WorldWideScience

Sample records for ct images showed

  1. 18F-FDG PET/CT/MRI Fusion Images Showing Cranial and Peripheral Nerve Involvement in Neurolymphomatosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevisan, Ana Carolina; Ribeiro, Fernanda Borges; Itikawa, Emerson Nobuyuki; Alexandre, Leonardo Santos; Pitella, Felipe Arriva; Santos, Antonio Carlos; Simões, Belinda Pinto; Wichert-Ana, Lauro

    2017-01-01

    We report a 56-year-old female patient with non-Hodgkin's diffuse large B cell lymphoma (NHL) who, on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with a T1 weighted and gadolinium-enhanced imaging, was found to have thickening and infiltration in 75% of peripheral nerves of the patient and enlargements of cranial nerves, possibly related to lymphomatous infiltration. Subsequent positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) using 18F-labeled 2-deoxy-2-fluoro-d-glucose (18F-FDG) showed widespread active involvement of the cervical plexus, bilateral peripheral nerves, right femoral nerve, the parasellar region of the skull, and marked hypermetabolism in the left trigeminal ganglia. This case re-emphasizes that while CT and MRI provide anatomical details, 18F-FDG PET/CT images better delineate the metabolic activity of neurolymphomatosis (NL) in the peripheral and central nervous system.

  2. CT images of gossypiboma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Hae Jeong; Lim, Jong Nam; Choi, Young Chil; Park, Jeong Hee [College of Medicine, Kon-Kuk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-04-15

    Surgical sponges retained after laparotomy can cause serious problem if they were not be identified in early state. In these circumstances abdominal CT yields the accurate diagnostic images. The purpose of this report is to present highly indicative findings permitting correct preoperative diagnosis of the gossypiboma. We experienced three cases in which CT showed the images sufficiently characteristic to suggest the correct preoperative diagnosis. We evaluated retrospectively the radiological images of gossypiboma confirmed by operation. Three patients were admitted due to palpable masses. Two female patients had medical histories of cesarean sections and a male patient had been operated due to malignant fibrous histiocytoma, previously. Abdominal CT scan of one case revealed huge ovoid hypodense mass with enhanced peripheral rim. Calcific spots and whirl-like stripes were noted within the lesion. Towel was found in pathologic specimen. CT images of two patients showed well-encapsulated, mixed fluid and soft tissue density mass with several gas bubbles. Surgical sponges were found within abscesses. The authors conclude that these characteristic CT findings and careful histories of surgery are very useful for correct pre-operative diagnosis and permit the guideline for the optimal plan of the surgical treatment.

  3. CT image of thymoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morioka, Nobuo; Shudo, Yuji; Jahana, Masanobu; Matsuki, Tsutomu; Kotani, Kazuhiko (Tottori Univ., Yonago (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1983-10-01

    Computor tomographic images of 11 patients who had had thymectomy for myasthenia gravis or thymoma were studied retrospectively. Of those 11 patients, malignant thymoma and benign condition including normal thymus were 6 and 5 respectively. On CT, calcification and lobulation with irregular margin seem to be reliable findings of malignancy. Defect or abscence of fatty plane and non-homogenous density are ancillary.

  4. Dynamic CT myocardial perfusion imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, Damiano; Eid, Marwen; Schoepf, U Joseph; Jin, Kwang Nam; Varga-Szemes, Akos; Tesche, Christian; Mangold, Stefanie; Spandorfer, Adam; Laghi, Andrea; De Cecco, Carlo N

    2016-10-01

    Non-invasive cardiac imaging has rapidly evolved during the last decade due to advancements in CT based technologies. Coronary CT angiography has been shown to reliably assess coronary anatomy and detect high risk coronary artery disease. However, this technique is limited to anatomical assessment, thus non-invasive techniques for functional assessment of the heart are necessary. CT myocardial perfusion is a new CT based technique that provides functional assessment of the myocardium and allows for a comprehensive assessment of coronary artery disease with a single modality when combined with CTA. This review aims to discuss dynamic CT myocardial perfusion as a new technique in the assessment of CAD.

  5. The stylohyoid chain: CT imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uysal Ramadan, Selma, E-mail: uysalselma@yahoo.co [Department of Radiology, Ankara Training and Research Hospital, Ankara 06590 (Turkey); Goekharman, Dilek, E-mail: gokharman@ttnet.net.t [Department of Radiology, Ankara Training and Research Hospital, Ankara 06590 (Turkey); Kosar, Pinar, E-mail: pkosar@hotmail.co [Department of Radiology, Ankara Training and Research Hospital, Ankara 06590 (Turkey); Kacar, Mahmut, E-mail: mkacar1961@gamil.co [Department of Radiology, Ankara Training and Research Hospital, Ankara 06590 (Turkey); Kosar, Ugur, E-mail: ugurkosar@hotmail.co [Department of Radiology, Ankara Training and Research Hospital, Ankara 06590 (Turkey)

    2010-09-15

    We aimed in this report to discuss the embryology, anatomy, theories of ossification and symptoms, clinical presentation, and diagnosis of the stylohyoid chain (SHC) variations, together with the role of radiographs, computed tomography (CT) and three-dimensional (3D)-CT in showing these variations. Because CT/3D-CT additionally facilitates visualization of the entire SHC with different axes, it is the most valuable method for establishing the relationship between the SHC and the surrounding tissue. SHC variation can be discovered during CT performed for indications other than ossified SHC. It is important to diagnose whether or not the SHC is ossified, since one of the treatment procedures in ossified SHC is total excision. If the clinician and radiologist are aware of these variations observed in the SHC, patients with vague symptoms may be spared unnecessary investigations and may be properly diagnosed earlier.

  6. RONI Based Secured and Authenticated Indexing of Lung CT Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasmine Selvakumari Jeya, I; Suganthi, J

    2015-01-01

    Medical images need to be transmitted with the patient's information without altering the image data. The present paper discusses secured indexing of lung CT image (SILI) which is a secured way of indexing the lung CT images with the patient information. Authentication is provided using the sender's logo information and the secret key is used for embedding the watermark into the host image. Watermark is embedded into the region of Noninterest (RONI) of the lung CT image. RONI is identified by segmenting the lung tissue from the CT scan image. The experimental results show that the proposed approach is robust against unauthorized access, noise, blurring, and intensity based attacks.

  7. The maxillomandibular ameloblastoma: CT and MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Na, Dong Gyu; Han, Moon Hee; Kim, Myung Jin; Chang, Kee Hyun [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-02-15

    We retrospectively performed this study to evaluate the characteristic findings of maxillomandibular ameloblastomas on CT and MR imaging. We reviewed histologically proved 12 cases of ameloblastomas, of which 7 cases were postoperative recurrent tumors, one of twelve cases was presumed ameloblastic carcinoma. Eleven cases were examined with CT and 3 cases with MR. The types were solid in 4, unicystic in 4, and mixed in the rest 4. CT and MRI of 11 ameloblastomas showed concentric expansile mass (n = 11), cortical bone thinning and focal bone destruction by the tumors (n = 9), well-margined, expansile destruction of surrounding sturctures (n = 9), focal bulging of the tumors (n = 6) and focal poorly-marginated invasion of tissue planes (n = 4). Ameloblastic carcinoma showed ill-defined irregular margin, aggressive invasion of surrounding structures and hematogeneous lung metastasis. Unerupted teeth or mural modules were found in unicystic ameloblastomas. All three tumors examined by MRI showed isointensity to muscle on T1 weighted images and slight hyperintensity on T2 weighted images. The wall, septa and solid portions of the tumors were strongly enhanced on MR imaging. There was no difference in CT ro MR finding between primary and recurrent tumors. Ameloblastomas showed solid, cystic or mixed pattern, and commonly well marginated expansile contour with local aggressiveness. Presence of mural nodules on CT in unicystic ameloblastoma with unerupted tooth was helpful in distinguishing ameloblastoma from dentigerous cyst.

  8. Autopsied case of tuberculous meningitis showing interesting CT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abiko, Takashi; Higuchi, Hiroshi; Imada, Ryuichi; Nagai, Kenichi (Iwate Prefectural Central Hospital (Japan))

    1983-11-01

    A 61-year-old female patient died of a neurological disorder of unknown origin one month after the first visit and was found to have had tuberculous meningitis at autopsy. CT revealed a low density area showing an enlargement of the cerebral ventricle but did not reveal contrast enhancement in the basal cistern peculiar to tuberculous meningitis.

  9. CT Imaging: Basics and New Trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyrin, Françoise; Engelke, Klaus

    This chapter presents the principle of X-ray CT and its evolution during the last 40 years. The first section describes the physical basis of X-ray CT, tomographic image reconstruction algorithms, and the source of artifacts in X-ray CT images. The second section is devoted to the evolution of CT technology from the first translation-rotation systems to multi-slice spiral CTs currently used today. The next section addresses specific developments of CT technology and applications, like perfusion CT, quantitative CT, and spectral CT. The fourth section introduces the problem of radiation exposure delivered to the patient and its evaluation. Finally the last section addresses the development in micro- and even nano-CT which is a rapidly evolving area in preclinical imaging and biology.

  10. CT imaging of enhanced oil recovery experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gall, B.L.

    1992-12-01

    X-ray computerized tomography (Cr) has been used to study fluid distributions during chemical enhanced oil recovery experiments. Four CT-monitored corefloods were conducted, and oil saturation distributions were calculated at various stages of the experiments. Results suggested that this technique could add significant information toward interpretation and evaluation of surfactant/polymer EOR recovery methods. CT-monitored tracer tests provided information about flow properties in the core samples. Nonuniform fluid advance could be observed, even in core that appeared uniform by visual inspection. Porosity distribution maps based on CT density calculations also showed the presence of different porosity layers that affected fluid movement through the cores. Several types of CT-monitored corefloods were conducted. Comparisons were made for CT-monitored corefloods using chemical systems that were highly successful in reducing residual oil saturations in laboratory experiments and less successful systems. Changes were made in surfactant formulation and in concentration of the mobility control polymer. Use of a poor mobility control agent failed to move oil that was not initially displaced by the injected surfactant solution; even when a good'' surfactant system was used. Use of a less favorable surfactant system with adequate mobility control could produce as much oil as the use of a good surfactant system with inadequate mobility control. The role of mobility control, therefore, becomes a critical parameter for successful application of chemical EOR. Continuation of efforts to use CT imaging in connection with chemical EOR evaluations is recommended.

  11. CT imaging of enhanced oil recovery experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gall, B.L.

    1992-12-01

    X-ray computerized tomography (Cr) has been used to study fluid distributions during chemical enhanced oil recovery experiments. Four CT-monitored corefloods were conducted, and oil saturation distributions were calculated at various stages of the experiments. Results suggested that this technique could add significant information toward interpretation and evaluation of surfactant/polymer EOR recovery methods. CT-monitored tracer tests provided information about flow properties in the core samples. Nonuniform fluid advance could be observed, even in core that appeared uniform by visual inspection. Porosity distribution maps based on CT density calculations also showed the presence of different porosity layers that affected fluid movement through the cores. Several types of CT-monitored corefloods were conducted. Comparisons were made for CT-monitored corefloods using chemical systems that were highly successful in reducing residual oil saturations in laboratory experiments and less successful systems. Changes were made in surfactant formulation and in concentration of the mobility control polymer. Use of a poor mobility control agent failed to move oil that was not initially displaced by the injected surfactant solution; even when a ``good`` surfactant system was used. Use of a less favorable surfactant system with adequate mobility control could produce as much oil as the use of a good surfactant system with inadequate mobility control. The role of mobility control, therefore, becomes a critical parameter for successful application of chemical EOR. Continuation of efforts to use CT imaging in connection with chemical EOR evaluations is recommended.

  12. Hepatic CT image query using Gabor features

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chenguang Zhao(赵晨光); Hongyan Cheng(程红岩); Tiange Zhuang(庄天戈)

    2004-01-01

    A retrieval scheme for liver computerize tomography (CT) images based on Gabor texture is presented.For each hepatic CT image, we manually delineate abnormal regions within liver area. Then, a continuous Gabor transform is utilized to analyze the texture of the pathology bearing region and extract the corresponding feature vectors. For a given sample image, we compare its feature vector with those of other images. Similar images with the highest rank are retrieved. In experiments, 45 liver CT images are collected, and the effectiveness of Gabor texture for content based retrieval is verified.

  13. Mass preserving image registration for lung CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorbunova, Vladlena; Sporring, Jon; Lo, Pechin;

    2012-01-01

    on four groups of data: 44 pairs of longitudinal inspiratory chest CT scans with small difference in lung volume; 44 pairs of longitudinal inspiratory chest CT scans with large difference in lung volume; 16 pairs of expiratory and inspiratory CT scans; and 5 pairs of images extracted at end exhale and end...... inhale phases of 4D-CT images. Registration errors, measured as the average distance between vessel tree centerlines in the matched images, are significantly lower for the proposed mass preserving image registration method in the second, third and fourth group, while there is no statistically significant......This paper presents a mass preserving image registration algorithm for lung CT images. To account for the local change in lung tissue intensity during the breathing cycle, a tissue appearance model based on the principle of preservation of total lung mass is proposed. This model is incorporated...

  14. Image reconstruction for brain CT slices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴建明; 施鹏飞

    2004-01-01

    Different modalities in biomedical images, like CT, MRI and PET scanners, provide detailed cross-sectional views of human anatomy. This paper introduces three-dimensional brain reconstruction based on CT slices. It contains filtering, fuzzy segmentation, matching method of contours, cell array structure and image animation. Experimental results have shown its validity. The innovation is matching method of contours and fuzzy segmentation algorithm of CT slices.

  15. RONI Based Secured and Authenticated Indexing of Lung CT Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Jasmine Selvakumari Jeya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Medical images need to be transmitted with the patient’s information without altering the image data. The present paper discusses secured indexing of lung CT image (SILI which is a secured way of indexing the lung CT images with the patient information. Authentication is provided using the sender’s logo information and the secret key is used for embedding the watermark into the host image. Watermark is embedded into the region of Noninterest (RONI of the lung CT image. RONI is identified by segmenting the lung tissue from the CT scan image. The experimental results show that the proposed approach is robust against unauthorized access, noise, blurring, and intensity based attacks.

  16. A New Method of CT MedicalImages Contrast Enhancement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUNFeng-rong; LIUWei; WANGChang-yu; MEILiang-mo

    2004-01-01

    A new method of contrast enhancement is proposed in the paper using multiscale edge representation of images, and is applied to the field of CT medical image processing. Comparing to the traditional Window technique, our method is adaptive and meets the demand of radiology clinics more better. The clinical experiment results show the practicality and the potential applied value of our methodin the field of CT medical images contrast enhancement.

  17. Fast CT-CT fluoroscopy registration with respiratory motion compensation for image-guided lung intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Po; Xue, Zhong; Lu, Kongkuo; Yang, Jianhua; Wong, Stephen T.

    2012-02-01

    CT-fluoroscopy (CTF) is an efficient imaging method for guiding percutaneous lung interventions such as biopsy. During CTF-guided biopsy procedure, four to ten axial sectional images are captured in a very short time period to provide nearly real-time feedback to physicians, so that they can adjust the needle as it is advanced toward the target lesion. Although popularly used in clinics, this traditional CTF-guided intervention procedure may require frequent scans and cause unnecessary radiation exposure to clinicians and patients. In addition, CTF only generates limited slices of images and provides limited anatomical information. It also has limited response to respiratory movements and has narrow local anatomical dynamics. To better utilize CTF guidance, we propose a fast CT-CTF registration algorithm with respiratory motion estimation for image-guided lung intervention using electromagnetic (EM) guidance. With the pre-procedural exhale and inhale CT scans, it would be possible to estimate a series of CT images of the same patient at different respiratory phases. Then, once a CTF image is captured during the intervention, our algorithm can pick the best respiratory phase-matched 3D CT image and performs a fast deformable registration to warp the 3D CT toward the CTF. The new 3D CT image can be used to guide the intervention by superimposing the EM-guided needle location on it. Compared to the traditional repetitive CTF guidance, the registered CT integrates both 3D volumetric patient data and nearly real-time local anatomy for more effective and efficient guidance. In this new system, CTF is used as a nearly real-time sensor to overcome the discrepancies between static pre-procedural CT and the patient's anatomy, so as to provide global guidance that may be supplemented with electromagnetic (EM) tracking and to reduce the number of CTF scans needed. In the experiments, the comparative results showed that our fast CT-CTF algorithm can achieve better registration

  18. Volumetric CT-images improve testing of radiological image interpretation skills

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ravesloot, Cécile J., E-mail: C.J.Ravesloot@umcutrecht.nl [Radiology Department at University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3508 GA Utrecht, Room E01.132 (Netherlands); Schaaf, Marieke F. van der, E-mail: M.F.vanderSchaaf@uu.nl [Department of Pedagogical and Educational Sciences at Utrecht University, Heidelberglaan 1, 3584 CS Utrecht (Netherlands); Schaik, Jan P.J. van, E-mail: J.P.J.vanSchaik@umcutrecht.nl [Radiology Department at University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3508 GA Utrecht, Room E01.132 (Netherlands); Cate, Olle Th.J. ten, E-mail: T.J.tenCate@umcutrecht.nl [Center for Research and Development of Education at University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3508 GA Utrecht (Netherlands); Gijp, Anouk van der, E-mail: A.vanderGijp-2@umcutrecht.nl [Radiology Department at University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3508 GA Utrecht, Room E01.132 (Netherlands); Mol, Christian P., E-mail: C.Mol@umcutrecht.nl [Image Sciences Institute at University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3508 GA Utrecht (Netherlands); Vincken, Koen L., E-mail: K.Vincken@umcutrecht.nl [Image Sciences Institute at University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3508 GA Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2015-05-15

    Rationale and objectives: Current radiology practice increasingly involves interpretation of volumetric data sets. In contrast, most radiology tests still contain only 2D images. We introduced a new testing tool that allows for stack viewing of volumetric images in our undergraduate radiology program. We hypothesized that tests with volumetric CT-images enhance test quality, in comparison with traditional completely 2D image-based tests, because they might better reflect required skills for clinical practice. Materials and methods: Two groups of medical students (n = 139; n = 143), trained with 2D and volumetric CT-images, took a digital radiology test in two versions (A and B), each containing both 2D and volumetric CT-image questions. In a questionnaire, they were asked to comment on the representativeness for clinical practice, difficulty and user-friendliness of the test questions and testing program. Students’ test scores and reliabilities, measured with Cronbach's alpha, of 2D and volumetric CT-image tests were compared. Results: Estimated reliabilities (Cronbach's alphas) were higher for volumetric CT-image scores (version A: .51 and version B: .54), than for 2D CT-image scores (version A: .24 and version B: .37). Participants found volumetric CT-image tests more representative of clinical practice, and considered them to be less difficult than volumetric CT-image questions. However, in one version (A), volumetric CT-image scores (M 80.9, SD 14.8) were significantly lower than 2D CT-image scores (M 88.4, SD 10.4) (p < .001). The volumetric CT-image testing program was considered user-friendly. Conclusion: This study shows that volumetric image questions can be successfully integrated in students’ radiology testing. Results suggests that the inclusion of volumetric CT-images might improve the quality of radiology tests by positively impacting perceived representativeness for clinical practice and increasing reliability of the test.

  19. Functional CT imaging of prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Elizabeth; Milosevic, Michael F.; Haider, Masoom A.; Yeung, Ivan W. T.

    2003-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the distribution of blood flow (F), mean capillary transit time (Tc), capillary permeability (PS) and blood volume (vb) in prostate cancer using contrast-enhanced CT. Nine stage T2-T3 prostate cancer patients were enrolled in the study. Following bolus injection of a contrast agent, a time series of CT images of the prostate was acquired. Functional maps showing the distribution of F, Tc, PS and vb within the prostate were generated using a distributed parameter tracer kinetic model, the adiabatic approximation to the tissue homogeneity model. The precision of the maps was assessed using covariance matrix analysis. Finally, maps were compared to the findings of standard clinical investigations. Eight of the functional maps demonstrated regions of increased F, PS and vb, the locations of which were consistent with the results of standard clinical investigations. However, model parameters other than F could only be measured precisely within regions of high F. In conclusion functional CT images of cancer-containing prostate glands demonstrate regions of elevated F, PS and vb. However, caution should be used when applying a complex tracer kinetic model to the study of prostate cancer since not all parameters can be measured precisely in all areas.

  20. SPECT/CT workflow and imaging protocols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckers, Catherine [University Hospital of Liege, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Oncological Imaging, Department of Medical Physics, Liege (Belgium); Hustinx, Roland [University Hospital of Liege, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Oncological Imaging, Department of Medical Physics, Liege (Belgium); Domaine Universitaire du Sart Tilman, Service de Medecine Nucleaire et Imagerie Oncologique, CHU de Liege, Liege (Belgium)

    2014-05-15

    Introducing a hybrid imaging method such as single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT greatly alters the routine in the nuclear medicine department. It requires designing new workflow processes and the revision of original scheduling process and imaging protocols. In addition, the imaging protocol should be adapted for each individual patient, so that performing CT is fully justified and the CT procedure is fully tailored to address the clinical issue. Such refinements often occur before the procedure is started but may be required at some intermediate stage of the procedure. Furthermore, SPECT/CT leads in many instances to a new partnership with the radiology department. This article presents practical advice and highlights the key clinical elements which need to be considered to help understand the workflow process of SPECT/CT and optimise imaging protocols. The workflow process using SPECT/CT is complex in particular because of its bimodal character, the large spectrum of stakeholders, the multiplicity of their activities at various time points and the need for real-time decision-making. With help from analytical tools developed for quality assessment, the workflow process using SPECT/CT may be separated into related, but independent steps, each with its specific human and material resources to use as inputs or outputs. This helps identify factors that could contribute to failure in routine clinical practice. At each step of the process, practical aspects to optimise imaging procedure and protocols are developed. A decision-making algorithm for justifying each CT indication as well as the appropriateness of each CT protocol is the cornerstone of routine clinical practice using SPECT/CT. In conclusion, implementing hybrid SPECT/CT imaging requires new ways of working. It is highly rewarding from a clinical perspective, but it also proves to be a daily challenge in terms of management. (orig.)

  1. Segmentation-based CT image compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thammineni, Arunoday; Mukhopadhyay, Sudipta; Kamath, Vidya

    2004-04-01

    The existing image compression standards like JPEG and JPEG 2000, compress the whole image as a single frame. This makes the system simple but inefficient. The problem is acute for applications where lossless compression is mandatory viz. medical image compression. If the spatial characteristics of the image are considered, it can give rise to a more efficient coding scheme. For example, CT reconstructed images have uniform background outside the field of view (FOV). Even the portion within the FOV can be divided as anatomically relevant and irrelevant parts. They have distinctly different statistics. Hence coding them separately will result in more efficient compression. Segmentation is done based on thresholding and shape information is stored using 8-connected differential chain code. Simple 1-D DPCM is used as the prediction scheme. The experiments show that the 1st order entropies of images fall by more than 11% when each segment is coded separately. For simplicity and speed of decoding Huffman code is chosen for entropy coding. Segment based coding will have an overhead of one table per segment but the overhead is minimal. Lossless compression of image based on segmentation resulted in reduction of bit rate by 7%-9% compared to lossless compression of whole image as a single frame by the same prediction coder. Segmentation based scheme also has the advantage of natural ROI based progressive decoding. If it is allowed to delete the diagnostically irrelevant portions, the bit budget can go down as much as 40%. This concept can be extended to other modalities.

  2. Myocardial perfusion imaging with dual energy CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Kwang Nam; De Cecco, Carlo N; Caruso, Damiano; Tesche, Christian; Spandorfer, Adam; Varga-Szemes, Akos; Schoepf, U Joseph

    2016-10-01

    Dual-energy CT (DECT) enables simultaneous use of two different tube voltages, thus different x-ray absorption characteristics are acquired in the same anatomic location with two different X-ray spectra. The various DECT techniques allow material decomposition and mapping of the iodine distribution within the myocardium. Static dual-energy myocardial perfusion imaging (sCTMPI) using pharmacological stress agents demonstrate myocardial ischemia by single snapshot images of myocardial iodine distribution. sCTMPI gives incremental values to coronary artery stenosis detected on coronary CT angiography (CCTA) by showing consequent reversible or fixed myocardial perfusion defects. The comprehensive acquisition of CCTA and sCTMPI offers extensive morphological and functional evaluation of coronary artery disease. Recent studies have revealed that dual-energy sCTMPI shows promising diagnostic accuracy for the detection of hemodynamically significant coronary artery disease compared to single-photon emission computed tomography, invasive coronary angiography, and cardiac MRI. The aim of this review is to present currently available DECT techniques for static myocardial perfusion imaging and recent clinical applications and ongoing investigations.

  3. Quantitative Techniques in PET-CT Imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Basu, Sandip; Zaidi, Habib; Holm, Soren; Alavi, Abass

    2011-01-01

    The appearance of hybrid PET/CT scanners has made quantitative whole body scanning of radioactive tracers feasible. This paper deals with the novel concepts for assessing global organ function and disease activity based on combined functional (PET) and structural (CT or MR) imaging techniques, their

  4. Virtual CT laparoscopic imaging using intravenous cholangiography with helical CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchida, Masafumi; Ishibashi, Masatoshi; Nishimura, Hiroshi; Hayabuchi, Naofumi [Kurume Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). School of Medicine

    2000-08-01

    Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is a reatively new technology that allows for minimally invasive treatment of cholelithiasis. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the feasibility of virtual laparoscopic imaging using helical CT cholangiography with volume rendering technique. We used the technique with ten patients with suspected gallbladder abnormalities. Our imaging sets produced high quality 3D images with excellent visualization in 70% (7/10) of all cases. Virtual laparoscopic imaging was also compared with other imaging techniques and imaging using helical scans can proved useful in preoperative imaging. Furthermore, virtual laparoscopic imaging using helical scans can in surgical planning and serve as a visual aid in discussions between radiologists, surgeons, and patients. (author)

  5. Castleman disease of the neck: CT and MR imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Xin-hua [Department of Radiology, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center for Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510060 (China); Song, Hao-ming [Department of Cardiology, Shanghai Tongji Hospital, Shanghai 200065 (China); Liu, Qing-yu [Department of Radiology, The Second Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510120 (China); Cao, Yun [Department of Pathology, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center for Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510060 (China); Li, Guo-hong [Department of Radiology, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center for Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510060 (China); Zhang, Wei-dong, E-mail: dongw.z@163.com [Department of Radiology, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center for Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510060 (China)

    2014-11-15

    Objective: To characterize the computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of Castleman disease of the neck. Methods: The imaging findings of 21 patients with Castleman disease of the neck were reviewed retrospectively. Of the 21 patients, 16 underwent unenhanced and contrast-enhanced CT scans; 5 underwent unenhanced and contrast-enhanced MRI scans. Results: The unenhanced CT images showed isolated or multiple well-defined homogenous mild hypodensity lesions in fifteen cases, and a heterogeneous nodule with central areas of mild hypodensity in one case. Calcification was not observed in any of the patients. In five patients, MR T1-weighted images revealed well-defined, homogeneous isointense or mild hyperintense lesions to the muscle; T2-weighted images showed these as intermediate hyperintense. Sixteen cases showed intermediate to marked homogeneous enhancement on contrast-enhanced CT or MR T1-weighted images. Of the other five cases that underwent double-phase CT scans, four showed mild or intermediate heterogeneous enhancement at the arterial phase, and homogeneous intermediate or marked enhancement at the venous phase; the remaining case showed mild and intermediate ring-enhancement with a central non-enhanced area at the arterial and venous phases, respectively. Conclusion: Castleman disease of the neck can be characterized as solitary or multiple well-defined, mild hypodensity or homogeneous intense lesions on plain CT/MR scans, and demonstrates intermediate and marked enhancement on contrast-enhanced CT/MR scans. On double-phase CT scans, Castleman disease often demonstrates mild enhancement at the arterial phase, and gradually uniform enhancement at venous phase. Double-phase enhanced CT or MRI may help to differentiate Castleman disease from other diseases.

  6. Automatic segmentation of bladder in CT images

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng SHI; Jie YANG; Yue-min ZHU

    2009-01-01

    Segmentation of the bladder in computerized tomography (CT) images is an important step in radiation therapy planning of prostate cancer. We present a new segmentation scheme to automatically delineate the bladder contour in CT images with three major steps. First, we use the mean shift algorithm to obtain a clustered image containing the rough contour of the bladder, which is then extracted in the second step by applying a region-growing algorithm with the initial seed point selected from a line-by-line scanning process. The third step is to refine the bladder contour more accurately using the rolling-ball algorithm. These steps are then extended to segment the bladder volume in a slice-by-slice manner. The obtained results were compared to manual segmentation by radiation oncologists. The average values of sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and Hausdorff distance are 86.5%, 96.3%, 90.5%, 96.5%, and 2.8 pixels, respectively. The results show that the bladder can be accurately segmented.

  7. Blind Analysis of CT Image Noise Using Residual Denoised Images

    CERN Document Server

    Roychowdhury, Sohini; Alessio, Adam

    2016-01-01

    CT protocol design and quality control would benefit from automated tools to estimate the quality of generated CT images. These tools could be used to identify erroneous CT acquisitions or refine protocols to achieve certain signal to noise characteristics. This paper investigates blind estimation methods to determine global signal strength and noise levels in chest CT images. Methods: We propose novel performance metrics corresponding to the accuracy of noise and signal estimation. We implement and evaluate the noise estimation performance of six spatial- and frequency- based methods, derived from conventional image filtering algorithms. Algorithms were tested on patient data sets from whole-body repeat CT acquisitions performed with a higher and lower dose technique over the same scan region. Results: The proposed performance metrics can evaluate the relative tradeoff of filter parameters and noise estimation performance. The proposed automated methods tend to underestimate CT image noise at low-flux levels...

  8. Automatic dental arch detection and panoramic image synthesis from CT images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sa-Ing, Vera; Wangkaoom, Kongyot; Thongvigitmanee, Saowapak S

    2013-01-01

    Due to accurate 3D information, computed tomography (CT), especially cone-beam CT or dental CT, has been widely used for diagnosis and treatment planning in dentistry. Axial images acquired from both medical and dental CT scanners can generate synthetic panoramic images similar to typical 2D panoramic radiographs. However, the conventional way to reconstruct the simulated panoramic images is to manually draw the dental arch on axial images. In this paper, we propose a new fast algorithm for automatic detection of the dental arch. Once the dental arch is computed, a series of synthetic panoramic images as well as a ray-sum panoramic image can be automatically generated. We have tested the proposed algorithm on 120 CT axial images and all of them can provide the decent estimate of the dental arch. The results show that our proposed algorithm can mostly detect the correct dental arch.

  9. Cirrhosis: CT and MR imaging evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brancatelli, Giuseppe [Sezione di Radiologia, Ospedale Specializzato in Gastroenterologia, ' Saverio de Bellis' -IRCCS, 70013 Castellana Grotte (Bari) (Italy) and Sezione di Scienze Radiologiche, Dipartimento di Biotecnologie Mediche e Medicina Legale, Universita di Palermo, Via del Vespro 127, 90127 Palermo (Italy) and Department of Radiology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, 200 Lothrop Street, 15213 Pittsburgh, PA (United States)]. E-mail: gbranca@yahoo.com; Federle, Michael P. [Department of Radiology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, 200 Lothrop Street, 15213 Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Ambrosini, Roberta [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, ' Maggiore della Carita' University Hospital, ' A.Avogadro' Eastern Piemonte University, Corso Mazzini 18, Novara (Italy); Lagalla, Roberto [Sezione di Scienze Radiologiche, Dipartimento di Biotecnologie Mediche e Medicina Legale, Universita di Palermo, Via del Vespro 127, 90127 Palermo (Italy); Carriero, Alessandro [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, ' Maggiore della Carita' University Hospital, ' A.Avogadro' Eastern Piemonte University, Corso Mazzini 18, Novara (Italy); Midiri, Massimo [Sezione di Scienze Radiologiche, Dipartimento di Biotecnologie Mediche e Medicina Legale, Universita di Palermo, Via del Vespro 127, 90127 Palermo (Italy); Vilgrain, Valerie [Service de Radiologie, Hopital Beaujon, 100 Boulevard du General Leclerc, 92118 Clichy (France)

    2007-01-15

    In this article, we present the CT and MR imaging characteristics of the cirrhotic liver. We describe the altered liver morphology in different forms of viral, alcoholic and autoimmune end-stage liver disease. We present the spectrum of imaging findings in portal hypertension, such as splenomegaly, ascites and varices. We describe the patchy and lacelike patterns of fibrosis, along with the focal confluent form. The process of hepatocarcinogenesis is detailed, from regenerative to dysplastic nodules to overt hepatocellular carcinoma. Different types of non-neoplastic focal liver lesions occurring in the cirrhotic liver are discussed, including arterially enhancing nodules, hemangiomas and peribiliary cysts. We show different conditions causing liver morphology changes that can mimic cirrhosis, such as congenital hepatic fibrosis, 'pseudo-cirrhosis' due to breast metastases treated with chemotherapy, Budd-Chiari syndrome, sarcoidosis and cavernous transformation of the portal vein.

  10. SPECT/CT and tumour imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abikhzer, Gad [Rambam Health Care Campus, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Haifa (Israel); Keidar, Zohar [Rambam Health Care Campus, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Haifa (Israel); Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, The Ruth and Bruce Rappaport Faculty of Medicine, Haifa (Israel)

    2014-05-15

    Scintigraphic techniques are sensitive imaging modalities in the diagnosis and follow-up of cancer patients providing the functional and metabolic activity characteristics of the tumour. Hybrid SPECT/CT improves the diagnostic accuracy of these well-established imaging techniques by precise anatomical localization and characterization of morphological findings, differentiation between foci of physiological and pathological tracer uptake, resulting in a significant impact on patient management and more definitive interpretations. The use of SPECT/CT has been studied in a variety of applications in tumour imaging which are reviewed in this article. By combining functional and anatomical information in a single imaging session, SPECT/CT has become a one-stop cancer imaging modality. (orig.)

  11. Advances in CT imaging for urolithiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasir Andrabi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Urolithiasis is a common disease with increasing prevalence worldwide and a lifetime-estimated recurrence risk of over 50%. Imaging plays a critical role in the initial diagnosis, follow-up and urological management of urinary tract stone disease. Unenhanced helical computed tomography (CT is highly sensitive (>95% and specific (>96% in the diagnosis of urolithiasis and is the imaging investigation of choice for the initial assessment of patients with suspected urolithiasis. The emergence of multi-detector CT (MDCT and technological innovations in CT such as dual-energy CT (DECT has widened the scope of MDCT in the stone disease management from initial diagnosis to encompass treatment planning and monitoring of treatment success. DECT has been shown to enhance pre-treatment characterization of stone composition in comparison with conventional MDCT and is being increasingly used. Although CT-related radiation dose exposure remains a valid concern, the use of low-dose MDCT protocols and integration of newer iterative reconstruction algorithms into routine CT practice has resulted in a substantial decrease in ionizing radiation exposure. In this review article, our intent is to discuss the role of MDCT in the diagnosis and post-treatment evaluation of urolithiasis and review the impact of emerging CT technologies such as dual energy in clinical practice.

  12. Cone Beam CT vs. Fan Beam CT: A Comparison of Image Quality and Dose Delivered Between Two Differing CT Imaging Modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechuga, Lawrence; Weidlich, Georg A

    2016-09-12

    A comparison of image quality and dose delivered between two differing computed tomography (CT) imaging modalities-fan beam and cone beam-was performed. A literature review of quantitative analyses for various image quality aspects such as uniformity, signal-to-noise ratio, artifact presence, spatial resolution, modulation transfer function (MTF), and low contrast resolution was generated. With these aspects quantified, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) shows a superior spatial resolution to that of fan beam, while fan beam shows a greater ability to produce clear and anatomically correct images with better soft tissue differentiation. The results indicate that fan beam CT produces superior images to that of on-board imaging (OBI) cone beam CT systems, while providing a considerably less dose to the patient.

  13. Cone Beam CT vs. Fan Beam CT: A Comparison of Image Quality and Dose Delivered Between Two Differing CT Imaging Modalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidlich, Georg A.

    2016-01-01

    A comparison of image quality and dose delivered between two differing computed tomography (CT) imaging modalities—fan beam and cone beam—was performed. A literature review of quantitative analyses for various image quality aspects such as uniformity, signal-to-noise ratio, artifact presence, spatial resolution, modulation transfer function (MTF), and low contrast resolution was generated. With these aspects quantified, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) shows a superior spatial resolution to that of fan beam, while fan beam shows a greater ability to produce clear and anatomically correct images with better soft tissue differentiation. The results indicate that fan beam CT produces superior images to that of on-board imaging (OBI) cone beam CT systems, while providing a considerably less dose to the patient. PMID:27752404

  14. Automated vertebra identification in CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehm, Matthias; Klinder, Tobias; Kneser, Reinhard; Lorenz, Cristian

    2009-02-01

    In this paper, we describe and compare methods for automatically identifying individual vertebrae in arbitrary CT images. The identification is an essential precondition for a subsequent model-based segmentation, which is used in a wide field of orthopedic, neurological, and oncological applications, e.g., spinal biopsies or the insertion of pedicle screws. Since adjacent vertebrae show similar characteristics, an automated labeling of the spine column is a very challenging task, especially if no surrounding reference structures can be taken into account. Furthermore, vertebra identification is complicated due to the fact that many images are bounded to a very limited field of view and may contain only few vertebrae. We propose and evaluate two methods for automatically labeling the spine column by evaluating similarities between given models and vertebral objects. In one method, object boundary information is taken into account by applying a Generalized Hough Transform (GHT) for each vertebral object. In the other method, appearance models containing mean gray value information are registered to each vertebral object using cross and local correlation as similarity measures for the optimization function. The GHT is advantageous in terms of computational performance but cuts back concerning the identification rate. A correct labeling of the vertebral column has been successfully performed on 93% of the test set consisting of 63 disparate input images using rigid image registration with local correlation as similarity measure.

  15. Mass preserving image registration for lung CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorbunova, Vladlena; Sporring, Jon; Lo, Pechin Chien Pau

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a mass preserving image registration algorithm for lung CT images. To account for the local change in lung tissue intensity during the breathing cycle, a tissue appearance model based on the principle of preservation of total lung mass is proposed. This model is incorporated...... into a standard image registration framework with a composition of a global affine and several free-form B-Spline transformations with increasing grid resolution. The proposed mass preserving registration method is compared to registration using the sum of squared intensity differences as a similarity function...... inhale phases of 4D-CT images. Registration errors, measured as the average distance between vessel tree centerlines in the matched images, are significantly lower for the proposed mass preserving image registration method in the second, third and fourth group, while there is no statistically significant...

  16. Image Analysis in CT Angiography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manniesing, R.

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis we develop and validate novel image processing techniques for the analysis of vascular structures in medical images. First a new type of filter is proposed which is capable of enhancing vascular structures while suppressing noise in the remainder of the image. This filter is based on

  17. Modern CT and PET/CT imaging of the liver; Moderne CT- und PET/CT-Bildgebung der Leber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klasen, J.; Heusner, T.A.; Riegger, C.; Reichelt, D.; Kuhlemann, J.; Antoch, G.; Blondin, D. [Medizinische Fakultaet, Heinrich-Heine-Universitaet Duesseldorf, Institut fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2011-08-15

    Computed tomography (CT) is now widely available and represents an important and rapid method for the diagnostics of acute liver disease, characterization of focal liver lesions, planning of interventional therapy measures and postintervention control. In recent years CT has not become less important despite the increasing value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). By the use of different contrast medium phases good characterization of space-occupying lesions can be achieved. For the diagnostics of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) a triphasic examination protocol should always be implemented. The introduction of dual energy CT increased the sensitivity of imaging of hypervascularized and hypovascularized liver lesions and by the use of virtual native imaging it has become possible to avoid additional native imaging which reduces the x-ray exposition of patients. Positron emission tomography (PET) has an advantage for imaging in oncology because nearly the complete body of the patient can be screened and this is the main indication for PET/CT (whole-body staging). For purely hepatic problems 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET/CT using diagnostic CT data has a higher precision than CT alone but is inferior to MRI. (orig.) [German] Die Computertomographie (CT) ist heute breit verfuegbar und stellt eine wichtige und schnelle Methode zur Diagnostik akuter Lebererkrankungen, der Artdiagnostik fokaler Leberlaesionen und der Planung interventioneller Therapiemassnahmen sowie der postinterventionellen Kontrolle dar. In den letzten Jahren hat die CT trotz des zunehmenden Stellenwerts der Magnetresonanztomographie (MRT) nicht an Bedeutung verloren. Durch den Einsatz unterschiedlicher Kontrastmittelphasen kann meist eine gute Charakterisierung von Raumforderungen erfolgen. Bei der Diagnostik des hepatozellulaeren Karzinoms (HCC) sollte beispielsweise immer ein triphasisches Untersuchungsprotokoll angewendet werden. Mit Einfuehrung der Dual-energy-CT hat die Sensitivitaet in der

  18. CT and MR imaging after middle ear surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koesling, Sabrina E-mail: sabrina.koesling@medizin.uni-halle.de; Bootz, F

    2001-11-01

    This article describes the current value of imaging in patients after stapes surgery and surgery after chronic otitis media including cholesteatoma. Possibilities and limits of computed tomography (CT) and MRI are described and most important investigation parameters are mentioned. After otosclerosis surgery, CT is the method of first choice in detection of reasons for vertigo and/or recurrent hearing loss in the later postoperative phase. CT may show the position and condition of prosthesis, scarring around the prosthesis and otospongiotic foci. Sometimes, it gives indirect hints for perilymphatic fistulas and incus necrosis. MRI is able to document inner ear complications. CT has a high negative predictive value in cases with a free cavity after mastoidectomy. Localized opacities or total occlusion are difficult to distinguish by CT alone. MRI provides important additional information in the differentiation of cholesterol granuloma, cholesteatoma, effusion, granulation and scar tissue.

  19. Pediatric renal leukemia: spectrum of CT imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilmes, Melissa A. [University of Michigan Health System, C.S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Section of Pediatric Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Vanderbilt University Children' s Hospital, Section of Pediatric Radiology, Nashville, TN (United States); Dillman, Jonathan R. [University of Michigan Health System, C.S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Section of Pediatric Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); University of Michigan Health System, Department of Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Mody, Rajen J. [University of Michigan Health System, C.S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Division of Pediatric Hematology-Oncology and Bone Marrow Transplantation, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Strouse, Peter J. [University of Michigan Health System, C.S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Section of Pediatric Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2008-04-15

    The kidneys are a site of extramedullary leukemic disease that can be readily detected by CT. To demonstrate the spectrum of CT findings in children with renal leukemic involvement. Twelve children were identified retrospectively as having renal leukemic involvement by contrast-enhanced CT of the abdomen. Contrast-enhanced CT images through the kidneys of each patient were reviewed by two pediatric radiologists. Pertinent imaging findings and renal lengths were documented. The electronic medical record was accessed to obtain relevant clinical and pathologic information. Five patients with renal leukemic involvement presented with multiple bilateral low-attenuation masses, while three patients demonstrated large areas of wedge-shaped and geographic low attenuation. Four other patients presented with unique imaging findings, including a solitary unilateral low-attenuation mass, solitary bilateral low-attenuation masses, multiple bilateral low-attenuation masses including unilateral large conglomerate masses, and bilateral areas of ill-defined parenchymal low attenuation. Two patients showed unilateral nephromegaly, while eight other patients showed bilateral nephromegaly. Two patients had normal size kidneys. Two patients had elevated serum creatinine concentrations at the time of imaging. Renal leukemic involvement in children can present with a variety of CT imaging findings. Focal renal abnormalities as well as nephromegaly are frequently observed. Most commonly, renal leukemic involvement does not appear to impair renal function. (orig.)

  20. Techniques in Iterative Proton CT Image Reconstruction

    CERN Document Server

    Penfold, Scott

    2015-01-01

    This is a review paper on some of the physics, modeling, and iterative algorithms in proton computed tomography (pCT) image reconstruction. The primary challenge in pCT image reconstruction lies in the degraded spatial resolution resulting from multiple Coulomb scattering within the imaged object. Analytical models such as the most likely path (MLP) have been proposed to predict the scattered trajectory from measurements of individual proton location and direction before and after the object. Iterative algorithms provide a flexible tool with which to incorporate these models into image reconstruction. The modeling leads to a large and sparse linear system of equations that can efficiently be solved by projection methods-based iterative algorithms. Such algorithms perform projections of the iterates onto the hyperlanes that are represented by the linear equations of the system. They perform these projections in possibly various algorithmic structures, such as block-iterative projections (BIP), string-averaging...

  1. Stress myocardial perfusion imaging with multidetector CT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Rossi (Alexia); D. Merkus (Daphne); E. Klotz (Ernst); N.R.A. Mollet (Nico); P.J. de Feyter (Pim); G.P. Krestin (Gabriel)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractComputed tomographic (CT) coronary angiography is a well-established, noninvasive imaging modality for detection of coronary stenosis, but it has limited accuracy in demonstrating whether a coronary stenosis is hemodynamically significant. An additional functional test is often required

  2. Stress myocardial perfusion imaging with multidetector CT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Rossi (Alexia); D. Merkus (Daphne); E. Klotz (Ernst); N.R.A. Mollet (Nico); P.J. de Feyter (Pim); G.P. Krestin (Gabriel)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractComputed tomographic (CT) coronary angiography is a well-established, noninvasive imaging modality for detection of coronary stenosis, but it has limited accuracy in demonstrating whether a coronary stenosis is hemodynamically significant. An additional functional test is often required

  3. CT imaging with a mobile C-arm prototype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheryauka, Arvi; Tubbs, David; Langille, Vinton; Kalya, Prabhanjana; Smith, Brady; Cherone, Rocco

    2008-03-01

    Mobile X-ray imagery is an omnipresent tool in conventional musculoskeletal and soft tissue applications. The next generation of mobile C-arm systems can provide clinicians of minimally-invasive surgery and pain management procedures with both real-time high-resolution fluoroscopy and intra-operative CT imaging modalities. In this study, we research two C-arm CT experimental system configurations and evaluate their imaging capabilities. In a non-destructive evaluation configuration, the X-ray Tube - Detector assembly is stationary while an imaging object is placed on a rotating table. In a medical imaging configuration, the C-arm gantry moves around the patient and the table. In our research setting, we connect the participating devices through a Mobile X-Ray Imaging Environment known as MOXIE. MOXIE is a set of software applications for internal research at GE Healthcare - Surgery and used to examine imaging performance of experimental systems. Anthropomorphic phantom volume renderings and orthogonal slices of reconstructed images are obtained and displayed. The experimental C-arm CT results show CT-like image quality that may be suitable for interventional procedures, real-time data management, and, therefore, have great potential for effective use on the clinical floor.

  4. Endolymphatic Sac Tumor Showing Increased Activity on 68Ga DOTATATE PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, Georgios Z; Millo, Corina; Sadowski, Samira M; Bagci, Ulas; Patronas, Nicholas J

    2016-10-01

    Endolymphatic sac tumors (ELSTs) are rare tumors arising from the epithelium of the endolymphatic sac and duct that can be either sporadic or associated with von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease. We report a case of a VHL patient with histologically proven residual ELST who underwent Ga DOTATATE PET/CT showing increased activity (SUVmax, 6.29) by the ELST. The presented case of a VHL-associated ELST with increased Ga DOTATATE uptake indicates cell-surface expression of somatostatin receptors by this tumor, suggesting the potential application of somatostatin receptor imaging using Ga DOTA-conjugated peptides in the workup and management of these patients.

  5. Generation of synthetic CT data using patient specific daily MR image data and image registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melanie Kraus, Kim; Jäkel, Oliver; Niebuhr, Nina I.; Pfaffenberger, Asja

    2017-02-01

    To fully exploit the advantages of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for radiotherapy (RT) treatment planning, a method is required to overcome the problem of lacking electron density information. We aim to establish and evaluate a new method for computed tomography (CT) data generation based on MRI and image registration. The thereby generated CT data is used for dose accumulation. We developed a process flow based on an initial pair of rigidly co-registered CT and T2-weighted MR image representing the same anatomical situation. Deformable image registration using anatomical landmarks is performed between the initial MRI data and daily MR images. The resulting transformation is applied to the initial CT, thus fractional CT data is generated. Furthermore, the dose for a photon intensity modulated RT (IMRT) or intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plan is calculated on the generated fractional CT and accumulated on the initial CT via inverse transformation. The method is evaluated by the use of phantom CT and MRI data. Quantitative validation is performed by evaluation of the mean absolute error (MAE) between the measured and the generated CT. The effect on dose accumulation is examined by means of dose-volume parameters. One patient case is presented to demonstrate the applicability of the method introduced here. Overall, CT data derivation lead to MAEs with a median of 37.0 HU ranging from 29.9 to 66.6 HU for all investigated tissues. The accuracy of image registration showed to be limited in the case of unexpected air cavities and at tissue boundaries. The comparisons of dose distributions based on measured and generated CT data agree well with the published literature. Differences in dose volume parameters kept within 1.6% and 3.2% for photon and proton RT, respectively. The method presented here is particularly suited for application in adaptive RT in current clinical routine, since only minor additional technical equipment is required.

  6. CT vaginography: a new CT technique for imaging of upper and middle vaginal fistulas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botsikas, Diomidis; Pluchino, Nicola; Kalovidouri, Anastasia; Platon, Alexandra; Montet, Xavier; Dallenbach, Patrick; Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre

    2017-05-01

    Different types of vaginal fistulas is a relatively uncommon condition in the Western world but very frequent in developing countries. In the past, conventional vaginography was the radiological examination of choice for exploring this condition. CT and MRI are now both used for this purpose. Our objective was to test the feasibility and to explore the potential role of a new CT imaging technique implementing vaginal introitus obstruction and opacification of the vagina with iodine contrast agent, to show patency of a fistula. We describe the technical protocol of CT-vaginography as performed in Geneva University Hospitals, including vaginal catheterization with a Foley catheter and obstruction of the introitus by inflating the balloon of the catheter. We also report three cases of patients with suspected vaginal fistula who underwent CT-vaginography. The examinations were technically successful. In one patient, it revealed the presence of fistulous pathways from the vaginal fornix along the bilateral infected surgical prostheses. In a second patient, it showed a fistula between the vagina and the necrotic cavity of a recurrent cervical cancer. In a third patient, it proved the absence of a suspected vaginal fistula. CT-vaginography is a technically feasible CT protocol that provides anatomical and functional information on clinically suspected vaginal fistulas. Advances in knowledge: After the abandon of conventional vaginography in the era of transaxial imaging, the current modalities of imaging vaginal fistulas provide excellent anatomical detail but less functional information concerning the permeability of a vaginal fistulous pathway. We propose the use of CT-vaginography, a technical protocol that we describe in detail.

  7. Automated delineation of stroke lesions using brain CT images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Céline R. Gillebert

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Computed tomographic (CT images are widely used for the identification of abnormal brain tissue following infarct and hemorrhage in stroke. Manual lesion delineation is currently the standard approach, but is both time-consuming and operator-dependent. To address these issues, we present a method that can automatically delineate infarct and hemorrhage in stroke CT images. The key elements of this method are the accurate normalization of CT images from stroke patients into template space and the subsequent voxelwise comparison with a group of control CT images for defining areas with hypo- or hyper-intense signals. Our validation, using simulated and actual lesions, shows that our approach is effective in reconstructing lesions resulting from both infarct and hemorrhage and yields lesion maps spatially consistent with those produced manually by expert operators. A limitation is that, relative to manual delineation, there is reduced sensitivity of the automated method in regions close to the ventricles and the brain contours. However, the automated method presents a number of benefits in terms of offering significant time savings and the elimination of the inter-operator differences inherent to manual tracing approaches. These factors are relevant for the creation of large-scale lesion databases for neuropsychological research. The automated delineation of stroke lesions from CT scans may also enable longitudinal studies to quantify changes in damaged tissue in an objective and reproducible manner.

  8. Denoising CT Images using wavelet transform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lubna Gabralla

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Image denoising is one of the most significant tasks especially in medical image processing, where the original images are of poor quality due the noises and artifacts introduces by the acquisition systems. In this paper, we propose a new image denoising scheme by modifying the wavelet coefficients using soft-thresholding method, we present a comparative study of different wavelet denoising techniques for CT images and we discuss the obtained results. The denoising process rejects noise by thresholding in the wavelet domain. The performance is evaluated using Peak Signal-to-Noise Ratio (PSNR and Mean Squared Error (MSE. Finally, Gaussian filter provides better PSNR and lower MSE values. Hence, we conclude that this filter is an efficient one for preprocessing medical images.

  9. Choline-PET/CT for imaging prostate cancer; Cholin-PET/CT zur Bildgebung des Prostatakarzinoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krause, Bernd Joachim [Klinik- und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany); Treiber, U.; Schwarzenboeck, S.; Souvatzoglou, M. [Klinik fuer Urologie, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany)

    2010-09-15

    PET and PET/CT using [{sup 11}C]- and [{sup 18}F]-labelled choline derivatives are increasingly being used for imaging of prostate cancer. The value of PET and PET/CT with [{sup 11}C]- and [{sup 18}F]-labelled choline derivates in biochemical recurrence of prostate cancer has been examined in many studies and demonstrates an increasing importance. Primary prostate cancer can be detected with moderate sensitivity using PET and PET/CT using [{sup 11}C]- and [{sup 18}F]-labelled choline derivatives - the differentiation between benign prostatic hyperplasia, prostatitis or high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN) is not always possible. At the present time [{sup 11}C]choline PET/CT is not recommended in the primary setting but may be utilized in clinically suspected prostate cancer with repeatedly negative prostate biopsies, in preparation of a focused re-biopsy. Promising results have been obtained for the use of PET and PET/CT with [{sup 11}C]- and [{sup 18}F]-labelled choline derivates in patients with biochemical recurrence. The detection rate of choline PET and PET/CT for local, regional, and distant recurrence in patients with a biochemical recurrence shows a linear correlation with PSA values at the time of imaging and reaches about 75% in patients with PSA > 3 ng/mL. At PSA values below 1 ng/mL, the recurrence can be diagnosed with choline PET/CT in approximately 1/3 of the patients. PET and PET/CT with [{sup 11}C]- and [{sup 18}F]choline derivates can be helpful for choosing a therapeutic strategy in the sense of an individualized treatment: since an early diagnosis of recurrence is crucial to the choice of optimal treatment. The localization of the site of recurrence - local recurrence, lymph node metastasis or systemic dissemination - has important influence on the therapy regimen. (orig.)

  10. A study on the effect of CT imaging acquisition parameters on lung nodule image interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shirley J.; Wantroba, Joseph S.; Raicu, Daniela S.; Furst, Jacob D.; Channin, David S.; Armato, Samuel G., III

    2009-02-01

    Most Computer-Aided Diagnosis (CAD) research studies are performed using a single type of Computer Tomography (CT) scanner and therefore, do not take into account the effect of differences in the imaging acquisition scanner parameters. In this paper, we present a study on the effect of the CT parameters on the low-level image features automatically extracted from CT images for lung nodule interpretation. The study is an extension of our previous study where we showed that image features can be used to predict semantic characteristics of lung nodules such as margin, lobulation, spiculation, and texture. Using the Lung Image Data Consortium (LIDC) dataset, we propose to integrate the imaging acquisition parameters with the low-level image features to generate classification models for the nodules' semantic characteristics. Our preliminary results identify seven CT parameters (convolution kernel, reconstruction diameter, exposure, nodule location along the z-axis, distance source to patient, slice thickness, and kVp) as influential in producing classification rules for the LIDC semantic characteristics. Further post-processing analysis, which included running box plots and binning of values, identified four CT parameters: distance source to patient, kVp, nodule location, and rescale intercept. The identification of these parameters will create the premises to normalize the image features across different scanners and, in the long run, generate automatic rules for lung nodules interpretation independently of the CT scanner types.

  11. Automatic anatomy recognition on CT images with pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lidong; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Tong, Yubing; Odhner, Dewey; Torigian, Drew A.

    2016-03-01

    Body-wide anatomy recognition on CT images with pathology becomes crucial for quantifying body-wide disease burden. This, however, is a challenging problem because various diseases result in various abnormalities of objects such as shape and intensity patterns. We previously developed an automatic anatomy recognition (AAR) system [1] whose applicability was demonstrated on near normal diagnostic CT images in different body regions on 35 organs. The aim of this paper is to investigate strategies for adapting the previous AAR system to diagnostic CT images of patients with various pathologies as a first step toward automated body-wide disease quantification. The AAR approach consists of three main steps - model building, object recognition, and object delineation. In this paper, within the broader AAR framework, we describe a new strategy for object recognition to handle abnormal images. In the model building stage an optimal threshold interval is learned from near-normal training images for each object. This threshold is optimally tuned to the pathological manifestation of the object in the test image. Recognition is performed following a hierarchical representation of the objects. Experimental results for the abdominal body region based on 50 near-normal images used for model building and 20 abnormal images used for object recognition show that object localization accuracy within 2 voxels for liver and spleen and 3 voxels for kidney can be achieved with the new strategy.

  12. Clinical micro-CT for dental imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youn, Hanbean; Cho, Min Kook; Shon, Cheol-Soon; Cho, Bong Hae; Kim, Chang Hyuk; Kim, Ho Kyung

    2009-02-01

    We exploit the development of a clinical computed microtomography (micro-CT) system for dental imaging. While the conventional dental CT simply serves implant treatment, the clinical dental micro-CT may provide clinicians with a histologic evaluation. To investigate the feasibility of the realization of a dental micro-CT, we have constructed an experimental test system which mainly consists of a microfocus x-ray source, a rotational subject holder, and a flat-panel detector. The flat-panel detector is based on a matrix-addressed photodiode array coupled to a CsI:Tl scintillator. The detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of the detector was measured as a function of magnification based on the measured modulation-transfer function (MTF) and noise-power spectrum (NPS). The best MTF and DQE performances were achieved at the magnification factor of 3. Similar tendency of the spatial resolving power in tomography was also observed with a wire phantom having a 25 μm diameter. From the investigation of tomographs reconstructed from a humanoid skull phantom, the application of magnification in the system largely reduced both signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) for a fixed dose at the entrance surface of the detector, 1.2 mGy, while this setup increased the dose at the object plane from 4.7 mGy to 19.1 mGy for the magnification factor from 2 to 4, respectively. Although the quantum mottles at the high magnification factor tackled the practical use in the clinic, the information contained in the magnified CT images was quite promising.

  13. Body-wide anatomy recognition in PET/CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huiqian; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Odhner, Dewey; Tong, Yubing; Zhao, Liming; Torigian, Drew A.

    2015-03-01

    With the rapid growth of positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT)-based medical applications, body-wide anatomy recognition on whole-body PET/CT images becomes crucial for quantifying body-wide disease burden. This, however, is a challenging problem and seldom studied due to unclear anatomy reference frame and low spatial resolution of PET images as well as low contrast and spatial resolution of the associated low-dose CT images. We previously developed an automatic anatomy recognition (AAR) system [15] whose applicability was demonstrated on diagnostic computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) images in different body regions on 35 objects. The aim of the present work is to investigate strategies for adapting the previous AAR system to low-dose CT and PET images toward automated body-wide disease quantification. Our adaptation of the previous AAR methodology to PET/CT images in this paper focuses on 16 objects in three body regions - thorax, abdomen, and pelvis - and consists of the following steps: collecting whole-body PET/CT images from existing patient image databases, delineating all objects in these images, modifying the previous hierarchical models built from diagnostic CT images to account for differences in appearance in low-dose CT and PET images, automatically locating objects in these images following object hierarchy, and evaluating performance. Our preliminary evaluations indicate that the performance of the AAR approach on low-dose CT images achieves object localization accuracy within about 2 voxels, which is comparable to the accuracies achieved on diagnostic contrast-enhanced CT images. Object recognition on low-dose CT images from PET/CT examinations without requiring diagnostic contrast-enhanced CT seems feasible.

  14. Disease quantification on PET/CT images without object delineation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Yubing; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Odhner, Dewey; Wu, Caiyun; Fitzpatrick, Danielle; Winchell, Nicole; Schuster, Stephen J.; Torigian, Drew A.

    2017-03-01

    The derivation of quantitative information from images to make quantitative radiology (QR) clinically practical continues to face a major image analysis hurdle because of image segmentation challenges. This paper presents a novel approach to disease quantification (DQ) via positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) images that explores how to decouple DQ methods from explicit dependence on object segmentation through the use of only object recognition results to quantify disease burden. The concept of an object-dependent disease map is introduced to express disease severity without performing explicit delineation and partial volume correction of either objects or lesions. The parameters of the disease map are estimated from a set of training image data sets. The idea is illustrated on 20 lung lesions and 20 liver lesions derived from 18F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG)-PET/CT scans of patients with various types of cancers and also on 20 NEMA PET/CT phantom data sets. Our preliminary results show that, on phantom data sets, "disease burden" can be estimated to within 2% of known absolute true activity. Notwithstanding the difficulty in establishing true quantification on patient PET images, our results achieve 8% deviation from "true" estimates, with slightly larger deviations for small and diffuse lesions where establishing ground truth becomes really questionable, and smaller deviations for larger lesions where ground truth set up becomes more reliable. We are currently exploring extensions of the approach to include fully automated body-wide DQ, extensions to just CT or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) alone, to PET/CT performed with radiotracers other than FDG, and other functional forms of disease maps.

  15. Incidental Detection of Interstitial Pregnancy on CT Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Byung Seok [Chungnam National University Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Mi Hyun [Dankook University Hospital, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-02-15

    Ectopic pregnancy is a potentially life-threatening condition. Detection of ectopic pregnancy on CT images is rare. In this case, we describe the CT findings of interstitial pregnancy both before and after rupture. If CT images demonstrate the presence of a strong enhancing ring-like mass in the pelvis, ectopic pregnancy should be considered

  16. SPECT/CT imaging in bone scintigraphy of a case of clavicular osteoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuka Yamamoto

    2014-05-01

    diphosphonate (HMDP. Whole-body image showed a focus of intensely increased uptake in the clavicle. Single photon emission computed tomography/ computed tomography (SPECT/CT images were also acquired and clearly showed intense uptake at the tumor site. Integrated SPECT/CT imaging supplies both functional and anatomic information about bone: the SPECT imaging improves sensitivity compared with planar imaging, the CT imaging provides precise localization of the abnormal uptake, and information on the shape and structure of the abnormalities improves the specificity of the diagnosis.

  17. Comparison of spectral CT imaging methods based a photon-counting detector: Experimental study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Youngjin; Lee, Seungwan; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2016-04-01

    Photon-counting detectors allow spectral computed tomography (CT) imaging using energy-resolved information from a polychromatic X-ray spectrum. The spectral CT images based on the photon-counting detectors are dependent on the energy ranges defined by energy bins for image acquisition. In this study, K-edge and energy weighting imaging methods were experimentally implemented by using a spectral CT system with a cadmium zinc telluride (CZT)-based photon-counting detector. The spectral CT images were obtained by various energy bins and compared in terms of CNR improvement for investigating the effect of energy bins and the efficiency of the spectral CT imaging methods. The results showed that the spectral CT image quality was improved by using the particular energy bins, which were optimized for each spectral CT imaging method and target material. The CNR improvement was different for the spectral CT imaging methods and target materials. It can be concluded that an appropriate selection of imaging method for each target material and the optimization of energy bin can maximize the quality of spectral CT images.

  18. Comparison of spectral CT imaging methods based a photon-counting detector: Experimental study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Youngjin [Department of Radiological Science, College of Health Science, Eulji University, 553 Sangseong-daero, Seongnam, Gyeonggi-do 461-713 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seungwan, E-mail: slee1@konyang.ac.kr [Department of Radiological Science, College of Medical Science, Konyang University, 158 Gwanjeodong-ro, Daejeon 302-812 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hee-Joung [Department of Radiological Science, College of Health Science, Yonsei University, 1 Yonseidae-gil, Wonju, Kangwon-do 220-710 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-11

    Photon-counting detectors allow spectral computed tomography (CT) imaging using energy-resolved information from a polychromatic X-ray spectrum. The spectral CT images based on the photon-counting detectors are dependent on the energy ranges defined by energy bins for image acquisition. In this study, K-edge and energy weighting imaging methods were experimentally implemented by using a spectral CT system with a cadmium zinc telluride (CZT)-based photon-counting detector. The spectral CT images were obtained by various energy bins and compared in terms of CNR improvement for investigating the effect of energy bins and the efficiency of the spectral CT imaging methods. The results showed that the spectral CT image quality was improved by using the particular energy bins, which were optimized for each spectral CT imaging method and target material. The CNR improvement was different for the spectral CT imaging methods and target materials. It can be concluded that an appropriate selection of imaging method for each target material and the optimization of energy bin can maximize the quality of spectral CT images.

  19. 3D Interpolation Method for CT Images of the Lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriaki Asada

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available A 3-D image can be reconstructed from numerous CT images of the lung. The procedure reconstructs a solid from multiple cross section images, which are collected during pulsation of the heart. Thus the motion of the heart is a special factor that must be taken into consideration during reconstruction. The lung exhibits a repeating transformation synchronized to the beating of the heart as an elastic body. There are discontinuities among neighboring CT images due to the beating of the heart, if no special techniques are used in taking CT images. The 3-D heart image is reconstructed from numerous CT images in which both the heart and the lung are taken. Although the outline shape of the reconstructed 3-D heart is quite unnatural, the envelope of the 3-D unnatural heart is fit to the shape of the standard heart. The envelopes of the lung in the CT images are calculated after the section images of the best fitting standard heart are located at the same positions of the CT images. Thus the CT images are geometrically transformed to the optimal CT images fitting best to the standard heart. Since correct transformation of images is required, an Area oriented interpolation method proposed by us is used for interpolation of transformed images. An attempt to reconstruct a 3-D lung image by a series of such operations without discontinuity is shown. Additionally, the same geometrical transformation method to the original projection images is proposed as a more advanced method.

  20. [A novel denoising approach to SVD filtering based on DCT and PCA in CT image].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Fuqiang; Wang, Jun

    2013-10-01

    Because of various effects of the imaging mechanism, noises are inevitably introduced in medical CT imaging process. Noises in the images will greatly degrade the quality of images and bring difficulties to clinical diagnosis. This paper presents a new method to improve singular value decomposition (SVD) filtering performance in CT image. Filter based on SVD can effectively analyze characteristics of the image in horizontal (and/or vertical) directions. According to the features of CT image, we can make use of discrete cosine transform (DCT) to extract the region of interest and to shield uninterested region so as to realize the extraction of structure characteristics of the image. Then we transformed SVD to the image after DCT, constructing weighting function for image reconstruction adaptively weighted. The algorithm for the novel denoising approach in this paper was applied in CT image denoising, and the experimental results showed that the new method could effectively improve the performance of SVD filtering.

  1. Combined SPECT/CT and PET/CT for breast imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russo, Paolo [Università di Napoli Federico II, Dipartimento di Fisica, Via Cintia, Naples I-80126 (Italy); INFN Sezione di Napoli, Via Cintia, Naples I-80126 (Italy); Larobina, Michele [Istituto di Biostrutture e Bioimmagini, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Via Tommaso De Amicis, 95, Naples I-80145 (Italy); Di Lillo, Francesca [Università di Napoli Federico II, Dipartimento di Fisica, Via Cintia, Naples I-80126 (Italy); INFN Sezione di Napoli, Via Cintia, Naples I-80126 (Italy); Del Vecchio, Silvana [Università di Napoli Federico II, Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche Avanzate, Via Pansini, 5, Naples I-80131 (Italy); Mettivier, Giovanni, E-mail: mettivier@na.infn.it [Università di Napoli Federico II, Dipartimento di Fisica, Via Cintia, Naples I-80126 (Italy); INFN Sezione di Napoli, Via Cintia, Naples I-80126 (Italy)

    2016-02-11

    In the field of nuclear medicine imaging, breast imaging for cancer diagnosis is still mainly based on 2D imaging techniques. Three-dimensional tomographic imaging with whole-body PET or SPECT scanners, when used for imaging the breast, has performance limits in terms of spatial resolution and sensitivity, which can be overcome only with a dedicated instrumentation. However, only few hybrid imaging systems for PET/CT or SPECT/CT dedicated to the breast have been developed in the last decade, providing complementary functional and anatomical information on normal breast tissue and lesions. These systems are still under development and clinical trials on just few patients have been reported; no commercial dedicated breast PET/CT or SPECT/CT is available. This paper reviews combined dedicated breast PET/CT and SPECT/CT scanners described in the recent literature, with focus on their technological aspects.

  2. The Experimental Research on the Frameless Registration of DSA/CT Images

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Yong-feng; LI Wen; ZENG Pei-feng; ZHAO Jun

    2006-01-01

    DSA images show vessels with clarity and CT images show bones distinctly. In this paper, we present an experimental research on the frameless registration of DSA/CT images based on localization algorithm. With four external markers, the vessels and bones in human brain can be integrated. The mean accuracy of simulated experiment is about 2.0 mm. The experiment proved that the 3D images composed cerebral anatomy and vasculature could help neurosurgeons perform accurate diagnosis and make right operation planning.

  3. CT myocardial perfusion imaging: current status and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, M C; Newby, D E

    2016-08-01

    Computed tomography (CT) imaging of the heart has advanced rapidly, and it is now possible to perform a comprehensive assessment at a low radiation dose. CT myocardial perfusion imaging can provide additive information to CT coronary angiography, and is particularly useful in patients with heavily calcified coronary arteries or coronary artery stents. A number of protocols are now available for CT myocardial perfusion including static, dynamic, and dual-energy techniques. This review will discuss the current status of CT myocardial perfusion imaging, its clinical application, and future directions for this technology.

  4. Fast and automatic ultrasound simulation from CT images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Weijian; Yang, Jian; Liu, Yue; Wang, Yongtian

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound is currently widely used in clinical diagnosis because of its fast and safe imaging principles. As the anatomical structures present in an ultrasound image are not as clear as CT or MRI. Physicians usually need advance clinical knowledge and experience to distinguish diseased tissues. Fast simulation of ultrasound provides a cost-effective way for the training and correlation of ultrasound and the anatomic structures. In this paper, a novel method is proposed for fast simulation of ultrasound from a CT image. A multiscale method is developed to enhance tubular structures so as to simulate the blood flow. The acoustic response of common tissues is generated by weighted integration of adjacent regions on the ultrasound propagation path in the CT image, from which parameters, including attenuation, reflection, scattering, and noise, are estimated simultaneously. The thin-plate spline interpolation method is employed to transform the simulation image between polar and rectangular coordinate systems. The Kaiser window function is utilized to produce integration and radial blurring effects of multiple transducer elements. Experimental results show that the developed method is very fast and effective, allowing realistic ultrasound to be fast generated. Given that the developed method is fully automatic, it can be utilized for ultrasound guided navigation in clinical practice and for training purpose.

  5. Fast and Automatic Ultrasound Simulation from CT Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weijian Cong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasound is currently widely used in clinical diagnosis because of its fast and safe imaging principles. As the anatomical structures present in an ultrasound image are not as clear as CT or MRI. Physicians usually need advance clinical knowledge and experience to distinguish diseased tissues. Fast simulation of ultrasound provides a cost-effective way for the training and correlation of ultrasound and the anatomic structures. In this paper, a novel method is proposed for fast simulation of ultrasound from a CT image. A multiscale method is developed to enhance tubular structures so as to simulate the blood flow. The acoustic response of common tissues is generated by weighted integration of adjacent regions on the ultrasound propagation path in the CT image, from which parameters, including attenuation, reflection, scattering, and noise, are estimated simultaneously. The thin-plate spline interpolation method is employed to transform the simulation image between polar and rectangular coordinate systems. The Kaiser window function is utilized to produce integration and radial blurring effects of multiple transducer elements. Experimental results show that the developed method is very fast and effective, allowing realistic ultrasound to be fast generated. Given that the developed method is fully automatic, it can be utilized for ultrasound guided navigation in clinical practice and for training purpose.

  6. Abdominal wall hernias: imaging with spiral CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stabile Ianora, A.A.; Midiri, M.; Vinci, R.; Rotondo, A.; Angelelli, G. [Department of Radiology, Bari University Hospital (Italy)

    2000-06-01

    Computed tomography is an accurate method of identifying the various types of abdominal wall hernias, especially if they are clinically occult, and of distinguishing them from other diseases such as hematomas, abscesses and neoplasia. In this study we examined the CT images of 94 patients affected by abdominal wall hernias observed over a period of 6 years. Computed tomography clearly demonstrates the anatomical site of the hernial sac, the content and any occlusive bowel complications due to incarceration or strangulation. Clinical diagnosis of external hernias is particularly difficult in obese patients or in those with laparotic scars. In these cases abdominal imaging is essential for a correct preoperative diagnosis and to determine the most effective treatment. (orig.)

  7. A novel stereoscopic projection display system for CT images of fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiujuan; Jiang, Hong; Lang, Yuedong; Wang, Hongbo; Sun, Na

    2013-06-01

    The present study proposed a novel projection display system based on a virtual reality enhancement environment. The proposed system displays stereoscopic images of fractures and enhances the computed tomography (CT) images. The diagnosis and treatment of fractures primarily depend on the post-processing of CT images. However, two-dimensional (2D) images do not show overlapping structures in fractures since they are displayed without visual depth and these structures are too small to be simultaneously observed by a group of clinicians. Stereoscopic displays may solve this problem and allow clinicians to obtain more information from CT images. Hardware with which to generate stereoscopic images was designed. This system utilized the conventional equipment found in meeting rooms. The off-axis algorithm was adopted to convert the CT images into stereo image pairs, which were used as the input for a stereo generator. The final stereoscopic images were displayed using a projection system. Several CT fracture images were imported into the system for comparison with traditional 2D CT images. The results showed that the proposed system aids clinicians in group discussions by producing large stereoscopic images. The results demonstrated that the enhanced stereoscopic CT images generated by the system appear clearer and smoother, such that the sizes, displacement and shapes of bone fragments are easier to assess. Certain fractures that were previously not visible on 2D CT images due to vision overlap became vividly evident in the stereo images. The proposed projection display system efficiently, economically and accurately displayed three-dimensional (3D) CT images. The system may help clinicians improve the diagnosis and treatment of fractures.

  8. Improving abdomen tumor low-dose CT images using a fast dictionary learning based processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yang; Yin, Xindao; Shi, Luyao; Shu, Huazhong; Luo, Limin; Coatrieux, Jean-Louis; Toumoulin, Christine

    2013-08-01

    In abdomen computed tomography (CT), repeated radiation exposures are often inevitable for cancer patients who receive surgery or radiotherapy guided by CT images. Low-dose scans should thus be considered in order to avoid the harm of accumulative x-ray radiation. This work is aimed at improving abdomen tumor CT images from low-dose scans by using a fast dictionary learning (DL) based processing. Stemming from sparse representation theory, the proposed patch-based DL approach allows effective suppression of both mottled noise and streak artifacts. The experiments carried out on clinical data show that the proposed method brings encouraging improvements in abdomen low-dose CT images with tumors.

  9. Neural network and its application to CT imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikravesh, M.; Kovscek, A.R.; Patzek, T.W. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-02-01

    We present an integrated approach to imaging the progress of air displacement by spontaneous imbibition of oil into sandstone. We combine Computerized Tomography (CT) scanning and neural network image processing. The main aspects of our approach are (I) visualization of the distribution of oil and air saturation by CT, (II) interpretation of CT scans using neural networks, and (III) reconstruction of 3-D images of oil saturation from the CT scans with a neural network model. Excellent agreement between the actual images and the neural network predictions is found.

  10. Information extraction and CT reconstruction of liver images based on diffraction enhanced imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chunhong Hu; Tao Zhao; Lu Zhang; Hui Li; Xinyan Zhao; Shuqian Luo

    2009-01-01

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging (PCI) is a new emerging imaging technique that generates a high spatial resolution and high contrast of biological soft tissues compared to conventional radiography. Herein a biomedical application of diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI) is presented. As one of the PCI methods, DEI derives contrast from many different kinds of sample information, such as the sample's X-ray absorption, refraction gradient and ultra-small-angle X-ray scattering (USAXS) properties, and the sample information is expressed by three parametric images. Combined with computed tomography (CT), DEI-CT can produce 3D volumetric images of the sample and can be used for investigating micro-structures of biomedical samples. Our DEI experiments for fiver samples were implemented at the topog-raphy station of Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility (BSRF). The results show that by using our provided information extraction method and DEI-CT reconstruction approach, the obtained parametric images clearly display the inner structures of liver tissues and the morphology of blood vessels. Furthermore, the reconstructed 3D view of the fiver blood vessels exhibits the micro blood vessels whose minimum diameter is on the order of about tens of microns, much better than its conventional CT reconstruction at a millimeter resolution.In conclusion, both the information extraction method and DEI-CT have the potential for use in biomedical micro-structures analysis.

  11. An approach for quantitative image quality analysis for CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, Amir; Cochran, Joe; Mooney, Doug; Regensburger, Joe

    2016-03-01

    An objective and standardized approach to assess image quality of Compute Tomography (CT) systems is required in a wide variety of imaging processes to identify CT systems appropriate for a given application. We present an overview of the framework we have developed to help standardize and to objectively assess CT image quality for different models of CT scanners used for security applications. Within this framework, we have developed methods to quantitatively measure metrics that should correlate with feature identification, detection accuracy and precision, and image registration capabilities of CT machines and to identify strengths and weaknesses in different CT imaging technologies in transportation security. To that end we have designed, developed and constructed phantoms that allow for systematic and repeatable measurements of roughly 88 image quality metrics, representing modulation transfer function, noise equivalent quanta, noise power spectra, slice sensitivity profiles, streak artifacts, CT number uniformity, CT number consistency, object length accuracy, CT number path length consistency, and object registration. Furthermore, we have developed a sophisticated MATLAB based image analysis tool kit to analyze CT generated images of phantoms and report these metrics in a format that is standardized across the considered models of CT scanners, allowing for comparative image quality analysis within a CT model or between different CT models. In addition, we have developed a modified sparse principal component analysis (SPCA) method to generate a modified set of PCA components as compared to the standard principal component analysis (PCA) with sparse loadings in conjunction with Hotelling T2 statistical analysis method to compare, qualify, and detect faults in the tested systems.

  12. CT and MR imaging of desmoplastic fibroblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shuto, Rieko; Kiyosue, Hiro; Hori, Yuko; Miyake, Hidetoshi; Mori, Hiromu [Department of Radiology, Oita Medical University, Hasama-machi, Oita 879-5593 (Japan); Kawano, Katsunori [1. Department of Surgery, Oita Medical University, Hasama-machi, Oita 879-5593 (Japan)

    2002-10-01

    Desmoplastic fibroblastoma (collagenous fibroma) developing as a slowly enlarging lower abdominal mass is described. The lesion had inhomogeneous low signal intensity (SI) on T1-weighted images, and mixed SI as low SI within high SI on T2-weighted images. On post-contrast T1-weighted images, the mass showed inhomogeneous enhancement. Histologically, the areas showing low SI on both post-contrast T1- and T2-weighted images consisted of dense collagenous components and reduced cellularity compared with the areas showing high SI on them. (orig.)

  13. AP diameter shows the strongest correlation with CTDI and DLP in abdominal and chest CT.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Zarb, Francis

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationships among cross-sectional diameters, weight and computed tomography (CT) dose descriptors (CTDI and DLP) to identify which is best used as a measure for the establishment of DRLs in CT. Data (gender, weight, cross-sectional diameters, dose descriptors) from 56 adult patients attending for either a CT examination of the abdomen or chest was obtained from two spiral CT units using automatic milliampere modulation. The AP diameter was demonstrated as the main contributing factor influencing the dose in CT (CTDI: r(2) = 0.269, p-value < or =0.001; DLP: r(2) = 0.260, p-value < or =0.001) since it has a greater correlation with radiation dose than body weight and can thus be its substitute in dose-reduction strategies and establishment of DRLs. The advantages of using the AP diameter are that it can easily be measured prior to scanning or retrospectively from previous CT images. However, further studies on the practicality of this approach are recommended.

  14. In vivo microCT imaging of rodent cerebral vasculature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Youngho; Hasegawa, Bruce H [Center for Molecular and Functional Imaging, Department of Radiology, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94143 (United States); Hashimoto, Tomoki; Nuki, Yoshitsugu [Center for Cerebrovascular Research, Department of Anesthesia and Perioperative Care, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94143 (United States)], E-mail: youngho.seo@radiology.ucsf.edu

    2008-04-07

    Computed tomography (CT) remains a critical diagnostic tool for evaluating patients with cerebrovascular disease, and the advent of specialized systems for imaging rodents has extended these techniques to small animal models of these diseases. We therefore have evaluated in vivo methods of imaging rat models of hemorrhagic stroke using a high resolution compact computed tomography ('microCT') system (FLEX(tm) X-O(tm), Gamma Medica-Ideas, Northridge, CA). For all in vivo studies, the head of the anesthetized rat was secured in a custom immobilization device for microCT imaging with 512 projections over 2 min at 60 kVp and 0.530 mA (I{sub tube} x t/rotation = 63.6 mAs). First, imaging without iodinated contrast was performed (a) to differentiate the effect of contrast agent in contrast-enhanced CT and (b) to examine the effectiveness of the immobilization device between two time points of CT acquisitions. Then, contrast-enhanced CT was performed with continuous administration of iopromide (300 mgI ml{sup -1} at 1.2 ml min{sup -1}) to visualize aneurysms and other vascular formations in the carotid and cerebral arteries that may precede subarachnoid hemorrhage. The accuracy of registration between the noncontrast and contrast-enhanced CT images with the immobilization device was compared against the images aligned with normalized mutual information using FMRIB's linear image registration tool (FLIRT). Translations and rotations were examined between the FLIRT-aligned noncontrast CT image and the nonaligned noncontrast CT image. These two data sets demonstrated translational and rotational differences of less than 0.5 voxel ({approx}85 {mu}m) and 0.5 deg., respectively. Noncontrast CT demonstrated a very small volume (0.1 ml) of femoral arterial blood introduced surgically into the rodent brain. Continuous administration of iopromide during the CT acquisition produced consistent vascular contrast in the reconstructed CT images. As a result, carotid

  15. Cerebellopontine angle epidermoid showing a positive enhancement upon metrizamide CT cisternography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, Takeshi; Wakamatsu, Koichi; Fujii, Toshiharu; Ito, Haruhide; Yamamoto, Shinjiro; Nagata, Izumi

    1985-04-01

    A case of epidermoid tumor in the left cerebellopontine angle cistern is reported in a 43-year-old woman with left trigeminal neuralgia. Plain CT scan revealed a low density area at the left cerebellopontine angle and left ambient cisterns, which could not be differentiated from their enlargement. Metrizamide CT cisternography showed an irregular, high density pattern in the low density filling defect which was extending into the suprasellar and interpeduncular cisterns. The developmental mechanism of this specific finding in the metrizamide CT cisternography was discussed on the basis of morphological characteristics of epidermoid tumor.

  16. Automated determination of spinal centerline in CT and MR images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Štern, Darko; Vrtovec, Tomaž; Pernuš, Franjo; Likar, Boštjan

    2009-02-01

    The spinal curvature is one of the most important parameters for the evaluation of spinal deformities. The spinal centerline, represented by the curve that passes through the centers of the vertebral bodies in three-dimensions (3D), allows valid quantitative measurements of the spinal curvature at any location along the spine. We propose a novel automated method for the determination of the spinal centerline in 3D spine images. Our method exploits the anatomical property that the vertebral body walls are cylindrically-shaped and therefore the lines normal to the edges of the vertebral body walls most often intersect in the middle of the vertebral bodies, i.e. at the location of spinal centerline. These points of intersection are first obtained by a novel algorithm that performs a selective search in the directions normal to the edges of the structures and then connected with a parametric curve that represents the spinal centerline in 3D. As the method is based on anatomical properties of the 3D spine anatomy, it is modality-independent, i.e. applicable to images obtained by computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR). The proposed method was evaluated on six CT and four MR images (T1- and T2-weighted) of normal spines and on one scoliotic CT spine image. The qualitative and quantitative results for the normal spines show that the spinal centerline can be successfully determined in both CT and MR spine images, while the results for the scoliotic spine indicate that the method may also be used to evaluate pathological curvatures.

  17. Mirror-image lymph node in FDG PET/CT and SPECT/CT for sentinel node detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domenech, Beatriz; Paredes, Pilar; Rubí, Sebastià; Pahisa, Jaume; Vidal-Sicart, Sergi; Pons, Francesca

    2014-03-01

    We report a case of a patient with presumed stage IB1 squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix in which FDG PET/CT scan revealed 1 hypermetabolic left iliac node suggestive to be malignant. Lymphoscintigraphy and SPECT/CT studies previous to sentinel node (SLN) biopsy revealed unilateral drainage in the right pelvis. Intraoperative pathological assessment of the SLN showed no tumoral involvement, and the hypermetabolic node revealed macrometastasis. Tumor node invasion can lead to a lymphatic blockage and become false-negative for SLN technique. Although FDG PET/CT has lower sensitivity than surgical staging, this case shows its value as a preoperative imaging technique.

  18. Tin-filter enhanced dual-energy-CT: image quality and accuracy of CT numbers in virtual noncontrast imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, Sascha; Sauter, Alexander; Spira, Daniel; Gatidis, Sergios; Ketelsen, Dominik; Heuschmid, Martin; Claussen, Claus D; Thomas, Christoph

    2013-05-01

    To measure and compare the objective image quality of true noncontrast (TNC) images with virtual noncontrast (VNC) images acquired by tin-filter-enhanced, dual-source, dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) of upper abdomen. Sixty-three patients received unenhanced abdominal CT and enhanced abdominal DECT (100/140 kV with tin filter) in portal-venous phase. VNC images were calculated from the DECT datasets using commercially available software. The mean attenuation of relevant tissues and image quality were compared between the TNC and VNC images. Image quality was rated objectively by measuring image noise and the sharpness of object edges using custom-designed software. Measurements were compared using Student two-tailed t-test. Correlation coefficients for tissue attenuation measurements between TNC and VNC were calculated and the relative deviations were illustrated using Bland-Altman plots. Mean attenuation differences between TNC and VNC (HUTNC - HUVNC) image sets were as follows: right liver lobe -4.94 Hounsfield units (HU), left liver lobe -3.29 HU, vena cava -2.19 HU, spleen -7.46 HU, pancreas 1.29 HU, fat -11.14 HU, aorta 1.29 HU, bone marrow 36.83 HU (all P Mean image noise was significantly higher in TNC images (P images (P = .19). The Hounsfield units in VNC images closely resemble TNC images in the majority of the organs of the upper abdomen (kidneys, liver, pancreas). In spleen and fat, Hounsfield numbers in VNC images are tend to be higher than in TNC images. VNC images show a low image noise and satisfactory edge sharpness. Other criteria of image quality and the depiction of certain lesions need to be evaluated additionally. Copyright © 2013 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The influence of respiratory motion on CT image volume definition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodríguez-Romero, Ruth, E-mail: rrromero@salud.madrid.org; Castro-Tejero, Pablo, E-mail: pablo.castro@salud.madrid.org [Servicio de Radiofísica y Protección Radiológica, Hospital Universitario Puerta de Hierro Majadahonda, 28222 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-04-15

    patterns of higher frequency and amplitude motion. Larger volume differences (>10%) and inconsistencies between the relative positions of objects were detected in image studies acquired without respiratory control. Increasing the 3DCT rotation period caused a higher distortion in structures without obtaining their envelope. Simulated data showed that the slice acquisition time should be at least twice the breath period to average object movement. Conclusions: Respiratory 4DCT images provide accurate volume and position of organs affected by breath motion detecting higher volume discrepancies as amplitude length or breath frequency are increased. For 3DCT acquisitions, a CT should be considered slow enough to include lesion envelope as long as the slice acquisition time exceeds twice the breathing period. If this requirement cannot be satisfied, a fast CT (along with breath-hold inhale and exhale CTs to estimate roughly the ITV) is recommended in order to minimize structure distortion. Even with an awareness of a patient's respiratory cycle, its coupling with 3DCT acquisition cannot be predicted since patient anatomy is not accurately known.

  20. The influence of respiratory motion on CT image volume definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Romero, Ruth; Castro-Tejero, Pablo

    2014-04-01

    frequency and amplitude motion. Larger volume differences (>10%) and inconsistencies between the relative positions of objects were detected in image studies acquired without respiratory control. Increasing the 3DCT rotation period caused a higher distortion in structures without obtaining their envelope. Simulated data showed that the slice acquisition time should be at least twice the breath period to average object movement. Respiratory 4DCT images provide accurate volume and position of organs affected by breath motion detecting higher volume discrepancies as amplitude length or breath frequency are increased. For 3DCT acquisitions, a CT should be considered slow enough to include lesion envelope as long as the slice acquisition time exceeds twice the breathing period. If this requirement cannot be satisfied, a fast CT (along with breath-hold inhale and exhale CTs to estimate roughly the ITV) is recommended in order to minimize structure distortion. Even with an awareness of a patient's respiratory cycle, its coupling with 3DCT acquisition cannot be predicted since patient anatomy is not accurately known. © 2014 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  1. Quantitative imaging of excised osteoarthritic cartilage using spectral CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajendran, Kishore; Bateman, Christopher J.; Younis, Raja Aamir; De Ruiter, Niels J.A.; Ramyar, Mohsen; Anderson, Nigel G. [University of Otago - Christchurch, Department of Radiology, Christchurch (New Zealand); Loebker, Caroline [University of Otago, Christchurch Regenerative Medicine and Tissue Engineering Group, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Musculoskeletal Medicine, Christchurch (New Zealand); University of Twente, Department of Developmental BioEngineering, Enschede (Netherlands); Schon, Benjamin S.; Hooper, Gary J.; Woodfield, Tim B.F. [University of Otago, Christchurch Regenerative Medicine and Tissue Engineering Group, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Musculoskeletal Medicine, Christchurch (New Zealand); Chernoglazov, Alex I. [University of Canterbury, Human Interface Technology Laboratory New Zealand, Christchurch (New Zealand); Butler, Anthony P.H. [University of Otago - Christchurch, Department of Radiology, Christchurch (New Zealand); European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); MARS Bioimaging, Christchurch (New Zealand)

    2017-01-15

    To quantify iodine uptake in articular cartilage as a marker of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content using multi-energy spectral CT. We incubated a 25-mm strip of excised osteoarthritic human tibial plateau in 50 % ionic iodine contrast and imaged it using a small-animal spectral scanner with a cadmium telluride photon-processing detector to quantify the iodine through the thickness of the articular cartilage. We imaged both spectroscopic phantoms and osteoarthritic tibial plateau samples. The iodine distribution as an inverse marker of GAG content was presented in the form of 2D and 3D images after applying a basis material decomposition technique to separate iodine in cartilage from bone. We compared this result with a histological section stained for GAG. The iodine in cartilage could be distinguished from subchondral bone and quantified using multi-energy CT. The articular cartilage showed variation in iodine concentration throughout its thickness which appeared to be inversely related to GAG distribution observed in histological sections. Multi-energy CT can quantify ionic iodine contrast (as a marker of GAG content) within articular cartilage and distinguish it from bone by exploiting the energy-specific attenuation profiles of the associated materials. (orig.)

  2. Dose calculation based on Cone Beam CT images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Slot Thing, Rune

    , several other factors contributing to the image quality degradation, and while one should, theoretically, be able to obtain CT-like image quality from CBCT scans, clinical image quality is often very far from this ideal realisation. The present thesis describes the investigation of potential image quality...... improvements in clinical CBCT imaging achieved through post-processing of the clinical image data. A Monte Carlo model was established to predict patient specific scattered radiation in CBCT imaging, based on anatomical information from the planning CT scan. This allowed the time consuming Monte Carlo......Cone beam CT (CBCT) imaging is frequently used in modern radiotherapy to ensure the proper positioning of the patient prior to each treatment fraction. With the increasing use of CBCT imaging for image guidance, interest has grown in exploring the potential use of these 3– or 4–D medical images...

  3. AAPM/RSNA physics tutorial for residents: topics in CT. Image processing in CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cody, Dianna D

    2002-01-01

    Several image-processing methods for computed tomographic (CT) examinations are currently being used in clinical radiology departments. Image processing involves operations such as reformatting of original CT images, volume-rendered displays, surface-rendered displays, and physiologic imaging analysis. The reformatting process does not alter the CT voxels in any way; instead it uses them in off-axis views and displays the images produced from the original reconstruction process in an orientation other than how they were originally generated. Sagittal, coronal, oblique, and curved reformatting are standard reformatting methods. Other reformatting techniques include maximum-intensity projection, minimum-intensity projection, and variable thickness viewing. Volume and surface rendering are two different methods for reformatting axial images into three-dimensional views. CT perfusion allows the measurement of physiologic parameters over time. Additional postprocessing efforts can potentially add value to the patients and their outcomes, as can be seen in the cases that illustrate this article.

  4. Personal computer aided cerebral perfusion imaging with dynamic CT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林燕; 高培毅

    2004-01-01

    @@Reports on the clinical implementation of dynamic computerised tomography (CT) perfusion imaging and quantitative measurement have increased dramatically of late.1-8 The advantages of dynamic CT perfusion imaging and quantitative measurement for the diagnosis of acute cerebral infarction have been acknowledged. However, most overseas CT vendors set perfusion imaging software package as an option for graphic workstation at a too high price for domestic practitioners. To foster the domestic implementation and development of this new technology, we have extended the earlier work.1,2 Applying the theory of central volume principle to DICOM 3.0 standard forms of prime CT images, we developed dynamic CT perfusion imaging and quantitative measure-ment programmes for PCs using Visual C+ + in Windows 98 system.

  5. Head and neck imaging with PET and PET/CT: artefacts from dental metallic implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goerres, Gerhard W.; Hany, Thomas F.; Kamel, Ehab; von Schulthess, Gustav K.; Buck, Alfred [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, University Hospital Zurich (Switzerland)

    2002-03-01

    Germanium-68 based attenuation correction (PET{sub Ge68}) is performed in positron emission tomography (PET) imaging for quantitative measurements. With the recent introduction of combined in-line PET/CT scanners, CT data can be used for attenuation correction. Since dental implants can cause artefacts in CT images, CT-based attenuation correction (PET{sub CT}) may induce artefacts in PET images. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of dental metallic artwork on the quality of PET images by comparing non-corrected images and images attenuation corrected by PET{sub Ge68} and PET{sub CT}. Imaging was performed on a novel in-line PET/CT system using a 40-mAs scan for PET{sub CT} in 41 consecutive patients with high suspicion of malignant or inflammatory disease. In 17 patients, additional PET{sub Ge68} images were acquired in the same imaging session. Visual analysis of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) distribution in several regions of the head and neck was scored on a 4-point scale in comparison with normal grey matter of the brain in the corresponding PET images. In addition, artefacts adjacent to dental metallic artwork were evaluated. A significant difference in image quality scoring was found only for the lips and the tip of the nose, which appeared darker on non-corrected than on corrected PET images. In 33 patients, artefacts were seen on CT, and in 28 of these patients, artefacts were also seen on PET imaging. In eight patients without implants, artefacts were seen neither on CT nor on PET images. Direct comparison of PET{sub Ge68} and PET{sub CT} images showed a different appearance of artefacts in 3 of 17 patients. Malignant lesions were equally well visible using both transmission correction methods. Dental implants, non-removable bridgework etc. can cause artefacts in attenuation-corrected images using either a conventional {sup 68}Ge transmission source or the CT scan obtained with a combined PET/CT camera. We recommend that the

  6. Optical-CT imaging of complex 3D dose distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldham, Mark; Kim, Leonard; Hugo, Geoffrey

    2005-04-01

    The limitations of conventional dosimeters restrict the comprehensiveness of verification that can be performed for advanced radiation treatments presenting an immediate and substantial problem for clinics attempting to implement these techniques. In essence, the rapid advances in the technology of radiation delivery have not been paralleled by corresponding advances in the ability to verify these treatments. Optical-CT gel-dosimetry is a relatively new technique with potential to address this imbalance by providing high resolution 3D dose maps in polymer and radiochromic gel dosimeters. We have constructed a 1st generation optical-CT scanner capable of high resolution 3D dosimetry and applied it to a number of simple and increasingly complex dose distributions including intensity-modulated-radiation-therapy (IMRT). Prior to application to IMRT, the robustness of optical-CT gel dosimetry was investigated on geometry and variable attenuation phantoms. Physical techniques and image processing methods were developed to minimize deleterious effects of refraction, reflection, and scattered laser light. Here we present results of investigations into achieving accurate high-resolution 3D dosimetry with optical-CT, and show clinical examples of 3D IMRT dosimetry verification. In conclusion, optical-CT gel dosimetry can provide high resolution 3D dose maps that greatly facilitate comprehensive verification of complex 3D radiation treatments. Good agreement was observed at high dose levels (>50%) between planned and measured dose distributions. Some systematic discrepancies were observed however (rms discrepancy 3% at high dose levels) indicating further work is required to eliminate confounding factors presently compromising the accuracy of optical-CT 3D gel-dosimetry.

  7. Multi-detector CT imaging in the postoperative orthopedic patient with metal hardware.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vande Berg, Bruno; Malghem, Jacques; Maldague, Baudouin; Lecouvet, Frederic

    2006-12-01

    Multi-detector CT imaging (MDCT) becomes routine imaging modality in the assessment of the postoperative orthopedic patients with metallic instrumentation that degrades image quality at MR imaging. This article reviews the physical basis and CT appearance of such metal-related artifacts. It also addresses the clinical value of MDCT in postoperative orthopedic patients with emphasis on fracture healing, spinal fusion or arthrodesis, and joint replacement. MDCT imaging shows limitations in the assessment of the bone marrow cavity and of the soft tissues for which MR imaging remains the imaging modality of choice despite metal-related anatomic distortions and signal alteration.

  8. Dual energy CT: New horizon in medical imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goo, Hyun Woo [Dept. of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Goo, Jin Mo [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-08-01

    Dual-energy CT has remained underutilized over the past decade probably due to a cumbersome workflow issue and current technical limitations. Clinical radiologists should be made aware of the potential clinical benefits of dual-energy CT over single-energy CT. To accomplish this aim, the basic principle, current acquisition methods with advantages and disadvantages, and various material-specific imaging methods as clinical applications of dual-energy CT should be addressed in detail. Current dual-energy CT acquisition methods include dual tubes with or without beam filtration, rapid voltage switching, dual-layer detector, split filter technique, and sequential scanning. Dual-energy material-specific imaging methods include virtual monoenergetic or monochromatic imaging, effective atomic number map, virtual non-contrast or unenhanced imaging, virtual non-calcium imaging, iodine map, inhaled xenon map, uric acid imaging, automatic bone removal, and lung vessels analysis. In this review, we focus on dual-energy CT imaging including related issues of radiation exposure to patients, scanning and post-processing options, and potential clinical benefits mainly to improve the understanding of clinical radiologists and thus, expand the clinical use of dual-energy CT; in addition, we briefly describe the current technical limitations of dual-energy CT and the current developments of photon-counting detector.

  9. Dual-Energy CT: New Horizon in Medical Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goo, Hyun Woo; Goo, Jin Mo

    2017-01-01

    Dual-energy CT has remained underutilized over the past decade probably due to a cumbersome workflow issue and current technical limitations. Clinical radiologists should be made aware of the potential clinical benefits of dual-energy CT over single-energy CT. To accomplish this aim, the basic principle, current acquisition methods with advantages and disadvantages, and various material-specific imaging methods as clinical applications of dual-energy CT should be addressed in detail. Current dual-energy CT acquisition methods include dual tubes with or without beam filtration, rapid voltage switching, dual-layer detector, split filter technique, and sequential scanning. Dual-energy material-specific imaging methods include virtual monoenergetic or monochromatic imaging, effective atomic number map, virtual non-contrast or unenhanced imaging, virtual non-calcium imaging, iodine map, inhaled xenon map, uric acid imaging, automatic bone removal, and lung vessels analysis. In this review, we focus on dual-energy CT imaging including related issues of radiation exposure to patients, scanning and post-processing options, and potential clinical benefits mainly to improve the understanding of clinical radiologists and thus, expand the clinical use of dual-energy CT; in addition, we briefly describe the current technical limitations of dual-energy CT and the current developments of photon-counting detector.

  10. Calibration free beam hardening correction for cardiac CT perfusion imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levi, Jacob; Fahmi, Rachid; Eck, Brendan L.; Fares, Anas; Wu, Hao; Vembar, Mani; Dhanantwari, Amar; Bezerra, Hiram G.; Wilson, David L.

    2016-03-01

    Myocardial perfusion imaging using CT (MPI-CT) and coronary CTA have the potential to make CT an ideal noninvasive gate-keeper for invasive coronary angiography. However, beam hardening artifacts (BHA) prevent accurate blood flow calculation in MPI-CT. BH Correction (BHC) methods require either energy-sensitive CT, not widely available, or typically a calibration-based method. We developed a calibration-free, automatic BHC (ABHC) method suitable for MPI-CT. The algorithm works with any BHC method and iteratively determines model parameters using proposed BHA-specific cost function. In this work, we use the polynomial BHC extended to three materials. The image is segmented into soft tissue, bone, and iodine images, based on mean HU and temporal enhancement. Forward projections of bone and iodine images are obtained, and in each iteration polynomial correction is applied. Corrections are then back projected and combined to obtain the current iteration's BHC image. This process is iterated until cost is minimized. We evaluate the algorithm on simulated and physical phantom images and on preclinical MPI-CT data. The scans were obtained on a prototype spectral detector CT (SDCT) scanner (Philips Healthcare). Mono-energetic reconstructed images were used as the reference. In the simulated phantom, BH streak artifacts were reduced from 12+/-2HU to 1+/-1HU and cupping was reduced by 81%. Similarly, in physical phantom, BH streak artifacts were reduced from 48+/-6HU to 1+/-5HU and cupping was reduced by 86%. In preclinical MPI-CT images, BHA was reduced from 28+/-6 HU to less than 4+/-4HU at peak enhancement. Results suggest that the algorithm can be used to reduce BHA in conventional CT and improve MPI-CT accuracy.

  11. CT and MR images of pleomorphic adenoma in major and minor salivary glands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kakimoto, Naoya [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Osaka University Graduate School of Dentistry, 1-8 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)], E-mail: kakimoto@dent.osaka-u.ac.jp; Gamoh, Shoko [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Osaka University Graduate School of Dentistry, 1-8 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)], E-mail: margot@dent.osaka-u.ac.jp; Tamaki, Junko [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Osaka University Graduate School of Dentistry, 1-8 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)], E-mail: tamako@dent.osaka-u.ac.jp; Kishino, Mitsunobu [Department of Oral Pathology, Osaka University Graduate School of Dentistry, 1-8 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)], E-mail: mkishino@dent.osaka-u.ac.jp; Murakami, Shumei [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Osaka University Graduate School of Dentistry, 1-8 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)], E-mail: shumei@dent.osaka-u.ac.jp; Furukawa, Souhei [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Osaka University Graduate School of Dentistry, 1-8 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)], E-mail: furu@dent.osaka-u.ac.jp

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the CT and MR imaging features of pleomorphic adenoma in the head and neck area. Materials and methods: Our materials of this study consisted of 50 pleomorphic adenomas from 50 patients which were all histopathologically diagnosed. The CT and MR images were retrospectively evaluated. The following features were evaluated: the detectability of the lesion, the tumor margin, the border of the lesion, the aspect of the lesion, the contrast between the lesion and surrounding tissue, the signal intensity of the lesion, the enhancement of contrast medium, the aspect of the lesion after the injection of contrast medium, the detectability of the capsule, and the detectability of bone resorption of the lesion. Results: The tumor detectabilities were 77% on axial plain CT images and 90% on axial CE CT images, respectively. On CT images, pleomorphic adenoma tended to show a well-defined margin, a smooth border, an inhomogeneous aspect, a low or high contrast, and intermediate or high signal intensity. After contrast medium administration, pleomorphic adenoma tended to show a slightly high enhancement and either an inhomogeneous or a periphery enhancement on the CE CT images. The capsule could be hardly detected on CT images. The tumor detectabilities were 86% on axial T1-weighted MR images, 88% on axial T2-weighted MR images, and 85% on axial CE T1-weighted MR images, respectively. On MR images, pleomorphic adenomas tended to show well-defined margin, a lobulate border, an inhomogeneous aspect, a high contrast, and intermediate or high signal intensity. After contrast medium administration, pleomorphic adenoma tended to show a high enhancement and either an inhomogeneous or a periphery enhancement on MR images. The capsule could be detected in many cases on MR images. Conclusions: It was possible to detect the capsule in pleomorphic adenoma using MR images. The pleomorphic adenomas in head and neck area should be evaluated with MR images.

  12. CT and MR images of pleomorphic adenoma in major and minor salivary glands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakimoto, Naoya; Gamoh, Shoko; Tamaki, Junko; Kishino, Mitsunobu; Murakami, Shumei; Furukawa, Souhei

    2009-03-01

    To investigate the CT and MR imaging features of pleomorphic adenoma in the head and neck area. Our materials of this study consisted of 50 pleomorphic adenomas from 50 patients which were all histopathologically diagnosed. The CT and MR images were retrospectively evaluated. The following features were evaluated: the detectability of the lesion, the tumor margin, the border of the lesion, the aspect of the lesion, the contrast between the lesion and surrounding tissue, the signal intensity of the lesion, the enhancement of contrast medium, the aspect of the lesion after the injection of contrast medium, the detectability of the capsule, and the detectability of bone resorption of the lesion. The tumor detectabilities were 77% on axial plain CT images and 90% on axial CE CT images, respectively. On CT images, pleomorphic adenoma tended to show a well-defined margin, a smooth border, an inhomogeneous aspect, a low or high contrast, and intermediate or high signal intensity. After contrast medium administration, pleomorphic adenoma tended to show a slightly high enhancement and either an inhomogeneous or a periphery enhancement on the CE CT images. The capsule could be hardly detected on CT images. The tumor detectabilities were 86% on axial T1-weighted MR images, 88% on axial T2-weighted MR images, and 85% on axial CE T1-weighted MR images, respectively. On MR images, pleomorphic adenomas tended to show well-defined margin, a lobulate border, an inhomogeneous aspect, a high contrast, and intermediate or high signal intensity. After contrast medium administration, pleomorphic adenoma tended to show a high enhancement and either an inhomogeneous or a periphery enhancement on MR images. The capsule could be detected in many cases on MR images. It was possible to detect the capsule in pleomorphic adenoma using MR images. The pleomorphic adenomas in head and neck area should be evaluated with MR images.

  13. Intracranial Hemorrhage Annotation for CT Brain Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Hau Lee

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we created a decision-making model to detect intracranial hemorrhage and adopted Expectation Maximization(EM segmentation to segment the Computed Tomography (CT images. In this work, basically intracranial hemorrhage is classified into two main types which are intra-axial hemorrhage and extra-axial hemorrhage. In order to ease classification, contrast enhancement is adopted to finetune the contrast of the hemorrhage. After that, k-means is applied to group the potential and suspicious hemorrhagic regions into one cluster. The decision-making process is to identify whether the suspicious regions are hemorrhagic regions or non-regions of interest. After the hemorrhagic detection, the images are segmented into brain matter and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF by using expectation-maximization (EM segmentation. The acquired experimental results are evaluated in terms of recall and precision. The encouraging results have been attained whereby the proposed system has yielded 0.9333 and 0.8880 precision for extra-axial and intra-axial hemorrhagic detection respectively, whereas recall rate obtained is 0.9245 and 0.8043 for extra-axial and intra-axial hemorrhagic detection respectively.

  14. Realistic simulation of reduced-dose CT with noise modeling and sinogram synthesis using DICOM CT images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Won Kim, Chang [Interdisciplinary Program of Bioengineering Major Seoul National University College of Engineering, San 56-1, Silim-dong, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 152-742, South Korea and Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 28, Yongon-dong, Chongno-gu, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jong Hyo, E-mail: kimjhyo@snu.ac.kr [Department of Radiology, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 28, Yongon-dong, Chongno-gu, Seoul, 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Transdisciplinary Studies, Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Seoul National University, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do, 443-270 (Korea, Republic of); Advanced Institutes of Convergence Technology, Seoul National University, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do, 443-270 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: Reducing the patient dose while maintaining the diagnostic image quality during CT exams is the subject of a growing number of studies, in which simulations of reduced-dose CT with patient data have been used as an effective technique when exploring the potential of various dose reduction techniques. Difficulties in accessing raw sinogram data, however, have restricted the use of this technique to a limited number of institutions. Here, we present a novel reduced-dose CT simulation technique which provides realistic low-dose images without the requirement of raw sinogram data. Methods: Two key characteristics of CT systems, the noise equivalent quanta (NEQ) and the algorithmic modulation transfer function (MTF), were measured for various combinations of object attenuation and tube currents by analyzing the noise power spectrum (NPS) of CT images obtained with a set of phantoms. Those measurements were used to develop a comprehensive CT noise model covering the reduced x-ray photon flux, object attenuation, system noise, and bow-tie filter, which was then employed to generate a simulated noise sinogram for the reduced-dose condition with the use of a synthetic sinogram generated from a reference CT image. The simulated noise sinogram was filtered with the algorithmic MTF and back-projected to create a noise CT image, which was then added to the reference CT image, finally providing a simulated reduced-dose CT image. The simulation performance was evaluated in terms of the degree of NPS similarity, the noise magnitude, the bow-tie filter effect, and the streak noise pattern at photon starvation sites with the set of phantom images. Results: The simulation results showed good agreement with actual low-dose CT images in terms of their visual appearance and in a quantitative evaluation test. The magnitude and shape of the NPS curves of the simulated low-dose images agreed well with those of real low-dose images, showing discrepancies of less than +/−3.2% in

  15. Elastic registration of multiphase CT images of liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heldmann, Stefan; Zidowitz, Stephan

    2009-02-01

    In this work we present a novel approach for elastic image registration of multi-phase contrast enhanced CT images of liver. A problem in registration of multiphase CT is that the images contain similar but complementary structures. In our application each image shows a different part of the vessel system, e.g., portal/hepatic venous/arterial, or biliary vessels. Portal, arterial and biliary vessels run in parallel and abut on each other forming the so called portal triad, while hepatic veins run independent. Naive registration will tend to align complementary vessel. Our new approach is based on minimizing a cost function consisting of a distance measure and a regularizer. For the distance we use the recently proposed normalized gradient field measure that focuses on the alignment of edges. For the regularizer we use the linear elastic potential. The key feature of our approach is an additional penalty term using segmentations of the different vessel systems in the images to avoid overlaps of complementary structures. We successfully demonstrate our new method by real data examples.

  16. Quantitative image quality evaluation for cardiac CT reconstructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Hsin-Wu; Fan, Jiahua; Kupinski, Matthew A.; Balhorn, William; Okerlund, Darin R.

    2016-03-01

    Maintaining image quality in the presence of motion is always desirable and challenging in clinical Cardiac CT imaging. Different image-reconstruction algorithms are available on current commercial CT systems that attempt to achieve this goal. It is widely accepted that image-quality assessment should be task-based and involve specific tasks, observers, and associated figures of merits. In this work, we developed an observer model that performed the task of estimating the percentage of plaque in a vessel from CT images. We compared task performance of Cardiac CT image data reconstructed using a conventional FBP reconstruction algorithm and the SnapShot Freeze (SSF) algorithm, each at default and optimal reconstruction cardiac phases. The purpose of this work is to design an approach for quantitative image-quality evaluation of temporal resolution for Cardiac CT systems. To simulate heart motion, a moving coronary type phantom synchronized with an ECG signal was used. Three different percentage plaques embedded in a 3 mm vessel phantom were imaged multiple times under motion free, 60 bpm, and 80 bpm heart rates. Static (motion free) images of this phantom were taken as reference images for image template generation. Independent ROIs from the 60 bpm and 80 bpm images were generated by vessel tracking. The observer performed estimation tasks using these ROIs. Ensemble mean square error (EMSE) was used as the figure of merit. Results suggest that the quality of SSF images is superior to the quality of FBP images in higher heart-rate scans.

  17. CT, MRI, and FDG-PET/CT imaging findings of abdominopelvic desmoplastic small round cell tumors: Correlation with histopathologic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Weidong, E-mail: dongw.z@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, 651 Dongfengdong Road, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510060 (China) and Department of Radiology, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510060 (China); Li Chuanxing, E-mail: lichuanh@mail.sysu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, 651 Dongfengdong Road, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510060 (China); Department of Radiology, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510060 (China); Liu Qingyu, E-mail: liu.qingyu@163.com [Department of Radiology, No. 2 Affiliated Hospital, 107 Yanjiangxi Road, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510120 (China); Hu Yingying, E-mail: yingyinghu1981@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, 651 Dongfengdong Road, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510060 (China) and Department of Radiology, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510060 (China); Cao Yun, E-mail: caoyun@mail.sysu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, 651 Dongfengdong Road, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510060 (China); Department of Pathology, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510060 (China); Huang Jinhua, E-mail: drhuangjh@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, 651 Dongfengdong Road, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510060 (China) and Department of Radiology, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510060 (China)

    2011-11-15

    Objective: To analyze computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET)/CT imaging features of abdominopelvic desmoplastic small round cell tumor (DSRCT) and to improve the diagnostic efficacy of these techniques for the detection of such tumor. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed 7 cases of abdominopelvic DSRCT confirmed by histopathologic analysis. Among the 7 patients, 5 patients had undergone CT scanning, 2 of which were also examined with FDG-PET/CT imaging, and 2 had undergone MRI. Unenhanced and contrast-enhanced examinations were performed in all patients, and 2 patients had also undergone dynamic CT contrast-enhanced examinations. Image characteristics, such as shape, size, number, edge, attenuation, and intensity of each lesion before and after contrast enhancement were analyzed and compared with the pathomorphology of the tumors. Results: Multiple large masses in the abdominopelvis were detected in 6 cases, and a large mass in the pelvis was detected in 1 case. Six cases showed largest mass in pelvis, and 1 case in mesentery. None of the masses had a definite organ origin. CT showed soft tissue masses with patchy foci of hypodense areas. MR T1-weighted images revealed lesions with mild hypointense areas and patchy hypointense areas in 2 cases and lesions with patchy hyperintense areas in 1 case. T2-weighted images showed lesions with mixed isointense and hyperintense areas in 1 case and lesions with mixed hypointense, isointense, and hyperintense areas in another. Contrast-enhanced CT and T1-weighted images showed mildly heterogeneous enhancement of the lesions. Other associated findings included peritoneal seeding (n = 3), peritoneal effusions (n = 3), hepatic metastasis (n = 2), bone metastasis (n = 1), and mesenteric and retroperitoneal lymphadenopathy (n = 4). FDG-PET/CT showed multiple nodular foci of increased metabolic activity in the abdominopelvic masses, in the hepatic and

  18. Robust cranial cavity segmentation in CT and CT perfusion images of trauma and suspected stroke patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Patel, A; Ginneken, B. van; Meijer, F.J.A.; Dijk, E.J. van; Prokop, M.; Manniesing, R.

    2017-01-01

    A robust and accurate method is presented for the segmentation of the cranial cavity in computed tomography (CT) and CT perfusion (CTP) images. The method consists of multi-atlas registration with label fusion followed by a geodesic active contour levelset refinement of the segmentation.

  19. SPECT/CT imaging in children with papillary thyroid carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hwa-Young; Gelfand, Michael J.; Sharp, Susan E. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2011-08-15

    SPECT/CT improves localization of single photon-emitting radiopharmaceuticals. To determine the utility of SPECT/CT in children with papillary thyroid carcinoma. 20 SPECT/CT and planar studies were reviewed in 13 children with papillary thyroid carcinoma after total thyroidectomy. Seven studies used I-123 and 13 used I-131, after elevating TSH by T4 deprivation or intramuscular thyrotropin alfa. Eight children had one study and five children had two to four studies. Studies were performed at initial post-total thyroidectomy evaluation, follow-up and after I-131 treatment doses. SPECT/CT was performed with a diagnostic-quality CT unit in 13 studies and a localization-only CT unit in 7. Stimulated thyroglobulin was measured (except in 2 cases with anti-thyroglobulin antibodies). In 13 studies, neck activity was present but poorly localized on planar imaging; all foci of uptake were precisely localized by SPECT/CT. Two additional foci of neck uptake were found on SPECT/CT. SPECT/CT differentiated high neck uptake from facial activity. In six studies (four children), neck uptake was identified as benign by SPECT/CT (three thyroglossal duct remnants, one skin contamination, two by precise anatomical CT localization). In two children, SPECT/CT supported a decision not to treat with I-131. When SPECT/CT was unable to identify focal uptake as benign, stimulated thyroglobulin measurements were valuable. In three of 13 studies with neck uptake, SPECT/CT provided no useful additional information. SPECT/CT precisely localizes neck iodine uptake. In small numbers of patients, treatment is affected. SPECT/CT should be used when available in thyroid carcinoma patients. (orig.)

  20. Multimodal CT in stroke imaging: new concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledezma, Carlos J; Wintermark, Max

    2009-01-01

    A multimodal CT protocol provides a comprehensive noninvasive survey of acute stroke patients with accurate demonstration of the site of arterial occlusion and its hemodynamic tissue status. It combines widespread availability with the ability to provide functional characterization of cerebral ischemia, and could potentially allow more accurate selection of candidates for acute stroke reperfusion therapy. This article discusses the individual components of multimodal CT and addresses the potential role of a combined multimodal CT stroke protocol in acute stroke therapy.

  1. Whole-brain dynamic CT angiography and perfusion imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orrison, W.W. [CHW Nevada Imaging Company, Nevada Imaging Centers, Spring Valley, Las Vegas, NV (United States); College of Osteopathic Medicine, Touro University Nevada, Henderson, NV (United States); Department of Health Physics and Diagnostic Sciences, University of Nevada Las Vegas, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Department of Medical Education, University of Nevada School of Medicine, Reno, NV (United States); Snyder, K.V.; Hopkins, L.N. [Department of Neurosurgery, Millard Fillmore Gates Circle Hospital, Buffalo, NY (United States); Roach, C.J. [School of Life Sciences, University of Nevada Las Vegas, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Advanced Medical Imaging and Genetics (Amigenics), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Ringdahl, E.N. [Department of Psychology, University of Nevada Las Vegas, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Nazir, R. [Shifa International Hospital, Islamabad (Pakistan); Hanson, E.H., E-mail: eric.hanson@amigenics.co [College of Osteopathic Medicine, Touro University Nevada, Henderson, NV (United States); Department of Health Physics and Diagnostic Sciences, University of Nevada Las Vegas, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Advanced Medical Imaging and Genetics (Amigenics), Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2011-06-15

    The availability of whole brain computed tomography (CT) perfusion has expanded the opportunities for analysing the haemodynamic parameters associated with varied neurological conditions. Examples demonstrating the clinical utility of whole-brain CT perfusion imaging in selected acute and chronic ischaemic arterial neurovascular conditions are presented. Whole-brain CT perfusion enables the detection and focused haemodynamic analyses of acute and chronic arterial conditions in the central nervous system without the limitation of partial anatomical coverage of the brain.

  2. Hepatic scar in a case of healed candidiasis showing prolonged enhancement on CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itai, Yuji; Yashiro, Naobumi

    1987-08-01

    A patient with acute myelocytic leukemia recovering from hepatic candidiasis after long-term administration of amphotericin B had large scar in the liver which showed prominent prolonged enhancement on postcontrast CT. Prolonged enhancement can occur in regions other than hepatic masses.

  3. Automated Selection of Uniform Regions for CT Image Quality Detection

    CERN Document Server

    Naeemi, Maitham D; Roychodhury, Sohini

    2016-01-01

    CT images are widely used in pathology detection and follow-up treatment procedures. Accurate identification of pathological features requires diagnostic quality CT images with minimal noise and artifact variation. In this work, a novel Fourier-transform based metric for image quality (IQ) estimation is presented that correlates to additive CT image noise. In the proposed method, two windowed CT image subset regions are analyzed together to identify the extent of variation in the corresponding Fourier-domain spectrum. The two square windows are chosen such that their center pixels coincide and one window is a subset of the other. The Fourier-domain spectral difference between these two sub-sampled windows is then used to isolate spatial regions-of-interest (ROI) with low signal variation (ROI-LV) and high signal variation (ROI-HV), respectively. Finally, the spatial variance ($var$), standard deviation ($std$), coefficient of variance ($cov$) and the fraction of abdominal ROI pixels in ROI-LV ($\

  4. Functional imaging of the lung by CT und MRI; Funktionelle Lungendiagnostik mit CT und MRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puderbach, M.; Eichinger, M.; Kauczor, H.U. [Deutsches Krebsforschungsinstitut Heidelberg (Germany). Abt. Radiologie

    2005-06-01

    Imaging techniques are indispensable for diagnosis and follow-up of pulmonary diseases. In the past the interest was focused on morphological aspects of pulmonary tissue. With the development of novel CT and MRI techniques functional pulmonary imaging became available. In this review the value of cross sectional functional imaging in pulmonary diseases is presented and its potential clinical applications are discussed. (orig.)

  5. In vivo 3D PIXE-micron-CT imaging of Drosophila melanogaster using a contrast agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuyama, Shigeo; Hamada, Naoki; Ishii, Keizo; Nozawa, Yuichiro; Ohkura, Satoru; Terakawa, Atsuki; Hatori, Yoshinobu; Fujiki, Kota; Fujiwara, Mitsuhiro; Toyama, Sho

    2015-04-01

    In this study, we developed a three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) in vivo imaging system for imaging small insects with micrometer resolution. The 3D CT imaging system, referred to as 3D PIXE-micron-CT (PIXEμCT), uses characteristic X-rays produced by ion microbeam bombardment of a metal target. PIXEμCT was used to observe the body organs and internal structure of a living Drosophila melanogaster. Although the organs of the thorax were clearly imaged, the digestive organs in the abdominal cavity could not be clearly discerned initially, with the exception of the rectum and the Malpighian tubule. To enhance the abdominal images, a barium sulfate powder radiocontrast agent was added. For the first time, 3D images of the ventriculus of a living D. melanogaster were obtained. Our results showed that PIXEμCT can provide in vivo 3D-CT images that reflect correctly the structure of individual living organs, which is expected to be very useful in biological research.

  6. Patient satisfaction with coronary CT angiography, myocardial CT perfusion, myocardial perfusion MRI, SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging and conventional coronary angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feger, S.; Rief, M.; Zimmermann, E.; Richter, F.; Roehle, R. [Freie Universitaet Berlin, Department of Radiology, Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin Campus Mitte, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Dewey, M. [Freie Universitaet Berlin, Department of Radiology, Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin Campus Mitte, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Institut fuer Radiologie, Berlin (Germany); Schoenenberger, E. [Medizinische Hochschule Hannover, Department of Medicine, Hannover (Germany)

    2015-07-15

    To evaluate patient acceptance of noninvasive imaging tests for detection of coronary artery disease (CAD), including single-photon emission computed tomography myocardial perfusion imaging (SPECT-MPI), stress perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), coronary CT angiography (CTA) in combination with CT myocardial stress perfusion (CTP), and conventional coronary angiography (CCA). Intraindividual comparison of perception of 48 patients from the CORE320 multicentre multinational study who underwent rest and stress SPECT-MPI with a technetium-based tracer, combined CTA and CTP (both with contrast agent, CTP with adenosine), MRI, and CCA. The analysis was performed by using a validated questionnaire. Patients had significantly more concern prior to CCA than before CTA/CTP (p < 0.001). CTA/CTP was also rated as more comfortable than SPECT-MPI (p = 0.001). Overall satisfaction with CT was superior to that of MRI (p = 0.007). More patients preferred CT (46 %; p < 0.001) as a future diagnostic test. Regarding combined CTA/CTP, CTP was characterised by higher pain levels and an increased frequency of angina pectoris during the examination (p < 0.001). Subgroup analysis showed a higher degree of pain during SPECT-MPI with adenosine stress compared to physical exercise (p = 0.016). All noninvasive cardiac imaging tests are well accepted by patients, with CT being the preferred examination. (orig.)

  7. Cortical region of interest definition on SPECT brain images using X-ray CT registration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tzourio, N.; Sutton, D. (Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Orsay (France). Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot); Joliot, M. (Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Orsay (France). Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot INSERM, Orsay (France)); Mazoyer, B.M. (Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Orsay (France). Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot Antenne d' Information Medicale, C.H.U. Bichat, Paris (France)); Charlot, V. (Hopital Louis Mourier, Colombes (France). Service de Psychiatrie); Salamon, G. (CHU La Timone, Marseille (France). Service de Neuroradiologie)

    1992-11-01

    We present a method for brain single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) analysis based on individual registration of anatomical (CT) and functional ([sup 133]Xe regional cerebral blood flow) images and on the definition of three-dimensional functional regions of interest. Registration of CT and SPECT is performed through adjustment of CT-defined cortex limits to the SPECT image. Regions are defined by sectioning a cortical ribbon on the CT images, copied over the SPECT images and pooled through slices to give 3D cortical regions of interest. The proposed method shows good intra- and interobserver reproducibility (regional intraclass correlation coefficient [approx equal]0.98), and good accuracy in terms of repositioning ([approx equal]3.5 mm) as compared to the SPECT image resolution (14 mm). The method should be particularly useful for analysing SPECT studies when variations in brain anatomy (normal or abnormal) must be accounted for. (orig.).

  8. Automatic nonrigid registration of whole body CT mice images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xia; Yankeelov, Thomas E; Peterson, Todd E; Gore, John C; Dawant, Benoit M

    2008-04-01

    Three-dimensional intra- and intersubject registration of image volumes is important for tasks that include quantification of temporal/longitudinal changes, atlas-based segmentation, computing population averages, or voxel and tensor-based morphometry. While a number of methods have been proposed to address this problem, few have focused on the problem of registering whole body image volumes acquired either from humans or small animals. These image volumes typically contain a large number of articulated structures, which makes registration more difficult than the registration of head images, to which the majority of registration algorithms have been applied. This article presents a new method for the automatic registration of whole body computed tomography (CT) volumes, which consists of two main steps. Skeletons are first brought into approximate correspondence with a robust point-based method. Transformations so obtained are refined with an intensity-based nonrigid registration algorithm that includes spatial adaptation of the transformation's stiffness. The approach has been applied to whole body CT images of mice, to CT images of the human upper torso, and to human head and neck CT images. To validate the authors method on soft tissue structures, which are difficult to see in CT images, the authors use coregistered magnetic resonance images. They demonstrate that the approach they propose can successfully register image volumes even when these volumes are very different in size and shape or if they have been acquired with the subjects in different positions.

  9. Ultrasonography Fused with PET-CT Hybrid Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Udesen, Jesper; Ewertsen, Caroline; Gran, Fredrik

    2011-01-01

    We present a method with fusion of images of three modalities 18F-FDG PET, CT, and 3-D ultrasound (US) applied to imaging of the anal canal and the rectum. To obtain comparable geometries in the three imaging modalities, a plexiglas rod, with the same dimensions as the US transducer, is placed...... in the anal canal prior to the PET-CT examination. The method is based on manual co-registration of PET-CT images and 3-D US images. The three-modality imaging of the rectum-anal canal may become useful as a supplement to conventional imaging in the external radiation therapy in the treatment of anal cancer......, where the precise delineation of a tumor is crucial to avoid damage from radiation therapy to the healthy tissue surrounding it. The technique is still in a phase of development, and the demands for integration different company software systems are significant before commercial application. Three...

  10. Optimization of CT image reconstruction algorithms for the lung tissue research consortium (LTRC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCollough, Cynthia; Zhang, Jie; Bruesewitz, Michael; Bartholmai, Brian

    2006-03-01

    To create a repository of clinical data, CT images and tissue samples and to more clearly understand the pathogenetic features of pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) launched a cooperative effort known as the Lung Tissue Resource Consortium (LTRC). The CT images for the LTRC effort must contain accurate CT numbers in order to characterize tissues, and must have high-spatial resolution to show fine anatomic structures. This study was performed to optimize the CT image reconstruction algorithms to achieve these criteria. Quantitative analyses of phantom and clinical images were conducted. The ACR CT accreditation phantom containing five regions of distinct CT attenuations (CT numbers of approximately -1000 HU, -80 HU, 0 HU, 130 HU and 900 HU), and a high-contrast spatial resolution test pattern, was scanned using CT systems from two manufacturers (General Electric (GE) Healthcare and Siemens Medical Solutions). Phantom images were reconstructed using all relevant reconstruction algorithms. Mean CT numbers and image noise (standard deviation) were measured and compared for the five materials. Clinical high-resolution chest CT images acquired on a GE CT system for a patient with diffuse lung disease were reconstructed using BONE and STANDARD algorithms and evaluated by a thoracic radiologist in terms of image quality and disease extent. The clinical BONE images were processed with a 3 x 3 x 3 median filter to simulate a thicker slice reconstructed in smoother algorithms, which have traditionally been proven to provide an accurate estimation of emphysema extent in the lungs. Using a threshold technique, the volume of emphysema (defined as the percentage of lung voxels having a CT number lower than -950 HU) was computed for the STANDARD, BONE, and BONE filtered. The CT numbers measured in the ACR CT Phantom images were accurate for all reconstruction kernels for both manufacturers. As expected, visual evaluation of the

  11. Compartment Syndrome After Varicose Vein Surgery Evidenced by CT Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sheng-Min; Kim, Maru

    2016-03-01

    A 21-year-old man developed compartment syndrome after a varicose vein surgery. Because of a lack of appropriate diagnostic apparatus, it was not possible to measure calf pressure. The only diagnostic tool available was computed tomography (CT). With the aid of CT, faster diagnosis of the compartment syndrome was possible, leading to appropriate management. By providing unique CT images of a patient before and after having compartment syndrome and after a fasciotomy, this study could add valuable references for diagnosis of compartment syndrome using CT. © The Author(s) 2014.

  12. CT venography for deep venous thrombosis: continuous images versus reformatted discontinuous images using PIOPED II data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Lawrence R; Stein, Paul D; Beemath, Afzal; Sostman, H Dirk; Wakefield, Thomas W; Woodard, Pamela K; Yankelevitz, David F

    2007-08-01

    This study was designed to determine whether discontinuous CT of the lower extremities for the detection of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) yields results similar to those of complete helical imaging using cases from the Prospective Investigation of Pulmonary Embolism Diagnosis II (PIOPED II). In PIOPED II, CT venography followed CT angiography (CTA) to detect pulmonary embolus, using 7.5-mm continuous helical imaging from the iliac crest to the tibial plateau. DVT was detected in 105 of 737 patients (14.2%). We randomly chose 54 positive cases and 96 negative cases for our study. The continuous helical images were reformatted as 7.5-mm images and two of every three images were deleted. These images (7.5 mm; skip = 15 mm) were then sent--without identifying information--to the original reviewers. From 1 to 3.5 years had elapsed since the original interpretations. The results of the new interpretations were compared with the original CT venography consensus interpretations of PIOPED II. There was agreement for the presence of DVT in at least one leg (same leg) or for the absence of DVT in both legs in 133 of the 150 study patients (89%). The kappa statistic showed substantial agreement between the consensus interpretations and the test interpretations (kappa = 0.75; 95% CI = 0.64-0.86) per patient. There was good--but not perfect--agreement between continuous helical and discontinuous axial imaging for the detection of DVT. Given the vagaries of interobserver and intraobserver variation, there appears to be little difference between the two approaches. Adopting discontinuous imaging and other dose-reduction strategies can reduce pelvic radiation by more than 75%.

  13. PET/CT (and CT) instrumentation, image reconstruction and data transfer for radiotherapy planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sattler, Bernhard; Lee, John A; Lonsdale, Markus;

    2010-01-01

    , especially when transferring data across the (network-) borders of different hospitals. Overall, the most important precondition for successful integration of functional imaging in RT treatment planning is the goal orientated as well as close and thorough communication between nuclear medicine......The positron emission tomography in combination with CT in hybrid, cross-modality imaging systems (PET/CT) gains more and more importance as a part of the treatment-planning procedure in radiotherapy. Positron emission tomography (PET), as a integral part of nuclear medicine imaging and non......-invasive imaging technique, offers the visualization and quantification of pre-selected tracer metabolism. In combination with the structural information from CT, this molecular imaging technique has great potential to support and improve the outcome of the treatment-planning procedure prior to radiotherapy...

  14. 'Ready-access' CT imaging for an orthopaedic trauma clinic.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cawley, D

    2011-03-01

    \\'Ready-Access\\' to CT imaging facilities in Orthopaedic Trauma Clinics is not a standard facility. This facility has been available at the regional trauma unit, in Merlin Park Hospital, Galway for the past four years. We reviewed the use of this facility over a 2-year period when 100 patients had CT scans as part of their trauma clinic assessment. The rate of CT scan per clinic was 0.6. The mean waiting time for a CT scan was 30 minutes. 20 (20%) new fractures were confirmed, 33 (33%) fractures were out-ruled, 25 (25%) fractures demonstrated additional information and 8 (8%) had additional fractures. 20 (20%) patients were discharged and 12 (12%) patients were admitted as a result of the CT scan. It adds little time and cost to CT scanning lists.

  15. Recurrent Convolutional Networks for Pulmonary Nodule Detection in CT Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Ypsilantis, Petros-Pavlos; Montana, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) generates a stack of cross-sectional images covering a region of the body. The visual assessment of these images for the identification of potential abnormalities is a challenging and time consuming task due to the large amount of information that needs to be processed. In this article we propose a deep artificial neural network architecture, ReCTnet, for the fully-automated detection of pulmonary nodules in CT scans. The architecture learns to distinguish nodules and...

  16. A new method for robust organ positioning in CT images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vik, T.; Bystrov, D.; Schadewaldt, N.; Schulz, H.; Peters, J.

    2012-01-01

    A robust initialization is the key to any successful segmentation process in medical images. For CT images, initialization ischallenging because the quality, appearance, content and field-of-view of the images are highly variable, and, furthermore, the user tolerance to errors in clinical applicatio

  17. A CT Image Segmentation Algorithm Based on Level Set Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QU Jing-yi; SHI Hao-shan

    2006-01-01

    Level Set methods are robust and efficient numerical tools for resolving curve evolution in image segmentation. This paper proposes a new image segmentation algorithm based on Mumford-Shah module. The method is used to CT images and the experiment results demonstrate its efficiency and veracity.

  18. Image quality assessment for CT used on small animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cisneros, Isabela Paredes, E-mail: iparedesc@unal.edu.co; Agulles-Pedrós, Luis, E-mail: lagullesp@unal.edu.co [Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Departamento de Física, Grupo de Física Médica (Colombia)

    2016-07-07

    Image acquisition on a CT scanner is nowadays necessary in almost any kind of medical study. Its purpose, to produce anatomical images with the best achievable quality, implies the highest diagnostic radiation exposure to patients. Image quality can be measured quantitatively based on parameters such as noise, uniformity and resolution. This measure allows the determination of optimal parameters of operation for the scanner in order to get the best diagnostic image. A human Phillips CT scanner is the first one minded for veterinary-use exclusively in Colombia. The aim of this study was to measure the CT image quality parameters using an acrylic phantom and then, using the computational tool MATLAB, determine these parameters as a function of current value and window of visualization, in order to reduce dose delivery by keeping the appropriate image quality.

  19. Image quality assessment for CT used on small animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisneros, Isabela Paredes; Agulles-Pedrós, Luis

    2016-07-01

    Image acquisition on a CT scanner is nowadays necessary in almost any kind of medical study. Its purpose, to produce anatomical images with the best achievable quality, implies the highest diagnostic radiation exposure to patients. Image quality can be measured quantitatively based on parameters such as noise, uniformity and resolution. This measure allows the determination of optimal parameters of operation for the scanner in order to get the best diagnostic image. A human Phillips CT scanner is the first one minded for veterinary-use exclusively in Colombia. The aim of this study was to measure the CT image quality parameters using an acrylic phantom and then, using the computational tool MatLab, determine these parameters as a function of current value and window of visualization, in order to reduce dose delivery by keeping the appropriate image quality.

  20. Three-dimensional multislice CT imaging of otitis media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Miyako [Yanagibasi Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Yoshikawa, Hiroshi; Hosokawa, Akira; Furukawa, Tomoyasu; Ichikawa, Ginichiro [Juntendo Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine; Wada, Akihiro; Ando, Ichiro [Juntendo Univ., Chiba (Japan). Urayasu Hospital

    2002-07-01

    In recent years, the multislice CT system has come into practical use that enables table movement of half mm, resulting in a significant improvement in resolution. The use of this CT system enables to depict the entire auditory ossicles, including the stapes. 3D reconstruction was performed using helical CT data in 5 patients with chronic otitis media and 5 patients with cholesteatoma. An Aquilion Multi (Toshiba) multislice helical CT scanner and a Xtension (Toshiba) image workstation were used in this study. We demonstrated the 3D display with axial, coronal and sagittal images. Compared with the normal ears, it was necessary to set a higher threshold for the affected ears. It is important to select suitable threshold for demonstration of 3D images optimally. Bone destruction of the stapes was confirmed at surgery in 2 ears. The stapes was observed at 3D-CT imaging in other 18 ears. It was found that the 3D images of the ossicular destruction in ears with cholesteatoma were consistent with surgical findings. It is therefore concluded that 3D imaging of the middle ear using a multislice CT scanner is clinically useful. (author)

  1. CT versus MR in neonatal brain imaging at term

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, Richard L.; Robson, Caroline D.; Zurakowski, David; Antiles, Sharon; Strauss, Keith; Mulkern, Robert V. [Department of Radiology, Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, 300 Longwood Avenue, MA 02115, Boston (United States)

    2003-07-01

    Recent reports have highlighted the lifetime risk of malignancy from using ionizing radiation in pediatric imaging. Computed tomography (CT), which uses ionizing radiation, is employed extensively for neonatal brain imaging of term infants. Magnetic resonance (MR) provides an alternative that does not use ionizing radiation. The purpose of this study was to assess the cross-modality agreement and interobserver agreement of CT and MR brain imaging of the term or near-term neonate. Brain CT and MR images of 48 neonates were retrospectively reviewed by two pediatric neuroradiologists. CT and MR examinations had been obtained within 72 h of one another in all patients. CT was obtained with 5 mm collimation (KV=120, mAs=340). MR consisted of T1-weighted imaging (TR/TE=300/14; 4-mm slice thickness/1-mm gap), T2-weighted imaging (TR/TE/etl= 3000/126/16; 4-mm slice thickness/1-mm gap), and line scan diffusion imaging (LSDI) (TR/TE/b factor=1258/63/750; nominal 4-mm slice thickness/3-mm gap). The brain was categorized as normal or abnormal on both CT and MR. Ischemic injury was the most common brain abnormality demonstrated. McNemar's test indicated no significant difference between CT and MR test results for reader 1 (P=0.22) or reader 2 (P=0.45). The readers agreed on the presence or absence of abnormality on CT in 40 patients (83.3%) and on MR in 45 patients (93.8%). For CT, the kappa coefficient indicated excellent interobserver agreement ({kappa}=0.68), although the lower limit of the 95% confidence interval extends to {kappa}=0.55, which indicates only good-to-moderate agreement. For MR, the kappa coefficient indicated almost perfect interobserver agreement ({kappa}=0.88) with the 95% confidence interval extending to a lower limit of {kappa}=0.76, which represents excellent agreement. Because MR demonstrates findings similar to CT and has greater interobserver agreement, it appears that MR is a superior test to CT in determining brain abnormalities in the term

  2. A method for extracting multi-organ from four-phase contrasted CT images based on CT value distribution estimation using EM-algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakashita, Makiko; Kitasaka, Takayuki; Mori, Kensaku; Suenaga, Yasuhito; Nawano, Shigeru

    2007-03-01

    This paper presents a method for extracting multi-organs from four-phase contrasted CT images taken at different contrast timings (non-contrast, early, portal, and late phases). First, we apply a median filter to each CT image and align four-phase CT images by performing non-rigid volumetric image registration. Then, a three-dimensional joint histogram of CT values is computed from three-phase (early-, portal-, and late-) CT images. We assume that this histogram is a mixture of normal distributions corresponding to the liver, spleen, kidney, vein, artery, muscle, and bone regions. The EM algorithm is employed to estimate each normal distribution. Organ labels are assigned to each voxel using the mahalanobis distance measure. Connected component analysis is applied to correct the shape of each organ region. After that, the pancreas region is extracted from non-contrasted CT images in which other extracted organs and vessel regions are excluded. The EM algorithm is also employed for estimating the distribution of CT values inside the pancreas. We applied this method to seven cases of four-phase CT images. Extraction results show that the proposed method extracted multi-organs satisfactorily.

  3. CT images of an anthropomorphic and anthropometric male pelvis phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matos, Andrea S.D. de; Campos, Tarcisio P.R. de, E-mail: campos@nuclear.ufmg.b [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Programa de Pos-graduacao em Ciencias e Tecnicas Nucleares

    2009-07-01

    Actually, among of the most often neoplasm types are the cancer of prostate, bladder and intestine. The incidence of the intestine neoplasm in Brazil is at fourth among the most frequent tumors of the male sex, barely close to the stomach, lung and prostate incidences. Phantoms are objects used as simulators for investigating ionizing radiation transport on humans, especially during radiation therapy or radiological diagnostic. The purpose of this work is the achievement of a set of computerized tomography (CT) images of a male pelvis phantom, with anthropomorphic and anthropometric features. It investigates and analyses the set of phantom CT images in according to a correspondent human pelvis one. The reason to develop a pelvis phantom is the needs of reproducing well established spatial dose distribution in radiation therapy, especially during calibration and protocol setup for various pelvis neoplasms. It aims to produce dose optimization on radiation therapy, improving health tissue protection and keeping control tumor dose. A male pelvis phantom with similar shape made of equivalent tissues was built for simulating the ionizing radiation transport to the human body. At the phantom, pelvis organs were reproduced including the bladder, the intestine, the prostate, the muscular and greasy tissue, as well as the bone tissue and the skin. A set of CT images was carried out in axial thin sections of 2mm thickness. As results, the constituent tissues had a tomography response on Hounsfield scale similar to values found on the human pelvis. Each tissue has its respective Hounsfield value, demonstrated here. The CT images also show that the organs have equivalent anthropometric measures and anthropomorphic features of the radiological human anatomy. The anatomical physical arrangement of the organs is also similar to of the pelvis human male, having the scales of gray and numerical scale of Hounsfield compatible with the scale of the human tissue. The phantom presents

  4. IMAGE RECONSTRUCTION AND OBJECT CLASSIFICATION IN CT IMAGING SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张晓明; 蒋大真; 等

    1995-01-01

    By obtaining a feasible filter function,reconstructed images can be got with linear interpolation and filtered backoprojection techniques.Considering the gray and spatial correlation neighbour informations of each pixel,a new supervised classification method is put forward for the reconstructed images,and an experiment with noise image is done,the result shows that the method is feasible and accurate compared with ideal phantoms.

  5. Dental CT: imaging technique, anatomy, and pathologic conditions of the jaws

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gahleitner, Andre [Department of Radiology/Osteology, Medical School, University of Vienna, Waehringer Strasse 25a, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Department of Oral Surgery, Dental School, University of Vienna, Waehringer Strasse 25a, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Watzek, G. [Department of Oral Surgery, Dental School, University of Vienna, Waehringer Strasse 25a, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Imhof, H. [Department of Radiology/Osteology, Medical School, University of Vienna, Waehringer Strasse 25a, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2003-02-01

    In addition to conventional imaging methods, dental CT has become an established method for anatomic imaging of the jaws prior to dental implant placement. More recently, this high-resolution imaging technique has gained importance in diagnosing dental-associated diseases of the mandible and maxilla. Since most radiologists have had little experience in these areas, many of the CT findings remain undescribed. The objective of this review article is to present the technique of dental CT, to illustrate the typical appearance of jaw anatomy and dental-related diseases of the jaws with dental CT, and to show where it can serve as an addition to conventional imaging methods in dental radiology. (orig.)

  6. Brain tissue segmentation in PET-CT images using probabilistic atlas and variational Bayes inference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yong; Wang, Jiabin; Eberl, Stefan; Fulham, Michael; Feng, David Dagan

    2011-01-01

    PET-CT provides aligned anatomical (CT) and functional (PET) images in a single scan, and has the potential to improve brain PET image segmentation, which can in turn improve quantitative clinical analyses. We propose a statistical segmentation algorithm that incorporates the prior anatomical knowledge represented by probabilistic brain atlas into the variational Bayes inference to delineate gray matter (GM), white matter (WM) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in brain PET-CT images. Our approach adds an additional novel aspect by allowing voxels to have variable and adaptive prior probabilities of belonging to each class. We compared our algorithm to the segmentation approaches implemented in the expectation maximization segmentation (EMS) and statistical parametric mapping (SPM8) packages in 26 clinical cases. The results show that our algorithm improves the accuracy of brain PET-CT image segmentation.

  7. Epididymal Cystadenomas in von Hippel-Lindau Disease Showing Increased Activity on 68Ga DOTATATE PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, Georgios Z; Millo, Corina; Sadowski, Samira M; Bagci, Ulas; Patronas, Nicholas J

    2016-10-01

    von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease is a familial cancer syndrome characterized by the development of a variety of malignant and benign tumors, including epididymal cystadenomas. We report a case of a VHL patient with bilateral epididymal cystadenomas who was evaluated with Ga DOTATATE PET/CT, showing intensely increased activity (SUVmax, 21.6) associated with the epididymal cystadenomas, indicating cell-surface overexpression of somatostatin receptors. The presented case supports the usefulness of somatostatin receptor imaging using Ga DOTA-conjugated peptides for detection and follow-up of VHL manifestations, as well as surveillance of asymptomatic gene carriers.

  8. Deep convolutional networks for pancreas segmentation in CT imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Holger R.; Farag, Amal; Lu, Le; Turkbey, Evrim B.; Summers, Ronald M.

    2015-03-01

    Automatic organ segmentation is an important prerequisite for many computer-aided diagnosis systems. The high anatomical variability of organs in the abdomen, such as the pancreas, prevents many segmentation methods from achieving high accuracies when compared to state-of-the-art segmentation of organs like the liver, heart or kidneys. Recently, the availability of large annotated training sets and the accessibility of affordable parallel computing resources via GPUs have made it feasible for "deep learning" methods such as convolutional networks (ConvNets) to succeed in image classification tasks. These methods have the advantage that used classification features are trained directly from the imaging data. We present a fully-automated bottom-up method for pancreas segmentation in computed tomography (CT) images of the abdomen. The method is based on hierarchical coarse-to-fine classification of local image regions (superpixels). Superpixels are extracted from the abdominal region using Simple Linear Iterative Clustering (SLIC). An initial probability response map is generated, using patch-level confidences and a two-level cascade of random forest classifiers, from which superpixel regions with probabilities larger 0.5 are retained. These retained superpixels serve as a highly sensitive initial input of the pancreas and its surroundings to a ConvNet that samples a bounding box around each superpixel at different scales (and random non-rigid deformations at training time) in order to assign a more distinct probability of each superpixel region being pancreas or not. We evaluate our method on CT images of 82 patients (60 for training, 2 for validation, and 20 for testing). Using ConvNets we achieve maximum Dice scores of an average 68% +/- 10% (range, 43-80%) in testing. This shows promise for accurate pancreas segmentation, using a deep learning approach and compares favorably to state-of-the-art methods.

  9. PET/CT Imaging in Mouse Models of Myocardial Ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Gargiulo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Different species have been used to reproduce myocardial infarction models but in the last years mice became the animals of choice for the analysis of several diseases, due to their short life cycle and the possibility of genetic manipulation. Many techniques are currently used for cardiovascular imaging in mice, including X-ray computed tomography (CT, high-resolution ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, and nuclear medicine procedures. Cardiac positron emission tomography (PET allows to examine noninvasively, on a molecular level and with high sensitivity, regional changes in myocardial perfusion, metabolism, apoptosis, inflammation, and gene expression or to measure changes in anatomical and functional parameters in heart diseases. Currently hybrid PET/CT scanners for small laboratory animals are available, where CT adds high-resolution anatomical information. This paper reviews mouse models of myocardial infarction and discusses the applications of dedicated PET/CT systems technology, including animal preparation, anesthesia, radiotracers, and images postprocessing.

  10. Imaging of female pelvic malignancies regarding MRI, CT, and PET/CT. Pt. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alt, Celine D.; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Hallscheidt, Peter [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Brocker, Kerstin A.; Eichbaum, Michael; Sohn, Christof; Arnegger, Florian U. [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Obstetrics and Gynecology

    2011-11-15

    To compose diagnostic standard operating procedures for both clinical and imaging assessment for vulvar and vaginal cancer, for vaginal sarcoma, and for ovarian cancer. The literature was reviewed for diagnosing the above mentioned malignancies in the female pelvis. Special focus herein lies in tumor representation in MRI, followed by the evaluation of CT and PET/CT for this topic. MRI is a useful additional diagnostic complement but by no means replaces established methods of gynecologic diagnostics and ultrasound. In fact, MRI is only implemented in the guidelines for vulvar cancer. According to the current literature, CT is still the cross-sectional imaging modality of choice for evaluating ovarian cancer. PET/CT appears to have advantages for staging and follow-up in sarcomas and cancers of the ovaries. (orig.)

  11. Atlas image labeling of subcortical structures and vascular territories in brain CT images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Kaifang; Zhang, Li; Nguyen, Tony; Ordy, Vincent; Fichte, Heinz; Ditt, Hendrik; Chefd'hotel, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    We propose a multi-atlas labeling method for subcortical structures and cerebral vascular territories in brain CT images. Each atlas image is registered to the query image by a non-rigid registration and the deformation is then applied to the labeling of the atlas image to obtain the labeling of the query image. Four label fusion strategies (single atlas, most similar atlas, major voting, and STAPLE) were compared. Image similarity values in non-rigid registration were calculated and used to select and rank atlases. Major voting fusion strategy gave the best accuracy, with DSC (Dice similarity coefficient) around 0.85 ± 0.03 for caudate, putamen, and thalamus. The experimental results also show that fusing more atlases does not necessarily yield higher accuracy and we should be able to improve accuracy and decrease computation cost at the same time by selecting a preferred set with the minimum number of atlases.

  12. MR and CT image fusion of the cervical spine: a noninvasive alternative to CT-myelography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yangqiu; Mirza, Sohail K.; Jarvik, Jeffrey G.; Heagerty, Patrick J.; Haynor, David R.

    2005-04-01

    CT-Myelography (CTM) is routinely used for planning surgery for degenerative disease of the spine, but its invasive nature, significant potential morbidity, and high costs make a noninvasive substitute desirable. We report our work on evaluating CT and MR image fusion as an alternative to CTM. Because the spine is only piecewise rigid, a multi-rigid approach to the registration of spinal CT and MR images was developed (SPIE 2004), in which the spine on CT images is first segmented into separate vertebrae, each of which is then rigidly registered with the corresponding vertebra on MR images. The results are then blended to obtain fusion images. Since they contain information from both modalities, we hypothesized that fusion images would be equivalent to CTM. To test this we selected 34 patients who had undergone MRI and CTM for degenerative disease of the cervical spine, and used the multi-rigid approach to produce fused images. A clinical vignette for each patient was created and presented along with either CT/MR fusion images or CTM images. A group of spine surgeons are asked to formulate detailed surgical plans based on each set of images, and the surgical plans are compared. A similar study assessing diagnostic agreement is being performed with neuroradiologists, who also assess the accuracy of registration. Our work to date has demonstrated the feasibility of segmentation and multi-rigid fusion in clinical cases and the acceptability of the questionnaire to physicians. Preliminary analysis of one surgeon's and one neuroradiologist"s evaluation has been performed.

  13. Qualitative and quantitative comparison of PET/CT and PET/MR imaging in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Nabhani, Khalsa Z; Syed, Rizwan; Michopoulou, Sofia; Alkalbani, Jokha; Afaq, Asim; Panagiotidis, Emmanouil; O'Meara, Celia; Groves, Ashley; Ell, Peter; Bomanji, Jamshed

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to prospectively compare whole-body PET/MR imaging and PET/CT, qualitatively and quantitatively, in oncologic patients and assess the confidence and degree of inter- and intraobserver agreement in anatomic lesion localization. Fifty patients referred for staging with known cancers underwent PET/CT with low-dose CT for attenuation correction immediately followed by PET/MR imaging with 2-point Dixon attenuation correction. PET/CT scans were obtained according to standard protocols (56 ± 20 min after injection of an average 367 MBq of (18)F-FDG, 150 MBq of (68)Ga-DOTATATE, or 333.8 MBq of (18)F-fluoro-ethyl-choline; 2.5 min/bed position). PET/MR was performed with 5 min/bed position. Three dual-accredited nuclear medicine physicians/radiologists identified the lesions and assigned each to an exact anatomic location. The image quality, alignment, and confidence in anatomic localization of lesions were scored on a scale of 1-3 for PET/CT and PET/MR imaging. Quantitative analysis was performed by comparing the standardized uptake values. Intraclass correlation coefficients and the Wilcoxon signed-rank test were used to assess intra- and interobserver agreement in image quality, alignment, and confidence in lesion localization for the 2 modalities. Two hundred twenty-seven tracer-avid lesions were identified in 50 patients. Of these, 225 were correctly identified on PET/CT and 227 on PET/MR imaging by all 3 observers. The confidence in anatomic localization improved by 5.1% when using PET/MR imaging, compared with PET/CT. The mean percentage interobserver agreement was 96% for PET/CT and 99% for PET/MR imaging, and intraobserver agreement in lesion localization across the 2 modalities was 93%. There was 10% (5/50 patients) improvement in local staging with PET/MR imaging, compared with PET/CT. In this first study, we show the effectiveness of whole-body PET/MR imaging in oncology. There is no statistically significant difference between PET

  14. PET/CT imaging and radioimmunotherapy of prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Bouchelouche, Kirsten; Tagawa, Scott T.; Goldsmith, Stanley J.; Turkbey, Baris; Capala, Jacek; Choyke, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a common cancer in men and continues to be a major health problem. Imaging plays an important role in the clinical management of patients with prostate cancer. An important goal for prostate cancer imaging is more accurate disease characterization through the synthesis of anatomic, functional, and molecular imaging information. Positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) in oncology is emerging as an important imaging tool. The most common radiotracer for PE...

  15. SPECT/CT 90Y-Bremsstrahlung images for dosimetry during therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Fabbri, C.; Sarti, G.; Agostini, M; Di Dia, A; Paganelli, G

    2008-01-01

    Background: the characteristics of 90Y, suitable for therapy, are denoted by the lack of γ-emission. Alternative methods, using analogues labelled with 111In or 86Y, are generally applied to image 90Y-conjugates, with some inevitable drawbacks. New generation SPECT/CT image systems offer improved Bremsstrahlung images. The intent of this brief communication is to show that high quality 90Y-Bremsstrahlung SPECT-CT images can be obtained, allowing the biodistribution of pure β-emitter therapeut...

  16. US, CT and MR imaging characteristics of nephroblastomatosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohrschneider, W.K.; Weirich, A.; Darge, K.; Troeger, J. [Department of Pediatric Radiology, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 153, D-69 120 Heidelberg (Germany); Rieden, K. [Department of Radiology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Graf, N. [Department of Paediatric Oncology, Children`s Hospital, University of Homburg/Saar (Germany)

    1998-06-01

    Objectives. To describe the imaging features of nephroblastomatosis with US, CT and MR, to point out characteristics of differentiation between nephrogenic rests (NR) and Wilms` tumour (WT) and to determine the most appropriate imaging modality. Materials and methods. We reviewed the US, CT and MR images of 29 cases of histopathologically confirmed nephroblastomatosis sent to our department for reference evaluation (German nephroblastoma study). The series included 17 kidneys with NR, 6 kidneys with WT and 32 kidneys with both NR and WT. Results. NR presented as multinodular, peripheral, cortical lesions, the diffuse form of distribution being less common. Foci were homogeneous and of low echogenicity, density or signal intensity. The lesions were most clearly depicted with contrast-enhanced CT and T1-weighted (T1-W) MR images. Lesions smaller than 1 cm were rarely identified by US. The most reliable criterion to differentiate NR from WT was their homogeneity. Conclusions. Contrast-enhanced CT and T1-W MR images are of similar potential and superior to US in the diagnosis of nephroblastomatosis. Due to the significant radiation dose of serial CT, MR imaging should be the method of choice wherever it is available. The cost-effectiveness and availability of US makes it ideal for serial follow-up of known lesions. (orig.) With 8 figs., 1 tab., 23 refs.

  17. Molecular imaging agents for SPECT (and SPECT/CT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gnanasegaran, Gopinath [Guy' s and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Ballinger, James R. [Guy' s and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom); King' s College London, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-05-15

    The development of hybrid single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) cameras has increased the diagnostic value of many existing single photon radiopharmaceuticals. Precise anatomical localization of lesions greatly increases diagnostic confidence in bone imaging of the extremities, infection imaging, sentinel lymph node localization, and imaging in other areas. Accurate anatomical localization is particularly important prior to surgery, especially involving the parathyroid glands and sentinel lymph node procedures. SPECT/CT plays a role in characterization of lesions, particularly in bone scintigraphy and radioiodine imaging of metastatic thyroid cancer. In the development of novel tracers, SPECT/CT is particularly important in monitoring response to therapies that do not result in an early change in lesion size. Preclinical SPECT/CT devices, which actually have spatial resolution superior to PET/CT devices, have become essential in characterization of the biodistribution and tissue kinetics of novel tracers, allowing coregistration of serial studies within the same animals, which serves both to reduce biological variability and reduce the number of animals required. In conclusion, SPECT/CT increases the utility of existing radiopharmaceuticals and plays a pivotal role in the evaluation of novel tracers. (orig.)

  18. CT imaging in acute ischemic stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borst, J.

    2016-01-01

    Time is of the essence when treating acute ischemic stroke, to limit the damage caused. One form of intra-arterial treatment (IAT) used in such cases is the mechanical removal of the blood clot using stent-retrievers. It is thought that patient selection for IAT requires improvement and that CT

  19. CT guided diffuse optical tomography for breast cancer imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baikejiang, Reheman; Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Dianwen; Li, Changqing

    2016-03-01

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) has attracted attentions in the last two decades due to its intrinsic sensitivity in imaging chromophores of tissues such as blood, water, and lipid. However, DOT has not been clinically accepted yet due to its low spatial resolution caused by strong optical scattering in tissues. Structural guidance provided by an anatomical imaging modality enhances the DOT imaging substantially. Here, we propose a computed tomography (CT) guided multispectral DOT imaging system for breast cancer detection. To validate its feasibility, we have built a prototype DOT imaging system which consists of a laser at wavelengths of 650 and an electron multiplying charge coupled device (EMCCD) camera. We have validated the CT guided DOT reconstruction algorithms with numerical simulations and phantom experiments, in which different imaging setup parameters, such as projection number of measurements, the width of measurement patch, have been investigated. Our results indicate that an EMCCD camera with air cooling is good enough for the transmission mode DOT imaging. We have also found that measurements at six projections are sufficient for DOT to reconstruct the optical targets with 4 times absorption contrast when the CT guidance is applied. Finally, we report our effort and progress on the integration of the multispectral DOT imaging system into a breast CT scanner.

  20. CT perfusion imaging in the management of posterior reversible encephalopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casey, S.O.; McKinney, A.; Teksam, M.; Liu, H.; Truwit, C.L. [Department of Radiology, University of Minnesota Medical School, 420 Delaware Street SE, Box 292, MN 55455, Minneapolis (United States)

    2004-04-01

    A 13-year-old girl with a renal transplant presented with hypertension and seizures. CT and MRI demonstrated typical bilateral parietal, occipital and posterior frontal cortical and subcortical edema, thought to represent posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome. The cause was presumed to be hypertension. Antihypertensive therapy was started, lowering of the blood pressure in the range of 110-120 mmHg systolic. However, stable xenon (Xe) CT perfusion imaging revealed ischemia within the left parietal occipital region. The antihypertensive was adjusted which increased both the systolic and diastolic blood pressure by 31 mm Hg. The patient was re-imaged with Xe CT and was found to have resolution of the ischemic changes within the left parietal occipital region. In this report, we present a case in which stable Xe CT was used to monitor the degree of cerebral perfusion and guide titration of antihypertensive therapy. Such brain perfusion monitoring may have helped to prevent infarction of our patient. (orig.)

  1. Characteristic MR and CT imaging findings of hepatobiliary paragonimiasis and their pathologic correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Chunyan; Hu, Yajun; Chen, Weixia [Dept of Radiology, West China Hospital of Sichuan Univ., Sichuan (China)], e-mail: wxchen25@126.com

    2012-06-15

    Background: Hepatobiliary paragonimiasis (HP) is not commonly encountered and may be confused with hepatobiliary tumors; however, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of HP allow this entity to be distinguished from other diseases. Purpose: To present the CT and MRI findings in patients with HP and to describe some specific imaging findings along with their pathological correlations. Material and Methods: Imaging and clinical findings of 21 patients (9 boys/men and 12 girls/women; age range 3-67 years; mean age 40 years) who were diagnosed with HP were retrospectively evaluated. Among these patients, 16 underwent CT examination only, two had MR examination only, and three underwent both CT and MR. All patients underwent surgery, and the HP diagnosis was confirmed by the surgical and histopathologic results. Results: Chronic abdominal pain or back pain was reported by 14 patients, severe abdominal pain with acute onset was reported by one patient, and six patients were asymptomatic and were discovered incidentally. Peripheral eosinophilia was present in 14 patients (14/21, 66.7%), and abnormal liver function tests were found in 16 patients (16/21, 76.2%). Of the 19 patients who underwent CT imaging, 17 patients showed multiple mixed hypodense lesions or multiple cysts with inlaying septation with separate irregular rims or circular enhancement on post-contrast CT images. Tunnel-shaped micro abscesses and necrotic cavities were found in the lesions of 12 of those 17 patients. The other two patients showed smaller cystic masses. MRI showed faveolate T1 hypointense and T2 hyperintense areas in the liver parenchyma with rim or peripheral enhancement. Nodular or circular hyperintense materials were found scattered in the lesions on T1-weighted imaging. Conclusion: CT and MRI can reveal the radiological-pathological features of HP. Together with laboratory findings, MRI and CT findings may provide diagnostic clues, especially in endemic

  2. Pulmonary Vascular Tree Segmentation from Contrast-Enhanced CT Images

    CERN Document Server

    Helmberger, M; Pienn, M; Balint, Z; Olschewski, A; Bischof, H

    2013-01-01

    We present a pulmonary vessel segmentation algorithm, which is fast, fully automatic and robust. It uses a coarse segmentation of the airway tree and a left and right lung labeled volume to restrict a vessel enhancement filter, based on an offset medialness function, to the lungs. We show the application of our algorithm on contrast-enhanced CT images, where we derive a clinical parameter to detect pulmonary hypertension (PH) in patients. Results on a dataset of 24 patients show that quantitative indices derived from the segmentation are applicable to distinguish patients with and without PH. Further work-in-progress results are shown on the VESSEL12 challenge dataset, which is composed of non-contrast-enhanced scans, where we range in the midfield of participating contestants.

  3. Noise spatial nonuniformity and the impact of statistical image reconstruction in CT myocardial perfusion imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauzier, Pascal Theriault; Tang Jie; Speidel, Michael A.; Chen Guanghong [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53705-2275 (United States); Department of Medical Physics and Department of Radiology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53705-2275 (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To achieve high temporal resolution in CT myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI), images are often reconstructed using filtered backprojection (FBP) algorithms from data acquired within a short-scan angular range. However, the variation in the central angle from one time frame to the next in gated short scans has been shown to create detrimental partial scan artifacts when performing quantitative MPI measurements. This study has two main purposes. (1) To demonstrate the existence of a distinct detrimental effect in short-scan FBP, i.e., the introduction of a nonuniform spatial image noise distribution; this nonuniformity can lead to unexpectedly high image noise and streaking artifacts, which may affect CT MPI quantification. (2) To demonstrate that statistical image reconstruction (SIR) algorithms can be a potential solution to address the nonuniform spatial noise distribution problem and can also lead to radiation dose reduction in the context of CT MPI. Methods: Projection datasets from a numerically simulated perfusion phantom and an in vivo animal myocardial perfusion CT scan were used in this study. In the numerical phantom, multiple realizations of Poisson noise were added to projection data at each time frame to investigate the spatial distribution of noise. Images from all datasets were reconstructed using both FBP and SIR reconstruction algorithms. To quantify the spatial distribution of noise, the mean and standard deviation were measured in several regions of interest (ROIs) and analyzed across time frames. In the in vivo study, two low-dose scans at tube currents of 25 and 50 mA were reconstructed using FBP and SIR. Quantitative perfusion metrics, namely, the normalized upslope (NUS), myocardial blood volume (MBV), and first moment transit time (FMT), were measured for two ROIs and compared to reference values obtained from a high-dose scan performed at 500 mA. Results: Images reconstructed using FBP showed a highly nonuniform spatial distribution

  4. CT imaging of mass-like renal lesions in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Edward Y. [Children' s Hospital Boston, Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2007-09-15

    Mass-like renal lesions in children occur in a diverse spectrum of conditions including benign and malignant neoplasm, infection, infarction, lymphatic malformation, and traumatic injury. Although mass-like renal lesions can sometimes be suspected on plain radiographs and evaluated with US in children, subsequent CT is usually performed for the confirmation of diagnosis and further characterization. The purpose of this pictorial essay was to review the CT imaging findings of both common and uncommon mass-like renal lesions in pediatric patients. Understanding the characteristic CT appearance of mass-like renal lesions in children enables an accurate diagnosis and optimizes patient management. (orig.)

  5. Image quality in CT: From physical measurements to model observers.

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Evaluation of image quality (IQ) in Computed Tomography (CT) is important to ensure that diagnostic questions are correctly answered, whilst keeping radiation dose to the patient as low as is reasonably possible. The assessment of individual aspects of IQ is already a key component of routine quality control of medical x-ray devices. These values together with standard dose indicators can be used to give rise to 'figures of merit' (FOM) to characterise the dose efficiency of the CT scanners o...

  6. Study of CT head scans using different voltages: image quality evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pacheco de Freitas C, I.; Prata M, A. [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica de Minas Gerais, Centro de Engenharia Biomedica, Av. Amazonas 5253, 30421-169 Nova Suica, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Alonso, T. C. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear / CNEN, Av. Pte. Antonio Carlos 6627, 31270-901 Pampulha, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Santana, P., E-mail: iarapfcorrea@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Departamento de Anatomia e Imagem, Av. Prof. Alfredo Balena 190, 30130-100 Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

    2016-10-15

    Computed tomography (CT) was introduced to medical practice in 1972. It generates images recognized by high diagnostic potential. CT allows investigation of structures in the human body inaccessible by conventional image methods, replacing invasive methods in many cases. Noise is a kind of variation of brightness observed on CT images, and it is inherent to this method. The magnitude of the noise is determined by the standard deviation of CT numbers of a region of interest in a homogeneous material. The aim of this study is to analyze the noise in head CT images generated by different acquisition protocols using four voltage values. Five different scans were performed using a female Alderson phantom and their images were analyzed with the RadiAnt software. With the average HU values and standard deviation of each scan, the values of noise were calculated in some region of interest. The obtained noise values were compared and it was observed that the 140 kV voltage promotes the in the lower noise in the image, resulting in better image quality. The results also show that the parameters, such as voltage and current, can be adjusted so that the noise can be decreased. Thus, acquisition protocols may be adapted to produce images with diagnostic quality and lower doses in patient. (Author)

  7. A LabVIEW Platform for Preclinical Imaging Using Digital Subtraction Angiography and Micro-CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badea, Cristian T; Hedlund, Laurence W; Johnson, G Allan

    2013-01-01

    CT and digital subtraction angiography (DSA) are ubiquitous in the clinic. Their preclinical equivalents are valuable imaging methods for studying disease models and treatment. We have developed a dual source/detector X-ray imaging system that we have used for both micro-CT and DSA studies in rodents. The control of such a complex imaging system requires substantial software development for which we use the graphical language LabVIEW (National Instruments, Austin, TX, USA). This paper focuses on a LabVIEW platform that we have developed to enable anatomical and functional imaging with micro-CT and DSA. Our LabVIEW applications integrate and control all the elements of our system including a dual source/detector X-ray system, a mechanical ventilator, a physiological monitor, and a power microinjector for the vascular delivery of X-ray contrast agents. Various applications allow cardiac- and respiratory-gated acquisitions for both DSA and micro-CT studies. Our results illustrate the application of DSA for cardiopulmonary studies and vascular imaging of the liver and coronary arteries. We also show how DSA can be used for functional imaging of the kidney. Finally, the power of 4D micro-CT imaging using both prospective and retrospective gating is shown for cardiac imaging.

  8. Sinusitis and intracranial sepsis: the CT imaging and clinical presentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saxton, V.J. [Dept. of Radiology, Royal Children`s Hospital, Melbourne (Australia); Boldt, D.W. [Dept. of Radiology, Royal Children`s Hospital, Melbourne (Australia); Shield, L.K. [Dept. of Neurology, Royal Children`s Hospital, Melbourne (Australia)

    1995-11-01

    The CT imaging and clinical presentation in 14 children with coexistent intracranial sepsis and sinusitis were reviewed. A routine CT head scan (10-mm thick semi-axial slices through the cranium done before and after intravenous contrast medium administration) was found to be an inadequate initial investigation as the intracranial collection was missed in four patients and the abnormal sinuses not shown in six. In half the children the dagnosis of sinusitis was unsuspected at the time of admission. The dominant clinical features were fever, intense headache and facial swelling in early adolescent males. In this clinical setting we recommend: (1) The routine scan is extended through the frontal and ethmoidal sinuses and photographed at a window level and width showing both bone detail and air/soft tissue interfaces; (2) direct coronal projections are performed through the anterior cranial fossa if no collection is seen on the routine study; (3) an early repeat scan within 48 h if the initial study shows no intracranial pathology but the fronto-ethomoidal sinuses are abnormal and there is a high clinical supicion of intracranial sepsis; and (4) in the presence of intracranial sepsis the vault is viewed at bone window settings to exclude cranial osteomyelitis. (orig.)

  9. A comparative study of SPECT/CT fusion imaging and CT in infiltrated mandible by gingival carcinoma%牙龈癌侵犯下颌骨SPECT/CT融合显像和CT影像的对照研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongwei Liu; Guichang Li; Ningyi Li; Jie Wang; Baomei Fang

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the study was to evaluate the clinical value of99mTc-methylene diphosphonic acid (MDP) SPECT/CT fusion imaging and CT scanning in diagnosis of infiltrated mandible by gingival carcinoma. Methods: 18 cases of gingival carcinoma were processed infiltrated mandible by99mTc-MDP SPECT/CT fusion image and CT, and their scanning results compared with pathology findings. Results: Eleven of 13 cases with well-differentiated squamous cell carcinoma showed positive images, one of 11 cases was false positive images by pathology findings, and 10 cases were exhibited infil-trated mandibles; 5 cases with moderately differentiated and poorly differentiated squamous cell carcinoma showed positive images, pathology showed carcinoma cell had infiltrated cavum ossis of mandible. Five of 18 cases were positive images by CT. Conclusion: 99mTc-MDP SPECT/CT fusion imaging is a useful method in diagnosis of infiltrated mandible by gingival carcinoma.

  10. Efficient iterative image reconstruction algorithm for dedicated breast CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antropova, Natalia; Sanchez, Adrian; Reiser, Ingrid S.; Sidky, Emil Y.; Boone, John; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2016-03-01

    Dedicated breast computed tomography (bCT) is currently being studied as a potential screening method for breast cancer. The X-ray exposure is set low to achieve an average glandular dose comparable to that of mammography, yielding projection data that contains high levels of noise. Iterative image reconstruction (IIR) algorithms may be well-suited for the system since they potentially reduce the effects of noise in the reconstructed images. However, IIR outcomes can be difficult to control since the algorithm parameters do not directly correspond to the image properties. Also, IIR algorithms are computationally demanding and have optimal parameter settings that depend on the size and shape of the breast and positioning of the patient. In this work, we design an efficient IIR algorithm with meaningful parameter specifications and that can be used on a large, diverse sample of bCT cases. The flexibility and efficiency of this method comes from having the final image produced by a linear combination of two separately reconstructed images - one containing gray level information and the other with enhanced high frequency components. Both of the images result from few iterations of separate IIR algorithms. The proposed algorithm depends on two parameters both of which have a well-defined impact on image quality. The algorithm is applied to numerous bCT cases from a dedicated bCT prototype system developed at University of California, Davis.

  11. A minimum spanning forest based classification method for dedicated breast CT images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pike, Robert [Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia 30329 (United States); Sechopoulos, Ioannis [Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia 30329 and Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States); Fei, Baowei, E-mail: bfei@emory.edu [Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia 30329 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Emory University and Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States); Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States); Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: To develop and test an automated algorithm to classify different types of tissue in dedicated breast CT images. Methods: Images of a single breast of five different patients were acquired with a dedicated breast CT clinical prototype. The breast CT images were processed by a multiscale bilateral filter to reduce noise while keeping edge information and were corrected to overcome cupping artifacts. As skin and glandular tissue have similar CT values on breast CT images, morphologic processing is used to identify the skin based on its position information. A support vector machine (SVM) is trained and the resulting model used to create a pixelwise classification map of fat and glandular tissue. By combining the results of the skin mask with the SVM results, the breast tissue is classified as skin, fat, and glandular tissue. This map is then used to identify markers for a minimum spanning forest that is grown to segment the image using spatial and intensity information. To evaluate the authors’ classification method, they use DICE overlap ratios to compare the results of the automated classification to those obtained by manual segmentation on five patient images. Results: Comparison between the automatic and the manual segmentation shows that the minimum spanning forest based classification method was able to successfully classify dedicated breast CT image with average DICE ratios of 96.9%, 89.8%, and 89.5% for fat, glandular, and skin tissue, respectively. Conclusions: A 2D minimum spanning forest based classification method was proposed and evaluated for classifying the fat, skin, and glandular tissue in dedicated breast CT images. The classification method can be used for dense breast tissue quantification, radiation dose assessment, and other applications in breast imaging.

  12. Three dimensional CT of stapes. Stapedial imagings in dry temporal bone and clinical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edamatsu, Hideo; Kubota, Osamu; Yamashita, Koichi [Kanazawa Medical Univ., Ishikawa (Japan)

    1995-03-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the usefulness and limitations of three dimensional (3-D) imagings of stapes in the middle ear by high speed helical CT. One dissected human temporal bone, ten normal and diseased ears were scanned with a slice of 1.0 mm and reconstructed in a thickness of 0.2-0.5 mm. Every specimen of 3-D can be observed in any plane and from any direction. Ossicular imagings of the temporal bone in 3-D were reconstructed as if the malleus, incus and stapes were observed under microscope. The whole structure of stapes was impossible to be represented by two dimensional CT heretofore in use, but 3-D in our study showed the head, crus and foot plate of the stapes in detail. Stapedial imagings of 3-D CT in normal ears showed the same findings as those recorded in temporal bone. Preoperative diagnostic findings of ossicles in the affected ears were very useful. Especially in ossicular anomalies, 3-D CT was positive in diagnosis and its accuracies were confirmed with operative observation. For the postoperative evaluation concerning the ossicular reconstruction, i.e. TORP and PORP, 3-D CT was also important method. It could present an anatomical relation between those prosthesis and the oval window. High speed helical CT can scan an object more quickly and clearly than formerly used CT, and its biological damage for human is less than that of the others. 3-D CT can be more clearly reconstructed with helical CT than former CT. (author).

  13. PET/CT (and CT) instrumentation, image reconstruction and data transfer for radiotherapy planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattler, Bernhard; Lee, John A; Lonsdale, Markus; Coche, Emmanuel

    2010-09-01

    The positron emission tomography in combination with CT in hybrid, cross-modality imaging systems (PET/CT) gains more and more importance as a part of the treatment-planning procedure in radiotherapy. Positron emission tomography (PET), as a integral part of nuclear medicine imaging and non-invasive imaging technique, offers the visualization and quantification of pre-selected tracer metabolism. In combination with the structural information from CT, this molecular imaging technique has great potential to support and improve the outcome of the treatment-planning procedure prior to radiotherapy. By the choice of the PET-Tracer, a variety of different metabolic processes can be visualized. First and foremost, this is the glucose metabolism of a tissue as well as for instance hypoxia or cell proliferation. This paper comprises the system characteristics of hybrid PET/CT systems. Acquisition and processing protocols are described in general and modifications to cope with the special needs in radiooncology. This starts with the different position of the patient on a special table top, continues with the use of the same fixation material as used for positioning of the patient in radiooncology while simulation and irradiation and leads to special processing protocols that include the delineation of the volumes that are subject to treatment planning and irradiation (PTV, GTV, CTV, etc.). General CT acquisition and processing parameters as well as the use of contrast enhancement of the CT are described. The possible risks and pitfalls the investigator could face during the hybrid-imaging procedure are explained and listed. The interdisciplinary use of different imaging modalities implies a increase of the volume of data created. These data need to be stored and communicated fast, safe and correct. Therefore, the DICOM-Standard provides objects and classes for this purpose (DICOM RT). Furthermore, the standard DICOM objects and classes for nuclear medicine (NM, PT) and

  14. Prior CT imaging history for patients who undergo PAN CT for acute traumatic injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy Kenter

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective. A single PAN scan may provide more radiation to a patient than is felt to be safe within a one-year period. Our objective was to determine how many patients admitted to the trauma service following a PAN scan had prior CT imaging within our six-hospital system.Methods. We performed a secondary analysis of a prospectively collected trauma registry. The study was based at a level-two trauma center and five affiliated hospitals, which comprise 70.6% of all Emergency Department visits within a twelve county region of southern Texas. Electronic medical records were reviewed dating from the point of trauma evaluation back to December 5, 2005 to determine evidence of prior CT imaging.Results. There were 867 patients were admitted to the trauma service between January 1, 2012 and December 31, 2012. 460 (53% received a PAN scan and were included in the study group. The mean age of the study group was 37.7 ± 1.54 years old, 24.8% were female, and the mean ISS score was 13.4 ± 1.07. The most common mechanism of injury was motor vehicle collision (47%. 65 (14%; 95% CI [11–18]% of the patients had at least one prior CT. The most common prior studies performed were: CT head (29%; 19–42%, CT Face (29%; 19–42% and CT Abdomen and Pelvis (18%; 11–30%.Conclusion. Within our trauma registry, 14% of patients had prior CT imaging within our hospital system before their traumatic event and PAN scan.

  15. Liver recognition based on statistical shape model in CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Dehui; Jiang, Xueqing; Shi, Fei; Zhu, Weifang; Chen, Xinjian

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, an automatic method is proposed to recognize the liver on clinical 3D CT images. The proposed method effectively use statistical shape model of the liver. Our approach consist of three main parts: (1) model training, in which shape variability is detected using principal component analysis from the manual annotation; (2) model localization, in which a fast Euclidean distance transformation based method is able to localize the liver in CT images; (3) liver recognition, the initial mesh is locally and iteratively adapted to the liver boundary, which is constrained with the trained shape model. We validate our algorithm on a dataset which consists of 20 3D CT images obtained from different patients. The average ARVD was 8.99%, the average ASSD was 2.69mm, the average RMSD was 4.92mm, the average MSD was 28.841mm, and the average MSD was 13.31%.

  16. Image Fusion of CT/MRI using DWT , PCA Methods and Analog DSP Processor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonali Mane

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Medical image fusion is a technique in which useful information from two or more recorded medical images is integrated into a new image to offer as much details as possible for diagnosis. The fusion of different modality images are Computer Tomography (CT and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI by integrating the DWT & PCA methods. The decomposed coefficients of Discrete Wavelet Transformation (DWT are applied with the Principal Component Analysis (PCA to get fused image information. Choose decomposed coefficients by fusion rule and using inverse DWT to get the fussed image of two modalities CT and MRI. The RMSE and PSNR analysis shows better improvement on results. For the proposed fusion enhancement technique going to implement on the processor based kit or will show the hardware support.

  17. Utility of iodine overlay technique and virtual unenhanced images for the characterization of renal masses by dual-energy CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kyoung Doo; Kim, Chan Kyo; Park, Byung Kwan; Kim, Bohyun

    2011-12-01

    The objective of our study was to assess the utility of dual-energy CT for characterizing renal masses using iodine overlay techniques and virtual unenhanced images and to measure the potential radiation dose reduction for two-phase kidney CT compared with a standard three-phase protocol. Sixty patients with suspected renal masses underwent dual-energy CT including true unenhanced, dual-energy corticomedullary, and dual-energy late nephrographic phase imaging. Iodine overlay and virtual unenhanced images were derived from the corticomedullary and late nephrographic phases, respectively. The CT numbers of renal masses were calculated using the iodine overlay images superimposed on the virtual unenhanced images. The overall imaging quality of the true unenhanced images and of the virtual unenhanced images was also evaluated. The effective radiation doses for dual-energy CT and for true unenhanced imaging were calculated. For overlay or enhancement values on iodine overlay images, 36 simple cysts and 10 hemorrhagic cysts had an attenuation value of less than 20 HU, whereas 21 renal cell carcinomas showed an attenuation value of 20 HU or greater. Eleven angiomyolipomas contained macroscopic fat tissue. All renal masses were accurately classified on the basis of dual-energy CT. The imaging quality of the virtual unenhanced images from the corticomedullary and late nephrographic phases was inferior to the image quality of the true unenhanced images (p overlay techniques and virtual unenhanced images may be useful for characterizing renal masses.

  18. Nasal polyps with metaplastic ossification: CT and MR imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yi Kyung; Kim, Hyung-Jin; Kim, Eunhee; Kim, Sung Tae [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jinna [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Seung-Kyu [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Young-Hyeh [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-12-15

    Metaplastic ossification is a rare event in nasal polyps. The purpose of this study was to review the computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings of nasal polyps with metaplastic ossification. CT (n = 5) and MR (n = 3) images of five patients (four men and one woman; mean age, 59 years) with surgically proven nasal polyp with metaplastic ossification were retrospectively reviewed. The location and morphologic characteristics of metaplastic ossification were documented as well. All lesions were seen as lobulated (n = 3), ovoid (n = 1), or dumbbell-shaped (n = 1) benign-looking masses with a mean size of 3.7 cm (range, 2.4-6.5 cm), located unilaterally in the posterior nasal cavity and nasopharynx (n = 2), posterior nasoethmoidal tract (n = 2), and maxillary sinus and nasal cavity (n = 1). Compared with the brain stem, the soft tissue components of all lesions demonstrated isoattenuation on precontrast CT scans, slight hypointensity on T1-weighted MR images, and hyperintensity on T2-weighted MR images. On contrast-enhanced MR images, heterogeneous enhancement with marked peripheral enhancement was seen in two and homogeneous moderate enhancement in one. All lesions contained centrally located radiodense materials on CT scans, the shape of which was multiple clustered in three, single nodular in one, and single large lobulated in one. Although rare, metaplastic ossification can occur within nasal polyps. The possibility of its diagnosis may be raised when one sees a benign-looking sinonasal mass with centrally located radiodense materials on CT scans. MR imaging may be useful when mycetoma or inverted papilloma cannot be ruled out on CT scans. (orig.)

  19. Combining transrectal ultrasound and CT for image-guided adaptive brachytherapy of cervical cancer: Proof of concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesvacil, Nicole; Schmid, Maximilian P; Pötter, Richard; Kronreif, Gernot; Kirisits, Christian

    To investigate the feasibility of a treatment planning workflow for three-dimensional image-guided cervix cancer brachytherapy, combining volumetric transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) for target definition with CT for dose optimization to organs at risk (OARs), for settings with no access to MRI. A workflow for TRUS/CT-based volumetric treatment planning was developed, based on a customized system including ultrasound probe, stepper unit, and software for image volume acquisition. A full TRUS/CT-based workflow was simulated in a clinical case and compared with MR- or CT-only delineation. High-risk clinical target volume was delineated on TRUS, and OARs were delineated on CT. Manually defined tandem/ring applicator positions on TRUS and CT were used as a reference for rigid registration of the image volumes. Treatment plan optimization for TRUS target and CT organ volumes was performed and compared to MRI and CT target contours. TRUS/CT-based contouring, applicator reconstruction, image fusion, and treatment planning were feasible, and the full workflow could be successfully demonstrated. The TRUS/CT plan fulfilled all clinical planning aims. Dose-volume histogram evaluation of the TRUS/CT-optimized plan (high-risk clinical target volume D90, OARs D2cm³ for) on different image modalities showed good agreement between dose values reported for TRUS/CT and MRI-only reference contours and large deviations for CT-only target parameters. A TRUS/CT-based workflow for full three-dimensional image-guided cervix brachytherapy treatment planning seems feasible and may be clinically comparable to MRI-based treatment planning. Further development to solve challenges with applicator definition in the TRUS volume is required before systematic applicability of this workflow. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The utilization of dual source CT in imaging of polytrauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicolaou, S. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver General Hospital, Department of Radiology, 899 West 12th Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia, V5Z1M9 (Canada)], E-mail: savvas.nicolaou@vch.ca; Eftekhari, A.; Sedlic, T.; Hou, D.J.; Mudri, M.J.; Aldrich, John; Louis, L. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver General Hospital, Department of Radiology, 899 West 12th Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia, V5Z1M9 (Canada)

    2008-12-15

    Despite the growing role of imaging, trauma remains the leading cause of death in people below the age of 45 years in the western industrialized countries. Trauma has been touted as the largest epidemic in the 20th century. The advent of MDCT has been the greatest advance in trauma care in the last 25 years. However, there are still challenges in CT imaging of the polytrauma individual including time restraints, diagnostic errors, radiation dose effects and bridging the gap between anatomy and physiology. This article will analyze these challenges and provide possible solutions offered by the unique design of the dual source CT scanner.

  1. Cerebral infarction on 99mTc-MDP SPECT/CT imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jia; Hu, Shuang; Wang, Haitao; Kuang, Anren

    2013-11-01

    A 70-year-old man with lung cancer underwent whole-body MDP bone scintigraphy to evaluate bone metastases that showed marked tracer uptake in the right side of the head, suggestive of skull metastasis. SPECT/CT imaging was performed for further evaluation. The SPECT images demonstrated increased MDP activity in the region of the brain perfused by the right middle cerebral artery. On CT images, there was a large hypoattenuation area corresponding to elevated MDP accumulation. At the same day, magnetic resonance angiography of the brain revealed occlusion of the right middle cerebral artery.

  2. PET/CT imaging of abdominal aorta with intramural hematomas, penetrating ulcer, and saccular pseudoaneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Vien X; Nguyen, Ba D

    2014-05-01

    Acute aortic syndromes, encompassing intramural hematoma, penetrating ulcer, and pseudoaneurysm, are best demonstrated by angiographic CT and magnetic resonance imaging. These imaging modalities provide an accurate evaluation and allow timely therapies of these frequently symptomatic lesions, thus reducing their morbidity and mortality. The inflammatory pathogenesis of these acute aortic syndromes may exhibit positive PET findings predictive of prognosis and outcomes of these vascular events. The authors present a case of PET/CT imaging showing asymptomatic intramural hematomas with penetrating ulcer and saccular pseudoaneurysm of the proximal abdominal aorta.

  3. PET/CT imaging in lung cancer: indications and findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Hochhegger

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of PET/CT imaging in the work-up and management of patients with lung cancer has greatly increased in recent decades. The ability to combine functional and anatomical information has equipped PET/CT to look into various aspects of lung cancer, allowing more precise disease staging and providing useful data during the characterization of indeterminate pulmonary nodules. In addition, the accuracy of PET/CT has been shown to be greater than is that of conventional modalities in some scenarios, making PET/CT a valuable noninvasive method for the investigation of lung cancer. However, the interpretation of PET/CT findings presents numerous pitfalls and potential confounders. Therefore, it is imperative for pulmonologists and radiologists to familiarize themselves with the most relevant indications for and limitations of PET/CT, seeking to protect their patients from unnecessary radiation exposure and inappropriate treatment. This review article aimed to summarize the basic principles, indications, cancer staging considerations, and future applications related to the use of PET/CT in lung cancer.

  4. Dual-energy compared to single-energy CT in pediatric imaging: a phantom study for DECT clinical guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Xiaowei; Servaes, Sabah; Darge, Kassa [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); University of Pennsylvania, The Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States); McCullough, William P. [University of Virginia Health System, Department of Radiology and Medical Imaging, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Mecca, Patricia [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2016-11-15

    Dual-energy CT technology is available on scanners from several vendors and offers significant advantages over classic single-energy CT technology in multiple clinical applications. Many studies have detailed dual-energy CT applications in adults and several have evaluated the relative radiation dose performance of dual-energy CT in adult imaging. However, little has been published on dual-energy CT imaging in the pediatric population, and the relative dose performance of dual-energy CT imaging in the pediatric population is not well described. When evaluating dual-energy CT technology for implementation into a routine clinical pediatric imaging practice, the radiation dose implications must be considered, and when comparing relative CT dose performance, image quality must also be evaluated. Therefore the purpose of this study is to develop dual-energy CT scan protocols based on our optimized single-energy scan protocols and compare the dose. We scanned the head, chest and abdomen regions of pediatric-size anthropomorphic phantoms with contrast inserts, using our optimized single-energy clinical imaging protocols on a Siemens Flash {sup registered} CT scanner. We then scanned the phantoms in dual-energy mode using matching image-quality reference settings. The effective CT dose index volume (CTDI{sub vol}) of the scans was used as a surrogate for relative dose in comparing the single- and dual-energy scans. Additionally, we evaluated image quality using visual assessment and contrast-to-noise ratio. Dual-energy CT scans of the head and abdomen were dose-neutral for all three phantoms. Dual-energy CT scans of the chest showed a relative dose increase over the single-energy scan for 1- and 5-year-old child-based age-equivalent phantoms, ranging 11-20%. Quantitative analysis of image quality showed no statistically significant difference in image quality between the single-energy and dual-energy scans. There was no clinically significant difference in image quality by

  5. Evaluation of GMI and PMI diffeomorphic-based demons algorithms for aligning PET and CT Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Juan; Wang, Hongjun; Zhang, You; Yin, Yong

    2015-07-08

    Fusion of anatomic information in computed tomography (CT) and functional information in 18F-FDG positron emission tomography (PET) is crucial for accurate differentiation of tumor from benign masses, designing radiotherapy treatment plan and staging of cancer. Although current PET and CT images can be acquired from combined 18F-FDG PET/CT scanner, the two acquisitions are scanned separately and take a long time, which may induce potential positional errors in global and local caused by respiratory motion or organ peristalsis. So registration (alignment) of whole-body PET and CT images is a prerequisite for their meaningful fusion. The purpose of this study was to assess the performance of two multimodal registration algorithms for aligning PET and CT images. The proposed gradient of mutual information (GMI)-based demons algorithm, which incorporated the GMI between two images as an external force to facilitate the alignment, was compared with the point-wise mutual information (PMI) diffeomorphic-based demons algorithm whose external force was modified by replacing the image intensity difference in diffeomorphic demons algorithm with the PMI to make it appropriate for multimodal image registration. Eight patients with esophageal cancer(s) were enrolled in this IRB-approved study. Whole-body PET and CT images were acquired from a combined 18F-FDG PET/CT scanner for each patient. The modified Hausdorff distance (d(MH)) was used to evaluate the registration accuracy of the two algorithms. Of all patients, the mean values and standard deviations (SDs) of d(MH) were 6.65 (± 1.90) voxels and 6.01 (± 1.90) after the GMI-based demons and the PMI diffeomorphic-based demons registration algorithms respectively. Preliminary results on oncological patients showed that the respiratory motion and organ peristalsis in PET/CT esophageal images could not be neglected, although a combined 18F-FDG PET/CT scanner was used for image acquisition. The PMI diffeomorphic-based demons

  6. PET/CT Imaging and Radioimmunotherapy of Prostate Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouchelouche, Kirsten; Tagawa, Scott T; Goldsmith, Stanley J;

    2011-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a common cancer in men and continues to be a major health problem. Imaging plays an important role in the clinical management of patients with prostate cancer. An important goal for prostate cancer imaging is more accurate disease characterization through the synthesis...... disease (ideal for antigen access and antibody delivery). Furthermore, prostate cancer is also radiation sensitive. Prostate-specific membrane antigen is expressed by virtually all prostate cancers, and represents an attractive target for RIT. Antiprostate-specific membrane antigen RIT demonstrates...... of anatomic, functional, and molecular imaging information. Positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) in oncology is emerging as an important imaging tool. The most common radiotracer for PET/CT in oncology, (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), is not very useful in the imaging of prostate cancer...

  7. CT-diskography in patients with sciatica. Comparison with plain CT and MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dullerud, R. [Ullevaal Univ. Hospital, Oslo (Norway). Section of Neuroradiology; Johansen, J.G. [Ullevaal Univ. Hospital, Oslo (Norway). Section of Neuroradiology

    1995-09-01

    The findings at CT-diskography (CT-D), including recording of the pain introduced at contrast injection, were compared with plain CT and MR imaging in 111 disks in 101 patients aged 18 to 68 years. Six disks which were normal at CT had normal CT-D and 5 of them had normal signal on MR imaging. The degree of annular degeneration and the depth of the annular tears were significantly associated with each other and with loss of disk height, but not with size or location of the hernias. Only the depth of the tears was significantly associated with loss of signal on MR. However, frequently complete annular tears and severe annular degeneration were seen in association with small bulges and hernias, even in disks with normal or slightly reduced signal on MR and with normal height. The type and intensity of the pain introduced were associated with each other and with the depth of the annular tears, but not with the degree of annular degeneration, size of the hernia or the MR signal intensity of the disks. Annular degeneration and tears on one hand, and the type and intensity of pain introduced on the other, see to be related rather than separate phenomena. (orig./MG).

  8. Assessment of CT image quality using a Bayesian approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reginatto, M.; Anton, M.; Elster, C.

    2017-08-01

    One of the most promising approaches for evaluating CT image quality is task-specific quality assessment. This involves a simplified version of a clinical task, e.g. deciding whether an image belongs to the class of images that contain the signature of a lesion or not. Task-specific quality assessment can be done by model observers, which are mathematical procedures that carry out the classification task. The most widely used figure of merit for CT image quality is the area under the ROC curve (AUC), a quantity which characterizes the performance of a given model observer. In order to estimate AUC from a finite sample of images, different approaches from classical statistics have been suggested. The goal of this paper is to introduce task-specific quality assessment of CT images to metrology and to propose a novel Bayesian estimation of AUC for the channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) applied to the task of detecting a lesion at a known image location. It is assumed that signal-present and signal-absent images follow multivariate normal distributions with the same covariance matrix. The Bayesian approach results in a posterior distribution for the AUC of the CHO which provides in addition a complete characterization of the uncertainty of this figure of merit. The approach is illustrated by its application to both simulated and experimental data.

  9. CT image segmentation using FEM with optimized boundary condition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Hishida

    Full Text Available The authors propose a CT image segmentation method using structural analysis that is useful for objects with structural dynamic characteristics. Motivation of our research is from the area of genetic activity. In order to reveal the roles of genes, it is necessary to create mutant mice and measure differences among them by scanning their skeletons with an X-ray CT scanner. The CT image needs to be manually segmented into pieces of the bones. It is a very time consuming to manually segment many mutant mouse models in order to reveal the roles of genes. It is desirable to make this segmentation procedure automatic. Although numerous papers in the past have proposed segmentation techniques, no general segmentation method for skeletons of living creatures has been established. Against this background, the authors propose a segmentation method based on the concept of destruction analogy. To realize this concept, structural analysis is performed using the finite element method (FEM, as structurally weak areas can be expected to break under conditions of stress. The contribution of the method is its novelty, as no studies have so far used structural analysis for image segmentation. The method's implementation involves three steps. First, finite elements are created directly from the pixels of a CT image, and then candidates are also selected in areas where segmentation is thought to be appropriate. The second step involves destruction analogy to find a single candidate with high strain chosen as the segmentation target. The boundary conditions for FEM are also set automatically. Then, destruction analogy is implemented by replacing pixels with high strain as background ones, and this process is iterated until object is decomposed into two parts. Here, CT image segmentation is demonstrated using various types of CT imagery.

  10. CT and MR image fusion scheme in nonsubsampled contourlet transform domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganasala, Padma; Kumar, Vinod

    2014-06-01

    Fusion of CT and MR images allows simultaneous visualization of details of bony anatomy provided by CT image and details of soft tissue anatomy provided by MR image. This helps the radiologist for the precise diagnosis of disease and for more effective interventional treatment procedures. This paper aims at designing an effective CT and MR image fusion method. In the proposed method, first source images are decomposed by using nonsubsampled contourlet transform (NSCT) which is a shift-invariant, multiresolution and multidirection image decomposition transform. Maximum entropy of square of the coefficients with in a local window is used for low-frequency sub-band coefficient selection. Maximum weighted sum-modified Laplacian is used for high-frequency sub-bands coefficient selection. Finally fused image is obtained through inverse NSCT. CT and MR images of different cases have been used to test the proposed method and results are compared with those of the other conventional image fusion methods. Both visual analysis and quantitative evaluation of experimental results shows the superiority of proposed method as compared to other methods.

  11. Edge-oriented dual-dictionary guided enrichment (EDGE) for MRI-CT image reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liang; Wang, Bigong; Wang, Ge

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we formulate the joint/simultaneous X-ray CT and MRI image reconstruction. In particular, a novel algorithm is proposed for MRI image reconstruction from highly under-sampled MRI data and CT images. It consists of two steps. First, a training dataset is generated from a series of well-registered MRI and CT images on the same patients. Then, an initial MRI image of a patient can be reconstructed via edge-oriented dual-dictionary guided enrichment (EDGE) based on the training dataset and a CT image of the patient. Second, an MRI image is reconstructed using the dictionary learning (DL) algorithm from highly under-sampled k-space data and the initial MRI image. Our algorithm can establish a one-to-one correspondence between the two imaging modalities, and obtain a good initial MRI estimation. Both noise-free and noisy simulation studies were performed to evaluate and validate the proposed algorithm. The results with different under-sampling factors show that the proposed algorithm performed significantly better than those reconstructed using the DL algorithm from MRI data alone.

  12. Sensitivity study of an image processing workflow on synchrotron μ-CT images of Berea sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leu, Leon; Berg, Steffen; Ott, Holger; Armstrong, Ryan T.; Enzmann, Frieder; Kersten, Michael

    2014-05-01

    For the present study, the sensitivity of the threshold value for watershed-based segmentation and global threshold segmentation was assessed on μ-CT images of fine grained Berea sandstone. The sensitivities were assessed in terms of porosity, permeability, single-phase flow simulations and capillary pressure curves that were calculated from the segmented data. The μ-CT images of fine grained Berea sandstone with a resolution of 3 μm/pixel was segmented using different threshold values that were systematically varied, which resulted in slightly different structures for the pore space. The results show, that watershed-based segmentation is more robust than global threshold segmentation and that the measured permeability showed a stronger sensitivity to threshold variation than porosity, indicating that it is a more sensitive parameter to image segmentation settings. Calculated permeability and capillary pressure curves matched well with experimental data revealing that the average pores and pore throats of the watershed-based segmented structure were segmented accurately. In contrast, capillary pressure curves indicated that pore sizes near the resolution limit of 3 μm, located in kaolinite rich areas of the rock, were not segmented correctly and thus caused the disagreement between the experimental measured porosity and that measured from the digital rock image. We conclude that capillary pressure curves and permeability values that result from the digital rock data is more indicative of the flow relevant fraction of the pore structure and are therefore better suited as validation criterion than porosity data. Numerical modeling of two-phase flow on segmented data from high resolution μ-CT images enhances our understanding of the dynamics of multiphase-flow of immiscible fluids at the pore-scale. To be confident about simulated data it is therefore important to identify meaningful properties, e.g. permeability, that can be used as benchmark parameters for

  13. CT scan of the brain (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... CAT scan (computed tomography) is a much more sensitive imaging technique than x-ray, allowing high definition not only of the bony structures, but of the soft tissues. Clear images of organs such as the brain, muscles, joint structures, veins ...

  14. CEREBRAL HYDATID DISEASE: CT AND MR IMAGING FINDINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Cerebral hydatid disease is very rare, representing only 2% of all cerebral space occupying lesions even in the countries where the disease is endemic. The aim of this paper is to describe the characteristic features of cerebral hydatid disease in computed tomography (CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. METHODS: Here is a case 25yr/m who presented to neurosurgery OPD with complaints of headache, vomiting, right sided weakness and seizures for 2 weeks. CT and MRI were the imaging modalities to reach the diagnosis which was pathologically confirmed postoperatively as hydatid disease. RESULTS: CT and MR imaging findings of E. granulosus lesions were well defined, smooth thin-walled, spherical, homogeneous cystic lesions with no contrast enhancement, no calcification, and no surrounding oedema. CONCLUSION: Although cystic cerebral hydatid disease is well demonstrated by CT and MR examinations, CT is superior in detecting calcification in the cyst, when present, MR is better in demonstrating cyst capsule, detecting multiplicity and defining the anatomic relationship of the lesion with the adjacent structures, and it is more helpful in surgical planning.

  15. Imaging of jaw with dental CT software program: Normal Anatomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Myong Gon; Seo, Kwang Hee; Jung, Hak Young; Sung, Nak Kwan; Chung, Duk Soo; Kim, Ok Dong [School of Medicine, Taegu Catholic University, Taegu (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Young Hwan [Taegu Armed Forces General Hospital, Taegu (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-07-15

    Dental CT software program can provide reformatted cross-sectional and panoramic images that cannot be obtained with conventional axial and direct coronal CT scan. The purpose of this study is to describe the method of the technique and to identify the precise anatomy of jaw. We evaluated 13 mandibles and 7 maxillae of 15 subjects without bony disease who were being considered for endosseous dental implants. Reformatted images obtained by the use of bone algorithm performed on GE HiSpeed Advantage CT scanner were retrospectively reviewed for detailed anatomy of jaw. Anatomy related to neurovascular bundle(mandibular foramen, inferior alveolar canal, mental foramen, canal for incisive artery, nutrient canal, lingual foramen and mylohyoid groove), muscular insertion(mylohyoid line, superior and inferior genial tubercle and digastric fossa) and other anatomy(submandibular fossa, sublingual fossa, contour of alveolar process, oblique line, retromolar fossa, temporal crest and retromolar triangle) were well delineated in mandible. In maxilla, anatomy related to neurovascular bundle(greater palatine foramen and groove, nasopalatine canal and incisive foramen) and other anatomy(alveolar process, maxillary sinus and nasal fossa) were also well delineated. Reformatted images using dental CT software program provided excellent delineation of the jaw anatomy. Therefore, dental CT software program can play an important role in the preoperative assessment of mandible and maxilla for dental implants and other surgical conditions.

  16. New frontiers in CT imaging of airway disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grenier, Philippe A.; Beigelman-Aubry, Catherine [Department of Radiology, University Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris (France); Fetita, Catalin; Preteux, Francoise [Institut National des Telecommunications, Department ARTEMIS, Evry (France); Brauner, Michel W. [Avicenne Hospital, UFR SMBH Paris XIII, Bobigny (France); Lenoir, Stephane [Institut Mutualiste Montsouris, Paris (France)

    2002-05-01

    Combining helical volumetric CT acquisition and thin-slice thickness during breath hold provides an accurate assessment of both focal and diffuse airway diseases. With multiple detector rows, compared with single-slice helical CT, multislice CT can cover a greater volume, during a simple breath hold, and with better longitudinal and in-plane spatial resolution and improved temporal resolution. The result in data set allows the generation of superior multiplanar and 3D images of the airways, including those obtained from techniques developed specifically for airway imaging, such as virtual bronchography and virtual bronchoscopy. Complementary CT evaluation at suspended or continuous full expiration is mandatory to detect air trapping that is a key finding for depicting an obstruction on the small airways. Indications for CT evaluation of the airways include: (a) detection of endobronchial lesions in patients with an unexplained hemoptysis; (b) evaluation of extent of tracheobronchial stenosis for planning treatment and follow-up; (c) detection of congenital airway anomalies revealed by hemoptysis or recurrent infection; (d) detection of postinfectious or postoperative airway fistula or dehiscence; and (e) diagnosis and assessment of extent of bronchiectasis and small airway disease. Improvement in image analysis technique and the use of spirometrically control of lung volume acquisition have made possible accurate and reproducible quantitative assessment of airway wall and lumen areas and lung density. This contributes to better insights in physiopathology of obstructive lung disease, particularly in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma. (orig.)

  17. Surgical stent for dental implant using cone beam CT images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hyung Soo; Kim, Gyu Tae; Choi, Yong Suk; Hwang, Eui Hwan [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, School of Dentistry, Kung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-12-15

    The purpose of this study is to develop a surgical stent for dental implant procedure that can be easily applied and affordable by using cone beam computerized tomography (CBCT). Aluminum, Teflon-PFA (perfluoroalkoxy), and acetal (polyoxymethylene plastic) were selected as materials for the surgical stent. Among these three materials, the appropriate material was chosen using the CBCT images. The surgical stent, which could be easily placed into an oral cavity, was designed with chosen material. CBCT images of the new surgical stent on mandible were obtained using Alphard-3030 dental CT system (Asahi Roentgen Co., Ltd., Kyoto, Japan). The point of insertion was prescribed on the surgical stent with the multiplanar reconstruction software of OnDemand3D (CyberMed Inc., Seoul, Korea). Guide holes were made at the point of insertion on the surgical stent using newly designed guide jig. CBCT scans was taken for the second time to verify the accuracy of the newly designed surgical stent. Teflon-PFA showed radiologically excellent image characteristics for the surgical stent. High accuracy and reproducibility of implantation were confirmed with the surgical stent. The newly designed surgical stent can lead to the accurate implantation and achieve the clinically predictable result.

  18. "Conventional" CT images from spectral measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajbhandary, Paurakh L.; Pelc, Norbert J.

    2016-03-01

    Spectral imaging systems need to be able to produce "conventional" images, and it's been shown that systems with energy discriminating detectors can achieve higher CNR than conventional systems by optimal weighting. Combining measured data in energy bins (EBs) and also combining basis material images have previously been proposed, but there are no studies systematically comparing the two methods. In this paper, we analytically evaluate the two methods for systems with ideal photon counting detectors using CNR and beam hardening (BH) artifact as metrics. For a 120-kVp polychromatic simulations of a water phantom with low contrast inserts, the difference of the optimal CNR between the two methods for the studied phantom is within 2%. For a polychromatic spectrum, beam-hardening artifacts are noticeable in EB weighted images (BH artifact of 3.8% for 8 EB and 6.9% for 2 EB), while weighted basis material images are free of such artifacts.

  19. Electronic noise in CT detectors: Impact on image noise and artifacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Xinhui; Wang, Jia; Leng, Shuai; Schmidt, Bernhard; Allmendinger, Thomas; Grant, Katharine; Flohr, Thomas; McCollough, Cynthia H

    2013-10-01

    The objective of our study was to evaluate in phantoms the differences in CT image noise and artifact level between two types of commercial CT detectors: one with distributed electronics (conventional) and one with integrated electronics intended to decrease system electronic noise. Cylindric water phantoms of 20, 30, and 40 cm in diameter were scanned using two CT scanners, one equipped with integrated detector electronics and one with distributed detector electronics. All other scanning parameters were identical. Scans were acquired at four tube potentials and 10 tube currents. Semianthropomorphic phantoms were scanned to mimic the shoulder and abdominal regions. Images of two patients were also selected to show the clinical values of the integrated detector. Reduction of image noise with the integrated detector depended on phantom size, tube potential, and tube current. Scans that had low detected signal had the greatest reductions in noise, up to 40% for a 30-cm phantom scanned using 80 kV. This noise reduction translated into up to 50% in dose reduction to achieve equivalent image noise. Streak artifacts through regions of high attenuation were reduced by up to 45% on scans obtained using the integrated detector. Patient images also showed superior image quality for the integrated detector. For the same applied radiation level, the use of integrated electronics in a CT detector showed a substantially reduced level of electronic noise, resulting in reductions in image noise and artifacts, compared with detectors having distributed electronics.

  20. PET/CT imaging in head and neck tumors; PET-CT-Bildgebung bei Kopf-Hals-Tumoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roedel, R.; Palmedo, H.; Reichmann, K.; Reinhardt, M.J.; Biersack, H.J. [Universitaetsklinikum Bonn, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin (Germany); Straehler-Pohl, H.J. [Universitaetsklinikum Bonn, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Hals-, Nasen- und Ohrenheilkunde (Germany); Jaeger, U. [Universitaetsklinikum Bonn, Radiologische Klinik (Germany)

    2004-11-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of combined PET/CT examinations for detection of malignant tumors and their metastases in head and neck oncology. 51 patients received whole body scans on a dual modality PET/CT system. CT was performed without i.v. contrast. The results were compared concerning the diagnostic impact of native CT scan on FDG-PET images and the additional value of fused imaging. From 153 lesions were 97 classified as malignant on CT and 136 on FDG/PET images, as suspicious for malignancy in 33 on CT and 7 on FDG-PET and as benign in 23 on CT and 10 on FDG-PET. With combined PET/CT all primary and recurrent tumors could be found, the detection rate in patients with unknown primary tumors was 45%. Compared to PET or CT alone the sensitivity, specifity and accuracy could be significantly improved by means of combined PET/CT. Fused PET/CT imaging with [F18]-FDG and native CT-scanning enables accurate diagnosis in 93% of lesions and 90% of patients with head and neck oncology. (orig.) [German] Die Bestimmung der Wertigkeit der kombinierten PET-CT-Untersuchung zum Nachweis maligner Kopf-Hals-Tumoren und ihrer Metastasen. Bei 51 Patienten wurden Ganzkoerperuntersuchungen mit dem kombiniertem PET-CT-System durchgefuehrt. Die CT erfolgte ohne i.v. Kontrastmittelgabe. Die Ergebnisse wurden in ihrer diagnostischen Aussage einerseits getrennt fuer native CT- und FDG-PET-Bildgebung und andererseits fuer das fusionierte Bild verglichen. Von 153 Laesionen wurden 97 im CT und 136 im FDG-PET als maligne, 33 im CT und 7 im FDG-PET als malignitaetsverdaechtig, 23 im CT und 10 in der FDG-PET als benigne beurteilt. Die Anzahl der konkordanten Ergebnisse betrug 94 (61%), die der diskordanten 59 (39 %). Mit der PET-CT konnten alle Primaertumoren und Rezidive entdeckt werden, die Nachweisrate eines unbekannten Primaertumors betrug 45%. Im Vergleich zur alleinigen PET- oder CT-Untersuchung erhoehen sich bei der kombinierten PET-CT Sensitivitaet, Spezifitaet sowie die

  1. Multiple Diagnostic Imaging of a Patient with Solid Pseudopapillary Tumour of the Pancreas: EUS, CT and FDG PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chong, Ari; Ha, Jungmin; Kwon, Seong Young [Chosun Univ. Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-15

    Solid pseudopapillary neoplam of the pancreas (SPNP) is a rare tumour, making up approximately 1 % to 3 % of pancreatic tumours. About 90 % of SPNPs occur in young women (mean age 35 years). SPNP rarely causes symptoms and is usually detected incidentally. Differentiating SPNP from other pancreatic tumours is very important, because surgical resection may provide favourable outcomes. Metastases or invasion to other organs has been reported in 15% to 20% of patients with SPNP. Histologically, the uniform, bland-appearing, epithelial cells of SPNP are similar to the cells making up other pancreatic endocrine neoplasms. However, SPNP cannot be regarded as a pure pancreatic endocrine neoplasm because of the absence of chromogranin A expression and low expression of other endocrine markers. SPNP has not been associated with specific serum tumour markers. CT and MRI are used for the diagnosis and staging of SPNP. On contrast-enhanced CT, SPNP shows isoattenuation on precontrast CT, weak enhancement during the arterial phase and gradually increased enhancement during the portal venous phase. SPNP can appear as an encapsulated lesion with cystic degeneration, necrosis, haemorrhage or calcification. MRI can characterise internal signal intensities, including a blood component, which is helpful in making a differential diagnosis. Dong et al. analysed CT and MRI findings from eight patients with SPNP and reported that four lesions showed mixed solid and cystic components, and the others appeared almost completely solid. Stoita et al. reported that EUS-guided fine-needle aspiration was a minimally invasive, safe and reliable diagnostic method for SPNP. They reported that all seven lesions examined were hypoechoic, heterogeneous and well circumscribed. Their findings are very similar to the findings in our patient. In addition, it is clear from the EUS images of our patient that EUS provides better images for evaluating SPNP lesions than US of the pancreas (Figs. 1e and f and 2

  2. Fusion imaging of real-time ultrasonography with CT or MRI for hepatic intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Woo Lee

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available

    With the technical development of ultrasonography (US, electromagnetic tracking-based fusion imaging of real-time US and computed tomography/magnetic resonance (CT/MR images has been used for percutaneous hepatic intervention such as biopsy and radiofrequency ablation (RFA. Because of the fusion imaging technique, the fused CT or MR images show the same plane and move synchronously while performing real-time US. With this information, fusion imaging can enhance lesion detectability and reduce the false positive detection of focal hepatic lesions with poor sonographic conspicuity. Three-dimensional US can also be fused with realtime US for the percutaneous RFA of liver tumors requiring overlapping ablation. When fusion imaging is not sufficient for identifying small focal hepatic lesions, contrast-enhanced US can be added to fusion imaging.

  3. Fusion imaging of real-time ultrasonography with CT or MRI for hepatic intervention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Min Woo [Dept. of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    With the technical development of ultrasonography (US), electromagnetic tracking-based fusion imaging of real-time US and computed tomography/magnetic resonance (CT/MR) images has been used for percutaneous hepatic intervention such as biopsy and radiofrequency ablation (RFA). Because of the fusion imaging technique, the fused CT or MR images show the same plane and move synchronously while performing real-time US. With this information, fusion imaging can enhance lesion detectability and reduce the false positive detection of focal hepatic lesions with poor sonographic conspicuity. Three-dimensional US can also be fused with realtime US for the percutaneous RFA of liver tumors requiring overlapping ablation. When fusion imaging is not sufficient for identifying small focal hepatic lesions, contrast-enhanced US can be added to fusion imaging.

  4. Benign hormone-secreting adenoma within a larger adrenocortical mass showing intensely increased activity on (18)F-FDG PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, Georgios Z; Millo, Corina; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2016-10-01

    Adrenal adenomas usually show (18)F-FDG activity less than that of the liver parenchyma. However, lipid-poor and hormone-secreting adenomas have been reported to show mild (18)F-FDG avidity. We report on a 51-year-old female with clinical symptoms of hypercortisolemia and a large right adrenal mass detected on CT. Post-contrast CT images showed an enhancing focus in the lower pole of the mass, with corresponding markedly increased activity on (18)F-FDG PET/CT. Right adrenalectomy was performed and histology revealed a benign adenoma, indicating that functioning benign adenomas can show intensely increased metabolic activity on (18)F-FDG mimicking malignancy.

  5. CT-MR image data fusion for computer-assisted navigated surgery of orbital tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemec, Stefan Franz [Department of Radiology/Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University Vienna, Waehringerguertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)], E-mail: stefan.nemec@meduniwien.ac.at; Peloschek, Philipp; Schmook, Maria Theresa; Krestan, Christian Robert [Department of Radiology/Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University Vienna, Waehringerguertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Hauff, Wolfgang [Department of Ophthalmology, Medical University Vienna, Waehringerguertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Matula, Christian [Department of Neurosurgery, Medical University Vienna, Waehringerguertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Czerny, Christian [Department of Radiology/Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University Vienna, Waehringerguertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2010-02-15

    Purpose: To demonstrate the value of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the preoperative assessment of orbital tumors, and to present, particularly, CT and MR image data fusion for surgical planning and performance in computer-assisted navigated surgery of orbital tumors. Materials and methods: In this retrospective case series, 10 patients with orbital tumors and associated complaints underwent MDCT and MRI of the orbit. MDCT was performed at high resolution, with a bone window level setting in the axial plane. MRI was performed with an axial 3D T1-weighted (w) gradient-echo (GE) contrast-enhanced sequence, in addition to a standard MRI protocol. First, MDCT and MR images were used to diagnose tumorous lesions compared to histology as a standard of reference. Then, the image data sets from CT and 3D T1-w GE sequences were merged on a workstation to create CT-MR fusion images that were used for interventional planning and intraoperative image guidance. The intraoperative accuracy of the navigation unit was measured, defined as the deviation between the same landmark in the navigation image and the patient. Furthermore, the clinical preoperative status was compared to the patients' postoperative outcome. Results: Radiological and histological diagnosis, which revealed 7 benign and 3 malignant tumors, were concordant in 7 of 10 cases (70%). The CT-MR fusion images supported the surgeon in the preoperative planning and improved the surgical performance. The mean intraoperative accuracy of the navigation unit was 1.35 mm. Postoperatively, orbital complaints showed complete regression in 6 cases, were ameliorated notably in 3 cases, and remained unchanged in 1 case. Conclusion: CT and MRI are essential for the preoperative assessment of orbital tumors. CT-MR image data fusion is an accurate tool for planning the correct surgical procedure, and can improve surgical results in computer-assisted navigated surgery of

  6. Image quality assessment of a pre-clinical flat-panel volumetric micro-CT scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Louise Y.; Lee, Ting-Yim; Holdsworth, David W.

    2006-03-01

    Small animal imaging has recently become an area of increased interest because more human diseases can be modeled in transgenic and knockout rodents. Current micro-CT systems are capable of achieving spatial resolution on the order of 10 μm, giving highly detailed anatomical information. However, the speed of data acquisition of these systems is relatively slow, when compared with clinical CT systems. Dynamic CT perfusion imaging has proven to be a powerful tool clinically in detecting and diagnosing cancer, stroke, pulmonary and ischemic heart diseases. In order to perform this technique in mice and rats, quantitative CT images must be acquired at a rate of at least 1 Hz. Recently, a research pre-clinical CT scanner (eXplore Ultra, GE Healthcare) has been designed specifically for dynamic perfusion imaging in small animals. Using an amorphous silicon flat-panel detector and a clinical slip-ring gantry, this system is capable of acquiring volumetric image data at a rate of 1 Hz, with in-plane resolution of 150 μm, while covering the entire thoracic region of a mouse or whole organs of a rat. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the principal imaging performance of the micro-CT system, in terms of spatial resolution, image uniformity, linearity, dose and voxel noise for the feasibility of imaging mice and rats. Our investigations show that 3D images can be obtained with a limiting spatial resolution of 2.7 line pairs per mm and noise of 42 HU, using an acquisition interval of 8 seconds at an entrance dose of 6.4 cGy.

  7. Imaging of female pelvic malignancies regarding MRI, CT, and PET/CT. Pt. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brocker, Kerstin A.; Eichbaum, Michael; Sohn, Christof [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Obstetrics and Gynecology; Alt, Celine D.; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Hallscheidt, Peter [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology

    2011-10-15

    The goal of this article is to provide an overview of diagnostic standard operating procedures for both clinical and imaging assessment of cervical and endometrial carcinoma, sarcoma of the uterus, and primary pelvic non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The literature was reviewed for methods used to diagnose malignancies in the female pelvis with a special focus on the role of MRI as the imaging method of choice. Furthermore, CT findings and staging criteria for the mentioned malignancies are also provided. Whereas ultrasound still remains the imaging modality of choice in clinical practice for the early diagnosis of female pelvic malignancies, MRI is more frequently recognized as a diagnostic tool for its accuracy in tumor identification. MRI also plays a crucial role in the 3D pretreatment planning for brachytherapy especially in cervical cancer. In the future, PET/CT might achieve an important role for staging lymph nodes or distant metastases as well as tumor recurrence.

  8. Rigid registration of CT, MR and cryosection images using a GLCM framework

    OpenAIRE

    Bro-Nielsen, Morten; Grimson, E.; Mosges, R.

    1997-01-01

    The majority of the available rigid registration measures are based on a 2-dimensional histogram of corresponding grey-values in the registered images. This paper shows that these features are similar to a family of texture measures based on grey level co-occurrence matrices (GLCM). Features from the GLCM literature are compared to the current range of measures using images from the visible human data set. The voxel-based rigid registration of cryosection and CT images have not been reported ...

  9. Osteosarcoma of the jaws: demographic and CT imaging features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S; Shi, H; Yu, Q

    2012-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the patient demographic and CT imaging findings of primary osteosarcoma of the jaws. Methods 88 primary osteosarcomas of the jaws histopathologically diagnosed during 1997–2007 were reviewed. 21 cases of CT images were reviewed. Results Of 88 patients, 51 (58%) had tumours in the mandible and 37 (42%) in the maxilla. The mean age was 37.8 years (range 9–80 years). The male-to-female ratio was 1.32:1. The mean age of patients with mandibular lesions was 41.04 years and in those with maxillary lesions it was 33.3 years. CT imaging findings were available in 21 patients. In the maxilla (n = 9), all tumours (100%) arose from the alveolar ridge. In the mandible (n = 12), most tumours (9 cases, 75%), arose from the ramus and/or condyle. All except two lesions had the epicentrum within the medullary cavity of the involved bone. The presence of periosteal reaction was demonstrated in 13 cases (62%). Soft-tissue extension was present in 18 lesions (86%), with calcification identified in 13 (72%). Conclusions This study provides age, sex distribution, location and CT imaging features of primary osteosarcoma of the jaws. PMID:22074870

  10. CT and MR imaging findings of sphenoidal masses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Shoki; Higano, Shuichi (Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). School of Medicine); Ishii, Kiyoshi (and others)

    1994-07-01

    CT and MR imaging findings of 57 sphenoidal masses were retrospectively reviewed to assess the possibility of differential diagnosis between them. Various kinds of masses such as pituitary adenoma, epipharyngeal cancer, mucocele, chordoma, chondroma, chondrosarcoma, distant metastasis, multiple myeloma, fibrous dysplasia, craniopharyngioma, hemangiopericytoma, giant cell tumor, primary sphenoidal cancer, malignant melanoma, leukemia, histiocytosis X, and giant cell tumor were included in this series. CT scanning was performed in all cases using a spin-echo pulse sequence. The relative density of the masses, bony changes and calcification were evaluated on CT, and on MR images, signal intensity of the masses relative to the normal gray matter, contrast enhancement and extension/contour were evaluated. Although no single feature appeared to be specific to the masses, detection of calcification on CT, identification of the normal pituitary gland as deformed or displaced on T1-weighted images, signal intensity on T2-weighted images, and extension of the masses seemed to be useful and should be examined in terms of their ability to assist in differential diagnosis. Finally, accommodative classification of sphenoidal masses primarily based on presumed origin or mode of extension was attempted. (author).

  11. Software windows for the display of CT-images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gell, G.; Sager, W.D.; Toelly, E.

    1983-03-01

    Software windows are a flexible and general method for defining arbitrary functions for the mapping of Hounsfield-numbers of CT-scans on to the grey levels of the display image. The method which is illustrated with the aid of a few examples has been implemented on an EMI viewing console.

  12. Computer aided detection of oral lesions on CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galib, S.; Islam, F.; Abir, M.; Lee, H. K.

    2015-12-01

    Oral lesions are important findings on computed tomography (CT) images. In this study, a fully automatic method to detect oral lesions in mandibular region from dental CT images is proposed. Two methods were developed to recognize two types of lesions namely (1) Close border (CB) lesions and (2) Open border (OB) lesions, which cover most of the lesion types that can be found on CT images. For the detection of CB lesions, fifteen features were extracted from each initial lesion candidates and multi layer perceptron (MLP) neural network was used to classify suspicious regions. Moreover, OB lesions were detected using a rule based image processing method, where no feature extraction or classification algorithm were used. The results were validated using a CT dataset of 52 patients, where 22 patients had abnormalities and 30 patients were normal. Using non-training dataset, CB detection algorithm yielded 71% sensitivity with 0.31 false positives per patient. Furthermore, OB detection algorithm achieved 100% sensitivity with 0.13 false positives per patient. Results suggest that, the proposed framework, which consists of two methods, has the potential to be used in clinical context, and assist radiologists for better diagnosis.

  13. Hydatid disease of the spleen; Ultrasonography, CT and MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinner, W.N. von; Stridbeck, H. (Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, King Faisal Specialist Hospital, and Research Center, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia) Lund Univ. Hospital (Sweden))

    1992-09-01

    Seven patients with hydatid disease of the spleen were examined by radiography, ultrasound, CT, and in one case MR imaging. The observations were confirmed by patho-anatomic findings except in 2 patients where high indirect hemagglutination tests confirmed the diagnosis. (orig./MG).

  14. Combination of CT scanning and fluoroscopy imaging on a flat-panel CT scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasruck, M.; Gupta, R.; Reichardt, B.; Suess, Ch.; Schmidt, B.; Stierstorfer, K.; Popescu, S.; Brady, T.; Flohr, T.

    2006-03-01

    We developed and evaluated a prototype flat-panel detector based Volume CT (fpVCT) scanner. The fpVCT scanner consists of a Varian 4030CB a-Si flat-panel detector mounted in a multi slice CT-gantry (Siemens Medical Solutions). It provides a 25 cm field of view with 18 cm z-coverage at the isocenter. In addition to the standard tomographic scanning, fpVCT allows two new scan modes: (1) fluoroscopic imaging from any arbitrary rotation angle, and (2) continuous, time-resolved tomographic scanning of a dynamically changing viewing volume. Fluoroscopic imaging is feasible by modifying the standard CT gantry so that the imaging chain can be oriented along any user-selected rotation angle. Scanning with a stationary gantry, after it has been oriented, is equivalent to a conventional fluoroscopic examination. This scan mode enables combined use of high-resolution tomography and real-time fluoroscopy with a clinically usable field of view in the z direction. The second scan mode allows continuous observation of a timeevolving process such as perfusion. The gantry can be continuously rotated for up to 80 sec, with the rotation time ranging from 3 to 20 sec, to gather projection images of a dynamic process. The projection data, that provides a temporal log of the viewing volume, is then converted into multiple image stacks that capture the temporal evolution of a dynamic process. Studies using phantoms, ex vivo specimens, and live animals have confirmed that these new scanning modes are clinically usable and offer a unique view of the anatomy and physiology that heretofore has not been feasible using static CT scanning. At the current level of image quality and temporal resolution, several clinical applications such a dynamic angiography, tumor enhancement pattern and vascularity studies, organ perfusion, and interventional applications are in reach.

  15. Lumbar intraspinal juxtafacet cysts: MR imaging and CT-arthrography; Lumbale intraspinale Juxta-Facettenzysten: Kernspintomograpie und CT-Arthrographie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmid, G.; Jergas, M.; Pennekamp, W.; Bickert, U.; Koester, O. [Bochum Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin; Willburger, R. [Bochum Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Orthopaedie

    2002-10-01

    Purpose: To present data on the MR imaging appearance of lumbar intraspinal juxtafacet cysts (JFC) and to assess the importance of additional CT arthrography. Material and Methods: Twenty-eight patients (16 women, 12 men) with a mean age of 64 years (range: 43-82), who underwent MR imaging because of radicular pain or spinal claudication, were found to have an intraspinal cyst associated with the facet joint. In 14 patients, additional CT-arthrography was performed to determine whether a communication exists between the cyst and the facet joint and to try to rupture the cyst. Results: In T{sub 2}-weighted images, juxtafacet cysts show a typical pattern consisting of a hyperintense center and hypointense rim. The center is likely to be inhomogeneous because of recurrent hemorrhage in the cyst. In T1-weighted images, the cysts are hypo/isointense. Irregular hyperintensity may indicate subacute hemorrhage, which may aggravate the clinical symptoms. MR allows superior visualization of the cyst in all anatomical planes. It also enables assessment of typical accompanying changes, such as degenerative spondylolisthesis and facet hypertrophy. All patients, who had CT-arthrography, were found to have a direct communication between joint space and cyst. Transarticular rupture of the cyst was possible in five patients. Two of these five patients had good to excellent improvement, and the remaining three patients underwent surgery. (orig.) [German] Ziel: Darstellung der kernspintomographischen Charakteristika sowie Wertigkeit der CT-Arthrographie bei lumbalen intraspinalen Juxta-Facettenzysten (JFZ). Material und Methode: Bei 28 Patienten (16 w, 12 m) mit einem Durchschnittsalter von 64 Jahren (43-82 Jahre) wurde im Rahmen der Abklaerung einer Lumboischialgie oder einer Claudicatio spinalis eine intraspinale facettgelenksassoziierte Zyste durch CT/MR diagnostiziert. Bei 14 Patienten wurde eine CT-gesteuerte Arthrographie des betroffenen Intervertebralgelenks durchgefuehrt zum

  16. Reliability of visual assessment of non-contrast CT, CT angiography source images and CT perfusion in patients with suspected ischemic stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom van Seeters

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Good reliability of methods to assess the extent of ischemia in acute stroke is important for implementation in clinical practice, especially between observers with varying experience. Our aim was to determine inter- and intra-observer reliability of the 1/3 middle cerebral artery (MCA rule and the Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score (ASPECTS for different CT modalities in patients suspected of acute ischemic stroke. METHODS: We prospectively included 105 patients with acute neurological deficit due to suspected acute ischemic stroke within 9 hours after symptom onset. All patients underwent non-contrast CT, CT perfusion and CT angiography on admission. All images were evaluated twice for presence of ischemia, ischemia with >1/3 MCA involvement, and ASPECTS. Four observers evaluated twenty scans twice for intra-observer agreement. We used kappa statistics and intraclass correlation coefficient to calculate agreement. RESULTS: Inter-observer agreement for the 1/3 MCA rule and ASPECTS was fair to good for non-contrast CT, poor to good for CT angiography source images, but excellent for all CT perfusion maps (cerebral blood volume, mean transit time, and predicted penumbra and infarct maps. Intra-observer agreement for the 1/3 MCA rule and ASPECTS was poor to good for non-contrast CT, fair to moderate for CT angiography source images, and good to excellent for all CT perfusion maps. CONCLUSION: Between observers with a different level of experience, agreement on the radiological diagnosis of cerebral ischemia is much better for CT perfusion than for non-contrast CT and CT angiography source images, and therefore CT perfusion is a very reliable addition to standard stroke imaging.

  17. Fast and Automatic Ultrasound Simulation from CT Images

    OpenAIRE

    Weijian Cong; Jian Yang; Yue Liu; Yongtian Wang

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound is currently widely used in clinical diagnosis because of its fast and safe imaging principles. As the anatomical structures present in an ultrasound image are not as clear as CT or MRI. Physicians usually need advance clinical knowledge and experience to distinguish diseased tissues. Fast simulation of ultrasound provides a cost-effective way for the training and correlation of ultrasound and the anatomic structures. In this paper, a novel method is proposed for fast simulation of...

  18. Phase and amplitude binning for 4D-CT imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelnour, A. F.; Nehmeh, S. A.; Pan, T.; Humm, J. L.; Vernon, P.; Schöder, H.; Rosenzweig, K. E.; Mageras, G. S.; Yorke, E.; Larson, S. M.; Erdi, Y. E.

    2007-07-01

    We compare the consistency and accuracy of two image binning approaches used in 4D-CT imaging. One approach, phase binning (PB), assigns each breathing cycle 2π rad, within which the images are grouped. In amplitude binning (AB), the images are assigned bins according to the breathing signal's full amplitude. To quantitate both approaches we used a NEMA NU2-2001 IEC phantom oscillating in the axial direction and at random frequencies and amplitudes, approximately simulating a patient's breathing. 4D-CT images were obtained using a four-slice GE Lightspeed CT scanner operating in cine mode. We define consistency error as a measure of ability to correctly bin over repeated cycles in the same field of view. Average consistency error μe ± σe in PB ranged from 18% ± 20% to 30% ± 35%, while in AB the error ranged from 11% ± 14% to 20% ± 24%. In PB nearly all bins contained sphere slices. AB was more accurate, revealing empty bins where no sphere slices existed. As a proof of principle, we present examples of two non-small cell lung carcinoma patients' 4D-CT lung images binned by both approaches. While AB can lead to gaps in the coronal images, depending on the patient's breathing pattern, PB exhibits no gaps but suffers visible artifacts due to misbinning, yielding images that cover a relatively large amplitude range. AB was more consistent, though often resulted in gaps when no data existed due to patients' breathing pattern. We conclude AB is more accurate than PB. This has important consequences to treatment planning and diagnosis.

  19. Phase and amplitude binning for 4D-CT imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdelnour, A F [US Patent and Trademark Office, Alexandria, VA (United States); Nehmeh, S A [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Pan, T [M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Humm, J L [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Vernon, P [GE Healthcare Technologies, Waukesha, WI (United States); Schoeder, H [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Rosenzweig, K E [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Mageras, G S [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Yorke, E [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Larson, S M [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Erdi, Y E [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2007-07-21

    We compare the consistency and accuracy of two image binning approaches used in 4D-CT imaging. One approach, phase binning (PB), assigns each breathing cycle 2{pi} rad, within which the images are grouped. In amplitude binning (AB), the images are assigned bins according to the breathing signal's full amplitude. To quantitate both approaches we used a NEMA NU2-2001 IEC phantom oscillating in the axial direction and at random frequencies and amplitudes, approximately simulating a patient's breathing. 4D-CT images were obtained using a four-slice GE Lightspeed CT scanner operating in cine mode. We define consistency error as a measure of ability to correctly bin over repeated cycles in the same field of view. Average consistency error {mu}{sub e} {+-} {sigma}{sub e} in PB ranged from 18% {+-} 20% to 30% {+-} 35%, while in AB the error ranged from 11% {+-} 14% to 20% {+-} 24%. In PB nearly all bins contained sphere slices. AB was more accurate, revealing empty bins where no sphere slices existed. As a proof of principle, we present examples of two non-small cell lung carcinoma patients' 4D-CT lung images binned by both approaches. While AB can lead to gaps in the coronal images, depending on the patient's breathing pattern, PB exhibits no gaps but suffers visible artifacts due to misbinning, yielding images that cover a relatively large amplitude range. AB was more consistent, though often resulted in gaps when no data existed due to patients' breathing pattern. We conclude AB is more accurate than PB. This has important consequences to treatment planning and diagnosis.

  20. Multi-material decomposition of spectral CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendonça, Paulo R. S.; Bhotika, Rahul; Maddah, Mahnaz; Thomsen, Brian; Dutta, Sandeep; Licato, Paul E.; Joshi, Mukta C.

    2010-04-01

    Spectral Computed Tomography (Spectral CT), and in particular fast kVp switching dual-energy computed tomography, is an imaging modality that extends the capabilities of conventional computed tomography (CT). Spectral CT enables the estimation of the full linear attenuation curve of the imaged subject at each voxel in the CT volume, instead of a scalar image in Hounsfield units. Because the space of linear attenuation curves in the energy ranges of medical applications can be accurately described through a two-dimensional manifold, this decomposition procedure would be, in principle, limited to two materials. This paper describes an algorithm that overcomes this limitation, allowing for the estimation of N-tuples of material-decomposed images. The algorithm works by assuming that the mixing of substances and tissue types in the human body has the physicochemical properties of an ideal solution, which yields a model for the density of the imaged material mix. Under this model the mass attenuation curve of each voxel in the image can be estimated, immediately resulting in a material-decomposed image triplet. Decomposition into an arbitrary number of pre-selected materials can be achieved by automatically selecting adequate triplets from an application-specific material library. The decomposition is expressed in terms of the volume fractions of each constituent material in the mix; this provides for a straightforward, physically meaningful interpretation of the data. One important application of this technique is in the digital removal of contrast agent from a dual-energy exam, producing a virtual nonenhanced image, as well as in the quantification of the concentration of contrast observed in a targeted region, thus providing an accurate measure of tissue perfusion.

  1. Improved diagnosis of actively bleeding aneurysm on CT angiography using delayed CT images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kathuria, Sudhir, E-mail: skathur2@jhmi.edu [Division of Interventional Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Division of Interventional Neuroradiology, Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Deveikis, John P.; Westesson, Per-Lennart [Division of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Department of Imaging Sciences, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY 14642 (United States); Gandhi, Dheeraj [Division of Interventional Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Division of Interventional Neuroradiology, Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2011-08-15

    Computed tomographic angiography (CTA) is being increasingly utilized in the non-invasive diagnosis of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). There are emerging reports of diagnosis of active aneurysmal bleeding on CTA, furthering our understanding of imaging features of active extravasation on cross-sectional studies. We demonstrate imaging characteristics of two such cases of active contrast extravasation from intracranial aneurysms. Additionally, we demonstrate that delayed CT images greatly improve the confidence of this diagnosis by demonstrating pooling of contrast in the subarachnoid space. Prompt recognition and management can improve prognosis of this potentially lethal condition.

  2. [CT coronary angiography: indications, image acquisition, and interpretation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoepf, U J; Thilo, C; Fernández, M J; Costello, P

    2008-01-01

    Intense scientific and clinical evaluation have brought about great improvements in cardiac CT. This is no longer merely an experimental technique, rather it has become a clinical application that is ready to fulfill its promise of replacing invasive cardiac catheterization in certain patient populations. Among the proven indications is the evaluation of patients with atypical chest pain, the morphological evaluation of the coronary arteries in cases of suspected congenital anomalies, and before surgical intervention, as well as the evaluation of coronary revascularizations. The use of CT angiography for the exhaustive evaluation of cardiac and non-cardiac pathology in patients with acute chest pain in the emergency department is currently being investigated. Because the heart is continuously moving, CT coronary angiography represents a greater technical challenge than other applications of CT. On the other hand, rapid technical development requires acquisition protocols to be adjusted constantly. However, users that know the general techniques of computed tomography can overcome these challenges. The aim of this article is to provide those interested and involved in CT angiography with a manual to enable them to follow our method step by step. We include considerations regarding the correct selection of patients, patient medication, radiological protection, contrast enhancement, acquisition and reconstruction parameters, image display, image analysis techniques, and the radiological report. Our recommendations are based on our experience, which runs from the evolution of multiple-row detector CT scanners for cardiac applications from its beginnings to the most modern presentations of advanced acquisition modalities, including dual-source CT, which we consider to be the precursor of this test in routine clinical practice.

  3. Reconstruction of CT images by the Bayes- back projection method

    CERN Document Server

    Haruyama, M; Takase, M; Tobita, H

    2002-01-01

    In the course of research on quantitative assay of non-destructive measurement of radioactive waste, the have developed a unique program based on the Bayesian theory for reconstruction of transmission computed tomography (TCT) image. The reconstruction of cross-section images in the CT technology usually employs the Filtered Back Projection method. The new imaging reconstruction program reported here is based on the Bayesian Back Projection method, and it has a function of iterative improvement images by every step of measurement. Namely, this method has the capability of prompt display of a cross-section image corresponding to each angled projection data from every measurement. Hence, it is possible to observe an improved cross-section view by reflecting each projection data in almost real time. From the basic theory of Baysian Back Projection method, it can be not only applied to CT types of 1st, 2nd, and 3rd generation. This reported deals with a reconstruction program of cross-section images in the CT of ...

  4. Imaging lobular breast carcinoma: comparison of synchrotron radiation DEI-CT technique with clinical CT, mammography and histology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiedler, S.; Bravin, A.; Keyriläinen, J.; Fernández, M.; Suortti, P.; Thomlinson, W.; Tenhunen, M.; Virkkunen, P.; Karjalainen-Lindsberg, M.-L.

    2004-01-01

    Different modalities for imaging cancer-bearing breast tissue samples are described and compared. The images include clinical mammograms and computed tomography (CT) images, CT images with partly coherent synchrotron radiation (SR), and CT and radiography images taken with SR using the diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI) method. The images are evaluated by a radiologist and compared with histopathological examination of the samples. Two cases of lobular carcinoma are studied in detail. The indications of cancer are very weak or invisible in the conventional images, but the morphological changes due to invasion of cancer become pronounced in the images taken by the DEI method. The strands penetrating adipose tissue are seen clearly in the DEI-CT images, and the histopathology confirms that some strands contain the so-called 'Indian file' formations of cancer cells. The radiation dose is carefully measured for each of the imaging modalities. The mean glandular dose (MGD) for 50% glandular breast tissue is about 1 mGy in conventional mammography and less than 0.25 mGy in projection DEI, while in the clinical CT imaging the MGD is very high, about 45 mGy. The entrance dose of 95 mGy in DEI-CT imaging gives rise to an MGD of 40 mGy, but the dose may be reduced by an order of magnitude, because the contrast is very large in most images.

  5. Clinical feasibility of {sup 90}Y digital PET/CT for imaging microsphere biodistribution following radioembolization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Chadwick L.; Binzel, Katherine; Zhang, Jun; Knopp, Michael V. [The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Wright Center of Innovation in Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, Columbus, OH (United States); Wuthrick, Evan J. [The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2017-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical feasibility of next generation solid-state digital photon counting PET/CT (dPET/CT) technology and imaging findings in patients following {sup 90}Y microsphere radioembolization in comparison with standard of care (SOC) bremsstrahlung SPECT/CT (bSPECT/CT). Five patients underwent SOC {sup 90}Y bremsstrahlung imaging immediately following routine radioembolization with 3.5 ± 1.7 GBq of {sup 90}Y-labeled glass microspheres. All patients also underwent dPET/CT imaging at 29 ± 11 h following radioembolization. Matched pairs comparison was used to compare image quality, image contrast and {sup 90}Y biodistribution between dPET/CT and bSPECT/CT images. Volumetric assessments of {sup 90}Y activity using different isocontour thresholds on dPET/CT and bSPECT/CT images were also compared. Digital PET/CT consistently provided better visual image quality and {sup 90}Y-to-background image contrast while depicting {sup 90}Y biodistribution than bSPECT/CT. Isocontour volumetric assessment using a 1% threshold precisely outlined {sup 90}Y activity and the treatment volume on dPET/CT images, whereas a more restrictive 20% threshold on bSPECT/CT images was needed to obtain comparable treatment volumes. The use of a less restrictive 10% threshold isocontour on bSPECT/CT images grossly overestimated the treatment volume when compared with the 1% threshold on dPET/CT images. Digital PET/CT is clinically feasible for the assessment of {sup 90}Y microsphere biodistribution following radioembolization, and provides better visual image quality and image contrast than routine bSPECT/CT with comparable acquisition times. With further optimization and clinical validation, dPET technology may allow faster and more accurate imaging-based assessment of {sup 90}Y microsphere biodistribution. (orig.)

  6. Esthesioneuroblastoma methods of intracranial extension: CT and MR imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Tian; Xu, Yi-Kai; Jia, Fei-Ge; Yang, Rui-Meng; Feng, Jie; Ye, Xiang-Hua; Qiu, Ying-Wei [Southern Medical University, Department of Medical Imaging Center, Nan Fang Hospital, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Li, Long [Chinese People' s Armed Police Forces, Department of Radiology, Guangdong Provincial Corps Hospital, Guangzhou (China); Duan, Gang; Wu, Yuan-Kui [Southern Medical University, Department of Radiology, Nan Fang Hospital, Guangzhou (China); Li, Hua-Yu [No. 458 Hospital of PLA, Department of Medical Imaging Center, Guangzhou (China)

    2009-12-15

    Esthesioneuroblastoma (ENB) is an aggressive neuroectodermal malignancy in the upper nasal cavity with local infiltration and lymphatic or hematogenous metastasis. The purpose of this paper is to document three types of direct intracranial extensions by ENB using computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Eleven patients with pathologically confirmed ENB were admitted in our hospital between December 2002 and December 2008. Their magnetic resonance (MR; n = 10) and CT (n = 8) images were retrospectively reviewed, and particular attention was paid to tumor location and extension, enhancement pattern, cervical lymph node metastasis, and Kadish stage. The majority of patients were male (8/11) with Kadish stage C tumor (10/11). Three types of direct intracranial extension by ENBs were put forward according to their MR and CT findings. The primary tumors were well-defined soft-tissue masses centered in the roof of the nasal cavity eroding into the paranasal sinuses (11/11), the contralateral nasal cavity (4/11), the cranial cavity (5/11), and the fossa orbitalis (3/11). The tumor parenchyma were hypointensity on T1-weighted images, heterogeneous hyperintensity on T2-weighted images, and isodensity or slight hyperdensity on CT images with scattered necroses (4/11) and marginal cysts(4/11). Their enhancements were significant and inhomogeneous. Cervical lymph nodes metastases were observed in four patients (4/11), but no pathologically proved distant metastasis was observed. Three types of direct intracranial extensions by ENB can be found on CT and MRI: cranio-orbital-nasal-communicating ENB, cranio-nasal-communicating ENB, and orbital-nasal-communicating ENB. (orig.)

  7. Hybrid detection of lung nodules on CT scan images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Lin; Tan, Yongqiang; Schwartz, Lawrence H.; Zhao, Binsheng, E-mail: bz2166@columbia.edu [Department of Radiology, Columbia University Medical Center, 630 West 168th Street, New York, New York 10032 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Purpose: The diversity of lung nodules poses difficulty for the current computer-aided diagnostic (CAD) schemes for lung nodule detection on computed tomography (CT) scan images, especially in large-scale CT screening studies. We proposed a novel CAD scheme based on a hybrid method to address the challenges of detection in diverse lung nodules. Methods: The hybrid method proposed in this paper integrates several existing and widely used algorithms in the field of nodule detection, including morphological operation, dot-enhancement based on Hessian matrix, fuzzy connectedness segmentation, local density maximum algorithm, geodesic distance map, and regression tree classification. All of the adopted algorithms were organized into tree structures with multi-nodes. Each node in the tree structure aimed to deal with one type of lung nodule. Results: The method has been evaluated on 294 CT scans from the Lung Image Database Consortium (LIDC) dataset. The CT scans were randomly divided into two independent subsets: a training set (196 scans) and a test set (98 scans). In total, the 294 CT scans contained 631 lung nodules, which were annotated by at least two radiologists participating in the LIDC project. The sensitivity and false positive per scan for the training set were 87% and 2.61%. The sensitivity and false positive per scan for the testing set were 85.2% and 3.13%. Conclusions: The proposed hybrid method yielded high performance on the evaluation dataset and exhibits advantages over existing CAD schemes. We believe that the present method would be useful for a wide variety of CT imaging protocols used in both routine diagnosis and screening studies.

  8. Implementation of efficient image reconstruction for CT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie Liu; Guangfei Wang

    2005-01-01

    @@ The operational procedures for efficiently reconstructing the two-dimensional image of a body by the filtered back projection are described in this paper. The projections are interpolated for four times of original projection by zero-padding the original projection in frequency-domain and then inverse fast Fourier transform (FFT) is taken to improve accuracy.

  9. Three-dimensional image analysis of the skull using variable CT scanning protocols-effect of slice thickness on measurement in the three-dimensional CT images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Ho Gul; Kim, Kee Deog; Park, Hyok; Kim, Dong Ook; Jeong, Hai Jo; Kim, Hee Joung; Yoo, Sun Kook; Kim, Yong Oock; Park, Chang Seo [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-15

    To evaluate the quantitative accuracy of three-dimensional (3D) images by mean of comparing distance measurements on the 3D images with direct measurements of dry human skull according to slice thickness and scanning modes. An observer directly measured the distance of 21 line items between 12 orthodontic landmarks on the skull surface using a digital vernier caliper and each was repeated five times. The dry human skull was scanned with a Helical CT with various slice thickness (3, 5, 7 mm) and acquisition modes (Conventional and Helical). The same observer measured corresponding distance of the same items on reconstructed 3D images with the internal program of V-works 4.0 (Cybermed Inc., Seoul, Korea). The quantitative accuracy of distance measurements were statistically evaluated with Wilcoxons' two-sample test. 11 line items in Conventional 3 mm, 8 in Helical 3 mm, 11 in Conventional 5 mm, 10 in Helical 5 mm, 5 in Conventional 7 mm and 9 in Helical 7 mm showed no statistically significant difference. Average difference between direct measurements and measurements on 3D CT images was within 2 mm in 19 line items of Conventional 3 mm. 20 of Helical 3 mm, 15 of Conventional 5 mm, 18 of Helical 5 mm, 11 of Conventional 7 mm and 16 of Helical 7 mm. Considering image quality and patient's exposure time, scanning protocol of Helical 5 mm is recommended for 3D image analysis of the skull in CT.

  10. Venous air embolism in consecutive balloon kyphoplasties visualised on CT imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tins, Bernhard J.; Cassar-Pullicino, Victor N.; Lalam, Radhesh; Haddaway, Mike [Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Orthopaedic Hospital, Department of Radiology, Oswestry, Shropshire (United Kingdom)

    2012-09-15

    We noted a large amount of intravenous gas during balloon kyphoplasty on CT imaging. Formal assessment to understand the extent, possible causes and implications was undertaken. Ten consecutive cases of balloon kyphoplasty were performed under general anaesthesia in the prone position, on a single vertebral level using a two-step technique under combined fluoroscopic and CT guidance. CT of the affected vertebra was performed before, after, and intermittently during the procedure. In 2 cases delayed CT was carried out in the supine position. Gas was seen on CT imaging, but not on conventional fluoroscopy. The gas is most likely to be air introduced during the procedure and was seen in the epidural and paravertebral venous plexus, posterior intercostal veins, renal veins, IVC and azygos vein. The average measured volume of gas seen on the post-procedure CT imaging was 1.07 mL, range 0.16-3.97 mL. There was no correlation of the measured amount of gas to the procedure duration or location, the use of a curette or the injected cement volume. Delayed CT in the supine position no longer showed air in the local venous system. Balloon kyphoplasty is associated with the fluoroscopically invisible introduction of air into the vertebral and paravertebral veins and deep systemic veins and is likely to be much more extensive than identified on CT imaging. There is potential for serious air embolism in kyphoplasty and if there is a sudden deterioration in patient condition during the procedure the possibility of this complication needs to be considered. (orig.)

  11. CT Image Reconstruction by Spatial-Radon Domain Data-Driven Tight Frame Regularization

    CERN Document Server

    Zhan, Ruohan

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a spatial-Radon domain CT image reconstruction model based on data-driven tight frames (SRD-DDTF). The proposed SRD-DDTF model combines the idea of joint image and Radon domain inpainting model of \\cite{Dong2013X} and that of the data-driven tight frames for image denoising \\cite{cai2014data}. It is different from existing models in that both CT image and its corresponding high quality projection image are reconstructed simultaneously using sparsity priors by tight frames that are adaptively learned from the data to provide optimal sparse approximations. An alternative minimization algorithm is designed to solve the proposed model which is nonsmooth and nonconvex. Convergence analysis of the algorithm is provided. Numerical experiments showed that the SRD-DDTF model is superior to the model by \\cite{Dong2013X} especially in recovering some subtle structures in the images.

  12. Robust linear registration of CT images using random regression forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konukoglu, Ender; Criminisi, Antonio; Pathak, Sayan; Robertson, Duncan; White, Steve; Haynor, David; Siddiqui, Khan

    2011-03-01

    Global linear registration is a necessary first step for many different tasks in medical image analysis. Comparing longitudinal studies1, cross-modality fusion2, and many other applications depend heavily on the success of the automatic registration. The robustness and efficiency of this step is crucial as it affects all subsequent operations. Most common techniques cast the linear registration problem as the minimization of a global energy function based on the image intensities. Although these algorithms have proved useful, their robustness in fully automated scenarios is still an open question. In fact, the optimization step often gets caught in local minima yielding unsatisfactory results. Recent algorithms constrain the space of registration parameters by exploiting implicit or explicit organ segmentations, thus increasing robustness4,5. In this work we propose a novel robust algorithm for automatic global linear image registration. Our method uses random regression forests to estimate posterior probability distributions for the locations of anatomical structures - represented as axis aligned bounding boxes6. These posterior distributions are later integrated in a global linear registration algorithm. The biggest advantage of our algorithm is that it does not require pre-defined segmentations or regions. Yet it yields robust registration results. We compare the robustness of our algorithm with that of the state of the art Elastix toolbox7. Validation is performed via 1464 pair-wise registrations in a database of very diverse 3D CT images. We show that our method decreases the "failure" rate of the global linear registration from 12.5% (Elastix) to only 1.9%.

  13. Cone beam CT for dental and maxillofacial imaging: dose matters

    OpenAIRE

    Pauwels, Ruben

    2015-01-01

    The widespread use of cone-beam CT (CBCT) in dentistry has led to increasing concern regarding justification and optimisation of CBCT exposures. When used as a substitute to multidetector CT (MDCT), CBCT can lead to significant dose reduction; however, low-dose protocols of current-generation MDCTs show that there is an overlap between CBCT and MDCT doses. More importantly, although the 3D information provided by CBCT can often lead to improved diagnosis and treatment compared with 2D radiogr...

  14. Dysplastic gangliocytoma (Lhermitte-Duclos disease): CT and MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieco, P.T.; Del Carpio-O' Donovan, R.; Melanson, D. (Montreal Neurological Hospital, PQ (Canada). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology); Montes, J. (Montreal Children' s Hospital, PQ (Canada). Dept. of Neurosurgery); O' Gorman, A.M. (Montreal Children' s Hospital, PQ (Canada). Dept. of Radiology); Meagher-Villemure, K. (Montreal Children' s Hospital, PQ (Canada). Dept. of Pathology)

    1992-09-01

    Dysplastic gangliocytoma (Lhermitte-Duclos disease) is a rare entity. Usually presenting as a posterior fossa mass, dyplastic gangliocytoma is not a true neoplasm but a hard-to-characterize lesion that may represent an abnormality of cell migration or a phacomatosis. Previous reports of CT findings are rare in the radiologic literature, and high-field (1.5 Tesla) MR images have never been described in the pediatric age group. We present a case of dysplastic gangliocytoma in a one-year-old boy with CT and MR findings. (orig.).

  15. 3D SPECT/CT fusion using image data projection of bone SPECT onto 3D volume-rendered CT images: feasibility and clinical impact in the diagnosis of bone metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Yuji; Nakahara, Tadaki; Ode, Kenichi; Matsusaka, Yohji; Katagiri, Mari; Iwabuchi, Yu; Itoh, Kazunari; Ichimura, Akira; Jinzaki, Masahiro

    2017-05-01

    We developed a method of image data projection of bone SPECT into 3D volume-rendered CT images for 3D SPECT/CT fusion. The aims of our study were to evaluate its feasibility and clinical usefulness. Whole-body bone scintigraphy (WB) and SPECT/CT scans were performed in 318 cancer patients using a dedicated SPECT/CT systems. Volume data of bone SPECT and CT were fused to obtain 2D SPECT/CT images. To generate our 3D SPECT/CT images, colored voxel data of bone SPECT were projected onto the corresponding location of the volume-rendered CT data after a semi-automatic bone extraction. Then, the resultant 3D images were blended with conventional volume-rendered CT images, allowing to grasp the three-dimensional relationship between bone metabolism and anatomy. WB and SPECT (WB + SPECT), 2D SPECT/CT fusion, and 3D SPECT/CT fusion were evaluated by two independent reviewers in the diagnosis of bone metastasis. The inter-observer variability and diagnostic accuracy in these three image sets were investigated using a four-point diagnostic scale. Increased bone metabolism was found in 744 metastatic sites and 1002 benign changes. On a per-lesion basis, inter-observer agreements in the diagnosis of bone metastasis were 0.72 for WB + SPECT, 0.90 for 2D SPECT/CT, and 0.89 for 3D SPECT/CT. Receiver operating characteristic analyses for the diagnostic accuracy of bone metastasis showed that WB + SPECT, 2D SPECT/CT, and 3D SPECT/CT had an area under the curve of 0.800, 0.983, and 0.983 for reader 1, 0.865, 0.992, and 0.993 for reader 2, respectively (WB + SPECT vs. 2D or 3D SPECT/CT, p < 0.001; 2D vs. 3D SPECT/CT, n.s.). The durations of interpretation of WB + SPECT, 2D SPECT/CT, and 3D SPECT/CT images were 241 ± 75, 225 ± 73, and 182 ± 71 s for reader 1 and 207 ± 72, 190 ± 73, and 179 ± 73 s for reader 2, respectively. As a result, it took shorter time to read 3D SPECT/CT images than 2D SPECT/CT (p < 0.0001) or WB

  16. Imaging in covert ectopic ACTH secretion: a CT pictorial review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sookur, Paul A.; Sahdev, Anju; Rockall, Andrea G.; Reznek, Rodney H. [St Bartholomew' s Hospital, Department of Academic Radiology, Dominion House, London (United Kingdom); Isidori, Andrea M. [Sapienza University of Rome, Department of Medical Pathophysiology, Rome (Italy); Monson, John P.; Grossman, Ashley B. [St Bartholomew' s Hospital, Department of Endocrinology, London (United Kingdom)

    2009-05-15

    The syndrome of ectopic adrenocorticotrophin secretion (EAS) is rare and is due to excess adrenocorticotrophin (ACTH) production from a nonpituitary tumour. These tumours can be covert, where the tumours are not readily apparent, and very small making them challenging to image. It is clinically and biochemically difficult to distinguish between covert EAS and Cushing's disease. The first-line investigation in locating the source of ACTH production is computed tomography (CT). The aim of this pictorial review is to illustrate the likely covert sites and related imaging findings. We review the CT appearances of tumours resulting in covert EAS and the associated literature. The most common tumours were bronchial carcinoid tumours, which appear as small, well-defined, round or ovoid pulmonary lesions. Rarer causes included thymic carcinoids, gastrointestinal carcinoids and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours. Awareness of the imaging characteristics will aid identification of the source of ACTH production and allow potentially curative surgical resection. (orig.)

  17. Automatic annotation of radiological observations in liver CT images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimenez, Francisco; Xu, Jiajing; Liu, Yi; Liu, Tiffany; Beaulieu, Christopher; Rubin, Daniel; Napel, Sandy

    2012-01-01

    We aim to predict radiological observations using computationally-derived imaging features extracted from computed tomography (CT) images. We created a dataset of 79 CT images containing liver lesions identified and annotated by a radiologist using a controlled vocabulary of 76 semantic terms. Computationally-derived features were extracted describing intensity, texture, shape, and edge sharpness. Traditional logistic regression was compared to L(1)-regularized logistic regression (LASSO) in order to predict the radiological observations using computational features. The approach was evaluated by leave one out cross-validation. Informative radiological observations such as lesion enhancement, hypervascular attenuation, and homogeneous retention were predicted well by computational features. By exploiting relationships between computational and semantic features, this approach could lead to more accurate and efficient radiology reporting.

  18. FDG PET/CT imaging as a biomarker in lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meignan, Michel; Itti, Emmanuel [Hopitaux Universitaires Henri Mondor, Paris-Est Creteil University, LYSA Imaging, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Creteil (France); Gallamini, Andrea [Nice University, Research, Innovation and Statistic Department, Antoine Lacassagne Cancer Center, Nice (France); Scientific Research Committee, S. Croce Hospital, Cuneo (Italy); Younes, Anas [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Lymphoma Service, New York, NY (United States)

    2015-04-01

    FDG PET/CT has changed the management of FDG-avid lymphoma and is now recommended as the imaging technique of choice for staging and restaging. The need for tailoring therapy to reduce toxicity in patients with a favourable outcome and for improving treatment in those with high-risk factors requires accurate diagnostic methods and a new prognostic algorithm to identify different risk categories. New drugs are used in relapsed/refractory patients. The role of FDG PET/CT as a biomarker in this context is summarized in this review. New trends in FDG metabolic imaging in lymphoma are addressed including metabolic tumour volume measurement at staging and integrative PET which combines PET data with clinical and molecular markers or other imaging techniques. The quantitative approach for response assessment which is under investigation and is used in large ongoing trials is compared with visual criteria. The place of FDG in the era of targeted therapy is discussed. (orig.)

  19. Hepatic CT Image Query Based on Threshold-based Classification Scheme with Gabor Features

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Li-jun; LUO Yong-zing; ZHAO Jun; ZHUANG Tian-ge

    2008-01-01

    Hepatic computed tomography (CT) images with Gabor function were analyzed.Then a thresholdbased classification scheme was proposed using Gabor features and proceeded with the retrieval of the hepatic CT images.In our experiments,a batch of hepatic CT images containing several types of CT findings was used and compared with the Zhao's image classification scheme,support vector machines (SVM) scheme and threshold-based scheme.

  20. Nondestructive Evaluation of Hardwood Logs Using Automated Interpretation of CT Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel L. Schmoldt; Dongping Zhu; Richard W. Conners

    1993-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) imaging is being used to examine the internal structure of hardwood logs. The following steps are used to automatically interpret CT images: (1) preprocessing to remove unwanted portions of the image, e.g., annual ring structure, (2) image-by-image segmentation to produce relatively homogeneous image areas, (3) volume growing to create volumes...

  1. FDG and FDG-labelled leucocyte PET/CT in the imaging of prosthetic joint infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aksoy, Sabire Yilmaz; Asa, Sertac; Ozhan, Meftune; Sager, M.S.; Halac, Metin; Kabasakal, Levent; Soenmezoglu, Kerim; Kanmaz, Bedii [University of Istanbul, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty, Aksaray, Istanbul (Turkey); Ocak, Meltem [University of Istanbul, Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Istanbul (Turkey); Erkan, Melih Engin [Duzce University School of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Duzce (Turkey)

    2014-03-15

    The demand for arthroplasty is rapidly growing as a result of the ageing of the population. Although complications such as heterotrophic ossification, fracture and dislocation are relatively rare, differentiating aseptic loosening, the most common complication of arthroplasty from infection, is a major challenge for clinicians. Radionuclide imaging is currently the imaging modality of choice since it is not affected by orthopaedic hardware. Whereas FDG PET/CT imaging has been widely used in periprosthetic infection, it cannot discriminate aseptic from septic inflammation. In this study we aimed to evaluate the role of FDG PET/CT and FDG-labelled leucocyte PET/CT in the diagnosis of periprosthetic infection. Of 54 patients with painful joint arthroplasty who were imaged by FDG PET/CT for diagnosis of periprosthetic infection examined, 46 (36 women, 10 men; mean age 61.04 ± 12.2 years, range 32 - 89 years) with 54 painful joint prostheses (19 hip, 35 knee) with grade 2 (above liver uptake) FDG accumulation on FDG PET/CT were included in the study and these 46 patients also underwent FDG-labelled leucocyte PET/CT. Final diagnoses were made by histopathological-microbiological culture or clinical follow-up. The final diagnosis showed infection in 15 (28 %) and aseptic loosening in 39 (72 %) of the 54 prostheses. FDG PET/CT was found to have a positive predictive value of 28 % (15/54). Since patients with no FDG uptake on FDG PET/CT were excluded from the study, the sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value and accuracy could not be calculated. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of FDG-labelled leucocyte PET/CT were 93.3 % (14/15), 97.4 % (38/39), 93.3 % and 97.4 %, respectively. Since FDG is not specific to infection, the specificity of FDG PET/CT was very low. FDG-labelled leucocyte PET/CT with its high specificity may be a useful method and better than labelled leucocyte scintigraphy in periprosthetic infection

  2. Multi-institutional MicroCT image comparison of image-guided small animal irradiators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, Chris D.; Lindsay, Patricia; E Graves, Edward; Wong, Eugene; Perez, Jessica R.; Poirier, Yannick; Ben-Bouchta, Youssef; Kanesalingam, Thilakshan; Chen, Haijian; E Rubinstein, Ashley; Sheng, Ke; Bazalova-Carter, Magdalena

    2017-07-01

    To recommend imaging protocols and establish tolerance levels for microCT image quality assurance (QA) performed on conformal image-guided small animal irradiators. A fully automated QA software SAPA (small animal phantom analyzer) for image analysis of the commercial Shelley micro-CT MCTP 610 phantom was developed, in which quantitative analyses of CT number linearity, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), uniformity and noise, geometric accuracy, spatial resolution by means of modulation transfer function (MTF), and CT contrast were performed. Phantom microCT scans from eleven institutions acquired with four image-guided small animal irradiator units (including the commercial PXi X-RAD SmART and Xstrahl SARRP systems) with varying parameters used for routine small animal imaging were analyzed. Multi-institutional data sets were compared using SAPA, based on which tolerance levels for each QA test were established and imaging protocols for QA were recommended. By analyzing microCT data from 11 institutions, we established image QA tolerance levels for all image quality tests. CT number linearity set to R 2  >  0.990 was acceptable in microCT data acquired at all but three institutions. Acceptable SNR  >  36 and noise levels  1.5 lp mm-1 for MTF  =  0.2) was obtained at all but four institutions due to their large image voxel size used (>0.275 mm). Ten of the eleven institutions passed the set QA tolerance for geometric accuracy (2000 HU for 30 mgI ml-1). We recommend performing imaging QA with 70 kVp, 1.5 mA, 120 s imaging time, 0.20 mm voxel size, and a frame rate of 5 fps for the PXi X-RAD SmART. For the Xstrahl SARRP, we recommend using 60 kVp, 1.0 mA, 240 s imaging time, 0.20 mm voxel size, and 6 fps. These imaging protocols should result in high quality images that pass the set tolerance levels on all systems. Average SAPA computation time for complete QA analysis for a 0.20 mm voxel, 400 slice Shelley phantom microCT data set

  3. Multislice CT brain image registration for perfusion studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhong Min; Pohlman, Scott; Chandra, Shalabh

    2002-04-01

    During the last several years perfusion CT techniques have been developed as an effective technique for clinically evaluating cerebral hemodynamics. Perfusion CT techniques are capable of measurings functional parameters such as tissue perfusion, blood flow, blood volume, and mean transit time and are commonly used to evaluate stroke patients. However, the quality of functional images of the brain frequently suffers from patient head motion. Because the time window for an effective treatment of stroke patient is narrow, a fast motion correction is required. The purpose of the paper is to present a fast and accurate registration technique for motion correction of multi-slice CT and to demonstrate the effects of the registration on perfusion calculation.

  4. F-18 FDG PET/CT imaging of primary hepatic neuroendocrine tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuya Mitamura

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary hepatic neuroendocrine tumors (PHNETs are extremely rare neoplasms. Herein, we report a case of a 70-year-old man with a hepatic mass. The non-contrast computed tomography (CT image showed a low-density mass, and dynamic CT images indicated the enhancement of the mass in the arterial phase and early washout in the late phase. F18- fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG positron emission tomography (PET and fused PET/CT images showed increased uptake in the hepatic mass. Whole-body 18F-FDG PET images showed no abnormal activity except for the liver lesion. Presence of an extrahepatic tumor was also ruled out by performing upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, total colonoscopy, and chest and abdominal CT. A posterior segmentectomy was performed, and histologic examination confirmed a neuroendocrine tumor (grade 1. The patient was followed up for about 2 years after the resection, and no extrahepatic lesions were radiologically found. Therefore, the patient was diagnosed with PHNET. To the best of our knowledge, no previous case of PHNET have been detected by 18F-FDG PET imaging.

  5. An experimental comparative study of radiography, ultrasonography and CT imaging in the IV catheter fragment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kweon, Dae Cheol [Dept. of Radiological Science, College of Health Science, Shinhan University, Uijeongbu (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    The objective of this study was to detect the fragments generated during IV (intravenous) catheter injection of contrast medium and drug administration in a clinical setting and removal was performed by experimentally producing a phantom, and to compare the radiography, ultrasonography, and multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) imaging and radiation dose. A 1 cm fragment of an 18 gage Teflon® IV catheter with saline was inserted into the IV control line. Radiography, CT, and ultrasonography were performed and radiography and CT dose were calculated. CT and ultrasonography showed an IV catheter fragment clinically and radiography showed no visible difference in the ability to provide a useful image of an IV catheter fragment modality (p >.05). Radiography of effective dose (0.2139 mSv·Gy-1·cm-2) form DAP DAP (0.93 μGy·m2 ), and dose length product (DLP) (201 mGy·cm) to effective dose was calculated as 0.483 mSv. IV catheter fragment were detected of radiography, ultrasonography and CT. These results can be obtained by menas of an excellent IV catheter fragment of detection capability CT. However, CT is followed by radiation exposure. IV catheter fragment confirming the position and information recommend an ultrasonography.

  6. MR and CT imaging of pulmonary valved conduits in children and adolescents: normal appearance and complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tenisch, Estelle V.; Alamo, Leonor T.; Gudinchet, Francois [Lausanne University Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Lausanne (Switzerland); Sekarski, Nicole [Lausanne University Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Lausanne (Switzerland); Hurni, Michel [Lausanne University Hospital, Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2014-12-15

    The Contegra registered is a conduit made from the bovine jugular vein and then interposed between the right ventricle and the pulmonary artery. It is used for cardiac malformations in the reconstruction of right ventricular outflow tract. To describe both normal and pathological appearances of the Contegra registered in radiological imaging, to describe imaging of complications and to define the role of CT and MRI in postoperative follow-up. Forty-three examinations of 24 patients (17 boys and 7 girls; mean age: 10.8 years old) with Contegra registered conduits were reviewed. Anatomical description and measurements of the conduits were performed. Pathological items examined included stenosis, dilatation, plicature or twist, thrombus or vegetations, calcifications and valvular regurgitation. Findings were correlated to the echographic gradient through the conduit when available. CT and MR work-up showed Contegra registered stenosis (n = 12), dilatation (n = 9) and plicature or twist (n = 7). CT displayed thrombus or vegetations in the Contegra registered in three clinically infected patients. Calcifications of the conduit were present at CT in 12 patients and valvular regurgitation in three patients. The comparison between CT and/or MR results showed a good correlation between the echographic gradient and the presence of stenosis in the Contegra registered. CT and MR bring additional information about permeability and postoperative anatomy especially when echocardiography is inconclusive. Both techniques depict the normal appearance of the conduit, and allow comparison and precise evaluation of changes in the postoperative follow-up. (orig.)

  7. Molecular Imaging with Small Animal PET/CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    in this field of small animal molecular imaging with special emphasis on the targets for tissue characterization in tumor biology such as hypoxia, proliferation and cancer specific over-expression of receptors. The added value of applying CT imaging for anatomical localization and tumor volume measurements...... is also described. In addition, the non-invasive nature of molecular imaging and the targets of these promising new tracers are attractive for other research areas as well, although these fields are much less explored. We present an example of an interesting research field with the application of small...

  8. A minimum spanning forest based classification method for dedicated breast CT images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pike, R.; Sechopoulos, I.; Fei, B.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To develop and test an automated algorithm to classify different types of tissue in dedicated breast CT images. METHODS: Images of a single breast of five different patients were acquired with a dedicated breast CT clinical prototype. The breast CT images were processed by a multiscale bila

  9. Importance of PET/CT for imaging of colorectal cancer; Stellenwert der PET/CT zur Bildgebung des kolorektalen Karzinoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meinel, F.G.; Schramm, N.; Graser, A.; Reiser, M.F.; Rist, C. [Klinikum der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Campus Grosshadern, Institut fuer Klinische Radiologie, Muenchen (Germany); Haug, A.R. [Klinikum der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Campus Grosshadern, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Muenchen (Germany)

    2012-06-15

    Fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) has emerged as a very useful imaging modality in the management of colorectal carcinoma. Data from the literature regarding the role of PET/CT in the initial diagnosis, staging, radiotherapy planning, response monitoring and surveillance of colorectal carcinoma is presented. Future directions and economic aspects are discussed. Computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and FDG-PET for colorectal cancer and endorectal ultrasound for rectal cancer. Combined FDG-PET/CT. While other imaging modalities allow superior visualization of the extent and invasion depth of the primary tumor, PET/CT is most sensitive for the detection of distant metastases of colorectal cancer. We recommend a targeted use of PET/CT in cases of unclear M staging, prior to metastasectomy and in suspected cases of residual or recurrent colorectal carcinoma with equivocal conventional imaging. The role of PET/CT in radiotherapy planning and response monitoring needs to be determined. Currently there is no evidence to support the routine use of PET/CT for colorectal screening, staging or surveillance. To optimally exploit the synergy between morphologic and functional information, FDG-PET should generally be performed as an integrated FDG-PET/CT with a contrast-enhanced CT component in colorectal carcinoma. (orig.) [German] Die Fluordesoxyglukose-Positronenemissionstomographie/Computertomographie (FDG-PET/CT) hat in den letzten Jahren zunehmende Bedeutung zur Bildgebung des kolorektalen Karzinoms erlangt. In diesem Beitrag stellen wir den Stand der Literatur zur Rolle der PET/CT bei Screening, Staging, Bestrahlungsplanung, Beurteilung eines Therapieansprechens und Nachsorge des kolorektalen Karzinoms dar. Zudem wird auf gesundheitsoekonomische Aspekte und zukuenftige Entwicklungen eingegangen. CT, MRT, FDG-PET, beim Rektumkarzinom zusaetzlich endorektaler Ultraschall. Kombinierte FDG-PET/CT. Waehrend

  10. Dosimetric impact of image artifact from a wide-bore CT scanner in radiotherapy treatment planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Vincent; Podgorsak, Matthew B.; Tran, Tuan-Anh; Malhotra, Harish K.; Wang, Iris Z. [Department of Radiation Medicine, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York 14263 (United States); Department of Radiation Medicine, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York 14263 and Department of Physiology and Biophysics, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14214 (United States); Department of Radiation Medicine, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York 14263 (United States); Department of Radiation Medicine, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York 14263 and Department of Physiology and Biophysics, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14214 (United States)

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: Traditional computed tomography (CT) units provide a maximum scan field-of-view (sFOV) diameter of 50 cm and a limited bore size, which cannot accommodate a large patient habitus or an extended simulation setup in radiation therapy (RT). Wide-bore CT scanners with increased bore size were developed to address these needs. Some scanners have the capacity to reconstruct the CT images at an extended FOV (eFOV), through data interpolation or extrapolation, using projection data acquired with a conventional sFOV. Objects that extend past the sFOV for eFOV reconstruction may generate image artifacts resulting from truncated projection data; this may distort CT numbers and structure contours in the region beyond the sFOV. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the dosimetric impact of image artifacts from eFOV reconstruction with a wide-bore CT scanner in radiotherapy (RT) treatment planning. Methods: Testing phantoms (i.e., a mini CT phantom with equivalent tissue inserts, a set of CT normal phantoms and anthropomorphic phantoms of the thorax and the pelvis) were used to evaluate eFOV artifacts. Reference baseline images of these phantoms were acquired with the phantom centrally positioned within the sFOV. For comparison, the phantoms were then shifted laterally and scanned partially outside the sFOV, but still within the eFOV. Treatment plans were generated for the thoracic and pelvic anthropomorphic phantoms utilizing the Eclipse treatment planning system (TPS) to study the potential effects of eFOV artifacts on dose calculations. All dose calculations of baseline and test treatment plans were carried out using the same MU. Results: Results show that both body contour and CT numbers are altered by image artifacts in eFOV reconstruction. CT number distortions of up to -356 HU for bone tissue and up to 323 HU for lung tissue were observed in the mini CT phantom. Results from the large body normal phantom, which is close to a clinical patient size, show

  11. Texture-learning-based system for three-dimensional segmentation of renal parenchyma in abdominal CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Cong-Qi; Chang, Yuan-Hsiang; Wang, Li-Jen; Wong, Yon-Choeng; Chiang, Yang-Jen; Jiang, Yan-Yau

    2009-02-01

    Abdominal CT images are commonly used for the diagnosis of kidney diseases. With the advances of CT technology, processing of CT images has become a challenging task mainly because of the large number of CT images being studied. This paper presents a texture-learning based system for the three-dimensional (3D) segmentation of renal parenchyma in abdominal CT images. The system is designed to automatically delineate renal parenchyma and is based on the texturelearning and the region-homogeneity-based approaches. The first approach is achieved with the texture analysis using the gray-level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) features and an artificial neural network (ANN) to determine if a pixel in the CT image is likely to fall within the renal parenchyma. The second approach incorporates a two-dimensional (2D) region growing to segment renal parenchyma in single CT image slice and a 3D region growing to propagate the segmentation results to neighboring CT image slices. The criterion for the region growing is a test of region-homogeneity which is defined by examining the ANN outputs. In system evaluation, 10 abdominal CT image sets were used. Automatic segmentation results were compared with manually segmentation results using the Dice similarity coefficient. Among the 10 CT image sets, our system has achieved an average Dice similarity coefficient of 0.87 that clearly shows a high correlation between the two segmentation results. Ultimately, our system could be incorporated in applications for the delineation of renal parenchyma or as a preprocessing in a CAD system of kidney diseases.

  12. Impact of the Adaptive Statistical Iterative Reconstruction Technique on Radiation Dose and Image Quality in Bone SPECT/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibille, Louis; Chambert, Benjamin; Alonso, Sandrine; Barrau, Corinne; D'Estanque, Emmanuel; Al Tabaa, Yassine; Collombier, Laurent; Demattei, Christophe; Kotzki, Pierre-Olivier; Boudousq, Vincent

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare a routine bone SPECT/CT protocol using CT reconstructed with filtered backprojection (FBP) with an optimized protocol using low-dose CT images reconstructed with adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR). In this prospective study, enrolled patients underwent bone SPECT/CT, with 1 SPECT acquisition followed by 2 randomized CT acquisitions: FBP CT (FBP; noise index, 25) and ASiR CT (70% ASiR; noise index, 40). The image quality of both attenuation-corrected SPECT and CT images was visually (5-point Likert scale, 2 interpreters) and quantitatively (contrast ratio [CR] and signal-to-noise ratio [SNR]) estimated. The CT dose index volume, dose-length product, and effective dose were compared. Seventy-five patients were enrolled in the study. Quantitative attenuation-corrected SPECT evaluation showed no inferiority for contrast ratio and SNR issued from FBP CT or ASiR CT (respectively, 13.41 ± 7.83 vs. 13.45 ± 7.99 and 2.33 ± 0.83 vs. 2.32 ± 0.84). Qualitative image analysis showed no difference between attenuation-corrected SPECT images issued from FBP CT or ASiR CT for both interpreters (respectively, 3.5 ± 0.6 vs. 3.5 ± 0.6 and 3.6 ± 0.5 vs. 3.6 ± 0.5). Quantitative CT evaluation showed no inferiority for SNR between FBP and ASiR CT images (respectively, 0.93 ± 0.16 and 1.07 ± 0.17). Qualitative image analysis showed no quality difference between FBP and ASiR CT images for both interpreters (respectively, 3.8 ± 0.5 vs. 3.6 ± 0.5 and 4.0 ± 0.1 vs. 4.0 ± 0.2). Mean CT dose index volume, dose-length product, and effective dose for ASiR CT (3.0 ± 2.0 mGy, 148 ± 85 mGy⋅cm, and 2.2 ± 1.3 mSv) were significantly lower than for FBP CT (8.5 ± 3.7 mGy, 365 ± 160 mGy⋅cm, and 5.5 ± 2.4 mSv). The use of 70% ASiR blending in bone SPECT/CT can reduce the CT radiation dose by 60%, with no sacrifice in attenuation-corrected SPECT and CT image quality, compared with the conventional protocol using FBP CT

  13. CT and MR imaging findings of xanthogranulomatous cholecystitis: correlation with pathologic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shuto, R.; Kiyosue, H.; Komatsu, E.; Matsumoto, S.; Mori, H. [Oita Medical Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Radiology; Kawano, K. [Oita Medical Univ. (Japan). Dept. of First Surgery; Kondo, Y.; Yokoyama, S. [Oita Medical Univ. (Japan). Dept. of First Pathology

    2004-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate CT and MRI findings in xanthogranulomatous cholecystitis (XGC) and to correlate the imaging findings with various pathologic parameters. The study included 13 patients with histopathologically confirmed XGC. The CT (n=13) and MRI (n=5) obtained in these patients were evaluated retrospectively. On CT, low-attenuation areas in the wall of XGC correlated with foam and inflammatory cells or necrosis and/or abscess in XGC. Areas of iso- to slightly high signal intensity on T2-weighted images, showing slight enhancement at early phase and strong enhancement at last phase on dynamic study, corresponded with areas of abundant xanthogranulomas. Areas with very high signal intensity on T2-weighted images without enhancement corresponded with necrosis and/or abscesses. Luminal surface enhancement (LSE) of gallbladder wall represented preservation of the epithelial layer. The early-enhanced areas of the liver bed on dynamic CT and MR images corresponded with accumulation of inflammatory cells and abundant fibrosis. Our results indicate that CT and MRI findings correlate well with the histopathologic findings of XGC.

  14. Diagnostic accuracy of {sup 68}Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT imaging in pheochromocytoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Punit; Dhull, Varun Singh; Arora, Saurabh; Kumar, Rajeev; Malhotra, Arun; Kumar, Rakesh; Bal, Chandrasekhar [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ansari Nagar, New Delhi (India); Gupta, Poonam; Ammini, Ariachery C. [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, New Delhi (India); Durgapal, Prashant [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Pathology, New Delhi (India); Chumber, Sunil [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Surgical Disciplines, New Delhi (India)

    2014-03-15

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of {sup 68}Ga-DOTANOC positron emission tomography (PET)/CT in patients with suspicion of pheochromocytoma. Data of 62 patients [age 34.3 ± 16.1 years, 14 with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 (MEN2)] with clinical/biochemical suspicion of pheochromocytoma and suspicious adrenal lesion on contrast CT (n = 70), who had undergone {sup 68}Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT, were retrospectively analyzed. PET/CT images were analyzed visually as well as semiquantitatively, with measurement of maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}), SUV{sub mean}, SUV{sub max}/SUV{sub liver}, and SUV{sub mean}/SUV{sub liver}. Results of PET/CT were compared with {sup 131}I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) imaging, which was available in 40 patients (45 lesions). Histopathology and/or imaging/clinical/biochemical follow-up (minimum 6 months) was used as reference standard. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of {sup 68}Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT was 90.4, 85, and 88.7 %, respectively, on patient-based analysis and 92, 85, and 90 %, respectively, on lesion-based analysis. {sup 68}Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT showed 100 % accuracy in patients with MEN2 syndrome and malignant pheochromocytoma. On direct comparison, lesion-based accuracy of {sup 68}Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT for pheochromocytoma was significantly higher than {sup 131}I-MIBG imaging (91.1 vs 66.6 %, p = 0.035). SUV{sub max} was higher for pheochromocytomas than other adrenal lesions (p = 0.005), MEN2-associated vs sporadic pheochromocytoma (p = 0.012), but no difference was seen between benign vs malignant pheochromocytoma (p = 0.269). {sup 68}Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT shows high diagnostic accuracy in patients with suspicion of pheochromocytoma and is superior to {sup 131}I-MIBG imaging for this purpose. Best results of {sup 68}Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT are seen in patients with MEN2-associated and malignant pheochromocytoma. (orig.)

  15. Gallium-68 EDTA PET/CT for Renal Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofman, Michael S; Hicks, Rodney J

    2016-09-01

    Nuclear medicine renal imaging provides important functional data to assist in the diagnosis and management of patients with a variety of renal disorders. Physiologically stable metal chelates like ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and diethylenetriamine penta-acetate (DTPA) are excreted by glomerular filtration and have been radiolabelled with a variety of isotopes for imaging glomerular filtration and quantitative assessment of glomerular filtration rate. Gallium-68 ((68)Ga) EDTA PET usage predates Technetium-99m ((99m)Tc) renal imaging, but virtually disappeared with the widespread adoption of gamma camera technology that was not optimal for imaging positron decay. There is now a reemergence of interest in (68)Ga owing to the greater availability of PET technology and use of (68)Ga to label other radiotracers. (68)Ga EDTA can be used a substitute for (99m)Tc DTPA for wide variety of clinical indications. A key advantage of PET for renal imaging over conventional scintigraphy is 3-dimensional dynamic imaging, which is particularly helpful in patients with complex anatomy in whom planar imaging may be nondiagnostic or difficult to interpret owing to overlying structures containing radioactive urine that cannot be differentiated. Other advantages include accurate and absolute (rather than relative) camera-based quantification, superior spatial and temporal resolution and integrated multislice CT providing anatomical correlation. Furthermore, the (68)Ga generator enables on-demand production at low cost, with no additional patient radiation exposure compared with conventional scintigraphy. Over the past decade, we have employed (68)Ga EDTA PET/CT primarily to answer difficult clinical questions in patients in whom other modalities have failed, particularly when it was envisaged that dynamic 3D imaging would be of assistance. We have also used it as a substitute for (99m)Tc DTPA if unavailable owing to supply issues, and have additionally examined the role of

  16. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT imaging versus dynamic contrast-enhanced CT for staging and prognosis of inflammatory breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Champion, Laurence; Edeline, Veronique; Giraudet, Anne-Laure; Wartski, Myriam [Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Saint-Cloud (France); Lerebours, Florence [Service d' Oncologie Medicale, Saint-Cloud (France); Cherel, Pascal [Institut Curie, Hopital Rene Huguenin, Service de Radiologie, Saint-Cloud (France); Bellet, Dominique [Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Saint-Cloud (France); Universite Paris Descartes, Pharmacologie Chimique et Genetique and Imagerie, Inserm U1022 CNRS UMR 8151, Faculte des sciences pharmaceutiques et biologiques, Paris (France); Alberini, Jean-Louis [Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Saint-Cloud (France); Universite Versailles Saint-Quentin, Faculte de medecine, Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines (France)

    2013-08-15

    Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is the most aggressive type of breast cancer with a poor prognosis. Locoregional staging is based on dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) CT or MRI. The aim of this study was to compare the performances of FDG PET/CT and DCE CT in locoregional staging of IBC and to assess their respective prognostic values. The study group comprised 50 women (median age: 51 {+-} 11 years) followed in our institution for IBC who underwent FDG PET/CT and DCE CT scans (median interval 5 {+-} 9 days). CT enhancement parameters were net maximal enhancement, net early enhancement and perfusion. The PET/CT scans showed intense FDG uptake in all primary tumours. Concordance rate between PET/CT and DCE CT for breast tumour localization was 92 %. No significant correlation was found between SUVmax and CT enhancement parameters in primary tumours (p > 0.6). PET/CT and DCE CT results were poorly correlated for skin infiltration (kappa = 0.19). Ipsilateral foci of increased axillary FDG uptake were found in 47 patients (median SUV: 7.9 {+-} 5.4), whereas enlarged axillary lymph nodes were observed on DCE CT in 43 patients. Results for axillary node involvement were fairly well correlated (kappa = 0.55). Nineteen patients (38 %) were found to be metastatic on PET/CT scan with a significant shorter progression-free survival than patients without distant lesions (p = 0.01). In the primary tumour, no statistically significant difference was observed between high and moderate tumour FDG uptake on survival, using an SUVmax cut-off of 5 (p = 0.7 and 0.9), or between high and low tumour enhancement on DCE CT (p > 0.8). FDG PET/CT imaging provided additional information concerning locoregional involvement to that provided by DCE CT on and allowed detection of distant metastases in the same whole-body procedure. Tumour FDG uptake or CT enhancement parameters were not correlated and were not found to have any prognostic value. (orig.)

  17. Xenon-enhanced CT imaging of local pulmonary ventilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajik, Jehangir K.; Tran, Binh Q.; Hoffman, Eric A.

    1996-04-01

    We are using the unique features of electron beam CT (EBCT) in conjunction with respiratory and cardiac gating to explore the use of non-radioactive xenon gas as a pulmonary ventilation contrast agent. The goal is to construct accurate and quantitative high-resolution maps of local pulmonary ventilation in humans. We are evaluating xenon-enhanced computed tomography in the pig model with dynamic tracer washout/dilution and single breath inhalation imaging protocols. Scanning is done via an EBCT scanner which offers 50 msec scan aperture speeds. CT attenuation coefficients (image gray scale value) show a linear increase with xenon concentration (r equals 0.99). We measure a 1.55 Hounsfield Unit (HU) enhancement (kV equals 130, mA equals 623) per percentage increase in xenon gas concentration giving an approximately 155 HU enhancement with 100% xenon gas concentration as measured in a plexiglass super-syringe. Early results indicate that a single breath (from functional residual capacity to total lung capacity) of 100% xenon gas provides an average 32 +/- 1.85 (SE) HU enhancement in the lung parenchyma (maximum 50 HU) and should not encounter unwanted xenon side effects. However, changes in lung density occurring during even short breath holds (as short as 10 seconds) may limit using a single breath technique to synchronous volumetric scanning, currently possible only with EBCT. Preliminary results indicate close agreement between measured regional xenon concentration-time curves and theoretical predictions for the same sample. More than 10 breaths with inspirations to as high as 25 cmH2O airway pressure were needed to clear tracer from all lung regions and some regions had nearly linear rather than mono-exponential clearance curves. When regional parenchymal xenon concentration-time curves were analyzed, vertical gradients in ventilation and redistribution of ventilation at higher inspiratory flow rates were consistent with known pulmonary physiology. We present

  18. Synthesis and characterization of ethosomal contrast agents containing iodine for computed tomography (CT) imaging applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hanjin; Cho, Young-Min; Lee, Kangtaek; Lee, Chang-Ha; Choi, Byoung Wook; Kim, Bumsang

    2014-06-01

    As a first step in the development of novel liver-specific contrast agents using ethosomes for computed tomography (CT) imaging applications, we entrapped iodine within ethosomes, which are phospholipid vesicular carriers containing relatively high alcohol concentrations, synthesized using several types of alcohol, such as methanol, ethanol, and propanol. The iodine containing ethosomes that were prepared using methanol showed the smallest vesicle size (392 nm) and the highest CT density (1107 HU). The incorporation of cholesterol into the ethosomal contrast agents improved the stability of the ethosomes but made the vesicle size large. The ethosomal contrast agents were taken up well by macrophage cells and showed no cellular toxicity. The results demonstrated that ethosomes containing iodine, as prepared in this study, have potential as contrast agents for applications in CT imaging.

  19. A Novel Mouse Segmentation Method Based on Dynamic Contrast Enhanced Micro-CT Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Dongmei; Zhang, Zhihong; Luo, Qingming; Yang, Xiaoquan

    2017-01-01

    With the development of hybrid imaging scanners, micro-CT is widely used in locating abnormalities, studying drug metabolism, and providing structural priors to aid image reconstruction in functional imaging. Due to the low contrast of soft tissues, segmentation of soft tissue organs from mouse micro-CT images is a challenging problem. In this paper, we propose a mouse segmentation scheme based on dynamic contrast enhanced micro-CT images. With a homemade fast scanning micro-CT scanner, dynamic contrast enhanced images were acquired before and after injection of non-ionic iodinated contrast agents (iohexol). Then the feature vector of each voxel was extracted from the signal intensities at different time points. Based on these features, the heart, liver, spleen, lung, and kidney could be classified into different categories and extracted from separate categories by morphological processing. The bone structure was segmented using a thresholding method. Our method was validated on seven BALB/c mice using two different classifiers: a support vector machine classifier with a radial basis function kernel and a random forest classifier. The results were compared to manual segmentation, and the performance was assessed using the Dice similarity coefficient, false positive ratio, and false negative ratio. The results showed high accuracy with the Dice similarity coefficient ranging from 0.709 ± 0.078 for the spleen to 0.929 ± 0.006 for the kidney. PMID:28060917

  20. Comparison of virtual unenhanced CT images of the abdomen under different iodine flow rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongrui; Li, Ye; Jackson, Alan; Li, Xiaodong; Huang, Ning; Guo, Chunjie; Zhang, Huimao

    2017-01-01

    To assess the effect of varying iodine flow rate (IFR) and iodine concentration on the quality of virtual unenhanced (VUE) images of the abdomen obtained with dual-energy CT. 94 subjects underwent unenhanced and triphasic contrast-enhanced CT scan of the abdomen, including arterial phase, portal venous phase, and delayed phase using dual-energy CT. Patients were randomized into 4 groups with different IFRs or iodine concentrations. VUE images were generated at 70 keV. The CT values, image noise, SNR and CNR of aorta, portal vein, liver, liver lesion, pancreatic parenchyma, spleen, erector spinae, and retroperitoneal fat were recorded. Dose-length product and effective dose for an examination with and without plain phase scan were calculated to assess the potential dose savings. Two radiologists independently assessed subjective image quality using a five-point scale. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov test was used first to test for normal distribution. Where data conformed to a normal distribution, analysis of variance was used to compare mean HU values, image noise, SNRs and CNRs for the 4 image sets. Where data distribution was not normal, a nonparametric test (Kruskal-Wallis test followed by stepwise step-down comparisons) was used. The significance level for all tests was 0.01 (two-sided) to allow for type 2 errors due to multiple testing. The CT numbers (HU) of VUE images showed no significant differences between the 4 groups (p > 0.05) or between different phases within the same group (p > 0.05). VUE images had equal or higher SNR and CNR than true unenhanced images. VUE images received equal or lower subjective image quality scores than unenhanced images but were of acceptable quality for diagnostic use. Calculated dose-length product and estimated dose showed that the use of VUE images in place of unenhanced images would be associated with a dose saving of 25%. VUE images can replace conventional unenhanced images. VUE images are not affected by varying iodine

  1. Segmentation of the ovine lung in 3D CT Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Lijun; Hoffman, Eric A.; Reinhardt, Joseph M.

    2004-04-01

    Pulmonary CT images can provide detailed information about the regional structure and function of the respiratory system. Prior to any of these analyses, however, the lungs must be identified in the CT data sets. A popular animal model for understanding lung physiology and pathophysiology is the sheep. In this paper we describe a lung segmentation algorithm for CT images of sheep. The algorithm has two main steps. The first step is lung extraction, which identifies the lung region using a technique based on optimal thresholding and connected components analysis. The second step is lung separation, which separates the left lung from the right lung by identifying the central fissure using an anatomy-based method incorporating dynamic programming and a line filter algorithm. The lung segmentation algorithm has been validated by comparing our automatic method to manual analysis for five pulmonary CT datasets. The RMS error between the computer-defined and manually-traced boundary is 0.96 mm. The segmentation requires approximately 10 minutes for a 512x512x400 dataset on a PC workstation (2.40 GHZ CPU, 2.0 GB RAM), while it takes human observer approximately two hours to accomplish the same task.

  2. Hybrid imaging (SPECT/CT, PET/CT) in differentiated thyroid cancer; Imagerie hybride (TEMP/TDM, TEP/TDM) et cancer differencie de la thyroide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bardet, S.; Ciappuccini, R.; Aide, N. [Unite de concertation pluridisciplinaire thyroide, service de medecine nucleaire, centre Francois-Baclesse, 14 - Caen (France); Barraux, V. [Unite de radiophysique, centre Francois-Baclesse, 14 - Caen (France); Rame, J.P. [Chirurgie ORL, centre Francois-Baclesse, 14 - Caen (France)

    2010-08-15

    Differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) is generally associated with a good prognosis. Local recurrences, mainly lymph-node involvement, account for 15-20% of cases and are surgically treated. Distant metastases, mostly in lungs and more rarely in bones, are present in 5% of patients. When iodine uptake is sufficient (in approximately 60% of patients), distant metastases can be destroyed by iterative activities of iodine 131. Serum thyroglobulin (Tg), which can be assessed either on hormonal treatment or on TSH stimulation is considered as the tumour marker in DTC. Functional (iodine 131 scintigraphy, FDG PET, bone scintigraphy) or anatomical (neck ultrasound, thoracic CT, bone MRI) imaging methods can be performed when Tg increases in order to show residual/recurrent disease. In recent years, new hybrid equipments integrating both a gamma camera and CT scan (SPECT/CT) have been commercialized while positron emission tomography cameras associated with CT (PET/CT) have been installed on the whole French territory. These equipments, which allow us to directly correlate functional and anatomical images, greatly improve the interpretation of planar scintigraphy or that of PET alone. Hybrid imaging enables us to precisely localize scintigraphic foci and most often, to immediately verify whether they correspond to tumour lesions. The aim of this article is to review the role of SPECT/CT and PET/CT in the management of patients with DTC in 2010. (authors)

  3. Construction of realistic liver phantoms from patient images using 3D printer and its application in CT image quality assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Shuai; Yu, Lifeng; Vrieze, Thomas; Kuhlmann, Joel; Chen, Baiyu; McCollough, Cynthia H.

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to use 3D printing techniques to construct a realistic liver phantom with heterogeneous background and anatomic structures from patient CT images, and to use the phantom to assess image quality with filtered back-projection and iterative reconstruction algorithms. Patient CT images were segmented into liver tissues, contrast-enhanced vessels, and liver lesions using commercial software, based on which stereolithography (STL) files were created and sent to a commercial 3D printer. A 3D liver phantom was printed after assigning different printing materials to each object to simulate appropriate attenuation of each segmented object. As high opacity materials are not available for the printer, we printed hollow vessels and filled them with iodine solutions of adjusted concentration to represent enhance levels in contrast-enhanced liver scans. The printed phantom was then placed in a 35×26 cm oblong-shaped water phantom and scanned repeatedly at 4 dose levels. Images were reconstructed using standard filtered back-projection and an iterative reconstruction algorithm with 3 different strength settings. Heterogeneous liver background were observed from the CT images and the difference in CT numbers between lesions and background were representative for low contrast lesions in liver CT studies. CT numbers in vessels filled with iodine solutions represented the enhancement of liver arteries and veins. Images were run through a Channelized Hotelling model observer with Garbor channels and ROC analysis was performed. The AUC values showed performance improvement using the iterative reconstruction algorithm and the amount of improvement increased with strength setting.

  4. Construction of Realistic Liver Phantoms from Patient Images using 3D Printer and Its Application in CT Image Quality Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Shuai; Yu, Lifeng; Vrieze, Thomas; Kuhlmann, Joel; Chen, Baiyu; McCollough, Cynthia H

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to use 3D printing techniques to construct a realistic liver phantom with heterogeneous background and anatomic structures from patient CT images, and to use the phantom to assess image quality with filtered backprojection and iterative reconstruction algorithms. Patient CT images were segmented into liver tissues, contrast-enhanced vessels, and liver lesions using commercial software, based on which stereolithography (STL) files were created and sent to a commercial 3D printer. A 3D liver phantom was printed after assigning different printing materials to each object to simulate appropriate attenuation of each segmented object. As high opacity materials are not available for the printer, we printed hollow vessels and filled them with iodine solutions of adjusted concentration to represent enhance levels in contrast-enhanced liver scans. The printed phantom was then placed in a 35×26 cm oblong-shaped water phantom and scanned repeatedly at 4 dose levels. Images were reconstructed using standard filtered backprojection and an iterative reconstruction algorithm with 3 different strength settings. Heterogeneous liver background were observed from the CT images and the difference in CT numbers between lesions and background were representative for low contrast lesions in liver CT studies. CT numbers in vessels filled with iodine solutions represented the enhancement of liver arteries and veins. Images were run through a Channelized Hotelling model observer with Garbor channels and ROC analysis was performed. The AUC values showed performance improvement using the iterative reconstruction algorithm and the amount of improvement increased with strength setting.

  5. Three modality image registration of brain SPECT/CT and MR images for quantitative analysis of dopamine transporter imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Yuzuho; Takeda, Yuta; Hara, Takeshi; Zhou, Xiangrong; Matsusako, Masaki; Tanaka, Yuki; Hosoya, Kazuhiko; Nihei, Tsutomu; Katafuchi, Tetsuro; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2016-03-01

    Important features in Parkinson's disease (PD) are degenerations and losses of dopamine neurons in corpus striatum. 123I-FP-CIT can visualize activities of the dopamine neurons. The activity radio of background to corpus striatum is used for diagnosis of PD and Dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB). The specific activity can be observed in the corpus striatum on SPECT images, but the location and the shape of the corpus striatum on SPECT images only are often lost because of the low uptake. In contrast, MR images can visualize the locations of the corpus striatum. The purpose of this study was to realize a quantitative image analysis for the SPECT images by using image registration technique with brain MR images that can determine the region of corpus striatum. In this study, the image fusion technique was used to fuse SPECT and MR images by intervening CT image taken by SPECT/CT. The mutual information (MI) for image registration between CT and MR images was used for the registration. Six SPECT/CT and four MR scans of phantom materials are taken by changing the direction. As the results of the image registrations, 16 of 24 combinations were registered within 1.3mm. By applying the approach to 32 clinical SPECT/CT and MR cases, all of the cases were registered within 0.86mm. In conclusions, our registration method has a potential in superimposing MR images on SPECT images.

  6. CT and MR imaging of the thoracic aorta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Cesare Ernesto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available At present time, both CT and MRI are valuable techniques in the study of the thoracic aorta. Nowadays, CT represents the most widely employed technique for the study of the thoracic aorta. The new generation CTs show sensitivities up to 100% and specificities of 98-99%. Sixteen and wider row detectors provide isotropic pixels, mandatory for the ineludible longitudinal reconstruction. The main limits are related to the X-ray dose expoure and the use of iodinated contrast media. MRI has great potential in the study of the thoracic aorta. Nevertheless, if compared to CT, acquisition times remain longer and movement artifact susceptibility higher. The main MRI disadvantages are claustrophobia, presence of ferromagnetic implants, pacemakers, longer acquisition times with respect to CT, inability to use contrast media in cases of renal insufficiency, lower spatial resolution and less availability than CT. CT is preferred in the acute aortic disease. Nevertheless, since it requires iodinated contrast media and X-ray exposure, it may be adequately replaced by MRI in the follow up of aortic diseases. The main limitation of MRI, however, is related to the scarce visibility of stents and calcifications.

  7. Relaxed Linearized Algorithms for Faster X-Ray CT Image Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nien, Hung; Fessler, Jeffrey A

    2016-04-01

    Statistical image reconstruction (SIR) methods are studied extensively for X-ray computed tomography (CT) due to the potential of acquiring CT scans with reduced X-ray dose while maintaining image quality. However, the longer reconstruction time of SIR methods hinders their use in X-ray CT in practice. To accelerate statistical methods, many optimization techniques have been investigated. Over-relaxation is a common technique to speed up convergence of iterative algorithms. For instance, using a relaxation parameter that is close to two in alternating direction method of multipliers (ADMM) has been shown to speed up convergence significantly. This paper proposes a relaxed linearized augmented Lagrangian (AL) method that shows theoretical faster convergence rate with over-relaxation and applies the proposed relaxed linearized AL method to X-ray CT image reconstruction problems. Experimental results with both simulated and real CT scan data show that the proposed relaxed algorithm (with ordered-subsets [OS] acceleration) is about twice as fast as the existing unrelaxed fast algorithms, with negligible computation and memory overhead.

  8. CT scan range estimation using multiple body parts detection: let PACS learn the CT image content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chunliang; Lundström, Claes

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an efficient CT scan range estimation method that is based on the analysis of image data itself instead of metadata analysis. This makes it possible to quantitatively compare the scan range of two studies. In our study, 3D stacks are first projected to 2D coronal images via a ray casting-like process. Trained 2D body part classifiers are then used to recognize different body parts in the projected image. The detected candidate regions go into a structure grouping process to eliminate false-positive detections. Finally, the scale and position of the patient relative to the projected figure are estimated based on the detected body parts via a structural voting. The start and end lines of the CT scan are projected to a standard human figure. The position readout is normalized so that the bottom of the feet represents 0.0, and the top of the head is 1.0. Classifiers for 18 body parts were trained using 184 CT scans. The final application was tested on 136 randomly selected heterogeneous CT scans. Ground truth was generated by asking two human observers to mark the start and end positions of each scan on the standard human figure. When compared with the human observers, the mean absolute error of the proposed method is 1.2% (max: 3.5%) and 1.6% (max: 5.4%) for the start and end positions, respectively. We proposed a scan range estimation method using multiple body parts detection and relative structure position analysis. In our preliminary tests, the proposed method delivered promising results.

  9. Pitfalls and Limitations of PET/CT in Brain Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, Eric; Bernard Ir, Claire; Hustinx, Roland

    2015-11-01

    Neurologic applications were at the forefront of PET imaging when the technique was developed in the mid-1970s. Although oncologic indications have become prominent in terms of number of studies performed worldwide, neurology remains a major field in which functional imaging provides unique information, both for clinical and research purposes. The evaluation of glucose metabolism using FDG remains the most frequent exploration, but in recent years, alternative radiotracers have been developed, including fluorinated amino acid analogues for primary brain tumor imaging and fluorinated compounds for assessing the amyloid deposits in patients with suspected Alzheimer disease. As the brain is enclosed in the skull, which presents fixed landmarks, it is relatively easy to coregister images obtained with various cross-sectional imaging methods, either functional or anatomical, with a relatively high accuracy and robustness. Nevertheless, PET in neurology has fully benefited from the advent of hybrid imaging. Attenuation and scatter correction is now much faster and equally accurate, using CT as compared with the traditional transmission scan using an external radioactive source. The perfect coregistration with the CT data, which is now systematically performed, also provides its own set of valuable information, for instance regarding cerebral atrophy. However, hybrid imaging in neurology comes with pitfalls and limitations, in addition to those that are well known, for example, blood glucose levels or psychotropic drugs that greatly affect the physiological FDG uptake. Movements of the patient's head, either during the PET acquisition or between the PET and the CT acquisitions will generate artifacts that may be very subtle yet lead to erroneous interpretation of the study. Similarly, quantitative analysis, such as voxel-based analyses, may prove very helpful in improving the diagnostic accuracy and the reproducibility of the reading, but a wide variety of artifacts may

  10. Dual-time-point FDG-PET/CT Imaging of Temporal Bone Chondroblastoma: A Report of Two Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toriihara, Akira; Tsunoda, Atsunobu; Takemoto, Akira; Kubota, Kazunori; Machida, Youichi; Tateishi, Ukihide

    2015-01-01

    Temporal bone chondroblastoma is an extremely rare benign bone tumor. We encountered two cases showing similar imaging findings on computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and dual-time-point (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/CT. In both cases, CT images revealed temporal bone defects and sclerotic changes around the tumor. Most parts of the tumor showed low signal intensity on T2-weighted MRI images and non-uniform enhancement on gadolinium contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images. No increase in signal intensity was noted in diffusion-weighted images. Dual-time-point PET/CT showed markedly elevated (18)F-FDG uptake, which increased from the early to delayed phase. Nevertheless, immunohistochemical analysis of the resected tumor tissue revealed weak expression of glucose transporter-1 and hexokinase II in both tumors. Temporal bone tumors, showing markedly elevated (18)F-FDG uptake, which increases from the early to delayed phase on PET/CT images, may be diagnosed as malignant bone tumors. Therefore, the differential diagnosis should include chondroblastoma in combination with its characteristic findings on CT and MRI.

  11. Dual-time-point FDG-PET/CT Imaging of Temporal Bone Chondroblastoma: A Report of Two Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Toriihara

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Temporal bone chondroblastoma is an extremely rare benign bone tumor. We encountered two cases showing similar imaging findings on computed tomography (CT, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, and dual-time-point 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG positron emission tomography (PET/CT. In both cases, CT images revealed temporal bone defects and sclerotic changes around the tumor. Most parts of the tumor showed low signal intensity on T2- weighted MRI images and non-uniform enhancement on gadolinium contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images. No increase in signal intensity was noted in diffusion-weighted images. Dual-time-point PET/CT showed markedly elevated 18F-FDG uptake, which increased from the early to delayed phase. Nevertheless, immunohistochemical analysis of the resected tumor tissue revealed weak expression of glucose transporter-1 and hexokinase II in both tumors. Temporal bone tumors, showing markedly elevated 18F-FDG uptake, which increases from the early to delayed phase on PET/CT images, may be diagnosed as malignant bone tumors. Therefore, the differential diagnosis should include chondroblastoma in combination with its characteristic findings on CT and MRI.

  12. SU-D-BRB-01: 4D-CT Lung Ventilation Images Vary with 4D-CT Sorting Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, T; Kabus, S; Lorenz, C; Johnston, E; Maxim, P; Loo, B; Keall, P

    2012-06-01

    4D-CT ventilation imaging is a novel promising technique for lung functional imaging and has potential as a biomarker for radiation pneumonitis, but has not been validated in human subjects. The current 4D- CT technique with phase-based sorting results in artifacts at an alarmingly high frequency (90%), which may introduce variations into ventilation calculations. The purpose of this study was to quantify the variability of 4D- CT ventilation imaging to 4D-CT sorting techniques. Two 4D-CT images were generated from the same data set by: (1) phase-based; (2) anatomic similarity- and abdominal displacement-based sorting for five patients. Two ventilation image sets (V_phase and V_anat) were then calculated by deformable image registration of peak-exhale and peak-inhale4D-CT images and quantification of regional volume change based on Hounsfield unit change. The variability of 4D-CT ventilation imaging wasquantified using the voxel-based Spearman rank correlation coefficients and Dice similarity coefficients (DSC) for the spatial overlap of segmented low- functional lung regions. The relationship between the abdominal motionrange variation and ventilation variation was also assessed using linearregression. Furthermore, the correlations between V_phase or V_anat and SPECT ventilation images (assumed ground-truth) were compared. In general, displacement- and anatomic similarity-based sorting reduced 4D- CT artifacts compared to phase-based sorting. The voxel-based correlationsbetween V_phase and V_anat were only moderate (range, 0.57-0.77). The DSCs for the low-functional lung regions were moderate to substantial (0.58-0.70). The relationship between the motion range variation and ventilation variation was strong on average (R2=0.79±0.25), suggesting that ventilation variations are related to 4D-CT artifacts. Vanat was found to improve correlations with SPECT ventilation images compared to V_phase. 4D-CT ventilation images vary markedly with 4D-CT sorting techniques. 4

  13. CT perfusion image processing: analysis of liver tumors

    OpenAIRE

    D’Antò, Michela

    2013-01-01

    Perfusion CT imaging of the liver has potential to improve evaluation of tumour angiogenesis. Quantitative parameters can be obtained applying mathematical models to Time Attenuation Curve (TAC). However, there are still some difficulties for an accurate quantification of perfusion parameters due, for example, to algorithms employed, to mathematical model, to patient’s weight and cardiac output and to the acquisition system. In this thesis, new parameters and alternative methodologies ab...

  14. Imaging of cochlear implant electrode array with flat-detector CT and conventional multislice CT: comparison of image quality and radiation dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struffert, Tobias; Hertel, Victoria; Kyriakou, Yannis; Krause, Jens; Engelhorn, Tobias; Schick, Bernhard; Iro, Heinrich; Hornung, Joachim; Doerfler, Arnd

    2010-04-01

    Cochlear implantation assessment is possible using commercially available standard flat-detector computed tomography (FD-CT) protocols. Image quality is superior to multislice CT (MSCT). The radiation dose of FD-CT is lower in comparison with MSCT standard protocols and may therefore overcome the limitations of MSCT in the evaluation of cochlear implants. FD-CT offers higher spatial resolution than MSCT. Our objective was to compare the image quality of FD-CT to conventional MSCT in the visualization of a cochlear implant electrode array with respect to radiation exposure. An isolated temporal bone specimen was scanned using a commercially available FD-CT system and a 4 and 64 row MSCT scanner. Different scanning protocols were used. Image quality was assessed by four independent readers using a scoring system with different criteria describing delineation of the cochlea and the electrode array, image noise and spatial resolution. Radiation dose was measured using the CT dose index (CTDI) and a 16 cm acrylic phantom. Image quality was rated superior for FD-CT for all criteria by all readers. Single electrode contacts were only visible in FD-CT and assessment of implant position was improved by FD-CT. The radiation dose of FD-CT was half that of MSCT standard protocols.

  15. WE-A-BRF-01: Dual-Energy CT Imaging in Diagnostic Imaging and Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molloi, S [University of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Li, B [Boston University Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States); Yin, F [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Chen, H [New York Presbyterian Hospital, New York, NY (United States)

    2014-06-15

    classification based on calcium scores shows excellent agreement with classification on the basis of conventional coronary artery calcium scoring. These studies demonstrate dual-energy cardiovascular CT can potentially be a noninvasive and sensitive modality in high risk patients. On-board KV/MV Imaging. To enhance soft tissue contrast and reduce metal artifacts, we have developed a dual-energy CBCT technique and a novel on-board kV/MV imaging technique based on hardware available on modern linear accelerators. We have also evaluated the feasibility of these two techniques in various phantom studies. Optimal techniques (energy, beam filtration, # of overlapping projections, etc) have been investigated with unique calibration procedures, which leads to successful decomposition of imaged material into acrylic-aluminum basis material pair. This enables the synthesis of virtual monochromatic (VM) CBCT images that demonstrate much less beam hardening, significantly reduced metal artifacts, and/or higher soft tissue CNR compared to single-energy CBCT. Adaptive Radiation Therapy. DECT could actually contribute to the area of Dose-Guided Radiation Therapy (or Adaptive Therapy). The application of DECT imaging using 80kV and 140 kV combinations could potentially increase the image quality by reducing the bone or high density material artifacts and also increase the soft tissue contrast by a light contrast agent. The result of this higher contrast / quality images is beneficial for deformable image registration / segmentation algorithm to improve its accuracy hence to make adaptive therapy less time consuming in its recontouring process. The real time re-planning prior to per treatment fraction could become more realistic with this improvement especially in hypofractional SBRT cases. Learning Objectives: Learn recent developments of dual-energy imaging in diagnosis and radiation therapy; Understand the unique clinical problem and required quantification accuracy in each application

  16. Kinematic CT and MR imaging of the patellofemoral joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muhle, C.; Brossmann, J.; Heller, M. [Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Christian-Albrechts-Universitaet, Kiel (Germany)

    1999-04-01

    Anterior knee pain is a frequently encountered orthopedic symptom and is often associated with patellofemoral malalignment, which may cause chondromalacia of the patella. The difficulty in determining the patellar position between 0 and 30 of knee flexion with a conventional axial radiographic examination is well known. The introduction of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging for the diagnosis of knee joint abnormalities has enabled assessment of the patellar position in this critical range. More recently, emphasis has been placed on dynamic visualization of patellar motion to detect an abnormal tracking pattern. The important influence of the quadriceps muscle on the patellar tracking pattern is well known and has been examined during active knee extension by the use of ultrafast CT, and motion-triggered and ultrafast MR imaging. This article provides an overview of the current status of kinematic CT and MR imaging in the diagnosis of patellofemoral alignment, its clinical implications, and future directions. (orig.) With 13 figs., 5 tabs., 47 refs.

  17. Image analysis of the inner ear with CT and MR imaging; Pre-operative assessment for cochlear implant surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumakawa, Kohzoh; Takeda, Hidehiko; Mutoh, Naoko; Miyakawa, Kohichi (Toranomon Hospital, Tokyo (Japan)); Yukawa, Kumiko; Funasaka, Sohtaro

    1992-06-01

    Recent progress in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has made it possible to obtain detailed images of the inner ear by delineating the lymphatic fluid within the labyrinth. We analyzed CT scans and MR imaging in 70 ears manifesting profound deafness owing to inner ear lesions and compared their detective ability for inner ear lesions. The following results were obtained. CT scan examination showed slight to extensive ossification of the labyrinth in six ears (9%), whereas MRI examination revealed low to absent signal intensity of the inner ear in nine ears (13%). Therefore, it was concluded that MRI is more sensitive in detecting abnormalities of the inner ear than CT scan. MRI provided useful information as to whether the cochlear turn is filled with lymphatic fluid or obstructed. This point was one of the greatest advantages of MRI over CT scan. Abnormal findings in either or both the CT scan and the MRI were detected in suppurative labyrinthitis occurring secondary to chronic otitis media, bacterial meningitis and in inner ear trauma. However, such abnormal findings were not detected in patients with idiopathic progressive sensorineural hearing loss, ototoxity or sudden deafness. These findings should be taken into consideration in pre-operative assessment of cochlear implant candidates. (author).

  18. SU-E-T-431: Feasiblity of Using CT Scout Images for 2D LDR Brachytherpay Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, J; Weaver, R [LAC+USC Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, M. Mariscal (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: i) To show the feasibility of using CT scout images for 2D low-dose rate brachytherapy planning with BrachyVision (version 10.4); ii) to show their advantages and disadvantages over DRRs. Methods: A phantom was constructed to house a Fletcher-Suite applicator. The phantom is made of Styrofoam with metal BBs positioned at well-defined separations. These markers are used to assess the image distortion in the scout images. Unlike DRRs, scout images are distorted only in the direction normal to the couch direction; therefore, they needed to be scaled unidirectionally prior to importing into BrachyVision. In addition to confirming the scaling is performed correctly by measuring distances between well-positioned BB, we also compare a LDR plan using scout images to a 3D CT-based plan. Results: There is no distortion of the image along the couch direction due to the collimation of the CT scanner. The distortion in the transverse plane can be corrected by multiplying by the ratio of distances between source-to-isocenter and source-to-detector. The results show the distance separations between BBs as measured in scout images and by a caliber are within a few millimeters. Dosimetrically, the difference between the dose rates to points A and B based on scout images and on 3D CT are less than a few percents. The accuracy can be improved by correcting for the distortion on the transverse plane. Conclusion: It is possible to use CT scout images for 2D planning in BrachyVision. This is an advantage because scout images have no metal artifacts often present in CT images or DRRs. Another advantage is the lack of distortion in the couch direction. One major disadvantage is that the image distortion due to beam divergence can be large. This is due to the inherent short distance between source-to-isocenter and source-to-detector on a CT scanner.

  19. Semiautomatic segmentation of liver metastases on volumetric CT images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Jiayong [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Shanghai University of Medicine & Health Sciences, 101 Yingkou Road, Yang Pu District, Shanghai 200093 (China); Schwartz, Lawrence H.; Zhao, Binsheng, E-mail: bz2166@cumc.columbia.edu [Department of Radiology, Columbia University Medical Center, 630 West 168th Street, New York, New York 10032 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Accurate segmentation and quantification of liver metastases on CT images are critical to surgery/radiation treatment planning and therapy response assessment. To date, there are no reliable methods to perform such segmentation automatically. In this work, the authors present a method for semiautomatic delineation of liver metastases on contrast-enhanced volumetric CT images. Methods: The first step is to manually place a seed region-of-interest (ROI) in the lesion on an image. This ROI will (1) serve as an internal marker and (2) assist in automatically identifying an external marker. With these two markers, lesion contour on the image can be accurately delineated using traditional watershed transformation. Density information will then be extracted from the segmented 2D lesion and help determine the 3D connected object that is a candidate of the lesion volume. The authors have developed a robust strategy to automatically determine internal and external markers for marker-controlled watershed segmentation. By manually placing a seed region-of-interest in the lesion to be delineated on a reference image, the method can automatically determine dual threshold values to approximately separate the lesion from its surrounding structures and refine the thresholds from the segmented lesion for the accurate segmentation of the lesion volume. This method was applied to 69 liver metastases (1.1–10.3 cm in diameter) from a total of 15 patients. An independent radiologist manually delineated all lesions and the resultant lesion volumes served as the “gold standard” for validation of the method’s accuracy. Results: The algorithm received a median overlap, overestimation ratio, and underestimation ratio of 82.3%, 6.0%, and 11.5%, respectively, and a median average boundary distance of 1.2 mm. Conclusions: Preliminary results have shown that volumes of liver metastases on contrast-enhanced CT images can be accurately estimated by a semiautomatic segmentation

  20. A general approach to liver lesion segmentation in CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Li; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Odhner, Dewey; Huang, Lidong; Tong, Yubing; Torigian, Drew A.

    2016-03-01

    Lesion segmentation has remained a challenge in different body regions. Generalizability is lacking in published methods as variability in results is common, even for a given organ and modality, such that it becomes difficult to establish standardized methods of disease quantification and reporting. This paper makes an attempt at a generalizable method based on classifying lesions along with their background into groups using clinically used visual attributes. Using an Iterative Relative Fuzzy Connectedness (IRFC) delineation engine, the ideas are implemented for the task of liver lesion segmentation in computed tomography (CT) images. For lesion groups with the same background properties, a few subjects are chosen as the training set to obtain the optimal IRFC parameters for the background tissue components. For lesion groups with similar foreground properties, optimal foreground parameters for IRFC are set as the median intensity value of the training lesion subset. To segment liver lesions belonging to a certain group, the devised method requires manual loading of the corresponding parameters, and correct setting of the foreground and background seeds. The segmentation is then completed in seconds. Segmentation accuracy and repeatability with respect to seed specification are evaluated. Accuracy is assessed by the assignment of a delineation quality score (DQS) to each case. Inter-operator repeatability is assessed by the difference between segmentations carried out independently by two operators. Experiments on 80 liver lesion cases show that the proposed method achieves a mean DQS score of 4.03 and inter-operator repeatability of 92.3%.

  1. CT and MR imaging of odontoid abnormalities: A pictorial review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishchint Jain

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Odontoid process is the central pillar of the craniovertebral junction. Imaging of this small structure continues to be a challenge for the radiologists due to complex bony and ligamentous anatomy. A wide range of developmental and acquired abnormalities of odontoid have been identified. Their accurate radiologic evaluation is important as different lesions have markedly different clinical course, patient management, and prognosis. This article seeks to provide knowledge for interpreting appearances of odontoid on computed tomography (CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI with respect to various disease processes, along with providing a quick review of the embryology and relevant anatomy.

  2. Pancreas tumor model in rabbit imaged by perfusion CT scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, Jason; Tichauer, Kenneth; Moodie, Karen; Kane, Susan; Hoopes, Jack; Stewart, Errol E.; Hadway, Jennifer; Lee, Ting-Yim; Pereira, Stephen P.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2013-03-01

    The goal of this work was to develop and validate a pancreas tumor animal model to investigate the relationship between photodynamic therapy (PDT) effectiveness and photosensitizer drug delivery. More specifically, this work lays the foundation for investigating the utility of dynamic contrast enhanced blood perfusion imaging to be used to inform subsequent PDT. A VX2 carcinoma rabbit cell line was grown in the tail of the pancreas of three New Zealand White rabbits and approximately 3-4 weeks after implantation the rabbits were imaged on a CT scanner using a contrast enhanced perfusion protocol, providing parametric maps of blood flow, blood volume, mean transit time, and vascular permeability surface area product.

  3. CT and MR Image Fusion Scheme in Nonsubsampled Contourlet Transform Domain

    OpenAIRE

    Ganasala, Padma; Kumar, Vinod

    2014-01-01

    Fusion of CT and MR images allows simultaneous visualization of details of bony anatomy provided by CT image and details of soft tissue anatomy provided by MR image. This helps the radiologist for the precise diagnosis of disease and for more effective interventional treatment procedures. This paper aims at designing an effective CT and MR image fusion method. In the proposed method, first source images are decomposed by using nonsubsampled contourlet transform (NSCT) which is a shift-invaria...

  4. MR imaging compared with CT, angiography, and myelography supplemented with CT in the diagnosis of spinal tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasuo, Kanehiro; Uchino, Akira; Matsumoto, Shunichi; Fujii, Kiyotaka; Fukui, Masashi; Masuda, Kouji (Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    To clarify the significance of MR imaging and the present status of CT, angiography, and myelography supplemented by CT (M-CTM), the radiological findings of 50 spinal tumors were reviewed and analyzed. MR imaging was most effective for visualizing morphological features such as the margins and/or inner structures of the tumors. CT was also effective for imaging 'dumbbell' neurinomas and extradural tumors. Angiography was necessary in one hemangioblastoma and in cervical extradural tumors. M-CTM visualized the morphology of intradural extramedullary tumors and extradural tumors, but provided no new information in most of these cases. It was concluded that when using MR the indications for CT, angiography, and M-CTM are limited and that CT or angiography should be performed only in selected cases. M-CTM appeared to be unnecessary. (author).

  5. Coronary imaging techniques with emphasis on CT and MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lederlin, Mathieu; Latrabe, Valerie; Corneloup, Olivier; Cochet, Hubert; Montaudon, Michel; Laurent, Francois [Hopital Cardiologique, CHU Bordeaux, Thoracic and Cardiovascular Imaging Department, Pessac (France); Thambo, Jean-Benoit [Hopital Cardiologique, CHU Bordeaux, Pediatric and Adult Congenital Heart Disease Unit, Pessac (France)

    2011-12-15

    Coronary artery imaging in children is challenging, with high demands both on temporal and spatial resolution due to high heart rates and smaller anatomy. Although invasive conventional coronary angiography remains the benchmark technique, over the past 10 years, CT and MRI have emerged in the field of coronary imaging. The choice of hardware is important. For CT, the minimum requirement is a 64-channel scanner. The temporal resolution of the scanner is most important for optimising image quality and minimising radiation dose. Manufacturers have developed several modes of electrocardiographic (ECG) triggering to facilitate dose reduction. Recent technical advances have opened new possibilities in MRI coronary imaging. As a non-ionising radiation technique, MRI is of great interest in paediatric imaging. It is currently recommended in centres with appropriate expertise for the screening of patients with suspected congenital coronary anomalies. However, MRI is still not feasible in infants. This review describes and discusses the technical requirements and the pros and cons of all three techniques. (orig.)

  6. Classification of CT brain images based on deep learning networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiaohong W; Hui, Rui; Tian, Zengmin

    2017-01-01

    While computerised tomography (CT) may have been the first imaging tool to study human brain, it has not yet been implemented into clinical decision making process for diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). On the other hand, with the nature of being prevalent, inexpensive and non-invasive, CT does present diagnostic features of AD to a great extent. This study explores the significance and impact on the application of the burgeoning deep learning techniques to the task of classification of CT brain images, in particular utilising convolutional neural network (CNN), aiming at providing supplementary information for the early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. Towards this end, three categories of CT images (N = 285) are clustered into three groups, which are AD, lesion (e.g. tumour) and normal ageing. In addition, considering the characteristics of this collection with larger thickness along the direction of depth (z) (~3-5 mm), an advanced CNN architecture is established integrating both 2D and 3D CNN networks. The fusion of the two CNN networks is subsequently coordinated based on the average of Softmax scores obtained from both networks consolidating 2D images along spatial axial directions and 3D segmented blocks respectively. As a result, the classification accuracy rates rendered by this elaborated CNN architecture are 85.2%, 80% and 95.3% for classes of AD, lesion and normal respectively with an average of 87.6%. Additionally, this improved CNN network appears to outperform the others when in comparison with 2D version only of CNN network as well as a number of state of the art hand-crafted approaches. As a result, these approaches deliver accuracy rates in percentage of 86.3, 85.6 ± 1.10, 86.3 ± 1.04, 85.2 ± 1.60, 83.1 ± 0.35 for 2D CNN, 2D SIFT, 2D KAZE, 3D SIFT and 3D KAZE respectively. The two major contributions of the paper constitute a new 3-D approach while applying deep learning technique to extract signature information

  7. Image quality in CT: From physical measurements to model observers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdun, F R; Racine, D; Ott, J G; Tapiovaara, M J; Toroi, P; Bochud, F O; Veldkamp, W J H; Schegerer, A; Bouwman, R W; Giron, I Hernandez; Marshall, N W; Edyvean, S

    2015-12-01

    Evaluation of image quality (IQ) in Computed Tomography (CT) is important to ensure that diagnostic questions are correctly answered, whilst keeping radiation dose to the patient as low as is reasonably possible. The assessment of individual aspects of IQ is already a key component of routine quality control of medical x-ray devices. These values together with standard dose indicators can be used to give rise to 'figures of merit' (FOM) to characterise the dose efficiency of the CT scanners operating in certain modes. The demand for clinically relevant IQ characterisation has naturally increased with the development of CT technology (detectors efficiency, image reconstruction and processing), resulting in the adaptation and evolution of assessment methods. The purpose of this review is to present the spectrum of various methods that have been used to characterise image quality in CT: from objective measurements of physical parameters to clinically task-based approaches (i.e. model observer (MO) approach) including pure human observer approach. When combined together with a dose indicator, a generalised dose efficiency index can be explored in a framework of system and patient dose optimisation. We will focus on the IQ methodologies that are required for dealing with standard reconstruction, but also for iterative reconstruction algorithms. With this concept the previously used FOM will be presented with a proposal to update them in order to make them relevant and up to date with technological progress. The MO that objectively assesses IQ for clinically relevant tasks represents the most promising method in terms of radiologist sensitivity performance and therefore of most relevance in the clinical environment.

  8. Usefulness of CT virtual endoscopy in imaging a large esophagorespiratory fistula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonomura, Tetsuo; Kishi, Kazushi; Ishii, Seigo; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Masuda, Mitsunori; Terada, Masaki; Nakamine, Hirokazu; Sato, Morio

    2000-04-01

    A 73-year-old woman with a large esophagorespiratory fistula underwent bronchoscopy and computed tomographic (CT) virtual endoscopy before stenting. Noninvasive CT virtual endoscopy showed the large fistula, and the CT findings agreed with the bronchoscopic findings.

  9. A registration-based segmentation method with application to adiposity analysis of mice microCT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Bing; Joshi, Anand; Brandhorst, Sebastian; Longo, Valter D.; Conti, Peter S.; Leahy, Richard M.

    2014-04-01

    Obesity is a global health problem, particularly in the U.S. where one third of adults are obese. A reliable and accurate method of quantifying obesity is necessary. Visceral adipose tissue (VAT) and subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) are two measures of obesity that reflect different associated health risks, but accurate measurements in humans or rodent models are difficult. In this paper we present an automatic, registration-based segmentation method for mouse adiposity studies using microCT images. We co-register the subject CT image and a mouse CT atlas. Our method is based on surface matching of the microCT image and an atlas. Surface-based elastic volume warping is used to match the internal anatomy. We acquired a whole body scan of a C57BL6/J mouse injected with contrast agent using microCT and created a whole body mouse atlas by manually delineate the boundaries of the mouse and major organs. For method verification we scanned a C57BL6/J mouse from the base of the skull to the distal tibia. We registered the obtained mouse CT image to our atlas. Preliminary results show that we can warp the atlas image to match the posture and shape of the subject CT image, which has significant differences from the atlas. We plan to use this software tool in longitudinal obesity studies using mouse models.

  10. Fundamentals of PET and PET/CT imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Sandip; Kwee, Thomas C; Surti, Suleman; Akin, Esma A; Yoo, Don; Alavi, Abass

    2011-06-01

    In this review, the fundamental principles of fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) and FDG PET/computed tomography (CT) imaging have been described. The basic physics of PET instrumentation, radiotracer chemistry, and the artifacts, as well as normal physiological or benign pathological variants, have been described and presented to the readers in a lucid manner to enable them an easy grasp of the fundamentals of the subject. Finally, we have outlined the current developments in quantitative PET imaging, including dual time point and delayed PET imaging, time-of-flight technology in PET imaging and partial volume correction, and global disease assessment with their potential of being incorporated into the assessment of benign and malignant disorders.

  11. Infective endocarditis detection through SPECT/CT images digital processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Albino; Valdés, Raquel; Jiménez, Luis; Vallejo, Enrique; Hernández, Salvador; Soto, Gabriel

    2014-03-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) is a difficult-to-diagnose pathology, since its manifestation in patients is highly variable. In this work, it was proposed a semiautomatic algorithm based on SPECT images digital processing for the detection of IE using a CT images volume as a spatial reference. The heart/lung rate was calculated using the SPECT images information. There were no statistically significant differences between the heart/lung rates values of a group of patients diagnosed with IE (2.62+/-0.47) and a group of healthy or control subjects (2.84+/-0.68). However, it is necessary to increase the study sample of both the individuals diagnosed with IE and the control group subjects, as well as to improve the images quality.

  12. Dynamic CT perfusion image data compression for efficient parallel processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, Renan Sales; Olabarriaga, Silvia Delgado; Borst, Jordi; van Walderveen, Marianne A A; Posthuma, Jorrit S; Streekstra, Geert J; van Herk, Marcel; Majoie, Charles B L M; Marquering, Henk A

    2016-03-01

    The increasing size of medical imaging data, in particular time series such as CT perfusion (CTP), requires new and fast approaches to deliver timely results for acute care. Cloud architectures based on graphics processing units (GPUs) can provide the processing capacity required for delivering fast results. However, the size of CTP datasets makes transfers to cloud infrastructures time-consuming and therefore not suitable in acute situations. To reduce this transfer time, this work proposes a fast and lossless compression algorithm for CTP data. The algorithm exploits redundancies in the temporal dimension and keeps random read-only access to the image elements directly from the compressed data on the GPU. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first work to present a GPU-ready method for medical image compression with random access to the image elements from the compressed data.

  13. Imaging performance in differential phase contrast CT compared with the conventional CT-noise equivalent quanta NEQ(k)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiangyang; Yang, Yi; Tang, Shaojie

    2012-03-01

    The grating-based x-ray differential phase contrast (DPC) CT is emerging as a new technology with the potential for extensive preclinical and clinical applications. In general, the performance of an imaging system is jointly determined by its signal property (modulation transfer function-MTF(k)) and noise property (noise power spectrum-NPS(k)), which is characterized by its spectrum of noise equivalent quanta. As reported by us previously, owing to an adoption of the Hilbert filtering for image reconstruction in the fashion of filtered backprojection (FBP), the noise property of DPC-CT characterized by its NPS(k) differs drastically from that of the conventional attenuation-based CT (1/|k| trait vs. |k| trait). In this work, via system analysis, modeling and simulated phantom study, we initially investigate the signal property of DPC-CT characterized by its MTF(k) and compare it with that of the conventional CT. In addition, we investigate the DPC-CT's spectrum of noise equivalent quanta NEQ(k) - the most important figure of merit (FOM) in the assessment of an imaging system's performance - by taking the MTF(k) and NPS(k) jointly into account. Through such a thorough investigation into both the signal and noise properties, the imaging performance of DPC-CT and its potential over the conventional attenuation-based CT can be fully understood and appreciated.

  14. A technique for multi-dimensional optimization of radiation dose, contrast dose, and image quality in CT imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahbaee, Pooyan; Abadi, Ehsan; Sanders, Jeremiah; Becchetti, Marc; Zhang, Yakun; Agasthya, Greeshma; Segars, Paul; Samei, Ehsan

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to substantiate the interdependency of image quality, radiation dose, and contrast material dose in CT towards the patient-specific optimization of the imaging protocols. The study deployed two phantom platforms. First, a variable sized phantom containing an iodinated insert was imaged on a representative CT scanner at multiple CTDI values. The contrast and noise were measured from the reconstructed images for each phantom diameter. Linearly related to iodine-concentration, contrast to noise ratio (CNR), was calculated for different iodine-concentration levels. Second, the analysis was extended to a recently developed suit of 58 virtual human models (5D-XCAT) with added contrast dynamics. Emulating a contrast-enhanced abdominal image procedure and targeting a peak-enhancement in aorta, each XCAT phantom was "imaged" using a CT simulation platform. 3D surfaces for each patient/size established the relationship between iodine-concentration, dose, and CNR. The Sensitivity of Ratio (SR), defined as ratio of change in iodine-concentration versus dose to yield a constant change in CNR was calculated and compared at high and low radiation dose for both phantom platforms. The results show that sensitivity of CNR to iodine concentration is larger at high radiation dose (up to 73%). The SR results were highly affected by radiation dose metric; CTDI or organ dose. Furthermore, results showed that the presence of contrast material could have a profound impact on optimization results (up to 45%).

  15. Astronomers Make "Movie" of Radio Images Showing Supernova Explosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-11-01

    Astronomers using an international network of radio telescopes have produced a "movie" showing details of the expansion of debris from an exploding star. Their sequence of images constitutes the best determination yet made of the details of a new supernova remnant, and already has raised new questions about such events. The scientists used radio telescopes in Europe and the United States, including the National Science Foundation's Very Large Array (VLA) and Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA), to make very high- resolution images of Supernova 1993J, which was discovered by a Spanish amateur astronomer on March 28, 1993 in the galaxy M81, some 11 million light-years distant in the constellation Ursa Major. Their results are reported in the December 1 issue of the journal Science. The "movie" is based on five images of the supernova, made during 1993 and 1994. The work was done by: Jon Marcaide and Eduardo Ros of the University of Valencia, Spain; Antxon Alberdi of the Special Laboratory for Astrophysics and Fundamental Physics of Madrid, Spain and the Institute of Astrophysics at Andalucia, Spain; Philip Diamond of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in Socorro, NM; Irwin Shapiro of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, MA; Jose-Carlos Guirado, Dayton Jones and Robert Preston of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, CA; Thomas Krichbaum and Arno Witzel of the Max-Planck Institute for Radioastronomy in Bonn, Germany; Franco Mantovani of the Institute of Radioastronomy in Bologna, Italy; Antonio Rius of the Special Laboratory for Astrophysics and Fundamental Physics of Madrid, Spain and the Center for Advanced Studies at Blanes, Spain; Richard Schilizzi of the Joint Institute for VLBI in Europe and Leiden Observatory in the Netherlands; Corrado Trigilio of the Institute of Radioastronomy in Noto, Italy; and Alan Whitney of the MIT- Haystack Observatory in Massachusetts. The capability to make such high-quality images with widely

  16. Multislice CT of the pelvis: dose reduction with regard to image quality using 16-row CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gurung, Jessen; Khan, M. Fawad; Maataoui, Adel; Herzog, C.; Vogl, Thomas J. [Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Bux, R.; Bratzke, H. [Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, Institute for Forensic Medicine, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Ackermann, Hanns [Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, Institute for Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2005-09-01

    To optimize examination protocols of 16-row multi-detector CT (MDCT) of pelvis for dose reduction with regard to image quality. MDCT of pelvis was performed on 12 cadaver specimens with stepwise reduction of tube current from 160 mA (113, 80, 56, 40, 28) to 20 mA at 120 kV. Scan parameters were 16 x 1.5 mm collimation. Reconstructions of axial and coronal images were used for evaluation of cortex, trabeculum, image quality, image noise, acetabulum and iliosacral (ISJ) joints. After data were blinded, evaluation of images was done by three radiologists according to 5-point Likert scale. Accuracy of the observers in sorting films according to dose reduction was determined with kappa coefficient. Mean values of image evaluation were determined. Pronounced deterioration of image quality for all criteria was observed between 80 and 28 mA. Adequate image quality was obtained at 40 mA [effective dose (E): 2.2 mSv, CTDI{sub w}: 2.8 mGy] for criterion detailed definition of acetabulum and ISJ and at 80 mA (E: 4.4 mSv, CTDI{sub w}: 5.6 mGy) for remaining criteria. Moderate agreement was observed between the three observers (kappa coefficient: 0.31). All observers were excellent in arranging images according to decreasing dose. Using 16-row MDCT image quality of pelvis is acceptable at 80 mA and 120 kV. This translates into a dose reduction of 33% of average value of the nationwide survey of the German Roentgen Society (1999) for this type of examination. (orig.)

  17. Accuracy of quantitative reconstructions in SPECT/CT imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shcherbinin, S; Celler, A [Department of Radiology, University of British Columbia, 366-828 West 10th Avenue, Vancouver BC, V5Z 1L8 (Canada); Belhocine, T; Vanderwerf, R; Driedger, A [Department of Nuclear Medicine, London Health Sciences Centre, 375 South Street, PO Box 5375, London ON, N6A 4G5 (Canada)], E-mail: shcher2@interchange.ubc.ca

    2008-09-07

    The goal of this study was to determine the quantitative accuracy of our OSEM-APDI reconstruction method based on SPECT/CT imaging for Tc-99m, In-111, I-123, and I-131 isotopes. Phantom studies were performed on a SPECT/low-dose multislice CT system (Infinia-Hawkeye-4 slice, GE Healthcare) using clinical acquisition protocols. Two radioactive sources were centrally and peripherally placed inside an anthropometric Thorax phantom filled with non-radioactive water. Corrections for attenuation, scatter, collimator blurring and collimator septal penetration were applied and their contribution to the overall accuracy of the reconstruction was evaluated. Reconstruction with the most comprehensive set of corrections resulted in activity estimation with error levels of 3-5% for all the isotopes.

  18. SPECT/CT imaging of the lumbar spine in chronic low back pain: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carstensen Michael H

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Mechanical low back pain is a common indication for Nuclear Medicine imaging. Whole-body bone scan is a very sensitive but poorly specific study for the detection of metabolic bone abnormalities. The accurate localisation of metabolically active bone disease is often difficult in 2D imaging but single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT allows accurate diagnosis and anatomic localisation of osteoblastic and osteolytic lesions in 3D imaging. We present a clinical case of a patient referred for evaluation of chronic lower back pain with no history of trauma, spinal surgery, or cancer. Planar whole-body scan showed heterogeneous tracer uptake in the lumbar spine with intense localisation to the right lateral aspect of L3. Integrated SPECT/CT of the lumbar spine detected active bone metabolism in the right L3/L4 facet joint in the presence of minimal signs of degenerative osteoarthrosis on CT images, while a segment demonstrating more gross degenerative changes was more quiescent with only mild tracer uptake. The usefulness of integrated SPECT/CT for anatomical and functional assessment of back pain opens promising opportunities both for multi-disciplinary clinical assessment and treatment for manual therapists and for research into the effectiveness of manual therapies.

  19. A study on using texture analysis methods for identifying lobar fissure regions in isotropic CT images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Q; Hu, Y

    2009-01-01

    The major hurdle for segmenting lung lobes in computed tomographic (CT) images is to identify fissure regions, which encase lobar fissures. Accurate identification of these regions is difficult due to the variable shape and appearance of the fissures, along with the low contrast and high noise associated with CT images. This paper studies the effectiveness of two texture analysis methods - the gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) and the gray level run length matrix (GLRLM) - in identifying fissure regions from isotropic CT image stacks. To classify GLCM and GLRLM texture features, we applied a feed-forward back-propagation neural network and achieved the best classification accuracy utilizing 16 quantized levels for computing the GLCM and GLRLM texture features and 64 neurons in the input/hidden layers of the neural network. Tested on isotropic CT image stacks of 24 patients with the pathologic lungs, we obtained accuracies of 86% and 87% for identifying fissure regions using the GLCM and GLRLM methods, respectively. These accuracies compare favorably with surgeons/radiologists' accuracy of 80% for identifying fissure regions in clinical settings. This shows promising potential for segmenting lung lobes using the GLCM and GLRLM methods.

  20. CT imaging vs. traditional radiographic imaging for evaluating Harris Lines in tibiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Primeau, Charlotte; Jakobsen, Lykke Schrøder; Lynnerup, Niels

    2016-01-01

    This paper is the first to systematically investigate computer tomography (CT) images vs. ordinary flat plane radiography for evaluating Harris Lines (HL) on tibiae. Harris Lines are traditionally investigated using radiographic images and recorded as either present or absent, or by counting...

  1. Lesion area detection using source image correlation coefficient for CT perfusion imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan Zhu; Rodriguez Gonzalez, David; Carpenter, Trevor; Atkinson, Malcolm; Wardlaw, Joanna

    2013-09-01

    Computer tomography (CT) perfusion imaging is widely used to calculate brain hemodynamic quantities such as cerebral blood flow, cerebral blood volume, and mean transit time that aid the diagnosis of acute stroke. Since perfusion source images contain more information than hemodynamic maps, good utilization of the source images can lead to better understanding than the hemodynamic maps alone. Correlation-coefficient tests are used in our approach to measure the similarity between healthy tissue time-concentration curves and unknown curves. This information is then used to differentiate penumbra and dead tissues from healthy tissues. The goal of the segmentation is to fully utilize information in the perfusion source images. Our method directly identifies suspected abnormal areas from perfusion source images and then delivers a suggested segmentation of healthy, penumbra, and dead tissue. This approach is designed to handle CT perfusion images, but it can also be used to detect lesion areas in magnetic resonance perfusion images.

  2. Multislice CT scans in patients on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation: Emphasis on hemodynamic changes and imaging pitfalls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Kao Lang; Wang, Yu Feng; Chang, Yeun Chung; Huang, Shu Chien; Chen, Shyh Jye; Chang, Chin Chen [National Taiwan University Hospital, National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei (China); Tsang, Yuk Ming [Dept. of Medical Imaging, Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, New Taipei City (China)

    2014-06-15

    This pictorial review provides the principles of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) support and associated CT imaging features with emphasis on the hemodynamic changes and possible imaging pitfalls encountered. It is important that radiologists in ECMO centers apply well-designed imaging protocols and familiarize themselves with post-contrast CT imaging findings in patients on ECMO.

  3. Automatic segmentation of lumbar vertebrae in CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Amruta; Raina, Akshita; Sharifi Sarabi, Mona; Ahn, Christine S.; Babayan, Diana; Gaonkar, Bilwaj; Macyszyn, Luke; Raghavendra, Cauligi

    2017-03-01

    Lower back pain is one of the most prevalent disorders in the developed/developing world. However, its etiology is poorly understood and treatment is often determined subjectively. In order to quantitatively study the emergence and evolution of back pain, it is necessary to develop consistently measurable markers for pathology. Imaging based measures offer one solution to this problem. The development of imaging based on quantitative biomarkers for the lower back necessitates automated techniques to acquire this data. While the problem of segmenting lumbar vertebrae has been addressed repeatedly in literature, the associated problem of computing relevant biomarkers on the basis of the segmentation has not been addressed thoroughly. In this paper, we propose a Random-Forest based approach that learns to segment vertebral bodies in CT images followed by a biomarker evaluation framework that extracts vertebral heights and widths from the segmentations obtained. Our dataset consists of 15 CT sagittal scans obtained from General Electric Healthcare. Our main approach is divided into three parts: the first stage is image pre-processing which is used to correct for variations in illumination across all the images followed by preparing the foreground and background objects from images; the next stage is Machine Learning using Random-Forests, which distinguishes the interest-point vectors between foreground or background; and the last step is image post-processing, which is crucial to refine the results of classifier. The Dice coefficient was used as a statistical validation metric to evaluate the performance of our segmentations with an average value of 0.725 for our dataset.

  4. Validation of a deformable image registration technique for cone beam CT-based dose verification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moteabbed, M., E-mail: mmoteabbed@partners.org; Sharp, G. C.; Wang, Y.; Trofimov, A.; Efstathiou, J. A.; Lu, H.-M. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States)

    2015-01-15

    lengths decreased from 10.1 to 2.5 mm when CBCT was calibrated prior to registration. The results showed no dependence on the level of bladder filling. In comparison with the dose calculated on the primary deformed CT, differences in mean dose averaged over all organs were 0.2% and 3.9% for dose calculated on the secondary deformed CT with and without CBCT calibration, respectively, and 0.5% for dose calculated directly on the calibrated CBCT, for the full-bladder scenario. Gamma analysis for the distance to agreement of 2 mm and 2% of prescribed dose indicated a pass rate of 100% for both cases involving calibrated CBCT and on average 86% without CBCT calibration. Conclusions: Using deformable registration on the planning CT images to evaluate the IMRT dose based on daily CBCTs was found feasible. The proposed method will provide an accurate dose distribution using planning CT and pretreatment CBCT data, avoiding the additional uncertainties introduced by CBCT inhomogeneity and artifacts. This is a necessary initial step toward future image-guided adaptive radiotherapy of the prostate.

  5. Improving the false-negative rate of CT in acute appendicitis-Reassessment of CT images by body imaging radiologists: A blinded prospective study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poortman, Pieter [Department of Surgery, St Elisabeth Hospital, Tilburg (Netherlands)], E-mail: ppoortman@wlz.nl; Lohle, Paul N.M. [Department of Surgery, St Elisabeth Hospital, Tilburg (Netherlands)], E-mail: plohle@elisabeth.nl; Schoemaker, Cees M. [Department of Surgery, St Elisabeth Hospital, Tilburg (Netherlands)], E-mail: mcschoemaker@elisabeth.nl; Cuesta, Miguel A. [Department of Surgery, VU Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands)], E-mail: ma.cuesta@vumc.nl; Oostvogel, Henk J.M. [Department of Surgery, St Elisabeth Hospital, Tilburg (Netherlands)], E-mail: h.oostvogel@elisabeth.nl; Lange-de Klerk, Elly S.M. de [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, VU Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands)], E-mail: esm.delange@vumc.nl; Hamming, Jaap F. [Department of Surgery, Leiden University Medical Centre (Netherlands)], E-mail: j.f.hamming@lumc.nl

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To compare the accuracy of computed tomography (CT) analyzed by individual radiology staff members and body imaging radiologists in a non-academic teaching hospital for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis. Patients and methods: In a prospective study 199 patients with suspected acute appendicitis were examined with unenhanced CT. CT images were pre-operatively analyzed by one of the 12 members of the radiology staff. In a later stage two body imaging radiologist reassessed all CT images without knowledge of the surgical findings and without knowledge of the primary CT diagnosis. The results, independently reported, were correlated with surgical and histopathologic findings. Results: In 132 patients (66%) acute appendicitis was found at surgery, in 67 patients (34%) a normal appendix was found. The sensitivity of the primary CT analysis and of the reassessment was 76% and 88%, respectively; the specificity was 84% and 87%; the positive predictive value was 90% and 93%; the negative predictive value was 64% and 78%; and the accuracy was 78% and 87%. Conclusion: Reassessment of CT images for acute appendicitis by body imaging radiologists results in a significant improvement of sensitivity, negative predictive value and accuracy. To prevent false-negative interpretation of CT images in acute appendicitis the expertise of the attending radiologist should be considered.

  6. X-Ray Scatter Correction on Soft Tissue Images for Portable Cone Beam CT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorapong Aootaphao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Soft tissue images from portable cone beam computed tomography (CBCT scanners can be used for diagnosis and detection of tumor, cancer, intracerebral hemorrhage, and so forth. Due to large field of view, X-ray scattering which is the main cause of artifacts degrades image quality, such as cupping artifacts, CT number inaccuracy, and low contrast, especially on soft tissue images. In this work, we propose the X-ray scatter correction method for improving soft tissue images. The X-ray scatter correction scheme to estimate X-ray scatter signals is based on the deconvolution technique using the maximum likelihood estimation maximization (MLEM method. The scatter kernels are obtained by simulating the PMMA sheet on the Monte Carlo simulation (MCS software. In the experiment, we used the QRM phantom to quantitatively compare with fan-beam CT (FBCT data in terms of CT number values, contrast to noise ratio, cupping artifacts, and low contrast detectability. Moreover, the PH3 angiography phantom was also used to mimic human soft tissues in the brain. The reconstructed images with our proposed scatter correction show significant improvement on image quality. Thus the proposed scatter correction technique has high potential to detect soft tissues in the brain.

  7. A curvelet transform approach for the fusion of MR and CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, F. E.; El-Dokany, I. M.; Saad, A. A.; Abd El-Samie, F. E.

    2010-02-01

    There are several medical imaging techniques such as the magnetic resonance (MR) and the computed tomography (CT) techniques. Both techniques give sophisticated characteristics of the region to be imaged. This paper proposes a curvelet based approach for fusing MR and CT images to obtain images with as much detail as possible, for the sake of medical diagnosis. This approach is based on the application of the additive wavelet transform (AWT) on both images and the segmentation of their detail planes into small overlapping tiles. The ridgelet transform is then applied on each of these tiles, and the fusion process is performed on the ridgelet transforms of the tiles. Simulation results show the superiority of the proposed curvelet fusion approach to the traditional fusion techniques like the multiresolution discrete wavelet transform (DWT) technique and the principal component analysis (PCA) technique. The fusion of MR and CT images in the presence of noise is also studied and the results reveal that unlike the DWT fusion technique, the proposed curvelet fusion approach doesn't require denoising.

  8. Ventilation imaging of the paranasal sinuses using xenon-enhanced dynamic single-energy CT and dual-energy CT: a feasibility study in a nasal cast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieme, Sven F; Möller, Winfried; Becker, Sven; Schuschnig, Uwe; Eickelberg, Oliver; Helck, Andreas D; Reiser, Maximilian F; Johnson, Thorsten R C

    2012-10-01

    To show the feasibility of dual-energy CT (DECT) and dynamic CT for ventilation imaging of the paranasal sinuses in a nasal cast. In a first trial, xenon gas was administered to a nasal cast with a laminar flow of 7 L/min. Dynamic CT acquisitions of the nasal cavity and the sinuses were performed. This procedure was repeated with pulsating xenon flow. Local xenon concentrations in the different compartments of the model were determined on the basis of the enhancement levels. In a second trial, DECT measurements were performed both during laminar and pulsating xenon administration and the xenon concentrations were quantified directly. Neither with dynamic CT nor DECT could xenon-related enhancement be detected in the sinuses during laminar airflow. Using pulsating flow, dynamic imaging showed a xenon wash-in and wash-out in the sinuses that followed a mono-exponential function with time constants of a few seconds. Accordingly, DECT revealed xenon enhancement in the sinuses only after pulsating xenon administration. The feasibility of xenon-enhanced DECT for ventilation imaging was proven in a nasal cast. The superiority of pulsating gas flow for the administration of gas or aerosolised drugs to the paranasal sinuses was demonstrated. • Ventilation of the paranasal sinuses is poorly understood. • Dual-energy CT ventilation imaging has been explored using phantom simulation. • Xenon can be seen in the paranasal sinuses using pulsating xenon flow. • Dual-energy CT uses a lower radiation dose compared with dynamic ventilation CT.

  9. Proton-induced x-ray fluorescence CT imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazalova-Carter, Magdalena; Ahmad, Moiz; Matsuura, Taeko; Takao, Seishin; Matsuo, Yuto; Fahrig, Rebecca; Shirato, Hiroki; Umegaki, Kikuo; Xing, Lei

    2015-02-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of proton-induced x-ray fluorescence CT (pXFCT) imaging of gold in a small animal sized object by means of experiments and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. First, proton-induced gold x-ray fluorescence (pXRF) was measured as a function of gold concentration. Vials of 2.2 cm in diameter filled with 0%-5% Au solutions were irradiated with a 220 MeV proton beam and x-ray fluorescence induced by the interaction of protons, and Au was detected with a 3 × 3 mm(2) CdTe detector placed at 90° with respect to the incident proton beam at a distance of 45 cm from the vials. Second, a 7-cm diameter water phantom containing three 2.2-diameter vials with 3%-5% Au solutions was imaged with a 7-mm FWHM 220 MeV proton beam in a first generation CT scanning geometry. X-rays scattered perpendicular to the incident proton beam were acquired with the CdTe detector placed at 45 cm from the phantom positioned on a translation/rotation stage. Twenty one translational steps spaced by 3 mm at each of 36 projection angles spaced by 10° were acquired, and pXFCT images of the phantom were reconstructed with filtered back projection. A simplified geometry of the experimental data acquisition setup was modeled with the MC TOPAS code, and simulation results were compared to the experimental data. A linear relationship between gold pXRF and gold concentration was observed in both experimental and MC simulation data (R(2) > 0.99). All Au vials were apparent in the experimental and simulated pXFCT images. Specifically, the 3% Au vial was detectable in the experimental [contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) = 5.8] and simulated (CNR = 11.5) pXFCT image. Due to fluorescence x-ray attenuation in the higher concentration vials, the 4% and 5% Au contrast were underestimated by 10% and 15%, respectively, in both the experimental and simulated pXFCT images. Proton-induced x-ray fluorescence CT imaging of 3%-5% gold solutions in a small animal sized water phantom has been demonstrated

  10. Proton-induced x-ray fluorescence CT imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazalova-Carter, Magdalena, E-mail: bazalova@stanford.edu; Xing, Lei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305-5847 and Global Station for Quantum Medical Science and Engineering, Global Institution for Collaborative Research and Education (GI-CoRE), Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8648 (Japan); Ahmad, Moiz [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305-5847 (United States); Matsuura, Taeko; Takao, Seishin; Shirato, Hiroki; Umegaki, Kikuo [Department of Medical Physics, Proton Beam Therapy Center, Hokkaido University Hospital, Sapporo 060-8648, Japan and Global Station for Quantum Medical Science and Engineering, Global Institution for Collaborative Research and Education (GI-CoRE), Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8648 (Japan); Matsuo, Yuto [Department of Medical Physics, Proton Beam Therapy Center, Hokkaido University Hospital, Sapporo 060-8648 (Japan); Fahrig, Rebecca [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: To demonstrate the feasibility of proton-induced x-ray fluorescence CT (pXFCT) imaging of gold in a small animal sized object by means of experiments and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Methods: First, proton-induced gold x-ray fluorescence (pXRF) was measured as a function of gold concentration. Vials of 2.2 cm in diameter filled with 0%–5% Au solutions were irradiated with a 220 MeV proton beam and x-ray fluorescence induced by the interaction of protons, and Au was detected with a 3 × 3 mm{sup 2} CdTe detector placed at 90° with respect to the incident proton beam at a distance of 45 cm from the vials. Second, a 7-cm diameter water phantom containing three 2.2-diameter vials with 3%–5% Au solutions was imaged with a 7-mm FWHM 220 MeV proton beam in a first generation CT scanning geometry. X-rays scattered perpendicular to the incident proton beam were acquired with the CdTe detector placed at 45 cm from the phantom positioned on a translation/rotation stage. Twenty one translational steps spaced by 3 mm at each of 36 projection angles spaced by 10° were acquired, and pXFCT images of the phantom were reconstructed with filtered back projection. A simplified geometry of the experimental data acquisition setup was modeled with the MC TOPAS code, and simulation results were compared to the experimental data. Results: A linear relationship between gold pXRF and gold concentration was observed in both experimental and MC simulation data (R{sup 2} > 0.99). All Au vials were apparent in the experimental and simulated pXFCT images. Specifically, the 3% Au vial was detectable in the experimental [contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) = 5.8] and simulated (CNR = 11.5) pXFCT image. Due to fluorescence x-ray attenuation in the higher concentration vials, the 4% and 5% Au contrast were underestimated by 10% and 15%, respectively, in both the experimental and simulated pXFCT images. Conclusions: Proton-induced x-ray fluorescence CT imaging of 3%–5% gold solutions in a

  11. CT enterography for Crohn's disease: optimal technique and imaging issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Mark E; Hara, Amy K; Platt, Joel F; Maglinte, Dean D T; Fletcher, Joel G

    2015-06-01

    CT enterography (CTE) is a common examination for patients with Crohn's disease. In order to achieve high quality, diagnostic images, proper technique is required. The purpose of this treatise is to review the processes and techniques that can optimize CTE for patients with suspected or known Crohn's disease. We will review the following: (1) how to start a CT enterography program; (2) workflow issues, including patient and ordering physician education and preparation; (3) oral contrast media options and administration regimens; (4) intravenous contrast media injection for uniphasic and multiphasic studies; (5) CTE radiation dose reduction strategies and the use of iterative reconstruction in lower dose examinations; (6) image reconstruction and interpretation; (7) imaging Crohn's patients in the acute or emergency department setting; (8) limitations of CTE as well as alternatives such as MRE or barium fluoroscopic examinations; and (9) dictation templates and a common nomenclature for reporting findings of CTE in Crohn's disease. Many of the issues discussed are summarized in the Abdominal Radiology Society Consensus MDCT Enterography Acquisition Protocol for Crohn's Disease.

  12. CT imaging in acute pulmonary embolism: diagnostic strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wildberger, Joachim E.; Mahnken, Andreas H.; Das, Marco; Guenther, Rolf W. [University of Technology (RWTH), Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital, Aachen (Germany); Kuettner, Axel [Eberhard Karls University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Lell, Michael [Friedrich Alexander University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Erlangen (Germany)

    2005-05-01

    Computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTA) has increasingly become accepted as a widely available, safe, cost-effective, and accurate method for a quick and comprehensive diagnosis of acute pulmonary embolism (PE). Pulmonary catheter angiography is still considered the gold standard and final imaging method in many diagnostic algorithms. However, spiral CTA has become established as the first imaging test in clinical routine due to its high negative predictive value for clinically relevant PE. Despite the direct visualization of clot material, depiction of cardiac and pulmonary function in combination with the quantification of pulmonary obstruction helps to grade the severity of PE for further risk stratification and to monitor the effect of thrombolytic therapy. Because PE and deep venous thrombosis are two different aspects of the same disease, additional indirect CT venography may be a valuable addition to the initial diagnostic algorithm - if this was positive for PE - and demonstration of the extent and localization of deep venous thrombosis has an impact on clinical management. Additional and alternate diagnoses add to the usefulness of this method. Using advanced multislice spiral CT technology, some practitioners have advocated CTA as the sole imaging tool for routine clinical assessment in suspected acute PE. This will simplify standards of practice in the near future. (orig.)

  13. Segmentation and separation of venous vasculatures in liver CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Hansen, Christian; Zidowitz, Stephan; Hahn, Horst K.

    2014-03-01

    Computer-aided analysis of venous vasculatures including hepatic veins and portal veins is important in liver surgery planning. The analysis normally consists of two important pre-processing tasks: segmenting both vasculatures and separating them from each other by assigning different labels. During the acquisition of multi-phase CT images, both of the venous vessels are enhanced by injected contrast agent and acquired either in a common phase or in two individual phases. The enhanced signals established by contrast agent are often not stably acquired due to non-optimal acquisition time. Inadequate contrast and the presence of large lesions in oncological patients, make the segmentation task quite challenging. To overcome these diffculties, we propose a framework with minimal user interactions to analyze venous vasculatures in multi-phase CT images. Firstly, presented vasculatures are automatically segmented adopting an efficient multi-scale Hessian-based vesselness filter. The initially segmented vessel trees are then converted to a graph representation, on which a series of graph filters are applied in post-processing steps to rule out irrelevant structures. Eventually, we develop a semi-automatic workow to refine the segmentation in the areas of inferior vena cava and entrance of portal veins, and to simultaneously separate hepatic veins from portal veins. Segmentation quality was evaluated with intensive tests enclosing 60 CT images from both healthy liver donors and oncological patients. To quantitatively measure the similarities between segmented and reference vessel trees, we propose three additional metrics: skeleton distance, branch coverage, and boundary surface distance, which are dedicated to quantifying the misalignment induced by both branching patterns and radii of two vessel trees.

  14. FDG PET/CT imaging in canine cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anders Elias; McEvoy, Fintan; Engelholm, Svend Aage;

    2011-01-01

    and organs in canine cancer patients. FDG PET/CT was performed in 14 dogs including, nine mesenchymal tumors, four carcinomas, and one incompletely excised mast cell tumor. A generally higher FDG uptake was observed in carcinomas relative to sarcomas. Maximum SUV of carcinomas ranged from 7.6 to 27.......0, and for sarcomas from 2.0 to 10.6. The FDG SUV of several organs and tissues, including regional brain uptake is reported, to serve as a reference for future FDG PET studies in canine cancer patients. Several potential pitfalls have been recognized in interpretation of FDG PET images of human patients, a number...

  15. Metastatic meningioma: positron emission tomography CT imaging findings.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Brennan, C

    2010-12-01

    The imaging findings of a case of metastasing meningioma are described. The case illustrates a number of rare and interesting features. The patient presented with haemoptysis 22 years after the initial resection of an intracranial meningioma. CT demonstrated heterogeneous masses with avid peripheral enhancement without central enhancement. Blood supply to the larger lesion was partially from small feeding vessels from the inferior pulmonary vein. These findings correlate with a previously published case in which there was avid uptake of fluoro-18-deoxyglucose peripherally with lesser uptake centrally. The diagnosis of metastasing meningioma was confirmed on percutaneous lung tissue biopsy.

  16. Wide coverage by volume CT: benefits for cardiac imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sablayrolles, Jean-Louis; Cesmeli, Erdogan; Mintandjian, Laura; Adda, Olivier; Dessalles-Martin, Diane

    2005-04-01

    With the development of new technologies, computed tomography (CT) is becoming a strong candidate for non-invasive imaging based tool for cardiac disease assessment. One of the challenges of cardiac CT is that a typical scan involves a breath hold period consisting of several heartbeats, about 20 sec with scanners having a longitudinal coverage of 2 cm, and causing the image quality (IQ) to be negatively impacted since beat to beat variation is high likely to occur without any medication, e.g. beta blockers. Because of this and the preference for shorter breath hold durations, a CT scanner with a wide coverage without the compromise in the spatial and temporal resolution of great clinical value. In this study, we aimed at determining the optimum scan duration and the delay relative to beginning of breath hold, to achieve high IQ. We acquired EKG data from 91 consecutive patients (77 M, 14 F; Age: 57 +/- 14) undergoing cardiac CT exams with contrast, performed on LightSpeed 16 and LightSpeed Pro16. As an IQ metric, we adopted the standard deviation of "beat-to-beat variation" (stdBBV) within a virtual scan period. Two radiologists evaluated images by assigning a score of 1 (worst) to 4 best). We validated stdBBV with the radiologist scores, which resulted in a population distribution of 9.5, 9.5, 31, and 50% for the score groups 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively. Based on the scores, we defined a threshold for stdBBV and identified an optimum combination of virtual scan period and a delay. With the assumption that the relationship between the stdBBV and diagnosable scan IQ holds, our analysis suggested that the success rate can be improved to 100% with scan durations equal or less than 5 sec with a delay of 1 - 2 sec. We confirmed the suggested conclusion with LightSpeed VCT (GE Healthcare Technologies, Waukesha, WI), which has a wide longitudinal coverage, fine isotropic spatial resolution, and high temporal resolution, e.g. 40 mm coverage per rotation of 0.35 sec

  17. Metastatic meningioma: positron emission tomography CT imaging findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, C; O'Connor, O J; O'Regan, K N; Keohane, C; Dineen, J; Hinchion, J; Sweeney, B; Maher, M M

    2010-01-01

    The imaging findings of a case of metastasing meningioma are described. The case illustrates a number of rare and interesting features. The patient presented with haemoptysis 22 years after the initial resection of an intracranial meningioma. CT demonstrated heterogeneous masses with avid peripheral enhancement without central enhancement. Blood supply to the larger lesion was partially from small feeding vessels from the inferior pulmonary vein. These findings correlate with a previously published case in which there was avid uptake of fluoro-18-deoxyglucose peripherally with lesser uptake centrally. The diagnosis of metastasing meningioma was confirmed on percutaneous lung tissue biopsy. PMID:21088084

  18. CT and MR Imagings of Semicircular Canal Aplasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Chung Hee; Hong, Hyun Sook; Yi, Beom Ha; Cha, Jang Gyu; Park, Seong Jin; Kim, Dae Ho; Lee, Hae Kyung; Kim, Shi Chan [Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-07-15

    To evaluate the clinical, CT and MR imaging findings of semicircular canal (SCC) aplasia and to evaluate if a correlation exists between these findings and the associated anomalies or syndromes. This study retrospectively reviewed the CT and MRI findings of five patients with SCC aplasia. The CT and MR findings were analyzed for SCC, direction of facial nerve canal, cochlea, vestibule, oval or round window, middle ear ossicles, and internal auditory canal (IAC). The subjects included three boys and two girls ranging in age from one to 120 months (mean age; 51 months). Four of the subjects had the CHARGE syndrome, and one had the Goldenhar syndrome. Moreover, four subjects had sensorineural hearing loss and one had combined hearing loss. The course of the facial nerve canal was abnormal in all five cases. Moreover, trapped cochlea and dysplastic modiolus were each observed in one case. Four subjects had atresia of the oval window; whereas ankylosis of the ossicles was present in three subjects. IAC stenosis was present in one patient with the CHARGE syndrome. The aberrant course of the facial nerve canal, atresia of the oval window, and abnormal ossicles were frequently associated in patients with SCC aplasia. In addition, the Goldenhar and CHARGE syndromes were also commonly associated syndromes.

  19. Ultra-filtration measurement using CT imaging technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu Junfeng [Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No.2 Beiyitiao Street, Zhongguancun, Haidian District, Beijing, 100190 (China); Lu Wenqiang, E-mail: junfenglu@mail.ipc.ac.c [Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, No.19A Yuquan Road, Shijingshan District, Beijing, 100049 (China)

    2009-02-01

    As a functional unit in the hemodialysis process, dialyzer captured quite a few medical research interests since 1980s. In the design of dialyzer or in the ongoing hemodialysis process, to estimate the ultra-filtration amount of a dialyzer, the sideway loss of the running blood flow through hollow fibers or filtration channels should be measured. This further leads to the measurement of the blood flow inside the dialyzer. For this measurement, a non-invasive method is highly desired because of the high-dense bundled hollow fibers or packed channels inside the dialyzer. As non-invasive measurement tools, CT (Computed Tomography) technologies were widely used for tissue, bone, and cancerous clinical analyses etc .... Thus, in this paper, a CT system is adopted to predict the blood flow inside a hollow fiber dialyzer. In view of symmetric property of the hollow fiber dialyzer, the largest cutting plane that parallels to the cylindrical dialyzer was analyzed by the CT system dynamically. And then, a noninvasive image analysis method used to predict the ultra-filtration amount is proposed.

  20. Lung No dules Detection in CT Images Using Gestalt-Based Algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIU Shi; WEN Desheng; CUI Ying; FENG Jun

    2016-01-01

    To overcome low accuracy and high false positive of existing computer-aided lung nodules detec-tion. We propose a novel lung nodule detection scheme based on the Gestalt visual cognition theory. The pro-posed scheme involves two parts which simulate human eyes cognition features such as simplicity, integrity and classification. Firstly, lung region was segmented from lung Computed tomography (CT) sequences. Then local three-dimensional information was integrated into the Maximum intensity projection (MIP) images from axial, coronal and sagittal profiles. In this way, lung nodules and vascular are strengthened and discriminated based on pathologic image characteristics of lung nodules. The experimental database includes fifty-three high resolution CT images contained lung nodules, which had been confirmed by biopsy. The experimental results show that, the accuracy rate of the proposed algorithm achieves 91.29%. The proposed frame-work improves performance and computation speed for computer aided nodules detection.

  1. Axial segmentation of lungs CT scan images using canny method and morphological operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noviana, Rina; Febriani, Rasal, Isram; Lubis, Eva Utari Cintamurni

    2017-08-01

    Segmentation is a very important topic in digital image process. It is found simply in varied fields of image analysis, particularly within the medical imaging field. Axial segmentation of lungs CT scan is beneficial in designation of abnormalities and surgery planning. It will do to ascertain every section within the lungs. The results of the segmentation are accustomed discover the presence of nodules. The method which utilized in this analysis are image cropping, image binarization, Canny edge detection and morphological operation. Image cropping is done so as to separate the lungs areas, that is the region of interest. Binarization method generates a binary image that has 2 values with grey level, that is black and white (ROI), from another space of lungs CT scan image. Canny method used for the edge detection. Morphological operation is applied to smoothing the lungs edge. The segmentation methodology shows an honest result. It obtains an awfully smooth edge. Moreover, the image background can also be removed in order to get the main focus, the lungs.

  2. Automated extraction method for the center line of spinal canal and its application to the spinal curvature quantification in torso X-ray CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Tatsuro; Zhou, Xiangrong; Chen, Huayue; Hara, Takeshi; Miyamoto, Kei; Kobayashi, Tatsunori; Yokoyama, Ryujiro; Kanematsu, Masayuki; Hoshi, Hiroaki; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2010-03-01

    X-ray CT images have been widely used in clinical routine in recent years. CT images scanned by a modern CT scanner can show the details of various organs and tissues. This means various organs and tissues can be simultaneously interpreted on CT images. However, CT image interpretation requires a lot of time and energy. Therefore, support for interpreting CT images based on image-processing techniques is expected. The interpretation of the spinal curvature is important for clinicians because spinal curvature is associated with various spinal disorders. We propose a quantification scheme of the spinal curvature based on the center line of spinal canal on CT images. The proposed scheme consists of four steps: (1) Automated extraction of the skeletal region based on CT number thresholding. (2) Automated extraction of the center line of spinal canal. (3) Generation of the median plane image of spine, which is reformatted based on the spinal canal. (4) Quantification of the spinal curvature. The proposed scheme was applied to 10 cases, and compared with the Cobb angle that is commonly used by clinicians. We found that a high-correlation (for the 95% confidence interval, lumbar lordosis: 0.81-0.99) between values obtained by the proposed (vector) method and Cobb angle. Also, the proposed method can provide the reproducible result (inter- and intra-observer variability: within 2°). These experimental results suggested a possibility that the proposed method was efficient for quantifying the spinal curvature on CT images.

  3. Validating and improving CT ventilation imaging by correlating with ventilation 4D-PET/CT using {sup 68}Ga-labeled nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kipritidis, John, E-mail: john.kipritidis@sydney.edu.au; Keall, Paul J. [Radiation Physics Laboratory, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney NSW 2006 (Australia); Siva, Shankar [Department of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, and Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, University of Melbourne, Parkville VIC 3052 (Australia); Hofman, Michael S.; Callahan, Jason; Hicks, Rodney J. [Centre for Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre and Department of Medicine, University of Melbourne, Melbourne VIC 3002 (Australia)

    2014-01-15

    improvements in r{sup ¯} and d{sup ¯}{sub 20} (p < 0.05), with density scaled metrics also showing higher r{sup ¯} than for unscaled versions (p < 0.02). r{sup ¯} and d{sup ¯}{sub 20} were also sensitive to image quality, with statistically significant improvements using standard (as opposed to gated) PET images and with application of median filtering. Conclusions: The use of modified CT ventilation metrics, in conjunction with PET-Galligas and careful application of image filtering has resulted in improved correlation compared to earlier studies using nuclear medicine ventilation. However, CT ventilation and PET-Galligas do not always provide the same functional information. The authors have demonstrated that the agreement can improve for CT ventilation metrics incorporating a tissue density scaling, and also with increasing PET image quality. CT ventilation imaging has clear potential for imaging regional air volume change in the lung, and further development is warranted.

  4. Skeletal scintigraphy and SPECT/CT in orthopedic imaging; Knochenszintigrafie und SPECT/CT bei orthopaedischen Fragestellungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klaeser, B.; Walter, M.; Krause, T. [Inselspital Bern (Switzerland). Universitaetsklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    2011-03-15

    Multi-modality imaging with SPECT-CT in orthopaedics combines the excellent sensitivity of scintigraphy with the morphological information of CT as a key for specific interpretation of findings in bone scans. The result is an imaging modality with the clear potential to prove of value even in a competitive setting dominated by MRI, and to significantly add to diagnostic imaging in orthopaedics. SPECT-CT is of great value in the diagnostic evaluation after fractures, and - in contrast to MRI - it is well suited for imaging in patients with osteosyntheses and metallic implants. In sports medicine, SPECT-CT allows for a sensitive and specific detection of osseous stress reactions before morphological changes become detectable by CT or MRI. In patients with osseous pain syndromes, actively evolving degenerative changes as a cause of pain can be identified and accurately localized. Further, particularly prospective diagnostic studies providing comparative data are needed to strengthen the position of nuclear imaging in orthopaedics and sports medicine and to help implementing SPECT/CT in diagnostic algorithms. (orig.)

  5. Free radical reaction in ischemic rat brain. ESR-CT imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kayama, Takamasa [Yamagata Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1998-07-01

    Free radical change in images of rat brain during brain ischemia was observed by using a rapid scan L-band ESR-CT system. Male Wistar rats weighing 200 g were used. Rats were divided into three groups according to the duration of occlusion of 2, 4, and 8 hr as well as a control, sham-operated group. C-PROXYL dissolved in saline solution was used as an imaging agent and injected intraperitoneally in a volume of 3 ml at a concentration of 0.3 M at the beginning of reperfusion. ESR-CT imaging was performed 20 min after injection of C-PROXYL. In the sham-operated group, histological examination disclosed no ischemic lesion. Because C-PROXYL does not pass the blood-brain barrier, no brain image was obtained. In the 2 hr occlusion ischemic group, histological findings revealed spongioid change at the dorsal putamen. The ESR-CT image showed a small spot of uptake of nitroxide radicals in the area of the presumed left putamen which corresponded to the histological ischemic lesion. In the 8 hr occlusion group, the ischemic lesion was found even in the cerebral cortex. The image of nitroxide radical in the brain again closely corresponded to the histological ischemic area and occupied most of the left cerebral hemisphere. However, the area of ESR-CT image was wider than that of histological ischemic lesion. This may be because C-PROXYL leakage in the ischemic lesion diffuses and also because the extent of the efficiency of scavenging free radicals may decline. (K.H.)

  6. Feasibility study of CT perfusion imaging for prostate carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cullu, Nesat [Mugla Sitki Kocman University, School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Mugla (Turkey); Atatuerk University, School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Erzurum (Turkey); Kantarci, Mecit; Ogul, Hayri; Pirimoglu, Berhan; Karaca, Leyla; Kizrak, Yesim [Atatuerk University, School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Erzurum (Turkey); Adanur, Senol; Koc, Erdem; Polat, Ozkan [Atatuerk University, School of Medicine, Department of Urology, Erzurum (Turkey); Okur, Aylin [Atatuerk University, School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Erzurum (Turkey); Bozok University, School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Yozgat (Turkey)

    2014-09-15

    The aim of this feasibility study was to obtain initial data with which to assess the efficiency of perfusion CT imaging (CTpI) and to compare this with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the diagnosis of prostate carcinoma. This prospective study involved 25 patients with prostate carcinoma undergoing MRI and CTpI. All analyses were performed on T2-weighted images (T2WI), apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps, diffusion-weighted images (DWI) and CTp images. We compared the performance of T2WI combined with DWI and CTp alone. The study was approved by the local ethics committee, and written informed consent was obtained from all patients. Tumours were present in 87 areas according to the histopathological results. The diagnostic performance of the T2WI+DWI+CTpI combination was significantly better than that of T2WI alone for prostate carcinoma (P < 0.001). The diagnostic value of CTpI was similar to that of T2WI+DWI in combination. There were statistically significant differences in the blood flow and permeability surface values between prostate carcinoma and background prostate on CTp images. CTp may be a valuable tool for detecting prostate carcinoma and may be preferred in cases where MRI is contraindicated. If this technique is combined with T2WI and DWI, its diagnostic value is enhanced. (orig.)

  7. Combining population and patient-specific characteristics for prostate segmentation on 3D CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ling; Guo, Rongrong; Tian, Zhiqiang; Venkataraman, Rajesh; Sarkar, Saradwata; Liu, Xiabi; Tade, Funmilayo; Schuster, David M.; Fei, Baowei

    2016-03-01

    Prostate segmentation on CT images is a challenging task. In this paper, we explore the population and patient-specific characteristics for the segmentation of the prostate on CT images. Because population learning does not consider the inter-patient variations and because patient-specific learning may not perform well for different patients, we are combining the population and patient-specific information to improve segmentation performance. Specifically, we train a population model based on the population data and train a patient-specific model based on the manual segmentation on three slice of the new patient. We compute the similarity between the two models to explore the influence of applicable population knowledge on the specific patient. By combining the patient-specific knowledge with the influence, we can capture the population and patient-specific characteristics to calculate the probability of a pixel belonging to the prostate. Finally, we smooth the prostate surface according to the prostate-density value of the pixels in the distance transform image. We conducted the leave-one-out validation experiments on a set of CT volumes from 15 patients. Manual segmentation results from a radiologist serve as the gold standard for the evaluation. Experimental results show that our method achieved an average DSC of 85.1% as compared to the manual segmentation gold standard. This method outperformed the population learning method and the patient-specific learning approach alone. The CT segmentation method can have various applications in prostate cancer diagnosis and therapy.

  8. CT paging arteriography with a multidetector-row CT. Advantages in splanchnic arterial imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Seiji [Keio Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    1999-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the utility of CT paging arteriography with a multidetector-row CT as a replacement for conventional angiography in the evaluation of splanchnic arterial anomalies. Sixty-three patients underwent CT paging arteriography with a multidetector-row CT. In the 56 patients with conventional angiographic correlation, there was only one minor disagreement with CT paging arteriography. In the 7 patients who underwent IVDSA (intra venous digital subtraction angiography), CT paging arteriography defined four hepatic arterial anomalies which could not be depicted by IVDSA. In conclusion, CT paging arteriography provides noninvasive means to identify splanchnic arterial anomalies. (author)

  9. Comparison of flat-panel detector and image-intensifier detector for cone-beam CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, Rika; Konno, Yasutaka; Ueda, Ken; Ikeda, Shigeyuki

    2002-01-01

    We evaluated a flat-panel detector (FPD) (scintillator screen and a-Si photo-sensor array) for use in a cone-beam computed tomography (CT) detector and compared it with an image-intensifier detector (IID). The FPD cone-beam CT system has a higher spatial resolution than the IID system. At equal pixel sizes, the standard deviation of noise intensity of the FPD system is equal to that of the IID system. However, the circuit noise of the FPD must be reduced, especially at low doses. Our evaluations show that the FPD system has a strong potential for use as a cone-beam CT detector because of high-spatial resolution.

  10. SU-E-I-21: Dosimetric Characterization and Image Quality Evaluation of the AIRO Mobile CT Scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weir, V; Zhang, J; Bruner, A [University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The AIRO Mobile CT system was recently introduced which overcomes the limitations from existing CT, CT fluoroscopy, and intraoperative O-arm. With an integrated table and a large diameter bore, the system is suitable for cranial, spine and trauma procedures, making it a highly versatile intraoperative imaging system. This study is to investigate radiation dose and image quality of the AIRO and compared with those from a routine CT scanner. Methods: Radiation dose was measured using a conventional 100mm pencil ionization chamber and CT polymethylmetacrylate (PMMA) body and head phantoms. Image quality was evaluated with a CATPHAN 500 phantom. Spatial resolution, low contrast resolution (CNR), Modulation Transfer Function (MTF), and Normalized Noise Power Spectrum (NNPS) were analyzed. Results: Under identical technique conditions, radiation dose (mGy/mAs) from the AIRO mobile CT system (AIRO) is higher than that from a 64 slice CT scanner. MTFs show that both Soft and Standard filters of the AIRO system lost resolution quickly compared to the Sensation 64 slice CT. With the Standard kernel, the spatial resolutions of the AIRO system are 3lp/cm and 4lp/cm for the body and head FOVs, respectively. NNPSs show low frequency noise due to ring-like artifacts. Due to a higher dose in terms of mGy/mAs at both head and body FOV, CNR of the AIRO system is higher than that of the Siemens scanner. However detectability of the low contrast objects is poorer in the AIRO due to the presence of ring artifacts in the location of the targets. Conclusion: For image guided surgery applications, the AIRO has some advantages over a routine CT scanner due to its versatility, large bore size, and acceptable image quality. Our evaluation of the physical performance helps its future improvements.

  11. Development of a high-speed CT imaging system using EMCCD camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thacker, Samta C.; Yang, Kai; Packard, Nathan; Gaysinskiy, Valeriy; Burkett, George; Miller, Stuart; Boone, John M.; Nagarkar, Vivek

    2009-02-01

    The limitations of current CCD-based microCT X-ray imaging systems arise from two important factors. First, readout speeds are curtailed in order to minimize system read noise, which increases significantly with increasing readout rates. Second, the afterglow associated with commercial scintillator films can introduce image lag, leading to substantial artifacts in reconstructed images, especially when the detector is operated at several hundred frames/second (fps). For high speed imaging systems, high-speed readout electronics and fast scintillator films are required. This paper presents an approach to developing a high-speed CT detector based on a novel, back-thinned electron-multiplying CCD (EMCCD) coupled to various bright, high resolution, low afterglow films. The EMCCD camera, when operated in its binned mode, is capable of acquiring data at up to 300 fps with reduced imaging area. CsI:Tl,Eu and ZnSe:Te films, recently fabricated at RMD, apart from being bright, showed very good afterglow properties, favorable for high-speed imaging. Since ZnSe:Te films were brighter than CsI:Tl,Eu films, for preliminary experiments a ZnSe:Te film was coupled to an EMCCD camera at UC Davis Medical Center. A high-throughput tungsten anode X-ray generator was used, as the X-ray fluence from a mini- or micro-focus source would be insufficient to achieve high-speed imaging. A euthanized mouse held in a glass tube was rotated 360 degrees in less than 3 seconds, while radiographic images were recorded at various readout rates (up to 300 fps); images were reconstructed using a conventional Feldkamp cone-beam reconstruction algorithm. We have found that this system allows volumetric CT imaging of small animals in approximately two seconds at ~110 to 190 μm resolution, compared to several minutes at 160 μm resolution needed for the best current systems.

  12. TU-A-12A-02: Novel Lung Ventilation Imaging with Single Energy CT After Single Inhalation of Xenon: Comparison with SPECT Ventilation Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Negahdar, M [Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Yamamoto, T [UC Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, CA (United States); Shultz, D; Gable, L; Shan, X; Mittra, E; Loo, B; Maxim, P [Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Diehn, M [Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: We propose a novel lung functional imaging method to determine the spatial distribution of xenon (Xe) gas in a single inhalation as a measure of regional ventilation. We compare Xe-CT ventilation to single-photon emission CT (SPECT) ventilation, which is the current clinical reference. Regional lung ventilation information may be useful for the diagnosis and monitoring of pulmonary diseases such as COPD, radiotherapy planning, and assessing the progression of toxicity after radiation therapy. Methods: In an IRB-approved clinical study, Xe-CT and SPECT ventilation scans were acquired for three patients including one patient with severe emphysema and two lung cancer patients treated with radiotherapy. For Xe- CT, we acquired two breath-hold single energy CT images of the entire lung with inspiration of 100% O2 and a mixture of 70% Xe and 30% O2, respectively. A video biofeedback system was used to achieve reproducible breath-holds. We used deformable image registration to align the breathhold images with each other to accurately subtract them, producing a map of the distribution of Xe as a surrogate of lung ventilation. We divided each lung into twelve parts and correlated the Hounsfield unit (HU) enhancement at each part with the SPECT ventilation count of the corresponding part of the lung. Results: The mean of the Pearson linear correlation coefficient values between the Xe-CT and ventilation SPECT count for all three patients were 0.62 (p<0.01). The Xe-CT image had a higher resolution than SPECT, and did not show central airway deposition artifacts that were present in the SPECT image. Conclusion: We developed a rapid, safe, clinically practical, and potentially widely accessible method for regional lung functional imaging. We demonstrated strong correlations between the Xe-CT ventilation image and SPECT ventilation image as the clinical reference. This ongoing study will investigate more patients to confirm this finding.

  13. Scatter correction, intermediate view estimation and dose characterization in megavoltage cone-beam CT imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sramek, Benjamin Koerner

    neck phantoms. The conclusions of this investigation were: (1) the implementation of intermediate view estimation techniques to megavoltage cone-beam CT produced improvements in image quality, with the largest impact occurring for smaller numbers of initially-acquired projections, (2) the SPECS scatter correction algorithm could be successfully incorporated into projection data acquired using an electronic portal imaging device during megavoltage cone-beam CT image reconstruction, (3) a large range of SPECS parameters were shown to reduce cupping artifacts as well as improve reconstruction accuracy, with application to anthropomorphic phantom geometries improving the percent difference in reconstructed electron density for soft tissue from -13.6% to -2.0%, and for cortical bone from -9.7% to 1.4%, (4) dose measurements in the anthropomorphic phantoms showed consistent agreement between planar measurements using radiochromic film and point measurements using thermoluminescent dosimeters, and (5) a comparison of normalized dose measurements acquired with radiochromic film to those calculated using multiple treatment planning systems, accelerator-detector combinations, patient geometries and accelerator outputs produced a relatively good agreement.

  14. MUTUAL INFORMATION BASED 3D NON-RIGID REGISTRATION OF CT/MR ABDOMEN IMAGES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A mutual information based 3D non-rigid registration approach was proposed for the registration of deformable CT/MR body abdomen images. The Parzen Windows Density Estimation (PWDE) method is adopted to calculate the mutual information between the two modals of CT and MRI abdomen images. By maximizing MI between the CT and MR volume images, the overlapping part of them reaches the biggest, which means that the two body images of CT and MR matches best to each other. Visible Human Project (VHP) Male abdomen CT and MRI Data are used as experimental data sets. The experimental results indicate that this approach of non-rigid 3D registration of CT/MR body abdominal images can be achieved effectively and automatically, without any prior processing procedures such as segmentation and feature extraction, but has a main drawback of very long computation time. Key words: medical image registration; multi-modality; mutual information; non-rigid; Parzen window density estimation

  15. Evaluation of the image quality of chest CT scans: a phantom study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins N, P. I.; Prata M, A., E-mail: priscillainglid@gmail.com [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica de Minas Gerais, Centro de Engenharia Biomedica, Av. Amazonas 5253, 30421-169 Nova Suica, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

    2016-10-15

    Computed tomography (CT) is considered one of the most important methods of medical imaging employed nowadays, due to its non-invasiveness and the high quality of the images it is able to generate. However, the diagnostic radiation dose received by an individual over the year often exceeds the dose received on account of background radiation. Therefore, it is important to know and to control the dose distribution in the patient by varying the image acquisition parameters. The aim of this study is to evaluate the variation of the image quality of chest CT scans performed by two phantoms. In this paper, a cylindrical Polymethyl Methacrylate (PMMA) chest phantom was used and a second PMMA phantom has been developed with the same volume but an oblong shape, based on the actual dimensions of a male human thorax, in the axillary region. Ten-centimeter scans of the central area of each phantom were performed by a 16-channel Toshiba CT scanner, model Alexion. The scanning protocol employed was the radiology service protocol for chest scans. The noise survey was conducted within the image of the center slice, in five regions: one central and four peripheral areas close to the edge of the object (anterior, posterior, left and right). The recorded values showed that the oblong phantom, with a shape that is more similar to the actual human chest, has a considerably smaller noise, especially in the anterior, posterior and central regions. (Author)

  16. Hounsfield unit recovery in clinical cone beam CT images of the thorax acquired for image guided radiation therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thing, Rune Slot; Bernchou, Uffe; Mainegra-Hing, Ernesto

    2016-01-01

    A comprehensive artefact correction method for clinical cone beam CT (CBCT) images acquired for image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) on a commercial system is presented. The method is demonstrated to reduce artefacts and recover CT-like Hounsfield units (HU) in reconstructed CBCT images of five ...

  17. Cone-beam CT with a flat-panel detector: From image science to image-guided surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H., E-mail: jeff.siewerdsen@jhu.edu [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Traylor Building, Room 718, 720 Rutland Avenue, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States)

    2011-08-21

    The development of large-area flat-panel X-ray detectors (FPDs) has spurred investigation in a spectrum of advanced medical imaging applications, including tomosynthesis and cone-beam CT (CBCT). Recent research has extended image quality metrics and theoretical models to such applications, providing a quantitative foundation for the assessment of imaging performance as well as a general framework for the design, optimization, and translation of such technologies to new applications. For example, cascaded systems models of the Fourier domain metrics, such as noise-equivalent quanta (NEQ), have been extended to these modalities to describe the propagation of signal and noise through the image acquisition and reconstruction chain and to quantify the factors that govern spatial resolution, image noise, and detectability. Moreover, such models have demonstrated basic agreement with human observer performance for a broad range of imaging conditions and imaging tasks. These developments in image science have formed a foundation for the knowledgeable development and translation of CBCT to new applications in image-guided interventions-for example, CBCT implemented on a mobile surgical C-arm for intraoperative 3D imaging. The ability to acquire high-quality 3D images on demand during surgical intervention overcomes conventional limitations of surgical guidance in the context of preoperative images alone. A prototype mobile C-arm developed in academic-industry partnership demonstrates CBCT with low radiation dose, sub-mm spatial resolution, and soft-tissue visibility potentially approaching that of diagnostic CT. Integration of the 3D imaging system with real-time tracking, deformable registration, endoscopic video, and 3D visualization offers a promising addition to the surgical arsenal in interventions ranging from head-and-neck/skull base surgery to spine, orthopaedic, thoracic, and abdominal surgeries. Cadaver studies show the potential for significant boosts in surgical

  18. Cone-beam CT with a flat-panel detector: From image science to image-guided surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.

    2011-08-01

    The development of large-area flat-panel X-ray detectors (FPDs) has spurred investigation in a spectrum of advanced medical imaging applications, including tomosynthesis and cone-beam CT (CBCT). Recent research has extended image quality metrics and theoretical models to such applications, providing a quantitative foundation for the assessment of imaging performance as well as a general framework for the design, optimization, and translation of such technologies to new applications. For example, cascaded systems models of the Fourier domain metrics, such as noise-equivalent quanta (NEQ), have been extended to these modalities to describe the propagation of signal and noise through the image acquisition and reconstruction chain and to quantify the factors that govern spatial resolution, image noise, and detectability. Moreover, such models have demonstrated basic agreement with human observer performance for a broad range of imaging conditions and imaging tasks. These developments in image science have formed a foundation for the knowledgeable development and translation of CBCT to new applications in image-guided interventions—for example, CBCT implemented on a mobile surgical C-arm for intraoperative 3D imaging. The ability to acquire high-quality 3D images on demand during surgical intervention overcomes conventional limitations of surgical guidance in the context of preoperative images alone. A prototype mobile C-arm developed in academic-industry partnership demonstrates CBCT with low radiation dose, sub-mm spatial resolution, and soft-tissue visibility potentially approaching that of diagnostic CT. Integration of the 3D imaging system with real-time tracking, deformable registration, endoscopic video, and 3D visualization offers a promising addition to the surgical arsenal in interventions ranging from head-and-neck/skull base surgery to spine, orthopaedic, thoracic, and abdominal surgeries. Cadaver studies show the potential for significant boosts in

  19. Assessment of pulmonary hypertension by CT and MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ley, Sebastian [Department of Radiology, Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120, Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Radiology, Johannes Gutenberg University, Langenbeckstrasse 1, 55131, Mainz (Germany); Kreitner, Karl-Friedrich; Heussel, Claus P. [Department of Radiology, Johannes Gutenberg University, Langenbeckstrasse 1, 55131, Mainz (Germany); Fink, Christian; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich [Department of Radiology, Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120, Heidelberg (Germany); Borst, Mathias M. [Department of Internal Medicine III, Ruprecht-Karls University, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2004-03-01

    In the recent World Health Organization (WHO) classification the group of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PH) comprises the classic primary pulmonary hypertension and several conditions with definite or very high risk factors to develop pulmonary arterial hypertension. Therapeutic advances drive the need for a comprehensive pre-therapeutic evaluation for optimal treatment. Furthermore, follow-up examinations need to be performed to monitor changes in disease status and response to therapy. Up to now, the diagnostic imaging work-up of PH comprises mainly echocardiography, invasive right heart catheterization and ventilation/perfusion scintigraphy. Due to technical advances helical computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) became more important in the evaluation and for differential diagnosis of pulmonary arterial hypertension. Both modalities are reviewed and recommendations for clinical use are given. (orig.)

  20. Constrain static target kinetic iterative image reconstruction for 4D cardiac CT imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alessio, Adam M.; La Riviere, Patrick J.

    2011-03-01

    Iterative image reconstruction offers improved signal to noise properties for CT imaging. A primary challenge with iterative methods is the substantial computation time. This computation time is even more prohibitive in 4D imaging applications, such as cardiac gated or dynamic acquisition sequences. In this work, we propose only updating the time-varying elements of a 4D image sequence while constraining the static elements to be fixed or slowly varying in time. We test the method with simulations of 4D acquisitions based on measured cardiac patient data from a) a retrospective cardiac-gated CT acquisition and b) a dynamic perfusion CT acquisition. We target the kinetic elements with one of two methods: 1) position a circular ROI on the heart, assuming area outside ROI is essentially static throughout imaging time; and 2) select varying elements from the coefficient of variation image formed from fast analytic reconstruction of all time frames. Targeted kinetic elements are updated with each iteration, while static elements remain fixed at initial image values formed from the reconstruction of data from all time frames. Results confirm that the computation time is proportional to the number of targeted elements; our simulations suggest that 3 times reductions in reconstruction time. The images reconstructed with the proposed method have matched mean square error with full 4D reconstruction. The proposed method is amenable to most optimization algorithms and offers the potential for significant computation improvements, which could be traded off for more sophisticated system models or penalty terms.

  1. CT imaging with fistulography for perianal fistula: does it really help the surgeon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Changhu; Jiang, Wanli; Zhao, Bin; Zhang, Yan; Du, Yinglin; Lu, Yongchao

    2013-01-01

    To prospectively evaluate the relative accuracy of computed tomography (CT) fistulography for preoperative assessment of fistula in ano. Ethical committee approval and informed consent were obtained. A total of 22 patients (15 male and 7 female, age 21-58 years) who were suspected of having fistula in ano underwent preoperative CT fistulography (CTF). The CT images of 0.6 mm were obtained respectively before and after fistulography; contrast-enhanced CT scan was also performed in 22 patients. CTF images were evaluated by two expert radiologists to assess the fistulas in the following respects: (a) the volume-rendered imaging; (b) the extensions of active inflammatory tissue; (c) the internal opening and external opening; (d) the hidden areas of tract or abscess; and (e) the deep abscess adjacent to fistula. CT findings in 18 patients were compared with surgical findings or exam under anesthesia. The CTF findings in 18 cases were basically in accordance with the surgical findings and/or examination findings under anesthesia. Both coronal and transverse planes were useful in assessing the location and direction of tracts or abscesses. Complicated spatial information within the perianal soft tissue about the fistula with secondary ramifications or abscesses can be easily demonstrated to the surgeons. Contrast-enhanced images were useful in assessing the inflammatory lesion activity and infiltrated area. CTF exquisitely depicts the perianal anatomy and shows the fistulous tracks with their associated ramifications, enables selection of the most appropriate surgical treatment, and therefore minimizes all chances of recurrence. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. An adaptive nonlocal filtering for low-dose CT in both image and projection domains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingmei Wang

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available An important problem in low-dose CT is the image quality degradation caused by photon starvation. There are a lot of algorithms in sinogram domain or image domain to solve this problem. In view of strong self-similarity contained in the special sinusoid-like strip data in the sinogram space, we propose a novel non-local filtering, whose average weights are related to both the image FBP (filtered backprojection reconstructed from restored sinogram data and the image directly FBP reconstructed from noisy sinogram data. In the process of sinogram restoration, we apply a non-local method with smoothness parameters adjusted adaptively to the variance of noisy sinogram data, which makes the method much effective for noise reduction in sinogram domain. Simulation experiments show that our proposed method by filtering in both image and projection domains has a better performance in noise reduction and details preservation in reconstructed images.

  3. Metal artifact reduction and image quality evaluation of lumbar spine CT images using metal sinogram segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaewlek, Titipong; Koolpiruck, Diew; Thongvigitmanee, Saowapak; Mongkolsuk, Manus; Thammakittiphan, Sastrawut; Tritrakarn, Siri-on; Chiewvit, Pipat

    2015-01-01

    Metal artifacts often appear in the images of computed tomography (CT) imaging. In the case of lumbar spine CT images, artifacts disturb the images of critical organs. These artifacts can affect the diagnosis, treatment, and follow up care of the patient. One approach to metal artifact reduction is the sinogram completion method. A mixed-variable thresholding (MixVT) technique to identify the suitable metal sinogram is proposed. This technique consists of four steps: 1) identify the metal objects in the image by using k-mean clustering with the soft cluster assignment, 2) transform the image by separating it into two sinograms, one of which is the sinogram of the metal object, with the surrounding tissue shown in the second sinogram. The boundary of the metal sinogram is then found by the MixVT technique, 3) estimate the new value of the missing data in the metal sinogram by linear interpolation from the surrounding tissue sinogram, 4) reconstruct a modified sinogram by using filtered back-projection and complete the image by adding back the image of the metal object into the reconstructed image to form the complete image. The quantitative and clinical image quality evaluation of our proposed technique demonstrated a significant improvement in image clarity and detail, which enhances the effectiveness of diagnosis and treatment.

  4. Imaging algorithms and CT protocols in trauma patients: survey of Swiss emergency centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinzpeter, R; Boehm, T; Boll, D; Constantin, C; Del Grande, F; Fretz, V; Leschka, S; Ohletz, T; Brönnimann, M; Schmidt, S; Treumann, T; Poletti, P-A; Alkadhi, Hatem

    2017-05-01

    To identify imaging algorithms and indications, CT protocols, and radiation doses in polytrauma patients in Swiss trauma centres. An online survey with multiple choice questions and free-text responses was sent to authorized level-I trauma centres in Switzerland. All centres responded and indicated that they have internal standardized imaging algorithms for polytrauma patients. Nine of 12 centres (75 %) perform whole-body CT (WBCT) after focused assessment with sonography for trauma (FAST) and conventional radiography; 3/12 (25 %) use WBCT for initial imaging. Indications for WBCT were similar across centres being based on trauma mechanisms, vital signs, and presence of multiple injuries. Seven of 12 centres (58 %) perform an arterial and venous phase of the abdomen in split-bolus technique. Six of 12 centres (50 %) use multiphase protocols of the head (n = 3) and abdomen (n = 4), whereas 6/12 (50 %) use single-phase protocols for WBCT. Arm position was on the patient`s body during scanning (3/12, 25 %), alongside the body (2/12, 17 %), above the head (2/12, 17 %), or was changed during scanning (5/12, 42 %). Radiation doses showed large variations across centres ranging from 1268-3988 mGy*cm (DLP) per WBCT. Imaging algorithms in polytrauma patients are standardized within, but vary across Swiss trauma centres, similar to the individual WBCT protocols, resulting in large variations in associated radiation doses. • Swiss trauma centres have internal standardized imaging algorithms for trauma patients • Whole-body CT is most commonly used for imaging of trauma patients • CT protocols and radiation doses vary greatly across Swiss trauma centres.

  5. 4D-CT motion estimation using deformable image registration and 5D respiratory motion modeling

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) imaging technology has been developed for radiation therapy to provide tumor and organ images at the different breathing phases. In this work, a procedure is proposed for estimating and modeling the respiratory motion field from acquired 4D-CT imaging data and predicting tissue motion at the different breathing phases. The 4D-CT image data consist of series of multislice CT volume segments acquired in ciné mode. A modified optical flow deformable i...

  6. Evaluation of the reconstruction of image acquired from CT simulator to reduce metal artifact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Ji Hun; Park, Jin Hong; Choi, Byung Don; Won, Hui Su; Chang, Nam Jun; Goo, Jang Hyun; Hong, Joo Wan [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Seoul national university bundang hospital, Sungnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    This study presents the usefulness assessment of metal artifact reduction for orthopedic implants(O-MAR) to decrease metal artifacts from materials with high density when acquired CT images. By CT simulator, original CT images were acquired from Gammex and Rando phantom and those phantoms inserted with high density materials were scanned for other CT images with metal artifacts and then O-MAR was applied to those images, respectively. To evaluate CT images using Gammex phantom, 5 regions of interest(ROIs) were placed at 5 organs and 3 ROIs were set up at points affected by artifacts. The averages of standard deviation(SD) and CT numbers were compared with a plan using original image. For assessment of variations in dose of tissue around materials with high density, the volume of a cylindrical shape was designed at 3 places in images acquired from Rando phantom by Eclipse. With 6 MV, 7-fields, 15x15cm{sup 2} and 100 cGy per fraction, treatment planning was created and the mean dose were compared with a plan using original image. In the test with the Gammex phantom, CT numbers had a few difference at established points and especially 3 points affected by artifacts had most of the same figures. In the case of O-MAR image, the more reduction in SD appeared at all of 8 points than non O-MAR image. In the test using the Rando Phantom, the variations in dose of tissue around high density materials had a few difference between original CT image and CT image with O-MAR. The CT images using O-MAR were acquired clearly at the boundary of tissue around high density materials and applying O-MAR was useful for correcting CT numbers.

  7. Feasibility study of phase-contrast cone beam CT imaging systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Weixing

    Attenuation-based x-ray imaging techniques have been developed for many decades. One of the state-of-the-art imaging modalities is the cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) that efficiently scans an object and reproduces high-resolution and isotropic three-dimensional images of it. However, attenuation-based imaging shows a limitation in soft tissue imaging where the absorption contrast is low. Recently several phase-contrast techniques have been developed that are expected to improve low-contrast details by using the phase information of the object. The idea of this thesis is to incorporate the phase-contrast techniques into the current cone beam CT systems to combine the advantages of both phase-contrast imaging and CBCT. From a practical view of medical imaging, two phase-contrast cone beam CT systems are proposed by using the in-line phase-contrast technique and the differential phase-contrast technique, respectively. An in-line phase-contrast image is a Fresnel diffraction pattern in the near field. The image is edge-enhanced, and for soft tissues it is possible to retrieve the phase projection from a single in-line image. Therefore, this technique can be utilized in either of two methods. The first method is to produce edge-enhanced reconstruction images of the attenuation coefficient, and the second is to reconstruct the phase coefficient using the retrieved phase projections. In order to investigate this modality, computer simulations were performed for both working modes. The results using the in-line phase-contrast technique demonstrate superior image quality than that of the attenuation-based technique. A bench-top in-line PC-CBCT system was designed and constructed on top of an optical table, and a simple phantom was imaged and reconstructed using both modes to validate the principle of the proposed imaging scheme. The grating-based differential phase-contrast technique is able to produce the first derivative of phase projections using the principle of

  8. Assessing Cardiac Injury in Mice With Dual Energy-MicroCT, 4D-MicroCT, and MicroSPECT Imaging After Partial Heart Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chang-Lung; Min, Hooney [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Befera, Nicholas; Clark, Darin; Qi, Yi [Center for In Vivo Microscopy, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Das, Shiva [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Johnson, G. Allan; Badea, Cristian T. [Center for In Vivo Microscopy, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Kirsch, David G., E-mail: david.kirsch@duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To develop a mouse model of cardiac injury after partial heart irradiation (PHI) and to test whether dual energy (DE)-microCT and 4-dimensional (4D)-microCT can be used to assess cardiac injury after PHI to complement myocardial perfusion imaging using micro-single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Methods and Materials: To study cardiac injury from tangent field irradiation in mice, we used a small-field biological irradiator to deliver a single dose of 12 Gy x-rays to approximately one-third of the left ventricle (LV) of Tie2Cre; p53{sup FL/+} and Tie2Cre; p53{sup FL/−} mice, where 1 or both alleles of p53 are deleted in endothelial cells. Four and 8 weeks after irradiation, mice were injected with gold and iodinated nanoparticle-based contrast agents, and imaged with DE-microCT and 4D-microCT to evaluate myocardial vascular permeability and cardiac function, respectively. Additionally, the same mice were imaged with microSPECT to assess myocardial perfusion. Results: After PHI with tangent fields, DE-microCT scans showed a time-dependent increase in accumulation of gold nanoparticles (AuNp) in the myocardium of Tie2Cre; p53{sup FL/−} mice. In Tie2Cre; p53{sup FL/−} mice, extravasation of AuNp was observed within the irradiated LV, whereas in the myocardium of Tie2Cre; p53{sup FL/+} mice, AuNp were restricted to blood vessels. In addition, data from DE-microCT and microSPECT showed a linear correlation (R{sup 2} = 0.97) between the fraction of the LV that accumulated AuNp and the fraction of LV with a perfusion defect. Furthermore, 4D-microCT scans demonstrated that PHI caused a markedly decreased ejection fraction, and higher end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes, to develop in Tie2Cre; p53{sup FL/−} mice, which were associated with compensatory cardiac hypertrophy of the heart that was not irradiated. Conclusions: Our results show that DE-microCT and 4D-microCT with nanoparticle-based contrast agents are novel imaging approaches

  9. Open source deformable image registration system for treatment planning and recurrence CT scans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zukauskaite, Ruta; Brink, Carsten; Hansen, Christian Rønn

    2016-01-01

    manually contoured eight anatomical regions-of-interest (ROI) twice on pCT and once on rCT. METHODS: pCT and rCT images were deformably registered using the open source software elastix. Mean surface distance (MSD) and Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) between contours were used for validation of DIR...... on pCT. DSC for DIR varied between 0.58 and 0.79 for soft tissues and was 0.79 or higher for bony structures, and correlated with the volumes of ROIs (r = 0.5, p elastix in HNSCC on planning and recurrence CT scans is feasible...

  10. Importance of multidetector CT imaging in multiple trauma; Stellenwert der Multidetektor-CT bei Polytrauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linsenmaier, U. [HELIOS Kliniken Muenchen West, HELIOS Klinik Muenchen Perlach, Institut fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Muenchen (Germany); Geyer, L.L.; Reiser, M.; Wirth, S. [Klinikum der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, Institut fuer Klinische Radiologie, Muenchen (Germany); Koerner, M. [Radiologie Muehleninsel, Landshut (Germany)

    2014-09-15

    Diagnostic imaging of complex multiple trauma remains a challenge for any department providing modern emergency radiology (ER) service. An early and comprehensive approach for ER imaging is crucial for a priority-oriented and timely therapy concept with the aim of identifying potentially life-threatening injuries early and initiating appropriate treatment. The basic diagnostic approach still consists of focused ultrasound using focused assessment with sonography for trauma (FAST) and conventional radiography (CR), usually limited to a single supine chest x-ray for triaging patients undergoing immediate operations. Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) has become established as early whole body CT (WBCT) as the undisputable diagnostic method. The detection rate of injuries by WBCT is outstanding and it improves the probability of survival by 20-25 % compared with all other previous methods. At the same time, the spatial and temporal resolution of MDCT was improved resulting in considerably shortened examination times but WBCT is still associated with a significant radiation exposure, even in the acute single use setting. Using modern scanner and dose reduction technology, including iterative reconstruction, a dose reduction of up to 40 % could be achieved. The substantial number of images in WBCT is another challenge; images must be processed priority-oriented, read and transferred to the picture archiving and communications system (PACS). For rapid diagnosis, volume image reading (VIR) offers additional options to keep the diagnostic process on time. Modern WBCT after multiple trauma is performed early, comprehensively and personalized so that WBCT improves the probability of survival by 20-25 %. (orig.) [German] Die Diagnostik komplexer Mehrfachverletzungen ist eine Herausforderung fuer die moderne radiologische Notfalldiagnostik. Eine umfassend angelegte, fruehe und praezise radiologische Diagnostik ist entscheidend fuer eine prioritaetenorientierte und

  11. Attenuation correction of myocardial SPECT images with X-ray CT. Effects of registration errors between X-ray CT and SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Yasuyuki; Murase, Kenya [Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan). Graduate School of Medicine; Higashino, Hiroshi [Ehime Prefectural Imabari Hospital (Japan); Mochizuki, Teruhito [Ehime Univ., Matsuyama (Japan). School of Medicine; Motomura, Nobutoku [Toshiba Corp., Otawara, Tochigi (Japan). Medical Engineering Lab.

    2002-09-01

    Attenuation correction with an X-ray CT image is a new method to correct attenuation on SPECT imaging, but the effect of the registration errors between CT and SPECT images is unclear. In this study, we investigated the effects of the registration errors on myocardial SPECT, analyzing data from a phantom and a human volunteer. Registerion (fusion) of the X-ray CT and SPECT images was done with standard packaged software in three dimensional fashion, by using linked transaxial, coronal and sagittal images. In the phantom study, and X-ray CT image was shifted 1 to 3 pixels on the x, y and z axes, and rotated 6 degrees clockwise. Attenuation correction maps generated from each misaligned X-ray CT image were used to reconstruct misaligned SPECT images of the phantom filled with {sup 201}Tl. In a human volunteer, X-ray CT was acquired in different conditions (during inspiration vs. expiration). CT values were transferred to an attenuation constant by using straight lines; an attenuation constant of 0/cm in the air (CT value=-1,000 HU) and that of 0.150/cm in water (CT value=0 HU). For comparison, attenuation correction with transmission CT (TCT) data and an external {gamma}-ray source ({sup 99m}Tc) was also applied to reconstruct SPECT images. Simulated breast attenuation with a breast attachment, and inferior wall attenuation were properly corrected by means of the attenuation correction map generated from X-ray CT. As pixel shift increased, deviation of the SPECT images increased in misaligned images in the phantom study. In the human study, SPECT images were affected by the scan conditions of the X-ray CT. Attenuation correction of myocardial SPECT with an X-ray CT image is a simple and potentially beneficial method for clinical use, but accurate registration of the X-ray CT to SPECT image is essential for satisfactory attenuation correction. (author)

  12. Development of a guideline on reading CT images of malignant pleural mesothelioma and selection of the reference CT films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Huashi, E-mail: zhouhua@u-fukui.ac.jp [Department of Environmental Health, School of Medicine, University of Fukui, 23-3 Shimoaitsuki, Matsuoka, Eihezi-cho, Fukui Prefecture 910-1193 (Japan); Tamura, Taro, E-mail: tarou@u-fukui.ac.jp [Department of Environmental Health, School of Medicine, University of Fukui, 23-3 Shimoaitsuki, Matsuoka, Eihezi-cho, Fukui Prefecture 910-1193 (Japan); Kusaka, Yukinori, E-mail: kusakayk@gmail.com [Department of Environmental Health, School of Medicine, University of Fukui, 23-3 Shimoaitsuki, Matsuoka, Eihezi-cho, Fukui Prefecture 910-1193 (Japan); Suganuma, Narufumi, E-mail: nsuganuma@kochi-u.ac.jp [Department of Environmental Medicine, Kochi University School of Medicine (Japan); Subhannachart, Ponglada, E-mail: pongladas@gmail.com [Central Chest Disease Institute of Thailand, 39 Moo 9, Tiwanon Road, Muang Nonthaburi 11000 (Thailand); Vijitsanguan, Chomphunut, E-mail: Chompoo_vj@yahoo.com [Central Chest Disease Institute of Thailand, 39 Moo 9, Tiwanon Road, Muang Nonthaburi 11000 (Thailand); Noisiri, Weeraya, E-mail: weeraya_tat@yahoo.com [Central Chest Disease Institute of Thailand, 39 Moo 9, Tiwanon Road, Muang Nonthaburi 11000 (Thailand); Hering, Kurt G., E-mail: k.g.hering@t-online.de [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Radiooncology and Nuclear Medicine, Radiological Clinic, Miner' s Hospital, Radiologische Klinik, Lansppaschaftskranhaus Dortmund, Wieckesweg 27 44309, Dortmund (Germany); Akira, Masanori, E-mail: akira@kch.hosp.go.jp [Department of Radiology, National Hospital Organization Kinki-Chuo Chest Medical Center, 1180 Nagasone-cho, Kita-ku, Sakai, Osaka 591-8555 (Japan); Itoh, Harumi, E-mail: hitoh@fmsrsa.fukui-med.ac.jp [Department of Environmental Health, School of Medicine, University of Fukui, 23-3 Shimoaitsuki, Matsuoka, Eihezi-cho, Fukui Prefecture 910-1193 (Japan); Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, University of Fukui, 23-3 Shimoaitsuki Matsuoka, Eiheizi-cho, Fukui Prefecture 910-1193 (Japan); and others

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: International experts developed a guideline on reading CT images of malignant pleural mesothelioma for radiologists and physicians. It is intended that it act as a supplement to the current International Classification of HRCT for Occupational and Environmental Respiratory Diseases. Methods: The research literatures on mesothelioma CT features were systematically reviewed. Ten mesothelioma CT features were adopted into the guideline prepared according to experts’ opinion. The terminology of mesothelioma CT features and mesothelioma probability were agreed by consensus of experts. The CT reference films for each mesothelioma feature were selected based on agreement by experts from 22 definite mesothelioma cases confirmed pathologically and immunohistochemically. To support the validity of the mesothelioma probability, 4 experts’ readings of CT films from 57 cases with or without mesothelioma were analyzed by kappa statistics between the experts; sensitivity and specificity for mesothelioma were also assessed. Results: The mesothelioma CT Guideline was developed, providing the terminology of CT features and the mesothelioma probability, the judgement of severity, the distribution of mesothelioma, and the revised CT reading sheet including mesothelioma items. The CT reference films with ten mesothelioma typical features were selected. The average linearly and quadratically weighted kappa of the agreement on the 4-point scale mesothelioma probability were 0.58 and 0.71, respectively. The average sensitivity and specificity for mesothelioma were 93.2% and 65.6%, respectively. Conclusion: The evidence-based mesothelioma CT Guideline developed may serve as a good educational tool to facilitate physicians in recognising mesothelioma and improve their proficiency in diagnosis of mesothelioma.

  13. Concurrent Diffuse Pyelonephritis and Prostatitis: Discordant Findings on Sequential FDG PET/CT and 67Ga SPECT/CT Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucaj, Robert; Achong, Dwight M

    2017-01-01

    A 45-year-old man underwent FDG PET/CT for initial imaging evaluation of recurrent Escherichia coli urinary tract infections, which demonstrated no significant FDG uptake in either kidney and subtle FDG uptake in the right prostate lobe. Subsequent Ga SPECT/CT demonstrated abnormal intense gallium uptake throughout the right kidney and entire prostate gland, clearly discordant with PET/CT findings and consistent with unexpected concurrent pyelonephritis and prostatitis. Although FDG has effectively replaced Ga in everyday clinical practice, the current case serves as a reminder that there is still a role for Ga in the evaluation of genitourinary infections.

  14. Integration of PET-CT and cone-beam CT for image-guided radiotherapy with high image quality and registration accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, T.-H.; Liang, C.-H.; Wu, J.-K.; Lien, C.-Y.; Yang, B.-H.; Huang, Y.-H.; Lee, J. J. S.

    2009-07-01

    Hybrid positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) system enhances better differentiation of tissue uptake of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) and provides much more diagnostic value in the non-small-cell lung cancer and nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). In PET-CT, high quality CT images not only offer diagnostic value on anatomic delineation of the tissues but also shorten the acquisition time for attenuation correction (AC) compared with PET-alone imaging. The linear accelerators equipped with the X-ray cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging system for image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) provides excellent verification on position setup error. The purposes of our study were to optimize the CT acquisition protocols of PET-CT and to integrate the PET-CT and CBCT for IGRT. The CT imaging parameters were modified in PET-CT for increasing the image quality in order to enhance the diagnostic value on tumour delineation. Reproducibility and registration accuracy via bone co-registration algorithm between the PET-CT and CBCT were evaluated by using a head phantom to simulate a head and neck treatment condition. Dose measurement in computed tomography dose index (CTDI) was also estimated. Optimization of the CT acquisition protocols of PET-CT was feasible in this study. Co-registration accuracy between CBCT and PET-CT on axial and helical modes was in the range of 1.06 to 2.08 and 0.99 to 2.05 mm, respectively. In our result, it revealed that the accuracy of the co-registration with CBCT on helical mode was more accurate than that on axial mode. Radiation doses in CTDI were 4.76 to 18.5 mGy and 4.83 to 18.79 mGy on axial and helical modes, respectively. Registration between PET-CT and CBCT is a state-of-the-art registration technology which could provide much information on diagnosis and accurate tumour contouring on radiotherapy while implementing radiotherapy procedures. This novelty technology of PET-CT and cone-beam CT integration for IGRT may have a

  15. Integration of PET-CT and cone-beam CT for image-guided radiotherapy with high image quality and registration accuracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, T-H [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chung Shan Medical University, No. 110, Sec.1, Jianguo N.Rd, Taichung City 40201, Taiwan (China); Liang, C-H [Agfa Healthcare Systems Taiwan Co., Ltd., 6F, 237 Sung Chiang Road, Taipei, 104 Taiwan (China); Wu, J-K [Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Oncology, and Cancer Research Center, National Taiwan University Hospital, No.7 Chung San South Road, Taipei, 104 Taiwan (China); Lien, C-Y [Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Yang Ming University, No. 155, Sec.2, Linong Street, Taipei, 112 Taiwan (China); Yang, B-H; Lee, J J S [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang Ming University, No. 155, Sec.2, Linong Street, Taipei, 112 Taiwan (China); Huang, Y-H [Department of Medical Imaing and Radiological Sciences, I-Shou University, No. 8, Yida Rd., Yanchao Township, Kaohsiung County 82445, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: jslee@ym.edu.tw

    2009-07-15

    Hybrid positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) system enhances better differentiation of tissue uptake of {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) and provides much more diagnostic value in the non-small-cell lung cancer and nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). In PET-CT, high quality CT images not only offer diagnostic value on anatomic delineation of the tissues but also shorten the acquisition time for attenuation correction (AC) compared with PET-alone imaging. The linear accelerators equipped with the X-ray cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging system for image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) provides excellent verification on position setup error. The purposes of our study were to optimize the CT acquisition protocols of PET-CT and to integrate the PET-CT and CBCT for IGRT. The CT imaging parameters were modified in PET-CT for increasing the image quality in order to enhance the diagnostic value on tumour delineation. Reproducibility and registration accuracy via bone co-registration algorithm between the PET-CT and CBCT were evaluated by using a head phantom to simulate a head and neck treatment condition. Dose measurement in computed tomography dose index (CTDI) was also estimated. Optimization of the CT acquisition protocols of PET-CT was feasible in this study. Co-registration accuracy between CBCT and PET-CT on axial and helical modes was in the range of 1.06 to 2.08 and 0.99 to 2.05 mm, respectively. In our result, it revealed that the accuracy of the co-registration with CBCT on helical mode was more accurate than that on axial mode. Radiation doses in CTDI were 4.76 to 18.5 mGy and 4.83 to 18.79 mGy on axial and helical modes, respectively. Registration between PET-CT and CBCT is a state-of-the-art registration technology which could provide much information on diagnosis and accurate tumour contouring on radiotherapy while implementing radiotherapy procedures. This novelty technology of PET-CT and cone-beam CT integration for IGRT

  16. Reporducibilities of cephalometric measurements of three-dimensional CT images reconstructed in the personal computer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Kug Jin; Park, Hyok; Lee, Hee Cheol; Kim, Kee Deog; Park, Chang Seo [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to report the reproducibility of intra-observer and inter-observer consistency of cephalometric measurements using three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT), and the degree of difference of the cephalometric measurements. CT images of 16 adult patients with normal class I occlusion were sent to personal computer and reconstructed into 3D images using V-Works 3.5{sup TM} (Cybermed Inc., Seoul, Korea). With the internal program of V-Works 3.5{sup TM}, 12 landmarks on regular cephalograms were transformed into 21 analytic categories and measured by 2 observers and in addition, one of the observers repeated their measurements. Intra-observer difference was calculated using paired t-test, and inter-observer by two sample test. There were significant differences in the intra-observer measurements (p<0.05) in four of the categories which included ANS-Me, ANS-PNS, Cdl-GO (Lt), GoL-GoR, but with the exception of Cdl-Go (Lt), ZmL-ZmR, Zyo-Zyo, the average differences were within 2 mm of each other. The inter-observer observations also showed significant differences in the measurements of the ZmL-ZmR and Zyo-Zyo categories (p<0.05). With the exception of the Cdl-Me (Rt), ZmL-ZmR, Zyo-Zyo categories, the average differences between the two observers were within 2mm, but the ZmL-ZmR and Zyo-Zyo values differed greatly with values of 8.10 and 19.8 mm respectively. In general, 3D CT images showed greater accuracy and reproducibility, with the exception of suture areas such as Zm and Zyo, than regular cephalograms in orthodontic measurement, showing differences of less than 2 mm, therefore 3D CT images can be useful in cephalometric measurements and treatment planning.

  17. Iodine contrast cone beam CT imaging of breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partain, Larry; Prionas, Stavros; Seppi, Edward; Virshup, Gary; Roos, Gerhard; Sutherland, Robert; Boone, John

    2007-03-01

    An iodine contrast agent, in conjunction with an X-ray cone beam CT imaging system, was used to clearly image three, biopsy verified, cancer lesions in two patients. The lesions were approximately in the 10 mm to 6 mm diameter range. Additional regions were also enhanced with approximate dimensions down to 1 mm or less in diameter. A flat panel detector, with 194 μm pixels in 2 x 2 binning mode, was used to obtain 500 projection images at 30 fps with an 80 kVp X-ray system operating at 112 mAs, for an 8-9 mGy dose - equivalent to two view mammography for these women. The patients were positioned prone, while the gantry rotated in the horizontal plane around the uncompressed, pendant breasts. This gantry rotated 360 degrees during the patient's 16.6 sec breath hold. A volume of 100 cc of 320 mg/ml iodine-contrast was power injected at 4 cc/sec, via catheter into the arm vein of the patient. The resulting 512 x 512 x 300 cone beam CT data set of Feldkamp reconstructed ~(0.3 mm) 3 voxels were analyzed. An interval of voxel contrast values, characteristic of the regions with iodine contrast enhancement, were used with surface rendering to clearly identify up to a total of 13 highlighted volumes. This included the three largest lesions, that were previously biopsied and confirmed to be malignant. The other ten highlighted regions, of smaller diameters, are likely areas of increased contrast trapping unrelated to cancer angiogenesis. However the technique itself is capable of resolving lesions that small.

  18. An evaluation of three commercially available metal artifact reduction methods for CT imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jessie Y.; Kerns, James R.; Nute, Jessica L.; Liu, Xinming; Balter, Peter A.; Stingo, Francesco C.; Followill, David S.; Mirkovic, Dragan; Howell, Rebecca M.; Kry, Stephen F.

    2015-02-01

    Three commercial metal artifact reduction methods were evaluated for use in computed tomography (CT) imaging in the presence of clinically realistic metal implants: Philips O-MAR, GE’s monochromatic gemstone spectral imaging (GSI) using dual-energy CT, and GSI monochromatic imaging with metal artifact reduction software applied (MARs). Each method was evaluated according to CT number accuracy, metal size accuracy, and streak artifact severity reduction by using several phantoms, including three anthropomorphic phantoms containing metal implants (hip prosthesis, dental fillings and spinal fixation rods). All three methods showed varying degrees of success for the hip prosthesis and spinal fixation rod cases, while none were particularly beneficial for dental artifacts. Limitations of the methods were also observed. MARs underestimated the size of metal implants and introduced new artifacts in imaging planes beyond the metal implant when applied to dental artifacts, and both the O-MAR and MARs algorithms induced artifacts for spinal fixation rods in a thoracic phantom. Our findings suggest that all three artifact mitigation methods may benefit patients with metal implants, though they should be used with caution in certain scenarios.

  19. {sup 18}F-FDOPA PET/CT imaging of insulinoma revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imperiale, Alessio; Namer, Izzie-Jacques [University Hospitals of Strasbourg, Department of Biophysics and Nuclear Medicine, Strasbourg (France); University of Strasbourg/CNRS and FMTS, Faculty of Medicine, ICube - UMR 7357, Strasbourg (France); Sebag, Frederic [Aix-Marseille University, Department of Endocrine Surgery, La Timone University Hospital, Marseille (France); Vix, Michel [University of Strasbourg, Department of General, Digestive, and Endocrine Surgery, IRCAD-IHU, Strasbourg (France); Castinetti, Frederic [Aix-Marseille University, Department of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolic Disorders, La Timone University Hospital, Marseille (France); Kessler, Laurence; Moreau, Francois [University of Strasbourg, Department of Diabetology, University Hospital of Strasbourg, Strasbourg (France); Bachellier, Philippe [University Hospitals of Strasbourg, Department of Visceral Surgery and Transplantation, Strasbourg (France); Guillet, Benjamin; Mundler, Olivier [Aix-Marseille University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, La Timone University Hospital, CERIMED, Marseille (France); Taieb, David [Aix-Marseille University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, La Timone University Hospital, CERIMED, Marseille (France); Aix-Marseille University, Biophysics and Nuclear Medecine, La Timone University Hospital, European Center for Research in Medical Imaging, Marseille (France)

    2014-11-01

    {sup 18}F-FDOPA PET imaging is increasingly used in the work-up of patients with neuroendocrine tumours. It has been shown to be of limited value in localizing pancreatic insulin-secreting tumours in adults with hyperinsulinaemic hypoglycaemia (HH) mainly due to {sup 18}F-FDOPA uptake by the whole pancreatic gland. The objective of this study was to review our experience with {sup 18}F-FDOPA PET/CT imaging with carbidopa (CD) premedication in patients with HH in comparison with PET/CT studies performed without CD premedication in an independent population. A retrospective study including 16 HH patients who were investigated between January 2011 and December 2013 using {sup 18}F-FDOPA PET/CT (17 examinations) in two academic endocrine tumour centres was conducted. All PET/CT examinations were performed under CD premedication (200 mg orally, 1 - 2 h prior to tracer injection). The PET/CT acquisition protocol included an early acquisition (5 min after {sup 18}F-FDOPA injection) centred over the upper abdomen and a delayed whole-body acquisition starting 20 - 30 min later. An independent series of eight consecutive patients with HH and investigated before 2011 were considered for comparison. All patients had a reference whole-body PET/CT scan performed about 1 h after {sup 18}F-FDOPA injection. In all cases, PET/CT was performed without CD premedication. In the study group, {sup 18}F-FDOPA PET/CT with CD premedication was positive in 8 out of 11 patients with histologically proven insulinoma (73 %). All {sup 18}F-FDOPA PET/CT-avid insulinomas were detected on early images and 5 of 11 (45 %) on delayed ones. The tumour/normal pancreas uptake ratio was not significantly different between early and delayed acquisitions. Considering all patients with HH, including those without imaging evidence of disease, the detection rate of the primary lesions using CD-assisted {sup 18}F-FDOPA PET/CT was 53 %, showing 9 insulinomas in 17 studies performed. In the control group (without

  20. Enhanced temporal resolution at cardiac CT with a novel CT image reconstruction algorithm: Initial patient experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apfaltrer, Paul, E-mail: paul.apfaltrer@medma.uni-heidelberg.de [Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, PO Box 250322, 169 Ashley Avenue, Charleston, SC 29425 (United States); Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Theodor-Kutzer-Ufer 1-3, D-68167 Mannheim (Germany); Schoendube, Harald, E-mail: harald.schoendube@siemens.com [Siemens Healthcare, CT Division, Forchheim Siemens, Siemensstr. 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany); Schoepf, U. Joseph, E-mail: schoepf@musc.edu [Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, PO Box 250322, 169 Ashley Avenue, Charleston, SC 29425 (United States); Allmendinger, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.allmendinger@siemens.com [Siemens Healthcare, CT Division, Forchheim Siemens, Siemensstr. 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany); Tricarico, Francesco, E-mail: francescotricarico82@gmail.com [Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, PO Box 250322, 169 Ashley Avenue, Charleston, SC 29425 (United States); Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, “A. Gemelli” Hospital, Largo A. Gemelli 8, Rome (Italy); Schindler, Andreas, E-mail: andreas.schindler@campus.lmu.de [Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, PO Box 250322, 169 Ashley Avenue, Charleston, SC 29425 (United States); Vogt, Sebastian, E-mail: sebastian.vogt@siemens.com [Siemens Healthcare, CT Division, Forchheim Siemens, Siemensstr. 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany); Sunnegårdh, Johan, E-mail: johan.sunnegardh@siemens.com [Siemens Healthcare, CT Division, Forchheim Siemens, Siemensstr. 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany); and others

    2013-02-15

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of a temporal resolution improvement method (TRIM) for cardiac CT on diagnostic image quality for coronary artery assessment. Materials and methods: The TRIM-algorithm employs an iterative approach to reconstruct images from less than 180° of projections and uses a histogram constraint to prevent the occurrence of limited-angle artifacts. This algorithm was applied in 11 obese patients (7 men, 67.2 ± 9.8 years) who had undergone second generation dual-source cardiac CT with 120 kV, 175–426 mAs, and 500 ms gantry rotation. All data were reconstructed with a temporal resolution of 250 ms using traditional filtered-back projection (FBP) and of 200 ms using the TRIM-algorithm. Contrast attenuation and contrast-to-noise-ratio (CNR) were measured in the ascending aorta. The presence and severity of coronary motion artifacts was rated on a 4-point Likert scale. Results: All scans were considered of diagnostic quality. Mean BMI was 36 ± 3.6 kg/m{sup 2}. Average heart rate was 60 ± 9 bpm. Mean effective dose was 13.5 ± 4.6 mSv. When comparing FBP- and TRIM reconstructed series, the attenuation within the ascending aorta (392 ± 70.7 vs. 396.8 ± 70.1 HU, p > 0.05) and CNR (13.2 ± 3.2 vs. 11.7 ± 3.1, p > 0.05) were not significantly different. A total of 110 coronary segments were evaluated. All studies were deemed diagnostic; however, there was a significant (p < 0.05) difference in the severity score distribution of coronary motion artifacts between FBP (median = 2.5) and TRIM (median = 2.0) reconstructions. Conclusion: The algorithm evaluated here delivers diagnostic imaging quality of the coronary arteries despite 500 ms gantry rotation. Possible applications include improvement of cardiac imaging on slower gantry rotation systems or mitigation of the trade-off between temporal resolution and CNR in obese patients.

  1. {sup 11}C-Choline PET/CT in patients with hormone-resistant prostate cancer showing biochemical relapse after radical prostatectomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ceci, Francesco; Ambrosini, Valentina; Boschi, Stefano; Fanti, Stefano [University of Bologna, Nuclear Medicine Unit, Department of Haematology Oncology and Laboratory Medicine, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Bologna, Policlinico Sant' Orsola-Malpighi, Bologna (Italy); Castellucci, Paolo [University of Bologna, Nuclear Medicine Unit, Department of Haematology Oncology and Laboratory Medicine, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Bologna, Policlinico Sant' Orsola-Malpighi, Bologna (Italy); Azienda Ospedaliero-Unversitaria di Bologna Policlinico Sant' Orsola-Malpighi, UO di Medicina Nucleare, PAD. 30, Bologna (Italy); Mamede, Marcelo [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Molecular Imaging Center, Belo Horizonte (Brazil); Schiavina, Riccardo; Martorana, Giuseppe [University of Bologna, Department of Urology, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Bologna, Policlinico Sant' Orsola-Malpighi, Bologna (Italy); Rubello, Domenico [' Santa Maria della Misericordia' Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine and PET/CT Centre, Rovigo (Italy); Fuccio, Chiara [Fondazione Salvatore Maugeri, Service of Nuclear Medicine, Pavia (Italy)

    2013-02-15

    To determine the diagnostic efficacy of {sup 11}C-choline PET/CT in patients with prostate cancer (PC) after radical prostatectomy who presented with increasing PSA levels during follow-up in spite of being on hormone treatment (HT), and therefore showing HT resistance. We evaluated a large series of 157 consecutive PC patients previously treated by radical prostatectomy who presented with biochemical recurrence with increasing PSA levels in spite of ongoing HT (HT-resistant patients). At the time of {sup 11}C-choline PET/CT, the mean value of trigger PSA level was 8.3 (range 0.2 - 60.6 ng/mL), the mean PSA doubling time (PSAdt) was 5.3 (range 0.4 - 35 months), and the mean PSA velocity (PSAvel) was 22.1 ng/mL/year (range 0.12 - 82 ng/mL/year). {sup 11}C-Choline PET/CT was performed following a standard procedure at our centre to investigate increasing PSA levels, either as the first imaging procedure or in patients with negative conventional imaging. At the time of {sup 11}C-choline PET/CT all patients were receiving HT (61 were receiving monotherapy and 96 multidrug therapy). PET-positive findings were validated by: (a) transrectal US-guided biopsy in patients with recurrence in the prostatic bed, (b) surgical pelvic lymphadenectomy, (c) other imaging modalities, including repeated {sup 11}C-choline PET/CT, performed during a minimum follow-up of 12-months. {sup 11}C-Choline PET/CT showed positive findings in 104 of the 157 patients (66 %). {sup 11}C-choline PET/CT detected: a single lesion in 40 patients (7 in the prostate bed, 10 in lymph nodes, 22 in bone, 1 at another site); two lesions in 18 patients (7 in lymph nodes, 7 in bone, 4 in both lymph nodes and bone); three or four lesions in 7 patients (4 in lymph nodes, 2 in bone, 1 at another site); and more than four lesions in the remaining 39 patients (2 in the prostate bed, 12 in lymph nodes, 12 in bone, 11 in both lymph nodes and bone, 2 at other sites). In {sup 11}C-choline PET-negative patients, the mean

  2. Deformable image registration based automatic CT-to-CT contour propagation for head and neck adaptive radiotherapy in the routine clinical setting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumarasiri, Akila, E-mail: akumara1@hfhs.org; Siddiqui, Farzan; Liu, Chang; Yechieli, Raphael; Shah, Mira; Pradhan, Deepak; Zhong, Hualiang; Chetty, Indrin J.; Kim, Jinkoo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan 48202 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical potential of deformable image registration (DIR)-based automatic propagation of physician-drawn contours from a planning CT to midtreatment CT images for head and neck (H and N) adaptive radiotherapy. Methods: Ten H and N patients, each with a planning CT (CT1) and a subsequent CT (CT2) taken approximately 3–4 week into treatment, were considered retrospectively. Clinically relevant organs and targets were manually delineated by a radiation oncologist on both sets of images. Four commercial DIR algorithms, two B-spline-based and two Demons-based, were used to deform CT1 and the relevant contour sets onto corresponding CT2 images. Agreement of the propagated contours with manually drawn contours on CT2 was visually rated by four radiation oncologists in a scale from 1 to 5, the volume overlap was quantified using Dice coefficients, and a distance analysis was done using center of mass (CoM) displacements and Hausdorff distances (HDs). Performance of these four commercial algorithms was validated using a parameter-optimized Elastix DIR algorithm. Results: All algorithms attained Dice coefficients of >0.85 for organs with clear boundaries and those with volumes >9 cm{sup 3}. Organs with volumes <3 cm{sup 3} and/or those with poorly defined boundaries showed Dice coefficients of ∼0.5–0.6. For the propagation of small organs (<3 cm{sup 3}), the B-spline-based algorithms showed higher mean Dice values (Dice = 0.60) than the Demons-based algorithms (Dice = 0.54). For the gross and planning target volumes, the respective mean Dice coefficients were 0.8 and 0.9. There was no statistically significant difference in the Dice coefficients, CoM, or HD among investigated DIR algorithms. The mean radiation oncologist visual scores of the four algorithms ranged from 3.2 to 3.8, which indicated that the quality of transferred contours was “clinically acceptable with minor modification or major modification in a small number of contours

  3. Deformable image registration based automatic CT-to-CT contour propagation for head and neck adaptive radiotherapy in the routine clinical setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumarasiri, Akila; Siddiqui, Farzan; Liu, Chang; Yechieli, Raphael; Shah, Mira; Pradhan, Deepak; Zhong, Hualiang; Chetty, Indrin J; Kim, Jinkoo

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate the clinical potential of deformable image registration (DIR)-based automatic propagation of physician-drawn contours from a planning CT to midtreatment CT images for head and neck (H&N) adaptive radiotherapy. Ten H&N patients, each with a planning CT (CT1) and a subsequent CT (CT2) taken approximately 3-4 week into treatment, were considered retrospectively. Clinically relevant organs and targets were manually delineated by a radiation oncologist on both sets of images. Four commercial DIR algorithms, two B-spline-based and two Demons-based, were used to deform CT1 and the relevant contour sets onto corresponding CT2 images. Agreement of the propagated contours with manually drawn contours on CT2 was visually rated by four radiation oncologists in a scale from 1 to 5, the volume overlap was quantified using Dice coefficients, and a distance analysis was done using center of mass (CoM) displacements and Hausdorff distances (HDs). Performance of these four commercial algorithms was validated using a parameter-optimized Elastix DIR algorithm. All algorithms attained Dice coefficients of >0.85 for organs with clear boundaries and those with volumes >9 cm(3). Organs with volumes <3 cm(3) and/or those with poorly defined boundaries showed Dice coefficients of ∼ 0.5-0.6. For the propagation of small organs (<3 cm(3)), the B-spline-based algorithms showed higher mean Dice values (Dice = 0.60) than the Demons-based algorithms (Dice = 0.54). For the gross and planning target volumes, the respective mean Dice coefficients were 0.8 and 0.9. There was no statistically significant difference in the Dice coefficients, CoM, or HD among investigated DIR algorithms. The mean radiation oncologist visual scores of the four algorithms ranged from 3.2 to 3.8, which indicated that the quality of transferred contours was "clinically acceptable with minor modification or major modification in a small number of contours." Use of DIR-based contour propagation in the routine

  4. Spleen Segmentation and Assessment in CT Images for Traumatic Abdominal Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reza Soroushmehr, S M; Davuluri, Pavani; Molaei, Somayeh; Hargraves, Rosalyn Hobson; Tang, Yang; Cockrell, Charles H; Ward, Kevin; Najarian, Kayvan

    2015-09-01

    Spleen segmentation is especially challenging as the majority of solid organs in the abdomen region have similar gray level range. Physician analysis of computed tomography (CT) images to assess abdominal trauma could be very time consuming and hence, automating this process can reduce time to treatment. The proposed method presented in this paper is a fully automated and knowledge based technique that employs anatomical information to accurately segment the spleen in CT images. The spleen detection procedure is proposed to locate the spleen in both healthy and injured cases. In the presence of hemorrhage and laceration, the edge merging technique is used. The accuracy of the method is measured by some criteria such as mis-segmented area, accuracy, specificity and sensitivity. The results show that the proposed spleen segmentation method performs well and outperforms other methods.

  5. A Content based CT Lung Image Retrieval by DCT Matrix and Feature Vector Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.Bridget Nirmala

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Most of the image retrieval systems are still incapable of providing retrieval result with high retrieval accuracy and less computational complexity. Image Retrieval technique to retrieve similar and relevant Computed Tomography (CT images of lung from a large database of images. During the process of retrieval, a query image which contains the affected area / abnormal region is given as an input to retrieve similar images which contain affected area/abnormal region from the database. DCT Matrix (DCTM is a kind of commonly used color feature representation in image retrieval. This paper describes a content based image retrieval (CBIR that represent each image in database by a vector of feature values called DCT vector matrix(8x8. Using this DCTM row and column feature vector values considered as a query image which is compared with existing database to cull out more similar and relevant images. The experimental result shows that 97% of images can be retrieved correctly using this technique

  6. Imaging characteristics of adult onset Still's disease demonstrated with 18F-FDG PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lei; Xiu, Yan; Gu, Taoying; Dong, Caihong; Wu, Bing; Shi, Hongcheng

    2017-09-01

    The diagnosis of adult onset Still's disease (AOSD) is non‑specific, and requires the exclusion of other diseases including infectious, inflammatory and malignant diseases. The current study aimed to summarize the imaging characteristics of fluorodeoxyglucose (18F‑FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computerized tomography (CT) in patients with AOSD. The 18F‑FDG PET/CT characteristic observations of 32 patients with definite AOSD were retrospectively reviewed based on visual interpretation and the semi‑quantitative index of standard uptake value of maximum (SUVmax). Among 32 patients, no normal case was observed. Abnormal FDG accumulation by the spleen, bone marrow and lymph nodes was the main observation of the PET/CT images. Totals of 27 (84.4%) and 26 cases (81.3%) were identified with diffusely elevated FDG uptake by the spleen and bone marrow, respectively, and the average SUVmax was 4.2±1.1 and 4.6±0.6, respectively. A total of 20 cases (62.5%) showed lymphadenopathy with FDG uptake, with the range of SUVmax from 2.2‑13.9. In addition, 7 patients (21.9%) were observed to exhibit effusion without FDG uptake, 1 case presented with abnormal FDG uptake by the skin, and another by the right shoulder joint. In addition, no abnormally elevated FDG uptake by the liver or large vessels was observed. Due to non‑specific imaging features, 18F‑FDG PET/CT could not be directly helpful in diagnosing AOSD. However, 18F‑FDG PET/CT serves important roles in evaluating the involved extent of AOSD, and guiding the biopsy of lymph nodes, bone marrow or other tissues, which may aid in the development of novel clinical management strategies.

  7. Automated detection of fiducial screws from CT/DVT volume data for image-guided ENT surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Guoyan; Gerber, Nicolas; Widmer, Daniel; Stieger, Christof; Caversaccio, Marco; Nolte, Lutz-Peter; Weber, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an automated solution for precise detection of fiducial screws from three-dimensional (3D) Computerized Tomography (CT)/Digital Volume Tomography (DVT) data for image-guided ENT surgery. Unlike previously published solutions, we regard the detection of the fiducial screws from the CT/DVT volume data as a pose estimation problem. We thus developed a model-based solution. Starting from a user-supplied initialization, our solution detects the fiducial screws by iteratively matching a computer aided design (CAD) model of the fiducial screw to features extracted from the CT/DVT data. We validated our solution on one conventional CT dataset and on five DVT volume datasets, resulting in a total detection of 24 fiducial screws. Our experimental results indicate that the proposed solution achieves much higher reproducibility and precision than the manual detection. Further comparison shows that the proposed solution produces better results on the DVT dataset than on the conventional CT dataset.

  8. Infectious sacroiliitis: value of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Breton, C. [Dept. of Radiology, Tenon Hospital, 75 Paris (France); Frey, I. [Dept. of Radiology, Tenon Hospital, 75 Paris (France); Carette, M.F. [Dept. of Radiology, Tenon Hospital, 75 Paris (France); Richaud, J. [Dept. of Radiology, Tenon Hospital, 75 Paris (France); Kujas, A. [Dept. of Radiology, Tenon Hospital, 75 Paris (France); Korzec, J. [Dept. of Radiology, Tenon Hospital, 75 Paris (France); Bigot, J.M. [Dept. of Radiology, Tenon Hospital, 75 Paris (France)

    1992-06-01

    Infectious sacroiliitis is an uncommon septic arthritis, the diagnosis of which is difficult to establish. We retrospectively examined 14 cases of septic sacroiliitis, by CT (two of whom also had an MRI examination). The patient population consisted of eight men and six women; 9 were African, 8 had tuberculous sacroiliitis and 6 pyogenic sacroiliitis. All the cases showed a pre-sacroiliac soft tissue swelling with ring-like enhancement following intravenous contrast in eight cases. A gas image was observed at the center of the abcess in two cases. Joint narrowing was found in four patients and widening in eight, associated with an image of bone sequestration in seven. CT gave an etiologic orientation in 8 cases, and facilitated the guidance of bone biopsy. MRI showed low signal T1-weighted images and high signal T2 of the subchondral bone, joint space and soft tissue abcess. We conclude that CT is helpful in the evaluation of infectious sacroiliitis, and that further studies are necessary to evaluate the role of MRI in such pathologic processes. (orig.)

  9. Segmentation of the thoracic aorta in noncontrast cardiac CT images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila-Montes, Olga C; Kurkure, Uday; Nakazato, Ryo; Berman, Daniel S; Dey, Damini; Kakadiaris, Ioannis A

    2013-09-01

    Studies have shown that aortic calcification is associated with cardiovascular disease. In this study, a method for localization, centerline extraction, and segmentation of the thoracic aorta in noncontrast cardiac-computed tomography (CT) images, toward the detection of aortic calcification, is presented. The localization of the right coronary artery ostium slice is formulated as a regression problem whose input variables are obtained from simple intensity features computed from a pyramid representation of the slice. The localization, centerline extraction, and segmentation of the aorta are formulated as optimal path detection problems. Dynamic programming is applied in the Hough space for localizing key center points in the aorta which guide the centerline tracing using a fast marching-based minimal path extraction framework. The input volume is then resampled into a stack of 2-D cross-sectional planes orthogonal to the obtained centerline. Dynamic programming is again applied for the segmentation of the aorta in each slice of the resampled volume. The obtained segmentation is finally mapped back to its original volume space. The performance of the proposed method was assessed on cardiac noncontrast CT scans and promising results were obtained.

  10. An evaluation on CT image acquisition method for medical VR applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Seong-wook; Ko, Junho; Yoo, Yon-sik; Kim, Yoonsang

    2017-02-01

    Recent medical virtual reality (VR) applications to minimize re-operations are being studied for improvements in surgical efficiency and reduction of operation error. The CT image acquisition method considering three-dimensional (3D) modeling for medical VR applications is important, because the realistic model is required for the actual human organ. However, the research for medical VR applications has focused on 3D modeling techniques and utilized 3D models. In addition, research on a CT image acquisition method considering 3D modeling has never been reported. The conventional CT image acquisition method involves scanning a limited area of the lesion for the diagnosis of doctors once or twice. However, the medical VR application is required to acquire the CT image considering patients' various postures and a wider area than the lesion. A wider area than the lesion is required because of the necessary process of comparing bilateral sides for dyskinesia diagnosis of the shoulder, pelvis, and leg. Moreover, patients' various postures are required due to the different effects on the musculoskeletal system. Therefore, in this paper, we perform a comparative experiment on the acquired CT images considering image area (unilateral/bilateral) and patients' postures (neutral/abducted). CT images are acquired from 10 patients for the experiments, and the acquired CT images are evaluated based on the length per pixel and the morphological deviation. Finally, by comparing the experiment results, we evaluate the CT image acquisition method for medical VR applications.

  11. Functional Mechanism of Lung Mosaic CT Attenuation: Assessment with Deep-Inspiration Breath-Hold Perfusion SPECT-CT Fusion Imaging and Non-Breath-Hold Technegas SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suga, K.; Yasuhiko, K. (Dept. of Radiology, St. Hill Hospital, Ube, Yamaguchi (Japan)); Iwanaga, H.; Tokuda, O.; Matsunaga, N. (Dept. of Radiology, Yamaguchi Univ. School of Medicine, Ube, Yamaguchi (Japan))

    2009-01-15

    Background: The functional mechanism of lung mosaic computed tomography attenuation (MCA) in pulmonary vascular disease (PVD) and obstructive airway disease (OAD) has not yet been fully clarified. Purpose: To clarify the mechanism of MCA in these diseases by assessing the relationship between regional lung function and CT attenuation change at MCA sites with the use of automated deep-inspiratory breath-hold (DIBrH) perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)-CT fusion images and non-breath-hold Technegas SPECT. Material and Methods: Subjects were 42 PVD patients (31 pulmonary thromboembolism, four primary/two secondary pulmonary hypertension, and five Takayasu arteritis), 12 OAD patients (five acute asthma, four obliterative bronchiolitis, and three bronchiectasis), and 12 normal controls, all of whom had MCA on DIBrH CT. The relationship between regional lung function and CT attenuation change at the lung slices with MCA was assessed using DIBrH perfusion SPECT-CT fusion images and non-breath-hold Technegas SPECT. The severity of perfusion defects with or without MCA was quantified by regions-of-interest analysis. Results: On DIBrH CT and perfusion SPECT, in contrast to no noticeable CT attenuation abnormality and fairly uniform perfusion in controls, 60 MCA and 274 perfusion defects in PVD patients, and 18 MCA and 61 defects in OAD patients were identified, with a total of 77 ventilation defects on Technegas SPECT in all patients. SPECT-CT correlation showed that, throughout the 78 MCA sites of all patients, lung perfusion was persistently decreased at low CT attenuation and preserved at intervening high CT attenuation, while lung ventilation was poorly correlated with CT attenuation change. The radioactivity ratios of reduced perfusion and the intervening preserved perfusion at the 78 perfusion defects with MCA were significantly lower than those at the remaining 257 defects without MCA (P<0.0001). Conclusion: Although further validation is

  12. Correction of oral contrast artifacts in CT-based attenuation correction of PET images using an automated segmentation algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmadian, Alireza; Ay, Mohammad R.; Sarkar, Saeed [Medical Sciences/University of Tehran, Research Center for Science and Technology in Medicine, Tehran (Iran); Medical Sciences/University of Tehran, Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, School of Medicine, Tehran (Iran); Bidgoli, Javad H. [Medical Sciences/University of Tehran, Research Center for Science and Technology in Medicine, Tehran (Iran); East Tehran Azad University, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Tehran (Iran); Zaidi, Habib [Geneva University Hospital, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2008-10-15

    Oral contrast is usually administered in most X-ray computed tomography (CT) examinations of the abdomen and the pelvis as it allows more accurate identification of the bowel and facilitates the interpretation of abdominal and pelvic CT studies. However, the misclassification of contrast medium with high-density bone in CT-based attenuation correction (CTAC) is known to generate artifacts in the attenuation map ({mu}map), thus resulting in overcorrection for attenuation of positron emission tomography (PET) images. In this study, we developed an automated algorithm for segmentation and classification of regions containing oral contrast medium to correct for artifacts in CT-attenuation-corrected PET images using the segmented contrast correction (SCC) algorithm. The proposed algorithm consists of two steps: first, high CT number object segmentation using combined region- and boundary-based segmentation and second, object classification to bone and contrast agent using a knowledge-based nonlinear fuzzy classifier. Thereafter, the CT numbers of pixels belonging to the region classified as contrast medium are substituted with their equivalent effective bone CT numbers using the SCC algorithm. The generated CT images are then down-sampled followed by Gaussian smoothing to match the resolution of PET images. A piecewise calibration curve was then used to convert CT pixel values to linear attenuation coefficients at 511 keV. The visual assessment of segmented regions performed by an experienced radiologist confirmed the accuracy of the segmentation and classification algorithms for delineation of contrast-enhanced regions in clinical CT images. The quantitative analysis of generated {mu}maps of 21 clinical CT colonoscopy datasets showed an overestimation ranging between 24.4% and 37.3% in the 3D-classified regions depending on their volume and the concentration of contrast medium. Two PET/CT studies known to be problematic demonstrated the applicability of the technique

  13. Iterative image reconstruction for sparse-view CT using normal-dose image induced total variation prior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Huang

    Full Text Available X-ray computed tomography (CT iterative image reconstruction from sparse-view projection data has been an important research topic for radiation reduction in clinic. In this paper, to relieve the requirement of misalignment reduction operation of the prior image constrained compressed sensing (PICCS approach introduced by Chen et al, we present an iterative image reconstruction approach for sparse-view CT using a normal-dose image induced total variation (ndiTV prior. The associative objective function of the present approach is constructed under the penalized weighed least-square (PWLS criteria, which contains two terms, i.e., the weighted least-square (WLS fidelity and the ndiTV prior, and is referred to as "PWLS-ndiTV". Specifically, the WLS fidelity term is built based on an accurate relationship between the variance and mean of projection data in the presence of electronic background noise. The ndiTV prior term is designed to reduce the influence of the misalignment between the desired- and prior- image by using a normal-dose image induced non-local means (ndiNLM filter. Subsequently, a modified steepest descent algorithm is adopted to minimize the associative objective function. Experimental results on two different digital phantoms and an anthropomorphic torso phantom show that the present PWLS-ndiTV approach for sparse-view CT image reconstruction can achieve noticeable gains over the existing similar approaches in terms of noise reduction, resolution-noise tradeoff, and low-contrast object detection.

  14. Automatic lobar segmentation for diseased lungs using an anatomy-based priority knowledge in low-dose CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang Joon; Kim, Jung Im; Goo, Jin Mo; Lee, Doohee

    2014-03-01

    Lung lobar segmentation in CT images is a challenging tasks because of the limitations in image quality inherent to CT image acquisition, especially low-dose CT for clinical routine environment. Besides, complex anatomy and abnormal lesions in the lung parenchyma makes segmentation difficult because contrast in CT images are determined by the differential absorption of X-rays by neighboring structures, such as tissue, vessel or several pathological conditions. Thus, we attempted to develop a robust segmentation technique for normal and diseased lung parenchyma. The images were obtained with low-dose chest CT using soft reconstruction kernel (Sensation 16, Siemens, Germany). Our PC-based in-house software segmented bronchial trees and lungs with intensity adaptive region-growing technique. Then the horizontal and oblique fissures were detected by using eigenvalues-ratio of the Hessian matrix in the lung regions which were excluded from airways and vessels. To enhance and recover the faithful 3-D fissure plane, our proposed fissure enhancing scheme were applied to the images. After finishing above steps, for careful smoothening of fissure planes, 3-D rolling-ball algorithm in xyz planes were performed. Results show that success rate of our proposed scheme was achieved up to 89.5% in the diseased lung parenchyma.

  15. Ensuring convergence in total-variation-based reconstruction for accurate microcalcification imaging in breast X-ray CT

    CERN Document Server

    Jørgensen, Jakob H; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2011-01-01

    Breast X-ray CT imaging is being considered in screening as an extension to mammography. As a large fraction of the population will be exposed to radiation, low-dose imaging is essential. Iterative image reconstruction based on solving an optimization problem, such as Total-Variation minimization, shows potential for reconstruction from sparse-view data. For iterative methods it is important to ensure convergence to an accurate solution, since important image features, such as presence of microcalcifications indicating breast cancer, may not be visible in a non-converged reconstruction, and this can have clinical significance. To prevent excessively long computational times, which is a practical concern for the large image arrays in CT, it is desirable to keep the number of iterations low, while still ensuring a sufficiently accurate reconstruction for the specific imaging task. This motivates the study of accurate convergence criteria for iterative image reconstruction. In simulation studies with a realistic...

  16. Ventilation imaging of the paranasal sinuses using xenon-enhanced dynamic single-energy CT and dual-energy CT: a feasibility study in a nasal cast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thieme, Sven F.; Helck, Andreas D.; Reiser, Maximilian F.; Johnson, Thorsten R.C. [Ludwig Maximilians University Hospital Munich, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Moeller, Winfried; Eickelberg, Oliver [Institute for Lung Biology and Disease (iLBD) and Comprehensive Pneumology Center (CPC), Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, Neuherberg, Munich (Germany); Becker, Sven [Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, Department of Otorhinolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Munich (Germany); Schuschnig, Uwe [Pari Pharma GmbH, Graefelfing (Germany)

    2012-10-15

    To show the feasibility of dual-energy CT (DECT) and dynamic CT for ventilation imaging of the paranasal sinuses in a nasal cast. In a first trial, xenon gas was administered to a nasal cast with a laminar flow of 7 L/min. Dynamic CT acquisitions of the nasal cavity and the sinuses were performed. This procedure was repeated with pulsating xenon flow. Local xenon concentrations in the different compartments of the model were determined on the basis of the enhancement levels. In a second trial, DECT measurements were performed both during laminar and pulsating xenon administration and the xenon concentrations were quantified directly. Neither with dynamic CT nor DECT could xenon-related enhancement be detected in the sinuses during laminar airflow. Using pulsating flow, dynamic imaging showed a xenon wash-in and wash-out in the sinuses that followed a mono-exponential function with time constants of a few seconds. Accordingly, DECT revealed xenon enhancement in the sinuses only after pulsating xenon administration. The feasibility of xenon-enhanced DECT for ventilation imaging was proven in a nasal cast. The superiority of pulsating gas flow for the administration of gas or aerosolised drugs to the paranasal sinuses was demonstrated. (orig.)

  17. Dynamic CT perfusion imaging of the myocardium: a technical note on improvement of image quality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Muenzel

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To improve image and diagnostic quality in dynamic CT myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI by using motion compensation and a spatio-temporal filter. METHODS: Dynamic CT MPI was performed using a 256-slice multidetector computed tomography scanner (MDCT. Data from two different patients-with and without myocardial perfusion defects-were evaluated to illustrate potential improvements for MPI (institutional review board approved. Three datasets for each patient were generated: (i original data (ii motion compensated data and (iii motion compensated data with spatio-temporal filtering performed. In addition to the visual assessment of the tomographic slices, noise and contrast-to-noise-ratio (CNR were measured for all data. Perfusion analysis was performed using time-density curves with regions-of-interest (ROI placed in normal and hypoperfused myocardium. Precision in definition of normal and hypoperfused areas was determined in corresponding coloured perfusion maps. RESULTS: The use of motion compensation followed by spatio-temporal filtering resulted in better alignment of the cardiac volumes over time leading to a more consistent perfusion quantification and improved detection of the extend of perfusion defects. Additionally image noise was reduced by 78.5%, with CNR improvements by a factor of 4.7. The average effective radiation dose estimate was 7.1±1.1 mSv. CONCLUSION: The use of motion compensation and spatio-temporal smoothing will result in improved quantification of dynamic CT MPI using a latest generation CT scanner.

  18. Accessory cardiac bronchus: Proposed imaging classification on multidetector CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kang Min; Kim, Young Tong; Han, Jong Kyu; Jou, Sung Shick [Dept. of Radiology, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Cheonan Hospital, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    To propose the classification of accessory cardiac bronchus (ACB) based on imaging using multidetector computed tomography (MDCT), and evaluate follow-up changes of ACB. This study included 58 patients diagnosed as ACB since 9 years, using MDCT. We analyzed the types, division locations and division directions of ACB, and also evaluated changes on follow-up. We identified two main types of ACB: blind-end (51.7%) and lobule (48.3%). The blind-end ACB was further classified into three subtypes: blunt (70%), pointy (23.3%) and saccular (6.7%). The lobule ACB was also further classified into three subtypes: complete (46.4%), incomplete (28.6%) and rudimentary (25%). Division location to the upper half bronchus intermedius (79.3%) and medial direction (60.3%) were the most common in all patients. The difference in division direction was statistically significant between the blind-end and lobule types (p = 0.019). Peribronchial soft tissue was found in five cases. One calcification case was identified in the lobule type. During follow-up, ACB had disappeared in two cases of the blind-end type and in one case of the rudimentary subtype. The proposed classification of ACB based on imaging, and the follow-up CT, helped us to understand the various imaging features of ACB.

  19. Automated Segmentation and Retrieval System for CT Head Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Hau-Lee; Ahmad Fauzi, Mohammad Faizal; Komiya, Ryoichi

    In this paper, automatic segmentation and retrieval of medical images are presented. For the segmentation, different unsupervised clustering techniques are employed to partition the Computed Tomography (CT) brain images into three regions, which are the abnormalities, cerebrospinal fluids (CSF) and brain matters. The novel segmentation method proposed is a dual level segmentation approach. The first level segmentation, which purpose is to acquire abnormal regions, uses the combination of fuzzy c-means (FCM) and k-means clustering. The second level segmentation performs either the expectation-maximization (EM) technique or the modified FCM with population-diameter independent (PDI) to segment the remaining intracranial area into CSF and brain matters. The system automatically determines which algorithm to be utilized in order to produce optimum results. The retrieval of the medical images is based on keywords such as "no abnormal region", "abnormal region(s) adjacent to the skull" and "abnormal region(s) not adjacent to the skull". Medical data from collaborating hospital are experimented and promising results are observed.

  20. CT imaging of splenic sequestration in sickle cell disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheth, S.; Piomelli, S. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Pediatrics; Ruzal-Shapiro, C.; Berdon, W.E. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States). Div. of Pediatric Radiology

    2000-12-01

    Pooling of blood in the spleen is a frequent occurrence in children with sickle cell diseases, particularly in the first few years of life, resulting in what is termed ''splenic sequestration crisis.'' The spectrum of severity in this syndrome is wide, ranging from mild splenomegaly to massive enlargement, circulatory collapse, and even death. The diagnosis is usually clinical, based on the enlargement of the spleen with a drop in hemoglobin level by >2 g/dl, and it is rare that imaging studies are ordered. However, in the patient who presents to the emergency department with non-specific findings of an acute abdomen, it is important to recognize the appearance of sequestration on imaging studies. We studied seven patients utilizing contrast-enhanced CT scans and found two distinct patterns - multiple, peripheral, non-enhancing low-density areas or large, diffuse areas of low density in the majority of the splenic tissue. Although radiological imaging is not always necessary to diagnose splenic sequestration, in those situations where this diagnosis is not immediately obvious, it makes an important clarifying contribution. (orig.)

  1. Metal artefact reduction in gemstone spectral imaging dual-energy CT with and without metal artefact reduction software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young Han; Song, Ho-Taek; Kim, Sungjun; Suh, Jin-Suck [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Research Institute of Radiological Science, Medical Convergence Research Institute, and Severance Biomedical Science Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Kwan Kyu [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    To assess the usefulness of gemstone spectral imaging (GSI) dual-energy CT (DECT) with/without metal artefact reduction software (MARs). The DECTs were performed using fast kV-switching GSI between 80 and 140 kV. The CT data were retro-reconstructed with/without MARs, by different displayed fields-of-view (DFOV), and with synthesised monochromatic energy in the range 40-140 keV. A phantom study of size and CT numbers was performed in a titanium plate and a stainless steel plate. A clinical study was performed in 26 patients with metallic hardware. All images were retrospectively reviewed in terms of the visualisation of periprosthetic regions and the severity of beam-hardening artefacts by using a five-point scale. The GSI-MARs reconstruction can markedly reduce the metal-related artefacts, and the image quality was affected by the prosthesis composition and DFOV. The spectral CT numbers of the prosthesis and periprosthetic regions showed different patterns on stainless steel and titanium plates. Dual-energy CT with GSI-MARs can reduce metal-related artefacts and improve the delineation of the prosthesis and periprosthetic region. We should be cautious when using GSI-MARs because the image quality was affected by the prosthesis composition, energy (in keV) and DFOV. The metallic composition and size should be considered in metallic imaging with GSI-MARs reconstruction. circle Metal-related artefacts can be troublesome on musculoskeletal computed tomography (CT). circle Gemstone spectral imaging (GSI) with dual-energy CT (DECT) offers a novel solution circle GSI and metallic artefact reduction software (GSI-MAR) can markedly reduce these artefacts. circle However image quality is influenced by the prosthesis composition and other parameters. circle We should be aware about potential overcorrection when using GSI-MARs. (orig.)

  2. CT imaging, then and now: a 30-year review of the economics of computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockburger, Wayne T

    2004-01-01

    The first computed tomography (CT) scanner in the US was installed in June 1973 at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN. By the end of 1974, 44 similar systems had been installed at medical facilities around the country. Less than 4 years after the introduction of CT imaging in the US, at least 400 CT systems had been installed. The practice of pneumoencephalography was eliminated. The use of nuclear medicine brain scans significantly diminished. At the time, CT imaging was limited to head studies, but with the introduction of contrast agents and full body CT systems the changes in the practice of medicine became even more significant. CT imaging was hailed by the US medical community as the greatest advance in radiology since the discovery of x-rays. But the rapid spread of CT systems, their frequency of use, and the associated increase in healthcare costs combined to draw the attention of decision-makers within the federal and state governments, specifically to establish policies regarding the acquisition and use of diagnostic technologies. Initially, CT imaging was limited to neurological applications, but in the 30 years since its inception, capabilities and applications have been expanded as a result of the advancements in technology and software development. While neurological disorders are still a common reason for CT imaging, many other medical disciplines (oncology, emergency medicine, orthopedics, etc.) have found CT imaging to be the definitive tool for diagnostic information. As such, the clinical demand for CT imaging has steadily increased. Economically, the development of CT imaging has been one of success, even in the face of governmental action to restrict its acquisition and utilization by healthcare facilities. CTimaging has increased the cost of healthcare, but in turn has added unquantifiable value to the practice of medicine in the US.

  3. Application of Simulated Three Dimensional CT Image in Orthognathic Surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun Don; Park, Chang Seo [Dept. of Dental Radiology, College of Dentistry, Yensei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Sun Kook; Lee, Kyoung Sang [Dept. of Medical Engineering, College of Medicine, Yensei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-08-15

    In orthodontics and orthognathic surgery, cephalogram has been routine practice in diagnosis and treatment evaluation of craniofacial deformity. But its inherent distortion of actual length and angles during projecting three dimensional object to two dimensional plane might cause errors in quantitative analysis of shape and size. Therefore, it is desirable that three dimensional object is diagnosed and evaluated three dimensionally and three dimensional CT image is best for three dimensional analysis. Development of clinic necessitates evaluation of result of treatment and comparison before and after surgery. It is desirable that patient that was diagnosed and planned by three dimensional computed tomography before surgery is evaluated by three dimensional computed tomography after surgery, too. But Because there is no standardized normal values in three dimension now and three dimensional Computed Tomography needs expensive equipment and because of its expenses and amount of exposure to radiation, limitations still remain to be solved in its application to routine practice. If postoperative three dimensional image is constructed by pre and postoperative lateral and postero-anterior cephalograms and preoperative three dimensional computed tomogram, pre and postoperative image will be compared and evaluated three dimensionally without three dimensional computed tomography after surgery and that will contribute to standardize normal values in three dimension. This study introduced new method that computer-simulated three dimensional image was constructed by preoperative three dimensional computed tomogram and pre and postoperative lateral and postero-anterior cephalograms, and for validation of new method, in four cases of dry skull that position of mandible was displaced and four patients of orthognathic surgery, computer-simulated three dimensional image and actual postoperative three dimensional image were compared. The results were as follows. 1. In four cases of

  4. Paired inspiratory/expiratory volumetric CT and deformable image registration for quantitative and qualitative evaluation of airflow limitation in smokers with or without copd.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishio, Mizuho; Matsumoto, Sumiaki; Tsubakimoto, Maho; Nishii, Tatsuya; Koyama, Hisanobu; Ohno, Yoshiharu; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2015-03-01

    To evaluate paired inspiratory/expiratory computed tomography (CT; iCT/eCT) and deformable image registration for quantitative and qualitative assessment of airflow limitation in smokers. Paired iCT/eCT images acquired from 35 smokers (30 men and 5 women) were coregistered and subtraction images (air trapping CT images [aCT]) generated. To evaluate emphysema quantitatively, the percentage of low-attenuation volume (LAV%) on iCT was calculated at -950 HU, as were mean and kurtosis on aCT for quantitative assessment of air trapping. Parametric response maps of emphysema (PRMe) and of functional small airways disease (PRMs) were also obtained. For qualitative evaluation of emphysema, low-attenuation areas on iCT were scored by consensus of two radiologists using Goddard classification. To assess air trapping qualitatively, the degree of air trapping on aCT was scored. For each quantitative and qualitative index, the Spearman rank correlation coefficient for forced expiratory flow in 1 second was calculated, and differences in correlation coefficients were statistically tested. The correlation coefficients for the indices were as follows: mean on aCT, 0.800; kurtosis on aCT, -0.726; LAV%, -0.472; PRMe, -0.570; PRMs, -0.565; addition of PRMe and PRMs, -0.653; emphysema score, -0.502; air trapping score, -0.793. The indices showing significant differences were as follows: mean on aCT and addition of PRMe and PRMs (P = 1.43 × 10(-8)); air trapping score and emphysema score (P = .0169). Air trapping images yielded more accurate quantitative and qualitative evaluation of airflow limitation than did LAV%, PRMe, PRMs, and Goddard classification. Copyright © 2015 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Impact of metal artefacts due to EEG electrodes in brain PET/CT imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemmens, Catherine; Montandon, Marie-Louise; Nuyts, Johan; Ratib, Osman; Dupont, Patrick; Zaidi, Habib

    2008-08-01

    The goal of this study is to investigate the impact of electroencephalogram (EEG) electrodes on the visual quality and quantification of 18F-FDG PET images in neurological PET/CT examinations. For this purpose, the scans of 20 epilepsy patients with EEG monitoring were used. The CT data were reconstructed with filtered backprojection (FBP) and with a metal artefact reduction (MAR) algorithm. Both data sets were used for CT-based attenuation correction (AC) of the PET data. Also, a calculated AC (CALC) technique was considered. A volume of interest (VOI)-based analysis and a voxel-based quantitative analysis were performed to compare the different AC methods. Images were also evaluated visually by two observers. It was shown with simulations and phantom measurements that from the considered AC methods, the MAR-AC can be used as the reference in this setting. The visual assessment of PET images showed local hot spots outside the brain corresponding to the locations of the electrodes when using FBP-AC. In the brain, no abnormalities were observed. The quantitative analysis showed a very good correlation between PET-FBP-AC and PET-MAR-AC, with a statistically significant positive bias in the PET-FBP-AC images of about 5-7% in most brain voxels. There was also good correlation between PET-CALC-AC and PET-MAR-AC, but in the PET-CALC-AC images, regions with both a significant positive and negative bias were observed. EEG electrodes give rise to local hot spots outside the brain and a positive quantification bias in the brain. However, when diagnosis is made by mere visual assessment, the presence of EEG electrodes does not seem to alter the diagnosis. When quantification is performed, the bias becomes an issue especially when comparing brain images with and without EEG monitoring.

  6. Automatic spectral imaging protocol selection and iterative reconstruction in abdominal CT with reduced contrast agent dose: initial experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lv, Peijie; Liu, Jie; Chai, Yaru; Yan, Xiaopeng; Gao, Jianbo; Dong, Junqiang [The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Department of Radiology, Zhengzhou, Henan Province (China)

    2017-01-15

    To evaluate the feasibility, image quality, and radiation dose of automatic spectral imaging protocol selection (ASIS) and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) with reduced contrast agent dose in abdominal multiphase CT. One hundred and sixty patients were randomly divided into two scan protocols (n = 80) each; protocol A, 120 kVp/450 mgI/kg, filtered back projection algorithm (FBP); protocol B, spectral CT imaging with ASIS and 40 to 70 keV monochromatic images generated per 300 mgI/kg, ASIR algorithm. Quantitative parameters (image noise and contrast-to-noise ratios [CNRs]) and qualitative visual parameters (image noise, small structures, organ enhancement, and overall image quality) were compared. Monochromatic images at 50 keV and 60 keV provided similar or lower image noise, but higher contrast and overall image quality as compared with 120-kVp images. Despite the higher image noise, 40-keV images showed similar overall image quality compared to 120-kVp images. Radiation dose did not differ between the two protocols, while contrast agent dose in protocol B was reduced by 33 %. Application of ASIR and ASIS to monochromatic imaging from 40 to 60 keV allowed contrast agent dose reduction with adequate image quality and without increasing radiation dose compared to 120 kVp with FBP. (orig.)

  7. [Characteristic of evaluation of new image filter devised for improvement of workflow in CT examination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Takanori; Ichikawa, Katsuhiro; Tsuzaka, Masatoshi

    2005-07-20

    In this study, we processed reconstructed images with a new image filter (Siemens Medical Systems, Adaptive Image Filter: AIF). As one of its characteristics, the filter uses low-pass filtering. When an image that emphasizes a high-frequency element is changed to one with a reduced high-frequency element, an image suitable for clinical use can be obtained. For the resolving characteristic and the noise characteristic, we evaluated the degree of transition, using the modulation transfer factor (MTF) and Wiener spectrum (WS). Moreover, we used the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) to examine the total loss of signal detection capability after use of the AIF. The results showed that, when we changed to images using the AIF and made it the same level as B30 and U40, we had to hold down the kernel level to at least B60 and U80. The use of an image filter did not recognize less of an SNR in comparison with the reconstruction image. In this study, changes in detailed characteristics of the image and SNR could be evaluated objectively using the AIF. As for the effective method by AIF that raw data isn't used for is available for the control of an image (times) using reconstruction and the change of an image on database. Therefore, we consider the AIF useful to improve workflow in CT examinations.

  8. Algorithms for density and composition-discrimination imaging for fourth-generation CT systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busono, P; Hussein, E M

    1999-06-01

    This paper shows that if the off-beam idle detectors in the detection ring of a fourth-generation x-ray computed tomography (CT) system are used to measure the scattered radiation, it is numerically feasible to reconstruct electron-density images to supplement the conventional attenuation-coefficient images of transmitted radiation. It is also shown that by combining these two images, composition changes can be detected with the aid of an effective-atomic-number indicator. The required image-reconstruction algorithms are developed and tested against Monte Carlo simulated measurements, for a variety of phantom configurations. In spite of the relatively poor statistical quality of scattering measurements, it is demonstrated that electron-density images of reasonable quality can be obtained. In addition, it is shown that composition discrimination is possible for materials of effective atomic number greater than five, in the photon energy range of a typical medical x-ray CT system operating at 102 kVp. The obtained supplementary electron-density and composition images can be useful in radiotherapy planning and for studying tumour histology, as well as in industrial and security applications where identification of materials based on density and composition is important.

  9. Evaluating 3D registration of CT-scan images using crest lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayache, Nicholas; Gueziec, Andre P.; Thirion, Jean-Philippe; Gourdon, A.; Knoplioch, Jerome

    1993-06-01

    We consider the issue of matching 3D objects extracted from medical images. We show that crest lines computed on the object surfaces correspond to meaningful anatomical features, and that they are stable with respect to rigid transformations. We present the current chain of algorithmic modules which automatically extract the major crest lines in 3D CT-Scan images, and then use differential invariants on these lines to register together the 3D images with a high precision. The extraction of the crest lines is done by computing up to third order derivatives of the image intensity function with appropriate 3D filtering of the volumetric images, and by the 'marching lines' algorithm. The recovered lines are then approximated by splines curves, to compute at each point a number of differential invariants. Matching is finally performed by a new geometric hashing method. The whole chain is now completely automatic, and provides extremely robust and accurate results, even in the presence of severe occlusions. In this paper, we briefly describe the whole chain of processes, already presented to evaluate the accuracy of the approach on a couple of CT-scan images of a skull containing external markers.

  10. Image analysis of intracranial high perfusion lesion by whole brain one-stop imaging technique with 320 detector rows CT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei-zhou DU

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective  The perfusion and vascular architecture features were investigated and evaluated by use of one-stop imaging technique with 320 rows CT for exploring the clinical value of one-stop imaging technique in the diagnosis of intracranial lesions. Methods  The perfusion parameters and vascular architecture of intracranial high perfusion lesions of 52 patients were collected in General Hospital of Chengdu Command from Oct. 2010 to Apr. 2013, who were examined by one-stop imaging technique with 320 rows CT, were retrospectively analyzed. The perfusion values of normal contralateral cerebral tissue were used as control to analyze the perfusion and vascular architecture features of injured parts. Results  Of the 52 patients, there were 16 cases of subacute cerebral infarction, 9 cases of arteriovenous malformation, 7 cases of hemangioma, 12 cases of meningioma, and 8 cases of glioma. All the patients showed elevated CBV and/or CBF and different changes in mean transit time (MTT, time to peak (TTP and delay time (Delay. In the cases of subacute cerebral infarction, the parameters of MTT, TTP and Delay increased. In the cases of arteriovenous malformation, all the parameters decreased. In the cases of hemangioma, the MTT decreased, while TTP and Delay increased. In the cases of glioma, the TTP and Delay increased, while the change of MTT varied. Meanwhile, abnormality of vascular structures was found in all the cases by CT angiography. Conclusion  With whole brain perfusion and one-stop vascular imaging with 320 rows CT, the perfusion characteristics of intracranial lesions can be revealed completely, including blood supply and microcirculation changes in the lesions, and it may be of benefit in guiding the clinical diagnosis and treatment. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2014.03.10

  11. Ultra-low dose comprehensive cardiac CT imaging in a patient with acute myocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tröbs, Monique; Brand, Michael; Achenbach, Stephan; Marwan, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    The ability of contrast-enhanced CT to detect "late enhancement" in a fashion similar to magnetic resonance imaging has been previously reported. We report a case of acute myocarditis with coronary CT angiography as well as "late enhancement" imaging with ultra-low effective radiation dose.

  12. Development of a combined microSPECT/CT system for small animal imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mingshan

    axial resolution. System performance of both modalities is characterized with phantoms and animals. The microSPECT shows 0.6 mm resolution and 60 cps/MBq detection efficiency for imaging mice with 0.5 mm pinholes. The microCT achieves 120 mum spatial resolution on detector but with a relatively low detective quantum efficiency of 0.2 at the zero frequency. The combined system demonstrates a flexible platform for instrumentation development and a valuable tool for biomedical research. In summary, this dissertation describes the development of a combined SPECT/CT system for imaging the physiological function and anatomical structure in small animals.

  13. Hounsfield unit recovery in clinical cone beam CT images of the thorax acquired for image guided radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slot Thing, Rune; Bernchou, Uffe; Mainegra-Hing, Ernesto; Hansen, Olfred; Brink, Carsten

    2016-08-01

    A comprehensive artefact correction method for clinical cone beam CT (CBCT) images acquired for image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) on a commercial system is presented. The method is demonstrated to reduce artefacts and recover CT-like Hounsfield units (HU) in reconstructed CBCT images of five lung cancer patients. Projection image based artefact corrections of image lag, detector scatter, body scatter and beam hardening are described and applied to CBCT images of five lung cancer patients. Image quality is evaluated through visual appearance of the reconstructed images, HU-correspondence with the planning CT images, and total volume HU error. Artefacts are reduced and CT-like HUs are recovered in the artefact corrected CBCT images. Visual inspection confirms that artefacts are indeed suppressed by the proposed method, and the HU root mean square difference between reconstructed CBCTs and the reference CT images are reduced by 31% when using the artefact corrections compared to the standard clinical CBCT reconstruction. A versatile artefact correction method for clinical CBCT images acquired for IGRT has been developed. HU values are recovered in the corrected CBCT images. The proposed method relies on post processing of clinical projection images, and does not require patient specific optimisation. It is thus a powerful tool for image quality improvement of large numbers of CBCT images.

  14. Coronary artery wall imaging in mice using osmium tetroxide and micro-computed tomography (micro-CT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pai, Vinay M.; Kozlowski, Megan; Donahue, Danielle; Miller, Elishiah; Xiao, Xianghui; Chen, Marcus Y.; Yu, Zu-Xi; Connelly, Patricia; Jeffries, Kenneth; Wen, Han (NIH)

    2012-05-10

    The high spatial resolution of micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) is ideal for 3D imaging of coronary arteries in intact mouse heart specimens. Previously, micro-CT of mouse heart specimens utilized intravascular contrast agents that hardened within the vessel lumen and allowed a vascular cast to be made. However, for mouse coronary artery disease models, it is highly desirable to image coronary artery walls and highlight plaques. For this purpose, we describe an ex vivo contrast-enhanced micro-CT imaging technique based on tissue staining with osmium tetroxide (OsO{sub 4}) solution. As a tissue-staining contrast agent, OsO{sub 4} is retained in the vessel wall and surrounding tissue during the fixation process and cleared from the vessel lumens. Its high X-ray attenuation makes the artery wall visible in CT. Additionally, since OsO{sub 4} preferentially binds to lipids, it highlights lipid deposition in the artery wall. We performed micro-CT of heart specimens of 5- to 25-week-old C57BL/6 wild-type mice and 5- to 13-week-old apolipoprotein E knockout (apoE{sup -/-}) mice at 10 {mu}m resolution. The results show that walls of coronary arteries as small as 45 {mu}m in diameter are visible using a table-top micro-CT scanner. Similar image clarity was achieved with 1/2000th the scan time using a synchrotron CT scanner. In 13-week-old apoE mice, lipid-rich plaques are visible in the aorta. Our study shows that the combination of OsO{sub 4} and micro-CT permits the visualization of the coronary artery wall in intact mouse hearts.

  15. Technological value of SPECT/CT fusion imaging for the diagnosis of lower gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z G; Zhang, G X; Hao, S H; Zhang, W W; Zhang, T; Zhang, Z P; Wu, R X

    2015-11-24

    The aim of this study was to assess the clinical value of diagnosing and locating lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/computed tomography (CT) fusion imaging with 99mTc labeled red blood cells ((99m)Tc-RBC). Fifty-six patients with suspected lower GI bleeding received a preoperative intravenous injection of (99m)Tc-RBC and each underwent planar, SPECT/CT imaging of the lower abdominal region. The location and path of lower GI bleeding were diagnosed by contrastive analysis of planar and SPECT/CT fusion imaging. Among the 56 patients selected, there were abnormalities in concentrated radionuclide activity with planar imaging in 50 patients and in SPECT/CT fusion imaging in 52 patients. Moreover, bleeding points that were coincident with the surgical results were evident with planar imaging in 31 patients and with SPECT/CT fusion imaging in 48 patients. The diagnostic sensitivity of planar imaging and SPECT/CT fusion imaging were 89.3% (50/56) and 92.9% (52/56), respectively, and the difference was not statistically significant (χ(2) = 0.11, P > 0.05). The corresponding positional accuracy values were 73.8% (31/42) and 92.3% (48/52), and the difference was statistically significant (χ(2) = 4.63, P CT fusion imaging is an effective, simple, and accurate method that can be used for diagnosing and locating lower GI bleeding.

  16. Characterization of imaging performance in differential phase contrast CT compared with the conventional CT: Spectrum of noise equivalent quanta NEQ(k)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang Xiangyang; Yang Yi; Tang Shaojie [Imaging and Medical Physics, Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Emory University School of Medicine, 1701 Uppergate Drive, C-5018, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: Differential phase contrast CT (DPC-CT) is emerging as a new technology to improve the contrast sensitivity of conventional attenuation-based CT. The noise equivalent quanta as a function over spatial frequency, i.e., the spectrum of noise equivalent quanta NEQ(k), is a decisive indicator of the signal and noise transfer properties of an imaging system. In this work, we derive the functional form of NEQ(k) in DPC-CT. Via system modeling, analysis, and computer simulation, we evaluate and verify the derived NEQ(k) and compare it with that of the conventional attenuation-based CT. Methods: The DPC-CT is implemented with x-ray tube and gratings. The x-ray propagation and data acquisition are modeled and simulated through Fresnel and Fourier analysis. A monochromatic x-ray source (30 keV) is assumed to exclude any system imperfection and interference caused by scatter and beam hardening, while a 360 Degree-Sign full scan is carried out in data acquisition to avoid any weighting scheme that may disrupt noise randomness. Adequate upsampling is implemented to simulate the x-ray beam's propagation through the gratings G{sub 1} and G{sub 2} with periods 8 and 4 {mu}m, respectively, while the intergrating distance is 193.6 mm (1/16 of the Talbot distance). The dimensions of the detector cell for data acquisition are 32 Multiplication-Sign 32, 64 Multiplication-Sign 64, 96 Multiplication-Sign 96, and 128 Multiplication-Sign 128 {mu}m{sup 2}, respectively, corresponding to a 40.96 Multiplication-Sign 40.96 mm{sup 2} field of view in data acquisition. An air phantom is employed to obtain the noise power spectrum NPS(k), spectrum of noise equivalent quanta NEQ(k), and detective quantum efficiency DQE(k). A cylindrical water phantom at 5.1 mm diameter and complex refraction coefficient n= 1 -{delta}+i{beta}= 1 -2.5604 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7}+i1.2353 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -10} is placed in air to measure the edge transfer function, line spread function

  17. Characterization of imaging performance in differential phase contrast CT compared with the conventional CT: Spectrum of noise equivalent quanta NEQ(k)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiangyang; Yang, Yi; Tang, Shaojie

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Differential phase contrast CT (DPC-CT) is emerging as a new technology to improve the contrast sensitivity of conventional attenuation-based CT. The noise equivalent quanta as a function over spatial frequency, i.e., the spectrum of noise equivalent quanta NEQ(k), is a decisive indicator of the signal and noise transfer properties of an imaging system. In this work, we derive the functional form of NEQ(k) in DPC-CT. Via system modeling, analysis, and computer simulation, we evaluate and verify the derived NEQ(k) and compare it with that of the conventional attenuation-based CT. Methods: The DPC-CT is implemented with x-ray tube and gratings. The x-ray propagation and data acquisition are modeled and simulated through Fresnel and Fourier analysis. A monochromatic x-ray source (30 keV) is assumed to exclude any system imperfection and interference caused by scatter and beam hardening, while a 360° full scan is carried out in data acquisition to avoid any weighting scheme that may disrupt noise randomness. Adequate upsampling is implemented to simulate the x-ray beam's propagation through the gratings G1 and G2 with periods 8 and 4 μm, respectively, while the intergrating distance is 193.6 mm (1/16 of the Talbot distance). The dimensions of the detector cell for data acquisition are 32 × 32, 64 × 64, 96 × 96, and 128 × 128 μm2, respectively, corresponding to a 40.96 × 40.96 mm2 field of view in data acquisition. An air phantom is employed to obtain the noise power spectrum NPS(k), spectrum of noise equivalent quanta NEQ(k), and detective quantum efficiency DQE(k). A cylindrical water phantom at 5.1 mm diameter and complex refraction coefficient n = 1 − δ + iβ = 1 −2.5604 × 10−7 + i1.2353 × 10−10 is placed in air to measure the edge transfer function, line spread function and then modulation transfer function MTF(k), of both DPC-CT and the conventional attenuation-based CT. The x-ray flux is set at 5 × 106 photon/cm2 per projection and

  18. Cardiac CT Imaging of Plaque Vulnerability : Hype or Hope?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemink, Martin J.; Leiner, Tim; Maurovich-Horvat, Pál

    2016-01-01

    Advances in cardiovascular computed tomography (CT) have resulted in an excellent ability to exclude coronary heart disease (CHD). Anatomical information, functional information, and spectral information can already be obtained with current CT technologies. Moreover, novel developments such as targe

  19. Cardiac CT Imaging of Plaque Vulnerability : Hype or Hope?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemink, Martin J.; Leiner, Tim; Maurovich-Horvat, Pál

    2016-01-01

    Advances in cardiovascular computed tomography (CT) have resulted in an excellent ability to exclude coronary heart disease (CHD). Anatomical information, functional information, and spectral information can already be obtained with current CT technologies. Moreover, novel developments such as targe

  20. Evaluation of accelerated iterative x-ray CT image reconstruction using floating point graphics hardware

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kole, J. S.; Beekman, F. J.

    2006-02-01

    Statistical reconstruction methods offer possibilities to improve image quality as compared with analytical methods, but current reconstruction times prohibit routine application in clinical and micro-CT. In particular, for cone-beam x-ray CT, the use of graphics hardware has been proposed to accelerate the forward and back-projection operations, in order to reduce reconstruction times. In the past, wide application of this texture hardware mapping approach was hampered owing to limited intrinsic accuracy. Recently, however, floating point precision has become available in the latest generation commodity graphics cards. In this paper, we utilize this feature to construct a graphics hardware accelerated version of the ordered subset convex reconstruction algorithm. The aims of this paper are (i) to study the impact of using graphics hardware acceleration for statistical reconstruction on the reconstructed image accuracy and (ii) to measure the speed increase one can obtain by using graphics hardware acceleration. We compare the unaccelerated algorithm with the graphics hardware accelerated version, and for the latter we consider two different interpolation techniques. A simulation study of a micro-CT scanner with a mathematical phantom shows that at almost preserved reconstructed image accuracy, speed-ups of a factor 40 to 222 can be achieved, compared with the unaccelerated algorithm, and depending on the phantom and detector sizes. Reconstruction from physical phantom data reconfirms the usability of the accelerated algorithm for practical cases.

  1. Evaluation of accelerated iterative x-ray CT image reconstruction using floating point graphics hardware

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kole, J S; Beekman, F J [Image Sciences Institute, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Department of Pharmacology and Anatomy, Rudolf Magnus Institute of Neuroscience, UMC Utrecht, Universiteitsweg 100, STR5.203, 3584 CG Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2006-02-21

    Statistical reconstruction methods offer possibilities to improve image quality as compared with analytical methods, but current reconstruction times prohibit routine application in clinical and micro-CT. In particular, for cone-beam x-ray CT, the use of graphics hardware has been proposed to accelerate the forward and back-projection operations, in order to reduce reconstruction times. In the past, wide application of this texture hardware mapping approach was hampered owing to limited intrinsic accuracy. Recently, however, floating point precision has become available in the latest generation commodity graphics cards. In this paper, we utilize this feature to construct a graphics hardware accelerated version of the ordered subset convex reconstruction algorithm. The aims of this paper are (i) to study the impact of using graphics hardware acceleration for statistical reconstruction on the reconstructed image accuracy and (ii) to measure the speed increase one can obtain by using graphics hardware acceleration. We compare the unaccelerated algorithm with the graphics hardware accelerated version, and for the latter we consider two different interpolation techniques. A simulation study of a micro-CT scanner with a mathematical phantom shows that at almost preserved reconstructed image accuracy, speed-ups of a factor 40 to 222 can be achieved, compared with the unaccelerated algorithm, and depending on the phantom and detector sizes. Reconstruction from physical phantom data reconfirms the usability of the accelerated algorithm for practical cases.

  2. Polydopamine-coated gold nanostars for CT imaging and enhanced photothermal therapy of tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Du; Shi, Xiangyang; Jin, Dayong

    2016-12-01

    The advancement of biocompatible nanoplatforms with dual functionalities of diagnosis and therapeutics is strongly demanded in biomedicine in recent years. In this work, we report the synthesis and characterization of polydopamine (pD)-coated gold nanostars (Au NSs) for computed tomography (CT) imaging and enhanced photothermal therapy (PTT) of tumors. Au NSs were firstly formed via a seed-mediated growth method and then stabilized with thiolated polyethyleneimine (PEI-SH), followed by deposition of pD on their surface. The formed pD-coated Au NSs (Au-PEI@pD NSs) were well characterized. We show that the Au-PEI@pD NSs are able to convert the absorbed near-infrared laser light into heat, and have strong X-ray attenuation property. Due to the co-existence of Au NSs and the pD, the light to heat conversion efficiency of the NSs can be significantly enhanced. These very interesting properties allow their uses as a powerful theranostic nanoplatform for efficient CT imaging and enhanced phtotothermal therapy of cancer cells in vitro and the xenografted tumor model in vivo. With the easy functionalization nature enabled by the coated pD shell, the developed pD-coated Au NSs may be developed as a versatile nanoplatform for targeted CT imaging and PTT of different types of cancer.

  3. A comparative study for spatial resolution and subjective image characteristics of a multi-slice CT and a cone-beam CT for dental use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Hiroshi, E-mail: hiro.orad@tmd.ac.jp [Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Division of Oral Restitution, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 5-45 Yushima 1-chome, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 1138549 (Japan); Honda, Eiichi [Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Division of Oral Health Sciences, The University of Tokushima Graduate School (Japan); Tetsumura, Akemi; Kurabayashi, Tohru [Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Division of Oral Restitution, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 5-45 Yushima 1-chome, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 1138549 (Japan)

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: Multi-slice CT (MSCT) and cone-beam CT (CBCT) are widely used in dental practice. This study compared the spatial resolution of these CT systems to elucidate which CT modalities should be selected for various clinical cases. Materials and methods: As MSCT and CBCT apparatuses, Somatom Sensation 64 and 3D Accuitomo instruments, respectively, were used. As an objective evaluation of spatial resolution of these CT systems, modulation transfer function (MTF) analysis was performed employing an over-sampling method. The results of MTF analysis were confirmed with a line-pair test using CATPHAN. As a subjective evaluation, a microstructure visualization ability study was performed using a Jcl:SD rat and a head CT phantom. Results: MTF analysis showed that for the in-plane direction, the z-axis ultrahigh resolution mode (zUHR) of the Sensation 64 and 3D Accuitomo instruments had higher spatial resolutions than the conventional mode (64x) of the Sensation 64, but for the longitudinal direction, the 3D Accuitomo had clearly higher spatial resolution than either mode of the Sensation 64. A line-pair test study and microstructure visualization ability studies confirmed the results for MTF analysis. However, images of the rat and the CT phantom revealed that the 3D Accuitomo demonstrated the failure to visualize the soft tissues along with aliasing and beam-hardening artifacts, which were not observed in the Sensation 64. Conclusions: This study successfully applied spatial resolution analysis using MSCT and CBCT systems in a comparative manner. These findings could help in deciding which CT modality should be selected for various clinical cases.

  4. A preliminary study of CT imaging of water in a carnation flower

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakanishi, T.M. [Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 1-1-1, Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113 (Japan); Furukawa, J. [Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 1-1-1, Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113 (Japan); Matsubayashi, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki-ken 319-11 (Japan)

    1999-11-03

    We present the trial to determine the water deletion part in a carnation flower tissue while drying by neutron computer tomography (CT). The flower part was fixed on a rotating disk and thermal neutrons were irradiated for 4 s per projection. The total neutron dose was 6.0x10{sup 8} n/cm{sup 2} per projection. The neutrons penetrating the sample were converted to photons by a fluorescence converter. The photon image was guided to a cooled CCD camera using two mirrors. The sample was rotated, stepwise, every 1 deg. , up to 180 deg. , i.e. 180 images were obtained for the CT construction. Horizontal CT images of several slices of the flower were taken before and after the drying treatment. Vertical CT images of the flower were also constructed based on horizontal CT images. It was found that the water around the ovule was selectively removed by the drying treatment.

  5. A preliminary study of CT imaging of water in a carnation flower

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, T. M.; Furukawa, J.; Matsubayashi, M.

    1999-11-01

    We present the trial to determine the water deletion part in a carnation flower tissue while drying by neutron computer tomography (CT). The flower part was fixed on a rotating disk and thermal neutrons were irradiated for 4 s per projection. The total neutron dose was 6.0×10 8 n/cm 2 per projection. The neutrons penetrating the sample were converted to photons by a fluorescence converter. The photon image was guided to a cooled CCD camera using two mirrors. The sample was rotated, stepwise, every 1°, up to 180°, i.e. 180 images were obtained for the CT construction. Horizontal CT images of several slices of the flower were taken before and after the drying treatment. Vertical CT images of the flower were also constructed based on horizontal CT images. It was found that the water around the ovule was selectively removed by the drying treatment.

  6. Thin-section CT imaging that correlates with pulmonary function tests in obstructive airway disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arakawa, Hiroaki, E-mail: arakawa@dokkyomed.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Dokkyo Medical University, 880 Kita-Kobayashi, Mibu, Tochigi 321-0293 (Japan); Fujimoto, Kiminori [Department of Radiology, Kurume University School of Medicine (Japan); Fukushima, Yasutugu [Department of Pulmonary Medicine and Clinical Immunology, Dokkyo Medical University (Japan); Kaji, Yasushi [Department of Radiology, Dokkyo Medical University, 880 Kita-Kobayashi, Mibu, Tochigi 321-0293 (Japan)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify independent CT findings that correlated with pulmonary function tests (PFTs) in patients with obstructive airway diseases. Materials and methods: Sixty-eight patients with obstructive airway disease and 29 normal subjects (mean age, 52 years; 36 men and 61 women) underwent inspiratory and expiratory thin-section CT and PFTs. Patient with obvious emphysema was excluded. Two radiologists independently reviewed the images and semi-quantitatively evaluated lung attenuation (mosaic perfusion, air trapping) and airway abnormalities (extent and severity of bronchial wall thickening and bronchiectasis, bronchiolectasis or centrilobular nodules, mucous plugging). Univariate, multivariate and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analyses were performed with CT findings and PFTs. Results: Forty-two patients showed obstructive PFTs, 26 symptomatic patients showed near-normal PFTs. On univariate analysis, air trapping and bronchial wall thickening showed highest correlation with obstructive PFTs such as FEV1.0/FVC, MMEF and FEF75 (r ranged from -0.712 to -0.782; p < 0.001), while mosaic perfusion and mucous plugging showed moderate correlation, and bronchiectasis, bronchiolectasis and nodules showed the least, but significant, correlation. Multiple logistic analyses revealed air trapping and bronchial wall thickening as the only significant independent determinants of obstructive PFTs. ROC analysis revealed the cut-off value of air trapping for obstructive PFTs to be one-third of whole lung (area under curve, 0.847). Conclusions: Our study confirmed air trapping and bronchial wall thickening are the most important observations when imaging obstructive PFTs. The cut-off value of air trapping for identifying obstructive PFTs was one-third of lung irrespective of inspiratory CT findings.

  7. Blockwise conjugate gradient methods for image reconstruction in volumetric CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, W; Titley-Peloquin, D; Soleimani, M

    2012-11-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) enables volumetric image reconstruction from 2D projection data and plays an important role in image guided radiation therapy (IGRT). Filtered back projection is still the most frequently used algorithm in applications. The algorithm discretizes the scanning process (forward projection) into a system of linear equations, which must then be solved to recover images from measured projection data. The conjugate gradients (CG) algorithm and its variants can be used to solve (possibly regularized) linear systems of equations Ax=b and linear least squares problems minx∥b-Ax∥2, especially when the matrix A is very large and sparse. Their applications can be found in a general CT context, but in tomography problems (e.g. CBCT reconstruction) they have not widely been used. Hence, CBCT reconstruction using the CG-type algorithm LSQR was implemented and studied in this paper. In CBCT reconstruction, the main computational challenge is that the matrix A usually is very large, and storing it in full requires an amount of memory well beyond the reach of commodity computers. Because of these memory capacity constraints, only a small fraction of the weighting matrix A is typically used, leading to a poor reconstruction. In this paper, to overcome this difficulty, the matrix A is partitioned and stored blockwise, and blockwise matrix-vector multiplications are implemented within LSQR. This implementation allows us to use the full weighting matrix A for CBCT reconstruction without further enhancing computer standards. Tikhonov regularization can also be implemented in this fashion, and can produce significant improvement in the reconstructed images.

  8. A compressed sensing-based iterative algorithm for CT reconstruction and its possible application to phase contrast imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Xueli

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Computed Tomography (CT is a technology that obtains the tomogram of the observed objects. In real-world applications, especially the biomedical applications, lower radiation dose have been constantly pursued. To shorten scanning time and reduce radiation dose, one can decrease X-ray exposure time at each projection view or decrease the number of projections. Until quite recently, the traditional filtered back projection (FBP method has been commonly exploited in CT image reconstruction. Applying the FBP method requires using a large amount of projection data. Especially when the exposure speed is limited by the mechanical characteristic of the imaging facilities, using FBP method may prolong scanning time and cumulate with a high dose of radiation consequently damaging the biological specimens. Methods In this paper, we present a compressed sensing-based (CS-based iterative algorithm for CT reconstruction. The algorithm minimizes the l1-norm of the sparse image as the constraint factor for the iteration procedure. With this method, we can reconstruct images from substantially reduced projection data and reduce the impact of artifacts introduced into the CT reconstructed image by insufficient projection information. Results To validate and evaluate the performance of this CS-base iterative algorithm, we carried out quantitative evaluation studies in imaging of both software Shepp-Logan phantom and real polystyrene sample. The former is completely absorption based and the later is imaged in phase contrast. The results show that the CS-based iterative algorithm can yield images with quality comparable to that obtained with existing FBP and traditional algebraic reconstruction technique (ART algorithms. Discussion Compared with the common reconstruction from 180 projection images, this algorithm completes CT reconstruction from only 60 projection images, cuts the scan time, and maintains the acceptable quality of the

  9. Radiation dose reduction in CT of the brain: can advanced noise filtering compensate for loss of image quality?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siemund, Roger; Loeve, A.; Westen, D. van; Stenberg, L.; Petersen, C. (Dept. of Radiology, Lund Univ., Lund (Sweden); Center for Medical Imaging and Physiology, Skaane Univ. Hospital, Lund (Sweden)), email: roger.siemund@med.lu.se; Bjoerkman-Burtscher, I. M. (Dept. of Radiology, Lund Univ., Lund (Sweden); Center for Medical Imaging and Physiology, Skaane Univ. Hospital, Lund (Sweden); Lund Univ. Bioimaging Center, Lund (Sweden))

    2012-05-15

    Background: Computed tomography (CT) of the brain is performed with high local doses due to high demands on low contrast resolution. Advanced algorithms for noise reduction might be able to preserve critical image information when reducing radiation dose. Purpose: To evaluate the effect of advanced noise filtering on image quality in brain CT acquired with reduced radiation dose. Material and Methods: Thirty patients referred for non-enhanced CT of the brain were examined with two helical protocols: normal dose (ND, CTDIvol 57 mGy) and low dose (LD, CTDIvol 40 mGy) implying a 30% radiation dose reduction. Images from the LD examinations were also post processed with a noise reduction software with non-linear filters (SharpView CT), creating filtered low dose images (FLD) for each patient. The three image stacks for each patient were presented side by side in randomized order. Five radiologists, blinded for dose level and filtering, ranked these three axial image stacks (ND, LD, FLD) as best to poorest (1 to 3) regarding three image quality criteria. Measurements of mean Hounsfield units (HU) and standard deviation (SD) of the HU were calculated for large region of interest in the centrum semiovale as a measure for noise. Results: Ranking results in pooled data showed that the advanced noise filtering significantly improved the image quality in FLD as compared to LD images for all tested criteria. No significant differences in image quality were found between ND examinations and FLD. However, there was a notable inter-reader spread of the ranking. SD values were 15% higher for LD as compared to ND and FLD. Conclusion: The advanced noise filtering clearly improves image quality of CT examinations of the brain. This effect can be used to significantly lower radiation dose.

  10. Science means business: medical imaging shows colour of money

    CERN Multimedia

    Macfie, Rebecca

    2007-01-01

    Doctors have used x-ray machines for 100 years, but they remain an imprecise and limited diagnostic tool. But a team of Canterbury University researchers is aiming to revolutionise medical x-ray technology with high-precision colour imaging. (1,5 page)

  11. Evaluation of chemotherapy response in ovarian cancer treatment using quantitative CT image biomarkers: a preliminary study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Yuchen; Tan, Maxine; McMeekin, Scott; Thai, Theresa; Moore, Kathleen; Ding, Kai; Liu, Hong; Zheng, Bin

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify and apply quantitative image biomarkers for early prediction of the tumor response to the chemotherapy among the ovarian cancer patients participated in the clinical trials of testing new drugs. In the experiment, we retrospectively selected 30 cases from the patients who participated in Phase I clinical trials of new drug or drug agents for ovarian cancer treatment. Each case is composed of two sets of CT images acquired pre- and post-treatment (4-6 weeks after starting treatment). A computer-aided detection (CAD) scheme was developed to extract and analyze the quantitative image features of the metastatic tumors previously tracked by the radiologists using the standard Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) guideline. The CAD scheme first segmented 3-D tumor volumes from the background using a hybrid tumor segmentation scheme. Then, for each segmented tumor, CAD computed three quantitative image features including the change of tumor volume, tumor CT number (density) and density variance. The feature changes were calculated between the matched tumors tracked on the CT images acquired pre- and post-treatments. Finally, CAD predicted patient's 6-month progression-free survival (PFS) using a decision-tree based classifier. The performance of the CAD scheme was compared with the RECIST category. The result shows that the CAD scheme achieved a prediction accuracy of 76.7% (23/30 cases) with a Kappa coefficient of 0.493, which is significantly higher than the performance of RECIST prediction with a prediction accuracy and Kappa coefficient of 60% (17/30) and 0.062, respectively. This study demonstrated the feasibility of analyzing quantitative image features to improve the early predicting accuracy of the tumor response to the new testing drugs or therapeutic methods for the ovarian cancer patients.

  12. Injectable facial fillers: imaging features, complications, and diagnostic pitfalls at MRI and PET CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundada, Pravin; Kohler, Romain; Boudabbous, Sana; Toutous Trellu, Laurence; Platon, Alexandra; Becker, Minerva

    2017-10-04

    Injectable fillers are widely used for facial rejuvenation, correction of disabling volumetric fat loss in HIV-associated facial lipoatrophy, Romberg disease, and post-traumatic facial disfiguring. The purpose of this article is to acquaint the reader with the anatomy of facial fat compartments, as well as with the properties and key imaging features of commonly used facial fillers, filler-related complications, interpretation pitfalls, and dermatologic conditions mimicking filler-related complications. The distribution of facial fillers is characteristic and depends on the anatomy of the superficial fat compartments. Silicone has signature MRI features, calcium hydroxyapatite has characteristic calcifications, whereas other injectable fillers have overlapping imaging features. Most fillers (hyaluronic acid, collagen, and polyalkylimide-polyacrylamide hydrogels) have signal intensity patterns compatible with high water content. On PET-CT, most fillers show physiologic high FDG uptake, which should not be confounded with pathology. Abscess, cellulitis, non-inflammatory nodules, and foreign body granulomas are the most common filler-related complications, and imaging can help in the differential diagnosis. Diffusion weighted imaging helps in detecting a malignant lesion masked by injected facial fillers. Awareness of imaging features of facial fillers and their complications helps to avoid misinterpretation of MRI, and PET-CT scans and facilitates therapeutic decisions in unclear clinical cases. • Facial fillers are common incidental findings on MRI and PET-CT scans. • They have a characteristic appearance and typical anatomic distribution • Although considered as safe, facial filler injections are associated with several complications • As they may mask malignancy, knowledge of typical imaging features is mandatory. • MRI is a problem-solving tool for unclear cases.

  13. Effectiveness of Different Mechanical Methods on Dentin Caries Removal: Micro-CT and Digital Image Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraz, C; Freire, A R; Mendonça, J S; Fernandes, C A O; Cardona, J C; Yamauti, M

    2015-01-01

    To determine the caries removal effectiveness (CRE) and minimal invasive potential (MIP) of caries excavation methods using digital imaging and microtomography analyses. Twelve human molars with occlusal caries lesions in dentin were randomly divided into three groups (carbide bur, exacavator, and polymer bur). They were sectioned mesiodistally, and standardized digital and computed microtomography x-ray (micro-CT) images were taken from each section before and after caries excavation. On each image, initial carious dentin (IC), prepared cavity (PC), and residual caries (RC) were defined according to visual criteria using ImageJ software. CRE was determined based on the RC/IC ratio, whereas MIP was determined by the PC/IC ratio. Data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance and Student t-test or with Kruskal-Wallis and Student-Newman-Keuls test. The level of significance was set at 0.05. For both digital image and micro-CT analysis, the carbide bur showed higher CRE values than the excavator (p=0.0063 and p=0.0263, respectively) and the polymer bur (p=0.0028 and p=0.0005, respectively). The latter two presented similar results (p>0.05). Regarding MIP, for the digital image analysis, the polymer bur was different from the carbide bur (p=0.0030) but was not different from that of the excavator (p=0.1240). For micro-CT analysis, the MIP values of all the groups were significantly different, and the polymer bur was the most conservative method (premoval but was not completely conservative. The polymer bur and excavator presented low invasive potential but were not able to remove all of the carious dentin.

  14. Material Science Image Analysis using Quant-CT in ImageJ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ushizima, Daniela M.; Bianchi, Andrea G. C.; DeBianchi, Christina; Bethel, E. Wes

    2015-01-05

    We introduce a computational analysis workflow to access properties of solid objects using nondestructive imaging techniques that rely on X-ray imaging. The goal is to process and quantify structures from material science sample cross sections. The algorithms can differentiate the porous media (high density material) from the void (background, low density media) using a Boolean classifier, so that we can extract features, such as volume, surface area, granularity spectrum, porosity, among others. Our workflow, Quant-CT, leverages several algorithms from ImageJ, such as statistical region merging and 3D object counter. It also includes schemes for bilateral filtering that use a 3D kernel, for parallel processing of sub-stacks, and for handling over-segmentation using histogram similarities. The Quant-CT supports fast user interaction, providing the ability for the user to train the algorithm via subsamples to feed its core algorithms with automated parameterization. Quant-CT plugin is currently available for testing by personnel at the Advanced Light Source and Earth Sciences Divisions and Energy Frontier Research Center (EFRC), LBNL, as part of their research on porous materials. The goal is to understand the processes in fluid-rock systems for the geologic sequestration of CO2, and to develop technology for the safe storage of CO2 in deep subsurface rock formations. We describe our implementation, and demonstrate our plugin on porous material images. This paper targets end-users, with relevant information for developers to extend its current capabilities.

  15. Biomechanical deformable image registration of longitudinal lung CT images using vessel information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazoulat, Guillaume; Owen, Dawn; Matuszak, Martha M.; Balter, James M.; Brock, Kristy K.

    2016-07-01

    Spatial correlation of lung tissue across longitudinal images, as the patient responds to treatment, is a critical step in adaptive radiotherapy. The goal of this work is to expand a biomechanical model-based deformable registration algorithm (Morfeus) to achieve accurate registration in the presence of significant anatomical changes. Six lung cancer patients previously treated with conventionally fractionated radiotherapy were retrospectively evaluated. Exhale CT scans were obtained at treatment planning and following three weeks of treatment. For each patient, the planning CT was registered to the follow-up CT using Morfeus, a biomechanical model-based deformable registration algorithm. To model the complex response of the lung, an extension to Morfeus has been developed: an initial deformation was estimated with Morfeus consisting of boundary conditions on the chest wall and incorporating a sliding interface with the lungs. It was hypothesized that the addition of boundary conditions based on vessel tree matching would provide a robust reduction of the residual registration error. To achieve this, the vessel trees were segmented on the two images by thresholding a vesselness image based on the Hessian matrix’s eigenvalues. For each point on the reference vessel tree centerline, the displacement vector was estimated by applying a variant of the Demons registration algorithm between the planning CT and the deformed follow-up CT. An expert independently identified corresponding landmarks well distributed in the lung to compute target registration errors (TRE). The TRE was: 5.8+/- 2.9 , 3.4+/- 2.3 and 1.6+/- 1.3 mm after rigid registration, Morfeus and Morfeus with boundary conditions on the vessel tree, respectively. In conclusion, the addition of boundary conditions on the vessels significantly improved the accuracy in modeling the response of the lung and tumor over the course of radiotherapy. Minimizing and modeling these geometrical uncertainties will enable

  16. Adaptive geodesic transform for segmentation of vertebrae on CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaonkar, Bilwaj; Shu, Liao; Hermosillo, Gerardo; Zhan, Yiqiang

    2014-03-01

    Vertebral segmentation is a critical first step in any quantitative evaluation of vertebral pathology using CT images. This is especially challenging because bone marrow tissue has the same intensity profile as the muscle surrounding the bone. Thus simple methods such as thresholding or adaptive k-means fail to accurately segment vertebrae. While several other algorithms such as level sets may be used for segmentation any algorithm that is clinically deployable has to work in under a few seconds. To address these dual challenges we present here, a new algorithm based on the geodesic distance transform that is capable of segmenting the spinal vertebrae in under one second. To achieve this we extend the theory of the geodesic distance transforms proposed in1 to incorporate high level anatomical knowledge through adaptive weighting of image gradients. Such knowledge may be provided by the user directly or may be automatically generated by another algorithm. We incorporate information 'learnt' using a previously published machine learning algorithm2 to segment the L1 to L5 vertebrae. While we present a particular application here, the adaptive geodesic transform is a generic concept which can be applied to segmentation of other organs as well.

  17. Cerebral blood volume imaging by flat detector computed tomography in comparison to conventional multislice perfusion CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struffert, Tobias; Deuerling-Zheng, Yu; Kloska, Stephan; Engelhorn, Tobias; Boese, Jan; Zellerhoff, Michael; Schwab, Stefan; Doerfler, Arnd

    2011-04-01

    We tested the hypothesis that Flat Detector computed tomography (FD-CT) with intravenous contrast medium would allow the calculation of whole brain cerebral blood volume (CBV) mapping (FD-CBV) and would correlate with multislice Perfusion CT (PCT). Twenty five patients were investigated with FD-CBV and PCT. Correlation of the CBV maps of both techniques was carried out with measurements from six anatomical regions from both sides of the brain. Mean values of each region and the correlation coefficient were calculated. Bland-Altman analysis was performed to compare the two different imaging techniques. The image and data quality of both PCT and FD-CBV were suitable for evaluation in all patients. The mean CBV values of FD-CBV and PCT showed only minimal differences with overlapping standard deviation. The correlation coefficient was 0.79 (p < 0.01). Bland-Altman analysis showed a mean difference of -0.077 ± 0.48 ml/100 g between FD-CBV and PCT CBV measurements, indicating that FD-CBV values were only slightly lower than those of PCT. CBV mapping with intravenous contrast medium using Flat Detector CT compared favourably with multislice PCT. The ability to assess cerebral perfusion within the angiographic suite may improve the management of ischaemic stroke and evaluation of the efficacy of dedicated therapies.

  18. Comparison of ring artifact removal methods using flat panel detector based CT images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Soo Y

    2011-08-01

    vector using a homogeneity test and then corrects the CT images by subtracting the artifact template vector from the uncorrected images. The second post-processing based correction technique performs median and mean filtering on the reconstructed images to produce the corrected images. Results The performances of the comparing algorithms have been tested by using both quantitative and perceptual measures. For quantitative analysis, two different numerical performance indices are chosen. On the other hand, different types of artifact patterns, e.g., single/band ring, artifacts from defective and mis-calibrated detector elements, rings in highly structural object and also in hard object, rings from different flat-panel detectors are analyzed to perceptually investigate the strength and weakness of the five methods. An investigation has been also carried out to compare the efficacy of these algorithms in correcting the volume images from a cone beam CT with the parameters determined from one particular slice. Finally, the capability of each correction technique in retaining the image information (e.g., small object at the iso-center accurately in the corrected CT image has been also tested. Conclusions The results show that the performances of the algorithms are limited and none is fully suitable for correcting different types of ring artifacts without introducing processing distortion to the image structure. To achieve the diagnostic quality of the corrected slices a combination of the two approaches (sinogram- and post-processing can be used. Also the comparing methods are not suitable for correcting the volume images from a cone beam flat-panel detector based CT.

  19. Automated midline shift and intracranial pressure estimation based on brain CT images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wenan; Belle, Ashwin; Cockrell, Charles; Ward, Kevin R; Najarian, Kayvan

    2013-04-13

    In this paper we present an automated system based mainly on the computed tomography (CT) images consisting of two main components: the midline shift estimation and intracranial pressure (ICP) pre-screening system. To estimate the midline shift, first an estimation of the ideal midline is performed based on the symmetry of the skull and anatomical features in the brain CT scan. Then, segmentation of the ventricles from the CT scan is performed and used as a guide for the identification of the actual midline through shape matching. These processes mimic the measuring process by physicians and have shown promising results in the evaluation. In the second component, more features are extracted related to ICP, such as the texture information, blood amount from CT scans and other recorded features, such as age, injury severity score to estimate the ICP are also incorporated. Machine learning techniques including feature selection and classification, such as Support Vector Machines (SVMs), are employed to build the prediction model using RapidMiner. The evaluation of the prediction shows potential usefulness of the model. The estimated ideal midline shift and predicted ICP levels may be used as a fast pre-screening step for physicians to make decisions, so as to recommend for or against invasive ICP monitoring.

  20. Hepatic CT image retrieval based on the combination of Gabor filters and support vector machine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Content-based image retrieval has been an active area of research for more than ten years.Gabor schemes and support vector machine (SVM) method have been proven effective in image representation and classification. In this paper,we propose a retrieval scheme based on Gabor filters and SVMs for hepatic computed tomography (CT) images query.In our experiments,a batch of hepatic CT images containing several types of CT findings are used for the retrieval test.Precision comparison between our scheme and existing methods is presented.

  1. Dual-energy CT (DECT) imaging of tophi and monosodium urate deposits in a patient with longstanding anorexia nervosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weihe, Johan Petur; Birger Morillon, Melanie; Lambrechtsen, Jess

    Dual-energy CT (DECT) imaging of tophi and monosodium urate deposits in a patient with longstanding anorexia nervosa......Dual-energy CT (DECT) imaging of tophi and monosodium urate deposits in a patient with longstanding anorexia nervosa...

  2. Dual-energy CT (DECT) imaging of tophi and monosodium urate deposits in a patient with longstanding anorexia nervosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weihe, Johan Petur; Birger Morillon, Melanie; Lambrechtsen, Jess

    Dual-energy CT (DECT) imaging of tophi and monosodium urate deposits in a patient with longstanding anorexia nervosa......Dual-energy CT (DECT) imaging of tophi and monosodium urate deposits in a patient with longstanding anorexia nervosa...

  3. Dual-energy CT (DECT) imaging of tophi and monosodium urate deposits in a patient with longstanding anorexia nervosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weihe, Johan Petur; Birger Morillon, Melanie; Lambrechtsen, Jess;

    2014-01-01

    Dual-energy CT (DECT) imaging of tophi and monosodium urate deposits in a patient with longstanding anorexia nervosa......Dual-energy CT (DECT) imaging of tophi and monosodium urate deposits in a patient with longstanding anorexia nervosa...

  4. Three-dimensional texture analysis of contrast enhanced CT images for treatment response assessment in Hodgkin lymphoma: Comparison with F-18-FDG PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knogler, Thomas; El-Rabadi, Karem; Weber, Michael; Karanikas, Georgios; Mayerhoefer, Marius E., E-mail: marius.mayerhoefer@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, Vienna 1090 (Austria)

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: To determine the diagnostic performance of three-dimensional (3D) texture analysis (TA) of contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CE-CT) images for treatment response assessment in patients with Hodgkin lymphoma (HL), compared with F-18-fludeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/CT. Methods: 3D TA of 48 lymph nodes in 29 patients was performed on venous-phase CE-CT images before and after chemotherapy. All lymph nodes showed pathologically elevated FDG uptake at baseline. A stepwise logistic regression with forward selection was performed to identify classic CT parameters and texture features (TF) that enable the separation of complete response (CR) and persistent disease. Results: The TF fraction of image in runs, calculated for the 45° direction, was able to correctly identify CR with an accuracy of 75%, a sensitivity of 79.3%, and a specificity of 68.4%. Classical CT features achieved an accuracy of 75%, a sensitivity of 86.2%, and a specificity of 57.9%, whereas the combination of TF and CT imaging achieved an accuracy of 83.3%, a sensitivity of 86.2%, and a specificity of 78.9%. Conclusions: 3D TA of CE-CT images is potentially useful to identify nodal residual disease in HL, with a performance comparable to that of classical CT parameters. Best results are achieved when TA and classical CT features are combined.

  5. Is CT-based perfusion and collateral imaging sensitive to time since stroke onset?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smriti eAgarwal

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract PurposeCT-based perfusion and collateral imaging is increasingly used in the assessment of patients with acute stroke. Time of stroke onset is a critical factor in determining eligibility for and benefit from thrombolysis. Animal studies predict that the volume of ischemic penumbra decreases with time. Here we evaluate if CT is able to detect a relationship between perfusion or collateral status, as assessed by CT and time since stroke onset.Materials and MethodsWe studied fifty-three consecutive patients with proximal vessel occlusions, mean (SD age of 71.3 (14.9 years at a mean (SD of 125.2 (55.3 minutes from onset, using whole-brain CT perfusion (CTp imaging. Penumbra was defined using voxel-based thresholds for cerebral blood flow (CBF and mean transit time (MTT; core was defined by cerebral blood volume (CBV. Normalized penumbra fraction was calculated as Penumbra volume /(Penumbra volume +Core volume for both CBF and MTT (PenCBF and PenMTT, respectively. Collaterals were assessed on CT angiography (CTA. CTp ASPECTS score was applied visually, lower scores indicating larger lesions. ASPECTS ratios were calculated corresponding to penumbra fractions.ResultsBoth PenCBF and PenMTT showed decremental trends with increasing time since onset (Kendall’s tau-b=-0.196, p=0.055, and -0.187, p=0.068, respectively. The CBF/CBV ASPECTS ratio, which showed a relationship to PenCBF (Kendall’s tau-b=0.190, p=0.070, decreased with increasing time since onset (Kendall’s tau-b=-0.265, p=0.006. Collateral response did not relate to time (Kendall’s tau-b=-0.039, p=0.724.ConclusionEven within 4.5hrs since stroke onset, a decremental relationship between penumbra and time, but not between collateral status and time, may be detected using perfusion CT imaging. The trends that we demonstrate merit evaluation in larger datasets to confirm our results, which may have potential wider applications e.g. in the setting of strokes of unknown onset time.

  6. CT imaging spectrum of pancreatic serous tumors: Based on new pathologic classification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Hye Young [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, 101 Daehangno, Jongno-gu, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Se Hyung, E-mail: shkim@radcom.snu.ac.k [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, 101 Daehangno, Jongno-gu, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, 101 Daehangno, Jongno-gu, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Min A. [Department of Pathology, Seoul National University Hospital, 101 Daehangno, Jongno-gu, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae Young; Han, Joon Koo; Choi, Byung Ihn [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, 101 Daehangno, Jongno-gu, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, 101 Daehangno, Jongno-gu, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-08-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to retrospectively analyze the variety of CT findings based on new pathologic classification. Materials and methods: During a 10-year period, 59 histopathologically proven pancreatic SCTs and 13 SCTs confirmed with typical image findings and strict clinical criteria were enlisted. Two radiologists analyzed CT images for the following items in consensus: location, size, outer margin, tumor shape, the presence of mural nodule, communication with main pancreatic duct (MPD), the presence and extent of MPD dilatation, calcification, central scar, and attenuation on pre- and post-contrast CT images. In addition, typicality of CT findings was determined. A typical finding was defined as a honeycomb appearance without or with oligocystic portion. In the cases with atypical features, the type of atypical features and differential diagnosis were recorded. For the shape of the tumor, tumors were categorized into the following groups: honeycomb without or with oligocystic, pleomorphic, purely oligolocular, unilocular cystic, hypovascular solid, hypervascular solid without or with oligocystic portion, and fingerlike cystic patterns. Results: 28 SCTs (38.9%) presented a honeycomb appearance with (n = 14) or without oligocystic portion (n = 14) and were classified as typical cases. The remaining 44 atypical cases (61.1%) presented the following: purely oligolocular pattern in 18; hypervascular solid without (n = 7) or with oligocystic portion (n = 2) in 9; pleomorphic in 8; unilocular cystic in 7; and fingerlike cystic pattern in 2. Most of the lesions manifesting as hypervascular solid lesions were confused with true solid hypervascular tumors such as neuroendocrine tumors or solid pseudopapillary tumors. For most of the remaining atypical lesions, mucinous cystic neoplasm or branch duct type IPMN were included as a differential diagnosis. Conclusion: Serous cystic tumors of the pancreas can have variable CT appearances ranging from compactly

  7. Impact of CT perfusion imaging on the assessment of peripheral chronic pulmonary thromboembolism: clinical experience in 62 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Faivre, Julien; Khung, Suonita; Faivre, Jean-Baptiste; Remy, Jacques; Remy-Jardin, Martine [University of Lille, Department of Thoracic Imaging, Hospital Calmette, Lille (France); Duhamel, Alain [University of Lille, Department of Biostatistics, Lille (France); Lamblin, Nicolas [University of Lille, Department of Cardiology, Cardiology Hospital, Lille (France)

    2016-11-15

    To evaluate the impact of CT perfusion imaging on the detection of peripheral chronic pulmonary embolisms (CPE). 62 patients underwent a dual-energy chest CT angiographic examination with (a) reconstruction of diagnostic and perfusion images; (b) enabling depiction of vascular features of peripheral CPE on diagnostic images and perfusion defects (20 segments/patient; total: 1240 segments examined). The interpretation of diagnostic images was of two types: (a) standard (i.e., based on cross-sectional images alone) or (b) detailed (i.e., based on cross-sectional images and MIPs). The segment-based analysis showed (a) 1179 segments analyzable on both imaging modalities and 61 segments rated as nonanalyzable on perfusion images; (b) the percentage of diseased segments was increased by 7.2 % when perfusion imaging was compared to the detailed reading of diagnostic images, and by 26.6 % when compared to the standard reading of images. At a patient level, the extent of peripheral CPE was higher on perfusion imaging, with a greater impact when compared to the standard reading of diagnostic images (number of patients with a greater number of diseased segments: n = 45; 72.6 % of the study population). Perfusion imaging allows recognition of a greater extent of peripheral CPE compared to diagnostic imaging. (orig.)

  8. The effect of a chest imaging lecture on emergency department doctors' ability to interpret chest CT images: a randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keijzers, Gerben; Sithirasenan, Vasugi

    2012-02-01

    To assess the chest computed tomography (CT) imaging interpreting skills of emergency department (ED) doctors and to study the effect of a CT chest imaging interpretation lecture on these skills. Sixty doctors in two EDs were randomized, using computerized randomization, to either attend a chest CT interpretation lecture or not to attend this lecture. Within 2 weeks of the lecture, the participants completed a questionnaire on demographic variables, anatomical knowledge, and diagnostic interpretation of 10 chest CT studies. Outcome measures included anatomical knowledge score, diagnosis score, and the combined overall score, all expressed as a percentage of correctly answered questions (0-100). Data on 58 doctors were analyzed, of which 27 were randomized to attend the lecture. The CT interpretation lecture did not have an effect on anatomy knowledge scores (72.9 vs. 70.2%), diagnosis scores (71.2 vs. 69.2%), or overall scores (71.4 vs. 69.5%). Twenty-nine percent of doctors stated that they had a systematic approach to chest CT interpretation. Overall self-perceived competency for interpreting CT imaging (brain, chest, abdomen) was low (between 3.2 and 5.2 on a 10-point Visual Analogue Scale). A single chest CT interpretation lecture did not improve chest CT interpretation by ED doctors. Less than one-third of doctors had a systematic approach to chest CT interpretation. A standardized systematic approach may improve interpretation skills.

  9. Image patch-based method for automated classification and detection of focal liver lesions on CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safdari, Mustafa; Pasari, Raghav; Rubin, Daniel; Greenspan, Hayit

    2013-03-01

    We developed a method for automated classification and detection of liver lesions in CT images based on image patch representation and bag-of-visual-words (BoVW). BoVW analysis has been extensively used in the computer vision domain to analyze scenery images. In the current work we discuss how it can be used for liver lesion classification and detection. The methodology includes building a dictionary for a training set using local descriptors and representing a region in the image using a visual word histogram. Two tasks are described: a classification task, for lesion characterization, and a detection task in which a scan window moves across the image and is determined to be normal liver tissue or a lesion. Data: In the classification task 73 CT images of liver lesions were used, 25 images having cysts, 24 having metastasis and 24 having hemangiomas. A radiologist circumscribed the lesions, creating a region of interest (ROI), in each of the images. He then provided the diagnosis, which was established either by biopsy or clinical follow-up. Thus our data set comprises 73 images and 73 ROIs. In the detection task, a radiologist drew ROIs around each liver lesion and two regions of normal liver, for a total of 159 liver lesion ROIs and 146 normal liver ROIs. The radiologist also demarcated the liver boundary. Results: Classification results of more than 95% were obtained. In the detection task, F1 results obtained is 0.76. Recall is 84%, with precision of 73%. Results show the ability to detect lesions, regardless of shape.

  10. Cone beam CT for dental and maxillofacial imaging: dose matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauwels, Ruben

    2015-07-01

    The widespread use of cone-beam CT (CBCT) in dentistry has led to increasing concern regarding justification and optimisation of CBCT exposures. When used as a substitute to multidetector CT (MDCT), CBCT can lead to significant dose reduction; however, low-dose protocols of current-generation MDCTs show that there is an overlap between CBCT and MDCT doses. More importantly, although the 3D information provided by CBCT can often lead to improved diagnosis and treatment compared with 2D radiographs, a routine or excessive use of CBCT would lead to a substantial increase of the collective patient dose. The potential use of CBCT for paediatric patients (e.g. developmental disorders, trauma and orthodontic treatment planning) further increases concern regarding its proper application. This paper provides an overview of justification and optimisation issues in dental and maxillofacial CBCT. The radiation dose in CBCT will be briefly reviewed. The European Commission's Evidence Based Guidelines prepared by the SEDENTEXCT Project Consortium will be summarised, and (in)appropriate use of CBCT will be illustrated for various dental applications.

  11. PET/SPECT/CT multimodal imaging in a transgenic mouse model of breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boisgard, R.; Alberini, J.L.; Jego, B.; Siquier, K.; Theze, B.; Guillermet, S.; Tavitian, B. [Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, Institut d' Imagerie BioMedicale, CEA, 91 - Orsay (France); Inserm, U803, 91 - Orsay (France)

    2008-02-15

    Background. - In the therapy monitoring of breast cancer, conventional imaging methods include ultrasound, mammography, CT and MRI, which are essentially based on tumor size modifications. However these modifications represent a late consequence of the biological response and fail to differentiate scar or necrotic tissue from residual viable tumoral tissue. Therefore, a current objective is to develop tools able to predict early response to treatment. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and Single Photon Emission Computerized Tomography (SPECT) are imaging modalities able to provide extremely sensitive quantitative molecular data and are widely used in humans and animals. Results. - Mammary epithelial cells of female transgenic mice expressing the polyoma middle T onco-protein (Py M.T.), undergo four distinct stages of tumour progression, from pre malignant to malignant stages. Stages are identifiable in the mammary tissue and can lead to the development of distant metastases Longitudinal studies by dynamic whole body acquisitions by multimodal imaging including PET, SPECT and Computed Tomography (CT) allow following the tumoral evolution in Py M.T. mice in comparison with the histopathological analysis. At four weeks of age, mammary hyperplasia was identified by histopathology, but no abnormalities were found by palpation or detected by PET with 2-deoxy-2-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-D-glucose. Such as in some human mammary cancers, the sodium iodide sym-porter (N.I.S.) in tumoral mammary epithelial cells is expressed in this mouse model. In order to investigate the expression of N.I.S. in the Py M.T. mice mammary tumours, [{sup 99m}Tc]TcO{sub 4} imaging was performed with a dedicated SPECT/CT system camera (B.I.O.S.P.A.C.E. Gamma Imager/CT). Local uptake of [{sup 99m}Tc]TcO{sub 4} was detected as early as four weeks of age. The efficacy of chemotherapy was evaluated in this mouse model using a conventional regimen (Doxorubicine, 100 mg/ kg) administered weekly from nine to

  12. Step and shoot coronary CT angiography using 256-slice CT: effect of heart rate and heart rate variability on image quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muenzel, D.; Noel, P.B.; Dorn, F.; Dobritz, M.; Rummeny, E.J.; Huber, A. [Klinikum rechts der Isar der Technischen Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Radiology, Munich (Germany)

    2011-11-15

    To evaluate the effect of heart rate variability (HRV) and heart rate (HR) on intra-image ''motion'' and inter-image ''stairstep'' artefacts in step-and-shoot coronary CT angiography (CCTA) using a wide detector CT scanner. 66 patients underwent step-and-shoot CCTA using 256-slice CT. Patients were divided into two groups (Group 1: HR <65 bpm, Group 2 {>=}65bpm). Motion artefacts were quantified using a 5-point-scale. Stairstep artefacts were defined by measurements of misalignment. Image noise, contrast-to-noise-ratio (CNR), signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR), and radiation dose were assessed. Mean HR was 66 {+-} 16.7 bpm (range: 45-125 bpm) and mean HRV was 10.7 {+-} 17.5 bpm. A significant correlation between HR and stairstep artefacts (r = 0.46, p < 0.001) and motion artefacts (r = 0.63, p < 0.001) was found. Group 2 showed significantly increased step artefacts with a mean misalignment of 1.4 mm compared to 0.4 mm in Group 1 (p < 0.001). There was no significant effect of HRV on stairstep artefacts (r = 0.15, p = 0.416) and motion artefacts (r = 0.13, p = 0.311). No significant differences in image noise, CNR, SNR, and radiation dose were seen. Unlike CCTA using narrow CT detectors, HRV has no significant effect on motion and stairstep artefacts using a wide CT detector with high z-coverage. However, a higher HR still increases stairstep and motion artefacts. (orig.)

  13. Value of postmortem thoracic CT over radiography in imaging of pediatric rib fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Terence S.; Babyn, Paul S. [The Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto (Canada); Reyes, Jeanette A.; Chiasson, David A. [The Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Paediatric Laboratory Medicine, Toronto (Canada); Moineddin, Rahim [University of Toronto, Department of Family and Community Medicine, Toronto (Canada); Berdon, Walter E. [Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center, Babies Hospital, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States)

    2011-06-15

    Studies have reported that thoracic CT may provide greater sensitivity compared with radiography in detection of pediatric rib fractures and fracture healing. The additional sensitivity afforded by thoracic CT may have medicolegal implications where abuse is suspected. To determine the additional value of postmortem thoracic CT compared with radiography in detecting pediatric rib fractures, and fracture healing, using autopsy findings as a gold standard. We retrospectively reviewed 56 coroner's cases with postmortem radiography and CT thoracic survey. All studies underwent primary interpretation by one or two radiologists. The study radiologist independently reviewed all images from 13 patients with positive findings on radiography, CT or autopsy. Sensitivity and specificity between observers and imaging modalities were compared. Primary interpretation: Fractures were recognized on radiography in 5/12 patients who had fractures found at autopsy, and on CT in 8/12 patients. In total, 29% (24/83) of fractures were reported on radiography, and 51% (52/101) of fractures were reported on CT. Study radiologist: Fractures were recognized on radiography in 7/12 patients who had fractures found at autopsy, and on CT in 11/12 patients. In total, 46% (38/83) of fractures were reported on radiography, and 85% (86/101) of fractures were reported on CT. Postmortem thoracic CT provides greater sensitivity than radiography in detecting pediatric rib fractures, most notably in anterior and posterior fractures. However, the degree of improvement in sensitivity provided by CT might depend on observer experience. (orig.)

  14. Sci—Thur PM: Imaging — 06: Canada's National Computed Tomography (CT) Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wardlaw, GM; Martel, N [Medical Imaging Division, Consumer and Clinical Radiation Protection Bureau, Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety Branch, Health Canada (Canada); Blackler, W; Asselin, J-F [Data Analysis and Information Systems, Applied Research and Analysis Directorate, Strategic Policy Branch, Health Canada (Canada)

    2014-08-15

    The value of computed tomography (CT) in medical imaging is reflected in its' increased use and availability since the early 1990's; however, given CT's relatively larger exposures (vs. planar x-ray) greater care must be taken to ensure that CT procedures are optimised in terms of providing the smallest dose possible while maintaining sufficient diagnostic image quality. The development of CT Diagnostic Reference Levels (DRLs) supports this process. DRLs have been suggested/supported by international/national bodies since the early 1990's and widely adopted elsewhere, but not on a national basis in Canada. Essentially, CT DRLs provide guidance on what is considered good practice for common CT exams, but require a representative sample of CT examination data to make any recommendations. Canada's National CT Survey project, in collaboration with provincial/territorial authorities, has collected a large national sample of CT practice data for 7 common examinations (with associated clinical indications) of both adult and pediatric patients. Following completion of data entry into a common database, a survey summary report and recommendations will be made on CT DRLs from this data. It is hoped that these can then be used by local regions to promote CT practice optimisation and support any dose reduction initiatives.

  15. The Combination of In vivo (124)I-PET and CT Small Animal Imaging for Evaluation of Thyroid Physiology and Dosimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El-Ali, Henrik H; Eckerwall, Martin; Skovgaard, Dorthe;

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: A thyroid rat model combining functional and anatomical information would be of great benefit for better modeling of thyroid physiology and for absorbed dose calculations. Our aim was to show that (124)I-PET and CT small animal imaging are useful as a combined model for studying thyroid...... physiology and dose calculation. METHODS: Seven rats were subjects for multiple thyroid (124)I-imaging and CT-scans. S-values [mGy/MBqs] for different thyroid sizes were simulated. A phantom with spheres was designed for validation of performances of the small animal PET and CT imaging systems. RESULTS...... indicates the importance of using an accurate volume-measuring technique such as the small animal CT. The small animal PET system was on the other hand able to accurately estimate the activity concentration in the thyroid volumes. We conclude that the combination of the PET and CT image information...

  16. A CT-, PET- and MR-imaging-compatible hyperbaric pressure chamber for baromedical research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kasper; Søvsø Szocska Hansen, Esben; Tolbod, Lars P;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We describe the development of a novel preclinical rodent-sized pressure chamber system compatible with computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) that allows continuous uncompromised and minimally invasive data acquisition...... different tissues in the MRI phantoms. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates a pressure chamber system compatible with CT, PET and MRI. We found that no correction in image intensity was required with pressurisation up to 1.013 mPa for any imaging modality. CT, PET or MRI can be used to obtain anatomical...... throughout hyperbaric exposures. The effect of various pressures on the acquired image intensity obtained with different CT, PET and MRI phantoms are characterised. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Tissue-representative phantom models were examined with CT, PET or MRI at normobaric pressure and hyperbaric pressures up...

  17. Delayed enhancement imaging of myocardial viability: low-dose high-pitch CT versus MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goetti, Robert; Feuchtner, Gudrun; Stolzmann, Paul; Donati, Olivio F.; Frauenfelder, Thomas; Leschka, Sebastian; Alkadhi, Hatem [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Wieser, Monika; Plass, Andre [University Hospital Zurich, Division of Cardiac and Vascular Surgery, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2011-10-15

    To evaluate the accuracy of high-pitch delayed enhancement (DE) CT for the assessment of myocardial viability with MRI as the reference standard. Twenty-four patients (mean age 66.9 {+-} 9.2 years) with coronary artery disease underwent DE imaging with 128-slice dual-source CT (prospective electrocardiography (ECG)-triggering) and MRI at 1.5 T. Two observers assessed DE transmurality per segment, and measured signal intensity (MRI) or attenuation (CT) in infarcted and healthy myocardium and noise in the left ventricular blood pool for calculating contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR). 75/408 (18.4%) segments in 18/24 patients (75.0%) showed DE in MRI, of which 28 segments in 10/24 (41.7%) patients were non-viable (scar tissue transmurality >50%). Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of CT for diagnosis of non-viability were 60.7%, 96.8% and 94.4% per segment, and 90.0%, 92.9% and 91.7% per patient. CNR was significantly higher in MR (7.4 {+-} 3.0 vs. 4.6 {+-} 1.5; p = 0.018), and image noise significantly lower (11.6 {+-} 5.7 vs.15.0 {+-} 4.5; p = 0.019). Radiation dose of DECT was 0.89 {+-} 0.07 mSv. CTDE imaging in the high-pitch mode enables myocardial viability assessment at a low radiation dose and good accuracy compared with MR, although associated with a lower CNR and higher noise. (orig.)

  18. The findings of ultrasonography, CT and magnetic resonance imaging of carotidynia: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jung Min; Kim, Heung Cheol [Hallym Univ. College of Medicine/Chuncheon Sacred Heart Hospital, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-07-15

    Carotidynia is a rare disease representing various aspects of pain around the carotid artery bifurcation. The pain in the carotid bifurcation area is a nonspecific symptom, and various diseases causing similar symptoms in the corresponding area should be distinguished. Mostly, carotidynia is diagnosed by history taking and physical examination, but it is not easy to distinguish carotidynia from other diseases without imaging study. Therefore, there are quite a number of inadequate treatments due to a considerable number of misdiagnosis, as infectious diseases. In US, CT scans, and MRI examinations, the authors experienced a patient who showed the outer thickening wall of blood vessels around the carotid artery, near the carotid artery bifurcation, and was diagnosed as carotidynia with clinical findings. In the follow up that was carried out two weeks later, the thickness of the lesions was significantly decreased. Imaging studies are helpful in the differential diagnosis because carotidynia shows relatively characteristic imaging findings.

  19. Automated Image Retrieval of Chest CT Images Based on Local Grey Scale Invariant Features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrais Porto, Marcelo; Cordeiro d'Ornellas, Marcos

    2015-01-01

    Textual-based tools are regularly employed to retrieve medical images for reading and interpretation using current retrieval Picture Archiving and Communication Systems (PACS) but pose some drawbacks. All-purpose content-based image retrieval (CBIR) systems are limited when dealing with medical images and do not fit well into PACS workflow and clinical practice. This paper presents an automated image retrieval approach for chest CT images based local grey scale invariant features from a local database. Performance was measured in terms of precision and recall, average retrieval precision (ARP), and average retrieval rate (ARR). Preliminary results have shown the effectiveness of the proposed approach. The prototype is also a useful tool for radiology research and education, providing valuable information to the medical and broader healthcare community.

  20. Impact of PET/CT image reconstruction methods and liver uptake normalization strategies on quantitative image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhnert, Georg; Boellaard, Ronald; Sterzer, Sergej; Kahraman, Deniz; Scheffler, Matthias; Wolf, Jürgen; Dietlein, Markus; Drzezga, Alexander; Kobe, Carsten

    2016-02-01

    In oncological imaging using PET/CT, the standardized uptake value has become the most common parameter used to measure tracer accumulation. The aim of this analysis was to evaluate ultra high definition (UHD) and ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM) PET/CT reconstructions for their potential impact on quantification. We analyzed 40 PET/CT scans of lung cancer patients who had undergone PET/CT. Standardized uptake values corrected for body weight (SUV) and lean body mass (SUL) were determined in the single hottest lesion in the lung and normalized to the liver for UHD and OSEM reconstruction. Quantitative uptake values and their normalized ratios for the two reconstruction settings were compared using the Wilcoxon test. The distribution of quantitative uptake values and their ratios in relation to the reconstruction method used were demonstrated in the form of frequency distribution curves, box-plots and scatter plots. The agreement between OSEM and UHD reconstructions was assessed through Bland-Altman analysis. A significant difference was observed after OSEM and UHD reconstruction for SUV and SUL data tested (p < 0.0005 in all cases). The mean values of the ratios after OSEM and UHD reconstruction showed equally significant differences (p < 0.0005 in all cases). Bland-Altman analysis showed that the SUV and SUL and their normalized values were, on average, up to 60 % higher after UHD reconstruction as compared to OSEM reconstruction. OSEM and HD reconstruction brought a significant difference for SUV and SUL, which remained constantly high after normalization to the liver, indicating that standardization of reconstruction and the use of comparable SUV measurements are crucial when using PET/CT.