michel, Roger; Steffen, Ingo; Fahdt, Daniel; Brenner, Winfried [Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department for Nuclear Medicine, Berlin (Germany); Graf, Reinhold [Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department for Radiation Therapy, Campus Virchow, Berlin (Germany); Denecke, Timm [Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department for Radiology, Campus Virchow, Berlin (Germany); Geworski, Lilli [Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department for Nuclear Medicine, Berlin (Germany); Medizinische Hochschule Hannover, Department for Radiation Safety and Medical Physics, Hannover (Germany); Wurm, Reinhard [Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department for Radiation Therapy, Campus Virchow, Berlin (Germany); Klinikum Frankfurt (Oder), Department for Radiation Therapy and Radiooncology, Frankfurt (Germany)

    2010-02-15

    Since meningiomas show a high expression of somatostatin receptor subtype 2, PET with {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC was proposed as an additional imaging modality beside CT and MRI for planning radiotherapy. We investigated the input of {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC-PET/CT on the definition of the ''gross tumour volume'' (GTV) in meningiomas, in order to assess the potential value of this method. Prior to radiotherapy, 42 patients with meningiomas (26 f, 16 m, mean age 55) underwent MRI and {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC-PET/CT examinations. History: operated n = 24, radiotherapy n = 1, operation and radiotherapy n = 8, no treatment n = 9. PET/CT and MRI data were co-registered using a BrainLAB workstation. For comparison, the GTV was defined first under consideration of CT and MRI data, then using PET data. 3/42 patients were excluded from the analysis (two with negative PET results, one with an extensive tumour, not precisely delineable by MRI or PET/CT). The average GTV{sub CT/MRI} was 22({+-}19)cm{sup 3}; GTV{sub PET} was 23({+-}20)cm{sup 3}. Additional GTV, obtained as a result of PET was 9({+-}10)cm{sup 3} and was observed in patients with osseous infiltration. In some pre-treated patients there were intratumoural areas (as identified in CT/MRI) without SR-expression (7({+-}11)cm{sup 3}). Common GTV as obtained by both CT/MRI and PET was 15({+-}14)cm{sup 3}. The mean bi-directional difference between the GTV{sub CT/MRI} and GTV{sub PET} accounted to 16({+-}15)cm{sup 3} (93%, p < 0.001). In a subgroup of seven patients with multiple meningiomas, PET showed a total of 19 lesions; nine of them were not recognizable by CT or MRI. {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC-PET enables delineation of SR-positive meningiomas and delivers additional information to both CT and MRI regarding the planning of stereotactic radiotherapy. The acquisition on a PET/CT scanner helps to estimate the relation of PET findings to anatomical structures and is especially useful for detection of osseous infiltration

  4. Evaluation of 68Ga-DOTATOC PET/MRI for whole-body staging of neuroendocrine tumours in comparison with 68Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawicki, Lino M.; Deuschl, Cornelius; Beiderwellen, Karsten; Forsting, Michael; Umutlu, Lale; Ruhlmann, Verena; Poeppel, Thorsten D.; Bockisch, Andreas; Herrmann, Ken; Heusch, Philipp; Antoch, Gerald; Lahner, Harald; Fuehrer, Dagmar

    2017-01-01

    To compare the diagnostic performance of 68 Ga-DOTATOC PET/MRI and 68 Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT in the whole-body staging of patients with neuroendocrine tumours (NET). Thirty patients with histopathologically confirmed NET underwent PET/CT and PET/MRI in a single-injection protocol. PET/CT and PET/MRI scans were prospectively evaluated with regard to lesion count, localization, nature (NET/non-NET), and conspicuity (four-point scale). Histopathology and follow-up imaging served as the reference standards. The proportions of NET and non-NET lesions rated correctly were compared using McNemar's chi-squared test. The Wilcoxon test was used to assess differences in SUVmax and lesion conspicuity. The correlation between the SUVmax for the same lesions from each modality was analysed using Pearson's correlation coefficient (r). According to the reference standard, there were 197 lesions (142 NET, 55 non-NET). Lesion-based analysis showed a higher proportion of correctly rated NET lesions on PET/MRI than on PET/CT (90.8% vs. 86.7%, p = 0.031), whereas on PET/CT there was a higher proportion of correctly rated non-NET lesions (94.5% vs. 83.6%, p = 0.031). SUVmax was strongly correlated (r = 0.86; p < 0.001) and did not differ significantly (p = 0.35) between the modalities. Overall conspicuity and NET lesion conspicuity were higher on PET/MRI (both p < 0.01). Ga-DOTATOC PET/MRI yielded a higher proportion of correctly rated NET lesions and should be regarded as a valuable alternative to 68 Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT in whole-body staging of NET patients. (orig.)

  5. Radiation exposure of patients during 68Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartmann, Holger; Freudenberg, R.; Oehme, L.; Andreeff, M.; Wunderlich, G.; Zoephel, K.; Eisenhofer, G.; Kotzerke, J.

    2009-01-01

    Investigation of the biodistribution and calculation of dosimetry of Ga-68-DOTATOC-for patients imaged in the routine clinical setting for diagnosis or exclusion of neuroendocrine tumours. Patients methods: Dynamic PET/CT-imaging (Biograph 16) was performed over 20 min in 14 patients (8 men, 6 women) after injection of (112 ± 22) MBq 68 Ga-DOTATOC followed by whole body 3D-acquisition (8 bed positions, 3 or 4 min each) 30 min p.i. and 120 min p.i., Urinary tracer elimination was measured and blood activity was derived non-invasively from the blood pool of the heart. The relevant organs for dosimetry were spleen, kidneys, liver, adrenals, urinary bladder and pituitary gland. Dosimetry was performed using OLINDA/EXM 1.0 software and specific organ uptake was expressed as standardized uptake values (SUVs). Results Rapid physiological uptake of the radiotracer could be demonstrated in liver, spleen and kidneys, adrenals and pituitary gland (mean SUVs were 6, 20, 16, 10, and 4, respectively). Radiotracer elimination was exclusively via urine (16% of injected dose within 2h); no redistribution could be observed. The spleen and the kidneys received the highest radiation exposure (0.24 mSv/MBq, 0.22 mSv/MBq resp.), mean effective dose yielded 0.023 mSv/MBq. Conclusion: 68 Ga-DOTATOC is used extensively for diagnosis of somatostatin receptor positive tumours because it has several advantages over the 111 In-labelled ligand. The derived dosimetric values are lower than first approximations from the biological data of OctreoScan. The use of CT for transmission correction of the PET data delivers radiation exposure up to 1 mSv (low dose). (orig.)

  6. 68Ga-DOTA-NOC PET/CT in comparison with CT for the detection of bone metastasis in patients with neuroendocrine tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambrosini, Valentina; Nanni, Cristina; Castellucci, Paolo; Allegri, Vincenzo; Montini, Giancarlo; Franchi, Roberto; Zompatori, Maurizio; Campana, Davide; Tomassetti, Paola; Rubello, Domenico; Fanti, Stefano

    2010-01-01

    To retrospectively evaluate the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of 68 Ga-DOTA-NOC PET/CT and CT alone for the evaluation of bone metastasis in patients with neuroendocrine tumour (NET). From among patients with NET who underwent 68 Ga-DOTA-NOC PET/CT between April 2006 and November 2008 in our centre, 223 were included in the study. Criteria for inclusion were pathological confirmation of NET and a follow-up period of at least 10 months. PET and CT images were retrospectively reviewed by two nuclear medicine specialists and two radiologists, respectively, without knowledge of the patient history or the findings of other imaging modalities. PET data were compared with the CT findings. Interobserver agreement was evaluated in terms of the kappa score. Clinical and imaging follow-up were used as the standard of reference to evaluate the PET findings. PET was performed for staging (49/223), unknown primary tumour detection (24/223), restaging (32/223), restaging before radioimmunotherapy (1/223), evaluation during therapy (12/223), equivocal findings on conventional imaging (4/223 at the bone level; 61/223 at sites other than bone), and follow-up (40/223). A very high interobserver agreement was observed. CT detected at least one bone lesion in only 35 of 44 patients with a positive PET scan. In particular, PET showed more lesions in 20/35 patients, a lower number of lesions in 8/35, and the same number in 7/35. The characteristics of the lesions (sclerotic, lytic, mixed) on the basis of the CT report did not influence PET reading. PET revealed the presence of at least one bone metastasis in nine patients with a negative CT scan. Considering patients with a negative PET scan (179), CT showed equivocal findings at the bone level in three (single small sclerotic abnormality in two at the spine level, and bilateral small sclerotic abnormalities in the humeri, femurs and scapula). Clinical follow-up confirmed the PET findings in all patients; thus there were no false

  7. 68Ga DOTA-TATE PET/CT allows tumor localization in patients with tumor-induced osteomalacia but negative 111In-octreotide SPECT/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breer, Stefan; Brunkhorst, Thomas; Beil, F Timo; Peldschus, Kersten; Heiland, Max; Klutmann, Susanne; Barvencik, Florian; Zustin, Jozef; Gratz, Klaus-Friedrich; Amling, Michael

    2014-07-01

    Tumor-induced osteomalacia (TIO) is a paraneoplastic syndrome characterized by renal phosphate wasting, hypophosphatemia and low calcitriol levels as well as clinical symptoms like diffuse bone and muscle pain, fatigue fractures or increased fracture risk. Conventional imaging methods, however, often fail to detect the small tumors. Lately, tumor localization clearly improved by somatostatin-receptor (SSTR) imaging, such as octreotide scintigraphy or octreotide SPECT/CT. However, recent studies revealed that still a large number of tumors remained undetected by octreotide imaging. Hence, studies focused on different SSTR imaging methods such as 68Ga DOTA-NOC, 68Ga DOTA-TOC and 68Ga DOTA-TATE PET/CT with promising first results. Studies comparing different SSTR imaging methods for tumor localization in TIO are rare and thus little is known about diagnostic alternatives once a particular method failed to detect a tumor in patients with TIO. Here, we report the data of 5 consecutive patients suffering from TIO, who underwent both 111Indium-octreotide scintigraphy (111In-OCT) SPECT/CT as well as 68Ga DOTA-TATE PET/CT for tumor detection. While 111In-OCT SPECT/CT allowed tumor detection in only 1 of 5 patients, 68Ga DOTA-TATE PET/CT was able to localize the tumor in all patients. Afterwards, anatomical imaging of the region of interest was performed with CT and MRI. Thus, successful surgical resection of the tumor was achieved in all patients. Serum phosphate levels returned to normal and all patients reported relief of symptoms within weeks. Moreover, an iliac crest biopsy was obtained from every patient and revealed marked osteomalacia in all cases. Follow-up DXA revealed an increase in BMD of up to 34.5% 1-year postoperative, indicating remineralization. No recurrence was observed. In conclusion our data indicates that 68Ga DOTA-TATE PET/CT is an effective and promising diagnostic tool in the diagnosis of TIO, even in patients in whom 111In-OCT prior failed to detect

  8. Comparison of {sup 68}Ga-DOTATATE and {sup 68}Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT imaging in the same patient group with neuroendocrine tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabasakal, Levent [Istanbul University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty, Istanbul (Turkey); Cerrahpasa Tip Fakultesi, Nukleer Tip Anabilim Dali, Aksaray, Istanbul (Turkey); Demirci, Emre; Uslu, Ilhami; Kanmaz, Bedii [Istanbul University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty, Istanbul (Turkey); Ocak, Meltem; Araman, Ahmet; Ozsoy, Yildiz [Istanbul University, Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, Pharmacy Faculty, Istanbul (Turkey); Decristoforo, Clemens [Medical University of Innsbruck, Clinical Department of Nuclear Medicine, Innsbruck (Austria)

    2012-08-15

    Recent studies have suggested that positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with {sup 68}Ga-labelled DOTA-somatostatin analogues (SST) like octreotide and octreotate is useful in diagnosing neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) and has superior value over both CT and planar and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS). The aim of the present study was to evaluate the role of {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-1-NaI{sup 3}-octreotide ({sup 68}Ga-DOTANOC) in patients with SST receptor-expressing tumours and to compare the results of {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-D-Phe{sup 1}-Tyr{sup 3}-octreotate ({sup 68}Ga-DOTATATE) in the same patient population. Twenty SRS were included in the study. Patients' age (n = 20) ranged from 25 to 75 years (mean 55.4 {+-} 12.7 years). There were eight patients with well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumour (WDNET) grade1, eight patients with WDNET grade 2, one patient with poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma (PDNEC) grade 3 and one patient with mixed adenoneuroendocrine tumour (MANEC). All patients had two consecutive PET studies with {sup 68}Ga-DOTATATE and {sup 68}Ga-DOTANOC. All images were evaluated visually and maximum standardized uptake values (SUV{sub max}) were also calculated for quantitative evaluation. On visual evaluation both tracers produced equally excellent image quality and similar body distribution. The physiological uptake sites of pituitary and salivary glands showed higher uptake in {sup 68}Ga-DOTATATE images. Liver and spleen uptake values were evaluated as equal. Both {sup 68}Ga-DOTATATE and {sup 68}Ga-DOTANOC were negative in 6 (30 %) patients and positive in 14 (70 %) patients. In {sup 68}Ga-DOTANOC images only 116 of 130 (89 %) lesions could be defined and 14 lesions were missed because of lack of any uptake. SUV{sub max} values of lesions were significantly higher on {sup 68}Ga-DOTATATE images. Our study demonstrated that the images obtained by {sup 68}Ga-DOTATATE and {sup 68}Ga

  9. Comparison of [68Ga]Ga-PSMA-11 PET/CT with [18F]NaF PET/CT in the evaluation of bone metastases in metastatic prostate cancer patients prior to radionuclide therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uprimny, Christian; Svirydenka, Anna; Fritz, Josef; Kroiss, Alexander Stephan; Nilica, Bernhard; Decristoforo, Clemens; Haubner, Roland; von Guggenberg, Elisabeth; Buxbaum, Sabine; Horninger, Wolfgang; Virgolini, Irene Johanna

    2018-05-16

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the diagnostic performance of 68 Ga-PSMA-11 PET/CT in the evaluation of bone metastases in metastatic prostate cancer (PC) patients scheduled for radionuclide therapy in comparison to [ 18 F]sodium fluoride ( 18 F-NaF) PET/CT. Sixteen metastatic PC patients with known skeletal metastases, who underwent both 68 Ga-PSMA-11 PET/CT and 18 F-NaF PET/CT for assessment of metastatic burden prior to radionuclide therapy, were analysed retrospectively. The performance of both tracers was calculated on a lesion-based comparison. Intensity of tracer accumulation of pathologic bone lesions on 18 F-NaF PET and 68 Ga-PSMA-11 PET was measured with maximum standardized uptake values (SUV max ) and compared to background activity of normal bone. In addition, SUV max values of PET-positive bone lesions were analysed with respect to morphologic characteristics on CT. Bone metastases were either confirmed by CT or follow-up PET scan. In contrast to 468 PET-positive lesions suggestive of bone metastases on 18 F-NaF PET, only 351 of the lesions were also judged positive on 68 Ga-PSMA-11 PET (75.0%). Intensity of tracer accumulation of pathologic skeletal lesions was significantly higher on 18 F-NaF PET compared to 68 Ga-PSMA-11 PET, showing a median SUV max of 27.0 and 6.0, respectively (p PET, with a median SUV max of 1.0 in comparison to 2.7 on 18 F-NaF PET; however, tumour to background ratio was significantly higher on 18 F-NaF PET (9.8 versus 5.9 on 68 Ga-PSMA-11 PET; p = 0.042). Based on morphologic lesion characterisation on CT, 18 F-NaF PET revealed median SUV max values of 23.6 for osteosclerotic, 35.0 for osteolytic, and 19.0 for lesions not visible on CT, whereas on 68 Ga-PSMA-11 PET median SUV max values of 5.0 in osteosclerotic, 29.5 in osteolytic, and 7.5 in lesions not seen on CT were measured. Intensity of tracer accumulation between 18 F-NaF PET and 68 Ga-PSMA-11 PET was significantly higher in osteosclerotic (p PET/CT

  10. Molecular imaging of neuroendocrine tumors using {sup 68}Ga-labeled peptides (Somatostatin receptor PET/CT); Molekulare Bildgebung neuroendokriner Tumoren mit {sup 68}Ga-markierten Peptiden (Somatostatinrezeptor-PET/CT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baum, R.P.; Prasad, V. [Zentralklinik Bad Berka GmbH (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin/PET-Zentrum; Hoersch, D. [Zentralklinik Bad Berka GmbH (Germany). Klinik fuer Innere Medizin, Gastroenterologie, Onkologie, Endokrionologie

    2009-06-15

    Receptor PET/CT using {sup 68}Ga-labeled somatostatin analogues (DOTA-NOC, DOTA-TOC or DOTA-TATE) enables the highly sensitive molecular imaging of neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) based on the expression of somatostatin receptors and even the detection of receptor subtypes. Our experience after more than 3000 studies shows that receptor PET/CT has a significantly higher tumor detection rate than conventional scintigraphy (even in SPECT/CT technique), and that tumor lesions can be very accurately localized. By calculating standardized uptake values (SUV) - which are reproducible and investigator-independent - patients can be selected for peptide receptor radiotherapy and also the course after therapy can be controlled. Receptor-PET/CT is the most sensitive imaging modality for the detection of unknown primary tumors (CUP syndrome), which is especially true for the detection of neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas and small bowel; whole-body staging (''one stop shop'') as well as restaging and selection of patients for peptide receptor radiotherapy can be performed using a patient-friendly procedure (examination finished within one hour) exposing the patient to less radiation than whole-body CT scanning. The {sup 68}Ge/{sup 68}Ga generator has proved very reliable over the years - even in a hospital environment. The effective costs for {sup 68}Ga labeled somatostatin analogues might be less than for scintigraphic agents, provided a certain number of studies per year are performed. The development of new tumor-specific peptides as well as of other DOTA- or NOTA-coupled radiopharmaceuticals opens a new avenue into the future: finally, the {sup 68}Ga generator could play a similar important role for PET/CT as did the {sup 99m}Tc-Generator for conventional gamma camera imaging over the last decades. (orig.)

  11. A retrospective comparison between 68Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT and 18F-DOPA PET/CT in patients with extra-adrenal paraganglioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroiss, Alexander; Putzer, Daniel; Decristoforo, Clemens; Uprimny, Christian; Virgolini, Irene Johanna; Frech, Andreas; Fraedrich, Gustav; Gasser, Rudolf Wolfgang; Shulkin, Barry Lynn; Url, Christoph; Widmann, Gerlig; Prommegger, Rupert; Sprinzl, Georg Mathias

    2013-01-01

    18 F-Fluoro-l-dihydroxyphenylalanine ( 18 F-DOPA) PET offers high sensitivity and specificity in the imaging of nonmetastatic extra-adrenal paragangliomas (PGL) but lower sensitivity in metastatic or multifocal disease. These tumours are of neuroendocrine origin and can be detected by 68 Ga-DOTA-Tyr 3 -octreotide ( 68 Ga-DOTA-TOC) PET. Therefore, we compared 68 Ga-DOTA-TOC and 18 F-DOPA as radiolabels for PET/CT imaging for the diagnosis and staging of extra-adrenal PGL. Combined cross-sectional imaging was the reference standard. A total of 5 men and 15 women (age range 22 to 73 years) with anatomical and/or histologically proven extra-adrenal PGL were included in this study. Of these patients, 5 had metastatic or multifocal lesions and 15 had single sites of disease. Comparative evaluation included morphological imaging with CT and functional imaging with 68 Ga-DOTA-TOC PET and 18 F-DOPA PET. The imaging results were analysed on a per-patient and a per-lesion basis. The maximum standardized uptake value (SUV max ) of each functional imaging modality in concordant tumour lesions was measured. Compared with anatomical imaging, 68 Ga-DOTA-TOC PET and 18 F-DOPA PET each had a per-patient and per-lesion detection rate of 100 % in nonmetastatic extra-adrenal PGL. However, in metastatic or multifocal disease, the per-lesion detection rate of 68 Ga-DOTA-TOC was 100 % and that of 18 F-DOPA PET was 56.0 %. Overall, 68 Ga-DOTA-TOC PET identified 45 lesions; anatomical imaging identified 43 lesions, and 18 F-DOPA PET identified 32 lesions. The overall per-lesion detection rate of 68 Ga-DOTA-TOC PET was 100 % (McNemar, P 18 F-DOPA PET was 71.1 % (McNemar, P max (mean ± SD) of all 32 concordant lesions was 67.9 ± 61.5 for 68 Ga-DOTA-TOC PET and 11.8 ± 7.9 for 18 F-DOPA PET (Mann-Whitney U test, P 68 Ga-DOTA-TOC PET may be superior to 18 F-DOPA PET and diagnostic CT in providing valuable information for pretherapeutic staging of extra-adrenal PGL, particularly in surgically

  12. Biphasic {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC-PET/CT in patients with recurrent and high-risk prostate carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahlmann, Carsten-Oliver; Meller, Birgit; Bouter, Caroline; Meller, Johannes [University Medical Center Goettingen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Goettingen (Germany); Ritter, Christian Oliver; Lotz, Joachim [University Medical Center Goettingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Goettingen (Germany); Stroebel, Philipp [University Medical Center Goettingen, Department of Pathology, Goettingen (Germany); Trojan, Lutz; Hijazi, Sameh [University Medical Center Goettingen, Department of Urology, Goettingen (Germany)

    2016-05-15

    Binding of {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC ({sup 68}Ga-PSMA) at prostate cancer (PC) cells increases over time. A biphasic protocol may help separating benign from tumor lesions. The aim of this study was the retrospective evaluation of a diagnostic incremental value of a dual-time point (biphasic) {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-PET/CT in patients with prostate cancer. Retrospective analysis of 35 consecutive patients (49-78 years, median 71) with newly diagnosed PC (12/35) or recurrence of PC (23/35). PET/CT (Gemini TF16, Philips) was acquired 1 h and 3 h p. i. of 140-392 MBq (300 MBq median) {sup 68}Ga-PSMA, followed by a diagnostic contrast CT. PET findings were correlated with histology or unequivocal CT findings. Semiquantitative PET data (SUVmax, SUV mean) were acquired and target-to-background-ratios (T/B-ratio) were calculated for benign and malign lesions for both time points. Size of lymph nodes (LN) on diagnostic CT was recorded. Statistical analysis was performed for assessment of significant changes of semiquantitative PET-parameters over time and for correlation of size and uptake of lymph nodes. One hundred and four lesions were evaluated. Sixty lesions were referenced by histology or unequivocal CT findings, including eight (13.3 %) histopathologically benign lymph nodes, 12 (20 %) histopathologically lymph node metastases, 12 (20 %) primary tumors, three (5 %) local recurrences, and 25 (41.7 %) bone metastases. Forty-four lesions were axillary LN with normal CT-appearance. Benign lesions had significantly lower SUVmax and T/B-ratios compared with malignant findings. Malign lesions showed a significant increase of both parameters over time compared to benign findings. There was no correlation between LN size and SUVmax. The sensitivity, specificity, the positive predictive value and negative predictive value of PET/CT regarding pelvic LN was 94 %, 99 %, 89 %, and 99.5 %, respectively. In contrast to benign tissues, the uptake of proven tumor lesions increases on {sup 68

  13. Improving PET Quantification of Small Animal [68Ga]DOTA-Labeled PET/CT Studies by Using a CT-Based Positron Range Correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cal-Gonzalez, Jacobo; Vaquero, Juan José; Herraiz, Joaquín L; Pérez-Liva, Mailyn; Soto-Montenegro, María Luisa; Peña-Zalbidea, Santiago; Desco, Manuel; Udías, José Manuel

    2018-01-19

    Image quality of positron emission tomography (PET) tracers that emits high-energy positrons, such as Ga-68, Rb-82, or I-124, is significantly affected by positron range (PR) effects. PR effects are especially important in small animal PET studies, since they can limit spatial resolution and quantitative accuracy of the images. Since generators accessibility has made Ga-68 tracers wide available, the aim of this study is to show how the quantitative results of [ 68 Ga]DOTA-labeled PET/X-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging of neuroendocrine tumors in mice can be improved using positron range correction (PRC). Eighteen scans in 12 mice were evaluated, with three different models of tumors: PC12, AR42J, and meningiomas. In addition, three different [ 68 Ga]DOTA-labeled radiotracers were used to evaluate the PRC with different tracer distributions: [ 68 Ga]DOTANOC, [ 68 Ga]DOTATOC, and [ 68 Ga]DOTATATE. Two PRC methods were evaluated: a tissue-dependent (TD-PRC) and a tissue-dependent spatially-variant correction (TDSV-PRC). Taking a region in the liver as reference, the tissue-to-liver ratio values for tumor tissue (TLR tumor ), lung (TLR lung ), and necrotic areas within the tumors (TLR necrotic ) and their respective relative variations (ΔTLR) were evaluated. All TLR values in the PRC images were significantly different (p DOTA-labeled PET/CT imaging of mice with neuroendocrine tumors, hence demonstrating that these techniques could also ameliorate the deleterious effect of the positron range in clinical PET imaging.

  14. Comparison of hybrid {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-PET/CT and {sup 99m}Tc-DPD-SPECT/CT for the detection of bone metastases in prostate cancer patients. Additional value of morphologic information from low dose CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janssen, Jan-Carlo; Meissner, Sebastian; Diederichs, Gerd; Hamm, Bernd; Makowski, Marcus R. [Charite, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Woythal, Nadine; Prasad, Vikas; Brenner, Winfried [Charite, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Berlin (Germany)

    2018-02-15

    This study compared {sup 68}Gallium-prostate-specific-membrane-antigen based Positron-emission-tomography ({sup 68}Ga-PSMA-PET) and {sup 99metastable}technetium-3,3-diphospho-1,2-propanedicarbonacid ({sup 99m}Tc-DPD-SPECT) in performing skeletal staging in prostate cancer (PC) patients and evaluated the additional value of the information from low-dose-computed tomography (CT). In this retrospective study, 54 patients who received {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-PET/CT and {sup 99m}Tc-DPD-SPECT/CT within 80 days were extracted from our database. Osseous lesions were classified as benign, malignant or equivocal. Lesion, region and patient based analysis was performed with and without CT fusion. The reference standard was generated by defining a best valuable comparator (BVC) containing information from all available data. In the patient based analysis, accuracies measured as ''area-under-the-curve'' (AUC) for {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-PET, {sup 99m}Tc-SPECT, {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-PET/CT and {sup 99m}Tc-SPECT/CT were 0.97-0.96, 0.86-0.83, 1.00 and 0.83, respectively (p<0.05) (ranges = optimistic vs. pessimistic view). Region based analysis resulted in the following sensitivities and specificities: 91.8-97.7%, 100-99.5% (PET); 61.2-70.6%, 99.8-98.3% (SPECT); 97.7%, 100% (PET/CT), 69.4% and 98.3% (SPECT/CT) (p<0.05). The amount of correct classifications of equivocal lesions by CT was significantly higher in PET (100%) compared to SPECT (52.4%) (p<0.05). {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-PET outperforms {sup 99m}Tc-DPD-SPECT in detecting bone metastases in PC patients. Additional information from low-dose-CT resulted in a significant reduction in equivocal lesions in both modalities, however {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-PET benefited most. (orig.)

  15. Evaluation of 68Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT for the detection of duodenopancreatic neuroendocrine tumors in patients with MEN1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgat, Clement; Mazere, Joachim; Hindie, Elif; Fernandez, Philippe; Velayoudom-Cephise, Fritz-Line; Nunes, Marie-Laure; Tabarin, Antoine; Schwartz, Paul; Guyot, Martine; Gaye, Delphine; Vimont, Delphine; Schulz, Juergen; Smith, Denis

    2016-01-01

    Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy with 111 In-pentetreotide (SRS) is used to detect duodenopancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (dpNETs) in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1). However, SRS has limited sensitivity for this purpose. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) with 68 Ga-DOTA-TOC has a higher rate of sporadic dpNETs detection than SRS but there is little data for dpNETs detection in MEN1. To compare the performances of 68 Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT, SRS and contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CE-CT) to diagnose dpNETs in MEN1. Single-institution prospective comparative study Nineteen consecutive MEN1 patients (aged 47 ± 13 years) underwent 68 Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT, SRS, and CE-CT within 2 months in random order. Blinded readings of images were performed separately by experienced physicians. Unblinded analysis of CE-CT, combined with additional magnetic resonance imaging, endoscopic-ultrasound, 18 F-2-fluoro-deoxy-d-glucose ( 18 F-FDG) PET/CT or histopathology results served as reference standard for dpNETs diagnosis. The sensitivity of 68 Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT, SRS, and CE-CT was 76, 20, and 60 %, respectively (p < 0.0001). All the true-positive lesions detected by SRS were also depicted on 68 Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT. 68 Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT detected lesions of smaller size than SRS (10.7 ± 7.6 and 15.2 ± 5.9 mm, respectively, p < 0.03). False negatives of 68 Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT included small dpNETs (<10 mm) and 18 F-FDG PET/CT positive aggressive dpNETs. No false positives were recorded. In addition, whole-body mapping with 68 Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT identified extra-abdominal MEN1-related tumors including one neuroendocrine thymic carcinoma identified by the three imaging procedures, one bronchial carcinoid undetected by CE-CT and three meningiomas undetected by SRS. Owing to higher diagnostic performance, 68 Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT (or alternative 68 Ga-labeled somatostatin analogues) should replace 111 In-pentetreotide in the investigation of MEN1

  16. Evaluation of {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT for the detection of duodenopancreatic neuroendocrine tumors in patients with MEN1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgat, Clement; Mazere, Joachim; Hindie, Elif; Fernandez, Philippe [CNRS, INCIA, Bordeaux (France); University of Bordeaux, INCIA, Bordeaux (France); University Hospital of Bordeaux, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Bordeaux (France); Velayoudom-Cephise, Fritz-Line; Nunes, Marie-Laure; Tabarin, Antoine [USN Haut-Leveque, Department of Endocrinology, Pessac (France); Schwartz, Paul; Guyot, Martine [University Hospital of Bordeaux, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Bordeaux (France); Gaye, Delphine [University Hospital of Bordeaux, Department of Radiology, Pessac (France); Vimont, Delphine; Schulz, Juergen [CNRS, INCIA, Bordeaux (France); University of Bordeaux, INCIA, Bordeaux (France); Smith, Denis [University Hospital of Bordeaux, Department of Oncology, Bordeaux (France)

    2016-07-15

    Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy with {sup 111}In-pentetreotide (SRS) is used to detect duodenopancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (dpNETs) in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1). However, SRS has limited sensitivity for this purpose. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) with {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TOC has a higher rate of sporadic dpNETs detection than SRS but there is little data for dpNETs detection in MEN1. To compare the performances of {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT, SRS and contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CE-CT) to diagnose dpNETs in MEN1. Single-institution prospective comparative study Nineteen consecutive MEN1 patients (aged 47 ± 13 years) underwent {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT, SRS, and CE-CT within 2 months in random order. Blinded readings of images were performed separately by experienced physicians. Unblinded analysis of CE-CT, combined with additional magnetic resonance imaging, endoscopic-ultrasound, {sup 18}F-2-fluoro-deoxy-d-glucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) PET/CT or histopathology results served as reference standard for dpNETs diagnosis. The sensitivity of {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT, SRS, and CE-CT was 76, 20, and 60 %, respectively (p < 0.0001). All the true-positive lesions detected by SRS were also depicted on {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT. {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT detected lesions of smaller size than SRS (10.7 ± 7.6 and 15.2 ± 5.9 mm, respectively, p < 0.03). False negatives of {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT included small dpNETs (<10 mm) and {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT positive aggressive dpNETs. No false positives were recorded. In addition, whole-body mapping with {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT identified extra-abdominal MEN1-related tumors including one neuroendocrine thymic carcinoma identified by the three imaging procedures, one bronchial carcinoid undetected by CE-CT and three meningiomas undetected by SRS. Owing to higher diagnostic performance, {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT (or alternative {sup 68}Ga-labeled somatostatin analogues

  17. Detection of unknown primary neuroendocrine tumours (CUP-NET) using 68Ga-DOTA-NOC receptor PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, Vikas; Baum, Richard P.; Ambrosini, Valentina; Fanti, Stefano; Hommann, Merten; Hoersch, Dieter

    2010-01-01

    This bi-centric study aimed to determine the role of receptor PET/CT using 68 Ga-DOTA-NOC in the detection of undiagnosed primary sites of neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) and to understand the molecular behaviour of the primarily undiagnosed tumours. Overall 59 patients (33 men and 26 women, age: 65 ± 9 years) with documented NET and unknown primary were enrolled. PET/CT was performed after injection of approximately 100 MBq (46-260 MBq) of 68 Ga-DOTA-NOC. The maximum standardised uptake values (SUV max ) were calculated and compared with SUV max in known pancreatic NET (pNET) and ileum/jejunum/duodenum (SI-NET). The results of PET/CT were also correlated with CT alone. In 35 of 59 patients (59%), 68 Ga-DOTA-NOC PET/CT localised the site of the primary: ileum/jejunum (14), pancreas (16), rectum/colon (2), lungs (2) and paraganglioma (1). CT alone (on retrospective analyses) confirmed the findings in 12 of 59 patients (20%). The mean SUV max of identified previously unknown pNET and SI-NET were 18.6 ± 9.8 (range: 7.8-34.8) and 9.1 ± 6.0 (range: 4.2-27.8), respectively. SUV max in patients with previously known pNET and SI-NET were 26.1 ± 14.5 (range: 8.7-42.4) and 11.3 ± 3.7 (range: 5.6-17.9). The SUV max of the unknown pNET and SI-NET were significantly lower (p 68 Ga-DOTA-NOC receptor PET/CT, 6 of 59 patients were operated and the primary was removed (4 pancreatic, 1 ileal and 1 rectal tumour) resulting in a management change in approximately 10% of the patients. In the remaining 29 patients, because of the far advanced stage of the disease (due to distant metastases), the primary tumours were not operated. Additional histopathological sampling was available from one patient with bronchial carcinoid (through bronchoscopy). Our data indicate that 68 Ga-DOTA-NOC PET/CT is highly superior to 111 In-OctreoScan (39% detection rate for CUP according to the literature) and can play a major role in the management of patients with CUP-NET. (orig.)

  18. Detection of unknown primary neuroendocrine tumours (CUP-NET) using {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-NOC receptor PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prasad, Vikas; Baum, Richard P. [Zentralklinik Bad Berka, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Centre for PET/CT, Bad Berka (Germany); Ambrosini, Valentina; Fanti, Stefano [University of Bologna, Nuclear Medicine Unit, Policlinico S. Orsola-Malpighi, Bologna (Italy); Hommann, Merten [Zentralklinik Bad Berka, Department of General and Visceral Surgery, Bad Berka (Germany); Hoersch, Dieter [Zentralklinik Bad Berka, Department of Internal Medicine/Gastroenterology, Oncology and Endocrinology, Bad Berka (Germany)

    2010-01-15

    This bi-centric study aimed to determine the role of receptor PET/CT using {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-NOC in the detection of undiagnosed primary sites of neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) and to understand the molecular behaviour of the primarily undiagnosed tumours. Overall 59 patients (33 men and 26 women, age: 65 {+-} 9 years) with documented NET and unknown primary were enrolled. PET/CT was performed after injection of approximately 100 MBq (46-260 MBq) of {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-NOC. The maximum standardised uptake values (SUV{sub max}) were calculated and compared with SUV{sub max} in known pancreatic NET (pNET) and ileum/jejunum/duodenum (SI-NET). The results of PET/CT were also correlated with CT alone. In 35 of 59 patients (59%), {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-NOC PET/CT localised the site of the primary: ileum/jejunum (14), pancreas (16), rectum/colon (2), lungs (2) and paraganglioma (1). CT alone (on retrospective analyses) confirmed the findings in 12 of 59 patients (20%). The mean SUV{sub max} of identified previously unknown pNET and SI-NET were 18.6 {+-} 9.8 (range: 7.8-34.8) and 9.1 {+-} 6.0 (range: 4.2-27.8), respectively. SUV{sub max} in patients with previously known pNET and SI-NET were 26.1 {+-} 14.5 (range: 8.7-42.4) and 11.3 {+-} 3.7 (range: 5.6-17.9). The SUV{sub max} of the unknown pNET and SI-NET were significantly lower (p < 0.05) as compared to the ones with known primary tumour sites; 19% of the patients had high-grade and 81% low-grade NET. Based on {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-NOC receptor PET/CT, 6 of 59 patients were operated and the primary was removed (4 pancreatic, 1 ileal and 1 rectal tumour) resulting in a management change in approximately 10% of the patients. In the remaining 29 patients, because of the far advanced stage of the disease (due to distant metastases), the primary tumours were not operated. Additional histopathological sampling was available from one patient with bronchial carcinoid (through bronchoscopy). Our data indicate that {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-NOC PET/CT is

  19. Potential impact of 68Ga-PSMA-11 PET/CT on prostate cancer definitive radiation therapy planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calais, Jérémie; Kishan, Amar U; Cao, Minsong; Fendler, Wolfgang P; Eiber, Matthias; Herrmann, Ken; Ceci, Francesco; Reiter, Robert E; Matthew, Rettig B; Hegde, John V; Shaverdian, Narek; King, Christopher R; Steinberg, Michael L; Czernin, Johannes; Nickols, Nicholas G

    2018-04-13

    Background: Standard-of-care imaging for initial staging of prostate cancer (PCa) underestimates disease burden. Prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) positron emission tomography/ computed tomography (PET/CT) detects PCa metastasis with superior accuracy with potential impact definitive radiation therapy (RT) planning for non-metastatic PCa. Objectives: i) To determine how often definitive PCa RT planning based on standard target volumes cover 68 Ga-PSMA-11 PET/CT defined disease, and ii) To assess the potential impact of 68 Ga-PSMA-11 PET/CT on definitive PCa RT planning. Patients and Methods: This is a post-hoc analysis of an intention to treat population of 73 patients with localized PCa without prior local therapy who underwent 68 Ga-PSMA PET/CT for initial staging as part of an Investigational New Drug trial. 11/73 were intermediate-risk (15%), 33/73 were high-risk (45%), 22/73 were very high risk (30%), and 7/73 were N1 (9.5%). Clinical target volumes (CTVs) that included the prostate, seminal vesicles, and pelvic lymph nodes (LNs) using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) consensus guidelines were contoured on the CT portion of the PET/CT by a radiation oncologist blinded to the PET findings. 68 Ga-PSMA-11 PET/CT images were analyzed by a nuclear medicine physician. PSMA-positive lesions not covered by planning volumes based on the CTVs were considered to have a major potential impact on treatment planning. Results: All patients had PSMA-positive primary prostate lesion(s). 25/73 (34%) and 7/73 (9.5%) had PSMA-positive pelvic nodal and distant metastases, respectively. The sites of nodal metastases in decreasing order of frequency were external iliac (20.5%), common iliac (13.5%), internal iliac (12.5%) obturator (12.5%), perirectal (4%), abdominal (4%), upper-diaphragm (4%), and presacral (1.5%). The median size of the nodal lesions was 6 mm (range 4-24 mm). RT planning based on the CTVs covered 69/73 (94.5%) of primary disease and 20/25 (80%) of

  20. {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11 dynamic PET/CT imaging in biochemical relapse of prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sachpekidis, C. [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Clinical Cooperation Unit Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); German Cancer Research Center, Medical PET Group-Biological Imaging, Clinical Cooperation Unit Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); Eder, M. [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Division of Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry, Heidelberg (Germany); Kopka, K. [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Division of Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry, Heidelberg (Germany); German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Heidelberg (Germany); Mier, W. [University of Heidelberg, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); Hadaschik, B.A. [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Urology, Heidelberg (Germany); Haberkorn, U. [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Clinical Cooperation Unit Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Heidelberg (Germany); University of Heidelberg, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, A. [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Clinical Cooperation Unit Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2016-07-15

    We aim to investigate the pharmacokinetics and distribution of the recently clinically introduced radioligand {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11 in men with recurrent prostate cancer (PC) by means of dynamic and whole-body PET/CT. The correlation between PSA levels and {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11 PET parameters is also investigated. 31 patients with biochemical failure after primary PC treatment with curative intent (median age 71.0 years) were enrolled in the analysis. The median PSA value was 2.0 ng/mL (range = 0.1 - 130.0 ng/mL) and the median Gleason score was 7 (range = 5 - 9). 8/31 (25.8 %) of the included patients had a PSA value < 0.5 ng/ml. All patients underwent dynamic PET/CT (dPET/CT) scanning (60 min) of the pelvis and lower abdomen as well as whole-body PET/CT with {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11. dPET/CT assessment was based on qualitative evaluation, SUV calculation, and quantitative analysis based on a two-tissue compartment model and a non-compartmental approach leading to the extraction of fractal dimension (FD). 22/31 patients (71.0 %) were {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11-positive, while 9/31 (29.0 %) patients were {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11-negative. The median PSA value in the {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11-positive group was significantly higher (median = 2.35 ng/mL; range = 0.19 - 130.0 ng/mL) than in the {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11-negative group (median value: 0.34 ng/mL; range = 0.10 - 4.20 ng/mL). A total of 76 lesions were semi-quantitatively evaluated. PC recurrence-associated lesions demonstrated a mean SUV{sub average} = 12.4 (median = 9.0; range = 2.2 - 84.5) and mean SUV{sub max} = 18.8 (median = 14.1; range = 3.1 - 120.3). Dynamic PET/CT studies of the pelvis revealed the following mean values for the PC recurrence-suspicious lesions: K{sub 1} = 0.26, k{sub 3} = 0.30, influx = 0.14 and FD = 1.24. Time-activity curves derived from PC-recurrence indicative lesions revealed an increasing {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11 accumulation during dynamic PET acquisition. Correlation analysis revealed a moderate, but significant

  1. Diagnostic performance and impact on patient management of 68Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT for detecting osteomalacia-associated tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquet, Marie; Gauthé, Mathieu; Zhang Yin, Jules; Nataf, Valérie; Bélissant, Ophélie; Orcel, Philippe; Roux, Christian; Talbot, Jean-Noël; Montravers, Françoise

    2018-03-12

    Oncogenic osteomalacia is an endocrine disorder induced by small benign tumours (TIO) producing excessive fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF23). The only way of curing oncogenic osteomalacia is surgical resection of the culprit TIO, which is extremely difficult to detect using conventional imaging modalities due to its small size and variable location in the body. Since TIO frequently overexpress somatostatin receptors, a clinical utility of SPECT or PET with radiolabelled somatostatin analogues has been reported. Among them, 68 Ga-DOTA-TOC has recently been granted a marketing authorization, facilitating its routine application. We report here the results of the first series evaluating the diagnostic performance of 68 Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT in detecting TIO and its impact on patient management. 68 Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT and clinical and imaging data from 15 patients with clinical and biochemical signs of oncogenic osteomalacia were retrospectively reviewed. The 68 Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT findings were compared with the results of post-surgical pathology and clinical and biochemical follow-up. 68 Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT resulted in the detection of one focus suspicious for TIO in nine of 15 patients (60%), and a tumour was surgically removed in eight. Post-operative pathology confirmed a TIO in those eight patients whose symptoms diminished promptly and biochemical anomalies resolved. 68 Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 73%, 67% and 71%, respectively. 68 Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT findings affected patient management in 67% of cases. In particular, 68 Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT was able to detect the TIO with a negative or a false-positive result of a previous 111 In-pentetreotide SPECT/CT in 5/8 patients (63%) or a previous FDG PET/CT in 7/11 patients (64%). No close relationship was found between the positivity of 68 Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT and the serum level of a biochemical marker. However, a true-positive result of 68 Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT was obtained in only one patient

  2. PSA levels as a predictor of 68Ga PSMA PET/CT positivity in patients with prostate cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soydal, Cigdem; Urun, Yuksel; Suer, Evren; Nak, Demet; Ozkan, Elgin; Kucuk, Ozlem N

    2018-05-10

    The aim of this study is to evaluate predictive factors of 68Gallium (68Ga) Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA) Positron Emission Tomography (PET)/Computed Tomography (CT) positivity. Relationships between serum Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA), Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) levels, Gleason Score (GS) and positivity of 68Ga PSMA PET in patients who underwent 68Ga PSMA PET/CT for restaging for PCa were evaluated retrospectively. One hundred and four (median age: 67; range: 51-88) patients were included in this study. Of these patients, PSMA PET was positive in 75 (72%) patients. Mean serum PSA levels for PET negative and positive groups were 0.76±1.00 and 180.85±324.93 ng/ml (pPSA cut-off and 92% and 90%, respectively, for the 2 ng/ml PSA cut-off values. The positivity rates for patients with PSA levels PSA recurrence. Patients with higher GS and early PSA recurrence could benefit from 68Ga PSMA PET/CT.

  3. A retrospective comparison between 68Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT and 18F-DOPA PET/CT in patients with extra-adrenal paraganglioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroiss, Alexander; Putzer, Daniel; Frech, Andreas; Decristoforo, Clemens; Uprimny, Christian; Gasser, Rudolf Wolfgang; Shulkin, Barry Lynn; Url, Christoph; Widmann, Gerlig; Prommegger, Rupert; Sprinzl, Georg Mathias; Fraedrich, Gustav; Virgolini, Irene Johanna

    2013-12-01

    (18)F-Fluoro-L-dihydroxyphenylalanine ((18)F-DOPA) PET offers high sensitivity and specificity in the imaging of nonmetastatic extra-adrenal paragangliomas (PGL) but lower sensitivity in metastatic or multifocal disease. These tumours are of neuroendocrine origin and can be detected by (68)Ga-DOTA-Tyr(3)-octreotide ((68)Ga-DOTA-TOC) PET. Therefore, we compared (68)Ga-DOTA-TOC and (18)F-DOPA as radiolabels for PET/CT imaging for the diagnosis and staging of extra-adrenal PGL. Combined cross-sectional imaging was the reference standard. A total of 5 men and 15 women (age range 22 to 73 years) with anatomical and/or histologically proven extra-adrenal PGL were included in this study. Of these patients, 5 had metastatic or multifocal lesions and 15 had single sites of disease. Comparative evaluation included morphological imaging with CT and functional imaging with (68)Ga-DOTA-TOC PET and (18)F-DOPA PET. The imaging results were analysed on a per-patient and a per-lesion basis. The maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) of each functional imaging modality in concordant tumour lesions was measured. Compared with anatomical imaging, (68)Ga-DOTA-TOC PET and (18)F-DOPA PET each had a per-patient and per-lesion detection rate of 100% in nonmetastatic extra-adrenal PGL. However, in metastatic or multifocal disease, the per-lesion detection rate of (68)Ga-DOTA-TOC was 100% and that of (18)F-DOPA PET was 56.0%. Overall, (68)Ga-DOTA-TOC PET identified 45 lesions; anatomical imaging identified 43 lesions, and (18)F-DOPA PET identified 32 lesions. The overall per-lesion detection rate of (68)Ga-DOTA-TOC PET was 100% (McNemar, P TOC PET and 11.8 ± 7.9 for (18)F-DOPA PET (Mann-Whitney U test, P TOC PET may be superior to (18)F-DOPA PET and diagnostic CT in providing valuable information for pretherapeutic staging of extra-adrenal PGL, particularly in surgically inoperable tumours and metastatic or multifocal disease.

  4. Prospective evaluation of 68Ga-DOTANOC PET-CT in differentiated thyroid cancer patients with raised thyroglobulin and negative 131I-whole body scan: comparison with 18F-FDG PET-CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kundu, Parveen; Lata, Sneh; Sharma, Punit; Singh, Harmandeep; Malhotra, Arun; Bal, Chandrasekhar

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the role of 68 Ga-DOTANOC PET-CT in differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) patients with negative 131 I-whole body scan (WBS) along with serially increasing serum thyroglobulin (Tg), and compare the same with 18 F-FDG PET-CT. Sixty two DTC patients with serially rising Tg levels and negative 131 I-WBS were prospectively enrolled. All patients underwent 68 Ga-DOTANOC PET-CT and 18 F-FDG PET-CT within an interval of two weeks. PET-CT analysis was done on a per-patient basis, location wise and lesion wise. All PET-CT lesions were divided into four categories-local, nodal, pulmonary and skeletal. Histopathology and/or serial serum Tg level, clinical and imaging follow up (minimum-1 year) were used as a reference standard. Ga-DOTANOC PET-CT demonstrated disease in 40/62 (65 %) patients and 18 F-FDG PET-CT in 45/62 (72 %) patients, with no significant difference on McNemar analysis (p = 0.226). Per-patient sensitivity and specificity of 68 Ga-DOTANOC PET-CT was 78.4 %, 100 %, and for 18 F-FDG PET-CT was 86.3 %, 90.9 %, respectively. Out of 186 lesions detected by both PET-CTs, 121/186 (65 %) lesions were seen on 68 Ga-DOTANOC PET-CT and 168/186 (90.3 %) lesions on 18 F-FDG PET-CT (p 68 Ga-DOTANOC PET-CT and 18 F-FDG PET-CT for detection of local disease (k = 0.92), while moderate agreement was noted for nodal and pulmonary disease (k = 0.67). 68 Ga-DOTANOC PET-CT changed management in 21/62 (34 %) patients and 18 F-FDG PET-CT in 17/62 (27 %) patients. Ga-DOTANOC PET-CT is inferior to 18 F-FDG PET-CT on lesion based but not on patient based analysis for detection of recurrent/residual disease in DTC patients with negative WBS scan and elevated serum Tg levels. It can also help in selection of potential candidates for peptide receptor radionuclide therapy. (orig.)

  5. The added value of 68Ga-DOTA-TATE-PET to contrast-enhanced CT for primary site detection in CUP of neuroendocrine origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazmierczak, Philipp M; Rominger, Axel; Wenter, Vera; Spitzweg, Christine; Auernhammer, Christoph; Angele, Martin K; Rist, Carsten; Cyran, Clemens C

    2017-04-01

    To quantify the additional value of 68 Ga-DOTA-TATE PET/CT in comparison with contrast-enhanced CT alone for primary tumour detection in neuroendocrine cancer of unknown primary (CUP-NET). In total, 38 consecutive patients (27 men, 11 women; mean age 62 years) with histologically proven CUP-NET who underwent a contrast-enhanced 68 Ga-DOTA-TATE PET/CT scan for primary tumour detection and staging between 2010 and 2014 were included in this IRB-approved retrospective study. Two blinded readers independently analysed the contrast-enhanced CT and 68 Ga-DOTA-TATE PET datasets separately and noted from which modality they suspected a primary tumour. Consensus was reached if the results were divergent. Postoperative histopathology (24 patients) and follow-up 68 Ga-DOTA-TATE PET/CT imaging (14 patients) served as the reference standards and statistical measures of diagnostic accuracy were calculated accordingly. The majority of confirmed primary tumours were located in the abdomen (ileum in 19 patients, pancreas in 12, lung in 2, small pelvis in 1). High interobserver agreement was noted regarding the suspected primary tumour site (Cohen's k 0.90, p DOTA-TATE PET demonstrated a significantly higher sensitivity (94 % vs. 63 %, p = 0.005) and a significantly higher accuracy (87 % vs. 68 %, p = 0.003) than contrast-enhanced CT. Ga-DOTA-TATE PET/CT compared with contrast-enhanced CT alone provides an improvement in sensitivity of 50 % and an improvement in accuracy of 30 % in primary tumour detection in CUP-NET. • 68 Ga-DOTA-TATE PET augments the sensitivity of contrast-enhanced CT by 50 % • 68 Ga-DOTA-TATE PET augments the accuracy of contrast-enhanced CT by 30 % • Somatostatin receptor-targeted hybrid imaging optimizes primary tumour detection in CUP-NET.

  6. Planned Improvements for the WB-57F Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baccus, S.; Roberts, A.; Ross, M.

    2003-12-01

    NASA WB-57F aircraft have supported the atmospheric science community for over 30 years. Recent attention has focused on the chemistry and dynamics of the UTLS region of the atmosphere and several NASA sponsored field campaigns (ACCENT, CRYSTAL-FACE) have made critical use of the WB-57F's unique ability to carry large (3 ton) payloads during extended cruise at all altitudes from the lower troposphere to the lower stratosphere (20 km ceiling). In addition, the WB-57F's robust structure permits a large number and variety of instruments to be carried at inlet-favorable locations on the aircraft. In order to further improve the WB-57F's performance and unique utility to the atmospheric research and spacecraft validation communities, NASA is planning several upgrades to the WB-57F including state-of-the-art avionics and autopilot, landing gear replacement, maximum gross weight increase, engine replacement, and ultrapod installation. We will review the present WB-57F performance, plans for upcoming science campaigns, and plans for increased WB-57F payload, range, endurance, and ceiling resulting from the upgrades.

  7. Correlation of 68Ga Ventilation-Perfusion PET/CT with Pulmonary Function Test Indices for Assessing Lung Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Roux, Pierre-Yves; Siva, Shankar; Steinfort, Daniel P; Callahan, Jason; Eu, Peter; Irving, Lou B; Hicks, Rodney J; Hofman, Michael S

    2015-11-01

    Pulmonary function tests (PFTs) are routinely used to assess lung function, but they do not provide information about regional pulmonary dysfunction. We aimed to assess correlation of quantitative ventilation-perfusion (V/Q) PET/CT with PFT indices. Thirty patients underwent V/Q PET/CT and PFT. Respiration-gated images were acquired after inhalation of (68)Ga-carbon nanoparticles and administration of (68)Ga-macroaggregated albumin. Functional volumes were calculated by dividing the volume of normal ventilated and perfused (%NVQ), unmatched and matched defects by the total lung volume. These functional volumes were correlated with forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC), FEV1/FVC, and diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide (DLCO). All functional volumes were significantly different in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (P volume of unmatched defects (r = -0.55). Considering %NVQ only, a cutoff value of 90% correctly categorized 28 of 30 patients with or without significant pulmonary function impairment. Our study demonstrates strong correlations between V/Q PET/CT functional volumes and PFT parameters. Because V/Q PET/CT is able to assess regional lung function, these data support the feasibility of its use in radiation therapy and preoperative planning and assessing pulmonary dysfunction in a variety of respiratory diseases. © 2015 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  8. "6"8Ga-PSMA PET/CT: Joint EANM and SNMMI procedure guideline for prostate cancer imaging: version 1.0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fendler, Wolfgang P.; Eiber, Matthias; Beheshti, Mohsen; Bomanji, Jamshed; Wan, Simon; Ceci, Francesco; Fanti, Stefano; Cho, Steven; Giesel, Frederik; Haberkorn, Uwe; Hope, Thomas A.; Kopka, Klaus; Krause, Bernd J.; Mottaghy, Felix M.; Schoeder, Heiko; Sunderland, John; Wester, Hans-Juergen; Herrmann, Ken

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this guideline is to provide standards for the recommendation, performance, interpretation and reporting of "6"8Ga-PSMA PET/CT for prostate cancer imaging. These recommendations will help to improve accuracy, precision, and repeatability of "6"8Ga-PSMA PET/CT for prostate cancer essentially needed for implementation of this modality in science and routine clinical practice. (orig.)

  9. 68Ga-PSMA-11 PET/CT-derived metabolic parameters for determination of whole-body tumor burden and treatment response in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidkonz, Christian; Cordes, Michael; Schmidt, Daniela; Bäuerle, Tobias; Goetz, Theresa Ida; Beck, Michael; Prante, Olaf; Cavallaro, Alexander; Uder, Michael; Wullich, Bernd; Goebell, Peter; Kuwert, Torsten; Ritt, Philipp

    2018-05-03

    We aimed at evaluating the role of 68 Ga-PSMA-11 PET/CT-derived metabolic parameters for assessment of whole-body tumor burden and its capability to determine therapeutic response in patients with prostate cancer. A total of 142 patients with biochemical recurrence of prostate cancer underwent PET/CT with [ 68 Ga]Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC ( 68 Ga-PSMA-11). Quantitative assessment of all 641 68 Ga-PSMA-11-positive lesions in the field of view was performed to calculate PSMA-derived parameters, including whole-body PSMA tumor volume (PSMA-TV) and whole-body total lesion PSMA (TL-PSMA), as well as the established SUVmax and SUVmean values. All PET-derived parameters were tested for correlation with serum PSA levels and for association with Gleason scores. In 23 patients who underwent 68 Ga-PSMA-11 PET/CT before and after therapy with either external beam radiation, androgen deprivation, or docetaxel chemotherapy, SUVmax and TL-PSMA were compared to radiographic response assessment of CT images based on RECIST 1.1 criteria and to biochemical response determined by changes of serum PSA levels. PSMA-TV and TL-PSMA demonstrated a significant correlation with serum PSA levels (P PET and biochemical response was 87% (95% confidence interval, 0.66-0.97; Cohen's κ = 0.78; P PET and CT were most likely due to limitations of CT and RECIST in rating small lymph nodes as metastases, as well as bone involvement, which was sometimes not detectable in CT. 68 Ga-PSMA-11 PET/CT-derived metabolic tumor parameters showed promising results for evaluation of treatment response. Especially, TL-PSMA demonstrated higher agreement rates with biochemical response compared to SUVmax. Larger, ideally prospective trials are needed to help to reveal the full potential of metabolic parameters derived from PET imaging with 68 Ga-PSMA-11.

  10. {sup 68}Ga-PSMA PET/CT: Joint EANM and SNMMI procedure guideline for prostate cancer imaging: version 1.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fendler, Wolfgang P. [UCLA, Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Eiber, Matthias [UCLA, Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Technical University of Munich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Klinikum Rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Beheshti, Mohsen [St. Vincent' s Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Endocrinology, PET-CT Center, Linz (Austria); Bomanji, Jamshed; Wan, Simon [UCL/UCLH, Institute of Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Ceci, Francesco; Fanti, Stefano [University of Bologna, S. Orsola Hospital Bologna, Nuclear Medicine Unit, Bologna (Italy); Cho, Steven [University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); Giesel, Frederik; Haberkorn, Uwe [University Hospital Heidelberg and DKFZ Heidelberg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); Hope, Thomas A. [University of California, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States); Kopka, Klaus [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) Heidelberg, Division of Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry, Heidelberg (Germany); Krause, Bernd J. [University Medical Center, University of Rostock, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rostock (Germany); Mottaghy, Felix M. [University Hospital RWTH Aachen University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Aachen (Germany); Maastricht University Medical Center (MUMC), Department of Nuclear Medicine, Maastricht (Netherlands); Schoeder, Heiko [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Sunderland, John [University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Department of Radiology, Iowa City, IA (United States); Wester, Hans-Juergen [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Pharmaceutical Radiochemistry, Garching (Germany); Herrmann, Ken [UCLA, Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Universitaetsklinikum Essen, Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Essen (Germany)

    2017-06-15

    The aim of this guideline is to provide standards for the recommendation, performance, interpretation and reporting of {sup 68}Ga-PSMA PET/CT for prostate cancer imaging. These recommendations will help to improve accuracy, precision, and repeatability of {sup 68}Ga-PSMA PET/CT for prostate cancer essentially needed for implementation of this modality in science and routine clinical practice. (orig.)

  11. 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT in Patients with Rising Prostatic-Specific Antigen After Definitive Treatment of Prostate Cancer: Detection Efficacy and Diagnostic accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamed, Maged Abdel Galil; Basha, Mohammad Abd Alkhalik; Ahmed, Hussien; Obaya, Ahmed Ali; Afifi, Amira Hamed Mohamed; Abdelbary, Eman H

    2018-06-20

    68 Ga-prostate-specific membrane antigen-11 ( 68 Ga-PSMA-11) is a recently developed positron emission tomography (PET) tracer that can detect prostate cancer (PC) relapses and metastases with high contrast resolution. The aim of this study was to assess the detection efficacy and diagnostic accuracy of 68 Ga-PSMA PET/CT image in patients with rising prostatic-specific antigen (PSA) after treatment of PC. The present prospective study included 188 patients who exhibited rising of PSA level on a routine follow-up examination after definitive treatment of PC. All patients underwent a 68 Ga-PSMA PET/CT examination. For each patient, we determined the disease stage, the Gleason score, and the maximum standardized uptake value of the local recurrence and extraprostatic metastases. The detection efficacy and diagnostic accuracy of 68 Ga-PSMA PET/CT were established by histopathology and clinical and imaging follow-up as the reference standards. 68 Ga-PSMA PET/CT detected tumour relapse in 165 patients (35 patients had local recurrence, 106 patients had extraprostatic metastases, and 24 patients had combined lesions). The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy values of 68 Ga-PSMA PET/CT examination in the detection of PC recurrence were 98.8%, 100%, and 98.8%, respectively. 68 Ga-PSMA PET/CT revealed an overall detection rate of 87.8% (165/188) in patients with rising PSA (median of 2.2 ng/mL, and range of 0.01-70 ng/mL). 68 Ga-PSMA PET/CT is a valuable tool for the detection of PC local recurrence or extraprostatic metastases following rising PSA levels after primary definitive therapy and should be incorporated during routine work-up. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Functional imaging in differentiating bronchial masses: an initial experience with a combination of (18)F-FDG PET-CT scan and (68)Ga DOTA-TOC PET-CT scan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Arvind; Jindal, Tarun; Dutta, Roman; Kumar, Rakesh

    2009-10-01

    To evaluate the role of combination of (18)F-FDG PET-CT scan and (68)Ga DOTA-TOC PET-CT scan in differentiating bronchial tumors observed in contrast enhanced computed tomography scan of chest. Prospective observational study. Place of study: All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India. 7 patients with bronchial mass detected in computed tomography scan of the chest were included in this study. All patients underwent (18)F-FDG PET-CT scan, (68)Ga DOTA-TOC PET-CT scan and fiberoptic bronchoscope guided biopsy followed by definitive surgical excision. The results of functional imaging studies were analyzed and the results are correlated with the final histopathology of the tumor. Histopathological examination of 7 bronchial masses revealed carcinoid tumors (2 typical, 1 atypical), inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (1), mucoepidermoid carcinoma (1), hamartoma (1), and synovial cell sarcoma (1). The typical carcinoids had mild (18)F-FDG uptake and high (68)Ga DOTA-TOC uptake. Atypical carcinoid had moderate uptake of (18)F-FDG and high (68)Ga DOTA-TOC uptake. Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor showed high uptake of (18)F-FDG and no uptake of (68)Ga DOTA-TOC. Mucoepidermoid carcinoma showed mild (18)F-FDG uptake and no (68)Ga DOTA-TOC uptake. Hamartoma showed no uptake on either scans. Synovial cell sarcoma showed moderate (18)F-FDG uptake and mild focal (68)Ga DOTA-TOC uptake. This initial experience with the combined use of (18)F-FDG and (68)Ga DOTA-TOC PET-CT scan reveals different uptake patterns in various bronchial tumors. Bronchoscopic biopsy will continue to be the gold standard; however, the interesting observations made in this study merits further evaluation of the utility of the combination of (18)F-FDG PET-CT scan and (68)Ga DOTA-TOC PET-CT scan in larger number of patients with bronchial masses.

  13. Vertebral metastases from neuroendocrine tumours: How to avoid false positives on 68Ga-DOTA-TOC PET using CT pattern analysis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthé, Mathieu; Testart Dardel, Nathalie; Ruiz Santiago, Fernando; Ohnona, Jessica; Nataf, Valérie; Montravers, Françoise; Talbot, Jean-Noël

    2018-03-12

    To develop criteria to improve discrimination between vertebral metastases from neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) and benign bone lesions on PET combined with CT using DOTA-D-Phe 1 -Tyr 3 -octreotide labelled with gallium-68 ( 68 Ga-DOTA-TOC). In 535 NET patients, 68 Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT examinations were reviewed retrospectively for vertebral CT lesions and/or PET foci. For each vertebral PET abnormality, appearance on CT, biological volume (BV), standardized uptake value (SUV max ) and ratios to those of reference organs were determined. All vertebral abnormalities were characterized as a metastasis, a typical vertebral haemangioma (VH) or other benign lesion. In 79 patients (14.8 %), we found 107 metastases, 34 VHs and 31 other benign lesions in the spine. The optimal cut-off values to differentiate metastases from benign lesions were BV ≥0.72 cm 3 , SUVmax ≥2, SUVmax ratio to a reference vertebra ≥2.1, to liver ≥0.28 and to spleen ≥0.14. They corresponded to lesion-based 68 Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT sensitivity of 87 %, 98 %, 97 %, 99 % and 94 %, and specificity of 55 %, 100 %, 90 %, 97 %, 100 %, respectively. The high sensitivity of 68 Ga-DOTA-TOC-PET/CT in detecting NET vertebral metastases was confirmed; this study showed that specificity could be improved by combining CT features and quantifying 68 Ga-DOTA-TOC uptake. • Bone metastases in neuroendocrine tumours correlate with prognosis. • Benign bone lesions may mimic metastases on 68 Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT imaging. • The specific polka-dot CT pattern may be missing in some vertebral haemangiomas. • Lesion atypical for haemangiomas can be better characterized by quantifying 68 Ga-DOTA-TOC uptake.

  14. Development of standardized image interpretation for 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT to detect prostate cancer recurrent lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fanti, Stefano; Ceci, Francesco; Castellucci, Paolo [University of Bologna, S. Orsola Hospital Bologna, Nuclear Medicine Unit, Bologna (Italy); Minozzi, Silvia [Lazio Regional Health Service, Department of Epidemiology, Rome (Italy); Morigi, Joshua James; Emmett, Louise [St. Vincent' s Public Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Sydney (Australia); Giesel, Frederik; Haberkorn, Uwe [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); Uprimny, Christian; Virgolini, Irene [Medical University Innsbruck, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Innsbruck (Austria); Hofman, Michael S.; Hicks, Rodney J. [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Centre for Molecular Imaging, Department of Cancer Imaging, Melbourne (Australia); Eiber, Matthias; Schwaiger, Markus [Technical University Munich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Schwarzenbock, Sarah; Krause, Bernd J. [University Medical Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rostock (Germany); Bellisario, Cristina [University Hospital ' ' Citta della Salute e della Scienza di Torino' ' , Department of Cancer Screening, Centre for Epidemiology and Prevention in Oncology (CPO), Turin (Italy); Chauvie, Stephane; Bergesio, Fabrizio [Santa Croce e Carle Hospital, Medical Physics Division, Cuneo (Italy); Chiti, Arturo [Humanitas Clinical and Research Hospital, Nuclear Medicine, Humanitas Cancer Center, Rozzano, MI (Italy)

    2017-09-15

    After primary treatment, biochemical relapse (BCR) occurs in a substantial number of patients with prostate cancer (PCa). PET/CT imaging with prostate-specific membrane antigen based tracers (68Ga-PSMA) has shown promising results for BCR patients. However, a standardized image interpretation methodology has yet to be properly agreed. The aim of this study, which was promoted and funded by European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM), is to define standardized image interpretation criteria for 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT to detect recurrent PCa lesions in patients treated with primary curative intent therapy (radical prostatectomy or radiotherapy) who presented a biochemical recurrence. In the first phase inter-rater agreement between seven readers from seven international centers was calculated on the reading of 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT images of 49 patients with BCR. Each reader evaluated findings in five different sites of recurrence (local, loco-regional lymph nodes, distant lymph nodes, bone, and other). In the second phase the re-analysis was limited to cases with poor, slight, fair, or moderate agreement [Krippendorff's (K) alpha<0.61]. Finally, on the basis of the consensus readings, we sought to define a list of revised consensus criteria for 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT interpretation. Between-reader agreement for the presence of anomalous findings in any of the five sites was only moderate (K's alpha: 0.47). The agreement improved and became substantial when readers had to judge whether the anomalous findings were suggestive for a pathologic, uncertain, or non-pathologic image (K's alpha: 0.64). K's alpha calculations for each of the five sites of recurrence were also performed and evaluated. First Delphi round was thus conducted. A more detailed definition of the criteria was proposed by the project coordinator, which was then discussed and finally agreed by the seven readers. After the second Delphi round only four cases of disagreement still remained. These

  15. Evaluation of (68)Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT for the detection of duodenopancreatic neuroendocrine tumors in patients with MEN1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgat, Clément; Vélayoudom-Céphise, Fritz-Line; Schwartz, Paul; Guyot, Martine; Gaye, Delphine; Vimont, Delphine; Schulz, Jürgen; Mazère, Joachim; Nunes, Marie-Laure; Smith, Denis; Hindié, Elif; Fernandez, Philippe; Tabarin, Antoine

    2016-07-01

    Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy with (111)In-pentetreotide (SRS) is used to detect duodenopancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (dpNETs) in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1). However, SRS has limited sensitivity for this purpose. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) with (68)Ga-DOTA-TOC has a higher rate of sporadic dpNETs detection than SRS but there is little data for dpNETs detection in MEN1. To compare the performances of (68)Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT, SRS and contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CE-CT) to diagnose dpNETs in MEN1. Single-institution prospective comparative study Nineteen consecutive MEN1 patients (aged 47 ± 13 years) underwent (68)Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT, SRS, and CE-CT within 2 months in random order. Blinded readings of images were performed separately by experienced physicians. Unblinded analysis of CE-CT, combined with additional magnetic resonance imaging, endoscopic-ultrasound, (18)F-2-fluoro-deoxy-D-glucose ((18)F-FDG) PET/CT or histopathology results served as reference standard for dpNETs diagnosis. The sensitivity of (68)Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT, SRS, and CE-CT was 76, 20, and 60 %, respectively (p TOC PET/CT. (68)Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT detected lesions of smaller size than SRS (10.7 ± 7.6 and 15.2 ± 5.9 mm, respectively, p TOC PET/CT included small dpNETs (TOC PET/CT identified extra-abdominal MEN1-related tumors including one neuroendocrine thymic carcinoma identified by the three imaging procedures, one bronchial carcinoid undetected by CE-CT and three meningiomas undetected by SRS. Owing to higher diagnostic performance, (68)Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT (or alternative (68)Ga-labeled somatostatin analogues) should replace (111)In-pentetreotide in the investigation of MEN1 patients.

  16. Assessment of Bone Metastases in Patients with Prostate Cancer—A Comparison between 99mTc-Bone-Scintigraphy and [68Ga]Ga-PSMA PET/CT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lena Thomas

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Bone scintigraphy is the standard of reference in bone metastases in prostate cancer patients. However, new radiotracers employed in prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA-ligands has led to the growing importance of PET/CT as diagnostic tool. The aim of our study was to investigate the difference between bone scan and PSMA-PET/CT for the detection of bone metastases in prostate cancer. Methods: Thirty patients with bone metastases originating from prostate cancer were examined by 99mTc-MDP bone scan and 68Ga-PSMA-PET/CT within an average of 21 days. Bone scans were analyzed visually according to the number of lesions and using the software package ExiniBONE by Exini Diagnostics. PET/CT data was analyzed visually. Numbers of detected lesions were compared for the different methods for the whole patient and for different regions. In addition, results were compared to serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA, alkaline phosphatase (ALP, bone alkaline phosphatase (bALP, pro gastrin releasing peptide (pGRP and eastern cooperative oncology group (ECOG performance status. Results: In the bone scans, visual and semiautomatic lesion detection showed similar results with an average of 19.4 and 17.8 detected bone lesion per patient. However, in PSMA-PET/CT, on average double the numbers of lesions (40.0 were detected. The largest differences were found in the thorax and pelvis, which can be explained by the advantages of tomographic imaging. Bland-Altman analysis showed greater differences in patients with large numbers of bone metastases. Conclusion: No significant difference was found when using semiautomatic analysis compared to visual reading for bone scans. Fewer bone metastases were detected in bone scans than in PSMA-PET/CT. However, in none of our patients would the difference have led to clinical consequences. Therefore, it seems that for patients undergoing PSMA-PET/CT, there is no need to perform additional bone scans if the appropriate

  17. Comparison of the prognostic values of {sup 68}Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT and {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in patients with well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Punit; Naswa, Niraj; Kc, Sudhir Suman; Yadav, Yashwant; Kumar, Rakesh; Bal, Chandrasekhar [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ansari Nagar, New Delhi (India); Alvarado, Luis Andres; Dwivedi, Alok Kumar [Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Division of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, El Paso, TX (United States); Ammini, Ariachery C. [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, New Delhi (India)

    2014-12-15

    To determine the prognostic value of {sup 68}Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT in patients with well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumor (NET), and to compare the prognostic value with that of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and other conventional clinicopathological prognostic factors. Data from 37 consecutive patients (age 46.6 ± 13.5 years, 51 % men) with well-differentiated NET who underwent {sup 68}Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT and {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT were analyzed. All patients underwent a baseline visit with laboratory and radiological examinations. Clinical and imaging follow-up was performed in all patients. Progression-free survival (PFS) was measured from the date of the first PET/CT scan to the first documentation of progression of disease. {sup 68}Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT was positive in 37 of the 37 patients and {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT was positive in 21. During follow-up 10 patients (27 %) showed progression of disease and 27 (73 %) showed no progression (24 stable disease, 3 partial response). The median follow-up was 25 months (range 2 - 52 months). Among the variables evaluated none was significantly different between the progressive disease and nonprogressive disease groups, with only SUVmax on {sup 68}Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT being borderline significant (P = 0.073). In the univariate analysis for PFS outcome, SUVmax on {sup 68}Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT (HR 0.122, 95 % CI 0.019 - 0.779; P = 0.026) and histopathological tumor grade (HR 4.238, 95 % CI 1.058 - 16.976; P = 0.041) were found to be associated with PFS. Other factors including age, sex, primary site, Ki-67 index, TNM stage, {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT status (positive/negative), SUVmax on {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and type of treatment were not significant. In multivariable analysis, only SUVmax on {sup 68}Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT was found to be an independent positive predictor of PFS (HR 0.122, 95 % CI 0.019 - 0.779; P = 0.026). SUVmax measured on {sup 68}Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT is an independent, positive prognostic factor in patients with well-differentiated NET and

  18. Evaluation of the recombinant antigens Wb14 and WbT for the capture antibody diagnosis of lymphatic filariasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Filipe Pastor

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Lymphatic filariasis (LF is a parasitic disease caused mainly by the Wuchereria bancrofti worm and that affects up to 120 million people worldwide. LF is the second cause of chronic global deformity, responsible for 15 million people with lymphedema (elephantiasis and 25 million men with scrotal hydrocele. Its diagnosis is still associated with numerous difficulties, such as the sample collection periods (microfilaria nocturnal periodicity and limited diagnostic kits. OBJECTIVES The aim of this work was to evaluate two recombinant antigens (Wb14 and WbT as part of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA based antibody capture tests for LF. METHODS The recombinant antigens rWb14 and rWbT were expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 and an antibody capture ELISA was performed. For this, sera were used from microfilaremic individuals with W. bancrofti (MF, chronic pathology (CP, individuals infected with Strongyloides (SP and healthy controls from endemic (EN and non-endemic (NE areas. FINDINGS Both tests showed similar results, with 90% sensitivity and 96.6% specificity. In comparison with the BM14 ELISA commercial test, the Wb14 and WbT antigens performed with identical sensitivity but greater specificity. Reduced positivity with the CP suggested a potential to monitor cure. This was not confirmed, however, when sera from individuals up to seven years after treatment were assayed. MAIN CONCLUSIONS The Wb14 and WbT ELISAs were considered efficient and promising diagnostic tests. Due to the importance of antibody capture analysis to evaluate the Global Program to Eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis (GPELF, the tests proposed here appear as great alternatives to the available commercial system.

  19. 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT for the detection of bone metastasis in recurrent prostate cancer and a PSA level <2 ng/ml

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Lars J; Nielsen, Julie B; Dettmann, Katja

    2017-01-01

    /computed tomography ((68)Ga-PSMA PET/CT) is a novel and promising method for imaging in prostate cancer. The present study reports two cases of patients with prostate cancer with biochemical recurrence, with evidence of bone metastases on (68)Ga-PSMA PET/CT images and low prostate specific antigen PSA levels (.../ml) and PSA doubling time >6 months. The bone metastases were verified by supplementary imaging with (18)F-sodium fluoride PET/CT and magnetic resonance imaging as well as biochemical responses to androgen deprivation therapy. Therefore, (68)Ga-PSMA PET/CT is promising for the restaging of patients...... with prostate cancer with biochemical recurrence, including patients with low PSA levels and low PSA kinetics....

  20. {sup 68}Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT in recurrent medullary thyroid carcinoma: a lesion-by-lesion comparison with {sup 111}In-octreotide SPECT/CT and conventional imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaga, Lilian Yuri Itaya; Cunha, Marcelo L.; Campos Neto, Guilherme C.; Garcia, Marcio R.T.; Wagner, Jairo; Funari, Marcelo B.G. [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Imaging Department, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Yang, Ji H.; Camacho, Cleber P. [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo, Multiple Neoplasia Outpatiet Clinic, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2017-09-15

    The aim of this study was to prospectively compare the detection rate of {sup 68}Ga-DOTATATE PET-CT with {sup 111}In-octreotide SPECT-CT and conventional imaging (CI) in medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) patients with increased calcitonin (Ctn) levels but negative CI after thyroidectomy. Fifteen patients with raised Ctn levels and/or CI evidence of recurrence underwent {sup 68}Ga-DOTATATE PET-CT, {sup 111}In-octreotide SPECT-CT and CI. Histopathology, CI and biochemical/clinical/imaging follow-up were used as the reference standard. PET/CT, SPECT/CT and CI were compared in a lesion-based and organ-based analysis. PET/CT evidenced recurrence in 14 of 15 patients. There were 13 true positive (TP), 1 true negative (TN), 1 false positive (FP) and no false negative (FN) cases, resulting in a sensitivity and accuracy of 100% and 93%. SPECT/CT was positive in 6 of 15 cases. There were 6 TP, 2 TN, 7 FN and no FP cases, resulting in a sensitivity of 46% and accuracy of 53%. CI procedures detected tumor lesions in 14 of 15 patients. There were 13 TP, 1TN, 1 FP and no FN cases with a sensitivity of 100% and accuracy of 93%. A significantly higher number of lesions was detected by PET/CT (112 lesions, p = 0.005) and CI (109 lesions, p = 0.005) in comparison to SPECT/CT (16 lesions). There was no significant difference between PET/CT and CI for the total number of detected lesions (p = 0.734). PET/CT detected more lesions than SPECT/CT regardless of the organ. PET/CT detected more bone lesions but missed some neck nodal metastases evidenced by CI. The number of lesions per region demonstrated by PET/CT and CI were similar in the other sites. {sup 68}Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT is superior to {sup 111}In-octreotide SPECT/CT for the detection of recurrent MTC demonstrating a significantly higher number of lesions. {sup 68}Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT showed a superior detection rate compared to CI in demonstrating bone metastases. (orig.)

  1. The added value of {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TATE-PET to contrast-enhanced CT for primary site detection in CUP of neuroendocrine origin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazmierczak, Philipp M. [Klinikum der Universitaet Muenchen, Institut fuer Klinische Radiologie, Muenchen (Germany); Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Muenchen (Germany); Rominger, Axel; Wenter, Vera [Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Muenchen (Germany); Spitzweg, Christine; Auernhammer, Christoph [Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Department of Internal Medicine II, Muenchen (Germany); Angele, Martin K. [Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Department of General, Visceral, Transplantation, Vascular and Thoracic Surgery, Muenchen (Germany); Rist, Carsten; Cyran, Clemens C. [Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Muenchen (Germany)

    2017-04-15

    To quantify the additional value of {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TATE PET/CT in comparison with contrast-enhanced CT alone for primary tumour detection in neuroendocrine cancer of unknown primary (CUP-NET). In total, 38 consecutive patients (27 men, 11 women; mean age 62 years) with histologically proven CUP-NET who underwent a contrast-enhanced {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TATE PET/CT scan for primary tumour detection and staging between 2010 and 2014 were included in this IRB-approved retrospective study. Two blinded readers independently analysed the contrast-enhanced CT and {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TATE PET datasets separately and noted from which modality they suspected a primary tumour. Consensus was reached if the results were divergent. Postoperative histopathology (24 patients) and follow-up {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TATE PET/CT imaging (14 patients) served as the reference standards and statistical measures of diagnostic accuracy were calculated accordingly. The majority of confirmed primary tumours were located in the abdomen (ileum in 19 patients, pancreas in 12, lung in 2, small pelvis in 1). High interobserver agreement was noted regarding the suspected primary tumour site (Cohen's k 0.90, p < 0.001). {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TATE PET demonstrated a significantly higher sensitivity (94 % vs. 63 %, p = 0.005) and a significantly higher accuracy (87 % vs. 68 %, p = 0.003) than contrast-enhanced CT. Ga-DOTA-TATE PET/CT compared with contrast-enhanced CT alone provides an improvement in sensitivity of 50 % and an improvement in accuracy of 30 % in primary tumour detection in CUP-NET. (orig.)

  2. Optimal time-point for 68Ga-PSMA-11 PET/CT imaging in assessment of prostate cancer: feasibility of sterile cold-kit tracer preparation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beheshti, Mohsen; Paymani, Zeinab; Brilhante, Joana; Geinitz, Hans; Gehring, Daniela; Leopoldseder, Thomas; Wouters, Ludovic; Pirich, Christian; Loidl, Wolfgang; Langsteger, Werner

    2018-07-01

    In this prospective study, we evaluated the optimal time-point for 68 Ga-PSMA-11 PET/CT acquisition in the assessment of prostate cancer. We also examined, for the first time the feasibility of tracer production using a PSMA-11 sterile cold-kit in the clinical workflow of PET/CT centres. Fifty prostate cancer patients (25 staging, 25 biochemical recurrence) were enrolled in this study. All patients received an intravenous dose of 2.0 MBq/kg body weight 68 Ga-PSMA-11 prepared using a sterile cold kit (ANMI SA, Liege, Belgium), followed by an early (20 min after injection) semi-whole-body PET/CT scan and a standard-delay (100 min after injection) abdominopelvic PET/CT scan. The detection rates with 68 Ga-PSMA-11 were compared between the two acquisitions. The pattern of physiological background activity and tumour to background ratio were also analysed. The total preparation time was reduced to 5 min using the PSMA-11 sterile cold kit, which improved the final radionuclide activity by about 30% per single 68 Ge/ 68 Ga generator elution. Overall, 158 pathological lesions were analysed in 45 patients (90%) suggestive of malignancy on both (early and standard-delay) 68 Ga-PSMA PET/CT images. There was a significant (p PET/CT imaging seems to provide a detection rate comparable with that of standard-delay imaging. Furthermore, the shorter preparation time using the 68 Ga-PSMA-11 sterile cold kit and promising value of early PET/CT scanning could allow tailoring of imaging protocols which may reduce the costs and improve the time efficiency in PET/CT centres.

  3. Cost comparison of 111In-DTPA-octreotide scintigraphy and 68Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT for staging enteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiter, Nils F.; Brenner, Winfried; Buchert, Ralph; Prasad, Vikas; Nogami, Munenobu; Huppertz, Alexander; Pape, Ulrich-Frank; Hamm, Bernd; Maurer, Martin H.

    2012-01-01

    Although somatostatin receptor positron emission tomography (PET)/CT is gaining increasing popularity and has shown its diagnostic superiority in several studies, 111 In-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA)-octreotide is still the current standard for diagnosis of neuroendocrine tumours (NET). The aim of this study was to compare the costs for the two diagnostic tests and the respective consequential costs. From January 2009 to July 2009, 51 consecutive patients with enteropancreatic NET who underwent contrast-enhanced 68 Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT (n = 29) or 111 In-DTPA-octreotide (mean 3 whole-body scans plus 1.6 low-dose single photon emission computed tomography/CT; n = 22) were included. For cost analysis, direct costs (equipment) and variable costs (material, labour) per examination were calculated. Additionally required CT and/or MRI examinations within the staging process were assessed as consequential costs. An additional deterministic sensitivity analysis was performed. A 68 Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT examination yielded total costs (equipment, personnel and material costs) of 548 EUR. On the other hand, an 111 In-DTPA-octreotide examination resulted in 827 EUR total costs. Costs for equipment and material had a share of 460 EUR/720 EUR for 68 Ga-DOTATOC/ 111 In-DTPA-octreotide and labour costs of 89 EUR/106 EUR. With 68 Ga-DOTATOC additional MRI had to be performed in 7% of the patients resulting in a mean of 20 EUR for supplementary imaging per patient; 82% of patients with 111 In-DTPA-octreotide needed additional MRI and/or CT resulting in mean additional costs of 161 EUR per patient. 68 Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT was considerably cheaper than 111 In-DTPA-octreotide with respect to both material and personnel costs. Furthermore, by using 68 Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT considerably fewer additional examinations were needed reducing the consequential costs significantly. (orig.)

  4. Ectopic ACTH and CRH co-secreting tumor localized by 68Ga-DOTA-TATE PET/CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, Georgios Z.; Bagci, Ulas; Sadowski, Samira M.; Patronas, Nicholas J.; Stratakis, Constantine A.

    2015-01-01

    Diagnosis of ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) co-secreting tumors causing Cushing syndrome (CS) is challenging, since these tumors are rare and their diagnosis is frequently confused with Cushing disease (CD), due to the effect of CRH on the pituitary. We report a case of a 21-year-old male who was referred to our institution with persistent hypercortisolemia and CS after undergoing unnecessary transsphenoidal surgery (TSS). 68Ga-DOTA-TATE PET/CT revealed increased tracer uptake in the thymus which was histologically proved to be neuroendocrine tumor (NET) staining positive for ACTH and CRH. Imaging with 18F-FDG PET/CT was not diagnostic. PMID:26018709

  5. Validating and improving CT ventilation imaging by correlating with ventilation 4D-PET/CT using {sup 68}Ga-labeled nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kipritidis, John, E-mail: john.kipritidis@sydney.edu.au; Keall, Paul J. [Radiation Physics Laboratory, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney NSW 2006 (Australia); Siva, Shankar [Department of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, and Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, University of Melbourne, Parkville VIC 3052 (Australia); Hofman, Michael S.; Callahan, Jason; Hicks, Rodney J. [Centre for Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre and Department of Medicine, University of Melbourne, Melbourne VIC 3002 (Australia)

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: CT ventilation imaging is a novel functional lung imaging modality based on deformable image registration. The authors present the first validation study of CT ventilation using positron emission tomography with{sup 68}Ga-labeled nanoparticles (PET-Galligas). The authors quantify this agreement for different CT ventilation metrics and PET reconstruction parameters. Methods: PET-Galligas ventilation scans were acquired for 12 lung cancer patients using a four-dimensional (4D) PET/CT scanner. CT ventilation images were then produced by applying B-spline deformable image registration between the respiratory correlated phases of the 4D-CT. The authors test four ventilation metrics, two existing and two modified. The two existing metrics model mechanical ventilation (alveolar air-flow) based on Hounsfield unit (HU) change (V{sub HU}) or Jacobian determinant of deformation (V{sub Jac}). The two modified metrics incorporate a voxel-wise tissue-density scaling (ρV{sub HU} and ρV{sub Jac}) and were hypothesized to better model the physiological ventilation. In order to assess the impact of PET image quality, comparisons were performed using both standard and respiratory-gated PET images with the former exhibiting better signal. Different median filtering kernels (σ{sub m} = 0 or 3 mm) were also applied to all images. As in previous studies, similarity metrics included the Spearman correlation coefficient r within the segmented lung volumes, and Dice coefficient d{sub 20} for the (0 − 20)th functional percentile volumes. Results: The best agreement between CT and PET ventilation was obtained comparing standard PET images to the density-scaled HU metric (ρV{sub HU}) with σ{sub m} = 3 mm. This leads to correlation values in the ranges 0.22 ⩽ r ⩽ 0.76 and 0.38 ⩽ d{sub 20} ⩽ 0.68, with r{sup ¯}=0.42±0.16 and d{sup ¯}{sub 20}=0.52±0.09 averaged over the 12 patients. Compared to Jacobian-based metrics, HU-based metrics lead to statistically significant

  6. Validating and improving CT ventilation imaging by correlating with ventilation 4D-PET/CT using 68Ga-labeled nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kipritidis, John; Keall, Paul J.; Siva, Shankar; Hofman, Michael S.; Callahan, Jason; Hicks, Rodney J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: CT ventilation imaging is a novel functional lung imaging modality based on deformable image registration. The authors present the first validation study of CT ventilation using positron emission tomography with 68 Ga-labeled nanoparticles (PET-Galligas). The authors quantify this agreement for different CT ventilation metrics and PET reconstruction parameters. Methods: PET-Galligas ventilation scans were acquired for 12 lung cancer patients using a four-dimensional (4D) PET/CT scanner. CT ventilation images were then produced by applying B-spline deformable image registration between the respiratory correlated phases of the 4D-CT. The authors test four ventilation metrics, two existing and two modified. The two existing metrics model mechanical ventilation (alveolar air-flow) based on Hounsfield unit (HU) change (V HU ) or Jacobian determinant of deformation (V Jac ). The two modified metrics incorporate a voxel-wise tissue-density scaling (ρV HU and ρV Jac ) and were hypothesized to better model the physiological ventilation. In order to assess the impact of PET image quality, comparisons were performed using both standard and respiratory-gated PET images with the former exhibiting better signal. Different median filtering kernels (σ m = 0 or 3 mm) were also applied to all images. As in previous studies, similarity metrics included the Spearman correlation coefficient r within the segmented lung volumes, and Dice coefficient d 20 for the (0 − 20)th functional percentile volumes. Results: The best agreement between CT and PET ventilation was obtained comparing standard PET images to the density-scaled HU metric (ρV HU ) with σ m = 3 mm. This leads to correlation values in the ranges 0.22 ⩽ r ⩽ 0.76 and 0.38 ⩽ d 20 ⩽ 0.68, with r ¯ =0.42±0.16 and d ¯ 20 =0.52±0.09 averaged over the 12 patients. Compared to Jacobian-based metrics, HU-based metrics lead to statistically significant improvements in r ¯ and d ¯ 20 (p ¯ than for unscaled

  7. Early Dynamic 68Ga-DOTA-D-Phe1-Tyr3-Octreotide PET/CT in Patients With Hepatic Metastases of Neuroendocrine Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sänger, Philipp Wilhelm; Freesmeyer, Martin

    2016-06-01

    Whole-body PET with Ga-DOTA-D-Phe-Tyr-octreotide (Ga-DOTATOC) and contrast-enhanced CT (ceCT) are considered a standard for the staging of neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). This study sought to verify whether early dynamic (ed) Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT can reliably detect liver metastases of NETs (hypervascular, nonhypervascular; positive or negative for somatostatin receptors) and to verify if the receptor positivity has a significant impact on the detection of tumor hypervascularization. Twenty-seven patients with NET were studied by ceCT and standard whole-body PET according to established Ga-DOTATOC protocols. In addition, edPET data were obtained by continuous scanning during the first 300 seconds after bolus injections of the radiotracer. Early dynamic PET required an additional low-dose, native CT image of the liver for the purpose of attenuation correction. Time-activity and time-contrast curves were obtained, the latter being calculated by the difference between tumor and reference regions. Early dynamic PET/CT proved comparable with ceCT in readily identifying hypervascular lesions, irrespective of the receptor status, with activities rising within 16 to 40 seconds. Early dynamic PET/CT also readily identified nonhypervascular, receptor-positive lesions. Positive image contrasts were obtained for hypervascular, receptor-positive lesions, whereas early negative contrasts were obtained for nonhypervascular, receptor-negative lesions. The high image contrast of hypervascular NET metastases in early arterial phases suggests that edPET/CT can become a useful alternative in patients with contraindications to ceCT. The high density of somatostatin receptors did not seem to interfere with the detection of the lesion's hypervascularization.

  8. High-resolution imaging of pulmonary ventilation and perfusion with 68Ga-VQ respiratory gated (4-D) PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callahan, Jason; Hofman, Michael S.; Siva, Shankar; Kron, Tomas; Schneider, Michal E.; Binns, David; Eu, Peter; Hicks, Rodney J.

    2014-01-01

    Our group has previously reported on the use of 68 Ga-ventilation/perfusion (VQ) PET/CT scanning for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism. We describe here the acquisition methodology for 68 Ga-VQ respiratory gated (4-D) PET/CT and the effects of respiratory motion on image coregistration in VQ scanning. A prospective study was performed in 15 patients with non-small-cell lung cancer. 4-D PET and 4-D CT images were acquired using an infrared marker on the patient's abdomen as a surrogate for breathing motion following inhalation of Galligas and intravenous administration of 68 Ga-macroaggregated albumin. Images were reconstructed with phase-matched attenuation correction. The lungs were contoured on CT and PET VQ images during free-breathing (FB) and at maximum inspiration (Insp) and expiration (Exp). The similarity between PET and CT volumes was measured using the Dice coefficient (DC) comparing the following groups; (1) FB-PET/CT, (2) InspPET/InspCT, (3) ExpPET/Exp CT, and (4) FB-PET/AveCT. A repeated measures one-way ANOVA with multiple comparison Tukey tests were performed to evaluate any difference between the groups. Diaphragmatic motion in the superior-inferior direction on the 4-D CT scan was also measured. 4-D VQ scanning was successful in all patients without additional acquisition time compared to the nongated technique. The highest volume overlap was between ExpPET and ExpCT and between FB-PET and AveCT with a DC of 0.82 and 0.80 for ventilation and perfusion, respectively. This was significantly better than the DC comparing the other groups (0.78-0.79, p 68 Ga-VQ 4-D PET/CT is feasible and the blurring caused by respiratory motion is well corrected with 4-D acquisition, which principally reduces artefact at the lung bases. The images with the highest spatial overlap were the combined expiration phase or FB PET and average CT. With higher resolution than SPECT/CT, the PET/CT technique has a broad range of potential clinical applications including

  9. Comparison of 68Ga-OPS202 (68Ga-NODAGA-JR11) and 68Ga-DOTATOC (68Ga-Edotreotide) PET/CT in Patients with Gastroenteropancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors: Evaluation of Sensitivity in a Prospective Phase II Imaging Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas, Guillaume P; Schreiter, Nils; Kaul, Felix; Uiters, John; Bouterfa, Hakim; Kaufmann, Jens; Erlanger, Tobias E; Cathomas, Richard; Christ, Emanuel; Fani, Melpomeni; Wild, Damian

    2017-11-30

    Radiolabeled somatostatin receptor (sst) agonists are integral to the diagnosis of gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs), but detection rates, especially of liver metastases, remain disappointing even with PET/CT. 68 Ga-OPS202 ( 68 Ga-NODAGA-JR11), a novel radiolabeled sst antagonist with a high affinity for sst 2 , has the potential to perform better than sst agonists. Here we present the results of the Phase II component of a Phase I/II study, which evaluated the sensitivity of 68 Ga-OPS202 PET/CT compared with the reference compound, 68 Ga-DOTATOC (sst agonist). Methods: Patients received a single intravenous administration of 68 Ga-DOTATOC (15 µg peptide) and 68 Ga-OPS202 (15 µg peptide at visit 1; 50 µg peptide at visit 2) with an activity of 150 MBq. Whole-body PET/CT acquisitions were performed 1 h post injection on the same calibrated PET/CT scanner. Diagnostic efficacy measures were compared against contrast medium-enhanced CT or MRI as gold standard. Two independent blinded experts read the scans and both outcomes were combined for analysis. Results: Twelve consecutive patients with G1 or G2 GEP-NETs took part in this prospective study. Image contrast for matched malignant liver lesions was significantly higher for 68 Ga-OPS202 scans than for the 68 Ga-DOTATOC scan: median of the mean [interquartile] tumor-to-normal-liver SUV max ratios for 15 µg and 50 µg 68 Ga-OPS202 (5.3 [2.9 - 5.7] and 4.3 [3.4 - 6.3], respectively) were significantly higher than for 68 Ga-DOTATOC (1.9 [1.4 - 2.9]; P = 0.004 and P = 0.008, respectively). The higher tumor-to-background ratio of 68 Ga-OPS202 resulted not only in a higher detection rate of liver metastases, but also in a significantly higher lesion-based overall sensitivity with the antagonist than with 68 Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT: 94% and 88% for 50 µg and 15 µg 68 Ga-OPS202 and 59% for 15 µg 68 Ga-DOTATOC, respectively (pPET/CT and 68 Ga DOTATOC PET/CT were similar (approximately 98%). There were no

  10. (68)Ga-DOTA-Siglec-9 PET/CT imaging of peri-implant tissue responses and staphylococcal infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahtinen, Helena; Kulkova, Julia; Lindholm, Laura; Eerola, Erkki; Hakanen, Antti J; Moritz, Niko; Söderström, Mirva; Saanijoki, Tiina; Jalkanen, Sirpa; Roivainen, Anne; Aro, Hannu T

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis (S. epidermidis) has emerged as one of the leading pathogens of biomaterial-related infections. Vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1) is an inflammation-inducible endothelial molecule controlling extravasation of leukocytes. Sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectin 9 (Siglec-9) is a leukocyte ligand of VAP-1. We hypothesized that (68)Ga-labeled 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid-conjugated Siglec-9 motif containing peptide ((68)Ga-DOTA-Siglec-9) could detect inflammatory response due to S. epidermidis peri-implant infection by positron emission tomography (PET). Thirty Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into three groups. A sterile catheter was implanted into the medullary canal of the left tibia. In groups 1 and 2, the implantation was followed by peri-implant injection of S. epidermidis or Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) with adjunct injections of aqueous sodium morrhuate. In group 3, sterile saline was injected instead of bacteria and no aqueous sodium morrhuate was used. At 2 weeks after operation, (68)Ga-DOTA-Siglec-9 PET coupled with computed tomography (CT) was performed with the measurement of the standardized uptake value (SUV). The presence of the implant-related infection was verified by microbiological analysis, imaging with fluorescence microscope, and histology. The in vivo PET results were verified by ex vivo measurements by gamma counter. In group 3, the tibias with implanted sterile catheters showed an increased local uptake of (68)Ga-DOTA-Siglec-9 compared with the intact contralateral bones (SUVratio +29.5%). (68)Ga-DOTA-Siglec-9 PET detected inflammation induced by S. epidermidis and S. aureus catheter-related bone infections (SUVratio +58.1% and +41.7%, respectively). The tracer uptake was significantly higher in the S. epidermidis group than in group 3 without bacterial inoculation, but the difference between S. epidermidis and S. aureus groups was not statistically significant. The

  11. Impact of 68Ga-DOTA-Peptide PET/CT on the Management of Gastrointestinal Neuroendocrine Tumour (GI-NET): Malaysian National Referral Centre Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Teik Hin; Boey, Ching Yeen; Lee, Boon Nang

    2018-04-01

    The National Cancer Institute is the only referral centre in Malaysia that provides 68 Ga-DOTA-peptide imaging. The purpose of this study is to determine the impact of 68 Ga-DOTA-peptide PET/CT on the management of gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumours (GI-NET). A cross-sectional study was performed to review the impact of 68 Ga-DOTA-peptide ( 68 Ga-DOTATATE or 68 Ga-DOTATOC) PET/CT on patients with biopsy-proven GI-NET between January 2011 and December 2015. Suspected NET was excluded. Demographic data, tumoral characteristics, change of disease stage, pre-PET intended management and post-PET management were evaluated. Over a 5-year period, 82 studies of 68 Ga-DOTA-peptide PET/CT were performed on 44 GI-NET patients. The most common primary site was the rectum (50.0%) followed by the small bowel, stomach and colon. Using WHO 2010 grading, 40.9% of patients had low-grade (G1) tumour, 22.7% intermediate (G2) and 4.5% high (G3). Of ten patients scheduled for pre-operative staging, 68 Ga-DOTA-peptide PET/CT only led to therapeutic change in three patients. Furthermore, false-negative results of 68 Ga-DOTA-peptide PET/CT were reported in one patient after surgical confirmation. However, therapeutic changes were seen in 20/36 patients (55.6%) scheduled for post-surgical restaging or assessment of somatostatin analogue (SSA) eligibility. When 68 Ga-DOTA-peptide PET/CT was used for monitoring disease progress during systemic treatment (sandostatin, chemotherapy, everolimus and PRRT) in metastatic disease, impact on management modification was seen in 19/36 patients (52.8%), of which 84.2% had inter-modality change (switch to everolimus, chemotherapy or PRRT) and 15.8% had intra-modality change (increased SSA dosage). 68 Ga-DOTA-peptide PET/CT has a significant impact on management decisions in GI-NET patients as it can provide additional information on occult metastasis/equivocal lesions and supply the clinician an opportunity to select patients for targeted therapy.

  12. PET-CT and PET-MRI of the prostate. From {sup 18}F-FDG to {sup 68}Ga-PSMA; PET-CT/-MRT der Prostata. Von {sup 18}F-FDG zu {sup 68}Ga-PSMA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knorr, K.; Eiber, M.; Scheidhauer, K. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Nuklearmedizinische Klinik und Poliklinik, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany); Maurer, T. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Urologische Klinik und Poliklinik, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany); Wester, H.J. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Pharmazeutische Radiochemie, Garching (Germany)

    2017-08-15

    In the last few years nuclear medical diagnostics have experienced a unprecedented renaissance in the diagnostics of prostate cancer, due to the availability of hybrid imaging with positron emission tomography computed tomography (PET/CT), PET magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) CT as well as the development of prostate-specific radiopharmaceuticals. The use of fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), which has been successfully implemented for many years in PET diagnostics, is only helpful in dedifferentiated tumors due to the biological characteristics of prostate cancer. New specific radiopharmaceuticals, such as choline-derivatives, which are incorporated into the prostate cancer cell and built into the cell membrane as well as the recently developed highly specific ligands for prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) are revolutionizing prostate cancer imaging and (re-) staging. The {sup 68} Ga-labeled PSMA ligands for PET-CT and PET-MRI are highly specific tracers for primary diagnostics and detection of metastases of prostate carcinoma. In risk patients, which includes patients with intermediate and high-risk tumors, they have largely replaced choline-based PET-CT, especially in the case of very low PSA values <0.5 ng/ml in the diagnostics of recurrence. The use in the primary diagnostics as PET-MRI, also in combination with multiparametric MRI (mpMRI), is promising with respect to early diagnostics and image fusion-assisted biopsy as well as surgery and irradiation planning. (orig.) [German] Die nuklearmedizinische Diagnostik hat in den letzten Jahren bei der Bildgebung des Prostatakarzinoms eine rasante Entwicklung erlebt, sowohl aufgrund der verfuegbaren Hybridbildgebung mit der Positronenemissionstomographie(PET)-CT, PET-MRT sowie der Single-photon-emission-computed-tomography(SPECT)-CT als auch durch die Entwicklung prostataspezifischer Radiopharmaka. Die in der PET-Diagnostik seit Jahren erfolgreich eingesetzte

  13. Groundwater impact assessment report for the 284-WB Powerplant Ponds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, D.J.; Johnson, V.G.; Lindsey, K.A.

    1993-09-01

    As required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-17-00A), this report assesses the impact of wastewater discharged to the 284-WB Powerplant Ponds on groundwater quality. The assessment reported herein expands upon the initial analysis conducted between 1989 and 1990 for the Liquid Effluent Study Final Project Plan

  14. Pituitary Adenoma Recurrence Suspected on Central Hyperthyroidism Despite Empty Sella and Confirmed by 68Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthé, Mathieu; Sarfati, Julie; Bourcigaux, Nathalie; Christin-Maitre, Sophie; Talbot, Jean-Noël; Montravers, Françoise

    2017-06-01

    Thyrotropin-secreting pituitary adenomas are very rare tumors, known to present overexpression of somatostatin receptor subtype 2 and which may consequently demonstrate abnormal uptake on Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT. A 67-year-old woman with a history of operated pituitary macroadenoma presented with symptoms of hyperthyroidism including a large goiter. Her serum thyroid hormone levels were in favor of central hyperthyroidism. Pituitary MRI depicted an empty sella but visualized an ambiguous lesion centered on the left sphenoidal sinus. Complementary Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT finally demonstrated intense uptake by the sphenoidal lesion, confirming recurrence of the pituitary adenoma.

  15. Guideline for PET/CT imaging of neuroendocrine neoplasms withGa-DOTA-conjugated somatostatin receptor targeting peptides andF-DOPA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bozkurt, Murat Fani; Virgolini, Irene; Balogova, Sona

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE & METHODS: Neuroendocrine neoplasms are a heterogenous group of tumours, for which nuclear medicine plays an important role in the diagnostic work-up as well as in the targeted therapeutic options. This guideline is aimed to assist nuclear medicine physicians in recommending, performing......, reporting and interpreting the results of somatostatin receptor (SSTR) PET/CT imaging using68Ga-DOTA-conjugated peptides, as well as18F-DOPA imaging for various neuroendocrine neoplasms. RESULTS & CONCLUSION: The previous procedural guideline by EANM regarding the use PET/CT tumour imaging with68Ga...

  16. Relationships between serum PSA levels, Gleason scores and results of 68Ga-PSMAPET/CT in patients with recurrent prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanli, Yasemin; Kuyumcu, Serkan; Sanli, Oner; Buyukkaya, Fikret; İribaş, Ayça; Alcin, Goksel; Darendeliler, Emin; Ozluk, Yasemin; Yildiz, Sevda Ozel; Turkmen, Cüneyt

    2017-11-01

    To investigate the relationship between serum PSA level, Gleason score of PCa and the outcomes of Ga 68 -PSMA PET/CT in patients with recurrent PCa. A total of 109 consecutive patients (median age 71 years; range 48-89 years) who had PSA recurrence after RP and/or hormonotherapy and/or radiotherapy were included in this study. Local recurrences, lymph node metastasis (pelvic, abdominal and/or supradiaphragmatic), bone metastases (oligometastatic/multimetastatic) and other metastatic sites (lung, liver, brain, etc) were documented. In 91(83.4%) patients at least one lesion characteristic for PCa was detected by 68 Ga-PSMA PET/CT. The median serum total PSA (tPSA) was 6.5 (0.2-640) ng/ml.There was a significant difference between 68 Ga-PSMA PET/CT positive and negative patients in terms of serum total PSA value. No statistical significance was found between positive and negative 68 Ga-PSMA PET/CT findings in terms of Gleason score. Local recurrence was detected in 56 patients. whereas lymph node metastases were demonstrated in 46 patients. Pelvic nodal disease was the most frequent presentation followed by abdominal and supradiaphragmaticnodal involvement. Bone metastases [oligometastasis, (n = 20); multimetastasis, (n = 35)⦌ were also detected in 55 patients. In the ROC analysis for the study cohort, the optimal cut-off value of total serum PSA was determined as 0.67 ng/ml for distinguishing between positive and negative 68 Ga-PSMA PET/CT images, with an area under curve of 0.952 (95% CI 0.911-0.993). 68 Ga-PSMA PET/CT was found to be an effective tool for the detection of recurrent PCa. Even though no relationship was detected between the GS and 68 Ga-PSMA PET/CT findings, serum total PSA values may be used for estimating the likelihood of positive 68 Ga-PSMA PET/CT results.

  17. Preliminary results on response assessment using {sup 68}Ga-HBED-CC-PSMA PET/CT in patients with metastatic prostate cancer undergoing docetaxel chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seitz, Anna Katharina [Technical University of Munich, Department of Urology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Julius Maximilians University Medical Centre of Wuerzburg, Department of Urology and Paediatric Urology, Wuerzburg (Germany); Rauscher, Isabel; Kroenke, Markus; Schwaiger, Markus [Technical University of Munich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Haller, Bernhard [Technical University of Munich, Institute of Medical Informatics, Statistics and Epidemiology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Luther, Sophia; Heck, Matthias M.; Horn, Thomas; Gschwend, Juergen E.; Maurer, Tobias [Technical University of Munich, Department of Urology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Eiber, Matthias [Technical University of Munich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, Los Angeles (United States)

    2018-04-15

    To investigate the value of {sup 68}Ga-HBED-CC PSMA ({sup 68}Ga-PSMA) PET/CT for response assessment in metastatic castration-sensitive and castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCSPC and mCRPC) during docetaxel chemotherapy. {sup 68}Ga-PSMA PET/CT was performed in seven mCSPC patients before and after six cycles of upfront docetaxel chemotherapy and in 16 mCRPC patients before and after three cycles of palliative docetaxel chemotherapy. Radiographic treatment response was evaluated separately on the {sup 68}Ga-PSMA PET and CT datasets. Changes in {sup 68}Ga-PSMA uptake (SUVmean) were assessed on a per-patient and a per-lesion basis using the PERCIST scoring system with slight modification. Treatment response was defined as absence of any PSMA uptake in all target lesions on posttreatment PET (complete response, CR) or a decrease in summed SUVmean of ≥30% (partial response, PR). The appearance of a new PET-positive lesion or an increase in summed SUVmean of ≥30% (progressive disease, PD) indicated nonresponse. A moderate change in summed SUVmean (between -30% and +30%) without a change in the number of target lesions was defined as stable disease (SD). For treatment response assessment on CT, RECIST1.1 criteria were used. Radiographic responses on {sup 68}Ga-PSMA PET [RR(PET)] and on CT [RR(CT)] were compared and correlated with biochemical response (BR). A decrease in serum PSA level of ≥50% was defined as biochemical PR. Biochemical PR was found in six of seven patients with mCSPC (86%, 95% confidence interval 42% to 99.6%). The concordance rate was higher between BR and RR(PET) than between BR and RR(CT) (6/7 vs. 3/6 patients). {sup 68}Ga-PSMA PET and CT were concordant in only three patients (50%, 12% to 88%). In mCRPC patients, biochemical PR was found in six of 16 patients (38%, 15% to 65%). Outcome prediction was concordant between BR and RR(PET) in nine of 16 patients (56%), and between BR and RR(CT) in only four of 12 patients (33%) with target

  18. Preliminary results on response assessment using 68Ga-HBED-CC-PSMA PET/CT in patients with metastatic prostate cancer undergoing docetaxel chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seitz, Anna Katharina; Rauscher, Isabel; Kroenke, Markus; Schwaiger, Markus; Haller, Bernhard; Luther, Sophia; Heck, Matthias M.; Horn, Thomas; Gschwend, Juergen E.; Maurer, Tobias; Eiber, Matthias

    2018-01-01

    To investigate the value of 68 Ga-HBED-CC PSMA ( 68 Ga-PSMA) PET/CT for response assessment in metastatic castration-sensitive and castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCSPC and mCRPC) during docetaxel chemotherapy. 68 Ga-PSMA PET/CT was performed in seven mCSPC patients before and after six cycles of upfront docetaxel chemotherapy and in 16 mCRPC patients before and after three cycles of palliative docetaxel chemotherapy. Radiographic treatment response was evaluated separately on the 68 Ga-PSMA PET and CT datasets. Changes in 68 Ga-PSMA uptake (SUVmean) were assessed on a per-patient and a per-lesion basis using the PERCIST scoring system with slight modification. Treatment response was defined as absence of any PSMA uptake in all target lesions on posttreatment PET (complete response, CR) or a decrease in summed SUVmean of ≥30% (partial response, PR). The appearance of a new PET-positive lesion or an increase in summed SUVmean of ≥30% (progressive disease, PD) indicated nonresponse. A moderate change in summed SUVmean (between -30% and +30%) without a change in the number of target lesions was defined as stable disease (SD). For treatment response assessment on CT, RECIST1.1 criteria were used. Radiographic responses on 68 Ga-PSMA PET [RR(PET)] and on CT [RR(CT)] were compared and correlated with biochemical response (BR). A decrease in serum PSA level of ≥50% was defined as biochemical PR. Biochemical PR was found in six of seven patients with mCSPC (86%, 95% confidence interval 42% to 99.6%). The concordance rate was higher between BR and RR(PET) than between BR and RR(CT) (6/7 vs. 3/6 patients). 68 Ga-PSMA PET and CT were concordant in only three patients (50%, 12% to 88%). In mCRPC patients, biochemical PR was found in six of 16 patients (38%, 15% to 65%). Outcome prediction was concordant between BR and RR(PET) in nine of 16 patients (56%), and between BR and RR(CT) in only four of 12 patients (33%) with target lesions on CT. 68 Ga-PSMA PET and CT

  19. Comparison of PET/CT and PET/MRI hybrid systems using a 68Ga-labelled PSMA ligand for the diagnosis of recurrent prostate cancer: initial experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afshar-Oromieh, A.; Haberkorn, U.; Schlemmer, H.P.; Fenchel, M.; Roethke, M.; Eder, M.; Eisenhut, M.; Hadaschik, B.A.; Kopp-Schneider, A.

    2014-01-01

    68 Ga-labelled HBED-CC-PSMA is a highly promising tracer for imaging recurrent prostate cancer (PCa). The intention of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of PET/MRI with this tracer. Twenty patients underwent PET/CT 1 h after injection of the 68 Ga-PSMA ligand followed by PET/MRI 3 h after injection. Data from the two investigations were first analysed separately and then compared with respect to tumour detection rate and radiotracer uptake in various tissues. To evaluate the quantification accuracy of the PET/MRI system, differences in SUVs between PET/CT and corresponding PET/MRI were compared with differences in SUVs between PET/CT 1 h and 3 h after injection in another patient cohort. This cohort was investigated using the same PET/CT system. With PET/MRI, different diagnostic sequences, higher contrast of lesions and higher resolution of MRI enabled a subjectively easier evaluation of the images. In addition, four unclear findings on PET/CT could be clarified as characteristic of PCa metastases by PET/MRI. However, in PET images of the PET/MRI, a reduced signal was observed at the level of the kidneys (in 11 patients) and around the urinary bladder (in 15 patients). This led to reduced SUVs in six lesions. SUV mean values provided by the PET/MRI system were different in muscles, blood pool, liver and spleen. PCa was detected more easily and more accurately with Ga-PSMA PET/MRI than with PET/CT and with lower radiation exposure. Consequently, this new technique could clarify unclear findings on PET/CT. However, scatter correction was challenging when the specific 68 Ga-PSMA ligand was used. Moreover, direct comparison of SUVs from PET/CT and PET/MR needs to be conducted carefully. (orig.)

  20. Detection rate of PET/CT in patients with biochemical relapse of prostate cancer using [{sup 68}Ga]PSMA I and T and comparison with published data of [{sup 68}Ga]PSMA HBED-CC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berliner, Christoph; Tienken, Milena; Kobayashi, Yuske; Helberg, Annabelle; Kirchner, Uve; Klutmann, Susanne; Mester, Janos; Bannas, Peter [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Hamburg (Germany); Frenzel, Thorsten [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Ambulatory Center, Department for Radiation Oncology, Hamburg (Germany); Beyersdorff, Dirk [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Hamburg (Germany); University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martini-Klinik, Hamburg (Germany); Budaeus, Lars [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martini-Klinik, Hamburg (Germany); Wester, Hans-Juergen [Technical University Munich, Pharmaceutical Radiochemistry, Garching (Germany)

    2017-04-15

    To determine the detection rate of PET/CT in biochemical relapse of prostate cancer using [{sup 68}Ga]PSMA I and T and to compare it with published detection rates of [{sup 68}Ga]PSMA HBED-CC. We performed a retrospective analysis in 83 consecutive patients with documented biochemical relapse after prostatectomy. All patients underwent whole body [{sup 68}Ga]PSMA I and T PET/CT. PET/CT images were evaluated for presence of local recurrence, lymph node metastases, and distant metastases. Proportions of positive PET/CT results were calculated for six subgroups with increasing prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels (<0.5 ng/mL, 0.5 to <1.0 ng/mL, 1.0 to <2.0 ng/mL, 2.0 to <5.0 ng/mL, 5.0 to <10.0, ≥10.0 ng/mL). Detection rates of [{sup 68}Ga]PSMA I and T were statistically compared with published detection rates of [{sup 68}Ga]PSMA HBED-CC using exact Fisher's test. Median PSA was 0.81 (range: 0.01 - 128) ng/mL. In 58/83 patients (70 %) at least one [{sup 68}Ga]PSMA I and T positive lesion was detected. Local recurrent cancer was present in 18 patients (22 %), lymph node metastases in 29 patients (35 %), and distant metastases in 15 patients (18 %). The tumor detection rate was positively correlated with PSA levels, resulting in detection rates of 52 % (<0.5 ng/mL), 55 % (0.5 to <1.0 ng/mL), 70 % (1.0 to <2.0 ng/mL), 93 % (2.0 to <5.0 ng/mL), 100 % (5.0 to <10.0 ng/mL), and 100 % (≥10.0 ng/mL). There was no significant difference between the detection rate of [{sup 68}Ga]PSMA I and T and published detection rates of [{sup 68}Ga]PSMA HBED-CC (all p>0.05). [{sup 68}Ga]PSMA I and T PET/CT has high detection rates of recurrent prostate cancer that are comparable to [{sup 68}Ga]PSMA HBED-CC. (orig.)

  1. Diagnosis of recurrent prostate cancer with PET/CT imaging using the gastrin-releasing peptide receptor antagonist {sup 68}Ga-RM2: Preliminary results in patients with negative or inconclusive [{sup 18}F]Fluoroethylcholine-PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wieser, Gesche; Bartholomae, Mark [University of Freiburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Medical Center -Faculty of Medicine, Freiburg (Germany); Popp, Ilinca; Grosu, Anca-Ligia [University of Freiburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical Center - Faculty of Medicine, Freiburg (Germany); Christian Rischke, H. [University of Freiburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Medical Center -Faculty of Medicine, Freiburg (Germany); University of Freiburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical Center - Faculty of Medicine, Freiburg (Germany); Drendel, Vanessa [University of Freiburg, Institute for Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Freiburg (Germany); Weber, Wolfgang A. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Molecular Imaging and Therapy Service, New York, NY (United States); Mansi, Rosalba [University Hospital Basel, Division of Radiological Chemistry, Basel (Switzerland); Wetterauer, Ulrich; Schultze-Seemann, Wolfgang; Jilg, Cordula Annette [University of Freiburg, Department of Urology, Medical Center -Faculty of Medicine, Freiburg (Germany); Meyer, Philipp T. [University of Freiburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Medical Center -Faculty of Medicine, Freiburg (Germany); Partner Site Freiburg, German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Freiburg (Germany)

    2017-08-15

    [{sup 18}F]fluoroethylcholine ({sup 18}FECH) has been shown to be a valuable PET-tracer in recurrent prostate cancer (PCa), but still has limited accuracy. RM2 is a gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPr) antagonist that binds to GRPr on PCa cells. Recent studies suggest that GRPr imaging with PET/CT is a promising technique for staging and restaging of PCa. We explore the value of GRPr-PET using the {sup 68}Ga-labeled GRPr antagonist RM2 in a selected population of patients with biochemically recurrent PCa and a negative/inconclusive {sup 18}FECH-PET/CT. In this retrospective study 16 men with biochemical PCa relapse and negative (n = 14) or inconclusive (n = 2) {sup 18}FECH-PET/CT underwent whole-body {sup 68}Ga-RM2-PET/CT. Mean time from {sup 18}FECH-PET/CT to {sup 68}Ga-RM2-PET/CT was 6.1 ± 6.8 months. Primary therapies in these patients were radical prostatectomy (n = 13; 81.3%) or radiotherapy (n = 3; 18.7%). 14/16 patients (87.5%) had already undergone salvage therapies because of biochemical relapse prior to {sup 68}Ga-RM2-PET/CT imaging. Mean ± SD PSA at {sup 68}Ga-RM2-PET/CT was 19.4 ± 53.5 ng/ml (range 1.06-226.4 ng/ml). {sup 68}Ga-RM2-PET/CT showed at least one region with focal pathological uptake in 10/16 patients (62.5%), being suggestive of local relapse (n = 4), lymph node metastases (LNM; n = 4), bone metastases (n = 1) and lung metastasis with hilar LNM (n = 1). Seven of ten positive {sup 68}Ga-RM2 scans were positively confirmed by surgical resection and histology of the lesions (n = 2), by response to site-directed therapies (n = 2) or by further imaging (n = 3). Patients with a positive {sup 68}Ga-RM2-scan showed a significantly higher median PSA (6.8 ng/ml, IQR 10.2 ng/ml) value than those with a negative scan (1.5 ng/ml, IQR 3.1 ng/ml; p = 0.016). Gleason scores or concomitant antihormonal therapy had no apparent impact on the detection of recurrent disease. Even in this highly selected population of patients with known biochemical

  2. Diagnostic performance of {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11 (HBED-CC) PET/CT in patients with recurrent prostate cancer: evaluation in 1007 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afshar-Oromieh, Ali; Haberkorn, Uwe [Heidelberg University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); German Cancer Research Centre, Clinical Cooperation Unit Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); Holland-Letz, Tim [German Cancer Research Center, Department of Biostatistics, Heidelberg (Germany); Giesel, Frederik L.; Kratochwil, Clemens; Mier, Walter; Haufe, Sabine; Debus, Nils [Heidelberg University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); Eder, Matthias [German Cancer Research Centre, Clinical Cooperation Unit Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); Eisenhut, Michael; Schaefer, Martin; Neels, Oliver; Kopka, Klaus [German Cancer Research Center, Division of Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry, Heidelberg (Germany); Hohenfellner, Markus [Heidelberg University Hospital, Department of Urology, Heidelberg (Germany); Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich [Heidelberg University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Debus, Juergen [Heidelberg University Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology and Therapy, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2017-08-15

    Since the clinical introduction of {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11 PET/CT, this imaging method has rapidly spread and is now regarded as a significant step forward in the diagnosis of recurrent prostate cancer (PCa). The aim of this study was to analyse the influence of several variables with possible influence on PSMA ligand uptake in a large cohort. We performed a retrospective analysis of 1007 consecutive patients who were scanned with {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11 PET/CT (1 h after injection) from January 2014 to January 2017 to detect recurrent disease. Patients with untreated primary PCa or patients referred for PSMA radioligand therapy were excluded. The possible effects of different variables including PSA level and PSA doubling time (PSA{sub DT}), PSA velocity (PSA{sub Vel}), Gleason score (GSC, including separate analysis of GSC 7a and 7b), ongoing androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), patient age and amount of injected activity were evaluated. In 79.5% of patients at least one lesion with characteristics suggestive of recurrent PCa was detected. A pathological (positive) PET/CT scan was associated with PSA level and ADT. GSC, amount of injected activity, patient age, PSA{sub DT} and PSA{sub Vel} were not associated with a positive PET/CT scan in multivariate analysis. {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11 PET/CT detects tumour lesions in a high percentage of patients with recurrent PCa. Tumour detection is clearly associated with PSA level and ADT. Only a tendency for an association without statistical significance was found between higher GSC and a higher probability of a pathological PET/CT scan. No associations were found between a pathological {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11 PET/CT scan and patient age, amount of injected activity, PSA{sub DT} or PSA{sub Vel}. (orig.)

  3. Diagnostic performance of 68Ga-PSMA-11 (HBED-CC) PET/CT in patients with recurrent prostate cancer: evaluation in 1007 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afshar-Oromieh, Ali; Holland-Letz, Tim; Giesel, Frederik L; Kratochwil, Clemens; Mier, Walter; Haufe, Sabine; Debus, Nils; Eder, Matthias; Eisenhut, Michael; Schäfer, Martin; Neels, Oliver; Hohenfellner, Markus; Kopka, Klaus; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Debus, Jürgen; Haberkorn, Uwe

    2017-08-01

    Since the clinical introduction of 68 Ga-PSMA-11 PET/CT, this imaging method has rapidly spread and is now regarded as a significant step forward in the diagnosis of recurrent prostate cancer (PCa). The aim of this study was to analyse the influence of several variables with possible influence on PSMA ligand uptake in a large cohort. We performed a retrospective analysis of 1007 consecutive patients who were scanned with 68 Ga-PSMA-11 PET/CT (1 h after injection) from January 2014 to January 2017 to detect recurrent disease. Patients with untreated primary PCa or patients referred for PSMA radioligand therapy were excluded. The possible effects of different variables including PSA level and PSA doubling time (PSA DT ), PSA velocity (PSA Vel ), Gleason score (GSC, including separate analysis of GSC 7a and 7b), ongoing androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), patient age and amount of injected activity were evaluated. In 79.5% of patients at least one lesion with characteristics suggestive of recurrent PCa was detected. A pathological (positive) PET/CT scan was associated with PSA level and ADT. GSC, amount of injected activity, patient age, PSA DT and PSA Vel were not associated with a positive PET/CT scan in multivariate analysis. 68 Ga-PSMA-11 PET/CT detects tumour lesions in a high percentage of patients with recurrent PCa. Tumour detection is clearly associated with PSA level and ADT. Only a tendency for an association without statistical significance was found between higher GSC and a higher probability of a pathological PET/CT scan. No associations were found between a pathological 68 Ga-PSMA-11 PET/CT scan and patient age, amount of injected activity, PSA DT or PSA Vel.

  4. Direct comparison of 68Ga-DOTA-TOC and 18F-FDG PET/CT in the follow-up of patients with neuroendocrine tumour treated with the first full peptide receptor radionuclide therapy cycle

    OpenAIRE

    Nilica, Bernhard; Waitz, Dietmar; Stevanovic, Vlado; Uprimny, Christian; Kendler, Dorota; Buxbaum, Sabine; Warwitz, Boris; Gerardo, Llanos; Henninger, Benjamin; Virgolini, Irene; Rodrigues, Margarida

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To determine the value of 68Ga-DOTA-TOC and 18F-FDG PET/CT for initial and follow-up evaluation of patients with neuroendocrine tumour (NET) treated with peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT). Methods We evaluated 66 patients who had histologically proven NET and underwent both PRRT and three combined 68Ga-DOTA-TOC and 18F-FDG PET/CT studies. 68Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT was performed before PRRT, 3?months after completion of PRRT and after a further 6???9 months. 18F-FDG PET/CT was do...

  5. Evaluation of {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET/MRI for whole-body staging of neuroendocrine tumours in comparison with {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawicki, Lino M. [University Dusseldorf, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Medical Faculty, Dusseldorf (Germany); University Duisburg-Essen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Medical Faculty, Essen (Germany); Deuschl, Cornelius; Beiderwellen, Karsten; Forsting, Michael; Umutlu, Lale [University Duisburg-Essen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Medical Faculty, Essen (Germany); Ruhlmann, Verena; Poeppel, Thorsten D.; Bockisch, Andreas; Herrmann, Ken [University Duisburg-Essen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Medical Faculty, Essen (Germany); Heusch, Philipp; Antoch, Gerald [University Dusseldorf, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Medical Faculty, Dusseldorf (Germany); Lahner, Harald; Fuehrer, Dagmar [University Duisburg-Essen, Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Endocrine Tumour Center at WTZ and ENETS Center of Excellence, Medical Faculty, Essen (Germany); Endocrine Tumour Center at WTZ and ENETS Center of Excellence, Essen (Germany)

    2017-10-15

    To compare the diagnostic performance of {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET/MRI and {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT in the whole-body staging of patients with neuroendocrine tumours (NET). Thirty patients with histopathologically confirmed NET underwent PET/CT and PET/MRI in a single-injection protocol. PET/CT and PET/MRI scans were prospectively evaluated with regard to lesion count, localization, nature (NET/non-NET), and conspicuity (four-point scale). Histopathology and follow-up imaging served as the reference standards. The proportions of NET and non-NET lesions rated correctly were compared using McNemar's chi-squared test. The Wilcoxon test was used to assess differences in SUVmax and lesion conspicuity. The correlation between the SUVmax for the same lesions from each modality was analysed using Pearson's correlation coefficient (r). According to the reference standard, there were 197 lesions (142 NET, 55 non-NET). Lesion-based analysis showed a higher proportion of correctly rated NET lesions on PET/MRI than on PET/CT (90.8% vs. 86.7%, p = 0.031), whereas on PET/CT there was a higher proportion of correctly rated non-NET lesions (94.5% vs. 83.6%, p = 0.031). SUVmax was strongly correlated (r = 0.86; p < 0.001) and did not differ significantly (p = 0.35) between the modalities. Overall conspicuity and NET lesion conspicuity were higher on PET/MRI (both p < 0.01). Ga-DOTATOC PET/MRI yielded a higher proportion of correctly rated NET lesions and should be regarded as a valuable alternative to {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT in whole-body staging of NET patients. (orig.)

  6. WB to Lend $441m for Energy Efficiency in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ The World Bank (WB) has approved loans of $441 million to improve energy efficiency and reduce emissions from power plants in China. The loans, which account for almost one third of planned loans for China in fiscal 2008, would go to three projects, according to the lender.The energy efficiency project, co-financed by the WB and the Global Environment Facility (GEF), would get a loan of $200 million. The project, which would also receive a grant of 13.5 million U.S. dollars from the GEF, aims to boost large-scale loans for energy efficiency programs in China. China's commercial banks are also reported to participate in the project, such as the Export-Import Bank of China and Huaxia Bank, to offer loans ranging from 5 million to 10 million U. S. dollars for energy conservation projects, especially in heavy industries.

  7. Role of 68Ga somatostatin receptor PET/CT in the detection of endogenous hyperinsulinaemic focus: an explorative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, Vikas; Sainz-Esteban, Aurora; Arsenic, Ruza; Ploeckinger, Ursula; Denecke, Timm; Pape, Ulrich-Frank; Pavel, Marianne; Pascher, Andreas; Kuehnen, Peter; Blankenstein, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    To explore the role of 68 Ga-DOTATATE/DOTATOC PET/CT (SR PET/CT) in patients with suspicion of or histopathologically proven pancreatogenic hyperinsulinaemic hypoglycaemia. We included 13 patients with histopathologically proven or a high clinical suspicion of pancreatogenic hyperinsulinaemia. All the patients underwent a SR PET/CT scan. The results were correlated with histopathological findings. Normalization of blood glucose levels after resection of the pancreatic lesion, as well as a cytological and/or pathological diagnosis of insulinoma, was considered the diagnostic gold standard for insulinoma. The diagnosis of nesidioblastosis was based on exclusion of an insulinoma and conclusive pathological examination of a segment of the pancreas. Malignant insulinoma was defined as the presence of locoregional or distant metastases. Based on histopathology, 13 patients were found to have pancreatic hyperinsulinaemia: two patients had malignant insulinoma, eight had nonmetastasized insulinoma, and three had nesidioblastosis. SR PET was positive in 11 of the 13 patients (84.6 %) with a final diagnosis of endogenous pancreatic hypoglycaemia. Histopathological staining confirmed 16 foci of hyperinsulinism (insulin positivity). SR PET detected 14 of the 16 lesions, resulting in a sensitivity of 87 %. One intrapancreatic spleen was falsely diagnosed as insulinoma focus on SR PET, resulting in positive predictive value of 93.3 %. Immunohistochemical staining of somatostatin receptor (SSR) subtype 2a was available in ten specimens: two nesidioblastosis, and seven benign and one malignant insulinoma. Eight out of the ten specimens (80 %) stained strongly to moderately positive. Seven of the eight SSR2a-positive lesions were picked up on SR PET. Based on the results of SR PET/CT, nine patients achieved complete remission of the hypoglycaemic events during follow-up. This explorative study suggests that SR PET in combination with CT may play a significant role in the detection

  8. The diagnostic value of PET/CT imaging with the {sup 68}Ga-labelled PSMA ligand HBED-CC in the diagnosis of recurrent prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afshar-Oromieh, Ali; Giesel, Frederik L.; Kratochwil, Clemens; Haberkorn, Uwe [University Hospital of Heidelberg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); Clinical Cooperation Unit Nuclear Medicine, German Cancer Research Centre, Heidelberg (Germany); Avtzi, Eleni [University Hospital of Heidelberg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); Holland-Letz, Tim [German Cancer Research Center, Department of Biostatistics, Heidelberg (Germany); Linhart, Heinz G. [German Cancer Research Centre, Heidelberg, National Centre for Tumor Diseases (NCT), Heidelberg (Germany); Eder, Matthias; Eisenhut, Michael; Kopka, Klaus [German Cancer Research Center, Division of Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry, Heidelberg (Germany); Boxler, Silvan; Hadaschik, Boris A. [University Hospital of Heidelberg, Department of Urology, Heidelberg (Germany); Weichert, Wilko [University Hospital of Heidelberg, Department of Pathology, Heidelberg (Germany); Debus, Juergen [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Oncology and Therapy, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-11-20

    Since the introduction of positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC (={sup 68}Ga-DKFZ-PSMA-11), this method has been regarded as a significant step forward in the diagnosis of recurrent prostate cancer (PCa). However, published data exist for small patient cohorts only. The aim of this evaluation was to analyse the diagnostic value of {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-ligand PET/CT in a large cohort and the influence of several possibly interacting variables. We performed a retrospective analysis in 319 patients who underwent {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-ligand PET/CT from 2011 to 2014. Potential influences of several factors such as prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level and doubling time (DT), Gleason score (GSC), androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), age and amount of injected tracer were evaluated. Histological verification was performed in 42 patients after the {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-ligand PET/CT. Tracer uptake was measured in 901 representative tumour lesions. In 82.8 % of the patients at least one lesion indicative of PCa was detected. Tumor-detection was positively associated with PSA level and ADT. GSC and PSA-DT were not associated with tumor-detection. The average maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}) of tumour lesions was 13.3 ± 14.6 (0.7-122.5). Amongst lesions investigated by histology, 30 were false-negative in 4 different patients, and all other lesions (n = 416) were true-positive or true-negative. A lesion-based analysis of sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value (NPV) and positive predictive value (PPV) revealed values of 76.6 %, 100 %, 91.4 % and 100 %. A patient-based analysis revealed a sensitivity of 88.1 %. Of 116 patients available for follow-up, 50 received local therapy after {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-ligand PET/CT. {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-ligand PET/CT can detect recurrent PCa in a high number of patients. In addition, the radiotracer is highly specific for PCa. Tumour detection is positively associated with PSA and ADT. {sup 68}Ga

  9. The role of 68Ga-DOTA-NOC PET/CT in evaluating neuroendocrine tumors: real-world experience from two large neuroendocrine tumor centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haidar, Mohamad; Shamseddine, Ali; Panagiotidis, Emmanouil; Jreige, Mario; Mukherji, Deborah; Assi, Rita; Abousaid, Rayan; Ibrahim, Toni; Haddad, Marwan M; Vinjamuri, Sobhan

    2017-02-01

    Our aim was to assess the role of Ga-DOTA-NOC PET/CT as a tool for the management of neuroendocrine tumors (NETs), evaluating the clinical impact on patients from two large NET centers in different geopolitical settings. This is a retrospective study of patients with NETs who underwent Ga-DOTA-NOC PET/CT at Royal Liverpool University Hospital (UK) and at Mount Lebanon Hospital (Lebanon). Indications for imaging and findings of the PET/CT along with demographic and clinical outcome data were recorded and evaluated. Four hundred and forty-five patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria, with a median age at the time of diagnosis of 56 (range: 3-90) years; 248 (55.7%) patients were male.Ga-DOTA-NOC PET/CT was indicated for staging in 193 (43.4%) patients, for diagnosis in 124 (27.9%) patients, for follow-up in 97 (21.7%) patients, and for identification of a primary NET site in 31 (7%) patients.One hundred and four (27.9%) patients underwent Ga-DOTA-NOC PET/CT for the primary diagnosis of NET, of whom 66 (52.7%) patients presented with a clinical suspicion of NET, 10 (8.3%) patients presented with a biochemical suspicion of NET only, and 48 (38.8%) patients presented with a suspicious NET lesion discovered on another imaging modality. The most common clinical presentation was typical carcinoid syndrome [4 (33%) patients].Results on the basis of histology were used as the gold standard for the diagnosis in 57% of patients and the remaining on the basis of follow-up as per established clinical consensus. Sensitivity, specificity, negative-predictive value, and positive-predictive value of PET/CT were 87.1, 97.7, 79.6, and 98.7%, respectively, for the entire sample. Accuracy was measured using the receiver operating characteristic curve analysis with an area under the curve of 0.924 (95% confidence interval: 0.874-0.974). Ga-DOTA-NOC PET/CT is a highly sensitive and specific study for the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with neuroendocrine tumors. These results

  10. Staging performance of whole-body DWI, PET/CT and PET/MRI in invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalano, Onofrio Antonio; Daye, Dania; Signore, Alberto; Iannace, Carlo; Vangel, Mark; Luongo, Angelo; Catalano, Marco; Filomena, Mazzeo; Mansi, Luigi; Soricelli, Andrea; Salvatore, Marco; Fuin, Niccolo; Catana, Ciprian; Mahmood, Umar; Rosen, Bruce Robert

    2017-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the performance of whole-body diffusion-weighted imaging (WB-DWI), whole-body positron emission tomography with computed tomography (WB-PET/CT), and whole-body positron emission tomography with magnetic resonance imaging (WB-PET/MRI) in staging patients with untreated invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast. Fifty-one women with newly diagnosed invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast underwent WB-DWI, WB-PET/CT and WB-PET/MRI before treatment. A radiologist and a nuclear medicine physician reviewed in consensus the images from the three modalities and searched for occurrence, number and location of metastases. Final staging, according to each technique, was compared. Pathology and imaging follow-up were used as the reference. WB-DWI, WB-PET/CT and WB-PET/MRI correctly and concordantly staged 33/51 patients: stage IIA in 7 patients, stage IIB in 8 patients, stage IIIC in 4 patients and stage IV in 14 patients. WB-DWI, WB-PET/CT and WB-PET/MRI incorrectly and concordantly staged 1/51 patient as stage IV instead of IIIA. Discordant staging was reported in 17/51 patients. WB-PET/MRI resulted in improved staging when compared to WB-PET/CT (50 correctly staged on WB-PET/MRI vs. 38 correctly staged on WB-PET/CT; McNemar's test; p<0.01). Comparing the performance of WB-PET/MRI and WB-DWI (43 correct) did not reveal a statistically significant difference (McNemar test, p=0.14). WB-PET/MRI is more accurate in the initial staging of breast cancer than WB-DWI and WB-PET/CT, however, the discrepancies between WB-PET/MRI and WB-DWI were not statistically significant. When available, WB-PET/MRI should be considered for staging patient with invasive ductal breast carcinoma.

  11. Ga-68 DOTATOC PET/CT-Guided Biopsy and Cryoablation with Autoradiography of Biopsy Specimen for Treatment of Tumor-Induced Osteomalacia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maybody, Majid, E-mail: maybodym@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Interventional Radiology Service (United States); Grewal, Ravinder K. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Molecular Imaging and Therapy Service, Department of Radiology (United States); Healey, John H. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Orthopedic Surgical Oncology Service, Department of Surgery (United States); Antonescu, Cristina R. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Pathology (United States); Fanchon, Louise [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Physics (United States); Hwang, Sinchun [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology (United States); Carrasquillo, Jorge A. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Molecular Imaging and Therapy Service, Department of Radiology (United States); Kirov, Assen [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Physics (United States); Farooki, Azeez [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Medicine (United States)

    2016-09-15

    Tumor-induced osteomalacia (TIO) is a rare paraneoplastic syndrome caused by small benign tumors of mesenchymal origin also known as phosphaturic mesenchymal tumors mixed connective tissue variant. Excellent prognosis is expected with eradication of the culprit tumor. These small tumors are notoriously difficult to localize with conventional imaging studies; this often leads to an extensive work up and prolonged morbidity. We report a patient with clinical diagnosis of TIO whose culprit tumor was localized with Ga-68 DOTATOC PET/CT and MRI. Biopsy and cryoablation were performed under Ga-68 DOTATOC PET/CT guidance. Autoradiography of the biopsy specimen was performed and showed in situ correlation between Ga-68 DOTATOC uptake and histopathology with millimeter resolution.

  12. Molecular imaging with {sup 68}Ga-SSTR PET/CT and correlation to immunohistochemistry of somatostatin receptors in neuroendocrine tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaemmerer, Daniel; Haugvik, Sven-Petter; Hommann, Merten [Zentralklinik Bad Berka GmbH, Department of General and Visceral Surgery, Bad Berka (Germany); Peter, Luisa; Lupp, Amelie; Schulz, Stefan [University of Jena, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Jena (Germany); Saenger, Joerg [Laboratory of Pathology and Cytology, Bad Berka (Germany); Prasad, Vikas; Kulkarni, Harshad; Baum, Richard Paul [Zentralklinik Bad Berka, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Center for PET, Bad Berka (Germany)

    2011-09-15

    Somatostatin receptors (SSTR) are known for an overexpression in gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumours (GEP-NET). The aim of the present study was to find out if the receptor density predicted by the semi-quantitative parameters generated from the static positron emission tomography (PET/CT) correlated with the in vitro immunohistochemistry using a novel rabbit monoclonal anti-SSTR2A antibody (clone UMB-1) for specific SSTR2A immunohistochemistry and polyclonal antibodies for SSTR1 and 3-5. Overall 14 surgical specimens generated from 34 histologically documented GEP-NET patients were correlated with the preoperative {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-NOC PET/CT. Quantitative assessment of the receptor density was done using the immunoreactive score (IRS) of Remmele and Stegner; the additional 4-point IRS classification for immunohistochemistry and standardized uptake values (SUV{sub max} and SUV{sub mean}) were used for PET/CT. The IRS for SSTR2A and SSTR5 correlated highly significant with the SUV{sub max} on the PET/CT (p < 0.001; p < 0.05) and the IRS for SSTR2A with the SUV{sub mean} (p < 0.013). The level of SSTR2A score correlated significantly with chromogranin A staining and indirectly to the tumour grading. The highly significant correlation between SSTR2A and SSTR5 and the SUV{sub max} on the {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-NOC PET/CT scans is concordant with the affinity profile of {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-NOC to the SSTR subtypes and demonstrates the excellent qualification of somatostatin analogues in the diagnostics of NET. This study correlating somatostatin receptor imaging using {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-NOC PET/CT with immunohistochemically analysed SSTR also underlines the approval of therapy using somatostatin analogues, follow-up imaging as well as radionuclide therapy. (orig.)

  13. PET/CT With 68Ga-DOTA-TATE for Diagnosis of Neuroendocrine: Differentiation in Patients With Castrate-Resistant Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gofrit, Ofer Nathan; Frank, Stephen; Meirovitz, Amichay; Nechushtan, Hovav; Orevi, Marina

    2017-01-01

    Castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) often shows histological evidence of neuroendocrine differentiation (NED). To evaluate the extent of NED in patients with CRPC, we used PET/CT with Ga-[DOTA-Tyr]-octreotate (Ga-DOTA-TATE), a somatostatin analog that binds somatostatin receptor 2 with high affinity. This radiotracer is used in imaging of neuroendocrine tumors. Twelve patients (mean age, 65 [SD, 12] years) with CRPC were studied. Their mean prostate-specific antigen level at scanning was 85.6 (SD, 144.6) ng/mL. PET/CT images were obtained after the injection of 120 to 200 MBq of Ga-DOTA-TATE. All participants had at least 1 blastic metastasis demonstrating uptake of Ga-DOTA-TATE (mean SUVmax of 5.3 [SD, 2.3]). In 6 patients, moderately high to high uptakes (SUVmax, >5) were seen. Patients with multiple bone metastases had a significantly higher SUVmax compared with patients with few metastases (mean of 5.8 vs 3.8, P = 0.05). In 4 patients, lytic bone lesions or lymph node metastases also showed uptake of the tracer (mean SUVmax of 7.2 [SD, 3.2]). Uptake of the radiotracer was also observed in bones showing normal architecture in CT, suggesting that NED cells appear early during metastases development. Uptake of Ga-DOTA-TATE is a common finding in metastases of CRPC patients, suggesting that NED is frequent in these patients. In half of the patients, widespread uptake of Ga-DOTA-TATE was observed. This suggests that the possibility of treating selected CRCP patients with anti-neuroendocrine tumor therapies should be explored and that Ga-DOTA-TATE scanning could have a role in predicting the efficacy of these treatments.

  14. Influence of PET/CT 68Ga somatostatin receptor imaging on proceeding with patients, who were previously diagnosed with 99mTc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC SPECT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madrzak, Dorota; Mikołajczak, Renata; Kamiński, Grzegorz

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was the assessment of utility of somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) by SPECT imaging using 99mTc-EDDA/HYNIC-Tyr3-octreotide (99mTc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC) in patients with neuroendocrine neoplasm (NEN) or suspected NEN, referred to Nuclear Medicine Dept. of Voivodship Specialty Center in Rzeszow. The selected group of patients was referred also to 68Ga PET/CT. The posed question was the ratio of patients for whom PET/CT with 68Ga would change their management. The distribution of somatostatin receptors was imaged using 99mTc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC in 61 planar and SPECT studies between 13/05/2010 and 04/02/2013 in Nuclear Medicine Dept. of Voivodship Specialty Center in Rzeszow. The patient age was within a range of 17-80, with the average age of 57.6. The average age of women (65% of patients over-all) was 55.6 and the average age of men (35% of patients overall) was 61.4. In 46 participants (75% of the study group), that underwent SRS, NEN was documented using pathology tests. Selected patients were referred to PET/CT with 68Ga labeled somatostatin analogs, DOTATATE or DOTANOC. This study group consisted of 14 female and 10 male participants with age range of 35-77 and average age of 55.5 years. Patients were classified into 3 groups, as follows: detection - referral due to clinical symptoms and/or biochemical markers (CgA-Chromogranin A, IAA-indoleacetic acid) with the aim of primary diagnosis, staging - referral with the aim of assessment of tumor spread, and follow-up - assessment of the therapy. Out of 61 patients, 24 underwent both 99mTc-EDDA/HYNIC-Tyr3-octreotide SPECT and 68Ga PET/CT. The result of PET/CT was used as a basis for further evaluation. Therefore, the patients were divided into groups; true positive TP (confirmed presence of tissue somatostatin receptors with 68Ga PET/CT) and TN (68Ga PET/CT did not detect any changes and the results were comparable and had the same influence on treatment protocol). In case of SPECT, the results

  15. High-resolution imaging of pulmonary ventilation and perfusion with {sup 68}Ga-VQ respiratory gated (4-D) PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callahan, Jason [Centre for Molecular Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Hofman, Michael S. [The University of Melbourne, Department of Medicine, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Centre for Molecular Imaging, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Siva, Shankar [The University of Melbourne, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); The University of Melbourne, Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Kron, Tomas [The University of Melbourne, Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); The University of Melbourne, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Department of Physical Sciences, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Schneider, Michal E. [Monash University, Department of Medical Imaging and Radiation Science, Clayton, VIC (Australia); Binns, David; Eu, Peter [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Centre for Cancer Imaging, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Hicks, Rodney J. [The University of Melbourne, Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Centre for Molecular Imaging, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia)

    2014-02-15

    Our group has previously reported on the use of {sup 68}Ga-ventilation/perfusion (VQ) PET/CT scanning for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism. We describe here the acquisition methodology for {sup 68}Ga-VQ respiratory gated (4-D) PET/CT and the effects of respiratory motion on image coregistration in VQ scanning. A prospective study was performed in 15 patients with non-small-cell lung cancer. 4-D PET and 4-D CT images were acquired using an infrared marker on the patient's abdomen as a surrogate for breathing motion following inhalation of Galligas and intravenous administration of {sup 68}Ga-macroaggregated albumin. Images were reconstructed with phase-matched attenuation correction. The lungs were contoured on CT and PET VQ images during free-breathing (FB) and at maximum inspiration (Insp) and expiration (Exp). The similarity between PET and CT volumes was measured using the Dice coefficient (DC) comparing the following groups; (1) FB-PET/CT, (2) InspPET/InspCT, (3) ExpPET/Exp CT, and (4) FB-PET/AveCT. A repeated measures one-way ANOVA with multiple comparison Tukey tests were performed to evaluate any difference between the groups. Diaphragmatic motion in the superior-inferior direction on the 4-D CT scan was also measured. 4-D VQ scanning was successful in all patients without additional acquisition time compared to the nongated technique. The highest volume overlap was between ExpPET and ExpCT and between FB-PET and AveCT with a DC of 0.82 and 0.80 for ventilation and perfusion, respectively. This was significantly better than the DC comparing the other groups (0.78-0.79, p < 0.05). These values agreed with a visual inspection of the images with improved image coregistration around the lung bases. The diaphragmatic motion during the 4-D CT scan was highly variable with a range of 0.4-3.4 cm (SD 0.81 cm) in the right lung and 0-2.8 cm (SD 0.83 cm) in the left lung. Right-sided diaphragmatic nerve palsy was observed in 3 of 15 patients. {sup 68}Ga-VQ 4-D

  16. MRI versus {sup 68}Ga-PSMA PET/CT for gross tumour volume delineation in radiation treatment planning of primary prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zamboglou, Constantinos; Kirste, Simon; Fechter, Tobias; Grosu, Anca-Ligia [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Freiburg (Germany); German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Heidelberg (Germany); Wieser, Gesche [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Freiburg (Germany); Hennies, Steffen [University Medical Center Goettingen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Goettingen (Germany); Rempel, Irene; Soschynski, Martin; Langer, Mathias [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Radiology, Freiburg (Germany); Rischke, Hans Christian [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Freiburg (Germany); Jilg, Cordula A. [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Urology, Freiburg (Germany); Meyer, Philipp T. [German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Heidelberg (Germany); University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Freiburg (Germany); Bock, Michael [German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Heidelberg (Germany); University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Radiology, Freiburg (Germany)

    2016-05-15

    Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) is widely used in radiation treatment planning of primary prostate cancer (PCA). Focal dose escalation to the dominant intraprostatic lesions (DIPL) may lead to improved PCA control. Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is overexpressed in most PCAs. {sup 68}Ga-labelled PSMA inhibitors have demonstrated promising results in detection of PCA with PET/CT. The aim of this study was to compare {sup 68}Ga-PSMA PET/CT with MRI for gross tumour volume (GTV) definition in primary PCA. This retrospective study included 22 patients with primary PCA analysed after {sup 68}Ga-PSMA PET/CT and mpMRI. GTVs were delineated on MR images by two radiologists (GTV-MRIrad) and two radiation oncologists separately. Both volumes were merged leading to GTV-MRIint. GTVs based on PET/CT were delineated by two nuclear medicine physicians in consensus (GTV-PET). Laterality (left, right, and left and right prostate lobes) on mpMRI, PET/CT and pathological analysis after biopsy were assessed. Mean GTV-MRIrad, GTV-MRIint and GTV-PET were 5.92, 3.83 and 11.41 cm{sup 3}, respectively. GTV-PET was significant larger then GTV-MRIint (p = 0.003). The MRI GTVs GTV-MRIrad and GTV-MRIint showed, respectively, 40 % and 57 % overlap with GTV-PET. GTV-MRIrad and GTV-MRIint included the SUVmax of GTV-PET in 12 and 11 patients (54.6 % and 50 %), respectively. In nine patients (47 %), laterality on mpMRI, PET/CT and histopathology after biopsy was similar. Ga-PSMA PET/CT and mpMRI provided concordant results for delineation of the DIPL in 47 % of patients (40 % - 54 % of lesions). GTV-PET was significantly larger than GTV-MRIint. {sup 68}Ga-PSMA PET/CT may have a role in radiation treatment planning for focal radiation to the DIPL. Exact correlation of PET and MRI images with histopathology is needed. (orig.)

  17. Automated Whole-Body Bone Lesion Detection for Multiple Myeloma on 68Ga-Pentixafor PET/CT Imaging Using Deep Learning Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lina; Tetteh, Giles; Lipkova, Jana; Zhao, Yu; Li, Hongwei; Christ, Patrick; Piraud, Marie; Buck, Andreas; Shi, Kuangyu; Menze, Bjoern H

    2018-01-01

    The identification of bone lesions is crucial in the diagnostic assessment of multiple myeloma (MM). 68 Ga-Pentixafor PET/CT can capture the abnormal molecular expression of CXCR-4 in addition to anatomical changes. However, whole-body detection of dozens of lesions on hybrid imaging is tedious and error prone. It is even more difficult to identify lesions with a large heterogeneity. This study employed deep learning methods to automatically combine characteristics of PET and CT for whole-body MM bone lesion detection in a 3D manner. Two convolutional neural networks (CNNs), V-Net and W-Net, were adopted to segment and detect the lesions. The feasibility of deep learning for lesion detection on 68 Ga-Pentixafor PET/CT was first verified on digital phantoms generated using realistic PET simulation methods. Then the proposed methods were evaluated on real 68 Ga-Pentixafor PET/CT scans of MM patients. The preliminary results showed that deep learning method can leverage multimodal information for spatial feature representation, and W-Net obtained the best result for segmentation and lesion detection. It also outperformed traditional machine learning methods such as random forest classifier (RF), k -Nearest Neighbors ( k -NN), and support vector machine (SVM). The proof-of-concept study encourages further development of deep learning approach for MM lesion detection in population study.

  18. Automated Whole-Body Bone Lesion Detection for Multiple Myeloma on 68Ga-Pentixafor PET/CT Imaging Using Deep Learning Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Xu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The identification of bone lesions is crucial in the diagnostic assessment of multiple myeloma (MM. 68Ga-Pentixafor PET/CT can capture the abnormal molecular expression of CXCR-4 in addition to anatomical changes. However, whole-body detection of dozens of lesions on hybrid imaging is tedious and error prone. It is even more difficult to identify lesions with a large heterogeneity. This study employed deep learning methods to automatically combine characteristics of PET and CT for whole-body MM bone lesion detection in a 3D manner. Two convolutional neural networks (CNNs, V-Net and W-Net, were adopted to segment and detect the lesions. The feasibility of deep learning for lesion detection on 68Ga-Pentixafor PET/CT was first verified on digital phantoms generated using realistic PET simulation methods. Then the proposed methods were evaluated on real 68Ga-Pentixafor PET/CT scans of MM patients. The preliminary results showed that deep learning method can leverage multimodal information for spatial feature representation, and W-Net obtained the best result for segmentation and lesion detection. It also outperformed traditional machine learning methods such as random forest classifier (RF, k-Nearest Neighbors (k-NN, and support vector machine (SVM. The proof-of-concept study encourages further development of deep learning approach for MM lesion detection in population study.

  19. A retrospective comparison between {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT and {sup 18}F-DOPA PET/CT in patients with extra-adrenal paraganglioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroiss, Alexander; Putzer, Daniel; Decristoforo, Clemens; Uprimny, Christian; Virgolini, Irene Johanna [Innsbruck Medical University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Innsbruck (Austria); Frech, Andreas; Fraedrich, Gustav [Innsbruck Medical University, Department of Vascular Surgery, Innsbruck (Austria); Gasser, Rudolf Wolfgang [Innsbruck Medical University, Department of Internal Medicine I, Innsbruck (Austria); Shulkin, Barry Lynn [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Department of Radiological Sciences, Memphis, TN (United States); Url, Christoph [Innsbruck Medical University, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Innsbruck (Austria); Widmann, Gerlig [Innsbruck Medical University, Department of Radiology, Innsbruck (Austria); Prommegger, Rupert [Sanatorium Kettenbruecke, Department of Surgery, Innsbruck (Austria); Sprinzl, Georg Mathias [State Clinic St. Poelten, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, St. Poelten (Austria)

    2013-12-15

    {sup 18}F-Fluoro-l-dihydroxyphenylalanine ({sup 18}F-DOPA) PET offers high sensitivity and specificity in the imaging of nonmetastatic extra-adrenal paragangliomas (PGL) but lower sensitivity in metastatic or multifocal disease. These tumours are of neuroendocrine origin and can be detected by {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-Tyr{sup 3}-octreotide ({sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TOC) PET. Therefore, we compared {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TOC and {sup 18}F-DOPA as radiolabels for PET/CT imaging for the diagnosis and staging of extra-adrenal PGL. Combined cross-sectional imaging was the reference standard. A total of 5 men and 15 women (age range 22 to 73 years) with anatomical and/or histologically proven extra-adrenal PGL were included in this study. Of these patients, 5 had metastatic or multifocal lesions and 15 had single sites of disease. Comparative evaluation included morphological imaging with CT and functional imaging with {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TOC PET and {sup 18}F-DOPA PET. The imaging results were analysed on a per-patient and a per-lesion basis. The maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}) of each functional imaging modality in concordant tumour lesions was measured. Compared with anatomical imaging, {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TOC PET and {sup 18}F-DOPA PET each had a per-patient and per-lesion detection rate of 100 % in nonmetastatic extra-adrenal PGL. However, in metastatic or multifocal disease, the per-lesion detection rate of {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TOC was 100 % and that of {sup 18}F-DOPA PET was 56.0 %. Overall, {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TOC PET identified 45 lesions; anatomical imaging identified 43 lesions, and {sup 18}F-DOPA PET identified 32 lesions. The overall per-lesion detection rate of {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TOC PET was 100 % (McNemar, P < 0.5), and that of {sup 18}F-DOPA PET was 71.1 % (McNemar, P < 0.001). The SUV{sub max} (mean {+-} SD) of all 32 concordant lesions was 67.9 {+-} 61.5 for {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TOC PET and 11.8 {+-} 7.9 for {sup 18}F-DOPA PET (Mann-Whitney U test, P < 0.0001). {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TOC PET

  20. Early dynamic imaging in {sup 68}Ga- PSMA-11 PET/CT allows discrimination of urinary bladder activity and prostate cancer lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uprimny, Christian; Kroiss, Alexander Stephan; Decristoforo, Clemens; Warwitz, Boris; Scarpa, Lorenza; Roig, Llanos Geraldo; Kendler, Dorota; Guggenberg, Elisabeth von; Virgolini, Irene Johanna [Medical University Innsbruck, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Innsbruck (Austria); Fritz, Josef [Medical University Innsbruck, Department for Medical Statistics, Informatics and Health Economics, Innsbruck (Austria); Bektic, Jasmin; Horninger, Wolfgang [Medical University Innsbruck, Department of Urology, Innsbruck (Austria)

    2017-05-15

    PET/CT with {sup 68}Ga-labelled prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA)-ligands has been proven to establish a promising imaging modality in the work-up of prostate cancer (PC) patients with biochemical relapse. Despite a high overall detection rate, the visualisation of local recurrence may be hampered by high physiologic tracer accumulation in the urinary bladder on whole body imaging, usually starting 60 min after injection. This study sought to verify whether early dynamic {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11 (HBED-CC)PET/CT can differentiate pathologic PC-related tracer uptake from physiologic tracer accumulation in the urinary bladder. Eighty consecutive PC patients referred to {sup 68}Ga -PSMA-11 PET/CT were included in this retrospective analysis (biochemical relapse: n = 64; primary staging: n = 8; evaluation of therapy response/restaging: n = 8). In addition to whole-body PET/CT acquisition 60 min post injection early dynamic imaging of the pelvis in the first 8 min after tracer injection was performed. SUV{sub max} of pathologic lesions was calculated and time-activity curves were generated and compared to those of urinary bladder and areas of physiologic tracer uptake. A total of 55 lesions consistent with malignancy on 60 min whole body imaging exhibited also pathologic {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11 uptake during early dynamic imaging (prostatic bed/prostate gland: n = 27; lymph nodes: n = 12; bone: n = 16). All pathologic lesions showed tracer uptake within the first 3 min, whereas urinary bladder activity was absent within the first 3 min of dynamic imaging in all patients. Suv{sub max} was significantly higher in PC lesions in the first 6 min compared to urinary bladder accumulation (p < 0.001). In the subgroup of PC patients with biochemical relapse the detection rate of local recurrence could be increased from 20.3 to 29.7%. Early dynamic imaging in {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11 PET/CT reliably enables the differentiation of pathologic tracer uptake in PC lesions from physiologic

  1. Early dynamic imaging in 68Ga- PSMA-11 PET/CT allows discrimination of urinary bladder activity and prostate cancer lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uprimny, Christian; Kroiss, Alexander Stephan; Decristoforo, Clemens; Fritz, Josef; Warwitz, Boris; Scarpa, Lorenza; Roig, Llanos Geraldo; Kendler, Dorota; von Guggenberg, Elisabeth; Bektic, Jasmin; Horninger, Wolfgang; Virgolini, Irene Johanna

    2017-05-01

    PET/CT with 68 Ga-labelled prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA)-ligands has been proven to establish a promising imaging modality in the work-up of prostate cancer (PC) patients with biochemical relapse. Despite a high overall detection rate, the visualisation of local recurrence may be hampered by high physiologic tracer accumulation in the urinary bladder on whole body imaging, usually starting 60 min after injection. This study sought to verify whether early dynamic 68 Ga-PSMA-11 (HBED-CC)PET/CT can differentiate pathologic PC-related tracer uptake from physiologic tracer accumulation in the urinary bladder. Eighty consecutive PC patients referred to 68 Ga -PSMA-11 PET/CT were included in this retrospective analysis (biochemical relapse: n = 64; primary staging: n = 8; evaluation of therapy response/restaging: n = 8). In addition to whole-body PET/CT acquisition 60 min post injection early dynamic imaging of the pelvis in the first 8 min after tracer injection was performed. SUV max of pathologic lesions was calculated and time-activity curves were generated and compared to those of urinary bladder and areas of physiologic tracer uptake. A total of 55 lesions consistent with malignancy on 60 min whole body imaging exhibited also pathologic 68 Ga-PSMA-11 uptake during early dynamic imaging (prostatic bed/prostate gland: n = 27; lymph nodes: n = 12; bone: n = 16). All pathologic lesions showed tracer uptake within the first 3 min, whereas urinary bladder activity was absent within the first 3 min of dynamic imaging in all patients. Suv max was significantly higher in PC lesions in the first 6 min compared to urinary bladder accumulation (p dynamic imaging in 68 Ga-PSMA-11 PET/CT reliably enables the differentiation of pathologic tracer uptake in PC lesions from physiologic bladder accumulation. Performance of early dynamic imaging in addition to whole body imaging 60 min after tracer injection might improve the detection rate

  2. Early dynamic imaging in "6"8Ga- PSMA-11 PET/CT allows discrimination of urinary bladder activity and prostate cancer lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uprimny, Christian; Kroiss, Alexander Stephan; Decristoforo, Clemens; Warwitz, Boris; Scarpa, Lorenza; Roig, Llanos Geraldo; Kendler, Dorota; Guggenberg, Elisabeth von; Virgolini, Irene Johanna; Fritz, Josef; Bektic, Jasmin; Horninger, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    PET/CT with "6"8Ga-labelled prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA)-ligands has been proven to establish a promising imaging modality in the work-up of prostate cancer (PC) patients with biochemical relapse. Despite a high overall detection rate, the visualisation of local recurrence may be hampered by high physiologic tracer accumulation in the urinary bladder on whole body imaging, usually starting 60 min after injection. This study sought to verify whether early dynamic "6"8Ga-PSMA-11 (HBED-CC)PET/CT can differentiate pathologic PC-related tracer uptake from physiologic tracer accumulation in the urinary bladder. Eighty consecutive PC patients referred to "6"8Ga -PSMA-11 PET/CT were included in this retrospective analysis (biochemical relapse: n = 64; primary staging: n = 8; evaluation of therapy response/restaging: n = 8). In addition to whole-body PET/CT acquisition 60 min post injection early dynamic imaging of the pelvis in the first 8 min after tracer injection was performed. SUV_m_a_x of pathologic lesions was calculated and time-activity curves were generated and compared to those of urinary bladder and areas of physiologic tracer uptake. A total of 55 lesions consistent with malignancy on 60 min whole body imaging exhibited also pathologic "6"8Ga-PSMA-11 uptake during early dynamic imaging (prostatic bed/prostate gland: n = 27; lymph nodes: n = 12; bone: n = 16). All pathologic lesions showed tracer uptake within the first 3 min, whereas urinary bladder activity was absent within the first 3 min of dynamic imaging in all patients. Suv_m_a_x was significantly higher in PC lesions in the first 6 min compared to urinary bladder accumulation (p < 0.001). In the subgroup of PC patients with biochemical relapse the detection rate of local recurrence could be increased from 20.3 to 29.7%. Early dynamic imaging in "6"8Ga-PSMA-11 PET/CT reliably enables the differentiation of pathologic tracer uptake in PC lesions from physiologic bladder accumulation

  3. Is {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-NOC PET/CT indicated in patients with clinical, biochemical or radiological suspicion of neuroendocrine tumour?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambrosini, Valentina [S. Orsola-Malpighi University Hospital, Nuclear Medicine, Bologna (Italy); Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria di Bologna, Policlinico S. Orsola-Malpighi, Nuclear Medicine, Pad 30, Bologna (Italy); Campana, Davide; Tomassetti, Paola [S. Orsola-Malpighi University Hospital, Internal Medicine, Bologna (Italy); Nanni, Cristina; Cambioli, Silvia; Fanti, Stefano [S. Orsola-Malpighi University Hospital, Nuclear Medicine, Bologna (Italy); Rubello, Domenico [Ospedale S. Maria della Misericordia, Nuclear Medicine, Rovigo (Italy)

    2012-08-15

    In recent years, {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-peptides positron emission tomography (PET)/CT has been increasingly used to study patients with neuroendocrine tumours (NET). However, performing specialized examinations in the appropriate contest is mandatory for both medical and economic reasons. The aim of the study is to evaluate the potential usefulness of {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-NOC PET/CT in patients with suspected NET. Among the patients undergoing {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-NOC PET/CT at our centre, we reviewed those studied for suspected NET based on the presence of either clinical signs/symptoms or imaging or raised biochemical markers or a combination of these conditions. PET/CT results were compared with clinical and imaging follow-up of at least 1 year or pathology. Overall 131 suspected NET cases were included. The most common condition considered suspicious for NET was the increase of blood markers (66), followed by inconclusive findings at conventional imaging (CI, 41), clinical signs/symptoms (10), equivocal {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET (7) or somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS, 4), or a combination of the above (3). PET/CT results were true-positive in 17 cases, true-negative in 112 and false-negative in 2 (overall sensitivity 89.5 %, specificity 100 %). Interestingly, increased blood markers and clinical signs/symptoms were associated with the lowest frequency of true-positive findings (1/66 and 1/10, respectively), while CI findings were confirmed in one third of the cases (13/41). Overall, the incidence of NET in the studied population was 14.5 % (19/131). Our data confirm the good accuracy (98 %) of {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-NOC PET/CT in NET lesion detection. However, our results also suggest that {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-NOC PET/CT may not be routinely recommended in patients with a suspicion of NET based on the mere detection of increased blood markers or clinical symptoms. Positive CI alone or in association with clinical/biochemical findings is on the contrary associated with

  4. Comparison of Ga-68 DOTA-TATE and Ga-68 DOTA-LAN PET/CT imaging in the same patient group with neuroendocrine tumours: preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirci, Emre; Ocak, Meltem; Kabasakal, Levent; Araman, Ahmet; Ozsoy, Yildiz; Kanmaz, Bedii

    2013-08-01

    Recent studies have suggested that PET imaging with Ga-68-labelled DOTA-somatostatin analogues such as octreotide and octreotate is useful in diagnosing neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) and has superior value over both computed tomography and planar and SPECT somatostatin receptor scintigraphy. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the role of Ga-68 DOTA-lanreotide (Ga-68-DOTA-LAN) in patients with somatostatin receptor (sst)-expressing tumours and to compare the results of Ga-68 DOTA-D-Phe1-Tyr3-octreotate (Ga-68-DOTA-TATE) in the same patient population. Twelve patients with NETs who were referred to our department for somatostatin receptor scintigraphy were included in the study. There were four patients with well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumour (WDNET) grade 1, two patients with WDNET grade 2, and three patients with poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma (PDNEC) grade 3. There was also one patient with medullary thyroid cancer, one patient with meningioma and one patient with MEN-1. All patients underwent two consecutive PET imaging studies with Ga-68-DOTA-TATE and Ga-68 DOTA-LAN. All images were evaluated visually, and maximum standardized uptake value was calculated for quantitative evaluation. On visual examination of maximum intensity projection images, GA-68 DOTA-LAN was seen to have high background activity and high bone marrow uptake. Both tracers defined 67 lesions. Ga-68 DOTA-TATE images revealed 63 (94%) clearly defined lesions, missing four lesions. In contrast, Ga-68 DOTA-LAN images defined only 23 (44%) lesions, missing 44 (56%) lesions. Thirty-two bone lesions were detected on Ga-68-DOTA-TATE images. Among them, only 11 (34%) were positive on Ga-68 DOTA-LAN images, whereas 21 (66%) were negative. When we evaluated liver, mediastinum and gastrointestinal tract lesions, Ga-68 DOTA-LAN was seen to be positive for 12 (34%) lesions and negative for 23 (66%) lesions. Although the results are preliminary, the image quality obtained by

  5. Rare Case of Intratracheal Metastasis Detected on 68Ga-Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen PET/CT Scan in a Case of Thyroglobulin Elevated Negative Iodine Scan Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasikumar, Arun; Joy, Ajith; Pillai, M R A; Oommen, Karuna Elza; Jayakumar, R

    2018-04-01

    A 64-year-old woman underwent completion thyroidectomy with upper tracheal ring resection and right-sided neck dissection for papillary carcinoma of the thyroid infiltrating the trachea and was given I radioiodine treatment. Three years later, she presented with hemoptysis. On evaluation, she had increased serum thyroglobulin and negative iodine scan (TENIS). F-FDG PET/CT scan did not identify any site of disease. One year later, Ga-PSMA scan done revealed a moderate focal tracer-avid intratracheal soft tissue; biopsy revealed it to be metastatic papillary carcinoma of the thyroid. This case kindles the possibility of using Ga-PSMA PET/CT to reveal occult disease in cases of TENIS.

  6. Guideline for PET/CT imaging of neuroendocrine neoplasms with {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-conjugated somatostatin receptor targeting peptides and {sup 18}F-DOPA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bozkurt, Murat Fani [Hacettepe University Faculty of Medicine Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ankara (Turkey); Virgolini, Irene; Decristoforo, Clemens [Medical University Innsbruck, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Innsbruck (Austria); Balogova, Sona [Comenius University and St. Elisabeth Oncology Institute, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Bratislava (Slovakia); Tenon Hospital AP-HP and Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Paris (France); Beheshti, Mohsen [St. Vincent' s Hospital, PET-CT Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Endocrinology, Linz (Austria); Paracelsus Medical University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Salzburg (Austria); Rubello, Domenico [Santa Maria della Misericordia Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, PET Center and Medical Physics and Radiology, Rovigo (Italy); Ambrosini, Valentina; Fanti, Stefano [University of Bologna, Department of Experimental, Diagnostic and Specialty Medicine-DIMES, Bologna (Italy); Kjaer, Andreas [National University Hospital and University of Copenhagen, Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear Medicine and PET, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Delgado-Bolton, Roberto [San Pedro Hospital and Centre for Biomedical Research of La Rioja (CIBIR), Department of Diagnostic Imaging (Radiology) and Nuclear Medicine, Logrono (Spain); Kunikowska, Jolanta [Medical University of Warsaw, Nuclear Medicine, Warsaw (Poland); Oyen, Wim J.G. [Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Chiti, Arturo [Humanitas University, Nuclear Medicine Department, Rozzano, MI (Italy); Giammarile, Francesco [University of Lyon, Nuclear Medicine, Lyon (France)

    2017-08-15

    Neuroendocrine neoplasms are a heterogenous group of tumours, for which nuclear medicine plays an important role in the diagnostic work-up as well as in the targeted therapeutic options. This guideline is aimed to assist nuclear medicine physicians in recommending, performing, reporting and interpreting the results of somatostatin receptor (SSTR) PET/CT imaging using {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-conjugated peptides, as well as {sup 18}F-DOPA imaging for various neuroendocrine neoplasms. The previous procedural guideline by EANM regarding the use PET/CT tumour imaging with {sup 68}Ga-conjugated peptides has been revised and updated with the relevant and recent literature in the field with contribution of distinguished experts. (orig.)

  7. Potential role of 68Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT in screening for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumour in patients with von Hippel-Lindau disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, Vikas; Brenner, Winfried; Tiling, Nikolaus; Ploeckinger, Ursula; Denecke, Timm

    2016-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumours of the pancreas (pNET) are observed in 8 - 17 % of patients with von Hippel-Lindau disease (vHLD), and 11 - 20 % of these patients develop metastatic disease. MRI and CT have a very high resolution; however, their sensitivity and specificity for the detection of pNET amongst cystic lesions in the pancreas of vHLD patients are generally considered insufficient. In contrast, 68 Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT demonstrates a high sensitivity for the diagnosis and staging of neuroendocrine tumours. In this study we investigated the potential role of 68 Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT in screening of patients with vHLD. 68 Ga-DOTATOC PET/three-phase contrast-enhanced CT was performed according to guidelines in all consecutive vHLD patients between January 2012 and November 2015. All patients underwent additional MRI imaging of the abdomen, spine, and head. Chromogranin A (CgA) was determined at the time of the PET/CT examination. A lesion seen on 68 Ga-DOTATOC PET in the pancreas was defined as positive if the uptake was visually higher than in the surrounding tissues. Lesions were quantified using maximum SUV. Overall, 20 patients (8 men, 12 women; mean age 44.7 ± 11.1 years) were prospectively examined. Genetically, 12 patients had type 1 vHLD and 8 had type 2 vHLD. 68 Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT detected more pNET than morphological imaging (CT or MRI): 11 patients (55 %; 8 type 1, 3 type 2) vs. 9 patients (45 %; 6 type 1, 3 type 2). The concentration of CgA was mildly elevated in 2 of 11 patients with pNET. The mean SUVmax of the pancreatic lesions was 18.9 ± 21.9 (range 5.0 - 65.6). Four patients (36.4 %) had multiple pNETs. The mean size of the lesions on CT and/or MRI was 10.4 ± 8.3 mm (range 4 - 38 mm), and 41.1 % were larger than 10 mm. In addition, somatostatin receptor-positive cerebellar and spinal haemangioblastomas were detected in three patients (SUVmax 2.1 - 10.1). One patient presented with a solitary somatostatin receptor-positive lymph node metastasis. pNETs were

  8. Potential role of {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT in screening for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumour in patients with von Hippel-Lindau disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prasad, Vikas; Brenner, Winfried [Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Berlin (Germany); Tiling, Nikolaus; Ploeckinger, Ursula [Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Interdisziplinaeren Stoffwechsel-Centrum, Campus Virchow Klinikum, Berlin (Germany); Denecke, Timm [Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany)

    2016-10-15

    Neuroendocrine tumours of the pancreas (pNET) are observed in 8 - 17 % of patients with von Hippel-Lindau disease (vHLD), and 11 - 20 % of these patients develop metastatic disease. MRI and CT have a very high resolution; however, their sensitivity and specificity for the detection of pNET amongst cystic lesions in the pancreas of vHLD patients are generally considered insufficient. In contrast, {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT demonstrates a high sensitivity for the diagnosis and staging of neuroendocrine tumours. In this study we investigated the potential role of {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT in screening of patients with vHLD. {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET/three-phase contrast-enhanced CT was performed according to guidelines in all consecutive vHLD patients between January 2012 and November 2015. All patients underwent additional MRI imaging of the abdomen, spine, and head. Chromogranin A (CgA) was determined at the time of the PET/CT examination. A lesion seen on {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET in the pancreas was defined as positive if the uptake was visually higher than in the surrounding tissues. Lesions were quantified using maximum SUV. Overall, 20 patients (8 men, 12 women; mean age 44.7 ± 11.1 years) were prospectively examined. Genetically, 12 patients had type 1 vHLD and 8 had type 2 vHLD. {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT detected more pNET than morphological imaging (CT or MRI): 11 patients (55 %; 8 type 1, 3 type 2) vs. 9 patients (45 %; 6 type 1, 3 type 2). The concentration of CgA was mildly elevated in 2 of 11 patients with pNET. The mean SUVmax of the pancreatic lesions was 18.9 ± 21.9 (range 5.0 - 65.6). Four patients (36.4 %) had multiple pNETs. The mean size of the lesions on CT and/or MRI was 10.4 ± 8.3 mm (range 4 - 38 mm), and 41.1 % were larger than 10 mm. In addition, somatostatin receptor-positive cerebellar and spinal haemangioblastomas were detected in three patients (SUVmax 2.1 - 10.1). One patient presented with a solitary somatostatin receptor-positive lymph

  9. Evaluation and comparison of Ga-68 DOTA-TATE and Ga-68 DOTA-NOC PET/CT imaging in well-differentiated thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocak, Meltem; Demirci, Emre; Kabasakal, Levent; Aygun, Aslan; Tutar, Rumeysa O; Araman, Ahmet; Kanmaz, Bedii

    2013-11-01

    Somatostatin receptor (Sstr) scintigraphy with radiolabelled somatostatin analogues has been used extensively for the diagnosis and therapy of Sstr-expressing tumours. It has been shown that well-differentiated thyroid cancer (WDTC) cells have a high expression of Sstr2, Sstr3 and Sstr5. Hence, WDTC cells could be an ideal target for the evaluation of lesion uptake of Ga-68 DOTA-1-NaI3-octreotide (DOTA-NOC), which has a high affinity not only to Sstr2 but also to Sstr3 and Sstr5. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the value of Ga-68 DOTA-NOC as a target for Sstr2-expressing, Sstr3-expressing and Sstr5-expressing tumours in WDTC patients and to compare the results with those of Ga-68 DOTA-TATE in the same patient population. Thirteen patients with WDTC were included in our study: nine with papillary thyroid cancer, three with Hurthle cell carcinoma and one with follicular thyroid carcinoma. All patients had elevated serum thyroglobulin levels and negative post-therapeutic I-131 whole-body scans, which were obtained after the last radioiodine treatment. All patients had undergone two consecutive PET imaging studies with Ga-68 DOTA-D-Phe1-Tyr3-octreotate (DOTA-TATE) and Ga-68 DOTA-NOC, respectively. All images were evaluated visually, and maximum standardized uptake values were calculated. Both Ga-68 DOTA-TATE and Ga-68 DOTA-NOC PET images gave comparable results. Among the 13 patients, imaging with both Ga-68 DOTA-TATE and Ga-68 DOTA-NOC gave negative results in five (38%) patients and positive results in eight (62%) patients. A total of 45 lesions were identified on Ga-68 DOTA-TATE images and 42 on Ga-68 DOTA-NOC images; three lesions were missed. Lesion uptake was significantly higher on Ga-68 DOTA-TATE images. Maximum standardized uptake values of Ga-68 DOTA-TATE and Ga-68 DOTA-NOC were 12.9±9.1 and 6.3±4.1 (n=54, PDOTA-TATE has a higher lesion uptake even in WDTC patients and may have potential advantage over Ga-68 DOTA-NOC.

  10. Association Analysis between g.18873C>T and g.27522G>A Genetic Polymorphisms of OPG and Bone Mineral Density in Chinese Postmenopausal Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Several studies report that the OPG is an important candidate gene in the pathogenesis of osteoporosis. This study aimed to detect the potential association of OPG gene polymorphisms with osteoporosis in postmenopausal women. We recruited 928 subjects containing 463 with primary postmenopausal osteoporosis and 465 healthy volunteers as controls. The BMD of neck hip, lumbar spine (L2–4, and total hip were assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA. Through the created restriction site-polymerase chain reaction (CRS-PCR, PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP, and DNA sequencing methods, the g.18873C>T and g.27522G>A have been investigated. As for g.18873C>T, our data indicated that subjects with CC genotype have significantly higher BMD value than those of CT and TT genotypes (all P values A, the BMD values of subjects with GG genotype were significantly higher than those of GA and AA genotypes (all P values T and g.27522G>A genetic polymorphisms are associated with the decreased risk for osteoporosis in Chinese postmenopausal women.

  11. Polymorphisms -1082 G/A and -819 C/T in the interleukin-10 gene are not associated with gout susceptibility in the Chinese Han male population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shiguo; Zhang, Kun; Yin, Congcong; Han, Lin; Sun, Yuping; Ren, Wei; Chu, Nan; Li, Changgui

    2012-08-01

    Gout is caused by monosodium urate crystal-induced inflammation of the joints and periarticular tissues. Interleukin 10 (IL-10) is an important immunoregulatory cytokine, levels of which can be influenced by functional single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the promoter. To investigate the association of -1082 G/A and -819 C/T polymorphisms in the IL-10 promoter with gout susceptibility in the Chinese Han male population. A case-control study was performed in 302 patients and 284 controls. Genotyping of IL-10 -1082 G/A and -819 C/T polymorphisms was performed by DNA sequencing techniques. An association analysis was analyzed by the χ(2) test. No significant differences were found in -819T/C and -1082 A/G genotypic and allelic frequencies between gout cases and controls (for -819T/C, χ(2)=0.212, df=1, p=0.645 by genotype; χ(2)=0.079, df=1, p=0.779 by allele; for -1082 A/G, χ(2)=2.116, df=1, p=0.146 by genotype; χ(2)=1.854, df=1, p=0.173 by allele). IL-10 -1082 G/A and -819 C/T polymorphisms may not be associated with susceptibility to gout and thus do not play a major role in the development of gout in the Chinese Han male population.

  12. Preclinical and first clinical experience with the gastrin-releasing peptide receptor-antagonist [⁶⁸Ga]SB3 and PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maina, Theodosia; Bergsma, Hendrik; Kulkarni, Harshad R; Mueller, Dirk; Charalambidis, David; Krenning, Eric P; Nock, Berthold A; de Jong, Marion; Baum, Richard P

    2016-05-01

    Gastrin-releasing peptide receptors (GRPR) represent attractive targets for tumor diagnosis and therapy because of their overexpression in major human cancers. Internalizing GRPR agonists were initially proposed for prolonged lesion retention, but a shift of paradigm to GRPR antagonists has recently been made. Surprisingly, radioantagonists, such as [(99m)Tc]DB1 ((99m)Tc-N4'-DPhe(6),Leu-NHEt(13)]BBN(6-13)), displayed better pharmacokinetics than radioagonists, in addition to their higher inherent biosafety. We introduce here [(68)Ga]SB3, a [(99m)Tc]DB1 mimic-carrying, instead of the (99m)Tc-binding tetraamine, the chelator DOTA for labeling with the PET radiometal (68)Ga. Competition binding assays of SB3 and [(nat)Ga]SB3 were conducted against [(125)I-Tyr(4)]BBN in PC-3 cell membranes. Blood samples collected 5 min postinjection (pi) of the [(67)Ga]SB3 surrogate in mice were analyzed using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) for degradation products. Likewise, biodistribution was performed after injection of [(67)Ga]SB3 (37 kBq, 100 μL, 10 pmol peptide) in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice bearing PC-3 xenografts. Eventually, [(68)Ga]SB3 (283 ± 91 MBq, 23 ± 7 nmol) was injected into 17 patients with breast (8) and prostate (9) cancer. All patients had disseminated disease and had received previous therapies. PET/CT fusion images were acquired 60-115 min pi. SB3 and [(nat)Ga]SB3 bound to the human GRPR with high affinity (IC50: 4.6 ± 0.5 nM and 1.5 ± 0.3 nM, respectively). [(67)Ga]SB3 displayed good in vivo stability (>85 % intact at 5 min pi). [(67)Ga]SB3 showed high, GRPR-specific and prolonged retention in PC-3 xenografts (33.1 ± 3.9%ID/g at 1 h pi - 27.0 ± 0.9%ID/g at 24 h pi), but much faster clearance from the GRPR-rich pancreas (≈160%ID/g at 1 h pi to <17%ID/g at 24 h pi) in mice. In patients, [(68)Ga]SB3 elicited no adverse effects and clearly visualized cancer lesions. Thus, 4 out of 8 (50 %) breast

  13. Preclinical and first clinical experience with the gastrin-releasing peptide receptor-antagonist [{sup 68}Ga]SB3 and PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maina, Theodosia; Charalambidis, David; Nock, Berthold A. [INRASTES, NCSR ' ' Demokritos' ' , Molecular Radiopharmacy, Athens (Greece); Bergsma, Hendrik; Krenning, Eric P. [Erasmus MC, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Kulkarni, Harshad R.; Mueller, Dirk; Baum, Richard P. [Zentralklinik, Molecular Radiotherapy and Molecular Imaging, Bad Berka (Germany); Jong, Marion de [Erasmus MC, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Erasmus MC, Department of Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2016-05-15

    Gastrin-releasing peptide receptors (GRPR) represent attractive targets for tumor diagnosis and therapy because of their overexpression in major human cancers. Internalizing GRPR agonists were initially proposed for prolonged lesion retention, but a shift of paradigm to GRPR antagonists has recently been made. Surprisingly, radioantagonists, such as [{sup 99m}Tc]DB1 ({sup 99m}Tc-N{sub 4}'-DPhe{sup 6},Leu-NHEt{sup 13}BBN(6-13)), displayed better pharmacokinetics than radioagonists, in addition to their higher inherent biosafety. We introduce here [{sup 68}Ga]SB3, a [{sup 99m}Tc]DB1 mimic-carrying, instead of the {sup 99m}Tc-binding tetraamine, the chelator DOTA for labeling with the PET radiometal {sup 68}Ga. Competition binding assays of SB3 and [{sup nat}Ga]SB3 were conducted against [{sup 125}I-Tyr{sup 4}]BBN in PC-3 cell membranes. Blood samples collected 5 min postinjection (pi) of the [{sup 67}Ga]SB3 surrogate in mice were analyzed using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) for degradation products. Likewise, biodistribution was performed after injection of [{sup 67}Ga]SB3 (37 kBq, 100 μL, 10 pmol peptide) in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice bearing PC-3 xenografts. Eventually, [{sup 68}Ga]SB3 (283 ± 91 MBq, 23 ± 7 nmol) was injected into 17 patients with breast (8) and prostate (9) cancer. All patients had disseminated disease and had received previous therapies. PET/CT fusion images were acquired 60-115 min pi. SB3 and [{sup nat}Ga]SB3 bound to the human GRPR with high affinity (IC{sub 50}: 4.6 ± 0.5 nM and 1.5 ± 0.3 nM, respectively). [{sup 67}Ga]SB3 displayed good in vivo stability (>85 % intact at 5 min pi). [{sup 67}Ga]SB3 showed high, GRPR-specific and prolonged retention in PC-3 xenografts (33.1 ± 3.9%ID/g at 1 h pi - 27.0 ± 0.9%ID/g at 24 h pi), but much faster clearance from the GRPR-rich pancreas (∼160%ID/g at 1 h pi to <17%ID/g at 24 h pi) in mice. In patients, [{sup 68}Ga]SB3 elicited no adverse effects and

  14. Preclinical and first clinical experience with the gastrin-releasing peptide receptor-antagonist [68Ga]SB3 and PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maina, Theodosia; Charalambidis, David; Nock, Berthold A.; Bergsma, Hendrik; Krenning, Eric P.; Kulkarni, Harshad R.; Mueller, Dirk; Baum, Richard P.; Jong, Marion de

    2016-01-01

    Gastrin-releasing peptide receptors (GRPR) represent attractive targets for tumor diagnosis and therapy because of their overexpression in major human cancers. Internalizing GRPR agonists were initially proposed for prolonged lesion retention, but a shift of paradigm to GRPR antagonists has recently been made. Surprisingly, radioantagonists, such as [ 99m Tc]DB1 ( 99m Tc-N 4 '-DPhe 6 ,Leu-NHEt 13 BBN(6-13)), displayed better pharmacokinetics than radioagonists, in addition to their higher inherent biosafety. We introduce here [ 68 Ga]SB3, a [ 99m Tc]DB1 mimic-carrying, instead of the 99m Tc-binding tetraamine, the chelator DOTA for labeling with the PET radiometal 68 Ga. Competition binding assays of SB3 and [ nat Ga]SB3 were conducted against [ 125 I-Tyr 4 ]BBN in PC-3 cell membranes. Blood samples collected 5 min postinjection (pi) of the [ 67 Ga]SB3 surrogate in mice were analyzed using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) for degradation products. Likewise, biodistribution was performed after injection of [ 67 Ga]SB3 (37 kBq, 100 μL, 10 pmol peptide) in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice bearing PC-3 xenografts. Eventually, [ 68 Ga]SB3 (283 ± 91 MBq, 23 ± 7 nmol) was injected into 17 patients with breast (8) and prostate (9) cancer. All patients had disseminated disease and had received previous therapies. PET/CT fusion images were acquired 60-115 min pi. SB3 and [ nat Ga]SB3 bound to the human GRPR with high affinity (IC 50 : 4.6 ± 0.5 nM and 1.5 ± 0.3 nM, respectively). [ 67 Ga]SB3 displayed good in vivo stability (>85 % intact at 5 min pi). [ 67 Ga]SB3 showed high, GRPR-specific and prolonged retention in PC-3 xenografts (33.1 ± 3.9%ID/g at 1 h pi - 27.0 ± 0.9%ID/g at 24 h pi), but much faster clearance from the GRPR-rich pancreas (∼160%ID/g at 1 h pi to <17%ID/g at 24 h pi) in mice. In patients, [ 68 Ga]SB3 elicited no adverse effects and clearly visualized cancer lesions. Thus, 4 out of 8 (50 %) breast cancer and 5 out of 9

  15. Effect of the positron range of 18F, 68Ga and 124I on PET/CT in lung-equivalent materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemerink, Gerrit J; Visser, Mariëlle G W; Franssen, Renee; Beijer, Emiel; Zamburlini, Mariangela; Halders, Servé G E A; Brans, Boudewijn; Mottaghy, Felix M; Teule, Gerrit J J

    2011-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of positron range on visualization and quantification in (18)F, (68)Ga and (124)I positron emission tomography (PET)/CT of lung-like tissue. Different sources were measured in air, in lung-equivalent foams and in water, using a clinical PET/CT and a microPET system. Intensity profiles and curves with the cumulative number of annihilations were derived and numerically characterized. (68)Ga and (124)I gave similar results. Their intensity profiles in lung-like foam had a peak similar to that for (18)F, and tails of very low intensity, but extending over distances of centimetres and containing a large fraction of all annihilations. For 90% recovery, volumes of interest with diameters up to 50 mm were required, and recovery within the 10% intensity isocontour was as low as 30%. In contrast, tailing was minor for (18)F. Lung lesions containing (18)F, (68)Ga or (124)I will be visualized similarly, and at least as sharp as in soft tissue. Nevertheless, for quantification of (68)Ga and (124)I large volumes of interest are needed for complete activity recovery. For clinical studies containing noise and background, new quantification approaches may have to be developed.

  16. Failure Investigation of WB-57 Aircraft Engine Cowling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, J. E.; Gafka, T.; Figert, J.

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Houston, Texas is the home of the NASA WB-57 High Altitude Research Program. Three fully operational WB-57 aircraft are based near JSC at Ellington Field. The aircraft have been flying research missions since the early 1960's, and continue to be an asset to the scientific community with professional, reliable, customer-oriented service designed to meet all scientific objectives. The NASA WB-57 Program provides unique, high-altitude airborne platforms to US Government agencies, academic institutions, and commercial customers in order to support scientific research and advanced technology development and testing at locations around the world. Mission examples include atmospheric and earth science, ground mapping, cosmic dust collection, rocket launch support, and test bed operations for future airborne or spaceborne systems. During the return from a 6 hour flight, at 30,000 feet, in the clean configuration, traveling at 175 knots indicated airspeed, in un-accelerated flight with the auto pilot engaged, in calm air, the 2-man crew heard a mechanical bang and felt a slight shudder followed by a few seconds of high frequency vibration. The crew did not notice any other abnormalities leading up to, or for the remaining 1 hour of flight and made an uneventful landing. Upon taxi into the chocks, the recovery ground crew noticed the high frequency long wire antenna had become disconnected from the vertical stabilizer and was trailing over the left inboard wing, and that the left engine upper center removable cowling panel was missing, with noticeable damage to the left engine inboard cowling fixed structure. The missing cowling panel was never recovered. Each engine cowling panel is attached to the engine nacelle using six bushings made of 17-4 PH steel. The cylinder portions of four of the six bushings were found still attached to the aircraft (Fig 1). The other two bushings were lost with the panel. The other four bushings exhibited

  17. Breath-hold [68Ga]DOTA-TOC PET/CT in neuroendocrine tumors: detection of additional lesions and effects on quantitative parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zirnsak, Mariana; Bärwolf, Robert; Freesmeyer, Martin

    2016-11-08

    Respiratory motion during PET/CT acquisition generates artifacts in the form of breath-related blurring, which influences the lesion detectability and diagnostic accuracy. The goal of this study was to verify whether breath-hold [68Ga]DOTA-TOC PET/CT (bhPET) allows detection of additional foci compared to free-breathing PET/CT (fbPET), and to assess the impact of breath-holding on standard uptake values (SUV) and isocontoured volume (Vic40) in patients with neuroendocrine tumors (NET). Patients with NET (n=39) were included in this study. BhPET and fbPET characteristics of 96 lesions were compared, and correlated with standard contrast-enhanced (ce) CT and MRI for lesion verification. Quantitative parameters SUV (max and mean) and Vic40 were assessed for both methods and evaluated by linear regression and Spearman's correlation. The impact of lesion size, localization and time interval between investigations was also analyzed. bhPET identified one additional metastasis not seen at fbPET but visible at ceMRI. Another additional bhPET focus did not have a morphological correlate. At bhPET, the SUVmax and SUVmean proved significantly higher and the Vic40 significantly lower than at fbPET. Lesion size, localization and time intervals did not impact significantly on SUV or Vic40. Currently, routine use of breath-hold [68Ga]DOTA-TOC PET/CT cannot be recommended as only one additional lesion was identified. Therefore, bhPET has currently no indication in patients with NET. If technical improvements regarding PET/CT scanner sensitivity are available, bhPET should be reevaluated in the future.

  18. {sup 68}Ga-PSMA I and T PET/CT for assessment of prostate cancer: evaluation of image quality after forced diuresis and delayed imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derlin, Thorsten; Weiberg, Desiree; Ross, Tobias L.; Bengel, Frank M. [Hannover Medical School, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hannover (Germany); Klot, Christoph von [Hannover Medical School, Department of Urology and Urologic Oncology, Hannover (Germany); Wester, Hans-Juergen [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Pharmaceutical Radiochemistry, Garching (Germany); Henkenberens, Christoph; Christiansen, Hans [Hannover Medical School, Department of Radiation Oncology, Hannover (Germany); Merseburger, Axel S. [University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Department of Urology, Campus Luebeck, Luebeck (Germany)

    2016-12-15

    Urinary radiotracer excretion of {sup 68}Ga-Labelled prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) ligands may complicate the assessment of the prostate region and differentiation of lymph nodes from ureteral activity. The aim of this study was to assess the value of delayed imaging after forced diuresis. Sixty-six patients underwent {sup 68}Ga-PSMA I and T PET/CT for evaluation of prostate cancer at 60 min post-injection. In subgroups of patients, this was amended by delayed imaging after 180 min post-injection, preceded by furosemide and oral hydration early, at the time of tracer injection, or delayed, at 100 min post-injection. Urinary tracer activity within the bladder and focal ureteral activity was analyzed. After forced diuresis, linear and focal visualization of ureters was significantly reduced. After delayed furosemide, mean and peak bladder activity decreased (p < 0.001), and image quality of the prostate region improved on delayed images (p < 0.001). Early furosemide co-injection with tracer resulted in increased mean and peak bladder activity (p < 0.001) and in deteriorated image quality of the prostate region on delayed images (p = 0.008). Ga-PSMA I and T PET/CT delayed imaging after forced diuresis can improve the assessment of prostate region and pelvic lymph nodes by removing excreted tracer from the lower urinary tract. (orig.)

  19. Multiple Time-Point 68Ga-PSMA I&T PET/CT for Characterization of Primary Prostate Cancer: Value of Early Dynamic and Delayed Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmuck, Sebastian; Mamach, Martin; Wilke, Florian; von Klot, Christoph A; Henkenberens, Christoph; Thackeray, James T; Sohns, Jan M; Geworski, Lilli; Ross, Tobias L; Wester, Hans-Juergen; Christiansen, Hans; Bengel, Frank M; Derlin, Thorsten

    2017-06-01

    The aims of this study were to gain mechanistic insights into prostate cancer biology using dynamic imaging and to evaluate the usefulness of multiple time-point Ga-prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) I&T PET/CT for the assessment of primary prostate cancer before prostatectomy. Twenty patients with prostate cancer underwent Ga-PSMA I&T PET/CT before prostatectomy. The PET protocol consisted of early dynamic pelvic imaging, followed by static scans at 60 and 180 minutes postinjection (p.i.). SUVs, time-activity curves, quantitative analysis based on a 2-tissue compartment model, Patlak analysis, histopathology, and Gleason grading were compared between prostate cancer and benign prostate gland. Primary tumors were identified on both early dynamic and delayed imaging in 95% of patients. Tracer uptake was significantly higher in prostate cancer compared with benign prostate tissue at any time point (P ≤ 0.0003) and increased over time. Consequently, the tumor-to-nontumor ratio within the prostate gland improved over time (2.8 at 10 minutes vs 17.1 at 180 minutes p.i.). Tracer uptake at both 60 and 180 minutes p.i. was significantly higher in patients with higher Gleason scores (P dynamic and static delayed Ga-PSMA ligand PET images. The tumor-to-nontumor ratio in the prostate gland improves over time, supporting a role of delayed imaging for optimal visualization of prostate cancer.

  20. Prospective comparison of {sup 68}Ga-DOTATATE and {sup 18}F-FDOPA PET/CT in patients with various pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas with emphasis on sporadic cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Archier, Aurelien; Taieb, David [Aix-Marseille University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, La Timone and North University Hospital, Marseille (France); Aix-Marseille University, European Center for Research in Medical Imaging, Marseille (France); Inserm UMR1068 Marseille Cancerology Research Center, Institut Paoli-Calmettes, Marseille (France); Varoquaux, Arthur; Beschmout, Eva [Aix-Marseille University, Department of Medical Imaging, Conception Hospital, Marseille (France); Garrigue, Philippe; Guillet, Benjamin [Aix-Marseille University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, La Timone and North University Hospital, Marseille (France); Aix-Marseille University, Department of Radiopharmacy, La Timone and North University Hospital, Marseille (France); Montava, Marion; Fakhry, Nicolas [Aix-Marseille University, Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Conception Hospital, Marseille (France); Guerin, Carole; Sebag, Frederic [Aix-Marseille University, Department of Endocrine Surgery, Conception Hospital, Marseille (France); Gabriel, Sophie [Aix-Marseille University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, La Timone and North University Hospital, Marseille (France); Aix-Marseille University, European Center for Research in Medical Imaging, Marseille (France); Morange, Isabelle; Castinetti, Frederic [Aix-Marseille University, Department of Endocrinology, Conception Hospital, Marseille (France); Barlier, Anne [Aix-Marseille, University, Laboratory of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Conception Hospital, Marseille (France); Loundou, Anderson [Aix-Marseille University, Department of Public Health, Marseille (France); Pacak, Karel [National Institutes of Health, Program in Reproductive and Adult Endocrinology, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2016-07-15

    Pheochromocytomas/paragangliomas (PHEOs/PGLs) overexpress somatostatin receptors and recent studies have already shown excellent results in the localization of these tumors using {sup 68}Ga-labeled somatostatin analogs ({sup 68}Ga-DOTA-SSA), especially in patients with germline succinate dehydrogenase subunit B gene (SDHB) mutations and head and neck PGLs (HNPGLs). The value of {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-SSA has to be established in sporadic cases, including PHEOs. Thus, the aim of this study was to compare {sup 68}Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT, {sup 18}F-FDOPA PET/CT, and conventional imaging in patients with various PHEOs/PGLs with a special emphasis on sporadic cases, including those located in the adrenal gland. {sup 68}Ga-DOTATATE, {sup 18}F-FDOPA PET/CT, and conventional imaging (contrast-enhanced CT and MRI with MR angiography sequences) were prospectively performed in 30 patients (8 with SDHD mutations, 1 with a MAX mutation and 21 sporadic cases) with PHEO/PGL at initial diagnosis or relapse. The patient-based sensitivities were 93 % (28/30), 97 % (29/30), and 93 % (28/30) for {sup 68}Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT, {sup 18}F-FDOPA PET/CT, and conventional imaging, respectively. The lesion-based sensitivities were 93 % (43/46), 89 % (41/46), and 76 % (35/46) for {sup 68}Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT, {sup 18}F-FDOPA PET/CT, and conventional imaging respectively (p = 0.042). {sup 68}Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT detected a higher number of HNPGLs (30/30) than {sup 18}F-FDOPA PET/CT (26/30; p = 0.112) and conventional imaging (24/30; p = 0.024). {sup 68}Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT missed two PHEOs of a few millimeters in size and a large recurrent PHEO. One lesion was considered false-positive on {sup 68}Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT and corresponded to a typical focal lesion of fibrous dysplasia on MRI. Among the 11 lesions missed by conventional imaging, 7 were detected by conventional imaging with knowledge of the PET results (4 HNPGLs, 2 LNs, and 1 recurrent PHEO). {sup 68}Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT is the most sensitive tool in the

  1. Combined early dynamic (18)F-FDG PET/CT and conventional whole-body (18)F-FDG PET/CT provide one-stop imaging for detecting hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shao-Bo; Wu, Hu-Bing; Wang, Quan-Shi; Zhou, Wen-Lan; Tian, Ying; Li, Hong-Sheng; Ji, Yun-Hai; Lv, Liang

    2015-06-01

    It is widely accepted that conventional (18)F-FDG PET/CT (whole-body static (18)F-FDG PET/CT, WB (18)F-FDG PET/CT) has a low detection rate for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We prospectively assessed the role of early dynamic (18)F-FDG PET/CT (ED (18)F-FDG PET/CT) and WB (18)F-FDG PET/CT in detecting HCC, and we quantified the added value of ED (18)F-FDG PET/CT to WB (18)F-FDG PET/CT. Twenty-two patients with 37 HCC tumors (HCCs) who underwent both a liver ED (18)F-FDG PET/CT (performed simultaneously with a 5.5 MBq/kg (18)F-FDG bolus injection and continued for 240 s) and a WB (18)F-FDG PET/CT were enrolled in the study. The WB (18)F-FDG PET/CT and ED (18)F-FDG PET/CT scans were positive in 56.7% (21/37) and 78.4% (29/37) HCCs, respectively (PPET/CT in conjunction with WB (18)F-FDG PET/CT (one-stop (18)F-FDG PET/CT) improved the positive detection rates of WB and ED (18)F-FDG PET/CT alone from 56.7% and 78.4% to 91.9% (34/37) (P0.05, respectively). One-stop (18)F-FDG PET/CT appears to be useful to improve WB (18)F-FDG PET/CT for HCC detection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. BetaWB - A language for modular representation of biological systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ihekwaba, Adoha; Larcher, Roberto; Mardare, Radu Iulian

    2007-01-01

    A. Ihekwaba, R. Larcher, R. Mardare, C. Priami. BetaWB - A language for modular representation of biological systems. In Proc. of International Conference on Systems Biology (ICSB), 2007......A. Ihekwaba, R. Larcher, R. Mardare, C. Priami. BetaWB - A language for modular representation of biological systems. In Proc. of International Conference on Systems Biology (ICSB), 2007...

  3. Comparison of hybrid {sup 68}Ga-PSMA PET/MRI and {sup 68}Ga-PSMA PET/CT in the evaluation of lymph node and bone metastases of prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freitag, Martin T.; Roethke, Matthias; Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter [German Cancer Research Center, Department of Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Radtke, Jan P. [German Cancer Research Center, Department of Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Urology, Heidelberg (Germany); Hadaschik, Boris A. [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Urology, Heidelberg (Germany); Kopp-Schneider, A. [German Cancer Research Center, Department of Bioinformatics and Statistics, Heidelberg (Germany); Eder, Matthias; Kopka, Klaus [German Cancer Research Center, Division of Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry, Heidelberg (Germany); Haberkorn, Uwe [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); German Cancer Research Center, Clinical Cooperation Unit Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); Afshar-Oromieh, Ali [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    To evaluate the reproducibility of the combination of hybrid PET/MRI and the {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11 tracer in depicting lymph node (LN) and bone metastases of prostate cancer (PC) in comparison with that of PET/CT. A retrospective analysis of 26 patients who were subjected to {sup 68}Ga-PSMA PET/CT{sub low-dose} (1 h after injection) followed by PET/MRI (3 h after injection) was performed. MRI sequences included T1-w native, T1-w contrast-enhanced, T2-w fat-saturated and diffusion-weighted sequences (DWI{sub b800}). Discordant PET-positive and morphological findings were evaluated. Standardized uptake values (SUV) of PET-positive LNs and bone lesions were quantified and their morphological size and conspicuity determined. Comparing the PET components, the proportion of discordant PSMA-positive suspicious findings was very low (98.5 % of 64 LNs concordant, 100 % of 28 bone lesions concordant). Two PET-positive bone metastases could not be confirmed morphologically using CT{sub low-dose}, but could be confirmed using MRI. In 12 of 20 patients, 47 PET-positive LNs (71.9 %) were smaller than 1 cm in short axis diameter. There were significant linear correlations between PET/MRI SUVs and PET/CT SUVs in the 64 LN metastases (p < 0.0001) and in the 28 osseous metastases (p < 0.0001) for SUV{sub mean} and SUV{sub max}, respectively. The LN SUVs were significantly higher on PET/MRI than on PET/CT (p{sub SUVmax} < 0.0001; p{sub SUVmean} < 0.0001) but there was no significant difference between the bone lesion SUVs (p{sub SUVmax} = 0.495; p{sub SUVmean} = 0.381). Visibility of LNs was significantly higher on MRI using the T1-w contrast-enhanced fat-saturated sequence (p = 0.013), the T2-w fat-saturated sequence (p < 0.0001) and the DWI sequence (p < 0.0001) compared with CT{sub low-dose}. For bone lesions, only the overall conspicuity was higher on MRI compared with CT{sub low-dose} (p < 0.006). Nodal and osseous metastases of PC are accurately and reliably depicted by hybrid PET

  4. Comparison of {sup 68}Ga-labelled PSMA-11 and {sup 11}C-choline in the detection of prostate cancer metastases by PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwenck, Johannes [Eberhard Karls University, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Clinical Molecular Imaging, Tuebingen (Germany); Eberhard Karls University, Department of Preclinical Imaging and Radiopharmacy, Tuebingen (Germany); Rempp, Hansjoerg; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Pfannenberg, Christina [Eberhard Karls University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Reischl, Gerald [Eberhard Karls University, Department of Preclinical Imaging and Radiopharmacy, Tuebingen (Germany); Kruck, Stephan; Stenzl, Arnulf [Eberhard Karls University, Department of Urology, Tuebingen (Germany); La Fougere, Christian [Eberhard Karls University, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Clinical Molecular Imaging, Tuebingen (Germany); German Cancer Consortium, German Cancer Research Center Partner Site, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2017-01-15

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is expressed ubiquitously on the membrane of most prostate tumors and its metastasis. While PET/CT using {sup 11}C-choline was considered as the gold standard in the staging of prostate cancer, PET with radiolabelled PSMA ligands was introduced into the clinic in recent years. Our aim was to compare the PSMA ligand {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11 with {sup 11}C-choline in patients with primary and recurrent prostate cancer. 123 patients underwent a whole-body PET/CT examination using {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11 and {sup 11}C-choline. Suspicious lesions were evaluated visually and semiquantitatively (SUVavg). Out of these, 103 suffered from a confirmed biochemical relapse after prostatectomy and/or radiotherapy (mean PSA level of 4.5 ng/ml), while 20 patients underwent primary staging. In 67 patients with biochemical relapse, we detected 458 lymph nodes suspicious for metastasis. PET using {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11 showed a significantly higher uptake and detection rate than {sup 11}C-choline PET. Also {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11 PET identified significantly more patients with suspicious lymph nodes as well as affected lymph nodes regions especially at low PSA levels. Bone lesions suspicious for prostate cancer metastasis were revealed in 36 patients' biochemical relapse. Significantly more bone lesions were detected by {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11, but only 3 patients had only PSMA-positive bone lesions. Nevertheless, we detected also 29 suspicious lymph nodes and 8 bone lesions, which were only positive as per {sup 11}C-choline PET. These findings led to crucial differences in the TNM classification and the identification of oligometastatic patients. In the patients who underwent initial staging, all primary tumors showed uptake of both tracers. Although significantly more suspicious lymph nodes and bone lesions were identified, only 2 patients presented with bone lesions only detected by {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11 PET. Thus, PET using {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11 showed a higher

  5. All’ombra del mago astuto W.B. Yeats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viola Papetti

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In 1949 Giorgio Manganelli published his first review of W.B. Yeats’s poetry in «La Fiera Letteraria». It was an impressive and enthusiastic appreciation of Yeats as the most intelligent and interesting poet among his contemporaries. In addition there was a very fine Italian translation of Sailing to Byzantium – at that time Manganelli himself was a young poet under the influence of the Symbolist Movement. In the late 1940s he had translated into Italian about 80 poems by Yeats, and was eager to publish them together with some of the Irish poet’s plays, but he was utterly disappointed. For the first time, here are published three typewritten letters to Manganelli’s friend, Oreste Macrì, in which he describes his attempts to publish his translations with Guanda and other companies. Also there are some interesting holographic pages from his cahier «9 aprile 1954-19 gennaio 1956/Roma», in which he discusses Yeats’s early poems with subtle critical acumen.

  6. 68Ga-DOTA-TOC uptake in neuroendocrine tumour and healthy tissue: differentiation of physiological uptake and pathological processes in PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroiss, A; Putzer, D; Decristoforo, C; Uprimny, C; Warwitz, B; Nilica, B; Gabriel, M; Kendler, D; Waitz, D; Widmann, G; Virgolini, I J

    2013-04-01

    We wanted to establish the range of (68)Ga-DOTA-TOC uptake in liver and bone metastases of patients with neuroendocrine tumours (NET) and to establish the range of its uptake in pancreatic NET. This would allow differentiation between physiological uptake and tumour-related somatostatin receptor expression in the pancreas (including the uncinate process), liver and bone. Finally, we wanted to test for differences in patients with NET, either treated or not treated with peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT). In 249 patients, 390 (68)Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT studies were performed. The clinical indications for PET/CT were gastroenteropancreatic NET (194 studies), nongastroenteropancreatic NET (origin in the lung and rectum; 46 studies), NET of unknown primary (111 studies), phaeochromocytoma/glomus tumours (18 studies), and radioiodine-negative metastatic thyroid carcinoma (21 studies). SUVmax (mean ± standard deviation) values of (68)Ga-DOTA-TOC were 29.8 ± 16.5 in 162 liver metastases, 19.8 ± 18.8 in 89 bone metastases and 34.6 ± 17.1 in 43 pancreatic NET (33.6 ± 14.3 in 30 tumours of the uncinate process and 36.3 ± 21.5 in 13 tumours of the pancreatic tail). A significant difference in SUVmax (p TOC is an excellent tracer for the imaging of tumours expressing somatostatin receptors on the tumour cell surface, facilitating the detection of even small tumour lesions. The noninvasive PET/CT approach by measurement of regional SUVmax can offer important clinical information to distinguish between physiological and pathological somatostatin receptor expression, especially in the uncinate process. PRRT does not significantly influence SUVmax, except in liver metastases of patients with NET.

  7. Gastroenteropancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors: Standardizing Therapy Monitoring with 68Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT Using the Example of Somatostatin Receptor Radionuclide Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Luboldt

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to standardize therapy monitoring of hepatic metastases from gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs during the course of somatostatin receptor radionuclide therapy (SRRT. In 21 consecutive patients with nonresectable hepatic metastases of GEP-NETs, chromogranin A (CgA and 68Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT were compared before and after the last SRRT. On 68Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT, the maximum standard uptake values (SUVmax of normal liver and hepatic metastases were calculated. In addition, the volumes of hepatic metastases (volume of interest [VOI] were measured using four cut-offs to separate normal liver tissue from metastases (SUVmax of the normal liver plus 10% [VOIliver+10%], 20% [VOIliver+20%], 30% [VOIliver+30%] and SUV = 10 [VOI10SUV]. The SUVmaxof the normal liver was below 10 (7.2 ± 1.3 in all patients and without significant changes. Overall therapy changes (Δ per patient (mean [95% CI] were statistically significant with p < .01 for ΔCgA = −43 (−69 to −17, ΔSUVmax = −22 (−29 to −14, and ΔVOI10SUV = −53 (−68 to −38% and significant with p < .05 for ΔVOIliver+10% = −29 (−55 to −3%, ΔVOIliver+20% = −32 (−62 to −2 and ΔVOIliver+30% = −37 (−66 to −8. Correlations were found only between ΔCgA and ΔVOI10SUV (r = .595; p < .01, ΔSUVmax and ΔVOI10SUV (0.629, p < .01, and SUVmax and ΔSUVmax (r = .446; p < .05. 68Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT allows volumetric therapy monitoring via an SUV-based cut-off separating hepatic metastases from normal liver tissue (10 SUV recommended.

  8. Optimized production, quality control, biological evaluation and PET/CT imaging of {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-617 in breast adenocarcinoma model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharifi, Mehdi; Yousefnia, Hassan; Bahrami-Samani, Ali; Zolghadri, Samaneh; Alirezapour, Behrouz [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute (NSTRI), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jalilian, Amir Reza; Geramifa, Parham; Beiki, Davood [Tehran Univ. of Medical Sciences (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Research Center for Nuclear Medicine; Maus, Stephan [Univ. Medical Centre Mainz (Germany). Clinic of Nuclear Medicine

    2017-08-01

    Optimized production, quality control and preclinical evaluation of {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-617 as a PET radiotracer for PSMA-positive malignancies as well as successful application in imaging of breast adenocarcinomas are reported. {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-617 radiolabeling and QC optimization, stability, log P, biodistribution in breast adenocarcinomas-bearing mice (direct and blockade studies) and also PET/CT imaging was performed. {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-617 complex was prepared in high radiochemical purity (>96%, ITLC, HPLC) and specific activity of 300-310 GBq/mM at 95 C using 2-4 micrograms of the peptide in 10 min followed by solid phase purification. The tracer was stable in serum and final formulation for at least 120 min. The log P was -1.98. Western blot test on the tumor cell homogenates demonstrated distinct existence of the PSMA on the surface. The biodistribution of the tracer demonstrated specific kidney and tumor significant uptake using blocking study. Significant tumor:blood and tumor:muscle ratio uptake observed at 30 min post-injection (2.69 and 19.1, respectively). A reduction of 40-80% off tumor uptake in the study time period observed using blocking test. {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-617 can be proposing a possible tracer for PET imaging of breast adenocarcinomas and other breast malignancies.

  9. Response Assessment of 68Ga-DOTA-E-[c(RGDfK)]2 PET/CT in Lung Adenocarcinoma Patients Treated with Nintedanib Plus Docetaxel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrieta, Oscar; Garcia-Perez, Francisco O; Michel-Tello, David; Ramírez-Tirado, Laura-Alejandra; Pitalua-Cortes, Quetzali; Cruz-Rico, Graciela; Macedo-Pérez, Eleazar-Omar; Cardona, Andrés F; Garza-Salazar, Jaime de la

    2018-03-01

    Nintedanib is an oral angiokinase inhibitor used as second-line treatment for non-small cell lung cancer. New radiotracers, such as 68 Ga-DOTA-E-[c(RGDfK)] 2 , that target α v β 3 integrin might have an impact as a noninvasive method for assessing angiogenesis inhibitors. Methods: From July 2011 through October 2015, 38 patients received second-line nintedanib plus docetaxel. All patients underwent PET/CT with 68 Ga-DOTA-E-[c(RGDfK)] 2 radiotracer and blood-sample tests to quantify angiogenesis factors (fibroblast growth factor, vascular endothelial growth factor, and platelet-derived growth factor AB) before and after completing 2 therapy cycles. Results: Of the 38 patients, 31 had available baseline and follow-up PET/CT. Baseline lung tumor volume addressed with 68 Ga-DOTA-E-[c(RGDfK)] 2 PET/CT correlated with serum vascular endothelial growth factor levels, whereas baseline lung/liver SUV max index correlated with platelet-derived growth factor AB. After treatment, the overall response rate and disease control rate were 7.9% and 47.3%, respectively. A greater decrease in lung tumor volume (-37.2% vs. -27.6%) was associated with a better disease control rate in patients ( P = 0.005). Median progression-free survival was 3.7 mo. Nonsmokers and patients with a higher baseline lung tumor volume were more likely to have a higher progression-free survival (6.4 vs. 3.74 [ P = 0.023] and 6.4 vs. 2.1 [ P = 0.003], respectively). Overall survival was not reached. Patients with a greater decrease in lung SUV max (not reached vs. 7.1 mo; P = 0.016) and a greater decrease in the lung/spleen SUV max index (not reached vs. 7.1; P = 0.043) were more likely to have a longer overall survival. Conclusion: 68 Ga-DOTA-E-[c(RGDfK)] 2 PET/CT is a potentially useful tool for assessing responses to angiogenesis inhibitors. Further analysis and novel studies are warranted to identify patients who might benefit from this therapy. © 2018 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular

  10. Sensitivity of whole-body CT and MRI versus projection radiography in the detection of osteolyses in patients with monoclonal plasma cell disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolf, Maya B., E-mail: m.mueller-wolf@dkfz.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 110, 69120 Heidelberg Germany (Germany); Department of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (Dkfz), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Murray, Fritz, E-mail: fritz.murray@hotmail.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 110, 69120 Heidelberg Germany (Germany); Kilk, Kerstin, E-mail: k_fechtner@hotmail.com [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 110, 69120 Heidelberg Germany (Germany); Hillengass, Jens, E-mail: jens.hillengass@med.uni-heidelberg.de [Department of Haematology, Oncology, Rheumatology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 410, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Delorme, Stefan, E-mail: s.delorme@dkfz-heidelberg.de [Department of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (Dkfz), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Heiss, Christiane, E-mail: c.heiss@dkfz-heidelberg.de [Department of Biostatistics, German Cancer Research Center (Dkfz), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Neben, Kai, E-mail: k.neben@klinikum-mittelbaden.de [Department of Haematology, Oncology, Rheumatology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 410, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Goldschmidt, Hartmut, E-mail: hartmut.goldschmidt@med.uni-heidelberg.de [Department of Haematology, Oncology, Rheumatology, University Hospital Heidelberg and National Center for Tumour Diseases, Im Neuenheimer Feld 410, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich, E-mail: hu.kauczor@med.uni-heidelberg.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 110, 69120 Heidelberg Germany (Germany); and others

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: To compare sensitivity of whole-body Computed Tomography (wb-CT) and whole-body Magnetic Resonance Imaging (wb-MRI) with Projection Radiography (PR) regarding each method's ability to detect osteolyses in patients with monoclonal plasma cell disease. Patients and methods: The bone status of 171 patients was evaluated. All patients presented with multiple myeloma (MM) of all stages, monoclonal gammopathy of unknown significance (MGUS) or solitary plasmacytoma. Two groups were formed. Group A consisted of 52 patients (26 females, 26 males) with an average age of 62 years (range, 45–89 years) who received, both, PR and wb-CT as part of their diagnostic work-up. Group B comprised 119 patients (58 females, 61 males) averaging 57 years of age (range, 20–80 years) who received, both, PR and wb-MRI. Two experienced radiologists were blinded regarding the disease status and assessed the number and location of osteolyses in consensus. A distinction was made between axial and extra-axial lesions. Results: In group A, wb-CT revealed osteolyses in 12 patients (23%) that were not detected in PR. CT was superior in detecting lesions in patients with osteopenia and osteoporosis. Compared with PR, wb-CT was significantly more sensitive in detecting osteolyses than PR (p < 0.001). This was particularly true for axial lesions. Additionally, CT revealed clinically relevant incidental findings in 33 patients (63%). In group B, wb-MRI revealed lesions in 19 patients (16%) that were not detected in PR. All lesions detected by PR were also detected by wb-MRI and wb-CT. Wb-MRI and wb-CT are each superior to PR in detecting axial lesions. Conclusion: Wb-CT can detect 23% more focal lesions than PR, especially in the axial skeleton. Therefore, this imaging method should be preferred over PR in the diagnostic work-up and staging of patients with monoclonal plasma cell disease.

  11. Observations of Stratospheric Gravity Waves During the WB57F Aerosol Mission and Modeling with Mesoscale Model 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, M.; Hicke, J.; Rosenlof, K.; Tuck, A.; Hovde, S.

    2000-01-01

    On April 11, 1998 WB57F aircraft flew northwest at lower stratospheric altitudes from Houston, Texas, over eastern Wyoming as part of the WB57F Aerosol Mission to sample a vortex filament forecast to pass over that region.

  12. 68Ga-PSMA and 11C-Choline comparison using a tri-modality PET/CT-MRI (3.0 T) system with a dedicated shuttle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Omar; Dos Santos, Gerardo; García Fontes, Margarita; Balter, Henia; Engler, Henry

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to prospectively compare the detection rate of 68 Ga-PSMA versus 11 C-Choline in men with prostate cancer with biochemical recurrence and to demonstrate the added value of a tri-modality PET/CT-MRI system. We analysed 36 patients who underwent both 11 C-Choline PET/CT and 68 Ga-PSMA PET/CT scanning within a time window of 1-2 weeks. Additionally, for the 68 Ga-PSMA scan, we used a PET/CT-MRI (3.0 T) system with a dedicated shuttle, acquiring MRI images of the pelvis. Both scans were positive in 18 patients (50%) and negative in 8 patients (22%). Nine patients were positive with 68 Ga-PSMA alone (25%) and one with 11 C-Choline only (3%). The median detected lesion per patient was 2 for 68 Ga-PSMA (range 0-93) and 1 for 11 C-Choline (range 0-57). Tumour to background ratios in all concordant lesions ( n  = 96) were higher for 68 Ga-PSMA than for 11 C-Choline (110.3 ± 107.8 and 27.5 ± 17.1, mean ± S.D., for each tracer, respectively P  = 0.0001). The number of detected lesions per patient was higher for 11 C-Choline in those with PSA ≥ 3.3 ng/mL, while the number of detected lesions was independent of PSA levels for 68 Ga-PSMA using the same PSA cut-off value. Metastatic pelvic lesions were found in 25 patients (69%) with 68 Ga-PSMA PET/CT, in 18 (50%) with 11 C-Choline PET/CT and in 21 (58%) with MRI (3.0 T). MRI was very useful in detecting recurrence in cases classified as indeterminate by means of PET/CT alone at prostate bed. In patients with prostate cancer with biochemical recurrence 68 Ga-PSMA detected more lesions per patient than 11 C-Choline, regardless of PSA levels. PET/CT-MRI (3.0 T) system is a feasible imaging modality that potentially adds useful relevant information with increased accuracy of diagnosis.

  13. The accuracy of {sup 68}Ga-PSMA PET/CT in primary lymph node staging in high-risk prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oebek, Can; Doganca, Tuenkut [Acibadem Taksim Hospital, Department of Urology, Istanbul (Turkey); Demirci, Emre [Sisli Etfal Training and Research Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Istanbul (Turkey); Ocak, Meltem [Istanbul University, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, Istanbul (Turkey); Kural, Ali Riza [Acibadem University, Department of Urology, Istanbul (Turkey); Yildirim, Asif [Istanbul Medeniyet University, Department of Urology, Istanbul (Turkey); Yuecetas, Ugur [Istanbul Training and Research Hospital, Department of Urology, Istanbul (Turkey); Demirdag, Cetin [Istanbul University, Cerrahpasa School of Medicine, Department of Urology, Istanbul (Turkey); Erdogan, Sarper M. [Istanbul University, Cerrahpasa School of Medicine, Department of Public Health, Istanbul (Turkey); Kabasakal, Levent [Istanbul University, Cerrahpasa School of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Istanbul (Turkey); Collaboration: Members of Urooncology Association, Turkey

    2017-10-15

    To assess the diagnostic accuracy of {sup 68}Ga-PSMA PET in predicting lymph node (LN) metastases in primary N staging in high-risk and very high-risk nonmetastatic prostate cancer in comparison with morphological imaging. This was a multicentre trial of the Society of Urologic Oncology in Turkey in conjunction with the Nuclear Medicine Department of Cerrahpasa School of Medicine, Istanbul University. Patients were accrued from eight centres. Patients with high-risk and very high-risk disease scheduled to undergo surgical treatment with extended LN dissection between July 2014 and October 2015 were included. Either MRI or CT was used for morphological imaging. PSMA PET/CT was performed and evaluated at a single centre. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were calculated for the detection of lymphatic metastases by PSMA PET/CT and morphological imaging. Kappa values were calculated to evaluate the correlation between the numbers of LN metastases detected by PSMA PET/CT and by histopathology. Data on 51 eligible patients are presented. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of PSMA PET in detecting LN metastases in the primary setting were 53%, 86% and 76%, and increased to 67%, 88% and 81% in the subgroup with of patients with ≥15 LN removed. Kappa values for the correlation between imaging and pathology were 0.41 for PSMA PET and 0.18 for morphological imaging. PSMA PET/CT is superior to morphological imaging for the detection of metastatic LNs in patients with primary prostate cancer. Surgical dissection remains the gold standard for precise lymphatic staging. (orig.)

  14. 68Ga-DOTA-TOC uptake in neuroendocrine tumour and healthy tissue: differentiation of physiological uptake and pathological processes in PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroiss, A.; Putzer, D.; Decristoforo, C.; Uprimny, C.; Warwitz, B.; Nilica, B.; Gabriel, M.; Kendler, D.; Waitz, D.; Virgolini, I.J.; Widmann, G.

    2013-01-01

    We wanted to establish the range of 68 Ga-DOTA-TOC uptake in liver and bone metastases of patients with neuroendocrine tumours (NET) and to establish the range of its uptake in pancreatic NET. This would allow differentiation between physiological uptake and tumour-related somatostatin receptor expression in the pancreas (including the uncinate process), liver and bone. Finally, we wanted to test for differences in patients with NET, either treated or not treated with peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT). In 249 patients, 390 68 Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT studies were performed. The clinical indications for PET/CT were gastroenteropancreatic NET (194 studies), nongastroenteropancreatic NET (origin in the lung and rectum; 46 studies), NET of unknown primary (111 studies), phaeochromocytoma/glomus tumours (18 studies), and radioiodine-negative metastatic thyroid carcinoma (21 studies). SUV max (mean ± standard deviation) values of 68 Ga-DOTA-TOC were 29.8 ± 16.5 in 162 liver metastases, 19.8 ± 18.8 in 89 bone metastases and 34.6 ± 17.1 in 43 pancreatic NET (33.6 ± 14.3 in 30 tumours of the uncinate process and 36.3 ± 21.5 in 13 tumours of the pancreatic tail). A significant difference in SUV max (p max between nonmalignant and malignant tissue for both bone and liver metastases and for pancreatic NET including the uncinate process (p max for differentiating tumours in the uncinate process were 93.6 % and 90.0 %, respectively (p 68 Ga-DOTA-TOC is an excellent tracer for the imaging of tumours expressing somatostatin receptors on the tumour cell surface, facilitating the detection of even small tumour lesions. The noninvasive PET/CT approach by measurement of regional SUV max can offer important clinical information to distinguish between physiological and pathological somatostatin receptor expression, especially in the uncinate process. PRRT does not significantly influence SUV max , except in liver metastases of patients with NET. (orig.)

  15. {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TOC uptake in neuroendocrine tumour and healthy tissue: differentiation of physiological uptake and pathological processes in PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroiss, A.; Putzer, D.; Decristoforo, C.; Uprimny, C.; Warwitz, B.; Nilica, B.; Gabriel, M.; Kendler, D.; Waitz, D.; Virgolini, I.J. [Innsbruck Medical University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Innsbruck (Austria); Widmann, G. [Innsbruck Medical University, Department of Radiology, Innsbruck (Austria)

    2013-04-15

    We wanted to establish the range of {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TOC uptake in liver and bone metastases of patients with neuroendocrine tumours (NET) and to establish the range of its uptake in pancreatic NET. This would allow differentiation between physiological uptake and tumour-related somatostatin receptor expression in the pancreas (including the uncinate process), liver and bone. Finally, we wanted to test for differences in patients with NET, either treated or not treated with peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT). In 249 patients, 390 {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT studies were performed. The clinical indications for PET/CT were gastroenteropancreatic NET (194 studies), nongastroenteropancreatic NET (origin in the lung and rectum; 46 studies), NET of unknown primary (111 studies), phaeochromocytoma/glomus tumours (18 studies), and radioiodine-negative metastatic thyroid carcinoma (21 studies). SUV{sub max} (mean {+-} standard deviation) values of {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TOC were 29.8 {+-} 16.5 in 162 liver metastases, 19.8 {+-} 18.8 in 89 bone metastases and 34.6 {+-} 17.1 in 43 pancreatic NET (33.6 {+-} 14.3 in 30 tumours of the uncinate process and 36.3 {+-} 21.5 in 13 tumours of the pancreatic tail). A significant difference in SUV{sub max} (p < 0.02) was found in liver metastases of NET patients treated with PRRT. There were significant differences in SUV{sub max} between nonmalignant and malignant tissue for both bone and liver metastases and for pancreatic NET including the uncinate process (p < 0.0001). At a cut-off value of 17.1 the specificity and sensitivity of SUV{sub max} for differentiating tumours in the uncinate process were 93.6 % and 90.0 %, respectively (p < 0.0001). {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TOC is an excellent tracer for the imaging of tumours expressing somatostatin receptors on the tumour cell surface, facilitating the detection of even small tumour lesions. The noninvasive PET/CT approach by measurement of regional SUV{sub max} can offer important clinical

  16. Qualitative and quantitative image analysis of CT and MR imaging in patients with neuroendocrine liver metastases in comparison to 68Ga-DOTATOC PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flechsig, Paul; Zechmann, Christian M.; Schreiweis, Julian; Kratochwil, Clemens; Rath, Daniel; Schwartz, Lawrence H.; Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Haberkorn, Uwe; Giesel, Frederik L.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Qualitative analysis revealed significantly higher results for spatial lesion detectability of liver metastasis in CE-MRI as compared to DW-imaging (p < 0.05). • Primary visibility of liver metastases was scored equally in CE-MRI and DW-imaging. • Contrast-enhancement ratios in liver metastases reached highest values for DW-imaging (p < 0.05). • Staging of liver metastases in patients with GEP-NETs should rather be performed using a combination of PET and MRI than of PET and CT. • The combination of functional and morphologic native MR-sequences seems to be sufficient for follow-up imaging in clinical routine, especially in post-interventional follow-up. - Abstract: Purpose: To compare lesion conspicuity in patients with liver metastases arising from gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs) using MRI, PET and CT. Materials and methods: 16 patients with GEP-NETs were evaluated using non-contrast MRI, contrast-enhanced (CE) MRI using Gd-EOB-DTPA and CE- 68 Ga-DOTATOC PET. Quantitative analyses were performed by two blinded readers using ROI-analyses quantifying contrast ratios (CR) between normal liver-tissue and GEP-NET-metastases. Qualitative analyses were performed evaluating primary visibility and spatial detectability of all lesions. Results: 103 of the same liver metastases were detected on all modalities. Qualitatively, lesion conspicuity was superior on CE-MRI imaging compared to non-contrast MR-sequences (T2, DWI, fl2D, fl3D), as well as arterial- and portal-venous phase CT. Concerning detectability of lesions, CE-MRI was superior to all other modalities. The quantitative ROI-analysis demonstrated improved CR for DWI compared to all other non-contrast MR-sequences (p < 0.001). CE-MRI presented with higher CR-values compared to CE- 68 Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Anatomic imaging using non contrast MRI with fl2D-and fl3D-sequences in combination with the molecular imaging modality 68 Ga-DOTATOC PET is

  17. Peptide synthesis, characterization and 68Ga-radiolabeling of NOTA-conjugated ubiquicidin fragments for prospective infection imaging with PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebenhan, Thomas; Chadwick, Nicholas; Sathekge, Mike M.; Govender, Patrick; Govender, Thavendran; Kruger, Hendrik G.; Marjanovic-Painter, Biljana; Zeevaart, Jan Rijn

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Human antimicrobial peptides are of interest for the development of positron emission tomography (PET) tracers as they exhibit desirable characteristics that make them good candidates for targeting vectors. Due to their natural role in the innate immune system they selectively bind to pathogenic bacteria and yeast, whilst remaining minimally immunogenic and cytotoxic to humans. Research into ubiquicidin (UBI)-based tracers has focused on 99m Tc as a radionuclide, however, the use of bi-functional chelators such as 1,4,7-triazacyclononane-1,4,7-triacetic acid (NOTA), in combination with 68 Ga as a radionuclide, allows for a simple radiolabeling procedure which is preferable in a clinical setting using PET/CT. Methods: The peptides fragments UBI29-41, UBI30-41 were synthesized by standard microwave Fmoc/tert-butyl (tBu)-solid phase synthetic protocols. Characterizations were performed using analytical HPLC and LC/MS. Both NOTA-conjugated peptides were exposed to nat Ga 3+ ; their complexed form was quantified by direct LC/MS injection. This complexation was utilized to testify bacterial and mammalian cell binding potential of fluorophore-linked NOTA-UBI29-41/30-41. 68 Ga labeled NOTA-UBI fragments were also tested for competitive interaction to Staphylococcus aureus to proof the binding target. 68 Ga was eluted from SnO 2 - and TiO 2 -based 68 Ge/ 68 Ga generators using fractionated elution and anion exchanged-based post-procession. NOTA-peptide radiolabeling was carried out including optimization of buffer molarity, NOTA-peptide concentration(s), incubation temperature and –duration as well as considering various SPE purification cartridges. Results: Pure UBI29-41, UBI30-41 and NOTA-UBI30-41 were successfully characterized. Both, NOTA-UBI fragments exhibited complexation rates to nat Ga 3+ ≥ 99%. The percentage binding was significantly higher to Staphylococcus aureus bacilli over Mt4 human leucocytes (P > 0.05) for NOTA-UBI29-41[Lys(Abz)] < NOTA

  18. A first-in-man study of 68Ga-nanocolloid PET-CT sentinel lymph node imaging in prostate cancer demonstrates aberrant lymphatic drainage pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doughton, Jacki A; Hofman, Michael S; Eu, Peter; Hicks, Rodney J; Williams, Scott G

    2018-05-04

    Purpose: To assess feasibility, safety and utility of a novel 68 Ga-nanocolloid radio-tracer with PET-CT lymphoscintigraphy for identification of sentinel lymph nodes (SLN). Methods: Pilot study of patients from a tertiary cancer hospital who required insertion of gold fiducials for prostate cancer radiation therapy. Participation did not affect cancer management. Ultrasound-guided transperineal intra-prostatic injection of PET tracer (iron oxide nanocolloid labelled with gallium-68) after placement of fiducials. PET-CT lymphoscintigraphy imaging at approximately 45 and 100 minutes after in-jection of tracer. The study was monitored using Bayesian trial design with the as-sumption that at least one sentinel lymph node (SLN) could be identified in at least two-thirds of cases with >80% confidence. Results: SLN identification was successful in all 5 participants, allowing completion of the pilot study as per protocol. No adverse effects were observed. Unexpected po-tential pathways for transit of malignant cells as well as expected regional drainage pathways were discovered. Rapid tracer drainage to pelvic bone, perivesical, mesorec-tal, inguinal and Virchow's nodes was identified. Conclusion: SLN identification using 68 Ga-nanocolloid PET-CT can be successfully performed. Non-traditional pathways of disease spread were identified including drainage to pelvic bone as well as perivesical, mesorectal, inguinal and Virchow's nodes. Prevalence of both aberrant and non-lymphatic pathways of spread should be further investigated with this technique. Copyright © 2018 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  19. Comparison of abdominal MRI with diffusion-weighted imaging to {sup 68}Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT in detection of neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmid-Tannwald, Christine; Schmid-Tannwald, Christoph M.; Neumann, Ralph; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Schramm, Nicolai; Reiser, Maximilian F.; Rist, Carsten [Ludwig Maximilians University Hospital Munich, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Morelli, John N. [Scott and White Hospital Temple, Department of Radiology, Temple, TX (United States); Haug, Alexander R.; Jansen, Nathalie [Ludwig Maximilians University Hospital Munich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany)

    2013-06-15

    The aim of the study was to evaluate contrast-enhanced MRI, diffusion-weighted MRI (DW MRI), and {sup 68}Ga-DOTATATE positron emission tomography (PET)/CT in the detection of intermediate to well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumors (NET) of the pancreas. Eighteen patients with pathologically proven pancreatic NET who underwent MRI including DW MRI and PET/CT within 6 weeks of each other were included in this retrospective study. Two radiologists evaluated T2-weighted (T2w), T2w + DW MRI, T2w + contrast-enhanced T1-weighted (CE T1w) MR images, and PET/CT for NET detection. The sensitivity and level of diagnostic confidence were compared among modalities using McNemar's test and a Wilcoxon signed rank test. Apparent diffusion coefficients (ADC) of pancreatic NETs and normal pancreatic tissue were compared with Student's t test. Of the NETs, 8/23 (34.8 %) and 9/23 (39.1 %) were detected on T2w images by observers 1 and 2, respectively. Detection rates improved significantly by combining T2w images with DW MRI (observer 1: 14/23 = 61 %; observer 2: 15/23 = 65.2 %; p < 0.05) or CE T1w images (observer 1: 14/23 = 61 %; observer 2: 15/23 = 65.2 %; p < 0.05). Detection rates of pancreatic NET with PET/CT (both observers: 23/23 = 100 %) were statistically significantly higher than with MRI (p < 0.05). The mean ADC value of NET (1.02 {+-} 0.26 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s) was statistically significantly lower than that of normal pancreatic tissue (1.48 {+-} 0.39 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s). DW MRI is a valuable adjunct to T2w imaging and comparable to CE T1w imaging in pancreatic NET detection, quantitatively differentiating between NET and normal pancreatic tissue with ADC measurements. {sup 68}Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT is more sensitive than MRI in the detection of pancreatic NET. (orig.)

  20. [68Ga]DOTATATE PET/MRI and [18F]FDG PET/CT are complementary and superior to diffusion-weighted MR imaging for radioactive-iodine-refractory differentiated thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vrachimis, Alexis; Stegger, Lars; Wenning, Christian; Noto, Benjamin; Konnert, Julia Renate; Riemann, Burkhard; Weckesser, Matthias; Burg, Matthias Christian; Allkemper, Thomas; Heindel, Walter; Schaefers, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether [ 68 Ga]DOTATATE PET/MRI with diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) can replace or complement [ 18 F]FDG PET/CT in patients with radioactive-iodine (RAI)-refractory differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC). The study population comprised 12 patients with elevated thyroglobulin and a negative RAI scan after thyroidectomy and RAI remnant ablation who underwent both [ 18 F]FDG PET/CT and [ 68 Ga]DOTATATE PET/MRI within 8 weeks of each other. The presence of recurrent cancer was evaluated on a per-patient, per-organ and per-lesion basis. Histology, and prior and follow-up examinations served as the standard of reference. Recurrent or metastatic tumour was confirmed in 11 of the 12 patients. [ 68 Ga]DOTATATE PET(/MRI) correctly identified the tumour burden in all 11 patients, whereas in one patient local relapse was missed by [ 18 F]FDG PET/CT. In the lesion-based analysis, overall lesion detection rates were 79/85 (93 %), 69/85 (81 %) and 27/82 (33 %) for [ 18 F]FDG PET/CT, [ 68 Ga]DOTATATE PET/MRI and DWI, respectively. [ 18 F]FDG PET(/CT) was superior to [ 68 Ga]DOTATATE PET(/MRI) in the overall evaluation and in the detection of pulmonary metastases. In the detection of extrapulmonary metastases, [ 68 Ga]DOTATATE PET(/MRI) showed a higher sensitivity than [ 18 F]FDG PET(/CT), at the cost of lower specificity. DWI achieved only poor sensitivity and was significantly inferior to [ 18 F]FDG PET in the lesion-based evaluation in the detection of both extrapulmonary and pulmonary metastases. [ 18 F]FDG PET/CT was more sensitive than [ 68 Ga]DOTATATE PET/MRI in the evaluation of RAI-refractory DTC, mostly because of its excellent ability to detect lung metastases. In the evaluation of extrapulmonary lesions, [ 68 Ga]DOTATATE PET(/MRI) was more sensitive and [ 18 F]FDG PET(/CT) more specific. Furthermore, DWI did not provide additional information and cannot replace [ 18 F]FDG PET for postoperative monitoring of patients with

  1. Extent of disease in recurrent prostate cancer determined by [(68)Ga]PSMA-HBED-CC PET/CT in relation to PSA levels, PSA doubling time and Gleason score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verburg, Frederik A; Pfister, David; Heidenreich, Axel; Vogg, Andreas; Drude, Natascha I; Vöö, Stefan; Mottaghy, Felix M; Behrendt, Florian F

    2016-03-01

    To examine the relationship between the extent of disease determined by [(68)Ga]PSMA-HBED-CC-PET/CT and the important clinical measures prostate-specific antigen (PSA), PSA doubling time (PSAdt) and Gleason score. We retrospectively studied the first 155 patients with recurrent prostate cancer (PCA) referred to our university hospital for [(68)Ga]PSMA-HBED-CC PET/CT. PET/CT was positive in 44%, 79% and 89% of patients with PSA levels of ≤1, 1-2 and ≥2 ng/ml, respectively. Patients with high PSA levels showed higher rates of local prostate tumours (p PSA and PSAdt were independent determinants of scan positivity and of extrapelvic lymph node metastases. PSAdt was the only independent marker of bone metastases (p = 0.001). Of 20 patients with a PSAdt PSA ≥2 ng/ml, 19 (95%) had a positive scan and 12 (60%) had M1a disease. Of 14 patients with PSA 6 months, only 5 (36%) had a positive scan and 1 (7%) had M1a disease. [(68)Ga]PSMA-HBED-CC PET/CT will identify PCA lesions even in patients with very low PSA levels. Higher PSA levels and shorter PSAdt are independently associated with scan positivity and extrapelvic metastases, and can be used for patient selection for [(68)Ga]PSMA-HBED-CC PET/CT.

  2. Comparison of PET/CT and PET/MRI hybrid systems using a {sup 68}Ga-labelled PSMA ligand for the diagnosis of recurrent prostate cancer: initial experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afshar-Oromieh, A. [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Department of Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Haberkorn, U. [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Clinical Cooperation Unit of Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); Schlemmer, H.P.; Fenchel, M.; Roethke, M. [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Department of Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Eder, M.; Eisenhut, M. [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Department of Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry, Heidelberg (Germany); Hadaschik, B.A. [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Urology, Heidelberg (Germany); Kopp-Schneider, A. [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Department of Biostatistics, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-05-15

    {sup 68}Ga-labelled HBED-CC-PSMA is a highly promising tracer for imaging recurrent prostate cancer (PCa). The intention of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of PET/MRI with this tracer. Twenty patients underwent PET/CT 1 h after injection of the {sup 68}Ga-PSMA ligand followed by PET/MRI 3 h after injection. Data from the two investigations were first analysed separately and then compared with respect to tumour detection rate and radiotracer uptake in various tissues. To evaluate the quantification accuracy of the PET/MRI system, differences in SUVs between PET/CT and corresponding PET/MRI were compared with differences in SUVs between PET/CT 1 h and 3 h after injection in another patient cohort. This cohort was investigated using the same PET/CT system. With PET/MRI, different diagnostic sequences, higher contrast of lesions and higher resolution of MRI enabled a subjectively easier evaluation of the images. In addition, four unclear findings on PET/CT could be clarified as characteristic of PCa metastases by PET/MRI. However, in PET images of the PET/MRI, a reduced signal was observed at the level of the kidneys (in 11 patients) and around the urinary bladder (in 15 patients). This led to reduced SUVs in six lesions. SUV{sub mean} values provided by the PET/MRI system were different in muscles, blood pool, liver and spleen. PCa was detected more easily and more accurately with Ga-PSMA PET/MRI than with PET/CT and with lower radiation exposure. Consequently, this new technique could clarify unclear findings on PET/CT. However, scatter correction was challenging when the specific {sup 68}Ga-PSMA ligand was used. Moreover, direct comparison of SUVs from PET/CT and PET/MR needs to be conducted carefully. (orig.)

  3. The reconstruction algorithm used for [{sup 68}Ga]PSMA-HBED-CC PET/CT reconstruction significantly influences the number of detected lymph node metastases and coeliac ganglia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krohn, Thomas [RWTH University Hospital Aachen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Aachen (Germany); Ulm University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ulm (Germany); Birmes, Anita; Winz, Oliver H.; Drude, Natascha I. [RWTH University Hospital Aachen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Aachen (Germany); Mottaghy, Felix M. [RWTH University Hospital Aachen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Aachen (Germany); Maastricht UMC+, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Maastricht (Netherlands); Behrendt, Florian F. [RWTH University Hospital Aachen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Aachen (Germany); Radiology Institute ' ' Aachen Land' ' , Wuerselen (Germany); Verburg, Frederik A. [RWTH University Hospital Aachen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Aachen (Germany); University Hospital Giessen and Marburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Marburg (Germany)

    2017-04-15

    To investigate whether the numbers of lymph node metastases and coeliac ganglia delineated on [{sup 68}Ga]PSMA-HBED-CC PET/CT scans differ among datasets generated using different reconstruction algorithms. Data were constructed using the BLOB-OS-TF, BLOB-OS and 3D-RAMLA algorithms. All reconstructions were assessed by two nuclear medicine physicians for the number of pelvic/paraaortal lymph node metastases as well the number of coeliac ganglia. Standardized uptake values (SUV) were also calculated in different regions. At least one [{sup 68}Ga]PSMA-HBED-CC PET/CT-positive pelvic or paraaortal lymph node metastasis was found in 49 and 35 patients using the BLOB-OS-TF algorithm, in 42 and 33 patients using the BLOB-OS algorithm, and in 41 and 31 patients using the 3D-RAMLA algorithm, respectively, and a positive ganglion was found in 92, 59 and 24 of 100 patients using the three algorithms, respectively. Quantitatively, the SUVmean and SUVmax were significantly higher with the BLOB-OS algorithm than with either the BLOB-OS-TF or the 3D-RAMLA algorithm in all measured regions (p < 0.001 for all comparisons). The differences between the SUVs with the BLOB-OS-TF- and 3D-RAMLA algorithms were not significant in the aorta (SUVmean, p = 0.93; SUVmax, p = 0.97) but were significant in all other regions (p < 0.001 in all cases). The SUVmean ganglion/gluteus ratio was significantly higher with the BLOB-OS-TF algorithm than with either the BLOB-OS or the 3D-RAMLA algorithm and was significantly higher with the BLOB-OS than with the 3D-RAMLA algorithm (p < 0.001 in all cases). The results of [{sup 68}Ga]PSMA-HBED-CC PET/CT are affected by the reconstruction algorithm used. The highest number of lesions and physiological structures will be visualized using a modern algorithm employing time-of-flight information. (orig.)

  4. {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11 PET/CT in primary staging of prostate carcinoma. Preliminary results on differences between black and white South-Africans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sathekge, Mike [University of Pretoria, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Pretoria (South Africa); University of Pretoria and Steve Biko Academic Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Pretoria (South Africa); Lengana, Thabo; Vorster, Mariza; Lawal, Ismaheel; Ebenhan, Thomas [University of Pretoria, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Pretoria (South Africa); Maes, Alex [University of Pretoria, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Pretoria (South Africa); AZ Groeninge, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Kortrijk (Belgium); KULAK, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Pathology, Kortrijk (Belgium); Zeevaart, JanRijn [University of Pretoria, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Pretoria (South Africa); Radiochemistry, The South African Nuclear Energy Corporation SOC Ltd (Necsa), Pelindaba, Pretoria (South Africa); Wiele, Christophe van de [University of Pretoria, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Pretoria (South Africa); AZ Groeninge, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Kortrijk (Belgium); University Ghent, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Ghent (Belgium)

    2018-02-15

    The incidence of prostate cancer is 60% higher and the mortality rate is two- to three-times greater in black versus white men. We report on differences in {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11 PET/CT imaging findings in 77 black South-African (BSAs) and 18 white South-African (WSAs) treatment-naive primary prostate carcinoma (PPC) patients. {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11 PET/CT imaging findings were compared to histological, biochemical and morphological imaging data. Patients were grouped into three Gleason grade groups (GG), GG 1 (scores 3 + 3 and 3 + 4), GG2 (scores 4 + 3 and 4 + 4) and GG3 (scores 9 and 10), and the PSA difference among the groups was determined. Inter-racial difference in SUVmax of the primary tumor as well as its correlation with serum PSA were also determined. Ninety-three out of 95 PPC where readily identified on {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11 PET/CT imaging. Median PPC SUVmax and serum PSA values proved significantly higher (p = 0.033 and p = 0.003) in GG3 patients (median 16.4 and 180 ng/ml) when compared to GG1 patients (median 9.6 and 25.1 ng/ml) or GG2 patients (median 8.8 and 46.2 ng/ml). SUVmax significantly correlated with serum PSA-values (r = 0.377 (p = 0.0001)). Age, frequency of lymph node involvement and distant metastases, and GGs (p ≥ 0.153) were similar in BSAs and WSAs, both median serum PSA-values as well as SUVmax values proved significantly higher in BSAs when compared to WSAs, respectively, 81.6 ng/ml versus 14.5 ng/ml (p = 0.0001) and 11.9 versus 4.38 (p = 0.004). Moreover, Gleason-score normalized median SUVmax values proved 2.5 times higher in BSAs when compared to WSAs (p = 0.005). SUVmax values proved significantly related to GG and to be significantly higher in BSAs when compared to WSAs. Also, SUVmax significantly correlated with serum PSA values, which was significantly higher in BSAs when compared with WSAs. (orig.)

  5. Roles of 67Ga-scintigraphy and CT in the decision of surgical treatment in cases with suspected abdominal abscess

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuwabara, Yasuo; Yasumori, Kotaro; Oshiumi, Yoshihiko; Nishitani, Hiromu; Ichiya, Yuichi

    1983-01-01

    67 Ga-scintigraphy and computed tomography in the decision of surgical treatment of abdominal abscess were evaluated in 37 clinically suspected cases. Eight of them were treated surgically. In the remaining 29 cases, 24 were treated conservatively, and 5 were confirmed not having abscesses at surgery for some other reason or autopsy. The clinical decisions in this study were considered to be appropriate, because there was no fatal case directly related to the existence of abscess. The sensitivity of 67 Ga-scintigraphy for surgically treated abscess was 88% (7/8), that of computed tomography was 100% (8/8). The specificity of 67 Ga-scintigraphy was 45% (13/29), that of computed tomography was 62% (18/29). In cases with descrepancy between 67 Ga-scintigraphy and computed tomography, computed tomography was more specific for abscess. It is concluded that in cases with negative findings in either examination, it is possible to deny a presence of abscess requring surgical treatment. However, even in cases with positive findings in both examinations, surgical treatment should be decided finally including other clinical informations. (author)

  6. Dynamic 68Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT and static image in NET patients. Correlation of parameters during PRRT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Binnebeek, Sofie; Koole, Michel; Terwinghe, Christelle; Baete, Kristof; Vanbilloen, Bert; Haustermans, Karine; Clement, Paul M; Bogaerts, Kris; Verbruggen, Alfons; Nackaerts, Kris; Van Cutsem, Eric; Verslype, Chris; Mottaghy, Felix M; Deroose, Christophe M

    2016-06-28

    To investigate the relationship between the dynamic parameters (Ki) and static image-derived parameters of 68Ga-DOTATOC-PET, to determine which static parameter best reflects underlying somatostatin-receptor-expression (SSR) levels on neuroendocrine tumours (NETs). 20 patients with metastasized NETs underwent a dynamic and static 68Ga-DOTATOC-PET before PRRT and at 7 and 40 weeks after the first administration of 90Y-DOTATOC (in total 4 cycles were planned); 175 lesions were defined and analyzed on the dynamic as well as static scans. Quantitative analysis was performed using the software PMOD. One to five target lesions per patient were chosen and delineated manually on the baseline dynamic scan and further, on the corresponding static 68Ga-DOTATOC-PET and the dynamic and static 68Ga-DOTATOC-PET at the other time-points; SUVmax and SUVmean of the lesions was assessed on the other six scans. The input function was retrieved from the abdominal aorta on the images. Further on, Ki was calculated using the Patlak-Plot. At last, 5 reference regions for normalization of SUVtumour were delineated on the static scans resulting in 5 ratios (SUVratio). SUVmax and SUVmean of the tumoural lesions on the dynamic 68Ga-DOTATOC-PET had a very strong correlation with the corresponding parameters in the static scan (R²: 0.94 and 0.95 respectively). SUVmax, SUVmean and Ki of the lesions showed a good linear correlation; the SUVratios correlated poorly with Ki. A significantly better correlation was noticed between Ki and SUVtumour(max and mean) (p dynamic parameter Ki correlates best with the absolute SUVtumour, SUVtumour best reflects underlying SSR-levels in NETs.

  7. Comparison of diagnostic accuracy of {sup 111}In-pentetreotide SPECT and {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT: A lesion-by-lesion analysis in patients with metastatic neuroendocrine tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Binnebeek, S. van; Vanbilloen, B.; Baete, K.; Terwinghe, C.; Koole, M.; Mortelmans, L. [KU Leuven, Nuclear Medicine, University Hospitals Leuven and Department of Imaging and Pathology, Leuven (Belgium); Mottaghy, F.M. [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Maastricht (Netherlands); University Hospital Aachen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Aachen (Germany); Clement, P.M. [KU Leuven, Medical Oncology, University Hospitals Leuven and Laboratory of Experimental Oncology, Leuven (Belgium); Bogaerts, K. [KU Leuven and UHasselt, Department of Public Health and Primary Care (I-BioStat), Leuven (Belgium); Haustermans, K. [KU Leuven, Radiation Oncology, University Hospitals Leuven and Department of Oncology, Leuven (Belgium); Nackaerts, K. [University Hospitals Leuven, Pulmonology, Leuven (Belgium); Cutsem, E. van; Verslype, C. [KU Leuven, Division of Digestive Oncology, University Hospitals Leuven and Department of Oncology, Leuven (Belgium); Verbruggen, A. [KU Leuven, Laboratory for Radiopharmacy, Leuven (Belgium); Deroose, C.M. [KU Leuven, Nuclear Medicine, University Hospitals Leuven and Department of Imaging and Pathology, Leuven (Belgium); University Hospitals Leuven, Nuclear Medicine, Leuven (Belgium)

    2016-03-15

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy of {sup 111}In-pentetreotide-scintigraphy with {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC-positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) in patients with metastatic-neuroendocrine tumour (NET) scheduled for peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT). Incremental lesions (ILs) were defined as lesions observed on only one modality. Fifty-three metastatic-NET-patients underwent {sup 111}In-pentetreotide-scintigraphy (24 h post-injection; planar+single-photon emission CT (SPECT) abdomen) and whole-body {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC-PET/CT. SPECT and PET were compared in a lesion-by-lesion and organ-by-organ analysis, determining the total lesions and ILs for both modalities. Significantly more lesions were detected on {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC-PET/CT versus {sup 111}In-pentetreotide-scintigraphy. More specifically, we observed 1,098 lesions on PET/CT (range: 1-105; median: 15) versus 660 on SPECT (range: 0-73, median: 9) (p<0.0001), with 439 PET-ILs (42/53 patients) and one SPECT-IL (1/53 patients). The sensitivity for PET/CT was 99.9 % (95 % CI, 99.3-100.0), for SPECT 60.0 % (95 % CI, 48.5-70.2). The organ-by-organ analysis showed that the PET-ILs were most frequently visualized in liver and skeleton. Ga-DOTATOC-PET/CT is superior for the detection of NET-metastases compared to {sup 111}In-pentetreotide SPECT. (orig.)

  8. Correlation between lactose absorption and the C/T-13910 and G/A-22018 mutations of the lactase-phlorizin hydrolase (LCT gene in adult-type hypolactasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.C. Bulhões

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The C/T-13910 mutation is the major factor responsible for the persistence of the lactase-phlorizin hydrolase (LCT gene expression. Mutation G/A-22018 appears to be only in co-segregation with C/T-13910. The objective of the present study was to assess the presence of these two mutations in Brazilian individuals with and without lactose malabsorption diagnosed by the hydrogen breath test (HBT. Ten milk-tolerant and 10 milk-intolerant individuals underwent the HBT after oral ingestion of 50 g lactose (equivalent to 1 L of milk. Analyses for C/T-13910 and G/A-22018 mutations were performed using a PCR-based method. Primers were designed for this study based on the GenBank sequence. The CT/GA, CT/AA, and TT/AA genotypes (lactase persistence were found in 10 individuals with negative HBT. The CC/GG genotype (lactase non-persistence was found in 10 individuals, 9 of them with positive HBT results. There was a significant agreement between the presence of mutations in the LCT gene promoter and HBT results (kappa = -0.9, P < 0.001. The CT/AA genotype has not been described previously and seems to be related to lactase persistence. The present study showed a significant agreement between the occurrence of mutations G/A-22018 and C/T-13910 and lactose absorption in Brazilian subjects, suggesting that the molecular test used here could be proposed for the laboratory diagnosis of adult-type primary hypolactasia.

  9. THERANOSTICS: From Molecular Imaging Using Ga-68 Labeled Tracers and PET/CT to Personalized Radionuclide Therapy - The Bad Berka Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, Richard P; Kulkarni, Harshad R

    2012-01-01

    The acronym THERANOSTICS epitomizes the inseparability of diagnosis and therapy, the pillars of medicine and takes into account personalized management of disease for a specific patient. Molecular phenotypes of neoplasms can be determined by molecular imaging with specific probes using positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), or optical methods, so that the treatment is specifically targeted against the tumor and its environment. To meet these demands, we need to define the targets, ligands, coupling and labeling chemistry, the most appropriate radionuclides, biodistribution modifiers, and finally select the right patients for the personalized treatment. THERANOSTICS of neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) using Ga-68 labeled tracers for diagnostics with positron emission tomography/ computed tomography (PET/CT), and using Lu-177 or other metallic radionuclides for radionuclide therapy by applying the same peptide proves that personalized radionuclide therapy today is already a fact and not a fiction.

  10. THERANOSTICS: From Molecular Imaging Using Ga-68 Labeled Tracers and PET/CT to Personalized Radionuclide Therapy - The Bad Berka Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard P. Baum, Harshad R. Kulkarni

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The acronym THERANOSTICS epitomizes the inseparability of diagnosis and therapy, the pillars of medicine and takes into account personalized management of disease for a specific patient. Molecular phenotypes of neoplasms can be determined by molecular imaging with specific probes using positron emission tomography (PET, single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, or optical methods, so that the treatment is specifically targeted against the tumor and its environment. To meet these demands, we need to define the targets, ligands, coupling and labeling chemistry, the most appropriate radionuclides, biodistribution modifiers, and finally select the right patients for the personalized treatment. THERANOSTICS of neuroendocrine tumors (NETs using Ga-68 labeled tracers for diagnostics with positron emission tomography/ computed tomography (PET/CT, and using Lu-177 or other metallic radionuclides for radionuclide therapy by applying the same peptide proves that personalized radionuclide therapy today is already a fact and not a fiction.

  11. Ga68-DOTA peptide PET/CT to detect occult mesenchymal tumor-inducing osteomalacia: A case series of three patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, Chi Long [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Singapore General Hospital, Singapore (Singapore)

    2015-09-15

    Tumor-induced osteomalacia (TIO) is a rare disease that manifests with paraneoplasic syndrome and overproduction of fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23), leading to renal phosphate wasting and hyperphosphaturia, eventually leading to acquired hypophosphatemic osteomalacia. Diagnosis of this disease is often challenging because of the small size of the lesion, which can be localized in bone or soft tissue anywhere in the body. Detecting these occult mesenchymal tumors (OMT) is of great importance as they are potentially curable after tumor resection. The purpose of this case series is to provide some insight into the diagnosis and localization of OMT associated with osteomalacia, particularly using functional imaging with Ga68-DOTA peptide PET/CT scans.

  12. Ga68-DOTA peptide PET/CT to detect occult mesenchymal tumor-inducing osteomalacia: A case series of three patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, Chi Long

    2015-01-01

    Tumor-induced osteomalacia (TIO) is a rare disease that manifests with paraneoplasic syndrome and overproduction of fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23), leading to renal phosphate wasting and hyperphosphaturia, eventually leading to acquired hypophosphatemic osteomalacia. Diagnosis of this disease is often challenging because of the small size of the lesion, which can be localized in bone or soft tissue anywhere in the body. Detecting these occult mesenchymal tumors (OMT) is of great importance as they are potentially curable after tumor resection. The purpose of this case series is to provide some insight into the diagnosis and localization of OMT associated with osteomalacia, particularly using functional imaging with Ga68-DOTA peptide PET/CT scans

  13. Interleukin 10 (- 1082 G/A) and (- 819 C/T) gene polymorphisms in Egyptian women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talaat, Roba M; Mohamed, Yasmin A; Mohamad, Ehab H; Elsharkawy, Marwa; Guirgis, Adel A

    2016-09-01

    Cytokines play critical roles in the pathogenesis of Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS). This work was designed to study the implication of IL10 gene polymorphisms (- 1082 G/A and - 819 C/T) on the susceptibility of Egyptian women to have PCOS. Rotterdam consensus criteria were used to diagnose PCOS patients. Genotyping was performed by single-stranded polymorphism-polymerase chain reaction (SSP-PCR) in 61 PCOS patients and 80 healthy controls, and IL-10 serum levels were measured using Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The frequency of IL10 - 1082 G/G (46%) genotype was significantly increased (p PCOS patients compared to controls (14% and 35% for G/G and A/A genotypes; respectively). G allele (65%) is significantly increased (p PCOS patients while A allele (61%) is significantly increased (p PCOS group. G/G genotype (odd ratio (OR = 5.322) with confidence interval (CI = 2.364-11.982) and the G allele (OR = 2.828 with CI = 1.73-4.61) of - 1082 G/A and T/T genotype of - 819 C/T (OR = 4.18 with CI = 1.26-13.86) could be considered as risk factors for PCOS. IL-10 levels were significantly lower among PCOS patients (313.42 ± 30.10) compared to normal controls (4914.36 ± 303.72). Depending on our preliminary work, IL10 - 1082 G/G might be considered as a host genetic factor for PCOS susceptibility in Egyptian women. Studies concerning other cytokine gene polymorphisms are required to get a better understanding of the pathogenesis of PCOS disease.

  14. Direct comparison of 68Ga-DOTA-TOC and 18F-FDG PET/CT in the follow-up of patients with neuroendocrine tumour treated with the first full peptide receptor radionuclide therapy cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilica, Bernhard; Waitz, Dietmar; Uprimny, Christian; Kendler, Dorota; Buxbaum, Sabine; Warwitz, Boris; Gerardo, Llanos; Virgolini, Irene; Rodrigues, Margarida; Stevanovic, Vlado; Henninger, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    To determine the value of 68 Ga-DOTA-TOC and 18 F-FDG PET/CT for initial and follow-up evaluation of patients with neuroendocrine tumour (NET) treated with peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT). We evaluated 66 patients who had histologically proven NET and underwent both PRRT and three combined 68 Ga-DOTA-TOC and 18 F-FDG PET/CT studies. 68 Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT was performed before PRRT, 3 months after completion of PRRT and after a further 6 - 9 months. 18 F-FDG PET/CT was done within 2 months of 68 Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT. Follow-up ranged from 11.8 to 80.0 months (mean 34.5 months). All patients were 68 Ga-DOTA-TOC PET-positive initially and at follow-up after the first full PRRT cycle. Overall, 62 of the 198 18 F-FDG PET studies (31 %) were true-positive in 38 of the 66 patients (58 %). Of the 66 patients, 28 (5 grade 1, 23 grade 2) were 18 F-FDG-negative initially and during follow-up (group 1), 24 (5 grade 1, 13 grade 2, 6 grade 3) were 18 F-FDG-positive initially and during follow-up (group 2), 9 patients (2 grade 1, 6 grade 2, 1 grade 3) were 18 F-FDG-negative initially but 18 F-FDG-positive during follow-up (group 3), and 5 patients (all grade 2) were 18 F-FDG-positive initially but 18 F-FDG-negative during follow-up (group 4). 18 F-FDG PET showed more and/or larger metastases than 68 Ga-DOTA-TOC PET in five patients of group 2 and four patients of group 3, all with progressive disease. In three patients with progressive disease who died during follow-up tumour SUVmax increased by 41 - 82 % from the first to the last follow-up investigation. In NET patients, the presence of 18 F-FDG-positive tumours correlates strongly with a higher risk of progression. Initially, patients with 18 F-FDG-negative NET may show 18 F-FDG-positive tumours during follow-up. Also patients with grade 1 and grade 2 NET may have 18 F-FDG-positive tumours. Therefore, 18 F-FDG PET/CT is a complementary tool to 68 Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT with clinical relevance for molecular investigation

  15. Direct comparison of (68)Ga-DOTA-TOC and (18)F-FDG PET/CT in the follow-up of patients with neuroendocrine tumour treated with the first full peptide receptor radionuclide therapy cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilica, Bernhard; Waitz, Dietmar; Stevanovic, Vlado; Uprimny, Christian; Kendler, Dorota; Buxbaum, Sabine; Warwitz, Boris; Gerardo, Llanos; Henninger, Benjamin; Virgolini, Irene; Rodrigues, Margarida

    2016-08-01

    To determine the value of (68)Ga-DOTA-TOC and (18)F-FDG PET/CT for initial and follow-up evaluation of patients with neuroendocrine tumour (NET) treated with peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT). We evaluated 66 patients who had histologically proven NET and underwent both PRRT and three combined (68)Ga-DOTA-TOC and (18)F-FDG PET/CT studies. (68)Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT was performed before PRRT, 3 months after completion of PRRT and after a further 6 - 9 months. (18)F-FDG PET/CT was done within 2 months of (68)Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT. Follow-up ranged from 11.8 to 80.0 months (mean 34.5 months). All patients were (68)Ga-DOTA-TOC PET-positive initially and at follow-up after the first full PRRT cycle. Overall, 62 of the 198 (18)F-FDG PET studies (31 %) were true-positive in 38 of the 66 patients (58 %). Of the 66 patients, 28 (5 grade 1, 23 grade 2) were (18)F-FDG-negative initially and during follow-up (group 1), 24 (5 grade 1, 13 grade 2, 6 grade 3) were (18)F-FDG-positive initially and during follow-up (group 2), 9 patients (2 grade 1, 6 grade 2, 1 grade 3) were (18)F-FDG-negative initially but (18)F-FDG-positive during follow-up (group 3), and 5 patients (all grade 2) were (18)F-FDG-positive initially but (18)F-FDG-negative during follow-up (group 4).(18)F-FDG PET showed more and/or larger metastases than (68)Ga-DOTA-TOC PET in five patients of group 2 and four patients of group 3, all with progressive disease. In three patients with progressive disease who died during follow-up tumour SUVmax increased by 41 - 82 % from the first to the last follow-up investigation. In NET patients, the presence of (18)F-FDG-positive tumours correlates strongly with a higher risk of progression. Initially, patients with (18)F-FDG-negative NET may show (18)F-FDG-positive tumours during follow-up. Also patients with grade 1 and grade 2 NET may have (18)F-FDG-positive tumours. Therefore, (18)F-FDG PET/CT is a complementary tool to (68)Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT with clinical

  16. Effect of Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy on Somatostatin Receptor Status and Glucose Metabolism in Neuroendocrine Tumors: Intraindividual Comparison of Ga-68 DOTANOC PET/CT and F-18 FDG PET/CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Sowon; Prasad, Vikas; Lee, Dong Soo; Baum, R. P.

    2011-01-01

    The heterogeneous nature of the neuroendocrine tumors (NET) makes it challenging to find one uniformly applicable management protocol which is especially true for diagnosis. The discovery of the overexpression of somatostatin receptors (SMS-R) on neuroendocrine tumor cells lead to the generalized and rapid acceptance of radiolabeled somatostatin receptor analogs for staging and restaging of NET as well as for Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy (PRRNT) using Y-90 and Lu-177 DOTATATE/DOTATOC. In this present work we tried to look in to the effect of PRRNT on the glucose metabolism assessed by F-18 FDG PET/CT and SMS-R density assessed by Ga-68 DOTANOC PET/CT. We observed a complex relationship between the somatostatin receptor expression and glucose metabolism with only 56% (77/138) of the lesions showing match, while the others show mismatch between the receptor status and metabolism. The match between receptor expression and glucose metabolism increases with the grade of NET. In grade 3 NET, there is a concurrence between the changes in glucose metabolism and somatostatin receptor expression. PRRNT was found to be more effective in lesions with higher receptor expression. PMID:22121482

  17. 68Ga-PSMA-PET/CT imaging of localized primary prostate cancer patients for intensity modulated radiation therapy treatment planning with integrated boost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Lena; Kantz, Steffi; Hung, Arthur; Monaco, Debra; Gaertner, Florian C; Essler, Markus; Strunk, Holger; Laub, Wolfram; Bundschuh, Ralph A

    2018-07-01

    The purpose of our study was to show the feasibility and potential benefits of using 68 Ga-PSMA-PET/CT imaging for radiation therapy treatment planning of patients with primary prostate cancer using either integrated boost on the PET-positive volume or localized treatment of the PET-positive volume. The potential gain of such an approach, the improvement of tumor control, and reduction of the dose to organs-at-risk at the same time was analyzed using the QUANTEC biological model. Twenty-one prostate cancer patients (70 years average) without previous local therapy received 68 Ga-PSMA-PET/CT imaging. Organs-at-risk and standard prostate target volumes were manually defined on the obtained datasets. A PET active volume (PTV_PET) was segmented with a 40% of the maximum activity uptake in the lesion as threshold followed by manual adaption. Five different treatment plan variations were calculated for each patient. Analysis of derived treatment plans was done according to QUANTEC with in-house developed software. Tumor control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) was calculated for all plan variations. Comparing the conventional plans to the plans with integrated boost and plans just treating the PET-positive tumor volume, we found that TCP increased to (95.2 ± 0.5%) for an integrated boost with 75.6 Gy, (98.1 ± 0.3%) for an integrated boost with 80 Gy, (94.7 ± 0.8%) for treatment of PET-positive volume with 75 Gy, and to (99.4 ± 0.1%) for treating PET-positive volume with 95 Gy (all p PET/CT image information allows for more individualized prostate treatment planning. TCP values of identified active tumor volumes were increased, while rectum and bladder NTCP values either remained the same or were even lower. However, further studies need to clarify the clinical benefit for the patients applying these techniques.

  18. Accuracy and Utility of Deformable Image Registration in 68Ga 4D PET/CT Assessment of Pulmonary Perfusion Changes During and After Lung Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardcastle, Nicholas; Hofman, Michael S.; Hicks, Rodney J.; Callahan, Jason; Kron, Tomas; MacManus, Michael P.; Ball, David L.; Jackson, Price; Siva, Shankar

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Measuring changes in lung perfusion resulting from radiation therapy dose requires registration of the functional imaging to the radiation therapy treatment planning scan. This study investigates registration accuracy and utility for positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) perfusion imaging in radiation therapy for non–small cell lung cancer. Methods: 68 Ga 4-dimensional PET/CT ventilation-perfusion imaging was performed before, during, and after radiation therapy for 5 patients. Rigid registration and deformable image registration (DIR) using B-splines and Demons algorithms was performed with the CT data to obtain a deformation map between the functional images and planning CT. Contour propagation accuracy and correspondence of anatomic features were used to assess registration accuracy. Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to determine statistical significance. Changes in lung perfusion resulting from radiation therapy dose were calculated for each registration method for each patient and averaged over all patients. Results: With B-splines/Demons DIR, median distance to agreement between lung contours reduced modestly by 0.9/1.1 mm, 1.3/1.6 mm, and 1.3/1.6 mm for pretreatment, midtreatment, and posttreatment (P<.01 for all), and median Dice score between lung contours improved by 0.04/0.04, 0.05/0.05, and 0.05/0.05 for pretreatment, midtreatment, and posttreatment (P<.001 for all). Distance between anatomic features reduced with DIR by median 2.5 mm and 2.8 for pretreatment and midtreatment time points, respectively (P=.001) and 1.4 mm for posttreatment (P>.2). Poorer posttreatment results were likely caused by posttreatment pneumonitis and tumor regression. Up to 80% standardized uptake value loss in perfusion scans was observed. There was limited change in the loss in lung perfusion between registration methods; however, Demons resulted in larger interpatient variation compared with rigid and B-splines registration. Conclusions

  19. Accuracy and Utility of Deformable Image Registration in {sup 68}Ga 4D PET/CT Assessment of Pulmonary Perfusion Changes During and After Lung Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardcastle, Nicholas, E-mail: nick.hardcastle@gmail.com [Department of Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong (Australia); Hofman, Michael S. [Molecular Imaging, Centre for Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia); Hicks, Rodney J. [Molecular Imaging, Centre for Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia); Department of Medicine, University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia); Callahan, Jason [Molecular Imaging, Centre for Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia); Kron, Tomas [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiation Sciences, Monash University, Clayton (Australia); The Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, Melbourne University, Victoria (Australia); MacManus, Michael P.; Ball, David L. [Division of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); The Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia); Jackson, Price [Department of Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Siva, Shankar [Division of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia)

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: Measuring changes in lung perfusion resulting from radiation therapy dose requires registration of the functional imaging to the radiation therapy treatment planning scan. This study investigates registration accuracy and utility for positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) perfusion imaging in radiation therapy for non–small cell lung cancer. Methods: {sup 68}Ga 4-dimensional PET/CT ventilation-perfusion imaging was performed before, during, and after radiation therapy for 5 patients. Rigid registration and deformable image registration (DIR) using B-splines and Demons algorithms was performed with the CT data to obtain a deformation map between the functional images and planning CT. Contour propagation accuracy and correspondence of anatomic features were used to assess registration accuracy. Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to determine statistical significance. Changes in lung perfusion resulting from radiation therapy dose were calculated for each registration method for each patient and averaged over all patients. Results: With B-splines/Demons DIR, median distance to agreement between lung contours reduced modestly by 0.9/1.1 mm, 1.3/1.6 mm, and 1.3/1.6 mm for pretreatment, midtreatment, and posttreatment (P<.01 for all), and median Dice score between lung contours improved by 0.04/0.04, 0.05/0.05, and 0.05/0.05 for pretreatment, midtreatment, and posttreatment (P<.001 for all). Distance between anatomic features reduced with DIR by median 2.5 mm and 2.8 for pretreatment and midtreatment time points, respectively (P=.001) and 1.4 mm for posttreatment (P>.2). Poorer posttreatment results were likely caused by posttreatment pneumonitis and tumor regression. Up to 80% standardized uptake value loss in perfusion scans was observed. There was limited change in the loss in lung perfusion between registration methods; however, Demons resulted in larger interpatient variation compared with rigid and B-splines registration

  20. Improved Frame Mode Selection for AMR-WB+ Based on Decision Tree

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong Kyu; Kim, Nam Soo

    In this letter, we propose a coding mode selection method for the AMR-WB+ audio coder based on a decision tree. In order to reduce computation while maintaining good performance, decision tree classifier is adopted with the closed loop mode selection results as the target classification labels. The size of the decision tree is controlled by pruning, so the proposed method does not increase the memory requirement significantly. Through an evaluation test on a database covering both speech and music materials, the proposed method is found to achieve a much better mode selection accuracy compared with the open loop mode selection module in the AMR-WB+.

  1. Clinical role of early dynamic FDG-PET/CT for the evaluation of renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Reiko; Abe, Koichiro; Kondo, Tsunenori; Tanabe, Kazunari; Sakai, Shuji

    2016-06-01

    We studied the usefulness of early dynamic (ED) and whole-body (WB) FDG-PET/CT for the evaluation of renal cell carcinoma (RCC). One hundred patients with 107 tumours underwent kidney ED and WB FDG-PET/CT. We visually and semiquantitatively evaluated the FDG accumulation in RCCs in the ED and WB phases, and compared the accumulation values with regard to histological type (clear cell carcinoma [CCC] vs. non-clear cell carcinoma [N-CCC]), the TNM stage (high stage [3-4] vs. low stage [1-2]), the Fuhrman grade (high grade [3-4] vs. low grade [1-2]) and presence versus absence of venous (V) and lymphatic (Ly) invasion. In the ED phase, visual evaluation revealed no significant differences in FDG accumulation in terms of each item. However, the maximum standardized uptake value and tumour-to-normal tissue ratios were significantly higher in the CCCs compared to the N-CCCs (p PET/CT is a useful tool for the evaluation of RCCs. • ED and WB FDG-PET/ CT helps to assess patients with RCC • ED FDG-PET/CT enabled differentiation between CCC and N-CCC • FDG accumulation in the WB phase reflects tumour aggressiveness • Management of RCC is improved by ED and WB FDG-PET/CT.

  2. Correlation of breast cancer subtypes, based on estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and HER2, with functional imaging parameters from {sup 68}Ga-RGD PET/CT and {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Hai-Jeon [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, The Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ewha Womans University School of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Keon Wook; Jeong, Jae Min; Chung, June-Key [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Biomedical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, The Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University, Cancer Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chun, In Kook [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kangwon National University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Chuncheon, Kangwon-Do (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Nariya [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Jongno-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Im, Seock-Ah [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Sunjoo [Dankook University, Department of Molecular Biology, Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Song [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, The Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Kyeong Cheon [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yun-Sang [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Molecular Medicine and Biopharmaceutical Sciences, Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Dong Soo [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, The Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University, Department of Molecular Medicine and Biopharmaceutical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Woo Kyung [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Jongno-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Biomedical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, The Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-15

    Imaging biomarkers from functional imaging modalities were assessed as potential surrogate markers of disease status. Specifically, in this prospective study, we investigated the relationships between functional imaging parameters and histological prognostic factors and breast cancer subtypes. In total, 43 patients with large or locally advanced invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) were analyzed (47.6 ± 7.5 years old). {sup 68}Ga-Labeled arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) and {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) were performed. The maximum and average standardized uptake values (SUV{sub max} and SUV{sub avg}) from RGD PET/CT and SUV{sub max} and SUV{sub avg} from FDG PET/CT were the imaging parameters used. For histological prognostic factors, estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) expression was identified using immunohistochemistry (IHC) or fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). Four breast cancer subtypes, based on ER/PR and HER2 expression (ER/PR+,Her2-, ER/PR+,Her2+, ER/PR-,Her2+, and ER/PR-,Her2-), were considered. Quantitative FDG PET parameters were significantly higher in the ER-negative group (15.88 ± 8.73 vs 10.48 ± 6.01, p = 0.02 for SUV{sub max}; 9.40 ± 5.19 vs 5.92 ± 4.09, p = 0.02 for SUV{sub avg}) and the PR-negative group (8.37 ± 4.94 vs 4.79 ± 3.93, p = 0.03 for SUV{sub avg}). Quantitative RGD PET parameters were significantly higher in the HER2-positive group (2.42 ± 0.59 vs 2.90 ± 0.75, p = 0.04 for SUV{sub max}; 1.60 ± 0.38 vs 1.95 ± 0.53, p = 0.04 for SUV{sub avg}) and showed a significant positive correlation with the HER2/CEP17 ratio (r = 0.38, p = 0.03 for SUV{sub max} and r = 0.46, p < 0.01 for SUV{sub avg}). FDG PET parameters showed significantly higher values in the ER/PR-,Her2- subgroup versus the ER/PR+,Her2- or ER/PR+,Her2+ subgroups, while RGD PET parameters showed significantly lower values in the ER

  3. Phase I Study of 68Ga-HER2-Nanobody for PET/CT Assessment of HER2 Expression in Breast Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyaerts, Marleen; Xavier, Catarina; Heemskerk, Johannes; Devoogdt, Nick; Everaert, Hendrik; Ackaert, Chloé; Vanhoeij, Marian; Duhoux, Francois P; Gevaert, Thierry; Simon, Philippe; Schallier, Denis; Fontaine, Christel; Vaneycken, Ilse; Vanhove, Christian; De Greve, Jacques; Lamote, Jan; Caveliers, Vicky; Lahoutte, Tony

    2016-01-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) status is one of the major tumor characteristics in breast cancer to guide therapy. Anti-HER2 treatment has clear survival advantages in HER2-positive breast carcinoma patients. Heterogeneity in HER2 expression between primary tumor and metastasis has repeatedly been described, resulting in the need to reassess HER2 status during the disease course. To avoid repeated biopsy with potential bias due to tumor heterogeneity, Nanobodies directed against HER2 have been developed as probes for molecular imaging. Nanobodies, which are derived from unique heavy-chain-only antibodies, are the smallest antigen-binding antibody fragments and have ideal characteristics for PET imaging. The primary aims were assessment of safety, biodistribution, and dosimetry. The secondary aim was to investigate tumor-targeting potential. In total, 20 women with primary or metastatic breast carcinoma (score of 2+ or 3+ on HER2 immunohistochemical assessment) were included. Anti-HER2-Nanobody was labeled with (68)Ga via a NOTA derivative. Administered activities were 53-174 MBq (average, 107 MBq). PET/CT scans for dosimetry assessment were obtained at 10, 60, and 90 min after administration. Physical evaluation and blood analysis were performed for safety evaluation. Biodistribution was analyzed for 11 organs using MIM software; dosimetry was assessed using OLINDA/EXM. Tumor-targeting potential was assessed in primary and metastatic lesions. No adverse reactions occurred. A fast blood clearance was observed, with only 10% of injected activity remaining in the blood at 1 h after injection. Uptake was seen mainly in the kidneys, liver, and intestines. The effective dose was 0.043 mSv/MBq, resulting in an average of 4.6 mSv per patient. The critical organ was the urinary bladder wall, with a dose of 0.406 mGy/MBq. In patients with metastatic disease, tracer accumulation well above the background level was demonstrated in most identified sites of

  4. Comparison of standard and delayed imaging to improve the detection rate of [{sup 68}Ga]PSMA I and T PET/CT in patients with biochemical recurrence or prostate-specific antigen persistence after primary therapy for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmuck, Sebastian; Nordlohne, Stefan; Sohns, Jan M.; Ross, Tobias L.; Bengel, Frank M.; Derlin, Thorsten [Hannover Medical School, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hannover (Germany); Klot, Christoph A. von [Hannover Medical School, Department of Urology and Urologic Oncology, Hannover (Germany); Henkenberens, Christoph; Christiansen, Hans [Hannover Medical School, Department of Radiation Oncology, Hannover (Germany); Wester, Hans-Juergen [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Pharmaceutical Radiochemistry, Garching (Germany)

    2017-06-15

    The aim of this study was to assess the value of dual-time point imaging in PET/CT for detection of biochemically recurrent or persistent prostate cancer, using the prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) ligand [{sup 68}Ga]PSMA I and T. 240 patients who underwent a [{sup 68}Ga]PSMA I and T PET/CT in the context of biochemical relapse of prostate cancer were included in this retrospective analysis. Imaging consisted of a standard whole-body PET/CT (1 h p.i.), followed by delayed (3 h p.i.) imaging of the abdomen. PSA-stratified proportions of positive PET/CT results, standardized uptake values and target-to-background ratios were analyzed, and compared between standard and delayed imaging. The overall detection rates of [{sup 68}Ga]PSMA I and T PET/CT were 94.2, 71.8, 58.6, 55.9 and 38.9% for PSA levels of ≥2, 1 to <2, 0.5 to <1, >0.2 to <0.5, and 0.01 to 0.2 ng/mL, respectively. Although the target-to-background ratio improved significantly over time (P < 0.0001), the majority (96.6%) of all lesions suggestive of recurrent disease could already be detected in standard imaging. Delayed imaging at 3 h p.i. exclusively identified pathologic findings in 5.4% (10/184) of abnormal [{sup 68}Ga]PSMA I and T PET/CT scans, and exclusively detected 3.4% (38/1134) of all lesions suggestive of recurrent disease. [{sup 68}Ga]PSMA I and T PET/CT shows high detection rates in patients with prostate-specific antigen persistence or biochemical recurrence of prostate cancer. Delayed imaging can detect lesions with improved contrast compared to standard imaging. However, the impact on detection rates was limited in this study. (orig.)

  5. Grazing incidence Fe-line telescopes using W/B4C multilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joensen, K. D.; Gorenstein, P.; Christensen, Finn Erland

    1995-01-01

    The loss of throughput observed at higher energies for traditional grazing-incidence X-ray telescopes coated with high-Z elements can be partly countered by employing multilayers on the outermost reflectors. Using 8-keV reflectivity data from a periodic W/B4C multilayer, the expected performance...

  6. Diagnostic potential of PET/CT using a {sup 68}Ga-labelled prostate-specific membrane antigen ligand in whole-body staging of renal cell carcinoma: initial experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawicki, Lino M.; Buchbender, Christian; Boos, Johannes; Antoch, Gerald [University Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Dusseldorf (Germany); Giessing, Markus [University Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Urology, Dusseldorf (Germany); Ermert, Johannes [Juelich Research Center, Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine, INM-5: Nuclear Chemistry, Juelich (Germany); Antke, Christina; Hautzel, Hubertus [University Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Dusseldorf (Germany)

    2017-01-15

    To evaluate the diagnostic potential of whole-body PET/CT using a {sup 68}Ga-labelled PSMA ligand in renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Six patients with histopathologically proven RCC underwent {sup 68}Ga-PSMA PET/CT. Each PET/CT scan was evaluated in relation to lesion count, location and dignity. SUVmax was measured in primary tumours and PET-positive metastases. Tumour-to-background SUVmax ratios (TBR{sub SUVmax}) were calculated for primary RCCs in relation to the surrounding normal renal parenchyma. Metastasis-to-background SUVmax ratios (MBR{sub SUVmax}) were calculated for PET-positive metastases in relation to gluteal muscle. Five primary RCCs and 16 metastases were evaluated. The mean SUVmax of the primary RCCs was 9.9 ± 9.2 (range 1.7 - 27.2). Due to high uptake in the surrounding renal parenchyma, the mean TBR{sub SUVmax} of the primary RCCs was only 0.2 ± 0.3 (range 0.02 - 0.7). Eight metastases showed focal {sup 68}Ga-PSMA uptake (SUVmax 9.9 ± 8.3, range 3.4 - 25.6). The mean MBR{sub SUVmax} of these PET-positive metastases was 11.7 ± 0.2 (range 4.4 - 28.1). All PET-negative metastases were subcentimetre lung metastases. {sup 68}Ga-PSMA PET/CT appears to be a promising method for detecting RCC metastases. However, no additional diagnostic value in assessing the primary tumour was found. (orig.)

  7. Beyond 18F-FDG: Characterization of PET/CT and PET/MR Scanners for a Comprehensive Set of Positron Emitters of Growing Application--18F, 11C, 89Zr, 124I, 68Ga, and 90Y.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soderlund, A Therese; Chaal, Jasper; Tjio, Gabriel; Totman, John J; Conti, Maurizio; Townsend, David W

    2015-08-01

    This study aimed to investigate image quality for a comprehensive set of isotopes ((18)F, (11)C, (89)Zr, (124)I, (68)Ga, and (90)Y) on 2 clinical scanners: a PET/CT scanner and a PET/MR scanner. Image quality and spatial resolution were tested according to NU 2-2007 of the National Electrical Manufacturers Association. An image-quality phantom was used to measure contrast recovery, residual bias in a cold area, and background variability. Reconstruction methods available on the 2 scanners were compared, including point-spread-function correction for both scanners and time of flight for the PET/CT scanner. Spatial resolution was measured using point sources and filtered backprojection reconstruction. With the exception of (90)Y, small differences were seen in the hot-sphere contrast recovery of the different isotopes. Cold-sphere contrast recovery was similar across isotopes for all reconstructions, with an improvement seen with time of flight on the PET/CT scanner. The lower-statistic (90)Y scans yielded substantially lower contrast recovery than the other isotopes. When isotopes were compared, there was no difference in measured spatial resolution except for PET/MR axial spatial resolution, which was significantly higher for (124)I and (68)Ga. Overall, both scanners produced good images with (18)F, (11)C, (89)Zr, (124)I, (68)Ga, and (90)Y. © 2015 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  8. [68Ga]pentixafor for CXCR4 imaging in a PC-3 prostate cancer xenograft model - comparison with [18F]FDG PET/CT, MRI and ex vivo receptor expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzenböck, Sarah M; Stenzel, Jan; Otto, Thomas; Helldorff, Heike V; Bergner, Carina; Kurth, Jens; Polei, Stefan; Lindner, Tobias; Rauer, Romina; Hohn, Alexander; Hakenberg, Oliver W; Wester, Hans J; Vollmar, Brigitte; Krause, Bernd J

    2017-11-10

    The aim was to characterize the properties of [ 68 Ga]Pentixafor as tracer for prostate cancer imaging in a PC-3 prostate cancer xenograft mouse model and to investigate its correlation with [ 18 F]FDG PET/CT, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ex vivo analyses. Static [ 68 Ga]Pentixafor and [ 18 F]FDG PET as well as morphological/ diffusion weighted MRI and 1 H MR spectroscopy was performed. Imaging data were correlated with ex vivo biodistribution and CXCR4 expression in PC-3 tumors (immunohistochemistry (IHC), mRNA analysis). Flow cytometry was performed for evaluation of localization of CXCR4 receptors ( in vitro PC-3 cell experiments). Tumor uptake of [ 68 Ga]Pentixafor was significantly lower compared to [ 18 F]FDG. Ex vivo CXCR4 mRNA expression of tumors was shown by PCR. Only faint tumor CXCR4 expression was shown by IHC (immuno reactive score of 3). Accordingly, flow cytometry of PC-3 cells revealed only a faint signal, cell membrane permeabilisation showed a slight signal increase. There was no significant correlation of [ 68 Ga]Pentixafor tumor uptake and ex vivo receptor expression. Spectroscopy showed typical spectra of prostate cancer. PC-3 tumor uptake of [ 68 Ga]Pentixafor was existent but lower compared to [ 18 F]FDG. No significant correlation of ex vivo tumor CXCR4 receptor expression and [ 68 Ga]Pentixafor tumor uptake was shown. CXCR4 receptor expression on the surface of PC-3 cells was existent but rather low possibly explaining the limited [ 68 Ga]Pentixafor tumor uptake; receptor localization in the interior of PC-3 cells is presumable as shown by cell membrane permeabilisation. Further studies are necessary to define the role of [ 68 Ga]Pentixafor in prostate cancer imaging.

  9. 68Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT and somatostatin receptor (sst1-sst5) expression in normal human tissue: correlation of sst2 mRNA and SUVmax

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boy, Christian; Poeppel, Thorsten D.; Jentzen, Walter; Brandau, Wolfgang; Bockisch, Andreas; Heusner, Till A.; Antoch, Gerald; Redmann-Bischofs, Anja; Unger, Nicole; Mann, Klaus; Petersenn, Stephan

    2011-01-01

    By targeting somatostatin receptors (sst) radiopeptides have been established for both diagnosis and therapy. For physiologically normal human tissues the study provides a normative database of maximum standardized uptake value (SUV max ) and sst mRNA. A total of 120 patients were subjected to diagnostic 68 Ga-DOTATOC positron emission tomography (PET)/CT (age range 19-83 years). SUV max values were measured in physiologically normal tissues defined by normal morphology, absence of surgical intervention and absence of metastatic spread during clinical follow-up. Expression of sst subtypes (sst1-sst5) was measured independently in pooled adult normal human tissue by real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). SUV max revealed a region-specific pattern (e.g., mean ± SD, spleen 31.1 ± 10.9, kidney 16.9 ± 5.3, liver 12.8 ± 3.6, stomach 7.0 ± 3.1, head of pancreas 6.2 ± 2.3, small bowel 4.8 ± 1.8, thyroid 4.7 ± 2.2, bone 3.9 ± 1.3, large bowel 2.9 ± 0.8, muscle 2.1 ± 0.5, parotid gland 1.9 ± 0.6, axillary lymph node 0.8 ± 0.3 and lung 0.7 ± 0.3). SUV max was age independent. Gender differences were evident within the thyroid (female/male: 3.7 ± 1.6/5.5 ± 2.4, p max values exclusively correlated with sst2 expression (r = 0.846, p max with the expression of the other four subtypes. In normal human tissues 68 Ga-DOTATOC imaging has been related to the expression of sst2 at the level of mRNA. The novel normative database may improve diagnostics, monitoring and therapy of sst-expressing tumours or inflammation on a molecular basis. (orig.)

  10. Evaluation of the WB55 bio-baler for baling woody biomass in a forest application

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. Klepac; B. Rummer

    2009-01-01

    A FLD model WB55 Bio-baler1 was evaluated while working in a pine plantation in southeast Georgia. The baler was equipped with a fixed tooth rotor and had atooth capacity, a 7.5-foot cutting width, and was powered by a Fendt 818 tractor which provided185 hp. Understory biomass removed consisted mainly of gall berry, wax myrtle and sawtopalmetto. Inventory data revealed...

  11. A Novel AMR-WB Speech Steganography Based on Diameter-Neighbor Codebook Partition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junhui He

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Steganography is a means of covert communication without revealing the occurrence and the real purpose of communication. The adaptive multirate wideband (AMR-WB is a widely adapted format in mobile handsets and is also the recommended speech codec for VoLTE. In this paper, a novel AMR-WB speech steganography is proposed based on diameter-neighbor codebook partition algorithm. Different embedding capacity may be achieved by adjusting the iterative parameters during codebook division. The experimental results prove that the presented AMR-WB steganography may provide higher and flexible embedding capacity without inducing perceptible distortion compared with the state-of-the-art methods. With 48 iterations of cluster merging, twice the embedding capacity of complementary-neighbor-vertices-based embedding method may be obtained with a decrease of only around 2% in speech quality and much the same undetectability. Moreover, both the quality of stego speech and the security regarding statistical steganalysis are better than the recent speech steganography based on neighbor-index-division codebook partition.

  12. Evaluation of the whole body physiologically based pharmacokinetic (WB-PBPK) modeling of drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munir, Anum; Azam, Shumaila; Fazal, Sahar; Bhatti, A I

    2018-08-14

    The Physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling is a supporting tool in drug discovery and improvement. Simulations produced by these models help to save time and aids in examining the effects of different variables on the pharmacokinetics of drugs. For this purpose, Sheila and Peters suggested a PBPK model capable of performing simulations to study a given drug absorption. There is a need to extend this model to the whole body entailing all another process like distribution, metabolism, and elimination, besides absorption. The aim of this scientific study is to hypothesize a WB-PBPK model through integrating absorption, distribution, metabolism, and elimination processes with the existing PBPK model.Absorption, distribution, metabolism, and elimination models are designed, integrated with PBPK model and validated. For validation purposes, clinical records of few drugs are collected from the literature. The developed WB-PBPK model is affirmed by comparing the simulations produced by the model against the searched clinical data. . It is proposed that the WB-PBPK model may be used in pharmaceutical industries to create of the pharmacokinetic profiles of drug candidates for better outcomes, as it is advance PBPK model and creates comprehensive PK profiles for drug ADME in concentration-time plots. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. An Efficient VQ Codebook Search Algorithm Applied to AMR-WB Speech Coding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Yu Yeh

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The adaptive multi-rate wideband (AMR-WB speech codec is widely used in modern mobile communication systems for high speech quality in handheld devices. Nonetheless, a major disadvantage is that vector quantization (VQ of immittance spectral frequency (ISF coefficients takes a considerable computational load in the AMR-WB coding. Accordingly, a binary search space-structured VQ (BSS-VQ algorithm is adopted to efficiently reduce the complexity of ISF quantization in AMR-WB. This search algorithm is done through a fast locating technique combined with lookup tables, such that an input vector is efficiently assigned to a subspace where relatively few codeword searches are required to be executed. In terms of overall search performance, this work is experimentally validated as a superior search algorithm relative to a multiple triangular inequality elimination (MTIE, a TIE with dynamic and intersection mechanisms (DI-TIE, and an equal-average equal-variance equal-norm nearest neighbor search (EEENNS approach. With a full search algorithm as a benchmark for overall search load comparison, this work provides an 87% search load reduction at a threshold of quantization accuracy of 0.96, a figure far beyond 55% in the MTIE, 76% in the EEENNS approach, and 83% in the DI-TIE approach.

  14. MicroPET/CT imaging of {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} integrin via a novel {sup 68}Ga-NOTA-RGD peptidomimetic conjugate in rat myocardial infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menichetti, Luca; Kusmic, Claudia; Panetta, Daniele; Petroni, Debora; Salvadori, Piero A. [CNR-Institute of Clinical Physiology (IFC), Pisa (Italy); Arosio, Daniela; Manzoni, Leonardo [CNR-Institute of Molecular Science and Technologies (ISTM), Milan (Italy); Matteucci, Marco [Scuola Superiore Sant' Anna, Pisa (Italy); Casagrande, Cesare [University of Milan, Department of Chemistry, Milan (Italy); L' Abbate, Antonio [CNR-Institute of Clinical Physiology (IFC), Pisa (Italy); Scuola Superiore Sant' Anna, Pisa (Italy)

    2013-08-15

    The {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} integrin is expressed in angiogenic vessels and is a potential target for molecular imaging of evolving pathological processes. Its expression is upregulated in cancer lesions and metastases as well as in acute myocardial infarction (MI) as part of the infarct healing process. The purpose of our study was to determine the feasibility of a new imaging approach with a novel {sup 68}Ga-2,2',2''-(1,4,7-triazonane-1,4,7-triyl)triacetic acid (NOTA)-arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) construct to assess integrin expression in the evolving MI. A straightforward labelling chemistry to attach the radionuclide {sup 68}Ga to a NOTA-based chelating agent conjugated with a cyclic RGD peptidomimetic is described. Affinity for {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} integrin was assessed by in vitro receptor binding assay. The proof-of-concept in vivo studies combined the {sup 68}Ga-NOTA-RGD with the flow tracer {sup 13}N-NH{sub 3} imaging in order to obtain positron emission tomography (PET)/CT imaging of both integrin expression and perfusion defect at 4 weeks after infarction. Hearts were then processed for immunostaining of integrin {beta}{sub 3}. NOTA-RGD conjugate displayed a binding affinity for {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} integrin of 27.9 {+-} 6.8 nM. {sup 68}Ga-NOTA-RGD showed stability without detectable degradation or formation of by-products in urine up to 2 h following injection in the rat. MI hearts exhibited {sup 68}Ga-NOTA-RGD uptake in correspondence to infarcted and border zone regions. The tracer signal drew a parallel with vascular remodelling due to ischaemia-induced angiogenesis as assessed by immunohistochemistry. As compared to similar imaging approaches using the {sup 18}F-galacto-derivative, we documented for the first time with microPET/CT imaging the {sup 68}Ga-NOTA-RGD derivative that appears eligible for PET imaging in animal models of vascular remodelling during evolving MI. The simple chemistry employed to

  15. {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11 PET/CT in primary staging of prostate cancer: PSA and Gleason score predict the intensity of tracer accumulation in the primary tumour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uprimny, Christian; Kroiss, Alexander Stephan; Decristoforo, Clemens; Guggenberg, Elisabeth von; Kendler, Dorota; Scarpa, Lorenza; Di Santo, Gianpaolo; Roig, Llanos Geraldo; Maffey-Steffan, Johanna; Virgolini, Irene Johanna [Medical University Innsbruck, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Innsbruck (Austria); Fritz, Josef [Medical University Innsbruck, Department of Medical Statistics, Informatics and Health Economics, Innsbruck (Austria); Horninger, Wolfgang [Medical University Innsbruck, Department of Urology, Innsbruck (Austria)

    2017-06-15

    Prostate cancer (PC) cells typically show increased expression of prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA), which can be visualized by {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11 PET/CT. The aim of this study was to assess the intensity of {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11 uptake in the primary tumour and metastases in patients with biopsy-proven PC prior to therapy, and to determine whether a correlation exists between the primary tumour-related {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11 accumulation and the Gleason score (GS) or prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level. Ninety patients with transrectal ultrasound biopsy-proven PC (GS 6-10; median PSA: 9.7 ng/ml) referred for {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11 PET/CT were retrospectively analysed. PET images were analysed visually and semiquantitatively by measuring the maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}). The SUV{sub max} of the primary tumour and pathologic lesions suspicious for lymphatic or distant metastases were then compared to the physiologic background activity of normal prostate tissue and gluteal muscle. The SUV{sub max} of the primary tumour was assessed in relation to both PSA level and GS. Eighty-two patients (91.1%) demonstrated pathologic tracer accumulation in the primary tumour that exceeded physiologic tracer uptake in normal prostate tissue (median SUV{sub max}: 12.5 vs. 3.9). Tumours with GS of 6, 7a (3+4) and 7b (4+3) showed significantly lower {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11 uptake, with median SUV{sub max} of 5.9, 8.3 and 8.2, respectively, compared to patients with GS >7 (median SUV{sub max}: 21.2; p < 0.001). PC patients with PSA ≥10.0 ng/ml exhibited significantly higher uptake than those with PSA levels <10.0 ng/ml (median SUV{sub max}: 17.6 versus 7.7; p < 0.001). In 24 patients (26.7%), 82 lymph nodes with pathologic tracer accumulation consistent with metastases were detected (median SUV{sub max}: 10.6). Eleven patients (12.2%) revealed 55 pathologic osseous lesions suspicious for bone metastases (median SUV{sub max}: 11.6). The GS and PSA level correlated with

  16. Double-target Antisense U1snRNAs Correct Mis-splicing Due to c.639+861C>T and c.639+919G>A GLA Deep Intronic Mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Ferri

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fabry disease is a rare X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by deficiency of the α-galactosidase A (α-Gal A enzyme, which is encoded by the GLA gene. GLA transcription in humans produces a major mRNA encoding α-Gal A and a minor mRNA of unknown function, which retains a 57-nucleotide-long cryptic exon between exons 4 and 5, bearing a premature termination codon. NM_000169.2:c.639+861C>T and NM_000169.2:c.639+919G>A GLA deep intronic mutations have been described to cause Fabry disease by inducing overexpression of the alternatively spliced mRNA, along with a dramatic decrease in the major one. Here, we built a wild-type GLA minigene and two minigenes that carry mutations c.639+861C>T and c.639+919G>A. Once transfected into cells, the minigenes recapitulate the molecular patterns observed in patients, at the mRNA, protein, and enzymatic level. We constructed a set of specific double-target U1asRNAs to correct c.639+861C>T and c.639+919G>A GLA mutations. Efficacy of U1asRNAs in inducing the skipping of the cryptic exon was evaluated upon their transient co-transfection with the minigenes in COS-1 cells, by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR, western blot analysis, and α-Gal A enzyme assay. We identified a set of U1asRNAs that efficiently restored α-Gal A enzyme activity and the correct splicing pathways in reporter minigenes. We also identified a unique U1asRNA correcting both mutations as efficently as the mutation-specific U1asRNAs. Our study proves that an exon skipping-based approach recovering α-Gal A activity in the c.639+861C>T and c.639+919G>A GLA mutations is active.

  17. Measurement of B(t --> Wb)/B(t--> Wq) at the collider detector at fermilab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, D; Adelman, J; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arisawa, T; Arguin, J-F; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Bacchetta, N; Bachacou, H; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barker, G J; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Ben-Haim, E; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bishai, M; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Bloom, K; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Bourov, S; Brau, B; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Casarsa, M; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carron, S; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chapman, J; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, I; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Chuang, S; Chung, K; Chung, W-H; Chung, Y S; Cijliak, M; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A G; Clark, D; Coca, M; Connolly, A; Convery, M; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cranshaw, J; Cuevas, J; Cruz, A; Culbertson, R; Currat, C; Cyr, D; Dagenhart, D; Da Ronco, S; D'Auria, S; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdecker, G; Dell'Orso, M; Demers, S; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; de Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Dionisi, C; Dittmann, J R; DiTuro, P; Dörr, C; Dominguez, A; Donati, S; Donega, M; Donini, J; D'Onofrio, M; Dorigo, T; Ebina, K; Efron, J; Ehlers, J; Erbacher, R; Erdmann, M; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H-C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Field, R D; Flanagan, G; Flores-Castillo, L R; Foland, A; Forrester, S; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Fujii, Y; Furic, I; Gajjar, A; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garcia-Sciveres, M; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D W; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, A; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C; Giolo, K; Giordani, M; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, D; Goldstein, J; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Y; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Griffiths, M; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; da Costa, J Guimaraes; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartmann, F; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Hayward, H; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Hennecke, M; Herndon, M; Hill, C; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hoffman, K D; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M A; Huffman, B T; Huang, Y; Hughes, R E; Huston, J; Ikado, K; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ishizawa, Y; Issever, C; Ivanov, A; Iwata, Y; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jensen, H; Jeon, E J; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T; Kamon, T; Kang, J; Unel, M Karagoz; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kemp, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, M S; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kirby, M; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kobayashi, H; Kong, D J; Kondo, K; Konigsberg, J; Kordas, K; Korn, A; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kovalev, A; Kraus, J; Kravchenko, I; Kreymer, A; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhlmann, S E; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lecci, C; Lecompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Li, K; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Liss, T M; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Liu, Y; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Loverre, P; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maksimovic, P; Manca, G; Margaroli, F; Marginean, R; Marino, C; Martin, A; Martin, M; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Maruyama, T; Matsunaga, H; Mattson, M; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McGivern, D; McIntyre, P M; McNamara, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, L; Miller, R; Miller, J S; Mills, C; Miquel, R; Miscetti, S; Mitselmakher, G; Miyamoto, A; Moggi, N; Mohr, B; Moore, R; Morello, M; Fernandez, P A Movilla; Muelmenstaedt, J; Mukherjee, A; Mulhearn, M; Muller, T; Mumford, R; Munar, A; Murat, P; Nachtman, J; Nahn, S; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Napora, R; Naumov, D; Necula, V; Nelson, T; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Ogawa, T; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Ohsugi, T; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Orejudos, W; Osterberg, K; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Paoletti, R; Papadimitriou, V; Paramonov, A A; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pitts, K T; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Pope, G; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, M A; Rakitine, A; Rappoccio, S; Ratnikov, F; Ray, H; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Rimondi, F; Rinnert, K; Ristori, L; Robertson, W J; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossin, R; Rott, C; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Ruiz, A; Ryan, D; Saarikko, H; Sabik, S; Safonov, A; St Denis, R; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Saltzberg, D; Sanchez, C; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sato, K; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Semeria, F; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfiligoi, I; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sill, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Sjolin, J; Skiba, A; Slaughter, A J; Sliwa, K; Smirnov, D; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soderberg, M; Soha, A; Somalwar, S V; Spalding, J; Spezziga, M; Spinella, F; Squillacioti, P; Stadie, H; Stanitzki, M; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sumorok, K; Sun, H; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Tafirout, R; Takano, H; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Takikawa, K; Tanaka, M; Tanaka, R; Tanimoto, N; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Tesarek, R J; Tether, S; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Tönnesmann, M; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tsuchiya, R; Tsuno, S; Tsybychev, D; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Unverhau, T; Uozumi, S; Usynin, D; Vacavant, L; Vaiciulis, A; Varganov, A; Vejcik, S; Velev, G; Veszpremi, V; Veramendi, G; Vickey, T; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vollrath, I; Volobouev, I; von der Mey, M; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wallny, R; Walter, T; Wan, Z; Wang, M J; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Ward, B; Waschke, S; Waters, D; Watts, T; Weber, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wolter, M; Worcester, M; Worm, S; Wright, T; Wu, X; Würthwein, F; Wyatt, A; Yagil, A; Yamashita, T; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yao, W; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, I; Yu, S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zetti, F; Zhou, J; Zucchelli, S

    2005-09-02

    We present a measurement of the ratio of top-quark branching fractions R = B(t --> Wb)/B(t --> Wq), where q can be a b, s, or a d quark, using lepton-plus-jets and dilepton data sets with an integrated luminosity of approximately 162 pb(-1) collected with the Collider Detector at Fermilab during Run II of the Tevatron. The measurement is derived from the relative numbers of tt events with different multiplicity of identified secondary vertices. We set a lower limit of R > 0.61 at 95% confidence level.

  18. Effect of Whole Body Low Dose Radiation (WB-LDR) on diabetic rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, B.G.

    2014-01-01

    Exposure of type II diabetic mice to LDR has been shown to significantly up regulate pancreatic antioxidants along with reduction of glucose levels. Present study was aimed to evaluate the effects of WB-LDR on type II diabetic rats. Sprague-Dawley male rats (n=18) were pre-treated with Alloxan Monohydrate (150 mg/kg body weight, IP) to induce hyperglycemia. Elevated level of blood glucose was monitored for consecutive 10 days by Glucometer (Accu-Chek, Active) before irradiation. Two group of rats (n=12) were exposed to single dose of 0.25 Gy and 0.5 Gy of gamma radiation at the rate of 1.02 Gy/minute. Blood glucose level, feed, water intake and body weight was monitored for 10 days post irradiation. Results revealed weight loss, polydipsia, polyphagia and elevated blood glucose level up to 10th day in diabetic control, whereas; reverse trend was observed from 7th day post irradiation in two treated groups. However, no significant difference was found between two treated groups. The results indicate that treatment with WB-LDR reduces the blood-glucose level and so its complications in diabetic rats. (author)

  19. Risk-related 18F-FDG PET/CT and new diagnostic strategies in patients with solitary pulmonary nodule: the ITALIAN multicenter trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spadafora, Marco; Pace, Leonardo; Evangelista, Laura; Mansi, Luigi; Del Prete, Francesco; Saladini, Giorgio; Miletto, Paolo; Fanti, Stefano; Del Vecchio, Silvana; Guerra, Luca; Pepe, Giovanna; Peluso, Giuseppina; Nicolai, Emanuele; Storto, Giovanni; Ferdeghini, Marco; Giordano, Alessandro; Farsad, Mohsen; Schillaci, Orazio; Gridelli, Cesare; Cuocolo, Alberto

    2018-05-05

    Diagnosis of solitary pulmonary nodule (SPN) is an important public health issue and 18 F-FDG PET/CT has proven to be more effective than CT alone. Pre-test risk stratification and clinical presentation of SPN could affect the diagnostic strategy. A relevant issue is whether thoracic segmental (s)-PET/CT could be implemented in patients with SPN. This retrospective multicenter study compared the results of FDG whole-body (wb)-PET/CT to those of s-PET/CT. 18 F-FDG PET/CT of 502 patients, stratified for pre-test cancer risk, were retrospectively analyzed. The thoracic part of wb-PET/CT, considered s-PET/CT, was compared to wb-PET/CT. Clinical and PET/CT variables were investigated for SPN characterization as well as for identification of patients in whom s-PET/CT could be performed. Histopathology or follow-up data were used as a reference. In the study population, 36% had malignant, 35% benign, and 29% indeterminate SPN. 18 F-FDG uptake indicative of thoracic and extra-thoracic lesions was detectable in 13% and 3% of the patients. All patients with extra-thoracic metastases (n = 13) had thoracic lymph node involvement and highest 18 F-FDG uptake at level of SPN (negative predictive value 100%). Compared to wb-PET/CT, s-PET/CT could save about 2/3 of 18 F-FDG dose, radiation exposure or scan-time, without affecting the clinical impact of PET/CT. Pre-test probability of malignancy can guide the diagnostic strategy of 18 FDG-PET/CT in patients with SPN. In subjects with low-intermediate pretest probability s-PET/CT imaging might be planned in advance, while in those at high risk and with thoracic lymph node involvement a wb-PET/CT is necessary.

  20. Comparison of sequential planar 177Lu-DOTA-TATE dosimetry scans with 68Ga-DOTA-TATE PET/CT images in patients with metastasized neuroendocrine tumours undergoing peptide receptor radionuclide therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sainz-Esteban, Aurora; Carril, Jose Manuel; Prasad, Vikas; Schuchardt, Christiane; Zachert, Carolin; Baum, Richard P.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare sequential 177 Lu-DOTA-TATE planar scans ( 177 Lu-DOTA-TATE) in patients with metastasized neuroendocrine tumours (NET) acquired during peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) for dosimetry purposes with the pre-therapeutic 68 Ga-DOTA-TATE positron emission tomography (PET)/CT ( 68 Ga-DOTA-TATE) maximum intensity projection (MIP) images obtained in the same patients concerning the sensitivity of the different methods. A total of 44 patients (59 ± 11 years old) with biopsy-proven NET underwent 68 Ga-DOTA-TATE and 177 Lu-DOTA-TATE imaging within 7.9 ± 7.5 days between the two examinations. 177 Lu-DOTA-TATE planar images were acquired at 0.5, 2, 24, 48 and 72 h post-injection; lesions were given a score from 0 to 4 depending on the uptake of the radiopharmaceutical (0 being lowest and 4 highest). The number of tumour lesions which were identified on 177 Lu-DOTA-TATE scans (in relation to the acquisition time after injection of the therapeutic dose as well as with regard to the body region) was compared to those detected on 68 Ga-DOTA-TATE studies obtained before PRRT. A total of 318 lesions were detected; 280 (88%) lesions were concordant. Among the discordant lesions, 29 were 68 Ga-DOTA-TATE positive and 177 Lu-DOTA-TATE negative, whereas 9 were 68 Ga-DOTA-TATE negative and 177 Lu-DOTA-TATE positive. The sensitivity, positive predictive value and accuracy for 177 Lu-DOTA-TATE as compared to 68 Ga-DOTA-TATE were 91, 97 and 88%, respectively. Significantly more lesions were seen on the delayed (72 h) 177 Lu-DOTA-TATE images (91%) as compared to the immediate (30 min) images (68%). The highest concordance was observed for bone metastases (97%) and the lowest for head/neck lesions (75%). Concordant lesions (n = 77; mean size 3.8 cm) were significantly larger than discordant lesions (n = 38; mean size 1.6 cm) (p max ). However, concordant liver lesions with a score from 1 to 3 in the 72-h 177 Lu-DOTA-TATE scan had a lower SUV max

  1. Comparison of sequential planar {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-TATE dosimetry scans with {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TATE PET/CT images in patients with metastasized neuroendocrine tumours undergoing peptide receptor radionuclide therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sainz-Esteban, Aurora; Carril, Jose Manuel [Hospital Universitario Marques de Valdecilla, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Santander (Spain); Prasad, Vikas; Schuchardt, Christiane; Zachert, Carolin; Baum, Richard P. [Zentralklinik Bad Berka, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Centre for PET/CT, Bad Berka (Germany)

    2012-03-15

    The aim of the study was to compare sequential {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-TATE planar scans ({sup 177}Lu-DOTA-TATE) in patients with metastasized neuroendocrine tumours (NET) acquired during peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) for dosimetry purposes with the pre-therapeutic {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TATE positron emission tomography (PET)/CT ({sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TATE) maximum intensity projection (MIP) images obtained in the same patients concerning the sensitivity of the different methods. A total of 44 patients (59 {+-} 11 years old) with biopsy-proven NET underwent {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TATE and {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-TATE imaging within 7.9 {+-} 7.5 days between the two examinations. {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-TATE planar images were acquired at 0.5, 2, 24, 48 and 72 h post-injection; lesions were given a score from 0 to 4 depending on the uptake of the radiopharmaceutical (0 being lowest and 4 highest). The number of tumour lesions which were identified on {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-TATE scans (in relation to the acquisition time after injection of the therapeutic dose as well as with regard to the body region) was compared to those detected on {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TATE studies obtained before PRRT. A total of 318 lesions were detected; 280 (88%) lesions were concordant. Among the discordant lesions, 29 were {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TATE positive and {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-TATE negative, whereas 9 were {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TATE negative and {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-TATE positive. The sensitivity, positive predictive value and accuracy for {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-TATE as compared to {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TATE were 91, 97 and 88%, respectively. Significantly more lesions were seen on the delayed (72 h) {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-TATE images (91%) as compared to the immediate (30 min) images (68%). The highest concordance was observed for bone metastases (97%) and the lowest for head/neck lesions (75%). Concordant lesions (n = 77; mean size 3.8 cm) were significantly larger than discordant lesions (n = 38; mean size 1.6 cm) (p < 0.05). No such significance was

  2. [Association study between 834+7G/A and +1332C/T polymorphisms in the growth arrest specific 6 gene and risk of severe preeclampsia in Chinese population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Liyan; Guan, Linbo; Fan, Ping; Liu, Xinghui; Liu, Rui; Chen, Jinxin; Zhu, Yue; Wei, Xin; Liu, Yu; Bai, Huai

    2017-02-10

    To investigate the relationship between polymorphisms of the growth arrest specific 6 (GAS6) gene and severe preeclampsia in a South West Han Chinese population. Blood samples from 167 patients with severe preeclampsia and 312 normal pregnant women as controls from Han Chinese in Chengdu area were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphisms. C and T allele frequencies for +1332C/T site were 85.63% and 14.37% in the patient group, respectively, and 78.04% and 21.96% in control group, respectively. The TT genotype and variant T allelic frequencies of the +1332C/T polymorphism were significantly lower in patients with severe preeclampsia than in the control group (both Ppreeclampsia was 0.602 (95%CI: 0.401-0.904) in carriers for the variant T allele (χ 2 =6.045, P=0.014). G and A allele frequencies for 834+7G/A site were 72.75% and 27.25% in case group, respectively, and 74.36% and 25.64% in control group, respectively. The genotype and allele frequencies of the 834+7G/A polymorphism in patients with severe preeclampsia and controls showed no significant differences (both P>0.05). In addition, there was no significant association between the polymorphisms and blood pressure levels in the patient or control groups. The variant GAS6+1332 T allele is associated with a decreased risk for severe preeclampsia in a South West Han Chinese population. On the other hand, the 834+7G/A polymorphism has no effect on the severe preeclampsia.

  3. Double tracer / double isotope gives Ga-68 dota-noc and F-18 FDG PET / CT. Protocol 1 day in a child with neuroblastoma to determine the clinical state and tumor metabolic state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliva Gonzalez, Juan P.; Baum, Richard P.

    2009-01-01

    We report on a 6-year-old carrier of a neuroblastoma. The tumor was diagnosed in March 2004, under the right adrenal gland and confirmed by FNAB, ultrasound, CT and tumor markers. Because of its size and extent of the tumor was inoperable at the time due to which was subject to two cycles of chemotherapy (vincristine, cisplatin, etoposide and cyclophosphamide alternating with vincristine, carboplatin, etoposide and cyclophosphamide). After these two cycles of chemotherapy the patient underwent retroperitoneal surgery getting totally dry right adrenal gland and tumor. After surgery the patient received four additional cycles of chemotherapy until March 2005. During the months of August and September 2005 the patient complained of abdominal pain and were suspected of recurrence. She received ultrasound and CT scan were not conclusive. In December 2005 he made a scan with I-131-MIBG (148 MBq, 4 mCi intravenous, is flat and SPECT imaging performed 24 hours to 6 days after injection) showing only the normal left adrenal gland but not recurrence was visualized, which showed that the tumor did not grasp MIBG. In January 2006 the boy (121 cm.'s Height, weight 21 kg) was referred to the Centre for PET / CT of the Bad Berka Central Clinic in Germany for a PET / CT using Ga-68/DOTA- receptor NOC, a high affinity analogue of somatostatin. The tumor marker NSE was determined in serum before the PET / CT whose outcome was high (24.8 ng / ml, cutoff 15). The patient received 46 MBq (1.24 mCi) of Ga-68 DOTA-NOC intravenous and PET / CT whole body was performed at 75 minutes post-injection. No abnormal uptake was observed which indicated that the appellants had no somatostatin receptors. By having this negative result was decided to perform an additional PET / CT with F-18 FDG (with a low dose of contrast to improve the TAC). After fasting for 6 hours, the patient received 151 MBq (4.1 mCi) of F-18 FDG. A PET / CT whole body was performed at 75 minutes after administration of

  4. The UCP2 -866G/A, Ala55Val and UCP3 -55C/T polymorphisms are associated with premature coronary artery disease and cardiovascular risk factors in Mexican population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamboa, Ricardo; Huesca-Gómez, Claudia; López-Pérez, Vanessa; Posadas-Sánchez, Rosalinda; Cardoso-Saldaña, Guillermo; Medina-Urrutia, Aida; Juárez-Rojas, Juan Gabriel; Soto, María Elena; Posadas-Romero, Carlos; Vargas-Alarcón, Gilberto

    2018-05-21

    We examined the role of UCP gene polymorphisms as susceptibility markers for premature coronary artery disease (pCAD). The UCP2 Ala55Val (C/T rs660339), UCP2 -866G/A (rs659366), and UCP3 -55C/T (rs1800849) polymorphisms were genotyped in 948 patients with pCAD, and 763 controls. The distribution of the UCP2 A55V (C/T rs660339) and UCP3 -55 (rs1800849) was similar in patients and controls. However, under a recessive model, the UCP2 -866 (rs659366) A allele was associated with increased risk of developing pCAD (OR = 1.43, Pc = 0.003). On the other hand, patients with pCAD and UCP2 A55V (rs660339) TT showed high levels of visceral abdominal fat (VAF) (Pc = 0.002), low levels of subcutaneous abdominal fat (SAF) (Pc = 0.001) and high VAT/SAT ratio (Pc cardiovascular risk factors.

  5. Comprehensive imaging of tumor recurrence in breast cancer patients using whole-body MRI at 1.5 and 3 T compared to FDG-PET-CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, Gerwin P. [Institute of Clinical Radiology, University Hospitals Munich-Grosshadern, Marchioninistr. 15, 81377 Munich (Germany)], E-mail: gerwin.schmidt@med.uni-muenchen.de; Baur-Melnyk, Andrea [Institute of Clinical Radiology, University Hospitals Munich-Grosshadern, Marchioninistr. 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Haug, Alexander [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospitals Munich-Grosshadern, 81377 Munich (Germany); Heinemann, Volker [Department of Internal Medicine III, University Hospitals Munich-Grosshadern, 81377 Munich (Germany); Bauerfeind, Ingo [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University Hospitals Munich-Grosshadern, 81377 Munich (Germany); Reiser, Maximilian F. [Institute of Clinical Radiology, University Hospitals Munich-Grosshadern, Marchioninistr. 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Schoenberg, Stefan O. [Institute of Clinical Radiology University Hospital Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, University of Heidelberg (Germany)

    2008-01-15

    Purpose: To compare the diagnostic accuracy for the detection of tumor recurrence in breast cancer patients using whole-body-MRI (WB-MRI) at 1.5 or 3 T compared to FDG-PET-CT. Materials and methods: Thirty-three female patients with breast cancer and suspicion of recurrence underwent FDG-PET-CT and WB-MRI. Coronal T1w-TSE- and STIR-sequences, HASTE-imaging of the lungs, contrast-enhanced T1w- and T2w-TSE-sequences of the liver, brain and abdomen were performed, using a WB-MRI-scanner at 1.5 (n = 23) or 3 T (n = 10). Presence of local recurrence, lymph node involvement and distant metastatic disease was assessed using clinical and radiological follow-up as a standard of reference. Results: Tumor recurrence was found in 20 of 33 patients. Overall 186 malignant foci were detected with WB-MRI and PET-CT. Both modalities revealed two recurrent tumors of the breast. PET-CT detected more lymph node metastases (n = 21) than WB-MRI (n = 16). WB-MRI was more precise in the detection of distant metastases (n = 154 versus n = 147). Sensitivity was 93% (172/186) and 91% (170/186) for WB-MRI and PET-CT, specificity was 86% (66/77) and 90% (69/77), respectively. Examination times for WB-MRI at 1.5 and 3 T were 51 and 43 min, respectively, examination time for PET-CT was 103 min. Conclusion: WB-MRI and PET-CT are useful for the detection of tumor recurrence in the follow-up of breast cancer. WB-MRI is highly sensitive to distant metastatic disease. PET-CT is more sensitive in detecting lymph node involvement. Tumor screening with WB-MRI is feasible at 1.5 and 3 T, scan time is further reduced at 3 T with identical resolution.

  6. Prognostic value of (18)F-FDG PET/CT volumetric parameters in recurrent epithelial ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayoral, M; Fernandez-Martinez, A; Vidal, L; Fuster, D; Aya, F; Pavia, J; Pons, F; Lomeña, F; Paredes, P

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic tumour volume (MTV) and total lesion glycolysis (TLG) from (18)F-FDG PET/CT are emerging prognostic biomarkers in various solid neoplasms. These volumetric parameters and the SUVmax have shown to be useful criteria for disease prognostication in preoperative and post-treatment epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) patients. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the utility of (18)F-FDG PET/CT measurements to predict survival in patients with recurrent EOC. Twenty-six patients with EOC who underwent a total of 31 (18)F-FDG PET/CT studies for suspected recurrence were retrospectively included. SUVmax and volumetric parameters whole-body MTV (wbMTV) and whole-body TLG (wbTLG) with a threshold of 40% and 50% of the SUVmax were obtained. Correlation between PET parameters and progression-free survival (PFS) and the survival analysis of prognostic factors were calculated. Serous cancer was the most common histological subtype (76.9%). The median PFS was 12.5 months (range 10.7-20.6 months). Volumetric parameters showed moderate inverse correlation with PFS but there was no significant correlation in the case of SUVmax. The correlation was stronger for first recurrences. By Kaplan-Meier analysis and log-rank test, wbMTV 40%, wbMTV 50% and wbTLG 50% correlated with PFS. However, SUVmax and wbTLG 40% were not statistically significant predictors for PFS. Volumetric parameters wbMTV and wbTLG 50% measured by (18)F-FDG PET/CT appear to be useful prognostic predictors of outcome and may provide valuable information to individualize treatment strategies in patients with recurrent EOC. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  7. WholeBbody Positron-Emission-Tomography (WB-PET) in oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feine, U.; Lietzenmayer, R.; Mueller-Schauenburg, W.; Geiger, L.; Hanke, J.P.; Weisser, G.; Woehrle, H.

    1996-01-01

    The new generation of high sensitive PET-Scanners with an FOV of about 15 cm allows to recognize with high sensitivity and good spezificity malign tumors and their metastases with 18F-FDG in a Whole-Body-Scan in 35 to 50 min scan time. 357 FDG-WB-PET-Scans have been performed in Tuebingen during 1 1/2 years since January 1994 in tumor patients and have been compared and evaluated to the results of other imaging methods performed in the same time together with clinics and in follow-up. In 4 groups of tumors - Melanoma - malign Lymphoma -Breast Cancer - Thyroid Cancer - and a fifth group of 24 various types of malign tumors we found a sensitivity of 88%, a specificity of 80% and an accuracy of 90%. Foci smaller than 6-8 mm diametre - mostly lung metastases or lymphomas - and also tumors of low malignancy such as 131l-trapping Tyroid Carcinomas and Ganglioneuroblastomas have been found false negative. Flase positive we found inflammated lymph nodes, abscesses and also benign thyroid adenomas. This high sensitivity makes 18F-FDG-WB-PET an important method for tumor searching and diagnosis of tumor spreading, esp. for primary and secondary staging in the future, but also as the unique imaging method which allows determination of resting tumor vitality after therapy. Further multi-center studies will be necessary before this method can be introduced to routine, that also is limited by the high costs of the procedure. (orig.) [de

  8. The reconstruction algorithm used for ["6"8Ga]PSMA-HBED-CC PET/CT reconstruction significantly influences the number of detected lymph node metastases and coeliac ganglia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krohn, Thomas; Birmes, Anita; Winz, Oliver H.; Drude, Natascha I.; Mottaghy, Felix M.; Behrendt, Florian F.; Verburg, Frederik A.

    2017-01-01

    To investigate whether the numbers of lymph node metastases and coeliac ganglia delineated on ["6"8Ga]PSMA-HBED-CC PET/CT scans differ among datasets generated using different reconstruction algorithms. Data were constructed using the BLOB-OS-TF, BLOB-OS and 3D-RAMLA algorithms. All reconstructions were assessed by two nuclear medicine physicians for the number of pelvic/paraaortal lymph node metastases as well the number of coeliac ganglia. Standardized uptake values (SUV) were also calculated in different regions. At least one ["6"8Ga]PSMA-HBED-CC PET/CT-positive pelvic or paraaortal lymph node metastasis was found in 49 and 35 patients using the BLOB-OS-TF algorithm, in 42 and 33 patients using the BLOB-OS algorithm, and in 41 and 31 patients using the 3D-RAMLA algorithm, respectively, and a positive ganglion was found in 92, 59 and 24 of 100 patients using the three algorithms, respectively. Quantitatively, the SUVmean and SUVmax were significantly higher with the BLOB-OS algorithm than with either the BLOB-OS-TF or the 3D-RAMLA algorithm in all measured regions (p < 0.001 for all comparisons). The differences between the SUVs with the BLOB-OS-TF- and 3D-RAMLA algorithms were not significant in the aorta (SUVmean, p = 0.93; SUVmax, p = 0.97) but were significant in all other regions (p < 0.001 in all cases). The SUVmean ganglion/gluteus ratio was significantly higher with the BLOB-OS-TF algorithm than with either the BLOB-OS or the 3D-RAMLA algorithm and was significantly higher with the BLOB-OS than with the 3D-RAMLA algorithm (p < 0.001 in all cases). The results of ["6"8Ga]PSMA-HBED-CC PET/CT are affected by the reconstruction algorithm used. The highest number of lesions and physiological structures will be visualized using a modern algorithm employing time-of-flight information. (orig.)

  9. UK quantitative WB-DWI technical workgroup: consensus meeting recommendations on optimisation, quality control, processing and analysis of quantitative whole-body diffusion-weighted imaging for cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Anna; Alonzi, Roberto; Blackledge, Matthew; Charles-Edwards, Geoff; Collins, David J; Cook, Gary; Coutts, Glynn; Goh, Vicky; Graves, Martin; Kelly, Charles; Koh, Dow-Mu; McCallum, Hazel; Miquel, Marc E; O'Connor, James; Padhani, Anwar; Pearson, Rachel; Priest, Andrew; Rockall, Andrea; Stirling, James; Taylor, Stuart; Tunariu, Nina; van der Meulen, Jan; Walls, Darren; Winfield, Jessica; Punwani, Shonit

    2018-01-01

    Application of whole body diffusion-weighted MRI (WB-DWI) for oncology are rapidly increasing within both research and routine clinical domains. However, WB-DWI as a quantitative imaging biomarker (QIB) has significantly slower adoption. To date, challenges relating to accuracy and reproducibility, essential criteria for a good QIB, have limited widespread clinical translation. In recognition, a UK workgroup was established in 2016 to provide technical consensus guidelines (to maximise accuracy and reproducibility of WB-MRI QIBs) and accelerate the clinical translation of quantitative WB-DWI applications for oncology. A panel of experts convened from cancer centres around the UK with subspecialty expertise in quantitative imaging and/or the use of WB-MRI with DWI. A formal consensus method was used to obtain consensus agreement regarding best practice. Questions were asked about the appropriateness or otherwise on scanner hardware and software, sequence optimisation, acquisition protocols, reporting, and ongoing quality control programs to monitor precision and accuracy and agreement on quality control. The consensus panel was able to reach consensus on 73% (255/351) items and based on consensus areas made recommendations to maximise accuracy and reproducibly of quantitative WB-DWI studies performed at 1.5T. The panel were unable to reach consensus on the majority of items related to quantitative WB-DWI performed at 3T. This UK Quantitative WB-DWI Technical Workgroup consensus provides guidance on maximising accuracy and reproducibly of quantitative WB-DWI for oncology. The consensus guidance can be used by researchers and clinicians to harmonise WB-DWI protocols which will accelerate clinical translation of WB-DWI-derived QIBs.

  10. The effect of X-ray irradiation on a red cell component in WB, WRC and LPRC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tayama, Tatsuya; Toyota, Kuroh; Nagahashi, Hisakata; Masuyama, Tetsuya; Haneda, Kenji; Juji, Takeo.

    1990-01-01

    In spite of the use of X-ray irradiation on blood products, few data about its effect on components are reported. We need more informations about a quality of irradiated red cell components. This study shows in vitro changes of irradiated red cell component in WB, WRC and LPRC as the minimum dose of 1,500, 3,000, and 5,000 rads. The fact as follows were observed in response to irradiated doses: 1) increased fragility of red cell membrane, 2) increased amount of plasma K and plasma Hb, and 3) decrease of ATP in WB.2,3-DPG, glucose, pH, Ht and Cl. The numbers of RBC, WBC and Platelet were not affected by irradiation with doses between 1,500 and 5,000 rads. According to these results, the followings are recommended: 1) irradiation with 1,500 rads is a proper method for WB, 2) in order to avoid the risk of increased plasma K, WB should be used within 1 week after irradiation, and WRC and LPRC should be used 24 hours after irradiation. (author)

  11. Clinical role of early dynamic FDG-PET/CT for the evaluation of renal cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakajima, Reiko; Abe, Koichiro; Sakai, Shuji [Tokyo Women' s Medical University, Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Kondo, Tsunenori; Tanabe, Kazunari [Tokyo Women' s Medical University, Department of Urology, Tokyo (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    We studied the usefulness of early dynamic (ED) and whole-body (WB) FDG-PET/CT for the evaluation of renal cell carcinoma (RCC). One hundred patients with 107 tumours underwent kidney ED and WB FDG-PET/CT. We visually and semiquantitatively evaluated the FDG accumulation in RCCs in the ED and WB phases, and compared the accumulation values with regard to histological type (clear cell carcinoma [CCC] vs. non-clear cell carcinoma [N-CCC]), the TNM stage (high stage [3-4] vs. low stage [1-2]), the Fuhrman grade (high grade [3-4] vs. low grade [1-2]) and presence versus absence of venous (V) and lymphatic (Ly) invasion. In the ED phase, visual evaluation revealed no significant differences in FDG accumulation in terms of each item. However, the maximum standardized uptake value and tumour-to-normal tissue ratios were significantly higher in the CCCs compared to the N-CCCs (p < 0.001). In the WB phase, in contrast, significantly higher FDG accumulation (p < 0.001) was found in RCCs with a higher TNM stage, higher Furman grade, and the presence of V and Ly invasion in both the visual and the semiquantitative evaluations. ED and WB FDG-PET/CT is a useful tool for the evaluation of RCCs. (orig.)

  12. Hydrogen peroxide stimulates cell motile activity through LPA receptor-3 in liver epithelial WB-F344 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shibata, Ayano; Tanabe, Eriko; Inoue, Serina; Kitayoshi, Misaho; Okimoto, Souta; Hirane, Miku; Araki, Mutsumi [Division of Cancer Biology and Bioinformatics, Department of Life Science, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Kinki University, 3-4-1, Kowakae, Higashiosaka, Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Fukushima, Nobuyuki [Division of Molecular Neurobiology, Department of Life Science, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Kinki University, 3-4-1, Kowakae, Higashiosaka, Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi, E-mail: ttujiuch@life.kindai.ac.jp [Division of Cancer Biology and Bioinformatics, Department of Life Science, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Kinki University, 3-4-1, Kowakae, Higashiosaka, Osaka 577-8502 (Japan)

    2013-04-12

    Highlights: •Hydrogen peroxide stimulates cell motility of WB-F344 cells. •LPA{sub 3} is induced by hydrogen peroxide in WB-F344 cells. •Cell motility by hydrogen peroxide is inhibited in LPA{sub 3} knockdown cells. •LPA signaling is involved in cell migration by hydrogen peroxide. -- Abstract: Hydrogen peroxide which is one of reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediates a variety of biological responses, including cell proliferation and migration. In the present study, we investigated whether lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) signaling is involved in cell motile activity stimulated by hydrogen peroxide. The rat liver epithelial WB-F344 cells were treated with hydrogen peroxide at 0.1 or 1 μM for 48 h. In cell motility assays, hydrogen peroxide treated cells showed significantly high cell motile activity, compared with untreated cells. To measure the expression levels of LPA receptor genes, quantitative real time RT-PCR analysis was performed. The expressions of LPA receptor-3 (Lpar3) in hydrogen peroxide treated cells were significantly higher than those in control cells, but not Lpar1 and Lpar2 genes. Next, to assess the effect of LPA{sub 3} on cell motile activity, the Lpar3 knockdown cells from WB-F344 cells were also treated with hydrogen peroxide. The cell motile activity of the knockdown cells was not stimulated by hydrogen peroxide. Moreover, in liver cancer cells, hydrogen peroxide significantly activated cell motility of Lpar3-expressing cells, but not Lpar3-unexpressing cells. These results suggest that LPA signaling via LPA{sub 3} may be mainly involved in cell motile activity of WB-F344 cells stimulated by hydrogen peroxide.

  13. Gene transcript analysis blood values correlate with {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-somatostatin analog (SSA) PET/CT imaging in neuroendocrine tumors and can define disease status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodei, L. [European Institute of Oncology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Milan (Italy); Kidd, M.; Modlin, I.M.; Drozdov, I. [Wren Laboratories, Branford, CT (United States); Prasad, V. [Charite University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Berlin (Germany); Severi, S.; Paganelli, G. [Istituto Scientifico Romagnolo per lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori (IRST) IRCCS, Nuclear Medicine and Radiometabolic Units, Meldola (Italy); Ambrosini, V. [S. Orsola-Malpighi University Hospital, Nuclear Medicine, Bologna (Italy); Kwekkeboom, D.J.; Krenning, E.P. [Erasmus Medical Center Rotterdam, Nuclear Medicine Department, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Baum, R.P. [Zentralklinik Bad Berka, THERANOSTICS Center for Molecular Radiotherapy and Imaging, Bad Berka (Germany)

    2015-08-15

    Precise determination of neuroendocrine tumor (NET) disease status and response to therapy remains a rate-limiting concern for disease management. This reflects limitations in biomarker specificity and resolution capacity of imaging. In order to evaluate biomarker precision and identify if combinatorial blood molecular markers and imaging could provide added diagnostic value, we assessed the concordance between {sup 68}Ga-somatostatin analog (SSA) positron emission tomography (PET), circulating NET gene transcripts (NETest), chromogranin A (CgA), and Ki-67 in NETs. We utilized two independent patient groups with positive {sup 68}Ga-SSA PET: data set 1 ({sup 68}Ga-SSA PETs undertaken for peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT), as primary or salvage treatment, n = 27) and data set 2 ({sup 68}Ga-SSA PETs performed in patients referred for initial disease staging or restaging after various therapies, n = 22). We examined the maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}), circulating gene transcripts, CgA levels, and baseline Ki-67. Regression analyses, generalized linear modeling, and receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analyses were undertaken to determine the strength of the relationships. SUV{sub max} measured in two centers were mathematically evaluated (regression modeling) and determined to be comparable. Of 49 patients, 47 (96 %) exhibited a positive NETest. Twenty-six (54 %) had elevated CgA (χ{sup 2} = 20.1, p < 2.5 x 10{sup -6}). The majority (78 %) had Ki-67 < 20 %. Gene transcript scores were predictive of imaging with >95 % concordance and significantly correlated with SUV{sub max} (R {sup 2} = 0.31, root-mean-square error = 9.4). The genes MORF4L2 and somatostatin receptors SSTR1, 3, and 5 exhibited the highest correlation with SUV{sub max}. Progressive disease was identified by elevated levels of a quotient of MORF4L2 expression and SUV{sub max} [ROC-derived AUC (R {sup 2} = 0.7, p < 0.05)]. No statistical relationship was identified

  14. Gene transcript analysis blood values correlate with 68Ga-DOTA-somatostatin analog (SSA) PET/CT imaging in neuroendocrine tumors and can define disease status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodei, L.; Kidd, M.; Modlin, I.M.; Drozdov, I.; Prasad, V.; Severi, S.; Paganelli, G.; Ambrosini, V.; Kwekkeboom, D.J.; Krenning, E.P.; Baum, R.P.

    2015-01-01

    Precise determination of neuroendocrine tumor (NET) disease status and response to therapy remains a rate-limiting concern for disease management. This reflects limitations in biomarker specificity and resolution capacity of imaging. In order to evaluate biomarker precision and identify if combinatorial blood molecular markers and imaging could provide added diagnostic value, we assessed the concordance between 68 Ga-somatostatin analog (SSA) positron emission tomography (PET), circulating NET gene transcripts (NETest), chromogranin A (CgA), and Ki-67 in NETs. We utilized two independent patient groups with positive 68 Ga-SSA PET: data set 1 ( 68 Ga-SSA PETs undertaken for peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT), as primary or salvage treatment, n = 27) and data set 2 ( 68 Ga-SSA PETs performed in patients referred for initial disease staging or restaging after various therapies, n = 22). We examined the maximum standardized uptake value (SUV max ), circulating gene transcripts, CgA levels, and baseline Ki-67. Regression analyses, generalized linear modeling, and receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analyses were undertaken to determine the strength of the relationships. SUV max measured in two centers were mathematically evaluated (regression modeling) and determined to be comparable. Of 49 patients, 47 (96 %) exhibited a positive NETest. Twenty-six (54 %) had elevated CgA (χ 2 = 20.1, p < 2.5 x 10 -6 ). The majority (78 %) had Ki-67 < 20 %. Gene transcript scores were predictive of imaging with >95 % concordance and significantly correlated with SUV max (R 2 = 0.31, root-mean-square error = 9.4). The genes MORF4L2 and somatostatin receptors SSTR1, 3, and 5 exhibited the highest correlation with SUV max . Progressive disease was identified by elevated levels of a quotient of MORF4L2 expression and SUV max [ROC-derived AUC (R 2 = 0.7, p < 0.05)]. No statistical relationship was identified between CgA and Ki-67 and no relationship with imaging parameters

  15. Up-regulation of serotonergic binding sites labeled by (3H) WB4101 following fimbrial transection and 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine-induced lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrow, A.L.; Norman, A.B.; Battaglia, G.; Loy, R.; Creese, I.

    1985-01-01

    Lesions of the serotonergic afferents to the hippocampus, by fimbrial transection or by 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine treatment, produce an increase in the Bmax of ( 3 H)WB4101 to its nanomolar affinity binding site, with no effect on its picomolar affinity binding site or on ( 3 H)prazosin binding. The nanomolar site is serotonergic as the serotonergic agonists, serotonin and 8-hydroxy-dipropylaminotetraline (8-OH-DPAT) have nanomolar affinity for ( 3 H)WB4101 binding when studied in the presence of a prazosin mask (30nM) of the alpha-1 component of ( 3 H)WB4101 binding. The serotonin receptor antagonists metergoline, lysergic acid diethylamide and lisuride also have high nanomolar affinities while ketanserin, yohimbine, prazosin and noradrenergic agonists have affinities in the micromolar range. Fimbrial transection or 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine injections produced 32% and 44% increases in the Bmax of ( 3 H)WB4101 binding in the presence of a prazosin mask. Serotonin competition for ( 3 H)WB4101 binding was identical in control and experimental tissues from each lesion experiment. Although specific binding of ( 3 H)WB4101 was increased, there was no change in the affinities or the percentages of the two binding components for serotonin competition with ( 3 H)WB4101. These data suggest that removal of the serotonergic input to the hippocampus produces an increase in the Bmax of serotonin receptor binding sites labeled by ( 3 H)WB4101. 33 references, 3 figures, 3 tables

  16. Evaluation of intensity modulated radiation therapy dose painting for localized prostate cancer using 68Ga-HBED-CC PSMA-PET/CT: A planning study based on histopathology reference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamboglou, Constantinos; Sachpazidis, Ilias; Koubar, Khodor; Drendel, Vanessa; Wiehle, Rolf; Kirste, Simon; Mix, Michael; Schiller, Florian; Mavroidis, Panayiotis; Meyer, Philipp T; Werner, Martin; Grosu, Anca L; Baltas, Dimos

    2017-06-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility and to evaluate the tumour control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) of IMRT dose painting using 68 Ga-HBED-CC PSMA PET/CT for target delineation in prostate cancer (PCa). 10 patients had PSMA PET/CT scans prior to prostatectomy. GTV-PET was generated on the basis of an intraprostatic SUVmax of 30%. Two IMRT plans were generated for each patient: Plan 77 which consisted of whole-prostate IMRT to 77Gy, and Plan 95 which consisted of whole-prostate IMRT to 77Gy and a simultaneous integrated boost to the GTV-PET up to 95Gy (35 fractions). The feasibility of these plans was judged by their ability to adhere to the FLAME trial protocol. TCP-histo/-PET were calculated on co-registered histology (GTV-histo) and GTV-PET, respectively. NTCPs for rectum and bladder were calculated. All plans reached prescription doses whilst adhering to dose constraints. In Plan 77 and Plan 95 mean doses in GTV-histo were 75.8±0.3Gy and 96.9±1Gy, respectively. Average TCP-histo values for Plan 77 and Plan 95 were 70% (range: 15-97%), and 96% (range: 78-100%, pPET values for Plan 77 and Plan 95 were 55% (range: 27-82%), and 100% (range: 99-100%, pPET and TCP-histo in Plan 95 (p=0.25). There were no significant differences in rectal (p=0.563) and bladder (p=0.3) NTCPs. IMRT dose painting using PSMA PET/CT was technically feasible and resulted in significantly higher TCPs without higher NTCPs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Whole-body MRI at 1.5 T and 3 T compared with FDG-PET-CT for the detection of tumour recurrence in patients with colorectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, G.P.; Baur-Melnyk, A.; Becker, C.R.; Reiser, M.F.; Hermann, K.A. [Ludwig Maximilian University Munich, Department of Clinical Radiology, University Hospitals Grosshadern, Munich (Germany); Haug, A.; Tiling, R. [University Hospitals Grosshadern, Ludwig Maximilian University Munich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Utzschneider, S. [University Hospitals Grosshadern, Ludwig Maximilian University Munich, Department of Orthopedics, Munich (Germany)

    2009-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the diagnostic accuracy of whole-body MRI (WB-MRI) at 1.5 T or 3 T compared with FDG-PET-CT in the follow-up of patients suffering from colorectal cancer. In a retrospective study, 24 patients with a history of colorectal cancer and suspected tumour recurrence underwent FDG-PET-CT and WB-MRI with the use of parallel imaging (PAT) for follow-up. High resolution coronal T1w-TSE and STIR sequences at four body levels, HASTE imaging of the lungs, contrast-enhanced T1w- and T2w-TSE sequences of the liver, brain, abdomen and pelvis were performed, using WB-MRI at either 1.5 T (n = 14) or 3 T (n = 10). Presence of local recurrent tumour, lymph node involvement and distant metastatic disease was confirmed using radiological follow-up within at least 5 months as a standard of reference. Seventy seven malignant foci in 17 of 24 patients (71%) were detected with both WB-MRI and PET-CT. Both investigations concordantly revealed two local recurrent tumours. PET-CT detected significantly more lymph node metastases (sensitivity 93%, n = 27/29) than WB-MRI (sensitivity 63%, n = 18/29). PET-CT and WB-MRI achieved a similar sensitivity for the detection of organ metastases with 80% and 78%, respectively (37/46 and 36/46). WB-MRI detected brain metastases in one patient. One false-positive local tumour recurrence was indicated by PET-CT. Overall diagnostic accuracy for PET-CT was 91% (sensitivity 86%, specificity 96%) and 83% for WB-MRI (sensitivity 72%, specificity 93%), respectively. Examination time for WB-MRI at 1.5 T and 3 T was 52 min and 43 min, respectively; examination time for PET-CT was 103 min. Initial results suggest that differences in accuracy for local and distant metastases detection using FDG-PET-CT and WB-MRI for integrated screening of tumour recurrence in colorectal cancer depend on the location of the malignant focus. Our results show that nodal disease is better detected using PET-CT, whereas organ disease is depicted

  18. Incremental value of 99mTc-HYNIC-TOC SPECT/CT over whole-body planar scintigraphy and SPECT in patients with neuroendocrine tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trogrlic, Mate; Težak, Stanko

    2017-06-12

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the additional value of 99m Tc-HYNIC-TOC SPECT/CT over planar whole-body (WB) scintigraphy and SPECT alone in the detection and accurate localisation of neuroendocrine tumour (NET) lesions. This study included 65 patients with a definitive histological diagnosis of NET prior to scintigraphy. Planar WB scintigraphy, SPECT, and SPECT/CT images were acquired at 4 h post-administration of 670 MBq 99m Tc-HYNIC-TOC. Additional SPECT images at 10 min after tracer administration were also acquired. Clinical and imaging follow-up findings were considered as the reference standards (minimum follow-up period, 15 months). Patient and lesion-based analyses of the efficacies of the imaging modalities were performed. While 38 patients exhibited metastasis of NETs, 27 presented no evidence of metastasis. Upon patient-based analysis, the sensitivity and specificity of SPECT/CT were found to be 88.9 and 79.3 %, respectively. The diagnostic accuracies of WB scintigraphy, 4h-SPECT, and SPECT/CT were 72.3, 73.8, and 84.6 %, respectively. The area under curve (AUC) value for SPECT/CT (0.84) was the highest, followed by those for 4h-SPECT (0.75) and WB scintigraphy (0.74). The accuracy and AUC values of SPECT/CT were significantly better compared to those of WB scintigraphy (p < 0.001), 10 min-SPECT (p < 0.001), and 4 h-SPECT (p = 0.001). The findings of SPECT/CT led to the change in treatment plan of 11 patients (16.9 %). The sensitivity and diagnostic accuracy of SPECT/CT in the evaluation of NET lesions outperforms planar WB imaging or SPECT alone.

  19. Effects of oil drops containing Lactobacillus salivarius WB21 on periodontal health and oral microbiota producing volatile sulfur compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Nao; Tanabe, Kazunari; Takeshita, Toru; Yoneda, Masahiro; Iwamoto, Tomoyuki; Oshiro, Sueko; Yamashita, Yoshihisa; Hirofuji, Takao

    2012-03-01

    The objective of this paper is to evaluate the effects of oil drops containing Lactobacillus salivarius WB21 on periodontal health and oral microbiota producing volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs). For this study, 42 subjects were randomly assigned to receive oil samples containing L. salivarius WB21 or a placebo for two weeks. Oral assessment and saliva collection were performed on days 1 and 15. Bacterial analysis was performed using the real-time polymerase chain reaction and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP). In both the experimental and placebo groups, the average probing depth, number of periodontal pockets, and the percentage of bleeding on probing (BOP) decreased while stimulated salivary flow increased on day 15. BOP was reduced in the experimental group compared with the placebo group (P = 0.010). In the experimental group, total bacterial numbers decreased, and the number of L. salivarius increased. The number of Prevotella intermedia, which is correlated with hydrogen sulfide concentration in mouth air, increased in the placebo group and did not change in the experimental group. T-RFLP analysis found that the peak area proportions representing Porphyromonas gingivalis, P. intermedia, Tannerella forsythensis, and Fusobacterium nucleatum decreased in the experimental group, although there was no significant change in the bacterial composition. Thus we observed oil drops containing L. salivarius WB21 improved BOP and inhibited the reproduction of total and VSC-producing periodontopathic bacteria compared with the placebo group, but also showed the limit of its efficacy in controlling VSCs producing and periodontal pathogens.

  20. Differences in Nanosecond Laser Ablation and Deposition of Tungsten, Boron, and WB2/B Composite due to Optical Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Moscicki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The first attempt to the deposition of WB3 films using nanosecond Nd:YAG laser demonstrated that deposited coatings are superhard. However, they have very high roughness. The deposited films consisted mainly of droplets. Therefore, in the present work, the explanation of this phenomenon is conducted. The interaction of Nd:YAG nanosecond laser pulse with tungsten, boron, and WB2/B target during ablation is investigated. The studies show the fundamental differences in ablation of those materials. The ablation of tungsten is thermal and occurs due to only evaporation. In the same conditions, during ablation of boron, the phase explosion and/or fragmentation due to recoil pressure is observed. The deposited films have a significant contribution of big debris with irregular shape. In the case of WB2/B composite, ablation is significantly different. The ablation seems to be the detonation in the liquid phase. The deposition mechanism is related mainly to the mechanical transport of the target material in the form of droplets, while the gaseous phase plays marginal role. The main origin of differences is optical properties of studied materials. A method estimating phase explosion occurrence based on material data such as critical temperature, thermal diffusivity, and optical properties is shown. Moreover, the effect of laser wavelength on the ablation process and the quality of the deposited films is discussed.

  1. A Search Complexity Improvement of Vector Quantization to Immittance Spectral Frequency Coefficients in AMR-WB Speech Codec

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing-Jhih Yao

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available An adaptive multi-rate wideband (AMR-WB code is a speech codec developed on the basis of an algebraic code-excited linear-prediction (ACELP coding technique, and has a double advantage of low bit rates and high speech quality. This coding technique is widely used in modern mobile communication systems for a high speech quality in handheld devices. However, a major disadvantage is that a vector quantization (VQ of immittance spectral frequency (ISF coefficients occupies a significant computational load in the AMR-WB encoder. Hence, this paper presents a triangular inequality elimination (TIE algorithm combined with a dynamic mechanism and an intersection mechanism, abbreviated as the DI-TIE algorithm, to remarkably improve the complexity of ISF coefficient quantization in the AMR-WB speech codec. Both mechanisms are designed in a way that recursively enhances the performance of the TIE algorithm. At the end of this work, this proposal is experimentally validated as a superior search algorithm relative to a conventional TIE, a multiple TIE (MTIE, and an equal-average equal-variance equal-norm nearest neighbor search (EEENNS approach. With a full search algorithm as a benchmark for search load comparison, this work provides a search load reduction above 77%, a figure far beyond 36% in the TIE, 49% in the MTIE, and 68% in the EEENNS approach.

  2. [3H]WB4101 labels the 5-HT1A serotonin receptor subtype in rat brain. Guanine nucleotide and divalent cation sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norman, A.B.; Battaglia, G.; Creese, I.

    1985-01-01

    In the presence of a 30 nM prazosin mask, [ 3 H]-2-(2,6-dimethoxyphenoxyethyl) aminomethyl-1,4-benzodioxane ([ 3 H]WB4101) can selectively label 5-HT1 serotonin receptors. Serotonin exhibits high affinity (Ki = 2.5 nM) and monophasic competition for [ 3 H] WB4101 binding in cerebral cortex. We have found a significant correlation (r = 0.96) between the affinities of a number of serotonergic and nonserotonergic compounds at [ 3 H]WB4101-binding sites in the presence of 30 nM prazosin and [ 3 H] lysergic acid diethylamide ([ 3 H]LSD)-labeled 5-HT1 serotonin receptors in homogenates of rat cerebral cortex. Despite similar pharmacological profiles, distribution studies indicate that, in the presence of 5 mM MgSO4, the Bmax of [ 3 H]WB4101 is significantly lower than the Bmax of [ 3 H]LSD in various brain regions. WB4101 competition for [ 3 H] LSD-labeled 5-HT1 receptors fits best to a computer-derived model assuming two binding sites, with the KH for WB4101 being similar to the KD of [ 3 H]WB4101 binding derived from saturation experiments. This suggests that [ 3 H]WB4101 labels only one of the subtypes of the 5-HT1 serotonin receptors labeled by [ 3 H]LSD. The selective 5-HT1A serotonin receptor antagonist, spiperone, and the selective 5-HT1A agonist, 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino) tetraline, exhibit high affinity and monophasic competition for [ 3 H]WB4101 but compete for multiple [ 3 H]LSD 5-HT1 binding sites. These data indicate that [ 3 H]WB4101 selectively labels the 5-HT1A serotonin receptor, whereas [ 3 H] LSD appears to label both the 5-HT1A and the 5-HT1B serotonin receptor subtypes. The divalent cations, Mn2+, Mg2+, and Ca2+ were found to markedly increase the affinity and Bmax of [ 3 H]WB4101 binding in cerebral cortex. Conversely, the guanine nucleotides guanylylimidodiphosphate and GTP, but not the adenosine nucleotide ATP, markedly reduce the Bmax of [ 3 H]WB4101 binding

  3. Comparison of standard and delayed imaging to improve the detection rate of ["6"8Ga]PSMA I and T PET/CT in patients with biochemical recurrence or prostate-specific antigen persistence after primary therapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmuck, Sebastian; Nordlohne, Stefan; Sohns, Jan M.; Ross, Tobias L.; Bengel, Frank M.; Derlin, Thorsten; Klot, Christoph A. von; Henkenberens, Christoph; Christiansen, Hans; Wester, Hans-Juergen

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the value of dual-time point imaging in PET/CT for detection of biochemically recurrent or persistent prostate cancer, using the prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) ligand ["6"8Ga]PSMA I and T. 240 patients who underwent a ["6"8Ga]PSMA I and T PET/CT in the context of biochemical relapse of prostate cancer were included in this retrospective analysis. Imaging consisted of a standard whole-body PET/CT (1 h p.i.), followed by delayed (3 h p.i.) imaging of the abdomen. PSA-stratified proportions of positive PET/CT results, standardized uptake values and target-to-background ratios were analyzed, and compared between standard and delayed imaging. The overall detection rates of ["6"8Ga]PSMA I and T PET/CT were 94.2, 71.8, 58.6, 55.9 and 38.9% for PSA levels of ≥2, 1 to 0.2 to <0.5, and 0.01 to 0.2 ng/mL, respectively. Although the target-to-background ratio improved significantly over time (P < 0.0001), the majority (96.6%) of all lesions suggestive of recurrent disease could already be detected in standard imaging. Delayed imaging at 3 h p.i. exclusively identified pathologic findings in 5.4% (10/184) of abnormal ["6"8Ga]PSMA I and T PET/CT scans, and exclusively detected 3.4% (38/1134) of all lesions suggestive of recurrent disease. ["6"8Ga]PSMA I and T PET/CT shows high detection rates in patients with prostate-specific antigen persistence or biochemical recurrence of prostate cancer. Delayed imaging can detect lesions with improved contrast compared to standard imaging. However, the impact on detection rates was limited in this study. (orig.)

  4. Can technical characteristics predict clinical performance in PET/CT imaging? A correlation study for thyroid cancer diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallergi, Maria; Menychtas, Dimitrios; Georgakopoulos, Alexandros; Pianou, Nikoletta; Metaxas, Marinos; Chatziioannou, Sofia

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether image characteristics could be used to predict the outcome of ROC studies in PET/CT imaging. Patients suspected for recurrent thyroid cancer underwent a standard whole body (WB) examination and an additional high-resolution head-and-neck (HN) F18-FDG PET/CT scan. The value of the latter was determined with an ROC study, the results of which showed that the WB+HN combination was better than WB alone for thyroid cancer detection and diagnosis. Following the ROC experiment, the WB and HN images of confirmed benign or malignant thyroid disease were analyzed and first and second order textural features were determined. Features included minimum, mean, and maximum intensity, as well as contrast in regions of interest encircling the thyroid lesions. Lesion size and standard uptake values (SUV) were also determined. Bivariate analysis was applied to determine relationships between WB and HN features and between observer ROC responses and the various feature values. The two sets showed significant associations in the values of SUV, contrast, and lesion size. They were completely different when the intensities were considered; no relationship was found between the WB minimum, maximum, and mean ROI values and their HN counterparts. SUV and contrast were the strongest predictors of ROC performance on PET/CT examinations of thyroid cancer. The high resolution HN images seem to enhance these relationships but without a single dramatic effect as was projected from the ROC results. A combination of features from both WB and HN datasets may possibly be a more robust predictor of ROC performance.

  5. Benign versus malignant osseous lesions in spine: differentiation by means of bone SPECT/CT fused image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Zhiming; Qu Wanying

    2004-01-01

    This study compared the efficiency of SPECT-CT fused image with planar bone scan, bone SPECT and CT in differentiating malignant from benign lesions and detecting metastases to the spine. Methods. Total 144 patients with spinal lesions underwent planar bone scan (WB), single photon tomography (SPECT), CT and SPECT-CT fused image by a SPECT/CT system. The malignant or benign nature of lesions was proved by radiological Methods, histological findings, 6-24 month follow-up, or all of these. The diagnostic results was divided into 4 types, i.e., normal, benign, doubtful malignant and malignant. Results. There were 137 malignant and 252 benign lesions in 144 patients, respectively. The percentages of doubtful malignant diagnosed by WB, SPECT, CT and fused image are 22.6%, 5.1%, 9.5% and 0%, respectively, p < 0.01-0.001, except for the comparison between the percentages of SPECT and CT. Sensitivities in detection of malignant lesions by WB, SPECT, CT and fused image are 75.2%, 94.2%, 96.6% and 99.3%, respectively, P < 0.001, excepting for the comparisons between those of SPECT and CT, and between those of CT and fused image. The sensitivities m detection of benign lesions by WB, SPECT, CT and fused image are, 56.7%, 86.5%, 90.1% and 96.8%, respectively, P < 0.005 - 0.001, excepting for the comparison between those of SPECT and CT. The specificities in detection of maliganant lesions by WB, SPECT, CT and fused image are 70.6%, 88.9%, 97.2% and 97.6%, respectively, P < 0.001, excepting for the comparison between those of CT and fused image. Conclusion. Bone SPECT-CT fused image has highest diagnostic and differentiating diagnostic values in detection of spinal abnormalities over the planar bone scanning and SPECT. The CT by present SPECT/CT system can complement planar bone scanning and SPECT and is clinically valuable in detection of spinal abnormalities. (authors)

  6. The first family with Tay-Sachs disease in Cyprus: Genetic analysis reveals a nonsense (c.78G>A) and a silent (c.1305C>T) mutation and allows preimplantation genetic diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiou, Theodoros; Christopoulos, George; Anastasiadou, Violetta; Hadjiloizou, Stavros; Cregeen, David; Jackson, Marie; Mavrikiou, Gavriella; Kleanthous, Marina; Drousiotou, Anthi

    2014-12-01

    Tay-Sachs disease (TSD) is a recessively inherited neurodegenerative disorder caused by mutations in the HEXA gene resulting in β-hexosaminidase A (HEX A) deficiency and neuronal accumulation of GM2 ganglioside. We describe the first patient with Tay-Sachs disease in the Cypriot population, a juvenile case which presented with developmental regression at the age of five. The diagnosis was confirmed by measurement of HEXA activity in plasma, peripheral leucocytes and fibroblasts. Sequencing the HEXA gene resulted in the identification of two previously described mutations: the nonsense mutation c.78G>A (p.Trp26X) and the silent mutation c.1305C>T (p.=). The silent mutation was reported once before in a juvenile TSD patient of West Indian origin with an unusually mild phenotype. The presence of this mutation in another juvenile TSD patient provides further evidence that it is a disease-causing mutation. Successful preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) and prenatal follow-up were provided to the couple.

  7. Local recurrence of prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy is at risk to be missed in {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11-PET of PET/CT and PET/MRI: comparison with mpMRI integrated in simultaneous PET/MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freitag, Martin T. [Department of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Clinical Cooperation Unit Nuclear Medicine, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Radtke, Jan P. [Department of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Urology, Heidelberg (Germany); Afshar-Oromieh, Ali; Flechsig, Paul; Giesel, Frederik; Haberkorn, Uwe [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); Roethke, Matthias C.; Bonekamp, David; Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter [Department of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Hadaschik, Boris A.; Hohenfellner, Markus [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Urology, Heidelberg (Germany); Gleave, Martin [University of British Columbia, The Vancouver Prostate Centre, Vancouver (Canada); Kopka, Klaus; Eder, Matthias [Division of Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Heusser, Thorsten; Kachelriess, Marc [Department of Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Wieczorek, Kathrin [University Hospital Heidelberg, Institute of Pathology, Heidelberg (Germany); Sachpekidis, Christos; Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, A. [Clinical Cooperation Unit Nuclear Medicine, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2017-05-15

    The positron emission tomography (PET) tracer {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11, targeting the prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA), is rapidly excreted into the urinary tract. This leads to significant radioactivity in the bladder, which may limit the PET-detection of local recurrence (LR) of prostate cancer (PC) after radical prostatectomy (RP), developing in close proximity to the bladder. Here, we analyze if there is additional value of multi-parametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) compared to the {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11-PET-component of PET/CT or PET/MRI to detect LR. One hundred and nineteen patients with biochemical recurrence after prior RP underwent both hybrid {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11-PET/CT{sub low-dose} (1 h p.i.) and -PET/MRI (2-3 h p.i.) including a mpMRI protocol of the prostatic bed. The comparison of both methods was restricted to the abdomen with focus on LR (McNemar). Bladder-LR distance and recurrence size were measured in axial T2w-TSE. A logistic regression was performed to determine the influence of these variables on detectability in {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11-PET. Standardized-uptake-value (SUV{sub mean}) quantification of LR was performed. There were 93/119 patients that had at least one pathologic finding. In addition, 18/119 Patients (15.1%) were diagnosed with a LR in mpMRI of PET/MRI but only nine were PET-positive in PET/CT and PET/MRI. This mismatch was statistically significant (p = 0.004). Detection of LR using the PET-component was significantly influenced by proximity to the bladder (p = 0.028). The PET-pattern of LR-uptake was classified into three types (1): separated from bladder; (2): fuses with bladder, and (3): obliterated by bladder. The size of LRs did not affect PET-detectability (p = 0.84), mean size was 1.7 ± 0.69 cm long axis, 1.2 ± 0.46 cm short-axis. SUV{sub mean} in nine men was 8.7 ± 3.7 (PET/CT) and 7.0 ± 4.2 (PET/MRI) but could not be quantified in the remaining nine cases (obliterated by bladder). The present study demonstrates

  8. Syphilis serology: Seroprevalence in a selected population and considerations on the Euroline WB test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Amodeo

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The clinical diagnosis of syphilis is always supported by appropriate laboratory tests and the test results are interpreted with reference to the patient’s history. In the diagnosis of syphilis, the use of tests based on antibody search that recognize both treponemal and reaginic antigens increases the diagnostic chances. Our study discusses the various serological and alternative tests currently available along with their limitations, and relates their results to the likely corresponding clinical stage of the disease. Methods: in our laboratory were analyzed 264 sera and 4 liquor (123 Females, 145 Males. 187 patients are subject at low risk for luetic infection, including pregnant woman, patient with organ transplant, outpatients or hospitalized undergoing routine serological, and 81 from patients with confirmed syphilis including 4 pregnant women in antibiotic treatment, patients with suspected disease, HIV positive and patients with autoimmune diseases with Cardiolipin positive. All sera were tested with ELISA Anti-Treponema pallidum Screen (IgG / IgM and in parallel with agglutination tests VDRL and TPHA. On all positive sera was tested Euroline-WB EUROIMMUN and reading done with the program EuroLineScan. Results: by ELISA Anti-Treponema pallidum Screen IgG / IgM 162 sera were negative and 106 sera positive (39.5%, distributed as follows: 45 (42% with a value greater than 200 RU / ml, 43 (41% with a value> 22 RU / ml and 18 (17% with a borderline value between> 16 to <22 RU / ml. The execution of the Blot IgG showed: 18 negative sera, 6 with borderline value with one only band of specific antigens (p15, p45, p47 or p17, while 82, including 4 liquor (neurolue, were certainly positive showing more than one band antibody to the treponemal antigens. Only one patient had in place at the time of screening, an initial infection; in fact, there was a single clear positivity in the IgM protein bands, while 7 sera was uncertain values

  9. Nerve Sheath Tumors in Neurofibromatosis Type 1: Assessment of Whole-Body Metabolic Tumor Burden Using F-18-FDG PET/CT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Salamon

    Full Text Available To determine the metabolically active whole-body tumor volume (WB-MTV on F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (F-18-FDG PET/CT in individuals with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1 using a three-dimensional (3D segmentation and computerized volumetry technique, and to compare PET WB-MTV between patients with benign and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (PNSTs.Thirty-six NF1 patients (18 patients with malignant PNSTs and 18 age- and sex-matched controls with benign PNSTs were examined by F-18-FDG PET/CT. WB-MTV, whole-body total lesion glycolysis (WB-TLG and a set of semi-quantitative imaging-based parameters were analyzed both on a per-patient and a per-lesion basis.On a per-lesion basis, malignant PNSTs demonstrated both a significantly higher MTV and TLG than benign PNSTs (p < 0.0001. On a per-patient basis, WB-MTV and WB-TLG were significantly higher in patients with malignant PNSTs compared to patients with benign PNSTs (p < 0.001. ROC analysis showed that MTV and TLG could be used to differentiate between benign and malignant tumors.WB-MTV and WB-TLG may identify malignant change and may have the potential to provide a basis for investigating molecular biomarkers that correlate with metabolically active disease manifestations. Further evaluation will determine the potential clinical impact of these PET-based parameters in NF1.

  10. Concerted evolution of the tandemly repeated genes encoding primate U2 small nuclear RNA (the RNU2 locus) does not prevent rapid diversification of the (CT){sub n} {center_dot} (GA){sub n} microsatellite embedded within the U2 repeat unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, D.; Weiner, A.M. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States)

    1995-12-10

    The RNU2 locus encoding human U2 small nuclear RNA (snRNA) is organized as a nearly perfect tandem array containing 5 to 22 copies of a 5.8-kb repeat unit. Just downstream of the U2 snRNA gene in each 5.8-kb repeat unit lies a large (CT){sub n}{center_dot}(GA){sub n} dinucleotide repeat (n {approx} 70). This form of genomic organization, in which one repeat is embedded within another, provides an unusual opportunity to study the balance of forces maintaining the homogeneity of both kinds of repeats. Using a combination of field inversion gel electrophoresis and polymerase chain reaction, we have been able to study the CT microsatellites within individual U2 tandem arrays. We find that the CT microsatellites within an RNU2 allele exhibit significant length polymorphism, despite the remarkable homogeneity of the surrounding U2 repeat units. Length polymorphism is due primarily to loss or gain of CT dinucleotide repeats, but other types of deletions, insertions, and substitutions are also frequent. Polymorphism is greatly reduced in regions where pure (CT){sub n} tracts are interrupted by occasional G residues, suggesting that irregularities stabilize both the length and the sequence of the dinucleotide repeat. We further show that the RNU2 loci of other catarrhine primates (gorilla, chimpanzee, ogangutan, and baboon) contain orthologous CT microsatellites; these also exhibit length polymorphism, but are highly divergent from each other. Thus, although the CT microsatellite is evolving far more rapidly than the rest of the U2 repeat unit, it has persisted through multiple speciation events spanning >35 Myr. The persistence of the CT microsatellite, despite polymorphism and rapid evolution, suggests that it might play a functional role in concerted evolution of the RNU2 loci, perhaps as an initiation site for recombination and/or gene conversion. 70 refs., 5 figs.

  11. Studies on the characterization and regulation of alpha-1 adrenergic receptors and [3H]WB4101 binding sites in the central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrow, A.L.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of these studies has been to resolve the anomalous binding characteristics of two alpha adrenergic receptor ligands, [ 3 H]WB4101 and [ 3 H]prazosin and to study the regulation of the receptors labeled by these compounds after surgical denervation and chronic drug treatments. Preliminary studies indicated that [ 3 H]WB4101 binding sites, which were believed to represent alpha-1 adrenergic receptors, were increased in number following removal of the fimbrial afferents to the hippocampus. This increase was not due to removal of the adrenergic input into this structure since destruction of the locus coeruleus or the dorsal noradrenergic bundle did not produce the up-regulation. Characterization of alpha-1 adrenergic receptors using [ 3 H]prazosin and [ 3 H]WB4101 revealed evidence for subtypes of alpha-1 receptors designated alpha-1A and alpha-1B. The nanomolar affinity component of [ 3 H]WB4101 binding is not adrenergic but serotonergic. The serotonergic agonists, serotonin and 8-hydroxy-dipropylaminotetraline have affinities of 1.5 and 3.0 nM for this site, when studied in the presence of a 30 nM prazosin mask of the alpha-1 component of [ 3 H]WB4101 binding. Fimbria transection or 5,7 dihydroxytryptamine injections produced increases in the Bmax of the nanomolar affinity component of [ 3 H]WB4101 binding in the presence of a prazosin mask. The up-regulated site showed identical serotonergic pharmacology compared to control tissue. Thus, the author concluded that serotonergic denervation of the hippocampus produces the increase in serotonergic binding sites labeled by [ 3 H]WB4101

  12. Comparison between whole-body MRI and Fluorine-18-Fluorodeoxyglucose PET or PET/CT in oncology: a systematic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciliberto, Mario; Maggi, Fabio; Treglia, Giorgio; Padovano, Federico; Calandriello, Lucio; Giordano, Alessandro; Bonomo, Lorenzo

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the article is to systematically review published data about the comparison between positron emission tomography (PET) or PET/computed tomography (PET/CT) using Fluorine-18-Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (WB-MRI) in patients with different tumours. A comprehensive literature search of studies published in PubMed/MEDLINE, Scopus and Embase databases through April 2012 and regarding the comparison between FDG-PET or PET/CT and WB-MRI in patients with various tumours was carried out. Forty-four articles comprising 2287 patients were retrieved in full-text version, included and discussed in this systematic review. Several articles evaluated mixed tumours with both diagnostic methods. Concerning the specific tumour types, more evidence exists for lymphomas, bone tumours, head and neck tumours and lung tumours, whereas there is less evidence for other tumour types. Overall, based on the literature findings, WB-MRI seems to be a valid alternative method compared to PET/CT in oncology. Further larger prospective studies and in particular cost-effectiveness analysis comparing these two whole-body imaging techniques are needed to better assess the role of WB-MRI compared to FDG-PET or PET/CT in specific tumour types

  13. Pretreatment evaluation of distant-site status in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma: accuracy of whole-body MRI at 3-Tesla and FDG-PET-CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, Shu-Hang; Chan, Sheng-Chieh; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Chang, Joseph Tung-Chieh; Liao, Chun-Ta; Ko, Sheung-Fat; Wai, Yau-Yau; Wang, Hung-Ming; Wang, Jiun-Jie; Chen, Min-Chi

    2009-01-01

    We sought to prospectively evaluate the accuracy of 3.0-Tesla whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (WB-MRI) and integrated fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) (FDG-PET-CT), and their combined interpretation for the assessment of distant-site status in 150 patients with untreated nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Eighteen (12%) patients were diagnosed as having distant malignancies (15 patients had distant metastases, and three distant synchronous tumours). On a patient-based analysis, WB-MRI and FDG-PET-CT showed similar sensitivity (77.8% vs 72.2%, P > 0.999), specificity (98.5% vs 97.7%, P > 0.999) and diagnostic capability (0.905 vs 0.878, P = 0.669). Combined interpretation of WB-MRI and FDG-PET-CT showed no significant benefit over either technique alone. In conclusion, 3.0-Tesla WB-MRI is a feasible, non-ionising technique that showed similar diagnostic capacity to FDG-PET-CT in assessing distant-site status in patients with untreated NPC and can be recommended as the first-line imaging technique for comprehensive evaluation of such patients. (orig.)

  14. Comparison of 11C-choline-PET/CT and whole body-MRI for staging of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eschmann, S.M.; Rieger, A.; Mueller, M.; Bares, R.; Pfannenberg, A.C.; Aschoff, P.; Claussen, C.D.; Schlemmer, H.P.; Paulsen, F.; Anastasiadis, A.

    2007-01-01

    Aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of positron emission tomography and computed tomography with 11 C-Choline (Cho-PET/CT) and whole body magneticresonance imaging (WB-MRI) for diagnostic work-up of prostate cancer. Patients, methods: We evaluated retrospectively 42 patients with untreated prostate cancer (n =17), or increasing levels of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) after curative therapy (n = 25) who had been investigated by both Cho-PET/CT and WB-MRI. MRI, CT, and PET images were separately analyzed by experienced radiologists or nuclear medicine experts, followed by consensus reading. Validation was established by histology, follow-up, or consensus reading. Results: 88/103 detected lesions were considered as malignant: 44 bone metastases, 22 local tumor, 15 lymph node metastases, 3 lung, and 3 brain metastases. One further lesion was located in the adrenal gland, which was a second tumor. Overall sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for Cho-PET/CT were 96.6%, 76.5%, and 93.3%, resp., and for WB-MRI 78.4%, 94.1%, and 81.0%, resp. 3 vertebral metastases had initially been missed by Cho-PET/CT and were found retrospectively. MRI identified 2 bone metastases and 1 lymph node metastasis after being informed about the results of Cho-PET/CT. Conclusions: Cho-PET/CT and WB-MRI both presented high accuracy in the detection of bone and lymph node metastases. The strength of MRI is excellent image quality providing detailed anatomical information whereas the advantage of Cho-PET/CT is high image contrast of pathological foci. (orig.)

  15. Effect of long-term propranolol administration on specific binding of 3H-WB-4101 with rat mesenteric vascular membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ismailov, S.I.; Rozhanets, V.V.; Val'dman, A.V.

    1985-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was, first, to study the affinity of certain beta-adrenoblockers for specific binding sites of 3 H-WB-4101 (identifiable as alpha-adrenoreceptors) of brain membranes and, second, to study the characteristics of these same receptors in membranes of mesenteric vessels of rats during long-term administration of propranolol. Isotherms of specific binding, because of the limited quantity of vascular membranes, were determined by the use of three concentrations of 3 H-WB-4101: 0.1, 0.5, and 1.0 nM. It is shown that some beta-adrenoblockers have weak affinity for alpha-adrenoreceptors of brain synaptic membranes exhibited only when these compounds are present in relatively high concentrations. It is also shown that administration of propranolol for 15 days led to a significant decrease in affinity of the alpha-adrenorecptors for their specific antagonist WB-4101

  16. Enhancement of critical current density of in situ processed MgB sub 2 tapes by WB addition

    CERN Document Server

    Fujii, H; Kumakura, H

    2003-01-01

    The effect of tungsten boride (WB) addition on the microstructure and superconducting properties of Fe-sheathed MgB sub 2 tapes has been investigated. The microstructure was not influenced appreciably by the addition, whereas the superconducting properties changed. Even by a 5 mol% addition, the critical temperature (T sub c) decreased by about 0.5 K. However, the field dependence of the inductive critical current density (J sub c sub i) became smaller with the increase in the amount of addition, suggesting that pinning centres effective in a high-field region were possibly introduced. The transport critical current density (J sub c sub t) at 4.2 K increased about twice by the 5 mol% addition and reached 15 and 5 kA cm sup - sup 2 at 8 and 10 T, respectively.

  17. Microstructure, Wear Behavior and Corrosion Resistance of WC-FeCrAl and WC-WB-Co Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janette Brezinová

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper is focused on investigating the quality of two grades of thermally sprayed coatings deposited by high-velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF technology. One grade contains WC hard particles in an environmentally progressive Ni- and Co-free FeCrAl matrix, while the second coating contains WC and WB hard particles in a cobalt matrix. The aim of the experimental work was to determine the effect of thermal cyclic loading on the coatings’ resistance to adhesive, abrasive and erosive wear. Abrasive wear was evaluated using abrasive cloth of two grit sizes, and erosive wear was evaluated by a dry-pot wear test in a pin mill at two sample angles. Adhesion wear resistance of the coatings was determined by a sliding wear test under dry friction conditions and in a 1 mol water solution of NaCl. Corrosion resistance of the coatings was evaluated using potentiodynamic polarization tests. Metallographic cross-sections were used for measurement of the microhardness and thickness and for line energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX analysis. The tests proved the excellent resistance of both coatings against adhesive, abrasive, and erosive wear, as well as the ability of the WC-WB-Co coating to withstand alternating temperatures of up to 600 °C. The “green carbide” coating (WC-FeCrAl can be recommended as an environmentally friendly replacement for Ni- and Co-containing coatings, but its operating temperature is strictly limited to 500 °C in air.

  18. 68Ga-DOTA-TOC Uptake in Pleomorphic Adenoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurens, S Tom; Netea-Maier, Romana T; Aarntzen, Erik J H G

    2018-07-01

    A 56-year-old man who was recently diagnosed with a carcinoid tumor of the os petrosum was referred for a Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT scan. Besides the moderately increased Ga-DOTA-TOC accumulation in the carcinoid tumor, the scan showed strongly increased and focal Ga-DOTA-TOC uptake in an additional lesion in the right parotid gland. The markedly different Ga-DOTA-TOC avidity suggested a different etiology, and histological examination demonstrated a pleomorphic adenoma.

  19. Treatment Outcomes from 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT-Informed Salvage Radiation Treatment in Men with Rising PSA After Radical Prostatectomy: Prognostic Value of a Negative PSMA PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmett, Louise; van Leeuwen, Pim J; Nandurkar, Rohan; Scheltema, Matthijs J; Cusick, Thomas; Hruby, George; Kneebone, Andrew; Eade, Thomas; Fogarty, Gerald; Jagavkar, Raj; Nguyen, Quoc; Ho, Bao; Joshua, Anthony M; Stricker, Phillip

    2017-12-01

    68 Ga-PSMA (prostate-specific membrane antigen) PET/CT is increasingly used in men with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) failure after radical prostatectomy (RP) to triage those who will benefit from salvage radiation treatment (SRT). This study examines the value of PSMA-informed SRT in improving treatment outcomes in the context of biochemical failure after RP. Methods: We analyzed men with rising PSA after RP with PSA readings between 0.05 and 1.0 ng/mL, considered eligible for SRT at the time of PSMA. For each patient, clinical and pathologic features as well as scan results, including site of PSMA-positive disease, number of lesions, and a certainty score, were documented. Subsequent management, including SRT, and most recent PSA were recorded using medical records. Treatment response was defined as both PSA ≤ 0.1 ng/mL and >50% reduction in PSA. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed for association of clinical variables and treatment response to SRT. Results: One hundred sixty-four men were included. PSMA was positive in 62% ( n = 102/164): 38 of 102 in the prostatic fossa, 41 of 102 in pelvic nodes, and 23 of 102 distantly. Twenty-four patients received androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) and were excluded for outcomes analysis. In total, 99 of 146 received SRT with a median follow-up after radiation treatment of 10.5 mo (interquartile range, 6-14 mo). Overall treatment response after SRT was 72% ( n = 71/99). Forty-five percent ( n = 27/60) of patients with a negative PSMA underwent SRT whereas 55% (33/60) did not. In men with a negative PSMA who received SRT, 85% ( n = 23/27) demonstrated a treatment response, compared with a further PSA increase in 65% (22/34) in those not treated. In 36 of 99 patients with disease confined to the prostate fossa on PSMA, 81% ( n = 29/36) responded to SRT. In total, 26 of 99 men had nodal disease on PSMA, of whom 61% ( n = 16/26) had treatment response after SRT. On multivariate logistic regression

  20. Susceptibility of 169 USA300 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates to two copper-based biocides, CuAL42 and CuWB50.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, Vicki Ann; Hall, Tony J; King, Debbie S; Cannons, Andrew C

    2010-05-01

    To test the activity of two copper-based biocides, CuAL42 and CuWB50, and benzalkonium chloride against 169 isolates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) pulsotype USA300, a virulent, multiply resistant, widespread clone in the USA. Tests including MIC, MBC and time-kill studies were performed multiple times. The MIC range, MIC(50) and MIC(90) (0.59-18.75, 4.69 and 4.69 ppm, respectively) and the MBC range, MBC(50) and MBC(90) (1.17-18.75, 4.69 and 9.38 ppm, respectively) for CuAL42 were identical with those obtained with CuWB50, except that the MBC range for CuWB50 was wider (0.59-37.5 ppm). In time-kill studies, a 6 log(10) reduction of cfu was achieved within 1 h (150 ppm) and 0.5 h (300 ppm) for CuAL42, and 1.5 h (150 ppm) and 0.75 h (300 ppm) for CuWB50. Both copper-based biocides can effectively kill USA300 MRSA and may facilitate the eradication of the organism from healthcare settings.

  1. Influence of Palm Oil Fuel Ash and W/B Ratios on Compressive Strength, Water Permeability, and Chloride Resistance of Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wachilakorn Sanawung

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This research studies the effects of W/B ratios and palm oil fuel ash (POFA on compressive strength, water permeability, and chloride resistance of concrete. POFA was ground until the particles retained on sieve number 325 were less than 5% by weight. POFA was used to partially replace OPC at rates of 15, 25, and 35% by weight of binder. The water to binder (W/B ratios of concrete were 0.40 and 0.50. The compressive strength, water permeability, and chloride resistance of concrete were investigated up to 90 days. The results showed that POFA concrete with W/B ratio of 0.40 had the compressive strengths ranging from 45.8 to 55.9 MPa or 82–94% of OPC concrete at 90 days, while POFA concrete with W/B ratio of 0.50 had the compressive strengths of 33.9–41.9 MPa or 81–94% of OPC concrete. Furthermore, the compressive strength of concrete incorporation of ground POFA at 15% was the same as OPC concrete. The water permeability coefficient and the chloride ion penetration of POFA concrete were lower than OPC concrete when both types of concrete had the same compressive strengths. The findings also indicated that water permeability and chloride ion penetration of POFA concrete were significantly reduced compared to OPC concrete.

  2. A Population WB-PBPK Model of Colistin and its Prodrug CMS in Pigs: Focus on the Renal Distribution and Excretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viel, Alexis; Henri, Jérôme; Bouchène, Salim; Laroche, Julian; Rolland, Jean-Guy; Manceau, Jacqueline; Laurentie, Michel; Couet, William; Grégoire, Nicolas

    2018-03-12

    The objective was the development of a whole-body physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (WB-PBPK) model for colistin, and its prodrug colistimethate sodium (CMS), in pigs to explore their tissue distribution, especially in kidneys. Plasma and tissue concentrations of CMS and colistin were measured after systemic administrations of different dosing regimens of CMS in pigs. The WB-PBPK model was developed based on these data according to a non-linear mixed effect approach and using NONMEM software. A detailed sub-model was implemented for kidneys to handle the complex disposition of CMS and colistin within this organ. The WB-PBPK model well captured the kinetic profiles of CMS and colistin in plasma. In kidneys, an accumulation and slow elimination of colistin were observed and well described by the model. Kidneys seemed to have a major role in the elimination processes, through tubular secretion of CMS and intracellular degradation of colistin. Lastly, to illustrate the usefulness of the PBPK model, an estimation of the withdrawal periods after veterinary use of CMS in pigs was made. The WB-PBPK model gives an insight into the renal distribution and elimination of CMS and colistin in pigs; it may be further developed to explore the colistin induced-nephrotoxicity in humans.

  3. Draft Genome Sequence of Streptomyces sp. Strain Wb2n-11, a Desert Isolate with Broad-Spectrum Antagonism against Soilborne Phytopathogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Köberl, Martina; White, Richard A.; Erschen, Sabine; El-Arabi, Tarek F.; Jansson, Janet K.; Berg, Gabriele

    2015-08-06

    Streptomyces sp. strain Wb2n-11, isolated from native desert soil, exhibited broad-spectrum antagonism against plant pathogenic fungi, bacteria and nematodes. The 8.2 Mb draft genome reveals genes putatively responsible for its promising biocontrol activity and genes which enable the soil bacterium to directly interact beneficially with plants.

  4. Search for single production of vector-like quarks decaying into $Wb$ in $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s} =$ 13 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    A search for singly-produced vector-like quarks $Q$, where $Q$ can be either a $T$ quark with charge $2/3$ or a $Y$ quark with charge $4/3$, is performed in 3.2 $fb^{-1}$ of proton--proton collision data at a centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV recorded with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. The analysis targets $Q \\to Wb$ decays where the $W$ boson decays leptonically. No significant excess over Standard Model backgrounds is observed and upper limits on the $Q \\to Wb$ cross-section times branching ratio are set as a function of the vector-like quark mass. For a $QWb$ coupling strength of $\\sqrt{(c_{\\mathrm{L}}^{Wb})^2 + (c_{\\mathrm{R}}^{Wb})^2 }=1/\\sqrt{2}$, the observed (expected) 95 % confidence level lower limit on the $Y$-quark mass is 1.44 TeV (1.45 TeV). The results are also interpreted as limits on the $QWb$ coupling strength and the mixing with the Standard Model sector for a singlet $T$ quark or a $Y$ quark from a $(B,Y)$ doublet. The smallest excluded coupling-strength values are obtained for vector-like ...

  5. Muchinako, GA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Muchinako, GA. Vol 28, No 2 (2013) - Articles Children living and/or working on the streets in Harare: Issues and challenges. Abstract. ISSN: 1012-1080. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL · AJOL's Partners · Terms and Conditions of ...

  6. The significance of IL-1β +3953C>T, IL-6 -174G>C and -596G>A, TNF-α -308G>A gene polymorphisms and 86 bp variable number tandem repeat polymorphism of IL-1RN in bronchopulmonary dysplasia in infants born before 32 weeks of gestation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawid Szpecht

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD is a chronic lung disease that affects primarily preterm infants. Genetic factors are also taken into consideration in the pathogenesis of BPD. Genetic predispositions to higher production of inflammation mediators seem to be crucial. Material and methods: The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible relationship between polymorphisms: interleukin-1β +3953 C>T, interleukin-6 -174 G>C and -596 G>A, tumour necrosis factor -308 G>A and interleukin-1RN VNTR 86bp and the occurrence of BPD in a population of 100 preterm infants born from singleton pregnancy, before 32+0 weeks of gestation, exposed to antenatal steroids therapy, and without congenital abnormalities.  Results : In the study population BPD was diagnosed in 36 (36% newborns. Among the studied polymorphisms we found the higher prevalence for BPD developing of the following genotypes: 1/2 (OR 1.842 [0.673-5.025] and 2/2 IL-1RN (OR 1.75 [0.418-6.908] 86bpVNTR; GC (2.222 [0.658-8.706] and CC IL-6 -174G>C (1.6 [0.315-8.314] and GA (2.753 [0.828-10.64] and AA (1.5 [0.275-8.067] IL-6 -596G>A, GA 1.509 (0.515-4.301 TNF-α -308G>A. However, these finding were not statistically significant.  Conclusions : Genetic factors are undeniably involved in the pathogenesis of BPD. In the times of individualised therapy finding genes responsible for BPD might allow the development of new treatment strategies. A new way of specific therapy could ensure the reduction of complications connected with BPD and treatment costs.

  7. Meningiomas: A Comparative Study of 68Ga-DOTATOC, 68Ga-DOTANOC and 68Ga-DOTATATE for Molecular Imaging in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-Montenegro, María Luisa; Peña-Zalbidea, Santiago; Mateos-Pérez, Jose María; Oteo, Marta; Romero, Eduardo; Morcillo, Miguel Ángel; Desco, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The goal of this study was to compare the tumor uptake kinetics and diagnostic value of three 68Ga-DOTA-labeled somatostatin analogues (68Ga-DOTATOC, 68Ga-DOTANOC, and 68Ga-DOTATATE) using PET/CT in a murine model with subcutaneous meningioma xenografts. Methods The experiment was performed with 16 male NUDE NU/NU mice bearing xenografts of a human meningioma cell line (CH-157MN). 68Ga-DOTATOC, 68Ga-DOTANOC, and 68Ga-DOTATATE were produced in a FASTLab automated platform. Imaging was performed on an Argus small-animal PET/CT scanner. The SUVmax of the liver and muscle, and the tumor-to-liver (T/L) and tumor-to-muscle (T/M) SUV ratios were computed. Kinetic analysis was performed using Logan graphical analysis for a two-tissue reversible compartmental model, and the volume of distribution (Vt) was determined. Results Hepatic SUVmax and Vt were significantly higher with 68Ga-DOTANOC than with 68Ga-DOTATOC and 68Ga-DOTATATE. No significant differences between tracers were found for SUVmax in tumor or muscle. No differences were found in the T/L SUV ratio between 68Ga-DOTATATE and 68Ga-DOTATOC, both of which had a higher fraction than 68Ga-DOTANOC. The T/M SUV ratio was significantly higher with 68Ga-DOTATATE than with 68Ga-DOTATOC and 68Ga-DOTANOC. The Vt for tumor was higher with 68Ga-DOTATATE than with 68Ga-DOTANOC and relatively similar to that of 68Ga-DOTATOC. Conclusions This study demonstrates, for the first time, the ability of the three radiolabeled somatostatin analogues tested to image a human meningioma cell line. Although Vt was relatively similar with 68Ga-DOTATATE and 68Ga-DOTATOC, uptake was higher with 68Ga-DOTATATE in the tumor than with 68Ga-DOTANOC and 68Ga-DOTATOC, suggesting a higher diagnostic value of 68Ga-DOTATATE for detecting meningiomas. PMID:25369268

  8. Meningiomas: a comparative study of 68Ga-DOTATOC, 68Ga-DOTANOC and 68Ga-DOTATATE for molecular imaging in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Luisa Soto-Montenegro

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to compare the tumor uptake kinetics and diagnostic value of three (68Ga-DOTA-labeled somatostatin analogues ((68Ga-DOTATOC, (68Ga-DOTANOC, and (68Ga-DOTATATE using PET/CT in a murine model with subcutaneous meningioma xenografts.The experiment was performed with 16 male NUDE NU/NU mice bearing xenografts of a human meningioma cell line (CH-157MN. (68Ga-DOTATOC, (68Ga-DOTANOC, and (68Ga-DOTATATE were produced in a FASTLab automated platform. Imaging was performed on an Argus small-animal PET/CT scanner. The SUVmax of the liver and muscle, and the tumor-to-liver (T/L and tumor-to-muscle (T/M SUV ratios were computed. Kinetic analysis was performed using Logan graphical analysis for a two-tissue reversible compartmental model, and the volume of distribution (Vt was determined.Hepatic SUVmax and Vt were significantly higher with (68Ga-DOTANOC than with (68Ga-DOTATOC and (68Ga-DOTATATE. No significant differences between tracers were found for SUVmax in tumor or muscle. No differences were found in the T/L SUV ratio between (68Ga-DOTATATE and (68Ga-DOTATOC, both of which had a higher fraction than (68Ga-DOTANOC. The T/M SUV ratio was significantly higher with (68Ga-DOTATATE than with (68Ga-DOTATOC and (68Ga-DOTANOC. The Vt for tumor was higher with (68Ga-DOTATATE than with (68Ga-DOTANOC and relatively similar to that of (68Ga-DOTATOC.This study demonstrates, for the first time, the ability of the three radiolabeled somatostatin analogues tested to image a human meningioma cell line. Although Vt was relatively similar with (68Ga-DOTATATE and (68Ga-DOTATOC, uptake was higher with (68Ga-DOTATATE in the tumor than with (68Ga-DOTANOC and (68Ga-DOTATOC, suggesting a higher diagnostic value of (68Ga-DOTATATE for detecting meningiomas.

  9. Study on the usefulness of whole body SPECT coronal image, MIP image in 67Ga scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Seiji

    2002-01-01

    In this study, we examined the usefulness of whole body coronal images and whole body cine display MIP images (CMIP) upon which image processing was carried out after whole body SPECT in comparison to the usefulness of whole body images (WB/SC) compensated by scattered radiation in tumor/inflammation scintigraphy with 67 Ga-citrate ( 67 Ga). Image interpretation was performed for the 120 patients with confirmed diagnoses, and the accuracy of their diagnoses was studied by three nuclear medical physicians and two clinical radiological technologists by means of sensitivity, specificity and ROC analysis. The resultant data show that sensitivity, specificity, accuracy and the area under the ROC curve Az in the WB/SC were approximately 65%, 86%, 74% and 0.724, respectively, whereas sensitivity, specificity, accuracy and Az of the image reading system in which CMIP is combined with whole body coronal images reconstructed by the OS-EM method were approximately 93%, 95%, 94% and 0.860, respectively. Furthermore, coronal images reconstructed by the OS-EM method tended to be superior to those produced by the FBP method in both diagnostic accuracy and ROC analysis. In conclusion, the image reading system in which CMIP is combined with whole body coronal images reconstructed by the OS-EM method was shown to be superior in diagnostic accuracy and ROC analysis. Our data suggest that whole body SPECT is an excellent technique as an alternative to WB/SC. (author)

  10. Study of 67Ga scan in sarcoidosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Lijun; Qu Wanyin; Liu Xiuqin

    1997-01-01

    Gallium scan and serum angiotensin-converting enzyme assay (SACE) were compared in patients with sarcoidosis. The examination of 67 Ga scan, SACE determination, pulmonary function test, chest CT and chest X-ray in 24 cases with sarcoidosis were studied. The results revealed that 4 of 24 cases had obviously high uptake of 67 Ga exceeding hepatic activity (3+) in clinical active stage, 3 patients had resembling the Greek letter lambda, symmetrically located in bilateral hilar lymph nodes, and among them two had an uptake of 67 Ga in the bilateral lacrimal and parotid gland simulating 'Panda Face'. 8 of 20 cases with inactive sarcoidosis had an abnormal 67 Ga scan (1+). In those patients with normal SACE level but increased uptake of 67 Ga, active stage of disease was demonstrated and steroid therapy was indicated. Gallium scan is a valuable method for the staging of its activity and evaluation of the therapeutic effect in the follow-up patients with sarcoidosis

  11. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons modulate cell proliferation in rat hepatic epithelial stem-like WB-F344 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chramostova, Katerina; Vondracek, Jan; Sindlerova, Lenka; Vojtesek, Borivoj; Kozubik, Alois; Machala, Miroslav

    2004-01-01

    Although many polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are recognized as potent mutagens and carcinogens, relatively little is known about their role in the tumor promotion. It is known that 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) can induce release of rat hepatic oval epithelial cells from contact inhibition by a mechanism possibly involving the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) activation. Many PAHs are AhR ligands and are known to act as transient inducers of AhR-mediated activity. In this study, effects of 19 selected PAHs on proliferation of confluent rat liver epithelial WB-F344 cells were investigated. Non-mutagens that are weak activators or nonactivators of AhR-mediated activity had no effect on cell proliferation. Relatively strong or moderate AhR ligands with low mutagenic potencies, such as benzofluoranthenes, benz[a]anthracene, and chrysene, were found to increase cell numbers, which corresponded to an increased percentage of cells entering S-phase. Strong mutagens, including benzo[a]pyrene and dibenzo[a,l]pyrene, increased a percentage of cells in S-phase without inducing a concomitant increase in cell numbers. The treatment with mutagenic PAHs was associated with an increased DNA synthesis and induction of cell death, which corresponded with the activation of p53 tumor suppressor. Apoptosis was blocked by pifithrin-α, the chemical inhibitor of p53. Both weakly and strongly mutagenic PAHs known as AhR ligands were found to induce significant increase of cytochrome P4501A activity, suggesting a presence of functional AhR. The results of the present study seem to suggest that a release from contact inhibition could be a part of tumor promoting effects of AhR-activating PAHs; however, the genotoxic effects of some PAHs associated with p53 activation might interfere with this process

  12. Inhibition of gap junctional Intercellular communication in WB-F344 rat liver epithelial cells by triphenyltin chloride through MAPK and PI3-kinase pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsai Ming-Che

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Organotin compounds (OTCs have been widely used as stabilizers in the production of plastic, agricultural pesticides, antifoulant plaints and wood preservation. The toxicity of triphenyltin (TPT compounds was known for their embryotoxic, neurotoxic, genotoxic and immunotoxic effects in mammals. The carcinogenicity of TPT was not well understood and few studies had discussed the effects of OTCs on gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC of cells. Method In the present study, the effects of triphenyltin chloride (TPTC on GJIC in WB-F344 rat liver epithelial cells were evaluated, using the scrape-loading dye transfer technique. Results TPTC inhibited GJIC after a 30-min exposure in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Pre-incubation of cells with the protein kinase C (PKC inhibitor did not modify the response, but the specific MEK 1 inhibitor PD98059 and PI3K inhibitor LY294002 decreased substantially the inhibition of GJIC by TPTC. After WB-F344 cells were exposed to TPTC, phosphorylation of Cx43 increased as seen in Western blot analysis. Conclusions These results show that TPTC inhibits GJIC in WB-F344 rat liver epithelial cells by altering the Cx43 protein expression through both MAPK and PI3-kinase pathways.

  13. Search for single production of vector-like quarks decaying into Wb in pp collisions at √(s) = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aad, G. [CPPM, Aix-Marseille Univ. et CNRS/IN2P3, Marseille (France); Abbott, B. [Oklahoma Univ., Norman, OK (United States). Homer L. Dodge Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Abdallah, J. [Academia Sinica, Taipei (China). Inst. of Physics; Collaboration: ATLAS Collaboration; and others

    2016-08-15

    A search for singly produced vector-like Q quarks, where Q can be either a T quark with charge +2/3 or a Y quark with charge -4/3, is performed in proton-proton collisions recorded with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. The dataset corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb{sup -1} and was produced with a centre-of-mass energy of √(s) = 8 TeV. This analysis targets Q → Wb decays where the W boson decays leptonically. A veto on massive largeradius jets is used to reject the dominant t anti t background. The reconstructed Q-candidate mass, ranging from 0.4 to 1.2 TeV, is used in the search to discriminate signal from background processes. No significant deviation from the Standard Model expectation is observed, and limits are set on the Q → Wb cross-section times branching ratio. The results are also interpreted as limits on the QWb coupling and the mixing with the Standard Model sector for a singlet T quark or a Y quark from a doublet. T quarks with masses below 0.95 TeV are excluded at 95 % confidence level, assuming a unit coupling and a BR(T → Wb) = 0.5, whereas the expected limit is 1.10 TeV. (orig.)

  14. A prospective randomised multi-centre study of the impact of Ga-68 PSMA-PET/CT imaging for staging high risk prostate cancer prior to curative-intent surgery or radiotherapy (proPSMA study): clinical trial protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofman, Michael S; Murphy, Declan G; Williams, Scott G; Nzenza, Tatenda; Herschtal, Alan; De Abreu Lourenco, Richard; Bailey, Dale L; Budd, Ray; Hicks, Rodney J; Francis, Roslyn J; Lawrentschuk, Nathan

    2018-05-03

    Accurate staging of patients with prostate cancer is important for therapeutic decision making. Relapse following surgery or radiotherapy of curative intent is not uncommon and, in part, represents a failure of staging with current diagnostic imaging techniques to detect disease spread. Prostate-specific-membrane-antigen (PSMA) positron emission tomography / computed tomography (PET/CT) is a new whole body scanning technique that enables visualisation of prostate cancer with high contrast. The hypotheses of this study are that (a) PSMA-PET/CT has improved diagnostic performance compared to conventional imaging, (b) PSMA-PET/CT should be used as a first-line diagnostic test for staging, (c) the improved diagnostic performance of PSMA-PET/CT will result in significant management impact and (d) there are economic benefits if PSMA-PET/CT is incorporated into the management algorithm. This is a prospective, multi-centre study in which patients with untreated high-risk prostate cancer will be randomised to Gallium-68-PSMA11-PET/CT or conventional imaging, consisting of computer tomography of the abdomen/pelvis and bone scintigraphy with SPECT/CT. Inclusion criteria are newly diagnosed prostate cancer patients with select high-risk prostate cancer defined as International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) grade group ≥ 3 (primary Gleason grade 4, or any Gleason grade 5), PSA ≥ 20ng/mL or clinical stage ≥ T3. Patients with negative, equivocal or oligometastatic disease on first line-imaging will cross-over to receive the other imaging arm. The primary objective is to compare the accuracy of PSMA-PET/CT to conventional imaging for detecting nodal or distant metastatic disease. Histopathologic, imaging and clinical follow-up at six months will define the primary endpoint according to a pre-defined scoring system. Secondary objectives include comparing management impact, the number of equivocal studies, the incremental value of second-line imaging in patients who

  15. TU-CD-207-11: Patient-Driven Automatic Exposure Control for Dedicated Breast CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez, A; Gazi, P; Seibert, J; Boone, J

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To implement automatic exposure control (AEC) in dedicated breast CT (bCT) on a patient-specific basis using only the pre-scan scout views. Methods: Using a large cohort (N=153) of bCT data sets, the breast effective diameter (D) and width in orthogonal planes (Wa,Wb) were calculated from the reconstructed bCT image and pre-scan scout views, respectively. D, Wa, and Wb were measured at the breast center-of-mass (COM), making use of the known geometry of our bCT system. These data were then fit to a second-order polynomial “D=F(Wa,Wb)” in a least squares sense in order to provide a functional form for determining the breast diameter. The coefficient of determination (R 2 ) and mean percent error between the measured breast diameter and fit breast diameter were used to evaluate the overall robustness of the polynomial fit. Lastly, previously-reported bCT technique factors derived from Monte Carlo simulations were used to determine the tube current required for each breast diameter in order to match two-view mammographic dose levels. Results: F(Wa,Wb) provided fitted breast diameters in agreement with the measured breast diameters resulting in R 2 values ranging from 0.908 to 0.929 and mean percent errors ranging from 3.2% to 3.7%. For all 153 bCT data sets used in this study, the fitted breast diameters ranged from 7.9 cm to 15.7 cm corresponding to tube current values ranging from 0.6 mA to 4.9 mA in order to deliver the same dose as two-view mammography in a 50% glandular breast with a 80 kV x-ray beam and 16.6 second scan time. Conclusion: The present work provides a robust framework for AEC in dedicated bCT using only the width measurements derived from the two orthogonal pre-scan scout views. Future work will investigate how these automatically chosen exposure levels affect the quality of the reconstructed image

  16. TU-CD-207-11: Patient-Driven Automatic Exposure Control for Dedicated Breast CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez, A; Gazi, P [Biomedical Engineering Graduate Group, University of California Davis, Davis, CA (United States); Department of Radiology, UC Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Seibert, J; Boone, J [Department of Radiology, UC Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California Davis, Davis, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To implement automatic exposure control (AEC) in dedicated breast CT (bCT) on a patient-specific basis using only the pre-scan scout views. Methods: Using a large cohort (N=153) of bCT data sets, the breast effective diameter (D) and width in orthogonal planes (Wa,Wb) were calculated from the reconstructed bCT image and pre-scan scout views, respectively. D, Wa, and Wb were measured at the breast center-of-mass (COM), making use of the known geometry of our bCT system. These data were then fit to a second-order polynomial “D=F(Wa,Wb)” in a least squares sense in order to provide a functional form for determining the breast diameter. The coefficient of determination (R{sup 2}) and mean percent error between the measured breast diameter and fit breast diameter were used to evaluate the overall robustness of the polynomial fit. Lastly, previously-reported bCT technique factors derived from Monte Carlo simulations were used to determine the tube current required for each breast diameter in order to match two-view mammographic dose levels. Results: F(Wa,Wb) provided fitted breast diameters in agreement with the measured breast diameters resulting in R{sup 2} values ranging from 0.908 to 0.929 and mean percent errors ranging from 3.2% to 3.7%. For all 153 bCT data sets used in this study, the fitted breast diameters ranged from 7.9 cm to 15.7 cm corresponding to tube current values ranging from 0.6 mA to 4.9 mA in order to deliver the same dose as two-view mammography in a 50% glandular breast with a 80 kV x-ray beam and 16.6 second scan time. Conclusion: The present work provides a robust framework for AEC in dedicated bCT using only the width measurements derived from the two orthogonal pre-scan scout views. Future work will investigate how these automatically chosen exposure levels affect the quality of the reconstructed image.

  17. CT pelvimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vicens, J.L.; Charles, G.; Le Berre, J.; Flageat, J.

    1989-01-01

    Pelvimetry aims at providing the obstetrician with information on the size and morphology of the female pelvis, thus enabling him to assess the obstetrical prognosis as accurately as possible. Computed tomography (CT) has several advantages, in particular the lower mother and fetus radiation dose. After a brief description of obstetrical anatomy, the usual CT exploration method is presented and its results are considered in terms of measurements, indices and morphological findings. If performed with a very strict exploration procedure, CT pelvimetry is a very reliable, fact and comfortable method of examination. All these advantages, combined with the minimized patient dose, should lead to an increasingly widespread use of this technique [fr

  18. Planetary Science from NASA's WB-57 Canberra High Altitude Research Aircraft During the Great American Eclipse of 2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, C.; Caspi, A.; DeForest, C. E.; Durda, D. D.; Steffl, A.; Lewis, J.; Wiseman, J.; Collier, J.; Mallini, C.; Propp, T.; Warner, J.

    2017-12-01

    The Great American Eclipse of 2017 provided an excellent opportunity for heliophysics research on the solar corona and dynamics that encompassed a large number of research groups and projects, including projects flown in the air and in space. Two NASA WB-57F Canberra high altitude research aircraft were launched from NASA's Johnson Space Center, Ellington Field into the eclipse path. At an altitude of 50,000ft, and outfitted with visible and near-infrared cameras, these aircraft provided increased duration of observations during eclipse totality, and much sharper images than possible on the ground. Although the primary mission goal was to study heliophysics, planetary science was also conducted to observe the planet Mercury and to search for Vulcanoids. Mercury is extremely challenging to study from Earth. The 2017 eclipse provided a rare opportunity to observe Mercury under ideal astronomical conditions. Only a handful of near-IR thermal images of Mercury exist, but IR images provide critical surface property (composition, albedo, porosity) information, essential to interpreting lower resolution IR spectra. Critically, no thermal image of Mercury currently exists. By observing the nightside surface during the 2017 Great American Eclipse, we aimed to measure the diurnal temperature as a function of local time (longitude) and attempted to deduce the surface thermal inertia integrated down to a few-cm depth below the surface. Vulcanoids are a hypothesized family of asteroids left over from the formation of the solar system, in the dynamically stable orbits between the Sun and Mercury at 15-45 Rs (4-12° solar elongation). Close proximity to the Sun, plus their small theoretical sizes, make Vulcanoid searches rare and difficult. The 2017 eclipse was a rare opportunity to search for Vulcanoids. If discovered these unique, highly refractory and primordial bodies would have a significant impact on our understanding of solar system formation. Only a handful of deep

  19. Chasing the Great American 2017 Total Solar Eclipse: Coronal Results from NASA's WB-57F High-Altitude Research Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caspi, A.; Tsang, C.; DeForest, C. E.; Seaton, D. B.; Bryans, P.; Burkepile, J.; Casey, T. A.; Collier, J.; Darrow, D.; DeLuca, E.; Durda, D. D.; Gallagher, P.; Golub, L.; Judge, P. G.; Laurent, G. T.; Lewis, J.; Mallini, C.; Parent, T.; Propp, T.; Steffl, A.; Tomczyk, S.; Warner, J.; West, M. J.; Wiseman, J.; Zhukov, A.

    2017-12-01

    Total solar eclipses present rare opportunities to study the complex solar corona, down to altitudes of just a few percent of a solar radius above the surface, using ground-based and airborne observatories that would otherwise be dominated by the intense solar disk and high sky brightness. Studying the corona is critical to gaining a better understanding of physical processes that occur on other stars and astrophysical objects, as well as understanding the dominant driver of space weather that affects human assets at Earth and elsewhere. For example, it is still poorly understood how the corona is heated to temperatures of 1-2 MK globally and up to 5-10 MK above active regions, while the underlying chromosphere is 100 times cooler; numerous theories abound, but are difficult to constrain due to the limited sensitivities and cadences of prior measurements. The origins and stability of coronal fans, and the extent of their reach to the middle and outer corona, are also not well known, limited in large part by sensitivities and fields of view of existing observations. Airborne observations during the eclipse provide unique advantages; by flying in the stratosphere at altitudes of 50 kft or higher, they avoid all weather, the seeing quality is enormously improved, and additional wavelengths such as near- IR also become available due to significantly reduced water absorption. For an eclipse, an airborne observatory can also follow the shadow, increasing the total observing time by 50% or more. We present results of solar coronal measurements from airborne observations of the 2017 Great American Total Solar Eclipse using two of NASA's WB-57 high-altitude research aircraft, each equipped with two 8.7" telescopes feeding high-sensitivity visible (green-line) and medium-wave IR (3-5 μm) cameras operating at high cadence (30 Hz) with 3 arcsec/pixel platescale and ±3 R_sun fields of view. The aircraft flew along the eclipse path, separated by 110 km, to observe a summed 7

  20. Enhanced extracellular production of L-asparaginase from Bacillus subtilis 168 by B. subtilis WB600 through a combined strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yue; Liu, Song; Jiao, Yun; Gao, Hui; Wang, Miao; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2017-02-01

    L-asparaginase (EC 3.5.1.1, ASN) exhibits great commercial value due to its uses in the food and medicine industry. In this study, we reported the enhanced expression of type II ASN from Bacillus subtilis 168 in B. subtilis WB600 through a combined strategy. First, eight signal peptides (the signal peptide of the ASN, ywbN, yvgO, amyE, oppA, vpr, lipA, and wapA) were used for ASN secretion in B. subtilis by using Hpa II promoter, respectively. The signal peptide wapA achieved the highest extracellular ASN activity (28.91 U/mL). Second, Hpa II promoter was replaced by a strong promoter, P43 promoter, resulting in 38.1 % enhanced ASN activity. By two rounds of error-prone PCR mutation, the P43 promoter variants with remarkably enhanced strength (D7, E2, H6, B2, and F3) were identified. B2 (-28: A → G, -13: A → G) achieved ASN activity up to 51.13 U/mL. Third, after deletion of the N-terminal 25-residues, ASN activity reached 102.41 U/mL, which was 100 % higher than that of the intact ASN. At last, the extracellular ASN of the B. subtilis arrived at 407.6 U/mL (2.5 g/L of ASN protein) in a 3-L bioreactor by using a fed-batch strategy. The purified ASN showed maximal activity at 65 °C and its half-life at 65 °C was 61 min. The K m and k cat of the ASN were 5.29 mM and 54.4 s -1 , respectively. To the best of our knowledge, we obtained the highest yield of ASN in a food-grade host ever reported, which may benefit the industrial production and application of ASN.

  1. CT Scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease, lung nodules and liver masses Monitor the effectiveness of certain treatments, such as cancer treatment Detect ... scan done in a hospital or an outpatient facility. CT scans are painless and, with newer machines, ...

  2. Thoracic CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... through a vein (IV) in your hand or forearm. It may be given through the rectum using ... CT scan Vertebra, thoracic (mid back) Normal lung anatomy Thoracic organs References Gotway MB, Panse PM, Gruden ...

  3. CT Enterography

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a CT scan can be reformatted in multiple planes, and can even generate three-dimensional images. These ... other medical conditions, and if you have a history of heart disease, asthma, diabetes, kidney disease or ...

  4. Whole-body MRI versus 18F-FDG PET/CT for pretherapeutic assessment and staging of lymphoma: a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang D

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Danyang Wang,1 Yanlei Huo,1 Suyun Chen,1 Hui Wang,1 Yingli Ding,2 Xiaochun Zhu,3 Chao Ma1,4 1Department of Nuclear Medicine, Affiliated XinHua Hospital of Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China; 2Department of Nuclear Medicine, Affiliated Third People’s Hospital of Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China; 3Department of Nuclear Medicine, Affiliated Ninth People’s Hospital of Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China; 4Department of Nuclear Medicine, Tenth People’s Hospital of Tongji University, Shanghai, China Purpose: 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT is the reference standard in staging of 18F-FDG-avid lymphomas; however, there is no recommended functional imaging modality for indolent lymphomas. Therefore, we aimed to compare the performance of whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (WB-MRI with that of 18F-FDG PET/CT for lesion detection and initial staging in patients with aggressive or indolent lymphoma. Materials and methods: We searched the MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CENTRAL databases for studies that compared WB-MRI with 18F-FDG PET/CT for lymphoma staging or lesion detection. The methodological quality of the studies was assessed using version 2 of the “Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies” tool. The pooled staging accuracy (µ of WB-MRI and 18F-FDG PET/CT for initial staging and for assessing possible heterogeneity (χ2 across studies were calculated using commercially available software. Results: Eight studies comprising 338 patients were included. In terms of staging, the meta-analytic staging accuracies of WB-MRI and 18F-FDG PET/CT for Hodgkin lymphoma and aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL were 98% (95% CI, 94%–100% and 98% (95% CI, 94%–100%, respectively. The pooled staging accuracy of 18F-FDG PET/CT dropped to 87% (95% CI, 72%–97% for staging in patients with indolent lymphoma

  5. Study on the usefulness of whole body SPECT coronal image, MIP image in {sup 67}Ga scintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawamura, Seiji [Kurume Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Hospital; Ishibashi, Masatoshi; Kurata, Seiji; Morita, Seiichirou; Hayabuchi, Naofumi [Kurume Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). School of Medicine; Fukushima, Shigehiro [Kyushu Inst. of Design, Fukuoka (Japan). Graduate School of Auditory and Visual Communication Sciences; Umezaki, Noriyoshi [Daiichi Coll. of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2002-05-01

    In this study, we examined the usefulness of whole body coronal images and whole body cine display MIP images (CMIP) upon which image processing was carried out after whole body SPECT in comparison to the usefulness of whole body images (WB/SC) compensated by scattered radiation in tumor/inflammation scintigraphy with {sup 67}Ga-citrate ({sup 67}Ga). Image interpretation was performed for the 120 patients with confirmed diagnoses, and the accuracy of their diagnoses was studied by three nuclear medical physicians and two clinical radiological technologists by means of sensitivity, specificity and ROC analysis. The resultant data show that sensitivity, specificity, accuracy and the area under the ROC curve Az in the WB/SC were approximately 65%, 86%, 74% and 0.724, respectively, whereas sensitivity, specificity, accuracy and Az of the image reading system in which CMIP is combined with whole body coronal images reconstructed by the OS-EM method were approximately 93%, 95%, 94% and 0.860, respectively. Furthermore, coronal images reconstructed by the OS-EM method tended to be superior to those produced by the FBP method in both diagnostic accuracy and ROC analysis. In conclusion, the image reading system in which CMIP is combined with whole body coronal images reconstructed by the OS-EM method was shown to be superior in diagnostic accuracy and ROC analysis. Our data suggest that whole body SPECT is an excellent technique as an alternative to WB/SC. (author)

  6. Differential diagnosis of the pelvic masses by computed tomography and 67Ga-scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Kiyoshi; Kamiya, Hirofumi; Nagai, Soichiro

    1986-01-01

    To differentiate between malignant and benign tumors, computed tomography (CT) and 67 Ga-scintigraphy were carried out on 40 patients having pelvic masses. The uptake of 67 Ga-citrate was divided into three groups: negative, suspicious and positive. Contrast enhancement (CE) was employed with CT. The increases in CT numbers after contrast enhancement were divided into three groups: no enhancement (0 to 20 HU), low enhancement (21 to 40 HU) and high enhancement (over 41 HU). The results were as follows: 1) 67 Ga negative group: out of 18 patients, there was only one patient with ovarian carcinoma. The lesion was too small to detect by CT. All the remaining 17 patients had benign tumors. The increased CT numbers in benign ovarian tumors were all within the range of no enhancement. On the other hand, the increases in CT number in myoma uteri were in the range of high enhancement. 2) 67 Ga suspicious group: in 3 of 10 patients, ovarian carcinomas were detected. Because the carcinoma tissues had low enhanced CT numbers after CE, they were easily differentiated from the benign tumors. 3) 67 Ga positive group: out of 12 patients, there were 3 patients with inflammatory disease. The increases in CT numbers in the inflammatory tissue were in the range of high enhancement, so they could be clearly differentiated from malignant tissues which ranged in low enhanced CT numbers. There were no benign tumors in this group. (author)

  7. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Sinuses Computed tomography (CT) of the sinuses ... CT of the Sinuses? What is CT (Computed Tomography) of the Sinuses? Computed tomography, more commonly known ...

  8. Search for single production of vector-like quarks decaying into $Wb$ in $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s} =$ 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, Georges; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdinov, Ovsat; Abeloos, Baptiste; Aben, Rosemarie; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abreu, Ricardo; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adye, Tim; Affolder, Tony; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Agricola, Johannes; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Akerstedt, Henrik; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimov, Andrei; Alberghi, Gian Luigi; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alio, Lion; Alison, John; Alkire, Steven Patrick; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allen, Benjamin William; Allport, Phillip; Aloisio, Alberto; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Άlvarez Piqueras, Damián; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amadio, Brian Thomas; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Amidei, Dante; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amoroso, Simone; Amram, Nir; Amundsen, Glenn; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anders, John Kenneth; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Angelozzi, Ivan; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Arabidze, Giorgi; Arai, Yasuo; Araque, Juan Pedro; Arce, Ayana; Arduh, Francisco Anuar; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnold, Hannah; Arratia, Miguel; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Artz, Sebastian; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ashkenazi, Adi; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Augsten, Kamil; Avolio, Giuseppe; Axen, Bradley; Ayoub, Mohamad Kassem; Azuelos, Georges; Baak, Max; Baas, Alessandra; Baca, Matthew John; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Bagiacchi, Paolo; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bai, Yu; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baldin, Evgenii; Balek, Petr; Balestri, Thomas; Balli, Fabrice; Balunas, William Keaton; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Swagato; Bannoura, Arwa A E; Barak, Liron; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnes, Sarah Louise; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Barnovska, Zuzana; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barranco Navarro, Laura; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartos, Pavol; Basalaev, Artem; Bassalat, Ahmed; Basye, Austin; Bates, Richard; Batista, Santiago Juan; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Marco; Bauce, Matteo; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beacham, James Baker; Beattie, Michael David; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans~Peter; Becker, Kathrin; Becker, Maurice; Beckingham, Matthew; Becot, Cyril; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bedognetti, Matteo; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Beermann, Thomas; Begel, Michael; Behr, Janna Katharina; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bender, Michael; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Bensinger, James; Bentvelsen, Stan; Beresford, Lydia; Beretta, Matteo; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Beringer, Jürg; Bernard, Clare; Bernard, Nathan Rogers; Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Berta, Peter; Bertella, Claudia; Bertoli, Gabriele; Bertolucci, Federico; Bertsche, Carolyn; Bertsche, David; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Bessidskaia Bylund, Olga; Bessner, Martin Florian; Besson, Nathalie; Betancourt, Christopher; Bethke, Siegfried; Bevan, Adrian John; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianchini, Louis; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Biedermann, Dustin; Biesuz, Nicolo Vladi; Biglietti, Michela; Bilbao De Mendizabal, Javier; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Biondi, Silvia; Bjergaard, David Martin; Black, Curtis; Black, James; Black, Kevin; Blackburn, Daniel; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste; Blanco, Jacobo Ezequiel; Blazek, Tomas; Bloch, Ingo; Blocker, Craig; Blum, Walter; Blumenschein, Ulrike; Blunier, Sylvain; Bobbink, Gerjan; Bobrovnikov, Victor; Bocchetta, Simona Serena; Bocci, Andrea; Bock, Christopher; Boehler, Michael; Boerner, Daniela; Bogaerts, Joannes Andreas; Bogavac, Danijela; Bogdanchikov, Alexander; Bohm, Christian; Boisvert, Veronique; Bold, Tomasz; Boldea, Venera; Boldyrev, Alexey; Bomben, Marco; Bona, Marcella; Boonekamp, Maarten; Borisov, Anatoly; Borissov, Guennadi; Bortfeldt, Jonathan; Bortolotto, Valerio; Bos, Kors; Boscherini, Davide; Bosman, Martine; Boudreau, Joseph; Bouffard, Julian; Bouhova-Thacker, Evelina Vassileva; Boumediene, Djamel Eddine; Bourdarios, Claire; Bousson, Nicolas; Boutle, Sarah Kate; Boveia, Antonio; Boyd, James; Boyko, Igor; Bracinik, Juraj; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Gerhard; Brandt, Oleg; Bratzler, Uwe; Brau, Benjamin; Brau, James; Braun, Helmut; Breaden Madden, William Dmitri; Brendlinger, Kurt; Brennan, Amelia Jean; Brenner, Lydia; Brenner, Richard; Bressler, Shikma; Bristow, Timothy Michael; Britton, Dave; Britzger, Daniel; Brochu, Frederic; Brock, Ian; Brock, Raymond; Brooijmans, Gustaaf; Brooks, Timothy; Brooks, William; Brosamer, Jacquelyn; Brost, Elizabeth; Bruckman de Renstrom, Pawel; Bruncko, Dusan; Bruneliere, Renaud; Bruni, Alessia; Bruni, Graziano; Brunt, Benjamin; Bruschi, Marco; Bruscino, Nello; Bryant, Patrick; Bryngemark, Lene; Buanes, Trygve; Buat, Quentin; Buchholz, Peter; Buckley, Andrew; Budagov, Ioulian; Buehrer, Felix; Bugge, Lars; Bugge, Magnar Kopangen; Bulekov, Oleg; Bullock, Daniel; Burckhart, Helfried; Burdin, Sergey; Burgard, Carsten Daniel; Burghgrave, Blake; Burke, Stephen; Burmeister, Ingo; Busato, Emmanuel; Büscher, Daniel; Büscher, Volker; Bussey, Peter; Butler, John; Butt, Aatif Imtiaz; Buttar, Craig; Butterworth, Jonathan; Butti, Pierfrancesco; Buttinger, William; Buzatu, Adrian; Buzykaev, Aleksey; Cabrera Urbán, Susana; Caforio, Davide; Cairo, Valentina; Cakir, Orhan; Calace, Noemi; Calafiura, Paolo; Calandri, Alessandro; Calderini, Giovanni; Calfayan, Philippe; Caloba, Luiz; Calvet, David; Calvet, Samuel; Calvet, Thomas Philippe; Camacho Toro, Reina; Camarda, Stefano; Camarri, Paolo; Cameron, David; Caminal Armadans, Roger; Camincher, Clement; Campana, Simone; Campanelli, Mario; Campoverde, Angel; Canale, Vincenzo; Canepa, Anadi; Cano Bret, Marc; Cantero, Josu; Cantrill, Robert; Cao, Tingting; Capeans Garrido, Maria Del Mar; Caprini, Irinel; Caprini, Mihai; Capua, Marcella; Caputo, Regina; Carbone, Ryne Michael; Cardarelli, Roberto; Cardillo, Fabio; Carli, Tancredi; Carlino, Gianpaolo; Carminati, Leonardo; Caron, Sascha; Carquin, Edson; Carrillo-Montoya, German D; Carter, Janet; Carvalho, João; Casadei, Diego; Casado, Maria Pilar; Casolino, Mirkoantonio; Casper, David William; Castaneda-Miranda, Elizabeth; Castelli, Angelantonio; Castillo Gimenez, Victoria; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Catinaccio, Andrea; Catmore, James; Cattai, Ariella; Caudron, Julien; Cavaliere, Viviana; Cavalli, Donatella; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cavasinni, Vincenzo; Ceradini, Filippo; Cerda Alberich, Leonor; Cerio, Benjamin; Santiago Cerqueira, Augusto; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Cerutti, Fabio; Cerv, Matevz; Cervelli, Alberto; Cetin, Serkant Ali; Chafaq, Aziz; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chalupkova, Ina; Chan, Yat Long; Chang, Philip; Chapman, John Derek; Charlton, Dave; Chau, Chav Chhiv; Chavez Barajas, Carlos Alberto; Che, Siinn; Cheatham, Susan; Chegwidden, Andrew; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chelstowska, Magda Anna; Chen, Chunhui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Karen; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Shion; Chen, Xin; Chen, Ye; Cheng, Hok Chuen; Cheng, Yangyang; Cheplakov, Alexander; Cheremushkina, Evgenia; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Chernyatin, Valeriy; Cheu, Elliott; Chevalier, Laurent; Chiarella, Vitaliano; Chiarelli, Giorgio; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chisholm, Andrew; Chislett, Rebecca Thalatta; Chitan, Adrian; Chizhov, Mihail; Choi, Kyungeon; Chouridou, Sofia; Chow, Bonnie Kar Bo; Christodoulou, Valentinos; Chromek-Burckhart, Doris; Chudoba, Jiri; Chuinard, Annabelle Julia; Chwastowski, Janusz; Chytka, Ladislav; Ciapetti, Guido; Ciftci, Abbas Kenan; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Cioara, Irina Antonela; Ciocio, Alessandra; Cirotto, Francesco; Citron, Zvi Hirsh; Ciubancan, Mihai; Clark, Allan G; Clark, Brian Lee; Clark, Philip James; Clarke, Robert; Clement, Christophe; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H; Coffey, Laurel; Colasurdo, Luca; Cole, Brian; Cole, Stephen; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Collot, Johann; Colombo, Tommaso; Compostella, Gabriele; Conde Muiño, Patricia; Coniavitis, Elias; Connell, Simon Henry; Connelly, Ian; Consorti, Valerio; Constantinescu, Serban; Conta, Claudio; Conti, Geraldine; Conventi, Francesco; Cooke, Mark; Cooper, Ben; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Cornelissen, Thijs; Corradi, Massimo; Corriveau, Francois; Corso-Radu, Alina; Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; Cortiana, Giorgio; Costa, Giuseppe; Costa, María José; Costanzo, Davide; Cottin, Giovanna; Cowan, Glen; Cox, Brian; Cranmer, Kyle; Crawley, Samuel Joseph; Cree, Graham; Crépé-Renaudin, Sabine; Crescioli, Francesco; Cribbs, Wayne Allen; Crispin Ortuzar, Mireia; Cristinziani, Markus; Croft, Vince; Crosetti, Giovanni; Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Cummings, Jane; Curatolo, Maria; Cúth, Jakub; Cuthbert, Cameron; Czirr, Hendrik; Czodrowski, Patrick; D'Auria, Saverio; D'Onofrio, Monica; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, Mario Jose; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dafinca, Alexandru; Dai, Tiesheng; Dale, Orjan; Dallaire, Frederick; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dam, Mogens; Dandoy, Jeffrey Rogers; Dang, Nguyen Phuong; Daniells, Andrew Christopher; Danninger, Matthias; Dano Hoffmann, Maria; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darmora, Smita; Dassoulas, James; Dattagupta, Aparajita; Davey, Will; David, Claire; Davidek, Tomas; Davies, Eleanor; Davies, Merlin; Davison, Peter; Davygora, Yuriy; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; Daya-Ishmukhametova, Rozmin; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Benedetti, Abraham; De Castro, Stefano; De Cecco, Sandro; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; De la Torre, Hector; De Lorenzi, Francesco; De Pedis, Daniele; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; De Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; Dearnaley, William James; Debbe, Ramiro; Debenedetti, Chiara; Dedovich, Dmitri; Deigaard, Ingrid; Del Peso, Jose; Del Prete, Tarcisio; Delgove, David; Deliot, Frederic; Delitzsch, Chris Malena; Deliyergiyev, Maksym; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Dell'Orso, Mauro; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Delmastro, Marco; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; Deluca, Carolina; DeMarco, David; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Demilly, Aurelien; Denisov, Sergey; Denysiuk, Denys; Derendarz, Dominik; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Deterre, Cecile; Dette, Karola; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Domenico, Antonio; Di Donato, Camilla; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Di Girolamo, Beniamino; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Di Micco, Biagio; Di Nardo, Roberto; Di Simone, Andrea; Di Sipio, Riccardo; Di Valentino, David; Diaconu, Cristinel; Diamond, Miriam; Dias, Flavia; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Diehl, Edward; Dietrich, Janet; Diglio, Sara; Dimitrievska, Aleksandra; Dingfelder, Jochen; Dita, Petre; Dita, Sanda; Dittus, Fridolin; Djama, Fares; Djobava, Tamar; Djuvsland, Julia Isabell; Barros do Vale, Maria Aline; Dobos, Daniel; Dobre, Monica; Doglioni, Caterina; Dohmae, Takeshi; Dolejsi, Jiri; Dolezal, Zdenek; Dolgoshein, Boris; Donadelli, Marisilvia; Donati, Simone; Dondero, Paolo; Donini, Julien; Dopke, Jens; Doria, Alessandra; Dova, Maria-Teresa; Doyle, Tony; Drechsler, Eric; Dris, Manolis; Du, Yanyan; Duarte-Campderros, Jorge; Dubreuil, Emmanuelle; Duchovni, Ehud; Duckeck, Guenter; Ducu, Otilia Anamaria; Duda, Dominik; Dudarev, Alexey; Duflot, Laurent; Duguid, Liam; Dührssen, Michael; Dunford, Monica; Duran Yildiz, Hatice; Düren, Michael; Durglishvili, Archil; Duschinger, Dirk; Dutta, Baishali; Dyndal, Mateusz; Eckardt, Christoph; Ecker, Katharina Maria; Edgar, Ryan Christopher; Edson, William; Edwards, Nicholas Charles; Eifert, Till; Eigen, Gerald; Einsweiler, Kevin; Ekelof, Tord; El Kacimi, Mohamed; Ellajosyula, Venugopal; Ellert, Mattias; Elles, Sabine; Ellinghaus, Frank; Elliot, Alison; Ellis, Nicolas; Elmsheuser, Johannes; Elsing, Markus; Emeliyanov, Dmitry; Enari, Yuji; Endner, Oliver Chris; Endo, Masaki; Ennis, Joseph Stanford; Erdmann, Johannes; Ereditato, Antonio; Ernis, Gunar; Ernst, Jesse; Ernst, Michael; Errede, Steven; Ertel, Eugen; Escalier, Marc; Esch, Hendrik; Escobar, Carlos; Esposito, Bellisario; Etienvre, Anne-Isabelle; Etzion, Erez; Evans, Hal; Ezhilov, Alexey; Fabbri, Laura; Facini, Gabriel; Fakhrutdinov, Rinat; Falciano, Speranza; Falla, Rebecca Jane; Faltova, Jana; Fang, Yaquan; Fanti, Marcello; Farbin, Amir; Farilla, Addolorata; Farina, Christian; Farooque, Trisha; Farrell, Steven; Farrington, Sinead; Farthouat, Philippe; Fassi, Farida; Fassnacht, Patrick; Fassouliotis, Dimitrios; Faucci Giannelli, Michele; Favareto, Andrea; Fayard, Louis; Fedin, Oleg; Fedorko, Wojciech; Feigl, Simon; Feligioni, Lorenzo; Feng, Cunfeng; Feng, Eric; Feng, Haolu; Fenyuk, Alexander; Feremenga, Last; Fernandez Martinez, Patricia; Fernandez Perez, Sonia; Ferrando, James; Ferrari, Arnaud; Ferrari, Pamela; Ferrari, Roberto; Ferreira de Lima, Danilo Enoque; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferrere, Didier; Ferretti, Claudio; Ferretto Parodi, Andrea; Fiedler, Frank; Filipčič, Andrej; Filipuzzi, Marco; Filthaut, Frank; Fincke-Keeler, Margret; Finelli, Kevin Daniel; Fiolhais, Miguel; Fiorini, Luca; Firan, Ana; Fischer, Adam; Fischer, Cora; Fischer, Julia; Fisher, Wade Cameron; Flaschel, Nils; Fleck, Ivor; Fleischmann, Philipp; Fletcher, Gareth Thomas; Fletcher, Gregory; Fletcher, Rob Roy MacGregor; Flick, Tobias; Floderus, Anders; Flores Castillo, Luis; Flowerdew, Michael; Forcolin, Giulio Tiziano; Formica, Andrea; Forti, Alessandra; Fournier, Daniel; Fox, Harald; Fracchia, Silvia; Francavilla, Paolo; Franchini, Matteo; Francis, David; Franconi, Laura; Franklin, Melissa; Frate, Meghan; Fraternali, Marco; Freeborn, David; Fressard-Batraneanu, Silvia; Friedrich, Felix; Froidevaux, Daniel; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fullana Torregrosa, Esteban; Fusayasu, Takahiro; Fuster, Juan; Gabaldon, Carolina; Gabizon, Ofir; Gabrielli, Alessandro; Gabrielli, Andrea; Gach, Grzegorz; Gadatsch, Stefan; Gadomski, Szymon; Gagliardi, Guido; Gagnon, Pauline; Galea, Cristina; Galhardo, Bruno; Gallas, Elizabeth; Gallop, Bruce; Gallus, Petr; Galster, Gorm Aske Gram Krohn; Gan, KK; Gao, Jun; Gao, Yanyan; Gao, Yongsheng; Garay Walls, Francisca; García, Carmen; García Navarro, José Enrique; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; Gardner, Robert; Garelli, Nicoletta; Garonne, Vincent; Gatti, Claudio; Gaudiello, Andrea; Gaudio, Gabriella; Gaur, Bakul; Gauthier, Lea; Gavrilenko, Igor; Gay, Colin; Gaycken, Goetz; Gazis, Evangelos; Gecse, Zoltan; Gee, Norman; Geich-Gimbel, Christoph; Geisler, Manuel Patrice; Gemme, Claudia; Genest, Marie-Hélène; Geng, Cong; Gentile, Simonetta; George, Simon; Gerbaudo, Davide; Gershon, Avi; Ghasemi, Sara; Ghazlane, Hamid; Giacobbe, Benedetto; Giagu, Stefano; Giannetti, Paola; Gibbard, Bruce; Gibson, Stephen; Gignac, Matthew; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gillam, Thomas; Gillberg, Dag; Gilles, Geoffrey; Gingrich, Douglas; Giokaris, Nikos; Giordani, MarioPaolo; Giorgi, Filippo Maria; Giorgi, Francesco Michelangelo; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giromini, Paolo; Giugni, Danilo; Giuliani, Claudia; Giulini, Maddalena; Gjelsten, Børge Kile; Gkaitatzis, Stamatios; Gkialas, Ioannis; Gkougkousis, Evangelos Leonidas; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glaysher, Paul; Glazov, Alexandre; Goblirsch-Kolb, Maximilian; Goddard, Jack Robert; Godlewski, Jan; Goldfarb, Steven; Golling, Tobias; Golubkov, Dmitry; Gomes, Agostinho; Gonçalo, Ricardo; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, Joao; Gonella, Laura; González de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez Parra, Garoe; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorišek, Andrej; Gornicki, Edward; Goshaw, Alfred; Gössling, Claus; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Goudet, Christophe Raymond; Goujdami, Driss; Goussiou, Anna; Govender, Nicolin; Gozani, Eitan; Graber, Lars; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Gradin, Per Olov Joakim; Grafström, Per; Gramling, Johanna; Gramstad, Eirik; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Gratchev, Vadim; Gray, Heather; Graziani, Enrico; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Grefe, Christian; Gregersen, Kristian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Grevtsov, Kirill; Griffiths, Justin; Grillo, Alexander; Grimm, Kathryn; Grinstein, Sebastian; Gris, Philippe Luc Yves; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Groh, Sabrina; Grohs, Johannes Philipp; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Grossi, Giulio Cornelio; Grout, Zara Jane; Guan, Liang; Guenther, Jaroslav; Guescini, Francesco; Guest, Daniel; Gueta, Orel; Guido, Elisa; Guillemin, Thibault; Guindon, Stefan; Gul, Umar; Gumpert, Christian; Guo, Jun; Guo, Yicheng; Gupta, Shaun; Gustavino, Giuliano; Gutierrez, Phillip; Gutierrez Ortiz, Nicolas Gilberto; Gutschow, Christian; Guyot, Claude; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haber, Carl; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Haddad, Nacim; Hadef, Asma; Haefner, Petra; Hageböck, Stephan; Hajduk, Zbigniew; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Haleem, Mahsana; Haley, Joseph; Hall, David; Halladjian, Garabed; Hallewell, Gregory David; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamal, Petr; Hamano, Kenji; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamity, Guillermo Nicolas; Hamnett, Phillip George; Han, Liang; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hanawa, Keita; Hance, Michael; Haney, Bijan; Hanke, Paul; Hanna, Remie; Hansen, Jørgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Maike Christina; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hard, Andrew; Harenberg, Torsten; Hariri, Faten; Harkusha, Siarhei; Harrington, Robert; Harrison, Paul Fraser; Hartjes, Fred; Hasegawa, Makoto; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hasib, A; Hassani, Samira; Haug, Sigve; Hauser, Reiner; Hauswald, Lorenz; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hawkins, Anthony David; Hayashi, Takayasu; Hayden, Daniel; Hays, Chris; Hays, Jonathan Michael; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Head, Simon; Heck, Tobias; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heim, Sarah; Heim, Timon; Heinemann, Beate; Heinrich, Lukas; Hejbal, Jiri; Helary, Louis; Hellman, Sten; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, James; Henderson, Robert; Heng, Yang; Henkelmann, Steffen; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Herbert, Geoffrey Henry; Hernández Jiménez, Yesenia; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Hesketh, Gavin Grant; Hessey, Nigel; Hetherly, Jeffrey Wayne; Hickling, Robert; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hill, Ewan; Hill, John; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillier, Stephen; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hines, Elizabeth; Hinman, Rachel Reisner; Hirose, Minoru; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoenig, Friedrich; Hohlfeld, Marc; Hohn, David; Holmes, Tova Ray; Homann, Michael; Hong, Tae Min; Hooberman, Benjamin Henry; Hopkins, Walter; Horii, Yasuyuki; Horton, Arthur James; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Suen; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howard, Jacob; Howarth, James; Hrabovsky, Miroslav; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hrynevich, Aliaksei; Hsu, Catherine; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Hu, Diedi; Hu, Qipeng; Huang, Yanping; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Huhtinen, Mika; Hülsing, Tobias Alexander; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibragimov, Iskander; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Ideal, Emma; Idrissi, Zineb; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Iizawa, Tomoya; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikeno, Masahiro; Ilchenko, Iurii; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Ilic, Nikolina; Ince, Tayfun; Introzzi, Gianluca; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Iordanidou, Kalliopi; Ippolito, Valerio; Irles Quiles, Adrian; Isaksson, Charlie; Ishino, Masaya; Ishitsuka, Masaki; Ishmukhametov, Renat; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Iturbe Ponce, Julia Mariana; Iuppa, Roberto; Ivarsson, Jenny; Iwanski, Wieslaw; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jabbar, Samina; Jackson, Brett; Jackson, Matthew; Jackson, Paul; Jain, Vivek; Jakobi, Katharina Bianca; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakoubek, Tomas; Jamin, David Olivier; Jana, Dilip; Jansen, Eric; Jansky, Roland; Janssen, Jens; Janus, Michel; Jarlskog, Göran; Javadov, Namig; Javůrek, Tomáš; Jeanneau, Fabien; Jeanty, Laura; Jejelava, Juansher; Jeng, Geng-yuan; Jennens, David; Jenni, Peter; Jentzsch, Jennifer; Jeske, Carl; Jézéquel, Stéphane; Ji, Haoshuang; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Hai; Jiang, Yi; Jiggins, Stephen; Jimenez Pena, Javier; Jin, Shan; Jinaru, Adam; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Johansson, Per; Johns, Kenneth; Johnson, William Joseph; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Graham; Jones, Roger; Jones, Sarah; Jones, Tim; Jongmanns, Jan; Jorge, Pedro; Jovicevic, Jelena; Ju, Xiangyang; Juste Rozas, Aurelio; Köhler, Markus Konrad; Kaci, Mohammed; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kahn, Sebastien Jonathan; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalderon, Charles William; Kaluza, Adam; Kama, Sami; Kamenshchikov, Andrey; Kanaya, Naoko; Kaneti, Steven; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kaplan, Laser Seymour; Kapliy, Anton; Kar, Deepak; Karakostas, Konstantinos; Karamaoun, Andrew; Karastathis, Nikolaos; Kareem, Mohammad Jawad; Karentzos, Efstathios; Karnevskiy, Mikhail; Karpov, Sergey; Karpova, Zoya; Karthik, Krishnaiyengar; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kasahara, Kota; Kashif, Lashkar; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Yousuke; Kato, Chikuma; Katre, Akshay; Katzy, Judith; Kawade, Kentaro; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kazama, Shingo; Kazanin, Vassili; Keeler, Richard; Kehoe, Robert; Keller, John; Kempster, Jacob Julian; Keoshkerian, Houry; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerševan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Keyes, Robert; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khandanyan, Hovhannes; Khanov, Alexander; Kharlamov, Alexey; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kido, Shogo; Kim, Hee Yeun; Kim, Shinhong; Kim, Young-Kee; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver Maria; King, Barry; King, Matthew; King, Samuel Burton; Kirk, Julie; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kishimoto, Tomoe; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kiss, Florian; Kiuchi, Kenji; Kivernyk, Oleh; Kladiva, Eduard; Klein, Matthew Henry; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klimek, Pawel; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klinger, Joel Alexander; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Knapik, Joanna; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knoops, Edith; Knue, Andrea; Kobayashi, Aine; Kobayashi, Dai; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Kocian, Martin; Kodys, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Kogan, Lucy Anne; Kohlmann, Simon; Kohriki, Takashi; Koi, Tatsumi; Kolanoski, Hermann; Kolb, Mathis; Koletsou, Iro; Komar, Aston; Komori, Yuto; Kondo, Takahiko; Kondrashova, Nataliia; Köneke, Karsten; König, Adriaan; Kono, Takanori; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kopeliansky, Revital; Koperny, Stefan; Köpke, Lutz; Kopp, Anna Katharina; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kosek, Tomas; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotov, Vladislav; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Kourkoumeli-Charalampidi, Athina; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Koutsman, Alex; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasnopevtsev, Dimitriy; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Kraus, Jana; Kravchenko, Anton; Kretz, Moritz; Kretzschmar, Jan; Kreutzfeldt, Kristof; Krieger, Peter; Krizka, Karol; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krüger, Hans; Krumnack, Nils; Kruse, Amanda; Kruse, Mark; Kruskal, Michael; Kubota, Takashi; Kucuk, Hilal; Kuday, Sinan; Kuechler, Jan Thomas; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuger, Fabian; Kuhl, Andrew; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kukhtin, Victor; Kukla, Romain; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kuna, Marine; Kunigo, Takuto; Kupco, Alexander; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kus, Vlastimil; Kuwertz, Emma Sian; Kuze, Masahiro; Kvita, Jiri; Kwan, Tony; Kyriazopoulos, Dimitrios; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rosa Navarro, Jose Luis; La Rotonda, Laura; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacey, James; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Lacuesta, Vicente Ramón; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Remi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Lambourne, Luke; Lammers, Sabine; Lampen, Caleb; Lampl, Walter; Lançon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Lang, Valerie Susanne; Lange, J örn Christian; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Lanza, Agostino; Laplace, Sandrine; Lapoire, Cecile; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Lasagni Manghi, Federico; Lassnig, Mario; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavrijsen, Wim; Law, Alexander; Laycock, Paul; Lazovich, Tomo; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Menedeu, Eve; LeBlanc, Matthew Edgar; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne Agnes Marie; Lee, Claire Alexandra; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Guillaume; Lefebvre, Michel; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehan, Allan; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Lei, Xiaowen; Leight, William Axel; Leisos, Antonios; Leister, Andrew Gerard; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Lemmer, Boris; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatjana; Lenzi, Bruno; Leone, Robert; Leone, Sandra; Leonidopoulos, Christos; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Leroy, Claude; Lester, Christopher; Levchenko, Mikhail; Levêque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Levy, Mark; Lewis, Adrian; Leyko, Agnieszka; Leyton, Michael; Li, Bing; Li, Haifeng; Li, Ho Ling; Li, Lei; Li, Liang; Li, Shu; Li, Xingguo; Li, Yichen; Liang, Zhijun; Liao, Hongbo; Liberti, Barbara; Liblong, Aaron; Lichard, Peter; Lie, Ki; Liebal, Jessica; Liebig, Wolfgang; Limbach, Christian; Limosani, Antonio; Lin, Simon; Lin, Tai-Hua; Lindquist, Brian Edward; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipniacka, Anna; Lisovyi, Mykhailo; Liss, Tony; Lissauer, David; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Bo; Liu, Dong; Liu, Hao; Liu, Hongbin; Liu, Jian; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Kun; Liu, Lulu; Liu, Miaoyuan; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Yanlin; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Lleres, Annick; Llorente Merino, Javier; Lloyd, Stephen; Lo Sterzo, Francesco; Lobodzinska, Ewelina; Loch, Peter; Lockman, William; Loebinger, Fred; Loevschall-Jensen, Ask Emil; Loew, Kevin Michael; Loginov, Andrey; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Long, Brian Alexander; Long, Jonathan David; Long, Robin Eamonn; Looper, Kristina Anne; Lopes, Lourenco; Lopez Mateos, David; Lopez Paredes, Brais; Lopez Paz, Ivan; Lopez Solis, Alvaro; Lorenz, Jeanette; Lorenzo Martinez, Narei; Losada, Marta; Lösel, Philipp Jonathan; Lou, XinChou; Lounis, Abdenour; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lu, Haonan; Lu, Nan; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Luedtke, Christian; Luehring, Frederick; Lukas, Wolfgang; Luminari, Lamberto; Lundberg, Olof; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Lynn, David; Lysak, Roman; Lytken, Else; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Macdonald, Calum Michael; Maček, Boštjan; Machado Miguens, Joana; Madaffari, Daniele; Madar, Romain; Maddocks, Harvey Jonathan; Mader, Wolfgang; Madsen, Alexander; Maeda, Junpei; Maeland, Steffen; Maeno, Tadashi; Maevskiy, Artem; Magradze, Erekle; Mahlstedt, Joern; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maier, Andreas Alexander; Maier, Thomas; Maio, Amélia; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Malaescu, Bogdan; Malecki, Pawel; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Malone, Caitlin; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyshev, Vladimir; Malyukov, Sergei; Mamuzic, Judita; Mancini, Giada; Mandelli, Beatrice; Mandelli, Luciano; Mandić, Igor; Maneira, José; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, Luciano; Manjarres Ramos, Joany; Mann, Alexander; Mansoulie, Bruno; Mantifel, Rodger; Mantoani, Matteo; Manzoni, Stefano; Mapelli, Livio; March, Luis; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marjanovic, Marija; Marley, Daniel; Marroquim, Fernando; Marsden, Stephen Philip; Marshall, Zach; Marti, Lukas Fritz; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Brian Thomas; Martin, Tim; Martin, Victoria Jane; Martin dit Latour, Bertrand; Martinez, Mario; Martin-Haugh, Stewart; Martoiu, Victor Sorin; Martyniuk, Alex; Marx, Marilyn; Marzano, Francesco; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Massa, Ignazio; Massa, Lorenzo; Mastrandrea, Paolo; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Mättig, Peter; Mattmann, Johannes; Maurer, Julien; Maxfield, Stephen; Maximov, Dmitriy; Mazini, Rachid; Mazza, Simone Michele; Mc Fadden, Neil Christopher; Mc Goldrick, Garrin; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; McFarlane, Kenneth; Mcfayden, Josh; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; McMahon, Steve; McPherson, Robert; Medinnis, Michael; Meehan, Samuel; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meier, Karlheinz; Meineck, Christian; Meirose, Bernhard; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Meloni, Federico; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Meoni, Evelin; Mercurio, Kevin Michael; Mergelmeyer, Sebastian; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meyer, Carsten; Meyer, Christopher; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Meyer Zu Theenhausen, Hanno; Middleton, Robin; Miglioranzi, Silvia; Mijović, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikuž, Marko; Milesi, Marco; Milic, Adriana; Miller, David; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Minaenko, Andrey; Minami, Yuto; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mistry, Khilesh; Mitani, Takashi; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitsou, Vasiliki A; Miucci, Antonio; Miyagawa, Paul; Mjörnmark, Jan-Ulf; Moa, Torbjoern; Mochizuki, Kazuya; Mohapatra, Soumya; Mohr, Wolfgang; Molander, Simon; Moles-Valls, Regina; Monden, Ryutaro; Mondragon, Matthew Craig; Mönig, Klaus; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montalbano, Alyssa; Montejo Berlingen, Javier; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Morange, Nicolas; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Mori, Daniel; Mori, Tatsuya; Morii, Masahiro; Morinaga, Masahiro; Morisbak, Vanja; Moritz, Sebastian; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morris, John; Mortensen, Simon Stark; Morvaj, Ljiljana; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Josh; Motohashi, Kazuki; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Mouraviev, Sergei; Moyse, Edward; Muanza, Steve; Mudd, Richard; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Ralph Soeren Peter; Mueller, Thibaut; Muenstermann, Daniel; Mullen, Paul; Mullier, Geoffrey; Munoz Sanchez, Francisca Javiela; Murillo Quijada, Javier Alberto; Murray, Bill; Musheghyan, Haykuhi; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nachman, Benjamin Philip; Nackenhorst, Olaf; Nadal, Jordi; Nagai, Koichi; Nagai, Ryo; Nagai, Yoshikazu; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nagata, Kazuki; Nagel, Martin; Nagy, Elemer; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakamura, Tomoaki; Nakano, Itsuo; Namasivayam, Harisankar; Naranjo Garcia, Roger Felipe; Narayan, Rohin; Narrias Villar, Daniel Isaac; Naryshkin, Iouri; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Nayyar, Ruchika; Neal, Homer; Nechaeva, Polina; Neep, Thomas James; Nef, Pascal Daniel; Negri, Andrea; Negrini, Matteo; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nellist, Clara; Nelson, Andrew; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nepomuceno, Andre Asevedo; Nessi, Marzio; Neubauer, Mark; Neumann, Manuel; Neves, Ricardo; Nevski, Pavel; Newman, Paul; Nguyen, Duong Hai; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nicquevert, Bertrand; Nielsen, Jason; Nikiforov, Andriy; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsen, Jon Kerr; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya, Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; Nisius, Richard; Nobe, Takuya; Nodulman, Lawrence; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Nooney, Tamsin; Norberg, Scarlet; Nordberg, Markus; Novgorodova, Olga; Nowak, Sebastian; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nozka, Libor; Ntekas, Konstantinos; Nurse, Emily; Nuti, Francesco; O'grady, Fionnbarr; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Shea, Val; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Obermann, Theresa; Ocariz, Jose; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Ochoa, Ines; Ochoa-Ricoux, Juan Pedro; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Ogren, Harold; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohman, Henrik; Oide, Hideyuki; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olariu, Albert; Oleiro Seabra, Luis Filipe; Olivares Pino, Sebastian Andres; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Onofre, António; Onogi, Kouta; Onyisi, Peter; Oram, Christopher; Oreglia, Mark; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Orlando, Nicola; Orr, Robert; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Otero y Garzon, Gustavo; Otono, Hidetoshi; Ouchrif, Mohamed; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Oussoren, Koen Pieter; Ouyang, Qun; Ovcharova, Ana; Owen, Mark; Owen, Rhys Edward; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pachal, Katherine; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Pagáčová, Martina; Pagan Griso, Simone; Paige, Frank; Pais, Preema; Pajchel, Katarina; Palacino, Gabriel; Palestini, Sandro; Palka, Marek; Pallin, Dominique; Palma, Alberto; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Pandini, Carlo Enrico; Panduro Vazquez, William; Pani, Priscilla; Panitkin, Sergey; Pantea, Dan; Paolozzi, Lorenzo; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Papageorgiou, Konstantinos; Paramonov, Alexander; Paredes Hernandez, Daniela; Parker, Michael Andrew; Parker, Kerry Ann; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pascuzzi, Vincent; Pasqualucci, Enrico; Passaggio, Stefano; Pastore, Fernanda; Pastore, Francesca; Pásztor, Gabriella; Pataraia, Sophio; Patel, Nikhul; Pater, Joleen; Pauly, Thilo; Pearce, James; Pearson, Benjamin; Pedersen, Lars Egholm; Pedersen, Maiken; Pedraza Lopez, Sebastian; Pedro, Rute; Peleganchuk, Sergey; Pelikan, Daniel; Penc, Ondrej; Peng, Cong; Peng, Haiping; Penning, Bjoern; Penwell, John; Perepelitsa, Dennis; Perez Codina, Estel; Perini, Laura; Pernegger, Heinz; Perrella, Sabrina; Peschke, Richard; Peshekhonov, Vladimir; Peters, Krisztian; Peters, Yvonne; Petersen, Brian; Petersen, Troels; Petit, Elisabeth; Petridis, Andreas; Petridou, Chariclia; Petroff, Pierre; Petrolo, Emilio; Petrucci, Fabrizio; Pettersson, Nora Emilia; Peyaud, Alan; Pezoa, Raquel; Phillips, Peter William; Piacquadio, Giacinto; Pianori, Elisabetta; Picazio, Attilio; Piccaro, Elisa; Piccinini, Maurizio; Pickering, Mark Andrew; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pilcher, James; Pilkington, Andrew; Pin, Arnaud Willy J; Pina, João Antonio; Pinamonti, Michele; Pinfold, James; Pingel, Almut; Pires, Sylvestre; Pirumov, Hayk; Pitt, Michael; Plazak, Lukas; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Pleskot, Vojtech; Plotnikova, Elena; Plucinski, Pawel; Pluth, Daniel; Poettgen, Ruth; Poggioli, Luc; Pohl, David-leon; Polesello, Giacomo; Poley, Anne-luise; Policicchio, Antonio; Polifka, Richard; Polini, Alessandro; Pollard, Christopher Samuel; Polychronakos, Venetios; Pommès, Kathy; Pontecorvo, Ludovico; Pope, Bernard; Popeneciu, Gabriel Alexandru; Popovic, Dragan; Poppleton, Alan; Pospisil, Stanislav; Potamianos, Karolos; Potrap, Igor; Potter, Christina; Potter, Christopher; Poulard, Gilbert; Poveda, Joaquin; Pozdnyakov, Valery; Pozo Astigarraga, Mikel Eukeni; Pralavorio, Pascal; Pranko, Aliaksandr; Prell, Soeren; Price, Darren; Price, Lawrence; Primavera, Margherita; Prince, Sebastien; Proissl, Manuel; Prokofiev, Kirill; Prokoshin, Fedor; Protopapadaki, Eftychia-sofia; Protopopescu, Serban; Proudfoot, James; Przybycien, Mariusz; Puddu, Daniele; Puldon, David; Purohit, Milind; Puzo, Patrick; Qian, Jianming; Qin, Gang; Qin, Yang; Quadt, Arnulf; Quarrie, David; Quayle, William; Queitsch-Maitland, Michaela; Quilty, Donnchadha; Raddum, Silje; Radeka, Veljko; Radescu, Voica; Radhakrishnan, Sooraj Krishnan; Radloff, Peter; Rados, Pere; Ragusa, Francesco; Rahal, Ghita; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Rammensee, Michael; Rangel-Smith, Camila; Rauscher, Felix; Rave, Stefan; Ravenscroft, Thomas; Raymond, Michel; Read, Alexander Lincoln; Readioff, Nathan Peter; Rebuzzi, Daniela; Redelbach, Andreas; Redlinger, George; Reece, Ryan; Reeves, Kendall; Rehnisch, Laura; Reichert, Joseph; Reisin, Hernan; Rembser, Christoph; Ren, Huan; Rescigno, Marco; Resconi, Silvia; Rezanova, Olga; Reznicek, Pavel; Rezvani, Reyhaneh; Richter, Robert; Richter, Stefan; Richter-Was, Elzbieta; Ricken, Oliver; Ridel, Melissa; Rieck, Patrick; Riegel, Christian Johann; Rieger, Julia; Rifki, Othmane; Rijssenbeek, Michael; Rimoldi, Adele; Rinaldi, Lorenzo; Ristić, Branislav; Ritsch, Elmar; Riu, Imma; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rizvi, Eram; Robertson, Steven; Robichaud-Veronneau, Andree; Robinson, Dave; Robinson, James; Robson, Aidan; Roda, Chiara; Rodina, Yulia; Rodriguez Perez, Andrea; Roe, Shaun; Rogan, Christopher Sean; Røhne, Ole; Romaniouk, Anatoli; Romano, Marino; Romano Saez, Silvestre Marino; Romero Adam, Elena; Rompotis, Nikolaos; Ronzani, Manfredi; Roos, Lydia; Ros, Eduardo; Rosati, Stefano; Rosbach, Kilian; Rose, Peyton; Rosenthal, Oliver; Rossetti, Valerio; Rossi, Elvira; Rossi, Leonardo Paolo; Rosten, Jonatan; Rosten, Rachel; Rotaru, Marina; Roth, Itamar; Rothberg, Joseph; Rousseau, David; Royon, Christophe; Rozanov, Alexandre; Rozen, Yoram; Ruan, Xifeng; Rubbo, Francesco; Rubinskiy, Igor; Rud, Viacheslav; Rudolph, Matthew Scott; Rühr, Frederik; Ruiz-Martinez, Aranzazu; Rurikova, Zuzana; Rusakovich, Nikolai; Ruschke, Alexander; Russell, Heather; Rutherfoord, John; Ruthmann, Nils; Ryabov, Yury; Rybar, Martin; Rybkin, Grigori; Ryder, Nick; Ryzhov, Andrey; Saavedra, Aldo; Sabato, Gabriele; Sacerdoti, Sabrina; Sadrozinski, Hartmut; Sadykov, Renat; Safai Tehrani, Francesco; Saha, Puja; Sahinsoy, Merve; Saimpert, Matthias; Saito, Tomoyuki; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Sakurai, Yuki; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Salamon, Andrea; Salazar Loyola, Javier Esteban; Salek, David; Sales De Bruin, Pedro Henrique; Salihagic, Denis; Salnikov, Andrei; Salt, José; Salvatore, Daniela; Salvatore, Pasquale Fabrizio; Salvucci, Antonio; Salzburger, Andreas; Sammel, Dirk; Sampsonidis, Dimitrios; Sanchez, Arturo; Sánchez, Javier; Sanchez Martinez, Victoria; Sandaker, Heidi; Sandbach, Ruth Laura; Sander, Heinz Georg; Sanders, Michiel; Sandhoff, Marisa; Sandoval, Carlos; Sandstroem, Rikard; Sankey, Dave; Sannino, Mario; Sansoni, Andrea; Santoni, Claudio; Santonico, Rinaldo; Santos, Helena; Santoyo Castillo, Itzebelt; Sapp, Kevin; Sapronov, Andrey; Saraiva, João; Sarrazin, Bjorn; Sasaki, Osamu; Sasaki, Yuichi; Sato, Koji; Sauvage, Gilles; Sauvan, Emmanuel; Savage, Graham; Savard, Pierre; Sawyer, Craig; Sawyer, Lee; Saxon, James; Sbarra, Carla; Sbrizzi, Antonio; Scanlon, Tim; Scannicchio, Diana; Scarcella, Mark; Scarfone, Valerio; Schaarschmidt, Jana; Schacht, Peter; Schaefer, Douglas; Schaefer, Ralph; Schaeffer, Jan; Schaepe, Steffen; Schaetzel, Sebastian; Schäfer, Uli; Schaffer, Arthur; Schaile, Dorothee; Schamberger, R Dean; Scharf, Veit; Schegelsky, Valery; Scheirich, Daniel; Schernau, Michael; Schiavi, Carlo; Schillo, Christian; Schioppa, Marco; Schlenker, Stefan; Schmieden, Kristof; Schmitt, Christian; Schmitt, Sebastian; Schmitt, Stefan; Schmitz, Simon; Schneider, Basil; Schnellbach, Yan Jie; Schnoor, Ulrike; Schoeffel, Laurent; Schoening, Andre; Schoenrock, Bradley Daniel; Schopf, Elisabeth; Schorlemmer, Andre Lukas; Schott, Matthias; Schouten, Doug; Schovancova, Jaroslava; Schramm, Steven; Schreyer, Manuel; Schuh, Natascha; Schultens, Martin Johannes; Schultz-Coulon, Hans-Christian; Schulz, Holger; Schumacher, Markus; Schumm, Bruce; Schune, Philippe; Schwanenberger, Christian; Schwartzman, Ariel; Schwarz, Thomas Andrew; Schwegler, Philipp; Schweiger, Hansdieter; Schwemling, Philippe; Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Schwindling, Jerome; Schwindt, Thomas; Sciolla, Gabriella; Scuri, Fabrizio; Scutti, Federico; Searcy, Jacob; Seema, Pienpen; Seidel, Sally; Seiden, Abraham; Seifert, Frank; Seixas, José; Sekhniaidze, Givi; Sekhon, Karishma; Sekula, Stephen; Seliverstov, Dmitry; Semprini-Cesari, Nicola; Serfon, Cedric; Serin, Laurent; Serkin, Leonid; Sessa, Marco; Seuster, Rolf; Severini, Horst; Sfiligoj, Tina; Sforza, Federico; Sfyrla, Anna; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Shaikh, Nabila Wahab; Shan, Lianyou; Shang, Ruo-yu; Shank, James; Shapiro, Marjorie; Shatalov, Pavel; Shaw, Kate; Shaw, Savanna Marie; Shcherbakova, Anna; Shehu, Ciwake Yusufu; Sherwood, Peter; Shi, Liaoshan; Shimizu, Shima; Shimmin, Chase Owen; Shimojima, Makoto; Shiyakova, Mariya; Shmeleva, Alevtina; Shoaleh Saadi, Diane; Shochet, Mel; Shojaii, Seyedruhollah; Shrestha, Suyog; Shulga, Evgeny; Shupe, Michael; Sicho, Petr; Sidebo, Per Edvin; Sidiropoulou, Ourania; Sidorov, Dmitri; Sidoti, Antonio; Siegert, Frank; Sijacki, Djordje; Silva, José; Silverstein, Samuel; Simak, Vladislav; Simard, Olivier; Simic, Ljiljana; Simion, Stefan; Simioni, Eduard; Simmons, Brinick; Simon, Dorian; Simon, Manuel; Sinervo, Pekka; Sinev, Nikolai; Sioli, Maximiliano; Siragusa, Giovanni; Sivoklokov, Serguei; Sjölin, Jörgen; Sjursen, Therese; Skinner, Malcolm Bruce; Skottowe, Hugh Philip; Skubic, Patrick; Slater, Mark; Slavicek, Tomas; Slawinska, Magdalena; Sliwa, Krzysztof; Smakhtin, Vladimir; Smart, Ben; Smestad, Lillian; Smirnov, Sergei; Smirnov, Yury; Smirnova, Lidia; Smirnova, Oxana; Smith, Matthew; Smith, Russell; Smizanska, Maria; Smolek, Karel; Snesarev, Andrei; Snidero, Giacomo; Snyder, Scott; Sobie, Randall; Socher, Felix; Soffer, Abner; Soh, Dart-yin; Sokhrannyi, Grygorii; Solans Sanchez, Carlos; Solar, Michael; Soldatov, Evgeny; Soldevila, Urmila; Solodkov, Alexander; Soloshenko, Alexei; Solovyanov, Oleg; Solovyev, Victor; Sommer, Philip; Song, Hong Ye; Soni, Nitesh; Sood, Alexander; Sopczak, Andre; Sopko, Vit; Sorin, Veronica; Sosa, David; Sotiropoulou, Calliope Louisa; Soualah, Rachik; Soukharev, Andrey; South, David; Sowden, Benjamin; Spagnolo, Stefania; Spalla, Margherita; Spangenberg, Martin; Spanò, Francesco; Sperlich, Dennis; Spettel, Fabian; Spighi, Roberto; Spigo, Giancarlo; Spiller, Laurence Anthony; Spousta, Martin; St Denis, Richard Dante; Stabile, Alberto; Staerz, Steffen; Stahlman, Jonathan; Stamen, Rainer; Stamm, Soren; Stanecka, Ewa; Stanek, Robert; Stanescu, Cristian; Stanescu-Bellu, Madalina; Stanitzki, Marcel Michael; Stapnes, Steinar; Starchenko, Evgeny; Stark, Giordon; Stark, Jan; Staroba, Pavel; Starovoitov, Pavel; Staszewski, Rafal; Steinberg, Peter; Stelzer, Bernd; Stelzer, Harald Joerg; Stelzer-Chilton, Oliver; Stenzel, Hasko; Stewart, Graeme; Stillings, Jan Andre; Stockton, Mark; Stoebe, Michael; Stoicea, Gabriel; Stolte, Philipp; Stonjek, Stefan; Stradling, Alden; Straessner, Arno; Stramaglia, Maria Elena; Strandberg, Jonas; Strandberg, Sara; Strandlie, Are; Strauss, Michael; Strizenec, Pavol; Ströhmer, Raimund; Strom, David; Stroynowski, Ryszard; Strubig, Antonia; Stucci, Stefania Antonia; Stugu, Bjarne; Styles, Nicholas Adam; Su, Dong; Su, Jun; Subramaniam, Rajivalochan; Suchek, Stanislav; Sugaya, Yorihito; Suk, Michal; Sulin, Vladimir; Sultansoy, Saleh; Sumida, Toshi; Sun, Siyuan; Sun, Xiaohu; Sundermann, Jan Erik; Suruliz, Kerim; Susinno, Giancarlo; Sutton, Mark; Suzuki, Shota; Svatos, Michal; Swiatlowski, Maximilian; Sykora, Ivan; Sykora, Tomas; Ta, Duc; Taccini, Cecilia; Tackmann, Kerstin; Taenzer, Joe; Taffard, Anyes; Tafirout, Reda; Taiblum, Nimrod; Takai, Helio; Takashima, Ryuichi; Takeda, Hiroshi; Takeshita, Tohru; Takubo, Yosuke; Talby, Mossadek; Talyshev, Alexey; Tam, Jason; Tan, Kong Guan; Tanaka, Junichi; Tanaka, Reisaburo; Tanaka, Shuji; Tannenwald, Benjamin Bordy; Tapia Araya, Sebastian; Tapprogge, Stefan; Tarem, Shlomit; Tartarelli, Giuseppe Francesco; Tas, Petr; Tasevsky, Marek; Tashiro, Takuya; Tassi, Enrico; Tavares Delgado, Ademar; Tayalati, Yahya; Taylor, Aaron; Taylor, Geoffrey; Taylor, Pierre Thor Elliot; Taylor, Wendy; Teischinger, Florian Alfred; Teixeira-Dias, Pedro; Temming, Kim Katrin; Temple, Darren; Ten Kate, Herman; Teng, Ping-Kun; Teoh, Jia Jian; Tepel, Fabian-Phillipp; Terada, Susumu; Terashi, Koji; Terron, Juan; Terzo, Stefano; Testa, Marianna; Teuscher, Richard; Theveneaux-Pelzer, Timothée; Thomas, Juergen; Thomas-Wilsker, Joshuha; Thompson, Emily; Thompson, Paul; Thompson, Ray; Thompson, Stan; Thomsen, Lotte Ansgaard; Thomson, Evelyn; Thomson, Mark; Tibbetts, Mark James; Ticse Torres, Royer Edson; Tikhomirov, Vladimir; Tikhonov, Yury; Timoshenko, Sergey; Tiouchichine, Elodie; Tipton, Paul; Tisserant, Sylvain; Todome, Kazuki; Todorov, Theodore; Todorova-Nova, Sharka; Tojo, Junji; Tokár, Stanislav; Tokushuku, Katsuo; Tolley, Emma; Tomlinson, Lee; Tomoto, Makoto; Tompkins, Lauren; Toms, Konstantin; Tong, Baojia(Tony); Torrence, Eric; Torres, Heberth; Torró Pastor, Emma; Toth, Jozsef; Touchard, Francois; Tovey, Daniel; Trefzger, Thomas; Tremblet, Louis; Tricoli, Alessandro; Trigger, Isabel Marian; Trincaz-Duvoid, Sophie; Tripiana, Martin; Trischuk, William; Trocmé, Benjamin; Trofymov, Artur; Troncon, Clara; Trottier-McDonald, Michel; Trovatelli, Monica; Truong, Loan; Trzebinski, Maciej; Trzupek, Adam; Tseng, Jeffrey; Tsiareshka, Pavel; Tsipolitis, Georgios; Tsirintanis, Nikolaos; Tsiskaridze, Shota; Tsiskaridze, Vakhtang; Tskhadadze, Edisher; Tsui, Ka Ming; Tsukerman, Ilya; Tsulaia, Vakhtang; Tsuno, Soshi; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Tudorache, Alexandra; Tudorache, Valentina; Tuna, Alexander Naip; Tupputi, Salvatore; Turchikhin, Semen; Turecek, Daniel; Turgeman, Daniel; Turra, Ruggero; Turvey, Andrew John; Tuts, Michael; Tylmad, Maja; Tyndel, Mike; Ueda, Ikuo; Ueno, Ryuichi; Ughetto, Michael; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Unal, Guillaume; Undrus, Alexander; Unel, Gokhan; Ungaro, Francesca; Unno, Yoshinobu; Unverdorben, Christopher; Urban, Jozef; Urquijo, Phillip; Urrejola, Pedro; Usai, Giulio; Usanova, Anna; Vacavant, Laurent; Vacek, Vaclav; Vachon, Brigitte; Valderanis, Chrysostomos; Valencic, Nika; Valentinetti, Sara; Valero, Alberto; Valery, Loic; Valkar, Stefan; Vallecorsa, Sofia; Valls Ferrer, Juan Antonio; Van Den Wollenberg, Wouter; Van Der Deijl, Pieter; van der Geer, Rogier; van der Graaf, Harry; van Eldik, Niels; van Gemmeren, Peter; Van Nieuwkoop, Jacobus; van Vulpen, Ivo; van Woerden, Marius Cornelis; Vanadia, Marco; Vandelli, Wainer; Vanguri, Rami; Vaniachine, Alexandre; Vardanyan, Gagik; Vari, Riccardo; Varnes, Erich; Varol, Tulin; Varouchas, Dimitris; Vartapetian, Armen; Varvell, Kevin; Vazeille, Francois; Vazquez Schroeder, Tamara; Veatch, Jason; Veloce, Laurelle Maria; Veloso, Filipe; Veneziano, Stefano; Ventura, Andrea; Venturi, Manuela; Venturi, Nicola; Venturini, Alessio; Vercesi, Valerio; Verducci, Monica; Verkerke, Wouter; Vermeulen, Jos; Vest, Anja; Vetterli, Michel; Viazlo, Oleksandr; Vichou, Irene; Vickey, Trevor; Vickey Boeriu, Oana Elena; Viehhauser, Georg; Viel, Simon; Vigne, Ralph; Villa, Mauro; Villaplana Perez, Miguel; Vilucchi, Elisabetta; Vincter, Manuella; Vinogradov, Vladimir; Vivarelli, Iacopo; Vlachos, Sotirios; Vladoiu, Dan; Vlasak, Michal; Vogel, Marcelo; Vokac, Petr; Volpi, Guido; Volpi, Matteo; von der Schmitt, Hans; von Toerne, Eckhard; Vorobel, Vit; Vorobev, Konstantin; Vos, Marcel; Voss, Rudiger; Vossebeld, Joost; Vranjes, Nenad; Vranjes Milosavljevic, Marija; Vrba, Vaclav; Vreeswijk, Marcel; Vuillermet, Raphael; Vukotic, Ilija; Vykydal, Zdenek; Wagner, Peter; Wagner, Wolfgang; Wahlberg, Hernan; Wahrmund, Sebastian; Wakabayashi, Jun; Walder, James; Walker, Rodney; Walkowiak, Wolfgang; Wallangen, Veronica; Wang, Chao; Wang, Chao; Wang, Fuquan; Wang, Haichen; Wang, Hulin; Wang, Jike; Wang, Jin; Wang, Kuhan; Wang, Rui; Wang, Song-Ming; Wang, Tan; Wang, Tingting; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Wanotayaroj, Chaowaroj; Warburton, Andreas; Ward, Patricia; Wardrope, David Robert; Washbrook, Andrew; Watkins, Peter; Watson, Alan; Watson, Ian; Watson, Miriam; Watts, Gordon; Watts, Stephen; Waugh, Ben; Webb, Samuel; Weber, Michele; Weber, Stefan Wolf; Webster, Jordan S; Weidberg, Anthony; Weinert, Benjamin; Weingarten, Jens; Weiser, Christian; Weits, Hartger; Wells, Phillippa; Wenaus, Torre; Wengler, Thorsten; Wenig, Siegfried; Wermes, Norbert; Werner, Matthias; Werner, Per; Wessels, Martin; Wetter, Jeffrey; Whalen, Kathleen; Wharton, Andrew Mark; White, Andrew; White, Martin; White, Ryan; White, Sebastian; Whiteson, Daniel; Wickens, Fred; Wiedenmann, Werner; Wielers, Monika; Wienemann, Peter; Wiglesworth, Craig; Wiik-Fuchs, Liv Antje Mari; Wildauer, Andreas; Wilkens, Henric George; Williams, Hugh; Williams, Sarah; Willis, Christopher; Willocq, Stephane; Wilson, John; Wingerter-Seez, Isabelle; Winklmeier, Frank; Winter, Benedict Tobias; Wittgen, Matthias; Wittkowski, Josephine; Wollstadt, Simon Jakob; Wolter, Marcin Wladyslaw; Wolters, Helmut; Wosiek, Barbara; Wotschack, Jorg; Woudstra, Martin; Wozniak, Krzysztof; Wu, Mengqing; Wu, Miles; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, Xin; Wu, Yusheng; Wyatt, Terry Richard; Wynne, Benjamin; Xella, Stefania; Xu, Da; Xu, Lailin; Yabsley, Bruce; Yacoob, Sahal; Yakabe, Ryota; Yamaguchi, Daiki; Yamaguchi, Yohei; Yamamoto, Akira; Yamamoto, Shimpei; Yamanaka, Takashi; Yamauchi, Katsuya; Yamazaki, Yuji; Yan, Zhen; Yang, Haijun; Yang, Hongtao; Yang, Yi; Yang, Zongchang; Yao, Weiming; Yap, Yee Chinn; Yasu, Yoshiji; Yatsenko, Elena; Yau Wong, Kaven Henry; Ye, Jingbo; Ye, Shuwei; Yeletskikh, Ivan; Yen, Andy L; Yildirim, Eda; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Rikutaro; Yoshihara, Keisuke; Young, Charles; Young, Christopher John; Youssef, Saul; Yu, David Ren-Hwa; Yu, Jaehoon; Yu, Jiaming; Yu, Jie; Yuan, Li; Yuen, Stephanie P; Yusuff, Imran; Zabinski, Bartlomiej; Zaidan, Remi; Zaitsev, Alexander; Zakharchuk, Nataliia; Zalieckas, Justas; Zaman, Aungshuman; Zambito, Stefano; Zanello, Lucia; Zanzi, Daniele; Zeitnitz, Christian; Zeman, Martin; Zemla, Andrzej; Zeng, Jian Cong; Zeng, Qi; Zengel, Keith; Zenin, Oleg; Ženiš, Tibor; Zerwas, Dirk; Zhang, Dongliang; Zhang, Fangzhou; Zhang, Guangyi; Zhang, Huijun; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Ruiqi; Zhang, Xueyao; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zhao, Xiandong; Zhao, Yongke; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhemchugov, Alexey; Zhong, Jiahang; Zhou, Bing; Zhou, Chen; Zhou, Lei; Zhou, Li; Zhou, Mingliang; Zhou, Ning; Zhu, Cheng Guang; Zhu, Hongbo; Zhu, Junjie; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhuang, Xuai; Zhukov, Konstantin; Zibell, Andre; Zieminska, Daria; Zimine, Nikolai; Zimmermann, Christoph; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Zinonos, Zinonas; Zinser, Markus; Ziolkowski, Michael; Živković, Lidija; Zobernig, Georg; Zoccoli, Antonio; zur Nedden, Martin; Zurzolo, Giovanni; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2016-08-08

    A search for singly produced vector-like $Q$ quarks, where $Q$ can be either a $T$ quark with charge $+2/3$ or a $Y$ quark with charge $-4/3$, is performed in proton--proton collisions recorded with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. The dataset corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb$^{-1}$ and was produced with a centre-of-mass energy of $\\sqrt{s}=8$ TeV. This analysis targets $Q \\to Wb$ decays where the $W$ boson decays leptonically. A veto on massive large-radius jets is used to reject the dominant $t\\bar{t}$ background. The reconstructed $Q$-candidate mass, ranging from 0.4 to 1.2 TeV, is used in the search to discriminate signal from background processes. No significant deviation from the Standard Model expectation is observed, and limits are set on the $Q \\to Wb$ cross-section times branching ratio. The results are also interpreted as limits on the $QWb$ coupling and the mixing with the Standard Model sector for a singlet $T$ quark or a $Y$ quark from a doublet. $T$ quarks with masses below 0.95...

  9. Improving the quality of Laminaria japonica-based diet for Apostichopus japonicus through degradation of its algin content with Bacillus amyloliquefaciens WB1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xitao; Wang, Lili; Che, Jian; Li, Zhen; Zhang, Jiancheng; Li, Xiaoyu; Hu, Weiqing; Xu, Yongping

    2015-07-01

    Laminaria japonica feedstuff is used as a substitute for Sargassum thunbergii in the small-scale culturing of Apostichopus japonicus (sea cucumber) because of its abundant sources and low price in China. However, the difficulty associated with the degradation of algin by A. japonicus and, hence, its utilization have limited the practical value of L. japonica feedstuff in sea cucumber farming. In this study, A. japonicus individuals were fed with L. japonica feedstuff pretreated, via fermentation with the algin-degrading bacterial strain, Bacillus amyloliquefaciens WB1, and their growth performance, nonspecific immune responses, and resistance against Vibrio infection were then determined over a 60-day period. Growth performance of these individuals was similar to those fed with a commercial feedstuff made from S. thunbergii (mean weight gain of 5.79 versus 5.69 g on day 60), but was significantly (P content had been degraded by B. amyloliquefaciens WB1 could improve the growth performance of A. japonicus as well its resistance to bacterial infection. It could therefore act as an alternative to S. thunbergii and is economical at the same time.

  10. Predicting a graphene-like WB4 nanosheet with a double Dirac cone, an ultra-high Fermi velocity and significant gap opening by spin-orbit coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chunmei; Jiao, Yalong; Ma, Fengxian; Bottle, Steven; Zhao, Mingwen; Chen, Zhongfang; Du, Aijun

    2017-02-15

    The zero-band gap nature of graphene prevents it from performing as a semi-conductor in modern electronics. Although various graphene modification strategies have been developed to address this limitation, the very small band gap of these materials and the suppressed charge carrier mobility of the devices developed still significantly hinder graphene's applications. In this work, a two dimensional (2D) WB 4 monolayer, which exhibits a double Dirac cone, was conceived and assessed using density functional theory (DFT) methods, which would provide a sizable band gap while maintaining higher charge mobility with a Fermi velocity of 1.099 × 10 6 m s -1 . Strong spin-orbit-coupling can generate an observable band gap of up to 0.27 eV that primarily originates from the d-orbit of the heavy metal atom W; therefore a 2D WB 4 nanosheet would be operable at room temperature (T = 300 K) and would be a promising candidate to fabricate nanoelectronics in the upcoming post-silicon era. The phonon-spectrum and ab initio molecular dynamics calculations further demonstrate the dynamic and thermal stability of such nanosheets, thus, suggesting a potentially synthesizable Dirac material.

  11. CT cystography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsili, A.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Cancer of the urinary bladder is one of the commonest urothelial neoplasms. Conventional cystoscopy remains the mainstay in the diagnosis of urinary bladder carcinomas. But it is an invasive and uncomfortable procedure, associated with complications. Computed tomographic (CT) virtual cystoscopy has been proposed as an alternative imaging modality with potential advantages in the detection of urinary bladder neoplasms and good patient acceptance. It is a minimally invasive technique, allowing imaging of the urinary bladder in multiple planes and a 360 0 view. CT cystoscopy provides information about the location, size and morphologic features of urinary bladder lesions, indicating appropriate areas for biopsy. It can be performed in cases in which conventional cystoscopy is not feasible, such as in the presence of urethral strictures, marked prostatic hypertrophy or active bleeding, and in cases in which cystoscopic findings are inconclusive. The technique can be used to evaluate areas of the urinary bladder difficult to evaluate with cystoscopy, such as the anterior bladder neck and narrowmouthed diverticula. Finally, virtual cystoscopy provides both intraluminal and extraluminal pathologic changes, so intravesical disease and exrtavesical extension can be evaluated in the same study. One of the limitations of this technique is the difficulty to demonstrate small-sized lesions. The introduction of multi-detector row CT (MDCT) scanners was a major technological advancement because among other things it substantially improves z-axis resolution by reducing section collimation and allowing the detection of very small lesions. The near isotropic or isotropic pixels achieved with a multidetector CT scanner, enable the creation of multiplanar reformatted images with a resolution very close to that of the axial images and three-dimensional (3D) renderings of outstanding quality. Transverse, multiplanar reformations and virtual endoscopic images are complementary

  12. Cardiac CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dewey, Marc

    2011-01-01

    Computed tomography of the heart has become a highly accurate diagnostic modality that is attracting increasing attention. This extensively illustrated book aims to assist the reader in integrating cardiac CT into daily clinical practice, while also reviewing its current technical status and applications. Clear guidance is provided on the performance and interpretation of imaging using the latest technology, which offers greater coverage, better spatial resolution, and faster imaging. The specific features of scanners from all four main vendors, including those that have only recently become available, are presented. Among the wide range of applications and issues to be discussed are coronary artery bypass grafts, stents, plaques, and anomalies, cardiac valves, congenital and acquired heart disease, and radiation exposure. Upcoming clinical uses of cardiac CT, such as plaque imaging and functional assessment, are also explored. (orig.)

  13. Cardiac CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewey, Marc [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologie

    2011-07-01

    Computed tomography of the heart has become a highly accurate diagnostic modality that is attracting increasing attention. This extensively illustrated book aims to assist the reader in integrating cardiac CT into daily clinical practice, while also reviewing its current technical status and applications. Clear guidance is provided on the performance and interpretation of imaging using the latest technology, which offers greater coverage, better spatial resolution, and faster imaging. The specific features of scanners from all four main vendors, including those that have only recently become available, are presented. Among the wide range of applications and issues to be discussed are coronary artery bypass grafts, stents, plaques, and anomalies, cardiac valves, congenital and acquired heart disease, and radiation exposure. Upcoming clinical uses of cardiac CT, such as plaque imaging and functional assessment, are also explored. (orig.)

  14. Somatostatin receptor PET in neuroendocrine tumours: 68Ga-DOTA0,Tyr3-octreotide versus 68Ga-DOTA0-lanreotide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Putzer, Daniel; Kroiss, Alexander; Waitz, Dietmar; Gabriel, Michael; Uprimny, Christian; Guggenberg, Elisabeth von; Decristoforo, Clemens; Warwitz, Boris; Virgolini, Irene Johanna; Traub-Weidinger, Tatjana; Widmann, Gerlig

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of 68 Ga-labelled DOTA 0 -lanreotide ( 68 Ga-DOTA-LAN) on the diagnostic assessment of neuroendocrine tumour (NET) patients with low to moderate uptake on planar somatostatin receptor (SSTR) scintigraphy or 68 Ga-labelled DOTA 0 ,Tyr 3 -octreotide ( 68 Ga-DOTA-TOC) positron emission tomography (PET). Fifty-three patients with histologically confirmed NET and clinical signs of progressive disease, who had not qualified for peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) on planar SSTR scintigraphy or 68 Ga-DOTA-TOC PET (n = 38) due to lack of tracer uptake, underwent 68 Ga-DOTA-LAN PET to evaluate a treatment option with 90 Y-labelled lanreotide according to the MAURITIUS trial. The included patients received 150 ± 30 MBq of each radiopharmaceutical intravenously. PET scans were acquired 60-90 min after intravenous bolus injection. Image results from both PET scans were compared head to head, focusing on the intensity of tracer uptake in terms of treatment decision. CT was used for morphologic correlation of tumour lesions. To further evaluate the binding affinities of each tracer, quantitative and qualitative values were calculated for target lesions. 68 Ga-DOTA-LAN and 68 Ga-DOTA-TOC both showed equivalent findings in 24/38 patients when fused PET/CT images were interpreted. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of 68 Ga-DOTA-LAN in comparison to CT were 0.63, 0.5 and 0.62 (n = 53; p 68 Ga-DOTA-TOC in comparison to CT 0.78, 0.5 and 0.76 (n = 38; p 68 Ga-DOTA-TOC showed a significantly higher maximum standardized uptake value (SUV max ) regarding the primary tumour in 25 patients (p 68 Ga-DOTA-LAN. Corresponding values of both PET scans for tumour and liver did not show any significant correlation. 68 Ga-DOTA-TOC revealed more tumour sites than 68 Ga-DOTA-LAN (106 vs 53). The tumour to background ratios for tumour and liver calculated from SUV max measurements were significantly higher for 68 Ga-DOTA-TOC than 68 Ga

  15. CT-Urography; Urografia CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalla Palma, Ludovico; Grotto, Maurizio [Trieste Univ., Trieste (Italy). Dipartimento di scienze cliniche, morfologiche e tecnologiche, UCO di radiologia; Morra, Aldo [CRO, Aviano (Italy). Reparto di radiologia

    2005-09-15

    In this paper we present an overview of CT-Urography. With the advent of multislice CT scanners and the evolution of image processing methods this technique now affords optimal urographic images comparable to those obtained with conventional techniques. We describe the acquisition techniques and protocols used by the various authors. Effective radiation dose has conditioned the use of CT-Urography so that the tendency today is to reduce the number of scans by performing, after the non enhanced scan, a single contrast-enhanced scan comprising both the nephrographic and urographic phase. With the use of multislice CT the quality of the urogram improves with the number of slices. We illustrate a variety of processing techniques, multiplanar reconstruction (MPR), maximum (MIP) and average intensity projection (AIP) and volume rendering (VR) and present a series of upper urinary tract tumours testifying to the superiority of the AIP technique over MIP. We then review the results of comparative studies of CT-Urography with conventional urography in upper urinary tract diagnostics. Finally, we describe the advantages and limitations of CT-Urography. [Italian] Gli Autori presentano una panoramica sulla Urografia TC (Uro TC). L'avvento della TC multistrato e l'evoluzione delle tecniche di elaborazione consentono di ottenere dei quadri urografici ottimali comparativi con quelli convenzionali. Vengono ricordate le varie tecniche di acquisizione e i protocolli usati dai vari Autori. La dose effettiva di radiazioni ha rappresentato uno dei fattori condizionanti per cui oggi prevale l'orientamento di ridurre il numero di scansioni, considerando dopo la scansione senza mezzo di contrasto un'unica scansione contrasto grafica comprendente sia la fase nefrografica che quella urografica. Con l'uso della TC multistrato la qualita dell'urogramma migliora con l'aumento del numero degli strati. Vengono descritte le varie tecniche di elaborazione, la

  16. Role of combined DWIBS/3D-CE-T1w whole-body MRI in tumor staging: Comparison with PET-CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manenti, Guglielmo; Cicciò, Carmelo; Squillaci, Ettore; Strigari, Lidia; Calabria, Ferdinando; Danieli, Roberta

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the diagnostic performance of whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (WB-MRI) by diffusion-weighted whole-body imaging with background body signal suppression (DWIBS) in malignant tumor detection and the potential diagnostic advantages in generating fused DWIBS/3D-contrast enhanced T1w (3D-CE-T1w) images. Methods: 45 cancer patients underwent 18F-FDG PET-CT and WB-MRI for staging purpose. Fused DWIBS/3D-CE T1w images were generated off-line. 3D-CE-T1w, DWIBS images alone and fused with 3D-CE T1w were compared by two readers groups for detection of primary diseases and local/distant metastases. Diagnostic performance between the three WB-MRI data sets was assessed using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. Imaging exams and histopathological results were used as standard of references. Results: Areas under the ROC curves of DWIBS vs. 3D-CE-T1w vs. both sequences in fused fashion were 0.97, 0.978, and 1.00, respectively. The diagnostic performance in tumor detection of fused DWIBS/3D-CE-T1w images were statistically superior to DWIBS (p < 0.001) and 3D-CE-T1w (p ≤ 0.002); while the difference between DWIBS and 3D-CE-T1w did not show statistical significance difference. Detection rates of malignancy did not differ between WB-MRI with DWIBS and 18F-FDG PET-CT. Conclusion: WB-MRI with DWIBS is to be considered as alternative tool to conventional whole-body methods for tumor staging and during follow-up in cancer patients.

  17. Whole body MRI (WB-MRI) assessment of metastatic spread in prostate cancer: Therapeutic perspectives on targeted management of oligometastatic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larbi, Ahmed; Dallaudière, Benjamin; Pasoglou, Vasiliki; Padhani, Anwar; Michoux, Nicolas; Vande Berg, Bruno C; Tombal, Bertrand; Lecouvet, Frédéric E

    2016-08-01

    To determine the proportion of prostate cancer (PCa) patients with oligometastatic disease (≤3 synchronous lesions) using whole body magnetic resonance imaging with diffusion-weighted imaging (WB-MRI/DWI). To determine the proportion of patients with nodal disease confined within currently accepted target areas for extended lymph node dissection (eLND) and pelvic external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). Two radiologists reviewed WB-MRI/DWI studies in 96 consecutive newly diagnosed metastatic PCa patients; 46 patients with newly diagnosed castration naive PCa (mHNPC) and 50 patients with first appearance of metastasis during monitoring for non-metastatic castration resistant PCa (M0 to mCRPC). The distribution of metastatic deposits was assessed and the proportions of patients with oligometastatic disease and with LN metastases located within eLND and EBRT targets were determined. Twenty-eight percent of mHNPC and 50% of mCPRC entered the metastatic disease with ≤3 sites. Bone metastases (BM) were identified in 68.8% patients; 71.7% of mHNPC and 66% mCRPC patients. Most commonly involved areas were iliac bones and lumbar spine. Enlarged lymph nodes (LN) were detected in 68.7% of patients; 69.6% of mHNPC and 68.0% of mCRPC. Most commonly involved areas were para-aortic, inter-aortico-cava, and external iliac areas. BM and LN were detected concomitantly in 41% of mHNPC and 34% of mCRPC. Visceral metastases were detected in 6.7%. Metastatic disease was confined to LN located within the accepted boundaries of eLND or pelvic EBRT target areas in only ≤25% and ≤30% of patients, respectively. Non-invasive mapping of metastatic landing sites in PCa using WB-MRI/DWI shows that 28% of the mHNPC patients, and 52% of the mCRPC can be classified as oligometastatic, thus challenging the concept of metastatic targeted therapy. More than two thirds of metastatic patients have LN located outside the usually recommended targets of eLND and pelvic EBRT. Prophylactic or salvage

  18. Electron magnetotransport in GaAs/AlGaAs superlattices with weak and strong inter-well coupling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Smrčka, Ludvík; Goncharuk, Natalya; Svoboda, Pavel; Vašek, Petr; Krupko, Yuriy; Wegscheider, W.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 39, 3-4 (2008), s. 411-413 ISSN 0026-2692 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC510; GA AV ČR KAN400100652 Grant - others:EC(XE) RITA -CT-2003-505474 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : superlattice * Fermi surface * magnetoresistance * Hall effect * Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.859, year: 2008

  19. Measurement of B(t→Wb)/B(t→Wq) in top-quark-pair decays using dilepton events and the full CDF Run II data set.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, T; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Auerbach, B; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Bae, T; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartos, P; Bauce, M; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Bland, K R; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brucken, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Butti, P; Buzatu, A; Calamba, A; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Canelli, F; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Clark, A; Clarke, C; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Corbo, M; Cordelli, M; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Cremonesi, M; Cruz, D; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; d'Ascenzo, N; Datta, M; de Barbaro, P; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; D'Errico, M; Devoto, F; Di Canto, A; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; Donati, S; D'Onofrio, M; Dorigo, M; Driutti, A; Ebina, K; Edgar, R; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, S; Esham, B; Farrington, S; Fernández Ramos, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Frisch, H; Funakoshi, Y; Galloni, C; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giromini, P; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldin, D; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González López, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gramellini, E; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Hahn, S R; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Harrington-Taber, T; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hocker, A; Hong, Z; Hopkins, W; Hou, S; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kambeitz, M; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kasmi, A; Kato, Y; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S H; Kim, S B; Kim, Y J; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirby, M; Knoepfel, K; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Kuhr, T; Kurata, M; Laasanen, A T; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lannon, K; Latino, G; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Leo, S; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Limosani, A; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Liu, H; Liu, Q; Liu, T; Lockwitz, S; Loginov, A; Lucchesi, D; Lucà, A; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Madrak, R; Maestro, P; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Marchese, L; Margaroli, F; Marino, P; Martínez, M; Matera, K; Mattson, M E; Mazzacane, A; Mazzanti, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Mietlicki, D; Mitra, A; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Nett, J; Neu, C; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Noh, S Y; Norniella, O; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Ortolan, L; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Palni, P; Papadimitriou, V; Parker, W; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pilot, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poprocki, S; Potamianos, K; Pranko, A; Prokoshin, F; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Ranjan, N; Redondo Fernández, I; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodriguez, T; Rolli, S; Ronzani, M; Roser, R; Rosner, J L; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Sakumoto, W K; Sakurai, Y; Santi, L; Sato, K; Saveliev, V; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scuri, F; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sforza, F; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shreyber-Tecker, I; Simonenko, A; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Song, H; Sorin, V; St Denis, R; Stancari, M; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Sudo, Y; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Takemasa, K; Takeuchi, Y; Tang, J; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Thom, J; Thomson, E; Thukral, V; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Trovato, M; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vernieri, C; Vidal, M; Vilar, R; Vizán, J; Vogel, M; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Waters, D; Wester, W C; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wilbur, S; Williams, H H; Wilson, J S; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, H; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wu, Z; Yamamoto, K; Yamato, D; Yang, T; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W-M; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Zanetti, A M; Zeng, Y; Zhou, C; Zucchelli, S

    2014-06-06

    We present a measurement of the ratio of the top-quark branching fractions R=B(t→Wb)/B(t→Wq), where q represents any quark flavor, in events with two charged leptons, imbalance in total transverse energy, and at least two jets. The measurement uses proton-antiproton collision data at center-of-mass energy 1.96 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 8.7  fb^{-1} collected with the Collider Detector at Fermilab during Run II of the Tevatron. We measure R to be 0.87±0.07, and extract the magnitude of the top-bottom quark coupling to be |V_{tb}|=0.93±0.04, assuming three generations of quarks. Under these assumptions, a lower limit of |V_{tb}|>0.85(0.87) at 95% (90%) credibility level is set.

  20. Ga penetration into polymers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hnatowicz, Vladimír; Švorčík, V.; Efimenko, K.; Rybka, V.

    1999-01-01

    Roč. 68, - (1999), s. 357-358 ISSN 0947-8396 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/96/0077; GA AV ČR KSK1048601 Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 1.753, year: 1999

  1. CT urography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korobkin, M. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2005-11-15

    With the advent of multidetector row CT scanners, evaluation of the urothelium of the entire urinary tract with high-resolution thin sections during a single breath-hold has become a reality. Multidetector CT urography (MDCTU) is a single examination that allows evaluation of potential urinary tract calculi, renal parenchymal masses, and both benign and malignant urothelial lesions. Initial results with this new technique are encouraging. Current investigations of MDCTU focus on methods to improve opacification and distension of the upper urinary tract - the collecting systems, pelvis, and ureters. The role of abdominal compression, infusion of saline and/or furosemide, and optimal time delay of excretory phase imaging is being explored. Upper tract urothelial malignancies, including small lesions less the 5 mmin diameter, can be detected with high sensitivity. Methods to reduce radiation exposure are being explored, including split-bolus contrast injection techniques that combine nephrographic and excretory phases into a single phase. It is likely that in the near future, radiological evaluation of significant unexplained hematuria or of known or prior urothelial malignancy will consist of a single examination - MDCTU. (orig.)

  2. Colorectal cancer staging: comparison of whole-body PET/CT and PET/MR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalano, Onofrio A; Coutinho, Artur M; Sahani, Dushyant V; Vangel, Mark G; Gee, Michael S; Hahn, Peter F; Witzel, Thomas; Soricelli, Andrea; Salvatore, Marco; Catana, Ciprian; Mahmood, Umar; Rosen, Bruce R; Gervais, Debra

    2017-04-01

    Correct staging is imperative for colorectal cancer (CRC) since it influences both prognosis and management. Several imaging methods are used for this purpose, with variable performance. Positron emission tomography-magnetic resonance (PET/MR) is an innovative imaging technique recently employed for clinical application. The present study was undertaken to compare the staging accuracy of whole-body positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET/CT) with whole-body PET/MR in patients with both newly diagnosed and treated colorectal cancer. Twenty-six patients, who underwent same day whole-body (WB) PET/CT and WB-PET/MR, were evaluated. PET/CT and PET/MR studies were interpreted by consensus by a radiologist and a nuclear medicine physician. Correlations with prior imaging and follow-up studies were used as the reference standard. Correct staging was compared between methods using McNemar's Chi square test. The two methods were in agreement and correct for 18/26 (69%) patients, and in agreement and incorrect for one patient (3.8%). PET/MR and PET/CT stages for the remaining 7/26 patients (27%) were discordant, with PET/MR staging being correct in all seven cases. PET/MR significantly outperformed PET/CT overall for accurate staging (P = 0.02). PET/MR outperformed PET/CT in CRC staging. PET/MR might allow accurate local and distant staging of CRC patients during both at the time of diagnosis and during follow-up.

  3. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... are the limitations of CT of the Sinuses? What is CT (Computed Tomography) of the Sinuses? Computed ... nasal cavity by small openings. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? CT ...

  4. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the limitations of CT Scanning of the Head? What is CT Scanning of the Head? Computed tomography, ... than regular radiographs (x-rays). top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? CT ...

  5. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... scanners to obtain multiple slices in a single rotation. These scanners, called multislice CT or multidetector CT, ... preferable over CT scanning. top of page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org: Radiation Therapy for Bladder ...

  6. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple slices in a single rotation. These scanners, called multislice CT or multidetector CT, ...

  7. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple slices in a single rotation. These scanners, called multislice CT or multidetector CT, ...

  8. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple slices in a single rotation. These scanners, called multislice CT or multidetector CT, ...

  9. Metabolic tumor burden quantified on [{sup 18}F]FDG PET/CT improves TNM staging of lung cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapa, Paula; Isidoro, Jorge; Costa, Gracinda [Centro Hospitalar e Universitario de Coimbra, Nuclear Medicine Department, Coimbra (Portugal); Oliveiros, Barbara [University of Coimbra, Laboratory of Biostatistics and Medical Informatics, Faculty of Medicine, Coimbra (Portugal); University of Coimbra, Institute for Biomedical Imaging and Life Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Coimbra (Portugal); Marques, Margarida [University of Coimbra, Laboratory of Biostatistics and Medical Informatics, Faculty of Medicine, Coimbra (Portugal); Centro Hospitalar e Universitario de Coimbra, Technology and Information Systems Department, Coimbra (Portugal); Caseiro Alves, Filipe [Centro Hospitalar e Universitario de Coimbra, Radiology Department, Coimbra (Portugal); Nascimento Costa, J.M. [University of Coimbra, University Oncology Clinic, Faculty of Medicine, Coimbra (Portugal); Lima, Joao Pedroso de [Centro Hospitalar e Universitario de Coimbra, Nuclear Medicine Department, Coimbra (Portugal); University of Coimbra, Institute of Nuclear Sciences Applied to Health-ICNAS, Coimbra (Portugal)

    2017-12-15

    The purpose of our study was to test a new staging algorithm, combining clinical TNM staging (cTNM) with whole-body metabolic active tumor volume (MATV-WB), with the goal of improving prognostic ability and stratification power. Initial staging [{sup 18}F]FDG PET/CT of 278 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients, performed between January/2011 and April/2016, 74(26.6%) women, 204(73.4%) men; aged 34-88 years (mean ± SD:66 ± 10), was retrospectively evaluated, and MATV-WB was quantified. Each patient's follow-up time was recorded: 0.7-83.6 months (mean ± SD:25.1 ± 20.3). MATV-WB was an independent and statistically-significant predictor of overall survival (p < 0.001). The overall survival predictive ability of MATV-WB (C index: mean ± SD = 0.7071 ± 0.0009) was not worse than cTNM (C index: mean ± SD = 0.7031 ± 0.007) (Z = -0.143, p = 0.773). Estimated mean survival times of 56.3 ± 3.0 (95%CI:50.40-62.23) and 21.7 ± 2.2 months (95%CI:17.34-25.98) (Log-Rank = 77.48, p < 0.001), one-year survival rate of 86.8% and of 52.8%, and five-year survival rate of 53.6% and no survivors, were determined, respectively, for patients with MATV-WB < 49.5 and MATV-WB ≥ 49.5. Patients with MATV-WB ≥ 49.5 had a mortality risk 2.9-5.8 times higher than those with MATV-WB < 49.5 (HR = 4.12, p < 0.001). MATV-WB cutoff points were also determined for each cTNM stage: 23.7(I), 49.5(II), 52(III), 48.8(IV) (p = 0.029, p = 0.227, p = 0.025 and p = 0.001, respectively). At stages I, III and IV there was a statistically-significant difference in the estimated mean overall survival time between groups of patients defined by the cutoff points (p = 0.007, p = 0.004 and p < 0.001, respectively). At stage II (p = 0.365), there was a clinically-significant difference of about 12 months between the groups. In all cTNM stages, patients with MATV-WB ≥ cutoff points had lower survival rates. Combined clinical TNM-PET staging (cTNM-P) was then tested: Stage I < 23.7; Stage I

  10. Development of 68Ga ethyl cysteinate dimer for PET studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alireza Mirzaei; Jalilian, A.R.; Gholamali Shabani; Ashraf Fakhari; Mehdi Akhlaghi; Davood Beiki

    2016-01-01

    In this work development of 68 Ga-ethyl cysteinate dimer ( 68 Ga-ECD) a 68 Ga tracer for possible cerebral blood flow based on 99m Tc ECD homolog is reported. 68 Ga-ECD was prepared using generator-based 68 GaCl 3 and ECD at optimized conditions. Quality control, stability, partition co-efficient and the biodistribution of the tracer (by tissue counting and PET/CT in rats) was studied. Significant metabolism of the lipophilic tracer into water soluble metabolite(s) led to urinary excretion of the tracer, un-comparable to that of homologous 99m Tc-compound. Cardiac uptake of the complex suggests formation of a possible lipophil cationic complex and/or metabolite. (author)

  11. SPECT/CT with radiolabeled somatostatin analogues in the evaluation of systemic granulomatous infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Paulo Henrique Silva; de Souza, Thiago Ferreira; Moretti, Maria Luiza; Resende, Mariangela Ribeiro; Mengatti, Jair; de Lima, Mariana da Cunha Lopes; Santos, Allan Oliveira; Ramos, Celso Darío

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate SPECT/CT with radiolabeled somatostatin analogues (RSAs) in systemic granulomatous infections in comparison with gallium-67 ( 67 Ga) citrate scintigraphy. We studied 28 patients with active systemic granulomatous infections, including tuberculosis, paracoccidioidomycosis, pneumocystosis, cryptococcosis, aspergillosis, leishmaniasis, infectious vasculitis, and an unspecified opportunistic infection. Of the 28 patients, 23 had started specific treatment before the study outset. All patients underwent whole-body SPECT/CT imaging: 7 after injection of 99m Tc-EDDA-HYNIC-TOC, and 21 after injection of 111 In-DTPA-octreotide. All patients also underwent 67 Ga citrate imaging, except for one patient who died before the 67 Ga was available. In 20 of the 27 patients who underwent imaging with both tracers, 27 sites of active disease were detected by 67 Ga citrate imaging and by SPECT/CT with an RSA. Both tracers had negative results in the other 7 patients. RSA uptake was visually lower than 67 Ga uptake in 11 of the 20 patients with positive images and similar to 67 Ga uptake in the other 9 patients. The only patient who did not undergo 67 Ga scintigraphy underwent 99m Tc-EDDA-HYNIC-TOC SPECT/CT-guided biopsy of a lung cavity with focal RSA uptake, which turned to be positive for aspergillosis. SPECT/CT with 99m Tc-EDDA-HYNIC-TOC or 111 In-DTPA-octreotide seems to be a good alternative to 67 Ga citrate imaging for the evaluation of patients with systemic granulomatous disease.

  12. Comparison of the utility of whole-body MRI with and without contrast-enhanced Quick 3D and double RF fat suppression techniques, conventional whole-body MRI, PET/CT and conventional examination for assessment of recurrence in NSCLC patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohno, Yoshiharu; Nishio, Mizuho; Koyama, Hisanobu; Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Sumiaki; Takenaka, Daisuke; Seki, Shinichiro; Tsubakimoto, Maho; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare diagnostic capabilities for assessment of recurrence in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients by contrast-enhanced whole-body MRI (CE-WB-MRI) with and without CE-Quick 3D and double RF fat suppression technique (DFS), FDG-PET/CT and conventional radiological examinations. Materials and methods: A total of 134 pathologically proven and completely resected NSCLC patients (78 males, 56 females; mean age: 72 years) underwent FDG-PET/CT, CE-WB-MRI with and without Quick 3D and DFS at 3 T as well as conventional radiological examinations. The probability of recurrence was assessed with a 5-point scoring system on a per-patient basis, and final diagnosis was made by consensus between two readers. The capability for overall recurrence assessment by all the methods was compared by means of ROC analysis and their sensitivity, specificity and accuracy by means of McNemar's test. Results: Although areas under the curve did not show any significant differences, specificity (100%) and accuracy (95.5%) of CE-WB-MRI with CE-Quick 3D and DFS were significantly higher than those of FDG-PET/CT (specificity: 93.6%, p = 0.02; accuracy: 89.6%, p = 0.01) and conventional radiological examinations (specificity: 92.7%, p = 0.01; accuracy: 91.0%, p = 0.03). In addition, specificity of CE-WB-MRI without CE-Quick 3D and DFS (100%) was significantly higher than that of FDG-PET/CT (p = 0.02) and conventional radiological examinations (p = 0.01). Conclusion: Specificity and accuracy of CE-WB-MRI with CE-Quick 3D and DFS for assessment of recurrence in NSCLC patients are at least as high as, or higher than those of others

  13. Comparison of the utility of whole-body MRI with and without contrast-enhanced Quick 3D and double RF fat suppression techniques, conventional whole-body MRI, PET/CT and conventional examination for assessment of recurrence in NSCLC patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohno, Yoshiharu, E-mail: yosirad@kobe-u.ac.jp [Advanced Biomedical Imaging Research Center, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Division of Functional and Diagnostic Imaging Research, Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan); Nishio, Mizuho [Advanced Biomedical Imaging Research Center, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Division of Functional and Diagnostic Imaging Research, Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan); Koyama, Hisanobu [Division of Radiology, Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan); Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Sumiaki [Advanced Biomedical Imaging Research Center, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Division of Functional and Diagnostic Imaging Research, Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan); Takenaka, Daisuke [Division of Radiology, Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan); Department of Radiology, Hyogo Cancer Center, Akashi (Japan); Seki, Shinichiro [Division of Radiology, Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan); Tsubakimoto, Maho [Division of Radiology, Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan); Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Science, University of the Ryukyus, Nishihara, Okinawa (Japan); Sugimura, Kazuro [Division of Radiology, Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan)

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare diagnostic capabilities for assessment of recurrence in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients by contrast-enhanced whole-body MRI (CE-WB-MRI) with and without CE-Quick 3D and double RF fat suppression technique (DFS), FDG-PET/CT and conventional radiological examinations. Materials and methods: A total of 134 pathologically proven and completely resected NSCLC patients (78 males, 56 females; mean age: 72 years) underwent FDG-PET/CT, CE-WB-MRI with and without Quick 3D and DFS at 3 T as well as conventional radiological examinations. The probability of recurrence was assessed with a 5-point scoring system on a per-patient basis, and final diagnosis was made by consensus between two readers. The capability for overall recurrence assessment by all the methods was compared by means of ROC analysis and their sensitivity, specificity and accuracy by means of McNemar's test. Results: Although areas under the curve did not show any significant differences, specificity (100%) and accuracy (95.5%) of CE-WB-MRI with CE-Quick 3D and DFS were significantly higher than those of FDG-PET/CT (specificity: 93.6%, p = 0.02; accuracy: 89.6%, p = 0.01) and conventional radiological examinations (specificity: 92.7%, p = 0.01; accuracy: 91.0%, p = 0.03). In addition, specificity of CE-WB-MRI without CE-Quick 3D and DFS (100%) was significantly higher than that of FDG-PET/CT (p = 0.02) and conventional radiological examinations (p = 0.01). Conclusion: Specificity and accuracy of CE-WB-MRI with CE-Quick 3D and DFS for assessment of recurrence in NSCLC patients are at least as high as, or higher than those of others.

  14. Production of a thermostable 1,3-1,4-β-glucanase mutant in Bacillus subtilis WB600 at a high fermentation capacity and its potential application in the brewing industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Chengtuo; Liu, Chunfeng; Li, Yongxian; Zheng, Feiyun; Wang, Jinjing; Li, Qi

    2018-02-01

    1,3-1,4-β-glucanase was an important biotechnological aid in the brewing industry. In a previous research, a Bacillus BglTO mutant (BglTO) with high tolerance towards high temperature and low-pH conditions was constructed and expressed in Escherichia coli. However, E. coli was not a suitable host for enzyme production in food industry. Therefore, the present work aimed to achieve the high-level expression of BglTO in Bacillus subtilis WB600 and to test its effect in Congress mashing. The β-glucanase mutant was successfully expressed in B. subtilis WB600 and favorable plasmid segregation and structural stability were observed. The maximal extracellular activity of β-glucanase in recombinant B. subtilis WB600 reached 4840.4UmL -1 after cultivation condition optimization, which was 1.94-fold higher than that before optimization. The fermentation capacity of recombinant B. subtilis reached 242.02UmL -1 h -1 , which was the highest among all reported β-glucanases. The addition of BglTO in Congress mashing significantly reduced the filtration time and viscosity of mash by 29.7% and 12.3%, respectively, which was superior to two commercial enzymes. These favorable properties indicated that B. subtilis WB600 was a suitable host for production of BglTO, which was promising for application in the brewing industry. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Improved InGaN/GaN quantum wells on treated GaN template with a Ga-rich GaN interlayer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, Zhilai; Shen, Xiyang; Wu, Zhengyuan; Zhang, Tong-Yi

    2015-01-01

    Treated GaN template was achieved by in situ droplet epitaxy of a Ga-rich GaN interlayer on the conventional GaN template. InGaN/GaN quantum wells (QWs) were grown on the conventional and treated GaN templates under the same growth conditions and then comprehensively characterized. The indium homogeneity in the InGaN layers and the interface sharpness between InGaN and GaN layers of the InGaN/GaN QWs on the treated GaN template were significantly improved. The emission intensity from the InGaN/GaN QWs on the treated GaN template was enhanced by 20% than that on the conventional GaN template, which was attributed to the strain reduction and the improvement in crystalline quality. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  16. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Z Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Pediatric computed tomography (CT) is a fast, painless exam that uses special ... the limitations of Children's CT? What is Children's CT? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT ...

  17. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Head Computed tomography (CT) of the head uses special x-ray ... What is CT Scanning of the Head? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT ...

  18. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Abdomen and Pelvis Computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen and pelvis is a ... is CT Scanning of the Abdomen/Pelvis? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT ...

  19. Measurement of the ratio $B(t \\to Wb)/B(t \\to Wq)$ in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Khachatryan, Vardan; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Bergauer, Thomas; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Fabjan, Christian; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hartl, Christian; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Kiesenhofer, Wolfgang; Knünz, Valentin; Krammer, Manfred; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Mikulec, Ivan; Rabady, Dinyar; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Herbert; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Taurok, Anton; Treberer-Treberspurg, Wolfgang; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Alderweireldt, Sara; Bansal, Monika; Bansal, Sunil; Cornelis, Tom; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Knutsson, Albert; Luyckx, Sten; Ochesanu, Silvia; Roland, Benoit; Rougny, Romain; Van De Klundert, Merijn; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Blekman, Freya; Blyweert, Stijn; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Daci, Nadir; Heracleous, Natalie; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Keaveney, James; Kim, Tae Jeong; Lowette, Steven; Maes, Michael; Olbrechts, Annik; Python, Quentin; Strom, Derek; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Villella, Ilaria; Caillol, Cécile; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Favart, Laurent; Gay, Arnaud; Grebenyuk, Anastasia; Léonard, Alexandre; Marage, Pierre Edouard; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Perniè, Luca; Reis, Thomas; Seva, Tomislav; Thomas, Laurent; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Wang, Jian; Adler, Volker; Beernaert, Kelly; Benucci, Leonardo; Cimmino, Anna; Costantini, Silvia; Crucy, Shannon; Dildick, Sven; Fagot, Alexis; Garcia, Guillaume; Klein, Benjamin; Mccartin, Joseph; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Salva Diblen, Sinem; Sigamani, Michael; Strobbe, Nadja; Thyssen, Filip; Tytgat, Michael; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Beluffi, Camille; Bruno, Giacomo; Castello, Roberto; Caudron, Adrien; Ceard, Ludivine; Da Silveira, Gustavo Gil; Delaere, Christophe; Du Pree, Tristan; Favart, Denis; Forthomme, Laurent; Giammanco, Andrea; Hollar, Jonathan; Jez, Pavel; Komm, Matthias; Lemaitre, Vincent; Liao, Junhui; Nuttens, Claude; Pagano, Davide; Pin, Arnaud; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Popov, Andrey; Quertenmont, Loic; Selvaggi, Michele; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Beliy, Nikita; Caebergs, Thierry; Daubie, Evelyne; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Alves, Gilvan; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; Dos Reis Martins, Thiago; Pol, Maria Elena; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Carvalho, Wagner; Chinellato, Jose; Custódio, Analu; Melo Da Costa, Eliza; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Malbouisson, Helena; Malek, Magdalena; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santaolalla, Javier; Santoro, Alberto; Sznajder, Andre; Tonelli Manganote, Edmilson José; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; De Almeida Dias, Flavia; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; 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Dalchenko, Mykhailo; Dobrzynski, Ludwik; Filipovic, Nicolas; Florent, Alice; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Mastrolorenzo, Luca; Miné, Philippe; Mironov, Camelia; Naranjo, Ivo Nicolas; Nguyen, Matthew; Ochando, Christophe; Paganini, Pascal; Salerno, Roberto; Sauvan, Jean-baptiste; Sirois, Yves; Veelken, Christian; Yilmaz, Yetkin; Zabi, Alexandre; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Andrea, Jeremy; Aubin, Alexandre; Bloch, Daniel; Brom, Jean-Marie; Chabert, Eric Christian; Collard, Caroline; Conte, Eric; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Goetzmann, Christophe; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Van Hove, Pierre; Gadrat, Sébastien; Beauceron, Stephanie; Beaupere, Nicolas; Boudoul, Gaelle; Brochet, Sébastien; Carrillo Montoya, Camilo Andres; Chasserat, Julien; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Fan, Jiawei; Fay, Jean; Gascon, Susan; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Ille, Bernard; Kurca, Tibor; Lethuillier, Morgan; Mirabito, Laurent; Perries, Stephane; Ruiz Alvarez, José David; Sabes, David; Sgandurra, Louis; Sordini, Viola; Vander Donckt, Muriel; Verdier, Patrice; Viret, Sébastien; Xiao, Hong; Tsamalaidze, Zviad; Autermann, Christian; Beranek, Sarah; Bontenackels, Michael; Calpas, Betty; Edelhoff, Matthias; Feld, Lutz; Hindrichs, Otto; Klein, Katja; Ostapchuk, Andrey; Perieanu, Adrian; Raupach, Frank; Sammet, Jan; Schael, Stefan; Sprenger, Daniel; Weber, Hendrik; Wittmer, Bruno; Zhukov, Valery; Ata, Metin; Caudron, Julien; Dietz-Laursonn, Erik; Duchardt, Deborah; Erdmann, Martin; Fischer, Robert; Güth, Andreas; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Klingebiel, Dennis; Knutzen, Simon; Kreuzer, Peter; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Olschewski, Mark; Padeken, Klaas; Papacz, Paul; Reithler, Hans; Schmitz, Stefan Antonius; Sonnenschein, Lars; Teyssier, Daniel; Thüer, Sebastian; Weber, Martin; Cherepanov, Vladimir; Erdogan, Yusuf; Flügge, Günter; Geenen, Heiko; Geisler, Matthias; Haj Ahmad, Wael; Hoehle, Felix; Kargoll, Bastian; Kress, Thomas; Kuessel, Yvonne; Lingemann, Joschka; Nowack, Andreas; Nugent, Ian Michael; Perchalla, Lars; Pooth, Oliver; Stahl, Achim; Asin, Ivan; Bartosik, Nazar; Behr, Joerg; Behrenhoff, Wolf; Behrens, Ulf; Bell, Alan James; Bergholz, Matthias; Bethani, Agni; Borras, Kerstin; Burgmeier, Armin; Cakir, Altan; Calligaris, Luigi; Campbell, Alan; Choudhury, Somnath; Costanza, Francesco; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Dooling, Samantha; Dorland, Tyler; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Eichhorn, Thomas; Flucke, Gero; Garay Garcia, Jasone; Geiser, Achim; Gunnellini, Paolo; Hauk, Johannes; Hellwig, Gregor; Hempel, Maria; Horton, Dean; Jung, Hannes; Kasemann, Matthias; Katsas, Panagiotis; Kieseler, Jan; Kleinwort, Claus; Krücker, Dirk; Lange, Wolfgang; Leonard, Jessica; Lipka, Katerina; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Lutz, Benjamin; Mankel, Rainer; Marfin, Ihar; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Naumann-Emme, Sebastian; Novgorodova, Olga; Nowak, Friederike; Ntomari, Eleni; Perrey, Hanno; Pitzl, Daniel; Placakyte, Ringaile; Raspereza, Alexei; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Ron, Elias; Sahin, Mehmet Özgür; Salfeld-Nebgen, Jakob; Saxena, Pooja; Schmidt, Ringo; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Schröder, Matthias; Vargas Trevino, Andrea Del Rocio; Walsh, Roberval; Wissing, Christoph; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Blobel, Volker; Centis Vignali, Matteo; Erfle, Joachim; Garutti, Erika; Goebel, Kristin; Görner, Martin; Gosselink, Martijn; Haller, Johannes; Höing, Rebekka Sophie; Kirschenmann, Henning; Klanner, Robert; Kogler, Roman; Lange, Jörn; Lapsien, Tobias; Lenz, Teresa; Marchesini, Ivan; Ott, Jochen; Peiffer, Thomas; Pietsch, Niklas; Rathjens, Denis; Sander, Christian; Schettler, Hannes; Schleper, Peter; Schlieckau, Eike; Schmidt, Alexander; Seidel, Markus; Sibille, Jennifer; Sola, Valentina; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Troendle, Daniel; Usai, Emanuele; Vanelderen, Lukas; Barth, Christian; Baus, Colin; Berger, Joram; Böser, Christian; Butz, Erik; Chwalek, Thorsten; 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Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Zsigmond, Anna Julia; Beni, Noemi; Czellar, Sandor; Karancsi, János; Molnar, Jozsef; Palinkas, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Swain, Sanjay Kumar; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Dhingra, Nitish; Gupta, Ruchi; Kalsi, Amandeep Kaur; Kaur, Manjit; Mittal, Monika; Nishu, Nishu; Singh, Jasbir; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Ahuja, Sudha; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Kumar, Ajay; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Ranjan, Kirti; Sharma, Varun; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Chatterjee, Kalyanmoy; Dutta, Suchandra; Gomber, Bhawna; Jain, Sandhya; Jain, Shilpi; Khurana, Raman; Modak, Atanu; Mukherjee, Swagata; Roy, Debarati; Sarkar, Subir; Sharan, Manoj; Abdulsalam, Abdulla; Dutta, Dipanwita; Kailas, Swaminathan; Kumar, Vineet; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Topkar, Anita; Aziz, Tariq; Chatterjee, Rajdeep Mohan; Ganguly, Sanmay; Ghosh, Saranya; Guchait, Monoranjan; Gurtu, Atul; Kole, Gouranga; Kumar, Sanjeev; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Parida, Bibhuti; Sudhakar, Katta; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Dewanjee, Ram Krishna; Dugad, Shashikant; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Behnamian, Hadi; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Fahim, Ali; Jafari, Abideh; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Naseri, Mohsen; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Felcini, Marta; Grunewald, Martin; Abbrescia, Marcello; Barbone, Lucia; Calabria, Cesare; Chhibra, Simranjit Singh; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Fiore, Luigi; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pacifico, Nicola; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Radogna, Raffaella; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Silvestris, Lucia; Singh, Gurpreet; Venditti, Rosamaria; Verwilligen, Piet; Zito, Giuseppe; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Benvenuti, Alberto; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; 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Levchenko, Petr; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Smirnov, Igor; Sulimov, Valentin; Uvarov, Lev; Vavilov, Sergey; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Andrey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Tlisov, Danila; Toropin, Alexander; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Safronov, Grigory; Semenov, Sergey; Spiridonov, Alexander; Stolin, Viatcheslav; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Leonidov, Andrey; Mesyats, Gennady; Rusakov, Sergey V; Vinogradov, Alexey; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Dubinin, Mikhail; Dudko, Lev; Ershov, Alexander; Gribushin, Andrey; Klyukhin, Vyacheslav; Kodolova, Olga; Lokhtin, Igor; Obraztsov, Stepan; Petrushanko, Sergey; Savrin, Viktor; Snigirev, Alexander; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Kachanov, Vassili; Kalinin, Alexey; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Krychkine, Victor; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Tourtchanovitch, Leonid; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Dordevic, Milos; Ekmedzic, Marko; Milosevic, Jovan; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Battilana, Carlo; Calvo, Enrique; Cerrada, Marcos; Chamizo Llatas, Maria; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Domínguez Vázquez, Daniel; Escalante Del Valle, Alberto; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Merino, Gonzalo; Navarro De Martino, Eduardo; Pérez Calero Yzquierdo, Antonio María; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Quintario Olmeda, Adrián; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Senghi Soares, Mara; Albajar, Carmen; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Missiroli, Marino; Brun, Hugues; Cuevas, Javier; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Folgueras, Santiago; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Duarte Campderros, Jordi; Fernandez, Marcos; Gomez, Gervasio; Gonzalez Sanchez, Javier; Graziano, Alberto; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Marco, Rafael; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Matorras, Francisco; Munoz Sanchez, Francisca Javiela; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Rodrigo, Teresa; Rodríguez-Marrero, Ana Yaiza; Ruiz-Jimeno, Alberto; Scodellaro, Luca; Vila, Ivan; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Abbaneo, Duccio; Auffray, Etiennette; Auzinger, Georg; Bachtis, Michail; Baillon, Paul; Ball, Austin; Barney, David; Benaglia, Andrea; Bendavid, Joshua; Benhabib, Lamia; Benitez, Jose F; Bernet, Colin; Bianchi, Giovanni; Bloch, Philippe; Bocci, Andrea; Bonato, Alessio; Bondu, Olivier; Botta, Cristina; Breuker, Horst; Camporesi, Tiziano; Cerminara, Gianluca; Christiansen, Tim; Colafranceschi, Stefano; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; D'Enterria, David; Dabrowski, Anne; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; De Guio, Federico; De Roeck, Albert; De Visscher, Simon; Dobson, Marc; Dupont-Sagorin, Niels; Elliott-Peisert, Anna; Eugster, Jürg; Franzoni, Giovanni; Funk, Wolfgang; Giffels, Manuel; Gigi, Dominique; Gill, Karl; Giordano, Domenico; Girone, Maria; Glege, Frank; Guida, Roberto; Hammer, Josef; Hansen, Magnus; Harris, Philip; Hegeman, Jeroen; Innocente, Vincenzo; Janot, Patrick; Karavakis, Edward; Kousouris, Konstantinos; Krajczar, Krisztian; Lecoq, Paul; Lourenco, Carlos; Magini, Nicolo; Malgeri, Luca; Mannelli, Marcello; Masetti, Lorenzo; Meijers, Frans; Mersi, Stefano; Meschi, Emilio; Moortgat, Filip; Mulders, Martijn; Musella, Pasquale; Orsini, Luciano; Pape, Luc; Perez, Emmanuelle; Perrozzi, Luca; Petrilli, Achille; Petrucciani, Giovanni; Pfeiffer, Andreas; Pierini, Maurizio; Pimiä, Martti; Piparo, Danilo; Plagge, Michael; Racz, Attila; Rolandi, Gigi; Rovere, Marco; Sakulin, Hannes; Schäfer, Christoph; Schwick, Christoph; Sekmen, Sezen; Sharma, Archana; Siegrist, Patrice; Silva, Pedro; Simon, Michal; Sphicas, Paraskevas; Spiga, Daniele; Steggemann, Jan; Stieger, Benjamin; Stoye, Markus; Treille, Daniel; Tsirou, Andromachi; Veres, Gabor Istvan; Vlimant, Jean-Roch; Wöhri, Hermine Katharina; Zeuner, Wolfram Dietrich; Bertl, Willi; Deiters, Konrad; Erdmann, Wolfram; Horisberger, Roland; Ingram, Quentin; Kaestli, Hans-Christian; König, Stefan; Kotlinski, Danek; Langenegger, Urs; Renker, Dieter; Rohe, Tilman; Bachmair, Felix; Bäni, Lukas; Bianchini, Lorenzo; Bortignon, Pierluigi; Buchmann, Marco-Andrea; Casal, Bruno; Chanon, Nicolas; Deisher, Amanda; Dissertori, Günther; Dittmar, Michael; Donegà, Mauro; Dünser, Marc; Eller, Philipp; Grab, Christoph; Hits, Dmitry; Lustermann, Werner; Mangano, Boris; Marini, Andrea Carlo; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, Pablo; Meister, Daniel; Mohr, Niklas; Nägeli, Christoph; Nef, Pascal; Nessi-Tedaldi, Francesca; Pandolfi, Francesco; Pauss, Felicitas; Peruzzi, Marco; Quittnat, Milena; Rebane, Liis; Ronga, Frederic Jean; Rossini, Marco; Starodumov, Andrei; Takahashi, Maiko; Theofilatos, Konstantinos; Wallny, Rainer; Weber, Hannsjoerg Artur; Amsler, Claude; Canelli, Maria Florencia; Chiochia, Vincenzo; De Cosa, Annapaola; Hinzmann, Andreas; Hreus, Tomas; Ivova Rikova, Mirena; Kilminster, Benjamin; Millan Mejias, Barbara; Ngadiuba, Jennifer; Robmann, Peter; Snoek, Hella; Taroni, Silvia; Verzetti, Mauro; Yang, Yong; Cardaci, Marco; Chen, Kuan-Hsin; Ferro, Cristina; Kuo, Chia-Ming; Lin, Willis; Lu, Yun-Ju; Volpe, Roberta; Yu, Shin-Shan; Chang, Paoti; Chang, You-Hao; Chang, Yu-Wei; Chao, Yuan; Chen, Kai-Feng; Chen, Po-Hsun; Dietz, Charles; Grundler, Ulysses; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Kao, Kai-Yi; Lei, Yeong-Jyi; Liu, Yueh-Feng; Lu, Rong-Shyang; Majumder, Devdatta; Petrakou, Eleni; Shi, Xin; Tzeng, Yeng-Ming; Wilken, Rachel; Asavapibhop, Burin; Srimanobhas, Norraphat; Suwonjandee, Narumon; Adiguzel, Aytul; Bakirci, Mustafa Numan; Cerci, Salim; Dozen, Candan; Dumanoglu, Isa; Eskut, Eda; Girgis, Semiray; Gokbulut, Gul; Gurpinar, Emine; Hos, Ilknur; Kangal, Evrim Ersin; Kayis Topaksu, Aysel; Onengut, Gulsen; Ozdemir, Kadri; Ozturk, Sertac; Polatoz, Ayse; Sogut, Kenan; Sunar Cerci, Deniz; Tali, Bayram; Topakli, Huseyin; Vergili, Mehmet; Akin, Ilina Vasileva; Bilin, Bugra; Bilmis, Selcuk; Gamsizkan, Halil; Karapinar, Guler; Ocalan, Kadir; Surat, Ugur Emrah; Yalvac, Metin; Zeyrek, Mehmet; Gülmez, Erhan; Isildak, Bora; Kaya, Mithat; Kaya, Ozlem; Bahtiyar, Hüseyin; Barlas, Esra; Cankocak, Kerem; Vardarlı, Fuat Ilkehan; Yücel, Mete; Levchuk, Leonid; Sorokin, Pavel; Brooke, James John; Clement, Emyr; Cussans, David; Flacher, Henning; Frazier, Robert; Goldstein, Joel; Grimes, Mark; Heath, Greg P; Heath, Helen F; Jacob, Jeson; Kreczko, Lukasz; Lucas, Chris; Meng, Zhaoxia; Newbold, Dave M; Paramesvaran, Sudarshan; Poll, Anthony; Senkin, Sergey; Smith, Vincent J; Williams, Thomas; Bell, Ken W; Belyaev, Alexander; Brew, Christopher; Brown, Robert M; Cockerill, David JA; Coughlan, John A; Harder, Kristian; Harper, Sam; Olaiya, Emmanuel; Petyt, David; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Thea, Alessandro; Tomalin, Ian R; Womersley, William John; Worm, Steven; Baber, Mark; Bainbridge, Robert; Buchmuller, Oliver; Burton, Darren; Colling, David; Cripps, Nicholas; Cutajar, Michael; Dauncey, Paul; Davies, Gavin; Della Negra, Michel; Dunne, Patrick; Ferguson, William; Fulcher, Jonathan; Futyan, David; Gilbert, Andrew; Guneratne Bryer, Arlo; Hall, Geoffrey; Hatherell, Zoe; Iles, Gregory; Jarvis, Martyn; Karapostoli, Georgia; Kenzie, Matthew; Lane, Rebecca; Lucas, Robyn; Lyons, Louis; Magnan, Anne-Marie; Malik, Sarah; Marrouche, Jad; Mathias, Bryn; Nandi, Robin; Nash, Jordan; Nikitenko, Alexander; Pela, Joao; Pesaresi, Mark; Petridis, Konstantinos; Raymond, David Mark; Rogerson, Samuel; Rose, Andrew; Seez, Christopher; Sharp, Peter; Sparrow, Alex; Tapper, Alexander; Vazquez Acosta, Monica; Virdee, Tejinder; Wakefield, Stuart; Cole, Joanne; Hobson, Peter R; Khan, Akram; Kyberd, Paul; Leggat, Duncan; Leslie, Dawn; Martin, William; Reid, Ivan; Symonds, Philip; Teodorescu, Liliana; Turner, Mark; Dittmann, Jay; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Kasmi, Azeddine; Liu, Hongxuan; Scarborough, Tara; Charaf, Otman; Cooper, Seth; Henderson, Conor; Rumerio, Paolo; Avetisyan, Aram; Bose, Tulika; Fantasia, Cory; Heister, Arno; Lawson, Philip; Richardson, Clint; Rohlf, James; Sperka, David; St John, Jason; Sulak, Lawrence; Alimena, Juliette; Bhattacharya, Saptaparna; Christopher, Grant; Cutts, David; Demiragli, Zeynep; Ferapontov, Alexey; Garabedian, Alex; Heintz, Ulrich; Jabeen, Shabnam; Kukartsev, Gennadiy; Laird, Edward; Landsberg, Greg; Luk, Michael; Narain, Meenakshi; Segala, Michael; Sinthuprasith, Tutanon; Speer, Thomas; Swanson, Joshua; Breedon, Richard; Breto, Guillermo; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, Manuel; Chauhan, Sushil; Chertok, Maxwell; Conway, John; Conway, Rylan; Cox, Peter Timothy; Erbacher, Robin; Gardner, Michael; Ko, Winston; Kopecky, Alexandra; Lander, Richard; Miceli, Tia; Mulhearn, Michael; Pellett, Dave; Pilot, Justin; Ricci-Tam, Francesca; Rutherford, Britney; Searle, Matthew; Shalhout, Shalhout; Smith, John; Squires, Michael; Tripathi, Mani; Wilbur, Scott; Yohay, Rachel; Cousins, Robert; Everaerts, Pieter; Farrell, Chris; Hauser, Jay; Ignatenko, Mikhail; Rakness, Gregory; Takasugi, Eric; Valuev, Vyacheslav; Weber, Matthias; Babb, John; Clare, Robert; Ellison, John Anthony; Gary, J William; Hanson, Gail; Heilman, Jesse; Jandir, Pawandeep; Lacroix, Florent; Liu, Hongliang; Long, Owen Rosser; Luthra, Arun; Malberti, Martina; Nguyen, Harold; Shrinivas, Amithabh; Sturdy, Jared; Sumowidagdo, Suharyo; Wimpenny, Stephen; Andrews, Warren; Branson, James G; Cerati, Giuseppe Benedetto; Cittolin, Sergio; D'Agnolo, Raffaele Tito; Evans, David; Holzner, André; Kelley, Ryan; Lebourgeois, Matthew; Letts, James; Macneill, Ian; Padhi, Sanjay; Palmer, Christopher; Pieri, Marco; Sani, Matteo; Sharma, Vivek; Simon, Sean; Sudano, Elizabeth; Tadel, Matevz; Tu, Yanjun; Vartak, Adish; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avraham; Yoo, Jaehyeok; Barge, Derek; Bradmiller-Feld, John; Campagnari, Claudio; Danielson, Thomas; Dishaw, Adam; Flowers, Kristen; Franco Sevilla, Manuel; Geffert, Paul; George, Christopher; Golf, Frank; Incandela, Joe; Justus, Christopher; Mccoll, Nickolas; Richman, Jeffrey; Stuart, David; To, Wing; West, Christopher; Apresyan, Artur; Bornheim, Adolf; Bunn, Julian; Chen, Yi; Di Marco, Emanuele; Duarte, Javier; Mott, Alexander; Newman, Harvey B; Pena, Cristian; Rogan, Christopher; Spiropulu, Maria; Timciuc, Vladlen; Wilkinson, Richard; Xie, Si; Zhu, Ren-Yuan; Azzolini, Virginia; Calamba, Aristotle; Carroll, Ryan; Ferguson, Thomas; Iiyama, Yutaro; Paulini, Manfred; Russ, James; Vogel, Helmut; Vorobiev, Igor; Cumalat, John Perry; Drell, Brian Robert; Ford, William T; Gaz, Alessandro; Luiggi Lopez, Eduardo; Nauenberg, Uriel; Smith, James; Stenson, Kevin; Ulmer, Keith; Wagner, Stephen Robert; Alexander, James; Chatterjee, Avishek; Chu, Jennifer; Eggert, Nicholas; Hopkins, Walter; Khukhunaishvili, Aleko; Kreis, Benjamin; Mirman, Nathan; Nicolas Kaufman, Gala; Patterson, Juliet Ritchie; Ryd, Anders; Salvati, Emmanuele; Skinnari, Louise; Sun, Werner; Teo, Wee Don; Thom, Julia; Thompson, Joshua; Tucker, Jordan; Weng, Yao; Winstrom, Lucas; Wittich, Peter; Winn, Dave; Abdullin, Salavat; Albrow, Michael; Anderson, Jacob; Apollinari, Giorgio; Bauerdick, Lothar AT; Beretvas, Andrew; Berryhill, Jeffrey; Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Burkett, Kevin; Butler, Joel Nathan; Cheung, Harry; Chlebana, Frank; Cihangir, Selcuk; Elvira, Victor Daniel; Fisk, Ian; Freeman, Jim; Gottschalk, Erik; Gray, Lindsey; Green, Dan; Grünendahl, Stefan; Gutsche, Oliver; Hanlon, Jim; Hare, Daryl; Harris, Robert M; Hirschauer, James; Hooberman, Benjamin; Jindariani, Sergo; Johnson, Marvin; Joshi, Umesh; Kaadze, Ketino; Klima, Boaz; Kwan, Simon; Linacre, Jacob; Lincoln, Don; Lipton, Ron; Liu, Tiehui; Lykken, Joseph; Maeshima, Kaori; Marraffino, John Michael; Martinez Outschoorn, Verena Ingrid; Maruyama, Sho; Mason, David; McBride, Patricia; Mishra, Kalanand; Mrenna, Stephen; Musienko, Yuri; Nahn, Steve; Newman-Holmes, Catherine; O'Dell, Vivian; Prokofyev, Oleg; Sexton-Kennedy, Elizabeth; Sharma, Seema; Soha, Aron; Spalding, William J; Spiegel, Leonard; Taylor, Lucas; Tkaczyk, Slawek; Tran, Nhan Viet; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Vaandering, Eric Wayne; Vidal, Richard; Whitmore, Juliana; Yang, Fan; Acosta, Darin; Avery, Paul; Bourilkov, Dimitri; Cheng, Tongguang; Das, Souvik; De Gruttola, Michele; Di Giovanni, Gian Piero; Dobur, Didar; Field, Richard D; Fisher, Matthew; Furic, Ivan-Kresimir; Hugon, Justin; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Korytov, Andrey; Kropivnitskaya, Anna; Kypreos, Theodore; Low, Jia Fu; Matchev, Konstantin; Milenovic, Predrag; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Muniz, Lana; Rinkevicius, Aurelijus; Shchutska, Lesya; Skhirtladze, Nikoloz; Snowball, Matthew; Yelton, John; Zakaria, Mohammed; Gaultney, Vanessa; Hewamanage, Samantha; Linn, Stephan; Markowitz, Pete; Martinez, German; Rodriguez, Jorge Luis; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Bochenek, Joseph; Diamond, Brendan; Haas, Jeff; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Johnson, Kurtis F; Prosper, Harrison; Veeraraghavan, Venkatesh; Weinberg, Marc; Baarmand, Marc M; Hohlmann, Marcus; Kalakhety, Himali; Yumiceva, Francisco; Adams, Mark Raymond; Apanasevich, Leonard; Bazterra, Victor Eduardo; Betts, Russell Richard; Bucinskaite, Inga; Cavanaugh, Richard; Evdokimov, Olga; Gauthier, Lucie; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Hofman, David Jonathan; Khalatyan, Samvel; Kurt, Pelin; Moon, Dong Ho; O'Brien, Christine; Silkworth, Christopher; Turner, Paul; Varelas, Nikos; Albayrak, Elif Asli; Bilki, Burak; Clarida, Warren; Dilsiz, Kamuran; Duru, Firdevs; Haytmyradov, Maksat; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mermerkaya, Hamit; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Moeller, Anthony; Nachtman, Jane; Ogul, Hasan; Onel, Yasar; Ozok, Ferhat; Penzo, Aldo; Rahmat, Rahmat; Sen, Sercan; Tan, Ping; Tiras, Emrah; Wetzel, James; Yetkin, Taylan; Yi, Kai; Barnett, Bruce Arnold; Blumenfeld, Barry; Fehling, David; Gritsan, Andrei; Maksimovic, Petar; Martin, Christopher; Swartz, Morris; Baringer, Philip; Bean, Alice; Benelli, Gabriele; Gray, Julia; Kenny III, Raymond Patrick; Murray, Michael; Noonan, Daniel; Sanders, Stephen; Sekaric, Jadranka; Stringer, Robert; Wang, Quan; Wood, Jeffrey Scott; Barfuss, Anne-Fleur; Chakaberia, Irakli; Ivanov, Andrew; Khalil, Sadia; Makouski, Mikhail; Maravin, Yurii; Saini, Lovedeep Kaur; Shrestha, Shruti; Svintradze, Irakli; Gronberg, Jeffrey; Lange, David; Rebassoo, Finn; Wright, Douglas; Baden, Drew; Calvert, Brian; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Gomez, Jaime; Hadley, Nicholas John; Kellogg, Richard G; Kolberg, Ted; Lu, Ying; Marionneau, Matthieu; Mignerey, Alice; Pedro, Kevin; Skuja, Andris; Tonjes, Marguerite; Tonwar, Suresh C; Apyan, Aram; Barbieri, Richard; Bauer, Gerry; Busza, Wit; Cali, Ivan Amos; Chan, Matthew; Di Matteo, Leonardo; Dutta, Valentina; Gomez Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim; Gulhan, Doga; Klute, Markus; Lai, Yue Shi; Lee, Yen-Jie; Levin, Andrew; Luckey, Paul David; Ma, Teng; Paus, Christoph; Ralph, Duncan; Roland, Christof; Roland, Gunther; Stephans, George; Stöckli, Fabian; Sumorok, Konstanty; Velicanu, Dragos; Veverka, Jan; Wyslouch, Bolek; Yang, Mingming; Zanetti, Marco; Zhukova, Victoria; Dahmes, Bryan; De Benedetti, Abraham; Gude, Alexander; Kao, Shih-Chuan; Klapoetke, Kevin; Kubota, Yuichi; Mans, Jeremy; Pastika, Nathaniel; Rusack, Roger; Singovsky, Alexander; Tambe, Norbert; Turkewitz, Jared; Acosta, John Gabriel; Oliveros, Sandra; Avdeeva, Ekaterina; Bloom, Kenneth; Bose, Suvadeep; Claes, Daniel R; Dominguez, Aaron; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Keller, Jason; Knowlton, Dan; Kravchenko, Ilya; Lazo-Flores, Jose; Malik, Sudhir; Meier, Frank; Snow, Gregory R; Dolen, James; Godshalk, Andrew; Iashvili, Ia; Kharchilava, Avto; Kumar, Ashish; Rappoccio, Salvatore; Alverson, George; Barberis, Emanuela; Baumgartel, Darin; Chasco, Matthew; Haley, Joseph; Massironi, Andrea; Morse, David Michael; Nash, David; Orimoto, Toyoko; Trocino, Daniele; Wood, Darien; Zhang, Jinzhong; Hahn, Kristan Allan; Kubik, Andrew; Mucia, Nicholas; Odell, Nathaniel; Pollack, Brian; Pozdnyakov, Andrey; Schmitt, Michael Henry; Stoynev, Stoyan; Sung, Kevin; Velasco, Mayda; Won, Steven; Berry, Douglas; Brinkerhoff, Andrew; Chan, Kwok Ming; Drozdetskiy, Alexey; Hildreth, Michael; Jessop, Colin; Karmgard, Daniel John; Kellams, Nathan; Lannon, Kevin; Luo, Wuming; Lynch, Sean; Marinelli, Nancy; Pearson, Tessa; Planer, Michael; Ruchti, Randy; Valls, Nil; Wayne, Mitchell; Wolf, Matthias; Woodard, Anna; Antonelli, Louis; Bylsma, Ben; Durkin, Lloyd Stanley; Flowers, Sean; Hill, Christopher; Hughes, Richard; Kotov, Khristian; Ling, Ta-Yung; Puigh, Darren; Rodenburg, Marissa; Smith, Geoffrey; Vuosalo, Carl; Winer, Brian L; Wolfe, Homer; Wulsin, Howard Wells; Berry, Edmund; Elmer, Peter; Hebda, Philip; Hunt, Adam; Koay, Sue Ann; Lujan, Paul; Marlow, Daniel; Medvedeva, Tatiana; Mooney, Michael; Olsen, James; Piroué, Pierre; Quan, Xiaohang; Saka, Halil; Stickland, David; Tully, Christopher; Werner, Jeremy Scott; Zenz, Seth Conrad; Zuranski, Andrzej; Brownson, Eric; Mendez, Hector; Ramirez Vargas, Juan Eduardo; Alagoz, Enver; Barnes, Virgil E; Benedetti, Daniele; Bolla, Gino; Bortoletto, Daniela; De Mattia, Marco; Everett, Adam; Hu, Zhen; Jha, Manoj; Jones, Matthew; Jung, Kurt; Kress, Matthew; Leonardo, Nuno; Lopes Pegna, David; Maroussov, Vassili; Merkel, Petra; Miller, David Harry; Neumeister, Norbert; Radburn-Smith, Benjamin Charles; Shipsey, Ian; Silvers, David; Svyatkovskiy, Alexey; Wang, Fuqiang; Xie, Wei; Xu, Lingshan; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Zablocki, Jakub; Zheng, Yu; Parashar, Neeti; Stupak, John; Adair, Antony; Akgun, Bora; Ecklund, Karl Matthew; Geurts, Frank JM; Li, Wei; Michlin, Benjamin; Padley, Brian Paul; Redjimi, Radia; Roberts, Jay; Zabel, James; Betchart, Burton; Bodek, Arie; Covarelli, Roberto; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demina, Regina; Eshaq, Yossof; Ferbel, Thomas; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Goldenzweig, Pablo; Han, Jiyeon; Harel, Amnon; Miner, Daniel Carl; Petrillo, Gianluca; Vishnevskiy, Dmitry; Ciesielski, Robert; Demortier, Luc; Goulianos, Konstantin; Lungu, Gheorghe; Mesropian, Christina; Arora, Sanjay; Barker, Anthony; Chou, John Paul; Contreras-Campana, Christian; Contreras-Campana, Emmanuel; Duggan, Daniel; Ferencek, Dinko; Gershtein, Yuri; Gray, Richard; Halkiadakis, Eva; Hidas, Dean; Lath, Amitabh; Panwalkar, Shruti; Park, Michael; Patel, Rishi; Rekovic, Vladimir; Salur, Sevil; Schnetzer, Steve; Seitz, Claudia; Somalwar, Sunil; Stone, Robert; Thomas, Scott; Thomassen, Peter; Walker, Matthew; Rose, Keith; Spanier, Stefan; York, Andrew; Bouhali, Othmane; Eusebi, Ricardo; Flanagan, Will; Gilmore, Jason; Kamon, Teruki; Khotilovich, Vadim; Krutelyov, Vyacheslav; Montalvo, Roy; Osipenkov, Ilya; Pakhotin, Yuriy; Perloff, Alexx; Roe, Jeffrey; Rose, Anthony; Safonov, Alexei; Sakuma, Tai; Suarez, Indara; Tatarinov, Aysen; Akchurin, Nural; Cowden, Christopher; Damgov, Jordan; Dragoiu, Cosmin; Dudero, Phillip Russell; Faulkner, James; Kovitanggoon, Kittikul; Kunori, Shuichi; Lee, Sung Won; Libeiro, Terence; Volobouev, Igor; Appelt, Eric; Delannoy, Andrés G; Greene, Senta; Gurrola, Alfredo; Johns, Willard; Maguire, Charles; Mao, Yaxian; Melo, Andrew; Sharma, Monika; Sheldon, Paul; Snook, Benjamin; Tuo, Shengquan; Velkovska, Julia; Arenton, Michael Wayne; Boutle, Sarah; Cox, Bradley; Francis, Brian; Goodell, Joseph; Hirosky, Robert; Ledovskoy, Alexander; Li, Hengne; Lin, Chuanzhe; Neu, Christopher; Wood, John; Gollapinni, Sowjanya; Harr, Robert; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, Chamath; Lamichhane, Pramod; Belknap, Donald; Carlsmith, Duncan; Cepeda, Maria; Dasu, Sridhara; Duric, Senka; Friis, Evan; Hall-Wilton, Richard; Herndon, Matthew; Hervé, Alain; Klabbers, Pamela; Klukas, Jeffrey; Lanaro, Armando; Lazaridis, Christos; Levine, Aaron; Loveless, Richard; Mohapatra, Ajit; Ojalvo, Isabel; Perry, Thomas; Pierro, Giuseppe Antonio; Polese, Giovanni; Ross, Ian; Sarangi, Tapas; Savin, Alexander; Smith, Wesley H; Woods, Nathaniel

    2014-09-07

    The ratio of the top-quark branching fractions $R = B(t \\to Wb)/B(t \\to Wq)$, where the denominator includes the sum over all down-type quarks (q = b, s, d), is measured in the $t\\bar{t}$ dilepton final state with proton-proton collision data at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV from an integrated luminosity of 19.7 inverse-femtobarns, collected with the CMS detector. In order to quantify the purity of the signal sample, the cross section is measured by fitting the observed jet multiplicity, thereby constraining the signal and background contributions. By counting the number of b jets per event, an unconstrained value of R = 1.014 $\\pm$ 0.003 (stat) $\\pm$ 0.032 (syst) is measured, in good agreement with the standard model prediction. A lower limit R greater than 0.955 at the 95% confidence level is obtained after requiring R lower than one, and a lower limit on the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element |$V_tb$| greater than 0.975 is set at 95% confidence level. The result is combined with a previous CMS measurement of th...

  20. Lactobacillus salivarius WB21--containing tablets for the treatment of oral malodor: a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled crossover trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Nao; Yoneda, Masahiro; Tanabe, Kazunari; Fujimoto, Akie; Iha, Kosaku; Seno, Kei; Yamada, Kazuhiko; Iwamoto, Tomoyuki; Masuo, Yosuke; Hirofuji, Takao

    2014-04-01

    This study evaluated the effect of probiotic intervention using lactobacilli on oral malodor. We conducted a 14-day, double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized crossover trial of tablets containing Lactobacillus salivarius WB21 (2.0 × 10(9) colony-forming units per day) or placebo taken orally by patients with oral malodor. Organoleptic test scores significantly decreased in both the probiotic and placebo periods compared with the respective baseline scores (P < .001 and P = .002), and no difference was detected between periods. In contrast, the concentration of volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) (P = .019) and the average probing pocket depth (P = .001) decreased significantly in the probiotic period compared with the placebo period. Bacterial quantitative analysis found significantly lower levels of ubiquitous bacteria (P = .003) and Fusobacterium nucleatum (P = .020) in the probiotic period. These results indicated that daily oral consumption of tablets containing probiotic lactobacilli could help to control oral malodor and malodor-related factors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Investigation of structural, electronic and anisotropic elastic properties of Ru-doped WB{sub 2} compound by increased valence electron concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surucu, Gokhan, E-mail: g_surucu@yahoo.com [Ahi Evran University, Department of Electric and Energy, 40100, Kirsehir (Turkey); Gazi University, Photonics Application and Research Center, 06500, Ankara (Turkey); Kaderoglu, Cagil [Ankara University, Department of Engineering Physics, 06100, Ankara (Turkey); Deligoz, Engin; Ozisik, Haci [Aksaray University, Department of Physics, 68100, Aksaray (Turkey)

    2017-03-01

    First principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations have been used to investigate the structural, anisotropic elastic and electronic properties of ruthenium doped tungsten-diboride ternary compounds (W{sub 1−x}Ru{sub x}B{sub 2}) for an increasing molar fraction of Ru atom from 0.1 to 0.9 by 0.1. Among the nine different compositions, W{sub 0.3}Ru{sub 0.7}B{sub 2} has been found as the most stable one due to the formation energy and band filling theory calculations. Moreover, the band structures and partial density of states (PDOS) have been computed for each x composition. After obtaining the elastic constants for all x compositions, the secondary results such as Bulk modulus, Young’s modulus, Poisson’s ratio, Shear modulus, and Vickers Hardness of polycrystalline aggregates have been derived and the relevant mechanical properties have been discussed. In addition, the elastic anisotropy has been visualized in detail by plotting the directional dependence of compressibility, Poisson ratio, Young’s and Shear moduli. - Highlights: • Effects of Ru substitution in WB{sub 2} using increased valence electron concentration. • Structural, electronic, mechanic and elastic properties for increasing Ru content. • Considered alloys are incompressible, brittle, stiffer and high hard materials.

  2. Measurement of B(t ---> Wb)/B(t ---> Wq) at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agelou, M.; Agram, J.-L.; Ahn, S.H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; /Buenos Aires U. /Rio de

    2006-03-01

    The authors present the measurement of R = {Beta}(t {yields} Wb)/{Beta}(t {yields} Wq) in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV, using 230 pb{sup -1} of data collected by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. They fit simultaneously R and the number (N{sub t{bar t}}) of selected top quark pairs (t{bar t}), to the number of identified b-quark jets in events with one electron or one muon, three or more jets, and high transverse energy imbalance. To improve sensitivity, kinematical properties of events with no identified b-quark jets are included in the fit. They measure R = 1.03{sub -0.17}{sup +0.19}(stat+syst), in good agreement with the standard model. They set lower limits of R > 0.61 and |V{sub tb}| > 0.78 at 95% confidence level.

  3. Dietary Supplementation with a Combination of Lactoferrin, Fish Oil, and Enterococcus faecium WB2000 for Treating Dry Eye: A Rat Model and Human Clinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawashima, Motoko; Nakamura, Shigeru; Izuta, Yusuke; Inoue, Sachiko; Tsubota, Kazuo

    2016-04-01

    To examine the effect of a combined dietary supplement containing fish oil, lactoferrin, zinc, vitamin C, lutein, vitamin E, γ-aminobutanoic acid, and Enterococcus faecium WB2000 on dry eye. A preliminary study in a rat model and a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study in humans were conducted. Forty Japanese volunteers aged 22 to 59 years were randomized into combined dietary supplement (2 capsules/day; 20 participants) and placebo (vehicle; 19 participants) groups and treated once daily for 8 weeks. Rats received the combined dietary supplement components (10 or 50 mg/kg orally) or vehicle (2% DMSO), and dry eye was mechanically induced for 2 days. Tear production was measured in rats after dry eye was induced. Humans were assessed at baseline and weeks 4 and 8 post-supplementation based on keratoconjunctival epithelial damage; fluorescein tear film breakup time; tear production; biochemical data; information regarding subjective dry eye symptoms by answering a questionnaire; and information regarding adverse events via medical interviews. Supplementation dose-dependently mitigated the decrease in tear production in rats. Among subjects with confirmed dry eye, clinical symptoms improved at weeks 4 and 8 more significantly in the supplementation group than in the placebo group (Peye symptoms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Signal to background interference in p p →t H-→t W-b b ¯ at the LHC Run II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arhrib, Abdesslam; Benbrik, Rachid; Moretti, Stefano; Santos, Rui; Sharma, Pankaj

    2018-04-01

    We investigate in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) environment the possibility that sizeable interference effects between a heavy charged Higgs boson signal produced via b g →t H- (+c .c . ) scattering and decaying via H-→W-A →W-b b ¯ (+c .c . ) and the irreducible background given by b g →t W-b b ¯ topologies could spoil current search approaches where the former and latter channels are treated separately. The rationale for this comes from the fact that a heavy charged Higgs state can have a large width, which can also happen for the C P -odd neutral Higgs state emerging in the ensuing decays, which in turn enables such interferences. We conclude that effects are very significant, both at the inclusive and exclusive level (i.e., both before and after H± selection cuts are enforced, respectively) and typically of a destructive nature. This, therefore, implies that currently established LHC reaches for heavy charged Higgs bosons require some level of rescaling. However, this is possible a posteriori, as the aforementioned H± selection cuts shape the interference contributions at the differential level in a way similar to that of the isolated H± signal, so there is no need to reassess the efficiency of the individual cuts. We show such effects quantitatively by borrowing benchmark points from different Yukawa types of a 2-Higgs doublet model parameter space for H± values starting from around 200 GeV.

  5. Metabolomics Workbench (MetWB)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Metabolomics Program's Data Repository and Coordinating Center (DRCC), housed at the San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC), University of California, San Diego,...

  6. Spinal CT scan, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Hiroshi

    1982-01-01

    Methods of CT of the cervical and thoracic spines were explained, and normal CT pictures of them were described. Spinal CT was evaluated in comparison with other methods in various spinal diseases. Plain CT revealed stenosis due to spondylosis or ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament and hernia of intervertebral disc. CT took an important role in the diagnosis of spinal cord tumors with calcification and destruction of the bone. CT scan in combination with other methods was also useful for the diagnosis of spinal injuries, congenital anomalies and infections. (Ueda, J.)

  7. Negative predictive value of 124I-PET/CT imaging in patients affected by metastatic thyroid cancer and treated with 131I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pettinato, C.; Civollani, S.; Nanni, C.; Celli, M.; Allegri, V.; Zagni, P.; Fanti, S.; Monari, F.; Cima, S.; Mazzarotto, R.; Spezi, E.

    2015-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. Aim: patients affected by metastatic Differentiated Thyroid Cancer (mDTC) are treated with 131 I even in presence of negative diagnostic 131 I whole body (WB) scan. Actually, very often, these patients present positive post therapy 131 I whole body scan, showing iodine avid metastases that were not seen with the diagnostic imaging. The aim of this work was the evaluation of the feasibility to use 124 I PET/CT images to predict patients who will not benefit from the iodine therapy, because of the absence of avidity, avoiding useless treatments. Material and methods: 25 patients affected by mDTC were enrolled in the study approved by the ethical Committee of our Institution, with the aim to evaluate the usefulness of 124 I PET/CT sequential scans to predict absorbed doses to metastatic thyroid cancer patients undergoing 131 I therapy. Patients (pts) were divided into 4 groups, based on their histology: group A, 4 pts with follicular cancer; group B, 13 pts with papillary cancer; group C, 2 pts with papillary tall cells cancer; group D, 6 patients with papillary cancer with follicular variant. Patients showing negative 124 I-PET/CT were treated with a reduced dose of 131 I (3700 MBq) and post treatment WB scans were acquired 96 hours after the therapeutic administration. Results: 12 patients showed at least one metastatic lesion at 124 I PET/CT imaging, and most of the lesions were visible at the 24 hours scan (4 pts group A, 3 pts group B, 5 pts group D). The remaining 13 patients did not show any uptake of all known metastatic lesions at each PET/CT time points (10 pts group B, 2 pts group C, 1 pt group D). Negative PET/CT findings were confirmed by post therapy WB scan. Discussion and Conclusion: 124 I-PET/CT scan is a useful diagnostic tool to discriminate patients with iodine avid metastases. Actually, when they are present, the superiority of PET/CT resolution and sensitivity, compared to standard 131 I planar imaging, allow the

  8. CT appearance of splenosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendelson, D.S.; Cohen, B.A.; Armas, R.R.

    1982-12-01

    Splenosis is an unusual complication of splenic trauma. The computed tomographic (CT) appearance of splenosis is described. One should consider this diagnosis when faced with a history of splenic trauma and multiple round or oval masses at CT.

  9. CT appearance of splenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendelson, D.S.; Cohen, B.A.; Armas, R.R.

    1982-01-01

    Splenosis is an unusual complication of splenic trauma. The computed tomographic (CT) appearance of splenosis is described. One should consider this diagnosis when faced with a history of splenic trauma and multiple round or oval masses at CT

  10. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... scanners to obtain multiple slices in a single rotation. These scanners, called multislice CT or multidetector CT, ... prescribed procedure with your doctor, the medical facility staff and/or your insurance provider to get a ...

  11. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... scanners to obtain multiple slices in a single rotation. These scanners, called multislice CT or multidetector CT, ... prescribed procedure with your doctor, the medical facility staff and/or your insurance provider to get a ...

  12. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... scanners to obtain multiple slices in a single rotation. These scanners, called multislice CT or multidetector CT, ... prescribed procedure with your doctor, the medical facility staff and/or your insurance provider to get a ...

  13. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... cavities (ventricles) in patients with hydrocephalus . diseases or malformations of the skull. CT scanning is also performed ... biopsy ) from the brain. assess aneurysms or arteriovenous malformations through a technique called CT angiography. For more ...

  14. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... CT scanners to obtain multiple slices in a single rotation. These scanners, called multislice CT or multidetector ... Safety page for more information about radiation dose. Women should always inform their physician and x-ray ...

  15. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CT scanners to obtain multiple slices in a single rotation. These scanners, called multislice CT or multidetector ... Safety page for more information about radiation dose. Women should always inform their physician and x-ray ...

  16. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... CT scanners to obtain multiple slices in a single rotation. These scanners, called multislice CT or multidetector ... Safety page for more information about radiation dose. Women should always inform their physician and x-ray ...

  17. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple ... preferable over CT scanning. top of page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org: Radiation Therapy for Bladder ...

  18. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... CT of the Sinuses? CT is usually the first test ordered when a sinus tumor is suspected. ... Radiology (ACR) and the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA), comprising physicians with expertise in several radiologic ...

  19. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... CT scanner or may be over the weight limit—usually 450 pounds—for the moving table. CT ... type your comment or suggestion into the following text box: Comment: E-mail: Area code: Phone no: ...

  20. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... microphone. top of page How does the procedure work? In many ways CT scanning works very much ... CT scan, an experienced radiologist can diagnose many causes of abdominal pain or injury from trauma with ...

  1. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... the scanning. Any motion, whether breathing or body movements, can lead to artifacts on the images. This ... clinical problems. CT is less sensitive to patient movement than MRI. CT can be performed if you ...

  2. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... the scanning. Any motion, whether breathing or body movements, can lead to artifacts on the images. This ... clinical problems. CT is less sensitive to patient movement than MRI. CT can be performed if you ...

  3. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... the scanning. Any motion, whether breathing or body movements, can lead to artifacts on the images. This ... clinical problems. CT is less sensitive to patient movement than MRI. CT can be performed if you ...

  4. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... to a CD or DVD. CT images of internal organs, bones, soft tissue and blood vessels provide ... clicking and whirring sounds as the CT scanner's internal parts, not usually visible to you, revolve around ...

  5. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... about tumors of the nasal cavity and sinuses. plan for surgery by defining anatomy. top of page ... for sinusitis. CT of the sinuses can help plan the safest and most effective surgery. CT of ...

  6. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... When the image slices are reassembled by computer software, the result is a very detailed multidimensional view ... Safety Images related to Computed Tomography (CT) - Head Videos related to Computed Tomography (CT) - Head Sponsored by ...

  7. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... When the image slices are reassembled by computer software, the result is a very detailed multidimensional view ... related to Computed Tomography (CT) - Abdomen and Pelvis Videos related to Computed Tomography (CT) - Abdomen and Pelvis ...

  8. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... sinus cavities – hollow, air-filled spaces within the bones of the face surrounding the nasal cavity. CT ... CD or DVD. CT images of internal organs, bones, soft tissue and blood vessels provide greater detail ...

  9. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... be viewed on a computer monitor, printed on film or transferred to a CD or DVD. CT ... distinguished from one another on an x-ray film or CT electronic image. In a conventional x- ...

  10. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... be viewed on a computer monitor, printed on film or transferred to a CD or DVD. CT ... distinguished from one another on an x-ray film or CT electronic image. In a conventional x- ...

  11. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... be viewed on a computer monitor, printed on film or transferred to a CD or DVD. CT ... distinguished from one another on an x-ray film or CT electronic image. In a conventional x- ...

  12. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... of CT Scanning of the Abdomen and Pelvis? What is CT Scanning of the Abdomen/Pelvis? Computed ... soft tissues and blood vessels. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? This ...

  13. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... microphone. top of page How does the procedure work? In many ways CT scanning works very much ... head CT scanning. Manufacturers of intravenous contrast indicate mothers should not breastfeed their babies for 24-48 ...

  14. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... over time. top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits A CT scan is one of the safest ... scanning is painless, noninvasive and accurate. A major advantage of CT is its ability to image bone, ...

  15. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... over time. top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits Viewing a CT scan, an experienced radiologist can ... scanning is painless, noninvasive and accurate. A major advantage of CT is its ability to image bone, ...

  16. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... as a CT or CAT scan, is a diagnostic medical test that, like traditional x-rays, produces ... particularly the lungs, abdomen, pelvis and bones. A diagnosis determined by CT scanning may eliminate the need ...

  17. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... as a CT or CAT scan, is a diagnostic medical test that, like traditional x-rays, produces ... medical device of any kind, unlike MRI. A diagnosis determined by CT scanning may eliminate the need ...

  18. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CT scanning. top of page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org: Radiation Therapy for Bladder Cancer Radiation ... Image Gallery Patient undergoing computed tomography (CT) scan View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging ...

  19. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CT) of the abdomen and pelvis is a diagnostic imaging test used to help detect diseases of ... as a CT or CAT scan, is a diagnostic medical test that, like traditional x-rays, produces ...

  20. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... benefits vs. risks? Benefits A CT scan is one of the safest means of studying the sinuses. ... CT scanning provides very detailed images of many types of tissue as well as the lungs, bones, ...

  1. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... sometimes compared to looking into a loaf of bread by cutting the loaf into thin slices. When ... actual CT scanning is performed. Depending on the type of CT scan, the machine may make several ...

  2. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple ... can be performed if you have an implanted medical device of any kind, unlike MRI. CT imaging ...

  3. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple ... can be performed if you have an implanted medical device of any kind, unlike MRI. CT imaging ...

  4. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits CT scanning is painless, noninvasive and accurate. ... CT scans should have no immediate side effects. Risks There is always a slight chance of cancer ...

  5. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits Viewing a CT scan, an experienced radiologist ... CT scans should have no immediate side effects. Risks There is always a slight chance of cancer ...

  6. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits A CT scan is one of the ... CT scans should have no immediate side effects. Risks There is always a slight chance of cancer ...

  7. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... scanners to obtain multiple slices in a single rotation. These scanners, called multislice CT or multidetector CT, ... membranes covering the brain. top of page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org Radiation Therapy for Brain ...

  8. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... scanners to obtain multiple slices in a single rotation. These scanners, called multislice CT or multidetector CT, ... for the moving table. top of page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org Radiation Therapy for Head ...

  9. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Stroke Brain Tumors Computer Tomography (CT) Safety During Pregnancy Head and Neck Cancer X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety Images related to Computed Tomography (CT) - ...

  10. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

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    Full Text Available ... air-filled spaces within the bones of the face surrounding the nasal cavity. CT scanning is painless, ... and blood vessels. A CT scan of the face produces images that also show a patient's paranasal ...

  11. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CT scanner is typically a large, box-like machine with a hole, or short tunnel, in the ... Then, the table will move slowly through the machine as the actual CT scanning is performed. Depending ...

  12. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CT scanner is typically a large, box-like machine with a hole, or short tunnel, in the ... Then, the table will move slowly through the machine as the actual CT scanning is performed. Depending ...

  13. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CT scanner is typically a large, box-like machine with a hole, or short tunnel, in the ... Then, the table will move slowly through the machine as the actual CT scanning is performed. Depending ...

  14. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple ... Then, the table will move slowly through the machine as the actual CT scanning is performed. Depending ...

  15. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple ... Then, the table will move slowly through the machine as the actual CT scanning is performed. Depending ...

  16. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple ... Then, the table will move slowly through the machine as the actual CT scanning is performed. Depending ...

  17. 67Ga lung scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niden, A.H.; Mishkin, F.S.; Khurana, M.M.L.; Pick, R.

    1977-01-01

    Twenty-three patients with clinical signs of pulmonary embolic disease and lung infiltrates were studied to determine the value of gallium citrate 67 Ga lung scan in differentiating embolic from inflammatory lung disease. In 11 patients without angiographically proved embolism, only seven had corresponding ventilation-perfusion defects compatible with inflammatory disease. In seven of these 11 patients, the 67 Ga concentration indicated inflammatory disease. In the 12 patients with angiographically proved embolic disease, six had corresponding ventilation-perfusion defects compatible with inflammatory disease. None had an accumulation of 67 Ga in the area of pulmonary infiltrate. Thus, ventilation-perfusion lung scans are of limited value when lung infiltrates are present. In contrast, the accumulation of 67 Ga in the lung indicates an inflammatory process. Gallium imaging can help select those patients with lung infiltrates who need angiography

  18. Development of methods for the purification of 67Ga and 68Ga for biomolecules labeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Renata Ferreira

    2012-01-01

    For more than fifty years, the long-lived 68 Ge/ 68 Ga generators have been in development, obtaining 68 Ga without the need of having in house cyclotron, which is a considerable convenience for PET centers that have no nearby cyclotrons. 68 Ga decays 89% by positron emission and low photon emission (1077 keV) and the physical half life of 67.7 minutes is compatible with the pharmacokinetics of low biomolecular weight substances like peptides and antibody fragments. Moreover, its established metallic chemistry allows it to be stably bound to the carrier peptide sequence via a suitable bifunctional chelator, such as DOTA. All these reasons together with the technology of PET/CT allowed advances in molecular imaging, in particular in the diagnosis of neuroendocrine diseases. However, the eluate from the commercial 68 Ge/ 68 Ga generators still contains high levels of long lived 68 Ge, besides other metallic impurities, which competes with 68 Ga with a consequent reduction of the labeling yield of biomolecules, such as Fe 3+ and Zn 2+ . Thus, the lower the amount of impurities in the eluate, the competition between the radiolabeled and unlabeled peptide by the receptor will be smaller and the quality of imaging will be better, a subsequent purification step is needed after the generator elution. The aim of this work is to evaluate different purifications methods of 68 Ga to label biomolecules, with emphasis on the study of the chemical impurities contained in the eluate and to develop a new purification method. Several purification methods were studied. Many cationic resin were tested simulating the commercial process. 68 Ga is adsorbed in cationic resin, which is not commercial available and eluted in acid/acetone solution. The use of minor particles of cationic resin AG50W-X4 (200-400 mesh) showed the best results. An innovate method was the extraction chromatography, which is based on the absorption of diisopropyl ether in XAD 16 and 68 Ga recovery in deionized

  19. CT of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghelman, B.

    1987-01-01

    CT can be combined with arthrography of the knee to study the following abnormalities: meniscal tears and cysts, synovial plicae, chondromalacia patellae, and osteochondritis dissecans. The CT-arthrogram images present abnormalities in a manner that resembles the ''in situ'' surgical findings, allowing management decisions to be made with greater confidence. The CT techniques for imaging the knee after arthrography are discussed, as is the use of plain CT

  20. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Pediatric computed tomography (CT) ... are the limitations of Children's CT? What is Children's CT? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a ...

  1. CT of laryngotracheal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lupetin, A.R.; Daffner, R.H.

    1991-01-01

    This paper evaluates the usefulness of CT for the diagnosis of traumatic laryngotracheal abnormalities. The authors retrospectively evaluated the neck CT studies of 50 patients (36 males, 14 females; age range, 16-75 years) who presented to a level I trauma center after suffering a blunt or penetrating laryngotracheal injury. CT results were correlated with endoscopic or surgical findings in 43 cases. Three groups emerge. CT positive: hyloid bone or laryngotracheal cartilage injury; CT positive: soft-tissue injury only; and CT negative. In group 1, CT demonstrated all bony or cartilaginous injuries proved at surgery or suggested at endoscopy. CT failed to demonstrate laryngotracheal separation in 1 case. In group 2, CT demonstrated all soft-tissue injuries suggested at endoscopy. In group 3, CT findings agreed with those of endoscopy in 7 cases, but minor soft-tissue findings seen at endoscopy were missed in 3 cases. Seven patients were studied only with CT. Ct is an accurate technique for detecting bony or cartilaginous laryngotracheal traumatic abnormalities. However, laryngotracheal separation and minor soft-tissue injuries can be missed

  2. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Sinuses Computed tomography (CT) of the sinuses uses special x-ray equipment ... story here Images × Image Gallery Patient undergoing computed tomography (CT) scan. View full size with caption Pediatric Content ...

  3. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Head Computed tomography (CT) of the head uses special x-ray equipment ... story here Images × Image Gallery Patient undergoing computed tomography (CT) scan. View full size with caption Pediatric Content ...

  4. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... vessels. CT examinations are fast and simple; in emergency cases, they can reveal internal injuries and bleeding quickly enough to help save lives. CT has been shown to be a cost-effective imaging tool for a wide range of clinical problems. CT is less sensitive to patient movement ...

  5. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... vessels. CT examinations are fast and simple; in emergency cases, they can reveal internal injuries and bleeding quickly enough to help save lives. CT has been shown to be a cost-effective imaging tool for a wide range of clinical problems. CT is less sensitive to patient movement ...

  6. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... vessels. CT examinations are fast and simple; in emergency cases, they can reveal internal injuries and bleeding quickly enough to help save lives. CT has been shown to be a cost-effective imaging tool for a wide range of clinical problems. CT is less sensitive to patient movement ...

  7. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Radiation Dose in X-Ray and CT Exams Blood Clots CT Perfusion of the Head CT Angiography ( ...

  8. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CT examinations are fast and simple; in emergency cases, they can reveal internal injuries and bleeding quickly enough to help save lives. CT has been shown to be a cost-effective imaging tool for a wide range of clinical problems. CT ...

  9. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CT examinations are fast and simple; in emergency cases, they can reveal internal injuries and bleeding quickly enough to help save lives. CT has been shown to be a cost-effective imaging tool for a wide range of clinical problems. CT ...

  10. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CT examinations are fast and simple; in emergency cases, they can reveal internal injuries and bleeding quickly enough to help save lives. CT has been shown to be a cost-effective imaging tool for a wide range of clinical problems. CT ...

  11. Low-temperature magnetization of (Ga,Mn)As semiconductors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jungwirth, Tomáš; Mašek, Jan; Wang, K. Y.; Edmonds, K. W.; Sawicki, M.; Polini, M.; Sinova, J.; MacDonald, A. H.; Campion, R. P.; Zhao, L.X.; Farley, N.R.S.; Johal, T.K.; van der Laan, G.; Foxon, C. T.; Gallagher, B. L.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 73, č. 16 (2006), 165205/1-165205/11 ISSN 1098-0121 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/05/0575 Grant - others:EPSRC(GB) GR/S81407/01; FENIKS(XE) EC:G5RD-CT-2001-00535; US Department of Energy(US) DE-FG03-02ER45958 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : ferromagnetic semiconductors * magnetization Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.107, year: 2006

  12. Marketing cardiac CT programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Jason

    2010-01-01

    There are two components of cardiac CT discussed in this article: coronary artery calcium scoring (CACS) and coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA).The distinctive advantages of each CT examination are outlined. In order to ensure a successful cardiac CT program, it is imperative that imaging facilities market their cardiac CT practices effectively in order to gain a competitive advantage in this valuable market share. If patients receive quality care by competent individuals, they are more likely to recommend the facility's cardiac CT program. Satisfied patients will also be more willing to come back for any further testing.

  13. Measurement of OCS, CO2, CO and H2O aboard NASA's WB-57 High Altitude Platform Using Off-Axis Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy (OA-ICOS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leen, J. B.; Owano, T. G.; Du, X.; Gardner, A.; Gupta, M.

    2014-12-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (OCS) is the most abundant sulfur gas in the atmosphere and has been implicated in controlling the sulfur budget and aerosol loading of the stratosphere. In the troposphere, OCS is irreversibly consumed during photosynthesis and may serve as a tracer for gross primary production (GPP). Its primary sources are ocean outgassing, industrial processes, and biomass burning. Its primary sinks are vegetation and soils. Despite the importance of OCS in atmospheric processes, the OCS atmospheric budget is poorly determined and has high uncertainty. OCS is typically monitored using either canisters analyzed by gas chromatography or integrated atmospheric column measurements. Improved in-situ terrestrial flux and airborne measurements are required to constrain the OCS budget and further elucidate its role in stratospheric aerosol formation and as a tracer for biogenic volatile organics and photosynthesis. Los Gatos Research has developed a flight capable mid-infrared Off-Axis Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy (OA-ICOS) analyzer to simultaneously quantify OCS, CO2, CO, and H2O in ambient air at up to 2 Hz. The prototype was tested on diluted, certified samples and found to be precise (OCS, CO2, CO, and H2O to better than ±4 ppt, ±0.2 ppm, ±0.31 ppb, and ±3.7 ppm respectively, 1s in 1 sec) and linear (R2 > 0.9997 for all gases) over a wide dynamic range (OCS, CO2, CO, and H2O ranging from 0.2 - 70 ppb, 500 - 3000 ppm, 150 - 480 ppb, and 7000 - 21000 ppm respectively). Cross-interference measurements showed no appreciable change in measured OCS concentration with variations in CO2 (500 - 3500 ppm) or CO. We report on high altitude measurements made aboard NASA's WB-57 research aircraft. Two research flights were conducted from Houston, TX. The concentration of OCS, CO2, CO, and H2O were continuously recorded from sea level to approximately 60,000 feet. The concentration of OCS was observed to increase with altitude through the troposphere due to the

  14. AlGaN/GaN double-channel HEMT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quan Si; Hao Yue; Ma Xiaohua; Zheng Pengtian; Xie Yuanbin

    2010-01-01

    The fabrication of AlGaN/GaN double-channel high electron mobility transistors on sapphire substrates is reported. Two carrier channels are formed in an AlGaN/GaN/AlGaN/GaN multilayer structure. The DC performance of the resulting double-channel HEMT shows a wider high transconductance region compared with single-channel HEMT. Simulations provide an explanation for the influence of the double-channel on the high transconductance region. The buffer trap is suggested to be related to the wide region of high transconductance. The RF characteristics are also studied. (semiconductor devices)

  15. (68)Ga-DOTATATE PET in juvenile angiofibroma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gronkiewicz, Zuzanna; Kukwa, Wojciech; Krolicki, Leszek; Cyran-Chlebicka, Agata; Pawlak, Dariusz; Stankiewicz, Czeslaw; Krzeski, Antoni; Górnicka, Barbara; Wolosz, Dominika; Kunikowska, Jolanta

    2016-06-01

    As somatostatin receptors (SSTRs) may be overexpressed in rapidly growing vessels, the aim of this study was the analysis of in vivo and in vitro SSTR2A expression in juvenile angiofibroma (JA). A group of six male adolescents with a diagnosis of primary, recurrent/residual JA was enrolled in the study. All patients underwent (68)Ga-DOTATATE PET/computed tomography (CT) followed by immunohistochemical staining for SSTR expression. (68)Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT showed accumulation in areas matching the pathologic tissue in the nasopharynx of all patients studied with SUVmax of 5.1 ± 0.9 (ranging from 3.6 to 6.4). In all cases, the immunohistochemical examination showed a presence of SSTR2A with a high staining index. In vitro SSTR2A cytoplasm expression was found to be high in all tumor specimens. However, the uptake of (68)Ga-DOTATATE was weak in the PET/CT studies. We postulate that the intracellular localization of the SSTR2A in JA may cause this discrepancy.

  16. Comparison of PET/CT with Sequential PET/MRI Using an MR-Compatible Mobile PET System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamoto, Ryusuke; Nakamoto, Yuji; Ishimori, Takayoshi; Fushimi, Yasutaka; Kido, Aki; Togashi, Kaori

    2018-05-01

    The current study tested a newly developed fl