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Sample records for ct imaging techniques

  1. In-room CT techniques for image-guided radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, C.-M. Charlie; Paskalev, Kamen M.S.

    2006-01-01

    Accurate patient setup and target localization are essential to advanced radiation therapy treatment. Significant improvement has been made recently with the development of image-guided radiation therapy, in which image guidance facilitates short treatment course and high dose per fraction radiotherapy, aiming at improving tumor control and quality of life. Many imaging modalities are being investigated, including x-ray computed tomography (CT), ultrasound imaging, positron emission tomography, magnetic resonant imaging, magnetic resonant spectroscopic imaging, and kV/MV imaging with flat panel detectors. These developments provide unique imaging techniques and methods for patient setup and target localization. Some of them are different; some are complementary. This paper reviews the currently available kV x-ray CT systems used in the radiation treatment room, with a focus on the CT-on-rails systems, which are diagnostic CT scanners moving on rails installed in the treatment room. We will describe the system hardware including configurations, specifications, operation principles, and functionality. We will review software development for image fusion, structure recognition, deformation correction, target localization, and alignment. Issues related to the clinical implementation of in-room CT techniques in routine procedures are discussed, including acceptance testing and quality assurance. Clinical applications of the in-room CT systems for patient setup, target localization, and adaptive therapy are also reviewed for advanced radiotherapy treatments

  2. Evaluation of the low dose cardiac CT imaging using ASIR technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jiahua; Hsieh, Jiang; Deubig, Amy; Sainath, Paavana; Crandall, Peter

    2010-04-01

    Today Cardiac imaging is one of the key driving forces for the research and development activities of Computed Tomography (CT) imaging. It requires high spatial and temporal resolution and is often associated with high radiation dose. The newly introduced ASIR technique presents an efficient method that offers the dose reduction benefits while maintaining image quality and providing fast reconstruction speed. This paper discusses the study of image quality of the ASIR technique for Cardiac CT imaging. Phantoms as well as clinical data have been evaluated to demonstrate the effectiveness of ASIR technique for Cardiac CT applications.

  3. 3D temporal subtraction on multislice CT images using nonlinear warping technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Takayuki; Katsuragawa, Shigehiko; Kawashita, Ikuo; Kim, Hyounseop; Itai, Yoshinori; Awai, Kazuo; Li, Qiang; Doi, Kunio

    2007-03-01

    The detection of very subtle lesions and/or lesions overlapped with vessels on CT images is a time consuming and difficult task for radiologists. In this study, we have developed a 3D temporal subtraction method to enhance interval changes between previous and current multislice CT images based on a nonlinear image warping technique. Our method provides a subtraction CT image which is obtained by subtraction of a previous CT image from a current CT image. Reduction of misregistration artifacts is important in the temporal subtraction method. Therefore, our computerized method includes global and local image matching techniques for accurate registration of current and previous CT images. For global image matching, we selected the corresponding previous section image for each current section image by using 2D cross-correlation between a blurred low-resolution current CT image and a blurred previous CT image. For local image matching, we applied the 3D template matching technique with translation and rotation of volumes of interests (VOIs) which were selected in the current and the previous CT images. The local shift vector for each VOI pair was determined when the cross-correlation value became the maximum in the 3D template matching. The local shift vectors at all voxels were determined by interpolation of shift vectors of VOIs, and then the previous CT image was nonlinearly warped according to the shift vector for each voxel. Finally, the warped previous CT image was subtracted from the current CT image. The 3D temporal subtraction method was applied to 19 clinical cases. The normal background structures such as vessels, ribs, and heart were removed without large misregistration artifacts. Thus, interval changes due to lung diseases were clearly enhanced as white shadows on subtraction CT images.

  4. Study of CT image texture using deep learning techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Sandeep; Fan, Jiahua; Chevalier, David

    2018-03-01

    For CT imaging, reduction of radiation dose while improving or maintaining image quality (IQ) is currently a very active research and development topic. Iterative Reconstruction (IR) approaches have been suggested to be able to offer better IQ to dose ratio compared to the conventional Filtered Back Projection (FBP) reconstruction. However, it has been widely reported that often CT image texture from IR is different compared to that from FBP. Researchers have proposed different figure of metrics to quantitate the texture from different reconstruction methods. But there is still a lack of practical and robust method in the field for texture description. This work applied deep learning method for CT image texture study. Multiple dose scans of a 20cm diameter cylindrical water phantom was performed on Revolution CT scanner (GE Healthcare, Waukesha) and the images were reconstructed with FBP and four different IR reconstruction settings. The training images generated were randomly allotted (80:20) to a training and validation set. An independent test set of 256-512 images/class were collected with the same scan and reconstruction settings. Multiple deep learning (DL) networks with Convolution, RELU activation, max-pooling, fully-connected, global average pooling and softmax activation layers were investigated. Impact of different image patch size for training was investigated. Original pixel data as well as normalized image data were evaluated. DL models were reliably able to classify CT image texture with accuracy up to 99%. Results show that the deep learning techniques suggest that CT IR techniques may help lower the radiation dose compared to FBP.

  5. Dental CT: imaging technique, anatomy, and pathologic conditions of the jaws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gahleitner, Andre; Watzek, G.; Imhof, H.

    2003-01-01

    In addition to conventional imaging methods, dental CT has become an established method for anatomic imaging of the jaws prior to dental implant placement. More recently, this high-resolution imaging technique has gained importance in diagnosing dental-associated diseases of the mandible and maxilla. Since most radiologists have had little experience in these areas, many of the CT findings remain undescribed. The objective of this review article is to present the technique of dental CT, to illustrate the typical appearance of jaw anatomy and dental-related diseases of the jaws with dental CT, and to show where it can serve as an addition to conventional imaging methods in dental radiology. (orig.)

  6. Dental CT: imaging technique, anatomy, and pathologic conditions of the jaws

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gahleitner, Andre [Department of Radiology/Osteology, Medical School, University of Vienna, Waehringer Strasse 25a, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Department of Oral Surgery, Dental School, University of Vienna, Waehringer Strasse 25a, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Watzek, G. [Department of Oral Surgery, Dental School, University of Vienna, Waehringer Strasse 25a, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Imhof, H. [Department of Radiology/Osteology, Medical School, University of Vienna, Waehringer Strasse 25a, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2003-02-01

    In addition to conventional imaging methods, dental CT has become an established method for anatomic imaging of the jaws prior to dental implant placement. More recently, this high-resolution imaging technique has gained importance in diagnosing dental-associated diseases of the mandible and maxilla. Since most radiologists have had little experience in these areas, many of the CT findings remain undescribed. The objective of this review article is to present the technique of dental CT, to illustrate the typical appearance of jaw anatomy and dental-related diseases of the jaws with dental CT, and to show where it can serve as an addition to conventional imaging methods in dental radiology. (orig.)

  7. Automated image-matching technique for comparative diagnosis of the liver on CT examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okumura, Eiichiro; Sanada, Shigeru; Suzuki, Masayuki; Tsushima, Yoshito; Matsui, Osamu

    2005-01-01

    When interpreting enhanced computer tomography (CT) images of the upper abdomen, radiologists visually select a set of images of the same anatomical positions from two or more CT image series (i.e., non-enhanced and contrast-enhanced CT images at arterial and delayed phase) to depict and to characterize any abnormalities. The same process is also necessary to create subtraction images by computer. We have developed an automated image selection system using a template-matching technique that allows the recognition of image sets at the same anatomical position from two CT image series. Using the template-matching technique, we compared several anatomical structures in each CT image at the same anatomical position. As the position of the liver may shift according to respiratory movement, not only the shape of the liver but also the gallbladder and other prominent structures included in the CT images were compared to allow appropriate selection of a set of CT images. This novel technique was applied in 11 upper abdominal CT examinations. In CT images with a slice thickness of 7.0 or 7.5 mm, the percentage of image sets selected correctly by the automated procedure was 86.6±15.3% per case. In CT images with a slice thickness of 1.25 mm, the percentages of correct selection of image sets by the automated procedure were 79.4±12.4% (non-enhanced and arterial-phase CT images) and 86.4±10.1% (arterial- and delayed-phase CT images). This automated method is useful for assisting in interpreting CT images and in creating digital subtraction images. (author)

  8. Improvement of temporal and dynamic subtraction images on abdominal CT using 3D global image matching and nonlinear image warping techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okumura, E; Sanada, S; Suzuki, M; Takemura, A; Matsui, O

    2007-01-01

    Accurate registration of the corresponding non-enhanced and arterial-phase CT images is necessary to create temporal and dynamic subtraction images for the enhancement of subtle abnormalities. However, respiratory movement causes misregistration at the periphery of the liver. To reduce these misregistration errors, we developed a temporal and dynamic subtraction technique to enhance small HCC by 3D global matching and nonlinear image warping techniques. The study population consisted of 21 patients with HCC. Using the 3D global matching and nonlinear image warping technique, we registered current and previous arterial-phase CT images or current non-enhanced and arterial-phase CT images obtained in the same position. The temporal subtraction image was obtained by subtracting the previous arterial-phase CT image from the warped current arterial-phase CT image. The dynamic subtraction image was obtained by the subtraction of the current non-enhanced CT image from the warped current arterial-phase CT image. The percentage of fair or superior temporal subtraction images increased from 52.4% to 95.2% using the new technique, while on the dynamic subtraction images, the percentage increased from 66.6% to 95.2%. The new subtraction technique may facilitate the diagnosis of subtle HCC based on the superior ability of these subtraction images to show nodular and/or ring enhancement

  9. Improvement in printing technique of spiral CT three-dimensional colour image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yicheng; Liu Feng; Zhang Ling

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the printing technique of spiral CT three-dimensional (3D) colour image. Methods: The 3D colour images of 136 patients were printed, with the equipment of Marconi spiral CT, personnel computer, colour ink printer, and network switchboard. Results: All printed images were satisfied by this method. Conclusion: This technique is economic, simple, and useful, and can meet the need for clinical diagnosis and operation. (authors)

  10. Coronary imaging techniques with emphasis on CT and MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lederlin, Mathieu; Latrabe, Valerie; Corneloup, Olivier; Cochet, Hubert; Montaudon, Michel; Laurent, Francois; Thambo, Jean-Benoit

    2011-01-01

    Coronary artery imaging in children is challenging, with high demands both on temporal and spatial resolution due to high heart rates and smaller anatomy. Although invasive conventional coronary angiography remains the benchmark technique, over the past 10 years, CT and MRI have emerged in the field of coronary imaging. The choice of hardware is important. For CT, the minimum requirement is a 64-channel scanner. The temporal resolution of the scanner is most important for optimising image quality and minimising radiation dose. Manufacturers have developed several modes of electrocardiographic (ECG) triggering to facilitate dose reduction. Recent technical advances have opened new possibilities in MRI coronary imaging. As a non-ionising radiation technique, MRI is of great interest in paediatric imaging. It is currently recommended in centres with appropriate expertise for the screening of patients with suspected congenital coronary anomalies. However, MRI is still not feasible in infants. This review describes and discusses the technical requirements and the pros and cons of all three techniques. (orig.)

  11. Evaluation of the robustness of the preprocessing technique improving reversible compressibility of CT images: Tested on various CT examinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Chang Ho; Kim, Bohyoung; Gu, Bon Seung; Lee, Jong Min [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 300 Gumi-ro, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do 463-707 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kil Joong [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 300 Gumi-ro, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do 463-707, South Korea and Department of Radiation Applied Life Science, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 103 Daehak-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyoung Ho [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 300 Gumi-ro, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do 463-707, South Korea and Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, and Clinical Research Institute, Seoul National University Hospital, 101 Daehak-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae Ki [Medical Information Center, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 300 Gumi-ro, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do 463-707 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: To modify the preprocessing technique, which was previously proposed, improving compressibility of computed tomography (CT) images to cover the diversity of three dimensional configurations of different body parts and to evaluate the robustness of the technique in terms of segmentation correctness and increase in reversible compression ratio (CR) for various CT examinations.Methods: This study had institutional review board approval with waiver of informed patient consent. A preprocessing technique was previously proposed to improve the compressibility of CT images by replacing pixel values outside the body region with a constant value resulting in maximizing data redundancy. Since the technique was developed aiming at only chest CT images, the authors modified the segmentation method to cover the diversity of three dimensional configurations of different body parts. The modified version was evaluated as follows. In randomly selected 368 CT examinations (352 787 images), each image was preprocessed by using the modified preprocessing technique. Radiologists visually confirmed whether the segmented region covers the body region or not. The images with and without the preprocessing were reversibly compressed using Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG), JPEG2000 two-dimensional (2D), and JPEG2000 three-dimensional (3D) compressions. The percentage increase in CR per examination (CR{sub I}) was measured.Results: The rate of correct segmentation was 100.0% (95% CI: 99.9%, 100.0%) for all the examinations. The median of CR{sub I} were 26.1% (95% CI: 24.9%, 27.1%), 40.2% (38.5%, 41.1%), and 34.5% (32.7%, 36.2%) in JPEG, JPEG2000 2D, and JPEG2000 3D, respectively.Conclusions: In various CT examinations, the modified preprocessing technique can increase in the CR by 25% or more without concerning about degradation of diagnostic information.

  12. Lesion Detection in CT Images Using Deep Learning Semantic Segmentation Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinovsky, A.; Liauchuk, V.; Tarasau, A.

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, the problem of automatic detection of tuberculosis lesion on 3D lung CT images is considered as a benchmark for testing out algorithms based on a modern concept of Deep Learning. For training and testing of the algorithms a domestic dataset of 338 3D CT scans of tuberculosis patients with manually labelled lesions was used. The algorithms which are based on using Deep Convolutional Networks were implemented and applied in three different ways including slice-wise lesion detection in 2D images using semantic segmentation, slice-wise lesion detection in 2D images using sliding window technique as well as straightforward detection of lesions via semantic segmentation in whole 3D CT scans. The algorithms demonstrate superior performance compared to algorithms based on conventional image analysis methods.

  13. Panoramic three-dimensional CT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamata, Akitoshi; Fujishita, Masami

    1998-01-01

    Panoramic radiography is a unique projection technique for producing a single image of both maxillary and mandibular arches and many other anatomical structures. To obtain a similar panoramic image without panoramic radiography system, a modified three-dimensional (3D) CT imaging technique was designed. A set of CT slice image data extending from the chin to the orbit was used for 3D reconstruction. The CT machine used in this study was the X-Vision (TOSHIBA, Japan). The helical scan technique was used. The slice thickness of reconstructed image was one or 1.5 mm. The occlusal plane or Frankfort horizontal (FH) plane was used as the reference line. The resultant slice image data was stored on a magnetic optical disk and then used to create panoramic 3D-CT images on a Macintosh computer systems (Power Macintosh 8600/250, Apple Computer Inc., USA). To create the panoramic 3D-CT image, the following procedure was designed: Design a curved panoramic 3D-CT imaging layer using the imaging layer and the movement of the x-ray beam in panoramic radiography system as a template; Cut this imaging layer from each slice image, then the trimmed image was transformed to a rectangular layer using the ''still image warping'' special effect in the Elastic Reality special effects system (Elastic Reality Inc., USA); Create panoramic 3D-CT image using the Voxel View (Vital Images Inc., USA) rendering system and volume rendering technique. Although the image quality was primitive, a panoramic view of maxillofacial region was obtained by this technique. (author)

  14. CT urethrography. New imaging technique of the urethra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeyama, Nobuyuki; Munechika, Hirotsugu

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to assess the usefulness of CT urethrography for evaluation of the posterior urethra and surrounding structures. The CT images were performed with 4 channel multidetector row CT unit. Twenty-six cases (12 cases of CT urethrography and 14 cases of conventional urethrography) were included in this study. 3D-volume rendering (VR) images and VR-multiplaner reconstruction (MPR) sagittal images were compared with conventional retrograde urethrography (RUG) images to evaluate the following anatomical structures; the inferior wall of bladder, the neck of bladder, the posterior urethra, and the prostate. Two radiologists undertook a task of evaluation of the images. There was no significant difference in image quality between RUG and 3D-VR. However, VR-MPR sagittal images were significantly better than RUG or 3D-VR images in any anatomical structures set up beforehand for evaluation. CT urerthrography was useful for evaluation of the posterior urethra and surrounding structures. (author)

  15. Primary study on image addition technique in CT measuring used to determine the malalignment of patellofemoral joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huan Jian; Gong Jianping; Zhu Jianbing; Dong Qirong; Lu Zhian

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the use of image addition technique in the field of CT measuring on patellofemoral joints. Method: In contractive condition and relaxant condition of quadriceps, 60 knee joints of 30 patients (47 knee joints accompanied with peri-patellar pain) were examined by CT scanning, and the CT image addition and single technique. Results: In contractive and relaxant condition of quadriceps in the normal group, the difference between index measured by image addition technique were not significant and it was found that demonstrated measurement error of image addition was smaller, but there was significant difference between index measured by single technique, and it suggests that its replication was bad. Conclusion: Use of image addition technique can decrease measurement error and play a important role on accurately determining the malalignment of patellofemoral joints

  16. Experimental validation of incomplete data CT image reconstruction techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eberhard, J.W.; Hsiao, M.L.; Tam, K.C.

    1989-01-01

    X-ray CT inspection of large metal parts is often limited by x-ray penetration problems along many of the ray paths required for a complete CT data set. In addition, because of the complex geometry of many industrial parts, manipulation difficulties often prevent scanning over some range of angles. CT images reconstructed from these incomplete data sets contain a variety of artifacts which limit their usefulness in part quality determination. Over the past several years, the authors' company has developed 2 new methods of incorporating a priori information about the parts under inspection to significantly improve incomplete data CT image quality. This work reviews the methods which were developed and presents experimental results which confirm the effectiveness of the techniques. The new methods for dealing with incomplete CT data sets rely on a priori information from part blueprints (in electronic form), outer boundary information from touch sensors, estimates of part outer boundaries from available x-ray data, and linear x-ray attenuation coefficients of the part. The two methods make use of this information in different fashions. The relative performance of the two methods in detecting various flaw types is compared. Methods for accurately registering a priori information with x-ray data are also described. These results are critical to a new industrial x-ray inspection cell built for inspection of large aircraft engine parts

  17. What is the difference in the hybrid imaging techniques - SPECT/CT and PET-CT and is there any advantage of their application?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostadinova, I.

    2012-01-01

    The hybrid imaging methods - Single Photon Emission Tomography-Computer Tomography /SPECT-CT / and Positron Emission Tomography-Computer Tomography / PET-CT/ allow receiving of combined image of two different techniques. In such a way it is possible to superimpose detailed anatomical image of the multislice spiral computer tomography with specific and sensitive molecular images of the SPECT and PET in a single study, allowing utilization of the full possibilities of the both techniques. They have advantages and disadvantages, which basically stem from the differences in the used radiopharmaceuticals and their physical properties. In PET- CT - positron emitters are applied, most often 18F and 11C, while in SPECT-CT - single photon emitters, most often 99m Tc and 131 I. A disadvantage of PET is a high cost, which is produced in cyclotron and its logistics is complicated. The great advantage of PET is its better spatial resolution, compared to SPECT, because of the possibility for simultaneous detection of pared photons and better registration. These techniques, especially PET-CT are nowadays the most increasing imaging methods in the world in making diagnosis, staging and following the effect of treatment in patients with oncological, neurological, cardiological, orthopedic diseases and infections. Recently, they are applied for the purposes of radiotherapy planning on the basis of the metabolically active tumor. As a final result, compared to the conventional techniques - roentgenography, CT and MRI, it is possible in many cases to make an early and more precise diagnosis, saving patients' time and using most appropriate treatment. As a conclusion it is clear, that the hybrid imaging has future and its application will increase. (author)

  18. TH-CD-202-04: Evaluation of Virtual Non-Contrast Images From a Novel Split-Filter Dual-Energy CT Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, J; Szczykutowicz, T; Bayouth, J; Miller, J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the ability of two dual-energy CT techniques, a novel split-filter single-source technique of superior temporal resolution against an established sequential-scan technique, to remove iodine contrast from images with minimal impact on CT number accuracy. Methods: A phantom containing 8 tissue substitute materials and vials of varying iodine concentrations (1.7–20.1 mg I /mL) was imaged using a Siemens Edge CT scanner. Dual-energy virtual non-contrast (VNC) images were generated using the novel split-filter technique, in which a 120kVp spectrum is filtered by tin and gold to create high- and low-energy spectra with < 1 second temporal separation between the acquisition of low- and high-energy data. Additionally, VNC images were generated with the sequential-scan technique (80 and 140kVp) for comparison. CT number accuracy was evaluated for all materials at 15, 25, and 35mGy CTDIvol. Results: The spectral separation was greater for the sequential-scan technique than the split-filter technique with dual-energy ratios of 2.18 and 1.26, respectively. Both techniques successfully removed iodine contrast, resulting in mean CT numbers within 60HU of 0HU (split-filter) and 40HU of 0HU (sequential-scan) for all iodine concentrations. Additionally, for iodine vials of varying diameter (2–20 mm) with the same concentration (9.9 mg I /mL), the system accurately detected iodine for all sizes investigated. Both dual-energy techniques resulted in reduced CT numbers for bone materials (by >400HU for the densest bone). Increasing the imaging dose did not improve the CT number accuracy for bone in VNC images. Conclusion: VNC images from the split-filter technique successfully removed iodine contrast. These results demonstrate a potential for improving dose calculation accuracy and reducing patient imaging dose, while achieving superior temporal resolution in comparison sequential scans. For both techniques, inaccuracies in CT numbers for bone materials

  19. TH-CD-202-04: Evaluation of Virtual Non-Contrast Images From a Novel Split-Filter Dual-Energy CT Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, J; Szczykutowicz, T; Bayouth, J; Miller, J [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To compare the ability of two dual-energy CT techniques, a novel split-filter single-source technique of superior temporal resolution against an established sequential-scan technique, to remove iodine contrast from images with minimal impact on CT number accuracy. Methods: A phantom containing 8 tissue substitute materials and vials of varying iodine concentrations (1.7–20.1 mg I /mL) was imaged using a Siemens Edge CT scanner. Dual-energy virtual non-contrast (VNC) images were generated using the novel split-filter technique, in which a 120kVp spectrum is filtered by tin and gold to create high- and low-energy spectra with < 1 second temporal separation between the acquisition of low- and high-energy data. Additionally, VNC images were generated with the sequential-scan technique (80 and 140kVp) for comparison. CT number accuracy was evaluated for all materials at 15, 25, and 35mGy CTDIvol. Results: The spectral separation was greater for the sequential-scan technique than the split-filter technique with dual-energy ratios of 2.18 and 1.26, respectively. Both techniques successfully removed iodine contrast, resulting in mean CT numbers within 60HU of 0HU (split-filter) and 40HU of 0HU (sequential-scan) for all iodine concentrations. Additionally, for iodine vials of varying diameter (2–20 mm) with the same concentration (9.9 mg I /mL), the system accurately detected iodine for all sizes investigated. Both dual-energy techniques resulted in reduced CT numbers for bone materials (by >400HU for the densest bone). Increasing the imaging dose did not improve the CT number accuracy for bone in VNC images. Conclusion: VNC images from the split-filter technique successfully removed iodine contrast. These results demonstrate a potential for improving dose calculation accuracy and reducing patient imaging dose, while achieving superior temporal resolution in comparison sequential scans. For both techniques, inaccuracies in CT numbers for bone materials

  20. CT and MR imaging of craniopharyngioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuda, M. [Tohoku Univ. School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan). Dept. of Radiology; Takahashi, S. [Tohoku Univ. School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan). Dept. of Radiology; Higano, S. [Tohoku Univ. School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan). Dept. of Radiology; Kurihara, N. [Tohoku Univ. School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan). Dept. of Radiology; Ikeda, H. [Tohoku Univ. School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan). Dept. of Neurosurgery; Sakamoto, K. [Tohoku Univ. School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan). Dept. of Radiology

    1997-05-01

    We reviewed imaging findings of CT and MR imaging in 20 cases of surgically confirmed craniopharyngioma in an attempt to determine their relation to patterns of tumor extent. The relationship between these patterns and the frequency of preoperative CT diagnosis and MR imaging diagnosis according to the surgical diagnosis were determined. The CT technique was superior to MR imaging in the detection of calcification. The MR imaging technique was superior to CT for determining tumor extent and provided valuable information about the relationships of the tumor to surrounding structures. Thus, CT and MR imaging have complementary roles in the diagnosis of craniopharyngiomas. In cases of possible craniopharyngioma, noncontrast sagittal T1-weighted images may enable the identification of the normal pituitary, possibly leading to the correct diagnosis. (orig.)

  1. CT and MR imaging of craniopharyngioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuda, M.; Takahashi, S.; Higano, S.; Kurihara, N.; Ikeda, H.; Sakamoto, K.

    1997-01-01

    We reviewed imaging findings of CT and MR imaging in 20 cases of surgically confirmed craniopharyngioma in an attempt to determine their relation to patterns of tumor extent. The relationship between these patterns and the frequency of preoperative CT diagnosis and MR imaging diagnosis according to the surgical diagnosis were determined. The CT technique was superior to MR imaging in the detection of calcification. The MR imaging technique was superior to CT for determining tumor extent and provided valuable information about the relationships of the tumor to surrounding structures. Thus, CT and MR imaging have complementary roles in the diagnosis of craniopharyngiomas. In cases of possible craniopharyngioma, noncontrast sagittal T1-weighted images may enable the identification of the normal pituitary, possibly leading to the correct diagnosis. (orig.)

  2. Contribution of brain imaging techniques: CT-scan and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasco-Papon, A.; Gourdier, A.L.; Papon, X.; Caron-Poitreau, C.

    1996-01-01

    In light of the current lack of consensus on the benefit of carotid artery surgery to treat asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis, the decision to operate on a patient depends on individual evaluation and characterization of risk factors on carotid artery stenosis greater than 70 %. The assessment of such risk factors is based especially on non-invasive brain imaging techniques.Computed tomography scanning (CT-scan) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) enable two types of stenosis to be differentiated, i.e. stenoses which are symptomatic and those that are radiologically proven versus those which are clinically and radiologically silent. CT-scan investigation (with and without injection of iodinated contrast media) still continues to be a common routine test in 1996 whenever a surgical revascularization procedure is planned. The presence of deep lacunar infarcts ipsilateral to the carotid artery stenosis generally evidence the reality of stenosis and thus are useful to the surgeon in establishing whether surgery is indicated. In the absence a consensus on indications for surgical management, the surgeon could use the CT-scan and MRI as medicolegal records which could be compared to a subsequent postoperative CT-scan in case of ischemic complications associated with the surgical procedure. Furthermore, recent cerebral ischemia as evidenced by filling with contrast material, will call for postponing treatment by a few weeks. Although conventional MRI is more contributive than brain CT-scan in terms of sensibility and specificity, its indications are narrower because of its limited availability and cost constraints. But, development of angio-MRI and functional imaging promise that its future is assured and even perhaps as the sole diagnostic method if its indications are expanded to include preoperative angiographic evaluation of atheromatous lesions of supra-aortic trunks. (authors). 37 refs

  3. Multi-technique hybrid imaging in PET/CT and PET/MR: what does the future hold?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galiza Barbosa, F. de; Delso, G.; Voert, E.E.G.W. ter; Huellner, M.W.; Herrmann, K.; Veit-Haibach, P.

    2016-01-01

    Integrated positron-emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT) is one of the most important imaging techniques to have emerged in oncological practice in the last decade. Hybrid imaging, in general, remains a rapidly growing field, not only in developing countries, but also in western industrialised healthcare systems. A great deal of technological development and research is focused on improving hybrid imaging technology further and introducing new techniques, e.g., integrated PET and magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI). Additionally, there are several new PET tracers on the horizon, which have the potential to broaden clinical applications in hybrid imaging for diagnosis as well as therapy. This article aims to highlight some of the major technical and clinical advances that are currently taking place in PET/CT and PET/MRI that will potentially maintain the position of hybrid techniques at the forefront of medical imaging technologies.

  4. Combined SPECT/CT and PET/CT for breast imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russo, Paolo [Università di Napoli Federico II, Dipartimento di Fisica, Via Cintia, Naples I-80126 (Italy); INFN Sezione di Napoli, Via Cintia, Naples I-80126 (Italy); Larobina, Michele [Istituto di Biostrutture e Bioimmagini, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Via Tommaso De Amicis, 95, Naples I-80145 (Italy); Di Lillo, Francesca [Università di Napoli Federico II, Dipartimento di Fisica, Via Cintia, Naples I-80126 (Italy); INFN Sezione di Napoli, Via Cintia, Naples I-80126 (Italy); Del Vecchio, Silvana [Università di Napoli Federico II, Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche Avanzate, Via Pansini, 5, Naples I-80131 (Italy); Mettivier, Giovanni, E-mail: mettivier@na.infn.it [Università di Napoli Federico II, Dipartimento di Fisica, Via Cintia, Naples I-80126 (Italy); INFN Sezione di Napoli, Via Cintia, Naples I-80126 (Italy)

    2016-02-11

    In the field of nuclear medicine imaging, breast imaging for cancer diagnosis is still mainly based on 2D imaging techniques. Three-dimensional tomographic imaging with whole-body PET or SPECT scanners, when used for imaging the breast, has performance limits in terms of spatial resolution and sensitivity, which can be overcome only with a dedicated instrumentation. However, only few hybrid imaging systems for PET/CT or SPECT/CT dedicated to the breast have been developed in the last decade, providing complementary functional and anatomical information on normal breast tissue and lesions. These systems are still under development and clinical trials on just few patients have been reported; no commercial dedicated breast PET/CT or SPECT/CT is available. This paper reviews combined dedicated breast PET/CT and SPECT/CT scanners described in the recent literature, with focus on their technological aspects.

  5. A Fourier-based compressed sensing technique for accelerated CT image reconstruction using first-order methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Kihwan; Li, Ruijiang; Nam, Haewon; Xing, Lei

    2014-01-01

    As a solution to iterative CT image reconstruction, first-order methods are prominent for the large-scale capability and the fast convergence rate O(1/k 2 ). In practice, the CT system matrix with a large condition number may lead to slow convergence speed despite the theoretically promising upper bound. The aim of this study is to develop a Fourier-based scaling technique to enhance the convergence speed of first-order methods applied to CT image reconstruction. Instead of working in the projection domain, we transform the projection data and construct a data fidelity model in Fourier space. Inspired by the filtered backprojection formalism, the data are appropriately weighted in Fourier space. We formulate an optimization problem based on weighted least-squares in the Fourier space and total-variation (TV) regularization in image space for parallel-beam, fan-beam and cone-beam CT geometry. To achieve the maximum computational speed, the optimization problem is solved using a fast iterative shrinkage-thresholding algorithm with backtracking line search and GPU implementation of projection/backprojection. The performance of the proposed algorithm is demonstrated through a series of digital simulation and experimental phantom studies. The results are compared with the existing TV regularized techniques based on statistics-based weighted least-squares as well as basic algebraic reconstruction technique. The proposed Fourier-based compressed sensing (CS) method significantly improves both the image quality and the convergence rate compared to the existing CS techniques. (paper)

  6. A Fourier-based compressed sensing technique for accelerated CT image reconstruction using first-order methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kihwan; Li, Ruijiang; Nam, Haewon; Xing, Lei

    2014-06-21

    As a solution to iterative CT image reconstruction, first-order methods are prominent for the large-scale capability and the fast convergence rate [Formula: see text]. In practice, the CT system matrix with a large condition number may lead to slow convergence speed despite the theoretically promising upper bound. The aim of this study is to develop a Fourier-based scaling technique to enhance the convergence speed of first-order methods applied to CT image reconstruction. Instead of working in the projection domain, we transform the projection data and construct a data fidelity model in Fourier space. Inspired by the filtered backprojection formalism, the data are appropriately weighted in Fourier space. We formulate an optimization problem based on weighted least-squares in the Fourier space and total-variation (TV) regularization in image space for parallel-beam, fan-beam and cone-beam CT geometry. To achieve the maximum computational speed, the optimization problem is solved using a fast iterative shrinkage-thresholding algorithm with backtracking line search and GPU implementation of projection/backprojection. The performance of the proposed algorithm is demonstrated through a series of digital simulation and experimental phantom studies. The results are compared with the existing TV regularized techniques based on statistics-based weighted least-squares as well as basic algebraic reconstruction technique. The proposed Fourier-based compressed sensing (CS) method significantly improves both the image quality and the convergence rate compared to the existing CS techniques.

  7. CT and MRI techniques for imaging around orthopedic hardware

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Do, Thuy Duong; Skornitzke, Stephan; Weber, Marc-Andre [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Clinical Radiology; Sutter, Reto [Uniklinik Balgrist, Zurich (Switzerland). Radiology

    2018-01-15

    Orthopedic hardware impairs image quality in cross-sectional imaging. With an increasing number of orthopedic implants in an aging population, the need to mitigate metal artifacts in computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging is becoming increasingly relevant. This review provides an overview of the major artifacts in CT and MRI and state-of-the-art solutions to improve image quality. All steps of image acquisition from device selection, scan preparations and parameters to image post-processing influence the magnitude of metal artifacts. Technological advances like dual-energy CT with the possibility of virtual monochromatic imaging (VMI) and new materials offer opportunities to further reduce artifacts in CT and MRI. Dedicated metal artifact reduction sequences contain algorithms to reduce artifacts and improve imaging of surrounding tissue and are essential tools in orthopedic imaging to detect postoperative complications in early stages.

  8. New techniques in dental surgical CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabin, D.N.; Rabin, H.; Sakowicz, B.A.; Rabin, M.A.; Rabin, S.I.; Schwartz, A.

    1991-01-01

    This paper demonstrates how CT can be used with dental software to evaluate prosthetic failure and for planning dental implants when a stent is used. The Food and Drug Administration issued a safety alert for proplast-coated temporomandibular joint prostheses. Prosthetic failure occurs with migration, fragmentation, or bone erosion. Sagittal CT requiring a special head holder can instead be performed with reformatted sagittal images. The technique of dental implant CT changes when a dental stent is used to provide more accurate implant anchorage and planning. Images must be parallel to the occlusal plane. We will demonstrate these techniques and present their rationale

  9. Techniques for virtual lung nodule insertion: volumetric and morphometric comparison of projection-based and image-based methods for quantitative CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robins, Marthony; Solomon, Justin; Sahbaee, Pooyan; Sedlmair, Martin; Choudhury, Kingshuk Roy; Pezeshk, Aria; Sahiner, Berkman; Samei, Ehsan

    2017-09-01

    Virtual nodule insertion paves the way towards the development of standardized databases of hybrid CT images with known lesions. The purpose of this study was to assess three methods (an established and two newly developed techniques) for inserting virtual lung nodules into CT images. Assessment was done by comparing virtual nodule volume and shape to the CT-derived volume and shape of synthetic nodules. 24 synthetic nodules (three sizes, four morphologies, two repeats) were physically inserted into the lung cavity of an anthropomorphic chest phantom (KYOTO KAGAKU). The phantom was imaged with and without nodules on a commercial CT scanner (SOMATOM Definition Flash, Siemens) using a standard thoracic CT protocol at two dose levels (1.4 and 22 mGy CTDIvol). Raw projection data were saved and reconstructed with filtered back-projection and sinogram affirmed iterative reconstruction (SAFIRE, strength 5) at 0.6 mm slice thickness. Corresponding 3D idealized, virtual nodule models were co-registered with the CT images to determine each nodule’s location and orientation. Virtual nodules were voxelized, partial volume corrected, and inserted into nodule-free CT data (accounting for system imaging physics) using two methods: projection-based Technique A, and image-based Technique B. Also a third Technique C based on cropping a region of interest from the acquired image of the real nodule and blending it into the nodule-free image was tested. Nodule volumes were measured using a commercial segmentation tool (iNtuition, TeraRecon, Inc.) and deformation was assessed using the Hausdorff distance. Nodule volumes and deformations were compared between the idealized, CT-derived and virtual nodules using a linear mixed effects regression model which utilized the mean, standard deviation, and coefficient of variation (Mea{{n}RHD} , ST{{D}RHD} and C{{V}RHD}{) }~ of the regional Hausdorff distance. Overall, there was a close concordance between the volumes of the CT-derived and

  10. Unsharp masking technique as a preprocessing filter for improvement of 3D-CT image of bony structure in the maxillofacial region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harada, Takuya; Nishikawa, Keiichi; Kuroyanagi, Kinya

    1998-01-01

    We evaluated the usefulness of the unsharp masking technique as a preprocessing filter to improve 3D-CT images of bony structure in the maxillofacial region. The effect of the unsharp masking technique with several combinations of mask size and weighting factor on image resolution was investigated using a spatial frequency phantom made of bone-equivalent material. The 3D-CT images were obtained with scans perpendicular to and parallel to the phantom plates. The contrast transfer function (CTF) and the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of each spatial frequency component were measured. The FWHM was expressed as a ratio against the actual thickness of phantom plate. The effect on pseudoforamina was assessed using sliced CT images obtained in clinical bony 3D-CT examinations. The effect of the unsharp masking technique on image quality was also visually evaluated using five clinical fracture cases. CTFs did not change. FWHM ratios of original 3D-CT images were smaller than 1.0, regardless of the scanning direction. Those in scans perpendicular to the phantom plates were not changed by the unsharp masking technique. Those in parallel scanning were increased by mask size and weighting factor. The area of pseudoforamina decreased with increases in mask size and weighting factor. The combination of mask size 3 x 3 pixels and weighting factor 5 was optimal. Visual evaluation indicated that preprocessing with the unsharp masking technique improved the image quality of the 3D-CT images. The unsharp masking technique is useful as a preprocessing filter to improve the 3D-CT image of bony structure in the maxillofacial region. (author)

  11. Cardiac CT for the assessment of chest pain: Imaging techniques and clinical results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, Hans-Christoph; Johnson, Thorsten

    2012-01-01

    Immediate and efficient risk stratification and management of patients with acute chest pain in the emergency department is challenging. Traditional management of these patients includes serial ECG, laboratory tests and further on radionuclide perfusion imaging or ECG treadmill testing. Due to the advances of multi-detector CT technology, dedicated coronary CT angiography provides the potential to rapidly and reliably diagnose or exclude acute coronary artery disease. Life-threatening causes of chest pain, such as aortic dissection and pulmonary embolism can simultaneously be assessed with a single scan, sometimes referred to as “triple rule out” scan. With appropriate patient selection, cardiac CT can accurately diagnose heart disease or other sources of chest pain, markedly decrease health care costs, and reliably predict clinical outcomes. This article reviews imaging techniques and clinical results for CT been used to evaluate patients with chest pain entering the emergency department.

  12. A technique of using gated-CT images to determine internal target volume (ITV) for fractionated stereotactic lung radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Jianyue; Ajlouni, Munther; Chen Qing; Yin, Fang-Fang; Movsas, Benjamin

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: To develop and evaluate a technique and procedure of using gated-CT images in combination with PET image to determine the internal target volume (ITV), which could reduce the planning target volume (PTV) with adequate target coverage. Patients and methods: A skin marker-based gating system connected to a regular single slice CT scanner was used for this study. A motion phantom with adjustable motion amplitude was used to evaluate the CT gating system. Specifically, objects of various sizes/shapes, considered as virtual tumors, were placed on the phantom to evaluate the number of phases of gated images required to determine the ITV while taking into account tumor size, shape and motion. A procedure of using gated-CT and PET images to define ITV for patients was developed and was tested in patients enrolled in an IRB approved protocol. Results: The CT gating system was capable of removing motion artifacts for target motion as large as 3-cm when it was gated at optimal phases. A phantom study showed that two gated-CT scans at the end of expiration and the end of inspiration would be sufficient to determine the ITV for tumor motion less than 1-cm, and another mid-phase scan would be required for tumors with 2-cm motion, especially for small tumors. For patients, the ITV encompassing visible tumors in all sets of gated-CT and regular spiral CT images seemed to be consistent with the target volume determined from PET images. PTV expanded from the ITV with a setup uncertainty margin had less volume than PTVs from spiral CT images with a 10-mm generalized margin or an individualized margin determined at fluoroscopy. Conclusions: A technique of determining the ITV using gated-CT images was developed and was clinically implemented successfully for fractionated stereotactic lung radiotherapy

  13. Dynamic CT myocardial perfusion imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caruso, Damiano; Eid, Marwen; Schoepf, U. Joseph; Jin, Kwang Nam; Varga-Szemes, Akos; Tesche, Christian; Mangold, Stefanie

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • CT myocardial perfusion provides functional assessment of the myocardium. • CCTA is limited in determining the hemodynamic significance of coronary stenosis. • CT-MPI can accurately detect hemodynamically significant coronary artery stenosis. - Abstract: Non-invasive cardiac imaging has rapidly evolved during the last decade due to advancements in CT based technologies. Coronary CT angiography has been shown to reliably assess coronary anatomy and detect high risk coronary artery disease. However, this technique is limited to anatomical assessment, thus non-invasive techniques for functional assessment of the heart are necessary. CT myocardial perfusion is a new CT based technique that provides functional assessment of the myocardium and allows for a comprehensive assessment of coronary artery disease with a single modality when combined with CTA. This review aims to discuss dynamic CT myocardial perfusion as a new technique in the assessment of CAD.

  14. Dynamic CT myocardial perfusion imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caruso, Damiano [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Department of Radiological Sciences, Oncological and Pathological Sciences, University of Rome “Sapienza”, Latina (Italy); Eid, Marwen [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Schoepf, U. Joseph, E-mail: schoepf@musc.edu [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Jin, Kwang Nam [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Department of Radiology, Seoul Metropolitan Government-Seoul National University Boramae Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Varga-Szemes, Akos [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Tesche, Christian [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Department of Cardiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Heart Center Munich-Bogenhausen, Munich (Germany); Mangold, Stefanie [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital of Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany); and others

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • CT myocardial perfusion provides functional assessment of the myocardium. • CCTA is limited in determining the hemodynamic significance of coronary stenosis. • CT-MPI can accurately detect hemodynamically significant coronary artery stenosis. - Abstract: Non-invasive cardiac imaging has rapidly evolved during the last decade due to advancements in CT based technologies. Coronary CT angiography has been shown to reliably assess coronary anatomy and detect high risk coronary artery disease. However, this technique is limited to anatomical assessment, thus non-invasive techniques for functional assessment of the heart are necessary. CT myocardial perfusion is a new CT based technique that provides functional assessment of the myocardium and allows for a comprehensive assessment of coronary artery disease with a single modality when combined with CTA. This review aims to discuss dynamic CT myocardial perfusion as a new technique in the assessment of CAD.

  15. Non-target activity detection by post-radioembolization yttrium-90 PET/CT: Image assessment technique and case examples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung Hsiang eKao

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available High-resolution yttrium-90 (90Y imaging of post-radioembolization microsphere biodistribution may be achieved by conventional positron emission tomography with integrated computed tomography (PET/CT scanners that have time-of-flight capability. However, reconstructed 90Y PET/CT images have high background noise, making non-target activity detection technically challenging. This educational article describes our image assessment technique for non-target activity detection by 90Y PET/CT which qualitatively overcomes the problem of background noise. We present selected case examples of non-target activity in untargeted liver, stomach, gallbladder, chest wall and kidney, supported by angiography and 90Y bremsstrahlung single photon emission computed tomography with integrated computed tomography (SPECT/CT or technetium-99m macroaggregated albumin SPECT/CT.

  16. CT colonography: Techniques, indications, findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mang, Thomas; Graser, Anno; Schima, Wolfgang; Maier, Andrea

    2007-01-01

    Computed tomographic colonography (CTC) is a minimally invasive technique for imaging the entire colon. Based on a helical thin-section CT of the cleansed and air-distended colon, two-dimensional and three-dimensional projections are used for image interpretation. Several clinical improvements in patient preparation, technical advances in CT, and new developments in evaluation software have allowed CTC to develop into a powerful diagnostic tool. It is already well established as a reliable diagnostic tool in symptomatic patients. Many experts currently consider CTC a comparable alternative to conventional colonoscopy, although there is still debate about its sensitivity for the detection of colonic polyps in a screening population. This article summarizes the main indications, the current techniques in patient preparation, data acquisition and data analysis as well as imaging features for common benign and malignant colorectal lesions

  17. Multimodality imaging techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martí-Bonmatí, Luis; Sopena, Ramón; Bartumeus, Paula; Sopena, Pablo

    2010-01-01

    In multimodality imaging, the need to combine morphofunctional information can be approached by either acquiring images at different times (asynchronous), and fused them through digital image manipulation techniques or simultaneously acquiring images (synchronous) and merging them automatically. The asynchronous post-processing solution presents various constraints, mainly conditioned by the different positioning of the patient in the two scans acquired at different times in separated machines. The best solution to achieve consistency in time and space is obtained by the synchronous image acquisition. There are many multimodal technologies in molecular imaging. In this review we will focus on those multimodality image techniques more commonly used in the field of diagnostic imaging (SPECT-CT, PET-CT) and new developments (as PET-MR). The technological innovations and development of new tracers and smart probes are the main key points that will condition multimodality image and diagnostic imaging professionals' future. Although SPECT-CT and PET-CT are standard in most clinical scenarios, MR imaging has some advantages, providing excellent soft-tissue contrast and multidimensional functional, structural and morphological information. The next frontier is to develop efficient detectors and electronics systems capable of detecting two modality signals at the same time. Not only PET-MR but also MR-US or optic-PET will be introduced in clinical scenarios. Even more, MR diffusion-weighted, pharmacokinetic imaging, spectroscopy or functional BOLD imaging will merge with PET tracers to further increase molecular imaging as a relevant medical discipline. Multimodality imaging techniques will play a leading role in relevant clinical applications. The development of new diagnostic imaging research areas, mainly in the field of oncology, cardiology and neuropsychiatry, will impact the way medicine is performed today. Both clinical and experimental multimodality studies, in

  18. Research of ART method in CT image reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zhipeng; Cong Peng; Wu Haifeng

    2005-01-01

    This paper studied Algebraic Reconstruction Technique (ART) in CT image reconstruction. Discussed the ray number influence on image quality. And the adopting of smooth method got high quality CT image. (authors)

  19. Imaging lobular breast carcinoma: comparison of synchrotron radiation DEI-CT technique with clinical CT, mammography and histology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiedler, S.; Bravin, A.; Keyriläinen, J.; Fernández, M.; Suortti, P.; Thomlinson, W.; Tenhunen, M.; Virkkunen, P.; Karjalainen-Lindsberg, M.-L.

    2004-01-01

    Different modalities for imaging cancer-bearing breast tissue samples are described and compared. The images include clinical mammograms and computed tomography (CT) images, CT images with partly coherent synchrotron radiation (SR), and CT and radiography images taken with SR using the diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI) method. The images are evaluated by a radiologist and compared with histopathological examination of the samples. Two cases of lobular carcinoma are studied in detail. The indications of cancer are very weak or invisible in the conventional images, but the morphological changes due to invasion of cancer become pronounced in the images taken by the DEI method. The strands penetrating adipose tissue are seen clearly in the DEI-CT images, and the histopathology confirms that some strands contain the so-called 'Indian file' formations of cancer cells. The radiation dose is carefully measured for each of the imaging modalities. The mean glandular dose (MGD) for 50% glandular breast tissue is about 1 mGy in conventional mammography and less than 0.25 mGy in projection DEI, while in the clinical CT imaging the MGD is very high, about 45 mGy. The entrance dose of 95 mGy in DEI-CT imaging gives rise to an MGD of 40 mGy, but the dose may be reduced by an order of magnitude, because the contrast is very large in most images.

  20. Dose reduction in pediatric abdominal CT: use of iterative reconstruction techniques across different CT platforms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khawaja, Ranish Deedar Ali; Singh, Sarabjeet; Otrakji, Alexi; Padole, Atul; Lim, Ruth; Nimkin, Katherine; Westra, Sjirk; Kalra, Mannudeep K.; Gee, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Dose reduction in children undergoing CT scanning is an important priority for the radiology community and public at large. Drawbacks of radiation reduction are increased image noise and artifacts, which can affect image interpretation. Iterative reconstruction techniques have been developed to reduce noise and artifacts from reduced-dose CT examinations, although reconstruction algorithm, magnitude of dose reduction and effects on image quality vary. We review the reconstruction principles, radiation dose potential and effects on image quality of several iterative reconstruction techniques commonly used in clinical settings, including 3-D adaptive iterative dose reduction (AIDR-3D), adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR), iDose, sinogram-affirmed iterative reconstruction (SAFIRE) and model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR). We also discuss clinical applications of iterative reconstruction techniques in pediatric abdominal CT. (orig.)

  1. Dose reduction in pediatric abdominal CT: use of iterative reconstruction techniques across different CT platforms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khawaja, Ranish Deedar Ali; Singh, Sarabjeet; Otrakji, Alexi; Padole, Atul; Lim, Ruth; Nimkin, Katherine; Westra, Sjirk; Kalra, Mannudeep K.; Gee, Michael S. [MGH Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Dose reduction in children undergoing CT scanning is an important priority for the radiology community and public at large. Drawbacks of radiation reduction are increased image noise and artifacts, which can affect image interpretation. Iterative reconstruction techniques have been developed to reduce noise and artifacts from reduced-dose CT examinations, although reconstruction algorithm, magnitude of dose reduction and effects on image quality vary. We review the reconstruction principles, radiation dose potential and effects on image quality of several iterative reconstruction techniques commonly used in clinical settings, including 3-D adaptive iterative dose reduction (AIDR-3D), adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR), iDose, sinogram-affirmed iterative reconstruction (SAFIRE) and model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR). We also discuss clinical applications of iterative reconstruction techniques in pediatric abdominal CT. (orig.)

  2. CT and MR imaging of the kidney and adrenal glands: CT of the kidney

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levine, E.

    1987-01-01

    Because of its high diagnostic yield, safety, and cost-effectiveness, CT has become a major imaging technique for evaluating the kidney. CT is highly accurate for determining the nature and extent of renal masses, and this has become the main indication for renal CT. However, CT is also valuable in assessing patients with renal cystic disease, trauma, inflammatory disease, infarction, hemorrhage and hydronephrosis of unknown cause. This presentation reviews the normal CT anatomy of the kidneys and the usefulness of CT in the diagnosis of all these conditions. Examination techniques are discussed with particular emphasis on avoiding diagnostic pitfalls and tailoring the examination to the nature of the clinical problem. CT findings in various renal disorders are compared with those of other imaging techniques, particularly US and angiography, and the place of CT in the diagnostic approach to these disorders is considered

  3. A MRI-CT prostate registration using sparse representation technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaofeng; Jani, Ashesh B.; Rossi, Peter J.; Mao, Hui; Curran, Walter J.; Liu, Tian

    2016-03-01

    Purpose: To develop a new MRI-CT prostate registration using patch-based deformation prediction framework to improve MRI-guided prostate radiotherapy by incorporating multiparametric MRI into planning CT images. Methods: The main contribution is to estimate the deformation between prostate MRI and CT images in a patch-wise fashion by using the sparse representation technique. We assume that two image patches should follow the same deformation if their patch-wise appearance patterns are similar. Specifically, there are two stages in our proposed framework, i.e., the training stage and the application stage. In the training stage, each prostate MR images are carefully registered to the corresponding CT images and all training MR and CT images are carefully registered to a selected CT template. Thus, we obtain the dense deformation field for each training MR and CT image. In the application stage, for registering a new subject MR image with the same subject CT image, we first select a small number of key points at the distinctive regions of this subject CT image. Then, for each key point in the subject CT image, we extract the image patch, centered at the underlying key point. Then, we adaptively construct the coupled dictionary for the underlying point where each atom in the dictionary consists of image patches and the respective deformations obtained from training pair-wise MRI-CT images. Next, the subject image patch can be sparsely represented by a linear combination of training image patches in the dictionary, where we apply the same sparse coefficients to the respective deformations in the dictionary to predict the deformation for the subject MR image patch. After we repeat the same procedure for each subject CT key point, we use B-splines to interpolate a dense deformation field, which is used as the initialization to allow the registration algorithm estimating the remaining small segment of deformations from MRI to CT image. Results: Our MRI-CT registration

  4. Automated detection of pulmonary nodules in PET/CT images: Ensemble false-positive reduction using a convolutional neural network technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teramoto, Atsushi, E-mail: teramoto@fujita-hu.ac.jp [Faculty of Radiological Technology, School of Health Sciences, Fujita Health University, 1-98 Dengakugakubo, Kutsukake, Toyoake, Aichi 470-1192 (Japan); Fujita, Hiroshi [Department of Intelligent Image Information, Division of Regeneration and Advanced Medical Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine, Gifu University, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu 501-1194 (Japan); Yamamuro, Osamu; Tamaki, Tsuneo [East Nagoya Imaging Diagnosis Center, 3-4-26 Jiyugaoka, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-0044 (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Automated detection of solitary pulmonary nodules using positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) images shows good sensitivity; however, it is difficult to detect nodules in contact with normal organs, and additional efforts are needed so that the number of false positives (FPs) can be further reduced. In this paper, the authors propose an improved FP-reduction method for the detection of pulmonary nodules in PET/CT images by means of convolutional neural networks (CNNs). Methods: The overall scheme detects pulmonary nodules using both CT and PET images. In the CT images, a massive region is first detected using an active contour filter, which is a type of contrast enhancement filter that has a deformable kernel shape. Subsequently, high-uptake regions detected by the PET images are merged with the regions detected by the CT images. FP candidates are eliminated using an ensemble method; it consists of two feature extractions, one by shape/metabolic feature analysis and the other by a CNN, followed by a two-step classifier, one step being rule based and the other being based on support vector machines. Results: The authors evaluated the detection performance using 104 PET/CT images collected by a cancer-screening program. The sensitivity in detecting candidates at an initial stage was 97.2%, with 72.8 FPs/case. After performing the proposed FP-reduction method, the sensitivity of detection was 90.1%, with 4.9 FPs/case; the proposed method eliminated approximately half the FPs existing in the previous study. Conclusions: An improved FP-reduction scheme using CNN technique has been developed for the detection of pulmonary nodules in PET/CT images. The authors’ ensemble FP-reduction method eliminated 93% of the FPs; their proposed method using CNN technique eliminates approximately half the FPs existing in the previous study. These results indicate that their method may be useful in the computer-aided detection of pulmonary nodules

  5. Automated detection of pulmonary nodules in PET/CT images: Ensemble false-positive reduction using a convolutional neural network technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teramoto, Atsushi; Fujita, Hiroshi; Yamamuro, Osamu; Tamaki, Tsuneo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Automated detection of solitary pulmonary nodules using positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) images shows good sensitivity; however, it is difficult to detect nodules in contact with normal organs, and additional efforts are needed so that the number of false positives (FPs) can be further reduced. In this paper, the authors propose an improved FP-reduction method for the detection of pulmonary nodules in PET/CT images by means of convolutional neural networks (CNNs). Methods: The overall scheme detects pulmonary nodules using both CT and PET images. In the CT images, a massive region is first detected using an active contour filter, which is a type of contrast enhancement filter that has a deformable kernel shape. Subsequently, high-uptake regions detected by the PET images are merged with the regions detected by the CT images. FP candidates are eliminated using an ensemble method; it consists of two feature extractions, one by shape/metabolic feature analysis and the other by a CNN, followed by a two-step classifier, one step being rule based and the other being based on support vector machines. Results: The authors evaluated the detection performance using 104 PET/CT images collected by a cancer-screening program. The sensitivity in detecting candidates at an initial stage was 97.2%, with 72.8 FPs/case. After performing the proposed FP-reduction method, the sensitivity of detection was 90.1%, with 4.9 FPs/case; the proposed method eliminated approximately half the FPs existing in the previous study. Conclusions: An improved FP-reduction scheme using CNN technique has been developed for the detection of pulmonary nodules in PET/CT images. The authors’ ensemble FP-reduction method eliminated 93% of the FPs; their proposed method using CNN technique eliminates approximately half the FPs existing in the previous study. These results indicate that their method may be useful in the computer-aided detection of pulmonary nodules

  6. Image mottle in abdominal CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ende, J F; Huda, W; Ros, P R; Litwiller, A L

    1999-04-01

    To investigate image mottle in conventional CT images of the abdomen as a function of radiographic technique factors and patient size. Water-filled phantoms simulating the abdomens of adult (32 cm in diameter) and pediatric (16 cm in diameter) patients were used to investigate image mottle in CT as a function of x-ray tube potential and mAs. CT images from 39 consecutive patients with noncontrast liver scans and 49 patients with iodine contrast scans were analyzed retrospectively. Measurements were made of the mean liver parenchyma Hounsfield unit value and the corresponding image mottle. For a given water phantom and x-ray tube potential, image mottle was proportional to the mAs-0.5. Increasing the phantom diameter from 16 cm (pediatric) to 32 cm increased the mottle by a factor of 2.4, and increasing the x-ray tube potential from 80 kVp to 140 kVp reduced the mottle by a factor of 2.5. All patients were scanned at 120 kVp, with no correlation between patient size and the x-ray tube mAs. The mean mottle level was 7.8 +/- 2.2 and 10.0 +/- 2.5 for the noncontrast and contrast studies, respectively. An increase in patient diameter of 3 cm would require approximately 65% more mAs to maintain the same level of image mottle. The mottle in abdominal CT images may be controlled by adjusting radiographic technique factors, which should be adjusted to take into account the size of the patient undergoing the examination.

  7. Automatic segmentation of liver structure in CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, K.T.; Giger, M.L.; Chen, C.; Kahn, C.E. Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The segmentation and three-dimensional representation of the liver from a computed tomography (CT) scan is an important step in many medical applications, such as in the surgical planning for a living-donor liver transplant and in the automatic detection and documentation of pathological states. A method is being developed to automatically extract liver structure from abdominal CT scans using a priori information about liver morphology and digital image-processing techniques. Segmentation is performed sequentially image-by-image (slice-by-slice), starting with a reference image in which the liver occupies almost the entire right half of the abdomen cross section. Image processing techniques include gray-level thresholding, Gaussian smoothing, and eight-point connectivity tracking. For each case, the shape, size, and pixel density distribution of the liver are recorded for each CT image and used in the processing of other CT images. Extracted boundaries of the liver are smoothed using mathematical morphology techniques and B-splines. Computer-determined boundaries were compared with those drawn by a radiologist. The boundary descriptions from the two methods were in agreement, and the calculated areas were within 10%

  8. Realistic simulation of reduced-dose CT with noise modeling and sinogram synthesis using DICOM CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Won Kim, Chang; Kim, Jong Hyo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Reducing the patient dose while maintaining the diagnostic image quality during CT exams is the subject of a growing number of studies, in which simulations of reduced-dose CT with patient data have been used as an effective technique when exploring the potential of various dose reduction techniques. Difficulties in accessing raw sinogram data, however, have restricted the use of this technique to a limited number of institutions. Here, we present a novel reduced-dose CT simulation technique which provides realistic low-dose images without the requirement of raw sinogram data. Methods: Two key characteristics of CT systems, the noise equivalent quanta (NEQ) and the algorithmic modulation transfer function (MTF), were measured for various combinations of object attenuation and tube currents by analyzing the noise power spectrum (NPS) of CT images obtained with a set of phantoms. Those measurements were used to develop a comprehensive CT noise model covering the reduced x-ray photon flux, object attenuation, system noise, and bow-tie filter, which was then employed to generate a simulated noise sinogram for the reduced-dose condition with the use of a synthetic sinogram generated from a reference CT image. The simulated noise sinogram was filtered with the algorithmic MTF and back-projected to create a noise CT image, which was then added to the reference CT image, finally providing a simulated reduced-dose CT image. The simulation performance was evaluated in terms of the degree of NPS similarity, the noise magnitude, the bow-tie filter effect, and the streak noise pattern at photon starvation sites with the set of phantom images. Results: The simulation results showed good agreement with actual low-dose CT images in terms of their visual appearance and in a quantitative evaluation test. The magnitude and shape of the NPS curves of the simulated low-dose images agreed well with those of real low-dose images, showing discrepancies of less than +/−3.2% in

  9. Cine-CT: A new technique in X-ray computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaschke, W.; Georgi, M.; Lipton, M.J.; Gould, R.G.

    1988-01-01

    The 'Cine-CT' belongs to a new generation of CT devices permitting not only diagnostics on a morphological basis but also function studies. By means of Cine-CT's electron beam technique, image frequencies of up to 17 images per second and exposure times of 50 msec are possible. (orig.) [de

  10. Automated medical image segmentation techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Neeraj

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate segmentation of medical images is a key step in contouring during radiotherapy planning. Computed topography (CT and Magnetic resonance (MR imaging are the most widely used radiographic techniques in diagnosis, clinical studies and treatment planning. This review provides details of automated segmentation methods, specifically discussed in the context of CT and MR images. The motive is to discuss the problems encountered in segmentation of CT and MR images, and the relative merits and limitations of methods currently available for segmentation of medical images.

  11. PET/CT (and CT) instrumentation, image reconstruction and data transfer for radiotherapy planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sattler, Bernhard; Lee, John A; Lonsdale, Markus

    2010-01-01

    -invasive imaging technique, offers the visualization and quantification of pre-selected tracer metabolism. In combination with the structural information from CT, this molecular imaging technique has great potential to support and improve the outcome of the treatment-planning procedure prior to radiotherapy......, the DICOM-Standard provides objects and classes for this purpose (DICOM RT). Furthermore, the standard DICOM objects and classes for nuclear medicine (NM, PT) and computed tomography (CT) are used to communicate the actual image data created by the modalities. Care must be taken for data security...

  12. Image Registration for PET/CT and CT Images with Particle Swarm Optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hak Jae; Kim, Yong Kwon; Lee, Ki Sung; Choi, Jong Hak; Kim, Chang Kyun; Moon, Guk Hyun; Joo, Sung Kwan; Kim, Kyeong Min; Cheon, Gi Jeong

    2009-01-01

    Image registration is a fundamental task in image processing used to match two or more images. It gives new information to the radiologists by matching images from different modalities. The objective of this study is to develop 2D image registration algorithm for PET/CT and CT images acquired by different systems at different times. We matched two CT images first (one from standalone CT and the other from PET/CT) that contain affluent anatomical information. Then, we geometrically transformed PET image according to the results of transformation parameters calculated by the previous step. We have used Affine transform to match the target and reference images. For the similarity measure, mutual information was explored. Use of particle swarm algorithm optimized the performance by finding the best matched parameter set within a reasonable amount of time. The results show good agreements of the images between PET/CT and CT. We expect the proposed algorithm can be used not only for PET/CT and CT image registration but also for different multi-modality imaging systems such as SPECT/CT, MRI/PET and so on.

  13. A comparative study of surface- and volume-based techniques for the automatic registration between CT and SPECT brain images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kagadis, George C.; Delibasis, Konstantinos K.; Matsopoulos, George K.; Mouravliansky, Nikolaos A.; Asvestas, Pantelis A.; Nikiforidis, George C.

    2002-01-01

    Image registration of multimodality images is an essential task in numerous applications in three-dimensional medical image processing. Medical diagnosis can benefit from the complementary information in different modality images. Surface-based registration techniques, while still widely used, were succeeded by volume-based registration algorithms that appear to be theoretically advantageous in terms of reliability and accuracy. Several applications of such algorithms for the registration of CT-MRI, CT-PET, MRI-PET, and SPECT-MRI images have emerged in the literature, using local optimization techniques for the matching of images. Our purpose in this work is the development of automatic techniques for the registration of real CT and SPECT images, based on either surface- or volume-based algorithms. Optimization is achieved using genetic algorithms that are known for their robustness. The two techniques are compared against a well-established method, the Iterative Closest Point--ICP. The correlation coefficient was employed as an independent measure of spatial match, to produce unbiased results. The repeated measures ANOVA indicates the significant impact of the choice of registration method on the magnitude of the correlation (F=4.968, p=0.0396). The volume-based method achieves an average correlation coefficient value of 0.454 with a standard deviation of 0.0395, as opposed to an average of 0.380 with a standard deviation of 0.0603 achieved by the surface-based method and an average of 0.396 with a standard deviation equal to 0.0353 achieved by ICP. The volume-based technique performs significantly better compared to both ICP (p<0.05, Neuman Keuls test) and the surface-based technique (p<0.05, Neuman-Keuls test). Surface-based registration and ICP do not differ significantly in performance

  14. Three dimensional imaging technique for laser-plasma diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Shaoen; Zheng Zhijian; Liu Zhongli

    2001-01-01

    A CT technique for laser-plasma diagnostic and a three-dimensional (3D) image reconstruction program (CT3D) have been developed. The 3D images of the laser-plasma are reconstructed by using a multiplication algebraic reconstruction technique (MART) from five pinhole camera images obtained along different sight directions. The technique has been used to measure the three-dimensional distribution of X-ray of laser-plasma experiments in Xingguang II device, and the good results are obtained. This shows that a CT technique can be applied to ICF experiments

  15. Three dimensional imaging technique for laser-plasma diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaoen, Jiang; Zhijian, Zheng; Zhongli, Liu [China Academy of Engineering Physics, Chengdu (China)

    2001-04-01

    A CT technique for laser-plasma diagnostic and a three-dimensional (3D) image reconstruction program (CT3D) have been developed. The 3D images of the laser-plasma are reconstructed by using a multiplication algebraic reconstruction technique (MART) from five pinhole camera images obtained along different sight directions. The technique has been used to measure the three-dimensional distribution of X-ray of laser-plasma experiments in Xingguang II device, and the good results are obtained. This shows that a CT technique can be applied to ICF experiments.

  16. CT image construction of a totally deflated lung using deformable model extrapolation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadeghi Naini, Ali; Pierce, Greg; Lee, Ting-Yim

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: A novel technique is proposed to construct CT image of a totally deflated lung from a free-breathing 4D-CT image sequence acquired preoperatively. Such a constructed CT image is very useful in performing tumor ablative procedures such as lung brachytherapy. Tumor ablative procedures are frequently performed while the lung is totally deflated. Deflating the lung during such procedures renders preoperative images ineffective for targeting the tumor. Furthermore, the problem cannot be solved using intraoperative ultrasound (U.S.) images because U.S. images are very sensitive to small residual amount of air remaining in the deflated lung. One possible solution to address these issues is to register high quality preoperative CT images of the deflated lung with their corresponding low quality intraoperative U.S. images. However, given that such preoperative images correspond to an inflated lung, such CT images need to be processed to construct CT images pertaining to the lung's deflated state. Methods: To obtain the CT images of deflated lung, we present a novel image construction technique using extrapolated deformable registration to predict the deformation the lung undergoes during full deflation. The proposed construction technique involves estimating the lung's air volume in each preoperative image automatically in order to track the respiration phase of each 4D-CT image throughout a respiratory cycle; i.e., the technique does not need any external marker to form a respiratory signal in the process of curve fitting and extrapolation. The extrapolated deformation field is then applied on a preoperative reference image in order to construct the totally deflated lung's CT image. The technique was evaluated experimentally using ex vivo porcine lung. Results: The ex vivo lung experiments led to very encouraging results. In comparison with the CT image of the deflated lung we acquired for the purpose of validation, the constructed CT image was very similar. The

  17. SU-F-T-427: Utilization and Evaluation of Diagnostic CT Imaging with MAR Technique for Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, M; Foster, R; Parks, H; Pankuch, M

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The objective was to utilize and evaluate diagnostic CT-MAR technique for radiation therapy treatment planning. Methods: A Toshiba-diagnostic-CT acquisition with SEMAR(Single-energy-MAR)-algorism was performed to make the metal-artifact-reduction (MAR) for patient treatment planning. CT-imaging datasets with and without SEMAR were taken on a Catphan-phantom. Two sets of CT-numbers were calibrated with the relative electron densities (RED). A tissue characterization phantom with Gammex various simulating material rods was used to establish the relationship between known REDs and corresponding CT-numbers. A GE-CT-sim acquisition was taken on the Catphan for comparison. A patient with bilateral hip arthroplasty was scanned in the radiotherapy CT-sim and the diagnostic SEMAR-CT on a flat panel. The derived SEMAR images were used as a primary CT dataset to create contours for the target, critical-structures, and for planning. A deformable registration was performed with VelocityAI to track voxel changes between SEMAR and CT-sim images. The SEMAR-CT images with minimal artifacts and high quality of geometrical and spatial integrity were employed for a treatment plan. Treatment-plans were evaluated based on deformable registration of SEMAR-CT and CT-sim dataset with assigned CT-numbers in the metal artifact regions in Eclipse v11 TPS. Results: The RED and CT-number relationships were consistent for the datasets in CT-sim and CT’s with and without SEMAR. SEMAR datasets with high image quality were used for PTV and organ delineation in the treatment planning process. For dose distribution to the PTV through the DVH analysis, the plan using CT-sim with the assigned CT-number showed a good agreement to those on deformable CT-SEMAR. Conclusion: A diagnostic-CT with MAR-algorithm can be utilized for radiotherapy treatment planning with CT-number calibrated to the RED. Treatment planning comparison and DVH shows a good agreement in the PTV and critical organs between

  18. Evaluation of pulmonary emphysema by the fused image of CT image and ventilation SPECT image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuda, Ituko; Maruno, Hiromasa; Mori, Kazuaki; Kohno, Tadashi; Kokubo, Takashi

    2007-01-01

    We evaluated pulmonary emphysema using a diagnostic device that could obtain a CT image, a ventilation single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) image and a lung perfusion SPECT image in one examination. The fused image made from the CT image and SPECT image had very little position gap between images, and the precision was high. From the fused image, we were able to detect the areas in which emphysematous change was the most marked in the CT image, while the accumulation decrease was most remarkable in the ventilation SPECT image. Thus it was possible to obtain an accurate status of pulmonary emphysema, and our method was regarded as a useful technique. (author)

  19. An analytical simulation technique for cone-beam CT and pinhole SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xuezhu; Qi Yujin

    2011-01-01

    This study was aimed at developing an efficient simulation technique with an ordinary PC. The work involved derivation of mathematical operators, analytic phantom generations, and effective analytical projectors developing for cone-beam CT and pinhole SPECT imaging. The computer simulations based on the analytical projectors were developed by ray-tracing method for cone-beam CT and voxel-driven method for pinhole SPECT of degrading blurring. The 3D Shepp-Logan, Jaszczak and Defrise phantoms were used for simulation evaluations and image reconstructions. The reconstructed phantom images were of good accuracy with the phantoms. The results showed that the analytical simulation technique is an efficient tool for studying cone-beam CT and pinhole SPECT imaging. (authors)

  20. Graphics Processing Unit-Accelerated Nonrigid Registration of MR Images to CT Images During CT-Guided Percutaneous Liver Tumor Ablations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokuda, Junichi; Plishker, William; Torabi, Meysam; Olubiyi, Olutayo I; Zaki, George; Tatli, Servet; Silverman, Stuart G; Shekher, Raj; Hata, Nobuhiko

    2015-06-01

    Accuracy and speed are essential for the intraprocedural nonrigid magnetic resonance (MR) to computed tomography (CT) image registration in the assessment of tumor margins during CT-guided liver tumor ablations. Although both accuracy and speed can be improved by limiting the registration to a region of interest (ROI), manual contouring of the ROI prolongs the registration process substantially. To achieve accurate and fast registration without the use of an ROI, we combined a nonrigid registration technique on the basis of volume subdivision with hardware acceleration using a graphics processing unit (GPU). We compared the registration accuracy and processing time of GPU-accelerated volume subdivision-based nonrigid registration technique to the conventional nonrigid B-spline registration technique. Fourteen image data sets of preprocedural MR and intraprocedural CT images for percutaneous CT-guided liver tumor ablations were obtained. Each set of images was registered using the GPU-accelerated volume subdivision technique and the B-spline technique. Manual contouring of ROI was used only for the B-spline technique. Registration accuracies (Dice similarity coefficient [DSC] and 95% Hausdorff distance [HD]) and total processing time including contouring of ROIs and computation were compared using a paired Student t test. Accuracies of the GPU-accelerated registrations and B-spline registrations, respectively, were 88.3 ± 3.7% versus 89.3 ± 4.9% (P = .41) for DSC and 13.1 ± 5.2 versus 11.4 ± 6.3 mm (P = .15) for HD. Total processing time of the GPU-accelerated registration and B-spline registration techniques was 88 ± 14 versus 557 ± 116 seconds (P processing time. The GPU-accelerated volume subdivision technique may enable the implementation of nonrigid registration into routine clinical practice. Copyright © 2015 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Improving image quality in portal venography with spectral CT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Li-qin; He, Wen; Li, Jian-ying; Chen, Jiang-hong; Wang, Ke-yang; Tan, Li

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of energy spectral CT on the image quality of CT portal venography in cirrhosis patients. Materials and methods: 30 portal hypertension patients underwent spectral CT examination using a single-tube, fast dual tube voltage switching technique. 101 sets of monochromatic images were generated from 40 keV to 140 keV. Image noise and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) for portal veins from the monochromatic images were measured. An optimal monochromatic image set was selected for obtaining the best CNR for portal veins. The image noise and CNR of the intra-hepatic portal vein and extra-hepatic main stem at the selected monochromatic level were compared with those from the conventional polychromatic images. Image quality was also assessed and compared. Results: The monochromatic images at 51 keV were found to provide the best CNR for both the intra-hepatic and extra-hepatic portal veins. At this energy level, the monochromatic images had about 100% higher CNR than the polychromatic images with a moderate 30% noise increase. The qualitative image quality assessment was also statistically higher with monochromatic images at 51 keV. Conclusion: Monochromatic images at 51 keV for CT portal venography could improve CNR for displaying hepatic portal veins and improve the overall image quality.

  2. Improving image quality in portal venography with spectral CT imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Li-qin, E-mail: zhaolqzr@sohu.com [Department of Radiology, Beijing Friendship Hospital Affiliated to Capital Medical University, Beijing,100050 (China); He, Wen, E-mail: hewen1724@sina.com [Department of Radiology, Beijing Friendship Hospital Affiliated to Capital Medical University, Beijing,100050 (China); Li, Jian-ying, E-mail: jianying.li@med.ge.com [CT Advanced Application and Research, GE Healthcare, 100176 China (China); Chen, Jiang-hong, E-mail: chenjianghong1973@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Beijing Friendship Hospital Affiliated to Capital Medical University, Beijing,100050 (China); Wang, Ke-yang, E-mail: ke7ke@sina.com [Department of Radiology, Beijing Friendship Hospital Affiliated to Capital Medical University, Beijing,100050 (China); Tan, Li, E-mail: Litan@ge.com [CT product, GE Healthcare, 100176 China (China)

    2012-08-15

    Objective: To investigate the effect of energy spectral CT on the image quality of CT portal venography in cirrhosis patients. Materials and methods: 30 portal hypertension patients underwent spectral CT examination using a single-tube, fast dual tube voltage switching technique. 101 sets of monochromatic images were generated from 40 keV to 140 keV. Image noise and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) for portal veins from the monochromatic images were measured. An optimal monochromatic image set was selected for obtaining the best CNR for portal veins. The image noise and CNR of the intra-hepatic portal vein and extra-hepatic main stem at the selected monochromatic level were compared with those from the conventional polychromatic images. Image quality was also assessed and compared. Results: The monochromatic images at 51 keV were found to provide the best CNR for both the intra-hepatic and extra-hepatic portal veins. At this energy level, the monochromatic images had about 100% higher CNR than the polychromatic images with a moderate 30% noise increase. The qualitative image quality assessment was also statistically higher with monochromatic images at 51 keV. Conclusion: Monochromatic images at 51 keV for CT portal venography could improve CNR for displaying hepatic portal veins and improve the overall image quality.

  3. In vivo microCT imaging of rodent cerebral vasculature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Youngho; Hasegawa, Bruce H; Hashimoto, Tomoki; Nuki, Yoshitsugu

    2008-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) remains a critical diagnostic tool for evaluating patients with cerebrovascular disease, and the advent of specialized systems for imaging rodents has extended these techniques to small animal models of these diseases. We therefore have evaluated in vivo methods of imaging rat models of hemorrhagic stroke using a high resolution compact computed tomography ('microCT') system (FLEX(tm) X-O(tm), Gamma Medica-Ideas, Northridge, CA). For all in vivo studies, the head of the anesthetized rat was secured in a custom immobilization device for microCT imaging with 512 projections over 2 min at 60 kVp and 0.530 mA (I tube x t/rotation = 63.6 mAs). First, imaging without iodinated contrast was performed (a) to differentiate the effect of contrast agent in contrast-enhanced CT and (b) to examine the effectiveness of the immobilization device between two time points of CT acquisitions. Then, contrast-enhanced CT was performed with continuous administration of iopromide (300 mgI ml -1 at 1.2 ml min -1 ) to visualize aneurysms and other vascular formations in the carotid and cerebral arteries that may precede subarachnoid hemorrhage. The accuracy of registration between the noncontrast and contrast-enhanced CT images with the immobilization device was compared against the images aligned with normalized mutual information using FMRIB's linear image registration tool (FLIRT). Translations and rotations were examined between the FLIRT-aligned noncontrast CT image and the nonaligned noncontrast CT image. These two data sets demonstrated translational and rotational differences of less than 0.5 voxel (∼85 μm) and 0.5 deg., respectively. Noncontrast CT demonstrated a very small volume (0.1 ml) of femoral arterial blood introduced surgically into the rodent brain. Continuous administration of iopromide during the CT acquisition produced consistent vascular contrast in the reconstructed CT images. As a result, carotid arteries and major cerebral blood vessels

  4. In vivo microCT imaging of rodent cerebral vasculature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Youngho; Hasegawa, Bruce H [Center for Molecular and Functional Imaging, Department of Radiology, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94143 (United States); Hashimoto, Tomoki; Nuki, Yoshitsugu [Center for Cerebrovascular Research, Department of Anesthesia and Perioperative Care, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94143 (United States)], E-mail: youngho.seo@radiology.ucsf.edu

    2008-04-07

    Computed tomography (CT) remains a critical diagnostic tool for evaluating patients with cerebrovascular disease, and the advent of specialized systems for imaging rodents has extended these techniques to small animal models of these diseases. We therefore have evaluated in vivo methods of imaging rat models of hemorrhagic stroke using a high resolution compact computed tomography ('microCT') system (FLEX(tm) X-O(tm), Gamma Medica-Ideas, Northridge, CA). For all in vivo studies, the head of the anesthetized rat was secured in a custom immobilization device for microCT imaging with 512 projections over 2 min at 60 kVp and 0.530 mA (I{sub tube} x t/rotation = 63.6 mAs). First, imaging without iodinated contrast was performed (a) to differentiate the effect of contrast agent in contrast-enhanced CT and (b) to examine the effectiveness of the immobilization device between two time points of CT acquisitions. Then, contrast-enhanced CT was performed with continuous administration of iopromide (300 mgI ml{sup -1} at 1.2 ml min{sup -1}) to visualize aneurysms and other vascular formations in the carotid and cerebral arteries that may precede subarachnoid hemorrhage. The accuracy of registration between the noncontrast and contrast-enhanced CT images with the immobilization device was compared against the images aligned with normalized mutual information using FMRIB's linear image registration tool (FLIRT). Translations and rotations were examined between the FLIRT-aligned noncontrast CT image and the nonaligned noncontrast CT image. These two data sets demonstrated translational and rotational differences of less than 0.5 voxel ({approx}85 {mu}m) and 0.5 deg., respectively. Noncontrast CT demonstrated a very small volume (0.1 ml) of femoral arterial blood introduced surgically into the rodent brain. Continuous administration of iopromide during the CT acquisition produced consistent vascular contrast in the reconstructed CT images. As a result, carotid

  5. Iterative Reconstruction Techniques in Abdominopelvic CT: Technical Concepts and Clinical Implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patino, Manuel; Fuentes, Jorge M; Singh, Sarabjeet; Hahn, Peter F; Sahani, Dushyant V

    2015-07-01

    This article discusses the clinical challenge of low-radiation-dose examinations, the commonly used approaches for dose optimization, and their effect on image quality. We emphasize practical aspects of the different iterative reconstruction techniques, along with their benefits, pitfalls, and clinical implementation. The widespread use of CT has raised concerns about potential radiation risks, motivating diverse strategies to reduce the radiation dose associated with CT. CT manufacturers have developed alternative reconstruction algorithms intended to improve image quality on dose-optimized CT studies, mainly through noise and artifact reduction. Iterative reconstruction techniques take unique approaches to noise reduction and provide distinct strength levels or settings.

  6. Low-dose CT image reconstruction using gain intervention-based dictionary learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Yadunath; Arya, K. V.; Tiwari, Shailendra

    2018-05-01

    Computed tomography (CT) approach is extensively utilized in clinical diagnoses. However, X-ray residue in human body may introduce somatic damage such as cancer. Owing to radiation risk, research has focused on the radiation exposure distributed to patients through CT investigations. Therefore, low-dose CT has become a significant research area. Many researchers have proposed different low-dose CT reconstruction techniques. But, these techniques suffer from various issues such as over smoothing, artifacts, noise, etc. Therefore, in this paper, we have proposed a novel integrated low-dose CT reconstruction technique. The proposed technique utilizes global dictionary-based statistical iterative reconstruction (GDSIR) and adaptive dictionary-based statistical iterative reconstruction (ADSIR)-based reconstruction techniques. In case the dictionary (D) is predetermined, then GDSIR can be used and if D is adaptively defined then ADSIR is appropriate choice. The gain intervention-based filter is also used as a post-processing technique for removing the artifacts from low-dose CT reconstructed images. Experiments have been done by considering the proposed and other low-dose CT reconstruction techniques on well-known benchmark CT images. Extensive experiments have shown that the proposed technique outperforms the available approaches.

  7. Development of a new photo-detector readout technique for PET and CT imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Powolny, François; Auffray, Etiennette; Dosanjh, Manjit; Jarron, Pierre; Kaplon, Jan; Lecoq, Paul; Meyer, T C; Trummer, Julia; Velitchko, Sandra

    2007-01-01

    In the framework of the European FP6's BioCare project, we develop a novel photo-detector readout technique to increase sensitivity and timing precision for molecular imaging in Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and Computer Tomography (CT). Within the Project's work packages, the CERN-BioCare group focuses on the development of a PET detection head suitable to process data from both PET and CT operation in one unit. The detector module consists of a LSO matrix coupled to an APD array. The signal is processed by a fast and low noise readout electronics recently developed for experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. The functioning of the individual system components and the performance of the entire readout channel are presented.

  8. Dual energy CT: New horizon in medical imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goo, Hyun Woo [Dept. of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Goo, Jin Mo [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-08-01

    Dual-energy CT has remained underutilized over the past decade probably due to a cumbersome workflow issue and current technical limitations. Clinical radiologists should be made aware of the potential clinical benefits of dual-energy CT over single-energy CT. To accomplish this aim, the basic principle, current acquisition methods with advantages and disadvantages, and various material-specific imaging methods as clinical applications of dual-energy CT should be addressed in detail. Current dual-energy CT acquisition methods include dual tubes with or without beam filtration, rapid voltage switching, dual-layer detector, split filter technique, and sequential scanning. Dual-energy material-specific imaging methods include virtual monoenergetic or monochromatic imaging, effective atomic number map, virtual non-contrast or unenhanced imaging, virtual non-calcium imaging, iodine map, inhaled xenon map, uric acid imaging, automatic bone removal, and lung vessels analysis. In this review, we focus on dual-energy CT imaging including related issues of radiation exposure to patients, scanning and post-processing options, and potential clinical benefits mainly to improve the understanding of clinical radiologists and thus, expand the clinical use of dual-energy CT; in addition, we briefly describe the current technical limitations of dual-energy CT and the current developments of photon-counting detector.

  9. Dual-Energy CT: New Horizon in Medical Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goo, Hyun Woo; Goo, Jin Mo

    2017-01-01

    Dual-energy CT has remained underutilized over the past decade probably due to a cumbersome workflow issue and current technical limitations. Clinical radiologists should be made aware of the potential clinical benefits of dual-energy CT over single-energy CT. To accomplish this aim, the basic principle, current acquisition methods with advantages and disadvantages, and various material-specific imaging methods as clinical applications of dual-energy CT should be addressed in detail. Current dual-energy CT acquisition methods include dual tubes with or without beam filtration, rapid voltage switching, dual-layer detector, split filter technique, and sequential scanning. Dual-energy material-specific imaging methods include virtual monoenergetic or monochromatic imaging, effective atomic number map, virtual non-contrast or unenhanced imaging, virtual non-calcium imaging, iodine map, inhaled xenon map, uric acid imaging, automatic bone removal, and lung vessels analysis. In this review, we focus on dual-energy CT imaging including related issues of radiation exposure to patients, scanning and post-processing options, and potential clinical benefits mainly to improve the understanding of clinical radiologists and thus, expand the clinical use of dual-energy CT; in addition, we briefly describe the current technical limitations of dual-energy CT and the current developments of photon-counting detector.

  10. Vascular imaging with spiral CT. The way to CY angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prokop, M.; Schaefer, C.; Kalender, W.A.; Polacin, A.; Galanski, M.

    1993-01-01

    Spiral CT is a technique that allows for high-quality two-dimensional angiographic projections and 3D imaging of vascular structures. The authors present the technical and methodological principles of the technique, including scan parameters and parameters of contrast application for various clinical imaging tasks. They present their experience with over 150 clinical cases using spiral CT angiography. Suitable applications of this technique include cogenital anomalies, aneurysms, dissections, stenoses, thrombi and vascular tumor involvement. Given a problem-adapted examination technique, pathologic changes in vessels of as little as 2 mm can be visualized. In some cases with complex vascular anatomy, spiral CT angiography can be superior to arterial angiography. (orig.) [de

  11. Implications of CT noise and artifacts for quantitative 99mTc SPECT/CT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hulme, K. W.; Kappadath, S. C.

    2014-01-01

    SPECT quantification is low (CTDI vol ∼ 4 μGy), the low dose limit for the CT exam as part of SPECT/CT will be guided by CT image quality requirements for anatomical localization and artifact reduction. A CT technique with higher kVp in combination with lower mAs is recommended when low-dose CT images are used for AC to minimize beam-hardening artifacts

  12. Intra-individual diagnostic image quality and organ-specific-radiation dose comparison between spiral cCT with iterative image reconstruction and z-axis automated tube current modulation and sequential cCT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wenz, Holger; Maros, Máté E.; Meyer, Mathias; Gawlitza, Joshua; Förster, Alex; Haubenreisser, Holger; Kurth, Stefan; Schoenberg, Stefan O.; Groden, Christoph; Henzler, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    •Superiority of spiral versus sequential cCT in image quality and organ-specific-radiation dose.•Spiral cCT: lower organ-specific-radiation-dose in eye lense compared to tilted sequential cCT.•State-of-the-art IR spiral cCT techniques has significant advantages over sequential cCT techniques. Superiority of spiral versus sequential cCT in image quality and organ-specific-radiation dose. Spiral cCT: lower organ-specific-radiation-dose in eye lense compared to tilted sequential cCT. State-of-the-art IR spiral cCT techniques has significant advantages over sequential cCT techniques. To prospectively evaluate image quality and organ-specific-radiation dose of spiral cranial CT (cCT) combined with automated tube current modulation (ATCM) and iterative image reconstruction (IR) in comparison to sequential tilted cCT reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP) without ATCM. 31 patients with a previous performed tilted non-contrast enhanced sequential cCT aquisition on a 4-slice CT system with only FBP reconstruction and no ATCM were prospectively enrolled in this study for a clinical indicated cCT scan. All spiral cCT examinations were performed on a 3rd generation dual-source CT system using ATCM in z-axis direction. Images were reconstructed using both, FBP and IR (level 1–5). A Monte-Carlo-simulation-based analysis was used to compare organ-specific-radiation dose. Subjective image quality for various anatomic structures was evaluated using a 4-point Likert-scale and objective image quality was evaluated by comparing signal-to-noise ratios (SNR). Spiral cCT led to a significantly lower (p < 0.05) organ-specific-radiation dose in all targets including eye lense. Subjective image quality of spiral cCT datasets with an IR reconstruction level 5 was rated significantly higher compared to the sequential cCT acquisitions (p < 0.0001). Consecutive mean SNR was significantly higher in all spiral datasets (FBP, IR 1–5) when compared to sequential cCT with a mean

  13. Comparison of image quality and radiation dose between combined automatic tube current modulation and fixed tube current technique in CT of abdomen and pelvis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sanghee (Dept. of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan Univ. School of Medicine (Korea, Republic of)); Yoon, Sang-Wook; Yoo, Seung-Min; Kim, Kyoung Ah; Kim, Sang Heum; Lee, Jong Tae (Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, CHA Bundang Medical Center, CHA Univ. (Korea, Republic of)), email: jansons@cha.ac.kr; Ji, Young Geon (Preventive Medicine, CHA Bundang Medical Center, CHA Univ. (Korea, Republic of))

    2011-12-15

    Background. Tube current is an important determinant of radiation dose and image quality in X-ray-based examination. The combined automatic tube current modulation technique (ATCM) enables automatic adjustment of the tube current in various planes (x-y and z) based on the size and attenuation of the body area scanned. Purpose. To compare image quality and radiation dose of the ATCM with those of a fixed tube current technique (FTC) in CT of the abdomen and pelvis performed with a 16-slice multidetector row CT. Material and Methods. We reviewed 100 patients in whom initial and follow-up CT of the abdomen and pelvis were performed with FTC and ATCM. All acquisition parameters were identical in both techniques except for tube current. We recorded objective image noise in liver parenchyma, subjective image noise and diagnostic acceptability by using a five-point scale, radiation dose, and body mass index (BMI, kg/m2). Data were analyzed with parametric and non-parametric statistical tests. Results. There was no significant difference in image noise and diagnostic acceptability between two techniques. All subjects had acceptable subjective image noise in both techniques. The significant reduction in radiation dose (45.25% reduction) was noted with combined ATCM (P < 0.001). There was a significant linear statistical correlation between BMI and dose reduction (r = -0.78, P < 0.05). Conclusion. The ATCM for CT of the abdomen and pelvis substantially reduced radiation dose while maintaining diagnostic image quality. Patients with lower BMI showed more reduction in radiation dose

  14. 90Y microsphere therapy: does 90Y PET/CT imaging obviate the need for 90Y Bremsstrahlung SPECT/CT imaging?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zade, Anand A; Rangarajan, Venkatesh; Purandare, Nilendu C; Shah, Sneha A; Agrawal, Archi R; Kulkarni, Suyash S; Shetty, Nitin

    2013-11-01

    Transarterial radioembolization using Y microspheres is a novel therapeutic option for inoperable hepatic malignancies. As these spheres are radiolucent, real-time assessment of their distribution during the infusion process under fluoroscopic guidance is not possible. Bremsstrahlung radiations arising from 90Y have conventionally been used for imaging its biodistribution. Recent studies have proved that sources of 90Y also emit positrons, which can further be used for PET/computed tomography (CT) imaging. This study aimed to assess the feasibility of 90Y PET/CT imaging in evaluating microsphere distributions and to compare its findings with those of Bremsstrahlung imaging. Thirty-five sessions of 90Y microsphere transarterial radioembolization were performed on 30 patients with hepatic malignancies. 90Y PET/CT imaging was performed within 3 h of therapy. Bremsstrahlung imaging was also performed for each patient. The imaging findings were compared for concordance in the distribution of microspheres. Exact one-to-one correspondence between 90Y PET/CT imaging and 90Y Bremsstrahlung imaging was observed in 97.14% of cases (i.e. in 34/35 cases). Discordance was observed only in one case in which 90Y PET/CT imaging resolved the microsphere uptake in the inferior vena cava tumor thrombus, which was, however, not visualized on Bremsstrahlung imaging. There is good concordance in the imaging findings of 90Y PET/CT and 90Y Bremsstrahlung imaging. 90Y PET/CT imaging scores over the conventionally used Bremsstrahlung imaging in terms of better resolution, ease of technique, and comparable image acquisition time. This makes it a preferred imaging modality for assessment of the distribution of 90Y microspheres.

  15. CT image registration in sinogram space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Weihua; Li, Tianfang; Wink, Nicole; Xing, Lei

    2007-09-01

    Object displacement in a CT scan is generally reflected in CT projection data or sinogram. In this work, the direct relationship between object motion and the change of CT projection data (sinogram) is investigated and this knowledge is applied to create a novel algorithm for sinogram registration. Calculated and experimental results demonstrate that the registration technique works well for registering rigid 2D or 3D motion in parallel and fan beam samplings. Problem and solution for 3D sinogram-based registration of metallic fiducials are also addressed. Since the motion is registered before image reconstruction, the presented algorithm is particularly useful when registering images with metal or truncation artifacts. In addition, this algorithm is valuable for dealing with situations where only limited projection data are available, making it appealing for various applications in image guided radiation therapy.

  16. CT image registration in sinogram space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao Weihua; Li Tianfang; Wink, Nicole; Xing Lei

    2007-01-01

    Object displacement in a CT scan is generally reflected in CT projection data or sinogram. In this work, the direct relationship between object motion and the change of CT projection data (sinogram) is investigated and this knowledge is applied to create a novel algorithm for sinogram registration. Calculated and experimental results demonstrate that the registration technique works well for registering rigid 2D or 3D motion in parallel and fan beam samplings. Problem and solution for 3D sinogram-based registration of metallic fiducials are also addressed. Since the motion is registered before image reconstruction, the presented algorithm is particularly useful when registering images with metal or truncation artifacts. In addition, this algorithm is valuable for dealing with situations where only limited projection data are available, making it appealing for various applications in image guided radiation therapy

  17. The findings and the role of axial CT imaging and 3D imaging of gastric lesion by spiral CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Dong Ho; Ko, Young Tae

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the efficacy of axial CT imaging and 3D imaging by spiral CT in the detection and evaluation of gastric lesion. Seventy-seven patients with pathologically-proven gastric lesions underwent axial CT and 3D imaging by spiral CT. There were 49 cases of advanced gastric carcinoma(AGC), 21 of early gastric carcinoma (EGC), three of benign ulcers, three of leiomyomas, and one case of lymphoma. Spiral CT was performed with 3-mm collimation, 4.5mm/sec table feed, and 1-1.5-mm reconstruction interval after the ingestion of gas. 3D imaging was obtained using the SSD technique, and on analysis a grade was given(excellent, good, poor). Axial CT scan was performed with 5-mm collimation, 7mm/sec table feed, and 5-mm reconstruction interval after the ingestion of water. Among 49 cases of AGC, excellent 3D images were obtained in seven patients (14.3%), good 3D images in 30(61.2%), and poor 3D images in 12(24.5%). Among the 12 patients with poor images, the cancers were located at the pyloric antrum in eight cases, were AGC Borrmann type 4 in three cases, and EGC-mimicking lesion in one case. Using axial CT scan alone, Borrmann's classification based tumor morphology were accurately identified in 67.3% of cases, but using 3D imaging, the corresponding figure was 85.7%. In 33 cases receiving surgery, good correlation between axial CT scan and pathology occurred in 72.7% of T class, and 69.7% of N class. Among 21 cases of EGC, excellent 3D images were obtained in three patients (14.3%), good 3D images in 14 (66.7%), and poor 3D images in two (9.5%). The other two cases of EGC were not detected. By axial CT scan, no tumor was detected in four cases, and there were two doubtful cases. 3D images of three benign ulcers were excellent in one case and good in two. 3D images of three leiomyomas and one lymphoma were excellent. Combined axial CT imaging and 3D imaging by spiral CT has the potential to accurately diagnose gastric lesions other than AGC

  18. Development of high resolution x-ray CT technique for irradiated fuel assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishimi, Akihiro; Katsuyama, Kozo; Maeda, Koji; Asaga, Takeo [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Oarai Research and Development Center, Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2012-03-15

    High X-ray CT technique was developed to observe the irradiation performance of FBR fuel assembly and MOX fuel. In this technique, the high energy X-ray pulse (12MeV) was used synchronizing detection system with the X-ray pulse to reduce the effect of the gamma ray emissions from the irradiated fuel assembly. In this study, this technique was upgraded to obtain high resolution X-ray CT image. In this upgrading, the collimator which had slit width of 0.1 mm and X-ray detector of a highly sensitive silicon semiconductor detector (100 channels) was introduced in the X-ray CT system. As a result of these developments, high resolution X-ray CT images could be obtained on the transverse cross section of irradiated fuel assembly. (author)

  19. Suitability of helical multislice acquisition technique for routine unenhanced brain CT: an image quality study using a 16-row detector configuration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernalsteen, Danielle; Cosnard, Guy; Grandin, Cecile; Duprez, Thierry [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, Department of Radiology and Medical Imaging, Brussels (Belgium); Robert, Annie [Public Health School, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Department of Epidemiologics and Medical Statistics, Brussels (Belgium); Vlassenbroek, Alain [CT Clinical Science, Philips Medical Systems, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2007-04-15

    Subjective and objective image quality (IQ) criteria, radiation doses, and acquisition times were compared using incremental monoslice, incremental multislice, and helical multislice acquisition techniques for routine unenhanced brain computed tomography (CT). Twenty-four patients were examined by two techniques in the same imaging session using a 16-row CT system equipped with 0.75-width detectors. Contiguous ''native'' 3-mm-thick slices were reconstructed for all acquisitions from four detectors for each slice (4 x 0.75 mm), with one channel available per detector. Two protocols were tailored to compare: (1) one-slice vs four-slice incremental images; (2) incremental vs helical four-slice images. Two trained observers independently scored 12 subjective items of IQ. Preference for the technique was assessed by one-tailed t test and the interobserver variation by two-tailed t test. The two observers gave very close IQ scores for the three techniques without significant interobserver variations. Measured IQ parameters failed to reveal any difference between techniques, and an approximate half radiation dose reduction was obtained by using the full 16-row configuration. Acquisition times were cumulatively shortened by using the multislice and the helical modality. (orig.)

  20. Suitability of helical multislice acquisition technique for routine unenhanced brain CT: an image quality study using a 16-row detector configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernalsteen, Danielle; Cosnard, Guy; Grandin, Cecile; Duprez, Thierry; Robert, Annie; Vlassenbroek, Alain

    2007-01-01

    Subjective and objective image quality (IQ) criteria, radiation doses, and acquisition times were compared using incremental monoslice, incremental multislice, and helical multislice acquisition techniques for routine unenhanced brain computed tomography (CT). Twenty-four patients were examined by two techniques in the same imaging session using a 16-row CT system equipped with 0.75-width detectors. Contiguous ''native'' 3-mm-thick slices were reconstructed for all acquisitions from four detectors for each slice (4 x 0.75 mm), with one channel available per detector. Two protocols were tailored to compare: (1) one-slice vs four-slice incremental images; (2) incremental vs helical four-slice images. Two trained observers independently scored 12 subjective items of IQ. Preference for the technique was assessed by one-tailed t test and the interobserver variation by two-tailed t test. The two observers gave very close IQ scores for the three techniques without significant interobserver variations. Measured IQ parameters failed to reveal any difference between techniques, and an approximate half radiation dose reduction was obtained by using the full 16-row configuration. Acquisition times were cumulatively shortened by using the multislice and the helical modality. (orig.)

  1. Contrast bolus technique with rapid CT scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, H.; Kuehne, D.; Rohr, W.; Heller, M.

    1981-01-01

    Twenty-three patients complying with the clinical criteria for brain death were studied by contrast-enhanced CT. In all but one, the great intracranial vessels escaped visualization; accordingly, angiography demonstrated cerebral circulatory arrest. In the remaining case, faint enhancement of the circle of Willis corresponded to angiographic demonstration of the proximal segments of cerebral arteris. Neither in normal brain nor in dead brain did slow CT scanning disclose any postcontrast increase in parenchymal attenuation. An improved technique is proposed to demonstrate the transit of the contrast bolus by rapid CT with image splitting. If cerebral blood flow is preserved, the grey and white matter will enhance significantly following administration of contrast medium. Vice versa, the absence of enhancement confirms brain death, even in instances in which the great cerebral vessels are obscured by hemorrhage or other extensive lesions. Two additional cases of brain death were evaluated by rapid CT scanning. As to brain death, the technique obviates the need for angiography or radionuclide angiography, usually applied in prospective organ donors, because its informative content is superior to that of either method. The CT technique described affords a reliable and safe diagnosis of brain death, and can be interpreted easily. (orig.)

  2. A novel data processing technique for image reconstruction of penumbral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Hongwei; Li, Hongyun; Xu, Zeping; Song, Guzhou; Zhang, Faqiang; Zhou, Lin

    2011-06-01

    CT image reconstruction technique was applied to the data processing of the penumbral imaging. Compared with other traditional processing techniques for penumbral coded pinhole image such as Wiener, Lucy-Richardson and blind technique, this approach is brand new. In this method, the coded aperture processing method was used for the first time independent to the point spread function of the image diagnostic system. In this way, the technical obstacles was overcome in the traditional coded pinhole image processing caused by the uncertainty of point spread function of the image diagnostic system. Then based on the theoretical study, the simulation of penumbral imaging and image reconstruction was carried out to provide fairly good results. While in the visible light experiment, the point source of light was used to irradiate a 5mm×5mm object after diffuse scattering and volume scattering. The penumbral imaging was made with aperture size of ~20mm. Finally, the CT image reconstruction technique was used for image reconstruction to provide a fairly good reconstruction result.

  3. Automatic labeling and segmentation of vertebrae in CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasoulian, Abtin; Rohling, Robert N.; Abolmaesumi, Purang

    2014-03-01

    Labeling and segmentation of the spinal column from CT images is a pre-processing step for a range of image- guided interventions. State-of-the art techniques have focused either on image feature extraction or template matching for labeling of the vertebrae followed by segmentation of each vertebra. Recently, statistical multi- object models have been introduced to extract common statistical characteristics among several anatomies. In particular, we have created models for segmentation of the lumbar spine which are robust, accurate, and computationally tractable. In this paper, we reconstruct a statistical multi-vertebrae pose+shape model and utilize it in a novel framework for labeling and segmentation of the vertebra in a CT image. We validate our technique in terms of accuracy of the labeling and segmentation of CT images acquired from 56 subjects. The method correctly labels all vertebrae in 70% of patients and is only one level off for the remaining 30%. The mean distance error achieved for the segmentation is 2.1 +/- 0.7 mm.

  4. Incorporating multislice imaging into x-ray CT polymer gel dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, H., E-mail: holly.johnston@utsw.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia V8W 2Y2 (Canada); Hilts, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia V8W 2Y2, Canada and Medical Physics, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver Island Centre, Victoria, British Columbia V8R 6V5 (Canada); Jirasek, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia V8W 2Y2, Canada and Department of Physics, University of British Columbia—Okanagan Campus, Kelowna, British Columbia V1V 1V7 (Canada)

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: To evaluate multislice computed tomography (CT) scanning for fast and reliable readout of radiation therapy (RT) dose distributions using CT polymer gel dosimetry (PGD) and to establish a baseline assessment of image noise and uniformity in an unirradiated gel dosimeter. Methods: A 16-slice CT scanner was used to acquire images through a 1 L cylinder filled with water. Additional images were collected using a single slice machine. The variability in CT number (N{sub CT}) associated with the anode heel effect was evaluated and used to define a new slice-by-slice background subtraction artifact removal technique for CT PGD. Image quality was assessed for the multislice system by evaluating image noise and uniformity. The agreement in N{sub CT} for slices acquired simultaneously using the multislice detector array was also examined. Further study was performed to assess the effects of increasing x-ray tube load on the constancy of measured N{sub CT} and overall scan time. In all cases, results were compared to the single slice machine. Finally, images were collected throughout the volume of an unirradiated gel dosimeter to quantify image noise and uniformity before radiation is delivered. Results: Slice-by-slice background subtraction effectively removes the variability in N{sub CT} observed across images acquired simultaneously using the multislice scanner and is the recommended background subtraction method when using a multislice CT system. Image noise was higher for the multislice system compared to the single slice scanner, but overall image quality was comparable between the two systems. Further study showed N{sub CT} was consistent across image slices acquired simultaneously using the multislice detector array for each detector configuration of the slice thicknesses examined. In addition, the multislice system was found to eliminate variations in N{sub CT} due to increasing x-ray tube load and reduce scanning time by a factor of 4 when compared to

  5. Functional Imaging: CT and MRI

    OpenAIRE

    van Beek, Edwin JR; Hoffman, Eric A

    2008-01-01

    Numerous imaging techniques permit evaluation of regional pulmonary function. Contrast-enhanced CT methods now allow assessment of vasculature and lung perfusion. Techniques using spirometric controlled MDCT allow for quantification of presence and distribution of parenchymal and airway pathology, Xenon gas can be employed to assess regional ventilation of the lungs and rapid bolus injections of iodinated contrast agent can provide quantitative measure of regional parenchymal perfusion. Advan...

  6. A study on CT-guided stereotactic technique for functional neurosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uetsuhara, Koichi; Asakura, Tetsuhiko; Hirahara, Kazuho; Gondo, Masazumi; Oda, Hiroshige

    1987-01-01

    Recently, CT-guided stereotactic surgery has become of major interest, and some authors have discussed its potential in functional neurosurgery. The following is a comparative study of the CT-guided stereotactic technique and the conventional roentogenographic stereotactic technique. The Brown-Roberts-Wells apparatus was used for both types of procedures. 37 stereotactic procedures were performed on 35 patients under local anesthesia; 16 for stereotactic biopsy and 21 for stereotactic functional neurosurgery. Target points for stereotactic biopsy were determined by the CT-guided technique and target points for functional neurosurgery were determined by the conventional roentogenographic technique. The correlation with the position of target point determined by both techniques was investigated in the 21 functional neurosurgical procedures. On these occasions the authors used the reformatted horizontal and sagittal CT through the anterior and posterior commissure to determine the position of target point by the CT-guided technique. Results: It was found that the AC-PC line crossed with Reid's base line at angle of 11 ± 1 deg, and therefore it is important to obtain a CT images including AC-PC line at this angle. When applying the CT guided stereotactic procedure for functional surgery, it should be known that there could be a discrepancy within 2 mm from the conventional target determination. (author)

  7. Feasibility of megavoltage portal CT using an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) and a multi-level scheme algebraic reconstruction technique (MLS-ART)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guan, Huaiqun; Zhu, Yunping

    1998-01-01

    Although electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) are efficient tools for radiation therapy verification, they only provide images of overlapped anatomic structures. We investigated using a fluorescent screen/CCD-based EPID, coupled with a novel multi-level scheme algebraic reconstruction technique (MLS-ART), for a feasibility study of portal computed tomography (CT) reconstructions. The CT images might be useful for radiation treatment planning and verification. We used an EPID, set it to work at the linear dynamic range and collimated 6 MV photons from a linear accelerator to a slit beam of 1 cm wide and 25 cm long. We performed scans under a total of ∼200 monitor units (MUs) for several phantoms in which we varied the number of projections and MUs per projection. The reconstructed images demonstrated that using the new MLS-ART technique megavoltage portal CT with a total of 200 MUs can achieve a contrast detectibility of ∼2.5% (object size 5mmx5mm) and a spatial resolution of 2.5 mm. (author)

  8. PET/CT (and CT) instrumentation, image reconstruction and data transfer for radiotherapy planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sattler, Bernhard; Lee, John A.; Lonsdale, Markus; Coche, Emmanuel

    2010-01-01

    The positron emission tomography in combination with CT in hybrid, cross-modality imaging systems (PET/CT) gains more and more importance as a part of the treatment-planning procedure in radiotherapy. Positron emission tomography (PET), as a integral part of nuclear medicine imaging and non-invasive imaging technique, offers the visualization and quantification of pre-selected tracer metabolism. In combination with the structural information from CT, this molecular imaging technique has great potential to support and improve the outcome of the treatment-planning procedure prior to radiotherapy. By the choice of the PET-Tracer, a variety of different metabolic processes can be visualized. First and foremost, this is the glucose metabolism of a tissue as well as for instance hypoxia or cell proliferation. This paper comprises the system characteristics of hybrid PET/CT systems. Acquisition and processing protocols are described in general and modifications to cope with the special needs in radiooncology. This starts with the different position of the patient on a special table top, continues with the use of the same fixation material as used for positioning of the patient in radiooncology while simulation and irradiation and leads to special processing protocols that include the delineation of the volumes that are subject to treatment planning and irradiation (PTV, GTV, CTV, etc.). General CT acquisition and processing parameters as well as the use of contrast enhancement of the CT are described. The possible risks and pitfalls the investigator could face during the hybrid-imaging procedure are explained and listed. The interdisciplinary use of different imaging modalities implies a increase of the volume of data created. These data need to be stored and communicated fast, safe and correct. Therefore, the DICOM-Standard provides objects and classes for this purpose (DICOM RT). Furthermore, the standard DICOM objects and classes for nuclear medicine (NM, PT) and

  9. Hybrid SPECT/CT imaging in neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciarmiello, Andrea; Giovannini, Elisabetta; Meniconi, Martina; Cuccurullo, Vincenzo; Gaeta, Maria Chiara

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the SPECT/CT hybrid modality has led to a rapid development of imaging techniques in nuclear medicine, opening new perspectives for imaging staff and patients as well. However, while, the clinical role of positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) is well consolidated, the diffusion and the consequent value of single-photon emission tomography-computed tomography (SPECT-CT) has yet to be weighed, Hence, there is a need for a careful analysis, comparing the "potential" benefits of the hybrid modality with the "established" ones of the standalone machine. The aim of this article is to analyze the impact of this hybrid tool on the diagnosis of diseases of the central nervous system, comparing strengths and weaknesses of both modalities through the use of SWOT analysis.

  10. 1975 Memorial Award Paper. Image generation and display techniques for CT scan data. Thin transverse and reconstructed coronal and sagittal planes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, W V; Johnston, R J; Morton, P E; Dwyer, S J

    1975-01-01

    The various limitations to computerized axial tomographic (CT) interpretation are due in part to the 8-13 mm standard tissue plane thickness and in part to the absence of alternative planes of view, such as coronal or sagittal images. This paper describes a method for gathering multiple overlapped 8 mm transverse sections, subjecting these data to a deconvolution process, and then displaying thin (1 mm) transverse as well as reconstructed coronal and sagittal CT images. Verification of the deconvolution technique with phantom experiments is described. Application of the phantom results to human post mortem CT scan data illustrates this method's faithful reconstruction of coronal and sagittal tissue densities when correlated with actual specimen photographs of a sectioned brain. A special CT procedure, limited basal overlap scanning, is proposed for use on current first generation CT scanners without hardware modification.

  11. SU-E-I-68: Practical Considerations On Implementation of the Image Gently Pediatric CT Protocols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, J; Adams, C; Lumby, C; Dillon, J; Woods, E; Richer, E

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: One limitation associated with the Image Gently pediatric CT protocols is practical implementation of the recommended manual techniques. Inconsistency as a result of different practice is a possibility among technologist. An additional concern is the added risk of data error that would result in over or underexposure. The Automatic Exposure Control (AEC) features automatically reduce radiation for children. However, they do not work efficiently for the patients of very small size and relative large size. This study aims to implement the Image Gently pediatric CT protocols in the practical setting while maintaining the use of AEC features for pediatric patients of varying size. Methods: Anthropomorphological abdomen phantoms were scanned in a CT scanner using the Image Gently pediatric protocols, the AEC technique with a fixed adult baseline, and automatic protocols with various baselines. The baselines were adjusted corresponding to patient age, weight and posterioranterior thickness to match the Image Gently pediatric CT manual techniques. CTDIvol was recorded for each examination. Image noise was measured and recorded for image quality comparison. Clinical images were evaluated by pediatric radiologists. Results: By adjusting vendor default baselines used in the automatic techniques, radiation dose and image quality can match those of the Image Gently manual techniques. In practice, this can be achieved by dividing pediatric patients into three major groups for technologist reference: infant, small child, and large child. Further division can be done but will increase the number of CT protocols. For each group, AEC can efficiently adjust acquisition techniques for children. This implementation significantly overcomes the limitation of the Image Gently manual techniques. Conclusion: Considering the effectiveness in clinical practice, Image Gently Pediatric CT protocols can be implemented in accordance with AEC techniques, with adjusted baselines, to

  12. Inner images of the human body with a 3D CT scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Hisashi

    1994-01-01

    This article deals with not only CT-endoscopy (CTES) technique but also various imaging and processing techniques of 3D CT. CTES images, which were obtained from 137 patients with suspected cardiovascular disorder or disease of other tubular organs, were reconstructed using a newly developed volumetric scanner with a slip-ring system. Among the 137 patients, 107 (78%) were successfully diagnosed by CTES. For cardiovascular region, dissecting aneurysm was detected in 27/32, aortitis in 9/9, and intra-arterial thrombosis in 5/6. Various imaging and processing techniques, including CT number conversion technique, multi-threshold range imaging, 'open-window' and 'virtual operation', and long segmental arteriogram by intravenous contrast injection, are displayed in futures. In conclusion, CTES might become a safe and minimally invasive means for observing the inner surface of the tubular organs, particularly of the aorta, without the need of fiberscopic manipulation. (N.K.)

  13. Computed tomography automatic exposure control techniques in 18F-FDG oncology PET-CT scanning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iball, Gareth R; Tout, Deborah

    2014-04-01

    Computed tomography (CT) automatic exposure control (AEC) systems are now used in all modern PET-CT scanners. A collaborative study was undertaken to compare AEC techniques of the three major PET-CT manufacturers for fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose half-body oncology imaging. An audit of 70 patients was performed for half-body CT scans taken on a GE Discovery 690, Philips Gemini TF and Siemens Biograph mCT (all 64-slice CT). Patient demographic and dose information was recorded and image noise was calculated as the SD of Hounsfield units in the liver. A direct comparison of the AEC systems was made by scanning a Rando phantom on all three systems for a range of AEC settings. The variation in dose and image quality with patient weight was significantly different for all three systems, with the GE system showing the largest variation in dose with weight and Philips the least. Image noise varied with patient weight in Philips and Siemens systems but was constant for all weights in GE. The z-axis mA profiles from the Rando phantom demonstrate that these differences are caused by the nature of the tube current modulation techniques applied. The mA profiles varied considerably according to the AEC settings used. CT AEC techniques from the three manufacturers yield significantly different tube current modulation patterns and hence deliver different doses and levels of image quality across a range of patient weights. Users should be aware of how their system works and of steps that could be taken to optimize imaging protocols.

  14. 3D Interpolation Method for CT Images of the Lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriaki Asada

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available A 3-D image can be reconstructed from numerous CT images of the lung. The procedure reconstructs a solid from multiple cross section images, which are collected during pulsation of the heart. Thus the motion of the heart is a special factor that must be taken into consideration during reconstruction. The lung exhibits a repeating transformation synchronized to the beating of the heart as an elastic body. There are discontinuities among neighboring CT images due to the beating of the heart, if no special techniques are used in taking CT images. The 3-D heart image is reconstructed from numerous CT images in which both the heart and the lung are taken. Although the outline shape of the reconstructed 3-D heart is quite unnatural, the envelope of the 3-D unnatural heart is fit to the shape of the standard heart. The envelopes of the lung in the CT images are calculated after the section images of the best fitting standard heart are located at the same positions of the CT images. Thus the CT images are geometrically transformed to the optimal CT images fitting best to the standard heart. Since correct transformation of images is required, an Area oriented interpolation method proposed by us is used for interpolation of transformed images. An attempt to reconstruct a 3-D lung image by a series of such operations without discontinuity is shown. Additionally, the same geometrical transformation method to the original projection images is proposed as a more advanced method.

  15. Myocardial perfusion imaging with dual energy CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Kwang Nam [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Department of Radiology, SMG-SNU Boramae Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); De Cecco, Carlo N. [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Caruso, Damiano [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Department of Radiological Sciences, Oncology and Pathology, University of Rome “Sapienza”, Rome (Italy); Tesche, Christian [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Department of Cardiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Heart Center Munich-Bogenhausen, Munich (Germany); Spandorfer, Adam; Varga-Szemes, Akos [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Schoepf, U. Joseph, E-mail: schoepf@musc.edu [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States)

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • Stress dual-energy sCTMPI offers the possibility to directly detect the presence of myocardial perfusion defects. • Stress dual-energy sCTMPI allows differentiating between reversible and fixed myocardial perfusion defects. • The combination of coronary CT angiography and dual-energy sCTMPI can improve the ability of CT to detect hemodynamically relevant coronary artery disease. - Abstract: Dual-energy CT (DECT) enables simultaneous use of two different tube voltages, thus different x-ray absorption characteristics are acquired in the same anatomic location with two different X-ray spectra. The various DECT techniques allow material decomposition and mapping of the iodine distribution within the myocardium. Static dual-energy myocardial perfusion imaging (sCTMPI) using pharmacological stress agents demonstrate myocardial ischemia by single snapshot images of myocardial iodine distribution. sCTMPI gives incremental values to coronary artery stenosis detected on coronary CT angiography (CCTA) by showing consequent reversible or fixed myocardial perfusion defects. The comprehensive acquisition of CCTA and sCTMPI offers extensive morphological and functional evaluation of coronary artery disease. Recent studies have revealed that dual-energy sCTMPI shows promising diagnostic accuracy for the detection of hemodynamically significant coronary artery disease compared to single-photon emission computed tomography, invasive coronary angiography, and cardiac MRI. The aim of this review is to present currently available DECT techniques for static myocardial perfusion imaging and recent clinical applications and ongoing investigations.

  16. Optimising imaging parameters in experimental spiral CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiitola, M.; Vehmas, T.; Kivisaari, R.P.; Kivisaari, L.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: This in vitro study was conducted to analyse lesion detection and relative radiation exposure in different CT techniques. Material and Methods: We used a plastic phantom (12 x 8 x 2 cm) containing holes filled with air or fluid of varying densities to simulate lesions. This was imaged with Siemens Somatom Plus S and GE High Speed Advantage units. We varied table feeds (3 and 6 mm/s in Siemens and 3 and 4.5 mm/s in GE) and increments (2 mm and 4 mm) while keeping collimation at 3 mm. The SmartScan program of GE and the reformating algorithm of Siemens were also analysed. To evaluate the different methods, the phatnom lesions were counted by 3 observers. Radiation exposures associated with each technique were also measured. Results: The images reformatted to a coronal direction were significantly inferior (p<0.01) to those in other techniques. The use of SmartScan did not influence lesion detection, nor did changes in pitch or increment. Spiral and non-spiral techniques proved to be equal. Radiation exposure was lowest when a greater pitch or the SmartScan program was used. Conclusion: Radiation exposure in CT can be limited without significantly impairing the image quality by using low-dose techniques. Reformatting to a coronal direction should be used with care as it debases the image quality. (orig.)

  17. Cone-beam volume CT mammographic imaging: feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Biao; Ning, Ruola

    2001-06-01

    X-ray projection mammography, using a film/screen combination or digital techniques, has proven to be the most effective imaging modality for early detection of breast cancer currently available. However, the inherent superimposition of structures makes small carcinoma (a few millimeters in size) difficult to detect in the occultation case or in dense breasts, resulting in a high false positive biopsy rate. The cone-beam x-ray projection based volume imaging using flat panel detectors (FPDs) makes it possible to obtain three-dimensional breast images. This may benefit diagnosis of the structure and pattern of the lesion while eliminating hard compression of the breast. This paper presents a novel cone-beam volume CT mammographic imaging protocol based on the above techniques. Through computer simulation, the key issues of the system and imaging techniques, including the x-ray imaging geometry and corresponding reconstruction algorithms, x-ray characteristics of breast tissues, x-ray setting techniques, the absorbed dose estimation and the quantitative effect of x-ray scattering on image quality, are addressed. The preliminary simulation results support the proposed cone-beam volume CT mammographic imaging modality in respect to feasibility and practicability for mammography. The absorbed dose level is comparable to that of current two-view mammography and would not be a prominent problem for this imaging protocol. Compared to traditional mammography, the proposed imaging protocol with isotropic spatial resolution will potentially provide significantly better low contrast detectability of breast tumors and more accurate location of breast lesions.

  18. Image Quality of 3rd Generation Spiral Cranial Dual-Source CT in Combination with an Advanced Model Iterative Reconstruction Technique: A Prospective Intra-Individual Comparison Study to Standard Sequential Cranial CT Using Identical Radiation Dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenz, Holger; Maros, Máté E; Meyer, Mathias; Förster, Alex; Haubenreisser, Holger; Kurth, Stefan; Schoenberg, Stefan O; Flohr, Thomas; Leidecker, Christianne; Groden, Christoph; Scharf, Johann; Henzler, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    To prospectively intra-individually compare image quality of a 3rd generation Dual-Source-CT (DSCT) spiral cranial CT (cCT) to a sequential 4-slice Multi-Slice-CT (MSCT) while maintaining identical intra-individual radiation dose levels. 35 patients, who had a non-contrast enhanced sequential cCT examination on a 4-slice MDCT within the past 12 months, underwent a spiral cCT scan on a 3rd generation DSCT. CTDIvol identical to initial 4-slice MDCT was applied. Data was reconstructed using filtered backward projection (FBP) and 3rd-generation iterative reconstruction (IR) algorithm at 5 different IR strength levels. Two neuroradiologists independently evaluated subjective image quality using a 4-point Likert-scale and objective image quality was assessed in white matter and nucleus caudatus with signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) being subsequently calculated. Subjective image quality of all spiral cCT datasets was rated significantly higher compared to the 4-slice MDCT sequential acquisitions (pspiral compared to sequential cCT datasets with mean SNR improvement of 61.65% (p*Bonferroni0.05spiral cCT with an advanced model IR technique significantly improves subjective and objective image quality compared to a standard sequential cCT acquisition acquired at identical dose levels.

  19. SU-F-I-31: Reproducibility of An Automatic Exposure Control Technique in the Low-Dose CT Scan of Cardiac PET/CT Exams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, M; Rosica, D; Agarwal, V; Di Carli, M; Dorbala, S [Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Two separate low-dose CT scans are usually performed for attenuation correction of rest and stress N-13 ammonia PET/CT myocardial perfusion imaging (PET/CT). We utilize an automatic exposure control (AEC) technique to reduce CT radiation dose while maintaining perfusion image quality. Our goal is to assess the reproducibility of displayed CT dose index (CTDI) on same-day repeat CT scans (CT1 and CT2). Methods: Retrospectively, we reviewed CT images of PET/CT studies performed on the same day. Low-dose CT utilized AEC technique based on tube current modulation called Smart-mA. The scan parameters were 64 × 0.625mm collimation, 5mm slice thickness, 0.984 pitch, 1-sec rotation time, 120 kVp, and noise index 50 with a range of 10–200 mA. The scan length matched with PET field of view (FOV) with the heart near the middle of axial FOV. We identified the reference slice number (RS) for an anatomical landmark (carina) and used it to estimate axial shift between two CTs. For patient size, we measured an effective diameter on the reference slice. The effect of patient positioning to CTDI was evaluated using the table height. We calculated the absolute percent difference of the CTDI (%diff) for estimation of the reproducibility. Results: The study included 168 adults with an average body-mass index of 31.72 ± 9.10 (kg/m{sup 2}) and effective diameter was 32.72 ± 4.60 cm. The average CTDI was 1.95 ± 1.40 mGy for CT1 and 1.97 ± 1.42mGy for CT2. The mean %diff was 7.8 ± 6.8%. Linear regression analysis showed a significant correlation between the table height and %diff CTDI. (r=0.82, p<0.001) Conclusion: We have shown for the first time in human subjects, using two same-day CT images, that the AEC technique in low-dose CT is reproducible within 10% and significantly depends on the patient centering.

  20. Evaluation of a breath-motion-correction technique in reducing measurement error in hepatic CT perfusion imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Wei; Liu Jianyu; Li Xuan; Li Jianying; Liao Jingmin

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of a breath-motion-correction (BMC) technique in reducing measurement error of the time-density curve (TDC) in hepatic CT perfusion imaging. Methods: Twenty-five patients with suspected liver diseases underwent hepatic CT perfusion scans. The right branch of portal vein was selected as the anatomy of interest and performed BMC to realign image slices for the TDC according to the rule of minimizing the temporal changes of overall structures. Ten ROIs was selected on the right branch of portal vein to generate 10 TDCs each with and without BMC. The values of peak enhancement and the time-to-peak enhancement for each TDC were measured. The coefficients of variation (CV) of peak enhancement and the time-to-peak enhancement were calculated for each patient with and without BMC. Wilcoxon signed ranks test was used to evaluate the difference between the CV of the two parameters obtained with and without BMC. Independent-samples t test was used to evaluate the difference between the values of peak enhancement obtained with and without BMC. Results: The median (quartiles) of CV of peak enhancement with BMC [2.84% (2.10%, 4.57%)] was significantly lower than that without BMC [5.19% (3.90%, 7.27%)] (Z=-3.108,P<0.01). The median (quartiles) of CV of time-to-peak enhancement with BMC [2.64% (0.76%, 4.41%)] was significantly lower than that without BMC [5.23% (3.81%, 7.43%)] (Z=-3.924, P<0.01). In 8 cases, TDC demonstrated statistically significant higher peak enhancement with BMC (P<0.05). Conclusion: By applying the BMC technique we can effectively reduce measurement error for parameters of the TDC in hepatic CT perfusion imaging. (authors)

  1. A novel 3D volumetric voxel registration technique for volume-view-guided image registration of multiple imaging modalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Guang; Xie Huchen; Ning, Holly; Capala, Jacek; Arora, Barbara C.; Coleman, C. Norman; Camphausen, Kevin; Miller, Robert W.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To provide more clinically useful image registration with improved accuracy and reduced time, a novel technique of three-dimensional (3D) volumetric voxel registration of multimodality images is developed. Methods and Materials: This technique can register up to four concurrent images from multimodalities with volume view guidance. Various visualization effects can be applied, facilitating global and internal voxel registration. Fourteen computed tomography/magnetic resonance (CT/MR) image sets and two computed tomography/positron emission tomography (CT/PET) image sets are used. For comparison, an automatic registration technique using maximization of mutual information (MMI) and a three-orthogonal-planar (3P) registration technique are used. Results: Visually sensitive registration criteria for CT/MR and CT/PET have been established, including the homogeneity of color distribution. Based on the registration results of 14 CT/MR images, the 3D voxel technique is in excellent agreement with the automatic MMI technique and is indicatory of a global positioning error (defined as the means and standard deviations of the error distribution) using the 3P pixel technique: 1.8 deg ± 1.2 deg in rotation and 2.0 ± 1.3 (voxel unit) in translation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that such positioning error has been addressed. Conclusion: This novel 3D voxel technique establishes volume-view-guided image registration of up to four modalities. It improves registration accuracy with reduced time, compared with the 3P pixel technique. This article suggests that any interactive and automatic registration should be safeguarded using the 3D voxel technique

  2. A temporal subtraction method for thoracic CT images based on generalized gradient vector flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyake, Noriaki; Kim, H.; Maeda, Shinya; Itai, Yoshinori; Tan, J.K.; Ishikawa, Seiji; Katsuragawa, Shigehiko

    2010-01-01

    A temporal subtraction image, which is obtained by subtraction of a previous image from a current one, can be used for enhancing interval changes (such as formation of new lesions and changes in existing abnormalities) on medical images by removing most of the normal structures. If image registration is incorrect, not only the interval changes but also the normal structures would be appeared as some artifacts on the temporal subtraction image. In a temporal subtraction technique for 2-D X-ray image, the effectiveness is shown through a lot of clinical evaluation experiments, and practical use is advancing. Moreover, the MDCT (Multi-Detector row Computed Tomography) can easily introduced on medical field, the development of a temporal subtraction for thoracic CT Images is expected. In our study, a temporal subtraction technique for thoracic CT Images is developed. As the technique, the vector fields are described by use of GGVF (Generalized Gradient Vector Flow) from the previous and current CT images. Afterwards, VOI (Volume of Interest) are set up on the previous and current CT image pairs. The shift vectors are calculated by using nearest neighbor matching of the vector fields in these VOIs. The search kernel on previous CT image is set up from the obtained shift vector. The previous CT voxel which resemble standard the current voxel is detected by voxel value and vector of the GGVF in the kernel. And, the previous CT image is transformed to the same coordinate of standard voxel. Finally, temporal subtraction image is made by subtraction of a warping image from a current one. To verify the proposal method, the result of application to 7 cases and the effectiveness are described. (author)

  3. Practical CT technology and techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berland, L.L.

    1987-01-01

    This handbook equips both radiologists and radiologists in training with a thorough working knowledge of the mechanisms and processes of computed tomography (CT) image generation, the common causes of image artifacts, and useful examination protocols for each area of the body. The author explains the fundamental technological principles of CT, focusing on those concepts crucial to successful CT examinations. The first part of the book succinctly reviews the fundamentals of CT technology. It begins with a methodical introduction to key principles of X-ray physics and technology, in which topics such as the modulation transfer function, magnification, and the X-ray tube are discussed in understandable, nonmathematical terms. The author then explains the basic technology of CT scanners, the principles of scan projection radiography, and the essential rules for radiation dosage determination and radiation protection. Careful attention is given to selectable scan factors in both routine and dynamic scanning, as well as to the processes involved in image creation and refinement and the chief determinants of image quality. Basic and specialized program features and the technology of image display, recording, and storage are also thoroughly described

  4. Comparative evaluation of the porta hepatis/hepatoduodenal ligament with CT and MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silverman, P.M.; Feuerstein, I.M.; Zeman, R.K.; Jaffe, M.H.; Garra, B.S.

    1988-01-01

    CT and MR imaging were compared in a retrospective evaluation of 16 patients with abnormalities, predominantly neoplasms, of the porta hepatis/hepatoduodenal ligament. Masses on CT were of decreased density compared with that of liver and were seen in contrast to surrounding periportal fat. On MR images, T1-weighted images demonstrated findings similar to those of CT. T2-weighted images clearly depicted intrahepatic lesions but less distinctly depicted lesions surrounded by fat. Short inversion recovery (STIR) images better demonstrated tumor relative to fat. CT was better than all MR imaging sequences in one of 16 cases, whereas at least one MR imaging sequence was better than CT in six of 16. In nine cases, CT was equivalent to the best MR imaging sequence. In five of six cases where MR imaging was better than CT, STIR sequences were most favorable. In conclusion, MR imaging provided a valuable technique for assessing abnormalities of the porta hepatis/hepatoduodenal ligament

  5. The role of key image notes in CT imaging study interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Shu-Feng; Xu, Zhe; He, Hai-Qing; Ding, Jian-Rong; Teng, Gao-Jun

    2011-04-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate the clinical effects of CT key image notes (KIN) in the interpretation of a CT image study. All experiments were approved by the ethics committee of the local district. Six experienced radiologists were equally divided into routine reporting (RR) group and KIN reporting (KIN) group. CT scans of each 100 consecutive cases before and after using KIN technique were randomly selected, and the reports were made by group RR and KIN, respectively. All the reports were again reviewed 3 months later by both groups. All the results with using or not using KIN were interpreted and reinterpreted after 3 months by six clinicians, who were experienced in picture archiving and communication system (PACS) applications and were equally divided into the clinical routine report group and the clinical KIN report group, respectively. The results were statistically analyzed; the time used in making a report, the re-reading time 3 months later, and the consistency of imaging interpretation were determined and compared between groups. After using KIN technique, the time used in making a report was significantly increased (8.77 ± 5.27 vs. 10.53 ± 5.71 min, P < 0.05), the re-reading time was decreased (5.23 ± 2.54 vs. 4.99 ± 1.70 min, P < 0.05), the clinical interpretation and reinterpretation time after 3 months were decreased, and the consistency of the interpretation, reinterpretation between different doctors in different time was markedly improved (P < 0.01). CT report with KIN technique in PACS can significantly improve the consistency of the interpretation and efficiency in routine clinical work.

  6. Comparison of adaptive statistical iterative and filtered back projection reconstruction techniques in brain CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren, Qingguo; Dewan, Sheilesh Kumar; Li, Ming; Li, Jianying; Mao, Dingbiao; Wang, Zhenglei; Hua, Yanqing

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To compare image quality and visualization of normal structures and lesions in brain computed tomography (CT) with adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) and filtered back projection (FBP) reconstruction techniques in different X-ray tube current–time products. Materials and methods: In this IRB-approved prospective study, forty patients (nineteen men, twenty-one women; mean age 69.5 ± 11.2 years) received brain scan at different tube current–time products (300 and 200 mAs) in 64-section multi-detector CT (GE, Discovery CT750 HD). Images were reconstructed with FBP and four levels of ASIR-FBP blending. Two radiologists (please note that our hospital is renowned for its geriatric medicine department, and these two radiologists are more experienced in chronic cerebral vascular disease than in neoplastic disease, so this research did not contain cerebral tumors but as a discussion) assessed all the reconstructed images for visibility of normal structures, lesion conspicuity, image contrast and diagnostic confidence in a blinded and randomized manner. Volume CT dose index (CTDI vol ) and dose-length product (DLP) were recorded. All the data were analyzed by using SPSS 13.0 statistical analysis software. Results: There was no statistically significant difference between the image qualities at 200 mAs with 50% ASIR blending technique and 300 mAs with FBP technique (p > .05). While between the image qualities at 200 mAs with FBP and 300 mAs with FBP technique a statistically significant difference (p < .05) was found. Conclusion: ASIR provided same image quality and diagnostic ability in brain imaging with greater than 30% dose reduction compared with FBP reconstruction technique

  7. Comparison of adaptive statistical iterative and filtered back projection reconstruction techniques in brain CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Qingguo, E-mail: renqg83@163.com [Department of Radiology, Hua Dong Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai 200040 (China); Dewan, Sheilesh Kumar, E-mail: sheilesh_d1@hotmail.com [Department of Geriatrics, Hua Dong Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai 200040 (China); Li, Ming, E-mail: minli77@163.com [Department of Radiology, Hua Dong Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai 200040 (China); Li, Jianying, E-mail: Jianying.Li@med.ge.com [CT Imaging Research Center, GE Healthcare China, Beijing (China); Mao, Dingbiao, E-mail: maodingbiao74@163.com [Department of Radiology, Hua Dong Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai 200040 (China); Wang, Zhenglei, E-mail: Williswang_doc@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Radiology, Shanghai Electricity Hospital, Shanghai 200050 (China); Hua, Yanqing, E-mail: cjr.huayanqing@vip.163.com [Department of Radiology, Hua Dong Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai 200040 (China)

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: To compare image quality and visualization of normal structures and lesions in brain computed tomography (CT) with adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) and filtered back projection (FBP) reconstruction techniques in different X-ray tube current–time products. Materials and methods: In this IRB-approved prospective study, forty patients (nineteen men, twenty-one women; mean age 69.5 ± 11.2 years) received brain scan at different tube current–time products (300 and 200 mAs) in 64-section multi-detector CT (GE, Discovery CT750 HD). Images were reconstructed with FBP and four levels of ASIR-FBP blending. Two radiologists (please note that our hospital is renowned for its geriatric medicine department, and these two radiologists are more experienced in chronic cerebral vascular disease than in neoplastic disease, so this research did not contain cerebral tumors but as a discussion) assessed all the reconstructed images for visibility of normal structures, lesion conspicuity, image contrast and diagnostic confidence in a blinded and randomized manner. Volume CT dose index (CTDI{sub vol}) and dose-length product (DLP) were recorded. All the data were analyzed by using SPSS 13.0 statistical analysis software. Results: There was no statistically significant difference between the image qualities at 200 mAs with 50% ASIR blending technique and 300 mAs with FBP technique (p > .05). While between the image qualities at 200 mAs with FBP and 300 mAs with FBP technique a statistically significant difference (p < .05) was found. Conclusion: ASIR provided same image quality and diagnostic ability in brain imaging with greater than 30% dose reduction compared with FBP reconstruction technique.

  8. New frontiers in CT imaging of airway disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grenier, Philippe A.; Beigelman-Aubry, Catherine; Fetita, Catalin; Preteux, Francoise; Brauner, Michel W.; Lenoir, Stephane

    2002-01-01

    Combining helical volumetric CT acquisition and thin-slice thickness during breath hold provides an accurate assessment of both focal and diffuse airway diseases. With multiple detector rows, compared with single-slice helical CT, multislice CT can cover a greater volume, during a simple breath hold, and with better longitudinal and in-plane spatial resolution and improved temporal resolution. The result in data set allows the generation of superior multiplanar and 3D images of the airways, including those obtained from techniques developed specifically for airway imaging, such as virtual bronchography and virtual bronchoscopy. Complementary CT evaluation at suspended or continuous full expiration is mandatory to detect air trapping that is a key finding for depicting an obstruction on the small airways. Indications for CT evaluation of the airways include: (a) detection of endobronchial lesions in patients with an unexplained hemoptysis; (b) evaluation of extent of tracheobronchial stenosis for planning treatment and follow-up; (c) detection of congenital airway anomalies revealed by hemoptysis or recurrent infection; (d) detection of postinfectious or postoperative airway fistula or dehiscence; and (e) diagnosis and assessment of extent of bronchiectasis and small airway disease. Improvement in image analysis technique and the use of spirometrically control of lung volume acquisition have made possible accurate and reproducible quantitative assessment of airway wall and lumen areas and lung density. This contributes to better insights in physiopathology of obstructive lung disease, particularly in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma. (orig.)

  9. Ultrasound and PET-CT image fusion for prostate brachytherapy image guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasford, F.

    2015-01-01

    Fusion of medical images between different cross-sectional modalities is widely used, mostly where functional images are fused with anatomical data. Ultrasound has for some time now been the standard imaging technique used for treatment planning of prostate cancer cases. While this approach is laudable and has yielded some positive results, latest developments have been the integration of images from ultrasound and other modalities such as PET-CT to compliment missing properties of ultrasound images. This study has sought to enhance diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancers by developing MATLAB algorithms to fuse ultrasound and PET-CT images. The fused ultrasound-PET-CT image has shown to contain improved quality of information than the individual input images. The fused image has the property of reduced uncertainty, increased reliability, robust system performance, and compact representation of information. The objective of co-registering the ultrasound and PET-CT images was achieved by conducting performance evaluation of the ultrasound and PET-CT imaging systems, developing image contrast enhancement algorithm, developing MATLAB image fusion algorithm, and assessing accuracy of the fusion algorithm. Performance evaluation of the ultrasound brachytherapy system produced satisfactory results in accordance with set tolerances as recommended by AAPM TG 128. Using an ultrasound brachytherapy quality assurance phantom, average axial distance measurement of 10.11 ± 0.11 mm was estimated. Average lateral distance measurements of 10.08 ± 0.07 mm, 20.01 ± 0.06 mm, 29.89 ± 0.03 mm and 39.84 ± 0.37 mm were estimated for the inter-target distances corresponding to 10 mm, 20 mm, 30 mm and 40 mm respectively. Volume accuracy assessment produced measurements of 3.97 cm 3 , 8.86 cm 3 and 20.11 cm 3 for known standard volumes of 4 cm 3 , 9 cm 3 and 20 cm 3 respectively. Depth of penetration assessment of the ultrasound system produced an estimate of 5.37 ± 0.02 cm

  10. TU-G-207-01: CT Imaging Using Energy-Sensitive Photon-Counting Detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taguchi, K.

    2015-01-01

    Last few years has witnessed the development of novel of X-ray imaging modalities, such as spectral CT, phase contrast CT, and X-ray acoustic/fluorescence/luminescence imaging. This symposium will present the recent advances of these emerging X-ray imaging modalities and update the attendees with knowledge in various related topics, including X-ray photon-counting detectors, X-ray physics underlying the emerging applications beyond the traditional X-ray imaging, image reconstruction for the novel modalities, characterization and evaluation of the systems, and their practical implications. In addition, the concept and practical aspects of X-ray activatable targeted nanoparticles for molecular X-ray imaging will be discussed in the context of X-ray fluorescence and luminescence CT. Learning Objectives: Present background knowledge of various emerging X-ray imaging techniques, such as spectral CT, phase contrast CT and X-ray fluorescence/luminescence CT. Discuss the practical need, technical aspects and current status of the emerging X-ray imaging modalities. Describe utility and future impact of the new generation of X-ray imaging applications

  11. Volumetric image processing: A new technique for three-dimensional imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fishman, E.K.; Drebin, B.; Magid, D.; St Ville, J.A.; Zerhouni, E.A.; Siegelman, S.S.; Ney, D.R.

    1986-01-01

    Volumetric three-dimensional (3D) image processing was performed on CT scans of 25 normal hips, and image quality and potential diagnostic applications were assessed. In contrast to surface detection 3D techniques, volumetric processing preserves every pixel of transaxial CT data, replacing the gray scale with transparent ''gels'' and shading. Anatomically, accurate 3D images can be rotated and manipulated in real time, including simulated tissue layer ''peeling'' and mock surgery or disarticulation. This pilot study suggests that volumetric rendering is a major advance in signal processing of medical image data, producing a high quality, uniquely maneuverable image that is useful for fracture interpretation, soft-tissue analysis, surgical planning, and surgical rehearsal

  12. Study of capillary absorption kinetics by X-ray CT imaging techniques: a survey on sedimentary rocks of Sicily

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiziano Schillaci

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Sedimentary rocks are natural porous materials with a great percent of microscopic interconnected pores: they contain fluids, permitting their movement on macroscopic scale. Generally, these rocks present porosity higher then metamorphic rocks. Under certain points of view, this feature represents an advantage; on the other hand, this can constitute an obstacle for cultural heritage applications, because the porosity grade can lead to a deterioration of the lapideous monument for water capillary absorption. In this paper, CT (Computerized Tomography image techniques are applied to capillary absorption kinetics in sedimentary rocks utilized for the Greek temples as well as baroc monuments, respectively located in western and southeastern Sicily. Rocks were sampled near the archaeological areas of Agrigento, Segesta, Selinunte and Val di Noto. CT images were acquired at different times, before and after the water contact, using image elaboration techniques during the acquisition as well as the post-processing phases. Water distribution into porous spaces has been evaluated on the basis of the Hounsfield number, estimated for the 3-D voxel structure of samples. For most of the considered samples, assumptions based on Handy model permit to correlate the average height of the wetting front to the square root of time. Stochastic equations were introduced in order to describe the percolative water behavior in heterogeneous samples, as the Agrigento one. Before the CT acquisition, an estimate of the capillary absorption kinetics has been carried out by the gravimetric method. A petrographical characterization of samples has been performed by stereomicroscope observations, while porosity and morphology of porous have been surveyed by SEM (Scanning Electron Microscope images. Furthermore, the proposed methods have also permitted to define penetration depth as well as distribution uniformity of materials used for restoration and conservation of historical

  13. Volumetric CT-images improve testing of radiological image interpretation skills

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ravesloot, Cécile J., E-mail: C.J.Ravesloot@umcutrecht.nl [Radiology Department at University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3508 GA Utrecht, Room E01.132 (Netherlands); Schaaf, Marieke F. van der, E-mail: M.F.vanderSchaaf@uu.nl [Department of Pedagogical and Educational Sciences at Utrecht University, Heidelberglaan 1, 3584 CS Utrecht (Netherlands); Schaik, Jan P.J. van, E-mail: J.P.J.vanSchaik@umcutrecht.nl [Radiology Department at University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3508 GA Utrecht, Room E01.132 (Netherlands); Cate, Olle Th.J. ten, E-mail: T.J.tenCate@umcutrecht.nl [Center for Research and Development of Education at University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3508 GA Utrecht (Netherlands); Gijp, Anouk van der, E-mail: A.vanderGijp-2@umcutrecht.nl [Radiology Department at University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3508 GA Utrecht, Room E01.132 (Netherlands); Mol, Christian P., E-mail: C.Mol@umcutrecht.nl [Image Sciences Institute at University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3508 GA Utrecht (Netherlands); Vincken, Koen L., E-mail: K.Vincken@umcutrecht.nl [Image Sciences Institute at University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3508 GA Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2015-05-15

    Rationale and objectives: Current radiology practice increasingly involves interpretation of volumetric data sets. In contrast, most radiology tests still contain only 2D images. We introduced a new testing tool that allows for stack viewing of volumetric images in our undergraduate radiology program. We hypothesized that tests with volumetric CT-images enhance test quality, in comparison with traditional completely 2D image-based tests, because they might better reflect required skills for clinical practice. Materials and methods: Two groups of medical students (n = 139; n = 143), trained with 2D and volumetric CT-images, took a digital radiology test in two versions (A and B), each containing both 2D and volumetric CT-image questions. In a questionnaire, they were asked to comment on the representativeness for clinical practice, difficulty and user-friendliness of the test questions and testing program. Students’ test scores and reliabilities, measured with Cronbach's alpha, of 2D and volumetric CT-image tests were compared. Results: Estimated reliabilities (Cronbach's alphas) were higher for volumetric CT-image scores (version A: .51 and version B: .54), than for 2D CT-image scores (version A: .24 and version B: .37). Participants found volumetric CT-image tests more representative of clinical practice, and considered them to be less difficult than volumetric CT-image questions. However, in one version (A), volumetric CT-image scores (M 80.9, SD 14.8) were significantly lower than 2D CT-image scores (M 88.4, SD 10.4) (p < .001). The volumetric CT-image testing program was considered user-friendly. Conclusion: This study shows that volumetric image questions can be successfully integrated in students’ radiology testing. Results suggests that the inclusion of volumetric CT-images might improve the quality of radiology tests by positively impacting perceived representativeness for clinical practice and increasing reliability of the test.

  14. Three-dimensional-CT imaging of colorectal disease with thin collimation helical CT scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogura, Toshihiro; Koizumi, Koichi; Sakai, Tatsuya; Kai, Shunkichi; Takatsu, Kazuaki; Maruyama, Masakazu

    1998-01-01

    We have conducted research on three-dimensional (3D)-CT-colonoscopy with thin collimation helical CT scanning over the past three years. This has lately become a subject of special interest. 3D-CT-colonoscopy has three kinds of visualizing methods depending on the threshold setting of CT values. The first one is the virtual endoscopy method which is displayed in a similar fashion to colonoscopic images. The second one is the air image method using the air in the digestive tract as a contrast medium. The third one is the pseudo-tract method which has characteristics of both virtual endoscopy and the air image method and visualizes in a shape of the digestive tract. The image visualized by 3D-CT-colonoscopy is similar to that of conventional colonoscopy and barium enema study, which is obtained with minimal invasion to patients. Obvious advanced carcinomas were easily visualized, and even a small flat polyp measuring 5 mm in size, was able to be observed retrospectively. The characteristics of our method are that we can easily make an examination in a short time and with little dependence on expert technique. Also patients have little discomfort compared to that experienced during colonoscopy and barium enema study. Important features are as follows; long calculation time, insufficient air insufflation, fecal material in the patient''s bowel, whole abdominal scan, and spatial resolution. In the near future, a multislice CT scanner system will have ability to overcome these problems. Therefore, 3D-CT-colonoscopy might be applied in the future for first line examination as a mass screening for colorectal carcinoma. (author)

  15. The interpolation method based on endpoint coordinate for CT three-dimensional image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suto, Yasuzo; Ueno, Shigeru.

    1997-01-01

    Image interpolation is frequently used to improve slice resolution to reach spatial resolution. Improved quality of reconstructed three-dimensional images can be attained with this technique as a result. Linear interpolation is a well-known and widely used method. The distance-image method, which is a non-linear interpolation technique, is also used to convert CT value images to distance images. This paper describes a newly developed method that makes use of end-point coordinates: CT-value images are initially converted to binary images by thresholding them and then sequences of pixels with 1-value are arranged in vertical or horizontal directions. A sequence of pixels with 1-value is defined as a line segment which has starting and end points. For each pair of adjacent line segments, another line segment was composed by spatial interpolation of the start and end points. Binary slice images are constructed from the composed line segments. Three-dimensional images were reconstructed from clinical X-ray CT images, using three different interpolation methods and their quality and processing speed were evaluated and compared. (author)

  16. Multidetector row CT for imaging the paediatric tracheobronchial tree

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papaioannou, Georgia; Young, Carolyn; Owens, Catherine M.

    2007-01-01

    The introduction of multidetector row computed tomography (MDCT) scanners has altered the approach to imaging the paediatric thorax. In an environment where the rapid acquisition of CT data allows general hospitals to image children instead of referring them to specialist paediatric centres, it is vital that general radiologists have access to protocols appropriate for paediatric applications. Thus a dramatic reduction in the delivered radiation dose is ensured with optimal contrast bolus delivery and timing, and inappropriate repetition of the scans is avoided. This article focuses on the main principles of volumetric CT imaging that apply generically to all MDCT scanners. We describe the reconstruction techniques for imaging the paediatric thorax and the low-dose protocols used in our institution on a 16-slice detector CT scanner. Examples of the commonest clinical applications are also given. (orig.)

  17. Inclusion of brain in FDG PET/CT scanning techniques in cancer patients: Does it obviate the need for dedicated brain imaging?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purandare, Nilendu C.

    2011-01-01

    Metastases to the brain can affect about 10-20% cancer patients. Rising incidence of brain metastases in recent years is related to improved survival rates as a result of advances in cancer therapy and development of more sensitive diagnostic imaging techniques. In patients with extracranial malignancies detection of brain metastases is very important in deciding further diagnostic procedures, planning therapeutic strategies and also to ascertain prognosis. Computerized tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are the modalities which have been traditionally used to assess metastatic disease to the central nervous system. It is generally accepted that MRI (contrast enhanced) is superior to CT scan (contrast enhanced) in the diagnosis of brain metastases. An inherently better soft tissue contrast resolution, stronger contrast enhancement, lack of bone artifacts and partial volume effects and direct multiplanar imaging enables MRI to pick up smaller sized as well as more number of metastases than a CT scan

  18. Dental CT: examination technique, radiation load and anatomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenglinger, F.X.; Muhr, T.

    1999-01-01

    Traditionally oral surgeons and dentists have evaluated the jaws using intraoral films and panoramic radiographs. The involvement of radiologists has been limited. In the past few years dedicated CT-software-programs developed to evaluate dental implant patients have provided a new look at the jaws. The complex anatomy is described and identified on human skulls and on axial, panoramic, and cross-sectional images. With this anatomic description Dental-CT-scans are used to demonstrate the anatomy of maxilla and the mandible. An overview of the technique of Dental-CT is provided, furthermore the radiation dose of different organs is explained. Suggestions to reduce these doses by simple modifications of the recommended protocols are given. (orig.) [de

  19. Automated planning of breast radiotherapy using cone beam CT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amit, Guy; Purdie, Thomas G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Develop and clinically validate a methodology for using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging in an automated treatment planning framework for breast IMRT. Methods: A technique for intensity correction of CBCT images was developed and evaluated. The technique is based on histogram matching of CBCT image sets, using information from “similar” planning CT image sets from a database of paired CBCT and CT image sets (n = 38). Automated treatment plans were generated for a testing subset (n = 15) on the planning CT and the corrected CBCT. The plans generated on the corrected CBCT were compared to the CT-based plans in terms of beam parameters, dosimetric indices, and dose distributions. Results: The corrected CBCT images showed considerable similarity to their corresponding planning CTs (average mutual information 1.0±0.1, average sum of absolute differences 185 ± 38). The automated CBCT-based plans were clinically acceptable, as well as equivalent to the CT-based plans with average gantry angle difference of 0.99°±1.1°, target volume overlap index (Dice) of 0.89±0.04 although with slightly higher maximum target doses (4482±90 vs 4560±84, P < 0.05). Gamma index analysis (3%, 3 mm) showed that the CBCT-based plans had the same dose distribution as plans calculated with the same beams on the registered planning CTs (average gamma index 0.12±0.04, gamma <1 in 99.4%±0.3%). Conclusions: The proposed method demonstrates the potential for a clinically feasible and efficient online adaptive breast IMRT planning method based on CBCT imaging, integrating automation

  20. An evaluation on CT image acquisition method for medical VR applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Seong-wook; Ko, Junho; Yoo, Yon-sik; Kim, Yoonsang

    2017-02-01

    Recent medical virtual reality (VR) applications to minimize re-operations are being studied for improvements in surgical efficiency and reduction of operation error. The CT image acquisition method considering three-dimensional (3D) modeling for medical VR applications is important, because the realistic model is required for the actual human organ. However, the research for medical VR applications has focused on 3D modeling techniques and utilized 3D models. In addition, research on a CT image acquisition method considering 3D modeling has never been reported. The conventional CT image acquisition method involves scanning a limited area of the lesion for the diagnosis of doctors once or twice. However, the medical VR application is required to acquire the CT image considering patients' various postures and a wider area than the lesion. A wider area than the lesion is required because of the necessary process of comparing bilateral sides for dyskinesia diagnosis of the shoulder, pelvis, and leg. Moreover, patients' various postures are required due to the different effects on the musculoskeletal system. Therefore, in this paper, we perform a comparative experiment on the acquired CT images considering image area (unilateral/bilateral) and patients' postures (neutral/abducted). CT images are acquired from 10 patients for the experiments, and the acquired CT images are evaluated based on the length per pixel and the morphological deviation. Finally, by comparing the experiment results, we evaluate the CT image acquisition method for medical VR applications.

  1. Fully Convolutional Architecture for Low-Dose CT Image Noise Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badretale, S.; Shaker, F.; Babyn, P.; Alirezaie, J.

    2017-10-01

    One of the critical topics in medical low-dose Computed Tomography (CT) imaging is how best to maintain image quality. As the quality of images decreases with lowering the X-ray radiation dose, improving image quality is extremely important and challenging. We have proposed a novel approach to denoise low-dose CT images. Our algorithm learns directly from an end-to-end mapping from the low-dose Computed Tomography images for denoising the normal-dose CT images. Our method is based on a deep convolutional neural network with rectified linear units. By learning various low-level to high-level features from a low-dose image the proposed algorithm is capable of creating a high-quality denoised image. We demonstrate the superiority of our technique by comparing the results with two other state-of-the-art methods in terms of the peak signal to noise ratio, root mean square error, and a structural similarity index.

  2. Combined X-ray CT and mass spectrometry for biomedical imaging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schioppa, E., Jr.; Ellis, S.; Bruinen, A. L.; Visser, J.; Heeren, R. M. A.; Uher, J.; Koffeman, E.

    2014-04-01

    Imaging technologies play a key role in many branches of science, especially in biology and medicine. They provide an invaluable insight into both internal structure and processes within a broad range of samples. There are many techniques that allow one to obtain images of an object. Different techniques are based on the analysis of a particular sample property by means of a dedicated imaging system, and as such, each imaging modality provides the researcher with different information. The use of multimodal imaging (imaging with several different techniques) can provide additional and complementary information that is not possible when employing a single imaging technique alone. In this study, we present for the first time a multi-modal imaging technique where X-ray computerized tomography (CT) is combined with mass spectrometry imaging (MSI). While X-ray CT provides 3-dimensional information regarding the internal structure of the sample based on X-ray absorption coefficients, MSI of thin sections acquired from the same sample allows the spatial distribution of many elements/molecules, each distinguished by its unique mass-to-charge ratio (m/z), to be determined within a single measurement and with a spatial resolution as low as 1 μm or even less. The aim of the work is to demonstrate how molecular information from MSI can be spatially correlated with 3D structural information acquired from X-ray CT. In these experiments, frozen samples are imaged in an X-ray CT setup using Medipix based detectors equipped with a CO2 cooled sample holder. Single projections are pre-processed before tomographic reconstruction using a signal-to-thickness calibration. In the second step, the object is sliced into thin sections (circa 20 μm) that are then imaged using both matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) and secondary ion (SIMS) mass spectrometry, where the spatial distribution of specific molecules within the sample is determined. The

  3. Technical Note: Improved CT number stability across patient size using dual-energy CT virtual monoenergetic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michalak, Gregory; Grimes, Joshua; Fletcher, Joel; Yu, Lifeng; Leng, Shuai; McCollough, Cynthia; Halaweish, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate, over a wide range of phantom sizes, CT number stability achieved using two techniques for generating dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) virtual monoenergetic images. Methods: Water phantoms ranging in lateral diameter from 15 to 50 cm and containing a CT number test object were scanned on a DSCT scanner using both single-energy (SE) and dual-energy (DE) techniques. The SE tube potentials were 70, 80, 90, 100, 110, 120, 130, 140, and 150 kV; the DE tube potential pairs were 80/140, 70/150Sn, 80/150Sn, 90/150Sn, and 100/150Sn kV (Sn denotes that the 150 kV beam was filtered with a 0.6 mm tin filter). Virtual monoenergetic images at energies ranging from 40 to 140 keV were produced from the DECT data using two algorithms, monoenergetic (mono) and monoenergetic plus (mono+). Particularly in large phantoms, water CT number errors and/or artifacts were observed; thus, datasets with water CT numbers outside ±10 HU or with noticeable artifacts were excluded from the study. CT numbers were measured to determine CT number stability across all phantom sizes. Results: Data exclusions were generally limited to cases when a SE or DE technique with a tube potential of less than 90 kV was used to scan a phantom larger than 30 cm. The 90/150Sn DE technique provided the most accurate water background over the large range of phantom sizes evaluated. Mono and mono+ provided equally improved CT number stability as a function of phantom size compared to SE; the average deviation in CT number was only 1.4% using 40 keV and 1.8% using 70 keV, while SE had an average deviation of 11.8%. Conclusions: The authors’ report demonstrates, across all phantom sizes, the improvement in CT number stability achieved with mono and mono+ relative to SE

  4. Technical Note: Improved CT number stability across patient size using dual-energy CT virtual monoenergetic imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michalak, Gregory; Grimes, Joshua; Fletcher, Joel; Yu, Lifeng; Leng, Shuai; McCollough, Cynthia, E-mail: mccollough.cynthia@mayo.edu [Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States); Halaweish, Ahmed [Siemens Medical Solutions, Malvern, Pennsylvania 19355 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate, over a wide range of phantom sizes, CT number stability achieved using two techniques for generating dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) virtual monoenergetic images. Methods: Water phantoms ranging in lateral diameter from 15 to 50 cm and containing a CT number test object were scanned on a DSCT scanner using both single-energy (SE) and dual-energy (DE) techniques. The SE tube potentials were 70, 80, 90, 100, 110, 120, 130, 140, and 150 kV; the DE tube potential pairs were 80/140, 70/150Sn, 80/150Sn, 90/150Sn, and 100/150Sn kV (Sn denotes that the 150 kV beam was filtered with a 0.6 mm tin filter). Virtual monoenergetic images at energies ranging from 40 to 140 keV were produced from the DECT data using two algorithms, monoenergetic (mono) and monoenergetic plus (mono+). Particularly in large phantoms, water CT number errors and/or artifacts were observed; thus, datasets with water CT numbers outside ±10 HU or with noticeable artifacts were excluded from the study. CT numbers were measured to determine CT number stability across all phantom sizes. Results: Data exclusions were generally limited to cases when a SE or DE technique with a tube potential of less than 90 kV was used to scan a phantom larger than 30 cm. The 90/150Sn DE technique provided the most accurate water background over the large range of phantom sizes evaluated. Mono and mono+ provided equally improved CT number stability as a function of phantom size compared to SE; the average deviation in CT number was only 1.4% using 40 keV and 1.8% using 70 keV, while SE had an average deviation of 11.8%. Conclusions: The authors’ report demonstrates, across all phantom sizes, the improvement in CT number stability achieved with mono and mono+ relative to SE.

  5. Multi-material decomposition of spectral CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendonça, Paulo R. S.; Bhotika, Rahul; Maddah, Mahnaz; Thomsen, Brian; Dutta, Sandeep; Licato, Paul E.; Joshi, Mukta C.

    2010-04-01

    Spectral Computed Tomography (Spectral CT), and in particular fast kVp switching dual-energy computed tomography, is an imaging modality that extends the capabilities of conventional computed tomography (CT). Spectral CT enables the estimation of the full linear attenuation curve of the imaged subject at each voxel in the CT volume, instead of a scalar image in Hounsfield units. Because the space of linear attenuation curves in the energy ranges of medical applications can be accurately described through a two-dimensional manifold, this decomposition procedure would be, in principle, limited to two materials. This paper describes an algorithm that overcomes this limitation, allowing for the estimation of N-tuples of material-decomposed images. The algorithm works by assuming that the mixing of substances and tissue types in the human body has the physicochemical properties of an ideal solution, which yields a model for the density of the imaged material mix. Under this model the mass attenuation curve of each voxel in the image can be estimated, immediately resulting in a material-decomposed image triplet. Decomposition into an arbitrary number of pre-selected materials can be achieved by automatically selecting adequate triplets from an application-specific material library. The decomposition is expressed in terms of the volume fractions of each constituent material in the mix; this provides for a straightforward, physically meaningful interpretation of the data. One important application of this technique is in the digital removal of contrast agent from a dual-energy exam, producing a virtual nonenhanced image, as well as in the quantification of the concentration of contrast observed in a targeted region, thus providing an accurate measure of tissue perfusion.

  6. [Positioning errors of CT common rail technique in intensity-modulated radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Fei; Xu, Zihai; Mo, Li; Zhu, Chaohua; Chen, Chaomin

    2012-11-01

    To evaluate the value of CT common rail technique for application in intensity-modulated radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Twenty-seven NPC patients underwent Somatom CT scans using the Siemens CTVision system prior to the commencement of the radiotherapy sessions. The acquired CT images were registered with the planning CT images using the matching function of the system to obtain the linear set-up errors of 3 directions, namely X (left to right), Y (superior to inferior), and Z (anterior to posterior). The errors were then corrected online on the moving couch. The 27 NPC patients underwent a total of 110 CT scans and the displacement deviations of the X, Y and Z directions were -0.16∓1.68 mm, 0.25∓1.66 mm, and 0.33∓1.09 mm, respectively. CT common rail technique can accurately and rapidly measure the space error between the posture and the target area to improve the set-up precision of intensity-modulated radiotherapy for NPC.

  7. Psoriatic arthritis: imaging techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Lubrano

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Imaging techniques to assess psoriatic arthritis (PsA include radiography, ultrasonography (US, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, computed tomography (CT and bone scintigraphy. The radiographic hallmark of PsA is the combination of destructive changes (joint erosions, tuft resorption, osteolysis with bone proliferation (including periarticular and shaft periostitis, ankylosis, spur formation and non-marginal syndesmophytes. US has an increasing important role in the evaluation of PsA. In fact, power Doppler US is useful mainly for its ability to assess musculoskeletal (joints, tendons, entheses and cutaneous (skin and nails involvement, to monitor efficacy of therapy and to guide steroid injections at the level of inflamed joints, tendon sheaths and entheses. MRI allows direct visualization of inflammation in peripheral and axial joints, and peripheral and axial entheses, and has dramatically improved the possibilities for early diagnosis and objective monitoring of the disease process in PsA. MRI has allowed explaining the relationships among enthesitis, synovitis and osteitis in PsA, supporting a SpA pattern of inflammation where enthesitis is the primary target of inflammation. CT has little role in assessment of peripheral joints, but it may be useful in assessing elements of spine disease. CT accuracy is similar to MRI in assessment of erosions in sacroiliac joint involvement, but CT is not as effective in detecting synovial inflammation. Bone scintigraphy lacks specificity and is now supplanted with US and MRI techniques.

  8. Development of information preserving data compression algorithm for CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Yoshio

    1989-01-01

    Although digital imaging techniques in radiology develop rapidly, problems arise in archival storage and communication of image data. This paper reports on a new information preserving data compression algorithm for computed tomographic (CT) images. This algorithm consists of the following five processes: 1. Pixels surrounding the human body showing CT values smaller than -900 H.U. are eliminated. 2. Each pixel is encoded by its numerical difference from its neighboring pixel along a matrix line. 3. Difference values are encoded by a newly designed code rather than the natural binary code. 4. Image data, obtained with the above process, are decomposed into bit planes. 5. The bit state transitions in each bit plane are encoded by run length coding. Using this new algorithm, the compression ratios of brain, chest, and abdomen CT images are 4.49, 4.34. and 4.40 respectively. (author)

  9. Inter-plane artifact suppression in tomosynthesis using 3D CT image data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Jae G

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite its superb lateral resolution, flat-panel-detector (FPD based tomosynthesis suffers from low contrast and inter-plane artifacts caused by incomplete cancellation of the projection components stemming from outside the focal plane. The incomplete cancellation of the projection components, mostly due to the limited scan angle in the conventional tomosynthesis scan geometry, often makes the image contrast too low to differentiate the malignant tissues from the background tissues with confidence. Methods In this paper, we propose a new method to suppress the inter-plane artifacts in FPD-based tomosynthesis. If 3D whole volume CT images are available before the tomosynthesis scan, the CT image data can be incorporated into the tomosynthesis image reconstruction to suppress the inter-plane artifacts, hence, improving the image contrast. In the proposed technique, the projection components stemming from outside the region-of-interest (ROI are subtracted from the measured tomosynthesis projection data to suppress the inter-plane artifacts. The projection components stemming from outside the ROI are calculated from the 3D whole volume CT images which usually have lower lateral resolution than the tomosynthesis images. The tomosynthesis images are reconstructed from the subtracted projection data which account for the x-ray attenuation through the ROI. After verifying the proposed method by simulation, we have performed both CT scan and tomosynthesis scan on a phantom and a sacrificed rat using a FPD-based micro-CT. Results We have measured contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR from the tomosynthesis images which is an indicator of the residual inter-plane artifacts on the focal-plane image. In both cases of the simulation and experimental imaging studies of the contrast evaluating phantom, CNRs have been significantly improved by the proposed method. In the rat imaging also, we have observed better visual contrast from the tomosynthesis

  10. Inter-plane artifact suppression in tomosynthesis using 3D CT image data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Despite its superb lateral resolution, flat-panel-detector (FPD) based tomosynthesis suffers from low contrast and inter-plane artifacts caused by incomplete cancellation of the projection components stemming from outside the focal plane. The incomplete cancellation of the projection components, mostly due to the limited scan angle in the conventional tomosynthesis scan geometry, often makes the image contrast too low to differentiate the malignant tissues from the background tissues with confidence. Methods In this paper, we propose a new method to suppress the inter-plane artifacts in FPD-based tomosynthesis. If 3D whole volume CT images are available before the tomosynthesis scan, the CT image data can be incorporated into the tomosynthesis image reconstruction to suppress the inter-plane artifacts, hence, improving the image contrast. In the proposed technique, the projection components stemming from outside the region-of-interest (ROI) are subtracted from the measured tomosynthesis projection data to suppress the inter-plane artifacts. The projection components stemming from outside the ROI are calculated from the 3D whole volume CT images which usually have lower lateral resolution than the tomosynthesis images. The tomosynthesis images are reconstructed from the subtracted projection data which account for the x-ray attenuation through the ROI. After verifying the proposed method by simulation, we have performed both CT scan and tomosynthesis scan on a phantom and a sacrificed rat using a FPD-based micro-CT. Results We have measured contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) from the tomosynthesis images which is an indicator of the residual inter-plane artifacts on the focal-plane image. In both cases of the simulation and experimental imaging studies of the contrast evaluating phantom, CNRs have been significantly improved by the proposed method. In the rat imaging also, we have observed better visual contrast from the tomosynthesis images reconstructed by

  11. Impact of SPECT/CT in imaging inflammation and infection; Wertigkeit der SPECT/CT fuer die nuklearmedizinische Entzuendungsdiagnostik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linke, R. [Klinikum Bremen-Mitte, Bremen (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Kuwert, T. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany). Nuklearmedizinische Klinik mit Poliklinik

    2011-03-15

    Even today infection remains a significant concern, and the diagnosis and localization of infectious foci is an important health issue. As an established infection-imaging modality, nuclear medicine plays a vital health-care role in the diagnosis and subsequent effective treatment of this condition. Several techniques in nuclear medicine significantly aid infection diagnosis, including triple-phase bone scanning, {sup 18}F-FDG-PET and imaging with {sup 111}In-oxine-, {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO-labeled leukocytes. Each radiopharmaceutical has specific advantages and disadvantages that makes it suitable to diagnose different infectious processes (e.g., soft-tissue sepsis, inflammatory bowel disease, osteomyelitis, occult fever, fever of unknown origin, and infections commonly found in immuno-compromised patients). However, their clinical applications may be limited by the relatively low spatial resolution and the lack of anatomic landmarks of a highly specific tracer with only scarce background uptake to use as a framework for orientation. Anatomic imaging modalities such as CT provide a high-quality assessment of structural abnormalities related to infection, but these structural abnormalities may be unspecific. Furthermore, to detect infection before anatomical changes are present, functional imaging could have some advantages over anatomical imaging. Scintigraphic studies have demonstrated high sensitivity and specificity to an infectious process. Diagnosis and precise delineation of infection may be challenging in certain clinical scenarios, rendering decisions concerning further patient management difficult. The SPECT/CT-technology combines the acquisition of SPECT and CT data with the same imaging device enabling perfect overlay of anatomical and functional images. SPECT/CT imaging data has been shown to be beneficial for many clinical settings such as indeterminate findings in bone scintigraphy, orthopaedic disorders, endocrine, and neuroendocrine tumors. Therefore

  12. Infrared laser transillumination CT imaging system using parallel fiber arrays and optical switches for finger joint imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Yoshiaki; Emori, Ryota; Inage, Hiroki; Goto, Masaki; Takahashi, Ryo; Yuasa, Tetsuya; Taniguchi, Hiroshi; Devaraj, Balasigamani; Akatsuka, Takao

    2004-05-01

    The heterodyne detection technique, on which the coherent detection imaging (CDI) method founds, can discriminate and select very weak, highly directional forward scattered, and coherence retaining photons that emerge from scattering media in spite of their complex and highly scattering nature. That property enables us to reconstruct tomographic images using the same reconstruction technique as that of X-Ray CT, i.e., the filtered backprojection method. Our group had so far developed a transillumination laser CT imaging method based on the CDI method in the visible and near-infrared regions and reconstruction from projections, and reported a variety of tomographic images both in vitro and in vivo of biological objects to demonstrate the effectiveness to biomedical use. Since the previous system was not optimized, it took several hours to obtain a single image. For a practical use, we developed a prototype CDI-based imaging system using parallel fiber array and optical switches to reduce the measurement time significantly. Here, we describe a prototype transillumination laser CT imaging system using fiber-optic based on optical heterodyne detection for early diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), by demonstrating the tomographic imaging of acrylic phantom as well as the fundamental imaging properties. We expect that further refinements of the fiber-optic-based laser CT imaging system could lead to a novel and practical diagnostic tool for rheumatoid arthritis and other joint- and bone-related diseases in human finger.

  13. Comparison of iterative model, hybrid iterative, and filtered back projection reconstruction techniques in low-dose brain CT: impact of thin-slice imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakaura, Takeshi; Iyama, Yuji; Kidoh, Masafumi; Yokoyama, Koichi [Amakusa Medical Center, Diagnostic Radiology, Amakusa, Kumamoto (Japan); Kumamoto University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kumamoto (Japan); Oda, Seitaro; Yamashita, Yasuyuki [Kumamoto University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kumamoto (Japan); Tokuyasu, Shinichi [Philips Electronics, Kumamoto (Japan); Harada, Kazunori [Amakusa Medical Center, Department of Surgery, Kumamoto (Japan)

    2016-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the utility of iterative model reconstruction (IMR) in brain CT especially with thin-slice images. This prospective study received institutional review board approval, and prior informed consent to participate was obtained from all patients. We enrolled 34 patients who underwent brain CT and reconstructed axial images with filtered back projection (FBP), hybrid iterative reconstruction (HIR) and IMR with 1 and 5 mm slice thicknesses. The CT number, image noise, contrast, and contrast noise ratio (CNR) between the thalamus and internal capsule, and the rate of increase of image noise in 1 and 5 mm thickness images between the reconstruction methods, were assessed. Two independent radiologists assessed image contrast, image noise, image sharpness, and overall image quality on a 4-point scale. The CNRs in 1 and 5 mm slice thickness were significantly higher with IMR (1.2 ± 0.6 and 2.2 ± 0.8, respectively) than with FBP (0.4 ± 0.3 and 1.0 ± 0.4, respectively) and HIR (0.5 ± 0.3 and 1.2 ± 0.4, respectively) (p < 0.01). The mean rate of increasing noise from 5 to 1 mm thickness images was significantly lower with IMR (1.7 ± 0.3) than with FBP (2.3 ± 0.3) and HIR (2.3 ± 0.4) (p < 0.01). There were no significant differences in qualitative analysis of unfamiliar image texture between the reconstruction techniques. IMR offers significant noise reduction and higher contrast and CNR in brain CT, especially for thin-slice images, when compared to FBP and HIR. (orig.)

  14. Detection and compensation of organ/lesion motion using 4D-PET/CT respiratory gated acquisition techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bettinardi, Valentino; Picchio, Maria; Di Muzio, Nadia; Gianolli, Luigi; Gilardi, Maria Carla; Messa, Cristina

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the degradation effects produced by respiratory organ and lesion motion on PET/CT images and to define the role of respiratory gated (RG) 4D-PET/CT techniques to compensate for such effects. Methods: Based on the literature and on our own experience, technical recommendations and clinical indications for the use of RG 4D PET/CT have been outlined. Results: RG 4D-PET/CT techniques require a state of the art PET/CT scanner, a respiratory monitoring system and dedicated acquisition and processing protocols. Patient training is particularly important to obtain a regular breathing pattern. An adequate number of phases has to be selected to balance motion compensation and statistical noise. RG 4D PET/CT motion free images may be clinically useful for tumour tissue characterization, monitoring patient treatment and target definition in radiation therapy planning. Conclusions: RG 4D PET/CT is a valuable tool to improve image quality and quantitative accuracy and to assess and measure organ and lesion motion for radiotherapy planning.

  15. CT images of gossypiboma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Hae Jeong; Lim, Jong Nam; Choi, Young Chil; Park, Jeong Hee

    1994-01-01

    Surgical sponges retained after laparotomy can cause serious problem if they were not be identified in early state. In these circumstances abdominal CT yields the accurate diagnostic images. The purpose of this report is to present highly indicative findings permitting correct preoperative diagnosis of the gossypiboma. We experienced three cases in which CT showed the images sufficiently characteristic to suggest the correct preoperative diagnosis. We evaluated retrospectively the radiological images of gossypiboma confirmed by operation. Three patients were admitted due to palpable masses. Two female patients had medical histories of cesarean sections and a male patient had been operated due to malignant fibrous histiocytoma, previously. Abdominal CT scan of one case revealed huge ovoid hypodense mass with enhanced peripheral rim. Calcific spots and whirl-like stripes were noted within the lesion. Towel was found in pathologic specimen. CT images of two patients showed well-encapsulated, mixed fluid and soft tissue density mass with several gas bubbles. Surgical sponges were found within abscesses. The authors conclude that these characteristic CT findings and careful histories of surgery are very useful for correct pre-operative diagnosis and permit the guideline for the optimal plan of the surgical treatment

  16. CT images of gossypiboma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Hae Jeong; Lim, Jong Nam; Choi, Young Chil; Park, Jeong Hee [College of Medicine, Kon-Kuk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-04-15

    Surgical sponges retained after laparotomy can cause serious problem if they were not be identified in early state. In these circumstances abdominal CT yields the accurate diagnostic images. The purpose of this report is to present highly indicative findings permitting correct preoperative diagnosis of the gossypiboma. We experienced three cases in which CT showed the images sufficiently characteristic to suggest the correct preoperative diagnosis. We evaluated retrospectively the radiological images of gossypiboma confirmed by operation. Three patients were admitted due to palpable masses. Two female patients had medical histories of cesarean sections and a male patient had been operated due to malignant fibrous histiocytoma, previously. Abdominal CT scan of one case revealed huge ovoid hypodense mass with enhanced peripheral rim. Calcific spots and whirl-like stripes were noted within the lesion. Towel was found in pathologic specimen. CT images of two patients showed well-encapsulated, mixed fluid and soft tissue density mass with several gas bubbles. Surgical sponges were found within abscesses. The authors conclude that these characteristic CT findings and careful histories of surgery are very useful for correct pre-operative diagnosis and permit the guideline for the optimal plan of the surgical treatment.

  17. Evaluation of a new image compression technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Algra, P.R.; Kroon, H.M.; Noordveld, R.B.; DeValk, J.P.J.; Seeley, G.W.; Westerink, P.H.

    1988-01-01

    The authors present the evaluation of a new image compression technique, subband coding using vector quantization, on 44 CT examinations of the upper abdomen. Three independent radiologists reviewed the original images and compressed versions. The compression ratios used were 16:1 and 20:1. Receiver operating characteristic analysis showed no difference in the diagnostic contents between originals and their compressed versions. Subjective visibility of anatomic structures was equal. Except for a few 20:1 compressed images, the observers could not distinguish compressed versions from original images. They conclude that subband coding using vector quantization is a valuable method for data compression in CT scans of the abdomen

  18. Cardiodiagnostic imaging. MRT, CT, echocardiography and other methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erbel, R.; Kreitner, K.F.; Barkhausen, J.; Thelen, M.

    2007-01-01

    The book presents a differentiated approach to cardiac imaging. The focus is n cardio-MR/-CT and echocardiography. These are highly complex methods involving new equipment, new protocols and indications. The techniques are new and difficult to learn for everybody concerned. MR, CT and echocardiography must always be viewed in the context of other diagnostic methods. The interdisciplinary approach of the book addresses both radiologists and cardiologists and relies on the vast experience of the authors. The book offers more than 500 large high-quality reference images reflecting the latest state of the art. It has amethodological section in which the current methods are described (X-ray, echocardiography, nuclear medicine, angiography, CT, MRT etc.) along with their advantages and shortcomings, and a clinical section in which the main indications are described in the common standardized way (anatomy, clinical picture, interpretation, differential diagnosis). (orig.)

  19. Active contour modes Crisp: new technique for segmentation of the lungs in CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reboucas Filho, Pedro Pedrosa; Cortez, Paulo Cesar; Holanda, Marcelo Alcantara

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes a new active contour model (ACM), called ACM Crisp, and evaluates the segmentation of lungs in computed tomography (CT) images. An ACM draws a curve around or within the object of interest. This curve changes its shape, when some energy acts on it and moves towards the edges of the object. This process is performed by successive iterations of minimization of a given energy, associated with the curve. The ACMs described in the literature have limitations when used for segmentations of CT lung images. The ACM Crisp model overcomes these limitations, since it proposes automatic initiation and new external energy based on rules and radiological pulmonary densities. The paper compares other ACMs with the proposed method, which is shown to be superior. In order to validate the algorithm a medical expert in the field of Pulmonology of the Walter Cantidio University Hospital from the Federal University of Ceara carried out a qualitative analysis. In these analyses 100 CT lung images were used. The segmentation efficiency was evaluated into 5 categories with the following results for the ACM Crisp: 73% excellent, without errors, 20% acceptable, with small errors, and 7% reasonable, with large errors, 0% poor, covering only a small part of the lung, and 0% very bad, making a totally incorrect segmentation. In conclusion the ACM Crisp is considered a useful algorithm to segment CT lung images, and with potential to integrate medical diagnosis systems. (author)

  20. GPU-accelerated few-view CT reconstruction using the OSC and TV techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matenine, Dmitri [Montreal Univ., QC (Canada). Dept. de Physique; Hissoiny, Sami [Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, QC (Canada). Dept. de Genie Informatique et Genie Logiciel; Despres, Philippe [Centre Hospitalier Univ. de Quebec, QC (Canada). Dept. de Radio-Oncologie

    2011-07-01

    The present work proposes a promising iterative reconstruction technique designed specifically for X-ray transmission computed tomography (CT). The main objective is to reduce diagnostic radiation dose through the reduction of the number of CT projections, while preserving image quality. The second objective is to provide a fast implementation compatible with clinical activities. The proposed tomographic reconstruction technique is a combination of the Ordered Subsets Convex (OSC) algorithm and the Total Variation minimization (TV) regularization technique. The results in terms of image quality and computational speed are discussed. Using this technique, it was possible to obtain reconstructed slices of relatively good quality with as few as 100 projections, leading to potential dose reduction factors of up to an order of magnitude depending on the application. The algorithm was implemented on a Graphical Processing Unit (GPU) and yielded reconstruction times of approximately 185 ms per slice. (orig.)

  1. Reconstruction of MRI/CT compatible ring and tandem applicators in CT or MRI images used for treatment planning in brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surendran, N.; Kim, Hayeon; Beriwal, Sushil; Saiful Huq, M.

    2008-01-01

    Brachytherapy (BT) plays a crucial role in the management of invasive cervix cancer from stage I to IV. Intracavitary techniques are based on afterloading devices, with different types of applicators. CT and/or MRI compatible applicators allow a sectional image based approach with a better assessment of gross tumour volume (GTV) and definition and delineation of target volume (CTV) compared to traditional approaches. To evaluate reconstruction of MRI/CT compatible ring and tandem applicators in 3D CT or MRI images used for treatment planning in Brachytherapy

  2. SU-E-I-73: Clinical Evaluation of CT Image Reconstructed Using Interior Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, J; Ge, G; Winkler, M; Cong, W; Wang, G

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation dose reduction has been a long standing challenge in CT imaging of obese patients. Recent advances in interior tomography (reconstruction of an interior region of interest (ROI) from line integrals associated with only paths through the ROI) promise to achieve significant radiation dose reduction without compromising image quality. This study is to investigate the application of this technique in CT imaging through evaluating imaging quality reconstructed from patient data. Methods: Projection data were directly obtained from patients who had CT examinations in a Dual Source CT scanner (DSCT). Two detectors in a DSCT acquired projection data simultaneously. One detector provided projection data for full field of view (FOV, 50 cm) while another detectors provided truncated projection data for a FOV of 26 cm. Full FOV CT images were reconstructed using both filtered back projection and iterative algorithm; while interior tomography algorithm was implemented to reconstruct ROI images. For comparison reason, FBP was also used to reconstruct ROI images. Reconstructed CT images were evaluated by radiologists and compared with images from CT scanner. Results: The results show that the reconstructed ROI image was in excellent agreement with the truth inside the ROI, obtained from images from CT scanner, and the detailed features in the ROI were quantitatively accurate. Radiologists evaluation shows that CT images reconstructed with interior tomography met diagnosis requirements. Radiation dose may be reduced up to 50% using interior tomography, depending on patient size. Conclusion: This study shows that interior tomography can be readily employed in CT imaging for radiation dose reduction. It may be especially useful in imaging obese patients, whose subcutaneous tissue is less clinically relevant but may significantly increase radiation dose

  3. CT coronary angiography: examination technique, clinical results, and outlook on future developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dewey, M.; Hamm, B.

    2007-01-01

    Multislice computed tomography (MSCT) after intravenous contrast agent administration enables visualization of the coronary arteries with high spatial resolution (voxel sizes down to 0.5 x 0.35 x 0.35 mm3) and a short scan time. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is also intensively studied with respect to the noninvasive detection of coronary artery stenosis and thus the detection of coronary artery disease (CAD) without radiation exposure but is not equal to MSCT at present. This article provides an overview of the historical development of CT coronary angiography from 4-slice CT to 16-slice CT and 64-slice CT. A crucial aspect of this development is the improvement in image quality resulting from shorter breath-hold periods and the reduced gantry rotation time. Other techniques that appear to considerably improve image quality and accuracy and make CT independent of patient heart rates are multisegment reconstruction and dual-source CT. Sublingual nitroglycerin as well as oral or intravenous betablocker administration should be considered in relation to the diagnostic question to be answered and the patient's heart rate. In the studies available CT coronary angiography with at least 12 simultaneous detector rows has a sensitivity of 96.9 % and a specificity of 75.3 % at the patient level. Especially the negative predictive value of CT (94.6 %) emphasizes the idea that this technique may reliably exclude CAD in patients with intermediate pretest likelihood. In the near future, 256-slice CT will allow examination of the entire heart during one heartbeat or even 4D CT scanning with simultaneous assessment of myocardial perfusion. Automatic or semiautomatic software tools will assume a central place in detecting and quantifying coronary artery stenoses and plaques as well as in the analysis of cardiac function in the clinical setting over the next years. Prior to its routine clinical use, the cost-effectiveness of CT coronary angiography must be determined and the

  4. NUFFT-Based Iterative Image Reconstruction via Alternating Direction Total Variation Minimization for Sparse-View CT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Yan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sparse-view imaging is a promising scanning method which can reduce the radiation dose in X-ray computed tomography (CT. Reconstruction algorithm for sparse-view imaging system is of significant importance. The adoption of the spatial iterative algorithm for CT image reconstruction has a low operation efficiency and high computation requirement. A novel Fourier-based iterative reconstruction technique that utilizes nonuniform fast Fourier transform is presented in this study along with the advanced total variation (TV regularization for sparse-view CT. Combined with the alternating direction method, the proposed approach shows excellent efficiency and rapid convergence property. Numerical simulations and real data experiments are performed on a parallel beam CT. Experimental results validate that the proposed method has higher computational efficiency and better reconstruction quality than the conventional algorithms, such as simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique using TV method and the alternating direction total variation minimization approach, with the same time duration. The proposed method appears to have extensive applications in X-ray CT imaging.

  5. Evaluation of whole-body MR to CT deformable image registration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akbarzadeh, A.; Gutierrez, D.; Baskin, A.; Ay, M. R.; Ahmadian, A.; Alam, N. Riahi; Loevblad, K. O.; Zaidi, H.

    2013-01-01

    Multimodality image registration plays a crucial role in various clinical and research applications. The aim of this study is to present an optimized MR to CT whole-body deformable image registration algorithm and its validation using clinical studies. A 3D intermodality registration technique based

  6. Radiation therapy treatment planning: CT, MR imaging and three-dimensional planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lichter, A.S.

    1987-01-01

    The accuracy and sophistication of radiation therapy treatment planning have increased rapidly in the last decade. Currently, CT-based treatment planning is standard throughout the country. Care must be taken when CT is used for treatment planning because of clear differences between diagnostic scans and scans intended for therapeutic management. The use of CT in radiation therapy planning is discussed and illustrated. MR imaging adds another dimension to treatment planning. The ability to use MR imaging directly in treatment planning involves an additional complex set of capabilities from a treatment planning system. The ability to unwarp the geometrically distorted MR image is a first step. Three-dimensional dose calculations are important to display the dose on sagittal and acoronal sections. The ability to integrate the MR and CT images into a unified radiographic image is critical. CT and MR images are two-dimensional representations of a three-dimensional problem. Through sophisticated computer graphics techniques, radiation therapists are now able to integrate a three-dimensional image of the patient into the treatment planning process. This allows the use of noncoplanar treatment plans and a detailed analysis of tumor and normal tissue anatomy; it is the first step toward a fully conformational treatment planning system. These concepts are illustrated and future research goals outlined

  7. Optimization of SPECT-CT Hybrid Imaging Using Iterative Image Reconstruction for Low-Dose CT: A Phantom Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver S Grosser

    Full Text Available Hybrid imaging combines nuclear medicine imaging such as single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT or positron emission tomography (PET with computed tomography (CT. Through this hybrid design, scanned patients accumulate radiation exposure from both applications. Imaging modalities have been the subject of long-term optimization efforts, focusing on diagnostic applications. It was the aim of this study to investigate the influence of an iterative CT image reconstruction algorithm (ASIR on the image quality of the low-dose CT images.Examinations were performed with a SPECT-CT scanner with standardized CT and SPECT-phantom geometries and CT protocols with systematically reduced X-ray tube currents. Analyses included image quality with respect to photon flux. Results were compared to the standard FBP reconstructed images. The general impact of the CT-based attenuation maps used during SPECT reconstruction was examined for two SPECT phantoms. Using ASIR for image reconstructions, image noise was reduced compared to FBP reconstructions for the same X-ray tube current. The Hounsfield unit (HU values reconstructed by ASIR were correlated to the FBP HU values(R2 ≥ 0.88 and the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR was improved by ASIR. However, for a phantom with increased attenuation, the HU values shifted for low X-ray tube currents I ≤ 60 mA (p ≤ 0.04. In addition, the shift of the HU values was observed within the attenuation corrected SPECT images for very low X-ray tube currents (I ≤ 20 mA, p ≤ 0.001.In general, the decrease in X-ray tube current up to 30 mA in combination with ASIR led to a reduction of CT-related radiation exposure without a significant decrease in image quality.

  8. FDG PET/CT imaging as a biomarker in lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meignan, Michel; Itti, Emmanuel [Hopitaux Universitaires Henri Mondor, Paris-Est Creteil University, LYSA Imaging, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Creteil (France); Gallamini, Andrea [Nice University, Research, Innovation and Statistic Department, Antoine Lacassagne Cancer Center, Nice (France); Scientific Research Committee, S. Croce Hospital, Cuneo (Italy); Younes, Anas [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Lymphoma Service, New York, NY (United States)

    2015-04-01

    FDG PET/CT has changed the management of FDG-avid lymphoma and is now recommended as the imaging technique of choice for staging and restaging. The need for tailoring therapy to reduce toxicity in patients with a favourable outcome and for improving treatment in those with high-risk factors requires accurate diagnostic methods and a new prognostic algorithm to identify different risk categories. New drugs are used in relapsed/refractory patients. The role of FDG PET/CT as a biomarker in this context is summarized in this review. New trends in FDG metabolic imaging in lymphoma are addressed including metabolic tumour volume measurement at staging and integrative PET which combines PET data with clinical and molecular markers or other imaging techniques. The quantitative approach for response assessment which is under investigation and is used in large ongoing trials is compared with visual criteria. The place of FDG in the era of targeted therapy is discussed. (orig.)

  9. Interest of hybrid SPECT-CT imaging for diagnosis of infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riviere, A.; Farid, K.; Guyot, M.; Jeandot, R.; Allard, M.; Fernandez, P.; Clermont, H. de; Dauchy, F.; Dupon, M.; Fernandez, P.

    2008-01-01

    Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography-Computerized Tomography (SPECT-CT) is a new hybrid technique which offers new diagnostic capabilities in daily nuclear medicine practice. This technique not only allows to acquire merged anatomic and functional images in the same time, but also, it increases sensitivity and accuracy of SPECT thanks to attenuation and scattering corrections got from transmission data. Until now, SPECT-CT data have been mainly obtained in oncology and cardiology, but now, many authors use it in many scan studies and particularly for infectious diseases. In inflammatory bowel diseases, SPECT-CT seems to increase diagnostic performances and to modify management of many patients. In suspected vascular sepsis, SPECT-CT could increase sensitivity of white blood cell scintigraphy but also its specificity thanks to spatial resolution of CT. In osteo-articular sepsis, SPECT-CT has the advantage to distinguish osteomyelitis from soft tissue infection and to guide biopsies. Nevertheless, in the light of PET-CT works, SPECT-CT development will probably modify nuclear medicine practice and many studies have to be conducted to highlight consensual procedure guidelines. (authors)

  10. SU-E-I-82: Improving CT Image Quality for Radiation Therapy Using Iterative Reconstruction Algorithms and Slightly Increasing Imaging Doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noid, G; Chen, G; Tai, A; Li, X

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Iterative reconstruction (IR) algorithms are developed to improve CT image quality (IQ) by reducing noise without diminishing spatial resolution or contrast. For CT in radiation therapy (RT), slightly increasing imaging dose to improve IQ may be justified if it can substantially enhance structure delineation. The purpose of this study is to investigate and to quantify the IQ enhancement as a result of increasing imaging doses and using IR algorithms. Methods: CT images were acquired for phantoms, built to evaluate IQ metrics including spatial resolution, contrast and noise, with a variety of imaging protocols using a CT scanner (Definition AS Open, Siemens) installed inside a Linac room. Representative patients were scanned once the protocols were optimized. Both phantom and patient scans were reconstructed using the Sinogram Affirmed Iterative Reconstruction (SAFIRE) and the Filtered Back Projection (FBP) methods. IQ metrics of the obtained CTs were compared. Results: IR techniques are demonstrated to preserve spatial resolution as measured by the point spread function and reduce noise in comparison to traditional FBP. Driven by the reduction in noise, the contrast to noise ratio is doubled by adopting the highest SAFIRE strength. As expected, increasing imaging dose reduces noise for both SAFIRE and FBP reconstructions. The contrast to noise increases from 3 to 5 by increasing the dose by a factor of 4. Similar IQ improvement was observed on the CTs for selected patients with pancreas and prostrate cancers. Conclusion: The IR techniques produce a measurable enhancement to CT IQ by reducing the noise. Increasing imaging dose further reduces noise independent of the IR techniques. The improved CT enables more accurate delineation of tumors and/or organs at risk during RT planning and delivery guidance

  11. Radiation protection in newer medical imaging techniques: CT colonography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    Multislice/detector computed tomography (CT) scanning, applied to visualization of the colon in CT colonography (CTC), also known as virtual colonoscopy (VC), is a relatively new application of CT introduced in recent years. The possibility of its application in population screening techniques raises a number of questions. Effort is required to ensure that the benefit of this new practice will not pose an undue level of detriment to the individual in multiple examinations. For practitioners and regulators, it is evident that innovation has been driven by both the imaging industry and by an ever increasing array of new applications generated and validated in the clinical environment. Regulation, industrial standardization, safety procedures and advice on best practice lag (inevitably) behind the industrial and clinical innovations being achieved. This series of Safety Reports (Nos 58, 60 and 61) is designed to help fill this growing vacuum, by bringing up to date and timely advice to bear on the problems involved. Under its statutory responsibility to establish standards for the protection of people against exposure to ionizing radiation and to provide for worldwide application of these standards, the IAEA has developed the Fundamental Safety Principles and the International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (BSS). The BSS was issued by the IAEA and co-sponsored by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), the International Labour Organisation (ILO), the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD/NEA), the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) and the World Health Organization (WHO), and requires radiation protection of patients undergoing medical exposures through justification of the procedures involved and through optimization. The IAEA programme on radiation protection of patients encourages the reduction of patient doses without losing diagnostic benefits. To facilitate this

  12. CT Imaging of Craniofacial Fibrous Dysplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zerrin Unal Erzurumlu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fibrous dysplasia is a benign fibroosseous bone dysplasia that can involve single (monostotic or multiple (polyostotic bones. Monostotic form is more frequent in the jaws. It is termed as craniofacial fibrous dysplasia, when it involves, though rarely, adjacent craniofacial bones. A 16-year-old girl consulted for a painless swelling in the right posterior mandible for two years. Panoramic radiography revealed ground-glass ill-defined lesions in the three different regions of the maxilla and mandible. Axial CT scan (bone window showed multiple lesions involving skull base and facial bones. Despite lesions in the skull base, the patient had no abnormal neurological findings. The lesion was diagnosed as fibrous dysplasia based on radiological and histopathological examination. In this paper, CT findings and differential diagnosis of CFD are discussed. CT is a useful imaging technique for CFD cases.

  13. MO-A-218-01: CT Protocol Review - Practical Tips for Imaging Physicists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzutiello, R

    2012-06-01

    In the 1980's and 90's, when every mammography department had a wet film processor and a sundial to keep the schedule, medical physicists performing mammography surveys were primarily focused on measuring machine performance and image quality. As our professional experience matured, medical physicists began to learn that they were uniquely qualified to help to recommend technique factors that would balance dose and image quality. Technique charts using different kVp, target-filter combinations and AEC modes gradually became common and patients benefitted from our input. With the revolutionary change in CT Scanner technology and utilization, medical physicists have begun to contribute their expertise to developing and improving CT protocols. This presentation will present practical challenges and offer some directions for the practicing medical physicist who desires to participate in this critical and emerging aspect of imaging physics practice: CT Protocol Review. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  14. Radiation protection in newer medical imaging techniques: PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    A major part of patient exposure now arises from practices that barely existed two decades ago, and the technological basis for their successful dissemination only began to flourish in the last decade or so. Hybrid imaging systems, such as the combination of computed tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography (PET), are an example of a technique that has only been introduced in the last decade. PET/CT has established a valuable place for itself in medical research and diagnosis. However, it is an application that can result in high patient and staff doses. For practitioners and regulators, it is evident that innovation has been driven both by the imaging industry and by an increasing array of new applications generated and validated in the clinical environment. Regulation, industrial standardization, safety procedures and advice on best practices lag (inevitably) behind the industrial and clinical innovations. This series of Safety Reports (Nos 58, 60 and 61) is designed to help fill the growing vacuum, by bringing up to date and timely advice from experienced practitioners to bear on the problems involved. The advice in this report has been developed within the IAEA's statutory responsibility to establish standards for the protection of people against exposure to ionizing radiation and to provide for the worldwide application of these standards. The Fundamental Safety Principles and the International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (BSS) were issued by the IAEA and co-sponsored by organizations including the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), the International Labour Organisation (ILO), the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD/NEA), the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) and the World Health Organization (WHO), and require the radiation protection of patients undergoing medical exposures through justification of the procedures involved and through

  15. A unified material decomposition framework for quantitative dual- and triple-energy CT imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wei; Vernekohl, Don; Han, Fei; Han, Bin; Peng, Hao; Yang, Yong; Xing, Lei; Min, James K

    2018-04-21

    Many clinical applications depend critically on the accurate differentiation and classi-fication of different types of materials in patient anatomy. This work introduces a unified framework for accurate nonlinear material decomposition and applies it, for the first time, in the concept of triple-energy CT (TECT) for enhanced material differentiation and classification as well as dual-energy CT METHODS: We express polychromatic projection into a linear combination of line integrals of material-selective images. The material decomposition is then turned into a problem of minimizing the least-squares difference between measured and estimated CT projections. The optimization problem is solved iteratively by updating the line integrals. The proposed technique is evaluated by using several numerical phantom measurements under different scanning protocols The triple-energy data acquisition is implemented at the scales of micro-CT and clinical CT imaging with commercial "TwinBeam" dual-source DECT configuration and a fast kV switching DECT configu-ration. Material decomposition and quantitative comparison with a photon counting detector and with the presence of a bow-tie filter are also performed. The proposed method provides quantitative material- and energy-selective images exam-ining realistic configurations for both dual- and triple-energy CT measurements. Compared to the polychromatic kV CT images, virtual monochromatic images show superior image quality. For the mouse phantom, quantitative measurements show that the differences between gadodiamide and iodine concentrations obtained using TECT and idealized photon counting CT (PCCT) are smaller than 8 mg/mL and 1 mg/mL, respectively. TECT outperforms DECT for multi-contrast CT imag-ing and is robust with respect to spectrum estimation. For the thorax phantom, the differences between the concentrations of the contrast map and the corresponding true reference values are smaller than 7 mg/mL for all of the realistic

  16. Design of a practical model-observer-based image quality assessment method for CT imaging systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Hsin-Wu; Fan, Jiahua; Cao, Guangzhi; Kupinski, Matthew A.; Sainath, Paavana

    2014-03-01

    The channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) is a powerful method for quantitative image quality evaluations of CT systems and their image reconstruction algorithms. It has recently been used to validate the dose reduction capability of iterative image-reconstruction algorithms implemented on CT imaging systems. The use of the CHO for routine and frequent system evaluations is desirable both for quality assurance evaluations as well as further system optimizations. The use of channels substantially reduces the amount of data required to achieve accurate estimates of observer performance. However, the number of scans required is still large even with the use of channels. This work explores different data reduction schemes and designs a new approach that requires only a few CT scans of a phantom. For this work, the leave-one-out likelihood (LOOL) method developed by Hoffbeck and Landgrebe is studied as an efficient method of estimating the covariance matrices needed to compute CHO performance. Three different kinds of approaches are included in the study: a conventional CHO estimation technique with a large sample size, a conventional technique with fewer samples, and the new LOOL-based approach with fewer samples. The mean value and standard deviation of area under ROC curve (AUC) is estimated by shuffle method. Both simulation and real data results indicate that an 80% data reduction can be achieved without loss of accuracy. This data reduction makes the proposed approach a practical tool for routine CT system assessment.

  17. Influence of iterative image reconstruction on CT-based calcium score measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Osch, Jochen A. C.; Mouden, Mohamed; van Dalen, Jorn A.; Timmer, Jorik R.; Reiffers, Stoffer; Knollema, Siert; Greuter, Marcel J. W.; Ottervanger, Jan Paul; Jager, Piet L.

    Iterative reconstruction techniques for coronary CT angiography have been introduced as an alternative for traditional filter back projection (FBP) to reduce image noise, allowing improved image quality and a potential for dose reduction. However, the impact of iterative reconstruction on the

  18. SU-F-J-96: Comparison of Frame-Based and Mutual Information Registration Techniques for CT and MR Image Sets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popple, R; Bredel, M; Brezovich, I; Dobelbower, M; Fisher, W; Fiveash, J; Guthrie, B; Riley, K; Wu, X [The University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To compare the accuracy of CT-MR registration using a mutual information method with registration using a frame-based localizer box. Methods: Ten patients having the Leksell head frame and scanned with a modality specific localizer box were imported into the treatment planning system. The fiducial rods of the localizer box were contoured on both the MR and CT scans. The skull was contoured on the CT images. The MR and CT images were registered by two methods. The frame-based method used the transformation that minimized the mean square distance of the centroids of the contours of the fiducial rods from a mathematical model of the localizer. The mutual information method used automated image registration tools in the TPS and was restricted to a volume-of-interest defined by the skull contours with a 5 mm margin. For each case, the two registrations were adjusted by two evaluation teams, each comprised of an experienced radiation oncologist and neurosurgeon, to optimize alignment in the region of the brainstem. The teams were blinded to the registration method. Results: The mean adjustment was 0.4 mm (range 0 to 2 mm) and 0.2 mm (range 0 to 1 mm) for the frame and mutual information methods, respectively. The median difference between the frame and mutual information registrations was 0.3 mm, but was not statistically significant using the Wilcoxon signed rank test (p=0.37). Conclusion: The difference between frame and mutual information registration techniques was neither statistically significant nor, for most applications, clinically important. These results suggest that mutual information is equivalent to frame-based image registration for radiosurgery. Work is ongoing to add additional evaluators and to assess the differences between evaluators.

  19. New CT-aided stereotactic neurosurgery technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shao, H.M.; Truong, T.K.; Reed, I.S.; Slater, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    In this communication, a new technique for CT-aided stereotactic neurosurgery is presented. The combination of specially designed hardware and software provides a fast, simple, and versatile tool for the accurate insertion of a probe into the human brain. This system is portable and can be implemented on any CT computer system. The complete procedure to perform the CT-aided stereotactic neurosurgery technique is presented. Experimental results are given which demonstrate the power of the method. Finally, the key algorithms for realizing this technique are described in the Appendix

  20. SPECT/CT workflow and imaging protocols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckers, Catherine [University Hospital of Liege, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Oncological Imaging, Department of Medical Physics, Liege (Belgium); Hustinx, Roland [University Hospital of Liege, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Oncological Imaging, Department of Medical Physics, Liege (Belgium); Domaine Universitaire du Sart Tilman, Service de Medecine Nucleaire et Imagerie Oncologique, CHU de Liege, Liege (Belgium)

    2014-05-15

    Introducing a hybrid imaging method such as single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT greatly alters the routine in the nuclear medicine department. It requires designing new workflow processes and the revision of original scheduling process and imaging protocols. In addition, the imaging protocol should be adapted for each individual patient, so that performing CT is fully justified and the CT procedure is fully tailored to address the clinical issue. Such refinements often occur before the procedure is started but may be required at some intermediate stage of the procedure. Furthermore, SPECT/CT leads in many instances to a new partnership with the radiology department. This article presents practical advice and highlights the key clinical elements which need to be considered to help understand the workflow process of SPECT/CT and optimise imaging protocols. The workflow process using SPECT/CT is complex in particular because of its bimodal character, the large spectrum of stakeholders, the multiplicity of their activities at various time points and the need for real-time decision-making. With help from analytical tools developed for quality assessment, the workflow process using SPECT/CT may be separated into related, but independent steps, each with its specific human and material resources to use as inputs or outputs. This helps identify factors that could contribute to failure in routine clinical practice. At each step of the process, practical aspects to optimise imaging procedure and protocols are developed. A decision-making algorithm for justifying each CT indication as well as the appropriateness of each CT protocol is the cornerstone of routine clinical practice using SPECT/CT. In conclusion, implementing hybrid SPECT/CT imaging requires new ways of working. It is highly rewarding from a clinical perspective, but it also proves to be a daily challenge in terms of management. (orig.)

  1. SPECT/CT workflow and imaging protocols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckers, Catherine; Hustinx, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Introducing a hybrid imaging method such as single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT greatly alters the routine in the nuclear medicine department. It requires designing new workflow processes and the revision of original scheduling process and imaging protocols. In addition, the imaging protocol should be adapted for each individual patient, so that performing CT is fully justified and the CT procedure is fully tailored to address the clinical issue. Such refinements often occur before the procedure is started but may be required at some intermediate stage of the procedure. Furthermore, SPECT/CT leads in many instances to a new partnership with the radiology department. This article presents practical advice and highlights the key clinical elements which need to be considered to help understand the workflow process of SPECT/CT and optimise imaging protocols. The workflow process using SPECT/CT is complex in particular because of its bimodal character, the large spectrum of stakeholders, the multiplicity of their activities at various time points and the need for real-time decision-making. With help from analytical tools developed for quality assessment, the workflow process using SPECT/CT may be separated into related, but independent steps, each with its specific human and material resources to use as inputs or outputs. This helps identify factors that could contribute to failure in routine clinical practice. At each step of the process, practical aspects to optimise imaging procedure and protocols are developed. A decision-making algorithm for justifying each CT indication as well as the appropriateness of each CT protocol is the cornerstone of routine clinical practice using SPECT/CT. In conclusion, implementing hybrid SPECT/CT imaging requires new ways of working. It is highly rewarding from a clinical perspective, but it also proves to be a daily challenge in terms of management. (orig.)

  2. Coronary artery imaging with 64-slice CT in atrial fibrillation patients: scanning method and post-processing techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Hongbo; Li Xiangmin; Peng Zhenpeng; Zhou Xuhui; Yan Chaogui; Li Ziping

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the clinical value of coronary artery imaging using 64-slice CT in patient with atrial fibrillation. Methods: All the cardiac volume data of 31 patients with atrial fibrillation were reconstructed using absolute time method. The images of 12 patients. The images of 31 patients who undeiwent contrast-enhanced CT coronary angiography were evaluated. The presence of stenosis on each segment of coronary arteries was recorded and their degree of stenosis was measured using the vessel analysis software.. The results of conventional coronary angiography (CAG) of the 10 patients were compared with CT coronary angiography. Results: The image quality of 364 coronary vessel segments on the images from 31 patients was evaluated and defined as excellent, fine, moderate or poor. The image quality was excellent, fine, moderate and poor in 194(53.3%), 82(22.5%), 41(11.3%) and 47(12.9%) vessel segments. Comparison was carried out between CTA findings and CAG findings of the 125 segments of the coronary arteries in the 10 patients who underwent CAG. The sensitivity and specificity of CTA for diagnosing vessel with stenosis (≥ 50% narrowing) was 85%(17/20) and 95.2% (100/105). Conclusion: Coronary artery imaging using 64-slice CT is useful in patient with atrial fibrillation. (authors)

  3. Latest techniques in head and neck CT angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuknecht, B.

    2004-01-01

    Continuous evolution of multi row CT is increasingly making CT angiography a viable imaging modality for assessment of the supraaortic and intracranial vessels as an anatomically and functionally coherent vascular system. Extended non-invasive examinations with reduced contrast volume have become feasible with the availability of 16 and 64 row MDCT scanners. Prerequisites to obtain high resolution CT angiographies of the head and neck vessels with superior detail include the administration of low contrast volume, high contrast density (400 mg I/ml) contrast media, adequate timing and data acquisition, optimal flow rate (4 ml/s) and saline flushing. Non-invasiveness, delineation of vessel calcification, virtual independence from hemodynamic conditions, and the ability to provide quantification without needing to correct for magnification are all attributes that favour CT angiography over digital subtraction angiography and to some extent even magnetic resonance angiography as an alternative non-invasive technique. CT angiography is established as a modality of choice for the assessment of patients with acute stroke and chronic steno-occlusive disease. CT angiography may indicate the presence of extra- or intracranial acute vessel occlusion and dissection, predisposing atherosclerotic steno-occlusive disease and thus indicate thrombo-embolism or local appositional thrombosis as the principle pathogenic factor. CT angiography is used to assess anatomy, and to depict the presence, location and extent of calcified and non-calcified plaque as a cause of high grade stenosis. Despite relatively limited sensitivity CT angiography is indicated for suspected or confirmed aneurysms that demand further verification of their presence, geometry, or relationship to parent artery branches and osseous anatomic landmarks. Low volume high density contrast media have substantially increased the ability of CT angiography to depict small aneurysms, small branches, and collateral vessels

  4. Material Science Image Analysis using Quant-CT in ImageJ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ushizima, Daniela M.; Bianchi, Andrea G. C.; DeBianchi, Christina; Bethel, E. Wes

    2015-01-05

    We introduce a computational analysis workflow to access properties of solid objects using nondestructive imaging techniques that rely on X-ray imaging. The goal is to process and quantify structures from material science sample cross sections. The algorithms can differentiate the porous media (high density material) from the void (background, low density media) using a Boolean classifier, so that we can extract features, such as volume, surface area, granularity spectrum, porosity, among others. Our workflow, Quant-CT, leverages several algorithms from ImageJ, such as statistical region merging and 3D object counter. It also includes schemes for bilateral filtering that use a 3D kernel, for parallel processing of sub-stacks, and for handling over-segmentation using histogram similarities. The Quant-CT supports fast user interaction, providing the ability for the user to train the algorithm via subsamples to feed its core algorithms with automated parameterization. Quant-CT plugin is currently available for testing by personnel at the Advanced Light Source and Earth Sciences Divisions and Energy Frontier Research Center (EFRC), LBNL, as part of their research on porous materials. The goal is to understand the processes in fluid-rock systems for the geologic sequestration of CO2, and to develop technology for the safe storage of CO2 in deep subsurface rock formations. We describe our implementation, and demonstrate our plugin on porous material images. This paper targets end-users, with relevant information for developers to extend its current capabilities.

  5. Standardization of MIP technique in three-dimensional CT portography: usefulness in evaluation of portosystemic collaterals in cirrhotic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Gi; Kim, Yong; Kim, Chang Won; Lee, Jun Woo; Lee, Suk Hong

    2003-01-01

    To assess the usefulness of three-dimensional CT portography using a standardized maximum intensity projection (MIP) technique for the evaluation of portosystemic collaterals in cirrhotic patients. In 25 cirrhotic patients with portosystemic collaterals, three-phase CT using a multide-tector-row helical CT scanner was performed to evaluate liver disease. Late arterial-phase images were transferred to an Advantage Windows 3.1 workstation (Gener Electric). Axial images were reconstructed by means of three-dimensional CT portography, using both a standardized and a non-standardized MIP technique, and the respective reconstruction times were determined. Three-dimensional CT portography with the standardized technique involved eight planes, namely the spleno-portal confluence axis (coronal, lordotic coronal, lordotic coronal RAO 30 .deg. C, and lordotic coronal LAO 30 .deg. C), the left renal vein axis (lordotic coronal), and axial MIP images (lower esophagus level, gastric fundus level and splenic hilum). The eight MIP images obtained in each case were interpreted by two radiologists, who reached a consensus in their evaluation. The portosystemic collaterals evaluated were as follows: left gastric vein dilatation; esophageal, paraesophageal, gastric, and splenic varix; paraumbilical vein dilatation; gastro-renal, spleno-renal, and gastro-spleno-renal shunt; mesenteric, retroperitoneal, and omental collaterals. The average reconstruction time using the non-standardized MIP technique was 11 minutes 23 seconds, and with the standardized technique, the time was 6 minutes 5 seconds. Three-dimensional CT portography with the standardized technique demonstrated left gastric vein dilatation (n=25), esophageal varix (n=18), paraesophageal varix (n=13), gastric varix (n=4), splenic varix (n=4), paraumbilical vein dilatation (n=4), gastro-renal shunt (n=3), spleno-renal shunt (n=3), and gastro-spleno-renal shunt (n=1). Using three-dimensional CT protography and the non

  6. Image processing based detection of lung cancer on CT scan images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdillah, Bariqi; Bustamam, Alhadi; Sarwinda, Devvi

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, we implement and analyze the image processing method for detection of lung cancer. Image processing techniques are widely used in several medical problems for picture enhancement in the detection phase to support the early medical treatment. In this research we proposed a detection method of lung cancer based on image segmentation. Image segmentation is one of intermediate level in image processing. Marker control watershed and region growing approach are used to segment of CT scan image. Detection phases are followed by image enhancement using Gabor filter, image segmentation, and features extraction. From the experimental results, we found the effectiveness of our approach. The results show that the best approach for main features detection is watershed with masking method which has high accuracy and robust.

  7. Fast parallel algorithm for CT image reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Liubov A; Vidal, Vicent; Mayo, Patricia; Rodenas, Francisco; Verdú, Gumersindo

    2012-01-01

    In X-ray computed tomography (CT) the X rays are used to obtain the projection data needed to generate an image of the inside of an object. The image can be generated with different techniques. Iterative methods are more suitable for the reconstruction of images with high contrast and precision in noisy conditions and from a small number of projections. Their use may be important in portable scanners for their functionality in emergency situations. However, in practice, these methods are not widely used due to the high computational cost of their implementation. In this work we analyze iterative parallel image reconstruction with the Portable Extensive Toolkit for Scientific computation (PETSc).

  8. Development and comparison of projection and image space 3D nodule insertion techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robins, Marthony; Solomon, Justin; Sahbaee, Pooyan; Samei, Ehsan

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to develop and compare two methods of inserting computerized virtual lesions into CT datasets. 24 physical (synthetic) nodules of three sizes and four morphologies were inserted into an anthropomorphic chest phantom (LUNGMAN, KYOTO KAGAKU). The phantom was scanned (Somatom Definition Flash, Siemens Healthcare) with and without nodules present, and images were reconstructed with filtered back projection and iterative reconstruction (SAFIRE) at 0.6 mm slice thickness using a standard thoracic CT protocol at multiple dose settings. Virtual 3D CAD models based on the physical nodules were virtually inserted (accounting for the system MTF) into the nodule-free CT data using two techniques. These techniques include projection-based and image-based insertion. Nodule volumes were estimated using a commercial segmentation tool (iNtuition, TeraRecon, Inc.). Differences were tested using paired t-tests and R2 goodness of fit between the virtually and physically inserted nodules. Both insertion techniques resulted in nodule volumes very similar to the real nodules (values were all <0.97 for both insertion techniques. These data imply that these techniques can confidently be used as a means of inserting virtual nodules in CT datasets. These techniques can be instrumental in building hybrid CT datasets composed of patient images with virtually inserted nodules.

  9. CT image quality improvement using adaptive iterative dose reduction with wide-volume acquisition on 320-detector CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gervaise, Alban; Osemont, Benoit; Lecocq, Sophie; Blum, Alain; Noel, Alain; Micard, Emilien; Felblinger, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of Adaptive Iterative Dose Reduction (AIDR) on image quality and radiation dose in phantom and patient studies. A phantom was examined in volumetric mode on a 320-detector CT at different tube currents from 25 to 550 mAs. CT images were reconstructed with AIDR and with Filtered Back Projection (FBP) reconstruction algorithm. Image noise, Contrast-to-Noise Ratio (CNR), Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) and spatial resolution were compared between FBP and AIDR images. AIDR was then tested on 15 CT examinations of the lumbar spine in a prospective study. Again, FBP and AIDR images were compared. Image noise and SNR were analysed using a Wilcoxon signed-rank test. In the phantom, spatial resolution assessment showed no significant difference between FBP and AIDR reconstructions. Image noise was lower with AIDR than with FBP images with a mean reduction of 40%. CNR and SNR were also improved with AIDR. In patients, quantitative and subjective evaluation showed that image noise was significantly lower with AIDR than with FBP. SNR was also greater with AIDR than with FBP. Compared to traditional FBP reconstruction techniques, AIDR significantly improves image quality and has the potential to decrease radiation dose. (orig.)

  10. Clinical PET/CT imaging. Promises and misconceptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czernin, J.; Auerbach, M.A.

    2005-01-01

    PET/CT is now established as the most important imaging tool in oncology. PET/CT stages and restages cancer with a higher accuracy than PET or CT alone. The sometimes irrational approach to combine state of the art PET with the highest end CT devices should give way to a more reasonable equipment design tailored towards the specific clinical indications in well-defined patient populations. The continuing success of molecular PET/CT now depends more upon advances in molecular imaging with the introduction of targeted imaging probes for individualized therapy approaches in cancer patients and less upon technological advances of imaging equipment. (orig.)

  11. Cone Beam CT vs. Fan Beam CT: A Comparison of Image Quality and Dose Delivered Between Two Differing CT Imaging Modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechuga, Lawrence; Weidlich, Georg A

    2016-09-12

    A comparison of image quality and dose delivered between two differing computed tomography (CT) imaging modalities-fan beam and cone beam-was performed. A literature review of quantitative analyses for various image quality aspects such as uniformity, signal-to-noise ratio, artifact presence, spatial resolution, modulation transfer function (MTF), and low contrast resolution was generated. With these aspects quantified, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) shows a superior spatial resolution to that of fan beam, while fan beam shows a greater ability to produce clear and anatomically correct images with better soft tissue differentiation. The results indicate that fan beam CT produces superior images to that of on-board imaging (OBI) cone beam CT systems, while providing a considerably less dose to the patient.

  12. Target localization on standard axial images in computed tomography (CT) stereotaxis for functional neurosurgery - a technical note

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patil, A.-A.

    1986-01-01

    A simple technique for marking functional neurosurgery target on computed tomography (CT) axial image is described. This permits the use of standard axial image for computed tomography (CT) stereotaxis in functional neurosurgery. (Author)

  13. Weight preserving image registration for monitoring disease progression in lung CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorbunova, Vladlena; Lo, Pechin Chien Pau; Haseem, Ashraf

    2008-01-01

    We present a new image registration based method for monitoring regional disease progression in longitudinal image studies of lung disease. A free-form image registration technique is used to match a baseline 3D CT lung scan onto a following scan. Areas with lower intensity in the following scan...... the density of lung tissue with respect to local expansion or compression such that the total weight of the lungs is preserved during deformation. Our method provides a good estimation of regional destruction of lung tissue for subjects with a significant difference in inspiration level between CT scans...

  14. Three-dimensional reconstruction of CT images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Toshiaki; Kattoh, Keiichi; Kawakami, Genichiroh; Igami, Isao; Mariya, Yasushi; Nakamura, Yasuhiko; Saitoh, Yohko; Tamura, Koreroku; Shinozaki, Tatsuyo

    1986-09-01

    Computed tomography (CT) has the ability to provide sensitive visualization of organs and lesions. Owing to the nature of CT to be transaxial images, a structure which is greater than a certain size appears as several serial CT images. Consequently each observer must reconstruct those images into a three-dimensional (3-D) form mentally. It has been supposed to be of great use if such a 3-D form can be described as a definite figure. A new computer program has been developed which can produce 3-D figures from the profiles of organs and lesions on CT images using spline curves. The figures obtained through this method are regarded to have practical applications.

  15. Imaging of head and neck tumors -- methods: CT, spiral-CT, multislice-spiral-CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baum, Ulrich; Greess, Holger; Lell, Michael; Noemayr, Anton; Lenz, Martin

    2000-01-01

    Spiral-CT is standard for imaging neck tumors. In correspondence with other groups we routinely use spiral-CT with thin slices (3 mm), a pitch of 1.3-1.5 and an overlapping reconstruction increment (2-3 mm). In patients with dental fillings a short additional spiral parallel to the corpus of the mandible reduces artifacts behind the dental arches and improves the diagnostic value of CT. For the assessment of the base of the skull, the orbital floor, the palate and paranasal sinuses an additional examination in the coronal plane is helpful. Secondary coronal reconstructions of axial scans are helpful in the evaluation of the crossing of the midline by small tumors of the tongue base or palate. For an optimal vascular or tissue contrast a sufficient volume of contrast medium and a start delay greater than 70-80 s are necessary. In our opinion the best results can be achieved with a volume of 150 ml, a flow of 2.5 ml/s and a start delay of 80 s. Dynamic enhanced CT is only necessary in some special cases. There is clear indication for dynamic enhanced CT where a glomus tumor is suspected. Additional functional CT imaging during i-phonation and/or Valsalva's maneuver are of great importance to prove vocal cords mobility. Therefore, imaging during i-phonation is an elemental part of every thorough examination of the hypopharynx and larynx region. Multislice-spiral-CT allows almost isotropic imaging of the head and neck region and improves the assessment of tumor spread and lymph node metastases in arbitrary oblique planes. Thin structures (the base of the skull, the orbital floor, the hard palate) as well as the floor of the mouth can be evaluated sufficiently with multiplanar reformations. Usually, additional coronal scanning is not necessary with multislice-spiral-CT. Multislice-spiral-CT is especially advantageous in defining the critical relationships of tumor and lymph node metastases and for functional imaging of the hypopharynx and larynx not only in the

  16. Retrieval of ion distributions in RC from TWINS ENA images by CT technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, S.; Yan, W.; Xu, L.; Goldstein, J.; McComas, D. J.

    2010-12-01

    The Two Wide-angle Imaging Neutral-atom Spectrometers (TWINS) mission is the first constellation to employ imagers on two separate spacecraft to measure energetic neutral atoms (ENA) produced by charge exchange between ring current energetic ions and cold exospheric neutral atoms. By applying the 3-D volumetric pixel (voxel) computed tomography (CT) inversion method to TWINS images, parent ion populations in the ring current (RC) and auroral regions are retrieved from their ENA signals. This methodology is implemented for data obtained during the main phase of a moderate geomagnetic storm on 11 October 2008. For this storm the two TWINS satellites were located in nearly the same meridian plane at vantage points widely separated in magnetic local time, and both more than 5 RE geocentric distance from the Earth. In the retrieval process, the energetic ion fluxes to be retrieved are assumed being isotropic with respect to pitch angle. The ENA data used in this study are differential fluxes averaged over 12 sweeps (corresponding to an interval of 16 min.) at different energy levels ranging throughout the full 1--100 keV energy range of TWINS. The ENA signals have two main components: (1) a low-latitude/ high-altitude signal from trapped RC ions and (2) a low-altitude signal from precipitating ions in the auroral/subauroral ionosphere. In the retrieved ion distributions, the main part of the RC component is located around midnight toward dawn sector with L from 3 to 7 or farther, while the subauroral low-altitude component is mainly at pre-midnight. It seems that the dominant energy of the RC ions for this storm is at the lowest energy level of 1-2 keV, with another important energy band centered about 44 keV. The low-altitude component is consistent with in situ observations by DMSP/SSJ4. The result of this study demonstrates that with satellite constellations such as TWINS, using all-sky ENA imagers deployed at multiple vantage points, 3-D distribution of RC ion

  17. Iterative model reconstruction: Improved image quality of low-tube-voltage prospective ECG-gated coronary CT angiography images at 256-slice CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oda, Seitaro, E-mail: seisei0430@nifty.com [Department of Cardiology, MedStar Washington Hospital Center, 110 Irving Street, NW, Washington, DC 20010 (United States); Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, 1-1-1 Honjyo, Chuo-ku, Kumamoto, 860-8556 (Japan); Weissman, Gaby, E-mail: Gaby.Weissman@medstar.net [Department of Cardiology, MedStar Washington Hospital Center, 110 Irving Street, NW, Washington, DC 20010 (United States); Vembar, Mani, E-mail: mani.vembar@philips.com [CT Clinical Science, Philips Healthcare, c595 Miner Road, Cleveland, OH 44143 (United States); Weigold, Wm. Guy, E-mail: Guy.Weigold@MedStar.net [Department of Cardiology, MedStar Washington Hospital Center, 110 Irving Street, NW, Washington, DC 20010 (United States)

    2014-08-15

    Objectives: To investigate the effects of a new model-based type of iterative reconstruction (M-IR) technique, the iterative model reconstruction, on image quality of prospectively gated coronary CT angiography (CTA) acquired at low-tube-voltage. Methods: Thirty patients (16 men, 14 women; mean age 52.2 ± 13.2 years) underwent coronary CTA at 100-kVp on a 256-slice CT. Paired image sets were created using 3 types of reconstruction, i.e. filtered back projection (FBP), a hybrid type of iterative reconstruction (H-IR), and M-IR. Quantitative parameters including CT-attenuation, image noise, and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were measured. The visual image quality, i.e. graininess, beam-hardening, vessel sharpness, and overall image quality, was scored on a 5-point scale. Lastly, coronary artery segments were evaluated using a 4-point scale to investigate the assessability of each segment. Results: There was no significant difference in coronary arterial CT attenuation among the 3 reconstruction methods. The mean image noise of FBP, H-IR, and M-IR images was 29.3 ± 9.6, 19.3 ± 6.9, and 12.9 ± 3.3 HU, respectively, there were significant differences for all comparison combinations among the 3 methods (p < 0.01). The CNR of M-IR was significantly better than of FBP and H-IR images (13.5 ± 5.0 [FBP], 20.9 ± 8.9 [H-IR] and 39.3 ± 13.9 [M-IR]; p < 0.01). The visual scores were significantly higher for M-IR than the other images (p < 0.01), and 95.3% of the coronary segments imaged with M-IR were of assessable quality compared with 76.7% of FBP- and 86.9% of H-IR images. Conclusions: M-IR can provide significantly improved qualitative and quantitative image quality in prospectively gated coronary CTA using a low-tube-voltage.

  18. In Vivo Respiratory-Gated Micro-CT Imaging in Small-Animal Oncology Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawn Cavanaugh

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Micro-computed tomography (micro-CT is becoming an accepted research tool for the noninvasive examination of laboratory animals such as mice and rats, but to date, in vivo scanning has largely been limited to the evaluation of skeletal tissues. We use a commercially available micro-CT device to perform respiratory gated in vivo acquisitions suitable for thoracic imaging. The instrument is described, along with the scan protocol and animal preparation techniques. Preliminary results confirm that lung tumors as small as 1 mm in diameter are visible in vivo with these methods. Radiation dose was evaluated using several approaches, and was found to be approximately 0.15 Gy for this respiratory-gated micro-CT imaging protocol. The combination of high-resolution CT imaging and respiratory-gated acquisitions appears well-suited to serial in vivo scanning.

  19. Algorithms of CT value correction for reconstructing a radiotherapy simulation image through axial CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogino, Takashi; Egawa, Sunao

    1991-01-01

    New algorithms of CT value correction for reconstructing a radiotherapy simulation image through axial CT images were developed. One, designated plane weighting method, is to correct CT value in proportion to the position of the beam element passing through the voxel. The other, designated solid weighting method, is to correct CT value in proportion to the length of the beam element passing through the voxel and the volume of voxel. Phantom experiments showed fair spatial resolution in the transverse direction. In the longitudinal direction, however, spatial resolution of under slice thickness could not be obtained. Contrast resolution was equivalent for both methods. In patient studies, the reconstructed radiotherapy simulation image was almost similar in visual perception of the density resolution to a simulation film taken by X-ray simulator. (author)

  20. CT imaging of congenital lung lesions: effect of iterative reconstruction on diagnostic performance and radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haggerty, Jay E.; Smith, Ethan A.; Dillman, Jonathan R.; Kunisaki, Shaun M.

    2015-01-01

    Different iterative reconstruction techniques are available for use in pediatric computed tomography (CT), but these techniques have not been systematically evaluated in infants. To determine the effect of iterative reconstruction on diagnostic performance, image quality and radiation dose in infants undergoing CT evaluation for congenital lung lesions. A retrospective review of contrast-enhanced chest CT in infants (<1 year) with congenital lung lesions was performed. CT examinations were reviewed to document the type of lung lesion, vascular anatomy, image noise measurements and image reconstruction method. CTDI vol was used to calculate size-specific dose estimates (SSDE). CT findings were correlated with intraoperative and histopathological findings. Analysis of variance and the Student's t-test were used to compare image noise measurements and radiation dose estimates between groups. Fifteen CT examinations used filtered back projection (FBP; mean age: 84 days), 15 used adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR; mean age: 93 days), and 11 used model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR; mean age: 98 days). Compared to operative findings, 13/15 (87%), 14/15 (93%) and 11/11 (100%) lesions were correctly characterized using FBP, ASiR and MBIR, respectively. Arterial anatomy was correctly identified in 12/15 (80%) using FBP, 13/15 (87%) using ASiR and 11/11 (100%) using MBIR. Image noise was less for MBIR vs. ASiR (P < 0.0001). Mean SSDE was different among groups (P = 0.003; FBP = 7.35 mGy, ASiR = 1.89 mGy, MBIR = 1.49 mGy). Congenital lung lesions can be adequately characterized in infants using iterative CT reconstruction techniques while maintaining image quality and lowering radiation dose. (orig.)

  1. CT imaging of congenital lung lesions: effect of iterative reconstruction on diagnostic performance and radiation dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haggerty, Jay E.; Smith, Ethan A.; Dillman, Jonathan R. [University of Michigan Health System, Section of Pediatric Radiology, Department of Radiology, C.S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Kunisaki, Shaun M. [University of Michigan Health System, Section of Pediatric Surgery, Department of Surgery, C.S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Different iterative reconstruction techniques are available for use in pediatric computed tomography (CT), but these techniques have not been systematically evaluated in infants. To determine the effect of iterative reconstruction on diagnostic performance, image quality and radiation dose in infants undergoing CT evaluation for congenital lung lesions. A retrospective review of contrast-enhanced chest CT in infants (<1 year) with congenital lung lesions was performed. CT examinations were reviewed to document the type of lung lesion, vascular anatomy, image noise measurements and image reconstruction method. CTDI{sub vol} was used to calculate size-specific dose estimates (SSDE). CT findings were correlated with intraoperative and histopathological findings. Analysis of variance and the Student's t-test were used to compare image noise measurements and radiation dose estimates between groups. Fifteen CT examinations used filtered back projection (FBP; mean age: 84 days), 15 used adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR; mean age: 93 days), and 11 used model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR; mean age: 98 days). Compared to operative findings, 13/15 (87%), 14/15 (93%) and 11/11 (100%) lesions were correctly characterized using FBP, ASiR and MBIR, respectively. Arterial anatomy was correctly identified in 12/15 (80%) using FBP, 13/15 (87%) using ASiR and 11/11 (100%) using MBIR. Image noise was less for MBIR vs. ASiR (P < 0.0001). Mean SSDE was different among groups (P = 0.003; FBP = 7.35 mGy, ASiR = 1.89 mGy, MBIR = 1.49 mGy). Congenital lung lesions can be adequately characterized in infants using iterative CT reconstruction techniques while maintaining image quality and lowering radiation dose. (orig.)

  2. Assessment of metastatic colorectal cancer with hybrid imaging: comparison of reading performance using different combinations of anatomical and functional imaging techniques in PET/MRI and PET/CT in a short case series

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brendle, C.; Schwenzer, N.F.; Rempp, H.; Schmidt, H.; Pfannenberg, C.; Nikolaou, K.; Schraml, C. [Eberhard Karls University, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); La Fougere, C. [Eberhard Karls University, Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    The purpose was to investigate the diagnostic performance of different combinations of anatomical and functional imaging techniques in PET/MRI and PET/CT for the evaluation of metastatic colorectal cancer lesions. Image data of 15 colorectal cancer patients (FDG-PET/CT and subsequent FDG-PET/MRI) were retrospectively evaluated by two readers in five reading sessions: MRI (morphology) alone, MRI/diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI), MRI/PET, MRI/DWI/PET; and PET/CT. Diagnostic performance of lesion detection with each combination was assessed in general and organ-based. The reference standard was given by histology and/or follow-up imaging. Separate analysis of mucinous tumours was performed. One hundred and eighty lesions (110 malignant) were evaluated (intestine n = 6, liver n = 37, lymph nodes n = 55, lung n = 4, and peritoneal n = 74). The overall lesion-based diagnostic accuracy was 0.46 for MRI, 0.47 for MRI/DWI, 0.57 for MRI/PET, 0.69 for MRI/DWI/PET and 0.66 for PET/CT. In the organ-based assessment, MRI/DWI/PET showed the highest accuracy for liver metastases (0.74), a comparable accuracy to PET/CT in peritoneal lesions (0.55), and in lymph node metastases (0.84). The accuracy in mucinous tumour lesions was limited in all modalities (MRI/DWI/PET = 0.52). PET/MRI including DWI is comparable to PET/CT in the evaluation of colorectal cancer metastases, with a markedly higher accuracy when using combined imaging data than the modalities separately. Further improvement is needed in the imaging of peritoneal carcinomatosis and mucinous tumours. (orig.)

  3. Normal anatomy of the lymphatic system in the CT-image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinbrich, W.; Peters, P.E.

    1982-01-01

    To evaluate a pathologic process of a lymphatic node, detailed knowledge is required of the normal anatomy of the lumphatic system in an axial CT image. The anatomy is demonstrated in a comparative study before and after lymphography with CT-scans of patients with normal lymphadenographs. Hereby it appears that with the high-resolution scanning method and favourable imaging conditions even small lymphatic nodes can be differentiated without a lymphographic contrast technique. However, nerves and vessels cannot be differentiated. The extreme variability in the size of normal lymphatic nodes makes the differentiation of pathologic processes very difficult. (orig.) [de

  4. Radiation doses during chest examinations using dose modulation techniques in multislice CT scanner

    OpenAIRE

    Livingstone Roshan; Pradip Joe; Dinakran Paul; Srikanth B

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the radiation dose and image quality using a manual protocol and dose modulation techniques in a 6-slice CT scanner. Materials and Methods: Two hundred and twenty-one patients who underwent contrast-enhanced CT of the chest were included in the study. For the manual protocol settings, constant tube potential (kV) and tube current-time product (mAs) of 140 kV and 120 mAs, respectively, were used. The angular and z-axis dose modulation techniques utilized a constant tu...

  5. Elimination of white Gaussian noise in arterial phase CT images to bring adrenal tumours into the forefront.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyuncu, Hasan; Ceylan, Rahime

    2018-04-01

    Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Computed Tomography (DCE-CT) is applied to observe adrenal tumours in detail by utilising from the contrast matter, which generally brings the tumour into the forefront. However, DCE-CT images are generally influenced by noises that occur as the result of the trade-off between radiation doses vs. noise. Herein, this situation constitutes a challenge in the achievement of accurate tumour segmentation. In CT images, most of the noises are similar to Gaussian Noise. In this study, arterial phase CT images containing adrenal tumours are utilised, and elimination of Gaussian Noise is realised by fourteen different techniques reported in literature for the achievement of the best denoising process. In this study, the Block Matching and 3D Filtering (BM3D) algorithm typically achieve reliable Peak Signal-to-Noise Ratios (PSNR) and resolves challenges of similar techniques when addressing different levels of noise. Furthermore, BM3D obtains the best mean PSNR values among the first five techniques. BM3D outperforms to other techniques by obtaining better Total Statistical Success (TSS), CPU time and computation cost. Consequently, it prepares clearer arterial phase CT images for the next step (segmentation of adrenal tumours). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Registration of SPECT, PET and/or X-ray CT images in patients with lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uemura, K.; Toyama, H.; Miyamoto, T.; Yoshikawa, K.; Mori, Y.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: In order to evaluate the therapeutic gain of heavy ion therapy performed on patients with lung cancer, the regional pulmonary functions and the amount of radio tracer accumulation to the tumor, we are investigated by using the region of interest based on anatomical information obtained from X-ray CT. There are many registration techniques for brain images, but not so much for the other organ images that we have studied registration of chest SPECT, PET and/or X-ray CT images. Materials and Methods: Perfusion, ventilation and blood pool images with Tc 99m labeled radiopharmaceuticals and SPECT, tumor images with 11 C-methionine and PET and X-ray CT scans were performed on several patients with lung cancer before and after heavy ion therapy. The registrations of SPECT-CT, PET-CT and CT-CT were performed by using AMIR (Automatic Multimodality Image Registration), which was developed by Babak et al. for registration of brain images. In a case of SPECT-CT registration, each of the three functional images was registered to the X-ray CT image, and the accuracy of each registration was compared. In the studies of PET-CT registration, the transmission images and X-ray CT images were registered at first, because the 11 C-methionine PET images bear little resemblance to the underlying anatomical images. Next, the emission images were realigned by using the same registration parameters. The X-ray CT images obtained from a single subject at the different time were registered to the first X-ray CT images, respectively. Results: In the SPECT-CT registration, the blood pool-CT registration is the best among three SPECT images in visual inspection by radiologists. In the PET-CT registration, the Transmission-CT registrations got good results. Therefore, Emission-CT registrations also got good results. In the CT-CT registration, the X-ray CT images obtained from a single subject at the different time were superimposed well each other except for lower lobe. As the results, it was

  7. Dental CT: examination technique, radiation load and anatomy; Dental-CT: Untersuchungstechnik, Strahlenbelastung und Anatomie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenglinger, F.X.; Muhr, T. [AKH Wels (Austria). Inst. fuer Radiologie; Krennmair, G. [Praxis fuer Zahn-, Mund- und Kieferheilkunde und Implantologie, Marchtrenk (Austria)

    1999-12-01

    Traditionally oral surgeons and dentists have evaluated the jaws using intraoral films and panoramic radiographs. The involvement of radiologists has been limited. In the past few years dedicated CT-software-programs developed to evaluate dental implant patients have provided a new look at the jaws. The complex anatomy is described and identified on human skulls and on axial, panoramic, and cross-sectional images. With this anatomic description Dental-CT-scans are used to demonstrate the anatomy of maxilla and the mandible. An overview of the technique of Dental-CT is provided, furthermore the radiation dose of different organs is explained. Suggestions to reduce these doses by simple modifications of the recommended protocols are given. (orig.) [German] Die Einfuehrung im Bereich der Computertomographiesoftware (Dental-CT) ermoeglicht dem Radiologen zusaetzlich zu den ueblichen, von den Zahnaerzten durchgefuehrten Roentgenuntersuchungen eine ueberlagerungs- und verzerrungsfreie Darstellung des Ober- und Unterkiefers. In der Implantologie ist mit dieser Darstellung eine exakte Planung moeglich. Weiterhin haben sich Duennschicht-CT-Untersuchungen auch bei der Abklaerung von Zysten, Tumoren, Frakturen, tiefen Parodontitiden und retinierten Zaehnen bewaehrt. In dieser Zeit wird ein Ueberblick ueber die Anatomie, die Untersuchungstechnik des Dental-CT und die auftretende Strahlenbelastung gegeben. Basierend auf rezente Literaturangaben kann eine Reduktion der absorbierten Dosis bei gleichbleibender Bildqualitaet durch einfache Protokollmodifikationen erzielt werden. (orig.)

  8. Imaging techniques and investigation protocols in pediatric emergency imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scharitzer, M.; Hoermann, M.; Puig, S.; Prokop, M.

    2002-01-01

    Paediatric emergencies demand a quick and efficient radiological investigation with special attention to specific adjustments related to patient age and radiation protection. Imaging modalities are improving rapidly and enable to diagnose childhood diseases and injuries more quickly, accurately and safely. This article provides an overview of imaging techniques adjusted to the age of the child and an overview of imaging strategies of common paediatric emergencies. Optimising the imaging parameters (digital radiography, different screen-film systems, exposure specifications) allows for substantial reduction of radiation dose. Spiral- and multislice-CT reduce scan time and enable a considerable reduction of radiation exposure if scanning parameters (pitch setting, tube current) are properly adjusted. MRI is still mainly used for neurological or spinal emergencies despite the advent of fast imaging sequences. The radiologist's task is to select an appropriate imaging strategy according to expected differential diagnosis and to adjust the imaging techniques to the individual patient. (orig.) [de

  9. Optimization of oncological {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT imaging based on a multiparameter analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menezes, Vinicius O., E-mail: vinicius@radtec.com.br [Nuclear Medicine Department, São Rafael Hospital, Salvador 41720-375, Brazil and Nuclear Medicine Department, Hospital das Clínicas da Universidade Federal de Pernambuco/Ebserh, Recife 50670-901 (Brazil); Machado, Marcos A. D. [Nuclear Medicine Department, São Rafael Hospital, Salvador 41720-375, Brazil and Nuclear Medicine Department, Hospital das Clínicas da Universidade Federal de Bahia/Ebserh, Salvador 40110-060 (Brazil); Queiroz, Cleiton C. [Nuclear Medicine Department, São Rafael Hospital, Salvador 41720-375, Brazil and Nuclear Medicine Department, Hospital Universitário Professor Alberto Antunes/Ebserh, Maceió 57072-900 (Brazil); Souza, Susana O. [Department of Physics, Universidade Federal de Sergipe, São Cristóvão 49100-000 (Brazil); D’Errico, Francesco [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 and School of Engineering, University of Pisa, Pisa 56126 (Italy); Namías, Mauro [Fundación Centro Diagnóstico Nuclear, Buenos Aires C1417CVE (Argentina); Larocca, Ticiana F. [Centro de Biotecnologia e Terapia Celular, São Rafael Hospital, Salvador 41253-190 (Brazil); Soares, Milena B. P. [Centro de Biotecnologia e Terapia Celular, São Rafael Hospital, Salvador 41253-190, Brazil and Fundação Oswaldo Cruz, Centro de Pesq. Gonçalo Moniz, Salvador 40296-710 (Brazil)

    2016-02-15

    Purpose: This paper describes a method to achieve consistent clinical image quality in {sup 18}F-FDG scans accounting for patient habitus, dose regimen, image acquisition, and processing techniques. Methods: Oncological PET/CT scan data for 58 subjects were evaluated retrospectively to derive analytical curves that predict image quality. Patient noise equivalent count rate and coefficient of variation (CV) were used as metrics in their analysis. Optimized acquisition protocols were identified and prospectively applied to 179 subjects. Results: The adoption of different schemes for three body mass ranges (<60 kg, 60–90 kg, >90 kg) allows improved image quality with both point spread function and ordered-subsets expectation maximization-3D reconstruction methods. The application of this methodology showed that CV improved significantly (p < 0.0001) in clinical practice. Conclusions: Consistent oncological PET/CT image quality on a high-performance scanner was achieved from an analysis of the relations existing between dose regimen, patient habitus, acquisition, and processing techniques. The proposed methodology may be used by PET/CT centers to develop protocols to standardize PET/CT imaging procedures and achieve better patient management and cost-effective operations.

  10. WE-A-BRF-01: Dual-Energy CT Imaging in Diagnostic Imaging and Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molloi, S; Li, B; Yin, F; Chen, H

    2014-01-01

    The quantification accuracy of dual-energy imaging is influenced by the fundamentals of x-ray physics, system geometry, data acquisition hardware/protocol, system calibration, and image processing technique. This symposium will provide updates on the following advanced application areas: Mammography. Volumetric breast density techniques based on standard mammograms require estimation of breast thickness, which is difficult to accurately measure. By comparison, calculation of breast density using dual energy mammography does not require measurement of breast thickness. Dual energy mammography has been implemented using both energy integrating flat panel detectors in conjunction with beam energy switching and energy resolved photon counting detectors. These techniques have been optimized using simulation studies and validated using physical phantoms and postmortem breasts. Chemical decomposition was used as the gold standard for volumetric breast density measurement in postmortem breasts. Breast density measurements have also been compared with results from four-category BI-RADS density rankings, standard image thresholding and Fuzzy k-mean clustering techniques. These studies indicate that dual energy mammography can be used to accurately measure volumetric breast density. Cardiovascular CT. The predicative accuracy of risk models for recurrent stroke and cardiac arrest depends heavily on accurate differentiation of thrombus or calcium from iodine in left atrial appendage or coronary arteries. The amount of energy separation is constrained by image noise; therefore, optimal kVp, beam filtration, and balanced flux are essential for the quantification accuracy of iodine and calcium. The basis materials are combined linearly to generate monochromatic energy images, where CT# accuracy and CNR are energy dependent. With optimal monochromatic energy, the mean iodine concentration for the thrombus, circulatory stasis, and control groups are significantly different. Risk

  11. A contrast enhancement and scanning techniques for CT angiography of head and neck. One phase injection method for simultaneous imaging of vessels and tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, Yasuhiko; Indo, Hiroko; Noikura, Takenori

    1999-01-01

    We report on a method of CT-Angiography useful for examining lesion of the head and neck using three-dimensional images and measured CT value. This study focused on some of the important blood vessels in the head and neck. The aim of this method was to obtain high-contrast enhancement for both vessels and tumors at same time. A total amount of 100 ml nonionic contrast media (Omnipaque 240, 240 mg iodine per milliliter, Daiichi seiyaku, Tokyo, Japan) was injected intravenously with a flow of 1.5 ml/sec. Spiral scans, 24 rotations with 24 seconds, were started at a time when remaining amount of contrast media had become 30 to 20 ml. All CT scans were performed using double speed spiral scan technique with a slice thickness of 2 to 3 mm and table speeds from 3 to 5 mm/rotation. The patients populations consisted of 9 men and 6 women who ranged in age from 37 to 85 years. Sixteen CT-angiography were performed according to this method. Mean CT values of major blood vessels were measured in order to find out threshold at the level of submandibular gland in 13 examinations for 12 subjects. Important vessels like the common, internal, and the external artery, internal and external jugular vein were clearly visible in all subjects. Three dimensional images of these vessels could also be reconstructed for 15 of the subjects. Mean CT values were 211 Hounsfield units (HU) and 209 HU for the right and left internal carotid artery, respectively, and 204 HU and 206 HU for the right and left external carotid artery, respectively. Mean CT values for right and left internal jugular vein were 195 HU and 194 HU respectively. Measured CT values at each important blood vessels showed this method could yields acceptable enhancements. Good enhancement effect of tumor and blood vessels in the same scan seems to be mutually incompatible. One very important trade-off is the early enhancement effect at blood vessels versus the late enhancement effect at tumors. The other important trade

  12. Upright CBCT: A novel imaging technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xenia J Fave

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: We present a method for acquiring and correcting upright images using the on board CBCT imager. An upright imaging technique would allow for the introduction of upright radiation therapy treatments, which would benefit a variety of patients including those with thoracic cancers whose lung volumes are increased in an upright position and those who experience substantial discomfort during supine treatment positions.Methods: To acquire upright CBCT images, the linac head was positioned at 0 degrees, the KV imager and detector arms extended to their lateral positions, and the couch placed at 270 degrees. The KV imager was programmed to begin taking continuous fluoroscopic projections as the couch rotated from 270 to 90 degrees. The FOV was extended by performing this procedure twice, once with the detector shifted 14.5 cm towards the gantry and once with it shifted 14.5 cm away from the gantry. The two resulting sets of images were stitched together prior to reconstruction. The imaging parameters were chosen to deliver the some dose as that delivered during a simulation CT. A simulation CT was deformably registered to an upright CBCT reconstruction in order to evaluate the possibility of correcting the HU values via mapping.Results: Both spatial linearity and high contrast resolution were maintained in upright CBCT when compared to a simulation CT. Low contrast resolution and HU linearity decreased. Streaking artifacts were caused by the limited 180 degree arc angle and a sharp point artifact in the center of the axial slices resulted at the site of the stitching. A method for correcting the HUs was shown to be robust against these artifacts.Conclusion: Upright CBCT could be of great benefit to many patients. This study demonstrates its feasibility and presents solutions to some of its first hurdles before clinical implementation.--------------------------Cite this article as:Fave X, Yang J, Balter P, Court L. Upright CBCT: A novel imaging

  13. Coronary artery plaques: Cardiac CT with model-based and adaptive-statistical iterative reconstruction technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheffel, Hans; Stolzmann, Paul; Schlett, Christopher L.; Engel, Leif-Christopher; Major, Gyöngi Petra; Károlyi, Mihály; Do, Synho; Maurovich-Horvat, Pál; Hoffmann, Udo

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To compare image quality of coronary artery plaque visualization at CT angiography with images reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP), adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR), and model based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) techniques. Methods: The coronary arteries of three ex vivo human hearts were imaged by CT and reconstructed with FBP, ASIR and MBIR. Coronary cross-sectional images were co-registered between the different reconstruction techniques and assessed for qualitative and quantitative image quality parameters. Readers were blinded to the reconstruction algorithm. Results: A total of 375 triplets of coronary cross-sectional images were co-registered. Using MBIR, 26% of the images were rated as having excellent overall image quality, which was significantly better as compared to ASIR and FBP (4% and 13%, respectively, all p < 0.001). Qualitative assessment of image noise demonstrated a noise reduction by using ASIR as compared to FBP (p < 0.01) and further noise reduction by using MBIR (p < 0.001). The contrast-to-noise-ratio (CNR) using MBIR was better as compared to ASIR and FBP (44 ± 19, 29 ± 15, 26 ± 9, respectively; all p < 0.001). Conclusions: Using MBIR improved image quality, reduced image noise and increased CNR as compared to the other available reconstruction techniques. This may further improve the visualization of coronary artery plaque and allow radiation reduction.

  14. Three-dimensional CT and MR imaging in congenital dislocation of the hip: Technical considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lang, P.; Steiger, P.; Lindquist, T.; Skinner, S.; Moore, S.; Chafetz, N.I.; Genant, H.K.

    1987-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) software techniques were developed to generate diagnostic-quality three-dimensional (3D) MR studies in two patients with congenital dislocation of the hip. Comparable 3D CT studies were obtained in two other patients. Unsharp masks were divided into the original MR images to correct for local variations in signal intensity. Combinations of first- and second-echo images improved the object contrast. Pixels with insufficient homogeneity relative to their neighboring data were excluded. CT did not require 2D preprocessing. Three-dimensional CT and MR images demonstrated subluxation and dislocation. 3D MR, in contrast to CT, demonstrated the cartilaginous femoral head. The described 2D MR preprocessing provides diagnostic-quality 3D MR studies. It will be useful for generating 3D MR images of other anatomic structures

  15. Multislice CT imaging of pulmonary embolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoepf, J.U.; Kessler, M.A.; Rieger, C.T.; Herzog, P.; Wiesgigl, S.; Becker, C.R.; Exarhos, D.N.; Reiser, M.F.

    2001-01-01

    In recent years CT has been established as the method of choice for the diagnosis of central pulmonary embolism (PE) to the level of the segmental arteries. The key advantage of CT over competing modalities is the reliable detection of relevant alternative or additional disease causing the patient's symptoms. Although the clinical relevance of isolated peripheral emboli remains unclear, the alleged poor sensitivity of CT for the detection of such small clots has to date prevented the acceptance of CT as the gold standard for diagnosing PE. With the advent of multislice CT we can now cover the entire chest of a patient with 1-mm slices within one breath-hold. In comparison with thicker sections, the detection rate of subsegmental emboli can be significantly increased with 1-mm slices. In addition, the interobserver correlation which can be achieved with 1-mm sections by far exceeds the reproducibility of competing modalities. Meanwhile use of multislice CT for a combined diagnosis of PE and deep venous thrombosis with the same modality appears to be clinically accepted. In the vast majority of patients who receive a combined thoracic and venous multislice CT examination the scan either confirms the suspected diagnosis or reveals relevant alternative or additional disease. The therapeutic regimen is usually chosen based on the functional effect of embolic vascular occlusion. With the advent of fast CT scanning techniques, also functional parameters of lung perfusion can be non-invasively assessed by CT imaging. These advantages let multislice CT appear as an attractive modality for a non-invasive, fast, accurate, and comprehensive diagnosis of PE, its causes, effects, and differential diagnoses. (orig.)

  16. 3D-CT imaging processing for qualitative and quantitative analysis of maxillofacial cysts and tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavalcanti, Marcelo de Gusmao Paraiso [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Odontologia. Dept. de Radiologia; Antunes, Jose Leopoldo Ferreira [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Odotologia. Dept. de Odontologia Social

    2002-09-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate spiral-computed tomography (3D-CT) images of 20 patients presenting with cysts and tumors in the maxillofacial complex, in order to compare the surface and volume techniques of image rendering. The qualitative and quantitative appraisal indicated that the volume technique allowed a more precise and accurate observation than the surface method. On the average, the measurements obtained by means of the 3D volume-rendering technique were 6.28% higher than those obtained by means of the surface method. The sensitivity of the 3D surface technique was lower than that of the 3D volume technique for all conditions stipulated in the diagnosis and evaluation of lesions. We concluded that the 3D-CT volume rendering technique was more reproducible and sensitive than the 3D-CT surface method, in the diagnosis, treatment planning and evaluation of maxillofacial lesions, especially those with intra-osseous involvement. (author)

  17. 3D-CT imaging processing for qualitative and quantitative analysis of maxillofacial cysts and tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavalcanti, Marcelo de Gusmao Paraiso; Antunes, Jose Leopoldo Ferreira

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate spiral-computed tomography (3D-CT) images of 20 patients presenting with cysts and tumors in the maxillofacial complex, in order to compare the surface and volume techniques of image rendering. The qualitative and quantitative appraisal indicated that the volume technique allowed a more precise and accurate observation than the surface method. On the average, the measurements obtained by means of the 3D volume-rendering technique were 6.28% higher than those obtained by means of the surface method. The sensitivity of the 3D surface technique was lower than that of the 3D volume technique for all conditions stipulated in the diagnosis and evaluation of lesions. We concluded that the 3D-CT volume rendering technique was more reproducible and sensitive than the 3D-CT surface method, in the diagnosis, treatment planning and evaluation of maxillofacial lesions, especially those with intra-osseous involvement. (author)

  18. Automated interpretation of PET/CT images in patients with lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gutte, Henrik; Jakobsson, David; Olofsson, Fredrik

    2007-01-01

    cancer. METHODS: A total of 87 patients who underwent PET/CT examinations due to suspected lung cancer comprised the training group. The test group consisted of PET/CT images from 49 patients suspected with lung cancer. The consensus interpretations by two experienced physicians were used as the 'gold...... method measured as the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, was 0.97 in the test group, with an accuracy of 92%. The sensitivity was 86% at a specificity of 100%. CONCLUSIONS: A completely automated method using artificial neural networks can be used to detect lung cancer......PURPOSE: To develop a completely automated method based on image processing techniques and artificial neural networks for the interpretation of combined [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) images for the diagnosis and staging of lung...

  19. Could new reconstruction CT techniques challenge MRI for the detection of brain metastases in the context of initial lung cancer staging?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Millon, Domitille; Byl, David; Coche, Emmanuel E. [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Department of Radiology and Medical Imaging, Cliniques Universitaires Saint Luc, Brussels (Belgium); Collard, Philippe [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Department of Pneumology, Cliniques Universitaires Saint Luc, Brussels (Belgium); Cambier, Samantha E.; Maanen, Aline G. van [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Statistic Unit, King Albert II Cancer Institute, Brussels (Belgium); Vlassenbroek, Alain [Philips Healthcare, Brussels (Belgium)

    2018-02-15

    To evaluate the diagnostic performance of brain CT images reconstructed with a model-based iterative algorithm performed at usual and reduced dose. 115 patients with histologically proven lung cancer were prospectively included over 15 months. Patients underwent two CT acquisitions at the initial staging, performed on a 256-slice MDCT, at standard (CTDIvol: 41.4 mGy) and half dose (CTDIvol: 20.7 mGy). Both image datasets were reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP) and iterative model-based reconstruction (IMR) algorithms. Brain MRI was considered as the reference. Two blinded independent readers analysed the images. Ninety-three patients underwent all examinations. At the standard dose, eight patients presented 17 and 15 lesions on IMR and FBP CT images, respectively. At half-dose, seven patients presented 15 and 13 lesions on IMR and FBP CT images, respectively. The test could not highlight any significant difference between the standard dose IMR and the half-dose FBP techniques (p-value = 0.12). MRI showed 46 metastases on 11 patients. Specificity, negative and positive predictive values were calculated (98.9-100 %, 93.6-94.6 %, 75-100 %, respectively, for all CT techniques). No significant difference could be demonstrated between the two CT reconstruction techniques. (orig.)

  20. Imaging and PET - PET/CT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Von Schulthess, G.K.; Hany, Th.F.

    2008-01-01

    PET/CT has grown because the lack of anatomic landmarks in PET makes 'hardware-fusion' to anatomic cross-sectional data extremely useful. Addition of CT to PET improves specificity, but also sensitivity, and adding PET to CT adds sensitivity and specificity in tumor imaging. The synergistic advantage of adding CT is that the attenuation correction needed for PET data can also be derived from the CT data. This makes PET-CT 25-30% faster than PET alone, leading to higher patient throughput and a more comfortable examination for patients typically lasting 20 minutes or less. FDG-PET-CT appears to provide relevant information in the staging and therapy monitoring of many tumors, such as lung carcinoma, colorectal cancer, lymphoma, gynaecological cancers, melanoma and many others, with the notable exception of prostatic cancer. for this cancer, choline derivatives may possibly become useful radiopharmaceuticals. The published literature on the applications of FDG-PET-CT in oncology is still limited but several designed studies have demonstrated the benefits of PET-CT. (authors)

  1. Integration of PET-CT and cone-beam CT for image-guided radiotherapy with high image quality and registration accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, T.-H.; Liang, C.-H.; Wu, J.-K.; Lien, C.-Y.; Yang, B.-H.; Huang, Y.-H.; Lee, J. J. S.

    2009-07-01

    Hybrid positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) system enhances better differentiation of tissue uptake of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) and provides much more diagnostic value in the non-small-cell lung cancer and nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). In PET-CT, high quality CT images not only offer diagnostic value on anatomic delineation of the tissues but also shorten the acquisition time for attenuation correction (AC) compared with PET-alone imaging. The linear accelerators equipped with the X-ray cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging system for image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) provides excellent verification on position setup error. The purposes of our study were to optimize the CT acquisition protocols of PET-CT and to integrate the PET-CT and CBCT for IGRT. The CT imaging parameters were modified in PET-CT for increasing the image quality in order to enhance the diagnostic value on tumour delineation. Reproducibility and registration accuracy via bone co-registration algorithm between the PET-CT and CBCT were evaluated by using a head phantom to simulate a head and neck treatment condition. Dose measurement in computed tomography dose index (CTDI) was also estimated. Optimization of the CT acquisition protocols of PET-CT was feasible in this study. Co-registration accuracy between CBCT and PET-CT on axial and helical modes was in the range of 1.06 to 2.08 and 0.99 to 2.05 mm, respectively. In our result, it revealed that the accuracy of the co-registration with CBCT on helical mode was more accurate than that on axial mode. Radiation doses in CTDI were 4.76 to 18.5 mGy and 4.83 to 18.79 mGy on axial and helical modes, respectively. Registration between PET-CT and CBCT is a state-of-the-art registration technology which could provide much information on diagnosis and accurate tumour contouring on radiotherapy while implementing radiotherapy procedures. This novelty technology of PET-CT and cone-beam CT integration for IGRT may have a

  2. Integration of PET-CT and cone-beam CT for image-guided radiotherapy with high image quality and registration accuracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, T-H; Liang, C-H; Wu, J-K; Lien, C-Y; Yang, B-H; Lee, J J S; Huang, Y-H

    2009-01-01

    Hybrid positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) system enhances better differentiation of tissue uptake of 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG) and provides much more diagnostic value in the non-small-cell lung cancer and nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). In PET-CT, high quality CT images not only offer diagnostic value on anatomic delineation of the tissues but also shorten the acquisition time for attenuation correction (AC) compared with PET-alone imaging. The linear accelerators equipped with the X-ray cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging system for image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) provides excellent verification on position setup error. The purposes of our study were to optimize the CT acquisition protocols of PET-CT and to integrate the PET-CT and CBCT for IGRT. The CT imaging parameters were modified in PET-CT for increasing the image quality in order to enhance the diagnostic value on tumour delineation. Reproducibility and registration accuracy via bone co-registration algorithm between the PET-CT and CBCT were evaluated by using a head phantom to simulate a head and neck treatment condition. Dose measurement in computed tomography dose index (CTDI) was also estimated. Optimization of the CT acquisition protocols of PET-CT was feasible in this study. Co-registration accuracy between CBCT and PET-CT on axial and helical modes was in the range of 1.06 to 2.08 and 0.99 to 2.05 mm, respectively. In our result, it revealed that the accuracy of the co-registration with CBCT on helical mode was more accurate than that on axial mode. Radiation doses in CTDI were 4.76 to 18.5 mGy and 4.83 to 18.79 mGy on axial and helical modes, respectively. Registration between PET-CT and CBCT is a state-of-the-art registration technology which could provide much information on diagnosis and accurate tumour contouring on radiotherapy while implementing radiotherapy procedures. This novelty technology of PET-CT and cone-beam CT integration for IGRT may have a

  3. Clinical assessment of SPECT/CT co-registration image fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Wen; Luan Zhaosheng; Peng Yong

    2004-01-01

    Objective: Study the methodology of the SPECT/CT co-registration image fusion, and Assessment the Clinical application value. Method: 172 patients who underwent SPECT/CT image fusion during 2001-2003 were studied, 119 men, 53 women. 51 patients underwent 18FDG image +CT, 26 patients underwent 99m Tc-RBC Liver pool image +CT, 43 patients underwent 99mTc-MDP Bone image +CT, 18 patients underwent 99m Tc-MAA Lung perfusion image +CT. The machine is Millium VG SPECT of GE Company. All patients have been taken three steps image: X-ray survey, X-ray transmission and nuclear emission image (Including planer imaging, SPECT or 18 F-FDG of dual head camera) without changing the position of the patients. We reconstruct the emission image with X-ray map and do reconstruction, 18FDG with COSEM and 99mTc with OSEM. Then combine the transmission image and the reconstructed emission image. We use different process parameters in deferent image methods. The accurate rate of SPECT/CT image fusion were statistics, and compare their accurate with that of single nuclear emission image. Results: The nuclear image which have been reconstructed by X-ray attenuation and OSEM are apparent better than pre-reconstructed. The post-reconstructed emission images have no scatter lines around the organs. The outline between different issues is more clear than before. The validity of All post-reconstructed images is better than pre-reconstructed. SPECT/CT image fusion make localization have worthy bases. 138 patients, the accuracy of SPECT/CT image fusion is 91.3% (126/138), whereas 60(88.2%) were found through SPECT/CT image fusion, There are significant difference between them(P 99m Tc- RBC-SPECT +CT image fusion, but 21 of them were inspected by emission image. In BONE 99m Tc -MDP-SPECT +CT image fusion, 4 patients' removed bone(1-6 months after surgery) and their relay with normal bone had activity, their morphologic and density in CT were different from normal bones. 11 of 20 patients who could

  4. Weight preserving image registration for monitoring disease progression in lung CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbunova, Vladlena; Lol, Pechin; Ashraf, Haseem; Dirksen, Asger; Nielsen, Mads; de Bruijne, Marleen

    2008-01-01

    We present a new image registration based method for monitoring regional disease progression in longitudinal image studies of lung disease. A free-form image registration technique is used to match a baseline 3D CT lung scan onto a following scan. Areas with lower intensity in the following scan compared with intensities in the deformed baseline image indicate local loss of lung tissue that is associated with progression of emphysema. To account for differences in lung intensity owing to differences in the inspiration level in the two scans rather than disease progression, we propose to adjust the density of lung tissue with respect to local expansion or compression such that the total weight of the lungs is preserved during deformation. Our method provides a good estimation of regional destruction of lung tissue for subjects with a significant difference in inspiration level between CT scans and may result in a more sensitive measure of disease progression than standard quantitative CT measures.

  5. CT simulation technique for craniospinal irradiation in supine position

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Suk; Kim, Yong Bae; Chu, Sung Sil; Suh, Chang Ok; Kwon, Soo Il

    2002-01-01

    In order to perform craniospinal irradiation (CSI) in the supine position on patients who are unable to lie in the prone position, a new simulation technique using a CT simulator was developed and its availability was evaluated. A CT simulator and a 3-D conformal treatment planning system were used to develop CSI in the supine position. The head and neck were immobilized with a thermoplastic mask in the supine position and the entire body was immobilized with a Vac-Loc. A volumetric image was then obtained using the CT simulator. In order to improve the reproducibility of the patients' setup, datum lines and points were marked on the head and the body. Virtual fluoroscopy was performed with the removal of visual obstacles such as the treatment table or the immobilization devices. After the virtual simulation, the treatment isocenters of each field were marked on the body and the immobilization devices at the conventional simulation room. Each treatment field was confirmed by comparing the fluoroscopy images with the digitally reconstructed radiography (DRR)/digitally composite radiography (DCR) images from the virtual simulation. The port verification films from the first treatment were also compared with the DRR/DCR images for a geometrical verification. CSI in the supine position was successfully performed in 9 patients. It required less than 20 minutes to construct the immobilization device and to obtain the whole body volumetric images. This made it possible to not only reduce the patients' inconvenience, but also to eliminate the position change variables during the long conventional simulation process. In addition, by obtaining the CT volumetric image, critical organs, such as the eyeballs and spinal cord, were better defined, and the accuracy of the port designs and shielding was improved. The difference between the DRRs and the portal films were less than 3 mm in the vertebral contour. CSI in the supine position is feasible in patients who cannot lie on

  6. CT simulation technique for craniospinal irradiation in supine position

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Suk; Kim, Yong Bae; Chu, Sung Sil; Suh, Chang Ok [Yonsei Cancer Center, College of Medicine, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Soo Il [Kyonggi University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-06-15

    In order to perform craniospinal irradiation (CSI) in the supine position on patients who are unable to lie in the prone position, a new simulation technique using a CT simulator was developed and its availability was evaluated. A CT simulator and a 3-D conformal treatment planning system were used to develop CSI in the supine position. The head and neck were immobilized with a thermoplastic mask in the supine position and the entire body was immobilized with a Vac-Loc. A volumetric image was then obtained using the CT simulator. In order to improve the reproducibility of the patients' setup, datum lines and points were marked on the head and the body. Virtual fluoroscopy was performed with the removal of visual obstacles such as the treatment table or the immobilization devices. After the virtual simulation, the treatment isocenters of each field were marked on the body and the immobilization devices at the conventional simulation room. Each treatment field was confirmed by comparing the fluoroscopy images with the digitally reconstructed radiography (DRR)/digitally composite radiography (DCR) images from the virtual simulation. The port verification films from the first treatment were also compared with the DRR/DCR images for a geometrical verification. CSI in the supine position was successfully performed in 9 patients. It required less than 20 minutes to construct the immobilization device and to obtain the whole body volumetric images. This made it possible to not only reduce the patients' inconvenience, but also to eliminate the position change variables during the long conventional simulation process. In addition, by obtaining the CT volumetric image, critical organs, such as the eyeballs and spinal cord, were better defined, and the accuracy of the port designs and shielding was improved. The difference between the DRRs and the portal films were less than 3 mm in the vertebral contour. CSI in the supine position is feasible in patients who cannot

  7. Scatter correction, intermediate view estimation and dose characterization in megavoltage cone-beam CT imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sramek, Benjamin Koerner

    The ability to deliver conformal dose distributions in radiation therapy through intensity modulation and the potential for tumor dose escalation to improve treatment outcome has necessitated an increase in localization accuracy of inter- and intra-fractional patient geometry. Megavoltage cone-beam CT imaging using the treatment beam and onboard electronic portal imaging device is one option currently being studied for implementation in image-guided radiation therapy. However, routine clinical use is predicated upon continued improvements in image quality and patient dose delivered during acquisition. The formal statement of hypothesis for this investigation was that the conformity of planned to delivered dose distributions in image-guided radiation therapy could be further enhanced through the application of kilovoltage scatter correction and intermediate view estimation techniques to megavoltage cone-beam CT imaging, and that normalized dose measurements could be acquired and inter-compared between multiple imaging geometries. The specific aims of this investigation were to: (1) incorporate the Feldkamp, Davis and Kress filtered backprojection algorithm into a program to reconstruct a voxelized linear attenuation coefficient dataset from a set of acquired megavoltage cone-beam CT projections, (2) characterize the effects on megavoltage cone-beam CT image quality resulting from the application of Intermediate View Interpolation and Intermediate View Reprojection techniques to limited-projection datasets, (3) incorporate the Scatter and Primary Estimation from Collimator Shadows (SPECS) algorithm into megavoltage cone-beam CT image reconstruction and determine the set of SPECS parameters which maximize image quality and quantitative accuracy, and (4) evaluate the normalized axial dose distributions received during megavoltage cone-beam CT image acquisition using radiochromic film and thermoluminescent dosimeter measurements in anthropomorphic pelvic and head and

  8. Postoperative evaluation after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: Measurements and abnormalities on radiographic and CT imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Min Cheol; Choi, Yun Sun; KIm, Hyoung Seop; Choi, Nam Hong [Nowon Eulji Medical Center, Eulji University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    Reconstruction of a ruptured anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is a well-established procedure for repair of ACL injury. Despite improvement of surgical and rehabilitation techniques over the past decades, up to 25% of patients still fail to regain satisfactory function after an ACL reconstruction. With development of CT imaging techniques for reducing metal artifacts, multi-planar reconstruction, and three-dimensional reconstruction, early post-operative imaging is increasingly being used to provide immediate feedback to surgeons regarding tunnel positioning, fixation, and device placement. Early post-operative radiography and CT imaging are easy to perform and serve as the baseline examinations for future reference.

  9. PET/CT imaging in head and neck tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roedel, R.; Palmedo, H.; Reichmann, K.; Reinhardt, M.J.; Biersack, H.J.; Straehler-Pohl, H.J.; Jaeger, U.

    2004-01-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of combined PET/CT examinations for detection of malignant tumors and their metastases in head and neck oncology. 51 patients received whole body scans on a dual modality PET/CT system. CT was performed without i.v. contrast. The results were compared concerning the diagnostic impact of native CT scan on FDG-PET images and the additional value of fused imaging. From 153 lesions were 97 classified as malignant on CT and 136 on FDG/PET images, as suspicious for malignancy in 33 on CT and 7 on FDG-PET and as benign in 23 on CT and 10 on FDG-PET. With combined PET/CT all primary and recurrent tumors could be found, the detection rate in patients with unknown primary tumors was 45%. Compared to PET or CT alone the sensitivity, specifity and accuracy could be significantly improved by means of combined PET/CT. Fused PET/CT imaging with [F18]-FDG and native CT-scanning enables accurate diagnosis in 93% of lesions and 90% of patients with head and neck oncology. (orig.) [de

  10. An attenuation correction method for PET/CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ue, Hidenori; Yamazaki, Tomohiro; Haneishi, Hideaki

    2006-01-01

    In PET/CT systems, accurate attenuation correction can be achieved by creating an attenuation map from an X-ray CT image. On the other hand, respiratory-gated PET acquisition is an effective method for avoiding motion blurring of the thoracic and abdominal organs caused by respiratory motion. In PET/CT systems employing respiratory-gated PET, using an X-ray CT image acquired during breath-holding for attenuation correction may have a large effect on the voxel values, especially in regions with substantial respiratory motion. In this report, we propose an attenuation correction method in which, as the first step, a set of respiratory-gated PET images is reconstructed without attenuation correction, as the second step, the motion of each phase PET image from the PET image in the same phase as the CT acquisition timing is estimated by the previously proposed method, as the third step, the CT image corresponding to each respiratory phase is generated from the original CT image by deformation according to the motion vector maps, and as the final step, attenuation correction using these CT images and reconstruction are performed. The effectiveness of the proposed method was evaluated using 4D-NCAT phantoms, and good stability of the voxel values near the diaphragm was observed. (author)

  11. Image Fusion of CT and MR with Sparse Representation in NSST Domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenhui Qiu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Multimodal image fusion techniques can integrate the information from different medical images to get an informative image that is more suitable for joint diagnosis, preoperative planning, intraoperative guidance, and interventional treatment. Fusing images of CT and different MR modalities are studied in this paper. Firstly, the CT and MR images are both transformed to nonsubsampled shearlet transform (NSST domain. So the low-frequency components and high-frequency components are obtained. Then the high-frequency components are merged using the absolute-maximum rule, while the low-frequency components are merged by a sparse representation- (SR- based approach. And the dynamic group sparsity recovery (DGSR algorithm is proposed to improve the performance of the SR-based approach. Finally, the fused image is obtained by performing the inverse NSST on the merged components. The proposed fusion method is tested on a number of clinical CT and MR images and compared with several popular image fusion methods. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed fusion method can provide better fusion results in terms of subjective quality and objective evaluation.

  12. Dual source CT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidensticker, Peter R.; Hofmann, Lars K.

    2008-01-01

    The introduction of Dual Source Computed Tomography (DSCT) in 2005 was an evolutionary leap in the field of CT imaging. Two x-ray sources operated simultaneously enable heart-rate independent temporal resolution and routine spiral dual energy imaging. The precise delivery of contrast media is a critical part of the contrast-enhanced CT procedure. This book provides an introduction to DSCT technology and to the basics of contrast media administration followed by 25 in-depth clinical scan and contrast media injection protocols. All were developed in consensus by selected physicians on the Dual Source CT Expert Panel. Each protocol is complemented by individual considerations, tricks and pitfalls, and by clinical examples from several of the world's best radiologists and cardiologists. This extensive CME-accredited manual is intended to help readers to achieve consistently high image quality, optimal patient care, and a solid starting point for the development of their own unique protocols. (orig.)

  13. Synchrotron-based DEI for bio-imaging and DEI-CT to image phantoms with contrast agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, Donepudi V.; Swapna, Medasani; Cesareo, Roberto; Brunetti, Antonio; Akatsuka, Tako; Yuasa, Tetsuya; Zhong, Zhong; Takeda, Tohoru; Gigante, Giovanni E.

    2012-01-01

    The introduction of water, physiological, or iodine as contrast agents is shown to enhance minute image features in synchrotron-based X-ray diffraction radiographic and tomographic imaging. Anatomical features of rat kidney, such as papillary ducts, ureter, renal artery and renal vein are clearly distinguishable. Olfactory bulb, olfactory tact, and descending bundles of the rat brain are visible with improved contrast. - Highlights: ► Distinguishable anatomical structures features of rat kidney and rat brain are acquired with Sy-DEI in planar mode. ► Images of a small brain phantom and cylindrical phantom are acquired in tomography mode (Sy-DEI-CT) with contrast agents. ► Sy-DEI and Sy-DEI-CT techniques provide new source of information related to biological microanatomy.

  14. A review of imaging techniques for systems biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po Ming J

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper presents a review of imaging techniques and of their utility in system biology. During the last decade systems biology has matured into a distinct field and imaging has been increasingly used to enable the interplay of experimental and theoretical biology. In this review, we describe and compare the roles of microscopy, ultrasound, CT (Computed Tomography, MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging, PET (Positron Emission Tomography, and molecular probes such as quantum dots and nanoshells in systems biology. As a unified application area among these different imaging techniques, examples in cancer targeting are highlighted.

  15. Validation of a large-scale audit technique for CT dose optimisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, T. J.; Davis, A. W.; Moore, C. S.; Beavis, A. W.; Saunderson, J. R.

    2008-01-01

    The expansion and increasing availability of computed tomography (CT) imaging means that there is a greater need for the development of efficient optimisation strategies that are able to inform clinical practice, without placing a significant burden on limited departmental resources. One of the most fundamental aspects to any optimisation programme is the collection of patient dose information, which can be compared with appropriate diagnostic reference levels. This study has investigated the implementation of a large-scale audit technique, which utilises data that already exist in the radiology information system, to determine typical doses for a range of examinations on four CT scanners. This method has been validated against what is considered the 'gold standard' technique for patient dose audits, and it has been demonstrated that results equivalent to the 'standard-sized patient' can be inferred from this much larger data set. This is particularly valuable where CT optimisation is concerned as it is considered a 'high dose' technique, and hence close monitoring of patient dose is particularly important. (authors)

  16. CT perfusion imaging in response assessment of pulmonary metastases undergoing stereotactic ablative radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawyer, Brooke; Pun, Emma; Tay, Huilee; Kron, Tomas; Bressel, Mathias; Ball, David; Siva, Shankar; Samuel, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR) is an emerging treatment technique for pulmonary metastases in which conventional Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumours (RECIST) may be inadequate. This study aims to assess the utility of CT perfusion imaging in response assessment of pulmonary metastases after SABR. In this ethics board-approved prospective study, 11 patients underwent a 26-Gy single fraction of SABR to pulmonary metastases. CT perfusion imaging occurred prior to and at 14 and 70 days post-SABR. Blood flow (mL/100 mL/min), blood volume (mL/100 mL), time to peak (seconds) and surface permeability (mL/100 mL/min), perfusion parameters of pulmonary metastases undergoing SABR, were independently assessed by two radiologists. Inter-observer variability was analysed. CT perfusion results were analysed for early response assessment comparing day 14 with baseline scans and for late response by comparing day 70 with baseline scans. The largest diameter of the pulmonary metastases undergoing SABR was recorded. Ten patients completed all three scans and one patient had baseline and early response assessment CT perfusion scans only. There was strong level of inter-observer agreement of CT perfusion interpretation with a median intraclass coefficient of 0.87 (range 0.20–0.98). Changes in all four perfusion parameters and tumour sizes were not statistically significant. CT perfusion imaging of pulmonary metastases is a highly reproducible imaging technique that may provide additional response assessment information above that of conventional RECIST, and it warrants further study in a larger cohort of patients undergoing SABR.

  17. Imaging features of primary Sarcomas of the great vessels in CT, MRI and PET/CT: a single-center experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falck, Christian von; Meyer, Bernhard; Fegbeutel, Christine; Länger, Florian; Bengel, Frank; Wacker, Frank; Rodt, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the imaging features of primary sarcomas of the great vessels in CT, MRI and 18 F-FDG PET/CT. Thirteen patients with a primary sarcoma of the great vessels were retrospectively evaluated. All available images studies including F-18 FDG PET(/CT) (n = 4), MDCT (n = 12) and MRI (n = 6) were evaluated and indicative image features of this rare tumor entity were identified. The median interval between the first imaging study and the final diagnosis was 11 weeks (0–12 weeks). The most frequently observed imaging findings suggestive of malignant disease in patients with sarcomas of the pulmonary arteries were a large filling defect with vascular distension, unilaterality and a lack of improvement despite effective anticoagulation. In patients with aortic sarcomas we most frequently observed a pedunculated appearance and an atypical location of the filling defect. The F-18 FDG PET(/CT) examinations demonstrated an unequivocal hypermetabolism of the lesion in all cases (4/4). MRI proved lesion vascularization in 5/6 cases. Intravascular unilateral or atypically located filling defects of the great vessels with vascular distension, a pedunculated shape and lack of improvement despite effective anticoagulation are suspicious for primary sarcoma on MDCT or MRI. MR perfusion techniques can add information on the nature of the lesion but the findings may be subtle and equivocal. F-18 FDG PET/CT may have a potential role in these patients and may be considered as part of the imaging workup

  18. Management of epithelial ovarian cancer from diagnosis to restaging: an overview of the role of imaging techniques with particular regard to the contribution of 18F-FDG PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musto, Alessandra; Grassetto, Gaia; Marzola, Maria Cristina; Rampin, Lucia; Chondrogiannis, Sotirios; Maffione, Anna Margherita; Colletti, Patrick M; Perkins, Alan C; Fagioli, Giorgio; Rubello, Domenico

    2014-06-01

    Epithelial ovarian carcinoma is a major form of cancer affecting women in the western world. The silent nature of this disease results in late presentation at an advanced stage in many patients. It is therefore important to assess the role of imaging techniques in the management of these patients. This article presents a review of the literature on the role of (18)F-FDG-PET/CT in the different stages of management of epithelial ovarian cancer. Moreover, a comparison with other imaging techniques has been made and the relationship between (18)F-PET/CT and the assay of serum CA-125 levels has been discussed.

  19. The influence of respiratory motion on CT image volume definition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodríguez-Romero, Ruth, E-mail: rrromero@salud.madrid.org; Castro-Tejero, Pablo, E-mail: pablo.castro@salud.madrid.org [Servicio de Radiofísica y Protección Radiológica, Hospital Universitario Puerta de Hierro Majadahonda, 28222 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: Radiotherapy treatments are based on geometric and density information acquired from patient CT scans. It is well established that breathing motion during scan acquisition induces motion artifacts in CT images, which can alter the size, shape, and density of a patient's anatomy. The aim of this work is to examine and evaluate the impact of breathing motion on multislice CT imaging with respiratory synchronization (4DCT) and without it (3DCT). Methods: A specific phantom with a movable insert was used. Static and dynamic phantom acquisitions were obtained with a multislice CT. Four sinusoidal breath patterns were simulated to move known geometric structures longitudinally. Respiratory synchronized acquisitions (4DCT) were performed to generate images during inhale, intermediate, and exhale phases using prospective and retrospective techniques. Static phantom data were acquired in helical and sequential mode to define a baseline for each type of respiratory 4DCT technique. Taking into account the fact that respiratory 4DCT is not always available, 3DCT helical image studies were also acquired for several CT rotation periods. To study breath and acquisition coupling when respiratory 4DCT was not performed, the beginning of the CT image acquisition was matched with inhale, intermediate, or exhale respiratory phases, for each breath pattern. Other coupling scenarios were evaluated by simulating different phantom and CT acquisition parameters. Motion induced variations in shape and density were quantified by automatic threshold volume generation and Dice similarity coefficient calculation. The structure mass center positions were also determined to make a comparison with their theoretical expected position. Results: 4DCT acquisitions provided volume and position accuracies within ±3% and ±2 mm for structure dimensions >2 cm, breath amplitude ≤15 mm, and breath period ≥3 s. The smallest object (1 cm diameter) exceeded 5% volume variation for the breath

  20. Feasibility of a novel deformable image registration technique to facilitate classification, targeting, and monitoring of tumor and normal tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brock, Kristy K.; Dawson, Laura A.; Sharpe, Michael B.; Moseley, Douglas J.; Jaffray, David A.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of a biomechanical-based deformable image registration technique for the integration of multimodality imaging, image guided treatment, and response monitoring. Methods and Materials: A multiorgan deformable image registration technique based on finite element modeling (FEM) and surface projection alignment of selected regions of interest with biomechanical material and interface models has been developed. FEM also provides an inherent method for direct tracking specified regions through treatment and follow-up. Results: The technique was demonstrated on 5 liver cancer patients. Differences of up to 1 cm of motion were seen between the diaphragm and the tumor center of mass after deformable image registration of exhale and inhale CT scans. Spatial differences of 5 mm or more were observed for up to 86% of the surface of the defined tumor after deformable image registration of the computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance images. Up to 6.8 mm of motion was observed for the tumor after deformable image registration of the CT and cone-beam CT scan after rigid registration of the liver. Deformable registration of the CT to the follow-up CT allowed a more accurate assessment of tumor response. Conclusions: This biomechanical-based deformable image registration technique incorporates classification, targeting, and monitoring of tumor and normal tissue using one methodology

  1. Detection and staging of chondromalacia patellae: relative efficacies of conventional MR imaging, MR arthrography, and CT arthrography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliardi, J A; Chung, E M; Chandnani, V P; Kesling, K L; Christensen, K P; Null, R N; Radvany, M G; Hansen, M F

    1994-09-01

    Chondromalacia patellae is a condition characterized by softening, fraying, and ulceration of patellar articular cartilage. We compare the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of conventional MR imaging, MR arthrography, and CT arthrography in detecting and staging this abnormality. Twenty-seven patients with pain in the anterior part of the knee were prospectively examined with MR imaging, including T1-weighted (650/16), proton density-weighted (2000/20), T2-weighted (2000/80), and spoiled two-dimensional gradient-recalled acquisition in the steady state (SPGR/)/35 degrees (51/10) with fat saturation pulse sequences. All were also examined with T1-weighted MR imaging after intraarticular injection of dilute gadopentetate dimeglumine and with double-contrast CT arthrography. Each imaging technique was evaluated independently by two observers, who reached a consensus interpretation. The signal characteristics of cartilage on MR images and contour abnormalities noted with all imaging techniques were evaluated and graded according to a modification of the classification of Shahriaree. Twenty-six of the 54 facets examined had chondromalacia shown by arthroscopy, which was used as the standard of reference. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of each imaging technique in the diagnosis of each stage of chondromalacia patellae were determined and compared by using the McNemar two-tailed analysis. Arthroscopy showed that 28 facets were normal. Grade 1 chondromalacia patellae was diagnosed only with MR and CT arthrography in two (29%) of seven facets. Intermediate (grade 2 or 3) chondromalacia patellae was detected in two (13%) of 15 facets with T1-weighted and SPGR MR imaging, in three (20%) of 15 facets with proton density-weighted MR imaging, in seven (47%) of 15 facets with T2-weighted MR imaging, in 11 (73%) of 15 facets with CT arthrography, and in 12 (80%) of 15 facets with MR arthrography. Grade 4 was detected in three (75%) of four facets with T1-, proton

  2. CT-Urography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalla Palma, Ludovico; Grotto, Maurizio; Morra, Aldo

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we present an overview of CT-Urography. With the advent of multislice CT scanners and the evolution of image processing methods this technique now affords optimal urographic images comparable to those obtained with conventional techniques. We describe the acquisition techniques and protocols used by the various authors. Effective radiation dose has conditioned the use of CT-Urography so that the tendency today is to reduce the number of scans by performing, after the non enhanced scan, a single contrast-enhanced scan comprising both the nephrographic and urographic phase. With the use of multislice CT the quality of the urogram improves with the number of slices. We illustrate a variety of processing techniques, multiplanar reconstruction (MPR), maximum (MIP) and average intensity projection (AIP) and volume rendering (VR) and present a series of upper urinary tract tumours testifying to the superiority of the AIP technique over MIP. We then review the results of comparative studies of CT-Urography with conventional urography in upper urinary tract diagnostics. Finally, we describe the advantages and limitations of CT-Urography [it

  3. FDG PET/CT : EANM procedure guidelines for tumour imaging: version 2.0

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boellaard, Ronald; Delgado-Bolton, Roberto; Oyen, Wim J. G.; Giammarile, Francesco; Tatsch, Klaus; Eschner, Wolfgang; Verzijlbergen, Fred J.; Barrington, Sally F.; Pike, Lucy C.; Weber, Wolfgang A.; Stroobants, Sigrid; Delbeke, Dominique; Donohoe, Kevin J.; Holbrook, Scott; Graham, Michael M.; Testanera, Giorgio; Hoekstra, Otto S.; Zijlstra, Josee; Visser, Eric; Hoekstra, Corneline J.; Pruim, Jan; Willemsen, Antoon; Arends, Bertjan; Kotzerke, Joerg; Bockisch, Andreas; Beyer, Thomas; Chiti, Arturo; Krause, Bernd J.

    The purpose of these guidelines is to assist physicians in recommending, performing, interpreting and reporting the results of FDG PET/CT for oncological imaging of adult patients. PET is a quantitative imaging technique and therefore requires a common quality control (QC)/quality assurance (QA)

  4. Effect of hybrid iterative reconstruction technique on quantitative and qualitative image analysis at 256-slice prospective gating cardiac CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utsunomiya, Daisuke; Weigold, W. Guy; Weissman, Gaby; Taylor, Allen J.

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of hybrid iterative reconstruction on qualitative and quantitative parameters at 256-slice cardiac CT. Prospective cardiac CT images from 20 patients were analysed. Paired image sets were created using 3 reconstructions, i.e. filtered back projection (FBP) and moderate- and high-level iterative reconstructions. Quantitative parameters including CT-attenuation, noise, and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were determined in both proximal- and distal coronary segments. Image quality was graded on a 4-point scale. Coronary CT attenuation values were similar for FBP, moderate- and high-level iterative reconstruction at 293 ± 74-, 290 ± 75-, and 283 ± 78 Hounsfield units (HU), respectively. CNR was significantly higher with moderate- and high-level iterative reconstructions (10.9 ± 3.5 and 18.4 ± 6.2, respectively) than FBP (8.2 ± 2.5) as was the visual grading of proximal vessels. Visualisation of distal vessels was better with high-level iterative reconstruction than FBP. The mean number of assessable segments among 289 segments was 245, 260, and 267 for FBP, moderate- and high-level iterative reconstruction, respectively; the difference between FBP and high-level iterative reconstruction was significant. Interobserver agreement was significantly higher for moderate- and high-level iterative reconstruction than FBP. Cardiac CT using hybrid iterative reconstruction yields higher CNR and better image quality than FBP. circle Cardiac CT helps clinicians to assess patients with coronary artery disease circle Hybrid iterative reconstruction provides improved cardiac CT image quality circle Hybrid iterative reconstruction improves the number of assessable coronary segments circle Hybrid iterative reconstruction improves interobserver agreement on cardiac CT. (orig.)

  5. Role of New Functional MRI Techniques in the Diagnosis, Staging, and Followup of Gynecological Cancer: Comparison with PET-CT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Alvarez Moreno

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments in diagnostic imaging techniques have magnified the role and potential of both MRI and PET-CT in female pelvic imaging. This article reviews the techniques and clinical applications of new functional MRI (fMRI including diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI, dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE-MRI, comparing with PET-CT. These new emerging provide not only anatomic but also functional imaging, allowing detection of small volumes of active tumor at diagnosis and early disease relapse, which may not result in detectable morphological changes at conventional imaging. This information is useful in distinguishing between recurrent/residual tumor and post-treatment changes and assessing treatment response, with a clear impact on patient management. Both PET-CT and now fMRI have proved to be very valuable tools for evaluation of gynecologic tumors. Most papers try to compare these techniques, but in our experience both are complementary in management of these patients. Meanwhile PET-CT is superior in diagnosis of ganglionar disease; fMRI presents higher accuracy in local preoperative staging. Both techniques can be used as biomarkers of tumor response and present high accuracy in diagnosis of local recurrence and peritoneal dissemination, with complementary roles depending on histological type, anatomic location and tumoral volume.

  6. PET/CT. Dose-escalated image fusion?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brix, G.; Beyer, T.

    2005-01-01

    Clinical studies demonstrate a gain in diagnostic accuracy by employing combined PET/CT instead of separate CT and PET imaging. However, whole-body PET/CT examinations result in a comparatively high radiation burden to patients and thus require a proper justification and optimization to avoid repeated exposure or over-exposure of patients. This review article summarizes relevant data concerning radiation exposure of patients resulting from the different components of a combined PET/CT examination and presents different imaging strategies that can help to balance the diagnostic needs and the radiation protection requirements. In addition various dose reduction measures are discussed, some of which can be adopted from CT practice, while others mandate modifications to the existing hard- and software of PET/CT systems. (orig.)

  7. Minimizing image noise in on-board CT reconstruction using both kilovoltage and megavoltage beam projections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Junan; Yin Fangfang

    2007-01-01

    We studied a recently proposed aggregated CT reconstruction technique which combines the complementary advantages of kilovoltage (kV) and megavoltage (MV) x-ray imaging. Various phantoms were imaged to study the effects of beam orientations and geometry of the imaging object on image quality of reconstructed CT. It was shown that the quality of aggregated CT was correlated with both kV and MV beam orientations and the degree of this correlation depended upon the geometry of the imaging object. The results indicated that the optimal orientations were those when kV beams pass through the thinner portion and MV beams pass through the thicker portion of the imaging object. A special preprocessing procedure was also developed to perform contrast conversions between kV and MV information prior to image reconstruction. The performance of two reconstruction methods, one filtered backprojection method and one iterative method, were compared. The effects of projection number, beam truncation, and contrast conversion on the CT image quality were investigated

  8. Static and dynamic CT imaging of the cervical spine in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soederman, Tomas; Shalabi, Adel; Sundin, Anders [Uppsala University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Uppsala (Sweden); Olerud, Claes; Alavi, Kamran [Uppsala University Hospital, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2014-09-18

    To compare CR with CT (static and dynamic) to evaluate upper spine instability and to determine if CT in flexion adds value compared to MR imaging in neutral position to assess compression of the subarachnoid space and of the spinal cord. Twenty-one consecutive patients with atlantoaxial subluxation due to rheumatoid arthritis planned for atlantoaxial fusion were included. CT and MRI were performed with the neck in the neutral position and CT also in flexion. CR in neutral position and flexion were obtained in all patients except for one subject who underwent examination in flexion and extension. CR and CT measurements of atlantoaxial subluxation correlated but were larger by CR than CT in flexion, however, the degree of vertical dislocation was similar with both techniques irrespective of the position of the neck. Cervical motion was larger at CR than at CT. The spinal cord compression was significantly worse at CT obtained in the flexed position as compared to MR imaging in the neutral position. Functional CR remains the primary imaging method but CT in the flexed position might be useful in the preoperative imaging work-up, as subarachnoid space involvement may be an indicator for the development of neurologic dysfunction. (orig.)

  9. Multi-Detector Computed Tomography Imaging Techniques in Arterial Injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cameron Adler

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Cross-sectional imaging has become a critical aspect in the evaluation of arterial injuries. In particular, angiography using computed tomography (CT is the imaging of choice. A variety of techniques and options are available when evaluating for arterial injuries. Techniques involve contrast bolus, various phases of contrast enhancement, multiplanar reconstruction, volume rendering, and maximum intensity projection. After the images are rendered, a variety of features may be seen that diagnose the injury. This article provides a general overview of the techniques, important findings, and pitfalls in cross sectional imaging of arterial imaging, particularly in relation to computed tomography. In addition, the future directions of computed tomography, including a few techniques in the process of development, is also discussed.

  10. An approach for quantitative image quality analysis for CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, Amir; Cochran, Joe; Mooney, Doug; Regensburger, Joe

    2016-03-01

    An objective and standardized approach to assess image quality of Compute Tomography (CT) systems is required in a wide variety of imaging processes to identify CT systems appropriate for a given application. We present an overview of the framework we have developed to help standardize and to objectively assess CT image quality for different models of CT scanners used for security applications. Within this framework, we have developed methods to quantitatively measure metrics that should correlate with feature identification, detection accuracy and precision, and image registration capabilities of CT machines and to identify strengths and weaknesses in different CT imaging technologies in transportation security. To that end we have designed, developed and constructed phantoms that allow for systematic and repeatable measurements of roughly 88 image quality metrics, representing modulation transfer function, noise equivalent quanta, noise power spectra, slice sensitivity profiles, streak artifacts, CT number uniformity, CT number consistency, object length accuracy, CT number path length consistency, and object registration. Furthermore, we have developed a sophisticated MATLAB based image analysis tool kit to analyze CT generated images of phantoms and report these metrics in a format that is standardized across the considered models of CT scanners, allowing for comparative image quality analysis within a CT model or between different CT models. In addition, we have developed a modified sparse principal component analysis (SPCA) method to generate a modified set of PCA components as compared to the standard principal component analysis (PCA) with sparse loadings in conjunction with Hotelling T2 statistical analysis method to compare, qualify, and detect faults in the tested systems.

  11. Pulmonary hypertension CT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nedevska, A.

    2013-01-01

    Full text: The right heart catheterization is the gold standard in the diagnosis and determines the severity of pulmonary hypertension. The significant technical progress of noninvasive diagnostic imaging methods significantly improves the pixel density and spatial resolution in the study of cardiovascular structures, thus changes their role and place in the overall diagnostic plan. Learning points: What is the etiology, clinical manifestation and general pathophysiological disorders in pulmonary hypertension. What are the established diagnostic methods in the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with pulmonary hypertension. What is the recommended protocol for CT scanning for patients with clinically suspected or documented pulmonary hypertension. What are the important diagnostic findings in CT scan of a patient with pulmonary hypertension. Discussion: The prospect of instantaneous complex - anatomical and functional cardiopulmonary and vascular diagnostics seems extremely attractive. The contrast enhanced multislice computed (CT ) and magnetic resonance imaging are very suitable methods for imaging the structures of the right heart, with the possibility of obtaining multiple projections and three-dimensional imaging reconstructions . There are specific morphological features that, if carefully analyzed, provide diagnostic information. Thus, it is possible to avoid or at least reduce the frequency of use of invasive diagnostic cardiac catheterization in patients with pulmonary hypertension. Conclusion: This review focuses on the use of contrast-enhanced CT for comprehensive evaluation of patients with pulmonary hypertension and presents the observed characteristic changes in the chest, lung parenchyma , the structures of the right half of the heart and pulmonary vessels

  12. Oncologic applications of diagnostic imaging techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forrest, L.J.; Thrall, D.E.

    1995-01-01

    Before appropriate therapy can be instituted for a cancer patient, the presence and extent of tumor must be evaluated. Deciding which imaging technique to use depends on tumor location, type, and biologic behavior. Conventional radiography provides important information at a relatively low cost compared with other imaging modalities. Ultrasound is a valuable adjunct to radiography, but does not replace it because both imaging modalities provide unique information. Nuclear medicine procedures contribute additional, unique data by providing physiological information, but specificity is lacking. Both CT and MRI provide images with exquisite anatomic detail, but availability and cost prohibit their general use

  13. Cardiovascular CT angiography in neonates and children : Image quality and potential for radiation dose reduction with iterative image reconstruction techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tricarico, Francesco; Hlavacek, Anthony M.; Schoepf, U. Joseph; Ebersberger, Ullrich; Nance, John W.; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn; Cho, Young Jun; Spears, J. Reid; Secchi, Francesco; Savino, Giancarlo; Marano, Riccardo; Schoenberg, Stefan O.; Bonomo, Lorenzo; Apfaltrer, Paul

    To evaluate image quality (IQ) of low-radiation-dose paediatric cardiovascular CT angiography (CTA), comparing iterative reconstruction in image space (IRIS) and sinogram-affirmed iterative reconstruction (SAFIRE) with filtered back-projection (FBP) and estimate the potential for further dose

  14. 3D CT cerebral angiography technique using a 320-detector machine with a time–density curve and low contrast medium volume: Comparison with fixed time delay technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, K.; Biswas, S.; Roughley, S.; Bhojak, M.; Niven, S.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To describe a cerebral computed tomography angiography (CTA) technique using a 320-detector CT machine and a small contrast medium volume (35 ml, 15 ml for test bolus). Also, to compare the quality of these images with that of the images acquired using a larger contrast medium volume (90 or 120 ml) and a fixed time delay (FTD) of 18 s using a 16-detector CT machine. Materials and methods: Cerebral CTA images were acquired using a 320-detector machine by synchronizing the scanning time with the time of peak enhancement as determined from the time–density curve (TDC) using a test bolus dose. The quality of CTA images acquired using this technique was compared with that obtained using a FTD of 18 s (by 16-detector CT), retrospectively. Average densities in four different intracranial arteries, overall opacification of arteries, and the degree of venous contamination were graded and compared. Results: Thirty-eight patients were scanned using the TDC technique and 40 patients using the FTD technique. The arterial densities achieved by the TDC technique were higher (significant for supraclinoid and basilar arteries, p < 0.05). The proportion of images deemed as having “good” arterial opacification was 95% for TDC and 90% for FTD. The degree of venous contamination was significantly higher in images produced by the FTD technique (p < 0.001%). Conclusion: Good diagnostic quality CTA images with significant reduction of venous contamination can be achieved with a low contrast medium dose using a 320-detector machine by coupling the time of data acquisition with the time of peak enhancement

  15. Diagnostic Accuracy of the Volume Rendering Images of Multi-Detector CT for the Detection of Lumbar Transverse Process Fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yun Hak; Chun, Tong Jin [Dept. of Radiology, Eulji University Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-01-15

    To compare the accuracy of three-dimensional computed tomographic (3D CT) volume rendering techniques with axial images of multi-detector row computed tomography to identify lumbar transverse process (LTP) fractures in trauma patients. We retrospectively evaluated 42 patients with back pain as a result of blunt trauma between January and June of 2010. Two radiologists examined the 3D CT volume rendering images independently. The confirmation of a LTP fracture was based on the consensus of the axial images by the two radiologists. The results of 3D CT volume rendering images were compared with the axial images and the diagnostic powers (sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy) were calculated. Seven of the 42 patients had twenty five lumbar transverse process fractures. The diagnostic power of the 3D CT volume rendering technique is as accurate as axial images. Reader 1, sensitivity 96%, specificity 100%, accuracy 99.9%; and Reader 2 sensitivity 100%, specificity 99.8%, accuracy 99.8%. The accordance of the two radiologists was 99.8%. 3D CT volume rendering images can alternate axial images to detect lumbar transverse process fractures with good image quality.

  16. Ring artifacts removal from synchrotron CT image slices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Zhouping; Chapman, Dean; Wiebe, Sheldon

    2013-01-01

    Ring artifacts can occur in reconstructed images from x-ray Computerized Tomography (CT) as full or partial concentric rings superimposed on the scanned structures. Due to the data corruption by those ring artifacts in CT images, qualitative and quantitative analysis of these images are compromised. In this paper, we propose to correct the ring artifacts on the reconstructed synchrotron radiation (SR) CT image slices. The proposed correction procedure includes the following steps: (1). transform the reconstructed CT images into polar coordinates; (2) apply discrete two-dimensional (2D) wavelet transform to the polar image to decompose it into four image components: low pass band image component, as well as the components from horizontal, vertical and diagonal details bands; (3). apply 2D Fourier transform to the vertical details band image component only, since the ring artifacts become vertical lines in the polar coordinates; (4). apply Gaussian filtering in Fourier domain along the abscissa direction to suppress the vertical lines, since the information of the vertical lines in Fourier domain is completely condensed to that direction; (5). perform inverse Fourier transform to get the corrected vertical details band image component; (6). perform inverse wavelet transform to get the corrected polar image; (7). transform the corrected polar image back to Cartesian coordinates to get the CT image slice with reduced ring artifacts. This approach has been successfully used on CT data acquired from the Biomedical Imaging and Therapy (BMIT) beamline in Canadian Light Source (CLS), and the results show that the ring artifacts in original SR CT images have been effectively suppressed with all the structure information in the image preserved.

  17. Validation of algorithm used for location of electrodes in CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bustos, J; Graffigna, J P; Isoardi, R; Gómez, M E; Romo, R

    2013-01-01

    It has been implement a noninvasive technique to detect and delineate the focus of electric discharge in patients with mono-focal epilepsy. For the detection of these sources it has used electroencephalogram (EEG) with 128 electrodes cap. With EEG data and electrodes position, it is possible locate this focus on MR volumes. The technique locates the electrodes on CT volumes using image processing algorithms to obtain descriptors of electrodes, as centroid, which determines its position in space. Finally these points are transformed into the coordinate space of MR through a registration for a better understanding by the physician. Due to the medical implications of this technique is of utmost importance to validate the results of the detection of electrodes coordinates. For that, this paper present a comparison between the actual values measured physically (measures including electrode size and spatial location) and the values obtained in the processing of CT and MR images

  18. Visualization of neonatal coronary arteries on multidetector row CT: ECG-gated versus non-ECG-gated technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, I.C.; Lee, Tain; Chen, Min-Chi; Fu, Yun-Ching; Jan, Sheng-Lin; Wang, Chung-Chi; Chang, Yen

    2007-01-01

    Multidetector CT (MDCT) seems to be a promising tool for detection of neonatal coronary arteries, but whether the ECG-gated or non-ECG-gated technique should be used has not been established. To compare the detection rate and image quality of neonatal coronary arteries on MDCT using ECG-gated and non-ECG-gated techniques. Twelve neonates with complex congenital heart disease were included. The CT scan was acquired using an ECG-gated technique, and the most quiescent phase of the RR interval was selected to represent the ECG-gated images. The raw data were then reconstructed without the ECG signal to obtain non-ECG-gated images. The detection rate and image quality of nine coronary artery segments in the two sets of images were then compared. A two-tailed paired t test was used with P values <0.05 considered as statistically significant. In all coronary segments the ECG-gated technique had a better detection rate and produced images of better quality. The difference between the two techniques ranged from 25% in the left main coronary artery to 100% in the distal right coronary artery. For neonates referred for MDCT, if evaluation of coronary artery anatomy is important for the clinical management or surgical planning, the ECG-gated technique should be used because it can reliably detect the coronary arteries. (orig.)

  19. Evaluation of Marfan syndrome: MR imaging versus CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soulen, R.L.; Fishman, E.K.; Pyeritz, R.E.; Gott, V.L.; Zerhouni, E.A.

    1986-01-01

    Twenty-five patients with Marfan, syndrome underwent both CT and MR imaging. MR imaging were interpreted in blinded fashion and then compared with CT scans MR imaging was found to be equivalent to CT in the detection of aortic, dural, and hip abnormalities in patients not operated on. MR imaging was superior to CT in the evaluation of postoperative patients because the artifact produced by Bjork-Shirley or St. Jude valves precludes adequate evaluation of the aortic root on CT while producing only a small inferior field distortion (a ''pseudo-ventricular septal defect'') on MR imaging. The absence of radiation exposure is another major advantage of MR imaging in this relatively young population requiring serial studies. The authors conclude that MR imaging is the modality of choice for the evaluation and follow-up of patients with Marfan syndrome and offers an appropriate means of screening their kindred

  20. Mass preserving image registration for lung CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorbunova, Vladlena; Sporring, Jon; Lo, Pechin Chien Pau

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a mass preserving image registration algorithm for lung CT images. To account for the local change in lung tissue intensity during the breathing cycle, a tissue appearance model based on the principle of preservation of total lung mass is proposed. This model is incorporated...... on four groups of data: 44 pairs of longitudinal inspiratory chest CT scans with small difference in lung volume; 44 pairs of longitudinal inspiratory chest CT scans with large difference in lung volume; 16 pairs of expiratory and inspiratory CT scans; and 5 pairs of images extracted at end exhale and end...

  1. Metal Artifacts Reduction of Pedicle Screws on Spine Computed Tomography Images Using Variable Thresholding Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaewlek, T.; Koolpiruck, D.; Thongvigitmanee, S.; Mongkolsuk, M.; Chiewvit, P.; Thammakittiphan, S.

    2012-01-01

    Metal artifacts are one of significant problems in computed tomography (CT). The streak lines and air gaps arise from metal implants of orthopedic patients, such as prosthesis, dental bucket, and pedicle screws that cause incorrect diagnosis and local treatment planning. A common technique to suppressed artifacts is by adjusting windows, but those artifacts still remain on the images. To improve the detail of spine CT images, the variable thresholding technique is proposed in this paper. Three medical cases of spine CT images categorized by the severity of artifacts (screws head, one full screw, and two full screws) were investigated. Metal regions were segmented by k-mean clustering, then transformed into a sinogram domain. The metal sinogram was identified by the variable thresholding method, and then replaced the new estimated values by linear interpolation. The modified sinogram was reconstructed by the filtered back- projection algorithm, and added the metal region back to the modified reconstructed image in order to reproduce the final image. The image quality of the proposed technique, the automatic thresholding (Kalender) technique, and window adjustment technique was compared in term of noise and signal to noise ratio (SNR). The propose method can reduce metal artifacts between pedicle screws. After processing by our proposed technique, noise in the modified images is reduced (screws head 121.15 to73.83, one full screw 160.88 to 94.04, and two full screws 199.73 to 110.05 from the initial image) and SNR is increased (screws head 0.87 to 1.88, one full screw 1.54 to 2.82, and two full screws 0.32 to 0.41 from the initial image). The variable thresholding technique can identify the suitable boundary for restoring the missing data. The efficiency of the metal artifacts reduction is indicated on the case of partial and full pedicle screws. Our technique can improve the detail of spine CT images better than automatic thresholding (Kalender) technique, and

  2. Quantitative imaging of excised osteoarthritic cartilage using spectral CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajendran, Kishore; Bateman, Christopher J.; Younis, Raja Aamir; De Ruiter, Niels J.A.; Ramyar, Mohsen; Anderson, Nigel G. [University of Otago - Christchurch, Department of Radiology, Christchurch (New Zealand); Loebker, Caroline [University of Otago, Christchurch Regenerative Medicine and Tissue Engineering Group, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Musculoskeletal Medicine, Christchurch (New Zealand); University of Twente, Department of Developmental BioEngineering, Enschede (Netherlands); Schon, Benjamin S.; Hooper, Gary J.; Woodfield, Tim B.F. [University of Otago, Christchurch Regenerative Medicine and Tissue Engineering Group, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Musculoskeletal Medicine, Christchurch (New Zealand); Chernoglazov, Alex I. [University of Canterbury, Human Interface Technology Laboratory New Zealand, Christchurch (New Zealand); Butler, Anthony P.H. [University of Otago - Christchurch, Department of Radiology, Christchurch (New Zealand); European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); MARS Bioimaging, Christchurch (New Zealand)

    2017-01-15

    To quantify iodine uptake in articular cartilage as a marker of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content using multi-energy spectral CT. We incubated a 25-mm strip of excised osteoarthritic human tibial plateau in 50 % ionic iodine contrast and imaged it using a small-animal spectral scanner with a cadmium telluride photon-processing detector to quantify the iodine through the thickness of the articular cartilage. We imaged both spectroscopic phantoms and osteoarthritic tibial plateau samples. The iodine distribution as an inverse marker of GAG content was presented in the form of 2D and 3D images after applying a basis material decomposition technique to separate iodine in cartilage from bone. We compared this result with a histological section stained for GAG. The iodine in cartilage could be distinguished from subchondral bone and quantified using multi-energy CT. The articular cartilage showed variation in iodine concentration throughout its thickness which appeared to be inversely related to GAG distribution observed in histological sections. Multi-energy CT can quantify ionic iodine contrast (as a marker of GAG content) within articular cartilage and distinguish it from bone by exploiting the energy-specific attenuation profiles of the associated materials. (orig.)

  3. Imaging of jaw with dental CT software program: Normal Anatomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Myong Gon; Seo, Kwang Hee; Jung, Hak Young; Sung, Nak Kwan; Chung, Duk Soo; Kim, Ok Dong; Lee, Young Hwan

    1994-01-01

    Dental CT software program can provide reformatted cross-sectional and panoramic images that cannot be obtained with conventional axial and direct coronal CT scan. The purpose of this study is to describe the method of the technique and to identify the precise anatomy of jaw. We evaluated 13 mandibles and 7 maxillae of 15 subjects without bony disease who were being considered for endosseous dental implants. Reformatted images obtained by the use of bone algorithm performed on GE HiSpeed Advantage CT scanner were retrospectively reviewed for detailed anatomy of jaw. Anatomy related to neurovascular bundle(mandibular foramen, inferior alveolar canal, mental foramen, canal for incisive artery, nutrient canal, lingual foramen and mylohyoid groove), muscular insertion(mylohyoid line, superior and inferior genial tubercle and digastric fossa) and other anatomy(submandibular fossa, sublingual fossa, contour of alveolar process, oblique line, retromolar fossa, temporal crest and retromolar triangle) were well delineated in mandible. In maxilla, anatomy related to neurovascular bundle(greater palatine foramen and groove, nasopalatine canal and incisive foramen) and other anatomy(alveolar process, maxillary sinus and nasal fossa) were also well delineated. Reformatted images using dental CT software program provided excellent delineation of the jaw anatomy. Therefore, dental CT software program can play an important role in the preoperative assessment of mandible and maxilla for dental implants and other surgical conditions

  4. TH-E-202-01: Pitfalls and Remedies in PET/CT Imaging for RT Planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, T.

    2016-01-01

    PET/CT is a very important imaging tool in the management of oncology patients. PET/CT has been applied for treatment planning and response evaluation in radiation therapy. This educational session will discuss: Pitfalls and remedies in PET/CT imaging for RT planning The use of hypoxia PET imaging for radiotherapy PET for tumor response evaluation The first presentation will address the issue of mis-registration between the CT and PET images in the thorax and the abdomen. We will discuss the challenges of respiratory gating and introduce an average CT technique to improve the registration for dose calculation and image-guidance in radiation therapy. The second presentation will discuss the use of hypoxia PET Imaging for radiation therapy. We will discuss various hypoxia radiotracers, the choice of clinical acquisition protocol (in particular a single late static acquisition versus a dynamic acquisition), and the compartmental modeling with different transfer rate constants explained. We will demonstrate applications of hypoxia imaging for dose escalation/de-escalation in clinical trials. The last presentation will discuss the use of PET/CT for tumor response evaluation. We will discuss anatomic response assessment vs. metabolic response assessment, visual evaluation and semi-quantitative evaluation, and limitations of current PET/CT assessment. We will summarize clinical trials using PET response in guiding adaptive radiotherapy. Finally, we will summarize recent advancements in PET/CT radiomics and non-FDG PET tracers for response assessment. Learning Objectives: Identify the causes of mis-registration of CT and PET images in PET/CT, and review the strategies to remedy the issue. Understand the basics of PET imaging of tumor hypoxia (radiotracers, how PET measures the hypoxia selective uptake, imaging protocols, applications in chemo-radiation therapy). Understand the basics of dynamic PET imaging, compartmental modeling and parametric images. Understand the

  5. TH-E-202-01: Pitfalls and Remedies in PET/CT Imaging for RT Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, T. [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States)

    2016-06-15

    PET/CT is a very important imaging tool in the management of oncology patients. PET/CT has been applied for treatment planning and response evaluation in radiation therapy. This educational session will discuss: Pitfalls and remedies in PET/CT imaging for RT planning The use of hypoxia PET imaging for radiotherapy PET for tumor response evaluation The first presentation will address the issue of mis-registration between the CT and PET images in the thorax and the abdomen. We will discuss the challenges of respiratory gating and introduce an average CT technique to improve the registration for dose calculation and image-guidance in radiation therapy. The second presentation will discuss the use of hypoxia PET Imaging for radiation therapy. We will discuss various hypoxia radiotracers, the choice of clinical acquisition protocol (in particular a single late static acquisition versus a dynamic acquisition), and the compartmental modeling with different transfer rate constants explained. We will demonstrate applications of hypoxia imaging for dose escalation/de-escalation in clinical trials. The last presentation will discuss the use of PET/CT for tumor response evaluation. We will discuss anatomic response assessment vs. metabolic response assessment, visual evaluation and semi-quantitative evaluation, and limitations of current PET/CT assessment. We will summarize clinical trials using PET response in guiding adaptive radiotherapy. Finally, we will summarize recent advancements in PET/CT radiomics and non-FDG PET tracers for response assessment. Learning Objectives: Identify the causes of mis-registration of CT and PET images in PET/CT, and review the strategies to remedy the issue. Understand the basics of PET imaging of tumor hypoxia (radiotracers, how PET measures the hypoxia selective uptake, imaging protocols, applications in chemo-radiation therapy). Understand the basics of dynamic PET imaging, compartmental modeling and parametric images. Understand the

  6. Secondary hypertension: Place of imaging techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marichez, M.; Jeunemaitre, X.; Despres, E.; Plouin, P.F.; Melki, J.P.; Taleb, A.

    1987-01-01

    To determine and illustrate the place of various imaging techniques in the diagnosis of arterial hypertension, a retrospective study of 4,530 patients examined during the past 2 years at Broussals and Saint Joseph Hospitals in Paris was undertaken. Between 1975 and 1984, only 20% of our patients underwent surgery, but in the past 2 years, 6% of patients with hypertension underwent either surgery or transluminal angioplasty. At our institution, imaging studies performed were Doppler US, excretory urography, CT, MR imaging, scintigraphy, adrenal venography, and arteriography. The authors encountered over 156 cases of renovascular hypertension, 23 Conn adenomas, 13 pheochromocytomas, four adrenal carcinomas, and 46 parenchymatous renal anomalies. This paper presents the modalities and the pitfalls of each imaging technique. The authors also indicate the strategies used in the diagnostic approach and the results the authors obtained

  7. Neural network and its application to CT imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikravesh, M.; Kovscek, A.R.; Patzek, T.W. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-02-01

    We present an integrated approach to imaging the progress of air displacement by spontaneous imbibition of oil into sandstone. We combine Computerized Tomography (CT) scanning and neural network image processing. The main aspects of our approach are (I) visualization of the distribution of oil and air saturation by CT, (II) interpretation of CT scans using neural networks, and (III) reconstruction of 3-D images of oil saturation from the CT scans with a neural network model. Excellent agreement between the actual images and the neural network predictions is found.

  8. Optimization of CT image reconstruction algorithms for the lung tissue research consortium (LTRC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCollough, Cynthia; Zhang, Jie; Bruesewitz, Michael; Bartholmai, Brian

    2006-03-01

    To create a repository of clinical data, CT images and tissue samples and to more clearly understand the pathogenetic features of pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) launched a cooperative effort known as the Lung Tissue Resource Consortium (LTRC). The CT images for the LTRC effort must contain accurate CT numbers in order to characterize tissues, and must have high-spatial resolution to show fine anatomic structures. This study was performed to optimize the CT image reconstruction algorithms to achieve these criteria. Quantitative analyses of phantom and clinical images were conducted. The ACR CT accreditation phantom containing five regions of distinct CT attenuations (CT numbers of approximately -1000 HU, -80 HU, 0 HU, 130 HU and 900 HU), and a high-contrast spatial resolution test pattern, was scanned using CT systems from two manufacturers (General Electric (GE) Healthcare and Siemens Medical Solutions). Phantom images were reconstructed using all relevant reconstruction algorithms. Mean CT numbers and image noise (standard deviation) were measured and compared for the five materials. Clinical high-resolution chest CT images acquired on a GE CT system for a patient with diffuse lung disease were reconstructed using BONE and STANDARD algorithms and evaluated by a thoracic radiologist in terms of image quality and disease extent. The clinical BONE images were processed with a 3 x 3 x 3 median filter to simulate a thicker slice reconstructed in smoother algorithms, which have traditionally been proven to provide an accurate estimation of emphysema extent in the lungs. Using a threshold technique, the volume of emphysema (defined as the percentage of lung voxels having a CT number lower than -950 HU) was computed for the STANDARD, BONE, and BONE filtered. The CT numbers measured in the ACR CT Phantom images were accurate for all reconstruction kernels for both manufacturers. As expected, visual evaluation of the

  9. Clinical application of 16-slice spiral CT in reconstruction imaging of coronary artery for diagnosing coronary disense

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao Xinbo; Zhu Xinjin; Zeng Huiliang; Chen Xueguang

    2005-01-01

    Objective: An evaluation of the reconstructed imaging of coronary arteries with 16-slice spiral CT in diagnosis of coronary disease. Methods: The reconstructed images of coronary arteries obtained on a 16-slice spiral CT scanner were reviewed in 60 cases, on which the following techniques were applied: retrospective ECG-gating, Segment method with 75% R-R interval, volume rendering technique (VRT), maximum intensity projection (MIP), mulfiplanar reconstruction (MPR), curved planar reconstruction (CPR) and CT virtual endoscopy (CTVE). Results: In all 60 cases, different stages of CHD were revealed in 21 cases; none abnormality was found in 33; and images were in poor quality in 2 cases, which was available for diagnosis. There were 4 stents planted in 4 cases: soft plaque suspected in lcase, patent in 2 and occlude in 1. Conclusion: The reconstructed imaging of coronary arteries with 16-slice spiral CT is superior modality in evaluation of severe coronary stenosis, plaques, and the pantency of the intra-luminal stents, which is an efficient and non-invasive imaging in diagnosis of early-stage CHD and screening in high risk population. (authors)

  10. CT reconstruction techniques for improved accuracy of lung CT airway measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, A. [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States); Ranallo, F. N. [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 and Department of Radiology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin 53792 (United States); Judy, P. F. [Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Gierada, D. S. [Department of Radiology, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States); Fain, S. B., E-mail: sfain@wisc.edu [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin 53792 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering,University of Wisconsin School of Engineering, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To determine the impact of constrained reconstruction techniques on quantitative CT (qCT) of the lung parenchyma and airways for low x-ray radiation dose. Methods: Measurement of small airways with qCT remains a challenge, especially for low x-ray dose protocols. Images of the COPDGene quality assurance phantom (CTP698, The Phantom Laboratory, Salem, NY) were obtained using a GE discovery CT750 HD scanner for helical scans at x-ray radiation dose-equivalents ranging from 1 to 4.12 mSv (12–100 mA s current–time product). Other parameters were 40 mm collimation, 0.984 pitch, 0.5 s rotation, and 0.625 mm thickness. The phantom was sandwiched between 7.5 cm thick water attenuating phantoms for a total length of 20 cm to better simulate the scatter conditions of patient scans. Image data sets were reconstructed using STANDARD (STD), DETAIL, BONE, and EDGE algorithms for filtered back projection (FBP), 100% adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR), and Veo reconstructions. Reduced (half) display field of view (DFOV) was used to increase sampling across airway phantom structures. Inner diameter (ID), wall area percent (WA%), and wall thickness (WT) measurements of eight airway mimicking tubes in the phantom, including a 2.5 mm ID (42.6 WA%, 0.4 mm WT), 3 mm ID (49.0 WA%, 0.6 mm WT), and 6 mm ID (49.0 WA%, 1.2 mm WT) were performed with Airway Inspector (Surgical Planning Laboratory, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA) using the phase congruency edge detection method. The average of individual measures at five central slices of the phantom was taken to reduce measurement error. Results: WA% measures were greatly overestimated while IDs were underestimated for the smaller airways, especially for reconstructions at full DFOV (36 cm) using the STD kernel, due to poor sampling and spatial resolution (0.7 mm pixel size). Despite low radiation dose, the ID of the 6 mm ID airway was consistently measured accurately for all methods other than STD

  11. CT reconstruction techniques for improved accuracy of lung CT airway measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, A.; Ranallo, F. N.; Judy, P. F.; Gierada, D. S.; Fain, S. B.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the impact of constrained reconstruction techniques on quantitative CT (qCT) of the lung parenchyma and airways for low x-ray radiation dose. Methods: Measurement of small airways with qCT remains a challenge, especially for low x-ray dose protocols. Images of the COPDGene quality assurance phantom (CTP698, The Phantom Laboratory, Salem, NY) were obtained using a GE discovery CT750 HD scanner for helical scans at x-ray radiation dose-equivalents ranging from 1 to 4.12 mSv (12–100 mA s current–time product). Other parameters were 40 mm collimation, 0.984 pitch, 0.5 s rotation, and 0.625 mm thickness. The phantom was sandwiched between 7.5 cm thick water attenuating phantoms for a total length of 20 cm to better simulate the scatter conditions of patient scans. Image data sets were reconstructed using STANDARD (STD), DETAIL, BONE, and EDGE algorithms for filtered back projection (FBP), 100% adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR), and Veo reconstructions. Reduced (half) display field of view (DFOV) was used to increase sampling across airway phantom structures. Inner diameter (ID), wall area percent (WA%), and wall thickness (WT) measurements of eight airway mimicking tubes in the phantom, including a 2.5 mm ID (42.6 WA%, 0.4 mm WT), 3 mm ID (49.0 WA%, 0.6 mm WT), and 6 mm ID (49.0 WA%, 1.2 mm WT) were performed with Airway Inspector (Surgical Planning Laboratory, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA) using the phase congruency edge detection method. The average of individual measures at five central slices of the phantom was taken to reduce measurement error. Results: WA% measures were greatly overestimated while IDs were underestimated for the smaller airways, especially for reconstructions at full DFOV (36 cm) using the STD kernel, due to poor sampling and spatial resolution (0.7 mm pixel size). Despite low radiation dose, the ID of the 6 mm ID airway was consistently measured accurately for all methods other than STD

  12. Multi-institutional MicroCT image comparison of image-guided small animal irradiators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, Chris D.; Lindsay, Patricia; E Graves, Edward; Wong, Eugene; Perez, Jessica R.; Poirier, Yannick; Ben-Bouchta, Youssef; Kanesalingam, Thilakshan; Chen, Haijian; E Rubinstein, Ashley; Sheng, Ke; Bazalova-Carter, Magdalena

    2017-07-01

    To recommend imaging protocols and establish tolerance levels for microCT image quality assurance (QA) performed on conformal image-guided small animal irradiators. A fully automated QA software SAPA (small animal phantom analyzer) for image analysis of the commercial Shelley micro-CT MCTP 610 phantom was developed, in which quantitative analyses of CT number linearity, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), uniformity and noise, geometric accuracy, spatial resolution by means of modulation transfer function (MTF), and CT contrast were performed. Phantom microCT scans from eleven institutions acquired with four image-guided small animal irradiator units (including the commercial PXi X-RAD SmART and Xstrahl SARRP systems) with varying parameters used for routine small animal imaging were analyzed. Multi-institutional data sets were compared using SAPA, based on which tolerance levels for each QA test were established and imaging protocols for QA were recommended. By analyzing microCT data from 11 institutions, we established image QA tolerance levels for all image quality tests. CT number linearity set to R 2  >  0.990 was acceptable in microCT data acquired at all but three institutions. Acceptable SNR  >  36 and noise levels  1.5 lp mm-1 for MTF  =  0.2) was obtained at all but four institutions due to their large image voxel size used (>0.275 mm). Ten of the eleven institutions passed the set QA tolerance for geometric accuracy (2000 HU for 30 mgI ml-1). We recommend performing imaging QA with 70 kVp, 1.5 mA, 120 s imaging time, 0.20 mm voxel size, and a frame rate of 5 fps for the PXi X-RAD SmART. For the Xstrahl SARRP, we recommend using 60 kVp, 1.0 mA, 240 s imaging time, 0.20 mm voxel size, and 6 fps. These imaging protocols should result in high quality images that pass the set tolerance levels on all systems. Average SAPA computation time for complete QA analysis for a 0.20 mm voxel, 400 slice Shelley phantom microCT data set

  13. Alignment of CT images of skull dysmorphology using anatomy-based perpendicular axes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Sun K; Kim, Yong O; Kim, Hee-Joung; Kim, Nam H; Jang, Young Beom; Kim, Kee-Deog; Lee, Hye-Yeon

    2003-01-01

    Rigid body registration of 3D CT scans, based on manual identification of homologous landmarks, is useful for the visual analysis of skull dysmorphology. In this paper, a robust and simple alignment method was proposed to allow for the comparison of skull morphologies, within and between individuals with craniofacial anomalies, based on 3D CT scans, and the minimum number of anatomical landmarks, under rigidity and uniqueness constraints. Three perpendicular axes, extracted from anatomical landmarks, define the absolute coordinate system, through a rigid body transformation, to align multiple CT images for different patients and acquisition times. The accuracy of the alignment method depends on the accuracy of the localized landmarks and target points. The numerical simulation generalizes the accuracy requirements of the alignment method. Experiments using a human dried skull specimen, and ten sets of skull CT images (the pre- and post-operative CT scans of four plagiocephaly, and one fibrous dysplasia patients), demonstrated the feasibility of the technique in clinical practice

  14. Image quality of conventional images of dual-layer SPECTRAL CT: a phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ommen, F; Bennink, E; Vlassenbroek, A; Dankbaar, J W; Schilham, A M R; Viergever, M A; de Jong, H W A M

    2018-05-10

    Spectral CT using a dual layer detector offers the possibility of retrospectively introducing spectral information to conventional CT images. In theory, the dual-layer technology should not come with a dose or image quality penalty for conventional images. In this study, we evaluate the influence of a dual-layer detector (IQon Spectral CT, Philips) on the image quality of conventional CT images, by comparing these images with those of a conventional but otherwise technically comparable single-layer CT scanner (Brilliance iCT, Philips), by means of phantom experiments. For both CT scanners conventional CT images were acquired using four adult scanning protocols: i) body helical, ii) body axial, iii) head helical and iv) head axial. A CATPHAN 600 phantom was scanned to conduct an assessment of image quality metrics at equivalent (CTDI) dose levels. Noise was characterized by means of noise power spectra (NPS) and standard deviation (SD) of a uniform region, and spatial resolution was evaluated with modulation transfer functions (MTF) of a tungsten wire. In addition, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), image uniformity, CT number linearity, slice thickness, slice spacing, and spatial linearity were measured and evaluated. Additional measurements of CNR, resolution and noise were performed in two larger phantoms. The resolution levels at 50%, 10% and 5% MTF of the iCT and IQon showed small but significant differences up to 0.25 lp/cm for body scans, and up to 0.2 lp/cm for head scans in favor of the IQon. The iCT and IQon showed perfect CT linearity for body scans, but for head scans both scanners showed an underestimation of the CT numbers of materials with a high opacity. Slice thickness was slightly overestimated for both scanners. Slice spacing was comparable and reconstructed correctly. In addition, spatial linearity was excellent for both scanners, with a maximum error of 0.11 mm. CNR was higher on the IQon compared to the iCT for both normal and larger phantoms with

  15. CT imaging of myocardial perfusion and viability. Beyond structure and function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoepf, U. Joseph [Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States). Dept. of Radiology and Radiological Sciences; Bamberg, Fabian [Muenchen Univ. (Germany); Bastarrika, Gorka [Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, ON (Canada). Cardiothoracic Imaging Division; Ruzsics, Balazs [Royal Liverpool and Broadgreen Univ., Liverpool (United Kingdom). Dept. of Cardiology; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn (ed.) [University Medical Center Groningen (Netherlands). Center for Medical Imaging

    2014-06-01

    First publication to be devoted to the subject. Reviews an advanced, promising application in healthcare. Spans multiple medical disciplines. The rapid evolution in cardiac computed tomography during the past decade has improved spatial and temporal resolution to the extent that cardiac CT is now an accepted alternative for the non-invasive interrogation of the heart. Beyond the assessment of cardiac structure and ventricular function, recent research has identified yet another promising CT application for the comprehensive diagnosis of coronary heart disease, namely the assessment of myocardial perfusion and viability. In this book, the first to be devoted to this novel application of CT, leading experts from across the world present up-to-date information and consider future directions. After short sections outlining the state of the art in the traditional applications of CT to image structure and function, the full range of CT techniques that may be employed to evaluate the myocardial blood supply are discussed in detail. Similarly, diverse CT approaches for the assessment of myocardial viability are described, with careful consideration of the available experimental and clinical evidence and the role of quantitative imaging.

  16. Image reconstruction design of industrial CT instrument for teaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou Yongning; Cai Yufang

    2009-01-01

    Industrial CT instrument for teaching is applied to teaching and study in field of physics and radiology major, image reconstruction is an important part of software on CT instrument. The paper expatiate on CT physical theory and first generation CT reconstruction algorithm, describe scan process of industrial CT instrument for teaching; analyze image artifact as result of displacement of rotation center, implement method of center displacement correcting, design and complete image reconstruction software, application shows that reconstructed image is very clear and qualitatively high. (authors)

  17. Applicability of three-dimensional imaging techniques in fetal medicine*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner Júnior, Heron; dos Santos, Jorge Lopes; Belmonte, Simone; Ribeiro, Gerson; Daltro, Pedro; Gasparetto, Emerson Leandro; Marchiori, Edson

    2016-01-01

    Objective To generate physical models of fetuses from images obtained with three-dimensional ultrasound (3D-US), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and, occasionally, computed tomography (CT), in order to guide additive manufacturing technology. Materials and Methods We used 3D-US images of 31 pregnant women, including 5 who were carrying twins. If abnormalities were detected by 3D-US, both MRI and in some cases CT scans were then immediately performed. The images were then exported to a workstation in DICOM format. A single observer performed slice-by-slice manual segmentation using a digital high resolution screen. Virtual 3D models were obtained from software that converts medical images into numerical models. Those models were then generated in physical form through the use of additive manufacturing techniques. Results Physical models based upon 3D-US, MRI, and CT images were successfully generated. The postnatal appearance of either the aborted fetus or the neonate closely resembled the physical models, particularly in cases of malformations. Conclusion The combined use of 3D-US, MRI, and CT could help improve our understanding of fetal anatomy. These three screening modalities can be used for educational purposes and as tools to enable parents to visualize their unborn baby. The images can be segmented and then applied, separately or jointly, in order to construct virtual and physical 3D models. PMID:27818540

  18. Applicability of three-dimensional imaging techniques in fetal medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werner Junior, Heron; Daltro, Pedro; Gasparetto, Emerson Leandro, E-mail: heronwerner@hotmail.com [Clinica de Diagnostico Por Imagem (CDPI), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Santos, Jorge Lopes dos; Belmonte, Simone; Ribeiro, Gerson [Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio de Janeiro (PUC-Rio), RJ (Brazil); Marchiori, Edson [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil)

    2016-09-15

    Objective: To generate physical models of fetuses from images obtained with three-dimensional ultrasound (3D-US), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and, occasionally, computed tomography (CT), in order to guide additive manufacturing technology. Materials and Methods: We used 3D-US images of 31 pregnant women, including 5 who were carrying twins. If abnormalities were detected by 3D-US, both MRI and in some cases CT scans were then immediately performed. The images were then exported to a workstation in DICOM format. A single observer performed slice-by-slice manual segmentation using a digital high resolution screen. Virtual 3D models were obtained from software that converts medical images into numerical models. Those models were then generated in physical form through the use of additive manufacturing techniques. Results: Physical models based upon 3D-US, MRI, and CT images were successfully generated. The postnatal appearance of either the aborted fetus or the neonate closely resembled the physical models, particularly in cases of malformations. Conclusion: The combined use of 3D-US, MRI, and CT could help improve our understanding of fetal anatomy. These three screening modalities can be used for educational purposes and as tools to enable parents to visualize their unborn baby. The images can be segmented and then applied, separately or jointly, in order to construct virtual and physical 3D models. (author)

  19. Improving the false-negative rate of CT in acute appendicitis-Reassessment of CT images by body imaging radiologists: A blinded prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poortman, Pieter; Lohle, Paul N.M.; Schoemaker, Cees M.; Cuesta, Miguel A.; Oostvogel, Henk J.M.; Lange-de Klerk, Elly S.M. de; Hamming, Jaap F.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the accuracy of computed tomography (CT) analyzed by individual radiology staff members and body imaging radiologists in a non-academic teaching hospital for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis. Patients and methods: In a prospective study 199 patients with suspected acute appendicitis were examined with unenhanced CT. CT images were pre-operatively analyzed by one of the 12 members of the radiology staff. In a later stage two body imaging radiologist reassessed all CT images without knowledge of the surgical findings and without knowledge of the primary CT diagnosis. The results, independently reported, were correlated with surgical and histopathologic findings. Results: In 132 patients (66%) acute appendicitis was found at surgery, in 67 patients (34%) a normal appendix was found. The sensitivity of the primary CT analysis and of the reassessment was 76% and 88%, respectively; the specificity was 84% and 87%; the positive predictive value was 90% and 93%; the negative predictive value was 64% and 78%; and the accuracy was 78% and 87%. Conclusion: Reassessment of CT images for acute appendicitis by body imaging radiologists results in a significant improvement of sensitivity, negative predictive value and accuracy. To prevent false-negative interpretation of CT images in acute appendicitis the expertise of the attending radiologist should be considered.

  20. Improving the false-negative rate of CT in acute appendicitis-Reassessment of CT images by body imaging radiologists: A blinded prospective study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poortman, Pieter [Department of Surgery, St Elisabeth Hospital, Tilburg (Netherlands)], E-mail: ppoortman@wlz.nl; Lohle, Paul N.M. [Department of Surgery, St Elisabeth Hospital, Tilburg (Netherlands)], E-mail: plohle@elisabeth.nl; Schoemaker, Cees M. [Department of Surgery, St Elisabeth Hospital, Tilburg (Netherlands)], E-mail: mcschoemaker@elisabeth.nl; Cuesta, Miguel A. [Department of Surgery, VU Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands)], E-mail: ma.cuesta@vumc.nl; Oostvogel, Henk J.M. [Department of Surgery, St Elisabeth Hospital, Tilburg (Netherlands)], E-mail: h.oostvogel@elisabeth.nl; Lange-de Klerk, Elly S.M. de [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, VU Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands)], E-mail: esm.delange@vumc.nl; Hamming, Jaap F. [Department of Surgery, Leiden University Medical Centre (Netherlands)], E-mail: j.f.hamming@lumc.nl

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To compare the accuracy of computed tomography (CT) analyzed by individual radiology staff members and body imaging radiologists in a non-academic teaching hospital for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis. Patients and methods: In a prospective study 199 patients with suspected acute appendicitis were examined with unenhanced CT. CT images were pre-operatively analyzed by one of the 12 members of the radiology staff. In a later stage two body imaging radiologist reassessed all CT images without knowledge of the surgical findings and without knowledge of the primary CT diagnosis. The results, independently reported, were correlated with surgical and histopathologic findings. Results: In 132 patients (66%) acute appendicitis was found at surgery, in 67 patients (34%) a normal appendix was found. The sensitivity of the primary CT analysis and of the reassessment was 76% and 88%, respectively; the specificity was 84% and 87%; the positive predictive value was 90% and 93%; the negative predictive value was 64% and 78%; and the accuracy was 78% and 87%. Conclusion: Reassessment of CT images for acute appendicitis by body imaging radiologists results in a significant improvement of sensitivity, negative predictive value and accuracy. To prevent false-negative interpretation of CT images in acute appendicitis the expertise of the attending radiologist should be considered.

  1. Image-guided stereotactic surgery using ultrasonography and reconstructive three-dimensional CT-imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Hirotsune; Iseki, Hiroshi; Umezawa, Yoshihiro

    1991-01-01

    A new simulation and navigation system utilizing three-dimensional CT images has been developed for image-guided stereotactic surgery. Preoperative CT images are not always useful in predicting the intraoperative location of lesions, for cerebral lesions are easily displaced or distorted by gravity, brain retraction, and/or CSF aspiration during operative procedure. This new system, however, has the advantage that the intraoperative locations of intracranial lesions or the anatomical structures of the brain can be precisely confirmed during stereotactic surgery. Serial CT images were obtained from a patient whose head had been fixed to the ISEKI CT-guided stereotactic frame. The data of serial CT images were saved on a floppy disc and then transferred to the work station (IRIS) using the off line. In order to find the best approach angle for ultrasound-guided stereotactic surgery, three-dimenstional CT images were reconstructed using the work station. The site of the craniotomy or the angle of the trajectory of the ultrasound probe was measured preoperatively based on the three-dimensional CT images. Then, in the operating room, the patient's head was fixed to the ISEKI frame with the subframe at the same position as before according to the measurement of the CT images. In a case of cystic glioma, the predicable ultrasonograms from three-dimensional reconstructive CT images were ascertained to correspond well to the actual ultrasound images during ultrasound-guided stereotactic surgery. Therefore, the new simulation and navigation system can be judged to be a powerful operative supporting modality for correcting the locations of cerebral lesions; it allows one to perform stereotactic surgery more accurately and less invasively. (author)

  2. Clinical application of three-dimensional imaging with multislice CT for laparoscopic colorectal surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuki, Mitsuru; Okuda, Jyunji; Yoshikawa, Syushi [Osaka Medical Coll., Takatsuki (Japan)] (and others)

    2003-03-01

    Laparoscopic colorectal surgery, while minimally invasive, is a complicated technique. Therefore, prior to this surgery, it is important to determine the anatomical information of colorectal cancer. Fifty-eight cases of patients with a confirmed diagnosis of colon cancer [caecal (n=4), ascending colon (n=6), transverse colon (n=7), descending colon (n=2), sigmoid colon (n=22), and rectal (n=17) cancer] were evaluated using multislice CT before laparoscopic surgery. CT examination was performed in an air-filled colorectum by colon fiberscopy. Contrast-enhanced images on multislice CT were obtained at arterial and venous phases. All images were reviewed on a workstation, and three-dimensional (3D) images of vessels, colorectum, cancer, and swollen lymph nodes were reconstructed by volume rendering and fused (integrated 3D imaging). We evaluated the usefulness of integrated 3D imaging with multislice CT for laparoscopic colorectal surgery. Integrated 3D imaging demonstrated clearly the distribution of arteries feeding the colorectal cancer and the anatomical location of colorectal cancer and arterial and venous systems. Moreover, measurement of the distance between the aortic bifurcation and the origin of the inferior mesenteric artery and that between the base of the inferior mesenteric artery and the origin of the left colic artery on integrated 3D imaging contributed to safe, prompt ligation of the vessels and excision of lymph nodes. Integrated 3D imaging with multislice CT was useful for simulation of laparoscopic colorectal surgery. (author)

  3. Clinical application of three-dimensional imaging with multislice CT for laparoscopic colorectal surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuki, Mitsuru; Okuda, Jyunji; Yoshikawa, Syushi

    2003-01-01

    Laparoscopic colorectal surgery, while minimally invasive, is a complicated technique. Therefore, prior to this surgery, it is important to determine the anatomical information of colorectal cancer. Fifty-eight cases of patients with a confirmed diagnosis of colon cancer [caecal (n=4), ascending colon (n=6), transverse colon (n=7), descending colon (n=2), sigmoid colon (n=22), and rectal (n=17) cancer] were evaluated using multislice CT before laparoscopic surgery. CT examination was performed in an air-filled colorectum by colon fiberscopy. Contrast-enhanced images on multislice CT were obtained at arterial and venous phases. All images were reviewed on a workstation, and three-dimensional (3D) images of vessels, colorectum, cancer, and swollen lymph nodes were reconstructed by volume rendering and fused (integrated 3D imaging). We evaluated the usefulness of integrated 3D imaging with multislice CT for laparoscopic colorectal surgery. Integrated 3D imaging demonstrated clearly the distribution of arteries feeding the colorectal cancer and the anatomical location of colorectal cancer and arterial and venous systems. Moreover, measurement of the distance between the aortic bifurcation and the origin of the inferior mesenteric artery and that between the base of the inferior mesenteric artery and the origin of the left colic artery on integrated 3D imaging contributed to safe, prompt ligation of the vessels and excision of lymph nodes. Integrated 3D imaging with multislice CT was useful for simulation of laparoscopic colorectal surgery. (author)

  4. Automatic anatomy recognition in whole-body PET/CT images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Huiqian [College of Optoelectronic Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044, China and Medical Image Processing Group Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Udupa, Jayaram K., E-mail: jay@mail.med.upenn.edu; Odhner, Dewey; Tong, Yubing; Torigian, Drew A. [Medical Image Processing Group Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Zhao, Liming [Medical Image Processing Group Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 and Research Center of Intelligent System and Robotics, Chongqing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Chongqing 400065 (China)

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: Whole-body positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) has become a standard method of imaging patients with various disease conditions, especially cancer. Body-wide accurate quantification of disease burden in PET/CT images is important for characterizing lesions, staging disease, prognosticating patient outcome, planning treatment, and evaluating disease response to therapeutic interventions. However, body-wide anatomy recognition in PET/CT is a critical first step for accurately and automatically quantifying disease body-wide, body-region-wise, and organwise. This latter process, however, has remained a challenge due to the lower quality of the anatomic information portrayed in the CT component of this imaging modality and the paucity of anatomic details in the PET component. In this paper, the authors demonstrate the adaptation of a recently developed automatic anatomy recognition (AAR) methodology [Udupa et al., “Body-wide hierarchical fuzzy modeling, recognition, and delineation of anatomy in medical images,” Med. Image Anal. 18, 752–771 (2014)] to PET/CT images. Their goal was to test what level of object localization accuracy can be achieved on PET/CT compared to that achieved on diagnostic CT images. Methods: The authors advance the AAR approach in this work in three fronts: (i) from body-region-wise treatment in the work of Udupa et al. to whole body; (ii) from the use of image intensity in optimal object recognition in the work of Udupa et al. to intensity plus object-specific texture properties, and (iii) from the intramodality model-building-recognition strategy to the intermodality approach. The whole-body approach allows consideration of relationships among objects in different body regions, which was previously not possible. Consideration of object texture allows generalizing the previous optimal threshold-based fuzzy model recognition method from intensity images to any derived fuzzy membership image, and in the process

  5. Automatic anatomy recognition in whole-body PET/CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Huiqian; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Odhner, Dewey; Tong, Yubing; Torigian, Drew A.; Zhao, Liming

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Whole-body positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) has become a standard method of imaging patients with various disease conditions, especially cancer. Body-wide accurate quantification of disease burden in PET/CT images is important for characterizing lesions, staging disease, prognosticating patient outcome, planning treatment, and evaluating disease response to therapeutic interventions. However, body-wide anatomy recognition in PET/CT is a critical first step for accurately and automatically quantifying disease body-wide, body-region-wise, and organwise. This latter process, however, has remained a challenge due to the lower quality of the anatomic information portrayed in the CT component of this imaging modality and the paucity of anatomic details in the PET component. In this paper, the authors demonstrate the adaptation of a recently developed automatic anatomy recognition (AAR) methodology [Udupa et al., “Body-wide hierarchical fuzzy modeling, recognition, and delineation of anatomy in medical images,” Med. Image Anal. 18, 752–771 (2014)] to PET/CT images. Their goal was to test what level of object localization accuracy can be achieved on PET/CT compared to that achieved on diagnostic CT images. Methods: The authors advance the AAR approach in this work in three fronts: (i) from body-region-wise treatment in the work of Udupa et al. to whole body; (ii) from the use of image intensity in optimal object recognition in the work of Udupa et al. to intensity plus object-specific texture properties, and (iii) from the intramodality model-building-recognition strategy to the intermodality approach. The whole-body approach allows consideration of relationships among objects in different body regions, which was previously not possible. Consideration of object texture allows generalizing the previous optimal threshold-based fuzzy model recognition method from intensity images to any derived fuzzy membership image, and in the process

  6. Optimization of a retrospective technique for respiratory-gated high speed micro-CT of free-breathing rodents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, Nancy L; Wheatley, Andrew R; Holdsworth, David W; Drangova, Maria

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a technique for dynamic respiratory imaging using retrospectively gated high-speed micro-CT imaging of free-breathing mice. Free-breathing C57Bl6 mice were scanned using a dynamic micro-CT scanner, comprising a flat-panel detector mounted on a slip-ring gantry. Projection images were acquired over ten complete gantry rotations in 50 s, while monitoring the respiratory motion in synchrony with projection-image acquisition. Projection images belonging to a selected respiratory phase were retrospectively identified and used for 3D reconstruction. The effect of using fewer gantry rotations-which influences both image quality and the ability to quantify respiratory function-was evaluated. Images reconstructed using unique projections from six or more gantry rotations produced acceptable images for quantitative analysis of lung volume, CT density, functional residual capacity and tidal volume. The functional residual capacity (0.15 ± 0.03 mL) and tidal volumes (0.08 ± 0.03 mL) measured in this study agree with previously reported measurements made using prospectively gated micro-CT and at higher resolution (150 μm versus 90 μm voxel spacing). Retrospectively gated micro-CT imaging of free-breathing mice enables quantitative dynamic measurement of morphological and functional parameters in the mouse models of respiratory disease, with scan times as short as 30 s, based on the acquisition of projection images over six gantry rotations

  7. Optimization of a retrospective technique for respiratory-gated high speed micro-CT of free-breathing rodents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ford, Nancy L [Department of Physics, Ryerson University, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto, Ontario M5B 2K3 (Canada); Wheatley, Andrew R [Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, 100 Perth Drive, PO Box 5015, London, Ontario N6A 5K8 (Canada); Holdsworth, David W [Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, 100 Perth Drive, PO Box 5015, London, Ontario N6A 5K8 (Canada); Drangova, Maria [Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, 100 Perth Drive, PO Box 5015, London, Ontario N6A 5K8 (Canada)

    2007-09-21

    The objective of this study was to develop a technique for dynamic respiratory imaging using retrospectively gated high-speed micro-CT imaging of free-breathing mice. Free-breathing C57Bl6 mice were scanned using a dynamic micro-CT scanner, comprising a flat-panel detector mounted on a slip-ring gantry. Projection images were acquired over ten complete gantry rotations in 50 s, while monitoring the respiratory motion in synchrony with projection-image acquisition. Projection images belonging to a selected respiratory phase were retrospectively identified and used for 3D reconstruction. The effect of using fewer gantry rotations-which influences both image quality and the ability to quantify respiratory function-was evaluated. Images reconstructed using unique projections from six or more gantry rotations produced acceptable images for quantitative analysis of lung volume, CT density, functional residual capacity and tidal volume. The functional residual capacity (0.15 {+-} 0.03 mL) and tidal volumes (0.08 {+-} 0.03 mL) measured in this study agree with previously reported measurements made using prospectively gated micro-CT and at higher resolution (150 {mu}m versus 90 {mu}m voxel spacing). Retrospectively gated micro-CT imaging of free-breathing mice enables quantitative dynamic measurement of morphological and functional parameters in the mouse models of respiratory disease, with scan times as short as 30 s, based on the acquisition of projection images over six gantry rotations.

  8. Use of a priori information in incomplete data x-ray CT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eberhard, J.W.; Hedengren, K.H.

    1988-01-01

    A new technique for utilizing a priori information is presented which uses CAD electronic part models to make use of effectively all the information which is available in the blueprint of a selected industrial part. Significant improvements in x-ray image quality are demonstrated using the technique in the image enhancement of the model of an exhaust nozzle actuation ring for the F110 aircraft. Three approaches were evaluated: a projection data approach, an iterative reconstruction approach, and an image processing and analysis approach. Results for these approaches are included. X-ray CT images of the simulated part image reconstructed with several choices of available angular range are shown

  9. Comparison of CT during arterial portography, delayed iodine CT, and MR imaging for the preoperative evaluation of hepatic tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, R.C.; Chezmar, J.L.; Sugarbaker, P.H.; Bernardino, M.E.

    1988-01-01

    Twenty-eight patients with neoplastic involvement of the liver were studied with CT during arterial portography, delayed iodine CT, and MR imaging, to determine the number, size, and location of focal hepatic lesions prior to hepatic tumor surgery. The MR pulse-sequences used included T1- and T2-weighted spin-echo (SE) sequences and inversion-recovery (IR) sequences at 0.5 T, 1.5 T, or both. Results were compared with operative and pathologic findings. The sensitivities for the detection of individual focal lesions are as follows: CT during arterial portography, delayed iodine CT, 77%, IR at 0.5 T, 74%; T1-weighted SE at 0.5 T, 69%; T2-weighted SE at 1.5 T, 55%, IR at 1.5 T, 50%; T2-weighted SE at 0.5 T, 48%, and T1-weighted SE at 1.5 T, 31%. The positive predictive values ranged from 88% to 100% for all techniques. The authors' data suggest that CT during arterial portography is a superior technique for evaluating patients prior to hepatic tumor surgery

  10. A dual-view digital tomosynthesis imaging technique for improved chest imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, Yuncheng; Lai, Chao-Jen; Wang, Tianpeng; Shaw, Chris C., E-mail: cshaw@mdanderson.org [Department of Imaging Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77054 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Purpose: Digital tomosynthesis (DTS) has been shown to be useful for reducing the overlapping of abnormalities with anatomical structures at various depth levels along the posterior–anterior (PA) direction in chest radiography. However, DTS provides crude three-dimensional (3D) images that have poor resolution in the lateral view and can only be displayed with reasonable quality in the PA view. Furthermore, the spillover of high-contrast objects from off-fulcrum planes generates artifacts that may impede the diagnostic use of the DTS images. In this paper, the authors describe and demonstrate the use of a dual-view DTS technique to improve the accuracy of the reconstructed volume image data for more accurate rendition of the anatomy and slice images with improved resolution and reduced artifacts, thus allowing the 3D image data to be viewed in views other than the PA view. Methods: With the dual-view DTS technique, limited angle scans are performed and projection images are acquired in two orthogonal views: PA and lateral. The dual-view projection data are used together to reconstruct 3D images using the maximum likelihood expectation maximization iterative algorithm. In this study, projection images were simulated or experimentally acquired over 360° using the scanning geometry for cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). While all projections were used to reconstruct CBCT images, selected projections were extracted and used to reconstruct single- and dual-view DTS images for comparison with the CBCT images. For realistic demonstration and comparison, a digital chest phantom derived from clinical CT images was used for the simulation study. An anthropomorphic chest phantom was imaged for the experimental study. The resultant dual-view DTS images were visually compared with the single-view DTS images and CBCT images for the presence of image artifacts and accuracy of CT numbers and anatomy and quantitatively compared with root-mean-square-deviation (RMSD) values

  11. Advanced imaging of the musculoskeletal system: Standard, three-dimensional, and contrast-enhanced CT and MR imaging, and quantitative bone densitometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resnick, D.; Sartoris, D.J.

    1987-01-01

    This course reviews the application of advanced imaging techniques to a broad spectrum of musculoskeletal disorders. The indications for and utility of standard CT in both the axial and the appendicular skeleton is explored. The combined use of CT with air and contrast arthrography at sites including the hip, knee, and shoulder is discussed. A summary of the proved and potential applications of MR imaging in osseous, articular, bone marrow, and soft-tissue disorders is provided. The utility of intraarticular contrast agents in enhancing the diagnostic capabilities of MR imaging for disorders of hyaline cartilage and and fibrocartilage is demonstrated. The advantages of multiplanar reformation and three-dimensional image reconstruction of cross-sectional imaging data are described in conjunction with the fundamental technological principles of these strategies. Accepted methods as well as investigative techniques for the diagnosis and follow-up of metabolic bone disease are contrasted with regard to relative indications, advantages, and limitations

  12. Application of SPECT/CT imaging in the diagnosis of benign diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcheva, M.; Demirev, A.

    2014-01-01

    The application of recently introduced hybrid nuclear medicine methods gains importance in a variety of clinical fields, mainly because of the unique combination between functional and anatomical data provided by those methods and their capability for a precise localization of pathological processes. Single photon emission computed tomography, combined with computed tomography (SPECT/CT) is one of those methods. Its role in nuclear cardiology is important, because it provides quick attenuation correction and calculates the calcium score. In nuclear endocrinology SPECT/CT participates in thyroid and parathyroid examinations, especially in cases, where there is a need for localization of ectopic parathyroid or thyroid tissue. In nuclear pulmonology, one of the best ways to attribute certain changes seen on the SPECT, to the zone of interest on the CT, is to study the fused images obtained from the SPECT/ CT scanner. In cases of suspected infection and inflammation, fused images are indispensable for accurate localization of the involved tissue (structure) and for discrimination between normal/abnormal uptake. Careful reading of the CT component (even low-dose) is related (in 10% of cases) to clinically important incidental findings: effusions, tumors, metastases or lymph node pathology. SPECT/CT increases the specificity of the examinations and improves significantly the localization of pathological processes. It provides additional information, shortens the diagnostic algorithm and influences the extent of surgical procedures. In many hybrid examinations the preferred CT component is a low-dose one, without considerable radiation exposure. The opportunity to combine nuclear medicine techniques and contrast CT images, aiming at better diagnosis needs further development. SPECT/CT provides important additional information and more accurate diagnostics in patients with benign diseases. (authors) Key words: SPECT/CT. BENIGN DISEASES

  13. Three-dimensional multislice CT imaging of otitis media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Miyako; Yoshikawa, Hiroshi; Hosokawa, Akira; Furukawa, Tomoyasu; Ichikawa, Ginichiro; Wada, Akihiro; Ando, Ichiro

    2002-01-01

    In recent years, the multislice CT system has come into practical use that enables table movement of half mm, resulting in a significant improvement in resolution. The use of this CT system enables to depict the entire auditory ossicles, including the stapes. 3D reconstruction was performed using helical CT data in 5 patients with chronic otitis media and 5 patients with cholesteatoma. An Aquilion Multi (Toshiba) multislice helical CT scanner and a Xtension (Toshiba) image workstation were used in this study. We demonstrated the 3D display with axial, coronal and sagittal images. Compared with the normal ears, it was necessary to set a higher threshold for the affected ears. It is important to select suitable threshold for demonstration of 3D images optimally. Bone destruction of the stapes was confirmed at surgery in 2 ears. The stapes was observed at 3D-CT imaging in other 18 ears. It was found that the 3D images of the ossicular destruction in ears with cholesteatoma were consistent with surgical findings. It is therefore concluded that 3D imaging of the middle ear using a multislice CT scanner is clinically useful. (author)

  14. Three-dimensional multislice CT imaging of otitis media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Miyako [Yanagibasi Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Yoshikawa, Hiroshi; Hosokawa, Akira; Furukawa, Tomoyasu; Ichikawa, Ginichiro [Juntendo Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine; Wada, Akihiro; Ando, Ichiro [Juntendo Univ., Chiba (Japan). Urayasu Hospital

    2002-07-01

    In recent years, the multislice CT system has come into practical use that enables table movement of half mm, resulting in a significant improvement in resolution. The use of this CT system enables to depict the entire auditory ossicles, including the stapes. 3D reconstruction was performed using helical CT data in 5 patients with chronic otitis media and 5 patients with cholesteatoma. An Aquilion Multi (Toshiba) multislice helical CT scanner and a Xtension (Toshiba) image workstation were used in this study. We demonstrated the 3D display with axial, coronal and sagittal images. Compared with the normal ears, it was necessary to set a higher threshold for the affected ears. It is important to select suitable threshold for demonstration of 3D images optimally. Bone destruction of the stapes was confirmed at surgery in 2 ears. The stapes was observed at 3D-CT imaging in other 18 ears. It was found that the 3D images of the ossicular destruction in ears with cholesteatoma were consistent with surgical findings. It is therefore concluded that 3D imaging of the middle ear using a multislice CT scanner is clinically useful. (author)

  15. SU-F-I-08: CT Image Ring Artifact Reduction Based On Prior Image

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, C; Qi, H; Chen, Z; Wu, S; Xu, Y; Zhou, L [Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: In computed tomography (CT) system, CT images with ring artifacts will be reconstructed when some adjacent bins of detector don’t work. The ring artifacts severely degrade CT image quality. We present a useful CT ring artifacts reduction based on projection data correction, aiming at estimating the missing data of projection data accurately, thus removing the ring artifacts of CT images. Methods: The method consists of ten steps: 1) Identification of abnormal pixel line in projection sinogram; 2) Linear interpolation within the pixel line of projection sinogram; 3) FBP reconstruction using interpolated projection data; 4) Filtering FBP image using mean filter; 5) Forwarding projection of filtered FBP image; 6) Subtraction forwarded projection from original projection; 7) Linear interpolation of abnormal pixel line area in the subtraction projection; 8) Adding the interpolated subtraction projection on the forwarded projection; 9) FBP reconstruction using corrected projection data; 10) Return to step 4 until the pre-set iteration number is reached. The method is validated on simulated and real data to restore missing projection data and reconstruct ring artifact-free CT images. Results: We have studied impact of amount of dead bins of CT detector on the accuracy of missing data estimation in projection sinogram. For the simulated case with a resolution of 256 by 256 Shepp-Logan phantom, three iterations are sufficient to restore projection data and reconstruct ring artifact-free images when the dead bins rating is under 30%. The dead-bin-induced artifacts are substantially reduced. More iteration number is needed to reconstruct satisfactory images while the rating of dead bins increases. Similar results were found for a real head phantom case. Conclusion: A practical CT image ring artifact correction scheme based on projection data is developed. This method can produce ring artifact-free CT images feasibly and effectively.

  16. SU-F-I-08: CT Image Ring Artifact Reduction Based On Prior Image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, C; Qi, H; Chen, Z; Wu, S; Xu, Y; Zhou, L

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: In computed tomography (CT) system, CT images with ring artifacts will be reconstructed when some adjacent bins of detector don’t work. The ring artifacts severely degrade CT image quality. We present a useful CT ring artifacts reduction based on projection data correction, aiming at estimating the missing data of projection data accurately, thus removing the ring artifacts of CT images. Methods: The method consists of ten steps: 1) Identification of abnormal pixel line in projection sinogram; 2) Linear interpolation within the pixel line of projection sinogram; 3) FBP reconstruction using interpolated projection data; 4) Filtering FBP image using mean filter; 5) Forwarding projection of filtered FBP image; 6) Subtraction forwarded projection from original projection; 7) Linear interpolation of abnormal pixel line area in the subtraction projection; 8) Adding the interpolated subtraction projection on the forwarded projection; 9) FBP reconstruction using corrected projection data; 10) Return to step 4 until the pre-set iteration number is reached. The method is validated on simulated and real data to restore missing projection data and reconstruct ring artifact-free CT images. Results: We have studied impact of amount of dead bins of CT detector on the accuracy of missing data estimation in projection sinogram. For the simulated case with a resolution of 256 by 256 Shepp-Logan phantom, three iterations are sufficient to restore projection data and reconstruct ring artifact-free images when the dead bins rating is under 30%. The dead-bin-induced artifacts are substantially reduced. More iteration number is needed to reconstruct satisfactory images while the rating of dead bins increases. Similar results were found for a real head phantom case. Conclusion: A practical CT image ring artifact correction scheme based on projection data is developed. This method can produce ring artifact-free CT images feasibly and effectively.

  17. CT Imaging of facial trauma. Role of different types of reconstruction. Part I - bones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myga-Porosilo, J.; Sraga, W.; Borowiak, H.; Jackowska, Z.; Kluczewska, E.; Skrzelewski, S.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Injury to the facial skeleton and the adjoining soft tissues is a frequently occurring condition. The main aim of this work was to assess the value of multiplanar and three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction computed tomography (CT) images obtained by using multi-detector row technology in spiral data acquisition in patients with facial skeleton injury. The authors attempted to answer the following questions: Are there particular mechanisms and types of injuries or locations of fractures which can be diagnosed significantly more effectively by conducting additional multiplanar image reconstructions? Do 3D image reconstructions contribute to the diagnostic process, to what extent? Compared to other imaging techniques, is the spiral CT data acquisition a more convenient for the patient and a faster investigation method of diagnosing post-injury lesions involving the facial skeleton? Material/Methods: Sixty-seven patients diagnosed with injury to the facial skeleton were referred for emergent CT scanning. Each patient underwent a CT scan with the use of a GE HiSpeed Qx/i scanner. The scans were conducted with the use of spiral data acquisition technique in the transverse plane. The following secondary image reconstructions were conducted for each patient: a two dimensional (2D) multiplanar reconstruction (MPR), maximum intensity projection (MIP), and 3D volume rendering (VR). Post-injury lesions of the facial skeleton were assessed and the presence of any loose displaced bone fragments was taken into consideration. Results: As far as fracture imaging is concerned, the 2D image reconstruction and volume rendering proved to be the most effective in the majority of locations. 3D image reconstructions proved the most sensitive in most cases of loose displaced bone fragments, except for fine structures such as the ethmoid bone and the inferior orbital wall. Conclusions: 1. Multiplanar computer reconstructions increase the effectiveness of visualisation of

  18. Helical CT imaging of clinically suspected appendicitis: Correlation of CT and histological findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, S.K.; Chan, L.P.; Yeo, A.

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: The diagnosis of appendicitis is traditionally made on the basis of clinical findings supported by laboratory results. The aim of our study was to determine the accuracy and feasibility of using a relatively new technique of computed tomography (CT) using only colonic contrast medium. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 50 patients clinically diagnosed as having appendicitis were prospectively examined before surgery with thin-collimation helical CT from the L3 level to the acetabular roof with only rectally administered colon contrast medium. The hard copy CT images were reviewed jointly by two radiologists and a consensus was reached for each patient. The results were then compared with the surgical and histological findings at appendicectomy. RESULTS: There were 35 true-positives, one false-positive, 12 true-negatives and two false-negatives for CT. This yielded an accuracy of 94%, sensitivity of 95%, specificity of 92%, positive predictive value of 97% and negative predictive value of 86%. The appendix was identified in 45 patients (90%) and obscured by an inflammatory mass in the remaining five. An alternative diagnosis was found in 10 of 12 normal CT examinations (83%). CONCLUSION: Helical CT with rectal contrast medium is a quick, well tolerated and accurate test to diagnose appendicitis. It can offer alternative, possibly non-surgical diagnosis in patients who would otherwise have undergone laparotomy. Wong, S.K. et al. (2002)

  19. Skeletal scintigraphy and SPECT/CT in orthopedic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klaeser, B.; Walter, M.; Krause, T.

    2011-01-01

    Multi-modality imaging with SPECT-CT in orthopaedics combines the excellent sensitivity of scintigraphy with the morphological information of CT as a key for specific interpretation of findings in bone scans. The result is an imaging modality with the clear potential to prove of value even in a competitive setting dominated by MRI, and to significantly add to diagnostic imaging in orthopaedics. SPECT-CT is of great value in the diagnostic evaluation after fractures, and - in contrast to MRI - it is well suited for imaging in patients with osteosyntheses and metallic implants. In sports medicine, SPECT-CT allows for a sensitive and specific detection of osseous stress reactions before morphological changes become detectable by CT or MRI. In patients with osseous pain syndromes, actively evolving degenerative changes as a cause of pain can be identified and accurately localized. Further, particularly prospective diagnostic studies providing comparative data are needed to strengthen the position of nuclear imaging in orthopaedics and sports medicine and to help implementing SPECT/CT in diagnostic algorithms. (orig.)

  20. Visualization of Tooth for Non-Destructive Evaluation from CT Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Hui; Chae, Ok Sam [Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-06-15

    This paper reports an effort to develop 3D tooth visualization system from CT sequence images as a part of the non-destructive evaluation suitable for the simulation of endodontics, orthodontics and other dental treatments. We focus on the segmentation and visualization for the individual tooth. In dental CT images teeth are touching the adjacent teeth or surrounded by the alveolar bones with similar intensity. We propose an improved level set method with shape prior to separate a tooth from other teeth as well as the alveolar bones. Reconstructed 3D model of individual tooth based on the segmentation results indicates that our technique is a very conducive tool for tooth visualization, evaluation and diagnosis. Some comparative visualization results validate the non-destructive function of our method.

  1. SPET/CT image co-registration in the abdomen with a simple and cost-effective tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foerster, Gregor J.; Laumann, Christina; Nickel, Otmar; Bartenstein, Peter; Kann, Peter; Rieker, Olaf

    2003-01-01

    Fusion of morphology and function has been shown to improve diagnostic accuracy in many clinical circumstances. Taking this into account, a number of instruments combining computed tomography (CT) with positron emission tomography (PET) or single-photon emission tomography (SPET) are appearing on the market. The aim of this study was to evaluate a simple and cost-effective approach to generate fusion images of similar quality. For the evaluation of the proposed approach, patients with neuroendocrine abdominal tumours with liver metastases were chosen, since the exact superimposition in the abdomen is more difficult than in other regions. Five hours following the injection of 110 MBq 111 In-DTPA-octreotide, patients were fixed in a vacuum cushion (MED-TEC, Vac-Loc) and investigated with helical CT in a mid-inspiration position (n=14). Directly following the CT, a SPET study (SPET1) of the abdominal region was performed without changing the position of the patient. A second SPET study (SPET2), 24 h p.i., was acquired after repositioning the patient in his or her individually moulded vacuum cushion. A total of nine markers suitable for imaging with CT and SPET were fixed on the cushion. Datasets were fused by means of internal landmarks (e.g. metastases or margin of abdominal organs) or by the external markers. Image fusion using external markers was fast and easy to handle compared with the use of internal landmarks. Using this technique, all lesions detectable by SPET (n=28) appeared exactly superpositioned on the respective CT morphology by visual inspection. Image fusion of CT/SPET1 and CT/SPET2 showed a mean deviation of the external markers that in the former case was smaller than the voxel size of 4.67 mm: 4.17±0.61 (CT/SPET1; ±SD) and 5.52±1.56 mm (CT/SPET2), respectively. Using internal landmarks, the mean deviation of the chosen landmarks was 6.47±1.37 and 7.78±1.21 mm. Vector subtraction of corresponding anatomical points of the CT and the re

  2. Automatic anatomy partitioning of the torso region on CT images by using multiple organ localizations with a group-wise calibration technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiangrong; Morita, Syoichi; Zhou, Xinxin; Chen, Huayue; Hara, Takeshi; Yokoyama, Ryujiro; Kanematsu, Masayuki; Hoshi, Hiroaki; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2015-03-01

    This paper describes an automatic approach for anatomy partitioning on three-dimensional (3D) computedtomography (CT) images that divide the human torso into several volume-of-interesting (VOI) images based on anatomical definition. The proposed approach combines several individual detections of organ-location with a groupwise organ-location calibration and correction to achieve an automatic and robust multiple-organ localization task. The essence of the proposed method is to jointly detect the 3D minimum bounding box for each type of organ shown on CT images based on intra-organ-image-textures and inter-organ-spatial-relationship in the anatomy. Machine-learning-based template matching and generalized Hough transform-based point-distribution estimation are used in the detection and calibration processes. We apply this approach to the automatic partitioning of a torso region on CT images, which are divided into 35 VOIs presenting major organ regions and tissues required by routine diagnosis in clinical medicine. A database containing 4,300 patient cases of high-resolution 3D torso CT images is used for training and performance evaluations. We confirmed that the proposed method was successful in target organ localization on more than 95% of CT cases. Only two organs (gallbladder and pancreas) showed a lower success rate: 71 and 78% respectively. In addition, we applied this approach to another database that included 287 patient cases of whole-body CT images scanned for positron emission tomography (PET) studies and used for additional performance evaluation. The experimental results showed that no significant difference between the anatomy partitioning results from those two databases except regarding the spleen. All experimental results showed that the proposed approach was efficient and useful in accomplishing localization tasks for major organs and tissues on CT images scanned using different protocols.

  3. Whole-body CT. Spiral and multislice CT. 2. tot. rev. and enl. ed.; Ganzkoerper-Computertomographie. Spiral- und Multislice-CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prokop, M.; Galanski, M.; Schaefer-Prokop, C.; Molen, A.J. van der

    2007-07-01

    Spiral and multidetector techniques have improved the diagnostic possibilities of CT, so that image analysis and interpretation have become increasingly complex. This book represents the current state of the art in CT imaging, including the most recent technical scanner developments. The second edition comprises the current state of knowledge in cT imaging. There are new chapters on image processing, application of contrasting agents and radiation dose. All organ-specific pathological findings are discussed in full. There are hints for optimum use and interpretation of CT, including CT angiography, CT colonography, CT-IVPL, and 3D imaging. There is an introduction to cardio-CT, from calcium scoring and CTA of the coronary arteries to judgement of cardiac morphology. There are detailed scan protocols with descriptions of how to go about parameter selection. Practical hints are given for better image quality and lower radiation exposure of patients, guidelines for patient preparation and complication management, and more than 1900 images in optimum RRR quality. (orig.)

  4. Dose performance and image quality: Dual source CT versus single source CT in cardiac CT angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Min; Qi Hengtao; Wang Ximing; Wang Tao; Chen, Jiu-Hong; Liu Cheng

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate dose performance and image quality of 64-slice dual source CT (DSCT) in comparison to 64-slice single source CT (SSCT) in cardiac CT angiography (CTA). Methods: 100 patients examined by DSCT and 60 patients scanned by SSCT were included in this study. Objective indices such as image noise, contrast-to-noise ratio and signal-to-noise ratio were analyzed. Subjective image quality was assessed by two cardiovascular radiologists in consensus using a four-point scale (1 = excellent to 4 = not acceptable). Estimation of effective dose was performed on the basis of dose length product (DLP). Results: At low heart rates ( 0.05), but, at high heart rates (>70 bpm), DSCT provided robust image quality (P 70 bpm), DSCT is able to provide robust diagnostic image quality at doses far below that of SSCT.

  5. CT and MR imaging of the normal and pathologic conditions of the facial nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaeger, Lorenz E-mail: jaeger@ikra.med.uni-muenchen.de; Reiser, Maximilian

    2001-11-01

    Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are well established imaging modalities to examine the facial nerve as well as the course of the facial nerve itself. High spatial resolution is guaranteed not only in the x- and y-axis, but also in the z-axis using multislice spiral CT. With this technique, reformatted multiplanar images in oblique planes, avoiding additional examinations in the coronal plane, facilitate the delineation of the facial nerve canal. This is beneficial in patients with temporal bone trauma, malformation or osseous changes. MR has a superior soft-tissue contrast to CT that enables imaging of the facial nerve itself. Therefore the normal facial nerve as well as pathologic changes of the facial nerve is readily visualized from the brain stem to the parotid gland. This review article presents anatomy, pathology and imaging strategies in the diagnostics of the facial nerve.

  6. CT, MRI, and FDG-PET/CT imaging findings of abdominopelvic desmoplastic small round cell tumors: Correlation with histopathologic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Weidong; Li Chuanxing; Liu Qingyu; Hu Yingying; Cao Yun; Huang Jinhua

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To analyze computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET)/CT imaging features of abdominopelvic desmoplastic small round cell tumor (DSRCT) and to improve the diagnostic efficacy of these techniques for the detection of such tumor. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed 7 cases of abdominopelvic DSRCT confirmed by histopathologic analysis. Among the 7 patients, 5 patients had undergone CT scanning, 2 of which were also examined with FDG-PET/CT imaging, and 2 had undergone MRI. Unenhanced and contrast-enhanced examinations were performed in all patients, and 2 patients had also undergone dynamic CT contrast-enhanced examinations. Image characteristics, such as shape, size, number, edge, attenuation, and intensity of each lesion before and after contrast enhancement were analyzed and compared with the pathomorphology of the tumors. Results: Multiple large masses in the abdominopelvis were detected in 6 cases, and a large mass in the pelvis was detected in 1 case. Six cases showed largest mass in pelvis, and 1 case in mesentery. None of the masses had a definite organ origin. CT showed soft tissue masses with patchy foci of hypodense areas. MR T1-weighted images revealed lesions with mild hypointense areas and patchy hypointense areas in 2 cases and lesions with patchy hyperintense areas in 1 case. T2-weighted images showed lesions with mixed isointense and hyperintense areas in 1 case and lesions with mixed hypointense, isointense, and hyperintense areas in another. Contrast-enhanced CT and T1-weighted images showed mildly heterogeneous enhancement of the lesions. Other associated findings included peritoneal seeding (n = 3), peritoneal effusions (n = 3), hepatic metastasis (n = 2), bone metastasis (n = 1), and mesenteric and retroperitoneal lymphadenopathy (n = 4). FDG-PET/CT showed multiple nodular foci of increased metabolic activity in the abdominopelvic masses, in the hepatic and

  7. Validation of a low dose simulation technique for computed tomography images.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Muenzel

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Evaluation of a new software tool for generation of simulated low-dose computed tomography (CT images from an original higher dose scan. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Original CT scan data (100 mAs, 80 mAs, 60 mAs, 40 mAs, 20 mAs, 10 mAs; 100 kV of a swine were acquired (approved by the regional governmental commission for animal protection. Simulations of CT acquisition with a lower dose (simulated 10-80 mAs were calculated using a low-dose simulation algorithm. The simulations were compared to the originals of the same dose level with regard to density values and image noise. Four radiologists assessed the realistic visual appearance of the simulated images. RESULTS: Image characteristics of simulated low dose scans were similar to the originals. Mean overall discrepancy of image noise and CT values was -1.2% (range -9% to 3.2% and -0.2% (range -8.2% to 3.2%, respectively, p>0.05. Confidence intervals of discrepancies ranged between 0.9-10.2 HU (noise and 1.9-13.4 HU (CT values, without significant differences (p>0.05. Subjective observer evaluation of image appearance showed no visually detectable difference. CONCLUSION: Simulated low dose images showed excellent agreement with the originals concerning image noise, CT density values, and subjective assessment of the visual appearance of the simulated images. An authentic low-dose simulation opens up opportunity with regard to staff education, protocol optimization and introduction of new techniques.

  8. Accurate localization of intracavitary brachytherapy applicators from 3D CT imaging studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerma, F.A.; Williamson, J.F.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To present an accurate method to identify the positions and orientations of intracavitary (ICT) brachytherapy applicators imaged in 3D CT scans, in support of Monte Carlo photon-transport simulations, enabling accurate dose modeling in the presence of applicator shielding and interapplicator attenuation. Materials and methods: The method consists of finding the transformation that maximizes the coincidence between the known 3D shapes of each applicator component (colpostats and tandem) with the volume defined by contours of the corresponding surface on each CT slice. We use this technique to localize Fletcher-Suit CT-compatible applicators for three cervix cancer patients using post-implant CT examinations (3 mm slice thickness and separation). Dose distributions in 1-to-1 registration with the underlying CT anatomy are derived from 3D Monte Carlo photon-transport simulations incorporating each applicator's internal geometry (source encapsulation, high-density shields, and applicator body) oriented in relation to the dose matrix according to the measured localization transformations. The precision and accuracy of our localization method are assessed using CT scans, in which the positions and orientations of dense rods and spheres (in a precision-machined phantom) were measured at various orientations relative to the gantry. Results: Using this method, we register 3D Monte Carlo dose calculations directly onto post insertion patient CT studies. Using CT studies of a precisely machined phantom, the absolute accuracy of the method was found to be ±0.2 mm in plane, and ±0.3 mm in the axial direction while its precision was ±0.2 mm in plane, and ±0.2 mm axially. Conclusion: We have developed a novel, and accurate technique to localize intracavitary brachytherapy applicators in 3D CT imaging studies, which supports 3D dose planning involving detailed 3D Monte Carlo dose calculations, modeling source positions, shielding and interapplicator shielding

  9. Techniques and software architectures for medical visualisation and image processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Botha, C.P.

    2005-01-01

    This thesis presents a flexible software platform for medical visualisation and image processing, a technique for the segmentation of the shoulder skeleton from CT data and three techniques that make contributions to the field of direct volume rendering. Our primary goal was to investigate the use

  10. Radiation protection in newer medical imaging techniques: Cardiac CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    Medical imaging has seen many developments as it has evolved since the mid-1890s. In the last 30-40 years, the pace of innovation has increased, starting with the introduction of computed tomography (CT) in the early 1970s. During the last decade, the rate of change has accelerated further, in terms of continuing innovation and its global application. Most patient exposure now arises from practices that barely existed two decades ago. These developments are evident in the technology on which this volume is based - multislice/detector CT scanning and its application in cardiac imaging. However, this advance is achieved at the cost of a radiation burden to the individual patient, and possibly to the community, if its screening potential is exploited. Much effort will be required to ensure that the undoubted benefit of this new practice will not pose an undue level of detriment to the individual in multiple examinations. For practitioners and regulators, it is evident that innovation has been driven by both the imaging industry and an increasing array of new applications generated and validated in the clinical environment. Regulation, industrial standardization, safety procedures and advice on best practices lag (inevitably) behind the industrial and clinical innovations. This series of Safety Reports (Nos 58, 60 and 61) is designed to help fill this growing vacuum, by bringing up to date and timely advice from experienced practitioners to bear on the problems involved. The advice in this report has been developed as part of the IAEA's statutory responsibility to establish standards for the protection of people against exposure to ionizing radiation and to provide for the worldwide application of these standards. The Fundamental Safety Principles and the International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (BSS) were issued by the IAEA and co-sponsored by organizations including the Food and Agriculture

  11. Imaging of pancreatic adenocarcinoma with emphasis on multidetector CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, S.L.; Rajan, P.S.

    2004-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is the fourth most frequent cause of cancer-related death. The incidence is increasing and the overall survival has altered little in recent years. Moreover, patients usually present late with inoperable disease and curative resection by standard pancreatico-duodenectomy (Whipple's procedure) is associated with significant morbidity. It should only be attempted in that small group of patients lacking radiological evidence of advanced disease. Despite the recent advances in body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and endoscopic ultrasound (EUS), computed tomography (CT) is the mainstay of staging in most centres and the recent development of multidetector CT machines (MDCT) has raised hope of an improvement in preoperative staging. This review focuses on the CT of pancreatic adenocarcinoma with particular emphasis on examination technique and on those criteria that determine resectability

  12. Imaging of pancreatic adenocarcinoma with emphasis on multidetector CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, S.L. E-mail: simon.smith@ipsh-tr.anglox.nhs.uk; Rajan, P.S

    2004-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is the fourth most frequent cause of cancer-related death. The incidence is increasing and the overall survival has altered little in recent years. Moreover, patients usually present late with inoperable disease and curative resection by standard pancreatico-duodenectomy (Whipple's procedure) is associated with significant morbidity. It should only be attempted in that small group of patients lacking radiological evidence of advanced disease. Despite the recent advances in body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and endoscopic ultrasound (EUS), computed tomography (CT) is the mainstay of staging in most centres and the recent development of multidetector CT machines (MDCT) has raised hope of an improvement in preoperative staging. This review focuses on the CT of pancreatic adenocarcinoma with particular emphasis on examination technique and on those criteria that determine resectability.

  13. Functional imaging of the pancreas. Image processing techniques and clinical evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakanishi, Fumiko

    1984-02-01

    An image processing technique for functional imaging of the pancreas was developed and is here reported. In this paper, clinical efficacy of the technique for detecting pancreatic abnormality is evaluated in comparison with conventional pancreatic scintigraphy and CT. For quantitative evaluation, functional rate, i.e. the rate of normal functioning pancreatic area, was calculated from the functional image and subtraction image. Two hundred and ninety-five cases were studied using this technique. Conventional image had a sensitivity of 65% and a specificity of 78%, while the use of functional imaging improved sensitivity to 88% and specificity to 88%. The mean functional rate in patients with pancreatic disease was significantly lower (33.3 +- 24.5 in patients with chronic pancreatitis, 28.1 +- 26.9 in patients with acute pancreatitis, 43.4 +- 22.3 in patients with diabetes mellitus, 20.4 +- 23.4 in patients with pancreatic cancer) than the mean functional rate in cases without pancreatic disease (86.4 +- 14.2). It is suggested that functional image of the pancreas reflecting pancreatic exocrine function and functional rate is a useful indicator of pancreatic exocrine function.

  14. Adaptive wiener filter based on Gaussian mixture distribution model for denoising chest X-ray CT image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabuchi, Motohiro; Yamane, Nobumoto; Morikawa, Yoshitaka

    2008-01-01

    In recent decades, X-ray CT imaging has become more important as a result of its high-resolution performance. However, it is well known that the X-ray dose is insufficient in the techniques that use low-dose imaging in health screening or thin-slice imaging in work-up. Therefore, the degradation of CT images caused by the streak artifact frequently becomes problematic. In this study, we applied a Wiener filter (WF) using the universal Gaussian mixture distribution model (UNI-GMM) as a statistical model to remove streak artifact. In designing the WF, it is necessary to estimate the statistical model and the precise co-variances of the original image. In the proposed method, we obtained a variety of chest X-ray CT images using a phantom simulating a chest organ, and we estimated the statistical information using the images for training. The results of simulation showed that it is possible to fit the UNI-GMM to the chest X-ray CT images and reduce the specific noise. (author)

  15. Correlative Imaging in a Patient with Cystic Thymoma: CT, MR and PET/CT Comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romeo, Valeria; Esposito, Alfredo; Maurea, Simone; Camera, Luigi; Mainenti, Pier Paolo; Palmieri, Giovannella; Buonerba, Carlo; Salvatore, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Cystic thymoma is a rare variant of thymic neoplasm characterized by almost complete cystic degeneration with mixed internal structure. We describe a case of a 60 year-old woman with a cystic thymoma studied with advanced tomographic imaging stydies. CT, MRI and PET/CT with 18 F-FDG were performed; volumetric CT and MRI images provided better anatomic evaluation for pre-operative assessment, while PET/CT was helpful for lesion characterization based on 18 F-FDG uptake. Although imaging studies are mandatory for pre-operative evaluation of cystic thymoma, final diagnosis still remains surgical. A 60-year-old woman with recent chest pain and no history of previous disease was admitted to our departement to investigate the result of a previous chest X-ray that showed bilateral mediastinal enlargement; for this purpose, enhanced chest CT scan was performed using a 64-rows scanner (Toshiba, Aquilion 64, Japan) before and after intravenous bolus administration of iodinated non ionic contrast agent; CT images demonstrated the presence of a large mediastinal mass (11×8 cm) located in the anterior mediastinum who extended from the anonymous vein to the cardio-phrenic space, compressing the left atrium and causing medium lobe atelectasis; bilateral pleural effusion was also present. In conclusion, correlative imaging plays a foundamental role for the diagnostic evaluation of patient with cystic thymoma. In particular, volumetric CT and MRI studies can provide better anatomic informations regarding internal structure and local tumor spread for pre-operative assessment. Conversely, metabolic imaging using 18 F-FDG PET/CT is helpful for lesion characterization differentiating benign from malignant lesion on the basis of intense tracer uptake. The role of PET/MRI is still under investigation. However, final diagnosis still remains surgical even though imaging studies are mandatory for pre-operative patient management

  16. Radiation dose reduction on multidetector abdominal CT using adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction technique in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Qifeng; Peng Yun; Duan Xiaomin; Sun Jihang; Yu Tong; Han Zhonglong

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the feasibility to reduce radiation doses on pediatric multidetector abdominal CT using the adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction technique (ASIR) associated with automated tube current modulation technique (ATCM). Methods: Thirty patients underwent abdominal CT with ATCM and the follow-up scan with ATCM cooperated with 40% ASIR. ATCM was used with age dependent noise index (NI) settings: NI = 9 for 0-5 year old and NI = 11 for > 5 years old for simple ATCM group, NI = 11 for 0-5 year old and NI = 15 for > 5 years old for ATCM cooperated with 40% ASIR group (AISR group). Two radiologists independently evaluated images for diagnostic quality and image noise with subjectively image quality score and image noise score using a 5-point scale. Interobserver agreement was assessed by Kappa test. The volume CT dose indexes (CTDIvol) for the two groups were recorded. Statistical significance for the CTDIvol value was analyzed by pair-sample t test. Results: The average CTDIvol for the ASIR group was (1.38 ± 0.64) mGy, about 60% lower than (3.56 ± 1.23) mGy for the simple ATCM group, and the CTDIvol of two groups had statistically significant differences. (t = 33.483, P < 0.05). The subjective image quality scores for the simple ATCM group were 4.43 ± 0.57 and 4.37 ±0.61, Kappa = 0.878, P < 0.01 (ASIR group: 4.70 ± 0.47 and 4.60 ± 0.50, Kappa = 0.783, P < 0.01), by two observers. The image noise score for the simple ATCM group were 4.03 ±0.56 and 3.83 ±0.53, Kappa = 0.572, P < 0.01 (ASIR group: 4.20 ± 0.48 and 4.10 ± 0.48, Kappa = 0.748, P < 0.01), by two observers. All images had acceptable diagnostic image quality. Conclusion: Lower radiation dose can be achieved by elevating NI with ASIR in pediatric CT abdominal studies, while maintaining diagnostically acceptable images. (authors)

  17. Pulmonary function-morphologic relationships assessed by SPECT-CT fusion images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suga, Kazuyoshi

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary single photon emission computed tomography-computed tomography (SPECT-CT) fusion images provide objective and comprehensive assessment of pulmonary function and morphology relationships at cross-sectional lungs. This article reviewed the noteworthy findings of lung pathophysiology in wide-spectral lung disorders, which have been revealed on SPECT-CT fusion images in 8 years of experience. The fusion images confirmed the fundamental pathophysiologic appearance of lung low CT attenuation caused by airway obstruction-induced hypoxic vasoconstriction and that caused by direct pulmonary arterial obstruction as in acute pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE). The fusion images showed better correlation of lung perfusion distribution with lung CT attenuation changes at lung mosaic CT attenuation (MCA) compared with regional ventilation in the wide-spectral lung disorders, indicating that lung heterogeneous perfusion distribution may be a dominant mechanism of MCA on CT. SPECT-CT angiography fusion images revealed occasional dissociation between lung perfusion defects and intravascular clots in acute PTE, indicating the importance of assessment of actual effect of intravascular colts on peripheral lung perfusion. Perfusion SPECT-CT fusion images revealed the characteristic and preferential location of pulmonary infarction in acute PTE. The fusion images showed occasional unexpected perfusion defects in normal lung areas on CT in chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases and interstitial lung diseases, indicating the ability of perfusion SPECT superior to CT for detection of mild lesions in these disorders. The fusion images showed frequent ''steal phenomenon''-induced perfusion defects extending to the surrounding normal lung of arteriovenous fistulas and those at normal lungs on CT in hepatopulmonary syndrome. Comprehensive assessment of lung function-CT morphology on fusion images will lead to more profound understanding of lung pathophysiology in wide-spectral lung

  18. CT applications of medical computer graphics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhodes, M.L.

    1985-01-01

    Few applications of computer graphics show as much promise and early success as that for CT. Unlike electron microscopy, ultrasound, business, military, and animation applications, CT image data are inherently digital. CT pictures can be processed directly by programs well established in the fields of computer graphics and digital image processing. Methods for reformatting digital pictures, enhancing structure shape, reducing image noise, and rendering three-dimensional (3D) scenes of anatomic structures have all become routine at many CT centers. In this chapter, the authors provide a brief introduction to computer graphics terms and techniques commonly applied to CT pictures and, when appropriate, to those showing promise for magnetic resonance images. Topics discussed here are image-processing options that are applied to digital images already constructed. In the final portion of this chapter techniques for ''slicing'' CT image data are presented, and geometric principles that describe the specification of oblique and curved images are outlined. Clinical examples are included

  19. Classification of CT brain images based on deep learning networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiaohong W; Hui, Rui; Tian, Zengmin

    2017-01-01

    While computerised tomography (CT) may have been the first imaging tool to study human brain, it has not yet been implemented into clinical decision making process for diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). On the other hand, with the nature of being prevalent, inexpensive and non-invasive, CT does present diagnostic features of AD to a great extent. This study explores the significance and impact on the application of the burgeoning deep learning techniques to the task of classification of CT brain images, in particular utilising convolutional neural network (CNN), aiming at providing supplementary information for the early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. Towards this end, three categories of CT images (N = 285) are clustered into three groups, which are AD, lesion (e.g. tumour) and normal ageing. In addition, considering the characteristics of this collection with larger thickness along the direction of depth (z) (~3-5 mm), an advanced CNN architecture is established integrating both 2D and 3D CNN networks. The fusion of the two CNN networks is subsequently coordinated based on the average of Softmax scores obtained from both networks consolidating 2D images along spatial axial directions and 3D segmented blocks respectively. As a result, the classification accuracy rates rendered by this elaborated CNN architecture are 85.2%, 80% and 95.3% for classes of AD, lesion and normal respectively with an average of 87.6%. Additionally, this improved CNN network appears to outperform the others when in comparison with 2D version only of CNN network as well as a number of state of the art hand-crafted approaches. As a result, these approaches deliver accuracy rates in percentage of 86.3, 85.6 ± 1.10, 86.3 ± 1.04, 85.2 ± 1.60, 83.1 ± 0.35 for 2D CNN, 2D SIFT, 2D KAZE, 3D SIFT and 3D KAZE respectively. The two major contributions of the paper constitute a new 3-D approach while applying deep learning technique to extract signature information

  20. Study of Image Quality From CT Scanner Multi-Detector by using Americans College of Radiology (ACR) Phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulyadin; Dewang, Syamsir; Abdullah, Bualkar; Tahir, Dahlang

    2018-03-01

    In this study, the image quality of CT scan using phantom American College of Radiology (ACR) was determined. Scanning multidetector CT is used to know the image quality parameters by using a solid phantom containing four modules and primarily from materials that are equivalent to water. Each module is 4 cm in diameter and 20 cm in diameter. There is white alignment marks painted white to reflect the alignment laser and there are also “HEAD”, “FOOT”, and “TOP” marks on the phantom to help align. This test obtains CT images of each module according to the routine inspection protocol of the head. Acceptance of image quality obtained for determination: CT Number Accuracy (CTN), CT Number Uniformity and Noise, Linearity CT Number, Slice Technique, Low Contrast Resolution and High Contrast Resolution represent image quality parameters. In testing CT Number Accuracy (CTN), CT Uniform number and Noise are in the range of tolerable values allowed. In the test, Linearity CT Number obtained correlation value above 0.99 is the relationship between electron density and CT Number. In a low contrast resolution test, the smallest contrast groups are visible. In contrast, the high resolution is seen up to 7 lp/cm. The quality of GE CT Scan is very high, as all the image quality tests obtained are within the tolerance brackets of values permitted by the Nuclear Power Control Agency (BAPETEN). Image quality test is a way to get very important information about the accuracy of snoring result by using phantom ACR.

  1. Skeletal scintigraphy and SPECT/CT in orthopedic imaging; Knochenszintigrafie und SPECT/CT bei orthopaedischen Fragestellungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klaeser, B.; Walter, M.; Krause, T. [Inselspital Bern (Switzerland). Universitaetsklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    2011-03-15

    Multi-modality imaging with SPECT-CT in orthopaedics combines the excellent sensitivity of scintigraphy with the morphological information of CT as a key for specific interpretation of findings in bone scans. The result is an imaging modality with the clear potential to prove of value even in a competitive setting dominated by MRI, and to significantly add to diagnostic imaging in orthopaedics. SPECT-CT is of great value in the diagnostic evaluation after fractures, and - in contrast to MRI - it is well suited for imaging in patients with osteosyntheses and metallic implants. In sports medicine, SPECT-CT allows for a sensitive and specific detection of osseous stress reactions before morphological changes become detectable by CT or MRI. In patients with osseous pain syndromes, actively evolving degenerative changes as a cause of pain can be identified and accurately localized. Further, particularly prospective diagnostic studies providing comparative data are needed to strengthen the position of nuclear imaging in orthopaedics and sports medicine and to help implementing SPECT/CT in diagnostic algorithms. (orig.)

  2. FDG PET/CT: EANM procedure guidelines for tumour imaging: version 2.0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boellaard, Ronald; Hoekstra, Otto S.; Delgado-Bolton, Roberto; Oyen, Wim J.G.; Visser, Eric; Giammarile, Francesco; Tatsch, Klaus; Eschner, Wolfgang; Verzijlbergen, Fred J.; Barrington, Sally F.; Pike, Lucy C.; Weber, Wolfgang A.; Stroobants, Sigrid; Delbeke, Dominique; Donohoe, Kevin J.; Holbrook, Scott; Graham, Michael M.; Testanera, Giorgio; Chiti, Arturo; Zijlstra, Josee; Hoekstra, Corneline J.; Pruim, Jan; Willemsen, Antoon; Arends, Bertjan; Kotzerke, Joerg; Bockisch, Andreas; Beyer, Thomas; Krause, Bernd J.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of these guidelines is to assist physicians in recommending, performing, interpreting and reporting the results of FDG PET/CT for oncological imaging of adult patients. PET is a quantitative imaging technique and therefore requires a common quality control (QC)/quality assurance (QA) procedure to maintain the accuracy and precision of quantitation. Repeatability and reproducibility are two essential requirements for any quantitative measurement and/or imaging biomarker. Repeatability relates to the uncertainty in obtaining the same result in the same patient when he or she is examined more than once on the same system. However, imaging biomarkers should also have adequate reproducibility, i.e. the ability to yield the same result in the same patient when that patient is examined on different systems and at different imaging sites. Adequate repeatability and reproducibility are essential for the clinical management of patients and the use of FDG PET/CT within multicentre trials. A common standardised imaging procedure will help promote the appropriate use of FDG PET/CT imaging and increase the value of publications and, therefore, their contribution to evidence-based medicine. Moreover, consistency in numerical values between platforms and institutes that acquire the data will potentially enhance the role of semiquantitative and quantitative image interpretation. Precision and accuracy are additionally important as FDG PET/CT is used to evaluate tumour response as well as for diagnosis, prognosis and staging. Therefore both the previous and these new guidelines specifically aim to achieve standardised uptake value harmonisation in multicentre settings. (orig.)

  3. FDG PET/CT: EANM procedure guidelines for tumour imaging: version 2.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boellaard, Ronald; Hoekstra, Otto S. [VU University Medical Centre, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Delgado-Bolton, Roberto [University of La Rioja, Department of Diagnostic Imaging (Radiology) and Nuclear Medicine, San Pedro Hospital and Centre for Biomedical Research of La Rioja (CIBIR), Logrono, La Rioja (Spain); Oyen, Wim J.G.; Visser, Eric [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Giammarile, Francesco [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Lyon, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Lyon (France); Tatsch, Klaus [Municipal Hospital Karlsruhe Inc., Department of Nuclear Medicine, Karlsruhe (Germany); Eschner, Wolfgang [University of Cologne, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Cologne (Germany); Verzijlbergen, Fred J. [Erasmus Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Barrington, Sally F.; Pike, Lucy C. [King' s College London, King' s Health Partners, PET Imaging Centre, St Thomas' Hospital, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom); Weber, Wolfgang A. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Stroobants, Sigrid [Antwerp University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Antwerp (Belgium); Delbeke, Dominique [Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Nashville, TN (United States); Donohoe, Kevin J. [Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States); Holbrook, Scott [Invivo Molecular Imaging LLC, Gray, TN (United States); Graham, Michael M. [University of Iowa, Department of Radiology, Iowa City, IA (United States); Testanera, Giorgio; Chiti, Arturo [Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rozzano, MI (Italy); Zijlstra, Josee [VU University Medical Centre, Department of Hematology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hoekstra, Corneline J. [Jeroen Bosch Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Den Bosch (Netherlands); Pruim, Jan; Willemsen, Antoon [University Medical Centre Groningen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Groningen (Netherlands); Arends, Bertjan [Catharina Hospital, Department of Clinical Physics, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Kotzerke, Joerg [University Hospital Dresden, Clinic and Outpatient Clinic for Nuclear Medicine, Dresden (Germany); Bockisch, Andreas [University Hospital Essen, Clinic for Nuclear Medicine, Essen (Germany); Beyer, Thomas [Medical University of Vienna, Centre for Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Vienna (Austria); Krause, Bernd J. [University Hospital Rostock, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rostock (Germany)

    2014-12-02

    The purpose of these guidelines is to assist physicians in recommending, performing, interpreting and reporting the results of FDG PET/CT for oncological imaging of adult patients. PET is a quantitative imaging technique and therefore requires a common quality control (QC)/quality assurance (QA) procedure to maintain the accuracy and precision of quantitation. Repeatability and reproducibility are two essential requirements for any quantitative measurement and/or imaging biomarker. Repeatability relates to the uncertainty in obtaining the same result in the same patient when he or she is examined more than once on the same system. However, imaging biomarkers should also have adequate reproducibility, i.e. the ability to yield the same result in the same patient when that patient is examined on different systems and at different imaging sites. Adequate repeatability and reproducibility are essential for the clinical management of patients and the use of FDG PET/CT within multicentre trials. A common standardised imaging procedure will help promote the appropriate use of FDG PET/CT imaging and increase the value of publications and, therefore, their contribution to evidence-based medicine. Moreover, consistency in numerical values between platforms and institutes that acquire the data will potentially enhance the role of semiquantitative and quantitative image interpretation. Precision and accuracy are additionally important as FDG PET/CT is used to evaluate tumour response as well as for diagnosis, prognosis and staging. Therefore both the previous and these new guidelines specifically aim to achieve standardised uptake value harmonisation in multicentre settings. (orig.)

  4. High spatial resolution CT image reconstruction using parallel computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin Yin; Liu Li; Sun Gongxing

    2003-01-01

    Using the PC cluster system with 16 dual CPU nodes, we accelerate the FBP and OR-OSEM reconstruction of high spatial resolution image (2048 x 2048). Based on the number of projections, we rewrite the reconstruction algorithms into parallel format and dispatch the tasks to each CPU. By parallel computing, the speedup factor is roughly equal to the number of CPUs, which can be up to about 25 times when 25 CPUs used. This technique is very suitable for real-time high spatial resolution CT image reconstruction. (authors)

  5. MR imaging and CT findings after liver transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langer, M.; Langer, R.; Scholz, A.; Zwicker, C.; Astinet, F.

    1990-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to evaluate MR imaging and dynamic CT as noninvasive procedures to image signs of graft failure after an orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). Thirty MR studies and 50 dynamic CT examinations were performed within 20 days after OLT. MR examinations were performed with a 0.5-T Siemens Magnetom. CT scans were obtained by using a Siemens Somatom Plus. In all patients, MR images demonstrated a perivascular rim of intermediate signal intensity on T1-weighted and increased signal intensity on T2-weighted images in the hilum of the liver; in 20/26, this was seen in peripheral areas also. In all patients, a perivascular area of low attenuation was diagnosed at angio-CT

  6. Hardware system of parallel processing for fast CT image reconstruction based on circular shifting float memory architecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Shi; Kang Kejun; Wang Jingjin

    1995-01-01

    Computerized Tomography (CT) is expected to become an inevitable diagnostic technique in the future. However, the long time required to reconstruct an image has been one of the major drawbacks associated with this technique. Parallel process is one of the best way to solve this problem. This paper gives the architecture and hardware design of PIRS-4 (4-processor Parallel Image Reconstruction System) which is a parallel processing system for fast 3D-CT image reconstruction by circular shifting float memory architecture. It includes structure and component of the system, the design of cross bar switch and details of control model. The test results are described

  7. A technique for on-board CT reconstruction using both kilovoltage and megavoltage beam projections for 3D treatment verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin Fangfang; Guan Huaiqun; Lu Wenkai

    2005-01-01

    The technologies with kilovoltage (kV) and megavoltage (MV) imaging in the treatment room are now available for image-guided radiation therapy to improve patient setup and target localization accuracy. However, development of strategies to efficiently and effectively implement these technologies for patient treatment remains challenging. This study proposed an aggregated technique for on-board CT reconstruction using combination of kV and MV beam projections to improve the data acquisition efficiency and image quality. These projections were acquired in the treatment room at the patient treatment position with a new kV imaging device installed on the accelerator gantry, orthogonal to the existing MV portal imaging device. The projection images for a head phantom and a contrast phantom were acquired using both the On-Board Imager TM kV imaging device and the MV portal imager mounted orthogonally on the gantry of a Varian Clinac TM 21EX linear accelerator. MV projections were converted into kV information prior to the aggregated CT reconstruction. The multilevel scheme algebraic-reconstruction technique was used to reconstruct CT images involving either full, truncated, or a combination of both full and truncated projections. An adaptive reconstruction method was also applied, based on the limited numbers of kV projections and truncated MV projections, to enhance the anatomical information around the treatment volume and to minimize the radiation dose. The effects of the total number of projections, the combination of kV and MV projections, and the beam truncation of MV projections on the details of reconstructed kV/MV CT images were also investigated

  8. Imaging the Parasinus Region with a Third-Generation Dual-Source CT and the Effect of Tin Filtration on Image Quality and Radiation Dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lell, M M; May, M S; Brand, M; Eller, A; Buder, T; Hofmann, E; Uder, M; Wuest, W

    2015-07-01

    CT is the imaging technique of choice in the evaluation of midface trauma or inflammatory disease. We performed a systematic evaluation of scan protocols to optimize image quality and radiation exposure on third-generation dual-source CT. CT protocols with different tube voltage (70-150 kV), current (25-300 reference mAs), prefiltration, pitch value, and rotation time were systematically evaluated. All images were reconstructed with iterative reconstruction (Advanced Modeled Iterative Reconstruction, level 2). To individually compare results with otherwise identical factors, we obtained all scans on a frozen human head. Conebeam CT was performed for image quality and dose comparison with multidetector row CT. Delineation of important anatomic structures and incidental pathologic conditions in the cadaver head was evaluated. One hundred kilovolts with tin prefiltration demonstrated the best compromise between dose and image quality. The most dose-effective combination for trauma imaging was Sn100 kV/250 mAs (volume CT dose index, 2.02 mGy), and for preoperative sinus surgery planning, Sn100 kV/150 mAs (volume CT dose index, 1.22 mGy). "Sn" indicates an additional prefiltration of the x-ray beam with a tin filter to constrict the energy spectrum. Exclusion of sinonasal disease was possible with even a lower dose by using Sn100 kV/25 mAs (volume CT dose index, 0.2 mGy). High image quality at very low dose levels can be achieved by using a Sn100-kV protocol with iterative reconstruction. The effective dose is comparable with that of conventional radiography, and the high image quality at even lower radiation exposure favors multidetector row CT over conebeam CT. © 2015 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  9. Patient-specific quantification of image quality: An automated method for measuring spatial resolution in clinical CT images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanders, Jeremiah, E-mail: jeremiah.sanders@duke.edu [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Clinical Imaging Physics Group, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Hurwitz, Lynne [Department of Radiology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Samei, Ehsan [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Clinical Imaging Physics Group, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27710 and Departments of Physics, Biomedical Engineering, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States)

    2016-10-15

    Purpose: To develop and validate an automated technique for evaluating the spatial resolution characteristics of clinical computed tomography (CT) images. Methods: Twenty one chest and abdominopelvic clinical CT datasets were examined in this study. An algorithm was developed to extract a CT resolution index (RI) analogous to the modulation transfer function from clinical CT images by measuring the edge-spread function (ESF) across the patient’s skin. A polygon mesh of the air-skin boundary was created. The faces of the mesh were then used to measure the ESF across the air-skin interface. The ESF was differentiated to obtain the line-spread function (LSF), and the LSF was Fourier transformed to obtain the RI. The algorithm’s ability to detect the radial dependence of the RI was investigated. RIs measured with the proposed method were compared with a conventional phantom-based method across two reconstruction algorithms (FBP and iterative) using the spatial frequency at 50% RI, f{sub 50}, as the metric for comparison. Three reconstruction kernels were investigated for each reconstruction algorithm. Finally, an observer study was conducted to determine if observers could visually perceive the differences in the measured blurriness of images reconstructed with a given reconstruction method. Results: RI measurements performed with the proposed technique exhibited the expected dependencies on the image reconstruction. The measured f{sub 50} values increased with harder kernels for both FBP and iterative reconstruction. Furthermore, the proposed algorithm was able to detect the radial dependence of the RI. Patient-specific measurements of the RI were comparable to the phantom-based technique, but the patient data exhibited a large spread in the measured f{sub 50}, indicating that some datasets were blurrier than others even when the projection data were reconstructed with the same reconstruction algorithm and kernel. Results from the observer study substantiated this

  10. Reprojection method using CT data. New means of visualization by improved technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishimori, Yoshiyuki; Tanaka, Masato; Komuro, Hiroyuki

    1995-01-01

    Reprojection Method (RPM) using computed tomography (CT) data can create simulating images of plain X-ray film. We could create material extracted images by selecting projected CT values, and created tomographic images by selecting spatial values. Virtual X-ray source can be set anywhere. So it can create stereographic images composed of a pair of beam's eye view, and can create panoramic images to set the source inside the volume data. Since RPM does not need the binaryzation process, the densities of the image reflect the original CT value of each voxel. RPM using CT data is a useful method to get the most information regarding X-ray attenuation and to cope with the fast scan CT system. (author)

  11. Clinical Application of colored three-dimensional CT (3D-CT) for brain tumors using helical scanning CT (HES-CT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogura, Yuko; Katada, Kazuhiro; Fujisawa, Kazuhisa; Imai, Fumihiro; Kawase, Tsukasa; Kamei, Yoshifumi; Kanno, Tetsuo; Takeshita, Gen; Koga, Sukehiko

    1995-01-01

    We applied colored three-dimensional CT (colored 3D-CT) images to distinguish brain tumors from the surrounding vascular and bony structures using a work station system and helical scanning CT (HES-CT). CT scanners with a slip-ring system were employed (TCT-900S and X vigor). A slice thickness of 2 mm and bed speed of 2 mm/s were used. The volume of contrast medium injected was 60 to 70 ml. Four to 8 colors were used for the tissue segmentation on the workstation system (xtension) using the data transferred from HES-CT. Tissue segmentation succeeded on the colored 3D-CT images in all 13 cases. The relationship between the tumors and the surrounding structures were easily recognized. The technique was useful to simulate operative fields, because deep structures could be visualized by cutting and drilling the colored 3D-CT volumetric data. On the basis of our findings, we suggest that colored 3D-CT images should be used as a supplementary aid for preoperative simulation. (author)

  12. MO-PIS-Exhibit Hall-01: Imaging: CT Dose Optimization Technologies I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denison, K; Smith, S [GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI (United States)

    2014-06-15

    DICOM Radiation Dose Structured Report (RDSR) generates a dose report at the conclusion of every examination. Dose Check preemptively notifies CT operators when scan parameters exceed user-defined dose thresholds. DoseWatch is an information technology application providing vendor-agnostic dose tracking and analysis for CT (and all other diagnostic x-ray modalities) SnapShot Pulse improves coronary CTA dose management. VolumeShuttle uses two acquisitions to increase coverage, decrease dose, and conserve on contrast administration. Color-Coding for Kids applies the Broselow-Luten Pediatric System to facilitate pediatric emergency care and reduce medical errors. FeatherLight achieves dose optimization through pediatric procedure-based protocols. Adventure Series scanners provide a child-friendly imaging environment promoting patient cooperation with resultant reduction in retakes and patient motion. Philips CT Dose Optimization Tools and Advanced Reconstruction Presentation Time: 11:45 ‘ 12:15 PM The first part of the talk will cover “Dose Reduction and Dose Optimization Technologies” present in Philips CT Scanners. The main Technologies to be presented include: DoseRight and tube current modulation (DoseRight, Z-DOM, 3D-DOM, DoseRight Cardiac) Special acquisition modes Beam filtration and beam shapers Eclipse collimator and ClearRay collimator NanoPanel detector DoseRight will cover automatic tube current selection that automatically adjusts the dose for the individual patient. The presentation will explore the modulation techniques currently employed in Philips CT scanners and will include the algorithmic concepts as well as illustrative examples. Modulation and current selection technologies to be covered include the Automatic Current Selection component of DoseRight, ZDOM longitudinal dose modulation, 3D-DOM (combination of longitudinal and rotational dose modulation), Cardiac Dose right (an ECG based dose modulation scheme), and the DoseRight Index (DRI) IQ

  13. MO-PIS-Exhibit Hall-01: Imaging: CT Dose Optimization Technologies I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denison, K; Smith, S

    2014-01-01

    DICOM Radiation Dose Structured Report (RDSR) generates a dose report at the conclusion of every examination. Dose Check preemptively notifies CT operators when scan parameters exceed user-defined dose thresholds. DoseWatch is an information technology application providing vendor-agnostic dose tracking and analysis for CT (and all other diagnostic x-ray modalities) SnapShot Pulse improves coronary CTA dose management. VolumeShuttle uses two acquisitions to increase coverage, decrease dose, and conserve on contrast administration. Color-Coding for Kids applies the Broselow-Luten Pediatric System to facilitate pediatric emergency care and reduce medical errors. FeatherLight achieves dose optimization through pediatric procedure-based protocols. Adventure Series scanners provide a child-friendly imaging environment promoting patient cooperation with resultant reduction in retakes and patient motion. Philips CT Dose Optimization Tools and Advanced Reconstruction Presentation Time: 11:45 ‘ 12:15 PM The first part of the talk will cover “Dose Reduction and Dose Optimization Technologies” present in Philips CT Scanners. The main Technologies to be presented include: DoseRight and tube current modulation (DoseRight, Z-DOM, 3D-DOM, DoseRight Cardiac) Special acquisition modes Beam filtration and beam shapers Eclipse collimator and ClearRay collimator NanoPanel detector DoseRight will cover automatic tube current selection that automatically adjusts the dose for the individual patient. The presentation will explore the modulation techniques currently employed in Philips CT scanners and will include the algorithmic concepts as well as illustrative examples. Modulation and current selection technologies to be covered include the Automatic Current Selection component of DoseRight, ZDOM longitudinal dose modulation, 3D-DOM (combination of longitudinal and rotational dose modulation), Cardiac Dose right (an ECG based dose modulation scheme), and the DoseRight Index (DRI) IQ

  14. CT and MRI of hip arthroplasty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cahir, J.G.; Toms, A.P.; Marshall, T.J.; Wimhurst, J.; Nolan, J.

    2007-01-01

    Plain films are the initial imaging method of choice for evaluation of hip arthroplasty. Recent advances in technology and imaging techniques have largely overcome the problems of beam hardening in computed tomography (CT) and magnetic susceptibility artefact in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). CT and MRI have now become useful imaging techniques in the assessment of hip arthroplasty

  15. CT and MR imaging findings of sinonasal angiomatous polyps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, Jing [Department of Radiology, The Affiliated Hospital of Qingdao University, Qingdao, Shandong (China); Man, Fengyuan [Department of Radiology, Beijing Tongren Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing (China); Deng, Kai [Department of Radiology, Qingdao No. 4 People' s Hospital, Qingdao, Shandong (China); Zheng, Yuanyuan [Department of Radiology, The Affiliated Hospital of Qingdao University, Qingdao, Shandong (China); Hao, Dapeng, E-mail: haodp_2009@163.com [Department of Radiology, The Affiliated Hospital of Qingdao University, Qingdao, Shandong (China); Xu, Wenjian, E-mail: cjr.xuwenjian@vip.163.com [Department of Radiology, The Affiliated Hospital of Qingdao University, Qingdao, Shandong (China)

    2014-03-15

    Objective: To characterize the CT and MR imaging findings of patients with sinonasal angiomatous polyps (SAPs) and evaluate their respective clinical value in the diagnosis of SAP. Methods: CT and MR imaging findings of 15 patients with pathologically proven SAP were examined. Assessed image features included location, size, margin, attenuation, and change of the bony walls of the sinonasal cavity on CT, and signal intensity and enhancement pattern on MR. Results: On CT, the SAP was mostly isoattenuated with patches of slight hyperattenuation. Most lesions caused changes in the adjacent bone, including expansile remodeling (n = 8), defect or destruction (n = 7), and hyperostosis (n = 6). All lesions examined by MR showed heterogeneous isointense signal intensity on T1-weighted images and mixed obvious hyperintense and hypointense signal intensity with linear hypointense septum internally (n = 10), and hypointense peripheral rim on T2-weighted images (n = 10). Postcontrast MR images demonstrated areas of heterogeneous and marked enhancement with an unenhanced hypointense rim and septa (n = 7). Conclusions: CT and MR imaging have respective advantages in the diagnosis of SAP. Combined application of CT and MR examinations is necessary for patients with suspected SAP.

  16. CT and MR imaging findings of sinonasal angiomatous polyps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou, Jing; Man, Fengyuan; Deng, Kai; Zheng, Yuanyuan; Hao, Dapeng; Xu, Wenjian

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To characterize the CT and MR imaging findings of patients with sinonasal angiomatous polyps (SAPs) and evaluate their respective clinical value in the diagnosis of SAP. Methods: CT and MR imaging findings of 15 patients with pathologically proven SAP were examined. Assessed image features included location, size, margin, attenuation, and change of the bony walls of the sinonasal cavity on CT, and signal intensity and enhancement pattern on MR. Results: On CT, the SAP was mostly isoattenuated with patches of slight hyperattenuation. Most lesions caused changes in the adjacent bone, including expansile remodeling (n = 8), defect or destruction (n = 7), and hyperostosis (n = 6). All lesions examined by MR showed heterogeneous isointense signal intensity on T1-weighted images and mixed obvious hyperintense and hypointense signal intensity with linear hypointense septum internally (n = 10), and hypointense peripheral rim on T2-weighted images (n = 10). Postcontrast MR images demonstrated areas of heterogeneous and marked enhancement with an unenhanced hypointense rim and septa (n = 7). Conclusions: CT and MR imaging have respective advantages in the diagnosis of SAP. Combined application of CT and MR examinations is necessary for patients with suspected SAP

  17. MO-E-12A-01: Quantitative Imaging: Techniques, Applications, and Challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, E; Jeraj, R; McNitt-Gray, M; Cao, Y

    2014-01-01

    The first symposium in the Quantitative Imaging Track focused on the introduction of quantitative imaging (QI) by illustrating the potential of QI in diagnostic and therapeutic applications in research and patient care, highlighting key challenges in implementation of such QI applications, and reviewing QI efforts of selected national and international agencies and organizations, including the FDA, NCI, NIST, and RSNA. This second QI symposium will focus more specifically on the techniques, applications, and challenges of QI. The first talk of the session will focus on modalityagnostic challenges of QI, beginning with challenges of the development and implementation of QI applications in single-center, single-vendor settings and progressing to the challenges encountered in the most general setting of multi-center, multi-vendor settings. The subsequent three talks will focus on specific QI challenges and opportunities in the modalityspecific settings of CT, PET/CT, and MR. Each talk will provide information on modality-specific QI techniques, applications, and challenges, including current efforts focused on solutions to such challenges. Learning Objectives: Understand key general challenges of QI application development and implementation, regardless of modality. Understand selected QI techniques and applications in CT, PET/CT, and MR. Understand challenges, and potential solutions for such challenges, for the applications presented for each modality

  18. Construction of Realistic Liver Phantoms from Patient Images using 3D Printer and Its Application in CT Image Quality Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Shuai; Yu, Lifeng; Vrieze, Thomas; Kuhlmann, Joel; Chen, Baiyu; McCollough, Cynthia H

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to use 3D printing techniques to construct a realistic liver phantom with heterogeneous background and anatomic structures from patient CT images, and to use the phantom to assess image quality with filtered backprojection and iterative reconstruction algorithms. Patient CT images were segmented into liver tissues, contrast-enhanced vessels, and liver lesions using commercial software, based on which stereolithography (STL) files were created and sent to a commercial 3D printer. A 3D liver phantom was printed after assigning different printing materials to each object to simulate appropriate attenuation of each segmented object. As high opacity materials are not available for the printer, we printed hollow vessels and filled them with iodine solutions of adjusted concentration to represent enhance levels in contrast-enhanced liver scans. The printed phantom was then placed in a 35×26 cm oblong-shaped water phantom and scanned repeatedly at 4 dose levels. Images were reconstructed using standard filtered backprojection and an iterative reconstruction algorithm with 3 different strength settings. Heterogeneous liver background were observed from the CT images and the difference in CT numbers between lesions and background were representative for low contrast lesions in liver CT studies. CT numbers in vessels filled with iodine solutions represented the enhancement of liver arteries and veins. Images were run through a Channelized Hotelling model observer with Garbor channels and ROC analysis was performed. The AUC values showed performance improvement using the iterative reconstruction algorithm and the amount of improvement increased with strength setting.

  19. Inter-slice bidirectional registration-based segmentation of the prostate gland in MR and CT image sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khalvati, Farzad, E-mail: farzad.khalvati@uwaterloo.ca; Tizhoosh, Hamid R. [Department of Systems Design Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada); Salmanpour, Aryan; Rahnamayan, Shahryar [Department of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Ontario Institute of Technology, Oshawa, Ontario L1H 7K4 (Canada); Rodrigues, George [Department of Radiation Oncology, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario N6C 2R6, Canada and Department of Epidemiology/Biostatistics, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada)

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Accurate segmentation and volume estimation of the prostate gland in magnetic resonance (MR) and computed tomography (CT) images are necessary steps in diagnosis, treatment, and monitoring of prostate cancer. This paper presents an algorithm for the prostate gland volume estimation based on the semiautomated segmentation of individual slices in T2-weighted MR and CT image sequences. Methods: The proposedInter-Slice Bidirectional Registration-based Segmentation (iBRS) algorithm relies on interslice image registration of volume data to segment the prostate gland without the use of an anatomical atlas. It requires the user to mark only three slices in a given volume dataset, i.e., the first, middle, and last slices. Next, the proposed algorithm uses a registration algorithm to autosegment the remaining slices. We conducted comprehensive experiments to measure the performance of the proposed algorithm using three registration methods (i.e., rigid, affine, and nonrigid techniques). Results: The results with the proposed technique were compared with manual marking using prostate MR and CT images from 117 patients. Manual marking was performed by an expert user for all 117 patients. The median accuracies for individual slices measured using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) were 92% and 91% for MR and CT images, respectively. The iBRS algorithm was also evaluated regarding user variability, which confirmed that the algorithm was robust to interuser variability when marking the prostate gland. Conclusions: The proposed algorithm exploits the interslice data redundancy of the images in a volume dataset of MR and CT images and eliminates the need for an atlas, minimizing the computational cost while producing highly accurate results which are robust to interuser variability.

  20. Inter-slice bidirectional registration-based segmentation of the prostate gland in MR and CT image sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalvati, Farzad; Tizhoosh, Hamid R.; Salmanpour, Aryan; Rahnamayan, Shahryar; Rodrigues, George

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Accurate segmentation and volume estimation of the prostate gland in magnetic resonance (MR) and computed tomography (CT) images are necessary steps in diagnosis, treatment, and monitoring of prostate cancer. This paper presents an algorithm for the prostate gland volume estimation based on the semiautomated segmentation of individual slices in T2-weighted MR and CT image sequences. Methods: The proposedInter-Slice Bidirectional Registration-based Segmentation (iBRS) algorithm relies on interslice image registration of volume data to segment the prostate gland without the use of an anatomical atlas. It requires the user to mark only three slices in a given volume dataset, i.e., the first, middle, and last slices. Next, the proposed algorithm uses a registration algorithm to autosegment the remaining slices. We conducted comprehensive experiments to measure the performance of the proposed algorithm using three registration methods (i.e., rigid, affine, and nonrigid techniques). Results: The results with the proposed technique were compared with manual marking using prostate MR and CT images from 117 patients. Manual marking was performed by an expert user for all 117 patients. The median accuracies for individual slices measured using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) were 92% and 91% for MR and CT images, respectively. The iBRS algorithm was also evaluated regarding user variability, which confirmed that the algorithm was robust to interuser variability when marking the prostate gland. Conclusions: The proposed algorithm exploits the interslice data redundancy of the images in a volume dataset of MR and CT images and eliminates the need for an atlas, minimizing the computational cost while producing highly accurate results which are robust to interuser variability

  1. Reconstructed coronal views of CT and isotopic images of the pancreas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasuga, Toshio; Kobayashi, Toshio; Nakanishi, Fumiko

    1980-01-01

    To compare functional images of the pancreas by scintigraphy with morphological views of the pancreas by CT, CT coronal views of the pancreas were reconstructed. As CT coronal views were reconstructed from the routine scanning, there was a problem in longitudinal spatial resolution. However, almost satisfactory total images of the pancreas were obtained by improving images adequately. In 27 patients whose diseases had been confirmed, it was easy to compare pancreatic scintigrams with pancreatic CT images by using reconstructed CT coronal views, and information which had not been obtained by original CT images could be obtained by using reconstructed CT coronal views. Especially, defects on pancreatic images and the shape of pancreas which had not been visualized clearly by scintigraphy alone could be visualized by using reconstructed CT coronal views of the pancreas. (Tsunoda, M.)

  2. WE-G-207-05: Relationship Between CT Image Quality, Segmentation Performance, and Quantitative Image Feature Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J; Nishikawa, R [University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Reiser, I [The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Boone, J [UC Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Segmentation quality can affect quantitative image feature analysis. The objective of this study is to examine the relationship between computed tomography (CT) image quality, segmentation performance, and quantitative image feature analysis. Methods: A total of 90 pathology proven breast lesions in 87 dedicated breast CT images were considered. An iterative image reconstruction (IIR) algorithm was used to obtain CT images with different quality. With different combinations of 4 variables in the algorithm, this study obtained a total of 28 different qualities of CT images. Two imaging tasks/objectives were considered: 1) segmentation and 2) classification of the lesion as benign or malignant. Twenty-three image features were extracted after segmentation using a semi-automated algorithm and 5 of them were selected via a feature selection technique. Logistic regression was trained and tested using leave-one-out-cross-validation and its area under the ROC curve (AUC) was recorded. The standard deviation of a homogeneous portion and the gradient of a parenchymal portion of an example breast were used as an estimate of image noise and sharpness. The DICE coefficient was computed using a radiologist’s drawing on the lesion. Mean DICE and AUC were used as performance metrics for each of the 28 reconstructions. The relationship between segmentation and classification performance under different reconstructions were compared. Distributions (median, 95% confidence interval) of DICE and AUC for each reconstruction were also compared. Results: Moderate correlation (Pearson’s rho = 0.43, p-value = 0.02) between DICE and AUC values was found. However, the variation between DICE and AUC values for each reconstruction increased as the image sharpness increased. There was a combination of IIR parameters that resulted in the best segmentation with the worst classification performance. Conclusion: There are certain images that yield better segmentation or classification

  3. Spiral CT versus conventional CT in the preoperative assessment of metallic intraocular foreign bodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prokesch, R.; Bankier, A.; Ba-Ssalamah, A.; Imhof, H.; Lakits, A.; Scholda, C.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the effectiveness of spiral CT versus conventional CT in the preoperative assessment of metallic intraocular foreign bodies. Results: All foreign bodies were detected by each scanning modality on the axial and on the reconstructed planes. The quality of the axial images was similar for spiral and conventional CT. The spiral technique provided high-quality reconstructed images which allowed accurate localization of the foreign bodies in all cases. Reconstructions by conventional technique were inadequate for preoperative assessment. The examination time for the total orbital volume was 18 s for spiral CT and 52 s for conventional CT. Radiation dose delivered to the lens was 35 mGy for spiral CT and 56 mGy for conventional CT axial scanning. Conclusion: Spiral CT multiplanar offers several significant advantages for the preoperative assessment of metallic intraocular foreign bodies compared to the conventional CT technique in clinical practice, including short examination time, minimized motion artifacts, reduced radiation exposure, and accurate localization. (orig.) [de

  4. Blind CT image quality assessment via deep learning strategy: initial study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sui; He, Ji; Wang, Yongbo; Liao, Yuting; Zeng, Dong; Bian, Zhaoying; Ma, Jianhua

    2018-03-01

    Computed Tomography (CT) is one of the most important medical imaging modality. CT images can be used to assist in the detection and diagnosis of lesions and to facilitate follow-up treatment. However, CT images are vulnerable to noise. Actually, there are two major source intrinsically causing the CT data noise, i.e., the X-ray photo statistics and the electronic noise background. Therefore, it is necessary to doing image quality assessment (IQA) in CT imaging before diagnosis and treatment. Most of existing CT images IQA methods are based on human observer study. However, these methods are impractical in clinical for their complex and time-consuming. In this paper, we presented a blind CT image quality assessment via deep learning strategy. A database of 1500 CT images is constructed, containing 300 high-quality images and 1200 corresponding noisy images. Specifically, the high-quality images were used to simulate the corresponding noisy images at four different doses. Then, the images are scored by the experienced radiologists by the following attributes: image noise, artifacts, edge and structure, overall image quality, and tumor size and boundary estimation with five-point scale. We trained a network for learning the non-liner map from CT images to subjective evaluation scores. Then, we load the pre-trained model to yield predicted score from the test image. To demonstrate the performance of the deep learning network in IQA, correlation coefficients: Pearson Linear Correlation Coefficient (PLCC) and Spearman Rank Order Correlation Coefficient (SROCC) are utilized. And the experimental result demonstrate that the presented deep learning based IQA strategy can be used in the CT image quality assessment.

  5. ACM-based automatic liver segmentation from 3-D CT images by combining multiple atlases and improved mean-shift techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Hongwei; He, Jiangping; Yang, Xin; Deklerck, Rudi; Cornelis, Jan

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, we present an autocontext model(ACM)-based automatic liver segmentation algorithm, which combines ACM, multiatlases, and mean-shift techniques to segment liver from 3-D CT images. Our algorithm is a learning-based method and can be divided into two stages. At the first stage, i.e., the training stage, ACM is performed to learn a sequence of classifiers in each atlas space (based on each atlas and other aligned atlases). With the use of multiple atlases, multiple sequences of ACM-based classifiers are obtained. At the second stage, i.e., the segmentation stage, the test image will be segmented in each atlas space by applying each sequence of ACM-based classifiers. The final segmentation result will be obtained by fusing segmentation results from all atlas spaces via a multiclassifier fusion technique. Specially, in order to speed up segmentation, given a test image, we first use an improved mean-shift algorithm to perform over-segmentation and then implement the region-based image labeling instead of the original inefficient pixel-based image labeling. The proposed method is evaluated on the datasets of MICCAI 2007 liver segmentation challenge. The experimental results show that the average volume overlap error and the average surface distance achieved by our method are 8.3% and 1.5 m, respectively, which are comparable to the results reported in the existing state-of-the-art work on liver segmentation.

  6. A randomized, double-blind, crossover comparison of novel continuous bed motion versus traditional bed position whole-body PET/CT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schatka, Imke; Weiberg, Desiree; Reichelt, Stephanie; Owsianski-Hille, Nicole; Derlin, Thorsten; Berding, Georg; Bengel, Frank M.

    2016-01-01

    Continuous bed motion has recently been introduced for whole-body PET/CT, and represents a paradigm shift towards individualized and flexible acquisition without the limitations of bed position-based planning. Increased patient comfort due to lack of abrupt table position changes may be another albeit still unproven advantage. For robust clinical implementation, image quality and quantitative accuracy should at least be equal to the prior standard of bed position-based step-and-shoot imaging. The study included 68 consecutive patients referred for whole-body PET/CT for various malignancies. The patients underwent traditional step-and-shoot and novel continuous bed motion acquisition in the same session in a randomized crossover design. The patients and two independent observers were blinded to the sequence of scan techniques. Patient comfort/satisfaction was examined using a standardized questionnaire. SUVs were compared for reference tissue (liver, muscle) and tumour lesions. PET image quality and misalignment with CT images were evaluated on a scale of 1 - 4. Patients preferred continuous bed motion over step-and-shoot (P = 0.0001). It was considered to be more relaxing (38 % vs. 8 %), quieter (34 % vs. 8 %), and more fluid (64 % vs. 8 %). Image quality, SUV and CT misalignment did not differ between the techniques. Continuous bed motion resulted in better end-plane image quality (P < 0.0001). Regardless of the technique, second examinations had significantly higher tumour lesion SUVmax values (P = 0.0002), and a higher CT misalignment score (P = 0.0017). Oncological PET/CT with continuous bed motion enhances patient comfort and is associated with image quality at least comparable to that with traditional bed position-based step-and-shoot acquisition. (orig.)

  7. A randomized, double-blind, crossover comparison of novel continuous bed motion versus traditional bed position whole-body PET/CT imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schatka, Imke [Hannover Medical School, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hannover (Germany); Charite, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Berlin (Germany); Weiberg, Desiree; Reichelt, Stephanie; Owsianski-Hille, Nicole; Derlin, Thorsten; Berding, Georg; Bengel, Frank M. [Hannover Medical School, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hannover (Germany)

    2016-04-15

    Continuous bed motion has recently been introduced for whole-body PET/CT, and represents a paradigm shift towards individualized and flexible acquisition without the limitations of bed position-based planning. Increased patient comfort due to lack of abrupt table position changes may be another albeit still unproven advantage. For robust clinical implementation, image quality and quantitative accuracy should at least be equal to the prior standard of bed position-based step-and-shoot imaging. The study included 68 consecutive patients referred for whole-body PET/CT for various malignancies. The patients underwent traditional step-and-shoot and novel continuous bed motion acquisition in the same session in a randomized crossover design. The patients and two independent observers were blinded to the sequence of scan techniques. Patient comfort/satisfaction was examined using a standardized questionnaire. SUVs were compared for reference tissue (liver, muscle) and tumour lesions. PET image quality and misalignment with CT images were evaluated on a scale of 1 - 4. Patients preferred continuous bed motion over step-and-shoot (P = 0.0001). It was considered to be more relaxing (38 % vs. 8 %), quieter (34 % vs. 8 %), and more fluid (64 % vs. 8 %). Image quality, SUV and CT misalignment did not differ between the techniques. Continuous bed motion resulted in better end-plane image quality (P < 0.0001). Regardless of the technique, second examinations had significantly higher tumour lesion SUVmax values (P = 0.0002), and a higher CT misalignment score (P = 0.0017). Oncological PET/CT with continuous bed motion enhances patient comfort and is associated with image quality at least comparable to that with traditional bed position-based step-and-shoot acquisition. (orig.)

  8. CT and MR imaging characteristics of infantile hepatic hemangioendothelioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Shiting; Chan Tao; Ching, A.S.C.; Sun Canhui; Guo Huanyi; Fan Miao; Meng Quanfei; Li Ziping

    2010-01-01

    Aim: This study aims to analyze computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging features of infantile hepatic hemangioendotheliomas before and after treatment. Materials and methods: CT and MR examinations of seven infants with biopsy proven hepatic hemangioendotheliomas were retrospectively analyzed. The distribution, number, size, imaging appearance, enhancement pattern and post-treatment changes of the tumors were evaluated. Results: A total of 153 hepatic hemangioendotheliomas were detected on CT (111) and MR (42) imaging. In six infants, 109/111 (98.2%) tumors were hypodense and 2/111 (1.8%) lesions contained calcification on unenhanced CT. On MR imaging, all 42 lesions in one infant were heterogeneously T1-hypointense and T2-hyperintense compared to the normal liver parenchyma. Contrast-enhanced CT and MRI showed peripheral rim (51.6%), uniform (48.4%), fibrillary (33.3%), and nodular (28.8%) contrast enhancement in the hepatic arterial phase. Homogeneous (100%), rim (98.2%) and mixed enhancement patterns were noted in tumors 2.0 cm and 1.0-2.0 cm in diameter respectively in the hepatic arterial phase. In three patients who underwent steroid therapy, follow-up CT examination demonstrated tumor size reduction and increased intra-tumoral calcification in two patients. Conclusion: Infantile hepatic hemangioendotheliomas show some typical imaging features and size-dependent pattern of contrast enhancement on CT and MR imaging, which allow accurate imaging diagnosis and post-treatment evaluation.

  9. Model-based iterative reconstruction technique for radiation dose reduction in chest CT: comparison with the adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katsura, Masaki; Matsuda, Izuru; Akahane, Masaaki; Sato, Jiro; Akai, Hiroyuki; Yasaka, Koichiro; Kunimatsu, Akira; Ohtomo, Kuni [University of Tokyo, Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medicine, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo (Japan)

    2012-08-15

    To prospectively evaluate dose reduction and image quality characteristics of chest CT reconstructed with model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) compared with adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR). One hundred patients underwent reference-dose and low-dose unenhanced chest CT with 64-row multidetector CT. Images were reconstructed with 50 % ASIR-filtered back projection blending (ASIR50) for reference-dose CT, and with ASIR50 and MBIR for low-dose CT. Two radiologists assessed the images in a blinded manner for subjective image noise, artefacts and diagnostic acceptability. Objective image noise was measured in the lung parenchyma. Data were analysed using the sign test and pair-wise Student's t-test. Compared with reference-dose CT, there was a 79.0 % decrease in dose-length product with low-dose CT. Low-dose MBIR images had significantly lower objective image noise (16.93 {+-} 3.00) than low-dose ASIR (49.24 {+-} 9.11, P < 0.01) and reference-dose ASIR images (24.93 {+-} 4.65, P < 0.01). Low-dose MBIR images were all diagnostically acceptable. Unique features of low-dose MBIR images included motion artefacts and pixellated blotchy appearances, which did not adversely affect diagnostic acceptability. Diagnostically acceptable chest CT images acquired with nearly 80 % less radiation can be obtained using MBIR. MBIR shows greater potential than ASIR for providing diagnostically acceptable low-dose CT images without severely compromising image quality. (orig.)

  10. Signal Amplification Technique (SAT): an approach for improving resolution and reducing image noise in computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phelps, M.E.; Huang, S.C.; Hoffman, E.J.; Plummer, D.; Carson, R.

    1981-01-01

    Spatial resolution improvements in computed tomography (CT) have been limited by the large and unique error propagation properties of this technique. The desire to provide maximum image resolution has resulted in the use of reconstruction filter functions designed to produce tomographic images with resolution as close as possible to the intrinsic detector resolution. Thus, many CT systems produce images with excessive noise with the system resolution determined by the detector resolution rather than the reconstruction algorithm. CT is a rigorous mathematical technique which applies an increasing amplification to increasing spatial frequencies in the measured data. This mathematical approach to spatial frequency amplification cannot distinguish between signal and noise and therefore both are amplified equally. We report here a method in which tomographic resolution is improved by using very small detectors to selectively amplify the signal and not noise. Thus, this approach is referred to as the signal amplification technique (SAT). SAT can provide dramatic improvements in image resolution without increases in statistical noise or dose because increases in the cutoff frequency of the reconstruction algorithm are not required to improve image resolution. Alternatively, in cases where image counts are low, such as in rapid dynamic or receptor studies, statistical noise can be reduced by lowering the cutoff frequency while still maintaining the best possible image resolution. A possible system design for a positron CT system with SAT is described

  11. Importance of PET/CT for imaging of colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meinel, F.G.; Schramm, N.; Graser, A.; Reiser, M.F.; Rist, C.; Haug, A.R.

    2012-01-01

    Fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) has emerged as a very useful imaging modality in the management of colorectal carcinoma. Data from the literature regarding the role of PET/CT in the initial diagnosis, staging, radiotherapy planning, response monitoring and surveillance of colorectal carcinoma is presented. Future directions and economic aspects are discussed. Computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and FDG-PET for colorectal cancer and endorectal ultrasound for rectal cancer. Combined FDG-PET/CT. While other imaging modalities allow superior visualization of the extent and invasion depth of the primary tumor, PET/CT is most sensitive for the detection of distant metastases of colorectal cancer. We recommend a targeted use of PET/CT in cases of unclear M staging, prior to metastasectomy and in suspected cases of residual or recurrent colorectal carcinoma with equivocal conventional imaging. The role of PET/CT in radiotherapy planning and response monitoring needs to be determined. Currently there is no evidence to support the routine use of PET/CT for colorectal screening, staging or surveillance. To optimally exploit the synergy between morphologic and functional information, FDG-PET should generally be performed as an integrated FDG-PET/CT with a contrast-enhanced CT component in colorectal carcinoma. (orig.) [de

  12. CT Image Reconstruction in a Low Dimensional Manifold

    OpenAIRE

    Cong, Wenxiang; Wang, Ge; Yang, Qingsong; Hsieh, Jiang; Li, Jia; Lai, Rongjie

    2017-01-01

    Regularization methods are commonly used in X-ray CT image reconstruction. Different regularization methods reflect the characterization of different prior knowledge of images. In a recent work, a new regularization method called a low-dimensional manifold model (LDMM) is investigated to characterize the low-dimensional patch manifold structure of natural images, where the manifold dimensionality characterizes structural information of an image. In this paper, we propose a CT image reconstruc...

  13. Whole-body CT. Spiral and multislice CT. 2. tot. rev. and enl. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prokop, M.; Galanski, M.; Schaefer-Prokop, C.; Molen, A.J. van der

    2007-01-01

    Spiral and multidetector techniques have improved the diagnostic possibilities of CT, so that image analysis and interpretation have become increasingly complex. This book represents the current state of the art in CT imaging, including the most recent technical scanner developments. The second edition comprises the current state of knowledge in cT imaging. There are new chapters on image processing, application of contrasting agents and radiation dose. All organ-specific pathological findings are discussed in full. There are hints for optimum use and interpretation of CT, including CT angiography, CT colonography, CT-IVPL, and 3D imaging. There is an introduction to cardio-CT, from calcium scoring and CTA of the coronary arteries to judgement of cardiac morphology. There are detailed scan protocols with descriptions of how to go about parameter selection. Practical hints are given for better image quality and lower radiation exposure of patients, guidelines for patient preparation and complication management, and more than 1900 images in optimum RRR quality. (orig.)

  14. Cardiac MR imaging: Comparison with echocardiography and dynamic CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colletti, P.M.; Norris, S.; Raval, J.; Boswell, W.; Lee, K.; Ralls, P.; Haywood, J.; Halls, J.

    1986-01-01

    The authors compared gated cardiac MR imaging with two-dimensional and Doppler echocardiography and dynamic CT. Gated cardiac MR imaging (VISTA unit, 0.5 T) was performed in 55 patients with a variety of conditions. Accuracy of diagnosis was compared. CT showed arterial, valvular, and pericardial calcifications not seen on MR imaging. Many lesions were seen as well on CT as on MR imaging. Two-dimensional echocardiography was superior in demonstrating wall motion and valvular disease. MR imaging was superior in demonstrating myocardial structures

  15. Clinical value of CARE dose 4D technique in decreasing CT scanning dose of adult chest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Aiqin; Zheng Wenlong; Xu Chongyong; Fang Bidong; Ge Wen

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the value of CARE Dose 4D technique in decreasing radiation dose and improving image quality of multi-slice spiral CT in adult chest scanning. Methods: 100 patients of chest CT scanning were equally divided into study group and control group randomly. CARE Dose 4D Technique was used in study group. Effective mAs value, volume CT dose index (CTDI vol ) and dose length product (DLP) were displayed automatically in machine while chest scanning; those values and actual mAs value of every image were recorded respectively. The image quality at apex of lung, lower edge of aorta arch, middle area of left atrium and base of lung on every image of 400 images was judged and classified as three level (excellent, good, poor) by two deputy chief physicians with double blind method, the image noise at corresponding parts was measured. Results: While setting 80 mAs for quality reference mAs, the effective mAs value in study group most decreased 44 mAs than control group with an average decrease of 9.60 (12.0%), CTDI vol with 4.75 mGy with an average decrease of 0.95 mCy (11.0%), DLP 99.50% in study group, with 98.0% in control group. But it was higher at apex of lung and base of lung, lower at middle area of left atrium, and similar at lower edge of aorta arch in study group than contrast group. The image noise were lower at apex of lung and base of lung in study group than control group (t =6.299 and 2.332, all P<0.05), higher at middle area of left atrium in study group than control group (t=3.078, P<0.05) and similar at lower edge of aorta arch in study group than control group (t=1.191, P>0.05). Conclusions: CARE Dose 4D technique provides a function regulated mAs real-time on line, it not only raises utilization rate of radiation and decreases radiation dose, but also promises and increases image quality in chest CT scanning, and has some clinical significance. (authors)

  16. Patient-specific estimation of detailed cochlear shape from clinical CT images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjer, H Martin; Fagertun, Jens; Wimmer, Wilhelm

    2018-01-01

    of the detailed patient-specific cochlear shape from CT images. From a collection of temporal bone [Formula: see text]CT images, we build a cochlear statistical deformation model (SDM), which is a description of how a human cochlea deforms to represent the observed anatomical variability. The model is used...... for regularization of a non-rigid image registration procedure between a patient CT scan and a [Formula: see text]CT image, allowing us to estimate the detailed patient-specific cochlear shape. We test the accuracy and precision of the predicted cochlear shape using both [Formula: see text]CT and CT images...

  17. Ultralow dose dentomaxillofacial CT imaging and iterative reconstruction techniques: variability of Hounsfield units and contrast-to-noise ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischel, Alexander; Stratis, Andreas; Kakar, Apoorv; Bosmans, Hilde; Jacobs, Reinhilde; Gassner, Eva-Maria; Puelacher, Wolfgang; Pauwels, Ruben

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate whether application of ultralow dose protocols and iterative reconstruction technology (IRT) influence quantitative Hounsfield units (HUs) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in dentomaxillofacial CT imaging. Methods: A phantom with inserts of five types of materials was scanned using protocols for (a) a clinical reference for navigated surgery (CT dose index volume 36.58 mGy), (b) low-dose sinus imaging (18.28 mGy) and (c) four ultralow dose imaging (4.14, 2.63, 0.99 and 0.53 mGy). All images were reconstructed using: (i) filtered back projection (FBP); (ii) IRT: adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction-50 (ASIR-50), ASIR-100 and model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR); and (iii) standard (std) and bone kernel. Mean HU, CNR and average HU error after recalibration were determined. Each combination of protocols was compared using Friedman analysis of variance, followed by Dunn's multiple comparison test. Results: Pearson's sample correlation coefficients were all >0.99. Ultralow dose protocols using FBP showed errors of up to 273 HU. Std kernels had less HU variability than bone kernels. MBIR reduced the error value for the lowest dose protocol to 138 HU and retained the highest relative CNR. ASIR could not demonstrate significant advantages over FBP. Conclusions: Considering a potential dose reduction as low as 1.5% of a std protocol, ultralow dose protocols and IRT should be further tested for clinical dentomaxillofacial CT imaging. Advances in knowledge: HU as a surrogate for bone density may vary significantly in CT ultralow dose imaging. However, use of std kernels and MBIR technology reduce HU error values and may retain the highest CNR. PMID:26859336

  18. An evaluation of the regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) measurement by xenon-enhanced dynamic CT with helical scanning technique and the functional imaging by multiplanar reconstruction (MPR). Fundamental study and clinical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Kenichi

    1997-01-01

    We evaluated the quantitative rCBF by xenon-enhanced dynamic CT with helical scanning technique on all brain regions, and also examined clinical usefulness of coronal and sagittal section images which are similar to SPECT images obtained by the functional multiplanar reconstitution (MPR) imaging of many successive flow maps. We used 14 clinical cases. The conventional xenon-enhanced CT was simple and ideal method to measure rCBF, however, it had disadvantages; it gives a few laminagraphical images or only the axial directional images, compared to SPECT or PET. There is a risk to overlook lesions out of the image or not to obtain the whole images of the lesion. Although the helical scanning technique has a methodological characteristics to use adjacent data for the image reconstitution, it is by no means inferior to the conventional method in the contrast resolution or the image resolution when the co-helical function and an appropriate reconstituted function were used. It has an advantage to scan all brain regions by only one cycle of scanning. Furthermore on making good use of the property that the helical scanning technique can give the successive data, we can observe rCBF by coronal and sagittal images when many flow maps were made up by reconstituted images of the narrow steps. This shows the clinical usefulness of this technique. One of the future problem to be solved is to decrease the exposure dose. (K.H.)

  19. Advances in CT imaging for urolithiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasir Andrabi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Urolithiasis is a common disease with increasing prevalence worldwide and a lifetime-estimated recurrence risk of over 50%. Imaging plays a critical role in the initial diagnosis, follow-up and urological management of urinary tract stone disease. Unenhanced helical computed tomography (CT is highly sensitive (>95% and specific (>96% in the diagnosis of urolithiasis and is the imaging investigation of choice for the initial assessment of patients with suspected urolithiasis. The emergence of multi-detector CT (MDCT and technological innovations in CT such as dual-energy CT (DECT has widened the scope of MDCT in the stone disease management from initial diagnosis to encompass treatment planning and monitoring of treatment success. DECT has been shown to enhance pre-treatment characterization of stone composition in comparison with conventional MDCT and is being increasingly used. Although CT-related radiation dose exposure remains a valid concern, the use of low-dose MDCT protocols and integration of newer iterative reconstruction algorithms into routine CT practice has resulted in a substantial decrease in ionizing radiation exposure. In this review article, our intent is to discuss the role of MDCT in the diagnosis and post-treatment evaluation of urolithiasis and review the impact of emerging CT technologies such as dual energy in clinical practice.

  20. Improved CT imaging in diagnosis of ankylosing spondylitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mai Yuanfeng; Sun Haixing; Ling Jian; Kuang Jianyi; Pan Ximin

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the improved CT imaging of sacroiliac joint in diagnosis of ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Methods: 22 patients, diagnosed as AS by clinical and radiography, undertook both conventional and improved CT imaging. All images were comparatively studied. Results: With conventional CT imaging, in the 44 joints of 22 cases, unremarkable images were obtained in 3 cases; early stage AS was found in 15 joints of 9 cases; AS in progressive stage was revealed in 8 cases/16 joints, stabled AS was presented in 2 cases/4 joints. There were 23 joints in 12 cases diagnosed as early term by improved imaging, progressive staged AS was shown in 8 cases/16 joints as, stable AS was demonstrated in 2 cases/4 joints. Conclusion: The improved imaging is sensitive in the diagnosis of early staged AS, for the application of thin slice scan, which helps to reduce partial volume effect. Scanning along the longitudinal axis of the sacroiliac joint extends the observation of erosion of the joint surface. For progressive or stable staged AS, the alterations of bone and joint space are prominent, improved CT imaging is not superior to the conventional. (authors)

  1. Reconstruction CT imaging of the hypopharynx and the larynx

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuno, Tetsuji; Fujimura, Akiko; Murakami, Yasushi; Shiga, Hayao

    1986-01-01

    The multiplanar reconstruction CT imaging of the hypopharynx and the larynx was performed on a total of 20 cases: 8 with laryngeal carcinomas, 6 with hypopharyngeal carcinomas, 4 with vocal cord paralyses due to various causes, 1 with laryngeal amyloidosis, 1 with inflammatory granuloma of the hypopharynx. Coronal, segittal, and parasagittal reconstruction images were obtained from either 1 or 2 mm overlapping axial scans with 4 or 5 mm slice thickness (3 cases) using 5 sec scan times during queit breathing. In 15 cases with coronal reconstruction imaging, the anatomical derangements of the laryngopharyngeal structures especially along the undersurface of the true vocal cord to the false cord level, the lateral wall of the pyriform sinus, and the paraglottic space were demonstrated more clearly than the axial CT imaging. In 5 cases with sagittal reconstruction imaging, the vertical extension of the lesions through the anterior commisure was more clearly depicted than the axial CT imaging. In 8 cases with parasagittal reconstruction imaging, which is along the vocal fold or across the aryepiglottic fold, pathological changes along the aryepiglottic fold, the arytenoid-corniculate cartilage complex, and the tip of the pyriform sinus were more clearly demonstrated than the axial CT imaging. In determining the feasibility of conservation surgery of the larynx and the hypopharynx, reconstruction CT imaging is recommended as the diagnostic procedure of a choice, which would supplement the findings of the routine axial CT imaging. (author)

  2. Molecular imaging agents for SPECT (and SPECT/CT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gnanasegaran, Gopinath; Ballinger, James R.

    2014-01-01

    The development of hybrid single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) cameras has increased the diagnostic value of many existing single photon radiopharmaceuticals. Precise anatomical localization of lesions greatly increases diagnostic confidence in bone imaging of the extremities, infection imaging, sentinel lymph node localization, and imaging in other areas. Accurate anatomical localization is particularly important prior to surgery, especially involving the parathyroid glands and sentinel lymph node procedures. SPECT/CT plays a role in characterization of lesions, particularly in bone scintigraphy and radioiodine imaging of metastatic thyroid cancer. In the development of novel tracers, SPECT/CT is particularly important in monitoring response to therapies that do not result in an early change in lesion size. Preclinical SPECT/CT devices, which actually have spatial resolution superior to PET/CT devices, have become essential in characterization of the biodistribution and tissue kinetics of novel tracers, allowing coregistration of serial studies within the same animals, which serves both to reduce biological variability and reduce the number of animals required. In conclusion, SPECT/CT increases the utility of existing radiopharmaceuticals and plays a pivotal role in the evaluation of novel tracers. (orig.)

  3. Molecular imaging agents for SPECT (and SPECT/CT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gnanasegaran, Gopinath [Guy' s and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Ballinger, James R. [Guy' s and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom); King' s College London, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-05-15

    The development of hybrid single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) cameras has increased the diagnostic value of many existing single photon radiopharmaceuticals. Precise anatomical localization of lesions greatly increases diagnostic confidence in bone imaging of the extremities, infection imaging, sentinel lymph node localization, and imaging in other areas. Accurate anatomical localization is particularly important prior to surgery, especially involving the parathyroid glands and sentinel lymph node procedures. SPECT/CT plays a role in characterization of lesions, particularly in bone scintigraphy and radioiodine imaging of metastatic thyroid cancer. In the development of novel tracers, SPECT/CT is particularly important in monitoring response to therapies that do not result in an early change in lesion size. Preclinical SPECT/CT devices, which actually have spatial resolution superior to PET/CT devices, have become essential in characterization of the biodistribution and tissue kinetics of novel tracers, allowing coregistration of serial studies within the same animals, which serves both to reduce biological variability and reduce the number of animals required. In conclusion, SPECT/CT increases the utility of existing radiopharmaceuticals and plays a pivotal role in the evaluation of novel tracers. (orig.)

  4. Revisiting renovascular imaging for renal sympathetic denervation: current techniques and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pua, Uei; Tan, Cher Heng [Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Singapore (Singapore); Ho, Hee Hwa; Tan, Julian Ko Beng; Ong, Paul Jau Leong [Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Department of Cardiology, Singapore (Singapore)

    2014-08-28

    Renal sympathetic denervation (RDN) is an emerging technique in the treatment of resistant hypertension, most commonly performed using an endovascular approach. Clinical and anatomical criteria for RDN are well established and imaging plays an integral role in selecting patients with suitable anatomy, procedural planning and device selection. Nevertheless, the current body of literature surrounding imaging related to RDN remains limited. The purpose of this article is to illustrate the expectations and limitations of various imaging techniques, including Doppler ultrasound, CT angiography, MR angiography and newer techniques such as non-contrast MR angiography, in the context of RDN. (orig.)

  5. Revisiting renovascular imaging for renal sympathetic denervation: current techniques and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pua, Uei; Tan, Cher Heng; Ho, Hee Hwa; Tan, Julian Ko Beng; Ong, Paul Jau Leong

    2015-01-01

    Renal sympathetic denervation (RDN) is an emerging technique in the treatment of resistant hypertension, most commonly performed using an endovascular approach. Clinical and anatomical criteria for RDN are well established and imaging plays an integral role in selecting patients with suitable anatomy, procedural planning and device selection. Nevertheless, the current body of literature surrounding imaging related to RDN remains limited. The purpose of this article is to illustrate the expectations and limitations of various imaging techniques, including Doppler ultrasound, CT angiography, MR angiography and newer techniques such as non-contrast MR angiography, in the context of RDN. (orig.)

  6. Clinical PET/CT Atlas: A Casebook of Imaging in Oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    Integrated positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) has evolved since its introduction into the commercial market more than a decade ago. It is now a key procedure, particularly in oncological imaging. Over the last years in routine clinical service, PET/CT has had a significant impact on diagnosis, treatment planning, staging, therapy, and monitoring of treatment response and has therefore played an important role in the care of cancer patients. The high sensitivity from the PET component and the specificity of the CT component give this hybrid imaging modality the unique characteristics that make PET/CT, even after over 10 years of clinical use, one of the fastest growing imaging modalities worldwide. This publication combines over 90 comprehensive cases covering all major indications of fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG)-PET/CT as well as some cases of clinically relevant special tracers. The cases provide an overview of what the specific disease can look like in PET/CT, the typical pattern of the disease’s spread as well as likely pitfalls and teaching points. This PET/CT Atlas will allow professionals interested in PET/CT imaging to embrace the variety of oncological imaging by providing clinically relevant teaching files on the effectiveness and diagnostic quality of FDG-PET/CT imaging in routine applications

  7. Automatic segmentation of lumbar vertebrae in CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Amruta; Raina, Akshita; Sharifi Sarabi, Mona; Ahn, Christine S.; Babayan, Diana; Gaonkar, Bilwaj; Macyszyn, Luke; Raghavendra, Cauligi

    2017-03-01

    Lower back pain is one of the most prevalent disorders in the developed/developing world. However, its etiology is poorly understood and treatment is often determined subjectively. In order to quantitatively study the emergence and evolution of back pain, it is necessary to develop consistently measurable markers for pathology. Imaging based measures offer one solution to this problem. The development of imaging based on quantitative biomarkers for the lower back necessitates automated techniques to acquire this data. While the problem of segmenting lumbar vertebrae has been addressed repeatedly in literature, the associated problem of computing relevant biomarkers on the basis of the segmentation has not been addressed thoroughly. In this paper, we propose a Random-Forest based approach that learns to segment vertebral bodies in CT images followed by a biomarker evaluation framework that extracts vertebral heights and widths from the segmentations obtained. Our dataset consists of 15 CT sagittal scans obtained from General Electric Healthcare. Our main approach is divided into three parts: the first stage is image pre-processing which is used to correct for variations in illumination across all the images followed by preparing the foreground and background objects from images; the next stage is Machine Learning using Random-Forests, which distinguishes the interest-point vectors between foreground or background; and the last step is image post-processing, which is crucial to refine the results of classifier. The Dice coefficient was used as a statistical validation metric to evaluate the performance of our segmentations with an average value of 0.725 for our dataset.

  8. Source position error influence on industry CT image quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cong Peng; Li Zhipeng; Wu Haifeng

    2004-01-01

    Based on the emulational exercise, the influence of source position error on industry CT (ICT) image quality was studied and the valuable parameters were obtained for the design of ICT. The vivid container CT image was also acquired from the CT testing system. (authors)

  9. High-resolution imaging of pulmonary ventilation and perfusion with 68Ga-VQ respiratory gated (4-D) PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callahan, Jason; Hofman, Michael S.; Siva, Shankar; Kron, Tomas; Schneider, Michal E.; Binns, David; Eu, Peter; Hicks, Rodney J.

    2014-01-01

    Our group has previously reported on the use of 68 Ga-ventilation/perfusion (VQ) PET/CT scanning for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism. We describe here the acquisition methodology for 68 Ga-VQ respiratory gated (4-D) PET/CT and the effects of respiratory motion on image coregistration in VQ scanning. A prospective study was performed in 15 patients with non-small-cell lung cancer. 4-D PET and 4-D CT images were acquired using an infrared marker on the patient's abdomen as a surrogate for breathing motion following inhalation of Galligas and intravenous administration of 68 Ga-macroaggregated albumin. Images were reconstructed with phase-matched attenuation correction. The lungs were contoured on CT and PET VQ images during free-breathing (FB) and at maximum inspiration (Insp) and expiration (Exp). The similarity between PET and CT volumes was measured using the Dice coefficient (DC) comparing the following groups; (1) FB-PET/CT, (2) InspPET/InspCT, (3) ExpPET/Exp CT, and (4) FB-PET/AveCT. A repeated measures one-way ANOVA with multiple comparison Tukey tests were performed to evaluate any difference between the groups. Diaphragmatic motion in the superior-inferior direction on the 4-D CT scan was also measured. 4-D VQ scanning was successful in all patients without additional acquisition time compared to the nongated technique. The highest volume overlap was between ExpPET and ExpCT and between FB-PET and AveCT with a DC of 0.82 and 0.80 for ventilation and perfusion, respectively. This was significantly better than the DC comparing the other groups (0.78-0.79, p 68 Ga-VQ 4-D PET/CT is feasible and the blurring caused by respiratory motion is well corrected with 4-D acquisition, which principally reduces artefact at the lung bases. The images with the highest spatial overlap were the combined expiration phase or FB PET and average CT. With higher resolution than SPECT/CT, the PET/CT technique has a broad range of potential clinical applications including

  10. Xenon ventilation CT using dual-source and dual-energy technique in children with bronchiolitis obliterans: correlation of xenon and CT density values with pulmonary function test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goo, Hyun Woo; Yang, Dong Hyun; Seo, Joon Beom; Chae, Eun Jin; Lee, Jeongjin; Hong, Soo-Jong; Yu, Jinho; Kim, Byoung-Ju; Krauss, Bernhard

    2010-01-01

    Xenon ventilation CT using dual-source and dual-energy technique is a recently introduced, promising functional lung imaging method. To expand its clinical applications evidence of additional diagnostic value of xenon ventilation CT over conventional chest CT is required. To evaluate the usefulness of xenon ventilation CT using dual-source and dual-energy technique in children with bronchiolitis obliterans (BO). Seventeen children (age 7-18 years; 11 boys) with BO underwent xenon ventilation CT using dual-source and dual-energy technique. Xenon and CT density values were measured in normal and hyperlucent lung regions on CT and were compared between the two regions. Volumes of hyperlucent regions and ventilation defects were calculated with thresholds determined by visual and histogram-based analysis. Indexed volumes of hyperlucent lung regions and ventilation defects were correlated with pulmonary function test results. Effective doses of xenon CT were calculated. Xenon (14.6 ± 6.4 HU vs 26.1 ± 6.5 HU; P 25-75 , (γ = -0.68-0.88, P ≤ 0.002). Volume percentages of xenon ventilation defects (35.0 ± 16.4%)] were not significantly different from those of hyperlucent lung regions (38.2 ± 18.6%). However, mismatches between the volume percentages were variable up to 21.4-33.3%. Mean effective dose of xenon CT was 1.9 ± 0.5 mSv. In addition to high-resolution anatomic information, xenon ventilation CT using dual-source and dual-energy technique demonstrates impaired regional ventilation and its heterogeneity accurately in children with BO without additional radiation exposure. (orig.)

  11. SU-E-J-275: Review - Computerized PET/CT Image Analysis in the Evaluation of Tumor Response to Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, W; Wang, J; Zhang, H

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To review the literature in using computerized PET/CT image analysis for the evaluation of tumor response to therapy. Methods: We reviewed and summarized more than 100 papers that used computerized image analysis techniques for the evaluation of tumor response with PET/CT. This review mainly covered four aspects: image registration, tumor segmentation, image feature extraction, and response evaluation. Results: Although rigid image registration is straightforward, it has been shown to achieve good alignment between baseline and evaluation scans. Deformable image registration has been shown to improve the alignment when complex deformable distortions occur due to tumor shrinkage, weight loss or gain, and motion. Many semi-automatic tumor segmentation methods have been developed on PET. A comparative study revealed benefits of high levels of user interaction with simultaneous visualization of CT images and PET gradients. On CT, semi-automatic methods have been developed for only tumors that show marked difference in CT attenuation between the tumor and the surrounding normal tissues. Quite a few multi-modality segmentation methods have been shown to improve accuracy compared to single-modality algorithms. Advanced PET image features considering spatial information, such as tumor volume, tumor shape, total glycolytic volume, histogram distance, and texture features have been found more informative than the traditional SUVmax for the prediction of tumor response. Advanced CT features, including volumetric, attenuation, morphologic, structure, and texture descriptors, have also been found advantage over the traditional RECIST and WHO criteria in certain tumor types. Predictive models based on machine learning technique have been constructed for correlating selected image features to response. These models showed improved performance compared to current methods using cutoff value of a single measurement for tumor response. Conclusion: This review showed that

  12. SU-E-J-275: Review - Computerized PET/CT Image Analysis in the Evaluation of Tumor Response to Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, W; Wang, J; Zhang, H [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To review the literature in using computerized PET/CT image analysis for the evaluation of tumor response to therapy. Methods: We reviewed and summarized more than 100 papers that used computerized image analysis techniques for the evaluation of tumor response with PET/CT. This review mainly covered four aspects: image registration, tumor segmentation, image feature extraction, and response evaluation. Results: Although rigid image registration is straightforward, it has been shown to achieve good alignment between baseline and evaluation scans. Deformable image registration has been shown to improve the alignment when complex deformable distortions occur due to tumor shrinkage, weight loss or gain, and motion. Many semi-automatic tumor segmentation methods have been developed on PET. A comparative study revealed benefits of high levels of user interaction with simultaneous visualization of CT images and PET gradients. On CT, semi-automatic methods have been developed for only tumors that show marked difference in CT attenuation between the tumor and the surrounding normal tissues. Quite a few multi-modality segmentation methods have been shown to improve accuracy compared to single-modality algorithms. Advanced PET image features considering spatial information, such as tumor volume, tumor shape, total glycolytic volume, histogram distance, and texture features have been found more informative than the traditional SUVmax for the prediction of tumor response. Advanced CT features, including volumetric, attenuation, morphologic, structure, and texture descriptors, have also been found advantage over the traditional RECIST and WHO criteria in certain tumor types. Predictive models based on machine learning technique have been constructed for correlating selected image features to response. These models showed improved performance compared to current methods using cutoff value of a single measurement for tumor response. Conclusion: This review showed that

  13. Model-based iterative reconstruction technique for radiation dose reduction in chest CT: comparison with the adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsura, Masaki; Matsuda, Izuru; Akahane, Masaaki; Sato, Jiro; Akai, Hiroyuki; Yasaka, Koichiro; Kunimatsu, Akira; Ohtomo, Kuni

    2012-01-01

    To prospectively evaluate dose reduction and image quality characteristics of chest CT reconstructed with model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) compared with adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR). One hundred patients underwent reference-dose and low-dose unenhanced chest CT with 64-row multidetector CT. Images were reconstructed with 50 % ASIR-filtered back projection blending (ASIR50) for reference-dose CT, and with ASIR50 and MBIR for low-dose CT. Two radiologists assessed the images in a blinded manner for subjective image noise, artefacts and diagnostic acceptability. Objective image noise was measured in the lung parenchyma. Data were analysed using the sign test and pair-wise Student's t-test. Compared with reference-dose CT, there was a 79.0 % decrease in dose-length product with low-dose CT. Low-dose MBIR images had significantly lower objective image noise (16.93 ± 3.00) than low-dose ASIR (49.24 ± 9.11, P < 0.01) and reference-dose ASIR images (24.93 ± 4.65, P < 0.01). Low-dose MBIR images were all diagnostically acceptable. Unique features of low-dose MBIR images included motion artefacts and pixellated blotchy appearances, which did not adversely affect diagnostic acceptability. Diagnostically acceptable chest CT images acquired with nearly 80 % less radiation can be obtained using MBIR. MBIR shows greater potential than ASIR for providing diagnostically acceptable low-dose CT images without severely compromising image quality. (orig.)

  14. Non-destructive failure analysis and measurement for molded devices and complex assemblies with X-ray CT and 3D image processing techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, Xiaoming; Liew, Seaw Jia; Jiang, Ting Ying; Xu, Jian; Kakarala, Ramakrishna

    2013-01-01

    In both automotive and healthcare sectors, reliable failure analysis and accurate measurement of molded devices and complex assemblies are important. Current methods of failure analysis and measurement require these molded parts to be cross-sectioned so that internal features or dimensions can be accessible. As a result, the parts are deemed unusable and additional failure introduced by sectioning may cause misinterpretation of the results. X-ray CT and 3D image processing techniques provide a new nondestructive solution for failure analysis and measurement of molded devices and complex assemblies. These techniques simplify failure analysis and measurement of molded devices and assemblies, and improve the productivity of molding manufacturing significantly.

  15. MO-DE-207A-09: Low-Dose CT Image Reconstruction Via Learning From Different Patient Normal-Dose Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, H; Xing, L [Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Liang, Z [Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate a novel low-dose CT (LdCT) image reconstruction strategy for lung CT imaging in radiation therapy. Methods: The proposed approach consists of four steps: (1) use the traditional filtered back-projection (FBP) method to reconstruct the LdCT image; (2) calculate structure similarity (SSIM) index between the FBP-reconstructed LdCT image and a set of normal-dose CT (NdCT) images, and select the NdCT image with the highest SSIM as the learning source; (3) segment the NdCT source image into lung and outside tissue regions via simple thresholding, and adopt multiple linear regression to learn high-order Markov random field (MRF) pattern for each tissue region in the NdCT source image; (4) segment the FBP-reconstructed LdCT image into lung and outside regions as well, and apply the learnt MRF prior in each tissue region for statistical iterative reconstruction of the LdCT image following the penalized weighted least squares (PWLS) framework. Quantitative evaluation of the reconstructed images was based on the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), local binary pattern (LBP) and histogram of oriented gradients (HOG) metrics. Results: It was observed that lung and outside tissue regions have different MRF patterns predicted from the NdCT. Visual inspection showed that our method obviously outperformed the traditional FBP method. Comparing with the region-smoothing PWLS method, our method has, in average, 13% increase in SNR, 15% decrease in LBP difference, and 12% decrease in HOG difference from reference standard for all regions of interest, which indicated the superior performance of the proposed method in terms of image resolution and texture preservation. Conclusion: We proposed a novel LdCT image reconstruction method by learning similar image characteristics from a set of NdCT images, and the to-be-learnt NdCT image does not need to be scans from the same subject. This approach is particularly important for enhancing image quality in radiation therapy.

  16. MO-DE-207A-09: Low-Dose CT Image Reconstruction Via Learning From Different Patient Normal-Dose Images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, H; Xing, L; Liang, Z

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate a novel low-dose CT (LdCT) image reconstruction strategy for lung CT imaging in radiation therapy. Methods: The proposed approach consists of four steps: (1) use the traditional filtered back-projection (FBP) method to reconstruct the LdCT image; (2) calculate structure similarity (SSIM) index between the FBP-reconstructed LdCT image and a set of normal-dose CT (NdCT) images, and select the NdCT image with the highest SSIM as the learning source; (3) segment the NdCT source image into lung and outside tissue regions via simple thresholding, and adopt multiple linear regression to learn high-order Markov random field (MRF) pattern for each tissue region in the NdCT source image; (4) segment the FBP-reconstructed LdCT image into lung and outside regions as well, and apply the learnt MRF prior in each tissue region for statistical iterative reconstruction of the LdCT image following the penalized weighted least squares (PWLS) framework. Quantitative evaluation of the reconstructed images was based on the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), local binary pattern (LBP) and histogram of oriented gradients (HOG) metrics. Results: It was observed that lung and outside tissue regions have different MRF patterns predicted from the NdCT. Visual inspection showed that our method obviously outperformed the traditional FBP method. Comparing with the region-smoothing PWLS method, our method has, in average, 13% increase in SNR, 15% decrease in LBP difference, and 12% decrease in HOG difference from reference standard for all regions of interest, which indicated the superior performance of the proposed method in terms of image resolution and texture preservation. Conclusion: We proposed a novel LdCT image reconstruction method by learning similar image characteristics from a set of NdCT images, and the to-be-learnt NdCT image does not need to be scans from the same subject. This approach is particularly important for enhancing image quality in radiation therapy.

  17. Postoperative follow-up study of craniosynostosis using three-dimensional surface reconstruction CT (3D-CT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimoto, Hiroshi; Tsukiyama, Takashi; Nishimura, Jiro; Fujioka, Mutsuhisa; Tsubokawa, Takashi.

    1988-12-01

    In 1983, Michael W. Vannier and Jeffrey L. Marsh developed a computer method that reconstructs three-dimensional images from high-resolution CT-scan series of the facial skeleton. This method has been applied to craniofacial anomalies, basal encephalocele, and other skeletal pathologies. In this study, the postoperative assessment of craniofacial surgical results has been accomplished using 3D-CT techniques in craniosynostosis. The results are as follows: (1) Postoperative 3D-CTs reveal the bony anatomical details corrected by the craniofacial surgery more precisely and more stereographically than do conventional radiological techniques. (2) Secondary changes in the cranium after the surgery, such as reossification at the area of osteotomies or postoperative asymmetric skull deformities, are more early detected by the 3D-CT imaging technique than by a craniogram. (3) In 3D-CT images, internal views of the skull, such mid-sagittal, rear internal, or top axial views of the intracranial skull base, are most useful in postoperative assessments of the surgical results and of postoperative secondary changes in the cranium. Based on our experience, we expect that 3D-CT imaging techniques will become more important in the management of craniosynostosis.

  18. Postoperative follow-up study of craniosynostosis using three-dimensional surface reconstruction CT (3D-CT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimoto, Hiroshi; Tsukiyama, Takashi; Nishimura, Jiro; Fujioka, Mutsuhisa; Tsubokawa, Takashi.

    1988-01-01

    In 1983, Michael W. Vannier and Jeffrey L. Marsh developed a computer method that reconstructs three-dimensional images from high-resolution CT-scan series of the facial skeleton. This method has been applied to craniofacial anomalies, basal encephalocele, and other skeletal pathologies. In this study, the postoperative assessment of craniofacial surgical results has been accomplished using 3D-CT techniques in craniosynostosis. The results are as follows: 1) Postoperative 3D-CTs reveal the bony anatomical details corrected by the craniofacial surgery more precisely and more stereographically than do conventional radiological techniques. 2) Secondary changes in the cranium after the surgery, such as reossification at the area of osteotomies or postoperative asymmetric skull deformities, are more early detected by the 3D-CT imaging technique than by a craniogram. 3) In 3D-CT images, internal views of the skull, such mid-sagittal, rear internal, or top axial views of the intracranial skull base, are most useful in postoperative assessments of the surgical results and of postoperative secondary changes in the cranium. Based on our experience, we expect that 3D-CT imaging techniques will become more important in the management of craniosynostosis. (author)

  19. Half-Fan-Based Intensity-Weighted Region-of-Interest Imaging for Low-Dose Cone-Beam CT in Image-Guided Radiation Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Boyeol; Son, Kihong; Pua, Rizza; Kim, Jinsung; Solodov, Alexander; Cho, Seungryong

    2016-10-01

    With the increased use of computed tomography (CT) in clinics, dose reduction is the most important feature people seek when considering new CT techniques or applications. We developed an intensity-weighted region-of-interest (IWROI) imaging method in an exact half-fan geometry to reduce the imaging radiation dose to patients in cone-beam CT (CBCT) for image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT). While dose reduction is highly desirable, preserving the high-quality images of the ROI is also important for target localization in IGRT. An intensity-weighting (IW) filter made of copper was mounted in place of a bowtie filter on the X-ray tube unit of an on-board imager (OBI) system such that the filter can substantially reduce radiation exposure to the outer ROI. In addition to mounting the IW filter, the lead-blade collimation of the OBI was adjusted to produce an exact half-fan scanning geometry for a further reduction of the radiation dose. The chord-based rebinned backprojection-filtration (BPF) algorithm in circular CBCT was implemented for image reconstruction, and a humanoid pelvis phantom was used for the IWROI imaging experiment. The IWROI image of the phantom was successfully reconstructed after beam-quality correction, and it was registered to the reference image within an acceptable level of tolerance. Dosimetric measurements revealed that the dose is reduced by approximately 61% in the inner ROI and by 73% in the outer ROI compared to the conventional bowtie filter-based half-fan scan. The IWROI method substantially reduces the imaging radiation dose and provides reconstructed images with an acceptable level of quality for patient setup and target localization. The proposed half-fan-based IWROI imaging technique can add a valuable option to CBCT in IGRT applications.

  20. Imaging fusion (SPECT/CT) in degenerative disease of spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernal, P.; Ucros, G.; Bermudez, S.; Ocampo, M.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Objective: To determine the utility of Fusion Imaging SPECT/CT in degenerative pathology of the spine and to establish the impact of the use of fusion imaging in spinal pain due to degenerative changes of the spine. Materials and methods: 44 Patients (M=21, F=23) average age of 63 years and with degenerative pathology of spine were sent to Diagnosis Imaging department in FSFB. Bone scintigraphy (SPECT), CT of spine (cervical: 30%, Lumbar 70%) and fusion imaging were performed in all of them. Bone scintigraphy was carried out in a gamma camera Siemens Diacam double head attached to ESOFT computer. The images were acquired in matrix 128 x 128, 20 seg/imag, 64 images. CT of spine was performed same day or two days after in Helycoidal Siemens somatom emotion CT. The fusion was done in a Dicom workstation in sagital, axial and coronal reconstruction. The findings were evaluated by 2 Nuclear Medicine physicians and 2 radiologists of the staff of FSFB in an independent way. Results: Bone scan (SPECT) and CT of 44 patients were evaluated. CT showed facet joint osteoarthrities in 27 (61.3%) patients, uncovertebral joint arthrosis in 7 (15.9%), bulging disc in 9(20.4%), spinal nucleus lesion in 7(15.9%), osteophytes in 9 (20.4%), spinal foraminal stenosis in 7 (15.9%), spondylolysis/spondylolisthesis in 4 (9%). Bone scan showed facet joint osteoarthrities in 29 (65.9%), uncovertebral joint arthrosis in 4 (9%), osteophytes in 9 (20.4%) and normal 3 (6.8%). The imaging fusion showed coincidence findings (main lesion in CT with high uptake in scintigraphy) in 34 patients (77.2%) and no coincidence in 10 (22.8%). In 15 (34.09%) patients the fusion provided additional information. The analysis of the findings of CT and SPECT showed similar results in most of the cases and the fusion didn't provide additional information but it allowed to confirm the findings but when the findings didn't match where the CT showed several findings and SPECT only one area with high uptake

  1. Application of dual-energy scanning technique with dual-source CT in pulmonary mass lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Jie; Xu Yiming; He Bo; Xie Xiaojie; Han Dan

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To explore the feasibility of DSCT dual-energy technique in pulmonary mass lesions. Methods: A total of 100 patients with pulmonary masses underwent conventional plain CT scan and dual-energy enhanced CT scan. The virtual non-contrast (VNC) images were obtained at post-processing workstation.The mean CT value,enhancement value,signal to noise ratio (SNR), image quality and radiation dose of pulmonary masses were compared between the two scan techniques using F or t test and the detectability of lesions was compared using Wilcoxon test. Results: There was no statistically significant difference among VNC (A) (32.89 ± 12.58) HU,VNC (S) (30.86 ± 9.60) HU and conventional plain images (35.89 ± 9.99) HU in mean CT value of mass (F =2.08, P>0.05). There was statistically significant difference among VNC (A) (3.29 ± 1.45), VNC (S) (3.93 ± 1.49) and conventional plain image (4.61 ± 1.50) in SNR (F =6.01, P<0.05), which of conventional plain scan was higher than that of VNC.The enhancement value of mass in conventional enhanced scan (60.74 ± 13.9) HU and distribution of iodine from VNC (A) (58.26 ± 31.99) HU was no statistically significant difference (t=0.48, P>0.05), but there was a significant difference between conventional enhanced scan (56.51 ± 17.94) HU and distribution of iodine from VNC (S) (52.65 ± 16.78) HU (t=4.45, P<0.05). There was no statistically significant difference among conventional plain scan (4.69 ± 0.06) and VNC (A) (4.60 ± 0.09), VNC (S) (4.61 ±0.11) in image quality at mediastinal window (F=3.014, P>0.05). The appearance, size, internal features of mass (such as necrosis, calcification and cavity) were showed the same in conventional plain scan, VNC (A) and VNC (S). Of 41 patients with hilar mass, 18 patients were found to have lobular and segmental perfusion decrease or defect. Perfusion defect area was found in 59 patients with peripheral lung mass. The radiation dose of dual-energy enhanced scan was lower than that of

  2. Prediction of CT Substitutes from MR Images Based on Local Diffeomorphic Mapping for Brain PET Attenuation Correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yao; Yang, Wei; Lu, Lijun; Lu, Zhentai; Zhong, Liming; Huang, Meiyan; Feng, Yanqiu; Feng, Qianjin; Chen, Wufan

    2016-10-01

    Attenuation correction is important for PET reconstruction. In PET/MR, MR intensities are not directly related to attenuation coefficients that are needed in PET imaging. The attenuation coefficient map can be derived from CT images. Therefore, prediction of CT substitutes from MR images is desired for attenuation correction in PET/MR. This study presents a patch-based method for CT prediction from MR images, generating attenuation maps for PET reconstruction. Because no global relation exists between MR and CT intensities, we propose local diffeomorphic mapping (LDM) for CT prediction. In LDM, we assume that MR and CT patches are located on 2 nonlinear manifolds, and the mapping from the MR manifold to the CT manifold approximates a diffeomorphism under a local constraint. Locality is important in LDM and is constrained by the following techniques. The first is local dictionary construction, wherein, for each patch in the testing MR image, a local search window is used to extract patches from training MR/CT pairs to construct MR and CT dictionaries. The k-nearest neighbors and an outlier detection strategy are then used to constrain the locality in MR and CT dictionaries. Second is local linear representation, wherein, local anchor embedding is used to solve MR dictionary coefficients when representing the MR testing sample. Under these local constraints, dictionary coefficients are linearly transferred from the MR manifold to the CT manifold and used to combine CT training samples to generate CT predictions. Our dataset contains 13 healthy subjects, each with T1- and T2-weighted MR and CT brain images. This method provides CT predictions with a mean absolute error of 110.1 Hounsfield units, Pearson linear correlation of 0.82, peak signal-to-noise ratio of 24.81 dB, and Dice in bone regions of 0.84 as compared with real CTs. CT substitute-based PET reconstruction has a regression slope of 1.0084 and R 2 of 0.9903 compared with real CT-based PET. In this method, no

  3. Molecular Imaging with Small Animal PET/CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Binderup, T.; El-Ali, H.H.; Skovgaard, D.

    2011-01-01

    is also described. In addition, the non-invasive nature of molecular imaging and the targets of these promising new tracers are attractive for other research areas as well, although these fields are much less explored. We present an example of an interesting research field with the application of small......Small animal positron emission tomography (PET) and computer tomography (CT) is an emerging field in pre-clinical imaging. High quality, state-of-the-art instruments are required for full optimization of the translational value of the small animal studies with PET and CT. However...... in this field of small animal molecular imaging with special emphasis on the targets for tissue characterization in tumor biology such as hypoxia, proliferation and cancer specific over-expression of receptors. The added value of applying CT imaging for anatomical localization and tumor volume measurements...

  4. CT of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghelman, B.

    1987-01-01

    CT can be combined with arthrography of the knee to study the following abnormalities: meniscal tears and cysts, synovial plicae, chondromalacia patellae, and osteochondritis dissecans. The CT-arthrogram images present abnormalities in a manner that resembles the ''in situ'' surgical findings, allowing management decisions to be made with greater confidence. The CT techniques for imaging the knee after arthrography are discussed, as is the use of plain CT

  5. A new technique for noise reduction at coronary CT angiography with multi-phase data-averaging and non-rigid image registration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tatsugami, Fuminari; Higaki, Toru; Nakamura, Yuko; Yamagami, Takuji; Date, Shuji; Awai, Kazuo [Hiroshima University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Minami-ku, Hiroshima (Japan); Fujioka, Chikako; Kiguchi, Masao [Hiroshima University, Department of Radiology, Minami-ku, Hiroshima (Japan); Kihara, Yasuki [Hiroshima University, Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Minami-ku, Hiroshima (Japan)

    2015-01-15

    To investigate the feasibility of a newly developed noise reduction technique at coronary CT angiography (CTA) that uses multi-phase data-averaging and non-rigid image registration. Sixty-five patients underwent coronary CTA with prospective ECG-triggering. The range of the phase window was set at 70-80 % of the R-R interval. First, three sets of consecutive volume data at 70 %, 75 % and 80 % of the R-R interval were prepared. Second, we applied non-rigid registration to align the 70 % and 80 % images to the 75 % image. Finally, we performed weighted averaging of the three images and generated a de-noised image. The image noise and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in the proximal coronary arteries between the conventional 75 % and the de-noised images were compared. Two radiologists evaluated the image quality using a 5-point scale (1, poor; 5, excellent). On de-noised images, mean image noise was significantly lower than on conventional 75 % images (18.3 HU ± 2.6 vs. 23.0 HU ± 3.3, P < 0.01) and the CNR was significantly higher (P < 0.01). The mean image quality score for conventional 75 % and de-noised images was 3.9 and 4.4, respectively (P < 0.01). Our method reduces image noise and improves image quality at coronary CTA. (orig.)

  6. The feasibility of endoscopy-CT image registration in the head and neck without prospective endoscope tracking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W Scott Ingram

    Full Text Available Endoscopic examinations are frequently-used procedures for patients with head and neck cancer undergoing radiotherapy, but radiation treatment plans are created on computed tomography (CT scans. Image registration between endoscopic video and CT could be used to improve treatment planning and analysis of radiation-related normal tissue toxicity. The purpose of this study was to explore the feasibility of endoscopy-CT image registration without prospective physical tracking of the endoscope during the examination.A novel registration technique called Location Search was developed. This technique uses physical constraints on the endoscope's view direction to search for the virtual endoscope coordinates that maximize the similarity between the endoscopic video frame and the virtual endoscopic image. Its performance was tested on phantom and patient images and compared to an established registration technique, Frame-To-Frame Tracking.In phantoms, Location Search had average registration errors of 0.55 ± 0.60 cm for point measurements and 0.29 ± 0.15 cm for object surface measurements. Frame-To-Frame Tracking achieved similar results on some frames, but it failed on others due to the virtual endoscope becoming lost. This weakness was more pronounced in patients, where Frame-To-Frame tracking could not make it through the nasal cavity. On successful patient video frames, Location Search was able to find endoscope positions with an average distance of 0.98 ± 0.53 cm away from the ground truth positions. However, it failed on many frames due to false similarity matches caused by anatomical structural differences between the endoscopic video and the virtual endoscopic images.Endoscopy-CT image registration without prospective physical tracking of the endoscope is possible, but more development is required to achieve an accuracy suitable for clinical translation.

  7. Quantification and visualization of alveolar bone resorption from 3D dental CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagao, Jiro; Mori, Kensaku; Kitasaka, Takayuki; Suenaga, Yasuhito; Yamada, Shohzoh; Naitoh, Munetaka

    2007-01-01

    Purpose A computer aided diagnosis (CAD) system for quantifying and visualizing alveolar bone resorption caused by periodontitis was developed based on three-dimensional (3D) image processing of dental CT images. Methods The proposed system enables visualization and quantification of resorption of alveolar bone surrounding and between the roots of teeth. It has the following functions: (1) vertical measurement of the depth of resorption surrounding the tooth in 3D images, avoiding physical obstruction; (2) quantification of the amount of resorption in the furcation area; and (3) visualization of quantification results by pseudo-color maps, graphs, and motion pictures. The resorption measurement accuracy in the area surrounding teeth was evaluated by comparing with dentist's recognition on five real patient CT images, giving average absolute difference of 0.87 mm. An artificial image with mathematical truth was also used for measurement evaluation. Results The average absolute difference was 0.36 and 0.10 mm for surrounding and furcation areas, respectively. The system provides an intuitive presentation of the measurement results. Conclusion Computer aided diagnosis of 3D dental CT scans is feasible and the technique is a promising new tool for the quantitative evaluation of periodontal bone loss. (orig.)

  8. Clinical applications of 2D and 3D CT imaging of the airways - a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvolini, Luca; Bichi Secchi, Elisabetta; Costarelli, Leonardo; De Nicola, Maurizio

    2000-01-01

    Hardware and software evolution has broadened the possibilities of 2D and 3D reformatting of spiral CT and MR data set. In the study of the thorax, intrinsic benefits of volumetric CT scanning and better quality of reconstructed images offer us the possibility to apply additional rendering techniques to everyday clinical practice. Considering the large number and redundancy of possible post-processing imaging techniques that we can apply to raw CT sections data, it is necessary to precisely set a well-defined number of clinical applications of each of them, by careful evaluation of their benefits and possible pitfalls in each clinical setting. In diagnostic evaluation of pathological processes affecting the airways, a huge number of thin sections is necessary for detailed appraisal and has to be evaluated, and information must then be transferred to referring clinicians. By additional rendering it is possible to make image evaluation and data transfer easier, faster, and more effective. In the study of central airways, additional rendering can be of interest for precise evaluation of the length, morphology, and degree of stenoses. It may help in depicting exactly the locoregional extent of central tumours by better display of relations with bronchovascular interfaces and can increase CT/bronchoscopy sinergy. It may allow closer radiotherapy planning and better depiction of air collections, and, finally, it could ease panoramic evaluation of the results of dynamic or functional studies, that are made possible by increased speed of spiral scanning. When applied to the evaluation of peripheral airways, as a completion to conventional HRCT scans, High-Resolution Volumetric CT, by projection slabs applied to target areas of interest, can better depict the profusion and extension of affected bronchial segments in bronchiectasis, influence the choice of different approaches for tissue sampling by better evaluation of the relations of lung nodules with the airways, or help

  9. Clinical applications of 2D and 3D CT imaging of the airways - a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salvolini, Luca E-mail: u.salvolini@popcsi.unian.it; Bichi Secchi, Elisabetta; Costarelli, Leonardo; De Nicola, Maurizio

    2000-04-01

    Hardware and software evolution has broadened the possibilities of 2D and 3D reformatting of spiral CT and MR data set. In the study of the thorax, intrinsic benefits of volumetric CT scanning and better quality of reconstructed images offer us the possibility to apply additional rendering techniques to everyday clinical practice. Considering the large number and redundancy of possible post-processing imaging techniques that we can apply to raw CT sections data, it is necessary to precisely set a well-defined number of clinical applications of each of them, by careful evaluation of their benefits and possible pitfalls in each clinical setting. In diagnostic evaluation of pathological processes affecting the airways, a huge number of thin sections is necessary for detailed appraisal and has to be evaluated, and information must then be transferred to referring clinicians. By additional rendering it is possible to make image evaluation and data transfer easier, faster, and more effective. In the study of central airways, additional rendering can be of interest for precise evaluation of the length, morphology, and degree of stenoses. It may help in depicting exactly the locoregional extent of central tumours by better display of relations with bronchovascular interfaces and can increase CT/bronchoscopy sinergy. It may allow closer radiotherapy planning and better depiction of air collections, and, finally, it could ease panoramic evaluation of the results of dynamic or functional studies, that are made possible by increased speed of spiral scanning. When applied to the evaluation of peripheral airways, as a completion to conventional HRCT scans, High-Resolution Volumetric CT, by projection slabs applied to target areas of interest, can better depict the profusion and extension of affected bronchial segments in bronchiectasis, influence the choice of different approaches for tissue sampling by better evaluation of the relations of lung nodules with the airways, or help

  10. Radiation dose and image quality in pediatric chest CT: effects of iterative reconstruction in normal weight and overweight children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Haesung; Kim, Myung-Joon; Shin, Hyun Joo; Kim, Hyun Gi; Lee, Mi-Jung; Yoon, Choon-Sik; Choi, Jiin

    2015-01-01

    New CT reconstruction techniques may help reduce the burden of ionizing radiation. To quantify radiation dose reduction when performing pediatric chest CT using a low-dose protocol and 50% adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) compared with age/gender-matched chest CT using a conventional dose protocol and reconstructed with filtered back projection (control group) and to determine its effect on image quality in normal weight and overweight children. We retrospectively reviewed 40 pediatric chest CT (M:F = 21:19; range: 0.1-17 years) in both groups. Radiation dose was compared between the two groups using paired Student's t-test. Image quality including noise, sharpness, artifacts and diagnostic acceptability was subjectively assessed by three pediatric radiologists using a four-point scale (superior, average, suboptimal, unacceptable). Eight children in the ASIR group and seven in the control group were overweight. All radiation dose parameters were significantly lower in the ASIR group (P < 0.01) with a greater than 57% dose reduction in overweight children. Image noise was higher in the ASIR group in both normal weight and overweight children. Only one scan in the ASIR group (1/40, 2.5%) was rated as diagnostically suboptimal and there was no unacceptable study. In both normal weight and overweight children, the ASIR technique is associated with a greater than 57% mean dose reduction, without significantly impacting diagnostic image quality in pediatric chest CT examinations. However, CT scans in overweight children may have a greater noise level, even when using the ASIR technique. (orig.)

  11. Radiation dose and image quality in pediatric chest CT: effects of iterative reconstruction in normal weight and overweight children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Haesung; Kim, Myung-Joon; Shin, Hyun Joo; Kim, Hyun Gi; Lee, Mi-Jung [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiological Science, Severance Children' s Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Choon-Sik [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Jiin [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Biostatistics Collaboration Unit, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-01

    New CT reconstruction techniques may help reduce the burden of ionizing radiation. To quantify radiation dose reduction when performing pediatric chest CT using a low-dose protocol and 50% adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) compared with age/gender-matched chest CT using a conventional dose protocol and reconstructed with filtered back projection (control group) and to determine its effect on image quality in normal weight and overweight children. We retrospectively reviewed 40 pediatric chest CT (M:F = 21:19; range: 0.1-17 years) in both groups. Radiation dose was compared between the two groups using paired Student's t-test. Image quality including noise, sharpness, artifacts and diagnostic acceptability was subjectively assessed by three pediatric radiologists using a four-point scale (superior, average, suboptimal, unacceptable). Eight children in the ASIR group and seven in the control group were overweight. All radiation dose parameters were significantly lower in the ASIR group (P < 0.01) with a greater than 57% dose reduction in overweight children. Image noise was higher in the ASIR group in both normal weight and overweight children. Only one scan in the ASIR group (1/40, 2.5%) was rated as diagnostically suboptimal and there was no unacceptable study. In both normal weight and overweight children, the ASIR technique is associated with a greater than 57% mean dose reduction, without significantly impacting diagnostic image quality in pediatric chest CT examinations. However, CT scans in overweight children may have a greater noise level, even when using the ASIR technique. (orig.)

  12. CT imaging techniques for describing motions of the cervicothoracic junction and cervical spine during flexion, extension, and cervical traction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Scott; Davis, Martin; Odhner, Dewey; Udupa, Jayaram; Winkelstein, Beth

    2006-01-01

    Computerized tomographic study of human cadavers undergoing traction and flexion-extension bending. To investigate the feasibility of using computerized tomography techniques to quantify relative vertebral motions of the cervical spine and cervicothoracic junction (CTJ), and to define normative CTJ kinematics. Despite developing an understanding of the mechanical behavior of the cervical spine, little remains known about the cervicothoracic junction. The CTJ is more difficult to image than other cervical regions given the anatomic features of the surrounding bones obstructing CTJ visualization. As such, limited data have been reported describing the responses of the CTJ for motions and loading in the sagittal plane, confounding the clinical assessment of its injuries and surgical treatments used at this region. Helical CT images of the cervical spine and CTJ were acquired incrementally during each of flexion, extension, and cervical traction. Vertebral surfaces were reconstructed using the specialized image analysis software, 3DVIEWNIX. A mathematical description of relative vertebral motions was derived by computing rigid transformations. Euler angles and translations were calculated. Regional spine stiffness was defined for traction. The CTJ was found to be much stiffer (779 N/mm) than the cervical spine (317 N/mm) in tension. In flexion-extension bending, the CTJ was similar to the lower cervical spine. The CTJ demonstrated significantly less coupled motion than the cervical spine. The CTJ, as a transition region between the cervical and thoracic spines, has unique kinematic characteristics. This application of kinematic CT methods is useful for quantifying unreported normative ranges of motion for the CTJ, difficult by other conventional radiologic means.

  13. Modified CT imaging by reduction factor transformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doehring, W.; Linke, G.

    1981-01-01

    The possibilities of CT image modification which had existed so far for given matrix of attenuation values (window setting, highlighting, black-and-white or colour reversal and logarithmic distortion of the video signal) are supplemented by the method of attenuation value transformation. As a specific case a linear interval by interval attenuation value transformation is described. First of all, the intirety of the measured CT values is transformed into the corresponding CT quotients (CTQ) and then subdivided into 5 optional intervals. Each one freely selected CTQ value can be allocated to the first and to the last interval; the intermediate 3 intervals can be linearly transformed at random. The article discusses the influence of such a manipulation on CT image reproduction; this is of particular importance for the image visualisation of the results of quantitative organ analyses by means of computed tomography. The presented paper also points to the possibility of effecting further attenuation value transformations. (orig.) [de

  14. Reducing image noise in computed tomography (CT) colonography: effect of an integrated circuit CT detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu; Leng, Shuai; Michalak, Gregory J; Vrieze, Thomas J; Duan, Xinhui; Qu, Mingliang; Shiung, Maria M; McCollough, Cynthia H; Fletcher, Joel G

    2014-01-01

    To investigate whether the integrated circuit (IC) detector results in reduced noise in computed tomography (CT) colonography (CTC). Three hundred sixty-six consecutive patients underwent clinically indicated CTC using the same CT scanner system, except for a difference in CT detectors (IC or conventional). Image noise, patient size, and scanner radiation output (volume CT dose index) were quantitatively compared between patient cohorts using each detector system, with separate comparisons for the abdomen and pelvis. For the abdomen and pelvis, despite significantly larger patient sizes in the IC detector cohort (both P 0.18). Based on the observed image noise reduction, radiation dose could alternatively be reduced by approximately 20% to result in similar levels of image noise. Computed tomography colonography images acquired using the IC detector had significantly lower noise than images acquired using the conventional detector. This noise reduction can permit further radiation dose reduction in CTC.

  15. Adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction use for radiation dose reduction in pediatric lower-extremity CT: impact on diagnostic image quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Amisha; Rees, Mitchell; Kar, Erica; Bolton, Kimberly; Lee, Vincent; Panigrahy, Ashok

    2018-06-01

    For the past several years, increased levels of imaging radiation and cumulative radiation to children has been a significant concern. Although several measures have been taken to reduce radiation dose during computed tomography (CT) scan, the newer dose reduction software adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) has been an effective technique in reducing radiation dose. To our knowledge, no studies are published that assess the effect of ASIR on extremity CT scans in children. To compare radiation dose, image noise, and subjective image quality in pediatric lower extremity CT scans acquired with and without ASIR. The study group consisted of 53 patients imaged on a CT scanner equipped with ASIR software. The control group consisted of 37 patients whose CT images were acquired without ASIR. Image noise, Computed Tomography Dose Index (CTDI) and dose length product (DLP) were measured. Two pediatric radiologists rated the studies in subjective categories: image sharpness, noise, diagnostic acceptability, and artifacts. The CTDI (p value = 0.0184) and DLP (p value ASIR compared with non-ASIR studies. However, the subjective ratings for sharpness (p ASIR images (p ASIR CT studies. Adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction reduces radiation dose for lower extremity CTs in children, but at the expense of diagnostic imaging quality. Further studies are warranted to determine the specific utility of ASIR for pediatric musculoskeletal CT imaging.

  16. SU-F-J-214: Dose Reduction by Spatially Optimized Image Quality Via Fluence Modulated Proton CT (FMpCT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Angelis, L; Landry, G; Dedes, G; Parodi, K; Hansen, D; Rit, S; Belka, C

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Proton CT (pCT) is a promising imaging modality for reducing range uncertainty in image-guided proton therapy. Range uncertainties partially originate from X-ray CT number conversion to stopping power ratio (SPR) and are limiting the exploitation of the full potential of proton therapy. In this study we explore the concept of spatially dependent fluence modulated proton CT (FMpCT), for achieving optimal image quality in a clinical region of interest (ROI), while reducing significantly the imaging dose to the patient. Methods: The study was based on simulated ideal pCT using pencil beam (PB) scanning. A set of 250 MeV protons PBs was used to create 360 projections of a cylindrical water phantom and a head and neck cancer patient. The tomographic images were reconstructed using a filtered backprojection (FBP) as well as an iterative algorithm (ITR). Different fluence modulation levels were investigated and their impact on the image was quantified in terms of SPR accuracy as well as noise within and outside selected ROIs, as a function of imaging dose. The unmodulated image served as reference. Results: Both FBP reconstruction and ITR without total variation (TV) yielded image quality in the ROIs similar to the reference images, for modulation down to 0.1 of the full proton fluence. The average dose was reduced by 75% for the water phantom and by 40% for the patient. FMpCT does not improve the noise for ITR with TV and modulation 0.1. Conclusion: This is the first work proposing and investigating FMpCT for producing optimal image quality for treatment planning and image guidance, while simultaneously reducing imaging dose. Future work will address spatial resolution effects and the impact of FMpCT on the quality of proton treatment plans for a prototype pCT scanner capable of list mode data acquisition. Acknowledgement: DFG-MAP DFG - Munich-Centre for Advanced Photonics (MAP)

  17. SU-F-J-214: Dose Reduction by Spatially Optimized Image Quality Via Fluence Modulated Proton CT (FMpCT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Angelis, L; Landry, G; Dedes, G; Parodi, K [Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen (LMU Munich), Garching b. Muenchen (Germany); Hansen, D [Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Jutland (Denmark); Rit, S [University Lyon, Lyon, Auvergne-Rhone-Alpes (France); Belka, C [LMU Munich, Munich (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Proton CT (pCT) is a promising imaging modality for reducing range uncertainty in image-guided proton therapy. Range uncertainties partially originate from X-ray CT number conversion to stopping power ratio (SPR) and are limiting the exploitation of the full potential of proton therapy. In this study we explore the concept of spatially dependent fluence modulated proton CT (FMpCT), for achieving optimal image quality in a clinical region of interest (ROI), while reducing significantly the imaging dose to the patient. Methods: The study was based on simulated ideal pCT using pencil beam (PB) scanning. A set of 250 MeV protons PBs was used to create 360 projections of a cylindrical water phantom and a head and neck cancer patient. The tomographic images were reconstructed using a filtered backprojection (FBP) as well as an iterative algorithm (ITR). Different fluence modulation levels were investigated and their impact on the image was quantified in terms of SPR accuracy as well as noise within and outside selected ROIs, as a function of imaging dose. The unmodulated image served as reference. Results: Both FBP reconstruction and ITR without total variation (TV) yielded image quality in the ROIs similar to the reference images, for modulation down to 0.1 of the full proton fluence. The average dose was reduced by 75% for the water phantom and by 40% for the patient. FMpCT does not improve the noise for ITR with TV and modulation 0.1. Conclusion: This is the first work proposing and investigating FMpCT for producing optimal image quality for treatment planning and image guidance, while simultaneously reducing imaging dose. Future work will address spatial resolution effects and the impact of FMpCT on the quality of proton treatment plans for a prototype pCT scanner capable of list mode data acquisition. Acknowledgement: DFG-MAP DFG - Munich-Centre for Advanced Photonics (MAP)

  18. Attenuation correction of myocardial SPECT images with X-ray CT. Effects of registration errors between X-ray CT and SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Yasuyuki; Murase, Kenya; Mochizuki, Teruhito; Motomura, Nobutoku

    2002-01-01

    Attenuation correction with an X-ray CT image is a new method to correct attenuation on SPECT imaging, but the effect of the registration errors between CT and SPECT images is unclear. In this study, we investigated the effects of the registration errors on myocardial SPECT, analyzing data from a phantom and a human volunteer. Registerion (fusion) of the X-ray CT and SPECT images was done with standard packaged software in three dimensional fashion, by using linked transaxial, coronal and sagittal images. In the phantom study, and X-ray CT image was shifted 1 to 3 pixels on the x, y and z axes, and rotated 6 degrees clockwise. Attenuation correction maps generated from each misaligned X-ray CT image were used to reconstruct misaligned SPECT images of the phantom filled with 201 Tl. In a human volunteer, X-ray CT was acquired in different conditions (during inspiration vs. expiration). CT values were transferred to an attenuation constant by using straight lines; an attenuation constant of 0/cm in the air (CT value=-1,000 HU) and that of 0.150/cm in water (CT value=0 HU). For comparison, attenuation correction with transmission CT (TCT) data and an external γ-ray source ( 99m Tc) was also applied to reconstruct SPECT images. Simulated breast attenuation with a breast attachment, and inferior wall attenuation were properly corrected by means of the attenuation correction map generated from X-ray CT. As pixel shift increased, deviation of the SPECT images increased in misaligned images in the phantom study. In the human study, SPECT images were affected by the scan conditions of the X-ray CT. Attenuation correction of myocardial SPECT with an X-ray CT image is a simple and potentially beneficial method for clinical use, but accurate registration of the X-ray CT to SPECT image is essential for satisfactory attenuation correction. (author)

  19. PET/CT Atlas on Quality Control and Image Artefacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    Combined positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) imaging has become a routine procedure in diagnostic radiology and nuclear medicine. The clinical review of both PET and PET/CT images requires a thorough understanding of the basics of image formation as well as an appreciation of variations of inter-patient and intra-patient image appearance. Such variations may be caused by variations in tracer accumulation and metabolism, and, perhaps more importantly, by image artefacts related to methodological pitfalls of the two modalities. This atlas on quality control (QC) and PET/CT artefacts provides guidance on typical image distortions in clinical PET/CT usage scenarios. A number of cases are presented to provide nuclear medicine and radiology professionals with an assortment of examples of possible image distortions and errors in order to support the correct interpretation of images. About 70 typical PET and PET/CT cases, comprised of image sets and cases, have been collected in this book, and all have been catalogued and have explanations as to the causes of and solutions to each individual image problem. This atlas is intended to be used as a guide on how to take proper QC measures, on performing situation and problem analysis, and on problem prevention. This book will be especially useful to medical physicists, physicians, technologists and service engineers in the clinical field

  20. Dual-phase helical CT using bolus triggering technique: optimization of transition time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Young Ho; Kim, Tae Kyoung; Park, Byung Kwan; Koh, Young Hwan; Han, Joon Koo; Choi, Byung Ihn

    1999-01-01

    To optimize the transition time between the triggering point in monitoring scanning and the initiation of diagnostic hepatic arterial phase (HAP) scanning in hepatic spiral CT, using a bolus triggering technique. One hundred consecutive patients with focal hepatic lesion were included in this study. Patients were randomized into two groups. Transition times of 7 and 11 seconds were used in group 1 and 2, respectively. In all patients, bolus triggered HAP spiral CT was obtained using a semi-automatic bolus tracking program after the injection of 120mL of non-ionic contrast media at a rate of 3mL/sec. When aortic enhancement reached 90 HU, diagnostic HAP scanning began after a given transition time. From images of group 1 and group 2, the degree of parenchymal enhancement of the liver and tumor-to-liver attenuation difference were measured. Also, for qualitative analysis, conspicuity of the hepatic artery and hypervascular tumor was scored and analyzed. Hepatic parenchymal enhancement on HAP was 12.07 + /-6.44 HU in group 1 and 16.03 + /-5.80 HU in group 2 (p .05). In the evaluation of conspicuity of hepatic artery, there was no statistically significant difference between the two groups (p > .05). The conspicuity of hypervascular tumors in group 2 was higher than in group 1 (p < .05). HAP spiral CT using a bolus triggering technique with a transition time of 11 seconds provides better HAP images than when the transition time is 7 seconds

  1. CT versus MR Techniques in the Detection of Cervical Artery Dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanning, Uta; Sporns, Peter B; Schmiedel, Meilin; Ringelstein, Erich B; Heindel, Walter; Wiendl, Heinz; Niederstadt, Thomas; Dittrich, Ralf

    2017-11-01

    Spontaneous cervical artery dissection (sCAD) is an important etiology of juvenile stroke. The gold standard for the diagnosis of sCAD is convential angiography. However, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)/MR angiography (MRA) and computed tomography (CT)/CT angiography (CTA) are frequently used alternatives. New developments such as multislice CT/CTA have enabled routine acquisition of thinner sections with rapid imaging times. The goal of this study was to compare the capability of recent developed 128-slice CT/CTA to MRI/MRA to detect radiologic features of sCAD. Retrospective review of patients with suspected sCAD (n = 188) in a database of our Stroke center (2008-2014), who underwent CT/CTA and MRI/MRA on initial clinical work-up. A control group of 26 patients was added. All Images were evaluated concerning specific and sensitive radiological features for dissection by two experienced neuroradiologists. Imaging features were compared between the two modalities. Forty patients with 43 dissected arteries received both modalities (29 internal carotid arteries [ICAs] and 14 vertebral arteries [VAs]). All CADs were identified in CT/CTA and MRI/MRA. The features intimal flap, stenosis, and lumen irregularity appeared in both modalities. One high-grade stenosis was identified by CT/CTA that was expected occluded on MRI/MRA. Two MRI/MRA-confirmed pseudoaneurysms were missed by CT/CTA. None of the controls evidenced specific imaging signs for dissection. CT/CTA is a reliable and better available alternative to MRI/MRA for diagnosis of sCAD. CT/CTA should be used to complement MRI/MRA in cases where MRI/MRA suggests occlusion. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Neuroimaging.

  2. MR-urography and CT-urography: principles, examination techniques, applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nolte-Ernsting, C.; Adam, G.; Staatz, G.; Wildberger, J.

    2003-01-01

    MR-urography (MRU) and CT-urography (CTU) provide refined imaging of the upper urinary tract not achievable with conventional intravenous urography (IVU). The traditional MR-urographic technique utilizes unenhanced, heavily T 2 -weighted turbo spin-echo sequences for obtaining static fluid images of the urinary tract independent of the excretory renal function. T 2 -weighted MR-urograms have proved to be excellent in visualizing the dilated urinary tract, even in non-excreting kidneys. In contrast, T 1 -weighted MRU reflects the excretory renal function and displays the urine flow through the upper tract after renal excretion of an intravenously administered gadolinium chelate. The gadolinium-enhanced urine is visualized with fast T 1 -weighted 3D-gradient-echo sequences. The combination of gadolinium and low-dose furosemide (5-10 mg) is the key for achieving a uniform distribution of gadolinium in the collecting system and for avoiding susceptibility artifacts (T 2 *-effects) in the urine. T 1 -weighted excretory MRU provides impressive urograms of both non-dilated and obstructed collecting systems in patients with normal or moderately impaired renal function. Multislice-CT-urography (MS-CTU) is also an excretory urography like T 1 -weighted MRU. Furthermore, MS-CTU can be combined with low-dose furosemide for accelerated passage of excreted contrast material obviating the need for abdominal compression. CT-urography is limited by its radiation burden and the nephrotoxicity of radiographic contrast media. Combining MRU or MS-CTU with conventional MRI or CT offers several applications, e.g., diagnosis of intrinsic and extrinsic tumors. Meanwhile, MRU has replaced IVU in pediatric uroradiology and is also recommended for the assessment of renal transplants. MS-CTU may provide valuable information in chronic urolithiasis, especially if associated with a distorted urinary tract anatomy. Both MRU and MS-CTU will play an important role in modern uroradiology. (orig

  3. Impact of the adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction technique on image quality in ultra-low-dose CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Yan; He, Wen; Chen, Hui; Hu, Zhihai; Li, Juan; Zhang, Tingting

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the relationship between different noise indices (NIs) and radiation dose and to compare the effect of different reconstruction algorithm applications for ultra-low-dose chest computed tomography (CT) on image quality improvement and the accuracy of volumetric measurement of ground-glass opacity (GGO) nodules using a phantom study. Materials and methods: A 11 cm thick transverse phantom section with a chest wall, mediastinum, and 14 artificial GGO nodules with known volumes (919.93 ± 64.05 mm 3 ) was constructed. The phantom was scanned on a Discovery CT 750HD scanner with five different NIs (NIs = 20, 30, 40, 50, and 60). All data were reconstructed with a 0.625 mm section thickness using the filtered back-projection (FBP), 50% adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR), and Veo model-base iterative reconstruction algorithms. Image noise was measured in six regions of interest (ROIs). Nodule volumes were measured using a commercial volumetric software package. The image quality and the volume measurement errors were analysed. Results: Image noise increased dramatically from 30.7 HU at NI 20 to 122.4 HU at NI 60, with FBP reconstruction. Conversely, Veo reconstruction effectively controlled the noise increase, with an increase from 9.97 HU at NI 20 to only 15.1 HU at NI 60. Image noise at NI 60 with Veo was even lower (50.8%) than that at NI 20 with FBP. The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of Veo at NI 40 was similar to that of FBP at NI 20. All artificial GGO nodules were successfully identified and measured with an average relative volume measurement error with Veo at NI 60 of 4.24%, comparable to a value of 10.41% with FBP at NI 20. At NI 60, the radiation dose was only one-tenth that at NI 20. Conclusion: The Veo reconstruction algorithms very effectively reduced image noise compared with the conventional FBP reconstructions. Using ultra-low-dose CT scanning and Veo reconstruction, GGOs can be detected and quantified with an acceptable

  4. Development of a 3-dimensional CT using an image intensifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyofuku, Fukai

    1992-01-01

    A prototype of three-dimensional CT (Fluoroscopic CT) has been developed using an image intensifier as a two-dimensional X-ray detector. A patient on a rotating table is projected onto an image intensifier by a cone beam of X-ray from the X-ray tube. A total of 390 projection images covering 180 degrees are acquired in a single scan (13 sec) and stored on a digital frame recorder (512 x 256 x 8-bit x 480). The transverse axial images are reconstructed by using the usual CT reconstruction algorithm, while longitudinal section images such as sagittal, coronal, oblique, and panoramic images are obtained by directly back-projecting the filtered projection image onto the sections. The radiation exposure was measured with an ionization chamber, and the exposure of the present fluoroscopic CT is about 10 to 20 times less than that of conventional X-ray CT. A similar monochromatic X-ray CT system has also been developed using synchrotron radiation. Large area parallel X-rays are obtained from a wiggler beam using a silicon crystal with [311] asymmetric reflection. By taking two images above and below iodine K-absorption edge (33.17 keV), iodine image is obtained. (author)

  5. Comparison of effective dose for imaging of mandible between multi-detector CT and cone-beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Dae Kyo; Lee, Sang Chul; Huh, Kyung Hoe; Yi, Won Jin; Lee, Sam Sun; Choi, Soon Chul

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effective dose for imaging of mandible between multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). An MDCT with low dose technique was also compared with them. Thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) chips were placed at 25 organ sites of an anthropomorphic phantom. The mandible of the phantom was exposed using 2 different types of MDCT units (Somatom Sensation 10 for standard-dose MDCT, Somatom Emotion 6 for low-dose MDCT) and 3 different CBCT units (AZ3000CT, Implagraphy, and Kavo 3D eXaM). The radiation absorbed dose was measured and the effective dose was calculated according to the ICRP 2007 report. The effective dose was the highest for Somatom Sensation 10 (425.84 μSv), followed by AZ3000CT (332.4 μSv), Somatom Emotion 6 (199.38 μSv), and 3D eXaM (111.6 μSv); it was the lowest for Implagraphy (83.09 μSv). The CBCT showed significant variation in dose level with different device. The effective doses of MDCTs were not significantly different from those of CBCTs for imaging of mandible. The effective dose of MDCT could be markedly decreased by using the low-dose technique.

  6. Comparison of effective dose for imaging of mandible between multi-detector CT and cone-beam CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Dae Kyo; Lee, Sang Chul; Huh, Kyung Hoe; Yi, Won Jin; Lee, Sam Sun; Choi, Soon Chul [School of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    The aim of this study was to compare the effective dose for imaging of mandible between multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). An MDCT with low dose technique was also compared with them. Thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) chips were placed at 25 organ sites of an anthropomorphic phantom. The mandible of the phantom was exposed using 2 different types of MDCT units (Somatom Sensation 10 for standard-dose MDCT, Somatom Emotion 6 for low-dose MDCT) and 3 different CBCT units (AZ3000CT, Implagraphy, and Kavo 3D eXaM). The radiation absorbed dose was measured and the effective dose was calculated according to the ICRP 2007 report. The effective dose was the highest for Somatom Sensation 10 (425.84 {mu}Sv), followed by AZ3000CT (332.4 {mu}Sv), Somatom Emotion 6 (199.38 {mu}Sv), and 3D eXaM (111.6 {mu}Sv); it was the lowest for Implagraphy (83.09 {mu}Sv). The CBCT showed significant variation in dose level with different device. The effective doses of MDCTs were not significantly different from those of CBCTs for imaging of mandible. The effective dose of MDCT could be markedly decreased by using the low-dose technique.

  7. Pediatric renal leukemia: spectrum of CT imaging findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilmes, Melissa A.; Dillman, Jonathan R.; Mody, Rajen J.; Strouse, Peter J.

    2008-01-01

    The kidneys are a site of extramedullary leukemic disease that can be readily detected by CT. To demonstrate the spectrum of CT findings in children with renal leukemic involvement. Twelve children were identified retrospectively as having renal leukemic involvement by contrast-enhanced CT of the abdomen. Contrast-enhanced CT images through the kidneys of each patient were reviewed by two pediatric radiologists. Pertinent imaging findings and renal lengths were documented. The electronic medical record was accessed to obtain relevant clinical and pathologic information. Five patients with renal leukemic involvement presented with multiple bilateral low-attenuation masses, while three patients demonstrated large areas of wedge-shaped and geographic low attenuation. Four other patients presented with unique imaging findings, including a solitary unilateral low-attenuation mass, solitary bilateral low-attenuation masses, multiple bilateral low-attenuation masses including unilateral large conglomerate masses, and bilateral areas of ill-defined parenchymal low attenuation. Two patients showed unilateral nephromegaly, while eight other patients showed bilateral nephromegaly. Two patients had normal size kidneys. Two patients had elevated serum creatinine concentrations at the time of imaging. Renal leukemic involvement in children can present with a variety of CT imaging findings. Focal renal abnormalities as well as nephromegaly are frequently observed. Most commonly, renal leukemic involvement does not appear to impair renal function. (orig.)

  8. Pediatric renal leukemia: spectrum of CT imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilmes, Melissa A. [University of Michigan Health System, C.S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Section of Pediatric Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Vanderbilt University Children' s Hospital, Section of Pediatric Radiology, Nashville, TN (United States); Dillman, Jonathan R. [University of Michigan Health System, C.S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Section of Pediatric Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); University of Michigan Health System, Department of Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Mody, Rajen J. [University of Michigan Health System, C.S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Division of Pediatric Hematology-Oncology and Bone Marrow Transplantation, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Strouse, Peter J. [University of Michigan Health System, C.S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Section of Pediatric Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2008-04-15

    The kidneys are a site of extramedullary leukemic disease that can be readily detected by CT. To demonstrate the spectrum of CT findings in children with renal leukemic involvement. Twelve children were identified retrospectively as having renal leukemic involvement by contrast-enhanced CT of the abdomen. Contrast-enhanced CT images through the kidneys of each patient were reviewed by two pediatric radiologists. Pertinent imaging findings and renal lengths were documented. The electronic medical record was accessed to obtain relevant clinical and pathologic information. Five patients with renal leukemic involvement presented with multiple bilateral low-attenuation masses, while three patients demonstrated large areas of wedge-shaped and geographic low attenuation. Four other patients presented with unique imaging findings, including a solitary unilateral low-attenuation mass, solitary bilateral low-attenuation masses, multiple bilateral low-attenuation masses including unilateral large conglomerate masses, and bilateral areas of ill-defined parenchymal low attenuation. Two patients showed unilateral nephromegaly, while eight other patients showed bilateral nephromegaly. Two patients had normal size kidneys. Two patients had elevated serum creatinine concentrations at the time of imaging. Renal leukemic involvement in children can present with a variety of CT imaging findings. Focal renal abnormalities as well as nephromegaly are frequently observed. Most commonly, renal leukemic involvement does not appear to impair renal function. (orig.)

  9. Creation and evaluation of complementary composite three-dimensional image in various brain diseases. An application of three-dimensional brain SPECT image and three-dimensional CT image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seiki, Yoshikatsu; Shibata, Iekado; Mito, Toshiaki; Sugo, Nobuo

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop 3D composite images for use in functional and anatomical evaluation of various cerebral pathologies. Imaging studies were performed in normal volunteers, patients with hydrocephalus and patients with brain tumor (meningioma and metastatic tumor) using a three-detector SPECT system (Prism 3000) and helical CT scanner (Xvigor). 123 I-IMP was used in normal volunteers and patients with hydrocephalus, and 201 TLCL in patients with brain tumor. An Application Visualization System-Medical Viewer (AVS-MV) was used on a workstation (Titan 2) to generate 3D images. A new program was developed by synthesizing surface rendering and volume rendering techniques. The clinical effects of shunt operations were successfully evaluated in patients with hydrocephalus by means of translucent 3D images of the deep brain. Changes in the hypoperfusion area around the cerebral ventricle were compared with morphological changes in the cerebral ventricle on CT. In addition to the information concerning the characteristics of brain tumors and surrounding edemas, hemodynamic changes and changeable hypoperfusion areas around the tumors were visualized on 3D composite CT and SPECT images. A new method of generating 3D composite images of CT and SPECT was developed by combining graphic data from different systems on the same workstation. Complementary 3D composite images facilitated quantitative analysis of brain volume and functional analysis in various brain diseases. (author)

  10. Primary staging of laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancer: CT, MR imaging and dual-energy CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuno, Hirofumi; Onaya, Hiroaki; Fujii, Satoshi; Ojiri, Hiroya; Otani, Katharina; Satake, Mitsuo

    2014-01-01

    Laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancer, in particular T4a disease associated with cartilage invasion and extralaryngeal spread, needs to be evaluated accurately because treatment can impact heavily on a patient's quality of life. Reliable imaging tools are therefore indispensible. CT offers high spatial and temporal resolution and remains the preferred imaging modality. Although cartilage invasion can be diagnosed with acceptable accuracy by applying defined criteria for combinations of erosion, lysis and transmural extralaryngeal spread, iodine-enhanced tumors and non-ossified cartilage are sometimes difficult to distinguish. MR offers high contrast resolution for images without motion artifacts, although inflammatory changes in cartilage sometimes resemble cartilage invasion. With dual-energy CT, combined iodine overlay images and weighted average images can be used for evaluation of cartilage invasion, since iodine enhancement is evident in tumor tissue but not in cartilage. Extralaryngeal spread can be evaluated from CT, MR or dual-energy CT images and the routes of tumor spread into the extralaryngeal soft tissue must be considered; (1) via the thyrohyoid membrane along the superior laryngeal neurovascular bundle, (2) via the inferior pharyngeal constrictor muscle, and (3) via the cricothyroid membrane. Radiologists need to understand the advantages and limitations of each imaging modality for staging of laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancer

  11. State of the art imaging of multiple myeloma: Comparative review of FDG PET/CT imaging in various clinical settings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mesguich, Charles, E-mail: charles.mesguich@chu-bordeaux.fr [Department of Radiology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY (United States); Fardanesh, Reza; Tanenbaum, Lawrence [Department of Radiology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY (United States); Chari, Ajai; Jagannath, Sundar [Department of Medicine Division of Hematology and Oncology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY (United States); Kostakoglu, Lale, E-mail: lale.kostakoglu@mssm.edu [Department of Radiology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY (United States)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Metabolic changes on FDG PET/CT offer an earlier response evaluation than MRI. • PET/CT is less sensitive than MRI for diffuse bone marrow involvement. • PET/CT is a highly sensitive modality to determine extra-medullary disease. • Red marrow expansion: false positive findings on both FDG PET/CT and MRI. • Compression fractures are best characterized with MRI. - Abstract: 18-Flurodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography with computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) have higher sensitivity and specificity than whole-body X-ray (WBXR) survey in evaluating disease extent in patients with multiple myeloma (MM). Both modalities are now recommended by the Durie–Salmon Plus classification although the emphasis is more on MRI than PET/CT. The presence of extra-medullary disease (EMD) as evaluated by PET/CT imaging, initial SUV{sub max} and number of focal lesions (FL) are deemed to be strong prognostic parameters at staging. MRI remains the most sensitive technique for the detection of diffuse bone marrow involvement in both the pre and post-therapy setting. Compression fractures are best characterized with MRI signal changes, for determining vertebroplasty candidates. While PET/CT allows for earlier and more specific evaluation of therapeutic efficacy compared to MRI, when signal abnormalities persist years after treatment. PET/CT interpretation, however, can be challenging in the vertebral column and pelvis as well as in cases with post-therapy changes. Hence, a reading approach combining the high sensitivity of MRI and superior specificity of FDG PET/CT would be preferred to increase the diagnostic accuracy. In summary, the established management methods in MM, mainly relying on biological tumor parameters should be complemented with functional imaging data, both at staging and restaging for optimal management of MM.

  12. Development of comprehensive image processing technique for differential diagnosis of liver disease by using multi-modality images. Pixel-based cross-correlation method using a profile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Akira; Okura, Yasuhiko; Akiyama, Mitoshi; Ishida, Takayuki; Kawashita, Ikuo; Ito, Katsuyoshi; Matsunaga, Naofumi; Sanada, Taizo

    2009-01-01

    Imaging techniques such as high magnetic field imaging and multidetector-row CT have been markedly improved recently. The final image-reading systems easily produce more than a thousand diagnostic images per patient. Therefore, we developed a comprehensive cross-correlation processing technique using multi-modality images, in order to decrease the considerable time and effort involved in the interpretation of a radiogram (multi-formatted display and/or stack display method, etc). In this scheme, the criteria of an attending radiologist for the differential diagnosis of liver cyst, hemangioma of liver, hepatocellular carcinoma, and metastatic liver cancer on magnetic resonance images with various sequences and CT images with and without contrast enhancement employ a cross-correlation coefficient. Using a one-dimensional cross-correlation method, comprehensive image processing could be also adapted for various artifacts (some depending on modality imaging, and some on patients), which may be encountered at the clinical scene. This comprehensive image-processing technique could assist radiologists in the differential diagnosis of liver diseases. (author)

  13. Imaging techniques and investigation protocols in pediatric emergency imaging; Aufnahmetechnik und Untersuchungsprotokolle beim paediatrischen Notfall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scharitzer, M.; Hoermann, M.; Puig, S.; Prokop, M. [Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiodiagnostik, Wien (Austria)

    2002-03-01

    Paediatric emergencies demand a quick and efficient radiological investigation with special attention to specific adjustments related to patient age and radiation protection. Imaging modalities are improving rapidly and enable to diagnose childhood diseases and injuries more quickly, accurately and safely. This article provides an overview of imaging techniques adjusted to the age of the child and an overview of imaging strategies of common paediatric emergencies. Optimising the imaging parameters (digital radiography, different screen-film systems, exposure specifications) allows for substantial reduction of radiation dose. Spiral- and multislice-CT reduce scan time and enable a considerable reduction of radiation exposure if scanning parameters (pitch setting, tube current) are properly adjusted. MRI is still mainly used for neurological or spinal emergencies despite the advent of fast imaging sequences. The radiologist's task is to select an appropriate imaging strategy according to expected differential diagnosis and to adjust the imaging techniques to the individual patient. (orig.) [German] Das akut erkrankte Kind erfordert eine rasche radiologische Abklaerung mit besonderer Beruecksichtung der geaenderten Untersuchungsparameter bei gleichzeitig hohem Anspruch an den Strahlenschutz. Hochaufloesende Schallkoepfe, Multislice-CT und schnelle MR-Sequenzen erlauben eine bessere Anpassung der Untersuchungsmethoden an die Beduerfnisse in der Kinderradiologie. Ziel dieses Artikels ist eine Uebersicht ueber die verschiedenen radiologischen Untersuchungstechniken sowie deren Anpassung an kindliche Anforderungen und die Angabe von Untersuchungsalgorithmen der haeufigsten paediatrischen Notfaelle. In der Projektionsradiographie erlaubt die Optimierung der Aufnahmetechnik (digitale Radiographie, unterschiedliche Klassen von Film-Folien-Systemen, Belichtungsparameter) eine deutliche Reduktion der Stra