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Sample records for ct phantom image

  1. NMR-CT image and symbol phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hongo, Syozo; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Takeshita, Hiroshi

    1990-01-01

    We have developed Japanese phantoms in two procedures. One is described as a mathematical expression. Another is 'symbol phantoms' in 3 dimensional picture-elements, each of which symbolize an organ name. The concept and the algorithm of the symbol phantom enables us to make a phantom for a individual in terms of all his transversal section images. We got 85 transversal section images of head and trunk parts, and those of 40 legs parts by using NMR-CT. We have made the individual phantom for computation of organ doses. The transversal section images were not so clear to identify all organs needed to dose estimation that we had to do hand-editing the shapes of organs with viewing a typical section images: we could not yet make symbol phantom in a automatic editing. Symbols were coded to be visual cords as ASCII characters. After we got the symbol phantom of the first stage, we can edit it easily using a word-processor. Symbol phantom could describe more freely the shape of organs than mathematical phantom. Symbol phantom has several advantages to be an individual phantom, but the only difficult point is how to determine its end-point as a reference man when we apply the method to build the reference man. (author)

  2. Image quality of conventional images of dual-layer SPECTRAL CT: a phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ommen, F; Bennink, E; Vlassenbroek, A; Dankbaar, J W; Schilham, A M R; Viergever, M A; de Jong, H W A M

    2018-05-10

    Spectral CT using a dual layer detector offers the possibility of retrospectively introducing spectral information to conventional CT images. In theory, the dual-layer technology should not come with a dose or image quality penalty for conventional images. In this study, we evaluate the influence of a dual-layer detector (IQon Spectral CT, Philips) on the image quality of conventional CT images, by comparing these images with those of a conventional but otherwise technically comparable single-layer CT scanner (Brilliance iCT, Philips), by means of phantom experiments. For both CT scanners conventional CT images were acquired using four adult scanning protocols: i) body helical, ii) body axial, iii) head helical and iv) head axial. A CATPHAN 600 phantom was scanned to conduct an assessment of image quality metrics at equivalent (CTDI) dose levels. Noise was characterized by means of noise power spectra (NPS) and standard deviation (SD) of a uniform region, and spatial resolution was evaluated with modulation transfer functions (MTF) of a tungsten wire. In addition, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), image uniformity, CT number linearity, slice thickness, slice spacing, and spatial linearity were measured and evaluated. Additional measurements of CNR, resolution and noise were performed in two larger phantoms. The resolution levels at 50%, 10% and 5% MTF of the iCT and IQon showed small but significant differences up to 0.25 lp/cm for body scans, and up to 0.2 lp/cm for head scans in favor of the IQon. The iCT and IQon showed perfect CT linearity for body scans, but for head scans both scanners showed an underestimation of the CT numbers of materials with a high opacity. Slice thickness was slightly overestimated for both scanners. Slice spacing was comparable and reconstructed correctly. In addition, spatial linearity was excellent for both scanners, with a maximum error of 0.11 mm. CNR was higher on the IQon compared to the iCT for both normal and larger phantoms with

  3. Optimization of SPECT-CT Hybrid Imaging Using Iterative Image Reconstruction for Low-Dose CT: A Phantom Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver S Grosser

    Full Text Available Hybrid imaging combines nuclear medicine imaging such as single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT or positron emission tomography (PET with computed tomography (CT. Through this hybrid design, scanned patients accumulate radiation exposure from both applications. Imaging modalities have been the subject of long-term optimization efforts, focusing on diagnostic applications. It was the aim of this study to investigate the influence of an iterative CT image reconstruction algorithm (ASIR on the image quality of the low-dose CT images.Examinations were performed with a SPECT-CT scanner with standardized CT and SPECT-phantom geometries and CT protocols with systematically reduced X-ray tube currents. Analyses included image quality with respect to photon flux. Results were compared to the standard FBP reconstructed images. The general impact of the CT-based attenuation maps used during SPECT reconstruction was examined for two SPECT phantoms. Using ASIR for image reconstructions, image noise was reduced compared to FBP reconstructions for the same X-ray tube current. The Hounsfield unit (HU values reconstructed by ASIR were correlated to the FBP HU values(R2 ≥ 0.88 and the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR was improved by ASIR. However, for a phantom with increased attenuation, the HU values shifted for low X-ray tube currents I ≤ 60 mA (p ≤ 0.04. In addition, the shift of the HU values was observed within the attenuation corrected SPECT images for very low X-ray tube currents (I ≤ 20 mA, p ≤ 0.001.In general, the decrease in X-ray tube current up to 30 mA in combination with ASIR led to a reduction of CT-related radiation exposure without a significant decrease in image quality.

  4. Design and evaluation of corn starch-bonded Rhizophora spp. particleboard phantoms for SPECT/CT imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamid, Puteri Nor Khatijah Abd; Yusof, Mohd Fahmi Mohd; Aziz Tajuddin, Abd; Hashim, Rokiah; Zainon, Rafidah

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to design and evaluate of corn starch-bonded Rhizophora spp. particleboards as phantom for SPECT/CT imaging. The phantom was designed according to the Jaszczak phantom commonly used in SPECT imaging with dimension of 22 cm diameter and 18 cm length. Six inserts with different diameter were made for insertion of vials filled with 1.6 µCi/ml of 99mTc unsealed source. The particleboard phantom was scanned using SPECT/CT imaging protocol. The contrast of each vial for particleboards phantom were calculated based on the ratio of counts in radionuclide volume and phantom background and compared to Perspex® and water phantom. The results showed that contrast values for each vial in particleboard phantomis near to 1.0 and in good agreement with Perspex® and water phantoms as common phantom materials for SPECT/CT. The paired sample t-test result showed no significant difference of contrast values between images in particleboard phantoms and that in water. The overall results showed the potential of corn starch-bonded Rhizophora spp. as phantom for quality control and dosimetry works in SPECT/CT imaging.

  5. CT images of an anthropomorphic and anthropometric male pelvis phantom

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    Matos, Andrea S.D. de; Campos, Tarcisio P.R. de, E-mail: campos@nuclear.ufmg.b [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Programa de Pos-graduacao em Ciencias e Tecnicas Nucleares

    2009-07-01

    Actually, among of the most often neoplasm types are the cancer of prostate, bladder and intestine. The incidence of the intestine neoplasm in Brazil is at fourth among the most frequent tumors of the male sex, barely close to the stomach, lung and prostate incidences. Phantoms are objects used as simulators for investigating ionizing radiation transport on humans, especially during radiation therapy or radiological diagnostic. The purpose of this work is the achievement of a set of computerized tomography (CT) images of a male pelvis phantom, with anthropomorphic and anthropometric features. It investigates and analyses the set of phantom CT images in according to a correspondent human pelvis one. The reason to develop a pelvis phantom is the needs of reproducing well established spatial dose distribution in radiation therapy, especially during calibration and protocol setup for various pelvis neoplasms. It aims to produce dose optimization on radiation therapy, improving health tissue protection and keeping control tumor dose. A male pelvis phantom with similar shape made of equivalent tissues was built for simulating the ionizing radiation transport to the human body. At the phantom, pelvis organs were reproduced including the bladder, the intestine, the prostate, the muscular and greasy tissue, as well as the bone tissue and the skin. A set of CT images was carried out in axial thin sections of 2mm thickness. As results, the constituent tissues had a tomography response on Hounsfield scale similar to values found on the human pelvis. Each tissue has its respective Hounsfield value, demonstrated here. The CT images also show that the organs have equivalent anthropometric measures and anthropomorphic features of the radiological human anatomy. The anatomical physical arrangement of the organs is also similar to of the pelvis human male, having the scales of gray and numerical scale of Hounsfield compatible with the scale of the human tissue. The phantom presents

  6. CT images of an anthropomorphic and anthropometric male pelvis phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matos, Andrea S.D. de; Campos, Tarcisio P.R. de

    2009-01-01

    Actually, among of the most often neoplasm types are the cancer of prostate, bladder and intestine. The incidence of the intestine neoplasm in Brazil is at fourth among the most frequent tumors of the male sex, barely close to the stomach, lung and prostate incidences. Phantoms are objects used as simulators for investigating ionizing radiation transport on humans, especially during radiation therapy or radiological diagnostic. The purpose of this work is the achievement of a set of computerized tomography (CT) images of a male pelvis phantom, with anthropomorphic and anthropometric features. It investigates and analyses the set of phantom CT images in according to a correspondent human pelvis one. The reason to develop a pelvis phantom is the needs of reproducing well established spatial dose distribution in radiation therapy, especially during calibration and protocol setup for various pelvis neoplasms. It aims to produce dose optimization on radiation therapy, improving health tissue protection and keeping control tumor dose. A male pelvis phantom with similar shape made of equivalent tissues was built for simulating the ionizing radiation transport to the human body. At the phantom, pelvis organs were reproduced including the bladder, the intestine, the prostate, the muscular and greasy tissue, as well as the bone tissue and the skin. A set of CT images was carried out in axial thin sections of 2mm thickness. As results, the constituent tissues had a tomography response on Hounsfield scale similar to values found on the human pelvis. Each tissue has its respective Hounsfield value, demonstrated here. The CT images also show that the organs have equivalent anthropometric measures and anthropomorphic features of the radiological human anatomy. The anatomical physical arrangement of the organs is also similar to of the pelvis human male, having the scales of gray and numerical scale of Hounsfield compatible with the scale of the human tissue. The phantom presents

  7. Development of a dynamic flow imaging phantom for dynamic contrast-enhanced CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Driscoll, B.; Keller, H.; Coolens, C.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Dynamic contrast enhanced CT (DCE-CT) studies with modeling of blood flow and tissue perfusion are becoming more prevalent in the clinic, with advances in wide volume CT scanners allowing the imaging of an entire organ with sub-second image frequency and sub-millimeter accuracy. Wide-spread implementation of perfusion DCE-CT, however, is pending fundamental validation of the quantitative parameters that result from dynamic contrast imaging and perfusion modeling. Therefore, the goal of this work was to design and construct a novel dynamic flow imaging phantom capable of producing typical clinical time-attenuation curves (TACs) with the purpose of developing a framework for the quantification and validation of DCE-CT measurements and kinetic modeling under realistic flow conditions. Methods: The phantom is based on a simple two-compartment model and was printed using a 3D printer. Initial analysis of the phantom involved simple flow measurements and progressed to DCE-CT experiments in order to test the phantoms range and reproducibility. The phantom was then utilized to generate realistic input TACs. A phantom prediction model was developed to compute the input and output TACs based on a given set of five experimental (control) parameters: pump flow rate, injection pump flow rate, injection contrast concentration, and both control valve positions. The prediction model is then inversely applied to determine the control parameters necessary to generate a set of desired input and output TACs. A protocol was developed and performed using the phantom to investigate image noise, partial volume effects and CT number accuracy under realistic flow conditionsResults: This phantom and its surrounding flow system are capable of creating a wide range of physiologically relevant TACs, which are reproducible with minimal error between experiments (σ/μ 2 ) for the input function between 0.95 and 0.98, while the maximum enhancement differed by no more than 3.3%. The

  8. Phantom-based standardization of CT angiography images for spot sign detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morotti, Andrea; Rosand, Jonathan; Romero, Javier M.; Jessel, Michael J.; Vashkevich, Anastasia; Schwab, Kristin; Greenberg, Steven M.; Hernandez, Andrew M.; Boone, John M.; Burns, Joseph D.; Shah, Qaisar A.; Bergman, Thomas A.; Suri, M.F.K.; Ezzeddine, Mustapha; Kirmani, Jawad F.; Agarwal, Sachin; Hays Shapshak, Angela; Messe, Steven R.; Venkatasubramanian, Chitra; Palmieri, Katherine; Lewandowski, Christopher; Chang, Tiffany R.; Chang, Ira; Rose, David Z.; Smith, Wade; Hsu, Chung Y.; Liu, Chun-Lin; Lien, Li-Ming; Hsiao, Chen-Yu; Iwama, Toru; Afzal, Mohammad Rauf; Qureshi, Adnan I.; Cassarly, Christy; Hebert Martin, Renee; Goldstein, Joshua N.

    2017-01-01

    The CT angiography (CTA) spot sign is a strong predictor of hematoma expansion in intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). However, CTA parameters vary widely across centers and may negatively impact spot sign accuracy in predicting ICH expansion. We developed a CT iodine calibration phantom that was scanned at different institutions in a large multicenter ICH clinical trial to determine the effect of image standardization on spot sign detection and performance. A custom phantom containing known concentrations of iodine was designed and scanned using the stroke CT protocol at each institution. Custom software was developed to read the CT volume datasets and calculate the Hounsfield unit as a function of iodine concentration for each phantom scan. CTA images obtained within 8 h from symptom onset were analyzed by two trained readers comparing the calibrated vs. uncalibrated density cutoffs for spot sign identification. ICH expansion was defined as hematoma volume growth >33%. A total of 90 subjects qualified for the study, of whom 17/83 (20.5%) experienced ICH expansion. The number of spot sign positive scans was higher in the calibrated analysis (67.8 vs 38.9% p < 0.001). All spot signs identified in the non-calibrated analysis remained positive after calibration. Calibrated CTA images had higher sensitivity for ICH expansion (76 vs 52%) but inferior specificity (35 vs 63%) compared with uncalibrated images. Normalization of CTA images using phantom data is a feasible strategy to obtain consistent image quantification for spot sign analysis across different sites and may improve sensitivity for identification of ICH expansion. (orig.)

  9. Phantom-based standardization of CT angiography images for spot sign detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morotti, Andrea; Romero, Javier M; Jessel, Michael J; Hernandez, Andrew M; Vashkevich, Anastasia; Schwab, Kristin; Burns, Joseph D; Shah, Qaisar A; Bergman, Thomas A; Suri, M Fareed K; Ezzeddine, Mustapha; Kirmani, Jawad F; Agarwal, Sachin; Shapshak, Angela Hays; Messe, Steven R; Venkatasubramanian, Chitra; Palmieri, Katherine; Lewandowski, Christopher; Chang, Tiffany R; Chang, Ira; Rose, David Z; Smith, Wade; Hsu, Chung Y; Liu, Chun-Lin; Lien, Li-Ming; Hsiao, Chen-Yu; Iwama, Toru; Afzal, Mohammad Rauf; Cassarly, Christy; Greenberg, Steven M; Martin, Renee' Hebert; Qureshi, Adnan I; Rosand, Jonathan; Boone, John M; Goldstein, Joshua N

    2017-09-01

    The CT angiography (CTA) spot sign is a strong predictor of hematoma expansion in intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). However, CTA parameters vary widely across centers and may negatively impact spot sign accuracy in predicting ICH expansion. We developed a CT iodine calibration phantom that was scanned at different institutions in a large multicenter ICH clinical trial to determine the effect of image standardization on spot sign detection and performance. A custom phantom containing known concentrations of iodine was designed and scanned using the stroke CT protocol at each institution. Custom software was developed to read the CT volume datasets and calculate the Hounsfield unit as a function of iodine concentration for each phantom scan. CTA images obtained within 8 h from symptom onset were analyzed by two trained readers comparing the calibrated vs. uncalibrated density cutoffs for spot sign identification. ICH expansion was defined as hematoma volume growth >33%. A total of 90 subjects qualified for the study, of whom 17/83 (20.5%) experienced ICH expansion. The number of spot sign positive scans was higher in the calibrated analysis (67.8 vs 38.9% p spot signs identified in the non-calibrated analysis remained positive after calibration. Calibrated CTA images had higher sensitivity for ICH expansion (76 vs 52%) but inferior specificity (35 vs 63%) compared with uncalibrated images. Normalization of CTA images using phantom data is a feasible strategy to obtain consistent image quantification for spot sign analysis across different sites and may improve sensitivity for identification of ICH expansion.

  10. Phantom-based standardization of CT angiography images for spot sign detection

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    Morotti, Andrea; Rosand, Jonathan [Harvard Medical School, Division of Neurocritical Care and Emergency Neurology, Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Harvard Medical School, J. P. Kistler Stroke Research Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Romero, Javier M. [Harvard Medical School, Division of Neurocritical Care and Emergency Neurology, Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Harvard Medical School, J. P. Kistler Stroke Research Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Harvard Medical School, Neuroradiology Service, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Jessel, Michael J.; Vashkevich, Anastasia; Schwab, Kristin; Greenberg, Steven M. [Harvard Medical School, J. P. Kistler Stroke Research Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Hernandez, Andrew M.; Boone, John M. [University of California Davis, Department of Radiology, Sacramento, CA (United States); Burns, Joseph D. [Lahey Hospital and Medical Center, Department of Neurology, Burlington, MA (United States); Shah, Qaisar A. [Abington Memorial Hospital, Abington, PA (United States); Bergman, Thomas A. [Hennepin County Medical Center, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Suri, M.F.K. [St. Cloud Hospital, St. Cloud, MN (United States); Ezzeddine, Mustapha [University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Kirmani, Jawad F. [JFK Medical Center, Stroke and Neurovascular Center, Edison, NJ (United States); Agarwal, Sachin [Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Hays Shapshak, Angela [University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States); Messe, Steven R. [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Venkatasubramanian, Chitra [Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Palmieri, Katherine [The University of Kansas Health System, Kansas City, KS (United States); Lewandowski, Christopher [Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI (United States); Chang, Tiffany R. [University of Texas Medical School, Houston, TX (United States); Chang, Ira [Colorado Neurological Institute, Swedish Medical Center, Englewood, CO (United States); Rose, David Z. [Tampa General Hospital, University of South Florida College of Medicine, Tampa, FL (United States); Smith, Wade [UCSF Medical Center, San Francisco, CA (United States); Hsu, Chung Y.; Liu, Chun-Lin [China Medical University Hospital, Taichung (China); Lien, Li-Ming; Hsiao, Chen-Yu [Shin Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, Taipei (China); Iwama, Toru [Gifu University Hospital, Gifu (Japan); Afzal, Mohammad Rauf; Qureshi, Adnan I. [University of Minnesota, Zeenat Qureshi Stroke Research Center, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Cassarly, Christy; Hebert Martin, Renee [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Public Health Sciences, Charleston, SC (United States); Goldstein, Joshua N. [Harvard Medical School, Division of Neurocritical Care and Emergency Neurology, Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Harvard Medical School, J. P. Kistler Stroke Research Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Harvard Medical School, Department of Emergency Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Collaboration: ATACH-II and NETT Investigators

    2017-09-15

    The CT angiography (CTA) spot sign is a strong predictor of hematoma expansion in intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). However, CTA parameters vary widely across centers and may negatively impact spot sign accuracy in predicting ICH expansion. We developed a CT iodine calibration phantom that was scanned at different institutions in a large multicenter ICH clinical trial to determine the effect of image standardization on spot sign detection and performance. A custom phantom containing known concentrations of iodine was designed and scanned using the stroke CT protocol at each institution. Custom software was developed to read the CT volume datasets and calculate the Hounsfield unit as a function of iodine concentration for each phantom scan. CTA images obtained within 8 h from symptom onset were analyzed by two trained readers comparing the calibrated vs. uncalibrated density cutoffs for spot sign identification. ICH expansion was defined as hematoma volume growth >33%. A total of 90 subjects qualified for the study, of whom 17/83 (20.5%) experienced ICH expansion. The number of spot sign positive scans was higher in the calibrated analysis (67.8 vs 38.9% p < 0.001). All spot signs identified in the non-calibrated analysis remained positive after calibration. Calibrated CTA images had higher sensitivity for ICH expansion (76 vs 52%) but inferior specificity (35 vs 63%) compared with uncalibrated images. Normalization of CTA images using phantom data is a feasible strategy to obtain consistent image quantification for spot sign analysis across different sites and may improve sensitivity for identification of ICH expansion. (orig.)

  11. Evaluation of the image quality of chest CT scans: a phantom study

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    Martins N, P. I.; Prata M, A., E-mail: priscillainglid@gmail.com [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica de Minas Gerais, Centro de Engenharia Biomedica, Av. Amazonas 5253, 30421-169 Nova Suica, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

    2016-10-15

    Computed tomography (CT) is considered one of the most important methods of medical imaging employed nowadays, due to its non-invasiveness and the high quality of the images it is able to generate. However, the diagnostic radiation dose received by an individual over the year often exceeds the dose received on account of background radiation. Therefore, it is important to know and to control the dose distribution in the patient by varying the image acquisition parameters. The aim of this study is to evaluate the variation of the image quality of chest CT scans performed by two phantoms. In this paper, a cylindrical Polymethyl Methacrylate (PMMA) chest phantom was used and a second PMMA phantom has been developed with the same volume but an oblong shape, based on the actual dimensions of a male human thorax, in the axillary region. Ten-centimeter scans of the central area of each phantom were performed by a 16-channel Toshiba CT scanner, model Alexion. The scanning protocol employed was the radiology service protocol for chest scans. The noise survey was conducted within the image of the center slice, in five regions: one central and four peripheral areas close to the edge of the object (anterior, posterior, left and right). The recorded values showed that the oblong phantom, with a shape that is more similar to the actual human chest, has a considerably smaller noise, especially in the anterior, posterior and central regions. (Author)

  12. Evaluation of the image quality of chest CT scans: a phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins N, P. I.; Prata M, A.

    2016-10-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is considered one of the most important methods of medical imaging employed nowadays, due to its non-invasiveness and the high quality of the images it is able to generate. However, the diagnostic radiation dose received by an individual over the year often exceeds the dose received on account of background radiation. Therefore, it is important to know and to control the dose distribution in the patient by varying the image acquisition parameters. The aim of this study is to evaluate the variation of the image quality of chest CT scans performed by two phantoms. In this paper, a cylindrical Polymethyl Methacrylate (PMMA) chest phantom was used and a second PMMA phantom has been developed with the same volume but an oblong shape, based on the actual dimensions of a male human thorax, in the axillary region. Ten-centimeter scans of the central area of each phantom were performed by a 16-channel Toshiba CT scanner, model Alexion. The scanning protocol employed was the radiology service protocol for chest scans. The noise survey was conducted within the image of the center slice, in five regions: one central and four peripheral areas close to the edge of the object (anterior, posterior, left and right). The recorded values showed that the oblong phantom, with a shape that is more similar to the actual human chest, has a considerably smaller noise, especially in the anterior, posterior and central regions. (Author)

  13. Image quality and dose optimisation for infant CT using a paediatric phantom

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    Lambert, Jack W.; Phelps, Andrew S.; Courtier, Jesse L.; Gould, Robert G.; MacKenzie, John D. [University of California, San Francisco, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2016-05-15

    To optimise image quality and reduce radiation exposure for infant body CT imaging. An image quality CT phantom was created to model the infant body habitus. Image noise, spatial resolution, low contrast detectability and tube current modulation (TCM) were measured after adjusting CT protocol parameters. Reconstruction method (FBP, hybrid iterative and model-based iterative), image quality reference parameter, helical pitch and beam collimation were systematically investigated for their influence on image quality and radiation output. Both spatial and low contrast resolution were significantly improved with model-based iterative reconstruction (p < 0.05). A change in the helical pitch from 0.969 to 1.375 resulted in a 23 % reduction in total TCM, while a change in collimation from 20 to 40 mm resulted in a 46 % TCM reduction. Image noise and radiation output were both unaffected by changes in collimation, while an increase in pitch enabled a dose length product reduction of ∝6 % at equivalent noise. An optimised protocol with ∝30 % dose reduction was identified using model-based iterative reconstruction. CT technology continues to evolve and require protocol redesign. This work provides an example of how an infant-specific phantom is essential for leveraging this technology to maintain image quality while reducing radiation exposure. (orig.)

  14. Study of Image Quality From CT Scanner Multi-Detector by using Americans College of Radiology (ACR) Phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulyadin; Dewang, Syamsir; Abdullah, Bualkar; Tahir, Dahlang

    2018-03-01

    In this study, the image quality of CT scan using phantom American College of Radiology (ACR) was determined. Scanning multidetector CT is used to know the image quality parameters by using a solid phantom containing four modules and primarily from materials that are equivalent to water. Each module is 4 cm in diameter and 20 cm in diameter. There is white alignment marks painted white to reflect the alignment laser and there are also “HEAD”, “FOOT”, and “TOP” marks on the phantom to help align. This test obtains CT images of each module according to the routine inspection protocol of the head. Acceptance of image quality obtained for determination: CT Number Accuracy (CTN), CT Number Uniformity and Noise, Linearity CT Number, Slice Technique, Low Contrast Resolution and High Contrast Resolution represent image quality parameters. In testing CT Number Accuracy (CTN), CT Uniform number and Noise are in the range of tolerable values allowed. In the test, Linearity CT Number obtained correlation value above 0.99 is the relationship between electron density and CT Number. In a low contrast resolution test, the smallest contrast groups are visible. In contrast, the high resolution is seen up to 7 lp/cm. The quality of GE CT Scan is very high, as all the image quality tests obtained are within the tolerance brackets of values permitted by the Nuclear Power Control Agency (BAPETEN). Image quality test is a way to get very important information about the accuracy of snoring result by using phantom ACR.

  15. Construction of Realistic Liver Phantoms from Patient Images using 3D Printer and Its Application in CT Image Quality Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Shuai; Yu, Lifeng; Vrieze, Thomas; Kuhlmann, Joel; Chen, Baiyu; McCollough, Cynthia H

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to use 3D printing techniques to construct a realistic liver phantom with heterogeneous background and anatomic structures from patient CT images, and to use the phantom to assess image quality with filtered backprojection and iterative reconstruction algorithms. Patient CT images were segmented into liver tissues, contrast-enhanced vessels, and liver lesions using commercial software, based on which stereolithography (STL) files were created and sent to a commercial 3D printer. A 3D liver phantom was printed after assigning different printing materials to each object to simulate appropriate attenuation of each segmented object. As high opacity materials are not available for the printer, we printed hollow vessels and filled them with iodine solutions of adjusted concentration to represent enhance levels in contrast-enhanced liver scans. The printed phantom was then placed in a 35×26 cm oblong-shaped water phantom and scanned repeatedly at 4 dose levels. Images were reconstructed using standard filtered backprojection and an iterative reconstruction algorithm with 3 different strength settings. Heterogeneous liver background were observed from the CT images and the difference in CT numbers between lesions and background were representative for low contrast lesions in liver CT studies. CT numbers in vessels filled with iodine solutions represented the enhancement of liver arteries and veins. Images were run through a Channelized Hotelling model observer with Garbor channels and ROC analysis was performed. The AUC values showed performance improvement using the iterative reconstruction algorithm and the amount of improvement increased with strength setting.

  16. Synchrotron-based DEI for bio-imaging and DEI-CT to image phantoms with contrast agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, Donepudi V.; Swapna, Medasani; Cesareo, Roberto; Brunetti, Antonio; Akatsuka, Tako; Yuasa, Tetsuya; Zhong, Zhong; Takeda, Tohoru; Gigante, Giovanni E.

    2012-01-01

    The introduction of water, physiological, or iodine as contrast agents is shown to enhance minute image features in synchrotron-based X-ray diffraction radiographic and tomographic imaging. Anatomical features of rat kidney, such as papillary ducts, ureter, renal artery and renal vein are clearly distinguishable. Olfactory bulb, olfactory tact, and descending bundles of the rat brain are visible with improved contrast. - Highlights: ► Distinguishable anatomical structures features of rat kidney and rat brain are acquired with Sy-DEI in planar mode. ► Images of a small brain phantom and cylindrical phantom are acquired in tomography mode (Sy-DEI-CT) with contrast agents. ► Sy-DEI and Sy-DEI-CT techniques provide new source of information related to biological microanatomy.

  17. Dual-energy compared to single-energy CT in pediatric imaging: a phantom study for DECT clinical guidance

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    Zhu, Xiaowei; Servaes, Sabah; Darge, Kassa [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); University of Pennsylvania, The Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States); McCullough, William P. [University of Virginia Health System, Department of Radiology and Medical Imaging, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Mecca, Patricia [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2016-11-15

    Dual-energy CT technology is available on scanners from several vendors and offers significant advantages over classic single-energy CT technology in multiple clinical applications. Many studies have detailed dual-energy CT applications in adults and several have evaluated the relative radiation dose performance of dual-energy CT in adult imaging. However, little has been published on dual-energy CT imaging in the pediatric population, and the relative dose performance of dual-energy CT imaging in the pediatric population is not well described. When evaluating dual-energy CT technology for implementation into a routine clinical pediatric imaging practice, the radiation dose implications must be considered, and when comparing relative CT dose performance, image quality must also be evaluated. Therefore the purpose of this study is to develop dual-energy CT scan protocols based on our optimized single-energy scan protocols and compare the dose. We scanned the head, chest and abdomen regions of pediatric-size anthropomorphic phantoms with contrast inserts, using our optimized single-energy clinical imaging protocols on a Siemens Flash {sup registered} CT scanner. We then scanned the phantoms in dual-energy mode using matching image-quality reference settings. The effective CT dose index volume (CTDI{sub vol}) of the scans was used as a surrogate for relative dose in comparing the single- and dual-energy scans. Additionally, we evaluated image quality using visual assessment and contrast-to-noise ratio. Dual-energy CT scans of the head and abdomen were dose-neutral for all three phantoms. Dual-energy CT scans of the chest showed a relative dose increase over the single-energy scan for 1- and 5-year-old child-based age-equivalent phantoms, ranging 11-20%. Quantitative analysis of image quality showed no statistically significant difference in image quality between the single-energy and dual-energy scans. There was no clinically significant difference in image quality by

  18. Metallic artifacts caused by dental metal prostheses on PET images. A PET/CT phantom study using different PET/CT scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimamoto, Hiroaki; Kakimoto, Naoya; Murakami, Shumei; Furukawa, Souhei; Fujino, Kouichi; Hamada, Seiki; Shimosegawa, Eku; Hatazawa, Jun

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of computed tomography (CT) artifacts caused by dental metal prostheses on positron emission tomography (PET) images. A dental arch cast was fixed in a cylindrical water-bath phantom. A spherical phantom positioned in the vicinity of the dental arch cast was used to simulate a tumor. To simulate the tumor imaging, the ratio of the 18 F-fluoro-deoxy-glucose radioactivity concentration of the spherical phantom to that of the water-bath phantom was set at 2.5. A dental bridge composed of a gold-silver-palladium alloy on the right mandibular side was prepared. A spherical phantom was set in the white artifact area on the CT images (site A), in a slightly remote area from the white artifact (site B), and in a black artifact area (site C). A PET/CT scan was performed with and without the metal bridge at each simulated tumor site, and the artifactual influence was evaluated on the axial attenuation-corrected (AC) PET images, in which the simulated tumor produced the strongest accumulation. Measurements were performed using three types of PET/CT scanners (scanners 1 and 2 with CT-based attenuation correction, and 3 with Cesium-137 ( 137 Cs)-based attenuation correction). The influence of the metal bridge was evaluated using the change rate of the SUVmean with and without the metal bridge. At site A, an overestimation was shown (scanner 1: +5.0% and scanner 2: +2.5%), while scanner 3 showed an underestimation of -31.8%. At site B, an overestimation was shown (scanner 1: +2.1% and scanner 2: +2.0%), while scanner 3 showed an underestimation of -2.6%. However, at site C, an underestimation was shown (scanner 1: -25.0%, scanner 2: -32.4%, and scanner 3: -8.4%). When CT is used for attenuation correction in patients with dental metal prostheses, an underestimation of radioactivity of accumulated tracer is anticipated in the dark streak artifact area on the CT images. In this study, the dark streak artifacts of the CT

  19. SU-G-206-01: A Fully Automated CT Tool to Facilitate Phantom Image QA for Quantitative Imaging in Clinical Trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahi-Anwar, M; Lo, P; Kim, H; Brown, M; McNitt-Gray, M

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The use of Quantitative Imaging (QI) methods in Clinical Trials requires both verification of adherence to a specified protocol and an assessment of scanner performance under that protocol, which are currently accomplished manually. This work introduces automated phantom identification and image QA measure extraction towards a fully-automated CT phantom QA system to perform these functions and facilitate the use of Quantitative Imaging methods in clinical trials. Methods: This study used a retrospective cohort of CT phantom scans from existing clinical trial protocols - totaling 84 phantoms, across 3 phantom types using various scanners and protocols. The QA system identifies the input phantom scan through an ensemble of threshold-based classifiers. Each classifier - corresponding to a phantom type - contains a template slice, which is compared to the input scan on a slice-by-slice basis, resulting in slice-wise similarity metric values for each slice compared. Pre-trained thresholds (established from a training set of phantom images matching the template type) are used to filter the similarity distribution, and the slice with the most optimal local mean similarity, with local neighboring slices meeting the threshold requirement, is chosen as the classifier’s matched slice (if it existed). The classifier with the matched slice possessing the most optimal local mean similarity is then chosen as the ensemble’s best matching slice. If the best matching slice exists, image QA algorithm and ROIs corresponding to the matching classifier extracted the image QA measures. Results: Automated phantom identification performed with 84.5% accuracy and 88.8% sensitivity on 84 phantoms. Automated image quality measurements (following standard protocol) on identified water phantoms (n=35) matched user QA decisions with 100% accuracy. Conclusion: We provide a fullyautomated CT phantom QA system consistent with manual QA performance. Further work will include parallel

  20. SU-G-206-01: A Fully Automated CT Tool to Facilitate Phantom Image QA for Quantitative Imaging in Clinical Trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wahi-Anwar, M; Lo, P; Kim, H; Brown, M; McNitt-Gray, M [UCLA Radiological Sciences, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The use of Quantitative Imaging (QI) methods in Clinical Trials requires both verification of adherence to a specified protocol and an assessment of scanner performance under that protocol, which are currently accomplished manually. This work introduces automated phantom identification and image QA measure extraction towards a fully-automated CT phantom QA system to perform these functions and facilitate the use of Quantitative Imaging methods in clinical trials. Methods: This study used a retrospective cohort of CT phantom scans from existing clinical trial protocols - totaling 84 phantoms, across 3 phantom types using various scanners and protocols. The QA system identifies the input phantom scan through an ensemble of threshold-based classifiers. Each classifier - corresponding to a phantom type - contains a template slice, which is compared to the input scan on a slice-by-slice basis, resulting in slice-wise similarity metric values for each slice compared. Pre-trained thresholds (established from a training set of phantom images matching the template type) are used to filter the similarity distribution, and the slice with the most optimal local mean similarity, with local neighboring slices meeting the threshold requirement, is chosen as the classifier’s matched slice (if it existed). The classifier with the matched slice possessing the most optimal local mean similarity is then chosen as the ensemble’s best matching slice. If the best matching slice exists, image QA algorithm and ROIs corresponding to the matching classifier extracted the image QA measures. Results: Automated phantom identification performed with 84.5% accuracy and 88.8% sensitivity on 84 phantoms. Automated image quality measurements (following standard protocol) on identified water phantoms (n=35) matched user QA decisions with 100% accuracy. Conclusion: We provide a fullyautomated CT phantom QA system consistent with manual QA performance. Further work will include parallel

  1. The construction of trunk voxel phantom by using CT images and application to 3 dimensional radiotherapy treatment planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, C. S.; Lee, J. K. [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-10-01

    Trunk voxel phantom was constructed by using whole body CT images and tumor doses were calculated by using Monte Carlo method after simulating situation of radiotheraphy treatment planning. The whole body CT images of VHP (Visual Human Project) man were acquired from National Library of Medicine of USA. 153 slices of trunk part were extracted from whole body CT images and MCNP4B, a general purpose Monte Carlo code, was used for dose calculation. Gray scale of CT images were converted into density of medium and processed into trunk voxel phantom ported to MCNP4B input deck. The conversion method was verified by comparing cross sectional images of voxel phantom with original CT images. Tumor volumes with diameter of 3 cm were defined in liver, stomach and right lung and irradiated with 5, 10 and 15 MeV gamma beam with diameter of 6 cm. The technical basis for 3D dose calculation was established through this study for localization of 3D RTP system.

  2. Developing optimized CT scan protocols: Phantom measurements of image quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarb, Francis; Rainford, Louise; McEntee, Mark F.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The increasing frequency of computerized tomography (CT) examinations is well documented, leading to concern about potential radiation risks for patients. However, the consequences of not performing the CT examination and missing injuries and disease are potentially serious, impacting upon correct patient management. The ALARA principle of dose optimization must be employed for all justified CT examinations. Dose indicators displayed on the CT console as either CT dose index (CTDI) and/or dose length product (DLP), are used to indicate dose and can quantify improvements achieved through optimization. Key scan parameters contributing to dose have been identified in previous literature and in previous work by our group. The aim of this study was to optimize the scan parameters of mA; kV and pitch, whilst maintaining image quality and reducing dose. This research was conducted using psychophysical image quality measurements on a CT quality assurance (QA) phantom establishing the impact of dose optimization on image quality parameters. Method: Current CT scan parameters for head (posterior fossa and cerebrum), abdomen and chest examinations were collected from 57% of CT suites available nationally in Malta (n = 4). Current scan protocols were used to image a Catphan 600 CT QA phantom whereby image quality was assessed. Each scan parameter: mA; kV and pitch were systematically reduced until the contrast resolution (CR), spatial resolution (SR) and noise were significantly lowered. The Catphan 600 images, produced by the range of protocols, were evaluated by 2 expert observers assessing CR, SR and noise. The protocol considered as the optimization threshold was just above the setting that resulted in a significant reduction in CR and noise but not affecting SR at the 95% confidence interval. Results: The limit of optimization threshold was determined for each CT suite. Employing optimized parameters, CTDI and DLP were both significantly reduced (p ≤ 0.001) by

  3. Automated movement correction for dynamic PET/CT images: evaluation with phantom and patient data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Hu; Wong, Koon-Pong; Wardak, Mirwais; Dahlbom, Magnus; Kepe, Vladimir; Barrio, Jorge R; Nelson, Linda D; Small, Gary W; Huang, Sung-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Head movement during a dynamic brain PET/CT imaging results in mismatch between CT and dynamic PET images. It can cause artifacts in CT-based attenuation corrected PET images, thus affecting both the qualitative and quantitative aspects of the dynamic PET images and the derived parametric images. In this study, we developed an automated retrospective image-based movement correction (MC) procedure. The MC method first registered the CT image to each dynamic PET frames, then re-reconstructed the PET frames with CT-based attenuation correction, and finally re-aligned all the PET frames to the same position. We evaluated the MC method's performance on the Hoffman phantom and dynamic FDDNP and FDG PET/CT images of patients with neurodegenerative disease or with poor compliance. Dynamic FDDNP PET/CT images (65 min) were obtained from 12 patients and dynamic FDG PET/CT images (60 min) were obtained from 6 patients. Logan analysis with cerebellum as the reference region was used to generate regional distribution volume ratio (DVR) for FDDNP scan before and after MC. For FDG studies, the image derived input function was used to generate parametric image of FDG uptake constant (Ki) before and after MC. Phantom study showed high accuracy of registration between PET and CT and improved PET images after MC. In patient study, head movement was observed in all subjects, especially in late PET frames with an average displacement of 6.92 mm. The z-direction translation (average maximum = 5.32 mm) and x-axis rotation (average maximum = 5.19 degrees) occurred most frequently. Image artifacts were significantly diminished after MC. There were significant differences (Pdynamic brain FDDNP and FDG PET/CT scans could improve the qualitative and quantitative aspects of images of both tracers.

  4. Dual-energy compared to single-energy CT in pediatric imaging: a phantom study for DECT clinical guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Xiaowei; Servaes, Sabah; Darge, Kassa; McCullough, William P.; Mecca, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Dual-energy CT technology is available on scanners from several vendors and offers significant advantages over classic single-energy CT technology in multiple clinical applications. Many studies have detailed dual-energy CT applications in adults and several have evaluated the relative radiation dose performance of dual-energy CT in adult imaging. However, little has been published on dual-energy CT imaging in the pediatric population, and the relative dose performance of dual-energy CT imaging in the pediatric population is not well described. When evaluating dual-energy CT technology for implementation into a routine clinical pediatric imaging practice, the radiation dose implications must be considered, and when comparing relative CT dose performance, image quality must also be evaluated. Therefore the purpose of this study is to develop dual-energy CT scan protocols based on our optimized single-energy scan protocols and compare the dose. We scanned the head, chest and abdomen regions of pediatric-size anthropomorphic phantoms with contrast inserts, using our optimized single-energy clinical imaging protocols on a Siemens Flash "r"e"g"i"s"t"e"r"e"d CT scanner. We then scanned the phantoms in dual-energy mode using matching image-quality reference settings. The effective CT dose index volume (CTDI_v_o_l) of the scans was used as a surrogate for relative dose in comparing the single- and dual-energy scans. Additionally, we evaluated image quality using visual assessment and contrast-to-noise ratio. Dual-energy CT scans of the head and abdomen were dose-neutral for all three phantoms. Dual-energy CT scans of the chest showed a relative dose increase over the single-energy scan for 1- and 5-year-old child-based age-equivalent phantoms, ranging 11-20%. Quantitative analysis of image quality showed no statistically significant difference in image quality between the single-energy and dual-energy scans. There was no clinically significant difference in image quality

  5. Can we trust the calculation of texture indices of CT images? A phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caramella, Caroline; Allorant, Adrien; Orlhac, Fanny; Bidault, Francois; Asselain, Bernard; Ammari, Samy; Jaranowski, Patricia; Moussier, Aurelie; Balleyguier, Corinne; Lassau, Nathalie; Pitre-Champagnat, Stephanie

    2018-04-01

    Texture analysis is an emerging tool in the field of medical imaging analysis. However, many issues have been raised in terms of its use in assessing patient images and it is crucial to harmonize and standardize this new imaging measurement tool. This study was designed to evaluate the reliability of texture indices of CT images on a phantom including a reproducibility study, to assess the discriminatory capacity of indices potentially relevant in CT medical images and to determine their redundancy. For the reproducibility and discriminatory analysis, eight identical CT acquisitions were performed on a phantom including one homogeneous insert and two close heterogeneous inserts. Texture indices were selected for their high reproducibility and capability of discriminating different textures. For the redundancy analysis, 39 acquisitions of the same phantom were performed using varying acquisition parameters and a correlation matrix was used to explore the 2 × 2 relationships. LIFEx software was used to explore 34 different parameters including first order and texture indices. Only eight indices of 34 exhibited high reproducibility and discriminated textures from each other. Skewness and kurtosis from histogram were independent from the six other indices but were intercorrelated, the other six indices correlated in diverse degrees (entropy, dissimilarity, and contrast of the co-occurrence matrix, contrast of the Neighborhood Gray Level difference matrix, SZE, ZLNU of the Gray-Level Size Zone Matrix). Care should be taken when using texture analysis as a tool to characterize CT images because changes in quantitation may be primarily due to internal variability rather than from real physio-pathological effects. Some textural indices appear to be sufficiently reliable and capable to discriminate close textures on CT images. © 2018 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  6. CT head-scan dosimetry in an anthropomorphic phantom and associated measurement of ACR accreditation-phantom imaging metrics under clinically representative scan conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunner, Claudia C.; Stern, Stanley H.; Chakrabarti, Kish [U.S. Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Avenue, Silver Spring, Maryland 20993 (United States); Minniti, Ronaldo [National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100 Bureau Drive, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Parry, Marie I. [Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, 8901 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, Maryland 20889 (United States); Skopec, Marlene [National Institutes of Health, 9000 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (United States)

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: To measure radiation absorbed dose and its distribution in an anthropomorphic head phantom under clinically representative scan conditions in three widely used computed tomography (CT) scanners, and to relate those dose values to metrics such as high-contrast resolution, noise, and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in the American College of Radiology CT accreditation phantom.Methods: By inserting optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLDs) in the head of an anthropomorphic phantom specially developed for CT dosimetry (University of Florida, Gainesville), we measured dose with three commonly used scanners (GE Discovery CT750 HD, Siemens Definition, Philips Brilliance 64) at two different clinical sites (Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, National Institutes of Health). The scanners were set to operate with the same data-acquisition and image-reconstruction protocols as used clinically for typical head scans, respective of the practices of each facility for each scanner. We also analyzed images of the ACR CT accreditation phantom with the corresponding protocols. While the Siemens Definition and the Philips Brilliance protocols utilized only conventional, filtered back-projection (FBP) image-reconstruction methods, the GE Discovery also employed its particular version of an adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) algorithm that can be blended in desired proportions with the FBP algorithm. We did an objective image-metrics analysis evaluating the modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum (NPS), and CNR for images reconstructed with FBP. For images reconstructed with ASIR, we only analyzed the CNR, since MTF and NPS results are expected to depend on the object for iterative reconstruction algorithms.Results: The OSLD measurements showed that the Siemens Definition and the Philips Brilliance scanners (located at two different clinical facilities) yield average absorbed doses in tissue of 42.6 and 43.1 m

  7. The development of a population of 4D pediatric XCAT phantoms for CT imaging research and optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Hannah; Zhang, Yakun; Frush, Jack; Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Minhas, Anum; Tward, Daniel J.; Ratnanather, J. Tilak; Miller, M. I.; Frush, Donald; Samei, Ehsan; Segars, W. Paul

    2014-03-01

    With the increased use of CT examinations, the associated radiation dose has become a large concern, especially for pediatrics. Much research has focused on reducing radiation dose through new scanning and reconstruction methods. Computational phantoms provide an effective and efficient means for evaluating image quality, patient-specific dose, and organ-specific dose in CT. We previously developed a set of highly-detailed 4D reference pediatric XCAT phantoms at ages of newborn, 1, 5, 10, and 15 years with organ and tissues masses matched to ICRP Publication 89 values. We now extend this reference set to a series of 64 pediatric phantoms of a variety of ages and height and weight percentiles, representative of the public at large. High resolution PET-CT data was reviewed by a practicing experienced radiologist for anatomic regularity and was then segmented with manual and semi-automatic methods to form a target model. A Multi-Channel Large Deformation Diffeomorphic Metric Mapping (MC-LDDMM) algorithm was used to calculate the transform from the best age matching pediatric reference phantom to the patient target. The transform was used to complete the target, filling in the non-segmented structures and defining models for the cardiac and respiratory motions. The complete phantoms, consisting of thousands of structures, were then manually inspected for anatomical accuracy. 3D CT data was simulated from the phantoms to demonstrate their ability to generate realistic, patient quality imaging data. The population of pediatric phantoms developed in this work provides a vital tool to investigate dose reduction techniques in 3D and 4D pediatric CT.

  8. CT Image Contrast of High-Z Elements: Phantom Imaging Studies and Clinical Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    FitzGerald, Paul F; Colborn, Robert E; Edic, Peter M; Lambert, Jack W; Torres, Andrew S; Bonitatibus, Peter J; Yeh, Benjamin M

    2016-03-01

    To quantify the computed tomographic (CT) image contrast produced by potentially useful contrast material elements in clinically relevant imaging conditions. Equal mass concentrations (grams of active element per milliliter of solution) of seven radiodense elements, including iodine, barium, gadolinium, tantalum, ytterbium, gold, and bismuth, were formulated as compounds in aqueous solutions. The compounds were chosen such that the active element dominated the x-ray attenuation of the solution. The solutions were imaged within a modified 32-cm CT dose index phantom at 80, 100, 120, and 140 kVp at CT. To simulate larger body sizes, 0.2-, 0.5-, and 1.0-mm-thick copper filters were applied. CT image contrast was measured and corrected for measured concentrations and presence of chlorine in some compounds. Each element tested provided higher image contrast than iodine at some tube potential levels. Over the range of tube potentials that are clinically practical for average-sized and larger adults-that is, 100 kVp and higher-barium, gadolinium, ytterbium, and tantalum provided consistently increased image contrast compared with iodine, respectively demonstrating 39%, 56%, 34%, and 24% increases at 100 kVp; 39%, 66%, 53%, and 46% increases at 120 kVp; and 40%, 72%, 65%, and 60% increases at 140 kVp, with no added x-ray filter. The consistently high image contrast produced with 100-140 kVp by tantalum compared with bismuth and iodine at equal mass concentration suggests that tantalum could potentially be favorable for use as a clinical CT contrast agent.

  9. Determination of CT number and density profile of binderless, pre-treated and tannin-based Rhizophora spp. particleboards using computed tomography imaging and electron density phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yusof, Mohd Fahmi Mohd, E-mail: mfahmi@usm.my; Hamid, Puteri Nor Khatijah Abdul; Tajuddin, Abdul Aziz [School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 Penang (Malaysia); Bauk, Sabar [School of Distance Education, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 Penang (Malaysia); Hashim, Rokiah [School of Industrial Technologies, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 Penang (Malaysia)

    2015-04-29

    Plug density phantoms were constructed in accordance to CT density phantom model 062M CIRS using binderless, pre-treated and tannin-based Rhizophora Spp. particleboards. The Rhizophora Spp. plug phantoms were scanned along with the CT density phantom using Siemens Somatom Definition AS CT scanner at three CT energies of 80, 120 and 140 kVp. 15 slices of images with 1.0 mm thickness each were taken from the central axis of CT density phantom for CT number and CT density profile analysis. The values were compared to water substitute plug phantom from the CT density phantom. The tannin-based Rhizophora Spp. gave the nearest value of CT number to water substitute at 80 and 120 kVp CT energies with χ{sup 2} value of 0.011 and 0.014 respectively while the binderless Rhizphora Spp. gave the nearest CT number to water substitute at 140 kVp CT energy with χ{sup 2} value of 0.023. The tannin-based Rhizophora Spp. gave the nearest CT density profile to water substitute at all CT energies. This study indicated the suitability of Rhizophora Spp. particleboard as phantom material for the use in CT imaging studies.

  10. Determination of CT number and density profile of binderless, pre-treated and tannin-based Rhizophora spp. particleboards using computed tomography imaging and electron density phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yusof, Mohd Fahmi Mohd; Hamid, Puteri Nor Khatijah Abdul; Tajuddin, Abdul Aziz; Bauk, Sabar; Hashim, Rokiah

    2015-01-01

    Plug density phantoms were constructed in accordance to CT density phantom model 062M CIRS using binderless, pre-treated and tannin-based Rhizophora Spp. particleboards. The Rhizophora Spp. plug phantoms were scanned along with the CT density phantom using Siemens Somatom Definition AS CT scanner at three CT energies of 80, 120 and 140 kVp. 15 slices of images with 1.0 mm thickness each were taken from the central axis of CT density phantom for CT number and CT density profile analysis. The values were compared to water substitute plug phantom from the CT density phantom. The tannin-based Rhizophora Spp. gave the nearest value of CT number to water substitute at 80 and 120 kVp CT energies with χ 2 value of 0.011 and 0.014 respectively while the binderless Rhizphora Spp. gave the nearest CT number to water substitute at 140 kVp CT energy with χ 2 value of 0.023. The tannin-based Rhizophora Spp. gave the nearest CT density profile to water substitute at all CT energies. This study indicated the suitability of Rhizophora Spp. particleboard as phantom material for the use in CT imaging studies

  11. Evaluation of radiation dose and image quality of CT scan for whole-body pediatric PET/CT: A phantom study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Ching-Ching, E-mail: cyang@tccn.edu.tw [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Tzu-Chi College of Technology, 970, Hualien, Taiwan (China); Liu, Shu-Hsin [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Buddhist Tzu-Chi General Hospital, 970, Hualien, Taiwan and Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Tzu-Chi College of Technology, 970, Hualien, Taiwan (China); Mok, Greta S. P. [Biomedical Imaging Laboratory, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Macau, Macau (China); Wu, Tung-Hsin [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, 112, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: This study aimed to tailor the CT imaging protocols for pediatric patients undergoing whole-body PET/CT examinations with appropriate attention to radiation exposure while maintaining adequate image quality for anatomic delineation of PET findings and attenuation correction of PET emission data. Methods: The measurements were made by using three anthropomorphic phantoms representative of 1-, 5-, and 10-year-old children with tube voltages of 80, 100, and 120 kVp, tube currents of 10, 40, 80, and 120 mA, and exposure time of 0.5 s at 1.75:1 pitch. Radiation dose estimates were derived from the dose-length product and were used to calculate risk estimates for radiation-induced cancer. The influence of image noise on image contrast and attenuation map for CT scans were evaluated based on Pearson's correlation coefficient and covariance, respectively. Multiple linear regression methods were used to investigate the effects of patient age, tube voltage, and tube current on radiation-induced cancer risk and image noise for CT scans. Results: The effective dose obtained using three anthropomorphic phantoms and 12 combinations of kVp and mA ranged from 0.09 to 4.08 mSv. Based on our results, CT scans acquired with 80 kVp/60 mA, 80 kVp/80 mA, and 100 kVp/60 mA could be performed on 1-, 5-, and 10-year-old children, respectively, to minimize cancer risk due to CT scans while maintaining the accuracy of attenuation map and CT image contrast. The effective doses of the proposed protocols for 1-, 5- and 10-year-old children were 0.65, 0.86, and 1.065 mSv, respectively. Conclusions: Low-dose pediatric CT protocols were proposed to balance the tradeoff between radiation-induced cancer risk and image quality for patients ranging in age from 1 to 10 years old undergoing whole-body PET/CT examinations.

  12. Design and implementation of a 3D-MR/CT geometric image distortion phantom/analysis system for stereotactic radiosurgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damyanovich, A. Z.; Rieker, M.; Zhang, B.; Bissonnette, J.-P.; Jaffray, D. A.

    2018-04-01

    The design, construction and application of a multimodality, 3D magnetic resonance/computed tomography (MR/CT) image distortion phantom and analysis system for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is presented. The phantom is characterized by (1) a 1 × 1 × 1 (cm)3 MRI/CT-visible 3D-Cartesian grid; (2) 2002 grid vertices that are 3D-intersections of MR-/CT-visible ‘lines’ in all three orthogonal planes; (3) a 3D-grid that is MR-signal positive/CT-signal negative; (4) a vertex distribution sufficiently ‘dense’ to characterize geometrical parameters properly, and (5) a grid/vertex resolution consistent with SRS localization accuracy. When positioned correctly, successive 3D-vertex planes along any orthogonal axis of the phantom appear as 1 × 1 (cm)2-2D grids, whereas between vertex planes, images are defined by 1 × 1 (cm)2-2D arrays of signal points. Image distortion is evaluated using a centroid algorithm that automatically identifies the center of each 3D-intersection and then calculates the deviations dx, dy, dz and dr for each vertex point; the results are presented as a color-coded 2D or 3D distribution of deviations. The phantom components and 3D-grid are machined to sub-millimeter accuracy, making the device uniquely suited to SRS applications; as such, we present it here in a form adapted for use with a Leksell stereotactic frame. Imaging reproducibility was assessed via repeated phantom imaging across ten back-to-back scans; 80%–90% of the differences in vertex deviations dx, dy, dz and dr between successive 3 T MRI scans were found to be  ⩽0.05 mm for both axial and coronal acquisitions, and over  >95% of the differences were observed to be  ⩽0.05 mm for repeated CT scans, clearly demonstrating excellent reproducibility. Applications of the 3D-phantom/analysis system are presented, using a 32-month time-course assessment of image distortion/gradient stability and statistical control chart for 1.5 T and 3 T GE TwinSpeed MRI

  13. Phantom studies on the artifacts of barium on 18F-FDG DHC/CT images induced by X-ray attenuation correction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Wei; Zhu Jiarui; Wang Xinqiang; Zhao Wenrui; Chuan Ling; Xu Genxiang; Gao Chunhua; Fang Tingzheng

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Attenuation correction (AC) based on X-ray transmission map may result in false positive readings or artifacts on PET images, some of them due to the internal residue of high density contrast media used in diagnostic X-ray imaging. The aim of this study was to experimentally estimate the impacts of different concentrations and volumes of barium contrast on X-CT AC (CTAC) for dual-head coincidence (DHC/CT) images. Methods: A cylindrical phantom containing 18 F solution (3.7 kBq/ml), in which plastic fingertips enclosed with different concentrations (0.05, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 3.0 kg/L)and volumes(0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5 ml) of BaSO 4 contrast media were inserted, was used to modulate routine 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) imaging study on a DHC/CT scanner (GE Discovery VH). Sequential 18 F emission and X-CT transmission acquisitions followed by data processing and reconstruction were carried out in clinical settings. For comparison, both visual and quantitative analyses were performed on CTAC and non-AC (NAC) images of the phantom. Results: In NAC images, the radioactivity distribution within the whole phantom was non-uniform with lower counts in the center; the plastic fingertips were all seen as 'cold spots' with much lower counts in the contrast region than in their surrounding areas. On the contrary, in CTAC images, the radioactivity distribution within the whole phantom was almost uniform; while most plastic fingertips with media concentration ≥0.1 kg/L and volume >0.5 ml were all depicted as 'hot spots' with higher counts than in surrounding areas. Conclusions: Barium contrast with relative high concentration or large volume can induce artifacts on CTAC DHC/CT images. In clinical setting, proper interpretation of CTAC DHC/CT images should refer to NAC DHC/CT images to exclude any artifacts related to the contrast media residues. (authors)

  14. CT image quality in sinogram affirmed iterative reconstruction phantom study - is there a point of diminishing returns?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Infante, Juan C. [University of Miami, Department of Radiology, Miami, FL (United States); Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Medical Imaging, Chicago, IL (United States); Liu, Yu [Medical College of Wisconsin, Department of Radiology, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Rigsby, Cynthia K. [Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Medical Imaging, Chicago, IL (United States); Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Chicago, IL (United States); Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2017-03-15

    In our pediatric practice, we have observed qualitatively limited improvement in the image quality of images generated with sinogram affirmed iterative reconstruction (SAFIRE) compared to series generated with filtered back projection (FBP), particularly in cases near or below a CT dose index volume (CTDI{sub vol}) of 1-mGy. To determine whether the image quality advantage of SAFIRE remains constant across clinically used CT dose levels in an American College of Radiology (ACR) CT accreditation phantom including the lower dose range used in pediatric imaging. An exemption from institutional review board approval was obtained for this phantom-based study. An ACR quality phantom was scanned in incremental kV steps and effective tube current intervals. Acquisitions were reconstructed with FBP and SAFIRE strengths of 1, 3 and 5. Image quality measures were calculated including signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), low-contrast resolution and high-contrast resolution. Peak SNR was also calculated. Descriptive and nonparametric statistics were used to compare these image quality metrics while normalizing to CT dose index (CTDI). The percent improvement in SNR and peak SNR of SAFIRE reconstructions compared to FBP decreased from about 70% for image sets acquired above a 1.42 mGy CTDI to 25% at a 0.25 mGy CTDI. CNR improvement with SAFIRE did not vary with dose. No significant difference was seen in the low-contrast resolution or high-contrast resolution of SAFIRE images compared to FBP. SNR did not improve equally after applying SAFIRE across a spectrum clinically used CTDIs. Below a threshold CTDI, the incremental improvement of SAFIRE compared to FBP decreased. (orig.)

  15. Construction of realistic phantoms from patient images and a commercial three-dimensional printer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Shuai; Chen, Baiyu; Vrieze, Thomas; Kuhlmann, Joel; Yu, Lifeng; Alexander, Amy; Matsumoto, Jane; Morris, Jonathan; McCollough, Cynthia H

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to use three-dimensional (3-D) printing techniques to construct liver and brain phantoms having realistic pathologies, anatomic structures, and heterogeneous backgrounds. Patient liver and head computed tomography (CT) images were segmented into tissue, vessels, liver lesion, white and gray matter, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Stereolithography files of each object were created and imported into a commercial 3-D printer. Printing materials were assigned to each object after test scans, which showed that the printing materials had CT numbers ranging from 70 to 121 HU at 120 kV. Printed phantoms were scanned on a CT scanner and images were evaluated. CT images of the liver phantom had measured CT numbers of 77.8 and 96.6 HU for the lesion and background, and 137.5 to 428.4 HU for the vessels channels, which were filled with iodine solutions. The difference in CT numbers between lesions and background (18.8 HU) was representative of the low-contrast values needed for optimization tasks. The liver phantom background was evaluated with Haralick features and showed similar texture between patient and phantom images. CT images of the brain phantom had CT numbers of 125, 134, and 108 HU for white matter, gray matter, and CSF, respectively. The CT number differences were similar to those in patient images.

  16. Neuronavigation accuracy dependence on CT and MR imaging parameters: a phantom-based study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poggi, S; Pallotta, S; Russo, S; Gallina, P; Torresin, A; Bucciolini, M

    2003-01-01

    Clinical benefits from neuronavigation are well established. However, the complexity of its technical environment requires a careful evaluation of different types of errors. In this work, a detailed phantom study which investigates the accuracy in a neuronavigation procedure is presented. The dependence on many different imaging parameters, such as field of view, slice thickness and different kind of sequences (sequential and spiral for CT, T1-weighted and T2-weighted for MRI), is quantified. Moreover, data based on CT images are compared to those based on MR images, taking into account MRI distortion. Finally, the contributions to global accuracy coming from image acquisition, registration and navigation itself are discussed. Results demonstrate the importance of imaging accuracy. Procedures based on CT proved to be more accurate than procedures based on MRI. In the former, values from 2 to 2.5 mm are obtained for 95% fractiles of cumulative distribution of Euclidean distances between the intended target and the reached one while, in the latter, the measured values range from 3 to 4 mm. The absence of imaging distortion proved to be crucial for registration accuracy in MR-based procedures

  17. Effect of phantom voxelization in CT simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goertzen, Andrew L.; Beekman, Freek J.; Cherry, Simon R.

    2002-01-01

    In computer simulations of x-ray CT systems one can either use continuous geometrical descriptions for phantoms or a voxelized representation. The voxelized approach allows arbitrary phantoms to be defined without being confined to geometrical shapes. The disadvantage of the voxelized approach is that inherent errors are introduced due to the phantom voxelization. To study effects of phantom discretization, analytical CT simulations were run for a fan-beam geometry with phantom voxel sizes ranging from 0.0625 to 2 times the reconstructed pixel size and noise levels corresponding to 10 3 -10 7 photons per detector pixel prior to attenuation. The number of rays traced per detector element was varied from 1 to 16. Differences in the filtered backprojection images caused by changing the phantom matrix sizes and number of rays traced were assessed by calculating the difference between reconstructions based on the finest matrix and coarser matrix simulations. In noise free simulations, all phantom matrix sizes produced a measurable difference in comparison with the finest phantom matrix used. When even a small amount of noise was added to the projection data, the differences due to the phantom discretization were masked by the noise, and in all cases there was almost no improvement by using a phantom matrix that was more than twice as fine as the reconstruction matrix. No substantial improvement was achieved by tracing more than 4 rays per detector pixel

  18. Evaluation of accuracy in target positions of multmodality imaging using brain phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juh, R. H.; Suh, T. S.; Chung, Y. A. [The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-07-01

    Determination of target positions in radiation therapy or radiosurgery is critical to the successful treatment. It is often difficult to recognize the target position only from single image modality since each image modality has unique image pattern and image distortion problem. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the accuracy of target positions with multimodality brain phantom. We obtained CT, MR, and SPECT scan images with the specially designed brain phantom. Brain phantom consists of brain for images and frame for localization. The phantom was a water fillable cylinder containing 58 axial layers of 2.0 mm thickness. Each layer allows water to permeate various regions to match gray matter to white matter of 1:1 ratio. Localization frame with 5mm inner diameter and 150/160 mm length were attached to the outside of the brain slice and inside of the phantom cylinder. The phantom was filled with 0.16 M CuSO{sub 4} solution for MRI scan, and distilled water for CT and 15mCi (555 MBq) Tc-99m for SPECT. Axial slice images and volume images including the targets and localizer were obtained for each modality. To evaluate the errors in target positions, the position of localization and target balls measured in SPECT were compared with MR and CT. Transformation parameters for translation, rotation and scaling were determined by surface matching each SPECT with MR and CT images. Multimodality phantom was very useful to evaluate the accuracy of target positions among the different types of image modality such as CT, MR and SPECT.

  19. SU-E-J-44: Design a Platform and Phantom Model for Photoacoustic Imaging in Combination with CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sick, J; Alsanea, F; Rancilio, N; Stantz, K [Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Our (long-term) objective is to develop a US manipulator that will provide in situ radiation response and image-guided therapy for bladder cancer based on photoacoustic molecular imaging. Methods: A platform was devised to provide a reproducible positional frame of reference for targeting anatomic structure between MDCT and US scans, in lieu of CBCT, and to fuse photoacoustic molecular imaging. US and photoacoustic scans are taken of a patient while in the CT scanner and IRMT. Through co-registration, based on anatomical positions, we identified a common coordinate system to be used in Eclipse. A bladder phantom was constructed to validate anatomical tracking via US and photoacoustic imaging. We tested the platform using phantom model to demonstrate validity once moved from the CT couch to the linear accelerator couch. Results: This platform interlocks with Varian exact couch index points for reproducibility of positioning. Construction from low Z material and sized appropriately to fit in CT/IMRT gantry. Error in conversion from cylindrical coordinates of the manipulator to X, Y, Z coordinates of the treatment couch was less than 1mm. We measured the bladder size in 3 different directions in both Eclipse from the CT and Acuson from US. The error was less than 2mm in all directions. CT and US images were co-registered in MATLAB. Co-registration of photoacoustic images is still being developed. Conclusion: For Linear Accelerators without on board imaging, MV portal images are not a viable option for the localization of soft tissue anatomy. We believe our manipulator provides an alternative using US imaging, which will be examined in an upcoming clinical trial. We plan to examine the value of hypoxia guided treatment through photoacoustic imaging during this trial.

  20. SU-E-J-44: Design a Platform and Phantom Model for Photoacoustic Imaging in Combination with CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sick, J; Alsanea, F; Rancilio, N; Stantz, K

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Our (long-term) objective is to develop a US manipulator that will provide in situ radiation response and image-guided therapy for bladder cancer based on photoacoustic molecular imaging. Methods: A platform was devised to provide a reproducible positional frame of reference for targeting anatomic structure between MDCT and US scans, in lieu of CBCT, and to fuse photoacoustic molecular imaging. US and photoacoustic scans are taken of a patient while in the CT scanner and IRMT. Through co-registration, based on anatomical positions, we identified a common coordinate system to be used in Eclipse. A bladder phantom was constructed to validate anatomical tracking via US and photoacoustic imaging. We tested the platform using phantom model to demonstrate validity once moved from the CT couch to the linear accelerator couch. Results: This platform interlocks with Varian exact couch index points for reproducibility of positioning. Construction from low Z material and sized appropriately to fit in CT/IMRT gantry. Error in conversion from cylindrical coordinates of the manipulator to X, Y, Z coordinates of the treatment couch was less than 1mm. We measured the bladder size in 3 different directions in both Eclipse from the CT and Acuson from US. The error was less than 2mm in all directions. CT and US images were co-registered in MATLAB. Co-registration of photoacoustic images is still being developed. Conclusion: For Linear Accelerators without on board imaging, MV portal images are not a viable option for the localization of soft tissue anatomy. We believe our manipulator provides an alternative using US imaging, which will be examined in an upcoming clinical trial. We plan to examine the value of hypoxia guided treatment through photoacoustic imaging during this trial

  1. SU-F-I-59: Quality Assurance Phantom for PET/CT Alignment and Attenuation Correction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, T; Hamacher, K

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This study utilizes a commercial PET/CT phantom to investigate two specific properties of a PET/CT system: the alignment accuracy of PET images with those from CT used for attenuation correction and the accuracy of this correction in PET images. Methods: A commercial PET/CT phantom consisting of three aluminum rods, two long central cylinders containing uniform activity, and attenuating materials such as air, water, bone and iodine contrast was scanned using a standard PET/CT protocol. Images reconstructed with 2 mm slice thickness and a 512 by 512 matrix were obtained. The center of each aluminum rod in the PET and CT images was compared to evaluate alignment accuracy. ROIs were drawn on transaxial images of the central rods at each section of attenuating material to determine the corrected activity (in BQML). BQML values were graphed as a function of slice number to provide a visual representation of the attenuation-correction throughout the whole phantom. Results: Alignment accuracy is high between the PET and CT images. The maximum deviation between the two in the axial plane is less than 1.5 mm, which is less than the width of a single pixel. BQML values measured along different sections of the large central rods are similar among the different attenuating materials except iodine contrast. Deviation of BQML values in the air and bone sections from the water section is less than 1%. Conclusion: Accurate alignment of PET and CT images is critical to ensure proper calculation and application of CT-based attenuation correction. This study presents a simple and quick method to evaluate the two with a single acquisition. As the phantom also includes spheres of increasing diameter, this could serve as a straightforward means to annually evaluate the status of a modern PET/CT system.

  2. SU-F-I-59: Quality Assurance Phantom for PET/CT Alignment and Attenuation Correction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, T; Hamacher, K [Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: This study utilizes a commercial PET/CT phantom to investigate two specific properties of a PET/CT system: the alignment accuracy of PET images with those from CT used for attenuation correction and the accuracy of this correction in PET images. Methods: A commercial PET/CT phantom consisting of three aluminum rods, two long central cylinders containing uniform activity, and attenuating materials such as air, water, bone and iodine contrast was scanned using a standard PET/CT protocol. Images reconstructed with 2 mm slice thickness and a 512 by 512 matrix were obtained. The center of each aluminum rod in the PET and CT images was compared to evaluate alignment accuracy. ROIs were drawn on transaxial images of the central rods at each section of attenuating material to determine the corrected activity (in BQML). BQML values were graphed as a function of slice number to provide a visual representation of the attenuation-correction throughout the whole phantom. Results: Alignment accuracy is high between the PET and CT images. The maximum deviation between the two in the axial plane is less than 1.5 mm, which is less than the width of a single pixel. BQML values measured along different sections of the large central rods are similar among the different attenuating materials except iodine contrast. Deviation of BQML values in the air and bone sections from the water section is less than 1%. Conclusion: Accurate alignment of PET and CT images is critical to ensure proper calculation and application of CT-based attenuation correction. This study presents a simple and quick method to evaluate the two with a single acquisition. As the phantom also includes spheres of increasing diameter, this could serve as a straightforward means to annually evaluate the status of a modern PET/CT system.

  3. PET/CT imaging for treatment verification after proton therapy: a study with plastic phantoms and metallic implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parodi, Katia; Paganetti, Harald; Cascio, Ethan; Flanz, Jacob B; Bonab, Ali A; Alpert, Nathaniel M; Lohmann, Kevin; Bortfeld, Thomas

    2007-02-01

    The feasibility of off-line positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) for routine three dimensional in-vivo treatment verification of proton radiation therapy is currently under investigation at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. In preparation for clinical trials, phantom experiments were carried out to investigate the sensitivity and accuracy of the method depending on irradiation and imaging parameters. Furthermore, they addressed the feasibility of PET/CT as a robust verification tool in the presence of metallic implants. These produce x-ray CT artifacts and fluence perturbations which may compromise the accuracy of treatment planning algorithms. Spread-out Bragg peak proton fields were delivered to different phantoms consisting of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), PMMA stacked with lung and bone equivalent materials, and PMMA with titanium rods to mimic implants in patients. PET data were acquired in list mode starting within 20 min after irradiation at a commercial luthetium-oxyorthosilicate (LSO)-based PET/CT scanner. The amount and spatial distribution of the measured activity could be well reproduced by calculations based on the GEANT4 and FLUKA Monte Carlo codes. This phantom study supports the potential of millimeter accuracy for range monitoring and lateral field position verification even after low therapeutic dose exposures of 2 Gy, despite the delay between irradiation and imaging. It also indicates the value of PET for treatment verification in the presence of metallic implants, demonstrating a higher sensitivity to fluence perturbations in comparison to a commercial analytical treatment planning system. Finally, it addresses the suitability of LSO-based PET detectors for hadron therapy monitoring. This unconventional application of PET involves countrates which are orders of magnitude lower than in diagnostic tracer imaging, i.e., the signal of interest is comparable to the noise originating from the intrinsic radioactivity of

  4. Comparative imaging study in ultrasound, MRI, CT, and DSA using a multimodality renal artery phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, Deirdre M.; Fagan, Andrew J.; Moran, Carmel M.; Browne, Jacinta E. [Medical Ultrasound Physics and Technology Group, School of Physics, Dublin Institute of Technology, Dublin 8 (Ireland); Centre for Advanced Medical Imaging (CAMI), St James' s Hospital, Dublin 8 (Ireland); Department of Medical Physics, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH16 4TJ (United Kingdom); Medical Ultrasound Physics and Technology Group, School of Physics, Dublin Institute of Technology, Dublin 8 (Ireland)

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: A range of anatomically realistic multimodality renal artery phantoms consisting of vessels with varying degrees of stenosis was developed and evaluated using four imaging techniques currently used to detect renal artery stenosis (RAS). The spatial resolution required to visualize vascular geometry and the velocity detection performance required to adequately characterize blood flow in patients suffering from RAS are currently ill-defined, with the result that no one imaging modality has emerged as a gold standard technique for screening for this disease. Methods: The phantoms, which contained a range of stenosis values (0%, 30%, 50%, 70%, and 85%), were designed for use with ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, x-ray computed tomography, and x-ray digital subtraction angiography. The construction materials used were optimized with respect to their ultrasonic speed of sound and attenuation coefficient, MR relaxometry (T{sub 1},T{sub 2}) properties, and Hounsfield number/x-ray attenuation coefficient, with a design capable of tolerating high-pressure pulsatile flow. Fiducial targets, incorporated into the phantoms to allow for registration of images among modalities, were chosen to minimize geometric distortions. Results: High quality distortion-free images of the phantoms with good contrast between vessel lumen, fiducial markers, and background tissue to visualize all stenoses were obtained with each modality. Quantitative assessments of the grade of stenosis revealed significant discrepancies between modalities, with each underestimating the stenosis severity for the higher-stenosed phantoms (70% and 85%) by up to 14%, with the greatest discrepancy attributable to DSA. Conclusions: The design and construction of a range of anatomically realistic renal artery phantoms containing varying degrees of stenosis is described. Images obtained using the main four diagnostic techniques used to detect RAS were free from artifacts and exhibited adequate contrast

  5. Comparative imaging study in ultrasound, MRI, CT, and DSA using a multimodality renal artery phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, Deirdre M.; Fagan, Andrew J.; Moran, Carmel M.; Browne, Jacinta E.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: A range of anatomically realistic multimodality renal artery phantoms consisting of vessels with varying degrees of stenosis was developed and evaluated using four imaging techniques currently used to detect renal artery stenosis (RAS). The spatial resolution required to visualize vascular geometry and the velocity detection performance required to adequately characterize blood flow in patients suffering from RAS are currently ill-defined, with the result that no one imaging modality has emerged as a gold standard technique for screening for this disease. Methods: The phantoms, which contained a range of stenosis values (0%, 30%, 50%, 70%, and 85%), were designed for use with ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, x-ray computed tomography, and x-ray digital subtraction angiography. The construction materials used were optimized with respect to their ultrasonic speed of sound and attenuation coefficient, MR relaxometry (T 1 ,T 2 ) properties, and Hounsfield number/x-ray attenuation coefficient, with a design capable of tolerating high-pressure pulsatile flow. Fiducial targets, incorporated into the phantoms to allow for registration of images among modalities, were chosen to minimize geometric distortions. Results: High quality distortion-free images of the phantoms with good contrast between vessel lumen, fiducial markers, and background tissue to visualize all stenoses were obtained with each modality. Quantitative assessments of the grade of stenosis revealed significant discrepancies between modalities, with each underestimating the stenosis severity for the higher-stenosed phantoms (70% and 85%) by up to 14%, with the greatest discrepancy attributable to DSA. Conclusions: The design and construction of a range of anatomically realistic renal artery phantoms containing varying degrees of stenosis is described. Images obtained using the main four diagnostic techniques used to detect RAS were free from artifacts and exhibited adequate contrast to allow

  6. Development of age-specific Japanese physical phantoms for dose evaluation in infant CT examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamauchi-Kawaura, C.; Fujii, K.; Imai, K.; Ikeda, M.; Akahane, K.; Obara, S.; Yamauchi, M.; Narai, K.; Katsu, T.

    2016-01-01

    Secondary to the previous development of age-specific Japanese head phantoms, the authors designed Japanese torso phantoms for dose assessment in infant computed tomography (CT) examinations and completed a Japanese 3-y-old head-torso phantom. For design of age-specific torso phantoms (0, 0.5, 1 and 3 y old), anatomical structures were measured from CT images of Japanese infant patients. From the CT morphometry, it was found that rib cages of Japanese infants were smaller than those in Europeans and Americans. Radiophotoluminescence glass dosemeters were used for dose measurement of a 3-y-old head-torso phantom. To examine the validity of the developed phantom, organ and effective doses by the in-phantom dosimetry system were compared with simulation values in a web-based CT dose calculation system (WAZA-ARI). The differences in doses between the two systems were <20 % at the doses of organs within scan regions and effective doses in head, chest and abdomino-pelvic CT examinations. (authors)

  7. MCNPX simulation of proton dose distribution in homogeneous and CT phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, C.C.; Lee, Y.J.; Tung, C.J.; Cheng, H.W.; Chao, T.C.

    2014-01-01

    A dose simulation system was constructed based on the MCNPX Monte Carlo package to simulate proton dose distribution in homogeneous and CT phantoms. Conversion from Hounsfield unit of a patient CT image set to material information necessary for Monte Carlo simulation is based on Schneider's approach. In order to validate this simulation system, inter-comparison of depth dose distributions among those obtained from the MCNPX, GEANT4 and FLUKA codes for a 160 MeV monoenergetic proton beam incident normally on the surface of a homogeneous water phantom was performed. For dose validation within the CT phantom, direct comparison with measurement is infeasible. Instead, this study took the approach to indirectly compare the 50% ranges (R 50% ) along the central axis by our system to the NIST CSDA ranges for beams with 160 and 115 MeV energies. Comparison result within the homogeneous phantom shows good agreement. Differences of simulated R 50% among the three codes are less than 1 mm. For results within the CT phantom, the MCNPX simulated water equivalent R eq,50% are compatible with the CSDA water equivalent ranges from the NIST database with differences of 0.7 and 4.1 mm for 160 and 115 MeV beams, respectively. - Highlights: ► Proton dose simulation based on the MCNPX 2.6.0 in homogeneous and CT phantoms. ► CT number (HU) conversion to electron density based on Schneider's approach. ► Good agreement among MCNPX, GEANT4 and FLUKA codes in a homogeneous water phantom. ► Water equivalent R 50 in CT phantoms are compatible to those of NIST database

  8. Adaptive iterative dose reduction algorithm in CT: Effect on image quality compared with filtered back projection in body phantoms of different sizes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Milim; Lee, Jeong Min; Son, Hyo Shin; Han, Joon Koo; Choi, Byung Ihn [College of Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Jeong Hee; Choi, Jin Woo [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    To evaluate the impact of the adaptive iterative dose reduction (AIDR) three-dimensional (3D) algorithm in CT on noise reduction and the image quality compared to the filtered back projection (FBP) algorithm and to compare the effectiveness of AIDR 3D on noise reduction according to the body habitus using phantoms with different sizes. Three different-sized phantoms with diameters of 24 cm, 30 cm, and 40 cm were built up using the American College of Radiology CT accreditation phantom and layers of pork belly fat. Each phantom was scanned eight times using different mAs. Images were reconstructed using the FBP and three different strengths of the AIDR 3D. The image noise, the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the phantom were assessed. Two radiologists assessed the image quality of the 4 image sets in consensus. The effectiveness of AIDR 3D on noise reduction compared with FBP were also compared according to the phantom sizes. Adaptive iterative dose reduction 3D significantly reduced the image noise compared with FBP and enhanced the SNR and CNR (p < 0.05) with improved image quality (p < 0.05). When a stronger reconstruction algorithm was used, greater increase of SNR and CNR as well as noise reduction was achieved (p < 0.05). The noise reduction effect of AIDR 3D was significantly greater in the 40-cm phantom than in the 24-cm or 30-cm phantoms (p < 0.05). The AIDR 3D algorithm is effective to reduce the image noise as well as to improve the image-quality parameters compared by FBP algorithm, and its effectiveness may increase as the phantom size increases.

  9. Adaptive iterative dose reduction algorithm in CT: Effect on image quality compared with filtered back projection in body phantoms of different sizes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Milim; Lee, Jeong Min; Son, Hyo Shin; Han, Joon Koo; Choi, Byung Ihn; Yoon, Jeong Hee; Choi, Jin Woo

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of the adaptive iterative dose reduction (AIDR) three-dimensional (3D) algorithm in CT on noise reduction and the image quality compared to the filtered back projection (FBP) algorithm and to compare the effectiveness of AIDR 3D on noise reduction according to the body habitus using phantoms with different sizes. Three different-sized phantoms with diameters of 24 cm, 30 cm, and 40 cm were built up using the American College of Radiology CT accreditation phantom and layers of pork belly fat. Each phantom was scanned eight times using different mAs. Images were reconstructed using the FBP and three different strengths of the AIDR 3D. The image noise, the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the phantom were assessed. Two radiologists assessed the image quality of the 4 image sets in consensus. The effectiveness of AIDR 3D on noise reduction compared with FBP were also compared according to the phantom sizes. Adaptive iterative dose reduction 3D significantly reduced the image noise compared with FBP and enhanced the SNR and CNR (p < 0.05) with improved image quality (p < 0.05). When a stronger reconstruction algorithm was used, greater increase of SNR and CNR as well as noise reduction was achieved (p < 0.05). The noise reduction effect of AIDR 3D was significantly greater in the 40-cm phantom than in the 24-cm or 30-cm phantoms (p < 0.05). The AIDR 3D algorithm is effective to reduce the image noise as well as to improve the image-quality parameters compared by FBP algorithm, and its effectiveness may increase as the phantom size increases.

  10. Computerized method for evaluating diagnostic image quality of calcified plaque images in cardiac CT: Validation on a physical dynamic cardiac phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, Martin; Rodgers, Zachary; Giger, Maryellen L.; Bardo, Dianna M. E.; Patel, Amit R.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: In cardiac computed tomography (CT), important clinical indices, such as the coronary calcium score and the percentage of coronary artery stenosis, are often adversely affected by motion artifacts. As a result, the expert observer must decide whether or not to use these indices during image interpretation. Computerized methods potentially can be used to assist in these decisions. In a previous study, an artificial neural network (ANN) regression model provided assessability (image quality) indices of calcified plaque images from the software NCAT phantom that were highly agreeable with those provided by expert observers. The method predicted assessability indices based on computer-extracted features of the plaque. In the current study, the ANN-predicted assessability indices were used to identify calcified plaque images with diagnostic calcium scores (based on mass) from a physical dynamic cardiac phantom. The basic assumption was that better quality images were associated with more accurate calcium scores. Methods: A 64-channel CT scanner was used to obtain 500 calcified plaque images from a physical dynamic cardiac phantom at different heart rates, cardiac phases, and plaque locations. Two expert observers independently provided separate sets of assessability indices for each of these images. Separate sets of ANN-predicted assessability indices tailored to each observer were then generated within the framework of a bootstrap resampling scheme. For each resampling iteration, the absolute calcium score error between the calcium scores of the motion-contaminated plaque image and its corresponding stationary image served as the ground truth in terms of indicating images with diagnostic calcium scores. The performances of the ANN-predicted and observer-assigned indices in identifying images with diagnostic calcium scores were then evaluated using ROC analysis. Results: Assessability indices provided by the first observer and the corresponding ANN performed

  11. Use of model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) in reduced-dose CT for routine follow-up of patients with malignant lymphoma: dose savings, image quality and phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herin, Edouard; Chiaradia, Melanie; Cavet, Madeleine; Deux, Jean-Francois; Rahmouni, Alain; Gardavaud, Francois; Beaussart, Pauline; Richard, Philippe; Haioun, Corinne; Itti, Emmanuel; Luciani, Alain

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate both in vivo and in phantom studies, dose reduction, and image quality of body CT reconstructed with model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR), performed during patient follow-ups for lymphoma. This study included 40 patients (mean age 49 years) with lymphoma. All underwent reduced-dose CT during follow-up, reconstructed using MBIR or 50 % advanced statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR). All had previously undergone a standard dose CT with filtered back projection (FBP) reconstruction. The volume CT dose index (CTDIvol), the density measures in liver, spleen, fat, air, and muscle, and the image quality (noise and signal to noise ratio, SNR) (ANOVA) observed using standard or reduced-dose CT were compared both in patients and a phantom study (Catphan 600) (Kruskal Wallis). The CTDIvol was decreased on reduced-dose body CT (4.06 mGy vs. 15.64 mGy p < 0.0001). SNR was higher in reduced-dose CT reconstructed with MBIR than in 50 % ASIR or than standard dose CT with FBP (patients, p ≤ 0.01; phantoms, p = 0.003). Low contrast detectability and spatial resolution in phantoms were not altered on MBIR-reconstructed CT (p ≥ 0.11). Reduced-dose CT with MBIR reconstruction can decrease radiation dose delivered to patients with lymphoma, while keeping an image quality similar to that obtained on standard-dose CT. (orig.)

  12. Use of model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) in reduced-dose CT for routine follow-up of patients with malignant lymphoma: dose savings, image quality and phantom study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herin, Edouard; Chiaradia, Melanie; Cavet, Madeleine; Deux, Jean-Francois; Rahmouni, Alain [AP-HP, Hopitaux Universitaires Henri Mondor, Imagerie Medicale, Creteil (France); Universite Paris Est Creteil, Faculte de Medecine, Creteil (France); Gardavaud, Francois; Beaussart, Pauline [AP-HP, Hopitaux Universitaires Henri Mondor, Imagerie Medicale, Creteil (France); Richard, Philippe [GE Healthcare France, Buc (France); Haioun, Corinne [Universite Paris Est Creteil, Faculte de Medecine, Creteil (France); AP-HP, Hopitaux Universitaires Henri Mondor, Hemopathies Lymphoides, Creteil (France); Itti, Emmanuel [Universite Paris Est Creteil, Faculte de Medecine, Creteil (France); AP-HP, Hopitaux Universitaires Henri Mondor, Medecine Nucleaire, Creteil (France); Luciani, Alain [AP-HP, Hopitaux Universitaires Henri Mondor, Imagerie Medicale, Creteil (France); Universite Paris Est Creteil, Faculte de Medecine, Creteil (France); INSERM Unite U 955, Creteil (France); AP-HP, Groupe Henri Mondor Albert Chenevier, Imagerie Medicale, CHU Henri Mondor, Creteil Cedex (France)

    2015-08-15

    To evaluate both in vivo and in phantom studies, dose reduction, and image quality of body CT reconstructed with model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR), performed during patient follow-ups for lymphoma. This study included 40 patients (mean age 49 years) with lymphoma. All underwent reduced-dose CT during follow-up, reconstructed using MBIR or 50 % advanced statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR). All had previously undergone a standard dose CT with filtered back projection (FBP) reconstruction. The volume CT dose index (CTDIvol), the density measures in liver, spleen, fat, air, and muscle, and the image quality (noise and signal to noise ratio, SNR) (ANOVA) observed using standard or reduced-dose CT were compared both in patients and a phantom study (Catphan 600) (Kruskal Wallis). The CTDIvol was decreased on reduced-dose body CT (4.06 mGy vs. 15.64 mGy p < 0.0001). SNR was higher in reduced-dose CT reconstructed with MBIR than in 50 % ASIR or than standard dose CT with FBP (patients, p ≤ 0.01; phantoms, p = 0.003). Low contrast detectability and spatial resolution in phantoms were not altered on MBIR-reconstructed CT (p ≥ 0.11). Reduced-dose CT with MBIR reconstruction can decrease radiation dose delivered to patients with lymphoma, while keeping an image quality similar to that obtained on standard-dose CT. (orig.)

  13. SU-E-J-119: Head-And-Neck Digital Phantoms for Geometric and Dosimetric Uncertainty Evaluation of CT-CBCT Deformable Image Registration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Z; Koyfman, S; Xia, P; Bzdusek, K

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate geometric and dosimetric uncertainties of CT-CBCT deformable image registration (DIR) algorithms using digital phantoms generated from real patients. Methods: We selected ten H&N cancer patients with adaptive IMRT. For each patient, a planning CT (CT1), a replanning CT (CT2), and a pretreatment CBCT (CBCT1) were used as the basis for digital phantom creation. Manually adjusted meshes were created for selected ROIs (e.g. PTVs, brainstem, spinal cord, mandible, and parotids) on CT1 and CT2. The mesh vertices were input into a thin-plate spline algorithm to generate a reference displacement vector field (DVF). The reference DVF was applied to CBCT1 to create a simulated mid-treatment CBCT (CBCT2). The CT-CBCT digital phantom consisted of CT1 and CBCT2, which were linked by the reference DVF. Three DIR algorithms (Demons, B-Spline, and intensity-based) were applied to these ten digital phantoms. The images, ROIs, and volumetric doses were mapped from CT1 to CBCT2 using the DVFs computed by these three DIRs and compared to those mapped using the reference DVF. Results: The average Dice coefficients for selected ROIs were from 0.83 to 0.94 for Demons, from 0.82 to 0.95 for B-Spline, and from 0.67 to 0.89 for intensity-based DIR. The average Hausdorff distances for selected ROIs were from 2.4 to 6.2 mm for Demons, from 1.8 to 5.9 mm for B-Spline, and from 2.8 to 11.2 mm for intensity-based DIR. The average absolute dose errors for selected ROIs were from 0.7 to 2.1 Gy for Demons, from 0.7 to 2.9 Gy for B- Spline, and from 1.3 to 4.5 Gy for intensity-based DIR. Conclusion: Using clinically realistic CT-CBCT digital phantoms, Demons and B-Spline were shown to have similar geometric and dosimetric uncertainties while intensity-based DIR had the worst uncertainties. CT-CBCT DIR has the potential to provide accurate CBCT-based dose verification for H&N adaptive radiotherapy. Z Shen: None; K Bzdusek: an employee of Philips Healthcare; S Koyfman: None; P Xia

  14. Effect of imaging parameters of spiral CT scanning on image quality for the dental implants. Visual evaluation using a semi-anthropomorphic mandible phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, Yasuhiko; Indou, Hiroko; Honda Eiichi

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of parameters of spiral CT scanning on the image quality required for the planning of dental implants operations. A semi-anthropomorphic mandible phantom which has artificial mandibular canals and teeth roots was used as a standard object for imaging. Spiral CT scans for the phantom settled in water phantom with diameters of 20 and 16 cm were performed. Visibility of the artificial mandibular canal made of a Teflon tube and gaps between tooth apex and canal in the mandibular phantom was evaluated for various combinations of the slice thickness, tables speeds, angles to the canal, and x-ray tube currents. Teeth roots were made of PVC (poly vinyl chloride). The artificial mandibular canal was clearly observed on the images of 1 mm slice thickness. At the same table speed of 2 mm /rotation, the images of thin slice (1 mm) were superior to that of thick slice (2 mm). The gap between teeth apex and canal was erroneously diagnosed on the images with table speeds of 3 mm/rotation. Horizontal scanning in parallel to the canal result in poor image quality for observation of mandibular canals because of the partial volume effect. A relatively high x-ray tube current (125 mA) at thin slice (1 mm) scanning was required for scanning the mandibular phantom in 20 cm water vessel. Spiral scanning with slice thickness of 1 mm and table speeds of 1 of 2 mm/rotation seemed to be suitable for dental implants. The result of this study suggested that diagnosis from two independent spiral scans with a different angle to the object was more accurate and more efficient than single spiral scanning. (author)

  15. Effect of x-ray tube parameters and iodine concentration on image quality and radiation dose in cerebral pediatric and adult CT angiography: a phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, Antonios E; Perisinakis, Kostas; Raissaki, Maria; Damilakis, John

    2013-04-01

    The aim of the present phantom study was to investigate the effect of x-ray tube parameters and iodine concentration on image quality and radiation dose in cerebral computed tomographic (CT) angiographic examinations of pediatric and adult individuals. Four physical anthropomorphic phantoms that represent the average individual as neonate, 1-year-old, 5-year-old, and 10-year-old children and the RANDO phantom that simulates the average adult individual were used. Cylindrical vessels were bored along the brain-equivalent plugs of each physical phantom. To simulate the brain vasculature, vessels of 0.6, 1, 2, and 3 mm in diameter were created. These vessels were filled with contrast medium (CM) solutions at different iodine concentrations, that is, 5.6, 4.2, 2.7, and 1.4 mg I/mL. The phantom heads were scanned at 120, 100, and 80 kV. The applied quality reference tube current-time product values ranged from a minimum of 45 to a maximum of 680. The CT acquisitions were performed on a 16-slice CT scanner using the automatic exposure control system. Image quality was evaluated on the basis of image noise and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) between the contrast-enhanced iodinated vessels and the unenhanced regions of interest. Dose reduction was calculated as the percentage difference of the CT dose index value at the quality reference tube current-time product and the CT dose index at the mean modulated tube current-time product. Image noise that was measured using the preset tube current-time product settings varied significantly among the different phantoms (P Hounsfield unit number of iodinated vessels was linearly related to CM concentration (r² = 0.907) and vessel diameter (r² = 0.918). The Hounsfield unit number of iodinated vessels followed a decreasing trend from the neonate phantom to the adult phantom at all kilovoltage settings. For the same image noise level, a CNR improvement of up to 69% and a dose reduction of up to 61% may be achieved when CT acquisition

  16. Computerized method for evaluating diagnostic image quality of calcified plaque images in cardiac CT: Validation on a physical dynamic cardiac phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, Martin; Rodgers, Zachary; Giger, Maryellen L.; Bardo, Dianna M. E.; Patel, Amit R. [Department of Radiology, Committee on Medical Physics, University of Chicago, 5841 South Maryland Avenue, MC 2026, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Oregon Health and Science University, 3181 Southwest Sam Jackson Park Road, Portland, Oregon 97239 (United States); Department of Medicine, University of Chicago, 5841 South Maryland Avenue, MC 5084, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: In cardiac computed tomography (CT), important clinical indices, such as the coronary calcium score and the percentage of coronary artery stenosis, are often adversely affected by motion artifacts. As a result, the expert observer must decide whether or not to use these indices during image interpretation. Computerized methods potentially can be used to assist in these decisions. In a previous study, an artificial neural network (ANN) regression model provided assessability (image quality) indices of calcified plaque images from the software NCAT phantom that were highly agreeable with those provided by expert observers. The method predicted assessability indices based on computer-extracted features of the plaque. In the current study, the ANN-predicted assessability indices were used to identify calcified plaque images with diagnostic calcium scores (based on mass) from a physical dynamic cardiac phantom. The basic assumption was that better quality images were associated with more accurate calcium scores. Methods: A 64-channel CT scanner was used to obtain 500 calcified plaque images from a physical dynamic cardiac phantom at different heart rates, cardiac phases, and plaque locations. Two expert observers independently provided separate sets of assessability indices for each of these images. Separate sets of ANN-predicted assessability indices tailored to each observer were then generated within the framework of a bootstrap resampling scheme. For each resampling iteration, the absolute calcium score error between the calcium scores of the motion-contaminated plaque image and its corresponding stationary image served as the ground truth in terms of indicating images with diagnostic calcium scores. The performances of the ANN-predicted and observer-assigned indices in identifying images with diagnostic calcium scores were then evaluated using ROC analysis. Results: Assessability indices provided by the first observer and the corresponding ANN performed

  17. Spatial resolution measurements by Radia diagnostic software with SEDENTEXCT image quality phantom in cone beam CT for dental use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Hiroshi; Nomura, Yoshikazu; Kuribayashi, Ami; Kurabayashi, Tohru

    2018-02-01

    We aimed to employ the Radia diagnostic software with the safety and efficacy of a new emerging dental X-ray modality (SEDENTEXCT) image quality (IQ) phantom in CT, and to evaluate its validity. The SEDENTEXCT IQ phantom and Radia diagnostic software were employed. The phantom was scanned using one medical full-body CT and two dentomaxillofacial cone beam CTs. The obtained images were imported to the Radia software, and the spatial resolution outputs were evaluated. The oversampling method was employed using our original wire phantom as a reference. The resultant modulation transfer function (MTF) curves were compared. The null hypothesis was that MTF curves generated using both methods would be in agreement. One-way analysis of variance tests were applied to the f50 and f10 values from the MTF curves. The f10 values were subjectively confirmed by observing the line pair modules. The Radia software reported the MTF curves on the xy-plane of the CT scans, but could not return f50 and f10 values on the z-axis. The null hypothesis concerning the reported MTF curves on the xy-plane was rejected. There were significant differences between the results of the Radia software and our reference method, except for f10 values in CS9300. These findings were consistent with our line pair observations. We evaluated the validity of the Radia software with the SEDENTEXCT IQ phantom. The data provided were semi-automatic, albeit with problems and statistically different from our reference. We hope the manufacturer will overcome these limitations.

  18. Technical Note: Multipurpose CT, ultrasound, and MRI breast phantom for use in radiotherapy and minimally invasive interventions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruschin, Mark, E-mail: Mark.Ruschin@sunnybrook.ca; Chin, Lee; Ravi, Ananth; McCann, Claire [Department of Medical Physics, Sunnybrook Odette Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5, Canada and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Davidson, Sean R. H. [Techna Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1P5 (Canada); Phounsy, William [Department of Physics, Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario M5B 2K3 (Canada); Yoo, Tae Sun [Institute of Health Policy, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5T 3M6 (Canada); Pignol, Jean-Philippe [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, 3075 EA Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: To develop a multipurpose gel-based breast phantom consisting of a simulated tumor with realistic imaging properties in CT, ultrasound and MRI, or a postsurgical cavity on CT. Applications for the phantom include: deformable image registration (DIR) quality assurance (QA), autosegmentation validation, and localization testing and training for minimally invasive image-guided procedures such as those involving catheter or needle insertion. Methods: A thermoplastic mask of a typical breast patient lying supine was generated and then filled to make an array of phantoms. The background simulated breast tissue consisted of 32.4 g each of ballistic gelatin (BG) powder and Metamusil™ (MM) dissolved in 800 ml of water. Simulated tumors were added using the following recipe: 12 g of barium sulfate (1.4% v/v) plus 0.000 14 g copper sulfate plus 0.7 g of MM plus 7.2 g of BG all dissolved in 75 ml of water. The phantom was evaluated quantitatively in CT by comparing Hounsfield units (HUs) with actual breast tissue. For ultrasound and MRI, the phantoms were assessed based on subjective image quality and signal-difference to noise (SDNR) ratio, respectively. The stiffness of the phantom was evaluated based on ultrasound elastography measurements to yield an average Young’s modulus. In addition, subjective tactile assessment of phantom was performed under needle insertion. Results: The simulated breast tissue had a mean background value of 24 HU on CT imaging, which more closely resembles fibroglandular tissue (40 HU) as opposed to adipose (−100 HU). The tumor had a mean CT number of 45 HU, which yielded a qualitatively realistic image contrast relative to the background either as an intact tumor or postsurgical cavity. The tumor appeared qualitatively realistic on ultrasound images, exhibiting hypoechoic characteristics compared to background. On MRI, the tumor exhibited a SDNR of 3.7. The average Young’s modulus was computed to be 15.8 ± 0.7 kPa (1 SD

  19. Influences of reconstruction and attenuation correction in brain SPECT images obtained by the hybrid SPECT/CT device: evaluation with a 3-dimensional brain phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akamatsu, Mana; Yamashita, Yasuo; Akamatsu, Go; Tsutsui, Yuji; Ohya, Nobuyoshi; Nakamura, Yasuhiko; Sasaki, Masayuki

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influences of reconstruction and attenuation correction on the differences in the radioactivity distributions in 123 I brain SPECT obtained by the hybrid SPECT/CT device. We used the 3-dimensional (3D) brain phantom, which imitates the precise structure of gray matter, white matter and bone regions. It was filled with 123 I solution (20.1 kBq/mL) in the gray matter region and with K 2 HPO 4 in the bone region. The SPECT/CT data were acquired by the hybrid SPECT/CT device. SPECT images were reconstructed by using filtered back projection with uniform attenuation correction (FBP-uAC), 3D ordered-subsets expectation-maximization with uniform AC (3D-OSEM-uAC) and 3D OSEM with CT-based non-uniform AC (3D-OSEM-CTAC). We evaluated the differences in the radioactivity distributions among these reconstruction methods using a 3D digital phantom, which was developed from CT images of the 3D brain phantom, as a reference. The normalized mean square error (NMSE) and regional radioactivity were calculated to evaluate the similarity of SPECT images to the 3D digital phantom. The NMSE values were 0.0811 in FBP-uAC, 0.0914 in 3D-OSEM-uAC and 0.0766 in 3D-OSEM-CTAC. The regional radioactivity of FBP-uAC was 11.5% lower in the middle cerebral artery territory, and that of 3D-OSEM-uAC was 5.8% higher in the anterior cerebral artery territory, compared with the digital phantom. On the other hand, that of 3D-OSEM-CTAC was 1.8% lower in all brain areas. By using the hybrid SPECT/CT device, the brain SPECT reconstructed by 3D-OSEM with CT attenuation correction can provide an accurate assessment of the distribution of brain radioactivity

  20. 3D reconstruction of microvascular flow phantoms with hybrid imaging modalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jingying; Hsiung, Kevin; Ritenour, Russell; Golzarian, Jafar

    2011-03-01

    Microvascular flow phantoms were built to aid the development of a hemodynamic simulation model for treating hepatocelluar carcinoma. The goal is to predict the blood flow routing for embolotherapy planning. Embolization is to deliver agents (e.g. microspheres) to the vicinity of the tumor to obstruct blood supply and nutrients to the tumor, targeting into 30 - 40 μm arterioles. Due to the size of the catheter, it has to release microspheres at an upper stream location, which may not localize the blocking effect. Accurate anatomical descriptions of microvasculature will help to conduct a reliable simulation and prepare a successful embolization strategy. Modern imaging devices can generate 3D reconstructions with ease. However, with a fixed detector size, larger field of view yields lower resolution. Clinical CT images can't be used to measure micro vessel dimensions, while micro-CT requires more acquisitions to reconstruct larger vessels. A multi-tiered, montage 3D reconstruction method with hybrid-modality imagery is devised to minimize the reconstruction effort. Regular CT is used for larger vessels and micro-CT is used for micro vessels. The montage approach aims to stitch up images with different resolutions and orientations. A resolution-adaptable 3D image registration is developed to assemble the images. We have created vessel phantoms that consist of several tiers of bifurcating polymer tubes in reducing diameters, down to 25 μm. No previous work of physical flow phantom has ventured into this small scale. Overlapping phantom images acquired from clinical CT and micro-CT are used to verify the image registration fidelity.

  1. Development of digital phantoms based on a finite element model to simulate low-attenuation areas in CT imaging for pulmonary emphysema quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diciotti, Stefano; Nobis, Alessandro; Ciulli, Stefano; Landini, Nicholas; Mascalchi, Mario; Sverzellati, Nicola; Innocenti, Bernardo

    2017-09-01

    To develop an innovative finite element (FE) model of lung parenchyma which simulates pulmonary emphysema on CT imaging. The model is aimed to generate a set of digital phantoms of low-attenuation areas (LAA) images with different grades of emphysema severity. Four individual parameter configurations simulating different grades of emphysema severity were utilized to generate 40 FE models using ten randomizations for each setting. We compared two measures of emphysema severity (relative area (RA) and the exponent D of the cumulative distribution function of LAA clusters size) between the simulated LAA images and those computed directly on the models output (considered as reference). The LAA images obtained from our model output can simulate CT-LAA images in subjects with different grades of emphysema severity. Both RA and D computed on simulated LAA images were underestimated as compared to those calculated on the models output, suggesting that measurements in CT imaging may not be accurate in the assessment of real emphysema extent. Our model is able to mimic the cluster size distribution of LAA on CT imaging of subjects with pulmonary emphysema. The model could be useful to generate standard test images and to design physical phantoms of LAA images for the assessment of the accuracy of indexes for the radiologic quantitation of emphysema.

  2. Imaging and dosimetric errors in 4D PET/CT-guided radiotherapy from patient-specific respiratory patterns: a dynamic motion phantom end-to-end study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, S R; Nyflot, M J; Herrmann, C; Groh, C M; Meyer, J; Wollenweber, S D; Stearns, C W; Kinahan, P E; Sandison, G A

    2015-05-07

    Effective positron emission tomography / computed tomography (PET/CT) guidance in radiotherapy of lung cancer requires estimation and mitigation of errors due to respiratory motion. An end-to-end workflow was developed to measure patient-specific motion-induced uncertainties in imaging, treatment planning, and radiation delivery with respiratory motion phantoms and dosimeters. A custom torso phantom with inserts mimicking normal lung tissue and lung lesion was filled with [(18)F]FDG. The lung lesion insert was driven by six different patient-specific respiratory patterns or kept stationary. PET/CT images were acquired under motionless ground truth, tidal breathing motion-averaged (3D), and respiratory phase-correlated (4D) conditions. Target volumes were estimated by standardized uptake value (SUV) thresholds that accurately defined the ground-truth lesion volume. Non-uniform dose-painting plans using volumetrically modulated arc therapy were optimized for fixed normal lung and spinal cord objectives and variable PET-based target objectives. Resulting plans were delivered to a cylindrical diode array at rest, in motion on a platform driven by the same respiratory patterns (3D), or motion-compensated by a robotic couch with an infrared camera tracking system (4D). Errors were estimated relative to the static ground truth condition for mean target-to-background (T/Bmean) ratios, target volumes, planned equivalent uniform target doses, and 2%-2 mm gamma delivery passing rates. Relative to motionless ground truth conditions, PET/CT imaging errors were on the order of 10-20%, treatment planning errors were 5-10%, and treatment delivery errors were 5-30% without motion compensation. Errors from residual motion following compensation methods were reduced to 5-10% in PET/CT imaging, PET/CT imaging to RT planning, and RT delivery under a dose painting paradigm is feasible within an integrated respiratory motion phantom workflow. For a limited set of cases, the magnitude

  3. Quantitative characterization of liver tumor radiodensity in CT images: a phantom study between two scanners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Benjamin Paul; Li, Qin; McKenney, Sarah; Fricke, Stanley Thomas; Fang, Yuan; Gavrielides, Marios A.; Petrick, Nicholas

    2018-02-01

    Quantitative assessment of tumor radiodensity is important for the clinical evaluation of contrast enhancement and treatment response, as well as for the extraction of texture-related features for image analysis or radiomics. Radiodensity estimation, Hounsfield Units (HU) in CT images, can be affected by patient factors such as tumor size, and by system factors such as acquisition and reconstruction protocols. In this project, we quantified the measurability of liver tumor HU using a 3D-printed phantom, imaged with two CT systems: Siemens Somatom Force and GE Lightspeed VCT. The phantom was printed by dithering two materials to create spherical tumors (10, 14 mm) with uniform densities (90, 95, 100, 105 HU). Image datasets were acquired at 120 kVp including 15 repeats using two matching exposures across the CT systems, and reconstructed using comparable algorithms. The radiodensity of each tumor was measured using an automated matched-filter method. We assessed the performance of each protocol using the area under the ROC curve (AUC) as the metric for distinguishing between tumors with different radiodensities. The AUC ranged from 0.8 to 1.0 and was affected by tumor size, radiodensity, and scanner; the lowest AUC values corresponded to low dose measurements of 10 mm tumors with less than 5 HU difference. The two scanners exhibited similar performance >0.9 AUC for large lesions with contrast above 7 HU, though differences were observed for the smallest and lowest contrast tumors. These results show that HU estimation should be carefully examined, considering that uncertainty in the tumor radiodensity may propagate to quantification of other characteristics, such as size and texture.

  4. Technical Note: Characterization of custom 3D printed multimodality imaging phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bieniosek, Matthew F.; Lee, Brian J.; Levin, Craig S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Imaging phantoms are important tools for researchers and technicians, but they can be costly and difficult to customize. Three dimensional (3D) printing is a widely available rapid prototyping technique that enables the fabrication of objects with 3D computer generated geometries. It is ideal for quickly producing customized, low cost, multimodal, reusable imaging phantoms. This work validates the use of 3D printed phantoms by comparing CT and PET scans of a 3D printed phantom and a commercial “Micro Deluxe” phantom. This report also presents results from a customized 3D printed PET/MRI phantom, and a customized high resolution imaging phantom with sub-mm features. Methods: CT and PET scans of a 3D printed phantom and a commercial Micro Deluxe (Data Spectrum Corporation, USA) phantom with 1.2, 1.6, 2.4, 3.2, 4.0, and 4.8 mm diameter hot rods were acquired. The measured PET and CT rod sizes, activities, and attenuation coefficients were compared. A PET/MRI scan of a custom 3D printed phantom with hot and cold rods was performed, with photon attenuation and normalization measurements performed with a separate 3D printed normalization phantom. X-ray transmission scans of a customized two level high resolution 3D printed phantom with sub-mm features were also performed. Results: Results show very good agreement between commercial and 3D printed micro deluxe phantoms with less than 3% difference in CT measured rod diameter, less than 5% difference in PET measured rod diameter, and a maximum of 6.2% difference in average rod activity from a 10 min, 333 kBq/ml (9 μCi/ml) Siemens Inveon (Siemens Healthcare, Germany) PET scan. In all cases, these differences were within the measurement uncertainties of our setups. PET/MRI scans successfully identified 3D printed hot and cold rods on PET and MRI modalities. X-ray projection images of a 3D printed high resolution phantom identified features as small as 350 μm wide. Conclusions: This work shows that 3D printed

  5. Technical Note: Characterization of custom 3D printed multimodality imaging phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bieniosek, Matthew F. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, 350 Serra Mall, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Lee, Brian J. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, 440 Escondido Mall, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Levin, Craig S., E-mail: cslevin@stanford.edu [Departments of Radiology, Physics, Bioengineering and Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, 300 Pasteur Dr., Stanford, California 94305-5128 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: Imaging phantoms are important tools for researchers and technicians, but they can be costly and difficult to customize. Three dimensional (3D) printing is a widely available rapid prototyping technique that enables the fabrication of objects with 3D computer generated geometries. It is ideal for quickly producing customized, low cost, multimodal, reusable imaging phantoms. This work validates the use of 3D printed phantoms by comparing CT and PET scans of a 3D printed phantom and a commercial “Micro Deluxe” phantom. This report also presents results from a customized 3D printed PET/MRI phantom, and a customized high resolution imaging phantom with sub-mm features. Methods: CT and PET scans of a 3D printed phantom and a commercial Micro Deluxe (Data Spectrum Corporation, USA) phantom with 1.2, 1.6, 2.4, 3.2, 4.0, and 4.8 mm diameter hot rods were acquired. The measured PET and CT rod sizes, activities, and attenuation coefficients were compared. A PET/MRI scan of a custom 3D printed phantom with hot and cold rods was performed, with photon attenuation and normalization measurements performed with a separate 3D printed normalization phantom. X-ray transmission scans of a customized two level high resolution 3D printed phantom with sub-mm features were also performed. Results: Results show very good agreement between commercial and 3D printed micro deluxe phantoms with less than 3% difference in CT measured rod diameter, less than 5% difference in PET measured rod diameter, and a maximum of 6.2% difference in average rod activity from a 10 min, 333 kBq/ml (9 μCi/ml) Siemens Inveon (Siemens Healthcare, Germany) PET scan. In all cases, these differences were within the measurement uncertainties of our setups. PET/MRI scans successfully identified 3D printed hot and cold rods on PET and MRI modalities. X-ray projection images of a 3D printed high resolution phantom identified features as small as 350 μm wide. Conclusions: This work shows that 3D printed

  6. Technical Note: Characterization of custom 3D printed multimodality imaging phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieniosek, Matthew F; Lee, Brian J; Levin, Craig S

    2015-10-01

    Imaging phantoms are important tools for researchers and technicians, but they can be costly and difficult to customize. Three dimensional (3D) printing is a widely available rapid prototyping technique that enables the fabrication of objects with 3D computer generated geometries. It is ideal for quickly producing customized, low cost, multimodal, reusable imaging phantoms. This work validates the use of 3D printed phantoms by comparing CT and PET scans of a 3D printed phantom and a commercial "Micro Deluxe" phantom. This report also presents results from a customized 3D printed PET/MRI phantom, and a customized high resolution imaging phantom with sub-mm features. CT and PET scans of a 3D printed phantom and a commercial Micro Deluxe (Data Spectrum Corporation, USA) phantom with 1.2, 1.6, 2.4, 3.2, 4.0, and 4.8 mm diameter hot rods were acquired. The measured PET and CT rod sizes, activities, and attenuation coefficients were compared. A PET/MRI scan of a custom 3D printed phantom with hot and cold rods was performed, with photon attenuation and normalization measurements performed with a separate 3D printed normalization phantom. X-ray transmission scans of a customized two level high resolution 3D printed phantom with sub-mm features were also performed. Results show very good agreement between commercial and 3D printed micro deluxe phantoms with less than 3% difference in CT measured rod diameter, less than 5% difference in PET measured rod diameter, and a maximum of 6.2% difference in average rod activity from a 10 min, 333 kBq/ml (9 μCi/ml) Siemens Inveon (Siemens Healthcare, Germany) PET scan. In all cases, these differences were within the measurement uncertainties of our setups. PET/MRI scans successfully identified 3D printed hot and cold rods on PET and MRI modalities. X-ray projection images of a 3D printed high resolution phantom identified features as small as 350 μm wide. This work shows that 3D printed phantoms can be functionally equivalent to

  7. Phantom study for the systemic performance of Gemini PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Yanlin; He Xiaohong; Huang Kemin; Yu Fengwen; Liu Dejun; Yuan Jianwei; Yuan Baihong; Su Shaodi

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To develop the methods and parameters for evaluating the systemic performance of Gemini PET/CT. Methods: The spatial resolution, standardized uptake value (SUV), uniformity and accuracy of image registration were selected as the evaluating indexes. The Jaszczak phantom with smaller inserts was filled with 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) solution and imaged with whole body and brain imaging modes, respectively, to evaluate the spatial resolution of the PET/CT; a Philips hollow phantom was filled with 18 F-FDG solution and imaged for calculating the SUV and the uniformity parameters; four 22 Na solid sources were put under the pad of the patient table and imaged synchronously with the patient's data acquisition to evaluate the accuracy of the PET and CT image fusion. Results: The rods of the diameter of 6.4 mm of both the hot and cold inserts were observed with whole body imaging mode, and rods of the diameters of 4.8 mm of both the hot and cold inserts were observed with brain imaging mode. The SUV with X-ray CT attenuation correction (CTAC) was 0.92 ± 0.24, and was 0.99±0.26 with 137 Cs attenuation correction (CsAC), and t=-1.327, P>0.05 between the two groups. The uniformity of the images with both CTAC and CsAC was very nice, no artifacts were seen either. The maximum pixel counts was 3790, the minimum was 1434, the average was 2581.23 and the standard deviation was 728.39 with CTAC; and were 4218, 1073, 2758.19 and 838.79 with CsAC correspondingly, and t=-1.069, P>0.05 between the two groups. The images of PET and CT were registrated better, and also no diversity was detected on the fusion images. Conclusions: These methods and parameters might be used to evaluate the systemic performance of the PET/CT, and could also be used as the supplementary items for the acceptance test and daily quality assurance of the PET/CT. (authors)

  8. Quantifying the impact of respiratory-gated 4D CT acquisition on thoracic image quality: A digital phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernatowicz, K.; Knopf, A.; Lomax, A.; Keall, P.; Kipritidis, J.; Mishra, P.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Prospective respiratory-gated 4D CT has been shown to reduce tumor image artifacts by up to 50% compared to conventional 4D CT. However, to date no studies have quantified the impact of gated 4D CT on normal lung tissue imaging, which is important in performing dose calculations based on accurate estimates of lung volume and structure. To determine the impact of gated 4D CT on thoracic image quality, the authors developed a novel simulation framework incorporating a realistic deformable digital phantom driven by patient tumor motion patterns. Based on this framework, the authors test the hypothesis that respiratory-gated 4D CT can significantly reduce lung imaging artifacts. Methods: Our simulation framework synchronizes the 4D extended cardiac torso (XCAT) phantom with tumor motion data in a quasi real-time fashion, allowing simulation of three 4D CT acquisition modes featuring different levels of respiratory feedback: (i) “conventional” 4D CT that uses a constant imaging and couch-shift frequency, (ii) “beam paused” 4D CT that interrupts imaging to avoid oversampling at a given couch position and respiratory phase, and (iii) “respiratory-gated” 4D CT that triggers acquisition only when the respiratory motion fulfills phase-specific displacement gating windows based on prescan breathing data. Our framework generates a set of ground truth comparators, representing the average XCAT anatomy during beam-on for each of ten respiratory phase bins. Based on this framework, the authors simulated conventional, beam-paused, and respiratory-gated 4D CT images using tumor motion patterns from seven lung cancer patients across 13 treatment fractions, with a simulated 5.5 cm 3 spherical lesion. Normal lung tissue image quality was quantified by comparing simulated and ground truth images in terms of overall mean square error (MSE) intensity difference, threshold-based lung volume error, and fractional false positive/false negative rates. Results: Averaged

  9. Quantifying the impact of respiratory-gated 4D CT acquisition on thoracic image quality: A digital phantom study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernatowicz, K., E-mail: kingab@student.ethz.ch; Knopf, A.; Lomax, A. [Center for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen PSI 5232, Switzerland and Department of Physics, ETH Zürich, Zürich 8092 (Switzerland); Keall, P.; Kipritidis, J., E-mail: john.kipritidis@sydney.edu.au [Radiation Physics Laboratory, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Mishra, P. [Brigham and Womens Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States)

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: Prospective respiratory-gated 4D CT has been shown to reduce tumor image artifacts by up to 50% compared to conventional 4D CT. However, to date no studies have quantified the impact of gated 4D CT on normal lung tissue imaging, which is important in performing dose calculations based on accurate estimates of lung volume and structure. To determine the impact of gated 4D CT on thoracic image quality, the authors developed a novel simulation framework incorporating a realistic deformable digital phantom driven by patient tumor motion patterns. Based on this framework, the authors test the hypothesis that respiratory-gated 4D CT can significantly reduce lung imaging artifacts. Methods: Our simulation framework synchronizes the 4D extended cardiac torso (XCAT) phantom with tumor motion data in a quasi real-time fashion, allowing simulation of three 4D CT acquisition modes featuring different levels of respiratory feedback: (i) “conventional” 4D CT that uses a constant imaging and couch-shift frequency, (ii) “beam paused” 4D CT that interrupts imaging to avoid oversampling at a given couch position and respiratory phase, and (iii) “respiratory-gated” 4D CT that triggers acquisition only when the respiratory motion fulfills phase-specific displacement gating windows based on prescan breathing data. Our framework generates a set of ground truth comparators, representing the average XCAT anatomy during beam-on for each of ten respiratory phase bins. Based on this framework, the authors simulated conventional, beam-paused, and respiratory-gated 4D CT images using tumor motion patterns from seven lung cancer patients across 13 treatment fractions, with a simulated 5.5 cm{sup 3} spherical lesion. Normal lung tissue image quality was quantified by comparing simulated and ground truth images in terms of overall mean square error (MSE) intensity difference, threshold-based lung volume error, and fractional false positive/false negative rates. Results

  10. Comparing Effective Doses During Image-Guided Core Needle Biopsies with Computed Tomography Versus C-Arm Cone Beam CT Using Adult and Pediatric Phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Shlomo, A; Cohen, D; Bruckheimer, E; Bachar, G N; Konstantinovsky, R; Birk, E; Atar, E

    2016-05-01

    To compare the effective doses of needle biopsies based on dose measurements and simulations using adult and pediatric phantoms, between cone beam c-arm CT (CBCT) and CT. Effective doses were calculated and compared based on measurements and Monte Carlo simulations of CT- and CBCT-guided biopsy procedures of the lungs, liver, and kidney using pediatric and adult phantoms. The effective doses for pediatric and adult phantoms, using our standard protocols for upper, middle and lower lungs, liver, and kidney biopsies, were significantly lower under CBCT guidance than CT. The average effective dose for a 5-year old for these five biopsies was 0.36 ± 0.05 mSv with the standard CBCT exposure protocols and 2.13 ± 0.26 mSv with CT. The adult average effective dose for the five biopsies was 1.63 ± 0.22 mSv with the standard CBCT protocols and 8.22 ± 1.02 mSv using CT. The CT effective dose was higher than CBCT protocols for child and adult phantoms by 803 and 590% for upper lung, 639 and 525% for mid-lung, and 461 and 251% for lower lung, respectively. Similarly, the effective dose was higher by 691 and 762% for liver and 513 and 608% for kidney biopsies. Based on measurements and simulations with pediatric and adult phantoms, radiation effective doses during image-guided needle biopsies of the lung, liver, and kidney are significantly lower with CBCT than with CT.

  11. A Study for Reappearance According to the Scan Type, the CT Scanning by a Moving Phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jae Hyock; Jeong, Do Hyeong; Choi, Gye Suk; Jang, Yo Jong; Kim, Jae Weon; Lee, Hui Seok

    2007-01-01

    CT scan shows that significant tumor movement occurs in lesions located in the proximity of the heart, diaphragm, and lung hilus. There are differences concerning three kinds of type to get images following the Scan type called Axial, Helical, Cine (4D-CT) mode, when the scanning by CT. To know how each protocol describe accurately, this paper is going to give you reappearance using the moving phantom. To reconstruct the movement of superior-inferior and anterior-posterior, the manufactured moving phantom and the motor following breathing were used. To distinguish movement from captured images by CT scanning, a localizer adhered to the marker on the motor. The moving phantom fixed the movement of superior-inferior upon 1.3 cm /1 min. The motor following breathing fixed the movement of anterior-posterior upon 0.2 cm /1 min. After fixing each movement, CT scanning was taken by following the CT protocols. The movement of A localizer and volume-reappearance analyzed by RTP machine. Total volume of a marker was 88.2 cm 3 considering movement of superior-inferior. Total volume was 184.3 cm 3 . Total volume according to each CT scan protocol were 135 cm 3 by axial mode, 164.9 cm 3 by helical mode, 181.7 cm 3 by cine (4D-CT) mode. The most closely describable protocol about moving reappearance was cine mode, the marker attached localizer as well. CT scan should reappear concerning a exact organ-description and target, when the moving organ is being scanned by three kinds of CT protocols. The cine (4D-CT) mode has the advantage of the most highly reconstructible ability of the three protocols in reappearance of the marker using a moving phantom. The marker on the phantom has always regular motion but breathing patients don't move like a phantom. Breathing education and devices setting patients were needed so that images reconstruct breathing as exactly as possible. Users should also consider that an amount of radiation to patients is being bombed.

  12. Measurement of cone beam CT coincidence with megavoltage isocentre and image sharpness using the QUASAR Penta-Guide phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sykes, J R; Lindsay, R; Dean, C J; Brettle, D S; Magee, D R; Thwaites, D I

    2008-10-07

    For image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) systems based on cone beam CT (CBCT) integrated into a linear accelerator, the reproducible alignment of imager to x-ray source is critical to the registration of both the x-ray-volumetric image with the megavoltage (MV) beam isocentre and image sharpness. An enhanced method of determining the CBCT to MV isocentre alignment using the QUASAR Penta-Guide phantom was developed which improved both precision and accuracy. This was benchmarked against our existing method which used software and a ball-bearing (BB) phantom provided by Elekta. Additionally, a method of measuring an image sharpness metric (MTF(50)) from the edge response function of a spherical air cavity within the Penta-Guide phantom was developed and its sensitivity was tested by simulating misalignments of the kV imager. Reproducibility testing of the enhanced Penta-Guide method demonstrated a systematic error of <0.2 mm when compared to the BB method with near equivalent random error (s=0.15 mm). The mean MTF(50) for five measurements was 0.278+/-0.004 lp mm(-1) with no applied misalignment. Simulated misalignments exhibited a clear peak in the MTF(50) enabling misalignments greater than 0.4 mm to be detected. The Penta-Guide phantom can be used to precisely measure CBCT-MV coincidence and image sharpness on CBCT-IGRT systems.

  13. Imaging and dosimetric errors in 4D PET/CT-guided radiotherapy from patient-specific respiratory patterns: a dynamic motion phantom end-to-end study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowen, S R; Nyflot, M J; Meyer, J; Sandison, G A; Herrmann, C; Groh, C M; Wollenweber, S D; Stearns, C W; Kinahan, P E

    2015-01-01

    Effective positron emission tomography / computed tomography (PET/CT) guidance in radiotherapy of lung cancer requires estimation and mitigation of errors due to respiratory motion. An end-to-end workflow was developed to measure patient-specific motion-induced uncertainties in imaging, treatment planning, and radiation delivery with respiratory motion phantoms and dosimeters. A custom torso phantom with inserts mimicking normal lung tissue and lung lesion was filled with [ 18 F]FDG. The lung lesion insert was driven by six different patient-specific respiratory patterns or kept stationary. PET/CT images were acquired under motionless ground truth, tidal breathing motion-averaged (3D), and respiratory phase-correlated (4D) conditions. Target volumes were estimated by standardized uptake value (SUV) thresholds that accurately defined the ground-truth lesion volume. Non-uniform dose-painting plans using volumetrically modulated arc therapy were optimized for fixed normal lung and spinal cord objectives and variable PET-based target objectives. Resulting plans were delivered to a cylindrical diode array at rest, in motion on a platform driven by the same respiratory patterns (3D), or motion-compensated by a robotic couch with an infrared camera tracking system (4D). Errors were estimated relative to the static ground truth condition for mean target-to-background (T/B mean ) ratios, target volumes, planned equivalent uniform target doses, and 2%-2 mm gamma delivery passing rates. Relative to motionless ground truth conditions, PET/CT imaging errors were on the order of 10–20%, treatment planning errors were 5–10%, and treatment delivery errors were 5–30% without motion compensation. Errors from residual motion following compensation methods were reduced to 5–10% in PET/CT imaging, <5% in treatment planning, and <2% in treatment delivery. We have demonstrated that estimation of respiratory motion uncertainty and its propagation from PET/CT imaging to RT

  14. Imaging and dosimetric errors in 4D PET/CT-guided radiotherapy from patient-specific respiratory patterns: a dynamic motion phantom end-to-end study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, S R; Nyflot, M J; Hermann, C; Groh, C; Meyer, J; Wollenweber, S D; Stearns, C W; Kinahan, P E; Sandison, G A

    2015-01-01

    Effective positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) guidance in radiotherapy of lung cancer requires estimation and mitigation of errors due to respiratory motion. An end-to-end workflow was developed to measure patient-specific motion-induced uncertainties in imaging, treatment planning, and radiation delivery with respiratory motion phantoms and dosimeters. A custom torso phantom with inserts mimicking normal lung tissue and lung lesion was filled with [18F]FDG. The lung lesion insert was driven by 6 different patient-specific respiratory patterns or kept stationary. PET/CT images were acquired under motionless ground truth, tidal breathing motion-averaged (3D), and respiratory phase-correlated (4D) conditions. Target volumes were estimated by standardized uptake value (SUV) thresholds that accurately defined the ground-truth lesion volume. Non-uniform dose-painting plans using volumetrically modulated arc therapy (VMAT) were optimized for fixed normal lung and spinal cord objectives and variable PET-based target objectives. Resulting plans were delivered to a cylindrical diode array at rest, in motion on a platform driven by the same respiratory patterns (3D), or motion-compensated by a robotic couch with an infrared camera tracking system (4D). Errors were estimated relative to the static ground truth condition for mean target-to-background (T/Bmean) ratios, target volumes, planned equivalent uniform target doses (EUD), and 2%-2mm gamma delivery passing rates. Relative to motionless ground truth conditions, PET/CT imaging errors were on the order of 10–20%, treatment planning errors were 5–10%, and treatment delivery errors were 5–30% without motion compensation. Errors from residual motion following compensation methods were reduced to 5–10% in PET/CT imaging, PET/CT imaging to RT planning, and RT delivery under a dose painting paradigm is feasible within an integrated respiratory motion phantom workflow. For a limited set of cases, the

  15. Recent advances on the development of phantoms using 3D printing for imaging with CT, MRI, PET, SPECT and Ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippou, Valeria; Tsoumpas, Charalampos

    2018-06-22

    Printing technology, capable of producing three-dimensional (3D) objects, has evolved in recent years and provides potential for developing reproducible and sophisticated physical phantoms. 3D printing technology can help rapidly develop relatively low cost phantoms with appropriate complexities, which are useful in imaging or dosimetry measurements. The need for more realistic phantoms is emerging since imaging systems are now capable of acquiring multimodal and multiparametric data. This review addresses three main questions about the 3D printers currently in use, and their produced materials. The first question investigates whether the resolution of 3D printers is sufficient for existing imaging technologies. The second question explores if the materials of 3D-printed phantoms can produce realistic images representing various tissues and organs as taken by different imaging modalities such as computer tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET), single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasound (US), and mammography. The emergence of multimodal imaging increases the need for phantoms that can be scanned using different imaging modalities. The third question probes the feasibility and easiness of "printing" radioactive and/or non-radioactive solutions during the printing process. A systematic review of medical imaging studies published after January 2013 is performed using strict inclusion criteria. The databases used were Scopus and Web of Knowledge with specific search terms. In total, 139 papers were identified, however only 50 were classified as relevant for the purpose of this paper. In this review, following an appropriate introduction and literature research strategy, all 50 articles are presented in detail. A summary of tables and example figures of the most recent advances in 3D printing for the purposes of phantoms across different imaging modalities are provided. All 50 studies printed and scanned

  16. Measurement of cone beam CT coincidence with megavoltage isocentre and image sharpness using the QUASAR(TM) Penta-Guide phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sykes, J R; Lindsay, R; Dean, C J; Thwaites, D I; Brettle, D S; Magee, D R

    2008-01-01

    For image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) systems based on cone beam CT (CBCT) integrated into a linear accelerator, the reproducible alignment of imager to x-ray source is critical to the registration of both the x-ray-volumetric image with the megavoltage (MV) beam isocentre and image sharpness. An enhanced method of determining the CBCT to MV isocentre alignment using the QUASAR(TM) Penta-Guide phantom was developed which improved both precision and accuracy. This was benchmarked against our existing method which used software and a ball-bearing (BB) phantom provided by Elekta. Additionally, a method of measuring an image sharpness metric (MTF 50 ) from the edge response function of a spherical air cavity within the Penta-Guide phantom was developed and its sensitivity was tested by simulating misalignments of the kV imager. Reproducibility testing of the enhanced Penta-Guide method demonstrated a systematic error of 50 for five measurements was 0.278 ± 0.004 lp mm -1 with no applied misalignment. Simulated misalignments exhibited a clear peak in the MTF 50 enabling misalignments greater than 0.4 mm to be detected. The Penta-Guide phantom can be used to precisely measure CBCT-MV coincidence and image sharpness on CBCT-IGRT systems

  17. Dose estimation of patients in CT examinations using EGS4 Monte-Carlo simulation of voxel phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akahane, K.; Kai, M.; Kusama, T.; Saito, K.

    2002-01-01

    A voxel phantom based on CT images of one Japanese male have developed in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. Dose calculations of patients in X-ray CT examinations were performed using the voxel phantom and EGS4 Monte-Carlo simulation code. The organ doses of the patients were estimated

  18. Dose estimation of patients in CT examinations using EGS4 Monte-Carlo simulation of voxel phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akahane, K.; Kai, M.; Kusama, T. [Oita Univ., of Nursing and Health Sciences, Oita-Ken (Japan); Saito, K. [JAERI, Ibaraki-ken (Japan)

    2002-07-01

    A voxel phantom based on CT images of one Japanese male have developed in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. Dose calculations of patients in X-ray CT examinations were performed using the voxel phantom and EGS4 Monte-Carlo simulation code. The organ doses of the patients were estimated.

  19. Dose reduction in multidetector CT of the urinary tract. Studies in a phantom model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coppenrath, E.; Meindl, T.; Herzog, P.; Khalil, R.; Mueller-Lisse, U.; Krenn, L.; Reiser, M.; Mueller-Lisse, U.G.

    2006-01-01

    A novel ureter phantom was developed for investigations of image quality and dose in CT urography. The ureter phantom consisted of a water box (14 cm x 32 cm x 42 cm) with five parallel plastic tubes (diameter 2.7 mm) filled with different concentrations of contrast media (1.88-30 mg iodine/ml). CT density of the tubes and noise of the surrounding water were determined using two multidetector scanners (Philips MX8000 with four rows, Siemens Sensation 16 with 16 rows) with varying tube current-time product (15-100 mAs per slice), voltage (90 kV, 100 kV, 120 kV), pitch (0.875-1.75), and slice thickness (1 mm, 2 mm, 3.2 mm). Contrast-to-noise ratio as a parameter of image quality was correlated with dose (CTDI) and was compared with image evaluation by two radiologists. The CT densities of different concentrations of contrast media and contrast-to-noise ratio were significantly higher when low voltages (90 kV versus 120 kV, 100 kV versus 120 kV) were applied. Smaller slice thickness (1 mm versus 2 mm) did not change CT density but decreased contrast-to-noise ratio due to increased noise. Contrast phantom studies showed favourable effects of low tube voltage on image quality in the low dose range. This may facilitate substantial dose reduction in CT urography. (orig.)

  20. Abdominal CT during pregnancy: a phantom study on the effect of patient centring on conceptus radiation dose and image quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solomou, G.; Damilakis, J. [University of Crete, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Physics, Heraklion, P.O. Box 2208, Crete (Greece); Papadakis, A.E. [University Hospital of Heraklion, Department of Medical Physics, Heraklion, P.O. Box 1352, Crete (Greece)

    2015-04-01

    To investigate the effect of patient centring on conceptus radiation dose and image quality in abdominal CT during pregnancy. Three anthropomorphic phantoms that represent a pregnant woman at the three trimesters of gestation were subjected to a routine abdominal CT. Examinations were performed with fixed mAs (mAs{sub f}) and with the automatic exposure control system (AEC) activated. The percent reduction between mAs{sub f} and modulated mAs (mAs{sub mod}) was calculated. Conceptus dose (D{sub c}) was measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters. To study the effect of misplacement of pregnant women on D{sub c}, each phantom was positioned at various locations relative to gantry isocentre. Image quality was evaluated on the basis of image noise, signal-to-noise ratio, and contrast-to-noise ratio. The maximum reduction between mAs{sub f} and mAs{sub mod} was 59.8 %, while the corresponding D{sub C} reduction was 59.3 %. D{sub C} was found to decrease by up to 25 % and 7.9 % for phantom locations below and above the isocentre, respectively. Image quality deteriorated when AEC was activated, and it was progressively improved from lower to higher than the isocentre locations. Centring errors do not result in an increase in D{sub c}. To maintain image quality, accurate centring is required. (orig.)

  1. Image mottle in abdominal CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ende, J F; Huda, W; Ros, P R; Litwiller, A L

    1999-04-01

    To investigate image mottle in conventional CT images of the abdomen as a function of radiographic technique factors and patient size. Water-filled phantoms simulating the abdomens of adult (32 cm in diameter) and pediatric (16 cm in diameter) patients were used to investigate image mottle in CT as a function of x-ray tube potential and mAs. CT images from 39 consecutive patients with noncontrast liver scans and 49 patients with iodine contrast scans were analyzed retrospectively. Measurements were made of the mean liver parenchyma Hounsfield unit value and the corresponding image mottle. For a given water phantom and x-ray tube potential, image mottle was proportional to the mAs-0.5. Increasing the phantom diameter from 16 cm (pediatric) to 32 cm increased the mottle by a factor of 2.4, and increasing the x-ray tube potential from 80 kVp to 140 kVp reduced the mottle by a factor of 2.5. All patients were scanned at 120 kVp, with no correlation between patient size and the x-ray tube mAs. The mean mottle level was 7.8 +/- 2.2 and 10.0 +/- 2.5 for the noncontrast and contrast studies, respectively. An increase in patient diameter of 3 cm would require approximately 65% more mAs to maintain the same level of image mottle. The mottle in abdominal CT images may be controlled by adjusting radiographic technique factors, which should be adjusted to take into account the size of the patient undergoing the examination.

  2. Pediatric thoracic CT angiography at 70 kV: a phantom study to investigate the effects on image quality and radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacDougall, Robert D.; Kleinman, Patricia L.; Lee, Edward Y.; Yu, Lifeng

    2016-01-01

    Studies have demonstrated that 70-kilovolt (kV) imaging enhances the contrast of iodine, potentially affording a reduction in radiation dose while maintaining the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). There is a maximum amount of image noise beyond which increased contrast does not improve structure visualization. Thus, noise should be constrained during protocol optimization. This phantom study investigated the effect of 70-kV imaging for pediatric thoracic CT angiography on image quality and radiation dose in a pediatric population when a noise constraint was considered. We measured contrast and noise using anthropomorphic thoracic phantoms ranging in size from newborn age equivalent to 10-year-old age equivalent. We inserted contrast rods into the phantoms to simulate injected contrast material used in a CT angiography study. The image-quality metric ''iodine CNR with a noise constraint'' was used to determine the relative dose factor for each phantom size, kV setting (70-140 kV) and noise constraint (1.00-1.20). A noise constraint of 1.20 indicates that noise should not increase by more than 20% of the noise level in images performed at the reference kV, selected to be 80 kV in this study. The relative dose factor can be applied to the original dose obtained at 80 kV in order to maintain iodine CNR with the noise constraint. A relative dose factor <1.0 indicates potential for dose reduction while a relative dose factor >1.0 indicates a dose penalty. Iodine contrast was highest for 70 kV and decreased with higher kV settings for all phantom sizes. The relative dose factor at 70 kV was <1.0 for all noise constraint >1.0, indicating potential for dose reduction, for the newborn, 1-year-old and 5-year-old age-equivalent phantom sizes. For the 10-year-old age-equivalent phantom, relative dose factor at 70 kV=1.22, 1.11, 1.01, 0.92 and 0.83 for noise constraint=1.00, 1.05, 1.10, 1.15, 1.20, respectively, indicating a dose penalty for noise constraint

  3. Limiting CT radiation dose in children with craniosynostosis: phantom study using model-based iterative reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaasalainen, Touko; Lampinen, Anniina [University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, HUS Medical Imaging Center, Radiology, POB 340, Helsinki (Finland); University of Helsinki, Department of Physics, Helsinki (Finland); Palmu, Kirsi [University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, HUS Medical Imaging Center, Radiology, POB 340, Helsinki (Finland); School of Science, Aalto University, Department of Biomedical Engineering and Computational Science, Helsinki (Finland); Reijonen, Vappu; Kortesniemi, Mika [University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, HUS Medical Imaging Center, Radiology, POB 340, Helsinki (Finland); Leikola, Junnu [University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, Department of Plastic Surgery, Helsinki (Finland); Kivisaari, Riku [University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, Helsinki (Finland)

    2015-09-15

    Medical professionals need to exercise particular caution when developing CT scanning protocols for children who require multiple CT studies, such as those with craniosynostosis. To evaluate the utility of ultra-low-dose CT protocols with model-based iterative reconstruction techniques for craniosynostosis imaging. We scanned two pediatric anthropomorphic phantoms with a 64-slice CT scanner using different low-dose protocols for craniosynostosis. We measured organ doses in the head region with metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeters. Numerical simulations served to estimate organ and effective doses. We objectively and subjectively evaluated the quality of images produced by adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR) 30%, ASiR 50% and Veo (all by GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI). Image noise and contrast were determined for different tissues. Mean organ dose with the newborn phantom was decreased up to 83% compared to the routine protocol when using ultra-low-dose scanning settings. Similarly, for the 5-year phantom the greatest radiation dose reduction was 88%. The numerical simulations supported the findings with MOSFET measurements. The image quality remained adequate with Veo reconstruction, even at the lowest dose level. Craniosynostosis CT with model-based iterative reconstruction could be performed with a 20-μSv effective dose, corresponding to the radiation exposure of plain skull radiography, without compromising required image quality. (orig.)

  4. CT radiation dose and image quality optimization using a porcine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarb, Francis; McEntee, Mark F; Rainford, Louise

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate potential radiation dose savings and resultant image quality effects with regard to optimization of commonly performed computed tomography (CT) studies derived from imaging a porcine (pig) model. Imaging protocols for 4 clinical CT suites were developed based on the lowest milliamperage and kilovoltage, the highest pitch that could be set from current imaging protocol parameters, or both. This occurred before significant changes in noise, contrast, and spatial resolution were measured objectively on images produced from a quality assurance CT phantom. The current and derived phantom protocols were then applied to scan a porcine model for head, abdomen, and chest CT studies. Further optimized protocols were developed based on the same methodology as in the phantom study. The optimization achieved with respect to radiation dose and image quality was evaluated following data collection of radiation dose recordings and image quality review. Relative visual grading analysis of image quality criteria adapted from the European guidelines on radiology quality criteria for CT were used for studies completed with both the phantom-based or porcine-derived imaging protocols. In 5 out of 16 experimental combinations, the current clinical protocol was maintained. In 2 instances, the phantom protocol reduced radiation dose by 19% to 38%. In the remaining 9 instances, the optimization based on the porcine model further reduced radiation dose by 17% to 38%. The porcine model closely reflects anatomical structures in humans, allowing the grading of anatomical criteria as part of image quality review without radiation risks to human subjects. This study demonstrates that using a porcine model to evaluate CT optimization resulted in more radiation dose reduction than when imaging protocols were tested solely on quality assurance phantoms.

  5. WE-D-18A-05: Construction of Realistic Liver Phantoms From Patient Images and a Commercial 3D Printer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leng, S; Vrieze, T; Kuhlmann, J; Yu, L; Matsumoto, J; Morris, J; McCollough, C

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To assess image quality and radiation dose reduction in abdominal CT imaging, physical phantoms having realistic background textures and lesions are highly desirable. The purpose of this work was to construct a liver phantom with realistic background and lesions using patient CT images and a 3D printer. Methods: Patient CT images containing liver lesions were segmented into liver tissue, contrast-enhanced vessels, and liver lesions using commercial software (Mimics, Materialise, Belgium). Stereolithography (STL) files of each segmented object were created and imported to a 3D printer (Object350 Connex, Stratasys, MN). After test scans were performed to map the eight available printing materials into CT numbers, printing materials were assigned to each object and a physical liver phantom printed. The printed phantom was scanned on a clinical CT scanner and resulting images were compared with the original patient CT images. Results: The eight available materials used to print the liver phantom had CT number ranging from 62 to 117 HU. In scans of the liver phantom, the liver lesions and veins represented in the STL files were all visible. Although the absolute value of the CT number in the background liver material (approx. 85 HU) was higher than in patients (approx. 40 HU), the difference in CT numbers between lesions and background were representative of the low contrast values needed for optimization tasks. Future work will investigate materials with contrast sufficient to emulate contrast-enhanced arteries. Conclusion: Realistic liver phantoms can be constructed from patient CT images using a commercial 3D printer. This technique may provide phantoms able to determine the effect of radiation dose reduction and noise reduction techniques on the ability to detect subtle liver lesions in the context of realistic background textures

  6. WE-D-18A-05: Construction of Realistic Liver Phantoms From Patient Images and a Commercial 3D Printer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leng, S; Vrieze, T; Kuhlmann, J; Yu, L; Matsumoto, J; Morris, J; McCollough, C [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To assess image quality and radiation dose reduction in abdominal CT imaging, physical phantoms having realistic background textures and lesions are highly desirable. The purpose of this work was to construct a liver phantom with realistic background and lesions using patient CT images and a 3D printer. Methods: Patient CT images containing liver lesions were segmented into liver tissue, contrast-enhanced vessels, and liver lesions using commercial software (Mimics, Materialise, Belgium). Stereolithography (STL) files of each segmented object were created and imported to a 3D printer (Object350 Connex, Stratasys, MN). After test scans were performed to map the eight available printing materials into CT numbers, printing materials were assigned to each object and a physical liver phantom printed. The printed phantom was scanned on a clinical CT scanner and resulting images were compared with the original patient CT images. Results: The eight available materials used to print the liver phantom had CT number ranging from 62 to 117 HU. In scans of the liver phantom, the liver lesions and veins represented in the STL files were all visible. Although the absolute value of the CT number in the background liver material (approx. 85 HU) was higher than in patients (approx. 40 HU), the difference in CT numbers between lesions and background were representative of the low contrast values needed for optimization tasks. Future work will investigate materials with contrast sufficient to emulate contrast-enhanced arteries. Conclusion: Realistic liver phantoms can be constructed from patient CT images using a commercial 3D printer. This technique may provide phantoms able to determine the effect of radiation dose reduction and noise reduction techniques on the ability to detect subtle liver lesions in the context of realistic background textures.

  7. A quality assurance phantom for the performance evaluation of volumetric micro-CT systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Louise Y [Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Western Ontario, London, ON (Canada); Umoh, Joseph [Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, London, ON (Canada); Nikolov, Hristo N [Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, London, ON (Canada); Pollmann, Steven I [Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, London, ON (Canada); Lee, Ting-Yim [Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Western Ontario, London, ON (Canada); Holdsworth, David W [Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Western Ontario, London, ON (Canada)

    2007-12-07

    Small-animal imaging has recently become an area of increased interest because more human diseases can be modeled in transgenic and knockout rodents. As a result, micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) systems are becoming more common in research laboratories, due to their ability to achieve spatial resolution as high as 10 {mu}m, giving highly detailed anatomical information. Most recently, a volumetric cone-beam micro-CT system using a flat-panel detector (eXplore Ultra, GE Healthcare, London, ON) has been developed that combines the high resolution of micro-CT and the fast scanning speed of clinical CT, so that dynamic perfusion imaging can be performed in mice and rats, providing functional physiological information in addition to anatomical information. This and other commercially available micro-CT systems all promise to deliver precise and accurate high-resolution measurements in small animals. However, no comprehensive quality assurance phantom has been developed to evaluate the performance of these micro-CT systems on a routine basis. We have designed and fabricated a single comprehensive device for the purpose of performance evaluation of micro-CT systems. This quality assurance phantom was applied to assess multiple image-quality parameters of a current flat-panel cone-beam micro-CT system accurately and quantitatively, in terms of spatial resolution, geometric accuracy, CT number accuracy, linearity, noise and image uniformity. Our investigations show that 3D images can be obtained with a limiting spatial resolution of 2.5 mm{sup -1} and noise of {+-}35 HU, using an acquisition interval of 8 s at an entrance dose of 6.4 cGy.

  8. A quality assurance phantom for the performance evaluation of volumetric micro-CT systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du, Louise Y; Umoh, Joseph; Nikolov, Hristo N; Pollmann, Steven I; Lee, Ting-Yim; Holdsworth, David W

    2007-01-01

    Small-animal imaging has recently become an area of increased interest because more human diseases can be modeled in transgenic and knockout rodents. As a result, micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) systems are becoming more common in research laboratories, due to their ability to achieve spatial resolution as high as 10 μm, giving highly detailed anatomical information. Most recently, a volumetric cone-beam micro-CT system using a flat-panel detector (eXplore Ultra, GE Healthcare, London, ON) has been developed that combines the high resolution of micro-CT and the fast scanning speed of clinical CT, so that dynamic perfusion imaging can be performed in mice and rats, providing functional physiological information in addition to anatomical information. This and other commercially available micro-CT systems all promise to deliver precise and accurate high-resolution measurements in small animals. However, no comprehensive quality assurance phantom has been developed to evaluate the performance of these micro-CT systems on a routine basis. We have designed and fabricated a single comprehensive device for the purpose of performance evaluation of micro-CT systems. This quality assurance phantom was applied to assess multiple image-quality parameters of a current flat-panel cone-beam micro-CT system accurately and quantitatively, in terms of spatial resolution, geometric accuracy, CT number accuracy, linearity, noise and image uniformity. Our investigations show that 3D images can be obtained with a limiting spatial resolution of 2.5 mm -1 and noise of ±35 HU, using an acquisition interval of 8 s at an entrance dose of 6.4 cGy

  9. A tool for validating MRI-guided strategies: a digital breathing CT/MRI phantom of the abdominal site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paganelli, Chiara; Summers, Paul; Gianoli, Chiara; Bellomi, Massimo; Baroni, Guido; Riboldi, Marco

    2017-11-01

    Dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is emerging as the elected image modality for organ motion quantification and management in image-guided radiotherapy. However, the lack of validation tools is an open issue for image guidance in the abdominal and thoracic organs affected by organ motion due to respiration. We therefore present an abdominal four-dimensional (4D) CT/MRI digital phantom, including the estimation of MR tissue parameters, simulation of dedicated abdominal MR sequences, modeling of radiofrequency coil response and noise, followed by k-space sampling and image reconstruction. The phantom allows the realistic simulation of images generated by MR pulse sequences with control of scan and tissue parameters, combined with co-registered CT images. In order to demonstrate the potential of the phantom in a clinical scenario, we describe the validation of a virtual T1-weighted 4D MRI strategy. Specifically, the motion extracted from a T2-weighted 4D MRI is used to warp a T1-weighted breath-hold acquisition, with the aim of overcoming trade-offs that limit T1-weighted acquisitions. Such an application shows the applicability of the digital CT/MRI phantom as a validation tool, which should be especially useful for cases unsuited to obtain real imaging data.

  10. PET/CT alignment calibration with a non-radioactive phantom and the intrinsic 176Lu radiation of PET detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Qingyang; Ma, Tianyu; Wang, Shi; Liu, Yaqiang; Gu, Yu; Dai, Tiantian

    2016-01-01

    Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is an important tool for clinical studies and pre-clinical researches which provides both functional and anatomical images. To achieve high quality co-registered PET/CT images, alignment calibration of PET and CT scanner is a critical procedure. The existing methods reported use positron source phantoms imaged both by PET and CT scanner and then derive the transformation matrix from the reconstructed images of the two modalities. In this paper, a novel PET/CT alignment calibration method with a non-radioactive phantom and the intrinsic 176 Lu radiation of the PET detector was developed. Firstly, a multi-tungsten-alloy-sphere phantom without positron source was designed and imaged by CT and the PET scanner using intrinsic 176 Lu radiation included in LYSO. Secondly, the centroids of the spheres were derived and matched by an automatic program. Lastly, the rotation matrix and the translation vector were calculated by least-square fitting of the centroid data. The proposed method was employed in an animal PET/CT system (InliView-3000) developed in our lab. Experimental results showed that the proposed method achieves high accuracy and is feasible to replace the conventional positron source based methods.

  11. PET/CT alignment calibration with a non-radioactive phantom and the intrinsic 176Lu radiation of PET detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Qingyang; Ma, Tianyu; Wang, Shi; Liu, Yaqiang; Gu, Yu; Dai, Tiantian

    2016-11-01

    Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is an important tool for clinical studies and pre-clinical researches which provides both functional and anatomical images. To achieve high quality co-registered PET/CT images, alignment calibration of PET and CT scanner is a critical procedure. The existing methods reported use positron source phantoms imaged both by PET and CT scanner and then derive the transformation matrix from the reconstructed images of the two modalities. In this paper, a novel PET/CT alignment calibration method with a non-radioactive phantom and the intrinsic 176Lu radiation of the PET detector was developed. Firstly, a multi-tungsten-alloy-sphere phantom without positron source was designed and imaged by CT and the PET scanner using intrinsic 176Lu radiation included in LYSO. Secondly, the centroids of the spheres were derived and matched by an automatic program. Lastly, the rotation matrix and the translation vector were calculated by least-square fitting of the centroid data. The proposed method was employed in an animal PET/CT system (InliView-3000) developed in our lab. Experimental results showed that the proposed method achieves high accuracy and is feasible to replace the conventional positron source based methods.

  12. Comparing Effective Doses During Image-Guided Core Needle Biopsies with Computed Tomography Versus C-Arm Cone Beam CT Using Adult and Pediatric Phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Shlomo, A.; Cohen, D.; Bruckheimer, E.; Bachar, G. N.; Konstantinovsky, R.; Birk, E.; Atar, E.

    2016-01-01

    PurposeTo compare the effective doses of needle biopsies based on dose measurements and simulations using adult and pediatric phantoms, between cone beam c-arm CT (CBCT) and CT.MethodEffective doses were calculated and compared based on measurements and Monte Carlo simulations of CT- and CBCT-guided biopsy procedures of the lungs, liver, and kidney using pediatric and adult phantoms.ResultsThe effective doses for pediatric and adult phantoms, using our standard protocols for upper, middle and lower lungs, liver, and kidney biopsies, were significantly lower under CBCT guidance than CT. The average effective dose for a 5-year old for these five biopsies was 0.36 ± 0.05 mSv with the standard CBCT exposure protocols and 2.13 ± 0.26 mSv with CT. The adult average effective dose for the five biopsies was 1.63 ± 0.22 mSv with the standard CBCT protocols and 8.22 ± 1.02 mSv using CT. The CT effective dose was higher than CBCT protocols for child and adult phantoms by 803 and 590 % for upper lung, 639 and 525 % for mid-lung, and 461 and 251 % for lower lung, respectively. Similarly, the effective dose was higher by 691 and 762 % for liver and 513 and 608 % for kidney biopsies.ConclusionsBased on measurements and simulations with pediatric and adult phantoms, radiation effective doses during image-guided needle biopsies of the lung, liver, and kidney are significantly lower with CBCT than with CT.

  13. Comparing Effective Doses During Image-Guided Core Needle Biopsies with Computed Tomography Versus C-Arm Cone Beam CT Using Adult and Pediatric Phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Shlomo, A. [Soreq NRC, Radiation Protection Domain (Israel); Cohen, D.; Bruckheimer, E. [Schneider Children’s Medical Center, Section of Pediatric Cardiology (Israel); Bachar, G. N.; Konstantinovsky, R. [Rabin Medical Center, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (Israel); Birk, E. [Schneider Children’s Medical Center, Section of Pediatric Cardiology (Israel); Atar, E., E-mail: elia@clalit.org.il [Rabin Medical Center, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (Israel)

    2016-05-15

    PurposeTo compare the effective doses of needle biopsies based on dose measurements and simulations using adult and pediatric phantoms, between cone beam c-arm CT (CBCT) and CT.MethodEffective doses were calculated and compared based on measurements and Monte Carlo simulations of CT- and CBCT-guided biopsy procedures of the lungs, liver, and kidney using pediatric and adult phantoms.ResultsThe effective doses for pediatric and adult phantoms, using our standard protocols for upper, middle and lower lungs, liver, and kidney biopsies, were significantly lower under CBCT guidance than CT. The average effective dose for a 5-year old for these five biopsies was 0.36 ± 0.05 mSv with the standard CBCT exposure protocols and 2.13 ± 0.26 mSv with CT. The adult average effective dose for the five biopsies was 1.63 ± 0.22 mSv with the standard CBCT protocols and 8.22 ± 1.02 mSv using CT. The CT effective dose was higher than CBCT protocols for child and adult phantoms by 803 and 590 % for upper lung, 639 and 525 % for mid-lung, and 461 and 251 % for lower lung, respectively. Similarly, the effective dose was higher by 691 and 762 % for liver and 513 and 608 % for kidney biopsies.ConclusionsBased on measurements and simulations with pediatric and adult phantoms, radiation effective doses during image-guided needle biopsies of the lung, liver, and kidney are significantly lower with CBCT than with CT.

  14. Evaluation of the reconstruction of image acquired from CT simulator to reduce metal artifact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Ji Hun; Park, Jin Hong; Choi, Byung Don; Won, Hui Su; Chang, Nam Jun; Goo, Jang Hyun; Hong, Joo Wan

    2014-01-01

    This study presents the usefulness assessment of metal artifact reduction for orthopedic implants(O-MAR) to decrease metal artifacts from materials with high density when acquired CT images. By CT simulator, original CT images were acquired from Gammex and Rando phantom and those phantoms inserted with high density materials were scanned for other CT images with metal artifacts and then O-MAR was applied to those images, respectively. To evaluate CT images using Gammex phantom, 5 regions of interest(ROIs) were placed at 5 organs and 3 ROIs were set up at points affected by artifacts. The averages of standard deviation(SD) and CT numbers were compared with a plan using original image. For assessment of variations in dose of tissue around materials with high density, the volume of a cylindrical shape was designed at 3 places in images acquired from Rando phantom by Eclipse. With 6 MV, 7-fields, 15x15cm 2 and 100 cGy per fraction, treatment planning was created and the mean dose were compared with a plan using original image. In the test with the Gammex phantom, CT numbers had a few difference at established points and especially 3 points affected by artifacts had most of the same figures. In the case of O-MAR image, the more reduction in SD appeared at all of 8 points than non O-MAR image. In the test using the Rando Phantom, the variations in dose of tissue around high density materials had a few difference between original CT image and CT image with O-MAR. The CT images using O-MAR were acquired clearly at the boundary of tissue around high density materials and applying O-MAR was useful for correcting CT numbers

  15. SU-E-I-74: Image-Matching Technique of Computed Tomography Images for Personal Identification: A Preliminary Study Using Anthropomorphic Chest Phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsunobu, Y; Shiotsuki, K [Department of Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Morishita, J [Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, JP (Japan)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Fingerprints, dental impressions, and DNA are used to identify unidentified bodies in forensic medicine. Cranial Computed tomography (CT) images and/or dental radiographs are also used for identification. Radiological identification is important, particularly in the absence of comparative fingerprints, dental impressions, and DNA samples. The development of an automated radiological identification system for unidentified bodies is desirable. We investigated the potential usefulness of bone structure for matching chest CT images. Methods: CT images of three anthropomorphic chest phantoms were obtained on different days in various settings. One of the phantoms was assumed to be an unidentified body. The bone image and the bone image with soft tissue (BST image) were extracted from the CT images. To examine the usefulness of the bone image and/or the BST image, the similarities between the two-dimensional (2D) or threedimensional (3D) images of the same and different phantoms were evaluated in terms of the normalized cross-correlation value (NCC). Results: For the 2D and 3D BST images, the NCCs obtained from the same phantom assumed to be an unidentified body (2D, 0.99; 3D, 0.93) were higher than those for the different phantoms (2D, 0.95 and 0.91; 3D, 0.89 and 0.80). The NCCs for the same phantom (2D, 0.95; 3D, 0.88) were greater compared to those of the different phantoms (2D, 0.61 and 0.25; 3D, 0.23 and 0.10) for the bone image. The difference in the NCCs between the same and different phantoms tended to be larger for the bone images than for the BST images. These findings suggest that the image-matching technique is more useful when utilizing the bone image than when utilizing the BST image to identify different people. Conclusion: This preliminary study indicated that evaluating the similarity of bone structure in 2D and 3D images is potentially useful for identifying of an unidentified body.

  16. SU-E-I-74: Image-Matching Technique of Computed Tomography Images for Personal Identification: A Preliminary Study Using Anthropomorphic Chest Phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsunobu, Y; Shiotsuki, K; Morishita, J

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Fingerprints, dental impressions, and DNA are used to identify unidentified bodies in forensic medicine. Cranial Computed tomography (CT) images and/or dental radiographs are also used for identification. Radiological identification is important, particularly in the absence of comparative fingerprints, dental impressions, and DNA samples. The development of an automated radiological identification system for unidentified bodies is desirable. We investigated the potential usefulness of bone structure for matching chest CT images. Methods: CT images of three anthropomorphic chest phantoms were obtained on different days in various settings. One of the phantoms was assumed to be an unidentified body. The bone image and the bone image with soft tissue (BST image) were extracted from the CT images. To examine the usefulness of the bone image and/or the BST image, the similarities between the two-dimensional (2D) or threedimensional (3D) images of the same and different phantoms were evaluated in terms of the normalized cross-correlation value (NCC). Results: For the 2D and 3D BST images, the NCCs obtained from the same phantom assumed to be an unidentified body (2D, 0.99; 3D, 0.93) were higher than those for the different phantoms (2D, 0.95 and 0.91; 3D, 0.89 and 0.80). The NCCs for the same phantom (2D, 0.95; 3D, 0.88) were greater compared to those of the different phantoms (2D, 0.61 and 0.25; 3D, 0.23 and 0.10) for the bone image. The difference in the NCCs between the same and different phantoms tended to be larger for the bone images than for the BST images. These findings suggest that the image-matching technique is more useful when utilizing the bone image than when utilizing the BST image to identify different people. Conclusion: This preliminary study indicated that evaluating the similarity of bone structure in 2D and 3D images is potentially useful for identifying of an unidentified body

  17. Dose reduction with adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction for paediatric CT: phantom study and clinical experience on chest and abdomen CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gay, F.; Lasalle, S.; Neuenschwander, S.; Brisse, H.J. [Institut Curie, Imaging Department, Paris (France); Pavia, Y.; Pierrat, N. [Institut Curie, Medical Physics Department, Paris (France)

    2014-01-15

    To assess the benefit and limits of iterative reconstruction of paediatric chest and abdominal computed tomography (CT). The study compared adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) with filtered back projection (FBP) on 64-channel MDCT. A phantom study was first performed using variable tube potential, tube current and ASIR settings. The assessed image quality indices were the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), the noise power spectrum, low contrast detectability (LCD) and spatial resolution. A clinical retrospective study of 26 children (M:F = 14/12, mean age: 4 years, range: 1-9 years) was secondarily performed allowing comparison of 18 chest and 14 abdominal CT pairs, one with a routine CT dose and FBP reconstruction, and the other with 30 % lower dose and 40 % ASIR reconstruction. Two radiologists independently compared the images for overall image quality, noise, sharpness and artefacts, and measured image noise. The phantom study demonstrated a significant increase in SNR without impairment of the LCD or spatial resolution, except for tube current values below 30-50 mA. On clinical images, no significant difference was observed between FBP and reduced dose ASIR images. Iterative reconstruction allows at least 30 % dose reduction in paediatric chest and abdominal CT, without impairment of image quality. (orig.)

  18. Dose reduction with adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction for paediatric CT: phantom study and clinical experience on chest and abdomen CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gay, F.; Lasalle, S.; Neuenschwander, S.; Brisse, H.J.; Pavia, Y.; Pierrat, N.

    2014-01-01

    To assess the benefit and limits of iterative reconstruction of paediatric chest and abdominal computed tomography (CT). The study compared adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) with filtered back projection (FBP) on 64-channel MDCT. A phantom study was first performed using variable tube potential, tube current and ASIR settings. The assessed image quality indices were the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), the noise power spectrum, low contrast detectability (LCD) and spatial resolution. A clinical retrospective study of 26 children (M:F = 14/12, mean age: 4 years, range: 1-9 years) was secondarily performed allowing comparison of 18 chest and 14 abdominal CT pairs, one with a routine CT dose and FBP reconstruction, and the other with 30 % lower dose and 40 % ASIR reconstruction. Two radiologists independently compared the images for overall image quality, noise, sharpness and artefacts, and measured image noise. The phantom study demonstrated a significant increase in SNR without impairment of the LCD or spatial resolution, except for tube current values below 30-50 mA. On clinical images, no significant difference was observed between FBP and reduced dose ASIR images. Iterative reconstruction allows at least 30 % dose reduction in paediatric chest and abdominal CT, without impairment of image quality. (orig.)

  19. Multi-institutional MicroCT image comparison of image-guided small animal irradiators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, Chris D.; Lindsay, Patricia; E Graves, Edward; Wong, Eugene; Perez, Jessica R.; Poirier, Yannick; Ben-Bouchta, Youssef; Kanesalingam, Thilakshan; Chen, Haijian; E Rubinstein, Ashley; Sheng, Ke; Bazalova-Carter, Magdalena

    2017-07-01

    To recommend imaging protocols and establish tolerance levels for microCT image quality assurance (QA) performed on conformal image-guided small animal irradiators. A fully automated QA software SAPA (small animal phantom analyzer) for image analysis of the commercial Shelley micro-CT MCTP 610 phantom was developed, in which quantitative analyses of CT number linearity, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), uniformity and noise, geometric accuracy, spatial resolution by means of modulation transfer function (MTF), and CT contrast were performed. Phantom microCT scans from eleven institutions acquired with four image-guided small animal irradiator units (including the commercial PXi X-RAD SmART and Xstrahl SARRP systems) with varying parameters used for routine small animal imaging were analyzed. Multi-institutional data sets were compared using SAPA, based on which tolerance levels for each QA test were established and imaging protocols for QA were recommended. By analyzing microCT data from 11 institutions, we established image QA tolerance levels for all image quality tests. CT number linearity set to R 2  >  0.990 was acceptable in microCT data acquired at all but three institutions. Acceptable SNR  >  36 and noise levels  1.5 lp mm-1 for MTF  =  0.2) was obtained at all but four institutions due to their large image voxel size used (>0.275 mm). Ten of the eleven institutions passed the set QA tolerance for geometric accuracy (2000 HU for 30 mgI ml-1). We recommend performing imaging QA with 70 kVp, 1.5 mA, 120 s imaging time, 0.20 mm voxel size, and a frame rate of 5 fps for the PXi X-RAD SmART. For the Xstrahl SARRP, we recommend using 60 kVp, 1.0 mA, 240 s imaging time, 0.20 mm voxel size, and 6 fps. These imaging protocols should result in high quality images that pass the set tolerance levels on all systems. Average SAPA computation time for complete QA analysis for a 0.20 mm voxel, 400 slice Shelley phantom microCT data set

  20. An innovative phantom for quantitative and qualitative investigation of advanced x-ray imaging technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiarot, C B; Siewerdsen, J H; Haycocks, T; Moseley, D J; Jaffray, D A

    2005-01-01

    Development, characterization, and quality assurance of advanced x-ray imaging technologies require phantoms that are quantitative and well suited to such modalities. This note reports on the design, construction, and use of an innovative phantom developed for advanced imaging technologies (e.g., multi-detector CT and the numerous applications of flat-panel detectors in dual-energy imaging, tomosynthesis, and cone-beam CT) in diagnostic and image-guided procedures. The design addresses shortcomings of existing phantoms by incorporating criteria satisfied by no other single phantom: (1) inserts are fully 3D-spherically symmetric rather than cylindrical; (2) modules are quantitative, presenting objects of known size and contrast for quality assurance and image quality investigation; (3) features are incorporated in ideal and semi-realistic (anthropomorphic) contexts; and (4) the phantom allows devices to be inserted and manipulated in an accessible module (right lung). The phantom consists of five primary modules: (1) head, featuring contrast-detail spheres approximate to brain lesions; (2) left lung, featuring contrast-detail spheres approximate to lung modules; (3) right lung, an accessible hull in which devices may be placed and manipulated; (4) liver, featuring conrast-detail spheres approximate to metastases; and (5) abdomen/pelvis, featuring simulated kidneys, colon, rectum, bladder, and prostate. The phantom represents a two-fold evolution in design philosophy-from 2D (cylindrically symmetric) to fully 3D, and from exclusively qualitative or quantitative to a design accommodating quantitative study within an anatomical context. It has proven a valuable tool in investigations throughout our institution, including low-dose CT, dual-energy radiography, and cone-beam CT for image-guided radiation therapy and surgery. (note)

  1. Quality control within the multicentre perfusion CT study of primary colorectal cancer (PROSPeCT): results of an iodine density phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, Maria; Honey, Ian; Goh, Vicky; Beggs, Shaun; Bridges, Andrew; Wayte, Sarah; Clewer, Philip; Davis, Anne; Foy, Trevelyan; Fuller, Karen; George, Jennifer; Higginson, Antony; Iball, Gareth; Mutch, Steve; Neil, Shellagh; Sutton, David; Rivett, Cat; Slater, Andrew; Weir, Nick

    2014-01-01

    To assess the cross-centre consistency of iodine enhancement, contrast-to-noise ratio and radiation dose in a multicentre perfusion CT trial of colorectal cancer. A cylindrical water phantom containing different iodine inserts was examined on seven CT models in 13 hospitals. The relationship between CT number (Hounsfield units, HU) and iodine concentration (milligrams per millilitre) was established and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) calculated. Radiation doses (CTDI vol , DLP) were compared across all sites. There was a linear relationship between CT number and iodine density. Iodine enhancement varied by a factor of at most 1.10, and image noise by at most 1.5 across the study sites. At an iodine concentration of 1 mg ml -1 and 100 kV, CNRs ranged from 3.6 to 4.8 in the 220-mm phantom and from 1.4 to 1.9 in the 300-mm phantom. Doses varied by a factor of at most 2.4, but remained within study dose constraints. Iterative reconstruction algorithms did not alter iodine enhancement but resulted in reduced image noise by a factor of at most 2.2, allowing a potential dose decrease of at most 80 % compared to filtered back projection (FBP). Quality control of CT performance across centres indicates that CNR values remain relatively consistent across all sites, giving acceptable image quality within the agreed dose constraints. (orig.)

  2. Quality control within the multicentre perfusion CT study of primary colorectal cancer (PROSPeCT): results of an iodine density phantom study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Maria; Honey, Ian [Trust, Medical Physics Department, Guy' s and St. Thomas' NHS Foundation, London (United Kingdom); Goh, Vicky [King' s College London, St Thomas' Hospital, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom); Beggs, Shaun [Bradford Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Radiation Physics Services, Bradford (United Kingdom); Bridges, Andrew; Wayte, Sarah [Radiology Physics University Hospitals Coventry and Warwickshire NHS Trust, Coventry (United Kingdom); Clewer, Philip [Medical Physics Department, University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, Southampton (United Kingdom); Davis, Anne [Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust, Medical Physics Department, Portsmouth (United Kingdom); Foy, Trevelyan [Royal Cornwall Hospital NHS Trust, Medical Physics Department, Truro (United Kingdom); Fuller, Karen [Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Medical Physics Department, Sheffield (United Kingdom); George, Jennifer [University Hospital of North Staffordshire NHS Trust, Medical Physics Department, Stoke-on-Trent (United Kingdom); Higginson, Antony [Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust, Department of Radiology, Portsmouth (United Kingdom); Iball, Gareth [Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Leeds (United Kingdom); Mutch, Steve [Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust, Radiation Physics and Protection Department, Oxford (United Kingdom); Neil, Shellagh; Sutton, David [NHS Tayside, Medical Physics Department, Dundee, Scotland (United Kingdom); Rivett, Cat [Plymouth Hospitals NHS Trust, Clinical and Radiation Physics, Plymouth (United Kingdom); Slater, Andrew [Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust, Department of Radiology, Oxford (United Kingdom); Weir, Nick [Queen' s Medical Research Institute, Clinical Research Imaging Centre, Edinburgh, Scotland (United Kingdom); Collaboration: on behalf of the PROSPeCT Investigators

    2014-09-15

    To assess the cross-centre consistency of iodine enhancement, contrast-to-noise ratio and radiation dose in a multicentre perfusion CT trial of colorectal cancer. A cylindrical water phantom containing different iodine inserts was examined on seven CT models in 13 hospitals. The relationship between CT number (Hounsfield units, HU) and iodine concentration (milligrams per millilitre) was established and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) calculated. Radiation doses (CTDI{sub vol}, DLP) were compared across all sites. There was a linear relationship between CT number and iodine density. Iodine enhancement varied by a factor of at most 1.10, and image noise by at most 1.5 across the study sites. At an iodine concentration of 1 mg ml{sup -1} and 100 kV, CNRs ranged from 3.6 to 4.8 in the 220-mm phantom and from 1.4 to 1.9 in the 300-mm phantom. Doses varied by a factor of at most 2.4, but remained within study dose constraints. Iterative reconstruction algorithms did not alter iodine enhancement but resulted in reduced image noise by a factor of at most 2.2, allowing a potential dose decrease of at most 80 % compared to filtered back projection (FBP). Quality control of CT performance across centres indicates that CNR values remain relatively consistent across all sites, giving acceptable image quality within the agreed dose constraints. (orig.)

  3. A phantom for testing of 4D-CT for radiotherapy of small lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunn, L.; Kron, T.; Taylor, M. L.; Callahan, J.; Franich, R. D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The use of time-resolved four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) in radiotherapy requires strict quality assurance to ensure the accuracy of motion management protocols. The aim of this work was to design and test a phantom capable of large amplitude motion for use in 4D-CT, with particular interest in small lesions typical for stereotactic body radiotherapy. Methods: The phantom of “see-saw” design is light weight, capable of including various sample materials and compatible with several surrogate marker signal acquisition systems. It is constructed of polymethylmethacrylate (Perspex) and its movement is controlled via a dc motor and drive wheel. It was tested using two CT scanners with different 4D acquisition methods: the Philips Brilliance Big Bore CT (helical scan, pressure belt) and a General Electric Discovery STE PET/CT (axial scan, infrared marker). Amplitudes ranging from 1.5 to 6.0 cm and frequencies of up to 40 cycles per minute were used to study the effect of motion on image quality. Maximum intensity projections (MIPs), as well as average intensity projections (AIPs) of moving objects were investigated and their quality dependence on the number of phase reconstruction bins assessed. Results: CT number discrepancies between moving and stationary objects were found to have no systematic dependence on amplitude, frequency, or specific interphase variability. MIP-delineated amplitudes of motion were found to match physical phantom amplitudes to within 2 mm for all motion scenarios tested. Objects undergoing large amplitude motions (>3.0 cm) were shown to cause artefacts in MIP and AIP projections when ten phase bins were assigned. This problem can be mitigated by increasing the number of phase bins in a 4D-CT scan. Conclusions: The phantom was found to be a suitable tool for evaluating the image quality of 4D-CT motion management technology, as well as providing a quality assurance tool for intercenter/intervendor testing of commercial

  4. Effects of automatic tube potential selection on radiation dose index, image quality, and lesion detectability in pediatric abdominopelvic CT and CTA: a phantom study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brinkley, Michael F.; Choudhury, Kingshuk Roy; Frush, Donald P. [Duke University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, DUMC Box 3808, Durham, NC (United States); Ramirez-Giraldo, Juan C. [Siemens Healthcare, Malvern (United States); Samei, Ehsan; Wilson, Joshua M.; Christianson, Olav I. [Duke University School of Medicine, Clinical Imaging Physics Group, Department of Radiology, Durham, NC (United States); Frush, Daniel J. [Duke University School of Medicine, Medical Physics, Durham, NC (United States)

    2016-01-15

    To assess the effect of automatic tube potential selection (ATPS) on radiation dose, image quality, and lesion detectability in paediatric abdominopelvic CT and CT angiography (CTA). A paediatric modular phantom with contrast inserts was examined with routine pitch (1.4) and high pitch (3.0) using a standard abdominopelvic protocol with fixed 120 kVp, and ATPS with variable kVp in non-contrast, contrast-enhanced, and CTA mode. The volume CT dose index (CTDI{sub vol}), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and lesion detectability index (d') were compared between the standard protocol and ATPS examinations. CTDI{sub vol} was reduced in all routine pitch ATPS examinations, with dose reductions of 27-52 % in CTA mode (P < 0.0001), 15-33 % in contrast-enhanced mode (P = 0.0003) and 8-14 % in non-contrast mode (P = 0.03). Iodine and soft tissue insert CNR and d' were improved or maintained in all ATPS examinations. kVp and dose were reduced in 25 % of high pitch ATPS examinations and in none of the full phantom examinations obtained after a single full phantom localizer. ATPS reduces radiation dose while maintaining image quality and lesion detectability in routine pitch paediatric abdominopelvic CT and CTA, but technical factors such as pitch and imaging range must be considered to optimize ATPS benefits. (orig.)

  5. A computer-simulated liver phantom (virtual liver phantom) for multidetector computed tomography evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Funama, Yoshinori [Kumamoto University, Department of Radiological Sciences, School of Health Sciences, Kumamoto (Japan); Awai, Kazuo; Nakayama, Yoshiharu; Liu, Da; Yamashita, Yasuyuki [Kumamoto University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kumamoto (Japan); Miyazaki, Osamu; Goto, Taiga [Hitachi Medical Corporation, Tokyo (Japan); Hori, Shinichi [Gate Tower Institute of Image Guided Therapy, Osaka (Japan)

    2006-04-15

    The purpose of study was to develop a computer-simulated liver phantom for hepatic CT studies. A computer-simulated liver phantom was mathematically constructed on a computer workstation. The computer-simulated phantom was calibrated using real CT images acquired by an actual four-detector CT. We added an inhomogeneous texture to the simulated liver by referring to CT images of chronically damaged human livers. The mean CT number of the simulated liver was 60 HU and we added numerous 5-to 10-mm structures with 60{+-}10 HU/mm. To mimic liver tumors we added nodules measuring 8, 10, and 12 mm in diameter with CT numbers of 60{+-}10, 60{+-}15, and 60{+-}20 HU. Five radiologists visually evaluated similarity of the texture of the computer-simulated liver phantom and a real human liver to confirm the appropriateness of the virtual liver images using a five-point scale. The total score was 44 in two radiologists, and 42, 41, and 39 in one radiologist each. They evaluated that the textures of virtual liver were comparable to those of human liver. Our computer-simulated liver phantom is a promising tool for the evaluation of the image quality and diagnostic performance of hepatic CT imaging. (orig.)

  6. SU-F-J-114: On-Treatment Imagereconstruction Using Transit Images of Treatment Beams Through Patient and Thosethrough Planning CT Images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H; Cho, S; Cheong, K; Jung, J; Jung, S; Kim, J; Yeo, I

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To reconstruct patient images at the time of radiation delivery using measured transit images of treatment beams through patient and calculated transit images through planning CT images. Methods: We hypothesize that the ratio of the measured transit images to the calculated images may provide changed amounts of the patient image between times of planning CT and treatment. To test, we have devised lung phantoms with a tumor object (3-cm diameter) placed at iso-center (simulating planning CT) and off-center by 1 cm (simulating treatment). CT images of the two phantoms were acquired; the image of the off-centered phantom, unavailable clinically, represents the reference on-treatment image in the image quality of planning CT. Cine-transit images through the two phantoms were also acquired in EPID from a non-modulated 6 MV beam when the gantry was rotated 360 degrees; the image through the centered phantom simulates calculated image. While the current study is a feasibility study, in reality our computational EPID model can be applicable in providing accurate transit image from MC simulation. Changed MV HU values were reconstructed from the ratio between two EPID projection data, converted to KV HU values, and added to the planning CT, thereby reconstructing the on-treatment image of the patient limited to the irradiated region of the phantom. Results: The reconstructed image was compared with the reference image. Except for local HU differences>200 as a maximum, excellent agreement was found. The average difference across the entire image was 16.2 HU. Conclusion: We have demonstrated the feasibility of a method of reconstructing on-treatment images of a patient using EPID image and planning CT images. Further studies will include resolving the local HU differences and investigation on the dosimetry impact of the reconstructed image.

  7. SU-F-J-114: On-Treatment Imagereconstruction Using Transit Images of Treatment Beams Through Patient and Thosethrough Planning CT Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, H; Cho, S [KAIST, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Cheong, K [Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Anyang (Korea, Republic of); Jung, J [East Carolina University Greenville, NC (United States); Jung, S [Samsung Medical Cener, Gangnam-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, J [Yonsei Cancer Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yeo, I [Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To reconstruct patient images at the time of radiation delivery using measured transit images of treatment beams through patient and calculated transit images through planning CT images. Methods: We hypothesize that the ratio of the measured transit images to the calculated images may provide changed amounts of the patient image between times of planning CT and treatment. To test, we have devised lung phantoms with a tumor object (3-cm diameter) placed at iso-center (simulating planning CT) and off-center by 1 cm (simulating treatment). CT images of the two phantoms were acquired; the image of the off-centered phantom, unavailable clinically, represents the reference on-treatment image in the image quality of planning CT. Cine-transit images through the two phantoms were also acquired in EPID from a non-modulated 6 MV beam when the gantry was rotated 360 degrees; the image through the centered phantom simulates calculated image. While the current study is a feasibility study, in reality our computational EPID model can be applicable in providing accurate transit image from MC simulation. Changed MV HU values were reconstructed from the ratio between two EPID projection data, converted to KV HU values, and added to the planning CT, thereby reconstructing the on-treatment image of the patient limited to the irradiated region of the phantom. Results: The reconstructed image was compared with the reference image. Except for local HU differences>200 as a maximum, excellent agreement was found. The average difference across the entire image was 16.2 HU. Conclusion: We have demonstrated the feasibility of a method of reconstructing on-treatment images of a patient using EPID image and planning CT images. Further studies will include resolving the local HU differences and investigation on the dosimetry impact of the reconstructed image.

  8. PET/CT alignment calibration with a non-radioactive phantom and the intrinsic {sup 176}Lu radiation of PET detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Qingyang [School of Automation and Electrical Engineering, University of Science & Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Ma, Tianyu; Wang, Shi; Liu, Yaqiang [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Gu, Yu, E-mail: guyu@ustb.edu.cn [School of Automation and Electrical Engineering, University of Science & Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Dai, Tiantian, E-mail: maxinedtt@163.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, China-Japan Friendship Hospital, Beijing 100029 (China)

    2016-11-01

    Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is an important tool for clinical studies and pre-clinical researches which provides both functional and anatomical images. To achieve high quality co-registered PET/CT images, alignment calibration of PET and CT scanner is a critical procedure. The existing methods reported use positron source phantoms imaged both by PET and CT scanner and then derive the transformation matrix from the reconstructed images of the two modalities. In this paper, a novel PET/CT alignment calibration method with a non-radioactive phantom and the intrinsic {sup 176}Lu radiation of the PET detector was developed. Firstly, a multi-tungsten-alloy-sphere phantom without positron source was designed and imaged by CT and the PET scanner using intrinsic {sup 176}Lu radiation included in LYSO. Secondly, the centroids of the spheres were derived and matched by an automatic program. Lastly, the rotation matrix and the translation vector were calculated by least-square fitting of the centroid data. The proposed method was employed in an animal PET/CT system (InliView-3000) developed in our lab. Experimental results showed that the proposed method achieves high accuracy and is feasible to replace the conventional positron source based methods.

  9. Image quality characteristics for virtual monoenergetic images using dual-layer spectral detector CT: Comparison with conventional tube-voltage images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakabe, Daisuke; Funama, Yoshinori; Taguchi, Katsuyuki; Nakaura, Takeshi; Utsunomiya, Daisuke; Oda, Seitaro; Kidoh, Masafumi; Nagayama, Yasunori; Yamashita, Yasuyuki

    2018-05-01

    To investigate the image quality characteristics for virtual monoenergetic images compared with conventional tube-voltage image with dual-layer spectral CT (DLCT). Helical scans were performed using a first-generation DLCT scanner, two different sizes of acrylic cylindrical phantoms, and a Catphan phantom. Three different iodine concentrations were inserted into the phantom center. The single-tube voltage for obtaining virtual monoenergetic images was set to 120 or 140 kVp. Conventional 120- and 140-kVp images and virtual monoenergetic images (40-200-keV images) were reconstructed from slice thicknesses of 1.0 mm. The CT number and image noise were measured for each iodine concentration and water on the 120-kVp images and virtual monoenergetic images. The noise power spectrum (NPS) was also calculated. The iodine CT numbers for the iodinated enhancing materials were similar regardless of phantom size and acquisition method. Compared with the iodine CT numbers of the conventional 120-kVp images, those for the monoenergetic 40-, 50-, and 60-keV images increased by approximately 3.0-, 1.9-, and 1.3-fold, respectively. The image noise values for each virtual monoenergetic image were similar (for example, 24.6 HU at 40 keV and 23.3 HU at 200 keV obtained at 120 kVp and 30-cm phantom size). The NPS curves of the 70-keV and 120-kVp images for a 1.0-mm slice thickness over the entire frequency range were similar. Virtual monoenergetic images represent stable image noise over the entire energy spectrum and improved the contrast-to-noise ratio than conventional tube voltage using the dual-layer spectral detector CT. Copyright © 2018 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Dose reduction with adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction for paediatric CT: phantom study and clinical experience on chest and abdomen CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay, F; Pavia, Y; Pierrat, N; Lasalle, S; Neuenschwander, S; Brisse, H J

    2014-01-01

    To assess the benefit and limits of iterative reconstruction of paediatric chest and abdominal computed tomography (CT). The study compared adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) with filtered back projection (FBP) on 64-channel MDCT. A phantom study was first performed using variable tube potential, tube current and ASIR settings. The assessed image quality indices were the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), the noise power spectrum, low contrast detectability (LCD) and spatial resolution. A clinical retrospective study of 26 children (M:F = 14/12, mean age: 4 years, range: 1-9 years) was secondarily performed allowing comparison of 18 chest and 14 abdominal CT pairs, one with a routine CT dose and FBP reconstruction, and the other with 30 % lower dose and 40 % ASIR reconstruction. Two radiologists independently compared the images for overall image quality, noise, sharpness and artefacts, and measured image noise. The phantom study demonstrated a significant increase in SNR without impairment of the LCD or spatial resolution, except for tube current values below 30-50 mA. On clinical images, no significant difference was observed between FBP and reduced dose ASIR images. Iterative reconstruction allows at least 30 % dose reduction in paediatric chest and abdominal CT, without impairment of image quality. • Iterative reconstruction helps lower radiation exposure levels in children undergoing CT. • Adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) significantly increases SNR without impairing spatial resolution. • For abdomen and chest CT, ASIR allows at least a 30 % dose reduction.

  11. Attenuation correction of myocardial SPECT images with X-ray CT. Effects of registration errors between X-ray CT and SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Yasuyuki; Murase, Kenya; Mochizuki, Teruhito; Motomura, Nobutoku

    2002-01-01

    Attenuation correction with an X-ray CT image is a new method to correct attenuation on SPECT imaging, but the effect of the registration errors between CT and SPECT images is unclear. In this study, we investigated the effects of the registration errors on myocardial SPECT, analyzing data from a phantom and a human volunteer. Registerion (fusion) of the X-ray CT and SPECT images was done with standard packaged software in three dimensional fashion, by using linked transaxial, coronal and sagittal images. In the phantom study, and X-ray CT image was shifted 1 to 3 pixels on the x, y and z axes, and rotated 6 degrees clockwise. Attenuation correction maps generated from each misaligned X-ray CT image were used to reconstruct misaligned SPECT images of the phantom filled with 201 Tl. In a human volunteer, X-ray CT was acquired in different conditions (during inspiration vs. expiration). CT values were transferred to an attenuation constant by using straight lines; an attenuation constant of 0/cm in the air (CT value=-1,000 HU) and that of 0.150/cm in water (CT value=0 HU). For comparison, attenuation correction with transmission CT (TCT) data and an external γ-ray source ( 99m Tc) was also applied to reconstruct SPECT images. Simulated breast attenuation with a breast attachment, and inferior wall attenuation were properly corrected by means of the attenuation correction map generated from X-ray CT. As pixel shift increased, deviation of the SPECT images increased in misaligned images in the phantom study. In the human study, SPECT images were affected by the scan conditions of the X-ray CT. Attenuation correction of myocardial SPECT with an X-ray CT image is a simple and potentially beneficial method for clinical use, but accurate registration of the X-ray CT to SPECT image is essential for satisfactory attenuation correction. (author)

  12. Anthropomorphic thorax phantom for cardio-respiratory motion simulation in tomographic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolwin, Konstantin; Czekalla, Björn; Frohwein, Lynn J.; Büther, Florian; Schäfers, Klaus P.

    2018-02-01

    Patient motion during medical imaging using techniques such as computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET), or single emission computed tomography (SPECT) is well known to degrade images, leading to blurring effects or severe artifacts. Motion correction methods try to overcome these degrading effects. However, they need to be validated under realistic conditions. In this work, a sophisticated anthropomorphic thorax phantom is presented that combines several aspects of a simulator for cardio-respiratory motion. The phantom allows us to simulate various types of cardio-respiratory motions inside a human-like thorax, including features such as inflatable lungs, beating left ventricular myocardium, respiration-induced motion of the left ventricle, moving lung lesions, and moving coronary artery plaques. The phantom is constructed to be MR-compatible. This means that we can not only perform studies in PET, SPECT and CT, but also inside an MRI system. The technical features of the anthropomorphic thorax phantom Wilhelm are presented with regard to simulating motion effects in hybrid emission tomography and radiotherapy. This is supplemented by a study on the detectability of small coronary plaque lesions in PET/CT under the influence of cardio-respiratory motion, and a study on the accuracy of left ventricular blood volumes.

  13. NOTE: An innovative phantom for quantitative and qualitative investigation of advanced x-ray imaging technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiarot, C. B.; Siewerdsen, J. H.; Haycocks, T.; Moseley, D. J.; Jaffray, D. A.

    2005-11-01

    Development, characterization, and quality assurance of advanced x-ray imaging technologies require phantoms that are quantitative and well suited to such modalities. This note reports on the design, construction, and use of an innovative phantom developed for advanced imaging technologies (e.g., multi-detector CT and the numerous applications of flat-panel detectors in dual-energy imaging, tomosynthesis, and cone-beam CT) in diagnostic and image-guided procedures. The design addresses shortcomings of existing phantoms by incorporating criteria satisfied by no other single phantom: (1) inserts are fully 3D—spherically symmetric rather than cylindrical; (2) modules are quantitative, presenting objects of known size and contrast for quality assurance and image quality investigation; (3) features are incorporated in ideal and semi-realistic (anthropomorphic) contexts; and (4) the phantom allows devices to be inserted and manipulated in an accessible module (right lung). The phantom consists of five primary modules: (1) head, featuring contrast-detail spheres approximate to brain lesions; (2) left lung, featuring contrast-detail spheres approximate to lung modules; (3) right lung, an accessible hull in which devices may be placed and manipulated; (4) liver, featuring conrast-detail spheres approximate to metastases; and (5) abdomen/pelvis, featuring simulated kidneys, colon, rectum, bladder, and prostate. The phantom represents a two-fold evolution in design philosophy—from 2D (cylindrically symmetric) to fully 3D, and from exclusively qualitative or quantitative to a design accommodating quantitative study within an anatomical context. It has proven a valuable tool in investigations throughout our institution, including low-dose CT, dual-energy radiography, and cone-beam CT for image-guided radiation therapy and surgery.

  14. TU-F-CAMPUS-I-04: A Novel Phantom to Evaluate Longitudinal and Angular Automatic Tube Current Modulation (ATCM) in CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merzan, D; Bujila, R; Nowik, P [Dept. of Medical Physics, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To manufacture a phantom specifically designed for the purpose of evaluating the performance of the longitudinal and angular automatic tube current modulation (ATCM) on modern CT scanners. Methods: In order to evaluate angular ATCM, the phantom has an elliptical cross section (aspect ratio 3:2). To evaluate longitudinal ATCM, the phantom consists of 3 sections, with different major axes (25 cm, 30 cm and 35 cm). Each section is 15 cm long in the longitudinal direction. Between each section is a smooth transition. The phantom was milled from a solid block of PMMA. ATCM performance is evaluated by 1) analyzing the applied tube current for each slice of the phantom and 2) analyzing the distribution of image noise (σ) along the scan direction at different positions in the phantom. A demonstration of the ATCM performance evaluation is given by investigating the effects of miscentering during a CT scan. Results: The developed phantom has proven useful for evaluating both the longitudinal and angular ATCM on modern CT scanners (spiral collimations ≥ 4 cm). Further benefits are the smooth transitions between the sections that prevent abnormal responses in the ATCM and the invariant sections that provide a means for investigating the stability of image noise. The homogeneity of the phantom makes image noise at different positions along the scan direction easy to quantify, which is crucial to understand how well the applied ATCM can produce a desired image quality. Conclusion: It is important to understand how the ATCM functions on CT scanners as it can directly affect dose and image quality. The phantom that has been developed is a most valuable tool to understand how different variables during a scan can affect the outcome of the longitudinal and angular ATCM.

  15. TU-F-CAMPUS-I-04: A Novel Phantom to Evaluate Longitudinal and Angular Automatic Tube Current Modulation (ATCM) in CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merzan, D; Bujila, R; Nowik, P

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To manufacture a phantom specifically designed for the purpose of evaluating the performance of the longitudinal and angular automatic tube current modulation (ATCM) on modern CT scanners. Methods: In order to evaluate angular ATCM, the phantom has an elliptical cross section (aspect ratio 3:2). To evaluate longitudinal ATCM, the phantom consists of 3 sections, with different major axes (25 cm, 30 cm and 35 cm). Each section is 15 cm long in the longitudinal direction. Between each section is a smooth transition. The phantom was milled from a solid block of PMMA. ATCM performance is evaluated by 1) analyzing the applied tube current for each slice of the phantom and 2) analyzing the distribution of image noise (σ) along the scan direction at different positions in the phantom. A demonstration of the ATCM performance evaluation is given by investigating the effects of miscentering during a CT scan. Results: The developed phantom has proven useful for evaluating both the longitudinal and angular ATCM on modern CT scanners (spiral collimations ≥ 4 cm). Further benefits are the smooth transitions between the sections that prevent abnormal responses in the ATCM and the invariant sections that provide a means for investigating the stability of image noise. The homogeneity of the phantom makes image noise at different positions along the scan direction easy to quantify, which is crucial to understand how well the applied ATCM can produce a desired image quality. Conclusion: It is important to understand how the ATCM functions on CT scanners as it can directly affect dose and image quality. The phantom that has been developed is a most valuable tool to understand how different variables during a scan can affect the outcome of the longitudinal and angular ATCM

  16. CT angiography using electron-beam computed tomography (EBCT). A phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchino, Akira; Kato, Akira; Kudo, Sho

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of CT angiography in small vessels using electron-beam computed tomography (EBCT). Vessel phantoms with inner diameters of 8 mm, 6 mm, and 4 mm were prepared with segments of 75%, 50%, and 25% stenosis in each vessel. The vessels were filled with contrast medium (Iopamidol 300 at 1/24 dilution, approximately 380 HU). The EBCT apparatus used was an Imatron C-150. The step volume scan mode was used with slice thicknesses of 1.5 mm and 3.0 mm, scan time of 0.3 sec, and 210 mm field of view. Images with a slice thickness of 1.5 mm were definitely better than those with a slice thickness of 3.0 mm. The quality of maximum intensity projection (MIP) images was quite similar to that of three-dimensional (3D) images. Using the 8 mm vessel phantom, all stenotic segments were accurately visualized on CT angiography. The 50% stenotic segments were accurately estimated in all vessels. However, the 75% stenotic segments were slightly overestimated in smaller vessels, and the 25% stenotic segments were slightly underestimated in smaller vessels. We consider CT angiography using EBCT to be a useful, less invasive diagnostic modality for stenoocclusive lesions. (author)

  17. 3D automatic exposure control for 64-detector row CT: Radiation dose reduction in chest phantom study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, Keiko, E-mail: palm_kei@yahoo.co.jp [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Department of Radiology, Yamanashi University, Shimokato, Yamanashi (Japan); Ohno, Yoshiharu; Koyama, Hisanobu; Kono, Atsushi [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Inokawa, Hiroyasu [Toshiba Medical Systems, Ohtawara, Tochigi (Japan); Onishi, Yumiko [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Nogami, Munenobu [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Division of Image-Based Medicine, Institute of Biomedical Research and Innovation, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Takenaka, Daisuke [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Araki, Tsutomu [Department of Radiology, Yamanashi University, Shimokato, Yamanashi (Japan); Sugimura, Kazuro [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan)

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the utility of three-dimensional (3D) automatic exposure control (AEC) for low-dose CT examination in a chest phantom study. Materials and methods: A chest CT phantom including simulated focal ground-glass opacities (GGOs) and nodules was scanned with a 64-detector row CT with and without AEC. Performance of 3D AEC included changing targeted standard deviations (SDs) of image noise from scout view. To determine the appropriate targeted SD number for identification, the capability of overall identification with the CT protocol adapted to each of the targeted SDs was compared with that obtained with CT without AEC by means of receiver operating characteristic analysis. Results: When targeted SD values equal to or higher than 250 were used, areas under the curve (Azs) of nodule identification with CT protocol using AEC were significantly smaller than that for CT protocol without AEC (p < 0.05). When targeted SD numbers at equal to or more than 180 were adapted, Azs of CT protocol with AEC had significantly smaller than that without AEC (p < 0.05). Conclusion: This phantom study shows 3D AEC is useful for low-dose lung CT examination, and can reduce the radiation dose while maintaining good identification capability and good image quality.

  18. Low-dose CT imaging of a total hip arthroplasty phantom using model-based iterative reconstruction and orthopedic metal artifact reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wellenberg, R.H.H.; Streekstra, G.J.; Maas, M. [Academic Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Boomsma, M.F.; Osch, J.A.C. van [Department of Radiology, Zwolle (Netherlands); Vlassenbroek, A. [Philips Medical Systems, Brussels (Belgium); Milles, J. [Philips Medical Systems, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Edens, M.A. [Department of Innovation and Science, Zwolle (Netherlands); Slump, C.H. [University of Twente, MIRA Institute for Biomedical Technology and Technical Medicine, Enschede (Netherlands)

    2017-05-15

    To compare quantitative measures of image quality, in terms of CT number accuracy, noise, signal-to-noise-ratios (SNRs), and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs), at different dose levels with filtered-back-projection (FBP), iterative reconstruction (IR), and model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) alone and in combination with orthopedic metal artifact reduction (O-MAR) in a total hip arthroplasty (THA) phantom. Scans were acquired from high- to low-dose (CTDI{sub vol}: 40.0, 32.0, 24.0, 16.0, 8.0, and 4.0 mGy) at 120- and 140- kVp. Images were reconstructed using FBP, IR (iDose{sup 4} level 2, 4, and 6) and MBIR (IMR, level 1, 2, and 3) with and without O-MAR. CT number accuracy in Hounsfield Units (HU), noise or standard deviation, SNRs, and CNRs were analyzed. The IMR technique showed lower noise levels (p < 0.01), higher SNRs (p < 0.001) and CNRs (p < 0.001) compared with FBP and iDose{sup 4} in all acquisitions from high- to low-dose with constant CT numbers. O-MAR reduced noise (p < 0.01) and improved SNRs (p < 0.01) and CNRs (p < 0.001) while improving CT number accuracy only at a low dose. At the low dose of 4.0 mGy, IMR level 1, 2, and 3 showed 83%, 89%, and 95% lower noise values, a factor 6.0, 9.2, and 17.9 higher SNRs, and 5.7, 8.8, and 18.2 higher CNRs compared with FBP respectively. Based on quantitative analysis of CT number accuracy, noise values, SNRs, and CNRs, we conclude that the combined use of IMR and O-MAR enables a reduction in radiation dose of 83% compared with FBP and iDose{sup 4} in the CT imaging of a THA phantom. (orig.)

  19. Scatter correction method for x-ray CT using primary modulation: Phantom studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Hewei; Fahrig, Rebecca; Bennett, N. Robert; Sun Mingshan; Star-Lack, Josh; Zhu Lei

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Scatter correction is a major challenge in x-ray imaging using large area detectors. Recently, the authors proposed a promising scatter correction method for x-ray computed tomography (CT) using primary modulation. Proof of concept was previously illustrated by Monte Carlo simulations and physical experiments on a small phantom with a simple geometry. In this work, the authors provide a quantitative evaluation of the primary modulation technique and demonstrate its performance in applications where scatter correction is more challenging. Methods: The authors first analyze the potential errors of the estimated scatter in the primary modulation method. On two tabletop CT systems, the method is investigated using three phantoms: A Catphan(c)600 phantom, an anthropomorphic chest phantom, and the Catphan(c)600 phantom with two annuli. Two different primary modulators are also designed to show the impact of the modulator parameters on the scatter correction efficiency. The first is an aluminum modulator with a weak modulation and a low modulation frequency, and the second is a copper modulator with a strong modulation and a high modulation frequency. Results: On the Catphan(c)600 phantom in the first study, the method reduces the error of the CT number in the selected regions of interest (ROIs) from 371.4 to 21.9 Hounsfield units (HU); the contrast to noise ratio also increases from 10.9 to 19.2. On the anthropomorphic chest phantom in the second study, which represents a more difficult case due to the high scatter signals and object heterogeneity, the method reduces the error of the CT number from 327 to 19 HU in the selected ROIs and from 31.4% to 5.7% on the overall average. The third study is to investigate the impact of object size on the efficiency of our method. The scatter-to-primary ratio estimation error on the Catphan(c)600 phantom without any annulus (20 cm in diameter) is at the level of 0.04, it rises to 0.07 and 0.1 on the phantom with an

  20. Performance evaluation of the General Electric eXplore CT 120 micro-CT using the vmCT phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahri, M.A., E-mail: M.Bahri@ulg.ac.be [ULg-Liege University, Cyclotron Research Centre, Liege, Bat. 30, Allee du 6 aout, 8 (Belgium); Warnock, G.; Plenevaux, A. [ULg-Liege University, Cyclotron Research Centre, Liege, Bat. 30, Allee du 6 aout, 8 (Belgium); Choquet, P.; Constantinesco, A. [Biophysique et Medecine Nucleaire, Hopitaux universitaires de Strasbourg, Strasbourg (France); Salmon, E.; Luxen, A. [ULg-Liege University, Cyclotron Research Centre, Liege, Bat. 30, Allee du 6 aout, 8 (Belgium); Seret, A. [ULg-Liege University, Cyclotron Research Centre, Liege, Bat. 30, Allee du 6 aout, 8 (Belgium); ULg-Liege University, Experimental Medical Imaging, Liege (Belgium)

    2011-08-21

    The eXplore CT 120 is the latest generation micro-CT from General Electric. It is equipped with a high-power tube and a flat-panel detector. It allows high resolution and high contrast fast CT scanning of small animals. The aim of this study was to compare the performance of the eXplore CT 120 with that of the eXplore Ultra, its predecessor for which the methodology using the vmCT phantom has already been described . The phantom was imaged using typical a rat (fast scan or F) or mouse (in vivo bone scan or H) scanning protocols. With the slanted edge method, a 10% modulation transfer function (MTF) was observed at 4.4 (F) and 3.9-4.4 (H) mm{sup -1} corresponding to 114 {mu}m resolution. A fairly larger MTF was obtained by the coil method with the MTF for the thinnest coil (3.3 mm{sup -1}) equal to 0.32 (F) and 0.34 (H). The geometric accuracy was better than 0.3%. There was a highly linear (R{sup 2}>0.999) relationship between measured and expected CT numbers for both the CT number accuracy and linearity sections of the phantom. A cupping effect was clearly seen on the uniform slices and the uniformity-to-noise ratio ranged from 0.52 (F) to 0.89 (H). The air CT number depended on the amount of polycarbonate surrounding the area where it was measured; a difference as high as approximately 200 HU was observed. This hindered the calibration of this scanner in HU. This is likely due to the absence of corrections for beam hardening and scatter in the reconstruction software. However in view of the high linearity of the system, the implementation of these corrections would allow a good quality calibration of the scanner in HU. In conclusion, the eXplore CT 120 achieved a better spatial resolution than the eXplore Ultra (based on previously reported specifications) and future software developments will include beam hardening and scatter corrections that will make the new generation CT scanner even more promising.

  1. A phantom study of tumor contouring on PET imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Song; Li Xuena; Li Yaming; Yin Yafu; Li Na; Han Chunqi

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To explore an algorithm to define the threshold value for tumor contouring on 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET imaging. Methods: A National Electrical Manufacturing Association (NEMA)NU 2 1994 PET phantom with 5 spheres of different diameters were filled with 18 F-FDG. Seven different sphere-to-background ratios were obtained and the phantom was scanned by Discovery LS 4. For each sphere-to-background ratio, the maximum standardized uptake value (SUV max ) of each sphere, the SUV of the border of each sphere (SUV border ), the mean SUV of a 1 cm region of background (SUV bg ) and the diameter (D) of each sphere were measured. SPSS 13.0 software was used for curve fitting and regression analysis to obtain the threshold algorithm. The calculated thresholds were applied to delineate 29 pathologically confirmed lung cancer lesions on PET images and the obtained volumes were compared with the volumes contoured on CT images in lung window. Results: The algorithm for defining contour threshold is TH% = 33.1% + 46.8% SUV bg /SUV max + 13.9%/D (r = 0.994) by phantom studies. For 29 lung cancer lesions, the average gross tumor volumes (GTV) delineated on PET and CT are (7.36±1.62) ml and (8.31±2.05) ml, respectively (t = -1.26, P>0.05). Conclusion: The proposed threshold algorithm for tumor contouring on PET image could provide comparable GTV with CT. (authors)

  2. 4D XCAT phantom for multimodality imaging research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segars, W. P.; Sturgeon, G.; Mendonca, S.; Grimes, Jason; Tsui, B. M. W. [Department of Radiology, Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University Medical Center, 2424 Erwin Road, Hock Plaza, Suite 302, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Radiology, Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University Medical Center, 2424 Erwin Road, Hock Plaza, Suite 302, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Department of Radiology, Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University Medical Center, 2424 Erwin Road, Hock Plaza, Suite 302, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland 21287 (United States)

    2010-09-15

    Purpose: The authors develop the 4D extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) phantom for multimodality imaging research. Methods: Highly detailed whole-body anatomies for the adult male and female were defined in the XCAT using nonuniform rational B-spline (NURBS) and subdivision surfaces based on segmentation of the Visible Male and Female anatomical datasets from the National Library of Medicine as well as patient datasets. Using the flexibility of these surfaces, the Visible Human anatomies were transformed to match body measurements and organ volumes for a 50th percentile (height and weight) male and female. The desired body measurements for the models were obtained using the PEOPLESIZE program that contains anthropometric dimensions categorized from 1st to the 99th percentile for US adults. The desired organ volumes were determined from ICRP Publication 89 [ICRP, ''Basic anatomical and physiological data for use in radiological protection: reference values,'' ICRP Publication 89 (International Commission on Radiological Protection, New York, NY, 2002)]. The male and female anatomies serve as standard templates upon which anatomical variations may be modeled in the XCAT through user-defined parameters. Parametrized models for the cardiac and respiratory motions were also incorporated into the XCAT based on high-resolution cardiac- and respiratory-gated multislice CT data. To demonstrate the usefulness of the phantom, the authors show example simulation studies in PET, SPECT, and CT using publicly available simulation packages. Results: As demonstrated in the pilot studies, the 4D XCAT (which includes thousands of anatomical structures) can produce realistic imaging data when combined with accurate models of the imaging process. With the flexibility of the NURBS surface primitives, any number of different anatomies, cardiac or respiratory motions or patterns, and spatial resolutions can be simulated to perform imaging research. Conclusions: With the

  3. 4D XCAT phantom for multimodality imaging research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segars, W. P.; Sturgeon, G.; Mendonca, S.; Grimes, Jason; Tsui, B. M. W.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The authors develop the 4D extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) phantom for multimodality imaging research. Methods: Highly detailed whole-body anatomies for the adult male and female were defined in the XCAT using nonuniform rational B-spline (NURBS) and subdivision surfaces based on segmentation of the Visible Male and Female anatomical datasets from the National Library of Medicine as well as patient datasets. Using the flexibility of these surfaces, the Visible Human anatomies were transformed to match body measurements and organ volumes for a 50th percentile (height and weight) male and female. The desired body measurements for the models were obtained using the PEOPLESIZE program that contains anthropometric dimensions categorized from 1st to the 99th percentile for US adults. The desired organ volumes were determined from ICRP Publication 89 [ICRP, ''Basic anatomical and physiological data for use in radiological protection: reference values,'' ICRP Publication 89 (International Commission on Radiological Protection, New York, NY, 2002)]. The male and female anatomies serve as standard templates upon which anatomical variations may be modeled in the XCAT through user-defined parameters. Parametrized models for the cardiac and respiratory motions were also incorporated into the XCAT based on high-resolution cardiac- and respiratory-gated multislice CT data. To demonstrate the usefulness of the phantom, the authors show example simulation studies in PET, SPECT, and CT using publicly available simulation packages. Results: As demonstrated in the pilot studies, the 4D XCAT (which includes thousands of anatomical structures) can produce realistic imaging data when combined with accurate models of the imaging process. With the flexibility of the NURBS surface primitives, any number of different anatomies, cardiac or respiratory motions or patterns, and spatial resolutions can be simulated to perform imaging research. Conclusions: With the ability to produce

  4. Evidence-based recommendations for musculoskeletal kinematic 4D-CT studies using wide area-detector scanners: a phantom study with cadaveric correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gondim Teixeira, Pedro Augusto; Formery, Anne-Sophie; Blum, Alain [CHRU-Nancy Hopital Central, Service d' Imagerie Guilloz, Nancy (France); Hossu, Gabriela [Universite de Lorraine, IADI U947, Nancy (France); INSERM, CIC-IT 1433, Nancy (France); Winninger, Daniel [IDCmem, Nancy (France); Batch, Toufik [Hopital de Mercy, Service de Radiologie, Metz (France); Gervaise, Alban [Legouest Military Instruction Hospital, Medical Imaging Department, Metz (France)

    2017-02-15

    To establish evidence-based recommendations for musculoskeletal kinematic 4D-CT on wide area-detector CT. In order to assess factors influencing image quality in kinematic CT studies, a phantom consisting of a polymethylmethacrylate rotating disk with round wells of different sizes was imaged with various acquisition protocols. Cadaveric acquisitions were performed on the ankle joint during motion in two different axes and at different speeds to allow validation of phantom data. Images were acquired with a 320 detector-row CT scanner and were evaluated by two readers. Motion artefacts were significantly correlated with various parameters (movement axis, distance to centre, rotation speed and volume acquisition speed) (p < 0.0001). The relation between motion artefacts and distance to motion fulcrum was exponential (R{sup 2} 0.99). Half reconstruction led to a 23 % increase in image noise and a 40 % decrease in motion artefacts. Cadaveric acquisitions confirmed phantom data. Based on these findings, high tube rotation speed and half reconstruction are recommended for kinematic CT. The axis of motion significantly influences image artefacts and should be considered in patient training and evaluation of acquisition protocol suitability. This study provides evidence-based recommendations for musculoskeletal kinematic 4D-CT. (orig.)

  5. Technical Note: Improved CT number stability across patient size using dual-energy CT virtual monoenergetic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michalak, Gregory; Grimes, Joshua; Fletcher, Joel; Yu, Lifeng; Leng, Shuai; McCollough, Cynthia; Halaweish, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate, over a wide range of phantom sizes, CT number stability achieved using two techniques for generating dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) virtual monoenergetic images. Methods: Water phantoms ranging in lateral diameter from 15 to 50 cm and containing a CT number test object were scanned on a DSCT scanner using both single-energy (SE) and dual-energy (DE) techniques. The SE tube potentials were 70, 80, 90, 100, 110, 120, 130, 140, and 150 kV; the DE tube potential pairs were 80/140, 70/150Sn, 80/150Sn, 90/150Sn, and 100/150Sn kV (Sn denotes that the 150 kV beam was filtered with a 0.6 mm tin filter). Virtual monoenergetic images at energies ranging from 40 to 140 keV were produced from the DECT data using two algorithms, monoenergetic (mono) and monoenergetic plus (mono+). Particularly in large phantoms, water CT number errors and/or artifacts were observed; thus, datasets with water CT numbers outside ±10 HU or with noticeable artifacts were excluded from the study. CT numbers were measured to determine CT number stability across all phantom sizes. Results: Data exclusions were generally limited to cases when a SE or DE technique with a tube potential of less than 90 kV was used to scan a phantom larger than 30 cm. The 90/150Sn DE technique provided the most accurate water background over the large range of phantom sizes evaluated. Mono and mono+ provided equally improved CT number stability as a function of phantom size compared to SE; the average deviation in CT number was only 1.4% using 40 keV and 1.8% using 70 keV, while SE had an average deviation of 11.8%. Conclusions: The authors’ report demonstrates, across all phantom sizes, the improvement in CT number stability achieved with mono and mono+ relative to SE

  6. Technical Note: Improved CT number stability across patient size using dual-energy CT virtual monoenergetic imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michalak, Gregory; Grimes, Joshua; Fletcher, Joel; Yu, Lifeng; Leng, Shuai; McCollough, Cynthia, E-mail: mccollough.cynthia@mayo.edu [Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States); Halaweish, Ahmed [Siemens Medical Solutions, Malvern, Pennsylvania 19355 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate, over a wide range of phantom sizes, CT number stability achieved using two techniques for generating dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) virtual monoenergetic images. Methods: Water phantoms ranging in lateral diameter from 15 to 50 cm and containing a CT number test object were scanned on a DSCT scanner using both single-energy (SE) and dual-energy (DE) techniques. The SE tube potentials were 70, 80, 90, 100, 110, 120, 130, 140, and 150 kV; the DE tube potential pairs were 80/140, 70/150Sn, 80/150Sn, 90/150Sn, and 100/150Sn kV (Sn denotes that the 150 kV beam was filtered with a 0.6 mm tin filter). Virtual monoenergetic images at energies ranging from 40 to 140 keV were produced from the DECT data using two algorithms, monoenergetic (mono) and monoenergetic plus (mono+). Particularly in large phantoms, water CT number errors and/or artifacts were observed; thus, datasets with water CT numbers outside ±10 HU or with noticeable artifacts were excluded from the study. CT numbers were measured to determine CT number stability across all phantom sizes. Results: Data exclusions were generally limited to cases when a SE or DE technique with a tube potential of less than 90 kV was used to scan a phantom larger than 30 cm. The 90/150Sn DE technique provided the most accurate water background over the large range of phantom sizes evaluated. Mono and mono+ provided equally improved CT number stability as a function of phantom size compared to SE; the average deviation in CT number was only 1.4% using 40 keV and 1.8% using 70 keV, while SE had an average deviation of 11.8%. Conclusions: The authors’ report demonstrates, across all phantom sizes, the improvement in CT number stability achieved with mono and mono+ relative to SE.

  7. An anthropomorphic multimodality (CT/MRI) head phantom prototype for end-to-end tests in ion radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallas, Raya R.; Huenemohr, Nora; Runz, Armin; Niebuhr, Nina I.; Greilich, Steffen [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany). Div. of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology; National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany). Heidelberg Institute of Radiation Oncology (HIRO); Jaekel, Oliver [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany). Div. of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology; National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany). Heidelberg Institute of Radiation Oncology (HIRO); Heidelberg University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center (HIT), Heidelberg (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    With the increasing complexity of external beam therapy ''end-to-end'' tests are intended to cover every step from therapy planning through to follow-up in order to fulfill the higher demands on quality assurance. As magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an important part of the treatment process, established phantoms such as the Alderson head cannot fully be used for those tests and novel phantoms have to be developed. Here, we present a feasibility study of a customizable multimodality head phantom. It is initially intended for ion radiotherapy but may also be used in photon therapy. As basis for the anthropomorphic head shape we have used a set of patient computed tomography (CT) images. The phantom recipient consisting of epoxy resin was produced by using a 3D printer. It includes a nasal air cavity, a cranial bone surrogate (based on dipotassium phosphate), a brain surrogate (based on agarose gel), and a surrogate for cerebrospinal fluid (based on distilled water). Furthermore, a volume filled with normoxic dosimetric gel mimicked a tumor. The entire workflow of a proton therapy could be successfully applied to the phantom. CT measurements revealed CT numbers agreeing with reference values for all surrogates in the range from 2 HU to 978 HU (120 kV). MRI showed the desired contrasts between the different phantom materials especially in T2-weighted images (except for the bone surrogate). T2-weighted readout of the polymerization gel dosimeter allowed approximate range verification.

  8. An anthropomorphic multimodality (CT/MRI) head phantom prototype for end-to-end tests in ion radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallas, Raya R.; Huenemohr, Nora; Runz, Armin; Niebuhr, Nina I.; Greilich, Steffen; Jaekel, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    With the increasing complexity of external beam therapy ''end-to-end'' tests are intended to cover every step from therapy planning through to follow-up in order to fulfill the higher demands on quality assurance. As magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an important part of the treatment process, established phantoms such as the Alderson head cannot fully be used for those tests and novel phantoms have to be developed. Here, we present a feasibility study of a customizable multimodality head phantom. It is initially intended for ion radiotherapy but may also be used in photon therapy. As basis for the anthropomorphic head shape we have used a set of patient computed tomography (CT) images. The phantom recipient consisting of epoxy resin was produced by using a 3D printer. It includes a nasal air cavity, a cranial bone surrogate (based on dipotassium phosphate), a brain surrogate (based on agarose gel), and a surrogate for cerebrospinal fluid (based on distilled water). Furthermore, a volume filled with normoxic dosimetric gel mimicked a tumor. The entire workflow of a proton therapy could be successfully applied to the phantom. CT measurements revealed CT numbers agreeing with reference values for all surrogates in the range from 2 HU to 978 HU (120 kV). MRI showed the desired contrasts between the different phantom materials especially in T2-weighted images (except for the bone surrogate). T2-weighted readout of the polymerization gel dosimeter allowed approximate range verification.

  9. An anthropomorphic multimodality (CT/MRI) head phantom prototype for end-to-end tests in ion radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallas, Raya R; Hünemohr, Nora; Runz, Armin; Niebuhr, Nina I; Jäkel, Oliver; Greilich, Steffen

    2015-12-01

    With the increasing complexity of external beam therapy "end-to-end" tests are intended to cover every step from therapy planning through to follow-up in order to fulfill the higher demands on quality assurance. As magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an important part of the treatment process, established phantoms such as the Alderson head cannot fully be used for those tests and novel phantoms have to be developed. Here, we present a feasibility study of a customizable multimodality head phantom. It is initially intended for ion radiotherapy but may also be used in photon therapy. As basis for the anthropomorphic head shape we have used a set of patient computed tomography (CT) images. The phantom recipient consisting of epoxy resin was produced by using a 3D printer. It includes a nasal air cavity, a cranial bone surrogate (based on dipotassium phosphate), a brain surrogate (based on agarose gel), and a surrogate for cerebrospinal fluid (based on distilled water). Furthermore, a volume filled with normoxic dosimetric gel mimicked a tumor. The entire workflow of a proton therapy could be successfully applied to the phantom. CT measurements revealed CT numbers agreeing with reference values for all surrogates in the range from 2 HU to 978 HU (120 kV). MRI showed the desired contrasts between the different phantom materials especially in T2-weighted images (except for the bone surrogate). T2-weighted readout of the polymerization gel dosimeter allowed approximate range verification. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  10. High Dose MicroCT Does Not Contribute Toward Improved MicroPET/CT Image Quantitative Accuracy and Can Limit Longitudinal Scanning of Small Animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy A. McDougald

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Obtaining accurate quantitative measurements in preclinical Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography (PET/CT imaging is of paramount importance in biomedical research and helps supporting efficient translation of preclinical results to the clinic. The purpose of this study was two-fold: (1 to investigate the effects of different CT acquisition protocols on PET/CT image quality and data quantification; and (2 to evaluate the absorbed dose associated with varying CT parameters.Methods: An air/water quality control CT phantom, tissue equivalent material phantom, an in-house 3D printed phantom and an image quality PET/CT phantom were imaged using a Mediso nanoPET/CT scanner. Collected data was analyzed using PMOD software, VivoQuant software and National Electric Manufactures Association (NEMA software implemented by Mediso. Measured Hounsfield Unit (HU in collected CT images were compared to the known HU values and image noise was quantified. PET recovery coefficients (RC, uniformity and quantitative bias were also measured.Results: Only less than 2 and 1% of CT acquisition protocols yielded water HU values < −80 and air HU values < −840, respectively. Four out of 11 CT protocols resulted in more than 100 mGy absorbed dose. Different CT protocols did not impact PET uniformity and RC, and resulted in <4% overall bias relative to expected radioactive concentration.Conclusion: Preclinical CT protocols with increased exposure times can result in high absorbed doses to the small animals. These should be avoided, as they do not contributed toward improved microPET/CT image quantitative accuracy and could limit longitudinal scanning of small animals.

  11. Study of three-dimensional image display by systemic CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujioka, Tadao; Ebihara, Yoshiyuki; Unei, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Masao; Shinohe, Tooru; Wada, Yuji; Sakai, Takatsugu; Kashima, Kenji; Fujita, Yoshihiro

    1989-01-01

    A head phantom for CT was scanned at 2 mm intervals from the cervix to the vertex in an attempt to obtain a three-dimensional image display of bones and facial epidermis from an ordinary axial image. Clinically, three-dimensional images were formed at eye sockets and hip joints. With the three-dimensional image using the head phantom, the entire head could be displayed at any angle. Clinically, images were obtained that could not be attained by ordinary CT scanning, such as broken bones in eye sockets and stereoscopic structure at the bottom of a cranium. The three-dimensional image display is considered to be useful in clinical diagnosis. (author)

  12. Dedicated mobile volumetric cone-beam computed tomography for human brain imaging: A phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Jong-Hyun; Kim, Tae-Hoon; Jeong, Chang-Won; Jun, Hong-Young; Heo, Dong-Woon; Lee, Jinseok; Kim, Kyong-Woo; Yoon, Kwon-Ha

    2015-01-01

    Mobile computed tomography (CT) with a cone-beam source is increasingly used in the clinical field. Mobile cone-beam CT (CBCT) has great merits; however, its clinical utility for brain imaging has been limited due to problems including scan time and image quality. The aim of this study was to develop a dedicated mobile volumetric CBCT for obtaining brain images, and to optimize the imaging protocol using a brain phantom. The mobile volumetric CBCT system was evaluated with regards to scan time and image quality, measured as signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise-ratio (CNR), spatial resolution (10% MTF), and effective dose. Brain images were obtained using a CT phantom. The CT scan took 5.14 s at 360 projection views. SNR and CNR were 5.67 and 14.5 at 120 kV/10 mA. SNR and CNR values showed slight improvement as the x-ray voltage and current increased (p < 0.001). Effective dose and 10% MTF were 0.92 mSv and 360 μ m at 120 kV/10 mA. Various intracranial structures were clearly visible in the brain phantom images. Using this CBCT under optimal imaging acquisition conditions, it is possible to obtain human brain images with low radiation dose, reproducible image quality, and fast scan time.

  13. Evaluation of Image Quality in Low Tube-Voltage Chest CT Scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyun Ju; Cho, Jae Hwan; Park, Cheol Soo

    2010-01-01

    The patients who visited this department for pulmonary disease and need CT scans for Follow-up to observe change of CT value, evaluation of image quality and decrease of radiation dose as change of kVp. Subjects were the patients of 20 persons visited this department for pulmonary disease and Somatom Sensation 16(Semens, Enlarge, Germany) was used. Measurement of CT value as change of kVp was done by setting up ROI diameter of 1cm at the height of thyroid, aortic arch, right pulmonary artery in arterial phase image using 100 kVp, measuring 3 times, and recorded the average. CT value of phantom was measured by scanning phantoms which means contrast media diluted by normal saline by various ratio with tube voltage of 80 kVp, 100 kVp, 120 kVp, 140 kVp and recorded the average of 3 CT values of center of phantom image. In analysing radiation dose, CTDIVOL values of the latest arterial phase image of 120 kVp and as this research set that of 100 kVp were analyzed comparatively. 2 observers graded quality of chest images by 5 degrees (Unacceptable, Suboptimal, Adequate, Good, Excellent). CT value of chest image increased at 100 kVp by 14.06%∼27.26% in each ROI than 120 kVp. CT value of phantom increased as tube voltage lowered at various concentration of contrast media. CTDIVOL decreased at 100 kVp(5.00 mGy) by 36% than 120 kVp(7.80 mGy) in radiation dose analysis. here were 0 Unacceptable, 1 Suboptimal, 3 Adequate, 10 Good, 6 Excellent in totally 20 persons. Chest CT scanning with low kilo-voltage for patients who need CT scan repeatedly can bring images valuable for diagnose, and decrease radiation dose against patients

  14. Electronic noise in CT detectors: Impact on image noise and artifacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Xinhui; Wang, Jia; Leng, Shuai; Schmidt, Bernhard; Allmendinger, Thomas; Grant, Katharine; Flohr, Thomas; McCollough, Cynthia H

    2013-10-01

    The objective of our study was to evaluate in phantoms the differences in CT image noise and artifact level between two types of commercial CT detectors: one with distributed electronics (conventional) and one with integrated electronics intended to decrease system electronic noise. Cylindric water phantoms of 20, 30, and 40 cm in diameter were scanned using two CT scanners, one equipped with integrated detector electronics and one with distributed detector electronics. All other scanning parameters were identical. Scans were acquired at four tube potentials and 10 tube currents. Semianthropomorphic phantoms were scanned to mimic the shoulder and abdominal regions. Images of two patients were also selected to show the clinical values of the integrated detector. Reduction of image noise with the integrated detector depended on phantom size, tube potential, and tube current. Scans that had low detected signal had the greatest reductions in noise, up to 40% for a 30-cm phantom scanned using 80 kV. This noise reduction translated into up to 50% in dose reduction to achieve equivalent image noise. Streak artifacts through regions of high attenuation were reduced by up to 45% on scans obtained using the integrated detector. Patient images also showed superior image quality for the integrated detector. For the same applied radiation level, the use of integrated electronics in a CT detector showed a substantially reduced level of electronic noise, resulting in reductions in image noise and artifacts, compared with detectors having distributed electronics.

  15. The effect of metal artefact reduction on CT-based attenuation correction for PET imaging in the vicinity of metallic hip implants. A phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harnish, R.; Lang, T.F.; Prevrhal, S.; Alavi, A.; Zaidi, H.

    2014-01-01

    To determine if metal artefact reduction (MAR) combined with a priori knowledge of prosthesis material composition can be applied to obtain CT-based attenuation maps with sufficient accuracy for quantitative assessment of 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose uptake in lesions near metallic prostheses. A custom hip prosthesis phantom with a lesion-sized cavity filled with 0.2 ml 18 F-FDG solution having an activity of 3.367 MBq adjacent to a prosthesis bore was imaged twice with a chrome-cobalt steel hip prosthesis and a plastic replica, respectively. Scanning was performed on a clinical hybrid PET/CT system equipped with an additional external 137 Cs transmission source. PET emission images were reconstructed from both phantom configurations with CT-based attenuation correction (CTAC) and with CT-based attenuation correction using MAR (MARCTAC). To compare results with the attenuation-correction method extant prior to the advent of PET/CT, we also carried out attenuation correction with 137 Cs transmission-based attenuation correction (TXAC). CTAC and MARCTAC images were scaled to attenuation coefficients at 511 keV using a trilinear function that mapped the highest CT values to the prosthesis alloy attenuation coefficient. Accuracy and spatial distribution of the lesion activity was compared between the three reconstruction schemes. Compared to the reference activity of 3.37 MBq, the estimated activity quantified from the PET image corrected by TXAC was 3.41 MBq. The activity estimated from PET images corrected by MARCTAC was similar in accuracy at 3.32 MBq. CTAC corrected PET images resulted in nearly 40% overestimation of lesion activity at 4.70 MBq. Comparison of PET images obtained with the plastic and metal prostheses in place showed that CTAC resulted in a marked distortion of the 18 F-FDG distribution within the lesion, whereas application of MARCTAC and TXAC resulted in lesion distributions similar to those observed with the plastic replica. (author)

  16. Noise-optimized virtual monoenergetic images and iodine maps for the detection of venous thrombosis in second-generation dual-energy CT (DECT): an ex vivo phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongers, Malte N; Schabel, Christoph; Krauss, Bernhard; Tsiflikas, Ilias; Ketelsen, Dominik; Mangold, Stefanie; Claussen, Claus D; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Thomas, Christoph

    2015-06-01

    Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) can be difficult to detect using CT due to poor and heterogeneous contrast. Dual-energy CT (DECT) allows iodine contrast optimization using noise-optimized monoenergetic extrapolations (MEIs) and iodine maps (IMs). Our aim was to assess whether MEI and IM could improve the delineation of thrombotic material within iodine-enhanced blood compared to single-energy CT (SECT). Six vessel phantoms, including human thrombus and contrast media-enhanced blood and one phantom without contrast, were placed in an attenuation phantom and scanned with DECT 100/140 kV and SECT 120 kV. IM, virtual non-contrast images (VNC), mixed images, and MEI were calculated. Attenuation of thrombi and blood were measured. Contrast and contrast-to-noise-ratios (CNRs) were calculated and compared among IM, VNC, mixed images, MEI, and SECT using paired t tests. MEI40keV and IM showed significantly higher contrast and CNR than SE120kV from high to intermediate iodine concentrations (contrast:pMEI40keV VNC images showed significantly higher contrast and CNR than SE120kV with inverted contrasts (contrast:pMEI190keV < 0.008,pVNC < 0.002;CNR:pMEI190keV < 0.003,pVNC < 0.002). Noise-optimized MEI and IM provide significantly higher contrast and CNR in the delineation of thrombosis compared to SECT, which may facilitate the detection of DVT in difficult cases. • Poor contrast makes it difficult to detect thrombosis in CT. • Dual-energy-CT allows contrast optimization using monoenergetic extrapolations (MEI) and iodine maps (IM). • Noise-optimized-MEI and IM are significantly superior to single-energy-CT in delineation of thrombosis. • Noise-optimized-MEI and IM may facilitate the detection of deep vein thrombosis.

  17. An approach for quantitative image quality analysis for CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, Amir; Cochran, Joe; Mooney, Doug; Regensburger, Joe

    2016-03-01

    An objective and standardized approach to assess image quality of Compute Tomography (CT) systems is required in a wide variety of imaging processes to identify CT systems appropriate for a given application. We present an overview of the framework we have developed to help standardize and to objectively assess CT image quality for different models of CT scanners used for security applications. Within this framework, we have developed methods to quantitatively measure metrics that should correlate with feature identification, detection accuracy and precision, and image registration capabilities of CT machines and to identify strengths and weaknesses in different CT imaging technologies in transportation security. To that end we have designed, developed and constructed phantoms that allow for systematic and repeatable measurements of roughly 88 image quality metrics, representing modulation transfer function, noise equivalent quanta, noise power spectra, slice sensitivity profiles, streak artifacts, CT number uniformity, CT number consistency, object length accuracy, CT number path length consistency, and object registration. Furthermore, we have developed a sophisticated MATLAB based image analysis tool kit to analyze CT generated images of phantoms and report these metrics in a format that is standardized across the considered models of CT scanners, allowing for comparative image quality analysis within a CT model or between different CT models. In addition, we have developed a modified sparse principal component analysis (SPCA) method to generate a modified set of PCA components as compared to the standard principal component analysis (PCA) with sparse loadings in conjunction with Hotelling T2 statistical analysis method to compare, qualify, and detect faults in the tested systems.

  18. Development of a realistic, dynamic digital brain phantom for CT perfusion validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divel, Sarah E.; Segars, W. Paul; Christensen, Soren; Wintermark, Max; Lansberg, Maarten G.; Pelc, Norbert J.

    2016-03-01

    Physicians rely on CT Perfusion (CTP) images and quantitative image data, including cerebral blood flow, cerebral blood volume, and bolus arrival delay, to diagnose and treat stroke patients. However, the quantification of these metrics may vary depending on the computational method used. Therefore, we have developed a dynamic and realistic digital brain phantom upon which CTP scans can be simulated based on a set of ground truth scenarios. Building upon the previously developed 4D extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) phantom containing a highly detailed brain model, this work consisted of expanding the intricate vasculature by semi-automatically segmenting existing MRA data and fitting nonuniform rational B-spline surfaces to the new vessels. Using time attenuation curves input by the user as reference, the contrast enhancement in the vessels changes dynamically. At each time point, the iodine concentration in the arteries and veins is calculated from the curves and the material composition of the blood changes to reflect the expected values. CatSim, a CT system simulator, generates simulated data sets of this dynamic digital phantom which can be further analyzed to validate CTP studies and post-processing methods. The development of this dynamic and realistic digital phantom provides a valuable resource with which current uncertainties and controversies surrounding the quantitative computations generated from CTP data can be examined and resolved.

  19. Quantifying the effects of iodine contrast media on standardised uptake values of FDG PET/CT images: an anthropomorphic phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Razak, Hairil Rashmizal; Nordin, Abdul Jalil; Ackerly, Trevor; Van Every, Bruce; Martin, Ruth; Geso, Moshi

    2011-09-01

    This study aimed to quantify the amount of change in Standardised Uptake Values (SUVs) of PET/CT images by simulating the set-up as closely as possible to the actual patient scanning. The experiments were conducted using an anthropomorphic phantom, which contained an amount of radioactivity in the form of Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) in a primary plastic test tube and one litre saline bags, including the insertion of bony structures and another two test tubes containing different concentrations of iodine contrast media. Standard scanning protocols were employed for the PET/CT image acquisition. The highest absolute differences in the SUVmax and SUVmean values of the saline bags were found to be about 0.2 and 0.4, respectively. The primary test tube showed the largest change of 1.5 in both SUVs; SUV max and SUVmean. However, none of these changes were found to be statistically significant. The clinical literature also contains no evidence to suggest that the changes of this magnitude would change the final diagnosis. Based on these preliminary data, we propose that iodine contrast media can be used during the CT scan of PET/CT imaging, without significantly affecting the diagnostic quality of this integrated imaging modality.

  20. SU-F-P-32: A Phantom Study of Accuracy of Four-Dimensional Cone-Beam CT (4D-CBCT) Vs. Three-Dimensional Cone Beam CT (3D-CBCT) in Image Guided Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, R; Morris, B; Duggar, N; Markovich, A; Standford, J; Lu, J; Yang, C [University of Mississippi Med. Center, Jackson, MS (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: SymmetryTM 4D IGRT system of Elekta has been installed at our institution, which offers the 4D CBCT registration option. This study is to evaluate the accuracy of 4D CBCT system by using the CIRS 4D motion phantom and to perform a feasibility study on the implementation of 4D-CBCT as image guidance for SBRT treatment. Methods: The 3D and 4D CT image data sets are acquired using the CIRS motion phantom on a Philips large bore CT simulator. The motion was set as 0.5 cm superior and inferior directions with 6 seconds recycle time. The 4D CT data were sorted as 10 phases. One identifiable part of the 4D CT QA insert from CIRS phantom was used as the target. The ITV MIP was drawn based on maximum intensity projection (MIP) and transferred as a planning structure into 4D CBCT system. Then the 3D CBCT and 4D CBCT images were taken and registered with the free breath (3D), MIP (4D) and average intensity projection (AIP)(4D) reference data sets. The couch shifts (X, Y, Z) are recorded and compared. Results: Table 1 listed the twelve couch shifts based on the registration of MIP, AIP and free breath CT data sets with 3D CBCT and 4D CBCT for both whole body and local registration. X, Y and Z represent couch shifts in the direction of the right-left, superior-inferior and anterior-posterior. The biggest differences of 0.73 cm and 0.57 cm are noted in the free breath CT data with 4D CBCT and 3D CBCT data registration. Fig. 1 and Fig. 2 are the shift analysis in diagram. Fig. 3 shows the registration. Conclusion: Significant differences exist in the shifts corresponding with the direction of target motion. Further investigations are ongoing.

  1. Image fusion tool: Validation by phantom measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zander, A.; Geworski, L.; Richter, M.; Ivancevic, V.; Munz, D.L.; Muehler, M.; Ditt, H.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: Validation of a new image fusion tool with regard to handling, application in a clinical environment and fusion precision under different acquisition and registration settings. Methods: The image fusion tool investigated allows fusion of imaging modalities such as PET, CT, MRI. In order to investigate fusion precision, PET and MRI measurements were performed using a cylinder and a body contour-shaped phantom. The cylinder phantom (diameter and length 20 cm each) contained spheres (10 to 40 mm in diameter) which represented 'cold' or 'hot' lesions in PET measurements. The body contour-shaped phantom was equipped with a heart model containing two 'cold' lesions. Measurements were done with and without four external markers placed on the phantoms. The markers were made of plexiglass (2 cm diameter and 1 cm thickness) and contained a Ga-Ge-68 core for PET and Vitamin E for MRI measurements. Comparison of fusion results with and without markers was done visually and by computer assistance. This algorithm was applied to the different fusion parameters and phantoms. Results: Image fusion of PET and MRI data without external markers yielded a measured error of 0 resulting in a shift at the matrix border of 1.5 mm. Conclusion: The image fusion tool investigated allows a precise fusion of PET and MRI data with a translation error acceptable for clinical use. The error is further minimized by using external markers, especially in the case of missing anatomical orientation. Using PET the registration error depends almost only on the low resolution of the data

  2. Performance of an automatic dose control system for CT. Specifications and basic phantom tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagel, H.D. [Wissenschaft und Technik fuer die Radiolgoe, Dr. HD Nagel, Buchholz (Germany); Stumpp, P.; Kahn, T.; Gosch, D. [Universitaetsklinikum Leipzig (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: To assess the performance and to provide more detailed insight into the characteristics and limitations of devices for automatic dose control (ADC) in CT. Materials and Methods: A comprehensive study on DoseRight 2.0, the ADC system provided by Philips for its Brilliance CT scanners, was conducted. Phantom tests were carried out on a 64-slice scanner (Brilliance 64) using assorted quality control (QC) phantoms that allowed verification of the basic specifications. If feasible, the findings were verified by model calculations based on known specifications. Results: For all tests, the dose reductions and modulation characteristics fully met the values expected from the specifications. Adverse effects due to increased image noise were only moderate as a result of the 'adequate noise system' design that employs comparatively gentle modulation, and the additional use of adaptive filtration. Conclusion: Simple tests with QC phantoms allow evaluation of the most relevant characteristics of devices for ADC in CT. (orig.)

  3. Performance of an automatic dose control system for CT. Anthropomorphic phantom studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gosch, D.; Stumpp, P.; Kahn, T. [Universitaetsklinikum Leipzig (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Nagel, H.D. [Wissenschaft und Technik fuer die Radiologie, Dr. HD Nagel, Buchholz (Germany)

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: To assess the performance and to provide more detailed insight into characteristics and limitations of devices for automatic dose control (ADC) in CT. Materials and Methods: A comprehensive study on DoseRight 2.0, the ADC system provided by Philips for its Brilliance CT scanners, was conducted with assorted tests using an anthropomorphic phantom that allowed simulation of the operation of the system under almost realistic conditions. The scan protocol settings for the neck, chest and abdomen with pelvis were identical to those applied in the clinical routine. Results: Using the appropriate ADC functionalities, dose reductions equal 40 % for the neck, 20 % for the chest and 10 % for the abdomen with pelvis. Larger dose reductions can be expected for average patients, since their attenuating properties differ significantly from the anthropomorphic phantom. Adverse effects due to increased image noise were only moderate as a consequence of the 'adequate noise system' design and the complementary use of adaptive filtration. The results of specific tests also provided deeper insight into the operation of the ADC system that helps to identify the causes of suspected malfunctions and to prevent potential pitfalls. Conclusion: Tests with anthropomorphic phantoms allow verification of the characteristics of devices for ADC in CT under almost realistic conditions. However, differences in phantom shape and material composition require supplementary patient studies on representative patient groups. (orig.)

  4. Dosimetric impact of image artifact from a wide-bore CT scanner in radiotherapy treatment planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Vincent; Podgorsak, Matthew B.; Tran, Tuan-Anh; Malhotra, Harish K.; Wang, Iris Z. [Department of Radiation Medicine, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York 14263 (United States); Department of Radiation Medicine, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York 14263 and Department of Physiology and Biophysics, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14214 (United States); Department of Radiation Medicine, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York 14263 (United States); Department of Radiation Medicine, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York 14263 and Department of Physiology and Biophysics, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14214 (United States)

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: Traditional computed tomography (CT) units provide a maximum scan field-of-view (sFOV) diameter of 50 cm and a limited bore size, which cannot accommodate a large patient habitus or an extended simulation setup in radiation therapy (RT). Wide-bore CT scanners with increased bore size were developed to address these needs. Some scanners have the capacity to reconstruct the CT images at an extended FOV (eFOV), through data interpolation or extrapolation, using projection data acquired with a conventional sFOV. Objects that extend past the sFOV for eFOV reconstruction may generate image artifacts resulting from truncated projection data; this may distort CT numbers and structure contours in the region beyond the sFOV. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the dosimetric impact of image artifacts from eFOV reconstruction with a wide-bore CT scanner in radiotherapy (RT) treatment planning. Methods: Testing phantoms (i.e., a mini CT phantom with equivalent tissue inserts, a set of CT normal phantoms and anthropomorphic phantoms of the thorax and the pelvis) were used to evaluate eFOV artifacts. Reference baseline images of these phantoms were acquired with the phantom centrally positioned within the sFOV. For comparison, the phantoms were then shifted laterally and scanned partially outside the sFOV, but still within the eFOV. Treatment plans were generated for the thoracic and pelvic anthropomorphic phantoms utilizing the Eclipse treatment planning system (TPS) to study the potential effects of eFOV artifacts on dose calculations. All dose calculations of baseline and test treatment plans were carried out using the same MU. Results: Results show that both body contour and CT numbers are altered by image artifacts in eFOV reconstruction. CT number distortions of up to -356 HU for bone tissue and up to 323 HU for lung tissue were observed in the mini CT phantom. Results from the large body normal phantom, which is close to a clinical patient size, show

  5. SU-E-J-219: Quantitative Evaluation of Motion Effects On Accuracy of Image-Guided Radiotherapy with Fiducial Markers Using CT Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, I; Oyewale, S; Ahmad, S; Algan, O [University of Oklahoma Health Sciences, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Alsbou, N [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ada, OH (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate quantitatively patient motion effects on the localization accuracy of image-guided radiation with fiducial markers using axial CT (ACT), helical CT (HCT) and cone-beam CT (CBCT) using modeling and experimental phantom studies. Methods: Markers with different lengths (2.5 mm, 5 mm, 10 mm, and 20 mm) were inserted in a mobile thorax phantom which was imaged using ACT, HCT and CBCT. The phantom moved with sinusoidal motion with amplitudes ranging 0–20 mm and a frequency of 15 cycles-per-minute. Three parameters that include: apparent marker lengths, center position and distance between the centers of the markers were measured in the different CT images of the mobile phantom. A motion mathematical model was derived to predict the variations in the previous three parameters and their dependence on the motion in the different imaging modalities. Results: In CBCT, the measured marker lengths increased linearly with increase in motion amplitude. For example, the apparent length of the 10 mm marker was about 20 mm when phantom moved with amplitude of 5 mm. Although the markers have elongated, the center position and the distance between markers remained at the same position for different motion amplitudes in CBCT. These parameters were not affected by motion frequency and phase in CBCT. In HCT and ACT, the measured marker length, center and distance between markers varied irregularly with motion parameters. The apparent lengths of the markers varied with inverse of the phantom velocity which depends on motion frequency and phase. Similarly the center position and distance between markers varied inversely with phantom speed. Conclusion: Motion may lead to variations in maker length, center position and distance between markers using CT imaging. These effects should be considered in patient setup using image-guided radiation therapy based on fiducial markers matching using 2D-radiographs or volumetric CT imaging.

  6. SU-E-J-219: Quantitative Evaluation of Motion Effects On Accuracy of Image-Guided Radiotherapy with Fiducial Markers Using CT Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, I; Oyewale, S; Ahmad, S; Algan, O; Alsbou, N

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate quantitatively patient motion effects on the localization accuracy of image-guided radiation with fiducial markers using axial CT (ACT), helical CT (HCT) and cone-beam CT (CBCT) using modeling and experimental phantom studies. Methods: Markers with different lengths (2.5 mm, 5 mm, 10 mm, and 20 mm) were inserted in a mobile thorax phantom which was imaged using ACT, HCT and CBCT. The phantom moved with sinusoidal motion with amplitudes ranging 0–20 mm and a frequency of 15 cycles-per-minute. Three parameters that include: apparent marker lengths, center position and distance between the centers of the markers were measured in the different CT images of the mobile phantom. A motion mathematical model was derived to predict the variations in the previous three parameters and their dependence on the motion in the different imaging modalities. Results: In CBCT, the measured marker lengths increased linearly with increase in motion amplitude. For example, the apparent length of the 10 mm marker was about 20 mm when phantom moved with amplitude of 5 mm. Although the markers have elongated, the center position and the distance between markers remained at the same position for different motion amplitudes in CBCT. These parameters were not affected by motion frequency and phase in CBCT. In HCT and ACT, the measured marker length, center and distance between markers varied irregularly with motion parameters. The apparent lengths of the markers varied with inverse of the phantom velocity which depends on motion frequency and phase. Similarly the center position and distance between markers varied inversely with phantom speed. Conclusion: Motion may lead to variations in maker length, center position and distance between markers using CT imaging. These effects should be considered in patient setup using image-guided radiation therapy based on fiducial markers matching using 2D-radiographs or volumetric CT imaging

  7. Algorithms of CT value correction for reconstructing a radiotherapy simulation image through axial CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogino, Takashi; Egawa, Sunao

    1991-01-01

    New algorithms of CT value correction for reconstructing a radiotherapy simulation image through axial CT images were developed. One, designated plane weighting method, is to correct CT value in proportion to the position of the beam element passing through the voxel. The other, designated solid weighting method, is to correct CT value in proportion to the length of the beam element passing through the voxel and the volume of voxel. Phantom experiments showed fair spatial resolution in the transverse direction. In the longitudinal direction, however, spatial resolution of under slice thickness could not be obtained. Contrast resolution was equivalent for both methods. In patient studies, the reconstructed radiotherapy simulation image was almost similar in visual perception of the density resolution to a simulation film taken by X-ray simulator. (author)

  8. Determining the Minimal Required Radioactivity of 18F-FDG for Reliable Semiquantification in PET/CT Imaging: A Phantom Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming-Kai; Menard, David H; Cheng, David W

    2016-03-01

    In pursuit of as-low-as-reasonably-achievable (ALARA) doses, this study investigated the minimal required radioactivity and corresponding imaging time for reliable semiquantification in PET/CT imaging. Using a phantom containing spheres of various diameters (3.4, 2.1, 1.5, 1.2, and 1.0 cm) filled with a fixed (18)F-FDG concentration of 165 kBq/mL and a background concentration of 23.3 kBq/mL, we performed PET/CT at multiple time points over 20 h of radioactive decay. The images were acquired for 10 min at a single bed position for each of 10 half-lives of decay using 3-dimensional list mode and were reconstructed into 1-, 2-, 3-, 4-, 5-, and 10-min acquisitions per bed position using an ordered-subsets expectation maximum algorithm with 24 subsets and 2 iterations and a gaussian 2-mm filter. SUVmax and SUVavg were measured for each sphere. The minimal required activity (±10%) for precise SUVmax semiquantification in the spheres was 1.8 kBq/mL for an acquisition of 10 min, 3.7 kBq/mL for 3-5 min, 7.9 kBq/mL for 2 min, and 17.4 kBq/mL for 1 min. The minimal required activity concentration-acquisition time product per bed position was 10-15 kBq/mL⋅min for reproducible SUV measurements within the spheres without overestimation. Using the total radioactivity and counting rate from the entire phantom, we found that the minimal required total activity-time product was 17 MBq⋅min and the minimal required counting rate-time product was 100 kcps⋅min. Our phantom study determined a threshold for minimal radioactivity and acquisition time for precise semiquantification in (18)F-FDG PET imaging that can serve as a guide in pursuit of achieving ALARA doses. © 2016 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  9. Realistic simulation of reduced-dose CT with noise modeling and sinogram synthesis using DICOM CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Won Kim, Chang; Kim, Jong Hyo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Reducing the patient dose while maintaining the diagnostic image quality during CT exams is the subject of a growing number of studies, in which simulations of reduced-dose CT with patient data have been used as an effective technique when exploring the potential of various dose reduction techniques. Difficulties in accessing raw sinogram data, however, have restricted the use of this technique to a limited number of institutions. Here, we present a novel reduced-dose CT simulation technique which provides realistic low-dose images without the requirement of raw sinogram data. Methods: Two key characteristics of CT systems, the noise equivalent quanta (NEQ) and the algorithmic modulation transfer function (MTF), were measured for various combinations of object attenuation and tube currents by analyzing the noise power spectrum (NPS) of CT images obtained with a set of phantoms. Those measurements were used to develop a comprehensive CT noise model covering the reduced x-ray photon flux, object attenuation, system noise, and bow-tie filter, which was then employed to generate a simulated noise sinogram for the reduced-dose condition with the use of a synthetic sinogram generated from a reference CT image. The simulated noise sinogram was filtered with the algorithmic MTF and back-projected to create a noise CT image, which was then added to the reference CT image, finally providing a simulated reduced-dose CT image. The simulation performance was evaluated in terms of the degree of NPS similarity, the noise magnitude, the bow-tie filter effect, and the streak noise pattern at photon starvation sites with the set of phantom images. Results: The simulation results showed good agreement with actual low-dose CT images in terms of their visual appearance and in a quantitative evaluation test. The magnitude and shape of the NPS curves of the simulated low-dose images agreed well with those of real low-dose images, showing discrepancies of less than +/−3.2% in

  10. Noise-optimized virtual monoenergetic images and iodine maps for the detection of venous thrombosis in second-generation dual-energy CT (DECT): an ex vivo phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bongers, Malte N.; Schabel, Christoph; Tsiflikas, Ilias; Ketelsen, Dominik; Mangold, Stefanie; Claussen, Claus D.; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Thomas, Christoph; Krauss, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) can be difficult to detect using CT due to poor and heterogeneous contrast. Dual-energy CT (DECT) allows iodine contrast optimization using noise-optimized monoenergetic extrapolations (MEIs) and iodine maps (IMs). Our aim was to assess whether MEI and IM could improve the delineation of thrombotic material within iodine-enhanced blood compared to single-energy CT (SECT). Six vessel phantoms, including human thrombus and contrast media-enhanced blood and one phantom without contrast, were placed in an attenuation phantom and scanned with DECT 100/140 kV and SECT 120 kV. IM, virtual non-contrast images (VNC), mixed images, and MEI were calculated. Attenuation of thrombi and blood were measured. Contrast and contrast-to-noise-ratios (CNRs) were calculated and compared among IM, VNC, mixed images, MEI, and SECT using paired t tests. MEI40keV and IM showed significantly higher contrast and CNR than SE120kV from high to intermediate iodine concentrations (contrast:pMEI40keV < 0.002,pIM < 0.005;CNR:pMEI40keV < 0.002,pIM < 0.004). At low iodine concentrations, MEI190keV and VNC images showed significantly higher contrast and CNR than SE120kV with inverted contrasts (contrast:pMEI190keV < 0.008,pVNC < 0.002;CNR:pMEI190keV < 0.003,pVNC < 0.002). Noise-optimized MEI and IM provide significantly higher contrast and CNR in the delineation of thrombosis compared to SECT, which may facilitate the detection of DVT in difficult cases. circle Poor contrast makes it difficult to detect thrombosis in CT. (orig.)

  11. Noise-optimized virtual monoenergetic images and iodine maps for the detection of venous thrombosis in second-generation dual-energy CT (DECT): an ex vivo phantom study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bongers, Malte N.; Schabel, Christoph; Tsiflikas, Ilias; Ketelsen, Dominik; Mangold, Stefanie; Claussen, Claus D.; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Thomas, Christoph [University Hospital of Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Krauss, Bernhard [Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Forchheim (Germany)

    2015-06-01

    Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) can be difficult to detect using CT due to poor and heterogeneous contrast. Dual-energy CT (DECT) allows iodine contrast optimization using noise-optimized monoenergetic extrapolations (MEIs) and iodine maps (IMs). Our aim was to assess whether MEI and IM could improve the delineation of thrombotic material within iodine-enhanced blood compared to single-energy CT (SECT). Six vessel phantoms, including human thrombus and contrast media-enhanced blood and one phantom without contrast, were placed in an attenuation phantom and scanned with DECT 100/140 kV and SECT 120 kV. IM, virtual non-contrast images (VNC), mixed images, and MEI were calculated. Attenuation of thrombi and blood were measured. Contrast and contrast-to-noise-ratios (CNRs) were calculated and compared among IM, VNC, mixed images, MEI, and SECT using paired t tests. MEI40keV and IM showed significantly higher contrast and CNR than SE120kV from high to intermediate iodine concentrations (contrast:pMEI40keV < 0.002,pIM < 0.005;CNR:pMEI40keV < 0.002,pIM < 0.004). At low iodine concentrations, MEI190keV and VNC images showed significantly higher contrast and CNR than SE120kV with inverted contrasts (contrast:pMEI190keV < 0.008,pVNC < 0.002;CNR:pMEI190keV < 0.003,pVNC < 0.002). Noise-optimized MEI and IM provide significantly higher contrast and CNR in the delineation of thrombosis compared to SECT, which may facilitate the detection of DVT in difficult cases. circle Poor contrast makes it difficult to detect thrombosis in CT. (orig.)

  12. Development of digital phantom for DRR evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Tsuyoshi; Katsuta, Shoichi; Oyama, Masaya; Ogino, Takashi

    2009-01-01

    Generally, digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) is evaluated by physical phantom. The CT image is camouflaged by the performance of the radiation treatment planning system and contains a variety of error factors. The CT image (as follows the digital phantom), where an arbitrary CT value is arranged in the matrix, is necessary to evaluate the pure performance of the radiation treatment planning system. In this study, the development of a digital phantom is described, and the utility is discussed. CTport and the radiation treatment planning system are evaluated with the use of a digital phantom as follows: geometrical accuracy evaluation of DRR, consisting of the center position, size of irradiation field, distortion, extension of X-ray, and beam axis, and the image quality evaluation of DRR, which consists of the contrast resolution. As for DRR made with CTport and the treatment planning system, the part that shifted geometrically was confirmed. In the image quality evaluation, there was a remarkable difference. Because the making accuracy and the installation accuracy of the phantom do not influence the digital phantom, the geometrical accuracy of the DRR is reliable. Because the CT conditions and the phantom factor have no influence, the peculiar DRR image quality can be evaluated and used to evaluate the best image processing parameters. (author)

  13. CT image quality improvement using adaptive iterative dose reduction with wide-volume acquisition on 320-detector CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gervaise, Alban; Osemont, Benoit; Lecocq, Sophie; Blum, Alain; Noel, Alain; Micard, Emilien; Felblinger, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of Adaptive Iterative Dose Reduction (AIDR) on image quality and radiation dose in phantom and patient studies. A phantom was examined in volumetric mode on a 320-detector CT at different tube currents from 25 to 550 mAs. CT images were reconstructed with AIDR and with Filtered Back Projection (FBP) reconstruction algorithm. Image noise, Contrast-to-Noise Ratio (CNR), Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) and spatial resolution were compared between FBP and AIDR images. AIDR was then tested on 15 CT examinations of the lumbar spine in a prospective study. Again, FBP and AIDR images were compared. Image noise and SNR were analysed using a Wilcoxon signed-rank test. In the phantom, spatial resolution assessment showed no significant difference between FBP and AIDR reconstructions. Image noise was lower with AIDR than with FBP images with a mean reduction of 40%. CNR and SNR were also improved with AIDR. In patients, quantitative and subjective evaluation showed that image noise was significantly lower with AIDR than with FBP. SNR was also greater with AIDR than with FBP. Compared to traditional FBP reconstruction techniques, AIDR significantly improves image quality and has the potential to decrease radiation dose. (orig.)

  14. WE-AB-204-03: A Novel 3D Printed Phantom for 4D PET/CT Imaging and SIB Radiotherapy Verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soultan, D; Murphy, J; Moiseenko, V; Cervino, L; Gill, B

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To construct and test a 3D printed phantom designed to mimic variable PET tracer uptake seen in lung tumor volumes. To assess segmentation accuracy of sub-volumes of the phantom following 4D PET/CT scanning with ideal and patient-specific respiratory motion. To plan, deliver and verify delivery of PET-driven, gated, simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) radiotherapy plans. Methods: A set of phantoms and inserts were designed and manufactured for a realistic representation of lung cancer gated radiotherapy steps from 4D PET/CT scanning to dose delivery. A cylindrical phantom (40x 120 mm) holds inserts for PET/CT scanning. The novel 3D printed insert dedicated to 4D PET/CT mimics high PET tracer uptake in the core and lower uptake in the periphery. This insert is a variable density porous cylinder (22.12×70 mm), ABS-P430 thermoplastic, 3D printed by uPrint SE Plus with inner void volume (5.5×42 mm). The square pores (1.8×1.8 mm2 each) fill 50% of outer volume, resulting in a 2:1 SUV ratio of PET-tracer in the void volume with respect to porous volume. A matching in size cylindrical phantom is dedicated to validate gated radiotherapy. It contains eight peripheral holes matching the location of the porous part of the 3D printed insert, and one central hole. These holes accommodate adaptors for Farmer-type ion chamber and cells vials. Results: End-to-end test were performed from 4D PET/CT scanning to transferring data to the planning system and target volume delineation. 4D PET/CT scans were acquired of the phantom with different respiratory motion patterns and gating windows. A measured 2:1 18F-FDG SUV ratio between inner void and outer volume matched the 3D printed design. Conclusion: The novel 3D printed phantom mimics variable PET tracer uptake typical of tumors. Obtained 4D PET/CT scans are suitable for segmentation, treatment planning and delivery in SIB gated treatments of NSCLC

  15. Analysis of main influence factors on coronary artery image quality with 64-multidetector row helical CT using a pulsating cardiac phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Bin; Zhao Hong; Wu Xingwang; Zhang Jiawen; Yu Yongqiang; Liao Jingmin

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To explore the main influence factors (heart rate, rotation speed, and reconstruction algorithm) on the image quality of coronary artery with 40 mm VCT (64-detector row helical CT) using a pulsating cardiac phantom. Methods: An adjustable pulsating cardiac phantom (GE) containing predetermined simulated coronary arteries was scanned using a 40 mm VCT (GE LightSpeed CT) with cardiac pulsating rates of 40, 45, 50, 55, 60, 65, 70, 75, 80, 85, 90, 95, 100, 105, 110, and 115 beats per minute (bpm). The variable rotation speeds technique of 0.35 s, 0.40 s, and 0.45 s were used, respectively. The raw data were reconstructed using both one-sector and multi-sector reconstruction algorithm at optimal window of the R-R interval. The image quality score (IQS) was evaluated by two radiologists according to the same evaluation standard of reformated image. The correlation between heart rate (HR), roation speed, reconstruction algorithm, and IQS were analyzed. The IQS as independent variable and the HR, rotation speed, reconstruction algorithm as dependent variables were analyzed by multiple linear regression analysis. Results: The heart rate and the reconstruction algorithm had significant influence on IQS. The rotation speed (0.35s, 0.40 s, and 0.45 s) didn't have significant influence on IQS. There was linear regression relationship between heart rate, reconstruction algorithm and IQS (P<0.01). The equation of multiple regression was IQS=5.154-0.046 x (HR) + 0.500 x (reconstruction algorithm). The multi-sector reconstruction algorithm improved the image quality than one-sector did. Conclusion: The main influence factors on the image quality of coronary artery can be evaluated with 40 mm VCT using a pulsating cardiac phantom. It plays an important role in clinical research and application. (authors)

  16. Development of 1-year-old computational phantom and calculation of organ doses during CT scans using Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, Yuxi; Qiu, Rui; Ge, Chaoyong; Xie, Wenzhang; Li, Junli; Gao, Linfeng; Zheng, Junzheng

    2014-01-01

    With the rapidly growing number of CT examinations, the consequential radiation risk has aroused more and more attention. The average dose in each organ during CT scans can only be obtained by using Monte Carlo simulation with computational phantoms. Since children tend to have higher radiation sensitivity than adults, the radiation dose of pediatric CT examinations requires special attention and needs to be assessed accurately. So far, studies on organ doses from CT exposures for pediatric patients are still limited. In this work, a 1-year-old computational phantom was constructed. The body contour was obtained from the CT images of a 1-year-old physical phantom and the internal organs were deformed from an existing Chinese reference adult phantom. To ensure the organ locations in the 1-year-old computational phantom were consistent with those of the physical phantom, the organ locations in 1-year-old computational phantom were manually adjusted one by one, and the organ masses were adjusted to the corresponding Chinese reference values. Moreover, a CT scanner model was developed using the Monte Carlo technique and the 1-year-old computational phantom was applied to estimate organ doses derived from simulated CT exposures. As a result, a database including doses to 36 organs and tissues from 47 single axial scans was built. It has been verified by calculation that doses of axial scans are close to those of helical scans; therefore, this database could be applied to helical scans as well. Organ doses were calculated using the database and compared with those obtained from the measurements made in the physical phantom for helical scans. The differences between simulation and measurement were less than 25% for all organs. The result shows that the 1-year-old phantom developed in this work can be used to calculate organ doses in CT exposures, and the dose database provides a method for the estimation of 1-year-old patient doses in a variety of CT examinations. (paper)

  17. A multimodality vascular imaging phantom of an abdominal aortic aneurysm with a visible thrombus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allard, Louise; Chayer, Boris; Qin Zhao [Laboratory of Biorheology and Medical Ultrasonics, Research Center, University of Montreal Hospital (CRCHUM), Quebec H2L 2W5 (Canada); Soulez, Gilles [Department of Radiology, University of Montreal Hospital (CHUM), Quebec H2L 2M1 (Canada); Department of Radiology, Radio-Oncology and Nuclear Medicine, University of Montreal, Quebec H3T 1J4 (Canada); Institute of Biomedical Engineering, University of Montreal, Quebec H3T 1J4 (Canada); Roy, David [Institute of Biomedical Engineering, University of Montreal, Quebec H3T 1J4 (Canada); Cloutier, Guy [Laboratory of Biorheology and Medical Ultrasonics, Research Center, University of Montreal Hospital (CRCHUM), Quebec H2L 2W5 (Canada); Department of Radiology, Radio-Oncology and Nuclear Medicine, University of Montreal, Quebec H3T 1J4 (Canada); Institute of Biomedical Engineering, University of Montreal, Quebec H3T 1J4 (Canada)

    2013-06-15

    Purpose: With the continuous development of new stent grafts and implantation techniques, it has now become technically feasible to treat abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) with challenging anatomy using endovascular repair with standard, fenestrated, or branched stent-grafts. In vitro experimentations are very useful to improve stent-graft design and conformability or imaging guidance for stent-graft delivery or follow-up. Vascular replicas also help to better understand the limitation of endovascular approaches in challenging anatomy and possibly improve surgical planning or training by practicing high risk clinical procedures in the laboratory to improve outcomes in the operating room. Most AAA phantoms available have a very basic anatomy, which is not representative of the clinical reality. This paper presents a method of fabrication of a realistic AAA phantom with a visible thrombus, as well as some mechanical properties characterizing such phantom. Methods: A realistic AAA geometry replica of a real patient anatomy taken from a multidetector computed tomography (CT) scan was manufactured. To demonstrate the multimodality imaging capability of this new phantom with a thrombus visible in magnetic resonance (MR) angiography, CT angiography (CTA), digital subtraction angiography (DSA), and ultrasound, image acquisitions with all these modalities were performed by using standard clinical protocols. Potential use of this phantom for stent deployment was also tested. A rheometer allowed defining hyperelastic and viscoelastic properties of phantom materials. Results: MR imaging measurements of SNR and CNR values on T1 and T2-weighted sequences and MR angiography indicated reasonable agreement with published values of AAA thrombus and abdominal components in vivo. X-ray absorption also lay within normal ranges of AAA patients and was representative of findings observed on CTA, fluoroscopy, and DSA. Ultrasound propagation speeds for developed materials were also in

  18. A multimodality vascular imaging phantom of an abdominal aortic aneurysm with a visible thrombus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allard, Louise; Chayer, Boris; Qin Zhao; Soulez, Gilles; Roy, David; Cloutier, Guy

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: With the continuous development of new stent grafts and implantation techniques, it has now become technically feasible to treat abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) with challenging anatomy using endovascular repair with standard, fenestrated, or branched stent-grafts. In vitro experimentations are very useful to improve stent-graft design and conformability or imaging guidance for stent-graft delivery or follow-up. Vascular replicas also help to better understand the limitation of endovascular approaches in challenging anatomy and possibly improve surgical planning or training by practicing high risk clinical procedures in the laboratory to improve outcomes in the operating room. Most AAA phantoms available have a very basic anatomy, which is not representative of the clinical reality. This paper presents a method of fabrication of a realistic AAA phantom with a visible thrombus, as well as some mechanical properties characterizing such phantom. Methods: A realistic AAA geometry replica of a real patient anatomy taken from a multidetector computed tomography (CT) scan was manufactured. To demonstrate the multimodality imaging capability of this new phantom with a thrombus visible in magnetic resonance (MR) angiography, CT angiography (CTA), digital subtraction angiography (DSA), and ultrasound, image acquisitions with all these modalities were performed by using standard clinical protocols. Potential use of this phantom for stent deployment was also tested. A rheometer allowed defining hyperelastic and viscoelastic properties of phantom materials. Results: MR imaging measurements of SNR and CNR values on T1 and T2-weighted sequences and MR angiography indicated reasonable agreement with published values of AAA thrombus and abdominal components in vivo. X-ray absorption also lay within normal ranges of AAA patients and was representative of findings observed on CTA, fluoroscopy, and DSA. Ultrasound propagation speeds for developed materials were also in

  19. Visibility of fiducial markers used for image-guided radiation therapy on optical coherence tomography for registration with CT: An esophageal phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelvehgaran, Pouya; Alderliesten, Tanja; Weda, Jelmer J A; de Bruin, Martijn; Faber, Dirk J; Hulshof, Maarten C C M; van Leeuwen, Ton G; van Herk, Marcel; de Boer, Johannes F

    2017-12-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is of interest to visualize microscopic esophageal tumor extensions to improve tumor delineation for radiation therapy (RT) planning. Fiducial marker placement is a common method to ensure target localization during planning and treatment. Visualization of these fiducial markers on OCT permits integrating OCT and computed tomography (CT) images used for RT planning via image registration. We studied the visibility of 13 (eight types) commercially available solid and liquid fiducial markers in OCT images at different depths using dedicated esophageal phantoms and evaluated marker placement depth in clinical practice. We designed and fabricated dedicated esophageal phantoms, in which three layers mimic the anatomical wall structures of a healthy human esophagus. We successfully implanted 13 commercially available fiducial markers that varied in diameter and material property at depths between 0.5 and 3.0 mm. The resulting esophageal phantoms were imaged with OCT, and marker visibility was assessed qualitatively and quantitatively using the contrast-to-background-noise ratio (CNR). The CNR was defined as the difference between the mean intensity of the fiducial markers and the mean intensity of the background divided by the standard deviation of the background intensity. To determine whether, in current clinical practice, the implanted fiducial markers are within the OCT visualization range (up to 3.0 mm depth), we retrospectively measured the distance of 19 fiducial markers to the esophageal lumen on CT scans of 16 esophageal cancer patients. In the esophageal phantoms, all the included fiducial markers were visible on OCT at all investigated depths. Solid fiducial markers were better visible on OCT than liquid fiducial markers with a 1.74-fold higher CNR. Although fiducial marker identification per type and size was slightly easier for superficially implanted fiducial markers, we observed no difference in the ability of OCT to

  20. Investigation of partial volume effect in different PET/CT systems: a comparison of results using the madeira phantom and the NEMA NU-2 2001 phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chipiga, L.; Sydoff, M.; Zvonova, I.; Bernhardsson, C.

    2016-01-01

    Positron emission tomography combined with computed tomography (PET/CT) is a quantitative technique used for diagnosing various diseases and for monitoring treatment response for different types of tumours. However, the accuracy of the data is limited by the spatial resolution of the system. In addition, the so-called partial volume effect (PVE) causes a blurring of image structures, which in turn may cause an underestimation of activity of a structure with high-activity content. In this study, a new phantom, MADEIRA (Minimising Activity and Dose with Enhanced Image quality by Radiopharmaceutical Administrations) for activity quantification in PET and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) was used to investigate the influence on the PVE by lesion size and tumour-to-background activity concentration ratio (TBR) in four different PET/CT systems. These measurements were compared with data from measurements with the NEMA NU-2 2001 phantom. The results with the MADEIRA phantom showed that the activity concentration (AC) values were closest to the true values at low ratios of TBR (<10) and reduced to 50 % of the actual AC values at high TBR (30-35). For all scanners, recovery of true values became closer to 1 with an increasing diameter of the lesion. The MADEIRA phantom showed good agreement with the results obtained from measurements with the NEMA NU-2 2001 phantom but allows for a wider range of possibilities in measuring image quality parameters. (authors)

  1. Relationships between cone beam CT value and physical density in image guided radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Xiaoqin; Bai Sen; Zhong Renming; Tang Zhiquan; Jiang Qinfeng; Li Tao

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the main factors affecting the relationship between physical density and CT value in cone-beam computed tomography(CBCT) for imaging guided radiation therapy(IGRT) by comparing the CT value in the image from cone-beam scanner and from fan-beam (FBCT) scanner of a reference phantom. Methods: A taking-park reference phantom with a set of tissue equivalent inserts was scanned at different energies different fields of view (FOV) for IGRT-CBCT and FBCT. The CT value of every insert was measured and compared. Results: The position of inserts in phantom, the size of phantom, the FOV of scanner and different energies had more effect on the relationships between physical density and the CT value from IGRT-CBCT than those from the normal FBCT. The higher the energy was, the less effect of the position of inserts in phantom, the size of phantom and the FOV of scanner on CT value, and the poorer density contrast was observed. Conclusion: At present, the CT value of IGRT-CBCT is not in the true HU value since the manufacturer has not corrected its number. Therefore, we are not able to use the CT value of CBCT for dose calculation in TPS. (authors)

  2. The effect of metal artefact reduction on CT-based attenuation correction for PET imaging in the vicinity of metallic hip implants: a phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harnish, Roy; Prevrhal, Sven; Alavi, Abass; Zaidi, Habib; Lang, Thomas F

    2014-07-01

    To determine if metal artefact reduction (MAR) combined with a priori knowledge of prosthesis material composition can be applied to obtain CT-based attenuation maps with sufficient accuracy for quantitative assessment of (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose uptake in lesions near metallic prostheses. A custom hip prosthesis phantom with a lesion-sized cavity filled with 0.2 ml (18)F-FDG solution having an activity of 3.367 MBq adjacent to a prosthesis bore was imaged twice with a chrome-cobalt steel hip prosthesis and a plastic replica, respectively. Scanning was performed on a clinical hybrid PET/CT system equipped with an additional external (137)Cs transmission source. PET emission images were reconstructed from both phantom configurations with CT-based attenuation correction (CTAC) and with CT-based attenuation correction using MAR (MARCTAC). To compare results with the attenuation-correction method extant prior to the advent of PET/CT, we also carried out attenuation correction with (137)Cs transmission-based attenuation correction (TXAC). CTAC and MARCTAC images were scaled to attenuation coefficients at 511 keV using a trilinear function that mapped the highest CT values to the prosthesis alloy attenuation coefficient. Accuracy and spatial distribution of the lesion activity was compared between the three reconstruction schemes. Compared to the reference activity of 3.37 MBq, the estimated activity quantified from the PET image corrected by TXAC was 3.41 MBq. The activity estimated from PET images corrected by MARCTAC was similar in accuracy at 3.32 MBq. CTAC corrected PET images resulted in nearly 40 % overestimation of lesion activity at 4.70 MBq. Comparison of PET images obtained with the plastic and metal prostheses in place showed that CTAC resulted in a marked distortion of the (18)F-FDG distribution within the lesion, whereas application of MARCTAC and TXAC resulted in lesion distributions similar to those observed with the plastic replica. MAR combined

  3. A 4D Digital Phantom for Patient-Specific Simulation of Brain CT Perfusion Protocols

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boom, R. van den; Manniesing, R.; Oei, M.T.H.; Woude, W.J. van der; Smit, E.J.; Laue, H.O.A.; Ginneken, B. van; Prokop, M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Optimizing CT brain perfusion protocols is a challenge because of the complex interaction between image acquisition, calculation of perfusion data and patient hemodynamics. Several digital phantoms have been developed to avoid unnecessary patient exposure or suboptimum choice of parameters.

  4. Using 3D printing techniques to create an anthropomorphic thorax phantom for medical imaging purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazelaar, Colien; van Eijnatten, Maureen; Dahele, Max; Wolff, Jan; Forouzanfar, Tymour; Slotman, Ben; Verbakel, Wilko F A R

    2018-01-01

    Imaging phantoms are widely used for testing and optimization of imaging devices without the need to expose humans to irradiation. However, commercially available phantoms are commonly manufactured in simple, generic forms and sizes and therefore do not resemble the clinical situation for many patients. Using 3D printing techniques, we created a life-size phantom based on a clinical CT scan of the thorax from a patient with lung cancer. It was assembled from bony structures printed in gypsum, lung structures consisting of airways, blood vessels >1 mm, and outer lung surface, three lung tumors printed in nylon, and soft tissues represented by silicone (poured into a 3D-printed mold). Kilovoltage x-ray and CT images of the phantom closely resemble those of the real patient in terms of size, shapes, and structures. Surface comparison using 3D models obtained from the phantom and the 3D models used for printing showed mean differences 3D printing and molding techniques. The phantom closely resembles a real patient in terms of spatial accuracy and is currently being used to evaluate x-ray-based imaging quality and positional verification techniques for radiotherapy. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  5. Superiority of CT imaging reconstruction on Linux OS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Shaochun; Yan Xufeng; Wu Tengfang; Luo Xiaomei; Cai Huasong

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To compare the speed of CT reconstruction using the Linux and Windows OS. Methods: Shepp-Logan head phantom in different pixel size was projected to obtain the sinogram by using the inverse Fourier transformation, filtered back projection and Radon transformation on both Linux and Windows OS. Results: CT image reconstruction using the Linux operating system was significantly better and more efficient than Windows. Conclusion: CT image reconstruction using the Linux operating system is more efficient. (authors)

  6. SU-F-I-08: CT Image Ring Artifact Reduction Based On Prior Image

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, C; Qi, H; Chen, Z; Wu, S; Xu, Y; Zhou, L [Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: In computed tomography (CT) system, CT images with ring artifacts will be reconstructed when some adjacent bins of detector don’t work. The ring artifacts severely degrade CT image quality. We present a useful CT ring artifacts reduction based on projection data correction, aiming at estimating the missing data of projection data accurately, thus removing the ring artifacts of CT images. Methods: The method consists of ten steps: 1) Identification of abnormal pixel line in projection sinogram; 2) Linear interpolation within the pixel line of projection sinogram; 3) FBP reconstruction using interpolated projection data; 4) Filtering FBP image using mean filter; 5) Forwarding projection of filtered FBP image; 6) Subtraction forwarded projection from original projection; 7) Linear interpolation of abnormal pixel line area in the subtraction projection; 8) Adding the interpolated subtraction projection on the forwarded projection; 9) FBP reconstruction using corrected projection data; 10) Return to step 4 until the pre-set iteration number is reached. The method is validated on simulated and real data to restore missing projection data and reconstruct ring artifact-free CT images. Results: We have studied impact of amount of dead bins of CT detector on the accuracy of missing data estimation in projection sinogram. For the simulated case with a resolution of 256 by 256 Shepp-Logan phantom, three iterations are sufficient to restore projection data and reconstruct ring artifact-free images when the dead bins rating is under 30%. The dead-bin-induced artifacts are substantially reduced. More iteration number is needed to reconstruct satisfactory images while the rating of dead bins increases. Similar results were found for a real head phantom case. Conclusion: A practical CT image ring artifact correction scheme based on projection data is developed. This method can produce ring artifact-free CT images feasibly and effectively.

  7. SU-F-I-08: CT Image Ring Artifact Reduction Based On Prior Image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, C; Qi, H; Chen, Z; Wu, S; Xu, Y; Zhou, L

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: In computed tomography (CT) system, CT images with ring artifacts will be reconstructed when some adjacent bins of detector don’t work. The ring artifacts severely degrade CT image quality. We present a useful CT ring artifacts reduction based on projection data correction, aiming at estimating the missing data of projection data accurately, thus removing the ring artifacts of CT images. Methods: The method consists of ten steps: 1) Identification of abnormal pixel line in projection sinogram; 2) Linear interpolation within the pixel line of projection sinogram; 3) FBP reconstruction using interpolated projection data; 4) Filtering FBP image using mean filter; 5) Forwarding projection of filtered FBP image; 6) Subtraction forwarded projection from original projection; 7) Linear interpolation of abnormal pixel line area in the subtraction projection; 8) Adding the interpolated subtraction projection on the forwarded projection; 9) FBP reconstruction using corrected projection data; 10) Return to step 4 until the pre-set iteration number is reached. The method is validated on simulated and real data to restore missing projection data and reconstruct ring artifact-free CT images. Results: We have studied impact of amount of dead bins of CT detector on the accuracy of missing data estimation in projection sinogram. For the simulated case with a resolution of 256 by 256 Shepp-Logan phantom, three iterations are sufficient to restore projection data and reconstruct ring artifact-free images when the dead bins rating is under 30%. The dead-bin-induced artifacts are substantially reduced. More iteration number is needed to reconstruct satisfactory images while the rating of dead bins increases. Similar results were found for a real head phantom case. Conclusion: A practical CT image ring artifact correction scheme based on projection data is developed. This method can produce ring artifact-free CT images feasibly and effectively.

  8. The use of megavoltage CT (MVCT) images for dose recomputations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langen, K M; Meeks, S L; Poole, D O; Wagner, T H; Willoughby, T R; Kupelian, P A; Ruchala, K J; Haimerl, J; Olivera, G H

    2005-01-01

    Megavoltage CT (MVCT) images of patients are acquired daily on a helical tomotherapy unit (TomoTherapy, Inc., Madison, WI). While these images are used primarily for patient alignment, they can also be used to recalculate the treatment plan for the patient anatomy of the day. The use of MVCT images for dose computations requires a reliable CT number to electron density calibration curve. In this work, we tested the stability of the MVCT numbers by determining the variation of this calibration with spatial arrangement of the phantom, time and MVCT acquisition parameters. The two calibration curves that represent the largest variations were applied to six clinical MVCT images for recalculations to test for dosimetric uncertainties. Among the six cases tested, the largest difference in any of the dosimetric endpoints was 3.1% but more typically the dosimetric endpoints varied by less than 2%. Using an average CT to electron density calibration and a thorax phantom, a series of end-to-end tests were run. Using a rigid phantom, recalculated dose volume histograms (DVHs) were compared with plan DVHs. Using a deformed phantom, recalculated point dose variations were compared with measurements. The MVCT field of view is limited and the image space outside this field of view can be filled in with information from the planning kVCT. This merging technique was tested for a rigid phantom. Finally, the influence of the MVCT slice thickness on the dose recalculation was investigated. The dosimetric differences observed in all phantom tests were within the range of dosimetric uncertainties observed due to variations in the calibration curve. The use of MVCT images allows the assessment of daily dose distributions with an accuracy that is similar to that of the initial kVCT dose calculation

  9. Impact of model-based iterative reconstruction on low-contrast lesion detection and image quality in abdominal CT: a 12-reader-based comparative phantom study with filtered back projection at different tube voltages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Euler, Andre; Stieltjes, Bram; Eichenberger, Reto; Reisinger, Clemens; Hirschmann, Anna; Zaehringer, Caroline; Kircher, Achim; Streif, Matthias; Bucher, Sabine; Buergler, David; D' Errico, Luigia; Kopp, Sebastien; Wilhelm, Markus [University Hospital Basel, Clinic of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Basel (Switzerland); Szucs-Farkas, Zsolt [Hospital Centre of Biel, Institute of Radiology, Biel (Switzerland); Schindera, Sebastian T. [University Hospital Basel, Clinic of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Basel (Switzerland); Cantonal Hospital Aarau, Institute of Radiology, Aarau (Switzerland)

    2017-12-15

    To evaluate the impact of model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) on image quality and low-contrast lesion detection compared with filtered back projection (FBP) in abdominal computed tomography (CT) of simulated medium and large patients at different tube voltages. A phantom with 45 hypoattenuating lesions was placed in two water containers and scanned at 70, 80, 100, and 120 kVp. The 120-kVp protocol served as reference, and the volume CT dose index (CTDI{sub vol}) was kept constant for all protocols. The datasets were reconstructed with MBIR and FBP. Image noise and contrast-to-noise-ratio (CNR) were assessed. Low-contrast lesion detectability was evaluated by 12 radiologists. MBIR decreased the image noise by 24% and 27%, and increased the CNR by 30% and 29% for the medium and large phantoms, respectively. Lower tube voltages increased the CNR by 58%, 46%, and 16% at 70, 80, and 100 kVp, respectively, compared with 120 kVp in the medium phantom and by 9%, 18% and 12% in the large phantom. No significant difference in lesion detection rate was observed (medium: 79-82%; large: 57-65%; P > 0.37). Although MBIR improved quantitative image quality compared with FBP, it did not result in increased low-contrast lesion detection in abdominal CT at different tube voltages in simulated medium and large patients. (orig.)

  10. Design of a multimodal ({sup 1}H/{sup 23}Na MR/CT) anthropomorphic thorax phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumann, Wiebke; Lietzmann, Florian; Schad, Lothar R.; Zoellner, Frank G. [Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Computer Assisted Clinical Medicine

    2017-08-01

    This work proposes a modular, anthropomorphic MR and CT thorax phantom that enables the comparison of experimental studies for quantitative evaluation of deformable, multimodal image registration algorithms and realistic multi-nuclear MR imaging techniques. A human thorax phantom was developed with insertable modules representing lung, liver, ribs and additional tracking spheres. The quality of human tissue mimicking characteristics was evaluated for {sup 1}H and {sup 23}Na MR as well as CT imaging. The position of landmarks in the lung lobes was tracked during CT image acquisition at several positions during breathing cycles. {sup 1}H MR measurements of the liver were repeated after seven months to determine long term stability. The modules possess HU, T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} values comparable to human tissues (lung module: -756 ± 148 HU, artificial ribs: 218 ± 56 HU (low CaCO{sub 3} concentration) and 339 ± 121 (high CaCO{sub 3} concentration), liver module: T{sub 1} = 790 ± 28 ms, T{sub 2} = 65 ± 1 ms). Motion analysis showed that the landmarks in the lung lobes follow a 3D trajectory similar to human breathing motion. The tracking spheres are well detectable in both CT and MRI. The parameters of the tracking spheres can be adjusted in the following ranges to result in a distinct signal: HU values from 150 to 900 HU, T{sub 1} relaxation time from 550 ms to 2000 ms, T{sub 2} relaxation time from 40 ms to 200 ms. The presented anthropomorphic multimodal thorax phantom fulfills the demands of a simple, inexpensive system with interchangeable components. In future, the modular design allows for complementing the present set up with additional modules focusing on specific research targets such as perfusion studies, {sup 23}Na MR quantification experiments and an increasing level of complexity for motion studies.

  11. The level of detail required in a deformable phantom to accurately perform quality assurance of deformable image registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saenz, Daniel L.; Kim, Hojin; Chen, Josephine; Stathakis, Sotirios; Kirby, Neil

    2016-09-01

    The primary purpose of the study was to determine how detailed deformable image registration (DIR) phantoms need to adequately simulate human anatomy and accurately assess the quality of DIR algorithms. In particular, how many distinct tissues are required in a phantom to simulate complex human anatomy? Pelvis and head-and-neck patient CT images were used for this study as virtual phantoms. Two data sets from each site were analyzed. The virtual phantoms were warped to create two pairs consisting of undeformed and deformed images. Otsu’s method was employed to create additional segmented image pairs of n distinct soft tissue CT number ranges (fat, muscle, etc). A realistic noise image was added to each image. Deformations were applied in MIM Software (MIM) and Velocity deformable multi-pass (DMP) and compared with the known warping. Images with more simulated tissue levels exhibit more contrast, enabling more accurate results. Deformation error (magnitude of the vector difference between known and predicted deformation) was used as a metric to evaluate how many CT number gray levels are needed for a phantom to serve as a realistic patient proxy. Stabilization of the mean deformation error was reached by three soft tissue levels for Velocity DMP and MIM, though MIM exhibited a persisting difference in accuracy between the discrete images and the unprocessed image pair. A minimum detail of three levels allows a realistic patient proxy for use with Velocity and MIM deformation algorithms.

  12. Organ dose evaluation for CT scans based on in-phantom measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Haikuan; Zhuo Weihai; Chen Bo; Yi Yanling; Li Dehong

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To explore the organ doses and their distributions in different projections of CT scans. Methods: The CT values were measured and the linear absorption coefficients were derived for the main organs of the anthropomorphic phantom to compare with the normal values of human beings. The radiophotoluminescent glass dosimeters were set into various tissues or organs of the phantom for mimic measurements of the organ doses undergoing the head, chest, abdomen and pelvis CT scans, respectively. Results: The tissue equivalence of the phantom used in this study was good. The brain had the largest organ dose undergoing the head CT scan. The organ doses in thyroid, breast, lung and oesophagus were relatively large in performing the chest CT scan, while the liver, stomach, colon and lung had relatively hrge organ doses in abdomen CT practice. The doses in bone surface and colon exceeded by 50 mGy in a single pelvis CT scan. Conclusions: The organ doses and their distributions largely vary with different projections of CT scans. The organ doses of colon, bone marrow,gonads and bladder are fairly large in performing pelvis CT scan, which should be paid attention in the practice. (authors)

  13. SU-E-I-62: Assessing Radiation Dose Reduction and CT Image Optimization Through the Measurement and Analysis of the Detector Quantum Efficiency (DQE) of CT Images Using Different Beam Hardening Filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collier, J; Aldoohan, S; Gill, K

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Reducing patient dose while maintaining (or even improving) image quality is one of the foremost goals in CT imaging. To this end, we consider the feasibility of optimizing CT scan protocols in conjunction with the application of different beam-hardening filtrations and assess this augmentation through noise-power spectrum (NPS) and detector quantum efficiency (DQE) analysis. Methods: American College of Radiology (ACR) and Catphan phantoms (The Phantom Laboratory) were scanned with a 64 slice CT scanner when additional filtration of thickness and composition (e.g., copper, nickel, tantalum, titanium, and tungsten) had been applied. A MATLAB-based code was employed to calculate the image of noise NPS. The Catphan Image Owl software suite was then used to compute the modulated transfer function (MTF) responses of the scanner. The DQE for each additional filter, including the inherent filtration, was then computed from these values. Finally, CT dose index (CTDIvol) values were obtained for each applied filtration through the use of a 100 mm pencil ionization chamber and CT dose phantom. Results: NPS, MTF, and DQE values were computed for each applied filtration and compared to the reference case of inherent beam-hardening filtration only. Results showed that the NPS values were reduced between 5 and 12% compared to inherent filtration case. Additionally, CTDIvol values were reduced between 15 and 27% depending on the composition of filtration applied. However, no noticeable changes in image contrast-to-noise ratios were noted. Conclusion: The reduction in the quanta noise section of the NPS profile found in this phantom-based study is encouraging. The reduction in both noise and dose through the application of beam-hardening filters is reflected in our phantom image quality. However, further investigation is needed to ascertain the applicability of this approach to reducing patient dose while maintaining diagnostically acceptable image qualities in a

  14. Impact of PET/CT system, reconstruction protocol, data analysis method, and repositioning on PET/CT precision: An experimental evaluation using an oncology and brain phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansor, Syahir; Pfaehler, Elisabeth; Heijtel, Dennis; Lodge, Martin A; Boellaard, Ronald; Yaqub, Maqsood

    2017-12-01

    In longitudinal oncological and brain PET/CT studies, it is important to understand the repeatability of quantitative PET metrics in order to assess change in tracer uptake. The present studies were performed in order to assess precision as function of PET/CT system, reconstruction protocol, analysis method, scan duration (or image noise), and repositioning in the field of view. Multiple (repeated) scans have been performed using a NEMA image quality (IQ) phantom and a 3D Hoffman brain phantom filled with 18 F solutions on two systems. Studies were performed with and without randomly (PET/CT, especially in the case of smaller spheres (PET metrics depends on the combination of reconstruction protocol, data analysis methods and scan duration (scan statistics). Moreover, precision was also affected by phantom repositioning but its impact depended on the data analysis method in combination with the reconstructed voxel size (tissue fraction effect). This study suggests that for oncological PET studies the use of SUV peak may be preferred over SUV max because SUV peak is less sensitive to patient repositioning/tumor sampling. © 2017 The Authors. Medical Physics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  15. Development of an Anthropomorphic Breast Phantom for Combined PET, B-Mode Ultrasound and Elastographic Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Dang, J; Tavernier, S; Lasaygues, P; Mensah, S; Zhang, D C; Auffray, E; Frisch, B; Varela, J; Wan, M X; Felix, N

    2011-01-01

    Combining the advantages of different imaging modalities leads to improved clinical results. For example, ultrasound provides good real-time structural information without any radiation and PET provides sensitive functional information. For the ongoing ClearPEM-Sonic project combining ultrasound and PET for breast imaging, we developed a dual-modality PET/Ultrasound (US) phantom. The phantom reproduces the acoustic and elastic properties of human breast tissue and allows labeling the different tissues in the phantom with different concentrations of FDG. The phantom was imaged with a whole-body PET/CT and with the Supersonic Imagine Aixplorer system. This system allows both B-mode US and shear wave elastographic imaging. US elastography is a new imaging method for displaying the tissue elasticity distribution. It was shown to be useful in breast imaging. We also tested the phantom with static elastography. A 6D magnetic positioning system allows fusing the images obtained with the two modalities. ClearPEM-Soni...

  16. Computer-assisted solid lung nodule 3D volumetry on CT : influence of scan mode and iterative reconstruction: a CT phantom study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coenen, Adriaan; Honda, Osamu; van der Jagt, Eric J.; Tomiyama, Noriyuki

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of high-resolution scan mode and iterative reconstruction on lung nodule 3D volumetry. Solid nodules with various sizes (5, 8, 10 and 12 mm) were placed inside a chest phantom. CT images were obtained with various tube currents, scan modes (conventional mode, high-resolution

  17. The effect of iodine uptake on radiation dose absorbed by patient tissues in contrast enhanced CT imaging. Implications for CT dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perisinakis, Kostas; Damilakis, John [University of Crete, Department of Medical Physics, Medical School, Heraklion, Crete (Greece); University Hospital of Heraklion, Department of Medical Physics, Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Tzedakis, Antonis; Papadakis, Antonios E. [University Hospital of Heraklion, Department of Medical Physics, Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Spanakis, Kostas [University Hospital of Heraklion, Department of Radiology, Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Hatzidakis, Adam [University Hospital of Heraklion, Department of Radiology, Heraklion, Crete (Greece); University of Crete, Department of Radiology, Medical School, Heraklion, Crete (Greece)

    2018-01-15

    To investigate the effect of iodine uptake on tissue/organ absorbed doses from CT exposure and its implications in CT dosimetry. The contrast-induced CT number increase of several radiosensitive tissues was retrospectively determined in 120 CT examinations involving both non-enhanced and contrast-enhanced CT imaging. CT images of a phantom containing aqueous solutions of varying iodine concentration were obtained. Plots of the CT number increase against iodine concentration were produced. The clinically occurring iodine tissue uptake was quantified by attributing recorded CT number increase to a certain concentration of aqueous iodine solution. Clinically occurring iodine uptake was represented in mathematical anthropomorphic phantoms. Standard 120 kV CT exposures were simulated using Monte Carlo methods and resulting organ doses were derived for non-enhanced and iodine contrast-enhanced CT imaging. The mean iodine uptake range during contrast-enhanced CT imaging was found to be 0.02-0.46% w/w for the investigated tissues, while the maximum value recorded was 0.82% w/w. For the same CT exposure, iodinated tissues were found to receive higher radiation dose than non-iodinated tissues, with dose increase exceeding 100% for tissues with high iodine uptake. Administration of iodinated contrast medium considerably increases radiation dose to tissues from CT exposure. (orig.)

  18. WE-FG-207B-12: Quantitative Evaluation of a Spectral CT Scanner in a Phantom Study: Results of Spectral Reconstructions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan, X; Arbique, G; Guild, J; Anderson, J; Yagil, Y

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the quantitative image quality of spectral reconstructions of phantom data from a spectral CT scanner. Methods: The spectral CT scanner (IQon Spectral CT, Philips Healthcare) is equipped with a dual-layer detector and generates conventional 80-140 kVp images and variety of spectral reconstructions, e.g., virtual monochromatic (VM) images, virtual non-contrast (VNC) images, iodine maps, and effective atomic number (Z) images. A cylindrical solid water phantom (Gammex 472, 33 cm diameter and 5 cm thick) with iodine (2.0-20.0 mg I/ml) and calcium (50-600 mg/ml) rod inserts was scanned at 120 kVp and 27 mGy CTDIvol. Spectral reconstructions were evaluated by comparing image measurements with theoretical values calculated from nominal rod compositions provided by the phantom manufacturer. The theoretical VNC was calculated using water and iodine basis material decomposition, and the theoretical Z was calculated using two common methods, the chemical formula method (Z1) and the dual-energy ratio method (Z2). Results: Beam-hardening-like artifacts between high-attenuation calcium rods (≥300 mg/ml, >800 HU) influenced quantitative measurements, so the quantitative analysis was only performed on iodine rods using the images from the scan with all the calcium rods removed. The CT numbers of the iodine rods in the VM images (50∼150 keV) were close to theoretical values with average difference of 2.4±6.9 HU. Compared with theoretical values, the average difference for iodine concentration, VNC CT number and effective Z of iodine rods were −0.10±0.38 mg/ml, −0.1±8.2 HU, 0.25±0.06 (Z1) and −0.23±0.07 (Z2). Conclusion: The results indicate that the spectral CT scanner generates quantitatively accurate spectral reconstructions at clinically relevant iodine concentrations. Beam-hardening-like artifacts still exist when high-attenuation objects are present and their impact on patient images needs further investigation. YY is an employee of Philips

  19. WE-FG-207B-12: Quantitative Evaluation of a Spectral CT Scanner in a Phantom Study: Results of Spectral Reconstructions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, X; Arbique, G; Guild, J; Anderson, J [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Yagil, Y [Philips Healthcare, Haifa (Israel)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the quantitative image quality of spectral reconstructions of phantom data from a spectral CT scanner. Methods: The spectral CT scanner (IQon Spectral CT, Philips Healthcare) is equipped with a dual-layer detector and generates conventional 80-140 kVp images and variety of spectral reconstructions, e.g., virtual monochromatic (VM) images, virtual non-contrast (VNC) images, iodine maps, and effective atomic number (Z) images. A cylindrical solid water phantom (Gammex 472, 33 cm diameter and 5 cm thick) with iodine (2.0-20.0 mg I/ml) and calcium (50-600 mg/ml) rod inserts was scanned at 120 kVp and 27 mGy CTDIvol. Spectral reconstructions were evaluated by comparing image measurements with theoretical values calculated from nominal rod compositions provided by the phantom manufacturer. The theoretical VNC was calculated using water and iodine basis material decomposition, and the theoretical Z was calculated using two common methods, the chemical formula method (Z1) and the dual-energy ratio method (Z2). Results: Beam-hardening-like artifacts between high-attenuation calcium rods (≥300 mg/ml, >800 HU) influenced quantitative measurements, so the quantitative analysis was only performed on iodine rods using the images from the scan with all the calcium rods removed. The CT numbers of the iodine rods in the VM images (50∼150 keV) were close to theoretical values with average difference of 2.4±6.9 HU. Compared with theoretical values, the average difference for iodine concentration, VNC CT number and effective Z of iodine rods were −0.10±0.38 mg/ml, −0.1±8.2 HU, 0.25±0.06 (Z1) and −0.23±0.07 (Z2). Conclusion: The results indicate that the spectral CT scanner generates quantitatively accurate spectral reconstructions at clinically relevant iodine concentrations. Beam-hardening-like artifacts still exist when high-attenuation objects are present and their impact on patient images needs further investigation. YY is an employee of Philips

  20. Comparison of air space measurement imaged by CT, small-animal CT, and hyperpolarized Xe MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madani, Aniseh; White, Steven; Santyr, Giles; Cunningham, Ian

    2005-04-01

    Lung disease is the third leading cause of death in the western world. Lung air volume measurements are thought to be early indicators of lung disease and markers in pharmaceutical research. The purpose of this work is to develop a lung phantom for assessing and comparing the quantitative accuracy of hyperpolarized xenon 129 magnetic resonance imaging (HP 129Xe MRI), conventional computed tomography (HRCT), and highresolution small-animal CTCT) in measuring lung gas volumes. We developed a lung phantom consisting of solid cellulose acetate spheres (1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 mm diameter) uniformly packed in circulated air or HP 129Xe gas. Air volume is estimated based on simple thresholding algorithm. Truth is calculated from the sphere diameters and validated using μCT. While this phantom is not anthropomorphic, it enables us to directly measure air space volume and compare these imaging methods as a function of sphere diameter for the first time. HP 129Xe MRI requires partial volume analysis to distinguish regions with and without 129Xe gas and results are within %5 of truth but settling of the heavy 129Xe gas complicates this analysis. Conventional CT demonstrated partial-volume artifacts for the 1mm spheres. μCT gives the most accurate air-volume results. Conventional CT and HP 129Xe MRI give similar results although non-uniform densities of 129Xe require more sophisticated algorithms than simple thresholding. The threshold required to give the true air volume in both HRCT and μCT, varies with sphere diameters calling into question the validity of thresholding method.

  1. Effect of CT scanning parameters on volumetric measurements of pulmonary nodules by 3D active contour segmentation: a phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Way, Ted W; Chan, H-P; Goodsitt, Mitchell M; Sahiner, Berkman; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M; Zhou Chuan; Chughtai, Aamer

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of CT scanning and reconstruction parameters on automated segmentation and volumetric measurements of nodules in CT images. Phantom nodules of known sizes were used so that segmentation accuracy could be quantified in comparison to ground-truth volumes. Spherical nodules having 4.8, 9.5 and 16 mm diameters and 50 and 100 mg cc -1 calcium contents were embedded in lung-tissue-simulating foam which was inserted in the thoracic cavity of a chest section phantom. CT scans of the phantom were acquired with a 16-slice scanner at various tube currents, pitches, fields-of-view and slice thicknesses. Scans were also taken using identical techniques either within the same day or five months apart for study of reproducibility. The phantom nodules were segmented with a three-dimensional active contour (3DAC) model that we previously developed for use on patient nodules. The percentage volume errors relative to the ground-truth volumes were estimated under the various imaging conditions. There was no statistically significant difference in volume error for repeated CT scans or scans taken with techniques where only pitch, field of view, or tube current (mA) were changed. However, the slice thickness significantly (p < 0.05) affected the volume error. Therefore, to evaluate nodule growth, consistent imaging conditions and high resolution should be used for acquisition of the serial CT scans, especially for smaller nodules. Understanding the effects of scanning and reconstruction parameters on volume measurements by 3DAC allows better interpretation of data and assessment of growth. Tracking nodule growth with computerized segmentation methods would reduce inter- and intraobserver variabilities

  2. Usefulness of CT based SPECT Fusion Image in the lung Disease : Preliminary Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Hoon Hee; Lyu, Kwang Yeul; Kim, Tae Hyung; Shin, Ji Yun

    2012-01-01

    Recently, SPECT/CT system has been applied to many diseases, however, the application is not extensively applied at pulmonary disease. Especially, in case that, the pulmonary embolisms suspect at the CT images, SPECT is performed. For the accurate diagnosis, SPECT/CT tests are subsequently undergoing. However, without SPECT/CT, there are some limitations to apply these procedures. With SPECT/CT, although, most of the examination performed after CT. Moreover, such a test procedures generate unnecessary dual irradiation problem to the patient. In this study, we evaluated the amount of unnecessary irradiation, and the usefulness of fusion images of pulmonary disease, which independently acquired from SPECT and CT. Using NEMA PhantomTM (NU2-2001), SPECT and CT scan were performed for fusion images. From June 2011 to September 2010, 10 patients who didn't have other personal history, except lung disease were selected (male: 7, female: 3, mean age: 65.3±12.7). In both clinical patient and phantom data, the fusion images scored higher than SPECT and CT images. The fusion images, which is combined with pulmonary vessel images from CT and functional images from SPECT, can increase the detection possibility in detecting pulmonary embolism in the resin of lung parenchyma. It is sure that performing SPECT and CT in integral SPECT/CT system were better. However, we believe this protocol can give more informative data to have more accurate diagnosis in the hospital without integral SPECT/CT system.

  3. SU-E-I-83: Error Analysis of Multi-Modality Image-Based Volumes of Rodent Solid Tumors Using a Preclinical Multi-Modality QA Phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Y [University of Kansas Hospital, Kansas City, KS (United States); Fullerton, G; Goins, B [University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In our previous study a preclinical multi-modality quality assurance (QA) phantom that contains five tumor-simulating test objects with 2, 4, 7, 10 and 14 mm diameters was developed for accurate tumor size measurement by researchers during cancer drug development and testing. This study analyzed the errors during tumor volume measurement from preclinical magnetic resonance (MR), micro-computed tomography (micro- CT) and ultrasound (US) images acquired in a rodent tumor model using the preclinical multi-modality QA phantom. Methods: Using preclinical 7-Tesla MR, US and micro-CT scanners, images were acquired of subcutaneous SCC4 tumor xenografts in nude rats (3–4 rats per group; 5 groups) along with the QA phantom using the same imaging protocols. After tumors were excised, in-air micro-CT imaging was performed to determine reference tumor volume. Volumes measured for the rat tumors and phantom test objects were calculated using formula V = (π/6)*a*b*c where a, b and c are the maximum diameters in three perpendicular dimensions determined by the three imaging modalities. Then linear regression analysis was performed to compare image-based tumor volumes with the reference tumor volume and known test object volume for the rats and the phantom respectively. Results: The slopes of regression lines for in-vivo tumor volumes measured by three imaging modalities were 1.021, 1.101 and 0.862 for MRI, micro-CT and US respectively. For phantom, the slopes were 0.9485, 0.9971 and 0.9734 for MRI, micro-CT and US respectively. Conclusion: For both animal and phantom studies, random and systematic errors were observed. Random errors were observer-dependent and systematic errors were mainly due to selected imaging protocols and/or measurement method. In the animal study, there were additional systematic errors attributed to ellipsoidal assumption for tumor shape. The systematic errors measured using the QA phantom need to be taken into account to reduce measurement

  4. Variation in the quality of CT images of the upper abdomen when CT automatic exposure control is employed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aizawa, Isao; Muramatsu, Yoshihisa; Nomura, Keiichi; Shimizu, Fuminori

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the reason for variation of image quality in the upper abdomen CT with the use of CT-automatic exposure control (AEC). The CT investigated was 3D modulation in the 16 multi detector row CT (MDCT) and lung cancer screening CT (LSCT) phantom was used to simulate the patient. When there was a phase difference, an image noise increase of around 15% at the maximum was accepted. It is concluded that the major reason for variation in image quality is respiratory motion and the importance of respiration control must be recognized. (author)

  5. Optimization for PET imaging based on phantom study and NECdensity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daisaki, Hiromitsu; Shimada, Naoki; Shinohara, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    In consideration of the requirement for global standardization and quality control of PET imaging, the present studies gave an outline of phantom study to decide both scan and reconstruction parameters based on FDG-PET/CT procedure guideline in Japan, and optimization of scan duration based on NEC density was performed continuously. In the phantom study, scan and reconstruction parameters were decided by visual assessment and physical indexes (N 10mm , NEC phantom , Q H,10mm /N 10mm ) to visualize hot spot of 10 mm diameter with standardized uptake value (SUV)=4 explicitly. Simultaneously, Recovery Coefficient (RC) was evaluated to recognize that PET images had enough quantifiably. Scan durations were optimized by Body Mass Index (BMI) based on retrospective analysis of NEC density . Correlation between visual score in clinical FDG-PET images and NEC density fell after the optimization of scan duration. Both Inter-institution and inter-patient variability were decreased by performing the phantom study based on the procedure guideline and the optimization of scan duration based on NEC density which seem finally useful to practice highly precise examination and promote high-quality controlled study. (author)

  6. Calibration of lung counter using a CT model of Torso phantom and Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Binquan; Ma Jizeng; Yang Duanjie; Liu Liye; Cheng Jianping

    2006-01-01

    Tomography image of a Torso phantom was obtained from CT-Scan. The Torso phantom represents the trunk of an adult man that is 170 cm high and weight of 65 kg. After these images were segmented, cropped, and resized, a 3-dimension voxel phantom was created. The voxel phantom includes more than 2 million voxels, which size was 2.73 mm x 2.73 mm x 3 mm. This model could be used for the calibration of lung counter with Monte Carlo method. On the assumption that radioactive material was homogeneously distributed throughout the lung, counting efficiencies of a HPGe detector in different positions were calculated as Adipose Mass fraction (AMF) was different in the soft tissue in chest. The results showed that counting efficiencies of the lung counter changed up to 67% for 17.5 keV γ ray and 20% for 25 keV γ ray when AMF changed from 0 to 40%. (authors)

  7. Influence of density and mean atomic number on CT attenuation corrected PET: Phantom studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maintas, D.; Houzard, C.; Galy, G.; Maintas, C.; Itti, R.; Cachin, F.; Mognetti, Th.; Slosman

    2007-01-01

    Aim: the aim of this work is to study the influence of medium density on the CT or external source attenuation corrected images, by simulation on a phantom, with various positron emission tomographs. Material and method: a series of experiments on a cylindrical phantom filled with water marked with [18 F]-FDG, containing six vials filled per pair with mediums of different densities or solutions of KI, CaCl 2 and saccharose with various densities, was carried out under comparable conditions on three different tomographs. In only one of the vials of each pair, an identical radioactivity of [18 F]-FDG was added, three to five fold the surrounding activity. The reconstructions and attenuation corrections suggested by the manufacturers, were carried out under the usual conditions of each site. The activity of each structure was estimated by the methods of profiles and regions of interest, on the non attenuation corrected images (N.A.C.), the images corrected by CT (C.T.A.C.), and/or external source (G.P.A.C.). Results: with all three tomographs, the activities estimated on the N.A.C. images present an inverse correlation to the medium density (important absorption by dense material). On C.T.A.C. images, we observed with only two of the three tomographs, an overestimation of the activity in the 'radioactive' vials, depending on the medium mean Z number and density (over correction), and a artifactual 'activity' in the denser 'cold' vial (incorrect attenuation correction. The dense saccharose solutions, with non elevated Z number, do not affect the CT attenuation correction. (authors)

  8. Development of an Anthropomorphic Breast Phantom for Combined PET, B-Mode Ultrasound and Elastographic Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Jun; Frisch, Benjamin; Lasaygues, Philippe; Zhang, Dachun; Tavernier, Stefaan; Felix, Nicolas; Lecoq, Paul; Auffray, Etiennette; Varela, Joao; Mensah, Serge; Wan, Mingxi

    2011-06-01

    Combining the advantages of different imaging modalities leads to improved clinical results. For example, ultrasound provides good real-time structural information without any radiation and PET provides sensitive functional information. For the ongoing ClearPEM-Sonic project combining ultrasound and PET for breast imaging, we developed a dual-modality PET/Ultrasound (US) phantom. The phantom reproduces the acoustic and elastic properties of human breast tissue and allows labeling the different tissues in the phantom with different concentrations of FDG. The phantom was imaged with a whole-body PET/CT and with the Supersonic Imagine Aixplorer system. This system allows both B-mode US and shear wave elastographic imaging. US elastography is a new imaging method for displaying the tissue elasticity distribution. It was shown to be useful in breast imaging. We also tested the phantom with static elastography. A 6D magnetic positioning system allows fusing the images obtained with the two modalities. ClearPEM-Sonic is a project of the Crystal Clear Collaboration and the European Centre for Research on Medical Imaging (CERIMED).

  9. SU-G-206-05: A Comparison of Head Phantoms Used for Dose Determination in Imaging Procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiong, Z; Vijayan, S; Kilian-Meneghin, J; Rudin, S; Bednarek, D [Toshiba Stroke and Vascular Research Center, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To determine similarities and differences between various head phantoms that might be used for dose measurements in diagnostic imaging procedures. Methods: We chose four frequently used anthropomorphic head phantoms (SK-150, PBU-50, RS-240T and Alderson Rando), a computational patient phantom (Zubal) and the CTDI head phantom for comparison in our study. We did a CT scan of the head phantoms using the same protocol and compared their dimensions and CT numbers. The scan data was used to calculate dose values for each of the phantoms using EGSnrc Monte Carlo software. An .egsphant file was constructed to describe these phantoms using a Visual C++ program for DOSXYZnrc/EGSnrc simulation. The lens dose was calculated for a simulated CBCT scan using DOSXYZnrc/EGSnrc and the calculated doses were validated with measurements using Gafchromic film and an ionization chamber. Similar calculations and measurements were made for PA radiography to investigate the attenuation and backscatter differences between these phantoms. We used the Zubal phantom as the standard for comparison since it was developed based on a CT scan of a patient. Results: The lens dose for the Alderson Rando phantom is around 9% different than the Zubal phantom, while the lens dose for the PBU-50 phantom was about 50% higher, possibly because its skull thickness and the density of bone and soft tissue are lower than anthropometric values. The lens dose for the CTDI phantom is about 500% higher because of its totally different structure. The entrance dose profiles are similar for the five anthropomorphic phantoms, while that for the CTDI phantom was distinctly different. Conclusion: The CTDI and PBU-50 head phantoms have substantially larger lens dose estimates in CBCT. The other four head phantoms have similar entrance dose with backscatter hence should be preferred for dose measurement in imaging procedures of the head. Partial support from NIH Grant R01-EB002873 and Toshiba Medical Systems

  10. Gated CT imaging using a free-breathing respiration signal from flow-volume spirometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Souza, Warren D.; Kwok, Young; Deyoung, Chad; Zacharapoulos, Nicholas; Pepelea, Mark; Klahr, Paul; Yu, Cedric X.

    2005-01-01

    Respiration-induced tumor motion is known to cause artifacts on free-breathing spiral CT images used in treatment planning. This leads to inaccurate delineation of target volumes on planning CT images. Flow-volume spirometry has been used previously for breath-holds during CT scans and radiation treatments using the active breathing control (ABC) system. We have developed a prototype by extending the flow-volume spirometer device to obtain gated CT scans using a PQ 5000 single-slice CT scanner. To test our prototype, we designed motion phantoms to compare image quality obtained with and without gated CT scan acquisition. Spiral and axial (nongated and gated) CT scans were obtained of phantoms with motion periods of 3-5 s and amplitudes of 0.5-2 cm. Errors observed in the volume estimate of these structures were as much as 30% with moving phantoms during CT simulation. Application of motion-gated CT with active breathing control reduced these errors to within 5%. Motion-gated CT was then implemented in patients and the results are presented for two clinical cases: lung and abdomen. In each case, gated scans were acquired at end-inhalation, end-exhalation in addition to a conventional free-breathing (nongated) scan. The gated CT scans revealed reduced artifacts compared with the conventional free-breathing scan. Differences of up to 20% in the volume of the structures were observed between gated and free-breathing scans. A comparison of the overlap of structures between the gated and free-breathing scans revealed misalignment of the structures. These results demonstrate the ability of flow-volume spirometry to reduce errors in target volumes via gating during CT imaging

  11. A study of parameters in spiral CT volumetry using balloon phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hak Jong; Han, Joon Koo

    2001-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of threshold values, reconstruction interval, slice thickness and table speed on the spiral CT volumetry. Two phantoms made of a balloon and diluted contrast media underwent spiral CT scanning with section thicknesses of 5, 7 and 10 mm and table speeds of 5, 8 and 10 mm with scans of 5 mm section thickness, 7, 10, and 14 mm with scans of 7 mm section thickness, and 10, 15, and 20 mm with scans of 10 mm section thickness. The volumetric values of phantom A and B were obtained at varying threshold values and a reconstruction interval of 5 and 10 mm for all scans. Volumes were also determined with the threshold value fixed and a reconstruction interval of 1, 5, 7 and 10 mm, respectively. Three-dimensional display and volumetric measurements were obtained using reconstructed images. The effects of threshold value, reconstruction interval, slice thickness and table speed on volumetry were analyzed. Volumetric values varied according to threshold values. Where a threshold value was low, value increased as pitch increased, but where a the threshold value was high, value decreased as pitch increased. With varying threshold values, measurement errors in CT volumetry were 1.6 to 9.0%. Volume decreased as reconstruction interval increased. Where the table speed/ slice thickness ratio was constant, volume was constant though slice thickness differed. At fixed threshold values, variation in the reconstruction interval was statistically more significant than variation in slice thickness or table speed (p<0.05, Kruskal-Wallis one-way ANOVA). Among serveral spiral scanning and image reconstruction parameters including threshold value, reconstruction interval, slice thickness, and table speed, threshold value most affected the result obtained. At fixed threshold values, the reconstruction interval used had more effect on CT volumetry than other parameters

  12. Radiation dose reduction for CT lung cancer screening using ASIR and MBIR: a phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieu, Kelsey B; Ai, Hua; Fox, Patricia S; Godoy, Myrna Cobos Barco; Munden, Reginald F; de Groot, Patricia M; Pan, Tinsu

    2014-03-06

    The purpose of this study was to reduce the radiation dosage associated with computed tomography (CT) lung cancer screening while maintaining overall diagnostic image quality and definition of ground-glass opacities (GGOs). A lung screening phantom and a multipurpose chest phantom were used to quantitatively assess the performance of two iterative image reconstruction algorithms (adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) and model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR)) used in conjunction with reduced tube currents relative to a standard clinical lung cancer screening protocol (51 effective mAs (3.9 mGy) and filtered back-projection (FBP) reconstruction). To further assess the algorithms' performances, qualitative image analysis was conducted (in the form of a reader study) using the multipurpose chest phantom, which was implanted with GGOs of two densities. Our quantitative image analysis indicated that tube current, and thus radiation dose, could be reduced by 40% or 80% from ASIR or MBIR, respectively, compared with conventional FBP, while maintaining similar image noise magnitude and contrast-to-noise ratio. The qualitative portion of our study, which assessed reader preference, yielded similar results, indicating that dose could be reduced by 60% (to 20 effective mAs (1.6 mGy)) with either ASIR or MBIR, while maintaining GGO definition. Additionally, the readers' preferences (as indicated by their ratings) regarding overall image quality were equal or better (for a given dose) when using ASIR or MBIR, compared with FBP. In conclusion, combining ASIR or MBIR with reduced tube current may allow for lower doses while maintaining overall diagnostic image quality, as well as GGO definition, during CT lung cancer screening.

  13. Quality assurance of CT-PET alignment and image registration for radiation treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong, S.J.; O'Keefe, G.J.; Gunawardana, D.H.

    2005-01-01

    A multi-layer point source phantom was first used to calibrate and verify the CT-PET system alignment. A partial whole-body Aldcrson RANDO Man Phantom (head through mid-femur) was externally and internally marked with small metal cannulas filled with 18F-FDG and then scanned with both modalities. Six series of phantom studies with different acquisition settings and scan positions were performed to reveal possible system bias and evaluate the accuracy and reliabilities of Philips Syntegra program in image alignment, coregistration and fusion. The registration error was assessed quantitatively by measuring the root-mean-square distance between the iso-centers of corresponding fiducial marker geometries in reference CT volumes and transformed CT or PET volumes. Results: Experimental data confirms the accuracy of manual, parameter, point and image-based registration using Syntegra is better than 2 mm. Comparisons between blind and cross definition of iso-centers of fiducial marks indicate that the fused CT and PET is superior to visual correlation of CT and PET side-by-side. Conclusion: In this work we demonstrate the QA procedures of Gemini image alignment and registration. Syntegra produces intrinsic and robust multi-modality image registration and fusion with careful user interaction. The registration accuracy is generally better than the spatial resolution of the PET scanner used and this appears to be sufficient for most RTP CT-PET registration procedures

  14. Objective image characterization of a spectral CT scanner with dual-layer detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozguner, Orhan; Dhanantwari, Amar; Halliburton, Sandra; Wen, Gezheng; Utrup, Steven; Jordan, David

    2018-01-01

    This work evaluated the performance of a detector-based spectral CT system by obtaining objective reference data, evaluating attenuation response of iodine and accuracy of iodine quantification, and comparing conventional CT and virtual monoenergetic images in three common phantoms. Scanning was performed using the hospital’s clinical adult body protocol. Modulation transfer function (MTF) was calculated for a tungsten wire and visual line pair targets were evaluated. Image noise power spectrum (NPS) and pixel standard deviation were calculated. MTF for monoenergetic images agreed with conventional images within 0.05 lp cm-1. NPS curves indicated that noise texture of 70 keV monoenergetic images is similar to conventional images. Standard deviation measurements showed monoenergetic images have lower noise except at 40 keV. Mean CT number and CNR agreed with conventional images at 75 keV. Measured iodine concentration agreed with true concentration within 6% for inserts at the center of the phantom. Performance of monoenergetic images at detector based spectral CT is the same as, or better than, that of conventional images. Spectral acquisition and reconstruction with a detector based platform represents the physical behaviour of iodine as expected and accurately quantifies the material concentration.

  15. TU-AB-202-02: Deformable Image Registration Accuracy Between External Beam Radiotherapy and HDR Brachytherapy CT Images for Cervical Cancer Using a 3D-Printed Deformable Pelvis Phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyasaka, Y; Kadoya, N; Ito, K; Chiba, M; Nakajima, Y; Dobashi, S; Takeda, K; Jingu, K; Kuroda, Y; Sato, K

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Accurate deformable image registration (DIR) between external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and HDR brachytherapy (BT) CT images in cervical cancer is challenging. DSC has been evaluated only on the basis of the consistency of the structure, and its use does not guarantee an anatomically reasonable deformation. We evaluate the DIR accuracy for cervical cancer with DSC and anatomical landmarks using a 3D-printed pelvis phantom. Methods: A 3D-printed, deformable female pelvis phantom was created on the basis of the patient’s CT image. Urethane and silicon were used as materials for creating the uterus and bladder, respectively, in the phantom. We performed DIR in two cases: case-A with a full bladder (170 ml) in both the EBRT and BT images and case-B with a full bladder in the BT image and a half bladder (100 ml) in the EBRT image. DIR was evaluated using DSCs and 70 uterus and bladder landmarks. A Hybrid intensity and structure DIR algorithm with two settings (RayStation) was used. Results: In the case-A, DSCs of the intensity-based DIR were 0.93 and 0.85 for the bladder and uterus, respectively, whereas those of hybrid-DIR were 0.98 and 0.96, respectively. The mean landmark error values of intensity-based DIR were 0.73±0.29 and 1.70±0.19 cm for the bladder and uterus, respectively, whereas those of Hybrid-DIR were 0.43±0.33 and 1.23±0.25 cm, respectively. In both cases, the Hybrid-DIR accuracy was better than the intensity-based DIR accuracy for both evaluation methods. However, for several bladder landmarks, the Hybrid-DIR landmark errors were larger than the corresponding intensity-based DIR errors (e.g., 2.26 vs 1.25 cm). Conclusion: Our results demonstrate that Hybrid-DIR can perform with a better accuracy than the intensity-based DIR for both DSC and landmark errors; however, Hybrid-DIR shows a larger landmark error for some landmarks because the technique focuses on both the structure and intensity.

  16. TU-AB-202-02: Deformable Image Registration Accuracy Between External Beam Radiotherapy and HDR Brachytherapy CT Images for Cervical Cancer Using a 3D-Printed Deformable Pelvis Phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyasaka, Y; Kadoya, N; Ito, K; Chiba, M; Nakajima, Y; Dobashi, S; Takeda, K; Jingu, K [Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai, Miyagi (Japan); Kuroda, Y [Cybermedia Center, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka (Japan); Sato, K [Tohoku University Hospital, Sendai, Miyagi (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Accurate deformable image registration (DIR) between external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and HDR brachytherapy (BT) CT images in cervical cancer is challenging. DSC has been evaluated only on the basis of the consistency of the structure, and its use does not guarantee an anatomically reasonable deformation. We evaluate the DIR accuracy for cervical cancer with DSC and anatomical landmarks using a 3D-printed pelvis phantom. Methods: A 3D-printed, deformable female pelvis phantom was created on the basis of the patient’s CT image. Urethane and silicon were used as materials for creating the uterus and bladder, respectively, in the phantom. We performed DIR in two cases: case-A with a full bladder (170 ml) in both the EBRT and BT images and case-B with a full bladder in the BT image and a half bladder (100 ml) in the EBRT image. DIR was evaluated using DSCs and 70 uterus and bladder landmarks. A Hybrid intensity and structure DIR algorithm with two settings (RayStation) was used. Results: In the case-A, DSCs of the intensity-based DIR were 0.93 and 0.85 for the bladder and uterus, respectively, whereas those of hybrid-DIR were 0.98 and 0.96, respectively. The mean landmark error values of intensity-based DIR were 0.73±0.29 and 1.70±0.19 cm for the bladder and uterus, respectively, whereas those of Hybrid-DIR were 0.43±0.33 and 1.23±0.25 cm, respectively. In both cases, the Hybrid-DIR accuracy was better than the intensity-based DIR accuracy for both evaluation methods. However, for several bladder landmarks, the Hybrid-DIR landmark errors were larger than the corresponding intensity-based DIR errors (e.g., 2.26 vs 1.25 cm). Conclusion: Our results demonstrate that Hybrid-DIR can perform with a better accuracy than the intensity-based DIR for both DSC and landmark errors; however, Hybrid-DIR shows a larger landmark error for some landmarks because the technique focuses on both the structure and intensity.

  17. Evaluation of radiation dose in pediatric head CT examination: a phantom study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norhasrina Nik Din, Nik; Zainon, Rafidah; Rahman, Ahmad Taufek Abdul

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the radiation dose in pediatric head Computed Tomography examination. It was reported that decreasing tube voltage in CT examination can reduce the dose to patients significantly. A head phantom was scanned with dual-energy CT at 80 kV and 120 kV. The tube current was set using automatic exposure control mode and manual setting. The pitch was adjusted to 1.4, 1.45 and 1.5 while the slice thickness was set at 5 mm. The dose was measured based on CT Dose Index (CTDI). Results from this study have shown that the image noise increases substantially with low tube voltage. The average dose was 2.60 mGy at CT imaging parameters of 80 kV and 10 - 30 mAs. The dose increases up to 17.19 mGy when the CT tube voltage increases to 120 kV. With the reduction of tube voltage from 120 kV to 80 kV, the radiation dose can be reduced by 12.1% to 15.1% without degradation of contrast-to-noise ratio.

  18. Optimization of CT image reconstruction algorithms for the lung tissue research consortium (LTRC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCollough, Cynthia; Zhang, Jie; Bruesewitz, Michael; Bartholmai, Brian

    2006-03-01

    To create a repository of clinical data, CT images and tissue samples and to more clearly understand the pathogenetic features of pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) launched a cooperative effort known as the Lung Tissue Resource Consortium (LTRC). The CT images for the LTRC effort must contain accurate CT numbers in order to characterize tissues, and must have high-spatial resolution to show fine anatomic structures. This study was performed to optimize the CT image reconstruction algorithms to achieve these criteria. Quantitative analyses of phantom and clinical images were conducted. The ACR CT accreditation phantom containing five regions of distinct CT attenuations (CT numbers of approximately -1000 HU, -80 HU, 0 HU, 130 HU and 900 HU), and a high-contrast spatial resolution test pattern, was scanned using CT systems from two manufacturers (General Electric (GE) Healthcare and Siemens Medical Solutions). Phantom images were reconstructed using all relevant reconstruction algorithms. Mean CT numbers and image noise (standard deviation) were measured and compared for the five materials. Clinical high-resolution chest CT images acquired on a GE CT system for a patient with diffuse lung disease were reconstructed using BONE and STANDARD algorithms and evaluated by a thoracic radiologist in terms of image quality and disease extent. The clinical BONE images were processed with a 3 x 3 x 3 median filter to simulate a thicker slice reconstructed in smoother algorithms, which have traditionally been proven to provide an accurate estimation of emphysema extent in the lungs. Using a threshold technique, the volume of emphysema (defined as the percentage of lung voxels having a CT number lower than -950 HU) was computed for the STANDARD, BONE, and BONE filtered. The CT numbers measured in the ACR CT Phantom images were accurate for all reconstruction kernels for both manufacturers. As expected, visual evaluation of the

  19. Accuracy of deformable image registration on magnetic resonance images in digital and physical phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ger, Rachel B; Yang, Jinzhong; Ding, Yao; Jacobsen, Megan C; Fuller, Clifton D; Howell, Rebecca M; Li, Heng; Jason Stafford, R; Zhou, Shouhao; Court, Laurence E

    2017-10-01

    Accurate deformable image registration is necessary for longitudinal studies. The error associated with commercial systems has been evaluated using computed tomography (CT). Several in-house algorithms have been evaluated for use with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), but there is still relatively little information about MRI deformable image registration. This work presents an evaluation of two deformable image registration systems, one commercial (Velocity) and one in-house (demons-based algorithm), with MRI using two different metrics to quantify the registration error. The registration error was analyzed with synthetic MR images. These images were generated from interpatient and intrapatient variation models trained on 28 patients. Four synthetic post-treatment images were generated for each of four synthetic pretreatment images, resulting in 16 image registrations for both the T1- and T2-weighted images. The synthetic post-treatment images were registered to their corresponding synthetic pretreatment image. The registration error was calculated between the known deformation vector field and the generated deformation vector field from the image registration system. The registration error was also analyzed using a porcine phantom with ten implanted 0.35-mm diameter gold markers. The markers were visible on CT but not MRI. CT, T1-weighted MR, and T2-weighted MR images were taken in four different positions. The markers were contoured on the CT images and rigidly registered to their corresponding MR images. The MR images were deformably registered and the distance between the projected marker location and true marker location was measured as the registration error. The synthetic images were evaluated only on Velocity. Root mean square errors (RMSEs) of 0.76 mm in the left-right (LR) direction, 0.76 mm in the anteroposterior (AP) direction, and 0.69 mm in the superior-inferior (SI) direction were observed for the T1-weighted MR images. RMSEs of 1.1 mm in the LR

  20. Quantum noise properties of CT images with anatomical textured backgrounds across reconstruction algorithms: FBP and SAFIRE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solomon, Justin, E-mail: justin.solomon@duke.edu [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Samei, Ehsan [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Departments of Biomedical Engineering and Electrical and Computer Engineering, Pratt School of Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: Quantum noise properties of CT images are generally assessed using simple geometric phantoms with uniform backgrounds. Such phantoms may be inadequate when assessing nonlinear reconstruction or postprocessing algorithms. The purpose of this study was to design anatomically informed textured phantoms and use the phantoms to assess quantum noise properties across two clinically available reconstruction algorithms, filtered back projection (FBP) and sinogram affirmed iterative reconstruction (SAFIRE). Methods: Two phantoms were designed to represent lung and soft-tissue textures. The lung phantom included intricate vessel-like structures along with embedded nodules (spherical, lobulated, and spiculated). The soft tissue phantom was designed based on a three-dimensional clustered lumpy background with included low-contrast lesions (spherical and anthropomorphic). The phantoms were built using rapid prototyping (3D printing) technology and, along with a uniform phantom of similar size, were imaged on a Siemens SOMATOM Definition Flash CT scanner and reconstructed with FBP and SAFIRE. Fifty repeated acquisitions were acquired for each background type and noise was assessed by estimating pixel-value statistics, such as standard deviation (i.e., noise magnitude), autocorrelation, and noise power spectrum. Noise stationarity was also assessed by examining the spatial distribution of noise magnitude. The noise properties were compared across background types and between the two reconstruction algorithms. Results: In FBP and SAFIRE images, noise was globally nonstationary for all phantoms. In FBP images of all phantoms, and in SAFIRE images of the uniform phantom, noise appeared to be locally stationary (within a reasonably small region of interest). Noise was locally nonstationary in SAFIRE images of the textured phantoms with edge pixels showing higher noise magnitude compared to pixels in more homogenous regions. For pixels in uniform regions, noise magnitude was

  1. Quantum noise properties of CT images with anatomical textured backgrounds across reconstruction algorithms: FBP and SAFIRE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solomon, Justin; Samei, Ehsan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Quantum noise properties of CT images are generally assessed using simple geometric phantoms with uniform backgrounds. Such phantoms may be inadequate when assessing nonlinear reconstruction or postprocessing algorithms. The purpose of this study was to design anatomically informed textured phantoms and use the phantoms to assess quantum noise properties across two clinically available reconstruction algorithms, filtered back projection (FBP) and sinogram affirmed iterative reconstruction (SAFIRE). Methods: Two phantoms were designed to represent lung and soft-tissue textures. The lung phantom included intricate vessel-like structures along with embedded nodules (spherical, lobulated, and spiculated). The soft tissue phantom was designed based on a three-dimensional clustered lumpy background with included low-contrast lesions (spherical and anthropomorphic). The phantoms were built using rapid prototyping (3D printing) technology and, along with a uniform phantom of similar size, were imaged on a Siemens SOMATOM Definition Flash CT scanner and reconstructed with FBP and SAFIRE. Fifty repeated acquisitions were acquired for each background type and noise was assessed by estimating pixel-value statistics, such as standard deviation (i.e., noise magnitude), autocorrelation, and noise power spectrum. Noise stationarity was also assessed by examining the spatial distribution of noise magnitude. The noise properties were compared across background types and between the two reconstruction algorithms. Results: In FBP and SAFIRE images, noise was globally nonstationary for all phantoms. In FBP images of all phantoms, and in SAFIRE images of the uniform phantom, noise appeared to be locally stationary (within a reasonably small region of interest). Noise was locally nonstationary in SAFIRE images of the textured phantoms with edge pixels showing higher noise magnitude compared to pixels in more homogenous regions. For pixels in uniform regions, noise magnitude was

  2. SU-E-J-115: Correlation of Displacement Vector Fields Calculated by Deformable Image Registration Algorithms with Motion Parameters of CT Images with Well-Defined Targets and Controlled-Motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaskowiak, J; Ahmad, S; Ali, I [University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Alsbou, N [Ohio Northern University, Ada, OH (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate correlation of displacement vector fields (DVF) calculated by deformable image registration algorithms with motion parameters in helical axial and cone-beam CT images with motion artifacts. Methods: A mobile thorax phantom with well-known targets with different sizes that were made from water-equivalent material and inserted in foam to simulate lung lesions. The thorax phantom was imaged with helical, axial and cone-beam CT. The phantom was moved with a cyclic motion with different motion amplitudes and frequencies along the superior-inferior direction. Different deformable image registration algorithms including demons, fast demons, Horn-Shunck and iterative-optical-flow from the DIRART software were used to deform CT images for the phantom with different motion patterns. The CT images of the mobile phantom were deformed to CT images of the stationary phantom. Results: The values of displacement vectors calculated by deformable image registration algorithm correlated strongly with motion amplitude where large displacement vectors were calculated for CT images with large motion amplitudes. For example, the maximal displacement vectors were nearly equal to the motion amplitudes (5mm, 10mm or 20mm) at interfaces between the mobile targets lung tissue, while the minimal displacement vectors were nearly equal to negative the motion amplitudes. The maximal and minimal displacement vectors matched with edges of the blurred targets along the Z-axis (motion-direction), while DVF’s were small in the other directions. This indicates that the blurred edges by phantom motion were shifted largely to match with the actual target edge. These shifts were nearly equal to the motion amplitude. Conclusions: The DVF from deformable-image registration algorithms correlated well with motion amplitude of well-defined mobile targets. This can be used to extract motion parameters such as amplitude. However, as motion amplitudes increased, image artifacts increased

  3. A study of the short- to long-phantom dose ratios for CT scanning without table translation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xinhua; Zhang, Da; Liu, Bob, E-mail: bliu7@mgh.harvard.edu [Division of Diagnostic Imaging Physics, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 and Webster Center for Advanced Research and Education in Radiation, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States); Yang, Jie [Pinnacle Health - Fox Chase Regional Cancer Center, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 17109 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: For CT scanning in the stationary-table modes, AAPM Task Group 111 proposed to measure the midpoint dose on the central and peripheral axes of sufficiently long phantoms. Currently, a long cylindrical phantom is usually not available in many clinical facilities. The use of a long phantom is also challenging because of the heavy weight. In order to shed light on assessing the midpoint dose in CT scanning without table movement, the authors present a study of the short- to long-phantom dose ratios, and perform a cross-comparison of CT dose ratios on different scanner models. Methods: The authors performed Geant4-based Monte Carlo simulations with a clinical CT scanner (Somatom Definition dual source CT, Siemens Healthcare), and modeled dosimetry measurements using a 0.6 cm{sup 3} Farmer type chamber and a 10-cm long pencil ion chamber. The short (15 cm) to long (90 cm) phantom dose ratios were computed for two PMMA diameters (16 and 32 cm), two phantom axes (the center and the periphery), and a range of beam apertures (3–25 cm). The results were compared with the published data of previous studies with other multiple detector CT (MDCT) scanners and cone beam CT (CBCT) scanners. Results: The short- to long-phantom dose ratios changed with beam apertures but were insensitive to beam qualities (80–140 kV, the head and body bowtie filters) and MDCT and CBCT scanner models. Conclusions: The short- to long-phantom dose ratios enable medical physicists to make dosimetry measurements using the standard CT dosimetry phantoms and a Farmer chamber or a 10 cm long pencil chamber, and to assess the midpoint dose in long phantoms. This method provides an effective approach for the dosimetry of CBCT scanning in the stationary-table modes, and is useful for perfusion and interventional CT.

  4. A study of the short- to long-phantom dose ratios for CT scanning without table translation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Xinhua; Zhang, Da; Liu, Bob; Yang, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: For CT scanning in the stationary-table modes, AAPM Task Group 111 proposed to measure the midpoint dose on the central and peripheral axes of sufficiently long phantoms. Currently, a long cylindrical phantom is usually not available in many clinical facilities. The use of a long phantom is also challenging because of the heavy weight. In order to shed light on assessing the midpoint dose in CT scanning without table movement, the authors present a study of the short- to long-phantom dose ratios, and perform a cross-comparison of CT dose ratios on different scanner models. Methods: The authors performed Geant4-based Monte Carlo simulations with a clinical CT scanner (Somatom Definition dual source CT, Siemens Healthcare), and modeled dosimetry measurements using a 0.6 cm 3 Farmer type chamber and a 10-cm long pencil ion chamber. The short (15 cm) to long (90 cm) phantom dose ratios were computed for two PMMA diameters (16 and 32 cm), two phantom axes (the center and the periphery), and a range of beam apertures (3–25 cm). The results were compared with the published data of previous studies with other multiple detector CT (MDCT) scanners and cone beam CT (CBCT) scanners. Results: The short- to long-phantom dose ratios changed with beam apertures but were insensitive to beam qualities (80–140 kV, the head and body bowtie filters) and MDCT and CBCT scanner models. Conclusions: The short- to long-phantom dose ratios enable medical physicists to make dosimetry measurements using the standard CT dosimetry phantoms and a Farmer chamber or a 10 cm long pencil chamber, and to assess the midpoint dose in long phantoms. This method provides an effective approach for the dosimetry of CBCT scanning in the stationary-table modes, and is useful for perfusion and interventional CT

  5. A phantom design for assessment of detectability in PET imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wollenweber, Scott D.; Alessio, Adam M.; Kinahan, Paul E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The primary clinical role of positron emission tomography (PET) imaging is the detection of anomalous regions of 18 F-FDG uptake, which are often indicative of malignant lesions. The goal of this work was to create a task-configurable fillable phantom for realistic measurements of detectability in PET imaging. Design goals included simplicity, adjustable feature size, realistic size and contrast levels, and inclusion of a lumpy (i.e., heterogeneous) background. Methods: The detection targets were hollow 3D-printed dodecahedral nylon features. The exostructure sphere-like features created voids in a background of small, solid non-porous plastic (acrylic) spheres inside a fillable tank. The features filled at full concentration while the background concentration was reduced due to filling only between the solid spheres. Results: Multiple iterations of feature size and phantom construction were used to determine a configuration at the limit of detectability for a PET/CT system. A full-scale design used a 20 cm uniform cylinder (head-size) filled with a fixed pattern of features at a contrast of approximately 3:1. Known signal-present and signal-absent PET sub-images were extracted from multiple scans of the same phantom and with detectability in a challenging (i.e., useful) range. These images enabled calculation and comparison of the quantitative observer detectability metrics between scanner designs and image reconstruction methods. The phantom design has several advantages including filling simplicity, wall-less contrast features, the control of the detectability range via feature size, and a clinically realistic lumpy background. Conclusions: This phantom provides a practical method for testing and comparison of lesion detectability as a function of imaging system, acquisition parameters, and image reconstruction methods and parameters.

  6. SU-E-I-89: Assessment of CT Radiation Dose and Image Quality for An Automated Tube Potential Selection Algorithm Using Pediatric Anthropomorphic and ACR Phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahmood, U; Erdi, Y; Wang, W [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, NY, NY (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of General Electrics automated tube potential algorithm, kV assist (kVa) on radiation dose and image quality, with an emphasis on optimizing protocols based on noise texture. Methods: Radiation dose was assessed by inserting optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLs) throughout the body of a pediatric anthropomorphic phantom (CIRS). The baseline protocol was: 120 kVp, 80 mA, 0.7s rotation time. Image quality was assessed by calculating the contrast to noise ratio (CNR) and noise power spectrum (NPS) from the ACR CT accreditation phantom. CNRs were calculated according to the steps described in ACR CT phantom testing document. NPS was determined by taking the 3D FFT of the uniformity section of the ACR phantom. NPS and CNR were evaluated with and without kVa and for all available adaptive iterative statistical reconstruction (ASiR) settings, ranging from 0 to 100%. Each NPS was also evaluated for its peak frequency difference (PFD) with respect to the baseline protocol. Results: For the baseline protocol, CNR was found to decrease from 0.460 ± 0.182 to 0.420 ± 0.057 when kVa was activated. When compared against the baseline protocol, the PFD at ASiR of 40% yielded a decrease in noise magnitude as realized by the increase in CNR = 0.620 ± 0.040. The liver dose decreased by 30% with kVa activation. Conclusion: Application of kVa reduces the liver dose up to 30%. However, reduction in image quality for abdominal scans occurs when using the automated tube voltage selection feature at the baseline protocol. As demonstrated by the CNR and NPS analysis, the texture and magnitude of the noise in reconstructed images at ASiR 40% was found to be the same as our baseline images. We have demonstrated that 30% dose reduction is possible when using 40% ASiR with kVa in pediatric patients.

  7. SU-E-I-89: Assessment of CT Radiation Dose and Image Quality for An Automated Tube Potential Selection Algorithm Using Pediatric Anthropomorphic and ACR Phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmood, U; Erdi, Y; Wang, W

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of General Electrics automated tube potential algorithm, kV assist (kVa) on radiation dose and image quality, with an emphasis on optimizing protocols based on noise texture. Methods: Radiation dose was assessed by inserting optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLs) throughout the body of a pediatric anthropomorphic phantom (CIRS). The baseline protocol was: 120 kVp, 80 mA, 0.7s rotation time. Image quality was assessed by calculating the contrast to noise ratio (CNR) and noise power spectrum (NPS) from the ACR CT accreditation phantom. CNRs were calculated according to the steps described in ACR CT phantom testing document. NPS was determined by taking the 3D FFT of the uniformity section of the ACR phantom. NPS and CNR were evaluated with and without kVa and for all available adaptive iterative statistical reconstruction (ASiR) settings, ranging from 0 to 100%. Each NPS was also evaluated for its peak frequency difference (PFD) with respect to the baseline protocol. Results: For the baseline protocol, CNR was found to decrease from 0.460 ± 0.182 to 0.420 ± 0.057 when kVa was activated. When compared against the baseline protocol, the PFD at ASiR of 40% yielded a decrease in noise magnitude as realized by the increase in CNR = 0.620 ± 0.040. The liver dose decreased by 30% with kVa activation. Conclusion: Application of kVa reduces the liver dose up to 30%. However, reduction in image quality for abdominal scans occurs when using the automated tube voltage selection feature at the baseline protocol. As demonstrated by the CNR and NPS analysis, the texture and magnitude of the noise in reconstructed images at ASiR 40% was found to be the same as our baseline images. We have demonstrated that 30% dose reduction is possible when using 40% ASiR with kVa in pediatric patients

  8. SU-F-J-214: Dose Reduction by Spatially Optimized Image Quality Via Fluence Modulated Proton CT (FMpCT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Angelis, L; Landry, G; Dedes, G; Parodi, K; Hansen, D; Rit, S; Belka, C

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Proton CT (pCT) is a promising imaging modality for reducing range uncertainty in image-guided proton therapy. Range uncertainties partially originate from X-ray CT number conversion to stopping power ratio (SPR) and are limiting the exploitation of the full potential of proton therapy. In this study we explore the concept of spatially dependent fluence modulated proton CT (FMpCT), for achieving optimal image quality in a clinical region of interest (ROI), while reducing significantly the imaging dose to the patient. Methods: The study was based on simulated ideal pCT using pencil beam (PB) scanning. A set of 250 MeV protons PBs was used to create 360 projections of a cylindrical water phantom and a head and neck cancer patient. The tomographic images were reconstructed using a filtered backprojection (FBP) as well as an iterative algorithm (ITR). Different fluence modulation levels were investigated and their impact on the image was quantified in terms of SPR accuracy as well as noise within and outside selected ROIs, as a function of imaging dose. The unmodulated image served as reference. Results: Both FBP reconstruction and ITR without total variation (TV) yielded image quality in the ROIs similar to the reference images, for modulation down to 0.1 of the full proton fluence. The average dose was reduced by 75% for the water phantom and by 40% for the patient. FMpCT does not improve the noise for ITR with TV and modulation 0.1. Conclusion: This is the first work proposing and investigating FMpCT for producing optimal image quality for treatment planning and image guidance, while simultaneously reducing imaging dose. Future work will address spatial resolution effects and the impact of FMpCT on the quality of proton treatment plans for a prototype pCT scanner capable of list mode data acquisition. Acknowledgement: DFG-MAP DFG - Munich-Centre for Advanced Photonics (MAP)

  9. SU-F-J-214: Dose Reduction by Spatially Optimized Image Quality Via Fluence Modulated Proton CT (FMpCT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Angelis, L; Landry, G; Dedes, G; Parodi, K [Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen (LMU Munich), Garching b. Muenchen (Germany); Hansen, D [Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Jutland (Denmark); Rit, S [University Lyon, Lyon, Auvergne-Rhone-Alpes (France); Belka, C [LMU Munich, Munich (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Proton CT (pCT) is a promising imaging modality for reducing range uncertainty in image-guided proton therapy. Range uncertainties partially originate from X-ray CT number conversion to stopping power ratio (SPR) and are limiting the exploitation of the full potential of proton therapy. In this study we explore the concept of spatially dependent fluence modulated proton CT (FMpCT), for achieving optimal image quality in a clinical region of interest (ROI), while reducing significantly the imaging dose to the patient. Methods: The study was based on simulated ideal pCT using pencil beam (PB) scanning. A set of 250 MeV protons PBs was used to create 360 projections of a cylindrical water phantom and a head and neck cancer patient. The tomographic images were reconstructed using a filtered backprojection (FBP) as well as an iterative algorithm (ITR). Different fluence modulation levels were investigated and their impact on the image was quantified in terms of SPR accuracy as well as noise within and outside selected ROIs, as a function of imaging dose. The unmodulated image served as reference. Results: Both FBP reconstruction and ITR without total variation (TV) yielded image quality in the ROIs similar to the reference images, for modulation down to 0.1 of the full proton fluence. The average dose was reduced by 75% for the water phantom and by 40% for the patient. FMpCT does not improve the noise for ITR with TV and modulation 0.1. Conclusion: This is the first work proposing and investigating FMpCT for producing optimal image quality for treatment planning and image guidance, while simultaneously reducing imaging dose. Future work will address spatial resolution effects and the impact of FMpCT on the quality of proton treatment plans for a prototype pCT scanner capable of list mode data acquisition. Acknowledgement: DFG-MAP DFG - Munich-Centre for Advanced Photonics (MAP)

  10. An attenuation correction method for PET/CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ue, Hidenori; Yamazaki, Tomohiro; Haneishi, Hideaki

    2006-01-01

    In PET/CT systems, accurate attenuation correction can be achieved by creating an attenuation map from an X-ray CT image. On the other hand, respiratory-gated PET acquisition is an effective method for avoiding motion blurring of the thoracic and abdominal organs caused by respiratory motion. In PET/CT systems employing respiratory-gated PET, using an X-ray CT image acquired during breath-holding for attenuation correction may have a large effect on the voxel values, especially in regions with substantial respiratory motion. In this report, we propose an attenuation correction method in which, as the first step, a set of respiratory-gated PET images is reconstructed without attenuation correction, as the second step, the motion of each phase PET image from the PET image in the same phase as the CT acquisition timing is estimated by the previously proposed method, as the third step, the CT image corresponding to each respiratory phase is generated from the original CT image by deformation according to the motion vector maps, and as the final step, attenuation correction using these CT images and reconstruction are performed. The effectiveness of the proposed method was evaluated using 4D-NCAT phantoms, and good stability of the voxel values near the diaphragm was observed. (author)

  11. SU-E-I-13: Evaluation of Metal Artifact Reduction (MAR) Software On Computed Tomography (CT) Images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, V; Kohli, K

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: A new commercially available metal artifact reduction (MAR) software in computed tomography (CT) imaging was evaluated with phantoms in the presence of metals. The goal was to assess the ability of the software to restore the CT number in the vicinity of the metals without impacting the image quality. Methods: A Catphan 504 was scanned with a GE Optima RT 580 CT scanner (GE Healthcare, Milwaukee, WI) and the images were reconstructed with and without the MAR software. Both datasets were analyzed with Image Owl QA software (Image Owl Inc, Greenwich, NY). CT number sensitometry, MTF, low contrast, uniformity, noise and spatial accuracy were compared for scans with and without MAR software. In addition, an in-house made phantom was scanned with and without a stainless steel insert at three different locations. The accuracy of the CT number and metal insert dimension were investigated as well. Results: Comparisons between scans with and without MAR algorithm on the Catphan phantom demonstrate similar results for image quality. However, noise was slightly higher for the MAR algorithm. Evaluation of the CT number at various locations of the in-house made phantom was also performed. The baseline HU, obtained from the scan without metal insert, was compared to scans with the stainless steel insert at 3 different locations. The HU difference between the baseline scan versus metal scan was improved when the MAR algorithm was applied. In addition, the physical diameter of the stainless steel rod was over-estimated by the MAR algorithm by 0.9 mm. Conclusion: This work indicates with the presence of metal in CT scans, the MAR algorithm is capable of providing a more accurate CT number without compromising the overall image quality. Future work will include the dosimetric impact on the MAR algorithm

  12. Hybrid computational phantoms of the 15-year male and female adolescent: Applications to CT organ dosimetry for patients of variable morphometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Choonsik; Lodwick, Daniel; Williams, Jonathan L.; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2008-01-01

    female phantoms were further developed from the 50th percentile phantoms through adjustments in the body contour to match the total body masses given in CDC pediatric growth curves. The resulting six NURBS phantoms, male and female phantoms representing their 10th, 50th, and 90th weight percentiles, were used to investigate the influence of body fat distributions on internal organ doses following CT imaging. The phantoms were exposed to multislice chest and abdomen helical CT scans, and in-field organ absorbed doses were calculated. The results demonstrated that the use of traditional stylized phantoms yielded organ dose estimates that deviate from those given by the UF reference hybrid phantoms by up to a factor of 2. The study also showed that use of reference, or 50th percentile, phantoms to assess organ doses in underweight 15-year-old children would not lead to significant organ dose errors (typically less than 10%). However, more significant errors were noted (up to ∼30%) when reference phantoms are used to represent overweight children in CT imaging dosimetry. These errors are expected to only further increase as one considers CT organ doses in overweight and obese individuals of the adult patient population, thus emphasizing the advantages of patient-sculptable phantom technology

  13. An evaluation of three commercially available metal artifact reduction methods for CT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Jessie Y; Kerns, James R; Balter, Peter A; Followill, David S; Mirkovic, Dragan; Howell, Rebecca M; Kry, Stephen F; Nute, Jessica L; Liu, Xinming; Stingo, Francesco C

    2015-01-01

    Three commercial metal artifact reduction methods were evaluated for use in computed tomography (CT) imaging in the presence of clinically realistic metal implants: Philips O-MAR, GE’s monochromatic gemstone spectral imaging (GSI) using dual-energy CT, and GSI monochromatic imaging with metal artifact reduction software applied (MARs). Each method was evaluated according to CT number accuracy, metal size accuracy, and streak artifact severity reduction by using several phantoms, including three anthropomorphic phantoms containing metal implants (hip prosthesis, dental fillings and spinal fixation rods). All three methods showed varying degrees of success for the hip prosthesis and spinal fixation rod cases, while none were particularly beneficial for dental artifacts. Limitations of the methods were also observed. MARs underestimated the size of metal implants and introduced new artifacts in imaging planes beyond the metal implant when applied to dental artifacts, and both the O-MAR and MARs algorithms induced artifacts for spinal fixation rods in a thoracic phantom. Our findings suggest that all three artifact mitigation methods may benefit patients with metal implants, though they should be used with caution in certain scenarios. (paper)

  14. Development of a patient-specific two-compartment anthropomorphic breast phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prionas, Nicolas D; Burkett, George W; McKenney, Sarah E; Chen, Lin; Boone, John M; Stern, Robin L

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop a technique for the construction of a two-compartment anthropomorphic breast phantom specific to an individual patient's pendant breast anatomy. Three-dimensional breast images were acquired on a prototype dedicated breast computed tomography (bCT) scanner as part of an ongoing IRB-approved clinical trial of bCT. The images from the breast of a patient were segmented into adipose and glandular tissue regions and divided into 1.59 mm thick breast sections to correspond to the thickness of polyethylene stock. A computer-controlled water-jet cutting machine was used to cut the outer breast edge and the internal regions corresponding to glandular tissue from the polyethylene. The stack of polyethylene breast segments was encased in a thermoplastic ‘skin’ and filled with water. Water-filled spaces modeled glandular tissue structures and the surrounding polyethylene modeled the adipose tissue compartment. Utility of the phantom was demonstrated by inserting 200 µm microcalcifications as well as by measuring point dose deposition during bCT scanning. Affine registration of the original patient images with bCT images of the phantom showed similar tissue distribution. Linear profiles through the registered images demonstrated a mean coefficient of determination (r 2 ) between grayscale profiles of 0.881. The exponent of the power law describing the anatomical noise power spectrum was identical in the coronal images of the patient's breast and the phantom. Microcalcifications were visualized in the phantom at bCT scanning. The real-time air kerma rate was measured during bCT scanning and fluctuated with breast anatomy. On average, point dose deposition was 7.1% greater than the mean glandular dose. A technique to generate a two-compartment anthropomorphic breast phantom from bCT images has been demonstrated. The phantom is the first, to our knowledge, to accurately model the uncompressed pendant breast and the glandular tissue

  15. SU-E-I-81: Assessment of CT Radiation Dose and Image Quality for An Automated Tube Potential Selection Algorithm Using Adult Anthropomorphic and ACR Phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmood, U; Erdi, Y; Wang, W

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of General Electrics (GE) automated tube potential algorithm, kV assist (kVa) on radiation dose and image quality, with an emphasis on optimizing protocols based on noise texture. Methods: Radiation dose was assessed by inserting optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLs) throughout the body of an adult anthropomorphic phantom (CIRS). The baseline protocol was: 120 kVp, Auto mA (180 to 380 mA), noise index (NI) = 14, adaptive iterative statistical reconstruction (ASiR) of 20%, 0.8s rotation time. Image quality was evaluated by calculating the contrast to noise ratio (CNR) and noise power spectrum (NPS) from the ACR CT accreditation phantom. CNRs were calculated according to the steps described in ACR CT phantom testing document. NPS was determined by taking the 3D FFT of the uniformity section of the ACR phantom. NPS and CNR were evaluated with and without kVa and for all available adaptive iterative statistical reconstruction (ASiR) settings, ranging from 0 to 100%. Each NPS was also evaluated for its peak frequency difference (PFD) with respect to the baseline protocol. Results: The CNR for the adult male was found to decrease from CNR = 0.912 ± 0.045 for the baseline protocol without kVa to a CNR = 0.756 ± 0.049 with kVa activated. When compared against the baseline protocol, the PFD at ASiR of 40% yielded a decrease in noise magnitude as realized by the increase in CNR = 0.903 ± 0.023. The difference in the central liver dose with and without kVa was found to be 0.07%. Conclusion: Dose reduction was insignificant in the adult phantom. As determined by NPS analysis, ASiR of 40% produced images with similar noise texture to the baseline protocol. However, the CNR at ASiR of 40% with kVa fails to meet the current ACR CNR passing requirement of 1.0

  16. SU-E-I-81: Assessment of CT Radiation Dose and Image Quality for An Automated Tube Potential Selection Algorithm Using Adult Anthropomorphic and ACR Phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahmood, U; Erdi, Y; Wang, W [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, NY, NY (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of General Electrics (GE) automated tube potential algorithm, kV assist (kVa) on radiation dose and image quality, with an emphasis on optimizing protocols based on noise texture. Methods: Radiation dose was assessed by inserting optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLs) throughout the body of an adult anthropomorphic phantom (CIRS). The baseline protocol was: 120 kVp, Auto mA (180 to 380 mA), noise index (NI) = 14, adaptive iterative statistical reconstruction (ASiR) of 20%, 0.8s rotation time. Image quality was evaluated by calculating the contrast to noise ratio (CNR) and noise power spectrum (NPS) from the ACR CT accreditation phantom. CNRs were calculated according to the steps described in ACR CT phantom testing document. NPS was determined by taking the 3D FFT of the uniformity section of the ACR phantom. NPS and CNR were evaluated with and without kVa and for all available adaptive iterative statistical reconstruction (ASiR) settings, ranging from 0 to 100%. Each NPS was also evaluated for its peak frequency difference (PFD) with respect to the baseline protocol. Results: The CNR for the adult male was found to decrease from CNR = 0.912 ± 0.045 for the baseline protocol without kVa to a CNR = 0.756 ± 0.049 with kVa activated. When compared against the baseline protocol, the PFD at ASiR of 40% yielded a decrease in noise magnitude as realized by the increase in CNR = 0.903 ± 0.023. The difference in the central liver dose with and without kVa was found to be 0.07%. Conclusion: Dose reduction was insignificant in the adult phantom. As determined by NPS analysis, ASiR of 40% produced images with similar noise texture to the baseline protocol. However, the CNR at ASiR of 40% with kVa fails to meet the current ACR CNR passing requirement of 1.0.

  17. Accuracy of lung nodule volumetry in low-dose CT with iterative reconstruction: an anthropomorphic thoracic phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doo, K W; Kang, E-Y; Yong, H S; Woo, O H; Lee, K Y; Oh, Y-W

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess accuracy of lung nodule volumetry in low-dose CT with application of iterative reconstruction (IR) according to nodule size, nodule density and CT tube currents, using artificial lung nodules within an anthropomorphic thoracic phantom. Eight artificial nodules (four diameters: 5, 8, 10 and 12 mm; two CT densities: -630 HU that represents ground-glass nodule and +100 HU that represents solid nodule) were randomly placed inside a thoracic phantom. Scans were performed with tube current-time product to 10, 20, 30 and 50 mAs. Images were reconstructed with IR and filtered back projection (FBP). We compared volume estimates to a reference standard and calculated the absolute percentage error (APE). The APE of all nodules was significantly lower when IR was used than with FBP (7.5 ± 4.7% compared with 9.0 ±6.9%; p volumetry in low-dose CT by application of IR showed reliable accuracy in a phantom study. Lung nodule volumetry can be reliably applicable to all lung nodules including small, ground-glass nodules even in ultra-low-dose CT with application of IR. IR significantly improved the accuracy of lung nodule volumetry compared with FBP particularly for ground-glass (-630 HU) nodules. Volumetry in low-dose CT can be utilized in patient with lung nodule work-up, and IR has benefit for small, ground-glass lung nodules in low-dose CT.

  18. Initial phantom study comparing image quality in computed tomography using adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction and new adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction v.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Kyungjae; Kwon, Heejin; Cho, Jinhan; Oh, Jongyoung; Yoon, Seongkuk; Kang, Myungjin; Ha, Dongho; Lee, Jinhwa; Kang, Eunju

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the image quality of a novel advanced iterative reconstruction (IR) method called as "adaptive statistical IR V" (ASIR-V) by comparing the image noise, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and spatial resolution from those of filtered back projection (FBP) and adaptive statistical IR (ASIR) on computed tomography (CT) phantom image. We performed CT scans at 5 different tube currents (50, 70, 100, 150, and 200 mA) using 3 types of CT phantoms. Scanned images were subsequently reconstructed in 7 different scan settings, such as FBP, and 3 levels of ASIR and ASIR-V (30%, 50%, and 70%). The image noise was measured in the first study using body phantom. The CNR was measured in the second study using contrast phantom and the spatial resolutions were measured in the third study using a high-resolution phantom. We compared the image noise, CNR, and spatial resolution among the 7 reconstructed image scan settings to determine whether noise reduction, high CNR, and high spatial resolution could be achieved at ASIR-V. At quantitative analysis of the first and second studies, it showed that the images reconstructed using ASIR-V had reduced image noise and improved CNR compared with those of FBP and ASIR (P ASIR-V had significantly improved spatial resolution than those of FBP and ASIR (P ASIR-V provides a significant reduction in image noise and a significant improvement in CNR as well as spatial resolution. Therefore, this technique has the potential to reduce the radiation dose further without compromising image quality.

  19. Evaluation of image uniformity and radiolucency for computed tomography phantom made of 3-dimensional printing of fused deposition modeling technology by using acrylonitrile but audience styrene resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seoung, Youl Hun

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the radiolucency for the phantom output to the 3D printing technology. The 3D printing technology was applied for FDM (fused deposition modeling) method and was used the material of ABS (acrylonitrile butadiene styrene) resin. The phantom was designed in cylindrical uniformity. An image uniformity was measured by a cross-sectional images of the 3D printed phantom obtained from the CT equipment. The evaluation of radiolucency was measured exposure dose by the inserted ion-chamber from the 3D printed phantom. As a results, the average of uniformity in the cross-sectional CT image was 2.70 HU and the correlation of radiolucency between PMMA CT phantom and 3D printed ABS phantom is found to have a high correlation to 0.976. In the future, this results will be expected to be used as the basis for the phantom production of the radiation quality control by used 3D printing technology

  20. Evaluation of image uniformity and radiolucency for computed tomography phantom made of 3-dimensional printing of fused deposition modeling technology by using acrylonitrile but audience styrene resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seoung, Youl Hun [Dept. of of Radiological Science, Cheongju University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the radiolucency for the phantom output to the 3D printing technology. The 3D printing technology was applied for FDM (fused deposition modeling) method and was used the material of ABS (acrylonitrile butadiene styrene) resin. The phantom was designed in cylindrical uniformity. An image uniformity was measured by a cross-sectional images of the 3D printed phantom obtained from the CT equipment. The evaluation of radiolucency was measured exposure dose by the inserted ion-chamber from the 3D printed phantom. As a results, the average of uniformity in the cross-sectional CT image was 2.70 HU and the correlation of radiolucency between PMMA CT phantom and 3D printed ABS phantom is found to have a high correlation to 0.976. In the future, this results will be expected to be used as the basis for the phantom production of the radiation quality control by used 3D printing technology.

  1. TU-H-207A-03: CT Hounsfield Unit Accuracy: Effect of Beam Hardening On Phantom and Clinical Whole-Body CT Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ai, H; Wendt, R [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To assess the effect of beam hardening on measured CT HU values. Methods: An anthropomorphic knee phantom was scanned with the CT component of a GE Discovery 690 PET/CT scanner (120kVp, 300mAs, 40?0.625mm collimation, pitch=0.984, FOV=500mm, matrix=512?512) with four different scan setups, each of which induces different degrees of beam hardening by introducing additional attenuation media into the field of view. Homogeneous voxels representing “soft tissue” and “bone” were segmented by HU thresholding followed by a 3D morphological erosion operation which removes the non-homogenous voxels located on the interface of thresholded tissue mask. HU values of segmented “soft tissue” and “bone” were compared.Additionally, whole-body CT data with coverage from the skull apex to the end of toes were retrospectively retrieved from seven PET/CT exams to evaluate the effect of beam hardening in vivo. Homogeneous bone voxels were segmented with the same method previously described. Total In-Slice Attenuation (TISA) for each CT slice, defined as the summation of HU values over all voxels within a CT slice, was calculated for all slices of the seven whole-body CT datasets and evaluated against the mean HU values of homogeneous bone voxels within that slice. Results: HU values measured from the phantom showed that while “soft tissue” HU values were unaffected, added attenuation within the FOV caused noticeable decreases in the measured HU values of “bone” voxels. A linear relationship was observed between bone HU and TISA for slices of the torso and legs, but not of the skull. Conclusion: Beam hardening effect is not an issue of concern for voxels with HU in the soft tissue range, but should not be neglected for bone voxels. A linear relationship exists between bone HU and the associated TISA in non-skull CT slices, which can be exploited to develop a correction strategy.

  2. Developing low-dose C-arm CT imaging for temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorder in interventional radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Xiaowei; Cahill, Anne Marie [Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Felice, Marc [University of Pennsylvania, Environmental Health and Radiation Safety, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Johnson, Laura [Computed Tomography Division, Siemens Healthcare Sector, Shanghai (China); Sarmiento, Marily [Siemens Medical Solutions, Angiography and X-ray Division, Hoffman Estates, IL (United States)

    2011-04-15

    Manufacturers have provided C-arm CT imaging technologies for applications in interventional radiology in recent years. However, clinical imaging protocols and radiation doses have not been well studied or reported. The purpose of this study is to develop low-dose settings for clinically acceptable CT imaging of temporomandibular joint in interventional radiology suites, using a C-arm imaging angiography system. CT scans were performed with a flat-panel digital C-arm angiographic system on a 5-year-old anthropomorphic phantom. The CTDI was determined for various rotation times, dose settings and Cu filter selections. The CTDI values were compared with those of conventional low-dose CT for the same phantom. The effectiveness of using Cu filters to reduce dose was also investigated. Images were reviewed by a senior radiologist for clinical acceptance. The manufacturer's default setting gave an equivalent CTDI of 4.8 mGy. Optimizing the dose settings and adding copper filtration reduced the radiation dose by 94%. This represents a 50% reduction from conventional CT. Use of Cu filters and low-dose settings significantly reduced radiation dose from that of standard settings. This phantom study process successfully guided the clinical implementation of low-dose studies for all ages at our institution. (orig.)

  3. Evaluation of the low dose cardiac CT imaging using ASIR technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jiahua; Hsieh, Jiang; Deubig, Amy; Sainath, Paavana; Crandall, Peter

    2010-04-01

    Today Cardiac imaging is one of the key driving forces for the research and development activities of Computed Tomography (CT) imaging. It requires high spatial and temporal resolution and is often associated with high radiation dose. The newly introduced ASIR technique presents an efficient method that offers the dose reduction benefits while maintaining image quality and providing fast reconstruction speed. This paper discusses the study of image quality of the ASIR technique for Cardiac CT imaging. Phantoms as well as clinical data have been evaluated to demonstrate the effectiveness of ASIR technique for Cardiac CT applications.

  4. Investigation of influence of 16-slice spiral CT electrocardiogram-controlled dose modulation on exposure dosage and image quality of cardiac CT imaging under simulated fluctuant heart rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin Yan; Chen Jie; Chai Weiming; Hua Jia; Gao Na; Xu Jianrong; Shen Yun

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the influence of electrocardiogram (ECG)-controlled dose modulation on exposure dosage and image quality of cardiac CT imaging in a cardiac phantom with simulated fluctuant heart rate. Methods: The basal heart rate of the cardiac pulsating phantom was set as 60 bpm, the experimental situations were divided as 6 groups according to different heart rates. The cardiac imaging was performed on the cardiac phantom when the ECG-controlled dose modulation was firstly turned off. The exposure dosage of each scan sequence was documented. The standard deviation of the CT values of the phantom was measured on the central slice after coronal reformation of the raw data. The quality of 2D and 3D images were scored. Then cardiac imaging was performed when ECG modulation was on and set as four groups according to different modulation parameters. All the data were documented as before. The results from the five groups with and without ECG modulation current were analyzed by F test and comparative rank sum test using the statistical software SPSS 10.0. Results: Statistical analysis showed no significant difference (P>0.05) between the SNR of images (SD value was 27.78 and 26.30) from the groups that full mA output at wide reconstruction phase (69%-99%) when the heart rate was fluctuant(≥7.5 bpm). There was also no significant difference (P>0.05) between the quality of the 2D and 3D images. But there was a significant difference (P 12.5 bpm, the exposure dosage would increase obviously (from 0.6 to 1.7 mSv). Conclusion: For cardiac imaging with 16-slice row CT, the application of ECG modulated current can effectively reduce the exposure dosage without compromising the image quality even if heart rate was fluctuant. (authors)

  5. The four-dimensional non-uniform rational B-splines-based cardiac-torso phantom and its application in medical imaging research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Chongguo; Wu Dake; Lang Jinyi

    2008-01-01

    Simulation skill is playing an increasingly important role in medical imaging research. four-dimensional non-uniform rational B-splines-based cardiac-torso (4D NCAT) phantom is new tool for meoical imaging res catch and when combined with accurate models for the imaging process a wealth of realistic imaging data from subjects of various anatomies. Can be provided 4D NCAT phantoms have bend widely used in medical research such as SPECT, PET, CT and so on. 4D NCAT phantoms have also been used in inverse planning system of intensity modulated radiation therapy. (authors)

  6. Development of a QA Phantom for online image registration and resultant couch shifts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arumugam, S.; Jameson, M.G.; Holloway, L.C.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Purpose Recently our centre purchased an Elekta-Synergy accelerator with kV-CBCT and a hexapod couch attachment. This system allows six degrees of freedom for couch lOp shifts, based on registration of on line imaging. We designed and built a phantom in our centre to test the accuracy and precision of this system. The goal of this project was to investigate the accuracy and practical utilisation of this phantom. Method The phantom was constructed from perspex sheets and high density dental putty (Fig. I). Five high density regions (three small regions to simulate prostate seeds and two larger regions to simulate boney anatomy) were incorporated to test the manual and automatic registrations within the software. The phantom was utilised to test the accuracy and precision of repositioning with the hexapod couch and imaging system. To achieve this, the phantom was placed on the couch at known orientations and the shifts were quantified using the registration of verification and reference image data sets. True shifts and those predicted by the software were compared. Results The geometrical accuracy of the phantom was verified with measurements of the CT scan to be with I mm of the intended geometry. The image registration and resultant couch shifts were found to be accurate within I mm and 0.5 degrees. The phantom was found to be practical and easy to use. Conclusion The presented phantom provides a less expensive and effective alternative to commercially available systems for verifying imaging registration and corresponding six degrees of freedom couch shifts. (author)

  7. Low-tube-voltage selection for non-contrast-enhanced CT: Comparison of the radiation dose in pediatric and adult phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimonobo, Toshiaki; Funama, Yoshinori; Utsunomiya, Daisuke; Nakaura, Takeshi; Oda, Seitaro; Kiguchi, Masao; Masuda, Takanori; Sakabe, Daisuke; Yamashita, Yasuyuki; Awai, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    We used pediatric and adult anthropomorphic phantoms to compare the radiation dose of low- and standard tube voltage chest and abdominal non-contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) scans. We also discuss the optimal low tube voltage for non-contrast-enhanced CT. Using a female adult- and three differently-sized pediatric anthropomorphic phantoms we acquired chest and abdominal non-contrast-enhanced scans on a 320-multidetector CT volume scanner. The tube voltage was set at 80-, 100-, and 120 kVp. The tube current was automatically assigned on the CT scanner in response to the set image noise level. On each phantom and at each tube voltage we measured the surface and center dose using high-sensitivity metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor detectors. The mean surface dose of chest and abdominal CT scans in 5-year olds was 4.4 and 5.3 mGy at 80 kVp, 4.5 and 5.4 mGy at 100 kV, and 4.0 and 5.0 mGy at 120 kVp, respectively. These values were similar in our 3-pediatric phantoms (p > 0.05). The mean surface dose in the adult phantom increased from 14.7 to 19.4 mGy for chest- and from 18.7 to 24.8 mGy for abdominal CT as the tube voltage decreased from 120 to 80 kVp (p voltage and the low tube voltage technique can be used for non-contrast-enhanced chest- and abdominal scanning. Copyright © 2015 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Tissue mimicking materials for a multi-imaging modality prostate phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Souza, Warren D.; Madsen, Ernest L.; Unal, Orhan; Vigen, Karl K.; Frank, Gary R.; Thomadsen, Bruce R.

    2001-01-01

    Materials that simultaneously mimic soft tissue in vivo for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasound (US), and computed tomography (CT) for use in a prostate phantom have been developed. Prostate and muscle mimicking materials contain water, agarose, lipid particles, protein, Cu ++ , EDTA, glass beads, and thimerosal (preservative). Fat was mimicked with safflower oil suffusing a random mesh (network) of polyurethane. Phantom material properties were measured at 22 deg. C. (22 deg. C is a typical room temperature at which phantoms are used.) The values of material properties should match, as well as possible, the values for tissues at body temperature, 37 deg. C. For MRI, the primary properties of interest are T1 and T2 relaxations times, for US they are the attenuation coefficient, propagation speed, and backscatter, and for CT, the x-ray attenuation. Considering the large number of parameters to be mimicked, rather good agreement was found with actual tissue values obtained from the literature. Using published values for prostate parenchyma, T1 and T2 at 37 deg. C and 40 MHz are estimated to be about 1100 and 98 ms, respectively. The CT number for in vivo prostate is estimated to be 45 HU (Hounsfield units). The prostate mimicking material has a T1 of 937 ms and a T2 of 88 ms at 22 deg. C and 40 MHz; the propagation speed and attenuation coefficient slope are 1540 m/s and 0.36 dB/cm/MHz, respectively, and the CT number of tissue mimicking prostate is 43 HU. Tissue mimicking (TM) muscle differs from TM prostate in the amount of dry weight agarose, Cu ++ , EDTA, and the quality and quantity of glass beads. The 18 μm glass beads used in TM muscle increase US backscatter and US attenuation; the presence of the beads also has some effect on T1 but no effect on T2. The composition of tissue-mimicking materials developed is such that different versions can be placed in direct contact with one another in a phantom with no long term change in US, MRI, or CT

  9. Evaluation of image quality and radiation dose using gold nanoparticles and other clinical contrast agents in dual-energy Computed Tomography (CT): CT abdomen phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zukhi, J.; Yusob, D.; Tajuddin, A. A.; Vuanghao, L.; Zainon, R.

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the image quality and radiation dose using commercial gold nanoparticles and clinical contrast agents in dual-energy Computed Tomography (CT). Five polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) tubes were used in this study, where four tubes were filled with different contrast agents (barium, iodine, gadolinium, and gold nanoparticles). The fifth tube was filled with water. Two optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLD) were placed in each tube to measure the radiation dose. The tubes were placed in a fabricated adult abdominal phantom of 32 cm in diameter using PMMA. The phantom was scanned using a DECT at low energy (80 kV) and high energy (140 kV) with different pitches (0.6 mm and 1.0 mm) and different slice thickness (3.0 mm and 5.0 mm). The tube current was applied automatically using automatic exposure control (AEC) and tube current modulation recommended by the manufacturer (CARE Dose 4D, Siemens, Germany). The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of each contrast agent was analyzed using Weasis software. Gold nanoparticles has highest atomic number (Z = 79) than barium (Z = 56), iodine (Z = 53) and gadolinium (Z = 64). The CNR value of each contrast agent increases when the slice thickness increases. The radiation dose obtained from this study decreases when the pitch increases. The optimal imaging parameters for gold nanoparticles and other clinical contrast agents is obtained at pitch value of 1.0 mm and slice thickness of 5.0 mm. Low noise and low radiation dose obtained at these imaging parameters. The optimal imaging parameters obtained in this study can be applied in multiple contrast agents imaging.

  10. Evaluation of image quality and radiation dose using gold nanoparticles and other clinical contrast agents in dual-energy Computed Tomography (CT): CT abdomen phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zukhi, J; Yusob, D; Vuanghao, L; Zainon, R; Tajuddin, A A

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the image quality and radiation dose using commercial gold nanoparticles and clinical contrast agents in dual-energy Computed Tomography (CT). Five polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) tubes were used in this study, where four tubes were filled with different contrast agents (barium, iodine, gadolinium, and gold nanoparticles). The fifth tube was filled with water. Two optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLD) were placed in each tube to measure the radiation dose. The tubes were placed in a fabricated adult abdominal phantom of 32 cm in diameter using PMMA. The phantom was scanned using a DECT at low energy (80 kV) and high energy (140 kV) with different pitches (0.6 mm and 1.0 mm) and different slice thickness (3.0 mm and 5.0 mm). The tube current was applied automatically using automatic exposure control (AEC) and tube current modulation recommended by the manufacturer (CARE Dose 4D, Siemens, Germany). The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of each contrast agent was analyzed using Weasis software. Gold nanoparticles has highest atomic number (Z = 79) than barium (Z = 56), iodine (Z = 53) and gadolinium (Z = 64). The CNR value of each contrast agent increases when the slice thickness increases. The radiation dose obtained from this study decreases when the pitch increases. The optimal imaging parameters for gold nanoparticles and other clinical contrast agents is obtained at pitch value of 1.0 mm and slice thickness of 5.0 mm. Low noise and low radiation dose obtained at these imaging parameters. The optimal imaging parameters obtained in this study can be applied in multiple contrast agents imaging. (paper)

  11. X-ray strain tensor imaging: FEM simulation and experiments with a micro-CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae G; Park, So E; Lee, Soo Y

    2014-01-01

    In tissue elasticity imaging, measuring the strain tensor components is necessary to solve the inverse problem. However, it is impractical to measure all the tensor components in ultrasound or MRI elastography because of their anisotropic spatial resolution. The objective of this study is to compute 3D strain tensor maps from the 3D CT images of a tissue-mimicking phantom. We took 3D micro-CT images of the phantom twice with applying two different mechanical compressions to it. Applying the 3D image correlation technique to the CT images under different compression, we computed 3D displacement vectors and strain tensors at every pixel. To evaluate the accuracy of the strain tensor maps, we made a 3D FEM model of the phantom, and we computed strain tensor maps through FEM simulation. Experimentally obtained strain tensor maps showed similar patterns to the FEM-simulated ones in visual inspection. The correlation between the strain tensor maps obtained from the experiment and the FEM simulation ranges from 0.03 to 0.93. Even though the strain tensor maps suffer from high level noise, we expect the x-ray strain tensor imaging may find some biomedical applications such as malignant tissue characterization and stress analysis inside the tissues.

  12. Technical Note: Evaluation of a 160-mm/256-row CT scanner for whole-heart quantitative myocardial perfusion imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    So, Aaron, E-mail: aso@robarts.ca [Imaging Program, Lawson Health Research Institute, London, Ontario N6A 4V2 (Canada); Imai, Yasuhiro; Nett, Brian; Jackson, John; Nett, Liz; Hsieh, Jiang [CT Engineering, GE Healthcare, Waukesha, Wisconsin 53188 (United States); Wisenberg, Gerald; Teefy, Patrick; Yadegari, Andrew [Cardiology, University Hospital, London Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario N6A 5A5 (Canada); Islam, Ali [Radiology, St. Joseph’s Hospital London, Ontario N6A 4V2 (Canada); Lee, Ting-Yim [Imaging Program, Lawson Health Research Institute, London, Ontario N6A 4V2, Canada and Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, London, Ontario N6A 5K8 (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: The authors investigated the performance of a recently introduced 160-mm/256-row CT system for low dose quantitative myocardial perfusion (MP) imaging of the whole heart. This platform is equipped with a gantry capable of rotating at 280 ms per full cycle, a second generation of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR-V) to correct for image noise arising from low tube voltage potential/tube current dynamic scanning, and image reconstruction algorithms to tackle beam-hardening, cone-beam, and partial-scan effects. Methods: Phantom studies were performed to investigate the effectiveness of image noise and artifact reduction with a GE Healthcare Revolution CT system for three acquisition protocols used in quantitative CT MP imaging: 100, 120, and 140 kVp/25 mAs. The heart chambers of an anthropomorphic chest phantom were filled with iodinated contrast solution at different concentrations (contrast levels) to simulate the circulation of contrast through the heart in quantitative CT MP imaging. To evaluate beam-hardening correction, the phantom was scanned at each contrast level to measure the changes in CT number (in Hounsfield unit or HU) in the water-filled region surrounding the heart chambers with respect to baseline. To evaluate cone-beam artifact correction, differences in mean water HU between the central and peripheral slices were compared. Partial-scan artifact correction was evaluated from the fluctuation of mean water HU in successive partial scans. To evaluate image noise reduction, a small hollow region adjacent to the heart chambers was filled with diluted contrast, and contrast-to-noise ratio in the region before and after noise correction with ASiR-V was compared. The quality of MP maps acquired with the CT system was also evaluated in porcine CT MP studies. Myocardial infarct was induced in a farm pig from a transient occlusion of the distal left anterior descending (LAD) artery with a catheter-based interventional procedure. MP

  13. Technical Note: Evaluation of a 160-mm/256-row CT scanner for whole-heart quantitative myocardial perfusion imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    So, Aaron; Imai, Yasuhiro; Nett, Brian; Jackson, John; Nett, Liz; Hsieh, Jiang; Wisenberg, Gerald; Teefy, Patrick; Yadegari, Andrew; Islam, Ali; Lee, Ting-Yim

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The authors investigated the performance of a recently introduced 160-mm/256-row CT system for low dose quantitative myocardial perfusion (MP) imaging of the whole heart. This platform is equipped with a gantry capable of rotating at 280 ms per full cycle, a second generation of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR-V) to correct for image noise arising from low tube voltage potential/tube current dynamic scanning, and image reconstruction algorithms to tackle beam-hardening, cone-beam, and partial-scan effects. Methods: Phantom studies were performed to investigate the effectiveness of image noise and artifact reduction with a GE Healthcare Revolution CT system for three acquisition protocols used in quantitative CT MP imaging: 100, 120, and 140 kVp/25 mAs. The heart chambers of an anthropomorphic chest phantom were filled with iodinated contrast solution at different concentrations (contrast levels) to simulate the circulation of contrast through the heart in quantitative CT MP imaging. To evaluate beam-hardening correction, the phantom was scanned at each contrast level to measure the changes in CT number (in Hounsfield unit or HU) in the water-filled region surrounding the heart chambers with respect to baseline. To evaluate cone-beam artifact correction, differences in mean water HU between the central and peripheral slices were compared. Partial-scan artifact correction was evaluated from the fluctuation of mean water HU in successive partial scans. To evaluate image noise reduction, a small hollow region adjacent to the heart chambers was filled with diluted contrast, and contrast-to-noise ratio in the region before and after noise correction with ASiR-V was compared. The quality of MP maps acquired with the CT system was also evaluated in porcine CT MP studies. Myocardial infarct was induced in a farm pig from a transient occlusion of the distal left anterior descending (LAD) artery with a catheter-based interventional procedure. MP

  14. Technical Note: Evaluation of a 160-mm/256-row CT scanner for whole-heart quantitative myocardial perfusion imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Aaron; Imai, Yasuhiro; Nett, Brian; Jackson, John; Nett, Liz; Hsieh, Jiang; Wisenberg, Gerald; Teefy, Patrick; Yadegari, Andrew; Islam, Ali; Lee, Ting-Yim

    2016-08-01

    The authors investigated the performance of a recently introduced 160-mm/256-row CT system for low dose quantitative myocardial perfusion (MP) imaging of the whole heart. This platform is equipped with a gantry capable of rotating at 280 ms per full cycle, a second generation of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR-V) to correct for image noise arising from low tube voltage potential/tube current dynamic scanning, and image reconstruction algorithms to tackle beam-hardening, cone-beam, and partial-scan effects. Phantom studies were performed to investigate the effectiveness of image noise and artifact reduction with a GE Healthcare Revolution CT system for three acquisition protocols used in quantitative CT MP imaging: 100, 120, and 140 kVp/25 mAs. The heart chambers of an anthropomorphic chest phantom were filled with iodinated contrast solution at different concentrations (contrast levels) to simulate the circulation of contrast through the heart in quantitative CT MP imaging. To evaluate beam-hardening correction, the phantom was scanned at each contrast level to measure the changes in CT number (in Hounsfield unit or HU) in the water-filled region surrounding the heart chambers with respect to baseline. To evaluate cone-beam artifact correction, differences in mean water HU between the central and peripheral slices were compared. Partial-scan artifact correction was evaluated from the fluctuation of mean water HU in successive partial scans. To evaluate image noise reduction, a small hollow region adjacent to the heart chambers was filled with diluted contrast, and contrast-to-noise ratio in the region before and after noise correction with ASiR-V was compared. The quality of MP maps acquired with the CT system was also evaluated in porcine CT MP studies. Myocardial infarct was induced in a farm pig from a transient occlusion of the distal left anterior descending (LAD) artery with a catheter-based interventional procedure. MP maps were generated

  15. Recent developments in detectors/phantoms for dosimetry, X-ray quality assurance and imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sankaran, A.

    2009-01-01

    During the past years, many new developments have taken place in detectors/phantoms for high energy photon and electron dosimetry (for radiotherapy), protection monitoring, X-ray quality assurance and X-ray imaging (for radiodiagnosis). A variety of detectors and systems, quality assurance (QA) gadgets and special phantoms have been developed for diverse applications. This paper discusses the important developments with some of which the author was actively associated in the past. For dosimetry and QA of 60 Co and high energy X-ray units, state-of-the-art radiation field analyzers, matrix ion chambers, MOSFET devices and Gafchromic films are described. OSL detectors find wide use in radiotherapy dosimetry and provide a good alternative for personnel monitoring. New systems introduced for QA/dosimetry of X-ray units and CT scanners include: multi-function instruments for simultaneous measurement of kVp, dose, time, X-ray waveform and HVT on diagnostic X-ray units; pencil chamber with head and body phantoms for CTDI check on CT scanners. Examples of phantoms used for dosimetry and imaging are given. Advancements in the field of diagnostic X-ray imaging (with applications in portal imaging/dosimetry of megavoltage X-ray units) have led to emergence of: film-replacement systems employing CCD-scintillator arrays, computed radiography (CR) using storage phosphor plate; digital radiography (DR), using a pixel-matrix of amorphous selenium, or amorphous silicon diode coupled to scintillator. All these provide (a) in radiotherapy, accurate dose delivery to tumour, saving the surrounding tissues and (b) in radiodiagnosis, superior image quality with low patient exposure. Lastly, iPODs and flash drives are utilized for storage of gigabyte-size images encountered in medical and allied fields. Although oriented towards medical applications, some of these have been of great utility in other fields, such as industrial radiography as well as a host of other research areas. (author)

  16. The influence of respiratory motion on CT image volume definition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodríguez-Romero, Ruth, E-mail: rrromero@salud.madrid.org; Castro-Tejero, Pablo, E-mail: pablo.castro@salud.madrid.org [Servicio de Radiofísica y Protección Radiológica, Hospital Universitario Puerta de Hierro Majadahonda, 28222 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: Radiotherapy treatments are based on geometric and density information acquired from patient CT scans. It is well established that breathing motion during scan acquisition induces motion artifacts in CT images, which can alter the size, shape, and density of a patient's anatomy. The aim of this work is to examine and evaluate the impact of breathing motion on multislice CT imaging with respiratory synchronization (4DCT) and without it (3DCT). Methods: A specific phantom with a movable insert was used. Static and dynamic phantom acquisitions were obtained with a multislice CT. Four sinusoidal breath patterns were simulated to move known geometric structures longitudinally. Respiratory synchronized acquisitions (4DCT) were performed to generate images during inhale, intermediate, and exhale phases using prospective and retrospective techniques. Static phantom data were acquired in helical and sequential mode to define a baseline for each type of respiratory 4DCT technique. Taking into account the fact that respiratory 4DCT is not always available, 3DCT helical image studies were also acquired for several CT rotation periods. To study breath and acquisition coupling when respiratory 4DCT was not performed, the beginning of the CT image acquisition was matched with inhale, intermediate, or exhale respiratory phases, for each breath pattern. Other coupling scenarios were evaluated by simulating different phantom and CT acquisition parameters. Motion induced variations in shape and density were quantified by automatic threshold volume generation and Dice similarity coefficient calculation. The structure mass center positions were also determined to make a comparison with their theoretical expected position. Results: 4DCT acquisitions provided volume and position accuracies within ±3% and ±2 mm for structure dimensions >2 cm, breath amplitude ≤15 mm, and breath period ≥3 s. The smallest object (1 cm diameter) exceeded 5% volume variation for the breath

  17. A unified material decomposition framework for quantitative dual- and triple-energy CT imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wei; Vernekohl, Don; Han, Fei; Han, Bin; Peng, Hao; Yang, Yong; Xing, Lei; Min, James K

    2018-04-21

    Many clinical applications depend critically on the accurate differentiation and classi-fication of different types of materials in patient anatomy. This work introduces a unified framework for accurate nonlinear material decomposition and applies it, for the first time, in the concept of triple-energy CT (TECT) for enhanced material differentiation and classification as well as dual-energy CT METHODS: We express polychromatic projection into a linear combination of line integrals of material-selective images. The material decomposition is then turned into a problem of minimizing the least-squares difference between measured and estimated CT projections. The optimization problem is solved iteratively by updating the line integrals. The proposed technique is evaluated by using several numerical phantom measurements under different scanning protocols The triple-energy data acquisition is implemented at the scales of micro-CT and clinical CT imaging with commercial "TwinBeam" dual-source DECT configuration and a fast kV switching DECT configu-ration. Material decomposition and quantitative comparison with a photon counting detector and with the presence of a bow-tie filter are also performed. The proposed method provides quantitative material- and energy-selective images exam-ining realistic configurations for both dual- and triple-energy CT measurements. Compared to the polychromatic kV CT images, virtual monochromatic images show superior image quality. For the mouse phantom, quantitative measurements show that the differences between gadodiamide and iodine concentrations obtained using TECT and idealized photon counting CT (PCCT) are smaller than 8 mg/mL and 1 mg/mL, respectively. TECT outperforms DECT for multi-contrast CT imag-ing and is robust with respect to spectrum estimation. For the thorax phantom, the differences between the concentrations of the contrast map and the corresponding true reference values are smaller than 7 mg/mL for all of the realistic

  18. A new cubic phantom for PET/CT dosimetry: Experimental and Monte Carlo characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belinato, Walmir; Silva, Rogerio M.V.; Souza, Divanizia N.; Santos, William S.; Caldas, Linda V.E.; Perini, Ana P.; Neves, Lucio P.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, positron emission tomography (PET) associated with multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) has become a diagnostic technique widely disseminated to evaluate various malignant tumors and other diseases. However, during PET/CT examinations, the doses of ionizing radiation experienced by the internal organs of patients may be substantial. To study the doses involved in PET/CT procedures, a new cubic phantom of overlapping acrylic plates was developed and characterized. This phantom has a deposit for the placement of the fluorine-18 fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ( 18 F-FDG) solution. There are also small holes near the faces for the insertion of optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLD). The holes for OSLD are positioned at different distances from the 18 F-FDG deposit. The experimental results were obtained in two PET/CT devices operating with different parameters. Differences in the absorbed doses were observed in OSLD measurements due to the non-orthogonal positioning of the detectors inside the phantom. This phantom was also evaluated using Monte Carlo simulations, with the MCNPX code. The phantom and the geometrical characteristics of the equipment were carefully modeled in the MCNPX code, in order to develop a new methodology form comparison of experimental and simulated results, as well as to allow the characterization of PET/CT equipments in Monte Carlo simulations. All results showed good agreement, proving that this new phantom may be applied for these experiments. (authors)

  19. A new cubic phantom for PET/CT dosimetry: Experimental and Monte Carlo characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belinato, Walmir [Departamento de Ensino, Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia da Bahia, Campus Vitoria da Conquista, Zabele, Av. Amazonas 3150, 45030-220 Vitoria da Conquista, BA (Brazil); Silva, Rogerio M.V.; Souza, Divanizia N. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Sergipe-UFS, Sao Cristovao, Sergipe (Brazil); Santos, William S.; Caldas, Linda V.E. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares - IPEN-CNEN/SP, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2242, Cidade Universitaria, 05508-000 Sao Paulo SP (Brazil); Perini, Ana P.; Neves, Lucio P. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares - IPEN-CNEN/SP, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2242, Cidade Universitaria, 05508-000 Sao Paulo SP (Brazil); Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Uberlandia, Caixa Postal 593, 38400-902, Uberlandia, MG (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    In recent years, positron emission tomography (PET) associated with multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) has become a diagnostic technique widely disseminated to evaluate various malignant tumors and other diseases. However, during PET/CT examinations, the doses of ionizing radiation experienced by the internal organs of patients may be substantial. To study the doses involved in PET/CT procedures, a new cubic phantom of overlapping acrylic plates was developed and characterized. This phantom has a deposit for the placement of the fluorine-18 fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) solution. There are also small holes near the faces for the insertion of optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLD). The holes for OSLD are positioned at different distances from the {sup 18}F-FDG deposit. The experimental results were obtained in two PET/CT devices operating with different parameters. Differences in the absorbed doses were observed in OSLD measurements due to the non-orthogonal positioning of the detectors inside the phantom. This phantom was also evaluated using Monte Carlo simulations, with the MCNPX code. The phantom and the geometrical characteristics of the equipment were carefully modeled in the MCNPX code, in order to develop a new methodology form comparison of experimental and simulated results, as well as to allow the characterization of PET/CT equipments in Monte Carlo simulations. All results showed good agreement, proving that this new phantom may be applied for these experiments. (authors)

  20. A 4D digital phantom for patient-specific simulation of brain CT perfusion protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Boom, Rieneke; Manniesing, Rashindra; Oei, Marcel T H; van der Woude, Willem-Jan; Smit, Ewoud J; Laue, Hendrik O A; van Ginneken, Bram; Prokop, Mathias

    2014-07-01

    Optimizing CT brain perfusion protocols is a challenge because of the complex interaction between image acquisition, calculation of perfusion data, and patient hemodynamics. Several digital phantoms have been developed to avoid unnecessary patient exposure or suboptimum choice of parameters. The authors expand this idea by using realistic noise patterns and measured tissue attenuation curves representing patient-specific hemodynamics. The purpose of this work is to validate that this approach can realistically simulate mean perfusion values and noise on perfusion data for individual patients. The proposed 4D digital phantom consists of three major components: (1) a definition of the spatial structure of various brain tissues within the phantom, (2) measured tissue attenuation curves, and (3) measured noise patterns. Tissue attenuation curves were measured in patient data using regions of interest in gray matter and white matter. By assigning the tissue attenuation curves to the corresponding tissue curves within the phantom, patient-specific CTP acquisitions were retrospectively simulated. Noise patterns were acquired by repeatedly scanning an anthropomorphic skull phantom at various exposure settings. The authors selected 20 consecutive patients that were scanned for suspected ischemic stroke and constructed patient-specific 4D digital phantoms using the individual patients' hemodynamics. The perfusion maps of the patient data were compared with the digital phantom data. Agreement between phantom- and patient-derived data was determined for mean perfusion values and for standard deviation in de perfusion data using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) and a linear fit. ICCs ranged between 0.92 and 0.99 for mean perfusion values. ICCs for the standard deviation in perfusion maps were between 0.86 and 0.93. Linear fitting yielded slope values between 0.90 and 1.06. A patient-specific 4D digital phantom allows for realistic simulation of mean values and

  1. Stereotactic imaging for radiotherapy: accuracy of CT, MRI, PET and SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karger, Christian P; Hipp, Peter; Henze, Marcus; Echner, Gernot; Hoess, Angelika; Schad, Lothar; Hartmann, Guenther H

    2003-01-01

    CT, MRI, PET and SPECT provide complementary information for treatment planning in stereotactic radiotherapy. Stereotactic correlation of these images requires commissioning tests to confirm the localization accuracy of each modality. A phantom was developed to measure the accuracy of stereotactic localization for CT, MRI, PET and SPECT in the head and neck region. To this end, the stereotactically measured coordinates of structures within the phantom were compared with their mechanically defined coordinates. For MRI, PET and SPECT, measurements were performed using two different devices. For MRI, T1- and T2-weighted imaging sequences were applied. For each measurement, the mean radial deviation in space between the stereotactically measured and mechanically defined position of target points was determined. For CT, the mean radial deviation was 0.4 ± 0.2 mm. For MRI, the mean deviations ranged between 0.7 ± 0.2 mm and 1.4 ± 0.5 mm, depending on the MRI device and the imaging sequence. For PET, mean deviations of 1.1 ± 0.5 mm and 2.4 ± 0.3 mm were obtained. The mean deviations for SPECT were 1.6 ± 0.5 mm and 2.0 ± 0.6 mm. The phantom is well suited to determine the accuracy of stereotactic localization with CT, MRI, PET and SPECT in the head and neck region. The obtained accuracy is well below the physical resolution for CT, PET and SPECT, and of comparable magnitude for MRI. Since the localization accuracy may be device dependent, results obtained at one device cannot be generalized to others

  2. Image quality assessment for CT used on small animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cisneros, Isabela Paredes, E-mail: iparedesc@unal.edu.co; Agulles-Pedrós, Luis, E-mail: lagullesp@unal.edu.co [Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Departamento de Física, Grupo de Física Médica (Colombia)

    2016-07-07

    Image acquisition on a CT scanner is nowadays necessary in almost any kind of medical study. Its purpose, to produce anatomical images with the best achievable quality, implies the highest diagnostic radiation exposure to patients. Image quality can be measured quantitatively based on parameters such as noise, uniformity and resolution. This measure allows the determination of optimal parameters of operation for the scanner in order to get the best diagnostic image. A human Phillips CT scanner is the first one minded for veterinary-use exclusively in Colombia. The aim of this study was to measure the CT image quality parameters using an acrylic phantom and then, using the computational tool MATLAB, determine these parameters as a function of current value and window of visualization, in order to reduce dose delivery by keeping the appropriate image quality.

  3. Accuracy verification of PET-CT image fusion and its utilization in target delineation of radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xuetao; Yu Jinming; Yang Guoren; Gong Heyi

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Evaluate the accuracy of co-registration of PET and CT (PET-CT) images on line with phantom, and utilize it on patients to provide clinical evidence for target delineation in radiotherapy. Methods: A phantom with markers and different volume cylinders was infused with various concentrations of 18 FDG, and scanned at 4 mm by PET and CT respectively. After having been transmitted into GE eNTEGRA and treatment planning system (TPS) workstations, the images were fused and reconstructed. The distance between the markers and the errors were monitored in PET and CT images respectively. The volume of cylinder in PET and CT images were measured and compared by certain pixel value proportion deduction method. The same procedure was performed on the pulmonary tumor image in ten patients. Results: eNTEGRA and TPS workstations had a good length linearity, but the fusion error of the latter was markedly greater than the former. Tumors in different volume filled by varying concentrations of 18 FDG required different pixel deduction proportion. The cylinder volume of PET and CT images were almost the same, so were the images of pulmonary tumor of ten patients. Conclusions: The accuracy of image co-registration of PET-CT on line may fulfill the clinical demand. Pixel value proportion deduction method can be used for target delineation on PET image. (authors)

  4. SU-E-J-218: Evaluation of CT Images Created Using a New Metal Artifact Reduction Reconstruction Algorithm for Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niemkiewicz, J; Palmiotti, A; Miner, M; Stunja, L; Bergene, J [Lehigh Valley Health Network, Allentown, PA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Metal in patients creates streak artifacts in CT images. When used for radiation treatment planning, these artifacts make it difficult to identify internal structures and affects radiation dose calculations, which depend on HU numbers for inhomogeneity correction. This work quantitatively evaluates a new metal artifact reduction (MAR) CT image reconstruction algorithm (GE Healthcare CT-0521-04.13-EN-US DOC1381483) when metal is present. Methods: A Gammex Model 467 Tissue Characterization phantom was used. CT images were taken of this phantom on a GE Optima580RT CT scanner with and without steel and titanium plugs using both the standard and MAR reconstruction algorithms. HU values were compared pixel by pixel to determine if the MAR algorithm altered the HUs of normal tissues when no metal is present, and to evaluate the effect of using the MAR algorithm when metal is present. Also, CT images of patients with internal metal objects using standard and MAR reconstruction algorithms were compared. Results: Comparing the standard and MAR reconstructed images of the phantom without metal, 95.0% of pixels were within ±35 HU and 98.0% of pixels were within ±85 HU. Also, the MAR reconstruction algorithm showed significant improvement in maintaining HUs of non-metallic regions in the images taken of the phantom with metal. HU Gamma analysis (2%, 2mm) of metal vs. non-metal phantom imaging using standard reconstruction resulted in an 84.8% pass rate compared to 96.6% for the MAR reconstructed images. CT images of patients with metal show significant artifact reduction when reconstructed with the MAR algorithm. Conclusion: CT imaging using the MAR reconstruction algorithm provides improved visualization of internal anatomy and more accurate HUs when metal is present compared to the standard reconstruction algorithm. MAR reconstructed CT images provide qualitative and quantitative improvements over current reconstruction algorithms, thus improving radiation

  5. SU-E-J-218: Evaluation of CT Images Created Using a New Metal Artifact Reduction Reconstruction Algorithm for Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niemkiewicz, J; Palmiotti, A; Miner, M; Stunja, L; Bergene, J

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Metal in patients creates streak artifacts in CT images. When used for radiation treatment planning, these artifacts make it difficult to identify internal structures and affects radiation dose calculations, which depend on HU numbers for inhomogeneity correction. This work quantitatively evaluates a new metal artifact reduction (MAR) CT image reconstruction algorithm (GE Healthcare CT-0521-04.13-EN-US DOC1381483) when metal is present. Methods: A Gammex Model 467 Tissue Characterization phantom was used. CT images were taken of this phantom on a GE Optima580RT CT scanner with and without steel and titanium plugs using both the standard and MAR reconstruction algorithms. HU values were compared pixel by pixel to determine if the MAR algorithm altered the HUs of normal tissues when no metal is present, and to evaluate the effect of using the MAR algorithm when metal is present. Also, CT images of patients with internal metal objects using standard and MAR reconstruction algorithms were compared. Results: Comparing the standard and MAR reconstructed images of the phantom without metal, 95.0% of pixels were within ±35 HU and 98.0% of pixels were within ±85 HU. Also, the MAR reconstruction algorithm showed significant improvement in maintaining HUs of non-metallic regions in the images taken of the phantom with metal. HU Gamma analysis (2%, 2mm) of metal vs. non-metal phantom imaging using standard reconstruction resulted in an 84.8% pass rate compared to 96.6% for the MAR reconstructed images. CT images of patients with metal show significant artifact reduction when reconstructed with the MAR algorithm. Conclusion: CT imaging using the MAR reconstruction algorithm provides improved visualization of internal anatomy and more accurate HUs when metal is present compared to the standard reconstruction algorithm. MAR reconstructed CT images provide qualitative and quantitative improvements over current reconstruction algorithms, thus improving radiation

  6. Automated image quality assessment for chest CT scans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Anthony P; Xie, Yiting; Liu, Shuang

    2018-02-01

    Medical image quality needs to be maintained at standards sufficient for effective clinical reading. Automated computer analytic methods may be applied to medical images for quality assessment. For chest CT scans in a lung cancer screening context, an automated quality assessment method is presented that characterizes image noise and image intensity calibration. This is achieved by image measurements in three automatically segmented homogeneous regions of the scan: external air, trachea lumen air, and descending aorta blood. Profiles of CT scanner behavior are also computed. The method has been evaluated on both phantom and real low-dose chest CT scans and results show that repeatable noise and calibration measures may be realized by automated computer algorithms. Noise and calibration profiles show relevant differences between different scanners and protocols. Automated image quality assessment may be useful for quality control for lung cancer screening and may enable performance improvements to automated computer analysis methods. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  7. Image based Monte Carlo modeling for computational phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, M.; Wang, W.; Zhao, K.; Fan, Y.; Long, P.; Wu, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Full text of the publication follows. The evaluation on the effects of ionizing radiation and the risk of radiation exposure on human body has been becoming one of the most important issues for radiation protection and radiotherapy fields, which is helpful to avoid unnecessary radiation and decrease harm to human body. In order to accurately evaluate the dose on human body, it is necessary to construct more realistic computational phantom. However, manual description and verification of the models for Monte Carlo (MC) simulation are very tedious, error-prone and time-consuming. In addition, it is difficult to locate and fix the geometry error, and difficult to describe material information and assign it to cells. MCAM (CAD/Image-based Automatic Modeling Program for Neutronics and Radiation Transport Simulation) was developed as an interface program to achieve both CAD- and image-based automatic modeling. The advanced version (Version 6) of MCAM can achieve automatic conversion from CT/segmented sectioned images to computational phantoms such as MCNP models. Imaged-based automatic modeling program(MCAM6.0) has been tested by several medical images and sectioned images. And it has been applied in the construction of Rad-HUMAN. Following manual segmentation and 3D reconstruction, a whole-body computational phantom of Chinese adult female called Rad-HUMAN was created by using MCAM6.0 from sectioned images of a Chinese visible human dataset. Rad-HUMAN contains 46 organs/tissues, which faithfully represented the average anatomical characteristics of the Chinese female. The dose conversion coefficients (Dt/Ka) from kerma free-in-air to absorbed dose of Rad-HUMAN were calculated. Rad-HUMAN can be applied to predict and evaluate dose distributions in the Treatment Plan System (TPS), as well as radiation exposure for human body in radiation protection. (authors)

  8. Development of a phantom for quality control of radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheidegger Soboll, D.; Reuters Schelin, H.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this work was to build a phantom for quality control of stereotactic radiosurgery on linear accelerators. The outward appearance is a translucent human head filled with water and enclosing an insert with test objects of known shapes. The phantom was submitted to computerized tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and angiography exams, in order to perform a radiosurgery planning. Contours of the internal structures on the therapy planning system were drawn over the MRI images. Through the image fusion of CT and MRI, the contour data was transferred to CT images. Stereotactic registration of CT and angiography was made. One isocenter treatment was created, and using the stereotactic coordinates given by the therapy planning system, the phantom was placed on a linac. X-ray images were performed in order to verify the final positioning of the planned isocenter. In the whole process the phantom showed usefulness and adequacy for the positioning quality control of stereotactic radiosurgery with linacs, according to the main documents concerning the issue. (author)

  9. Development of XFCT imaging strategy for monitoring the spatial distribution of platinum-based chemodrugs: Instrumentation and phantom validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuang Yu [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS), Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305-5847 and Medical Physics Program, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, Nevada 89154-3037 (United States); Pratx, Guillem; Bazalova, Magdalena; Qian Jianguo; Meng Bowen; Xing Lei [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS), Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305-5847 (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: Developing an imaging method to directly monitor the spatial distribution of platinum-based (Pt) drugs at the tumor region is of critical importance for early assessment of treatment efficacy and personalized treatment. In this study, the authors investigated the feasibility of imaging platinum (Pt)-based drug distribution using x-ray fluorescence (XRF, a.k.a. characteristic x ray) CT (XFCT). Methods: A 5-mm-diameter pencil beam produced by a polychromatic x-ray source equipped with a tungsten anode was used to stimulate emission of XRF photons from Pt drug embedded within a water phantom. The phantom was translated and rotated relative to the stationary pencil beam in a first-generation CT geometry. The x-ray energy spectrum was collected for 18 s at each position using a cadmium telluride detector. The spectra were then used for the K-shell XRF peak isolation and sinogram generation for Pt. The distribution and concentration of Pt were reconstructed with an iterative maximum likelihood expectation maximization algorithm. The capability of XFCT to multiplexed imaging of Pt, gadolinium (Gd), and iodine (I) within a water phantom was also investigated. Results: Measured XRF spectrum showed a sharp peak characteristic of Pt with a narrow full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) (FWHM{sub K{alpha}1}= 1.138 keV, FWHM{sub K{alpha}2}= 1.052 keV). The distribution of Pt drug in the water phantom was clearly identifiable on the reconstructed XRF images. Our results showed a linear relationship between the XRF intensity of Pt and its concentrations (R{sup 2}= 0.995), suggesting that XFCT is capable of quantitative imaging. A transmission CT image was also obtained to show the potential of the approach for providing attenuation correction and morphological information. Finally, the distribution of Pt, Gd, and I in the water phantom was clearly identifiable in the reconstructed images from XFCT multiplexed imaging. Conclusions: XFCT is a promising modality for monitoring

  10. WE-FG-207B-09: Experimental Assessment of Noise and Spatial Resolution in Virtual Non-Contrast Dual-Energy CT Images Across Multiple Patient Sizes and CT Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montoya, J; Ferrero, A; Yu, L; Leng, S; McCollough, C

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the noise and spatial resolution properties of virtual non-contrast (VNC) dual-energy CT images compared to true non-contrast (TNC) images across multiple patient sizes and CT systems. Methods: Torso-shaped water phantoms with lateral widths of 25, 30, 35, 40 and 45 cm and a high resolution bar pattern phantom (Catphan CTP528) were scanned using 2nd and 3rd generation dual-source CT systems (Scanner A: Somatom Definition Flash, Scanner B: Somatom Force, Siemens Healthcare) in dual-energy scan mode with the same radiation dose for a given phantom size. Tube potentials of 80/Sn140 and 100/Sn140 on Scanner A and 80/Sn150, 90/Sn150 and 100/Sn150 on Scanner B were evaluated to examine the impact of spectral separation. Images were reconstructed using a medium sharp quantitative kernel (Qr40), 1.0-mm thickness, 1.0-mm interval and 20 cm field of view. Mixed images served as TNC images. VNC images were created using commercial software (Virtual Unenhanced, Syngo VIA Version VA30, Siemens Healthcare). The noise power spectrum (NPS), area under the NPS, peak frequency of the NPS and image noise were measured for every phantom size and tube potential combination in TNC and VNC images. Results were compared within and between CT systems. Results: Minimal shift in NPS peak frequencies was observed in VNC images compared to TNC for NPS having pronounced peaks. Image noise and area under the NPS were higher in VNC images compared to TNC images across all tube potentials and for scanner A compared to scanner B. Limiting spatial resolution was deemed to be identical between VNC and TNC images. Conclusion: Quantitative assessment of image quality in VNC images demonstrated higher noise but equivalent spatial resolution compared to TNC images. Decreased noise was observed in the 3rd generation dual-source CT system for tube potential pairs having greater spectral separation. Dr. McCollough receives research support from Siemens Healthcare

  11. WE-FG-207B-09: Experimental Assessment of Noise and Spatial Resolution in Virtual Non-Contrast Dual-Energy CT Images Across Multiple Patient Sizes and CT Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montoya, J; Ferrero, A; Yu, L; Leng, S; McCollough, C [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the noise and spatial resolution properties of virtual non-contrast (VNC) dual-energy CT images compared to true non-contrast (TNC) images across multiple patient sizes and CT systems. Methods: Torso-shaped water phantoms with lateral widths of 25, 30, 35, 40 and 45 cm and a high resolution bar pattern phantom (Catphan CTP528) were scanned using 2nd and 3rd generation dual-source CT systems (Scanner A: Somatom Definition Flash, Scanner B: Somatom Force, Siemens Healthcare) in dual-energy scan mode with the same radiation dose for a given phantom size. Tube potentials of 80/Sn140 and 100/Sn140 on Scanner A and 80/Sn150, 90/Sn150 and 100/Sn150 on Scanner B were evaluated to examine the impact of spectral separation. Images were reconstructed using a medium sharp quantitative kernel (Qr40), 1.0-mm thickness, 1.0-mm interval and 20 cm field of view. Mixed images served as TNC images. VNC images were created using commercial software (Virtual Unenhanced, Syngo VIA Version VA30, Siemens Healthcare). The noise power spectrum (NPS), area under the NPS, peak frequency of the NPS and image noise were measured for every phantom size and tube potential combination in TNC and VNC images. Results were compared within and between CT systems. Results: Minimal shift in NPS peak frequencies was observed in VNC images compared to TNC for NPS having pronounced peaks. Image noise and area under the NPS were higher in VNC images compared to TNC images across all tube potentials and for scanner A compared to scanner B. Limiting spatial resolution was deemed to be identical between VNC and TNC images. Conclusion: Quantitative assessment of image quality in VNC images demonstrated higher noise but equivalent spatial resolution compared to TNC images. Decreased noise was observed in the 3rd generation dual-source CT system for tube potential pairs having greater spectral separation. Dr. McCollough receives research support from Siemens Healthcare.

  12. Image quality optimization and evaluation of linearly mixed images in dual-source, dual-energy CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Lifeng; Primak, Andrew N.; Liu Xin; McCollough, Cynthia H.

    2009-01-01

    In dual-source dual-energy CT, the images reconstructed from the low- and high-energy scans (typically at 80 and 140 kV, respectively) can be mixed together to provide a single set of non-material-specific images for the purpose of routine diagnostic interpretation. Different from the material-specific information that may be obtained from the dual-energy scan data, the mixed images are created with the purpose of providing the interpreting physician a single set of images that have an appearance similar to that in single-energy images acquired at the same total radiation dose. In this work, the authors used a phantom study to evaluate the image quality of linearly mixed images in comparison to single-energy CT images, assuming the same total radiation dose and taking into account the effect of patient size and the dose partitioning between the low-and high-energy scans. The authors first developed a method to optimize the quality of the linearly mixed images such that the single-energy image quality was compared to the best-case image quality of the dual-energy mixed images. Compared to 80 kV single-energy images for the same radiation dose, the iodine CNR in dual-energy mixed images was worse for smaller phantom sizes. However, similar noise and similar or improved iodine CNR relative to 120 kV images could be achieved for dual-energy mixed images using the same total radiation dose over a wide range of patient sizes (up to 45 cm lateral thorax dimension). Thus, for adult CT practices, which primarily use 120 kV scanning, the use of dual-energy CT for the purpose of material-specific imaging can also produce a set of non-material-specific images for routine diagnostic interpretation that are of similar or improved quality relative to single-energy 120 kV scans.

  13. The relationship between image quality and CT dose index of multi-slice low-dose chest CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Xiaohua; Shao Jiang; Shi Jingyun; You Zhengqian; Li Shijun; Xue Yongming

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To explore the rationality and possibility of multi-slice low-dose CT scan in the examination of the chest. Methods: (1) X-ray dose index measurement: 120 kV tube voltage, 0.75 s rotation, 8 mm and 3 mm slice thickness, and the tube current setting of 115.0, 40.0, 25.0, and 7.5 mAs were employed in every section. The X-ray radiation dose was measured and compared statistically. (2) phantom measurement of homogeneity and noise: The technical parameters were 120 kV, 0.75 s, 8 mm and 3 mm sections, and every slice was scanned using tube current of 115.0, 40.0, 25.0, and 7.5 mAs. Five same regions of interest were measured on every image. The homogeneity and noise level of CT were appraised. (3) The multi-slice low-dose CT in patients: 30 patients with mass and 30 with patch shadow in the lung were selected randomly. The technical parameters were 120 kV, 0.75 s, 8 mm and 3 mm slice thickness. 115.0, 40.0, 25.0, 15.0, and 7.5 mAs tube current were employed in each same slice. Otherwise, 15 cases with helical scan were examined using 190, 150, 40, 25, and 15 mAs tube current. The reconstruction images of MIP, MPR, CVR, HRCT, 3D, CT virtual endoscopy, and variety of interval reconstruction were compared. (4) Evaluation of image quality: CT images were evaluated by four doctors using single-blind method, and 3 degrees including normal image, image with few artifact, and image with excessive artifact, were employed and analyzed statistically. Results: (1) The CT dose index with 115.0 mAs tube current exceeded those of 40.0, 25.0, and 7.5 mAs by about 60%, 70%, and 85%, respectively. (2) The phantom measurement showed that the lower of CT dose the lower of homogeneity, the lower of CT dose the higher of noise level. (3) Result of image quality evaluation: The percentage of the normal image had no significant difference between 8 and 3 mm in 115, 40, and 25 mAs (P>0.05). Conclusion: Multi-slice low-dose chest CT technology may protect the patients and guarantee the

  14. Electrical characterization of bolus material as phantom for use in electrical impedance and computed tomography fusion imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvind Kaur Grewal

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Phantoms are widely used in medical imaging to predict image quality prior to clinical imaging. This paper discusses the possible use of bolus material, as a conductivity phantom, for validation and interpretation of electrical impedance tomography (EIT images. Bolus is commonly used in radiation therapy to mimic tissue. When irradiated, it has radiological characteristics similar to tissue. With increased research interest in CT/EIT fusion imaging there is a need to find a material which has both the absorption coefficient and electrical conductivity similar to biological tissues. In the present study the electrical properties, specifically resistivity, of various commercially available bolus materials were characterized by comparing their frequency response with that of in-vivo connective adipose tissue. It was determined that the resistivity of Gelatin Bolus is similar to in-vivo tissue in the frequency range 10 kHz to 1MHz and therefore has potential to be used in EIT/CT fusion imaging studies.

  15. SU-E-J-209: Verification of 3D Surface Registration Between Stereograms and CT Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, T; Gifford, K [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Smith, B [MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Salehpour, M [M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Stereography can provide a visualization of the skin surface for radiation therapy patients. The aim of this study was to verify the registration algorithm in a commercial image analysis software, 3dMDVultus, for the fusion of stereograms and CT images. Methods: CT and stereographic scans were acquired of a head phantom and a deformable phantom. CT images were imported in 3dMDVultus and the surface contours were generated by threshold segmentation. Stereograms were reconstructed in 3dMDVultus. The resulting surfaces were registered with Vultus algorithm and then exported to in-house registration software and compared with four algorithms: rigid, affine, non-rigid iterative closest point (ICP) and b-spline algorithm. RMS (root-mean-square residuals of the surface point distances) error between the registered CT and stereogram surfaces was calculated and analyzed. Results: For the head phantom, the maximum RMS error between registered CT surfaces to stereogram was 6.6 mm for Vultus algorithm, whereas the mean RMS error was 0.7 mm. For the deformable phantom, the maximum RMS error was 16.2 mm for Vultus algorithm, whereas the mean RMS error was 4.4 mm. Non-rigid ICP demonstrated the best registration accuracy, as the mean of RMS errors were both within 1 mm. Conclusion: The accuracy of registration algorithm in 3dMDVultus was verified and exceeded RMS of 2 mm for deformable cases. Non-rigid ICP and b-spline algorithms improve the registration accuracy for both phantoms, especially in deformable one. For those patients whose body habitus deforms during radiation therapy, more advanced nonrigid algorithms need to be used.

  16. SU-E-I-48: The Behavior of AEC in Scan Regions Outside the Localizer Radiograph FOV: An In Phantom Study of CT Systems From Four Vendors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Supanich, M [Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL (United States); Bevins, N [Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: This review of scanners from 4 major manufacturers examines the clinical impact of performing CT scans that extend into areas of the body that were not acquired in the CT localizer radiograph. Methods: Anthropomorphic chest and abdomen phantoms were positioned together on the tables of CT scanners from 4 different vendors. All of the scanners offered an Automatic Exposure Control (AEC) option with both lateral and axial tube current modulation. A localizer radiograph was taken covering the entire extent of both phantoms and then the scanner's Chest-Abdomen-Pelvis (CAP) study was performed with the clinical AEC settings employed and the scan and reconstruction range extending from the superior portion of the chest phantom through the inferior portion of the abdomen phantom. A new study was then initiated with a localizer radiograph extending the length of the chest phantom (not covering the abdomen phantom). The same CAP protocol and AEC settings were then used to scan and reconstruct the entire length of both phantoms. Scan parameters at specific locations in the abdomen phantom from both studies were investigated using the information contained in the DICOM metadata of the reconstructed images. Results: The AEC systems on all scanners utilized different tube current settings in the abdomen phantom for the scan completed without the full localizer radiograph. The AEC system behavior was also scanner dependent with the default manual tube current, the maximum tube current and the tube current at the last known position observed as outcomes. Conclusion: The behavior of the AEC systems of CT scanners in regions not covered by the localizer radiograph is vendor dependent. To ensure optimal image quality and radiation exposure it is important to include the entire planned scan region in the localizer radiograph.

  17. SU-E-I-48: The Behavior of AEC in Scan Regions Outside the Localizer Radiograph FOV: An In Phantom Study of CT Systems From Four Vendors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Supanich, M; Bevins, N

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This review of scanners from 4 major manufacturers examines the clinical impact of performing CT scans that extend into areas of the body that were not acquired in the CT localizer radiograph. Methods: Anthropomorphic chest and abdomen phantoms were positioned together on the tables of CT scanners from 4 different vendors. All of the scanners offered an Automatic Exposure Control (AEC) option with both lateral and axial tube current modulation. A localizer radiograph was taken covering the entire extent of both phantoms and then the scanner's Chest-Abdomen-Pelvis (CAP) study was performed with the clinical AEC settings employed and the scan and reconstruction range extending from the superior portion of the chest phantom through the inferior portion of the abdomen phantom. A new study was then initiated with a localizer radiograph extending the length of the chest phantom (not covering the abdomen phantom). The same CAP protocol and AEC settings were then used to scan and reconstruct the entire length of both phantoms. Scan parameters at specific locations in the abdomen phantom from both studies were investigated using the information contained in the DICOM metadata of the reconstructed images. Results: The AEC systems on all scanners utilized different tube current settings in the abdomen phantom for the scan completed without the full localizer radiograph. The AEC system behavior was also scanner dependent with the default manual tube current, the maximum tube current and the tube current at the last known position observed as outcomes. Conclusion: The behavior of the AEC systems of CT scanners in regions not covered by the localizer radiograph is vendor dependent. To ensure optimal image quality and radiation exposure it is important to include the entire planned scan region in the localizer radiograph

  18. Evaluation of conventional imaging performance in a research whole-body CT system with a photon-counting detector array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhicong; Leng, Shuai; Jorgensen, Steven M; Li, Zhoubo; Gutjahr, Ralf; Chen, Baiyu; Halaweish, Ahmed F; Kappler, Steffen; Yu, Lifeng; Ritman, Erik L; McCollough, Cynthia H

    2016-02-21

    This study evaluated the conventional imaging performance of a research whole-body photon-counting CT system and investigated its feasibility for imaging using clinically realistic levels of x-ray photon flux. This research system was built on the platform of a 2nd generation dual-source CT system: one source coupled to an energy integrating detector (EID) and the other coupled to a photon-counting detector (PCD). Phantom studies were conducted to measure CT number accuracy and uniformity for water, CT number energy dependency for high-Z materials, spatial resolution, noise, and contrast-to-noise ratio. The results from the EID and PCD subsystems were compared. The impact of high photon flux, such as pulse pile-up, was assessed by studying the noise-to-tube-current relationship using a neonate water phantom and high x-ray photon flux. Finally, clinical feasibility of the PCD subsystem was investigated using anthropomorphic phantoms, a cadaveric head, and a whole-body cadaver, which were scanned at dose levels equivalent to or higher than those used clinically. Phantom measurements demonstrated that the PCD subsystem provided comparable image quality to the EID subsystem, except that the PCD subsystem provided slightly better longitudinal spatial resolution and about 25% improvement in contrast-to-noise ratio for iodine. The impact of high photon flux was found to be negligible for the PCD subsystem: only subtle high-flux effects were noticed for tube currents higher than 300 mA in images of the neonate water phantom. Results of the anthropomorphic phantom and cadaver scans demonstrated comparable image quality between the EID and PCD subsystems. There were no noticeable ring, streaking, or cupping/capping artifacts in the PCD images. In addition, the PCD subsystem provided spectral information. Our experiments demonstrated that the research whole-body photon-counting CT system is capable of providing clinical image quality at clinically realistic levels of x

  19. Evaluation of conventional imaging performance in a research whole-body CT system with a photon-counting detector array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Zhicong; Leng, Shuai; Li, Zhoubo; Chen, Baiyu; Yu, Lifeng; McCollough, Cynthia H; Jorgensen, Steven M; Ritman, Erik L; Gutjahr, Ralf; Kappler, Steffen; Halaweish, Ahmed F

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the conventional imaging performance of a research whole-body photon-counting CT system and investigated its feasibility for imaging using clinically realistic levels of x-ray photon flux. This research system was built on the platform of a 2nd generation dual-source CT system: one source coupled to an energy integrating detector (EID) and the other coupled to a photon-counting detector (PCD). Phantom studies were conducted to measure CT number accuracy and uniformity for water, CT number energy dependency for high-Z materials, spatial resolution, noise, and contrast-to-noise ratio. The results from the EID and PCD subsystems were compared. The impact of high photon flux, such as pulse pile-up, was assessed by studying the noise-to-tube-current relationship using a neonate water phantom and high x-ray photon flux. Finally, clinical feasibility of the PCD subsystem was investigated using anthropomorphic phantoms, a cadaveric head, and a whole-body cadaver, which were scanned at dose levels equivalent to or higher than those used clinically. Phantom measurements demonstrated that the PCD subsystem provided comparable image quality to the EID subsystem, except that the PCD subsystem provided slightly better longitudinal spatial resolution and about 25% improvement in contrast-to-noise ratio for iodine. The impact of high photon flux was found to be negligible for the PCD subsystem: only subtle high-flux effects were noticed for tube currents higher than 300 mA in images of the neonate water phantom. Results of the anthropomorphic phantom and cadaver scans demonstrated comparable image quality between the EID and PCD subsystems. There were no noticeable ring, streaking, or cupping/capping artifacts in the PCD images. In addition, the PCD subsystem provided spectral information. Our experiments demonstrated that the research whole-body photon-counting CT system is capable of providing clinical image quality at clinically realistic levels of x

  20. Precision of quantitative computed tomography texture analysis using image filtering: A phantom study for scanner variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasaka, Koichiro; Akai, Hiroyuki; Mackin, Dennis; Court, Laurence; Moros, Eduardo; Ohtomo, Kuni; Kiryu, Shigeru

    2017-05-01

    Quantitative computed tomography (CT) texture analyses for images with and without filtration are gaining attention to capture the heterogeneity of tumors. The aim of this study was to investigate how quantitative texture parameters using image filtering vary among different computed tomography (CT) scanners using a phantom developed for radiomics studies.A phantom, consisting of 10 different cartridges with various textures, was scanned under 6 different scanning protocols using four CT scanners from four different vendors. CT texture analyses were performed for both unfiltered images and filtered images (using a Laplacian of Gaussian spatial band-pass filter) featuring fine, medium, and coarse textures. Forty-five regions of interest were placed for each cartridge (x) in a specific scan image set (y), and the average of the texture values (T(x,y)) was calculated. The interquartile range (IQR) of T(x,y) among the 6 scans was calculated for a specific cartridge (IQR(x)), while the IQR of T(x,y) among the 10 cartridges was calculated for a specific scan (IQR(y)), and the median IQR(y) was then calculated for the 6 scans (as the control IQR, IQRc). The median of their quotient (IQR(x)/IQRc) among the 10 cartridges was defined as the variability index (VI).The VI was relatively small for the mean in unfiltered images (0.011) and for standard deviation (0.020-0.044) and entropy (0.040-0.044) in filtered images. Skewness and kurtosis in filtered images featuring medium and coarse textures were relatively variable across different CT scanners, with VIs of 0.638-0.692 and 0.430-0.437, respectively.Various quantitative CT texture parameters are robust and variable among different scanners, and the behavior of these parameters should be taken into consideration.

  1. SU-F-T-441: Dose Calculation Accuracy in CT Images Reconstructed with Artifact Reduction Algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, C; Chan, S; Lee, F; Ngan, R [Queen Elizabeth Hospital (Hong Kong); Lee, V [University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, HK (Hong Kong)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Accuracy of radiotherapy dose calculation in patients with surgical implants is complicated by two factors. First is the accuracy of CT number, second is the dose calculation accuracy. We compared measured dose with dose calculated on CT images reconstructed with FBP and an artifact reduction algorithm (OMAR, Philips) for a phantom with high density inserts. Dose calculation were done with Varian AAA and AcurosXB. Methods: A phantom was constructed with solid water in which 2 titanium or stainless steel rods could be inserted. The phantom was scanned with the Philips Brillance Big Bore CT. Image reconstruction was done with FBP and OMAR. Two 6 MV single field photon plans were constructed for each phantom. Radiochromic films were placed at different locations to measure the dose deposited. One plan has normal incidence on the titanium/steel rods. In the second plan, the beam is at almost glancing incidence on the metal rods. Measurements were then compared with dose calculated with AAA and AcurosXB. Results: The use of OMAR images slightly improved the dose calculation accuracy. The agreement between measured and calculated dose was best with AXB and image reconstructed with OMAR. Dose calculated on titanium phantom has better agreement with measurement. Large discrepancies were seen at points directly above and below the high density inserts. Both AAA and AXB underestimated the dose directly above the metal surface, while overestimated the dose below the metal surface. Doses measured downstream of metal were all within 3% of calculated values. Conclusion: When doing treatment planning for patients with metal implants, care must be taken to acquire correct CT images to improve dose calculation accuracy. Moreover, great discrepancies in measured and calculated dose were observed at metal/tissue interface. Care must be taken in estimating the dose in critical structures that come into contact with metals.

  2. Frameless image registration of X-ray CT and SPECT by volume matching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Yuko; Kihara, Tomohiko; Yui, Nobuharu; Kinoshita, Fujimi; Kamimura, Yoshitsugu; Yamada, Yoshifumi.

    1998-01-01

    Image registration of functional (SPECT) and morphological (X-ray CT/MRI) images is studied in order to improve the accuracy and the quantity of the image diagnosis. We have developed a new frameless registration method of X-ray CT and SPECT image using transmission CT image acquired for absorption correction of SPECT images. This is the automated registration method and calculates the transformation matrix between the two coordinate systems of image data by the optimization method. This registration method is based on the similar physical property of X-ray CT and transmission CT image. The three-dimensional overlap of the bone region is used for image matching. We verified by a phantom test that it can provide a good result of within two millimeters error. We also evaluated visually the accuracy of the registration method by the application study of SPECT, X-ray CT, and transmission CT head images. This method can be carried out accurately without any frames. We expect this registration method becomes an efficient tool to improve image diagnosis and medical treatment. (author)

  3. Comparison of the image quality between volumetric and conventional high-resolution CT with 64-slice row CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Yanli; Zhang Lei; Zhao Xia; Ma Min; Zhai Renyou

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To compare the image quality between volumetric high-resolution CT (VHRCT) and conventional high-resolution CT (CHRCT), and investigate the feasibility of VHRCT. Methods: Catphan 412 phantom was scanned with protocols of CHRCT and VHRCT on a set of GE Lightspeed VCT. The spatial-resolution (LP/cm), noise (standard deviation in an ROI) and radiation close (CTDI) were recorded for each CT scan. Difference of noise between CHRCT and VHRCT were evaluated by paired t test. In clinical study, 32 patients were scanned with VHRCT and CHRCT protocols. The image quality of CHRCT and VHRCT was rated and compared. The quality difference between CHRCT and VHRCT was assessed by Wilcoxon paired signed rank sum test. Results: In phantom study, the in-plane spatial-resolution of both VHRCT and CHRCT was 11 LP/cm for axial images and 12 LP/cm for coronal reformatted images. The noise of VHRCT and CHRCT was (69.18±2.77)HU and (54.62±2.12) HU respectively (t=-15.929, P 0.05). The quality assessment scores of VHRCT coronal reformatted images and CHRCT coronal reformatted images were 3.05 and 1.88 respectively with significant difference (Z= -5.088, P<0.01). Conclusion: The image quality of VHRCT cross-sectional image is similar to that of CHRCT. Multiplanar images with high resolution of VHRCT are recommended. The radiation dose of VHRCT remains to be optimized. (authors)

  4. Tissue Equivalent Phantom Design for Characterization of a Coherent Scatter X-ray Imaging System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albanese, Kathryn Elizabeth

    Scatter in medical imaging is typically cast off as image-related noise that detracts from meaningful diagnosis. It is therefore typically rejected or removed from medical images. However, it has been found that every material, including cancerous tissue, has a unique X-ray coherent scatter signature that can be used to identify the material or tissue. Such scatter-based tissue-identification provides the advantage of locating and identifying particular materials over conventional anatomical imaging through X-ray radiography. A coded aperture X-ray coherent scatter spectral imaging system has been developed in our group to classify different tissue types based on their unique scatter signatures. Previous experiments using our prototype have demonstrated that the depth-resolved coherent scatter spectral imaging system (CACSSI) can discriminate healthy and cancerous tissue present in the path of a non-destructive x-ray beam. A key to the successful optimization of CACSSI as a clinical imaging method is to obtain anatomically accurate phantoms of the human body. This thesis describes the development and fabrication of 3D printed anatomical scatter phantoms of the breast and lung. The purpose of this work is to accurately model different breast geometries using a tissue equivalent phantom, and to classify these tissues in a coherent x-ray scatter imaging system. Tissue-equivalent anatomical phantoms were designed to assess the capability of the CACSSI system to classify different types of breast tissue (adipose, fibroglandular, malignant). These phantoms were 3D printed based on DICOM data obtained from CT scans of prone breasts. The phantoms were tested through comparison of measured scatter signatures with those of adipose and fibroglandular tissue from literature. Tumors in the phantom were modeled using a variety of biological tissue including actual surgically excised benign and malignant tissue specimens. Lung based phantoms have also been printed for future

  5. A technique of using gated-CT images to determine internal target volume (ITV) for fractionated stereotactic lung radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Jianyue; Ajlouni, Munther; Chen Qing; Yin, Fang-Fang; Movsas, Benjamin

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: To develop and evaluate a technique and procedure of using gated-CT images in combination with PET image to determine the internal target volume (ITV), which could reduce the planning target volume (PTV) with adequate target coverage. Patients and methods: A skin marker-based gating system connected to a regular single slice CT scanner was used for this study. A motion phantom with adjustable motion amplitude was used to evaluate the CT gating system. Specifically, objects of various sizes/shapes, considered as virtual tumors, were placed on the phantom to evaluate the number of phases of gated images required to determine the ITV while taking into account tumor size, shape and motion. A procedure of using gated-CT and PET images to define ITV for patients was developed and was tested in patients enrolled in an IRB approved protocol. Results: The CT gating system was capable of removing motion artifacts for target motion as large as 3-cm when it was gated at optimal phases. A phantom study showed that two gated-CT scans at the end of expiration and the end of inspiration would be sufficient to determine the ITV for tumor motion less than 1-cm, and another mid-phase scan would be required for tumors with 2-cm motion, especially for small tumors. For patients, the ITV encompassing visible tumors in all sets of gated-CT and regular spiral CT images seemed to be consistent with the target volume determined from PET images. PTV expanded from the ITV with a setup uncertainty margin had less volume than PTVs from spiral CT images with a 10-mm generalized margin or an individualized margin determined at fluoroscopy. Conclusions: A technique of determining the ITV using gated-CT images was developed and was clinically implemented successfully for fractionated stereotactic lung radiotherapy

  6. Unsharp masking technique as a preprocessing filter for improvement of 3D-CT image of bony structure in the maxillofacial region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harada, Takuya; Nishikawa, Keiichi; Kuroyanagi, Kinya

    1998-01-01

    We evaluated the usefulness of the unsharp masking technique as a preprocessing filter to improve 3D-CT images of bony structure in the maxillofacial region. The effect of the unsharp masking technique with several combinations of mask size and weighting factor on image resolution was investigated using a spatial frequency phantom made of bone-equivalent material. The 3D-CT images were obtained with scans perpendicular to and parallel to the phantom plates. The contrast transfer function (CTF) and the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of each spatial frequency component were measured. The FWHM was expressed as a ratio against the actual thickness of phantom plate. The effect on pseudoforamina was assessed using sliced CT images obtained in clinical bony 3D-CT examinations. The effect of the unsharp masking technique on image quality was also visually evaluated using five clinical fracture cases. CTFs did not change. FWHM ratios of original 3D-CT images were smaller than 1.0, regardless of the scanning direction. Those in scans perpendicular to the phantom plates were not changed by the unsharp masking technique. Those in parallel scanning were increased by mask size and weighting factor. The area of pseudoforamina decreased with increases in mask size and weighting factor. The combination of mask size 3 x 3 pixels and weighting factor 5 was optimal. Visual evaluation indicated that preprocessing with the unsharp masking technique improved the image quality of the 3D-CT images. The unsharp masking technique is useful as a preprocessing filter to improve the 3D-CT image of bony structure in the maxillofacial region. (author)

  7. [Development of a digital chest phantom for studies on energy subtraction techniques].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Norio; Taniguchi, Anna; Noto, Kimiya; Shimosegawa, Masayuki; Ogura, Toshihiro; Doi, Kunio

    2014-03-01

    Digital chest phantoms continue to play a significant role in optimizing imaging parameters for chest X-ray examinations. The purpose of this study was to develop a digital chest phantom for studies on energy subtraction techniques under ideal conditions without image noise. Computed tomography (CT) images from the LIDC (Lung Image Database Consortium) were employed to develop a digital chest phantom. The method consisted of the following four steps: 1) segmentation of the lung and bone regions on CT images; 2) creation of simulated nodules; 3) transformation to attenuation coefficient maps from the segmented images; and 4) projection from attenuation coefficient maps. To evaluate the usefulness of digital chest phantoms, we determined the contrast of the simulated nodules in projection images of the digital chest phantom using high and low X-ray energies, soft tissue images obtained by energy subtraction, and "gold standard" images of the soft tissues. Using our method, the lung and bone regions were segmented on the original CT images. The contrast of simulated nodules in soft tissue images obtained by energy subtraction closely matched that obtained using the gold standard images. We thus conclude that it is possible to carry out simulation studies based on energy subtraction techniques using the created digital chest phantoms. Our method is potentially useful for performing simulation studies for optimizing the imaging parameters in chest X-ray examinations.

  8. Automatic exposure control in pediatric and adult multidetector CT examinations: A phantom study on dose reduction and image quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papadakis, Antonios E.; Perisinakis, Kostas; Damilakis, John [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Crete, P.O. Box 1352, Iraklion 71110, Crete (Greece)

    2008-10-15

    The aim of this study was to assess the potential of a modern x,y,z modulation-based automatic exposure control system (AEC) for dose reduction in pediatric and adult multidetector CT (MDCT) imaging and evaluate the quality of the images obtained. Five physical anthropomorphic phantoms that simulate the average individual as neonate, 1-, 5-, 10-year old child, and adult were scanned with a MDCT scanner, equipped with a modern AEC system. Dose reduction (%DR) was calculated as the percentage difference of the mean modulated and the preset tube current-time product that is prescribed for standard head and body scan protocols. The effect of the tube potential and the orientation of the topogram acquisition on dose reduction were assessed. Image quality was evaluated on the basis of image noise and signal to noise ratio (SNR). The dose reduction values achieved in pediatric phantoms were remarkably lower than those achieved for the adult. The efficiency of the AEC is decreased at 80 kVp compared to higher tube potentials and for helical scans following an anterior posterior (AP-AEC) compared to a lateral (LAT-AEC) topogram acquisition. In AP-AEC scans, the dose reduction ranged between 4.7 and 34.7% for neonate, 15.4 and 30.9% for 1 year old, 3.1 and 26.7% for 5 years old, 1.2 and 58.7% for 10 years old, and 15.5 and 57.4% for adult. In LAT-AEC scans, the corresponding dose reduction ranged between 11.0 and 36.5%, 27.2 and 35.7%, 11.3 and 35.6%, 0.3 and 67.0%, and 15.0 and 61.7%, respectively. AP-AEC scans resulted in a 17.1% and 19.7% dose increase in the thorax of neonate and the pelvis of the 10-year old phantom, respectively. The variation in the measured noise among images obtained along the scanning z axis was lower in AEC activated compared to fixed milliamperes scans. However, image noise was significantly increased (P<.001) and SNR significantly decreased (P<.001) in most AEC activated compared to fixed milliamperes scans. In conclusion, AEC resulted in a (i

  9. Radiation dose and cancer risk from pediatric CT examinations on 64-slice CT: A phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Shiting; Law, Martin Wai-Ming; Huang Bingsheng; Ng, Sherry; Li Ziping; Meng Quanfei; Khong, Pek-Lan

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To measure the radiation dose from CT scans in an anthropomorphic phantom using a 64-slice MDCT, and to estimate the associated cancer risk. Materials and methods: Organ doses were measured with a 5-year-old phantom and thermoluminescent dosimeters. Four protocols; head CT, thorax CT, abdomen CT and pelvis CT were studied. Cancer risks, in the form of lifetime attributable risk (LAR) of cancer incidence, were estimated by linear extrapolation using the organ radiation doses and the LAR data. Results: The effective doses for head, thorax, abdomen and pelvis CT, were 0.7 mSv, 3.5 mSv, 3.0 mSv, 1.3 mSv respectively. The organs with the highest dose were; for head CT, salivary gland (22.33 mGy); for thorax CT, breast (7.89 mGy); for abdomen CT, colon (6.62 mGy); for pelvis CT, bladder (4.28 mGy). The corresponding LARs for boys and girls were 0.015-0.053% and 0.034-0.155% respectively. The organs with highest LARs were; for head CT, thyroid gland (0.003% for boys, 0.015% for girls); for thorax CT, lung for boys (0.014%) and breast for girls (0.069%); for abdomen CT, colon for boys (0.017%) and lung for girls (0.016%); for pelvis CT, bladder for both boys and girls (0.008%). Conclusion: The effective doses from these common pediatric CT examinations ranged from 0.7 mSv to 3.5 mSv and the associated lifetime cancer risks were found to be up to 0.16%, with some organs of higher radiosensitivity including breast, thyroid gland, colon and lungs.

  10. TH-AB-209-12: Tissue Equivalent Phantom with Excised Human Tissue for Assessing Clinical Capabilities of Coherent Scatter Imaging Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albanese, K; Morris, R; Spencer, J [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Greenberg, J [Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Kapadia, A [Carl E Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Durham, NC (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Previously we reported the development of anthropomorphic tissue-equivalent scatter phantoms of the human breast. Here we present the first results from the scatter imaging of the tissue equivalent breast phantoms for breast cancer diagnosis. Methods: A breast phantom was designed to assess the capability of coded aperture coherent x-ray scatter imaging to classify different types of breast tissue (adipose, fibroglandular, tumor). The phantom geometry was obtained from a prone breast geometry scanned on a dedicated breast CT system. The phantom was 3D printed using the segmented DICOM breast CT data. The 3D breast phantom was filled with lard (as a surrogate for adipose tissue) and scanned in different geometries alongside excised human breast tissues (obtained from lumpectomy and mastectomy procedures). The raw data were reconstructed using a model-based reconstruction algorithm and yielded the location and form factor (i.e., momentum transfer (q) spectrum) of the materials that were imaged. The measured material form factors were then compared to the ground truth measurements acquired by x-ray diffraction (XRD) imaging. Results: Our scatter imaging system was able to define the location and composition of the various materials and tissues within the phantom. Cancerous breast tissue was detected and classified through automated spectral matching and an 86% correlation threshold. The total scan time for the sample was approximately 10 minutes and approaches workflow times for clinical use in intra-operative or other diagnostic tasks. Conclusion: This work demonstrates the first results from an anthropomorphic tissue equivalent scatter phantom to characterize a coherent scatter imaging system. The functionality of the system shows promise in applications such as intra-operative margin detection or virtual biopsy in the diagnosis of breast cancer. Future work includes using additional patient-derived tissues (e.g., human fat), and modeling additional organs

  11. SU-E-I-93: Improved Imaging Quality for Multislice Helical CT Via Sparsity Regularized Iterative Image Reconstruction Method Based On Tensor Framelet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nam, H; Guo, M; Lee, K; Li, R; Xing, L; Gao, H

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Inspired by compressive sensing, sparsity regularized iterative reconstruction method has been extensively studied. However, its utility pertinent to multislice helical 4D CT for radiotherapy with respect to imaging quality, dose, and time has not been thoroughly addressed. As the beginning of such an investigation, this work carries out the initial comparison of reconstructed imaging quality between sparsity regularized iterative method and analytic method through static phantom studies using a state-of-art 128-channel multi-slice Siemens helical CT scanner. Methods: In our iterative method, tensor framelet (TF) is chosen as the regularization method for its superior performance from total variation regularization in terms of reduced piecewise-constant artifacts and improved imaging quality that has been demonstrated in our prior work. On the other hand, X-ray transforms and its adjoints are computed on-the-fly through GPU implementation using our previous developed fast parallel algorithms with O(1) complexity per computing thread. For comparison, both FDK (approximate analytic method) and Katsevich algorithm (exact analytic method) are used for multislice helical CT image reconstruction. Results: The phantom experimental data with different imaging doses were acquired using a state-of-art 128-channel multi-slice Siemens helical CT scanner. The reconstructed image quality was compared between TF-based iterative method, FDK and Katsevich algorithm with the quantitative analysis for characterizing signal-to-noise ratio, image contrast, and spatial resolution of high-contrast and low-contrast objects. Conclusion: The experimental results suggest that our tensor framelet regularized iterative reconstruction algorithm improves the helical CT imaging quality from FDK and Katsevich algorithm for static experimental phantom studies that have been performed

  12. PET/CT image registration: Preliminary tests for its application to clinical dosimetry in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banos-Capilla, M. C.; Garcia, M. A.; Bea, J.; Pla, C.; Larrea, L.; Lopez, E.

    2007-01-01

    The quality of dosimetry in radiotherapy treatment requires the accurate delimitation of the gross tumor volume. This can be achieved by complementing the anatomical detail provided by CT images through fusion with other imaging modalities that provide additional metabolic and physiological information. Therefore, use of multiple imaging modalities for radiotherapy treatment planning requires an accurate image registration method. This work describes tests carried out on a Discovery LS positron emission/computed tomography (PET/CT) system by General Electric Medical Systems (GEMS), for its later use to obtain images to delimit the target in radiotherapy treatment. Several phantoms have been used to verify image correlation, in combination with fiducial markers, which were used as a system of external landmarks. We analyzed the geometrical accuracy of two different fusion methods with the images obtained with these phantoms. We first studied the fusion method used by the PET/CT system by GEMS (hardware fusion) on the basis that there is satisfactory coincidence between the reconstruction centers in CT and PET systems; and secondly the fiducial fusion, a registration method, by means of least-squares fitting algorithm of a landmark points system. The study concluded with the verification of the centroid position of some phantom components in both imaging modalities. Centroids were estimated through a calculation similar to center-of-mass, weighted by the value of the CT number and the uptake intensity in PET. The mean deviations found for the hardware fusion method were: vertical bar Δx vertical bar ±σ=3.3 mm±1.0 mm and vertical bar Δy vertical bar ±σ=3.6 mm±1.0 mm. These values were substantially improved upon applying fiducial fusion based on external landmark points: vertical bar Δx vertical bar ±σ=0.7 mm±0.8 mm and vertical bar Δy vertical bar ±σ=0.3 mm±1.7 mm. We also noted that differences found for each of the fusion methods were similar for

  13. WE-AB-BRA-11: Improved Imaging of Permanent Prostate Brachytherapy Seed Implants by Combining an Endorectal X-Ray Sensor with a CT Scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steiner, J; Matthews, K; Jia, G

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To test feasibility of the use of a digital endorectal x-ray sensor for improved image resolution of permanent brachytherapy seed implants compared to conventional CT. Methods: Two phantoms simulating the male pelvic region were used to test the capabilities of a digital endorectal x-ray sensor for imaging permanent brachytherapy seed implants. Phantom 1 was constructed from acrylic plastic with cavities milled in the locations of the prostate and the rectum. The prostate cavity was filled a Styrofoam plug implanted with 10 training seeds. Phantom 2 was constructed from tissue-equivalent gelatins and contained a prostate phantom implanted with 18 strands of training seeds. For both phantoms, an intraoral digital dental x-ray sensor was placed in the rectum within 2 cm of the seed implants. Scout scans were taken of the phantoms over a limited arc angle using a CT scanner (80 kV, 120–200 mA). The dental sensor was removed from the phantoms and normal helical CT and scout (0 degree) scans using typical parameters for pelvic CT (120 kV, auto-mA) were collected. A shift-and add tomosynthesis algorithm was developed to localize seed plane location normal to detector face. Results: The endorectal sensor produced images with improved resolution compared to CT scans. Seed clusters and individual seed geometry were more discernable using the endorectal sensor. Seed 3D locations, including seeds that were not located in every projection image, were discernable using the shift and add algorithm. Conclusion: This work shows that digital endorectal x-ray sensors are a feasible method for improving imaging of permanent brachytherapy seed implants. Future work will consist of optimizing the tomosynthesis technique to produce higher resolution, lower dose images of 1) permanent brachytherapy seed implants for post-implant dosimetry and 2) fine anatomic details for imaging and managing prostatic disease compared to CT images. Funding: LSU Faculty Start-up Funding

  14. WE-AB-BRA-11: Improved Imaging of Permanent Prostate Brachytherapy Seed Implants by Combining an Endorectal X-Ray Sensor with a CT Scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steiner, J; Matthews, K; Jia, G [Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To test feasibility of the use of a digital endorectal x-ray sensor for improved image resolution of permanent brachytherapy seed implants compared to conventional CT. Methods: Two phantoms simulating the male pelvic region were used to test the capabilities of a digital endorectal x-ray sensor for imaging permanent brachytherapy seed implants. Phantom 1 was constructed from acrylic plastic with cavities milled in the locations of the prostate and the rectum. The prostate cavity was filled a Styrofoam plug implanted with 10 training seeds. Phantom 2 was constructed from tissue-equivalent gelatins and contained a prostate phantom implanted with 18 strands of training seeds. For both phantoms, an intraoral digital dental x-ray sensor was placed in the rectum within 2 cm of the seed implants. Scout scans were taken of the phantoms over a limited arc angle using a CT scanner (80 kV, 120–200 mA). The dental sensor was removed from the phantoms and normal helical CT and scout (0 degree) scans using typical parameters for pelvic CT (120 kV, auto-mA) were collected. A shift-and add tomosynthesis algorithm was developed to localize seed plane location normal to detector face. Results: The endorectal sensor produced images with improved resolution compared to CT scans. Seed clusters and individual seed geometry were more discernable using the endorectal sensor. Seed 3D locations, including seeds that were not located in every projection image, were discernable using the shift and add algorithm. Conclusion: This work shows that digital endorectal x-ray sensors are a feasible method for improving imaging of permanent brachytherapy seed implants. Future work will consist of optimizing the tomosynthesis technique to produce higher resolution, lower dose images of 1) permanent brachytherapy seed implants for post-implant dosimetry and 2) fine anatomic details for imaging and managing prostatic disease compared to CT images. Funding: LSU Faculty Start-up Funding

  15. Integration of PET-CT and cone-beam CT for image-guided radiotherapy with high image quality and registration accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, T.-H.; Liang, C.-H.; Wu, J.-K.; Lien, C.-Y.; Yang, B.-H.; Huang, Y.-H.; Lee, J. J. S.

    2009-07-01

    Hybrid positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) system enhances better differentiation of tissue uptake of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) and provides much more diagnostic value in the non-small-cell lung cancer and nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). In PET-CT, high quality CT images not only offer diagnostic value on anatomic delineation of the tissues but also shorten the acquisition time for attenuation correction (AC) compared with PET-alone imaging. The linear accelerators equipped with the X-ray cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging system for image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) provides excellent verification on position setup error. The purposes of our study were to optimize the CT acquisition protocols of PET-CT and to integrate the PET-CT and CBCT for IGRT. The CT imaging parameters were modified in PET-CT for increasing the image quality in order to enhance the diagnostic value on tumour delineation. Reproducibility and registration accuracy via bone co-registration algorithm between the PET-CT and CBCT were evaluated by using a head phantom to simulate a head and neck treatment condition. Dose measurement in computed tomography dose index (CTDI) was also estimated. Optimization of the CT acquisition protocols of PET-CT was feasible in this study. Co-registration accuracy between CBCT and PET-CT on axial and helical modes was in the range of 1.06 to 2.08 and 0.99 to 2.05 mm, respectively. In our result, it revealed that the accuracy of the co-registration with CBCT on helical mode was more accurate than that on axial mode. Radiation doses in CTDI were 4.76 to 18.5 mGy and 4.83 to 18.79 mGy on axial and helical modes, respectively. Registration between PET-CT and CBCT is a state-of-the-art registration technology which could provide much information on diagnosis and accurate tumour contouring on radiotherapy while implementing radiotherapy procedures. This novelty technology of PET-CT and cone-beam CT integration for IGRT may have a

  16. Integration of PET-CT and cone-beam CT for image-guided radiotherapy with high image quality and registration accuracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, T-H; Liang, C-H; Wu, J-K; Lien, C-Y; Yang, B-H; Lee, J J S; Huang, Y-H

    2009-01-01

    Hybrid positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) system enhances better differentiation of tissue uptake of 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG) and provides much more diagnostic value in the non-small-cell lung cancer and nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). In PET-CT, high quality CT images not only offer diagnostic value on anatomic delineation of the tissues but also shorten the acquisition time for attenuation correction (AC) compared with PET-alone imaging. The linear accelerators equipped with the X-ray cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging system for image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) provides excellent verification on position setup error. The purposes of our study were to optimize the CT acquisition protocols of PET-CT and to integrate the PET-CT and CBCT for IGRT. The CT imaging parameters were modified in PET-CT for increasing the image quality in order to enhance the diagnostic value on tumour delineation. Reproducibility and registration accuracy via bone co-registration algorithm between the PET-CT and CBCT were evaluated by using a head phantom to simulate a head and neck treatment condition. Dose measurement in computed tomography dose index (CTDI) was also estimated. Optimization of the CT acquisition protocols of PET-CT was feasible in this study. Co-registration accuracy between CBCT and PET-CT on axial and helical modes was in the range of 1.06 to 2.08 and 0.99 to 2.05 mm, respectively. In our result, it revealed that the accuracy of the co-registration with CBCT on helical mode was more accurate than that on axial mode. Radiation doses in CTDI were 4.76 to 18.5 mGy and 4.83 to 18.79 mGy on axial and helical modes, respectively. Registration between PET-CT and CBCT is a state-of-the-art registration technology which could provide much information on diagnosis and accurate tumour contouring on radiotherapy while implementing radiotherapy procedures. This novelty technology of PET-CT and cone-beam CT integration for IGRT may have a

  17. Implications of CT noise and artifacts for quantitative 99mTc SPECT/CT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hulme, K. W.; Kappadath, S. C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This paper evaluates the effects of computed tomography (CT) image noise and artifacts on quantitative single-photon emission computed-tomography (SPECT) imaging, with the aim of establishing an appropriate range of CT acquisition parameters for low-dose protocols with respect to accurate SPECT attenuation correction (AC). Methods: SPECT images of two geometric and one anthropomorphic phantom were reconstructed iteratively using CT scans acquired at a range of dose levels (CTDI vol = 0.4 to 46 mGy). Resultant SPECT image quality was evaluated by comparing mean signal, background noise, and artifacts to SPECT images reconstructed using the highest dose CT for AC. Noise injection was performed on linear-attenuation (μ) maps to determine the CT noise threshold for accurate AC. Results: High levels of CT noise (σ ∼ 200–400 HU) resulted in low μ-maps noise (σ ∼ 1%–3%). Noise levels greater than ∼10% in 140 keV μ-maps were required to produce visibly perceptible increases of ∼15% in 99m Tc SPECT images. These noise levels would be achieved at low CT dose levels (CTDI vol = 4 μGy) that are over 2 orders of magnitude lower than the minimum dose for diagnostic CT scanners. CT noise could also lower (bias) the expected μ values. The relative error in reconstructed SPECT signal trended linearly with the relative shift in μ. SPECT signal was, on average, underestimated in regions corresponding with beam-hardening artifacts in CT images. Any process that has the potential to change the CT number of a region by ∼100 HU (e.g., misregistration between CT images and SPECT images due to motion, the presence of contrast in CT images) could introduce errors in μ 140 keV on the order of 10%, that in turn, could introduce errors on the order of ∼10% into the reconstructed 99m Tc SPECT image. Conclusions: The impact of CT noise on SPECT noise was demonstrated to be negligible for clinically achievable CT parameters. Because CT dose levels that affect

  18. Design and development of a new pulsating cardiac coronary phantom for ECG-gated CT and its experimental characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Yun; Sato, Munekuni; Kimura, Fumiko; Jinzaki, Masahiro; Kuribayashi, Sachio; Horiguchi, Jun; Ito, Katsuhide

    2005-01-01

    The optimal pulsating cardiac phantom is an important tool for the evaluation of cardiac images and cardiac applications on electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated multidetector-row CT (MDCT). The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the design and fabrication of the pulsating cardiac coronary phantom. The newly developed pulsating cardiac coronary phantom has the following five key advantages: a driver component that uses only one servomotor to move the phantom in three dimensions (X, Y, and Z directions) with 16 presets of different heart types (heartbeat: 0-120 bpm; ejection fraction: 0-90%); versatile pumping and filling phases to simulate a real heart in a cardiac cycle can be incorporated into the driver sequence including shift of patient heartbeat or irregular pulse (maximum: 200 different heart waves in one scan); a cardiac coronary component constituted of an acrylic/silicon/rubber tube (2-6 mm inner diameter) with stent/in-stent restenosis/stenosis/soft plaque/calcification parts and maximum 16 coronary arteries that can be attached to the phantom in the same scan; the complete phantom can be submerged in a tank to simulate the heart and its surrounding tissues; ECG gating can be from interior trigger and exterior trigger. It has been confirmed that the developed pulsating cardiac phantom is very useful to quantitatively assess imaging of the heart and coronary arteries during phantom experiments. (author)

  19. Radiological image interpretation for hematoma and small tumors simulated in a head and neck phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, Larissa; Campos, Tarcisio Passos Ribeiro

    2009-01-01

    Subarachnoidal hemorrhages (HSA) are caused by aneurysms and their symptom usually becomes evident after a rupture. Nevertheless, there are situations in which the aneurysms compress a nerve or produce a bleed before the rupture happens, as consequence one alert signal like headache occurs. It, often occurs after minutes or weeks previous the major rupture. The main goal is to prevent a massive hemorrhage. Thus the Computer Tomography (CT) scan of skull provides a basic and specific function: to reveal the position where the hemorrhage was produced, guiding to a additional medical procedures. On the other hand, CT does not prevent the cerebral tumor development, but precise diagnostic for some symptoms such as vomits, nauseas, epileptic attacks, weakness in arms or legs, require this image protocol. CT has its fundamental importance to tumor detection. Indeed CT reveals its importance in the tumor early diagnosis. Specialized training in CT analysis shall be done. Ahead of a precise diagnosis to manager an early intervention, a CT diagnostic training is suitable for a favorable prognostic. In this context, focusing on propose of radiological inquires; a head and neck phantom will be used to simulate hematomas and cerebral tumors. Images of CT of skull will be used to identify these lesions physically implanted in phantom. The radiological response will be analyzed with the purpose of validation of the skull's CT diagnosis, for a double blind test. The diagnostic with non contrast CT shows only higher 5mm diameter subjects (tumors) identified by the double blind test. Hemorrhage is identified by only the administrator (single-blind test). As conclusion, the author's launches the hypothesis that this object simulator shall provide assistance for specialized training on pathology interpretation on radiological images. (author)

  20. Integrated image presentation of transmission and fluorescent X-ray CT using synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeniya, T.; Takeda, T. E-mail: ttakeda@md.tsukuba.ac.jp; Yu, Q.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hyodo, K.; Yuasa, T.; Hiranaka, Y.; Itai, Y.; Akatsuka, T

    2001-07-21

    We have developed a computed tomography (CT) system with synchrotron radiation (SR) to detect fluorescent X-rays and transmitted X-rays simultaneously. Both SR transmission X-ray CT (SR-TXCT) and SR fluorescent X-ray CT (SR-FXCT) can describe cross-sectional images with high spatial and contrast resolutions as compared to conventional CT. TXCT gives morphological information and FXCT gives functional information of organs. So, superposed display system for SR-FXCT and SR-TXCT images has been developed for clinical diagnosis with higher reliability. Preliminary experiment with brain phantom was carried out and the superposition of both images was performed. The superposed SR-CT image gave us both functional and morphological information easily with high reliability, thus demonstrating the usefulness of this system.

  1. Integrated image presentation of transmission and fluorescent X-ray CT using synchrotron radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeniya, T.; Takeda, T.; Yu, Q.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hyodo, K.; Yuasa, T.; Hiranaka, Y.; Itai, Y.; Akatsuka, T.

    2001-07-01

    We have developed a computed tomography (CT) system with synchrotron radiation (SR) to detect fluorescent X-rays and transmitted X-rays simultaneously. Both SR transmission X-ray CT (SR-TXCT) and SR fluorescent X-ray CT (SR-FXCT) can describe cross-sectional images with high spatial and contrast resolutions as compared to conventional CT. TXCT gives morphological information and FXCT gives functional information of organs. So, superposed display system for SR-FXCT and SR-TXCT images has been developed for clinical diagnosis with higher reliability. Preliminary experiment with brain phantom was carried out and the superposition of both images was performed. The superposed SR-CT image gave us both functional and morphological information easily with high reliability, thus demonstrating the usefulness of this system.

  2. Dual-source spiral CT with pitch up to 3.2 and 75 ms temporal resolution: image reconstruction and assessment of image quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flohr, Thomas G; Leng, Shuai; Yu, Lifeng; Aiimendinger, Thomas; Bruder, Herbert; Petersilka, Martin; Eusemann, Christian D; Stierstorfer, Karl; Schmidt, Bernhard; McCollough, Cynthia H

    2009-12-01

    To present the theory for image reconstruction of a high-pitch, high-temporal-resolution spiral scan mode for dual-source CT (DSCT) and evaluate its image quality and dose. With the use of two x-ray sources and two data acquisition systems, spiral CT exams having a nominal temporal resolution per image of up to one-quarter of the gantry rotation time can be acquired using pitch values up to 3.2. The scan field of view (SFOV) for this mode, however, is limited to the SFOV of the second detector as a maximum, depending on the pitch. Spatial and low contrast resolution, image uniformity and noise, CT number accuracy and linearity, and radiation dose were assessed using the ACR CT accreditation phantom, a 30 cm diameter cylindrical water phantom or a 32 cm diameter cylindrical PMMA CTDI phantom. Slice sensitivity profiles (SSPs) were measured for different nominal slice thicknesses, and an anthropomorphic phantom was used to assess image artifacts. Results were compared between single-source scans at pitch = 1.0 and dual-source scans at pitch = 3.2. In addition, image quality and temporal resolution of an ECG-triggered version of the DSCT high-pitch spiral scan mode were evaluated with a moving coronary artery phantom, and radiation dose was assessed in comparison with other existing cardiac scan techniques. No significant differences in quantitative measures of image quality were found between single-source scans at pitch = 1.0 and dual-source scans at pitch = 3.2 for spatial and low contrast resolution, CT number accuracy and linearity, SSPs, image uniformity, and noise. The pitch value (1.6 pitch 3.2) had only a minor impact on radiation dose and image noise when the effective tube current time product (mA s/pitch) was kept constant. However, while not severe, artifacts were found to be more prevalent for the dual-source pitch = 3.2 scan mode when structures varied markedly along the z axis, particularly for head scans. Images of the moving coronary artery phantom

  3. Dual-source spiral CT with pitch up to 3.2 and 75 ms temporal resolution: Image reconstruction and assessment of image quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flohr, Thomas G.; Leng Shuai; Yu Lifeng; Allmendinger, Thomas; Bruder, Herbert; Petersilka, Martin; Eusemann, Christian D.; Stierstorfer, Karl; Schmidt, Bernhard; McCollough, Cynthia H.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To present the theory for image reconstruction of a high-pitch, high-temporal-resolution spiral scan mode for dual-source CT (DSCT) and evaluate its image quality and dose. Methods: With the use of two x-ray sources and two data acquisition systems, spiral CT exams having a nominal temporal resolution per image of up to one-quarter of the gantry rotation time can be acquired using pitch values up to 3.2. The scan field of view (SFOV) for this mode, however, is limited to the SFOV of the second detector as a maximum, depending on the pitch. Spatial and low contrast resolution, image uniformity and noise, CT number accuracy and linearity, and radiation dose were assessed using the ACR CT accreditation phantom, a 30 cm diameter cylindrical water phantom or a 32 cm diameter cylindrical PMMA CTDI phantom. Slice sensitivity profiles (SSPs) were measured for different nominal slice thicknesses, and an anthropomorphic phantom was used to assess image artifacts. Results were compared between single-source scans at pitch=1.0 and dual-source scans at pitch=3.2. In addition, image quality and temporal resolution of an ECG-triggered version of the DSCT high-pitch spiral scan mode were evaluated with a moving coronary artery phantom, and radiation dose was assessed in comparison with other existing cardiac scan techniques. Results: No significant differences in quantitative measures of image quality were found between single-source scans at pitch=1.0 and dual-source scans at pitch=3.2 for spatial and low contrast resolution, CT number accuracy and linearity, SSPs, image uniformity, and noise. The pitch value (1.6≤pitch≤3.2) had only a minor impact on radiation dose and image noise when the effective tube current time product (mA s/pitch) was kept constant. However, while not severe, artifacts were found to be more prevalent for the dual-source pitch=3.2 scan mode when structures varied markedly along the z axis, particularly for head scans. Images of the moving

  4. Dual-source spiral CT with pitch up to 3.2 and 75 ms temporal resolution: Image reconstruction and assessment of image quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flohr, Thomas G.; Leng Shuai; Yu Lifeng; Allmendinger, Thomas; Bruder, Herbert; Petersilka, Martin; Eusemann, Christian D.; Stierstorfer, Karl; Schmidt, Bernhard; McCollough, Cynthia H. [Siemens Healthcare, Computed Tomography, 91301 Forchheim, Germany and Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Eberhard-Karls-Universitaet, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States); Siemens Healthcare, Computed Tomography, 91301 Forchheim (Germany); Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States)

    2009-12-15

    Purpose: To present the theory for image reconstruction of a high-pitch, high-temporal-resolution spiral scan mode for dual-source CT (DSCT) and evaluate its image quality and dose. Methods: With the use of two x-ray sources and two data acquisition systems, spiral CT exams having a nominal temporal resolution per image of up to one-quarter of the gantry rotation time can be acquired using pitch values up to 3.2. The scan field of view (SFOV) for this mode, however, is limited to the SFOV of the second detector as a maximum, depending on the pitch. Spatial and low contrast resolution, image uniformity and noise, CT number accuracy and linearity, and radiation dose were assessed using the ACR CT accreditation phantom, a 30 cm diameter cylindrical water phantom or a 32 cm diameter cylindrical PMMA CTDI phantom. Slice sensitivity profiles (SSPs) were measured for different nominal slice thicknesses, and an anthropomorphic phantom was used to assess image artifacts. Results were compared between single-source scans at pitch=1.0 and dual-source scans at pitch=3.2. In addition, image quality and temporal resolution of an ECG-triggered version of the DSCT high-pitch spiral scan mode were evaluated with a moving coronary artery phantom, and radiation dose was assessed in comparison with other existing cardiac scan techniques. Results: No significant differences in quantitative measures of image quality were found between single-source scans at pitch=1.0 and dual-source scans at pitch=3.2 for spatial and low contrast resolution, CT number accuracy and linearity, SSPs, image uniformity, and noise. The pitch value (1.6{<=}pitch{<=}3.2) had only a minor impact on radiation dose and image noise when the effective tube current time product (mA s/pitch) was kept constant. However, while not severe, artifacts were found to be more prevalent for the dual-source pitch=3.2 scan mode when structures varied markedly along the z axis, particularly for head scans. Images of the moving

  5. CT dose profiles and MSAD calculation in a chest phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Bruno Beraldo; Silva, Teogenes Augusto da

    2011-01-01

    For optimizing patient doses in computed tomography (CT), the Brazilian legislation has only established diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) in terms of Multiple Scan Average Dose (MSAD) in a typical adult as a quality control parameter for CT scanners. Compliance with the DRLs can be verified by measuring the Computed Tomography Air Kerma Index with a calibrated pencil ionization chamber or by obtaining the dose distribution in CT scans. An analysis of the quality of five CT scanners in Belo Horizonte was done in terms of dose profile of chest scans and MSAD determinations. Measurements were done with rod shape lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD-100) distributed in cylinders positioned in peripheral and central regions of a polymethylmethacrylate chest phantom. The peripheral regions presented higher dose values. The longitudinal dose variation can be observed and the maximum dose was recorded at the edges of the phantom at the midpoint of the longitudinal axis. The MSAD results were in according to the DRL of 25 mGy established by Brazilian legislation. The results contribute to disseminate to hospitals and radiologists the proper procedure to use the thermoluminescent dosimeters for the calculation of the MSAD from the CT dose profiles and to notice the compliance with the DRLs. (author)

  6. SU-F-I-01: Normalized Mean Glandular Dose Values for Dedicated Breast CT Using Realistic Breast-Shaped Phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez, A [Department of Radiology, Biomedical Engineering Graduate Group, University of California Davis, Sacramento, CA (United States); Boone, J [Departments of Radiology and Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Engeering Graduate Group, University of California Davis, Sacramento, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To estimate normalized mean glandular dose values for dedicated breast CT (DgN-CT) using breast CT-derived phantoms and compare to estimations using cylindrical phantoms. Methods: Segmented breast CT (bCT) volume data sets (N=219) were used to measure effective diameter profiles and were grouped into quintiles by volume. The profiles were averaged within each quintile to represent the range of breast sizes found clinically. These profiles were then used to generate five voxelized computational phantoms (V1, V2, V3, V4, V5 for the small to large phantom sizes, respectively), and loaded into the MCNP6 lattice geometry to simulate normalized mean glandular dose coefficients (DgN-CT) using the system specifications of the Doheny-prototype bCT scanner in our laboratory. The DgN-CT coefficients derived from the bCT-derived breast-shaped phantoms were compared to those generated using a simpler cylindrical phantom using a constant volume, and the following constraints: (1) Length=1.5*radius; (2) radius determined at chest wall (Rcw), and (3) radius determined at the phantom center-of-mass (Rcm). Results: The change in Dg-NCT coefficients averaged across all phantom sizes, was - 0.5%, 19.8%, and 1.3%, for constraints 1–3, respectively. This suggests that the cylindrical assumption is a good approximation if the radius is taken at the breast center-of-mass, but using the radius at the chest wall results in an underestimation of the glandular dose. Conclusion: The DgN-CT coefficients for bCT-derived phantoms were compared against the assumption of a cylindrical phantom and proved to be essentially equivalent when the cylinder radius was set to r=1.5/L or Rcm. While this suggests that for dosimetry applications a patient’s breast can be approximated as a cylinder (if the correct radius is applied), this assumes a homogenous composition of breast tissue and the results may be different if the realistic heterogeneous distribution of glandular tissue is considered

  7. A cross-platform survey of CT image quality and dose from routine abdomen protocols and a method to systematically standardize image quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Favazza, Christopher P; Duan, Xinhui; Zhang, Yi; Yu, Lifeng; Leng, Shuai; Kofler, James M; Bruesewitz, Michael R; McCollough, Cynthia H

    2015-01-01

    Through this investigation we developed a methodology to evaluate and standardize CT image quality from routine abdomen protocols across different manufacturers and models. The influence of manufacturer-specific automated exposure control systems on image quality was directly assessed to standardize performance across a range of patient sizes. We evaluated 16 CT scanners across our health system, including Siemens, GE, and Toshiba models. Using each practice’s routine abdomen protocol, we measured spatial resolution, image noise, and scanner radiation output (CTDI vol ). Axial and in-plane spatial resolutions were assessed through slice sensitivity profile (SSP) and modulation transfer function (MTF) measurements, respectively. Image noise and CTDI vol values were obtained for three different phantom sizes. SSP measurements demonstrated a bimodal distribution in slice widths: an average of 6.2  ±  0.2 mm using GE’s ‘Plus’ mode reconstruction setting and 5.0  ±  0.1 mm for all other scanners. MTF curves were similar for all scanners. Average spatial frequencies at 50%, 10%, and 2% MTF values were 3.24  ±  0.37, 6.20  ±  0.34, and 7.84  ±  0.70 lp cm −1 , respectively. For all phantom sizes, image noise and CTDI vol varied considerably: 6.5–13.3 HU (noise) and 4.8–13.3 mGy (CTDI vol ) for the smallest phantom; 9.1–18.4 HU and 9.3–28.8 mGy for the medium phantom; and 7.8–23.4 HU and 16.0–48.1 mGy for the largest phantom. Using these measurements and benchmark SSP, MTF, and image noise targets, CT image quality can be standardized across a range of patient sizes. (paper)

  8. A cross-platform survey of CT image quality and dose from routine abdomen protocols and a method to systematically standardize image quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favazza, Christopher P; Duan, Xinhui; Zhang, Yi; Yu, Lifeng; Leng, Shuai; Kofler, James M; Bruesewitz, Michael R; McCollough, Cynthia H

    2015-11-07

    Through this investigation we developed a methodology to evaluate and standardize CT image quality from routine abdomen protocols across different manufacturers and models. The influence of manufacturer-specific automated exposure control systems on image quality was directly assessed to standardize performance across a range of patient sizes. We evaluated 16 CT scanners across our health system, including Siemens, GE, and Toshiba models. Using each practice's routine abdomen protocol, we measured spatial resolution, image noise, and scanner radiation output (CTDIvol). Axial and in-plane spatial resolutions were assessed through slice sensitivity profile (SSP) and modulation transfer function (MTF) measurements, respectively. Image noise and CTDIvol values were obtained for three different phantom sizes. SSP measurements demonstrated a bimodal distribution in slice widths: an average of 6.2  ±  0.2 mm using GE's 'Plus' mode reconstruction setting and 5.0  ±  0.1 mm for all other scanners. MTF curves were similar for all scanners. Average spatial frequencies at 50%, 10%, and 2% MTF values were 3.24  ±  0.37, 6.20  ±  0.34, and 7.84  ±  0.70 lp cm(-1), respectively. For all phantom sizes, image noise and CTDIvol varied considerably: 6.5-13.3 HU (noise) and 4.8-13.3 mGy (CTDIvol) for the smallest phantom; 9.1-18.4 HU and 9.3-28.8 mGy for the medium phantom; and 7.8-23.4 HU and 16.0-48.1 mGy for the largest phantom. Using these measurements and benchmark SSP, MTF, and image noise targets, CT image quality can be standardized across a range of patient sizes.

  9. Ultrasound and PET-CT image fusion for prostate brachytherapy image guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasford, F.

    2015-01-01

    Fusion of medical images between different cross-sectional modalities is widely used, mostly where functional images are fused with anatomical data. Ultrasound has for some time now been the standard imaging technique used for treatment planning of prostate cancer cases. While this approach is laudable and has yielded some positive results, latest developments have been the integration of images from ultrasound and other modalities such as PET-CT to compliment missing properties of ultrasound images. This study has sought to enhance diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancers by developing MATLAB algorithms to fuse ultrasound and PET-CT images. The fused ultrasound-PET-CT image has shown to contain improved quality of information than the individual input images. The fused image has the property of reduced uncertainty, increased reliability, robust system performance, and compact representation of information. The objective of co-registering the ultrasound and PET-CT images was achieved by conducting performance evaluation of the ultrasound and PET-CT imaging systems, developing image contrast enhancement algorithm, developing MATLAB image fusion algorithm, and assessing accuracy of the fusion algorithm. Performance evaluation of the ultrasound brachytherapy system produced satisfactory results in accordance with set tolerances as recommended by AAPM TG 128. Using an ultrasound brachytherapy quality assurance phantom, average axial distance measurement of 10.11 ± 0.11 mm was estimated. Average lateral distance measurements of 10.08 ± 0.07 mm, 20.01 ± 0.06 mm, 29.89 ± 0.03 mm and 39.84 ± 0.37 mm were estimated for the inter-target distances corresponding to 10 mm, 20 mm, 30 mm and 40 mm respectively. Volume accuracy assessment produced measurements of 3.97 cm 3 , 8.86 cm 3 and 20.11 cm 3 for known standard volumes of 4 cm 3 , 9 cm 3 and 20 cm 3 respectively. Depth of penetration assessment of the ultrasound system produced an estimate of 5.37 ± 0.02 cm

  10. Influence of tube voltage on CT attenuation, radiation dose, and image quality: phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Fengtan; Li Dong; Zhang Yunting

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To assess the influence of tube current and tube voltage on the CT attenuation, radiation dose, and image quality. Methods: A total of 113 saline solutions with decreasing dilution of contrast medium (370 mg I/ml) was produced. MDCT scan was performed with 15 series of different settings of tube current and tube voltage. CT attenuations with 15 series of different settings were all measured, and influence of tube current and tube voltage on CT attenuations was analyzed. CT dose index (CTDIvol) was recorded. The CT attenuations with different tube voltage and current were compared with one-way ANOVA and Kruskal-Wallis rank sum test. The correlation of CT attenuation with different tube voltage and the influence of tube voltage and current on radiation dose and image quality were tested by correlation analysis. Results: Tube current (250, 200, 150, 100, and 50 mA) had no significant effect on CT attenuation (F = 0.001, 0.008, 0.075, P > 0.05), while tube voltage (120, 100, and 80 kV) had significant effect (H = 17.906, 17.906, 13.527, 20.124, 23.563, P < 0.05). The correlation between CT attenuation and tube voltage was determined with equation: CT attenuatio N_1_0_0 _k_V = 1.561 × CT attenuatio N_1_2_0 _k_v + 4.0818, CT attenuatio N_8_0 _k_v = 1.2131 × CT attenuatio N_1_2_0 _k_v + 0.9283. The influence of tube voltage on radiation dose and image quality was also analyzed, and equations were also obtained: N_1_2_0 -k_v = -5.9771 Ln (D_1_2_0 kv) + 25.412, N_1_0_0 _k_v = -10.544 Ln (D_1_0_0 _k_v) + 36.262, N_8_0 _k_v = -25.326 Ln (D_8_0 _k_v) + 62.816. According to the results of relationship among CT attenuation, radiation dose, and image quality, lower tube voltage with higher tube current can reduce the radiation dose. Conclusions: Lower tube voltage can reduce the radiation dose. However, CT attenuation was influenced, and correction should be done with the equations. (authors)

  11. Stopping power accuracy and achievable spatial resolution of helium ion imaging using a prototype particle CT detector system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volz Lennart

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A precise relative stopping power map of the patient is crucial for accurate particle therapy. Charged particle imaging determines the stopping power either tomographically – particle computed tomography (pCT – or by combining prior knowledge from particle radiography (pRad and x-ray CT. Generally, multiple Coulomb scattering limits the spatial resolution. Compared to protons, heavier particles scatter less due to their lower charge/mass ratio. A theoretical framework to predict the most likely trajectory of particles in matter was developed for light ions up to carbon and was found to be the most accurate for helium comparing for fixed initial velocity. To further investigate the potential of helium in particle imaging, helium computed tomography (HeCT and radiography (HeRad were studied at the Heidel-berg Ion-Beam Therapy Centre (HIT using a prototype pCT detector system registering individual particles, originally developed by the U.S. pCT collaboration. Several phantoms were investigated: modules of the Catphan QA phantom for analysis of spatial resolution and achievable stopping power accuracy, a paediatric head phantom (CIRS and a custom-made phantom comprised of animal meat enclosed in a 2 % agarose mixture representing human tissue. The pCT images were reconstructed applying the CARP iterative reconstruction algorithm. The MTF10% was investigated using a sharp edge gradient technique. HeRad provides a spatial resolution above that of protons (MTF1010%=6.07 lp/cm for HeRad versus MTF10%=3.35 lp/cm for proton radiography. For HeCT, the spatial resolution was limited by the number of projections acquired (90 projections for a full scan. The RSP accuracy for all inserts of the Catphan CTP404 module was found to be 2.5% or better and is subject to further optimisation. In conclusion, helium imaging appears to offer higher spatial resolution compared to proton imaging. In future studies, the advantage of helium imaging compared to other

  12. Inter-plane artifact suppression in tomosynthesis using 3D CT image data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Jae G

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite its superb lateral resolution, flat-panel-detector (FPD based tomosynthesis suffers from low contrast and inter-plane artifacts caused by incomplete cancellation of the projection components stemming from outside the focal plane. The incomplete cancellation of the projection components, mostly due to the limited scan angle in the conventional tomosynthesis scan geometry, often makes the image contrast too low to differentiate the malignant tissues from the background tissues with confidence. Methods In this paper, we propose a new method to suppress the inter-plane artifacts in FPD-based tomosynthesis. If 3D whole volume CT images are available before the tomosynthesis scan, the CT image data can be incorporated into the tomosynthesis image reconstruction to suppress the inter-plane artifacts, hence, improving the image contrast. In the proposed technique, the projection components stemming from outside the region-of-interest (ROI are subtracted from the measured tomosynthesis projection data to suppress the inter-plane artifacts. The projection components stemming from outside the ROI are calculated from the 3D whole volume CT images which usually have lower lateral resolution than the tomosynthesis images. The tomosynthesis images are reconstructed from the subtracted projection data which account for the x-ray attenuation through the ROI. After verifying the proposed method by simulation, we have performed both CT scan and tomosynthesis scan on a phantom and a sacrificed rat using a FPD-based micro-CT. Results We have measured contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR from the tomosynthesis images which is an indicator of the residual inter-plane artifacts on the focal-plane image. In both cases of the simulation and experimental imaging studies of the contrast evaluating phantom, CNRs have been significantly improved by the proposed method. In the rat imaging also, we have observed better visual contrast from the tomosynthesis

  13. Inter-plane artifact suppression in tomosynthesis using 3D CT image data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Despite its superb lateral resolution, flat-panel-detector (FPD) based tomosynthesis suffers from low contrast and inter-plane artifacts caused by incomplete cancellation of the projection components stemming from outside the focal plane. The incomplete cancellation of the projection components, mostly due to the limited scan angle in the conventional tomosynthesis scan geometry, often makes the image contrast too low to differentiate the malignant tissues from the background tissues with confidence. Methods In this paper, we propose a new method to suppress the inter-plane artifacts in FPD-based tomosynthesis. If 3D whole volume CT images are available before the tomosynthesis scan, the CT image data can be incorporated into the tomosynthesis image reconstruction to suppress the inter-plane artifacts, hence, improving the image contrast. In the proposed technique, the projection components stemming from outside the region-of-interest (ROI) are subtracted from the measured tomosynthesis projection data to suppress the inter-plane artifacts. The projection components stemming from outside the ROI are calculated from the 3D whole volume CT images which usually have lower lateral resolution than the tomosynthesis images. The tomosynthesis images are reconstructed from the subtracted projection data which account for the x-ray attenuation through the ROI. After verifying the proposed method by simulation, we have performed both CT scan and tomosynthesis scan on a phantom and a sacrificed rat using a FPD-based micro-CT. Results We have measured contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) from the tomosynthesis images which is an indicator of the residual inter-plane artifacts on the focal-plane image. In both cases of the simulation and experimental imaging studies of the contrast evaluating phantom, CNRs have been significantly improved by the proposed method. In the rat imaging also, we have observed better visual contrast from the tomosynthesis images reconstructed by

  14. Pediatric personalized CT-dosimetry Monte Carlo simulations, using computational phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papadimitroulas, P; Kagadis, G C; Ploussi, A; Kordolaimi, S; Papamichail, D; Karavasilis, E; Syrgiamiotis, V; Loudos, G

    2015-01-01

    The last 40 years Monte Carlo (MC) simulations serve as a “gold standard” tool for a wide range of applications in the field of medical physics and tend to be essential in daily clinical practice. Regarding diagnostic imaging applications, such as computed tomography (CT), the assessment of deposited energy is of high interest, so as to better analyze the risks and the benefits of the procedure. The last few years a big effort is done towards personalized dosimetry, especially in pediatric applications. In the present study the GATE toolkit was used and computational pediatric phantoms have been modeled for the assessment of CT examinations dosimetry. The pediatric models used come from the XCAT and IT'IS series. The X-ray spectrum of a Brightspeed CT scanner was simulated and validated with experimental data. Specifically, a DCT-10 ionization chamber was irradiated twice using 120 kVp with 100 mAs and 200 mAs, for 1 sec in 1 central axial slice (thickness = 10mm). The absorbed dose was measured in air resulting in differences lower than 4% between the experimental and simulated data. The simulations were acquired using ∼10 10 number of primaries in order to achieve low statistical uncertainties. Dose maps were also saved for quantification of the absorbed dose in several children critical organs during CT acquisition. (paper)

  15. 3D Printing Openable Imaging Phantom Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Myoung Keun; Won, Jun Hyeok; Lee, Seung Wook

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to design an openable phantom that can replace the internal measurement bar used for contrast comparison in order to increase the efficiency of manufacturing imaging phantom used in the medical industry and to improve convenience using 3D printer. Phantom concept design, 3D printing, and Image reconstruction were defined as the scope of the thesis. Also, we study metal artifact reduction with openable phantom. We have designed a Openable phantom using 3D printing, and have investigated metal artifact reduction after inserting a metallic material inside the phantom. The openable phantom can be adjusted at any time to suit the user's experiment and can be easily replaced and useful.

  16. Comparison of CT numbers between cone-beam CT and multi-detector CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong Soo; Han, Won Jeong; Kim, Eun Kyung

    2010-01-01

    To compare the CT numbers on 3 cone-beam CT (CBCT) images with those on multi-detector CT (MDCT) image using CT phantom and to develop linear regressive equations using CT numbers to material density for all the CT scanner each. Mini CT phantom comprised of five 1 inch thick cylindrical models with 1.125 inches diameter of materials with different densities (polyethylene, polystyrene, plastic water, nylon and acrylic) was used. It was scanned in 3 CBCTs (i-CAT, Alphard VEGA, Implagraphy SC) and 1 MDCT (Somatom Emotion). The images were saved as DICOM format and CT numbers were measured using OnDemand 3D. CT numbers obtained from CBCTs and MDCT images were compared and linear regression analysis was performed for the density, ρ(g/cm 3 ), as the dependent variable in terms of the CT numbers obtained from CBCTs and MDCT images. CT numbers on i-CAT and Implagraphy CBCT images were smaller than those on Somatom Emotion MDCT image (p<0.05). Linear relationship on a range of materials used for this study were ρ=0.001 H+1.07 with R2 value of 0.999 for Somatom Emotion, ρ=0.002 H+1.09 with R2 value of 0.991 for Alphard VEGA, ρ=0.001 H+1.43 with R2 value of 0.980 for i-CAT and ρ=0.001 H+1.30 with R2 value of 0.975 for Implagraphy. CT numbers on i-CAT and Implagraphy CBCT images were not same as those on Somatom Emotion MDCT image. The linear regressive equations to determine the density from the CT numbers with very high correlation coefficient were obtained on three CBCT and MDCT scan.

  17. Comparison of CT numbers between cone-beam CT and multi-detector CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong Soo; Han, Won Jeong; Kim, Eun Kyung [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, School of Dentistry, Dankook University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-06-15

    To compare the CT numbers on 3 cone-beam CT (CBCT) images with those on multi-detector CT (MDCT) image using CT phantom and to develop linear regressive equations using CT numbers to material density for all the CT scanner each. Mini CT phantom comprised of five 1 inch thick cylindrical models with 1.125 inches diameter of materials with different densities (polyethylene, polystyrene, plastic water, nylon and acrylic) was used. It was scanned in 3 CBCTs (i-CAT, Alphard VEGA, Implagraphy SC) and 1 MDCT (Somatom Emotion). The images were saved as DICOM format and CT numbers were measured using OnDemand 3D. CT numbers obtained from CBCTs and MDCT images were compared and linear regression analysis was performed for the density, {rho}(g/cm{sup 3}), as the dependent variable in terms of the CT numbers obtained from CBCTs and MDCT images. CT numbers on i-CAT and Implagraphy CBCT images were smaller than those on Somatom Emotion MDCT image (p<0.05). Linear relationship on a range of materials used for this study were {rho}=0.001 H+1.07 with R2 value of 0.999 for Somatom Emotion, {rho}=0.002 H+1.09 with R2 value of 0.991 for Alphard VEGA, {rho}=0.001 H+1.43 with R2 value of 0.980 for i-CAT and {rho}=0.001 H+1.30 with R2 value of 0.975 for Implagraphy. CT numbers on i-CAT and Implagraphy CBCT images were not same as those on Somatom Emotion MDCT image. The linear regressive equations to determine the density from the CT numbers with very high correlation coefficient were obtained on three CBCT and MDCT scan.

  18. TU-H-CAMPUS-IeP2-03: Development of 3D Printed Coronary Phantoms for In-Vitro CT-FFR Validation Using Data from 320- Detector Row Coronary CT Angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionita, C; Rudin, S; Bednarek, D; Zaid, S; Wilson, M; Angel, E; Mitsouras, D; Rybicki, F

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To validate Computed Tomography Fractional Flow Reserve (CT-FFR) measurements with accurate 3D printed coronary phantoms. Methods: DICOM data from four phases in two patients imaged with a standard 320 × 0.5mm coronary CT acquisition (70–80% cardiac cycle) underwent semi-automated segmentation using a research workstation. Both patients had a >50% stenosis from the clinical image interpretation. Each volume was saved as a Stereo Lithographic (STL) file with 250 micron resolution. The 3D geometries were qualitatively assessed; the best of the four phases was 3D printed using a Stratasys Eden260V printer in Tango+, a rubber-like material that roughly emulates mechanical properties of human vasculature. We connected the model to a programmable pump and measured the pressure drop using pressure sensors embedded proximal and distal to the arterial stenosis. Next, the STL files used for the 3D printed models were uploaded in the ANSYS meshing tool (ICEM CFD 16.1). A standard meshing process was applied and the meshed geometry was directly imported in the ANSYS Fluent for Computational Flow Dynamics simulations. The CFD simulations were used to calculate the CT-FFR and compared to the bench top FFR measured in the 3D printed phantoms. Results: FFR-CT measurements and phantoms were completed in within an hour after the segmentation. Patient 1 had a 60% stenosis that resulted in a CT-FFR of 0.68. The second case had a 50% stenosis and a CT-FFR of 0.75. The average bench top FFR measurements were 0.72 and 0.80, respectively. Conclusion: This pilot investigation demonstrated the use of a bench-top coronary model for CT-FFR validation. The measurements and the CFD simulations agreed within 6%. Project supported by Support: Toshiba America Medical Systems Corp.and NIH grant R01-EB002873. Project supported by Toshiba America Medical Systems Corp.and partial support from NIH grant R01-EB002873

  19. TU-H-CAMPUS-IeP2-03: Development of 3D Printed Coronary Phantoms for In-Vitro CT-FFR Validation Using Data from 320- Detector Row Coronary CT Angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ionita, C; Rudin, S; Bednarek, D; Zaid, S; Wilson, M [University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY (United States); Angel, E [Toshiba America Medical Systems, Inc, Tustin, CA (United States); Mitsouras, D [Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Rybicki, F [University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To validate Computed Tomography Fractional Flow Reserve (CT-FFR) measurements with accurate 3D printed coronary phantoms. Methods: DICOM data from four phases in two patients imaged with a standard 320 × 0.5mm coronary CT acquisition (70–80% cardiac cycle) underwent semi-automated segmentation using a research workstation. Both patients had a >50% stenosis from the clinical image interpretation. Each volume was saved as a Stereo Lithographic (STL) file with 250 micron resolution. The 3D geometries were qualitatively assessed; the best of the four phases was 3D printed using a Stratasys Eden260V printer in Tango+, a rubber-like material that roughly emulates mechanical properties of human vasculature. We connected the model to a programmable pump and measured the pressure drop using pressure sensors embedded proximal and distal to the arterial stenosis. Next, the STL files used for the 3D printed models were uploaded in the ANSYS meshing tool (ICEM CFD 16.1). A standard meshing process was applied and the meshed geometry was directly imported in the ANSYS Fluent for Computational Flow Dynamics simulations. The CFD simulations were used to calculate the CT-FFR and compared to the bench top FFR measured in the 3D printed phantoms. Results: FFR-CT measurements and phantoms were completed in within an hour after the segmentation. Patient 1 had a 60% stenosis that resulted in a CT-FFR of 0.68. The second case had a 50% stenosis and a CT-FFR of 0.75. The average bench top FFR measurements were 0.72 and 0.80, respectively. Conclusion: This pilot investigation demonstrated the use of a bench-top coronary model for CT-FFR validation. The measurements and the CFD simulations agreed within 6%. Project supported by Support: Toshiba America Medical Systems Corp.and NIH grant R01-EB002873. Project supported by Toshiba America Medical Systems Corp.and partial support from NIH grant R01-EB002873.

  20. The appearance and effects of metallic implants in CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kairn, T.; Crowe, S.B.; Trapp, J.V.; Fogg, P.

    2013-01-01

    The computed tomography (CT) imaging artefacts that metallic medical implants produce in surrounding tissues are usually contoured and over-ridden during radiotherapy treatment planning. In cases where radiotherapy treatment beams unavoidably pass though implants, it is especially important to understand the imaging artefacts that may occur within the implants themselves. This study examines CT images of a set of simple metallic objects, immersed in water, in order to evaluate reliability and variability of CT numbers (Hounsfield units, HUs) within medical implants. Model implants with a range of sizes (heights from 2.2 to 49.6 mm), electron densities (from 2.3 to 7.7 times the electron density of water) and effective atomic numbers (from 3.9 to 9.0 times the effective atomic number of water in a CT X-ray beam) were created by stacking metal coins from several currencies. These 'implants' were CT scanned within a large (31.0 cm across) and a small (12.8 cm across) water phantom. Resulting HU values are as much as 50 % lower than the result of extrapolating standard electron density calibration data (obtained for tissue and bone densities) up to the metal densities and there is a 6 % difference between the results obtained by scanning with 120 and 140 kVp tube potentials. Profiles through the implants show localised cupping artefacts, within the implants, as well as a gradual decline in HU outside the implants that can cause the implants' sizes to be over estimated by 1.3–9.0 mm. These effects are exacerbated when the implants are scanned in the small phantom or at the side of the large phantom, due to reduced pre-hardening of the X-ray beam in these configurations. These results demonstrate the necessity of over-riding the densities of metallic implants, as well as their artefacts in tissue, in order to obtain accurate radiotherapy dose calculations.

  1. The appearance and effects of metallic implants in CT images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kairn, T; Crowe, S B; Fogg, P; Trapp, J V

    2013-06-01

    The computed tomography (CT) imaging artefacts that metallic medical implants produce in surrounding tissues are usually contoured and over-ridden during radiotherapy treatment planning. In cases where radiotherapy treatment beams unavoidably pass though implants, it is especially important to understand the imaging artefacts that may occur within the implants themselves. This study examines CT images of a set of simple metallic objects, immersed in water, in order to evaluate reliability and variability of CT numbers (Hounsfield units, HUs) within medical implants. Model implants with a range of sizes (heights from 2.2 to 49.6 mm), electron densities (from 2.3 to 7.7 times the electron density of water) and effective atomic numbers (from 3.9 to 9.0 times the effective atomic number of water in a CT X-ray beam) were created by stacking metal coins from several currencies. These 'implants' were CT scanned within a large (31.0 cm across) and a small (12.8 cm across) water phantom. Resulting HU values are as much as 50 % lower than the result of extrapolating standard electron density calibration data (obtained for tissue and bone densities) up to the metal densities and there is a 6 % difference between the results obtained by scanning with 120 and 140 kVp tube potentials. Profiles through the implants show localised cupping artefacts, within the implants, as well as a gradual decline in HU outside the implants that can cause the implants' sizes to be over estimated by 1.3-9.0 mm. These effects are exacerbated when the implants are scanned in the small phantom or at the side of the large phantom, due to reduced pre-hardening of the X-ray beam in these configurations. These results demonstrate the necessity of over-riding the densities of metallic implants, as well as their artefacts in tissue, in order to obtain accurate radiotherapy dose calculations.

  2. Development of an organ-specific insert phantom generated using a 3D printer for investigations of cardiac computed tomography protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Kamarul A; McEntee, Mark F; Reed, Warren; Kench, Peter L

    2018-04-30

    An ideal organ-specific insert phantom should be able to simulate the anatomical features with appropriate appearances in the resultant computed tomography (CT) images. This study investigated a 3D printing technology to develop a novel and cost-effective cardiac insert phantom derived from volumetric CT image datasets of anthropomorphic chest phantom. Cardiac insert volumes were segmented from CT image datasets, derived from an anthropomorphic chest phantom of Lungman N-01 (Kyoto Kagaku, Japan). These segmented datasets were converted to a virtual 3D-isosurface of heart-shaped shell, while two other removable inserts were included using computer-aided design (CAD) software program. This newly designed cardiac insert phantom was later printed by using a fused deposition modelling (FDM) process via a Creatbot DM Plus 3D printer. Then, several selected filling materials, such as contrast media, oil, water and jelly, were loaded into designated spaces in the 3D-printed phantom. The 3D-printed cardiac insert phantom was positioned within the anthropomorphic chest phantom and 30 repeated CT acquisitions performed using a multi-detector scanner at 120-kVp tube potential. Attenuation (Hounsfield Unit, HU) values were measured and compared to the image datasets of real-patient and Catphan ® 500 phantom. The output of the 3D-printed cardiac insert phantom was a solid acrylic plastic material, which was strong, light in weight and cost-effective. HU values of the filling materials were comparable to the image datasets of real-patient and Catphan ® 500 phantom. A novel and cost-effective cardiac insert phantom for anthropomorphic chest phantom was developed using volumetric CT image datasets with a 3D printer. Hence, this suggested the printing methodology could be applied to generate other phantoms for CT imaging studies. © 2018 The Authors. Journal of Medical Radiation Sciences published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Australian Society of Medical

  3. Dose profile study in head CT scans using a male anthropomorphic phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez, Alvaro M.L.; Santana, Priscila do C.; Mourao, Arnaldo P.

    2017-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) test is an efficient and non-invasive method to obtain data about internal structures of the human body. CT scans contribute with the highest absorbed doses in population due X-ray beam attenuation and it has raised concern in radiosensitive tissues. Techniques for the optimization of CT scanning protocols in diagnostic services have been developing with the objective of decreasing the absorbed dose in the patient, aiming image quality within acceptable parameters for diagnosis by noise control. Routine head scans were performed using GE CT scan of 64 channels programmed with automatic exposure control and voltages of 80, 100 and 120 kV attaching the noise index in approximately 0.5%, using the tool of smart mA. An anthropomorphic adult male phantom was used and radiochromic film strips were placed to measure the absorbed dose deposited in areas such as the lens, thyroid and pituitary for study of dose deposited in these important areas containing high radiosensitive tissues. Different head scans were performed using optimized values of mA.s for the different voltages. The absorbed dose measured by the film strips were in the range of the 0.58 and 44.36 mGy. The analysis of noise in the images is within the acceptable levels for diagnosis, and the optimized protocol happens with the voltage of 100 kV. The use of other voltage values can allow obtain better protocols for head scans. (author)

  4. Dose profile study in head CT scans using a male anthropomorphic phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez, Alvaro M.L.; Santana, Priscila do C.; Mourao, Arnaldo P., E-mail: amlgphys@gmail.com, E-mail: pridili@gmail.com, E-mail: apratabhz@gmail.com.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear; Centro Federal de Educação Tecnológica de Minas Gerais (CEFET-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2017-11-01

    Computed tomography (CT) test is an efficient and non-invasive method to obtain data about internal structures of the human body. CT scans contribute with the highest absorbed doses in population due X-ray beam attenuation and it has raised concern in radiosensitive tissues. Techniques for the optimization of CT scanning protocols in diagnostic services have been developing with the objective of decreasing the absorbed dose in the patient, aiming image quality within acceptable parameters for diagnosis by noise control. Routine head scans were performed using GE CT scan of 64 channels programmed with automatic exposure control and voltages of 80, 100 and 120 kV attaching the noise index in approximately 0.5%, using the tool of smart mA. An anthropomorphic adult male phantom was used and radiochromic film strips were placed to measure the absorbed dose deposited in areas such as the lens, thyroid and pituitary for study of dose deposited in these important areas containing high radiosensitive tissues. Different head scans were performed using optimized values of mA.s for the different voltages. The absorbed dose measured by the film strips were in the range of the 0.58 and 44.36 mGy. The analysis of noise in the images is within the acceptable levels for diagnosis, and the optimized protocol happens with the voltage of 100 kV. The use of other voltage values can allow obtain better protocols for head scans. (author)

  5. Precise Plan in the analysis of volume precision in SynergyTM conebeam CT image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai Sen; Xu Qingfeng; Zhong Renming; Jiang Xiaoqin; Jiang Qingfeng; Xu Feng

    2007-01-01

    Objective: A method of checking the volume precision in Synergy TM conebeam CT image. Methods: To scan known phantoms (big, middle, small spheres, cubes and cuniform cavum) at different positions (CBCT centre and departure centre from 5, 8, 10 cm along the accelerator G-T way)with conebeam CT, the phantom volume of reconstructed images were measure. Then to compared measured volume of Synergy TM conebeam CT with fanbeam CT results and nominal values. Results: The middle spheres had 1.5% discrepancy in nominal values and metrical average values at CBCT centre and departure from centre 5, 8 cm along accelerator G-T way. The small spheres showed 8.1%, with 0.8 % of the big cube and 2.9% of small cube, in nominal values and metrical average values at CBCT centre and departure from centre 5, 8, 10 cm along the accelerator G-T way. Conclusion: In valid scan range of Synergy TM conebeam CT, reconstructed precision is independent of the distance deviation from the center. (authors)

  6. SU-F-I-14: 3D Breast Digital Phantom for XACT Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, S; Laaroussi, R; Chen, J; Samant, P; Xiang, L [University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States); Chen, Y; Ahmad, S [University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Yang, K [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The X-ray induced acoustic computed tomography (XACT) is a new imaging modality which combines X-ray contrast and high ultrasonic resolution in a single modality. Using XACT in breast imaging, a 3D breast volume can be imaged by only one pulsed X-ray radiation, which could dramatically reduce the imaging dose for patients undergoing breast cancer screening and diagnosis. A 3D digital phantom that contains both X-ray properties and acoustic properties of different tissue types is indeed needed for developing and optimizing the XACT system. The purpose of this study is to offer a realistic breast digital phantom as a valuable tool for improving breast XACT imaging techniques and potentially leading to better diagnostic outcomes. Methods: A series of breast CT images along the coronal plane from a patient who has breast calcifications are used as the source images. A HU value based segmentation algorithm is employed to identify breast tissues in five categories, namely the skin tissue, fat tissue, glandular tissue, chest bone and calcifications. For each pixel, the dose related parameters, such as material components and density, and acoustic related parameters, such as frequency-dependent acoustic attenuation coefficient and bandwidth, are assigned based on tissue types. Meanwhile, other parameters which are used in sound propagation, including the sound speed, thermal expansion coefficient, and heat capacity are also assigned to each tissue. Results: A series of 2D tissue type image is acquired first and the 3D digital breast phantom is obtained by using commercial 3D reconstruction software. When giving specific settings including dose depositions and ultrasound center frequency, the X-ray induced initial pressure rise can be calculated accordingly. Conclusion: The proposed 3D breast digital phantom represents a realistic breast anatomic structure and provides a valuable tool for developing and evaluating the system performance for XACT.

  7. CT, MRI and PET image fusion using the ProSoma 3D simulation software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalah, E.; Bradley, D.A.; Nisbet, A.; Reise, S.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Multi-modality imaging is involved in almost all oncology applications focusing on the extent of disease and target volume delineation. Commercial image fusion software packages are becoming available but require comprehensive evaluation to ensure reliability of fusion and the underpinning registration algorithm particularly for radiotherapy. The present work seeks to assess such accuracy for a number of available registration methods provided by the commercial package ProSoma. A NEMA body phantom was used in evaluating CT, MR and PET images. In addition, discussion is provided concerning the choice and geometry of fiducial markers in phantom studies and the effect of window-level on target size, in particular in regard to the application of multi modality imaging in treatment planning. In general, the accuracy of fusion of multi-modality images was within 0.5-1.5 mm of actual feature diameters and < 2 ml volume of actual values, particularly in CT images. (author)

  8. SU-E-J-94: Geometric and Dosimetric Evaluation of Deformation Image Registration Algorithms Using Virtual Phantoms Generated From Patients with Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Z; Greskovich, J; Xia, P; Bzdusek, K

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To generate virtual phantoms with clinically relevant deformation and use them to objectively evaluate geometric and dosimetric uncertainties of deformable image registration (DIR) algorithms. Methods: Ten lung cancer patients undergoing adaptive 3DCRT planning were selected. For each patient, a pair of planning CT (pCT) and replanning CT (rCT) were used as the basis for virtual phantom generation. Manually adjusted meshes were created for selected ROIs (e.g. PTV, lungs, spinal cord, esophagus, and heart) on pCT and rCT. The mesh vertices were input into a thin-plate spline algorithm to generate a reference displacement vector field (DVF). The reference DVF was used to deform pCT to generate a simulated replanning CT (srCT) that was closely matched to rCT. Three DIR algorithms (Demons, B-Spline, and intensity-based) were applied to these ten virtual phantoms. The images, ROIs, and doses were mapped from pCT to srCT using the DVFs computed by these three DIRs and compared to those mapped using the reference DVF. Results: The average Dice coefficients for selected ROIs were from 0.85 to 0.96 for Demons, from 0.86 to 0.97 for intensity-based, and from 0.76 to 0.95 for B-Spline. The average Hausdorff distances for selected ROIs were from 2.2 to 5.4 mm for Demons, from 2.3 to 6.8 mm for intensity-based, and from 2.4 to 11.4 mm for B-Spline. The average absolute dose errors for selected ROIs were from 0.2 to 0.6 Gy for Demons, from 0.1 to 0.5 Gy for intensity-based, and from 0.5 to 1.5 Gy for B-Spline. Conclusion: Virtual phantoms were modeled after patients with lung cancer and were clinically relevant for adaptive radiotherapy treatment replanning. Virtual phantoms with known DVFs serve as references and can provide a fair comparison when evaluating different DIRs. Demons and intensity-based DIRs were shown to have smaller geometric and dosimetric uncertainties than B-Spline. Z Shen: None; K Bzdusek: an employee of Philips Healthcare; J Greskovich: None; P Xia

  9. Study of CT image texture using deep learning techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Sandeep; Fan, Jiahua; Chevalier, David

    2018-03-01

    For CT imaging, reduction of radiation dose while improving or maintaining image quality (IQ) is currently a very active research and development topic. Iterative Reconstruction (IR) approaches have been suggested to be able to offer better IQ to dose ratio compared to the conventional Filtered Back Projection (FBP) reconstruction. However, it has been widely reported that often CT image texture from IR is different compared to that from FBP. Researchers have proposed different figure of metrics to quantitate the texture from different reconstruction methods. But there is still a lack of practical and robust method in the field for texture description. This work applied deep learning method for CT image texture study. Multiple dose scans of a 20cm diameter cylindrical water phantom was performed on Revolution CT scanner (GE Healthcare, Waukesha) and the images were reconstructed with FBP and four different IR reconstruction settings. The training images generated were randomly allotted (80:20) to a training and validation set. An independent test set of 256-512 images/class were collected with the same scan and reconstruction settings. Multiple deep learning (DL) networks with Convolution, RELU activation, max-pooling, fully-connected, global average pooling and softmax activation layers were investigated. Impact of different image patch size for training was investigated. Original pixel data as well as normalized image data were evaluated. DL models were reliably able to classify CT image texture with accuracy up to 99%. Results show that the deep learning techniques suggest that CT IR techniques may help lower the radiation dose compared to FBP.

  10. Experimental and computational development of a natural breast phantom for dosimetry studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nogueira, Luciana B.; Campos, Tarcisio P.R.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the experimental and computational development of a natural breast phantom, anthropomorphic and anthropometric for studies in dosimetry of brachytherapy and teletherapy of breast. The natural breast phantom developed corresponding to fibroadipose breasts of women aged 30 to 50 years, presenting radiographically medium density. The experimental breast phantom was constituted of three tissue-equivalents (TE's): glandular TE, adipose TE and skin TE. These TE's were developed according to chemical composition of human breast and present radiological response to exposure. Completed the construction of experimental breast phantom this was mounted on a thorax phantom previously developed by the research group NRI/UFMG. Then the computational breast phantom was constructed by performing a computed tomography (CT) by axial slices of the chest phantom. Through the images generated by CT a computational model of voxels of the thorax phantom was developed by SISCODES computational program, being the computational breast phantom represented by the same TE's of the experimental breast phantom. The images generated by CT allowed evaluating the radiological equivalence of the tissues. The breast phantom is being used in studies of experimental dosimetry both in brachytherapy as in teletherapy of breast. Dosimetry studies by MCNP-5 code using the computational model of the phantom breast are in progress. (author)

  11. Improving the quality of brain CT image from Wavelet filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pita Machado, Reinaldo; Perez Diaz, Marlen; Bravo Pino, Rolando

    2012-01-01

    An algorithm to reduce Poisson noise is described using Wavelet filters. Five tomographic images of patients and a head anthropomorphic phantom were used. They were acquired with two different CT machines. Due to the original images contain the acquisition noise; some simulated free noise lesions were added to the images and after that the whole images were contaminated with noise. Contaminated images were filtered with 9 Wavelet filters at different decomposition levels and thresholds. Image quality of filtered and unfiltered images was graded using the Signal to Noise ratio, Normalized Mean Square Error and the Structural Similarity Index, as well as, by the subjective JAFROC methods with 5 observers. Some filters as Bior 3.7 and dB45 improved in a significant way head CT image quality (p<0.05) producing an increment in SNR without visible structural distortions

  12. CT-based attenuation correction and resolution compensation for I-123 IMP brain SPECT normal database: a multicenter phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inui, Yoshitaka; Ichihara, Takashi; Uno, Masaki; Ishiguro, Masanobu; Ito, Kengo; Kato, Katsuhiko; Sakuma, Hajime; Okazawa, Hidehiko; Toyama, Hiroshi

    2018-03-19

    Statistical image analysis of brain SPECT images has improved diagnostic accuracy for brain disorders. However, the results of statistical analysis vary depending on the institution even when they use a common normal database (NDB), due to different intrinsic spatial resolutions or correction methods. The present study aimed to evaluate the correction of spatial resolution differences between equipment and examine the differences in skull bone attenuation to construct a common NDB for use in multicenter settings. The proposed acquisition and processing protocols were those routinely used at each participating center with additional triple energy window (TEW) scatter correction (SC) and computed tomography (CT) based attenuation correction (CTAC). A multicenter phantom study was conducted on six imaging systems in five centers, with either single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) or SPECT/CT, and two brain phantoms. The gray/white matter I-123 activity ratio in the brain phantoms was 4, and they were enclosed in either an artificial adult male skull, 1300 Hounsfield units (HU), a female skull, 850 HU, or an acrylic cover. The cut-off frequency of the Butterworth filters was adjusted so that the spatial resolution was unified to a 17.9 mm full width at half maximum (FWHM), that of the lowest resolution system. The gray-to-white matter count ratios were measured from SPECT images and compared with the actual activity ratio. In addition, mean, standard deviation and coefficient of variation images were calculated after normalization and anatomical standardization to evaluate the variability of the NDB. The gray-to-white matter count ratio error without SC and attenuation correction (AC) was significantly larger for higher bone densities (p correction. The proposed protocol showed potential for constructing an appropriate common NDB from SPECT images with SC, AC and spatial resolution compensation.

  13. Comparison of Volumes between Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography and Cone-Beam Computed Tomography Images using Dynamic Phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seong Eun; Won, Hui Su; Hong, Joo Wan; Chang, Nam Jun; Jung, Woo Hyun; Choi, Byeong Don [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Sungnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    The aim of this study was to compare the differences between the volumes acquired with four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT)images with a reconstruction image-filtering algorithm and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images with dynamic phantom. The 4DCT images were obtained from the computerized imaging reference systems (CIRS) phantom using a computed tomography (CT) simulator. We analyzed the volumes for maximum intensity projection (MIP), minimum intensity projection (MinIP) and average intensity projection (AVG) of the images obtained with the 4DCT scanner against those acquired from CBCT images with CT ranger tools. Difference in volume for node of 1, 2 and 3 cm between CBCT and 4DCT was 0.54⁓2.33, 5.16⁓8.06, 9.03⁓20.11 ml in MIP, respectively, 0.00⁓1.48, 0.00⁓8.47, 1.42⁓24.85 ml in MinIP, respectively and 0.00⁓1.17, 0.00⁓2.19, 0.04⁓3.35 ml in AVG, respectively. After a comparative analysis of the volumes for each nodal size, it was apparent that the CBCT images were similar to the AVG images acquired using 4DCT.

  14. TH-CD-202-01: BEST IN PHYSICS (JOINT IMAGING-THERAPY): Evaluation of the Use of Direct Electron Density CT Images in Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, T; Sun, B; Li, H; Mutic, S [Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Mistry, N [Siemens Healthcare, Cary, NC (United States); Raupach, R; Huenemohr, N; Ritter [Siemens Healthcare GmbH, Forchheim, Bavaria (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The current standard for calculation of photon and electron dose requires conversion of Hounsfield Units (HU) to Electron Density (ED) by applying a calibration curve specifically constructed for the corresponding CT tube voltage. This practice limits the use of the CT scanner to a single tube voltage and hinders the freedom in the selection of optimal tube voltage for better image quality. The objective of this study is to report a prototype CT reconstruction algorithm that provides direct ED images from the raw CT data independently of tube voltages used during acquisition. Methods: A tissue substitute phantom was scanned for Stoichiometric CT calibrations at tube voltages of 70kV, 80kV, 100kV, 120kV and 140kV respectively. HU images and direct ED images were acquired sequentially on a thoracic anthropomorphic phantom at the same tube voltages. Electron densities converted from the HU images were compared to ED obtained from the direct ED images. A 7-field treatment plan was made on all HU and ED images. Gamma analysis was performed to demonstrate quantitatively dosimetric change from the two schemes in acquiring ED. Results: The average deviation of EDs obtained from the direct ED images was −1.5%±2.1% from the EDs from HU images with the corresponding CT calibration curves applied. Gamma analysis on dose calculated on the direct ED images and the HU images acquired at the same tube voltage indicated negligible difference with lowest passing rate at 99.9%. Conclusion: Direct ED images require no CT calibration while demonstrate equivalent dosimetry compared to that obtained from standard HU images. The ability of acquiring direct ED images simplifies the current practice at a safer level by eliminating CT calibration and HU conversion from commissioning and treatment planning respectively. Furthermore, it unlocks a wider range of tube voltages in CT scanner for better imaging quality while maintaining similar dosimetric accuracy.

  15. Is metal artefact reduction mandatory in cardiac PET/CT imaging in the presence of pacemaker and implantable cardioverter defibrillator leads?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghafarian, Pardis [Shahid Beheshti University, Department of Radiation Medicine, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Geneva University Hospital, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Research Center for Science and Technology in Medicine, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Aghamiri, S.M.R. [Shahid Beheshti University, Department of Radiation Medicine, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ay, Mohammad R. [Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Research Center for Science and Technology in Medicine, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Research Institute for Nuclear Medicine, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rahmim, Arman [Johns Hopkins University, Department of Radiology, Baltimore, MD (United States); Schindler, Thomas H. [Geneva University, Cardiovascular Center, Nuclear Cardiology, Geneva (Switzerland); Ratib, Osman [Geneva University Hospital, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Zaidi, Habib [Geneva University Hospital, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Geneva University, Geneva Neuroscience Center, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2011-02-15

    Cardiac PET/CT imaging is often performed in patients with pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) leads. However, metallic implants usually produce artefacts on CT images which might propagate to CT-based attenuation-corrected (CTAC) PET images. The impact of metal artefact reduction (MAR) for CTAC of cardiac PET/CT images in the presence of pacemaker, ICD and ECG leads was investigated using both qualitative and quantitative analysis in phantom and clinical studies. The study included 14 patients with various leads undergoing perfusion and viability examinations using dedicated cardiac PET/CT protocols. The PET data were corrected for attenuation using both artefactual CT images and CT images corrected using the MAR algorithm. The severity and magnitude of metallic artefacts arising from these leads were assessed on both linear attenuation coefficient maps ({mu}-maps) and attenuation-corrected PET images. CT and PET emission data were obtained using an anthropomorphic thorax phantom and a dedicated heart phantom made in-house incorporating pacemaker and ICD leads attached at the right ventricle of the heart. Volume of interest-based analysis and regression plots were performed for regions related to the lead locations. Bull's eye view analysis was also performed on PET images corrected for attenuation with and without the MAR algorithm. In clinical studies, the visual assessment of PET images by experienced physicians and quantitative analysis did not reveal erroneous interpretation of the tracer distribution or significant differences when PET images were corrected for attenuation with and without MAR. In phantom studies, the mean differences between tracer uptake obtained without and with MAR were 10.16{+-}2.1% and 6.86{+-}2.1% in the segments of the heart in the vicinity of metallic ICD or pacemaker leads, and were 4.43{+-}0.5% and 2.98{+-}0.5% in segments far from the leads. Although the MAR algorithm was able to effectively improve

  16. Phantom study on three-dimensional target volume delineation by PET/CT-based auto-contouring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Tiejiao; Sakaguchi, Yuichi; Mitsumoto, Katsuhiko; Mitsumoto, Tatsuya; Sasaki, Masayuki; Tachiya, Yosuke; Ohya, Nobuyoshi

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine an appropriate threshold value for delineation of the target volume in positron emission tomography (PET)/CT and to investigate whether we could delineate a target volume by phantom studies. A phantom consisted of six spheres (φ10-37 mm) filled with 18 F solution. Data acquisition was performed PET/CT in non-motion and motion status with high 18 F solution and in non-motion status with low 18 F solution. In non-motion phantom experiments, we determined two types of threshold value, an absolute SUV (T SUV ) and a percentage of the maximum SUV (T % ). Delineation using threshold values was applied for all spheres and for selected large spheres (a diameter of 22 mm or larger). In motion phantom experiments, data acquisition was performed in a static mode (sPET) and a gated mode (gPET). CT scanning was performed with helical CT (HCT) and 4-dimentional CT (4DCT). The appropriate threshold values were aT % =27% and aT SUV =2.4 for all spheres, and sT % =30% and sT SUV =4.3 for selected spheres. For all spheres in sPET/HCT in motion, the delineated volumes were 84%-129% by the aT % and 34%-127% by the aT SUV . In gPET/4DCT in motion, the delineated volumes were 94-103% by the aT % and 51-131% by the aT SUV . For low radioactivity spheres, the delineated volumes were all underestimated. A threshold value of T % =27% was proposed for auto-contouring of lung tumors. Our results also suggested that the respiratory gated data acquisition should be performed in both PET and CT for target volume delineation. (author)

  17. Scatter correction, intermediate view estimation and dose characterization in megavoltage cone-beam CT imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sramek, Benjamin Koerner

    neck phantoms. The conclusions of this investigation were: (1) the implementation of intermediate view estimation techniques to megavoltage cone-beam CT produced improvements in image quality, with the largest impact occurring for smaller numbers of initially-acquired projections, (2) the SPECS scatter correction algorithm could be successfully incorporated into projection data acquired using an electronic portal imaging device during megavoltage cone-beam CT image reconstruction, (3) a large range of SPECS parameters were shown to reduce cupping artifacts as well as improve reconstruction accuracy, with application to anthropomorphic phantom geometries improving the percent difference in reconstructed electron density for soft tissue from -13.6% to -2.0%, and for cortical bone from -9.7% to 1.4%, (4) dose measurements in the anthropomorphic phantoms showed consistent agreement between planar measurements using radiochromic film and point measurements using thermoluminescent dosimeters, and (5) a comparison of normalized dose measurements acquired with radiochromic film to those calculated using multiple treatment planning systems, accelerator-detector combinations, patient geometries and accelerator outputs produced a relatively good agreement.

  18. SU-E-J-123: Assessing Segmentation Accuracy of Internal Volumes and Sub-Volumes in 4D PET/CT of Lung Tumors Using a Novel 3D Printed Phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soultan, D; Murphy, J; James, C; Hoh, C; Moiseenko, V; Cervino, L; Gill, B

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the accuracy of internal target volume (ITV) segmentation of lung tumors for treatment planning of simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) radiotherapy as seen in 4D PET/CT images, using a novel 3D-printed phantom. Methods: The insert mimics high PET tracer uptake in the core and 50% uptake in the periphery, by using a porous design at the periphery. A lung phantom with the insert was placed on a programmable moving platform. Seven breathing waveforms of ideal and patient-specific respiratory motion patterns were fed to the platform, and 4D PET/CT scans were acquired of each of them. CT images were binned into 10 phases, and PET images were binned into 5 phases following the clinical protocol. Two scenarios were investigated for segmentation: a gate 30–70 window, and no gating. The radiation oncologist contoured the outer ITV of the porous insert with on CT images, while the internal void volume with 100% uptake was contoured on PET images for being indistinguishable from the outer volume in CT images. Segmented ITVs were compared to the expected volumes based on known target size and motion. Results: 3 ideal breathing patterns, 2 regular-breathing patient waveforms, and 2 irregular-breathing patient waveforms were used for this study. 18F-FDG was used as the PET tracer. The segmented ITVs from CT closely matched the expected motion for both no gating and gate 30–70 window, with disagreement of contoured ITV with respect to the expected volume not exceeding 13%. PET contours were seen to overestimate volumes in all the cases, up to more than 40%. Conclusion: 4DPET images of a novel 3D printed phantom designed to mimic different uptake values were obtained. 4DPET contours overestimated ITV volumes in all cases, while 4DCT contours matched expected ITV volume values. Investigation of the cause and effects of the discrepancies is undergoing

  19. Evaluation of the retrospective ECG-gated helical scan using half-second multi-slice CT. Motion phantom study for volumetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Shuji; Matsumoto, Takashi; Nakanishi, Shohzoh; Hamada, Seiki; Takahei, Kazunari; Naito, Hiroaki; Ogata, Yuji

    2002-01-01

    ECG synchronized technique on multi-slice CT provide the thinner (less 2 mm slice thickness) and faster (0.5 sec/rotation) scan than that of the single detector CT and can acquire the coverage of the entire heart volume within one breath-hold. However, temporal resolution of multi-slice CT is insufficient on practical range of heart rate. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of volumetry on cardiac function measurement in retrospective ECG-gated helical scan. We discussed the influence of the degradation of image quality and limitation of the heart rate in cardiac function measurement (volumetry) using motion phantom. (author)

  20. Integral test phantom for dosimetric quality assurance of image guided and intensity modulated stereotactic radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Létourneau, Daniel; Keller, Harald; Sharpe, Michael B; Jaffray, David A

    2007-05-01

    The objective of this work is to develop a dosimetric phantom quality assurance (QA) of linear accelerators capable of cone-beam CT (CBCT) image guided and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT). This phantom is to be used in an integral test to quantify in real-time both the performance of the image guidance and the dose delivery systems in terms of dose localization. The prototype IG-IMRT QA phantom consisted of a cylindrical imaging phantom (CatPhan) combined with an array of 11 radiation diodes mounted on a 10 cm diameter disk, oriented perpendicular to the phantom axis. Basic diode response characterization was performed for 6 and 18 MV photons. The diode response was compared to planning system calculations in the open and penumbrae regions of simple and complex beam arrangements. The clinical use of the QA phantom was illustrated in an integral test of an IG-IMRT treatment designed for a clinical spinal radiosurgery case. The sensitivity of the phantom to multileaf collimator (MLC) calibration and setup errors in the clinical setting was assessed by introducing errors in the IMRT plan or by displacing the phantom. The diodes offered good response linearity and long-term reproducibility for both 6 and 18 MV. Axial dosimetry of coplanar beams (in a plane containing the beam axes) was made possible with the nearly isoplanatic response of the diodes over 360 degrees of gantry (usually within +/-1%). For single beam geometry, errors in phantom placement as small as 0.5 mm could be accurately detected (in gradient > or = 1% /mm). In clinical setting, MLC systematic errors of 1 mm on a single MLC bank introduced in the IMRT plan were easily detectable with the QA phantom. The QA phantom demonstrated also sufficient sensitivity for the detection of setup errors as small as 1 mm for the IMRT delivery. These results demonstrated that the prototype can accurately and efficiently verify the entire IG-IMRT process. This tool, in conjunction with image guidance

  1. Integral test phantom for dosimetric quality assurance of image guided and intensity modulated stereotactic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Letourneau, Daniel; Keller, Harald; Sharpe, Michael B.; Jaffray, David A.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this work is to develop a dosimetric phantom quality assurance (QA) of linear accelerators capable of cone-beam CT (CBCT) image guided and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT). This phantom is to be used in an integral test to quantify in real-time both the performance of the image guidance and the dose delivery systems in terms of dose localization. The prototype IG-IMRT QA phantom consisted of a cylindrical imaging phantom (CatPhan) combined with an array of 11 radiation diodes mounted on a 10 cm diameter disk, oriented perpendicular to the phantom axis. Basic diode response characterization was performed for 6 and 18 MV photons. The diode response was compared to planning system calculations in the open and penumbrae regions of simple and complex beam arrangements. The clinical use of the QA phantom was illustrated in an integral test of an IG-IMRT treatment designed for a clinical spinal radiosurgery case. The sensitivity of the phantom to multileaf collimator (MLC) calibration and setup errors in the clinical setting was assessed by introducing errors in the IMRT plan or by displacing the phantom. The diodes offered good response linearity and long-term reproducibility for both 6 and 18 MV. Axial dosimetry of coplanar beams (in a plane containing the beam axes) was made possible with the nearly isoplanatic response of the diodes over 360 deg. of gantry (usually within ±1%). For single beam geometry, errors in phantom placement as small as 0.5 mm could be accurately detected (in gradient ≥1%/mm). In clinical setting, MLC systematic errors of 1 mm on a single MLC bank introduced in the IMRT plan were easily detectable with the QA phantom. The QA phantom demonstrated also sufficient sensitivity for the detection of setup errors as small as 1 mm for the IMRT delivery. These results demonstrated that the prototype can accurately and efficiently verify the entire IG-IMRT process. This tool, in conjunction with image guidance capabilities

  2. Image quality of cone beam CT on respiratory motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Ke; Li Minghui; Dai Jianrong; Wang Shi

    2011-01-01

    In this study,the influence of respiratory motion on Cone Beam CT (CBCT) image quality was investigated by a motion simulating platform, an image quality phantom, and a kV X-ray CBCT. A total of 21 motion states in the superior-inferior direction and the anterior-posterior direction, separately or together, was simulated by considering different respiration amplitudes, periods and hysteresis. The influence of motion on CBCT image quality was evaluated with the quality indexes of low contrast visibility, geometric accuracy, spatial resolution and uniformity of CT values. The results showed that the quality indexes were affected by the motion more prominently in AP direction than in SI direction, and the image quality was affected by the respiration amplitude more prominently than the respiration period and the hysteresis. The CBCT image quality and its characteristics influenced by the respiration motion, and may be exploited in finding solutions. (authors)

  3. Study of CT head scans using different voltages: image quality evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pacheco de Freitas C, I.; Prata M, A. [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica de Minas Gerais, Centro de Engenharia Biomedica, Av. Amazonas 5253, 30421-169 Nova Suica, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Alonso, T. C. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear / CNEN, Av. Pte. Antonio Carlos 6627, 31270-901 Pampulha, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Santana, P., E-mail: iarapfcorrea@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Departamento de Anatomia e Imagem, Av. Prof. Alfredo Balena 190, 30130-100 Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

    2016-10-15

    Computed tomography (CT) was introduced to medical practice in 1972. It generates images recognized by high diagnostic potential. CT allows investigation of structures in the human body inaccessible by conventional image methods, replacing invasive methods in many cases. Noise is a kind of variation of brightness observed on CT images, and it is inherent to this method. The magnitude of the noise is determined by the standard deviation of CT numbers of a region of interest in a homogeneous material. The aim of this study is to analyze the noise in head CT images generated by different acquisition protocols using four voltage values. Five different scans were performed using a female Alderson phantom and their images were analyzed with the RadiAnt software. With the average HU values and standard deviation of each scan, the values of noise were calculated in some region of interest. The obtained noise values were compared and it was observed that the 140 kV voltage promotes the in the lower noise in the image, resulting in better image quality. The results also show that the parameters, such as voltage and current, can be adjusted so that the noise can be decreased. Thus, acquisition protocols may be adapted to produce images with diagnostic quality and lower doses in patient. (Author)

  4. Study of CT head scans using different voltages: image quality evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacheco de Freitas C, I.; Prata M, A.; Alonso, T. C.; Santana, P.

    2016-10-01

    Computed tomography (CT) was introduced to medical practice in 1972. It generates images recognized by high diagnostic potential. CT allows investigation of structures in the human body inaccessible by conventional image methods, replacing invasive methods in many cases. Noise is a kind of variation of brightness observed on CT images, and it is inherent to this method. The magnitude of the noise is determined by the standard deviation of CT numbers of a region of interest in a homogeneous material. The aim of this study is to analyze the noise in head CT images generated by different acquisition protocols using four voltage values. Five different scans were performed using a female Alderson phantom and their images were analyzed with the RadiAnt software. With the average HU values and standard deviation of each scan, the values of noise were calculated in some region of interest. The obtained noise values were compared and it was observed that the 140 kV voltage promotes the in the lower noise in the image, resulting in better image quality. The results also show that the parameters, such as voltage and current, can be adjusted so that the noise can be decreased. Thus, acquisition protocols may be adapted to produce images with diagnostic quality and lower doses in patient. (Author)

  5. Evaluation of accelerated iterative x-ray CT image reconstruction using floating point graphics hardware

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kole, J S; Beekman, F J

    2006-01-01

    Statistical reconstruction methods offer possibilities to improve image quality as compared with analytical methods, but current reconstruction times prohibit routine application in clinical and micro-CT. In particular, for cone-beam x-ray CT, the use of graphics hardware has been proposed to accelerate the forward and back-projection operations, in order to reduce reconstruction times. In the past, wide application of this texture hardware mapping approach was hampered owing to limited intrinsic accuracy. Recently, however, floating point precision has become available in the latest generation commodity graphics cards. In this paper, we utilize this feature to construct a graphics hardware accelerated version of the ordered subset convex reconstruction algorithm. The aims of this paper are (i) to study the impact of using graphics hardware acceleration for statistical reconstruction on the reconstructed image accuracy and (ii) to measure the speed increase one can obtain by using graphics hardware acceleration. We compare the unaccelerated algorithm with the graphics hardware accelerated version, and for the latter we consider two different interpolation techniques. A simulation study of a micro-CT scanner with a mathematical phantom shows that at almost preserved reconstructed image accuracy, speed-ups of a factor 40 to 222 can be achieved, compared with the unaccelerated algorithm, and depending on the phantom and detector sizes. Reconstruction from physical phantom data reconfirms the usability of the accelerated algorithm for practical cases

  6. SU-E-I-82: Improving CT Image Quality for Radiation Therapy Using Iterative Reconstruction Algorithms and Slightly Increasing Imaging Doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noid, G; Chen, G; Tai, A; Li, X

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Iterative reconstruction (IR) algorithms are developed to improve CT image quality (IQ) by reducing noise without diminishing spatial resolution or contrast. For CT in radiation therapy (RT), slightly increasing imaging dose to improve IQ may be justified if it can substantially enhance structure delineation. The purpose of this study is to investigate and to quantify the IQ enhancement as a result of increasing imaging doses and using IR algorithms. Methods: CT images were acquired for phantoms, built to evaluate IQ metrics including spatial resolution, contrast and noise, with a variety of imaging protocols using a CT scanner (Definition AS Open, Siemens) installed inside a Linac room. Representative patients were scanned once the protocols were optimized. Both phantom and patient scans were reconstructed using the Sinogram Affirmed Iterative Reconstruction (SAFIRE) and the Filtered Back Projection (FBP) methods. IQ metrics of the obtained CTs were compared. Results: IR techniques are demonstrated to preserve spatial resolution as measured by the point spread function and reduce noise in comparison to traditional FBP. Driven by the reduction in noise, the contrast to noise ratio is doubled by adopting the highest SAFIRE strength. As expected, increasing imaging dose reduces noise for both SAFIRE and FBP reconstructions. The contrast to noise increases from 3 to 5 by increasing the dose by a factor of 4. Similar IQ improvement was observed on the CTs for selected patients with pancreas and prostrate cancers. Conclusion: The IR techniques produce a measurable enhancement to CT IQ by reducing the noise. Increasing imaging dose further reduces noise independent of the IR techniques. The improved CT enables more accurate delineation of tumors and/or organs at risk during RT planning and delivery guidance

  7. Realistic phantoms to characterize dosimetry in pediatric CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carver, Diana E.; Kost, Susan D.; Fraser, Nicholas D.; Pickens, David R.; Price, Ronald R.; Stabin, Michael G. [Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Nashville, TN (United States); Segars, W.P. [Duke University, Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Durham, NC (United States)

    2017-05-15

    The estimation of organ doses and effective doses for children receiving CT examinations is of high interest. Newer, more realistic anthropomorphic body models can provide information on individual organ doses and improved estimates of effective dose. Previously developed body models representing 50th-percentile individuals at reference ages (newborn, 1, 5, 10 and 15 years) were modified to represent 10th, 25th, 75th and 90th height percentiles for both genders and an expanded range of ages (3, 8 and 13 years). We calculated doses for 80 pediatric reference phantoms from simulated chest-abdomen-pelvis exams on a model of a Philips Brilliance 64 CT scanner. Individual organ and effective doses were normalized to dose-length product (DLP) and fit as a function of body diameter. We calculated organ and effective doses for 80 reference phantoms and plotted them against body diameter. The data were well fit with an exponential function. We found DLP-normalized organ dose to correlate strongly with body diameter (R{sup 2}>0.95 for most organs). Similarly, we found a very strong correlation with body diameter for DLP-normalized effective dose (R{sup 2}>0.99). Our results were compared to other studies and we found average agreement of approximately 10%. We provide organ and effective doses for a total of 80 reference phantoms representing normal-stature children ranging in age and body size. This information will be valuable in replacing the types of vendor-reported doses available. These data will also permit the recording and tracking of individual patient doses. Moreover, this comprehensive dose database will facilitate patient matching and the ability to predict patient-individualized dose prior to examination. (orig.)

  8. Blind deblurring of spiral CT images - comparative studies on edge-to-noise ratios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Ming; Wan Ge; Skinner, Margaret W.; Rubinstein, Jay T.; Vannier, Michael W.

    2002-01-01

    A recently developed blind deblurring algorithm based on the edge-to-noise ratio has been applied to improve the quality of spiral CT images. Since the discrepancy measure used to quantify the edge and noise effects is not symmetric, there are several ways to formulate the edge-to-noise ratio. This article is to investigate the performance of those ratios with phantom and patient data. In the phantom study, it is shown that all the ratios share similar properties, validating the blind deblurring algorithm. The image fidelity improvement varies from 29% to 33% for different ratios, according to the root mean square error (RMSE) criterion; the optimal iteration number determined for each ratio varies from 25 to 35. Those ratios that are associated with most satisfactory performance are singled out for the image fidelity improvement of about 33% in the numerical simulation. After automatic blind deblurring with the selected ratios, the spatial resolution of CT is substantially refined in all the cases tested

  9. Stability of deep features across CT scanners and field of view using a physical phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Rahul; Shafiq-ul-Hassan, Muhammad; Moros, Eduardo G.; Gillies, Robert J.; Hall, Lawrence O.; Goldgof, Dmitry B.

    2018-02-01

    Radiomics is the process of analyzing radiological images by extracting quantitative features for monitoring and diagnosis of various cancers. Analyzing images acquired from different medical centers is confounded by many choices in acquisition, reconstruction parameters and differences among device manufacturers. Consequently, scanning the same patient or phantom using various acquisition/reconstruction parameters as well as different scanners may result in different feature values. To further evaluate this issue, in this study, CT images from a physical radiomic phantom were used. Recent studies showed that some quantitative features were dependent on voxel size and that this dependency could be reduced or removed by the appropriate normalization factor. Deep features extracted from a convolutional neural network, may also provide additional features for image analysis. Using a transfer learning approach, we obtained deep features from three convolutional neural networks pre-trained on color camera images. An we examination of the dependency of deep features on image pixel size was done. We found that some deep features were pixel size dependent, and to remove this dependency we proposed two effective normalization approaches. For analyzing the effects of normalization, a threshold has been used based on the calculated standard deviation and average distance from a best fit horizontal line among the features' underlying pixel size before and after normalization. The inter and intra scanner dependency of deep features has also been evaluated.

  10. CT-guided procedures: evaluation of a phantom system to teach accurate needle placement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimmick, S.; Jones, M.; Challen, J.; Iedema, J.; Wattuhewa, U.; Coucher, J.

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the use of a phantom system to help teach the basic techniques of accurate CT-guided needle placement, thereby avoiding the risks associated with teaching on patients. Materials and Methods: Gelatine phantoms with five, 1.9 cm embedded spherical wooden targets were constructed. Four trainee operators performed 15 simulated biopsy procedures on the targets (series one) and repeated identical procedures 2 weeks later (series two). Statistical analysis of accuracy of needle placement and subject confidence were performed. Results: Significant sequential improvement in axial plane angular error was noted with the average error decreasing by 0.33 degrees after every five procedures performed (95% CI: -0.58 to -0.08, p = 0.01). Operator confidence indicated significant improvement both within each series and from series one to series two (95% CI: 0.08 to 1.17, p = 0.025 and 95% CI: 0.00 to 0.58, p = 0.05) respectively. However, variability in operator performance made statistically significant improvement in other variables unproven. Conclusion: Despite the study comprising a relatively small number of participants and procedures, it clearly demonstrated the effectiveness of teaching operators to perform CT-guided procedures using a phantom system. Needle placement accuracy significantly improved, with a reduction in axial angular error, and improved operator confidence without the risks associated with training on patients. Three of the operators in this study had never performed a CT-guided procedure previously, and their proficiency, after a relatively short but intense period of training, was impressive. The use of phantoms should be considered routinely for basic training of CT-guided needle placement

  11. An analytical simulation technique for cone-beam CT and pinhole SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xuezhu; Qi Yujin

    2011-01-01

    This study was aimed at developing an efficient simulation technique with an ordinary PC. The work involved derivation of mathematical operators, analytic phantom generations, and effective analytical projectors developing for cone-beam CT and pinhole SPECT imaging. The computer simulations based on the analytical projectors were developed by ray-tracing method for cone-beam CT and voxel-driven method for pinhole SPECT of degrading blurring. The 3D Shepp-Logan, Jaszczak and Defrise phantoms were used for simulation evaluations and image reconstructions. The reconstructed phantom images were of good accuracy with the phantoms. The results showed that the analytical simulation technique is an efficient tool for studying cone-beam CT and pinhole SPECT imaging. (authors)

  12. Finite-element modeling of compression and gravity on a population of breast phantoms for multimodality imaging simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturgeon, Gregory M; Kiarashi, Nooshin; Lo, Joseph Y; Samei, E; Segars, W P

    2016-05-01

    The authors are developing a series of computational breast phantoms based on breast CT data for imaging research. In this work, the authors develop a program that will allow a user to alter the phantoms to simulate the effect of gravity and compression of the breast (craniocaudal or mediolateral oblique) making the phantoms applicable to multimodality imaging. This application utilizes a template finite-element (FE) breast model that can be applied to their presegmented voxelized breast phantoms. The FE model is automatically fit to the geometry of a given breast phantom, and the material properties of each element are set based on the segmented voxels contained within the element. The loading and boundary conditions, which include gravity, are then assigned based on a user-defined position and compression. The effect of applying these loads to the breast is computed using a multistage contact analysis in FEBio, a freely available and well-validated FE software package specifically designed for biomedical applications. The resulting deformation of the breast is then applied to a boundary mesh representation of the phantom that can be used for simulating medical images. An efficient script performs the above actions seamlessly. The user only needs to specify which voxelized breast phantom to use, the compressed thickness, and orientation of the breast. The authors utilized their FE application to simulate compressed states of the breast indicative of mammography and tomosynthesis. Gravity and compression were simulated on example phantoms and used to generate mammograms in the craniocaudal or mediolateral oblique views. The simulated mammograms show a high degree of realism illustrating the utility of the FE method in simulating imaging data of repositioned and compressed breasts. The breast phantoms and the compression software can become a useful resource to the breast imaging research community. These phantoms can then be used to evaluate and compare imaging

  13. TU-F-18A-09: CT Number Stability Across Patient Sizes Using Virtual-Monoenergetic Dual-Energy CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michalak, G; Grimes, J; Fletcher, J; McCollough, C [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Halaweish, A [Siemens Healthcare, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Virtual-monoenergetic imaging uses dual-energy CT data to synthesize images corresponding to a single photon energy, thereby reducing beam-hardening artifacts. This work evaluated the ability of a commercial virtual-monoenergetic algorithm to achieve stable CT numbers across patient sizes. Methods: Test objects containing a range of iodine and calcium hydroxyapatite concentrations were placed inside 8 torso-shaped water phantoms, ranging in lateral width from 15 to 50 cm, and scanned on a dual-source CT system (Siemens Somatom Force). Single-energy scans were acquired from 70-150 kV in 10 kV increments; dual-energy scans were acquired using 4 energy pairs (low energy: 70, 80, 90, and 100 kV; high energy: 150 kV + 0.6 mm Sn). CTDIvol was matched for all single- and dual-energy scans for a given phantom size. All scans used 128×0.6 mm collimation and were reconstructed with 1-mm thickness at 0.8-mm increment and a medium smooth body kernel. Monoenergetic images were generated using commercial software (syngo Via Dual Energy, VA30). Iodine contrast was calculated as the difference in mean iodine and water CT numbers from respective regions-of-interest in 10 consecutive images. Results: CT numbers remained stable as phantom width varied from 15 to 50 cm for all dual-energy data sets (except for at 50 cm using 70/150Sn due to photon starvation effects). Relative to the 15 cm phantom, iodine contrast was within 5.2% of the 70 keV value for phantom sizes up to 45 cm. At 90/150Sn, photon starvation did not occur at 50 cm, and iodine contrast in the 50-cm phantom was within 1.4% of the 15-cm phantom. Conclusion: Monoenergetic imaging, as implemented in the evaluated commercial system, eliminated the variation in CT numbers due to patient size, and may provide more accurate data for quantitative tasks, including radiation therapy treatment planning. Siemens Healthcare.

  14. Restoration of Thickness, Density, and Volume for Highly Blurred Thin Cortical Bones in Clinical CT Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakdel, Amirreza; Hardisty, Michael; Fialkov, Jeffrey; Whyne, Cari

    2016-11-01

    In clinical CT images containing thin osseous structures, accurate definition of the geometry and density is limited by the scanner's resolution and radiation dose. This study presents and validates a practical methodology for restoring information about thin bone structure by volumetric deblurring of images. The methodology involves 2 steps: a phantom-free, post-reconstruction estimation of the 3D point spread function (PSF) from CT data sets, followed by iterative deconvolution using the PSF estimate. Performance of 5 iterative deconvolution algorithms, blind, Richardson-Lucy (standard, plus Total Variation versions), modified residual norm steepest descent (MRNSD), and Conjugate Gradient Least-Squares were evaluated using CT scans of synthetic cortical bone phantoms. The MRNSD algorithm resulted in the highest relative deblurring performance as assessed by a cortical bone thickness error (0.18 mm) and intensity error (150 HU), and was subsequently applied on a CT image of a cadaveric skull. Performance was compared against micro-CT images of the excised thin cortical bone samples from the skull (average thickness 1.08 ± 0.77 mm). Error in quantitative measurements made from the deblurred images was reduced 82% (p < 0.01) for cortical thickness and 55% (p < 0.01) for bone mineral mass. These results demonstrate a significant restoration of geometrical and radiological density information derived for thin osseous features.

  15. Application of the optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) technique for mouse dosimetry in micro-CT imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vrigneaud, Jean-Marc; Courteau, Alan; Oudot, Alexandra; Collin, Bertrand [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Centre Georges-François Leclerc, 1 rue Professeur Marion, Dijon 21079 Cedex (France); Ranouil, Julien [Landauer Europe, 33 avenue du Général Leclerc, Fontenay-aux-Roses 92266 Cedex (France); Morgand, Loïc; Raguin, Olivier [Oncodesign, 20 rue Jean Mazen, Dijon 21076 Cedex (France); Walker, Paul [LE2i CNRS UMR 5158, Faculty of Medicine, BP 87900, 21079 Dijon Cedex (France); Brunotte, François [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Centre Georges-François Leclerc, 1 rue Professeur Marion, Dijon 21079 Cedex, France and LE2i CNRS UMR 5158, Faculty of Medicine, BP 87900, 21079 Dijon Cedex (France)

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Micro-CT is considered to be a powerful tool to investigate various models of disease on anesthetized animals. In longitudinal studies, the radiation dose delivered by the micro-CT to the same animal is a major concern as it could potentially induce spurious effects in experimental results. Optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLDs) are a relatively new kind of detector used in radiation dosimetry for medical applications. The aim of this work was to assess the dose delivered by the CT component of a micro-SPECT (single-photon emission computed tomography)/CT camera during a typical whole-body mouse study, using commercially available OSLDs based on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C crystals.Methods: CTDI (computed tomography dose index) was measured in micro-CT with a properly calibrated pencil ionization chamber using a rat-like phantom (60 mm in diameter) and a mouse-like phantom (30 mm in diameter). OSLDs were checked for reproducibility and linearity in the range of doses delivered by the micro-CT. Dose measurements obtained with OSLDs were compared to those of the ionization chamber to correct for the radiation quality dependence of OSLDs in the low-kV range. Doses to tissue were then investigated in phantoms and cadavers. A 30 mm diameter phantom, specifically designed to insert OSLDs, was used to assess radiation dose over a typical whole-body mouse imaging study. Eighteen healthy female BALB/c mice weighing 27.1 ± 0.8 g (1 SD) were euthanized for small animal measurements. OLSDs were placed externally or implanted internally in nine different locations by an experienced animal technician. Five commonly used micro-CT protocols were investigated.Results: CTDI measurements were between 78.0 ± 2.1 and 110.7 ± 3.0 mGy for the rat-like phantom and between 169.3 ± 4.6 and 203.6 ± 5.5 mGy for the mouse-like phantom. On average, the displayed CTDI at the operator console was underestimated by 1.19 for the rat-like phantom and 2.36 for the mouse

  16. An algorithm for 4D CT image sorting using spatial continuity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chen; Liu, Jie

    2013-01-01

    4D CT, which could locate the position of the movement of the tumor in the entire respiratory cycle and reduce image artifacts effectively, has been widely used in making radiation therapy of tumors. The current 4D CT methods required external surrogates of respiratory motion obtained from extra instruments. However, respiratory signals recorded by these external makers may not always accurately represent the internal tumor and organ movements, especially when irregular breathing patterns happened. In this paper we have proposed a novel automatic 4D CT sorting algorithm that performs without these external surrogates. The sorting algorithm requires collecting the image data with a cine scan protocol. Beginning with the first couch position, images from the adjacent couch position are selected out according to spatial continuity. The process is continued until images from all couch positions are sorted and the entire 3D volume is produced. The algorithm is verified by respiratory phantom image data and clinical image data. The primary test results show that the 4D CT images created by our algorithm have eliminated the motion artifacts effectively and clearly demonstrated the movement of tumor and organ in the breath period.

  17. Lesion detection performance: comparative analysis of low-dose CT data of the chest on two hybrid imaging systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessop, Maryam; Thompson, John D; Coward, Joanne; Sanderud, Audun; Jorge, José; de Groot, Martijn; Lança, Luís; Hogg, Peter

    2015-03-01

    Incidental findings on low-dose CT images obtained during hybrid imaging are an increasing phenomenon as CT technology advances. Understanding the diagnostic value of incidental findings along with the technical limitations is important when reporting image results and recommending follow-up, which may result in an additional radiation dose from further diagnostic imaging and an increase in patient anxiety. This study assessed lesions incidentally detected on CT images acquired for attenuation correction on two SPECT/CT systems. An anthropomorphic chest phantom containing simulated lesions of varying size and density was imaged on an Infinia Hawkeye 4 and a Symbia T6 using the low-dose CT settings applied for attenuation correction acquisitions in myocardial perfusion imaging. Twenty-two interpreters assessed 46 images from each SPECT/CT system (15 normal images and 31 abnormal images; 41 lesions). Data were evaluated using a jackknife alternative free-response receiver-operating-characteristic analysis (JAFROC). JAFROC analysis showed a significant difference (P detection, with the figures of merit being 0.599 (95% confidence interval, 0.568, 0.631) and 0.810 (95% confidence interval, 0.781, 0.839) for the Infinia Hawkeye 4 and Symbia T6, respectively. Lesion detection on the Infinia Hawkeye 4 was generally limited to larger, higher-density lesions. The Symbia T6 allowed improved detection rates for midsized lesions and some lower-density lesions. However, interpreters struggled to detect small (5 mm) lesions on both image sets, irrespective of density. Lesion detection is more reliable on low-dose CT images from the Symbia T6 than from the Infinia Hawkeye 4. This phantom-based study gives an indication of potential lesion detection in the clinical context as shown by two commonly used SPECT/CT systems, which may assist the clinician in determining whether further diagnostic imaging is justified. © 2015 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging

  18. The UF/NCI family of hybrid computational phantoms representing the current US population of male and female children, adolescents, and adults—application to CT dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geyer, Amy M; O'Reilly, Shannon; Long, Daniel J; Bolch, Wesley E; Lee, Choonsik

    2014-01-01

    Substantial increases in pediatric and adult obesity in the US have prompted a major revision to the current UF/NCI (University of Florida/National Cancer Institute) family of hybrid computational phantoms to more accurately reflect current trends in larger body morphometry. A decision was made to construct the new library in a gridded fashion by height/weight without further reference to age-dependent weight/height percentiles as these become quickly outdated. At each height/weight combination, circumferential parameters were defined and used for phantom construction. All morphometric data for the new library were taken from the CDC NHANES survey data over the time period 1999–2006, the most recent reported survey period. A subset of the phantom library was then used in a CT organ dose sensitivity study to examine the degree to which body morphometry influences the magnitude of organ doses for patients that are underweight to morbidly obese in body size. Using primary and secondary morphometric parameters, grids containing 100 adult male height/weight bins, 93 adult female height/weight bins, 85 pediatric male height/weight bins and 73 pediatric female height/weight bins were constructed. These grids served as the blueprints for construction of a comprehensive library of patient-dependent phantoms containing 351 computational phantoms. At a given phantom standing height, normalized CT organ doses were shown to linearly decrease with increasing phantom BMI for pediatric males, while curvilinear decreases in organ dose were shown with increasing phantom BMI for adult females. These results suggest that one very useful application of the phantom library would be the construction of a pre-computed dose library for CT imaging as needed for patient dose-tracking. (paper)

  19. Evaluation of scatter limitation correction: a new method of correcting photopenic artifacts caused by patient motion during whole-body PET/CT imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miwa, Kenta; Umeda, Takuro; Murata, Taisuke; Wagatsuma, Kei; Miyaji, Noriaki; Terauchi, Takashi; Koizumi, Mitsuru; Sasaki, Masayuki

    2016-02-01

    Overcorrection of scatter caused by patient motion during whole-body PET/computed tomography (CT) imaging can induce the appearance of photopenic artifacts in the PET images. The present study aimed to quantify the accuracy of scatter limitation correction (SLC) for eliminating photopenic artifacts. This study analyzed photopenic artifacts in (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) PET/CT images acquired from 12 patients and from a National Electrical Manufacturers Association phantom with two peripheral plastic bottles that simulated the human body and arms, respectively. The phantom comprised a sphere (diameter, 10 or 37 mm) containing fluorine-18 solutions with target-to-background ratios of 2, 4, and 8. The plastic bottles were moved 10 cm posteriorly between CT and PET acquisitions. All PET data were reconstructed using model-based scatter correction (SC), no scatter correction (NSC), and SLC, and the presence or absence of artifacts on the PET images was visually evaluated. The SC and SLC images were also semiquantitatively evaluated using standardized uptake values (SUVs). Photopenic artifacts were not recognizable in any NSC and SLC image from all 12 patients in the clinical study. The SUVmax of mismatched SLC PET/CT images were almost equal to those of matched SC and SLC PET/CT images. Applying NSC and SLC substantially eliminated the photopenic artifacts on SC PET images in the phantom study. SLC improved the activity concentration of the sphere for all target-to-background ratios. The highest %errors of the 10 and 37-mm spheres were 93.3 and 58.3%, respectively, for mismatched SC, and 73.2 and 22.0%, respectively, for mismatched SLC. Photopenic artifacts caused by SC error induced by CT and PET image misalignment were corrected using SLC, indicating that this method is useful and practical for clinical qualitative and quantitative PET/CT assessment.

  20. Study on the testing standards of quality assurance for CT image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jingxin; Yang Haishan; Liu Gang; Wang Liyun

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To establish national testing standards of quality assurance for CT image. Methods: 104 sets of CT system were tested using quality assurance test phantoms and devices including American RMI 461A, RMI 463, MDH 1015 C with ION Chamber, Sweden UNF 9004 kvp meter. These CT were made from different manufacturers including out of date of CT and state-of-art spiral CT system. Thirteen kinds of standards on CT from different countries and 87 sets of technical specifications of CT were collected. The results of the test were compared using phantoms of RMI, Victoreen, Catphan on the same CT system (Siemens HQS). Results: Based on the test results of this study, with reference to the foreign standards and some of regulations in China, CT test items should include high contrast resolution, low contrast resolution, noise, uniformity, mean CT unit, dose slice thickness, localization light, positioning of patient support and gantry tilt. Standards including acceptance test, status test, and constancy test were made in specification. Among them, constancy test equals to IEC 122-2-6; items and results in acceptance test are stricter than in the status test; and low contrast resolution, uniformity, localization light accuracy and positioning of patient support in the acceptance test are even stricter than that in foreign standards. Conclusion: The testing standards of quality assurance for CT developed in this study shows practical and useful in China, which supplemented to the existing international standards

  1. Computational anthropomorphic phantoms for radiation protection dosimetry: evolution and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Choonsik; Lee, Jaiki

    2006-01-01

    Computational anthropomorphic phantoms are computer models of human anatomy used in the calculation of radiation dose distribution in the human body upon exposure to a radiation source. Depending on the manner to represent human anatomy, they are categorized into two classes: stylized and tomographic phantoms. Stylized phantoms, which have mainly been developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), describe human anatomy by using simple mathematical equations of analytical geometry. Several improved stylized phantoms such as male and female adults, pediatric series, and enhanced organ models have been developed following the first hermaphrodite adult stylized phantom, Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD)-5 phantom. Although stylized phantoms have significantly contributed to dosimetry calculation, they provide only approximations of the true anatomical features of the human body and the resulting organ dose distribution. An alternative class of computational phantom, the tomographic phantom, is based upon three-dimensional imaging techniques such as Magnetic Resonance (MR) imaging and Computed Tomography (CT). The tomographic phantoms represent the human anatomy with a large number of voxels that are assigned tissue type and organ identity. To date, a total of around 30 tomographic phantoms including male and female adults, pediatric phantoms, and even a pregnant female, have been developed and utilized for realistic radiation dosimetry calculation. They are based on MRI/CT images or sectional color photos from patients, volunteers or cadavers. Several investigators have compared tomographic phantoms with stylized phantoms, and demonstrated the superiority of tomographic phantoms in terms of realistic anatomy and dosimetry calculation. This paper summarizes the history and current status of both stylized and tomographic phantoms, including Korean computational phantoms. Advantages, limitations, and future prospects are also discussed

  2. TH-CD-206-08: An Anthropopathic Deformable Phantom for Geometric and Dose Accumulation Accuracy Validation of Deformable Image Registration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, Y; Chen, H; Chen, J; Zhen, X; Zhou, L [Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Gu, X [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To design and construct a three-dimensional (3D) anthropopathic abdominal phantom for evaluating deformable image registration (DIR) accuracy on images and dose deformation in adaptive radiation therapy (ART). Method: Organ moulds, including liver, kidney, spleen, stomach, vertebra and two metastasis tumors, are 3D printed using the contours from an ovarian cancer patient. The organ moulds are molded with deformable gels that made of different mixtures of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and the softener dioctyl terephthalate. Gels with different densities are obtained by a polynomial fitting curve which describes the relation between the CT number and PVC-softener blending ratio. The rigid vertebras are constructed by moulding with white cement. The final abdominal phantom is assembled by arranging all the fabricated organs inside a hollow dummy according to their anatomies and sealed with deformable gel with averaged CT number of muscle and fat. Geometric and dosimetric landmarks are embedded inside the phantom for spatial accuracy and dose accumulation accuracy studies. Three DIR algorithms available in the open source DIR toolkit-DIRART, including the Demons, the Horn-Schunck and Lucas-Kanade method and the Level-Set Motion method, are tested using the constructed phantom. Results: Viscoelastic behavior is observed in the constructed deformable gel, which serves as an ideal material for the deformable phantom. The constructed abdominal phantom consists of highly realistic anatomy and the fabricated organs inside have close CT number to its reference patient. DIR accuracy studies conducted on the constructed phantom using three DIR approaches indicate that geometric accuracy of a DIR algorithm has achieved does not guarantee accuracy in dose accumulation. Conclusions: We have designed and constructed an anthropopathic abdominal deformable phantom with satisfactory elastic property, realistic organ density and anatomy. This physical phantom is recyclable and can

  3. Relationships of clinical protocols and reconstruction kernels with image quality and radiation dose in a 128-slice CT scanner: Study with an anthropomorphic and water phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, Jijo; Krauss, B.; Banckwitz, R.; Maentele, W.; Bauer, R.W.; Vogl, T.J.

    2012-01-01

    Research highlights: ► Clinical protocol, reconstruction kernel, reconstructed slice thickness, phantom diameter or the density of material it contains directly affects the image quality of DSCT. ► Dual energy protocol shows the lowest DLP compared to all other protocols examined. ► Dual-energy fused images show excellent image quality and the noise is same as that of single- or high-pitch mode protocol images. ► Advanced CT technology improves image quality and considerably reduce radiation dose. ► An important finding is the comparatively higher DLP of the dual-source high-pitch protocol compared to other single- or dual-energy protocols. - Abstract: Purpose: The aim of this study was to explore the relationship of scanning parameters (clinical protocols), reconstruction kernels and slice thickness with image quality and radiation dose in a DSCT. Materials and methods: The chest of an anthropomorphic phantom was scanned on a DSCT scanner (Siemens Somatom Definition flash) using different clinical protocols, including single- and dual-energy modes. Four scan protocols were investigated: 1) single-source 120 kV, 110 mA s, 2) single-source 100 kV, 180 mA s, 3) high-pitch 120 kV, 130 mA s and 4) dual-energy with 100/Sn140 kV, eff.mA s 89, 76. The automatic exposure control was switched off for all the scans and the CTDIvol selected was in between 7.12 and 7.37 mGy. The raw data were reconstructed using the reconstruction kernels B31f, B80f and B70f, and slice thicknesses were 1.0 mm and 5.0 mm. Finally, the same parameters and procedures were used for the scanning of water phantom. Friedman test and Wilcoxon-Matched-Pair test were used for statistical analysis. Results: The DLP based on the given CTDIvol values showed significantly lower exposure for protocol 4, when compared to protocol 1 (percent difference 5.18%), protocol 2 (percent diff. 4.51%), and protocol 3 (percent diff. 8.81%). The highest change in Hounsfield Units was observed with dual

  4. SU-F-T-136: Breath Hold Lung Phantom Study in Using CT Density Versus Relative Stopping Power Ratio for Proton Pencil Beam Scanning System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syh, J; Wu, H; Rosen, L [Willis-Knighton Medical Center, Shreveport, LA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate mass density effects of CT conversion table and its variation in current treatment planning system of spot scanning proton beam using an IROC proton lung phantom for this study. Methods: A proton lung phantom study was acquired to Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core Houston (IROC) Quality Assurance Center. Inside the lung phantom, GAF Chromic films and couples of thermal luminescent dosimeter (TLD) capsules embedded in specified PTV and adjacent structures to monitor delivered dosage and 3D dose distribution profiles. Various material such as cork (Lung), blue water (heart), Techron HPV (ribs) and organic material of balsa wood and cork as dosimetry inserts within phantom of solid water (soft tissue). Relative stopping power (RLSP) values were provided. Our treatment planning system (TPS) doesn’t require SP instead relative density was converted relative to water. However lung phantom was irradiated by planning with density override and the results were compared with IROC measurements. The second attempt was conducted without density override and compared with IROC’s. Results: The higher passing rate of imaging and measurement results of the lung phantom irradiation met the criteria by IROC without density override. The film at coronal plane was found to be shift due to inclined cylinder insertion. The converted CT density worked as expected to correlate relative stopping power. Conclusion: The proton lung phantom provided by IROC is a useful tool to qualify our commissioned proton pencil beam delivery with TPS within reliable confidence. The relative mass stopping power ratios of materials were converted from the relative physical density relative to water and the results were satisfied.

  5. Impact of CT attenuation correction method on quantitative respiratory-correlated (4D) PET/CT imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nyflot, Matthew J., E-mail: nyflot@uw.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195-6043 (United States); Lee, Tzu-Cheng [Department of Bioengineering, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195-6043 (United States); Alessio, Adam M.; Kinahan, Paul E. [Department of Radiology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195-6043 (United States); Wollenweber, Scott D.; Stearns, Charles W. [GE Healthcare, Waukesha, Wisconsin 53188 (United States); Bowen, Stephen R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195-6043 and Department of Radiology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195-6043 (United States)

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: Respiratory-correlated positron emission tomography (PET/CT) 4D PET/CT is used to mitigate errors from respiratory motion; however, the optimal CT attenuation correction (CTAC) method for 4D PET/CT is unknown. The authors performed a phantom study to evaluate the quantitative performance of CTAC methods for 4D PET