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Sample records for ct cardiac imaging

  1. Quantitative image quality evaluation for cardiac CT reconstructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Hsin-Wu; Fan, Jiahua; Kupinski, Matthew A.; Balhorn, William; Okerlund, Darin R.

    2016-03-01

    Maintaining image quality in the presence of motion is always desirable and challenging in clinical Cardiac CT imaging. Different image-reconstruction algorithms are available on current commercial CT systems that attempt to achieve this goal. It is widely accepted that image-quality assessment should be task-based and involve specific tasks, observers, and associated figures of merits. In this work, we developed an observer model that performed the task of estimating the percentage of plaque in a vessel from CT images. We compared task performance of Cardiac CT image data reconstructed using a conventional FBP reconstruction algorithm and the SnapShot Freeze (SSF) algorithm, each at default and optimal reconstruction cardiac phases. The purpose of this work is to design an approach for quantitative image-quality evaluation of temporal resolution for Cardiac CT systems. To simulate heart motion, a moving coronary type phantom synchronized with an ECG signal was used. Three different percentage plaques embedded in a 3 mm vessel phantom were imaged multiple times under motion free, 60 bpm, and 80 bpm heart rates. Static (motion free) images of this phantom were taken as reference images for image template generation. Independent ROIs from the 60 bpm and 80 bpm images were generated by vessel tracking. The observer performed estimation tasks using these ROIs. Ensemble mean square error (EMSE) was used as the figure of merit. Results suggest that the quality of SSF images is superior to the quality of FBP images in higher heart-rate scans.

  2. Marketing cardiac CT programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Jason

    2010-01-01

    There are two components of cardiac CT discussed in this article: coronary artery calcium scoring (CACS) and coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA).The distinctive advantages of each CT examination are outlined. In order to ensure a successful cardiac CT program, it is imperative that imaging facilities market their cardiac CT practices effectively in order to gain a competitive advantage in this valuable market share. If patients receive quality care by competent individuals, they are more likely to recommend the facility's cardiac CT program. Satisfied patients will also be more willing to come back for any further testing.

  3. Wide coverage by volume CT: benefits for cardiac imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sablayrolles, Jean-Louis; Cesmeli, Erdogan; Mintandjian, Laura; Adda, Olivier; Dessalles-Martin, Diane

    2005-04-01

    With the development of new technologies, computed tomography (CT) is becoming a strong candidate for non-invasive imaging based tool for cardiac disease assessment. One of the challenges of cardiac CT is that a typical scan involves a breath hold period consisting of several heartbeats, about 20 sec with scanners having a longitudinal coverage of 2 cm, and causing the image quality (IQ) to be negatively impacted since beat to beat variation is high likely to occur without any medication, e.g. beta blockers. Because of this and the preference for shorter breath hold durations, a CT scanner with a wide coverage without the compromise in the spatial and temporal resolution of great clinical value. In this study, we aimed at determining the optimum scan duration and the delay relative to beginning of breath hold, to achieve high IQ. We acquired EKG data from 91 consecutive patients (77 M, 14 F; Age: 57 +/- 14) undergoing cardiac CT exams with contrast, performed on LightSpeed 16 and LightSpeed Pro16. As an IQ metric, we adopted the standard deviation of "beat-to-beat variation" (stdBBV) within a virtual scan period. Two radiologists evaluated images by assigning a score of 1 (worst) to 4 best). We validated stdBBV with the radiologist scores, which resulted in a population distribution of 9.5, 9.5, 31, and 50% for the score groups 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively. Based on the scores, we defined a threshold for stdBBV and identified an optimum combination of virtual scan period and a delay. With the assumption that the relationship between the stdBBV and diagnosable scan IQ holds, our analysis suggested that the success rate can be improved to 100% with scan durations equal or less than 5 sec with a delay of 1 - 2 sec. We confirmed the suggested conclusion with LightSpeed VCT (GE Healthcare Technologies, Waukesha, WI), which has a wide longitudinal coverage, fine isotropic spatial resolution, and high temporal resolution, e.g. 40 mm coverage per rotation of 0.35 sec

  4. Quantification in non-invasive cardiac imaging: CT and MR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Rossi (Alexia)

    2013-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ The diagnosis and management of cardiac disease require a precise assessment of morphological and functional cardiac parameters. This thesis is divided in three parts. Part I emphasizes the role of cardiac computed tomography (CT) in the diagnosis of patients with

  5. Segmentation of the thoracic aorta in noncontrast cardiac CT images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila-Montes, Olga C; Kurkure, Uday; Nakazato, Ryo; Berman, Daniel S; Dey, Damini; Kakadiaris, Ioannis A

    2013-09-01

    Studies have shown that aortic calcification is associated with cardiovascular disease. In this study, a method for localization, centerline extraction, and segmentation of the thoracic aorta in noncontrast cardiac-computed tomography (CT) images, toward the detection of aortic calcification, is presented. The localization of the right coronary artery ostium slice is formulated as a regression problem whose input variables are obtained from simple intensity features computed from a pyramid representation of the slice. The localization, centerline extraction, and segmentation of the aorta are formulated as optimal path detection problems. Dynamic programming is applied in the Hough space for localizing key center points in the aorta which guide the centerline tracing using a fast marching-based minimal path extraction framework. The input volume is then resampled into a stack of 2-D cross-sectional planes orthogonal to the obtained centerline. Dynamic programming is again applied for the segmentation of the aorta in each slice of the resampled volume. The obtained segmentation is finally mapped back to its original volume space. The performance of the proposed method was assessed on cardiac noncontrast CT scans and promising results were obtained.

  6. Accessory cardiac bronchus: Proposed imaging classification on multidetector CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kang Min; Kim, Young Tong; Han, Jong Kyu; Jou, Sung Shick [Dept. of Radiology, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Cheonan Hospital, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    To propose the classification of accessory cardiac bronchus (ACB) based on imaging using multidetector computed tomography (MDCT), and evaluate follow-up changes of ACB. This study included 58 patients diagnosed as ACB since 9 years, using MDCT. We analyzed the types, division locations and division directions of ACB, and also evaluated changes on follow-up. We identified two main types of ACB: blind-end (51.7%) and lobule (48.3%). The blind-end ACB was further classified into three subtypes: blunt (70%), pointy (23.3%) and saccular (6.7%). The lobule ACB was also further classified into three subtypes: complete (46.4%), incomplete (28.6%) and rudimentary (25%). Division location to the upper half bronchus intermedius (79.3%) and medial direction (60.3%) were the most common in all patients. The difference in division direction was statistically significant between the blind-end and lobule types (p = 0.019). Peribronchial soft tissue was found in five cases. One calcification case was identified in the lobule type. During follow-up, ACB had disappeared in two cases of the blind-end type and in one case of the rudimentary subtype. The proposed classification of ACB based on imaging, and the follow-up CT, helped us to understand the various imaging features of ACB.

  7. Calibration free beam hardening correction for cardiac CT perfusion imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levi, Jacob; Fahmi, Rachid; Eck, Brendan L.; Fares, Anas; Wu, Hao; Vembar, Mani; Dhanantwari, Amar; Bezerra, Hiram G.; Wilson, David L.

    2016-03-01

    Myocardial perfusion imaging using CT (MPI-CT) and coronary CTA have the potential to make CT an ideal noninvasive gate-keeper for invasive coronary angiography. However, beam hardening artifacts (BHA) prevent accurate blood flow calculation in MPI-CT. BH Correction (BHC) methods require either energy-sensitive CT, not widely available, or typically a calibration-based method. We developed a calibration-free, automatic BHC (ABHC) method suitable for MPI-CT. The algorithm works with any BHC method and iteratively determines model parameters using proposed BHA-specific cost function. In this work, we use the polynomial BHC extended to three materials. The image is segmented into soft tissue, bone, and iodine images, based on mean HU and temporal enhancement. Forward projections of bone and iodine images are obtained, and in each iteration polynomial correction is applied. Corrections are then back projected and combined to obtain the current iteration's BHC image. This process is iterated until cost is minimized. We evaluate the algorithm on simulated and physical phantom images and on preclinical MPI-CT data. The scans were obtained on a prototype spectral detector CT (SDCT) scanner (Philips Healthcare). Mono-energetic reconstructed images were used as the reference. In the simulated phantom, BH streak artifacts were reduced from 12+/-2HU to 1+/-1HU and cupping was reduced by 81%. Similarly, in physical phantom, BH streak artifacts were reduced from 48+/-6HU to 1+/-5HU and cupping was reduced by 86%. In preclinical MPI-CT images, BHA was reduced from 28+/-6 HU to less than 4+/-4HU at peak enhancement. Results suggest that the algorithm can be used to reduce BHA in conventional CT and improve MPI-CT accuracy.

  8. Cardiac CT for planning redo cardiac surgery: effect of knowledge-based iterative model reconstruction on image quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oda, Seitaro [MedStar Washington Hospital Center, Department of Cardiology, Washington, DC (United States); Kumamoto University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto (Japan); Weissman, Gaby; Weigold, W. Guy [MedStar Washington Hospital Center, Department of Cardiology, Washington, DC (United States); Vembar, Mani [Philips Healthcare, CT Clinical Science, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2015-01-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of knowledge-based iterative model reconstruction (IMR) on image quality in cardiac CT performed for the planning of redo cardiac surgery by comparing IMR images with images reconstructed with filtered back-projection (FBP) and hybrid iterative reconstruction (HIR). We studied 31 patients (23 men, 8 women; mean age 65.1 ± 16.5 years) referred for redo cardiac surgery who underwent cardiac CT. Paired image sets were created using three types of reconstruction: FBP, HIR, and IMR. Quantitative parameters including CT attenuation, image noise, and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of each cardiovascular structure were calculated. The visual image quality - graininess, streak artefact, margin sharpness of each cardiovascular structure, and overall image quality - was scored on a five-point scale. The mean image noise of FBP, HIR, and IMR images was 58.3 ± 26.7, 36.0 ± 12.5, and 14.2 ± 5.5 HU, respectively; there were significant differences in all comparison combinations among the three methods. The CNR of IMR images was better than that of FBP and HIR images in all evaluated structures. The visual scores were significantly higher for IMR than for the other images in all evaluated parameters. IMR can provide significantly improved qualitative and quantitative image quality at in cardiac CT for planning of reoperative cardiac surgery. (orig.)

  9. Constrain static target kinetic iterative image reconstruction for 4D cardiac CT imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alessio, Adam M.; La Riviere, Patrick J.

    2011-03-01

    Iterative image reconstruction offers improved signal to noise properties for CT imaging. A primary challenge with iterative methods is the substantial computation time. This computation time is even more prohibitive in 4D imaging applications, such as cardiac gated or dynamic acquisition sequences. In this work, we propose only updating the time-varying elements of a 4D image sequence while constraining the static elements to be fixed or slowly varying in time. We test the method with simulations of 4D acquisitions based on measured cardiac patient data from a) a retrospective cardiac-gated CT acquisition and b) a dynamic perfusion CT acquisition. We target the kinetic elements with one of two methods: 1) position a circular ROI on the heart, assuming area outside ROI is essentially static throughout imaging time; and 2) select varying elements from the coefficient of variation image formed from fast analytic reconstruction of all time frames. Targeted kinetic elements are updated with each iteration, while static elements remain fixed at initial image values formed from the reconstruction of data from all time frames. Results confirm that the computation time is proportional to the number of targeted elements; our simulations suggest that 3 times reductions in reconstruction time. The images reconstructed with the proposed method have matched mean square error with full 4D reconstruction. The proposed method is amenable to most optimization algorithms and offers the potential for significant computation improvements, which could be traded off for more sophisticated system models or penalty terms.

  10. Cardiac tumors: CT and MR imaging features; Tumeurs cardiaques: aspects en scanner et en IRM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moskovitch, G.; Chabbert, V.; Escourrou, G.; Desloques, L.; Otal, P.; Glock, Y.; Rousseau, H. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Rangueil, Service de Radiologie Generale, 31 - Toulouse (France)

    2010-09-15

    The CT and MR imaging features of the main cardiac tumors will be reviewed. Cross-sectional imaging features may help differentiate between cardiac tumors and pseudo-tumoral lesions and identify malignant features. Based on clinical features, imaging findings are helpful to further characterize the nature of the lesion. CT and MR imaging can demonstrate the relationship of the tumor with adjacent anatomical structures and are invaluable in the pre-surgical work-up and post-surgical follow-up. (authors)

  11. Enhanced temporal resolution at cardiac CT with a novel CT image reconstruction algorithm: Initial patient experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apfaltrer, Paul, E-mail: paul.apfaltrer@medma.uni-heidelberg.de [Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, PO Box 250322, 169 Ashley Avenue, Charleston, SC 29425 (United States); Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Theodor-Kutzer-Ufer 1-3, D-68167 Mannheim (Germany); Schoendube, Harald, E-mail: harald.schoendube@siemens.com [Siemens Healthcare, CT Division, Forchheim Siemens, Siemensstr. 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany); Schoepf, U. Joseph, E-mail: schoepf@musc.edu [Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, PO Box 250322, 169 Ashley Avenue, Charleston, SC 29425 (United States); Allmendinger, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.allmendinger@siemens.com [Siemens Healthcare, CT Division, Forchheim Siemens, Siemensstr. 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany); Tricarico, Francesco, E-mail: francescotricarico82@gmail.com [Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, PO Box 250322, 169 Ashley Avenue, Charleston, SC 29425 (United States); Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, “A. Gemelli” Hospital, Largo A. Gemelli 8, Rome (Italy); Schindler, Andreas, E-mail: andreas.schindler@campus.lmu.de [Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, PO Box 250322, 169 Ashley Avenue, Charleston, SC 29425 (United States); Vogt, Sebastian, E-mail: sebastian.vogt@siemens.com [Siemens Healthcare, CT Division, Forchheim Siemens, Siemensstr. 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany); Sunnegårdh, Johan, E-mail: johan.sunnegardh@siemens.com [Siemens Healthcare, CT Division, Forchheim Siemens, Siemensstr. 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany); and others

    2013-02-15

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of a temporal resolution improvement method (TRIM) for cardiac CT on diagnostic image quality for coronary artery assessment. Materials and methods: The TRIM-algorithm employs an iterative approach to reconstruct images from less than 180° of projections and uses a histogram constraint to prevent the occurrence of limited-angle artifacts. This algorithm was applied in 11 obese patients (7 men, 67.2 ± 9.8 years) who had undergone second generation dual-source cardiac CT with 120 kV, 175–426 mAs, and 500 ms gantry rotation. All data were reconstructed with a temporal resolution of 250 ms using traditional filtered-back projection (FBP) and of 200 ms using the TRIM-algorithm. Contrast attenuation and contrast-to-noise-ratio (CNR) were measured in the ascending aorta. The presence and severity of coronary motion artifacts was rated on a 4-point Likert scale. Results: All scans were considered of diagnostic quality. Mean BMI was 36 ± 3.6 kg/m{sup 2}. Average heart rate was 60 ± 9 bpm. Mean effective dose was 13.5 ± 4.6 mSv. When comparing FBP- and TRIM reconstructed series, the attenuation within the ascending aorta (392 ± 70.7 vs. 396.8 ± 70.1 HU, p > 0.05) and CNR (13.2 ± 3.2 vs. 11.7 ± 3.1, p > 0.05) were not significantly different. A total of 110 coronary segments were evaluated. All studies were deemed diagnostic; however, there was a significant (p < 0.05) difference in the severity score distribution of coronary motion artifacts between FBP (median = 2.5) and TRIM (median = 2.0) reconstructions. Conclusion: The algorithm evaluated here delivers diagnostic imaging quality of the coronary arteries despite 500 ms gantry rotation. Possible applications include improvement of cardiac imaging on slower gantry rotation systems or mitigation of the trade-off between temporal resolution and CNR in obese patients.

  12. Region-Based 4D Tomographic Image Reconstruction: Application to Cardiac X-ray CT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eyndhoven, G. Van; Batenburg, K.J.; Sijbers, J.

    2015-01-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) is a powerful tool for noninvasive cardiac imaging. However, radiation dose is a major issue. In this paper, we propose an iterative reconstruction method that reduces the radiation dose without compromising image quality. This is achieved by exploiting prior knowledge

  13. Subcutaneous Tissue Thickness is an Independent Predictor of Image Noise in Cardiac CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staniak, Henrique Lane; Sharovsky, Rodolfo [Hospital Universitário - Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Pereira, Alexandre Costa [Hospital das Clínicas - Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Castro, Cláudio Campi de; Benseñor, Isabela M.; Lotufo, Paulo A. [Hospital Universitário - Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Faculdade de Medicina - Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Bittencourt, Márcio Sommer, E-mail: msbittencourt@mail.harvard.edu [Hospital Universitário - Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-01-15

    Few data on the definition of simple robust parameters to predict image noise in cardiac computed tomography (CT) exist. To evaluate the value of a simple measure of subcutaneous tissue as a predictor of image noise in cardiac CT. 86 patients underwent prospective ECG-gated coronary computed tomographic angiography (CTA) and coronary calcium scoring (CAC) with 120 kV and 150 mA. The image quality was objectively measured by the image noise in the aorta in the cardiac CTA, and low noise was defined as noise < 30HU. The chest anteroposterior diameter and lateral width, the image noise in the aorta and the skin-sternum (SS) thickness were measured as predictors of cardiac CTA noise. The association of the predictors and image noise was performed by using Pearson correlation. The mean radiation dose was 3.5 ± 1.5 mSv. The mean image noise in CT was 36.3 ± 8.5 HU, and the mean image noise in non-contrast scan was 17.7 ± 4.4 HU. All predictors were independently associated with cardiac CTA noise. The best predictors were SS thickness, with a correlation of 0.70 (p < 0.001), and noise in the non-contrast images, with a correlation of 0.73 (p < 0.001). When evaluating the ability to predict low image noise, the areas under the ROC curve for the non-contrast noise and for the SS thickness were 0.837 and 0.864, respectively. Both SS thickness and CAC noise are simple accurate predictors of cardiac CTA image noise. Those parameters can be incorporated in standard CT protocols to adequately adjust radiation exposure.

  14. Reduction of blooming artifacts in cardiac CT images by blind deconvolution and anisotropic diffusion filtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Amor, Angélica M.; Navarro-Navia, Cristian A.; Cadena-Bonfanti, Alberto J.; Contreras-Ortiz, Sonia H.

    2015-12-01

    Even though CT is an imaging technique that offers high quality images, limitations on its spatial resolution cause blurring in small objects with high contrast. This phenomenon is known as blooming artifact and affects cardiac images with small calcifications and stents. This paper describes an approach to reduce the blooming artifact and improve resolution in cardiac images using blind deconvolution and anisotropic diffusion filtering. Deconvolution increases resolution but reduces signal-to-noise ratio, and the anisotropic diffusion filter counteracts this effect without affecting the edges in the image.

  15. Noncardiac findings on cardiac CT. Part II: spectrum of imaging findings.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Killeen, Ronan P

    2012-02-01

    Cardiac computed tomography (CT) has evolved into an effective imaging technique for the evaluation of coronary artery disease in selected patients. Two distinct advantages over other noninvasive cardiac imaging methods include its ability to directly evaluate the coronary arteries and to provide a unique opportunity to evaluate for alternative diagnoses by assessing the extracardiac structures, such as the lungs and mediastinum, particularly in patients presenting with the chief symptom of acute chest pain. Some centers reconstruct a small field of view (FOV) cropped around the heart but a full FOV (from skin to skin in the area irradiated) is obtainable in the raw data of every scan so that clinically relevant noncardiac findings are identifiable. Debate in the scientific community has centered on the necessity for this large FOV. A review of noncardiac structures provides the opportunity to make alternative diagnoses that may account for the patient\\'s presentation or to detect important but clinically silent problems such as lung cancer. Critics argue that the yield of biopsy-proven cancers is low and that the follow-up of incidental noncardiac findings is expensive, resulting in increased radiation exposure and possibly unnecessary further testing. In this 2-part review we outline the issues surrounding the concept of the noncardiac read, looking for noncardiac findings on cardiac CT. Part I focused on the pros and cons for and against the practice of identifying noncardiac findings on cardiac CT. Part II illustrates the imaging spectrum of cardiac CT appearances of benign and malignant noncardiac pathology.

  16. Delayed cardiac tamponade after open heart surgery - is supplemental CT imaging reasonable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floerchinger, Bernhard; Camboni, Daniele; Schopka, Simon; Kolat, Philipp; Hilker, Michael; Schmid, Christof

    2013-06-24

    Cardiac tamponade is a severe complication after open heart surgery. Diagnostic imaging is challenging in postoperative patients, especially if tamponade develops with subacute symptoms. Hypothesizing that delayed tamponade after open heart surgery is not sufficiently detected by transthoracic echocardiography, in this study CT scans were used as standard reference and were compared with transthoracic echocardiography imaging in patients with suspected cardiac tamponade. Twenty-five patients after open heart surgery were enrolled in this analysis. In case of suspected cardiac tamponade patients underwent both echocardiography and CT imaging. Using CT as standard of reference sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of ultrasound imaging in detecting pericardial effusion/hematoma were analyzed. Clinical appearance of tamponade, need for re-intervention as well as patient outcome were monitored. In 12 cases (44%) tamponade necessitated surgical re-intervention. Most common symptoms were deterioration of hemodynamic status and dyspnea. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of echocardiography were 75%, 64%, 75%, and 64% for detecting pericardial effusion, and 33%, 83%, 50, and 71% for pericardial hematoma, respectively. In-hospital mortality of the re-intervention group was 50%. Diagnostic accuracy of transthoracic echocardiography is limited in patients after open heart surgery. Suplemental CT imaging provides rapid diagnostic reliability in patients with delayed cardiac tamponade.

  17. Cardiac carcinoid: tricuspid delayed hyperenhancement on cardiac 64-slice multidetector CT and magnetic resonance imaging.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Martos, R

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: Carcinoid heart disease is a rare condition in adults. Its diagnosis can be easily missed in a patient presenting to a primary care setting. We revised the advantages of using coronary multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in diagnosing this condition. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We studied a 65-year-old patient with carcinoid heart disease and right heart failure using transthoracic Doppler-echocardiogram, cardiac MDCT and MRI. Cardiac echocardiogram revealed marked thickening and retraction of the tricuspid leaflets with dilated right atrium and ventricle. Cardiac MDCT and MRI demonstrated fixation and retraction of the tricuspid leaflets with delayed contrast hyperenhancement of the tricuspid annulus. CONCLUSION: This case demonstrates fascinating imaging findings of cardiac carcinoid disease and highlights the increasing utility of contrast-enhanced MRI and cardiac MDCT in the diagnosis of this interesting condition.

  18. Cardiac CT Imaging of Plaque Vulnerability : Hype or Hope?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemink, Martin J.; Leiner, Tim; Maurovich-Horvat, Pál

    2016-01-01

    Advances in cardiovascular computed tomography (CT) have resulted in an excellent ability to exclude coronary heart disease (CHD). Anatomical information, functional information, and spectral information can already be obtained with current CT technologies. Moreover, novel developments such as targe

  19. Cardiac CT Imaging of Plaque Vulnerability : Hype or Hope?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemink, Martin J.; Leiner, Tim; Maurovich-Horvat, Pál

    2016-01-01

    Advances in cardiovascular computed tomography (CT) have resulted in an excellent ability to exclude coronary heart disease (CHD). Anatomical information, functional information, and spectral information can already be obtained with current CT technologies. Moreover, novel developments such as targe

  20. First pass cable artefact correction for cardiac C-arm CT imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haase, C; Schäfer, D; Kim, M; Chen, S J; Carroll, J D; Eshuis, P; Dössel, O; Grass, M

    2014-07-21

    Cardiac C-arm CT imaging delivers a tomographic region-of-interest reconstruction of the patient's heart during image guided catheter interventions. Due to the limited size of the flat detector a volume image is reconstructed, which is truncated in the cone-beam (along the patient axis) and the fan-beam (in the transaxial plane) direction. To practically address this local tomography problem correction methods, like projection extension, are available for first pass image reconstruction. For second pass correction methods, like metal artefact reduction, alternative correction schemes are required when the field of view is limited to a region-of-interest of the patient. In classical CT imaging metal artefacts are corrected by metal identification in a first volume reconstruction and generation of a corrected projection data set followed by a second reconstruction. This approach fails when the metal structures are located outside the reconstruction field of view. When a C-arm CT is performed during a cardiac intervention pacing leads and other cables are frequently positioned on the patients skin, which results in propagating streak artefacts in the reconstruction volume. A first pass approach to reduce this type of artefact is introduced and evaluated here. It makes use of the fact that the projected position of objects outside the reconstruction volume changes with the projection perspective. It is shown that projection based identification, tracking and removal of high contrast structures like cables, only detected in a subset of the projections, delivers a more consistent reconstruction volume with reduced artefact level. The method is quantitatively evaluated based on 50 simulations using cardiac CT data sets with variable cable positioning. These data sets are forward projected using a C-arm CT system geometry and generate artefacts comparable to those observed in clinical cardiac C-arm CT acquisitions. A C-arm CT simulation of every cardiac CT data set without

  1. Automated segmentation of cardiac visceral fat in low-dose non-contrast chest CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yiting; Liang, Mingzhu; Yankelevitz, David F.; Henschke, Claudia I.; Reeves, Anthony P.

    2015-03-01

    Cardiac visceral fat was segmented from low-dose non-contrast chest CT images using a fully automated method. Cardiac visceral fat is defined as the fatty tissues surrounding the heart region, enclosed by the lungs and posterior to the sternum. It is measured by constraining the heart region with an Anatomy Label Map that contains robust segmentations of the lungs and other major organs and estimating the fatty tissue within this region. The algorithm was evaluated on 124 low-dose and 223 standard-dose non-contrast chest CT scans from two public datasets. Based on visual inspection, 343 cases had good cardiac visceral fat segmentation. For quantitative evaluation, manual markings of cardiac visceral fat regions were made in 3 image slices for 45 low-dose scans and the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) was computed. The automated algorithm achieved an average DSC of 0.93. Cardiac visceral fat volume (CVFV), heart region volume (HRV) and their ratio were computed for each case. The correlation between cardiac visceral fat measurement and coronary artery and aortic calcification was also evaluated. Results indicated the automated algorithm for measuring cardiac visceral fat volume may be an alternative method to the traditional manual assessment of thoracic region fat content in the assessment of cardiovascular disease risk.

  2. Evaluation of respiratory and cardiac motion correction schemes in dual gated PET/CT cardiac imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamare, F., E-mail: frederic.lamare@chu-bordeaux.fr; Fernandez, P. [Univ. Bordeaux, INCIA, UMR 5287, F-33400 Talence (France); CNRS, INCIA, UMR 5287, F-33400 Talence (France); Service de Médecine Nucléaire, Hôpital Pellegrin, CHU de Bordeaux, 33076 Bordeaux (France); Le Maitre, A.; Visvikis, D. [INSERM, UMR1101, LaTIM, Université de Bretagne Occidentale, 29609 Brest (France); Dawood, M.; Schäfers, K. P. [European Institute for Molecular Imaging, University of Münster, Mendelstr. 11, 48149 Münster (Germany); Rimoldi, O. E. [Vita-Salute University and Scientific Institute San Raffaele, Milan, Italy and CNR Istituto di Bioimmagini e Fisiologia Molecolare, Milan (Italy)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Cardiac imaging suffers from both respiratory and cardiac motion. One of the proposed solutions involves double gated acquisitions. Although such an approach may lead to both respiratory and cardiac motion compensation there are issues associated with (a) the combination of data from cardiac and respiratory motion bins, and (b) poor statistical quality images as a result of using only part of the acquired data. The main objective of this work was to evaluate different schemes of combining binned data in order to identify the best strategy to reconstruct motion free cardiac images from dual gated positron emission tomography (PET) acquisitions. Methods: A digital phantom study as well as seven human studies were used in this evaluation. PET data were acquired in list mode (LM). A real-time position management system and an electrocardiogram device were used to provide the respiratory and cardiac motion triggers registered within the LM file. Acquired data were subsequently binned considering four and six cardiac gates, or the diastole only in combination with eight respiratory amplitude gates. PET images were corrected for attenuation, but no randoms nor scatter corrections were included. Reconstructed images from each of the bins considered above were subsequently used in combination with an affine or an elastic registration algorithm to derive transformation parameters allowing the combination of all acquired data in a particular position in the cardiac and respiratory cycles. Images were assessed in terms of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast, image profile, coefficient-of-variation (COV), and relative difference of the recovered activity concentration. Results: Regardless of the considered motion compensation strategy, the nonrigid motion model performed better than the affine model, leading to higher SNR and contrast combined with a lower COV. Nevertheless, when compensating for respiration only, no statistically significant differences were

  3. Cardiac CT for the assessment of chest pain: Imaging techniques and clinical results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, Hans-Christoph, E-mail: christoph.becker@med.uni-muenchen.de [Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Grosshadern Clinic, Department of Clinical Radiology, Marchioninistr. 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Johnson, Thorsten [Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Grosshadern Clinic, Department of Clinical Radiology, Marchioninistr. 15, 81377 Munich (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    Immediate and efficient risk stratification and management of patients with acute chest pain in the emergency department is challenging. Traditional management of these patients includes serial ECG, laboratory tests and further on radionuclide perfusion imaging or ECG treadmill testing. Due to the advances of multi-detector CT technology, dedicated coronary CT angiography provides the potential to rapidly and reliably diagnose or exclude acute coronary artery disease. Life-threatening causes of chest pain, such as aortic dissection and pulmonary embolism can simultaneously be assessed with a single scan, sometimes referred to as “triple rule out” scan. With appropriate patient selection, cardiac CT can accurately diagnose heart disease or other sources of chest pain, markedly decrease health care costs, and reliably predict clinical outcomes. This article reviews imaging techniques and clinical results for CT been used to evaluate patients with chest pain entering the emergency department.

  4. 18F-NaF PET/CT Images of Cardiac Metastasis From Osteosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Yi-Hsien; Ko, Kuan-Yin; Cheng, Mei-Fang; Chen, Wei-Wu; Yen, Ruoh-Fang

    2016-09-01

    Osteosarcomas are aggressive with a high incidence of recurrence and metastasis. Cardiac osteosarcoma metastasis is rare. We described a 17-year-old boy who had right distal femoral osteosarcoma with lung metastases. During follow-up, right ventricular (RV) metastasis was noted and confirmed by histopathological examination of the surgical specimen. F-NaF PET/CT was then arranged 1 month after debulking surgery for residual tumor survey. The images showed intense F-NaF uptake at RV region, suggestive of residual cardiac metastases.

  5. Hybrid cardiac imaging: SPECT/CT and PET/CT. A joint position statement by the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM), the European Society of Cardiac Radiology (ESCR) and the European Council of Nuclear Cardiology (ECNC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flotats, Albert; Gutberlet, Matthias; Knuuti, Juhani

    2011-01-01

    . The European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM), the European Society of Cardiac Radiology (ESCR) and the European Council of Nuclear Cardiology (ECNC) in this paper want to present a position statement of the institutions on the current roles of SPECT/CT and PET/CT hybrid cardiac imaging in patients...

  6. Image registration and analysis for quantitative myocardial perfusion: application to dynamic circular cardiac CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isola, A A [Philips Research Laboratories, X-ray Imaging Systems Department, Weisshausstrasse 2, D-52066 Aachen (Germany); Schmitt, H; Van Stevendaal, U; Grass, M [Philips Research Laboratories, Sector Digital Imaging, Roentgenstrasse 24-26, D-22335 Hamburg (Germany); Begemann, P G [Department of Radiology, University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martinistrasse 52, D-20246 Hamburg (Germany); Coulon, P [Philips Healthcare France, 33 rue de Verdun, F-92150 Suresnes Cedex (France); Boussel, L, E-mail: Alfonso.Isola@Philips.com [Department of Radiology, Louis Pradel Hospital, CREATIS, UMR CNRS 5515, INSERM U630, Lyon (France)

    2011-09-21

    Large area detector computed tomography systems with fast rotating gantries enable volumetric dynamic cardiac perfusion studies. Prospectively, ECG-triggered acquisitions limit the data acquisition to a predefined cardiac phase and thereby reduce x-ray dose and limit motion artefacts. Even in the case of highly accurate prospective triggering and stable heart rate, spatial misalignment of the cardiac volumes acquired and reconstructed per cardiac cycle may occur due to small motion pattern variations from cycle to cycle. These misalignments reduce the accuracy of the quantitative analysis of myocardial perfusion parameters on a per voxel basis. An image-based solution to this problem is elastic 3D image registration of dynamic volume sequences with variable contrast, as it is introduced in this contribution. After circular cone-beam CT reconstruction of cardiac volumes covering large areas of the myocardial tissue, the complete series is aligned with respect to a chosen reference volume. The results of the registration process and the perfusion analysis with and without registration are evaluated quantitatively in this paper. The spatial alignment leads to improved quantification of myocardial perfusion for three different pig data sets.

  7. Image registration and analysis for quantitative myocardial perfusion: application to dynamic circular cardiac CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isola, A. A.; Schmitt, H.; van Stevendaal, U.; Begemann, P. G.; Coulon, P.; Boussel, L.; Grass, M.

    2011-09-01

    Large area detector computed tomography systems with fast rotating gantries enable volumetric dynamic cardiac perfusion studies. Prospectively, ECG-triggered acquisitions limit the data acquisition to a predefined cardiac phase and thereby reduce x-ray dose and limit motion artefacts. Even in the case of highly accurate prospective triggering and stable heart rate, spatial misalignment of the cardiac volumes acquired and reconstructed per cardiac cycle may occur due to small motion pattern variations from cycle to cycle. These misalignments reduce the accuracy of the quantitative analysis of myocardial perfusion parameters on a per voxel basis. An image-based solution to this problem is elastic 3D image registration of dynamic volume sequences with variable contrast, as it is introduced in this contribution. After circular cone-beam CT reconstruction of cardiac volumes covering large areas of the myocardial tissue, the complete series is aligned with respect to a chosen reference volume. The results of the registration process and the perfusion analysis with and without registration are evaluated quantitatively in this paper. The spatial alignment leads to improved quantification of myocardial perfusion for three different pig data sets.

  8. Method for Automatic Tube Current Selection for Obtaining a Consistent Image Quality and Dose Optimization in a Cardiac Multidetector CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, Weiwei; Du, Xiangke [Peking University People' s Hospital, Beijing (China); Li, Jianying [GE Healthcare China, Beijing (China)

    2009-12-15

    To evaluate a quantitative method for individually adjusting the tube current to obtain images with consistent noise in electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated CT cardiac scans. The image noise from timing bolus and cardiac CT scans of 80 patients (Group A) who underwent a 64-row multidetector (MD) CT cardiac examination with patient-independent scan parameters were analyzed. A formula was established using the noise correlation between the timing bolus and cardiac scans. This formula was used to predict the required tube current to obtain the desired cardiac CT image noise based on the timing bolus noise measurement. Subsequently, 80 additional cardiac patients (Group B) were scanned with individually adjusted tube currents using an established formula to evaluate its ability to obtain accurate and consistent image noise across the patient population. Image quality was evaluated using score scale of 1 to 5 with a score of 3 or higher being clinically acceptable. Using the formula, we obtained an average CT image noise of 28.55 Hounsfield unit (HU), with a standard deviation of only 1.7 HU, as opposed to a target value of 28 HU. Image quality scores were 4.03 and 4.27 for images in Groups A and B, respectively, and there was no statistical difference between the image quality scores between the two groups. However, the average CT dose index (CTDIvol) was 30% lower for Group B. Adjusting the tube current based on timing bolus scans may provide a consistent image quality and dose optimization for cardiac patients of various body mass index values.

  9. Improving Low-dose Cardiac CT Images based on 3D Sparse Representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Luyao; Hu, Yining; Chen, Yang; Yin, Xindao; Shu, Huazhong; Luo, Limin; Coatrieux, Jean-Louis

    2016-03-01

    Cardiac computed tomography (CCT) is a reliable and accurate tool for diagnosis of coronary artery diseases and is also frequently used in surgery guidance. Low-dose scans should be considered in order to alleviate the harm to patients caused by X-ray radiation. However, low dose CT (LDCT) images tend to be degraded by quantum noise and streak artifacts. In order to improve the cardiac LDCT image quality, a 3D sparse representation-based processing (3D SR) is proposed by exploiting the sparsity and regularity of 3D anatomical features in CCT. The proposed method was evaluated by a clinical study of 14 patients. The performance of the proposed method was compared to the 2D spares representation-based processing (2D SR) and the state-of-the-art noise reduction algorithm BM4D. The visual assessment, quantitative assessment and qualitative assessment results show that the proposed approach can lead to effective noise/artifact suppression and detail preservation. Compared to the other two tested methods, 3D SR method can obtain results with image quality most close to the reference standard dose CT (SDCT) images.

  10. Cardiac CT Scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... combine these pictures to create a three-dimensional (3D) model of the whole heart. This imaging test ... findings from earlier chest x rays. Different CT scanners are used for different purposes. A multidetector CT ...

  11. Image-based motion estimation for cardiac CT via image registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cammin, J.; Taguchi, K.

    2010-03-01

    Images reconstructed from tomographic projection data are subject to motion artifacts from organs that move during the duration of the scan. The effect can be reduced by taking the motion into account in the reconstruction algorithm if an estimate of the deformation exists. This paper presents the estimation of the three-dimensional cardiac motion by registering reconstructed images from cardiac quiet phases as a first step towards motion-compensated cardiac image reconstruction. The non-rigid deformations of the heart are parametrized on a coarse grid on the image volume and are interpolated with cubic b-splines. The optimization problem of finding b-spline coefficients that best describe the observed deformations is ill-posed due to the large number of parameters and the resulting motion vector field is sensitive to the choice of initial parameters. Particularly challenging is the task to capture the twisting motion of the heart. The motion vector field from a dynamic computer phantom of the human heart is used to initialize the transformation parameters for the optimization process with realistic starting values. The results are evaluated by comparing the registered images and the obtained motion vector field to the case when the registration is performed without using prior knowledge about the expected cardiac motion. We find that the registered images are similar for both approaches, but the motion vector field obtained from motion estimation initialized with the phantom describes the cardiac contraction and twisting motion more accurately.

  12. The effects of gantry tilt on breast dose and image noise in cardiac CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoppe, Michael E.; Gandhi, Diksha; Schmidt, Taly Gilat [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Marquette University, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53233 (United States); Stevens, Grant M. [GE Healthcare, Waukesha, Wisconsin 53188 (United States); Foley, W. Dennis [Department of Radiology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Froedtert Memorial Lutheran Hospital, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53226 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: This study investigated the effects of tilted-gantry acquisition on image noise and glandular breast dose in females during cardiac computed tomography (CT) scans. Reducing the dose to glandular breast tissue is important due to its high radiosensitivity and limited diagnostic significance in cardiac CT scans.Methods: Tilted-gantry acquisition was investigated through computer simulations and experimental measurements. Upon IRB approval, eight voxelized phantoms were constructed from previously acquired cardiac CT datasets. Monte Carlo simulations quantified the dose deposited in glandular breast tissue over a range of tilt angles. The effects of tilted-gantry acquisition on breast dose were measured on a clinical CT scanner (CT750HD, GE Healthcare) using an anthropomorphic phantom with MOSFET dosimeters in the breast regions. In both simulations and experiments, scans were performed at gantry tilt angles of 0°–30°, in 5° increments. The percent change in breast dose was calculated relative to the nontilted scan for all tilt angles. The percent change in noise standard deviation due to gantry tilt was calculated in all reconstructed simulated and experimental images.Results: Tilting the gantry reduced the breast dose in all simulated and experimental phantoms, with generally greater dose reduction at increased gantry tilts. For example, at 30° gantry tilt, the dosimeters located in the superior, middle, and inferior breast regions measured dose reductions of 74%, 61%, and 9%, respectively. The simulations estimated 0%–30% total breast dose reduction across the eight phantoms and range of tilt angles. However, tilted-gantry acquisition also increased the noise standard deviation in the simulated phantoms by 2%–50% due to increased pathlength through the iodine-filled heart. The experimental phantom, which did not contain iodine in the blood, demonstrated decreased breast dose and decreased noise at all gantry tilt angles.Conclusions: Tilting the

  13. Automatic cable artifact removal for cardiac C-arm CT imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haase, C.; Schäfer, D.; Kim, M.; Chen, S. J.; Carroll, J.; Eshuis, P.; Dössel, O.; Grass, M.

    2014-03-01

    Cardiac C-arm computed tomography (CT) imaging using interventional C-arm systems can be applied in various areas of interventional cardiology ranging from structural heart disease and electrophysiology interventions to valve procedures in hybrid operating rooms. In contrast to conventional CT systems, the reconstruction field of view (FOV) of C-arm systems is limited to a region of interest in cone-beam (along the patient axis) and fan-beam (in the transaxial plane) direction. Hence, highly X-ray opaque objects (e.g. cables from the interventional setup) outside the reconstruction field of view, yield streak artifacts in the reconstruction volume. To decrease the impact of these streaks a cable tracking approach on the 2D projection sequences with subsequent interpolation is applied. The proposed approach uses the fact that the projected position of objects outside the reconstruction volume depends strongly on the projection perspective. By tracking candidate points over multiple projections only objects outside the reconstruction volume are segmented in the projections. The method is quantitatively evaluated based on 30 simulated CT data sets. The 3D root mean square deviation to a reference image could be reduced for all cases by an average of 50 % (min 16 %, max 76 %). Image quality improvement is shown for clinical whole heart data sets acquired on an interventional C-arm system.

  14. Image artefact propagation in motion estimation and reconstruction in interventional cardiac C-arm CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, K; Maier, A K; Schwemmer, C; Lauritsch, G; De Buck, S; Wielandts, J-Y; Hornegger, J; Fahrig, R

    2014-06-21

    The acquisition of data for cardiac imaging using a C-arm computed tomography system requires several seconds and multiple heartbeats. Hence, incorporation of motion correction in the reconstruction step may improve the resulting image quality. Cardiac motion can be estimated by deformable three-dimensional (3D)/3D registration performed on initial 3D images of different heart phases. This motion information can be used for a motion-compensated reconstruction allowing the use of all acquired data for image reconstruction. However, the result of the registration procedure and hence the estimated deformations are influenced by the quality of the initial 3D images. In this paper, the sensitivity of the 3D/3D registration step to the image quality of the initial images is studied. Different reconstruction algorithms are evaluated for a recently proposed cardiac C-arm CT acquisition protocol. The initial 3D images are all based on retrospective electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated data. ECG-gating of data from a single C-arm rotation provides only a few projections per heart phase for image reconstruction. This view sparsity leads to prominent streak artefacts and a poor signal to noise ratio. Five different initial image reconstructions are evaluated: (1) cone beam filtered-backprojection (FDK), (2) cone beam filtered-backprojection and an additional bilateral filter (FFDK), (3) removal of the shadow of dense objects (catheter, pacing electrode, etc) before reconstruction with a cone beam filtered-backprojection (cathFDK), (4) removal of the shadow of dense objects before reconstruction with a cone beam filtered-backprojection and a bilateral filter (cathFFDK). The last method (5) is an iterative few-view reconstruction (FV), the prior image constrained compressed sensing combined with the improved total variation algorithm. All reconstructions are investigated with respect to the final motion-compensated reconstruction quality. The algorithms were tested on a mathematical

  15. A framework of whole heart extracellular volume fraction estimation for low dose cardiac CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xinjian; Summers, Ronald M.; Nacif, Marcelo Souto; Liu, Songtao; Bluemke, David A.; Yao, Jianhua

    2012-02-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) has been well validated and allows quantification of myocardial fibrosis in comparison to overall mass of the myocardium. Unfortunately, CMRI is relatively expensive and is contraindicated in patients with intracardiac devices. Cardiac CT (CCT) is widely available and has been validated for detection of scar and myocardial stress/rest perfusion. In this paper, we sought to evaluate the potential of low dose CCT for the measurement of myocardial whole heart extracellular volume (ECV) fraction. A novel framework was proposed for CCT whole heart ECV estimation, which consists of three main steps. First, a shape constrained graph cut (GC) method was proposed for myocardium and blood pool segmentation for post-contrast image. Second, the symmetric Demons deformable registrations method was applied to register pre-contrast to post-contrast images. Finally, the whole heart ECV value was computed. The proposed method was tested on 7 clinical low dose CCT datasets with pre-contrast and post-contrast images. The preliminary results demonstrated the feasibility and efficiency of the proposed method.

  16. Cardiac motion correction based on partial angle reconstructed images in x-ray CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seungeon; Chang, Yongjin; Ra, Jong Beom, E-mail: jbra@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Electrical Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: Cardiac x-ray CT imaging is still challenging due to heart motion, which cannot be ignored even with the current rotation speed of the equipment. In response, many algorithms have been developed to compensate remaining motion artifacts by estimating the motion using projection data or reconstructed images. In these algorithms, accurate motion estimation is critical to the compensated image quality. In addition, since the scan range is directly related to the radiation dose, it is preferable to minimize the scan range in motion estimation. In this paper, the authors propose a novel motion estimation and compensation algorithm using a sinogram with a rotation angle of less than 360°. The algorithm estimates the motion of the whole heart area using two opposite 3D partial angle reconstructed (PAR) images and compensates the motion in the reconstruction process. Methods: A CT system scans the thoracic area including the heart over an angular range of 180° + α + β, where α and β denote the detector fan angle and an additional partial angle, respectively. The obtained cone-beam projection data are converted into cone-parallel geometry via row-wise fan-to-parallel rebinning. Two conjugate 3D PAR images, whose center projection angles are separated by 180°, are then reconstructed with an angular range of β, which is considerably smaller than a short scan range of 180° + α. Although these images include limited view angle artifacts that disturb accurate motion estimation, they have considerably better temporal resolution than a short scan image. Hence, after preprocessing these artifacts, the authors estimate a motion model during a half rotation for a whole field of view via nonrigid registration between the images. Finally, motion-compensated image reconstruction is performed at a target phase by incorporating the estimated motion model. The target phase is selected as that corresponding to a view angle that is orthogonal to the center view angles of

  17. Watermarked cardiac CT image segmentation using deformable models and the Hermite transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Coronel, Sandra L.; Moya-Albor, Ernesto; Escalante-Ramírez, Boris; Brieva, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Medical image watermarking is an open area for research and is a solution for the protection of copyright and intellectual property. One of the main challenges of this problem is that the marked images should not differ perceptually from the original images allowing a correct diagnosis and authentication. Furthermore, we also aim at obtaining watermarked images with very little numerical distortion so that computer vision tasks such as segmentation of important anatomical structures do not be impaired or affected. We propose a preliminary watermarking application in cardiac CT images based on a perceptive approach that includes a brightness model to generate a perceptive mask and identify the image regions where the watermark detection becomes a difficult task for the human eye. We propose a normalization scheme of the image in order to improve robustness against geometric attacks. We follow a spread spectrum technique to insert an alphanumeric code, such as patient's information, within the watermark. The watermark scheme is based on the Hermite transform as a bio-inspired image representation model. In order to evaluate the numerical integrity of the image data after watermarking, we perform a segmentation task based on deformable models. The segmentation technique is based on a vector-value level sets method such that, given a curve in a specific image, and subject to some constraints, the curve can evolve in order to detect objects. In order to stimulate the curve evolution we introduce simultaneously some image features like the gray level and the steered Hermite coefficients as texture descriptors. Segmentation performance was assessed by means of the Dice index and the Hausdorff distance. We tested different mark sizes and different insertion schemes on images that were later segmented either automatic or manual by physicians.

  18. Myocardial Extracellular Volume Fraction with Dual-Energy Equilibrium Contrast-enhanced Cardiac CT in Nonischemic Cardiomyopathy: A Prospective Comparison with Cardiac MR Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hye-Jeong; Im, Dong Jin; Youn, Jong-Chan; Chang, Suyon; Suh, Young Joo; Hong, Yoo Jin; Kim, Young Jin; Hur, Jin; Choi, Byoung Wook

    2016-07-01

    Purpose To evaluate the feasibility of equilibrium contrast material-enhanced dual-energy cardiac computed tomography (CT) to determine extracellular volume fraction (ECV) in nonischemic cardiomyopathy (CMP) compared with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Materials and Methods This study was approved by the institutional review board; informed consent was obtained. Seven healthy subjects and 23 patients (six with hypertrophic CMP, nine with dilated CMP, four with amyloidosis, and four with sarcoidosis) (mean age ± standard deviation, 57.33 years ± 14.82; 19 male participants [63.3%]) were prospectively enrolled. Twelve minutes after contrast material injection (1.8 mL/kg at 3 mL/sec), dual-energy cardiac CT was performed. ECV was measured by two observers independently. Hematocrit levels were compared between healthy subjects and patients with the Mann-Whitney U test. In per-subject analysis, interobserver agreement for CT was assessed with the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), and intertest agreement between MR imaging and CT was assessed with Bland-Altman analysis. In per-segment analysis, Student t tests in the linear mixed model were used to compare ECV on CT images between healthy subjects and patients. Results Hematocrit level was 43.44% ± 1.80 for healthy subjects and 41.23% ± 5.61 for patients with MR imaging (P = .16) and 43.50% ± 1.92 for healthy subjects and 41.35% ± 5.92 for patients with CT (P = .15). For observer 1 in per-subject analysis, ECV was 34.18% ± 8.98 for MR imaging and 34.48% ± 8.97 for CT. For observer 2, myocardial ECV was 34.42% ± 9.03 for MR imaging and 33.98% ± 9.05 for CT. Interobserver agreement for ECV at CT was excellent (ICC = 0.987). Bland-Altman analysis between MR imaging and CT showed a small bias (-0.06%), with 95% limits of agreement of -1.19 and 1.79. Compared with healthy subjects, patients with hypertrophic CMP, dilated CMP, amyloidosis, and sarcoidosis had significantly higher myocardial ECV at dual

  19. A framework of whole heart extracellular volume fraction estimation for low-dose cardiac CT images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xinjian; Nacif, Marcelo S; Liu, Songtao; Sibley, Christopher; Summers, Ronald M; Bluemke, David A; Yao, Jianhua

    2012-09-01

    Cardiac CT (CCT) is widely available and has been validated for the detection of focal myocardial scar using a delayed enhancement technique in this paper. CCT, however, has not been previously evaluated for quantification of diffuse myocardial fibrosis. In our investigation, we sought to evaluate the potential of low-dose CCT for the measurement of myocardial whole heart extracellular volume (ECV) fraction. ECV is altered under conditions of increased myocardial fibrosis. A framework consisting of three main steps was proposed for CCT whole heart ECV estimation. First, a shape-constrained graph cut (GC) method was proposed for myocardium and blood pool segmentation on postcontrast image. Second, the symmetric demons deformable registration method was applied to register precontrast to postcontrast images. So the correspondences between the voxels from precontrast to postcontrast images were established. Finally, the whole heart ECV value was computed. The proposed method was tested on 20 clinical low-dose CCT datasets with precontrast and postcontrast images. The preliminary results demonstrated the feasibility and efficiency of the proposed method.

  20. Assessing Cardiac Injury in Mice With Dual Energy-MicroCT, 4D-MicroCT, and MicroSPECT Imaging After Partial Heart Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chang-Lung; Min, Hooney [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Befera, Nicholas; Clark, Darin; Qi, Yi [Center for In Vivo Microscopy, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Das, Shiva [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Johnson, G. Allan; Badea, Cristian T. [Center for In Vivo Microscopy, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Kirsch, David G., E-mail: david.kirsch@duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To develop a mouse model of cardiac injury after partial heart irradiation (PHI) and to test whether dual energy (DE)-microCT and 4-dimensional (4D)-microCT can be used to assess cardiac injury after PHI to complement myocardial perfusion imaging using micro-single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Methods and Materials: To study cardiac injury from tangent field irradiation in mice, we used a small-field biological irradiator to deliver a single dose of 12 Gy x-rays to approximately one-third of the left ventricle (LV) of Tie2Cre; p53{sup FL/+} and Tie2Cre; p53{sup FL/−} mice, where 1 or both alleles of p53 are deleted in endothelial cells. Four and 8 weeks after irradiation, mice were injected with gold and iodinated nanoparticle-based contrast agents, and imaged with DE-microCT and 4D-microCT to evaluate myocardial vascular permeability and cardiac function, respectively. Additionally, the same mice were imaged with microSPECT to assess myocardial perfusion. Results: After PHI with tangent fields, DE-microCT scans showed a time-dependent increase in accumulation of gold nanoparticles (AuNp) in the myocardium of Tie2Cre; p53{sup FL/−} mice. In Tie2Cre; p53{sup FL/−} mice, extravasation of AuNp was observed within the irradiated LV, whereas in the myocardium of Tie2Cre; p53{sup FL/+} mice, AuNp were restricted to blood vessels. In addition, data from DE-microCT and microSPECT showed a linear correlation (R{sup 2} = 0.97) between the fraction of the LV that accumulated AuNp and the fraction of LV with a perfusion defect. Furthermore, 4D-microCT scans demonstrated that PHI caused a markedly decreased ejection fraction, and higher end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes, to develop in Tie2Cre; p53{sup FL/−} mice, which were associated with compensatory cardiac hypertrophy of the heart that was not irradiated. Conclusions: Our results show that DE-microCT and 4D-microCT with nanoparticle-based contrast agents are novel imaging approaches

  1. Investigation of saddle trajectories for cardiac CT imaging in cone-beam geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pack, Jed D [Department of Radiology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Noo, Frederic [Department of Radiology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Kudo, H [Department of Computer Science, Graduate School of Systems and Information Engineering, University of Tsukuba (Japan)

    2004-06-07

    This paper investigates cone-beam tomography for a wide class of x-ray source trajectories called saddles. In particular, a mathematical analysis of the number of intersections between a saddle and an arbitrary plane is given. This analysis demonstrates that axially truncated cone-beam projections acquired along a saddle can be used for exact reconstruction at any point in a large volume. The reconstruction can be achieved either using a new algorithm presented herein or using a formula recently introduced by Katsevich (2003 Int. J. Math. Math. Sci. 21 1305-21). The shape of the reconstructed volume and the properties of saddles make saddles attractive for cardiac imaging. Three examples of saddles are presented with a discussion of implementation on devices similar to modern C-arm systems and multislice CT scanners. Reconstruction with one of these saddles has been tested using computer-simulated data, with and without truncation. The imaged phantom for the truncated data is a FORBILD head phantom (representing the heart) that has been modified and embedded inside the FORBILD thorax phantom. The non-truncated data were generated by excluding the thorax. The reconstructed images demonstrate the accuracy of the mathematical results.

  2. Ultra-low dose comprehensive cardiac CT imaging in a patient with acute myocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tröbs, Monique; Brand, Michael; Achenbach, Stephan; Marwan, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    The ability of contrast-enhanced CT to detect "late enhancement" in a fashion similar to magnetic resonance imaging has been previously reported. We report a case of acute myocarditis with coronary CT angiography as well as "late enhancement" imaging with ultra-low effective radiation dose.

  3. New Applications of Cardiac Computed Tomography Dual-Energy, Spectral, and Molecular CT Imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Danad, Ibrahim; Fayad, Zahi A.; Willemink, Martin J.; Min, James K.

    2015-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) has evolved into a powerful diagnostic tool, and it is impossible to imagine current clinical practice without CT imaging. Because of its widespread availability, ease of clinical application, superb sensitivity for the detection of coronary artery disease, and noninvasive n

  4. Cardiac imaging in adults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaffe, C.C.

    1987-01-01

    This book approaches adult cardiac disease from the correlative imaging perspective. It includes chest X-rays and angiographs, 2-dimensional echocardiograms with explanatory diagrams for clarity, plus details on digital radiology, nuclear medicine techniques, CT and MRI. It also covers the normal heart, valvular heart disease, myocardial disease, pericardial disease, bacterial endocarditis, aortic aneurysm, cardiac tumors, and congenital heart disease of the adult. It points out those aspects where one imaging technique has significant superiority.

  5. Cardiac hybrid imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaemperli, Oliver [University Hospital Zurich, Cardiac Imaging, Zurich (Switzerland); University Hospital Zurich, Nuclear Cardiology, Cardiovascular Center, Zurich (Switzerland); Kaufmann, Philipp A. [University Hospital Zurich, Cardiac Imaging, Zurich (Switzerland); Alkadhi, Hatem [University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-05-15

    Hybrid cardiac single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT imaging allows combined assessment of anatomical and functional aspects of cardiac disease. In coronary artery disease (CAD), hybrid SPECT/CT imaging allows detection of coronary artery stenosis and myocardial perfusion abnormalities. The clinical value of hybrid imaging has been documented in several subsets of patients. In selected groups of patients, hybrid imaging improves the diagnostic accuracy to detect CAD compared to the single imaging techniques. Additionally, this approach facilitates functional interrogation of coronary stenoses and guidance with regard to revascularization procedures. Moreover, the anatomical information obtained from CT coronary angiography or coronary artery calcium scores (CACS) adds prognostic information over perfusion data from SPECT. The use of cardiac hybrid imaging has been favoured by the dissemination of dedicated hybrid systems and the release of dedicated image fusion software, which allow simple patient throughput for hybrid SPECT/CT studies. Further technological improvements such as more efficient detector technology to allow for low-radiation protocols, ultra-fast image acquisition and improved low-noise image reconstruction algorithms will be instrumental to further promote hybrid SPECT/CT in research and clinical practice. (orig.)

  6. Gated cardiac imaging using a continuously rotating CT scanner: clinical evaluation of 91 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyama, Y; Uji, T; Hirayama, T; Inada, Y; Ishikawa, T; Fujii, M

    1984-05-01

    To produce electrocardiographically (ECG)-gated computed tomographic (CT) images of the heart, a post-data-acquisition ECG correlation technique was used in which data for missing angular projections are derived from the original scan data to complete 360 angular projections. Improved image quality and clinical usefulness were demonstrated compared with routine nongated CT and two-dimensional echocardiography. Gated CT was better than nongated CT in 26 of 41 positive and three of five negative cases of suspected myocardial infarction, four of 10 positive and one of 12 negative cases of suspected left atrial mass, three of 10 cases with pericardial fluid collection, and three other cases. Compared with echocardiography, CT was of additional value in eight of 10 cases of myocardial infarction, five of nine positive and one of 10 negative cases of suspected left atrial mass, four of 10 positive and one of three negative cases of suspected pericardial fluid collection, and two other cases. The equipment required for CT gating is of low cost, but the examination time is lengthy and less conveniently performed than echocardiography. However, when echocardiography is indecisive or suspected to be falsely negative, gated CT imaging of the heart is recommended.

  7. Prospective-gated cardiac micro-CT imaging of free-breathing mice using carbon nanotube field emission x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Guohua; Burk, Laurel M.; Lee, Yueh Z.; Calderon-Colon, Xiomara; Sultana, Shabana; Lu, Jianping; Zhou, Otto

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Carbon nanotube (CNT) based field emission x-ray source technology has recently been investigated for diagnostic imaging applications because of its attractive characteristics including electronic programmability, fast switching, distributed source, and multiplexing. The purpose of this article is to demonstrate the potential of this technology for high-resolution prospective-gated cardiac micro-CT imaging. Methods: A dynamic cone-beam micro-CT scanner was constructed using a rotating gantry, a stationary mouse bed, a flat-panel detector, and a sealed CNT based microfocus x-ray source. The compact single-beam CNT x-ray source was operated at 50 KVp and 2 mA anode current with 100 μm×100 μm effective focal spot size. Using an intravenously administered iodinated blood-pool contrast agent, prospective cardiac and respiratory-gated micro-CT images of beating mouse hearts were obtained from ten anesthetized free-breathing mice in their natural position. Four-dimensional cardiac images were also obtained by gating the image acquisition to different phases in the cardiac cycle. Results: High-resolution CT images of beating mouse hearts were obtained at 15 ms temporal resolution and 6.2 lp∕mm spatial resolution at 10% of system MTF. The images were reconstructed at 76 μm isotropic voxel size. The data acquisition time for two cardiac phases was 44±9 min. The CT values observed within the ventricles and the ventricle wall were 455±49 and 120±48 HU, respectively. The entrance dose for the acquisition of a single phase of the cardiac cycle was 0.10 Gy. Conclusions: A high-resolution dynamic micro-CT scanner was developed from a compact CNT microfocus x-ray source and its feasibility for prospective-gated cardiac micro-CT imaging of free-breathing mice under their natural position was demonstrated. PMID:21089765

  8. Prospective-gated cardiac micro-CT imaging of free-breathing mice using carbon nanotube field emission x-ray

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao Guohua; Burk, Laurel M.; Lee, Yueh Z.; Calderon-Colon, Xiomara; Sultana, Shabana; Lu Jianping; Zhou, Otto [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 and Department of Radiology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Curriculum in Applied Sciences and Engineering, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States) and Curriculum in Applied Sciences and Engineering, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Curriculum in Applied Sciences and Engineering, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States) and Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    Purpose: Carbon nanotube (CNT) based field emission x-ray source technology has recently been investigated for diagnostic imaging applications because of its attractive characteristics including electronic programmability, fast switching, distributed source, and multiplexing. The purpose of this article is to demonstrate the potential of this technology for high-resolution prospective-gated cardiac micro-CT imaging. Methods: A dynamic cone-beam micro-CT scanner was constructed using a rotating gantry, a stationary mouse bed, a flat-panel detector, and a sealed CNT based microfocus x-ray source. The compact single-beam CNT x-ray source was operated at 50 KVp and 2 mA anode current with 100 {mu}mx100 {mu}m effective focal spot size. Using an intravenously administered iodinated blood-pool contrast agent, prospective cardiac and respiratory-gated micro-CT images of beating mouse hearts were obtained from ten anesthetized free-breathing mice in their natural position. Four-dimensional cardiac images were also obtained by gating the image acquisition to different phases in the cardiac cycle. Results: High-resolution CT images of beating mouse hearts were obtained at 15 ms temporal resolution and 6.2 lp/mm spatial resolution at 10% of system MTF. The images were reconstructed at 76 {mu}m isotropic voxel size. The data acquisition time for two cardiac phases was 44{+-}9 min. The CT values observed within the ventricles and the ventricle wall were 455{+-}49 and 120{+-}48 HU, respectively. The entrance dose for the acquisition of a single phase of the cardiac cycle was 0.10 Gy. Conclusions: A high-resolution dynamic micro-CT scanner was developed from a compact CNT microfocus x-ray source and its feasibility for prospective-gated cardiac micro-CT imaging of free-breathing mice under their natural position was demonstrated.

  9. Prospective-gated cardiac micro-CT imaging of free-breathing mice using carbon nanotube field emission x-ray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Guohua; Burk, Laurel M; Lee, Yueh Z; Calderon-Colon, Xiomara; Sultana, Shabana; Lu, Jianping; Zhou, Otto

    2010-10-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) based field emission x-ray source technology has recently been investigated for diagnostic imaging applications because of its attractive characteristics including electronic programmability, fast switching, distributed source, and multiplexing. The purpose of this article is to demonstrate the potential of this technology for high-resolution prospective-gated cardiac micro-CT imaging. A dynamic cone-beam micro-CT scanner was constructed using a rotating gantry, a stationary mouse bed, a flat-panel detector, and a sealed CNT based microfocus x-ray source. The compact single-beam CNT x-ray source was operated at 50 KVp and 2 mA anode current with 100 microm x 100 microm effective focal spot size. Using an intravenously administered iodinated blood-pool contrast agent, prospective cardiac and respiratory-gated micro-CT images of beating mouse hearts were obtained from ten anesthetized free-breathing mice in their natural position. Four-dimensional cardiac images were also obtained by gating the image acquisition to different phases in the cardiac cycle. High-resolution CT images of beating mouse hearts were obtained at 15 ms temporal resolution and 6.2 lp/mm spatial resolution at 10% of system MTF. The images were reconstructed at 76 microm isotropic voxel size. The data acquisition time for two cardiac phases was 44 +/- 9 min. The CT values observed within the ventricles and the ventricle wall were 455 +/- 49 and 120 +/- 48 HU, respectively. The entrance dose for the acquisition of a single phase of the cardiac cycle was 0.10 Gy. A high-resolution dynamic micro-CT scanner was developed from a compact CNT microfocus x-ray source and its feasibility for prospective-gated cardiac micro-CT imaging of free-breathing mice under their natural position was demonstrated.

  10. Cardiac fusion and complex congenital cardiac defects in thoracopagus twins: diagnostic value of cardiac CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goo, Hyun Woo [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jeong-Jun [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Pediatric Cardiac Surgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ellen Ai-Rhan [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Division of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Won, Hye-Sung [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    Most thoracopagus twins present with cardiac fusion and associated congenital cardiac defects, and assessment of this anatomy is of critical importance in determining patient care and outcome. Cardiac CT with electrocardiographic triggering provides an accurate and quick morphological assessment of both intracardiac and extracardiac structures in newborns, making it the best imaging modality to assess thoracopagus twins during the neonatal period. In this case report, we highlight the diagnostic value of cardiac CT in thoracopagus twins with an interatrial channel and complex congenital cardiac defects. (orig.)

  11. Quantitative assessment of left ventricular function with dual-source CT in comparison to cardiac magnetic resonance imaging: initial findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busch, S.; Johnson, T.R.C.; Wintersperger, B.J.; Minaifar, N.; Bhargava, A.; Rist, C.; Reiser, M.F.; Becker, C.; Nikolaou, K. [University of Munich, Department of Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany)

    2008-03-15

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and echocardiography are currently regarded as standard modalities for the quantification of left ventricular volumes and ejection fraction. With the recent introduction of dual-source computedtomography (DSCT), the increased temporal resolution of 83 ms should also improve the assessment of cardiac function in CT. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of DSCT in the assessment of left ventricular functional parameters with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as standard of reference. Fifteen patients (two female, 13 male; mean age 50.8 {+-} 19.2 years) underwent CT and MRI examinations on a DSCT (Somatom Definition; Siemens Medical Solutions, Forchheim, Germany) and a 3.0-Tesla MR scanner (Magnetom Trio; Siemens Medical Solutions), respectively. Multiphase axial CT images were analysed with a semiautomatic region growing algorithms (Syngo Circulation; Siemens Medical Solutions) by two independent blinded observers. In MRI, dynamic cine loops of short axis slices were evaluated with semiautomatic contour detection software (ARGUS; Siemens Medical Solutions) independently by two readers. End-systolic volume (ESV), end-diastolic volume (EDV), ejection fraction (EF) and stroke volume (SV) were determined for both modalities, and correlation coefficient, systematic error, limits of agreement and inter-observer variability were assessed. In DSCT, EDV and ESV were 135.8 {+-} 41.9 ml and 54.9 {+-} 29.6 ml, respectively, compared with 132.1 {+-} 40.8 ml EDV and 57.6 {+-} 27.3 ml ESV in MRI. Thus, EDV was overestimated by 3.7 ml (limits of agreement -46.1/+53.6), while ESV was underestimated by 2.6 ml (-36.6/+31.4). Mean EF was 61.6 {+-} 12.4% in DSCT and 57.9 {+-} 9.0% in MRI, resulting in an overestimation of EF by 3.8% with limits of agreement at -14.7 and +22.2%. Rank correlation rho values were 0.81 for EDV (P = 0.0024), 0.79 for ESV (P = 0.0031) and 0.64 for EF (P = 0.0168). The kappa value of inter

  12. Estimation of diastolic filling pressure with cardiac CT in comparison with echocardiography using tissue doppler imaging: Determination of optimal CT reconstruction parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Ji Sun; Suh, Jon; Lee, Heon [Soonchunhyang University Hospital Bucheon, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Bora [Dept. of Biostatistics, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Soo Jeong [Terarecon Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jou, Sung Shick [Dept. of Radiology, Soonchunhyang University Hospital Cheonan, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Hyun Kyung [Dept. of Radiology, Soonchunhyang University Hospital Seoul, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-08-01

    To determine the optimal CT image reconstruction parameters for the measurement of early transmitral peak velocity (E), early peak mitral septal tissue velocity (E′), and E / E′. Forty-six patients underwent simultaneous cardiac CT and echocardiography on the same day. Four CT datasets were reconstructed with a slice thickness/interval of 0.9/0.9 mm or 3/3 mm at 10 (10% RR-interval) or 20 (5% RR-interval) RR-intervals. The E was calculated by dividing the peak transmitral flow (mL/s) by the corresponding mitral valve area (cm{sup 2}). E′ was calculated from the changes in the left ventricular length per cardiac phase. E / E′ was then estimated and compared with that from echocardiography. For assessment of E / E′, CT and echocardiography were more strongly correlated (p < 0.05) with a slice thickness of 0.9 mm and 5% RR-interval (r = 0.77) than with 3 mm or 10% RR-interval. The diagnostic accuracy of predicting elevated filling pressure (E / E′ ≥ 13, n = 14) was better with a slice thickness of 0.9 mm and 5% RR-interval (87.0%) than with 0.9 mm and 10% RR-interval (71.7%) (p = 0.123) and significantly higher than that with a slice thickness of 3 mm with 5% (67.4%) and 10% RR-interval (63.0%), (p < 0.05), respectively. Data reconstruction with a slice thickness of 0.9 mm at 5% RR-interval is superior to that with a slice thickness of 3 mm or 10% RR-interval in terms of the correlation of E / E′ between CT and echocardiography. Thin slices and frequent sampling also allow for more accurate prediction of elevated filling pressure.

  13. Bicuspid aortic valves: Diagnostic accuracy of standard axial 64-slice chest CT compared to aortic valve image plane ECG-gated cardiac CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, David J., E-mail: david.murphy@st-vincents.ie [Department of Radiology, St Vincent' s University Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland); McEvoy, Sinead H., E-mail: s.mcevoy@st-vincents.ie [Department of Radiology, St Vincent' s University Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Iyengar, Sri, E-mail: sri.iyengar@nhs.net [Department of Radiology, Plymouth Hospitals NHS Trust, Plymouth Devon PL6 8DH (United Kingdom); Feuchtner, Gudrun, E-mail: Gudrun.Feuchtner@i-med.ac.at [Department of Radiology, Innsbruck Medical University, Anichstr. 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Cury, Ricardo C., E-mail: r.cury@baptisthealth.net [Department of Radiology, Baptist Cardiac and Vascular Institute, 8900 North Kendall Drive, Miami, FL 33176 (United States); Roobottom, Carl, E-mail: carl.roobottom@nhs.net [Department of Radiology, Plymouth Hospitals NHS Trust, Plymouth Devon PL6 8DH (United Kingdom); Plymouth University Peninsula Schools of Medicine and Dentistry (United Kingdom); Baumueller, Stephan, E-mail: Hatem.Alkadhi@usz.ch [Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Zurich, Raemistrasse 100, CH-8091 Zurich (Switzerland); Alkadhi, Hatem, E-mail: stephan.baumueller@usz.ch [Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Zurich, Raemistrasse 100, CH-8091 Zurich (Switzerland); Dodd, Jonathan D., E-mail: jonniedodd@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, St Vincent' s University Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland)

    2014-08-15

    Objectives: To assess the diagnostic accuracy of standard axial 64-slice chest CT compared to aortic valve image plane ECG-gated cardiac CT for bicuspid aortic valves. Materials and methods: The standard axial chest CT scans of 20 patients with known bicuspid aortic valves were blindly, randomly analyzed for (i) the appearance of the valve cusps, (ii) the largest aortic sinus area, (iii) the longest aortic cusp length, (iv) the thickest aortic valve cusp and (v) valve calcification. A second blinded reader independently analyzed the appearance of the valve cusps. Forty-two age- and sex-matched patients with known tricuspid aortic valves were used as controls. Retrospectively ECG-gated cardiac CT multiphase reconstructions of the aortic valve were used as the gold-standard. Results: Fourteen (21%) scans were scored as unevaluable (7 bicuspid, 7 tricuspid). Of the remainder, there were 13 evaluable bicuspid valves, ten of which showed an aortic valve line sign, while the remaining three showed a normal Mercedes-Benz appearance owing to fused valve cusps. The 35 evaluable tricuspid aortic valves all showed a normal Mercedes-Benz appearance (P = 0.001). Kappa analysis = 0.62 indicating good interobserver agreement for the aortic valve cusp appearance. Aortic sinus areas, aortic cusp lengths and aortic cusp thicknesses of ≥3.8 cm{sup 2}, 3.2 cm and 1.6 mm respectively on standard axial chest CT best distinguished bicuspid from tricuspid aortic valves (P < 0.0001 for all). Of evaluable scans, the sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of standard axial chest CT in diagnosing bicuspid aortic valves was 77% (CI 0.54–1.0), 100%, 100% and 70% respectively. Conclusion: The aortic valve is evaluable in approximately 80% of standard chest 64-slice CT scans. Bicuspid aortic valves may be diagnosed on evaluable scans with good diagnostic accuracy. An aortic valve line sign, enlarged aortic sinuses and elongated, thickened valve cusps are specific CT

  14. Practical textbook of cardiac CT and MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Tae-Hwan (ed.) [ASAN Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Radiology

    2015-04-01

    Guide to the interpretation of cardiac CT and MRI for the purposes of diagnosis, treatment planning, and follow-up. Emphasis on applications in a wide range of real clinical situations. Numerous informative illustrations. Summarizing sections permitting rapid retrieval of information. QR codes allowing access to references, additional figures, and motion pictures from the internet. This up-to-date textbook comprehensively reviews all aspects of cardiac CT and MRI and demonstrates the value of these techniques in clinical practice. A wide range of applications are considered, including imaging of atherosclerotic and non-atherosclerotic coronary artery disease, coronary revascularization, ischemic heart disease, non-ischemic cardiomyopathy, valvular heart disease, cardiac tumors, and pericardial disease. The numerous high-quality images illustrate how to interpret cardiac CT and MRI correctly for the purposes of diagnosis, treatment planning, and follow-up. Helpful summarizing sections in every chapter will facilitate rapid retrieval of information. This book will be of great value to radiologists and cardiologists seeking a reliable guide to the optimal use of cardiac CT and MRI in real clinical situations.

  15. Cardiac imaging with multi-sector data acquisition in volumetric CT: variation of effective temporal resolution and its potential clinical consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiangyang; Hsieh, Jiang; Taha, Basel H.; Vass, Melissa L.; Seamans, John L.; Okerlund, Darin R.

    2009-02-01

    With increasing longitudinal detector dimension available in diagnostic volumetric CT, step-and-shoot scan is becoming popular for cardiac imaging. In comparison to helical scan, step-and-shoot scan decouples patient table movement from cardiac gating/triggering, which facilitates the cardiac imaging via multi-sector data acquisition, as well as the administration of inter-cycle heart beat variation (arrhythmia) and radiation dose efficiency. Ideally, a multi-sector data acquisition can improve temporal resolution at a factor the same as the number of sectors (best scenario). In reality, however, the effective temporal resolution is jointly determined by gantry rotation speed and patient heart beat rate, which may significantly lower than the ideal or no improvement (worst scenario). Hence, it is clinically relevant to investigate the behavior of effective temporal resolution in cardiac imaging with multi-sector data acquisition. In this study, a 5-second cine scan of a porcine heart, which cascades 6 porcine cardiac cycles, is acquired. In addition to theoretical analysis and motion phantom study, the clinical consequences due to the effective temporal resolution variation are evaluated qualitative or quantitatively. By employing a 2-sector image reconstruction strategy, a total of 15 (the permutation of P(6, 2)) cases between the best and worst scenarios are studied, providing informative guidance for the design and optimization of CT cardiac imaging in volumetric CT with multi-sector data acquisition.

  16. Dynamic CT myocardial perfusion imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, Damiano; Eid, Marwen; Schoepf, U Joseph; Jin, Kwang Nam; Varga-Szemes, Akos; Tesche, Christian; Mangold, Stefanie; Spandorfer, Adam; Laghi, Andrea; De Cecco, Carlo N

    2016-10-01

    Non-invasive cardiac imaging has rapidly evolved during the last decade due to advancements in CT based technologies. Coronary CT angiography has been shown to reliably assess coronary anatomy and detect high risk coronary artery disease. However, this technique is limited to anatomical assessment, thus non-invasive techniques for functional assessment of the heart are necessary. CT myocardial perfusion is a new CT based technique that provides functional assessment of the myocardium and allows for a comprehensive assessment of coronary artery disease with a single modality when combined with CTA. This review aims to discuss dynamic CT myocardial perfusion as a new technique in the assessment of CAD.

  17. Downstream resource utilization following hybrid cardiac imaging with an integrated cadmium-zinc-telluride/64-slice CT device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiechter, Michael; Kaufmann, Philipp A. [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Radiology, Cardiac Imaging, Zurich (Switzerland); University of Zurich, Zurich Center for Integrative Human Physiology (ZIHP), Zurich (Switzerland); Ghadri, Jelena R.; Wolfrum, Mathias; Kuest, Silke M.; Pazhenkottil, Aju P.; Nkoulou, Rene N.; Herzog, Bernhard A.; Gebhard, Catherine; Fuchs, Tobias A.; Gaemperli, Oliver [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Radiology, Cardiac Imaging, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2012-03-15

    Low yield of invasive coronary angiography and unnecessary coronary interventions have been identified as key cost drivers in cardiology for evaluation of coronary artery disease (CAD). This has fuelled the search for noninvasive techniques providing comprehensive functional and anatomical information on coronary lesions. We have evaluated the impact of implementation of a novel hybrid cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT)/64-slice CT camera into the daily clinical routine on downstream resource utilization. Sixty-two patients with known or suspected CAD were referred for same-day single-session hybrid evaluation with CZT myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) and coronary CT angiography (CCTA). Hybrid MPI/CCTA images from the integrated CZT/CT camera served for decision-making towards conservative versus invasive management. Based on the hybrid images patients were classified into those with and those without matched findings. Matched findings were defined as the combination of MPI defect with a stenosis by CCTA in the coronary artery subtending the respective territory. All patients with normal MPI and CCTA as well as those with isolated MPI or CCTA finding or combined but unmatched findings were categorized as ''no match''. All 23 patients with a matched finding underwent invasive coronary angiography and 21 (91%) were revascularized. Of the 39 patients with no match, 5 (13%, p < 0.001 vs matched) underwent catheterization and 3 (8%, p < 0.001 vs matched) were revascularized. Cardiac hybrid imaging in CAD evaluation has a profound impact on patient management and may contribute to optimal downstream resource utilization. (orig.)

  18. Is metal artefact reduction mandatory in cardiac PET/CT imaging in the presence of pacemaker and implantable cardioverter defibrillator leads?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghafarian, Pardis [Shahid Beheshti University, Department of Radiation Medicine, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Geneva University Hospital, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Research Center for Science and Technology in Medicine, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Aghamiri, S.M.R. [Shahid Beheshti University, Department of Radiation Medicine, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ay, Mohammad R. [Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Research Center for Science and Technology in Medicine, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Research Institute for Nuclear Medicine, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rahmim, Arman [Johns Hopkins University, Department of Radiology, Baltimore, MD (United States); Schindler, Thomas H. [Geneva University, Cardiovascular Center, Nuclear Cardiology, Geneva (Switzerland); Ratib, Osman [Geneva University Hospital, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Zaidi, Habib [Geneva University Hospital, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Geneva University, Geneva Neuroscience Center, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2011-02-15

    Cardiac PET/CT imaging is often performed in patients with pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) leads. However, metallic implants usually produce artefacts on CT images which might propagate to CT-based attenuation-corrected (CTAC) PET images. The impact of metal artefact reduction (MAR) for CTAC of cardiac PET/CT images in the presence of pacemaker, ICD and ECG leads was investigated using both qualitative and quantitative analysis in phantom and clinical studies. The study included 14 patients with various leads undergoing perfusion and viability examinations using dedicated cardiac PET/CT protocols. The PET data were corrected for attenuation using both artefactual CT images and CT images corrected using the MAR algorithm. The severity and magnitude of metallic artefacts arising from these leads were assessed on both linear attenuation coefficient maps ({mu}-maps) and attenuation-corrected PET images. CT and PET emission data were obtained using an anthropomorphic thorax phantom and a dedicated heart phantom made in-house incorporating pacemaker and ICD leads attached at the right ventricle of the heart. Volume of interest-based analysis and regression plots were performed for regions related to the lead locations. Bull's eye view analysis was also performed on PET images corrected for attenuation with and without the MAR algorithm. In clinical studies, the visual assessment of PET images by experienced physicians and quantitative analysis did not reveal erroneous interpretation of the tracer distribution or significant differences when PET images were corrected for attenuation with and without MAR. In phantom studies, the mean differences between tracer uptake obtained without and with MAR were 10.16{+-}2.1% and 6.86{+-}2.1% in the segments of the heart in the vicinity of metallic ICD or pacemaker leads, and were 4.43{+-}0.5% and 2.98{+-}0.5% in segments far from the leads. Although the MAR algorithm was able to effectively improve

  19. Image Registration and Analysis for Quantitative Myocardial Perfusion: Application to Dynamic Circular Cardiac CT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Isola, A.; Schmitt, H.; Van Stevendaal, U.; Begemann, P.G.C.; Coulon, P.; Boussel, L.; Grass, M.

    2012-01-01

    Large area detector computed tomography systems with fastrotating gantries enable volumetric dynamic cardiac perfusion studies. Prospectively ECG-triggered acquisitions limit the data acquisition to a predefined cardiac phase and thereby reduce X-ray dose andlimit motion artifacts. Even in the case

  20. Image Registration and Analysis for Quantitative Myocardial Perfusion: Application to Dynamic Circular Cardiac CT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Isola, A.; Schmitt, H.; Van Stevendaal, U.; Begemann, P.G.C.; Coulon, P.; Boussel, L.; Grass, M.

    2012-01-01

    Large area detector computed tomography systems with fastrotating gantries enable volumetric dynamic cardiac perfusion studies. Prospectively ECG-triggered acquisitions limit the data acquisition to a predefined cardiac phase and thereby reduce X-ray dose andlimit motion artifacts. Even in the case

  1. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging with cardiac synchronization in chronic thrombosis of main pulmonary arteries. A case review with CT scan imaging correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coulomb, M.; Wolf, J.E.; Rose-Pittet, L.; Le Bas, J.F.; Dalsoglio, S.; Paramelle, B.

    Results of nuclear magnetic resonance exploration in a patient with chronic thrombosis of main pulmonary arteries are used to outline an elementary semiology in agreement with current documented data. Signs observed relate to the thrombosis and showing of flow due to associated pulmonary artery hypertension. Cardiac synchronization is essential: obtaining 2 echos by the spin-echo technique allows differentiation of circulatory slowing phenomena, which provoke increased strength of 2nd echo, from the thrombus itself. Correlations established with V/Q scintigraphy, angiography and CT scan findings in this case provided preliminary evaluation of use of this imaging technique in this affection.

  2. Cardiac CT angiography in children with congenital heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siripornpitak, Suvipaporn, E-mail: ssiripornpitak@yahoo.com [Division of Diagnostic Radiology, Department of Diagnostic and Therapeutic Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Pornkul, Ratanaporn [Division of Diagnostic Radiology, Department of Diagnostic and Therapeutic Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Khowsathit, Pongsak [Pediatric Cardiac Unit, Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Layangool, Thanarat; Promphan, Worakan [Pediatric Cardiology Unit, Queen Sirikit National Institute of Child Health, Bangkok (Thailand); Pongpanich, Boonchob [Pediatric Cardiac Unit, Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand)

    2013-07-15

    Cardiac imaging plays an important role in both congenital and acquired heart diseases. Cardiac computed tomography (angiography) cCT(A) is a non-invasive, increasingly popular, complementary modality to echocardiography in evaluation of congenital heart diseases (CHD) in children. Despite radiation exposure, cCT(A) is now commonly used for evaluation of the complex CHD, giving information of both intra-cardiac and extra-cardiac anatomy, coronary arteries, and vascular structures. This review article will focus on the fundamentals and essentials for performing cCT(A) in children, including radiation dose awareness, basic techniques, and strengths and weaknesses of cCT(A) compared with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (cMRI), and applications. The limitations of this modality will also be discussed, including the CHD for which cMRI may be substituted.

  3. Localized and efficient cardiac CT reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, D. P.; Badea, C. T.

    2017-03-01

    The superiority of iterative reconstruction techniques over classic analytical ones is well documented in a variety of CT imaging applications where radiation dose and sampling time are limiting factors. However, by definition, the iterative nature of advanced reconstruction techniques is accompanied by a substantial increase in data processing time. This problem is further exacerbated in temporal and spectral CT reconstruction problems where the gap between the amount of data acquired and the amount of data to be reconstructed is exaggerated within the framework of compressive sensing. Two keys to overcoming this barrier include (1) advancements in parallel-computing technology and (2) advancements in data-efficient reconstruction. In this work, we propose a novel, two-stage strategy for 4D cardiac CT reconstruction which leverages these two keys by (1) exploiting GPU computing hardware and by (2) reconstructing temporal contrast on a limited spatial domain. Following a review of the proposed algorithm, we demonstrate its application in retrospectively gated cardiac CT reconstruction using the 4D MOBY mouse phantom. Quantitatively, reconstructing the temporal contrast on a limited domain reduces the overall reconstruction error by 20% and the reconstruction error within the dynamic portion of the phantom by 15% (root-mean-square error metric). A complementary in vivo mouse experiment demonstrates a suitable reconstruction fidelity to allow the measurement of cardiac functional metrics while reducing computation time by 75% relative to direct reconstruction of ten phases of the cardiac cycle. We believe that the proposed algorithm will serve as the basis for novel, data-efficient, multi-dimensional CT reconstruction techniques.

  4. Cardiac Computed Tomography (Multidetector CT, or MDCT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Cardiac Computed Tomography (Multidetector CT, or MDCT) Updated:Sep 19, ... The ECG is also needed to help the computer that is connected to the CT scanner create ...

  5. Radiation dose assessment in a 320-detector-row CT scanner used in cardiac imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goma, Carles; Ruiz, Agustin; Jornet, Nuria; Latorre, Artur; Pallerol, Rosa M.; Carrasco, Pablo; Eudaldo, Teresa; Ribas, Montserrat [Servei de Radiofisica i Radioproteccio, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Sant Antoni Maria Claret 167, 08025 Barcelona (Spain)

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: In the present era of cone-beam CT scanners, the use of the standardized CTDI{sub 100} as a surrogate of the idealized CTDI is strongly discouraged and, consequently, so should be the use of the dose-length product (DLP) as an estimate of the total energy imparted to the patient. However, the DLP is still widely used as a reference quantity to normalize the effective dose for a given scan protocol mainly because the CTDI{sub 100} is an easy-to-measure quantity. The aim of this article is therefore to describe a method for radiation dose assessment in large cone-beam single axial scans, which leads to a straightforward estimation of the total energy imparted to the patient. The authors developed a method accessible to all medical physicists and easy to implement in clinical practice in an attempt to update the bridge between CT dosimetry and the estimation of the effective dose. Methods: The authors used commercially available material and a simple mathematical model. The method described herein is based on the dosimetry paradigm introduced by the AAPM Task Group 111. It consists of measuring the dose profiles at the center and the periphery of a long body phantom with a commercial solid-state detector. A weighted dose profile is then calculated from these measurements. To calculate the CT dosimetric quantities analytically, a Gaussian function was fitted to the dose profile data. Furthermore, the Gaussian model has the power to condense the z-axis information of the dose profile in two parameters: The single-scan central dose, f(0), and the width of the profile, {sigma}. To check the energy dependence of the solid-state detector, the authors compared the dose profiles to measurements made with a small volume ion chamber. To validate the overall method, the authors compared the CTDI{sub 100} calculated analytically to the measurement made with a 100 mm pencil ion chamber. Results: For the central and weighted dose profiles, the authors found a good

  6. Cardiac imaging. A multimodality approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thelen, Manfred [Johannes Gutenberg University Hospital, Mainz (Germany); Erbel, Raimund [University Hospital Essen (Germany). Dept. of Cardiology; Kreitner, Karl-Friedrich [Johannes Gutenberg University Hospital, Mainz (Germany). Clinic and Polyclinic for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Barkhausen, Joerg (eds.) [University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Luebeck (Germany). Dept. of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine

    2009-07-01

    An excellent atlas on modern diagnostic imaging of the heart Written by an interdisciplinary team of experts, Cardiac Imaging: A Multimodality Approach features an in-depth introduction to all current imaging modalities for the diagnostic assessment of the heart as well as a clinical overview of cardiac diseases and main indications for cardiac imaging. With a particular emphasis on CT and MRI, the first part of the atlas also covers conventional radiography, echocardiography, angiography and nuclear medicine imaging. Leading specialists demonstrate the latest advances in the field, and compare the strengths and weaknesses of each modality. The book's second part features clinical chapters on heart defects, endocarditis, coronary heart disease, cardiomyopathies, myocarditis, cardiac tumors, pericardial diseases, pulmonary vascular diseases, and diseases of the thoracic aorta. The authors address anatomy, pathophysiology, and clinical features, and evaluate the various diagnostic options. Key features: - Highly regarded experts in cardiology and radiology off er image-based teaching of the latest techniques - Readers learn how to decide which modality to use for which indication - Visually highlighted tables and essential points allow for easy navigation through the text - More than 600 outstanding images show up-to-date technology and current imaging protocols Cardiac Imaging: A Multimodality Approach is a must-have desk reference for cardiologists and radiologists in practice, as well as a study guide for residents in both fields. It will also appeal to cardiac surgeons, general practitioners, and medical physicists with a special interest in imaging of the heart. (orig.)

  7. Cardiac PET/CT with Rb-82: optimization of image acquisition and reconstruction parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilra, P; Gnesin, S; Allenbach, G; Monteiro, M; Prior, J O; Vieira, L; Pires Jorge, J A

    2017-12-01

    Our aim was to characterize the influence of time-of-flight (TOF) and point spread function (PSF) recovery corrections, as well as ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM) reconstruction parameters, in (82)Rb PET/CT quantification of myocardial blood flow (MBF) and myocardial flow reserve (MFR). Rest and stress list-mode dynamic (82)Rb PET acquisition data from 10 patients without myocardial flow defects and 10 patients with myocardial blood flow defects were reconstructed retrospectively. OSEM reconstructions were performed with Gaussian filters of 4, 6, and 8 mm, different iterations, and subset numbers (2 × 24; 2 × 16; 3 × 16; 4 × 16). Rest and stress global, regional, and segmental MBF and MFR were computed from time activity curves with FlowQuant(©) software. Left ventricular segmentation using the 17-segment American Heart Association model was obtained. Whole left ventricle (LV) MBF at rest and stress were 0.97 ± 0.30 and 2.30 ± 1.00 mL/min/g, respectively, and MFR was 2.40 ± 1.13. Concordance was excellent and all reconstruction parameters had no significant impact on MBF, except for the exclusion of TOF which led to significantly decreased concordance in rest and stress MBF in patients with or without perfusion defects on a coronary artery basis and in MFR in patients with perfusion defects. Changes in reconstruction parameters in perfusion (82)Rb PET/CT studies influence quantitative MBF analysis. The inclusion of TOF information in the tomographic reconstructions had significant impact in MBF quantification.

  8. Clinical Utility of Iopamidol (Pamiray 370) for Cardiac CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Mok Hee; Seon, Hyun Ju [Dept. of Radiology, Chonnam National University Hospital, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Song [Dept. of Radiology, Chonnam National University Hwasun Hospital, Hwasun (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yun Hyeon; Kim, Jae Kyu; Park, Jin Gyoon; Kang, Heong Keun [Dept. of Radiology, Chonnam National University Medicine School, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-07-15

    We evaluated the utility of iopamidol-based nonionic contrast media (Pamiray 370) for cardiac CT, with assessment of its image quality and safety. The study included 100 patients who underwent cardiac CT with Pamiray 370 (experimental group), and 100 patients who underwent cardiac CT with Ultravist 370 (control group). A comparison of the image qualities and degree of vascular contrast enhancement was made between the two groups and evaluated statistically by an independent t-test. Changes in vital signs and adverse events during cardiac CT were evaluated in the experimental group. There were no statistically significant differences in the image quality (image quality score in experimental group vs. control group: 4.26 {+-} 0.63 vs. 4.24 {+-} 0.62), and mean attenuation values at the coronary arteries(p > 0.05) between two groups. For the experimental group, 12% experienced adverse events, including mild and transient reactions such as dizziness (7%), nausea (4%), and fatigue (1%). Further, 94% of patients complained of mild to moderate febrile sense just after contrast agent administration, which spontaneously disappeared within 3 minutes without any specific management. For cardiac CT, Pamiray 370 was comparable to the widely-used contrast agent (Ultravist 370) in terms of image quality and safety without any severe adverse reaction.

  9. Measuring temporal resolution of cardiac CT reconstructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, David; Heuscher, Dominic

    2005-04-01

    Multi-slice CT today is capable of imaging the heart with excellent temporal resolution. Algorithms have been developed to perform reconstructions combining data from multiple cardiac cycles. This paper presents a simulation phantom that enables a direct measurement of the actual temporal resolution achieved by these algorithms. This is not only useful for assessing the temporal resolution but also for validating the algorithms themselves. A simulation phantom was developed that consists of a 20 cm. diameter water phantom containing an array of cylinders whose intensities are pulsed for various durations ranging from 10 msec. to 250 msec. The intensity varied between the background value of water (0 HU) and 800 HU. By measuring the nominal attenuation value at the center of each cylinder, a curve can be derived representing the response over the given temporal range. A temporal resolution representing the FWHM value is determined based on the half-max value of this curve. Reconstructions were performed using a multi-cycle cardiac algorithm described previously in the literature. The measured FWHM values agree quite well to the temporal resolution predicted by the cardiac algorithm itself. Even the variation along the longitudinal axis can be accounted for by the predicted values. A simulated phantom can be used to accurately assess the temporal resolution of cardiac reconstruction algorithms. Excellent agreement was achieved between the predicted and measured temporal resolution values for the multi-cycle algorithm used in this study.

  10. MRI and CT appearances of cardiac tumours in adults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoey, E.T.D. [Department of Radiology, Leeds Teaching Hopsitals NHS Trust (United Kingdom); Department of Radiology, Papworth Hospital, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Department of Radiology, Heart of England NHS Trust (United Kingdom); Mankad, K.; Puppala, S. [Department of Radiology, Leeds Teaching Hopsitals NHS Trust (United Kingdom); Gopalan, D. [Department of Radiology, Papworth Hospital, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Sivananthan, M.U., E-mail: Jill_E.Taylor@leedsth.nhs.u [Department of Radiology, Leeds Teaching Hopsitals NHS Trust (United Kingdom); Department of Cardiology, Leeds Teaching Hopsitals NHS Trust (United Kingdom)

    2009-12-15

    Primary cardiac tumours are rare, and metastases to the heart are much more frequent. Myxoma is the commonest benign primary tumour and sarcomas account for the majority of malignant lesions. Clinical manifestations are diverse, non-specific, and governed by the location, size, and aggressiveness. Imaging plays a central role in their evaluation, and familiarity with characteristic features is essential to generate a meaningful differential diagnosis. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become the reference technique for evaluation of a suspected cardiac mass. Computed tomography (CT) provides complementary information and, with the advent of electrocardiographic gating, has become a powerful tool in its own right for cardiac morphological assessment. This paper reviews the MRI and CT features of primary and secondary cardiac malignancy. Important differential considerations and potential diagnostic pitfalls are also highlighted.

  11. Left and right ventricle assessment with Cardiac CT: validation study vs. Cardiac MR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maffei, Erica; Seitun, Sara [Giovanni XXIII Hospital, Cardiovascular Radiology Unit, Monastier di Treviso (Italy); Messalli, Giancarlo; Catalano, Onofrio [SDN Foundation - IRCCS, Naples (Italy); Martini, Chiara; Cademartiri, Filippo [Giovanni XXIII Hospital, Cardiovascular Radiology Unit, Monastier di Treviso (Italy); Erasmus Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Cardiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Nieman, Koen; Rossi, Alexia; Mollet, Nico R. [Erasmus Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Cardiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Guaricci, Andrea I. [Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Foggia, Department of Cardiology, Foggia (Italy); Tedeschi, Carlo [Ospedale San Gennaro, Department of Cardiology, Naples (Italy)

    2012-05-15

    To compare Magnetic Resonance (MR) and Computed Tomography (CT) for the assessment of left (LV) and right (RV) ventricular functional parameters. Seventy nine patients underwent both Cardiac CT and Cardiac MR. Images were acquired using short axis (SAX) reconstructions for CT and 2D cine b-SSFP (balanced-steady state free precession) SAX sequence for MR, and evaluated using dedicated software. CT and MR images showed good agreement: LV EF (Ejection Fraction) (52 {+-} 14% for CT vs. 52 {+-} 14% for MR; r = 0.73; p > 0.05); RV EF (47 {+-} 12% for CT vs. 47 {+-} 12% for MR; r = 0.74; p > 0.05); LV EDV (End Diastolic Volume) (74 {+-} 21 ml/m{sup 2} for CT vs. 76 {+-} 25 ml/m{sup 2} for MR; r = 0.59; p > 0.05); RV EDV (84 {+-} 25 ml/m{sup 2} for CT vs. 80 {+-} 23 ml/m{sup 2} for MR; r = 0.58; p > 0.05); LV ESV (End Systolic Volume)(37 {+-} 19 ml/m{sup 2} for CT vs. 38 {+-} 23 ml/m{sup 2} for MR; r = 0.76; p > 0.05); RV ESV (46 {+-} 21 ml/m{sup 2} for CT vs. 43 {+-} 18 ml/m{sup 2} for MR; r = 0.70; p > 0.05). Intra- and inter-observer variability were good, and the performance of CT was maintained for different EF subgroups. Cardiac CT provides accurate and reproducible LV and RV volume parameters compared with MR, and can be considered as a reliable alternative for patients who are not suitable to undergo MR. circle Cardiac-CT is able to provide Left and Right Ventricular function. circle Cardiac-CT is accurate as MR for LV and RV volume assessment. (orig.)

  12. Multimodality imaging for resuscitated sudden cardiac death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yingming Amy; Deva, Djeven; Kirpalani, Anish; Prabhudesai, Vikram; Marcuzzi, Danny W; Graham, John J; Verma, Subodh; Jimenez-Juan, Laura; Yan, Andrew T

    2015-01-01

    We present a case that elegantly illustrates the utility of two novel noninvasive imaging techniques, computed tomography (CT) coronary angiography and cardiac MRI, in the diagnosis and management of a 27-year-old man with exertion-induced cardiac arrest caused by an anomalous right coronary artery. CT coronary angiography with 3D reformatting delineated the interarterial course of an anomalous right coronary artery compressed between the aorta and pulmonary artery, whereas cardiac MRI showed a small myocardial infarction in the right coronary artery territory not detected on echocardiography. This case highlights the value of novel multimodality imaging techniques in the risk stratification and management of patients with resuscitated cardiac arrest.

  13. Imaging of cardiac perfusion of free-breathing small animals using dynamic phase-correlated micro-CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawall, Stefan; Kuntz, Jan; Socher, Michaela; Knaup, Michael; Hess, Andreas; Bartling, Soenke; Kachelriess, Marc [Institute of Medical Physics, Friedrich-Alexander-University (FAU) Erlangen-Nuernberg, 91052 Erlangen, Germany and Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Animal Laboratory Services Core Facility, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Institute of Medical Physics, Friedrich-Alexander-University (FAU) Erlangen-Nuernberg, 91052 Erlangen (Germany); Institute of Experimental and Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology, Friedrich-Alexander-University (FAU) Erlangen-Nuernberg, 91052 Erlangen (Germany); Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Institute of Medical Physics, Friedrich-Alexander-University (FAU) Erlangen-Nuernberg, 91052 Erlangen, Germany and Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    Purpose:Mouse models of cardiac diseases have proven to be a valuable tool in preclinical research. The high cardiac and respiratory rates of free breathing mice prohibit conventional in vivo cardiac perfusion studies using computed tomography even if gating methods are applied. This makes a sacrification of the animals unavoidable and only allows for the application of ex vivo methods. Methods: To overcome this issue the authors propose a low dose scan protocol and an associated reconstruction algorithm that allows for in vivo imaging of cardiac perfusion and associated processes that are retrospectively synchronized to the respiratory and cardiac motion of the animal. The scan protocol consists of repetitive injections of contrast media within several consecutive scans while the ECG, respiratory motion, and timestamp of contrast injection are recorded and synchronized to the acquired projections. The iterative reconstruction algorithm employs a six-dimensional edge-preserving filter to provide low-noise, motion artifact-free images of the animal examined using the authors' low dose scan protocol. Results: The reconstructions obtained show that the complete temporal bolus evolution can be visualized and quantified in any desired combination of cardiac and respiratory phase including reperfusion phases. The proposed reconstruction method thereby keeps the administered radiation dose at a minimum and thus reduces metabolic inference to the animal allowing for longitudinal studies. Conclusions: The authors' low dose scan protocol and phase-correlated dynamic reconstruction algorithm allow for an easy and effective way to visualize phase-correlated perfusion processes in routine laboratory studies using free-breathing mice.

  14. Validation of a new cardiac image fusion software for three-dimensional integration of myocardial perfusion SPECT and stand-alone 64-slice CT angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaemperli, Oliver; Schepis, Tiziano; Namdar, Mehdi; Valenta, Ines [University Hospital Zurich, Nuclear Cardiology, Cardiovascular Center, Zurich (Switzerland); Kalff, Victor [Alfred Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Melbourne (Australia); Stefani, Laurent [GE Healthcare Bio-Sciences, Buc Cedex (France); Desbiolles, Lotus; Leschka, Sebastian; Husmann, Lars; Alkadhi, Hatem [University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Kaufmann, Philipp A. [University Hospital Zurich, Nuclear Cardiology, Cardiovascular Center, Zurich (Switzerland); University of Zurich, Zurich Center for Integrative Human Physiology (ZIHP), Zurich (Switzerland)

    2007-07-15

    Combining the functional information of SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging (SPECT-MPI) and the morphological information of coronary CT angiography (CTA) may allow easier evaluation of the spatial relationship between coronary stenoses and perfusion defects. The aim of the present study was the validation of a novel software solution for three-dimensional (3D) image fusion of SPECT-MPI and CTA. SPECT-MPI with adenosine stress/rest {sup 99m}Tc-tetrofosmin was fused with 64-slice CTA in 15 consecutive patients with a single perfusion defect and a single significant coronary artery stenosis ({>=}50% diameter stenosis). 3D fused SPECT/CT images were analysed by two independent observers with regard to superposition of the stenosed vessel onto the myocardial perfusion defect. Interobserver variability was assessed by recording the X, Y, Z coordinates for the origin of the stenosed coronary artery and the centre of the perfusion defect and measuring the distance between the two landmarks. SPECT-MPI revealed a fixed defect in seven patients, a reversible defect in five patients and a mixed defect in three patients and CTA documented a significant stenosis in the respective subtending coronary artery. 3D fused SPECT/CT images showed a match of coronary lesion and perfusion defect in each patient and the fusion process took less than 15 min. Interobserver variability was excellent for landmark detection (r = 1.00 and r = 0.99, p < 0.0001) and very good for the 3D distance between the two landmarks (r = 0.94, p < 0.001). 3D SPECT/CT image fusion is feasible, reproducible and allows correct superposition of SPECT segments onto cardiac CT anatomy. (orig.)

  15. Inter- and Intraobserver Agreement of (18)F-FDG PET/CT Image Interpretation in Patients Referred for Assessment of Cardiac Sarcoidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohira, Hiroshi; Ardle, Brian Mc; deKemp, Robert A; Nery, Pablo; Juneau, Daniel; Renaud, Jennifer M; Klein, Ran; Clarkin, Owen; MacDonald, Karen; Leung, Eugene; Nair, Girish; Beanlands, Rob; Birnie, David

    2017-08-01

    Recent studies have reported the usefulness of (18)F-FDG PET in aiding with the diagnosis and management of patients with cardiac sarcoidosis (CS). However, image interpretation of (18)F-FDG PET for CS is sometimes challenging. We sought to investigate the inter- and intraobserver agreement and explore factors that led to important discrepancies between readers. Methods: We studied consecutive patients with no significant coronary artery disease who were referred for assessment of CS. Two experienced readers masked to clinical information, imaging reports, independently reviewed (18)F-FDG PET/CT images. (18)F-FDG PET/CT images were interpreted according to a predefined standard operating procedure, with cardiac (18)F-FDG uptake patterns categorized into 5 patterns: none, focal, focal on diffuse, diffuse, and isolated lateral wall or basal uptake. Overall image assessment was classified as either consistent with active CS or not. Results: One hundred scans were included from 71 patients. Of these, 46 underwent (18)F-FDG PET/CT with a no-restriction diet (no-restriction group), and 54 underwent (18)F-FDG PET/CT with a low-carbohydrate, high-fat and protein-permitted diet (low-carb group). There was agreement of the interpretation category in 74 of 100 scans. The κ-value of agreement among all 5 categories was 0.64, indicating moderate agreement. For overall clinical interpretation, there was agreement in 93 of 100 scans (κ = 0.85). When scans were divided into the preparation groups, there was a trend toward higher agreement in the low-carb group versus the no-restriction group (80% vs. 67%, P = 0.08). Regarding the overall clinical interpretation, there was also a trend toward greater agreement in the low-carb group versus the no-restriction group (96% vs. 89%, P = 0.08). Conclusion: The interobserver agreement of cardiac (18)F-FDG uptake image patterns was moderate. However, agreement was better regarding overall interpretation of CS. Detailed prescan dietary

  16. Strategies to reduce radiation dose in cardiac PET/CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tung Hsin; Wu, Nien-Yun; Wang, Shyh-Jen; Wu, Jay; S. P. Mok, Greta; Yang, Ching-Ching; Huang, Tzung-Chi

    2011-08-01

    Our aim was to investigate CT dose reduction strategies on a hybrid PET/CT scanner for cardiac applications.MaterialsImage quality and dose estimation of different CT scanning protocols for CT coronary angiography (CTCA), and CT-based attenuation correction for PET imaging were investigated. Fifteen patients underwent CTCA, perfusion PET imaging at rest and under stress, and FDG PET for myocardial viability. These patients were divided into three groups based on the CTCA technique performed: retrospectively gated helical (RGH), ECG tube current modulation (ETCM), and prospective gated axial (PGA) acquisitions. All emission images were corrected for photon attenuation using CT images obtained by default setting and an ultra-low dose CT (ULDCT) scan.ResultsRadiation dose in RGH technique was 22.2±4.0 mSv. It was reduced to 10.95±0.82 and 4.13±0.31 mSv using ETCM and PGA techniques, respectively. Radiation dose in CT transmission scan was reduced by 96.5% (from 4.53±0.5 to 0.16±0.01 mSv) when applying ULDCT as compared to the default CT. No significant difference in terms of image quality was found among various protocols.ConclusionThe proposed CT scanning strategies, i.e. ETCM or PGA for CTCA and ULDCT for PET attenuation correction, could reduce radiation dose up to 47% without degrading imaging quality in an integrated cardiac PET/CT coronary artery examination.

  17. Cardiac pathologies incidentally detected with non-gated chest CT; Inzidentelle Pathologien des Herzens im Thorax-CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scherer, Axel; Kroepil, P.; Lanzman, R.S.; Moedder, U. [Inst. fuer Radiologie, Universitaetsklinikum Duesseldorf, Heinrich-Heine-Univ. (Germany); Choy, G.; Abbara, S. [Cardiovascular Imaging Section, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School (United States)

    2009-12-15

    Cardiac imaging using electrocardiogram-gated multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) permits noninvasive diagnosis of congenital and acquired cardiac pathologies and has thus become increasingly important in the last years. Several studies investigated the incidence and relevance of incidental extracardiac structures within the lungs, mediastinum, chest wall, and abdomen with gated coronary CT. This resulted in the general acceptance of the review of extracardiac structures as a routine component of coronary CT interpretation. On the other hand radiologists tend to neglect pericardial and cardiac pathologies in non-gated chest CT, which is primarily performed for the evaluation of the respiratory system or for tumor staging. Since the introduction of multi-detector spiral CT technology, the incidental detection of cardiac and pericardial findings has become possible using non-gated chest CT. This article reviews the imaging appearances and differential diagnostic considerations of incidental cardiac entities that may be encountered in non-gated chest CT. (orig.)

  18. Guideline for appropriate use of cardiac CT in heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Jin; Hong, Yoo Jin [Dept. of Radiology, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yong, Hwan Seok [Dept. of Radiology, Korea University Guro Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung Mok [Dept. of Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jeong A [Dept. of Radiology, Ilsan Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Dong Hyun [Dept. of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-15

    Heart disease is one of the leading causes of deaths in Korea, along with malignant neoplasms and cerebrovascular diseases. The proper diagnosis and management for patients with suspected heart diseases should be warranted for the public health care. Advances in CT technology have allowed detailed images of the heart to be obtained, which enable evaluations not only of the coronary arteries but also of other cardiac structures. Currently, the latest multi-detector CT machines are widespread around Korea. The appropriate use of cardiac CT may lead to improvements of the physicians' medical performances and to reduce medical costs which eventually contribute to promotions of public health. However, until now, there has been no guidelines regarding the appropriate use of cardiac CT in Korea. We intend to provide guidelines for the appropriate use of cardiac CT in heart diseases based on scientific data. The purpose of this guideline is to assist the clinicians and other health professionals when using cardiac CT for diagnosis and treatments of heart diseases.

  19. Current Roles and Future Applications of Cardiac CT: Risk Stratification of Coronary Artery Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Yeonyee Elizabeth [Department of Cardiology, Cardiovascular Center, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam 463-707 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Tae-Hwan [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-01

    Cardiac computed tomography (CT) has emerged as a noninvasive modality for the assessment of coronary artery disease (CAD), and has been rapidly integrated into clinical cares. CT has changed the traditional risk stratification based on clinical risk to image-based identification of patient risk. Cardiac CT, including coronary artery calcium score and coronary CT angiography, can provide prognostic information and is expected to improve risk stratification of CAD. Currently used conventional cardiac CT, provides accurate anatomic information but not functional significance of CAD, and it may not be sufficient to guide treatments such as revascularization. Recently, myocardial CT perfusion imaging, intracoronary luminal attenuation gradient, and CT-derived computed fractional flow reserve were developed to combine anatomical and functional data. Although at present, the diagnostic and prognostic value of these novel technologies needs to be evaluated further, it is expected that all-in-one cardiac CT can guide treatment and improve patient outcomes in the near future.

  20. Cardiac CT Angiography in Congestive Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Avi; Hecht, Harvey S

    2015-06-01

    Cardiac CT angiography has become an important tool for the diagnosis and treatment of congestive heart failure. Differentiation of ischemic from nonischemic cardiomyopathy; evaluation of myocardial perfusion; characterization of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, left ventricular noncompaction, and arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia; and delineation of congenital heart defects and valvular abnormalities are the primary diagnostic applications. Therapeutic use includes visualization of the coronary venous anatomy for optimal implementation of cardiac resynchronization therapy and evaluation of left ventricular assist devices and transplant vasculopathy.

  1. Multimodality Molecular Imaging of Cardiac Cell Transplantation: Part II. In Vivo Imaging of Bone Marrow Stromal Cells in Swine with PET/CT and MR Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parashurama, Natesh; Ahn, Byeong-Cheol; Ziv, Keren; Ito, Ken; Paulmurugan, Ramasamy; Willmann, Jürgen K; Chung, Jaehoon; Ikeno, Fumiaki; Swanson, Julia C; Merk, Denis R; Lyons, Jennifer K; Yerushalmi, David; Teramoto, Tomohiko; Kosuge, Hisanori; Dao, Catherine N; Ray, Pritha; Patel, Manishkumar; Chang, Ya-Fang; Mahmoudi, Morteza; Cohen, Jeff Eric; Goldstone, Andrew Brooks; Habte, Frezghi; Bhaumik, Srabani; Yaghoubi, Shahriar; Robbins, Robert C; Dash, Rajesh; Yang, Phillip C; Brinton, Todd J; Yock, Paul G; McConnell, Michael V; Gambhir, Sanjiv S

    2016-09-01

    Purpose To quantitatively determine the limit of detection of marrow stromal cells (MSC) after cardiac cell therapy (CCT) in swine by using clinical positron emission tomography (PET) reporter gene imaging and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with cell prelabeling. Materials and Methods Animal studies were approved by the institutional administrative panel on laboratory animal care. Seven swine received 23 intracardiac cell injections that contained control MSC and cell mixtures of MSC expressing a multimodality triple fusion (TF) reporter gene (MSC-TF) and bearing superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (NP) (MSC-TF-NP) or NP alone. Clinical MR imaging and PET reporter gene molecular imaging were performed after intravenous injection of the radiotracer fluorine 18-radiolabeled 9-[4-fluoro-3-(hydroxyl methyl) butyl] guanine ((18)F-FHBG). Linear regression analysis of both MR imaging and PET data and nonlinear regression analysis of PET data were performed, accounting for multiple injections per animal. Results MR imaging showed a positive correlation between MSC-TF-NP cell number and dephasing (dark) signal (R(2) = 0.72, P = .0001) and a lower detection limit of at least approximately 1.5 × 10(7) cells. PET reporter gene imaging demonstrated a significant positive correlation between MSC-TF and target-to-background ratio with the linear model (R(2) = 0.88, P = .0001, root mean square error = 0.523) and the nonlinear model (R(2) = 0.99, P = .0001, root mean square error = 0.273) and a lower detection limit of 2.5 × 10(8) cells. Conclusion The authors quantitatively determined the limit of detection of MSC after CCT in swine by using clinical PET reporter gene imaging and clinical MR imaging with cell prelabeling. (©) RSNA, 2016 Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  2. Cardiac causes of pulmonary arterial hypertension: assessment with multidetector CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoey, Edward T.D.; Gopalan, Deepa; Agrawal, S.K.B. [Papworth Hospital, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Screaton, Nicholas J. [Papworth Hospital, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Papworth Hospital NHS Trust, Diagnostic Centre, Department of Radiology, Papworth Everard, Cambridgeshire (United Kingdom)

    2009-11-15

    The causes of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) are diverse and include multiple congenital and acquired cardiac diseases as well as diseases primarily affecting the pulmonary vasculature, lung, pleura and chest wall. The traditional role of CT in evaluating PAH includes assessment of pulmonary vasculature and lung parenchyma with limited assessment of the heart. Advances in multidetector CT technology with improved spatial and temporal resolution now permit accurate delineation of cardiac morphology. CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA) is widely utilised in the workup of patients with suspected pulmonary vascular disease and can identify both pulmonary and cardiac causes. As the initial presentation for CTPA is often precipitated by nonspecific, unexplained symptoms and therefore undertaken by a general radiologist, it is important that a systematic approach to the interpretation of these studies, including cardiac evaluation, is routinely adopted. This paper reviews the CT evaluation in pulmonary hypertension with a particular focus on the cardiac causes, their subclassification into congenital systemic to pulmonary shunts and secondary to left heart disease, and their imaging features. It emphasises the use of a systematic approach to interpretation of CTPA examinations both in patients with known PAH and those with previously unsuspected disease. (orig.)

  3. CT images of gossypiboma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Hae Jeong; Lim, Jong Nam; Choi, Young Chil; Park, Jeong Hee [College of Medicine, Kon-Kuk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-04-15

    Surgical sponges retained after laparotomy can cause serious problem if they were not be identified in early state. In these circumstances abdominal CT yields the accurate diagnostic images. The purpose of this report is to present highly indicative findings permitting correct preoperative diagnosis of the gossypiboma. We experienced three cases in which CT showed the images sufficiently characteristic to suggest the correct preoperative diagnosis. We evaluated retrospectively the radiological images of gossypiboma confirmed by operation. Three patients were admitted due to palpable masses. Two female patients had medical histories of cesarean sections and a male patient had been operated due to malignant fibrous histiocytoma, previously. Abdominal CT scan of one case revealed huge ovoid hypodense mass with enhanced peripheral rim. Calcific spots and whirl-like stripes were noted within the lesion. Towel was found in pathologic specimen. CT images of two patients showed well-encapsulated, mixed fluid and soft tissue density mass with several gas bubbles. Surgical sponges were found within abscesses. The authors conclude that these characteristic CT findings and careful histories of surgery are very useful for correct pre-operative diagnosis and permit the guideline for the optimal plan of the surgical treatment.

  4. Imaging of Cardiac Valves by Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gudrun Feuchtner

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes “how to” examine cardiac valves with computed tomography, the normal, diseased valves, and prosthetic valves. A review of current scientific literature is provided. Firstly, technical basics, “how to” perform and optimize a multislice CT scan and “how to” interpret valves on CT images are outlined. Then, diagnostic imaging of the entire spectrum of specific valvular disease by CT, including prosthetic heart valves, is highlighted. The last part gives a guide “how to” use CT for planning of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI, an emerging effective treatment option for patients with severe aortic stenosis. A special focus is placed on clinical applications of cardiac CT in the context of valvular disease.

  5. CT image of thymoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morioka, Nobuo; Shudo, Yuji; Jahana, Masanobu; Matsuki, Tsutomu; Kotani, Kazuhiko (Tottori Univ., Yonago (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1983-10-01

    Computor tomographic images of 11 patients who had had thymectomy for myasthenia gravis or thymoma were studied retrospectively. Of those 11 patients, malignant thymoma and benign condition including normal thymus were 6 and 5 respectively. On CT, calcification and lobulation with irregular margin seem to be reliable findings of malignancy. Defect or abscence of fatty plane and non-homogenous density are ancillary.

  6. New cardiac cameras: single-photon emission CT and PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slomka, Piotr J; Berman, Daniel S; Germano, Guido

    2014-07-01

    measurements for this tracer. The availability of high-end CT component in most PET/CT configurations enables hybrid multimodality cardiac imaging protocols with calcium scoring or CT angiography or both. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Measurement of cardiac output from dynamic pulmonary circulation time CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yee, Seonghwan, E-mail: Seonghwan.Yee@Beaumont.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beaumont Health System, Royal Oak, Michigan 48073 (United States); Scalzetti, Ernest M. [Department of Radiology, SUNY Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, New York 13210 (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To introduce a method of estimating cardiac output from the dynamic pulmonary circulation time CT that is primarily used to determine the optimal time window of CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA). Methods: Dynamic pulmonary circulation time CT series, acquired for eight patients, were retrospectively analyzed. The dynamic CT series was acquired, prior to the main CTPA, in cine mode (1 frame/s) for a single slice at the level of the main pulmonary artery covering the cross sections of ascending aorta (AA) and descending aorta (DA) during the infusion of iodinated contrast. The time series of contrast changes obtained for DA, which is the downstream of AA, was assumed to be related to the time series for AA by the convolution with a delay function. The delay time constant in the delay function, representing the average time interval between the cross sections of AA and DA, was determined by least square error fitting between the convoluted AA time series and the DA time series. The cardiac output was then calculated by dividing the volume of the aortic arch between the cross sections of AA and DA (estimated from the single slice CT image) by the average time interval, and multiplying the result by a correction factor. Results: The mean cardiac output value for the six patients was 5.11 (l/min) (with a standard deviation of 1.57 l/min), which is in good agreement with the literature value; the data for the other two patients were too noisy for processing. Conclusions: The dynamic single-slice pulmonary circulation time CT series also can be used to estimate cardiac output.

  8. Simulation evaluation of quantitative myocardial perfusion assessment from cardiac CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindschadler, Michael; Modgil, Dimple; Branch, Kelley R.; La Riviere, Patrick J.; Alessio, Adam M.

    2014-03-01

    Contrast enhancement on cardiac CT provides valuable information about myocardial perfusion and methods have been proposed to assess perfusion with static and dynamic acquisitions. There is a lack of knowledge and consensus on the appropriate approach to ensure 1) sufficient diagnostic accuracy for clinical decisions and 2) low radiation doses for patient safety. This work developed a thorough dynamic CT simulation and several accepted blood flow estimation techniques to evaluate the performance of perfusion assessment across a range of acquisition and estimation scenarios. Cardiac CT acquisitions were simulated for a range of flow states (Flow = 0.5, 1, 2, 3 ml/g/min, cardiac output = 3,5,8 L/min). CT acquisitions were simulated with a validated CT simulator incorporating polyenergetic data acquisition and realistic x-ray flux levels for dynamic acquisitions with a range of scenarios including 1, 2, 3 sec sampling for 30 sec with 25, 70, 140 mAs. Images were generated using conventional image reconstruction with additional image-based beam hardening correction to account for iodine content. Time attenuation curves were extracted for multiple regions around the myocardium and used to estimate flow. In total, 2,700 independent realizations of dynamic sequences were generated and multiple MBF estimation methods were applied to each of these. Evaluation of quantitative kinetic modeling yielded blood flow estimates with an root mean square error (RMSE) of ~0.6 ml/g/min averaged across multiple scenarios. Semi-quantitative modeling and qualitative static imaging resulted in significantly more error (RMSE = ~1.2 and ~1.2 ml/min/g respectively). For quantitative methods, dose reduction through reduced temporal sampling or reduced tube current had comparable impact on the MBF estimate fidelity. On average, half dose acquisitions increased the RMSE of estimates by only 18% suggesting that substantial dose reductions can be employed in the context of quantitative myocardial

  9. Noncardiac findings on cardiac CT part I: Pros and cons.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Killeen, Ronan P

    2012-02-01

    Cardiac computed tomography (CT) has evolved into an effective imaging technique for the evaluation of coronary artery disease in selected patients. Two distinct advantages over other noninvasive imaging modalities include its ability to evaluate directly the coronary arteries and to provide an opportunity to evaluate extracardiac structures, such as the lungs and mediastinum. Some centers reconstruct a small field of view (FOV) cropped around the heart, but a full FOV (from skin to skin in the irradiated area) is obtainable in the raw data of every scan so that clinically relevant noncardiac findings are identifiable. Debate in the scientific community has centered on the necessity for this large FOV evaluation. A review of noncardiac structures provides the opportunity to make alternative diagnoses that may account for the patient\\'s presentation or to detect important but clinically silent problems such as lung cancer. Critics argue that the yield of biopsy-proven cancers is low and that the follow-up of incidental noncardiac findings is expensive, resulting in increased radiation exposure and possibly unnecessary further testing. In this two-part review we outline the issues surrounding the concept of the noncardiac read looking for noncardiac findings on cardiac CT. Part I focuses on the pros and cons of the practice of identifying noncardiac findings on cardiac CT.

  10. Korean guidelines for the appropriate use of cardiac CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Jin [Dept. of Radiology, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul(Korea, Republic of); Yong, Hwan Seok [Dept. of Radiology, Korea University Guro Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul(Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung Mok [Dept. of Radiology, amsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jung A [Dept. of Radiology, Ilsan Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Yoo Jin [Dept. of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    The development of cardiac CT has provided a non-invasive alternative to echocardiography, exercise electrocardiogram, and invasive angiography and cardiac CT continues to develop at an exponential speed even now. The appropriate use of cardiac CT may lead to improvements in the medical performances of physicians and can reduce medical costs which eventually contribute to better public health. However, until now, there has been no guideline regarding the appropriate use of cardiac CT in Korea. We intend to provide guidelines for the appropriate use of cardiac CT in heart diseases based on scientific data. The purpose of this guideline is to assist clinicians and other health professionals in the use of cardiac CT for diagnosis and treatment of heart diseases, especially in patients at high risk or suspected of heart disease.

  11. Automatic segmentation and quantification of the cardiac structures from non-contrast-enhanced cardiac CT scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahzad, Rahil; Bos, Daniel; Budde, Ricardo P. J.; Pellikaan, Karlijn; Niessen, Wiro J.; van der Lugt, Aad; van Walsum, Theo

    2017-05-01

    Early structural changes to the heart, including the chambers and the coronary arteries, provide important information on pre-clinical heart disease like cardiac failure. Currently, contrast-enhanced cardiac computed tomography angiography (CCTA) is the preferred modality for the visualization of the cardiac chambers and the coronaries. In clinical practice not every patient undergoes a CCTA scan; many patients receive only a non-contrast-enhanced calcium scoring CT scan (CTCS), which has less radiation dose and does not require the administration of contrast agent. Quantifying cardiac structures in such images is challenging, as they lack the contrast present in CCTA scans. Such quantification would however be relevant, as it enables population based studies with only a CTCS scan. The purpose of this work is therefore to investigate the feasibility of automatic segmentation and quantification of cardiac structures viz whole heart, left atrium, left ventricle, right atrium, right ventricle and aortic root from CTCS scans. A fully automatic multi-atlas-based segmentation approach is used to segment the cardiac structures. Results show that the segmentation overlap between the automatic method and that of the reference standard have a Dice similarity coefficient of 0.91 on average for the cardiac chambers. The mean surface-to-surface distance error over all the cardiac structures is 1.4+/- 1.7 mm. The automatically obtained cardiac chamber volumes using the CTCS scans have an excellent correlation when compared to the volumes in corresponding CCTA scans, a Pearson correlation coefficient (R) of 0.95 is obtained. Our fully automatic method enables large-scale assessment of cardiac structures on non-contrast-enhanced CT scans.

  12. Cardiac computed tomography core syllabus of the European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging (EACVI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieman, Koen; Achenbach, Stephan; Pugliese, Francesca; Cosyns, Bernard; Lancellotti, Patrizio; Kitsiou, Anastasia

    2015-04-01

    The European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging (EACVI) Core Syllabus for Cardiac Computed Tomography (CT) is now available online. The syllabus lists key elements of knowledge in Cardiac CT. It represents a framework for the development of training curricula and provides expected knowledge-based learning outcomes to the Cardiac CT trainees.

  13. Cardiac CT: coronary arteries and beyond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahnken, Andreas H. [RWTH Aachen University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital, Aachen (Germany); RWTH Aachen University, Applied Medical Engineering, Aachen (Germany); Muehlenbruch, Georg; Guenther, Rolf W.; Wildberger, Joachim E. [RWTH Aachen University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital, Aachen (Germany)

    2007-04-15

    Multi-detector-row computed tomography (MDCT) has emerged as a rapidly developing method for non-invasive imaging of the heart. An understanding of ECG synchronization, contrast material administration, patient preparation and image post-processing is needed to optimize image quality. The basic technical principles and essentials of these technical basics are described here. Correctly applied cardiac MDCT allows imaging of the coronary arteries including coronary anatomy and stenosis detection. The same is true for evaluation of coronary artery bypass grafts and, to some extent, coronary artery stents. While quantification of total calcified plaque burden has been long established, coronary MDCT allows assessing plaque morphology and constitution. Recent approaches go beyond the coronaries and include evaluation of left ventricular function at rest and myocardial viability. In combination with experimental approaches for assessing aortic valve function and myocardial perfusion imaging, cardiac MDCT offers the potential for a comprehensive examination of the heart using a single breath-hold examination. (orig.)

  14. Molecular nuclear cardiac imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dong Soo; Paeng, Jin Chul [College of Medicine, Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-04-01

    Molecular nuclear cardiac imaging has included Tc-99m Annexin imaging to visualize myocardial apoptosis, but is now usually associated with gene therapy and cell-based therapy. Cardiac gene therapy was not successful so far but cardiac reporter gene imaging was made possible using HSV-TK (herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase) and F-18 FHBG (fluoro-hydroxymethylbutyl guanine) or I-124 FIAU (fluoro-deoxyiodo-arabino-furanosyluracil). Gene delivery was performed by needle injection with or without catheter guidance. TK expression did not last longer than 2 weeks in myocardium. Cell-based therapy of ischemic heart or failing heart looks promising, but biodistribution and differentiation of transplanted cells are not known. Reporter genes can be transfected to the stem/progenitor cells and cells containing these genes can be transplanted to the recipients using catheter-based purging or injection. Repeated imaging should be available and if promoter are varied to let express reporter transgenes, cellular (trans)differentiation can be studied. NIS (sodium iodide symporter) or D2R receptor genes are promising in this aspect.

  15. Comparison of image quality between 70 kVp and 80 kVp: application to paediatric cardiac CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durand, Sebastien [Centre Chirurgical Marie Lannelongue, Radiology Department, Le Plessis-Robinson (France); Paul, Jean-Francois [Institut Mutualiste Montsouris, Radiology Department, Paris (France)

    2014-12-15

    To evaluate noise level and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) with various kVp-mAs pairs producing the same computed tomography dose index (CTDI) value. The 80 kVp and new 70-kVp settings were compared. The noise was measured in 10 ovoid water phantoms with different diameters from 10 cm to 28 cm. Contrast was obtained from CTs of iodine-filled tubes. Spiral acquisition protocols at 70 kVp and 80 kVp, with the same CTDI, were applied. In the clinical study, two matched groups, each of 21 paediatric patients, underwent 70-kVp or 80-kVp ECG-gated iodinated-enhanced sequential CT. Noise was significantly higher with 70 kVp than 80-kVp settings for all phantom sizes. Estimated CNR with phantoms was higher at 70 kVp than 80 kVp, and the difference decreased from 17 % to 3 % as phantom size increased. The mean CNR in paediatric patients was 15.2 at 70 kVp and 14.3 at 80 kVp (ns). The CNR difference was significantly larger in the small-child subgroup. Noise level is slightly higher at the 70-kVp than the 80-kVp setting, but the CNR is higher, particularly for small children. Therefore, 70 kVp may be appropriate for contrast-enhanced CT examinations and 80 kVp for non-enhanced CT in small children. (orig.)

  16. Cardiac amyloidosis imaged by dual-source computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marwan, Mohamed; Pflederer, Tobias; Ropers, Dieter; Schmid, Michael; Wasmeier, Gerald; Söder, Stephan; Daniel, Werner G; Achenbach, Stephan

    2008-11-01

    The ability of contrast-enhanced CT to detect "late enhancement" in a fashion similar to magnetic resonance imaging has been reported previously. Typical myocardial distribution patterns of "late enhancement" have been described for MRI. The same patterns can be observed in CT imaging, albeit at a lower signal to noise ratio. We report a case of cardiac amyloidosis with a typical pattern of subendocardial, circumferential late enhancement in all four cardiac chambers.

  17. Dose assessment according to changes in algorithm in cardiac CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, H. C.; Cho, J. H.; Lee, H. K.; Hong, I. S.; Cho, M. S.; Park, C. S.; Lee, S. Y.; Dong, K. R.; Goo, E. H.; Chung, W. K.; Ryu, Y. H.; Lim, C. S.

    2012-06-01

    The principal objective of this study was to determine the effects of the application of the adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) technique in combination with another two factors (body mass index (BMI) and tube potential) on radiation dose in cardiac computed tomography (CT). For quantitative analysis, regions of interest were positioned on the central region of the great coronary artery, the right coronary artery, and the left anterior descending artery, after which the means and standard deviations of measured CT numbers were obtained. For qualitative analysis, images taken from the major coronary arteries (right coronary, left anterior descending, and left circumflex) were graded on a scale of 1-5, with 5 indicating the best image quality. Effective dose, which was calculated by multiplying the value of the dose length product by a standard conversion factor of 0.017 for the chest, was employed as a measure of radiation exposure dose. In cardiac CT in patients with BMI of less than 25 kg/m2, the use of 40% ASIR in combination with a low tube potential of 100 kVp resulted in a significant reduction in the radiation dose without compromising diagnostic quality. Additionally, the combination of the 120 kVp protocol and the application of 40% ASIR application for patients with BMI higher than 25 kg/m2 yielded similar results.

  18. Cardiac CT and cardiac MRI - competitive or complementary for nuclear cardiology; Kardio-CT und Kardio-MR - konkurrierend oder komplementaer zur Nuklearkardiologie?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moshage, W. [Medizinische Abt. (Kardiologie, Angiologie, Pneumologie, Intensivmedizin), Klinikum Traunstein (Germany)

    2004-09-01

    In summary, cardiac computed tomography (CT) and cardiac magnetic resonance (MR) are two different technologies with distinct imaging properties that gain increasing importance in clinical cardiology. Even though images may look similar, the areas of application of CT and MR are quite different. Clinical applications of cardiac CT focus on on-invasive imaging of the coronary arteries. In this respect, the higher spatial resolution of cardiac CT constitutes a significant advantage as compared to MR and clinical results are superior. Clinical applications of cardiac MR, next to morphologic imaging of the heart, are most frequently found in the context of intra-and pericardial masses, complex congenital anomalies, and the assessment of left ventricular function (dobutamine) and perfusion (adenosine) under stress. The evaluation of the size and localization of myocardial necrosis, scars, and fibrosis gains increasing importance, for example in the workup of myocardial infarction, but also myocarditis and cardiomyopathies. In this respect, magnetic resonance imaging partly constitutes an alternative to nuclear medicine methods. Due to the lack of ionizing radiation and a relatively high spatial resolution, an increase of MR diagnostic procedures at the expense of nuclear medicine can be expected. (orig.)

  19. Investigation techniques and importance of CT for diagnostics of cardiac valvular diseases; Untersuchungstechniken und Stellenwert der CT bei der Diagnostik von Herzklappenerkrankungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordic, S.; Alkadhi, H. [Universitaetsspital Zuerich, Institut fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2013-10-15

    Cardiac computed tomography (CT) is the first-line modality for coronary assessment. In addition valvular morphology and function can be evaluated. The method of choice for the evaluation of cardiac valves is echocardiography, followed by magnetic resonance imaging. Recent technical improvements and advances in temporal resolution allow a detailed anatomical and functional evaluation of the cardiac valves. Cardiac CT provides an excellent image quality of the aortic and mitral valve thus enabling an evaluation of the morphology. In addition, cardiac CT allows an assessment of aortic valve function with respect to the grading of stenosis and regurgitation. Cardiac CT is not considered the first-line modality for the evaluation of cardiac valves; however, beyond coronary assessment CT provides important information on the morphology and function of cardiac valves. Cardiac CT can be a useful imaging alternative for patients in whom other more commonly used methods, such as echocardiography and magnetic resonance imaging fail to provide the necessary information. (orig.) [German] Die Herz-CT wird in erster Linie anlaesslich einer Koronarabklaerung durchgefuehrt. Sie ist aber auch in der Lage, wichtige Informationen ueber die Morphologie und teilweise auch Herzklappenfunktion zu liefern. Die primaere Modalitaet zur Evaluation der Herzklappen ist die Echokardiographie, gefolgt von der Magnetresonanztomographie. Durch die kontinuierliche technische Weiterentwicklung der CT-Geraete erfolgte eine markante Verbesserung der raeumlichen und zeitlichen Aufloesung, welche fuer die artefaktfreie Darstellung schnell bewegender und kleiner Strukturen, wie etwa der Koronargefaesse und Herzklappen, entscheidend sind. Die CT liefert eine ausgezeichnete Bildqualitaet der Aorten- und Mitralklappe und erlaubt somit eine praezise Beurteilung ihrer Morphologie. Zudem ermoeglicht die CT eine gute Beurteilung der Aortenklappenfunktion mit einer Graduierung von Stenose und Insuffizienz. Die

  20. Cardiac Imaging System

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    Although not available to all patients with narrowed arteries, balloon angioplasty has expanded dramatically since its introduction with an estimated further growth to 562,000 procedures in the U.S. alone by 1992. Growth has fueled demand for higher quality imaging systems that allow the cardiologist to be more accurate and increase the chances of a successful procedure. A major advance is the Digital Cardiac Imaging (DCI) System designed by Philips Medical Systems International, Best, The Netherlands and marketed in the U.S. by Philips Medical Systems North America Company. The key benefit is significantly improved real-time imaging and the ability to employ image enhancement techniques to bring out added details. Using a cordless control unit, the cardiologist can manipulate images to make immediate assessment, compare live x-ray and roadmap images by placing them side-by-side on monitor screens, or compare pre-procedure and post procedure conditions. The Philips DCI improves the cardiologist's precision by expanding the information available to him.

  1. Atresia of the bilateral pulmonary veins: a rare and dismal anomaly identified on cardiac CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goo, Hyun Woo; Park, Sang-Hyub; Koo, Hyun Jung; Cho, Young Hoon; Lee, Eunsol [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-15

    Imaging findings of bilateral pulmonary vein atresia have not been described. To describe cardiac CT findings and clinical outcomes of bilateral pulmonary vein atresia. Three newborns with bilateral pulmonary vein atresia were encountered at our institution during a period of 8 years. We evaluated prenatal echocardiographic findings, clinical presentations, postnatal echocardiographic findings, chest radiographic findings, cardiac CT findings and clinical outcomes. All newborns presented immediately after birth with severe cyanosis, respiratory distress and acidosis that were unresponsive to medical management. Prenatal and postnatal echocardiographic studies and chest radiography were misleading, inconclusive or nonspecific in making the diagnosis in these children; however cardiac CT clearly demonstrated atresia of the bilateral pulmonary veins with multiple small mediastinal collateral veins and pulmonary edema. Surgical treatments were not feasible for this anomaly. Their clinical outcomes were universally dismal and all infants died within 3 days. Cardiac CT provides an accurate diagnosis of bilateral pulmonary vein atresia and leads to prompt treatment decision in these children. (orig.)

  2. Postmortem cardiac imaging in fetuses and children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Andrew M. [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust, Cardiorespiratory Division, Level 7, Old Nurses Home, London (United Kingdom); UCL Institute of Cardiovascular Science, London (United Kingdom); Arthurs, Owen J. [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); UCL Institute of Cardiovascular Science, London (United Kingdom); Sebire, Neil J. [UCL Institute of Cardiovascular Science, London (United Kingdom); Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Histopathology, London (United Kingdom)

    2015-04-01

    Fetal and pediatric cardiac autopsies have a crucial role in the counseling of parents with regard to both the cause of death of their child and the implications of such findings for future pregnancies, as well as for quality assurance of antenatal screening programs and antemortem diagnostic procedures. Postmortem imaging allows an opportunity to investigate the heart in situ prior to dissection, and both postmortem CT and postmortem MRI have shown excellent accuracy in detecting the majority of clinically significant cardiac lesions in the perinatal and pediatric population. As less-invasive autopsy becomes increasingly popular, clinical guidelines for maximal diagnostic yield in specific circumstances can be developed. (orig.)

  3. Cardiac tamponade (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardiac tamponade is a condition involving compression of the heart caused by blood or fluid accumulation in the space ... they cannot adequately fill or pump blood. Cardiac tamponade is an emergency condition that requires hospitalization.

  4. Cardiac imaging in valvular heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, W S; Steeds, R P

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this article is to provide a perspective on the relative importance and contribution of different imaging modalities in patients with valvular heart disease. Valvular heart disease is increasing in prevalence across Europe, at a time when the clinical ability of physicians to diagnose and assess severity is declining. Increasing reliance is placed on echocardiography, which is the mainstay of cardiac imaging in valvular heart disease. This article outlines the techniques used in this context and their limitations, identifying areas in which dynamic imaging with cardiovascular magnetic resonance and multislice CT are expanding.

  5. Churg-Strauss Syndrome with Cardiac Involvement: A Case Report with CT and MRI Findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Seong Joo; Cho, Young Jun; Kim, Keum; Hwang, Cheol Mok; Kim, Dae Ho [Dept. of Radiology, Konyang University College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Eu Gene [Dept. of Internal Medicine, Konyang University College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-15

    This is a case report of Churg-Strauss Syndrome (CSS) associated with cardiac involvement which is demonstrated in chest CT and cardiac MRI (CMR) without specific cardiac symptoms. A 32-year-old woman had a 3-year history of bronchial asthma, chronic sinusitis, and otitis media. The patient had various typical findings of CSS. The patient had no specific cardiac symptoms or signs such as chest pain, palpitations, syncope, or murmur, but she had diffuse low attenuation lesions in the inner wall of the left ventricle (LV) in contrast-enhanced CT. This corresponded to the area of subendocardial hyperenhancement in delayed contrast-enhanced CMR images. She was treated with steroids for 2 months. Follow-up delayed contrast-enhanced CMR of the LV showed a decrease in the size of the subendocardial enhancement area, and she had no symptoms. Therefore, the radiologist and clinician both should pay careful attention to observe possible cardiac involvement in case of CSS.

  6. Practical tips and tricks for assessing prosthetic valves and detecting paravalvular regurgitation using cardiac CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Ailbhe C; Martos, Ramon; Murtagh, Gillian; Ryan, Edmund Ronan; McCreery, Charles; Keane, David; Quinn, Martin; Dodd, Jonathan D

    2014-01-01

    Paravalvular leaks are an uncommon but serious complication of prosthetic valves. Transthoracic echocardiography is used in the assessment of prosthetic valves but can be limited by acoustic shadowing from the prosthesis and poor acoustic windowing. Small case series have previously shown cardiac CT to have promising results in detecting paravalvular leaks. We assessed 32 valves in our institution on cardiac CT using echocardiography results as standard and developed methods for improved evaluation of prosthetic valves. These include optimizing prescan drug therapy for heart rate control, optimum window and center adjustments, and carefully selected image planes to best demonstrate the valve ring and valve annulus. Recognition of surgical material is also important to recognize. In this review, we provide a detailed description of these techniques with imaging examples of prosthetic valve evaluation using cardiac CT. Copyright © 2014 Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Is It Possible to Predict Heart Rate and Range during Enhanced Cardiac CT Scan from Previous Non-enhanced Cardiac CT?

    OpenAIRE

    Horiguchi, Jun; Yamamoto, Hideya; Arie, Ryuichi; Kiguchi, Masao; Fujioka, Chikako; Ohtaki, Megu; Kihara, Yasuki; Awai, Kazuo

    2010-01-01

    The effect of heart rate and variation during cardiac computed tomography (CT) on the examination quality. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether it is possible to predict heart rate and range during enhanced cardiac computed CT scan from previous non-enhanced cardiac CT scan. Electrocardiograph (ECG) files from 112 patients on three types of cardiac 64-slice CT (non-enhanced, prospective ECG-triggered and retrospective ECG-gated enhanced scans) were recorded. The mean heart rate...

  8. Cardiac imaging in infectious endocarditis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Niels Eske; Habib, Gilbert; Thuny, Franck;

    2014-01-01

    Infectious endocarditis remains both a diagnostic and a treatment challenge. A positive outcome depends on a rapid diagnosis, accurate risk stratification, and a thorough follow-up. Imaging plays a key role in each of these steps and echocardiography remains the cornerstone of the methods in use....... The technique of both transthoracic echocardiography and transoesophageal echocardiography has been markedly improved across the last decades and most recently three-dimensional real-time echocardiography has been introduced in the management of endocarditis patients. Echocardiography depicts structural changes...... with conventional CT (SPECT/CT). Of these methods, (18)F-FDG PET-CT carries the best promise for a future role in endocarditis. But there are distinct limitations with both SPECT/CT and (18)F-FDG PET-CT which should not be neglected. MRI and spiral CT are methods primarily used in the search for extra cardial...

  9. 4D micro-CT for cardiac and perfusion applications with view under sampling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badea, Cristian T; Johnston, Samuel M; Qi Yi; Johnson, G Allan, E-mail: Cristian.Badea@duke.edu [Center for In Vivo Microscopy, Box 3302, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States)

    2011-06-07

    Micro-CT is commonly used in preclinical studies to provide anatomical information. There is growing interest in obtaining functional measurements from 4D micro-CT. We report here strategies for 4D micro-CT with a focus on two applications: (i) cardiac imaging based on retrospective gating and (ii) pulmonary perfusion using multiple contrast injections/rotations paradigm. A dual source micro-CT system is used for image acquisition with a sampling rate of 20 projections per second. The cardiac micro-CT protocol involves the use of a liposomal blood pool contrast agent. Fast scanning of free breathing mice is achieved using retrospective gating. The ECG and respiratory signals are used to sort projections into ten cardiac phases. The pulmonary perfusion protocol uses a conventional contrast agent (Isovue 370) delivered by a micro-injector in four injections separated by 2 min intervals to allow for clearance. Each injection is synchronized with the rotation of the animal, and each of the four rotations is started with an angular offset of 22.5 from the starting angle of the previous rotation. Both cardiac and perfusion protocols result in an irregular angular distribution of projections that causes significant streaking artifacts in reconstructions when using traditional filtered backprojection (FBP) algorithms. The reconstruction involves the use of the point spread function of the micro-CT system for each time point, and the analysis of the distribution of the reconstructed data in the Fourier domain. This enables us to correct for angular inconsistencies via deconvolution and identify regions where data is missing. The missing regions are filled with data from a high quality but temporally averaged prior image reconstructed with all available projections. Simulations indicate that deconvolution successfully removes the streaking artifacts while preserving temporal information. 4D cardiac micro-CT in a mouse was performed with adequate image quality at isotropic

  10. Low-dose computed tomography scans with automatic exposure control for patients of different ages undergoing cardiac PET/CT and SPECT/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ching-Ching; Yang, Bang-Hung; Tu, Chun-Yuan; Wu, Tung-Hsin; Liu, Shu-Hsin

    2017-06-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of automatic exposure control (AEC) in order to optimize low-dose computed tomography (CT) protocols for patients of different ages undergoing cardiac PET/CT and single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT). One PET/CT and one SPECT/CT were used to acquire CT images for four anthropomorphic phantoms representative of 1-year-old, 5-year-old and 10-year-old children and an adult. For the hybrid systems investigated in this study, the radiation dose and image quality of cardiac CT scans performed with AEC activated depend mainly on the selection of a predefined image quality index. Multiple linear regression methods were used to analyse image data from anthropomorphic phantom studies to investigate the effects of body size and predefined image quality index on CT radiation dose in cardiac PET/CT and SPECT/CT scans. The regression relationships have a coefficient of determination larger than 0.9, indicating a good fit to the data. According to the regression models, low-dose protocols using the AEC technique were optimized for patients of different ages. In comparison with the standard protocol with AEC activated for adult cardiac examinations used in our clinical routine practice, the optimized paediatric protocols in PET/CT allow 32.2, 63.7 and 79.2% CT dose reductions for anthropomorphic phantoms simulating 10-year-old, 5-year-old and 1-year-old children, respectively. The corresponding results for cardiac SPECT/CT are 8.4, 51.5 and 72.7%. AEC is a practical way to reduce CT radiation dose in cardiac PET/CT and SPECT/CT, but the AEC settings should be determined properly for optimal effect. Our results show that AEC does not eliminate the need for paediatric protocols and CT examinations using the AEC technique should be optimized for paediatric patients to reduce the radiation dose as low as reasonably achievable.

  11. Haemodynamic findings on cardiac CT in children with congenital heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goo, Hyun Woo [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-02-15

    In patients with congenital heart disease, haemodynamic findings demonstrated on cardiac CT might provide useful hints for understanding the haemodynamics of cardiac defects. In contrast to morphological features depicted on cardiac CT, such haemodynamic findings on cardiac CT have not been comprehensively reviewed in patients with congenital heart disease. This article describes normal haemodynamic phenomena of cardiovascular structures and various abnormal haemodynamic findings with their mechanisms and clinical significance on cardiac CT in patients with congenital heart disease. (orig.)

  12. Multimodality 3-Dimensional Image Integration for Congenital Cardiac Catheterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac catheterization procedures for patients with congenital and structural heart disease are becoming more complex. New imaging strategies involving integration of 3-dimensional images from rotational angiography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computerized tomography (CT), and transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) are employed to facilitate these procedures. We discuss the current use of these new 3D imaging technologies and their advantages and challenges when used to guide complex diagnostic and interventional catheterization procedures in patients with congenital heart disease. PMID:25114757

  13. Effect of pre-cardiac and adult stages of Dirofilaria immitis in pulmonary disease of cats: CBC, bronchial lavage cytology, serology, radiographs, CT images, bronchial reactivity, and histopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray Dillon, A; Tillson, D M; Wooldridge, A; Cattley, R; Hathcock, J; Brawner, W R; Cole, R; Welles, B; Christopherson, P W; Lee-Fowler, T; Bordelon, S; Barney, S; Sermersheim, M; Garbarino, R; Wells, S Z; Diffie, E B; Schachner, E R

    2014-11-15

    A controlled, blind study was conducted to define the initial inflammatory response and lung damage associated with the death of precardiac stages of Dirofilaria immitis in cats as compared to adult heartworm infections and normal cats. Three groups of six cats each were used: UU: uninfected untreated controls; PreS I: infected with 100 D. immitis L3 by subcutaneous injection and treated topically with selamectin 32 and 2 days pre-infection and once monthly for 8 months); IU: infected with 100 D. immitis L3 and left untreated. Peripheral blood, serum, bronchial lavage, and thoracic radiographic images were collected from all cats on Days 0, 70, 110, 168, and 240. CT images were acquired on Days 0, 110, and 240. Cats were euthanized, and necropsies were conducted on Day 240 to determine the presence of heartworms. Bronchial rings were collected for in vitro reactivity. Lung, heart, brain, kidney, and liver tissues were collected for histopathology. Results were compared for changes within each group. Pearson and Spearman correlations were performed for association between histologic, radiographic, serologic, hematologic and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) results. Infected cats treated with selamectin did not develop radiographically evident changes throughout the study, were heartworm antibody negative, and were free of adult heartworms and worm fragments at necropsy. Histologic lung scores and CT analysis were not significantly different between PreS I cats and UU controls. Subtle alveolar myofibrosis was noted in isolated areas of several PreS I cats and an eosinophilic BAL cytology was noted on Days 75 and 120. Bronchial ring reactivity was blunted in IU cats but was normal in PreS I and UU cats. The IU cats became antibody positive, and five cats developed adult heartworms. All cats with heartworms were antigen positive at one time point; but one cat was antibody positive, antigen negative, with viable adult females at necropsy. The CT revealed early involvement

  14. [CT coronary angiography: indications, image acquisition, and interpretation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoepf, U J; Thilo, C; Fernández, M J; Costello, P

    2008-01-01

    Intense scientific and clinical evaluation have brought about great improvements in cardiac CT. This is no longer merely an experimental technique, rather it has become a clinical application that is ready to fulfill its promise of replacing invasive cardiac catheterization in certain patient populations. Among the proven indications is the evaluation of patients with atypical chest pain, the morphological evaluation of the coronary arteries in cases of suspected congenital anomalies, and before surgical intervention, as well as the evaluation of coronary revascularizations. The use of CT angiography for the exhaustive evaluation of cardiac and non-cardiac pathology in patients with acute chest pain in the emergency department is currently being investigated. Because the heart is continuously moving, CT coronary angiography represents a greater technical challenge than other applications of CT. On the other hand, rapid technical development requires acquisition protocols to be adjusted constantly. However, users that know the general techniques of computed tomography can overcome these challenges. The aim of this article is to provide those interested and involved in CT angiography with a manual to enable them to follow our method step by step. We include considerations regarding the correct selection of patients, patient medication, radiological protection, contrast enhancement, acquisition and reconstruction parameters, image display, image analysis techniques, and the radiological report. Our recommendations are based on our experience, which runs from the evolution of multiple-row detector CT scanners for cardiac applications from its beginnings to the most modern presentations of advanced acquisition modalities, including dual-source CT, which we consider to be the precursor of this test in routine clinical practice.

  15. Autopsy imaging for cardiac tamponade in a Thoroughbred foal

    Science.gov (United States)

    YAMADA, Kazutaka; SATO, Fumio; HORIUCHI, Noriyuki; HIGUCHI, Tohru; KOBAYASHI, Yoshiyasu; SASAKI, Naoki; NAMBO, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Autopsy imaging (Ai), postmortem imaging before necropsy, is used in human forensic medicine. Ai was performed using computed tomography (CT) for a 1-month-old Thoroughbred foal cadaver found in a pasture. CT revealed pericardial effusion, collapse of the aorta, bleeding in the lung lobe, gas in the ventricles and liver parenchyma, and distension of the digestive tract. Rupture in the left auricle was confirmed by necropsy; however, it was not depicted on CT. Therefore, Ai and conventional necropsy are considered to complement each other. The cause of death was determined to be traumatic cardiac tamponade. In conclusion, Ai is an additional option for determining cause of death. PMID:27703406

  16. Autopsy imaging for cardiac tamponade in a Thoroughbred foal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Kazutaka; Sato, Fumio; Horiuchi, Noriyuki; Higuchi, Tohru; Kobayashi, Yoshiyasu; Sasaki, Naoki; Nambo, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    Autopsy imaging (Ai), postmortem imaging before necropsy, is used in human forensic medicine. Ai was performed using computed tomography (CT) for a 1-month-old Thoroughbred foal cadaver found in a pasture. CT revealed pericardial effusion, collapse of the aorta, bleeding in the lung lobe, gas in the ventricles and liver parenchyma, and distension of the digestive tract. Rupture in the left auricle was confirmed by necropsy; however, it was not depicted on CT. Therefore, Ai and conventional necropsy are considered to complement each other. The cause of death was determined to be traumatic cardiac tamponade. In conclusion, Ai is an additional option for determining cause of death.

  17. Attenuation correction in cardiac PET/CT with three different CT protocols: a comparison with conventional PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souvatzoglou, Michael [Nuklearmedizinische Klinik und Poliklinik der Technischen Universitaet Muenchen, Munich (Germany); Nuklearmedizinische Klinik der Technischen Universitaet Muenchen, Munich (Germany); Bengel, Frank; Kruschke, Coletta; Fernolendt, Helga; Lee, Denise; Schwaiger, Markus; Nekolla, Stephan G. [Nuklearmedizinische Klinik und Poliklinik der Technischen Universitaet Muenchen, Munich (Germany); Busch, Raymonde [Institut fuer Statistik und Epidemiologie der Technischen Universitaet Muenchen, Munich (Germany)

    2007-12-15

    CT-based attenuation correction may influence cardiac PET owing to its higher susceptibility to misalignment compared with conventional {sup 68}Ge transmission scans. The aims of this study were to evaluate whether CT attenuation correction leads to changes in tracer distribution compared with conventional cardiac PET and to determine a suitable CT protocol. A total of 27 patients underwent PET/CT and subsequently a PET scan. Twenty patients received a low-dose CT (LDCT group; 120 kV, 26 mA, 8-s scan time), seven patients a slow CT (SCT group; 120 kV, 99 mA, 46-s scan time) and ten patients an ultra-low-dose CT (ULDCT group; 80 kV, 13 mA, 5-s scan time) as the transmission scan in PET/CT. Polar maps were divided into 17 segments and regression analysis was computed in every scan pair (CT attenuation corrected-{sup 68}Ge attenuation corrected). Correlation coefficient (r), the slope (s) and the offset (os) of the regression line were determined. Visual assessment of misalignment between the transmission and emission data was performed. The effective dose of the different transmission scans was calculated. Overall, there was a moderate correlation between the mean values measured in all segments on PET/CT and on PET when using LDCT (r=0.78, p<0.0001), SCT (r=0.79, p<0.0001) and ULDCT (r=0.82, p<0.0001). No differences were observed when comparing the scores assigned in the visual misalignment assessment in the three groups (p=0.12). The differences between the results from the regression analysis observed in the respective groups were not statistically significant (Kruskal-Wallis p=0.11 for r, p=0.67 for s and p=0.27 for os). The effective dose was lowest for the ULDCT. Our study shows that CT-based attenuation correction is feasible for cardiac PET imaging. The results indicate that ultra-low-dose CT is the preferable choice for transmission scanning. (orig.)

  18. Myocardial perfusion imaging with dual energy CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Kwang Nam; De Cecco, Carlo N; Caruso, Damiano; Tesche, Christian; Spandorfer, Adam; Varga-Szemes, Akos; Schoepf, U Joseph

    2016-10-01

    Dual-energy CT (DECT) enables simultaneous use of two different tube voltages, thus different x-ray absorption characteristics are acquired in the same anatomic location with two different X-ray spectra. The various DECT techniques allow material decomposition and mapping of the iodine distribution within the myocardium. Static dual-energy myocardial perfusion imaging (sCTMPI) using pharmacological stress agents demonstrate myocardial ischemia by single snapshot images of myocardial iodine distribution. sCTMPI gives incremental values to coronary artery stenosis detected on coronary CT angiography (CCTA) by showing consequent reversible or fixed myocardial perfusion defects. The comprehensive acquisition of CCTA and sCTMPI offers extensive morphological and functional evaluation of coronary artery disease. Recent studies have revealed that dual-energy sCTMPI shows promising diagnostic accuracy for the detection of hemodynamically significant coronary artery disease compared to single-photon emission computed tomography, invasive coronary angiography, and cardiac MRI. The aim of this review is to present currently available DECT techniques for static myocardial perfusion imaging and recent clinical applications and ongoing investigations.

  19. Nuclear imaging in cardiac amyloidosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glaudemans, A.W.J.M.; Slart, R.H.J.A.; Veltman, N.C.; Dierckx, R.A.J.O. [University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Hanzeplein 1, P.O. Box 30001, Groningen (Netherlands); Zeebregts, C.J. [University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Surgery (Division of Vascular Surgery), Groningen (Netherlands); Tio, R.A. [University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Cardiology, Groningen (Netherlands); Hazenberg, B.P.C. [University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2009-04-15

    Amyloidosis is a disease characterized by depositions of amyloid in organs and tissues. It can be localized (in just one organ) or systemic. Cardiac amyloidosis is a debilitating disease and can lead to arrhythmias, deterioration of heart function and even sudden death. We reviewed PubMed/Medline, without time constraints, on the different nuclear imaging modalities that are used to visualize myocardial amyloid involvement. Several SPECT tracers have been used for this purpose. The results with these tracers in the evaluation of myocardial amyloidosis and their mechanisms of action are described. Most clinical evidence was found for the use of {sup 123}I-MIBG. Myocardial defects in MIBG activity seem to correlate well with impaired cardiac sympathetic nerve endings due to amyloid deposits. {sup 123}I-MIBG is an attractive option for objective evaluation of cardiac sympathetic level and may play an important role in the indirect measurement of the effect of amyloid myocardial infiltration. Other, less sensitive, options are {sup 99m}Tc-aprotinin for imaging amyloid deposits and perhaps {sup 99m}Tc-labelled phosphate derivatives, especially in the differential diagnosis of the aetiology of cardiac amyloidosis. PET tracers, despite the advantage of absolute quantification and higher resolution, are not yet well evaluated for the study of cardiac amyloidosis. Because of these advantages, there is still the need for further research in this field. (orig.)

  20. PET/CT Imaging in Mouse Models of Myocardial Ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Gargiulo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Different species have been used to reproduce myocardial infarction models but in the last years mice became the animals of choice for the analysis of several diseases, due to their short life cycle and the possibility of genetic manipulation. Many techniques are currently used for cardiovascular imaging in mice, including X-ray computed tomography (CT, high-resolution ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, and nuclear medicine procedures. Cardiac positron emission tomography (PET allows to examine noninvasively, on a molecular level and with high sensitivity, regional changes in myocardial perfusion, metabolism, apoptosis, inflammation, and gene expression or to measure changes in anatomical and functional parameters in heart diseases. Currently hybrid PET/CT scanners for small laboratory animals are available, where CT adds high-resolution anatomical information. This paper reviews mouse models of myocardial infarction and discusses the applications of dedicated PET/CT systems technology, including animal preparation, anesthesia, radiotracers, and images postprocessing.

  1. Coronary CT in Acute Cardiac Care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Dedic (Admir)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractCoronary CT angiography is a well-established diagnostic modality for stable angina pectoris. It provides an angiographic, non-invasive alternative for the diagnosis of coronary artery disease, exceeding in the ability to exclude important coronary artery disease. Having the ability

  2. CT Imaging: Basics and New Trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyrin, Françoise; Engelke, Klaus

    This chapter presents the principle of X-ray CT and its evolution during the last 40 years. The first section describes the physical basis of X-ray CT, tomographic image reconstruction algorithms, and the source of artifacts in X-ray CT images. The second section is devoted to the evolution of CT technology from the first translation-rotation systems to multi-slice spiral CTs currently used today. The next section addresses specific developments of CT technology and applications, like perfusion CT, quantitative CT, and spectral CT. The fourth section introduces the problem of radiation exposure delivered to the patient and its evaluation. Finally the last section addresses the development in micro- and even nano-CT which is a rapidly evolving area in preclinical imaging and biology.

  3. Cardiopulmonary manifestations of isolated pulmonary valve infective endocarditis demonstrated with cardiac CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passen, Edward; Feng, Zekun

    2015-01-01

    Right-sided infective endocarditis involving the pulmonary valve is rare. This pictorial essay discusses the use and findings of cardiac CT combined with delayed chest CT and noncontrast chest CT of pulmonary valve endocarditis. Cardiac CT is able to show the full spectrum of right-sided endocarditis cardiopulmonary features including manifestations that cannot be demonstrated by echocardiography.

  4. A prospective evaluation of contrast and radiation dose and image quality in cardiac CT in children with complex congenital heart disease using low-concentration iodinated contrast agent and low tube voltage and current.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Qiao-Ru; Gao, Wei; Sun, Ai-Min; Wang, Qian; Qiu, Hai-Sheng; Wang, Fang; Hu, Li-Wei; Li, Jian-Ying; Zhong, Yu-Min

    2017-02-01

    To the assess image quality, contrast dose and radiation dose in cardiac CT in children with congenital heart disease (CHD) using low-concentration iodinated contrast agent and low tube voltage and current in comparison with standard dose protocol. 110 patients with CHD were randomized to 1 of the 2 scan protocols: Group A (n = 45) with 120 mA tube current and contrast agent of 270 mgI/ml in concentration (Visipaque(™); GE Healthcare Ireland, Co., Cork, UK); and Group B (n = 65) with the conventional 160 mA and 370 mgI/ml concentration contrast (Iopamiro(®); Shanghai Bracco Sine Pharmaceutical Corp Ltd, Shanghai, China). Both groups used 80 kVp tube voltage and were reconstructed with 70% adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction algorithm. The CT value and noise in aortic arch were measured and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were calculated. A five-point scale was used to subjectively evaluate image quality. Contrast and radiation dose were recorded. There was no difference in age and weight between the two groups (all p > 0.05). The iodine load and radiation dose in Group A were statistically lower (3976 ± 747 mgI vs 5763 ± 1018 mgI in iodine load and 0.60 ± 0.08 mSv vs 0.77 ± 0.10 mSv in effective dose; p  0.05), and with good agreement between the two observers. Comparing the surgery results, the diagnostic accuracy for extracardiac and intracardiac defects for Group A was 96% and 92%, respectively, while the corresponding numbers for Group B were 95% and 93%. Compared with the standard dose protocol, the use of low tube voltage (80 kVp), low tube current (120 mA) and low-concentration iodinated contrast agent (270 mgI/ml) enables a reduction of 30% in iodine load and 22% in radiation dose while maintaining compatible image quality and diagnostic accuracy. Advances in knowledge: The new cardiac CT scanning protocol can largely reduce the adverse effects of

  5. [Impact of both cardiac-CT and cardiac-MR on the assessment of coronary risk].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silber, S; Richartz, B M

    2005-01-01

    invasive strategy should be performed. Since non-invasive coronary angiography (CTA) with cardiac-CT has been shown to provide a high negative predictive value, CTA (with good imaging quality) is suitable for ruling out a significant obstructive CAD in the group at intermediate risk for an obstructive CAD. Another approach could be a functional test to initially prove a relevant, inducible myocardial ischemia: In a large cohort it was shown that patients will only prognostically benefit from revascularization procedures if the ischemic myocardial area is greater than 10%. Therefore, the assessment of the extent of myocardial ischemia is the domain of modern stress imaging tests. Stress-echocardiography and myocardial scintigraphy have almost the same sensitivity (74-80%, 84-90%, respectively) and specificity (84-89%, 77-86%, respectively), which are considerably higher than for stress-ECG. Cardiac MR is most suitable for the assessment of myocardial perfusion, because it traces the first pass dynamics of gadolinium at rest and during stress in reproducible slices at an acceptable spatial and a high temporal resolution without ionizing radiation. Whether the non-invasive coronary angiography with cardiac-CT and the Adenosin-perfusion imaging with cardiac-MR will completely replace diagnostic cardiac catheterization and stress-echocardiography as well as myocardial scintigraphy remains to be evaluated in further studies.

  6. Cardiac imaging: does radiation matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einstein, Andrew J.; Knuuti, Juhani

    2012-01-01

    The use of ionizing radiation in cardiovascular imaging has generated considerable discussion. Radiation should not be considered in isolation, but rather in the context of a careful examination of the benefits, risks, and costs of cardiovascular imaging. Such consideration requires an understanding of some fundamental aspects of the biology, physics, epidemiology, and terminology germane to radiation, as well as principles of radiological protection. This paper offers a concise, contemporary perspective on these areas by addressing pertinent questions relating to radiation and its application to cardiac imaging. PMID:21828062

  7. Non-cardiac findings on coronary computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewey, Marc; Schnapauff, Dirk; Teige, Florian; Hamm, Bernd [Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Department of Radiology, Chariteplatz 1, P.O. Box 10098, Berlin (Germany)

    2007-08-15

    Both multislice computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are emerging as methods to detect coronary artery stenoses and assess cardiac function and morphology. Non-cardiac structures are also amenable to assessment by these non-invasive tests. We investigated the rate of significant and insignificant non-cardiac findings using CT and MRI. A total of 108 consecutive patients suspected of having coronary artery disease and without contraindications to CT and MRI were included in this study. Significant non-cardiac findings were defined as findings that required additional clinical or radiological follow-up. CT and MR images were read independently in a blinded fashion. CT yielded five significant non-cardiac findings in five patients (5%). These included a pulmonary embolism, large pleural effusions, sarcoid, a large hiatal hernia, and a pulmonary nodule (>1.0 cm). Two of these significant non-cardiac findings were also seen on MRI (pleural effusions and sarcoid, 2%). Insignificant non-cardiac findings were more frequent than significant findings on both CT (n = 11, 10%) and MRI (n = 7, 6%). Incidental non-cardiac findings on CT and MRI of the coronary arteries are common, which is why images should be analyzed by radiologists to ensure that important findings are not missed and unnecessary follow-up examinations are avoided. (orig.)

  8. Low radiation dose protocol in cardiac CT with 100 kVp: usefulness of display preset optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakaura, Takeshi; Kidoh, Masafumi; Sakaino, Naritsugu; Nakamura, Shota; Nozaki, Toshimitsu; Izumi, Akari; Harada, Kazunori; Yamashita, Yasuyuki

    2013-08-01

    To evaluate the radiation dose and image quality of 100 kVp cardiac CT, and the effects of display setting optimization. We randomly assigned 100 patients undergoing cardiac CT to one of following two protocols. Fifty patients underwent our conventional protocol with 120 kVp, and the other 50 patients underwent our low radiation dose protocol with 100 kVp. We compared effective dose (ED); CT number, image noise, and contrast noise ratio (CNR) of ascending aorta at 120 and 100 kVp protocol. We also performed quantitative analysis and qualitative analysis for bitmap image of 120, 100 kVp, and display preset optimization for 100 kVp images. The estimated ED was 48 % lower with the 100 kVp protocol than the 120 kVp protocol (2.8 vs. 5.5 mSv, p protocol (18.5 ± 3.6 vs. 18.6 ± 3.8, p = 0.84). Display preset optimization significantly improved image quality of 100 kVp cardiac CT, and there is no significant difference in qualitative analysis and quantitative analysis between 100 kVp scan with optimized display preset and 120 kVp scan (p > 0.05). The 100 kVp scanning with optimized display preset offers almost same image quality at cardiac CT of thin adults under 48 % decreased radiation dose.

  9. Canadian Association of Radiologists: consensus guidelines and standards for cardiac CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dennie, C.J. [Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, The Ottawa Hospital, Civic Campus, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)], E-mail: cdennie@toh.on.ca; Leipsic, J. [Dept. of Radiology, Div. of Cardiology, Univ. of British Columbia and St Paul' s Hospital, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Brydie, A. [Dept. of Radiology, Dalhousie Univ. and Queen Elizabeth II Health Sciences Centre, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada)

    2009-02-15

    Invasive coronary angiography remains the gold standard for imaging of the coronary arteries. Because of poor temporal and spatial resolution, noninvasive imaging of the heart using computed tomography (CT) had remained a challenge until the recent past. Since 1999, and the advent of 4-detector electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated CT, there have been rapid technical developments in CT technology and postprocessing tools, thus enabling an accurate noninvasive assessment of cardiac anatomy including the coronary arteries as well as cardiac function. Today, this relatively new technique increasingly is being requested and performed on a routine basis. Although guidelines and standards for the performance of cardiac CT (CCT) have been published by other societies outside of Canada [1-5], the Canadian Association of Radiologists recognizes that Canadian radiologists play a leading and pivotal role in the safe and proper implementation of CCT throughout the country, as well as in the training and continuing medical education of physicians performing and interpreting CCT studies. This comprehensive article reviews the current evidence for CCT to date and outlines the standards for the implementation of a CCT program. Based on the review of the current literature and on expert opinion, recommendations regarding indications and contraindications for CCT also are provided. (author)

  10. Effect of heart rate on CT angiography using the enhanced cardiac model of the 4D NCAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segars, W. P.; Taguchi, K.; Fung, G. S. K.; Fishman, E. K.; Tsui, B. M. W.

    2006-03-01

    We investigate the effect of heart rate on the quality and artifact generation in coronary artery images obtained using multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT) with the purpose of finding the optimal time resolution for data acquisition. To perform the study, we used the 4D NCAT phantom, a computer model of the normal human anatomy and cardiac and respiratory motions developed in our laboratory. Although capable of being far more realistic, the 4D NCAT cardiac model was originally designed for low-resolution imaging research, and lacked the anatomical detail to be applicable to high-resolution CT. In this work, we updated the cardiac model to include a more detailed anatomy and physiology based on high-resolution clinical gated MSCT data. To demonstrate its utility in high-resolution dynamic CT imaging research, the enhanced 4D NCAT was then used in a pilot simulation study to investigate the effect of heart rate on CT angiography. The 4D NCAT was used to simulate patients with different heart rates (60-120 beats/minute) and with various cardiac plaques of known size and location within the coronary arteries. For each simulated patient, MSCT projection data was generated with data acquisition windows ranging from 100 to 250 ms centered within the quiet phase (mid-diastole) of the heart using an analytical CT projection algorithm. CT images were reconstructed from the projection data, and the contrast of the plaques was then measured to assess the effect of heart rate and to determine the optimal time resolution required for each case. The 4D NCAT phantom with its realistic model for the cardiac motion was found to provide a valuable tool from which to optimize CT cardiac applications. Our results indicate the importance of optimizing the time resolution with regard to heart rate and plaque location for improved CT images at a reduced patient dose.

  11. Hepatic CT image query using Gabor features

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chenguang Zhao(赵晨光); Hongyan Cheng(程红岩); Tiange Zhuang(庄天戈)

    2004-01-01

    A retrieval scheme for liver computerize tomography (CT) images based on Gabor texture is presented.For each hepatic CT image, we manually delineate abnormal regions within liver area. Then, a continuous Gabor transform is utilized to analyze the texture of the pathology bearing region and extract the corresponding feature vectors. For a given sample image, we compare its feature vector with those of other images. Similar images with the highest rank are retrieved. In experiments, 45 liver CT images are collected, and the effectiveness of Gabor texture for content based retrieval is verified.

  12. 4D micro-CT for cardiac and perfusion applications with view under sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badea, Cristian T.; Johnston, Samuel M.; Qi, Yi; Johnson, G. Allan

    2011-06-01

    Micro-CT is commonly used in preclinical studies to provide anatomical information. There is growing interest in obtaining functional measurements from 4D micro-CT. We report here strategies for 4D micro-CT with a focus on two applications: (i) cardiac imaging based on retrospective gating and (ii) pulmonary perfusion using multiple contrast injections/rotations paradigm. A dual source micro-CT system is used for image acquisition with a sampling rate of 20 projections per second. The cardiac micro-CT protocol involves the use of a liposomal blood pool contrast agent. Fast scanning of free breathing mice is achieved using retrospective gating. The ECG and respiratory signals are used to sort projections into ten cardiac phases. The pulmonary perfusion protocol uses a conventional contrast agent (Isovue 370) delivered by a micro-injector in four injections separated by 2 min intervals to allow for clearance. Each injection is synchronized with the rotation of the animal, and each of the four rotations is started with an angular offset of 22.5 from the starting angle of the previous rotation. Both cardiac and perfusion protocols result in an irregular angular distribution of projections that causes significant streaking artifacts in reconstructions when using traditional filtered backprojection (FBP) algorithms. The reconstruction involves the use of the point spread function of the micro-CT system for each time point, and the analysis of the distribution of the reconstructed data in the Fourier domain. This enables us to correct for angular inconsistencies via deconvolution and identify regions where data is missing. The missing regions are filled with data from a high quality but temporally averaged prior image reconstructed with all available projections. Simulations indicate that deconvolution successfully removes the streaking artifacts while preserving temporal information. 4D cardiac micro-CT in a mouse was performed with adequate image quality at isotropic

  13. False dyssynchrony: problem with image-based cardiac functional analysis using x-ray computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidoh, Masafumi; Shen, Zeyang; Suzuki, Yuki; Ciuffo, Luisa; Ashikaga, Hiroshi; Fung, George S. K.; Otake, Yoshito; Zimmerman, Stefan L.; Lima, Joao A. C.; Higuchi, Takahiro; Lee, Okkyun; Sato, Yoshinobu; Becker, Lewis C.; Fishman, Elliot K.; Taguchi, Katsuyuki

    2017-03-01

    We have developed a digitally synthesized patient which we call "Zach" (Zero millisecond Adjustable Clinical Heart) phantom, which allows for an access to the ground truth and assessment of image-based cardiac functional analysis (CFA) using CT images with clinically realistic settings. The study using Zach phantom revealed a major problem with image-based CFA: "False dyssynchrony." Even though the true motion of wall segments is in synchrony, it may appear to be dyssynchrony with the reconstructed cardiac CT images. It is attributed to how cardiac images are reconstructed and how wall locations are updated over cardiac phases. The presence and the degree of false dyssynchrony may vary from scan-to-scan, which could degrade the accuracy and the repeatability (or precision) of image-based CT-CFA exams.

  14. Mass preserving image registration for lung CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorbunova, Vladlena; Sporring, Jon; Lo, Pechin;

    2012-01-01

    on four groups of data: 44 pairs of longitudinal inspiratory chest CT scans with small difference in lung volume; 44 pairs of longitudinal inspiratory chest CT scans with large difference in lung volume; 16 pairs of expiratory and inspiratory CT scans; and 5 pairs of images extracted at end exhale and end...... inhale phases of 4D-CT images. Registration errors, measured as the average distance between vessel tree centerlines in the matched images, are significantly lower for the proposed mass preserving image registration method in the second, third and fourth group, while there is no statistically significant......This paper presents a mass preserving image registration algorithm for lung CT images. To account for the local change in lung tissue intensity during the breathing cycle, a tissue appearance model based on the principle of preservation of total lung mass is proposed. This model is incorporated...

  15. Assessments of Coronary Artery Visibility and Radiation Dose in Infants with Congenital Heart Disease on Cardiac 128-slice CT and on Cardiac 64-slice CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Y; Huang, M; Zheng, J; Li, J; Liu, H; Liang, C

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the coronary artery visibility and radiation dose in infants with CHD on cardiac 128-slice CT and on cardiac 64-slice CT. The images of 200 patients were analyzed in this study, 100 patients were selected randomly from a group of 789 infants (coronary artery segments was graded on a four-point scale. The coronary arteries were considered to be detected or visible when grade was 2 or higher. The visibility of the coronary artery segments and the radiation dose was compared between the two groups. Except for the rate of LM (96 vs. 99%), the detection rates of the total, LAD, LCX, RCA, and the proximal segment of the RCA in the 256-slice CT group were significantly higher than those in the 64-slice CT group (51.7, 53.33, 33.67, 53.33, and 99 vs. 34.8, 34.33, 18, 30.67, and 75%, respectively). The counts of visibility score (4/3/2/1) for the LM and the proximal segment of the RCA were 62/22/12/4 and 56/20/17/7, respectively, in the 128-slice CT group and 17/42/30/1 and 9/30/38/25, respectively, in the 64-slice CT group. There were significant differences, especially for score 4 and 3, between the two groups. The radiation dose in the 128-slice CT group was significantly decreased than those in the 64-slice CT group (CTDIvol 1.88 ± 0.51 vs. 5.61 ± 0.63 mGy; SSDE 4.48 ± 1.15 vs. 13.97 ± 1.52 mGy; effective radiation dose 1.36 ± 0.44 vs. 4.06 ± 0.7 mSv). With reduced radiation dose, the visibility of the coronary artery in infants with CHD via prospective ECG-triggered mode on a 128-slice CT is superior to that of the 64-slice CT using retrospective ECG-gated spiral mode.

  16. CT perfusion image processing: analysis of liver tumors

    OpenAIRE

    D’Antò, Michela

    2013-01-01

    Perfusion CT imaging of the liver has potential to improve evaluation of tumour angiogenesis. Quantitative parameters can be obtained applying mathematical models to Time Attenuation Curve (TAC). However, there are still some difficulties for an accurate quantification of perfusion parameters due, for example, to algorithms employed, to mathematical model, to patient’s weight and cardiac output and to the acquisition system. In this thesis, new parameters and alternative methodologies ab...

  17. Image reconstruction for brain CT slices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴建明; 施鹏飞

    2004-01-01

    Different modalities in biomedical images, like CT, MRI and PET scanners, provide detailed cross-sectional views of human anatomy. This paper introduces three-dimensional brain reconstruction based on CT slices. It contains filtering, fuzzy segmentation, matching method of contours, cell array structure and image animation. Experimental results have shown its validity. The innovation is matching method of contours and fuzzy segmentation algorithm of CT slices.

  18. Feasibility of epicardial adipose tissue quantification in non-ECG-gated low-radiation-dose CT: comparison with prospectively ECG-gated cardiac CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon-Yarza, Isabel; Viteri-Ramirez, Guillermo; Saiz-Mendiguren, Ramon; Slon-Roblero, Pedro J.; Paramo, Maria [Dept. of Radiology, Clinica Univ. de Navarra, Pamplona (Spain); Bastarrika, Gorka [Dept. of Radiology, Clinica Univ. de Navarra, Pamplona (Spain); Cardiac Imaging Unit, Clinica Univ. de Navarra, Pamplona (Spain)], e-mail: bastarrika@unav.es

    2012-06-15

    Background: Epicardial adipose tissue (EAT) is an important indicator of cardiovascular risk. This parameter is generally assessed on ECG-gated computed tomography (CT) images. Purpose: To evaluate feasibility and reliability of EAT quantification on non-gated thoracic low-radiation-dose CT examinations with respect to prospectively ECG-gated cardiac CT acquisition. Material and Methods: Sixty consecutive asymptomatic smokers (47 men; mean age 64 {+-} 9.8 years) underwent low-dose CT of the chest and prospectively ECG-gated cardiac CT acquisitions (64-slice dual-source CT). The two examinations were reconstructed with the same range, field of view, slice thickness, and convolution algorithm. Two independent observers blindly quantified EAT volume using commercially available software. Data were compared with paired sample Student t-test, concordance correlation coefficients (CCC), and Bland-Altman plots. Results: No statistically significant difference was observed for EAT volume quantification with low-dose-CT (141.7 {+-} 58.3 mL) with respect to ECG-gated CT (142.7 {+-} 57.9 mL). Estimation of CCC showed almost perfect concordance between the two techniques for EAT-volume assessment (CCC, 0.99; mean difference, 0.98 {+-} 5.1 mL). Inter-observer agreement for EAT volume estimation was CCC: 0.96 for low-dose-CT examinations and 0.95 for ECG-gated CT. Conclusion: Non-gated low-dose CT allows quantifying EAT with almost the same concordance and reliability as using dedicated prospectively ECG-gated cardiac CT acquisition protocols.

  19. Performance comparison between static and dynamic cardiac CT on perfusion quantitation and patient classification tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindschadler, Michael; Modgil, Dimple; Branch, Kelley R.; La Riviere, Patrick J.; Alessio, Adam M.

    2015-03-01

    Cardiac CT acquisitions for perfusion assessment can be performed in a dynamic or static mode. In this simulation study, we evaluate the relative classification and quantification performance of these modes for assessing myocardial blood flow (MBF). In the dynamic method, a series of low dose cardiac CT acquisitions yields data on contrast bolus dynamics over time; these data are fit with a model to give a quantitative MBF estimate. In the static method, a single CT acquisition is obtained, and the relative CT numbers in the myocardium are used to infer perfusion states. The static method does not directly yield a quantitative estimate of MBF, but these estimates can be roughly approximated by introducing assumed linear relationships between CT number and MBF, consistent with the ways such images are typically visually interpreted. Data obtained by either method may be used for a variety of clinical tasks, including 1) stratifying patients into differing categories of ischemia and 2) using the quantitative MBF estimate directly to evaluate ischemic disease severity. Through simulations, we evaluate the performance on each of these tasks. The dynamic method has very low bias in MBF estimates, making it particularly suitable for quantitative estimation. At matched radiation dose levels, ROC analysis demonstrated that the static method, with its high bias but generally lower variance, has superior performance in stratifying patients, especially for larger patients.

  20. SPECT/CT workflow and imaging protocols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckers, Catherine [University Hospital of Liege, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Oncological Imaging, Department of Medical Physics, Liege (Belgium); Hustinx, Roland [University Hospital of Liege, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Oncological Imaging, Department of Medical Physics, Liege (Belgium); Domaine Universitaire du Sart Tilman, Service de Medecine Nucleaire et Imagerie Oncologique, CHU de Liege, Liege (Belgium)

    2014-05-15

    Introducing a hybrid imaging method such as single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT greatly alters the routine in the nuclear medicine department. It requires designing new workflow processes and the revision of original scheduling process and imaging protocols. In addition, the imaging protocol should be adapted for each individual patient, so that performing CT is fully justified and the CT procedure is fully tailored to address the clinical issue. Such refinements often occur before the procedure is started but may be required at some intermediate stage of the procedure. Furthermore, SPECT/CT leads in many instances to a new partnership with the radiology department. This article presents practical advice and highlights the key clinical elements which need to be considered to help understand the workflow process of SPECT/CT and optimise imaging protocols. The workflow process using SPECT/CT is complex in particular because of its bimodal character, the large spectrum of stakeholders, the multiplicity of their activities at various time points and the need for real-time decision-making. With help from analytical tools developed for quality assessment, the workflow process using SPECT/CT may be separated into related, but independent steps, each with its specific human and material resources to use as inputs or outputs. This helps identify factors that could contribute to failure in routine clinical practice. At each step of the process, practical aspects to optimise imaging procedure and protocols are developed. A decision-making algorithm for justifying each CT indication as well as the appropriateness of each CT protocol is the cornerstone of routine clinical practice using SPECT/CT. In conclusion, implementing hybrid SPECT/CT imaging requires new ways of working. It is highly rewarding from a clinical perspective, but it also proves to be a daily challenge in terms of management. (orig.)

  1. Cardiac imaging by means of four-detector row computed tomography and cardiac gating; Imagerie cardiaque en tomodensitometrie a quatre canaux d'acquisition et synchronisation cardiaque

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ketelslegers, E.; Coche, E.; Goffette, P.; Maldague, B.; Be, Van Beers [Clinique Universitaires UCL Saint-Luc, Bruxelles (Belgium); Gerber, B. [Clinique Universitaires UCL Saint-Luc, Dept. d' Imagerie Medicale, Bruxelles (Belgium)

    2003-09-01

    Electrocardiographically-assisted imaging is a recent development in multislice spiral computed tomography, In this article, we summarize the principles of four-detector row CT for cardiac applications. Following is an overview of the potential of this technique to evaluate the heart, the thoracic aorta, and the para-cardiac pulmonary parenchyma. Technical considerations for optimal imaging are highlighted. (authors)

  2. Noninvasive Physiologic Assessment of Coronary Stenoses Using Cardiac CT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Xu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Coronary CT angiography (CCTA has become an important noninvasive imaging modality in the diagnosis of coronary artery disease (CAD. CCTA enables accurate evaluation of coronary artery stenosis. However, CCTA provides limited information on the physiological significance of stenotic lesions. A noninvasive “one-stop-shop” diagnostic test that can provide both anatomical significance and functional significance of stenotic lesions would be beneficial in the diagnosis and management of CAD. Recently, with the introduction of novel techniques, such as myocardial CT perfusion, CT-derived fractional flow reserve (FFRCT, and transluminal attenuation gradient (TAG, CCTA has emerged as a noninvasive method for the assessment of both anatomy of coronary lesions and its physiological consequences during a single study. This review provides an overview of the current status of new CT techniques for the physiologic assessments of CAD.

  3. Automated Segmentation of Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stegmann, Mikkel Bille; Nilsson, Jens Chr.; Grønning, Bjørn A.

    2001-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been shown to be an accurate and precise technique to assess cardiac volumes and function in a non-invasive manner and is generally considered to be the current gold-standard for cardiac imaging [1]. Measurement of ventricular volumes, muscle mass and function...

  4. Spiral CT of Non-Graft Post Cardiac Surgery Complications: A Pictorial Essay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Shirani

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Spiral CT is a rapidly growing method for noninvasive visualization of post-operative complications, including post-operative complications in CABG (coronary artery bypass graft. In the recent years, several different, yet more efficient types have been introduced with progressive improvement in the diagnostic accuracy in the detection of post-operative complications. The introduction of 64-slice technology, which allows high resolution as well as reconstructed images, has resulted in further progress in the diagnostic process. This kind of diagnostic equipment will spread rapidly in the world. Although studies with large numbers of patients regarding spiral CT as a routine diagnostic method have not been reported, there is great need for it all over the world. In this article, we intend to review the spiral CT findings of non-graft complications in patients after cardiac surgery.

  5. SPECT-CT Hybrid cardiac imaging synchronized to Ecg for the mouse after myocardium infarction; Imagerie cardiaque hybride TEMP-TDM synchronisee a l'ECG chez la souris apres infarctus du myocarde

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choquet, P.; Goetz, C.; Aubertin, G.; Hubele, F. [HUS Strasbourg, Service de biophysique et medecine nucleaire, 67 (France); El-Fertak, L.; Monassier, L. [Laboratoire de pharmacologie cardiovasculaire, 67 - Strasbourg (France)

    2010-07-01

    The preclinical SPECT-CT imaging synchronized to electrocardiogram among mice allows to acquire isotropic morphological and functional data, data of high spatial and temporal resolutions with relatively short acquisition times. (N.C.)

  6. Fully automated intrinsic respiratory and cardiac gating for small animal CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuntz, J; Baeuerle, T; Semmler, W; Bartling, S H [Department of Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Dinkel, J [Department of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Zwick, S [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Medical Physics, Freiburg University (Germany); Grasruck, M [Siemens Healthcare, Forchheim (Germany); Kiessling, F [Chair of Experimental Molecular Imaging, RWTH-Aachen University, Medical Faculty, Aachen (Germany); Gupta, R [Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)], E-mail: j.kuntz@dkfz.de

    2010-04-07

    A fully automated, intrinsic gating algorithm for small animal cone-beam CT is described and evaluated. A parameter representing the organ motion, derived from the raw projection images, is used for both cardiac and respiratory gating. The proposed algorithm makes it possible to reconstruct motion-corrected still images as well as to generate four-dimensional (4D) datasets representing the cardiac and pulmonary anatomy of free-breathing animals without the use of electrocardiogram (ECG) or respiratory sensors. Variation analysis of projections from several rotations is used to place a region of interest (ROI) on the diaphragm. The ROI is cranially extended to include the heart. The centre of mass (COM) variation within this ROI, the filtered frequency response and the local maxima are used to derive a binary motion-gating parameter for phase-sensitive gated reconstruction. This algorithm was implemented on a flat-panel-based cone-beam CT scanner and evaluated using a moving phantom and animal scans (seven rats and eight mice). Volumes were determined using a semiautomatic segmentation. In all cases robust gating signals could be obtained. The maximum volume error in phantom studies was less than 6%. By utilizing extrinsic gating via externally placed cardiac and respiratory sensors, the functional parameters (e.g. cardiac ejection fraction) and image quality were equivalent to this current gold standard. This algorithm obviates the necessity of both gating hardware and user interaction. The simplicity of the proposed algorithm enables adoption in a wide range of small animal cone-beam CT scanners.

  7. The stylohyoid chain: CT imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uysal Ramadan, Selma, E-mail: uysalselma@yahoo.co [Department of Radiology, Ankara Training and Research Hospital, Ankara 06590 (Turkey); Goekharman, Dilek, E-mail: gokharman@ttnet.net.t [Department of Radiology, Ankara Training and Research Hospital, Ankara 06590 (Turkey); Kosar, Pinar, E-mail: pkosar@hotmail.co [Department of Radiology, Ankara Training and Research Hospital, Ankara 06590 (Turkey); Kacar, Mahmut, E-mail: mkacar1961@gamil.co [Department of Radiology, Ankara Training and Research Hospital, Ankara 06590 (Turkey); Kosar, Ugur, E-mail: ugurkosar@hotmail.co [Department of Radiology, Ankara Training and Research Hospital, Ankara 06590 (Turkey)

    2010-09-15

    We aimed in this report to discuss the embryology, anatomy, theories of ossification and symptoms, clinical presentation, and diagnosis of the stylohyoid chain (SHC) variations, together with the role of radiographs, computed tomography (CT) and three-dimensional (3D)-CT in showing these variations. Because CT/3D-CT additionally facilitates visualization of the entire SHC with different axes, it is the most valuable method for establishing the relationship between the SHC and the surrounding tissue. SHC variation can be discovered during CT performed for indications other than ossified SHC. It is important to diagnose whether or not the SHC is ossified, since one of the treatment procedures in ossified SHC is total excision. If the clinician and radiologist are aware of these variations observed in the SHC, patients with vague symptoms may be spared unnecessary investigations and may be properly diagnosed earlier.

  8. Quantitative Techniques in PET-CT Imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Basu, Sandip; Zaidi, Habib; Holm, Soren; Alavi, Abass

    2011-01-01

    The appearance of hybrid PET/CT scanners has made quantitative whole body scanning of radioactive tracers feasible. This paper deals with the novel concepts for assessing global organ function and disease activity based on combined functional (PET) and structural (CT or MR) imaging techniques, their

  9. A registration based approach for 4D cardiac micro-CT using combined prospective and retrospective gating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badea, Cristian T.; Schreibmann, Eduard; Fox, Tim

    2008-01-01

    Recent advances in murine cardiac studies with three-dimensional cone beam micro-computed tomography (CT) have used either prospective or retrospective gating technique. While prospective gating ensures the best image quality and the highest resolution, it involves longer sampling times and higher radiation dose. Sampling is faster and the radiation dose can be reduced with retrospective gating but the image quality is affected by the limited number of projections with an irregular angular distribution which complicate the reconstruction process, causing significant streaking artifacts. This work involves both prospective and retrospective gating in sampling. Deformable registration is used between a high quality image set acquired with prospective gating with the multiple data sets during the cardiac cycle obtained using retrospective gating. Tests were conducted on a four-dimensional (4D) cardiac mouse phantom and after optimization, the method was applied to in vivo cardiac micro-CT data. Results indicate that, by using our method, the sampling time can be reduced by a factor of 2.5 and the radiation dose can be reduced 35% compared to the prospective sampling while the image quality can be maintained. In conclusion, we proposed a novel solution to 4D cine cardiac micro-CT based on a combined prospective with retrospective gating in sampling and deformable registration post reconstruction that mixed the advantages of both strategies. PMID:18491508

  10. Virtual CT laparoscopic imaging using intravenous cholangiography with helical CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchida, Masafumi; Ishibashi, Masatoshi; Nishimura, Hiroshi; Hayabuchi, Naofumi [Kurume Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). School of Medicine

    2000-08-01

    Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is a reatively new technology that allows for minimally invasive treatment of cholelithiasis. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the feasibility of virtual laparoscopic imaging using helical CT cholangiography with volume rendering technique. We used the technique with ten patients with suspected gallbladder abnormalities. Our imaging sets produced high quality 3D images with excellent visualization in 70% (7/10) of all cases. Virtual laparoscopic imaging was also compared with other imaging techniques and imaging using helical scans can proved useful in preoperative imaging. Furthermore, virtual laparoscopic imaging using helical scans can in surgical planning and serve as a visual aid in discussions between radiologists, surgeons, and patients. (author)

  11. Randomized controlled trial of relaxation music to reduce heart rate in patients undergoing cardiac CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, Ming Yen [University of Toronto, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto General Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); The University of Hong Kong, Queen Mary Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Hong Kong (China); Karimzad, Yasser; Menezes, Ravi J.; Wintersperger, Bernd J.; Li, Qin; Forero, Julian; Paul, Narinder S.; Nguyen, Elsie T. [University of Toronto, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto General Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2016-10-15

    To evaluate the heart rate lowering effect of relaxation music in patients undergoing coronary CT angiography (CCTA), pulmonary vein CT (PVCT) and coronary calcium score CT (CCS). Patients were randomised to a control group (i.e. standard of care protocol) or to a relaxation music group (ie. standard of care protocol with music). The groups were compared for heart rate, radiation dose, image quality and dose of IV metoprolol. Both groups completed State-Trait Anxiety Inventory anxiety questionnaires to assess patient experience. One hundred and ninety-seven patients were recruited (61.9 % males); mean age 56y (19-86 y); 127 CCTA, 17 PVCT, 53 CCS. No significant difference in heart rate, radiation dose, image quality, metoprolol dose and anxiety scores. 86 % of patients enjoyed the music. 90 % of patients in the music group expressed a strong preference to have music for future examinations. The patient cohort demonstrated low anxiety levels prior to CT. Relaxation music in CCTA, PVCT and CCS does not reduce heart rate or IV metoprolol use. Patients showed low levels of anxiety indicating that anxiolytics may not have a significant role in lowering heart rate. Music can be used in cardiac CT to improve patient experience. (orig.)

  12. Cardiac MRI and CT features of inheritable and congenital conditions associated with sudden cardiac death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sparrow, Patrick; Merchant, Naeem; Provost, Yves; Doyle, Deirdre; Nguyen, Elsie; Paul, Narinder [University Health Network and Mount Sinai Hospital, Division of Cardiothoracic Imaging, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2009-02-15

    Cardiac MRI (CMR) and electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) are increasingly important tools in the identification and assessment of cardiac-related disease processes, including those associated with sudden cardiac death (SCD). While the commonest cause of SCD is coronary artery disease (CAD), in patients under 35 years inheritable cardiomyopathies such as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy are important aetiologies. CMR in particular offers both accurate delineation of the morphological abnormalities associated with these and other conditions and the possibility for risk stratification for development of ventricular arrhythmias with demonstration of macroscopic scar by delayed enhancement imaging with intravenous gadolinium. (orig.)

  13. Blind Analysis of CT Image Noise Using Residual Denoised Images

    CERN Document Server

    Roychowdhury, Sohini; Alessio, Adam

    2016-01-01

    CT protocol design and quality control would benefit from automated tools to estimate the quality of generated CT images. These tools could be used to identify erroneous CT acquisitions or refine protocols to achieve certain signal to noise characteristics. This paper investigates blind estimation methods to determine global signal strength and noise levels in chest CT images. Methods: We propose novel performance metrics corresponding to the accuracy of noise and signal estimation. We implement and evaluate the noise estimation performance of six spatial- and frequency- based methods, derived from conventional image filtering algorithms. Algorithms were tested on patient data sets from whole-body repeat CT acquisitions performed with a higher and lower dose technique over the same scan region. Results: The proposed performance metrics can evaluate the relative tradeoff of filter parameters and noise estimation performance. The proposed automated methods tend to underestimate CT image noise at low-flux levels...

  14. Feasibility of determining myocardial transient ischemic dilation from cardiac CT by automated stress/rest registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Jonghye; Slomka, Piotr J.; Nakazato, Ryo; Tamarappoo, Balaji K.; Min, James K.; Germano, Guido; Berman, Daniel S.; Dey, Damini

    2012-02-01

    Transient ischemic dilation (TID) of the left ventricle measured by myocardial perfusion Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) and defined as a the ratio of stress myocardial blood volume to rest myocardial blood volume has been shown to be highly specific for detection of severe coronary artery disease. This work investigates automated quantification of TID from cardiac Computed Tomography (CT) perfusion images. To date, TID has not been computed from CT. Previous studies to compute TID have assumed accurate segmentation of the left ventricle and performed subsequent analysis of volume change mainly on static or less often on gated myocardial perfusion SPECT. This, however, may limit the accuracy of TID due to potential errors from segmentation, perfusion defects or volume measurement from both images. In this study, we propose to use registration methods to determine TID from cardiac CT scans where deformation field within the structure of interest is used to measure the local volume change between stress and rest. Promising results have been demonstrated with 7 datasets, showing the potential of this approach as a comparative method for measuring TID.

  15. Automatic coronary calcium scoring in cardiac CT angiography using convolutional neural networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolterink, Jelmer M.; Leiner, Tim; Viergever, Max A.; Isgum, I

    2015-01-01

    The amount of coronary artery calcification (CAC) is a strong and independent predictor of cardiovascular events. Non-contrast enhanced cardiac CT is considered a reference for quantification of CAC. Recently, it has been shown that CAC may be quantified in cardiac CT angiography (CCTA). We present

  16. SPECT/CT and tumour imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abikhzer, Gad [Rambam Health Care Campus, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Haifa (Israel); Keidar, Zohar [Rambam Health Care Campus, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Haifa (Israel); Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, The Ruth and Bruce Rappaport Faculty of Medicine, Haifa (Israel)

    2014-05-15

    Scintigraphic techniques are sensitive imaging modalities in the diagnosis and follow-up of cancer patients providing the functional and metabolic activity characteristics of the tumour. Hybrid SPECT/CT improves the diagnostic accuracy of these well-established imaging techniques by precise anatomical localization and characterization of morphological findings, differentiation between foci of physiological and pathological tracer uptake, resulting in a significant impact on patient management and more definitive interpretations. The use of SPECT/CT has been studied in a variety of applications in tumour imaging which are reviewed in this article. By combining functional and anatomical information in a single imaging session, SPECT/CT has become a one-stop cancer imaging modality. (orig.)

  17. Cardiac diagnostic imaging; Bildgebende Verfahren in der Diagnostik des Herzens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knez, A.; Becker, A.; Leber, A.; Haberl, R.; Steinbeck, G. [Klinikum Grosshadern, Muenchen (Germany). Medizinische Klinik 1; Becker, C.; Reiser, M. [Klinikum Grosshadern, Muenchen (Germany). Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie

    2000-02-01

    Purpose: Cardiac imaging includes determination of the size and structure of the cardiac chambers, valves, great vessels and the coronary arteries, chamber and valvular function, myocardial perfusion, viability and metabolism. Material and methods: Chest roentgenography, angiography, echocardiography and nuclear imaging are commonly used but computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging also offer a promising potential. Results: Coronary angiography is the gold standard in assessing coronary anatomy. Fast CT technologies such as electron-beam and multi-row-CT are promising non-invasive imaging modalities in the assessment of coronary artery disease. With intravascular ultrasound early stages of coronary atherosclerosis can be detected. For the assessment of myocardial perfusion and viability as well as cardiac function, scintigraphic methods are widely accepted. However, MRI methods have also reached a high degree of accuracy. Evaluation of chamber and valvular function is, due to its wide availability, the field of echocardiography. (orig.) [German] Zielsetzung: Anforderungen an die kardiale Bildgebung sind die Darstellung der Anatomie der Herzhoehlen, Herzklappen, Koronararterien und der grossen Gefaesse, Parameter der Ventrikel- und Klappenfunktion, der Myokardperfusion, Myokardvitalitaet und des myokardialen Stoffwechsels. Material und Methode: In der Bildgebung kommen neben den etablierten Standardverfahren wie Roentgen, Angiographie, Echokardiographie und nuklearmedizinischen Methoden auch neuere Verfahren der Computer- und Magnetresonanztomographie zum Einsatz. Ergebnisse: Die Koronarangiographie ist der Goldstandard in der Darstellung des gesamten Koronarsystems. In der Diagnostik der koronaren Herzerkrankung zeigen schnelle CT-Verfahren wie die Elektronenstrahltomographie (EBT) und die Mehrzeilendetektor-CT (MDCT) Vorteile gegenueber der Kernspintomographie. Fruehstadien der koronaren Arteriosklerose koennen nur mit dem intravaskulaeren Ultraschall

  18. Ultrasound Imaging in Teaching Cardiac Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Christopher D.; Montgomery, Laura E. A.; Quinn, Joe G.; Roe, Sean M.; Stewart, Michael T.; Tansey, Etain A.

    2016-01-01

    This laboratory session provides hands-on experience for students to visualize the beating human heart with ultrasound imaging. Simple views are obtained from which students can directly measure important cardiac dimensions in systole and diastole. This allows students to derive, from first principles, important measures of cardiac function, such…

  19. Survey regarding the clinical practice of cardiac CT in Germany. Indications, scanning technique and reporting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maurer, Marc H.; Hamm, B.; Dewey, M. [Inst. fuer Radiologie, Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany)

    2009-12-15

    Purpose: to obtain an overview of the current clinical practice of cardiac computed tomography (CT) in Germany. Materials and methods: a 30-item question-naire was mailed to 149 providers of cardiac CT in Germany. The items asked about indications, scanning technique and reporting, data storage, and cost of the examination. Results: overall 45 questionnaires could be analyzed (30%). The majority of centers (76%, 34 of 45 centers) used CT scanners of the latest generation (at least 64 rows). The most common appropriate indications were exclusion of coronary artery disease (91%, 41/45), coronary anomalies (80%, 36/45), and follow-up after coronary artery bypass grafting (53%, 24/45). Each center examined on average 243 {+-} 310 patients in 2007 and the number of centers performing cardiac CT increased significantly in 2007 (p = 0.035) compared with the preceding year. Most used sublingual nitroglycerin (84%, 38/45; median of 2 sprays = 0.8 mg) and/or a beta blocker (86%, 39/44; median of 5 mg IV, median heart rate threshold: 70 beats/min). Many providers used ECG-triggered tube current modulation (65%, 29/44) and/or adjusted the tube current to the body mass index or body weight (63%, 28/44). A median slice thickness of 0.75 mm with a 0.5 mm increment and a 20 cm field-of-view was most commonly used. Source images in orthogonal planes (96%, 43/45), curved MPRs (93%, 42/45), and thin-slice MIPs (69%, 31/45) were used most frequently for interpretation. Extracardiac structures were also evaluated by 84% of the centers (38/45). The mean examination time was 16.2 min and reporting took an average of 28.8 min. (orig.)

  20. Nuclear Imaging of a Cardiac Paraganglioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almenieir, Nada; Karls, Shawn; Derbekyan, Vilma; Lisbona, Robert

    2017-09-01

    We report a case of a cardiac paraganglioma in the right atrioventricular groove in which the use of different nuclear medicine studies aided in the diagnosis. © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  1. Cardiac Imaging in Heart Failure with Comorbidities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Chiew; Chen, Sylvia; Iyngkaran, Pupalan

    2017-01-01

    Imaging modalities stand at the frontiers for progress in congestive heart failure (CHF) screening, risk stratification and monitoring. Advancements in echocardiography (ECHO) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) have allowed for improved tissue characterizations, cardiac motion analysis, and cardiac performance analysis under stress. Common cardiac comorbidities such as hypertension, metabolic syndromes and chronic renal failure contribute to cardiac remodeling, sharing similar pathophysiological mechanisms starting with interstitial changes, structural changes and finally clinical CHF. These imaging techniques can potentially detect changes earlier. Such information could have clinical benefits for screening, planning preventive therapies and risk stratifying patients. Imaging reports have often focused on traditional measures without factoring these novel parameters. This review is aimed at providing a synopsis on how we can use this information to assess and monitor improvements for CHF with comorbidities.

  2. Advances in CT imaging for urolithiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasir Andrabi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Urolithiasis is a common disease with increasing prevalence worldwide and a lifetime-estimated recurrence risk of over 50%. Imaging plays a critical role in the initial diagnosis, follow-up and urological management of urinary tract stone disease. Unenhanced helical computed tomography (CT is highly sensitive (>95% and specific (>96% in the diagnosis of urolithiasis and is the imaging investigation of choice for the initial assessment of patients with suspected urolithiasis. The emergence of multi-detector CT (MDCT and technological innovations in CT such as dual-energy CT (DECT has widened the scope of MDCT in the stone disease management from initial diagnosis to encompass treatment planning and monitoring of treatment success. DECT has been shown to enhance pre-treatment characterization of stone composition in comparison with conventional MDCT and is being increasingly used. Although CT-related radiation dose exposure remains a valid concern, the use of low-dose MDCT protocols and integration of newer iterative reconstruction algorithms into routine CT practice has resulted in a substantial decrease in ionizing radiation exposure. In this review article, our intent is to discuss the role of MDCT in the diagnosis and post-treatment evaluation of urolithiasis and review the impact of emerging CT technologies such as dual energy in clinical practice.

  3. Influence of technical parameters on epicardial fat volume quantification at cardiac CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bucher, Andreas M. [Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Clinic of the Goethe University, Frankfurt (Germany); Joseph Schoepf, U., E-mail: schoepf@musc.edu [Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Krazinski, Aleksander W.; Silverman, Justin; Spearman, James V. [Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); De Cecco, Carlo N. [Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Department of Radiological Sciences, Oncology and Pathology, University of Rome “Sapienza” – Polo Pontino, Latina (Italy); Meinel, Felix G. [Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital, Munich (Germany); Vogl, Thomas J. [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Clinic of the Goethe University, Frankfurt (Germany); Geyer, Lucas L. [Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital, Munich (Germany)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • Upper threshold levels and contrast enhancement influence epicardial fat volumetry. • Cardiac cycle does not significantly influence epicardial fat volumetry. • Adjustments of upper threshold can lead to comparable volumetry results. - Abstract: Objectives: To systematically analyze the influence of technical parameters on quantification of epicardial fat volume (EATV) at cardiac CT. Methods: 153 routine cardiac CT data sets were analyzed using three-dimensional pericardial border delineation. Three image series were reconstructed per patient: (a) CTA{sub D}: coronary CT angiography (CTA), diastolic phase; (b) CTA{sub S}: coronary CTA, systolic phase; (c) CaSc{sub D}: non-contrast CT, diastolic phase. EATV was calculated using three different upper thresholds (−15HU, −30HU, −45HU). Repeated measures ANOVA, Spearman's rho, and Bland Altman plots were used. Results: Mean EATV differed between all three image series at a −30HU threshold (CTA{sub D} 87.2 ± 38.5 ml, CTA{sub S} 90.9 ± 37.7 ml, CaSc{sub D} 130.7 ± 49.5 ml, P < 0.001). EATV of diastolic and systolic CTA reconstructions did not differ significantly (P = 0.225). Mean EATV for contrast enhanced CTA at a −15HU threshold (CTA{sub D15} 102.4 ± 43.6 ml, CTA{sub S15} 105.3 ± 42.3 ml) could be approximated most closely by non-contrast CT at −45HU threshold (CaSc{sub D45} 105.3 ± 40.8 ml). The correlation was excellent: CTA{sub S15}–CTA{sub D15}, rho = 0.943; CTA{sub D15}–CaSc{sub D45}, rho = 0.905; CTA{sub S15}–CaSc{sub D45}, rho = 0.924; each P < 0.001). Bias values from Bland Altman Analysis were: CTA{sub S15}–CTA{sub D15}, 4.9%; CTA{sub D15}–CaSc{sub D45}, −4.3%; CTA{sub S15}–CaSc{sub D45}, 0.6%. Conclusions: Measured EATV can differ substantially between contrast enhanced and non-contrast CT studies, which can be reconciled by threshold modification. Heart cycle phase does not significantly influence EATV measurements.

  4. Novel phase-based noise reduction strategy for quantification of left ventricular function and mass assessment by cardiac CT: Comparison with cardiac magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wai, Bryan, E-mail: bwai@partners.org [Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Division of Cardiology and Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Thai, Wai-ee [Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Division of Cardiology and Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Brown, Heather [Qi Imaging, Redwood City, California (United States); Truong, Quynh A. [Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Division of Cardiology and Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2013-08-15

    Background: Tube current modulation in retrospective ECG gated cardiac computed tomography (CT) results in increased image noise and may reduce the accuracy of left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction (EF) and mass assessment. Objective: To examine the effects of a novel CT phase-based noise reduction (NR) algorithm on LV EF and mass quantification as compared to cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR). Methods: In 40 subjects, we compared the LV EF and mass between CT and CMR. In a subset of 24 subjects with tube current modulated CT, the effect of phase-based noise reduction strategies on contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and the assessment of LV EF and mass was compared to CMR. Results: There was excellent correlation between CT and CMR for EF (r = 0.94) and mass (r = 0.97). As compared to CMR, the limits of agreement improved with increasing strength of NR strategy. There was a systematic underestimation of LV mass by CT compared to CMR with no NR (−10.3 ± 10.1 g) and low NR (−10.3 ± 12.5 g), but was attenuated with high NR (−0.5 ± 8.3 g). Studies without NR had lower CNR compared to low and high NR at both the ES phase and ED phase (all p < 0.01). Conclusions: A high NR strategy on tube current modulated functional cardiac CT improves correlation of EF compared to CMR and reduces variability of EF and mass evaluation by increasing the CNR. In an effort to reduce radiation dose with tube current modulation, this strategy provides better image quality when LV function and mass quantification is needed.

  5. Novel phase-based noise reduction strategy for quantification of left ventricular function and mass assessment by cardiac CT: comparison with cardiac magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wai, Bryan; Thai, Wai-Ee; Brown, Heather; Truong, Quynh A

    2013-08-01

    Tube current modulation in retrospective ECG gated cardiac computed tomography (CT) results in increased image noise and may reduce the accuracy of left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction (EF) and mass assessment. To examine the effects of a novel CT phase-based noise reduction (NR) algorithm on LV EF and mass quantification as compared to cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR). In 40 subjects, we compared the LV EF and mass between CT and CMR. In a subset of 24 subjects with tube current modulated CT, the effect of phase-based noise reduction strategies on contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and the assessment of LV EF and mass was compared to CMR. There was excellent correlation between CT and CMR for EF (r=0.94) and mass (r=0.97). As compared to CMR, the limits of agreement improved with increasing strength of NR strategy. There was a systematic underestimation of LV mass by CT compared to CMR with no NR (-10.3±10.1g) and low NR (-10.3±12.5g), but was attenuated with high NR (-0.5±8.3g). Studies without NR had lower CNR compared to low and high NR at both the ES phase and ED phase (all p<0.01). A high NR strategy on tube current modulated functional cardiac CT improves correlation of EF compared to CMR and reduces variability of EF and mass evaluation by increasing the CNR. In an effort to reduce radiation dose with tube current modulation, this strategy provides better image quality when LV function and mass quantification is needed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Cardiac CT and MRI guide surgery in impending left ventricular rupture after acute myocardial infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah Ashish S

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We report the case of a 67 year-old patient who presented with worsening chest pain and shortness of breath, four days post acute myocardial infarction. Contrast enhanced computed tomography of the chest ruled out a pulmonary embolus but revealed an unexpected small subepicardial aneurysm (SEA in the lateral left ventricular wall which was confirmed on cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. Intraoperative palpation of the left lateral wall was guided by the cardiac MRI and CT findings and confirmed the presence of focally thinned and weakened myocardium, covered by epicardial fat. An aneurysmorrhaphy was subsequently performed in addition to coronary bypass surgery and a mitral valve repair. The patient was discharged home on post operative day eight in good condition and is feeling well 2 years after surgery.

  7. Accessory left atrial diverticulae: contractile properties depicted with 64-slice cine-cardiac CT.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Killeen, Ronan P

    2012-02-01

    To assess the contractility of accessory left atrial appendages (LAAs) using multiphasic cardiac CT. We retrospectively analyzed the presence, location, size and contractile properties of accessory LAAs using multiphasic cardiac 64-slice CT in 102 consecutive patients (63 males, 39 females, mean age 57). Multiplanar reformats were used to create image planes in axial oblique, sagittal oblique and coronal oblique planes. For all appendages with an orifice diameter >or= 10 mm, axial and sagittal diameters and appendage volumes were recorded in atrial diastole and systole. Regression analysis was performed to assess which imaging appearances best predicted accessory appendage contractility. Twenty-three (23%) patients demonstrated an accessory LAA, all identified along the anterior LA wall. Dimensions for axial oblique (AOD) and sagittal oblique (SOD) diameters and sagittal oblique length (SOL) were 6.3-19, 3.4-20 and 5-21 mm, respectively. All appendages (>or=10 mm) demonstrated significant contraction during atrial systole (greatest diameter reduction was AOD [3.8 mm, 27%]). Significant correlations were noted between AOD-contraction and AOD (R = 0.57, P < 0.05) and SOD-contraction and AOD, SOD and SOL (R = 0.6, P < 0.05). Mean diverticulum volume in atrial diastole was 468.4 +\\/- 493 mm(3) and in systole was 171.2 +\\/- 122 mm(3), indicating a mean change in volume of 297.2 +\\/- 390 mm(3), P < 0.0001. Stepwise multiple regression analysis revealed SOL to be the strongest independent predictor of appendage contractility (R(2) = 0.86, P < 0.0001) followed by SOD (R(2) = 0.91, P < 0.0001). Accessory LAAs show significant contractile properties on cardiac CT. Those accessory LAAs with a large sagittal height or depth should be evaluated for contractile properties, and if present should be examined for ectopic activity during electrophysiological studies.

  8. Mass preserving image registration for lung CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorbunova, Vladlena; Sporring, Jon; Lo, Pechin Chien Pau

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a mass preserving image registration algorithm for lung CT images. To account for the local change in lung tissue intensity during the breathing cycle, a tissue appearance model based on the principle of preservation of total lung mass is proposed. This model is incorporated...... into a standard image registration framework with a composition of a global affine and several free-form B-Spline transformations with increasing grid resolution. The proposed mass preserving registration method is compared to registration using the sum of squared intensity differences as a similarity function...... inhale phases of 4D-CT images. Registration errors, measured as the average distance between vessel tree centerlines in the matched images, are significantly lower for the proposed mass preserving image registration method in the second, third and fourth group, while there is no statistically significant...

  9. Image Analysis in CT Angiography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manniesing, R.

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis we develop and validate novel image processing techniques for the analysis of vascular structures in medical images. First a new type of filter is proposed which is capable of enhancing vascular structures while suppressing noise in the remainder of the image. This filter is based on

  10. Beam hardening and motion artifacts in cardiac CT: evaluation and iterative correction method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Zeyang; Lee, Okkyun; Taguchi, Katsuyuki

    2016-03-01

    For myocardial perfusion CT exams, beam hardening (BH) artifacts may degrade the accuracy of myocardial perfusion defect detection. Meanwhile, cardiac motion may make BH process inconsistent, which makes conventional BH correction (BHC) methods ineffective. The aims of this study were to assess the severity of BH artifacts and motion artifacts and propose a projection-based iterative BHC method which has a potential to handle the motion-induced inconsistency better than conventional methods. In this study, four sets of forward projection data were first acquired using both cylindrical phantoms and cardiac images as objects: (1) with monochromatic x-rays without motion; (2) with polychromatic x-rays without motion; (3) with monochromatic x-rays with motion; and (4) with polychromatic x-rays with motion. From each dataset, images were reconstructed using filtered back projection; for datasets 2 and 4, one of the following BHC methods was also performed: (A) no BHC; (B) BHC that concerns water only; and (C) BHC that takes both water and iodine into account, which is an iterative method we developed in this work. Biases of images were quantified by the mean absolute difference (MAD). The MAD of images with BH artifacts alone (dataset 2, without BHC) was comparable or larger than that of images with motion artifacts alone (dataset 3): In the study of cardiac image, BH artifacts account for over 80% of the total artifacts. The use of BHC was effective: with dataset 4, MAD values were 170 HU with no BHC, 54 HU with water BHC, and 42 HU with the proposed BHC. Qualitative improvements in image quality were also noticeable in reconstructed images.

  11. The maxillomandibular ameloblastoma: CT and MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Na, Dong Gyu; Han, Moon Hee; Kim, Myung Jin; Chang, Kee Hyun [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-02-15

    We retrospectively performed this study to evaluate the characteristic findings of maxillomandibular ameloblastomas on CT and MR imaging. We reviewed histologically proved 12 cases of ameloblastomas, of which 7 cases were postoperative recurrent tumors, one of twelve cases was presumed ameloblastic carcinoma. Eleven cases were examined with CT and 3 cases with MR. The types were solid in 4, unicystic in 4, and mixed in the rest 4. CT and MRI of 11 ameloblastomas showed concentric expansile mass (n = 11), cortical bone thinning and focal bone destruction by the tumors (n = 9), well-margined, expansile destruction of surrounding sturctures (n = 9), focal bulging of the tumors (n = 6) and focal poorly-marginated invasion of tissue planes (n = 4). Ameloblastic carcinoma showed ill-defined irregular margin, aggressive invasion of surrounding structures and hematogeneous lung metastasis. Unerupted teeth or mural modules were found in unicystic ameloblastomas. All three tumors examined by MRI showed isointensity to muscle on T1 weighted images and slight hyperintensity on T2 weighted images. The wall, septa and solid portions of the tumors were strongly enhanced on MR imaging. There was no difference in CT ro MR finding between primary and recurrent tumors. Ameloblastomas showed solid, cystic or mixed pattern, and commonly well marginated expansile contour with local aggressiveness. Presence of mural nodules on CT in unicystic ameloblastoma with unerupted tooth was helpful in distinguishing ameloblastoma from dentigerous cyst.

  12. Modern CT and PET/CT imaging of the liver; Moderne CT- und PET/CT-Bildgebung der Leber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klasen, J.; Heusner, T.A.; Riegger, C.; Reichelt, D.; Kuhlemann, J.; Antoch, G.; Blondin, D. [Medizinische Fakultaet, Heinrich-Heine-Universitaet Duesseldorf, Institut fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2011-08-15

    Computed tomography (CT) is now widely available and represents an important and rapid method for the diagnostics of acute liver disease, characterization of focal liver lesions, planning of interventional therapy measures and postintervention control. In recent years CT has not become less important despite the increasing value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). By the use of different contrast medium phases good characterization of space-occupying lesions can be achieved. For the diagnostics of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) a triphasic examination protocol should always be implemented. The introduction of dual energy CT increased the sensitivity of imaging of hypervascularized and hypovascularized liver lesions and by the use of virtual native imaging it has become possible to avoid additional native imaging which reduces the x-ray exposition of patients. Positron emission tomography (PET) has an advantage for imaging in oncology because nearly the complete body of the patient can be screened and this is the main indication for PET/CT (whole-body staging). For purely hepatic problems 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET/CT using diagnostic CT data has a higher precision than CT alone but is inferior to MRI. (orig.) [German] Die Computertomographie (CT) ist heute breit verfuegbar und stellt eine wichtige und schnelle Methode zur Diagnostik akuter Lebererkrankungen, der Artdiagnostik fokaler Leberlaesionen und der Planung interventioneller Therapiemassnahmen sowie der postinterventionellen Kontrolle dar. In den letzten Jahren hat die CT trotz des zunehmenden Stellenwerts der Magnetresonanztomographie (MRT) nicht an Bedeutung verloren. Durch den Einsatz unterschiedlicher Kontrastmittelphasen kann meist eine gute Charakterisierung von Raumforderungen erfolgen. Bei der Diagnostik des hepatozellulaeren Karzinoms (HCC) sollte beispielsweise immer ein triphasisches Untersuchungsprotokoll angewendet werden. Mit Einfuehrung der Dual-energy-CT hat die Sensitivitaet in der

  13. [The effect of the severity of congenital pectus excavatum on the cardiac morphology in children: evaluation with multislice helical CT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Tao; Deng, Kaihong

    2013-12-01

    This paper is aimed to evaluate the CT manifestation of congenital pectus excavatum and its effect on the cardiac morphology. CT features of 34 children with pectus excavatum were retrospectively reviewed. The Haller index (HI), CT depression index (CTDI), cardiac rotation angle (CRA), pulmonary vein angle (PVA), cardiac compression index (CCI) and cardiac asymmetry index (CAI) were measured from the images on the PACS system. The relationships among these indexes were evaluated. The HI was 4.12 +/- 1.48, the CTDI was 2.39+/- 0.70, CRA was (53.52 +/- 7.68) degrees, PVA was (66.51 +/- 11.02) degrees, CCI was 2.43 +/- 0.95, and CAI was 1.55 +/- 0.56. There was statistical significance of CCI and CAI between children with severe or slight pectus excavatum. The HI and CTDI were positively related with CCI and CAI respectively, whereas there was no statistical significance of CRA and PVA between children with severe or slight pectus excavatum. There was no statistical significance of HI, CTDI, CRA, PVA, CCI and CAI among different age groups. The morphological change of the heart compressed in children with pectus excavatum can be accurately evaluated by multislice helical CT.

  14. Dynamic NMR cardiac imaging in a piglet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doyle, M.; Rzedzian, R.; Mansfield, P. (Nottingham Univ. (UK). Dept. of Physics); Coupland, R.E. (Nottingham Univ. (UK). Queen' s Medical Centre)

    1983-12-01

    NMR echo-planar imaging (EPI) has been used in a real-time mode to visualise the thorax of a live piglet. Moving pictures are available on an immediate image display system which demonstrates dynamic cardiac function. Frame rates vary from one per cardiac cycle in a prospective stroboscopic mode with immediate visual output to a maximum of 10 frames per second yielding up to six looks in one piglet heart cycle, but using a visual playback mode. A completely new system has been used to obtain these images, features of which include a probe assembly with 22 cm access and an AP400 array processor for real-time data processing.

  15. Fully automatic multi-atlas segmentation of CTA for partial volume correction in cardiac SPECT/CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qingyi; Mohy-ud-Din, Hassan; Boutagy, Nabil E.; Jiang, Mingyan; Ren, Silin; Stendahl, John C.; Sinusas, Albert J.; Liu, Chi

    2017-05-01

    Anatomical-based partial volume correction (PVC) has been shown to improve image quality and quantitative accuracy in cardiac SPECT/CT. However, this method requires manual segmentation of various organs from contrast-enhanced computed tomography angiography (CTA) data. In order to achieve fully automatic CTA segmentation for clinical translation, we investigated the most common multi-atlas segmentation methods. We also modified the multi-atlas segmentation method by introducing a novel label fusion algorithm for multiple organ segmentation to eliminate overlap and gap voxels. To evaluate our proposed automatic segmentation, eight canine 99mTc-labeled red blood cell SPECT/CT datasets that incorporated PVC were analyzed, using the leave-one-out approach. The Dice similarity coefficient of each organ was computed. Compared to the conventional label fusion method, our proposed label fusion method effectively eliminated gaps and overlaps and improved the CTA segmentation accuracy. The anatomical-based PVC of cardiac SPECT images with automatic multi-atlas segmentation provided consistent image quality and quantitative estimation of intramyocardial blood volume, as compared to those derived using manual segmentation. In conclusion, our proposed automatic multi-atlas segmentation method of CTAs is feasible, practical, and facilitates anatomical-based PVC of cardiac SPECT/CT images.

  16. Techniques in Iterative Proton CT Image Reconstruction

    CERN Document Server

    Penfold, Scott

    2015-01-01

    This is a review paper on some of the physics, modeling, and iterative algorithms in proton computed tomography (pCT) image reconstruction. The primary challenge in pCT image reconstruction lies in the degraded spatial resolution resulting from multiple Coulomb scattering within the imaged object. Analytical models such as the most likely path (MLP) have been proposed to predict the scattered trajectory from measurements of individual proton location and direction before and after the object. Iterative algorithms provide a flexible tool with which to incorporate these models into image reconstruction. The modeling leads to a large and sparse linear system of equations that can efficiently be solved by projection methods-based iterative algorithms. Such algorithms perform projections of the iterates onto the hyperlanes that are represented by the linear equations of the system. They perform these projections in possibly various algorithmic structures, such as block-iterative projections (BIP), string-averaging...

  17. Stress myocardial perfusion imaging with multidetector CT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Rossi (Alexia); D. Merkus (Daphne); E. Klotz (Ernst); N.R.A. Mollet (Nico); P.J. de Feyter (Pim); G.P. Krestin (Gabriel)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractComputed tomographic (CT) coronary angiography is a well-established, noninvasive imaging modality for detection of coronary stenosis, but it has limited accuracy in demonstrating whether a coronary stenosis is hemodynamically significant. An additional functional test is often required

  18. Stress myocardial perfusion imaging with multidetector CT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Rossi (Alexia); D. Merkus (Daphne); E. Klotz (Ernst); N.R.A. Mollet (Nico); P.J. de Feyter (Pim); G.P. Krestin (Gabriel)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractComputed tomographic (CT) coronary angiography is a well-established, noninvasive imaging modality for detection of coronary stenosis, but it has limited accuracy in demonstrating whether a coronary stenosis is hemodynamically significant. An additional functional test is often required

  19. CT imaging of enhanced oil recovery experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gall, B.L.

    1992-12-01

    X-ray computerized tomography (Cr) has been used to study fluid distributions during chemical enhanced oil recovery experiments. Four CT-monitored corefloods were conducted, and oil saturation distributions were calculated at various stages of the experiments. Results suggested that this technique could add significant information toward interpretation and evaluation of surfactant/polymer EOR recovery methods. CT-monitored tracer tests provided information about flow properties in the core samples. Nonuniform fluid advance could be observed, even in core that appeared uniform by visual inspection. Porosity distribution maps based on CT density calculations also showed the presence of different porosity layers that affected fluid movement through the cores. Several types of CT-monitored corefloods were conducted. Comparisons were made for CT-monitored corefloods using chemical systems that were highly successful in reducing residual oil saturations in laboratory experiments and less successful systems. Changes were made in surfactant formulation and in concentration of the mobility control polymer. Use of a poor mobility control agent failed to move oil that was not initially displaced by the injected surfactant solution; even when a good'' surfactant system was used. Use of a less favorable surfactant system with adequate mobility control could produce as much oil as the use of a good surfactant system with inadequate mobility control. The role of mobility control, therefore, becomes a critical parameter for successful application of chemical EOR. Continuation of efforts to use CT imaging in connection with chemical EOR evaluations is recommended.

  20. CT imaging of enhanced oil recovery experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gall, B.L.

    1992-12-01

    X-ray computerized tomography (Cr) has been used to study fluid distributions during chemical enhanced oil recovery experiments. Four CT-monitored corefloods were conducted, and oil saturation distributions were calculated at various stages of the experiments. Results suggested that this technique could add significant information toward interpretation and evaluation of surfactant/polymer EOR recovery methods. CT-monitored tracer tests provided information about flow properties in the core samples. Nonuniform fluid advance could be observed, even in core that appeared uniform by visual inspection. Porosity distribution maps based on CT density calculations also showed the presence of different porosity layers that affected fluid movement through the cores. Several types of CT-monitored corefloods were conducted. Comparisons were made for CT-monitored corefloods using chemical systems that were highly successful in reducing residual oil saturations in laboratory experiments and less successful systems. Changes were made in surfactant formulation and in concentration of the mobility control polymer. Use of a poor mobility control agent failed to move oil that was not initially displaced by the injected surfactant solution; even when a ``good`` surfactant system was used. Use of a less favorable surfactant system with adequate mobility control could produce as much oil as the use of a good surfactant system with inadequate mobility control. The role of mobility control, therefore, becomes a critical parameter for successful application of chemical EOR. Continuation of efforts to use CT imaging in connection with chemical EOR evaluations is recommended.

  1. Anatomical-based partial volume correction for low-dose dedicated cardiac SPECT/CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui; Chan, Chung; Grobshtein, Yariv; Ma, Tianyu; Liu, Yaqiang; Wang, Shi; Stacy, Mitchel R.; Sinusas, Albert J.; Liu, Chi

    2015-09-01

    Due to the limited spatial resolution, partial volume effect has been a major degrading factor on quantitative accuracy in emission tomography systems. This study aims to investigate the performance of several anatomical-based partial volume correction (PVC) methods for a dedicated cardiac SPECT/CT system (GE Discovery NM/CT 570c) with focused field-of-view over a clinically relevant range of high and low count levels for two different radiotracer distributions. These PVC methods include perturbation geometry transfer matrix (pGTM), pGTM followed by multi-target correction (MTC), pGTM with known concentration in blood pool, the former followed by MTC and our newly proposed methods, which perform the MTC method iteratively, where the mean values in all regions are estimated and updated by the MTC-corrected images each time in the iterative process. The NCAT phantom was simulated for cardiovascular imaging with 99mTc-tetrofosmin, a myocardial perfusion agent, and 99mTc-red blood cell (RBC), a pure intravascular imaging agent. Images were acquired at six different count levels to investigate the performance of PVC methods in both high and low count levels for low-dose applications. We performed two large animal in vivo cardiac imaging experiments following injection of 99mTc-RBC for evaluation of intramyocardial blood volume (IMBV). The simulation results showed our proposed iterative methods provide superior performance than other existing PVC methods in terms of image quality, quantitative accuracy, and reproducibility (standard deviation), particularly for low-count data. The iterative approaches are robust for both 99mTc-tetrofosmin perfusion imaging and 99mTc-RBC imaging of IMBV and blood pool activity even at low count levels. The animal study results indicated the effectiveness of PVC to correct the overestimation of IMBV due to blood pool contamination. In conclusion, the iterative PVC methods can achieve more accurate quantification, particularly for low

  2. "Porcelain heart" cardiomyopathy secondary to hyperparathyroidism: radiographic, echocardiographic, and cardiac CT appearances.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Freeman, James

    2010-11-01

    We report the radiographic, echocardiographic and cardiac CT appearances of \\'porcelain heart\\' in an 85-year-old woman who presented with progressive heart failure. The extensive myocardial calcification was secondary to hyperparathyroidism with renal failure.

  3. "Porcelain heart" cardiomyopathy secondary to hyperparathyroidism: radiographic, echocardiographic, and cardiac CT appearances.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Freeman, James

    2012-02-01

    We report the radiographic, echocardiographic and cardiac CT appearances of \\'porcelain heart\\' in an 85-year-old woman who presented with progressive heart failure. The extensive myocardial calcification was secondary to hyperparathyroidism with renal failure.

  4. A LabVIEW Platform for Preclinical Imaging Using Digital Subtraction Angiography and Micro-CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badea, Cristian T; Hedlund, Laurence W; Johnson, G Allan

    2013-01-01

    CT and digital subtraction angiography (DSA) are ubiquitous in the clinic. Their preclinical equivalents are valuable imaging methods for studying disease models and treatment. We have developed a dual source/detector X-ray imaging system that we have used for both micro-CT and DSA studies in rodents. The control of such a complex imaging system requires substantial software development for which we use the graphical language LabVIEW (National Instruments, Austin, TX, USA). This paper focuses on a LabVIEW platform that we have developed to enable anatomical and functional imaging with micro-CT and DSA. Our LabVIEW applications integrate and control all the elements of our system including a dual source/detector X-ray system, a mechanical ventilator, a physiological monitor, and a power microinjector for the vascular delivery of X-ray contrast agents. Various applications allow cardiac- and respiratory-gated acquisitions for both DSA and micro-CT studies. Our results illustrate the application of DSA for cardiopulmonary studies and vascular imaging of the liver and coronary arteries. We also show how DSA can be used for functional imaging of the kidney. Finally, the power of 4D micro-CT imaging using both prospective and retrospective gating is shown for cardiac imaging.

  5. Brain {sup 18}F-FDG, {sup 18}F-florbtaben PET/CT, {sup 123}I-FP-CIT SPECT and cardiac {sup 123}I-MBG imaging for diagnosis of a 'cerebral type' of Lewy Body disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gucht, Axel Van Der; Bélissant, Ophélie; Rabu, Corenti; Cottereau, Anne-Ségolène; Evangelista, Eva; Chalaye, Julia; Bonnot-Lours, Sophie; Fénelon, Gilles; Itti, Emmanuel [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, AP-HP, Henri-Mondor Teaching Hospital, Crteil (France); De Langavant, Laurent Cleret [Cognitive Neurology Unit, H. Mondor Hospital, Creteil (France)

    2016-09-15

    A 67-year-old man was referred for fluctuating neuropsychiatric symptoms, featuring depression, delirious episodes, recurrent visual hallucinations and catatonic syndrome associated with cognitive decline. No parkinsonism was found clinically even under neuroleptic treatment. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT showed hypometabolism in the posterior associative cortex including the occipital cortex, suggesting Lewy body dementia, but {sup 123}I-FP-CIT SPECT was normal and cardiac {sup 123}I-MIBG imaging showed no signs of sympathetic denervation. Alzheimer's disease was excluded by a normal {sup 18}F-florbetaben PET/CT. This report suggests a rare case of α-synucleinopathy without brainstem involvement, referred to as 'cerebral type' of Lewy body disease.

  6. Computational modeling and analysis for left ventricle motion using CT/Echo image fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji-Yeon; Kang, Nahyup; Lee, Hyoung-Euk; Kim, James D. K.

    2014-03-01

    In order to diagnose heart disease such as myocardial infarction, 2D strain through the speckle tracking echocardiography (STE) or the tagged MRI is often used. However out-of-plane strain measurement using STE or tagged MRI is inaccurate. Therefore, strain for whole organ which are analyzed by simulation of 3D cardiac model can be applied in clinical diagnosis. To simulate cardiac contraction in a cycle, cardiac physical properties should be reflected in cardiac model. The myocardial wall in left ventricle is represented as a transversely orthotropic hyperelastic material, with the fiber orientation varying sequentially from the epicardial surface, through about 0° at the midwall, to the endocardial surface. A time-varying elastance model is simulated to contract myocardial fiber, and physiological intraventricular systolic pressure curves are employed for the cardiac dynamics simulation in a cycle. And an exact description of the cardiac motion should be acquired in order that essential boundary conditions for cardiac simulation are obtained effectively. Real time cardiac motion can be acquired by using echocardiography and exact cardiac geometrical 3D model can be reconstructed using 3D CT data. In this research, image fusion technology from CT and echocardiography is employed in order to consider patient-specific left ventricle movement. Finally, longitudinal strain from speckle tracking echocardiography which is known to fit actual left ventricle deformation relatively well is used to verify these results.

  7. Denoising CT Images using wavelet transform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lubna Gabralla

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Image denoising is one of the most significant tasks especially in medical image processing, where the original images are of poor quality due the noises and artifacts introduces by the acquisition systems. In this paper, we propose a new image denoising scheme by modifying the wavelet coefficients using soft-thresholding method, we present a comparative study of different wavelet denoising techniques for CT images and we discuss the obtained results. The denoising process rejects noise by thresholding in the wavelet domain. The performance is evaluated using Peak Signal-to-Noise Ratio (PSNR and Mean Squared Error (MSE. Finally, Gaussian filter provides better PSNR and lower MSE values. Hence, we conclude that this filter is an efficient one for preprocessing medical images.

  8. Cardiac nonrigid motion analysis from image sequences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Huafeng

    2006-01-01

    Noninvasive estimation of the soft tissue kinematics properties from medical image sequences has many important clinical and physiological implications, such as the diagnosis of heart diseases and the understanding of cardiac mechanics. In this paper, we present a biomechanics based strategy, framed as a priori constraints for the ill-posed motion recovery problema, to realize estimation of the cardiac motion and deformation parameters. By constructing the heart dynamics system equations from biomechanics principles, we use the finite element method to generate smooth estimates.of heart kinematics throughout the cardiac cycle. We present the application of the strategy to the estimation of displacements and strains from in vivo left ventricular magnetic resonance image sequence.

  9. Cardiac tumors: optimal cardiac MR sequences and spectrum of imaging appearances.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Donnell, David H

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVE: This article reviews the optimal cardiac MRI sequences for and the spectrum of imaging appearances of cardiac tumors. CONCLUSION: Recent technologic advances in cardiac MRI have resulted in the rapid acquisition of images of the heart with high spatial and temporal resolution and excellent myocardial tissue characterization. Cardiac MRI provides optimal assessment of the location, functional characteristics, and soft-tissue features of cardiac tumors, allowing accurate differentiation of benign and malignant lesions.

  10. Is it time for cardiac innervation imaging?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knuuti, J. [Turku Univ., Turku (Finland) Turku PET Center; Sipola, P. [Kuopio Univ., Kuopio (Finland)

    2005-03-01

    The autonomic nervous system plays an important role in the regulation of cardiac function and the regional distribution of cardiac nerve terminals can be visualized using scintigraphic techniques. The most commonly used tracer is iodine-123-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) but C-11-hydroxyephedrine has also been used with PET. When imaging with MIBG, the ratio of heart-to-mediastinal counts is used as an index of tracer uptake, and regional distribution is also assessed from tomographic images. The rate of clearance of the tracer can also be measured and indicates the function of the adrenergic system. Innervation imaging has been applied in patients with susceptibility to arrythmias, coronary artery disease, hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathy and anthracycline induced cardiotoxicity. Abnormal adrenergic innervation or function appear to exist in many pathophysiological conditions indicating that sympathetic neurons are very susceptible to damage. Abnormal findings in innervation imaging also appear to have significant prognostic value especially in patients with cardiomyopathy. Recently, it has also been shown that innervation imaging can monitor drug-induced changes in cardiac adrenergic activity. Although innervation imaging holds great promise for clinical use, the method has not received wider clinical acceptance. Larger randomized studies are required to confirm the value of innervation imaging in various specific indications.

  11. Patient satisfaction with coronary CT angiography, myocardial CT perfusion, myocardial perfusion MRI, SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging and conventional coronary angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feger, S.; Rief, M.; Zimmermann, E.; Richter, F.; Roehle, R. [Freie Universitaet Berlin, Department of Radiology, Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin Campus Mitte, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Dewey, M. [Freie Universitaet Berlin, Department of Radiology, Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin Campus Mitte, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Institut fuer Radiologie, Berlin (Germany); Schoenenberger, E. [Medizinische Hochschule Hannover, Department of Medicine, Hannover (Germany)

    2015-07-15

    To evaluate patient acceptance of noninvasive imaging tests for detection of coronary artery disease (CAD), including single-photon emission computed tomography myocardial perfusion imaging (SPECT-MPI), stress perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), coronary CT angiography (CTA) in combination with CT myocardial stress perfusion (CTP), and conventional coronary angiography (CCA). Intraindividual comparison of perception of 48 patients from the CORE320 multicentre multinational study who underwent rest and stress SPECT-MPI with a technetium-based tracer, combined CTA and CTP (both with contrast agent, CTP with adenosine), MRI, and CCA. The analysis was performed by using a validated questionnaire. Patients had significantly more concern prior to CCA than before CTA/CTP (p < 0.001). CTA/CTP was also rated as more comfortable than SPECT-MPI (p = 0.001). Overall satisfaction with CT was superior to that of MRI (p = 0.007). More patients preferred CT (46 %; p < 0.001) as a future diagnostic test. Regarding combined CTA/CTP, CTP was characterised by higher pain levels and an increased frequency of angina pectoris during the examination (p < 0.001). Subgroup analysis showed a higher degree of pain during SPECT-MPI with adenosine stress compared to physical exercise (p = 0.016). All noninvasive cardiac imaging tests are well accepted by patients, with CT being the preferred examination. (orig.)

  12. CT imaging of myocardial perfusion and viability. Beyond structure and function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoepf, U. Joseph [Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States). Dept. of Radiology and Radiological Sciences; Bamberg, Fabian [Muenchen Univ. (Germany); Bastarrika, Gorka [Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, ON (Canada). Cardiothoracic Imaging Division; Ruzsics, Balazs [Royal Liverpool and Broadgreen Univ., Liverpool (United Kingdom). Dept. of Cardiology; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn (ed.) [University Medical Center Groningen (Netherlands). Center for Medical Imaging

    2014-06-01

    First publication to be devoted to the subject. Reviews an advanced, promising application in healthcare. Spans multiple medical disciplines. The rapid evolution in cardiac computed tomography during the past decade has improved spatial and temporal resolution to the extent that cardiac CT is now an accepted alternative for the non-invasive interrogation of the heart. Beyond the assessment of cardiac structure and ventricular function, recent research has identified yet another promising CT application for the comprehensive diagnosis of coronary heart disease, namely the assessment of myocardial perfusion and viability. In this book, the first to be devoted to this novel application of CT, leading experts from across the world present up-to-date information and consider future directions. After short sections outlining the state of the art in the traditional applications of CT to image structure and function, the full range of CT techniques that may be employed to evaluate the myocardial blood supply are discussed in detail. Similarly, diverse CT approaches for the assessment of myocardial viability are described, with careful consideration of the available experimental and clinical evidence and the role of quantitative imaging.

  13. New concepts in cardiac imaging 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pohost, G.M.; Higgins, C.B.; Morganroth, J.; Ritchie, J.L.; Schelbert, H.R.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents 5 specialists work on reviewing and editing the area of applications for cardiac imaging: Contents: Ultrasound Methods; 1. Echocardiography in Valvular Heart Disease, 2. Echocardiography in Ischemic Heart Disease, 3. Current Status of Doppler Ultrasound for Assessing Regurgitant Valvular Lesions, Radionuclide Methods; 4. Cardiovascular Nuclear Medicine, 5. Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT): Validation and Application for Myocardial Perfusion Imaging, 6. Assessment of Regional Myocardial Perfusion with Positron Emission Tomography, 7. Assessment of Regional Myocardial Substrate Metabolism with Positron Emission Tomography, X-Ray Imaging Techniques; 8. The Evaluation of Left Ventricular Function in Ischemic Heart Disease by Digital Subtraction Angigraphy, 9. Digital Angiography in the Assessment of Coronary Artery Disease, 10. Cardiac Computed Tomography: Its Potential Use in Evaluation of Ischemic Heart Disease, Magnetic Methods; 11. NMR Evaluation of the Cardiovascular System, 12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Heart.

  14. Clinical micro-CT for dental imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youn, Hanbean; Cho, Min Kook; Shon, Cheol-Soon; Cho, Bong Hae; Kim, Chang Hyuk; Kim, Ho Kyung

    2009-02-01

    We exploit the development of a clinical computed microtomography (micro-CT) system for dental imaging. While the conventional dental CT simply serves implant treatment, the clinical dental micro-CT may provide clinicians with a histologic evaluation. To investigate the feasibility of the realization of a dental micro-CT, we have constructed an experimental test system which mainly consists of a microfocus x-ray source, a rotational subject holder, and a flat-panel detector. The flat-panel detector is based on a matrix-addressed photodiode array coupled to a CsI:Tl scintillator. The detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of the detector was measured as a function of magnification based on the measured modulation-transfer function (MTF) and noise-power spectrum (NPS). The best MTF and DQE performances were achieved at the magnification factor of 3. Similar tendency of the spatial resolving power in tomography was also observed with a wire phantom having a 25 μm diameter. From the investigation of tomographs reconstructed from a humanoid skull phantom, the application of magnification in the system largely reduced both signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) for a fixed dose at the entrance surface of the detector, 1.2 mGy, while this setup increased the dose at the object plane from 4.7 mGy to 19.1 mGy for the magnification factor from 2 to 4, respectively. Although the quantum mottles at the high magnification factor tackled the practical use in the clinic, the information contained in the magnified CT images was quite promising.

  15. CT imaging in acute pulmonary embolism: diagnostic strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wildberger, Joachim E.; Mahnken, Andreas H.; Das, Marco; Guenther, Rolf W. [University of Technology (RWTH), Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital, Aachen (Germany); Kuettner, Axel [Eberhard Karls University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Lell, Michael [Friedrich Alexander University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Erlangen (Germany)

    2005-05-01

    Computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTA) has increasingly become accepted as a widely available, safe, cost-effective, and accurate method for a quick and comprehensive diagnosis of acute pulmonary embolism (PE). Pulmonary catheter angiography is still considered the gold standard and final imaging method in many diagnostic algorithms. However, spiral CTA has become established as the first imaging test in clinical routine due to its high negative predictive value for clinically relevant PE. Despite the direct visualization of clot material, depiction of cardiac and pulmonary function in combination with the quantification of pulmonary obstruction helps to grade the severity of PE for further risk stratification and to monitor the effect of thrombolytic therapy. Because PE and deep venous thrombosis are two different aspects of the same disease, additional indirect CT venography may be a valuable addition to the initial diagnostic algorithm - if this was positive for PE - and demonstration of the extent and localization of deep venous thrombosis has an impact on clinical management. Additional and alternate diagnoses add to the usefulness of this method. Using advanced multislice spiral CT technology, some practitioners have advocated CTA as the sole imaging tool for routine clinical assessment in suspected acute PE. This will simplify standards of practice in the near future. (orig.)

  16. RONI Based Secured and Authenticated Indexing of Lung CT Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasmine Selvakumari Jeya, I; Suganthi, J

    2015-01-01

    Medical images need to be transmitted with the patient's information without altering the image data. The present paper discusses secured indexing of lung CT image (SILI) which is a secured way of indexing the lung CT images with the patient information. Authentication is provided using the sender's logo information and the secret key is used for embedding the watermark into the host image. Watermark is embedded into the region of Noninterest (RONI) of the lung CT image. RONI is identified by segmenting the lung tissue from the CT scan image. The experimental results show that the proposed approach is robust against unauthorized access, noise, blurring, and intensity based attacks.

  17. Body-wide anatomy recognition in PET/CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huiqian; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Odhner, Dewey; Tong, Yubing; Zhao, Liming; Torigian, Drew A.

    2015-03-01

    With the rapid growth of positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT)-based medical applications, body-wide anatomy recognition on whole-body PET/CT images becomes crucial for quantifying body-wide disease burden. This, however, is a challenging problem and seldom studied due to unclear anatomy reference frame and low spatial resolution of PET images as well as low contrast and spatial resolution of the associated low-dose CT images. We previously developed an automatic anatomy recognition (AAR) system [15] whose applicability was demonstrated on diagnostic computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) images in different body regions on 35 objects. The aim of the present work is to investigate strategies for adapting the previous AAR system to low-dose CT and PET images toward automated body-wide disease quantification. Our adaptation of the previous AAR methodology to PET/CT images in this paper focuses on 16 objects in three body regions - thorax, abdomen, and pelvis - and consists of the following steps: collecting whole-body PET/CT images from existing patient image databases, delineating all objects in these images, modifying the previous hierarchical models built from diagnostic CT images to account for differences in appearance in low-dose CT and PET images, automatically locating objects in these images following object hierarchy, and evaluating performance. Our preliminary evaluations indicate that the performance of the AAR approach on low-dose CT images achieves object localization accuracy within about 2 voxels, which is comparable to the accuracies achieved on diagnostic contrast-enhanced CT images. Object recognition on low-dose CT images from PET/CT examinations without requiring diagnostic contrast-enhanced CT seems feasible.

  18. Five-dimensional motion compensation for respiratory and cardiac motion with cone-beam CT of the thorax region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauppe, Sebastian; Hahn, Andreas; Brehm, Marcus; Paysan, Pascal; Seghers, Dieter; Kachelrieß, Marc

    2016-03-01

    We propose an adapted method of our previously published five-dimensional (5D) motion compensation (MoCo) algorithm1, developed for micro-CT imaging of small animals, to provide for the first time motion artifact-free 5D cone-beam CT (CBCT) images from a conventional flat detector-based CBCT scan of clinical patients. Image quality of retrospectively respiratory- and cardiac-gated volumes from flat detector CBCT scans is deteriorated by severe sparse projection artifacts. These artifacts further complicate motion estimation, as it is required for MoCo image reconstruction. For high quality 5D CBCT images at the same x-ray dose and the same number of projections as todays 3D CBCT we developed a double MoCo approach based on motion vector fields (MVFs) for respiratory and cardiac motion. In a first step our already published four-dimensional (4D) artifact-specific cyclic motion-compensation (acMoCo) approach is applied to compensate for the respiratory patient motion. With this information a cyclic phase-gated deformable heart registration algorithm is applied to the respiratory motion-compensated 4D CBCT data, thus resulting in cardiac MVFs. We apply these MVFs on double-gated images and thereby respiratory and cardiac motion-compensated 5D CBCT images are obtained. Our 5D MoCo approach processing patient data acquired with the TrueBeam 4D CBCT system (Varian Medical Systems). Our double MoCo approach turned out to be very efficient and removed nearly all streak artifacts due to making use of 100% of the projection data for each reconstructed frame. The 5D MoCo patient data show fine details and no motion blurring, even in regions close to the heart where motion is fastest.

  19. Highlights of the 12th International Conference on Nuclear Cardiology and Cardiac CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitsiou, Anastasia; Dorbala, Sharmila; Scholte, Arthur J H A

    2015-09-01

    The 12th International Conference on Nuclear Cardiology and Cardiac CT was held from 3 to 5 May 2015 in Madrid, Spain. In this article, the three Congress Program Committee Chairs summarize selected highlights of the presented abstracts. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com. This article is being published concurrently in the Journal of Nuclear Cardiology (10.1007/s12350-015-0260-y) and European Heart Journal – Cardiovascular Imaging (10.1093/ehjci/jev179). The articles are identical except for minor stylistic and spelling differences in keeping with each journal’s style. Either citation can be used when citing this article.

  20. Feasibility of contrast material volume reduction in coronary artery imaging using 320-slice volume CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hein, Patrick A.; May, Juliane; Rogalla, Patrik; Hamm, Bernd; Lembcke, Alexander [Charite-University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Butler, Craig [Charite-University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); University of Alberta, Department of Cardiology, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)

    2010-06-15

    To assess reduced volumes of contrast agent on image quality for coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) by using single-beat cardiac imaging with 320-slice CT. Forty consecutive male patients (mean age: 55.8 years) undergoing CCTA with body weight {<=}85 kg, heart rate {<=}65 bpm, and ejection fraction {>=}55% were included. Image acquisition protocol was standardized (120 kV, 400 mA, and prospective ECG-triggered single-beat nonspiral CCTA). Patients were randomly assigned to one of four groups (G1: received 40 ml, G2: 50 ml, G3: 60 ml, G4: 70 ml). Groups were compared with respect to aortic attenuation, image noise, and image quality. CT values (mean {+-} standard deviation) in the aortic root were measured as 423 {+-} 38 HU in G1, and 471 {+-} 68, 463 {+-} 60, and 476 {+-} 78 HU in G2-4, respectively. There were no statistically significant differences in attenuation among the groups (P > 0.068). All 40 CT datasets were rated diagnostic, and image noise and image quality were not statistically different among groups. Using 320-slice volume CT, diagnostic image quality can be achieved with 40 ml of contrast material in CCTA in patients with normal body weight, cardiac function, and low heart rate. (orig.)

  1. Incidental Detection of Interstitial Pregnancy on CT Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Byung Seok [Chungnam National University Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Mi Hyun [Dankook University Hospital, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-02-15

    Ectopic pregnancy is a potentially life-threatening condition. Detection of ectopic pregnancy on CT images is rare. In this case, we describe the CT findings of interstitial pregnancy both before and after rupture. If CT images demonstrate the presence of a strong enhancing ring-like mass in the pelvis, ectopic pregnancy should be considered

  2. Towards real-time 3D US-CT registration on the beating heart for guidance of minimally invasive cardiac interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feng; Lang, Pencilla; Rajchl, Martin; Chen, Elvis C. S.; Guiraudon, Gerard; Peters, Terry M.

    2012-02-01

    Compared to conventional open-heart surgeries, minimally invasive cardiac interventions cause less trauma and sideeffects to patients. However, the direct view of surgical targets and tools is usually not available in minimally invasive procedures, which makes image-guided navigation systems essential. The choice of imaging modalities used in the navigation systems must consider the capability of imaging soft tissues, spatial and temporal resolution, compatibility and flexibility in the OR, and financial cost. In this paper, we propose a new means of guidance for minimally invasive cardiac interventions using 3D real-time ultrasound images to show the intra-operative heart motion together with preoperative CT image(s) employed to demonstrate high-quality 3D anatomical context. We also develop a method to register intra-operative ultrasound and pre-operative CT images in close to real-time. The registration method has two stages. In the first, anatomical features are segmented from the first frame of ultrasound images and the CT image(s). A feature based registration is used to align those features. The result of this is used as an initialization in the second stage, in which a mutual information based registration is used to register every ultrasound frame to the CT image(s). A GPU based implementation is used to accelerate the registration.

  3. Dynamic CT perfusion imaging of the myocardium: a technical note on improvement of image quality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Muenzel

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To improve image and diagnostic quality in dynamic CT myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI by using motion compensation and a spatio-temporal filter. METHODS: Dynamic CT MPI was performed using a 256-slice multidetector computed tomography scanner (MDCT. Data from two different patients-with and without myocardial perfusion defects-were evaluated to illustrate potential improvements for MPI (institutional review board approved. Three datasets for each patient were generated: (i original data (ii motion compensated data and (iii motion compensated data with spatio-temporal filtering performed. In addition to the visual assessment of the tomographic slices, noise and contrast-to-noise-ratio (CNR were measured for all data. Perfusion analysis was performed using time-density curves with regions-of-interest (ROI placed in normal and hypoperfused myocardium. Precision in definition of normal and hypoperfused areas was determined in corresponding coloured perfusion maps. RESULTS: The use of motion compensation followed by spatio-temporal filtering resulted in better alignment of the cardiac volumes over time leading to a more consistent perfusion quantification and improved detection of the extend of perfusion defects. Additionally image noise was reduced by 78.5%, with CNR improvements by a factor of 4.7. The average effective radiation dose estimate was 7.1±1.1 mSv. CONCLUSION: The use of motion compensation and spatio-temporal smoothing will result in improved quantification of dynamic CT MPI using a latest generation CT scanner.

  4. Functional CT imaging of prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Elizabeth; Milosevic, Michael F.; Haider, Masoom A.; Yeung, Ivan W. T.

    2003-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the distribution of blood flow (F), mean capillary transit time (Tc), capillary permeability (PS) and blood volume (vb) in prostate cancer using contrast-enhanced CT. Nine stage T2-T3 prostate cancer patients were enrolled in the study. Following bolus injection of a contrast agent, a time series of CT images of the prostate was acquired. Functional maps showing the distribution of F, Tc, PS and vb within the prostate were generated using a distributed parameter tracer kinetic model, the adiabatic approximation to the tissue homogeneity model. The precision of the maps was assessed using covariance matrix analysis. Finally, maps were compared to the findings of standard clinical investigations. Eight of the functional maps demonstrated regions of increased F, PS and vb, the locations of which were consistent with the results of standard clinical investigations. However, model parameters other than F could only be measured precisely within regions of high F. In conclusion functional CT images of cancer-containing prostate glands demonstrate regions of elevated F, PS and vb. However, caution should be used when applying a complex tracer kinetic model to the study of prostate cancer since not all parameters can be measured precisely in all areas.

  5. Automated selection of the optimal cardiac phase for single-beat coronary CT angiography reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stassi, D.; Ma, H.; Schmidt, T. G., E-mail: taly.gilat-schmidt@marquette.edu [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Marquette University, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53201 (United States); Dutta, S.; Soderman, A.; Pazzani, D.; Gros, E.; Okerlund, D. [GE Healthcare, Waukesha, Wisconsin 53188 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: Reconstructing a low-motion cardiac phase is expected to improve coronary artery visualization in coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) exams. This study developed an automated algorithm for selecting the optimal cardiac phase for CCTA reconstruction. The algorithm uses prospectively gated, single-beat, multiphase data made possible by wide cone-beam imaging. The proposed algorithm differs from previous approaches because the optimal phase is identified based on vessel image quality (IQ) directly, compared to previous approaches that included motion estimation and interphase processing. Because there is no processing of interphase information, the algorithm can be applied to any sampling of image phases, making it suited for prospectively gated studies where only a subset of phases are available. Methods: An automated algorithm was developed to select the optimal phase based on quantitative IQ metrics. For each reconstructed slice at each reconstructed phase, an image quality metric was calculated based on measures of circularity and edge strength of through-plane vessels. The image quality metric was aggregated across slices, while a metric of vessel-location consistency was used to ignore slices that did not contain through-plane vessels. The algorithm performance was evaluated using two observer studies. Fourteen single-beat cardiac CT exams (Revolution CT, GE Healthcare, Chalfont St. Giles, UK) reconstructed at 2% intervals were evaluated for best systolic (1), diastolic (6), or systolic and diastolic phases (7) by three readers and the algorithm. Pairwise inter-reader and reader-algorithm agreement was evaluated using the mean absolute difference (MAD) and concordance correlation coefficient (CCC) between the reader and algorithm-selected phases. A reader-consensus best phase was determined and compared to the algorithm selected phase. In cases where the algorithm and consensus best phases differed by more than 2%, IQ was scored by three

  6. 3D Interpolation Method for CT Images of the Lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriaki Asada

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available A 3-D image can be reconstructed from numerous CT images of the lung. The procedure reconstructs a solid from multiple cross section images, which are collected during pulsation of the heart. Thus the motion of the heart is a special factor that must be taken into consideration during reconstruction. The lung exhibits a repeating transformation synchronized to the beating of the heart as an elastic body. There are discontinuities among neighboring CT images due to the beating of the heart, if no special techniques are used in taking CT images. The 3-D heart image is reconstructed from numerous CT images in which both the heart and the lung are taken. Although the outline shape of the reconstructed 3-D heart is quite unnatural, the envelope of the 3-D unnatural heart is fit to the shape of the standard heart. The envelopes of the lung in the CT images are calculated after the section images of the best fitting standard heart are located at the same positions of the CT images. Thus the CT images are geometrically transformed to the optimal CT images fitting best to the standard heart. Since correct transformation of images is required, an Area oriented interpolation method proposed by us is used for interpolation of transformed images. An attempt to reconstruct a 3-D lung image by a series of such operations without discontinuity is shown. Additionally, the same geometrical transformation method to the original projection images is proposed as a more advanced method.

  7. Segmentation-based CT image compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thammineni, Arunoday; Mukhopadhyay, Sudipta; Kamath, Vidya

    2004-04-01

    The existing image compression standards like JPEG and JPEG 2000, compress the whole image as a single frame. This makes the system simple but inefficient. The problem is acute for applications where lossless compression is mandatory viz. medical image compression. If the spatial characteristics of the image are considered, it can give rise to a more efficient coding scheme. For example, CT reconstructed images have uniform background outside the field of view (FOV). Even the portion within the FOV can be divided as anatomically relevant and irrelevant parts. They have distinctly different statistics. Hence coding them separately will result in more efficient compression. Segmentation is done based on thresholding and shape information is stored using 8-connected differential chain code. Simple 1-D DPCM is used as the prediction scheme. The experiments show that the 1st order entropies of images fall by more than 11% when each segment is coded separately. For simplicity and speed of decoding Huffman code is chosen for entropy coding. Segment based coding will have an overhead of one table per segment but the overhead is minimal. Lossless compression of image based on segmentation resulted in reduction of bit rate by 7%-9% compared to lossless compression of whole image as a single frame by the same prediction coder. Segmentation based scheme also has the advantage of natural ROI based progressive decoding. If it is allowed to delete the diagnostically irrelevant portions, the bit budget can go down as much as 40%. This concept can be extended to other modalities.

  8. Cardiac CT angiography for device surveillance after endovascular left atrial appendage closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saw, Jacqueline; Fahmy, Peter; DeJong, Peggy; Lempereur, Mathieu; Spencer, Ryan; Tsang, Michael; Gin, Kenneth; Jue, John; Mayo, John; McLaughlin, Patrick; Nicolaou, Savvas

    2015-11-01

    Left atrial appendage (LAA) device imaging after endovascular closure is important to assess for device thrombus, residual leak, positioning, surrounding structures, and pericardial effusion. Cardiac CT angiography (CCTA) is well suited to assess these non-invasively. We report our consecutive series of non-valvular atrial fibrillation patients who underwent CCTA post-LAA closure with Amplatzer Cardiac Plug (ACP), Amulet (second generation ACP), or WATCHMAN devices. Patients underwent CCTA typically 1-6 months post-implantation. Prospective cardiac-gated CCTA was performed with Toshiba 320-detector or Siemens 2nd generation 128-slice dual-source scanners, and images interpreted with VitreaWorkstation™. GFR Amulet, 18 WATCHMAN). Average age was 75.5 ± 8.9 years, mean CHADS2 score 3.1 ± 1.3, and CHADS-VASc score 4.9 ± 1.6. All had contraindications to oral anticoagulation. Post-procedure, 41 (91.1%) were discharged on DAPT. There was one device embolization (ACP, successfully retrieved percutaneously) and one thrombus (WATCHMAN, resolved with 3 months of warfarin). There were two pericardial effusions, both pre-existing and not requiring intervention. Residual leak (patency) was seen in 28/44 (63.6%), and the mechanisms of leak were readily identified by CCTA (off-axis device, gaps at orifice, or fabric leak). Mean follow-up was 1.2 ± 1.1year, with no death, stroke, or systemic embolism. CCTA appears to be a feasible alternative to transoesophageal echocardiography for post-LAA device surveillance to evaluate for device thrombus, residual leak, embolization, position, and pericardial effusion. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Combined SPECT/CT and PET/CT for breast imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russo, Paolo [Università di Napoli Federico II, Dipartimento di Fisica, Via Cintia, Naples I-80126 (Italy); INFN Sezione di Napoli, Via Cintia, Naples I-80126 (Italy); Larobina, Michele [Istituto di Biostrutture e Bioimmagini, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Via Tommaso De Amicis, 95, Naples I-80145 (Italy); Di Lillo, Francesca [Università di Napoli Federico II, Dipartimento di Fisica, Via Cintia, Naples I-80126 (Italy); INFN Sezione di Napoli, Via Cintia, Naples I-80126 (Italy); Del Vecchio, Silvana [Università di Napoli Federico II, Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche Avanzate, Via Pansini, 5, Naples I-80131 (Italy); Mettivier, Giovanni, E-mail: mettivier@na.infn.it [Università di Napoli Federico II, Dipartimento di Fisica, Via Cintia, Naples I-80126 (Italy); INFN Sezione di Napoli, Via Cintia, Naples I-80126 (Italy)

    2016-02-11

    In the field of nuclear medicine imaging, breast imaging for cancer diagnosis is still mainly based on 2D imaging techniques. Three-dimensional tomographic imaging with whole-body PET or SPECT scanners, when used for imaging the breast, has performance limits in terms of spatial resolution and sensitivity, which can be overcome only with a dedicated instrumentation. However, only few hybrid imaging systems for PET/CT or SPECT/CT dedicated to the breast have been developed in the last decade, providing complementary functional and anatomical information on normal breast tissue and lesions. These systems are still under development and clinical trials on just few patients have been reported; no commercial dedicated breast PET/CT or SPECT/CT is available. This paper reviews combined dedicated breast PET/CT and SPECT/CT scanners described in the recent literature, with focus on their technological aspects.

  10. Automatic segmentation of bladder in CT images

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng SHI; Jie YANG; Yue-min ZHU

    2009-01-01

    Segmentation of the bladder in computerized tomography (CT) images is an important step in radiation therapy planning of prostate cancer. We present a new segmentation scheme to automatically delineate the bladder contour in CT images with three major steps. First, we use the mean shift algorithm to obtain a clustered image containing the rough contour of the bladder, which is then extracted in the second step by applying a region-growing algorithm with the initial seed point selected from a line-by-line scanning process. The third step is to refine the bladder contour more accurately using the rolling-ball algorithm. These steps are then extended to segment the bladder volume in a slice-by-slice manner. The obtained results were compared to manual segmentation by radiation oncologists. The average values of sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and Hausdorff distance are 86.5%, 96.3%, 90.5%, 96.5%, and 2.8 pixels, respectively. The results show that the bladder can be accurately segmented.

  11. CT myocardial perfusion imaging: current status and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, M C; Newby, D E

    2016-08-01

    Computed tomography (CT) imaging of the heart has advanced rapidly, and it is now possible to perform a comprehensive assessment at a low radiation dose. CT myocardial perfusion imaging can provide additive information to CT coronary angiography, and is particularly useful in patients with heavily calcified coronary arteries or coronary artery stents. A number of protocols are now available for CT myocardial perfusion including static, dynamic, and dual-energy techniques. This review will discuss the current status of CT myocardial perfusion imaging, its clinical application, and future directions for this technology.

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Evaluation of Cardiac Masses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braggion-Santos, Maria Fernanda, E-mail: ferbraggion@yahoo.com.br [Divisão de Cardiologia do Departamento de Clínica Médica - Hospital das Clínicas - Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Hospital Universitário - Universidade de Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Koenigkam-Santos, Marcel [Centro de Ciências das Imagens e Física Médica - Hospital das Clínicas - Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto da Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Hospital Universitário - Universidade de Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Teixeira, Sara Reis [Centro de Ciências das Imagens e Física Médica - Hospital das Clínicas - Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto da Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Volpe, Gustavo Jardim [Divisão de Cardiologia do Departamento de Clínica Médica - Hospital das Clínicas - Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Divisão de Cardiologia - Universidade Johns Hopkins, Baltimore (United States); Trad, Henrique Simão [Centro de Ciências das Imagens e Física Médica - Hospital das Clínicas - Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto da Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Schmidt, André [Divisão de Cardiologia do Departamento de Clínica Médica - Hospital das Clínicas - Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2013-09-15

    Cardiac tumors are extremely rare; however, when there is clinical suspicion, proper diagnostic evaluation is necessary to plan the most appropriate treatment. In this context, cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) plays an important role, allowing a comprehensive characterization of such lesions. To review cases referred to a CMRI Department for investigation of cardiac and paracardiac masses. To describe the positive case series with a brief review of the literature for each type of lesion and the role of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging in evaluation. Between August 2008 and December 2011, all cases referred for CMRI with suspicion of tumor involving the heart were reviewed. Cases with positive histopathological diagnosis, clinical evolution or therapeutic response compatible with the clinical suspicion and imaging findings were selected. Among the 13 cases included in our study, eight (62%) had histopathological confirmation. We describe five benign tumors (myxomas, rhabdomyoma and fibromas), five malignancies (sarcoma, lymphoma, Richter syndrome involving the heart and metastatic disease) and three non-neoplastic lesions (pericardial cyst, intracardiac thrombus and infectious vegetation). CMRI plays an important role in the evaluation of cardiac masses of non-neoplastic and neoplastic origin, contributing to a more accurate diagnosis in a noninvasive manner and assisting in treatment planning, allowing safe clinical follow-up with good reproducibility.

  13. A novel method for incorporating respiratory-matched attenuation correction in the motion correction of cardiac PET-CT studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuaid, Sarah J.; Lambrou, Tryphon; Hutton, Brian F.

    2011-05-01

    Mismatches between PET and CT datasets due to respiratory effects can lead to artefactual perfusion defects. To overcome this, we have proposed a method of aligning a single CT with each frame of a gated PET study in a semi-automatic manner, incorporating a statistical shape model of the diaphragm and a rigid registration of the heart. This ensures that the structures that could influence the appearance of the reconstructed cardiac activity are correctly matched between emission and transmission datasets. When tested on two patient studies, it was found in both cases that attenuation correction using the proposed technique resulted in PET images that were closer to the gold standard of attenuation correction with a gated CT, compared with scenarios where only heart matching was considered (and not the diaphragm) or where no transformation was performed (i.e. where a single CT frame was used to attenuation-correct all PET frames). These preliminary results suggest that diaphragm matching between PET and CT improves the quantitative accuracy of reconstructed PET images and that the proposed method of using a statistical shape model to describe the diaphragm shape and motion, in combination with a rigid registration to determine respiratory-induced heart motion, is a feasible method of achieving this.

  14. Nuclear cardiac imaging: Principles and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iskandrian, A.S.

    1987-01-01

    This book is divided into 11 chapters. The first three provide a short description of the instrumentation, radiopharmaceuticals, and imaging techniques used in nuclear cardiology. Chapter 4 discusses exercise testing. Chapter 5 gives the theory, technical aspects, and interpretations of thallium-201 myocardial imaging and radionuclide ventriculography. The remaining chapters discuss the use of these techniques in patients with coronary artery disease, acute myocardial infarction, valvular heart disease, and other forms of cardiac disease. The author intended to emphasize the implications of nuclear cardiology procedures on patient care management and to provide a comprehensive bibliography.

  15. Antimyosin imaging in cardiac transplant rejection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, L.L.; Cannon, P.J. (Department of Medicine, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York (United States))

    1991-09-01

    Fab fragments of antibodies specific for cardiac myosin have been labeled with indium-111 and injected intravenously into animals and into patients with heart transplants. The antibodies, developed by Khaw, Haber, and co-workers, localize in cardiac myocytes that have been damaged irreversibly by ischemia, myocarditis, or the rejection process. After clearance of the labeled antibody from the cardiac blood pool, planar imaging or single photon emission computed tomography is performed. Scintigrams reveal the uptake of the labeled antimyosin in areas of myocardium undergoing transplant rejection. In animal studies, the degree of antimyosin uptake appears to correlate significantly with the degree of rejection assessed at necropsy. In patients, the correlation between scans and pathologic findings from endomyocardial biopsy is not as good, possibly because of sampling error in the endomyocardial biopsy technique. The scan results at 1 year correlate with either late complications (positive) or benign course (negative). Current limitations of the method include slow blood clearance, long half-life of indium-111, and hepatic uptake. Overcoming these limitations represents a direction for current research. It is possible that from these efforts a noninvasive approach to the diagnosis and evaluation of cardiac transplantation may evolve that will decrease the number of endomyocardial biopsies required to evaluate rejection. This would be particularly useful in infants and children. 31 references.

  16. Prospectively ECG Gated CT pulmonary angiography versus helical ungated CT pulmonary angiography: Impact on cardiac related motion artifacts and patient radiation dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shuman, William P., E-mail: wshuman@u.washington.edu [Department of Radiology, 1959 NE Pacific Street, Box 357115, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Leipsic, Jonathon A., E-mail: JLeipsic@providencehealth.bc.ca [University of British Columbia and St. Paul' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, 1081 Burrard Street, Vancouver, BC, V6Z1Y6 (Canada); Busey, Janet M., E-mail: jbonny@u.washington.edu [Department of Radiology, 1959 NE Pacific Street, Box 357115, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Green, Douglas E., E-mail: dougreen@uw.edu [Department of Radiology, 1959 NE Pacific Street, Box 357115, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Pipavath, Sudhakar N., E-mail: snjp@u.wwashington.edu [Department of Radiology, 1959 NE Pacific Street, Box 357115, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Hague, Cameron J., E-mail: cjhague@interchange.ubc.ca [University of British Columbia and St. Paul' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, 1081 Burrard Street, Vancouver, BC, V6Z1Y6 (Canada); Koprowicz, Kent M., E-mail: kentk@u.washington.edu [Department of Radiology, 1959 NE Pacific Street, Box 357115, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

    2012-09-15

    Objective: To compare prospectively ECG gated CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA) with routine helical ungated CTPA for cardiac related motion artifacts and patient radiation dose. Subjects and methods: Twenty patients with signs and symptoms suspicious for pulmonary embolism and who had a heart rate below 85 were scanned with prospectively ECG gated CTPA. These gated exams were matched for several clinical parameters to exams from twenty similar clinical patients scanned with routine ungated helical CTPA. Three blinded independent reviewers subjectively evaluated all exams for overall pulmonary artery enhancement and for several cardiac motion related artifacts, including vessel blurring, intravascular shading, and double line. Reviewers also measured pulmonary artery intravascular density and image noise. Patient radiation dose for each technique was compared. Fourteen clinical prospectively ECG gated CTPA exams from a second institution were evaluated for the same parameters. Results: Prospectively ECG gated CTPA resulted in significantly decreased motion-related image artifact scores in lung segments adjacent to the heart compared to ungated CTPA. Measured image noise was not significantly different between the two types of CTPA exams. Effective dose was 28% less for prospectively ECG gated CTPA (4.9 mSv versus 6.8 mSv, p = 0.02). Similar results were found in the prospectively ECG gated exams from the second institution. Conclusion: Compared to routine helical ungated CTPA, prospectively ECG gated CTPA may result in less cardiac related motion artifact in lung segments adjacent to the heart and significantly less patient radiation dose.

  17. Cirrhosis: CT and MR imaging evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brancatelli, Giuseppe [Sezione di Radiologia, Ospedale Specializzato in Gastroenterologia, ' Saverio de Bellis' -IRCCS, 70013 Castellana Grotte (Bari) (Italy) and Sezione di Scienze Radiologiche, Dipartimento di Biotecnologie Mediche e Medicina Legale, Universita di Palermo, Via del Vespro 127, 90127 Palermo (Italy) and Department of Radiology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, 200 Lothrop Street, 15213 Pittsburgh, PA (United States)]. E-mail: gbranca@yahoo.com; Federle, Michael P. [Department of Radiology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, 200 Lothrop Street, 15213 Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Ambrosini, Roberta [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, ' Maggiore della Carita' University Hospital, ' A.Avogadro' Eastern Piemonte University, Corso Mazzini 18, Novara (Italy); Lagalla, Roberto [Sezione di Scienze Radiologiche, Dipartimento di Biotecnologie Mediche e Medicina Legale, Universita di Palermo, Via del Vespro 127, 90127 Palermo (Italy); Carriero, Alessandro [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, ' Maggiore della Carita' University Hospital, ' A.Avogadro' Eastern Piemonte University, Corso Mazzini 18, Novara (Italy); Midiri, Massimo [Sezione di Scienze Radiologiche, Dipartimento di Biotecnologie Mediche e Medicina Legale, Universita di Palermo, Via del Vespro 127, 90127 Palermo (Italy); Vilgrain, Valerie [Service de Radiologie, Hopital Beaujon, 100 Boulevard du General Leclerc, 92118 Clichy (France)

    2007-01-15

    In this article, we present the CT and MR imaging characteristics of the cirrhotic liver. We describe the altered liver morphology in different forms of viral, alcoholic and autoimmune end-stage liver disease. We present the spectrum of imaging findings in portal hypertension, such as splenomegaly, ascites and varices. We describe the patchy and lacelike patterns of fibrosis, along with the focal confluent form. The process of hepatocarcinogenesis is detailed, from regenerative to dysplastic nodules to overt hepatocellular carcinoma. Different types of non-neoplastic focal liver lesions occurring in the cirrhotic liver are discussed, including arterially enhancing nodules, hemangiomas and peribiliary cysts. We show different conditions causing liver morphology changes that can mimic cirrhosis, such as congenital hepatic fibrosis, 'pseudo-cirrhosis' due to breast metastases treated with chemotherapy, Budd-Chiari syndrome, sarcoidosis and cavernous transformation of the portal vein.

  18. Abdominal wall hernias: imaging with spiral CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stabile Ianora, A.A.; Midiri, M.; Vinci, R.; Rotondo, A.; Angelelli, G. [Department of Radiology, Bari University Hospital (Italy)

    2000-06-01

    Computed tomography is an accurate method of identifying the various types of abdominal wall hernias, especially if they are clinically occult, and of distinguishing them from other diseases such as hematomas, abscesses and neoplasia. In this study we examined the CT images of 94 patients affected by abdominal wall hernias observed over a period of 6 years. Computed tomography clearly demonstrates the anatomical site of the hernial sac, the content and any occlusive bowel complications due to incarceration or strangulation. Clinical diagnosis of external hernias is particularly difficult in obese patients or in those with laparotic scars. In these cases abdominal imaging is essential for a correct preoperative diagnosis and to determine the most effective treatment. (orig.)

  19. Coronary ostial involvement in acute aortic dissection: detection with 64-slice cardiac CT.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ryan, E Ronan

    2012-02-01

    A 41-year-old man collapsed after lifting weights at a gym. Following admission to the emergency department, a 64-slice cardiac computed tomography (CT) revealed a Stanford Type A aortic dissection arising from a previous coarctation repair. Multiphasic reconstructions demonstrated an unstable, highly mobile aortic dissection flap that extended proximally to involve the right coronary artery ostium. Our case is an example of the application of electrocardiogram-gated cardiac CT in directly visualizing involvement of the coronary ostia in acute aortic dissection, which may influence surgical management.

  20. The utility of cardiac CT beyond the assessment of suspected coronary artery disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kakouros, N. [Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD (United States); Giles, J.; Crundwell, N.B. [Conquest Hospital, St Leonards-on-Sea, East Sussex (United Kingdom); McWilliams, E.T.M., E-mail: eric.mcwilliams@esht.nhs.uk [Conquest Hospital, St Leonards-on-Sea, East Sussex (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-15

    Extensive work has been done over recent years to improve the spatial and temporal resolution of electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated cardiac computed tomography (CT). Advances in both hardware and software analysis have enabled the development of non-invasive coronary angiography. However, these high-quality examinations lend themselves to multiple additional applications beyond coronary angiography. In this review, we illustrate and discuss some established and some emerging applications of ECG-gated cardiac CT beyond the assessment of suspected coronary disease, particularly in light of recent recommendations on the appropriate use of this technology.

  1. Subjective and objective image differences in pediatric computed tomography cardiac angiography using lower iodine concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Jae-Yeon [Pusan National University Yangsan Hospital, Department of Radiology, Yangsan-si, Gyeongsangnam-do (Korea, Republic of); Pusan National University Yangsan Hospital, Research Institute for Convergence of Biomedical Science and Technology, Yangsan-si, Gyeongsangnam-do (Korea, Republic of); Choo, Ki Seok; Choi, Yoon Young; Kim, Jin Hyeok; Ryu, Hwaseong; Kim, Yong-Woo; Jeon, Ung Bae; Nam, Kyung Jin [Pusan National University Yangsan Hospital, Department of Radiology, Yangsan-si, Gyeongsangnam-do (Korea, Republic of); Han, Junhee [Pusan National University Yangsan Hospital, Division of Biostatistics, Research Institute for Convergence of Biomedical Science and Technology, Yangsan-si, Gyeongsangnam-do (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-05-15

    Several recent studies showed the optimal contrast enhancement with a low-concentration and iso-osmolar contrast media in both adult and pediatric patients. However, low contrast media concentrations are not routinely used due to concerns of suboptimal enhancement of cardiac structures and small vessels. To evaluate the feasibility of using iso-osmolar contrast media containing a low iodine dose for CT cardiac angiography at 80 kilovolts (kVp) in neonates and infants. The iodixanol 270 group consisted of 79 CT scans and the iopromide 370 group of 62 CT scans in patients ≤1 year old. Objective measurement of the contrast enhancement was analyzed and contrast-to-noise ratios of the ascending aorta and left ventricle were calculated. Regarding subjective measurement, a four-point scale system was devised to evaluate degrees of contrast enhancement, image noise, motion artifact and overall image quality of each image set. Reader performance for correctly differentiating iodixanol 270 and iopromide 370 by visual assessment was evaluated. Group objective and subjective measurements were nonsignificantly different. Overall sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic accuracy for correctly differentiating iodixanol 270 and iopromide 370 by visual assessment were 42.8%, 59%, and 50%, respectively. The application of iodixanol 270 achieved optimal enhancement for performing pediatric cardiac CT angiography at 80 kVp in neonates and infants. Objective measurements of contrast enhancement and subjective image quality assessments were not statistically different in the iodixanol 270 and iopromide 370 groups. (orig.)

  2. Anatomical-based Partial Volume Correction for Low-dose Dedicated Cardiac SPECT/CT

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Hui; Chan, Chung; Grobshtein, Yariv; Ma, Tianyu; Liu, Yaqiang; Wang, Shi; Stacy, Mitchel R.; Sinusas, Albert J.; Liu, Chi

    2015-01-01

    Due to the limited spatial resolution, partial volume effect (PVE) has been a major degrading factor on quantitative accuracy in emission tomography systems. This study aims to investigate the performance of several anatomical-based partial volume correction (PVC) methods for a dedicated cardiac SPECT/CT system (GE Discovery NM/CT 570c) with focused field-of-view (FOV) over a clinically relevant range of high and low count levels for two different radiotracer distributions. These PVC methods ...

  3. Neural network and its application to CT imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikravesh, M.; Kovscek, A.R.; Patzek, T.W. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-02-01

    We present an integrated approach to imaging the progress of air displacement by spontaneous imbibition of oil into sandstone. We combine Computerized Tomography (CT) scanning and neural network image processing. The main aspects of our approach are (I) visualization of the distribution of oil and air saturation by CT, (II) interpretation of CT scans using neural networks, and (III) reconstruction of 3-D images of oil saturation from the CT scans with a neural network model. Excellent agreement between the actual images and the neural network predictions is found.

  4. A dual tracer (68)Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT and (18)F-FDG PET/CT pilot study for detection of cardiac sarcoidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gormsen, Lars C; Haraldsen, Ate; Kramer, Stine; Dias, Andre H; Kim, Won Yong; Borghammer, Per

    2016-12-01

    Cardiac sarcoidosis (CS) is a potentially fatal condition lacking a single test with acceptable diagnostic accuracy. (18)F-FDG PET/CT has emerged as a promising imaging modality, but is challenged by physiological myocardial glucose uptake. An alternative tracer, (68)Ga-DOTANOC, binds to somatostatin receptors on inflammatory cells in sarcoid granulomas. We therefore aimed to conduct a proof-of-concept study using (68)Ga-DOTANOC to diagnose CS. In addition, we compared diagnostic accuracy and inter-observer variability of (68)Ga-DOTANOC vs. (18)F-FDG PET/CT. Nineteen patients (seven female) with suspected CS were prospectively recruited and dual tracer scanned within 7 days. PET images were reviewed by four expert readers for signs of CS and compared to the reference standard (Japanese ministry of Health and Welfare CS criteria). CS was diagnosed in 3/19 patients. By consensus, 11/19 (18)F-FDG scans and 0/19 (68)Ga-DOTANOC scans were rated as inconclusive. The sensitivity of (18)F-FDG PET for diagnosing CS was 33 %, specificity was 88 %, PPV was 33 %, NPV was 88 %, and diagnostic accuracy was 79 %. For (68)Ga-DOTANOC, accuracy was 100 %. Inter-observer agreement was poor for (18)F-FDG PET (Fleiss' combined kappa 0.27, NS) and significantly better for (68)Ga-DOTANOC (Fleiss' combined kappa 0.46, p = 0.001). Despite prolonged pre-scan fasting, a large proportion of (18)F-FDG PET/CT images were rated as inconclusive, resulting in low agreement among reviewers and correspondingly poor diagnostic accuracy. By contrast, (68)Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT had excellent diagnostic accuracy with the caveat that inter-observer variability was still significant. Nevertheless, (68)Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT looks very promising as an alternative CS PET tracer. Current Controlled Trials NCT01729169 .

  5. Image quality and radiation dose in cardiac imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, van Joris David

    2016-01-01

    Coronary artery disease is a major cause of death accounting for 8% of all deaths in the Netherlands. This disease can be detected in an early stage by cardiac imaging. However, this detection comes at the price of a relatively high radiation dose which is potentially harmful for the patient. Despit

  6. Image quality and radiation dose in cardiac imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, Joris David

    2016-01-01

    Coronary artery disease is a major cause of death accounting for 8% of all deaths in the Netherlands. This disease can be detected in an early stage by cardiac imaging. However, this detection comes at the price of a relatively high radiation dose which is potentially harmful for the patient.

  7. An approach for quantitative image quality analysis for CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, Amir; Cochran, Joe; Mooney, Doug; Regensburger, Joe

    2016-03-01

    An objective and standardized approach to assess image quality of Compute Tomography (CT) systems is required in a wide variety of imaging processes to identify CT systems appropriate for a given application. We present an overview of the framework we have developed to help standardize and to objectively assess CT image quality for different models of CT scanners used for security applications. Within this framework, we have developed methods to quantitatively measure metrics that should correlate with feature identification, detection accuracy and precision, and image registration capabilities of CT machines and to identify strengths and weaknesses in different CT imaging technologies in transportation security. To that end we have designed, developed and constructed phantoms that allow for systematic and repeatable measurements of roughly 88 image quality metrics, representing modulation transfer function, noise equivalent quanta, noise power spectra, slice sensitivity profiles, streak artifacts, CT number uniformity, CT number consistency, object length accuracy, CT number path length consistency, and object registration. Furthermore, we have developed a sophisticated MATLAB based image analysis tool kit to analyze CT generated images of phantoms and report these metrics in a format that is standardized across the considered models of CT scanners, allowing for comparative image quality analysis within a CT model or between different CT models. In addition, we have developed a modified sparse principal component analysis (SPCA) method to generate a modified set of PCA components as compared to the standard principal component analysis (PCA) with sparse loadings in conjunction with Hotelling T2 statistical analysis method to compare, qualify, and detect faults in the tested systems.

  8. Biphasic contrast medium injection in cardiac CT: moderate versus high concentration contrast material at identical iodine flux and iodine dose.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, A.; Meijs, M.F.; Vos, A.M.C.; Seidensticker, P.R.; Prokop, M.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To prospectively investigate the influence of contrast material concentration on enhancement in cardiac CT by using a biphasic single-injection protocol. METHODS: Sixty-four-row multidetector cardiac CT angiography was performed in 159 patients randomised to a moderate or high contrast me

  9. SU-E-P-10: Imaging in the Cardiac Catheterization Lab - Technologies and Clinical Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fetterly, K [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Diagnosis and treatment of cardiovascular disease in the cardiac catheterization laboratory is often aided by a multitude of imaging technologies. The purpose of this work is to highlight the contributions to patient care offered by the various imaging systems used during cardiovascular interventional procedures. Methods: Imaging technologies used in the cardiac catheterization lab were characterized by their fundamental technology and by the clinical applications for which they are used. Whether the modality is external to the patient, intravascular, or intracavity was specified. Specific clinical procedures for which multiple modalities are routinely used will be highlighted. Results: X-ray imaging modalities include fluoroscopy/angiography and angiography CT. Ultrasound imaging is performed with external, trans-esophageal echocardiography (TEE), and intravascular (IVUS) transducers. Intravascular infrared optical coherence tomography (IVOCT) is used to assess vessel endothelium. Relatively large (>0.5 mm) anatomical structures are imaged with x-ray and ultrasound. IVUS and IVOCT provide high resolution images of vessel walls. Cardiac CT and MRI images are used to plan complex cardiovascular interventions. Advanced applications are used to spatially and temporally merge images from different technologies. Diagnosis and treatment of coronary artery disease frequently utilizes angiography and intra-vascular imaging, and treatment of complex structural heart conditions routinely includes use of multiple imaging modalities. Conclusion: There are several imaging modalities which are routinely used in the cardiac catheterization laboratory to diagnose and treat both coronary artery and structural heart disease. Multiple modalities are frequently used to enhance the quality and safety of procedures. The cardiac catheterization laboratory includes many opportunities for medical physicists to contribute substantially toward advancing patient care.

  10. Visualization and enhancement patterns of radiofrequency ablation lesions with iodine contrast-enhanced cardiac C-arm CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard-Hughes, Erin; Al-Ahmad, Amin; Moore, Teri; Lauritsch, Günter; Boese, Jan; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether contrast-enhanced C-arm CT (3D rotational angiography) can distinguish radiofrequency (RF) ablation lesions created in the left ventricle. Ablation lesions were created on the endocardial surface of the left ventricle of 6 swine using a 7 F RF ablation catheter with a 4 mm electrode. An ECGgated C-arm CT imaging protocol was used to acquire projection images during iodine contrast injection and every 5 min for up to 30 min, with no additional contrast. Reconstructed images were analyzed offline and the mean and standard deviation of the signal intensity of the ablation lesion, normal myocardium, and blood were measured. Eleven ablation lesions were visualized and the time-attenuation curve of the signal intensity was plotted. A mean signal intensity increase of 64.8 +/-33.6 HU was measured in the late enhancement of seven lesions compared to normal myocardium. This is the first study to demonstrate RF ablation lesion enhancement patterns similar to those seen for MR imaging using C-arm CT, an imaging modality that can provide valuable feedback during cardiac interventional procedures.

  11. Correlation of CT-based regional cardiac function (SQUEEZ) with myocardial strain calculated from tagged MRI: an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourmorteza, Amir; Chen, Marcus Y; van der Pals, Jesper; Arai, Andrew E; McVeigh, Elliot R

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the correlation between local myocardial function estimates from CT and myocardial strain from tagged MRI in the same heart. Accurate detection of regional myocardial dysfunction can be an important finding in the diagnosis of functionally significant coronary artery disease. Tagged MRI is currently a reference standard for noninvasive regional myocardial function analysis; however, it has practical drawbacks. We have developed a CT imaging protocol and automated image analysis algorithm for estimating regional cardiac function from a few heartbeats. This method tracks the motion of the left ventricular (LV) endocardial surface to produce local function maps: we call the method Stretch Quantification of Endocardial Engraved Zones (SQUEEZ). Myocardial infarction was created by ligation of the left anterior descending coronary artery for 2 h followed by reperfusion in canine models. Tagged and cine MRI scans were performed during the reperfusion phase and first-pass contrast enhanced CT scans were acquired. The average delay between the CT and MRI scans was myocardial strain (Ecc) was calculated from the tagged MRI data. The agreement between peak systolic Ecc and SQUEEZ was investigated in 162 segments in the 9 hearts. Linear regression and Bland-Altman analysis was used to assess the correlation between the two metrics of local LV function. The results show good agreement between SQUEEZ and Ecc: (r = 0.71, slope = 0.78, p function. The good agreement between the estimates of local myocardial function obtained from CT SQUEEZ and tagged MRI provides encouragement to investigate the use of SQUEEZ for measuring regional cardiac function at a low clinical dose in humans.

  12. Korean Society of Cardiovascular Imaging Guidelines for Cardiac Computed Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Jin [Korean Society of Cariovascular Imaging Guidelines Committee, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Byoung Wook; Choe, Kyu Ok [Dept. of Radiology, Yensei University Heath System, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yong, Hwan Seok [Dept. of Radiology, Korea University Guro Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yang Min [Dept. of Radiology, Sejong Hospital and Sejong Heart Institute, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of); Choe, Yeon Hyeon [Dept. of Radiology, Samsug Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Tae Hwan [Dept. of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jae Hyung [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-09-15

    The Korean Society of Cardiovascular Imaging (KOCSI) has issued a guideline for the use of cardiac CT imaging in order to assist clinicians and patients in providing adequate level of medical service. In order to establish a guideline founded on evidence based medicine, it was designed based on comprehensive data such as questionnaires conducted in international and domestic hospitals, intensive journal reviews, and with experts in cardiac radiology. The recommendations of this guideline should not be used as an absolute standard and medical professionals can always refer to methods non-adherent to this guideline when it is considered more reasonable and beneficial to an individual patient's medical situation. The guideline has its limitation and should be revised appropriately with the advancement medical equipment technology and public health care system. The guideline should not be served as a measure for standard of care. KOCSI strongly disapproves the use of the guideline to be used as the standard of expected practice in medical litigation processes.

  13. Automated vertebra identification in CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehm, Matthias; Klinder, Tobias; Kneser, Reinhard; Lorenz, Cristian

    2009-02-01

    In this paper, we describe and compare methods for automatically identifying individual vertebrae in arbitrary CT images. The identification is an essential precondition for a subsequent model-based segmentation, which is used in a wide field of orthopedic, neurological, and oncological applications, e.g., spinal biopsies or the insertion of pedicle screws. Since adjacent vertebrae show similar characteristics, an automated labeling of the spine column is a very challenging task, especially if no surrounding reference structures can be taken into account. Furthermore, vertebra identification is complicated due to the fact that many images are bounded to a very limited field of view and may contain only few vertebrae. We propose and evaluate two methods for automatically labeling the spine column by evaluating similarities between given models and vertebral objects. In one method, object boundary information is taken into account by applying a Generalized Hough Transform (GHT) for each vertebral object. In the other method, appearance models containing mean gray value information are registered to each vertebral object using cross and local correlation as similarity measures for the optimization function. The GHT is advantageous in terms of computational performance but cuts back concerning the identification rate. A correct labeling of the vertebral column has been successfully performed on 93% of the test set consisting of 63 disparate input images using rigid image registration with local correlation as similarity measure.

  14. In vivo microCT imaging of rodent cerebral vasculature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Youngho; Hasegawa, Bruce H [Center for Molecular and Functional Imaging, Department of Radiology, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94143 (United States); Hashimoto, Tomoki; Nuki, Yoshitsugu [Center for Cerebrovascular Research, Department of Anesthesia and Perioperative Care, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94143 (United States)], E-mail: youngho.seo@radiology.ucsf.edu

    2008-04-07

    Computed tomography (CT) remains a critical diagnostic tool for evaluating patients with cerebrovascular disease, and the advent of specialized systems for imaging rodents has extended these techniques to small animal models of these diseases. We therefore have evaluated in vivo methods of imaging rat models of hemorrhagic stroke using a high resolution compact computed tomography ('microCT') system (FLEX(tm) X-O(tm), Gamma Medica-Ideas, Northridge, CA). For all in vivo studies, the head of the anesthetized rat was secured in a custom immobilization device for microCT imaging with 512 projections over 2 min at 60 kVp and 0.530 mA (I{sub tube} x t/rotation = 63.6 mAs). First, imaging without iodinated contrast was performed (a) to differentiate the effect of contrast agent in contrast-enhanced CT and (b) to examine the effectiveness of the immobilization device between two time points of CT acquisitions. Then, contrast-enhanced CT was performed with continuous administration of iopromide (300 mgI ml{sup -1} at 1.2 ml min{sup -1}) to visualize aneurysms and other vascular formations in the carotid and cerebral arteries that may precede subarachnoid hemorrhage. The accuracy of registration between the noncontrast and contrast-enhanced CT images with the immobilization device was compared against the images aligned with normalized mutual information using FMRIB's linear image registration tool (FLIRT). Translations and rotations were examined between the FLIRT-aligned noncontrast CT image and the nonaligned noncontrast CT image. These two data sets demonstrated translational and rotational differences of less than 0.5 voxel ({approx}85 {mu}m) and 0.5 deg., respectively. Noncontrast CT demonstrated a very small volume (0.1 ml) of femoral arterial blood introduced surgically into the rodent brain. Continuous administration of iopromide during the CT acquisition produced consistent vascular contrast in the reconstructed CT images. As a result, carotid

  15. Cardiac CT: are we underestimating the dose? A radiation dose study utilizing the 2007 ICRP tissue weighting factors and a cardiac specific scan volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gosling, O., E-mail: Oliver.gosling@pms.ac.u [Plymouth Hospitals NHS Trust, Derriford Hospital, Plymouth, Devon (United Kingdom); Loader, R.; Venables, P.; Rowles, N.; Morgan-Hughes, G. [Plymouth Hospitals NHS Trust, Derriford Hospital, Plymouth, Devon (United Kingdom); Roobottom, C. [Peninsula College of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Plymouth, Devon (United Kingdom)

    2010-12-15

    Aim: To calculate the effective dose from cardiac multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) using a computer-based model utilizing the latest International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP) 103 tissue-weighting factors (2007), to compare this dose with those calculated with previously published chest conversion factors and to produce a conversion factor specific for cardiac MDCT. Materials and methods: An observational study of 152 patients attending for cardiac MDCT as part of their usual clinical care in a university teaching hospital. The dose for each examination was calculated using the computer-based anthropomorphic ImPACT model (the imaging performance assessment of CT scanners) and this was compared with the dose derived from the dose-length product (DLP) and a chest conversion factor. Results: The median effective dose calculated using the ImPACT calculator (4.5 mSv) was significantly higher than the doses calculated with the chest conversion factors (2.2-3 mSv). Conclusion: The use of chest conversion factors significantly underestimates the effective dose when compared to the dose calculated using the ImPACT calculator. A conversion factor of 0.028 would give a better estimation of the effective dose from prospectively gated cardiac MDCT.

  16. Fusion of 3D cardiac SPECT and 64-channel-CT angiography using personal computer in functionally relevant coronary artery stenosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahk, Yong Whee [Sung-Ae General Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-06-15

    Image fusion is fast catching attention as Wagner pointed out in this 2006 version of the recent progress and development presented at the annual meeting of Society of Nuclear Medicine. Prototypical fusion of bone scan and radiograph was already attempted at in 1961 when Fleming et al. published an article on strontium-85 bone scan. They simply superimposed dot scan on radiograph enabling simultaneous assessment of altered bone metabolism and local bone anatomy. Indeed the parallel reading of images of bone scan and radiography, CT, MRI or ultrasonography has been practiced in nuclear medicine long since. It is fortunate that recent development of computer science and technology along with the availability of refined CT and SPECT machines has permitted us to open a new avenue to digitally produce precise fusion image so that they can readily be read, exchanged and disseminated using internet. Ten years ago fusion was performed using Bresstrahlung SPECT/CT and it is now achievable by PET/CT and SPECT/CT software and SPECT/CT hardware. The merit of image fusion is its feasibility of reliable assessment of morphological and metabolic change. It is now applicable not only to stationary organs such as brain and skeleton but also to moving organs such as the heart, lung and stomach. Recently, we could create useful fusion image of cardiac SPECT and 64-channel CT angiograph. The former provided myocardial metabolic profile and the latter vascular narrowing in two patients with coronary artery stenosis and myocardial ischemia.

  17. Where Does It Lead? Imaging Features of Cardiovascular Implantable Electronic Devices on Chest Radiograph and CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanzman, Rotem S.; Blondin, Dirk; Furst, Gunter; Scherer, Axel; R Miese, Falk; Kroepil, Patric [University of Duesseldorf, Medical Faculty, 40225 Duesseldorf (Germany); Winter, Joachim [University Hospital Duesseldorf, 40225 Duesseldorf (Germany); Abbara, Suhny [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (US)

    2011-10-15

    Pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) are being increasingly employed in patients suffering from cardiac rhythm disturbances. The principal objective of this article is to familiarize radiologists with pacemakers and ICDs on chest radiographs and CT scans. Therefore, the preferred lead positions according to pacemaker types and anatomic variants are introduced in this study. Additionally, the imaging features of incorrect lead positions and defects, as well as complications subsequent to pacemaker implantation are demonstrated herein.

  18. Time-resolved cardiac cone beam CT using an interventional C-arm system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schomberg, H.

    2012-01-01

    It is both desirable and challenging to make interventional C-arm systems fit for cardiac cone beam CT. A number of methods towards thisgoal have been proposed, some of which even attempt to generate 4Dimages of the beating heart. A promising candidate of this type, proposed earlier by this author,

  19. 3D X-ray imaging methods in support catheter ablations of cardiac arrhythmias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stárek, Zdeněk; Lehar, František; Jež, Jiří; Wolf, Jiří; Novák, Miroslav

    2014-10-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias are a very frequent illness. Pharmacotherapy is not very effective in persistent arrhythmias and brings along a number of risks. Catheter ablation has became an effective and curative treatment method over the past 20 years. To support complex arrhythmia ablations, the 3D X-ray cardiac cavities imaging is used, most frequently the 3D reconstruction of CT images. The 3D cardiac rotational angiography (3DRA) represents a modern method enabling to create CT like 3D images on a standard X-ray machine equipped with special software. Its advantage lies in the possibility to obtain images during the procedure, decreased radiation dose and reduction of amount of the contrast agent. The left atrium model is the one most frequently used for complex atrial arrhythmia ablations, particularly for atrial fibrillation. CT data allow for creation and segmentation of 3D models of all cardiac cavities. Recently, a research has been made proving the use of 3DRA to create 3D models of other cardiac (right ventricle, left ventricle, aorta) and non-cardiac structures (oesophagus). They can be used during catheter ablation of complex arrhythmias to improve orientation during the construction of 3D electroanatomic maps, directly fused with 3D electroanatomic systems and/or fused with fluoroscopy. An intensive development in the 3D model creation and use has taken place over the past years and they became routinely used during catheter ablations of arrhythmias, mainly atrial fibrillation ablation procedures. Further development may be anticipated in the future in both the creation and use of these models.

  20. Transthoracic Cardiac Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradway, David Pierson

    This dissertation investigates the feasibility of a real-time transthoracic Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) imaging system to measure myocardial function non-invasively in clinical setting. Heart failure is an important cardiovascular disease and contributes to the leading cause of death for developed countries. Patients exhibiting heart failure with a low left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) can often be identified by clinicians, but patients with preserved LVEF might be undetected if they do not exhibit other signs and symptoms of heart failure. These cases motivate development of transthoracic ARFI imaging to aid the early diagnosis of the structural and functional heart abnormalities leading to heart failure. M-Mode ARFI imaging utilizes ultrasonic radiation force to displace tissue several micrometers in the direction of wave propagation. Conventional ultrasound tracks the response of the tissue to the force. This measurement is repeated rapidly at a location through the cardiac cycle, measuring timing and relative changes in myocardial stiffness. ARFI imaging was previously shown capable of measuring myocardial properties and function via invasive open-chest and intracardiac approaches. The prototype imaging system described in this dissertation is capable of rapid acquisition, processing, and display of ARFI images and shear wave elasticity imaging (SWEI) movies. Also presented is a rigorous safety analysis, including finite element method (FEM) simulations of tissue heating, hydrophone intensity and mechanical index (MI) measurements, and thermocouple transducer face heating measurements. For the pulse sequences used in later animal and clinical studies, results from the safety analysis indicates that transthoracic ARFI imaging can be safely applied at rates and levels realizable on the prototype ARFI imaging system. Preliminary data are presented from in vivo trials studying changes in myocardial stiffness occurring under normal and abnormal

  1. Dose calculation based on Cone Beam CT images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Slot Thing, Rune

    , several other factors contributing to the image quality degradation, and while one should, theoretically, be able to obtain CT-like image quality from CBCT scans, clinical image quality is often very far from this ideal realisation. The present thesis describes the investigation of potential image quality...... improvements in clinical CBCT imaging achieved through post-processing of the clinical image data. A Monte Carlo model was established to predict patient specific scattered radiation in CBCT imaging, based on anatomical information from the planning CT scan. This allowed the time consuming Monte Carlo......Cone beam CT (CBCT) imaging is frequently used in modern radiotherapy to ensure the proper positioning of the patient prior to each treatment fraction. With the increasing use of CBCT imaging for image guidance, interest has grown in exploring the potential use of these 3– or 4–D medical images...

  2. Growing cardiac hemangioma on serial F18 FDG PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Young Jin; Yoon, Hyun Jin; Kang, Do Young [Dong A Univ. Medical Center, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    Cardiac hemangiomas are extremely rare, benign tumors, which can occur anywhere in the heart. Symptoms are variable according to the size, extension and tumor location, but most cases are asymptomatic and are detected incidentally. They may grow, remain stable and regress; therefore, the natural course of the tumors is unpredictable. Diagnosis mainly depends upon echocardiography, CT, MRI and angiography. Reports of detection by F18 FDG PET/CT are very limited. We report a case of cardiac hemangioma attached to the right ventricle, compressing the ventricle. It was revealed incidentally on F18 FDG PET/CT for routine evaluation of thyroid cancer. During two serial F18 FDG PET/CTs, it grew from 2.8cm to 4.0cm with mild FDG uptake. After surgery, the patient remained stable without any complications.

  3. AAPM/RSNA physics tutorial for residents: topics in CT. Image processing in CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cody, Dianna D

    2002-01-01

    Several image-processing methods for computed tomographic (CT) examinations are currently being used in clinical radiology departments. Image processing involves operations such as reformatting of original CT images, volume-rendered displays, surface-rendered displays, and physiologic imaging analysis. The reformatting process does not alter the CT voxels in any way; instead it uses them in off-axis views and displays the images produced from the original reconstruction process in an orientation other than how they were originally generated. Sagittal, coronal, oblique, and curved reformatting are standard reformatting methods. Other reformatting techniques include maximum-intensity projection, minimum-intensity projection, and variable thickness viewing. Volume and surface rendering are two different methods for reformatting axial images into three-dimensional views. CT perfusion allows the measurement of physiologic parameters over time. Additional postprocessing efforts can potentially add value to the patients and their outcomes, as can be seen in the cases that illustrate this article.

  4. Dynamic CT perfusion measurement in a cardiac phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemer, Benjamin P; Hubbard, Logan; Lipinski, Jerry; Molloi, Sabee

    2015-10-01

    Widespread clinical implementation of dynamic CT myocardial perfusion has been hampered by its limited accuracy and high radiation dose. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy and radiation dose reduction of a dynamic CT myocardial perfusion technique based on first pass analysis (FPA). To test the FPA technique, a pulsatile pump was used to generate known perfusion rates in a range of 0.96-2.49 mL/min/g. All the known perfusion rates were determined using an ultrasonic flow probe and the known mass of the perfusion volume. FPA and maximum slope model (MSM) perfusion rates were measured using volume scans acquired from a 320-slice CT scanner, and then compared to the known perfusion rates. The measured perfusion using FPA (P(FPA)), with two volume scans, and the maximum slope model (P(MSM)) were related to known perfusion (P(K)) by P(FPA) = 0.91P(K) + 0.06 (r = 0.98) and P(MSM) = 0.25P(K) - 0.02 (r = 0.96), respectively. The standard error of estimate for the FPA technique, using two volume scans, and the MSM was 0.14 and 0.30 mL/min/g, respectively. The estimated radiation dose required for the FPA technique with two volume scans and the MSM was 2.6 and 11.7-17.5 mSv, respectively. Therefore, the FPA technique can yield accurate perfusion measurements using as few as two volume scans, corresponding to approximately a factor of four reductions in radiation dose as compared with the currently available MSM. In conclusion, the results of the study indicate that the FPA technique can make accurate dynamic CT perfusion measurements over a range of clinically relevant perfusion rates, while substantially reducing radiation dose, as compared to currently available dynamic CT perfusion techniques.

  5. Personal computer aided cerebral perfusion imaging with dynamic CT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林燕; 高培毅

    2004-01-01

    @@Reports on the clinical implementation of dynamic computerised tomography (CT) perfusion imaging and quantitative measurement have increased dramatically of late.1-8 The advantages of dynamic CT perfusion imaging and quantitative measurement for the diagnosis of acute cerebral infarction have been acknowledged. However, most overseas CT vendors set perfusion imaging software package as an option for graphic workstation at a too high price for domestic practitioners. To foster the domestic implementation and development of this new technology, we have extended the earlier work.1,2 Applying the theory of central volume principle to DICOM 3.0 standard forms of prime CT images, we developed dynamic CT perfusion imaging and quantitative measure-ment programmes for PCs using Visual C+ + in Windows 98 system.

  6. Molecular cardiac PET besides FDG viability imaging; Molekulare Kardiale PET jenseits der FDG-Vitalitaetsdiagnostik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindner, O.; Burchert, W. [Universitaetsklinik der Ruhr-Univ. Bochum (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologie, Nuklearmedizin und Molekulare Bildgebung, Herz- und Diabetszentrum NRW

    2009-06-15

    Molecular cardiac non F-18-FDG PET is currently based on perfusion imaging. It is of excellent diagnostic accuracy to detect coronary artery disease (CAD) and superior to perfusion SPECT. There is also evidence for its incremental prognostic value. The unique feature of PET to measure myocardial perfusion in absolute terms and in short time periods define its impact on cardiac imaging enabling both the evaluation of early changes in CAD and the accurate characterization of multivessel disease. Currently, all available PET perfusion tracers in Europe are cyclotron products. Rb-82, a generator product, is the most frequently employed perfusion tracer in the United States and cyclotron independent. This tracer has the potential to become an alternative in Europe soon. Nowadays, PET systems are manufactured as hybrid PET-CT scanners. In oncology, hybrid imaging revealed, that the combination of functional and morphological imaging is superior to the single components. In cardiology, the integration of perfusion PET imaging with CT calcium scoring and CT anatomy of the coronary arteries represents a similar constellation. Atherosclerotic plaque evaluation by combined PET-CT technique will be one of the most promising future applications with a potential immense impact on prophylaxis, diagnosis and therapy of CAD in the future. (orig.)

  7. Fast CT-CT fluoroscopy registration with respiratory motion compensation for image-guided lung intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Po; Xue, Zhong; Lu, Kongkuo; Yang, Jianhua; Wong, Stephen T.

    2012-02-01

    CT-fluoroscopy (CTF) is an efficient imaging method for guiding percutaneous lung interventions such as biopsy. During CTF-guided biopsy procedure, four to ten axial sectional images are captured in a very short time period to provide nearly real-time feedback to physicians, so that they can adjust the needle as it is advanced toward the target lesion. Although popularly used in clinics, this traditional CTF-guided intervention procedure may require frequent scans and cause unnecessary radiation exposure to clinicians and patients. In addition, CTF only generates limited slices of images and provides limited anatomical information. It also has limited response to respiratory movements and has narrow local anatomical dynamics. To better utilize CTF guidance, we propose a fast CT-CTF registration algorithm with respiratory motion estimation for image-guided lung intervention using electromagnetic (EM) guidance. With the pre-procedural exhale and inhale CT scans, it would be possible to estimate a series of CT images of the same patient at different respiratory phases. Then, once a CTF image is captured during the intervention, our algorithm can pick the best respiratory phase-matched 3D CT image and performs a fast deformable registration to warp the 3D CT toward the CTF. The new 3D CT image can be used to guide the intervention by superimposing the EM-guided needle location on it. Compared to the traditional repetitive CTF guidance, the registered CT integrates both 3D volumetric patient data and nearly real-time local anatomy for more effective and efficient guidance. In this new system, CTF is used as a nearly real-time sensor to overcome the discrepancies between static pre-procedural CT and the patient's anatomy, so as to provide global guidance that may be supplemented with electromagnetic (EM) tracking and to reduce the number of CTF scans needed. In the experiments, the comparative results showed that our fast CT-CTF algorithm can achieve better registration

  8. Clinical evaluation of new automatic coronary-specific best cardiac phase selection algorithm for single-beat coronary CT angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Xu, Lei; Fan, Zhanming; Liang, Junfu; Yan, Zixu; Sun, Zhonghua

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the workflow efficiency of a new automatic coronary-specific reconstruction technique (Smart Phase, GE Healthcare-SP) for selection of the best cardiac phase with least coronary motion when compared with expert manual selection (MS) of best phase in patients with high heart rate. A total of 46 patients with heart rates above 75 bpm who underwent single beat coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) were enrolled in this study. CCTA of all subjects were performed on a 256-detector row CT scanner (Revolution CT, GE Healthcare, Waukesha, Wisconsin, US). With the SP technique, the acquired phase range was automatically searched in 2% phase intervals during the reconstruction process to determine the optimal phase for coronary assessment, while for routine expert MS, reconstructions were performed at 5% intervals and a best phase was manually determined. The reconstruction and review times were recorded to measure the workflow efficiency for each method. Two reviewers subjectively assessed image quality for each coronary artery in the MS and SP reconstruction volumes using a 4-point grading scale. The average HR of the enrolled patients was 91.1±19.0bpm. A total of 204 vessels were assessed. The subjective image quality using SP was comparable to that of the MS, 1.45±0.85 vs 1.43±0.81 respectively (p = 0.88). The average time was 246 seconds for the manual best phase selection, and 98 seconds for the SP selection, resulting in average time saving of 148 seconds (60%) with use of the SP algorithm. The coronary specific automatic cardiac best phase selection technique (Smart Phase) improves clinical workflow in high heart rate patients and provides image quality comparable with manual cardiac best phase selection. Reconstruction of single-beat CCTA exams with SP can benefit the users with less experienced in CCTA image interpretation.

  9. Imaging spectrum of sudden athlete cardiac death.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Arrigan, M T

    2012-02-01

    Sudden athlete death (SAD) is a widely publicized and increasingly reported phenomenon. For many, the athlete population epitomize human physical endeavour and achievement and their unexpected death comes with a significant emotional impact on the public. Sudden deaths within this group are often without prior warning. Preceding symptoms of exertional syncope and chest pain do, however, occur and warrant investigation. Similarly, a positive family history of sudden death in a young person or a known family history of a condition associated with SAD necessitates further tests. Screening programmes aimed at detecting those at risk individuals also exist with the aim of reducing fatalities. In this paper we review the topic of SAD and discuss the epidemiology, aetiology, and clinical presentations. We then proceed to discuss each underlying cause, in turn discussing the pathophysiology of each condition. This is followed by a discussion of useful imaging methods with an emphasis on cardiac magnetic resonance and cardiac computed tomography and how these address the various issues raised by the pathophysiology of each entity. We conclude by proposing imaging algorithms for the investigation of patients considered at risk for these conditions and discuss the various issues raised in screening.

  10. Dual energy CT: New horizon in medical imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goo, Hyun Woo [Dept. of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Goo, Jin Mo [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-08-01

    Dual-energy CT has remained underutilized over the past decade probably due to a cumbersome workflow issue and current technical limitations. Clinical radiologists should be made aware of the potential clinical benefits of dual-energy CT over single-energy CT. To accomplish this aim, the basic principle, current acquisition methods with advantages and disadvantages, and various material-specific imaging methods as clinical applications of dual-energy CT should be addressed in detail. Current dual-energy CT acquisition methods include dual tubes with or without beam filtration, rapid voltage switching, dual-layer detector, split filter technique, and sequential scanning. Dual-energy material-specific imaging methods include virtual monoenergetic or monochromatic imaging, effective atomic number map, virtual non-contrast or unenhanced imaging, virtual non-calcium imaging, iodine map, inhaled xenon map, uric acid imaging, automatic bone removal, and lung vessels analysis. In this review, we focus on dual-energy CT imaging including related issues of radiation exposure to patients, scanning and post-processing options, and potential clinical benefits mainly to improve the understanding of clinical radiologists and thus, expand the clinical use of dual-energy CT; in addition, we briefly describe the current technical limitations of dual-energy CT and the current developments of photon-counting detector.

  11. Dual-Energy CT: New Horizon in Medical Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goo, Hyun Woo; Goo, Jin Mo

    2017-01-01

    Dual-energy CT has remained underutilized over the past decade probably due to a cumbersome workflow issue and current technical limitations. Clinical radiologists should be made aware of the potential clinical benefits of dual-energy CT over single-energy CT. To accomplish this aim, the basic principle, current acquisition methods with advantages and disadvantages, and various material-specific imaging methods as clinical applications of dual-energy CT should be addressed in detail. Current dual-energy CT acquisition methods include dual tubes with or without beam filtration, rapid voltage switching, dual-layer detector, split filter technique, and sequential scanning. Dual-energy material-specific imaging methods include virtual monoenergetic or monochromatic imaging, effective atomic number map, virtual non-contrast or unenhanced imaging, virtual non-calcium imaging, iodine map, inhaled xenon map, uric acid imaging, automatic bone removal, and lung vessels analysis. In this review, we focus on dual-energy CT imaging including related issues of radiation exposure to patients, scanning and post-processing options, and potential clinical benefits mainly to improve the understanding of clinical radiologists and thus, expand the clinical use of dual-energy CT; in addition, we briefly describe the current technical limitations of dual-energy CT and the current developments of photon-counting detector.

  12. RONI Based Secured and Authenticated Indexing of Lung CT Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Jasmine Selvakumari Jeya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Medical images need to be transmitted with the patient’s information without altering the image data. The present paper discusses secured indexing of lung CT image (SILI which is a secured way of indexing the lung CT images with the patient information. Authentication is provided using the sender’s logo information and the secret key is used for embedding the watermark into the host image. Watermark is embedded into the region of Noninterest (RONI of the lung CT image. RONI is identified by segmenting the lung tissue from the CT scan image. The experimental results show that the proposed approach is robust against unauthorized access, noise, blurring, and intensity based attacks.

  13. Intracranial Hemorrhage Annotation for CT Brain Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Hau Lee

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we created a decision-making model to detect intracranial hemorrhage and adopted Expectation Maximization(EM segmentation to segment the Computed Tomography (CT images. In this work, basically intracranial hemorrhage is classified into two main types which are intra-axial hemorrhage and extra-axial hemorrhage. In order to ease classification, contrast enhancement is adopted to finetune the contrast of the hemorrhage. After that, k-means is applied to group the potential and suspicious hemorrhagic regions into one cluster. The decision-making process is to identify whether the suspicious regions are hemorrhagic regions or non-regions of interest. After the hemorrhagic detection, the images are segmented into brain matter and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF by using expectation-maximization (EM segmentation. The acquired experimental results are evaluated in terms of recall and precision. The encouraging results have been attained whereby the proposed system has yielded 0.9333 and 0.8880 precision for extra-axial and intra-axial hemorrhagic detection respectively, whereas recall rate obtained is 0.9245 and 0.8043 for extra-axial and intra-axial hemorrhagic detection respectively.

  14. The Risks of Inappropriateness in Cardiac Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenio Picano

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The immense clinical and scientific benefits of cardiovascular imaging are well-established, but are also true that 30 to 50% of all examinations are partially or totally inappropriate. Marketing messages, high patient demand and defensive medicine, lead to the vicious circle of the so-called Ulysses syndrome. Mr. Ulysses, a typical middle-aged “worried-well” asymptomatic subject with an A-type coronary personality, a heavy (opium smoker, leading a stressful life, would be advised to have a cardiological check-up after 10 years of war. After a long journey across imaging laboratories, he will have stress echo, myocardial perfusion scintigraphy, PET-CT, 64-slice CT, and adenosine-MRI performed, with a cumulative cost of >100 times a simple exercise-electrocardiography test and a cumulative radiation dose of >4,000 chest x-rays, with a cancer risk of 1 in 100. Ulysses is tired of useless examinations, exorbitant costs. unaffordable even by the richest society, and unacceptable risks.

  15. Xenon-enhanced CT imaging of local pulmonary ventilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajik, Jehangir K.; Tran, Binh Q.; Hoffman, Eric A.

    1996-04-01

    We are using the unique features of electron beam CT (EBCT) in conjunction with respiratory and cardiac gating to explore the use of non-radioactive xenon gas as a pulmonary ventilation contrast agent. The goal is to construct accurate and quantitative high-resolution maps of local pulmonary ventilation in humans. We are evaluating xenon-enhanced computed tomography in the pig model with dynamic tracer washout/dilution and single breath inhalation imaging protocols. Scanning is done via an EBCT scanner which offers 50 msec scan aperture speeds. CT attenuation coefficients (image gray scale value) show a linear increase with xenon concentration (r equals 0.99). We measure a 1.55 Hounsfield Unit (HU) enhancement (kV equals 130, mA equals 623) per percentage increase in xenon gas concentration giving an approximately 155 HU enhancement with 100% xenon gas concentration as measured in a plexiglass super-syringe. Early results indicate that a single breath (from functional residual capacity to total lung capacity) of 100% xenon gas provides an average 32 +/- 1.85 (SE) HU enhancement in the lung parenchyma (maximum 50 HU) and should not encounter unwanted xenon side effects. However, changes in lung density occurring during even short breath holds (as short as 10 seconds) may limit using a single breath technique to synchronous volumetric scanning, currently possible only with EBCT. Preliminary results indicate close agreement between measured regional xenon concentration-time curves and theoretical predictions for the same sample. More than 10 breaths with inspirations to as high as 25 cmH2O airway pressure were needed to clear tracer from all lung regions and some regions had nearly linear rather than mono-exponential clearance curves. When regional parenchymal xenon concentration-time curves were analyzed, vertical gradients in ventilation and redistribution of ventilation at higher inspiratory flow rates were consistent with known pulmonary physiology. We present

  16. Robust cranial cavity segmentation in CT and CT perfusion images of trauma and suspected stroke patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Patel, A; Ginneken, B. van; Meijer, F.J.A.; Dijk, E.J. van; Prokop, M.; Manniesing, R.

    2017-01-01

    A robust and accurate method is presented for the segmentation of the cranial cavity in computed tomography (CT) and CT perfusion (CTP) images. The method consists of multi-atlas registration with label fusion followed by a geodesic active contour levelset refinement of the segmentation.

  17. Cardiac stress MR imaging with dobutamine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strach, K.; Meyer, C.; Schild, H.; Sommer, T. [University of Bonn, Department of Radiology, Bonn (Germany)

    2006-12-15

    Stress testing for detection of ischemia-induced wall-motion abnormalities has become a mainstay for noninvasive diagnosis and risk stratification of patients with suspected coronary artery disease (CAD). Recent technical developments in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), including the adoption of balanced steady-state free precession (b-SSFP) sequences - preferentially in combination with parallel imaging techniques - have led to a significant reduction of imaging time and improved patient safety. The stress protocol includes application of high-dose dobutamine (up to 40 {mu}g/kg/min) combined with fractionated atropine (up to a maximal dose of 1.0 mg). High-dose dobutamine stress MRI revealed good sensitivity (83-96%) and specificity (80-100%) for detection of significant CAD. Myocardial tagging methods have been shown to further increase sensitivity for CAD detection. Severe complications (sustained tachycardia, ventricular fibrillation, myocardial infarction, cardiogenic shock) are rare but may be expected in 0.1-0.3% of patients. Dobutamine stress MRI has emerged as a reliable and safe clinical alternative for noninvasive assessment of CAD. New pulse sequences, such as real-time imaging, might obviate the need for breath holding and electrocardiogram (ECG) triggering in patients with severe dyspnoea and cardiac arrhythmias, which may further improve the clinical impact and acceptance of stress MRI in the future. (orig.)

  18. Integrated imaging of cardiac anatomy, physiology, and viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrighi, James A

    2009-03-01

    Technologic developments in imaging will have a significant impact on cardiac imaging over the next decade. These advances will permit more detailed assessment of cardiac anatomy, complex assessment of cardiac physiology, and integration of anatomic and physiologic data. The distinction between anatomic and physiologic imaging is important. For assessing patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease, physiologic and anatomic imaging data are complementary. The strength of anatomic imaging rests in its ability to detect the presence of disease, whereas physiologic imaging techniques assess the impact of disease, such as whether a coronary atherosclerotic lesion limits myocardial blood flow. Research indicates that physiologic data are more prognostically important than anatomic data, but both may be important in patient management decisions. Integrated cardiac imaging is an evolving field, with many potential indications. These include assessment of coronary stenosis, myocardial viability, anatomic and physiologic characterization of atherosclerotic plaque, and advanced molecular imaging.

  19. A New Method of CT MedicalImages Contrast Enhancement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUNFeng-rong; LIUWei; WANGChang-yu; MEILiang-mo

    2004-01-01

    A new method of contrast enhancement is proposed in the paper using multiscale edge representation of images, and is applied to the field of CT medical image processing. Comparing to the traditional Window technique, our method is adaptive and meets the demand of radiology clinics more better. The clinical experiment results show the practicality and the potential applied value of our methodin the field of CT medical images contrast enhancement.

  20. SPECT/CT imaging in children with papillary thyroid carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hwa-Young; Gelfand, Michael J.; Sharp, Susan E. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2011-08-15

    SPECT/CT improves localization of single photon-emitting radiopharmaceuticals. To determine the utility of SPECT/CT in children with papillary thyroid carcinoma. 20 SPECT/CT and planar studies were reviewed in 13 children with papillary thyroid carcinoma after total thyroidectomy. Seven studies used I-123 and 13 used I-131, after elevating TSH by T4 deprivation or intramuscular thyrotropin alfa. Eight children had one study and five children had two to four studies. Studies were performed at initial post-total thyroidectomy evaluation, follow-up and after I-131 treatment doses. SPECT/CT was performed with a diagnostic-quality CT unit in 13 studies and a localization-only CT unit in 7. Stimulated thyroglobulin was measured (except in 2 cases with anti-thyroglobulin antibodies). In 13 studies, neck activity was present but poorly localized on planar imaging; all foci of uptake were precisely localized by SPECT/CT. Two additional foci of neck uptake were found on SPECT/CT. SPECT/CT differentiated high neck uptake from facial activity. In six studies (four children), neck uptake was identified as benign by SPECT/CT (three thyroglossal duct remnants, one skin contamination, two by precise anatomical CT localization). In two children, SPECT/CT supported a decision not to treat with I-131. When SPECT/CT was unable to identify focal uptake as benign, stimulated thyroglobulin measurements were valuable. In three of 13 studies with neck uptake, SPECT/CT provided no useful additional information. SPECT/CT precisely localizes neck iodine uptake. In small numbers of patients, treatment is affected. SPECT/CT should be used when available in thyroid carcinoma patients. (orig.)

  1. Triple rule-out CT in the emergency department: protocols and spectrum of imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frauenfelder, Thomas; Appenzeller, Philippe; Karlo, Christoph; Scheffel, Hans; Desbiolles, Lotus; Stolzmann, Paul; Marincek, Borut; Alkadhi, Hatem; Schertler, Thomas [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Medical Radiology, Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2009-04-15

    Triage decisions in patients suffering from acute chest pain remain a challenge. The patient's history, initial cardiac enzyme levels, or initial electrocardiograms (ECG) often do not allow selecting the patients in whom further tests are needed. Numerous vascular and non-vascular chest problems, such as pulmonary embolism (PE), aortic dissection, or acute coronary syndrome, as well as pulmonary, pleural, or osseous lesions, must be taken into account. Nowadays, contrast-enhanced multi-detector-row computed tomography (CT) has replaced previous invasive diagnostic procedures and currently represents the imaging modality of choice when the clinical suspicion of PE or acute aortic syndrome is raised. At the same time, CT is capable of detecting a multitude of non-vascular causes of acute chest pain, such as pneumonia, pericarditis, or fractures. Recent technical advances in CT technology have also shown great advantages for non-invasive imaging of the coronary arteries. In patients with acute chest pain, the optimization of triage decisions and cost-effectiveness using cardiac CT in the emergency department have been repetitively demonstrated. Triple rule-out CT denominates an ECG-gated protocol that allows for the depiction of the pulmonary arteries, thoracic aorta, and coronary arteries within a single examination. This can be accomplished through the use of a dedicated contrast media administration regimen resulting in a simultaneous attenuation of the three vessel territories. This review is intended to demonstrate CT parameters and contrast media administration protocols for performing a triple rule-out CT and discusses radiation dose issues pertinent to the protocol. Typical life-threatening and non-life-threatening diseases causing acute chest pain are illustrated. (orig.)

  2. Multimodal CT in stroke imaging: new concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledezma, Carlos J; Wintermark, Max

    2009-01-01

    A multimodal CT protocol provides a comprehensive noninvasive survey of acute stroke patients with accurate demonstration of the site of arterial occlusion and its hemodynamic tissue status. It combines widespread availability with the ability to provide functional characterization of cerebral ischemia, and could potentially allow more accurate selection of candidates for acute stroke reperfusion therapy. This article discusses the individual components of multimodal CT and addresses the potential role of a combined multimodal CT stroke protocol in acute stroke therapy.

  3. Functional cardiac imaging by random access microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia eCrocini

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Advances in the development of voltage sensitive dyes and Ca2+ sensors in combination with innovative microscopy techniques allowed researchers to perform functional measurements with an unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution. At the moment, one of the shortcomings of available technologies is their incapability of imaging multiple fast phenomena while controlling the biological determinants involved. In the near future, ultrafast deflectors can be used to rapidly scan laser beams across the sample, performing optical measurements of action potential and Ca2+ release from multiple sites within cardiac cells and tissues. The same scanning modality could also be used to control local Ca2+ release and membrane electrical activity by activation of caged compounds and light-gated ion channels. With this approach, local Ca2+ or voltage perturbations could be induced, simulating arrhythmogenic events, and their impact on physiological cell activity could be explored. The development of this optical methodology will provide fundamental insights in cardiac disease, boosting new therapeutic strategies, and, more generally, it will represent a new approach for the investigation of the physiology of excitable cells.

  4. Automated cardiac sarcomere analysis from second harmonic generation images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Canadilla, Patricia; Gonzalez-Tendero, Anna; Iruretagoyena, Igor; Crispi, Fatima; Torre, Iratxe; Amat-Roldan, Ivan; Bijnens, Bart H.; Gratacos, Eduard

    2014-05-01

    Automatic quantification of cardiac muscle properties in tissue sections might provide important information related to different types of diseases. Second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging provides a stain-free microscopy approach to image cardiac fibers that, combined with our methodology of the automated measurement of the ultrastructure of muscle fibers, computes a reliable set of quantitative image features (sarcomere length, A-band length, thick-thin interaction length, and fiber orientation). We evaluated the performance of our methodology in computer-generated muscle fibers modeling some artifacts that are present during the image acquisition. Then, we also evaluated it by comparing it to manual measurements in SHG images from cardiac tissue of fetal and adult rabbits. The results showed a good performance of our methodology at high signal-to-noise ratio of 20 dB. We conclude that our automated measurements enable reliable characterization of cardiac fiber tissues to systematically study cardiac tissue in a wide range of conditions.

  5. Whole-brain dynamic CT angiography and perfusion imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orrison, W.W. [CHW Nevada Imaging Company, Nevada Imaging Centers, Spring Valley, Las Vegas, NV (United States); College of Osteopathic Medicine, Touro University Nevada, Henderson, NV (United States); Department of Health Physics and Diagnostic Sciences, University of Nevada Las Vegas, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Department of Medical Education, University of Nevada School of Medicine, Reno, NV (United States); Snyder, K.V.; Hopkins, L.N. [Department of Neurosurgery, Millard Fillmore Gates Circle Hospital, Buffalo, NY (United States); Roach, C.J. [School of Life Sciences, University of Nevada Las Vegas, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Advanced Medical Imaging and Genetics (Amigenics), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Ringdahl, E.N. [Department of Psychology, University of Nevada Las Vegas, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Nazir, R. [Shifa International Hospital, Islamabad (Pakistan); Hanson, E.H., E-mail: eric.hanson@amigenics.co [College of Osteopathic Medicine, Touro University Nevada, Henderson, NV (United States); Department of Health Physics and Diagnostic Sciences, University of Nevada Las Vegas, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Advanced Medical Imaging and Genetics (Amigenics), Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2011-06-15

    The availability of whole brain computed tomography (CT) perfusion has expanded the opportunities for analysing the haemodynamic parameters associated with varied neurological conditions. Examples demonstrating the clinical utility of whole-brain CT perfusion imaging in selected acute and chronic ischaemic arterial neurovascular conditions are presented. Whole-brain CT perfusion enables the detection and focused haemodynamic analyses of acute and chronic arterial conditions in the central nervous system without the limitation of partial anatomical coverage of the brain.

  6. MR and CT imaging of pulmonary valved conduits in children and adolescents: normal appearance and complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tenisch, Estelle V.; Alamo, Leonor T.; Gudinchet, Francois [Lausanne University Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Lausanne (Switzerland); Sekarski, Nicole [Lausanne University Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Lausanne (Switzerland); Hurni, Michel [Lausanne University Hospital, Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2014-12-15

    The Contegra registered is a conduit made from the bovine jugular vein and then interposed between the right ventricle and the pulmonary artery. It is used for cardiac malformations in the reconstruction of right ventricular outflow tract. To describe both normal and pathological appearances of the Contegra registered in radiological imaging, to describe imaging of complications and to define the role of CT and MRI in postoperative follow-up. Forty-three examinations of 24 patients (17 boys and 7 girls; mean age: 10.8 years old) with Contegra registered conduits were reviewed. Anatomical description and measurements of the conduits were performed. Pathological items examined included stenosis, dilatation, plicature or twist, thrombus or vegetations, calcifications and valvular regurgitation. Findings were correlated to the echographic gradient through the conduit when available. CT and MR work-up showed Contegra registered stenosis (n = 12), dilatation (n = 9) and plicature or twist (n = 7). CT displayed thrombus or vegetations in the Contegra registered in three clinically infected patients. Calcifications of the conduit were present at CT in 12 patients and valvular regurgitation in three patients. The comparison between CT and/or MR results showed a good correlation between the echographic gradient and the presence of stenosis in the Contegra registered. CT and MR bring additional information about permeability and postoperative anatomy especially when echocardiography is inconclusive. Both techniques depict the normal appearance of the conduit, and allow comparison and precise evaluation of changes in the postoperative follow-up. (orig.)

  7. Autopsy imaging for cardiac tamponade in a Thoroughbred foal

    OpenAIRE

    YAMADA, Kazutaka; Sato, Fumio; HORIUCHI, Noriyuki; HIGUCHI, Tohru; KOBAYASHI, Yoshiyasu; SASAKI, Naoki; NAMBO, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Autopsy imaging (Ai), postmortem imaging before necropsy, is used in human forensic medicine. Ai was performed using computed tomography (CT) for a 1-month-old Thoroughbred foal cadaver found in a pasture. CT revealed pericardial effusion, collapse of the aorta, bleeding in the lung lobe, gas in the ventricles and liver parenchyma, and distension of the digestive tract. Rupture in the left auricle was confirmed by necropsy; however, it was not depicted on CT. Therefore, Ai and conven...

  8. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging: patient safety considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giroletti, Elio; Corbucci, Giorgio

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is widely used in medicine. In cardiology, it is used to assess congenital or acquired diseases of the heat: and large vessels. Unless proper precautions are taken, it is generally advisable to avoid using this technique in patients with implanted electronic stimulators, such as pacemakers and defibrillators, on account of the potential risk of inducing electrical currents on the endocardial catheters, since these currents might stimulate the heart at a high frequency, thereby triggering dangerous arrhythmias. In addition to providing some basic information on pacemakers, defibrillators and MRI, and on the possible physical phenomena that may produce harmful effects, the present review examines the indications given in the literature, with particular reference to coronary stents, artificial heart valves and implantable cardiac stimulators.

  9. Automated Selection of Uniform Regions for CT Image Quality Detection

    CERN Document Server

    Naeemi, Maitham D; Roychodhury, Sohini

    2016-01-01

    CT images are widely used in pathology detection and follow-up treatment procedures. Accurate identification of pathological features requires diagnostic quality CT images with minimal noise and artifact variation. In this work, a novel Fourier-transform based metric for image quality (IQ) estimation is presented that correlates to additive CT image noise. In the proposed method, two windowed CT image subset regions are analyzed together to identify the extent of variation in the corresponding Fourier-domain spectrum. The two square windows are chosen such that their center pixels coincide and one window is a subset of the other. The Fourier-domain spectral difference between these two sub-sampled windows is then used to isolate spatial regions-of-interest (ROI) with low signal variation (ROI-LV) and high signal variation (ROI-HV), respectively. Finally, the spatial variance ($var$), standard deviation ($std$), coefficient of variance ($cov$) and the fraction of abdominal ROI pixels in ROI-LV ($\

  10. Functional imaging of the lung by CT und MRI; Funktionelle Lungendiagnostik mit CT und MRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puderbach, M.; Eichinger, M.; Kauczor, H.U. [Deutsches Krebsforschungsinstitut Heidelberg (Germany). Abt. Radiologie

    2005-06-01

    Imaging techniques are indispensable for diagnosis and follow-up of pulmonary diseases. In the past the interest was focused on morphological aspects of pulmonary tissue. With the development of novel CT and MRI techniques functional pulmonary imaging became available. In this review the value of cross sectional functional imaging in pulmonary diseases is presented and its potential clinical applications are discussed. (orig.)

  11. Using multidetector-row CT in neonates with complex congenital heart disease to replace diagnostic cardiac catheterization for anatomical investigation: initial experiences in technical and clinical feasibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Tain; Tsai, I.C.; Chen, Min-Chi [Taichung Veterans General Hospital, 407 Department of Radiology, Taichung (Taiwan); Medical College of Chung Shan Medical University, Faculty of Medicine, Taichung (Taiwan); National Yang Ming University School of Medicine, Department of Medicine, Taipei (Taiwan); Fu, Yun-Ching; Jan, Sheng-Lin [Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Department of Paediatrics, Taichung (Taiwan); National Yang-Ming University, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Taipei (Taiwan); Wang, Chung-Chi; Chang, Yen [Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Section of Cardiovascular Surgery, Department of Surgery, Taichung (Taiwan)

    2006-12-15

    Echocardiography is the first-line modality for the investigation of neonatal congenital heart disease. Diagnostic cardiac catheterization, which has a small but recognized risk, is usually performed if echocardiography fails to provide a confident evaluation of the lesions. To verify the technical and clinical feasibilities of replacing diagnostic cardiac catheterization with multidetector-row CT (MDCT) in neonatal complex congenital heart disease. Over a 1-year period we prospectively enrolled all neonates with complex congenital heart disease referred for diagnostic cardiac catheterization after initial assessment by echocardiography. MDCT was performed using a 40-detector-row CT scanner with dual syringe injection. A multidisciplinary congenital heart disease team evaluated the MDCT images and decided if further diagnostic cardiac catheterization was necessary. The accuracy of MDCT in detecting separate cardiovascular anomalies and bolus geometry of contrast enhancement were calculated. A total of 14 neonates were included in the study. No further diagnostic cardiac catheterization was needed in any neonate. The accuracy of MDCT in diagnosing separate cardiovascular anomalies was 98% (53/54) with only one atrial septal defect missed in a patient with coarctation syndrome. The average cardiovascular enhancement in evaluated chambers was 471 HU. No obvious beam-hardening artefact was observed. The technical and clinical feasibility of MDCT in complex congenital heart disease in neonates is confirmed. After initial assessment with echocardiography, MDCT could probably replace diagnostic cardiac catheterization for further anatomical clarification in neonates. (orig.)

  12. Multimodality imaging to guide cardiac interventional procedures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tops, Laurens Franciscus

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, a number of new cardiac interventional procedures have been introduced. Catheter ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) have been refined and are now considered a good treatment option in patients with drug-refractory AF. In cardiac pacing, cardiac resynchronization therap

  13. Multimodality imaging to guide cardiac interventional procedures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tops, Laurens Franciscus

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, a number of new cardiac interventional procedures have been introduced. Catheter ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) have been refined and are now considered a good treatment option in patients with drug-refractory AF. In cardiac pacing, cardiac resynchronization

  14. Automatic nonrigid registration of whole body CT mice images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xia; Yankeelov, Thomas E; Peterson, Todd E; Gore, John C; Dawant, Benoit M

    2008-04-01

    Three-dimensional intra- and intersubject registration of image volumes is important for tasks that include quantification of temporal/longitudinal changes, atlas-based segmentation, computing population averages, or voxel and tensor-based morphometry. While a number of methods have been proposed to address this problem, few have focused on the problem of registering whole body image volumes acquired either from humans or small animals. These image volumes typically contain a large number of articulated structures, which makes registration more difficult than the registration of head images, to which the majority of registration algorithms have been applied. This article presents a new method for the automatic registration of whole body computed tomography (CT) volumes, which consists of two main steps. Skeletons are first brought into approximate correspondence with a robust point-based method. Transformations so obtained are refined with an intensity-based nonrigid registration algorithm that includes spatial adaptation of the transformation's stiffness. The approach has been applied to whole body CT images of mice, to CT images of the human upper torso, and to human head and neck CT images. To validate the authors method on soft tissue structures, which are difficult to see in CT images, the authors use coregistered magnetic resonance images. They demonstrate that the approach they propose can successfully register image volumes even when these volumes are very different in size and shape or if they have been acquired with the subjects in different positions.

  15. Ultrasonography Fused with PET-CT Hybrid Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Udesen, Jesper; Ewertsen, Caroline; Gran, Fredrik

    2011-01-01

    We present a method with fusion of images of three modalities 18F-FDG PET, CT, and 3-D ultrasound (US) applied to imaging of the anal canal and the rectum. To obtain comparable geometries in the three imaging modalities, a plexiglas rod, with the same dimensions as the US transducer, is placed...... in the anal canal prior to the PET-CT examination. The method is based on manual co-registration of PET-CT images and 3-D US images. The three-modality imaging of the rectum-anal canal may become useful as a supplement to conventional imaging in the external radiation therapy in the treatment of anal cancer......, where the precise delineation of a tumor is crucial to avoid damage from radiation therapy to the healthy tissue surrounding it. The technique is still in a phase of development, and the demands for integration different company software systems are significant before commercial application. Three...

  16. ECG-gated HYPR reconstruction for undersampled CT myocardial perfusion imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speidel, Michael A.; Van Lysel, Michael S.; Reeder, Scott B.; Supanich, Mark; Nett, Brian E.; Zambelli, Joseph; Chang, Su Min; Hsieh, Jiang; Chen, Guang-Hong; Mistretta, Charles A.

    2007-03-01

    In this study we develop a novel ECG-gated method of HYPR (HighlY constrained backPRojection) CT reconstruction for low-dose myocardial perfusion imaging and present its first application in a porcine model. HYPR is a method of reconstructing time-resolved images from view-undersampled projection data. Scanning and reconstruction techniques were explored using x-ray projections from a 50 sec contrast-enhanced axial scan of a 47 kg swine on a 64-slice MDCT system. Scans were generated with view undersampling factors from 2 to 10. A HYPR reconstruction algorithm was developed in which a fully-sampled composite image is generated from views collected from multiple cardiac cycles within a diastolic window. A time frame image for a heartbeat was produced by modifying the composite with projections from the cycle of interest. Heart rate variations were handled by automatically selecting cardiac window size and number of cycles per composite within defined limits. Cardiac window size averaged 35% of the R-R interval for 2x undersampling and increased to 64% R-R using 10x undersampling. The selected window size and cycles per composite was sensitive to synchrony between heart rate, gantry rate, and the view undersampling pattern. Temporal dynamics and perfusion metrics measured in conventional short-scan (FBP) images were well-reproduced in the undersampled HYPR time series. Mean transit times determined from HYPR myocardial time-density curves agreed to within 8% with the FBP results. The results indicate potential for an order of magnitude reduction in dose requirement per image in cardiac perfusion CT via undersampled scanning and ECG-gated HYPR reconstruction.

  17. Automated volume of interest delineation and rendering of cone beam CT images in interventional cardiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Cristian; Schäfer, Dirk; Eshuis, Peter; Carroll, John; Grass, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Interventional C-arm systems allow the efficient acquisition of 3D cone beam CT images. They can be used for intervention planning, navigation, and outcome assessment. We present a fast and completely automated volume of interest (VOI) delineation for cardiac interventions, covering the whole visceral cavity including mediastinum and lungs but leaving out rib-cage and spine. The problem is addressed in a model based approach. The procedure has been evaluated on 22 patient cases and achieves an average surface error below 2mm. The method is able to cope with varying image intensities, varying truncations due to the limited reconstruction volume, and partially with heavy metal and motion artifacts.

  18. Compartment Syndrome After Varicose Vein Surgery Evidenced by CT Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sheng-Min; Kim, Maru

    2016-03-01

    A 21-year-old man developed compartment syndrome after a varicose vein surgery. Because of a lack of appropriate diagnostic apparatus, it was not possible to measure calf pressure. The only diagnostic tool available was computed tomography (CT). With the aid of CT, faster diagnosis of the compartment syndrome was possible, leading to appropriate management. By providing unique CT images of a patient before and after having compartment syndrome and after a fasciotomy, this study could add valuable references for diagnosis of compartment syndrome using CT. © The Author(s) 2014.

  19. Volumetric CT-images improve testing of radiological image interpretation skills

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ravesloot, Cécile J., E-mail: C.J.Ravesloot@umcutrecht.nl [Radiology Department at University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3508 GA Utrecht, Room E01.132 (Netherlands); Schaaf, Marieke F. van der, E-mail: M.F.vanderSchaaf@uu.nl [Department of Pedagogical and Educational Sciences at Utrecht University, Heidelberglaan 1, 3584 CS Utrecht (Netherlands); Schaik, Jan P.J. van, E-mail: J.P.J.vanSchaik@umcutrecht.nl [Radiology Department at University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3508 GA Utrecht, Room E01.132 (Netherlands); Cate, Olle Th.J. ten, E-mail: T.J.tenCate@umcutrecht.nl [Center for Research and Development of Education at University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3508 GA Utrecht (Netherlands); Gijp, Anouk van der, E-mail: A.vanderGijp-2@umcutrecht.nl [Radiology Department at University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3508 GA Utrecht, Room E01.132 (Netherlands); Mol, Christian P., E-mail: C.Mol@umcutrecht.nl [Image Sciences Institute at University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3508 GA Utrecht (Netherlands); Vincken, Koen L., E-mail: K.Vincken@umcutrecht.nl [Image Sciences Institute at University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3508 GA Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2015-05-15

    Rationale and objectives: Current radiology practice increasingly involves interpretation of volumetric data sets. In contrast, most radiology tests still contain only 2D images. We introduced a new testing tool that allows for stack viewing of volumetric images in our undergraduate radiology program. We hypothesized that tests with volumetric CT-images enhance test quality, in comparison with traditional completely 2D image-based tests, because they might better reflect required skills for clinical practice. Materials and methods: Two groups of medical students (n = 139; n = 143), trained with 2D and volumetric CT-images, took a digital radiology test in two versions (A and B), each containing both 2D and volumetric CT-image questions. In a questionnaire, they were asked to comment on the representativeness for clinical practice, difficulty and user-friendliness of the test questions and testing program. Students’ test scores and reliabilities, measured with Cronbach's alpha, of 2D and volumetric CT-image tests were compared. Results: Estimated reliabilities (Cronbach's alphas) were higher for volumetric CT-image scores (version A: .51 and version B: .54), than for 2D CT-image scores (version A: .24 and version B: .37). Participants found volumetric CT-image tests more representative of clinical practice, and considered them to be less difficult than volumetric CT-image questions. However, in one version (A), volumetric CT-image scores (M 80.9, SD 14.8) were significantly lower than 2D CT-image scores (M 88.4, SD 10.4) (p < .001). The volumetric CT-image testing program was considered user-friendly. Conclusion: This study shows that volumetric image questions can be successfully integrated in students’ radiology testing. Results suggests that the inclusion of volumetric CT-images might improve the quality of radiology tests by positively impacting perceived representativeness for clinical practice and increasing reliability of the test.

  20. Evaluation of commissural malalignment of aortic-pulmonary sinus using cardiac CT for arterial switch operation: comparison with transthoracic echocardiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bang, Ji Hyun; Park, Jeong-Jun [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Divisions of Pediatric Cardiac Surgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Goo, Hyun Woo [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-05-15

    There are limited data regarding the influence of commissural malalignment of the aortic-pulmonary sinus on the arterial switch operation. To compare diagnostic accuracy between cardiac CT and echocardiography for evaluating commissural malalignment of aortic-pulmonary sinus in children with complete transposition of the great arteries and to seek potential clinical implication of commissural malalignment on the arterial switch operation. In 37 patients (35 boys; median age: 8 days, range: 3-80 days) with complete transposition of the great arteries who had tricuspid semilunar valves and underwent an arterial switch operation, the degree of the commissural rotation of the aortic-pulmonary sinus was assessed on cardiac CT (n=37) and echocardiography (n=35). With surgical finding as a reference, cardiac CT was compared with echocardiography in identifying commissural malalignment in 35 patients. The influence of the height difference between the semilunar valves measured by cardiac CT on the identification of commissural malalignment with cardiac CT and echocardiography was evaluated. The impact of commissural malalignment on coronary transfer techniques was evaluated. In operative findings, the commissures of the semilunar valves were aligned in 24 patients and malaligned in 13. With surgical findings as a reference, cardiac CT showed higher, but not statistically significant (P>0.05), sensitivity (91.7% vs. 75.0%), specificity (87.0% vs. 78.3%) and accuracy (88.6% vs. 77.1%) for the diagnosis of the malalignment than echocardiography. The measured height difference between the semilunar valves did not affect the identification of the malalignment with cardiac CT and echocardiography. The surgical malalignment group showed a higher requirement of modified coronary transfer techniques than the surgical aligned group (11/13 vs. 11/24, P=0.03). Cardiac CT and echocardiography appear useful for evaluating commissural malalignment of the semilunar valves in patients with

  1. Cardiac CT angiography after coronary artery surgery in children using 64-slice CT scan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marini, Davide; Agnoletti, Gabriella [Centre de Reference Malformations Cardiaques Congenitales Complexes-M3C, Universite Paris Descartes, UFR Necker-Enfants Malades, Paris (France); Brunelle, Francis [University Paris Descartes, UFR Necker-Enfants Malades, Department of Pediatric Radiology, APHP, Paris (France); Sidi, Daniel; Bonnet, Damien [Centre de Reference Malformations Cardiaques Congenitales Complexes-M3C, Universite Paris Descartes, UFR Necker-Enfants Malades, Paris (France); Ou, Phalla [Centre de Reference Malformations Cardiaques Congenitales Complexes-M3C, Universite Paris Descartes, UFR Necker-Enfants Malades, Paris (France); University Paris Descartes, UFR Necker-Enfants Malades, Department of Pediatric Radiology, APHP, Paris (France)], E-mail: phalla.ou@nck.aphp.fr

    2009-09-15

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of 64-slice CT with that of invasive angiography in the detection of graft and/or coronary angioplasty stenosis in children who had undergone coronary artery surgery. Population and methods: Fifteen consecutive children (8 male and 7 female; age 9.2 {+-} 6.1 years) underwent 64-slice CT because of chest pain or ECG changes mean 4.8 {+-} 3.7 years after surgical coronary artery surgery; 10 patients had coronary angioplasty using a patch from the saphenous vein, four had mammary artery bypass, and one had saphenous vein bypass. Six main segments of the coronary arteries and all the bypass graft considered as a single segment were analyzed and compared with invasive angiography used as the reference standard. Results: CT correctly identified the four children with coronary angioplasty and mammary graft lesions that were confirmed by conventional angiography: one patient had a significant stenosis (>50% stenosis) at the mammary bypass graft anastomosis site; three other had non-significant stenosis (<50% stenosis) including a mild lesion of the saphenous vein patch in two patients and a mild lesion at the anastomosis site of the mammary bypass in one. All segments identified as normal by CT in the other 11 children were also found to be normal by conventional angiography. Conclusion: In centers expert in this technique, 64-slice CT scanning is a promising, rapid, and useful diagnostic technique for evaluating both coronary angioplasty and bypass graft lesions in children who had undergone coronary artery surge0008.

  2. PET/CT (and CT) instrumentation, image reconstruction and data transfer for radiotherapy planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sattler, Bernhard; Lee, John A; Lonsdale, Markus;

    2010-01-01

    , especially when transferring data across the (network-) borders of different hospitals. Overall, the most important precondition for successful integration of functional imaging in RT treatment planning is the goal orientated as well as close and thorough communication between nuclear medicine......The positron emission tomography in combination with CT in hybrid, cross-modality imaging systems (PET/CT) gains more and more importance as a part of the treatment-planning procedure in radiotherapy. Positron emission tomography (PET), as a integral part of nuclear medicine imaging and non......-invasive imaging technique, offers the visualization and quantification of pre-selected tracer metabolism. In combination with the structural information from CT, this molecular imaging technique has great potential to support and improve the outcome of the treatment-planning procedure prior to radiotherapy...

  3. 'Ready-access' CT imaging for an orthopaedic trauma clinic.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cawley, D

    2011-03-01

    \\'Ready-Access\\' to CT imaging facilities in Orthopaedic Trauma Clinics is not a standard facility. This facility has been available at the regional trauma unit, in Merlin Park Hospital, Galway for the past four years. We reviewed the use of this facility over a 2-year period when 100 patients had CT scans as part of their trauma clinic assessment. The rate of CT scan per clinic was 0.6. The mean waiting time for a CT scan was 30 minutes. 20 (20%) new fractures were confirmed, 33 (33%) fractures were out-ruled, 25 (25%) fractures demonstrated additional information and 8 (8%) had additional fractures. 20 (20%) patients were discharged and 12 (12%) patients were admitted as a result of the CT scan. It adds little time and cost to CT scanning lists.

  4. Recurrent Convolutional Networks for Pulmonary Nodule Detection in CT Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Ypsilantis, Petros-Pavlos; Montana, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) generates a stack of cross-sectional images covering a region of the body. The visual assessment of these images for the identification of potential abnormalities is a challenging and time consuming task due to the large amount of information that needs to be processed. In this article we propose a deep artificial neural network architecture, ReCTnet, for the fully-automated detection of pulmonary nodules in CT scans. The architecture learns to distinguish nodules and...

  5. A new method for robust organ positioning in CT images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vik, T.; Bystrov, D.; Schadewaldt, N.; Schulz, H.; Peters, J.

    2012-01-01

    A robust initialization is the key to any successful segmentation process in medical images. For CT images, initialization ischallenging because the quality, appearance, content and field-of-view of the images are highly variable, and, furthermore, the user tolerance to errors in clinical applicatio

  6. A CT Image Segmentation Algorithm Based on Level Set Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QU Jing-yi; SHI Hao-shan

    2006-01-01

    Level Set methods are robust and efficient numerical tools for resolving curve evolution in image segmentation. This paper proposes a new image segmentation algorithm based on Mumford-Shah module. The method is used to CT images and the experiment results demonstrate its efficiency and veracity.

  7. Castleman disease of the neck: CT and MR imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Xin-hua [Department of Radiology, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center for Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510060 (China); Song, Hao-ming [Department of Cardiology, Shanghai Tongji Hospital, Shanghai 200065 (China); Liu, Qing-yu [Department of Radiology, The Second Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510120 (China); Cao, Yun [Department of Pathology, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center for Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510060 (China); Li, Guo-hong [Department of Radiology, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center for Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510060 (China); Zhang, Wei-dong, E-mail: dongw.z@163.com [Department of Radiology, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center for Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510060 (China)

    2014-11-15

    Objective: To characterize the computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of Castleman disease of the neck. Methods: The imaging findings of 21 patients with Castleman disease of the neck were reviewed retrospectively. Of the 21 patients, 16 underwent unenhanced and contrast-enhanced CT scans; 5 underwent unenhanced and contrast-enhanced MRI scans. Results: The unenhanced CT images showed isolated or multiple well-defined homogenous mild hypodensity lesions in fifteen cases, and a heterogeneous nodule with central areas of mild hypodensity in one case. Calcification was not observed in any of the patients. In five patients, MR T1-weighted images revealed well-defined, homogeneous isointense or mild hyperintense lesions to the muscle; T2-weighted images showed these as intermediate hyperintense. Sixteen cases showed intermediate to marked homogeneous enhancement on contrast-enhanced CT or MR T1-weighted images. Of the other five cases that underwent double-phase CT scans, four showed mild or intermediate heterogeneous enhancement at the arterial phase, and homogeneous intermediate or marked enhancement at the venous phase; the remaining case showed mild and intermediate ring-enhancement with a central non-enhanced area at the arterial and venous phases, respectively. Conclusion: Castleman disease of the neck can be characterized as solitary or multiple well-defined, mild hypodensity or homogeneous intense lesions on plain CT/MR scans, and demonstrates intermediate and marked enhancement on contrast-enhanced CT/MR scans. On double-phase CT scans, Castleman disease often demonstrates mild enhancement at the arterial phase, and gradually uniform enhancement at venous phase. Double-phase enhanced CT or MRI may help to differentiate Castleman disease from other diseases.

  8. Self-gated cardiac cine imaging using phase information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Hyunseok; Kim, Dongchan; Oh, Changheun; Park, HyunWook

    2017-03-01

    To obtain multiphase cardiac cine images with high resolution, a novel self-gating method for both cardiac and respiratory motions is proposed. The proposed method uses the phase of projection data obtained from a separate axial slice to measure cardiac and respiratory motion, after the acquisition of every k-space line in the image plane. Cardiac motion is estimated from the phase of the projection data passing through the aorta, which is amplified by superior-inferior directional bipolar gradients, whereas respiratory motion is estimated from the phase of the left-right directional projection data of the abdomen. To verify the proposed self-gating method, a simulation and in vivo steady state free precession cardiac imaging were performed. The proposed method provides high resolution multiphase cardiac cine images. Using the proposed self-gating method, the phase variation of the projection data offers information about cardiac and respiratory motions that is equivalent to external gating devices. The proposed method can capture time-resolved cardiac and respiratory motion from the phase information of the projection data. Because the projection data is obtained from a separate gating slice, the self-gating signals are not affected by imaging planes. Magn Reson Med 77:1216-1222, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  9. Image quality assessment for CT used on small animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cisneros, Isabela Paredes, E-mail: iparedesc@unal.edu.co; Agulles-Pedrós, Luis, E-mail: lagullesp@unal.edu.co [Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Departamento de Física, Grupo de Física Médica (Colombia)

    2016-07-07

    Image acquisition on a CT scanner is nowadays necessary in almost any kind of medical study. Its purpose, to produce anatomical images with the best achievable quality, implies the highest diagnostic radiation exposure to patients. Image quality can be measured quantitatively based on parameters such as noise, uniformity and resolution. This measure allows the determination of optimal parameters of operation for the scanner in order to get the best diagnostic image. A human Phillips CT scanner is the first one minded for veterinary-use exclusively in Colombia. The aim of this study was to measure the CT image quality parameters using an acrylic phantom and then, using the computational tool MATLAB, determine these parameters as a function of current value and window of visualization, in order to reduce dose delivery by keeping the appropriate image quality.

  10. Image quality assessment for CT used on small animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisneros, Isabela Paredes; Agulles-Pedrós, Luis

    2016-07-01

    Image acquisition on a CT scanner is nowadays necessary in almost any kind of medical study. Its purpose, to produce anatomical images with the best achievable quality, implies the highest diagnostic radiation exposure to patients. Image quality can be measured quantitatively based on parameters such as noise, uniformity and resolution. This measure allows the determination of optimal parameters of operation for the scanner in order to get the best diagnostic image. A human Phillips CT scanner is the first one minded for veterinary-use exclusively in Colombia. The aim of this study was to measure the CT image quality parameters using an acrylic phantom and then, using the computational tool MatLab, determine these parameters as a function of current value and window of visualization, in order to reduce dose delivery by keeping the appropriate image quality.

  11. Three-dimensional multislice CT imaging of otitis media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Miyako [Yanagibasi Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Yoshikawa, Hiroshi; Hosokawa, Akira; Furukawa, Tomoyasu; Ichikawa, Ginichiro [Juntendo Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine; Wada, Akihiro; Ando, Ichiro [Juntendo Univ., Chiba (Japan). Urayasu Hospital

    2002-07-01

    In recent years, the multislice CT system has come into practical use that enables table movement of half mm, resulting in a significant improvement in resolution. The use of this CT system enables to depict the entire auditory ossicles, including the stapes. 3D reconstruction was performed using helical CT data in 5 patients with chronic otitis media and 5 patients with cholesteatoma. An Aquilion Multi (Toshiba) multislice helical CT scanner and a Xtension (Toshiba) image workstation were used in this study. We demonstrated the 3D display with axial, coronal and sagittal images. Compared with the normal ears, it was necessary to set a higher threshold for the affected ears. It is important to select suitable threshold for demonstration of 3D images optimally. Bone destruction of the stapes was confirmed at surgery in 2 ears. The stapes was observed at 3D-CT imaging in other 18 ears. It was found that the 3D images of the ossicular destruction in ears with cholesteatoma were consistent with surgical findings. It is therefore concluded that 3D imaging of the middle ear using a multislice CT scanner is clinically useful. (author)

  12. Automated detection of cardiac phase from intracoronary ultrasound image sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zheng; Dong, Yi; Li, Mengchan

    2015-01-01

    Intracoronary ultrasound (ICUS) is a widely used interventional imaging modality in clinical diagnosis and treatment of cardiac vessel diseases. Due to cyclic cardiac motion and pulsatile blood flow within the lumen, there exist changes of coronary arterial dimensions and relative motion between the imaging catheter and the lumen during continuous pullback of the catheter. The action subsequently causes cyclic changes to the image intensity of the acquired image sequence. Information on cardiac phases is implied in a non-gated ICUS image sequence. A 1-D phase signal reflecting cardiac cycles was extracted according to cyclical changes in local gray-levels in ICUS images. The local extrema of the signal were then detected to retrieve cardiac phases and to retrospectively gate the image sequence. Results of clinically acquired in vivo image data showed that the average inter-frame dissimilarity of lower than 0.1 was achievable with our technique. In terms of computational efficiency and complexity, the proposed method was shown to be competitive when compared with the current methods. The average frame processing time was lower than 30 ms. We effectively reduced the effect of image noises, useless textures, and non-vessel region on the phase signal detection by discarding signal components caused by non-cardiac factors.

  13. CT measurement of coronary calcium mass: impact on global cardiac risk assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, Christoph R.; Majeed, Amal; Reiser, Maximilian F. [Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Department of Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Crispin, Alexander [University Hospital Munich, Department of Medical Data Processing, Biometry, and Epidemiology, Munich (Germany); Knez, Andreas; Boekstegers, Peter; Steinbeck, Gerhard [University Hospital Munich, Department of Cardiology, Munich (Germany); Schoepf, U. Joseph [Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Coronary calcium mass percentiles can be derived from electron beam CT as well as from multidetector-row CT of all manufacturers. Coronary calcium mass may serve as a more individualized substitute for age for cardiac risk stratification. The aim was to investigate the potential impact of CT coronary calcium mass quantification on cardiac risk stratification using an adjusted Framingham score. Standardized coronary calcium mass was determined by multidetector-row CT in a total of 1,473 patients (1,038 male, 435 female). The impact on risk stratification of replacing the traditional Framingham age point score by a point score based on calcium mass relative to age was tested. Any coronary calcium found in males in the age group of 20-34 years and females in the age group of 20-59 years results in an increase of the Framingham score by 9 and 4-7 points, respectively. Only in males 65 years of age and older, none or minimal amounts of coronary calcium decrease the Framingham score by three points. The coronary calcium mass and age-related scoring system may have impact on the reassignment of patients with an intermediate Framingham risk to a lower or higher risk group. (orig.)

  14. CT versus MR in neonatal brain imaging at term

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, Richard L.; Robson, Caroline D.; Zurakowski, David; Antiles, Sharon; Strauss, Keith; Mulkern, Robert V. [Department of Radiology, Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, 300 Longwood Avenue, MA 02115, Boston (United States)

    2003-07-01

    Recent reports have highlighted the lifetime risk of malignancy from using ionizing radiation in pediatric imaging. Computed tomography (CT), which uses ionizing radiation, is employed extensively for neonatal brain imaging of term infants. Magnetic resonance (MR) provides an alternative that does not use ionizing radiation. The purpose of this study was to assess the cross-modality agreement and interobserver agreement of CT and MR brain imaging of the term or near-term neonate. Brain CT and MR images of 48 neonates were retrospectively reviewed by two pediatric neuroradiologists. CT and MR examinations had been obtained within 72 h of one another in all patients. CT was obtained with 5 mm collimation (KV=120, mAs=340). MR consisted of T1-weighted imaging (TR/TE=300/14; 4-mm slice thickness/1-mm gap), T2-weighted imaging (TR/TE/etl= 3000/126/16; 4-mm slice thickness/1-mm gap), and line scan diffusion imaging (LSDI) (TR/TE/b factor=1258/63/750; nominal 4-mm slice thickness/3-mm gap). The brain was categorized as normal or abnormal on both CT and MR. Ischemic injury was the most common brain abnormality demonstrated. McNemar's test indicated no significant difference between CT and MR test results for reader 1 (P=0.22) or reader 2 (P=0.45). The readers agreed on the presence or absence of abnormality on CT in 40 patients (83.3%) and on MR in 45 patients (93.8%). For CT, the kappa coefficient indicated excellent interobserver agreement ({kappa}=0.68), although the lower limit of the 95% confidence interval extends to {kappa}=0.55, which indicates only good-to-moderate agreement. For MR, the kappa coefficient indicated almost perfect interobserver agreement ({kappa}=0.88) with the 95% confidence interval extending to a lower limit of {kappa}=0.76, which represents excellent agreement. Because MR demonstrates findings similar to CT and has greater interobserver agreement, it appears that MR is a superior test to CT in determining brain abnormalities in the term

  15. TU-A-12A-09: Absolute Blood Flow Measurement in a Cardiac Phantom Using Low Dose CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziemer, B; Hubbard, L; Lipinski, J; Molloi, S [University of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate a first pass analysis technique to measure absolute flow from low dose CT images in a cardiac phantom. This technique can be combined with a myocardial mass assignment to yield absolute perfusion using only two volume scans and reduce the radiation dose to the patient. Methods: A four-chamber cardiac phantom and perfusion chamber were constructed from poly-acrylic and connected with tubing to approximate anatomical features. The system was connected to a pulsatile pump, input/output reservoirs and power contrast injector. Flow was varied in the range of 1-2.67 mL/s with the pump operating at 60 beats/min. The system was imaged once a second for 14 seconds with a 320-row scanner (Toshiba Medical Systems) using a contrast-enhanced, prospective-gated cardiac perfusion protocol. Flow was calculated by the following steps: subsequent images of the perfusion volume were subtracted to find the contrast entering the volume; this was normalized by an upstream, known volume region to convert Hounsfield (HU) values to concentration; this was divided by the subtracted images time difference. The technique requires a relatively stable input contrast concentration and no contrast can leave the perfusion volume before the flow measurement is completed. Results: The flow calculated from the images showed an excellent correlation with the known rates. The data was fit to a linear function with slope 1.03, intercept 0.02 and an R{sup 2} value of 0.99. The average root mean square (RMS) error was 0.15 mL/s and the average standard deviation was 0.14 mL/s. The flow rate was stable within 7.7% across the full scan and served to validate model assumptions. Conclusion: Accurate, absolute flow rates were measured from CT images using a conservation of mass model. Measurements can be made using two volume scans which can substantially reduce the radiation dose compared with current dynamic perfusion techniques.

  16. Advances in cardiac magnetic resonance imaging of congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, Mieke M P; Breur, Johannes M. P. J.; Budde, Ricardo P J; van Oorschot, Joep W M; van Kimmenade, Roland R J; Sieswerda, Gertjan Tj.; Meijboom, Folkert J; Leiner, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Due to advances in cardiac surgery, survival of patients with congenital heart disease has increased considerably during the past decades. Many of these patients require repeated cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging to assess cardiac anatomy and function. In the past decade, technological advan

  17. Imaging of female pelvic malignancies regarding MRI, CT, and PET/CT. Pt. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alt, Celine D.; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Hallscheidt, Peter [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Brocker, Kerstin A.; Eichbaum, Michael; Sohn, Christof; Arnegger, Florian U. [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Obstetrics and Gynecology

    2011-11-15

    To compose diagnostic standard operating procedures for both clinical and imaging assessment for vulvar and vaginal cancer, for vaginal sarcoma, and for ovarian cancer. The literature was reviewed for diagnosing the above mentioned malignancies in the female pelvis. Special focus herein lies in tumor representation in MRI, followed by the evaluation of CT and PET/CT for this topic. MRI is a useful additional diagnostic complement but by no means replaces established methods of gynecologic diagnostics and ultrasound. In fact, MRI is only implemented in the guidelines for vulvar cancer. According to the current literature, CT is still the cross-sectional imaging modality of choice for evaluating ovarian cancer. PET/CT appears to have advantages for staging and follow-up in sarcomas and cancers of the ovaries. (orig.)

  18. MR and CT image fusion of the cervical spine: a noninvasive alternative to CT-myelography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yangqiu; Mirza, Sohail K.; Jarvik, Jeffrey G.; Heagerty, Patrick J.; Haynor, David R.

    2005-04-01

    CT-Myelography (CTM) is routinely used for planning surgery for degenerative disease of the spine, but its invasive nature, significant potential morbidity, and high costs make a noninvasive substitute desirable. We report our work on evaluating CT and MR image fusion as an alternative to CTM. Because the spine is only piecewise rigid, a multi-rigid approach to the registration of spinal CT and MR images was developed (SPIE 2004), in which the spine on CT images is first segmented into separate vertebrae, each of which is then rigidly registered with the corresponding vertebra on MR images. The results are then blended to obtain fusion images. Since they contain information from both modalities, we hypothesized that fusion images would be equivalent to CTM. To test this we selected 34 patients who had undergone MRI and CTM for degenerative disease of the cervical spine, and used the multi-rigid approach to produce fused images. A clinical vignette for each patient was created and presented along with either CT/MR fusion images or CTM images. A group of spine surgeons are asked to formulate detailed surgical plans based on each set of images, and the surgical plans are compared. A similar study assessing diagnostic agreement is being performed with neuroradiologists, who also assess the accuracy of registration. Our work to date has demonstrated the feasibility of segmentation and multi-rigid fusion in clinical cases and the acceptability of the questionnaire to physicians. Preliminary analysis of one surgeon's and one neuroradiologist"s evaluation has been performed.

  19. PET imaging of human cardiac opioid receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villemagne, Patricia S.R.; Dannals, Robert F. [Department of Radiology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 605 N Caroline St., Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Department of Environmental Health Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Ravert, Hayden T. [Department of Radiology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 605 N Caroline St., Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Frost, James J. [Department of Radiology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 605 N Caroline St., Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Department of Environmental Health Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Department of Neuroscience, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)

    2002-10-01

    The presence of opioid peptides and receptors and their role in the regulation of cardiovascular function has been previously demonstrated in the mammalian heart. The aim of this study was to image {mu} and {delta} opioid receptors in the human heart using positron emission tomography (PET). Five subjects (three females, two males, 65{+-}8 years old) underwent PET scanning of the chest with [{sup 11}C]carfentanil ([{sup 11}C]CFN) and [{sup 11}C]-N-methyl-naltrindole ([{sup 11}C]MeNTI) and the images were analyzed for evidence of opioid receptor binding in the heart. Either [{sup 11}C]CFN or [{sup 11}C]MeNTI (20 mCi) was injected i.v. with subsequent dynamic acquisitions over 90 min. For the blocking studies, either 0.2 mg/kg or 1 mg/kg of naloxone was injected i.v. 5 min prior to the injection of [{sup 11}C]CFN and [{sup 11}C]MeNTI, respectively. Regions of interest were placed over the left ventricle, left ventricular chamber, lung and skeletal muscle. Graphical analysis demonstrated average baseline myocardial binding potentials (BP) of 4.37{+-}0.91 with [{sup 11}C]CFN and 3.86{+-}0.60 with [{sup 11}C]MeNTI. Administration of 0.2 mg/kg naloxone prior to [{sup 11}C]CFN produced a 25% reduction in BP in one subject in comparison with baseline values, and a 19% decrease in myocardial distribution volume (DV). Administration of 1 mg/kg of naloxone before [{sup 11}C]MeNTI in another subject produced a 14% decrease in BP and a 21% decrease in the myocardial DV. These results demonstrate the ability to image these receptors in vivo by PET. PET imaging of cardiac opioid receptors may help to better understand their role in cardiovascular pathophysiology and the effect of abuse of opioids and drugs on heart function. (orig.)

  20. PET/CT imaging and radioimmunotherapy of prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Bouchelouche, Kirsten; Tagawa, Scott T.; Goldsmith, Stanley J.; Turkbey, Baris; Capala, Jacek; Choyke, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a common cancer in men and continues to be a major health problem. Imaging plays an important role in the clinical management of patients with prostate cancer. An important goal for prostate cancer imaging is more accurate disease characterization through the synthesis of anatomic, functional, and molecular imaging information. Positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) in oncology is emerging as an important imaging tool. The most common radiotracer for PE...

  1. Dynamic CT myocardial perfusion imaging: detection of ischemia in a porcine model with FFR verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahmi, Rachid; Eck, Brendan L.; Vembar, Mani; Bezerra, Hiram G.; Wilson, David L.

    2014-03-01

    Dynamic cardiac CT perfusion (CTP) is a high resolution, non-invasive technique for assessing myocardial blood ow (MBF), which in concert with coronary CT angiography enable CT to provide a unique, comprehensive, fast analysis of both coronary anatomy and functional ow. We assessed perfusion in a porcine model with and without coronary occlusion. To induce occlusion, each animal underwent left anterior descending (LAD) stent implantation and angioplasty balloon insertion. Normal ow condition was obtained with balloon completely de ated. Partial occlusion was induced by balloon in ation against the stent with FFR used to assess the extent of occlusion. Prospective ECG-triggered partial scan images were acquired at end systole (45% R-R) using a multi-detector CT (MDCT) scanner. Images were reconstructed using FBP and a hybrid iterative reconstruction (iDose4, Philips Healthcare). Processing included: beam hardening (BH) correction, registration of image volumes using 3D cubic B-spline normalized mutual-information, and spatio-temporal bilateral ltering to reduce partial scan artifacts and noise variation. Absolute blood ow was calculated with a deconvolutionbased approach using singular value decomposition (SVD). Arterial input function was estimated from the left ventricle (LV) cavity. Regions of interest (ROIs) were identi ed in healthy and ischemic myocardium and compared in normal and occluded conditions. Under-perfusion was detected in the correct LAD territory and ow reduction agreed well with FFR measurements. Flow was reduced, on average, in LAD territories by 54%.

  2. US, CT and MR imaging characteristics of nephroblastomatosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohrschneider, W.K.; Weirich, A.; Darge, K.; Troeger, J. [Department of Pediatric Radiology, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 153, D-69 120 Heidelberg (Germany); Rieden, K. [Department of Radiology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Graf, N. [Department of Paediatric Oncology, Children`s Hospital, University of Homburg/Saar (Germany)

    1998-06-01

    Objectives. To describe the imaging features of nephroblastomatosis with US, CT and MR, to point out characteristics of differentiation between nephrogenic rests (NR) and Wilms` tumour (WT) and to determine the most appropriate imaging modality. Materials and methods. We reviewed the US, CT and MR images of 29 cases of histopathologically confirmed nephroblastomatosis sent to our department for reference evaluation (German nephroblastoma study). The series included 17 kidneys with NR, 6 kidneys with WT and 32 kidneys with both NR and WT. Results. NR presented as multinodular, peripheral, cortical lesions, the diffuse form of distribution being less common. Foci were homogeneous and of low echogenicity, density or signal intensity. The lesions were most clearly depicted with contrast-enhanced CT and T1-weighted (T1-W) MR images. Lesions smaller than 1 cm were rarely identified by US. The most reliable criterion to differentiate NR from WT was their homogeneity. Conclusions. Contrast-enhanced CT and T1-W MR images are of similar potential and superior to US in the diagnosis of nephroblastomatosis. Due to the significant radiation dose of serial CT, MR imaging should be the method of choice wherever it is available. The cost-effectiveness and availability of US makes it ideal for serial follow-up of known lesions. (orig.) With 8 figs., 1 tab., 23 refs.

  3. Molecular imaging agents for SPECT (and SPECT/CT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gnanasegaran, Gopinath [Guy' s and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Ballinger, James R. [Guy' s and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom); King' s College London, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-05-15

    The development of hybrid single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) cameras has increased the diagnostic value of many existing single photon radiopharmaceuticals. Precise anatomical localization of lesions greatly increases diagnostic confidence in bone imaging of the extremities, infection imaging, sentinel lymph node localization, and imaging in other areas. Accurate anatomical localization is particularly important prior to surgery, especially involving the parathyroid glands and sentinel lymph node procedures. SPECT/CT plays a role in characterization of lesions, particularly in bone scintigraphy and radioiodine imaging of metastatic thyroid cancer. In the development of novel tracers, SPECT/CT is particularly important in monitoring response to therapies that do not result in an early change in lesion size. Preclinical SPECT/CT devices, which actually have spatial resolution superior to PET/CT devices, have become essential in characterization of the biodistribution and tissue kinetics of novel tracers, allowing coregistration of serial studies within the same animals, which serves both to reduce biological variability and reduce the number of animals required. In conclusion, SPECT/CT increases the utility of existing radiopharmaceuticals and plays a pivotal role in the evaluation of novel tracers. (orig.)

  4. Imaging the pericardium: appearances on ECG-gated 64-detector row cardiac computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, S M; Williams, P L; Williams, M P; Edwards, A J; Roobottom, C A; Morgan-Hughes, G J; Manghat, N E

    2010-01-01

    Multidetector row computed tomography (MDCT) with its high spatial and temporal resolution has now become an established and complementary method for cardiac imaging. It can now be used reliably to exclude significant coronary artery disease and delineate complex coronary artery anomalies, and has become a valuable problem-solving tool. Our experience with MDCT imaging suggests that it is clinically useful for imaging the pericardium. It is important to be aware of the normal anatomy of the pericardium and not mistake normal variations for pathology. The pericardial recesses are visible in up to 44% of non-electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated MDCT images. Abnormalities of the pericardium can now be identified with increasing certainty on 64-detector row CT; they may be the key to diagnosis and therefore must not be overlooked. This educational review of the pericardium will cover different imaging techniques, with a significant emphasis on MDCT. We have a large research and clinical experience of ECG-gated cardiac CT and will demonstrate examples of pericardial recesses, their variations and a wide variety of pericardial abnormalities and systemic conditions affecting the pericardium. We give a brief relevant background of the conditions and reinforce the key imaging features. We aim to provide a pictorial demonstration of the wide variety of abnormalities of the pericardium and the pitfalls in the diagnosis of pericardial disease. PMID:20197434

  5. CT and MR imaging after middle ear surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koesling, Sabrina E-mail: sabrina.koesling@medizin.uni-halle.de; Bootz, F

    2001-11-01

    This article describes the current value of imaging in patients after stapes surgery and surgery after chronic otitis media including cholesteatoma. Possibilities and limits of computed tomography (CT) and MRI are described and most important investigation parameters are mentioned. After otosclerosis surgery, CT is the method of first choice in detection of reasons for vertigo and/or recurrent hearing loss in the later postoperative phase. CT may show the position and condition of prosthesis, scarring around the prosthesis and otospongiotic foci. Sometimes, it gives indirect hints for perilymphatic fistulas and incus necrosis. MRI is able to document inner ear complications. CT has a high negative predictive value in cases with a free cavity after mastoidectomy. Localized opacities or total occlusion are difficult to distinguish by CT alone. MRI provides important additional information in the differentiation of cholesterol granuloma, cholesteatoma, effusion, granulation and scar tissue.

  6. CT imaging in acute ischemic stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borst, J.

    2016-01-01

    Time is of the essence when treating acute ischemic stroke, to limit the damage caused. One form of intra-arterial treatment (IAT) used in such cases is the mechanical removal of the blood clot using stent-retrievers. It is thought that patient selection for IAT requires improvement and that CT

  7. Measurement of four chambers' volumes and ventricular masses by cardiac CT examination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimura, Motomasa; Naito, Hiroaki; Ohta, Mitsushige; Kozuka, Takahiro; Kito, Yoshitsugu (National Cardiovascular Center, Suita, Osaka (Japan))

    1983-09-01

    Using cardiac computed tomography (CT), the ''mean'' volume of each cardiac chamber and both ventricular masses were calculated from summation of a sliced volume by ungated scans obtained using rapid sequential scanning covering the whole heart. 1. Estimation of a normal value of each chamber's volume was attempted in 20 patients with ischemic heart disease and with normal heart function. The ''mean'' volume of the right atrium (RAMV), right ventricle (RVMV), and left atrium (LAMV) was 22.3 +- 6.5, 40.3 +- 6.5 and 28.7 +- 8.2ml/m/sup 2/, respectively. 2. In 54 patients with valvular heart diseases, each chamber's volume obrained by CT was compared with the grade of tricuspid regurgitation (TR) estimated by ultrasonic Doppler technique or the grade of mitral regurgitation (MR) by left ventriculography (LVG). The RAMV (234 +- 119 ml/m/sup 2/) and the RVMV (101 +- 39 ml/m/sup 2/) were markedly increased in patients with severe TR (grade 3 to 4) (p<0.01). The LAMV (487 +- 231 ml/m/sup 2/) was also increased in patients with severe mitral regurgitation (grade 3 to 4) (p<0.01). 3. In 46 patients with valvular heart diseases, the LVMV by CT was well correlated with end-diastolic volume (EDV) obtained by LVG (r=0.92), and the LVEDVs by ECG gated CT and by LVG showed a fairly good correlation (r=0.95). 4. CT examination was performed before and after surgery in 17 patients with MR or TR for evaluation of the change of chamber volumes. The mean reduction ratio (MRR) of the RAMV after tricuspid annuloplasty, the LVMV after mitral valve plasty, and the LAMV after left atrial plication was 44%, 41%, and 60%, respectively.

  8. Automatic dental arch detection and panoramic image synthesis from CT images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sa-Ing, Vera; Wangkaoom, Kongyot; Thongvigitmanee, Saowapak S

    2013-01-01

    Due to accurate 3D information, computed tomography (CT), especially cone-beam CT or dental CT, has been widely used for diagnosis and treatment planning in dentistry. Axial images acquired from both medical and dental CT scanners can generate synthetic panoramic images similar to typical 2D panoramic radiographs. However, the conventional way to reconstruct the simulated panoramic images is to manually draw the dental arch on axial images. In this paper, we propose a new fast algorithm for automatic detection of the dental arch. Once the dental arch is computed, a series of synthetic panoramic images as well as a ray-sum panoramic image can be automatically generated. We have tested the proposed algorithm on 120 CT axial images and all of them can provide the decent estimate of the dental arch. The results show that our proposed algorithm can mostly detect the correct dental arch.

  9. CT guided diffuse optical tomography for breast cancer imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baikejiang, Reheman; Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Dianwen; Li, Changqing

    2016-03-01

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) has attracted attentions in the last two decades due to its intrinsic sensitivity in imaging chromophores of tissues such as blood, water, and lipid. However, DOT has not been clinically accepted yet due to its low spatial resolution caused by strong optical scattering in tissues. Structural guidance provided by an anatomical imaging modality enhances the DOT imaging substantially. Here, we propose a computed tomography (CT) guided multispectral DOT imaging system for breast cancer detection. To validate its feasibility, we have built a prototype DOT imaging system which consists of a laser at wavelengths of 650 and an electron multiplying charge coupled device (EMCCD) camera. We have validated the CT guided DOT reconstruction algorithms with numerical simulations and phantom experiments, in which different imaging setup parameters, such as projection number of measurements, the width of measurement patch, have been investigated. Our results indicate that an EMCCD camera with air cooling is good enough for the transmission mode DOT imaging. We have also found that measurements at six projections are sufficient for DOT to reconstruct the optical targets with 4 times absorption contrast when the CT guidance is applied. Finally, we report our effort and progress on the integration of the multispectral DOT imaging system into a breast CT scanner.

  10. CT imaging with a mobile C-arm prototype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheryauka, Arvi; Tubbs, David; Langille, Vinton; Kalya, Prabhanjana; Smith, Brady; Cherone, Rocco

    2008-03-01

    Mobile X-ray imagery is an omnipresent tool in conventional musculoskeletal and soft tissue applications. The next generation of mobile C-arm systems can provide clinicians of minimally-invasive surgery and pain management procedures with both real-time high-resolution fluoroscopy and intra-operative CT imaging modalities. In this study, we research two C-arm CT experimental system configurations and evaluate their imaging capabilities. In a non-destructive evaluation configuration, the X-ray Tube - Detector assembly is stationary while an imaging object is placed on a rotating table. In a medical imaging configuration, the C-arm gantry moves around the patient and the table. In our research setting, we connect the participating devices through a Mobile X-Ray Imaging Environment known as MOXIE. MOXIE is a set of software applications for internal research at GE Healthcare - Surgery and used to examine imaging performance of experimental systems. Anthropomorphic phantom volume renderings and orthogonal slices of reconstructed images are obtained and displayed. The experimental C-arm CT results show CT-like image quality that may be suitable for interventional procedures, real-time data management, and, therefore, have great potential for effective use on the clinical floor.

  11. Accelerating Dynamic Cardiac MR Imaging Using Structured Sparse Representation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nian Cai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Compressed sensing (CS has produced promising results on dynamic cardiac MR imaging by exploiting the sparsity in image series. In this paper, we propose a new method to improve the CS reconstruction for dynamic cardiac MRI based on the theory of structured sparse representation. The proposed method user the PCA subdictionaries for adaptive sparse representation and suppresses the sparse coding noise to obtain good reconstructions. An accelerated iterative shrinkage algorithm is used to solve the optimization problem and achieve a fast convergence rate. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method improves the reconstruction quality of dynamic cardiac cine MRI over the state-of-the-art CS method.

  12. CT perfusion imaging in the management of posterior reversible encephalopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casey, S.O.; McKinney, A.; Teksam, M.; Liu, H.; Truwit, C.L. [Department of Radiology, University of Minnesota Medical School, 420 Delaware Street SE, Box 292, MN 55455, Minneapolis (United States)

    2004-04-01

    A 13-year-old girl with a renal transplant presented with hypertension and seizures. CT and MRI demonstrated typical bilateral parietal, occipital and posterior frontal cortical and subcortical edema, thought to represent posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome. The cause was presumed to be hypertension. Antihypertensive therapy was started, lowering of the blood pressure in the range of 110-120 mmHg systolic. However, stable xenon (Xe) CT perfusion imaging revealed ischemia within the left parietal occipital region. The antihypertensive was adjusted which increased both the systolic and diastolic blood pressure by 31 mm Hg. The patient was re-imaged with Xe CT and was found to have resolution of the ischemic changes within the left parietal occipital region. In this report, we present a case in which stable Xe CT was used to monitor the degree of cerebral perfusion and guide titration of antihypertensive therapy. Such brain perfusion monitoring may have helped to prevent infarction of our patient. (orig.)

  13. Clinical impact of 18F-FDG-PET/CT in the extra cardiac work-up of patients with infective endocarditis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asmar, Ali; Ozcan, Cengiz; Diederichsen, Axel C P;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to assess the clinical importance of (18)F-FDG-PET/CT used in the extra cardiac work-up of patients with infective endocarditis (IE). BACKGROUND: IE is a serious condition with a significant mortality. Besides the degree of valvular involvement, the progno...... lesions of clinical importance in one of seven IE patients and may be a substantial imaging technique for tracing peripheral infectious embolism due to IE. Thus, (18)F-FDG-PET/CT may help to guide adequate therapy and thereby improve the prognosis of patients with IE.......OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to assess the clinical importance of (18)F-FDG-PET/CT used in the extra cardiac work-up of patients with infective endocarditis (IE). BACKGROUND: IE is a serious condition with a significant mortality. Besides the degree of valvular involvement......, the prognosis relies crucially on the presence of systemic infectious embolism. METHODS: Seventy-two patients (71% males and mean age 63 ± 17 years) with IE were evaluated with (18)F-FDG-PET/CT in addition to standard work-up including patient history, physical examination, conventional imaging modalities...

  14. WE-A-BRF-01: Dual-Energy CT Imaging in Diagnostic Imaging and Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molloi, S [University of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Li, B [Boston University Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States); Yin, F [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Chen, H [New York Presbyterian Hospital, New York, NY (United States)

    2014-06-15

    The quantification accuracy of dual-energy imaging is influenced by the fundamentals of x-ray physics, system geometry, data acquisition hardware/protocol, system calibration, and image processing technique. This symposium will provide updates on the following advanced application areas: Mammography. Volumetric breast density techniques based on standard mammograms require estimation of breast thickness, which is difficult to accurately measure. By comparison, calculation of breast density using dual energy mammography does not require measurement of breast thickness. Dual energy mammography has been implemented using both energy integrating flat panel detectors in conjunction with beam energy switching and energy resolved photon counting detectors. These techniques have been optimized using simulation studies and validated using physical phantoms and postmortem breasts. Chemical decomposition was used as the gold standard for volumetric breast density measurement in postmortem breasts. Breast density measurements have also been compared with results from four-category BI-RADS density rankings, standard image thresholding and Fuzzy k-mean clustering techniques. These studies indicate that dual energy mammography can be used to accurately measure volumetric breast density. Cardiovascular CT. The predicative accuracy of risk models for recurrent stroke and cardiac arrest depends heavily on accurate differentiation of thrombus or calcium from iodine in left atrial appendage or coronary arteries. The amount of energy separation is constrained by image noise; therefore, optimal kVp, beam filtration, and balanced flux are essential for the quantification accuracy of iodine and calcium. The basis materials are combined linearly to generate monochromatic energy images, where CT# accuracy and CNR are energy dependent. With optimal monochromatic energy, the mean iodine concentration for the thrombus, circulatory stasis, and control groups are significantly different. Risk

  15. Delayed contrast enhancement imaging of a murine model for ischemia reperfusion with carbon nanotube micro-CT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurel M Burk

    Full Text Available We aim to demonstrate the application of free-breathing prospectively gated carbon nanotube (CNT micro-CT by evaluating a myocardial infarction model with a delayed contrast enhancement technique. Evaluation of murine cardiac models using micro-CT imaging has historically been limited by extreme imaging requirements. Newly-developed CNT-based x-ray sources offer precise temporal resolution, allowing elimination of physiological motion through prospective gating. Using free-breathing, cardiac-gated CNT micro-CT, a myocardial infarction model can be studied non-invasively and with high resolution. Myocardial infarction was induced in eight male C57BL/6 mice aged 8-12 weeks. The ischemia reperfusion model was achieved by surgically occluding the LAD artery for 30 minutes followed by 24 hours of reperfusion. Tail vein catheters were placed for contrast administration. Iohexol 300 mgI/mL was administered followed by images obtained in diastole. Iodinated lipid blood pool contrast agent was then administered, followed with images at systole and diastole. Respiratory and cardiac signals were monitored externally and used to gate the scans of free-breathing subjects. Seven control animals were scanned using the same imaging protocol. After imaging, the heart was harvested, cut into 1mm slices and stained with TTC. Post-processing analysis was performed using ITK-Snap and MATLAB. All animals demonstrated obvious delayed contrast enhancement in the left ventricular wall following the Iohexol injection. The blood pool contrast agent revealed significant changes in cardiac function quantified by 3-D volume ejection fractions. All subjects demonstrated areas of myocardial infarct in the LAD distribution on both TTC staining and micro-CT imaging. The CNT micro-CT system aids straightforward, free-breathing, prospectively-gated 3-D murine cardiac imaging. Delayed contrast enhancement allows identification of infarcted myocardium after a myocardial ischemic

  16. CT imaging of mass-like renal lesions in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Edward Y. [Children' s Hospital Boston, Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2007-09-15

    Mass-like renal lesions in children occur in a diverse spectrum of conditions including benign and malignant neoplasm, infection, infarction, lymphatic malformation, and traumatic injury. Although mass-like renal lesions can sometimes be suspected on plain radiographs and evaluated with US in children, subsequent CT is usually performed for the confirmation of diagnosis and further characterization. The purpose of this pictorial essay was to review the CT imaging findings of both common and uncommon mass-like renal lesions in pediatric patients. Understanding the characteristic CT appearance of mass-like renal lesions in children enables an accurate diagnosis and optimizes patient management. (orig.)

  17. Image quality in CT: From physical measurements to model observers.

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Evaluation of image quality (IQ) in Computed Tomography (CT) is important to ensure that diagnostic questions are correctly answered, whilst keeping radiation dose to the patient as low as is reasonably possible. The assessment of individual aspects of IQ is already a key component of routine quality control of medical x-ray devices. These values together with standard dose indicators can be used to give rise to 'figures of merit' (FOM) to characterise the dose efficiency of the CT scanners o...

  18. Pediatric renal leukemia: spectrum of CT imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilmes, Melissa A. [University of Michigan Health System, C.S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Section of Pediatric Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Vanderbilt University Children' s Hospital, Section of Pediatric Radiology, Nashville, TN (United States); Dillman, Jonathan R. [University of Michigan Health System, C.S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Section of Pediatric Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); University of Michigan Health System, Department of Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Mody, Rajen J. [University of Michigan Health System, C.S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Division of Pediatric Hematology-Oncology and Bone Marrow Transplantation, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Strouse, Peter J. [University of Michigan Health System, C.S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Section of Pediatric Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2008-04-15

    The kidneys are a site of extramedullary leukemic disease that can be readily detected by CT. To demonstrate the spectrum of CT findings in children with renal leukemic involvement. Twelve children were identified retrospectively as having renal leukemic involvement by contrast-enhanced CT of the abdomen. Contrast-enhanced CT images through the kidneys of each patient were reviewed by two pediatric radiologists. Pertinent imaging findings and renal lengths were documented. The electronic medical record was accessed to obtain relevant clinical and pathologic information. Five patients with renal leukemic involvement presented with multiple bilateral low-attenuation masses, while three patients demonstrated large areas of wedge-shaped and geographic low attenuation. Four other patients presented with unique imaging findings, including a solitary unilateral low-attenuation mass, solitary bilateral low-attenuation masses, multiple bilateral low-attenuation masses including unilateral large conglomerate masses, and bilateral areas of ill-defined parenchymal low attenuation. Two patients showed unilateral nephromegaly, while eight other patients showed bilateral nephromegaly. Two patients had normal size kidneys. Two patients had elevated serum creatinine concentrations at the time of imaging. Renal leukemic involvement in children can present with a variety of CT imaging findings. Focal renal abnormalities as well as nephromegaly are frequently observed. Most commonly, renal leukemic involvement does not appear to impair renal function. (orig.)

  19. Cone Beam CT vs. Fan Beam CT: A Comparison of Image Quality and Dose Delivered Between Two Differing CT Imaging Modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechuga, Lawrence; Weidlich, Georg A

    2016-09-12

    A comparison of image quality and dose delivered between two differing computed tomography (CT) imaging modalities-fan beam and cone beam-was performed. A literature review of quantitative analyses for various image quality aspects such as uniformity, signal-to-noise ratio, artifact presence, spatial resolution, modulation transfer function (MTF), and low contrast resolution was generated. With these aspects quantified, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) shows a superior spatial resolution to that of fan beam, while fan beam shows a greater ability to produce clear and anatomically correct images with better soft tissue differentiation. The results indicate that fan beam CT produces superior images to that of on-board imaging (OBI) cone beam CT systems, while providing a considerably less dose to the patient.

  20. Cone Beam CT vs. Fan Beam CT: A Comparison of Image Quality and Dose Delivered Between Two Differing CT Imaging Modalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidlich, Georg A.

    2016-01-01

    A comparison of image quality and dose delivered between two differing computed tomography (CT) imaging modalities—fan beam and cone beam—was performed. A literature review of quantitative analyses for various image quality aspects such as uniformity, signal-to-noise ratio, artifact presence, spatial resolution, modulation transfer function (MTF), and low contrast resolution was generated. With these aspects quantified, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) shows a superior spatial resolution to that of fan beam, while fan beam shows a greater ability to produce clear and anatomically correct images with better soft tissue differentiation. The results indicate that fan beam CT produces superior images to that of on-board imaging (OBI) cone beam CT systems, while providing a considerably less dose to the patient. PMID:27752404

  1. Efficient iterative image reconstruction algorithm for dedicated breast CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antropova, Natalia; Sanchez, Adrian; Reiser, Ingrid S.; Sidky, Emil Y.; Boone, John; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2016-03-01

    Dedicated breast computed tomography (bCT) is currently being studied as a potential screening method for breast cancer. The X-ray exposure is set low to achieve an average glandular dose comparable to that of mammography, yielding projection data that contains high levels of noise. Iterative image reconstruction (IIR) algorithms may be well-suited for the system since they potentially reduce the effects of noise in the reconstructed images. However, IIR outcomes can be difficult to control since the algorithm parameters do not directly correspond to the image properties. Also, IIR algorithms are computationally demanding and have optimal parameter settings that depend on the size and shape of the breast and positioning of the patient. In this work, we design an efficient IIR algorithm with meaningful parameter specifications and that can be used on a large, diverse sample of bCT cases. The flexibility and efficiency of this method comes from having the final image produced by a linear combination of two separately reconstructed images - one containing gray level information and the other with enhanced high frequency components. Both of the images result from few iterations of separate IIR algorithms. The proposed algorithm depends on two parameters both of which have a well-defined impact on image quality. The algorithm is applied to numerous bCT cases from a dedicated bCT prototype system developed at University of California, Davis.

  2. Imaging of aortopulmonary collateral arteries with high-resolution multidetector CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greil, Gerald F.; Hofbeck, Michael; Sieverding, Ludger [University of Tuebingen, Department of Pediatric Cardiology, Children' s Hospital, Tuebingen (Germany); Schoebinger, Max; Meinzer, Hans-Peter [German Cancer Research Center, Division of Medical and Biological Informatics, Heidelberg (Germany); Kuettner, Axel; Schaefer, Juergen F.; Dammann, Florian; Claussen, Claus D. [University of Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2006-06-15

    Precise visualization of the pulmonary vasculature is mandatory for adequate treatment of patients with pulmonary atresia and ventricular septal defect (PA-VSD). Aortopulmonary collateral arteries (APCs) can be visualized by selective injections of contrast agent in the catheterization laboratory. To evaluate multidetector CT (MDCT) and different image postprocessing methods for analysis of complex pulmonary blood supply in patients with PA-VSD. Eight patients (6 weeks to 27.8 years of age) with PA-VSD and APCs underwent MDCT and cardiac catheterization. Using multiplanar reformatting, volume rendering and semiautomatic segmentation algorithms, the aorta, pulmonary arteries and APCs were displayed. MDCT and cardiac catheterization were analyzed by two independent observers. MDCT accurately imaged central pulmonary arteries (n=8), aortopulmonary shunts (n=2), right ventricular to pulmonary artery conduits (n=2) and origin, course and intrapulmonary connections of APCs (n=25), compared to X-ray angiography. A high correlation was found between the MDCT vessel diameter measurements by two independent observers (n=70, r=0.96, P<0.01) and between MDCT and angiographic vessel diameter measurements (n=68, r=0.96, P<0.01). Using three-dimensional imaging software, a complex pulmonary blood supply can be non-invasively and accurately imaged with high-resolution MDCT. This technique may help to reduce the number of cardiac catheterizations or guide interventional or surgical therapy. (orig.)

  3. Incidental Cardiac Findings on Thoracic Imaging.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kok, Hong Kuan

    2013-02-07

    The cardiac structures are well seen on nongated thoracic computed tomography studies in the investigation and follow-up of cardiopulmonary disease. A wide variety of findings can be incidentally picked up on careful evaluation of the pericardium, cardiac chambers, valves, and great vessels. Some of these findings may represent benign variants, whereas others may have more profound clinical importance. Furthermore, the expansion of interventional and surgical practice has led to the development and placement of new cardiac stents, implantable pacemaker devices, and prosthetic valves with which the practicing radiologist should be familiar. We present a collection of common incidental cardiac findings that can be readily identified on thoracic computed tomography studies and briefly discuss their clinical relevance.

  4. Automatic intrinsic cardiac and respiratory gating from cone-beam CT scans of the thorax region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Andreas; Sauppe, Sebastian; Lell, Michael; Kachelrieß, Marc

    2016-03-01

    We present a new algorithm that allows for raw data-based automated cardiac and respiratory intrinsic gating in cone-beam CT scans. It can be summarized in three steps: First, a median filter is applied to an initially reconstructed volume. The forward projection of this volume contains less motion information and is subtracted from the original projections. This results in new raw data that contain only moving and not static anatomy like bones, that would otherwise impede the cardiac or respiratory signal acquisition. All further steps are applied to these modified raw data. Second, the raw data are cropped to a region of interest (ROI). The ROI in the raw data is determined by the forward projection of a binary volume of interest (VOI) that includes the diaphragm for respiratory gating and most of the edge of the heart for cardiac gating. Third, the mean gray value in this ROI is calculated for every projection and the respiratory/cardiac signal is acquired using a bandpass filter. Steps two and three are carried out simultaneously for 64 or 1440 overlapping VOI inside the body for the respiratory or cardiac signal respectively. The signals acquired from each ROI are compared and the most consistent one is chosen as the desired cardiac or respiratory motion signal. Consistency is assessed by the standard deviation of the time between two maxima. The robustness and efficiency of the method is evaluated using simulated and measured patient data by computing the standard deviation of the mean signal difference between the ground truth and the intrinsic signal.

  5. Choline-PET/CT for imaging prostate cancer; Cholin-PET/CT zur Bildgebung des Prostatakarzinoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krause, Bernd Joachim [Klinik- und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany); Treiber, U.; Schwarzenboeck, S.; Souvatzoglou, M. [Klinik fuer Urologie, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany)

    2010-09-15

    PET and PET/CT using [{sup 11}C]- and [{sup 18}F]-labelled choline derivatives are increasingly being used for imaging of prostate cancer. The value of PET and PET/CT with [{sup 11}C]- and [{sup 18}F]-labelled choline derivates in biochemical recurrence of prostate cancer has been examined in many studies and demonstrates an increasing importance. Primary prostate cancer can be detected with moderate sensitivity using PET and PET/CT using [{sup 11}C]- and [{sup 18}F]-labelled choline derivatives - the differentiation between benign prostatic hyperplasia, prostatitis or high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN) is not always possible. At the present time [{sup 11}C]choline PET/CT is not recommended in the primary setting but may be utilized in clinically suspected prostate cancer with repeatedly negative prostate biopsies, in preparation of a focused re-biopsy. Promising results have been obtained for the use of PET and PET/CT with [{sup 11}C]- and [{sup 18}F]-labelled choline derivates in patients with biochemical recurrence. The detection rate of choline PET and PET/CT for local, regional, and distant recurrence in patients with a biochemical recurrence shows a linear correlation with PSA values at the time of imaging and reaches about 75% in patients with PSA > 3 ng/mL. At PSA values below 1 ng/mL, the recurrence can be diagnosed with choline PET/CT in approximately 1/3 of the patients. PET and PET/CT with [{sup 11}C]- and [{sup 18}F]choline derivates can be helpful for choosing a therapeutic strategy in the sense of an individualized treatment: since an early diagnosis of recurrence is crucial to the choice of optimal treatment. The localization of the site of recurrence - local recurrence, lymph node metastasis or systemic dissemination - has important influence on the therapy regimen. (orig.)

  6. PET/CT (and CT) instrumentation, image reconstruction and data transfer for radiotherapy planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattler, Bernhard; Lee, John A; Lonsdale, Markus; Coche, Emmanuel

    2010-09-01

    The positron emission tomography in combination with CT in hybrid, cross-modality imaging systems (PET/CT) gains more and more importance as a part of the treatment-planning procedure in radiotherapy. Positron emission tomography (PET), as a integral part of nuclear medicine imaging and non-invasive imaging technique, offers the visualization and quantification of pre-selected tracer metabolism. In combination with the structural information from CT, this molecular imaging technique has great potential to support and improve the outcome of the treatment-planning procedure prior to radiotherapy. By the choice of the PET-Tracer, a variety of different metabolic processes can be visualized. First and foremost, this is the glucose metabolism of a tissue as well as for instance hypoxia or cell proliferation. This paper comprises the system characteristics of hybrid PET/CT systems. Acquisition and processing protocols are described in general and modifications to cope with the special needs in radiooncology. This starts with the different position of the patient on a special table top, continues with the use of the same fixation material as used for positioning of the patient in radiooncology while simulation and irradiation and leads to special processing protocols that include the delineation of the volumes that are subject to treatment planning and irradiation (PTV, GTV, CTV, etc.). General CT acquisition and processing parameters as well as the use of contrast enhancement of the CT are described. The possible risks and pitfalls the investigator could face during the hybrid-imaging procedure are explained and listed. The interdisciplinary use of different imaging modalities implies a increase of the volume of data created. These data need to be stored and communicated fast, safe and correct. Therefore, the DICOM-Standard provides objects and classes for this purpose (DICOM RT). Furthermore, the standard DICOM objects and classes for nuclear medicine (NM, PT) and

  7. Images as drivers of progress in cardiac computational modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamata, Pablo; Casero, Ramón; Carapella, Valentina; Niederer, Steve A; Bishop, Martin J; Schneider, Jürgen E; Kohl, Peter; Grau, Vicente

    2014-08-01

    Computational models have become a fundamental tool in cardiac research. Models are evolving to cover multiple scales and physical mechanisms. They are moving towards mechanistic descriptions of personalised structure and function, including effects of natural variability. These developments are underpinned to a large extent by advances in imaging technologies. This article reviews how novel imaging technologies, or the innovative use and extension of established ones, integrate with computational models and drive novel insights into cardiac biophysics. In terms of structural characterization, we discuss how imaging is allowing a wide range of scales to be considered, from cellular levels to whole organs. We analyse how the evolution from structural to functional imaging is opening new avenues for computational models, and in this respect we review methods for measurement of electrical activity, mechanics and flow. Finally, we consider ways in which combined imaging and modelling research is likely to continue advancing cardiac research, and identify some of the main challenges that remain to be solved.

  8. Iterative reconstruction in image space (IRIS) in cardiac computed tomography: initial experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittencourt, Márcio Sommer; Schmidt, Bernhard; Seltmann, Martin; Muschiol, Gerd; Ropers, Dieter; Daniel, Werner Günther; Achenbach, Stephan

    2011-10-01

    Improvements in image quality in cardiac computed tomography may be achieved through iterative image reconstruction techniques. We evaluated the ability of "Iterative Reconstruction in Image Space" (IRIS) reconstruction to reduce image noise and improve subjective image quality. 55 consecutive patients undergoing coronary CT angiography to rule out coronary artery stenosis were included. A dual source CT system and standard protocols were used. Images were reconstructed using standard filtered back projection and IRIS. Image noise, attenuation within the coronary arteries, contrast, signal to noise and contrast to noise parameters as well as subjective classification of image quality (using a scale with four categories) were evaluated and compared between the two image reconstruction protocols. Subjective image quality (2.8 ± 0.4 in filtered back projection and 2.8 ± 0.4 in iterative reconstruction) and the number of "evaluable" segments per patient 14.0 ± 1.2 in filtered back projection and 14.1 ± 1.1 in iterative reconstruction) were not significant different between the two methods. However iterative reconstruction had a lower image noise (22.6 ± 4.5 HU vs. 28.6 ± 5.1 HU) and higher signal to noise and image to noise ratios in the proximal coronary arteries. IRIS reduces image noise and contrast-to-noise ratio in coronary CT angiography, thus providing potential for reducing radiation exposure.

  9. Prior CT imaging history for patients who undergo PAN CT for acute traumatic injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy Kenter

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective. A single PAN scan may provide more radiation to a patient than is felt to be safe within a one-year period. Our objective was to determine how many patients admitted to the trauma service following a PAN scan had prior CT imaging within our six-hospital system.Methods. We performed a secondary analysis of a prospectively collected trauma registry. The study was based at a level-two trauma center and five affiliated hospitals, which comprise 70.6% of all Emergency Department visits within a twelve county region of southern Texas. Electronic medical records were reviewed dating from the point of trauma evaluation back to December 5, 2005 to determine evidence of prior CT imaging.Results. There were 867 patients were admitted to the trauma service between January 1, 2012 and December 31, 2012. 460 (53% received a PAN scan and were included in the study group. The mean age of the study group was 37.7 ± 1.54 years old, 24.8% were female, and the mean ISS score was 13.4 ± 1.07. The most common mechanism of injury was motor vehicle collision (47%. 65 (14%; 95% CI [11–18]% of the patients had at least one prior CT. The most common prior studies performed were: CT head (29%; 19–42%, CT Face (29%; 19–42% and CT Abdomen and Pelvis (18%; 11–30%.Conclusion. Within our trauma registry, 14% of patients had prior CT imaging within our hospital system before their traumatic event and PAN scan.

  10. CT vaginography: a new CT technique for imaging of upper and middle vaginal fistulas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botsikas, Diomidis; Pluchino, Nicola; Kalovidouri, Anastasia; Platon, Alexandra; Montet, Xavier; Dallenbach, Patrick; Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre

    2017-05-01

    Different types of vaginal fistulas is a relatively uncommon condition in the Western world but very frequent in developing countries. In the past, conventional vaginography was the radiological examination of choice for exploring this condition. CT and MRI are now both used for this purpose. Our objective was to test the feasibility and to explore the potential role of a new CT imaging technique implementing vaginal introitus obstruction and opacification of the vagina with iodine contrast agent, to show patency of a fistula. We describe the technical protocol of CT-vaginography as performed in Geneva University Hospitals, including vaginal catheterization with a Foley catheter and obstruction of the introitus by inflating the balloon of the catheter. We also report three cases of patients with suspected vaginal fistula who underwent CT-vaginography. The examinations were technically successful. In one patient, it revealed the presence of fistulous pathways from the vaginal fornix along the bilateral infected surgical prostheses. In a second patient, it showed a fistula between the vagina and the necrotic cavity of a recurrent cervical cancer. In a third patient, it proved the absence of a suspected vaginal fistula. CT-vaginography is a technically feasible CT protocol that provides anatomical and functional information on clinically suspected vaginal fistulas. Advances in knowledge: After the abandon of conventional vaginography in the era of transaxial imaging, the current modalities of imaging vaginal fistulas provide excellent anatomical detail but less functional information concerning the permeability of a vaginal fistulous pathway. We propose the use of CT-vaginography, a technical protocol that we describe in detail.

  11. Liver recognition based on statistical shape model in CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Dehui; Jiang, Xueqing; Shi, Fei; Zhu, Weifang; Chen, Xinjian

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, an automatic method is proposed to recognize the liver on clinical 3D CT images. The proposed method effectively use statistical shape model of the liver. Our approach consist of three main parts: (1) model training, in which shape variability is detected using principal component analysis from the manual annotation; (2) model localization, in which a fast Euclidean distance transformation based method is able to localize the liver in CT images; (3) liver recognition, the initial mesh is locally and iteratively adapted to the liver boundary, which is constrained with the trained shape model. We validate our algorithm on a dataset which consists of 20 3D CT images obtained from different patients. The average ARVD was 8.99%, the average ASSD was 2.69mm, the average RMSD was 4.92mm, the average MSD was 28.841mm, and the average MSD was 13.31%.

  12. Automated delineation of stroke lesions using brain CT images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Céline R. Gillebert

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Computed tomographic (CT images are widely used for the identification of abnormal brain tissue following infarct and hemorrhage in stroke. Manual lesion delineation is currently the standard approach, but is both time-consuming and operator-dependent. To address these issues, we present a method that can automatically delineate infarct and hemorrhage in stroke CT images. The key elements of this method are the accurate normalization of CT images from stroke patients into template space and the subsequent voxelwise comparison with a group of control CT images for defining areas with hypo- or hyper-intense signals. Our validation, using simulated and actual lesions, shows that our approach is effective in reconstructing lesions resulting from both infarct and hemorrhage and yields lesion maps spatially consistent with those produced manually by expert operators. A limitation is that, relative to manual delineation, there is reduced sensitivity of the automated method in regions close to the ventricles and the brain contours. However, the automated method presents a number of benefits in terms of offering significant time savings and the elimination of the inter-operator differences inherent to manual tracing approaches. These factors are relevant for the creation of large-scale lesion databases for neuropsychological research. The automated delineation of stroke lesions from CT scans may also enable longitudinal studies to quantify changes in damaged tissue in an objective and reproducible manner.

  13. Nasal polyps with metaplastic ossification: CT and MR imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yi Kyung; Kim, Hyung-Jin; Kim, Eunhee; Kim, Sung Tae [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jinna [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Seung-Kyu [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Young-Hyeh [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-12-15

    Metaplastic ossification is a rare event in nasal polyps. The purpose of this study was to review the computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings of nasal polyps with metaplastic ossification. CT (n = 5) and MR (n = 3) images of five patients (four men and one woman; mean age, 59 years) with surgically proven nasal polyp with metaplastic ossification were retrospectively reviewed. The location and morphologic characteristics of metaplastic ossification were documented as well. All lesions were seen as lobulated (n = 3), ovoid (n = 1), or dumbbell-shaped (n = 1) benign-looking masses with a mean size of 3.7 cm (range, 2.4-6.5 cm), located unilaterally in the posterior nasal cavity and nasopharynx (n = 2), posterior nasoethmoidal tract (n = 2), and maxillary sinus and nasal cavity (n = 1). Compared with the brain stem, the soft tissue components of all lesions demonstrated isoattenuation on precontrast CT scans, slight hypointensity on T1-weighted MR images, and hyperintensity on T2-weighted MR images. On contrast-enhanced MR images, heterogeneous enhancement with marked peripheral enhancement was seen in two and homogeneous moderate enhancement in one. All lesions contained centrally located radiodense materials on CT scans, the shape of which was multiple clustered in three, single nodular in one, and single large lobulated in one. Although rare, metaplastic ossification can occur within nasal polyps. The possibility of its diagnosis may be raised when one sees a benign-looking sinonasal mass with centrally located radiodense materials on CT scans. MR imaging may be useful when mycetoma or inverted papilloma cannot be ruled out on CT scans. (orig.)

  14. Induced apnea enhances image quality and visualization of cardiopulmonary anatomic during contrastenhanced cardiac computerized tomographic angiography in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murali Chakravarthy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of our study was to determine the effect of induced apnea on quality of cardiopulmonary structures during computerized tomographic (CT angiography images in children with congenital heart diseases. Methods: Pediatric patients with congenital heart defects undergoing cardiac CT angiography at our facility in the past 3 years participated in this study. The earlier patients underwent cardiac CT angiography without induced apnea and while, later, apnea was induced in patients, which was followed by electrocardiogram gated cardiac CT angiography. General anesthesia was induced using sleep dose of intravenous propofol. After the initial check CT, on request by the radiologist, apnea was induced by the anesthesiologist by administering 1 mg/kg of intravenous suxamethonium. Soon after apnea ensued, the contrast was injected, and CT angiogram carried out. CT images in the "apnea group" were compared with those in "nonapnea group." After the completion of the procedure, the patients were mask ventilated with 100% oxygen till the spontaneous ventilation was restored. Results: We studied 46 patients, of whom 36 with apnea and yet another 10 without. The quality of the image, visualization of structures such as cardiac wall, outflow tracts, lung field, aortopulmonary shunts, and coronary arteries were analyzed and subjected to statistical analysis (Mann-Whitney U, Fischer′s exact test and Pearson′s Chi-square test. In the induced apnea group, overall image quality was considered excellent in 89% (n = 33 of the studies, while in the "no apnea group," only 30% of studies were excellent. Absent or minimal motion artifacts were seen in a majority of the studies in apnea group (94%. In the nonapnea group, the respiratory and body motion artifacts were severe in 50%, moderate in 30%, and minimal in 20%, but they were significantly lesser in the apnea group. All the studied parameters were statistically significant in the apnea group in

  15. The utilization of dual source CT in imaging of polytrauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicolaou, S. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver General Hospital, Department of Radiology, 899 West 12th Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia, V5Z1M9 (Canada)], E-mail: savvas.nicolaou@vch.ca; Eftekhari, A.; Sedlic, T.; Hou, D.J.; Mudri, M.J.; Aldrich, John; Louis, L. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver General Hospital, Department of Radiology, 899 West 12th Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia, V5Z1M9 (Canada)

    2008-12-15

    Despite the growing role of imaging, trauma remains the leading cause of death in people below the age of 45 years in the western industrialized countries. Trauma has been touted as the largest epidemic in the 20th century. The advent of MDCT has been the greatest advance in trauma care in the last 25 years. However, there are still challenges in CT imaging of the polytrauma individual including time restraints, diagnostic errors, radiation dose effects and bridging the gap between anatomy and physiology. This article will analyze these challenges and provide possible solutions offered by the unique design of the dual source CT scanner.

  16. Non invasive cardiac vein mapping: Role of multislice CT coronary angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malago, Roberto, E-mail: robertomalag@yahoo.it [Radiology Department, University Hospital Policlinico G.B.Rossi, P.le L.A. Scuro 10, 37134 Verona (Italy); Pezzato, Andrea; Barbiani, Camilla; Sala, Giuseppe; Zamboni, Giulia A. [Radiology Department, University Hospital Policlinico G.B.Rossi, P.le L.A. Scuro 10, 37134 Verona (Italy); Tavella, Domenico [Cardiology Service, University Hospital Policlinico G.B.Rossi, P.le L.A. Scuro 10, 37134 Verona (Italy); Mucelli, Roberto Pozzi [Radiology Department, University Hospital Policlinico G.B.Rossi, P.le L.A. Scuro 10, 37134 Verona (Italy)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: Coronary venous anatomy is of primary importance when implanting a cardiac resynchronization therapy device, besides, the coronary sinus can be differently enlarged depending on chronic heart failure. The aim of this study is to evaluate the usefulness of Coronary CTA in describing the coronary venous tree and in particular the coronary sinus and detecting main venous system variants. Materials and methods: 301 consecutive patients (196 Male-Sign , mean age 63.74 years) studied for coronary artery disease with 64 slice Coronary CTA were retrospectively examined. The acquisition protocol was the standard acquisition one used for coronary artery evaluation but the cardiac venous system were visualized. The cardiac venous system was depicted using 3D, MPR, cMPR and MIP post-processing reconstructions on an off-line workstation. For each patient image quality, presence and caliber of the coronary sinus (CS), great cardiac vein (GCV), middle vein (MV), anterior interventricular vein (AIV), lateral cardiac vein (LCV), posterior cardiac vein (PCV), small cardiac vein (SCV) and presence of variant of the normal anatomy were examined and recorded. Results: CS, GCV, MV and AIV were visualized in 100% of the cases. The LCV was visualized in 255/301 (84%) patients, the PCV in 248/301 (83%) patients and the SCV in 69/301 (23%) patients. Mean diameter of the CS was 8.7 mm in 276/301 (91.7%) patients without chronic heart failure and 9.93 mm in 25/301 (8.3%) patients with chronic heart failure. Conclusions: Coronary CTA allows non invasive mapping of the cardiac venous system and may represent a useful presurgical tool for biventricular pacemaker devices implantation.

  17. PET/CT imaging in lung cancer: indications and findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Hochhegger

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of PET/CT imaging in the work-up and management of patients with lung cancer has greatly increased in recent decades. The ability to combine functional and anatomical information has equipped PET/CT to look into various aspects of lung cancer, allowing more precise disease staging and providing useful data during the characterization of indeterminate pulmonary nodules. In addition, the accuracy of PET/CT has been shown to be greater than is that of conventional modalities in some scenarios, making PET/CT a valuable noninvasive method for the investigation of lung cancer. However, the interpretation of PET/CT findings presents numerous pitfalls and potential confounders. Therefore, it is imperative for pulmonologists and radiologists to familiarize themselves with the most relevant indications for and limitations of PET/CT, seeking to protect their patients from unnecessary radiation exposure and inappropriate treatment. This review article aimed to summarize the basic principles, indications, cancer staging considerations, and future applications related to the use of PET/CT in lung cancer.

  18. Radiation exposure of cardiac sonographers working in an academic noninvasive cardiovascular imaging laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velez, Michael R; Orsinelli, Maryellen H; Orsinelli, David A

    2017-09-24

    Exposure to workplace radiation among cardiac sonographers has been felt to be low, and patient-related sources have been considered negligible. Sonographers may be exposed to radiation from patient emitted sources as well as external sources in interventional laboratories. This study quantified radiation exposure to cardiac sonographers. Cardiac sonographers, vascular imaging technologists, exercise physiologists, noninvasive nursing staff, and CT/MRI technologists were provided body dosimeter badges. Sonographers were provided dosimeter rings for their scanning hands. Radiation exposure was quantified from the dosimeter data, reported in millirems (mrem) for deep, eye, and shallow exposure, as well as shallow exposure data from the rings. Data were prospectively collected for 63 employees over a 12-month period and retrospectively analyzed. The mean annual deep body exposure in sonographers was 8.2 mrem/year, shallow exposure 9.8 mrem/year, eye exposure 8.5 mrem/year, and ring exposure 207 mrem/year. There was a significant difference between body and ring exposure (P = .0002). When comparing exposure data between the vascular imaging technologists, CT/MRI technologists, noninvasive nursing staff, and the cardiac sonographers, there were no statistical differences (P > .23). Exercise physiologists had significantly higher exposure compared to sonographers (P exposure is low, cardiac sonographers are exposed to workplace radiation, most likely from patient emitted radiation. The finding that radiation exposure from rings exceeded body exposure supports this conclusion. Continued education and assessment of work flow practices should be employed to minimize staff radiation exposure. © 2017, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. CT and MR imaging of desmoplastic fibroblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shuto, Rieko; Kiyosue, Hiro; Hori, Yuko; Miyake, Hidetoshi; Mori, Hiromu [Department of Radiology, Oita Medical University, Hasama-machi, Oita 879-5593 (Japan); Kawano, Katsunori [1. Department of Surgery, Oita Medical University, Hasama-machi, Oita 879-5593 (Japan)

    2002-10-01

    Desmoplastic fibroblastoma (collagenous fibroma) developing as a slowly enlarging lower abdominal mass is described. The lesion had inhomogeneous low signal intensity (SI) on T1-weighted images, and mixed SI as low SI within high SI on T2-weighted images. On post-contrast T1-weighted images, the mass showed inhomogeneous enhancement. Histologically, the areas showing low SI on both post-contrast T1- and T2-weighted images consisted of dense collagenous components and reduced cellularity compared with the areas showing high SI on them. (orig.)

  20. PET/CT Imaging and Radioimmunotherapy of Prostate Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouchelouche, Kirsten; Tagawa, Scott T; Goldsmith, Stanley J;

    2011-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a common cancer in men and continues to be a major health problem. Imaging plays an important role in the clinical management of patients with prostate cancer. An important goal for prostate cancer imaging is more accurate disease characterization through the synthesis...... disease (ideal for antigen access and antibody delivery). Furthermore, prostate cancer is also radiation sensitive. Prostate-specific membrane antigen is expressed by virtually all prostate cancers, and represents an attractive target for RIT. Antiprostate-specific membrane antigen RIT demonstrates...... of anatomic, functional, and molecular imaging information. Positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) in oncology is emerging as an important imaging tool. The most common radiotracer for PET/CT in oncology, (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), is not very useful in the imaging of prostate cancer...

  1. Real-time dynamic display of registered 4D cardiac MR and ultrasound images using a GPU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Q.; Huang, X.; Eagleson, R.; Guiraudon, G.; Peters, T. M.

    2007-03-01

    In minimally invasive image-guided surgical interventions, different imaging modalities, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT), and real-time three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound (US), can provide complementary, multi-spectral image information. Multimodality dynamic image registration is a well-established approach that permits real-time diagnostic information to be enhanced by placing lower-quality real-time images within a high quality anatomical context. For the guidance of cardiac procedures, it would be valuable to register dynamic MRI or CT with intraoperative US. However, in practice, either the high computational cost prohibits such real-time visualization of volumetric multimodal images in a real-world medical environment, or else the resulting image quality is not satisfactory for accurate guidance during the intervention. Modern graphics processing units (GPUs) provide the programmability, parallelism and increased computational precision to begin to address this problem. In this work, we first outline our research on dynamic 3D cardiac MR and US image acquisition, real-time dual-modality registration and US tracking. Then we describe image processing and optimization techniques for 4D (3D + time) cardiac image real-time rendering. We also present our multimodality 4D medical image visualization engine, which directly runs on a GPU in real-time by exploiting the advantages of the graphics hardware. In addition, techniques such as multiple transfer functions for different imaging modalities, dynamic texture binding, advanced texture sampling and multimodality image compositing are employed to facilitate the real-time display and manipulation of the registered dual-modality dynamic 3D MR and US cardiac datasets.

  2. CT-diskography in patients with sciatica. Comparison with plain CT and MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dullerud, R. [Ullevaal Univ. Hospital, Oslo (Norway). Section of Neuroradiology; Johansen, J.G. [Ullevaal Univ. Hospital, Oslo (Norway). Section of Neuroradiology

    1995-09-01

    The findings at CT-diskography (CT-D), including recording of the pain introduced at contrast injection, were compared with plain CT and MR imaging in 111 disks in 101 patients aged 18 to 68 years. Six disks which were normal at CT had normal CT-D and 5 of them had normal signal on MR imaging. The degree of annular degeneration and the depth of the annular tears were significantly associated with each other and with loss of disk height, but not with size or location of the hernias. Only the depth of the tears was significantly associated with loss of signal on MR. However, frequently complete annular tears and severe annular degeneration were seen in association with small bulges and hernias, even in disks with normal or slightly reduced signal on MR and with normal height. The type and intensity of the pain introduced were associated with each other and with the depth of the annular tears, but not with the degree of annular degeneration, size of the hernia or the MR signal intensity of the disks. Annular degeneration and tears on one hand, and the type and intensity of pain introduced on the other, see to be related rather than separate phenomena. (orig./MG).

  3. Automatic anatomy recognition on CT images with pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lidong; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Tong, Yubing; Odhner, Dewey; Torigian, Drew A.

    2016-03-01

    Body-wide anatomy recognition on CT images with pathology becomes crucial for quantifying body-wide disease burden. This, however, is a challenging problem because various diseases result in various abnormalities of objects such as shape and intensity patterns. We previously developed an automatic anatomy recognition (AAR) system [1] whose applicability was demonstrated on near normal diagnostic CT images in different body regions on 35 organs. The aim of this paper is to investigate strategies for adapting the previous AAR system to diagnostic CT images of patients with various pathologies as a first step toward automated body-wide disease quantification. The AAR approach consists of three main steps - model building, object recognition, and object delineation. In this paper, within the broader AAR framework, we describe a new strategy for object recognition to handle abnormal images. In the model building stage an optimal threshold interval is learned from near-normal training images for each object. This threshold is optimally tuned to the pathological manifestation of the object in the test image. Recognition is performed following a hierarchical representation of the objects. Experimental results for the abdominal body region based on 50 near-normal images used for model building and 20 abnormal images used for object recognition show that object localization accuracy within 2 voxels for liver and spleen and 3 voxels for kidney can be achieved with the new strategy.

  4. Assessment of CT image quality using a Bayesian approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reginatto, M.; Anton, M.; Elster, C.

    2017-08-01

    One of the most promising approaches for evaluating CT image quality is task-specific quality assessment. This involves a simplified version of a clinical task, e.g. deciding whether an image belongs to the class of images that contain the signature of a lesion or not. Task-specific quality assessment can be done by model observers, which are mathematical procedures that carry out the classification task. The most widely used figure of merit for CT image quality is the area under the ROC curve (AUC), a quantity which characterizes the performance of a given model observer. In order to estimate AUC from a finite sample of images, different approaches from classical statistics have been suggested. The goal of this paper is to introduce task-specific quality assessment of CT images to metrology and to propose a novel Bayesian estimation of AUC for the channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) applied to the task of detecting a lesion at a known image location. It is assumed that signal-present and signal-absent images follow multivariate normal distributions with the same covariance matrix. The Bayesian approach results in a posterior distribution for the AUC of the CHO which provides in addition a complete characterization of the uncertainty of this figure of merit. The approach is illustrated by its application to both simulated and experimental data.

  5. CT image segmentation using FEM with optimized boundary condition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Hishida

    Full Text Available The authors propose a CT image segmentation method using structural analysis that is useful for objects with structural dynamic characteristics. Motivation of our research is from the area of genetic activity. In order to reveal the roles of genes, it is necessary to create mutant mice and measure differences among them by scanning their skeletons with an X-ray CT scanner. The CT image needs to be manually segmented into pieces of the bones. It is a very time consuming to manually segment many mutant mouse models in order to reveal the roles of genes. It is desirable to make this segmentation procedure automatic. Although numerous papers in the past have proposed segmentation techniques, no general segmentation method for skeletons of living creatures has been established. Against this background, the authors propose a segmentation method based on the concept of destruction analogy. To realize this concept, structural analysis is performed using the finite element method (FEM, as structurally weak areas can be expected to break under conditions of stress. The contribution of the method is its novelty, as no studies have so far used structural analysis for image segmentation. The method's implementation involves three steps. First, finite elements are created directly from the pixels of a CT image, and then candidates are also selected in areas where segmentation is thought to be appropriate. The second step involves destruction analogy to find a single candidate with high strain chosen as the segmentation target. The boundary conditions for FEM are also set automatically. Then, destruction analogy is implemented by replacing pixels with high strain as background ones, and this process is iterated until object is decomposed into two parts. Here, CT image segmentation is demonstrated using various types of CT imagery.

  6. Novel cardiac imaging technologies : implications in clinical decision making

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delgado, Victoria

    2010-01-01

    The objectives of this thesis were to investigate the role of novel cardiac imaging technologies in the current clinical daily practice with the advent of novel therapies. In Part I, the role of novel imaging modalities to assess left ventricular mechanics will be discussed, focusing on 1) the

  7. CT scan of the brain (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... CAT scan (computed tomography) is a much more sensitive imaging technique than x-ray, allowing high definition not only of the bony structures, but of the soft tissues. Clear images of organs such as the brain, muscles, joint structures, veins ...

  8. CEREBRAL HYDATID DISEASE: CT AND MR IMAGING FINDINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Cerebral hydatid disease is very rare, representing only 2% of all cerebral space occupying lesions even in the countries where the disease is endemic. The aim of this paper is to describe the characteristic features of cerebral hydatid disease in computed tomography (CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. METHODS: Here is a case 25yr/m who presented to neurosurgery OPD with complaints of headache, vomiting, right sided weakness and seizures for 2 weeks. CT and MRI were the imaging modalities to reach the diagnosis which was pathologically confirmed postoperatively as hydatid disease. RESULTS: CT and MR imaging findings of E. granulosus lesions were well defined, smooth thin-walled, spherical, homogeneous cystic lesions with no contrast enhancement, no calcification, and no surrounding oedema. CONCLUSION: Although cystic cerebral hydatid disease is well demonstrated by CT and MR examinations, CT is superior in detecting calcification in the cyst, when present, MR is better in demonstrating cyst capsule, detecting multiplicity and defining the anatomic relationship of the lesion with the adjacent structures, and it is more helpful in surgical planning.

  9. Imaging of jaw with dental CT software program: Normal Anatomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Myong Gon; Seo, Kwang Hee; Jung, Hak Young; Sung, Nak Kwan; Chung, Duk Soo; Kim, Ok Dong [School of Medicine, Taegu Catholic University, Taegu (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Young Hwan [Taegu Armed Forces General Hospital, Taegu (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-07-15

    Dental CT software program can provide reformatted cross-sectional and panoramic images that cannot be obtained with conventional axial and direct coronal CT scan. The purpose of this study is to describe the method of the technique and to identify the precise anatomy of jaw. We evaluated 13 mandibles and 7 maxillae of 15 subjects without bony disease who were being considered for endosseous dental implants. Reformatted images obtained by the use of bone algorithm performed on GE HiSpeed Advantage CT scanner were retrospectively reviewed for detailed anatomy of jaw. Anatomy related to neurovascular bundle(mandibular foramen, inferior alveolar canal, mental foramen, canal for incisive artery, nutrient canal, lingual foramen and mylohyoid groove), muscular insertion(mylohyoid line, superior and inferior genial tubercle and digastric fossa) and other anatomy(submandibular fossa, sublingual fossa, contour of alveolar process, oblique line, retromolar fossa, temporal crest and retromolar triangle) were well delineated in mandible. In maxilla, anatomy related to neurovascular bundle(greater palatine foramen and groove, nasopalatine canal and incisive foramen) and other anatomy(alveolar process, maxillary sinus and nasal fossa) were also well delineated. Reformatted images using dental CT software program provided excellent delineation of the jaw anatomy. Therefore, dental CT software program can play an important role in the preoperative assessment of mandible and maxilla for dental implants and other surgical conditions.

  10. New frontiers in CT imaging of airway disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grenier, Philippe A.; Beigelman-Aubry, Catherine [Department of Radiology, University Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris (France); Fetita, Catalin; Preteux, Francoise [Institut National des Telecommunications, Department ARTEMIS, Evry (France); Brauner, Michel W. [Avicenne Hospital, UFR SMBH Paris XIII, Bobigny (France); Lenoir, Stephane [Institut Mutualiste Montsouris, Paris (France)

    2002-05-01

    Combining helical volumetric CT acquisition and thin-slice thickness during breath hold provides an accurate assessment of both focal and diffuse airway diseases. With multiple detector rows, compared with single-slice helical CT, multislice CT can cover a greater volume, during a simple breath hold, and with better longitudinal and in-plane spatial resolution and improved temporal resolution. The result in data set allows the generation of superior multiplanar and 3D images of the airways, including those obtained from techniques developed specifically for airway imaging, such as virtual bronchography and virtual bronchoscopy. Complementary CT evaluation at suspended or continuous full expiration is mandatory to detect air trapping that is a key finding for depicting an obstruction on the small airways. Indications for CT evaluation of the airways include: (a) detection of endobronchial lesions in patients with an unexplained hemoptysis; (b) evaluation of extent of tracheobronchial stenosis for planning treatment and follow-up; (c) detection of congenital airway anomalies revealed by hemoptysis or recurrent infection; (d) detection of postinfectious or postoperative airway fistula or dehiscence; and (e) diagnosis and assessment of extent of bronchiectasis and small airway disease. Improvement in image analysis technique and the use of spirometrically control of lung volume acquisition have made possible accurate and reproducible quantitative assessment of airway wall and lumen areas and lung density. This contributes to better insights in physiopathology of obstructive lung disease, particularly in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma. (orig.)

  11. Disease quantification on PET/CT images without object delineation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Yubing; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Odhner, Dewey; Wu, Caiyun; Fitzpatrick, Danielle; Winchell, Nicole; Schuster, Stephen J.; Torigian, Drew A.

    2017-03-01

    The derivation of quantitative information from images to make quantitative radiology (QR) clinically practical continues to face a major image analysis hurdle because of image segmentation challenges. This paper presents a novel approach to disease quantification (DQ) via positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) images that explores how to decouple DQ methods from explicit dependence on object segmentation through the use of only object recognition results to quantify disease burden. The concept of an object-dependent disease map is introduced to express disease severity without performing explicit delineation and partial volume correction of either objects or lesions. The parameters of the disease map are estimated from a set of training image data sets. The idea is illustrated on 20 lung lesions and 20 liver lesions derived from 18F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG)-PET/CT scans of patients with various types of cancers and also on 20 NEMA PET/CT phantom data sets. Our preliminary results show that, on phantom data sets, "disease burden" can be estimated to within 2% of known absolute true activity. Notwithstanding the difficulty in establishing true quantification on patient PET images, our results achieve 8% deviation from "true" estimates, with slightly larger deviations for small and diffuse lesions where establishing ground truth becomes really questionable, and smaller deviations for larger lesions where ground truth set up becomes more reliable. We are currently exploring extensions of the approach to include fully automated body-wide DQ, extensions to just CT or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) alone, to PET/CT performed with radiotracers other than FDG, and other functional forms of disease maps.

  12. "Conventional" CT images from spectral measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajbhandary, Paurakh L.; Pelc, Norbert J.

    2016-03-01

    Spectral imaging systems need to be able to produce "conventional" images, and it's been shown that systems with energy discriminating detectors can achieve higher CNR than conventional systems by optimal weighting. Combining measured data in energy bins (EBs) and also combining basis material images have previously been proposed, but there are no studies systematically comparing the two methods. In this paper, we analytically evaluate the two methods for systems with ideal photon counting detectors using CNR and beam hardening (BH) artifact as metrics. For a 120-kVp polychromatic simulations of a water phantom with low contrast inserts, the difference of the optimal CNR between the two methods for the studied phantom is within 2%. For a polychromatic spectrum, beam-hardening artifacts are noticeable in EB weighted images (BH artifact of 3.8% for 8 EB and 6.9% for 2 EB), while weighted basis material images are free of such artifacts.

  13. PET/CT imaging in head and neck tumors; PET-CT-Bildgebung bei Kopf-Hals-Tumoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roedel, R.; Palmedo, H.; Reichmann, K.; Reinhardt, M.J.; Biersack, H.J. [Universitaetsklinikum Bonn, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin (Germany); Straehler-Pohl, H.J. [Universitaetsklinikum Bonn, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Hals-, Nasen- und Ohrenheilkunde (Germany); Jaeger, U. [Universitaetsklinikum Bonn, Radiologische Klinik (Germany)

    2004-11-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of combined PET/CT examinations for detection of malignant tumors and their metastases in head and neck oncology. 51 patients received whole body scans on a dual modality PET/CT system. CT was performed without i.v. contrast. The results were compared concerning the diagnostic impact of native CT scan on FDG-PET images and the additional value of fused imaging. From 153 lesions were 97 classified as malignant on CT and 136 on FDG/PET images, as suspicious for malignancy in 33 on CT and 7 on FDG-PET and as benign in 23 on CT and 10 on FDG-PET. With combined PET/CT all primary and recurrent tumors could be found, the detection rate in patients with unknown primary tumors was 45%. Compared to PET or CT alone the sensitivity, specifity and accuracy could be significantly improved by means of combined PET/CT. Fused PET/CT imaging with [F18]-FDG and native CT-scanning enables accurate diagnosis in 93% of lesions and 90% of patients with head and neck oncology. (orig.) [German] Die Bestimmung der Wertigkeit der kombinierten PET-CT-Untersuchung zum Nachweis maligner Kopf-Hals-Tumoren und ihrer Metastasen. Bei 51 Patienten wurden Ganzkoerperuntersuchungen mit dem kombiniertem PET-CT-System durchgefuehrt. Die CT erfolgte ohne i.v. Kontrastmittelgabe. Die Ergebnisse wurden in ihrer diagnostischen Aussage einerseits getrennt fuer native CT- und FDG-PET-Bildgebung und andererseits fuer das fusionierte Bild verglichen. Von 153 Laesionen wurden 97 im CT und 136 im FDG-PET als maligne, 33 im CT und 7 im FDG-PET als malignitaetsverdaechtig, 23 im CT und 10 in der FDG-PET als benigne beurteilt. Die Anzahl der konkordanten Ergebnisse betrug 94 (61%), die der diskordanten 59 (39 %). Mit der PET-CT konnten alle Primaertumoren und Rezidive entdeckt werden, die Nachweisrate eines unbekannten Primaertumors betrug 45%. Im Vergleich zur alleinigen PET- oder CT-Untersuchung erhoehen sich bei der kombinierten PET-CT Sensitivitaet, Spezifitaet sowie die

  14. Assessment of Cardiac Sarcoidosis with Advanced Imaging Modalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akasaka, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a chronic systemic disease of unknown etiology that is characterized by the presence of noncaseating epithelioid granulomas, usually in multiple organs. Several studies have shown that sarcoidosis might be the result of an exaggerated granulomatous reaction after exposure to unidentified antigens in genetically susceptible individuals. Cardiac involvement may occur and lead to an adverse outcome: the heart mechanics will be affected and that causes ventricular failure, and the cardiac electrical system will be disrupted and lead to third degree atrioventricular block, malignant ventricular tachycardia, and sudden cardiac death. Thus, early diagnosis and treatment of this potentially devastating disease is critically important. However, sensitive and accurate imaging modalities have not been established. Recent studies have demonstrated the promising potential of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and 18F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography (18F-FDG PET) in the diagnosis and assessment of cardiac sarcoidosis (CS). In this review, we discuss the epidemiology, etiology, histological findings, and clinical features of sarcoidosis. We also introduce advanced imaging including 18F-FDG PET and cardiac MRI as more reliable diagnostic modalities for CS. PMID:25250336

  15. Characterisation of peripartum cardiomyopathy by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mouquet, Frederic; Groote, Pascal de; Bouabdallaoui, Nadia; Dagorn, Joel; Lamblin, Nicolas; Bauters, Christophe [Pole de Cardiologie et Maladies Vasculaires, CHRU Lille et Universite Lille 2, Lille Cedex (France); Lions, Christophe; Willoteaux, Serge; Beregi, Jean Paul [Radiologie et Imagerie Cardiovasculaire, CHRU Lille et Universite Lille 2, Lille Cedex (France); Deruelle, Philippe [Gynecologie-Maternite, CHRU Lille et Universite Lille 2, Lille Cedex (France)

    2008-12-15

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) is a rare cause of heart failure. Only half of the patients recover normal cardiac function. We assessed the usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and late enhancement imaging to detect myocardial fibrosis in order to predict cardiac function recovery in patients with peripartum cardiomyopathy. Among a consecutive series of 1,037 patients referred for heart failure treatment or prognostic evaluation between 1999 and 2006, eight women had confirmed PPCM. They all underwent echocardiography and cardiac MRI for assessment of left ventricular anatomy, systolic function and detection of myocardial fibrosis through late enhancement imaging. Mean ({+-} SD) baseline left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was 28 {+-} 4%. After a follow-up of 50 {+-} 9 months, half the patients recovered normal cardiac function (LVEF = 58 {+-} 4%) and four did not (LVEF = 35 {+-} 6%). None of the eight patients exhibited abnormal myocardial late enhancement. No difference in MRI characteristics was observed between the two groups. Patients with PPCM do not exhibit a specific cardiac MRI pattern and particularly no myocardial late enhancement. It suggests that myocardial fibrosis does not play a major role in the limitation of cardiac function recovery after PPCM. (orig.)

  16. The evaluation of cardiac tamponade risk in patients with pericardial effusion detected by non-gated chest CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Yasutoshi; Miyoshi, Fuminori; Kaminou, Toshio; Kaetsu, Yasuhiro; Ogawa, Toshihide

    2016-05-01

    Although pericardial effusion is often identified using non-gated chest computed tomography (CT), findings predictive of cardiac tamponade have not been adequately established. To determine the findings predictive of clinical cardiac tamponade in patients with moderate to large pericardial effusion using non-gated chest CT. We performed a retrospective analysis of 134 patients with moderate to large pericardial effusion who were identified from among 4581 patients who underwent non-gated chest CT. Cardiac structural changes, including right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT), were qualitatively evaluated. The inferior vena cava ratio with hepatic (IVCupp) and renal portions (IVClow) and effusion size were measured. The diagnostic performance of each structural change was calculated, and multivariate analysis was used to determine the predictors of cardiac tamponade. Of the 134 patients (mean age, 70.3 years; 64 men), 37 (28%) had cardiac tamponade. The sensitivity and specificity were 76% and 74% for RVOT compression; 87% and 84% for an IVClow ratio ≥0.77; and 60% and 77% for an effusion size ≥25.5 mm, respectively. Multivariate logistic regression analysis demonstrated that RVOT compression, an IVClow ratio ≥0.77, and an effusion size ≥25.5 mm were independent predictors of cardiac tamponade. The combination of these three CT findings had a sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of 81%, 95%, and 91%, respectively. In patients with moderate to large pericardial effusion, non-gated chest CT provides additional information for predicting cardiac tamponade. © The Foundation Acta Radiologica 2015.

  17. Imaging of female pelvic malignancies regarding MRI, CT, and PET/CT. Pt. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brocker, Kerstin A.; Eichbaum, Michael; Sohn, Christof [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Obstetrics and Gynecology; Alt, Celine D.; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Hallscheidt, Peter [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology

    2011-10-15

    The goal of this article is to provide an overview of diagnostic standard operating procedures for both clinical and imaging assessment of cervical and endometrial carcinoma, sarcoma of the uterus, and primary pelvic non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The literature was reviewed for methods used to diagnose malignancies in the female pelvis with a special focus on the role of MRI as the imaging method of choice. Furthermore, CT findings and staging criteria for the mentioned malignancies are also provided. Whereas ultrasound still remains the imaging modality of choice in clinical practice for the early diagnosis of female pelvic malignancies, MRI is more frequently recognized as a diagnostic tool for its accuracy in tumor identification. MRI also plays a crucial role in the 3D pretreatment planning for brachytherapy especially in cervical cancer. In the future, PET/CT might achieve an important role for staging lymph nodes or distant metastases as well as tumor recurrence.

  18. Four-dimensional modeling of the heart for image guidance of minimally invasive cardiac surgeries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wierzbicki, Marcin; Drangova, Maria; Guiraudon, Gerard; Peters, Terry

    2004-05-01

    Minimally invasive surgery of the beating heart can be associated with two major limitations: selecting port locations for optimal target coverage from x-rays and angiograms, and navigating instruments in a dynamic and confined 3D environment using only an endoscope. To supplement the current surgery planning and guidance strategies, we continue developing VCSP - a virtual reality, patient-specific, thoracic cavity model derived from 3D pre-procedural images. In this work, we apply elastic image registration to 4D cardiac images to model the dynamic heart. Our method is validated on two image modalities, and for different parts of the cardiac anatomy. In a helical CT dataset of an excised heart phantom, we found that the artificial motion of the epicardial surface can be extracted to within 0.93 +/- 0.33 mm. For an MR dataset of a human volunteer, the error for different heart structures such as the myocardium, right and left atria, right ventricle, aorta, vena cava, and pulmonary artery, ranged from 1.08 +/- 0.18 mm to 1.14 +/- 0.22 mm. These results indicate that our method of modeling the motion of the heart is not only easily adaptable but also sufficiently accurate to meet the requirements for reliable cardiac surgery training, planning, and guidance.

  19. Osteosarcoma of the jaws: demographic and CT imaging features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S; Shi, H; Yu, Q

    2012-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the patient demographic and CT imaging findings of primary osteosarcoma of the jaws. Methods 88 primary osteosarcomas of the jaws histopathologically diagnosed during 1997–2007 were reviewed. 21 cases of CT images were reviewed. Results Of 88 patients, 51 (58%) had tumours in the mandible and 37 (42%) in the maxilla. The mean age was 37.8 years (range 9–80 years). The male-to-female ratio was 1.32:1. The mean age of patients with mandibular lesions was 41.04 years and in those with maxillary lesions it was 33.3 years. CT imaging findings were available in 21 patients. In the maxilla (n = 9), all tumours (100%) arose from the alveolar ridge. In the mandible (n = 12), most tumours (9 cases, 75%), arose from the ramus and/or condyle. All except two lesions had the epicentrum within the medullary cavity of the involved bone. The presence of periosteal reaction was demonstrated in 13 cases (62%). Soft-tissue extension was present in 18 lesions (86%), with calcification identified in 13 (72%). Conclusions This study provides age, sex distribution, location and CT imaging features of primary osteosarcoma of the jaws. PMID:22074870

  20. CT and MR imaging findings of sphenoidal masses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Shoki; Higano, Shuichi (Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). School of Medicine); Ishii, Kiyoshi (and others)

    1994-07-01

    CT and MR imaging findings of 57 sphenoidal masses were retrospectively reviewed to assess the possibility of differential diagnosis between them. Various kinds of masses such as pituitary adenoma, epipharyngeal cancer, mucocele, chordoma, chondroma, chondrosarcoma, distant metastasis, multiple myeloma, fibrous dysplasia, craniopharyngioma, hemangiopericytoma, giant cell tumor, primary sphenoidal cancer, malignant melanoma, leukemia, histiocytosis X, and giant cell tumor were included in this series. CT scanning was performed in all cases using a spin-echo pulse sequence. The relative density of the masses, bony changes and calcification were evaluated on CT, and on MR images, signal intensity of the masses relative to the normal gray matter, contrast enhancement and extension/contour were evaluated. Although no single feature appeared to be specific to the masses, detection of calcification on CT, identification of the normal pituitary gland as deformed or displaced on T1-weighted images, signal intensity on T2-weighted images, and extension of the masses seemed to be useful and should be examined in terms of their ability to assist in differential diagnosis. Finally, accommodative classification of sphenoidal masses primarily based on presumed origin or mode of extension was attempted. (author).

  1. Software windows for the display of CT-images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gell, G.; Sager, W.D.; Toelly, E.

    1983-03-01

    Software windows are a flexible and general method for defining arbitrary functions for the mapping of Hounsfield-numbers of CT-scans on to the grey levels of the display image. The method which is illustrated with the aid of a few examples has been implemented on an EMI viewing console.

  2. Computer aided detection of oral lesions on CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galib, S.; Islam, F.; Abir, M.; Lee, H. K.

    2015-12-01

    Oral lesions are important findings on computed tomography (CT) images. In this study, a fully automatic method to detect oral lesions in mandibular region from dental CT images is proposed. Two methods were developed to recognize two types of lesions namely (1) Close border (CB) lesions and (2) Open border (OB) lesions, which cover most of the lesion types that can be found on CT images. For the detection of CB lesions, fifteen features were extracted from each initial lesion candidates and multi layer perceptron (MLP) neural network was used to classify suspicious regions. Moreover, OB lesions were detected using a rule based image processing method, where no feature extraction or classification algorithm were used. The results were validated using a CT dataset of 52 patients, where 22 patients had abnormalities and 30 patients were normal. Using non-training dataset, CB detection algorithm yielded 71% sensitivity with 0.31 false positives per patient. Furthermore, OB detection algorithm achieved 100% sensitivity with 0.13 false positives per patient. Results suggest that, the proposed framework, which consists of two methods, has the potential to be used in clinical context, and assist radiologists for better diagnosis.

  3. Hydatid disease of the spleen; Ultrasonography, CT and MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinner, W.N. von; Stridbeck, H. (Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, King Faisal Specialist Hospital, and Research Center, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia) Lund Univ. Hospital (Sweden))

    1992-09-01

    Seven patients with hydatid disease of the spleen were examined by radiography, ultrasound, CT, and in one case MR imaging. The observations were confirmed by patho-anatomic findings except in 2 patients where high indirect hemagglutination tests confirmed the diagnosis. (orig./MG).

  4. 3D printing based on cardiac CT assists anatomic visualization prior to transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripley, Beth; Kelil, Tatiana; Cheezum, Michael K; Goncalves, Alexandra; Di Carli, Marcelo F; Rybicki, Frank J; Steigner, Mike; Mitsouras, Dimitrios; Blankstein, Ron

    2016-01-01

    3D printing is a promising technique that may have applications in medicine, and there is expanding interest in the use of patient-specific 3D models to guide surgical interventions. To determine the feasibility of using cardiac CT to print individual models of the aortic root complex for transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) planning as well as to determine the ability to predict paravalvular aortic regurgitation (PAR). This retrospective study included 16 patients (9 with PAR identified on blinded interpretation of post-procedure trans-thoracic echocardiography and 7 age, sex, and valve size-matched controls with no PAR). 3D printed models of the aortic root were created from pre-TAVR cardiac computed tomography data. These models were fitted with printed valves and predictions regarding post-implant PAR were made using a light transmission test. Aortic root 3D models were highly accurate, with excellent agreement between annulus measurements made on 3D models and those made on corresponding 2D data (mean difference of -0.34 mm, 95% limits of agreement: ± 1.3 mm). The 3D printed valve models were within 0.1 mm of their designed dimensions. Examination of the fit of valves within patient-specific aortic root models correctly predicted PAR in 6 of 9 patients (6 true positive, 3 false negative) and absence of PAR in 5 of 7 patients (5 true negative, 2 false positive). Pre-TAVR 3D-printing based on cardiac CT provides a unique patient-specific method to assess the physical interplay of the aortic root and implanted valves. With additional optimization, 3D models may complement traditional techniques used for predicting which patients are more likely to develop PAR. Copyright © 2016 Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Combination of CT scanning and fluoroscopy imaging on a flat-panel CT scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasruck, M.; Gupta, R.; Reichardt, B.; Suess, Ch.; Schmidt, B.; Stierstorfer, K.; Popescu, S.; Brady, T.; Flohr, T.

    2006-03-01

    We developed and evaluated a prototype flat-panel detector based Volume CT (fpVCT) scanner. The fpVCT scanner consists of a Varian 4030CB a-Si flat-panel detector mounted in a multi slice CT-gantry (Siemens Medical Solutions). It provides a 25 cm field of view with 18 cm z-coverage at the isocenter. In addition to the standard tomographic scanning, fpVCT allows two new scan modes: (1) fluoroscopic imaging from any arbitrary rotation angle, and (2) continuous, time-resolved tomographic scanning of a dynamically changing viewing volume. Fluoroscopic imaging is feasible by modifying the standard CT gantry so that the imaging chain can be oriented along any user-selected rotation angle. Scanning with a stationary gantry, after it has been oriented, is equivalent to a conventional fluoroscopic examination. This scan mode enables combined use of high-resolution tomography and real-time fluoroscopy with a clinically usable field of view in the z direction. The second scan mode allows continuous observation of a timeevolving process such as perfusion. The gantry can be continuously rotated for up to 80 sec, with the rotation time ranging from 3 to 20 sec, to gather projection images of a dynamic process. The projection data, that provides a temporal log of the viewing volume, is then converted into multiple image stacks that capture the temporal evolution of a dynamic process. Studies using phantoms, ex vivo specimens, and live animals have confirmed that these new scanning modes are clinically usable and offer a unique view of the anatomy and physiology that heretofore has not been feasible using static CT scanning. At the current level of image quality and temporal resolution, several clinical applications such a dynamic angiography, tumor enhancement pattern and vascularity studies, organ perfusion, and interventional applications are in reach.

  6. Reliability of visual assessment of non-contrast CT, CT angiography source images and CT perfusion in patients with suspected ischemic stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom van Seeters

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Good reliability of methods to assess the extent of ischemia in acute stroke is important for implementation in clinical practice, especially between observers with varying experience. Our aim was to determine inter- and intra-observer reliability of the 1/3 middle cerebral artery (MCA rule and the Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score (ASPECTS for different CT modalities in patients suspected of acute ischemic stroke. METHODS: We prospectively included 105 patients with acute neurological deficit due to suspected acute ischemic stroke within 9 hours after symptom onset. All patients underwent non-contrast CT, CT perfusion and CT angiography on admission. All images were evaluated twice for presence of ischemia, ischemia with >1/3 MCA involvement, and ASPECTS. Four observers evaluated twenty scans twice for intra-observer agreement. We used kappa statistics and intraclass correlation coefficient to calculate agreement. RESULTS: Inter-observer agreement for the 1/3 MCA rule and ASPECTS was fair to good for non-contrast CT, poor to good for CT angiography source images, but excellent for all CT perfusion maps (cerebral blood volume, mean transit time, and predicted penumbra and infarct maps. Intra-observer agreement for the 1/3 MCA rule and ASPECTS was poor to good for non-contrast CT, fair to moderate for CT angiography source images, and good to excellent for all CT perfusion maps. CONCLUSION: Between observers with a different level of experience, agreement on the radiological diagnosis of cerebral ischemia is much better for CT perfusion than for non-contrast CT and CT angiography source images, and therefore CT perfusion is a very reliable addition to standard stroke imaging.

  7. DNA damage in lymphocytes induced by cardiac CT and comparison with physical exposure parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukumoto, Wataru; Tatsugami, Fuminari; Awai, Kazuo [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Institute of Biomedical Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Ishida, Mari; Sakai, Chiemi [Institute of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Department of Cardiovascular Physiology and Medicine, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Tashiro, Satoshi [Hiroshima University, Department of Cellular Biology, Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine, Hiroshima (Japan); Ishida, Takafumi [Institute of Clinical Research West Medical Center, Hiroshima (Japan); Nakano, Yukiko [Hiroshima University Hospital, Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Hiroshima (Japan)

    2017-04-15

    To investigate whether physical exposure parameters such as the dose index (CTDI), dose length product (DLP), and size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) are predictive of DNA damage. In vitro, we scanned a phantom containing blood samples from five volunteers at CTDI 50, 100, and 150 mGy. One sample was not scanned. We also scanned samples in three different-size phantoms at CTDI 100 mGy. In vivo, we enrolled 45 patients and obtained blood samples before and after cardiac CT. The γ-H2AX foci were counted. In vitro, in the control and at CTDI 50, 100, and 150 mGy, the number of γ-H2AX was 0.94 ± 0.24 (standard error, SE), 1.28 ± 0.30, 1.91 ± 0.47, and 2.16 ± 0.20. At SSDE 180, 156, and 135 mGy, it was 2.41 ± 0.20, 1.91 ± 0.47, and 1.42 ± 0.20 foci/cell. The γ-H2AX foci were positively correlated with the radiation dose and negatively correlated with the body size. In vivo, the γ-H2AX foci were significantly increased after CT (from 1.21 ± 0.19 to 1.92 ± 0.22 foci/cell) and correlated with CTDI, DLP, and SSDE. DNA damage was induced by cardiac CT. There was a correlation between the physical exposure parameters and γ-H2AX. (orig.)

  8. Denoising of 4D cardiac micro-CT data using median-centric bilateral filtration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, D.; Johnson, G. A.; Badea, C. T.

    2012-02-01

    Bilateral filtration has proven an effective tool for denoising CT data. The classic filter uses Gaussian domain and range weighting functions in 2D. More recently, other distributions have yielded more accurate results in specific applications, and the bilateral filtration framework has been extended to higher dimensions. In this study, brute-force optimization is employed to evaluate the use of several alternative distributions for both domain and range weighting: Andrew's Sine Wave, El Fallah Ford, Gaussian, Flat, Lorentzian, Huber's Minimax, Tukey's Bi-weight, and Cosine. Two variations on the classic bilateral filter, which use median filtration to reduce bias in range weights, are also investigated: median-centric and hybrid bilateral filtration. Using the 4D MOBY mouse phantom reconstructed with noise (stdev. ~ 65 HU), hybrid bilateral filtration, a combination of the classic and median-centric filters, with Flat domain and range weighting is shown to provide optimal denoising results (PSNRs: 31.69, classic; 31.58 median-centric; 32.25, hybrid). To validate these phantom studies, the optimal filters are also applied to in vivo, 4D cardiac micro-CT data acquired in the mouse. In a constant region of the left ventricle, hybrid bilateral filtration with Flat domain and range weighting is shown to provide optimal smoothing (stdev: original, 72.2 HU; classic, 20.3 HU; median-centric, 24.1 HU; hybrid, 15.9 HU). While the optimal results were obtained using 4D filtration, the 3D hybrid filter is ultimately recommended for denoising 4D cardiac micro-CT data, because it is more computationally tractable and less prone to artifacts (MOBY PSNR: 32.05; left ventricle stdev: 20.5 HU).

  9. Cardiac MR image segmentation using CHNN and level set method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王洪元; 周则明; 王平安; 夏德深

    2004-01-01

    Although cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can provide high spatial resolution image, the area gray level inhomogenization, weak boundary and artifact often can be found in MR images. So, the MR images segmentation using the gradient-based methods is poor in quality and efficiency. An algorithm, based on the competitive hopfield neural network (CHNN) and the curve propagation, is proposed for cardiac MR images segmentation in this paper. The algorithm is composed of two phases. In first phase, a CHNN is used to classify the image objects, and to make gray level homogenization and to recognize weak boundaries in objects. In second phase, based on the classified results, the level set velocity function is created and the object boundaries are extracted with the curve propagation algorithm of the narrow band-based level set. The test results are promising and encouraging.

  10. Fast and Automatic Ultrasound Simulation from CT Images

    OpenAIRE

    Weijian Cong; Jian Yang; Yue Liu; Yongtian Wang

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound is currently widely used in clinical diagnosis because of its fast and safe imaging principles. As the anatomical structures present in an ultrasound image are not as clear as CT or MRI. Physicians usually need advance clinical knowledge and experience to distinguish diseased tissues. Fast simulation of ultrasound provides a cost-effective way for the training and correlation of ultrasound and the anatomic structures. In this paper, a novel method is proposed for fast simulation of...

  11. Phase and amplitude binning for 4D-CT imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelnour, A. F.; Nehmeh, S. A.; Pan, T.; Humm, J. L.; Vernon, P.; Schöder, H.; Rosenzweig, K. E.; Mageras, G. S.; Yorke, E.; Larson, S. M.; Erdi, Y. E.

    2007-07-01

    We compare the consistency and accuracy of two image binning approaches used in 4D-CT imaging. One approach, phase binning (PB), assigns each breathing cycle 2π rad, within which the images are grouped. In amplitude binning (AB), the images are assigned bins according to the breathing signal's full amplitude. To quantitate both approaches we used a NEMA NU2-2001 IEC phantom oscillating in the axial direction and at random frequencies and amplitudes, approximately simulating a patient's breathing. 4D-CT images were obtained using a four-slice GE Lightspeed CT scanner operating in cine mode. We define consistency error as a measure of ability to correctly bin over repeated cycles in the same field of view. Average consistency error μe ± σe in PB ranged from 18% ± 20% to 30% ± 35%, while in AB the error ranged from 11% ± 14% to 20% ± 24%. In PB nearly all bins contained sphere slices. AB was more accurate, revealing empty bins where no sphere slices existed. As a proof of principle, we present examples of two non-small cell lung carcinoma patients' 4D-CT lung images binned by both approaches. While AB can lead to gaps in the coronal images, depending on the patient's breathing pattern, PB exhibits no gaps but suffers visible artifacts due to misbinning, yielding images that cover a relatively large amplitude range. AB was more consistent, though often resulted in gaps when no data existed due to patients' breathing pattern. We conclude AB is more accurate than PB. This has important consequences to treatment planning and diagnosis.

  12. Phase and amplitude binning for 4D-CT imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdelnour, A F [US Patent and Trademark Office, Alexandria, VA (United States); Nehmeh, S A [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Pan, T [M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Humm, J L [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Vernon, P [GE Healthcare Technologies, Waukesha, WI (United States); Schoeder, H [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Rosenzweig, K E [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Mageras, G S [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Yorke, E [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Larson, S M [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Erdi, Y E [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2007-07-21

    We compare the consistency and accuracy of two image binning approaches used in 4D-CT imaging. One approach, phase binning (PB), assigns each breathing cycle 2{pi} rad, within which the images are grouped. In amplitude binning (AB), the images are assigned bins according to the breathing signal's full amplitude. To quantitate both approaches we used a NEMA NU2-2001 IEC phantom oscillating in the axial direction and at random frequencies and amplitudes, approximately simulating a patient's breathing. 4D-CT images were obtained using a four-slice GE Lightspeed CT scanner operating in cine mode. We define consistency error as a measure of ability to correctly bin over repeated cycles in the same field of view. Average consistency error {mu}{sub e} {+-} {sigma}{sub e} in PB ranged from 18% {+-} 20% to 30% {+-} 35%, while in AB the error ranged from 11% {+-} 14% to 20% {+-} 24%. In PB nearly all bins contained sphere slices. AB was more accurate, revealing empty bins where no sphere slices existed. As a proof of principle, we present examples of two non-small cell lung carcinoma patients' 4D-CT lung images binned by both approaches. While AB can lead to gaps in the coronal images, depending on the patient's breathing pattern, PB exhibits no gaps but suffers visible artifacts due to misbinning, yielding images that cover a relatively large amplitude range. AB was more consistent, though often resulted in gaps when no data existed due to patients' breathing pattern. We conclude AB is more accurate than PB. This has important consequences to treatment planning and diagnosis.

  13. Multi-material decomposition of spectral CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendonça, Paulo R. S.; Bhotika, Rahul; Maddah, Mahnaz; Thomsen, Brian; Dutta, Sandeep; Licato, Paul E.; Joshi, Mukta C.

    2010-04-01

    Spectral Computed Tomography (Spectral CT), and in particular fast kVp switching dual-energy computed tomography, is an imaging modality that extends the capabilities of conventional computed tomography (CT). Spectral CT enables the estimation of the full linear attenuation curve of the imaged subject at each voxel in the CT volume, instead of a scalar image in Hounsfield units. Because the space of linear attenuation curves in the energy ranges of medical applications can be accurately described through a two-dimensional manifold, this decomposition procedure would be, in principle, limited to two materials. This paper describes an algorithm that overcomes this limitation, allowing for the estimation of N-tuples of material-decomposed images. The algorithm works by assuming that the mixing of substances and tissue types in the human body has the physicochemical properties of an ideal solution, which yields a model for the density of the imaged material mix. Under this model the mass attenuation curve of each voxel in the image can be estimated, immediately resulting in a material-decomposed image triplet. Decomposition into an arbitrary number of pre-selected materials can be achieved by automatically selecting adequate triplets from an application-specific material library. The decomposition is expressed in terms of the volume fractions of each constituent material in the mix; this provides for a straightforward, physically meaningful interpretation of the data. One important application of this technique is in the digital removal of contrast agent from a dual-energy exam, producing a virtual nonenhanced image, as well as in the quantification of the concentration of contrast observed in a targeted region, thus providing an accurate measure of tissue perfusion.

  14. Generation of synthetic CT data using patient specific daily MR image data and image registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melanie Kraus, Kim; Jäkel, Oliver; Niebuhr, Nina I.; Pfaffenberger, Asja

    2017-02-01

    To fully exploit the advantages of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for radiotherapy (RT) treatment planning, a method is required to overcome the problem of lacking electron density information. We aim to establish and evaluate a new method for computed tomography (CT) data generation based on MRI and image registration. The thereby generated CT data is used for dose accumulation. We developed a process flow based on an initial pair of rigidly co-registered CT and T2-weighted MR image representing the same anatomical situation. Deformable image registration using anatomical landmarks is performed between the initial MRI data and daily MR images. The resulting transformation is applied to the initial CT, thus fractional CT data is generated. Furthermore, the dose for a photon intensity modulated RT (IMRT) or intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plan is calculated on the generated fractional CT and accumulated on the initial CT via inverse transformation. The method is evaluated by the use of phantom CT and MRI data. Quantitative validation is performed by evaluation of the mean absolute error (MAE) between the measured and the generated CT. The effect on dose accumulation is examined by means of dose-volume parameters. One patient case is presented to demonstrate the applicability of the method introduced here. Overall, CT data derivation lead to MAEs with a median of 37.0 HU ranging from 29.9 to 66.6 HU for all investigated tissues. The accuracy of image registration showed to be limited in the case of unexpected air cavities and at tissue boundaries. The comparisons of dose distributions based on measured and generated CT data agree well with the published literature. Differences in dose volume parameters kept within 1.6% and 3.2% for photon and proton RT, respectively. The method presented here is particularly suited for application in adaptive RT in current clinical routine, since only minor additional technical equipment is required.

  15. Performance of automated software in the assessment of segmental left ventricular function in cardiac CT: Comparison with cardiac magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Rui [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Capital Medical University, Department of Radiology, Beijing Anzhen Hospital, Beijing (China); Meinel, Felix G. [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Schoepf, U.J. [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Charleston, SC (United States); Canstein, Christian [Siemens Medical Solutions USA, Malvern, PA (United States); Spearman, James V. [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); De Cecco, Carlo N. [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); University of Rome ' ' Sapienza' ' , Departments of Radiological Sciences, Oncology and Pathology, Latina (Italy)

    2015-12-15

    To evaluate the accuracy, reliability and time saving potential of a novel cardiac CT (CCT)-based, automated software for the assessment of segmental left ventricular function compared to visual and manual quantitative assessment of CCT and cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR). Forty-seven patients with suspected or known coronary artery disease (CAD) were enrolled in the study. Wall thickening was calculated. Segmental LV wall motion was automatically calculated and shown as a colour-coded polar map. Processing time for each method was recorded. Mean wall thickness in both systolic and diastolic phases on polar map, CCT, and CMR was 9.2 ± 0.1 mm and 14.9 ± 0.2 mm, 8.9 ± 0.1 mm and 14.5 ± 0.1 mm, 8.3 ± 0.1 mm and 13.6 ± 0.1 mm, respectively. Mean wall thickening was 68.4 ± 1.5 %, 64.8 ± 1.4 % and 67.1 ± 1.4 %, respectively. Agreement for the assessment of LV wall motion between CCT, CMR and polar maps was good. Bland-Altman plots and ICC indicated good agreement between CCT, CMR and automated polar maps of the diastolic and systolic segmental wall thickness and thickening. The processing time using polar map was significantly decreased compared with CCT and CMR. Automated evaluation of segmental LV function with polar maps provides similar measurements to manual CCT and CMR evaluation, albeit with substantially reduced analysis time. (orig.)

  16. Improved diagnosis of actively bleeding aneurysm on CT angiography using delayed CT images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kathuria, Sudhir, E-mail: skathur2@jhmi.edu [Division of Interventional Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Division of Interventional Neuroradiology, Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Deveikis, John P.; Westesson, Per-Lennart [Division of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Department of Imaging Sciences, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY 14642 (United States); Gandhi, Dheeraj [Division of Interventional Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Division of Interventional Neuroradiology, Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2011-08-15

    Computed tomographic angiography (CTA) is being increasingly utilized in the non-invasive diagnosis of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). There are emerging reports of diagnosis of active aneurysmal bleeding on CTA, furthering our understanding of imaging features of active extravasation on cross-sectional studies. We demonstrate imaging characteristics of two such cases of active contrast extravasation from intracranial aneurysms. Additionally, we demonstrate that delayed CT images greatly improve the confidence of this diagnosis by demonstrating pooling of contrast in the subarachnoid space. Prompt recognition and management can improve prognosis of this potentially lethal condition.

  17. Cardiac imaging in patients with chronic liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiese, Signe; Hove, Jens D; Møller, Søren

    2017-07-01

    Cirrhotic cardiomyopathy (CCM) is characterized by an impaired contractile response to stress, diastolic dysfunction and the presence of electrophysiological abnormalities, and it may be diagnosed at rest in some patients or demasked by physiological or pharmacological stress. CCM seems to be involved in the development of hepatic nephropathy and is associated with an impaired survival. In the field of cardiac imaging, CCM is not yet a well-characterized entity, hence various modalities of cardiac imaging have been applied. Stress testing with either physiologically or pharmacologically induced circulatory stress has been used to assess systolic dysfunction. Whereas echocardiography with tissue Doppler is by far the most preferred method to detect diastolic dysfunction with measurement of E/A- and E/E'-ratio. In addition, echocardiography may also possess the potential to evaluate systolic dysfunction at rest by application of new myocardial strain techniques. Experience with other modalities such as cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and cardiac computed tomography is limited. Future studies exploring these imaging modalities are necessary to characterize and monitor the cardiac changes in cirrhotic patients. © 2015 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Reconstruction of CT images by the Bayes- back projection method

    CERN Document Server

    Haruyama, M; Takase, M; Tobita, H

    2002-01-01

    In the course of research on quantitative assay of non-destructive measurement of radioactive waste, the have developed a unique program based on the Bayesian theory for reconstruction of transmission computed tomography (TCT) image. The reconstruction of cross-section images in the CT technology usually employs the Filtered Back Projection method. The new imaging reconstruction program reported here is based on the Bayesian Back Projection method, and it has a function of iterative improvement images by every step of measurement. Namely, this method has the capability of prompt display of a cross-section image corresponding to each angled projection data from every measurement. Hence, it is possible to observe an improved cross-section view by reflecting each projection data in almost real time. From the basic theory of Baysian Back Projection method, it can be not only applied to CT types of 1st, 2nd, and 3rd generation. This reported deals with a reconstruction program of cross-section images in the CT of ...

  19. Imaging lobular breast carcinoma: comparison of synchrotron radiation DEI-CT technique with clinical CT, mammography and histology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiedler, S.; Bravin, A.; Keyriläinen, J.; Fernández, M.; Suortti, P.; Thomlinson, W.; Tenhunen, M.; Virkkunen, P.; Karjalainen-Lindsberg, M.-L.

    2004-01-01

    Different modalities for imaging cancer-bearing breast tissue samples are described and compared. The images include clinical mammograms and computed tomography (CT) images, CT images with partly coherent synchrotron radiation (SR), and CT and radiography images taken with SR using the diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI) method. The images are evaluated by a radiologist and compared with histopathological examination of the samples. Two cases of lobular carcinoma are studied in detail. The indications of cancer are very weak or invisible in the conventional images, but the morphological changes due to invasion of cancer become pronounced in the images taken by the DEI method. The strands penetrating adipose tissue are seen clearly in the DEI-CT images, and the histopathology confirms that some strands contain the so-called 'Indian file' formations of cancer cells. The radiation dose is carefully measured for each of the imaging modalities. The mean glandular dose (MGD) for 50% glandular breast tissue is about 1 mGy in conventional mammography and less than 0.25 mGy in projection DEI, while in the clinical CT imaging the MGD is very high, about 45 mGy. The entrance dose of 95 mGy in DEI-CT imaging gives rise to an MGD of 40 mGy, but the dose may be reduced by an order of magnitude, because the contrast is very large in most images.

  20. Dual-Energy Computed Tomography Gemstone Spectral Imaging: A Novel Technique to Determine Human Cardiac Calculus Composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ching-Li; Chang, Hsiao-Huang; Ko, Shih-Chi; Huang, Pei-Jung; Lin, Shan-Yang

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the chemical composition of any calculus in different human organs is essential for choosing the best treatment strategy for patients. The purpose of this study was to assess the capability of determining the chemical composition of a human cardiac calculus using gemstone spectral imaging (GSI) mode on a single-source dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) in vitro. The cardiac calculus was directly scanned on the Discovery CT750 HD FREEdom Edition using GSI mode, in vitro. A portable fiber-optic Raman spectroscopy was also applied to verify the quantitative accuracy of the DECT measurements. The results of spectral DECT measurements indicate that effective Z values in 3 designated positions located in this calculus were 15.02 to 15.47, which are close to values of 15.74 to 15.86, corresponding to the effective Z values of calcium apatite and hydroxyapatite. The Raman spectral data were also reflected by the predominant Raman peak at 960 cm for hydroxyapatite and the minor peak at 875 cm for calcium apatite. A potential single-source DECT with GSI mode was first used to examine the morphological characteristics and chemical compositions of a giant human cardiac calculus, in vitro. The CT results were consistent with the Raman spectral data, suggesting that spectral CT imaging techniques could be accurately used to diagnose and characterize the compositional materials in the cardiac calculus.

  1. Clinical feasibility of {sup 90}Y digital PET/CT for imaging microsphere biodistribution following radioembolization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Chadwick L.; Binzel, Katherine; Zhang, Jun; Knopp, Michael V. [The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Wright Center of Innovation in Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, Columbus, OH (United States); Wuthrick, Evan J. [The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2017-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical feasibility of next generation solid-state digital photon counting PET/CT (dPET/CT) technology and imaging findings in patients following {sup 90}Y microsphere radioembolization in comparison with standard of care (SOC) bremsstrahlung SPECT/CT (bSPECT/CT). Five patients underwent SOC {sup 90}Y bremsstrahlung imaging immediately following routine radioembolization with 3.5 ± 1.7 GBq of {sup 90}Y-labeled glass microspheres. All patients also underwent dPET/CT imaging at 29 ± 11 h following radioembolization. Matched pairs comparison was used to compare image quality, image contrast and {sup 90}Y biodistribution between dPET/CT and bSPECT/CT images. Volumetric assessments of {sup 90}Y activity using different isocontour thresholds on dPET/CT and bSPECT/CT images were also compared. Digital PET/CT consistently provided better visual image quality and {sup 90}Y-to-background image contrast while depicting {sup 90}Y biodistribution than bSPECT/CT. Isocontour volumetric assessment using a 1% threshold precisely outlined {sup 90}Y activity and the treatment volume on dPET/CT images, whereas a more restrictive 20% threshold on bSPECT/CT images was needed to obtain comparable treatment volumes. The use of a less restrictive 10% threshold isocontour on bSPECT/CT images grossly overestimated the treatment volume when compared with the 1% threshold on dPET/CT images. Digital PET/CT is clinically feasible for the assessment of {sup 90}Y microsphere biodistribution following radioembolization, and provides better visual image quality and image contrast than routine bSPECT/CT with comparable acquisition times. With further optimization and clinical validation, dPET technology may allow faster and more accurate imaging-based assessment of {sup 90}Y microsphere biodistribution. (orig.)

  2. Esthesioneuroblastoma methods of intracranial extension: CT and MR imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Tian; Xu, Yi-Kai; Jia, Fei-Ge; Yang, Rui-Meng; Feng, Jie; Ye, Xiang-Hua; Qiu, Ying-Wei [Southern Medical University, Department of Medical Imaging Center, Nan Fang Hospital, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Li, Long [Chinese People' s Armed Police Forces, Department of Radiology, Guangdong Provincial Corps Hospital, Guangzhou (China); Duan, Gang; Wu, Yuan-Kui [Southern Medical University, Department of Radiology, Nan Fang Hospital, Guangzhou (China); Li, Hua-Yu [No. 458 Hospital of PLA, Department of Medical Imaging Center, Guangzhou (China)

    2009-12-15

    Esthesioneuroblastoma (ENB) is an aggressive neuroectodermal malignancy in the upper nasal cavity with local infiltration and lymphatic or hematogenous metastasis. The purpose of this paper is to document three types of direct intracranial extensions by ENB using computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Eleven patients with pathologically confirmed ENB were admitted in our hospital between December 2002 and December 2008. Their magnetic resonance (MR; n = 10) and CT (n = 8) images were retrospectively reviewed, and particular attention was paid to tumor location and extension, enhancement pattern, cervical lymph node metastasis, and Kadish stage. The majority of patients were male (8/11) with Kadish stage C tumor (10/11). Three types of direct intracranial extension by ENBs were put forward according to their MR and CT findings. The primary tumors were well-defined soft-tissue masses centered in the roof of the nasal cavity eroding into the paranasal sinuses (11/11), the contralateral nasal cavity (4/11), the cranial cavity (5/11), and the fossa orbitalis (3/11). The tumor parenchyma were hypointensity on T1-weighted images, heterogeneous hyperintensity on T2-weighted images, and isodensity or slight hyperdensity on CT images with scattered necroses (4/11) and marginal cysts(4/11). Their enhancements were significant and inhomogeneous. Cervical lymph nodes metastases were observed in four patients (4/11), but no pathologically proved distant metastasis was observed. Three types of direct intracranial extensions by ENB can be found on CT and MRI: cranio-orbital-nasal-communicating ENB, cranio-nasal-communicating ENB, and orbital-nasal-communicating ENB. (orig.)

  3. Paediatric cardiac computed tomography: a review of imaging techniques and radiation dose consideration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, Carolyn; Taylor, Andrew M. [UCL, Institute of Child Health, Cardiorespiratory Unit, London (United Kingdom); Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Cardiorespiratory Unit, London (United Kingdom); Owens, Catherine M. [UCL, Institute of Child Health, Cardiorespiratory Unit, London (United Kingdom)

    2011-03-15

    The significant challenges involved in imaging the heart in small children (<15 kg) have been addressed by, and partially resolved with improvement in temporal and spatial resolution secondary to the advent of new multi-detector CT technology. This has enabled both retrospective and prospective ECG-gated imaging in children even at high heart rates (over 100 bpm) without the need for beta blockers. Recent studies have highlighted that the radiation burden associated with cardiac CT can be reduced using prospective ECG-gating. Our experience shows that the resultant dose reduction can be optimised to a level equivalent to that of a non-gated study. This article reviews the different aspects of ECG-gating and the preferred technique for cardiac imaging in the young child (<15 kg). We summarize our evidenced based recommendations for readers, referencing recent articles and using our in house data, protocols and dose measurements discussing the various methods available for dose calculations and their inherent bias. (orig.)

  4. Hybrid detection of lung nodules on CT scan images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Lin; Tan, Yongqiang; Schwartz, Lawrence H.; Zhao, Binsheng, E-mail: bz2166@columbia.edu [Department of Radiology, Columbia University Medical Center, 630 West 168th Street, New York, New York 10032 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Purpose: The diversity of lung nodules poses difficulty for the current computer-aided diagnostic (CAD) schemes for lung nodule detection on computed tomography (CT) scan images, especially in large-scale CT screening studies. We proposed a novel CAD scheme based on a hybrid method to address the challenges of detection in diverse lung nodules. Methods: The hybrid method proposed in this paper integrates several existing and widely used algorithms in the field of nodule detection, including morphological operation, dot-enhancement based on Hessian matrix, fuzzy connectedness segmentation, local density maximum algorithm, geodesic distance map, and regression tree classification. All of the adopted algorithms were organized into tree structures with multi-nodes. Each node in the tree structure aimed to deal with one type of lung nodule. Results: The method has been evaluated on 294 CT scans from the Lung Image Database Consortium (LIDC) dataset. The CT scans were randomly divided into two independent subsets: a training set (196 scans) and a test set (98 scans). In total, the 294 CT scans contained 631 lung nodules, which were annotated by at least two radiologists participating in the LIDC project. The sensitivity and false positive per scan for the training set were 87% and 2.61%. The sensitivity and false positive per scan for the testing set were 85.2% and 3.13%. Conclusions: The proposed hybrid method yielded high performance on the evaluation dataset and exhibits advantages over existing CAD schemes. We believe that the present method would be useful for a wide variety of CT imaging protocols used in both routine diagnosis and screening studies.

  5. Implementation of efficient image reconstruction for CT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie Liu; Guangfei Wang

    2005-01-01

    @@ The operational procedures for efficiently reconstructing the two-dimensional image of a body by the filtered back projection are described in this paper. The projections are interpolated for four times of original projection by zero-padding the original projection in frequency-domain and then inverse fast Fourier transform (FFT) is taken to improve accuracy.

  6. Motion correction for improving the accuracy of dual-energy myocardial perfusion CT imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pack, Jed D.; Yin, Zhye; Xiong, Guanglei; Mittal, Priya; Dunham, Simon; Elmore, Kimberly; Edic, Peter M.; Min, James K.

    2016-03-01

    Coronary Artery Disease (CAD) is the leading cause of death globally [1]. Modern cardiac computed tomography angiography (CCTA) is highly effective at identifying and assessing coronary blockages associated with CAD. The diagnostic value of this anatomical information can be substantially increased in combination with a non-invasive, low-dose, correlative, quantitative measure of blood supply to the myocardium. While CT perfusion has shown promise of providing such indications of ischemia, artifacts due to motion, beam hardening, and other factors confound clinical findings and can limit quantitative accuracy. In this paper, we investigate the impact of applying a novel motion correction algorithm to correct for motion in the myocardium. This motion compensation algorithm (originally designed to correct for the motion of the coronary arteries in order to improve CCTA images) has been shown to provide substantial improvements in both overall image quality and diagnostic accuracy of CCTA. We have adapted this technique for application beyond the coronary arteries and present an assessment of its impact on image quality and quantitative accuracy within the context of dual-energy CT perfusion imaging. We conclude that motion correction is a promising technique that can help foster the routine clinical use of dual-energy CT perfusion. When combined, the anatomical information of CCTA and the hemodynamic information from dual-energy CT perfusion should facilitate better clinical decisions about which patients would benefit from treatments such as stent placement, drug therapy, or surgery and help other patients avoid the risks and costs associated with unnecessary, invasive, diagnostic coronary angiography procedures.

  7. Mapping cardiac surface mechanics with structured light imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laughner, Jacob I; Zhang, Song; Li, Hao; Shao, Connie C; Efimov, Igor R

    2012-09-15

    Cardiovascular disease often manifests as a combination of pathological electrical and structural heart remodeling. The relationship between mechanics and electrophysiology is crucial to our understanding of mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmias and the treatment of cardiac disease. While several technologies exist for describing whole heart electrophysiology, studies of cardiac mechanics are often limited to rhythmic patterns or small sections of tissue. Here, we present a comprehensive system based on ultrafast three-dimensional (3-D) structured light imaging to map surface dynamics of whole heart cardiac motion. Additionally, we introduce a novel nonrigid motion-tracking algorithm based on an isometry-maximizing optimization framework that forms correspondences between consecutive 3-D frames without the use of any fiducial markers. By combining our 3-D imaging system with nonrigid surface registration, we are able to measure cardiac surface mechanics at unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution. In conclusion, we demonstrate accurate cardiac deformation at over 200,000 surface points of a rabbit heart recorded at 200 frames/s and validate our results on highly contrasting heart motions during normal sinus rhythm, ventricular pacing, and ventricular fibrillation.

  8. Advances in cardiac magnetic resonance imaging of congenital heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Driessen, Mieke M.P. [University of Utrecht, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); University of Utrecht, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Cardiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); The Interuniversity Cardiology Institute of the Netherlands (ICIN) - Netherlands Heart Institute, PO Box 19258, Utrecht (Netherlands); Breur, Johannes M.P.J. [Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Pediatric Cardiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Budde, Ricardo P.J.; Oorschot, Joep W.M. van; Leiner, Tim [University of Utrecht, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Kimmenade, Roland R.J. van; Sieswerda, Gertjan Tj [University of Utrecht, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Cardiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Meijboom, Folkert J. [University of Utrecht, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Cardiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Pediatric Cardiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2015-01-01

    Due to advances in cardiac surgery, survival of patients with congenital heart disease has increased considerably during the past decades. Many of these patients require repeated cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging to assess cardiac anatomy and function. In the past decade, technological advances have enabled faster and more robust cardiovascular magnetic resonance with improved image quality and spatial as well as temporal resolution. This review aims to provide an overview of advances in cardiovascular magnetic resonance hardware and acquisition techniques relevant to both pediatric and adult patients with congenital heart disease and discusses the techniques used to assess function, anatomy, flow and tissue characterization. (orig.)

  9. Automatic coronary artery calcium scoring in cardiac CT angiography using paired convolutional neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolterink, Jelmer M; Leiner, Tim; de Vos, Bob D; van Hamersvelt, Robbert W; Viergever, Max A; Išgum, Ivana

    2016-12-01

    The amount of coronary artery calcification (CAC) is a strong and independent predictor of cardiovascular events. CAC is clinically quantified in cardiac calcium scoring CT (CSCT), but it has been shown that cardiac CT angiography (CCTA) may also be used for this purpose. We present a method for automatic CAC quantification in CCTA. This method uses supervised learning to directly identify and quantify CAC without a need for coronary artery extraction commonly used in existing methods. The study included cardiac CT exams of 250 patients for whom both a CCTA and a CSCT scan were available. To restrict the volume-of-interest for analysis, a bounding box around the heart is automatically determined. The bounding box detection algorithm employs a combination of three ConvNets, where each detects the heart in a different orthogonal plane (axial, sagittal, coronal). These ConvNets were trained using 50 cardiac CT exams. In the remaining 200 exams, a reference standard for CAC was defined in CSCT and CCTA. Out of these, 100 CCTA scans were used for training, and the remaining 100 for evaluation of a voxel classification method for CAC identification. The method uses ConvPairs, pairs of convolutional neural networks (ConvNets). The first ConvNet in a pair identifies voxels likely to be CAC, thereby discarding the majority of non-CAC-like voxels such as lung and fatty tissue. The identified CAC-like voxels are further classified by the second ConvNet in the pair, which distinguishes between CAC and CAC-like negatives. Given the different task of each ConvNet, they share their architecture, but not their weights. Input patches are either 2.5D or 3D. The ConvNets are purely convolutional, i.e. no pooling layers are present and fully connected layers are implemented as convolutions, thereby allowing efficient voxel classification. The performance of individual 2.5D and 3D ConvPairs with input sizes of 15 and 25 voxels, as well as the performance of ensembles of these Conv

  10. Dysplastic gangliocytoma (Lhermitte-Duclos disease): CT and MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieco, P.T.; Del Carpio-O' Donovan, R.; Melanson, D. (Montreal Neurological Hospital, PQ (Canada). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology); Montes, J. (Montreal Children' s Hospital, PQ (Canada). Dept. of Neurosurgery); O' Gorman, A.M. (Montreal Children' s Hospital, PQ (Canada). Dept. of Radiology); Meagher-Villemure, K. (Montreal Children' s Hospital, PQ (Canada). Dept. of Pathology)

    1992-09-01

    Dysplastic gangliocytoma (Lhermitte-Duclos disease) is a rare entity. Usually presenting as a posterior fossa mass, dyplastic gangliocytoma is not a true neoplasm but a hard-to-characterize lesion that may represent an abnormality of cell migration or a phacomatosis. Previous reports of CT findings are rare in the radiologic literature, and high-field (1.5 Tesla) MR images have never been described in the pediatric age group. We present a case of dysplastic gangliocytoma in a one-year-old boy with CT and MR findings. (orig.).

  11. Cardiac conductive system excitation maps using intracardiac tissue Doppler imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尹立雪; 郑昌琼; 蔡力; 郑翊; 李春梅; 邓燕; 罗芸; 李德玉; 赵树魁

    2003-01-01

    Objective To precisely visualize cardiac anatomic structures and simultaneously depict ele ctro-mechanical events for the purpose of precise underblood intervention. Methods Intracardiac high-resolution tissue Doppler imaging was used to map realt imemyocardial contractions in response to electrical activation within the anat omic structure of the cardiac conductive system using a canine open-chest model . Results The detailed inner anatomic structure of the cardiac conductive system at differ entsites (i.e., sino-atrial, atrial wall, atrial-ventricular node and ventr icular wall) with the inside onset and propagation of myocardial velocity and ac celeration induced by electrical activation was clearly visualized and quan titatively evaluated.Conclusion The simultaneous single modality visualization of the anatomy, function and electrical events of the cardiac conductive system will foster target pacing and pre cision ablation.

  12. Extranodal Rosai-Dorfman Disease Involving the Left Atrium: Cardiac MRI, CT, and PET Scan Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vistasp J. Daruwalla

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rosai-Dorfman disease (RDD is a rare entity that usually involves the lymph nodes but extranodal involvements have been seen in numerous cases, although RDD with cardiovascular involvement is extremely rare. We describe a case of a young male who presented with intermittent palpitations and was found to have a left atrium mass. Our case not only emphasizes the rarity of the above lesion but also highlights the importance of modern-day imaging like computed tomography, Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging (CMRI, and PET scan in characterizing such nonspecific lesions and directing appropriate line of treatment. RDD should be considered as one of the differentials even for isolated cardiac lesions.

  13. Quantifying the impact of respiratory-gated 4D CT acquisition on thoracic image quality: A digital phantom study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernatowicz, K., E-mail: kingab@student.ethz.ch; Knopf, A.; Lomax, A. [Center for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen PSI 5232, Switzerland and Department of Physics, ETH Zürich, Zürich 8092 (Switzerland); Keall, P.; Kipritidis, J., E-mail: john.kipritidis@sydney.edu.au [Radiation Physics Laboratory, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Mishra, P. [Brigham and Womens Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States)

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: Prospective respiratory-gated 4D CT has been shown to reduce tumor image artifacts by up to 50% compared to conventional 4D CT. However, to date no studies have quantified the impact of gated 4D CT on normal lung tissue imaging, which is important in performing dose calculations based on accurate estimates of lung volume and structure. To determine the impact of gated 4D CT on thoracic image quality, the authors developed a novel simulation framework incorporating a realistic deformable digital phantom driven by patient tumor motion patterns. Based on this framework, the authors test the hypothesis that respiratory-gated 4D CT can significantly reduce lung imaging artifacts. Methods: Our simulation framework synchronizes the 4D extended cardiac torso (XCAT) phantom with tumor motion data in a quasi real-time fashion, allowing simulation of three 4D CT acquisition modes featuring different levels of respiratory feedback: (i) “conventional” 4D CT that uses a constant imaging and couch-shift frequency, (ii) “beam paused” 4D CT that interrupts imaging to avoid oversampling at a given couch position and respiratory phase, and (iii) “respiratory-gated” 4D CT that triggers acquisition only when the respiratory motion fulfills phase-specific displacement gating windows based on prescan breathing data. Our framework generates a set of ground truth comparators, representing the average XCAT anatomy during beam-on for each of ten respiratory phase bins. Based on this framework, the authors simulated conventional, beam-paused, and respiratory-gated 4D CT images using tumor motion patterns from seven lung cancer patients across 13 treatment fractions, with a simulated 5.5 cm{sup 3} spherical lesion. Normal lung tissue image quality was quantified by comparing simulated and ground truth images in terms of overall mean square error (MSE) intensity difference, threshold-based lung volume error, and fractional false positive/false negative rates. Results

  14. A study on the effect of CT imaging acquisition parameters on lung nodule image interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shirley J.; Wantroba, Joseph S.; Raicu, Daniela S.; Furst, Jacob D.; Channin, David S.; Armato, Samuel G., III

    2009-02-01

    Most Computer-Aided Diagnosis (CAD) research studies are performed using a single type of Computer Tomography (CT) scanner and therefore, do not take into account the effect of differences in the imaging acquisition scanner parameters. In this paper, we present a study on the effect of the CT parameters on the low-level image features automatically extracted from CT images for lung nodule interpretation. The study is an extension of our previous study where we showed that image features can be used to predict semantic characteristics of lung nodules such as margin, lobulation, spiculation, and texture. Using the Lung Image Data Consortium (LIDC) dataset, we propose to integrate the imaging acquisition parameters with the low-level image features to generate classification models for the nodules' semantic characteristics. Our preliminary results identify seven CT parameters (convolution kernel, reconstruction diameter, exposure, nodule location along the z-axis, distance source to patient, slice thickness, and kVp) as influential in producing classification rules for the LIDC semantic characteristics. Further post-processing analysis, which included running box plots and binning of values, identified four CT parameters: distance source to patient, kVp, nodule location, and rescale intercept. The identification of these parameters will create the premises to normalize the image features across different scanners and, in the long run, generate automatic rules for lung nodules interpretation independently of the CT scanner types.

  15. Imaging in covert ectopic ACTH secretion: a CT pictorial review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sookur, Paul A.; Sahdev, Anju; Rockall, Andrea G.; Reznek, Rodney H. [St Bartholomew' s Hospital, Department of Academic Radiology, Dominion House, London (United Kingdom); Isidori, Andrea M. [Sapienza University of Rome, Department of Medical Pathophysiology, Rome (Italy); Monson, John P.; Grossman, Ashley B. [St Bartholomew' s Hospital, Department of Endocrinology, London (United Kingdom)

    2009-05-15

    The syndrome of ectopic adrenocorticotrophin secretion (EAS) is rare and is due to excess adrenocorticotrophin (ACTH) production from a nonpituitary tumour. These tumours can be covert, where the tumours are not readily apparent, and very small making them challenging to image. It is clinically and biochemically difficult to distinguish between covert EAS and Cushing's disease. The first-line investigation in locating the source of ACTH production is computed tomography (CT). The aim of this pictorial review is to illustrate the likely covert sites and related imaging findings. We review the CT appearances of tumours resulting in covert EAS and the associated literature. The most common tumours were bronchial carcinoid tumours, which appear as small, well-defined, round or ovoid pulmonary lesions. Rarer causes included thymic carcinoids, gastrointestinal carcinoids and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours. Awareness of the imaging characteristics will aid identification of the source of ACTH production and allow potentially curative surgical resection. (orig.)

  16. Automatic annotation of radiological observations in liver CT images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimenez, Francisco; Xu, Jiajing; Liu, Yi; Liu, Tiffany; Beaulieu, Christopher; Rubin, Daniel; Napel, Sandy

    2012-01-01

    We aim to predict radiological observations using computationally-derived imaging features extracted from computed tomography (CT) images. We created a dataset of 79 CT images containing liver lesions identified and annotated by a radiologist using a controlled vocabulary of 76 semantic terms. Computationally-derived features were extracted describing intensity, texture, shape, and edge sharpness. Traditional logistic regression was compared to L(1)-regularized logistic regression (LASSO) in order to predict the radiological observations using computational features. The approach was evaluated by leave one out cross-validation. Informative radiological observations such as lesion enhancement, hypervascular attenuation, and homogeneous retention were predicted well by computational features. By exploiting relationships between computational and semantic features, this approach could lead to more accurate and efficient radiology reporting.

  17. FDG PET/CT imaging as a biomarker in lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meignan, Michel; Itti, Emmanuel [Hopitaux Universitaires Henri Mondor, Paris-Est Creteil University, LYSA Imaging, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Creteil (France); Gallamini, Andrea [Nice University, Research, Innovation and Statistic Department, Antoine Lacassagne Cancer Center, Nice (France); Scientific Research Committee, S. Croce Hospital, Cuneo (Italy); Younes, Anas [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Lymphoma Service, New York, NY (United States)

    2015-04-01

    FDG PET/CT has changed the management of FDG-avid lymphoma and is now recommended as the imaging technique of choice for staging and restaging. The need for tailoring therapy to reduce toxicity in patients with a favourable outcome and for improving treatment in those with high-risk factors requires accurate diagnostic methods and a new prognostic algorithm to identify different risk categories. New drugs are used in relapsed/refractory patients. The role of FDG PET/CT as a biomarker in this context is summarized in this review. New trends in FDG metabolic imaging in lymphoma are addressed including metabolic tumour volume measurement at staging and integrative PET which combines PET data with clinical and molecular markers or other imaging techniques. The quantitative approach for response assessment which is under investigation and is used in large ongoing trials is compared with visual criteria. The place of FDG in the era of targeted therapy is discussed. (orig.)

  18. Application of Micro-Computed Tomography with Iodine Staining to Cardiac Imaging, Segmentation and Computational Model Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslanidi, OV; Nikolaidou, T; Zhao, J; Smaill, BH; Gilbert, SH; Holden, AV; Lowe, T; Withers, PJ; Jarvis, JC; Stephenson, RS; Hart, G; Hancox, JC; Boyett, MR; Zhang, H

    2012-01-01

    Micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) has been widely used to generate high-resolution 3D tissue images from small animals non-destructively, especially for mineralized skeletal tissues. However, its application to the analysis of soft cardiovascular tissues has been limited by poor inter-tissue contrast. Recent ex vivo studies have shown that contrast between muscular and connective tissue in micro-CT images can be enhanced by staining with iodine. In the present study, we apply this novel technique for imaging of cardiovascular structures in canine hearts. We optimize the method to obtain high resolution X-ray micro-CT images of the canine atria and its distinctive regions - including the Bachmann’s bundle, atrioventricular node, pulmonary arteries and veins - with clear inter-tissue contrast. The imaging results are used to reconstruct and segment the detailed 3D geometry of the atria. Structure tensor analysis shows that the arrangement of atrial fibres can also be characterised using the enhanced micro-CT images, as iodine preferentially accumulates within the muscular fibres rather than in connective tissues. This novel technique can be particularly useful in non-destructive imaging of 3D cardiac architectures from large animals and humans, due to the combination of relatively high speed (~1 hour/scan of a large canine heart) and high voxel resolution (36 μm) provided. In summary, contrast micro-CT facilitates fast and non-destructive imaging and segmenting of detailed 3D cardiovascular geometries, as well as measuring fibre orientation, which are crucial in constructing biophysically detailed computational cardiac models. PMID:22829390

  19. Fast and automatic ultrasound simulation from CT images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Weijian; Yang, Jian; Liu, Yue; Wang, Yongtian

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound is currently widely used in clinical diagnosis because of its fast and safe imaging principles. As the anatomical structures present in an ultrasound image are not as clear as CT or MRI. Physicians usually need advance clinical knowledge and experience to distinguish diseased tissues. Fast simulation of ultrasound provides a cost-effective way for the training and correlation of ultrasound and the anatomic structures. In this paper, a novel method is proposed for fast simulation of ultrasound from a CT image. A multiscale method is developed to enhance tubular structures so as to simulate the blood flow. The acoustic response of common tissues is generated by weighted integration of adjacent regions on the ultrasound propagation path in the CT image, from which parameters, including attenuation, reflection, scattering, and noise, are estimated simultaneously. The thin-plate spline interpolation method is employed to transform the simulation image between polar and rectangular coordinate systems. The Kaiser window function is utilized to produce integration and radial blurring effects of multiple transducer elements. Experimental results show that the developed method is very fast and effective, allowing realistic ultrasound to be fast generated. Given that the developed method is fully automatic, it can be utilized for ultrasound guided navigation in clinical practice and for training purpose.

  20. Fast and Automatic Ultrasound Simulation from CT Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weijian Cong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasound is currently widely used in clinical diagnosis because of its fast and safe imaging principles. As the anatomical structures present in an ultrasound image are not as clear as CT or MRI. Physicians usually need advance clinical knowledge and experience to distinguish diseased tissues. Fast simulation of ultrasound provides a cost-effective way for the training and correlation of ultrasound and the anatomic structures. In this paper, a novel method is proposed for fast simulation of ultrasound from a CT image. A multiscale method is developed to enhance tubular structures so as to simulate the blood flow. The acoustic response of common tissues is generated by weighted integration of adjacent regions on the ultrasound propagation path in the CT image, from which parameters, including attenuation, reflection, scattering, and noise, are estimated simultaneously. The thin-plate spline interpolation method is employed to transform the simulation image between polar and rectangular coordinate systems. The Kaiser window function is utilized to produce integration and radial blurring effects of multiple transducer elements. Experimental results show that the developed method is very fast and effective, allowing realistic ultrasound to be fast generated. Given that the developed method is fully automatic, it can be utilized for ultrasound guided navigation in clinical practice and for training purpose.

  1. Cardiac imaging in diagnostic VCT using multi-sector data acquisition and image reconstruction: step-and-shoot scan vs. helical scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiangyang; Hsieh, Jiang; Seamans, John L.; Dong, Fang; Okerlund, Darin

    2008-03-01

    Since the advent of multi-slice CT, helical scan has played an increasingly important role in cardiac imaging. With the availability of diagnostic volumetric CT, step-and-shoot scan has been becoming popular recently. Step-and-shoot scan decouples patient table motion from heart beating, and thus the temporal window for data acquisition and image reconstruction can be optimized, resulting in significantly reduced radiation dose, improved tolerance to heart beat rate variation and inter-cycle cardiac motion inconsistency. Multi-sector data acquisition and image reconstruction have been utilized in helical cardiac imaging to improve temporal resolution, but suffers from the coupling of heart beating and patient table motion. Recognizing the clinical demands, the multi-sector data acquisition scheme for step-and-shoot scan is investigated in this paper. The most outstanding feature of the multi-sector data acquisition combined with the stepand- shoot scan is the decoupling of patient table proceeding from heart beating, which offers the opportunities of employing prospective ECG-gating to improve dose efficiency and fine adjusting cardiac imaging phase to suppress artifacts caused by inter-cycle cardiac motion inconsistency. The improvement in temporal resolution and the resultant suppression of motion artifacts are evaluated via motion phantoms driven by artificial ECG signals. Both theoretical analysis and experimental evaluation show promising results for multi-sector data acquisition scheme to be employed with the step-and-shoot scan. With the ever-increasing gantry rotation speed and detector longitudinal coverage in stateof- the-art VCT scanners, it is expected that the step-and-shoot scan with multi-sector data acquisition scheme would play an increasingly important role in cardiac imaging using diagnostic VCT scanners.

  2. Hepatic CT Image Query Based on Threshold-based Classification Scheme with Gabor Features

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Li-jun; LUO Yong-zing; ZHAO Jun; ZHUANG Tian-ge

    2008-01-01

    Hepatic computed tomography (CT) images with Gabor function were analyzed.Then a thresholdbased classification scheme was proposed using Gabor features and proceeded with the retrieval of the hepatic CT images.In our experiments,a batch of hepatic CT images containing several types of CT findings was used and compared with the Zhao's image classification scheme,support vector machines (SVM) scheme and threshold-based scheme.

  3. Nondestructive Evaluation of Hardwood Logs Using Automated Interpretation of CT Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel L. Schmoldt; Dongping Zhu; Richard W. Conners

    1993-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) imaging is being used to examine the internal structure of hardwood logs. The following steps are used to automatically interpret CT images: (1) preprocessing to remove unwanted portions of the image, e.g., annual ring structure, (2) image-by-image segmentation to produce relatively homogeneous image areas, (3) volume growing to create volumes...

  4. Multi-institutional MicroCT image comparison of image-guided small animal irradiators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, Chris D.; Lindsay, Patricia; E Graves, Edward; Wong, Eugene; Perez, Jessica R.; Poirier, Yannick; Ben-Bouchta, Youssef; Kanesalingam, Thilakshan; Chen, Haijian; E Rubinstein, Ashley; Sheng, Ke; Bazalova-Carter, Magdalena

    2017-07-01

    To recommend imaging protocols and establish tolerance levels for microCT image quality assurance (QA) performed on conformal image-guided small animal irradiators. A fully automated QA software SAPA (small animal phantom analyzer) for image analysis of the commercial Shelley micro-CT MCTP 610 phantom was developed, in which quantitative analyses of CT number linearity, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), uniformity and noise, geometric accuracy, spatial resolution by means of modulation transfer function (MTF), and CT contrast were performed. Phantom microCT scans from eleven institutions acquired with four image-guided small animal irradiator units (including the commercial PXi X-RAD SmART and Xstrahl SARRP systems) with varying parameters used for routine small animal imaging were analyzed. Multi-institutional data sets were compared using SAPA, based on which tolerance levels for each QA test were established and imaging protocols for QA were recommended. By analyzing microCT data from 11 institutions, we established image QA tolerance levels for all image quality tests. CT number linearity set to R 2  >  0.990 was acceptable in microCT data acquired at all but three institutions. Acceptable SNR  >  36 and noise levels  1.5 lp mm-1 for MTF  =  0.2) was obtained at all but four institutions due to their large image voxel size used (>0.275 mm). Ten of the eleven institutions passed the set QA tolerance for geometric accuracy (2000 HU for 30 mgI ml-1). We recommend performing imaging QA with 70 kVp, 1.5 mA, 120 s imaging time, 0.20 mm voxel size, and a frame rate of 5 fps for the PXi X-RAD SmART. For the Xstrahl SARRP, we recommend using 60 kVp, 1.0 mA, 240 s imaging time, 0.20 mm voxel size, and 6 fps. These imaging protocols should result in high quality images that pass the set tolerance levels on all systems. Average SAPA computation time for complete QA analysis for a 0.20 mm voxel, 400 slice Shelley phantom microCT data set

  5. Coronary artery imaging during preoperative CT staging: preliminary experience with 64-slice multidetector CT in 99 consecutive patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delhaye, Damien; Remy-Jardin, Martine; Rozel, Celine; Remy, Jacques [University Center of Lille, Boulevard Jules Leclerc, Department of Thoracic Imaging, Hospital Calmette, Lille cedex (France); Dusson, Catherine; Wurtz, Alain [University Center of Lille, Department of Thoracic Surgery, Hospital Calmette, Lille cedex (France); Delannoy-Deken, Valerie; Duhamel, Alain [University of Lille, Department of Medical Statistics, Lille cedex (France)

    2007-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical feasibility of coronary artery imaging during routine preoperative 64-slice MDCT scans of the chest. Ninety-nine consecutive patients in sinus rhythm underwent a biphasic multidetector-row spiral CT examination of the chest without the administration of beta-blockers, including an ECG-gated acquisition over the cardiac cavities, followed by a non-gated examination of the upper third of the thorax. Data were reconstructed to evaluate coronary arteries and to obtain presurgical staging of the underlying disease. The percentage of assessable segments ranged from 65.4% (972/1,485) when considering all coronary artery segments to 88% (613/693) for the proximal and mid segments, reaching 98% (387/396) for proximal coronary artery segments. The 387 interpretable proximal segments included 97 (97%) LM, 99 (100%) LAD, 96 (97%) LCX and 95 (96%) RCA with a mean attenuation of 280.70{+-}52.93 HU. The mean percentage of assessable segments was significantly higher in patients with a heart rate {<=}80 bpm (n=48) than in patients with a heart rate greater than 80 bpm (n=35) (80{+-}11% vs. 72{+-}13%; P=0.0008). Diagnostic image quality was achieved in all patients for preoperative staging of the underlying disorder. The mean estimated effective dose was 12.06{+-}3.25 mSv for ECG-gated scans and 13.88{+-}3.49 mSv for complete chest examinations. Proximal and mid-coronary artery segments can be adequately evaluated during presurgical CT examinations of the chest obtained with 64-slice MDCT without the administration of {beta}-blockers. (orig.)

  6. Multislice CT brain image registration for perfusion studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhong Min; Pohlman, Scott; Chandra, Shalabh

    2002-04-01

    During the last several years perfusion CT techniques have been developed as an effective technique for clinically evaluating cerebral hemodynamics. Perfusion CT techniques are capable of measurings functional parameters such as tissue perfusion, blood flow, blood volume, and mean transit time and are commonly used to evaluate stroke patients. However, the quality of functional images of the brain frequently suffers from patient head motion. Because the time window for an effective treatment of stroke patient is narrow, a fast motion correction is required. The purpose of the paper is to present a fast and accurate registration technique for motion correction of multi-slice CT and to demonstrate the effects of the registration on perfusion calculation.

  7. Molecular Imaging with Small Animal PET/CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    in this field of small animal molecular imaging with special emphasis on the targets for tissue characterization in tumor biology such as hypoxia, proliferation and cancer specific over-expression of receptors. The added value of applying CT imaging for anatomical localization and tumor volume measurements...... is also described. In addition, the non-invasive nature of molecular imaging and the targets of these promising new tracers are attractive for other research areas as well, although these fields are much less explored. We present an example of an interesting research field with the application of small...

  8. A minimum spanning forest based classification method for dedicated breast CT images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pike, R.; Sechopoulos, I.; Fei, B.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To develop and test an automated algorithm to classify different types of tissue in dedicated breast CT images. METHODS: Images of a single breast of five different patients were acquired with a dedicated breast CT clinical prototype. The breast CT images were processed by a multiscale bila

  9. Importance of PET/CT for imaging of colorectal cancer; Stellenwert der PET/CT zur Bildgebung des kolorektalen Karzinoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meinel, F.G.; Schramm, N.; Graser, A.; Reiser, M.F.; Rist, C. [Klinikum der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Campus Grosshadern, Institut fuer Klinische Radiologie, Muenchen (Germany); Haug, A.R. [Klinikum der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Campus Grosshadern, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Muenchen (Germany)

    2012-06-15

    Fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) has emerged as a very useful imaging modality in the management of colorectal carcinoma. Data from the literature regarding the role of PET/CT in the initial diagnosis, staging, radiotherapy planning, response monitoring and surveillance of colorectal carcinoma is presented. Future directions and economic aspects are discussed. Computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and FDG-PET for colorectal cancer and endorectal ultrasound for rectal cancer. Combined FDG-PET/CT. While other imaging modalities allow superior visualization of the extent and invasion depth of the primary tumor, PET/CT is most sensitive for the detection of distant metastases of colorectal cancer. We recommend a targeted use of PET/CT in cases of unclear M staging, prior to metastasectomy and in suspected cases of residual or recurrent colorectal carcinoma with equivocal conventional imaging. The role of PET/CT in radiotherapy planning and response monitoring needs to be determined. Currently there is no evidence to support the routine use of PET/CT for colorectal screening, staging or surveillance. To optimally exploit the synergy between morphologic and functional information, FDG-PET should generally be performed as an integrated FDG-PET/CT with a contrast-enhanced CT component in colorectal carcinoma. (orig.) [German] Die Fluordesoxyglukose-Positronenemissionstomographie/Computertomographie (FDG-PET/CT) hat in den letzten Jahren zunehmende Bedeutung zur Bildgebung des kolorektalen Karzinoms erlangt. In diesem Beitrag stellen wir den Stand der Literatur zur Rolle der PET/CT bei Screening, Staging, Bestrahlungsplanung, Beurteilung eines Therapieansprechens und Nachsorge des kolorektalen Karzinoms dar. Zudem wird auf gesundheitsoekonomische Aspekte und zukuenftige Entwicklungen eingegangen. CT, MRT, FDG-PET, beim Rektumkarzinom zusaetzlich endorektaler Ultraschall. Kombinierte FDG-PET/CT. Waehrend

  10. Incidental cardiac findings on computed tomography imaging of the thorax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Gendi Hossam

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Investigation of pulmonary pathology with computed tomography also allows visualisation of the heart and major vessels. We sought to explore whether clinically relevant cardiac pathology could be identified on computed tomography pulmonary angiograms (CTPA requested for the exclusion of pulmonary embolism (PE. 100 consecutive CT contrast-enhanced pulmonary angiograms carried out for exclusion of PE at a single centre were assessed retrospectively by two cardiologists. Findings Evidence of PE was reported in 5% of scans. Incidental cardiac findings included: aortic wall calcification (54%, coronary calcification (46%, cardiomegaly (41%, atrial dilatation (18%, mitral annulus calcification (15%, right ventricular dilatation (11%, aortic dilatation (8% and right ventricular thrombus (1%. Apart from 3 (3% reports describing cardiomegaly, no other cardiac findings were described in radiologists' reports. Other reported pulmonary abnormalities included: lung nodules (14%, lobar collapse/consolidation (8%, pleural effusion (2%, lobar collapse/consolidation (8%, emphysema (6% and pleural calcification (4%. Conclusions CTPAs requested for the exclusion of PE have a high yield of cardiac abnormalities. Although these abnormalities may not have implications for acute clinical management, they may, nevertheless, be important in long-term care.

  11. Gallium-68 EDTA PET/CT for Renal Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofman, Michael S; Hicks, Rodney J

    2016-09-01

    Nuclear medicine renal imaging provides important functional data to assist in the diagnosis and management of patients with a variety of renal disorders. Physiologically stable metal chelates like ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and diethylenetriamine penta-acetate (DTPA) are excreted by glomerular filtration and have been radiolabelled with a variety of isotopes for imaging glomerular filtration and quantitative assessment of glomerular filtration rate. Gallium-68 ((68)Ga) EDTA PET usage predates Technetium-99m ((99m)Tc) renal imaging, but virtually disappeared with the widespread adoption of gamma camera technology that was not optimal for imaging positron decay. There is now a reemergence of interest in (68)Ga owing to the greater availability of PET technology and use of (68)Ga to label other radiotracers. (68)Ga EDTA can be used a substitute for (99m)Tc DTPA for wide variety of clinical indications. A key advantage of PET for renal imaging over conventional scintigraphy is 3-dimensional dynamic imaging, which is particularly helpful in patients with complex anatomy in whom planar imaging may be nondiagnostic or difficult to interpret owing to overlying structures containing radioactive urine that cannot be differentiated. Other advantages include accurate and absolute (rather than relative) camera-based quantification, superior spatial and temporal resolution and integrated multislice CT providing anatomical correlation. Furthermore, the (68)Ga generator enables on-demand production at low cost, with no additional patient radiation exposure compared with conventional scintigraphy. Over the past decade, we have employed (68)Ga EDTA PET/CT primarily to answer difficult clinical questions in patients in whom other modalities have failed, particularly when it was envisaged that dynamic 3D imaging would be of assistance. We have also used it as a substitute for (99m)Tc DTPA if unavailable owing to supply issues, and have additionally examined the role of

  12. Left ventricle endocardium segmentation for cardiac CT volumes using an optimal smooth surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yefeng; Georgescu, Bogdan; Vega-Higuera, Fernando; Comaniciu, Dorin

    2009-02-01

    We recently proposed a robust heart chamber segmentation approach based on marginal space learning. In this paper, we focus on improving the LV endocardium segmentation accuracy by searching for an optimal smooth mesh that tightly encloses the whole blood pool. The refinement procedure is formulated as an optimization problem: maximizing the surface smoothness under the tightness constraint. The formulation is a convex quadratic programming problem, therefore has a unique global optimum and can be solved efficiently. Our approach has been validated on the largest cardiac CT dataset (457 volumes from 186 patients) ever reported. Compared to our previous work, it reduces the mean point-to-mesh error from 1.13 mm to 0.84 mm (22% improvement). Additionally, the system has been extensively tested on a dataset with 2000+ volumes without any major failure.

  13. Automated determination of spinal centerline in CT and MR images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Štern, Darko; Vrtovec, Tomaž; Pernuš, Franjo; Likar, Boštjan

    2009-02-01

    The spinal curvature is one of the most important parameters for the evaluation of spinal deformities. The spinal centerline, represented by the curve that passes through the centers of the vertebral bodies in three-dimensions (3D), allows valid quantitative measurements of the spinal curvature at any location along the spine. We propose a novel automated method for the determination of the spinal centerline in 3D spine images. Our method exploits the anatomical property that the vertebral body walls are cylindrically-shaped and therefore the lines normal to the edges of the vertebral body walls most often intersect in the middle of the vertebral bodies, i.e. at the location of spinal centerline. These points of intersection are first obtained by a novel algorithm that performs a selective search in the directions normal to the edges of the structures and then connected with a parametric curve that represents the spinal centerline in 3D. As the method is based on anatomical properties of the 3D spine anatomy, it is modality-independent, i.e. applicable to images obtained by computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR). The proposed method was evaluated on six CT and four MR images (T1- and T2-weighted) of normal spines and on one scoliotic CT spine image. The qualitative and quantitative results for the normal spines show that the spinal centerline can be successfully determined in both CT and MR spine images, while the results for the scoliotic spine indicate that the method may also be used to evaluate pathological curvatures.

  14. Segmentation of the ovine lung in 3D CT Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Lijun; Hoffman, Eric A.; Reinhardt, Joseph M.

    2004-04-01

    Pulmonary CT images can provide detailed information about the regional structure and function of the respiratory system. Prior to any of these analyses, however, the lungs must be identified in the CT data sets. A popular animal model for understanding lung physiology and pathophysiology is the sheep. In this paper we describe a lung segmentation algorithm for CT images of sheep. The algorithm has two main steps. The first step is lung extraction, which identifies the lung region using a technique based on optimal thresholding and connected components analysis. The second step is lung separation, which separates the left lung from the right lung by identifying the central fissure using an anatomy-based method incorporating dynamic programming and a line filter algorithm. The lung segmentation algorithm has been validated by comparing our automatic method to manual analysis for five pulmonary CT datasets. The RMS error between the computer-defined and manually-traced boundary is 0.96 mm. The segmentation requires approximately 10 minutes for a 512x512x400 dataset on a PC workstation (2.40 GHZ CPU, 2.0 GB RAM), while it takes human observer approximately two hours to accomplish the same task.

  15. Detection of Trabeculae and Papillary Muscles in Cardiac MR Images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spreeuwers, Lieuwe Jan; Bangma, S.J.; Meerwaldt, R.J.H.W.; Vonken, E.J.; Breeuwer, M.

    2005-01-01

    With the improvement of the quality of MR imagery, more and more details become visible. Only 5-10 years ago cardiac images of the heart were still so unsharp that finer details of the heart like the papillary muscles and the trabeculae were hardly visible and it was simply impossible to determine

  16. Detection of Trabeculae and Papillary Muscles in Cardiac MR Images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spreeuwers, L.J.; Bangma, S.J.; Meerwaldt, R.J.H.W.; Vonken, E.J.; Breeuwer, M.

    2005-01-01

    With the improvement of the quality of MR imagery, more and more details become visible. Only 5-10 years ago cardiac images of the heart were still so unsharp that finer details of the heart like the papillary muscles and the trabeculae were hardly visible and it was simply impossible to determine t

  17. The influence of respiratory motion on CT image volume definition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodríguez-Romero, Ruth, E-mail: rrromero@salud.madrid.org; Castro-Tejero, Pablo, E-mail: pablo.castro@salud.madrid.org [Servicio de Radiofísica y Protección Radiológica, Hospital Universitario Puerta de Hierro Majadahonda, 28222 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: Radiotherapy treatments are based on geometric and density information acquired from patient CT scans. It is well established that breathing motion during scan acquisition induces motion artifacts in CT images, which can alter the size, shape, and density of a patient's anatomy. The aim of this work is to examine and evaluate the impact of breathing motion on multislice CT imaging with respiratory synchronization (4DCT) and without it (3DCT). Methods: A specific phantom with a movable insert was used. Static and dynamic phantom acquisitions were obtained with a multislice CT. Four sinusoidal breath patterns were simulated to move known geometric structures longitudinally. Respiratory synchronized acquisitions (4DCT) were performed to generate images during inhale, intermediate, and exhale phases using prospective and retrospective techniques. Static phantom data were acquired in helical and sequential mode to define a baseline for each type of respiratory 4DCT technique. Taking into account the fact that respiratory 4DCT is not always available, 3DCT helical image studies were also acquired for several CT rotation periods. To study breath and acquisition coupling when respiratory 4DCT was not performed, the beginning of the CT image acquisition was matched with inhale, intermediate, or exhale respiratory phases, for each breath pattern. Other coupling scenarios were evaluated by simulating different phantom and CT acquisition parameters. Motion induced variations in shape and density were quantified by automatic threshold volume generation and Dice similarity coefficient calculation. The structure mass center positions were also determined to make a comparison with their theoretical expected position. Results: 4DCT acquisitions provided volume and position accuracies within ±3% and ±2 mm for structure dimensions >2 cm, breath amplitude ≤15 mm, and breath period ≥3 s. The smallest object (1 cm diameter) exceeded 5% volume variation for the breath

  18. The influence of respiratory motion on CT image volume definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Romero, Ruth; Castro-Tejero, Pablo

    2014-04-01

    Radiotherapy treatments are based on geometric and density information acquired from patient CT scans. It is well established that breathing motion during scan acquisition induces motion artifacts in CT images, which can alter the size, shape, and density of a patient's anatomy. The aim of this work is to examine and evaluate the impact of breathing motion on multislice CT imaging with respiratory synchronization (4DCT) and without it (3DCT). A specific phantom with a movable insert was used. Static and dynamic phantom acquisitions were obtained with a multislice CT. Four sinusoidal breath patterns were simulated to move known geometric structures longitudinally. Respiratory synchronized acquisitions (4DCT) were performed to generate images during inhale, intermediate, and exhale phases using prospective and retrospective techniques. Static phantom data were acquired in helical and sequential mode to define a baseline for each type of respiratory 4DCT technique. Taking into account the fact that respiratory 4DCT is not always available, 3DCT helical image studies were also acquired for several CT rotation periods. To study breath and acquisition coupling when respiratory 4DCT was not performed, the beginning of the CT image acquisition was matched with inhale, intermediate, or exhale respiratory phases, for each breath pattern. Other coupling scenarios were evaluated by simulating different phantom and CT acquisition parameters. Motion induced variations in shape and density were quantified by automatic threshold volume generation and Dice similarity coefficient calculation. The structure mass center positions were also determined to make a comparison with their theoretical expected position. 4DCT acquisitions provided volume and position accuracies within ± 3% and ± 2 mm for structure dimensions >2 cm, breath amplitude ≤ 15 mm, and breath period ≥ 3 s. The smallest object (1 cm diameter) exceeded 5% volume variation for the breath patterns of higher

  19. Three modality image registration of brain SPECT/CT and MR images for quantitative analysis of dopamine transporter imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Yuzuho; Takeda, Yuta; Hara, Takeshi; Zhou, Xiangrong; Matsusako, Masaki; Tanaka, Yuki; Hosoya, Kazuhiko; Nihei, Tsutomu; Katafuchi, Tetsuro; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2016-03-01

    Important features in Parkinson's disease (PD) are degenerations and losses of dopamine neurons in corpus striatum. 123I-FP-CIT can visualize activities of the dopamine neurons. The activity radio of background to corpus striatum is used for diagnosis of PD and Dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB). The specific activity can be observed in the corpus striatum on SPECT images, but the location and the shape of the corpus striatum on SPECT images only are often lost because of the low uptake. In contrast, MR images can visualize the locations of the corpus striatum. The purpose of this study was to realize a quantitative image analysis for the SPECT images by using image registration technique with brain MR images that can determine the region of corpus striatum. In this study, the image fusion technique was used to fuse SPECT and MR images by intervening CT image taken by SPECT/CT. The mutual information (MI) for image registration between CT and MR images was used for the registration. Six SPECT/CT and four MR scans of phantom materials are taken by changing the direction. As the results of the image registrations, 16 of 24 combinations were registered within 1.3mm. By applying the approach to 32 clinical SPECT/CT and MR cases, all of the cases were registered within 0.86mm. In conclusions, our registration method has a potential in superimposing MR images on SPECT images.

  20. Investigation of the potential causes of partial scan artifacts in dynamic CT myocardial perfusion imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Yinghua; Speidel, Michael; Szczykutowicz, Timothy; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2014-03-01

    In recent years, there have been several findings regarding CT number variations (partial scan artifact or PSA) across time in dynamic myocardial perfusion studies with short scan gated reconstruction. These variations are correlated with the view angle range corresponding to the short scan acquisition for a given cardiac phase, which can vary from one cardiac cycle to another due to the asynchrony between heart rate and gantry rotation speed. In this study, we investigate several potential causes of PSA, including noise, beam hardening and scatter, using numerical simulations. In addition, we investigate partial scan artifact in a single source 64-slice diagnostic CT scanner in vivo data sets, and report its effect on perfusion analysis. Results indicated that among all three factors investigated, scatter can cause obvious partial scan artifact in dynamic myocardial perfusion imaging. Further, scatter is a low frequency phenomenon and is not heavily dependent on the changing contrasts, as both the frequency method and the virtual scan method are effective in reducing partial scan artifact. However, PSA does not necessarily lead to different blood volume maps compared to the full scan, because these maps are usually generated with a curve fitting procedure.

  1. Hotspot quantification of myocardial focal tracer uptake from molecular targeted SPECT/CT images: experimental validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi-Hwa; Sahul, Zakir; Weyman, Christopher A.; Ryder, William J.; Dione, Donald P.; Dobrucki, Lawrence W.; Mekkaoui, Choukri; Brennan, Matthew P.; Hu, Xiaoyue; Hawley, Christi; Sinusas, Albert J.

    2008-03-01

    We have developed a new single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) hotspot quantification method incorporating extra cardiac activity correction and hotspot normal limit estimation. The method was validated for estimation accuracy of myocardial tracer focal uptake in a chronic canine model of myocardial infarction (MI). Dogs (n = 4) at 2 weeks post MI were injected with Tl-201 and a Tc-99m-labeled hotspot tracer targeted at matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). An external point source filled with Tc-99m was used for a reference of absolute radioactivity. Dual-isotope (Tc-99m/Tl-201) SPECT images were acquired simultaneously followed by an X-ray CT acquisition. Dogs were sacrificed after imaging for myocardial gamma well counting. Images were reconstructed with CT-based attenuation correction (AC) and without AC (NAC) and were quantified using our quantification method. Normal limits for myocardial hotspot uptake were estimated based on 3 different schemes: maximum entropy, meansquared-error minimization (MSEM) and global minimization. Absolute myocardial hotspot uptake was quantified from SPECT images using the normal limits and compared with well-counted radioactivity on a segment-by-segment basis (n = 12 segments/dog). Radioactivity was expressed as % injected dose (%ID). There was an excellent correlation (r = 0.78-0.92) between the estimated activity (%ID) derived using the SPECT quantitative approach and well-counting, independent of AC. However, SPECT quantification without AC resulted in the significant underestimation of radioactivity. Quantification using SPECT with AC and the MSEM normal limit yielded the best results compared with well-counting. In conclusion, focal myocardial "hotspot" uptake of a targeted radiotracer can be accurately quantified in vivo using a method that incorporates SPECT imaging with AC, an external reference, background scatter compensation, and a suitable normal limit. This hybrid SPECT/CT approach allows for the serial

  2. CT scan range estimation using multiple body parts detection: let PACS learn the CT image content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chunliang; Lundström, Claes

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an efficient CT scan range estimation method that is based on the analysis of image data itself instead of metadata analysis. This makes it possible to quantitatively compare the scan range of two studies. In our study, 3D stacks are first projected to 2D coronal images via a ray casting-like process. Trained 2D body part classifiers are then used to recognize different body parts in the projected image. The detected candidate regions go into a structure grouping process to eliminate false-positive detections. Finally, the scale and position of the patient relative to the projected figure are estimated based on the detected body parts via a structural voting. The start and end lines of the CT scan are projected to a standard human figure. The position readout is normalized so that the bottom of the feet represents 0.0, and the top of the head is 1.0. Classifiers for 18 body parts were trained using 184 CT scans. The final application was tested on 136 randomly selected heterogeneous CT scans. Ground truth was generated by asking two human observers to mark the start and end positions of each scan on the standard human figure. When compared with the human observers, the mean absolute error of the proposed method is 1.2% (max: 3.5%) and 1.6% (max: 5.4%) for the start and end positions, respectively. We proposed a scan range estimation method using multiple body parts detection and relative structure position analysis. In our preliminary tests, the proposed method delivered promising results.

  3. TU-G-BRA-08: BEST IN PHYSICS (JOINT IMAGING-THERAPY): Hybrid PET-MRI Imaging of Acute Radiation Induced Cardiac Toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Sherif, O; Xhaferllari, I; Gaede, S [Western Univeristy, London, ON (United Kingdom); London Regional Cancer Program, London, ON (United Kingdom); Sykes, J; Butler, J [Lawson Health Research Institute, London, ON (United Kingdom); Wisenberg, G; Prato, F [Western Univeristy, London, ON (United Kingdom); Lawson Health Research Institute, London, ON (United Kingdom)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To identify the presence of low-dose radiation induced cardiac toxicity in a canine model using hybrid positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods: Research ethics board approval was obtained for a longitudinal imaging study of 5 canines after cardiac irradiation. Animals were imaged at baseline, 1 week post cardiac irradiation, and 1 month post cardiac irradiation using a hybrid PET- MRI system (Biograph mMR, Siemens Healthcare). The imaging protocol was designed to assess acute changes in myocardial perfusion and inflammation. Myocardial perfusion imaging was performed using N13-ammonia tracer followed by a dynamic PET acquisition scan. A compartmental tracer kinetic model was used for absolute perfusion quantification. Myocardial inflammation imaging was performed using F18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) tracer. The standard uptake value (SUV) over a region encompassing the whole heart was used to compare FDG scans. All animals received a simulation CT scan (GE Medical Systems) for radiation treatment planning. Radiation treatment plans were created using the Pinncale3 treatment planning system (Philips Radiation Oncology Systems) and designed to resemble the typical cardiac exposure during left-sided breast cancer radiotherapy. Cardiac irradiations were performed in a single fraction using a TrueBeam linear accelerator (Varian Medical Systems). Results: The delivered dose (mean ± standard deviation) to heart was 1.8±0.2 Gy. Reductions in myocardial stress perfusion relative to baseline were observed in 2 of the 5 animals 1 month post radiation. A global inflammatory response 1 month post radiation was observed in 4 of the 5 animals. The calculated SUV at 1 month post radiation was significantly higher (p=0.05) than the baseline SUV. Conclusion: Low doses of cardiac irradiation (< 2 Gy) may lead to myocardial perfusion defects and a global inflammatory response that can be detectable as early as 1 month post irradiation

  4. Detection of Trabeculae and Papillary Muscles in Cardiac MR Images

    OpenAIRE

    Spreeuwers, Lieuwe Jan; Bangma, S.J.; Meerwaldt, R.J.H.W.; Vonken, E.J.; Breeuwer, M.

    2005-01-01

    With the improvement of the quality of MR imagery, more and more details become visible. Only 5-10 years ago cardiac images of the heart were still so unsharp that finer details of the heart like the papillary muscles and the trabeculae were hardly visible and it was simply impossible to determine their outlines with any measure of accuracy. With the improved image quality it becomes feasible to extract information about these small structures. Studying the operation of these tiny muscles can...

  5. Pitfalls and Limitations of PET/CT in Brain Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, Eric; Bernard Ir, Claire; Hustinx, Roland

    2015-11-01

    Neurologic applications were at the forefront of PET imaging when the technique was developed in the mid-1970s. Although oncologic indications have become prominent in terms of number of studies performed worldwide, neurology remains a major field in which functional imaging provides unique information, both for clinical and research purposes. The evaluation of glucose metabolism using FDG remains the most frequent exploration, but in recent years, alternative radiotracers have been developed, including fluorinated amino acid analogues for primary brain tumor imaging and fluorinated compounds for assessing the amyloid deposits in patients with suspected Alzheimer disease. As the brain is enclosed in the skull, which presents fixed landmarks, it is relatively easy to coregister images obtained with various cross-sectional imaging methods, either functional or anatomical, with a relatively high accuracy and robustness. Nevertheless, PET in neurology has fully benefited from the advent of hybrid imaging. Attenuation and scatter correction is now much faster and equally accurate, using CT as compared with the traditional transmission scan using an external radioactive source. The perfect coregistration with the CT data, which is now systematically performed, also provides its own set of valuable information, for instance regarding cerebral atrophy. However, hybrid imaging in neurology comes with pitfalls and limitations, in addition to those that are well known, for example, blood glucose levels or psychotropic drugs that greatly affect the physiological FDG uptake. Movements of the patient's head, either during the PET acquisition or between the PET and the CT acquisitions will generate artifacts that may be very subtle yet lead to erroneous interpretation of the study. Similarly, quantitative analysis, such as voxel-based analyses, may prove very helpful in improving the diagnostic accuracy and the reproducibility of the reading, but a wide variety of artifacts may

  6. Detection of intramyocardial fatty components in patients with cardiac disease by ultrafast X-ray CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaminaga, T. [Div. of Tracer Kinetics, Biomedical Research Center, Osaka Univ. Medical School, Suita (Japan); Naito, H. [Div. of Functional Diagnostic Imaging, Biomedical Research Center, Osaka Univ. Medical School, Suita (Japan); Takamiya, M. [Dept. of Radiology, National Cardiovascular Center, Suita, Osaka (Japan)

    1994-10-01

    To investigate intramyocardial fatty components as regards their distribution, frequency by disorder and cause, 331 patients with cardiac disease were examined with ultrafast X-ray CT (UFCT). The patient group consisted of 139 cases of myocardial infarction and angina, 27 cases of Kawasaki disease, 28 cases of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), 22 cases of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), 3 cases of arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia (ARVD), 40 cases of valvular disease, 33 cases of left ventricular hypertrophy due to hypertension, 17 cases of arrhythmia, 10 cases of cardiac sarcoidosis, 6 cases of myocarditis and 6 cases of congenital anomaly. Intramyocardial fatty components were detected in 15 patients (5 myocardial infarction, 2 Kawasaki disease, 3 HCM, 4 DCM, 1 ARVD). In patients with myocardial infarction, Kawasaki disease or DCM, the segments with fatty components agreed well with the segments with asynergy in left ventriculography and/or the segments with perfusion defects in thallium myocardial scintigraphy. The frequency of intramyocardial fatty components in each disease was initially determined as follows: 6% in myocardial infarction, 7% in Kawasaki disease, 11% in HCM and 18% in DCM. Ischaemic myocardial damage can induce intramyocardial fatty components in patients with myocardial infarction, Kawasaki disease or DCM. (orig.)

  7. SU-D-BRB-01: 4D-CT Lung Ventilation Images Vary with 4D-CT Sorting Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, T; Kabus, S; Lorenz, C; Johnston, E; Maxim, P; Loo, B; Keall, P

    2012-06-01

    4D-CT ventilation imaging is a novel promising technique for lung functional imaging and has potential as a biomarker for radiation pneumonitis, but has not been validated in human subjects. The current 4D- CT technique with phase-based sorting results in artifacts at an alarmingly high frequency (90%), which may introduce variations into ventilation calculations. The purpose of this study was to quantify the variability of 4D- CT ventilation imaging to 4D-CT sorting techniques. Two 4D-CT images were generated from the same data set by: (1) phase-based; (2) anatomic similarity- and abdominal displacement-based sorting for five patients. Two ventilation image sets (V_phase and V_anat) were then calculated by deformable image registration of peak-exhale and peak-inhale4D-CT images and quantification of regional volume change based on Hounsfield unit change. The variability of 4D-CT ventilation imaging wasquantified using the voxel-based Spearman rank correlation coefficients and Dice similarity coefficients (DSC) for the spatial overlap of segmented low- functional lung regions. The relationship between the abdominal motionrange variation and ventilation variation was also assessed using linearregression. Furthermore, the correlations between V_phase or V_anat and SPECT ventilation images (assumed ground-truth) were compared. In general, displacement- and anatomic similarity-based sorting reduced 4D- CT artifacts compared to phase-based sorting. The voxel-based correlationsbetween V_phase and V_anat were only moderate (range, 0.57-0.77). The DSCs for the low-functional lung regions were moderate to substantial (0.58-0.70). The relationship between the motion range variation and ventilation variation was strong on average (R2=0.79±0.25), suggesting that ventilation variations are related to 4D-CT artifacts. Vanat was found to improve correlations with SPECT ventilation images compared to V_phase. 4D-CT ventilation images vary markedly with 4D-CT sorting techniques. 4

  8. Dual-step prospective ECG-triggered 128-slice dual-source CT for evaluation of coronary arteries and cardiac function without heart rate control: a technical note

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feuchtner, Gudrun [University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Innsbruck Medical University, Department of Radiology II, Innsbruck (Austria); Goetti, Robert; Marincek, Borut; Alkadhi, Hatem; Leschka, Sebastian [University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Plass, Andre; Wieser, Monika [University Hospital Zurich, Clinic for Cardiovascular Surgery, Zurich (Switzerland); Baumueller, Stephan; Stolzmann, Paul; Scheffel, Hans [University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); University Hospital Zurich, Clinic for Cardiovascular Surgery, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2010-09-15

    To describe prospective ECG-triggered dual-source CT dual-step pulsing (pECG{sub dual-step}) for evaluation of coronary arteries and cardiac function. Fifty-one consecutive patients pre- or post-cardiovascular surgery were examined with adaptive sequential tube current modulated (pECG{sub dual-step}) 128-slice dual-source CT without heart rate control (main padding window: 40% RR interval >65 bpm/70% RR interval <65 bpm). Image quality of coronary arteries was graded (4-point scale), and cardiac function was evaluated. Mean HR was 68 bpm. Thirty-seven patients were in stable sinus rhythm (SR); 14 had arrhythmia. Image quality of coronary arteries was diagnostic in 804/816 (98%) of segments. The number of non-diagnostic segments was higher in patients with arrhythmia as compared to those in SR (4% vs. 0.5%; p = 0.01), and there were fewer segments with excellent image quality (79% vs. 94%; p < 0.001) and more segments with impaired image quality (p < 0.001 and p = 0.002). Global and regional LV function could be evaluated in 41 (80%) and 47 (92%) patients, and valvular function in 48 (94%). In 11/14 of patients with arrhythmia, the second step switched to full mAs, increasing radiation exposure to 8.6 mAs (p < 0.001). The average radiation dose was 3.8 mSv (range, 1.7-7.9) in patients in SR. pECG{sub dual-step}128-slice DSCT is feasible for the evaluation of coronary arteries and cardiac function without heart rate control in patients in stable sinus rhythm at a low radiation dose. (orig.)

  9. Heartfelt images: learning cardiac science artistically.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courneya, Carol Ann

    2017-07-29

    There are limited curricular options for medical students to engage in art-making during their training. Yet, it is known that art-making confers a variety of benefits related to learning. This qualitative study utilises a visual methodology to explore students' art-making in the context of the cardiovascular sciences. The existence of a multiyear repository of medical/dental student generated, cardiac-inspired art, collected over 6 years, provided the opportunity to explore the nature of the art made. The aim was to categorise the art produced, as well as the depth and breadth of understanding required to produce the art. The data set included a wide variety of titled art (paintings, photographs, sketches, sculptures, collages, poetry and music/dance). Systematic curation of the collection, across all media, yielded three main categories: anatomical renderings, physiology/pathophysiology renderings and kinesthetic creations (music/dance/tactile). Overall (medical and dental) student-generated art suggested a high level of content/process understanding, as illustrated by attention to scientific detail, integration of form and function as well as the sophisticated use of visual metaphor and word play. Dental students preferentially expressed their understanding of anatomy and physiology kinesthetically, creating art that required manual dexterity as well as through choreography and dance. Combining art-making with basic science curricular learning invited the medical and dentistry students to link their understanding to different modes of expression and a non-biomedical way of knowing. Subsequent incorporation of the student-generated cardiac art into lectures exposed the entire class to creative pictorial expressions of anatomy, physiology and pathophysiology. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  10. Tin-filter enhanced dual-energy-CT: image quality and accuracy of CT numbers in virtual noncontrast imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, Sascha; Sauter, Alexander; Spira, Daniel; Gatidis, Sergios; Ketelsen, Dominik; Heuschmid, Martin; Claussen, Claus D; Thomas, Christoph

    2013-05-01

    To measure and compare the objective image quality of true noncontrast (TNC) images with virtual noncontrast (VNC) images acquired by tin-filter-enhanced, dual-source, dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) of upper abdomen. Sixty-three patients received unenhanced abdominal CT and enhanced abdominal DECT (100/140 kV with tin filter) in portal-venous phase. VNC images were calculated from the DECT datasets using commercially available software. The mean attenuation of relevant tissues and image quality were compared between the TNC and VNC images. Image quality was rated objectively by measuring image noise and the sharpness of object edges using custom-designed software. Measurements were compared using Student two-tailed t-test. Correlation coefficients for tissue attenuation measurements between TNC and VNC were calculated and the relative deviations were illustrated using Bland-Altman plots. Mean attenuation differences between TNC and VNC (HUTNC - HUVNC) image sets were as follows: right liver lobe -4.94 Hounsfield units (HU), left liver lobe -3.29 HU, vena cava -2.19 HU, spleen -7.46 HU, pancreas 1.29 HU, fat -11.14 HU, aorta 1.29 HU, bone marrow 36.83 HU (all P Mean image noise was significantly higher in TNC images (P images (P = .19). The Hounsfield units in VNC images closely resemble TNC images in the majority of the organs of the upper abdomen (kidneys, liver, pancreas). In spleen and fat, Hounsfield numbers in VNC images are tend to be higher than in TNC images. VNC images show a low image noise and satisfactory edge sharpness. Other criteria of image quality and the depiction of certain lesions need to be evaluated additionally. Copyright © 2013 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Imaging of cochlear implant electrode array with flat-detector CT and conventional multislice CT: comparison of image quality and radiation dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struffert, Tobias; Hertel, Victoria; Kyriakou, Yannis; Krause, Jens; Engelhorn, Tobias; Schick, Bernhard; Iro, Heinrich; Hornung, Joachim; Doerfler, Arnd

    2010-04-01

    Cochlear implantation assessment is possible using commercially available standard flat-detector computed tomography (FD-CT) protocols. Image quality is superior to multislice CT (MSCT). The radiation dose of FD-CT is lower in comparison with MSCT standard protocols and may therefore overcome the limitations of MSCT in the evaluation of cochlear implants. FD-CT offers higher spatial resolution than MSCT. Our objective was to compare the image quality of FD-CT to conventional MSCT in the visualization of a cochlear implant electrode array with respect to radiation exposure. An isolated temporal bone specimen was scanned using a commercially available FD-CT system and a 4 and 64 row MSCT scanner. Different scanning protocols were used. Image quality was assessed by four independent readers using a scoring system with different criteria describing delineation of the cochlea and the electrode array, image noise and spatial resolution. Radiation dose was measured using the CT dose index (CTDI) and a 16 cm acrylic phantom. Image quality was rated superior for FD-CT for all criteria by all readers. Single electrode contacts were only visible in FD-CT and assessment of implant position was improved by FD-CT. The radiation dose of FD-CT was half that of MSCT standard protocols.

  12. A Review on Motion Correction Methods in Pet/Ct Images for Detection of Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayyeri F.

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Positron Emission Tomography (PET is an important cancer imaging tool, both for diagnosing and staging, as well as offering predictive information based on response. PET is a nuclear medicine imaging technique which produces a three-dimensional image of functional processes in the body. While PET is commonly used to detect the tumors, especially in breast, colon, lung and for lymphoma, as well in the last decade it is verified as considerably more accurate than Computed Tomography (CT in the distinction between benign and malignant lesions. PET is not only more accurate than conventional imaging for the assessment of therapy response, but also it is useful to detect some viable tumor cells after treatment. However, motion is a source of artifacts in the medical imaging and results in reducing the quantitative and qualitative accuracy of the image. In general during the procedure of PET scanning, a few types of motion can occur that should be corrected and compensated. Different body motions are classified as brain motion, cardiac motion and respiratory motion. In this study, some of the most important motion correction and compensation methods using PET imaging system are compared.

  13. In vivo small-animal imaging using micro-CT and digital subtraction angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badea, C T; Johnson, G A [Center for In Vivo Microscopy, Department of Radiology, Duke University, Durham, NC 27710 (United States); Drangova, M; Holdsworth, D W [Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 5K8 (United States)], E-mail: Cristian.Badea@duke.edu

    2008-10-07

    Small-animal imaging has a critical role in phenotyping, drug discovery and in providing a basic understanding of mechanisms of disease. Translating imaging methods from humans to small animals is not an easy task. The purpose of this work is to review in vivo x-ray based small-animal imaging, with a focus on in vivo micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) and digital subtraction angiography (DSA). We present the principles, technologies, image quality parameters and types of applications. We show that both methods can be used not only to provide morphological, but also functional information, such as cardiac function estimation or perfusion. Compared to other modalities, x-ray based imaging is usually regarded as being able to provide higher throughput at lower cost and adequate resolution. The limitations are usually associated with the relatively poor contrast mechanisms and potential radiation damage due to ionizing radiation, although the use of contrast agents and careful design of studies can address these limitations. We hope that the information will effectively address how x-ray based imaging can be exploited for successful in vivo preclinical imaging. (topical reviews)

  14. Optical-CT imaging of complex