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  1. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... often used to determine the cause of unexplained pain. CT scanning is fast, painless, noninvasive and accurate. ... help diagnose the cause of abdominal or pelvic pain and diseases of the internal organs, small bowel ...

  2. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... organs and is often used to determine the cause of unexplained pain. CT scanning is fast, painless, ... procedure is typically used to help diagnose the cause of abdominal or pelvic pain and diseases of ...

  3. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... the technologist verifies that the images are of high enough quality for accurate interpretation. The CT examination ... abdominal pain or injury from trauma with very high accuracy, enabling faster treatment and often eliminating the ...

  4. Abdominal aspergillosis: CT findings

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    Yeom, Suk Keu, E-mail: pagoda20@hanmail.net [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 388-1, Poongnap2-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul, 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hye Jin, E-mail: kimhyejin@amc.seoul.kr [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 388-1, Poongnap2-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul, 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Byun, Jae Ho, E-mail: jhbyun@amc.seoul.kr [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 388-1, Poongnap2-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul, 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ah Young, E-mail: aykim@amc.seoul.kr [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 388-1, Poongnap2-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul, 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Moon-Gyu, E-mail: mglee@amc.seoul.kr [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 388-1, Poongnap2-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul, 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Hyun Kwon, E-mail: hkha@amc.seoul.kr [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 388-1, Poongnap2-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul, 138-736 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-03-15

    Objective: In order to retrospectively evaluate the CT findings of abdominal aspergillosis in immunocompromised patients. Materials and methods: CT scans were reviewed with regard to the sites, number, morphologic appearance, attenuation, and the contrast enhancement patterns of the lesions in six patients (5 women, 1 man; mean age, 43.4 years; range, 23-59 years) with pathologically proved abdominal aspergillosis by two gastrointestinal radiologists in consensus. Medical records were also reviewed to determine each patient's clinical status and outcome. Results: All patients were immunocompromised state: 4 patients received immunosuppressive therapy for solid organ transplantation and 2 patients received chemotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia. Aspergillosis involved blood vessels (n = 3), liver (n = 2), spleen (n = 2), gastrointestinal tract (n = 2), native kidney (n = 1), transplanted kidney (n = 1), peritoneum (n = 1), and retroperitoneum (n = 1). CT demonstrated solid organ or bowel infarction or perforation secondary to vascular thrombosis or pseudoaneurysm, multiple low-attenuating lesions of solid organs presenting as abscesses, concentric bowel wall thickening mimicking typhlitis, or diffuse or nodular infiltration of the peritoneum and retroperitoneum. Conclusion: Familiarity with findings commonly presenting as angioinvasive features or abscesses on CT, may facilitate the diagnosis of rare and fatal abdominal aspergillosis.

  5. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... accurate. In emergency cases, it can reveal internal injuries and bleeding quickly enough to help save lives. ... kidney and bladder stones. abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA), injuries to abdominal organs such as the spleen, liver, ...

  6. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... pancreas, ovaries and bladder as well as lymphoma. kidney and bladder stones. abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA), injuries to abdominal organs such as the spleen, liver, kidneys or other internal organs in cases of trauma. ...

  7. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple slices in a single rotation. These scanners, called multislice CT or multidetector CT, ...

  8. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... scanners to obtain multiple slices in a single rotation. These scanners, called multislice CT or multidetector CT, ... prescribed procedure with your doctor, the medical facility staff and/or your insurance provider to get a ...

  9. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple ... preferable over CT scanning. top of page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org: Radiation Therapy for Bladder ...

  10. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... be viewed on a computer monitor, printed on film or transferred to a CD or DVD. CT ... distinguished from one another on an x-ray film or CT electronic image. In a conventional x- ...

  11. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... the scanner at one time such as with MRI. If an intravenous contrast material is used, you ... CT is less sensitive to patient movement than MRI. CT can be performed if you have an ...

  12. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits Viewing a CT scan, an experienced radiologist ... CT scans should have no immediate side effects. Risks There is always a slight chance of cancer ...

  13. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... time, resulting in more detail and additional view capabilities. Modern CT scanners are so fast that they ... the technologist verifies that the images are of high enough quality for accurate interpretation. The CT examination ...

  14. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... of soft tissues and blood vessels. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? This ... information about pregnancy and x-rays. top of page What does the CT equipment look like? The CT ...

  15. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... of CT Scanning of the Abdomen and Pelvis? What is CT Scanning of the Abdomen/Pelvis? Computed ... soft tissues and blood vessels. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? This ...

  16. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... resulting in more detail and additional view capabilities. Modern CT scanners are so fast that they can ... to ensure that you are properly positioned. With modern CT scanners, you will hear only slight buzzing, ...

  17. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... CT scanner or may be over the weight limit—usually 450 pounds—for the moving table. CT ... type your comment or suggestion into the following text box: Comment: E-mail: Area code: Phone no: ...

  18. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... CT scanner is typically a large, box-like machine with a hole, or short tunnel, in the ... Then, the table will move slowly through the machine as the actual CT scanning is performed. Depending ...

  19. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... for tumors as well as monitor response to chemotherapy. top of page How should I prepare? You ... of acute abdominal conditions in babies, such as vomiting or blood in stool. For some conditions, including ...

  20. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... be asked to remove hearing aids and removable dental work. Women will be asked to remove bras ... can diagnose many causes of abdominal pain or injury from trauma with very high accuracy, enabling faster ...

  1. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... experienced radiologist can diagnose many causes of abdominal pain or injury from trauma with very high accuracy, enabling faster treatment and often eliminating the need for additional, more ...

  2. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... is done because a potential abnormality needs further evaluation with additional views or a special imaging technique. ... GI) contrast exams and ultrasound are preferred for evaluation of acute abdominal conditions in babies, such as ...

  3. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... disease such as ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease , pancreatitis or liver cirrhosis. cancers of the liver, kidneys, ... exams and ultrasound are preferred for evaluation of acute abdominal conditions in babies, such as vomiting or ...

  4. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... abdominal conditions in babies, such as vomiting or blood in stool. For some conditions, including but not limited to some liver, kidney, pancreatic, uterine or ... Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy ...

  5. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... the liver, kidneys, pancreas, ovaries and bladder as well as lymphoma. kidney and bladder stones. abdominal aortic ... and properly administer radiation treatments for tumors as well as monitor response to chemotherapy. top of page ...

  6. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... benefits of the scan far outweigh any possible risks from the exposure to diagnostic radiation. top of page What are the limitations of CT Scanning of the Abdomen/Pelvis? A person who is very large may not fit into the opening of a conventional CT scanner ...

  7. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... CT equipment look like? How does the procedure work? How is the procedure performed? What will I experience during and after the procedure? Who interprets the results and how do I get them? What are the benefits vs. risks? What are the limitations of CT Scanning of ...

  8. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... images or pictures of the inside of the body. The cross-sectional images generated during a CT scan can be reformatted ... of data to create two-dimensional cross-sectional images of your body, which are then displayed on a monitor. CT ...

  9. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... are very nervous or anxious or have chronic pain, you may find a CT exam to be stressful. The technologist or nurse, under the direction of a physician, may offer you some medication to help you tolerate the CT scanning procedure. ...

  10. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... as a CT or CAT scan, is a diagnostic medical test that, like traditional x-rays, produces multiple images or pictures of the inside of the body. ... often eliminating the need for additional, more invasive diagnostic ... of CT is its ability to image bone, soft tissue and blood vessels all at ...

  11. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... about pregnancy and x-rays. top of page What does the CT equipment look like? The CT scanner is typically a large, box-like machine with a hole, or short tunnel, in the center. You will ...

  12. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... microphone. top of page How does the procedure work? In many ways CT scanning works very much like other x-ray examinations. Different ... bleeding quickly enough to help save lives. CT has been shown to be a cost-effective imaging ...

  13. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... to help diagnose the cause of abdominal or pelvic pain and diseases of the internal organs, small bowel and colon, such as: infections such as appendicitis , pyelonephritis or infected fluid collections, also known as abscesses. inflammatory bowel disease such as ulcerative colitis or Crohn's ...

  14. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... as ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease , pancreatitis or liver cirrhosis. cancers of the liver, kidneys, pancreas, ovaries and bladder as well as ... injuries to abdominal organs such as the spleen, liver, kidneys or other internal organs in cases of ...

  15. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... exams and ultrasound are preferred for evaluation of acute abdominal conditions in babies, such as vomiting or blood in stool. For some conditions, including but not limited to some liver, kidney, pancreatic, uterine or ovarian abnormalities, the evaluation and diagnosis ...

  16. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... objects, including jewelry, eyeglasses, dentures and hairpins, may affect the CT images and should be left at ... of the examination the same way that it affects photographs. If contrast material is used, depending on ...

  17. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... small amount of radiation is aimed at and passes through the part of the body being examined, ... of CT scan, the machine may make several passes. You may be asked to hold your breath ...

  18. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... microphone. top of page How does the procedure work? In many ways CT scanning works very much ... deal with them. Manufacturers of intravenous contrast indicate mothers should not breastfeed their babies for 24-48 ...

  19. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... you have a history of heart disease, asthma, diabetes, kidney disease or thyroid problems. Any of these ... allows the body parts to be distinguished from one another on an x-ray film or CT ...

  20. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... Radiation Therapy for Bladder Cancer Radiation Therapy for Colorectal Cancer top of page This page was reviewed on ... GI Tract X-ray (Radiography) - Upper GI Tract Colorectal Cancer Images related to Computed Tomography (CT) - Abdomen and ...

  1. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... CT scanning. top of page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org: Radiation Therapy for Bladder Cancer Radiation ... To locate a medical imaging or radiation oncology provider in your community, you can search the ACR- ...

  2. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... liver, shows up in shades of gray, and air appears black. With CT scanning, numerous x-ray ... cause blurring of the images and degrade the quality of the examination the same way that it ...

  3. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... images or pictures of the inside of the body. The cross-sectional images generated during a CT ... very much like other x-ray examinations. Different body parts absorb the x-rays in varying degrees. ...

  4. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... scanning is fast, painless, noninvasive and accurate. In emergency cases, it can reveal internal injuries and bleeding ... vessels. CT examinations are fast and simple; in emergency cases, they can reveal internal injuries and bleeding ...

  5. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT scan, is a diagnostic medical test that, like ... imaging provides real-time imaging, making it a good tool for guiding minimally invasive procedures such as ...

  6. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... as: infections such as appendicitis , pyelonephritis or infected fluid collections, also known as abscesses. inflammatory bowel disease ... caused by a burst appendix or an infected fluid collection and the subsequent spread of infection. CT ...

  7. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... injuries and bleeding quickly enough to help save lives. Tell your doctor if there’s a possibility you ... injuries and bleeding quickly enough to help save lives. CT has been shown to be a cost- ...

  8. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... allows the body parts to be distinguished from one another on an x-ray film or CT ... entire body will be "inside" the scanner at one time such as with MRI. If an intravenous ...

  9. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple ... Safety page for more information about radiation dose. Women should always inform their physician and x-ray ...

  10. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... its ability to image bone, soft tissue and blood vessels all at the same time. Unlike conventional x-rays, CT scanning provides very detailed images of many types of tissue as well as the lungs, bones, ...

  11. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... seconds, and even faster in small children. Such speed is beneficial for all patients but especially children, ... pain is caused by infection and inflammation, the speed, ease and accuracy of a CT examination can ...

  12. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... See the Safety page for more information about pregnancy and x-rays. top of page What does ... See the Safety page for more information about pregnancy and x-rays. CT scanning is, in general, ...

  13. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... pictures of the inside of the body. The cross-sectional images generated during a CT scan can ... large volume of data to create two-dimensional cross-sectional images of your body, which are then ...

  14. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... slices. When the image slices are reassembled by computer software, the result is a very detailed multidimensional view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple ...

  15. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... hours prior to your exam. Leave jewelry at home and wear loose, comfortable clothing. You may be ... the CT images and should be left at home or removed prior to your exam. You may ...

  16. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... entire body will be "inside" the scanner at one time such as with MRI. If an intravenous ... CT scanning provides very detailed images of many types of tissue as well as the lungs, bones, ...

  17. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... DVD. CT images of internal organs, bones, soft tissue and blood vessels provide greater detail than traditional x-rays, particularly of soft tissues and blood vessels. top of page What are some common ...

  18. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... can lead to artifacts on the images. This loss of image quality can resemble the blurring seen ... advantage of CT is its ability to image bone, soft tissue and blood vessels all at the ...

  19. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... treatments. plan for and assess the results of surgery, such as organ transplants. stage, plan and properly ... CT scanning may eliminate the need for exploratory surgery and surgical biopsy. No radiation remains in a ...

  20. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... an image on a special electronic image recording plate. Bones appear white on the x-ray; soft ... will hear only slight buzzing, clicking and whirring sounds as the CT scanner's internal parts, not usually ...

  1. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... pancreatic, uterine or ovarian abnormalities, the evaluation and diagnosis with MRI may be preferable over CT scanning. top of page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org: Radiation Therapy for Bladder Cancer Radiation Therapy for Colorectal Cancer ...

  2. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    ... pancreatic, uterine or ovarian abnormalities, the evaluation and diagnosis with MRI may be preferable over CT scanning. top of page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org: Radiation Therapy for Bladder Cancer Radiation Therapy for Colorectal Cancer top of page ...

  3. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... you are pregnant and discuss any recent illnesses, medical conditions, medications you’re taking, and allergies. You ... a CT or CAT scan, is a diagnostic medical test that, like traditional x-rays, produces multiple ...

  4. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... up in shades of gray, and air appears black. With CT scanning, numerous x-ray beams and ... Safety page for more information about radiation dose. Women should always inform their physician and x-ray ...

  5. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... to remove hearing aids and removable dental work. Women will be asked to remove bras containing metal ... increase the risk of an unusual adverse effect. Women should always inform their physician and the CT ...

  6. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... have a history of heart disease, asthma, diabetes, kidney disease or thyroid problems. Any of these conditions may ... still, are very nervous or anxious or have chronic pain, you may find a CT exam to ...

  7. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... over time. top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits Viewing a CT scan, an experienced radiologist can ... cancer from excessive exposure to radiation. However, the benefit of an accurate diagnosis far outweighs the risk. ...

  8. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... view of the body's interior. Refinements in detector technology allow nearly all CT scanners to obtain multiple ... to urinate; however, this is actually a contrast effect and subsides quickly. If the contrast material is ...

  9. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... many types of tissue as well as the lungs, bones, and blood vessels. CT examinations are fast ... of many areas of the body, particularly the lungs, abdomen, pelvis and bones. A diagnosis determined by ...

  10. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... infections such as appendicitis , pyelonephritis or infected fluid collections, also known as abscesses. inflammatory bowel disease such ... by a burst appendix or an infected fluid collection and the subsequent spread of infection. CT scanning ...

  11. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... When the image slices are reassembled by computer software, the result is a very detailed multidimensional view ... accurate. A major advantage of CT is its ability to image bone, soft tissue and blood vessels ...

  12. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... emergency cases, it can reveal internal injuries and bleeding quickly enough to help save lives. Tell your ... emergency cases, they can reveal internal injuries and bleeding quickly enough to help save lives. CT has ...

  13. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... will analyze the images and send an official report to your primary care physician or physician who ... been shown to be a cost-effective imaging tool for a wide range of clinical problems. CT ...

  14. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... should always inform their physician and the CT technologist if there is any possibility that they may ... located in a separate control room, where the technologist operates the scanner and monitors your examination in ...

  15. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... CD or DVD. CT images of internal organs, bones, soft tissue and blood vessels provide greater detail ... image on a special electronic image recording plate. Bones appear white on the x-ray; soft tissue, ...

  16. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... as monitor response to chemotherapy. top of page How should I prepare? You should wear comfortable, loose- ... of a speaker and microphone. top of page How does the procedure work? In many ways CT ...

  17. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... lives. CT has been shown to be a cost-effective imaging tool for a wide range of ... accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The costs for specific medical imaging tests, ...

  18. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... to obtain images. For children, the CT scanner technique will be adjusted to their size and the ... evaluation with additional views or a special imaging technique. A follow-up examination may also be necessary ...

  19. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... to arriving. top of page What will I experience during and after the procedure? CT exams are ... at most a minute or two. You may experience a sensation like you have to urinate; however, ...

  20. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... is reduced. Though the scanning itself causes no pain, there may be some discomfort from having to ... are very nervous or anxious or have chronic pain, you may find a CT exam to be ...

  1. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... varying degrees. It is this crucial difference in absorption that allows the body parts to be distinguished ... will hear only slight buzzing, clicking and whirring sounds as the CT scanner's internal parts, not usually ...

  2. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... that contain iodine is extremely rare, and radiology departments are well-equipped to deal with them. Manufacturers ... always be done with low-dose technique. Radiology departments tailor the radiation dose for CT scans, especially ...

  3. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... tomography (CT) scan View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. ...

  4. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... high accuracy, enabling faster treatment and often eliminating the need for additional, more invasive diagnostic procedures. When pain ... A diagnosis determined by CT scanning may eliminate the need for exploratory surgery and surgical biopsy. No radiation ...

  5. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... preferable over CT scanning. top of page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org: Radiation Therapy for Bladder ... Send us your feedback Did you find the information you were looking for? Yes No Please type ...

  6. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... Abdomen and Pelvis? What is CT Scanning of the Abdomen/Pelvis? Computed tomography, more commonly known as ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? This procedure is typically used to help ...

  7. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... beneficial for all patients but especially children, the elderly and critically ill, all of whom may have ... x-rays. CT scanning is, in general, not recommended for pregnant women unless medically necessary because of ...

  8. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... scanning is painless, noninvasive and accurate. A major advantage of CT is its ability to image bone, ... us improve RadiologyInfo.org by taking our brief survey: Survey Do you have a personal story about ...

  9. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... heart disease, asthma, diabetes, kidney disease or thyroid problems. Any of these conditions may increase the risk ... imaging tool for a wide range of clinical problems. CT is less sensitive to patient movement than ...

  10. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Abdomen ...

  11. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... you through a built-in intercom system. With pediatric patients, a parent may be allowed in the room but will be required to wear a lead apron to minimize radiation exposure. After a CT exam, the intravenous line used to inject the contrast material will be ...

  12. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... have a history of heart disease, asthma, diabetes, kidney disease or thyroid problems. Any of these conditions may increase the risk of an unusual adverse effect. Women should always ... such as the liver, kidneys and pancreas. When you enter the CT scanner, ...

  13. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Ultrasound - Abdomen X-ray (Radiography) - Lower GI Tract X-ray (Radiography) - Upper GI Tract Colorectal Cancer Images related to Computed Tomography (CT) - Abdomen and ...

  14. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... may increase the risk of an unusual adverse effect. Women should always inform their physician and the CT technologist if there is any possibility that they may be pregnant. See the Safety page for more information about pregnancy ...

  15. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... images or pictures of the inside of the body. The cross-sectional images generated during a CT scan can be reformatted ... at and passes through the part of the body being examined, recording an image on a special electronic image recording plate. Bones ...

  16. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... pancreatic, uterine or ovarian abnormalities, the evaluation and diagnosis with MRI may be preferable over CT scanning. top of page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org: Radiation Therapy for Bladder Cancer Radiation Therapy for Colorectal Cancer top of page ...

  17. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... microphone. top of page How does the procedure work? In many ways CT scanning works very much like other x-ray examinations. Different ... shield may stay in the room with their child. However, the technologist will always be able to ...

  18. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... children should always be done with low-dose technique. Radiology departments tailor the radiation dose for CT scans, especially when scanning children, so that the benefits of the scan far outweigh any possible risks from the exposure to diagnostic radiation. top of page What are ...

  19. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... to arriving. top of page What will I experience during and after the procedure? CT exams are ... areas. Outside links: For the convenience of our users, RadiologyInfo .org provides links to relevant websites. RadiologyInfo. ...

  20. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... in direct visual contact and usually with the ability to hear and talk to you with the use of a speaker and microphone. top of page How does the procedure work? In many ways CT scanning works very much like other x-ray examinations. Different body parts absorb the x-rays in varying ...

  1. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... Rotating around you, the x-ray tube and electronic x-ray detectors are located opposite each other ... another on an x-ray film or CT electronic image. In a conventional x-ray exam, a ...

  2. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... operates the scanner and monitors your examination in direct visual contact and usually with the ability to hear and talk to you with the use of a speaker and microphone. top of page How does the procedure work? In many ways CT scanning works very much ...

  3. CT diagnosis of abdominal abscess in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xin; Yang Zhiyong

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate CT in the diagnosis of abdominal abscess in children. Methods: Analysis of CT manifestations in 23 cases proved by operation and needle aspiration. Causes: acute appendicitis 13 cases, ascending colon perforation 1 case, Meckel diverticulitis 2 cases, cause obscured 7 cases. Bolus injection of contrast medium was given in 19 cases. Results: The CT value had no relationship to the course of disease and type of bacteria, amount of abscess had positive relevance relative with course of illness. Air-fluid level or scattered gas bubbles was seen in abscesses in 52%; little calcified plague was present in 22%. All cases presented nonhomogeneous thick wall enhancement after one week of illness. Conclusion: The characteristic CT features of intra-abdominal abscess were the presence of air and little calcified plague shadow; a large air-fluid level was indicative of fistula, while the absence of air in the abscess can not exclude fistula

  4. CT diagnosis of abdominal abscesses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobota, J.

    1983-01-01

    The noninvasive nature and amount of information obtained using computed tomography have very quickly put this method of diagnosis to the forefront of the interest of the medical public. So far the authors examined 21 cases of intraabdominal abscess. The successful detection of the abscess depends on the site of the abscess, the stage of development, the size, the choice of measuring program and the experience of the examining physician. The diagnostic possibilities of CT as compared with other radiological methods are by far the best. Ultrasound and scintigraphy are also highly successful but CT also allows the physician to localize the abscess, to determine its size, shape and distance from neighbouring organs which is very important in targeted aspiration biopsy. CT also makes it possible to estimate the stage of development, to make a choice of therapy and to evaluate the state of healing or the success of drainage. (author)

  5. Abdominal wall hernias: imaging with spiral CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stabile Ianora, A.A.; Midiri, M.; Vinci, R.; Rotondo, A.; Angelelli, G.

    2000-01-01

    Computed tomography is an accurate method of identifying the various types of abdominal wall hernias, especially if they are clinically occult, and of distinguishing them from other diseases such as hematomas, abscesses and neoplasia. In this study we examined the CT images of 94 patients affected by abdominal wall hernias observed over a period of 6 years. Computed tomography clearly demonstrates the anatomical site of the hernial sac, the content and any occlusive bowel complications due to incarceration or strangulation. Clinical diagnosis of external hernias is particularly difficult in obese patients or in those with laparotic scars. In these cases abdominal imaging is essential for a correct preoperative diagnosis and to determine the most effective treatment. (orig.)

  6. Differential Aging Signals in Abdominal CT Scans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlov, Nikita V; Makrogiannis, Sokratis; Ferrucci, Luigi; Goldberg, Ilya G

    2017-12-01

    Changes in the composition of body tissues are major aging phenotypes, but they have been difficult to study in depth. Here we describe age-related change in abdominal tissues observable in computed tomography (CT) scans. We used pattern recognition and machine learning to detect and quantify these changes in a model-agnostic fashion. CT scans of abdominal L4 sections were obtained from Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging (BLSA) participants. Age-related change in the constituent tissues were determined by training machine classifiers to differentiate age groups within male and female strata ("Younger" at 50-70 years old vs "Older" at 80-99 years old). The accuracy achieved by the classifiers in differentiating the age cohorts was used as a surrogate measure of the aging signal in the different tissues. The highest accuracy for discriminating age differences was 0.76 and 0.72 for males and females, respectively. The classification accuracy was 0.79 and 0.71 for adipose tissue, 0.70 and 0.68 for soft tissue, and 0.65 and 0.64 for bone. Using image data from a large sample of well-characterized pool of participants dispersed over a wide age range, we explored age-related differences in gross morphology and texture of abdominal tissues. This technology is advantageous for tracking effects of biological aging and predicting adverse outcomes when compared to the traditional use of specific molecular biomarkers. Application of pattern recognition and machine learning as a tool for analyzing medical images may provide much needed insight into tissue changes occurring with aging and, further, connect these changes with their metabolic and functional consequences. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Experimental study of abdominal CT scanning exposal doses adjusted on the basis of pediatric abdominal perimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Wenzhou; Zhu Gongsheng; Zeng Lingyan; Yin Xianglin; Yang Fuwen; Liu Changsheng

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To optimize the abdominal helical CT scanning parameters in pediatric patients and to reduce its radiation hazards. Methods: 60 canines were evenly grouped into 4 groups on the basis of pediatric abdominal perimeter, scanned with 110,150,190 and 240 mAs, and their qualities of canine CT images were analyzed. 120 pediafric patients with clinic suspected abdominal diseases were divided into 4 groups on the basis of abdominal perimeter, scanned by optimal parameters and their image qualities were analyzed. Results: After CT exposure were reduced, the percentages of total A and B were 90.9 % and 92.0 % in experimental canines and in pediatric patients, respectively. Compared with conventional CT scanning, the exposure and single slice CT dose index weighted (CTDIw) were reduced to 45.8%-79.17%. Conclusion: By adjusted the pediatric helical CT parameters basedon the of pediatric abdominal perimeter, exposure of patient to the hazards of radiation is reduced. (authors)

  8. Diagnostic accuracy of low-dose CT compared with abdominal radiography in non-traumatic acute abdominal pain: prospective study and systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshamari, Muhammed; Norrman, Eva; Geijer, Mats; Jansson, Kjell; Geijer, Håkan

    2016-06-01

    Abdominal radiography is frequently used in acute abdominal non-traumatic pain despite the availability of more advanced diagnostic modalities. This study evaluates the diagnostic accuracy of low-dose CT compared with abdominal radiography, at similar radiation dose levels. Fifty-eight patients were imaged with both methods and were reviewed independently by three radiologists. The reference standard was obtained from the diagnosis in medical records. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated. A systematic review was performed after a literature search, finding a total of six relevant studies including the present. Overall sensitivity with 95 % CI for CT was 75 % (66-83 %) and 46 % (37-56 %) for radiography. Specificity was 87 % (77-94 %) for both methods. In the systematic review the overall sensitivity for CT varied between 75 and 96 % with specificity from 83 to 95 % while the overall sensitivity for abdominal radiography varied between 30 and 77 % with specificity 75 to 88 %. Based on the current study and available evidence, low-dose CT has higher diagnostic accuracy than abdominal radiography and it should, where logistically possible, replace abdominal radiography in the workup of adult patients with acute non-traumatic abdominal pain. • Low-dose CT has a higher diagnostic accuracy than radiography. • A systematic review shows that CT has better diagnostic accuracy than radiography. • Radiography has no place in the workup of acute non-traumatic abdominal pain.

  9. Value of abdominal CT in the emergency department for patients with abdominal pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosen, Max P.; Siewert, Bettina; Bromberg, Rebecca; Raptopoulos, Vassilios [Department of Radiology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, 330 Brookline Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Sands, Daniel Z. [Department of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, 330 Brookline Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Edlow, Jonathan [Department of Emergency Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, 330 Brookline Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 (United States)

    2003-02-01

    The purpose of our study is to demonstrate the value of CT in the emergency department (ED) for patients with non-traumatic abdominal pain. Between August 1998 and April 1999, 536 consecutive patients with non-traumatic abdominal pain were entered into our study. Using a computer order entry system, physicians were asked to identify: (a) their most likely diagnosis; (b) their level of certainty in their diagnosis; (c) if they thought CT would be normal or abnormal; (d) their treatment plan (prior to knowledge of the CT results); and (e) their role in deciding to order CT. This information was correlated with each patient's post-CT diagnosis and subsequent management. Pre- and post-CT diagnoses were concordant in 200 of 536 (37%) patients. The physicians' certainty in the accuracy of their pre-CT diagnosis was less than high in 88% of patients. Prior to CT, the management plan included hospital admission for 402 patients. Following CT, only 312 patients were actually admitted; thus, the net impact of performing CT was to obviate the need for hospital admission in 90 of 536 (17%) of patients with abdominal pain. Prior to CT, 67 of 536 (13%) of all patients would have undergone immediate surgery; however, following CT only 25 (5%) actually required immediate surgery. Among patients with the four most common pre-CT diagnoses (appendicitis, abscess, diverticulitis, and urinary tract stones) CT had the greatest impact on hospital admission and surgical management for patients with suspected appendicitis. For patients with suspected appendicitis, CT reduced the hospital admission rate in 28% (26 of 91) of patients and changed the surgical management in 40% (39 of 91) of patients. Our study demonstrates the advantage of performing abdominal CT in the ED for patients with non-traumatic abdominal pain. (orig.)

  10. Value of abdominal CT in the emergency department for patients with abdominal pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, Max P.; Siewert, Bettina; Bromberg, Rebecca; Raptopoulos, Vassilios; Sands, Daniel Z.; Edlow, Jonathan

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of our study is to demonstrate the value of CT in the emergency department (ED) for patients with non-traumatic abdominal pain. Between August 1998 and April 1999, 536 consecutive patients with non-traumatic abdominal pain were entered into our study. Using a computer order entry system, physicians were asked to identify: (a) their most likely diagnosis; (b) their level of certainty in their diagnosis; (c) if they thought CT would be normal or abnormal; (d) their treatment plan (prior to knowledge of the CT results); and (e) their role in deciding to order CT. This information was correlated with each patient's post-CT diagnosis and subsequent management. Pre- and post-CT diagnoses were concordant in 200 of 536 (37%) patients. The physicians' certainty in the accuracy of their pre-CT diagnosis was less than high in 88% of patients. Prior to CT, the management plan included hospital admission for 402 patients. Following CT, only 312 patients were actually admitted; thus, the net impact of performing CT was to obviate the need for hospital admission in 90 of 536 (17%) of patients with abdominal pain. Prior to CT, 67 of 536 (13%) of all patients would have undergone immediate surgery; however, following CT only 25 (5%) actually required immediate surgery. Among patients with the four most common pre-CT diagnoses (appendicitis, abscess, diverticulitis, and urinary tract stones) CT had the greatest impact on hospital admission and surgical management for patients with suspected appendicitis. For patients with suspected appendicitis, CT reduced the hospital admission rate in 28% (26 of 91) of patients and changed the surgical management in 40% (39 of 91) of patients. Our study demonstrates the advantage of performing abdominal CT in the ED for patients with non-traumatic abdominal pain. (orig.)

  11. Multidetector CT findings of bowel Transection in blunt abdominal trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Hyun Suk; Woo, Ji Young; Hong, Hye Suk; Park, Mee Hyun; Yang, Ik; Lee, Yul; Jung, Ah Young; Hwang, Ji Young [Dept. of Radiology, Hallym University College of Medicine, Kangnam Sacred Heart Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Hong Il [Dept. of Radiology, Hallym University College of Medicine, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Anyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-08-15

    Though a number of CT findings of bowel and mesenteric injuries in blunt abdominal trauma are described in literature, no studies on the specific CT signs of a transected bowel have been published. In the present study we describe the incidence and new CT signs of bowel transection in blunt abdominal trauma. We investigated the incidence of bowel transection in 513 patients admitted for blunt abdominal trauma who underwent multidetector CT (MDCT). The MDCT findings of 8 patients with a surgically proven complete bowel transection were assessed retrospectively. We report novel CT signs that are unique for transection, such as complete cutoff sign (transection of bowel loop), Janus sign (abnormal dual bowel wall enhancement, both increased and decreased), and fecal spillage. The incidence of bowel transection in blunt abdominal trauma was 1.56%. In eight cases of bowel transection, percentage of CT signs unique for bowel transection were as follows: complete cutoff in 8 (100%), Janus sign in 6 (100%, excluding duodenal injury), and fecal spillage in 2 (25%). The combination of complete cutoff and Janus sign were highly specific findings in patients with bowel transection. Complete cut off and Janus sign are the unique CT findings to help detect bowel transection in blunt abdominal trauma and recognition of these findings enables an accurate and prompt diagnosis for emergency laparotomy leading to reduced mortality and morbidity.

  12. Gallbladder visualization on CT shortly after abdominal angiography with iodixanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajima, Hiroyuki; Murakami, Ryusuke; Goto, Shinsuke; Aoyama, Toshiya; Kaizu, Toshihide; Ichikawa, Taro; Kumazaki, Tatsuo; Onda, Masahiko

    1996-01-01

    Fifteen patients underwent CT examination shortly after abdominal angiography with iodixanol. Gallbladder opacification was observed in 13 patients in the absence of clinical evidence of renal impairment. Among them, 2 patients showed a strong opacification on CT. There was no significant relationship between visualization of the gallbladder and the total dose of contrast medium. Gallbladder opacification on CT examination shortly after angiography shows that the hepatobiliary tract is important in the excretion of iodixanol. (author)

  13. Abdominal actinomycosis associated with intrauterine device: CT features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laurent, T.; Grandi, P. de; Schnyder, P.

    1996-01-01

    We report two cases of pelviperitoneal actinomycosis appearing in two young women with acute low abdominal pain. Abdominal CT demonstrated multiple solid or encapsulated peritoneal masses with marked contrast enhancement and infiltration of the adjacent mesenteric fat. Laparoscopy confirmed the presence of intraperitoneal abscesses which contained Actinomyces israelii. High doses of amoxicillin and clavulanic acid (Augmentine) were given and following CT scan after 2 and 6 weeks showed a slow, but complete, resolution of the lesions. Although the radiologic presentation of actinomycosis is nonspecific, the diagnosis should be raised in the presence of pseudotumoral mesenteric infiltration, particularly in young women with an IUD. Abdominal CT is a useful method for diagnosis and for follow-up. (orig./MG)

  14. Abdominal actinomycosis associated with intrauterine device: CT features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurent, T. [Dept. of Radiology, CHUV-1011, Lausanne (Switzerland); Grandi, P. de [Dept. of Gynecology-Obstetrics, CHUV-1011, Lausame (Switzerland); Schnyder, P. [Dept. of Radiology, CHUV-1011, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    1996-10-01

    We report two cases of pelviperitoneal actinomycosis appearing in two young women with acute low abdominal pain. Abdominal CT demonstrated multiple solid or encapsulated peritoneal masses with marked contrast enhancement and infiltration of the adjacent mesenteric fat. Laparoscopy confirmed the presence of intraperitoneal abscesses which contained Actinomyces israelii. High doses of amoxicillin and clavulanic acid (Augmentine) were given and following CT scan after 2 and 6 weeks showed a slow, but complete, resolution of the lesions. Although the radiologic presentation of actinomycosis is nonspecific, the diagnosis should be raised in the presence of pseudotumoral mesenteric infiltration, particularly in young women with an IUD. Abdominal CT is a useful method for diagnosis and for follow-up. (orig./MG)

  15. Diagnostic accuracy of low-dose CT compared with abdominal radiography in non-traumatic acute abdominal pain: prospective study and systematic review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alshamari, Muhammed; Geijer, Haakan [Oerebro University, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Oerebro (Sweden); Norrman, Eva [Oerebro University, Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Oerebro (Sweden); Geijer, Mats [Lund University and Skaane University Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging and Physiology, Lund (Sweden); Jansson, Kjell [Oerebro University, Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Oerebro (Sweden)

    2016-06-15

    Abdominal radiography is frequently used in acute abdominal non-traumatic pain despite the availability of more advanced diagnostic modalities. This study evaluates the diagnostic accuracy of low-dose CT compared with abdominal radiography, at similar radiation dose levels. Fifty-eight patients were imaged with both methods and were reviewed independently by three radiologists. The reference standard was obtained from the diagnosis in medical records. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated. A systematic review was performed after a literature search, finding a total of six relevant studies including the present. Overall sensitivity with 95 % CI for CT was 75 % (66-83 %) and 46 % (37-56 %) for radiography. Specificity was 87 % (77-94 %) for both methods. In the systematic review the overall sensitivity for CT varied between 75 and 96 % with specificity from 83 to 95 % while the overall sensitivity for abdominal radiography varied between 30 and 77 % with specificity 75 to 88 %. Based on the current study and available evidence, low-dose CT has higher diagnostic accuracy than abdominal radiography and it should, where logistically possible, replace abdominal radiography in the workup of adult patients with acute non-traumatic abdominal pain. (orig.)

  16. Abdominal lymphadenopathy in tuberculosis and lymphoma: Differentiation with CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Yong Moon; Choi, Byung Ihn; Han, Joon Koo; Han, Man Chung; Song, Chi Sung; Yang, Seoung Oh

    1993-01-01

    Tuberculosis and lymphoma, these 2 dieases can present with lymphadenopathy in anywhere of the body. Therefore differentiation of tuberculosis from lymphoma is often difficult. CT scans of 17 patients with tuberculosis and 23 patients with lymphoma were retrospectively reviewed to evaluate the efficacy of CT scans in differentating adenopathy between tuberculosis and lymphoma. All the patients underwent abdominal CT scans with contrast enhancement before treatment. The size, internal architecture, distribution of lymph nodes, and associated findings on CT scans were analyzed. As compared with lymphoma, tuberculous lymphadenopathy showed 1) female preponderance (65%), 2) predilection for percolative lymph nodes (47%), 3) internal low attenuation in lymph nodes (82%), 4) cold abscess formation (24%). Characteristics of lymphoma on CT scans include 1) male preponderance (78%), 2) conglomeration of lymph nodes (39%), 3) homogeneous internal lymph node structure (83%). These results suggest that evaluation of the cahracteristics of lymphadenopathy on CT scans is helpful for differentiating between tuberculousis and lymphoma

  17. Inter-observer agreement for abdominal CT in unselected patients with acute abdominal pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randen, Adrienne van [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); University of Amsterdam, Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Lameris, Wytze [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); University of Amsterdam, Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Nio, C.Y.; Spijkerboer, Anje M.; Meier, Mark A.; Tutein Nolthenius, Charlotte; Smithuis, Frank; Stoker, Jaap [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bossuyt, Patrick M. [University of Amsterdam, Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Biostatistics, and Bioinformatics, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Boermeester, Marja A. [University of Amsterdam, Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2009-06-15

    The level of inter-observer agreement of abdominal computed tomography (CT) in unselected patients presenting with acute abdominal pain at the Emergency Department (ED) was evaluated. Two hundred consecutive patients with acute abdominal pain were prospectively included. Multi-slice CT was performed in all patients with intravenous contrast medium only. Three radiologists independently read all CT examinations. They recorded specific radiological features and a final diagnosis on a case record form. We calculated the proportion of agreement and kappa values, for overall, urgent and frequently occurring diagnoses. The mean age of the evaluated patients was 46 years (range 19-94), of which 54% were women. Overall agreement on diagnoses was good, with a median kappa of 0.66. Kappa values for specific urgent diagnoses were excellent, with median kappa values of 0.84, 0.90 and 0.81, for appendicitis, diverticulitis and bowel obstruction, respectively. Abdominal CT has good inter-observer agreement in unselected patients with acute abdominal pain at the ED, with excellent agreement for specific urgent diagnoses as diverticulitis and appendicitis. (orig.)

  18. Inter-observer agreement for abdominal CT in unselected patients with acute abdominal pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randen, Adrienne van; Lameris, Wytze; Nio, C.Y.; Spijkerboer, Anje M.; Meier, Mark A.; Tutein Nolthenius, Charlotte; Smithuis, Frank; Stoker, Jaap; Bossuyt, Patrick M.; Boermeester, Marja A.

    2009-01-01

    The level of inter-observer agreement of abdominal computed tomography (CT) in unselected patients presenting with acute abdominal pain at the Emergency Department (ED) was evaluated. Two hundred consecutive patients with acute abdominal pain were prospectively included. Multi-slice CT was performed in all patients with intravenous contrast medium only. Three radiologists independently read all CT examinations. They recorded specific radiological features and a final diagnosis on a case record form. We calculated the proportion of agreement and kappa values, for overall, urgent and frequently occurring diagnoses. The mean age of the evaluated patients was 46 years (range 19-94), of which 54% were women. Overall agreement on diagnoses was good, with a median kappa of 0.66. Kappa values for specific urgent diagnoses were excellent, with median kappa values of 0.84, 0.90 and 0.81, for appendicitis, diverticulitis and bowel obstruction, respectively. Abdominal CT has good inter-observer agreement in unselected patients with acute abdominal pain at the ED, with excellent agreement for specific urgent diagnoses as diverticulitis and appendicitis. (orig.)

  19. ORIGINAL ARTICLE ORIG ORIG CT for upper abdominal pathology ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    exists in other modalities, and tailoring the examination to pathology will result in higher positive yield. Objective. ... Of 133 CT studies done, 116 did not show any abnormality in the pelvis. In 3 cases there were pelvic .... dependence and poor evaluation of the pelvis as directed by a request for upper-abdominal pathology.

  20. Can abdominal multi-detector CT diagnose spinal osteoporosis?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papadakis, Antonios E.; Damilakis, John [University of Crete, Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medicine, P.O. Box 2208, Iraklion, Crete (Greece); Karantanas, Apostolos H. [University of Crete, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, P.O. Box 2208, Iraklion, Crete (Greece); Papadokostakis, Giorgos [University Hospital of Heraklion, Department of Orthopedics, Faculty of Medicine, P.O. Box 2208, Iraklion, Crete (Greece); Petinellis, Effie [University Hospital of Heraklion, Department of Radiotherapy, Faculty of Medicine, P.O. Box 2208, Iraklion, Crete (Greece)

    2009-01-15

    The aim of this study was to (1) generate quantitative CT (QCT) densitometric data based on routine abdominal multi-detector (MDCT) examinations and (2) investigate whether these data can be used to differentiate osteoporotic from healthy females. Twenty-five female patients (group A) with a history of radiotherapy were examined both with routine abdominal MDCT and standard QCT to generate a MDCT-to-QCT conversion equation. Twenty-one osteoporotic (group B) and 23 healthy female patients (group C) were also recruited in the study. Patients of groups B and C underwent routine abdominal MDCT examination for various clinical indications. Mean bone mineral density (BMD) in patients of group A was 103.4 mg/ml {+-} 32.8 with routine abdominal MDCT and 91.0 mg/ml {+-}28.5 with QCT. Quantitative CT BMD{sub QCT} values for patients in groups B and C were calculated utilizing the BMD{sub MDCT} values derived from routine abdominal MDCT data sets and the MDCT to QCT conversion equation: BMD{sub QCT}=0.78. BMD{sub MDCT}+10.13. The calculated QCT densitometric data adequately differentiated osteoporotic from healthy females (area under ROC curve 0.828, p=0.05). In conclusion, this study showed that in a group of female patients, QCT data derived from routine abdominal MDCT examinations discriminated osteoporotic from healthy subjects. (orig.)

  1. Computed Tomography (CT) Perfusion in Abdominal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin Lundsgaard; Norling, Rikke; Lauridsen, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    for assessment of vascularity. CT perfusion has also been used for tumor characterization, staging of disease, response evaluation of newer drugs targeted towards angiogenesis and as a method for early detection of recurrence after radiation and embolization. There are several software solutions available...

  2. Imaging of abdominal tumours: CT or MRI?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, Oeystein E.

    2009-01-01

    The scope of this review is to discuss a theoretical approach to imaging policy, particularly in the perspective of radiation risk reduction. Decisions are ideally driven by empirical evidence about efficacy and risk, e.g., in classical hierarchical efficacy model. As a result of the paucity of empirical evidence (inevitable because of rapid technological development), a pragmatic model is needed. This should avoid overemphasis of factors that currently seem to hamper change, namely personal preference, local expertise, infrastructure, availability. Extrapolation of current general knowledge about CT and MRI demonstrates how a pragmatic approach can be applied in the real world with intermediate goals such as (1) channeling patients from CT to MRI, and (2) reducing CT-delivered radiation. Increased utilisation of MRI in body imaging requires optimisation of scan protocols and equipment, and, being a very operator-dependent modality, the active involvement of the radiologist. In CT dose reduction the main challenge is to benchmark the minimum radiation-dose requirement, and therefore the minimum required image quality that is diagnostically acceptable. As this will ultimately depend on pre-test likelihoods in institutional populations, it is difficult to issue general guidance, and local assessment remains a cornerstone in this effort. (orig.)

  3. CT angiography versus intraarterial DSA in abdominal aortic aneurysms; CT-Angiographie versus intraarterielle DSA bei Bauchaortenaneurysmen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rieker, O. [Klinik fuer Radiologie, Johannes-Gutenberg-Universitaet, Mainz (Germany); Dueber, C. [Klinik fuer Radiologie, Johannes-Gutenberg-Universitaet, Mainz (Germany); Schmiedt, W. [Klinik fuer Herz-, Thorax- und Gefaesschirurgie, Johannes-Gutenberg-Universitaet, Mainz (Germany); Neufang, A. [Klinik fuer Herz-, Thorax- und Gefaesschirurgie, Johannes-Gutenberg-Universitaet, Mainz (Germany); Pittow, M. [Klinik fuer Radiologie, Johannes-Gutenberg-Universitaet, Mainz (Germany); Schweden, F. [Klinik fuer Radiologie, Johannes-Gutenberg-Universitaet, Mainz (Germany)

    1996-07-01

    To evaluate if CT angiography is able to image all features necessary for the preoperative planning of abdominal aortic aneurysms (accessory renal arteries, stenoses or occlusions of renal and iliac arteries, patency of inferior mesentric artery). CT angiography and DSA were performed on 27 patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms. CT angiography was performed using a protocol that covered the abdominal aorta and the pelvic arteries with a single spiral acquisition (contrast dose: 150 ml, collimation: 5 mm, table feed: 7.5 mm/s, increment of reconstruction: 2 mm). Maximum intensity projections (MIP) and axial scans were compared with the results of intraarterial DSA. Using axial scans and subvolume MIP, CTA accurately defined 7/8 accessory renal arteries, 13/13 occlusions and 9/12 high grade stenoses of renal and pelvic arteries. High-grade stenoses of the iliac arteries were underestimated in two cases and overlooked in one case. CT angiography was superior to DSA in imaging the inferior mesenteric artery. CT angiography precisely diagnosed 33 aneurysms of the iliac, renal and coeliac arteries. CT angiography using a single administration of intravenous contrast may replace preoperative DSA in most cases of abdominal aortic aneurysm. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ziel dieser Studie war es zu pruefen, ob mit der CT-Angiographie die fuer die praeoperative Planung von Bauchaortenaneurysmen relevanten Gefaessveraenderungen darstelbar sind (Akzessorische Nierenarterien, Nierenarterienstenosen, A. mesenterica inferior, Beckenarterien). Die CT-Angiographien wurden mit einem Protokoll durchgefuehrt, das die Bauchaorta und die Beckenarterien bis zur Leiste mit einer einzigen Spiralakquisition erfasst (150 ml Kontrastmittel, Kollimation: 5 mm, Tischvorschub: 7,5 mm/s, Rekonstruktionsintervall: 2 mm). Die Befunde aus Maximum-Intensitaets-Projektionen (MIP) und den axialen Schnittbildern wurden mit den Befunden der intraarteriellen DSA bei 27 Patienten verglichen. Bei Hinzuziehung von

  4. Abdominal CT findings of delayed postoperative complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zissin, R.; Osadchy, A. [Sapir Medical Center, Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, Kfar Saba (Israel)]. E-mail: zisinrivka@clalit.org.il; Gayer, G. [Assaf Harofe Medical Center, Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, Zrifin (Israel)

    2007-10-15

    Despite progress in surgical techniques and modern medical treatment, postoperative complications occur not infrequently and vary according to type of surgery, clinical setting, and time elapsed since surgery. In general, they can be divided into early and delayed complications. Delayed postoperative complications can be classified as specific and nonspecific. The common nonspecific delayed complications are incisional hernia and postoperative bowel obstruction. Bowel obstruction can be further categorized as obstruction related to benign or neoplastic etiology, the latter occurring in oncology patients in whom the primary surgery was related to an underlying abdominal neoplasm. Gossypiboma is another, fortunately rare, postoperative complication. Specific complications appear after specific operations and include the following: Splenosis - following splenectomy. Retained gallstones and spilled gallstones - following cholecystectomy, mainly laparoscopic. Dropped appendicolith and stump appendicitis - following appendectomy, mainly laparoscopic. Obturation obstruction by a bezoar - following gastric surgery. Afferent loop syndrome (ALS) - following Bilroth II gastrectomy. (author)

  5. Radiography and abdominal CT compared with sacroiliac joint CT in the diagnosis of sacroiliitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melchior, Julian; Azraq, Yusef; Chary-Valckenaere, Isabelle; Rat, Anne-Christine; Texeira, Pedro; Blum, Alain; Loeuille, Damien

    2017-10-01

    Background The presence of structural sacroiliitis is strong evidence for the diagnosis of spondyloarthritis (SpA). Purpose To assess the performance of abdominal computed tomography (CT) and pelvic plain radiography for the diagnosis of structural sacroiliitis compared with sacroiliac CT (SI joint CT) considered the reference technique in patients with SpA. Material and Methods All SpA patients eligible for biologic treatment were selected from 2005 to 2012. An assessment of sacroiliitis was based on radiography according to the modified New York criteria and on abdominal CT and SI joint CT scans depending on the presence of erosion on at least two consecutive slices. A senior rheumatologist and radiologist independently scored the grade and diagnosis of structural sacroiliitis for the three imaging modalities. After a consensus reading of conflicting examinations (radiography and CT), a final diagnosis of structural sacroiliitis was attained. Results Of the 72 patients selected, sacroiliitis was diagnosed on radiography, abdominal CT, and SI joint CT in 40, 31, and 44 patients, respectively. Inter-reader agreements for the grade of sacroiliitis were substantial for the three imaging modalities, with a weighted kappa range of 0.63-0.75 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.52-0.83), and they were moderate for the diagnosis of sacroiliitis, with a kappa range of 0.50-0.55 (95% CI, 0.32-0.74). The sensitivity and specificity were 79.1% and 70.5%, respectively, for radiography and 82.1% and 100%, respectively, for abdominal CT. Conclusion This study demonstrates the relevance of abdominal CT for the diagnosis of structural sacroiliitis, with good sensitivity and excellent specificity. These imaging techniques avoid unnecessary examinations.

  6. Pitfalls in diagnosing colon cancer on abdominal CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klang, E; Eifer, M; Kopylov, U; Belsky, V; Raskin, S; Konen, E; Amitai, M M

    2017-10-01

    To assess the frequency of undetected colon cancer on conventional abdominal CT and to evaluate the imaging features that are characteristic of those cancers. The present study included consecutive patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer at colonoscopy (2006-2015) who also underwent abdominal computed tomography (CT) performed for various reasons within a year prior to the colonoscopy. The frequency of undetected lesions was evaluated for the original CT interpretations ("original readers"). Two radiologists ("study readers"), blinded to the tumour location, independently performed interpretations oriented for colon cancer detection. The study readers analysed the imaging features of detected tumours (tumour shape, length, maximal wall thickness, free fluid, fat stranding, vascular engorgement, stenosis, and lymphadenopathy). Imaging features of the cancers undetected by the original readers were evaluated. The study included 127 patients. The original readers' frequency of undetected cancer was 25/127 (19.7%). Each study reader could not identify the cancer in 8/127 (6.3%) patients. Imaging features associated with undetected cancers by the original readers included the absence of fat stranding (p=0.007, p=0.003), absence of vascular engorgement (pColon cancer is undetected in 20% of abdominal CT examinations in patients subsequently proven to have colon cancer at colonoscopy. The absence of fat stranding, vascular engorgement, or lymphadenopathy, and an average tumour length of 3.3 cm are contributing factors for failure of detection. Radiologists' training should emphasis these findings as it may improve cancer detection, and clinicians should be aware of the limitations of abdominal CT. Copyright © 2017 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Abdominal organ motion measured using 4D CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandner, Edward D.; Wu, Andrew; Chen, Hungcheng; Heron, Dwight; Kalnicki, Shalom; Komanduri, Krishna; Gerszten, Kristina; Burton, Steve; Ahmed, Irfan; Shou, Zhenyu

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To measure respiration-induced abdominal organ motion using four-dimensional computed tomography (4D CT) scanning and to examine the organ paths. Methods and Materials: During 4D CT scanning, consecutive CT images are acquired of the patient at each couch position. Simultaneously, the patient's respiratory pattern is recorded using an external marker block taped to the patient's abdomen. This pattern is used to retrospectively organize the CT images into multiple three-dimensional images, each representing one breathing phase. These images are analyzed to measure organ motion between each phase. The displacement from end expiration is compared to a displacement limit that represents acceptable dosimetric results (5 mm). Results: The organs measured in 13 patients were the liver, spleen, and left and right kidneys. Their average superior to inferior absolute displacements were 1.3 cm for the liver, 1.3 cm for the spleen, 1.1 cm for the left kidney, and 1.3 cm for the right kidney. Although the organ paths varied among patients, 5 mm of superior to inferior displacement from end expiration resulted in less than 5 mm of displacement in the other directions for 41 of 43 organs measured. Conclusions: Four-dimensional CT scanning can accurately measure abdominal organ motion throughout respiration. This information may result in greater organ sparing and planning target volume coverage

  8. The CT features of abdominal tuberculosis in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andronikou, Savvas; Welman, Chris J.; Kader, Ebrahim

    2002-01-01

    Background: The last decade has seen a resurgence in the incidence and clinical presentation of tuberculosis (TB). Little data exist in the paediatric age group regarding abdominal tuberculosis (ATB) and limited reports of its CT features have been published. Purpose: To elucidate the CT features of ATB in children. Materials and methods: The medical records of 22 patients with ATB were reviewed. Data were extracted regarding the methods of diagnosis and HIV status. The plain chest films were examined and the CT scans were assessed for adenopathy, solid organ involvement, ascites, bowel wall and omental thickening and inflammatory masses. Results: Ten patients had biopsy-proven ATB, 11 had extra-abdominal TB with clinical suspicion of ATB and 1 had a positive trial of therapy. Five patients were tested for HIV and one tested positive. Thirteen patients had abnormal chest radiographs. The commonest CT finding was lymphadenopathy (n=17), followed by solid organ involvement (n=12), ascites (n=5), bowel wall thickening (n=5), inflammatory masses (n=2) and omental thickening (n=1). Conclusions: The clinical features of ATB are protean. This usually results in a delay in diagnosis and impacts negatively on patient morbidity and mortality. On CT, the constellation of findings is highly suggestive of the diagnosis of ATB and, used in conjunction with clinical and laboratory data, should narrow the differential considerably. Unique findings include histologically proven active TB in calcified lymph nodes and a pancreatic TB granuloma. (orig.)

  9. Iterative reconstruction reduces abdominal CT dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinsen, Anne Catrine Trægde; Sæther, Hilde Kjernlie; Hol, Per Kristian; Olsen, Dag Rune; Skaane, Per

    2012-01-01

    Objective: In medical imaging, lowering radiation dose from computed tomography scanning, without reducing diagnostic performance is a desired achievement. Iterative image reconstruction may be one tool to achieve dose reduction. This study reports the diagnostic performance using a blending of 50% statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) and filtered back projection reconstruction (FBP) compared to standard FBP image reconstruction at different dose levels for liver phantom examinations. Methods: An anthropomorphic liver phantom was scanned at 250, 185, 155, 140, 120 and 100 mA s, on a 64-slice GE Lightspeed VCT scanner. All scans were reconstructed with ASIR and FBP. Four readers evaluated independently on a 5-point scale 21 images, each containing 32 test sectors. In total 672 areas were assessed. ROC analysis was used to evaluate the differences. Results: There was a difference in AUC between the 250 mA s FBP images and the 120 and 100 mA s FBP images. ASIR reconstruction gave a significantly higher diagnostic performance compared to standard reconstruction at 100 mA s. Conclusion: A blending of 50–90% ASIR and FBP may improve image quality of low dose CT examinations of the liver, and thus give a potential for reducing radiation dose.

  10. Using Abdominal CT Data for Visceral Fat Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Pop

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Quantitative assessment of body fat is important for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases related to obesity, Computed tomography (CT becoming the standard procedure for measuring the abdominal fat distribution. Material and method: The retrospective study included 111 inpatients, who underwent routine abdominal CT exams in the Radiology Laboratory of SCJU Tg.Mures (2013. MPR MDCT (SOMATOM AS 64 data was processed using a custom written MATLAB R2009b software, ImageJ being used for tracing of the visceral fat area (VFA. Patient data (including blood glucose, cholesterol and triglycerides were analyzed using MO Excel and GraphPad Inprism5. Results: Visceral Fat percentage varied in population from 14.59-68.69 (SD = 11.83 with significant difference between sexes (male vs. female, 46.98 vs. 31.62, p 220 mg% and triglycerides >150 mg% are significantly associated with the VF percent (p <0.05. Overall there is a weak correlation between the lab variables and the measured fat, the strongest one being between triglycerides and the VFA (r = +0.23 and between age and VFA percentage (certain samples. Conclusions: The technique used should decreases the human error in marking of the fat areas providing a better estimation of the VF/VF percentage. CT measured VF relates with certain lab tests. Further analysis, is required for a better use of CT in obesity related pathology diagnosis and treatment

  11. Spiral CT angiography of the abdominal aorta and its branches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costello, P. [Dept. of Radiology, Deaconess Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Gaa, J. [Dept. of Radiology, Deaconess Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    1993-08-01

    Spiral CT angiography (CTA) was performed on 19 patients for the pre-operative assessment of abdominal aortic aneurysms and in 3 post-operative renal artery bypass patients. Spiral CTA performed during intravenous contrast infusion provided a volume of data that was reconstructed at thin increments. Images were edited and reformatted either as surface rendered three-dimensional or maximum intensity projection (MIP) displays. Final images were viewed in a cine-loop presentation of quality comparable to conventional angiograms. The entire aorta can be examined from the coeliac axis to mid-pelvis with only 107 ml of 60% contrast. (orig.)

  12. CT in predicting abdominal cocoon in patients on peritoneal dialysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terebus Loock, M. [Service de Radiologie A, CHU Minjoz, Besancon (France); Lubrano, J. [Service de Chirurgie Digestive, CHU Minjoz, Besancon (France); Courivaud, C.; Bresson Vautrin, C. [Service de Nephrologie, CHU St-Jacques, Besancon (France); Kastler, B. [Service de Radiologie A, CHU Minjoz, Besancon (France); Delabrousse, E., E-mail: eric.delabrousse@orange.f [Service de Radiologie A, CHU Minjoz, Besancon (France)

    2010-11-15

    Aim: To evaluate the computed tomography (CT) signs of encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis (EPS) in patients on peritoneal dialysis (PD) as predictive factors for the evolution to abdominal cocoon (AC). Materials and methods: Clinical features and CT signs of 90 patients on PD were retrospectively reviewed. According to the clinical features, they were divided into three groups (asymptomatic, moderate, or severe). Clinical results were correlated with previously reported CT signs of EPS, i.e., peritoneal thickening, peritoneal calcifications, loculated fluids, small bowel faeces sign, small bowel obstruction, clustered bowel loops, pseudo sac, signs of bowel ischaemia or necrosis. AC was defined at CT by the association of clustered bowel loops and a pseudo sac. Statistical analysis was performed using the Fisher's exact test and the t-test. Results: Although demonstrated in symptomatic patients (p = 0.041), the occurrence of AC was not correlated with the severity of the symptoms (p = 0.16). Among the CT signs, the presence of loculated fluids (p = 0.011), a small bowel faeces sign (p = 0.002); and small bowel obstruction (p = 0.0001) were found to be statistically correlated with the appearance of an AC. Moreover, the association of loculated fluids, small bowel faeces sign, small bowel obstruction was extremely sensitive and specific in the development of AC (sensitivity = 67%, specifity = 100%, positive predictive value = 100%, negative predictive value = 96%). Conclusion: CT should be carried out in every symptomatic patient on PD. Indeed, the association of loculated fluid, small bowel faeces sign, and small bowel obstruction enables the prediction of the development of AC, which is likely to curtail PD and require surgery.

  13. Distribution of pleural effusion associated with ascites on abdominal CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, In Young; Park, Chan Sup; Yeon, Jae Woo; Jeon, Yong Sun; Choi, Sung Kyu; Chung, Won Kyun [Inha Univ. Hospital, Songnam (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-04-01

    To determine through an analysis of the location of pleural effusion associated with ascites, as seen on abdominal CT scan, differences in the distribution of pleural effusion according to the etiology and distribution of ascites. We retrospectively evaluated 77 consecutive patients in whom abdominal CT scan revealed pleural effusion associated with ascites. Patients with history of surgery or trauma and those with clinically and radiologically diagnosed lung or pleural diseases were excluded. We compared the location of pleural effusion with the etiology and distribution of ascites. Forty-two patients were suffering from hepatobiliary diseases, mainly right dominant pleural effusion (26/42, 62%). Fourteen had intraperitoneal carcinomatosis with no significant difference between the frequency of right dominant (5/14, 36%) and of left dominant (6/14, 43%) pleural effusion. Eleven patients had pancreatic diseases, with mainly left dominant pleural effusion (6/11, 55%). Patients with right dominant ascites usually had right dominant pleural effusion (22/24, 92%) and those with left dominant ascites had left dominant pleural effusion (9/10, 90%). Ascites-associated pleural effusion correlated with the anatomical location of the etiology of ascites; its laterality was, in addition, usually the same as that of ascites.

  14. Cost reduction in abdominal CT by weight-adjusted dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arana, Estanislao; Marti-Bonmati, Luis; Tobarra, Eva; Sierra, Consuelo

    2009-01-01

    Aim: To analyze the influence of contrast dose adjusted by weight vs. fixed contrast dose in the attenuation and cost of abdominal computed tomography (CT). Materials and methods: A randomised, consecutive, parallel group study was conducted in 151 patients (74 men and 77 women, age range 22-67 years), studied with the same CT helical protocol. A dose at 1.75 ml/kg was administered in 101 patients while 50 patients had a fixed dose of 120 ml of same non-ionic contrast material (320 mg/ml). Mean enhancements were measured at right hepatic lobe, superior abdominal aorta and inferior cava vein. Statistical analysis was weight-stratified ( 81 kg). Results: Aortic attenuation was significantly superior (p 61 kg in dose-adjusted group, presented higher hepatic attenuation, being statistically significant in those >81 kg (p 80 kg, there was an over cost of Euro 10.7 per patient. Conclusions: An injection volume of 1.75 ml/kg offers an optimal diagnostic quality with a global savings of Euro 1.34 per patient.

  15. Cost reduction in abdominal CT by weight-adjusted dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arana, Estanislao; Martí-Bonmatí, Luis; Tobarra, Eva; Sierra, Consuelo

    2009-06-01

    To analyze the influence of contrast dose adjusted by weight vs. fixed contrast dose in the attenuation and cost of abdominal computed tomography (CT). A randomised, consecutive, parallel group study was conducted in 151 patients (74 men and 77 women, age range 22-67 years), studied with the same CT helical protocol. A dose at 1.75 ml/kg was administered in 101 patients while 50 patients had a fixed dose of 120 ml of same non-ionic contrast material (320 mg/ml). Mean enhancements were measured at right hepatic lobe, superior abdominal aorta and inferior cava vein. Statistical analysis was weight-stratified (81 kg). Aortic attenuation was significantly superior (p61 kg in dose-adjusted group, presented higher hepatic attenuation, being statistically significant in those >81 kg (p80 kg, there was an over cost of euro 10.7 per patient. An injection volume of 1.75 ml/kg offers an optimal diagnostic quality with a global savings of euro 1.34 per patient.

  16. Routine use of precontrast and delayed acquisitions in abdominal CT: time for change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Pamela T; Fishman, Elliot K

    2013-04-01

    With major efforts being made to reduce radiation exposure in CT, one area of practice that requires additional improvement is limiting the number of acquisitions for body CT imaging. This review article defines best MDCT practice in terms of tailored abdominal CT protocols, designed to maximize lesion detection while limiting radiation exposure. The literature defines optimal acquisitions for a range of abdominal CT indications, with precontrast and delayed acquisitions being least commonly indicated.

  17. Various complications of abdominal aortic aneurysm : CT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang Hoon; Byun, Jae Young; Kim, Bum Soo; Kim, Euy Neyung; Yoon, Yeo Dong; Kim, Ki Tae; Lee, Jae Mun; Shinn, Kyung Sub [The Catholic Univ. of Korea, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-03-01

    To evaluate on abdominal CT the type and incidence of various complications of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Twenty six suspected cases of AAA were confirmed by operation(n=21) and by CT(n=5). The etiology, size, shape and incidence of various complications of AAA were then retrospectively evaluated. In addition, post-operative complications were also evaluated in five cases. The etiology of the aneurysm was atherosclerotic in 18 cases and mycotic in three;it showed the presence of Behcet disease in three cases, of tuberculosis in one, and of Marfan syndrome in one. Among the 18 fusiform AAA, the mean maximum diameter of ruptured AAA(7.5{+-}3cm, n=3) was significantly larger than that of unruptured AAA(4.9{+-}1.6cm, n=15) (p<0.05). The saccular type was much more likely to rupture than the fusiform type(p<0.00001). Out of the eight saccular AAA, seven ruptured ; their mean maximum diameter was 3.9{+-}1.3cm This was significantly smaller than that of ruptured fusiform aneurysm(p<0.05). The most common complication was rupture, and occurred ten of 26 cases(38%). Others included hydronephrosis in three cases, bowel infarction in one, and perianeurysmal retroperitoneal fibrosis in one case. Various post-oper-ative complications developed in five patients; these comprised periprosthetic pseudoaneurysm with hematoma (two cases), bowel ischemia (one), focal renal infarction (one), and secondary aorticoduodenal fistula (one). The most common complication of AAA was rupture, the rate of which was much higher in the saccular type with smaller size than the fusiform type. Other various and uncommon complications were observed. CT was helpful in detecting complications arising from AAA and in planning its treatment.

  18. Various complications of abdominal aortic aneurysm : CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang Hoon; Byun, Jae Young; Kim, Bum Soo; Kim, Euy Neyung; Yoon, Yeo Dong; Kim, Ki Tae; Lee, Jae Mun; Shinn, Kyung Sub

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate on abdominal CT the type and incidence of various complications of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Twenty six suspected cases of AAA were confirmed by operation(n=21) and by CT(n=5). The etiology, size, shape and incidence of various complications of AAA were then retrospectively evaluated. In addition, post-operative complications were also evaluated in five cases. The etiology of the aneurysm was atherosclerotic in 18 cases and mycotic in three;it showed the presence of Behcet disease in three cases, of tuberculosis in one, and of Marfan syndrome in one. Among the 18 fusiform AAA, the mean maximum diameter of ruptured AAA(7.5±3cm, n=3) was significantly larger than that of unruptured AAA(4.9±1.6cm, n=15) (p<0.05). The saccular type was much more likely to rupture than the fusiform type(p<0.00001). Out of the eight saccular AAA, seven ruptured ; their mean maximum diameter was 3.9±1.3cm This was significantly smaller than that of ruptured fusiform aneurysm(p<0.05). The most common complication was rupture, and occurred ten of 26 cases(38%). Others included hydronephrosis in three cases, bowel infarction in one, and perianeurysmal retroperitoneal fibrosis in one case. Various post-oper-ative complications developed in five patients; these comprised periprosthetic pseudoaneurysm with hematoma (two cases), bowel ischemia (one), focal renal infarction (one), and secondary aorticoduodenal fistula (one). The most common complication of AAA was rupture, the rate of which was much higher in the saccular type with smaller size than the fusiform type. Other various and uncommon complications were observed. CT was helpful in detecting complications arising from AAA and in planning its treatment

  19. Quantitative analysis of calcification of the abdominal aorta by CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Hiromi; Kubota, Kazuo; Ito, Kengo; Ono, Shuichi; Matsuzawa, Taiju

    1983-01-01

    Of the abdominal aorta, the relationship between the calcification index (C.I.) obtained from CT films and the atheromatous surface involved (S.I.) obtained from autopsy specimens was studied. The relations of C.I. to hypertension and hyperlipidemia were also analyzed. The coefficient of correlation between C.I. and S.I. was 0.83 (p< 0.001). Compared with a non-hypertensive group, the hypertensives showed a higher C.I., and such a difference was great in the male patients in their 50s and females in their 60s and 70s. The male patients with hyperlipidemia did not show definite differences in C.I. from the non-hyperlipidemia group, but the female patients in their 60s and 70s showed significantly higher values. (Chiba, N.)

  20. Abdominal and pelvic CT: is positive enteric contrast still necessary? Results of a retrospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammerer, S; Höink, A J; Wessling, J; Heinzow, H; Koch, R; Schuelke, C; Heindel, W; Buerke, B

    2015-03-01

    Evaluation of diagnostic accuracy of abdominal CT depending on the type of enteric contrast agent. Multislice CTs of 2,008 patients with different types of oral preparation (positive with barium, n = 576; neutral with water, n = 716; and no enteric contrast, n = 716) were retrospectively evaluated by two radiologists including delineation of intestinal segments and influence on diagnosis and diagnostic reliability exerted by the enteric contrast, using a three-point scale. Furthermore, diagnostic reliability of the delineation of selected enteric pathologies was noted. CT data were assigned into groups: oncology, inflammation, vascular, pathology, trauma and gastrointestinal pathology. Delineation of the bowel was clearly practicable across all segments irrespective of the type of enteric contrast, though a slight impairment was observed without enteric contrast. Although delineation of intestinal pathologies was mostly classified "clearly delimitable" more difficulties occurred without oral contrast (neutral/positive/no contrast, 0.8 %/3.8 %/6.5 %). Compared to examinations without enteric contrast, there was a significant improvement in diagnosis that was even increased regarding the reader's diagnostic reliability. Positive opacification impaired detection of mucosal enhancement or intestinal bleeding. Water can replace positive enteric contrast agents in abdominal CTs. However, selected clinical questions require individual enteric contrast preparations. Pathology detection is noticeably impaired without any enteric contrast.

  1. Quantifying the usefulness of CT in evaluating seniors with abdominal pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, Lawrence M.; Klippel, Allen P.; Bavolek, Rebecca A.; Ross, Laura M.; Scherer, Tara M.; Banet, Gerald A.

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: (1) Determine if older patients with abdominal pain who receive emergency department (ED) abdominal CT have changes in diagnosis and/or disposition more often than similar patients without CT; (2) compare physician confidence in diagnosis and disposition for patients with versus without CT; (3) document factors that most influence physician's decision to order abdominal CT in this population. Methods: ED patients 60 years of age or older, with acute non-traumatic abdominal pain were enrolled over a 6-week period. Physicians documented a preliminary and final ED diagnosis and disposition, along with pre- and post-evaluation confidence levels. Decision to order CT, along with clinical information most influencing that decision, was noted. Physician confidence levels and percent change in diagnosis and disposition were compared for patients with versus without CT. Results: One hundred and twenty-six patients comprised study sample. Abdominal CT rate was 59% (95%CI, 50-67%). CT was associated with an increased change in diagnosis (46%; 95%CI, 4-58% versus 29%; 95%CI, 16-42%), but no change in disposition between patients with versus without CT. Preliminary diagnostic confidence was lower for EPs who ordered a CT than for those who did not (p < 0.001). Patient history most influenced ordering CT, whereas prior lab/imaging results most influenced not ordering CT. Conclusion: Patients with CT had a change in diagnosis more often than those without. Preliminary diagnostic confidence was lower in CT group. Percent change in disposition did not differ between groups. Physicians most often ordered CT based on history and did not order CT when other diagnostic evaluation supported a specific diagnosis

  2. Clinical efficacy of a new barium sulfate for abdominal CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Tatuya; Kohno, Mitio; Uematsu, Sadao; Nisitani, Hiromu; Tanaka, Takao.

    1988-01-01

    Computed Tomography of the abdomen requires that the intestines are filled with contrast medium so that the gut is not misinterpreted as a pathologic process. Besides, normal structures may be difficult to delimit in patients with scanty intra-abdominal fat. In Japan, up to date, only a single contrast medium has been available for this purpose, Gastrografin and thus identical with the intravasculaly used Urografin or Angiografin. A new Barium Sulfate suspention (Fusimi Seiyaku, Kagawa) for computed tomographic use has been dilute solution (4.77 %) and with suspending agents that prevent a rapid sedimentation of the Barium Sulfate. The aim of this investigation was to compare Gastrografin with a new barium regarding patients tolerance, side effects and diagnostic information. The investigation comprised 146 patients who were reffered for abdominal CT and was carried out by 5 facilities; National Cancer Center, Kobe University, Chiba University, Kyushu University and Juntendo University. Diagnostic information was judged with respect to the filling of the stomach and intestines, the presence of imaging artifacts and finally clinical estimation. Patients tolerance was investigated as regards taste and side effects. Good filling of the stomach and intestines was obtained in this investigation. However, imaging artifacts occured in only a few cases. The imaging artifacts appeared almost exclusively to arise in the boundary layer between the bowel gas and contrast medium, and were most common in the stomach. However, the contrasting effect of this medium did not in itself appear to cause any imaging artifacts. Fushimi's new barium seems to be preffered because of its lesser tendency to arise artifacts and better tendency to make good filling of the stomach and intestines. Moreover, this investigation did not have any side effects. (J.P.N.)

  3. Immersive Virtual Reality for Visualization of Abdominal CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Qiufeng; Xu, Zhoubing; Li, Bo; Baucom, Rebeccah; Poulose, Benjamin; Landman, Bennett A; Bodenheimer, Robert E

    2013-03-28

    Immersive virtual environments use a stereoscopic head-mounted display and data glove to create high fidelity virtual experiences in which users can interact with three-dimensional models and perceive relationships at their true scale. This stands in stark contrast to traditional PACS-based infrastructure in which images are viewed as stacks of two-dimensional slices, or, at best, disembodied renderings. Although there has substantial innovation in immersive virtual environments for entertainment and consumer media, these technologies have not been widely applied in clinical applications. Here, we consider potential applications of immersive virtual environments for ventral hernia patients with abdominal computed tomography imaging data. Nearly a half million ventral hernias occur in the United States each year, and hernia repair is the most commonly performed general surgery operation worldwide. A significant problem in these conditions is communicating the urgency, degree of severity, and impact of a hernia (and potential repair) on patient quality of life. Hernias are defined by ruptures in the abdominal wall (i.e., the absence of healthy tissues) rather than a growth (e.g., cancer); therefore, understanding a hernia necessitates understanding the entire abdomen. Our environment allows surgeons and patients to view body scans at scale and interact with these virtual models using a data glove. This visualization and interaction allows users to perceive the relationship between physical structures and medical imaging data. The system provides close integration of PACS-based CT data with immersive virtual environments and creates opportunities to study and optimize interfaces for patient communication, operative planning, and medical education.

  4. Immersive virtual reality for visualization of abdominal CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Qiufeng; Xu, Zhoubing; Li, Bo; Baucom, Rebeccah; Poulose, Benjamin; Landman, Bennett A.; Bodenheimer, Robert E.

    2013-03-01

    Immersive virtual environments use a stereoscopic head-mounted display and data glove to create high fidelity virtual experiences in which users can interact with three-dimensional models and perceive relationships at their true scale. This stands in stark contrast to traditional PACS-based infrastructure in which images are viewed as stacks of two dimensional slices, or, at best, disembodied renderings. Although there has substantial innovation in immersive virtual environments for entertainment and consumer media, these technologies have not been widely applied in clinical applications. Here, we consider potential applications of immersive virtual environments for ventral hernia patients with abdominal computed tomography imaging data. Nearly a half million ventral hernias occur in the United States each year, and hernia repair is the most commonly performed general surgery operation worldwide. A significant problem in these conditions is communicating the urgency, degree of severity, and impact of a hernia (and potential repair) on patient quality of life. Hernias are defined by ruptures in the abdominal wall (i.e., the absence of healthy tissues) rather than a growth (e.g., cancer); therefore, understanding a hernia necessitates understanding the entire abdomen. Our environment allows surgeons and patients to view body scans at scale and interact with these virtual models using a data glove. This visualization and interaction allows users to perceive the relationship between physical structures and medical imaging data. The system provides close integration of PACS-based CT data with immersive virtual environments and creates opportunities to study and optimize interfaces for patient communication, operative planning, and medical education.

  5. ROLE OF ULTRASONOGRAPHY AND CT IN THE EVALUATION OF ABDOMINAL MASSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harinath

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available BACK GROUND : Investigators have stressed the ability of CT and US to image abdominal masses and have touted them as first - line imaging modalities. MRI may be used to evaluate complex lesions not definitely characterized by US or CT. We want to evaluate the utility of U S and CT for evaluating abdominal masses in our rural India setup, wherein the study has to be appropriately utilized and tailored to the clinical need and also according to the socioeconomic situation. MATERIALS AND METHODS : This is a prospective observat ional study done in Department of Radiodiagnosis, PES Institute of medical sciences, Kuppam, between November 2011 to June 2013 in 30 patients with suspicious of abdominal masses and referred to the Department of Radio diagnosis and Imaging, for ult rasound and CT scan of abdomen. RESULTS : Ultrasound and CT has 73% and 100% sensitivity respectively for identifying the site of origin in abdominal and retroperitoneal masses when compared with surgical findings. Ultrasound is less sensitive for the detection of fat and characterization of retroperitoneal masses compared to CT. By combining the ultrasound and CT findings we can able to give the histopathological diagnosis in 83% c ases of abdominal mass lesions. CONCLUSION : We conclude that ultrasound and CT has additive role in the evaluation of abdominal masses and their management

  6. Role of CT in the Diagnosis of Nonspecific Abdominal Pain: A Multicenter Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, Jonathan D; Reisner, Andrew T; Binder, William D; Zaheer, Atif; Gunn, Martin L; Linnau, Ken F; Miller, Chad M; Tramontano, Angela C; Herring, Maurice S; Dowling, Emily C; Halpern, Elkan F; Donelan, Karen; Gazelle, G Scott; Pandharipande, Pari V

    2017-03-01

    The objective of our study was to determine whether specific patient and physician factors-known before CT-are associated with a diagnosis of nonspecific abdominal pain (NSAP) after CT in the emergency department (ED). We analyzed data originally collected in a prospective multicenter study. In the parent study, we identified ED patients referred to CT for evaluation of abdominal pain. We surveyed their physicians before and after CT to identify changes in leading diagnoses, diagnostic confidence, and admission decisions. In the current study, we conducted a multiple regression analysis to identify whether the following were associated with a post-CT diagnosis of NSAP: patient age; patient sex; physicians' years of experience; physicians' pre-CT diagnostic confidence; and physicians' pre-CT admission decision if CT had not been available. We analyzed patients with and those without a pre-CT diagnosis of NSAP separately. For the sensitivity analysis, we excluded patients with different physicians before and after CT. In total, 544 patients were included: 10% (52/544) with a pre-CT diagnosis of NSAP and 90% (492/544) with a pre-CT diagnosis other than NSAP. The leading diagnoses changed after CT in a large proportion of patients with a pre-CT diagnosis of NSAP (38%, 20/52). In regression analysis, we found that physicians' pre-CT diagnostic confidence was inversely associated with a post-CT diagnosis of NSAP in patients with a pre-CT diagnosis other than NSAP (p = 0.0001). No other associations were significant in both primary and sensitivity analyses. With the exception of physicians' pre-CT diagnostic confidence, the factors evaluated were not associated with a post-CT diagnosis of NSAP.

  7. Relationship between abdominal fat area measured by screening abdominal fat CT and metabolic syndrome in asymptomatic Korean individuals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Dae Woong; Park, Noh Hyuck; Park, Ji Yeon; Kim, Seon Jeong [Dept. of Radiology, MyoungJi Hospital, Seonam University College of Medicine, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between abdominal fat as assessed by abdominal fat CT and metabolic syndrome (MS), especially in asymptomatic Korean individuals. Retrospectively, a medical record analysis was performed in a total of 111 patients with screening abdominal fat CT. The data such as visceral fat (VF), subcutaneous fat (SF) and VF/SF were elicited by abdominal fat CT, and we analyzed the relationship of VF, SF, and VF/SF with MS and cardiovascular risk factors. In males, VF and SF had a positive correlation with many cardiovascular risk factors and MS, but VF was superior to SF. In females, VF, but not SF, had a positive correlation with some cardiovascular risk factors and MS. The cut-off values of VF and SF to predict MS, which were calculated by drawing receiver operating characteristic curves, were as follows: the cut-off value of VF in men: 136.50 cm{sup 2}, the cut-off value of SF in men: 159.50 cm{sup 2}, and the cut-off value of VF in women: 134.50 cm{sup 2}. In conclusion, VF accumulation was the best predictor of MS and it had a positive correlation with cardiovascular risk factors in both sexes. SF also had a significant association with MS, especially in men, although it was not superior to VF.

  8. Cholestrol granuloma of the breast incidentally detected on dynamic abdominal CT: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Sun Hye; Lee, Eun Hye; Hong, Hyun Sook; Kwak, Jeong Ja [Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Bucheon Hospital, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    A breast cholesterol granuloma is an uncommon nodular breast lesion. We incidentally detected a persistently enhancing breast mass on the dynamic abdominal computed tomography (CT) of a 78-year-old woman. The mass decreased in diameter over 50 days following a core needle biopsy. This report is the first to describe the dynamic-enhanced CT features of a breast cholesterol granuloma.

  9. CT in the diagnosis of abdominal wall hernias: a preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoejer, A.M.; Jess, P. [Department of Surgery, Roskilde County Hospital Koege, DK-4600 Koege (Denmark); Rygaard, H. [Department of Radiology, Roskilde County Hospital Koege, DK-4600 Koege (Denmark)

    1997-12-01

    The aim of the study was to estimate the value of CT in the diagnosis of abdominal wall hernias and at the same time to create a standard for this CT investigation. Twenty-four patients with suspected hernia of the abdominal wall were examined. All were operated on. The CT scans were assessed by two radiologists to estimate the interobserver variation. The CT diagnoses made by the two radiologists were correct in 83 % and 79 % of cases, respectively. The sensitivity was 0.83 in both CT evaluations and the specificity was 0.83 and 0.67, respectively. The predictive value of a positive CT finding was 0.94 and 0.88, while the predictive value of a negative CT finding was 0.63 and 0.57, respectively. The interobserver variation (kappa) was 0.87. The study therefore indicates that a positive CT finding of abdominal wall hernia is reliable, while a negative finding does not exclude the diagnosis. The interobserver variation of the CT diagnoses is acceptable. To achieve the highest diagnostic accuracy, it is recommended to always use the Valsalva manoeuvre, oral intake of contrast and 10/10 mm CT slices. (orig.) With 3 figs., 1 tab., 7 refs.

  10. Abdominal manifestations of polyarteritis nodosa demonstrated with CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adaletli, Ibrahim; Ozpeynirci, Yigit; Kurugoglu, Sebuh [Istanbul University, Department of Radiology, Cerrahpasa Medical School, Istanbul (Turkey); Sever, Lale; Arisoy, Nil [Istanbul University, Department of Pediatric Nephrology, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2010-05-15

    We report a rare case of polyarteritis nodosa (PAN) presenting in childhood. The child had multiple visceral aneurysms and later developed ascending colitis and jejunitis. The diagnosis was established with multidetector CT and CT angiography. (orig.)

  11. Unsupervised quantification of abdominal fat from CT images using Greedy Snakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Chirag; Dallal, Ahmed H.; Arbabshirani, Mohammad R.; Patel, Aalpen; Moore, Gregory

    2017-02-01

    Adipose tissue has been associated with adverse consequences of obesity. Total adipose tissue (TAT) is divided into subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) and visceral adipose tissue (VAT). Intra-abdominal fat (VAT), located inside the abdominal cavity, is a major factor for the classic obesity related pathologies. Since direct measurement of visceral and subcutaneous fat is not trivial, substitute metrics like waist circumference (WC) and body mass index (BMI) are used in clinical settings to quantify obesity. Abdominal fat can be assessed effectively using CT or MRI, but manual fat segmentation is rather subjective and time-consuming. Hence, an automatic and accurate quantification tool for abdominal fat is needed. The goal of this study is to extract TAT, VAT and SAT fat from abdominal CT in a fully automated unsupervised fashion using energy minimization techniques. We applied a four step framework consisting of 1) initial body contour estimation, 2) approximation of the body contour, 3) estimation of inner abdominal contour using Greedy Snakes algorithm, and 4) voting, to segment the subcutaneous and visceral fat. We validated our algorithm on 952 clinical abdominal CT images (from 476 patients with a very wide BMI range) collected from various radiology departments of Geisinger Health System. To our knowledge, this is the first study of its kind on such a large and diverse clinical dataset. Our algorithm obtained a 3.4% error for VAT segmentation compared to manual segmentation. These personalized and accurate measurements of fat can complement traditional population health driven obesity metrics such as BMI and WC.

  12. Are output measurements always necessary after CT tube replacement?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul J Stauduhar

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: TX regulations and the ACR require that CT radiation output be measured within 30 days of major service. The most common major service is tube replacement. We hypothesized that historical QC data could be used instead to determine if output measurements are necessary, reducing the need for costly output measurements.Methods: We reviewed 66 records of tube replacements to determine with what frequency output falls outside specifications. We also conducted an experiment to verify that clinically significant output changes could be identified by comparing image noise in historical QC data with the same data after tube replacement. We used 30 days of historical QC data to establish a baseline noise level and 95% confidence interval (CI for individual noise measurements. To simulate output changes, we acquired phantom images with our QC protocol while manually changing output (mA. We acquired 10 images using the baseline output and 10 images at each different “output”. We evaluated individual images and subsets of images at each “output” to determine if the system was within the manufacturer’s specifications.Results: None of the 66 tube replacements resulted in an output change that exceeded specifications. Analysis of 30 days of historic QC data for our experimental system indicated a mean noise of 5.4 HU with 95% CI of 5.1 ‒ 5.7 HU. When using the mean noise of 10 images acquired at each of the varying outputs, we were able to identify, with 100% accuracy, images acquired at outputs outside manufacturer’s specifications.Conclusion: The results of our review of historical tube replacement data indicated the likelihood of output falling outside manufacturer’s specifications is low. Considering this, it is likely that by using QC data from programs required by regulation and the ACR physicists can reliably verify radiation output stability remotely instead of making physical measurements.--------------------Cite this article

  13. Abdominal wall CT angiography: a detailed account of a newly established preoperative imaging technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Timothy J; Stella, Damien L; Rozen, Warren M; Ashton, Mark; Taylor, G Ian

    2008-10-01

    Institutional review board approval was obtained for this study, and all patients gave written informed consent. Autologous surgical breast reconstruction with use of abdominal wall donor flaps based on the deep inferior epigastric artery (DIEA) and one or more of its anterior musculocutaneous perforating branches (DIEA perforator flap) is being used with increasing frequency instead of breast reconstruction with use of traditional transverse rectus abdominus musculocutaneous and modified muscle-sparing flaps. Preoperative mapping of the DIEA perforators with abdominal wall computed tomographic (CT) angiography may improve patient care by providing the surgeon with additional information that will lead to optimization of the surgical technique, shorter procedure time, and reduction in the frequency of surgical complications. The branching patterns of the DIEA, the segmental anatomy of the anterior adipocutaneous perforating branches of the DIEA, and the importance of these features in pre- and intraoperative surgical planning necessitate a different approach to abdominal wall CT angiography than that used with other abdominal CT angiographic techniques. In abdominal wall CT angiography, the common femoral artery is used as the bolus trigger, CT scanning is performed in the caudocranial direction, the automatic exposure control feature is disabled, a scaled grid overlay tool is used to present information to the surgeons, and radiation dose is minimized (average dose, 6 mSv). The anatomic accuracy of abdominal wall CT angiography has been investigated in cadaveric and surgical studies, with sensitivity of 96%-100% and specificity of 95%-100%. This detailed description will allow other radiologists and surgeons interested in free DIEP flap surgery to incorporate this useful tool into their practice. (c) RSNA, 2008.

  14. ORIGINAL ARTICLE ORIG ORIG CT for upper abdominal pathology ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    quadrant pain. Abdom Imaging 2003; 28: 643-651. 3. Ramsay DW, Markham DH, Morgan B, Rodgers PM, Liddicoat AJ. The use of dilute Calogen as a fat density oral contrast medium in upper abdominal computed tomography, compared with the use of water and positive oral contrast media. Clin Radiol 2001; 56: 670-673.

  15. Automated segmentation and recognition of abdominal wall muscles in X-ray torso CT images and its application in abdominal CAD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, X.; Kamiya, N.; Hara, T.; Fujita, H.; Chen, H.; Yokoyama, R.; Hoshi, H.

    2007-01-01

    The information of abdominal wall is very important for the planning of surgical operation and abdominal organ recognition. In research fields of computer assisted radiology and surgery and computer-aided diagnosis, the segmentation and recognition of the abdominal wall muscles in CT images is a necessary pre-processing step. Due to the complexity of the abdominal wall structure and indistinctive in CT images, the automated segmentation of abdominal wall muscles is a difficult issue and has not been solved completely. We propose an approach to segment the abdominal wall muscles and divide it into three categories (front abdominal muscles including rectus abdominis; left and right side abdominal muscles including external oblique, internal oblique and transversus abdominis muscles) automatically. The approach, first, makes an initial classification of bone, fat, and muscles and organs based on the CT number. Then a layer structure is generated to describe the 3-D anatomical structures of human torso by stretching the torso region onto a thin-plate for easy recognition. The abdominal wall muscles are recognized on the layer structures using the spatial relations to the skeletal structure and CT numbers. Finally, the recognized regions are mapped back to the 3-D CT images using an inverse transformation of the stretching process. This method is applied to 20 cases of torso CT images and evaluations are based on visual comparison of the recognition results and the original CT images by an expert in anatomy. The results show that our approach can segment and recognize abdominal wall muscle regions effectively. (orig.)

  16. Automated segmentation and recognition of abdominal wall muscles in X-ray torso CT images and its application in abdominal CAD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, X.; Kamiya, N.; Hara, T.; Fujita, H. [Dept. of Intelligent Image Information, Div. of Regeneration and Advanced Medical Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine, Gifu Univ., Gifu (Japan); Chen, H. [Dept. of Anatomy, Graduate School of Medicine, Gifu Univ., Gifu (Japan); Yokoyama, R.; Hoshi, H. [Dept. of Radiology, Gifu Univ. Graduate School of Medicine and Univ. Hospital, Gifu (Japan)

    2007-06-15

    The information of abdominal wall is very important for the planning of surgical operation and abdominal organ recognition. In research fields of computer assisted radiology and surgery and computer-aided diagnosis, the segmentation and recognition of the abdominal wall muscles in CT images is a necessary pre-processing step. Due to the complexity of the abdominal wall structure and indistinctive in CT images, the automated segmentation of abdominal wall muscles is a difficult issue and has not been solved completely. We propose an approach to segment the abdominal wall muscles and divide it into three categories (front abdominal muscles including rectus abdominis; left and right side abdominal muscles including external oblique, internal oblique and transversus abdominis muscles) automatically. The approach, first, makes an initial classification of bone, fat, and muscles and organs based on the CT number. Then a layer structure is generated to describe the 3-D anatomical structures of human torso by stretching the torso region onto a thin-plate for easy recognition. The abdominal wall muscles are recognized on the layer structures using the spatial relations to the skeletal structure and CT numbers. Finally, the recognized regions are mapped back to the 3-D CT images using an inverse transformation of the stretching process. This method is applied to 20 cases of torso CT images and evaluations are based on visual comparison of the recognition results and the original CT images by an expert in anatomy. The results show that our approach can segment and recognize abdominal wall muscle regions effectively. (orig.)

  17. CT identification of abdominal injuries in abused pre-school-age children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilmes, Melissa A.; Hernanz-Schulman, Marta; Kan, J.H.; Greeley, Christopher S.; Piercey, Lisa M.; Yu, Chang

    2011-01-01

    Although the abdominopelvic CT findings of abdominal trauma in children have been described, little has been written about the subset of children who are victims of abuse. Our purpose is to describe abdominopelvic injuries in abused pre-school-age children as identified on CT. An IRB-approved retrospective review of our institutional child abuse registry was performed. Searching a 14-year period, we identified 84 children ≤ 5 years of age with medically diagnosed abuse who underwent CT. We reviewed imaging studies, operative reports, autopsy findings and patient outcomes. Consensus review of the CT examinations was performed by CAQ-certified pediatric radiologists, and findings were categorized as normal or by injury types (solid organ versus bowel). The injuries were analyzed in light of existing literature on pediatric accidental and non-accidental injuries. Of the 84 children, 35 (41.7%) had abdominal injuries. Abdominal injuries included liver (15), bowel (13), mesentery (4), spleen (6), kidneys (7), pancreas (4) and adrenal glands (3). Of these children, 26% (9/35) required surgical intervention for bowel, mesenteric and pancreatic injuries. Another 9/35 children died, not as a result of abdominal injuries but as a direct result of inflicted intracranial injuries. Our data indicate that abdominal injuries in abused children present in a pattern similar to that of children with accidental abdominal trauma, underscoring the need for vigilance and correlative historical and clinical data to identify victims of abuse. Mortality in abused children with intra-abdominal injury was frequently related to concomitant head injury. (orig.)

  18. CT identification of abdominal injuries in abused pre-school-age children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilmes, Melissa A.; Hernanz-Schulman, Marta; Kan, J.H. [Vanderbilt Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Nashville, TN (United States); Greeley, Christopher S. [University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Department of Pediatrics, Houston, TX (United States); Piercey, Lisa M. [Vanderbilt Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Nashville, TN (United States); Yu, Chang [Vanderbilt University, Department of Biostatistics, Nashville, TN (United States)

    2011-05-15

    Although the abdominopelvic CT findings of abdominal trauma in children have been described, little has been written about the subset of children who are victims of abuse. Our purpose is to describe abdominopelvic injuries in abused pre-school-age children as identified on CT. An IRB-approved retrospective review of our institutional child abuse registry was performed. Searching a 14-year period, we identified 84 children {<=} 5 years of age with medically diagnosed abuse who underwent CT. We reviewed imaging studies, operative reports, autopsy findings and patient outcomes. Consensus review of the CT examinations was performed by CAQ-certified pediatric radiologists, and findings were categorized as normal or by injury types (solid organ versus bowel). The injuries were analyzed in light of existing literature on pediatric accidental and non-accidental injuries. Of the 84 children, 35 (41.7%) had abdominal injuries. Abdominal injuries included liver (15), bowel (13), mesentery (4), spleen (6), kidneys (7), pancreas (4) and adrenal glands (3). Of these children, 26% (9/35) required surgical intervention for bowel, mesenteric and pancreatic injuries. Another 9/35 children died, not as a result of abdominal injuries but as a direct result of inflicted intracranial injuries. Our data indicate that abdominal injuries in abused children present in a pattern similar to that of children with accidental abdominal trauma, underscoring the need for vigilance and correlative historical and clinical data to identify victims of abuse. Mortality in abused children with intra-abdominal injury was frequently related to concomitant head injury. (orig.)

  19. Abdominal Applications of a Novel Detector-Based Spectral CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, Nicholas; Rajiah, Prabhakar

    Detector-based spectral computed tomography (SDCT) is a recently introduced technology that uses a single x-ray tube and 2 layers of detectors to simultaneously collect low- and high-energy data. In this article, we provide an overview of this novel SDCT technology in abdominal imaging. Several applications of SDCT in abdominal imaging are discussed and illustrated, along with a brief description of current literature on the status of dual-energy computed tomography in these applications. This includes urinary calculus composition, characterization of masses (renal, adrenal, hepatic, and others), tumor perfusion, improving vascular contrast, improving lesion conspicuity, decreasing artifacts, and reducing radiation dose. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Extra-appendiceal findings in pediatric abdominal CT for suspected appendicitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halverson, Mark; Delgado, Jorge; Mahboubi, Soroosh [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Much has been written regarding the incidence, types, importance and management of abdominal CT incidental findings in adults, but there is a paucity of literature on incidental findings in children. We sought to determine the prevalence and characteristics of extra-appendiceal and incidental findings in pediatric abdominal CT performed for suspected appendicitis. A retrospective review was performed of abdominal CT for suspected appendicitis in a pediatric emergency department from July 2010 to June 2012. Extra-appendiceal findings were recorded. Any subsequent imaging was noted. Extra-appendiceal findings were divided into incidental findings of doubtful clinical significance, alternative diagnostic findings potentially providing a diagnosis other than appendicitis explaining the symptoms, and incidental findings that were abnormalities requiring clinical correlation and sometimes requiring further evaluation but not likely related to the patient symptoms. One hundred sixty-five children had abdominal CT for suspected appendicitis. Seventy-seven extra-appendiceal findings were found in 57 (34.5%) patients. Most findings (64 of 77) were discovered in children who did not have appendicitis. Forty-one of these findings (53%) could potentially help explain the patient's symptoms, while 30 of the findings (39%) were abnormalities that were unlikely to be related to the symptoms but required clinical correlation and sometimes further work-up. Six of the findings (8%) had doubtful or no clinical significance. Extra-appendiceal findings are common in children who undergo abdominal CT in the setting of suspected appendicitis. A significant percentage of these patients have findings that help explain their symptoms. Knowledge of the types and prevalence of these findings may help radiologists in the planning and interpretation of CT examinations in this patient population. (orig.)

  1. A segmentation framework for abdominal organs from CT scans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campadelli, Paola; Casiraghi, Elena; Pratissoli, Stella

    2010-09-01

    Computed tomography images are becoming an invaluable mean for abdominal organ investigation. In the field of medical image processing, some of the current interests are the automatic diagnosis of liver, spleen, and kidney pathologies, and the 3D volume rendering of these abdominal organs. Their automatic segmentation is the first and fundamental step in all these studies, but it is still an open problem. In this paper we propose a fully automatic, gray-level based segmentation framework based on a multiplanar fast marching method. The proposed segmentation scheme is general, and employs only established and not critical anatomical knowledge. For this reason, it can be easily adapted to segment different abdominal organs, by overcoming problems due to the high inter- and intra-patient gray-level, and shape variabilities; the extracted volumes are then combined to produce the final results. The system has been evaluated by computing the symmetric volume overlap (SVO) between the automatically segmented (liver and spleen) volumes and the volumes manually traced by radiological experts. The test dataset is composed of 60 images, where 40 images belong to a private dataset, and 20 images to a public one. Liver segmentation has achieved an average SVO congruent with94, which is comparable to the mean intra- and inter-personal variation (96). Spleen segmentation achieves similar, promising results (SVO congruent with93). The comparison of these results with those achieved by active contour models (SVO congruent with90), and topology adaptive snakes (SVO congruent with92) proves the efficacy of our system. The described segmentation method is a general framework that can be adapted to segment different abdominal organs, achieving promising segmentation results. It has to be noted that its performance could be further improved by incorporating shape based rules. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Abdominal and pelvic computed tomography (CT) interpretation: discrepancy rates among experienced radiologists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abujudeh, Hani H.; Boland, Giles W.; Kaewlai, Rathachai; Rabiner, Pavel; Thrall, James H. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Halpern, Elkarn F.; Gazelle, G.S. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Institute for Technology Assessment, Boston, MA (United States)

    2010-08-15

    To assess the discrepancy rate for the interpretation of abdominal and pelvic computed tomography (CT) examinations among experienced radiologists. Ninety abdominal and pelvic CT examinations reported by three experienced radiologists who specialize in abdominal imaging were randomly selected from the radiological database. The same radiologists, blinded to previous interpretation, were asked to re-interpret 60 examinations: 30 of their previous interpretations and 30 interpreted by others. All reports were assessed for the degree of discrepancy between initial and repeat interpretations according to a three-level scoring system: no discrepancy, minor, or major discrepancy. Inter- and intrareader discrepancy rates and causes were evaluated. CT examinations included in the investigation were performed on 90 patients (43 men, mean age 59 years, SD 14, range 19-88) for the following indications: follow-up/evaluation of malignancy (69/90, 77%), pancreatitis (5/90, 6%), urinary tract stone (4/90, 4%) or other (12/90, 13%). Interobserver and intraobserver major discrepancy rates were 26 and 32%, respectively. Major discrepancies were due to missed findings, different opinions regarding interval change of clinically significant findings, and the presence of recommendation. Major discrepancy of between 26 and 32% was observed in the interpretation of abdominal and pelvic CT examinations. (orig.)

  3. Pyelolymphatic backflow demonstrated by an abdominal CT: A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durhan, Gamze; Ayyıldız, Veysel Atilla; Çiftçi, Türkmen Turan; Akata, Deniz; Özmen, Mustafa Nasuh

    2014-01-01

    Pyelolymphatic backflow phenomenon, which is a subtype of pyelorenal backflow, is a rare condition that occurs during the acute phase of urinary obstruction. Pyelorenal backflow has already been described in humans with retrograde pyelography. Our report presents a rare case of pyelolyphatic backflow demonstrated by a computed tomography. A 67-year-old man with a history of bladder carcinoma was admitted to the emergency department due to right-sided flank pain and hematuria. Hematuria resolved after insertion of a 3-way urinary catheter, but flank pain persisted. As a result, an abdominopelvic CT was performed. CT revealed numerous tiny, serpiginous tubular structures connected with each other and filled with urine. They began intrarenally and extended caudally surrounding the ureter in the retroperitoneum. Subsequently, the patient underwent an ultrasound-guided nephrostomy to decompress the collecting system of the right kidney. Antegrade pyelography revealed minimal hydroneprosis. However, no leakage from the ureter to the retroperitoneum was observed, proving that the changes demonstrated by a CT were due to pyelolymphatic reflux caused by increased pressure in the collecting tubules filling the lymphatics with opaque urine. This report presents a very rare case of pyelolymphatic reflux demonstrated by a CT. We present this case report as a reminder that although rare, pyelolymphatic reflux can occur as a result of obstruction without manifestations of hydronephrosis and it can be confused with leakage from the ureter

  4. Acute Appendagitis Presenting with Features of Appendicitis: Value of Abdominal CT Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukhpreet Dubb

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of acute appendagitis in a patient who presented initially with typical features of acute appendicitis. The diagnosis of acute appendagitis was made on pathognomonic signs on computed tomography (CT scan. Abdominal pain is a common surgical emergency. CT is not always done if there are clear features of acute appendicitis. The rare but important differential diagnosis of acute appendagitis must be borne in mind when dealing with patients with suspected acute appendicitis. A CT scan of the abdomen may avoid unnecessary surgery in these patients.

  5. Analysis of local concentration in stomach fold pattern by using abdominal X-ray CT image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Shigeto; Hasegawa, Jun-ichi; Mekada, Yoshito; Mori, Kensaku; Nawano, Shigeru

    2004-01-01

    The paper presents a method for analysis of stomach folds pattern in abdominal X-ray CT images. Many stomach cancers have local concentration of folds at cancer lesions. Therefore, in stomach diagnosis, it is very important to evaluate quantitatively such fold concentration. In this paper, a method for calculation of concentration index for line figure on a curved surface is proposed first. Then, using this method a processing procedure for detection of stomach cancer from an abdominal X-ray CT image is developed. In the experiment using practical X-ray CT images, it is shown that by the proposed procedure, higher values of concentration index are obtained at cancer area. (author)

  6. SU-F-I-33: Estimating Radiation Dose in Abdominal Fat Quantitative CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, X; Yang, K; Liu, B [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To compare size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) in abdominal fat quantitative CT with another dose estimate D{sub size,L} that also takes into account scan length. Methods: This study complied with the requirements of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act. At our institution, abdominal fat CT is performed with scan length = 1 cm and CTDI{sub vol} = 4.66 mGy (referenced to body CTDI phantom). A previously developed CT simulation program was used to simulate single rotation axial scans of 6–55 cm diameter water cylinders, and dose integral of the longitudinal dose profile over the central 1 cm length was used to predict the dose at the center of one-cm scan range. SSDE and D{sub size,L} were assessed for 182 consecutive abdominal fat CT examinations with mean water-equivalent diameter (WED) of 27.8 cm ± 6.0 (range, 17.9 - 42.2 cm). Patient age ranged from 18 to 75 years, and weight ranged from 39 to 163 kg. Results: Mean SSDE was 6.37 mGy ± 1.33 (range, 3.67–8.95 mGy); mean D{sub size,L} was 2.99 mGy ± 0.85 (range, 1.48 - 4.88 mGy); and mean D{sub size,L}/SSDE ratio was 0.46 ± 0.04 (range, 0.40 - 0.55). Conclusion: The conversion factors for size-specific dose estimate in AAPM Report No. 204 were generated using 15 - 30 cm scan lengths. One needs to be cautious in applying SSDE to small length CT scans. For abdominal fat CT, SSDE was 80–150% higher than the dose of 1 cm scan length.

  7. Systematic unenhanced CT for acute abdominal symptoms in the elderly patients improves both emergency department diagnosis and prompt clinical management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Millet, Ingrid; Pages-Bouic, Emma; Curros-Doyon, Fernanda; Taourel, Patrice [CHU Lapeyronie, Department of Medical Imaging, Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Sebbane, Mustapha [Department of Emergency Medicine, CHU Lapeyronie, Montpellier (France); Molinari, Nicolas [Department of Medical Information and Statistics, CHU Montpellier (France); Riou, Bruno [GH Pitie-Salpetriere, APHP, Department of Emergency Medicine and Surgery, Paris (France)

    2017-02-15

    To assess the added-value of systematic unenhanced abdominal computed tomography (CT) on emergency department (ED) diagnosis and management accuracy compared to current practice, in elderly patients with non-traumatic acute abdominal symptoms. Institutional review board approval and informed consent were obtained. This prospective study included 401 consecutive patients 75 years of age or older, admitted to the ED with acute abdominal symptoms, and investigated by early systematic unenhanced abdominal CT scan. ED diagnosis and intended management before CT, after unenhanced CT, and after contrast CT if requested, were recorded. Diagnosis and management accuracies were evaluated and compared before CT (clinical strategy) and for two conditional strategies (current practice and systematic unenhanced CT). An expert clinical panel assigned a final diagnosis and management after a 3-month follow-up. Systematic unenhanced CT significantly improved the accurate diagnosis (76.8% to 85%, p=1.1 x 10{sup -6}) and management (88.5% to 95.8%, p=2.6 x 10{sup -6}) rates compared to current practice. It allowed diagnosing 30.3% of acute unsuspected pathologies, 3.4% of which were unexpected surgical procedure requirement. Systematic unenhanced abdominal CT improves ED diagnosis accuracy and appropriate management in elderly patients presenting with acute abdominal symptoms compared to current practice. (orig.)

  8. Systematic unenhanced CT for acute abdominal symptoms in the elderly patients improves both emergency department diagnosis and prompt clinical management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millet, Ingrid; Pages-Bouic, Emma; Curros-Doyon, Fernanda; Taourel, Patrice; Sebbane, Mustapha; Molinari, Nicolas; Riou, Bruno

    2017-01-01

    To assess the added-value of systematic unenhanced abdominal computed tomography (CT) on emergency department (ED) diagnosis and management accuracy compared to current practice, in elderly patients with non-traumatic acute abdominal symptoms. Institutional review board approval and informed consent were obtained. This prospective study included 401 consecutive patients 75 years of age or older, admitted to the ED with acute abdominal symptoms, and investigated by early systematic unenhanced abdominal CT scan. ED diagnosis and intended management before CT, after unenhanced CT, and after contrast CT if requested, were recorded. Diagnosis and management accuracies were evaluated and compared before CT (clinical strategy) and for two conditional strategies (current practice and systematic unenhanced CT). An expert clinical panel assigned a final diagnosis and management after a 3-month follow-up. Systematic unenhanced CT significantly improved the accurate diagnosis (76.8% to 85%, p=1.1 x 10 -6 ) and management (88.5% to 95.8%, p=2.6 x 10 -6 ) rates compared to current practice. It allowed diagnosing 30.3% of acute unsuspected pathologies, 3.4% of which were unexpected surgical procedure requirement. Systematic unenhanced abdominal CT improves ED diagnosis accuracy and appropriate management in elderly patients presenting with acute abdominal symptoms compared to current practice. (orig.)

  9. Role of F-18 FDG PET/CT in the management of infected abdominal aortic aneurysm due to salmonella

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Seung Jin; Lee, Jin Soo; Cheong, Moon Hyun; Byun, Sung Su; Hyun, In Young [Inha University College of Medicine, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-12-15

    We present a case of infected abdominal aortic aneurysm due to salmonella enteritidis. F-18 FDG PET/CT was performed to diagnosis and during follow-up after antibiotic treatment. Computed tomography (CT) is considered to be the best diagnostic imaging modality in infected aortic lesions. In this case, a combination of CT and FDG PET/CT provided accurate information for the diagnosis of infected abdominal aortic aneurysm. Moreover, FDG PET/CT made an important contribution of monitoring disease activity during antibiotic treatment.

  10. Abdominal fat volume estimation by stereology on CT: a comparison with manual planimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manios, G.E.; Mazonakis, M.; Damilakis, J. [University of Crete, Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medicine, Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Voulgaris, C.; Karantanas, A. [University of Crete, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Heraklion, Crete (Greece)

    2016-03-15

    To deploy and evaluate a stereological point-counting technique on abdominal CT for the estimation of visceral (VAF) and subcutaneous abdominal fat (SAF) volumes. Stereological volume estimations based on point counting and systematic sampling were performed on images from 14 consecutive patients who had undergone abdominal CT. For the optimization of the method, five sampling intensities in combination with 100 and 200 points were tested. The optimum stereological measurements were compared with VAF and SAF volumes derived by the standard technique of manual planimetry on the same scans. Optimization analysis showed that the selection of 200 points along with the sampling intensity 1/8 provided efficient volume estimations in less than 4 min for VAF and SAF together. The optimized stereology showed strong correlation with planimetry (VAF: r = 0.98; SAF: r = 0.98). No statistical differences were found between the two methods (VAF: P = 0.81; SAF: P = 0.83). The 95 % limits of agreement were also acceptable (VAF: -16.5 %, 16.1 %; SAF: -10.8 %, 10.7 %) and the repeatability of stereology was good (VAF: CV = 4.5 %, SAF: CV = 3.2 %). Stereology may be successfully applied to CT images for the efficient estimation of abdominal fat volume and may constitute a good alternative to the conventional planimetric technique. (orig.)

  11. Role of multidetector abdominal CT in the evaluation of abnormalities in polyarteritis nodosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singhal, M.; Gupta, P.; Sharma, A.; Lal, A.; Rathi, M.; Khandelwal, N.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To identify arterial and end-organ abnormalities on abdominal computed tomography (CT) in patients with polyarteritis nodosa (PAN). Materials and methods: A prospective study comprising 27 consecutive patients with PAN was conducted from 2007 to 2013. Departmental ethics committee approval was obtained. All patients underwent contrast-enhanced CT comprising an arterial and a portal venous phase. Images were assessed for arterial irregularity, aneurysms, stenosis, and occlusion. End-organ changes, including infarcts, haematoma, and bowel involvement, were also recorded. Results: A positive CT was recorded in 15 patients including eight females. The mean age was 32 years. The most common abnormalities were aneurysms seen in 12 patients. The renal artery was the most common site of aneurysms (n=9). The hepatic (n=3), superior mesenteric (n=3) and splenic arteries (n=1) were also involved. Contour irregularity was noted in four patients involving the hepatic, splenic, and superior mesenteric arteries. Stenosis/occlusion was also noted in seven patients. The most common end-organ abnormality was infarct (n=9), followed by bowel wall thickening (n=3), and perinephric haematoma (n=2). Conclusion: A combination of arterial and end-organ abnormalities on abdominal CT enables an accurate diagnosis of PAN in occult cases and may obviate the need for angiography and, sometimes, biopsy. - Highlights: • A combination of findings on CT allows a diagnosis of PAN. • Specific findings include arterial and end organ abnormalities. • The most common abnormalities on CTA and CT are aneurysms and infarcts.

  12. Screening of illegal intracorporeal containers ("body packing"): is abdominal radiography sufficiently accurate? A comparative study with low-dose CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre; Canel, Laurent; Becker, Christoph D; Wolff, Hans; Elger, Bernice; Lock, Eric; Sarasin, François; Bonfanti, Monica S; Dupuis-Lozeron, Elise; Perneger, Thomas; Platon, Alexandra

    2012-12-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic performance of abdominal radiography in the detection of illegal intracorporeal containers (hereafter, packets), with low-dose computed tomography (CT) as the reference standard. This study was approved by the institutional ethical review board, with written informed consent. From July 2007 to July 2010, 330 people (296 men, 34 women; mean age, 32 years [range, 18-55 years]) suspected of having ingested drug packets underwent supine abdominal radiography and low-dose CT. The presence or absence of packets at abdominal radiography was reported, with low-dose CT as the reference standard. The density and number of packets (≤ 12 or >12) at low-dose CT were recorded and analyzed to determine whether those variables influence interpretation of results at abdominal radiography. Packets were detected at low-dose CT in 53 (16%) suspects. Sensitivity of abdominal radiography for depiction of packets was 0.77 (41 of 53), and specificity was 0.96 (267 of 277). The packets appeared isoattenuated to the bowel contents at low-dose CT in 16 (30%) of the 53 suspects with positive results. Nineteen (36%) of the 53 suspects with positive low-dose CT results had fewer than 12 packets. Packets that were isoattenuated at low-dose CT and a low number of packets (≤12) were both significantly associated with false-negative results at abdominal radiography (P = .004 and P = .016, respectively). Abdominal radiography is mainly limited by low sensitivity when compared with low-dose CT in the screening of people suspected of carrying drug packets. Low-dose CT is an effective imaging alternative to abdominal radiography. © RSNA, 2012.

  13. Clinical significance of pulmonary nodules detected on abdominal CT in pediatric patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breen, Micheal; Lee, Edward Y. [Boston Children' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Zurakowski, David [Boston Children' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Departments of Anesthesiology and Surgery, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-11-15

    The clinical significance of a pulmonary nodule that is detected incidentally on CT studies in children is unknown. In addition, there is limited information regarding the management of incidentally detected pulmonary nodules discovered on abdominal CT studies in children. The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical significance of incidental pulmonary nodules detected on abdominal CT studies in children. This was a retrospective study performed following institutional review board approval. Abdominal CT reports in patients younger than 18 years of age from July 2004 to June 2011 were reviewed for the terms ''nodule,'' ''nodular'' or ''mass'' in reference to the lung bases. The study population included those pediatric patients in whom pulmonary nodules were initially detected on abdominal CT studies. The largest pulmonary nodules detected on CT studies were evaluated for their features (size, shape, margin, attenuation, location, and presence of calcification and cavitation). Follow-up CT studies and clinical records were reviewed for demographic information, history of underlying malignancies and the clinical outcome of the incidental pulmonary nodules. Comparison of malignant versus benign pulmonary nodules was performed with respect to the size of the nodule, imaging features on CT, and patient history of malignancy using the Student's t-test and Fisher exact test. Youden J-index in receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to determine the optimal cut-off size for suggesting a high risk of malignancy of incidentally detected pulmonary nodules. Pulmonary nodules meeting inclusion criteria were detected in 62 (1.2%) of 5,234 patients. The mean age of patients with nodules was 11.2 years (range: 5 months-18 years). Thirty-one patients (50%) had follow-up CT studies and two of these patients (6%) were subsequently found to have malignant pulmonary nodules. Both of these

  14. Kaposi sarcoma and lymphadenopathy syndrome: limitations of abdominal CT in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, K.L. Jr.; Federle, M.P.; Abrams, D.I.; Volberding, P.; Lewis, B.J.

    1984-02-01

    Abdominal computed tomography (CT) was performed in 31 patients with Kaposi sarcoma (KS) related to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), three patients with classic KS, and 12 patients with the newly described lymphadenopathy syndrome (LNS). The frequency, distribution, and appearance of lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly were similar in the AIDS-related KS and LNS groups. Rectal and perirectal disease was identified in 86% of homosexual men studied; rectal KS could not be distinguished from proctitis on CT criteria alone. No CT abnormalities were seen in patients with classic KS. The CT demonstration of retroperitoneal, mesenteric, or pelvic adenopathy or of rectal or perirectal disease in patients with AIDS-related KS is not necessarily indicative of widespread involvement with the disease.

  15. Kaposi sarcoma and lymphadenopathy syndrome: limitations of abdominal CT in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, K.L. Jr.; Federle, M.P.; Abrams, D.I.; Volberding, P.; Lewis, B.J.

    1984-01-01

    Abdominal computed tomography (CT) was performed in 31 patients with Kaposi sarcoma (KS) related to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), three patients with classic KS, and 12 patients with the newly described lymphadenopathy syndrome (LNS). The frequency, distribution, and appearance of lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly were similar in the AIDS-related KS and LNS groups. Rectal and perirectal disease was identified in 86% of homosexual men studied; rectal KS could not be distinguished from proctitis on CT criteria alone. No CT abnormalities were seen in patients with classic KS. The CT demonstration of retroperitoneal, mesenteric, or pelvic adenopathy or of rectal or perirectal disease in patients with AIDS-related KS is not necessarily indicative of widespread involvement with the disease

  16. Colonic polyp detection method from 3D abdominal CT images based on local intensity analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oda, M.; Nakada, Y.; Kitasaka, T.; Mori, K.; Suenaga, Y.; Takayama, T.; Takabatake, H.; Mori, M.; Natori, H.; Nawano, S.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a detection method of colonic polyps from 3D abdominal CT images based on local intensity analysis. Recently, virtual colonoscopy (VC) has widely received attention as a new colon diagnostic method. VC is considered as a less-invasive inspection method which reduces patient load. However, since the colon has many haustra and its shape is long and convoluted, a physician has to change the viewpoint and the viewing direction of the virtual camera of VC many times while diagnosis. Additionally, there is a risk to overlook lesions existing in blinded areas caused by haustra. This paper proposes an automated colonic polyp detection method from 3D abdominal CT images. Colonic polyps are located on the colonic wall. Their CT values are higher than those of colonic lumen regions and lower than those of fecal materials tagged by an X-ray opaque contrast agent. CT values inside polyps which exist outside the tagged fecal materials tend to gradually increase from outward to inward (blob-like structure). CT values inside polyps that exist inside the tagged fecal materials tend to gradually decrease from outward to inward (inv-blob-like structure). We employ the blob and the inv-blob structure enhancement filters based on the eigenvalues of the Hessian matrix to detect polyps using intensity characteristic of polyps. Connected components with low output values of the enhancement filter are eliminated in false positive reduction process. Small connected components are also eliminated. We applied the proposed method to 44 cases of abdominal CT images. Sensitivity for polyps of 6 mm or larger was 80% with 4.7 false positives per case. (orig.)

  17. CT aspects in the diagnosis of tuberculosis in the abdominal and urogenital areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, W.; Fischer, H.J.; Uhlenbrock, D.

    1983-01-01

    The morphologic aspect of abdominal tuberculosis are evaluated by C.T. The necrotising tuberculosis of the genitourinary tract presents course cystic lesions of fluid density. Similar morphologic criteria are seen in ileocoecal tuberculosis. The peritoneal tuberculosis is characterized by large soft tissue masses of a high density which can be found in nearly all areas of the abdomen. The increased morbidity of tuberculosis in peoble from foreign countries living in the Federal Republic of Germany is pointed out. (orig.) [de

  18. Clear cell sarcoma of the abdominal wall with peritoneal sarcomatosis: CT features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabate, J.M.; Fernandez, A.; Torrubia, S.; Villanueva, A.; Monill, J.M.

    1999-01-01

    Clear cell sarcoma, also called malignant melanoma of soft parts, is an uncommon neoplasm that involves tendons or aponeuroses of the lower extremity. The CT features of a clear cell sarcoma arising from the abdominal wall with later peritoneal dissemination are described. Peritoneal sarcomatosis from soft tissue sarcomas is a very rare condition previously unreported in the radiologic literature. Metastases to peritoneal surfaces must therefore be considered a possible site for systemic dissemination of soft tissue sarcomas. (orig.)

  19. Evaluation of atherosclerosis in the abdominal aorta by contrast enhanced helical CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong, Honghan; Hiraishi, Kumiko; Shimizu, Tadafumi; Adachi, Itaru; Sueyoshi, Kouzou; Narabayashi, Isamu

    1997-01-01

    We retrospectively evaluated helical CT findings of the abdominal aorta in 85 patients (47 men and 38 women) ranging from 21 to 84 years of age (mean±SD : 58.8±13.6) with nonvascular disease. The degree of atherosclerosis of the abdominal aorta was assessed by examining the imaging findings of the curvature, double contour (wall thickening), and calcification of the abdominal aorta. Each of the atherosclerosis findings was classified into one of four degree of severity: no atherosclerosis as 0, minimal atherosclerosis as 1, moderate atherosclerosis as 2, and severe atherosclerosis as 3. Findings of abdominal aortic sclerosis were given a score of 9. The mean score of the men was 2.8±1.8 and that of the women was 1.1±1.2. The mean score of patients below age 39 was 0.3±0.7, that of patients between ages 40 and 59 was 1.4±1.5, and that of patients over age 60 was 2.9±1.6. The results showed that atherosclerosis occurred earlier and more frequently, and was more severe, in the men than in the women. There are many nonsymptomatic patients with arteriosclerosis, and they should be carefully managed. Because of high resolusion and fast scanning, helical CT is useful for evaluating the severity of atherosclerosis. Double contour of the abdominal aorta at the later arterial phase of the contrast enhancement was an important finding, suggesting atherosclerosis of the abdominal aorta. (author)

  20. Proposed protocol for realization of abdominal CT in patients admitted to the emergency room for trauma in HSJD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quesada Cascante, Lizbeth

    2013-01-01

    A protocol is established for computed tomography in trauma patients treated in emergency of Hospital San Juan de Dios. A literature review is conducted on abdominal CT protocols in specialized databases. The criteria, scanning, parameters and delay time are established for realization of abdominal CT in patients with traumatic emergencies in HSJD. Taking the thickness of the sections, the thickness of the sections in reconstruction, the quantities of contrast and the speed of injection in patients, have been standardized for the realization of abdominal CT in HSJD. Computed tomography should be preferably performed of routine in portal phase and the late from 5 minutes in patients with abdominal trauma, contributing in this phase as much information regarding the extent of abdominal injury [es

  1. Abdominal plain film in patients admitted with clinical suspicion of renal colic: should it be replaced by low-dose computed tomography?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre; Platon, Alexandra; Rutschmann, Olivier T; Verdun, Francis R; Schmidlin, Franz R; Iselin, Christophe E; Vermeulen, Bernard; Sarasin, François P; Buhler, Léo H; Becker, Christoph D

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate a low-dose abdominal computed tomography (LDCT) protocol, delivering a radiation dose close to that delivered by an abdominal plain film (APF), in patients with a clinical suspicion of renal colic. A total of 139 patients for whom an APF was requested for suspicion of renal colic were randomized into two groups. The patients in group 1 (n = 68) underwent an admission LDCT scan delivering a 2.1-mSv radiation dose to women and 1.6 mSv to men, instead of the APF. Patients in group 2 (n = 71) underwent an APF. Clinical and radiologic follow-up data were obtained for each patient. The number of additional abdominal ultrasound and CT scans performed to reach a confident final diagnosis and determine the proper treatment was compared between the two groups. A mean effective radiation dose was obtained in each group. Of the 68 patients in group 1 (LDCT), 10 (15%) underwent ultrasonography, 9 (13%) conventional abdominal CT, and 2 (3%) both. In group 2 (APF), the corresponding percentages were 27% (19 of 71), 28% (20 of 71), and 23% (16 of 71). Of the 68 patients in group 1, 47 (69%) did not require any additional examinations compared with 16 (23%) of the 71 patients in group 2 (P < 0.0001). The mean effective dose was 3.5 and 6.9 mSv in groups 1 and 2, respectively (P < 0.0001). In patients with suspicion of renal colic, replacing the admission APF with our LDCT protocol will significantly reduce the need for additional CT or ultrasonography. Also, our LDCT protocol decreases by almost 50% the mean radiation dose per patient.

  2. Metastasectomy of Abdominal Wall Lesions due to Prostate Cancer Detected Through PET/CT Gallium 68-PMSA: First Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Ochoa

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Introducing the topic of abdominal wall metastasis secondary to prostate cancer with a reminder of the disease's rarity, being the first published case. This article is about a 66 year old patient diagnosed with prostate cancer [cT2aNxMx iPSA: 5,6 ng/ml Gleason 3+3, (Grade 1 Group], treated with radical prostatectomy as well as accompanied with amplified pelvic lymphadenectomy, who subsequently presented metastatic lesions to the abdominal wall diagnosed with PET/CT Gallium 68-PMSA technique and treated with abdominal metastasectomy with adequate short term results.

  3. Metastasectomy of Abdominal Wall Lesions due to Prostate Cancer Detected Through PET/CT Gallium 68-PMSA: First Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa, Claudia; Ramirez, Angie; Varela, Rodolfo; Godoy, Fabian; Vargas, Rafael; Forero, Jorge; Rojas, Andres; Roa, Carmen; Céspedes, Carlos; Ramos, Jose; Cabrera, Marino; Calderon, Andres

    2017-05-01

    Introducing the topic of abdominal wall metastasis secondary to prostate cancer with a reminder of the disease's rarity, being the first published case. This article is about a 66 year old patient diagnosed with prostate cancer [cT2aNxMx iPSA: 5,6 ng/ml Gleason 3+3, (Grade 1 Group)], treated with radical prostatectomy as well as accompanied with amplified pelvic lymphadenectomy, who subsequently presented metastatic lesions to the abdominal wall diagnosed with PET/CT Gallium 68-PMSA technique and treated with abdominal metastasectomy with adequate short term results.

  4. CT-SPECT fusion to correlate radiolabeled monoclonal antibody uptake with abdominal CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, E.L.; Noz, M.E.; Sanger, J.J.; Megibow, A.J.; Maguire, G.Q.

    1989-01-01

    To enhance the information provided by computed tomography (CT) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) performed with radiolabeled, anti-carcinoembryonic antigen monoclonal antibody (MoAb), the authors performed fusion of these types of images from eight subjects with suspected colorectal adenocarcinoma. Section thickness and pixel size of the two studies were matched, coordinates of corresponding points from each study were identified, and CT sections were translated, rotated, and reprojected to match the corresponding SPECT scans. The CT-SPECT fusion enabled identification of anatomic sites of tumor-specific MoAb accumulation in four cases, showed non-specific MoAb accumulation in two, and helped confirm information only suggested by the two studies separately in one

  5. Abdominal CT Does Not Improve Outcome for Children with Suspected Acute Appendicitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle I. Miano

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Acute appendicitis in children is a clinical diagnosis, which often requires preoperative confirmation with either ultrasound (US or computed tomography (CT studies. CTs expose children to radiation, which may increase the lifetime risk of developing malignancy. US in the pediatric population with appropriate clinical follow up and serial exam may be an effective diagnostic modality for many children without incurring the risk of radiation. The objective of the study was to compare the rate of appendiceal rupture and negative appendectomies between children with and without abdominal CTs; and to evaluate the same outcomes for children with and without USs to determine if there were any associations between imaging modalities and outcomes. Methods: We conducted a retrospective chart review including emergency department (ED and inpatient records from 1/1/2009–2/31/2010 and included patients with suspected acute appendicitis. Results: 1,493 children, aged less than one year to 20 years, were identified in the ED with suspected appendicitis. These patients presented with abdominal pain who had either a surgical consult or an abdominal imaging study to evaluate for appendicitis, or were transferred from an outside hospital or primary care physician office with the stated suspicion of acute appendicitis. Of these patients, 739 were sent home following evaluation in the ED and did not return within the subsequent two weeks and were therefore presumed not to have appendicitis. A total of 754 were admitted and form the study population, of which 20% received a CT, 53% US, and 8% received both. Of these 57%, 95% CI [53.5,60.5] had pathology-proven appendicitis. Appendicitis rates were similar for children with a CT (57%, 95% CI [49.6,64.4] compared to those without (57%, 95% CI [52.9,61.0]. Children with perforation were similar between those with a CT (18%, 95% CI [12.3,23.7] and those without (13%, 95% CI [10.3,15.7]. The proportion of

  6. Organ and effective dose reduction in adult chest CT using abdominal lead shielding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iball, G R; Brettle, D S

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare organ and effective dose savings that could be achieved using conventional lead aprons and a new, custom-designed shield as out-of-plane shielding devices during chest CT scans. Thermoluminescent dosimeters were used to measure doses throughout the abdomen and pelvis during CT scans of the chest of a RANDO phantom. Dose measurements were made with no shielding, with lead aprons and with the new shield around the abdomen and pelvis in order to quantify the achievable organ and effective dose reductions. Average dose savings in the 10 phantom sections ranged from 5% to 78% with the highest point dose saving of 93% being found in the mid-pelvis. When shielding was used, the maximum measured organ dose reduction was a 72% dose saving to the testes. Significant dose savings were found throughout the abdomen and pelvis, which contributed to an effective dose saving of 4% that was achieved over and above the dose savings obtained through conventional optimisation strategies. This could yield significant population dose savings and reductions in collective radiation risk. In this study significant organ and effective dose reductions have been achieved through the use of abdominal shielding during chest CT examinations and it is therefore recommended that out-of-plane patient shielding devices should be used for all chest CT scans and potentially for every CT scan, irrespective of body part.

  7. Spectrum of abdominal pathologies detected with CT in long term dialysis patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulu, Esra Meltem Kayahan [Baskent University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Fevzi Cakmak cad. No.: 45, Bahcelievler/Ankara (Turkey)], E-mail: emkayahanulu@yahoo.com; Tarhan, N. Cagla [Baskent University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Fevzi Cakmak cad. No.: 45, Bahcelievler/Ankara (Turkey); Hocaoglu, Elif [Bakirkoy Dr Sadi Konuk Training and Research Hospital, Department of Radiology, Zuhurat Baba mah, Bakirkoy/Istanbul (Turkey); Akman, Beril [Department of Nephrology, Fevzi Cakmak cad. No.: 45, Bahcelievler/Ankara (Turkey); Basaran, Ceyla; Donmez, Fuldem Yildirim; Niron, Emin Alp [Baskent University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Fevzi Cakmak cad. No.: 45, Bahcelievler/Ankara (Turkey)

    2009-11-15

    As a consequence of the expanded use of long term hemodialysis and continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) treatments and extended life spans, complications of end-stage renal disease and dialysis treatments are being encountered with increasing frequency in these patients. Computed tomography can accurately depict many of the potential complications of end-stage renal disease on dialysis. This article presents the abdominal CT findings of 429 end-stage renal disease patients who are on either hemodialysis or continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis treatment.

  8. Endovascular repair of inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm: serial changes of periaortic fibrosis demonstrated by CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sueyoshi, Eijun; Sakamoto, Ichiro; Uetani, Masataka

    2009-07-01

    Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm (IAAA) is characterized by inflammatory and/or fibrotic changes in the periaortic regions of the retroperitoneum. Surgical repair is usually selected for this disease. However, the perioperative mortality associated with open surgical repair of IAAs is three times higher than that with noninflammatory aortic aneurysms due to inflammation and periaortic fibrosis (PAF). Endovascular aneurysm repair of IAAs excludes the aneurysm and seems to reduce the size of the aneurysmal sac and the extent of PAF with acceptable peri-interventional and long-term morbidity. We describe the successful endovascular repair of an IAAA and the serial CT findings after repair.

  9. Automated extraction of metastatic liver cancer regions from abdominal contrast CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamakawa, Junki; Matsubara, Hiroaki; Kimura, Shouta; Hasegawa, Junichi; Shinozaki, Kenji; Nawano, Shigeru

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, automated extraction of metastatic liver cancer regions from abdominal contrast X-ray CT images is investigated. Because even in Japan, cases of metastatic liver cancers are increased due to recent Europeanization and/or Americanization of Japanese eating habits, development of a system for computer aided diagnosis of them is strongly expected. Our automated extraction procedure consists of following four steps; liver region extraction, density transformation for enhancement of cancer regions, segmentation for obtaining candidate cancer regions, and reduction of false positives by shape feature. Parameter values used in each step of the procedure are decided based on density and shape features of typical metastatic liver cancers. In experiments using practical 20 cases of metastatic liver tumors, it is shown that 56% of true cancers can be detected successfully from CT images by the proposed procedure. (author)

  10. Intra-abdominal Kikuchi's Disease Mimicking Malignant Lymphoma on FDG PET-CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Hye Suk; Kim, Gi hyun; Cho, Young Shim; Joo, Hye Jin; Lee, Ok Jun; Ryu, Dong Hee; Lee, Ki Hyeong; Kim, Seung Taik [Chungbuk National University College of Medicine, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-08-15

    Kikuchi's disease is a self-limiting benign disease characterized by cervical lymphadenopathy, but it can be mistaken for malignant disease, and when involved lymph nodes are unusually located, diagnosis can be more difficult. The authors report the case of a 19-year-old man with Kikuchi's disease, who had isolated intraabdominal lymphadenopathy and increased 18-fluoro-deoxyglucose (FDG) uptake in positron emission tomography computed tomography (PET-CT). Although its incidence is extremely rare, intra-abdominal Kikuchi's disease with increased FDG uptake in PET-CT image should be considered in the differential diagnosis when constitutional symptoms mimic those of malignant lymphoma.

  11. Abdominal CT predictors of fibrosis in patients with chronic pancreatitis undergoing surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinha, Amitasha; Afghani, Elham [Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Division of Gastroenterology, Baltimore, MD (United States); Singh, Vikesh K. [Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Division of Gastroenterology, Baltimore, MD (United States); Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Pancreatitis Center, Baltimore, MD (United States); Cruise, Michael; Matsukuma, Karen [Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Department of Pathology, Baltimore, MD (United States); Ali, Sumera; Raman, Siva P.; Fishman, Elliot K. [Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, The Russel H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Baltimore, MD (United States); Andersen, Dana K. [National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, Bethesda, MD (United States); Makary, Martin A. [Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Department of Surgery, Baltimore, MD (United States); Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Pancreatitis Center, Baltimore, MD (United States); Zaheer, Atif [Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, The Russel H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Baltimore, MD (United States); Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Pancreatitis Center, Baltimore, MD (United States); Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2015-05-01

    To determine which abdominal CT findings predict severe fibrosis and post-operative pain relief in chronic pancreatitis (CP). Pre-operative abdominal CTs of 66 patients (mean age 52 ± 12 years, 53 % males) with painful CP who underwent the Whipple procedure (n = 32), Frey procedure (n = 32) or pancreatic head biopsy (n = 2), between 1/2003-3/2014, were evaluated. CT was evaluated for parenchymal calcifications, intraductal calculi, main pancreatic duct dilation (>5 mm), main pancreatic duct stricture, and abnormal side branch(es). The surgical histopathology was graded for fibrosis. CT findings were evaluated as predictors of severe fibrosis and post-operative pain relief using regression and area under receiver operating curve (AUC) analysis. Thirty-eight (58 %) patients had severe fibrosis. Parenchymal calcification(s) were an independent predictor of severe fibrosis (p = 0.03), and post-operative pain relief over a mean follow-up of 1-year (p = 0.04). Presence of >10 parenchymal calcifications had higher predictive accuracy for severe fibrosis than 1-10 parenchymal calcification(s) (AUC 0.88 vs. 0.59, p = 0.003). The predictive accuracy of >10 versus 1-10 parenchymal calcifications increased after adjusting for all other CT findings (AUC 0.89 vs. 0.63, p = 0.01). Parenchymal calcification(s) independently predict severe fibrosis and are significantly associated with post-operative pain relief in CP. The presence of >10 parenchymal calcifications is a better predictor of severe fibrosis than 1-10 parenchymal calcification(s). (orig.)

  12. Abdominal CT predictors of fibrosis in patients with chronic pancreatitis undergoing surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinha, Amitasha; Afghani, Elham; Singh, Vikesh K.; Cruise, Michael; Matsukuma, Karen; Ali, Sumera; Raman, Siva P.; Fishman, Elliot K.; Andersen, Dana K.; Makary, Martin A.; Zaheer, Atif

    2015-01-01

    To determine which abdominal CT findings predict severe fibrosis and post-operative pain relief in chronic pancreatitis (CP). Pre-operative abdominal CTs of 66 patients (mean age 52 ± 12 years, 53 % males) with painful CP who underwent the Whipple procedure (n = 32), Frey procedure (n = 32) or pancreatic head biopsy (n = 2), between 1/2003-3/2014, were evaluated. CT was evaluated for parenchymal calcifications, intraductal calculi, main pancreatic duct dilation (>5 mm), main pancreatic duct stricture, and abnormal side branch(es). The surgical histopathology was graded for fibrosis. CT findings were evaluated as predictors of severe fibrosis and post-operative pain relief using regression and area under receiver operating curve (AUC) analysis. Thirty-eight (58 %) patients had severe fibrosis. Parenchymal calcification(s) were an independent predictor of severe fibrosis (p = 0.03), and post-operative pain relief over a mean follow-up of 1-year (p = 0.04). Presence of >10 parenchymal calcifications had higher predictive accuracy for severe fibrosis than 1-10 parenchymal calcification(s) (AUC 0.88 vs. 0.59, p = 0.003). The predictive accuracy of >10 versus 1-10 parenchymal calcifications increased after adjusting for all other CT findings (AUC 0.89 vs. 0.63, p = 0.01). Parenchymal calcification(s) independently predict severe fibrosis and are significantly associated with post-operative pain relief in CP. The presence of >10 parenchymal calcifications is a better predictor of severe fibrosis than 1-10 parenchymal calcification(s). (orig.)

  13. The optimal parameter for radiation dose in pediatric low dose abdominal CT: cross-sectional dimensions versus body weight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Yoon Young; Goo, Hyun Woo [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-02-15

    To investigate the best parameter between cross-sectional dimensions and body weight in pediatric low dose abdominal CT. One hundred and thirty six children consecutively underwent weight-based abdominal CT. The subjects consisted of group 1 (79 children, weight range 10.0-19.9 kg) and group 2 (57 children, weight range 20.0-39.9 kg). Abdominal cross-sectional dimensions including circumference, area, anteroposterior diameters and transverse diameters were calculated. Image noise (standard deviation of CT density) was measured by placing a region of interest in the posterior segment of the right hepatic lobe on a CT image at the celiac axis. The measured image noise was correlated with the cross-sectional abdominal dimensions and body weight for subjects in each group. In group 1 subjects,area, circumference, transverse diameter, anteroposterior diameter, and body weight showed a significant positive correlation with image noise in descending order({gamma} = 0.63, 0.62, 0.61, 0.51, and 0.49; {rho} < 0.0001). In group 2 subjects, transverse diameter, circumference, area, anteroposterior diameter, and body weight showed a significant positive correlation with image noise in descending order ({gamma} = 0.83, 0.82, 0.78, 0.71, and 0.71; {rho} < 0.0001). Cross-sectional dimensions such as area, circumference, and transverse diameter showed a higher positive correlation with image noise than body weight for pediatric low dose abdominal CT.

  14. The optimal parameter for radiation dose in pediatric low dose abdominal CT: cross-sectional dimensions versus body weight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Yoon Young; Goo, Hyun Woo

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the best parameter between cross-sectional dimensions and body weight in pediatric low dose abdominal CT. One hundred and thirty six children consecutively underwent weight-based abdominal CT. The subjects consisted of group 1 (79 children, weight range 10.0-19.9 kg) and group 2 (57 children, weight range 20.0-39.9 kg). Abdominal cross-sectional dimensions including circumference, area, anteroposterior diameters and transverse diameters were calculated. Image noise (standard deviation of CT density) was measured by placing a region of interest in the posterior segment of the right hepatic lobe on a CT image at the celiac axis. The measured image noise was correlated with the cross-sectional abdominal dimensions and body weight for subjects in each group. In group 1 subjects,area, circumference, transverse diameter, anteroposterior diameter, and body weight showed a significant positive correlation with image noise in descending order(γ = 0.63, 0.62, 0.61, 0.51, and 0.49; ρ < 0.0001). In group 2 subjects, transverse diameter, circumference, area, anteroposterior diameter, and body weight showed a significant positive correlation with image noise in descending order (γ = 0.83, 0.82, 0.78, 0.71, and 0.71; ρ < 0.0001). Cross-sectional dimensions such as area, circumference, and transverse diameter showed a higher positive correlation with image noise than body weight for pediatric low dose abdominal CT

  15. CT and MR imaging in patients with localized acute abdominal pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prassopoulos, P.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Acute abdominal pain (AAP) is one of the most common causes for admissions to emergency departments. Clinical presentation, physical and laboratory examinations are often inconclusive and, therefore, imaging evaluation is required. Ultrasonography is efficient in the evaluation of gallbladder and gynecologic conditions and it is considered the first-line examination in many centres. Plain radiography and barium studies are often falsely normal or non-specific, especially in the most common conditions related with rightsided AAP and their use has significantly decreased. CT is a rapid and accurate imaging modality in the diagnosis of common (appendicitis, acute cholecystitis, biliary obstruction, duodenal ulcer perforation) or uncommon (mesenteric adenitis, liver abscess, cholangitis etc) conditions associated with right-sided AAP. CT may demonstrate a number of either specific or sensitive imaging findings for the confident diagnosis of diseases manifested with AAP. Moreover, CT has the advantage to suggest alternative diagnoses, if the suspected clinical diagnosis is unconfirmed. Different examination protocols and different strategies for the application of oral-rectal-intravenous contrast agents have been proposed to balance diagnostic accuracy to time effectiveness and radiation dose. MRI is suggested for AAP related to biliary abnormalities or to gynecologic diseases and it may be used as a complementary examination in pregnant patients. Imaging evaluation is an indispensable part in the diagnostic work up of most patients with AAP. CT has gained widespread acceptance, as offering more accurate and confident diagnosis and its use has changed management of the patients in 28-60% of the cases

  16. Efficacy of 'fine' focal spot imaging in CT abdominal angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Lawrence Chia Wei; Devapalasundaram, Ashwini; Ardley, Nicholas [Monash Health, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Clayton, Victoria (Australia); Lau, Kenneth K. [Monash Health, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Clayton, Victoria (Australia); Monash University, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing, and Health Sciences, Victoria (Australia); Buchan, Kevin [Phillips Healthcare, Clinical Science, PO Box 312, Mont Albert, Victoria (Australia); Huynh, Minh [RMIT University, School of Mathematical and Geospatial Sciences, Victoria (Australia)

    2014-12-15

    To assess the efficacy of fine focal spot imaging in calcification beam-hardening artefact reduction and vessel clarity on CT abdominal angiography (CTAA). Adult patients of any age and gender who presented for CTAA were included. Thirty-nine patients were examined with a standard focal spot size (SFSS) of 1 x 1 mm in the first 3 months while 31 consecutive patients were examined with a fine focal spot size (FFSS) of 1 x 0.5 mm in the following 3 months. Vessel clarity and calcification beam-hardening artefacts of the abdominal aorta, celiac axis, superior mesenteric artery, inferior mesenteric artery, renal arteries, and iliac arteries were assessed using a 5-point grading scale by two blinded radiologists randomly. Cohen's Kappa test indicated that on average, there was substantial agreement among reviewers for vessel wall clarity and calcification artefact grading. Mann-Whitney test showed that there was a significant difference between the two groups, with FFSS performing significantly better for vessel clarity (U, 6481.50; p < 0.001; r, 0.73) and calcification artefact reduction (U, 1916; p < 0.001; r, 0.77). Fine focus CT angiography produces images with better vessel wall clarity and less vessel calcification beam-hardening artefact. (orig.)

  17. Cone beam CT for organs motion evaluation in pediatric abdominal neuroblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazmy, Mohamed Soliman; Khafaga, Yasser; Mousa, Amr; Khalil, Ehab

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose: To quantify the organ motion relative to bone in different breathing states in pediatric neuroblastoma using cone beam CT (CBCT) for better definition of the planning margins during abdominal IMRT. Methods and materials: Forty-two datasets of kV CBCT for 9 pediatric patients with abdominal neuroblastoma treated with IMRT were evaluated. Organs positions on planning CT scan were considered the reference position against which organs and target motions were evaluated. The position of the kidneys and the liver was assessed in all scans. The target movement was evaluated in four patients who were treated for gross residual disease. Results: The mean age of the patients was 4.1 ± 1.6 years. The range of target movement in the craniocaudal direction (CC) was 5 mm. In the CC direction, the range of movement was 10 mm for the right kidney, and 8 mm for the left kidney. Similarly, the liver upper edge range of motion was 11 mm while the lower edge range of motion was 13 mm. Conclusions: With the use of daily CBCT we may be able to reduce the PTV margin. If CBCT is not used daily, a wider margin is needed.

  18. Comparative evaluation of organ and effective doses for paediatric patients with those for adults in chest and abdominal CT examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, K; Aoyama, T; Koyama, S; Kawaura, C

    2007-08-01

    Patient doses in paediatric and adult CT examinations were investigated for modern multislice CT scanners by using specially constructed in-phantom dose measuring systems. The systems were composed of 32 photodiode dosemeters embedded in various tissue and organ sites within anthropomorphic phantoms representing the bodies of 6-year-old children and adults. Organ and the effective doses were evaluated from dose values measured at these sites. In chest CT examinations, organ doses for organs within the scanning area were 2-21 mGy for children and 7-26 mGy for adults. Thyroid doses for children were frequently the highest with a maximum of 21 mGy. In abdominal CT examinations, organ doses for organs within the scanning area were 3-16 mGy for children and 10-34 mGy for adults. Effective doses evaluated for children and adults were found to be proportional to the effective mAs of CT scanners, where linear coefficients were specific to the types of CT examinations and to the manufacturers of CT scanners. Effective doses in paediatric chest CT and abdominal CT examinations were lower than those in adult examinations by a factor of two or greater on average for the same CT scanners because of the lower effective mAs adopted in paediatric examinations.

  19. Non-contrast CT at comparable dose to an abdominal radiograph in patients with acute renal colic; impact of iterative reconstruction on image quality and diagnostic performance.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McLaughlin, P D

    2014-04-01

    The aim was to assess the performance of low-dose non-contrast CT of the urinary tract (LD-CT) acquired at radiation exposures close to that of abdominal radiography using adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR).

  20. The neurolytic celiac plexus block using CT guidance through anterior abdominal approach to control the cancer pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Jie; Yang Ning; Liu Wei; Jin Zhengyu; Zhao Yupei; Cai Lixing

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the therapeutic effect and safety of neurolytic celiac plexus block (Ncb) using CT guidance through anterior abdominal approach. Methods: The clinical data of 24 patients who were given NCPB because of the suffering of upper abdominal and back pain caused by pancreatic carcinoma and other cancer in advanced stage were retrospectively analyzed. The therapeutic effect was evaluated with complete pain relief and partial pain relief. Results: The effective rate and complete pain relief rate in short period ( 3 months) were 71.4% and 14.3% respectively. No severe complications occurred. Conclusion: NCPB guided by CT through anterior abdominal approach is an effective, safe and simple method to control the upper abdominal and back pain caused by cancer

  1. Development of automated quantification of visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue volumes from abdominal CT scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mensink, Sanne D.; Spliethoff, Jarich W.; Belder, Ruben; Klaase, Joost M.; Bezooijen, Roland; Slump, Cornelis H.

    2011-03-01

    This contribution describes a novel algorithm for the automated quantification of visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue volumes from abdominal CT scans of patients referred for colorectal resection. Visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue volumes can accurately be measured with errors of 1.2 and 0.5%, respectively. Also the reproducibility of CT measurements is good; a disadvantage is the amount of radiation. In this study the diagnostic CT scans in the work - up of (colorectal) cancer were used. This implied no extra radiation. For the purpose of segmentation alone, a low dose protocol can be applied. Obesity is a well known risk factor for complications in and after surgery. Body Mass Index (BMI) is a widely accepted indicator of obesity, but it is not specific for risk assessment of colorectal surgery. We report on an automated method to quantify visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue volumes as a basic step in a clinical research project concerning preoperative risk assessment. The outcomes are to be correlated with the surgery results. The hypothesis is that the balance between visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue together with the presence of calcifications in the major bloodvessels, is a predictive indicator for post - operatieve complications such as anastomotic leak. We start with four different computer simulated humanoid abdominal volumes with tissue values in the appropriate Hounsfield range at different dose levels. With satisfactory numerical results for this test, we have applied the algorithm on over a 100 patient scans and have compared results with manual segmentations by an expert for a smaller pilot group. The results are within a 5% difference. Compared to other studies reported in the literature, reliable values are obtained for visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue areas.

  2. Post-processing image filtration enabling dose reduction in standard abdominal CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leander, Peter; Söderberg, Marcus; Fält, Tobias; Gunnarsson, Mikael; Albertsson, Ida

    2010-01-01

    The collective effective radiation dose to the population is increasing due to a higher use of computerised tomography. SharpView AB, Linköping, Sweden, has developed an adaptive non-linear post-processing image filtration that may enable the use of lower radiation doses. The present study assessed if a lower dose with image filtration had the same image quality as a higher dose without the filter applied. All imaging was performed on a Siemens Somatom Sensation 16 CT. The parameters used were 120 kV and 200 mAs (40 patients) and 130 mAs without and with image filtering (40 patients), respectively. All studies were quantitatively evaluated for noise and image quality was assessed by visual grading characteristics (VGC) analysis. After image filtration, the noise in the processed images was lowered and the image quality was improved as shown by the VGC analysis. However, images using the higher dose were still ranked as the best in five out of eight criteria as shown by the VGC analysis. Image filtration enhances CT images significantly and further studies will show if 130 mAs with image filtration may be sufficient for clinically general abdominal CT.

  3. A clinical retrospective study of the detectable ability of the advanced colorectal cancer by plain abdominal multislice CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamasaki, Kazufumi; Nakamura, Takashi; Matsuo, Kengo

    2002-01-01

    We evaluated the efficacy of plain CT for diagnosis of advanced colorectal cancer retrospectively. During 2 years between December 1999 and November 2001, 26 patients with advanced colorectal cancer underwent abdominal CT scan (Toshiba ASTEIONMULTI). The patients had received no special preparation for CT scan except for avoiding breakfast. The sensitivity of CT scan in detecting tumors was 76.9%. Moreover, cancers originated in the cecum, ascending colon and descending colon were all detectable by CT. Ninety-two percent of cancers occupying more than 2/3 of circumference of the colonic wall were detectable. These evidences may indicate that plain CT is useful for detecting colorectal cancers with little patients' burden as well as providing information about their extension and metastasis, when colorectal cancer is suspected by patients' symptom. (author)

  4. Emergency assessment of patients with acute abdominal pain using low-dose CT with iterative reconstruction: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre; Becker, Minerva; Becker, Christoph D; Halfon Poletti, Alice; Rutschmann, Olivier T; Zaidi, Habib; Perneger, Thomas; Platon, Alexandra

    2017-08-01

    To determine if radiation dose delivered by contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) for acute abdominal pain can be reduced to the dose administered in abdominal radiography (<2.5 mSv) using low-dose CT (LDCT) with iterative reconstruction algorithms. One hundred and fifty-one consecutive patients requiring CECT for acute abdominal pain were included, and their body mass index (BMI) was calculated. CECT was immediately followed by LDCT. LDCT series was processed using 1) 40% iterative reconstruction algorithm blended with filtered back projection (LDCT-IR-FBP) and 2) model-based iterative reconstruction algorithm (LDCT-MBIR). LDCT-IR-FBP and LDCT-MBIR images were reviewed independently by two board-certified radiologists (Raters 1 and 2). Abdominal pathology was revealed on CECT in 120 (79%) patients. In those with BMI <30, accuracies for correct diagnosis by Rater 1 with LDCT-IR-FBP and LDCT-MBIR, when compared to CECT, were 95.4% (104/109) and 99% (108/109), respectively, and 92.7% (101/109) and 100% (109/109) for Rater 2. In patients with BMI ≥30, accuracies with LDCT-IR-FBP and LDCT-MBIR were 88.1% (37/42) and 90.5% (38/42) for Rater 1 and 78.6% (33/42) and 92.9% (39/42) for Rater 2. The radiation dose delivered by CT to non-obese patients with acute abdominal pain can be safely reduced to levels close to standard radiography using LDCT-MBIR. • LDCT-MBIR (<2.5 mSv) can be used to assess acute abdominal pain. • LDCT-MBIR (<2.5 mSv) cannot safely assess acute abdominal pain in obese patients. • LDCT-IR-FBP (<2.5 mSv) cannot safely assess patients with acute abdominal pain.

  5. Liver Segmentation Based on Snakes Model and Improved GrowCut Algorithm in Abdominal CT Image

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiyan Jiang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel method based on Snakes Model and GrowCut algorithm is proposed to segment liver region in abdominal CT images. First, according to the traditional GrowCut method, a pretreatment process using K-means algorithm is conducted to reduce the running time. Then, the segmentation result of our improved GrowCut approach is used as an initial contour for the future precise segmentation based on Snakes model. At last, several experiments are carried out to demonstrate the performance of our proposed approach and some comparisons are conducted between the traditional GrowCut algorithm. Experimental results show that the improved approach not only has a better robustness and precision but also is more efficient than the traditional GrowCut method.

  6. A quantitative approach of abdominal aortic atherosclerosis with x-ray CT, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Hiromi; Yoshioka, Seiro; Matsuzawa, Taiju; Itagaki, Shinya.

    1983-01-01

    Until now, aortic tortuosity is understood as a sign of atherosclerosis. But, there was no quantitative approach of abdominal aortic tortuosity. In this paper, we quantitatively evaluated the tortuosity with RI angiography. And, we already reported a quantitative method to evaluate aortic calcification from X-ray CT films. The Calcification Index (C.I.) calculated in its method has strong reration with aortic atherosclerosis evaluated by pathological method. So, we used C.I. as an atherosclerosis index. Tortuosity becomes stonger with increasing age. C.I. also becomes higher with increasing age, but there is no relation between tortuosity and C.I.. When atherosclerosis is defined as local lesion, tortuosity is not a sign of atherosclerosis but of aortic aging. (author)

  7. CFD modelling of abdominal aortic aneurysm on hemodynamic loads using a realistic geometry with CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soudah, Eduardo; Ng, E Y K; Loong, T H; Bordone, Maurizio; Pua, Uei; Narayanan, Sriram

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study is to find a correlation between the abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) geometric parameters, wall stress shear (WSS), abdominal flow patterns, intraluminal thrombus (ILT), and AAA arterial wall rupture using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Real AAA 3D models were created by three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of in vivo acquired computed tomography (CT) images from 5 patients. Based on 3D AAA models, high quality volume meshes were created using an optimal tetrahedral aspect ratio for the whole domain. In order to quantify the WSS and the recirculation inside the AAA, a 3D CFD using finite elements analysis was used. The CFD computation was performed assuming that the arterial wall is rigid and the blood is considered a homogeneous Newtonian fluid with a density of 1050 kg/m(3) and a kinematic viscosity of 4 × 10(-3) Pa·s. Parallelization procedures were used in order to increase the performance of the CFD calculations. A relation between AAA geometric parameters (asymmetry index ( β ), saccular index ( γ ), deformation diameter ratio ( χ ), and tortuosity index ( ε )) and hemodynamic loads was observed, and it could be used as a potential predictor of AAA arterial wall rupture and potential ILT formation.

  8. CFD Modelling of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm on Hemodynamic Loads Using a Realistic Geometry with CT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Soudah

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to find a correlation between the abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA geometric parameters, wall stress shear (WSS, abdominal flow patterns, intraluminal thrombus (ILT, and AAA arterial wall rupture using computational fluid dynamics (CFD. Real AAA 3D models were created by three-dimensional (3D reconstruction of in vivo acquired computed tomography (CT images from 5 patients. Based on 3D AAA models, high quality volume meshes were created using an optimal tetrahedral aspect ratio for the whole domain. In order to quantify the WSS and the recirculation inside the AAA, a 3D CFD using finite elements analysis was used. The CFD computation was performed assuming that the arterial wall is rigid and the blood is considered a homogeneous Newtonian fluid with a density of 1050 kg/m3 and a kinematic viscosity of 4×10-3 Pa·s. Parallelization procedures were used in order to increase the performance of the CFD calculations. A relation between AAA geometric parameters (asymmetry index (β, saccular index (γ, deformation diameter ratio (χ, and tortuosity index (ε and hemodynamic loads was observed, and it could be used as a potential predictor of AAA arterial wall rupture and potential ILT formation.

  9. Quantitative Aortic Distensibility Measurement Using CT in Patients with Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: Reproducibility and Clinical Relevance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunfei Zha

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To investigate the reproducibility of aortic distensibility (D measurement using CT and assess its clinical relevance in patients with infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA. Methods. 54 patients with infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm were studied to determine their distensibility by using 64-MDCT. Aortic cross-sectional area changes were determined at two positions of the aorta, immediately below the lowest renal artery (level 1. and at the level of its maximal diameter (level 2. by semiautomatic segmentation. Measurement reproducibility was assessed using intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC and Bland-Altman analyses. Stepwise multiple regression analysis was performed to assess linear associations between aortic D and anthropometric and biochemical parameters. Results. A mean distensibility of Dlevel  1.=(1.05±0.22×10-5  Pa-1 and Dlevel  2.=(0.49±0.18×10-5  Pa-1 was found. ICC proved excellent consistency between readers over two locations: 0.92 for intraobserver and 0.89 for interobserver difference in level 1. and 0.85 and 0.79 in level 2. Multivariate analysis of all these variables showed sac distensibility to be independently related (R2=0.68 to BMI, diastolic blood pressure, and AAA diameter. Conclusions. Aortic distensibility measurement in patients with AAA demonstrated high inter- and intraobserver agreement and may be valuable when choosing the optimal dimensions graft for AAA before endovascular aneurysm repair.

  10. The Use of CT Scan in Hemodynamically Stable Children with Blunt Abdominal Trauma : Look before You Leap

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nellensteijn, David R.; Greuter, Marcel J.; el Moumni, Moustafa; Hulscher, Jan B.

    We set out to determine the diagnostic value of computed tomographic (CT) scans in relation to the radiation dose, tumor incidence, and tumor mortality by radiation for hemodynamically stable pediatric patients with blunt abdominal injury. We focused on the changes in management because of new

  11. Can dual-energy CT replace perfusion CT for the functional evaluation of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulé, Sébastien; Pigneur, Frédéric; Quelever, Ronan; Tenenhaus, Arthur; Baranes, Laurence; Richard, Philippe; Tacher, Vania; Herin, Edouard; Pasquier, Hugo; Ronot, Maxime; Rahmouni, Alain; Vilgrain, Valérie; Luciani, Alain

    2017-11-22

    To determine the degree of relationship between iodine concentrations derived from dual-energy CT (DECT) and perfusion CT parameters in patients with advanced HCC under treatment. In this single-centre IRB approved study, 16 patients with advanced HCC treated with sorafenib or radioembolization who underwent concurrent dynamic perfusion CT and multiphase DECT using a single source, fast kV switching DECT scanner were included. Written informed consent was obtained for all patients. HCC late-arterial and portal iodine concentrations, blood flow (BF)-related and blood volume (BV)-related perfusion parameters maps were calculated. Mixed-effects models of the relationship between iodine concentrations and perfusion parameters were computed. An adjusted p value (Bonferroni method) perfusion index (F=28.24, pperfusion changes. • Late-arterial iodine concentration is highly related to arterial BF and BV. • Portal iodine concentration mainly reflects tumour blood volume. • Dual-energy CT offers significantly decreased radiation dose compared with perfusion CT.

  12. A new technique for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis: abdominal CT with compression to the right lower quadrant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilincer, Abidin; Akpinar, Erhan; Uenal, Emre; Karaosmanoglu, Ali Devrim; Akata, Deniz; Oezmen, Mustafa [Hacettepe University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Sihhiye, Ankara (Turkey); Erbil, Buelent [Hacettepe University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Emergency Medicine, Ankara (Turkey); Kaynaroglu, Volkan [Hacettepe University Faculty of Medicine, Department of General Surgery, Ankara (Turkey)

    2017-08-15

    To determine the diagnostic accuracy of abdominal CT with compression to the right lower quadrant (RLQ) in adults with acute appendicitis. 168 patients (age range, 18-78 years) were included who underwent contrast-enhanced CT for suspected appendicitis performed either using compression to the RLQ (n = 71) or a standard protocol (n = 97). Outer diameter of the appendix, appendiceal wall thickening, luminal content and associated findings were evaluated in each patient. Kruskal-Wallis, Fisher's and Pearson's chi-squared tests were used for statistical analysis. There was no significant difference in the mean outer diameter (MOD) between compression CT scans (10.6 ± 1.9 mm) and standard protocol (11.2 ± 2.3 mm) in patients with acute appendicitis (P = 1). MOD was significantly lower in the compression group (5.2 ± 0.8 mm) compared to the standard protocol (6.5 ± 1.1 mm) (P < 0.01) in patients without appendicitis. A cut-off value of 6.75 mm for the outer diameter of the appendix was found to be 100% sensitive in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis for both groups. The specificity was higher for compression CT technique (67.7 vs. 94.9%). Normal appendix diameter was significantly smaller in the compression-CT group compared to standard-CT group, increasing diagnostic accuracy of abdominal compression CT. (orig.)

  13. The Use of Autologous Peritoneum for Complete Caval Replacement Following Resection of Major Intra-abdominal Malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coubeau, Laurent; Rico Juri, Juan-Manuel; Ciccarelli, Olga; Jabbour, Nicolas; Lerut, Jan

    2017-04-01

    Assessment of a simple layer peritoneal tube used as an autogenous inferior vena cava replacement. Extensive en-bloc multivisceral resection including major vessels is effective in selected abdominal malignancies, but the need for vascular reconstruction represents a surgical challenge. We describe the use of autologous peritoneum for caval replacement. Autogenous parietal peritoneum without fascial backing was harvested and tubularized to replace the inferior vena cava (IVC) in four patients with complex abdominal tumors. Surgical morbidity was evaluated using the Clavien-Dindo classification, and graft patency was systematically evaluated with ultrasound. All four patients had multiorgan resections for malignancies involving the retro-hepatic IVC, and they all required the replacement of infrarenal and suprarenal IVC segments. Additionally, all four required a right nephrectomy, two had a combined major hepatectomy, and one patient needed a veno-venous bypass. All had an R0 resection. A clinical follow-up took place between 5 and 11 months after surgery for each patient. Four-month graft patency was confirmed by ultra-sound and TDM with no sign of disease recurrence. Autologous peritoneum without fascial backing is a good and safe option for circumferential replacement of IVC after extensive en-bloc tumor resection with IVC involvement.

  14. TU-AB-BRA-01: Abdominal Synthetic CT Generation in Support of Liver SBRT Dose Calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bredfeldt, JS; Liu, L; Feng, M [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Cao, Y [The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Balter, J [University Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To demonstrate and validate a technique for generating MRI-derived synthetic CT volumes (MRCTs) in support of adaptive liver SBRT. Methods: Under IRB approval, ten hepatocellular carcinoma patients were scanned using a single MR sequence (T1 Dixon-VIBE), yielding inherently-registered water, fat, and T1-weighted images. Air-containing voxels were identified by intensity thresholding. The envelope of the anterior vertebral bodies was segmented from the fat image by fitting a shape model to vertebral body candidate voxels, then using level sets to expand the contour outward. Fuzzy-C-Means (FCM) was then used to classify each non-air voxel in the image as fat, water, bone, or marrow. Bone and marrow only were classified within the vertebral body envelope. The MRCT was created by integrating the product of the FCM class probability with the assigned class density for each voxel. The resulting MRCTs were deformably aligned with planning CTs and 2-ARC SBRT VMAT plans were optimized on the MRCT density maps. Fluence was copied onto the CT density grids and dose recalculated. Results: The MRCTs faithfully reproduced most of the features visible in the corresponding CT image volumes, with exceptions of ribs and posterior spinous processes. The liver, vertebral bodies, kidneys, spleen and cord all had median HU differences of less than 75 between MRCT and CT images. PTV D99% values had an average 0.2% difference (standard deviation: 0.46%) between calculations on MRCT and CT density grids. The maximum difference in dose to 0.1cc of the PTV was 0.25% (std:0.49%). OAR dose differences were similarly small (mean:0.03Gy, std:0.26Gy). The largest normal tissue complication percentage (NTCP) difference was 1.48% (mean:0.06%, std:0.54%). Conclusions: MRCTs from a single abdominal imaging sequence are promising for use in SBRT dose calculation. Future work will focus on extending models to better define bones in the upper abdomen. Supported by NIHR01EB016079 and NIH1L30CA

  15. Automatic multi-label annotation of abdominal CT images using CBIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Zhiyun; Antani, Sameer; Long, L. Rodney; Thoma, George R.

    2017-03-01

    We present a technique to annotate multiple organs shown in 2-D abdominal/pelvic CT images using CBIR. This annotation task is motivated by our research interests in visual question-answering (VQA). We aim to apply results from this effort in Open-iSM, a multimodal biomedical search engine developed by the National Library of Medicine (NLM). Understanding visual content of biomedical images is a necessary step for VQA. Though sufficient annotational information about an image may be available in related textual metadata, not all may be useful as descriptive tags, particularly for anatomy on the image. In this paper, we develop and evaluate a multi-label image annotation method using CBIR. We evaluate our method on two 2-D CT image datasets we generated from 3-D volumetric data obtained from a multi-organ segmentation challenge hosted in MICCAI 2015. Shape and spatial layout information is used to encode visual characteristics of the anatomy. We adapt a weighted voting scheme to assign multiple labels to the query image by combining the labels of the images identified as similar by the method. Key parameters that may affect the annotation performance, such as the number of images used in the label voting and the threshold for excluding labels that have low weights, are studied. The method proposes a coarse-to-fine retrieval strategy which integrates the classification with the nearest-neighbor search. Results from our evaluation (using the MICCAI CT image datasets as well as figures from Open-i) are presented.

  16. Computerized organ localization in abdominal CT volume with context-driven generalized Hough transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Li, Qiang

    2014-03-01

    Fast localization of organs is a key step in computer-aided detection of lesions and in image guided radiation therapy. We developed a context-driven Generalized Hough Transform (GHT) for robust localization of organ-of-interests (OOIs) in a CT volume. Conventional GHT locates the center of an organ by looking-up center locations of pre-learned organs with "matching" edges. It often suffers from mislocalization because "similar" edges in vicinity may attract the prelearned organs towards wrong places. The proposed method not only uses information from organ's own shape but also takes advantage of nearby "similar" edge structures. First, multiple GHT co-existing look-up tables (cLUT) were constructed from a set of training shapes of different organs. Each cLUT represented the spatial relationship between the center of the OOI and the shape of a co-existing organ. Second, the OOI center in a test image was determined using GHT with each cLUT separately. Third, the final localization of OOI was based on weighted combination of the centers obtained in the second stage. The training set consisted of 10 CT volumes with manually segmented OOIs including liver, spleen and kidneys. The method was tested on a set of 25 abdominal CT scans. Context-driven GHT correctly located all OOIs in the test image and gave localization errors of 19.5±9.0, 12.8±7.3, 9.4±4.6 and 8.6±4.1 mm for liver, spleen, left and right kidney respectively. Conventional GHT mis-located 8 out of 100 organs and its localization errors were 26.0±32.6, 14.1±10.6, 30.1±42.6 and 23.6±39.7mm for liver, spleen, left and right kidney respectively.

  17. Evaluation of adverse events and imaging quality in contrast-enhanced abdominal CT using generic CT contrast developed in South Korea: A multicenter prospective observational study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, You Sung [Dept. of Radiology, Ilsan Paik Hospital, College of Medicine, Inje University, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Seung Eun; Park, Micheal Yong; Rha, Sung Eun [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Soo Rim [Dept. of Radiology, Uijeongbu St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Uijeongbu (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Seong Su [Dept. of Radiology, St. Vincent Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Yeon Soo [Dept. of Radiology, Bucheon St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jeong Mi [Dept. of Radiology, Yeouido St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the clinical safety and usefulness of the Prosure®300 in contrast-enhanced abdominal CT. This prospective study was approved by our center's Institutional Review Board. This study included 727 patients in four hospitals who underwent contrast-enhanced abdominal CT using Prosure®300 from December 2010 to June 2011. Adverse events were classified into minor and major adverse events. Logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the relationship between adverse events and patient gender, age, underlying disease, and amount of injected contrast agent. Two radiologists independently evaluated imaging quality as poor, insufficient, sufficient, good, or very good. One hundred seventy-six out of 727 patients complained of adverse events, but most of them were minor adverse events. Five patients complained of dyspnea and one patient had hoarseness, but recovered without treatment. The rate of adverse events was significantly higher in men (p = 0.011), and a greater amount of injected contrast agent was related to a higher rate of adverse events (p = 0.000). Imaging quality was evaluated as 'good' or 'very good' in all cases. Prosure®300, a generic CT contrast agent developed in South Korea, can be used in contrast-enhanced abdominal CT.

  18. The in vivo relationship between cross-sectional area and CT dose index in abdominal multidetector CT with automatic exposure control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meeson, S; Alvey, C M; Golding, S J, E-mail: stuart.meeson@nds.ox.ac.u [Radiology Group, Nuffield Department of Surgery, University of Oxford, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford OX3 9DU (United Kingdom)

    2010-06-15

    The relationship between patient cross-sectional area and both volume CT dose index (CTDI) and dose length product was explored for abdominal CT in vivo, using a 16 multidetector row CT (MDCT) scanner with automatic exposure control. During a year-long retrospective survey of patients with MDCT for symptoms of abdominal sepsis, cross-sectional areas were estimated using customised ellipses at the level of the middle of vertebra L3. The relationship between cross-sectional area and the exposure parameters was explored. Scans were performed using a LightSpeed 16 (GE Healthcare Medical Systems, Milwaukee, WI) operated with tube current modulation. From a survey of 94 patients it was found that the CTDI increased with the increase in patient cross-sectional area. The relationship was logarithmic rather than linear, with a least-squares fit to the data (R{sup 2} = 0.80). For abdominal CT the cross-sectional area gave a measure of patient size based on the region of the body to be exposed. Exposure parameters increased with increasing cross-sectional area and the greater radiation exposure of larger patients was partly a consequence of their size. Given increasing obesity levels we believe that cross-sectional area and scan length should be added to future dose surveys, allowing patient size to be considered as a factor of relevance when examining population doses.

  19. Evaluation of adverse events and imaging quality in contrast-enhanced abdominal CT using generic CT contrast developed in South Korea: A multicenter prospective observational study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, You Sung; Jung, Seung Eun; Park, Micheal Yong; Rha, Sung Eun; Lee, Soo Rim; Hwang, Seong Su; Lim, Yeon Soo; Park, Jeong Mi

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the clinical safety and usefulness of the Prosure®300 in contrast-enhanced abdominal CT. This prospective study was approved by our center's Institutional Review Board. This study included 727 patients in four hospitals who underwent contrast-enhanced abdominal CT using Prosure®300 from December 2010 to June 2011. Adverse events were classified into minor and major adverse events. Logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the relationship between adverse events and patient gender, age, underlying disease, and amount of injected contrast agent. Two radiologists independently evaluated imaging quality as poor, insufficient, sufficient, good, or very good. One hundred seventy-six out of 727 patients complained of adverse events, but most of them were minor adverse events. Five patients complained of dyspnea and one patient had hoarseness, but recovered without treatment. The rate of adverse events was significantly higher in men (p = 0.011), and a greater amount of injected contrast agent was related to a higher rate of adverse events (p = 0.000). Imaging quality was evaluated as 'good' or 'very good' in all cases. Prosure®300, a generic CT contrast agent developed in South Korea, can be used in contrast-enhanced abdominal CT

  20. The in vivo relationship between cross-sectional area and CT dose index in abdominal multidetector CT with automatic exposure control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meeson, S; Alvey, C M; Golding, S J

    2010-01-01

    The relationship between patient cross-sectional area and both volume CT dose index (CTDI) and dose length product was explored for abdominal CT in vivo, using a 16 multidetector row CT (MDCT) scanner with automatic exposure control. During a year-long retrospective survey of patients with MDCT for symptoms of abdominal sepsis, cross-sectional areas were estimated using customised ellipses at the level of the middle of vertebra L3. The relationship between cross-sectional area and the exposure parameters was explored. Scans were performed using a LightSpeed 16 (GE Healthcare Medical Systems, Milwaukee, WI) operated with tube current modulation. From a survey of 94 patients it was found that the CTDI increased with the increase in patient cross-sectional area. The relationship was logarithmic rather than linear, with a least-squares fit to the data (R 2 = 0.80). For abdominal CT the cross-sectional area gave a measure of patient size based on the region of the body to be exposed. Exposure parameters increased with increasing cross-sectional area and the greater radiation exposure of larger patients was partly a consequence of their size. Given increasing obesity levels we believe that cross-sectional area and scan length should be added to future dose surveys, allowing patient size to be considered as a factor of relevance when examining population doses.

  1. A new technique for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis: abdominal CT with compression to the right lower quadrant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kılınçer, Abidin; Akpınar, Erhan; Erbil, Bülent; Ünal, Emre; Karaosmanoğlu, Ali Devrim; Kaynaroğlu, Volkan; Akata, Deniz; Özmen, Mustafa

    2017-08-01

    To determine the diagnostic accuracy of abdominal CT with compression to the right lower quadrant (RLQ) in adults with acute appendicitis. 168 patients (age range, 18-78 years) were included who underwent contrast-enhanced CT for suspected appendicitis performed either using compression to the RLQ (n = 71) or a standard protocol (n = 97). Outer diameter of the appendix, appendiceal wall thickening, luminal content and associated findings were evaluated in each patient. Kruskal-Wallis, Fisher's and Pearson's chi-squared tests were used for statistical analysis. There was no significant difference in the mean outer diameter (MOD) between compression CT scans (10.6 ± 1.9 mm) and standard protocol (11.2 ± 2.3 mm) in patients with acute appendicitis (P = 1). MOD was significantly lower in the compression group (5.2 ± 0.8 mm) compared to the standard protocol (6.5 ± 1.1 mm) (P appendicitis. A cut-off value of 6.75 mm for the outer diameter of the appendix was found to be 100% sensitive in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis for both groups. The specificity was higher for compression CT technique (67.7 vs. 94.9%). Normal appendix diameter was significantly smaller in the compression-CT group compared to standard-CT group, increasing diagnostic accuracy of abdominal compression CT. • Normal appendix diameter is significantly smaller in compression CT. • Compression could force contrast material to flow through the appendiceal lumen. • Compression CT may be a CT counterpart of graded compression US.

  2. Effects of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction on radiation dose reduction and diagnostic accuracy of pediatric abdominal CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Sohi; Kim, Myung-Joon; Lee, Mi-Jung [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiological Science, Severance Children' s Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Choon-Sik [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong Wook; Hong, Jung Hwa [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Biostatistics Collaboration Unit, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    Since children are more radio-sensitive than adults, there is a need to minimize radiation exposure during CT exams. To evaluate the effects of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) on radiation dose reduction, image quality and diagnostic accuracy in pediatric abdominal CT. We retrospectively reviewed the abdominal CT examinations of 41 children (24 boys and 17 girls; mean age: 10 years) with a low-dose radiation protocol and reconstructed with ASIR (the ASIR group). We also reviewed routine-dose abdominal CT examinations of 41 age- and sex-matched controls reconstructed with filtered-back projection (control group). Image quality was assessed objectively as noise measured in the liver, spleen and aorta, as well as subjectively by three pediatric radiologists for diagnostic acceptability using a four-point scale. Radiation dose and objective image qualities of each group were compared with the paired t-test. Diagnostic accuracy was evaluated by reviewing follow-up imaging studies and medical records in 2012 and 2013. There was 46.3% dose reduction of size-specific dose estimates in ASIR group (from 13.4 to 7.2 mGy) compared with the control group. Objective noise was higher in the liver, spleen and aorta of the ASIR group (P < 0.001). However, the subjective image quality was average or superior in 84-100% of studies. Only one image was subjectively rated as unacceptable by one reviewer. There was only one case with interpretational error in the control group and none in the ASIR group. Use of the ASIR technique resulted in greater than a 45% reduction in radiation dose without impairing subjective image quality or diagnostic accuracy in pediatric abdominal CT, despite increased objective image noise. (orig.)

  3. Is dual-phase abdominal CT necessary for the optimal detection of metastases from renal cell carcinoma?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, Y.; Liew, S.; Taylor, M.B.; Bonington, S.C.

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To determine whether dual-phase abdominal computed tomography (CT) detected more metastases than portal-phase CT alone in patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Materials and methods: Audit committee approval was obtained. A retrospective audit was undertaken in 100 patients who underwent both arterial and portal phase CT. The CT images were independently reviewed by two consultant radiologists. The presence of metastases in the liver, pancreas, and contralateral kidney were recorded for each phase of contrast enhancement. Results: Metastases were identified in the liver in 27 patients, pancreas in 12, and contralateral kidney in 23 patients. Nine of the 27 (33%) liver metastases, three of the 12 (25%) pancreatic metastases, and two of the 23 (9%) renal metastases were only detected in the arterial phase, whilst four of the 27 (15%) liver metastases, three of the 12 (25%) pancreatic metastases, and two of the 23 (9%) renal metastases were only detected in the portal phase. Nine patients (9%) had metastases only visualized in the arterial phase, and six (6%) only in the portal phase. Detection of metastases only visible in the arterial phase led to a change of management in two patients (2%). Conclusion: The audit results support our current standard of dual-phase abdominal CT for optimal detection of RCC metastases.

  4. Emergency assessment of patients with acute abdominal pain using low-dose CT with iterative reconstruction: a comparative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre; Becker, Minerva; Becker, Christoph D.; Zaidi, Habib; Platon, Alexandra [University Hospital of Geneva, Department of Radiology, Geneva (Switzerland); Halfon Poletti, Alice; Rutschmann, Olivier T. [University Hospital of Geneva, Department of Community, Primary Care and Emergency Medicine, Geneva (Switzerland); Perneger, Thomas [University Hospital of Geneva, Division of Clinical Epidemiology, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2017-08-15

    To determine if radiation dose delivered by contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) for acute abdominal pain can be reduced to the dose administered in abdominal radiography (<2.5 mSv) using low-dose CT (LDCT) with iterative reconstruction algorithms. One hundred and fifty-one consecutive patients requiring CECT for acute abdominal pain were included, and their body mass index (BMI) was calculated. CECT was immediately followed by LDCT. LDCT series was processed using 1) 40% iterative reconstruction algorithm blended with filtered back projection (LDCT-IR-FBP) and 2) model-based iterative reconstruction algorithm (LDCT-MBIR). LDCT-IR-FBP and LDCT-MBIR images were reviewed independently by two board-certified radiologists (Raters 1 and 2). Abdominal pathology was revealed on CECT in 120 (79%) patients. In those with BMI <30, accuracies for correct diagnosis by Rater 1 with LDCT-IR-FBP and LDCT-MBIR, when compared to CECT, were 95.4% (104/109) and 99% (108/109), respectively, and 92.7% (101/109) and 100% (109/109) for Rater 2. In patients with BMI ≥30, accuracies with LDCT-IR-FBP and LDCT-MBIR were 88.1% (37/42) and 90.5% (38/42) for Rater 1 and 78.6% (33/42) and 92.9% (39/42) for Rater 2. The radiation dose delivered by CT to non-obese patients with acute abdominal pain can be safely reduced to levels close to standard radiography using LDCT-MBIR. (orig.)

  5. Differential diagnosis of incidentally detected adrenal masses revealed on routine abdominal CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ctvrtlik, Filip; Herman, Miroslav; Student, Vladimir; Ticha, Vlastislava; Minarik, Jiri

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to compare CT findings of adrenal incidentalomas with a definitive histological diagnosis in order to establish CT features characteristic for individual types of lesions. Patients and methods: The retrospective study comprised of patients with adrenal lesions detected on abdominal CT. The patients with these incidental findings subsequently underwent adrenalectomy. The adrenalectomy was followed by a histological assessment of the expansion process. The study consisted of 62 adrenal expansions found in 55 patients (in seven patients bilateral lesions were found). According to the definitive histological diagnosis after adrenalectomy, the lesions were divided into the following six groups: primary adrenocortical carcinoma (n = 4), metastasis (n = 7), adrenocortical adenoma (n = 37), pheochromocytoma (n = 9), myelolipoma (n = 2), and others (n = 3). CT observations were categorized as follows: size, shape, margins, density, side of the expansion, homogeneous or heterogeneous density before and after contrast application, presence of central hypodensity, presence of central calcifications and fat deposits. Statistical analysis was carried out using the χ 2 -test, Kruskal-Wallis test and Mann-Whitney test. To estimate the differences between the subgroups, the t-test was used. For the evaluation of the mutual relations of maximum size, mean size, and volume, regression analysis (coefficient of determination R 2 ) was used. Results: The correlation and regression analysis suggest that there will be no statistically significant error if the maximum size measurements are used instead of the mean size or volume measurements of the lesion. Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value, negative predictive value for distinguishing adenomas and non-adenomas using a cut-off diameter of 41.5 mm were 81.1%, 70.0%, 77.2%, 83.3%, 66.7%, respectively; using the non-contrast density threshold of 23 HU, they were 89.2%, 100%, 93

  6. Incidental unilateral tuberculous sacroiliitis detected by 18F-FDG PET/CT in a patient with abdominal tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico Albano

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis is a systemic disease which involves skeletal and articular system very rarely. Osteoarticular tuberculosis commonly occurs in the vertebral column and more rarely in the sacroiliac joints. In this study, we report a 44-years-old male patient with low-grade fever, malabsorption syndrome, abdominal and pelvic ascites and low-back pain, that underwent 18F-FDG PET/CT for identifying the cause of signs and symptoms after a negative abdominal CT and negative thorax radiography. The study revealed increased tracer uptake at the peritoneal ascites and at the right sacroiliac joint in absence of bone alteration suggesting a sacroiliitis. Staining of the ascitic fluid was positive for acid-fast bacilli (Ziehl–Neelsen and in the subsequent abdominal paracentesis Mycobacterium Tuberculosis was isolated; the final diagnosis was abdominal tuberculosis with a sacroiliac joint involvement. The patient started antitubercular therapy for 6 months and the clinical conditions were resolved, in particular both back pain and ascites disappeared.

  7. A tool for validating MRI-guided strategies: a digital breathing CT/MRI phantom of the abdominal site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paganelli, Chiara; Summers, Paul; Gianoli, Chiara; Bellomi, Massimo; Baroni, Guido; Riboldi, Marco

    2017-11-01

    Dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is emerging as the elected image modality for organ motion quantification and management in image-guided radiotherapy. However, the lack of validation tools is an open issue for image guidance in the abdominal and thoracic organs affected by organ motion due to respiration. We therefore present an abdominal four-dimensional (4D) CT/MRI digital phantom, including the estimation of MR tissue parameters, simulation of dedicated abdominal MR sequences, modeling of radiofrequency coil response and noise, followed by k-space sampling and image reconstruction. The phantom allows the realistic simulation of images generated by MR pulse sequences with control of scan and tissue parameters, combined with co-registered CT images. In order to demonstrate the potential of the phantom in a clinical scenario, we describe the validation of a virtual T1-weighted 4D MRI strategy. Specifically, the motion extracted from a T2-weighted 4D MRI is used to warp a T1-weighted breath-hold acquisition, with the aim of overcoming trade-offs that limit T1-weighted acquisitions. Such an application shows the applicability of the digital CT/MRI phantom as a validation tool, which should be especially useful for cases unsuited to obtain real imaging data.

  8. The role of spiral CT in patients with intermediate probability V/Q scans: can spiral CT replace pulmonary angiography?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vu, T.; Glenn, D.; Lovett, I.; Moses, J.; Wadhwa, S.S.; Nour, R.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: Spiral CT (SCT) has been advocated as a replacement for pulmonary angiography (PA)in patients with intermediate probability (IP) ventilation-perfusion lung scans (V/Q). More generally it has been proposed as a replacement for V/Q to detect Pulmonary Embolism. This study investigates the accuracy of SCT in the IP patient group 31 patients with IP scans (Modified PIOPED criteria) who were not at high risk of contrast nephrotoxicity were enrolled to have both SCT and PA within the 24 hours following their V/Q. Patients were classified as IP due to a single segmental mismatch (n=7) or a matched V/Q abnormality corresponding to CXR opacity (n=21), or both (n=3). PA is the gold standard for the detection of PE. SCT was read by an experienced radiologist blinded to the PA results. SCT was performed according to standard protocol. All SCT were technically satisfactory for interpretation. Pulmonary embolism was present in 9/31 patients (29%). Of the patients with PE detected by PA, SCT was positive in 4 (44% sensitivity). Of the 22 patients who did not have PE, SCT was negative in 21 and positive in one (96% specificity). In conclusion SCT has limited sensitivity for the detection of PE in patients with IP lung scans. SCT may not be an adequate replacement for PA. Copyright (2000) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  9. Determination of the optimal energy level in spectral CT imaging for displaying abdominal vessels in pediatric patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Di; Yu, Tong; Duan, Xiaomin; Peng, Yun; Zhai, Renyou

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the optimal energy level in contrast-enhanced spectral CT imaging for displaying abdominal vessels in pediatric patients. Materials and methods: This retrospective study was institutional review board approved. 15 children (8 males and 7 females, age range, 6–15 years, mean age 10.1 ± 3.1 years) underwent contrast-enhanced spectral CT imaging for diagnosing solid tumors in abdomen and pelvic areas were included. A single contrast-enhanced scan was performed using a dual energy spectral CT mode with a new split contrast injection scheme (iodixanol at 1–1.5 ml/kg dose. 2/3 first, 1/3 at 7–15 s after the first injection). 101 sets of monochromatic images with photon energies of 40–140 keV with 1 keV interval were reconstructed. Contrast-noise-ratio (CNR) for hepatic portal or vein were generated and compared at every energy level to determine the optimal energy level to maximize CNR. 2 board-certified radiologists interpreted the selected image sets independently for image quality scores. Results: CT values and CNR for the vessels increased as photon energy decreased from 140 to 40 keV: (CT value: 48.29–570.12 HU, CNR: 0.08–14.90) in the abdominal aorta, (58.48–369.73 HU, 0.64–5.87) in the inferior vena cava, and (58.48–369.73 HU, 0.06–6.96) in the portal vein. Monochromatic images at 40–50 keV (average 42.0 ± 4.67 keV) could display vessels above three levels clearly, and with excellent image quality scores of 3.17 ± 0.58 (of 4) (k = 0.50). The CNR values at the optimal energy level were significantly higher than those at 70 keV, an average energy corresponding to the conventional 120 kVp for abdominal CT imaging. Conclusion: Spectral CT imaging provides a set of monochromatic images to optimize image quality and enhance vascular visibility, especially in the hepatic portal and vein systems. The best CNR for displaying abdominal vessels in children was obtained at 42 keV photon energy level

  10. Abdominal and pelvic CT in cases of suspected abuse: can clinical and laboratory findings guide its use?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trout, Andrew T.; Strouse, Peter J. [University of Michigan Health System, C.S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Mohr, Bethany A. [University of Michigan Health System, C.S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Khalatbari, S.; Myles, Jamie D. [University of Michigan, Michigan Institute for Clinical and Health Research, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2011-01-15

    Incomplete history and concern for occult injury in suspected child abuse occasionally results in CT screenings of the abdomen and pelvis. At our institution, we noted that these exams were infrequently positive. To identify clinical or laboratory criteria that may predict intra-abdominal injury and guide the use of abdominal and pelvic CT in this population. This retrospective review involved 68 children older than 36 months who had a CT of the abdomen/pelvis for suspected abuse. CT results and patient charts were reviewed for physical exam and historical and laboratory variables. CTs were positive in 16% of patients (11/68). Hypoactive/absent bowel sounds (P = 0.01, specificity = 94.7%) and AST and ALT values greater than twice normal (P = 0.004 and P = 0.003 respectively, NPV = 93.6%) were significantly associated with positive CTs. Multiple abnormal physical exam or laboratory findings were also significantly associated with positive CTs (P = 0.03 and P = 0.002 respectively, specificity = 91.3% and NPV = 93.6% respectively). CTs of the abdomen and pelvis are infrequently positive in cases of suspected abuse. To reduce radiation exposure, CTs should only be ordered if there are findings indicating that they may be positive. In our population, these findings include absent/hypoactive bowel sounds, LFTs greater than twice normal and {>=}2 abnormal labs or physical exam findings. (orig.)

  11. Abdominal and pelvic CT in cases of suspected abuse: can clinical and laboratory findings guide its use?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trout, Andrew T.; Strouse, Peter J.; Mohr, Bethany A.; Khalatbari, S.; Myles, Jamie D.

    2011-01-01

    Incomplete history and concern for occult injury in suspected child abuse occasionally results in CT screenings of the abdomen and pelvis. At our institution, we noted that these exams were infrequently positive. To identify clinical or laboratory criteria that may predict intra-abdominal injury and guide the use of abdominal and pelvic CT in this population. This retrospective review involved 68 children older than 36 months who had a CT of the abdomen/pelvis for suspected abuse. CT results and patient charts were reviewed for physical exam and historical and laboratory variables. CTs were positive in 16% of patients (11/68). Hypoactive/absent bowel sounds (P = 0.01, specificity = 94.7%) and AST and ALT values greater than twice normal (P = 0.004 and P = 0.003 respectively, NPV = 93.6%) were significantly associated with positive CTs. Multiple abnormal physical exam or laboratory findings were also significantly associated with positive CTs (P = 0.03 and P = 0.002 respectively, specificity = 91.3% and NPV = 93.6% respectively). CTs of the abdomen and pelvis are infrequently positive in cases of suspected abuse. To reduce radiation exposure, CTs should only be ordered if there are findings indicating that they may be positive. In our population, these findings include absent/hypoactive bowel sounds, LFTs greater than twice normal and ≥2 abnormal labs or physical exam findings. (orig.)

  12. A novel multiinstance learning approach for liver cancer recognition on abdominal CT images based on CPSO-SVM and IO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Huiyan; Zheng, Ruiping; Yi, Dehui; Zhao, Di

    2013-01-01

    A novel multi-instance learning (MIL) method is proposed to recognize liver cancer with abdominal CT images based on instance optimization (IO) and support vector machine with parameters optimized by a combination algorithm of particle swarm optimization and local optimization (CPSO-SVM). Introducing MIL into liver cancer recognition can solve the problem of multiple regions of interest classification. The images we use in the experiments are liver CT images extracted from abdominal CT images. The proposed method consists of two main steps: (1) obtaining the key instances through IO by texture features and a classification threshold in classification of instances with CPSO-SVM and (2) predicting unknown samples with the key instances and the classification threshold. By extracting the instances equally based on the entire image, the proposed method can ignore the procedure of tumor region segmentation and lower the demand of segmentation accuracy of liver region. The normal SVM method and two MIL algorithms, Citation-kNN algorithm and WEMISVM algorithm, have been chosen as comparing algorithms. The experimental results show that the proposed method can effectively recognize liver cancer images from two kinds of cancer CT images and greatly improve the recognition accuracy.

  13. Endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair: surveillance of endoleak using maximum transverse diameter of aorta on non-enhanced CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagayama, Hiroki; Sueyoshi, Eijun; Sakamoto, Ichiro; Uetani, Masataka [Dept. of Radiology, Nagasaki Univ. School of Medicine, Nagasaki (Japan)], E-mail: sueyo@nagasaki-u.ac.jp

    2012-07-15

    Background. Repeat volumetric analysis of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) after endovascular AAA repair (EVAR) is time-consuming and requires advanced processing, dedicated equipment, and skilled operators. Purpose. To clarify the validity of measuring the maximal short-axis diameter (Dmax) of AAA in follow-up non-enhanced axial CT as a means of detecting substantial endoleaks after EVAR. Material and Methods. CT images were retrospectively reviewed in 47 patients (7 women, 40 men; mean age, 76.2 years) who had no endoleak on initial contrast-enhanced CT after EVAR. Regular follow-up CT studies were performed every 6 months. At each CT study, the Dmax on the CT axial image was measured and compared with that on the last CT (115 data-sets). Contrast-enhanced CT was regarded as the standard of reference to decide the presence or absence of endoleaks. The appearance of endoleak was defined as the end point of this study. Results. Endoleaks were detected in 17 patients during the follow-up period. Mean Dmax changes for 6 months were significant between positive and negative endoleak cases (1.8 {+-} 1.9 vs. -1.1 {+-} 3.0 mm, P < 0.0001). When the Dmax change {<=} 0 mm for 6 months was used as the threshold for negative endoleak, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were 74.5, 82.4, 96.1, and 35.9%, respectively. When Dmax change {<=}-1 mm was used as the threshold, the sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV were 38.8, 100, 100, and 22.1%, respectively. Conclusion. Contrast-enhanced CT is not required for the evaluation of endoleaks when the Dmax decreases by at least 1 mm over 6 months after EVAR.

  14. [PET/CT for monitoring the therapeutic response in a patient with abdominal lymph node tuberculosis after colon cancer resection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Yasuo; Hashizume, Yutaka

    2012-11-01

    In February 2007, a 76-year-old man underwent endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) for sigmoid colon cancer. Histological examination of the EMR specimen revealed adenocarcinoma in adenoma that was confined to the mucosal layer, and pathological complete resection was achieved. Since then, the patient has been followed up every year with endoscopic examination of the colon, with normal results except for hemorrhoids. In June 2011, a positive result for occult blood was obtained on examination of a stool sample. In July 2011, enhanced computed tomography of the chest and abdomen was performed, and the left supraclavicular, paraaortic, and left common iliac artery lymph nodes were found to be enlarged. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT) identified accumulation of 18F-FDG in the enlarged lymph nodes. Histopathological examination of a biopsy specimen from the left supraclavicular lymph node revealed tuberculous changes; therefore, the patient was administered anti-tuberculosis therapy. The culture isolate of the above lymphatic tissue specimen was identified as Mycobacterium tuberculosis by immunochromatographic assay with MPB64 protein (Capilia TB). Laparoscopic examination of abdominal lymph nodes was not performed because the patient's consent could not be obtained. After the anti-tuberculosis therapy, the size of the abdominal lymph nodes was reduced, and subsequently, 18F-FDG accumulation decreased. It is considered that mucosal colon cancer did not spread to the lymph nodes after it was removed completely. For the definitive diagnosis of abdominal lymph node swelling, it would have been necessary to perform laparoscopic examination, which was impossible in this case. When it is difficult to perform invasive examinations, such as laparoscopy in case of swelling of the abdominal lymph node, 18F-FDG PET/CT can be useful for monitoring the therapeutic response of abdominal tuberculosis.

  15. Evaluation of reduced-dose CT for acute non-traumatic abdominal pain: evaluation of diagnostic accuracy in comparison to standard-dose CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, Ahmed E; Bongers, Malte Niklas; Zinsser, Dominik; Schabel, Christoph; Wichmann, Julian L; Arshid, Rami; Notohamiprodjo, Mike; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Bamberg, Fabian

    2018-01-01

    Background Patients with acute non-traumatic abdominal pain often undergo abdominal computed tomography (CT). However, abdominal CT is associated with high radiation exposure. Purpose To evaluate diagnostic performance of a reduced-dose 100 kVp CT protocol with advanced modeled iterative reconstruction as compared to a linearly blended 120 kVp protocol for assessment of acute, non-traumatic abdominal pain. Material and Methods Two radiologists assessed 100 kVp and linearly blended 120 kVp series of 112 consecutive patients with acute non-traumatic pain (onset diagnostic confidence. Both 100 kVp and linearly blended 120 kVp series were quantitatively evaluated regarding radiation dose and image noise. Comparative statistics and diagnostic accuracy was calculated using receiver operating curve (ROC) statistics, with final clinical diagnosis/clinical follow-up as reference standard. Results Image quality was high for both series without detectable significant differences ( P = 0.157). Image noise and artifacts were rated low for both series but significantly higher for 100 kVp ( P ≤ 0.021). Diagnostic accuracy was high for both series (120 kVp: area under the curve [AUC] = 0.950, sensitivity = 0.958, specificity = 0.941; 100 kVp: AUC ≥ 0.910, sensitivity ≥ 0.937, specificity = 0.882; P ≥ 0.516) with almost perfect inter-rater agreement (Kappa = 0.939). Diagnostic confidence was high for both dose levels without significant differences (100 kVp 5, range 4-5; 120 kVp 5, range 3-5; P = 0.134). The 100 kVp series yielded 26.1% lower radiation dose compared with the 120 kVp series (5.72 ± 2.23 mSv versus 7.75 ± 3.02 mSv, P diagnostic accuracy for the assessment of acute non-traumatic abdominal pain.

  16. Retropsoas hernia as a cause of chronic abdominal pain: CT diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benson, J.E.; Strauch, E.D.

    1998-01-01

    Congenital retropsoas small bowel herniation is reported as the cause of long-standing recurrent abdominal pain in a teenage girl. Knowledge of this entity is important for differential diagnosis of abdominal pain, mass, or retroperitoneal gas and fluid, and for avoiding complications of percutaneous renal interventions. (orig.)

  17. Retropsoas hernia as a cause of chronic abdominal pain: CT diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, J.E. [Div. of Pediatric Radiology, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD (United States); Strauch, E.D. [Division of Pediatric Surgery, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)

    1998-05-01

    Congenital retropsoas small bowel herniation is reported as the cause of long-standing recurrent abdominal pain in a teenage girl. Knowledge of this entity is important for differential diagnosis of abdominal pain, mass, or retroperitoneal gas and fluid, and for avoiding complications of percutaneous renal interventions. (orig.) With 2 figs., 6 refs.

  18. A preliminary study of treating intractable abdominal pain caused by cancer through neurolytic celiac plexus block guided by CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Jun; Nian Dingfang; Cao Qingxuan; Li Wenhua; Huang Xianglong

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the therapeutic effect of neurolytic cliac plexus block (NCPB), and to analyze the factors related to the degree of pain relief. Methods: Eight cases of the abdominal cancer with intractable pain from 7 days to 20 days, were treated by NCPB. During NCPB,10 ml or 15 ml, dehydrated alcohol was injected bilaterally for the former and unilateral for the latter. The results of pain relief were classified into four score-grade. The spread of alcohol was observed through CT scanning. Results: During the follow-up of 1W, 1M, 2M, 3M, 4M, 5M, 6M, the cases of pain relief ( ≥2 cases) were 7,7, 6, 5, 4, 3 and 3 cases respectively. With CT scanning, 7 cases showed the satisfactory spread of alcohol except 1 case which was not properly distributed. No severe complication occurred. Conclusions: NCPB guided by CT is an effective and safe method for treating intractable abdominal cancer pain

  19. Evidence for replacement of an infected synthetic by a biological mesh in abdominal wall hernia repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agneta eMontgomery

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of deep infection using a synthetic mesh in inguinal hernia repair is low and reported to be well below 1%. This is in contrast to incisional hernia surgery where the reported incidence is 3% respective 13% comparing laparoscopic to open mesh repair reported in a Cochrane review. Main risk factors were long operation time, surgical site contamination and early wound complications. An infected mesh can be preserved using conservative treatment were negative pressure wound therapy (VAC® could play an important role. If strategy fails, the mesh needs to be removed. This review aims to look at evidence for situations were a biological mesh would work as a replacement of a removed infected synthetic mesh. Material and MethodsA literature search of the Medline database was performed using the PubMed search engine. Twenty publications were found relevant for this review.ResultsFor studies reviewed three options are presented: removal of the infected synthetic mesh alone, replacement with either a new synthetic or a new biological mesh. Operations were all performed at specialist centers. Removal of the mesh alone was an option limited to inguinal hernias. In ventral/incisional hernias the use of a biological mesh for replacement resulted in a very high recurrence rate, if bridging was required. Either a synthetic or a biological mesh seems to work as a replacement when fascial closure can be achieved. Evidence is though very low. ConclusionWhen required, either a synthetic or a biological meshes seems to work as a replacement for an infected synthetic mesh if the defect can be closed. It is however not recommended to use a biological mesh for bridging. Mesh replacement surgery is demanding and is recommended to be performed in a specialist center.

  20. Model for improved correlation of BMD values between abdominal routine Dual energy CT data and DXA scans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woisetschläger, Mischa; Spångeus, Anna

    2018-02-01

    Osteoporosis is a common but underdiagnosed and undertreated disease causing severe morbidity and economic burden. The gold standard for detection of osteoporosis is DXA (dual energy x-ray absorptiometry), which is a dedicated examination for osteoporosis. Dual energy CT (DECT) examinations are increasingly used in daily routine for a wide variety of diagnoses. In the present study, we wanted to examine whether vBMD (volume bone mass density) could be evaluated as a side product in non-contrast as well as contrast phases as well as to evaluate a correction model taking known shortcomings for DXA into account. A total of 20 patients, i.e. 79 vertebrae (one excluded due to vertebral fracture), mean age 71 years (range 43-85) with a mean BMI (body mass index) of 26 (range 17-33) were examined with both abdominal/pelvic DECT as well as DXA. Furthermore, aortic calcium was measured as well as the presence of osteoarthritis of the spine (OAS) and osteoarthritis in facet joints (OAF) with a 5-grade scaling system. A significant correlation was found between DXA BMD and vBMD from DECT with no contrast (WNC) (r = 0.424, p = 0.001), and with venous contrast (WVC) (r = 0.402, p < 0.001), but no significant correlation was found with arterial contrast (WAC). Using multivariate linear regression with DXA BMD as dependent, two models were created combining DECT WNC, aortic calciumscore (ACS), OAS and BMI yielding an R 2  = 0.616 (model 1) and replacement of WNC to WVC a R 2  = 0.612 (model 2). The Pearson correlation between DXA and predictive DXA BMD value of model 1 was r = 0.785 (p < 0.001) and model 2 r = 0.782 (p < 0.001). There is a correlation between DXA BMD and DECT in non-contrast and venous contrast scans but not in arterial scans. The correlation is further improved by quantifying the degree of different confounding factors (osteoarthritis of the spine, body mass index and aortic calcium score) and taking these into account in

  1. Dose monitoring using the DICOM structured report: assessment of the relationship between cumulative radiation exposure and BMI in abdominal CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boos, J.; Lanzman, R.S.; Meineke, A.; Heusch, P.; Sawicki, L.M.; Antoch, G.; Kröpil, P.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To perform a systematic, large-scale analysis using the Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine structured report (DICOM-SR) to assess the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and radiation exposure in abdominal CT. Materials and methods: A retrospective analysis of DICOM-SR of 3121 abdominal CT examinations between April 2013 and March 2014 was performed. All examinations were conducted using a 128 row CT system. Patients (mean age 61 ± 15 years) were divided into five groups according to their BMI: group A <20 kg/m 2 (underweight), group B 20–25 kg/m 2 (normal weight), group C 25–30 kg/m 2 (overweight), group D 30–35 kg/m 2 (obese), and group E > 35 kg/m 2 (extremely obese). CT dose index (CTDI vol ) and dose–length product (DLP) were compared between all groups and matched to national diagnostic reference values. Results: The mean CTDI vol and DLP were 5.4 ± 2.9 mGy and 243 ± 153 mGy·cm in group A, 6 ± 3.6 mGy and 264 ± 179 mGy• cm in group B, 7 ± 3.6 mGy and 320 ± 180 mGy• cm in group C, 8.1 ± 5.2 mGy and 375 ± 306 mGy• cm in group D, and 10 ± 8 mGy and 476 ± 403 mGy• cm in group E, respectively. Except for group A versus group B, CTDI vol and DLP differed significantly between all groups (p<0.05). Significantly more CTDI vol values exceeded national diagnostic reference values in groups D and E (2.1% and 6.3%) compared to group B (0.5%, p<0.05). Conclusion: DICOM-SR is a comprehensive, fast, and reproducible way to analyse dose-related data at CT. It allows for automated evaluation of radiation dose in a large study population. Dose exposition is related to the patient's BMI and is increased by up to 96% for extremely obese patients undergoing abdominal CT. - Highlights: • DICOM-SR was used to implement automatic CT-dose monitoring. • DICOM-SR allowed for a fast and comprehensive analysis of CT dose data. • Radiation exposure for abdominal CT was increased by up to 96% for

  2. Quantitative X-ray CT analysis of calcification of the abdominal aorta and its relationship to obesity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinagawa, Toshio; Hiraiwa, Yoshio; Mizuno, Seio; Kusunoki, Norio; Nitta, Yu; Matsubara, Takao; Iwainaka, Yoichi; Konishi, Hideo

    1992-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of abdominal aorta calcification by X-ray CT is useful method for non-invasive diagnosis of atherosclerosis. We recently examined the relationship between the X-ray CT measurement of abdominal aorta calcification and the degree of obesity. For this purpose, the body mass index (BMI) and the subcutaneous fat thickness (determined by X-ray CT at the umbilical level) were analyzed in relation to the abdominal aorta calcification index (ACI) in 845 patients (453 males and 392 females aged 40-79 years). Patients with BMI under 20 were classified as 'lean', those with BMI between 20-26 as 'normal' and those with BMI over 26 as 'obese'. 1. Among males, the ACI was highest in lean individuals and lowest in obese individuals. The difference in ACI between lean and obese males was significant in the middle aged group (40-65 years). Among females, no relationship was observed between the degree of obesity and ACI. 2. Among males, ACI was higher in individuals with low subcutaneous fat thickness and lower in individuals with greater subcutaneous fat thickness. The difference was significant in the middle aged group. Among females, no relationship was observed between the two parameters. 3. When the visceral fat to subcutaneous fat ratio (V/S) in 85 males and females aged 60-69 years was analyzed in relation to ACI, ACI tended to decrease as the V/S increased, in both males and females. 4. Relationships between BMI and subcutaneous fat thickness, between BMI and lipids and between lipids and ACI were also analyzed. (author)

  3. Indications for surgery in acute pancreatitis on the basis of abdominal CT in the early stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Keishoku; Nakasaku, Osamu; Kim, Jung-hyo; Hatakeyama, Gen

    1986-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis clinically manifests various degrees of severity. In the present study, we performed a retrospective study on 39 cases of acute pancreatitis and examined the indications for surgery and infection as an aggravating factor in acute pancreatitis on the basis of CT in the early stage (about 48 hours after onset). CT in the early stage of acute pancreatitis permits objective determination of the extent of lesion enlargement. The cases could be classified into three grades: severe (CT score ≥ 6; surgical therapy), moderate (CT score = 5, 4; medical therapy possible), and mild (CT score ≤ 3; medical therapy) as determined by CT. Emergency surgery was performed in seven of 10 patients in whom pancreatitis was judged to be severe on the basis of CT and clinical findings. Of the seven, four had infection in the early stage (within 48 hours after onset). Three of the four had MOF complications and died. Two of the three patients without infection were relieved. The extent of inflammatory lesions of severe pancreatitis was severe by CT, and the CT scores were especially high in cases with infection. Infection in the early stage of acute pancreatitis was thus thought to be an serious aggravating factor. It was concluded, therefore, that, in the early stage, CT was very useful as a helpful guide to early judgement and an indicator for emergency surgery. (author)

  4. Deceptions in localizing extrahepatic right-upper-quadrant abdominal masses by CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frick, M.P.; Feinberg, S.B.

    1982-09-01

    Eleven patients with various extrahepatic right-upper-quadrant lesions had findings on computed tomography (CT) that strongly suggested intrahepatic location. Diagnostic uncertainties on CT were caused by the large size of these masses (5-12 cm in diameter) and sparsity of retroperitoneal fat planes. Sonography depicted the true location of these lesions more clearly than CT. The complementary role of sonography is stressed.

  5. Abdominal CT during pregnancy: a phantom study on the effect of patient centring on conceptus radiation dose and image quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solomou, G.; Damilakis, J. [University of Crete, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Physics, Heraklion, P.O. Box 2208, Crete (Greece); Papadakis, A.E. [University Hospital of Heraklion, Department of Medical Physics, Heraklion, P.O. Box 1352, Crete (Greece)

    2015-04-01

    To investigate the effect of patient centring on conceptus radiation dose and image quality in abdominal CT during pregnancy. Three anthropomorphic phantoms that represent a pregnant woman at the three trimesters of gestation were subjected to a routine abdominal CT. Examinations were performed with fixed mAs (mAs{sub f}) and with the automatic exposure control system (AEC) activated. The percent reduction between mAs{sub f} and modulated mAs (mAs{sub mod}) was calculated. Conceptus dose (D{sub c}) was measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters. To study the effect of misplacement of pregnant women on D{sub c}, each phantom was positioned at various locations relative to gantry isocentre. Image quality was evaluated on the basis of image noise, signal-to-noise ratio, and contrast-to-noise ratio. The maximum reduction between mAs{sub f} and mAs{sub mod} was 59.8 %, while the corresponding D{sub C} reduction was 59.3 %. D{sub C} was found to decrease by up to 25 % and 7.9 % for phantom locations below and above the isocentre, respectively. Image quality deteriorated when AEC was activated, and it was progressively improved from lower to higher than the isocentre locations. Centring errors do not result in an increase in D{sub c}. To maintain image quality, accurate centring is required. (orig.)

  6. The study of controlling intractable upper abdominal pain caused by cancer through neurolytic celiac plexus block guided by CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui Hengwu; Tian Jianming; Wang Peijun; Chen Aihua; Zuo Changjing; Xiao Yi; Wang Minjie; Fan Yuelan

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the therapeutic effect of neurolytic celiac plexus block (NCPB) and to analyze the factors related to the degree of pain relief. Methods: Forty-two patients who had intractable upper abdominal pain or accompanying referred back pain from cancer of pancreas, liver, stomach, colon and bile duct received bilateral alcohol neurolytic celiac plexus blocks under CT guidance. The results of pain relief were classified into 0-III grade. The spread of neurolytic solution (with contrast material) was observed through 3D reconstruction. Results: During the 3 months follow-up, the total effective rates of pain relief in 2 weeks, 1 month, 2 months and 3 months were 92.86%, 88.10%, 85.00% and 80.56% respectively. Satisfactory pain relief results were obtained when the neurolytic solution encircled the aorta adequately from two sides. There were no severe complications in any case. Conclusion: NCPB guided by CT proves to be an effective and safe means of controlling intractable upper abdominal cancer pain and should be popularized

  7. Establishing the case for CT angiography in the preoperative imaging of abdominal wall perforators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozen, W M; Ashton, M W; Grinsell, D; Stella, D L; Phillips, T J; Taylor, G I

    2008-01-01

    Preoperative imaging of the donor site vasculature for deep inferior epigastric artery (DIEA) perforator flaps and other abdominal wall reconstructive flaps has become more commonplace. Abdominal wall computed tomography angiography (CTA) has been described as the most accurate and reproducible modality available for demonstrating the location, size, and course of individual perforators. We drew on our experience of 75 consecutive patients planned for DIEA-based flap surgery undertaking CTA at a single institution. Seven of these cases have been reported to highlight the utility of CTA for preoperative planning, emphasizing the unique information supplied by CTA that may influence operative outcome. Among all cases that underwent preoperative imaging with CTA, there was 100% flap survival, with no partial or complete flap necrosis. We found that in three of the cases described, the choice of operation was necessarily selected based on CTA findings (DIEA perforator flap, transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap, and superficial superior epigastric artery flap). In addition, three cases demonstrate that CTA findings may dictate the decision to operate at all, and one case demonstrates the utility of CTA for evaluating the entire abdominal contents for comorbid conditions. Our experience with CTA for abdominal wall perforator mapping has been highly beneficial. CTA may guide operative technique and improve perforator selection in uncomplicated cases, and in difficult cases it can guide the most appropriate operation or indeed if an operation is appropriate at all. This is particularly the case in the setting of comorbidities or previous abdominal surgery.

  8. Effect of reducing abdominal compression during prone CT colonography on ascending colonic rotation during supine-to-prone positional change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Jong eon; Park, Seong Ho; Lee, Jong Seok; Kim, Hyun Jin; KIm, Ah Young; Ha, Hyun Kwon

    2016-01-01

    To determine the effect of reduced abdominal compression in prone position on ascending colonic movement during supine-to-prone positional change during CT colonography (CTC). Eighteen consecutive patients who had undergone prone CTC scanning with cushion blocks placed under the chest and hip/thigh to reduce abdominal compression and had confirmed sessile polyps ≥ 6 mm in the well-distended, straight, mid-ascending colon, were included. Radial location along the ascending colonic luminal circumference (°) was measured for 24 polyps and 54 colonic teniae on supine and prone CTC images. The supine-to-prone change ranging between -180° and +180° (- and + for internal and external colonic rotations, respectively), was determined. In addition, possible causes of any ascending colonic rotations were explored. Abdominal compression during prone CTC scanning completely disappeared with the use of cushion blocks in 17 of 18 patients. However, some degrees of ascending colonic rotation were still observed, with the radial location changes of -22° to 61° (median, 13.9°) for the polyps and similar degrees for teniae. Fifty-four percent and 56% of polyps and teniae, respectively, showed changes > 10°. The radial location change of the polyps was significantly associated with the degree of anterior shift of the small bowel and mesentery (r = 0.722, p < 0.001) and the degree of posterior displacement of the ascending colon (r = 0.566, p = 0.004) during supine-to-prone positional change. Ascending colonic rotation upon supine-to-prone positional change during CTC, mostly in the form of external rotation, is not eliminated by removing abdominal compression in prone position

  9. A prospective study to evaluate the depictability of the hepatic veins on abdominal contrast-enhanced CT in small children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Motoo; Hara, Masaki; Shibamoto, Yuta

    2009-01-01

    The optimal conditions for abdominal contrast-enhanced (CE) CT, especially with respect to depiction of the hepatic veins (HVs), have not been well studied in small children. We compared the depiction of the HVs in small children using scan delay times of 50 s and 60 s and a power injector. The degree of contrast enhancement of the HVs according to body weight was also evaluated. A total of 50 CT studies in 31 children ages 2 days to 3 years 4 months (median 12 months) with a body weight less than 15 kg were prospectively evaluated. Nonionic contrast medium (300 mgI/ml) at a dose of 2 ml/kg and an injection rate calculated as (body weight in kilograms x 0.1) ml/s was injected through a 24-gauge intravenous catheter. Scan delay time was randomly chosen at 50 s or 60 s (25 times each). Subjective assessment of HV depiction was performed and the difference in CT number between the HV and hepatic parenchyma (HV-HP value) was calculated. In all cases, subjective assessment of HV depiction was good and the HV-HP value was greater than 20 HU. The mean±SD HV-HP value was 47.7±13.2 HU. There were no differences in the mean HV-HP values between scan delay times of 50 s and 60 s (P=0.58). For small children, this protocol for pediatric abdominal CECT resulted in good depiction of the HVs with no difference between scan delay times of 50 s and 60 s. (orig.)

  10. Abdominal multi-organ segmentation from CT images using conditional shape–location and unsupervised intensity priors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linguraru, Marius George; Hori, Masatoshi; Summers, Ronald M; Tomiyama, Noriyuki

    2015-01-01

    This paper addresses the automated segmentation of multiple organs in upper abdominal computed tomography (CT) data. The aim of our study is to develop methods to effectively construct the conditional priors and use their prediction power for more accurate segmentation as well as easy adaptation to various imaging conditions in CT images, as observed in clinical practice. We propose a general framework of multi-organ segmentation which effectively incorporates interrelations among multiple organs and easily adapts to various imaging conditions without the need for supervised intensity information. The features of the framework are as follows: (1) A method for modeling conditional shape and location (shape–location) priors, which we call prediction-based priors, is developed to derive accurate priors specific to each subject, which enables the estimation of intensity priors without the need for supervised intensity information. (2) Organ correlation graph is introduced, which defines how the conditional priors are constructed and segmentation processes of multiple organs are executed. In our framework, predictor organs, whose segmentation is sufficiently accurate by using conventional single-organ segmentation methods, are pre-segmented, and the remaining organs are hierarchically segmented using conditional shape–location priors. The proposed framework was evaluated through the segmentation of eight abdominal organs (liver, spleen, left and right kidneys, pancreas, gallbladder, aorta, and inferior vena cava) from 134 CT data from 86 patients obtained under six imaging conditions at two hospitals. The experimental results show the effectiveness of the proposed prediction-based priors and the applicability to various imaging conditions without the need for supervised intensity information. Average Dice coefficients for the liver, spleen, and kidneys were more than 92%, and were around 73% and 67% for the pancreas and gallbladder, respectively. PMID:26277022

  11. Segmenting the thoracic, abdominal and pelvic musculature on CT scans combining atlas-based model and active contour model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weidong; Liu, Jiamin; Yao, Jianhua; Summers, Ronald M.

    2013-03-01

    Segmentation of the musculature is very important for accurate organ segmentation, analysis of body composition, and localization of tumors in the muscle. In research fields of computer assisted surgery and computer-aided diagnosis (CAD), muscle segmentation in CT images is a necessary pre-processing step. This task is particularly challenging due to the large variability in muscle structure and the overlap in intensity between muscle and internal organs. This problem has not been solved completely, especially for all of thoracic, abdominal and pelvic regions. We propose an automated system to segment the musculature on CT scans. The method combines an atlas-based model, an active contour model and prior segmentation of fat and bones. First, body contour, fat and bones are segmented using existing methods. Second, atlas-based models are pre-defined using anatomic knowledge at multiple key positions in the body to handle the large variability in muscle shape. Third, the atlas model is refined using active contour models (ACM) that are constrained using the pre-segmented bone and fat. Before refining using ACM, the initialized atlas model of next slice is updated using previous atlas. The muscle is segmented using threshold and smoothed in 3D volume space. Thoracic, abdominal and pelvic CT scans were used to evaluate our method, and five key position slices for each case were selected and manually labeled as the reference. Compared with the reference ground truth, the overlap ratio of true positives is 91.1%+/-3.5%, and that of false positives is 5.5%+/-4.2%.

  12. Renal streaky artifact during contrast-enhanced abdominal and pelvic CT: Comparison of high versus low osmolality contrast media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dae Hong; Kim, Jong Chul; Lee, Chung Keun; Shin, Kyoung Suk

    1994-01-01

    Introduction of low osmolality contrast agent(LOCA) has allowed safer, more comfortable contrast-enhanced CT examination, but there has been significant increase in image degradation when evaluating the kidneys due to streaky artifact. The authors reviewed findings of contrast- enhanced abdominal and pelvic computed tomography(CT) to know the difference of renal streaky artifact between a high osmolality contrast agent (HOCA) and LOCA. This study included two hundred contrast-enhanced CT in 200 patients, 100 performed with HOCA(meglumine ioglicate, 150 ml) and 100 performed with LOCA (iopromide,150 ml). The severity of renal streaky artifact was compared between HOCA and LOCA groups. Of the scans performed with HOCA, 40 had no artifact, 52 had grade I artifact, 6 had grade II artifact, and 2 had grade III artifact. Of the scans preformed with LOCA, 23 had no artifact, 44 had grade I artifact, 29 had grade II artifact, and 4 had grade III artifact. There was significant difference in the degree of the streaky artifact depending upon the osmolality of the contrast media used(by χ 2 -test, P=.0001). The results of this study revealed a statistically significant increased incidence of artifacts and distortions of renal image with LOCA when compared with HOCA

  13. AP diameter shows the strongest correlation with CTDI and DLP in abdominal and chest CT.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Zarb, Francis

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationships among cross-sectional diameters, weight and computed tomography (CT) dose descriptors (CTDI and DLP) to identify which is best used as a measure for the establishment of DRLs in CT. Data (gender, weight, cross-sectional diameters, dose descriptors) from 56 adult patients attending for either a CT examination of the abdomen or chest was obtained from two spiral CT units using automatic milliampere modulation. The AP diameter was demonstrated as the main contributing factor influencing the dose in CT (CTDI: r(2) = 0.269, p-value < or =0.001; DLP: r(2) = 0.260, p-value < or =0.001) since it has a greater correlation with radiation dose than body weight and can thus be its substitute in dose-reduction strategies and establishment of DRLs. The advantages of using the AP diameter are that it can easily be measured prior to scanning or retrospectively from previous CT images. However, further studies on the practicality of this approach are recommended.

  14. AP diameter shows the strongest correlation with CTDI and DLP in abdominal and chest CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarb, F.; Rainford, L.; McEntee, M. F.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationships among cross-sectional diameters, weight and computed tomography (CT) dose descriptors (CTDI and DLP) to identify which is best used as a measure for the establishment of DRLs in CT. Data (gender, weight, cross-sectional diameters, dose descriptors) from 56 adult patients attending for either a CT examination of the abdomen or chest was obtained from two spiral CT units using automatic milli-ampere modulation. The AP diameter was demonstrated as the main contributing factor influencing the dose in CT (CTDI: r 2 = 0.269, p-value ≤0.001; DLP: r 2 = 0.260, p-value ≤0.001) since it has a greater correlation with radiation dose than body weight and can thus be its substitute in dose-reduction strategies and establishment of DRLs. The advantages of using the AP diameter are that it can easily be measured prior to scanning or retrospectively from previous CT images. However, further studies on the practicality of this approach are recommended. (authors)

  15. A Method for the Automatic Exposure Control in Pediatric Abdominal CT: Application to the Standard Deviation Value and Tube Current Methods by Using Patient's Age and Body Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuya, Ken; Akiyama, Shinji; Nambu, Atushi; Suzuki, Yutaka; Hasebe, Yuusuke

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to apply the pediatric abdominal CT protocol of Donnelly et al. in the United States to the pediatric abdominal CT-AEC. Examining CT images of 100 children, we found that the sectional area of the hepatic portal region (y) was strongly correlated with the body weight (x) as follows: y=7.14x + 84.39 (correlation coefficient=0.9574). We scanned an elliptical cone phantom that simulates the human body using a pediatric abdominal CT scanning method of Donnelly et al. in, and measured SD values. We further scanned the same phantom under the settings for adult CT-AEC scan and obtained the relationship between the sectional areas (y) and the SD values. Using these results, we obtained the following preset noise factors for CT-AEC at each body weight range: 6.90 at 4.5-8.9 kg, 8.40 at 9.0-17.9 kg, 8.68 at 18.0-26.9 kg, 9.89 at 27.0-35.9 kg, 12.22 at 36.0-45.0 kg, 13.52 at 45.1-70.0 kg, 15.29 at more than 70 kg. From the relation between age, weight and the distance of liver and tuber ischiadicum of 500 children, we obtained the CTDI vol values and DLP values under the scanning protocol of Donnelly et al. Almost all of DRL from these values turned out to be smaller than the DRL data of IAEA and various countries. Thus, by setting the maximum current values of CT-AEC to be the Donnelly et al.'s age-wise current values, and using our weight-wise noise factors, we think we can perform pediatric abdominal CT-AEC scans that are consistent with the same radiation safety and the image quality as those proposed by Donnelly et al.

  16. Automated tube potential selection for standard chest and abdominal CT in follow-up patients with testicular cancer: comparison with fixed tube potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gnannt, Ralph; Winklehner, Anna; Frauenfelder, Thomas; Alkadhi, Hatem; Eberli, Daniel; Knuth, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate prospectively, in patients with testicular cancer, the radiation dose-saving potential and image quality of contrast-enhanced chest and abdominal CT with automated tube potential selection. Forty consecutive patients with testicular cancer underwent contrast-enhanced arterio-venous chest and portal-venous abdominal CT with automated tube potential selection (protocol B; tube potential 80-140 kVp), which is based on the attenuation of the CT topogram. All had a first CT at 120 kVp (protocol A) using the same 64-section CT machine and similar settings. Image quality was assessed; dose information (CTDI vol ) was noted. Image noise and attenuation in the liver and spleen were significantly higher for protocol B (P vol was significantly lower for protocol B compared to protocol A (reduction by 12%, P < 0.01). In patients with testicular cancer, radiation dose of chest and abdominal CT can be reduced with automated tube potential selection, while image quality is preserved. (orig.)

  17. Blunt abdominal trauma in adults: role of CT in the diagnosis and management of visceral injuries. Part 1. Liver and spleen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, C.D.; Terrier, F. [Department of Radiology, Division of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Geneva (Switzerland); Mentha, G. [Department of Surgery, Division of Abdominal Surgery, Geneva University Hospital, Geneva (Switzerland)

    1998-05-01

    Computed tomography is now widely used in the initial diagnostic workup of adult trauma victims with suspected intra-abdominal injuries. We review the role of CT in the detection and management of blunt visceral injuries in two parts. In the first part we discuss general aspects of performing CT in the setting of abdominal trauma and the diagnostic findings of intra-abdominal hemorrhage and blunt hepatic and splenic injuries. Hepatic and splenic injuries can be detected by means of CT with a high accuracy. The vast majority of hepatic injuries can be successfully managed conservatively, even when CT demonstrates parenchymal damage of more than three segments and major hemoperitoneum. Delayed complications, e. g., formation of biloma or a false aneurysm, can be readily detected on repeat CT studies, although they are quite uncommon. The outcome of conservative treatment of splenic injuries remains unpredictable because delayed splenic rupture may occur even when initial CT shows only minor parenchymal lesions and little or no intraperitoneal hemorrhage. (orig.) With 11 figs., 5 tabs., 64 refs.

  18. Dual-energy CT for detection of endoleaks after endovascular abdominal aneurysm repair: usefulness of colored iodine overlay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascenti, Giorgio; Mazziotti, Silvio; Lamberto, Salvatore; Bottari, Antonio; Caloggero, Simona; Racchiusa, Sergio; Mileto, Achille; Scribano, Emanuele

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of our study was to evaluate the value of dual-source dual-energy CT with colored iodine overlay for detection of endoleaks after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. We also calculated the potential dose reduction by using a dual-energy CT single-phase protocol. From November 2007 to November 2009, 74 patients underwent CT angiography 2-7 days after endovascular repair during single-energy unenhanced and dual-energy venous phases. By using dual-energy software, the iodine overlay was superimposed on venous phase images with different percentages ranging between 0 (virtual unenhanced images) and 50-75% to show the iodine in an orange color. Two blinded readers evaluated the data for diagnosis of endoleaks during standard unenhanced and venous phase images (session 1, standard of reference) and virtual unenhanced and venous phase images with colored iodine overlay images (session 2). We compared the effective dose radiation of a single-energy biphasic protocol with that of a single-phase dual-energy protocol. The diagnostic accuracy of session 2 was calculated. The mean dual-energy effective dose was 7.27 mSv. By using a dual-energy single-phase protocol, we obtained a mean dose reduction of 28% with respect to a single-energy biphasic protocol. The diagnostic accuracy of session 2 was: 100% sensitivity, 100% specificity, 100% negative predictive value, and 100% positive predictive value. Statistically significant differences in the level of confidence for endoleak detection between the two sessions were found by reviewers for scores 3-5. Dual-energy CT with colored iodine overlay is a useful diagnostic tool in endoleak detection. The use of a dual-energy single-phase study protocol will lower radiation exposure to patients.

  19. 3D printing based on cardiac CT assists anatomic visualization prior to transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripley, Beth; Kelil, Tatiana; Cheezum, Michael K; Goncalves, Alexandra; Di Carli, Marcelo F; Rybicki, Frank J; Steigner, Mike; Mitsouras, Dimitrios; Blankstein, Ron

    2016-01-01

    3D printing is a promising technique that may have applications in medicine, and there is expanding interest in the use of patient-specific 3D models to guide surgical interventions. To determine the feasibility of using cardiac CT to print individual models of the aortic root complex for transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) planning as well as to determine the ability to predict paravalvular aortic regurgitation (PAR). This retrospective study included 16 patients (9 with PAR identified on blinded interpretation of post-procedure trans-thoracic echocardiography and 7 age, sex, and valve size-matched controls with no PAR). 3D printed models of the aortic root were created from pre-TAVR cardiac computed tomography data. These models were fitted with printed valves and predictions regarding post-implant PAR were made using a light transmission test. Aortic root 3D models were highly accurate, with excellent agreement between annulus measurements made on 3D models and those made on corresponding 2D data (mean difference of -0.34 mm, 95% limits of agreement: ± 1.3 mm). The 3D printed valve models were within 0.1 mm of their designed dimensions. Examination of the fit of valves within patient-specific aortic root models correctly predicted PAR in 6 of 9 patients (6 true positive, 3 false negative) and absence of PAR in 5 of 7 patients (5 true negative, 2 false positive). Pre-TAVR 3D-printing based on cardiac CT provides a unique patient-specific method to assess the physical interplay of the aortic root and implanted valves. With additional optimization, 3D models may complement traditional techniques used for predicting which patients are more likely to develop PAR. Copyright © 2016 Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Multidetector CT predictors of prosthesis-patient mismatch in transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Melanie; Webb, John G; Willson, Alexander B; Wheeler, Miriam; Blanke, Philipp; Moss, Robert R; Thompson, Christopher R; Munt, Brad; Norgaard, Bjarne L; Yang, Tae-Hyun; Min, James K; Poulsen, Steen; Hansson, Nicolaj C; Binder, Ronald K; Toggweiler, Stefan; Hague, Cameron; Wood, David A; Pibarot, Philippe; Leipsic, Jonathon

    2013-01-01

    Prosthesis-patient mismatch (PPM) is a predictor of mortality after aortic valve replacement (AVR). We examined whether accurate 3-dimensional annular sizing with multidetector CT (MDCT) is predictive of PPM after transcatheter AVR (TAVR). One hundred twenty-eight patients underwent MDCT then TAVR. Moderate PPM was defined as an indexed effective orifice area ≤0.85 cm²/m² and severe ≤0.65 cm²/m². MDCT annular measurements (area, short and long axis) were compared with the size of the selected transcatheter heart valve (THV) to obtain (1) the difference between prosthesis size and CT-measured mean annular diameter and (2) the percentage of undersizing or oversizing (calculated as 100 × [MDCT annular area--THV nominal area]/THV nominal area). In addition, the MDCT annular area was indexed to body surface area. These measures were evaluated as potential PPM predictors. We found that 42.2% of patients had moderate PPM and 9.4% had severe PPM. Procedural characteristics and in-hospital outcomes were similar between patients with or without PPM. THV undersizing of the mean aortic annulus diameter was not predictive of PPM (odds ratio [OR], 0.84; 95% CI, 0.65-1.07; P = .16; area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve [AUC], 0.58). THV undersizing of annular area was not predictive of PPM (OR, 0.96; 95% CI, 0.80-1.16; P = .69; AUC, 0.52). Indexed MDCT annular area was, however, predictive of PPM (OR, 0.24; 95% CI, 0.10-0.59; P < .001; AUC, 0.66). PPM is frequent after TAVR. Appropriate annular oversizing does not reduce the rate or severity of PPM. Patient annulus size mismatch, identified by indexed MDCT annular area, is a significant predictor of PPM. Copyright © 2013 Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The diagnostic role of abdominal CT imaging findings in adults intussusception: Focused on the vascular compromise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sung Bin; Ha, Hyun Kwon; Kim, Ah Young; Lee, Seung Soo; Kim, Hye Jin; Park, Beom Jin; Jin, Yong Hyun; Park, Seong Ho; Kim, Kyoung Won

    2007-01-01

    Intussusception is defined as telescoping of one segment of the gastrointestinal tract into an adjacent one. Unlike that in children, adult intussusception is a relatively rare condition. More than 90% of patients with adult intussusception have been reported to have an organic cause, with benign or malignant tumors for accounting for approximately 65% of the cases. In general, the diagnosis is easily made by means of computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The imaging appearance of a bowel-within-bowel configuration with or without contained fat and mesenteric vessels, is pathognomonic. As the intussusceptum enters into the intussuscipiens, the mesentery is carried forward and trapped between the overlapping layers of bowel. The twisting or severe constriction of the mesenteric vessels may result in vascular compromise with subsequent edematous thickening of the involved bowel. In these circumstances, ischemic necrosis may develop if timely intervention is not undertaken. Therefore, determination of the presence or absence of intestinal necrosis in intussusception is important in patient management. On CT, the presence of well-known diagnostic CT criteria for strangulated obstruction (especially severe engorgement or twisting of the mesenteric vessels) as well as evidence of loss of the layered pattern, accumulation of extraluminal fluid collection, and bowel perforation, may suggest the diagnosis of intestinal necrosis. CT and MR imaging are limited in determining the primary disease causing intussusception. However, CT and MR provide excellent pre-operative evaluation, including the possible extension and/or dissemination of a malignant tumor. CT and MR imaging may also be useful in suggesting the presence of vascular compromise

  2. Partly replacing meat protein with soy protein alters insulin resistance and blood lipids in postmenopausal women with abdominal obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Nielen, Monique; Feskens, Edith J M; Rietman, Annemarie; Siebelink, Els; Mensink, Marco

    2014-09-01

    Increasing protein intake and soy consumption appear to be promising approaches to prevent metabolic syndrome (MetS). However, the effect of soy consumption on insulin resistance, glucose homeostasis, and other characteristics of MetS is not frequently studied in humans. We aimed to investigate the effects of a 4-wk, strictly controlled, weight-maintaining, moderately high-protein diet rich in soy on insulin sensitivity and other cardiometabolic risk factors. We performed a randomized crossover trial of 2 4-wk diet periods in 15 postmenopausal women with abdominal obesity to test diets with 22 energy percent (En%) protein, 27 En% fat, and 50 En% carbohydrate. One diet contained protein of mixed origin (mainly meat, dairy, and bread), and the other diet partly replaced meat with soy meat analogues and soy nuts containing 30 g/d soy protein. For our primary outcome, a frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test (FSIGT) was performed at the end of both periods. Plasma total, LDL, and HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, glucose, insulin, and C-reactive protein were assessed, and blood pressure, arterial stiffness, and intrahepatic lipid content were measured at the start and end of both periods. Compared with the mixed-protein diet, the soy-protein diet resulted in greater insulin sensitivity [FSIGT: insulin sensitivity, 34 ± 29 vs. 22 ± 17 (mU/L)(-1) · min(-1), P = 0.048; disposition index, 4974 ± 2543 vs. 2899 ± 1878, P = 0.038; n = 11]. Total cholesterol was 4% lower after the soy-protein diet than after the mixed-protein diet (4.9 ± 0.7 vs. 5.1 ± 0.6 mmol/L, P = 0.001), and LDL cholesterol was 9% lower (2.9 ± 0.7 vs. 3.2 ± 0.6 mmol/L, P = 0.004; n = 15). Thus, partly replacing meat with soy in a moderately high-protein diet has clear advantages regarding insulin sensitivity and total and LDL cholesterol. Therefore, partly replacing meat products with soy products could be important in preventing MetS. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials

  3. Balancing Radiation and Contrast Media Dose in Single-Pass Abdominal Multidetector CT: Prospective Evaluation of Image Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camera, Luigi; Romano, Federica; Liccardo, Immacolata; Liuzzi, Raffaele; Imbriaco, Massimo; Mainenti, Pier Paolo; Pizzuti, Laura Micol; Segreto, Sabrina; Maurea, Simone; Brunetti, Arturo

    2015-11-01

    As both contrast and radiation dose affect the quality of CT images, a constant image quality in abdominal contrast-enhanced multidetector computed tomography (CE-MDCT) could be obtained balancing radiation and contrast media dose according to the age of the patients. Seventy-two (38 Men; 34 women; aged 20-83 years) patients underwent a single-pass abdominal CE-MDCT. Patients were divided into three different age groups: A (20-44 years); B (45-65 years); and C (>65 years). For each group, a different noise index (NI) and contrast media dose (370 mgI/mL) was selected as follows: A (NI, 15; 2.5 mL/kg), B (NI, 12.5; 2 mL/kg), and C (NI, 10; 1.5 mL/kg). Radiation exposure was reported as dose-length product (DLP) in mGy × cm. For quantitative analysis, signal-to-noise (SNR) and contrast-to-noise (CNR) ratios were calculated for both the liver (L) and the abdominal aorta (A). Statistical analysis was performed with a one-way analysis of variance. Standard imaging criteria were used for qualitative analysis. Although peak hepatic enhancement was 152 ± 16, 128 ± 12, and 101 ± 14 Hounsfield units (P contrast media dose (mL) administered were 476 ± 147 and 155 ± 27 for group A, 926 ± 291 and 130 ± 16 for group B, and 1981 ± 451 and 106 ± 15 for group C, respectively (P contrast media dose administered to patients of different age. Copyright © 2015 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Automatic spectral imaging protocol selection and iterative reconstruction in abdominal CT with reduced contrast agent dose: initial experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lv, Peijie; Liu, Jie; Chai, Yaru; Yan, Xiaopeng; Gao, Jianbo; Dong, Junqiang [The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Department of Radiology, Zhengzhou, Henan Province (China)

    2017-01-15

    To evaluate the feasibility, image quality, and radiation dose of automatic spectral imaging protocol selection (ASIS) and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) with reduced contrast agent dose in abdominal multiphase CT. One hundred and sixty patients were randomly divided into two scan protocols (n = 80) each; protocol A, 120 kVp/450 mgI/kg, filtered back projection algorithm (FBP); protocol B, spectral CT imaging with ASIS and 40 to 70 keV monochromatic images generated per 300 mgI/kg, ASIR algorithm. Quantitative parameters (image noise and contrast-to-noise ratios [CNRs]) and qualitative visual parameters (image noise, small structures, organ enhancement, and overall image quality) were compared. Monochromatic images at 50 keV and 60 keV provided similar or lower image noise, but higher contrast and overall image quality as compared with 120-kVp images. Despite the higher image noise, 40-keV images showed similar overall image quality compared to 120-kVp images. Radiation dose did not differ between the two protocols, while contrast agent dose in protocol B was reduced by 33 %. Application of ASIR and ASIS to monochromatic imaging from 40 to 60 keV allowed contrast agent dose reduction with adequate image quality and without increasing radiation dose compared to 120 kVp with FBP. (orig.)

  5. Longitudinal tube modulation for chest and abdominal CT examinations: impact on effective patient doses calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanca, F.; Michielsen, K.; Depuydt, M.; Jacobs, J.; Nens, J.; Lemmens, K.; Oyen, R.; Bosmans, H.

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: In multi-slice CT, manufacturers have implemented automatic tube current modulation (TCM) algorithms. These adjust tube current in the x-y plane (angular modulation) and/or along the z-axis (z-axis modulation) according to the size and attenuation of the scanned body part. Current methods for estimating effective dose (ED) values in CT do not account for such new developments. This study investigated the need to take TCM into account when calculating ED values, using clinical data. Methods: The effect of TCM algorithms as implemented on a GE BrightSpeed 16, a Philips Brilliance 64 and a Siemens Sensation 64 CT scanners was investigated. Here, only z-axis modulation was addressed, considering thorax and abdomen CT examinations collected from 534 adult patients. Commercially available CT dosimetry software (CT expo v.1.7) was used to compute EDTCM (ED accounting for TCM) as the sum of ED of successive slices. A two-step approach was chosen: first we estimated the relative contribution of each slice assuming a constant tube current. Next a weighted average was taken based upon the slice specific tube current value. EDTCM was than compared to patient ED estimated using average mA of all slices. Results and Conclusions: The proposed method is relatively simple and uses as input: the parameters of each protocol, a fitted polynomial function of weighting factors for each slice along the scan length and mA values of the individual patient examination. Results show that z-axis modulation does not have a strong impact on ED for the Siemens and the GE scanner (difference ranges from -4.1 to 3.3 percent); for the Philips scanner the effect was more important, (difference ranges from -8.5 to 6.9 percent), but still all median values approached zero (except for one case, where the median reached -5.6%), suggesting that ED calculation using average mA is in general a good approximation for EDTCM. Higher difference values for the Philips scanner are due to a stronger

  6. SU-E-I-23: A General KV Constrained Optimization of CNR for CT Abdominal Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weir, V; Zhang, J [University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: While Tube current modulation has been well accepted for CT dose reduction, kV adjusting in clinical settings is still at its early stage. This is mainly due to the limited kV options of most current CT scanners. kV adjusting can potentially reduce radiation dose and optimize image quality. This study is to optimize CT abdomen imaging acquisition based on the assumption of a continuous kV, with the goal to provide the best contrast to noise ratio (CNR). Methods: For a given dose (CTDIvol) level, the CNRs at different kV and pitches were measured with an ACR GAMMEX phantom. The phantom was scanned in a Siemens Sensation 64 scanner and a GE VCT 64 scanner. A constrained mathematical optimization was used to find the kV which led to the highest CNR for the anatomy and pitch setting. Parametric equations were obtained from polynomial fitting of plots of kVs vs CNRs. A suitable constraint region for optimization was chosen. Subsequent optimization yielded a peak CNR at a particular kV for different collimations and pitch setting. Results: The constrained mathematical optimization approach yields kV of 114.83 and 113.46, with CNRs of 1.27 and 1.11 at the pitch of 1.2 and 1.4, respectively, for the Siemens Sensation 64 scanner with the collimation of 32 x 0.625mm. An optimized kV of 134.25 and 1.51 CNR is obtained for a GE VCT 64 slice scanner with a collimation of 32 x 0.625mm and a pitch of 0.969. At 0.516 pitch and 32 x 0.625 mm an optimized kV of 133.75 and a CNR of 1.14 was found for the GE VCT 64 slice scanner. Conclusion: CNR in CT image acquisition can be further optimized with a continuous kV option instead of current discrete or fixed kV settings. A continuous kV option is a key for individualized CT protocols.

  7. [Indications for low-dose CT in the emergency setting].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre; Andereggen, Elisabeth; Rutschmann, Olivier; de Perrot, Thomas; Caviezel, Alessandro; Platon, Alexandra

    2009-08-19

    CT delivers a large dose of radiation, especially in abdominal imaging. Recently, a low-dose abdominal CT protocol (low-dose CT) has been set-up in our institution. "Low-dose CT" is almost equivalent to a single standard abdominal radiograph in term of dose of radiation (about one sixth of those delivered by a standard CT). "Low-dose CT" is now used routinely in our emergency service in two main indications: patients with a suspicion of renal colic and those with right lower quadrant pain. It is obtained without intravenous contrast media. Oral contrast is given to patients with suspicion of appendicitis. "Low-dose CT" is used in the frame of well defined clinical algorithms, and does only replace standard CT when it can reach a comparable diagnostic quality.

  8. Detection of necrosis of the gastric fundus after blunt abdominal trauma by PET-CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofer, A; Kratochwill, H; Pentsch, A; Gabriel, M

    2015-02-01

    Positron emission tomography with [(18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucose provides functional and anatomic information by visualising the uptake of radiolabelled glucose in tumour and inflammatory cells. We report delayed diagnosis of necrosis of the gastric fundus after blunt abdominal trauma in a 73-year-old man. After a car accident with head-on collision, the patient was stabilised in our emergency room. His femur was treated by internal fixation, his ellbow was stabilised by a fixateur externe. During surgery his status deteriorated. The patient was in need of high dosage of inotrops during the following days. He had a biventricular pacemaker implanted because of ischemic myocardiopathy, and he suffered from renal insufficiency. Over the next days, his haemodynamics improved. A central venous line had to be removed because of ensuing septic fever. The patient complained of upper abdominal pain and nausea. A sonography and computer tomography without contrast medium were performed with negative result. Because of contamination of the central venous line with Staphylococcus epidermidis the pacemaker was evaluated for infection by transoesophageal echocardiography, again without any findings. Because of ongoing fever and positive inflammatory markers a positron emission tomography was indicated, as a contrast examination and a magnetic resonance examination were not feasible because of the renal insufficiency and the pacemaker, respectively. Prophylactic removal of the pacemaker would have been a substantial risk for the patient due to his underlying myocardiopathy. Positron emission tomography showed an increased tracer uptake in the gastric fundus, which turned out to be necrotic by endoscopy. A laparoscopic resection followed, and drainage of an abscess, which had evolved subsequently between stomach and spleen stopped the inflammatory process. This case report demonstrates that positron emission tomography may be an alternative to computer tomography with contrast medium

  9. Comparison between two positive and one negative oral contrast medium for abdominal CT diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zwaan, M.; Gmelin, E.

    1989-01-01

    In a prospective randomised study three groups of 30 patients each were subjected to CT of the entire abdomen. The oral intestinal contrast media used were iodine solution (2%), barium suspension (1.5%) and paraffin emulsion (25%). The results were evaluated according to imaging, artifacts, assessability of the intestinal wall, taste and side effects. All three contrast media are suitable for marking the gastrointestinal tract; paraffin shows advantages in the upper part of the tract and is the only medium that enables assessment of the wall, while causing the lowest rate of artifacts. Barium has a high acceptance and the best tolerance of all contrast agents. (orig.) [de

  10. Estimation of patient dose in abdominal CT examination in some Sudanese hospitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, Ebthal Adam Shikhalden

    2016-04-01

    The use of CT in medical diagnosis delivers radiation doses to patients that are higher than those from other radiological procedures. The aim of this study was to estimate radiation doses in abdomen CT examinations of patients in two Sudanese hospitals. Details were obtained from approximately 80 CT examinations and included all age groups ( adults and pediatric). The results from the two hospitals were compared with each other as well as with the IAEA guidance level for this particular investigation. The estimation of radiation doses were carried out by calculating volume dose index (CTD1vol), dose length product (DLP), doses to some organs of interest and effective dose (E) using the software program C T EXPO V2.1 . The study showed that the mean DLP of the one hospitals ASH is 1736.7 mGy.cm which is by far much higher than that for the other hospital NMDC which stands at 185.3 mGy.cm, as well as higher than the IAEA level which is 696 mGy.cm. The study showed that the mean CTD1vol for patients in ASH is 36.2 mGy which again higher than that for the other hospital which is 3.9 mGy and higher than the IAEA level which is 10.9 mGy calculating the effective dose for patients in the two hospitals reveals that the mean effective dose of patient in one hospital (ASH) is 26.25 mSv, which is quite high compared with other hospital (NMDC), which has the mean value of 2.8 mGv and also higher than the IAEA level from this investigation which is 7.6 mSv. Regarding organ doses, the study showed that organ doses in hospital ASH are always higher than that calculated in hospital NMDC and the highest doses in both hospital were delivered to the kidneys with mean values of 50.24 mGy and 5045 mGy for the two hospitals respectively. The study showed that there is an urgent need for optimizing patient doses in such CT examinations. This can be ensured by providing training and retraining for workers and conducting quality control measurements and preventive maintenance regularly so

  11. Whole body imaging in the abdominal cancer patient: pitfalls of PET-CT.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McDermott, Shaunagh

    2012-02-01

    Proper interpretation of PET-CT images requires knowledge of the normal physiological distribution of the tracer, frequently encountered physiological variants, and benign pathological causes of FDG uptake that can be confused with a malignant neoplasm. In addition, not all malignant processes are associated with avid tracer uptake. A basic knowledge of the technique of image acquisition is also required to avoid pitfalls such as misregistration of anatomical and scintigraphic data. This article reviews these potential pitfalls as they apply to the abdomen and pelvis of patients with cancer.

  12. SU-F-18C-12: On the Relationship of the Weighted Dose to the Surface Dose In Abdominal CT - Patient Size Dependency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Y; Scott, A; Allahverdian, J [Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: It is possible to measure the patient surface dose non-invasively using radiolucent dosimeters. However, the patient size specific weighted dose remains unknown. We attempted to study the weighted dose to surface dose relationship as the patient size varies in abdominal CT. Methods: Seven abdomen phantoms (CIRS TE series) simulating patients from an infant to a large adult were used. Size specific doses were measured with a 100 mm CT chamber under axial scans using a Siemens Sensation 64 (mCT) and a GE 750 HD. The scanner settings were 120 kVp, 200 mAs with fully opened collimations. Additional kVps (80, 100, 140) were added depending on the phantom sizes. The ratios (r) of the weighted CT dose (Dw) to the surface dose (Ds) were related to the phantom size (L) defined as the diameter resulting the equivalent cross-sectional area. Results: The Dw versus Ds ratio (r) was fitted to a linear relationship: r = 1.083 − 0.007L (R square = 0.995), and r = 1.064 − 0.007L (R square = 0.953), for Siemens Sensation 64 and GE 750 HD, respectively. The relationship appears to be independent of the scanner specifics. Conclusion: The surface dose to the weighted dose ratio decreases linearly as the patient size increases. The result is independent of the scanner specifics. The result can be used to obtain in vivo CT dosimetry in abdominal CT.

  13. Improved image quality in abdominal CT in patients who underwent treatment for hepatocellular carcinoma with small metal implants using a raw data-based metal artifact reduction algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sofue, Keitaro; Sugimura, Kazuro [Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Ohno, Yoshiharu [Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Advanced Biomedical Imaging Research Center, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Division of Functional and Diagnostic Imaging Research, Department of Radiology, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Negi, Noriyuki [Kobe University Hospital, Division of Radiology, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Inokawa, Hiroyasu; Sugihara, Naoki [Toshiba Medical Systems Corporation, Otawara, Tochigi (Japan)

    2017-07-15

    To determine the value of a raw data-based metal artifact reduction (SEMAR) algorithm for image quality improvement in abdominal CT for patients with small metal implants. Fifty-eight patients with small metal implants (3-15 mm in size) who underwent treatment for hepatocellular carcinoma were imaged with CT. CT data were reconstructed by filtered back projection with and without SEMAR algorithm in axial and coronal planes. To evaluate metal artefact reduction, mean CT number (HU and SD) and artefact index (AI) values within the liver were calculated. Two readers independently evaluated image quality of the liver and pancreas and visualization of vasculature using a 5-point visual score. HU and AI values and image quality on images with and without SEMAR were compared using the paired Student's t-test and Wilcoxon signed rank test. Interobserver agreement was evaluated using linear-weighted κ test. Mean HU and AI on images with SEMAR was significantly lower than those without SEMAR (P < 0.0001). Liver and pancreas image qualities and visualizations of vasculature were significantly improved on CT with SEMAR (P < 0.0001) with substantial or almost perfect agreement (0.62 ≤ κ ≤ 0.83). SEMAR can improve image quality in abdominal CT in patients with small metal implants by reducing metallic artefacts. (orig.)

  14. Diagnostic value of CT compared to ultrasound in the evaluation of acute abdominal pain in children younger than 10 years old.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simanovsky, Natalia; Dola, Tamar; Hiller, Nurith

    2016-02-01

    To assess the diagnostic value of ultrasound compared to CT in evaluating acute abdominal pain of different causes in children 10 years of age and under, hospital records and imaging files of 4052 patients under age of 10 who had imaging for abdominal pain were reviewed. One-hundred-thirty-two patients (3 %), (74 males/58 females) who underwent ultrasound and CT within 24 h were divided by age: group I, ages 0-48 months (25 patients); group II, 49-84 months (53 patients); and group III, 85-120 months (54 patients). Diagnoses at ultrasound, CT, and discharge were compared. Cases of a change in diagnosis following CT and impact of the changed diagnosis on patient management were assessed. Non-diagnostic ultrasound or a diagnostic conundrum was present in a small percentage (3 %) of our patients. In the group of patients imaged with two modalities, CT changed the diagnosis in 73/132 patients (55.3 %). Patient management changed in 63/132 patients (47.7 %). CT changed the diagnosis in 46/64 patients with surgical conditions (71.8 %, p diagnostic or equivocal US in a small percentage of patients is probably sufficient to justify the additional radiation burden.

  15. Coronal reconstruction of unenhanced abdominal CT for correct ureteral stone size classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berkovitz, Nadav; Simanovsky, Natalia; Hiller, Nurith; Katz, Ran; Salama, Shaden

    2010-01-01

    To determine whether size measurement of a urinary calculus in coronal reconstruction of computed tomography (CT) differs from stone size measured in the axial plane, and whether the difference alters clinical decision making. We retrospectively reviewed unenhanced CT examinations of 150 patients admitted to the emergency room (ER) with acute renal colic. Maximal ureteral calculus size was measured on axial slices and coronal reconstructions. Clinical significance was defined as an upgrading or downgrading of stone size according to accepted thresholds of treatment: ≤5 mm, 6-9 mm and ≥10 mm. There were 151 stones in 150 patients (male:female 115:34, mean age 41 years). Transverse stone diameters ranged from 1 to 11 mm (mean 4 mm). On coronal images, 56 (37%) stones were upgraded in severity; 46 (30%) from below 5 mm to 6 mm or more, and ten (7%) from 6-9 mm to 10 mm or more. Transverse measurement on the axial slices enabled correct categorization of 95 stones (63%). Transverse calculus measurement on axial slices often underestimates stone size and provides incorrect clinical classification of the true maximal stone diameter. Coronal reconstruction provides additional information in patients with renal colic that may alter treatment strategy. (orig.)

  16. Coronal reconstruction of unenhanced abdominal CT for correct ureteral stone size classification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berkovitz, Nadav; Simanovsky, Natalia; Hiller, Nurith [Hadassah Mount Scopus - Hebrew University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Jerusalem (Israel); Katz, Ran [Hadassah Mount Scopus - Hebrew University Medical Center, Department of Urology, Jerusalem (Israel); Salama, Shaden [Hadassah Mount Scopus - Hebrew University Medical Center, Department of Emergency Medicine, Jerusalem (Israel)

    2010-05-15

    To determine whether size measurement of a urinary calculus in coronal reconstruction of computed tomography (CT) differs from stone size measured in the axial plane, and whether the difference alters clinical decision making. We retrospectively reviewed unenhanced CT examinations of 150 patients admitted to the emergency room (ER) with acute renal colic. Maximal ureteral calculus size was measured on axial slices and coronal reconstructions. Clinical significance was defined as an upgrading or downgrading of stone size according to accepted thresholds of treatment: {<=}5 mm, 6-9 mm and {>=}10 mm. There were 151 stones in 150 patients (male:female 115:34, mean age 41 years). Transverse stone diameters ranged from 1 to 11 mm (mean 4 mm). On coronal images, 56 (37%) stones were upgraded in severity; 46 (30%) from below 5 mm to 6 mm or more, and ten (7%) from 6-9 mm to 10 mm or more. Transverse measurement on the axial slices enabled correct categorization of 95 stones (63%). Transverse calculus measurement on axial slices often underestimates stone size and provides incorrect clinical classification of the true maximal stone diameter. Coronal reconstruction provides additional information in patients with renal colic that may alter treatment strategy. (orig.)

  17. Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Radhakrishnan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The fishmeal replaced with Spirulina platensis, Chlorella vulgaris and Azolla pinnata and the formulated diet fed to Macrobrachium rosenbergii postlarvae to assess the enhancement ability of non-enzymatic antioxidants (vitamin C and E, enzymatic antioxidants (superoxide dismutase (SOD and catalase (CAT and lipid peroxidation (LPx were analysed. In the present study, the S. platensis, C. vulgaris and A. pinnata inclusion diet fed groups had significant (P < 0.05 improvement in the levels of vitamins C and E in the hepatopancreas and muscle tissue. Among all the diets, the replacement materials in 50% incorporated feed fed groups showed better performance when compared with the control group in non-enzymatic antioxidant activity. The 50% fishmeal replacement (best performance diet fed groups taken for enzymatic antioxidant study, in SOD, CAT and LPx showed no significant increases when compared with the control group. Hence, the present results revealed that the formulated feed enhanced the vitamins C and E, the result of decreased level of enzymatic antioxidants (SOD, CAT and LPx revealed that these feeds are non-toxic and do not produce any stress to postlarvae. These ingredients can be used as an alternative protein source for sustainable Macrobrachium culture.

  18. Radiologist-initiated double reading of abdominal CT: retrospective analysis of the clinical importance of changes to radiology reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauritzen, Peter Mæhre; Andersen, Jack Gunnar; Stokke, Mali Victoria; Tennstrand, Anne Lise; Aamodt, Rolf; Heggelund, Thomas; Dahl, Fredrik A; Sandbæk, Gunnar; Hurlen, Petter; Gulbrandsen, Pål

    2016-08-01

    Misinterpretation of radiological examinations is an important contributing factor to diagnostic errors. Consultant radiologists in Norwegian hospitals frequently request second reads by colleagues in real time. Our objective was to estimate the frequency of clinically important changes to radiology reports produced by these prospectively obtained double readings. We retrospectively compared the preliminary and final reports from 1071 consecutive double-read abdominal CT examinations of surgical patients at five public hospitals in Norway. Experienced gastrointestinal surgeons rated the clinical importance of changes from the preliminary to final report. The severity of the radiological findings in clinically important changes was classified as increased, unchanged or decreased. Changes were classified as clinically important in 146 of 1071 reports (14%). Changes to 3 reports (0.3%) were critical (demanding immediate action), 35 (3%) were major (implying a change in treatment) and 108 (10%) were intermediate (requiring further investigations). The severity of the radiological findings was increased in 118 (81%) of the clinically important changes. Important changes were made less frequently when abdominal radiologists were first readers, more frequently when they were second readers, and more frequently to urgent examinations. A 14% rate of clinically important changes made during double reading may justify quality assurance of radiological interpretation. Using expert second readers and a targeted selection of urgent cases and radiologists reading outside their specialty may increase the yield of discrepant cases. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  19. Oral contrast for CT in patients with acute non-traumatic abdominal and pelvic pain: what should be its current role?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kielar, Ania Z; Patlas, Michael N; Katz, Douglas S

    2016-10-01

    Positive oral contrast agents, including barium suspensions and water-soluble iodinated solutions, have traditionally been used in conjunction with the CT evaluation of patients with abdominal and pelvic pain. Due to continued advancements in CT technology, and due to increasing obesity and correspondingly a general increase in the intra-abdominal and intra-pelvic fat separating bowel loops in North American patients and in patients in other parts of the world over the past few decades, the ability of radiologists to accurately evaluate the cause of acute symptoms has substantially improved. Recent research and evolving imaging society guidelines/systematic reviews increasingly support performing CT scans of the abdomen and pelvis without the need for positive oral contrast in these types of adult patient populations, in most clinical situations. Increased patient throughput, patient preference, patient safety, and most importantly, retention of high diagnostic accuracy, are reasons for this recent change in practice to routinely omit the use of enteric contrast agents for the majority of patients presenting with acute abdominal and pelvic pain whom are undergoing emergency CT.

  20. Selective nonoperative management in 1106 patients with abdominal gunshot wounds: conclusions on safety, efficacy, and the role of selective CT imaging in a prospective single-center study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navsaria, Pradeep H; Nicol, Andrew J; Edu, Sorin; Gandhi, Rajiv; Ball, Chad G

    2015-04-01

    The primary aim of this study was to delineate the role of computed tomography (CT) in patients undergoing NOM for AGSW. Nonoperative management (NOM) of abdominal gunshot wounds (AGSWs) remains controversial. This prospective study included all patients with abdominal gunshot injuries admitted to our trauma center from April 1, 2004 to September 30, 2009. Exclusion criteria included patients with peritonitis, hemodynamic instability, unreliable physical examination, head and spinal cord injury with an AGSW underwent immediate laparotomy. The remaining patients were selected for NOM. Nonperitonitic stable patients with right-sided thoracoabdominal/right upper quadrant gunshots and/or hematuria underwent mandatory CT with intravenous contrast. CT to detect missile trajectory was optional. The primary outcome measure was failure of NOM. Secondary outcomes were unnecessary laparotomy rates and mortality. A total of 1106 patients with abdominal gunshot injuries were admitted. Of these, 834 (75.4%) underwent immediate laparotomy, whereas 272 (24.6%) were selected for NOM. In the former group, there were 56 (6.7%) deaths and 29 (3.5%) unnecessary laparotomies, whereas in the latter NOM group, 82 (30.1%) patients were managed by serial clinical examination alone, whereas 190 (69.9%) patients underwent abdominal CT scanning, in addition to serial clinical examination. The overall NOM success rate was 95.2%. Of the 13 patients undergoing delayed laparotomy, there were 10 therapeutic, 2 nontherapeutic, and 1 negative laparotomy. The NOM of appropriately selected patients with AGSW with selective use of CT scanning is feasible, safe, and effective, but largely based on findings from serial clinical examinations.

  1. Value of a step-up diagnosis plan: CRP and CT-scan to diagnose and manage postoperative complications after major abdominal surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Straatman

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Postoperative complications frequently follow major abdominal surgery and are associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Early diagnosis and treatment of complications is associated with improved patient outcome. In this study we assessed the value of a step-up diagnosis plan by C-reactive protein and CT-scan (computed tomography-scan imaging for detection of postoperative complications following major abdominal surgery. An observational cohort study was conducted of 399 consecutive patients undergoing major abdominal surgery between January 2009 and January 2011. Indication for operation, type of surgery, postoperative morbidity, complications according to the Clavien-Dindo classification and mortality were recorded. Clinical parameters were recorded until 14 days postoperatively or until discharge. Regular C-reactive protein (CPR measurements in peripheral blood and on indication -enhanced CT-scans were performed. Eighty-three out of 399 (20.6 % patients developed a major complication in the postoperative course after a median of seven days (IQR 4-9 days. One hundred and thirty two patients received additional examination consisting of enhanced CT-scan imaging, and treatment by surgical reintervention or intensive care observation. CRP levels were significantly higher in patients with postoperative complications. On the second postoperative day CRP levels were on average 197.4 mg/L in the uncomplicated group, 220.9 mg/L in patients with a minor complication and 280.1 mg/L in patients with major complications (p < 0,001. CT-scan imaging showed a sensitivity of 91.7 % and specificity of 100 % in diagnosis of major complications. Based on clinical deterioration and the increase of CRP, an additional enhanced CT-scan offered clear discrimination between patients with major abdominal complications and uncomplicated patients. Adequate treatment could then be accomplished.

  2. Improved image quality in abdominal CT in patients who underwent treatment for hepatocellular carcinoma with small metal implants using a raw data-based metal artifact reduction algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofue, Keitaro; Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Ohno, Yoshiharu; Negi, Noriyuki; Inokawa, Hiroyasu; Sugihara, Naoki; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2017-07-01

    To determine the value of a raw data-based metal artifact reduction (SEMAR) algorithm for image quality improvement in abdominal CT for patients with small metal implants. Fifty-eight patients with small metal implants (3-15 mm in size) who underwent treatment for hepatocellular carcinoma were imaged with CT. CT data were reconstructed by filtered back projection with and without SEMAR algorithm in axial and coronal planes. To evaluate metal artefact reduction, mean CT number (HU and SD) and artefact index (AI) values within the liver were calculated. Two readers independently evaluated image quality of the liver and pancreas and visualization of vasculature using a 5-point visual score. HU and AI values and image quality on images with and without SEMAR were compared using the paired Student's t-test and Wilcoxon signed rank test. Interobserver agreement was evaluated using linear-weighted κ test. Mean HU and AI on images with SEMAR was significantly lower than those without SEMAR (P small metal implants by reducing metallic artefacts. • SEMAR algorithm significantly reduces metallic artefacts from small implants in abdominal CT. • SEMAR can improve image quality of the liver in dynamic CECT. • Confidence visualization of hepatic vascular anatomies can also be improved by SEMAR.

  3. An Incidentally Found Inflamed Uterine Myoma Causing Low Abdominal Pain, Using Tc-99m-Tektrotyd Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography-CT Hybrid Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Zandieh, Shahin; Sch?tz, Matthias; Bernt, Reinhard; Zwerina, Jochen; Haller, Joerg

    2013-01-01

    We report the case of a 50-year-old woman presented with a history of right hemicolectomy due to an ileocecal neuroendocrine tumor and left breast metastasis. Owing to a slightly elevated chromogranin A-level and lower abdominal pain, single photon emission computed tomography-computer tomography (SPECT-CT) was performed. There were no signs of recurrence on the SPECT-CT scan, but the patient was incidentally found to have an inflamed intramural myoma. We believe that the slightly elevated ch...

  4. Non-contrast 3D black blood MRI for abdominal aortic aneurysm surveillance: comparison with CT angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Chengcheng; Leach, Joseph R.; Hope, Michael D. [University of California San Francisco, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States); Tian, Bing; Liu, Qi; Lu, Jianping; Chen, Luguang [Changhai Hospital, Department of Radiology, Shanghai (China); Saloner, David [University of California San Francisco, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States); Radiology Service, VA Medical Center, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2017-05-15

    Management of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) is based on diameter. CT angiography (CTA) is commonly used, but requires radiation and iodinated contrast. Non-contrast MRI is an appealing alternative that may allow better characterization of intraluminal thrombus (ILT). This study aims to 1) validate non-contrast MRI for measuring AAA diameter, and 2) to assess ILT with CTA and MRI. 28 patients with AAAs (diameter 50.7 ± 12.3 mm) underwent CTA and non-contrast MRI. MRI was acquired at 3 T using 1) a conventional 3D gradient echo (GRE) sequence and 2) a 3D T{sub 1}-weighted black blood fast-spin-echo sequence. Two radiologists independently measured the AAA diameter. The ratio of signal of ILT and adjacent psoas muscle (ILT{sub r} = signal{sub ILT}/signal{sub Muscle}) was quantified. Strong agreement between CTA and non-contrast MRI was shown for AAA diameter (intra-class coefficient > 0.99). Both approaches had excellent inter-observer reproducibility (ICC > 0.99). ILT appeared homogenous on CTA, whereas MRI revealed compositional variations. Patients with AAAs ≥5.5 cm and <5.5 cm had a variety of distributions of old/fresh ILT types. Non-contrast 3D black blood MRI provides accurate and reproducible AAA diameter measurements as validated by CTA. It also provides unique information about ILT composition, which may be linked with elevated risk for disease progression. (orig.)

  5. Value of a probabilistic atlas in medical image segmentation regarding non-rigid registration of abdominal CT scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyunjin; Meyer, Charles R.

    2012-10-01

    A probabilistic atlas provides important information to help segmentation and registration applications in medical image analysis. We construct a probabilistic atlas by picking a target geometry and mapping other training scans onto that target and then summing the results into one probabilistic atlas. By choosing an atlas space close to the desired target, we construct an atlas that represents the population well. Image registration used to map one image geometry onto another is a primary task in atlas building. One of the main parameters of registration is the choice of degrees of freedom (DOFs) of the geometric transform. Herein, we measure the effect of the registration's DOFs on the segmentation performance of the resulting probabilistic atlas. Twenty-three normal abdominal CT scans were used, and four organs (liver, spinal cord, left and right kidneys) were segmented for each scan. A well-known manifold learning method, ISOMAP, was used to find the best target space to build an atlas. In summary, segmentation performance was high for high DOF registrations regardless of the chosen target space, while segmentation performance was lowered for low DOF registrations if a target space was far from the best target space. At the 0.05 level of statistical significance, there were no significant differences at high DOF registrations while there were significant differences at low DOF registrations when choosing different targets.

  6. Can Surgeons Assess CT Suitability for Endovascular Repair (EVAR) in Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm? Implications for a Ruptured EVAR Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rayt, Harjeet; Lambert, Kelly; Bown, Matthew; Fishwick, Guy; Morgan, Robert; McCarthy, Mark; London, Nick; Sayers, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether surgeons without formal radiological training are able to assess suitability of patients with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) for EVAR. The CT scans of 20 patients with AAA were reviewed under timed conditions by six vascular surgeons. Twenty minutes was allocated per scan. They were asked to determine if each aneurysm would be treatable by EVAR in the emergency setting and, if so, to measure for device selection. The results were then compared with those of a vascular radiologist. Six surgeons agreed on the suitability of endovascular repair in 45% of cases (95% CI, 23.1-68.5%; 9/20 scans; κ = 0.41 [p = 0.01]) and concurred with the radiologist in eight of these. Individually, agreement ranged from 13 to 16 of the 20 scans, 65-80% between surgeons. The kappa value for agreement between all the surgeons and the radiologist was 0.47 (p = 0.01, moderate agreement). For the individual surgeons, this ranged from 0.3 to 0.6 (p = 0.01). In conclusion, while overall agreement was moderate between the surgeons and the radiologist, it is clear that if surgeons are to assess patients for ruptured EVAR in the future, focused training of surgical trainees is required.

  7. Acute renal failure and renal replacement therapy in the postoperative period of orthotopic liver transplant patients versus nonelective abdominal surgery patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biagioni, E; Cavazzuti, I; Busani, S; Trevisan, D; Zavatti, L; Ferrari, E; Girardis, M; Massimo, G

    2011-05-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) often complicates the postoperative period of patients undergoing orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT); it is habitually associated with high mortality rates. Similarly, patients undergoing major nonelective abdominal surgery are prone to ARF because of their frequent preexistent morbidities, abdominal sepsis, and needed for extended surgical procedures. The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of ARF and use of renal replacement therapy (RRT) among OLT versus nonelective abdominal surgery patients and associations with clinical outcomes. We studied all the patients admitted to a surgical intensive care unit (ICU) from January 2008 to December 2009 after OLT or nonelective abdominal surgery. The inclusion criteria were an ICU stay of at least 48 hours and without prior end-stage renal failure. OLT patients (n=84) were younger and less severly ill than surgery patients (n=60). ARF occurrence was lower among the OLT (29%) than the surgery group (47%) requiring RRT in 71% and 53% of patients due to ARF, respectively. The ICU mortality of ARF patients in both groups (29% OLT and 51% surgery) were greater than among subjects without ARF (2% and 6%). The occurrence of ARF is common among these two patient groups, and associated with increased risk of death among in surgery (+45%) versus in OLT (+27%) patients. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. SU-F-207-14: Low Contrast Detectability (LCD) at Different Diagnostic Reference Levels for Adult Abdominal CT Procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahmood, U; Erdi, Y [Mem Sloan-Kettering Cancer Ctr, New York, NY (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose Using diagnostic reference levels (DRL) to optimize CT protocols has potential to reduce radiation dose and meet regulatory requirements. However, DRL’s tend to be misconstrued as dose limits, are typically designed for specific patient populations, and are assumed to have acceptable image quality (AIQ) associated with them. To determine the image quality that is associated with established DRL’s for adult abdominal CT studies, a LCD phantom study was employed. Methods: A CT phantom (CIRS) containing three columns of 7 spherical targets, ranging from 10mm to 2.4 mm, that are 5, 10, and 20 HU below the background (HUBB) matrix was scanned with a GE HD750 64 slice scanner. The phantom was scanned at the NEXT 2006 25th CTDIvol of 12 mGy, the NCRP 172 achievable dose (AD) CTDIvol of 17 mGy and 75th CTDIvol of 25 mGy and at the ACR recommended CTDIvol of 25 mGy. It was also scanned at a CTDIvol 20% greater than the AD at 20 mGy and the ACR maximum threshold of 30 mGy. Results: At the NEXT 2006 25th percentile CTDIvol of 12 mGy, a 6.3 mm low contrast lesion was detectable in the 20 HUBB; 6.3 mm in the 10 HUBB and 10 mm in the 5 HUBB column. Increasing the CTDIvol to the NCRP 172 AD of 17 mGy, an additional 4.8 mm lesion was visualized in the 20 HUBB column. At 20 mGy, an additional 4.8 mm lesion was detectable in the 10 HUBB column. No further lesions were visible between 20 and 30 mGy. However, conspicuity of all lesions increased with each additional step up in CTDI. Conclusion: Optimizing radiation dose to achieve AIQ is a critical aspect of any dose optimization committee. Hence, judicious monitoring of radiation exposure to patients has to be balanced with diagnostic image quality.

  9. Upper abdominal gadoxetic acid-enhanced and diffusion-weighted MRI for the detection of gastric cancer: Comparison with two-dimensional multidetector row CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, K.M.; Kim, S.H.; Lee, S.J.; Lee, M.W.; Choi, D.; Kim, K.M.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the diagnostic performance of abdominal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the detection of gastric cancer in comparison with that of two-dimensional (2D) multidetector row computed tomography (CT). Materials and methods: The study included 189 patients with 170 surgically confirmed gastric cancers and 19 patients without gastric cancer, all of whom underwent gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI with diffusion-weighted (DW) imaging, and multidetector contrast-enhanced abdominal CT imaging. Two observers independently analysed three sets of images (CT set, conventional MRI set, and combined conventional and DW MRI set). A five-point scale for likelihood of gastric cancer was used. Diagnostic accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were evaluated. Quantitative [apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) analyses with Mann–Whitney U-test were conducted for gastric cancers and the nearby normal gastric wall. Results: The diagnostic accuracy and sensitivity for detection of gastric cancer were significantly higher on combined conventional and DW MRI set (77.8–78.3%; 75.3–75.9%) than the CT imaging set (67.7–71.4%; 64.1–68.2%) or the conventional MRI set (72–73%; 68.8–70%; p < 0.01). In particular, for gastric cancers with pT2 and pT3, the combined conventional and DW MRI set (91.6–92.6%) yielded significantly higher sensitivity for detection of gastric cancer than did the CT imaging set (76.8–81.1%) by both observers (p < 0.01). The mean ADC of gastric cancer lesions (1 ± 0.23 × 10 −3 mm 2 /s) differed significantly from that of normal gastric wall (1.77 ± 0.25 × 10 −3  mm 2 /s; p < 0.01). Conclusion: Abdominal MRI with DW imaging was more sensitive for the detection of gastric cancer than 2D-multidetector row CT or conventional MRI alone. - Highlights: • The sensitivity for detection of gastric cancer is high on abdominal MR imaging. • DW imaging is helpful for

  10. Comparison of diagnostic performance of CT and MRI for abdominal staging of pediatric renal tumors: a report from the Children's Oncology Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Servaes, Sabah [Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Khanna, Geetika [Washington University School of Medicine, Pediatric Radiology, St. Louis Children' s Hospital, Mallinckrodt Institute for Radiology, 510 S. Kingshighway, Campus Box 8131-MIR, St. Louis, MO (United States); Naranjo, Arlene [University of Florida, Department of Biostatistics, Gainesville, FL (United States); Geller, James I. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Division of Oncology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Ehrlich, Peter F. [University of Michigan, Department of Surgery, C.S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Gow, Kenneth W. [Seattle Children' s Hospital, Pediatric Surgery, Seattle, WA (United States); Perlman, Elizabeth J. [Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Pathology, Chicago, IL (United States); Dome, Jeffrey S. [Children' s National Medical Center, Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders, Washington, DC (United States); Gratias, Eric; Mullen, Elizabeth A. [Harvard University, Dana Farber Cancer Institute and Boston Children' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-08-19

    CT and MRI are both used for abdominal staging of pediatric renal tumors. The diagnostic performance of the two modalities for local and regional staging of renal tumors has not been systematically evaluated. To compare the diagnostic performance of CT and MRI for local staging of pediatric renal tumors. The study population was derived from the AREN03B2 study of the Children's Oncology Group. Baseline abdominal imaging performed with both CT and MRI within 30 days of nephrectomy was available for retrospective review in 82 renal tumor cases. Each case was evaluated for capsular penetration, lymph node metastasis, tumor thrombus, preoperative tumor rupture, and synchronous contralateral lesions. The surgical and pathological findings at central review were the reference standard. The sensitivity of CT and MRI for detecting capsular penetration was 68.6% and 62.9%, respectively (P = 0.73), while specificity was 86.5% and 83.8% (P = 1.0). The sensitivity of CT and MRI for detecting lymph node metastasis was 76.5% and 52.9% (P = 0.22), and specificity was 90.4% and 92.3% (P = 1.0). Synchronous contralateral lesions were identified by CT in 4/9 cases and by MRI in 7/9 cases. CT and MRI have similar diagnostic performance for detection of lymph node metastasis and capsular penetration. MR detected more contralateral synchronous lesions; however these were present in a very small number of cases. Either modality can be used for initial loco-regional staging of pediatric renal tumors. (orig.)

  11. Comparison of diagnostic performance of CT and MRI for abdominal staging of pediatric renal tumors: a report from the Children's Oncology Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Servaes, Sabah; Khanna, Geetika; Naranjo, Arlene; Geller, James I.; Ehrlich, Peter F.; Gow, Kenneth W.; Perlman, Elizabeth J.; Dome, Jeffrey S.; Gratias, Eric; Mullen, Elizabeth A.

    2015-01-01

    CT and MRI are both used for abdominal staging of pediatric renal tumors. The diagnostic performance of the two modalities for local and regional staging of renal tumors has not been systematically evaluated. To compare the diagnostic performance of CT and MRI for local staging of pediatric renal tumors. The study population was derived from the AREN03B2 study of the Children's Oncology Group. Baseline abdominal imaging performed with both CT and MRI within 30 days of nephrectomy was available for retrospective review in 82 renal tumor cases. Each case was evaluated for capsular penetration, lymph node metastasis, tumor thrombus, preoperative tumor rupture, and synchronous contralateral lesions. The surgical and pathological findings at central review were the reference standard. The sensitivity of CT and MRI for detecting capsular penetration was 68.6% and 62.9%, respectively (P = 0.73), while specificity was 86.5% and 83.8% (P = 1.0). The sensitivity of CT and MRI for detecting lymph node metastasis was 76.5% and 52.9% (P = 0.22), and specificity was 90.4% and 92.3% (P = 1.0). Synchronous contralateral lesions were identified by CT in 4/9 cases and by MRI in 7/9 cases. CT and MRI have similar diagnostic performance for detection of lymph node metastasis and capsular penetration. MR detected more contralateral synchronous lesions; however these were present in a very small number of cases. Either modality can be used for initial loco-regional staging of pediatric renal tumors. (orig.)

  12. Systematic radiation dose optimization of abdominal dual-energy CT on a second-generation dual-source CT scanner: assessment of the accuracy of iodine uptake measurement and image quality in an in vitro and in vivo investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindera, Sebastian T; Zaehringer, Caroline; D'Errico, Luigia; Schwartz, Fides; Kekelidze, Maka; Szucs-Farkas, Zsolt; Benz, Matthias R

    2017-10-01

    To assess the accuracy of iodine quantification in a phantom study at different radiation dose levels with dual-energy dual-source CT and to evaluate image quality and radiation doses in patients undergoing a single-energy and two dual-energy abdominal CT protocols. In a phantom study, the accuracy of iodine quantification (4.5-23.5 mgI/mL) was evaluated using the manufacturer-recommended and three dose-optimized dual-energy protocols. In a patient study, 75 abdomino-pelvic CT examinations were acquired as follows: 25 CT scans with the manufacturer-recommended dual-energy protocol (protocol A); 25 CT scans with a dose-optimized dual-energy protocol (protocol B); and 25 CT scans with a single-energy CT protocol (protocol C). CTDI vol and objective noise were measured. Five readers scored each scan according to six subjective image quality parameters (noise, contrast, artifacts, visibility of small structures, sharpness, overall diagnostic confidence). In the phantom study, differences between the real and measured iodine concentrations ranged from -8.8% to 17.0% for the manufacturer-recommended protocol and from -1.6% to 20.5% for three dose-optimized protocols. In the patient study, the CTDI vol of protocol A, B, and C were 12.5 ± 1.9, 7.5 ± 1.2, and 6.5 ± 1.7 mGycm, respectively (p dual-energy and the single-energy protocol. A dose reduction of 41% is feasible for the manufacturer-recommended, abdominal dual-energy CT protocol, as it maintained the accuracy of iodine measurements and subjective image quality compared to a single-energy protocol.

  13. The utility of dual bioelectrical impedance analysis in detecting intra-abdominal fat area in obese patients during weight reduction therapy in comparison with waist circumference and abdominal CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamakage, Hajime; Ito, Ryo; Tochiya, Mayu; Muranaka, Kazuya; Tanaka, Masashi; Matsuo, Yoshiyuki; Odori, Shinji; Kono, Shigeo; Shimatsu, Akira; Satoh-Asahara, Noriko

    2014-01-01

    An increase in intra-abdominal fat area (IAFA) is an essential component of metabolic syndrome (MetS). Waist circumference (WC) is not a precise measure of IAFA, and computed tomography (CT) is unsuitable for frequent monitoring. Here, we examined utility of a dual bioelectrical impedance analysis (Dual BIA) for measuring IAFA in obese patients during weight reduction. Fat distribution was measured by Dual BIA and CT in 100 obese outpatients. All fat areas including total, IAFA, and subcutaneous fat by Dual BIA were more closely correlated with those by CT than WC. Estimated IAFA by Dual BIA was significantly correlated with number of MetS components as well as CT, but WC was not. Furthermore, in 61 obese patients who received 6-month weight reduction therapy, estimated IAFA by Dual BIA showed an earlier and greater decrease as well as that by CT than WC and BMI. In addition, decrease in estimated IAFA by Dual BIA through weight reduction had a higher correlation with decrease in IAFA by CT, than WC. This study is the first to demonstrate that the change in estimated IAFA by Dual BIA was highly correlated with that in IAFA by CT during weight reduction therapy. Our findings also indicate that estimated IAFA by Dual BIA is, potentially, a better indicator of severity of MetS, cardiovascular risk factors, and effectiveness of weight reduction than WC, and equal to IAFA by CT. Estimated IAFA by Dual BIA may be useful for monitoring the effectiveness of weight reduction therapy in obese patients.

  14. Use of internal references for assessing CT density measurements of the pelvis as replacement for use of an external phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boomsma, Martijn F; Slouwerhof, Inge; van Dalen, Jorn A; Edens, Mireille A; Mueller, Dirk; Milles, Julien; Maas, Mario

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this research is to study the use of an internal reference standard for fat- and muscle as a replacement for an external reference standard with a phantom. By using a phantomless internal reference standard, Hounsfield unit (HU) measurements of various tissues can potentially be assessed in patients with a CT scan of the pelvis without an added phantom at time of CT acquisition. This paves the way for development of a tool for quantification of the change in tissue density in one patient over time and between patients. This could make every CT scan made without contrast available for research purposes. Fifty patients with unilateral metal-on-metal total hip replacements, scanned together with a calibration reference phantom used in bone mineral density measurements, were included in this study. On computed tomography scans of the pelvis without the use of intravenous iodine contrast, reference values for fat and muscle were measured in the phantom as well as within the patient's body. The conformity between the references was examined with the intra-class correlation coefficient. The mean HU (± SD) of reference values for fat for the internal- and phantom references were -91.5 (±7.0) and -90.9 (±7.8), respectively. For muscle, the mean HU (± SD) for the internal- and phantom references were 59.2 (±6.2) and 60.0 (±7.2), respectively. The intra-class correlation coefficients for fat and muscle were 0.90 and 0.84 respectively and show excellent agreement between the phantom and internal references. Internal references can be used with similar accuracy as references from an external phantom. There is no need to use an external phantom to asses CT density measurements of body tissue.

  15. Use of internal references for assessing CT density measurements of the pelvis as replacement for use of an external phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boomsma, Martijn F.; Slouwerhof, Inge; Dalen, Jorn A. van [Isala Hospital, Department of Radiology, Zwolle (Netherlands); Edens, Mireille A. [Isala Hospital, Department of Innovation and Science, Zwolle (Netherlands); Mueller, Dirk [Philips Healthcare systems, Hamburg (Germany); Milles, Julien [Philips Healthcare Benelux, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Maas, Mario [AMC, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2015-11-15

    The purpose of this research is to study the use of an internal reference standard for fat- and muscle as a replacement for an external reference standard with a phantom. By using a phantomless internal reference standard, Hounsfield unit (HU) measurements of various tissues can potentially be assessed in patients with a CT scan of the pelvis without an added phantom at time of CT acquisition. This paves the way for development of a tool for quantification of the change in tissue density in one patient over time and between patients. This could make every CT scan made without contrast available for research purposes. Fifty patients with unilateral metal-on-metal total hip replacements, scanned together with a calibration reference phantom used in bone mineral density measurements, were included in this study. On computed tomography scans of the pelvis without the use of intravenous iodine contrast, reference values for fat and muscle were measured in the phantom as well as within the patient's body. The conformity between the references was examined with the intra-class correlation coefficient. The mean HU (± SD) of reference values for fat for the internal- and phantom references were -91.5 (±7.0) and -90.9 (±7.8), respectively. For muscle, the mean HU (± SD) for the internal- and phantom references were 59.2 (±6.2) and 60.0 (±7.2), respectively. The intra-class correlation coefficients for fat and muscle were 0.90 and 0.84 respectively and show excellent agreement between the phantom and internal references. Internal references can be used with similar accuracy as references from an external phantom. There is no need to use an external phantom to asses CT density measurements of body tissue. (orig.)

  16. An incidentally found inflamed uterine myoma Causing low abdominal pain, using TC-99m-tektrotyd single photon emission computed tomography-CT hybrid imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zandieh, Shahin; Schuetz, Matthias; Bernt, Reinhard; Zwerina, Jochen; Haller, Joerg [Hanusch-Hospital, Teaching Hospital of Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Australia)

    2013-10-15

    We report the case of a 50-year-old woman presented with a history of right hemicolectomy due to an ileocecal neuroendocrine tumor and left breast metastasis. Owing to a slightly elevated chromogranin A-level and lower abdominal pain, single photon emission computed tomography-computer tomography (SPECT-CT) was performed. There were no signs of recurrence on the SPECT-CT scan, but the patient was incidentally found to have an inflamed intramural myoma. We believe that the slightly elevated chromogranin A-level was caused by the hypertension that the patient presented. In the clinical context, this is a report of an inflamed uterine myoma seen as a false positive result detected by TC-99m-Tc-EDDA/HYNIC-Tyr3-Octreotide (Tektrotyd) SPECT-CT hybrid imaging.

  17. An incidentally found inflamed uterine myoma causing low abdominal pain, using Tc-99m-tektrotyd single photon emission computed tomography-CT hybrid imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandieh, Shahin; Schütz, Matthias; Bernt, Reinhard; Zwerina, Jochen; Haller, Joerg

    2013-01-01

    We report the case of a 50-year-old woman presented with a history of right hemicolectomy due to an ileocecal neuroendocrine tumor and left breast metastasis. Owing to a slightly elevated chromogranin A-level and lower abdominal pain, single photon emission computed tomography-computer tomography (SPECT-CT) was performed. There were no signs of recurrence on the SPECT-CT scan, but the patient was incidentally found to have an inflamed intramural myoma. We believe that the slightly elevated chromogranin A-level was caused by the hypertension that the patient presented. In the clinical context, this is a report of an inflamed uterine myoma seen as a false positive result detected by TC-99m-Tc-EDDA/HYNIC-Tyr3-Octreotide (Tektrotyd) SPECT-CT hybrid imaging.

  18. Transretroperitoneal CT-guided Embolization of Growing Internal Iliac Artery Aneurysm after Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: A Transretroperitoneal Approach with Intramuscular Lidocaine Injection Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Joon Young, E-mail: pjy1331@hanmail.net; Kim, Shin Jung, E-mail: witdd2@hanmail.net; Kim, Hyoung Ook, E-mail: chaos821209@hanmail.net [Chonnam National University Hospital, Department of Radiology (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yong Tae, E-mail: mono-111@hanmail.net [Chonnam National University Hwasun Hospital, Department of Radiology (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Nam Yeol, E-mail: apleseed@hanmail.net; Kim, Jae Kyu, E-mail: kjkrad@jnu.ac.kr [Chonnam National University Hospital, Department of Radiology (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Sang Young, E-mail: sycpvts@jnu.ac.kr; Choi, Soo Jin Na, E-mail: choisjn@jnu.ac.kr; Lee, Ho Kyun, E-mail: mhaha@hanmail.net [Chonnam National University Hospital, Department of Surgery (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of CT-guided embolization of internal iliac artery aneurysm (IIAA) after repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm by transretroperitoneal approach using the lidocaine injection technique to iliacus muscle, making window for safe needle path for three patients for whom CT-guided embolization of IIAA was performed by transretroperitoneal approach with intramuscular lidocaine injection technique. Transretroperitoneal access to the IIAA was successful in all three patients. In all three patients, the IIAA was first embolized using microcoils. The aneurysmal sac was then embolized with glue and coils without complication. With a mean follow-up of 7 months, the volume of the IIAAs remained stable without residual endoleaks. Transretroperitoneal CT-guided embolization of IIAA using intramuscular lidocaine injection technique is effective, safe, and results in good outcome.

  19. IDENTIFICATION OF CORONARY ARTERY CALCIFICATION AND DIAGNOSIS OF CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE BY ABDOMINAL CT; A RESIDENT EDUCATION CONTINUOUS QUALITY IMPROVEMENT PROJECT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Michael; Hobbs, Stephen; Charnigo, Richard; Embertson, Ryan; Daugherty, Michael; Hall, Michael; Brooks, Michael; Leung, Steve; Sorrell, Vince

    2015-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives Coronary artery calcium (CAC) scoring is an excellent imaging tool for subclinical atherosclerosis detection and risk stratification. We hypothesize that although CAC has been underreported in the past on computed tomography (CT) scans of the abdomen, specialized resident educational intervention can improve on this underreporting. Materials and Methods Beginning July 2009, a dedicated radiology resident cardiac imaging rotation and curriculum was initiated. A retrospective review of the first 500 abdominal CT reports from January 2009, 2011 and 2013 was performed including studies originally interpreted by a resident as well as primary attending physician interpretations. Each scan was re-evaluated for presence or absence of CAC and coronary artery disease (CAD) by a cardiovascular CT expert reader. These data were then correlated to determine if the presence of CAC had been properly reported initially. The results of the three time periods were compared to assess for improved rates of CAC and CAD reporting after initiation of a resident cardiac imaging curriculum. Results Statistically significant improvements in the reporting of CAC and CAD on CT scans of the abdomen occurred following the initiation of formal resident cardiac imaging training which included two rotations (4 weeks each) of dedicated cardiac CT and cardiac MRI interpretation during the resident's 2nd, 3rd, or 4th radiology training years. The improvement was persistent and increased over time, improving from 1% to 72% after two years and to 90% after four years. Conclusion This single center retrospective analysis shows association between implementation of formal cardiac imaging training into radiology resident education and improved CAC detection and CAD reporting on abdominal CT scans. PMID:25579636

  20. Abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giordany, B.R.

    1985-01-01

    Abdominal injury is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in childhood. Ten percent of trauma-related deaths are due to abdominal injury. Thousands of children are involved in auto accidents annually; many suffer severe internal injury. Child abuse is a second less frequent but equally serious cause of internal abdominal injury. The descriptions of McCort and Eisenstein and their associates in the 1960s first brought to attention the frequency and severity of visceral injury as important manifestations of the child abuse syndrome. Blunt abdominal trauma often causes multiple injuries; in the past, many children have been subjected to exploratory surgery to evaluate the extent of possible hidden injury. Since the advent of noninvasive radiologic imaging techniques including radionuclide scans and ultrasound and, especially, computed tomography (CT), the radiologist has been better able to assess (accurately) the extent of abdominal injury and thus allow conservative therapy in many cases. Penetrating abdominal trauma occurs following gunshot wounds, stabbing, and other similar injury. This is fortunately, a relatively uncommon occurrence in most pediatric centers and will not be discussed specifically here, although many principles of blunt trauma diagnosis are valid for evaluation of penetrating abdominal trauma. If there is any question that a wound has extended intraperitonelly, a sinogram with water-soluble contrast material allows quick, accurate diagnosis. The presence of large amounts of free intraperitoneal gas suggests penetrating injury to the colon or other gas-containing viscus and is generally considered an indication for surgery

  1. 77 FR 54495 - Regulated Navigation Area; Thames River Degaussing Range Replacement Operations; New London, CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-05

    ... London Harbor, New London, CT. The proposed RNA would establish speed and wake restrictions as well as... comments by mail and would like to know that they reached the Facility, please enclose a stamped, self.... 0170.1. This proposal would establish speed and wake restrictions as well as allow the Coast Guard to...

  2. Gastrointestinal tract wall visualization and distention during abdominal and pelvic multidetector CT with a neutral barium sulphate suspension: comparison with positive barium sulphate suspension and with water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva, M R; Erturk, S M; Ichikawa, T; Rocha, T; Ros, P R; Silverman, S G; Mortele, K J

    2012-01-01

    When examining patients with contrast-enhanced multidetector-row CT, we determined if the stomach and small bowel were visualized and distended better with a neutral barium sulphate suspension than with positive barium sulphate suspension or water. After obtaining approval from our institutional review board, 156 patients (women: 84; mean age: 54 yrs) with no history of gastrointestinal tract disease were randomized prospectively to receive orally either 900 ml of neutral (0.1% w/v) barium sulphate suspension (n = 53), 900 ml of positive (2.1% w/v) barium sulphate suspension (n = 53), or 900 ml of water (n = 50), prior to undergoing contrast-enhanced abdominal and pelvic multidetector-row CT. Two independent radiologists evaluated the stomach, and small bowel, for luminal distension and wall visualization, using a five point scale. Results were compared using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests. The walls of the stomach, and small bowel were visualized better in patients who were administered neutral barium sulphate suspension than those who were administered either positive barium sulphate suspension (p barium sulphate suspension, the stomach and small bowel were distended better compared to patients administered water (p barium sulphate suspension (p contrast-enhanced abdominal and pelvic multidetector-row CT, orally administered neutral barium sulphate suspension allows the gastrointestinal tract to be visualized and distended better than either positive barium sulphate suspension, or water.

  3. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

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    Full Text Available ... of Use | Links | Site Map Copyright © 2018 Radiological Society of North America, Inc. (RSNA). To help ensure current and accurate information, we do not permit copying but encourage linking ...

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    Full Text Available ... your breath during the scanning. Any motion, whether breathing or body movements, can lead to artifacts on ... minutes. However, if you are required to drink oral contrast you will be asked to arrive approximately ...

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    Full Text Available ... taste in your mouth that lasts for at most a minute or two. You may experience a ... you may find the taste mildly unpleasant; however, most patients can easily tolerate it. You can expect ...

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    Full Text Available ... radiation oncology provider in your community, you can search the ACR-accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The costs for specific medical imaging tests, treatments ...

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    Full Text Available ... infected fluid collections, also known as abscesses. inflammatory bowel disease such as ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease , pancreatitis or liver cirrhosis. cancers of the liver, kidneys, pancreas, ovaries and bladder ...

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    Full Text Available ... Survey Do you have a personal story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery ... Related Articles and Media Ultrasound - Abdomen X-ray (Radiography) - Lower GI Tract X-ray (Radiography) - Upper GI ...

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    Full Text Available ... need to be taken 12 hours prior to administration of contrast material. To avoid unnecessary delays, contact ... the imaging information is located in a separate control room, where the technologist operates the scanner and ...

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    Full Text Available ... at these links. About Us | Contact Us | FAQ | Privacy | Terms of Use | Links | Site Map Copyright © 2018 ... message (optional): Bees: Wax: Notice: RadiologyInfo respects your privacy. Information entered here will not be used for ...

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    Full Text Available ... pyelonephritis or infected fluid collections, also known as abscesses. inflammatory bowel disease such as ulcerative colitis or ... to: guide biopsies and other procedures such as abscess drainages and minimally invasive tumor treatments. plan for ...

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    Full Text Available ... is a diagnostic medical test that, like traditional x-rays, produces multiple images or pictures of the inside ... and blood vessels provide greater detail than traditional x-rays, particularly of soft tissues and blood vessels. top ...

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    Full Text Available ... sometimes compared to looking into a loaf of bread by cutting the loaf into thin slices. When ... Risks There is always a slight chance of cancer from excessive exposure to radiation. However, the benefit ...

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    Full Text Available ... is any possibility that they may be pregnant. See the Safety page for more information about pregnancy ... However, the technologist will always be able to see, hear and speak with you through a built- ...

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    Full Text Available ... to you, revolve around you during the imaging process. You will be alone in the exam room ... possible charges you will incur. Web page review process: This Web page is reviewed regularly by a ...

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    Full Text Available ... beam follows a spiral path. A special computer program processes this large volume of data to create ... technologist or nurse, under the direction of a physician, may offer you some medication to help you ...

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    Full Text Available ... Leave jewelry at home and wear loose, comfortable clothing. You may be asked to wear a gown. ... I prepare? You should wear comfortable, loose-fitting clothing to your exam. You may be given a ...

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    Full Text Available ... dye," your doctor may prescribe medications (usually a steroid) to reduce the risk of an allergic reaction. ... to hear and talk to you with the use of a speaker and microphone. top of page ...

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    Full Text Available ... Any motion, whether breathing or body movements, can lead to artifacts on the images. This loss of ... circumstances. For example, sometimes a parent wearing a lead shield may stay in the room with their ...

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    Full Text Available ... vein. You will likely have a warm, flushed sensation during the injection of the contrast materials and ... a minute or two. You may experience a sensation like you have to urinate; however, this is ...

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    Full Text Available ... understanding of the possible charges you will incur. Web page review process: This Web page is reviewed regularly by a physician with ... not responsible for the content contained on the web pages found at these links. About Us | Contact ...

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    Full Text Available ... When the image slices are reassembled by computer software, the result is a very detailed multidimensional view ... If contrast material is used, depending on the type of exam, it will be swallowed, injected through ...

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    Full Text Available ... diseases of the small bowel, colon and other internal organs and is often used to determine the ... and accurate. In emergency cases, it can reveal internal injuries and bleeding quickly enough to help save ...

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    Full Text Available ... colitis or Crohn's disease , pancreatitis or liver cirrhosis. cancers of the liver, kidneys, pancreas, ovaries and bladder as well as lymphoma. ... conditions, including but not limited to some liver, kidney, pancreatic, uterine or ovarian abnormalities, ... for Colorectal Cancer top of page ...

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    Full Text Available ... images. These images can be viewed on a computer monitor, printed on film or transferred to a ... other in a ring, called a gantry. The computer workstation that processes the imaging information is located ...

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    Full Text Available ... cause blurring of the images and degrade the quality of the examination the same way that it ... artifacts on the images. This loss of image quality can resemble the blurring seen on a photograph ...

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    Full Text Available ... ring, called a gantry. The computer workstation that processes the imaging information is located in a separate ... follows a spiral path. A special computer program processes this large volume of data to create two- ...

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    Full Text Available ... interprets the results and how do I get them? A radiologist with expertise in supervising and interpreting ... radiology departments are well-equipped to deal with them. Manufacturers of intravenous contrast indicate mothers should not ...

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    Full Text Available ... whether you have a history of heart disease, asthma, diabetes, kidney disease or thyroid problems. Any of ... shield may stay in the room with their child. However, the technologist will always be able to ...

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    Full Text Available ... as organs like the heart or liver, shows up in shades of gray, and air appears black. ... who will discuss the results with you. Follow-up examinations may be necessary. Your doctor will explain ...

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    Full Text Available ... operates the scanner and monitors your examination in direct visual contact and usually with the ability to ... of North America, Inc. (RSNA). To help ensure current and accurate information, we do not permit copying ...

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    Full Text Available ... conditions and whether you have a history of heart disease, asthma, diabetes, kidney disease or thyroid problems. ... ray; soft tissue, such as organs like the heart or liver, shows up in shades of gray, ...

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    Full Text Available ... dye," your doctor may prescribe medications (usually a steroid) to reduce the risk of an allergic reaction. ... may increase the risk of an unusual adverse effect. Women should always inform their physician and the ...

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    Full Text Available ... Radiology (ACR) and the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA), comprising physicians with expertise in several radiologic ... Site Map Copyright © 2018 Radiological Society of North America, Inc. (RSNA). To help ensure current and accurate ...

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    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... the abdomen and pelvis is a diagnostic imaging test used to help detect diseases of the small ...

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    Full Text Available ... be asked to remove hearing aids and removable dental work. Women will be asked to remove bras ... Manual on Contrast Media and its references. Because children are more sensitive to radiation, they should have ...

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    Full Text Available ... an allergic reaction. These medications must be taken 12 hours prior to your exam. Leave jewelry at ... reaction. These medications generally need to be taken 12 hours prior to administration of contrast material. To ...

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    Full Text Available ... the imaging information is located in a separate control room, where the technologist operates the scanner and ... speak with you through a built-in intercom system. With pediatric patients, a parent may be allowed ...

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    Full Text Available ... The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Ultrasound - Abdomen X-ray (Radiography) - Lower ... facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The costs for specific medical imaging tests, treatments ...

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    Full Text Available ... colitis or Crohn's disease , pancreatitis or liver cirrhosis. cancers of the liver, kidneys, pancreas, ovaries and bladder ... procedures such as abscess drainages and minimally invasive tumor treatments. plan for and assess the results of ...

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    Full Text Available ... pregnant and discuss any recent illnesses, medical conditions, medications you’re taking, and allergies. You will be ... allergy to contrast material, your doctor may prescribe medications to reduce the risk of an allergic reaction. ...

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    Full Text Available ... vessels. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? This procedure is typically used ... is done because a potential abnormality needs further evaluation with additional views or a special imaging technique. ...

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    Full Text Available ... You will be instructed not to eat or drink anything for a few hours beforehand. If you ... You will be asked not to eat or drink anything for a few hours beforehand, if contrast ...

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    Full Text Available ... other medical conditions and whether you have a history of heart disease, asthma, diabetes, kidney disease or ... other in a ring, called a gantry. The computer workstation that processes the imaging information is located ...

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    Full Text Available ... a known allergy to contrast material, your doctor may prescribe medications to reduce the risk of an ... at home and wear loose, comfortable clothing. You may be asked to wear a gown. What is ...

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    Full Text Available ... special computer program processes this large volume of data to create two-dimensional cross-sectional images of ... Society of Urogenital Radiology note that the available data suggest that it is safe to continue breastfeeding ...

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    Full Text Available ... speak with you through a built-in intercom system. With pediatric patients, a parent may be allowed ... will analyze the images and send an official report to your primary care physician or physician who ...

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    Full Text Available ... you have a history of heart disease, asthma, diabetes, kidney disease or thyroid problems. Any of these ... are sometimes the best way to see if treatment is working or if a finding is stable ...

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    Full Text Available ... colitis or Crohn's disease , pancreatitis or liver cirrhosis. cancers of the liver, kidneys, pancreas, ovaries and bladder ... Risks There is always a slight chance of cancer from excessive exposure to radiation. However, the benefit ...

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    Full Text Available ... evaluation with additional views or a special imaging technique. A follow-up examination may also be necessary so that any change in a known abnormality can be monitored over time. Follow-up examinations are sometimes the best way to see if treatment is working or ...

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    Full Text Available ... as organ transplants. stage, plan and properly administer radiation treatments for tumors as well as monitor response ... conventional x-ray exam, a small amount of radiation is aimed at and passes through the part ...

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    Full Text Available ... contrast material, your doctor may prescribe medications to reduce the risk of an allergic reaction. These medications ... doctor may prescribe medications (usually a steroid) to reduce the risk of an allergic reaction. These medications ...

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    Full Text Available ... No Please type your comment or suggestion into the following text box: Comment: E-mail: Area code: Phone no: Thank you! Please help us improve RadiologyInfo.org by taking our brief survey: Survey ... and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles ...

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    Full Text Available ... shield may stay in the room with their child. However, the technologist will always be able to ... have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Ultrasound - Abdomen ...

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    Full Text Available ... illnesses, medical conditions, medications you’re taking, and allergies. You will be instructed not to eat or ... few hours beforehand. If you have a known allergy to contrast material, your doctor may prescribe medications ...

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    Full Text Available ... be necessary. Your doctor will explain the exact reason why another exam is requested. Sometimes a follow- ... Risks There is always a slight chance of cancer from excessive exposure to radiation. However, the benefit ...

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    Full Text Available ... if there’s a possibility you are pregnant and discuss any recent illnesses, medical conditions, medications you’re ... who referred you for the exam, who will discuss the results with you. Follow-up examinations may ...

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    Full Text Available ... and neck) your head will remain outside the hole in the center of the scanner. The scanner ... be removed by the technologist, and the tiny hole made by the needle will be covered with ...

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    Full Text Available ... or short tunnel, in the center. You will lie on a narrow examination table that slides into ... amount of time that the patient needs to lie still is reduced. Though the scanning itself causes ...

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    Full Text Available ... a history of heart disease, asthma, diabetes, kidney disease or thyroid problems. Any of these conditions may increase the risk of an unusual adverse effect. Women should always inform their physician and ... any purpose other than this referral.

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  1. Comparative study of radiation dose and image noise between single-source fast kilo voltage peak switching technique and conventional mode on abdominal CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Xiaozhu; Xu Xueqin; Chen Kemin; Yan Fuhua; Isao Tanaka; Rika Fukui; Haruhiko Machida; Eiko Ueno

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the radiation dose and image noise of abdominal CT with spectral imaging and conventional scan mode. Methods: This was a retrospective study. The first part of this study was a phantom study. A standard quality assessment phantom was scanned with gemstone spectral imaging mode and conventional helical mode using 120 kVp with different mAs. A regression function for the mAs between conventional scan mode and spectral imaging mode was obtained. According to the regression function, the mAs on 120 kVp corresponding to different gemstone spectral imaging protocol were calculated. The second part of this study was a clinical study. Twenty-two patients who underwent contrast enhanced abdominal CT scanning were included. The pre-contrast CT was scanned by a conventional mode with automatic exposure control technique. According to the mAs of pre-contrast scan, corresponding spectral imaging parameters were selected for the portal venous phase of post-contrast scan. Five sets of images with 5 mm slice thickness were reconstructed, with 65 keV monochromatic image for spectral imaging and FBP, 20%,40% and 60% ASIR image for conventional imaging respectively. Image noise was measured on hepatic parenchyma and urinary bladder for each set of image. Radiation dose and image noise were compared between CT spectral imaging and conventional imaging with paired t-test. Results: No significant differences were found for the CTDIvol [(13.8 ± 4.8) mGy versus (14.0 ± 7.0) mGy] and DLP [(691.1 ± 274.2) mGy · cm versus (678.8 ± 385.0) mGy · cm] between CT spectral imaging and conventional imaging. Monochromatic image (65 keV) by spectral imaging [(7.6 ± 1.4) HU for hepatic parenchyma and (9.1 ± 1.3) HU for urinary bladder] had equal image noise with 40% ASIR [hepatic parenchyma: (7.8 ±0.7) HU] and 20% ASIR [urinary bladder: (9.2 ± 1.2) HU] and lower image noise than FBP image [(10.4 ± 1.0) HU for hepatic parenchyma and (10.5 ± 1.3) HU for urinary

  2. FDG-PET/CT in advanced ovarian cancer staging: Value and pitfalls in detecting lesions in different abdominal and pelvic quadrants compared with laparoscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Iaco, Pierandrea [Department of Gynaecology, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Bologna, Policlinico S.Orsola-Malpighi, Bologna (Italy); Musto, Alessandra [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Bologna, Policlinico S.Orsola-Malpighi, Bologna (Italy); Orazi, Luca [Department of Gynaecology, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Bologna, Policlinico S.Orsola-Malpighi, Bologna (Italy); Zamagni, Claudio; Rosati, Marta [Department of Medical Oncology, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Bologna, Policlinico S.Orsola-Malpighi, Bologna (Italy); Allegri, Vincenzo [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Bologna, Policlinico S.Orsola-Malpighi, Bologna (Italy); Cacciari, Nicoletta [Department of Medical Oncology, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Bologna, Policlinico S.Orsola-Malpighi, Bologna (Italy); Al-Nahhas, Adil [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hammersmith Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Rubello, Domenico, E-mail: domenico.rubello@libero.it [Department of Nuclear Medicine, PET/CT Centre, Radiology, Medical Physics, ' Santa Maria della Misericordia' Hospital, Viale Tre Martiri 140, 45100 Rovigo (Italy); Venturoli, Stefano [Department of Gynaecology, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Bologna, Policlinico S.Orsola-Malpighi, Bologna (Italy); Fanti, Stefano [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Bologna, Policlinico S.Orsola-Malpighi, Bologna (Italy)

    2011-11-15

    Introduction and aim: Ovarian carcinoma (OC) is a common cancer in the Western Countries, and an important cause of death in patients suffering with gynaecologic malignancies. The majority of patients present with advanced disease at the time of diagnosis. Treatment with debulking surgery followed by chemotherapy is the standard approach while chemotherapy is contemplated when surgery is not possible. A correct pre-operative staging is important to ensure a most appropriate management. Laparoscopy (LPS) is the standard diagnostic tool for the assessment of intraperitoneal infiltration but is invasive and requires general anaesthesia. FDG-PET/CT is increasingly used for staging different types of cancer, and the aim of this study is to assess the value of FDG-PET/CT in staging advanced OC and its sensitivity to detect lesions in different quadrants of the abdominal-pelvic area compared to laparoscopy. Materials and methods: From September 2004 till April 2008, 40 patients with high suspicion of OC were referred to our hospital for diagnostic LPS to explore the possibility of optimal debulking surgery. Those who were not suitable for surgery were referred for chemotherapy. Before chemotherapy, the patients underwent an FDG-PET/CT scan. The findings in 9 quadrants of abdominal-pelvic area (total 360 quadrants) for PET/CT and LPS were recorded and compared. Results: In 14/360 areas (3.8%), surgical evaluation was not possible because of presence of adhesions, thus the number of areas explored by laparoscopy was 346. Tumour was found in 308 quadrants (38 quadrants free of disease). PET/CT was positive in all 40 patients with true negative results in 26/346 quadrants (7.5%), and true positives results in 243/346 quadrants (70.2%). False positive and negative PET/CT results were found in 12/346 and 65/346 quadrants, respectively. False positive PET/CT findings were evenly present in all quadrants. False negative PET/CT findings were present in 31/109 (28.4%) upper

  3. Whole-body CT in polytrauma patients: the effect of arm position on abdominal image quality when using a human phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Pil-Hyun [Yonsei University, Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Wonju Christian Hospital, Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hee-Joung; Lee, Chang-Lae; Kim, Dae-Hong [Yonsei University, Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Won-Hyung; Jeon, Sung-Su [Wonju Christian Hospital, Wonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    For a considerable number of emergency computed tomography (CT) scans, patients are unable to position their arms above their head due to traumatic injuries. The arms-down position has been shown to reduce image quality with beam-hardening artifacts in the dorsal regions of the liver, spleen, and kidneys, rendering these images non-diagnostic. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of arm position on the image quality in patients undergoing whole-body CT. We acquired CT scans with various acquisition parameters at voltages of 80, 120, and 140 kVp and an increasing tube current from 200 to 400 mAs in 50 mAs increments. The image noise and the contrast assessment were considered for quantitative analyses of the CT images. The image noise (IN), the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and the coefficient of variation (COV) were evaluated. Quantitative analyses of the experiments were performed with CT scans representative of five different arm positions. Results of the CT scans acquired at 120 kVp and 250 mAs showed high image quality in patients with both arms raised above the head (SNR: 12.4, CNR: 10.9, and COV: 8.1) and both arms flexed at the elbows on the chest (SNR: 11.5, CNR: 10.2, and COV: 8.8) while the image quality significantly decreased with both arms in the down position (SNR: 9.1, CNR: 7.6, and COV: 11). Both arms raised, one arm raised, and both arms flexed improved the image quality compared to arms in the down position by reducing beam-hardening and streak artifacts caused by the arms being at the side of body. This study provides optimal methods for achieving higher image quality and lower noise in abdominal CT for trauma patients.

  4. Whole-body CT in polytrauma patients: the effect of arm position on abdominal image quality when using a human phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Pil-Hyun; Kim, Hee-Joung; Lee, Chang-Lae; Kim, Dae-Hong; Lee, Won-Hyung; Jeon, Sung-Su

    2012-01-01

    For a considerable number of emergency computed tomography (CT) scans, patients are unable to position their arms above their head due to traumatic injuries. The arms-down position has been shown to reduce image quality with beam-hardening artifacts in the dorsal regions of the liver, spleen, and kidneys, rendering these images non-diagnostic. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of arm position on the image quality in patients undergoing whole-body CT. We acquired CT scans with various acquisition parameters at voltages of 80, 120, and 140 kVp and an increasing tube current from 200 to 400 mAs in 50 mAs increments. The image noise and the contrast assessment were considered for quantitative analyses of the CT images. The image noise (IN), the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and the coefficient of variation (COV) were evaluated. Quantitative analyses of the experiments were performed with CT scans representative of five different arm positions. Results of the CT scans acquired at 120 kVp and 250 mAs showed high image quality in patients with both arms raised above the head (SNR: 12.4, CNR: 10.9, and COV: 8.1) and both arms flexed at the elbows on the chest (SNR: 11.5, CNR: 10.2, and COV: 8.8) while the image quality significantly decreased with both arms in the down position (SNR: 9.1, CNR: 7.6, and COV: 11). Both arms raised, one arm raised, and both arms flexed improved the image quality compared to arms in the down position by reducing beam-hardening and streak artifacts caused by the arms being at the side of body. This study provides optimal methods for achieving higher image quality and lower noise in abdominal CT for trauma patients.

  5. Core muscle size assessed by perioperative abdominal CT scan is related to mortality, postoperative complications, and hospitalization after major abdominal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasselager, Rune; Gögenur, Ismail

    2014-01-01

    of these found significantly longer length of stay related to low core muscle area. Seven studies investigated 1-year and long-term mortality after surgery, whereof only one did not find significantly increased mortality related to low core muscle area. Furthermore, one study found increased short-term (... abdominal surgery. RESULTS: Eight studies were found. Four studies investigated postoperative complications related to core muscle area. Three of these studies found significantly increased risk of complications related to low core muscle area. Three studies investigated length of hospitalization, and two...

  6. Pilot study of dynamic cine CT angiography for the evaluation of abdominal aortic aneurysms : Implications for endograft treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teutelink, A; Rutten, A; Muhs, BE; Olree, M; van Herwaarden, JA; de Vos, AM; Prokop, M; Moll, FL; Verhagen, HJM

    Purpose: To utilize 40-slice electrocardiographically (ECG)-gated cine computed tomographic angiography (CTA) to characterize normal aortic motion during the cardiac cycle at relevant anatomical landmarks in preoperative abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) patients. Methods: In 10 consecutive

  7. Quality of pediatric abdominal CT scans performed at a dedicated children's hospital and its referring institutions: a multifactorial evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snow, Aisling [Boston Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Our Lady' s Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Dublin (Ireland); Milliren, Carly E.; Graham, Dionne A. [Boston Children' s Hospital, Program for Patient Safety and Quality, Boston, MA (United States); Callahan, Michael J.; MacDougall, Robert D.; Robertson, Richard L.; Taylor, George A. [Boston Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2017-04-15

    Pediatric patients requiring transfer to a dedicated children's hospital from an outside institution may undergo CT imaging as part of their evaluation. Whether this imaging is performed prior to or after transfer has been shown to impact the radiation dose imparted to the patient. Other quality variables could also be affected by the pediatric experience and expertise of the scanning institution. To identify differences in quality between abdominal CT scans and reports performed at a dedicated children's hospital, and those performed at referring institutions. Fifty consecutive pediatric abdominal CT scans performed at outside institutions were matched (for age, gender and indication) with 50 CT scans performed at a dedicated freestanding children's hospital. We analyzed the scans for technical parameters, report findings, correlation with final clinical diagnosis, and clinical utility. Technical evaluation included use of intravenous and oral contrast agents, anatomical coverage, number of scan phases and size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) for each scan. Outside institution scans were re-reported when the child was admitted to the children's hospital; they were also re-interpreted for this study by children's hospital radiologists who were provided with only the referral information given in the outside institution's report. Anonymized original outside institutional reports and children's hospital admission re-reports were analyzed by two emergency medicine physicians for ease of understanding, degree to which the clinical question was answered, and level of confidence in the report. Mean SSDE was lower (8.68) for children's hospital scans, as compared to outside institution scans (13.29, P = 0.03). Concordance with final clinical diagnosis was significantly lower for original outside institution reports (38/48, 79%) than for both the admission and study children's hospital reports (48/50, 96%; P = 0.005). Children

  8. Quality of pediatric abdominal CT scans performed at a dedicated children's hospital and its referring institutions: a multifactorial evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snow, Aisling; Milliren, Carly E.; Graham, Dionne A.; Callahan, Michael J.; MacDougall, Robert D.; Robertson, Richard L.; Taylor, George A.

    2017-01-01

    Pediatric patients requiring transfer to a dedicated children's hospital from an outside institution may undergo CT imaging as part of their evaluation. Whether this imaging is performed prior to or after transfer has been shown to impact the radiation dose imparted to the patient. Other quality variables could also be affected by the pediatric experience and expertise of the scanning institution. To identify differences in quality between abdominal CT scans and reports performed at a dedicated children's hospital, and those performed at referring institutions. Fifty consecutive pediatric abdominal CT scans performed at outside institutions were matched (for age, gender and indication) with 50 CT scans performed at a dedicated freestanding children's hospital. We analyzed the scans for technical parameters, report findings, correlation with final clinical diagnosis, and clinical utility. Technical evaluation included use of intravenous and oral contrast agents, anatomical coverage, number of scan phases and size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) for each scan. Outside institution scans were re-reported when the child was admitted to the children's hospital; they were also re-interpreted for this study by children's hospital radiologists who were provided with only the referral information given in the outside institution's report. Anonymized original outside institutional reports and children's hospital admission re-reports were analyzed by two emergency medicine physicians for ease of understanding, degree to which the clinical question was answered, and level of confidence in the report. Mean SSDE was lower (8.68) for children's hospital scans, as compared to outside institution scans (13.29, P = 0.03). Concordance with final clinical diagnosis was significantly lower for original outside institution reports (38/48, 79%) than for both the admission and study children's hospital reports (48/50, 96%; P = 0.005). Children

  9. Comparison of image quality and radiation dose between split-filter dual-energy images and single-energy images in single-source abdominal CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Euler, André; Obmann, Markus M; Szucs-Farkas, Zsolt; Mileto, Achille; Zaehringer, Caroline; Falkowski, Anna L; Winkel, David J; Marin, Daniele; Stieltjes, Bram; Krauss, Bernhard; Schindera, Sebastian T

    2018-02-19

    To compare image quality and radiation dose of abdominal split-filter dual-energy CT (SF-DECT) combined with monoenergetic imaging to single-energy CT (SECT) with automatic tube voltage selection (ATVS). Two-hundred single-source abdominal CT scans were performed as SECT with ATVS (n = 100) and SF-DECT (n = 100). SF-DECT scans were reconstructed and subdivided into composed images (SF-CI) and monoenergetic images at 55 keV (SF-MI). Objective and subjective image quality were compared among single-energy images (SEI), SF-CI and SF-MI. CNR and FOM were separately calculated for the liver (e.g. CNR liv ) and the portal vein (CNR pv ). Radiation dose was compared using size-specific dose estimate (SSDE). Results of the three groups were compared using non-parametric tests. Image noise of SF-CI was 18% lower compared to SEI and 48% lower compared to SF-MI (p 0.628). Subjective sharpness was equal between single-energy and monoenergetic images and diagnostic confidence was equal between single-energy and composed images. FOM liv was highest for SF-CI. FOM pv was equal for SEI and SF-MI (p = 0.78). SSDE was significant lower for SF-DECT compared to SECT (p quality at lower radiation dose compared to single-energy CT with ATVS. • Split-filter dual-energy results in 18% lower noise compared to single-energy with ATVS. • Split-filter dual-energy results in 11% lower SSDE compared to single-energy with ATVS. • Spectral shaping of split-filter dual-energy leads to an increased dose-efficiency.

  10. CT angiography for planning transcatheter aortic valve replacement using automated tube voltage selection: Image quality and radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mangold, Stefanie [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Eberhard-Karls University Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany); De Cecco, Carlo N. [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Schoepf, U. Joseph, E-mail: schoepf@musc.edu [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Kuhlman, Taylor S.; Varga-Szemes, Akos [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Caruso, Damiano [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Department of Radiological Sciences, Oncology and Pathology, University of Rome “Sapienza”, Rome (Italy); Duguay, Taylor M. [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Tesche, Christian [Department of Cardiology, Heart Centre Munich-Bogenhausen, Munich (Germany); Vogl, Thomas J. [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Frankfurt, Frankfurt (Germany); Nikolaou, Konstantin [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Eberhard-Karls University Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany); and others

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • TAVR-planning CT was performed with automated tube voltage selection. • Automated tube voltage selection enables individual tube voltage adaptation. • Image quality was diagnostic while radiation exposure was significantly decreased. - Abstract: Purpose: To assess image quality and accuracy of CT angiography (CTA) for transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) planning performed with 3rd generation dual-source CT (DSCT). Material and methods: We evaluated 125 patients who underwent TAVR-planning CTA on 3rd generation DSCT. A two-part protocol was performed including retrospectively ECG-gated coronary CTA (CCTA) and prospectively ECG-triggered aortoiliac CTA using 60 mL of contrast medium. Automated tube voltage selection and advanced iterative reconstruction were applied. Effective dose (ED), signal-to-noise (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) were calculated. Five-point scales were used for subjective image quality analysis. In patients who underwent TAVR, sizing parameters were obtained. Results: Image quality was rated good to excellent in 97.6% of CCTA and 100% of aortoiliac CTAs. CTA studies at >100 kV showed decreased objective image quality compared to 70–100 kV (SNR, all p ≤ 0.0459; CNR, all p ≤ 0.0462). Mean ED increased continuously from 70 to >100 kV (CCTA: 4.5 ± 1.7 mSv–13.6 ± 2.9 mSv, all p ≤ 0.0233; aortoiliac CTA: 2.4 ± 0.9 mSv–6.8 ± 2.7 mSv, all p ≤ 0.0414). In 39 patients TAVR was performed and annulus diameter was within the recommended range in all patients. No severe cardiac or vascular complications were noted. Conclusion: 3rd generation DSCT provides diagnostic image quality in TAVR-planning CTA and facilitates reliable assessment of TAVR device and delivery option while reducing radiation dose.

  11. Quality of routine diagnostic abdominal images generated from a novel detector-based spectral CT scanner: a technical report on a phantom and clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojjati, Mojgan; Van Hedent, Steven; Rassouli, Negin; Tatsuoka, Curtis; Jordan, David; Dhanantwari, Amar; Rajiah, Prabhakar

    2017-11-01

    To evaluate the image quality of routine diagnostic images generated from a novel detector-based spectral detector CT (SDCT) and compare it with CT images obtained from a conventional scanner with an energy-integrating detector (Brilliance iCT), Routine diagnostic (conventional/polyenergetic) images are non-material-specific images that resemble single-energy images obtained at the same radiation, METHODS: ACR guideline-based phantom evaluations were performed on both SDCT and iCT for CT adult body protocol. Retrospective analysis was performed on 50 abdominal CT scans from each scanner. Identical ROIs were placed at multiple locations in the abdomen and attenuation, noise, SNR, and CNR were measured. Subjective image quality analysis on a 5-point Likert scale was performed by 2 readers for enhancement, noise, and image quality. On phantom studies, SDCT images met the ACR requirements for CT number and deviation, CNR and effective radiation dose. In patients, the qualitative scores were significantly higher for the SDCT than the iCT, including enhancement (4.79 ± 0.38 vs. 4.60 ± 0.51, p = 0.005), noise (4.63 ± 0.42 vs. 4.29 ± 0.50, p = 0.000), and quality (4.85 ± 0.32, vs. 4.57 ± 0.50, p = 0.000). The SNR was higher in SDCT than iCT for liver (7.4 ± 4.2 vs. 7.2 ± 5.3, p = 0.662), spleen (8.6 ± 4.1 vs. 7.4 ± 3.5, p = 0.152), kidney (11.1 ± 6.3 vs. 8.7 ± 5.0, p = 0.033), pancreas (6.90 ± 3.45 vs 6.11 ± 2.64, p = 0.303), aorta (14.2 ± 6.2 vs. 11.0 ± 4.9, p = 0.007), but was slightly lower in lumbar-vertebra (7.7 ± 4.2 vs. 7.8 ± 4.5, p = 0.937). The CNR of the SDCT was also higher than iCT for all abdominal organs. Image quality of routine diagnostic images from the SDCT is comparable to images of a conventional CT scanner with energy-integrating detectors, making it suitable for diagnostic purposes.

  12. Reduced Radiation Dose with Model-based Iterative Reconstruction versus Standard Dose with Adaptive Statistical Iterative Reconstruction in Abdominal CT for Diagnosis of Acute Renal Colic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontarensky, Mikael; Alfidja, Agaïcha; Perignon, Renan; Schoenig, Arnaud; Perrier, Christophe; Mulliez, Aurélien; Guy, Laurent; Boyer, Louis

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of reduced-dose abdominal computed tomographic (CT) imaging by using a new generation model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) to diagnose acute renal colic compared with a standard-dose abdominal CT with 50% adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR). This institutional review board-approved prospective study included 118 patients with symptoms of acute renal colic who underwent the following two successive CT examinations: standard-dose ASIR 50% and reduced-dose MBIR. Two radiologists independently reviewed both CT examinations for presence or absence of renal calculi, differential diagnoses, and associated abnormalities. The imaging findings, radiation dose estimates, and image quality of the two CT reconstruction methods were compared. Concordance was evaluated by κ coefficient, and descriptive statistics and t test were used for statistical analysis. Intraobserver correlation was 100% for the diagnosis of renal calculi (κ = 1). Renal calculus (τ = 98.7%; κ = 0.97) and obstructive upper urinary tract disease (τ = 98.16%; κ = 0.95) were detected, and differential or alternative diagnosis was performed (τ = 98.87% κ = 0.95). MBIR allowed a dose reduction of 84% versus standard-dose ASIR 50% (mean volume CT dose index, 1.7 mGy ± 0.8 [standard deviation] vs 10.9 mGy ± 4.6; mean size-specific dose estimate, 2.2 mGy ± 0.7 vs 13.7 mGy ± 3.9; P < .001) without a conspicuous deterioration in image quality (reduced-dose MBIR vs ASIR 50% mean scores, 3.83 ± 0.49 vs 3.92 ± 0.27, respectively; P = .32) or increase in noise (reduced-dose MBIR vs ASIR 50% mean, respectively, 18.36 HU ± 2.53 vs 17.40 HU ± 3.42). Its main drawback remains the long time required for reconstruction (mean, 40 minutes). A reduced-dose protocol with MBIR allowed a dose reduction of 84% without increasing noise and without an conspicuous deterioration in image quality in patients suspected of having renal colic.

  13. Lateral decubitus HRCT: a simple technique to replace expiratory CT in children with air trapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Soo-Jung; Choi, Byeong-Kyoo; Kim, Hyeon Joo; Lee, Soo Hyun; Choi, Seong Hoon; Park, Sang Joon; Goo, Hyun Woo; Lee, Jin Seong; Yoon, Chong Hyun [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Asan Medical Centre, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea)

    2002-03-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of lateral decubitus high-resolution CT (HRCT) in detecting air trapping in children. Materials and methods: HRCT scans of 21 children with heterogeneous lung attenuation caused by air trapping (n=10) or with infiltrative lung disease (n=11) were reviewed retrospectively. The air-trapping disease included bronchiolitis obliterans (n=7), bronchial obstruction due to mediastinal lymphoma (n=1), endobronchial haemangioma (n=1) and foreign body aspiration (n=1). HRCT was performed in both lateral decubitus positions as well as the supine position. The attenuation (Hounsfield units; HU) was measured in both the hypo- and adjacent hyper-attenuating areas of the heterogeneous lung portion, and the difference of attenuation between these two areas was calculated in the supine and both lateral decubitus scans, respectively. The attenuation differences of the three scans were compared in each group. Results: The attenuation difference was larger in the ipsilateral decubitus (207.95{+-}105.24 HU) scans than in the contralateral (121.25{+-}90.05 HU) or supine (162{+-}94.01 HU) scans in the air-trapping group (P<0.05). There were no significant differences among the three scans in the infiltrative lung disease group (P>0.05). Conclusions: Lateral decubitus HRCT is an effective adjunct to standard HRCT in the evaluation of air trapping as a cause of mosaic lung attenuation in uncooperative paediatric patients. (orig.)

  14. SU-F-207-02: Use of Postmortem Subjects for Subjective Image Quality Assessment in Abdominal CT Protocols with Iterative Reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mench, A [Salem Hospital, Salem, OR (United States); Lipnharski, I; Carranza, C; Lamoureux, R; Smajdor, L; Cormack, B; Mohammed, T; Rill, L; Arreola, M [University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Sinclair, L [Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: New radiation dose reduction technologies are emerging constantly in the medical imaging field. The latest of these technologies, iterative reconstruction (IR) in CT, presents the ability to reduce dose significantly and hence provides great opportunity for CT protocol optimization. However, without effective analysis of image quality, the reduction in radiation exposure becomes irrelevant. This work explores the use of postmortem subjects as an image quality assessment medium for protocol optimizations in abdominal CT. Methods: Three female postmortem subjects were scanned using the Abdomen-Pelvis (AP) protocol at reduced minimum tube current and target noise index (SD) settings of 12.5, 17.5, 20.0, and 25.0. Images were reconstructed using two strengths of iterative reconstruction. Radiologists and radiology residents from several subspecialties were asked to evaluate 8 AP image sets including the current facility default scan protocol and 7 scans with the parameters varied as listed above. Images were viewed in the soft tissue window and scored on a 3-point scale as acceptable, borderline acceptable, and unacceptable for diagnosis. The facility default AP scan was identified to the reviewer while the 7 remaining AP scans were randomized and de-identified of acquisition and reconstruction details. The observers were also asked to comment on the subjective image quality criteria they used for scoring images. This included visibility of specific anatomical structures and tissue textures. Results: Radiologists scored images as acceptable or borderline acceptable for target noise index settings of up to 20. Due to the postmortem subjects’ close representation of living human anatomy, readers were able to evaluate images as they would those of actual patients. Conclusion: Postmortem subjects have already been proven useful for direct CT organ dose measurements. This work illustrates the validity of their use for the crucial evaluation of image quality

  15. [Significance of abdominal wall CT-angiography in planning DIEA perforator flaps, TRAM flaps and SIEA flaps].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fansa, H; Schirmer, S; Frerichs, O; Gehl, H B

    2011-04-01

    Muscle sparing TRAM flaps and DIEA perforator flaps are standard procedures for breast reconstruction. Recently CT-angiography has been established to evaluate perforator vessels pre-operatively. CT-angiography was introduced to our department in July 2009. In a retrospective analysis data of the last 20 patients (altogether 22 flaps) before CT-angiography introduction and the following 20 (also 22 flaps) patients after introduction of CT-angiography were analysed with regard to the ratio of TRAM to DIEP flaps, and the time required to raise the flaps. The same surgeon raised all flaps. As different surgeons performed dissection of the recipient site, anastomoses, and insertion of flaps, and patients received primary (with sentinel or complete lymphadenctomy) or secondary reconstructions, only the time required harvesting the flap was compared. Thus other influences on raising the flap were eliminated. DIEP flaps were harvested with one single perforator. If perfusion or was considered not to be safe via one single perforator a muscle sparing TRAM flap (ms2) was raised. Angiography was performed using a 64-slice multi-detector CT scanner. CT-angiography did not lead to an increased rate of DIEP flaps in relation to ms2-TRAM flaps. Harvesting time of all flap types with CT-angiography on average was 121 min, without CT-angiography 135 min. This was not significantly different. However, separate analysis of DIEP flaps and ms2-TRAM flaps revealed a significant advantage of CT-angiography based harvesting of DIEP flaps of 26 min: with CT-angiography 101 min vs. 127 min without CT-angiography (p<0.028). There were no significant differences for ms2-TRAM flaps. All scans showed course and branching, diameter and size of the inferior epigastric artery. If evident the superficial inferior epigastric artery (SIEA) was marked. Dosage was 292 mGy-606 mGy×cm dependent on body weight. CTDI was 6.8-14.7 mGy. CT-angiography is a reproducible and observer independent procedure

  16. The blood flow channel index as novel predictor of abdominal aortic aneurysm impending rupture based on the intraluminal thrombus angio-CT study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiernicki, Ireneusz; Szumilowicz, Pawel; Kazimierczak, Arkadiusz; Falkowski, Aleksander; Rutkowski, Donald; Gutowski, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Objective: In this study the hypothesis that the thickness of the thinnest part of the thrombus, combined with bleeding into the intraluminal thrombus (ILT), is associated with a possible higher risk of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) rupture was investigated, independently of aneurysm diameter, by using angio-CT. This article describes blood flow channel index based on the CT imaging findings that may help identify impending rupture prior to complete rupture. Methods: Computed tomographic images of 310 hospitalized patients with infrarenal AAA, were collected over a three-year period. They were divided into two main groups: 125 with bleeding into the ILT and control group 185 without the presence of blood in the thrombus. Patients were also analyzed in subgroups with ruptured, symptomatic and asymptomatic AAAs. A blood flow channel index was formulated as: maximal/minimal thickness ratio of thrombus from the same CT scan. Results: In dissected ILT group blood flow channel index was over a twofold higher than in group with intact ILT (19.0 [1.2–89.3] vs. (9.7 [1.3–38.9]; p < 0.001), respectively. Median thickness at the thinnest part of the ILT in dissected thrombus group was lower (1.3 mm [0.3–16.0]) than in group with intact ILT (1.7 mm [0.2–23.4]; p < 0.003). Conclusion: An association between a high blood flow channel index and bleeding into the ILT based on angio-CT study was demonstrated, and can suggest the aneurysm propensity for rupture

  17. The blood flow channel index as novel predictor of abdominal aortic aneurysm impending rupture based on the intraluminal thrombus angio-CT study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiernicki, Ireneusz, E-mail: irekwie@wp.eu [Department of Vascular Surgery and Angiology, Pomeranian Medical University, Szczecin (Poland); Szumilowicz, Pawel; Kazimierczak, Arkadiusz [Department of Vascular Surgery and Angiology, Pomeranian Medical University, Szczecin (Poland); Falkowski, Aleksander; Rutkowski, Donald [Department of Interventional Radiology, Pomeranian Medical University, Szczecin (Poland); Gutowski, Piotr [Department of Vascular Surgery and Angiology, Pomeranian Medical University, Szczecin (Poland)

    2015-04-15

    Objective: In this study the hypothesis that the thickness of the thinnest part of the thrombus, combined with bleeding into the intraluminal thrombus (ILT), is associated with a possible higher risk of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) rupture was investigated, independently of aneurysm diameter, by using angio-CT. This article describes blood flow channel index based on the CT imaging findings that may help identify impending rupture prior to complete rupture. Methods: Computed tomographic images of 310 hospitalized patients with infrarenal AAA, were collected over a three-year period. They were divided into two main groups: 125 with bleeding into the ILT and control group 185 without the presence of blood in the thrombus. Patients were also analyzed in subgroups with ruptured, symptomatic and asymptomatic AAAs. A blood flow channel index was formulated as: maximal/minimal thickness ratio of thrombus from the same CT scan. Results: In dissected ILT group blood flow channel index was over a twofold higher than in group with intact ILT (19.0 [1.2–89.3] vs. (9.7 [1.3–38.9]; p < 0.001), respectively. Median thickness at the thinnest part of the ILT in dissected thrombus group was lower (1.3 mm [0.3–16.0]) than in group with intact ILT (1.7 mm [0.2–23.4]; p < 0.003). Conclusion: An association between a high blood flow channel index and bleeding into the ILT based on angio-CT study was demonstrated, and can suggest the aneurysm propensity for rupture.

  18. Automatic abdominal lymph node detection method based on local intensity structure analysis from 3D x-ray CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Yoshihiko; Nimura, Yukitaka; Kitasaka, Takayuki; Mizuno, Shinji; Furukawa, Kazuhiro; Goto, Hidemi; Fujiwara, Michitaka; Misawa, Kazunari; Ito, Masaaki; Nawano, Shigeru; Mori, Kensaku

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents an automated method of abdominal lymph node detection to aid the preoperative diagnosis of abdominal cancer surgery. In abdominal cancer surgery, surgeons must resect not only tumors and metastases but also lymph nodes that might have a metastasis. This procedure is called lymphadenectomy or lymph node dissection. Insufficient lymphadenectomy carries a high risk for relapse. However, excessive resection decreases a patient's quality of life. Therefore, it is important to identify the location and the structure of lymph nodes to make a suitable surgical plan. The proposed method consists of candidate lymph node detection and false positive reduction. Candidate lymph nodes are detected using a multi-scale blob-like enhancement filter based on local intensity structure analysis. To reduce false positives, the proposed method uses a classifier based on support vector machine with the texture and shape information. The experimental results reveal that it detects 70.5% of the lymph nodes with 13.0 false positives per case.

  19. Vascular thrombosis as a cause of abdominal pain in a patient with neuroendocrine carcinoma of pancreas: Findings on 68Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naswa, Niraj; Kumar, Rakesh; Bal, Chandrasekhar; Malhotra, Arun

    2012-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors of pancreas are relatively rare neoplasms and are classified as either functioning or non-functioning tumors. A 55-year-old female diagnosed with a large, well-differentiated, non-functional neuroendocrine carcinoma of pancreas, presented with abdominal pain of increasing severity. A contrast-enhanced examination of the abdomen was performed to reveal a large, diffuse, enhancing pancreatic mass with multiple filling defects within the mesenteric vasculature. We present findings on 68 Ga-labeled [1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid]-1-NaI 3 -Octreotide, positron emission tomography-computed tomography ( 68 Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT) and the importance of somatostatin receptor-based PET imaging in such patients

  20. SU-F-I-47: Optimizing Protocols for Image Quality and Dose in Abdominal CT of Large Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, L; Yester, M [UAB Medical Center, Birmingham, AL (United Kingdom)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Newer CT scanners are able to use scout views to adjust mA throughout the scan in order to achieve a given noise level. However, given constraints of radiologist preferences for kVp and rotation time, it may not be possible to achieve an acceptable noise level for large patients. A study was initiated to determine for which patients kVp and/or rotation time should be changed in order to achieve acceptable image quality. Methods: Patient scans were reviewed on two new Emergency Department scanners (Philips iCT) to identify patients over a large range of sizes. These iCTs were set with a limit of 500 mA to safeguard against a failure that might cause a CT scan to be (incorrectly) obtained at too-high mA. Scout views of these scans were assessed for both AP and LAT patient width and AP and LAT standard deviation in an ROI over the liver. Effective diameter and product of the scout standard deviations over the liver were both studied as possible metrics for identifying patients who would need kVp and/or rotation time changed. The mA used for the liver in the CT was compared to these metrics for those patients whose CT scans showed acceptable image quality. Results: Both effective diameter and product of the scout standard deviations over the liver result in similar predictions for which patients will require the kVp and/or rotation time to be changed to achieve an optimal combination of image quality and dose. Conclusion: Two mechanisms for CT technologists to determine based on scout characteristics what kVp, mA limit, and rotation time to use when DoseRight with our physicians’ preferred kVp and rotation time will not yield adequate image quality are described.

  1. Estimation of CT-derived abdominal visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue depots from anthropometry in Europeans, South Asians and African Caribbeans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie V Eastwood

    Full Text Available South Asians and African Caribbeans experience more cardiometabolic disease than Europeans. Risk factors include visceral (VAT and subcutaneous abdominal (SAT adipose tissue, which vary with ethnicity and are difficult to quantify using anthropometry.We developed and cross-validated ethnicity and gender-specific equations using anthropometrics to predict VAT and SAT.669 Europeans, 514 South Asians and 227 African Caribbeans (70 ± 7 years underwent anthropometric measurement and abdominal CT scanning. South Asian and African Caribbean participants were first-generation migrants living in London. Prediction equations were derived for CT-measured VAT and SAT using stepwise regression, then cross-validated by comparing actual and predicted means.South Asians had more and African Caribbeans less VAT than Europeans. For basic VAT prediction equations (age and waist circumference, model fit was better in men (R(2 range 0.59-0.71 than women (range 0.35-0.59. Expanded equations (+ weight, height, hip and thigh circumference improved fit for South Asian and African Caribbean women (R(2 0.35 to 0.55, and 0.43 to 0.56 respectively. For basic SAT equations, R(2 was 0.69-0.77, and for expanded equations it was 0.72-0.86. Cross-validation showed differences between actual and estimated VAT of <7%, and SAT of <8% in all groups, apart from VAT in South Asian women which disagreed by 16%.We provide ethnicity- and gender-specific VAT and SAT prediction equations, derived from a large tri-ethnic sample. Model fit was reasonable for SAT and VAT in men, while basic VAT models should be used cautiously in South Asian and African Caribbean women. These equations will aid studies of mechanisms of cardiometabolic disease in later life, where imaging data are not available.

  2. Inferior mesenteric artery as outflow vessel in endoleaks after abdominal aortic stent-graft implantation: 36-month follow-up CT study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorffner, R.; Mostbeck, G. [Dept. of Radiology, Hospital of the Brothers of St. John, Eisenstadt (Austria); Schoder, M.; Thurnher, S.; Lammer, J. [Dept. of Angiography and Interventional Radiology, Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Hoelzenbein, T. [Dept. of Vascular Surgery, Univ. of Vienna (Austria)

    2001-11-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the role of the inferior mesenteric artery (IMA) as an outflow vessel in endoleaks after abdominal aortic stent-graft implantation. Forty consecutive patients in whom abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) had been treated with stent-graft implantation were evaluated retrospectively. Spiral-CT examinations and angiographies up to 36 months after implantation were analyzed. In 29 (73%) of the 40 patients the IMA was perfused prior to implantation. In 5 (17%) of these 29 cases, the artery remained perfused after stent-graft insertion. In all 5 cases, endoleaks were detected; however, in none of these cases was the IMA the sole cause. In 3 of these 5 cases, angiography showed antegrade flow in the IMA. Implantation of extension stent grafts caused thrombosis of the aneurysmal sac and the IMA. There were no secondary endoleaks caused by the IMA at the 36-month follow-up examinations. The majority of IMAs which are patent prior to intervention occlude after successful stent-graft insertion. In cases with leaks and angiographically proven antegrade flow in the IMA, implantation of extension stent grafts is a therapeutic alternative to embolization. In this study, the IMA was not responsible for secondary endoleaks. (orig.)

  3. Inferior mesenteric artery as outflow vessel in endoleaks after abdominal aortic stent-graft implantation: 36-month follow-up CT study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorffner, R.; Mostbeck, G.; Schoder, M.; Thurnher, S.; Lammer, J.; Hoelzenbein, T.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the role of the inferior mesenteric artery (IMA) as an outflow vessel in endoleaks after abdominal aortic stent-graft implantation. Forty consecutive patients in whom abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) had been treated with stent-graft implantation were evaluated retrospectively. Spiral-CT examinations and angiographies up to 36 months after implantation were analyzed. In 29 (73%) of the 40 patients the IMA was perfused prior to implantation. In 5 (17%) of these 29 cases, the artery remained perfused after stent-graft insertion. In all 5 cases, endoleaks were detected; however, in none of these cases was the IMA the sole cause. In 3 of these 5 cases, angiography showed antegrade flow in the IMA. Implantation of extension stent grafts caused thrombosis of the aneurysmal sac and the IMA. There were no secondary endoleaks caused by the IMA at the 36-month follow-up examinations. The majority of IMAs which are patent prior to intervention occlude after successful stent-graft insertion. In cases with leaks and angiographically proven antegrade flow in the IMA, implantation of extension stent grafts is a therapeutic alternative to embolization. In this study, the IMA was not responsible for secondary endoleaks. (orig.)

  4. Effect of gantry rotation speed and scan mode on peristalsis motion artifact frequency and severity at abdominal CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Rutwik; Khoram, Rhanna; Lambert, Jack W; Sun, Yuxin; Wang, Zhen J; Webb, Emily M; Yeh, Benjamin M

    2018-02-15

    The purpose of the study was to understand the effect of CT gantry speed and axial vs. helical scan mode on the frequency and severity of bowel peristalsis artifacts. We retrospectively identified 150 oncologic abdominopelvic CT scans obtained on a 256 slice CT scanner: 50 scans obtained with Axial mode and 0.5-s gantry rotation time (Slow-Axial); 50 with Axial mode and 0.28-s gantry rotation time (Fast-Axial); and 50 scans with Helical mode and 0.28-s gantry rotation time (Fast-Helical). The patients included 74 women and 76 men with a mean age of 61 years (range 22-85 years). Two readers viewed all CT scans to record the presence and severity of bowel peristalsis artifact, location of artifact (stomach, duodenum/jejunum, ileum, and colon) and artifact location relative to bowel interface (gas-bowel, fluid-bowel, and gas-fluid). The severity of artifacts was recorded subjectively on a 3-point scale, and objectively based on maximum length of the artifact. Peristalsis artifact was more commonly seen with Slow-Axial scan acquisition (37 of 50 patient scans, or 74%) than Fast-Axial (15 in 50 patient scans, or 30%, p peristalsis artifacts were not significantly different between scan techniques. Peristalsis artifacts are common at abdominopelvic CT scans. Fast gantry rotation speed significantly reduces the frequency of bowel peristalsis artifacts and should be a consideration when imaging of bowel and structures near bowel is critical.

  5. Abdominal tuberculosis: Imaging features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Jose M.; Madureira, Antonio J.; Vieira, Alberto; Ramos, Isabel

    2005-01-01

    Radiological findings of abdominal tuberculosis can mimic those of many different diseases. A high level of suspicion is required, especially in high-risk population. In this article, we will describe barium studies, ultrasound (US) and computed tomography (CT) findings of abdominal tuberculosis (TB), with emphasis in the latest. We will illustrate CT findings that can help in the diagnosis of abdominal tuberculosis and describe imaging features that differentiate it from other inflammatory and neoplastic diseases, particularly lymphoma and Crohn's disease. As tuberculosis can affect any organ in the abdomen, emphasis is placed to ileocecal involvement, lymphadenopathy, peritonitis and solid organ disease (liver, spleen and pancreas). A positive culture or hystologic analysis of biopsy is still required in many patients for definitive diagnosis. Learning objectives:1.To review the relevant pathophysiology of abdominal tuberculosis. 2.Illustrate CT findings that can help in the diagnosis

  6. Abdominal tuberculosis: Imaging features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Jose M. [Department of Radiology, Hospital de S. Joao, Porto (Portugal)]. E-mail: jmpjesus@yahoo.com; Madureira, Antonio J. [Department of Radiology, Hospital de S. Joao, Porto (Portugal); Vieira, Alberto [Department of Radiology, Hospital de S. Joao, Porto (Portugal); Ramos, Isabel [Department of Radiology, Hospital de S. Joao, Porto (Portugal)

    2005-08-01

    Radiological findings of abdominal tuberculosis can mimic those of many different diseases. A high level of suspicion is required, especially in high-risk population. In this article, we will describe barium studies, ultrasound (US) and computed tomography (CT) findings of abdominal tuberculosis (TB), with emphasis in the latest. We will illustrate CT findings that can help in the diagnosis of abdominal tuberculosis and describe imaging features that differentiate it from other inflammatory and neoplastic diseases, particularly lymphoma and Crohn's disease. As tuberculosis can affect any organ in the abdomen, emphasis is placed to ileocecal involvement, lymphadenopathy, peritonitis and solid organ disease (liver, spleen and pancreas). A positive culture or hystologic analysis of biopsy is still required in many patients for definitive diagnosis. Learning objectives:1.To review the relevant pathophysiology of abdominal tuberculosis. 2.Illustrate CT findings that can help in the diagnosis.

  7. Blunt abdominal trauma in adults: role of CT in the diagnosis and management of visceral injuries. Part 2: Gastrointestinal tract and retroperitoneal organs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, C.D.; Terrier, F. [Department of Radiology, Division of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, 24, Rue Micheli-du-Crest, CH-1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Mentha, G. [Department of Surgery, Division of Abdominal Surgery, Geneva University Hospital, 24, Rue Micheli-du-Crest, CH-1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Schmidlin, F. [Department of Surgery, Division of Urology, Geneva University Hospital, 24, Rue Micheli-du-Crest, CH-1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland)

    1998-06-02

    Computed tomography plays an important role in the detection and management of blunt visceral injuries in adults. Current standard examination techniques enable detection of the majority of perforating or devascularizing bowel injuries, although diagnostic findings are often subtle and meticulous inspection is required. Computed tomography may demonstrate pancreatic contusions and lacerations and help in distinguishing minor traumatic lesions without involvement of the pancreatic duct (organ injury scale, grades I and II) from deep lacerations with ductal involvement (grades III and V). Computed tomography enables distinguishing renal contusions and minor cortical lacerations that can usually be managed conservatively (injuries of grades I-III) from corticomedullary lacerations and injuries of the major renal vessels (grades IV and V) that have a less favorable prognosis and more commonly require surgical repair. In addition, CT is well suited for the detection of active renal hemorrhage and guidance of transcatheter embolization treatment and delineation of preexisting benign or malignant pathologies that may predispose to posttraumatic hemorrhage. The radiologist`s awareness of the diagnostic CT findings of abdominal visceral injuries as well as their clinical and surgical implications are important prerequisites for optimal patient management. (orig.) With 11 figs., 5 tabs., 56 refs.

  8. Abdominal adipose tissue distribution in obese children. US versus CT measurements; Valutazione della distribuzione del tessuto adiposo addominale nei bambini obesi. Confronto tra ecografia e Tomografia Computerizzata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrozzi, F.; Zuccoli, G.; Tognini, G.; Castriota-Scanderbeg, A.; Bacchini, E. [Parma Univ., Parma (Italy). Ist. di Scienze Radiologiche; Bernasconi, S. [Modena Univ., Modena (Italy). Clinica Pediatrica; Campani, R. [Pavia Univ., Pavia (Italy). Ist. di Radiologia

    1999-12-01

    Computed Tomography (CT) and, more recently, ultrasound (US), have proved excellent tools for quantifying adipose tissue distribution. Body fat distribution is an important factor in the treatment of obesity and its complications. In this work it is investigated the correlation between CT and US measurements in pediatric obesity. Forty obese children and adolescents aged 4.1-14.8 years were submitted to CT and US. Intra-abdominal, subcutaneous and total body fat were calculated (in cm{sup 2}), with the CT image analysis software. The rectus muscle-spine and rectus muscle-aorta distances, as indicative of visceral fat thickness, were measured on US images with(out) compression. The distance between skin fat and fat-rectus muscle interfaces was measured as subcutaneous fat thickness. US-CT findings have been compared with other morphometric variables-i.e., patient's (ideal) body weight and skin fold measures. A statistically significant correlation was found between the CT measurement of visceral fat and the aorta-rectus muscle and rectus muscle-spine distances (r=0.80 and 0.74, respectively). The US measurements of subcutaneous fat were correlated with CT subcutaneous fat area (r=0.82). No correlation was found between overweight, as calculated by body mass index, and CT or US fat. In conclusions, the findings indicate that US is as useful as CT in evaluating body fat distribution in pediatric obesity. [Italian] La TC e piu' recentemente l'ecografia si sono dimostrate eccellenti tecniche di valutazione della quantita' e della distribuzione del tessuto adiposo corporeo. La compartimentazione del grasso corporeo ha, infatti, importanti implicazioni per il trattamento dell'obesita' e delle sue complicanze. Scopo dello studio e' stato quello di correlare i risultati ottenuti con la TC con quelli ecografici nella valutazione dell'obesita' del paziente pediatrico. Quaranta bambini obesi con eta' compresa tra 4,1 e 14

  9. Dual-energy CT iodine maps as an alternative quantitative imaging biomarker to abdominal CT perfusion: determination of appropriate trigger delays for acquisition using bolus tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skornitzke, Stephan; Fritz, Franziska; Mayer, Philipp; Koell, Marco; Hansen, Jens; Pahn, Gregor; Hackert, Thilo; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Stiller, Wolfram

    2018-03-07

    Quantitative evaluation of different bolus tracking trigger delays for acquisition of dual energy (DE) CT iodine maps as an alternative to CT perfusion. Prior to this retrospective analysis of prospectively acquired data, DECT perfusion sequences were dynamically acquired in 22 patients with pancreatic carcinoma using dual source CT at 80/140 kV p with tin filtration. After deformable motion-correction, perfusion maps of blood flow (BF) were calculated from 80 kV p image series of DECT, and iodine maps were calculated for each of the 34 DECT acquisitions per patient. BF and iodine concentrations were measured in healthy pancreatic tissue and carcinoma. To evaluate potential DECT acquisition triggered by bolus tracking, measured iodine concentrations from the 34 DECT acquisitions per patient corresponding to different trigger delays were assessed for correlation to BF and intergroup differences between tissue types depending on acquisition time. Average BF measured in healthy pancreatic tissue and carcinoma was 87.6 ± 28.4 and 38.6 ± 22.2 ml/100 ml min -1 , respectively. Correlation between iodine concentrations and BF was statistically significant for bolus tracking with trigger delay greater than 0 s (r max = 0.89; p alternative to CT perfusion measurements of BF. Advances in knowledge: After clinical validation, DECT iodine maps of pancreas acquired using bolus tracking with appropriate trigger delay as determined in this study could offer an alternative quantitative imaging biomarker providing functional information for tumor assessment at reduced patient radiation exposure compared to CT perfusion measurements of BF.

  10. Abdominal emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raissaki, M.

    2012-01-01

    children and young individuals with abdominal pain. Sensitivity and specificity for US in diagnosing intussusception, midgut volvulus, urinary tract abnormalities and appendicitis is over 90%. US, occasionally with x-rays, usually suffice for an accurate diagnosis. Upper GI contrast studies are indicated in suspected malrotation, volvulus and atypical high obstruction cases. Lower GI contrast studies are indicated in low/colonic obstruction. CT and/or MRI should be reserved for atypical, complex cases when US and conventional radiography are equivocal or inconclusive. The radiologist should engage oneself to act immediately, consider and actively exclude those diagnoses that could be a threat to the child's health or life. The appropriate modality should be chosen and proper technique should be applied. Radiologists should function as clinicians, take initiative and discuss options and alternative diagnoses. Lack of experience should not delay performance of tests. Our job is finished when a diagnostic test has a written report provided that we make sure the child is managed properly.

  11. Acute traumatic abdominal wall hernia

    OpenAIRE

    Hartog, Dennis; Tuinebreijer, Wim; Oprel, Pim; Patka, Peter

    2011-01-01

    textabstractAlthough blunt abdominal trauma is frequent, traumatic abdominal wall hernias (TAWH) are rare. We describe a large TAWH with associated intra-abdominal lesions that were caused by high-energy trauma. The diagnosis was missed by clinical examination but was subsequently revealed by a computed tomography (CT) scan. Repair consisted of an open anatomical reconstruction of the abdominal wall layers with reinforcement by an intraperitoneal composite mesh. The patient recovered well and...

  12. A case of lanthanum carbonate ingestion thought to be phlebosclerotic colitis on CT imaging and abdominal radiograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, K.; Balcam, S.

    2017-01-01

    A male admitted in the early hours of the morning, complained of a four week, right sided, non-radiating, dull and intermittent abdominal pain. Imaging suggested a diagnosis of phlebosclerotic colitis which was later discounted when the patients' history of lanthanum carbonate ingestion was examined. Phlebosclerotic colitis mostly affects the Asian population, and its cause is still not known, but can be associated with specific radiographic features. Collections of lanthanum may confuse a diagnosis of phlebosclerotic colitis as well as other factors such as voxel errors, photon starvation and movement. - Highlights: • PC can be non-specific, its cause unknown, diagnosis is often delayed. • PC depends on specific radiographic features. • Lanthanum Carbonate can collect within the lumen and confuses diagnosis. • Voxel errors, photon starvation and patient movement can displace densities.

  13. Can FDG-PET/CT replace blind bone marrow biopsy of the posterior iliac crest in Ewing sarcoma?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasalak, Oemer; Glaudemans, Andor W.J.M.; Overbosch, Jelle; Kwee, Thomas C.; Jutte, Paul C.

    2018-01-01

    To determine and compare the value of 18 F-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) to blind bone marrow biopsy (BMB) of the posterior iliac crest in detecting metastatic bone marrow involvement in newly diagnosed Ewing sarcoma. This retrospective study included 20 patients with newly diagnosed Ewing sarcoma who underwent pretreatment FDG-PET/CT and a total of 38 blind BMBs (two unilateral and 18 bilateral) of the posterior iliac crest. FDG-PET/CT scans were evaluated for bone marrow involvement, both in the posterior iliac crest and other sites, and compared to blind BMB results. FDG-PET/CT was positive for bone marrow involvement in 7/38 posterior iliac crests, whereas BMB was positive in 5/38 posterior iliac crests. FDG-PET/CT and BMB results in the posterior iliac crest agreed in 36/38 cases (94.7%, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 82.7-98.5%). On a patient level, FDG-PET/CT was positive for bone marrow involvement in 4/20 patients, whereas BMB of the posterior iliac crest was positive in 3/20 patients. On a patient level, FDG-PET/CT and BMB results agreed in 19/20 patients (95.0%, 95% CI: 76.4-99.1%). The only discrepancies between FDG-PET/CT and BMB were observed in two BMBs of one patient. Both BMBs in this patient were negative, whereas FDG-PET/CT indicated bilateral posterior iliac crest involvement and also extensive bone marrow involvement elsewhere. FDG-PET/CT appears to be a valuable method for metastatic bone marrow assessment in newly diagnosed Ewing sarcoma. The routine use of blind BMB of the posterior iliac crest should be reconsidered when FDG-PET/CT is available. (orig.)

  14. Significance of sagittal reformations in routine thoracic and abdominal multislice CT studies for detecting osteoporotic fractures and other spine abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Dirk; Bauer, Jan S.; Zeile, Martin; Rummeny, Ernst J. [Klinikum Rechts der Isar, TU Muenchen, Department of Radiology, Muenchen (Germany); Link, Thomas M. [Musculoskeletal and Quantitative Imaging Research, UCSF, Department of Radiology, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2008-08-15

    The purpose was to assess osteoporotic vertebral fractures and other spinal lesions in sagittal reformations obtained from routine multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) studies of the thorax and abdomen, to compare sagittal reformations with axial images in detecting these lesions and to investigate how frequently they were missed in the official radiology report. Routine abdominal or thoracoabdominal MDCT using a standard protocol was performed in 112 postmenopausal women. Axial images and sagittal reformations were analyzed separately by two radiologists in consensus and were compared in order to evaluate how often spinal lesions could be detected. In addition the official radiology reports were assessed to determine how many of those abnormalities were identified. Spine abnormalities were visualized in 101/112 postmenopausal women. In 27 patients osteoporotic vertebral deformities were found; 6 of these were shown in the axial images, but none of these were diagnosed in the official radiology report. Additional abnormalities included degenerative disc disease, osteoarthritis of the facet joints, scoliosis, hemangiomas and bone metastases. In only 9/101 patients spine abnormalities were mentioned in the radiology report. Sagittal reformations of standard MDCT images provide important additional information on spinal abnormalities; in particular, osteoporotic vertebral deformities are substantially better detected. (orig.)

  15. Tuberculosis abdominal Abdominal tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    T. Rubio; M. T. Gaztelu; A. Calvo; M. Repiso; H. Sarasíbar; F. Jiménez Bermejo; A. Martínez Echeverría

    2005-01-01

    La tuberculosis abdominal cursa con un cuadro inespecífico, con difícil diagnóstico diferencial respecto a otras entidades de similar semiología. Presentamos el caso de un varón que ingresa por presentar dolor abdominal, pérdida progresiva y notoria de peso corporal y fiebre de dos meses de evolución. El cultivo de la biopsia de colon mostró presencia de bacilo de Koch.Abdominal tuberculosis develops according to a non-specific clinical picture, with a difficult differential diagnosis with re...

  16. PET/CT in cancer: moderate sample sizes may suffice to justify replacement of a regional gold standard

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerke, Oke; Poulsen, Mads Hvid; Bouchelouche, Kirsten

    2009-01-01

    /CT also performs well in adjacent areas, then sample sizes in accuracy studies can be reduced. PROCEDURES: Traditional standard power calculations for demonstrating sensitivities of both 80% and 90% are shown. The argument is then described in general terms and demonstrated by an ongoing study...... of metastasized prostate cancer. RESULTS: An added value in accuracy of PET/CT in adjacent areas can outweigh a downsized target level of accuracy in the gold standard region, justifying smaller sample sizes. CONCLUSIONS: If PET/CT provides an accuracy benefit in adjacent regions, then sample sizes can be reduced...

  17. Nontraumatic abdominal emergencies: acute abdominal pain: diagnostic strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marincek, B. [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Zurich, Raemistrasse 100, 8091 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2002-09-01

    Common causes of acute abdominal pain include appendicitis, cholecystitis, bowel obstruction, urinary colic, perforated peptic ulcer, pancreatitis, diverticulitis, and nonspecific, nonsurgical abdominal pain. The topographic classification of acute abdominal pain (pain in one of the four abdominal quadrants, diffuse abdominal pain, flank or epigastric pain) facilitates the choice of the imaging technique. The initial radiological evaluation often consists of plain abdominal radiography, despite significant diagnostic limitations. The traditional indications for plain films - bowel obstruction, pneumoperitoneum, and the search of ureteral calculi - are questioned by helical computed tomography (CT). Although ultrasonography (US) is in many centers the modality of choice for imaging the gallbladder and the pelvis in children and women of reproductive age, CT is considered to be one of the most valued tools for triaging patients with acute abdominal pain. CT is particularly beneficial in patients with marked obesity, unclear US findings, bowel obstruction, and multiple lesions. The introduction of multidetector row CT (MDCT) has further enhanced the utility of CT in imaging patients with acute abdominal pain. (orig.)

  18. Nontraumatic abdominal emergencies: acute abdominal pain: diagnostic strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marincek, B.

    2002-01-01

    Common causes of acute abdominal pain include appendicitis, cholecystitis, bowel obstruction, urinary colic, perforated peptic ulcer, pancreatitis, diverticulitis, and nonspecific, nonsurgical abdominal pain. The topographic classification of acute abdominal pain (pain in one of the four abdominal quadrants, diffuse abdominal pain, flank or epigastric pain) facilitates the choice of the imaging technique. The initial radiological evaluation often consists of plain abdominal radiography, despite significant diagnostic limitations. The traditional indications for plain films - bowel obstruction, pneumoperitoneum, and the search of ureteral calculi - are questioned by helical computed tomography (CT). Although ultrasonography (US) is in many centers the modality of choice for imaging the gallbladder and the pelvis in children and women of reproductive age, CT is considered to be one of the most valued tools for triaging patients with acute abdominal pain. CT is particularly beneficial in patients with marked obesity, unclear US findings, bowel obstruction, and multiple lesions. The introduction of multidetector row CT (MDCT) has further enhanced the utility of CT in imaging patients with acute abdominal pain. (orig.)

  19. Gallstone ileus: CT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delabrousse, E.; Bartholomot, B.; Sohm, O.; Kastler, B. [Dept. of Radiology A, CHU Jean Minjoz, University of Besancon (France); Wallerand, H. [Dept. of Surgery, CHU Jean Minjoz, University of Besancon (France)

    2000-06-01

    Gallstone ileus is a rare complication of recurrent gallstone cholecystitis. The classic radiographic triad of small bowel obstruction, pneumobilia and ectopic gallstone on abdominal plain radiograph is described with CT imaging. Because of the better resolution of CT compared with abdominal radiography and its recent accession to emergency use, radiologists should be aware of CT findings of gallstone ileus. We report a case in which gallstone ileus was initially diagnosed by CT. (orig.)

  20. A phantom study : should (124) I-mIBG PET/CT replace (123) I-mIBG SPECT/CT?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beijst, Casper; de Keizer, Bart; Lam, Marnix G E H; Janssens, Geert O; Tytgat, Godelieve A M; de Jong, Hugo W A M

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: The isotope (123) I is commonly labeled with meta-iodobenzylguanidine (mIBG) for imaging of neuroendocrine tumors, such as pheochromocytomas and neuroblastomas. (123) I-mIBG SPECT/CT imaging is performed for staging, follow-up and selection of patients for treatment with (131) I mIBG. As an

  1. The role of whole body spiral CT in the primary work-up of polytrauma patients - comparison with conventional radiography and abdominal sonography; Die Rolle der Ganzkoerper-Spiral-CT bei der Primaerdiagnostik polytraumatisierter Patienten - Vergleich mit konventioneller Radiographie und Abdomensonographie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albrecht, T.; Schlippenbach, J. von; Wolf, K.J. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Charite - Campus Benjamin Franklin (Germany); Stahel, P.F.; Ertel, W. [Klinik fuer Unfall- und Wiederherstellungschirurgie, Charite - Campus Benjamin Franklin (Germany)

    2004-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the role of routine 'whole body spiral CT' in the primary work-up of polytrauma patients for injuries of the thorax, abdomen and spine, and to compare the results with those of conventional radiography of the chest and spine and abdominal ultrasound. Materials and Methods: Fifty consecutive polytrauma patients underwent contrast-enhanced single slice spiral CT (5 mm collimation) from the vertex to the floor of the pelvis as part of the primary work-up after emergency room admission. Overlapping high resolution sections and sagittal reformations of the spine were obtained. Reports of additional chest radiographs (n=43), abdominal ultrasound examinations (n=47) and spine radiographs (n=36) performed in the emergency room were available for retrospective comparison. The 'final diagnoses', which served as the standard of reference, were taken from the patients' records using all information that became available until discharge or death, such as findings from further imaging, surgery and autopsy. Results: CT showed 109 (97%) of 112 thoracic and abdominal soft-tissue injuries. Relevant injuries missed were an early splenic laceration and an early pelvic hematoma, both of which became clinically apparent several hours later. There were 4 false positive CT findings. Conventional chest radiography demonstrated only 20% of thoracic and sonography 22% of abdominal injuries. Chest radiography and sonography produced 2 false-positive findings each. CT showed 66 (87%) of 76 vertebral fractures including all 19 unstable ones. CT missed 5 anterior vertebral body and 5 spinous/transverse process fractures. Conventional radiography found 71% of vertebral fractures including only 50% of the unstable one. (orig.)

  2. Abdominal tap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peritoneal tap; Paracentesis; Ascites - abdominal tap; Cirrhosis - abdominal tap; Malignant ascites - abdominal tap ... You then receive a local numbing medicine. The tap needle is inserted 1 to 2 inches (2. ...

  3. Topogram-based automated selection of the tube potential and current in thoraco-abdominal trauma CT - a comparison to fixed kV with mAs modulation alone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frellesen, Claudia; Stock, Wenzel; Kerl, J.M.; Lehnert, Thomas; Wichmann, Julian L.; Beeres, Martin; Schulz, Boris; Bodelle, Boris; Vogl, Thomas J. [Clinic of the Goethe University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Frankfurt (Germany); Nau, Christoph; Geiger, Emanuel; Wutzler, Sebastian [Clinic of the Goethe University, Department of Trauma, Hand and Reconstructive Surgery, Frankfurt (Germany); Ackermann, Hanns [Clinic of the Goethe University, Department of Biostatistics and Mathematical Modelling, Frankfurt (Germany); Bauer, Ralf W. [Clinic of the Goethe University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Frankfurt (Germany); Klinikum der Goethe-Universitaet, Institut fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2014-07-15

    To investigate the impact of automated attenuation-based tube potential selection on image quality and exposure parameters in polytrauma patients undergoing contrast-enhanced thoraco-abdominal CT. One hundred patients were examined on a 16-slice device at 120 kV with 190 ref.mAs and automated mA modulation only. Another 100 patients underwent 128-slice CT with automated mA modulation and topogram-based automated tube potential selection (autokV) at 100, 120 or 140 kV. Volume CT dose index (CTDI{sub vol}), dose-length product (DLP), body diameters, noise, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and subjective image quality were compared. In the autokV group, 100 kV was automatically selected in 82 patients, 120 kV in 12 patients and 140 kV in 6 patients. Patient diameters increased with higher kV settings. The median CTDI{sub vol} (8.3 vs. 12.4 mGy; -33 %) and DLP (594 vs. 909 mGy cm; -35 %) in the entire autokV group were significantly lower than in the group with fixed 120 kV (p < 0.05 for both). Image quality remained at a constantly high level at any selected kV level. Topogram-based automated selection of the tube potential allows for significant dose savings in thoraco-abdominal trauma CT while image quality remains at a constantly high level. (orig.)

  4. Clinical validation of a software for quantitative follow-up of abdominal aortic aneurysm maximal diameter and growth by CT angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kauffmann, Claude; Tang, An; Dugas, Alexandre; Therasse, Eric; Oliva, Vincent; Soulez, Gilles

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the reproducibility and accuracy of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) maximal diameter (D-max) measurements using segmentation software, with manual measurement on double-oblique MPR as a reference standard. Materials and methods: The local Ethics Committee approved this study and waived informed consent. Forty patients (33 men, 7 women; mean age, 72 years, range, 49-86 years) had previously undergone two CT angiography (CTA) studies within 16 ± 8 months for follow-up of AAA ≥35 mm without previous treatment. The 80 studies were segmented twice using the software to calculate reproducibility of automatic D-max calculation on 3D models. Three radiologists reviewed the 80 studies and manually measured D-max on double-oblique MPR projections. Intra-observer and inter-observer reproducibility were calculated by intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Systematic errors were evaluated by linear regression and Bland-Altman analyses. Differences in D-max growth were analyzed with a paired Student's t-test. Results: The ICC for intra-observer reproducibility of D-max measurement was 0.992 (≥0.987) for the software and 0.985 (≥0.974) and 0.969 (≥0.948) for two radiologists. Inter-observer reproducibility was 0.979 (0.954-0.984) for the three radiologists. Mean absolute difference between semi-automated and manual D-max measurements was estimated at 1.1 ± 0.9 mm and never exceeded 5 mm. Conclusion: Semi-automated software measurement of AAA D-max is reproducible, accurate, and requires minimal operator intervention.

  5. Can FDG-PET/CT replace blind bone marrow biopsy of the posterior iliac crest in Ewing sarcoma?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kasalak, Omer; Glaudemans, Andor W. J. M.; Overbosch, Jelle; Jutte, Paul C.; Kwee, Thomas C.

    OBJECTIVE: To determine and compare the value of (18)F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) to blind bone marrow biopsy (BMB) of the posterior iliac crest in detecting metastatic bone marrow involvement in newly diagnosed Ewing sarcoma. MATERIALS AND

  6. Role of FDG-PET in the Diagnosis of Recurrence and Assessment of Therapeutic Response in Cervical Cancer and Ovarian Cancer Patients: Comparison of Diagnostic Report between PET, Abdominal CT and Tumor Marker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, You Mie; Choe, Jae Gol; Kang, Bung Chul

    2008-01-01

    We aimed to assess the role of positron emission tomography using fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG-PET) in the diagnosis of recurrence or the assessment of therapeutic response in cervical and ovarian cancer patients through making a comparison between FDG-PET, abdominal computed tomography (CT) and serum tumor marker. We included 103 cases (67 patients) performed FDG-PET and abdominal CT. There were 42 cervical cancers and 61 ovarian cancers. We retrospectively reviewed the interpretations of PET and CT images as well as the level of tumor marker. We calculated their sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value for these three modalities. And then we analyzed the differences between these three modalities. Tumor recurrences were diagnosed in 37 cases (11 cervical cancers and 26 ovarian cancers). For PET, CT and tumor marker, in cervical cancer group, sensitivity was 100% (11/11), 54.5% (6/11) and 81.1% (9/11), respectively. And specificity was 93.6% (29/31), 93.6% (29/31) and 100% (31/31). In ovarian cancer group, sensitivity was 96.2% (25/26), 84.6% (22/26) and 80.8% (21/26), and specificity was 94.3% (33/35), 94.3% (33/35), 94.3% (33/35). PET was highly sensitive to detect the intraperitoneal and extraperitoneal metastasis with the help of the CT images to localize the lesions. However, CT had limitations in differentiation of the recurrent tumor from benign fibrotic tissue, identification of viable tumors at the interface of tissues, and detecting extraperitoneal lesions. FDG-PET can be an essential modality to detect the recurrent or residual tumors in gynecologic cancer patients because of its great field of the application and high sensitivity

  7. Using multidetector-row CT in neonates with complex congenital heart disease to replace diagnostic cardiac catheterization for anatomical investigation: initial experiences in technical and clinical feasibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Tain; Tsai, I.C.; Chen, Min-Chi [Taichung Veterans General Hospital, 407 Department of Radiology, Taichung (Taiwan); Medical College of Chung Shan Medical University, Faculty of Medicine, Taichung (Taiwan); National Yang Ming University School of Medicine, Department of Medicine, Taipei (Taiwan); Fu, Yun-Ching; Jan, Sheng-Lin [Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Department of Paediatrics, Taichung (Taiwan); National Yang-Ming University, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Taipei (Taiwan); Wang, Chung-Chi; Chang, Yen [Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Section of Cardiovascular Surgery, Department of Surgery, Taichung (Taiwan)

    2006-12-15

    Echocardiography is the first-line modality for the investigation of neonatal congenital heart disease. Diagnostic cardiac catheterization, which has a small but recognized risk, is usually performed if echocardiography fails to provide a confident evaluation of the lesions. To verify the technical and clinical feasibilities of replacing diagnostic cardiac catheterization with multidetector-row CT (MDCT) in neonatal complex congenital heart disease. Over a 1-year period we prospectively enrolled all neonates with complex congenital heart disease referred for diagnostic cardiac catheterization after initial assessment by echocardiography. MDCT was performed using a 40-detector-row CT scanner with dual syringe injection. A multidisciplinary congenital heart disease team evaluated the MDCT images and decided if further diagnostic cardiac catheterization was necessary. The accuracy of MDCT in detecting separate cardiovascular anomalies and bolus geometry of contrast enhancement were calculated. A total of 14 neonates were included in the study. No further diagnostic cardiac catheterization was needed in any neonate. The accuracy of MDCT in diagnosing separate cardiovascular anomalies was 98% (53/54) with only one atrial septal defect missed in a patient with coarctation syndrome. The average cardiovascular enhancement in evaluated chambers was 471 HU. No obvious beam-hardening artefact was observed. The technical and clinical feasibility of MDCT in complex congenital heart disease in neonates is confirmed. After initial assessment with echocardiography, MDCT could probably replace diagnostic cardiac catheterization for further anatomical clarification in neonates. (orig.)

  8. [A Case of Abdominal Wall Hernia Rupture during Bevacizumab Treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Satoshi; Miyazaki, Yasuaki; Hirose, Sou; Michiura, Toshiya; Fujita, Shigeo; Yamabe, Kazuo; Miyazaki, Satoru; Nagaoka, Makio

    2015-11-01

    A 78 -year-old man with rectal cancer underwent abdominoperineal resection of the rectum. In the postoperative period, the patient experienced wound infection, leading to an abdominal wall hernia. Two years following surgery, a rise in the serum CEA level was seen. A metastatic tumor was detected in the right lung on chest CT. VATS right lung inferior lobe segmental resection was performed. After lobectomy, the serum CEA level continued to increase. Another metastatic tumor was detected in the right lung on chest CT. Chemotherapy with capecitabine, oxaliplatin, and bevacizumab was commenced. The erosive part of the abdominal wall scar hernia extended during the nine weeks of chemotherapy. The chemotherapy was then discontinued. In the follow-up CT scan, a right pleural recurrence, local recurrence in the pelvis, and a liver metastasis were detected. Chemotherapy was re-introduced 3 years after surgery. The erosive part of the abdominal wall hernia again began to spread with chemotherapy recommencement. Four months after restarting chemotherapy, the hernia ruptured, with a loop of the small intestine protruding out of it. The patient covered this with a sheet of vinyl and was taken by the ambulance to our hospital. The erosive part of the abdominal wall hernia had split by 10 cm, and a loop of the small intestine was protruding. As ischemia of the small intestine was not observed, we replaced it into the abdominal cavity, and performed a temporary suture repair of the hernia sac. Following this, bevacizumab was discontinued, and the erosive part reduced. We performed a radical operation for abdominal wall scar hernia repair 11 weeks after the discontinuation of bevacizumab.

  9. Use of internal references for assessing CT density measurements of the pelvis as replacement for use of an external phantom

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boomsma, Martijn F.; Slouwerhof, Inge; van Dalen, Jorn A.; Edens, Mireille A.; Mueller, Dirk; Milles, Julien; Maas, Mario

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to study the use of an internal reference standard for fat- and muscle as a replacement for an external reference standard with a phantom. By using a phantomless internal reference standard, Hounsfield unit (HU) measurements of various tissues can potentially be

  10. [Diagnostic imaging and acute abdominal pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liljekvist, Mads Svane; Pommergaard, Hans-Christian; Burcharth, Jakob; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2015-01-19

    Acute abdominal pain is a common clinical condition. Clinical signs and symptoms can be difficult to interpret, and diagnostic imaging may help to identify intra-abdominal disease. Conventional X-ray, ultrasound (US) and computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen vary in usability between common surgical causes of acute abdominal pain. Overall, conventional X-ray cannot confidently diagnose or rule out disease. US and CT are equally trustworthy for most diseases. US with subsequent CT may enhance diagnostic precision. Magnetic resonance seems promising for future use in acute abdominal imaging.

  11. [Lethality and outcome in multiple injured patients after severe abdominal and pelvic trauma. Influence of preclinical volume replacement - an analysis of 604 patients from the trauma registry of the DGU].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussmann, B; Taeger, G; Lefering, R; Waydhas, C; Nast-Kolb, D; Ruchholtz, S; Lendemans, S

    2011-08-01

    Uncontrollable hemorrhaging after blunt trauma and the resulting hemorrhagic shock is still one of the main causes of death in trauma patients. Starting volume replacement before admission to hospital is one of the main pillars of immediate treatment. The statements concerning the quantity of the preclinically administered fluid are still controversial and have a low level of evidence in the literature. Massive abdominal trauma and unstable pelvic fractures belong to the most relevant causes of hemorrhagic shock. The aim of this study was to analyze the influence of the quantity of the preclinically administered fluid on the posttraumatic course of patients with massive abdominal and pelvic injuries. All patients of the trauma registry of the DGU (German Society for Trauma Surgery) who met the following criteria were included: injury severity score ≥16 points, primary admission to hospital, age ≥16 years, initial blood pressure 3000 ml). Of the 375 patients with abdominal trauma and 229 patients with pelvic trauma were consistent with the inclusion criteria. In both groups an increasing volume replacement was associated with an increased need for transfusion and a reduction of the coagulation ability (Quick 61% in the case of 3000 ml). The rescue time had a relevant influence on the quantity of preclinically infused volume (62 min for 3000 ml). On admission to hospital the blood pressure values were on average the same in all patients (~ 95 mmHg). With an increasing volume a slight elevation of lethality was found as well as a significant increase of the transfused erythrocyte concentrates, a significant deterioration of coagulation and an increase of patients with mass transfusions. In the case of a preclinical relevant bleeding after blunt pelvic or abdominal trauma moderate volume replacement (<1000 ml) results in an enhancement of the initial coagulation situation and in a reduction in the need for transfusion. The results of this study support the

  12. Impact of model-based iterative reconstruction on low-contrast lesion detection and image quality in abdominal CT: a 12-reader-based comparative phantom study with filtered back projection at different tube voltages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Euler, Andre; Stieltjes, Bram; Eichenberger, Reto; Reisinger, Clemens; Hirschmann, Anna; Zaehringer, Caroline; Kircher, Achim; Streif, Matthias; Bucher, Sabine; Buergler, David; D' Errico, Luigia; Kopp, Sebastien; Wilhelm, Markus [University Hospital Basel, Clinic of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Basel (Switzerland); Szucs-Farkas, Zsolt [Hospital Centre of Biel, Institute of Radiology, Biel (Switzerland); Schindera, Sebastian T. [University Hospital Basel, Clinic of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Basel (Switzerland); Cantonal Hospital Aarau, Institute of Radiology, Aarau (Switzerland)

    2017-12-15

    To evaluate the impact of model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) on image quality and low-contrast lesion detection compared with filtered back projection (FBP) in abdominal computed tomography (CT) of simulated medium and large patients at different tube voltages. A phantom with 45 hypoattenuating lesions was placed in two water containers and scanned at 70, 80, 100, and 120 kVp. The 120-kVp protocol served as reference, and the volume CT dose index (CTDI{sub vol}) was kept constant for all protocols. The datasets were reconstructed with MBIR and FBP. Image noise and contrast-to-noise-ratio (CNR) were assessed. Low-contrast lesion detectability was evaluated by 12 radiologists. MBIR decreased the image noise by 24% and 27%, and increased the CNR by 30% and 29% for the medium and large phantoms, respectively. Lower tube voltages increased the CNR by 58%, 46%, and 16% at 70, 80, and 100 kVp, respectively, compared with 120 kVp in the medium phantom and by 9%, 18% and 12% in the large phantom. No significant difference in lesion detection rate was observed (medium: 79-82%; large: 57-65%; P > 0.37). Although MBIR improved quantitative image quality compared with FBP, it did not result in increased low-contrast lesion detection in abdominal CT at different tube voltages in simulated medium and large patients. (orig.)

  13. Childhood abdominal cystic lymphangioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konen, Osnat; Rathaus, Valeria; Shapiro, Myra [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Meir General Hospital, Sapir Medical Centre, Kfar Saba (Israel); Dlugy, Elena [Department of Paediatric Surgery, Schneider Medical Centre, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University (Israel); Freud, Enrique [Department of Paediatric Surgery, Sapir Medical Centre, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University (Israel); Kessler, Ada [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Sourasky Medical Centre, Tel-Aviv (Israel); Horev, Gadi [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Schneider Medical Centre, Tel-Aviv (Israel)

    2002-02-01

    Background: Abdominal lymphangioma is a rare benign congenital malformation of the mesenteric and/or retroperitoneal lymphatics. Clinical presentation is variable and may be misleading; therefore, complex imaging studies are necessary in the evaluation of this condition. US and CT have a major role in the correct preoperative diagnosis and provide important information regarding location, size, adjacent organ involvement, and expected complications. Objective: To evaluate the clinical and imaging findings of seven children with proven abdominal cystic lymphangioma. Materials and methods: Clinical and imaging files of seven children with pathologically proven abdominal lymphangioma, from three university hospitals, were retrospectively evaluated. Patient's ages ranged from 1 day to 6 years (mean, 2.2 years). Symptoms and signs included evidence of inflammation, abnormal prenatal US findings, chronic abdominal pain, haemorrhage following trauma, clinical signs of intestinal obstruction, and abdominal distension with lower extremities lymphoedema. Plain films of five patients, US of six patients and CT of five patients were reviewed. Sequential imaging examinations were available in two cases. Results: Abdominal plain films showed displacement of bowel loops by a soft tissue mass in five of six patients, two of them with dilatation of small bowel loops. US revealed an abdominal multiloculated septated cystic mass in five of six cases and a single pelvic cyst in one which changed in appearance over 2 months. Ascites was present in three cases. CT demonstrated a septated cystic mass of variable sizes in all available five cases. Sequential US and CT examinations in two patients showed progressive enlargement of the masses, increase of fluid echogenicity, and thickening of walls or septa in both cases, with multiplication of septa in one case. At surgery, mesenteric lymphangioma was found in five patients and retroperitoneal lymphangioma in the other two

  14. Abdominal imaging in AIDS patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Dawei; Wang Wei; Yuan Chunwang; Jia Cuiyu; Zhao Xuan; Zhang Tong; Ma Daqing

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate abdominal imaging in AIDS. Methods: The imaging examinations (including US, CT and MR) of 6 patients with AIDS associated abdominal foci were analysed retrospectively. All the cases were performed US, and CT scan, of which 4 performed enhanced CT scan and 1 with MR. Results: Abdominal tuberculosis were found in 4 patients, including abdominal lymph nodes tuberculosis (3 cases) and pancreatic tuberculosis (1 case). The imaging of lymph nodes tuberculosis typically showed enlarged peripheral tim enhancement with central low-attenuation on contrast-enhanced CT. Pancreatic tuberculosis demonstrated low-attenuation area in pancreatic head and slightly peripheral enhancement. Disseminated Kaposi's sarcoma was seen in 1 case: CT and MRI scan demonstrated tumour infiltrated along hepatic portal vein and bronchovascular bundles. Pelvic tumor was observed in 1 case: CT scan showed large mass with thick and irregular wall and central low attenuation liquefacient necrotic area in the pelvic cavity. Conclusion: The imaging findings of AIDS with abdominal foci is extraordinarily helpful to the diagnosis of such disease. Tissue biopsy is needed to confirm the diagnosis. (authors)

  15. Malignant granular cell tumor of the abdominal wall mimicking desmoid tumor: A case report with CT imaging findings and literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Je Hong; Ahn, Sung Eun; Lee, Dong Ho; Park, Seong Jin; Moon, Sung Kyoung; Lim, Joo Won [Dept. Radiology, Kyung Hee University Hospital, Kyung Hee University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    Granular cell tumors (GCTs) are extremely rare mesenchymal neoplasms of Schwann cell origin. Malignant GCTs (MGCTs) comprise 0.5-2% of all GCTs. In the present report, we describe a case of a 66-year-old man with MGCT of the abdominal wall. The patient visited our hospital due to a recently growing palpable soft tissue mass in the abdominal wall. Computed tomography scan revealed a 4.3 × 4.1 × 2.9 cm sized mass arising from the left abdominal wall, which was contemplated as a desmoid tumor before surgical excision. Histopathological examination confirmed MGCT.

  16. Benign hepatic portal venous gas following blunt abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dill-Mackay, M.J.

    1997-01-01

    A 71-year-old man presented to Royal Perth Hospital Emergency Department with back pain following a fall from the roof of his house. There was no history of loss of consciousness. Physical examination revealed epigastric tenderness and guarding and a suspicion of CSF otorrhoea. All other clinical parameters were normal. His past medical history included alcohol abuse, chronic obstructive airways disease, peripheral vascular disease, cerebellar infarction and a right total hip replacement. Spinal radiographs demonstrated crush fractures involving the T12 and L1 vertebral bodies and a CT scan of the skull base was normal. An abdominal CT scan performed with intravenous contrast demonstrated gas within the portal veins of the anterior segments of the liver and a small fluid collection in the anterior pararenal space. During the ensuing 24 hours a repeat non-contrast abdominal Ct scan was performed and reveled complete resolution of the fluid. No other intra-abdominal abnormality was detected to warrant an invasive procedure

  17. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... such as inflammation of the bronchi (breathing passages) birth defects trauma to blood vessels or lung CT ... used to: diagnose appendicitis detect abdominal tumors or birth defects In the pelvic region, CT scans can ...

  18. Evaluation of a Leg-to-Leg Bioimpedance Device in the Estimation of Abdominal Visceral Fat for the Elderly – Comparison with CT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Chyuan Lai

    2017-09-01

    Conclusion: The LBIA results showed that each obese group all has large LOA when compared with the CT reference values. The study suggests that the LBIA accuracy for estimating VFA is limited in the Chinese elderly population.

  19. Efficacy of low-calorie, partial meal replacement diet plans on weight and abdominal fat in obese subjects with metabolic syndrome: a double-blind, randomised controlled trial of two diet plans - one high in protein and one nutritionally balanced.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, K; Lee, J; Bae, W K; Choi, J K; Kim, H J; Cho, B

    2009-02-01

    Little is known about the relative efficacy of high-protein vs. conventional diet plans that include partial meal replacements on body fat loss in obese subjects with metabolic syndrome. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of two low-calorie diets with partial meal replacement plans-a high-protein plan (HP) and a nutritionally balanced conventional (C) plan-on reducing obesity in obese subjects with metabolic syndrome. In a 12-week, double-blind study, we randomised 75 participants to either the HP- or the C-plan group. We recorded key metrics at 0 and 12 weeks. The overall mean weight loss was 5 kg in the HP-plan group and 4.9 kg in the C-plan group (p = 0.72). Truncal fat mass decreased 1.6 kg in the HP-plan group (p or = 70% dietary compliance, however, truncal and whole body fat mass decreased more in the HP-plan group (Delta 2.2 kg and Delta 3.5 kg respectively) than in the C-plan group (Delta 1.3 kg and Delta 2.3 [corrected] kg respectively) (p < 0.05). The HP- and C-plans had a similar effect on weight and abdominal fat reduction, but the HP-plan was more effective in reducing body fat among compliant subjects.

  20. Abdominal emergencies in pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coca Robinot, D; Liébana de Rojas, C; Aguirre Pascual, E

    2016-05-01

    Abdominal symptoms are among the most common reasons for pediatric emergency department visits, and abdominal pain is the most frequently reported symptom. Thorough history taking and physical examination can often reach the correct diagnosis. Knowing the abdominal conditions that are most common in each age group can help radiologists narrow the differential diagnosis. When imaging tests are indicated, ultrasonography is usually the first-line technique, enabling the diagnosis or adding relevant information with the well-known advantages of this technique. Nowadays, plain-film X-ray studies are reserved for cases in which perforation, bowel obstruction, or foreign body ingestion is suspected. It is also important to remember that abdominal pain can also occur secondary to basal pneumonia. CT is reserved for specific indications and in individual cases, for example, in patients with high clinical suspicion of abdominal disease and inconclusive findings at ultrasonography. We review some of the most common conditions in pediatric emergencies, the different imaging tests indicated in each case, and the imaging signs in each condition. Copyright © 2016 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Positive enteric contrast material for abdominal and pelvic CT with automatic exposure control: What is the effect on patient radiation exposure?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhen J., E-mail: jane.wang@radiology.ucsf.edu [Department of Radiology, University of California San Francisco, 505 Parnassus Avenue, San Francisco, CA 94143-0628 (United States); Chen, Katherine S.; Gould, Robert; Coakley, Fergus V.; Fu Yanjun; Yeh, Benjamin M. [Department of Radiology, University of California San Francisco, 505 Parnassus Avenue, San Francisco, CA 94143-0628 (United States)

    2011-08-15

    Objective: To assess the effect of positive enteric contrast administration on automatic exposure control (AEC) CT radiation exposure in (1) a CT phantom, and (2) a retrospective review of patients. Materials and methods: We scanned a CT phantom containing simulated bowel that was sequentially filled with water and positive enteric contrast, and recorded the mean volume CT dose index (CTDIvol). We also identified 17 patients who had undergone 2 technically comparable CT scans of the abdomen and pelvis, one with positive enteric contrast and the other with oral water. Paired Student's t-tests were used to compare the mean CTDIvol between scans performed with and without positive enteric contrast. Both the phantom and patient CT scans were performed using AEC with a fixed noise index. Results: The mean CTDIvol for the phantom with simulated bowel containing water and positive enteric contrast were 8.2 {+-} 0.2 mGy, and 8.7 {+-} 0.1 mGy (6.1% higher than water, p = 0.02), respectively. The mean CTDIvol for patients scanned with oral water and with positive enteric contrast were 11.8 mGy and 13.1 mGy, respectively (p = 0.003). This corresponded to a mean CTDIvol which was 11.0% higher (range: 0.0-20.7% higher) in scans with positive enteric contrast than those with oral water in patients. Conclusions: When automatic exposure control is utilized for abdominopelvic CT, the radiation exposure, as measured by CTDIvol, is higher for scans performed with positive enteric contrast than those with oral water.

  2. Can Computed Tomography Scout Radiography Replace Plain Film in the Evaluation of Patients with Acute Urinary Tract Colic?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ege, G.; Akman, H.; Kuzucu, K.; Yildiz, S. [Istanbul International Hospital, Istanbul (Turkey). Dept. of Radiology

    2004-07-01

    Purpose: To determine the sensitivity of computed tomography (CT) scout view in detecting ureteral stones and whether CT scout radiography can replace plain film in the evaluation of patients with acute urinary tract colic. Material and Methods: Between January 2000 and 2002, 110 patients with ureterolithiasis were prospectively evaluated for the detection of ureteral stones on CT scout radiographs. The findings were compared with those of plain films. All patients were examined with plain film, CT scout radiography, and unenhanced helical CT. CT scans were performed within 24 h of plain films. Each CT scout radiograph was interpreted without knowledge of the findings on plain film. Results: 111 stones were detected by unenhanced helical CT. Mean stone size was 3.9 mm (range 1-10 mm). Of all stones, 57 (52%) were visible on plain film; 44 (40%) were seen on CT radiographs. The sensitivity of 79 small stones (<5 mm) on CT scout radiography was 29% and of abdominal radiography 37%. For 32 big stones (>5 mm), the sensitivity of CT scout radiography was 66% and of abdominal radiography 87.5%. Conclusion: In this study, plain film was more sensitive than CT scout radiography in revealing ureteral calculi. However, the detection of stones 5 mm or larger had a sensitivity of 66% on CT scout radiographs; 77% (44/57) of the stones visible on plain films were also seen on CT scout radiographs. We therefore believe that CT scout radiography can be used as a baseline study in most patients with big ureteral stones.

  3. Computed tomographic diagnosis of abdominal abscess

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasumori, Kotaro; Nishitani, Hiromu; Onitsuka, Hideo; Baba, Hiromi; Kawahira, Kosaburo

    1982-01-01

    The clinical usefulness of computed tomography (CT) for the diagnosis of abdominal abscess was evaluated in 62 cases with suspicious abdominal abscesses. Sensitivity and specificity of CT were 96% and 89%, respectively. When no evidence of abscess cavity was seen on CT, our results suggested that the presence of surgically treatable abscesses could practically be denied. On the other hand, even if abscesses were diagnosed on CT, all of them were not necessary to be treated surgically. Other possibilities such as hematoma and necrotic tumor should also be considered. (author)

  4. [A TUBERCULOUS PSEUDO-ANEURYSM OF THE ABDOMINAL AORTA COMPLICATED BY MILIARY TUBERCULOSIS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsutake, Toyoshi; Hashizume, Kouji; Kinoshita, Naoe; Sueyoshi, Eijun; Ehara, Naomi; Nakano, Reiji; Yoshida, Shintaro; Fukushima, Kiyoyasu; Kakeya, Hiroshi; Kohno, Shigeru

    2015-04-01

    A 66-year-old man was transferred to our hospital on November 2010 owing to a diagnosis of miliary tuberculosis. Treatment was initially started with INH, RFP, PZA, and EB. However, PZA and EB were discontinued because of their adverse effects. Subsequently, chest radiographic and laboratory findings gradually improved. However, the patient experienced lumbago, which exacerbated towards the end of March 2011. An abdominal CT scan showed an abdominal mass at the L3-L5 level between the abdominal aorta and lumbar vertebra. On the basis of the findings of abdominal ultrasonography, MRI, and PET-CT, infectious abdominal aortic aneurysm was highly suspected. Therefore, vascular graft replacement surgery was performed at the beginning of May 2011. The result of histopathological analysis showed the presence of acid-fast bacteria in the aneurysm and the lymph nodes around it, revealing that the aneurysm was due to systemic miliary tuberculosis. After the surgery, the patient was administered LVFX in addition to INH and RFP for 18 months and showed no recurrence.

  5. Comparison between angiography and CT scan in the urologic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujioka, Toshio; Takao, Masaya; Odajima, Kunio; Nakamura, Hiroshi

    1988-01-01

    Seventy-five consecutive patients with urological diseases were examined preoperatively by means of computerized tomography and renal angiography. Classification of the diseases were 53 renal diseases which included renal cell carcinoma, sarcoma, cyst, renal bleeding, arteriovenous fistula, trauma, hydronephrosis and tuberculosis, 11 vesical diseases which included bladder tumor and endometriosis, 9 adrenal diseases which included primary aldosteronism, Cushing syndrome, pheochromocytoma, and metastatic tumor, and 1 case of intra-abdominal testes. For renal diseases, both angiography and CT were useful imaging tools. For vesical diseases, CT was a more useful imaging method but, for adrenal diseases, angiography was superior to CT. CT offers certain advantages over conventional techniques but, in the near future, it may be replaced by MRI. On the contrary, angiography will remain popular for a long time, because angiography is the only way to show which vessels feed organs. (author)

  6. Endometrioma de parede abdominal Abdominal wall endometrioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Italo Accetta

    2011-03-01

    : Retrospective analysis of patients operated for abdominal wall endometrioma with emphasis on data relating to age, symptoms, previous cesarean, relation of symptoms with the menstrual cycle, physical examinations and additional surgical treatment, postoperative course and histopathological results of specimens. RESULTS: Forteen patients were operated during the study period, aged between 28 and 40 years. The presence of local mass and pain that worsened during menstruation were the main complaints. Ultrasound and CT examinations were important to precisely localize the disease. Surgical excision was a wide excision of the tumor and affected tissues. The patient progressed satisfactorily and histopathology confirmed the diagnosis of abdominal wall endometrioma in all cases. CONCLUSION: Exists a clear relationship between cesarean operation and abdominal wall endometrioma; ultrasound studies and CT scans help to plan the surgical resection allowing resection of tumor and all affected adjacent tissues.

  7. Traumatic injuries: imaging of abdominal and pelvic injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weishaupt, Dominik; Grozaj, Ana M.; Willmann, Juergen K.; Roos, Justus E.; Hilfiker, Paul R.; Marincek, Borut

    2002-01-01

    The availability of new imaging modalities has altered the diagnostic approach to patients with abdominal and pelvic trauma. Computed tomography and ultrasound have largely replaced diagnostic peritoneal lavage. Ultrasound is used in most trauma centers as the initial imaging technique for the detection of hemoperitoneum and helps to determine the need for emergency laparotomy. Computed tomography allows for an accurate diagnosis of a wide range of traumatic abdominal and pelvic conditions. The speed of single-detector helical and multi-detector row CT (MDCT) permits a rapid CT examination of the seriously ill patient in the emergency room. In particular, the technology of MDCT permits multiple, sequential CT scans to be quickly obtained in the same patient, which is a great advance in the rapid assessment of the multiple-injured patient. The evolving concepts in trauma care promoting non-operative management of liver and splenic injuries creates the need for follow-up cross-sectional imaging studies in these patients. Computed tomography and, less frequently, MR or ultrasound, are used for this purpose. (orig.)

  8. Thoraco-abdominal high-pitch dual-source CT angiography: Experimental evaluation of injection protocols with an anatomical human vascular phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puippe, Gilbert D., E-mail: gilbert.puippe@usz.ch [Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Zurich, Switzerland Raemistrasse 100, CH-8091 Zurich (Switzerland); Winklehner, Anna [Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Zurich, Switzerland Raemistrasse 100, CH-8091 Zurich (Switzerland); Hasenclever, Peter; Plass, André [Division of Cardiac and Vascular Surgery, University Hospital Zurich, Switzerland Raemistrasse 100, CH-8091 Zurich (Switzerland); Frauenfelder, Thomas; Baumueller, Stephan [Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Zurich, Switzerland Raemistrasse 100, CH-8091 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2012-10-15

    Objective: To experimentally evaluate three different contrast injection protocols at thoraco-abdominal high-pitch dual-source computed tomography angiography (CTA), with regard to level and homogeneity of vascular enhancement at different cardiac outputs. Materials and methods: A uniphasic, a biphasic as well as an individually tailored contrast protocol were tested using a human vascular phantom. Each protocol was scanned at 5 different cardiac outputs (3–5 L/min, steps of 0.5 L/min) using an extracorporeal cardiac pump. Vascular enhancement of the thoraco-abdominal aorta was measured every 5 cm. Overall mean enhancement of each protocol and mean enhancement for each cardiac output within each protocol were calculated. Enhancement homogeneity along the z-axis was evaluated for each cardiac output and protocol. Results: Overall mean enhancement was significantly higher in the uniphasic than in the other two protocols (all p < .05), whereas the difference between the biphasic and tailored protocol was not significant (p = .76). Mean enhancement among each of the 5 cardiac outputs within each protocol was significantly different (all p < .05). Only within the tailored protocol mean enhancement differed not significantly at cardiac outputs of 3.5 L/min vs. 5 L/min (484 ± 25 HU vs. 476 ± 19 HU, p = .14) and 4 vs. 5 L/min (443 ± 49 HU vs. 476 ± 19 HU, p = .05). Both, uniphasic and tailored protocol yielded homogenous enhancement at all cardiac outputs, whereas the biphasic protocol failed to achieve homogenous enhancement. Conclusion: This phantom study suggests that diagnostic and homogenous enhancement at thoraco-abdominal high-pitch dual-source CTA is feasible with either a uniphasic or an individually tailored contrast protocol.

  9. Abdominal Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are at greater risk of having anxiety as young adults [2] . Abdominal pain or bellyaches in children What ... can help the overall situation for the child. Teaching kids self-hypnosis [8] or guided imagery [8a] ...

  10. Abdominal exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... diverticulitis ) Inflammation of the pancreas ( acute or chronic pancreatitis ) Liver abscess Pockets of infection (retroperitoneal abscess, abdominal abscess , pelvic abscess) Pregnancy outside of the uterus ( ectopic pregnancy ) Scar tissue ...

  11. Abdominal Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to ease your pain. For instance, eat smaller meals if your pain is accompanied by indigestion. Avoid ... http://www.mayoclinic.org/symptoms/abdominal-pain/basics/definition/SYM-20050728 . Mayo Clinic Footer Legal Conditions and ...

  12. ABDOMINAL TRAUMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alojz Pleskovič

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. The most common cause of abdominal trauma is blunt trauma, gunshot wounds and stab wounds are rare. Most commonly injured organs in abdominal cavity are the spleen and the liver.Conclusions. Early diagnosis is very important and include precise phisical examination and all available diagnostic methods. The final decission about the method of treatmet depends on patients clinical condition, surgeon’s experience and other local conditions.

  13. Adult abdominal hernias.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, Kevin P

    2014-06-01

    Educational Objectives and Key Points. 1. Given that abdominal hernias are a frequent imaging finding, radiologists not only are required to interpret the appearances of abdominal hernias but also should be comfortable with identifying associated complications and postrepair findings. 2. CT is the imaging modality of choice for the assessment of a known adult abdominal hernia in both elective and acute circumstances because of rapid acquisition, capability of multiplanar reconstruction, good spatial resolution, and anatomic depiction with excellent sensitivity for most complications. 3. Ultrasound is useful for adult groin assessment and is the imaging modality of choice for pediatric abdominal wall hernia assessment, whereas MRI is beneficial when there is reasonable concern that a patient\\'s symptoms could be attributable to a hernia or a musculoskeletal source. 4. Fluoroscopic herniography is a sensitive radiologic investigation for patients with groin pain in whom a hernia is suspected but in whom a hernia cannot be identified at physical examination. 5. The diagnosis of an internal hernia not only is a challenging clinical diagnosis but also can be difficult to diagnose with imaging: Closed-loop small-bowel obstruction and abnormally located bowel loops relative to normally located small bowel or colon should prompt assessment for an internal hernia.

  14. Assessment of image quality and low-contrast detectability in abdominal CT of obese patients: comparison of a novel integrated circuit with a conventional discrete circuit detector at different tube voltages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Euler, A.; Heye, T.; Kekelidze, M.; Bongartz, G.; Schindera, Sebastian T.; Szucs-Farkas, Z.; Sommer, C.; Schmidt, B.

    2015-01-01

    To compare image quality and low-contrast detectability of an integrated circuit (IC) detector in abdominal CT of obese patients with conventional detector technology at low tube voltages. A liver phantom with 45 lesions was placed in a water container to mimic an obese patient and examined on two different CT systems at 80, 100 and 120 kVp. The systems were equipped with either the IC or conventional detector. Image noise was measured, and the contrast-to-noise-ratio (CNR) was calculated. Low-contrast detectability was assessed independently by three radiologists. Radiation dose was estimated by the volume CT dose index (CTDI vol ). The image noise was significantly lower, and the CNR was significantly higher with the IC detector at 80, 100 and 120 kVp, respectively (P = 0.023). The IC detector resulted in an increased lesion detection rate at 80 kVp (38.1 % vs. 17.2 %) and 100 kVp (57.0 % vs. 41.0 %). There was no difference in the detection rate between the IC detector at 100 kVp and the conventional detector at 120 kVp (57.0 % vs. 62.2 %). The CTDI vol at 80, 100 and 120 kVp measured 4.5-5.2, 7.3-7.9 and 9.8-10.2 mGy, respectively. The IC detector at 100 kVp resulted in similar low-contrast detectability compared to the conventional detector with a 120-kVp protocol at a radiation dose reduction of 37 %. (orig.)

  15. Abdominal manifestations of cystic fibrosis in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudry, Gulraiz; Navarro, Oscar M.; Levine, Daniel S.; Oudjhane, Kamaldine

    2006-01-01

    Pulmonary complications remain the main cause of mortality in cystic fibrosis, but the presenting symptoms in children are often related to gastrointestinal or pancreaticobiliary disease. Furthermore, abdominal manifestations are now seen throughout childhood, from infancy to adolescence. The child might present in the neonatal period with meconium ileus or its attendant complications. The older child might present with distal intestinal obstruction syndrome or colonic stricture secondary to high doses of pancreatic enzyme replacement. Less-common gastrointestinal manifestations include intussusception, duodenitis and fecal impaction of the appendix. Most children also show evidence of exocrine pancreatic deficiency. Radiologically, the combination of fat deposition and pancreatic fibrosis leads to varying CT and MR appearances. A higher than normal incidence of pancreatic cysts and calcification is also seen. Decreased transport of water and chloride also increases the viscosity of bile, with subsequent obstruction of the biliary ductules. If extensive, this can progress to obstructive cirrhosis, portal hypertension and esophageal varices. Diffuse fatty infiltration, hypersplenism and gallstones are also commonly seen in these patients. We present a pictorial review of the radiological appearance of these abdominal manifestations. The conditions are dealt with individually, together with typical appearances in various imaging modalities. (orig.)

  16. Abdominal manifestations of cystic fibrosis in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaudry, Gulraiz; Navarro, Oscar M.; Levine, Daniel S.; Oudjhane, Kamaldine [University of Toronto, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2006-03-15

    Pulmonary complications remain the main cause of mortality in cystic fibrosis, but the presenting symptoms in children are often related to gastrointestinal or pancreaticobiliary disease. Furthermore, abdominal manifestations are now seen throughout childhood, from infancy to adolescence. The child might present in the neonatal period with meconium ileus or its attendant complications. The older child might present with distal intestinal obstruction syndrome or colonic stricture secondary to high doses of pancreatic enzyme replacement. Less-common gastrointestinal manifestations include intussusception, duodenitis and fecal impaction of the appendix. Most children also show evidence of exocrine pancreatic deficiency. Radiologically, the combination of fat deposition and pancreatic fibrosis leads to varying CT and MR appearances. A higher than normal incidence of pancreatic cysts and calcification is also seen. Decreased transport of water and chloride also increases the viscosity of bile, with subsequent obstruction of the biliary ductules. If extensive, this can progress to obstructive cirrhosis, portal hypertension and esophageal varices. Diffuse fatty infiltration, hypersplenism and gallstones are also commonly seen in these patients. We present a pictorial review of the radiological appearance of these abdominal manifestations. The conditions are dealt with individually, together with typical appearances in various imaging modalities. (orig.)

  17. Comparison of abdominal MRI with diffusion-weighted imaging to {sup 68}Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT in detection of neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmid-Tannwald, Christine; Schmid-Tannwald, Christoph M.; Neumann, Ralph; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Schramm, Nicolai; Reiser, Maximilian F.; Rist, Carsten [Ludwig Maximilians University Hospital Munich, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Morelli, John N. [Scott and White Hospital Temple, Department of Radiology, Temple, TX (United States); Haug, Alexander R.; Jansen, Nathalie [Ludwig Maximilians University Hospital Munich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany)

    2013-06-15

    The aim of the study was to evaluate contrast-enhanced MRI, diffusion-weighted MRI (DW MRI), and {sup 68}Ga-DOTATATE positron emission tomography (PET)/CT in the detection of intermediate to well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumors (NET) of the pancreas. Eighteen patients with pathologically proven pancreatic NET who underwent MRI including DW MRI and PET/CT within 6 weeks of each other were included in this retrospective study. Two radiologists evaluated T2-weighted (T2w), T2w + DW MRI, T2w + contrast-enhanced T1-weighted (CE T1w) MR images, and PET/CT for NET detection. The sensitivity and level of diagnostic confidence were compared among modalities using McNemar's test and a Wilcoxon signed rank test. Apparent diffusion coefficients (ADC) of pancreatic NETs and normal pancreatic tissue were compared with Student's t test. Of the NETs, 8/23 (34.8 %) and 9/23 (39.1 %) were detected on T2w images by observers 1 and 2, respectively. Detection rates improved significantly by combining T2w images with DW MRI (observer 1: 14/23 = 61 %; observer 2: 15/23 = 65.2 %; p < 0.05) or CE T1w images (observer 1: 14/23 = 61 %; observer 2: 15/23 = 65.2 %; p < 0.05). Detection rates of pancreatic NET with PET/CT (both observers: 23/23 = 100 %) were statistically significantly higher than with MRI (p < 0.05). The mean ADC value of NET (1.02 {+-} 0.26 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s) was statistically significantly lower than that of normal pancreatic tissue (1.48 {+-} 0.39 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s). DW MRI is a valuable adjunct to T2w imaging and comparable to CE T1w imaging in pancreatic NET detection, quantitatively differentiating between NET and normal pancreatic tissue with ADC measurements. {sup 68}Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT is more sensitive than MRI in the detection of pancreatic NET. (orig.)

  18. Computed tomography and nonoperative treatment for blunt abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Shinsuke; Ishi, Takashi; Kamachi, Masahiro; Takahashi, Toshio.

    1990-01-01

    Studies were undertaken to determine if computed tomography (CT) could reliably assist physical examination in the initial assessment of blunt abdominal trauma, and also to examine how various abdominal injuries were managed with the guidance of CT. A total of 255 patients underwent emergency abdominal CT following blunt abdominal trauma over a period of seven years. One hundred and fifty two patients had abnormal CT scans, including 58 hepatic, 36 renal, 25 splenic and 9 pancreatic injuries as well as 67 patients with intra-abdominal hemorrhage and 21 patients with free abdominal air. A comparative study on the detection of pneumoperitoneum revealed CT to be far superior to plain radiography. One hundred and three patients had normal CT scans, all of whom were managed nonoperatively, except for three false-negative cases and two nontherapeutic cases. The patients with injury to the parenchymal organs were given nonoperative treatment if they had stable vital signs and no evidence of associated injuries demanding immediate surgery and the majority of these patients were managed well nonoperatively. CT was thus found to be a useful adjunct in the management of victims of blunt abdominal trauma, since in a rapid and noninvasive fashion, CT accurately defined the extent of parenchymal organ injury and also disclosed any other abdominal injuries. (author)

  19. Identification of blunt abdominal injuries in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hynick, Nina H; Brennan, Maureen; Schmit, Pierre; Noseworthy, Steve; Yanchar, Natalie L

    2014-01-01

    The use of computed tomography (CT) to screen for injuries in pediatric blunt abdominal trauma (BAT) is increasing, concurrent with increasing concern over long-term risk of radiation-associated malignancies. We proposed to determine features that could be identified in the early assessment of these patients, which can predict the likelihood of clinically important intra-abdominal injuries warranting imaging by CT. We further queried if these were discrepant from factors associated with the decision to obtain an abdominal CT. Data of patients admitted with BAT to one of two Level I pediatric trauma centers were reviewed retrospectively. Clinical, laboratory, radiographic, and epidemiologic data were collected. Logistic regression was used to determine associations between pre-CT findings and ultimate diagnoses of "notable" or "clinically important" intra-abdominal injuries. Similar analyses were performed to determine which findings were associated with actually receiving an abdominal CT scan. Of 571 patients, 37% had a notable intra-abdominal injury and 18% a clinically important intra-abdominal injury. After adjusting for all covariates, hematuria (gross or microscopic), elevated serum alanine aminotransferase, and documentation of clinically concerning abdominal findings upon examination remained significant predictors (odds ratio (OR), 3.5; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.8-6.8; OR, 10.9; 95% CI, 2.5-47, respectively) of a clinically important injury. Undergoing a CT head and the presence of hematuria were significantly associated with obtaining a CT of the abdomen (OR, 3.4; 95% CI, 1.5-7.7; OR, 2.9; 95% CI, 1.1-7.3, respectively), while concerning abdominal findings and decreased Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score were not. Clinical variables may be used to predict intra-abdominal injuries after pediatric BAT that may warrant imaging with CT scanning. Combined with findings from similar studies, it may be possible to derive and validate a decision-making rule both

  20. Imaging of abdominal neuroblastoma in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hugosson, C.; Nyman, R.; Jorulf, H.; McDonald, P.; Rifai, A.; Jacobsson, B.; Kofide, A.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: The aims of the study were: (1) to assess the efficacy of different imaging methods for use prior to treatment; (2) to compare the surgico-histopathologically-based International Neuroblastoma Staging System (INSS) staging with the imaging results; and (3) to suggest a localisation scheme for abdominal neuroblastoma. Material and Methods: Thirty-one children with an abdominal neuroblastoma (median age 2 years), underwent abdominal US, CT of chest and abdomen, MR imaging of abdomen and spine, chest radiography, skeletal survey, radionuclide bone scintigraphy, MIBG scintigraphy, and bone marrow biopsy. Results: In the evaluation of local disease, CT and MR were superior to US. There was no significant difference between CT and MR in assessment of the location or size of the tumour. Evaluation of invasive growth and lymphadenopathy was uncertain irrespective of imaging modality. Intraspinal extension was more distinctly demonstrated with MR. Tissue characterization with CT and MR did not contribute in the assessment of the tumours. Contrast enhancement at CT and MR examinations both improved demarcation between tumour and kidney, and was a necessity for evaluation of vessel encasement with CT. The local disease was best assessed by either CT or MR, while metastatic disease was best revealed by CT, MR, scintigraphy or bone marrow biopsy. Conclusion: Imaging may be a valuable basis for clinical assessment and pretreatment staging of abdominal neuroblastoma. (orig.)