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Sample records for ct breast imaging

  1. Combined SPECT/CT and PET/CT for breast imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russo, Paolo [Università di Napoli Federico II, Dipartimento di Fisica, Via Cintia, Naples I-80126 (Italy); INFN Sezione di Napoli, Via Cintia, Naples I-80126 (Italy); Larobina, Michele [Istituto di Biostrutture e Bioimmagini, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Via Tommaso De Amicis, 95, Naples I-80145 (Italy); Di Lillo, Francesca [Università di Napoli Federico II, Dipartimento di Fisica, Via Cintia, Naples I-80126 (Italy); INFN Sezione di Napoli, Via Cintia, Naples I-80126 (Italy); Del Vecchio, Silvana [Università di Napoli Federico II, Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche Avanzate, Via Pansini, 5, Naples I-80131 (Italy); Mettivier, Giovanni, E-mail: mettivier@na.infn.it [Università di Napoli Federico II, Dipartimento di Fisica, Via Cintia, Naples I-80126 (Italy); INFN Sezione di Napoli, Via Cintia, Naples I-80126 (Italy)

    2016-02-11

    In the field of nuclear medicine imaging, breast imaging for cancer diagnosis is still mainly based on 2D imaging techniques. Three-dimensional tomographic imaging with whole-body PET or SPECT scanners, when used for imaging the breast, has performance limits in terms of spatial resolution and sensitivity, which can be overcome only with a dedicated instrumentation. However, only few hybrid imaging systems for PET/CT or SPECT/CT dedicated to the breast have been developed in the last decade, providing complementary functional and anatomical information on normal breast tissue and lesions. These systems are still under development and clinical trials on just few patients have been reported; no commercial dedicated breast PET/CT or SPECT/CT is available. This paper reviews combined dedicated breast PET/CT and SPECT/CT scanners described in the recent literature, with focus on their technological aspects.

  2. A minimum spanning forest based classification method for dedicated breast CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pike, Robert; Sechopoulos, Ioannis; Fei, Baowei

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To develop and test an automated algorithm to classify different types of tissue in dedicated breast CT images. Methods: Images of a single breast of five different patients were acquired with a dedicated breast CT clinical prototype. The breast CT images were processed by a multiscale bilateral filter to reduce noise while keeping edge information and were corrected to overcome cupping artifacts. As skin and glandular tissue have similar CT values on breast CT images, morphologic processing is used to identify the skin based on its position information. A support vector machine (SVM) is trained and the resulting model used to create a pixelwise classification map of fat and glandular tissue. By combining the results of the skin mask with the SVM results, the breast tissue is classified as skin, fat, and glandular tissue. This map is then used to identify markers for a minimum spanning forest that is grown to segment the image using spatial and intensity information. To evaluate the authors’ classification method, they use DICE overlap ratios to compare the results of the automated classification to those obtained by manual segmentation on five patient images. Results: Comparison between the automatic and the manual segmentation shows that the minimum spanning forest based classification method was able to successfully classify dedicated breast CT image with average DICE ratios of 96.9%, 89.8%, and 89.5% for fat, glandular, and skin tissue, respectively. Conclusions: A 2D minimum spanning forest based classification method was proposed and evaluated for classifying the fat, skin, and glandular tissue in dedicated breast CT images. The classification method can be used for dense breast tissue quantification, radiation dose assessment, and other applications in breast imaging

  3. Diagnosis and staging of breast cancer by SPECT images fused with CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yanjing; Zhu Qiaomei

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the TNM staging value of 99mTc-MIBI scintimammotraphy with SPECT-CT images fusing for the diagnosis of breast cancer. Methods: 10 patients with breast cancer underwent scintimammography with 99mTc-MIBI, and SPECT images were fused with CT images. Images were compared with final diagnosis confirmed by histopathology. Results: Of the 19 breast cancer patients, one case of invasive ductal carcinoma showed false-negative. Among 18 cases of positive lesions, axillary metastases were involved in 10, supraclavicular nodes were also defined in 3, para-sternum nodes were involved in 2, 2 were missed and 1 cases without metastatic node. The axillary lymph nodes were divided into three levels with respect to their position relative to the pectoralis minor muscle by fused images. Conclusion: 99mTc-MIBI scintimammotraphy combined with SPECT-CT images fusing is of some clinical value in TNM staging of breast cancer. (authors)

  4. Normalized glandular dose (DgN) coefficients for flat-panel CT breast imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thacker, Samta C; Glick, Stephen J

    2004-01-01

    The development of new digital mammography techniques such as dual-energy imaging, tomosynthesis and CT breast imaging will require investigation of optimal camera design parameters and optimal imaging acquisition parameters. In optimizing these acquisition protocols and imaging systems it is important to have knowledge of the radiation dose to the breast. This study presents a methodology for estimating the normalized glandular dose to the uncompressed breast using the geometry proposed for flat-panel CT breast imaging. The simulation uses the GEANT 3 Monte Carlo code to model x-ray transport and absorption within the breast phantom. The Monte Carlo software was validated for breast dosimetry by comparing results of the normalized glandular dose (DgN) values of the compressed breast to those reported in the literature. The normalized glandular dose was then estimated for a range of breast diameters from 10 cm to 18 cm using an uncompressed breast model with a homogeneous composition of adipose and glandular tissue, and for monoenergetic x-rays from 10 keV to 120 keV. These data were fit providing expressions for the normalized glandular dose. Using these expressions for the DgN coefficients and input variables such as the diameter, height and composition of the breast phantom, the mean glandular dose for any spectra can be estimated. A computer program to provide normalized glandular dose values has been made available online. In addition, figures displaying energy deposition maps are presented to better understand the spatial distribution of dose in CT breast imaging

  5. A case of recurrence-mimicking charcoal granuloma in a breast cancer patient: Ultrasound,CT, PET/CT and breast-specific gamma imaging findings

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    Park, Dae Woong; Park, Ji Yeon; Park, Noh Hyuck; Kim, Seon Jeong; Shin, Hyuck Jai; Lee, Jeong Ju [Myongji Hospital, Seonam University College of Medicine, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Seong Yoon [Div. of Hematology-Oncology, Dept. of Internal Medicine, Inje University Ilsan Paik Hospital, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-07-15

    Charcoal remains stable without causing a foreign body reaction and it may be used for preoperative localization of a non-palpable breast mass. However, cases of post-charcoal-marking granuloma have only rarely been reported in the breast, and a charcoal granuloma can be misdiagnosed as malignancy. Herein, we report the ultrasound, computed tomography (CT), 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/CT, and breast-specific gamma imaging findings of recurrence-mimicking charcoal granuloma after breast conserving surgery, following localization with charcoal in a breast cancer patient.

  6. Imaging lobular breast carcinoma: comparison of synchrotron radiation DEI-CT technique with clinical CT, mammography and histology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiedler, S.; Bravin, A.; Keyriläinen, J.; Fernández, M.; Suortti, P.; Thomlinson, W.; Tenhunen, M.; Virkkunen, P.; Karjalainen-Lindsberg, M.-L.

    2004-01-01

    Different modalities for imaging cancer-bearing breast tissue samples are described and compared. The images include clinical mammograms and computed tomography (CT) images, CT images with partly coherent synchrotron radiation (SR), and CT and radiography images taken with SR using the diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI) method. The images are evaluated by a radiologist and compared with histopathological examination of the samples. Two cases of lobular carcinoma are studied in detail. The indications of cancer are very weak or invisible in the conventional images, but the morphological changes due to invasion of cancer become pronounced in the images taken by the DEI method. The strands penetrating adipose tissue are seen clearly in the DEI-CT images, and the histopathology confirms that some strands contain the so-called 'Indian file' formations of cancer cells. The radiation dose is carefully measured for each of the imaging modalities. The mean glandular dose (MGD) for 50% glandular breast tissue is about 1 mGy in conventional mammography and less than 0.25 mGy in projection DEI, while in the clinical CT imaging the MGD is very high, about 45 mGy. The entrance dose of 95 mGy in DEI-CT imaging gives rise to an MGD of 40 mGy, but the dose may be reduced by an order of magnitude, because the contrast is very large in most images.

  7. Contrast-enhanced dedicated breast CT detection of invasive breast cancer preceding mammographic diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas D. Prionas, MD, PhD

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dedicated breast computed tomography (bCT generates high-resolution, three-dimensional images of the pendent uncompressed breast. Intravenous iodinated contrast during bCT provides additional physiologic information. In this case, a 10.0-mm invasive ductal carcinoma was visualized using contrast-enhanced breast CT one year before mammographic detection. Mammography four months before bCT was negative. The bCT contrast enhancement pattern closely matched the dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI obtained after diagnosis. Lesion enhancement at contrast-enhanced breast CT matched previously published enhancement values of breast cancer. Contrast-enhanced dedicated bCT provided high-resolution tomographic images and physiologic contrast enhancement data that facilitated the detection of an early breast cancer.

  8. Automated planning of breast radiotherapy using cone beam CT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amit, Guy; Purdie, Thomas G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Develop and clinically validate a methodology for using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging in an automated treatment planning framework for breast IMRT. Methods: A technique for intensity correction of CBCT images was developed and evaluated. The technique is based on histogram matching of CBCT image sets, using information from “similar” planning CT image sets from a database of paired CBCT and CT image sets (n = 38). Automated treatment plans were generated for a testing subset (n = 15) on the planning CT and the corrected CBCT. The plans generated on the corrected CBCT were compared to the CT-based plans in terms of beam parameters, dosimetric indices, and dose distributions. Results: The corrected CBCT images showed considerable similarity to their corresponding planning CTs (average mutual information 1.0±0.1, average sum of absolute differences 185 ± 38). The automated CBCT-based plans were clinically acceptable, as well as equivalent to the CT-based plans with average gantry angle difference of 0.99°±1.1°, target volume overlap index (Dice) of 0.89±0.04 although with slightly higher maximum target doses (4482±90 vs 4560±84, P < 0.05). Gamma index analysis (3%, 3 mm) showed that the CBCT-based plans had the same dose distribution as plans calculated with the same beams on the registered planning CTs (average gamma index 0.12±0.04, gamma <1 in 99.4%±0.3%). Conclusions: The proposed method demonstrates the potential for a clinically feasible and efficient online adaptive breast IMRT planning method based on CBCT imaging, integrating automation

  9. WE-FG-207A-05: Dedicated Breast CT as a Diagnostic Imaging Tool: Physics and Clinical Feasibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karellas, A.

    2016-01-01

    Mammography-based screening has been a valuable imaging tool for the early detection of non-palpable lesions and has contributed to significant reduction in breast cancer associated mortality. However, the breast imaging community recognizes that mammography is not ideal, and in particular is inferior for women with dense breasts. Also, the 2-D projection of a 3-D organ results in tissue superposition contributing to false-positives. The sensitivity of mammography is breast-density dependent. Its sensitivity, especially in dense breasts, is low due to overlapping tissue and the fact that normal breast tissue, benign lesions and breast cancers all have similar “densities”, making lesion detection more difficult. We ideally need 3-D imaging for imaging the 3-D breast. MRI is 3-D, whole breast ultrasound is 3-D, digital breast tomosynthesis is called 3-D but is really “pseudo 3-D” due to poor resolution along the depth-direction. Also, and importantly, we need to be able to administer intravenous contrast agents for optimal imaging, similar to other organ systems in the body. Dedicated breast CT allows for 3-D imaging of the uncompressed breast. In current designs, the patient is positioned prone on the table and the breast is pendant through an aperture and the scan takes approximately 10 seconds [O’Connell et al., AJR 195: 496–509, 2010]. Almost on the heels of the invention of CT itself, work began on the development of dedicated breast CT. These early breast CT systems were used in clinical trials and the results from comparative performance evaluation of breast CT and mammography for 1625 subjects were reported in 1980 [Chang et al., Cancer 46: 939–46, 1980]. However, the technological limitations at that time stymied clinical translation for decades. Subsequent to the landmark article in 2001 [Boone et al., Radiology 221: 657–67, 2001] that demonstrated the potential feasibility in terms of radiation dose, multiple research groups are actively

  10. WE-FG-207A-05: Dedicated Breast CT as a Diagnostic Imaging Tool: Physics and Clinical Feasibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karellas, A. [University of Massachusetts Medical School (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Mammography-based screening has been a valuable imaging tool for the early detection of non-palpable lesions and has contributed to significant reduction in breast cancer associated mortality. However, the breast imaging community recognizes that mammography is not ideal, and in particular is inferior for women with dense breasts. Also, the 2-D projection of a 3-D organ results in tissue superposition contributing to false-positives. The sensitivity of mammography is breast-density dependent. Its sensitivity, especially in dense breasts, is low due to overlapping tissue and the fact that normal breast tissue, benign lesions and breast cancers all have similar “densities”, making lesion detection more difficult. We ideally need 3-D imaging for imaging the 3-D breast. MRI is 3-D, whole breast ultrasound is 3-D, digital breast tomosynthesis is called 3-D but is really “pseudo 3-D” due to poor resolution along the depth-direction. Also, and importantly, we need to be able to administer intravenous contrast agents for optimal imaging, similar to other organ systems in the body. Dedicated breast CT allows for 3-D imaging of the uncompressed breast. In current designs, the patient is positioned prone on the table and the breast is pendant through an aperture and the scan takes approximately 10 seconds [O’Connell et al., AJR 195: 496–509, 2010]. Almost on the heels of the invention of CT itself, work began on the development of dedicated breast CT. These early breast CT systems were used in clinical trials and the results from comparative performance evaluation of breast CT and mammography for 1625 subjects were reported in 1980 [Chang et al., Cancer 46: 939–46, 1980]. However, the technological limitations at that time stymied clinical translation for decades. Subsequent to the landmark article in 2001 [Boone et al., Radiology 221: 657–67, 2001] that demonstrated the potential feasibility in terms of radiation dose, multiple research groups are actively

  11. CT/FMT dual-model imaging of breast cancer based on peptide-lipid nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guoqiang; Lin, Qiaoya; Lian, Lichao; Qian, Yuan; Lu, Lisen; Zhang, Zhihong

    2016-03-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most harmful cancers in human. Its early diagnosis is expected to improve the patients' survival rate. X-ray computed tomography (CT) has been widely used in tumor detection for obtaining three-dimentional information. Fluorescence Molecular Tomography (FMT) imaging combined with near-infrared fluorescent dyes provides a powerful tool for the acquisition of molecular biodistribution information in deep tissues. Thus, the combination of CT and FMT imaging modalities allows us to better differentiate diseased tissues from normal tissues. Here we developed a tumor-targeting nanoparticle for dual-modality imaging based on a biocompatible HDL-mimicking peptide-phospholipid scaffold (HPPS) nanocarrier. By incorporation of CT contrast agents (iodinated oil) and far-infrared fluorescent dyes (DiR-BOA) into the hydrophobic core of HPPS, we obtained the FMT and CT signals simultaneously. Increased accumulation of the nanoparticles in the tumor lesions was achieved through the effect of the tumor-targeting peptide on the surface of nanoparticle. It resulted in excellent contrast between lesions and normal tissues. Together, the abilities to sensitively separate the lesions from adjacent normal tissues with the aid of a FMT/CT dual-model imaging approach make the targeting nanoparticles a useful tool for the diagnostics of breast cancer.

  12. The effects of bismuth breast shields in conjunction with automatic tube current modulation in CT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Servaes, Sabah; Zhu, Xiaowei

    2013-01-01

    There are mechanisms within CT scanners and shielding that can be used to lower dose to patients. The objective of our study was to evaluate the dose changes and image quality with and without a breast shield for multidetector CT of the chest with angular tube current modulation. An anthropomorphic 5-year-old phantom was scanned with and without bismuth breast shielding and with and without angular tube current modulation. Image quality was assessed by measuring signal-to-noise ratio and contrast-to-noise ratio as well as measuring qualitatively. ANOVA single-factor p-value analysis of paired datasets was used for the statistical analysis. The breast shielding and angular tube current modulation resulted in a dose reduction to 85% for the breast and 90% overall. Although no qualitative differences were noted with and without the breast shielding used with angular tube current modulation, there were statistically significant differences in the contrast-to-noise ratio and CT numbers. When used with angular tube current modulation, breast shields influence the contrast-to-noise ratio and CT numbers, and therefore should not be used for chest CT. Greater dose reduction can be obtained by reducing the reference mAs (or reference noise index). (orig.)

  13. CT images and radiotherapy treatment planning of patients with breast cancer: A dataset

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Rezaei

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The data presented here were originally collected for the research project “CT-Scan processing and analysis in patient with breast cancer after radiotherapy”. Also, it reported in our study “Prediction of Lung Tissue Damage by Evaluating Clinical and Dosimetric Parameters in Breast Cancer Patients” (Hasanabdali et al., 2016 [1]. This article describes and directly links to 52 subjects referred to Mahdieh Oncology and Radiotherapy Center from February to August 2015. Treatment planning was done for delivering 50 Gy dose to PTV in 25 fractions. the lungs and heart objects were extracted from CT images along with compliance Dose plan. Dose-volume histogram (DVH and Dose-mass histogram (DMH extracted using CT images and dose plan matrix. Moreover, the complete clinical and dosimetric specifications of subjects is attached.

  14. Dynamic helical CT mammography of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Akira; Fukushima, Hitoshi; Okamura, Ryuji; Nakamura, Yoshiaki; Morimoto, Taisuke; Urata, Yoji; Mukaihara, Sumio; Hayakawa, Katsumi

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether dynamic helical computed tomography (CT)-mammography could assist in selecting the most appropriate surgical method in women with breast cancer. Preoperative contrast-enhanced helical CT scanning of the breast was performed on 133 female patients with suspicion of breast cancer at the same time as clinical, mammographic, and/or ultrasonographic examinations. The patients were scanned in the prone position with a specially designed CT-compatible device. A helical scan was made with rapid intravenous bolus injection (3 ml/s) of 100 ml of iodine contrast material. Three-dimensional maximum intensity projection (MIP) images were reconstructed, and CT findings were correlated with surgical and histopathological findings. Histopathological analysis revealed 84 malignant lesions and seven benign lesions. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy levels of the CT scanning were 94.6%, 58.6%, and 78.9%. Helical scanning alone revealed additional contralateral carcinomas in three of four patients and additional ipsilateral carcinomas in three of five patients. However, the technique gave false-positive readings in 24 patients. The preoperative CT-mammogram altered the surgical method in six patients. Dynamic helical CT-mammography in the prone position may be one of the choices of adjunct imaging in patients with suspected breast cancer scheduled for surgery. (author)

  15. A computer simulation study comparing lesion detection accuracy with digital mammography, breast tomosynthesis, and cone-beam CT breast imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong Xing; Glick, Stephen J.; Liu, Bob; Vedula, Aruna A.; Thacker, Samta

    2006-01-01

    Although conventional mammography is currently the best modality to detect early breast cancer, it is limited in that the recorded image represents the superposition of a three-dimensional (3D) object onto a 2D plane. Recently, two promising approaches for 3D volumetric breast imaging have been proposed, breast tomosynthesis (BT) and CT breast imaging (CTBI). To investigate possible improvements in lesion detection accuracy with either breast tomosynthesis or CT breast imaging as compared to digital mammography (DM), a computer simulation study was conducted using simulated lesions embedded into a structured 3D breast model. The computer simulation realistically modeled x-ray transport through a breast model, as well as the signal and noise propagation through a CsI based flat-panel imager. Polyenergetic x-ray spectra of Mo/Mo 28 kVp for digital mammography, Mo/Rh 28 kVp for BT, and W/Ce 50 kVp for CTBI were modeled. For the CTBI simulation, the intensity of the x-ray spectra for each projection view was determined so as to provide a total average glandular dose of 4 mGy, which is approximately equivalent to that given in conventional two-view screening mammography. The same total dose was modeled for both the DM and BT simulations. Irregular lesions were simulated by using a stochastic growth algorithm providing lesions with an effective diameter of 5 mm. Breast tissue was simulated by generating an ensemble of backgrounds with a power law spectrum, with the composition of 50% fibroglandular and 50% adipose tissue. To evaluate lesion detection accuracy, a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) study was performed with five observers reading an ensemble of images for each case. The average area under the ROC curves (A z ) was 0.76 for DM, 0.93 for BT, and 0.94 for CTBI. Results indicated that for the same dose, a 5 mm lesion embedded in a structured breast phantom was detected by the two volumetric breast imaging systems, BT and CTBI, with statistically

  16. WE-FG-207A-00: Advances in Dedicated Breast CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    Mammography-based screening has been a valuable imaging tool for the early detection of non-palpable lesions and has contributed to significant reduction in breast cancer associated mortality. However, the breast imaging community recognizes that mammography is not ideal, and in particular is inferior for women with dense breasts. Also, the 2-D projection of a 3-D organ results in tissue superposition contributing to false-positives. The sensitivity of mammography is breast-density dependent. Its sensitivity, especially in dense breasts, is low due to overlapping tissue and the fact that normal breast tissue, benign lesions and breast cancers all have similar “densities”, making lesion detection more difficult. We ideally need 3-D imaging for imaging the 3-D breast. MRI is 3-D, whole breast ultrasound is 3-D, digital breast tomosynthesis is called 3-D but is really “pseudo 3-D” due to poor resolution along the depth-direction. Also, and importantly, we need to be able to administer intravenous contrast agents for optimal imaging, similar to other organ systems in the body. Dedicated breast CT allows for 3-D imaging of the uncompressed breast. In current designs, the patient is positioned prone on the table and the breast is pendant through an aperture and the scan takes approximately 10 seconds [O’Connell et al., AJR 195: 496–509, 2010]. Almost on the heels of the invention of CT itself, work began on the development of dedicated breast CT. These early breast CT systems were used in clinical trials and the results from comparative performance evaluation of breast CT and mammography for 1625 subjects were reported in 1980 [Chang et al., Cancer 46: 939–46, 1980]. However, the technological limitations at that time stymied clinical translation for decades. Subsequent to the landmark article in 2001 [Boone et al., Radiology 221: 657–67, 2001] that demonstrated the potential feasibility in terms of radiation dose, multiple research groups are actively

  17. WE-FG-207A-00: Advances in Dedicated Breast CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2016-06-15

    Mammography-based screening has been a valuable imaging tool for the early detection of non-palpable lesions and has contributed to significant reduction in breast cancer associated mortality. However, the breast imaging community recognizes that mammography is not ideal, and in particular is inferior for women with dense breasts. Also, the 2-D projection of a 3-D organ results in tissue superposition contributing to false-positives. The sensitivity of mammography is breast-density dependent. Its sensitivity, especially in dense breasts, is low due to overlapping tissue and the fact that normal breast tissue, benign lesions and breast cancers all have similar “densities”, making lesion detection more difficult. We ideally need 3-D imaging for imaging the 3-D breast. MRI is 3-D, whole breast ultrasound is 3-D, digital breast tomosynthesis is called 3-D but is really “pseudo 3-D” due to poor resolution along the depth-direction. Also, and importantly, we need to be able to administer intravenous contrast agents for optimal imaging, similar to other organ systems in the body. Dedicated breast CT allows for 3-D imaging of the uncompressed breast. In current designs, the patient is positioned prone on the table and the breast is pendant through an aperture and the scan takes approximately 10 seconds [O’Connell et al., AJR 195: 496–509, 2010]. Almost on the heels of the invention of CT itself, work began on the development of dedicated breast CT. These early breast CT systems were used in clinical trials and the results from comparative performance evaluation of breast CT and mammography for 1625 subjects were reported in 1980 [Chang et al., Cancer 46: 939–46, 1980]. However, the technological limitations at that time stymied clinical translation for decades. Subsequent to the landmark article in 2001 [Boone et al., Radiology 221: 657–67, 2001] that demonstrated the potential feasibility in terms of radiation dose, multiple research groups are actively

  18. Detection of breast abnormalities on enhanced chest CT: Correlation with breast composition on mammography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Eun Mi; Kang, Hee; Shin, Young Gyung; Yun, Jong Hyouk; Oh, Kyung Seung [Dept. of Radiology, Kosin University Gospel Hospital, Kosin University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    To investigate the capability of enhanced chest computed tomography (CT) for detecting breast abnormalities and to assess the influence of breast composition on this detectability. From 2000 to 2013, 75 patients who underwent mammography, breast sonography, and enhanced chest CT within one month and had abnormalities on sonography were included. Detection rate of breast abnormality on enhanced chest CT was compared among 4 types of breast composition by the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System. Contribution of breast composition, size and enhancement of target lesions to detectability of enhanced chest CT was assessed using logistic regression and chi-square test. Of the 75 target lesions, 34 (45.3%) were detected on enhanced chest CT, corresponding with those on breast sonography; there were no significantly different detection rates among the 4 types of breast composition (p = 0.078). Breast composition [odds ratio (OR) = 1.07, p = 0.206] and enhancement (OR = 21.49, p = 0.998) had no significant effect, but size (OR = 1.23, p = 0.004) was a significant contributing factor influencing the detectability of enhanced chest CT for breast lesions. About half of the cases (45.3%) demonstrated breast lesions on chest CT corresponding with target lesions on sonography. Breast composition defined on mammography did not affect the detectability of enhanced chest CT for breast lesions.

  19. Low-Dose Contrast-Enhanced Breast CT Using Spectral Shaping Filters: An Experimental Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makeev, Andrey; Glick, Stephen J

    2017-12-01

    Iodinated contrast-enhanced X-ray imaging of the breast has been studied with various modalities, including full-field digital mammography (FFDM), digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT), and dedicated breast CT. Contrast imaging with breast CT has a number of advantages over FFDM and DBT, including the lack of breast compression, and generation of fully isotropic 3-D reconstructions. Nonetheless, for breast CT to be considered as a viable tool for routine clinical use, it would be desirable to reduce radiation dose. One approach for dose reduction in breast CT is spectral shaping using X-ray filters. In this paper, two high atomic number filter materials are studied, namely, gadolinium (Gd) and erbium (Er), and compared with Al and Cu filters currently used in breast CT systems. Task-based performance is assessed by imaging a cylindrical poly(methyl methacrylate) phantom with iodine inserts on a benchtop breast CT system that emulates clinical breast CT. To evaluate detectability, a channelized hoteling observer (CHO) is used with sums of Laguerre-Gauss channels. It was observed that spectral shaping using Er and Gd filters substantially increased the dose efficiency (defined as signal-to-noise ratio of the CHO divided by mean glandular dose) as compared with kilovolt peak and filter settings used in commercial and prototype breast CT systems. These experimental phantom study results are encouraging for reducing dose of breast CT, however, further evaluation involving patients is needed.

  20. Efficacy of Breast Shielding During CT of the Head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brnic, Z.; Vekic, B.; Hebrang, A.; Anic, P.

    2003-01-01

    The use of computerized tomography (CT) is rapidly increasing in last two decades, and this method has become the major non-natural source of radiation exposure to the population. CT examinations delivers to the patients more radiation than all other imaging techniques, and contribute disproportionately to the collective dose; in Britain it has been estimated that 4% of diagnostic radiology procedures are CT examinations, being responsible for approximately 40% of the total annual collective dose. Breast doses are high in CT examinations with breasts in scanning planes, being not insignificant also when breasts are exposed only to scatter radiation. Breast doses received through scatter radiation during head CT may account for up to one-fifth of an average mammographic dose per one view. Whilst the possibilities of reduction of radiation load to organs lying in CT scanning planes are limited, the tissues outside the primary beam should be protected against scatter whenever it does not sacrifice image quality. Lead shielding results in significant reduction of external scatter to radiosensitive superficial organs in many diagnostic procedures. The published studies of breast shielding against scatter radiation in diagnostic radiology are scanty, only the later one dealing particularly with breast shielding during head CT examination. The aims of this study were to investigate in vivo the levels of breast exposure to scatter radiation in head CT examination and the dependence of breast exposure upon body constitution. We tried to estimate the efficacy of external lead shielding as a mean of breast dose reduction, and to determine how much radiation reaches the organ from outside, in comparison to radiation load caused through internal scatter. We conclude that, although the level of breast radiation exposure during head CT examinations is generally low, shielding of the breasts with lead apron will further reduce the doses. However is the effect of shielding limited

  1. WE-FG-207A-02: Why We Need Breast CT? - Clinical Perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O’Connell, A.

    2016-01-01

    Mammography-based screening has been a valuable imaging tool for the early detection of non-palpable lesions and has contributed to significant reduction in breast cancer associated mortality. However, the breast imaging community recognizes that mammography is not ideal, and in particular is inferior for women with dense breasts. Also, the 2-D projection of a 3-D organ results in tissue superposition contributing to false-positives. The sensitivity of mammography is breast-density dependent. Its sensitivity, especially in dense breasts, is low due to overlapping tissue and the fact that normal breast tissue, benign lesions and breast cancers all have similar “densities”, making lesion detection more difficult. We ideally need 3-D imaging for imaging the 3-D breast. MRI is 3-D, whole breast ultrasound is 3-D, digital breast tomosynthesis is called 3-D but is really “pseudo 3-D” due to poor resolution along the depth-direction. Also, and importantly, we need to be able to administer intravenous contrast agents for optimal imaging, similar to other organ systems in the body. Dedicated breast CT allows for 3-D imaging of the uncompressed breast. In current designs, the patient is positioned prone on the table and the breast is pendant through an aperture and the scan takes approximately 10 seconds [O’Connell et al., AJR 195: 496–509, 2010]. Almost on the heels of the invention of CT itself, work began on the development of dedicated breast CT. These early breast CT systems were used in clinical trials and the results from comparative performance evaluation of breast CT and mammography for 1625 subjects were reported in 1980 [Chang et al., Cancer 46: 939–46, 1980]. However, the technological limitations at that time stymied clinical translation for decades. Subsequent to the landmark article in 2001 [Boone et al., Radiology 221: 657–67, 2001] that demonstrated the potential feasibility in terms of radiation dose, multiple research groups are actively

  2. WE-FG-207A-01: Introduction to Dedicated Breast CT - Early Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vedantham, S.

    2016-01-01

    Mammography-based screening has been a valuable imaging tool for the early detection of non-palpable lesions and has contributed to significant reduction in breast cancer associated mortality. However, the breast imaging community recognizes that mammography is not ideal, and in particular is inferior for women with dense breasts. Also, the 2-D projection of a 3-D organ results in tissue superposition contributing to false-positives. The sensitivity of mammography is breast-density dependent. Its sensitivity, especially in dense breasts, is low due to overlapping tissue and the fact that normal breast tissue, benign lesions and breast cancers all have similar “densities”, making lesion detection more difficult. We ideally need 3-D imaging for imaging the 3-D breast. MRI is 3-D, whole breast ultrasound is 3-D, digital breast tomosynthesis is called 3-D but is really “pseudo 3-D” due to poor resolution along the depth-direction. Also, and importantly, we need to be able to administer intravenous contrast agents for optimal imaging, similar to other organ systems in the body. Dedicated breast CT allows for 3-D imaging of the uncompressed breast. In current designs, the patient is positioned prone on the table and the breast is pendant through an aperture and the scan takes approximately 10 seconds [O’Connell et al., AJR 195: 496–509, 2010]. Almost on the heels of the invention of CT itself, work began on the development of dedicated breast CT. These early breast CT systems were used in clinical trials and the results from comparative performance evaluation of breast CT and mammography for 1625 subjects were reported in 1980 [Chang et al., Cancer 46: 939–46, 1980]. However, the technological limitations at that time stymied clinical translation for decades. Subsequent to the landmark article in 2001 [Boone et al., Radiology 221: 657–67, 2001] that demonstrated the potential feasibility in terms of radiation dose, multiple research groups are actively

  3. WE-FG-207A-02: Why We Need Breast CT? - Clinical Perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O’Connell, A. [University of Rochester Medical Center (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Mammography-based screening has been a valuable imaging tool for the early detection of non-palpable lesions and has contributed to significant reduction in breast cancer associated mortality. However, the breast imaging community recognizes that mammography is not ideal, and in particular is inferior for women with dense breasts. Also, the 2-D projection of a 3-D organ results in tissue superposition contributing to false-positives. The sensitivity of mammography is breast-density dependent. Its sensitivity, especially in dense breasts, is low due to overlapping tissue and the fact that normal breast tissue, benign lesions and breast cancers all have similar “densities”, making lesion detection more difficult. We ideally need 3-D imaging for imaging the 3-D breast. MRI is 3-D, whole breast ultrasound is 3-D, digital breast tomosynthesis is called 3-D but is really “pseudo 3-D” due to poor resolution along the depth-direction. Also, and importantly, we need to be able to administer intravenous contrast agents for optimal imaging, similar to other organ systems in the body. Dedicated breast CT allows for 3-D imaging of the uncompressed breast. In current designs, the patient is positioned prone on the table and the breast is pendant through an aperture and the scan takes approximately 10 seconds [O’Connell et al., AJR 195: 496–509, 2010]. Almost on the heels of the invention of CT itself, work began on the development of dedicated breast CT. These early breast CT systems were used in clinical trials and the results from comparative performance evaluation of breast CT and mammography for 1625 subjects were reported in 1980 [Chang et al., Cancer 46: 939–46, 1980]. However, the technological limitations at that time stymied clinical translation for decades. Subsequent to the landmark article in 2001 [Boone et al., Radiology 221: 657–67, 2001] that demonstrated the potential feasibility in terms of radiation dose, multiple research groups are actively

  4. WE-FG-207A-04: Performance Characteristics of Photon-Counting Breast CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalender, W. [University of Erlangen (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    Mammography-based screening has been a valuable imaging tool for the early detection of non-palpable lesions and has contributed to significant reduction in breast cancer associated mortality. However, the breast imaging community recognizes that mammography is not ideal, and in particular is inferior for women with dense breasts. Also, the 2-D projection of a 3-D organ results in tissue superposition contributing to false-positives. The sensitivity of mammography is breast-density dependent. Its sensitivity, especially in dense breasts, is low due to overlapping tissue and the fact that normal breast tissue, benign lesions and breast cancers all have similar “densities”, making lesion detection more difficult. We ideally need 3-D imaging for imaging the 3-D breast. MRI is 3-D, whole breast ultrasound is 3-D, digital breast tomosynthesis is called 3-D but is really “pseudo 3-D” due to poor resolution along the depth-direction. Also, and importantly, we need to be able to administer intravenous contrast agents for optimal imaging, similar to other organ systems in the body. Dedicated breast CT allows for 3-D imaging of the uncompressed breast. In current designs, the patient is positioned prone on the table and the breast is pendant through an aperture and the scan takes approximately 10 seconds [O’Connell et al., AJR 195: 496–509, 2010]. Almost on the heels of the invention of CT itself, work began on the development of dedicated breast CT. These early breast CT systems were used in clinical trials and the results from comparative performance evaluation of breast CT and mammography for 1625 subjects were reported in 1980 [Chang et al., Cancer 46: 939–46, 1980]. However, the technological limitations at that time stymied clinical translation for decades. Subsequent to the landmark article in 2001 [Boone et al., Radiology 221: 657–67, 2001] that demonstrated the potential feasibility in terms of radiation dose, multiple research groups are actively

  5. WE-FG-207A-01: Introduction to Dedicated Breast CT - Early Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vedantham, S. [University of Massachusetts Medical School (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Mammography-based screening has been a valuable imaging tool for the early detection of non-palpable lesions and has contributed to significant reduction in breast cancer associated mortality. However, the breast imaging community recognizes that mammography is not ideal, and in particular is inferior for women with dense breasts. Also, the 2-D projection of a 3-D organ results in tissue superposition contributing to false-positives. The sensitivity of mammography is breast-density dependent. Its sensitivity, especially in dense breasts, is low due to overlapping tissue and the fact that normal breast tissue, benign lesions and breast cancers all have similar “densities”, making lesion detection more difficult. We ideally need 3-D imaging for imaging the 3-D breast. MRI is 3-D, whole breast ultrasound is 3-D, digital breast tomosynthesis is called 3-D but is really “pseudo 3-D” due to poor resolution along the depth-direction. Also, and importantly, we need to be able to administer intravenous contrast agents for optimal imaging, similar to other organ systems in the body. Dedicated breast CT allows for 3-D imaging of the uncompressed breast. In current designs, the patient is positioned prone on the table and the breast is pendant through an aperture and the scan takes approximately 10 seconds [O’Connell et al., AJR 195: 496–509, 2010]. Almost on the heels of the invention of CT itself, work began on the development of dedicated breast CT. These early breast CT systems were used in clinical trials and the results from comparative performance evaluation of breast CT and mammography for 1625 subjects were reported in 1980 [Chang et al., Cancer 46: 939–46, 1980]. However, the technological limitations at that time stymied clinical translation for decades. Subsequent to the landmark article in 2001 [Boone et al., Radiology 221: 657–67, 2001] that demonstrated the potential feasibility in terms of radiation dose, multiple research groups are actively

  6. Cone-beam volume CT breast imaging: Feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Biao; Ning Ruola

    2002-01-01

    X-ray projection mammography, using a film/screen combination, or digital techniques, has proven to be the most effective imaging modality currently available for early detection of breast cancer. However, the inherent superimposition of structures makes a small carcinoma (a few millimeters in size) difficult to detect when it is occult or in dense breasts, leading to a high false-positive biopsy rate. Cone-beam x-ray-projection-based volume imaging using flat panel detectors (FPDs) may allow obtaining three-dimensional breast images, resulting in more accurate diagnosis of structures and patterns of lesions while eliminating the hard compression of breasts. This article presents a novel cone-beam volume computed tomographic breast imaging (CBVCTBI) technique based on the above techniques. Through a variety of computer simulations, the key issues of the system and imaging techniques were addressed, including the x-ray imaging geometry and corresponding reconstruction algorithms, x-ray characteristics of breast tissue and lesions, x-ray setting techniques, the absorbed dose estimation, and the quantitative effect of x-ray scattering on image quality. The preliminary simulation results support the proposed CVBCTBI modality for breast imaging in respect to its feasibility and practicability. The absorbed dose level is comparable to that of current mammography and will not be a prominent problem for this imaging technique. Compared to conventional mammography, the proposed imaging technique with isotropic spatial resolution will potentially provide significantly better low-contrast detectability of breast tumors and more accurate location of breast lesions

  7. A dedicated breast-PET/CT scanner: Evaluation of basic performance characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raylman, Raymond R; Van Kampen, Will; Stolin, Alexander V; Gong, Wenbo; Jaliparthi, Gangadhar; Martone, Peter F; Smith, Mark F; Sarment, David; Clinthorne, Neal H; Perna, Mark

    2018-04-01

    Application of advanced imaging techniques, such as PET and x ray CT, can potentially improve detection of breast cancer. Unfortunately, both modalities have challenges in the detection of some lesions. The combination of the two techniques, however, could potentially lead to an overall improvement in diagnostic breast imaging. The purpose of this investigation is to test the basic performance of a new dedicated breast-PET/CT. The PET component consists of a rotating pair of detectors. Its performance was evaluated using the NEMA NU4-2008 protocols. The CT component utilizes a pulsed x ray source and flat panel detector mounted on the same gantry as the PET scanner. Its performance was assessed using specialized phantoms. The radiation dose to a breast during CT imaging was explored by the measurement of free-in-air kerma and air kerma measured at the center of a 16 cm-diameter PMMA cylinder. Finally, the combined capabilities of the system were demonstrated by imaging of a micro-hot-rod phantom. Overall, performance of the PET component is comparable to many pre-clinical and other dedicated breast-PET scanners. Its spatial resolution is 2.2 mm, 5 mm from the center of the scanner using images created with the single-sliced-filtered-backprojection algorithm. Peak NECR is 24.6 kcps; peak sensitivity is 1.36%; the scatter fraction is 27%. Spatial resolution of the CT scanner is 1.1 lp/mm at 10% MTF. The free-in-air kerma is 2.33 mGy, while the PMMA-air kerma is 1.24 mGy. Finally, combined imaging of a micro-hot-rod phantom illustrated the potential utility of the dual-modality images produced by the system. The basic performance characteristics of a new dedicated breast-PET/CT scanner are good, demonstrating that its performance is similar to current dedicated PET and CT scanners. The potential value of this system is the capability to produce combined duality-modality images that could improve detection of breast disease. The next stage in development of this system

  8. Image-Based Treatment Planning of the Post-Lumpectomy Breast Utilizing CT and 3TMRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobson, G.; Betts, V.; Muruganandham, M.; Buechler-Price, J.; Zamba, G.

    2011-01-01

    Accurate lumpectomy cavity definition is critical in breast treatment planning. We compared contouring lumpectomy cavity volume and cavity visualization score (CVS) with CT versus 3T MRI. 29 patients were imaged with CT and 3T MRI. Seven additional boost planning sets were obtained for 36 image sets total. Three observers contoured the lumpectomy cavity on all images, assigning a cavity visualization score (CVS ) of 1 to 5. Measures of consistency and agreement for CT volumes were 98.84% and 98.62%, for T1 MRI were 95.65% and 95.55%, and for T2 MRI were 97.63% and 97.71%. The mean CT, T1 MRI, and T2 MRI CVS scores were 3.28, 3.38, and 4.32, respectively. There was a highly significant difference between CT and T2 scores (P<.00001) and between T1 and T2 scores (P<.00001). Interobserver consistency and agreement regarding volumes were high for all three modalities with T2 MRI CVS the highest. MRI may contribute to target definition in selected patients

  9. Image-Based Treatment Planning of the Post-Lumpectomy Breast Utilizing CT and 3TMRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldine Jacobson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate lumpectomy cavity definition is critical in breast treatment planning. We compared contouring lumpectomy cavity volume and cavity visualization score (CVS with CT versus 3T MRI. 29 patients were imaged with CT and 3T MRI. Seven additional boost planning sets were obtained for 36 image sets total. Three observers contoured the lumpectomy cavity on all images, assigning a cavity visualization score (CVS of 1 to 5. Measures of consistency and agreement for CT volumes were 98.84% and 98.62%, for T1 MRI were 95.65% and 95.55%, and for T2 MRI were 97.63% and 97.71%. The mean CT, T1 MRI, and T2 MRI CVS scores were 3.28, 3.38, and 4.32, respectively. There was a highly significant difference between CT and T2 scores (<.00001 and between T1 and T2 scores (<.00001. Interobserver consistency and agreement regarding volumes were high for all three modalities with T2 MRI CVS the highest. MRI may contribute to target definition in selected patients.

  10. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT imaging versus dynamic contrast-enhanced CT for staging and prognosis of inflammatory breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Champion, Laurence; Edeline, Veronique; Giraudet, Anne-Laure; Wartski, Myriam [Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Saint-Cloud (France); Lerebours, Florence [Service d' Oncologie Medicale, Saint-Cloud (France); Cherel, Pascal [Institut Curie, Hopital Rene Huguenin, Service de Radiologie, Saint-Cloud (France); Bellet, Dominique [Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Saint-Cloud (France); Universite Paris Descartes, Pharmacologie Chimique et Genetique and Imagerie, Inserm U1022 CNRS UMR 8151, Faculte des sciences pharmaceutiques et biologiques, Paris (France); Alberini, Jean-Louis [Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Saint-Cloud (France); Universite Versailles Saint-Quentin, Faculte de medecine, Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines (France)

    2013-08-15

    Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is the most aggressive type of breast cancer with a poor prognosis. Locoregional staging is based on dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) CT or MRI. The aim of this study was to compare the performances of FDG PET/CT and DCE CT in locoregional staging of IBC and to assess their respective prognostic values. The study group comprised 50 women (median age: 51 {+-} 11 years) followed in our institution for IBC who underwent FDG PET/CT and DCE CT scans (median interval 5 {+-} 9 days). CT enhancement parameters were net maximal enhancement, net early enhancement and perfusion. The PET/CT scans showed intense FDG uptake in all primary tumours. Concordance rate between PET/CT and DCE CT for breast tumour localization was 92 %. No significant correlation was found between SUVmax and CT enhancement parameters in primary tumours (p > 0.6). PET/CT and DCE CT results were poorly correlated for skin infiltration (kappa = 0.19). Ipsilateral foci of increased axillary FDG uptake were found in 47 patients (median SUV: 7.9 {+-} 5.4), whereas enlarged axillary lymph nodes were observed on DCE CT in 43 patients. Results for axillary node involvement were fairly well correlated (kappa = 0.55). Nineteen patients (38 %) were found to be metastatic on PET/CT scan with a significant shorter progression-free survival than patients without distant lesions (p = 0.01). In the primary tumour, no statistically significant difference was observed between high and moderate tumour FDG uptake on survival, using an SUVmax cut-off of 5 (p = 0.7 and 0.9), or between high and low tumour enhancement on DCE CT (p > 0.8). FDG PET/CT imaging provided additional information concerning locoregional involvement to that provided by DCE CT on and allowed detection of distant metastases in the same whole-body procedure. Tumour FDG uptake or CT enhancement parameters were not correlated and were not found to have any prognostic value. (orig.)

  11. Multifunctional dendrimer-based nanoparticles for in vivo MR/CT dual-modal molecular imaging of breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li K

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Kangan Li,1,4,5,* Shihui Wen,2,* Andrew C Larson,4,5 Mingwu Shen,2 Zhuoli Zhang,4,5 Qian Chen,3 Xiangyang Shi,2,3 Guixiang Zhang1 1Department of Radiology, Shanghai First People’s Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 2College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, Donghua University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 3State Key Laboratory for Modification of Chemical Fibers and Polymer Materials, Donghua University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 4Departments of Radiology and Biomedical Engineering, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA; 5Robert H Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, IL, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Development of dual-mode or multi-mode imaging contrast agents is important for accurate and self-confirmatory diagnosis of cancer. We report a new multifunctional, dendrimer-based gold nanoparticle (AuNP as a dual-modality contrast agent for magnetic resonance (MR/computed tomography (CT imaging of breast cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. In this study, amine-terminated generation 5 poly(amidoamine dendrimers modified with gadolinium chelate (DOTA-NHS and polyethylene glycol monomethyl ether were used as templates to synthesize AuNPs, followed by Gd(III chelation and acetylation of the remaining dendrimer terminal amine groups; multifunctional dendrimer-entrapped AuNPs (Gd-Au DENPs were formed. The formed Gd-Au DENPs were used for both in vitro and in vivo MR/CT imaging of human MCF-7 cancer cells. Both MR and CT images demonstrate that MCF-7 cells and the xenograft tumor model can be effectively imaged. The Gd-Au DENPs uptake, mainly in the cell cytoplasm, was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. The cell cytotoxicity assay, cell morphology observation, and flow cytometry show that the developed Gd-Au DENPs have good biocompatibility in the given concentration range. Our results

  12. Molecular Imaging in Breast Cancer: From Whole-Body PET/CT to Dedicated Breast PET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. B. Koolen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Positron emission tomography (PET, with or without integrated computed tomography (CT, using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG is based on the principle of elevated glucose metabolism in malignant tumors, and its use in breast cancer patients is frequently being investigated. It has been shown useful for classification, staging, and response monitoring, both in primary and recurrent disease. However, because of the partial volume effect and limited resolution of most whole-body PET scanners, sensitivity for the visualization of small tumors is generally low. To improve the detection and quantification of primary breast tumors with FDG PET, several dedicated breast PET devices have been developed. In this nonsystematic review, we shortly summarize the value of whole-body PET/CT in breast cancer and provide an overview of currently available dedicated breast PETs.

  13. 3D tumor measurement in cone-beam CT breast imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zikuan; Ning, Ruola

    2004-05-01

    Cone-beam CT breast imaging provides a digital volume representation of a breast. With a digital breast volume, the immediate task is to extract the breast tissue information, especially for suspicious tumors, preferably in an automatic manner or with minimal user interaction. This paper reports a program for three-dimensional breast tissue analysis. It consists of volumetric segmentation (by globally thresholding), subsegmentation (connection-based separation), and volumetric component measurement (volume, surface, shape, and other geometrical specifications). A combination scheme of multi-thresholding and binary volume morphology is proposed to fast determine the surface gradients, which may be interpreted as the surface evolution (outward growth or inward shrinkage) for a tumor volume. This scheme is also used to optimize the volumetric segmentation. With a binary volume, we decompose the foreground into components according to spatial connectedness. Since this decomposition procedure is performed after volumetric segmentation, it is called subsegmentation. The subsegmentation brings the convenience for component visualization and measurement, in the whole support space, without interference from others. Upon the tumor component identification, we measure the following specifications: volume, surface area, roundness, elongation, aspect, star-shapedness, and location (centroid). A 3D morphological operation is used to extract the cluster shell and, by delineating the corresponding volume from the grayscale volume, to measure the shell stiffness. This 3D tissue measurement is demonstrated with a tumor-borne breast specimen (a surgical part).

  14. FDG-PET/CT detection of very early breast cancer in women with breast microcalcification lesions found in mammography screening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, Nang-Jing; Chou, Chen-Pin; Pan, Huay-Ben; Chang, Tsung-Hsien; Hu, Chin; Chiu, Yu-Li; Fu, Ting-Ying; Chang, Hong-Tai

    2015-01-01

    To assess the efficacy of positron emission tomography/computed tomography with the glucose analogue 2-[ 18 F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG-PET/CT) in Taiwanese women with early breast cancer detected by mammography screening. Dual-time-point imaging of whole-body supine and breast prone scans using FDG-PET/CT were performed sequentially in the pre-operative stage. A total of 11,849 patients underwent screening mammography, of whom 1,209 (10.2%) displayed positive results. After further investigation, 54 patients underwent FDG-PET/CT. Post-operative pathology examinations revealed malignancies in 26 lesions, including invasive breast cancer in 11 cases and non-invasive breast cancer in 15 cases, as well as benign disease in 30 lesions. The FDG-PET/CT findings from the whole-body scans were positive for 9 of 11 invasive breast cancers (81.8%) and 3 of 15 non-invasive cancers (20%), and they were negative for all benign lesions. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of FDG-PET/CT with whole-body supine imaging were 46.2%, 100%, 100% and 68.2%, respectively. Breast prone imaging revealed another patient with ductal carcinoma in situ, increasing the sensitivity to 50%. Importantly, positive PET findings were significantly correlated with tumour histology (P = 0.006), tumour size (P = 0.039) and Ki-67 expression (P = 0.011). FDG-PET/CT with whole-body scanning demonstrated high sensitivity to invasive breast cancer, limited sensitivity to non-invasive breast cancer, and high specificity for breast cancer. FDG-PET/CT might be useful for differentiating tumour invasiveness. However, the good PPV but poor NPV do not allow the physician to discard the biopsy.

  15. Clinical Significance of Focal Breast Lesions Incidentally Identified by 18F-FDG PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Young Seok; Choi, Joon Young; Lee, Su Jin; Hyun, Seung Hyup; Lee, Ji Young; Choi, Yong; Choe, Yearn Seong; Lee, Kyung Han; Kim, Byung Tae

    2008-01-01

    We evaluated the incidence and malignant risk of focal breast lesions incidentally detected by 18 F-FDG PET/CT. Various PET/CT findings of the breast lesions were also analyzed to improve the differentiation between benign from malignant focal breast lesions. The subjects were 3,768 consecutive 18 F-FDG PET/CT exams performed in adult females without a history of breast cancer. A focal breast lesion was defined as a focal 18 F-FDG uptake or a focal nodular lesion on CT image irrespective of 18 F-FDG uptake in the breasts. The maximum SUV and CT pattern of focal breast lesions were evaluated, and were compared with final diagnosis. The incidence of focal breast lesions on PET/CT in adult female subjects was 1.4% (58 lesions in 53 subjects). In finally confirmed 53 lesions of 48 subjects, 11 lesions of 8 subjects (20.8%) were proven to be malignant. When the PET/CT patterns suggesting benignancy (maximum attenuation value > 75 HU or 20) were added as diagnostic criteria of PET/CT to differentiate benign from malignant breast lesions along with maximum SUV, the area under ROC curve of PET/CT was significantly increased compared with maximum SUV alone (0.680±0.093 vs. 0.786±0.076, p 18 F-FDG PET/CT is not low, deserving further diagnostic confirmation. Image interpretation considering both 18 F-FDG uptake and PET/CT pattern may be helpful to improve the differentiation from malignant and benign focal breast lesion

  16. Breast multidetector-row CT with histopathologic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, Makiko; Yamashita, Akiyoshi; Ohgi, Kazuyuki; Kobori, Kenichi; Furukawa, Takashi

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the correlation between multidetector-row CT (MDCT) and histopathologic findings using the same MDCT image as the histopathologic cross-section. MDCT with contrast enhancement was performed in 10 patients with breast cancers (8 invasive ductal carcinomas, one invasive lobular carcinoma, and one non-invasive ductal carcinoma). We tried to reconstruct multiplanar reconstructions (MPR) in the same plane as the histopathologic cross-section, and we evaluated the histopathologic findings of the false-positive lesions. In all cases, we obtained the same MDCT image as the histopathologic cross-section. There were 10 main lesions and 18 other lesions. In the other lesions, we found no false-negative lesions and 11 false-positive lesions. False-positive lesions included periductal fibrosis, cystic change, duct papillomatosis, sclerosing adenosis, fibroadenoma, and others. Using MDCT of the breast, it is possible to obtain good correlation between CT images and histopathologic findings. MDCT is thought to be useful in the evaluation CT findings on the basis of histopathologic evidence. (author)

  17. Local curvature analysis for classifying breast tumors: Preliminary analysis in dedicated breast CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Juhun; Nishikawa, Robert M.; Reiser, Ingrid; Boone, John M.; Lindfors, Karen K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to measure the effectiveness of local curvature measures as novel image features for classifying breast tumors. Methods: A total of 119 breast lesions from 104 noncontrast dedicated breast computed tomography images of women were used in this study. Volumetric segmentation was done using a seed-based segmentation algorithm and then a triangulated surface was extracted from the resulting segmentation. Total, mean, and Gaussian curvatures were then computed. Normalized curvatures were used as classification features. In addition, traditional image features were also extracted and a forward feature selection scheme was used to select the optimal feature set. Logistic regression was used as a classifier and leave-one-out cross-validation was utilized to evaluate the classification performances of the features. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC, area under curve) was used as a figure of merit. Results: Among curvature measures, the normalized total curvature (C_T) showed the best classification performance (AUC of 0.74), while the others showed no classification power individually. Five traditional image features (two shape, two margin, and one texture descriptors) were selected via the feature selection scheme and its resulting classifier achieved an AUC of 0.83. Among those five features, the radial gradient index (RGI), which is a margin descriptor, showed the best classification performance (AUC of 0.73). A classifier combining RGI and C_T yielded an AUC of 0.81, which showed similar performance (i.e., no statistically significant difference) to the classifier with the above five traditional image features. Additional comparisons in AUC values between classifiers using different combinations of traditional image features and C_T were conducted. The results showed that C_T was able to replace the other four image features for the classification task. Conclusions: The normalized curvature measure

  18. High-resolution breast tomography at high energy: a feasibility study of phase contrast imaging on a whole breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sztrókay, A; Schlossbauer, T; Bamberg, F; Reiser, M F; Coan, P; Diemoz, P C; Brun, E; Bravin, A; Mayr, D

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies on phase contrast imaging (PCI) mammography have demonstrated an enhancement of breast morphology and cancerous tissue visualization compared to conventional imaging. We show here the first results of the PCI analyser-based imaging (ABI) in computed tomography (CT) mode on whole and large (>12 cm) tumour-bearing breast tissues. We demonstrate in this work the capability of the technique of working at high x-ray energies and producing high-contrast images of large and complex specimens. One entire breast of an 80-year-old woman with invasive ductal cancer was imaged using ABI-CT with monochromatic 70 keV x-rays and an area detector of 92×92 µm 2 pixel size. Sagittal slices were reconstructed from the acquired data, and compared to corresponding histological sections. Comparison with conventional absorption-based CT was also performed. Five blinded radiologists quantitatively evaluated the visual aspects of the ABI-CT images with respect to sharpness, soft tissue contrast, tissue boundaries and the discrimination of different structures/tissues. ABI-CT excellently depicted the entire 3D architecture of the breast volume by providing high-resolution and high-contrast images of the normal and cancerous breast tissues. These results are an important step in the evolution of PCI-CT towards its clinical implementation. (paper)

  19. High-resolution breast tomography at high energy: a feasibility study of phase contrast imaging on a whole breast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sztrókay, A.; Diemoz, P. C.; Schlossbauer, T.; Brun, E.; Bamberg, F.; Mayr, D.; Reiser, M. F.; Bravin, A.; Coan, P.

    2012-05-01

    Previous studies on phase contrast imaging (PCI) mammography have demonstrated an enhancement of breast morphology and cancerous tissue visualization compared to conventional imaging. We show here the first results of the PCI analyser-based imaging (ABI) in computed tomography (CT) mode on whole and large (>12 cm) tumour-bearing breast tissues. We demonstrate in this work the capability of the technique of working at high x-ray energies and producing high-contrast images of large and complex specimens. One entire breast of an 80-year-old woman with invasive ductal cancer was imaged using ABI-CT with monochromatic 70 keV x-rays and an area detector of 92×92 µm2 pixel size. Sagittal slices were reconstructed from the acquired data, and compared to corresponding histological sections. Comparison with conventional absorption-based CT was also performed. Five blinded radiologists quantitatively evaluated the visual aspects of the ABI-CT images with respect to sharpness, soft tissue contrast, tissue boundaries and the discrimination of different structures/tissues. ABI-CT excellently depicted the entire 3D architecture of the breast volume by providing high-resolution and high-contrast images of the normal and cancerous breast tissues. These results are an important step in the evolution of PCI-CT towards its clinical implementation.

  20. Personalized estimates of radiation dose from dedicated breast CT in a diagnostic population and comparison with diagnostic mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vedantham, Srinivasan; Shi, Linxi; Karellas, Andrew; O'Connell, Avice M; Conover, David L

    2013-01-01

    This study retrospectively analyzed the mean glandular dose (MGD) to 133 breasts from 132 subjects, all women, who participated in a clinical trial evaluating dedicated breast CT in a diagnostic population. The clinical trial was conducted in adherence to a protocol approved by institutional review boards and the study participants provided written informed consent. Individual estimates of MGD to each breast from dedicated breast CT was obtained by combining x-ray beam characteristics with estimates of breast dimensions and fibroglandular fraction from volumetric breast CT images, and using normalized glandular dose coefficients. For each study participant and for the breast corresponding to that imaged with breast CT, an estimate of the MGD from diagnostic mammography (including supplemental views) was obtained from the DICOM image headers for comparison. This estimate uses normalized glandular dose coefficients corresponding to a breast with 50% fibroglandular weight fraction. The median fibroglandular weight fraction for the study cohort determined from volumetric breast CT images was 15%. Hence, the MGD from diagnostic mammography was corrected to be representative of the study cohort. Individualized estimates of MGD from breast CT ranged from 5.7 to 27.8 mGy. Corresponding to the breasts imaged with breast CT, the MGD from diagnostic mammography ranged from 2.6 to 31.6 mGy. The mean (± inter-breast SD) and the median MGD (mGy) from dedicated breast CT exam were 13.9 ± 4.6 and 12.6, respectively. For the corresponding breasts, the mean (± inter-breast SD) and the median MGD (mGy) from diagnostic mammography were 12.4 ± 6.3 and 11.1, respectively. Statistical analysis indicated that at the 0.05 level, the distributions of MGD from dedicated breast CT and diagnostic mammography were significantly different (Wilcoxon signed ranks test, p = 0.007). While the interquartile range and the range (maximum–minimum) of MGD from dedicated breast CT was lower than

  1. WE-FG-207A-03: Low-Dose Cone-Beam Breast CT: Physics and Technology Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boone, J.

    2016-01-01

    Mammography-based screening has been a valuable imaging tool for the early detection of non-palpable lesions and has contributed to significant reduction in breast cancer associated mortality. However, the breast imaging community recognizes that mammography is not ideal, and in particular is inferior for women with dense breasts. Also, the 2-D projection of a 3-D organ results in tissue superposition contributing to false-positives. The sensitivity of mammography is breast-density dependent. Its sensitivity, especially in dense breasts, is low due to overlapping tissue and the fact that normal breast tissue, benign lesions and breast cancers all have similar “densities”, making lesion detection more difficult. We ideally need 3-D imaging for imaging the 3-D breast. MRI is 3-D, whole breast ultrasound is 3-D, digital breast tomosynthesis is called 3-D but is really “pseudo 3-D” due to poor resolution along the depth-direction. Also, and importantly, we need to be able to administer intravenous contrast agents for optimal imaging, similar to other organ systems in the body. Dedicated breast CT allows for 3-D imaging of the uncompressed breast. In current designs, the patient is positioned prone on the table and the breast is pendant through an aperture and the scan takes approximately 10 seconds [O’Connell et al., AJR 195: 496–509, 2010]. Almost on the heels of the invention of CT itself, work began on the development of dedicated breast CT. These early breast CT systems were used in clinical trials and the results from comparative performance evaluation of breast CT and mammography for 1625 subjects were reported in 1980 [Chang et al., Cancer 46: 939–46, 1980]. However, the technological limitations at that time stymied clinical translation for decades. Subsequent to the landmark article in 2001 [Boone et al., Radiology 221: 657–67, 2001] that demonstrated the potential feasibility in terms of radiation dose, multiple research groups are actively

  2. WE-FG-207A-03: Low-Dose Cone-Beam Breast CT: Physics and Technology Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boone, J. [UC Davis Medical Center (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Mammography-based screening has been a valuable imaging tool for the early detection of non-palpable lesions and has contributed to significant reduction in breast cancer associated mortality. However, the breast imaging community recognizes that mammography is not ideal, and in particular is inferior for women with dense breasts. Also, the 2-D projection of a 3-D organ results in tissue superposition contributing to false-positives. The sensitivity of mammography is breast-density dependent. Its sensitivity, especially in dense breasts, is low due to overlapping tissue and the fact that normal breast tissue, benign lesions and breast cancers all have similar “densities”, making lesion detection more difficult. We ideally need 3-D imaging for imaging the 3-D breast. MRI is 3-D, whole breast ultrasound is 3-D, digital breast tomosynthesis is called 3-D but is really “pseudo 3-D” due to poor resolution along the depth-direction. Also, and importantly, we need to be able to administer intravenous contrast agents for optimal imaging, similar to other organ systems in the body. Dedicated breast CT allows for 3-D imaging of the uncompressed breast. In current designs, the patient is positioned prone on the table and the breast is pendant through an aperture and the scan takes approximately 10 seconds [O’Connell et al., AJR 195: 496–509, 2010]. Almost on the heels of the invention of CT itself, work began on the development of dedicated breast CT. These early breast CT systems were used in clinical trials and the results from comparative performance evaluation of breast CT and mammography for 1625 subjects were reported in 1980 [Chang et al., Cancer 46: 939–46, 1980]. However, the technological limitations at that time stymied clinical translation for decades. Subsequent to the landmark article in 2001 [Boone et al., Radiology 221: 657–67, 2001] that demonstrated the potential feasibility in terms of radiation dose, multiple research groups are actively

  3. Cone-beam volume CT mammographic imaging: feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Biao; Ning, Ruola

    2001-06-01

    X-ray projection mammography, using a film/screen combination or digital techniques, has proven to be the most effective imaging modality for early detection of breast cancer currently available. However, the inherent superimposition of structures makes small carcinoma (a few millimeters in size) difficult to detect in the occultation case or in dense breasts, resulting in a high false positive biopsy rate. The cone-beam x-ray projection based volume imaging using flat panel detectors (FPDs) makes it possible to obtain three-dimensional breast images. This may benefit diagnosis of the structure and pattern of the lesion while eliminating hard compression of the breast. This paper presents a novel cone-beam volume CT mammographic imaging protocol based on the above techniques. Through computer simulation, the key issues of the system and imaging techniques, including the x-ray imaging geometry and corresponding reconstruction algorithms, x-ray characteristics of breast tissues, x-ray setting techniques, the absorbed dose estimation and the quantitative effect of x-ray scattering on image quality, are addressed. The preliminary simulation results support the proposed cone-beam volume CT mammographic imaging modality in respect to feasibility and practicability for mammography. The absorbed dose level is comparable to that of current two-view mammography and would not be a prominent problem for this imaging protocol. Compared to traditional mammography, the proposed imaging protocol with isotropic spatial resolution will potentially provide significantly better low contrast detectability of breast tumors and more accurate location of breast lesions.

  4. Scan Quality and Entrance Skin Dose in Thoracic CT: A Comparison between Bismuth Breast Shield and Posteriorly Centered Partial CT Scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tappouni, Rafel; Mathers, Bradley

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. To compare the effectiveness of the bismuth breast shield and partial CT scan in reducing entrance skin dose and to evaluate the effect of the breast shield on image quality (IQ). Methods. Nanodots were placed on an adult anthropomorphic phantom. Standard chest CT, CT with shield, and partial CT were performed. Nanodot readings and effective doses were recorded. 50 patients with chest CTs obtained both with and without breast shields were reviewed. IQ was evaluated by two radiologists and by measuring Hounsfield units (HUs) and standard deviation (SD) of HU in anterior subcutaneous region. Results. Breast shield and the partial CT scans reduced radiation to the anterior chest by 38% and 16%, respectively. Partial CT increased dose to the posterior chest by 37% and effective dose by 8%. Change in IQ in shield CT was observed in the anterior chest wall. Significant change in IQ was observed in 5/50 cases. The shield caused an increase of 20 HU (P = 0.021) and a 1.86 reduction in SD of HU (P = 0.027) in the anterior compared to posterior subcutaneous regions. Summary. Bismuth breast shield is more effective than the partial CT in reducing entrance skin dose while maintaining image quality

  5. Dual resolution cone beam breast CT: A feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Lingyun; Shen Youtao; Lai, Chao-Jen; Han Tao; Zhong Yuncheng; Ge Shuaiping; Liu Xinming; Wang Tianpeng; Yang, Wei T.; Whitman, Gary J.; Shaw, Chris C.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, the authors investigated the feasibility of a dual resolution volume-of-interest (VOI) cone beam breast CT technique and compared two implementation approaches in terms of dose saving and scatter reduction. Methods: With this technique, a lead VOI mask with an opening is inserted between the x-ray source and the breast to deliver x-ray exposure to the VOI while blocking x rays outside the VOI. A CCD detector is used to collect the high resolution projection data of the VOI. Low resolution cone beam CT (CBCT) images of the entire breast, acquired with a flat panel (FP) detector, were used to calculate the projection data outside the VOI with the ray-tracing reprojection method. The Feldkamp-Davis-Kress filtered backprojection algorithm was used to reconstruct the dual resolution 3D images. Breast phantoms with 180 μm and smaller microcalcifications (MCs) were imaged with both FP and FP-CCD dual resolution CBCT systems, respectively. Two approaches of implementing the dual resolution technique, breast-centered approach and VOI-centered approach, were investigated and evaluated for dose saving and scatter reduction with Monte Carlo simulation using a GEANT4 package. Results: The results showed that the breast-centered approach saved more breast absorbed dose than did VOI-centered approach with similar scatter reduction. The MCs in fatty breast phantom, which were invisible with FP CBCT scan, became visible with the FP-CCD dual resolution CBCT scan. Conclusions: These results indicate potential improvement of the image quality inside the VOI with reduced breast dose both inside and outside the VOI.

  6. Imaging dose in breast radiotherapy: does breast size affect the dose to the organs at risk and the risk of secondary cancer to the contralateral breast?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batumalai, Vikneswary; Quinn, Alexandra; Jameson, Michael; Delaney, Geoff; Holloway, Lois

    2015-01-01

    Correct target positioning is crucial for accurate dose delivery in breast radiotherapy resulting in utilisation of daily imaging. However, the radiation dose from daily imaging is associated with increased probability of secondary induced cancer. The aim of this study was to quantify doses associated with three imaging modalities and investigate the correlation of dose and varying breast size in breast radiotherapy. Planning computed tomography (CT) data sets of 30 breast cancer patients were utilised to simulate the dose received by various organs from a megavoltage computed tomography (MV-CT), megavoltage electronic portal image (MV-EPI) and megavoltage cone-beam computed tomography (MV-CBCT). The mean dose to organs adjacent to the target volume (contralateral breast, lungs, spinal cord and heart) were analysed. Pearson correlation analysis was performed to determine the relationship between imaging dose and primary breast volume and the lifetime attributable risk (LAR) of induced secondary cancer was calculated for the contralateral breast. The highest contralateral breast mean dose was from the MV-CBCT (1.79 Gy), followed by MV-EPI (0.22 Gy) and MV-CT (0.11 Gy). A similar trend was found for all organs at risk (OAR) analysed. The primary breast volume inversely correlated with the contralateral breast dose for all three imaging modalities. As the primary breast volume increases, the likelihood of a patient developing a radiation-induced secondary cancer to the contralateral breast decreases. MV-CBCT showed a stronger relationship between breast size and LAR of developing a radiation-induced contralateral breast cancer in comparison with the MV-CT and MV-EPI. For breast patients, imaging dose to OAR depends on imaging modality and treated breast size. When considering the use of imaging during breast radiotherapy, the patient's breast size and contralateral breast dose should be taken into account

  7. Usefulness of preoperative chest multidetector CT for evaluation of breast cancer: comparison with breast MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Yun Woo; Kim, Dong Hun; Lee, Min Hyuk

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of chest multidetector-row helical computed tomography (MDCT) in detecting breast cancer in preoperative metastasis work-ups and to assess the accuracy of MDCT compared with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MDCT were performed on 69 consecutive patients with 94 lesions of histologically proven breast cancer. Retrospectively, two radiologists performed a blind review of the MDCT images for margin, shape, mass enhancement pattern and the enhancing distribution of non-mass lesions with consensus. CT attenuation values were measured in the average HU on pre-enhancing and enhanced CT in gland, fat, muscle, and in masses with the largest region of interest (ROI). MDCT finding were analyzed and compared with breast MRI. Of the 91 breast lesions detected on MDCT, 64 were mass lesions and 24 were non-mass lesions on enhancement, 86 lesions were malignant and 5 were benign. Three pathologically proven malignant masses were not detected on MDCT. Positive predictive value, false positive rate and false negative rate were 94.5%, 5.3%, 3.2% respectively. The highly predictive features for malignancy were a spiculated or irregular margin, an irregular of round shape, and a heterogeneously or rim enhanced mass. Another highly predictive feature for malignancy was linear or segmentally distributed enhancing non-mass lesions. The CT values of masses in pre-enhanced scans were 38.6 ± 7.9 HU; these values increased to 110.9 ± 26.6 HU after contrast injection (90 sec). The attenuation values from enhancing CT of malignant lesions were significantly higher than those of non-enhancing lesions. The depiction of enhancing masses on MDCT compared with MR imaging were 88.6%. The extension of malignancy were equally well correlated MDCT with MR imaging. The diagnostic value of chest MDCT for preoperative staging is comparable with MR imaging for the detection and extension of lesions. Therefore, chest MDCT of breast cancer can add to the information obtained from

  8. Utility of three-dimensional helical CT in the diagnosis of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Yoshiaki; Hata, Yoshinobu; Matsuoka, Shinnichi; Nakajima, Nobuhisa; Ito, Toichi; Osada, Tadahiro; Sano, Fumio

    2004-01-01

    Although utility of three-dimensional (3D) helical CT for preoperative examination of breast cancer has been discussed, the accuracy of the helical CT in diagnosing breast cancer has not been fully evaluated. In this study 56 malignant and 28 benign breast tumors were evaluated preoperatively with 3D-helical CT, and their imaging results were compared with pathological findings of surgical specimens. Helical CT identified the presence of malignancy in 54 out of the 56 cancer cases tested and the sensitivity and specificity in distinguishing between malignant and benign tumors were 82% and 57%, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity in diagnosing the presence of metastatic axillary lymph nodes using helical CT were 70% and 80%, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity in diagnosing the presence of extensive intraductal component (EIC) using helical CT were 71% and 86%, respectively. Helical CT visualized all of the tumors in multifocal breast cancer cases. In conclusion, 3D-helical CT is a useful modality for preoperative examination of breast cancer, especially for assessing axillary lymph node status, and EIC, and will be helpful for conducting sentinel lymph node biopsy (SNLB) and breast-conserving surgery. (author)

  9. Task-based optimization of image reconstruction in breast CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Adrian A.; Sidky, Emil Y.; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2014-03-01

    We demonstrate a task-based assessment of image quality in dedicated breast CT in order to optimize the number of projection views acquired. The methodology we employ is based on the Hotelling Observer (HO) and its associated metrics. We consider two tasks: the Rayleigh task of discerning between two resolvable objects and a single larger object, and the signal detection task of classifying an image as belonging to either a signalpresent or signal-absent hypothesis. HO SNR values are computed for 50, 100, 200, 500, and 1000 projection view images, with the total imaging radiation dose held constant. We use the conventional fan-beam FBP algorithm and investigate the effect of varying the width of a Hanning window used in the reconstruction, since this affects both the noise properties of the image and the under-sampling artifacts which can arise in the case of sparse-view acquisitions. Our results demonstrate that fewer projection views should be used in order to increase HO performance, which in this case constitutes an upper-bound on human observer performance. However, the impact on HO SNR of using fewer projection views, each with a higher dose, is not as significant as the impact of employing regularization in the FBP reconstruction through a Hanning filter.

  10. CT diagnosis in diseases of the breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Hongbin; Xie Jingxia

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To study the CT signs of breast diseases, and discuss the value of CT in the diagnosis of breast cancer and the axillary lymph node (LN) metastases. Materials and methods: Fifty three cases were reported, including breast cancer 30 cases and benign diseases 23 cases. CT were performed in all patients, 44 also had mammography examination. Results: (1) The CT appearance of breast cancer: round or irregular mass, spiculate border, duct retraction, involved Cooper's ligament, deformed adipose space etc. Benign hyperplasia: Irregular mass and symmetrical thickening of breast glands. Cystic hyperplasia: typically multiple, round, liquid-density mass. (2) CT was comparable to mammography in terms of differential diagnosis, however with breast mass located near the axilla or for evaluation of the thoracic wall. CT was superior to mammography. CT was also helpful in detecting LN metastases. Conclusion: CT is valuable in detecting and differentiating breast diseases as well as in the diagnosis of LN metastases

  11. Calibration and analysis of a multimodal micro-CT and structured light imaging system for the evaluation of excised breast tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClatchy, David M., III; Rizzo, Elizabeth J.; Meganck, Jeff; Kempner, Josh; Vicory, Jared; Wells, Wendy A.; Paulsen, Keith D.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2017-12-01

    A multimodal micro-computed tomography (CT) and multi-spectral structured light imaging (SLI) system is introduced and systematically analyzed to test its feasibility to aid in margin delineation during breast conserving surgery (BCS). Phantom analysis of the micro-CT yielded a signal-to-noise ratio of 34, a contrast of 1.64, and a minimum detectable resolution of 240 μm for a 1.2 min scan. The SLI system, spanning wavelengths 490 nm to 800 nm and spatial frequencies up to 1.37 mm-1 , was evaluated with aqueous tissue simulating phantoms having variations in particle size distribution, scatter density, and blood volume fraction. The reduced scattering coefficient, μs\\prime and phase function parameter, γ, were accurately recovered over all wavelengths independent of blood volume fractions from 0% to 4%, assuming a flat sample geometry perpendicular to the imaging plane. The resolution of the optical system was tested with a step phantom, from which the modulation transfer function was calculated yielding a maximum resolution of 3.78 cycles per mm. The three dimensional spatial co-registration between the CT and optical imaging space was tested and shown to be accurate within 0.7 mm. A freshly resected breast specimen, with lobular carcinoma, fibrocystic disease, and adipose, was imaged with the system. The micro-CT provided visualization of the tumor mass and its spiculations, and SLI yielded superficial quantification of light scattering parameters for the malignant and benign tissue types. These results appear to be the first demonstration of SLI combined with standard medical tomography for imaging excised tumor specimens. While further investigations are needed to determine and test the spectral, spatial, and CT features required to classify tissue, this study demonstrates the ability of multimodal CT/SLI to quantify, visualize, and spatially navigate breast tumor specimens, which could potentially aid in the assessment of tumor margin status during

  12. TU-CD-207-11: Patient-Driven Automatic Exposure Control for Dedicated Breast CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez, A; Gazi, P; Seibert, J; Boone, J

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To implement automatic exposure control (AEC) in dedicated breast CT (bCT) on a patient-specific basis using only the pre-scan scout views. Methods: Using a large cohort (N=153) of bCT data sets, the breast effective diameter (D) and width in orthogonal planes (Wa,Wb) were calculated from the reconstructed bCT image and pre-scan scout views, respectively. D, Wa, and Wb were measured at the breast center-of-mass (COM), making use of the known geometry of our bCT system. These data were then fit to a second-order polynomial “D=F(Wa,Wb)” in a least squares sense in order to provide a functional form for determining the breast diameter. The coefficient of determination (R 2 ) and mean percent error between the measured breast diameter and fit breast diameter were used to evaluate the overall robustness of the polynomial fit. Lastly, previously-reported bCT technique factors derived from Monte Carlo simulations were used to determine the tube current required for each breast diameter in order to match two-view mammographic dose levels. Results: F(Wa,Wb) provided fitted breast diameters in agreement with the measured breast diameters resulting in R 2 values ranging from 0.908 to 0.929 and mean percent errors ranging from 3.2% to 3.7%. For all 153 bCT data sets used in this study, the fitted breast diameters ranged from 7.9 cm to 15.7 cm corresponding to tube current values ranging from 0.6 mA to 4.9 mA in order to deliver the same dose as two-view mammography in a 50% glandular breast with a 80 kV x-ray beam and 16.6 second scan time. Conclusion: The present work provides a robust framework for AEC in dedicated bCT using only the width measurements derived from the two orthogonal pre-scan scout views. Future work will investigate how these automatically chosen exposure levels affect the quality of the reconstructed image

  13. TU-CD-207-11: Patient-Driven Automatic Exposure Control for Dedicated Breast CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez, A; Gazi, P [Biomedical Engineering Graduate Group, University of California Davis, Davis, CA (United States); Department of Radiology, UC Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Seibert, J; Boone, J [Department of Radiology, UC Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California Davis, Davis, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To implement automatic exposure control (AEC) in dedicated breast CT (bCT) on a patient-specific basis using only the pre-scan scout views. Methods: Using a large cohort (N=153) of bCT data sets, the breast effective diameter (D) and width in orthogonal planes (Wa,Wb) were calculated from the reconstructed bCT image and pre-scan scout views, respectively. D, Wa, and Wb were measured at the breast center-of-mass (COM), making use of the known geometry of our bCT system. These data were then fit to a second-order polynomial “D=F(Wa,Wb)” in a least squares sense in order to provide a functional form for determining the breast diameter. The coefficient of determination (R{sup 2}) and mean percent error between the measured breast diameter and fit breast diameter were used to evaluate the overall robustness of the polynomial fit. Lastly, previously-reported bCT technique factors derived from Monte Carlo simulations were used to determine the tube current required for each breast diameter in order to match two-view mammographic dose levels. Results: F(Wa,Wb) provided fitted breast diameters in agreement with the measured breast diameters resulting in R{sup 2} values ranging from 0.908 to 0.929 and mean percent errors ranging from 3.2% to 3.7%. For all 153 bCT data sets used in this study, the fitted breast diameters ranged from 7.9 cm to 15.7 cm corresponding to tube current values ranging from 0.6 mA to 4.9 mA in order to deliver the same dose as two-view mammography in a 50% glandular breast with a 80 kV x-ray beam and 16.6 second scan time. Conclusion: The present work provides a robust framework for AEC in dedicated bCT using only the width measurements derived from the two orthogonal pre-scan scout views. Future work will investigate how these automatically chosen exposure levels affect the quality of the reconstructed image.

  14. Dual time point FDG-PET/CT imaging...; Potential tool for diagnosis of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zytoon, A.A.; Murakami, K.; El-Kholy, M.R.; El-Shorbagy, E.

    2008-01-01

    Aim: This prospective study was designed to assess the utility of the dual time point imaging technique using 2- [ 18 F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) positron-emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) to detect primary breast cancer and to determine whether it is useful for the detection of small and non-invasive cancers, as well as cancers in dense breast tissue. Methods: One hundred and eleven patients with newly diagnosed breast cancer underwent two sequential PET/CT examinations (dual time point imaging) for preoperative staging. The maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) of FDG was measured from both time points. The percentage change in SUVmax (ΔSUVmax%) between time points 1 (SUVmax1) and 2 (SUVmax2) was calculated. The patients were divided into groups: invasive (n = 82), non invasive (n = 29); large (>10 mm; n = 80), small (≤10 mm; n = 31); tumours in dense breasts (n = 61), and tumours in non-dense breasts (n = 50). The tumour:background (T:B) ratios at both time points were measured and the ΔSUVmax%, ΔT:B% values were calculated. All PET study results were correlated with the histopathology results. Results: Of the 111 cancer lesions, 88 (79.3%) showed an increase and 23 (20.7%) showed either no change [10 (9%)] or a decrease [13 (11.7%)] in the SUVmax over time. Of the 111 contralateral normal breasts, nine (8.1%) showed an increase and 102 (91.9%) showed either no change [17 (15.3%)] or a decrease [85 (76.6%)] in the SUVmax over time. The mean ± SD of SUVmax1, SUVmax2, Δ%SUVmax were 4.9 ± 3.6, 6.0 ± 4.5, and 22.6 ± 13.1% for invasive cancers, 4.1 ± 3.8, 4.4 ± 4.8, and -2.4 ± 18.5% for non-invasive cancers, 2.3 ± 1.9, 2.7 ± 2.3, and 12.9 ± 21.1% for small cancers, 5.6 ± 3.7, 6.8 ± 4.8, and 17.3 ± 17.1% for large cancers, 4.9 ± 3.7, 5.8 ± 4.8, and 15.1 ± 17.6% for cancers in dense breast, and 4.5 ± 3.6, 5.4 ± 4.5, and 17.2 ± 19.2% for cancers in non-dense breast. The receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analysis

  15. Optimization of registration template of cone-beam CT guided whole breast irradiation after lumpectomy of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Dongqing; Li Hongsheng; Zhou Tao; Liu Tonghai; Yu Ningsha; Li Baosheng

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To optimize the registration template of kilovoltage cone-beam CT (CBCT) guided radiotherapy in whole breast irradiation (WBI) after lumpectomy of breast cancer. Methods: From April 2006 to July 2009, twelve patients undergoing WBI with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) were recruited in this study. All patients were performed with both conventional planning CT and CBCT integrated on Varian 23EX. Six distinguishable reference points (the diameter 1 mm) around the lumpectomy cavity and the surrounding gland on the planning CT image were marked. The images were manually registered offline based on the breast surface, surgical clips, breast gland, contiguous rib, ipsilateral lung and its external contours, respectively. The same six reference points were then marked on the CBCT image. The performance of the five registration templates was compared using the concept of registration error, while the registration time was taken into account. The registration error was calculated based on the six reference points' translations between the planning CT image and CBCT image, and analyzed with SPSS 13.0 software using one-way ANOVA. Results: The values of the registration error for the breast surface, surgical clips, breast gland, contiguous rib, ipsilateral lung and its external contours were (0.60±0.20), (0.43±0.15), (0.49±0.19), (0.69±0.36) and (0.94±0.49) cm, respectively, and the registration time were (3.8±1.1), (3.0±0.9), (4.7±1.7), (4.3±1.3) and (4.5±1.3) min, respectively. There was no statistical difference between the breast surface, surgical clips and breast gland registration template (t=0.48-1.36, P<0.05), the same result trend to contiguous rib compared with ipsilateral lung (t=2.00, P=0.055), however, there was significant difference between surgical clips and the last two registration methods (t=2.08-4.08, P<0.05). Conclusions: In this initial study with a modest number of patients, surgical clips show a best registration template

  16. CT-guided thermoplastic assisted segmentectomy is an optimal breast conserving surgery for breast cancer with nipple discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makita, Masujiro; Gomi, Naoya; Tachikawa, Tomohiro

    2004-01-01

    Improvement of imaging by injecting contrast agents into the discharging duct and immobilizing the breast mound with a drape-type thermoplastic shell in breast conserving surgery was assessed by evaluating 96 cases of breast cancer patients with nipple discharge treated by partial mastectomy between April 1998 and August 2003. These patients were divided to three groups: Group A was treated by ordinary partial mastectomy or microdochectomy without new methods. Group B underwent contrast imaging without shell immobilization, and Group C received both shell immobilization and contrast imaging. The negative rates of surgical margins in Groups A, B and C were 19.0%, 17.2%, and 37.5%, respectively. The rates of negative ''lateral'' surgical margins in Groups A, B and C were 23.8%, 27.6%, and 50%, respectively. The rate of negative ''lateral'' surgical margins in Group C was significantly higher than that in Group A. Our findings suggest CT-guided thermoplastic assisted segmentectomy, adopting both ductography CT and immobilization by shell, is an optimal breast conserving surgery for breast cancer with nipple discharge. (author)

  17. FDG-PET/CT in the diagnosis of recurrent breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Ryusuke; Kumita, Shin-ichiro; Yoshida, Tamiko; Ishihara, Keiichi; Kiriyama, Tomonari; Hakozaki, Kenta; Yanagihara, Keiko; Lida, Shinya; Tsuchiya, Shin-ichi

    2012-01-01

    Background. An advantage of PET/CT has been demonstrated for diagnosis of several tumor entities. In patients with breast cancer, early diagnosis and accurate restaging of recurrence after surgery is important for selection of the most appropriate therapeutic strategy. Purpose. To evaluate the accuracy of integrated positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT) using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), for follow-up of patients with suspected recurrent breast cancer. Material and Methods. Forty-seven patients with suspected recurrent breast cancer underwent PET/CT. The PET and PET/CT images were interpreted without knowledge of the results of other diagnostic modalities, and compared with each other with reference to the final diagnosis. Results. Twenty-five (53%) patients suffered tumor recurrence. The overall sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and accuracy of PET/CT were 96%, 91%, 92%, 95%, and 94%, respectively. In comparison with PET, PET/CT had a higher sensitivity and accuracy (96% vs. 80% and 94% vs. 81%, respectively). The difference in diagnostic accuracy between PET/CT and PET was significant (P < 0.05). Conclusion. The present findings indicate that PET/CT is an accurate, sensitive and reliable modality for screening and detection of breast cancer recurrence. PET/CT appears to be an effective surveillance tool, as it is able to cover the whole body in a single procedure and shows good performance

  18. The value of imaging examinations in diagnosis and curative effect evaluation of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Xiaotian; Zhang Yongxue

    2010-01-01

    Breast cancer is a serious impact on women's physical and mental health and a life-threatening common disease. Imaging examinations have great significances in diagnosing and evaluating curative effect on breast cancer. This article aims to introduce and comprehensive the value of diagnosis and curative effect evaluation of breast cancer in the context of imaging examinations (ultrasonography, mammography, breast CT, breast MRI, breast 99 Tc m -MIBI imaging, PET, PET-CT, etc). (authors)

  19. Performance of FDG PET/CT in the clinical management of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groheux, David; Espié, Marc; Giacchetti, Sylvie; Hindié, Elif

    2013-02-01

    In this analysis, the role of metabolic imaging with fluorine 18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) in breast cancer is reviewed. The analysis was limited to recent works by using state-of-the-art positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) technology. The strengths and limitations of FDG PET/CT are examined in various clinical settings, and the following questions are answered: Is FDG PET/CT useful to differentiate malignant from benign breast lesions? Can FDG PET/CT replace sentinel node biopsy for axillary staging? What is the role of FDG PET/CT in initial staging of inflammatory or locally advanced breast cancer? What is the role of FDG PET/CT in initial staging of clinical stage IIA and IIB and primary operable stage IIIA breast cancer? How does FDG PET/CT compare with conventional techniques in the restaging of cancer in patients who are suspected of having disease recurrence? What is the role of FDG PET/CT in the assessment of early response to neoadjuvant therapy and of response to therapy for metastatic disease? Some recommendations for clinical practice are given.

  20. Imaging features of breast echinococcus granulosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Li; Liu Fanming; Gong Yue; Ge Jinmei; Li Xianjun; Shi Minxin; Guo Yongzhong

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To demonstrate the X-ray and CT features of breast hydatid disease. Methods: Of 11 patients with pathologically confirmed breast Echinococcus hydatid disease were collected and the X-ray and CT image data were analyzed. Results: Of 11 patients with hydatid cysts,single cyst was found in 9 patients which one cyst was ruptured due to trauma, multiple cyst in 2 patients. Mammography showed small or large shadow in different size, with low or high density and smooth margin. Calcification was found in 5 and 2 patients with egg shell-like calcification along the wall of cyst, 3 patients with spotted calcification within cyst. One case had cavity-like change (annular solar eclipse sign). Cystic lesion with a complete capsule was demonstrated on CT scan in 1 patient. Conclusion: Molybdenum target mammography can accurately display the imaging characteristics of hydatid cyst and improve the diagnostic ability of breast hydatid cyst in combination with clinical and epidemiological data. (authors)

  1. The effect of skin thickness determined using breast CT on mammographic dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Shihying; Boone, John M.; Yang, Kai; Kwan, Alexander L. C.; Packard, Nathan J.

    2008-01-01

    The effect of breast skin thickness on dosimetry in mammography was investigated. Breast computed tomography (CT) acquisition techniques, combined with algorithms designed for determining specific breast metrics, were useful for estimating skin thickness. A radial-geometry edge detection scheme was implemented on coronal reconstructed breast CT (bCT) images to measure the breast skin thickness. Skin thickness of bilateral bCT volume data from 49 women and unilateral bCT volume data from 2 women (10 healthy women and 41 women with BIRADS 4 and 5 diagnoses) was robustly measured with the edge detection scheme. The mean breast skin thickness (±inter-breast standard deviation) was found to be 1.45±0.30 mm. Since most current published normalized glandular dose (D gN ) coefficients are based on the assumption of a 4-mm breast skin thickness, the D gN values computed with Monte Carlo techniques will increase up to 18% due to the thinner skin layers (e.g., 6-cm 50% glandular breast, 28 kVp Mo-Mo spectrum). The thinner skin dimensions found in this study suggest that the current D gN values used for mammographic dosimetry lead to a slight underestimate in glandular dose

  2. [18F]Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-Positron Emission Tomography (PET)/Computed Tomography (CT) in Suspected Recurrent Breast Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hildebrandt, Malene Grubbe; Gerke, Oke; Baun, Christina

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To prospectively investigate the diagnostic accuracy of [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) with dual-time-point imaging, contrast-enhanced CT (ceCT), and bone scintigraphy (BS) in patients with suspected breast cancer recurrence....... PATIENTS AND METHODS: One hundred women with suspected recurrence of breast cancer underwent 1-hour and 3-hour FDG-PET/CT, ceCT, and BS within approximately 10 days. The study was powered to estimate the precision of the individual imaging tests. Images were visually interpreted using a four...

  3. Diagnostic value of FDG PET-CT for detecting primary breast malignancy: comparison with other image modalities and histopathologic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Na Young; Lee, Jae Hee; Kim, Chung Ho; Yoo, Ie Ryung; Kim, Sung Hoon; Chung, Yong An; Sohn, Hyung Sun; Chung, Soo Kyo; Jung, Sang Seol

    2004-01-01

    To compare the diagnostic value of 18F-FDG PET-CT in detecting the primary breast malignancy with other imaging modalities and to determine whether detectability of PET-CT depends on any factors such as size, differentiation, or nuclear grade of tumor. We evaluated pathologically proven 66 lesions in 61 patients (26-74 years, mean 46.9) who underwent preoperative PET-CT. Other imaging modalities were also evaluated: mammography in 58, US in 49 and MRI in 16. PET-CT images were visually evaluated and peak and mean SUV of mass were measured. For mammography and US, category 4 and 5 lesions as positive, and category 0-3 lesions as negative. For MRI, we used morphology and dynamic kinetic curve data based scoring system; sum of the scores higher than 10 as positive. Sensitivities of each modality were obtained. We analyzed PET-CT positive and negative groups in relation to size, SUV, differentiation and nuclear grade of tumors using paired t-test and Fisher's exact test. 65 among 66 were malignant lesions: invasive ductal carcinoma (n=56), ductal carcinoma in situ (n=3), tubular carcinoma (n=1), medullary carcinoma(n=3), mucinous carcinoma(n=1) and malignant fibrous histiocytoma (n=1). One lesion was benign lesion. Sensitivities of PET-CT, mammography, US, and MRI for detecting malignant mass were 86.2%, 80.7%, 100% and 94.1% respectively. SUV(P) and SUV(M) in PET-CT positive group (5.28±3.24 and 3.56±2.24) was significantly higher than that of PET CT negative group (1.96±0.35 and 1.46±0.44) [p<0.0001 for both]. The size of the primary mass in PET-CT positive group (2.66±1.47) was significantly larger than that in PET-CT negative group (1.52±0.57) (p=0.0002). The nuclear grade and tumor differentiation were not significantly different between two groups. The sensitivity of the FDG PET-CT in detecting primary breast cancer is lower than those of other imaging modalities. The detectability of the FDG PET-CT might be degraded when the tumor is small in size

  4. The influence of patient positioning in breast CT on breast tissue coverage and patient comfort

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roessler, A.C.; Althoff, F.; Kalender, W. [Erlangen Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Medical Physics; Wenkel, E. [University Hospital of Erlangen (Germany). Radiological Inst.

    2015-02-15

    The presented study aimed at optimizing a patient table design for breast CT (BCT) systems with respect to breast tissue coverage and patient comfort. Additionally, the benefits and acceptance of an immobilization device for BCT using underpressure were evaluated. Three different study parts were carried out. In a positioning study women were investigated on an MRI tabletop with exchangeable inserts (flat and cone-shaped with different opening diameters) to evaluate their influence on breast coverage and patient comfort in various positioning alternatives. Breast length and volume were calculated to compare positioning modalities including various opening diameters and forms. In the second study part, an underpressure system was tested for its functionality and comfort on a stereotactic biopsy table mimicking a future CT scanner table. In the last study part, this system was tested regarding breast tissue coverage. Best results for breast tissue coverage were shown for cone-shaped table inserts with an opening of 180 mm. Flat inserts did not provide complete coverage of breast tissue. The underpressure system showed robust function and tended to pull more breast tissue into the field of view. Patient comfort was rated good for all table inserts, with highest ratings for cone-shaped inserts. Cone-shaped tabletops appeared to be adequate for BCT systems and to allow imaging of almost the complete breast. An underpressure system proved promising for the fixation of the breast during imaging and increased coverage. Patient comfort appears to be adequate.

  5. Lymphoscintigraphic sentinel node identification in patients with breast cancer: the role of SPECT-CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerman, H.; Metser, U.; Lievshitz, G.; Sperber, F.; Shneebaum, S.; Even-Sapir, E.

    2006-01-01

    Lymph node status is a major factor in determining the stage, appropriate therapy and outcome in patients with breast cancer. It is therefore of clinical importance to accurately identify all sentinel nodes (SNs) for each individual tumour before surgery. The purpose of this study was to assess the role of SPECT-CT lymphoscintigraphy in SN identification in patients with breast cancer. Lymphoscintigraphy comprising planar and SPECT-CT acquisition was performed in 157 consecutive patients with breast cancer (mean age 54.7±10.6, range 27-81 years) with a palpable mass (n=100), with a non-palpable mass (n=52) or post lumpectomy (n=5). Planar and SPECT-CT images were interpreted separately and the two imaging techniques were compared with respect to their ability to identify hot nodes. Planar imaging alone was negative for identification of hot nodes in 15% of the patients. SPECT-CT alone was negative in 10% and both techniques were negative in 9% of the patients. Forty-six of the total of 361 (13%) hot nodes identified by lymphoscintigraphy were detected only on SPECT-CT, including 21 nodes obscured by the scattered radiation from the injection site, nine adjacent nodes misinterpreted on planar images as a single node and 16 nodes which were missed on planar images and detected on SPECT data. SPECT-CT detected additional sites of drainage unexpected on planar images, including axillary (n=23 patients), internal mammary (n=5 patients), interpectoral (n=3 patients) and intramammary (n=2 patients) lymph node sites. Fourteen of the 329 (4%) hot lesions seen on planar images were false positive non-nodal sites of uptake that were accurately assessed by SPECT-CT and further validated by surgery. In a single patient, SPECT-CT was negative while planar images identified the SN. (orig.)

  6. Augmented Reality Imaging System: 3D Viewing of a Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, David B; Boone, John M; Petricoin, Emanuel; Liotta, Lance; Wilson, Eugene

    2016-01-01

    To display images of breast cancer from a dedicated breast CT using Depth 3-Dimensional (D3D) augmented reality. A case of breast cancer imaged using contrast-enhanced breast CT (Computed Tomography) was viewed with the augmented reality imaging, which uses a head display unit (HDU) and joystick control interface. The augmented reality system demonstrated 3D viewing of the breast mass with head position tracking, stereoscopic depth perception, focal point convergence and the use of a 3D cursor and joy-stick enabled fly through with visualization of the spiculations extending from the breast cancer. The augmented reality system provided 3D visualization of the breast cancer with depth perception and visualization of the mass's spiculations. The augmented reality system should be further researched to determine the utility in clinical practice.

  7. Comparative analysis of multi-slice spiral CT and positron emission tomography-CT in evaluation of axillary lymph nodes in breast cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Xianchang; Zhang Ruyi; Liu Qingwei; Zhao Suhong; Zu Degui; Li Xin

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate and compare spiral CT and positron emission tomography-CT (PET-CT) in characterization of of axillary lymph nodes in breast cancer patients. Methods: Forty patients with pathologically proven breast cancer underwent contrast-enhanced spiral CT of the breast and axilla, 13 of them also underwent PET-CT examination. One hundred and fifty-eight axillary lymph nodes were found in the 40 patients through contrast enhanced spiral CT, while 57 lymph nodes were found in the 13 patients through PET-CT. Three radiologists rated the lymph nodes found in CT images on a five-point scale. If the score was equal to or greater than 3, it was defined as positive (metastatic), otherwise negative. Visual observation and semiquantitative analysis were used to classify lymph nodes in PET-CT images. The results of spiral CT observation and PET-CT observation of lymph nodes were compared with pathological results. The relative value of CT and PET-CT was analyzed. Exact probability statistics were employed. Results: One hundred and fifty eight lymph nodes of 40 patients were detected by spiral CT, 91 of them were diagnosed as positive and 67 as negative Among the lymph nodes found in spiral CT, 99 were positive and 59 were negative pathologicall. A total of 57 lymph nodes were found by PET-CT. Thirty-nine of them were defined as positive and 18 as negative. Among the lymph nodes found in PET-CT, 39 were positive and 18 were negative pathologically. The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive and negative predictive values in CT prediction in axillary lymph nodes metastases were 88.89%, 94.91%, 91.14%, 96.70%, and 83.58%, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive and negative predictive values in PET-CT prediction in axillary lymph nodes metastases were 97.44%, 94.44%, 96.49%, 97.44%, and 94.44%, respectively. PET-CT had no significant difference with spiral CT in sensitivity, accuracy, positive and negative predictive values for detection

  8. Fully automated deformable registration of breast DCE-MRI and PET/CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmitriev, I. D.; Loo, C. E.; Vogel, W. V.; Pengel, K. E.; Gilhuijs, K. G. A.

    2013-02-01

    Accurate characterization of breast tumors is important for the appropriate selection of therapy and monitoring of the response. For this purpose breast imaging and tissue biopsy are important aspects. In this study, a fully automated method for deformable registration of DCE-MRI and PET/CT of the breast is presented. The registration is performed using the CT component of the PET/CT and the pre-contrast T1-weighted non-fat suppressed MRI. Comparable patient setup protocols were used during the MRI and PET examinations in order to avoid having to make assumptions of biomedical properties of the breast during and after the application of chemotherapy. The registration uses a multi-resolution approach to speed up the process and to minimize the probability of converging to local minima. The validation was performed on 140 breasts (70 patients). From a total number of registration cases, 94.2% of the breasts were aligned within 4.0 mm accuracy (1 PET voxel). Fused information may be beneficial to obtain representative biopsy samples, which in turn will benefit the treatment of the patient.

  9. An X-Ray computed tomography/positron emission tomography system designed specifically for breast imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boone, John M; Yang, Kai; Burkett, George W; Packard, Nathan J; Huang, Shih-ying; Bowen, Spencer; Badawi, Ramsey D; Lindfors, Karen K

    2010-02-01

    Mammography has served the population of women who are at-risk for breast cancer well over the past 30 years. While mammography has undergone a number of changes as digital detector technology has advanced, other modalities such as computed tomography have experienced technological sophistication over this same time frame as well. The advent of large field of view flat panel detector systems enable the development of breast CT and several other niche CT applications, which rely on cone beam geometry. The breast, it turns out, is well suited to cone beam CT imaging because the lack of bones reduces artifacts, and the natural tapering of the breast anteriorly reduces the x-ray path lengths through the breast at large cone angle, reducing cone beam artifacts as well. We are in the process of designing a third prototype system which will enable the use of breast CT for image guided interventional procedures. This system will have several copies fabricated so that several breast CT scanners can be used in a multi-institutional clinical trial to better understand the role that this technology can bring to breast imaging.

  10. Pre-operative CT angiography and three-dimensional image post processing for deep inferior epigastric perforator flap breast reconstructive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, D L; Mitsumori, L M; Neligan, P C; Warren, B H; Shuman, W P; Dubinsky, T J

    2012-12-01

    Autologous breast reconstructive surgery with deep inferior epigastric artery (DIEA) perforator flaps has become the mainstay for breast reconstructive surgery. CT angiography and three-dimensional image post processing can depict the number, size, course and location of the DIEA perforating arteries for the pre-operative selection of the best artery to use for the tissue flap. Knowledge of the location and selection of the optimal perforating artery shortens operative times and decreases patient morbidity.

  11. Quantification of FDG-PET/CT with delayed imaging in patients with newly diagnosed recurrent breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baun, Christina; Falch, Kirsten; Gerke, Oke; Hansen, Jeanette; Nguyen, Tram; Alavi, Abass; Høilund-Carlsen, Poul-Flemming; Hildebrandt, Malene G

    2018-05-09

    Several studies have shown the advantage of delayed-time-point imaging with 18F-FDG-PET/CT to distinguish malignant from benign uptake. This may be relevant in cancer diseases with low metabolism, such as breast cancer. We aimed at examining the change in SUV from 1 h (1h) to 3 h (3h) time-point imaging in local and distant lesions in patients with recurrent breast cancer. Furthermore, we investigated the effect of partial volume correction in the different types of metastases, using semi-automatic quantitative software (ROVER™). One-hundred and two patients with suspected breast cancer recurrence underwent whole-body PET/CT scans 1h and 3h after FDG injection. Semi-quantitative standardised uptake values (SUVmax, SUVmean) and partial volume corrected SUVmean (cSUVmean), were estimated in malignant lesions, and as reference in healthy liver tissue. The change in quantitative measures from 1h to 3h was calculated, and SUVmean was compared to cSUVmean. Metastases were verified by biopsy. Of the 102 included patients, 41 had verified recurrent disease with in median 15 lesions (range 1-70) amounting to a total of 337 malignant lesions included in the analysis. SUVmax of malignant lesions increased from 6.4 ± 3.4 [0.9-19.7] (mean ± SD, min and max) at 1h to 8.1 ± 4.4 [0.7-29.7] at 3h. SUVmax in breast, lung, lymph node and bone lesions increased significantly (p < 0.0001) between 1h and 3h by on average 25, 40, 33, and 27%, respectively. A similar pattern was observed with (uncorrected) SUVmean. Partial volume correction increased SUVmean significantly, by 63 and 71% at 1h and 3h imaging, respectively. The highest impact was in breast lesions at 3h, where cSUVmean increased by 87% compared to SUVmean. SUVs increased from 1h to 3h in malignant lesions, SUVs of distant recurrence were in general about twice as high as those of local recurrence. Partial volume correction caused significant increases in these values. However, it is questionable, if

  12. Evaluation of the BreastSimulator software platform for breast tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mettivier, G.; Bliznakova, K.; Sechopoulos, I.; Boone, J. M.; Di Lillo, F.; Sarno, A.; Castriconi, R.; Russo, P.

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this work was the evaluation of the software BreastSimulator, a breast x-ray imaging simulation software, as a tool for the creation of 3D uncompressed breast digital models and for the simulation and the optimization of computed tomography (CT) scanners dedicated to the breast. Eight 3D digital breast phantoms were created with glandular fractions in the range 10%-35%. The models are characterised by different sizes and modelled realistic anatomical features. X-ray CT projections were simulated for a dedicated cone-beam CT scanner and reconstructed with the FDK algorithm. X-ray projection images were simulated for 5 mono-energetic (27, 32, 35, 43 and 51 keV) and 3 poly-energetic x-ray spectra typically employed in current CT scanners dedicated to the breast (49, 60, or 80 kVp). Clinical CT images acquired from two different clinical breast CT scanners were used for comparison purposes. The quantitative evaluation included calculation of the power-law exponent, β, from simulated and real breast tomograms, based on the power spectrum fitted with a function of the spatial frequency, f, of the form S(f)  =  α/f   β . The breast models were validated by comparison against clinical breast CT and published data. We found that the calculated β coefficients were close to that of clinical CT data from a dedicated breast CT scanner and reported data in the literature. In evaluating the software package BreastSimulator to generate breast models suitable for use with breast CT imaging, we found that the breast phantoms produced with the software tool can reproduce the anatomical structure of real breasts, as evaluated by calculating the β exponent from the power spectral analysis of simulated images. As such, this research tool might contribute considerably to the further development, testing and optimisation of breast CT imaging techniques.

  13. Evaluation of a Hanging-Breast PET System for Primary Tumor Visualization in Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer: Comparison With Standard PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Suzana C; Rebolleda, José Ferrér; Koolen, Bas B; Wesseling, Jelle; Jurado, Raúl Sánchez; Stokkel, Marcel P M; Del Puig Cózar Santiago, María; van der Noort, Vincent; Rutgers, Emiel J Th; Valdés Olmos, Renato A

    2016-06-01

    The purposes of this study were to evaluate the performance of a mammography with molecular imaging PET (MAMMI-PET) system for breast imaging in the hanging-breast position for the visualization of primary breast cancer lesions and to compare this method with whole-body PET/CT. Between March 2011 and March 2014, a prospective evaluation included women with one or more histologically confirmed primary breast cancer lesions (index lesions). After injection of 180-240 MBq of (18)F-FDG, whole-body PET/CT and MAMMI-PET acquisitions were performed, index lesions were scored 0, 1, or 2 for FDG uptake relative to background. Detection and FDG uptake were compared by breast length, maximal tumor diameter, affected breast quadrants, tumor grade, and histologic and immunologic sub-types. Finally, the two PET modalities were compared for detection of index lesions. For 234 index lesions (diameter, 5-170 mm), the overall sensitivity was 88.9% for MAMMI-PET and 91% for PET/CT (p = 0.61). Twenty-three (9.8%) index lesions located too close to the pectoral muscle were missed with MAMMI-PET, and 20 index lesions were missed with PET/CT. Lesion visibility on MAMMI-PET images was influenced by tumor grade (p = 0.034) but not by cancer subtype (p = 0.65). Although in an overall evaluation MAMMI-PET was not superior to PET/CT, MAMMI-PET does have higher sensitivity for primary breast cancer lesions within the scanning range of the device. Optimization of the positioning device may increase visualization of the most dorsal lesions.

  14. CT-guided preoperative needle localization of MRI-detected breast lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giagounidis, Elektra M. E-mail: giagounjdis@online.de; Markus, Ruwe; Josef, Luetzeler; Wemer, Audretsch; Mahdi, Rezai; Bernward, Kurtz

    2001-08-01

    To assess the value of accurate preoperative CT-guided needle localization of occult breast lesions, we reviewed a total of 39 needle-directed biopsies of breast tumors in 24 women. The average age was 52.9 years (range 31-67). All lesions were nonpalpable and mammographically, as well as sonographically occult. They were solely seen on MR-images. After demonstrating the suspicious region on CT scans, a hookwire was inserted. The correct position was confirmed by a control scan. The subsequent histopathological examination showed that 28 of the lesions (71.8%) were benign, among them mastopathy, fibrosis, fibroadenoma, papilloma, intramammary lymph node, liponecrosis and epitheliosis. Eleven lesions (28%) were malignant and showed either lobular, ductal or tubular cancer. Our results endorse that CT guided needle localization is a helpful method that allows a precise surgical excision of the suspect area with the removal of a minimal amount of breast tissue.

  15. Microcalcification detectability using a bench-top prototype photon-counting breast CT based on a Si strip detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hyo-Min; Ding, Huanjun; Barber, William C; Iwanczyk, Jan S; Molloi, Sabee

    2015-07-01

    To investigate the feasibility of detecting breast microcalcification (μCa) with a dedicated breast computed tomography (CT) system based on energy-resolved photon-counting silicon (Si) strip detectors. The proposed photon-counting breast CT system and a bench-top prototype photon-counting breast CT system were simulated using a simulation package written in matlab to determine the smallest detectable μCa. A 14 cm diameter cylindrical phantom made of breast tissue with 20% glandularity was used to simulate an average-sized breast. Five different size groups of calcium carbonate grains, from 100 to 180 μm in diameter, were simulated inside of the cylindrical phantom. The images were acquired with a mean glandular dose (MGD) in the range of 0.7-8 mGy. A total of 400 images was used to perform a reader study. Another simulation study was performed using a 1.6 cm diameter cylindrical phantom to validate the experimental results from a bench-top prototype breast CT system. In the experimental study, a bench-top prototype CT system was constructed using a tungsten anode x-ray source and a single line 256-pixels Si strip photon-counting detector with a pixel pitch of 100 μm. Calcium carbonate grains, with diameter in the range of 105-215 μm, were embedded in a cylindrical plastic resin phantom to simulate μCas. The physical phantoms were imaged at 65 kVp with an entrance exposure in the range of 0.6-8 mGy. A total of 500 images was used to perform another reader study. The images were displayed in random order to three blinded observers, who were asked to give a 4-point confidence rating on each image regarding the presence of μCa. The μCa detectability for each image was evaluated by using the average area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) across the readers. The simulation results using a 14 cm diameter breast phantom showed that the proposed photon-counting breast CT system can achieve high detection accuracy with an average AUC greater

  16. Higher-order scene statistics of breast images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbey, Craig K.; Sohl-Dickstein, Jascha N.; Olshausen, Bruno A.; Eckstein, Miguel P.; Boone, John M.

    2009-02-01

    Researchers studying human and computer vision have found description and construction of these systems greatly aided by analysis of the statistical properties of naturally occurring scenes. More specifically, it has been found that receptive fields with directional selectivity and bandwidth properties similar to mammalian visual systems are more closely matched to the statistics of natural scenes. It is argued that this allows for sparse representation of the independent components of natural images [Olshausen and Field, Nature, 1996]. These theories have important implications for medical image perception. For example, will a system that is designed to represent the independent components of natural scenes, where objects occlude one another and illumination is typically reflected, be appropriate for X-ray imaging, where features superimpose on one another and illumination is transmissive? In this research we begin to examine these issues by evaluating higher-order statistical properties of breast images from X-ray projection mammography (PM) and dedicated breast computed tomography (bCT). We evaluate kurtosis in responses of octave bandwidth Gabor filters applied to PM and to coronal slices of bCT scans. We find that kurtosis in PM rises and quickly saturates for filter center frequencies with an average value above 0.95. By contrast, kurtosis in bCT peaks near 0.20 cyc/mm with kurtosis of approximately 2. Our findings suggest that the human visual system may be tuned to represent breast tissue more effectively in bCT over a specific range of spatial frequencies.

  17. Novel Breast Imaging and Machine Learning: Predicting Breast Lesion Malignancy at Cone-Beam CT Using Machine Learning Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlig, Johannes; Uhlig, Annemarie; Kunze, Meike; Beissbarth, Tim; Fischer, Uwe; Lotz, Joachim; Wienbeck, Susanne

    2018-05-24

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the diagnostic performance of machine learning techniques for malignancy prediction at breast cone-beam CT (CBCT) and to compare them to human readers. Five machine learning techniques, including random forests, back propagation neural networks (BPN), extreme learning machines, support vector machines, and K-nearest neighbors, were used to train diagnostic models on a clinical breast CBCT dataset with internal validation by repeated 10-fold cross-validation. Two independent blinded human readers with profound experience in breast imaging and breast CBCT analyzed the same CBCT dataset. Diagnostic performance was compared using AUC, sensitivity, and specificity. The clinical dataset comprised 35 patients (American College of Radiology density type C and D breasts) with 81 suspicious breast lesions examined with contrast-enhanced breast CBCT. Forty-five lesions were histopathologically proven to be malignant. Among the machine learning techniques, BPNs provided the best diagnostic performance, with AUC of 0.91, sensitivity of 0.85, and specificity of 0.82. The diagnostic performance of the human readers was AUC of 0.84, sensitivity of 0.89, and specificity of 0.72 for reader 1 and AUC of 0.72, sensitivity of 0.71, and specificity of 0.67 for reader 2. AUC was significantly higher for BPN when compared with both reader 1 (p = 0.01) and reader 2 (p Machine learning techniques provide a high and robust diagnostic performance in the prediction of malignancy in breast lesions identified at CBCT. BPNs showed the best diagnostic performance, surpassing human readers in terms of AUC and specificity.

  18. SU-E-I-53: Variation in Measurements of Breast Skin Thickness Obtained Using Different Imaging Modalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, U; Kumaraswamy, N; Markey, M

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate variation in measurements of breast skin thickness obtained using different imaging modalities, including mammography, computed tomography (CT), ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods: Breast skin thicknesses as measured by mammography, CT, ultrasound, and MRI were compared. Mammographic measurements of skin thickness were obtained from published studies that utilized standard positioning (upright) and compression. CT measurements of skin thickness were obtained from a published study of a prototype breast CT scanner in which the women were in the prone position and the breast was uncompressed. Dermatological ultrasound exams of the breast skin were conducted at our institution, with the subjects in the upright position and the breast uncompressed. Breast skin thickness was calculated from breast MRI exams at our institution, with the patient in the prone position and the breast uncompressed. Results: T tests for independent samples demonstrated significant differences in the mean breast skin thickness as measured by different imaging modalities. Repeated measures ANOVA revealed significant differences in breast skin thickness across different quadrants of the breast for some modalities. Conclusion: The measurement of breast skin thickness is significantly different across different imaging modalities. Differences in the amount of compression and differences in patient positioning are possible reasons why measurements of breast skin thickness vary by modality

  19. An algorithm for longitudinal registration of PET/CT images acquired during neoadjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer: preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xia; Abramson, Richard G; Arlinghaus, Lori R; Chakravarthy, Anuradha Bapsi; Abramson, Vandana; Mayer, Ingrid; Farley, Jaime; Delbeke, Dominique; Yankeelov, Thomas E

    2012-11-16

    By providing estimates of tumor glucose metabolism, 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) can potentially characterize the response of breast tumors to treatment. To assess therapy response, serial measurements of FDG-PET parameters (derived from static and/or dynamic images) can be obtained at different time points during the course of treatment. However, most studies track the changes in average parameter values obtained from the whole tumor, thereby discarding all spatial information manifested in tumor heterogeneity. Here, we propose a method whereby serially acquired FDG-PET breast data sets can be spatially co-registered to enable the spatial comparison of parameter maps at the voxel level. The goal is to optimally register normal tissues while simultaneously preventing tumor distortion. In order to accomplish this, we constructed a PET support device to enable PET/CT imaging of the breasts of ten patients in the prone position and applied a mutual information-based rigid body registration followed by a non-rigid registration. The non-rigid registration algorithm extended the adaptive bases algorithm (ABA) by incorporating a tumor volume-preserving constraint, which computed the Jacobian determinant over the tumor regions as outlined on the PET/CT images, into the cost function. We tested this approach on ten breast cancer patients undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy. By both qualitative and quantitative evaluation, our constrained algorithm yielded significantly less tumor distortion than the unconstrained algorithm: considering the tumor volume determined from standard uptake value maps, the post-registration median tumor volume changes, and the 25th and 75th quantiles were 3.42% (0%, 13.39%) and 16.93% (9.21%, 49.93%) for the constrained and unconstrained algorithms, respectively (p = 0.002), while the bending energy (a measure of the smoothness of the deformation) was 0.0015 (0.0005, 0.012) and 0.017 (0.005, 0

  20. TH-A-18A-01: Innovation in Clinical Breast Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, B; Yang, K; Yaffe, M; Chen, J

    2014-01-01

    Several novel modalities have been or are on the verge of being introduced into the breast imaging clinic. These include tomosynthesis imaging, dedicated breast CT, contrast-enhanced digital mammography, and automated breast ultrasound, all of which are covered in this course. Tomosynthesis and dedicated breast CT address the problem of tissue superimposition that limits mammography screening performance, by improved or full resolution of the 3D breast morphology. Contrast-enhanced digital mammography provides functional information that allows for visualization of tumor angiogenesis. 3D breast ultrasound has high sensitivity for tumor detection in dense breasts, but the imaging exam was traditionally performed by radiologists. In automated breast ultrasound, the scan is performed in an automated fashion, making for a more practical imaging tool, that is now used as an adjunct to digital mammography in breast cancer screening. This course will provide medical physicists with an in-depth understanding of the imaging physics of each of these four novel imaging techniques, as well as the rationale and implementation of QC procedures. Further, basic clinical applications and work flow issues will be discussed. Learning Objectives: To be able to describe the underlying physical and physiological principles of each imaging technique, and to understand the corresponding imaging acquisition process. To be able to describe the critical system components and their performance requirements. To understand the rationale and implementation of quality control procedures, as well as regulatory requirements for systems with FDA approval. To learn about clinical applications and understand risks and benefits/strength and weakness of each modality in terms of clinical breast imaging

  1. Detection of synchronous parathyroid adenoma and breast cancer with {sup 18}F-fluorocholine PET-CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vorselaars, Wessel MCM; Kluijfthout, Wiuter P.; Vriens, Menno R; Van der Pol, Carmen C.; Rinkes, Inne HM Borel; Valk, Gerlof D.; De Keizer, Bart [University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2016-06-15

    A 71-year-old woman was referred to our tertiary care center for evaluation of asymptomatic recurrence of primary hyperparathyroidism. As per our protocol, the patient underwent neck/mediastinum {sup 18}F-fluorocholine (FCH) positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) for localization. In our institution, FCH PET-CT is performed in patients with hyperparathyroidism and negative conventional imaging. FCH PET-CT is a promising new imaging modality for detection of hyperfunctioning parathyroid glands. As can be seen in the case presented, high FCH uptake was seen in a small breast cancer. Due to its favorable half-life and wide availability by its use as a localization technique for patients with prostate cancer and complicated hyperparathyroidism, FCH PET-CT may be a new promising modality in the imaging of breast cancer.

  2. Multi-modality PET-CT imaging of breast cancer in an animal model using nanoparticle x-ray contrast agent and 18F-FDG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badea, C. T.; Ghaghada, K.; Espinosa, G.; Strong, L.; Annapragada, A.

    2011-03-01

    Multi-modality PET-CT imaging is playing an important role in the field of oncology. While PET imaging facilitates functional interrogation of tumor status, the use of CT imaging is primarily limited to anatomical reference. In an attempt to extract comprehensive information about tumor cells and its microenvironment, we used a nanoparticle xray contrast agent to image tumor vasculature and vessel 'leakiness' and 18F-FDG to investigate the metabolic status of tumor cells. In vivo PET/CT studies were performed in mice implanted with 4T1 mammary breast cancer cells.Early-phase micro-CT imaging enabled visualization 3D vascular architecture of the tumors whereas delayedphase micro-CT demonstrated highly permeable vessels as evident by nanoparticle accumulation within the tumor. Both imaging modalities demonstrated the presence of a necrotic core as indicated by a hypo-enhanced region in the center of the tumor. At early time-points, the CT-derived fractional blood volume did not correlate with 18F-FDG uptake. At delayed time-points, the tumor enhancement in 18F-FDG micro-PET images correlated with the delayed signal enhanced due to nanoparticle extravasation seen in CT images. The proposed hybrid imaging approach could be used to better understand tumor angiogenesis and to be the basis for monitoring and evaluating anti-angiogenic and nano-chemotherapies.

  3. Visualizing Typical Features of Breast Fibroadenomas Using Phase-Contrast CT: An Ex-Vivo Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandl, Susanne; Willner, Marian; Herzen, Julia; Sztrókay-Gaul, Anikó; Mayr, Doris; Auweter, Sigrid D.; Hipp, Alexander; Birnbacher, Lorenz; Marschner, Mathias; Chabior, Michael; Reiser, Maximilian; Pfeiffer, Franz; Bamberg, Fabian; Hellerhoff, Karin

    2014-01-01

    Background Fibroadenoma is the most common benign solid breast lesion type and a very common cause for histologic assessment. To justify a conservative therapy, a highly specific discrimination between fibroadenomas and other breast lesions is crucial. Phase-contrast imaging offers improved soft-tissue contrast and differentiability of fine structures combined with the potential of 3-dimensional imaging. In this study we assessed the potential of grating-based phase-contrast CT imaging for visualizing diagnostically relevant features of fibroadenomas. Materials and Methods Grating-based phase-contrast CT was performed on six ex-vivo formalin-fixed breast specimens containing a fibroadenoma and three samples containing benign changes that resemble fibroadenomas using Talbot Lau interferometry and a polychromatic X-ray source. Phase-contrast and simultaneously acquired absorption-based 3D-datasets were manually matched with corresponding histological slices. The visibility of diagnostically valuable features was assessed in comparison with histology as the gold-standard. Results In all cases, matching of grating-based phase-contrast CT images and histology was successfully completed. Grating-based phase-contrast CT showed greatly improved differentiation of fine structures and provided accurate depiction of strands of fibrous tissue within the fibroadenomas as well as of the diagnostically valuable dilated, branched ductuli of the fibroadenomas. A clear demarcation of tumor boundaries in all cases was provided by phase- but not absorption-contrast CT. Conclusions Pending successful translation of the technology to a clinical setting and considerable reduction of the required dose, the data presented here suggest that grating-based phase-contrast CT may be used as a supplementary non-invasive diagnostic tool in breast diagnostics. Phase-contrast CT may thus contribute to the reduction of false positive findings and reduce the recall and core biopsy rate in population

  4. Attenuation correction of myocardial SPECT images with X-ray CT. Effects of registration errors between X-ray CT and SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Yasuyuki; Murase, Kenya; Mochizuki, Teruhito; Motomura, Nobutoku

    2002-01-01

    Attenuation correction with an X-ray CT image is a new method to correct attenuation on SPECT imaging, but the effect of the registration errors between CT and SPECT images is unclear. In this study, we investigated the effects of the registration errors on myocardial SPECT, analyzing data from a phantom and a human volunteer. Registerion (fusion) of the X-ray CT and SPECT images was done with standard packaged software in three dimensional fashion, by using linked transaxial, coronal and sagittal images. In the phantom study, and X-ray CT image was shifted 1 to 3 pixels on the x, y and z axes, and rotated 6 degrees clockwise. Attenuation correction maps generated from each misaligned X-ray CT image were used to reconstruct misaligned SPECT images of the phantom filled with 201 Tl. In a human volunteer, X-ray CT was acquired in different conditions (during inspiration vs. expiration). CT values were transferred to an attenuation constant by using straight lines; an attenuation constant of 0/cm in the air (CT value=-1,000 HU) and that of 0.150/cm in water (CT value=0 HU). For comparison, attenuation correction with transmission CT (TCT) data and an external γ-ray source ( 99m Tc) was also applied to reconstruct SPECT images. Simulated breast attenuation with a breast attachment, and inferior wall attenuation were properly corrected by means of the attenuation correction map generated from X-ray CT. As pixel shift increased, deviation of the SPECT images increased in misaligned images in the phantom study. In the human study, SPECT images were affected by the scan conditions of the X-ray CT. Attenuation correction of myocardial SPECT with an X-ray CT image is a simple and potentially beneficial method for clinical use, but accurate registration of the X-ray CT to SPECT image is essential for satisfactory attenuation correction. (author)

  5. MRI and PET/CT of patients with bone metastases from breast carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grankvist, J.; Fisker, R.; Iyer, V.; Fründ, E.T.; Simonsen, C.; Christensen, T.; Stenbygaard, L.; Ewertz, M.; Larsson, E.-M.

    2012-01-01

    3.0 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) was compared with combined 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT) in patients with suspected bone metastases from breast cancer. A prospective clinical study was performed in 13 female breast cancer patients (mean age 61years; range 45–85 years). The spine was imaged in the sagittal plane with T1-weighted (T1), short tau inversion recovery (STIR), and T2-weighted fat-saturated (T2) sequences. The pelvis was imaged similarly in the coronal plane. Axial DWI was performed from the skull base to the mid-thigh. MRI and PET/CT were performed in all patients at a maximum interval of 10 working days and at least 14 days after chemotherapy. MRI was reviewed by two radiologists, and their consensus on potential metastases in 27 predefined locations was recorded. The predefined locations were the vertebral bodies (24), the left (1) and right (1) pelvic bones, and the sacral bone (1). The PET/CT was reviewed by a radiologists and a nuclear medicine physician. MRI detected 59 of the 60 active metastases found with our gold standard modality PET/CT. T1 had the highest sensitivity (98%) but rather low specificity (77%), but with the addition of STIR and DWI, the specificity increased to 95%. The additional metastases detected with MRI most likely represented postherapeutic residual scars without active tumour. In conclusion, 3.0 Tesla MRI with T1, STIR, and DWI is useful for the clinical evaluation of bone metastases from breast cancer and compares well to PET/CT.

  6. TU-EF-207-05: Dedicated Cone-beam Breast CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vedantham, S.

    2015-01-01

    mode due to lower photon fluence per projection. This may require fast-frame acquisition and symmetric or asymmetric pixel binning in some systems. Recent studies investigated the performance of increased conversion layer thickness for contrast-enhanced imaging of the breast in dual-energy acquisition mode. In other direct conversion detectors operating in the avalanche mode, sensitivities close to the single photon response are also explored for mammography and breast tomosynthesis. The potential advantages and challenges of this approach are described. Dedicated breast CT brings x-ray imaging of the breast to true tomographic 3D imaging. It can eliminate the tissue superposition problem and does not require physical compression of the breast. Using cone beam geometry and a flat-panel detector, several hundred projections are acquired and reconstructed to near isotropic voxels. Multiplanar reconstruction facilitates viewing the breast volume in any desired orientation. Ongoing clinical studies, the current state-of-the art, and research to advance the technology are described. Learning Objectives: To understand the ongoing developments in x-ray imaging of the breast To understand the approaches and applications of spectral mammography To understand the potential advantages of distributed x-ray source arrays for digital breast tomosynthesis To understand the ongoing developments in detector technology for digital mammography and breast tomosynthesis To understand the current state-of-the-art for dedicated cone-beam breast CT and research to advance the technology. Research collaboration with Koning Corporation

  7. TU-EF-207-05: Dedicated Cone-beam Breast CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vedantham, S. [Univ. of Massachusetts Medical School (United States)

    2015-06-15

    mode due to lower photon fluence per projection. This may require fast-frame acquisition and symmetric or asymmetric pixel binning in some systems. Recent studies investigated the performance of increased conversion layer thickness for contrast-enhanced imaging of the breast in dual-energy acquisition mode. In other direct conversion detectors operating in the avalanche mode, sensitivities close to the single photon response are also explored for mammography and breast tomosynthesis. The potential advantages and challenges of this approach are described. Dedicated breast CT brings x-ray imaging of the breast to true tomographic 3D imaging. It can eliminate the tissue superposition problem and does not require physical compression of the breast. Using cone beam geometry and a flat-panel detector, several hundred projections are acquired and reconstructed to near isotropic voxels. Multiplanar reconstruction facilitates viewing the breast volume in any desired orientation. Ongoing clinical studies, the current state-of-the art, and research to advance the technology are described. Learning Objectives: To understand the ongoing developments in x-ray imaging of the breast To understand the approaches and applications of spectral mammography To understand the potential advantages of distributed x-ray source arrays for digital breast tomosynthesis To understand the ongoing developments in detector technology for digital mammography and breast tomosynthesis To understand the current state-of-the-art for dedicated cone-beam breast CT and research to advance the technology. Research collaboration with Koning Corporation.

  8. WE-DE-207B-11: Implementation of Size-Specific 3D Beam Modulation Filters On a Dedicated Breast CT Platform Using Breast Immobilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez, A [Department of Radiology, Biomedical Engineering Graduate Group, University of California Davis, Sacramento, CA (United States); Boone, J [Departments of Radiology and Biomedical Engineering, University of California Davis, Sacramento, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To implement a 3D beam modulation filter (3D-BMF) in dedicated breast CT (bCT) and develop a method for conforming the patient’s breast to a pre-defined shape, optimizing the effects of the filter. This work expands on previous work reporting the methodology for designing a 3D-BMF that can spare unnecessary dose and improve signal equalization at the detector by preferentially filtering the beam in the thinner anterior and peripheral breast regions. Methods: Effective diameter profiles were measured for 219 segmented bCT images, grouped into volume quintiles, and averaged within each group to represent the range of breast sizes found clinically. These profiles were then used to generate five size-specific computational phantoms and fabricate five size-specific UHMW phantoms. Each computational phantom was utilized for designing a size-specific 3D-BMF using previously reported methods. Glandular dose values and projection images were simulated in MCNP6 with and without the 3DBMF using the system specifications of our prototype bCT scanner “Doheny”. Lastly, thermoplastic was molded around each of the five phantom sizes and used to produce a series of breast immobilizers for use in conforming the patient’s breast during bCT acquisition. Results: After incorporating the 3D-BMF, MC simulations estimated an 80% average reduction in the detector dynamic range requirements across all phantom sizes. The glandular dose was reduced on average 57% after normalizing by the number of quanta reaching the detector under the thickest region of the breast. Conclusion: A series of bCT-derived breast phantoms were used to design size-specific 3D-BMFs and breast immobilizers that can be used on the bCT platform to conform the patient’s breast and therefore optimally exploit the benefits of the 3D-BMF. Current efforts are focused on fabricating several prototype 3D-BMFs and performing phantom scans on Doheny for MC simulation validation and image quality analysis

  9. WE-DE-207B-11: Implementation of Size-Specific 3D Beam Modulation Filters On a Dedicated Breast CT Platform Using Breast Immobilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez, A; Boone, J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To implement a 3D beam modulation filter (3D-BMF) in dedicated breast CT (bCT) and develop a method for conforming the patient’s breast to a pre-defined shape, optimizing the effects of the filter. This work expands on previous work reporting the methodology for designing a 3D-BMF that can spare unnecessary dose and improve signal equalization at the detector by preferentially filtering the beam in the thinner anterior and peripheral breast regions. Methods: Effective diameter profiles were measured for 219 segmented bCT images, grouped into volume quintiles, and averaged within each group to represent the range of breast sizes found clinically. These profiles were then used to generate five size-specific computational phantoms and fabricate five size-specific UHMW phantoms. Each computational phantom was utilized for designing a size-specific 3D-BMF using previously reported methods. Glandular dose values and projection images were simulated in MCNP6 with and without the 3DBMF using the system specifications of our prototype bCT scanner “Doheny”. Lastly, thermoplastic was molded around each of the five phantom sizes and used to produce a series of breast immobilizers for use in conforming the patient’s breast during bCT acquisition. Results: After incorporating the 3D-BMF, MC simulations estimated an 80% average reduction in the detector dynamic range requirements across all phantom sizes. The glandular dose was reduced on average 57% after normalizing by the number of quanta reaching the detector under the thickest region of the breast. Conclusion: A series of bCT-derived breast phantoms were used to design size-specific 3D-BMFs and breast immobilizers that can be used on the bCT platform to conform the patient’s breast and therefore optimally exploit the benefits of the 3D-BMF. Current efforts are focused on fabricating several prototype 3D-BMFs and performing phantom scans on Doheny for MC simulation validation and image quality analysis

  10. Technical Note: Multipurpose CT, ultrasound, and MRI breast phantom for use in radiotherapy and minimally invasive interventions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruschin, Mark, E-mail: Mark.Ruschin@sunnybrook.ca; Chin, Lee; Ravi, Ananth; McCann, Claire [Department of Medical Physics, Sunnybrook Odette Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5, Canada and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Davidson, Sean R. H. [Techna Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1P5 (Canada); Phounsy, William [Department of Physics, Ryerson University, Toronto, Ontario M5B 2K3 (Canada); Yoo, Tae Sun [Institute of Health Policy, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5T 3M6 (Canada); Pignol, Jean-Philippe [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, 3075 EA Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: To develop a multipurpose gel-based breast phantom consisting of a simulated tumor with realistic imaging properties in CT, ultrasound and MRI, or a postsurgical cavity on CT. Applications for the phantom include: deformable image registration (DIR) quality assurance (QA), autosegmentation validation, and localization testing and training for minimally invasive image-guided procedures such as those involving catheter or needle insertion. Methods: A thermoplastic mask of a typical breast patient lying supine was generated and then filled to make an array of phantoms. The background simulated breast tissue consisted of 32.4 g each of ballistic gelatin (BG) powder and Metamusil™ (MM) dissolved in 800 ml of water. Simulated tumors were added using the following recipe: 12 g of barium sulfate (1.4% v/v) plus 0.000 14 g copper sulfate plus 0.7 g of MM plus 7.2 g of BG all dissolved in 75 ml of water. The phantom was evaluated quantitatively in CT by comparing Hounsfield units (HUs) with actual breast tissue. For ultrasound and MRI, the phantoms were assessed based on subjective image quality and signal-difference to noise (SDNR) ratio, respectively. The stiffness of the phantom was evaluated based on ultrasound elastography measurements to yield an average Young’s modulus. In addition, subjective tactile assessment of phantom was performed under needle insertion. Results: The simulated breast tissue had a mean background value of 24 HU on CT imaging, which more closely resembles fibroglandular tissue (40 HU) as opposed to adipose (−100 HU). The tumor had a mean CT number of 45 HU, which yielded a qualitatively realistic image contrast relative to the background either as an intact tumor or postsurgical cavity. The tumor appeared qualitatively realistic on ultrasound images, exhibiting hypoechoic characteristics compared to background. On MRI, the tumor exhibited a SDNR of 3.7. The average Young’s modulus was computed to be 15.8 ± 0.7 kPa (1 SD

  11. Comparison of diffusion-weighted MR imaging and FDG PET/CT to predict pathological complete response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sang Hee; Moon, Woo Kyung; Cho, Nariya; Chang, Jung Min; Im, Seock-Ah; Park, In Ae; Kang, Keon Wook; Han, Wonshik; Noh, Dong-Young

    2012-01-01

    To compare the use of diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI) and 18 F-FDG PET/CT to predict pathological complete response (pCR) in breast cancer patients receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Thirty-four women with 34 invasive breast cancers underwent DWI and PET/CT before and after chemotherapy and before surgery. The percentage changes in the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and the standardised uptake value (SUV) were calculated, and the diagnostic performances for predicting pCR were evaluated using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. After surgery, 7/34 patients (20.6%) were found to have pCR. A z values for DWI, PET/CT and the combined use of DWI and PET/CT were 0.910, 0.873 and 0.944, respectively. The best cut-offs for differentiating pCR from non-pCR were a 54.9% increase in the ADC and a 63.9% decrease in the SUV. DWI showed 100% (7/7) sensitivity and 70.4% (19/27) specificity and PET/CT showed 100% sensitivity and 77.8% (21/27) specificity. When DWI and PET/CT were combined, there was a trend towards improved specificity compared with DWI. DWI and FDG PET/CT show similar diagnostic accuracy for predicting pCR to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer patients. The combined use of DWI and FDG PET/CT has the potential to improve specificity in predicting pCR. (orig.)

  12. [18F]Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-Positron Emission Tomography (PET)/Computed Tomography (CT) in Suspected Recurrent Breast Cancer: A Prospective Comparative Study of Dual-Time-Point FDG-PET/CT, Contrast-Enhanced CT, and Bone Scintigraphy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrandt, Malene Grubbe; Gerke, Oke; Baun, Christina; Falch, Kirsten; Hansen, Jeanette Ansholm; Farahani, Ziba Ahangarani; Petersen, Henrik; Larsen, Lisbet Brønsro; Duvnjak, Sandra; Buskevica, Inguna; Bektas, Selma; Søe, Katrine; Jylling, Anne Marie Bak; Ewertz, Marianne; Alavi, Abass; Høilund-Carlsen, Poul Flemming

    2016-06-01

    To prospectively investigate the diagnostic accuracy of [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) with dual-time-point imaging, contrast-enhanced CT (ceCT), and bone scintigraphy (BS) in patients with suspected breast cancer recurrence. One hundred women with suspected recurrence of breast cancer underwent 1-hour and 3-hour FDG-PET/CT, ceCT, and BS within approximately 10 days. The study was powered to estimate the precision of the individual imaging tests. Images were visually interpreted using a four-point assessment scale, and readers were blinded to other test results. The reference standard was biopsy along with treatment decisions and clinical follow-up (median, 17 months). FDG-PET/CT resulted in no false negatives and fewer false positives than the other imaging techniques. Accuracy of results were similar for 1-hour and 3-hour FDG-PET/CT. For distant recurrence, the area under the receiver operating curve was 0.99 (95% CI, 0.97 to 1) for FDG-PET/CT, 0.84 (95% CI, 0.73 to 0.94) for ceCT, and 0.86 (95% CI, 0.77 to 0.94) for the combined ceCT+BS. Of 100 patients, 22 (22%) were verified with distant recurrence, and 18 of these had bone involvement. Nineteen patients (19%) had local recurrence only. In exploratory analyses, diagnostic accuracy of FDG-PET/CT was better than ceCT alone or ceCT combined with BS in diagnosing distant, bone, and local recurrence, shown by a greater area under the receiver operating curve and higher sensitivity, specificity, and superior likelihood ratios. FDG-PET/CT was accurate in diagnosing recurrence in breast cancer patients. It allowed for distant recurrence to be correctly ruled out and resulted in only a small number of false-positive cases. Exploratory findings suggest that FDG-PET/CT has greater accuracy than conventional imaging technologies in this patient group. © 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  13. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer: prediction of pathologic response with PET/CT and dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging--prospective assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tateishi, Ukihide; Miyake, Mototaka; Nagaoka, Tomoaki; Terauchi, Takashi; Kubota, Kazunori; Kinoshita, Takayuki; Daisaki, Hiromitsu; Macapinlac, Homer A

    2012-04-01

    To clarify whether fluorine 18 ((18)F) fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging performed after two cycles of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) can be used to predict pathologic response in breast cancer. Institutional human research committee approval and written informed consent were obtained. Accuracy after two cycles of NAC for predicting pathologic complete response (pCR) was examined in 142 women (mean age, 57 years: range, 43-72 years) with histologically proved breast cancer between December 2005 and February 2009. Quantitative PET/CT and DCE MR imaging were performed at baseline and after two cycles of NAC. Parameters of PET/CT and of blood flow and microvascular permeability at DCE MR were compared with pathologic response. Patients were also evaluated after NAC by using Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) 1.1 based on DCE MR measurements and European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) criteria and PET Response Criteria in Solid Tumors (PERCIST) 1.0 based on PET/CT measurements. Multiple logistic regression analyses were performed to examine continuous variables at PET/CT and DCE MR to predict pCR, and diagnostic accuracies were compared with the McNemar test. Significant decrease from baseline of all parameters at PET/CT and DCE MR was observed after NAC. Therapeutic response was obtained in 24 patients (17%) with pCR and 118 (83%) without pCR. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy to predict pCR were 45.5%, 85.5%, and 82.4%, respectively, with RECIST and 70.4%, 95.7%, and 90.8%, respectively, with EORTC and PERCIST. Multiple logistic regression revealed three significant independent predictors of pCR: percentage maximum standardized uptake value (%SUV(max)) (odds ratio [OR], 1.22; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.11, 1.34; P PET/CT is superior to DCE MR for the prediction of pCR (%SUV(max) [90.1%] vs %κ

  14. PET-CT in the evaluation of metastatic breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, A.M.; Fulham, M.J.

    2005-01-01

    A 44-year-old woman underwent two PET-CT scans for the evaluation of metastatic breast cancer. A radical left mastectomy with axillary dissection (1 of 43 nodes positive) followed by chemotherapy, was performed in 1998. She represented in October 2003 with a left supraclavicular fossa mass. This was confirmed to be recurrent breast cancer on FNAB. She was considered for a radical neck dissection and the surgeon requested a PET scan. Other imaging at this time included a normal bone scan and CT brain. CT neck/chest/abdomen/pelvis showed soft tissue thickening in the left lower neck. The PET-CT scan showed multiple glucose avid lesions in the sternum, mediastinum and neck lymph nodes as well as a small lesion in the proximal left femur consistent with extensive metastatic disease. Surgery was cancelled and Femara chemotherapy commenced. Femara was stopped in March 2004 and the patient began alternative therapies. In October 2004 she presented to her surgeon with new back and chest pain. CT of the neck/chest/abdomen/pelvis showed a soft tissue mass in the upper sternum and a lymph node at the base of the neck highly suspicious for metastatic disease. There were also 2 suspicious lung nodules and a lesion in the proximal left femur reported as an osteoid osteoma. Wholebody PET-CT scans were performed on a Siemens LSO Biograph, 60mins after the injection of 350Mbq of Fl 8-Fag, with arms at the patient's side and head in the field-of-view. On both occasions the patient had to pay for the scan. On the 2004 PET-CT scan, the CT brain revealed multiple hyperdense lesions consistent with hemorrhagic metastases. In addition, there were innumerable glucose avid foci involving viscera, nodes and skeleton consistent with disseminated disease. Our case illustrates: (i) the value of PET in the management of metastatic breast cancer; (ii) the improved accuracy of PET-CT in delineating sites of disease; (iii) the issues of head movement in PET-CT and. (iv) the problem with lack of

  15. 18F-FDG-PET/CT in patients with breast cancer and rising Ca 15-3 with negative conventional imaging: A multicentre study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grassetto, Gaia; Fornasiero, Adriano; Otello, Daniele; Bonciarelli, Giorgio; Rossi, Elena; Nashimben, Ottorino; Minicozzi, Anna Maria; Crepaldi, Giorgio; Pasini, Felice; Facci, Enzo; Mandoliti, Giovanni; Marzola, Maria Cristina; Al-Nahhas, Adil; Rubello, Domenico

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Breast cancer is the second cause of death in women in Europe and North America. The mortality of this disease can be reduced with effective therapy and regular follow up to detect early recurrence. Tumor markers are sensitive in detecting recurrent or residual disease but imaging is required to customize the therapeutic option. Rising tumor markers and negative conventional imaging (US, X-mammography, CT and MR) poses a management problem. Our aim is to assess the role of 18 F-FDG-PET/CT in the management of post-therapy patients with rising markers but negative conventional imaging. Materials and methods: In the period from January 2008 to September 2009, 89 female patients with breast cancer who developed post-therapy rising markers (serum Ca 15-3 levels = 64.8 ± 16.3 U/mL) but negative clinical examination and conventional imaging were investigated with 18 F-FDG-PET/CT. Results: Tumor deposits were detected in 40/89 patients in chest wall, internal mammary nodes, lungs, liver and skeleton. The mean SUVmax value calculated in these lesions was 6.6 ± 1.7 (range 3.1–12.8). In 23/40 patients solitary small lesion were amenable to radical therapy. In 7 out of these 23 patients a complete disease remission lasting more than 1 year was observed. Conclusions: 18 F-FDG-PET/CT may have a potential role in asymptomatic patients with rising markers and negative conventional imaging. Our findings agree with other studies in promoting regular investigations such as tumor markers and 18 F-FDG-PET/CT rather than awaiting the developments of physical symptoms as suggested by current guidelines since the timely detection of early recurrence may have a major impact on therapy and survival.

  16. 18F-Fluoride PET/CT tumor burden quantification predicts survival in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, Ana E; Santos, Allan; Sasse, André Deeke; Cabello, Cesar; Oliveira, Paulo; Mosci, Camila; Souza, Tiago; Amorim, Barbara; Lima, Mariana; Ramos, Celso D; Etchebehere, Elba

    2017-05-30

    In bone-metastatic breast cancer patients, there are no current imaging biomarkers to identify which patients have worst prognosis. The purpose of our study was to investigate if skeletal tumor burden determined by 18F-Fluoride PET/CT correlates with clinical outcomes and may help define prognosis throughout the course of the disease. Bone metastases were present in 49 patients. On multivariable analysis, skeletal tumor burden was significantly and independently associated with overall survival (p breast cancer patients (40 for primary staging and the remainder for restaging after therapy). Clinical parameters, primary tumor characteristics and skeletal tumor burden were correlated to overall survival, progression free-survival and time to bone event. The median follow-up time was 19.5 months. 18F-Fluoride PET/CT skeletal tumor burden is a strong independent prognostic imaging biomarker in breast cancer patients.

  17. Characteristic performance evaluation of a photon counting Si strip detector for low dose spectral breast CT imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hyo-Min; Barber, William C.; Ding, Huanjun; Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Molloi, Sabee

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The possible clinical applications which can be performed using a newly developed detector depend on the detector's characteristic performance in a number of metrics including the dynamic range, resolution, uniformity, and stability. The authors have evaluated a prototype energy resolved fast photon counting x-ray detector based on a silicon (Si) strip sensor used in an edge-on geometry with an application specific integrated circuit to record the number of x-rays and their energies at high flux and fast frame rates. The investigated detector was integrated with a dedicated breast spectral computed tomography (CT) system to make use of the detector's high spatial and energy resolution and low noise performance under conditions suitable for clinical breast imaging. The aim of this article is to investigate the intrinsic characteristics of the detector, in terms of maximum output count rate, spatial and energy resolution, and noise performance of the imaging system. Methods: The maximum output count rate was obtained with a 50 W x-ray tube with a maximum continuous output of 50 kVp at 1.0 mA. A109Cd source, with a characteristic x-ray peak at 22 keV from Ag, was used to measure the energy resolution of the detector. The axial plane modulation transfer function (MTF) was measured using a 67 μm diameter tungsten wire. The two-dimensional (2D) noise power spectrum (NPS) was measured using flat field images and noise equivalent quanta (NEQ) were calculated using the MTF and NPS results. The image quality parameters were studied as a function of various radiation doses and reconstruction filters. The one-dimensional (1D) NPS was used to investigate the effect of electronic noise elimination by varying the minimum energy threshold. Results: A maximum output count rate of 100 million counts per second per square millimeter (cps/mm2) has been obtained (1 million cps per 100 × 100 μm pixel). The electrical noise floor was less than 4 keV. The energy resolution

  18. TU-AB-204-04: Advances in CBCT for Breast Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boone, J.

    2015-01-01

    assessment of novel therapies. Finally, Dr. J. Boone (UC Davis) will present on the topic: Advances in CBCT for Breast Imaging. Breast CT has been studied as an imaging tool for diagnostic breast evaluation and for potential breast cancer screening. The breast CT application lends itself to CBCT because of the small dimensions of the breast, the tapered shape of the breast towards higher cone angle, and the fact that there are no bones in the breast. The performance of various generations of breast CT scanners developed in recent years will be discussed, focusing on advances in spatial resolution and image noise characteristics. The results will also demonstrate the results of clinical trials using both computer and human observers. Learning Objectives: Understand the challenges, key technological advances, and emerging opportunities of CBCT in: Brain perfusion imaging, including assessment of ischemic stroke Cardiac imaging for functional assessment in cardiac interventions Orthopedics imaging for evaluation of musculoskeletal trauma, arthritis, and osteoporosis Breast imaging for screening and diagnosis of breast cancer. Work presented in this symposium includes research support by: Siemens Healthcare (Dr. Chen); NIH and Siemens Healthcare (Dr. Fahrig); NIH and Carestream Health (Dr. Zbijewski); and NIH (Dr. Boone)

  19. TU-AB-204-04: Advances in CBCT for Breast Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boone, J. [University of California Davis School of Medicine (United States)

    2015-06-15

    assessment of novel therapies. Finally, Dr. J. Boone (UC Davis) will present on the topic: Advances in CBCT for Breast Imaging. Breast CT has been studied as an imaging tool for diagnostic breast evaluation and for potential breast cancer screening. The breast CT application lends itself to CBCT because of the small dimensions of the breast, the tapered shape of the breast towards higher cone angle, and the fact that there are no bones in the breast. The performance of various generations of breast CT scanners developed in recent years will be discussed, focusing on advances in spatial resolution and image noise characteristics. The results will also demonstrate the results of clinical trials using both computer and human observers. Learning Objectives: Understand the challenges, key technological advances, and emerging opportunities of CBCT in: Brain perfusion imaging, including assessment of ischemic stroke Cardiac imaging for functional assessment in cardiac interventions Orthopedics imaging for evaluation of musculoskeletal trauma, arthritis, and osteoporosis Breast imaging for screening and diagnosis of breast cancer. Work presented in this symposium includes research support by: Siemens Healthcare (Dr. Chen); NIH and Siemens Healthcare (Dr. Fahrig); NIH and Carestream Health (Dr. Zbijewski); and NIH (Dr. Boone)

  20. Clinicopathological and prognostic relevance of uptake level using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography fusion imaging (18F-FDG PET/CT) in primary breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Shigeto; Tsuda, Hitoshi; Asakawa, Hideki

    2008-01-01

    Using integrated 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography fusion imaging ( 18 F-FDG PET/CT), the clinical significance of 18 F-FDG uptake was evaluated in patients with primary breast cancer. Clinicopathological correlation with the level of maximum standardized uptake values (SUV) 60 min obtained from preoperative 18 F-FDG PET/CT were examined in 152 patients with primary breast cancer. The prognostic impact of the level of SUV was explored using simulated prognosis derived from computed program Adjuvant! in 136 (89%) patients with invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC). High SUV level was significantly correlated with tumor invasive size (≤2 cm) (P 18 F-FDG would be predictive of poor prognosis in patients with primary breast cancer, and aggressive features of cancer cells in patients with early breast cancer. 18 F-FDG PET/CT could be a useful tool to pretherapeutically predict biological characteristics and baseline risk of breast cancer. (author)

  1. PET/SPECT/CT multimodal imaging in a transgenic mouse model of breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boisgard, R.; Alberini, J.L.; Jego, B.; Siquier, K.; Theze, B.; Guillermet, S.; Tavitian, B. [Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, Institut d' Imagerie BioMedicale, CEA, 91 - Orsay (France); Inserm, U803, 91 - Orsay (France)

    2008-02-15

    Background. - In the therapy monitoring of breast cancer, conventional imaging methods include ultrasound, mammography, CT and MRI, which are essentially based on tumor size modifications. However these modifications represent a late consequence of the biological response and fail to differentiate scar or necrotic tissue from residual viable tumoral tissue. Therefore, a current objective is to develop tools able to predict early response to treatment. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and Single Photon Emission Computerized Tomography (SPECT) are imaging modalities able to provide extremely sensitive quantitative molecular data and are widely used in humans and animals. Results. - Mammary epithelial cells of female transgenic mice expressing the polyoma middle T onco-protein (Py M.T.), undergo four distinct stages of tumour progression, from pre malignant to malignant stages. Stages are identifiable in the mammary tissue and can lead to the development of distant metastases Longitudinal studies by dynamic whole body acquisitions by multimodal imaging including PET, SPECT and Computed Tomography (CT) allow following the tumoral evolution in Py M.T. mice in comparison with the histopathological analysis. At four weeks of age, mammary hyperplasia was identified by histopathology, but no abnormalities were found by palpation or detected by PET with 2-deoxy-2-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-D-glucose. Such as in some human mammary cancers, the sodium iodide sym-porter (N.I.S.) in tumoral mammary epithelial cells is expressed in this mouse model. In order to investigate the expression of N.I.S. in the Py M.T. mice mammary tumours, [{sup 99m}Tc]TcO{sub 4} imaging was performed with a dedicated SPECT/CT system camera (B.I.O.S.P.A.C.E. Gamma Imager/CT). Local uptake of [{sup 99m}Tc]TcO{sub 4} was detected as early as four weeks of age. The efficacy of chemotherapy was evaluated in this mouse model using a conventional regimen (Doxorubicine, 100 mg/ kg) administered weekly from nine to

  2. Monte Carlo simulations to assess the effects of tube current modulation on breast dose for multidetector CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angel, Erin; Yaghmai, Nazanin; Jude, Cecilia Matilda; DeMarco, John J; Cagnon, Christopher H; Goldin, Jonathan G; McNitt-Gray, Michael F; Primak, Andrew N; McCollough, Cynthia H; Stevens, Donna M; Cody, Dianna D

    2009-01-01

    Tube current modulation was designed to reduce radiation dose in CT imaging while maintaining overall image quality. This study aims to develop a method for evaluating the effects of tube current modulation (TCM) on organ dose in CT exams of actual patient anatomy. This method was validated by simulating a TCM and a fixed tube current chest CT exam on 30 voxelized patient models and estimating the radiation dose to each patient's glandular breast tissue. This new method for estimating organ dose was compared with other conventional estimates of dose reduction. Thirty detailed voxelized models of patient anatomy were created based on image data from female patients who had previously undergone clinically indicated CT scans including the chest area. As an indicator of patient size, the perimeter of the patient was measured on the image containing at least one nipple using a semi-automated technique. The breasts were contoured on each image set by a radiologist and glandular tissue was semi-automatically segmented from this region. Previously validated Monte Carlo models of two multidetector CT scanners were used, taking into account details about the source spectra, filtration, collimation and geometry of the scanner. TCM data were obtained from each patient's clinical scan and factored into the model to simulate the effects of TCM. For each patient model, two exams were simulated: a fixed tube current chest CT and a tube current modulated chest CT. X-ray photons were transported through the anatomy of the voxelized patient models, and radiation dose was tallied in the glandular breast tissue. The resulting doses from the tube current modulated simulations were compared to the results obtained from simulations performed using a fixed mA value. The average radiation dose to the glandular breast tissue from a fixed tube current scan across all patient models was 19 mGy. The average reduction in breast dose using the tube current modulated scan was 17%. Results were

  3. Breast fibroadenoma with increased activity on 68Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, Georgios Z.; Millo, Corina; Sadowski, Samira M.; Karantanas, Apostolos H.; Bagci, Ulas; Patronas, Nicholas J.

    2016-01-01

    Fibroadenoma is the most common benign breast tumor in women of reproductive age, carrying little to no risk of breast cancer development. We report on a case of a woman with history of neuroendocrine tumor (NET), who on follow-up imaging tests underwent whole-body PET/CT study using 68Ga-DOTATATE. The scan showed increased focal activity in the right breast, which was biopsied revealing a fibroadenoma. The presented data suggests cell surface over-expression of somatostatin receptors (SSTRs) by this benign breast tumor. Moreover, this finding emphasizes the need for cautious interpretation of 68Ga-DOTATATE avid breast lesions which could mimic malignancy in NET patients. PMID:27879489

  4. Breast Fibroadenoma With Increased Activity on 68Ga DOTATATE PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, Georgios Z; Millo, Corina; Sadowski, Samira M; Karantanas, Apostolos H; Bagci, Ulas; Patronas, Nicholas J

    2017-02-01

    Fibroadenoma is the most common benign breast tumor in women of reproductive age, carrying little to no risk of breast cancer development. We report on a case of a woman with history of neuroendocrine tumor who on follow-up imaging tests underwent whole-body PET/CT study using Ga DOTATATE. The scan showed increased focal activity in the right breast, which was biopsied revealing a fibroadenoma. The presented data suggests cell surface overexpression of somatostatin receptors by this benign breast tumor. Moreover, this finding emphasizes the need for cautious interpretation of Ga DOTATATE-avid breast lesions that could mimic malignancy in neuroendocrine tumor patients.

  5. Evaluation and comparison of contrast to noise ratio and signal to noise ratio according to change of reconstruction on breast PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young Jae [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Eul Kyu [Dept. of Radiology, Inje Paik University Hospital Jeo-dong, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ki Won [Dept. of Radiology, Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gang-dong, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Hoi Woun [Dept. of Radiological Technology, The Baekseok Culture University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Lyu, Kwang Yeul; Park, Hoon Hee; Son, Jin Hyun; Min, Jung Whan [Dept. of Radiological Technology, The Shingu University, Sungnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to measure contrast to noise ratio (CNR) and signal to noise ratio (SNR) according to change of reconstruction from region of interest (ROI) in breast positron emission tomography- computed tomography (PET-CT), and to analyze the CNR and SNR statically. We examined images of breast PET-CT of 100 patients in a University-affiliated hospital, Seoul, Korea. Each patient's image of breast PET-CT were calculated by using Image J. Differences of CNR and SNR among four reconstruction algorithms were tested by SPSS Statistics21 ANOVA test for there was statistical significance (p<0.05). We have analysis socio-demographical variables, CNR and SNR according to reconstruction images, 95% confidence according to CNR and SNR of reconstruction and difference in a mean of CNR and SNR. SNR results, with the quality of distributions in the order of PSF{sub T}OF, Iterative and Iterative-TOF, FBP-TOF. CNR, with the quality of distributions in the order of PSF{sub T}OF, Iterative and Iterative-TOF, FBP-TOF. CNR and SNR of PET-CT reconstruction methods of the breast would be useful to evaluate breast diseases.

  6. Initial experience with FDG-PET/CT in the evaluation of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatsumi, Mitsuaki; Cohade, Christian; Mourtzikos, Karen A.; Wahl, Richard L.; Fishman, Elliot K.

    2006-01-01

    We retrospectively reviewed FDG-PET/CT images in patients with breast cancer to determine whether PET/CT improved the level of diagnostic confidence as compared with PET and to compare PET/CT and CT findings at the location of suspected malignancies. The study included 75 patients with known breast cancer. The initial PET/CT study for each patient was retrospectively reviewed to determine whether improved diagnostic confidence (IDC) regarding lesion localization and characterization was observed with PET/CT as compared with PET alone. PET/CT and CT findings were compared regarding lesion characterization and staging in 69 of the 75 patients, and in the case of discordant findings, comparison with histological or informative follow-up results was also performed. Fifty of the 75 patients exhibited increased FDG uptake in a total of 95 regions. In the comparison of PET/CT and PET, PET/CT resulted in IDC in 30 (60%) of these 50 patients and in 52 (55%) of the 95 regions. In the comparison between PET/CT and CT in 69 patients, PET/CT demonstrated a significantly better accuracy than CT (P<0.05). PET/CT showed definitely positive findings in 60 regions with malignancies, among which CT exhibited positive findings in 43 (72%). PET/CT and CT accurately staged 59 (86%) and 53 (77%) of the 69 patients, respectively. (orig.)

  7. Focal breast lesions in clinical CT examinations of the chest. A retrospective analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krug, Kathrin Barbara; Houbois, Christian; Grinstein, Olga; Borggrefe, Jan; Puesken, Michael; Maintz, David; Hanstein, Bettina; Malter, Wolfram; Hellmich, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Based on radiological reports, the percentage of breast cancers visualized as incidental findings in routine CT examinations is estimated at ≤2%. In view of the rising number of CT examinations and the high prevalence of breast cancer, it was the goal of the present study to verify the frequency and image morphology of false-negative senological CT findings. All first contrast-enhanced CT examinations of the chest in adult female patients carried out in 2012 were retrospectively included. A senior radiologist systematically assessed the presence of breast lesions on all CT images using the BI-RADS system. All BI-RADS ≥3 notations were evaluated by a second senior radiologist. A consensus was obtained in case of differing BI-RADS assessments. Reference diagnoses were elaborated based on all available clinical, radiological and pathological data. The findings of the CT reports were classified according to the BI-RADS system and were compared with the retrospective consensus findings as well as with the reference diagnoses. The range of indications comprised a broad spectrum including staging and follow-up examinations of solid tumors/lymphoma (N = 701, 59.9 %) and vascular (190, 16.2 %), inflammatory (48, 4.1 %) and pulmonologic (22, 1.9 %) issues. BI-RADS 1/2 classifications were present in 92.5 % and BI-RADS 6 classifications were assessed in 1.7 % of the 1170 included examinations. 68 patients (5.8 %) had at least one lesion retrospectively classified as BI-RADS 3 - 5. The histological potential was known in 57 of these lesions as benign (46, 3.9 %) or malignant (11, 0.9 %). 13 BI-RADS 4/5 consensus assessments (1.1 %) were false-positive. 2 of the 10 lesions classified as being malignant based on the further clinical and radiological course were not mentioned in the written CT reports (0.2 %). Both false-negative CT reports were therapeutically and prognostically irrelevant. The relative frequency of BI-RADS 3 - 5 findings was 5.8 %. It reflects the situation

  8. CT-image based conformal high-dose rate brachytherapy boost in the conservative treatment of stage I - II breast cancer - introducing the procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubaszewska, M.; Skowronek, J.; Chichel, A.; Kanikowski, M.; Dymnicka, M.

    2008-01-01

    Aim: Breast-conserving surgery (BCS) followed by radiotherapy (RT) has become the standard treatment for the majority of patients with early breast cancer. With regard to boost technique some disagreements are found between groups that are emphasizing the value of electron boost treatment and groups pointing out the value of interstitial brachytherapy (BT) boost treatment. We present the preliminary results in treating selected patients with early-stage breast cancer using high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HD R-BT) as a boost after breast conservation therapy (BCT). Materials/Methods: Between January 2006 and August 2007, a total of 58 female patients with first and second stage breast cancer underwent BCT. This therapeutic procedure involves BCS, whole breast radiation therapy (WBRT) and additional irradiation to the tumour bed (boost) using interstitial HDR-BT via flexible implant tubes. A 10 Gy boost dose was received by all patients. The treatment planning was based on CT-guided 3D (three-dimensional) reconstruction of the surgical clips, implant tubes and critical structures localization (skin and ribs). The accuracy of tumour bed localization, the conformity of planning target volume and treated volume were analyzed. Results: The evaluations of implant parameters involved the use of: dose volume histogram (DVH), the volume encompassed by the 100% reference isodose surface (V100%), the high dose volumecalculation (V150%, V200%, V300%), the dose non-uniformity ratio (DNR), and the conformity index (COIN). Our results were as follows: the mean PTV volume, the mean high dose volume (V150%; V200%; V300%), the DNR and COIN mean value were estimated at 57.38, 42.98, 21.38, 7.90, 0.52 and 0.83 respectively. Conclusions: CT-guided 3D HDR-BT is most appropriate for planning the boost procedure after BT especially in large breast volume, in cases with a deep seated tumour bed, as well as in patients with high risk for local recurrences. This technique reduces the

  9. WE-G-207-05: Relationship Between CT Image Quality, Segmentation Performance, and Quantitative Image Feature Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J; Nishikawa, R [University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Reiser, I [The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Boone, J [UC Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Segmentation quality can affect quantitative image feature analysis. The objective of this study is to examine the relationship between computed tomography (CT) image quality, segmentation performance, and quantitative image feature analysis. Methods: A total of 90 pathology proven breast lesions in 87 dedicated breast CT images were considered. An iterative image reconstruction (IIR) algorithm was used to obtain CT images with different quality. With different combinations of 4 variables in the algorithm, this study obtained a total of 28 different qualities of CT images. Two imaging tasks/objectives were considered: 1) segmentation and 2) classification of the lesion as benign or malignant. Twenty-three image features were extracted after segmentation using a semi-automated algorithm and 5 of them were selected via a feature selection technique. Logistic regression was trained and tested using leave-one-out-cross-validation and its area under the ROC curve (AUC) was recorded. The standard deviation of a homogeneous portion and the gradient of a parenchymal portion of an example breast were used as an estimate of image noise and sharpness. The DICE coefficient was computed using a radiologist’s drawing on the lesion. Mean DICE and AUC were used as performance metrics for each of the 28 reconstructions. The relationship between segmentation and classification performance under different reconstructions were compared. Distributions (median, 95% confidence interval) of DICE and AUC for each reconstruction were also compared. Results: Moderate correlation (Pearson’s rho = 0.43, p-value = 0.02) between DICE and AUC values was found. However, the variation between DICE and AUC values for each reconstruction increased as the image sharpness increased. There was a combination of IIR parameters that resulted in the best segmentation with the worst classification performance. Conclusion: There are certain images that yield better segmentation or classification

  10. Assessment of female breast dose for thoracic cone-beam CT using MOSFET dosimeters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wenzhao; Wang, Bin; Qiu, Bo; Liang, Jian; Xie, Weihao; Deng, Xiaowu; Qi, Zhenyu

    2017-03-21

    To assess the breast dose during a routine thoracic cone-beam CT (CBCT) check with the efforts to explore the possible dose reduction strategy. Metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeters were used to measure breast surface doses during a thorax kV CBCT scan in an anthropomorphic phantom. Breast doses for different scanning protocols and breast sizes were compared. Dose reduction was attempted by using partial arc CBCT scan with bowtie filter. The impact of this dose reduction strategy on image registration accuracy was investigated. The average breast surface doses were 20.02 mGy and 11.65 mGy for thoracic CBCT without filtration and with filtration, respectively. This indicates a dose reduction of 41.8% by use of bowtie filter. It was found 220° partial arc scanning significantly reduced the dose to contralateral breast (44.4% lower than ipsilateral breast), while the image registration accuracy was not compromised. Breast dose reduction can be achieved by using ipsilateral 220° partial arc scan with bowtie filter. This strategy also provides sufficient image quality for thorax image registration in daily patient positioning verification.

  11. Breast density quantification with cone-beam CT: a post-mortem study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Travis; Ding, Huanjun; Le, Huy Q; Ducote, Justin L; Molloi, Sabee

    2013-01-01

    Forty post-mortem breasts were imaged with a flat-panel based cone-beam x-ray CT system at 50 kVp. The feasibility of breast density quantification has been investigated using standard histogram thresholding and an automatic segmentation method based on the fuzzy c-means algorithm (FCM). The breasts were chemically decomposed into water, lipid, and protein immediately after image acquisition was completed. The per cent fibroglandular volume (%FGV) from chemical analysis was used as the gold standard for breast density comparison. Both image-based segmentation techniques showed good precision in breast density quantification with high linear coefficients between the right and left breast of each pair. When comparing with the gold standard using %FGV from chemical analysis, Pearson's r-values were estimated to be 0.983 and 0.968 for the FCM clustering and the histogram thresholding techniques, respectively. The standard error of the estimate was also reduced from 3.92% to 2.45% by applying the automatic clustering technique. The results of the postmortem study suggested that breast tissue can be characterized in terms of water, lipid and protein contents with high accuracy by using chemical analysis, which offers a gold standard for breast density studies comparing different techniques. In the investigated image segmentation techniques, the FCM algorithm had high precision and accuracy in breast density quantification. In comparison to conventional histogram thresholding, it was more efficient and reduced inter-observer variation. (paper)

  12. WE-A-BRF-01: Dual-Energy CT Imaging in Diagnostic Imaging and Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molloi, S; Li, B; Yin, F; Chen, H

    2014-01-01

    The quantification accuracy of dual-energy imaging is influenced by the fundamentals of x-ray physics, system geometry, data acquisition hardware/protocol, system calibration, and image processing technique. This symposium will provide updates on the following advanced application areas: Mammography. Volumetric breast density techniques based on standard mammograms require estimation of breast thickness, which is difficult to accurately measure. By comparison, calculation of breast density using dual energy mammography does not require measurement of breast thickness. Dual energy mammography has been implemented using both energy integrating flat panel detectors in conjunction with beam energy switching and energy resolved photon counting detectors. These techniques have been optimized using simulation studies and validated using physical phantoms and postmortem breasts. Chemical decomposition was used as the gold standard for volumetric breast density measurement in postmortem breasts. Breast density measurements have also been compared with results from four-category BI-RADS density rankings, standard image thresholding and Fuzzy k-mean clustering techniques. These studies indicate that dual energy mammography can be used to accurately measure volumetric breast density. Cardiovascular CT. The predicative accuracy of risk models for recurrent stroke and cardiac arrest depends heavily on accurate differentiation of thrombus or calcium from iodine in left atrial appendage or coronary arteries. The amount of energy separation is constrained by image noise; therefore, optimal kVp, beam filtration, and balanced flux are essential for the quantification accuracy of iodine and calcium. The basis materials are combined linearly to generate monochromatic energy images, where CT# accuracy and CNR are energy dependent. With optimal monochromatic energy, the mean iodine concentration for the thrombus, circulatory stasis, and control groups are significantly different. Risk

  13. Comprehensive imaging of tumor recurrence in breast cancer patients using whole-body MRI at 1.5 and 3 T compared to FDG-PET-CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, Gerwin P. [Institute of Clinical Radiology, University Hospitals Munich-Grosshadern, Marchioninistr. 15, 81377 Munich (Germany)], E-mail: gerwin.schmidt@med.uni-muenchen.de; Baur-Melnyk, Andrea [Institute of Clinical Radiology, University Hospitals Munich-Grosshadern, Marchioninistr. 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Haug, Alexander [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospitals Munich-Grosshadern, 81377 Munich (Germany); Heinemann, Volker [Department of Internal Medicine III, University Hospitals Munich-Grosshadern, 81377 Munich (Germany); Bauerfeind, Ingo [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University Hospitals Munich-Grosshadern, 81377 Munich (Germany); Reiser, Maximilian F. [Institute of Clinical Radiology, University Hospitals Munich-Grosshadern, Marchioninistr. 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Schoenberg, Stefan O. [Institute of Clinical Radiology University Hospital Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, University of Heidelberg (Germany)

    2008-01-15

    Purpose: To compare the diagnostic accuracy for the detection of tumor recurrence in breast cancer patients using whole-body-MRI (WB-MRI) at 1.5 or 3 T compared to FDG-PET-CT. Materials and methods: Thirty-three female patients with breast cancer and suspicion of recurrence underwent FDG-PET-CT and WB-MRI. Coronal T1w-TSE- and STIR-sequences, HASTE-imaging of the lungs, contrast-enhanced T1w- and T2w-TSE-sequences of the liver, brain and abdomen were performed, using a WB-MRI-scanner at 1.5 (n = 23) or 3 T (n = 10). Presence of local recurrence, lymph node involvement and distant metastatic disease was assessed using clinical and radiological follow-up as a standard of reference. Results: Tumor recurrence was found in 20 of 33 patients. Overall 186 malignant foci were detected with WB-MRI and PET-CT. Both modalities revealed two recurrent tumors of the breast. PET-CT detected more lymph node metastases (n = 21) than WB-MRI (n = 16). WB-MRI was more precise in the detection of distant metastases (n = 154 versus n = 147). Sensitivity was 93% (172/186) and 91% (170/186) for WB-MRI and PET-CT, specificity was 86% (66/77) and 90% (69/77), respectively. Examination times for WB-MRI at 1.5 and 3 T were 51 and 43 min, respectively, examination time for PET-CT was 103 min. Conclusion: WB-MRI and PET-CT are useful for the detection of tumor recurrence in the follow-up of breast cancer. WB-MRI is highly sensitive to distant metastatic disease. PET-CT is more sensitive in detecting lymph node involvement. Tumor screening with WB-MRI is feasible at 1.5 and 3 T, scan time is further reduced at 3 T with identical resolution.

  14. Staging performance of whole-body DWI, PET/CT and PET/MRI in invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalano, Onofrio Antonio; Daye, Dania; Signore, Alberto; Iannace, Carlo; Vangel, Mark; Luongo, Angelo; Catalano, Marco; Filomena, Mazzeo; Mansi, Luigi; Soricelli, Andrea; Salvatore, Marco; Fuin, Niccolo; Catana, Ciprian; Mahmood, Umar; Rosen, Bruce Robert

    2017-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the performance of whole-body diffusion-weighted imaging (WB-DWI), whole-body positron emission tomography with computed tomography (WB-PET/CT), and whole-body positron emission tomography with magnetic resonance imaging (WB-PET/MRI) in staging patients with untreated invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast. Fifty-one women with newly diagnosed invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast underwent WB-DWI, WB-PET/CT and WB-PET/MRI before treatment. A radiologist and a nuclear medicine physician reviewed in consensus the images from the three modalities and searched for occurrence, number and location of metastases. Final staging, according to each technique, was compared. Pathology and imaging follow-up were used as the reference. WB-DWI, WB-PET/CT and WB-PET/MRI correctly and concordantly staged 33/51 patients: stage IIA in 7 patients, stage IIB in 8 patients, stage IIIC in 4 patients and stage IV in 14 patients. WB-DWI, WB-PET/CT and WB-PET/MRI incorrectly and concordantly staged 1/51 patient as stage IV instead of IIIA. Discordant staging was reported in 17/51 patients. WB-PET/MRI resulted in improved staging when compared to WB-PET/CT (50 correctly staged on WB-PET/MRI vs. 38 correctly staged on WB-PET/CT; McNemar's test; p<0.01). Comparing the performance of WB-PET/MRI and WB-DWI (43 correct) did not reveal a statistically significant difference (McNemar test, p=0.14). WB-PET/MRI is more accurate in the initial staging of breast cancer than WB-DWI and WB-PET/CT, however, the discrepancies between WB-PET/MRI and WB-DWI were not statistically significant. When available, WB-PET/MRI should be considered for staging patient with invasive ductal breast carcinoma.

  15. Predictive and prognostic value of FDG-PET/CT imaging and different response evaluation criteria after primary systemic therapy of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tőkés, Tímea; Kajáry, Kornélia; Szentmártoni, Gyöngyvér; Lengyel, Zsolt; Györke, Tamás; Torgyík, László; Somlai, Krisztián; Tőkés, Anna-Mária; Kulka, Janina; Dank, Magdolna

    2017-01-01

    (1) To predict pathological complete remission (pCR) and survival after primary systemic therapy (PST) in patients diagnosed with breast cancer by using two different PET/CT based scores: a simplified PERCIST-based PET/CT score (Method 1) and a combined PET/CT score supplemented with the morphological results of the RECIST system (Method 2) and (2) to assess the effect of different breast carcinoma subtypes on tumor response and its evaluation. Eighty-eight patients were enrolled in the study who underwent PET/CT imaging before and after PST. PET/CTs were evaluated by changes in maximum Standardized Uptake Value (SUVmax) and tumor size. Method 1 and 2 were applied to predict pathological complete remission (pCR). Kaplan-Meier analyses for survival were performed. Classification into biological subtypes was performed based on the pre-therapeutic tumor characteristics. A total of 30/88 patients showed pCR (34.1 %). Comparing pCR/non-pCR patient groups, significant differences were detected by changes in SUVmax (p evaluation with Method 2 and not with Method 1. In our study, neither clinical nor pathological CR were predictors of longer progression-free survival. Our results suggest that combined PET/CT criteria are more predictive of pCR. The effect of biological subtypes is significant on pCR rate as well as on the changes in FDG-uptake and morphological tumor response. Response evaluation with combined criteria was also able to reflect the differences between the biological behavior of breast tumor subtypes.

  16. Incidental breast masses detected by computed tomography: are any imaging features predictive of malignancy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porter, G. [Primrose Breast Care Unit, Derriford Hospital, Plymouth (United Kingdom)], E-mail: Gareth.Porter@phnt.swest.nhs.uk; Steel, J.; Paisley, K.; Watkins, R. [Primrose Breast Care Unit, Derriford Hospital, Plymouth (United Kingdom); Holgate, C. [Department of Histopathology, Derriford Hospital, Plymouth (United Kingdom)

    2009-05-15

    Aim: To review the outcome of further assessment of breast abnormalities detected incidentally by multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and to determine whether any MDCT imaging features were predictive of malignancy. Material and methods: The outcome of 34 patients referred to the Primrose Breast Care Unit with breast abnormalities detected incidentally using MDCT was prospectively recorded. Women with a known diagnosis of breast cancer were excluded. CT imaging features and histological diagnoses were recorded and the correlation assessed using Fisher's exact test. Results: Of the 34 referred patients a malignant diagnosis was noted in 11 (32%). There were 10 breast malignancies (seven invasive ductal carcinomas, one invasive lobular carcinoma, two metastatic lesions) and one axillary lymphoma. CT features suggestive of breast malignancy were spiculation [6/10 (60%) versus 0/24 (0%) p = 0.0002] and associated axillary lymphadenopathy [3/10 (33%) versus 0/20 (0%) p = 0.030]. Conversely, a well-defined mass was suggestive of benign disease [10/24 (42%) versus 0/10 (0%); p = 0.015]. Associated calcification, ill-definition, heterogeneity, size, and multiplicity of lesions were not useful discriminating CT features. There was a non-significant trend for lesions in involuted breasts to be more frequently malignant than in dense breasts [6/14 (43%) versus 4/20 (20%) p = 0.11]. Conclusion: In the present series there was a significant rate (32%) of malignancy in patients referred to the breast clinic with CT-detected incidental breast lesions. The CT features of spiculation or axillary lymphadenopathy are strongly suggestive of malignancy.

  17. Novel CT and scintigraphic findings of bone metastasis from invasive lobular breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Ogaili, Zeyad; Troedson, Russell

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to identify and describe the computed tomography and scintigraphic imaging patterns of osseous metastasis from invasive lobular breast cancer (ILC). CT and skeletal scintigraphy (SS) studies of 23 patients with diagnosis of ILC and osseous metastasis on their initial presentation were reviewed.Osseous metastases in 14 patients (60.8%) appear as uniform small sclerotic lesions (USSL) on CT scan. The SS in these patients were interpreted as negative for metastasis (either normal or with some equivocal findings not typical for metastasis). Osseous metastasis from ILC can have a characteristic imaging pattern on CT and SS. The pattern of USSL on CT scan with negative SS is highly suggestive of osseous metastasis from ILC.

  18. A False Positive {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT Scan Caused by Breast Silicone Injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Chao Jung; Lee, Bi Fang; Yao, Wei Jen; Wu, Pei Shan; Chen, Wen Chung; Peng, Shu Lin; Chiu, Nan Tsing [Cheng Kung University Medical College and Hospital, Tainan (Turkmenistan)

    2009-04-15

    We present here the case of a 40-year-old woman with a greater than 10 year prior history of bilateral breast silicone injection and saline bag implantation. Bilateral palpable breast nodules were observed, but the ultrasound scan was suboptimal and the magnetic resonance imaging showed no gadolinium enhanced tumor. The {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT scan showed a hypermetabolic nodule in the left breast with a 30% increase of {sup 18}F-FDG uptake on the delayed imaging, and this mimicked breast cancer. She underwent a left partial mastectomy and the pathology demonstrated a siliconoma.

  19. Optimized production, quality control, biological evaluation and PET/CT imaging of {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-617 in breast adenocarcinoma model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharifi, Mehdi; Yousefnia, Hassan; Bahrami-Samani, Ali; Zolghadri, Samaneh; Alirezapour, Behrouz [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute (NSTRI), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jalilian, Amir Reza; Geramifa, Parham; Beiki, Davood [Tehran Univ. of Medical Sciences (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Research Center for Nuclear Medicine; Maus, Stephan [Univ. Medical Centre Mainz (Germany). Clinic of Nuclear Medicine

    2017-08-01

    Optimized production, quality control and preclinical evaluation of {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-617 as a PET radiotracer for PSMA-positive malignancies as well as successful application in imaging of breast adenocarcinomas are reported. {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-617 radiolabeling and QC optimization, stability, log P, biodistribution in breast adenocarcinomas-bearing mice (direct and blockade studies) and also PET/CT imaging was performed. {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-617 complex was prepared in high radiochemical purity (>96%, ITLC, HPLC) and specific activity of 300-310 GBq/mM at 95 C using 2-4 micrograms of the peptide in 10 min followed by solid phase purification. The tracer was stable in serum and final formulation for at least 120 min. The log P was -1.98. Western blot test on the tumor cell homogenates demonstrated distinct existence of the PSMA on the surface. The biodistribution of the tracer demonstrated specific kidney and tumor significant uptake using blocking study. Significant tumor:blood and tumor:muscle ratio uptake observed at 30 min post-injection (2.69 and 19.1, respectively). A reduction of 40-80% off tumor uptake in the study time period observed using blocking test. {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-617 can be proposing a possible tracer for PET imaging of breast adenocarcinomas and other breast malignancies.

  20. Library based x-ray scatter correction for dedicated cone beam breast CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Linxi; Zhu, Lei; Vedantham, Srinivasan; Karellas, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The image quality of dedicated cone beam breast CT (CBBCT) is limited by substantial scatter contamination, resulting in cupping artifacts and contrast-loss in reconstructed images. Such effects obscure the visibility of soft-tissue lesions and calcifications, which hinders breast cancer detection and diagnosis. In this work, we propose a library-based software approach to suppress scatter on CBBCT images with high efficiency, accuracy, and reliability. Methods: The authors precompute a scatter library on simplified breast models with different sizes using the GEANT4-based Monte Carlo (MC) toolkit. The breast is approximated as a semiellipsoid with homogeneous glandular/adipose tissue mixture. For scatter correction on real clinical data, the authors estimate the breast size from a first-pass breast CT reconstruction and then select the corresponding scatter distribution from the library. The selected scatter distribution from simplified breast models is spatially translated to match the projection data from the clinical scan and is subtracted from the measured projection for effective scatter correction. The method performance was evaluated using 15 sets of patient data, with a wide range of breast sizes representing about 95% of general population. Spatial nonuniformity (SNU) and contrast to signal deviation ratio (CDR) were used as metrics for evaluation. Results: Since the time-consuming MC simulation for library generation is precomputed, the authors’ method efficiently corrects for scatter with minimal processing time. Furthermore, the authors find that a scatter library on a simple breast model with only one input parameter, i.e., the breast diameter, sufficiently guarantees improvements in SNU and CDR. For the 15 clinical datasets, the authors’ method reduces the average SNU from 7.14% to 2.47% in coronal views and from 10.14% to 3.02% in sagittal views. On average, the CDR is improved by a factor of 1.49 in coronal views and 2.12 in sagittal

  1. Library based x-ray scatter correction for dedicated cone beam breast CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Linxi; Zhu, Lei, E-mail: leizhu@gatech.edu [Nuclear and Radiological Engineering and Medical Physics Programs, The George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Vedantham, Srinivasan; Karellas, Andrew [Department of Radiology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01655 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: The image quality of dedicated cone beam breast CT (CBBCT) is limited by substantial scatter contamination, resulting in cupping artifacts and contrast-loss in reconstructed images. Such effects obscure the visibility of soft-tissue lesions and calcifications, which hinders breast cancer detection and diagnosis. In this work, we propose a library-based software approach to suppress scatter on CBBCT images with high efficiency, accuracy, and reliability. Methods: The authors precompute a scatter library on simplified breast models with different sizes using the GEANT4-based Monte Carlo (MC) toolkit. The breast is approximated as a semiellipsoid with homogeneous glandular/adipose tissue mixture. For scatter correction on real clinical data, the authors estimate the breast size from a first-pass breast CT reconstruction and then select the corresponding scatter distribution from the library. The selected scatter distribution from simplified breast models is spatially translated to match the projection data from the clinical scan and is subtracted from the measured projection for effective scatter correction. The method performance was evaluated using 15 sets of patient data, with a wide range of breast sizes representing about 95% of general population. Spatial nonuniformity (SNU) and contrast to signal deviation ratio (CDR) were used as metrics for evaluation. Results: Since the time-consuming MC simulation for library generation is precomputed, the authors’ method efficiently corrects for scatter with minimal processing time. Furthermore, the authors find that a scatter library on a simple breast model with only one input parameter, i.e., the breast diameter, sufficiently guarantees improvements in SNU and CDR. For the 15 clinical datasets, the authors’ method reduces the average SNU from 7.14% to 2.47% in coronal views and from 10.14% to 3.02% in sagittal views. On average, the CDR is improved by a factor of 1.49 in coronal views and 2.12 in sagittal

  2. Technical feasibility proof for high-resolution low-dose photon-counting CT of the breast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalender, Willi A.; Kolditz, Daniel; Lueck, Ferdinand [University of Erlangen-Nuernberg, Institute of Medical Physics (IMP), Erlangen (Germany); CT Imaging GmbH, Erlangen (Germany); Steiding, Christian [University of Erlangen-Nuernberg, Institute of Medical Physics (IMP), Erlangen (Germany); CT Imaging GmbH, Erlangen (Germany); University Hospital of Erlangen, Institute of Radiology, Erlangen (Germany); Ruth, Veikko; Roessler, Ann-Christin [University of Erlangen-Nuernberg, Institute of Medical Physics (IMP), Erlangen (Germany); Wenkel, Evelyn [University Hospital of Erlangen, Institute of Radiology, Erlangen (Germany)

    2017-03-15

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) has been proposed and evaluated multiple times as a potentially alternative method for breast imaging. All efforts shown so far have been criticized and partly disapproved because of their limited spatial resolution and higher patient dose when compared to mammography. Our concept for a dedicated breast CT (BCT) scanner therefore aimed at novel apparatus and detector design to provide high spatial resolution of about 100 μm and average glandular dose (AGD) levels of 5 mGy or below. Photon-counting technology was considered as a solution to reach these goals. The complete concept was previously evaluated and confirmed by simulations and basic experiments on laboratory setups. We here present measurements of dose, technical image quality parameters and surgical specimen results on such a scanner. For comparison purposes, the specimens were also imaged with digital mammography (DM) and breast tomosynthesis (BT) apparatus. Results show that photon-counting BCT (pcBCT) at 5 mGy AGD offers sufficiently high 3D spatial resolution for reliable detectability of calcifications and soft tissue delineation. (orig.)

  3. Metastatic Brachial Plexopathy in a Case of Recurrent Breast Carcinoma Demonstrated on 18F-FDG PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tripathi, Madhavi; Das, Chandan J.; Srivastava, Anurag; Bal, ChandraSekhar; Malhotra, Arun

    2014-01-01

    This case highlights the importance of recognition of the pattern of metastatic brachialplexopathy in breast cancer patients undergoing 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) for evaluation of recurrent disease.This pattern can be appreciated on maximum intensity projection (MIP) and coronal 18 F-FDG PET/CT images as a linear extension of tracer activity from superomedial aspect(supra/infraclavicular) to lateral aspect of the axilla closely related to the subclavian/axillary vessels). A 35-year-old woman diagnosed with infiltrating ductal carcinoma of the right breast had undergone six cycles of neoadjuvant chemotherapy, followed by wide local incision and radiotherapy. She had local recurrence, for which she was operated upon and given chemotherapy. She presented to her oncologist with pain and swelling in the right breast, nodules in the right axilla and restriction of movement of the right upper limb. The patient was referred for 18 F-FDG PET/CT to evaluate the extent of recurrent/metastatic disease. Whole-body PET/CT was acquired 1 h following the intravenous injection of 296 MBq of 18 F-FDG on a Biograph mCT scanner (Siemens). Evaluation of the MIP image revealed abnormal FDG accumulation at multiple sites in the thorax, along with a linear pattern of FDG uptake in the right lateral aspect of the upper chest (Fig. 1a, arrow). The coronal fused PET/CT image revealed a linear pattern of FDG uptake corresponding to an ill-defined mass extending from just behind the right clavicle into the right axilla (arrow). In addition, abnormal FDG accumulation was seen in a soft tissue density mass in the upper outer quadrant of the right breast, skin of the right breast laterally, both pectoral muscles (discrete foci) and in a few subpectoral nodes. Soft tissue nodular opacities in both lungs showed FDG accumulation suggestive of pulmonary metastasis (Fig. 1b, thick arrow). The patient was referred for magnetic

  4. Dedicated breast CT: radiation dose for circle-plus-line trajectory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vedantham, Srinivasan; Shi, Linxi; Karellas, Andrew; Noo, Frederic

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Dedicated breast CT prototypes used in clinical investigations utilize single circular source trajectory and cone-beam geometry with flat-panel detectors that do not satisfy data-sufficiency conditions and could lead to cone beam artifacts. Hence, this work investigated the glandular dose characteristics of a circle-plus-line trajectory that fulfills data-sufficiency conditions for image reconstruction in dedicated breast CT. Methods: Monte Carlo-based computer simulations were performed using the GEANT4 toolkit and was validated with previously reported normalized glandular dose coefficients for one prototype breast CT system. Upon validation, Monte Carlo simulations were performed to determine the normalized glandular dose coefficients as a function of x-ray source position along the line scan. The source-to-axis of rotation distance and the source-to-detector distance were maintained constant at 65 and 100 cm, respectively, in all simulations. The ratio of the normalized glandular dose coefficient at each source position along the line scan to that for the circular scan, defined as relative normalized glandular dose coefficient (RD g N), was studied by varying the diameter of the breast at the chest wall, chest-wall to nipple distance, skin thickness, x-ray beam energy, and glandular fraction of the breast. Results: The RD g N metric when stated as a function of source position along the line scan, relative to the maximum length of line scan needed for data sufficiency, was found to be minimally dependent on breast diameter, chest-wall to nipple distance, skin thickness, glandular fraction, and x-ray photon energy. This observation facilitates easy estimation of the average glandular dose of the line scan. Polynomial fit equations for computing the RD g N and hence the average glandular dose are provided. Conclusions: For a breast CT system that acquires 300-500 projections over 2π for the circular scan, the addition of a line trajectory with equal

  5. Three-dimensional helical CT for treatment planning of breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiramatsu, Hideko; Enomoto, Kohji; Ikeda, Tadashi [Keio Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine] [and others

    1999-01-01

    The role of three-dimensional (3D) helical CT in the treatment planning of breast cancer was evaluated. Of 36 patients examined, 30 had invasive ductal carcinoma, three had invasive lobular carcinoma, one had DCIS, one had DCIS with minimal invasion, and 1 had Paget`s disease. Patients were examined in the supine position. The whole breast was scanned under about 25 seconds of breath-holding using helical CT (Proceed, Yokogawa Medical Systems, or High-speed Advantage, GE Medical Systems). 3D imaging was obtained with computer assistance (Advantage Windows, GE Medical Systems). Linear and/or spotty enhancement on helical CT was considered to suggest DCIS or intraductal spread in the area surrounding the invasive cancer. Of 36 patients, 24 showed linear and/or spotty enhancement on helical CT, and 22 of those 24 patients had DCIS or intraductal spread. In contrast, 12 of 36 patients were considered to have little or no intraductal spread on helical CT, and eight of the 12 patients had little or no intraductal spread on pathological examination. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy rates for detecting intraductal spread on MRI were 85%, 80%, and 83%, respectively. 3D helical CT was considered useful in detecting intraductal spread and planning surgery, however, a larger study using a precise correlation with pathology is necessary. (author)

  6. Combined use of 18F-FDG PET/CT and MRI for response monitoring of breast cancer during neoadjuvant chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pengel, Kenneth E.; Loo, Claudette E.; Koolen, Bas B.; Vogel, Wouter V.; Valdes Olmos, Renato A.; Wesseling, Jelle; Lips, Esther H.; Rutgers, Emiel J.T.; Vrancken Peeters, Marie Jeanne T.F.D.; Rodenhuis, Sjoerd; Gilhuijs, Kenneth G.A.

    2014-01-01

    To explore the potential complementary value of PET/CT and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI in predicting pathological response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) of breast cancer and the dependency on breast cancer subtype. We performed 18 F-FDG PET/CT and MRI examinations before and during NAC. The imaging features evaluated on both examinations included baseline and changes in 18 F-FDG maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) on PET/CT, and tumour morphology and contrast uptake kinetics on MRI. The outcome measure was a (near) pathological complete response ((near-)pCR) after surgery. Receiver operating characteristic curves with area under the curve (AUC) were used to evaluate the relationships between patient, tumour and imaging characteristics and tumour responses. Of 93 patients, 43 achieved a (near-)pCR. The responses varied among the different breast cancer subtypes. On univariate analysis the following variables were significantly associated with (near-)pCR: age (p = 0.033), breast cancer subtype (p < 0.001), relative change in SUVmax on PET/CT (p < 0.001) and relative change in largest tumour diameter on MRI (p < 0.001). The AUC for the relative reduction in SUVmax on PET/CT was 0.78 (95 % CI 0.68-0.88), and for the relative reduction in tumour diameter at late enhancement on MRI was 0.79 (95 % CI 0.70-0.89). The AUC increased to 0.90 (95 % CI 0.83-0.96) in the final multivariate model with PET/CT, MRI and breast cancer subtype combined (p = 0.012). PET/CT and MRI showed comparable value for monitoring response during NAC. Combined use of PET/CT and MRI had complementary potential. Research with more patients is required to further elucidate the dependency on breast cancer subtype. (orig.)

  7. Metastatic Breast Lesion to the Falx Detected with PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, Chester; Schuster, David M. [Emory Univ., Atlanta (United States)

    2012-06-15

    Intracranial dural metastasis is increasingly encountered in imaging. Autopsies conducted on patients with advanced metastatic disease demonstrate dural involvement in 9% of cases, with breast and prostate cancer the most common primaries. Awareness of this entity and imaging appearances is especially important in evaluating malignancies prone to dural metastasis. A 57-year-old woman with a strong family history of breast cancer initially presented after self-detection of a right breast lump. Subsequent mammogram and biopsies yielded a diagnosis of right infiltrating ductal carcinoma with a positive lymph node as well as left invasive lobular carcinoma. Initial staging PET-CT (not shown) at the time of diagnosis demonstrated no abnormal FDG uptake remote from the breast. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy was instituted, and a PET-CT was obtained to evaluate disease response, demonstrating an approximately 1.8 cm hypermetabolic intra-cranial mass, localized to the region of the anterior corpus callosum on axian PET (Fig. 1a), axial fused PET-CT (Fig. 1b), and sagittal fused PET-CT (Fig. 1c) with a maximum SUV of 15.9. There was associated bifrontal vasogenic edema (Fig. 1d) on the CT demonstrated on brain windows. Marked progression of disease was noted elsewhere, including hypermetabolic adenopathy and skeletal disease. A contrast-enhanced MRI of the brain was obtained demonstrating extensive T1 hypointensity, T2, and FLAIR (Fig. 2a) hyperintensity in the bilateral paramedian frontallobes representing vasogenic edema. Post-contrast imaging demonstrated three solidly enhancing masses in the areas of described vasogenic edema, one large extra-axial and two sub-centimeter parenchymal lesions. The large extra-axial and two sub-centimeter parenchymal lesions. The large extra-axial mass demonstrated homogeneous solid enhancement, in the midline anteriorly centered on the falx, just superior to the anterior corpus callosum. This measured 1.7cm transverse x 3.1cm AP x 2.4cm

  8. Evaluation of the Significance of Incidental Breast Lesions Detected by Chest CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae Hyun; Chang, Yun Woo; Hwang, Jung Hwa; Kim, Hyung Hwan; Lee, Eun Hye; Yang, Seung Boo

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the significance of incidentally detected breast lesions on a chest CT scan. Thirty-six incidental breast lesions in 26 patients were detected on a chest CT scan and were correlated with breast sonography, retrospectively. Among them, twenty-four breast lesions in 20 patients that were correlated with chest CT and sonography were available to pathology or follow up sonography. The CT findings were compared with sonographic findings according to the pathologic results. Incidentally detected breast lesions on a chest CT scan were correlated with sonography in 86% (31/36). Among 24 lesions that were available to pathology or follow up sonography, seven (29.2%) lesions were malignant and 17 (70.8%) lesions were benign. CT revealed a significant difference between benign and malignant lesions in terms of shape and margin (p = 0.007; p = 0.008, respectively). The CT findings were well correlated with sonographic findings in shape and margin (p = 0.001, respectively). Incidentally detected breast lesions on chest CT can be correlated with sonography. An irregular shape or a non-circumscribed margin of breast lesions on a CT scan can be considered as a suggestive sign of malignancy.

  9. Prediction of sentinel lymph node status using single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/computed tomography (CT) imaging of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomiguchi, Mai; Yamamoto-Ibusuki, Mutsuko; Yamamoto, Yutaka; Fujisue, Mamiko; Shiraishi, Shinya; Inao, Touko; Murakami, Kei-ichi; Honda, Yumi; Yamashita, Yasuyuki; Iyama, Ken-ichi; Iwase, Hirotaka

    2016-02-01

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/computed tomography (CT) improves the anatomical identification of sentinel lymph nodes (SNs). We aimed to evaluate the possibility of predicting the SN status using SPECT/CT. SN mapping using a SPECT/CT system was performed in 381 cases of clinically node-negative, operable invasive breast cancer. We evaluated and compared the values of SN mapping on SPECT/CT, the findings of other modalities and clinicopathological factors in predicting the SN status. Patients with SNs located in the Level I area were evaluated. Of the 355 lesions (94.8 %) assessed, six cases (1.6 %) were not detected using any imaging method. According to the final histological diagnosis, 298 lesions (78.2 %) were node negative and 83 lesions (21.7 %) were node positive. The univariate analysis showed that SN status was significantly correlated with the number of SNs detected on SPECT/CT in the Level I area (P = 0.0048), total number of SNs detected on SPECT/CT (P = 0.011), findings of planar lymphoscintigraphy (P = 0.011) and findings of a handheld gamma probe during surgery (P = 0.012). According to the multivariate analysis, the detection of multiple SNs on SPECT/CT imaging helped to predict SN metastasis. The number of SNs located in the Level I area detected using the SPECT/CT system may be a predictive factor for SN metastasis.

  10. Focal breast lesions in clinical CT examinations of the chest. A retrospective analysis; Senologische Befunde bei CT-Untersuchungen des Thorax. Eine retrospektive Auswertung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krug, Kathrin Barbara; Houbois, Christian; Grinstein, Olga; Borggrefe, Jan; Puesken, Michael; Maintz, David [Cologne Univ. Medical School, Cologne (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostical and Interventional Radiology; Hanstein, Bettina; Malter, Wolfram [Cologne Univ. Medical School, Cologne (Germany). Breast Center and Dept. of Obstetrics and Gynecology; Hellmich, Martin [Cologne Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Medical Statistics, Informatics and Epidemiology

    2017-10-15

    Based on radiological reports, the percentage of breast cancers visualized as incidental findings in routine CT examinations is estimated at ≤2%. In view of the rising number of CT examinations and the high prevalence of breast cancer, it was the goal of the present study to verify the frequency and image morphology of false-negative senological CT findings. All first contrast-enhanced CT examinations of the chest in adult female patients carried out in 2012 were retrospectively included. A senior radiologist systematically assessed the presence of breast lesions on all CT images using the BI-RADS system. All BI-RADS ≥3 notations were evaluated by a second senior radiologist. A consensus was obtained in case of differing BI-RADS assessments. Reference diagnoses were elaborated based on all available clinical, radiological and pathological data. The findings of the CT reports were classified according to the BI-RADS system and were compared with the retrospective consensus findings as well as with the reference diagnoses. The range of indications comprised a broad spectrum including staging and follow-up examinations of solid tumors/lymphoma (N = 701, 59.9 %) and vascular (190, 16.2 %), inflammatory (48, 4.1 %) and pulmonologic (22, 1.9 %) issues. BI-RADS 1/2 classifications were present in 92.5 % and BI-RADS 6 classifications were assessed in 1.7 % of the 1170 included examinations. 68 patients (5.8 %) had at least one lesion retrospectively classified as BI-RADS 3 - 5. The histological potential was known in 57 of these lesions as benign (46, 3.9 %) or malignant (11, 0.9 %). 13 BI-RADS 4/5 consensus assessments (1.1 %) were false-positive. 2 of the 10 lesions classified as being malignant based on the further clinical and radiological course were not mentioned in the written CT reports (0.2 %). Both false-negative CT reports were therapeutically and prognostically irrelevant. The relative frequency of BI-RADS 3 - 5 findings was 5.8 %. It reflects the situation

  11. Combined approach of perioperative 18F-FDG PET/CT imaging and intraoperative 18F-FDG handheld gamma probe detection for tumor localization and verification of complete tumor resection in breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knopp Michael V

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT has become an established method for detecting hypermetabolic sites of known and occult disease and is widely used in oncology surgical planning. Intraoperatively, it is often difficult to localize tumors and verify complete resection of tumors that have been previously detected on diagnostic PET/CT at the time of the original evaluation of the cancer patient. Therefore, we propose an innovative approach for intraoperative tumor localization and verification of complete tumor resection utilizing 18F-FDG for perioperative PET/CT imaging and intraoperative gamma probe detection. Methods Two breast cancer patients were evaluated. 18F-FDG was administered and PET/CT was acquired immediately prior to surgery. Intraoperatively, tumors were localized and resected with the assistance of a handheld gamma probe. Resected tumors were scanned with specimen PET/CT prior to pathologic processing. Shortly after the surgical procedure, patients were re-imaged with PET/CT utilizing the same preoperatively administered 18F-FDG dose. Results One patient had primary carcinoma of breast and a metastatic axillary lymph node. The second patient had a solitary metastatic liver lesion. In both cases, preoperative PET/CT verified these findings and demonstrated no additional suspicious hypermetabolic lesions. Furthermore, intraoperative gamma probe detection, specimen PET/CT, and postoperative PET/CT verified complete resection of the hypermetabolic lesions. Conclusion Immediate preoperative and postoperative PET/CT imaging, utilizing the same 18F-FDG injection dose, is feasible and image quality is acceptable. Such perioperative PET/CT imaging, along with intraoperative gamma probe detection and specimen PET/CT, can be used to verify complete tumor resection. This innovative approach demonstrates promise for assisting the oncologic surgeon in localizing and

  12. Breast cancer with low FDG uptake: Characterization by means of dual-time point FDG-PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zytoon, Ashraf Anas; Murakami, Koji; El-Kholy, Mohamed Ramdan; El-Shorbagy, Emad; Ebied, Osama

    2009-01-01

    Background: Malignant breast lesions usually are differentiated by FDG-PET with a semiquantitative FDG standardized uptake value (SUV) of 2.5. However, the frequency of breast cancer with an SUV of less than or equal to 2.5 is noteworthy, and often present diagnostic challenges. This study was undertaken to evaluate the accuracy of dual-time point FDG-PET/CT with FDG standardized uptake value (SUV) calculation in the characterization of such breast tumors. Methods: Forty-nine female patients with newly diagnosed breast cancer were found to have primary breast cancer with minimally increased FDG uptake and met the criteria for inclusion in this study by having borderline levels of increased FDG uptake (SUVmax less than or equal to 2.5) in the initial FDG-PET/CT images. Consequently, they underwent further delayed phase FDG-PET/CT scan for better evaluation of the disease. Results: Of the 49 cancer lesions; the majority were found to have rising or unvarying dual-time changes in SUVmax (75.5%). The median value of SUVmax increases by 25% between the early and delayed scan. The means ± S.D. of the SUVmax1, the SUVmax2, and the ΔSUVmax% were 1.2 ± 0.6%, 1.3 ± 0.9%, and 5.1 ± 22.4%, respectively. The receiver-operating-characteristic (ROC) analysis proved that the highest accuracy for characterization of malignant breast lesions was obtained when a ΔSUVmax% cut-off value 0.0% was used as criteria for malignant FDG uptake-change over time with sensitivity 75.5%, and false-positive rate 20.4%. Conclusion: These results suggested that dual-time FDG-PET/CT imaging with standardized uptake value (SUV) estimation can improve the accuracy of the test in the evaluation of breast cancer with low FDG uptake.

  13. Image Registration for PET/CT and CT Images with Particle Swarm Optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hak Jae; Kim, Yong Kwon; Lee, Ki Sung; Choi, Jong Hak; Kim, Chang Kyun; Moon, Guk Hyun; Joo, Sung Kwan; Kim, Kyeong Min; Cheon, Gi Jeong

    2009-01-01

    Image registration is a fundamental task in image processing used to match two or more images. It gives new information to the radiologists by matching images from different modalities. The objective of this study is to develop 2D image registration algorithm for PET/CT and CT images acquired by different systems at different times. We matched two CT images first (one from standalone CT and the other from PET/CT) that contain affluent anatomical information. Then, we geometrically transformed PET image according to the results of transformation parameters calculated by the previous step. We have used Affine transform to match the target and reference images. For the similarity measure, mutual information was explored. Use of particle swarm algorithm optimized the performance by finding the best matched parameter set within a reasonable amount of time. The results show good agreements of the images between PET/CT and CT. We expect the proposed algorithm can be used not only for PET/CT and CT image registration but also for different multi-modality imaging systems such as SPECT/CT, MRI/PET and so on.

  14. Novel CT and scintigraphic findings of bone metastasis from invasive lobular breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ogaili, Zeyad; Troedson, Russell

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study is to identify and describe the computed tomography and scintigraphic imaging patterns of osseous metastasis from invasive lobular breast cancer (ILC). CT and skeletal scintigraphy (SS) studies of 23 patients with diagnosis of ILC and osseous metastasis on their initial presentation were reviewed. Osseous metastases in 14 patients (60.8%) appear as uniform small sclerotic lesions (USSL) on CT scan. The SS in these patients were interpreted as negative for metastasis (either normal or with some equivocal findings not typical for metastasis). Osseous metastasis from ILC can have a characteristic imaging pattern on CT and SS. The pattern of USSL on CT scan with negative SS is highly suggestive of osseous metastasis from ILC. © 2015 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  15. Evaluation of the efficiency of bismuth breast shield in CT chest paediatric examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevillano, D.; Espana, M. L.; Castro, P.; Minguez, C.; Albi, G.; Garcia, E.; Lopez Franco, P.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficiency of bismuth breast shield in CT chest paediatric examinations when automatic exposure control techniques are used. The influence in the radiation dose and the image quality has been evaluated with and without the breast shield in the scoutview. In addition the radiation dose in shielded and non-shielded areas has been compared. Measurements were made in a 16 cm diameter cylindrical PMMA phantom simulating a newborn, and older children were simulated controlling the maximum intensities allowed by the automatic exposure control system AutomA. The highest dose reduction (59%) was obtained with AutomA system and when the breast shield is not used in the scoutview. This reduction in the radiation dose does not mean a significant increase of noise level. The use of the breast shield in the scoutview yielded an increase in the radiation dose in non-shielded areas. The use of bismuth breast shield is recommended only after the scoutview in order to optimise the radiation dose in CT chest paediatric examination when using automatic exposure control AutomA. (Author)

  16. Comparison of FDG-PET/CT and bone scintigraphy for detection of bone metastases in breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, Steffen; Heusner, Till; Forsting, Michael; Antoch, Gerald (Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Univ. Hospital Essen, Univ. Duisburg-Essen, Essen (Germany)), email: steffen.hahn@uk-essen.de; Kuemmel, Sherko; Koeninger, Angelika (Dept. of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Univ. Hospital Essen, Univ. Duisburg-Essen, Essen (Germany)); Nagarajah, James; Mueller, Stefan; Boy, Christian; Bockisch, Andreas; Stahl, Alexander (Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Univ. Hospital Essen, Univ. Duisburg-Essen, Essen (Germany))

    2011-11-15

    Background Bone scintigraphy is the standard procedure for the detection of bone metastases in breast cancer patients. FDG-PET/CT has been reported to be a sensitive tool for tumor staging in different malignant diseases. However, its accuracy for the detection of bone metastases has not been compared to bone scintigraphy. Purpose To compare whole-body FDG-PET/CT and bone scintigraphy for the detection of bone metastases on a lesion basis in breast cancer patients. Material and Methods Twenty-nine consecutive women (mean age 58 years, range 35-78 years) with histologically proven breast cancer were assessed with bone scintigraphy and whole-body FDG-PET/CT. Twenty-one patients (72%) were suffering from primary breast cancer and eight patients (28%) were in aftercare with a history of advanced breast cancer. Both imaging procedures were assessed for bone metastases by a radiologist and a nuclear medicine physician. Concordant readings between bone scintigraphy and FDG-PET/CT were taken as true. Discordant readings were verified with additional MRI imaging in all patients and follow-up studies in most patients. Results A total of 132 lesions were detected on bone scintigraphy, FDG-PET/CT or both. According to the reference standard, 70/132 lesions (53%) were bone metastases, 59/132 lesions (45%) were benign, and three lesions (2%) remained unclear. The sensitivity of bone scintigraphy was 76% (53/70) compared to 96% (67/70) for FDG-PET/CT. The specificity of bone scintigraphy and FDG-PET/CT was 95% (56/59) and 92% (54/59), respectively. According to the reference standard bone metastases were present in eight out of the 29 patients (28%), whereas 20 patients (69%) were free of bone metastases. One (3%) patient had inconclusive readings on both modalities as well as on MRI and follow-up studies. Bone scintigraphy and FDG-PET/CT correctly identified seven out of eight patients with bone metastases and 20 out of 20 patients free of metastases. Conclusion On a lesion

  17. The value of delayed 18F-FDG PET/CT imaging for differentiating axillary lymph nodes in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji, Young Sik; Son, Ju Cheol; Park, Cheol Woo

    2013-01-01

    Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging with fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) have been used as a powerful fusion modality in nuclear medicine not only for detecting cancer but also for staging and therapy monitoring. Nevertheless, there are various causes of FDG uptake in normal and/or benign tissues. The purpose of present study was to investigate whether additional delayed imaging can improve the diagnosis to differentiate the rates of FDG uptake at axillary lymph nodes (ALN) between malignant and benign in breast cancer patients. 180 PET/CT images were obtained for 27 patients with ALN uptake. The patients who had radiotherapy and chemotherapy were excluded from the study. 18 F-FDG PET/CT scan at 50 min (early phase) and 90 min (delayed phase) after 18 F-FDG injection were included in this retrospective study. The staging of cancers was confirmed by final clinical according to radiologic follow-up and pathologic findings. The standardized uptake value (SUV) of ALN was measured at the Syngo Acquisition Workplace by Siemens. The 27 patients included 18 malignant and 9 ALN benign groups and the 18 malignant groups were classified into the 3 groups according to number of metastatic ALN in each patient. ALNs were categorized less than or equal 3 as N1, between 4 to 9 as N2 and more than 10 as N3 group. Results are expressed as the mean ± standard deviation (S.D.) and statistically analyzed by SPSS. As a result, Retention index (RI-SUV max) in metastasis was significantly higher than that in non-metastasis about 5 fold increased. On the other hand, RI-SUV max in N group tended to decrease gradually from N1 to N3. However, we could not prove significance statistically in malignant group with ANOVA. As a consequence, RI-SUV max was good indicator for differentiating ALN positive group from node negative group in breast cancer patients. These results show that dual-time-point scan appears to be useful in distinguishing malignant from benign

  18. Estimation of breast dose and cancer risk in chest and abdomen CT procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eltahir, Suha Abubaker Ali

    2013-05-01

    The use of CT in medical diagnosis delivers radiation doses to patents that are higher than those from other radiological procedures. Lack of optimized protocols be an additional source of increased dose in developing countries. The aims of this study are first, to measure patient doses during CT chest and abdomen procedures, second, to estimate the radiation dose to the breast, and third to quantify the radiation risks during the procedures. Patient doses from two common CT examinations were obtained from four hospitals in Khartoum.The patient doses were estimated using measurement of CT dose indexes (CTDI), exposure-related parameters, and the IMPACT spreadsheet based on NRPB conversion factors. A large variation of mean organ doses among hospitals was observed for similar CT examinations. These variations largely originated from different CT scanning protocols used in different hospitals and scanner type. The largest range was found for CT of the chest, for which the dose varied from 2.3 to 47 (average 24.7) mSv and for abdomen CT, it was 1.6 to 18.8 (average 10.2) mSv. Radiation dose to the breast ranged from 1.6 to 32.9 mSv for the chest and 1.1 to 13.2 mSv for the abdomen. The radiation risk per procedure was high. The obtained values were mostly higher than the values of organ doses reported from the other studies. It was concluded that current clinical chest and abdomen protocols result in variable radiation doses to the breast. The magnitude of exposure may have implications for imaging strategies.(Author)

  19. Multiparametric and molecular imaging of breast tumors with MRI and PET/MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinker, K.; Marino, M.A.; Meyer-Baese, A.; Helbich, T.H.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the breast is an indispensable tool in breast imaging for many indications. Several functional parameters with MRI and positron emission tomography (PET) have been assessed for imaging of breast tumors and their combined application is defined as multiparametric imaging. Available data suggest that multiparametric imaging using different functional MRI and PET parameters can provide detailed information about the hallmarks of cancer and may provide additional specificity. Multiparametric and molecular imaging of the breast comprises established MRI parameters, such as dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI, diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), MR proton spectroscopy ( 1 H-MRSI) as well as combinations of radiological and MRI techniques (e.g. PET/CT and PET/MRI) using radiotracers, such as fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). Multiparametric and molecular imaging of the breast can be performed at different field-strengths (range 1.5-7 T). Emerging parameters comprise novel promising techniques, such as sodium imaging ( 23 Na MRI), phosphorus spectroscopy ( 31 P-MRSI), chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) imaging, blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) and hyperpolarized MRI as well as various specific radiotracers. Multiparametric and molecular imaging has multiple applications in breast imaging. Multiparametric and molecular imaging of the breast is an evolving field that will enable improved detection, characterization, staging and monitoring for personalized medicine in breast cancer. (orig.) [de

  20. TU-EF-207-00: Advances in Breast Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2015-06-15

    mode due to lower photon fluence per projection. This may require fast-frame acquisition and symmetric or asymmetric pixel binning in some systems. Recent studies investigated the performance of increased conversion layer thickness for contrast-enhanced imaging of the breast in dual-energy acquisition mode. In other direct conversion detectors operating in the avalanche mode, sensitivities close to the single photon response are also explored for mammography and breast tomosynthesis. The potential advantages and challenges of this approach are described. Dedicated breast CT brings x-ray imaging of the breast to true tomographic 3D imaging. It can eliminate the tissue superposition problem and does not require physical compression of the breast. Using cone beam geometry and a flat-panel detector, several hundred projections are acquired and reconstructed to near isotropic voxels. Multiplanar reconstruction facilitates viewing the breast volume in any desired orientation. Ongoing clinical studies, the current state-of-the art, and research to advance the technology are described. Learning Objectives: To understand the ongoing developments in x-ray imaging of the breast To understand the approaches and applications of spectral mammography To understand the potential advantages of distributed x-ray source arrays for digital breast tomosynthesis To understand the ongoing developments in detector technology for digital mammography and breast tomosynthesis To understand the current state-of-the-art for dedicated cone-beam breast CT and research to advance the technology. Research collaboration with Koning Corporation.

  1. Disseminated osteomyelitis or bone metastases of breast cancer. 18F-FDG-PET/CT helps unravel an unusual presentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandegaran, Ramin; Wagner, Thomas; Debard, Alexa; Alvarez, Muriel; Marchou, Bruno; Massip, Patrice

    2014-01-01

    We present a case wherein striking 18 F-FDG-PET/CT findings initially considered consistent with recurrent disseminated skeletal metastases of breast cancer were later identified as an unusual presentation of disseminated chronic pyogenic osteomyelitis with Staphylococcus aureus and warneri identified on microbiological culture. A 76-year-old female with previous history of breast cancer presented with a 6-month history of pyrexia, myalgia and weight loss. Besides neutrophilia and elevated C-reactive protein, other blood indices, cultures and conventional imaging failed to identify the cause of pyrexia of unknown origin (PUO). 18 F-FDG-PET/CT demonstrated multiple widespread foci of intense FDG uptake in lytic lesions throughout the skeleton. Coupled with previous history of malignancy, findings were strongly suggestive of disseminated metastases of breast cancer. Through targeting an FDG avid lesion, 18 F-FDG-PET/CT aided CT-guided biopsy, which instead identified the lesions as chronic pyogenic osteomyelitis. Following prolonged antibiotic therapy, repeat 18 F-FDG-PET/CT demonstrated significant resolution of lesions. This case demonstrated an unusual presentation of disseminated osteomyelitis on 18 F-FDG-PET/CT and highlighted the use of 18 F-FDG-PET/CT as a trouble shooter in PUO but demonstrated that unusual presentations of benign or malignant pathologies cannot always reliably be differentiated on imaging alone without aid of tissue sampling. Furthermore, this case highlights the potential role 18 F-FDG-PET/CT could provide in assessing response to antibiotic therapy. (author)

  2. Breast cancer imaging: A perspective for the next decade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karellas, Andrew; Vedantham, Srinivasan

    2008-01-01

    Breast imaging is largely indicated for detection, diagnosis, and clinical management of breast cancer and for evaluation of the integrity of breast implants. In this work, a prospective view of techniques for breast cancer detection and diagnosis is provided based on an assessment of current trends. The potential role of emerging techniques that are under various stages of research and development is also addressed. It appears that the primary imaging tool for breast cancer screening in the next decade will be high-resolution, high-contrast, anatomical x-ray imaging with or without depth information. MRI and ultrasonography will have an increasingly important adjunctive role for imaging high-risk patients and women with dense breasts. Pilot studies with dedicated breast CT have demonstrated high-resolution three-dimensional imaging capabilities, but several technological barriers must be overcome before clinical adoption. Radionuclide based imaging techniques and x-ray imaging with intravenously injected contrast offer substantial potential as a diagnostic tools and for evaluation of suspicious lesions. Developing optical and electromagnetic imaging techniques hold significant potential for physiologic information and they are likely to be of most value when integrated with or adjunctively used with techniques that provide anatomic information. Experimental studies with breast specimens suggest that phase-sensitive x-ray imaging techniques can provide edge enhancement and contrast improvement but more research is needed to evaluate their potential role in clinical breast imaging. From the technological perspective, in addition to improvements within each modality, there is likely to be a trend towards multi-modality systems that combine anatomic with physiologic information. We are also likely to transition from a standardized screening, where all women undergo the same imaging exam (mammography), to selection of a screening modality or modalities based an

  3. Breast cancer imaging: A perspective for the next decade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karellas, Andrew; Vedantham, Srinivasan [Department of Radiology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA 01655 (United States)

    2008-11-15

    Breast imaging is largely indicated for detection, diagnosis, and clinical management of breast cancer and for evaluation of the integrity of breast implants. In this work, a prospective view of techniques for breast cancer detection and diagnosis is provided based on an assessment of current trends. The potential role of emerging techniques that are under various stages of research and development is also addressed. It appears that the primary imaging tool for breast cancer screening in the next decade will be high-resolution, high-contrast, anatomical x-ray imaging with or without depth information. MRI and ultrasonography will have an increasingly important adjunctive role for imaging high-risk patients and women with dense breasts. Pilot studies with dedicated breast CT have demonstrated high-resolution three-dimensional imaging capabilities, but several technological barriers must be overcome before clinical adoption. Radionuclide based imaging techniques and x-ray imaging with intravenously injected contrast offer substantial potential as a diagnostic tools and for evaluation of suspicious lesions. Developing optical and electromagnetic imaging techniques hold significant potential for physiologic information and they are likely to be of most value when integrated with or adjunctively used with techniques that provide anatomic information. Experimental studies with breast specimens suggest that phase-sensitive x-ray imaging techniques can provide edge enhancement and contrast improvement but more research is needed to evaluate their potential role in clinical breast imaging. From the technological perspective, in addition to improvements within each modality, there is likely to be a trend towards multi-modality systems that combine anatomic with physiologic information. We are also likely to transition from a standardized screening, where all women undergo the same imaging exam (mammography), to selection of a screening modality or modalities based an

  4. The current status of imaging diagnosis of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Fang; Tang Guangcai

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, the incidence and the mortality rate of female breast cancer in our country is increasing, Early diagnosis of breast cancer is particularly important. Precious preoperative staging in the breast cancer is advantageous for the treatment planning. Evaluating the efficacy of chemotherapy is beneficial for adjusting the follow-up plan. Imaging examination has become an important role in breast cancer management. At present, commonly used equipment include mammography, ultrasound, CT, and MRI, etc. This article reviews the present study status of these tools in diagnosis of breast cancer. A reasonable and effective choice of those tools can facilitate clinic diagnosis and treatment. (authors)

  5. Discordant Findings of Skeletal Metastasis Between Tc99m MDP Bone Scans and F18 FDG PET/CT Imaging for Advanced Breast and Lung Cancers—Two Case Reports and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Wen Chen

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, Tc99m methyl diphosphate (MDP bone scintigraphy provides high-sensitivity detection of skeletal metastasis from breast and lung cancers in regular follow-up. Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT, based on the glucose metabolism of malignant cells, plays a role in describing rumor growth, proliferation of neoplasm and the extent of metastasis. In general, concordant findings of skeletal metastasis are seen on both types of image, especially in cases of breast and lung cancer. However, there were extremely discordant findings of skeletal metastasis between bone scans and F18 FDG PET/CT imaging in two cases among 300 consecutive F18 FDG PET/CT follow-up exams of patients with malignancies, during the past year, in our center. Both cases, one of breast cancer and one of lung cancer, had negative bone scintigraphic findings, but a diffusely high grade of F18 FDG avid marrow infiltration in the axial spine, leading to the diagnosis of stage IV disease in both cases. Owing to variant genetic aberrance of malignance, F18 FDG PET/CT reveals direct evidence of diffuse, rapid neoplasm metabolism in the bone marrow of the spine, but not of secondary osteoblastic reactions in vivo. F18 FDG PET/CT should always be employed in the follow-up of patients with malignancies.

  6. Dual-time FDG-PET/CT in patients with potential breast cancer recurrence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baun, Christina; Falch Braas, Kirsten; Gerke, Oke

    Dual-time FDG-PET/CT in patients with potential breast cancer recurrence: head-to-head comparison with CT and bonescintigraphy......Dual-time FDG-PET/CT in patients with potential breast cancer recurrence: head-to-head comparison with CT and bonescintigraphy...

  7. PET imaging in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bombardieri, E.; Crippa, F.

    2001-01-01

    The basis of tumour imaging with PET is a specific uptake mechanism of positron emitting radiopharmaceuticals. Among the potential tracers for breast cancer (fluorodeoxyglucose, methionine, tyrosine, fluoro-estradiol, nor-progesterone), 2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose labelled with fluorine (FDG) is the most widely used radiopharmaceutical because breast cancer is particularly avid of FDG and 18 F has the advantages of the a relatively long physical half-life. Mammography is the first choice examination in studying breast masses, due to its very good performances, an excellent compliance and the best value regarding the cost/effectiveness aspects. The FDG uptake in tissue correlates with the histological grade and potential aggressiveness of breast cancer and this may have prognostic consequences. Besides the evaluation of breast lesions, FDG-PET shows a great efficacy in staging lymph node involvement prior surgery and this could have a great value in loco-regional staging. Whole body PET provides also information with regard to metastasis localizations both in soft tissue and bone, and plays an important clinical role mainly in detecting recurrent metastatic disease. In fact for its metabolic characteristics PET visualizes regions of enhanced metabolic activity and can complete other imaging modalities based on structural anatomic changes. Even though CT and MRI show superior resolution characteristics, it has been demonstrated that PET provides more accurate information in discriminating between viable tumour, fibrotic scar or necrosis. These statements are coming from the examination of more than 2000 breast cancer detection

  8. Preoperative PET/CT in early-stage breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernsdorf, M; Berthelsen, A K; Timmermans-Wielenga, Vera

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the diagnostic and therapeutic impact of preoperative positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT) in the initial staging of patients with early-stage breast cancer.......The aim of this study was to assess the diagnostic and therapeutic impact of preoperative positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT) in the initial staging of patients with early-stage breast cancer....

  9. The value of delayed {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT imaging for differentiating axillary lymph nodes in breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Young Sik; Son, Ju Cheol [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Dongnam Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences Cancer Center, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Park, Cheol Woo [Dept. of Radiological Technology Dong-Eui Institute of Technology, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging with fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) have been used as a powerful fusion modality in nuclear medicine not only for detecting cancer but also for staging and therapy monitoring. Nevertheless, there are various causes of FDG uptake in normal and/or benign tissues. The purpose of present study was to investigate whether additional delayed imaging can improve the diagnosis to differentiate the rates of FDG uptake at axillary lymph nodes (ALN) between malignant and benign in breast cancer patients. 180 PET/CT images were obtained for 27 patients with ALN uptake. The patients who had radiotherapy and chemotherapy were excluded from the study. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT scan at 50 min (early phase) and 90 min (delayed phase) after {sup 18}F-FDG injection were included in this retrospective study. The staging of cancers was confirmed by final clinical according to radiologic follow-up and pathologic findings. The standardized uptake value (SUV) of ALN was measured at the Syngo Acquisition Workplace by Siemens. The 27 patients included 18 malignant and 9 ALN benign groups and the 18 malignant groups were classified into the 3 groups according to number of metastatic ALN in each patient. ALNs were categorized less than or equal 3 as N1, between 4 to 9 as N2 and more than 10 as N3 group. Results are expressed as the mean ± standard deviation (S.D.) and statistically analyzed by SPSS. As a result, Retention index (RI-SUV max) in metastasis was significantly higher than that in non-metastasis about 5 fold increased. On the other hand, RI-SUV max in N group tended to decrease gradually from N1 to N3. However, we could not prove significance statistically in malignant group with ANOVA. As a consequence, RI-SUV max was good indicator for differentiating ALN positive group from node negative group in breast cancer patients. These results show that dual-time-point scan appears to be useful in distinguishing malignant from benign.

  10. Image-guided focal therapies for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marqa, Mohamad-Feras

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common in women, affecting one in ten women, by geographic area. Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation (APBI) is a new concept of postoperative irradiation after breast conserving surgery for cancer at low risk of local recurrence. In the first chapter of this thesis, we present the rational use of the APBI method as an alternative to the whole breast irradiation and then we discuss the principles, the benefits, and the drawbacks of the different techniques used. One of these techniques is the multi catheters high dose rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy. Multi catheter interstitial brachytherapy was the originally employed APBI technique and as a consequence has generated clinical experience with the longest follow-up duration, and with encouraging results. The accuracy of treatment planning system (TPS) in the source location and the dose calculation is absolutely necessary to ensure the planned dose. Sievert Integral and TG43 formalism provide quick and easy methods to check and to verify the dose calculated by the TPS. In the second chapter, we discuss a dose calculation and optimization tool for the APBI method using HDR sources. This tool simulates the dose from the parameters defined by the physicist. Often, the radiotherapist performs during the procedure a mental re-adjustment of catheters positions simulated on the CT images. This operation could lead to errors due to differences in breast form and catheters positions on the intra-operative ultrasound images compared to the planed one on CT images. In chapter three of this thesis, we propose a registration method between data from planning and the one from intra-operative ultrasound images as a solution that will allow to the radiotherapist to report planning data automatically on the brachytherapy template to visualize all data on the computer monitor. The APBI technique is considered an invasive and expensive method due to radiation protection reasons. Laser Interstitial

  11. Metastatic Brachial Plexopathy in a Case of Recurrent Breast Carcinoma Demonstrated on {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tripathi, Madhavi; Das, Chandan J.; Srivastava, Anurag; Bal, ChandraSekhar; Malhotra, Arun [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi (India)

    2014-03-15

    This case highlights the importance of recognition of the pattern of metastatic brachialplexopathy in breast cancer patients undergoing {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) for evaluation of recurrent disease.This pattern can be appreciated on maximum intensity projection (MIP) and coronal {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT images as a linear extension of tracer activity from superomedial aspect(supra/infraclavicular) to lateral aspect of the axilla closely related to the subclavian/axillary vessels). A 35-year-old woman diagnosed with infiltrating ductal carcinoma of the right breast had undergone six cycles of neoadjuvant chemotherapy, followed by wide local incision and radiotherapy. She had local recurrence, for which she was operated upon and given chemotherapy. She presented to her oncologist with pain and swelling in the right breast, nodules in the right axilla and restriction of movement of the right upper limb. The patient was referred for {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT to evaluate the extent of recurrent/metastatic disease. Whole-body PET/CT was acquired 1 h following the intravenous injection of 296 MBq of {sup 18}F-FDG on a Biograph mCT scanner (Siemens). Evaluation of the MIP image revealed abnormal FDG accumulation at multiple sites in the thorax, along with a linear pattern of FDG uptake in the right lateral aspect of the upper chest (Fig. 1a, arrow). The coronal fused PET/CT image revealed a linear pattern of FDG uptake corresponding to an ill-defined mass extending from just behind the right clavicle into the right axilla (arrow). In addition, abnormal FDG accumulation was seen in a soft tissue density mass in the upper outer quadrant of the right breast, skin of the right breast laterally, both pectoral muscles (discrete foci) and in a few subpectoral nodes. Soft tissue nodular opacities in both lungs showed FDG accumulation suggestive of pulmonary metastasis (Fig. 1b, thick arrow). The patient was

  12. Quantitative breast tissue characterization using grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willner, M.; Herzen, J.; Grandl, S.; Auweter, S.; Mayr, D.; Hipp, A.; Chabior, M.; Sarapata, A.; Achterhold, K.; Zanette, I.; Weitkamp, T.; Sztrókay, A.; Hellerhoff, K.; Reiser, M.; Pfeiffer, F.

    2014-04-01

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging has received growing interest in recent years due to its high capability in visualizing soft tissue. Breast imaging became the focus of particular attention as it is considered the most promising candidate for a first clinical application of this contrast modality. In this study, we investigate quantitative breast tissue characterization using grating-based phase-contrast computed tomography (CT) at conventional polychromatic x-ray sources. Different breast specimens have been scanned at a laboratory phase-contrast imaging setup and were correlated to histopathology. Ascertained tumor types include phylloides tumor, fibroadenoma and infiltrating lobular carcinoma. Identified tissue types comprising adipose, fibroglandular and tumor tissue have been analyzed in terms of phase-contrast Hounsfield units and are compared to high-quality, high-resolution data obtained with monochromatic synchrotron radiation, as well as calculated values based on tabulated tissue properties. The results give a good impression of the method’s prospects and limitations for potential tumor detection and the associated demands on such a phase-contrast breast CT system. Furthermore, the evaluated quantitative tissue values serve as a reference for simulations and the design of dedicated phantoms for phase-contrast mammography.

  13. {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT for systemic staging of newly diagnosed triple-negative breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulaner, Gary A.; Castillo, Raychel; Riedl, Christopher C.; Jochelson, Maxine S. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Weill Cornell Medical College, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Goldman, Debra A.; Goenen, Mithat [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, New York, NY (United States); Wills, Jonathan [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Information Systems, New York, NY (United States); Pinker-Domenig, Katja [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States)

    2016-10-15

    National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines recommend {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT, in addition to standard staging procedures, for systemic staging of newly diagnosed stage III breast cancer patients. However, factors in addition to stage may influence PET/CT utility. As breast cancers that are negative for estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and human epidermal growth factor receptor (triple-negative breast cancer, or TNBC) are more aggressive and metastasize earlier than other breast cancers, we hypothesized that receptor expression may be one such factor. This study assesses {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT for systemic staging of newly diagnosed TNBC. In this Institutional Review Board-approved retrospective study, our Healthcare Information System was screened for patients with TNBC who underwent {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT in 2007-2013 prior to systemic or radiation therapy. Initial stage was determined from mammography, ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, and/or surgery, if performed prior to {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT. {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT was evaluated to identify unsuspected extra-axillary regional nodal and distant metastases, as well as unsuspected synchronous malignancies. Kaplan Meier survival estimates were calculated for initial stage IIB patients stratified by whether or not stage 4 disease was detected by {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT. A total of 232 patients with TNBC met inclusion criteria. {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT revealed unsuspected distant metastases in 30 (13 %): 0/23 initial stage I, 4/82 (5 %) stage IIA, 13/87 (15 %) stage IIB, 4/23 (17 %) stage IIIA, 8/14 (57 %) stage IIIB, and 1/3 (33 %) stage IIIC. Twenty-six of 30 patients upstaged to IV by {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT were confirmed by pathology, with the remaining four patients confirmed by follow-up imaging. In addition, seven unsuspected synchronous malignancies were identified in six patients. Initial stage 2B patients who were upstaged to 4 by {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT had significantly shorter survival compared to

  14. Three-dimensional breast image reconstruction from a limited number of views

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCauley, Thomas G.; Stewart, Alexander X.; Stanton, Martin J.; Wu, Tao; Phillips, Walter C.

    2000-04-01

    Typically in three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) imaging, hundreds or thousands of x-ray projection images are recorded. The image-collection time and patient dose required rule out conventional CT as a tool for screening mammography. We have developed a CT method that overcomes these limitations by using (1) a novel image collection geometry, (2) new digital electronic x-ray detector technology, and (3) modern image reconstruction procedures. The method, which we call Computed Planar Mammography (CPM), is made possible by the full-field, low-noise, high-resolution CCD-based detector design that we have previously developed. With this method, we need to record only a limited number (10 - 50) of low-dose x- ray images of the breast. The resulting 3D full breast image has a resolution in two orientations equal to the full detector resolution (47 microns), and a lower, variable resolution (0.5 - 10 mm) in the third orientation. This 3D reconstructed image can then be viewed as a series of cross- sectional layers, or planes, each at the full detector resolution. Features due to overlapping tissue, which could not be differentiated in a conventional mammogram, are separated into layers at different depths. We demonstrate the features and capabilities of this method by presenting reconstructed images of phantoms and mastectomy specimens. Finally, we discuss outstanding issues related to the further development of this procedure, as well as considerations for its clinical implementation.

  15. Diffuse optical tomography for breast cancer imaging guided by computed tomography: A feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baikejiang, Reheman; Zhang, Wei; Li, Changqing

    2017-01-01

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) has attracted attentions in the last two decades due to its intrinsic sensitivity in imaging chromophores of tissues such as hemoglobin, water, and lipid. However, DOT has not been clinically accepted yet due to its low spatial resolution caused by strong optical scattering in tissues. Structural guidance provided by an anatomical imaging modality enhances the DOT imaging substantially. Here, we propose a computed tomography (CT) guided multispectral DOT imaging system for breast cancer imaging. To validate its feasibility, we have built a prototype DOT imaging system which consists of a laser at the wavelength of 650 nm and an electron multiplying charge coupled device (EMCCD) camera. We have validated the CT guided DOT reconstruction algorithms with numerical simulations and phantom experiments, in which different imaging setup parameters, such as projection number of measurements and width of measurement patch, have been investigated. Our results indicate that an air-cooling EMCCD camera is good enough for the transmission mode DOT imaging. We have also found that measurements at six angular projections are sufficient for DOT to reconstruct the optical targets with 2 and 4 times absorption contrast when the CT guidance is applied. Finally, we have described our future research plan on integration of a multispectral DOT imaging system into a breast CT scanner.

  16. Eighteen cases of small breast cancer: a comparative study of mammography, CT scan and pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Yaopan; Lin Haogao; Cai Peiqiang; Ouyang Yi; Zhang Weizhang; Lu Bingui

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To improve the early diagnosis of breast cancer through a study of the mammography and CT findings of small breast cancer. Methods: The mammography and CT findings of 18 cases of small breast cancer (φ≤2.0 cm in diameter) were studied and compared with pathological results. Results: The diagnostic accuracy of CT and mammography was 83% and 61%, respectively. There was a statistical difference between both modalities (P<0.05), CT scan was superior to mammography. However, there was no difference between them when assessing the lesion arising in F-type breast. In detecting breast fine cluster of calcification, the sensitivity of mammography was better than CT scan. Conclusion: The patient suspected of small breast cancer should take mammography as the first evaluation. CT scan is reserved for the further investigation. The mammography combined with CT scan can improve the early diagnostic rate of breast cancer

  17. Skeletal metastases from breast cancer: uptake of 18F-fluoride measured with positron emission tomography in correlation with CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petren-Mallmin, M.; Andreasson, I.; Bergh, J.; Ljunggren, Oe.; Ahlstroem, H.; Antoni, G.; Laangstroem, B.; Bergstroem, M.

    1998-01-01

    Objective. To characterise the uptake of 18 F in skeletal metastases from breast cancer using positron emission tomography (PET) and to relate these findings to the appearance on CT. Patients and design. PET with 18 F and CT were performed in five patients with multiple skeletal metastases from breast cancer. The CT characteristics were analysed in areas with high uptake on the PET study. Dynamic PET imaging of the skeletal kinetics of the 18 F-fluoride ion were included. Results. The areas of abnormal high accumulation of 18 F correlated well with the pathological appearance on CT. Lytic as well as sclerotic lesions had markedly higher uptake than normal bone, with a 5-10 times higher transport rate constant for trapping of the tracer in the metastatic lesions than in normal bone. Conclusion. PET with 18 F-fluoride demonstrates very high uptake in lytic and sclerotic breast cancer metastases. (orig.)

  18. Imaging diagnostics of breast metastases from extramammary tumors; Bildgebende Diagnostik bei Brustmetastasen extramammaerer Tumoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wienbeck, S.; Lotz, J. [Georg-August-Universitaet Goettingen, Institut fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Goettingen (Germany); Nemat, S. [Universitaet Homburg/Saar, Institut fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Homburg/Saar (Germany); Surov, A. [Universitaet Leipzig, Institut fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Leipzig (Germany)

    2017-06-15

    Breast metastases of solid extramammary tumors are very rare in comparison to primary malignancies of the breast and account for only 0.33-6.3% of all malignant neoplasms of the breast. The most common primary tumors are malignant melanoma, distant sarcomas, lung cancer, ovarian cancer, renal cell cancer and thyroid cancer in decreasing order of frequency. This review article summarizes the clinical features and the different imaging findings of breast metastases from different extramammary solid tumors. Breast metastases are often incidental findings in computed tomography (CT) or positron emission tomography CT (PET-CT) imaging. Mammography shows two different imaging patterns, namely focal lesions and diffuse architectural distortion with skin thickening. Breast metastases presenting as focal masses usually occur as solitary and more rarely as multiple round lesions with a smooth edge boundary. Associated calcifications are rare findings. Diffuse architectural distortion with skin thickening is more common in breast metastases from most gastric tumors, ovarian cancer and rhabdomyosarcoma. Using ultrasound most lesions are hypoechoic, oval or round with smooth boundaries and posterior acoustic enhancement. The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) criteria of breast metastases show an inconstant signal behavior that cannot be safely classified as benign or malignant. In summary, in patients with known malignancies the presence of breast metastases should be considered even with imposing clinically and radiologically benign findings. (orig.) [German] Brustmetastasen solider extramammaerer Tumoren sind im Vergleich zu primaeren Malignomen der Brust mit einer Praevalenz von 0,33-6,3 % aller boesartigen Neubildungen in der Brust sehr selten. Die haeufigsten Primaertumoren sind dabei das maligne Melanom, ferner Sarkome, Bronchial-, Ovarial-, Nierenzell- und Schilddruesenkarzinome mit einer absteigenden Haeufigkeit ihres Auftretens. In dieser Uebersichtsarbeit werden die

  19. {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC PET imaging in breast carcinoma patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sathekge, Mike; Lengana, Thabo; Modiselle, Moshe; Vorster, Mariza; Zeevaart, JanRijn; Ebenhan, Thomas [University of Pretoria and Steve Biko Academic Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Pretoria (South Africa); Maes, Alex [University of Pretoria and Steve Biko Academic Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Pretoria (South Africa); AZ Groeninge, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Kortrijk (Belgium); Wiele, Christophe van de [University of Pretoria and Steve Biko Academic Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Pretoria (South Africa); University Ghent, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Ghent (Belgium)

    2017-04-15

    To report on imaging findings using {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC PET in a series of 19 breast carcinoma patients. {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC PET imaging results obtained were compared to routinely performed staging examinations and analyzed as to lesion location and progesterone receptor status. Out of 81 tumor lesions identified, 84% were identified on {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC PET. {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC SUVmean values of distant metastases proved significantly higher (mean, 6.86, SD, 5.68) when compared to those of primary or local recurrences (mean, 2.45, SD, 2.55, p = 0.04) or involved lymph nodes (mean, 3.18, SD, 1.79, p = 0.011). SUVmean values of progesterone receptor-positive lesions proved not significantly different from progesterone receptor-negative lesions. SUV values derived from FDG PET/CT, available in seven patients, and {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC PET/CT imaging proved weakly correlated (r = 0.407, p = 0.015). {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-HBED-CC PET/CT imaging in breast carcinoma confirms the reported considerable variation of PSMA expression on human solid tumors using immunohistochemistry. (orig.)

  20. 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography (FDG-PET/CT) Imaging in the Staging and Prognosis of Inflammatory Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alberini, J.L.; Wartski, M.; Gontier, E.; Madar, O.; Pecking, A.P.; Lerebours, F.; Fourme, E.; Le Stanc, E.; Cherel, P.; Alberini, J.L.

    2009-01-01

    Background: To prospectively assess fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) staging and prognosis value in patients with suspected inflammatory breast cancer (IBC). Methods: Sixty-two women (mean age 50.7 ± 11.4 years) presenting with unilateral inflammatory breast tumors (59 invasive carcinomas; 3 mastitis) underwent a PET/CT scan before biopsy. Results: PET/CT scan was positive for the primary malignant tumor in 100% and false positive in 2 of 3 benign mastitis. In 59 IBC patients, FDG nodal foci were detected in axillary (90%; n = 53) and extra-axillary areas (56%; n = 33) ipsilateral to the cancer. Compared with clinical examination, the axillary lymph node status by PET/CT was upstaged and down staged in 35 and 5 patients, respectively. In 7 of 9 N0 patients, the axillary lymph node positivity on PET/CT was correct, as revealed by pathological post surgery assessment (not available in the 2 remaining patients). The nodal foci were compared with preoperative fine needle aspiration and/or pathological post chemotherapy findings available in 44 patients and corresponded to 38 true positive, 4 false-negative, and 2 false-positive cases. In 18 of 59 IBC patients (31%), distant lesions were found. On the basis of a univariate analysis of the first enrolled patients (n = 42), among 28 patients who showed intense tumoral uptake (standard uptake value(max)≥5), the 11 patients with distant lesions had a worse prognosis than the 17 patients without distant lesions (P =.04). Conclusions: FDG-PET/CT imaging provides additional invaluable information regarding nodal status or distant metastases in IBC patients and should be considered in the initial staging. It seems also that some prognostic information can be derived from FDG uptake characteristics. (authors)

  1. The choice of radiopharmaceutical to image breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capriotti, G.; Scopinaro, F.; Signore, A.; Wiele, C. van de

    2004-01-01

    Breast function and development are regulated by a network of local and systemic signals which can exert either stimulatory or inhibitory effects. Many of these signals are mediated by topically produced hormones and cytokines, which are both believed to be part of complex feedback loops. These local feedback loops also play an integral part in the vascularization and invasion of malignant breast tumours. More specifically, it has been demonstrated that the disruption of physiological negative feedback loops in breast tissue may result in the loss of cell cycle control and eventually leading to local breakdown of the adjacent stroma implying interactions between breast tumour cells and their stromal environment. Novel anticancer strategies selectively interacting with breast tumour vascularization and metastasis, include blocking monoclonal antibodies, peptide hormone antagonists, peptide/toxin fusion proteins and inhibitors of signal transduction. As most of these novel drugs are cytostatic, objective response as measured by morphological imaging modalities, e.g., Computed Tomography (CT) or Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) cannot be utilized as a surrogate marker for drug development, nor for clinical decision- making. Accordingly, in order to maximize the benefit from these new treatment paradigms, novel objective markers of therapeutic success are mandatory. This editorial focuses on recently developed radioligands for SPECT imaging as potential markers for the in vivo assessment of ongoing angiogenesis and metastasis in patients suffering from breast carcinoma

  2. Positron Emission Tomography/Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Local Tumor Staging in Patients With Primary Breast Cancer: A Comparison With Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grueneisen, Johannes; Nagarajah, James; Buchbender, Christian; Hoffmann, Oliver; Schaarschmidt, Benedikt Michael; Poeppel, Thorsten; Forsting, Michael; Quick, Harald H; Umutlu, Lale; Kinner, Sonja

    2015-08-01

    This study aimed to assess the diagnostic performance of integrated positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the breast for lesion detection and local tumor staging of patients with primary breast cancer in comparison to PET/computed tomography (CT) and MRI. The study was approved by the local institutional review board. Forty-nine patients with biopsy-proven invasive breast cancer were prospectively enrolled in our study. All patients underwent a PET/CT, and subsequently, a contrast-enhanced PET/MRI of the breast after written informed consent was obtained before each examination. Two radiologists independently evaluated the corresponding data sets (PET/CT, PET/MRI, and MRI) and were instructed to identify primary tumors lesions as well as multifocal/multicentric and bilateral disease. Furthermore, the occurrence of lymph node metastases was assessed, and the T-stage for each patient was determined. Histopathological verification of the local tumor extent and the axillary lymph node status was available for 30 of 49 and 48 of 49 patients, respectively. For the remaining patients, a consensus characterization was performed for the determination of the T-stage and nodal status, taking into account the results of clinical staging, PET/CT, and PET/MRI examinations. Statistical analysis was performed to test for differences in diagnostic performance between the different imaging procedures. P values less than 0.05 were considered to be statistically significant. Positron emission tomography/MRI and MRI correctly identified 47 (96%) of the 49 patients with primary breast cancer, whereas PET/CT enabled detection of 46 (94%) of 49 breast cancer patients and missed a synchronous carcinoma in the contralateral breast in 1 patient. In a lesion-by-lesion analysis, no significant differences could be obtained between the 3 imaging procedures for the identification of primary breast cancer lesions (P > 0.05). Positron emission tomography/MRI and

  3. Breast cancer imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Funke, M.; Villena, C.

    2008-01-01

    Advances in female breast imaging have substantially influenced the diagnosis, therapy, and prognosis of breast cancer in the past few years. Mammography using conventional or digital technique is considered the gold standard for the early detection of breast cancer. Other modalities such as breast ultrasound and contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of the breast play an important role in diagnostic imaging, staging, and follow-up of breast cancer. Percutaneous needle biopsy is a faster, less invasive, and more cost-effective method than surgical biopsy for verifying the histological diagnosis. New methods such as breast tomosynthesis, contrast-enhanced mammography, and positron emission tomography promise to further improve breast imaging. Further studies are mandatory to adapt these new methods to clinical needs and to evaluate their performance in clinical practice. (orig.) [de

  4. SU-F-I-01: Normalized Mean Glandular Dose Values for Dedicated Breast CT Using Realistic Breast-Shaped Phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez, A [Department of Radiology, Biomedical Engineering Graduate Group, University of California Davis, Sacramento, CA (United States); Boone, J [Departments of Radiology and Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Engeering Graduate Group, University of California Davis, Sacramento, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To estimate normalized mean glandular dose values for dedicated breast CT (DgN-CT) using breast CT-derived phantoms and compare to estimations using cylindrical phantoms. Methods: Segmented breast CT (bCT) volume data sets (N=219) were used to measure effective diameter profiles and were grouped into quintiles by volume. The profiles were averaged within each quintile to represent the range of breast sizes found clinically. These profiles were then used to generate five voxelized computational phantoms (V1, V2, V3, V4, V5 for the small to large phantom sizes, respectively), and loaded into the MCNP6 lattice geometry to simulate normalized mean glandular dose coefficients (DgN-CT) using the system specifications of the Doheny-prototype bCT scanner in our laboratory. The DgN-CT coefficients derived from the bCT-derived breast-shaped phantoms were compared to those generated using a simpler cylindrical phantom using a constant volume, and the following constraints: (1) Length=1.5*radius; (2) radius determined at chest wall (Rcw), and (3) radius determined at the phantom center-of-mass (Rcm). Results: The change in Dg-NCT coefficients averaged across all phantom sizes, was - 0.5%, 19.8%, and 1.3%, for constraints 1–3, respectively. This suggests that the cylindrical assumption is a good approximation if the radius is taken at the breast center-of-mass, but using the radius at the chest wall results in an underestimation of the glandular dose. Conclusion: The DgN-CT coefficients for bCT-derived phantoms were compared against the assumption of a cylindrical phantom and proved to be essentially equivalent when the cylinder radius was set to r=1.5/L or Rcm. While this suggests that for dosimetry applications a patient’s breast can be approximated as a cylinder (if the correct radius is applied), this assumes a homogenous composition of breast tissue and the results may be different if the realistic heterogeneous distribution of glandular tissue is considered

  5. [Accelerated partial breast irradiation with image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy following breast-conserving surgery - preliminary results of a phase II clinical study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mészáros, Norbert; Major, Tibor; Stelczer, Gábor; Zaka, Zoltán; Mózsa, Emõke; Fodor, János; Polgár, Csaba

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to implement accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) by means of image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) following breast-conserving surgery (BCS) for low-risk early invasive breast cancer. Between July 2011 and March 2014, 60 patients with low-risk early invasive (St I-II) breast cancer who underwent BCS were enrolled in our phase II prospective study. Postoperative APBI was given by means of step and shoot IG-IMRT using 4 to 5 fields to a total dose of 36.9 Gy (9×4.1 Gy) using a twice-a-day fractionation. Before each fraction, series of CT images were taken from the region of the target volume using a kV CT on-rail mounted in the treatment room. An image fusion software was used for automatic image registration of the planning and verification CT images. Patient set-up errors were detected in three directions (LAT, LONG, VERT), and inaccuracies were adjusted by automatic movements of the treatment table. Breast cancer related events, acute and late toxicities, and cosmetic results were registered and analysed. At a median follow-up of 24 months (range 12-44) neither locoregional nor distant failure was observed. Grade 1 (G1), G2 erythema, G1 oedema, and G1 and G2 pain occurred in 21 (35%), 2 (3.3%), 23 (38.3%), 6 (10%) and 2 (3.3%) patients, respectively. No G3-4 acute side effects were detected. Among late radiation side effects G1 pigmentation, G1 fibrosis, and G1 fat necrosis occurred in 5 (8.3%), 7 (11.7%), and 2 (3.3%) patients, respectively. No ≥G2 late toxicity was detected. Excellent and good cosmetic outcome was detected in 45 (75%) and 15 (25%) patients. IG-IMRT is a reproducible and feasible technique for the delivery of APBI following conservative surgery for the treatment of low-risk, early-stage invasive breast carcinoma. Preliminary results are promising, early radiation side effects are minimal, and cosmetic results are excellent.

  6. SU-E-J-134: An Augmented-Reality Optical Imaging System for Accurate Breast Positioning During Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazareth, D; Malhotra, H; French, S; Hoffmann, K; Merrow, C

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Breast radiotherapy, particularly electronic compensation, may involve large dose gradients and difficult patient positioning problems. We have developed a simple self-calibrating augmented-reality system, which assists in accurately and reproducibly positioning the patient, by displaying her live image from a single camera superimposed on the correct perspective projection of her 3D CT data. Our method requires only a standard digital camera capable of live-view mode, installed in the treatment suite at an approximately-known orientation and position (rotation R; translation T). Methods: A 10-sphere calibration jig was constructed and CT imaged to provide a 3D model. The (R,T) relating the camera to the CT coordinate system were determined by acquiring a photograph of the jig and optimizing an objective function, which compares the true image points to points calculated with a given candidate R and T geometry. Using this geometric information, 3D CT patient data, viewed from the camera's perspective, is plotted using a Matlab routine. This image data is superimposed onto the real-time patient image, acquired by the camera, and displayed using standard live-view software. This enables the therapists to view both the patient's current and desired positions, and guide the patient into assuming the correct position. The method was evaluated using an in-house developed bolus-like breast phantom, mounted on a supporting platform, which could be tilted at various angles to simulate treatment-like geometries. Results: Our system allowed breast phantom alignment, with an accuracy of about 0.5 cm and 1 ± 0.5 degree. Better resolution could be possible using a camera with higher-zoom capabilities. Conclusion: We have developed an augmented-reality system, which combines a perspective projection of a CT image with a patient's real-time optical image. This system has the potential to improve patient setup accuracy during breast radiotherapy, and could possibly be

  7. SU-E-J-134: An Augmented-Reality Optical Imaging System for Accurate Breast Positioning During Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazareth, D; Malhotra, H; French, S [Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY (United States); Hoffmann, K [Neurosurgery at SUNY at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY (United States); Merrow, C [Bassett Healthcare, Oneonta, NY (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Breast radiotherapy, particularly electronic compensation, may involve large dose gradients and difficult patient positioning problems. We have developed a simple self-calibrating augmented-reality system, which assists in accurately and reproducibly positioning the patient, by displaying her live image from a single camera superimposed on the correct perspective projection of her 3D CT data. Our method requires only a standard digital camera capable of live-view mode, installed in the treatment suite at an approximately-known orientation and position (rotation R; translation T). Methods: A 10-sphere calibration jig was constructed and CT imaged to provide a 3D model. The (R,T) relating the camera to the CT coordinate system were determined by acquiring a photograph of the jig and optimizing an objective function, which compares the true image points to points calculated with a given candidate R and T geometry. Using this geometric information, 3D CT patient data, viewed from the camera's perspective, is plotted using a Matlab routine. This image data is superimposed onto the real-time patient image, acquired by the camera, and displayed using standard live-view software. This enables the therapists to view both the patient's current and desired positions, and guide the patient into assuming the correct position. The method was evaluated using an in-house developed bolus-like breast phantom, mounted on a supporting platform, which could be tilted at various angles to simulate treatment-like geometries. Results: Our system allowed breast phantom alignment, with an accuracy of about 0.5 cm and 1 ± 0.5 degree. Better resolution could be possible using a camera with higher-zoom capabilities. Conclusion: We have developed an augmented-reality system, which combines a perspective projection of a CT image with a patient's real-time optical image. This system has the potential to improve patient setup accuracy during breast radiotherapy, and could

  8. A 16-channel MR coil for simultaneous PET/MR imaging in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dregely, Isabel; Lanz, Titus; Mueller, Matthias F.; Metz, Stephan; Kuschan, Marika; Nimbalkar, Manoj; Ziegler, Sibylle I.; Nekolla, Stephan G.; Schwaiger, Markus; Bundschuh, Ralph A.; Haase, Axel

    2015-01-01

    To implement and evaluate a dedicated receiver array coil for simultaneous positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance (PET/MR) imaging in breast cancer. A 16-channel receiver coil design was optimized for simultaneous PET/MR imaging. To assess MR performance, the signal-to-noise ratio, parallel imaging capability and image quality was evaluated in phantoms, volunteers and patients and compared to clinical standard protocols. For PET evaluation, quantitative 18 F-FDG PET images of phantoms and seven patients (14 lesions) were compared to images without the coil. In PET image reconstruction, a CT-based template of the coil was combined with the MR-acquired attenuation correction (AC) map of the phantom/patient. MR image quality was comparable to clinical MR-only examinations. PET evaluation in phantoms showed regionally varying underestimation of the standardised uptake value (SUV; mean 22 %) due to attenuation caused by the coil. This was improved by implementing the CT-based coil template in the AC (<2 % SUV underestimation). Patient data indicated that including the coil in the AC increased the SUV values in the lesions (21 ± 9 %). Using a dedicated PET/MR breast coil, state-of-the-art MRI was possible. In PET, accurate quantification and image homogeneity could be achieved if a CT-template of this coil was included in the AC for PET image reconstruction. (orig.)

  9. CT breast dose reduction with the use of breast positioning and organ-based tube current modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Wanyi; Tian, Xiaoyu; Sturgeon, Gregory M; Agasthya, Greeshma; Segars, William Paul; Goodsitt, Mitchell M; Kazerooni, Ella A; Samei, Ehsan

    2017-02-01

    This study aimed to investigate the breast dose reduction potential of a breast-positioning (BP) technique for thoracic CT examinations with organ-based tube current modulation (OTCM). This study included 13 female anthropomorphic computational phantoms (XCAT, age range: 27-65 y.o., weight range: 52-105.8 kg). Each phantom was modified to simulate three breast sizes in standard supine geometry. The modeled breasts were then morphed to emulate BP that constrained the majority of the breast tissue inside the 120° anterior tube current (mA) reduction zone. The OTCM mA value was modeled using a ray-tracing program, which reduced the mA to 20% in the anterior region with a corresponding increase to the posterior region. The organ doses were estimated by a validated Monte Carlo program for a typical clinical CT system (SOMATOM Definition Flash, Siemens Healthcare). The simulated organ doses and organ doses normalized by CTDI vol were used to compare three CT protocols: attenuation-based tube current modulation (ATCM), OTCM, and OTCM with BP (OTCM BP ). On average, compared to ATCM, OTCM reduced breast dose by 19.3 ± 4.5%, whereas OTCM BP reduced breast dose by 38.6 ± 8.1% (an additional 23.8 ± 9.4%). The dose saving of OTCM BP was more significant for larger breasts (on average 33, 38, and 44% reduction for 0.5, 1, and 2 kg breasts, respectively). Compared to ATCM, OTCM BP also reduced thymus and heart dose by 15.1 ± 7.4% and 15.9 ± 6.2% respectively. In thoracic CT examinations, OTCM with a breast-positioning technique can markedly reduce unnecessary exposure to radiosensitive organs in anterior chest wall, specifically breast tissue. The breast dose reduction is more notable for women with larger breasts. © 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  10. Detection of distant metastases in patients with locally advanced breast cancer: role of {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography and conventional imaging with computed tomography scans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bitencourt, Almir Galvao Vieira; Andrade, Wesley Pereira; Cunha, Rodrigo Rodrigues da; Conrado, Jorge Luis Fonseca de Acioli; Lima, Eduardo Nobrega Pereira; Barbosa, Paula Nicole Vieira Pinto; Chojniak, Rubens, E-mail: rodrigo.rcunha@hotmail.com [A. C. Camargo Cancer Center, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Hospital Beneficincia Portuguesa de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-15

    Objective: To evaluate positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) and conventional imaging tests for the detection of distant metastases in patients with locally advanced breast cancer. Materials and Methods: We included 81 patients with breast cancer who had undergone {sup 18}-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET/CT before treatment. Conventional imaging included the following: bone scintigraphy; chest X-ray (in 14.5%) or CT (in 85.5%); and abdominal ultrasound (in 10.8%), CT (in 87.8%), or magnetic resonance imaging (in 1.4%). Histopathology and clinical/imaging follow-up served as reference. Results: Distant metastases were observed in nine patients (11.1%). On patient-based analysis, conventional imaging identified distant metastases in all 9 patients. In one patient, the initial {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT failed to demonstrate bone metastases that was evident on bone scintigraphy. In two patients, the CT scan failed to show extra-axillary lymph node metastases that were identified on {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT. There was no significant difference between {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and conventional imaging in terms of their sensitivity for the detection of distant metastases in patients with locally advanced breast cancer. Conclusion: This study showed that {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and conventional imaging with CT scans had similar sensitivity for the diagnosis of distant metastases in patients with locally advanced breast cancer. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT can add information about extra-axillary lymph node involvements. (author)

  11. Multi-detector row CT in the assessment of axillary lymph node metastasis in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Shogo

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the diagnostic capability instead of clinical efficacy of multi-detector row CT (MDCT) in the assessment of axillary lymph node metastasis in breast cancer. MDCT was performed in 63 patients with breast cancer, and multiplanar reformation (MPR) and volume rendering (VR) images were reconstructed for the evaluation of bilateral axillary lymph nodes. Two hundred sixty eight lymph nodes were depicted with MDCT, and correlation with pathological findings was performed. The short axis length of lymph node was measured on MPR image, and the shape of the nodes was analyzed with the pathological results statistically. The diagnostic criteria on size and shape of lymph node metastasis were discussed Dynamic study with contrast media was also performed, and the CT value ratios (CTVR) of the lymph nodes and breast tumors were calculated. No relevance of axillary lymph node metastasis was noted to the pathological types of breast cancer. The average short axis length of the ipsilateral axillary nodes was 8.9 mm±3.8 (SD) while that of the contralateral nodes was 4.9 mm±1.1 (SD) showing significant difference. More than 6.5 mm in short length of the lymph node was thought to be an effective criterion for positive metastasis, and its sensitivity was 96%. Soybean-shape lymph node was statistically common in metastasis, while non-metastatic nodes were commonly demonstrated as letter ''c'' shape or ring-like shape. Statistical relevance was obtained between the CTVR of axillary lymph nodes and that of breast tumors, suggesting clinical usefulness of dynamic study using contrast media in the evaluation of lymph node metastasis. With MPR and VR images using MDCT, more accurate morphological evaluation of axillary lymph nodes was possible. When soybean-shape node with more than 6.5 mm in short axis is depicted in the axillar region on MDCT metastasis should be the consideration. Comparison with the contralateral side as a control in coronal

  12. Non-invasive breast biopsy method using GD-DTPA contrast enhanced MRI series and F-18-FDG PET/CT dynamic image series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magri, Alphonso William

    This study was undertaken to develop a nonsurgical breast biopsy from Gd-DTPA Contrast Enhanced Magnetic Resonance (CE-MR) images and F-18-FDG PET/CT dynamic image series. A five-step process was developed to accomplish this. (1) Dynamic PET series were nonrigidly registered to the initial frame using a finite element method (FEM) based registration that requires fiducial skin markers to sample the displacement field between image frames. A commercial FEM package (ANSYS) was used for meshing and FEM calculations. Dynamic PET image series registrations were evaluated using similarity measurements SAVD and NCC. (2) Dynamic CE-MR series were nonrigidly registered to the initial frame using two registration methods: a multi-resolution free-form deformation (FFD) registration driven by normalized mutual information, and a FEM-based registration method. Dynamic CE-MR image series registrations were evaluated using similarity measurements, localization measurements, and qualitative comparison of motion artifacts. FFD registration was found to be superior to FEM-based registration. (3) Nonlinear curve fitting was performed for each voxel of the PET/CT volume of activity versus time, based on a realistic two-compartmental Patlak model. Three parameters for this model were fitted; two of them describe the activity levels in the blood and in the cellular compartment, while the third characterizes the washout rate of F-18-FDG from the cellular compartment. (4) Nonlinear curve fitting was performed for each voxel of the MR volume of signal intensity versus time, based on a realistic two-compartment Brix model. Three parameters for this model were fitted: rate of Gd exiting the compartment, representing the extracellular space of a lesion; rate of Gd exiting a blood compartment; and a parameter that characterizes the strength of signal intensities. Curve fitting used for PET/CT and MR series was accomplished by application of the Levenburg-Marquardt nonlinear regression

  13. Correlation of breast cancer subtypes, based on estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and HER2, with functional imaging parameters from {sup 68}Ga-RGD PET/CT and {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Hai-Jeon [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, The Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ewha Womans University School of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Keon Wook; Jeong, Jae Min; Chung, June-Key [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Biomedical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, The Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University, Cancer Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chun, In Kook [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kangwon National University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Chuncheon, Kangwon-Do (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Nariya [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Jongno-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Im, Seock-Ah [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Sunjoo [Dankook University, Department of Molecular Biology, Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Song [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, The Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Kyeong Cheon [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yun-Sang [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Molecular Medicine and Biopharmaceutical Sciences, Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Dong Soo [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, The Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University, Department of Molecular Medicine and Biopharmaceutical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Woo Kyung [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Jongno-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Biomedical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, The Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-15

    Imaging biomarkers from functional imaging modalities were assessed as potential surrogate markers of disease status. Specifically, in this prospective study, we investigated the relationships between functional imaging parameters and histological prognostic factors and breast cancer subtypes. In total, 43 patients with large or locally advanced invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) were analyzed (47.6 ± 7.5 years old). {sup 68}Ga-Labeled arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) and {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) were performed. The maximum and average standardized uptake values (SUV{sub max} and SUV{sub avg}) from RGD PET/CT and SUV{sub max} and SUV{sub avg} from FDG PET/CT were the imaging parameters used. For histological prognostic factors, estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) expression was identified using immunohistochemistry (IHC) or fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). Four breast cancer subtypes, based on ER/PR and HER2 expression (ER/PR+,Her2-, ER/PR+,Her2+, ER/PR-,Her2+, and ER/PR-,Her2-), were considered. Quantitative FDG PET parameters were significantly higher in the ER-negative group (15.88 ± 8.73 vs 10.48 ± 6.01, p = 0.02 for SUV{sub max}; 9.40 ± 5.19 vs 5.92 ± 4.09, p = 0.02 for SUV{sub avg}) and the PR-negative group (8.37 ± 4.94 vs 4.79 ± 3.93, p = 0.03 for SUV{sub avg}). Quantitative RGD PET parameters were significantly higher in the HER2-positive group (2.42 ± 0.59 vs 2.90 ± 0.75, p = 0.04 for SUV{sub max}; 1.60 ± 0.38 vs 1.95 ± 0.53, p = 0.04 for SUV{sub avg}) and showed a significant positive correlation with the HER2/CEP17 ratio (r = 0.38, p = 0.03 for SUV{sub max} and r = 0.46, p < 0.01 for SUV{sub avg}). FDG PET parameters showed significantly higher values in the ER/PR-,Her2- subgroup versus the ER/PR+,Her2- or ER/PR+,Her2+ subgroups, while RGD PET parameters showed significantly lower values in the ER

  14. {sup 18}F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography (FDG-PET/CT) Imaging in the Staging and Prognosis of Inflammatory Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberini, J.L.; Wartski, M.; Gontier, E.; Madar, O.; Pecking, A.P. [Nuclear Medicine Department, Cancer Research Center Rene Huguenin, Saint-Cloud (France); Lerebours, F. [Oncology Department, Cancer Research Center Rene Huguenin, Saint-Cloud (France); Fourme, E. [Biostatistics Department, Cancer Research Center Rene Huguenin, Saint-Cloud (France); Le Stanc, E. [Nuclear Medicine Department, Foch Hospital, Suresnes (France); Cherel, P. [Radiology Department, Cancer Research Center Rene Huguenin, Saint-Cloud (France); Alberini, J.L. [School of Medicine, Versailles Saint-Quentin University (France)

    2009-07-01

    Background: To prospectively assess fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) staging and prognosis value in patients with suspected inflammatory breast cancer (IBC). Methods: Sixty-two women (mean age 50.7 {+-} 11.4 years) presenting with unilateral inflammatory breast tumors (59 invasive carcinomas; 3 mastitis) underwent a PET/CT scan before biopsy. Results: PET/CT scan was positive for the primary malignant tumor in 100% and false positive in 2 of 3 benign mastitis. In 59 IBC patients, FDG nodal foci were detected in axillary (90%; n = 53) and extra-axillary areas (56%; n = 33) ipsilateral to the cancer. Compared with clinical examination, the axillary lymph node status by PET/CT was upstaged and down staged in 35 and 5 patients, respectively. In 7 of 9 N0 patients, the axillary lymph node positivity on PET/CT was correct, as revealed by pathological post surgery assessment (not available in the 2 remaining patients). The nodal foci were compared with preoperative fine needle aspiration and/or pathological post chemotherapy findings available in 44 patients and corresponded to 38 true positive, 4 false-negative, and 2 false-positive cases. In 18 of 59 IBC patients (31%), distant lesions were found. On the basis of a univariate analysis of the first enrolled patients (n = 42), among 28 patients who showed intense tumoral uptake (standard uptake value(max){>=}5), the 11 patients with distant lesions had a worse prognosis than the 17 patients without distant lesions (P =.04). Conclusions: FDG-PET/CT imaging provides additional invaluable information regarding nodal status or distant metastases in IBC patients and should be considered in the initial staging. It seems also that some prognostic information can be derived from FDG uptake characteristics. (authors)

  15. Correlation between PET/CT results and histological and immunohistochemical findings in breast carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bitencourt, Almir Galvao Vieira; Lima, Eduardo Nobrega Pereira; Chojniak, Rubens; Marques, Elvira Ferreira; Souza, Juliana Alves de; Graziano, Luciana; Andrade, Wesley Pereira; Osorio, Cynthia Aparecida Bueno de Toledo

    2014-01-01

    Objective: to correlate the results of 18 F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ( 18 F-FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) performed with a specific protocol for assessment of breasts with histological/immunohistochemical findings in breast carcinoma patients. Materials and methods: cross-sectional study with prospective data collection, where patients with biopsy-confirmed breast carcinomas were studied. The patients underwent PET/CT examination in prone position, with a specific protocol for assessment of breasts. PET/CT findings were compared with histological and immunohistochemical data. Results: the authors identified 59 malignant breast lesions in 50 patients. The maximum diameter of the lesions ranged from 6 to 80 mm (mean: 32.2 mm). Invasive ductal carcinoma was the most common histological type (n = 47; 79.7%). At PET/CT, 53 (89.8%) of the lesions demonstrated anomalous concentrations of 18 F-FDG, with maximum SUV ranging from 0.8 to 23.1 (mean: 5.5). A statistically significant association was observed between higher values of maximum SUV and histological type, histological grade, molecular subtype, tumor diameter, mitotic index and Ki-67 expression. Conclusion: PET/CT performed with specific protocol for assessment of breasts has demonstrated good sensitivity and was associated with relevant histological/immunohistochemical factors related to aggressiveness and prognosis of breast carcinomas. (author)

  16. Highly sensitive detection of the soft tissues based on refraction contrast by in-plane diffraction-enhanced imaging CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuasa, Tetsuya; Hashimoto, Eiko; Maksimenko, Anton; Sugiyama, Hiroshi; Arai, Yoshinori; Shimao, Daisuke; Ichihara, Shu; Ando, Masami

    2008-01-01

    We discuss the recently proposed computed tomography (CT) technique based on refractive effects for biomedical use, which reconstructs the in-plane refractive-index gradient vector field in a cross-sectional plane of interest by detecting the angular deviation of the beam, refracted by a sample, from the incident beam, using the diffraction-enhanced imaging (DEI) method. The CT has advantages for delineating biological weakly absorbing soft tissues over the conventional absorption-contrast CT because of the use of phase sensitive detection. The paper aims to define the imaging scheme rigidly and to demonstrate its efficacy for non-destructive measurement of biomedical soft-tissue samples without imaging agent. We first describe the imaging principle of in-plane DEI-CT from the physico-mathematical viewpoints in detail, and investigate what physical quantities are extracted from the reconstructed images. Then, we introduce the imaging system using the synchrotron radiation as a light source, constructed at beamline BL-14B in KEK, Japan. Finally, we demonstrate the advantage of the refraction-based image for non-destructive analysis of biological sample by investigating the image of human breast cancer tumors obtained using the imaging system. Here, the refraction- and the apparent absorption-based images obtained simultaneously by the in-plane DEI-CT are compared. Also, the conventional absorption-based image obtained using micro-computed tomography (μCT) imaging system is compared with them. Thereby, it is shown that the refraction contrast much more sensitively delineates the soft tissues than the absorption contrast. In addition, the radiologic-histologic correlation study not only validates the efficacy for imaging soft tissues, but also produces the potential that the pathological inspection for the breast cancer tumors may be feasible non-destructively

  17. Optical Imaging of the Breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Min Jung; Kim, Eun Kyung

    2011-01-01

    As the increased prevalence of breast cancer and the advances in breast evaluation awareness have resulted in an increased number of breast examinations and benign breast biopsies, several investigations have been performed to improve the diagnostic accuracy for breast lesions. Optical imaging of the breast that uses nearinfrared light to assess the optical properties of breast tissue is a novel non-invasive imaging technique to characterize breast lesions in clinical practice. This review provides a summary of the current state of optical breast imaging and it describes the basic concepts of optical imaging, the potential clinical applications for breast cancer imaging and its potential incorporation with other imaging modalities

  18. Pros and cons of organ shielding for CT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samei, Ehsan

    2014-01-01

    With the increased importance of CT radiation dose to health care providers, patients and the general public, there is an increased responsibility to minimize patient dose effectively. Bismuth shields offer a simple strategy to reduce dose to certain anterior radiosensitive organs such as breasts and eyes. However, in order to reduce organ dose they must be used properly; improper use can lead to an actual increase in the patient dose. They also create a proportional increase in image noise in the section of the body adjacent to the shield and further reduce the quantitative precision of CT numbers. In addition, shielding can degrade the overall efficiency (by an order of approximately 10%) of the imaging process, reducing the theoretical image quality that can be expected from a certain level of patient dose. However, in spite of their significant disadvantages, there are certain clinical situations and practice considerations that provide qualified justification for their continued use. (orig.)

  19. SU-F-I-14: 3D Breast Digital Phantom for XACT Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, S; Laaroussi, R; Chen, J; Samant, P; Xiang, L [University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States); Chen, Y; Ahmad, S [University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Yang, K [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The X-ray induced acoustic computed tomography (XACT) is a new imaging modality which combines X-ray contrast and high ultrasonic resolution in a single modality. Using XACT in breast imaging, a 3D breast volume can be imaged by only one pulsed X-ray radiation, which could dramatically reduce the imaging dose for patients undergoing breast cancer screening and diagnosis. A 3D digital phantom that contains both X-ray properties and acoustic properties of different tissue types is indeed needed for developing and optimizing the XACT system. The purpose of this study is to offer a realistic breast digital phantom as a valuable tool for improving breast XACT imaging techniques and potentially leading to better diagnostic outcomes. Methods: A series of breast CT images along the coronal plane from a patient who has breast calcifications are used as the source images. A HU value based segmentation algorithm is employed to identify breast tissues in five categories, namely the skin tissue, fat tissue, glandular tissue, chest bone and calcifications. For each pixel, the dose related parameters, such as material components and density, and acoustic related parameters, such as frequency-dependent acoustic attenuation coefficient and bandwidth, are assigned based on tissue types. Meanwhile, other parameters which are used in sound propagation, including the sound speed, thermal expansion coefficient, and heat capacity are also assigned to each tissue. Results: A series of 2D tissue type image is acquired first and the 3D digital breast phantom is obtained by using commercial 3D reconstruction software. When giving specific settings including dose depositions and ultrasound center frequency, the X-ray induced initial pressure rise can be calculated accordingly. Conclusion: The proposed 3D breast digital phantom represents a realistic breast anatomic structure and provides a valuable tool for developing and evaluating the system performance for XACT.

  20. Chest CT findings in breast cancer patients treated with postoperative irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Yeon Joo; Kim, Kun Il; Lee, Suk Hong; Kim, Dong Won; Bae, Yeong Tae [College of Medicine, Pusan National Univ., Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-07-01

    The determine the chest CT findings in breast cancer patients who have undergone postoperative irradiation. The chest CT findings in 36 female patients who underwent breast surgery and radiotherapy between May 1996 and March 2000 were rerospectively analysed. Prior to radiotheraphy, baseline chest CT depicted normal parenchyma in all cases. In 11 patients, the ipsilateral breast and chest wall were irradiated using opposed tangential fields, while 25 were treated by the four fields method (opposed tangential fields plus anterior and posterior supraclavicular/high axillary fields), with a total dose of 5040-5400 cGy for 5-9 weeks. CT after radiotherapy demonstrated reticular opacity (n=24), perpendicular linear opacity (n=15), traction bronchiectasis (n=7), consolidation (n=6), ground glass attenuation (n=3), pathologic rib fractures (n=3) pleural effusion (n=2), and pleural thickening (n=1), while in five patients no abnormality was observed. in addition, in the anterolateral lung area of 23 (64%) of 36 patients who underwent tangential beam irradiation, CT demonstrated peripheral opacities. When supraclavicular and axillary portals were used, radiation-induced lung changes mostly occurred at the apex of the lung (n=24). Chest radiographs were abnormal in 26 patients and normal in ten; in five of these ten, CT demonstrated reticular opacity. Depending on the irradiation CT findings of radiation-induced lung injury in breast cancer include areas of increased opacity with or without fibrosis, in apical and/or anterior subpleural regions. CT may help differentiate radiation-induced parenchymal change from superimposed or combined lung disease.

  1. CT-image-based conformal brachytherapy of breast cancer. The significance of semi-3-D and 3-D treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polgár, C; Major, T; Somogyi, A; Takácsi-Nagy, Z; Mangel, L C; Forrai, G; Sulyok, Z; Fodor, J; Németh, G

    2000-03-01

    To compare the conventional 2-D, the simulator-guided semi-3-D and the recently developed CT-guided 3-D brachytherapy treatment planning in the interstitial radiotherapy of breast cancer. In 103 patients with T1-2, N0-1 breast cancer the tumor bed was clipped during breast conserving surgery. Fifty-two of them received boost brachytherapy after 46 to 50 Gy teletherapy and 51 patients were treated with brachytherapy alone via flexible implant tubes. Single, double and triple plane implant was used in 6, 89 and 8 cases, respectively. The dose of boost brachytherapy and sole brachytherapy prescribed to dose reference points was 3 times 4.75 Gy and 7 times 5.2 Gy, respectively. The positions of dose reference points varied according to the level (2-D, semi-3-D and 3-D) of treatment planning performed. The treatment planning was based on the 3-D reconstruction of the surgical clips, implant tubes and skin points. In all cases the implantations were planned with a semi-3-D technique aided by simulator. In 10 cases a recently developed CT-guided 3-D planning system was used. The semi-3-D and 3-D treatment plans were compared to hypothetical 2-D plans using dose-volume histograms and dose non-uniformity ratios. The values of mean central dose, mean skin dose, minimal clip dose, proportion of underdosaged clips and mean target surface dose were evaluated. The accuracy of tumor bed localization and the conformity of planning target volume and treated volume were also analyzed in each technique. With the help of conformal semi-3-D and 3-D brachytherapy planning we could define reference dose points, active source positions and dwell times individually. This technique decreased the mean skin dose with 22.2% and reduced the possibility of geographical miss. We could achieve the best conformity between the planning target volume and the treated volume with the CT-image based 3-D treatment planning, at the cost of worse dose homogeneity. The mean treated volume was reduced by 25

  2. Prognostic value of CtIP/RBBP8 expression in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soria-Bretones, Isabel; Sáez, Carmen; Ruíz-Borrego, Manuel; Japón, Miguel A; Huertas, Pablo

    2013-01-01

    CtIP/RBBP8 is a multifunctional protein involved in transcription, DNA replication, DNA repair by homologous recombination and the G1 and G2 checkpoints. Its multiple roles are controlled by its interaction with several specific factors, including the tumor suppressor proteins BRCA1 and retinoblastoma. Both its functions and interactors point to a putative oncogenic potential of CtIP/RBBP8 loss. However, CtIP/RBBP8 relevance in breast tumor appearance, development, and prognosis has yet to be established. We performed a retrospective analysis of CtIP/RBBP8 and RB1 levels by immunohistochemistry using 384 paraffin-embedded breast cancer biopsies obtained during tumor removal surgery. We have observed that low or no expression of CtIP/RBBP8 correlates with high-grade breast cancer and with nodal metastasis. Reduction on CtIP/RBBP8 is most common in hormone receptor (HR)-negative, HER2-positive, and basal-like tumors. We observed lower levels of RB1 on those tumors with reduced CtIP/RBBP8 levels. On luminal tumors, decreased but not absence of CtIP/RBBP8 levels correlate with increased disease-free survival when treated with a combination of hormone, radio, and chemo therapies

  3. Scaling-law for the energy dependence of anatomic power spectrum in dedicated breast CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vedantham, Srinivasan; Shi, Linxi; Glick, Stephen J.; Karellas, Andrew [Department of Radiology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01655 (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: To determine the x-ray photon energy dependence of the anatomic power spectrum of the breast when imaged with dedicated breast computed tomography (CT). Methods: A theoretical framework for scaling the empirically determined anatomic power spectrum at one x-ray photon energy to that at any given x-ray photon energy when imaged with dedicated breast CT was developed. Theory predicted that when the anatomic power spectrum is fitted with a power curve of the form k f{sup -{beta}}, where k and {beta} are fit coefficients and f is spatial frequency, the exponent {beta} would be independent of x-ray photon energy (E), and the amplitude k scales with the square of the difference in energy-dependent linear attenuation coefficients of fibroglandular and adipose tissues. Twenty mastectomy specimens based numerical phantoms that were previously imaged with a benchtop flat-panel cone-beam CT system were converted to 3D distribution of glandular weight fraction (f{sub g}) and were used to verify the theoretical findings. The 3D power spectrum was computed in terms of f{sub g} and after converting to linear attenuation coefficients at monoenergetic x-ray photon energies of 20-80 keV in 5 keV intervals. The 1D power spectra along the axes were extracted and fitted with a power curve of the form k f{sup -{beta}}. The energy dependence of k and {beta} were analyzed. Results: For the 20 mastectomy specimen based numerical phantoms used in the study, the exponent {beta} was found to be in the range of 2.34-2.42, depending on the axis of measurement. Numerical simulations agreed with the theoretical predictions that for a power-law anatomic spectrum of the form k f{sup -{beta}}, {beta} was independent of E and k(E) =k{sub 1}[{mu}{sub g}(E) -{mu}{sub a}(E)]{sup 2}, where k{sub 1} is a constant, and {mu}{sub g}(E) and {mu}{sub a}(E) represent the energy-dependent linear attenuation coefficients of fibroglandular and adipose tissues, respectively. Conclusions: Numerical

  4. Development of a patient-specific two-compartment anthropomorphic breast phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prionas, Nicolas D; Burkett, George W; McKenney, Sarah E; Chen, Lin; Boone, John M; Stern, Robin L

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop a technique for the construction of a two-compartment anthropomorphic breast phantom specific to an individual patient's pendant breast anatomy. Three-dimensional breast images were acquired on a prototype dedicated breast computed tomography (bCT) scanner as part of an ongoing IRB-approved clinical trial of bCT. The images from the breast of a patient were segmented into adipose and glandular tissue regions and divided into 1.59 mm thick breast sections to correspond to the thickness of polyethylene stock. A computer-controlled water-jet cutting machine was used to cut the outer breast edge and the internal regions corresponding to glandular tissue from the polyethylene. The stack of polyethylene breast segments was encased in a thermoplastic ‘skin’ and filled with water. Water-filled spaces modeled glandular tissue structures and the surrounding polyethylene modeled the adipose tissue compartment. Utility of the phantom was demonstrated by inserting 200 µm microcalcifications as well as by measuring point dose deposition during bCT scanning. Affine registration of the original patient images with bCT images of the phantom showed similar tissue distribution. Linear profiles through the registered images demonstrated a mean coefficient of determination (r 2 ) between grayscale profiles of 0.881. The exponent of the power law describing the anatomical noise power spectrum was identical in the coronal images of the patient's breast and the phantom. Microcalcifications were visualized in the phantom at bCT scanning. The real-time air kerma rate was measured during bCT scanning and fluctuated with breast anatomy. On average, point dose deposition was 7.1% greater than the mean glandular dose. A technique to generate a two-compartment anthropomorphic breast phantom from bCT images has been demonstrated. The phantom is the first, to our knowledge, to accurately model the uncompressed pendant breast and the glandular tissue

  5. 18F-FDG PET/CT in breast cancer: Evidence-based recommendations in initial staging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caresia Aroztegui, Ana Paula; García Vicente, Ana María; Alvarez Ruiz, Soledad; Delgado Bolton, Roberto Carlos; Orcajo Rincon, Javier; Garcia Garzon, Jose Ramon; de Arcocha Torres, Maria; Garcia-Velloso, Maria Jose

    2017-10-01

    Current guidelines do not systematically recommend 18F-FDG PET/CT for breast cancer staging; and the recommendations and level of evidence supporting its use in different groups of patients vary among guidelines. This review summarizes the evidence about the role of 18F-FDG PET/CT in breast cancer staging and the therapeutic and prognostic impact accumulated in the last decade. Other related aspects, such as the association of metabolic information with biology and prognosis are considered and evidence-based recommendations for the use of 18F-FDG PET/CT in breast cancer staging are offered. We systematically searched MEDLINE for articles reporting studies with at least 30 patients related to clinical questions following the Problem/Population, Intervention, Comparison, and Outcome framework. We critically reviewed the selected articles and elaborated evidence tables structuring the summarized information into methodology, results, and limitations. The level of evidence and the grades of recommendation for the use of 18F-FDG PET/CT in different contexts are summarized. Level III evidence supports the use of 18F-FDG PET/CT for initial staging in patients with recently diagnosed breast cancer; the diagnostic and therapeutic impact of the 18F-FDG PET/CT findings is sufficient for a weak recommendation in this population. In patients with locally advanced breast cancer, level II evidence supports the use of 18F-FDG PET/CT for initial staging; the diagnostic and therapeutic impact of the 18F-FDG PET/CT findings is sufficient for a strong recommendation in this population. In patients with recently diagnosed breast cancer, the metabolic information from baseline 18F-FDG PET/CT is associated with tumor biology and has prognostic implications, supported by level II evidence. In conclusion, 18F-FDG PET/CT is not recommended for staging all patients with early breast cancer, although evidence of improved regional and systemic staging supports its use in locally advanced

  6. Correlation between PET/CT results and histological and immunohistochemical findings in breast carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almir Galvão Vieira Bitencourt

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To correlate the results of 18F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (18F-FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT performed with a specific protocol for assessment of breasts with histological/immunohistochemical findings in breast carcinoma patients. Materials and Methods Cross-sectional study with prospective data collection, where patients with biopsy-confirmed breast carcinomas were studied. The patients underwent PET/CT examination in prone position, with a specific protocol for assessment of breasts. PET/CT findings were compared with histological and immunohistochemical data. Results The authors identified 59 malignant breast lesions in 50 patients. The maximum diameter of the lesions ranged from 6 to 80 mm (mean: 32.2 mm. Invasive ductal carcinoma was the most common histological type (n = 47; 79.7%. At PET/CT, 53 (89.8% of the lesions demonstrated anomalous concentrations of 18F-FDG, with maximum SUV ranging from 0.8 to 23.1 (mean: 5.5. A statistically significant association was observed between higher values of maximum SUV and histological type, histological grade, molecular subtype, tumor diameter, mitotic index and Ki-67 expression. Conclusion PET/CT performed with specific protocol for assessment of breasts has demonstrated good sensitivity and was associated with relevant histological/immunohistochemical factors related to aggressiveness and prognosis of breast carcinomas.

  7. TU-H-CAMPUS-JeP2-01: Inter-Observer Delineation Comparison of Visible Glandular Breast Tissue On Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Computed Tomography (prone and Supine)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pogson, EM; Delaney, G; Yap, M; Ahern, V; Boxer, M; David, S; Dimigen, M; Harvey, J; Koh, E; Batumalai, V; Lim, K; Papadatos, G; Metcalfe, P

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Breast cancers predominantly arise from Glandular Breast Tissue (GBT). If the GBT can be treated effectively post-operatively utilising radiotherapy this may be adequate volumetric coverage for adjuvant breast radiotherapy. Adequate imaging of the GBT is necessary and will be assessed between MRI and CT modalities. GBT visualisation is acknowledged to be qualitatively superior on Magnetic Resonance Image (MRI) compared to Computed Tomography (CT), the current radiotherapy imaging standard, however this has not been quantitatively assessed. For radiotherapy purposes it is important that any treatment volume can be consistently defined between observers. This study investigates the consistency of CT and MRI GBT contours for potential radiotherapy planning. Methods: Ten experts (9 breast radiation oncologists and 1 radiologist) contoured the extent of the visible GBT for 33 patients on MRI and CT (both without contrast), which was performed according to a contouring guideline in supine and prone patient positions. The GBT volume was not a conventional whole breast radiotherapy planning volume, but rather the extent of GBT that was indicated from the CT or MR imaging. Volumes were compared utilizing the dice similarity coefficient (DSC), kappa statistic, and Hausdorff Distances (HDs) to ascertain the modality that was most consistently volumed. Results: The inter-observer concordance was of substantial agreement (kappa above 0.6) for the CT supine, CT prone, MRI supine and MRI prone datasets. The MRI GBT volumes were larger than the CT GBT volumes (p<0.001). Inter-observer conformity was higher for CT than MRI, although the magnitude of this difference was small (VOI<0.04). Conformity between modalities (CT and MRI) was in agreement for both prone and supine, DSC=0.75. Prone GBT volumes were larger than supine for both MRI and CT. Conclusion: MRI improves the extent of GBT delineation. The role of MRI guided, GBT-targeted radiotherapy requires investigation in

  8. TU-H-CAMPUS-JeP2-01: Inter-Observer Delineation Comparison of Visible Glandular Breast Tissue On Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Computed Tomography (prone and Supine)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pogson, EM [Institute of Medical Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW (Australia); University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW (Australia); Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres, Liverpool, NSW (United Kingdom); Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research, Liverpool Hospital, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Delaney, G; Yap, M [Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres, Liverpool, NSW (United Kingdom); Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research, Liverpool Hospital, Sydney, NSW (Australia); South Western Sydney Clinical School, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW (Australia); School of Medicine, University of Western Sydney, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Ahern, V [Westmead Hospital, Westmead, NSW (Australia); Boxer, M [Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres, Liverpool, NSW (United Kingdom); Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research, Liverpool Hospital, Sydney, NSW (Australia); David, S [Peter MacCallum Cancer Institute,, Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Dimigen, M [Department of Radiology, Liverpool Hospital, NSW (United Kingdom); Harvey, J [University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD (Australia); Princess Alexandra Hospital, QLD (Australia); Koh, E; Batumalai, V [Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres, Liverpool, NSW (United Kingdom); Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research, Liverpool Hospital, Sydney, NSW (Australia); South Western Sydney Clinical School, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Lim, K; Papadatos, G [Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres, Liverpool, NSW (United Kingdom); Metcalfe, P [University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW (Australia); Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres, Liverpool, NSW (United Kingdom); Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research, Liverpool Hospital, Sydney, NSW (Australia); and others

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Breast cancers predominantly arise from Glandular Breast Tissue (GBT). If the GBT can be treated effectively post-operatively utilising radiotherapy this may be adequate volumetric coverage for adjuvant breast radiotherapy. Adequate imaging of the GBT is necessary and will be assessed between MRI and CT modalities. GBT visualisation is acknowledged to be qualitatively superior on Magnetic Resonance Image (MRI) compared to Computed Tomography (CT), the current radiotherapy imaging standard, however this has not been quantitatively assessed. For radiotherapy purposes it is important that any treatment volume can be consistently defined between observers. This study investigates the consistency of CT and MRI GBT contours for potential radiotherapy planning. Methods: Ten experts (9 breast radiation oncologists and 1 radiologist) contoured the extent of the visible GBT for 33 patients on MRI and CT (both without contrast), which was performed according to a contouring guideline in supine and prone patient positions. The GBT volume was not a conventional whole breast radiotherapy planning volume, but rather the extent of GBT that was indicated from the CT or MR imaging. Volumes were compared utilizing the dice similarity coefficient (DSC), kappa statistic, and Hausdorff Distances (HDs) to ascertain the modality that was most consistently volumed. Results: The inter-observer concordance was of substantial agreement (kappa above 0.6) for the CT supine, CT prone, MRI supine and MRI prone datasets. The MRI GBT volumes were larger than the CT GBT volumes (p<0.001). Inter-observer conformity was higher for CT than MRI, although the magnitude of this difference was small (VOI<0.04). Conformity between modalities (CT and MRI) was in agreement for both prone and supine, DSC=0.75. Prone GBT volumes were larger than supine for both MRI and CT. Conclusion: MRI improves the extent of GBT delineation. The role of MRI guided, GBT-targeted radiotherapy requires investigation in

  9. Assessment of response to endocrine therapy using FDG PET/CT in metastatic breast cancer: a pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mortazavi-Jehanno, Nina; Giraudet, Anne-Laure; Champion, Laurence; Edeline, Veronique; Madar, Olivier; Pecking, Alain Paul; Lerebours, Florence; Stanc, Elise Le; Bellet, Dominique; Alberini, Jean-Louis

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to assess whether outcome in metastatic or recurrent breast cancer patients is related to metabolic response to endocrine therapy determined by 18 F-FDG PET/CT. The study group comprised 22 patients with breast cancer (age 58 ± 11 years, mean ± SD) who were scheduled to receive endocrine therapy. They were systematically assessed by PET/CT at baseline and after a mean of 10 ± 4 weeks for evaluation of response after induction. All patients demonstrated FDG-avid lesions on the baseline PET/CT scan. The metabolic response was assessed according to EORTC criteria and based on the mean difference in SUV max between the two PET/CT scans, and the patients were classified into four groups: complete or partial metabolic response, or stable or progressive metabolic disease (CMR, PMR, SMD and PMD, respectively). All patients were followed in our institution. Metastatic sites were localized in bone (n = 15), lymph nodes (n = 11), chest wall (n = 3), breast (n = 5), lung (n = 3), soft tissue (n = 1) and liver (n = 1). PMR was observed in 11 patients (50%), SMD in 5 (23%) and PMD in 6 (27%). The median progression-free survival (PFS) times were 20, 27 and 6 months in the PMR, SMD and PMD groups, respectively. PFS in the SMD group differed from that in the PMR and SMD groups (p < 0.0001). Metabolic response assessed by FDG PET/CT imaging in patients with metastatic breast cancer treated with endocrine therapy is predictive of the patients' PFS. (orig.)

  10. Assessment of response to endocrine therapy using FDG PET/CT in metastatic breast cancer: a pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mortazavi-Jehanno, Nina; Giraudet, Anne-Laure; Champion, Laurence; Edeline, Veronique; Madar, Olivier; Pecking, Alain Paul [Institut Curie, Hopital Rene Huguenin, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Saint-Cloud (France); Lerebours, Florence [Institut Curie, Hopital Rene Huguenin, Service d' Oncologie Medicale, Saint-Cloud (France); Stanc, Elise Le [Hopital Foch, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Suresnes (France); Bellet, Dominique [Institut Curie, Hopital Rene Huguenin, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Saint-Cloud (France); Universite Paris Descartes, Pharmacologie Chimique et Genetique and Imagerie, Inserm U1022 CNRS UMR 8151, Faculte des sciences pharmaceutiques et biologiques, Paris (France); Alberini, Jean-Louis [Institut Curie, Hopital Rene Huguenin, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Saint-Cloud (France); Universite Versailles Saint-Quentin, Faculte de Medecine, Versailles (France)

    2012-03-15

    The purpose of this pilot study was to assess whether outcome in metastatic or recurrent breast cancer patients is related to metabolic response to endocrine therapy determined by {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT. The study group comprised 22 patients with breast cancer (age 58 {+-} 11 years, mean {+-} SD) who were scheduled to receive endocrine therapy. They were systematically assessed by PET/CT at baseline and after a mean of 10 {+-} 4 weeks for evaluation of response after induction. All patients demonstrated FDG-avid lesions on the baseline PET/CT scan. The metabolic response was assessed according to EORTC criteria and based on the mean difference in SUV{sub max} between the two PET/CT scans, and the patients were classified into four groups: complete or partial metabolic response, or stable or progressive metabolic disease (CMR, PMR, SMD and PMD, respectively). All patients were followed in our institution. Metastatic sites were localized in bone (n = 15), lymph nodes (n = 11), chest wall (n = 3), breast (n = 5), lung (n = 3), soft tissue (n = 1) and liver (n = 1). PMR was observed in 11 patients (50%), SMD in 5 (23%) and PMD in 6 (27%). The median progression-free survival (PFS) times were 20, 27 and 6 months in the PMR, SMD and PMD groups, respectively. PFS in the SMD group differed from that in the PMR and SMD groups (p < 0.0001). Metabolic response assessed by FDG PET/CT imaging in patients with metastatic breast cancer treated with endocrine therapy is predictive of the patients' PFS. (orig.)

  11. A Bone Metastasis Nude Mouse Model Created by Ultrasound Guided Intracardiac Injection of Breast Cancer Cells: the Micro-CT, MRI and Bioluminescence Imaging Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Young Jin; Song, Eun Hye; Kim, Seol Hwa; Song, Ho Taek; Suh, Jin Suck [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Sang Hyun [Korean Minjok Leadership Academy, Heongsung (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-01-15

    The purpose of this study was to develop a nude mouse model of bone metastasis by performing intracardiac injection of breast cancer cells under ultrasonography guidance and we wanted to evaluate the development and the distribution of metastasis in vivo using micro-CT, MRI and bioluminescence imaging. Animal experiments were performed in 6-week-old female nude mice. The animals underwent left ventricular injection of 2x105 MDA-MB-231Bo-Luc cells. After injection of the tumor cells, serial bioluminescence imaging was performed for 7 weeks. The findings of micro-CT, MRI and the histology were correlated with the 'hot' lesions seen on the bioluminescence imaging. Metastasis was found in 62.3% of the animals. Two weeks after intracardiac injection, metastasis to the brain, spine and femur was detected with bioluminescence imaging with an increasing intensity by week 7. Micro-CT scan confirmed multiple osteolytic lesions at the femur, spine and skull. MRI and the histology were able to show metastasis in the brain and extraskeletal metastasis around the femur. The intracardiac injection of cancer cells under ultrasonography guidance is a safe and highly reproducible method to produce bone metastasis in nude mice. This bone metastasis nude mouse model will be useful to study the mechanism of bone metastasis and to validate new therapeutics

  12. Reducing radiation dose to the female breast during conventional and dedicated breast computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupcich, Franco John

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the effectiveness of techniques intended to reduce dose to the breast during CT coronary angiography (CTCA) scans with respect to task-based image quality, and to evaluate the effectiveness of optimal energy weighting in improving contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and thus the potential for reducing breast dose, during energy-resolved dedicated breast CT. A database quantifying organ dose for several radiosensitive organs irradiated during CTCA, including the breast, was generated using Monte Carlo simulations. This database facilitates estimation of organ-specific dose deposited during CTCA protocols using arbitrary x-ray spectra or tube-current modulation schemes without the need to run Monte Carlo simulations. The database was used to estimate breast dose for simulated CT images acquired for a reference protocol and five protocols intended to reduce breast dose. For each protocol, the performance of two tasks (detection of signals with unknown locations) was compared over a range of breast dose levels using a task-based, signal-detectability metric: the estimator of the area under the exponential free-response relative operating characteristic curve, AFE. For large-diameter/medium-contrast signals, when maintaining equivalent AFE, the 80 kV partial, 80 kV, 120 kV partial, and 120 kV tube-current modulated protocols reduced breast dose by 85%, 81%, 18%, and 6%, respectively, while the shielded protocol increased breast dose by 68%. Results for the small-diameter/high-contrast signal followed similar trends, but with smaller magnitude of the percent changes in dose. The 80 kV protocols demonstrated the greatest reduction to breast dose, however, the subsequent increase in noise may be clinically unacceptable. Tube output for these protocols can be adjusted to achieve more desirable noise levels with lesser dose reduction. The improvement in CNR of optimally projection-based and image-based weighted images relative to photon

  13. Advanced Imaging and Receipt of Guideline Concordant Care in Women with Early Stage Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Trice Loggers

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. It is unknown whether advanced imaging (AI is associated with higher quality breast cancer (BC care. Materials and Methods. Claims and Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results data were linked for women diagnosed with incident stage I-III BC between 2002 and 2008 in western Washington State. We examined receipt of preoperative breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI or AI (defined as computed tomography [CT]/positron emission tomography [PET]/PET/CT versus mammogram and/or ultrasound (M-US alone and receipt of guideline concordant care (GCC using multivariable logistic regression. Results. Of 5247 women, 67% received M-US, 23% MRI, 8% CT, and 3% PET/PET-CT. In 2002, 5% received MRI and 5% AI compared to 45% and 12%, respectively, in 2008. 79% received GCC, but GCC declined over time and was associated with younger age, urban residence, less comorbidity, shorter time from diagnosis to surgery, and earlier year of diagnosis. Breast MRI was associated with GCC for lumpectomy plus radiation therapy (RT (OR 1.55, 95% CI 1.08–2.26, and p=0.02 and AI was associated with GCC for adjuvant chemotherapy for estrogen-receptor positive (ER+ BC (OR 1.74, 95% CI 1.17–2.59, and p=0.01. Conclusion. GCC was associated with prior receipt of breast MRI and AI for lumpectomy plus RT and adjuvant chemotherapy for ER+ BC, respectively.

  14. Cholestrol granuloma of the breast incidentally detected on dynamic abdominal CT: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Sun Hye; Lee, Eun Hye; Hong, Hyun Sook; Kwak, Jeong Ja [Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Bucheon Hospital, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    A breast cholesterol granuloma is an uncommon nodular breast lesion. We incidentally detected a persistently enhancing breast mass on the dynamic abdominal computed tomography (CT) of a 78-year-old woman. The mass decreased in diameter over 50 days following a core needle biopsy. This report is the first to describe the dynamic-enhanced CT features of a breast cholesterol granuloma.

  15. CT measurement of fat in pre- and post-menopausal women with breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Masanori; Ogura, Toshihiro

    2011-01-01

    Since breast cancer is the most common cancer among Japanese women, research leading to its prevention and early detection is important, and many studies have reported a relationship between this cancer and obesity. In addition, it has been reported that the risk of breast cancer posed by obesity differs between pre- and post-menopausal patients. In this study, we investigated the difference in the amount of body fat between pre- and post-menopausal breast cancer patients by measuring the areas of total, visceral, and subcutaneous fat on CT images acquired at the level of the umbilicus. The subjects were 136 women, comprising 63 with breast cancer (21 pre- and 42 post-menopausal) and 73 with other diseases (31 pre- and 42 post menopausal). We found that post-menopausal women with breast cancer had a significantly greater amount of fat than their pre-menopausal counterparts, presumably attributable to the action of estrogen. These results suggest that fat accumulation in post-menopausal women increases the risk of breast cancer. (author)

  16. Panoramic three-dimensional CT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamata, Akitoshi; Fujishita, Masami

    1998-01-01

    Panoramic radiography is a unique projection technique for producing a single image of both maxillary and mandibular arches and many other anatomical structures. To obtain a similar panoramic image without panoramic radiography system, a modified three-dimensional (3D) CT imaging technique was designed. A set of CT slice image data extending from the chin to the orbit was used for 3D reconstruction. The CT machine used in this study was the X-Vision (TOSHIBA, Japan). The helical scan technique was used. The slice thickness of reconstructed image was one or 1.5 mm. The occlusal plane or Frankfort horizontal (FH) plane was used as the reference line. The resultant slice image data was stored on a magnetic optical disk and then used to create panoramic 3D-CT images on a Macintosh computer systems (Power Macintosh 8600/250, Apple Computer Inc., USA). To create the panoramic 3D-CT image, the following procedure was designed: Design a curved panoramic 3D-CT imaging layer using the imaging layer and the movement of the x-ray beam in panoramic radiography system as a template; Cut this imaging layer from each slice image, then the trimmed image was transformed to a rectangular layer using the ''still image warping'' special effect in the Elastic Reality special effects system (Elastic Reality Inc., USA); Create panoramic 3D-CT image using the Voxel View (Vital Images Inc., USA) rendering system and volume rendering technique. Although the image quality was primitive, a panoramic view of maxillofacial region was obtained by this technique. (author)

  17. TU-EF-207-01: Introductory Remarks on Recent Advances in Breast Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karellas, A. [University of Massachusetts Medical School (United States)

    2015-06-15

    mode due to lower photon fluence per projection. This may require fast-frame acquisition and symmetric or asymmetric pixel binning in some systems. Recent studies investigated the performance of increased conversion layer thickness for contrast-enhanced imaging of the breast in dual-energy acquisition mode. In other direct conversion detectors operating in the avalanche mode, sensitivities close to the single photon response are also explored for mammography and breast tomosynthesis. The potential advantages and challenges of this approach are described. Dedicated breast CT brings x-ray imaging of the breast to true tomographic 3D imaging. It can eliminate the tissue superposition problem and does not require physical compression of the breast. Using cone beam geometry and a flat-panel detector, several hundred projections are acquired and reconstructed to near isotropic voxels. Multiplanar reconstruction facilitates viewing the breast volume in any desired orientation. Ongoing clinical studies, the current state-of-the art, and research to advance the technology are described. Learning Objectives: To understand the ongoing developments in x-ray imaging of the breast To understand the approaches and applications of spectral mammography To understand the potential advantages of distributed x-ray source arrays for digital breast tomosynthesis To understand the ongoing developments in detector technology for digital mammography and breast tomosynthesis To understand the current state-of-the-art for dedicated cone-beam breast CT and research to advance the technology. Research collaboration with Koning Corporation.

  18. TU-EF-207-01: Introductory Remarks on Recent Advances in Breast Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karellas, A.

    2015-01-01

    mode due to lower photon fluence per projection. This may require fast-frame acquisition and symmetric or asymmetric pixel binning in some systems. Recent studies investigated the performance of increased conversion layer thickness for contrast-enhanced imaging of the breast in dual-energy acquisition mode. In other direct conversion detectors operating in the avalanche mode, sensitivities close to the single photon response are also explored for mammography and breast tomosynthesis. The potential advantages and challenges of this approach are described. Dedicated breast CT brings x-ray imaging of the breast to true tomographic 3D imaging. It can eliminate the tissue superposition problem and does not require physical compression of the breast. Using cone beam geometry and a flat-panel detector, several hundred projections are acquired and reconstructed to near isotropic voxels. Multiplanar reconstruction facilitates viewing the breast volume in any desired orientation. Ongoing clinical studies, the current state-of-the art, and research to advance the technology are described. Learning Objectives: To understand the ongoing developments in x-ray imaging of the breast To understand the approaches and applications of spectral mammography To understand the potential advantages of distributed x-ray source arrays for digital breast tomosynthesis To understand the ongoing developments in detector technology for digital mammography and breast tomosynthesis To understand the current state-of-the-art for dedicated cone-beam breast CT and research to advance the technology. Research collaboration with Koning Corporation

  19. Imaging of the Adolescent Breast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Katie N.

    2013-01-01

    The mainstay of breast imaging in the adolescent is ultrasonography. There is occasionally a need for additional imaging, particularly with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Imaging of the adolescent breast differs substantially from the adult in both the imaging modalities utilized and the relative likelihood of pathologies encountered. The majority of lesions in the adolescent are benign, but the presence of a breast lesion may cause anxiety to patients and their families due to the wide awareness of breast malignancy in the adult population. It is important to be aware of the imaging modalities available to image the adolescent breast to prevent unnecessary radiation exposure while answering the clinical question. The current recommendations for adolescent diagnostic and screening breast imaging will be reviewed. Benign breast lesions such as fibroadenomas, fibrocystic change, pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia, gynecomastia, and posttraumatic or infectious lesions with their associated imaging findings and management will be outlined. Additionally, review of breast malignancies that can affect adolescents will provide the reader with features to distinguish benign from malignant processes in the adolescent based on imaging findings and clinical presentation. PMID:24872737

  20. Cirrhosis: CT and MR imaging evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brancatelli, Giuseppe; Federle, Michael P.; Ambrosini, Roberta; Lagalla, Roberto; Carriero, Alessandro; Midiri, Massimo; Vilgrain, Valerie

    2007-01-01

    In this article, we present the CT and MR imaging characteristics of the cirrhotic liver. We describe the altered liver morphology in different forms of viral, alcoholic and autoimmune end-stage liver disease. We present the spectrum of imaging findings in portal hypertension, such as splenomegaly, ascites and varices. We describe the patchy and lacelike patterns of fibrosis, along with the focal confluent form. The process of hepatocarcinogenesis is detailed, from regenerative to dysplastic nodules to overt hepatocellular carcinoma. Different types of non-neoplastic focal liver lesions occurring in the cirrhotic liver are discussed, including arterially enhancing nodules, hemangiomas and peribiliary cysts. We show different conditions causing liver morphology changes that can mimic cirrhosis, such as congenital hepatic fibrosis, 'pseudo-cirrhosis' due to breast metastases treated with chemotherapy, Budd-Chiari syndrome, sarcoidosis and cavernous transformation of the portal vein

  1. Cirrhosis: CT and MR imaging evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brancatelli, Giuseppe [Sezione di Radiologia, Ospedale Specializzato in Gastroenterologia, ' Saverio de Bellis' -IRCCS, 70013 Castellana Grotte (Bari) (Italy) and Sezione di Scienze Radiologiche, Dipartimento di Biotecnologie Mediche e Medicina Legale, Universita di Palermo, Via del Vespro 127, 90127 Palermo (Italy) and Department of Radiology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, 200 Lothrop Street, 15213 Pittsburgh, PA (United States)]. E-mail: gbranca@yahoo.com; Federle, Michael P. [Department of Radiology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, 200 Lothrop Street, 15213 Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Ambrosini, Roberta [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, ' Maggiore della Carita' University Hospital, ' A.Avogadro' Eastern Piemonte University, Corso Mazzini 18, Novara (Italy); Lagalla, Roberto [Sezione di Scienze Radiologiche, Dipartimento di Biotecnologie Mediche e Medicina Legale, Universita di Palermo, Via del Vespro 127, 90127 Palermo (Italy); Carriero, Alessandro [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, ' Maggiore della Carita' University Hospital, ' A.Avogadro' Eastern Piemonte University, Corso Mazzini 18, Novara (Italy); Midiri, Massimo [Sezione di Scienze Radiologiche, Dipartimento di Biotecnologie Mediche e Medicina Legale, Universita di Palermo, Via del Vespro 127, 90127 Palermo (Italy); Vilgrain, Valerie [Service de Radiologie, Hopital Beaujon, 100 Boulevard du General Leclerc, 92118 Clichy (France)

    2007-01-15

    In this article, we present the CT and MR imaging characteristics of the cirrhotic liver. We describe the altered liver morphology in different forms of viral, alcoholic and autoimmune end-stage liver disease. We present the spectrum of imaging findings in portal hypertension, such as splenomegaly, ascites and varices. We describe the patchy and lacelike patterns of fibrosis, along with the focal confluent form. The process of hepatocarcinogenesis is detailed, from regenerative to dysplastic nodules to overt hepatocellular carcinoma. Different types of non-neoplastic focal liver lesions occurring in the cirrhotic liver are discussed, including arterially enhancing nodules, hemangiomas and peribiliary cysts. We show different conditions causing liver morphology changes that can mimic cirrhosis, such as congenital hepatic fibrosis, 'pseudo-cirrhosis' due to breast metastases treated with chemotherapy, Budd-Chiari syndrome, sarcoidosis and cavernous transformation of the portal vein.

  2. Prototype volumetric ultrasound tomography image guidance system for prone stereotactic partial breast irradiation: proof-of-concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Tsuicheng D.; Parsons, David; Zhang, Yue; Hrycushko, Brian; Zhao, Bo; Chopra, Rajiv; Kim, Nathan; Spangler, Ann; Rahimi, Asal; Timmerman, Robert; Jiang, Steve B.; Lu, Weiguo; Gu, Xuejun

    2018-03-01

    Accurate dose delivery in stereotactic partial breast irradiation (S-PBI) is challenging because of the target position uncertainty caused by breast deformation, the target volume changes caused by lumpectomy cavity shrinkage, and the target delineation uncertainty on simulation computed tomography (CT) images caused by poor soft tissue contrast. We have developed a volumetric ultrasound tomography (UST) image guidance system for prone position S-PBI. The system is composed of a novel 3D printed rotation water tank, a patient-specific resin breast immobilization cup, and a 1D array ultrasound transducer. Coronal 2D US images were acquired in 5° increments over a 360° range, and planes were acquired every 2 mm in elevation. A super-compounding technique was used to reconstruct the image volume. The image quality of UST was evaluated with a BB-1 breast phantom and BioZorb surgical marker, and the results revealed that UST offered better soft tissue contrast than CT and similar image quality to MR. In the evaluated plane, the size and location of five embedded objects were measured and compared to MR, which is considered as the ground truth. Objects’ diameters and the distances between objects in UST differ by approximately 1 to 2 mm from those in MR, which showed that UST offers the image quality required for S-PBI. In future work we will develop a robotic system that will be ultimately implemented in the clinic.

  3. Efficacy of breast shielding during CT of the head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brnic, Z.; Hebrang, A.; Anic, P.

    2002-01-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate in vivo the levels of breast exposure to scatter radiation in head CT examination and the dependence of breast exposure upon body constitution. We tried to estimate the efficacy of external lead shielding as a mean of breast dose reduction. We wanted to estimate how much radiation reaches the organ from outside, in comparison to radiation load due to internal scatter

  4. Normal physiologic and Benign foci with F-18 FDG avidity on PET/CT in patients with breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Soon Ah; Lee, Kwang Man; Choi, Un Jong; Kim, Hun Soo; Kim, Hye Won; Song, Jeong Hoon [College of Medicine, Wonkwnag University, Iksan (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-12-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the physiologic and benign F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) avid foci in patients with breast cancer. On 309 F-18 FDG PET/CT scans of 241 women with breast cancer, the hypermetabolic lesions compared with the surrounding normal region were evaluated retrospectively. Available reports of other relevant radiological imaging medical records, and follow-up PET/CT were reviewed for explanations of the abnormal uptake. Among the 70 physiologic foci, muscular uptake of the lower neck following the surgical and/or radiation therapy of ipsilateral breast (29%), hypermetabolic ovaries (16%) and uterine (10%) uptake during the ovulatory and menstrual phases during the normal menstrual cycle were identified, and also hypermetabolic brown fat in cold-induced thermogenesis (7%), non-specific bowel uptake (35%) were observed. Among the 147 benign lesions, sequelae of the chest wall and breasts following surgical and/or radiation therapy, were often observed (27%). Hypermetabolic thyroid glands were noted as adenomas and chronic thyroiditis (18%). Reactive hyperplasia of cervical or mediastinal lymph nodes (32%), degenerative osteoarthritis and healed fractures (15%), hypermetabolic benign lung lesions (6%) were observed. Altered physiologic and benign F-18 FDG uptake in the cervical muscle and chest wall following ipsilateral breast surgery or radiotherapy were common, and also normal physiologic uptake in ovary and uterus, brown fat, thyroid were considered as predominant findings in women patients with breast cancer. Knowledge of these findings might aid in the interpretation of FDG PET/CT in patients with breast cancer

  5. Volumetric CT-images improve testing of radiological image interpretation skills

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ravesloot, Cécile J., E-mail: C.J.Ravesloot@umcutrecht.nl [Radiology Department at University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3508 GA Utrecht, Room E01.132 (Netherlands); Schaaf, Marieke F. van der, E-mail: M.F.vanderSchaaf@uu.nl [Department of Pedagogical and Educational Sciences at Utrecht University, Heidelberglaan 1, 3584 CS Utrecht (Netherlands); Schaik, Jan P.J. van, E-mail: J.P.J.vanSchaik@umcutrecht.nl [Radiology Department at University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3508 GA Utrecht, Room E01.132 (Netherlands); Cate, Olle Th.J. ten, E-mail: T.J.tenCate@umcutrecht.nl [Center for Research and Development of Education at University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3508 GA Utrecht (Netherlands); Gijp, Anouk van der, E-mail: A.vanderGijp-2@umcutrecht.nl [Radiology Department at University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3508 GA Utrecht, Room E01.132 (Netherlands); Mol, Christian P., E-mail: C.Mol@umcutrecht.nl [Image Sciences Institute at University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3508 GA Utrecht (Netherlands); Vincken, Koen L., E-mail: K.Vincken@umcutrecht.nl [Image Sciences Institute at University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3508 GA Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2015-05-15

    Rationale and objectives: Current radiology practice increasingly involves interpretation of volumetric data sets. In contrast, most radiology tests still contain only 2D images. We introduced a new testing tool that allows for stack viewing of volumetric images in our undergraduate radiology program. We hypothesized that tests with volumetric CT-images enhance test quality, in comparison with traditional completely 2D image-based tests, because they might better reflect required skills for clinical practice. Materials and methods: Two groups of medical students (n = 139; n = 143), trained with 2D and volumetric CT-images, took a digital radiology test in two versions (A and B), each containing both 2D and volumetric CT-image questions. In a questionnaire, they were asked to comment on the representativeness for clinical practice, difficulty and user-friendliness of the test questions and testing program. Students’ test scores and reliabilities, measured with Cronbach's alpha, of 2D and volumetric CT-image tests were compared. Results: Estimated reliabilities (Cronbach's alphas) were higher for volumetric CT-image scores (version A: .51 and version B: .54), than for 2D CT-image scores (version A: .24 and version B: .37). Participants found volumetric CT-image tests more representative of clinical practice, and considered them to be less difficult than volumetric CT-image questions. However, in one version (A), volumetric CT-image scores (M 80.9, SD 14.8) were significantly lower than 2D CT-image scores (M 88.4, SD 10.4) (p < .001). The volumetric CT-image testing program was considered user-friendly. Conclusion: This study shows that volumetric image questions can be successfully integrated in students’ radiology testing. Results suggests that the inclusion of volumetric CT-images might improve the quality of radiology tests by positively impacting perceived representativeness for clinical practice and increasing reliability of the test.

  6. The study of target delineation and target movement of whole breast assisted by active breathing control in intensity modulated radiotherapy after breast conservative surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jianbing; Yu Jinming; Ma Zhifang; Lu Jie; Sun Tao; Guo Shoufang; Wang Jingguo

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To explore the influence of different delineators and different delineating time on target determination of the whole breast and to explore intrafraction and interfraction target displacements of the breast on moderate deep inspiration breathing hold (mDIBH) assisted by active breathing control (ABC) alter breast conservative surgery. Methods: Twenty patients received primary CT-simulation assisted by ABC to get five sets of CT image on the three breathing condition which included one set from free breath (FB), two sets from mDIBH and two sets from deep expiration breathing control (DEBH). After radiotherapy with ten to fifteen fractions, the repeat CT-simulation was carried out to get the same five sets of CT image as the primary CT- simulation. The whole breast target were delineated at different time by the same delineator and delineated respectively by five delineators on the first set of CT images got with mDIBH from the primary CT-simulation, and to compare the influence of delineator and delineating time on the whole breast target. The total silver clips in the cavity were marked respectively on the two sets of CT images got with mDIBH from the primary CT-simulation, and to compare the intrafraction displacement of geometric body structured by the total of silver clips. The two ribs near the isocentric plane of the breast target were delineated respectively on two sets of the mDIBH CT image from the primary CT-simulation and on one set of the mDIBH CT image from the repeat CT-simulation, and comparing the movement of the point of interest (POI) of the ribs delineated to get the value of intrafraction and interfraction thoracic expansion. Results: There was not statistically significant between the four volumes of whole breast targets delineated by the same delineator at different time, but with statistics significant between the volumes of whole breast target delineated by the different delineators ( F=19.681, P=0.000). There was not statistically

  7. Breast cancer detection using high-resolution breast PET compared to whole-body PET or PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalinyak, Judith E. [Naviscan Inc., San Diego, CA (United States); Berg, Wendie A. [University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Magee-Womens Hospital, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Schilling, Kathy [Boca Raton Regional Hospital, Boca Raton, FL (United States); Madsen, Kathleen S. [Certus International, Inc., St. Louis, MO (United States); Narayanan, Deepa [Naviscan Inc., San Diego, CA (United States); National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States); Tartar, Marie [Scripps Clinic, Scripps Green Hospital, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2014-02-15

    To compare the performance characteristics of positron emission mammography (PEM) with those of whole-body PET (WBPET) and PET/CT in women with newly diagnosed breast cancer. A total of 178 women consented to PEM for presurgical planning in an IRB-approved protocol and also underwent either WBPET (n = 69) or PET/CT (n = 109) imaging, as per usual care at three centers. Tumor detection sensitivity, positive predictive values, and {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake were compared between the modalities. The effects of tumor size, type, and grade on detection were examined. The chi-squared or Fisher's exact tests were used to compare distributions between groups, and McNemar's test was used to compare distributions for paired data within subject groups, i.e. PEM versus WBPET or PEM versus PET/CT. The mean age of the women was 59 ± 12 years (median 60 years, range 26-89 years), with a mean invasive index tumor size of 1.6 ± 0.8 cm (median 1.5 cm, range 0.5-4.0 cm). PEM detected more index tumors (61/66, 92 %) than WBPET (37/66, 56 %; p < 0.001) or PET/CT (95/109, 87 % vs. 104/109, 95 % for PEM; p < 0.029). Sensitivity for the detection of additional ipsilateral malignancies was also greater with PEM (7/15, 47 %) than with WBPET (1/15, 6.7 %; p = 0.014) or PET/CT (3/23, 13 % vs. 13/23, 57 % for PEM; p = 0.003). Index tumor detection decreased with decreasing invasive tumor size for both WBPET (p = 0.002) and PET/CT (p < 0.001); PEM was not significantly affected (p = 0.20). FDG uptake, quantified in terms of maximum PEM uptake value, was lowest in ductal carcinoma in situ (median 1.5, range 0.7-3.0) and invasive lobular carcinoma (median 1.5, range 0.7-3.4), and highest in grade III invasive ductal carcinoma (median 3.1, range 1.4-12.9). PEM was more sensitive than either WBPET or PET/CT in showing index and additional ipsilateral breast tumors and remained highly sensitive for tumors smaller than 1 cm. (orig.)

  8. Scatter radiation breast exposure during head CT: impact of scanning conditions and anthropometric parameters on shielded and unshielded breast dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klasic, B. [Hospital for pulmonary diseases, Zagreb (Croatia); Knezevic, Z.; Vekic, B. [Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Zagreb (Croatia); Brnic, Z.; Novacic, K. [Merkur Univ. Hospital, Zagreb (Croatia)

    2006-07-01

    Constantly increasing clinical requests for CT scanning of the head on our facility continue to raise concern regarding radiation exposure of patients, especially radiosensitive tissues positioned close to the scanning plane. The aim of our prospective study was to estimate scatter radiation doses to the breast from routine head CT scans, both with and without use of lead shielding, and to establish influence of various technical and anthropometric factors on doses using statistical data analysis. In 85 patient referred to head CT for objective medical reasons, one breast was covered with lead apron during CT scanning. Radiation doses were measured at skin of both breasts and over the apron simultaneously, by the use of thermo luminescent dosimeters. The doses showed a mean reduction by 37% due to lead shielding. After we statistically analyzed our data, we observed significant correlation between under-the-shield dose and values of technical parameters. We used multiple linear regression model to describe the relationships of doses to unshielded and shielded breast respectively, with anthropometric and technical factors. Our study proved lead shielding of the breast to be effective, easy to use and leading to a significant reduction in scatter dose. (author)

  9. Scatter radiation breast exposure during head CT: impact of scanning conditions and anthropometric parameters on shielded and unshielded breast dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klasic, B.; Knezevic, Z.; Vekic, B.; Brnic, Z.; Novacic, K.

    2006-01-01

    Constantly increasing clinical requests for CT scanning of the head on our facility continue to raise concern regarding radiation exposure of patients, especially radiosensitive tissues positioned close to the scanning plane. The aim of our prospective study was to estimate scatter radiation doses to the breast from routine head CT scans, both with and without use of lead shielding, and to establish influence of various technical and anthropometric factors on doses using statistical data analysis. In 85 patient referred to head CT for objective medical reasons, one breast was covered with lead apron during CT scanning. Radiation doses were measured at skin of both breasts and over the apron simultaneously, by the use of thermo luminescent dosimeters. The doses showed a mean reduction by 37% due to lead shielding. After we statistically analyzed our data, we observed significant correlation between under-the-shield dose and values of technical parameters. We used multiple linear regression model to describe the relationships of doses to unshielded and shielded breast respectively, with anthropometric and technical factors. Our study proved lead shielding of the breast to be effective, easy to use and leading to a significant reduction in scatter dose. (author)

  10. PET-CT detection rate of primary breast cancer lesions. Correlation with the clinicopathological factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Tomoko; Tozaki, Mitsuhiro; Fukuma, Eisuke

    2008-01-01

    One hundred and forty lesions of primary breast cancer underwent positron emission tomography (PET)-CT between June 2006 and May 2007. The PET-CT detection rate of primary breast cancer lesions was 72.1%. The detection rate was 52.1% for invasive cancer ≤20 mm, 92.8% for invasive breast cancers >20 mm, and these results were significant. In the present study, no significant relationship was observed between tumor types, however, invasive lobular carcinoma showed a lower detection rate, 58.3%. The PET-CT results were not significantly affected by either estrogen and progesterone receptors or distant metastasis. A significant correlation regarding the detection rate of PET-CT was found with HER2 status, tumor grade, and axillary lymph node status. The detection rate was 100% for invasive cancer ≤20 mm when the interval between prior diagnostic Mammotome biopsies and PET-CT was less than 3 weeks, 18.8% for invasive cancer ≤20 mm when the interval was more than 3 weeks, and these results were significant. Mammotome biopsies may therefore affect the detection rate of PET-CT. Invasive cancers ≤20 mm showed a low detection rate, therefore, it is considered to be insufficient to use PET-CT for the detection of early breast cancer. (author)

  11. Three dimensional dose distribution comparison of simple and complex acquisition trajectories in dedicated breast CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, Jainil P., E-mail: jainil.shah@duke.edu [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Multi Modality Imaging Lab, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Mann, Steve D. [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Multi Modality Imaging Lab, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); McKinley, Randolph L. [ZumaTek, Inc., Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27709 (United States); Tornai, Martin P. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Multi Modality Imaging Lab, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Purpose: A novel breast CT system capable of arbitrary 3D trajectories has been developed to address cone beam sampling insufficiency as well as to image further into the patient’s chest wall. The purpose of this study was to characterize any trajectory-related differences in 3D x-ray dose distribution in a pendant target when imaged with different orbits. Methods: Two acquisition trajectories were evaluated: circular azimuthal (no-tilt) and sinusoidal (saddle) orbit with ±15° tilts around a pendant breast, using Monte Carlo simulations as well as physical measurements. Simulations were performed with tungsten (W) filtration of a W-anode source; the simulated source flux was normalized to the measured exposure of a W-anode source. A water-filled cylindrical phantom was divided into 1 cm{sup 3} voxels, and the cumulative energy deposited was tracked in each voxel. Energy deposited per voxel was converted to dose, yielding the 3D distributed dose volumes. Additionally, three cylindrical phantoms of different diameters (10, 12.5, and 15 cm) and an anthropomorphic breast phantom, initially filled with water (mimicking pure fibroglandular tissue) and then with a 75% methanol-25% water mixture (mimicking 50–50 fibroglandular-adipose tissues), were used to simulate the pendant breast geometry and scanned on the physical system. Ionization chamber calibrated radiochromic film was used to determine the dose delivered in a 2D plane through the center of the volume for a fully 3D CT scan using the different orbits. Results: Measured experimental results for the same exposure indicated that the mean dose measured throughout the central slice for different diameters ranged from 3.93 to 5.28 mGy, with the lowest average dose measured on the largest cylinder with water mimicking a homogeneously fibroglandular breast. These results align well with the cylinder phantom Monte Carlo studies which also showed a marginal difference in dose delivered by a saddle trajectory in the

  12. Three dimensional dose distribution comparison of simple and complex acquisition trajectories in dedicated breast CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, Jainil P.; Mann, Steve D.; McKinley, Randolph L.; Tornai, Martin P.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: A novel breast CT system capable of arbitrary 3D trajectories has been developed to address cone beam sampling insufficiency as well as to image further into the patient’s chest wall. The purpose of this study was to characterize any trajectory-related differences in 3D x-ray dose distribution in a pendant target when imaged with different orbits. Methods: Two acquisition trajectories were evaluated: circular azimuthal (no-tilt) and sinusoidal (saddle) orbit with ±15° tilts around a pendant breast, using Monte Carlo simulations as well as physical measurements. Simulations were performed with tungsten (W) filtration of a W-anode source; the simulated source flux was normalized to the measured exposure of a W-anode source. A water-filled cylindrical phantom was divided into 1 cm"3 voxels, and the cumulative energy deposited was tracked in each voxel. Energy deposited per voxel was converted to dose, yielding the 3D distributed dose volumes. Additionally, three cylindrical phantoms of different diameters (10, 12.5, and 15 cm) and an anthropomorphic breast phantom, initially filled with water (mimicking pure fibroglandular tissue) and then with a 75% methanol-25% water mixture (mimicking 50–50 fibroglandular-adipose tissues), were used to simulate the pendant breast geometry and scanned on the physical system. Ionization chamber calibrated radiochromic film was used to determine the dose delivered in a 2D plane through the center of the volume for a fully 3D CT scan using the different orbits. Results: Measured experimental results for the same exposure indicated that the mean dose measured throughout the central slice for different diameters ranged from 3.93 to 5.28 mGy, with the lowest average dose measured on the largest cylinder with water mimicking a homogeneously fibroglandular breast. These results align well with the cylinder phantom Monte Carlo studies which also showed a marginal difference in dose delivered by a saddle trajectory in the

  13. Diagnostic Value of Nineteen Different Imaging Methods for Patients with Breast Cancer: a Network Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Hong Zhang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: We performed a network meta-analysis (NMA to investigate and compare the diagnostic value of 19 different imaging methods used for breast cancer (BC. Methods: Cochrane Library, PubMed and EMBASE were searched to collect the relevant literature from the inception of the study until November 2016. A combination of direct and indirect comparisons was performed using an NMA to evaluate the combined odd ratios (OR and draw the surface under the cumulative ranking curves (SUCRA of the diagnostic value of different imaging methods for BC. Results: A total of 39 eligible diagnostic tests regarding 19 imaging methods (mammography [MG], breast-specific gamma imaging [BSGI], color Doppler sonography [CD], contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging [CE-MRI], digital breast tomosynthesis [DBT], fluorodeoxyglucose positron-emission tomography/computed tomography [FDG PET/CT], fluorodeoxyglucose positron-emission tomography [FDG-PET], full field digital mammography [FFDM], handheld breast ultrasound [HHUS], magnetic resonance imaging [MRI], automated breast volume scanner [ABUS], magnetic resonance mammography [MRM], scintimammography [SMM], single photon emission computed tomography scintimammography [SPECT SMM], ultrasound elastography [UE], ultrasonography [US], mammography + ultrasonography [MG + US], mammography + scintimammography [MG + SMM], and ultrasound elastography + ultrasonography [UE + US] were included in the study. According to this network meta-analysis, in comparison to the MG method, the CE-MRI, MRI, MRM, MG + SMM and UE + US methods exhibited relatively higher sensitivity, and the specificity of the FDG PET/CT method was higher, while the BSGI and MRI methods exhibited higher accuracy. Conclusion: The results from this NMA indicate that the diagnostic value of the BSGI, MG + SMM, MRI and CE-MRI methods for BC were relatively higher in terms of sensitivity, specificity and accuracy.

  14. {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT for systemic staging of patients with newly diagnosed ER-positive and HER2-positive breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulaner, Gary A.; Castillo, Raychel [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Weill Cornell Medical College, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Wills, Jonathan [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Information Systems, New York, NY (United States); Goenen, Mithat; Goldman, Debra A. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, New York, NY (United States)

    2017-08-15

    This study assesses {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT for patients with newly diagnosed estrogen receptor-positive/human epidermal growth factor receptor-negative (ER+/HER2-) and human epidermal growth factor receptor-positive (HER2+) breast cancer. In this Institutional Review Board-approved retrospective study, our Healthcare Information System was screened for patients with ER+/HER2- and HER2+ breast cancer who underwent {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT prior to systemic or radiation therapy. The initial stage was determined from mammography, ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, and/or surgery.{sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT was evaluated to identify unsuspected extra-axillary regional nodal and distant metastases. The proportion of patients upstaged overall and stratified by stage and receptor phenotypes was calculated along with confidence intervals (CI). A total of 238 patients with ER+/HER2- and 245 patients with HER2+ who met inclusion criteria were evaluated. For patients with ER+/HER2-breast cancer, {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT revealed unsuspected distant metastases in 3/71 (4%) initial stage IIA, 13/95 (14%) stage IIB, and 15/57 (26%) stage III. For patients with HER2+ breast cancer, {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT revealed unsuspected distant metastases in 3/72 (4%) initial stage IIA, 13/93 (14%) stage IIB, and 13/59 (22%) stage III. The overall upstaging rate for IIB was 14% (95% confidence interval (CI): 9-20%). {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT revealed distant metastases in 14% (95% CI: 9-20%) of patients with stage IIB ER+/HER2- and HER2+ breast cancer, which is similar to upstaging rates previously seen in patients with stage IIB triple-negative breast cancer (15%, 95% CI: 9-24%). The detection of unsuspected distant metastases in these patients alters treatment and prognosis. NCCN guidelines should consider adding patients with stage IIB breast cancer for consideration of systemic staging with {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT at the time of initial diagnosis. (orig.)

  15. PET/CT imaging: The incremental value of assessing the glucose metabolic phenotype and the structure of cancers in a single examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czernin, Johannes; Benz, Matthias R.; Allen-Auerbach, Martin S.

    2010-01-01

    PET/CT with the glucose analogue FDG is emerging as the most important diagnostic imaging tool in oncology. More than 2000 PET/CT scanners are operational worldwide and its unique role for diagnosing, staging, restaging and therapeutic monitoring in cancer is undisputed. Studies conducted in thousands of cancer patients have clearly indicated that the combination of molecular PET with anatomical CT imaging provides incremental diagnostic value over PET or CT alone. State of the art imaging protocols combine fully diagnostic CT scans with quality whole body PET surveys. The current review briefly describes the biological alterations of cancer cells that result in their switch to a strongly glycolytic phenotype. Different whole body imaging protocols are discussed. We summarize the evidence for the incremental value of PET/CT over CT and PET alone using imaging of sarcoma as an example. Following this section we discuss the performance of FDG-PET/CT imaging for staging, restaging and monitoring of head and neck cancer, solitary lung nodules and lung cancer, breast cancer, colorectal cancer, lymphoma and unknown primary tumors. Finally, the recently emerging evidence of a substantial impact of PET/CT imaging on patient management is presented.

  16. The application value of PET-CT in the diagnosis of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Haitao

    2005-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women in most of countries. During the past decades, the application of PET with 18 f-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glocuse ( 18 F-FDG) has remarkably improved the management of breast cancer. Nevertheless, due to anatomical localisation of 18 F-FDG uptake was difficult, the clinical interpretation of 18 F-FDG PET scan could not be exactly. A novel combined PET-CT system has largely improved the capacity of sensitivity and specificity in the diagnosis of breast cancer. In this artiacal we focus on the application value of PET-CT to breast cancer diagnosis, with respect to dissease re-staging, treatment monitoring, preoperative staging and radiotherapy planning. (authors)

  17. Development of an Anthropomorphic Breast Phantom for Combined PET, B-Mode Ultrasound and Elastographic Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Dang, J; Tavernier, S; Lasaygues, P; Mensah, S; Zhang, D C; Auffray, E; Frisch, B; Varela, J; Wan, M X; Felix, N

    2011-01-01

    Combining the advantages of different imaging modalities leads to improved clinical results. For example, ultrasound provides good real-time structural information without any radiation and PET provides sensitive functional information. For the ongoing ClearPEM-Sonic project combining ultrasound and PET for breast imaging, we developed a dual-modality PET/Ultrasound (US) phantom. The phantom reproduces the acoustic and elastic properties of human breast tissue and allows labeling the different tissues in the phantom with different concentrations of FDG. The phantom was imaged with a whole-body PET/CT and with the Supersonic Imagine Aixplorer system. This system allows both B-mode US and shear wave elastographic imaging. US elastography is a new imaging method for displaying the tissue elasticity distribution. It was shown to be useful in breast imaging. We also tested the phantom with static elastography. A 6D magnetic positioning system allows fusing the images obtained with the two modalities. ClearPEM-Soni...

  18. The study of dose variation and change of heart volume using 4D-CT in left breast radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Seon Mi; Cheon, Geum Seong; Heo, Gyeong Hun; Shin, Sung Pil; Kim, Kwang Seok; Kim, Chang Uk; Kim, Hoi Nam

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the results of changed heart volume and heart dose in the left breast cancer patients while considering the movements of respiration. During the months of March and May in 2012, we designated the 10 patients who had tangential irradiation with left breast cancer in the department of radiation Oncology. With acquired images of free breathing pattern through 3D and 4D CT, we had planed enough treatment filed for covered up the whole left breast. It compares the results of the exposed dose and the volume of heart by DVH (Dose Volume histogram). Although total dose was 50.4 Gy (1.8 Gy/28 fraction), reirradiated 9 Gy (1.8 Gy/5 Fraction) with PTV (Planning Target Volume) if necessary. It compares the results of heart volume and heart dose with the free breathing in 3D CT and 4D CT. It represents the maximum difference volume of heart is 40.5%. In addition, it indicated the difference volume of maximum and minimum, average are 8.8% and 27.9%, 37.4% in total absorbed dose of heart. In case of tangential irradiation (opposite beam) in left breast cancer patients, it is necessary to consider the changed heart volume by the respiration of patient and the heartbeat of patient

  19. Video-assisted breast surgery and 3-dimensional computed tomographic mammary lymphography (2). Sentinel node biopsy with 3D-CT mammary lymphography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Koji

    2010-01-01

    I have studied endoscopic surgery for breast diseases and 3-dimensional (3D) computed tomographic (CT) lymphography for sentinel node (SN) biopsy. In this second in a series of reports, I explain the techniques of 3D-CT lymphography. 3D-CT lymphography can show the detailed lymphatic flow from the breast tumor toward the SNs and the exact local relation between axillary lymph nodes. I have developed this 3D image-processing system to more precisely depict the anatomical structures of the mammary lymphovascular system. This system allows us to systematically collect axillary lymph nodes, including SNs. 3D-CT lymphography was performed to mark SNs on the skin on the day before surgery. Above the tumor and near the areola, 2 ml of Iopamiron 300 was injected subcutaneously. Sixteen-channel multidetector-row helical CT scan images were obtained 1 minute after injection to detect SNs, and after 3 and 5 minutes to observe lymph flow into the venous angle. The scan images were reconstructed to produce 3D images. SN biopsy was performed with the dye-staining method and endoscopy. 3D-CT lymphography accurately showed lymphatic flow from the tumor to SNs. We classified the relationship between the lymph ducts and the drained SNs into 4 patterns. Following up 3 and 5 minutes after injection of the contrast agent, we can follow the lymph ducts beyond the SN into the second and third nodes toward the venous angle with the complex plexus. The figure of the axillary nodes shows 5 beads-like grouped nodes. 3D-CT lymphography can also recognize the metastatic patterns of the enhanced lymph node. These patterns will predict the metastasis before SN biopsy. 3D-CT lymphography can also be used to detect lymph flow from the arm to avoid harming the arm lymph channel during axillary node dissection and SN biopsy. With 3D-CT lymphography, we can more accurately and precisely recognize lymph flow and the positional relations of SN and axillary nodes to surrounding anatomical structures

  20. CT and MR imaging of craniopharyngioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuda, M. [Tohoku Univ. School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan). Dept. of Radiology; Takahashi, S. [Tohoku Univ. School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan). Dept. of Radiology; Higano, S. [Tohoku Univ. School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan). Dept. of Radiology; Kurihara, N. [Tohoku Univ. School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan). Dept. of Radiology; Ikeda, H. [Tohoku Univ. School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan). Dept. of Neurosurgery; Sakamoto, K. [Tohoku Univ. School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan). Dept. of Radiology

    1997-05-01

    We reviewed imaging findings of CT and MR imaging in 20 cases of surgically confirmed craniopharyngioma in an attempt to determine their relation to patterns of tumor extent. The relationship between these patterns and the frequency of preoperative CT diagnosis and MR imaging diagnosis according to the surgical diagnosis were determined. The CT technique was superior to MR imaging in the detection of calcification. The MR imaging technique was superior to CT for determining tumor extent and provided valuable information about the relationships of the tumor to surrounding structures. Thus, CT and MR imaging have complementary roles in the diagnosis of craniopharyngiomas. In cases of possible craniopharyngioma, noncontrast sagittal T1-weighted images may enable the identification of the normal pituitary, possibly leading to the correct diagnosis. (orig.)

  1. CT and MR imaging of craniopharyngioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuda, M.; Takahashi, S.; Higano, S.; Kurihara, N.; Ikeda, H.; Sakamoto, K.

    1997-01-01

    We reviewed imaging findings of CT and MR imaging in 20 cases of surgically confirmed craniopharyngioma in an attempt to determine their relation to patterns of tumor extent. The relationship between these patterns and the frequency of preoperative CT diagnosis and MR imaging diagnosis according to the surgical diagnosis were determined. The CT technique was superior to MR imaging in the detection of calcification. The MR imaging technique was superior to CT for determining tumor extent and provided valuable information about the relationships of the tumor to surrounding structures. Thus, CT and MR imaging have complementary roles in the diagnosis of craniopharyngiomas. In cases of possible craniopharyngioma, noncontrast sagittal T1-weighted images may enable the identification of the normal pituitary, possibly leading to the correct diagnosis. (orig.)

  2. Toward optimal X-ray flux utilization in breast CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jakob Heide; Hansen, Per Christian; Sidky, Emil Y.

    2011-01-01

    A realistic computer-simulation of a breast computed tomography (CT) system and subject is constructed. The model is used to investigate the optimal number of views for the scan given a fixed total X-ray fluence. The reconstruction algorithm is based on accurate solution to a constrained......, TVminimization problem, which has received much interest recently for sparse-view CT data....

  3. CT images of gossypiboma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Hae Jeong; Lim, Jong Nam; Choi, Young Chil; Park, Jeong Hee

    1994-01-01

    Surgical sponges retained after laparotomy can cause serious problem if they were not be identified in early state. In these circumstances abdominal CT yields the accurate diagnostic images. The purpose of this report is to present highly indicative findings permitting correct preoperative diagnosis of the gossypiboma. We experienced three cases in which CT showed the images sufficiently characteristic to suggest the correct preoperative diagnosis. We evaluated retrospectively the radiological images of gossypiboma confirmed by operation. Three patients were admitted due to palpable masses. Two female patients had medical histories of cesarean sections and a male patient had been operated due to malignant fibrous histiocytoma, previously. Abdominal CT scan of one case revealed huge ovoid hypodense mass with enhanced peripheral rim. Calcific spots and whirl-like stripes were noted within the lesion. Towel was found in pathologic specimen. CT images of two patients showed well-encapsulated, mixed fluid and soft tissue density mass with several gas bubbles. Surgical sponges were found within abscesses. The authors conclude that these characteristic CT findings and careful histories of surgery are very useful for correct pre-operative diagnosis and permit the guideline for the optimal plan of the surgical treatment

  4. CT images of gossypiboma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Hae Jeong; Lim, Jong Nam; Choi, Young Chil; Park, Jeong Hee [College of Medicine, Kon-Kuk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-04-15

    Surgical sponges retained after laparotomy can cause serious problem if they were not be identified in early state. In these circumstances abdominal CT yields the accurate diagnostic images. The purpose of this report is to present highly indicative findings permitting correct preoperative diagnosis of the gossypiboma. We experienced three cases in which CT showed the images sufficiently characteristic to suggest the correct preoperative diagnosis. We evaluated retrospectively the radiological images of gossypiboma confirmed by operation. Three patients were admitted due to palpable masses. Two female patients had medical histories of cesarean sections and a male patient had been operated due to malignant fibrous histiocytoma, previously. Abdominal CT scan of one case revealed huge ovoid hypodense mass with enhanced peripheral rim. Calcific spots and whirl-like stripes were noted within the lesion. Towel was found in pathologic specimen. CT images of two patients showed well-encapsulated, mixed fluid and soft tissue density mass with several gas bubbles. Surgical sponges were found within abscesses. The authors conclude that these characteristic CT findings and careful histories of surgery are very useful for correct pre-operative diagnosis and permit the guideline for the optimal plan of the surgical treatment.

  5. Evaluation of bismuth shielding effectiveness in reducing breast absorbed dose during thoracic CT scan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso, T. C.; Mourao, A. P.; Santana, P. C.; Silva, T. A. [Federal University of Minas Gerais, Program of Nuclear Science and Techniques, Av. Pte. Antonio Carlos 6627, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

    2015-10-15

    Computed Tomography (CT) is an essential method for tracking neoplasia and efficiently diagnosing a wide variety of thoracic diseases. CT is generally considered the most accurate choice for lung examination. Due to the growing use of CT, breast and other superficial and radiosensitive organs are unnecessarily irradiated during radiological procedures, thus requiring the development of strategies appropriate to optimize and, if possible, to reduce the radiation dose. The use of bismuth shielding to reduce radiation dose absorbed by breast during thoracic CT examinations has been the subject of many studies recently published by Brazilian and foreign authors of various fields. The purpose of this paper is both to accurately determine the glandular dose when breast is exposed to radiation and to assess the reduction in absorbed dose during thoracic CT examinations, using a set of Thermoluminescent Dosimeters, an anthropomorphic phantom and bismuth shielding. (Author)

  6. Evaluation of bismuth shielding effectiveness in reducing breast absorbed dose during thoracic CT scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, T. C.; Mourao, A. P.; Santana, P. C.; Silva, T. A.

    2015-10-01

    Computed Tomography (CT) is an essential method for tracking neoplasia and efficiently diagnosing a wide variety of thoracic diseases. CT is generally considered the most accurate choice for lung examination. Due to the growing use of CT, breast and other superficial and radiosensitive organs are unnecessarily irradiated during radiological procedures, thus requiring the development of strategies appropriate to optimize and, if possible, to reduce the radiation dose. The use of bismuth shielding to reduce radiation dose absorbed by breast during thoracic CT examinations has been the subject of many studies recently published by Brazilian and foreign authors of various fields. The purpose of this paper is both to accurately determine the glandular dose when breast is exposed to radiation and to assess the reduction in absorbed dose during thoracic CT examinations, using a set of Thermoluminescent Dosimeters, an anthropomorphic phantom and bismuth shielding. (Author)

  7. Breast dose reduction for chest CT by modifying the scanning parameters based on the pre-scan size-specific dose estimate (SSDE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kidoh, Masafumi; Utsunomiya, Daisuke; Oda, Seitaro; Nakaura, Takeshi; Yuki, Hideaki; Hirata, Kenichiro; Namimoto, Tomohiro; Sakabe, Daisuke; Hatemura, Masahiro; Yamashita, Yasuyuki [Kumamoto University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Faculty of Life Sciences, Honjo, Kumamoto (Japan); Funama, Yoshinori [Kumamoto University, Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Life Sciences, Honjo, Kumamoto (Japan)

    2017-06-15

    To investigate the usefulness of modifying scanning parameters based on the size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) for a breast-dose reduction for chest CT. We scanned 26 women with a fixed volume CT dose index (CTDI{sub vol}) (15 mGy) and another 26 with a fixed SSDE (15 mGy) protocol (protocol 1 and 2, respectively). In protocol 2, tube current was calculated based on the patient habitus obtained on scout images. We compared the mean breast dose and the inter-patient breast dose variability and performed linear regression analysis of the breast dose and the body mass index (BMI) of the two protocols. The mean breast dose was about 35 % lower under protocol 2 than protocol 1 (10.9 mGy vs. 16.8 mGy, p < 0.01). The inter-patient breast dose variability was significantly lower under protocol 2 than 1 (1.2 mGy vs. 2.5 mGy, p < 0.01). We observed a moderate negative correlation between the breast dose and the BMI under protocol 1 (r = 0.43, p < 0.01); there was no significant correlation (r = 0.06, p = 0.35) under protocol 2. The SSDE-based protocol achieved a reduction in breast dose and in inter-patient breast dose variability. (orig.)

  8. Breast varices: imaging findings of an unusual presentation of collateral pathways in superior vena caval syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oezdemir, Ayseguel; Ilgit, Erhan T.; Konus, Oeznur L.; Cetin, Meltem; Oezsunar, Yelda

    2000-01-01

    Imaging findings are presented of an unusual pathway of collateral circulation consisting of bilateral and diffuse dilated breast veins from a patient with long standing superior vena caval syndrome. The main importance of this case is the extent of the collateral development through the breast veins, serving as the major pathway of collateral circulation. Identification of this unusual collateral development, which resembles breast varices, was performed with contrast-enhanced chest CT scans, digital subtraction venography, color Doppler ultrasonography, and mammographic studies. Collateral development was secondary to a long segment idiopathic venous occlusion involving bilateral subclavian and brachiocephalic veins as well as vena cava superior. We conclude that dilated breast veins when detected on any imaging modality should raise the suspicion of central venous obstruction

  9. Utility of 18FDG-PET/CT in breast cancer diagnostics – a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warning, Karina; Hildebrandt, Malene; Christensen, Bent

    2011-01-01

    as a primary diagnostic procedure in breast cancer; but it has the potential to be useful for the detection of distant metastases and for monitoring response to chemotherapy in breast cancer patients. PET/CT should still be regarded as a supplement to conventional diagnostic procedures such as CT and MRI....

  10. Augmented reality for breast imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rancati, Alberto; Angrigiani, Claudio; Nava, Maurizio B; Catanuto, Giuseppe; Rocco, Nicola; Ventrice, Fernando; Dorr, Julio

    2018-02-21

    Augmented reality (AR) enables the superimposition of virtual reality reconstructions onto clinical images of a real patient, in real time. This allows visualization of internal structures through overlying tissues, thereby providing a virtual transparency vision of surgical anatomy. AR has been applied to neurosurgery, which utilizes a relatively fixed space, frames, and bony references; the application of AR facilitates the relationship between virtual and real data. Augmented Breast imaging (ABI) is described. Breast MRI studies for breast implant patients with seroma were performed using a Siemens 3T system with a body coil and a four-channel bilateral phased-array breast coil as the transmitter and receiver, respectively. The contrast agent used was (CA) gadolinium (Gd) injection (0.1 mmol/kg at 2 ml/s) by a programmable power injector. Dicom formated images data from 10 MRI cases of breast implant seroma and 10 MRI cases with T1-2 N0 M0 breast cancer, were imported and transformed into Augmented reality images. Augmented breast imaging (ABI) demonstrated stereoscopic depth perception, focal point convergence, 3D cursor use, and joystick fly-through. Augmented breast imaging (ABI) to the breast can improve clinical outcomes, giving an enhanced view of the structures to work on. It should be further studied to determine its utility in clinical practice.

  11. Development of an Anthropomorphic Breast Phantom for Combined PET, B-Mode Ultrasound and Elastographic Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Jun; Frisch, Benjamin; Lasaygues, Philippe; Zhang, Dachun; Tavernier, Stefaan; Felix, Nicolas; Lecoq, Paul; Auffray, Etiennette; Varela, Joao; Mensah, Serge; Wan, Mingxi

    2011-06-01

    Combining the advantages of different imaging modalities leads to improved clinical results. For example, ultrasound provides good real-time structural information without any radiation and PET provides sensitive functional information. For the ongoing ClearPEM-Sonic project combining ultrasound and PET for breast imaging, we developed a dual-modality PET/Ultrasound (US) phantom. The phantom reproduces the acoustic and elastic properties of human breast tissue and allows labeling the different tissues in the phantom with different concentrations of FDG. The phantom was imaged with a whole-body PET/CT and with the Supersonic Imagine Aixplorer system. This system allows both B-mode US and shear wave elastographic imaging. US elastography is a new imaging method for displaying the tissue elasticity distribution. It was shown to be useful in breast imaging. We also tested the phantom with static elastography. A 6D magnetic positioning system allows fusing the images obtained with the two modalities. ClearPEM-Sonic is a project of the Crystal Clear Collaboration and the European Centre for Research on Medical Imaging (CERIMED).

  12. Investigation of variability in image acquisition and contouring during 3D ultrasound guidance for partial breast irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landry, Anthony; Olivotto, Ivo; Beckham, Wayne; Berrang, Tanya; Gagne, Isabelle; Popescu, Carmen; Mitchell, Tracy; Vey, Hazel; Sand, Letricia; Soh, Siew Yan; Wark, Jill

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional ultrasound (3DUS) at simulation compared to 3DUS at treatment is an image guidance option for partial breast irradiation (PBI). This study assessed if user dependence in acquiring and contouring 3DUS (operator variability) contributed to variation in seroma shifts calculated for breast IGRT. Eligible patients met breast criteria for current randomized PBI studies. 5 Operators participated in this study. For each patient, 3 operators were involved in scan acquisitions and 5 were involved in contouring. At CT simulation (CT1), a 3DUS (US1) was performed by a single radiation therapist (RT). 7 to 14 days after CT1 a second CT (CT2) and 3 sequential 3DUS scans (US2a,b,c) were acquired by each of 3 RTs. Seroma shifts, between US1 and US2 scans were calculated by comparing geometric centers of the seromas (centroids). Operator contouring variability was determined by comparing 5 RT’s contours for a single image set. Scanning variability was assessed by comparing shifts between multiple scans acquired at the same time point (US1-US2a,b,c). Shifts in seromas contoured on CT (CT1-CT2) were compared to US data. From an initial 28 patients, 15 had CT visible seromas, met PBI dosimetric constraints, had complete US data, and were analyzed. Operator variability contributed more to the overall variability in seroma localization than the variability associated with multiple scan acquisitions (95% confidence mean uncertainty of 6.2 mm vs. 1.1 mm). The mean standard deviation in seroma shift was user dependent and ranged from 1.7 to 2.9 mm. Mean seroma shifts from simulation to treatment were comparable to CT. Variability in shifts due to different users acquiring and contouring 3DUS for PBI guidance were comparable to CT shifts. Substantial inter-observer effect needs to be considered during clinical implementation of 3DUS IGRT

  13. Optimization of SPECT-CT Hybrid Imaging Using Iterative Image Reconstruction for Low-Dose CT: A Phantom Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver S Grosser

    Full Text Available Hybrid imaging combines nuclear medicine imaging such as single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT or positron emission tomography (PET with computed tomography (CT. Through this hybrid design, scanned patients accumulate radiation exposure from both applications. Imaging modalities have been the subject of long-term optimization efforts, focusing on diagnostic applications. It was the aim of this study to investigate the influence of an iterative CT image reconstruction algorithm (ASIR on the image quality of the low-dose CT images.Examinations were performed with a SPECT-CT scanner with standardized CT and SPECT-phantom geometries and CT protocols with systematically reduced X-ray tube currents. Analyses included image quality with respect to photon flux. Results were compared to the standard FBP reconstructed images. The general impact of the CT-based attenuation maps used during SPECT reconstruction was examined for two SPECT phantoms. Using ASIR for image reconstructions, image noise was reduced compared to FBP reconstructions for the same X-ray tube current. The Hounsfield unit (HU values reconstructed by ASIR were correlated to the FBP HU values(R2 ≥ 0.88 and the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR was improved by ASIR. However, for a phantom with increased attenuation, the HU values shifted for low X-ray tube currents I ≤ 60 mA (p ≤ 0.04. In addition, the shift of the HU values was observed within the attenuation corrected SPECT images for very low X-ray tube currents (I ≤ 20 mA, p ≤ 0.001.In general, the decrease in X-ray tube current up to 30 mA in combination with ASIR led to a reduction of CT-related radiation exposure without a significant decrease in image quality.

  14. Comparison of FDG-PET/CT and contrast-enhanced CT for monitoring therapy response in patients with metastatic breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riedl, Christopher C.; Ulaner, Gary A.; Jochelson, Maxine S.; Weber, Wolfgang A. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Weill Cornell Medical College, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Pinker, Katja [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Medical University of Vienna, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Ong, Leonard T. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Baltzer, Pascal [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); McArthur, Heather L. [Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Department of Medicine, Breast Oncology, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Goenen, Mithat [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, New York, NY (United States); Dickler, Maura [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Medicine, New York, NY (United States)

    2017-08-15

    The aim of this study was to compare fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) and contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CE-CT) for the prediction of progression-free survival (PFS) and disease-specific survival (DSS) in patients with stage IV breast cancer undergoing systemic therapy. Sixty-five patients with metastatic breast cancer treated with first- or second-line systemic therapy in prospective clinical trials were included. Response to treatment was evaluated by Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) 1.1 for CE-CT and by PET Response Criteria in Solid Tumors (PERCIST), respectively. All responders by RECIST (n = 22) were also responders by PERCIST, but 40% (17/43) of non-responders by RECIST were responders by PERCIST. Responses according to RECIST and PERCIST both correlated with PFS, but PERCIST showed a significantly higher predictive accuracy (concordance index for PFS: 0.70 vs. 0.60). One-year PFS for responders vs. non-responders by RECIST was 59% vs. 27%, compared to 63% vs. 0% by PERCIST. Four-year DSS of responders and non-responders by RECIST was 50% and 38%, respectively (p = 0.2, concordance index: 0.55) as compared to 58% vs. 18% for PERCIST (p < 0.001, concordance index: 0.65). Response on PET/CT was also a significantly better predictor for DSS than disease control on CE-CT. In patients with metastatic breast cancer, tumor response on PET/CT appears to be a superior predictor of PFS and DSS than response on CE-CT. Monitoring tumor response by PET/CT may increase the power of clinical trials using tumor response as an endpoint, and may improve patient management in clinical routine. (orig.)

  15. A pilot study of FDG PET/CT detects a link between brown adipose tissue and breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Qi; Jones, Laundette; Hersl, Jerome; La, Hongloan; Smith, Mark; Jenkins, Jason; Goloubeva, Olga; Dilsizian, Vasken; Tkaczuk, Katherine; Chen, Wengen

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the second most lethal cancer in women. Understanding biological mechanisms that cause progression of this disease could yield new targets for prevention and treatment. Recent experimental studies suggest that brown adipose tissue (BAT) may play a key role in breast cancer progression. The primary objective for this pilot study was to determine if the prevalence of active BAT in patients with breast cancer is increased compared to cancer patients with other malignancies. We retrospectively analyzed data from 96 breast cancer patients who had FDG PET/CT scan for routine staging at the University of Maryland and 96 age- and weight-matched control female patients with other malignancies (predominantly colon cancer) who had undergone FDG PET/CT imaging on the same day. Data on the distribution (bilateral upper neck, supraclavicular and paraspinal regions) and intensity (SUVmax) of active BAT were evaluated by 2 Nuclear Medicine physicians, blinded to the clinical history. We found sufficient evidence to conclude that based on our sample data the prevalence of active BAT in breast cancer patients’ group is significantly different from that in the control group. The estimated frequency of BAT activity was 3 fold higher in breast cancer patients as compared to controls with other cancers, (16.7% vs. 5.2%, respectively, p = 0.019). When patients were stratified by age in order to determine the possible impact of age related hormonal changes on active BAT among the younger women (≤ 55 years of age), 25.6% breast cancer patients exhibited BAT activity compared to only 2.8% in control women (p = 0.007). In contrast, among the older women (> 55 years of age), the prevalence of active BAT was similar among breast cancer and control women (10.7% vs 6.7%). In breast cancer patients prevalence of BAT activity on FDGPET/CT is 3-fold greater than in age- and body weight-matched patients with other solid tumor malignancies; this difference is particularly

  16. Cross-sectional imaging to evaluate the extent of regional nodal disease in breast cancer patients undergoing neoadjuvant systemic therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Tara L., E-mail: anderson.tara@mayo.edu [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN, 55905 (United States); Glazebrook, Katrina N., E-mail: glazebrook.katrina@mayo.edu [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN, 55905 (United States); Murphy, Brittany L., E-mail: murphy.brittany@mayo.edu [Mayo Clinic, Department of Surgery, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN, 55905 (United States); Viers, Lyndsay D., E-mail: viers.lyndsay@mayo.edu [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN, 55905 (United States); Hieken, Tina J, E-mail: hieken.tina@mayo.edu [Mayo Clinic, Department of Surgery, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN, 55905 (United States)

    2017-04-15

    Purpose: Cross-sectional imaging often is performed in breast cancer patients undergoing neoadjuvant systemic therapy (NST) and may identify level III axillary and extra-axillary nodal disease. Our aim was to investigate associations of radiologic nodal staging with pathological N (pN) stage at operation and to explore how this might aid surgical and radiotherapy treatment planning. Materials and methods: With IRB approval, we reviewed pre-treatment breast MRI, PET/CT, and CT imaging and clinicopathologic data on 348 breast cancer patients with imaging available for review undergoing NST followed by operation at our institution 1/2008-9/2013. We defined abnormal lymph node findings on MRI, CT, and PET/CT to include cortical thickening, FDG-avidity and loss of fatty hilum. Patients were assigned a radiologic nodal (rN) stage based on imaging findings. Statistical analysis was performed using JMP 10.1 software Results: Pre-NST imaging included axillary ultrasound in 338 patients (97%), breast MRI in 305 (88%) and PET/CT or CT in 215 (62%). 213 patients (61%) were biopsy-proven axillary lymph node-positive (LN+) pre-treatment. cT stage was T1 in 9%, T2 in 49%, T3 in 29%, T4 in 12%; median tumor size was 4 cm. Pre-treatment rN stage across all the patients was rN0 in 86 (25%), rN1 in 173 (50%), and rN3 in 89 (26%). rN3 disease included level III axillary, supraclavicular and suspicious internal mammary lymph nodes in 47 (53%), 32 (37%) and 45 (52%), respectively. Of patients LN+ at diagnosis, 78 (37%) were rN3. After NST, 162 patients (47%) were node-positive at operation with a median (mean) of 3 (5.9 ± 0.4) positive lymph nodes including 128 of 213 (60%) LN+ at diagnosis. Pre-NST rN stage correlated with the likelihood and extent of axillary disease at operation, p = 0.002. Fifty four of 89 rN3 patients (61%) were node-positive at operation with a median (mean) of 5 (8 ± 1) positive nodes. rN3 patients had larger nodal metastases (median 9 vs 6 mm) and more

  17. Cross-sectional imaging to evaluate the extent of regional nodal disease in breast cancer patients undergoing neoadjuvant systemic therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, Tara L.; Glazebrook, Katrina N.; Murphy, Brittany L.; Viers, Lyndsay D.; Hieken, Tina J

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Cross-sectional imaging often is performed in breast cancer patients undergoing neoadjuvant systemic therapy (NST) and may identify level III axillary and extra-axillary nodal disease. Our aim was to investigate associations of radiologic nodal staging with pathological N (pN) stage at operation and to explore how this might aid surgical and radiotherapy treatment planning. Materials and methods: With IRB approval, we reviewed pre-treatment breast MRI, PET/CT, and CT imaging and clinicopathologic data on 348 breast cancer patients with imaging available for review undergoing NST followed by operation at our institution 1/2008-9/2013. We defined abnormal lymph node findings on MRI, CT, and PET/CT to include cortical thickening, FDG-avidity and loss of fatty hilum. Patients were assigned a radiologic nodal (rN) stage based on imaging findings. Statistical analysis was performed using JMP 10.1 software Results: Pre-NST imaging included axillary ultrasound in 338 patients (97%), breast MRI in 305 (88%) and PET/CT or CT in 215 (62%). 213 patients (61%) were biopsy-proven axillary lymph node-positive (LN+) pre-treatment. cT stage was T1 in 9%, T2 in 49%, T3 in 29%, T4 in 12%; median tumor size was 4 cm. Pre-treatment rN stage across all the patients was rN0 in 86 (25%), rN1 in 173 (50%), and rN3 in 89 (26%). rN3 disease included level III axillary, supraclavicular and suspicious internal mammary lymph nodes in 47 (53%), 32 (37%) and 45 (52%), respectively. Of patients LN+ at diagnosis, 78 (37%) were rN3. After NST, 162 patients (47%) were node-positive at operation with a median (mean) of 3 (5.9 ± 0.4) positive lymph nodes including 128 of 213 (60%) LN+ at diagnosis. Pre-NST rN stage correlated with the likelihood and extent of axillary disease at operation, p = 0.002. Fifty four of 89 rN3 patients (61%) were node-positive at operation with a median (mean) of 5 (8 ± 1) positive nodes. rN3 patients had larger nodal metastases (median 9 vs 6 mm) and more

  18. The Assessment of Estrogen Receptor Status and Its Intratumoral Heterogeneity in Patients With Breast Cancer by Using 18F-Fluoroestradiol PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhongyi; Sun, Yifei; Xu, Xiaoping; Zhang, Yongping; Zhang, Jianping; Xue, Jing; Wang, Mingwei; Yuan, Huiyu; Hu, Silong; Shi, Wei; Zhu, Beiling; Zhang, Yingjian

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical value of F-fluoroestradiol (F-FES) PET/CT in the assessment of the estrogen receptor (ER) and its intratumoral heterogeneity in breast cancer patients. Forty-six female patients (50 lesions) with histologically confirmed invasive breast cancer who underwent both F-FES and F-FDG PET/CT in our center were retrospectively included. All the patients enrolled were scheduled to undergo biopsy. The F-FES and FDG uptakes were compared with pathological features (tumor size, ER, progesterone receptor, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, and Ki67%). The optimal threshold to discriminate ER-positive and ER-negative lesions was determined by receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. Furthermore, we observed the intratumoral heterogeneity by a heterogeneity index (SUVmax/SUVmean) and compared the results with the Chang-Gung Image Texture Analysis. There was good agreement between F-FES uptake and ER, progesterone receptor, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 expression (P heterogeneity index-FES can easily observe ER heterogeneity. In addition, our results suggested that recurrent/metastatic patients and lesions located other than breast might have greater heterogeneity. F-FES PET/CT is a feasible, noninvasive method for assessing ER expression in breast cancer patients. Because intratumoral heterogeneity exists, F-FES PET/CT might better reflect the ER expression, especially in metastatic patients after treatment, thus assisting in making individualized treatment decisions.

  19. Implications of CT noise and artifacts for quantitative 99mTc SPECT/CT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hulme, K. W.; Kappadath, S. C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This paper evaluates the effects of computed tomography (CT) image noise and artifacts on quantitative single-photon emission computed-tomography (SPECT) imaging, with the aim of establishing an appropriate range of CT acquisition parameters for low-dose protocols with respect to accurate SPECT attenuation correction (AC). Methods: SPECT images of two geometric and one anthropomorphic phantom were reconstructed iteratively using CT scans acquired at a range of dose levels (CTDI vol = 0.4 to 46 mGy). Resultant SPECT image quality was evaluated by comparing mean signal, background noise, and artifacts to SPECT images reconstructed using the highest dose CT for AC. Noise injection was performed on linear-attenuation (μ) maps to determine the CT noise threshold for accurate AC. Results: High levels of CT noise (σ ∼ 200–400 HU) resulted in low μ-maps noise (σ ∼ 1%–3%). Noise levels greater than ∼10% in 140 keV μ-maps were required to produce visibly perceptible increases of ∼15% in 99m Tc SPECT images. These noise levels would be achieved at low CT dose levels (CTDI vol = 4 μGy) that are over 2 orders of magnitude lower than the minimum dose for diagnostic CT scanners. CT noise could also lower (bias) the expected μ values. The relative error in reconstructed SPECT signal trended linearly with the relative shift in μ. SPECT signal was, on average, underestimated in regions corresponding with beam-hardening artifacts in CT images. Any process that has the potential to change the CT number of a region by ∼100 HU (e.g., misregistration between CT images and SPECT images due to motion, the presence of contrast in CT images) could introduce errors in μ 140 keV on the order of 10%, that in turn, could introduce errors on the order of ∼10% into the reconstructed 99m Tc SPECT image. Conclusions: The impact of CT noise on SPECT noise was demonstrated to be negligible for clinically achievable CT parameters. Because CT dose levels that affect

  20. SPECT/CT workflow and imaging protocols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckers, Catherine [University Hospital of Liege, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Oncological Imaging, Department of Medical Physics, Liege (Belgium); Hustinx, Roland [University Hospital of Liege, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Oncological Imaging, Department of Medical Physics, Liege (Belgium); Domaine Universitaire du Sart Tilman, Service de Medecine Nucleaire et Imagerie Oncologique, CHU de Liege, Liege (Belgium)

    2014-05-15

    Introducing a hybrid imaging method such as single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT greatly alters the routine in the nuclear medicine department. It requires designing new workflow processes and the revision of original scheduling process and imaging protocols. In addition, the imaging protocol should be adapted for each individual patient, so that performing CT is fully justified and the CT procedure is fully tailored to address the clinical issue. Such refinements often occur before the procedure is started but may be required at some intermediate stage of the procedure. Furthermore, SPECT/CT leads in many instances to a new partnership with the radiology department. This article presents practical advice and highlights the key clinical elements which need to be considered to help understand the workflow process of SPECT/CT and optimise imaging protocols. The workflow process using SPECT/CT is complex in particular because of its bimodal character, the large spectrum of stakeholders, the multiplicity of their activities at various time points and the need for real-time decision-making. With help from analytical tools developed for quality assessment, the workflow process using SPECT/CT may be separated into related, but independent steps, each with its specific human and material resources to use as inputs or outputs. This helps identify factors that could contribute to failure in routine clinical practice. At each step of the process, practical aspects to optimise imaging procedure and protocols are developed. A decision-making algorithm for justifying each CT indication as well as the appropriateness of each CT protocol is the cornerstone of routine clinical practice using SPECT/CT. In conclusion, implementing hybrid SPECT/CT imaging requires new ways of working. It is highly rewarding from a clinical perspective, but it also proves to be a daily challenge in terms of management. (orig.)

  1. SPECT/CT workflow and imaging protocols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckers, Catherine; Hustinx, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Introducing a hybrid imaging method such as single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT greatly alters the routine in the nuclear medicine department. It requires designing new workflow processes and the revision of original scheduling process and imaging protocols. In addition, the imaging protocol should be adapted for each individual patient, so that performing CT is fully justified and the CT procedure is fully tailored to address the clinical issue. Such refinements often occur before the procedure is started but may be required at some intermediate stage of the procedure. Furthermore, SPECT/CT leads in many instances to a new partnership with the radiology department. This article presents practical advice and highlights the key clinical elements which need to be considered to help understand the workflow process of SPECT/CT and optimise imaging protocols. The workflow process using SPECT/CT is complex in particular because of its bimodal character, the large spectrum of stakeholders, the multiplicity of their activities at various time points and the need for real-time decision-making. With help from analytical tools developed for quality assessment, the workflow process using SPECT/CT may be separated into related, but independent steps, each with its specific human and material resources to use as inputs or outputs. This helps identify factors that could contribute to failure in routine clinical practice. At each step of the process, practical aspects to optimise imaging procedure and protocols are developed. A decision-making algorithm for justifying each CT indication as well as the appropriateness of each CT protocol is the cornerstone of routine clinical practice using SPECT/CT. In conclusion, implementing hybrid SPECT/CT imaging requires new ways of working. It is highly rewarding from a clinical perspective, but it also proves to be a daily challenge in terms of management. (orig.)

  2. A Novel Form of Breast Intraoperative Radiation Therapy With CT-Guided High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy: Results of a Prospective Phase 1 Clinical Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Showalter, Shayna L.; Petroni, Gina; Trifiletti, Daniel M.; Libby, Bruce; Schroen, Anneke T.; Brenin, David R.; Dalal, Parchayi; Smolkin, Mark; Reardon, Kelli A.; Showalter, Timothy N.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Existing intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) techniques are criticized for the lack of image guided treatment planning and energy deposition with, at times, poor resultant dosimetry and low radiation dose. We pioneered a novel method of IORT that incorporates customized, computed tomography (CT)-based treatment planning and high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy to overcome these drawbacks: CT-HDR-IORT. Methods and Materials: A phase 1 study was conducted to demonstrate the feasibility and safety of CT-HDR-IORT. Eligibility criteria included age ≥50 years, invasive or in situ breast cancer, tumor size <3 cm, and N0 disease. Patients were eligible before or within 30 days of breast-conserving surgery (BCS). BCS was performed, and a multilumen balloon catheter was placed. CT images were obtained, a customized HDR brachytherapy plan was created, and a dose of 12.5 Gy was delivered to 1-cm depth from the balloon surface. The catheter was removed, and the skin was closed. The primary endpoints were feasibility and acute toxicity. Feasibility was defined as IORT treatment interval (time from CT acquisition until IORT completion) ≤90 minutes. The secondary endpoints included dosimetry, cosmetic outcome, quality of life, and late toxicity. Results: Twenty-eight patients were enrolled. The 6-month follow-up assessments were completed by 93% of enrollees. The median IORT treatment interval was 67.2 minutes (range, 50-108 minutes). The treatment met feasibility criteria in 26 women (93%). The dosimetric goals were met in 22 patients (79%). There were no Radiation Therapy Oncology Group grade 3+ toxicities; 6 patients (21%) experienced grade 2 events. Most patients (93%) had good/excellent cosmetic outcomes at the last follow-up visit. Conclusions: CT-HDR-IORT is feasible and safe. This promising approach for a conformal, image-based, higher-dose breast IORT is being evaluated in a phase 2 trial.

  3. A Novel Form of Breast Intraoperative Radiation Therapy With CT-Guided High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy: Results of a Prospective Phase 1 Clinical Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Showalter, Shayna L., E-mail: snl2t@virginia.edu [Division of Surgical Oncology, Department of Surgery, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States); Petroni, Gina [Division of Translation Research and Applied Statistics, Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States); Trifiletti, Daniel M.; Libby, Bruce [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States); Schroen, Anneke T.; Brenin, David R. [Division of Surgical Oncology, Department of Surgery, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States); Dalal, Parchayi [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States); Smolkin, Mark [Division of Translation Research and Applied Statistics, Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States); Reardon, Kelli A.; Showalter, Timothy N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Purpose: Existing intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) techniques are criticized for the lack of image guided treatment planning and energy deposition with, at times, poor resultant dosimetry and low radiation dose. We pioneered a novel method of IORT that incorporates customized, computed tomography (CT)-based treatment planning and high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy to overcome these drawbacks: CT-HDR-IORT. Methods and Materials: A phase 1 study was conducted to demonstrate the feasibility and safety of CT-HDR-IORT. Eligibility criteria included age ≥50 years, invasive or in situ breast cancer, tumor size <3 cm, and N0 disease. Patients were eligible before or within 30 days of breast-conserving surgery (BCS). BCS was performed, and a multilumen balloon catheter was placed. CT images were obtained, a customized HDR brachytherapy plan was created, and a dose of 12.5 Gy was delivered to 1-cm depth from the balloon surface. The catheter was removed, and the skin was closed. The primary endpoints were feasibility and acute toxicity. Feasibility was defined as IORT treatment interval (time from CT acquisition until IORT completion) ≤90 minutes. The secondary endpoints included dosimetry, cosmetic outcome, quality of life, and late toxicity. Results: Twenty-eight patients were enrolled. The 6-month follow-up assessments were completed by 93% of enrollees. The median IORT treatment interval was 67.2 minutes (range, 50-108 minutes). The treatment met feasibility criteria in 26 women (93%). The dosimetric goals were met in 22 patients (79%). There were no Radiation Therapy Oncology Group grade 3+ toxicities; 6 patients (21%) experienced grade 2 events. Most patients (93%) had good/excellent cosmetic outcomes at the last follow-up visit. Conclusions: CT-HDR-IORT is feasible and safe. This promising approach for a conformal, image-based, higher-dose breast IORT is being evaluated in a phase 2 trial.

  4. Usefulness of 18F fluoride PET/CT in breast cancer patients with osteosclerotic bone metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Seok Ho; Kim, Ku Sang; Kang, Seok Yun; Song, Hee Sung; Jo, Kyung Sook; Lee, Su Jin; Yoon, Joon Kee; An, Young Sil; Choi, Bong Hoi

    2012-01-01

    Bone metastasis is an important factor for the treatment and prognosis of breast cancer patients. Whole body bone scintigraphy (WBBS) can evaluate skeletal metastases, and 18 F FDG PET/CT seems to exhibit high specificity and accuracy in detecting bone metastases. However, there is a limitation of 18 F FDG PET in assessing sclerotic bone metastases because some lesions may be undetectable. Recent studies showed that 18 F fluoride PET/CT is more sensitive than WBBS in detecting bone metastases. This study aims to evaluate the usefulness of 18 F fluoride PET/CT by comparing it with WBBS and 18 F FDG PET/CT in breast cancer patients with osteosclerotic skeletal metastases. Nine breast cancer patients with suspected bone metastases (9 females; mean age ± SD, 55.6±10.0 years) underwent 99m Tc MDP WBBS, 18 F FDG PET/CT and 18 F fluoride PET/CT. Lesion based analysis of five regions of the skeletons(skull, vertebral column, thoracic cage, pelvic bones and long bones of extremities) and patient based analysis were performed. 18 F fluoride PET/CT, 18 F FDG PET/CT and WBBS detected 49, 20 and 25 true metastases, respectively. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of 18 F fluoride PET/CT were 94.2%, 46.3%, 57.7% and 91.2%, respectively. Most true metastatic lesions of 18 F fluoride PET/CT had osteosclerotic change (45/49, 91.8%), and only four lesions showed osteolytic change. Most lesions on 18 F FDG PET/CT also demonstrated osteosclerotic change (17/20, 85.0%) with three osteolytic lesions. All true metastatic lesions detected on WBBS and 18 F FDG PET/CT were identified on 18 F fluoride PET/CT. 18 F FDG PET/CT in detecting osteosclerotic metastatic lesions. 18 F fluoride PET/CT might be useful in evaluating osteosclerotic metastases in breast cancer patients

  5. Reducing Radiation Doses in Female Breast and Lung during CT Examinations of Thorax: A new Technique in two Scanners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehnati P.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chest CT is a commonly used examination for the diagnosis of lung diseases, but a breast within the scanned field is nearly never the organ of interest. Objective: The purpose of this study is to compare the female breast and lung doses using split and standard protocols in chest CT scanning. Materials and Methods: The sliced chest and breast female phantoms were used. CT exams were performed using a single-slice (SS- and a 16 multi-slice (MS- CT scanner at 100 kVp and 120 kVp. Two different protocols, including standard and split protocols, were selected for scanning. The breast and lung doses were measured using thermo-luminescence dosimeters which were inserted into different layers of the chest and breast phantoms. The differences in breast and lung radiation doses in two protocols were studied in two scanners, analyzed by SPSS software and compared by t-test. Results: Breast dose by split scanning technique reduced 11% and 31% in SS- and MS- CT. Also, the radiation dose of lung tissue in this method decreased 18% and 54% in SS- and MS- CT, respectively. Moreover, there was a significant difference (p< 0.0001 in the breast and lung radiation doses between standard and split scanning protocols. Conclusion: The application of a split scan technique instead of standard protocol has a considerable potential to reduce breast and lung doses in SS- and MS- CT scanners. If split scanning protocol is associated with an optimum kV and MSCT, the maximum dose decline will be provided.

  6. Integrated PET/MR breast cancer imaging: Attenuation correction and implementation of a 16-channel RF coil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oehmigen, Mark, E-mail: mark.oehmigen@uni-due.de; Lindemann, Maike E. [High Field and Hybrid MR Imaging, University Hospital Essen, Essen 45147 (Germany); Lanz, Titus [Rapid Biomedical GmbH, Rimpar 97222 (Germany); Kinner, Sonja [Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, University Hospital Essen, Essen 45147 (Germany); Quick, Harald H. [High Field and Hybrid MR Imaging, University Hospital Essen, Essen 45147, Germany and Erwin L. Hahn Institute for MR Imaging, University Duisburg-Essen, Essen 45141 (Germany)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: This study aims to develop, implement, and evaluate a 16-channel radiofrequency (RF) coil for integrated positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance (PET/MR) imaging of breast cancer. The RF coil is designed for optimized MR imaging performance and PET transparency and attenuation correction (AC) is applied for accurate PET quantification. Methods: A 16-channel breast array RF coil was designed for integrated PET/MR hybrid imaging of breast cancer lesions. The RF coil features a lightweight rigid design and is positioned with a spacer at a defined position on the patient table of an integrated PET/MR system. Attenuation correction is performed by generating and applying a dedicated 3D CT-based template attenuation map. Reposition accuracy of the RF coil on the system patient table while using the positioning frame was tested in repeated measurements using MR-visible markers. The MR, PET, and PET/MR imaging performances were systematically evaluated using modular breast phantoms. Attenuation correction of the RF coil was evaluated with difference measurements of the active breast phantoms filled with radiotracer in the PET detector with and without the RF coil in place, serving as a standard of reference measurement. The overall PET/MR imaging performance and PET quantification accuracy of the new 16-channel RF coil and its AC were then evaluated in first clinical examinations on ten patients with local breast cancer. Results: The RF breast array coil provides excellent signal-to-noise ratio and signal homogeneity across the volume of the breast phantoms in MR imaging and visualizes small structures in the phantoms down to 0.4 mm in plane. Difference measurements with PET revealed a global loss and thus attenuation of counts by 13% (mean value across the whole phantom volume) when the RF coil is placed in the PET detector. Local attenuation ranging from 0% in the middle of the phantoms up to 24% was detected in the peripheral regions of the phantoms at

  7. Breast imaging with the SoftVue imaging system: first results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duric, Neb; Littrup, Peter; Schmidt, Steven; Li, Cuiping; Roy, Olivier; Bey-Knight, Lisa; Janer, Roman; Kunz, Dave; Chen, Xiaoyang; Goll, Jeffrey; Wallen, Andrea; Zafar, Fouzaan; Allada, Veerendra; West, Erik; Jovanovic, Ivana; Li, Kuo; Greenway, William

    2013-03-01

    For women with dense breast tissue, who are at much higher risk for developing breast cancer, the performance of mammography is at its worst. Consequently, many early cancers go undetected when they are the most treatable. Improved cancer detection for women with dense breasts would decrease the proportion of breast cancers diagnosed at later stages, which would significantly lower the mortality rate. The emergence of whole breast ultrasound provides good performance for women with dense breast tissue, and may eliminate the current trade-off between the cost effectiveness of mammography and the imaging performance of more expensive systems such as magnetic resonance imaging. We report on the performance of SoftVue, a whole breast ultrasound imaging system, based on the principles of ultrasound tomography. SoftVue was developed by Delphinus Medical Technologies and builds on an early prototype developed at the Karmanos Cancer Institute. We present results from preliminary testing of the SoftVue system, performed both in the lab and in the clinic. These tests aimed to validate the expected improvements in image performance. Initial qualitative analyses showed major improvements in image quality, thereby validating the new imaging system design. Specifically, SoftVue's imaging performance was consistent across all breast density categories and had much better resolution and contrast. The implications of these results for clinical breast imaging are discussed and future work is described.

  8. Unusual Horner's syndrome in recurrent breast cancer: Evaluating using {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, So Hyun; Kim, Tae Sung; Kim, Seok Ki [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is a widely used imaging modality in the initial diagnosis of cancer, treatment response evaluation and detection of recurrence. Herein, we present the case of a 39-year-old female who presented right ptosis on the follow-up of breast cancer after surgery. Clinicians suspected Horner's syndrome, and the patient underwent FDG PET/CT for the evaluation of recurrence that could cause Horner's syndrome. FDG PET/CT demonstrated a focal hypermetabolic lesion in the right cervicothoracic junction area, corresponding to the preganglionic cervical sympathetic trunk. A subsequent needle biopsy was done, and the lesion was confirmed as metastatic ductal carcinoma. In this case, we could detect the exact location of the recurring lesion that caused Horner's syndrome using FDG PET/CT.

  9. Dual-time FDG-PET/CT in patients with potential breast cancer recurrence: Head-to-head comparison with CT and bone scintigraphy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baun, Christina; Falch Braas, Kirsten; Gerke, Oke

    of six hours and had a blood glucose level less than 8 mmol/l prior to injection of 4 MBq/kg of FDG. Imaging was performed 1 and 3 hours (±5 mins) after injection. At both time-points a low-dose CT from the skull to the proximal femur was obtained followed by a 3D PET-scan of the same area. The duration...... administered with a flow of 3.0 ml/s and a delay of 60 seconds. Bone scintigraphy. The patients were injected with 700 MBq 99mTc-DPD 3 to 4 hours prior to whole body imaging. In the waiting period the patients were asked to drink approx. 1 litre of clear liquids. Positive findings with any of the three...... had sensitivities of 67% and 81% and specificities of 100% and 48%, respectively. Conclusion: These interim results suggest that FDG PET/CT may have a role in the diagnostic work-up of patients with suspected recurrent breast cancer. The 3-hour FDG-PET scan may be diagnostically superior to the other...

  10. Microwave Breast Imaging Techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhurbenko, Vitaliy; Rubæk, Tonny

    2010-01-01

    This paper outlines the applicability of microwave radiation for breast cancer detection. Microwave imaging systems are categorized based on their hardware architecture. The advantages and disadvantages of various imaging techniques are discussed. The fundamental tradeoffs are indicated between...... various requirements to be fulfilled in the design of an imaging system for breast cancer detection and some strategies to overcome these limitations....

  11. Clinical PET/CT imaging. Promises and misconceptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czernin, J.; Auerbach, M.A.

    2005-01-01

    PET/CT is now established as the most important imaging tool in oncology. PET/CT stages and restages cancer with a higher accuracy than PET or CT alone. The sometimes irrational approach to combine state of the art PET with the highest end CT devices should give way to a more reasonable equipment design tailored towards the specific clinical indications in well-defined patient populations. The continuing success of molecular PET/CT now depends more upon advances in molecular imaging with the introduction of targeted imaging probes for individualized therapy approaches in cancer patients and less upon technological advances of imaging equipment. (orig.)

  12. Incidentally Detected Enhancing Breast Lesions on Chest Computed Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Wen Chiung; Hsu, Hsian He; Yu, Jyh Cherng; Hsu, Giu Cheng; Yu, Cheng Ping; Chang, Tsun Hou; Huang, Guo Shu; Li, Chao Shiang

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the nature and imaging appearance of incidental enhancing breast lesions detected on a routine contrast-enhanced chest CT. Twenty-three patients with incidental enhancing breast lesions on contrast-enhanced chest CT were retrospectively reviewed. The breast lesions were reviewed by unenhanced and enhanced CT, and evaluated by observing the shapes, margins, enhancement patterns and backgrounds of breast lesions. A histopathologic diagnosis or long-term follow-up served as reference standard. Sixteen (70%) patients had malignant breast lesions and seven (30%) had benign lesions. In 10 patients, the breast lesions were exclusively detected on contrast-enhanced CT. Using unenhanced CT, breast lesions with fi broglandular backgrounds were prone to be obscured (p < 0.001). Incidental primary breast cancer showed an non-significant trend of a higher percentage irregular margin (p = 0.056). All of the four incidental breast lesions with non-mass-like enhancement were proven to be malignant. Routine contrast-enhanced chest CT can reveal sufficient details to allow for the detection of unsuspected breast lesions, in which some cases may be proven as malignant. An irregular margin of incidental enhancing breast lesion can be considered a suggestive sign of malignancy

  13. Cone Beam CT vs. Fan Beam CT: A Comparison of Image Quality and Dose Delivered Between Two Differing CT Imaging Modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechuga, Lawrence; Weidlich, Georg A

    2016-09-12

    A comparison of image quality and dose delivered between two differing computed tomography (CT) imaging modalities-fan beam and cone beam-was performed. A literature review of quantitative analyses for various image quality aspects such as uniformity, signal-to-noise ratio, artifact presence, spatial resolution, modulation transfer function (MTF), and low contrast resolution was generated. With these aspects quantified, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) shows a superior spatial resolution to that of fan beam, while fan beam shows a greater ability to produce clear and anatomically correct images with better soft tissue differentiation. The results indicate that fan beam CT produces superior images to that of on-board imaging (OBI) cone beam CT systems, while providing a considerably less dose to the patient.

  14. Three-dimensional reconstruction of CT images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Toshiaki; Kattoh, Keiichi; Kawakami, Genichiroh; Igami, Isao; Mariya, Yasushi; Nakamura, Yasuhiko; Saitoh, Yohko; Tamura, Koreroku; Shinozaki, Tatsuyo

    1986-09-01

    Computed tomography (CT) has the ability to provide sensitive visualization of organs and lesions. Owing to the nature of CT to be transaxial images, a structure which is greater than a certain size appears as several serial CT images. Consequently each observer must reconstruct those images into a three-dimensional (3-D) form mentally. It has been supposed to be of great use if such a 3-D form can be described as a definite figure. A new computer program has been developed which can produce 3-D figures from the profiles of organs and lesions on CT images using spline curves. The figures obtained through this method are regarded to have practical applications.

  15. Distribution of internal mammary lymphadenopathy in breast carcinoma: CT appraisal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scatarige, J.C.; Fishman, E.K.; Zinreich, E.S.; Almaraz, R.

    1987-01-01

    The authors studied the anatomic distribution of enlarged internal mammary lymph nodes in breast carcinoma by reviewing thoracic CT examinations in 219 women with operable, advanced or recurrent disease. Enlarged internal mammary lymph nodes were observed in 45 patients (20.5%); they were unilateral in 32 and bilateral in 13. Lymphadenopathy was limited to one anterior intercostal space in 43%, two spaces in 26%, and three or more species in 31%. Dominant modal disease was centered at the first anterior intercostal space in 14%, the second space in 60%, and the third space in 26%. Isolated adenopathy in the fourth intercostal space was not observed. The authors' data concur with current surgical practice when internal mammary lymph nodes are sampled. Implications for preoperative imaging strategy are discussed

  16. Imaging of head and neck tumors -- methods: CT, spiral-CT, multislice-spiral-CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baum, Ulrich; Greess, Holger; Lell, Michael; Noemayr, Anton; Lenz, Martin

    2000-01-01

    Spiral-CT is standard for imaging neck tumors. In correspondence with other groups we routinely use spiral-CT with thin slices (3 mm), a pitch of 1.3-1.5 and an overlapping reconstruction increment (2-3 mm). In patients with dental fillings a short additional spiral parallel to the corpus of the mandible reduces artifacts behind the dental arches and improves the diagnostic value of CT. For the assessment of the base of the skull, the orbital floor, the palate and paranasal sinuses an additional examination in the coronal plane is helpful. Secondary coronal reconstructions of axial scans are helpful in the evaluation of the crossing of the midline by small tumors of the tongue base or palate. For an optimal vascular or tissue contrast a sufficient volume of contrast medium and a start delay greater than 70-80 s are necessary. In our opinion the best results can be achieved with a volume of 150 ml, a flow of 2.5 ml/s and a start delay of 80 s. Dynamic enhanced CT is only necessary in some special cases. There is clear indication for dynamic enhanced CT where a glomus tumor is suspected. Additional functional CT imaging during i-phonation and/or Valsalva's maneuver are of great importance to prove vocal cords mobility. Therefore, imaging during i-phonation is an elemental part of every thorough examination of the hypopharynx and larynx region. Multislice-spiral-CT allows almost isotropic imaging of the head and neck region and improves the assessment of tumor spread and lymph node metastases in arbitrary oblique planes. Thin structures (the base of the skull, the orbital floor, the hard palate) as well as the floor of the mouth can be evaluated sufficiently with multiplanar reformations. Usually, additional coronal scanning is not necessary with multislice-spiral-CT. Multislice-spiral-CT is especially advantageous in defining the critical relationships of tumor and lymph node metastases and for functional imaging of the hypopharynx and larynx not only in the

  17. The findings and the role of axial CT imaging and 3D imaging of gastric lesion by spiral CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Dong Ho; Ko, Young Tae

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the efficacy of axial CT imaging and 3D imaging by spiral CT in the detection and evaluation of gastric lesion. Seventy-seven patients with pathologically-proven gastric lesions underwent axial CT and 3D imaging by spiral CT. There were 49 cases of advanced gastric carcinoma(AGC), 21 of early gastric carcinoma (EGC), three of benign ulcers, three of leiomyomas, and one case of lymphoma. Spiral CT was performed with 3-mm collimation, 4.5mm/sec table feed, and 1-1.5-mm reconstruction interval after the ingestion of gas. 3D imaging was obtained using the SSD technique, and on analysis a grade was given(excellent, good, poor). Axial CT scan was performed with 5-mm collimation, 7mm/sec table feed, and 5-mm reconstruction interval after the ingestion of water. Among 49 cases of AGC, excellent 3D images were obtained in seven patients (14.3%), good 3D images in 30(61.2%), and poor 3D images in 12(24.5%). Among the 12 patients with poor images, the cancers were located at the pyloric antrum in eight cases, were AGC Borrmann type 4 in three cases, and EGC-mimicking lesion in one case. Using axial CT scan alone, Borrmann's classification based tumor morphology were accurately identified in 67.3% of cases, but using 3D imaging, the corresponding figure was 85.7%. In 33 cases receiving surgery, good correlation between axial CT scan and pathology occurred in 72.7% of T class, and 69.7% of N class. Among 21 cases of EGC, excellent 3D images were obtained in three patients (14.3%), good 3D images in 14 (66.7%), and poor 3D images in two (9.5%). The other two cases of EGC were not detected. By axial CT scan, no tumor was detected in four cases, and there were two doubtful cases. 3D images of three benign ulcers were excellent in one case and good in two. 3D images of three leiomyomas and one lymphoma were excellent. Combined axial CT imaging and 3D imaging by spiral CT has the potential to accurately diagnose gastric lesions other than AGC

  18. Algorithms of CT value correction for reconstructing a radiotherapy simulation image through axial CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogino, Takashi; Egawa, Sunao

    1991-01-01

    New algorithms of CT value correction for reconstructing a radiotherapy simulation image through axial CT images were developed. One, designated plane weighting method, is to correct CT value in proportion to the position of the beam element passing through the voxel. The other, designated solid weighting method, is to correct CT value in proportion to the length of the beam element passing through the voxel and the volume of voxel. Phantom experiments showed fair spatial resolution in the transverse direction. In the longitudinal direction, however, spatial resolution of under slice thickness could not be obtained. Contrast resolution was equivalent for both methods. In patient studies, the reconstructed radiotherapy simulation image was almost similar in visual perception of the density resolution to a simulation film taken by X-ray simulator. (author)

  19. Definitive diagnosis of breast implant rupture using magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, C Y; Shaw, W W; Narayanan, K; Gorczyca, D P; Sinha, S; Debruhl, N D; Bassett, L W

    1993-09-01

    Breast implant rupture is an important complication of augmented and reconstructed breasts. Although several techniques such as mammography, xeromammography, ultrasound, thermography, and computed tomographic (CT) scanning have been proven to be useful to detect implant rupture, they have several disadvantages and lack specificity. In the current study, we have established magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a definitive, reliable, and reproducible technique to diagnose both intracapsular and extracapsular ruptures. The study was conducted in 100 symptomatic patients. Our imaging parameters were able to identify ruptures in implants with silicone shells. All the ruptures showed the presence of wavy lines, free-floating silicone shell within the gel ("free-floating loose-thread sign" or "linguine sign"). We had a 3.75 percent incidence of false-positive and false-negative results. The sensitivity for detection of silicone implant rupture was 76 percent, with a specificity of 97 percent. In addition, we also were able to identify the artifacts that may interfere with the definitive diagnosis of implant rupture.

  20. Correlation between PET/CT results and histological and immunohistochemical findings in breast carcinomas; Correlacao entre resultado do PET/CT e achados histologicos e imuno-histoquimicos em carcinomas mamarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bitencourt, Almir Galvao Vieira; Lima, Eduardo Nobrega Pereira; Chojniak, Rubens; Marques, Elvira Ferreira; Souza, Juliana Alves de; Graziano, Luciana; Andrade, Wesley Pereira; Osorio, Cynthia Aparecida Bueno de Toledo, E-mail: almirgvb@yahoo.com.br [A.C.Camargo Cancer Center, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-03-15

    Objective: to correlate the results of {sup 18}F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) performed with a specific protocol for assessment of breasts with histological/immunohistochemical findings in breast carcinoma patients. Materials and methods: cross-sectional study with prospective data collection, where patients with biopsy-confirmed breast carcinomas were studied. The patients underwent PET/CT examination in prone position, with a specific protocol for assessment of breasts. PET/CT findings were compared with histological and immunohistochemical data. Results: the authors identified 59 malignant breast lesions in 50 patients. The maximum diameter of the lesions ranged from 6 to 80 mm (mean: 32.2 mm). Invasive ductal carcinoma was the most common histological type (n = 47; 79.7%). At PET/CT, 53 (89.8%) of the lesions demonstrated anomalous concentrations of {sup 18}F-FDG, with maximum SUV ranging from 0.8 to 23.1 (mean: 5.5). A statistically significant association was observed between higher values of maximum SUV and histological type, histological grade, molecular subtype, tumor diameter, mitotic index and Ki-67 expression. Conclusion: PET/CT performed with specific protocol for assessment of breasts has demonstrated good sensitivity and was associated with relevant histological/immunohistochemical factors related to aggressiveness and prognosis of breast carcinomas. (author)

  1. Contribution of SPECT/CT for sentinel node localization in patients with ipsilateral breast cancer relapse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borrelli, Pablo [Antoni Van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hospital La Fe, Nuclear Medicine, Medical Imaging Clinical Area, Valencia (Spain); Donswijk, Maarten L.; Stokkel, Marcel P.; Teixeira, Suzana C. [Antoni Van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Tinteren, Harm van [Antoni Van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Biometrics, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Rutgers, Emiel J.T. [Antoni Van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Surgery, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Valdes Olmos, Renato A. [Antoni Van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Leiden University Medical Centre, Nuclear Medicine Section and Interventional Molecular Imaging Laboratory, Department of Radiology, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2017-04-15

    In recent years repeat sentinel node (SN) biopsy has been proven to be feasible in local breast cancer recurrence (LBCR). However, in these patients SNs outside the ipsilateral axilla are frequently observed. This study evaluates the contribution of SPECT/CT for SN localization and surgical adjustment in LBCR patients. SN biopsy was performed in 122 LBCR patients (median age 60.5 years, range 24-87), enrolled from August 2006 to July 2015. Median disease-free time lapse was 109.5 months (range 9-365). Axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) had previously been performed in 55 patients, SN biopsy in 44, both techniques in 13 and fine-needle aspiration in 10. Primary breast cancer treatment included radiotherapy in 104 patients (85.3 %) and chemotherapy in 40 (32.8 %). Preoperative lymphatic mapping, using planar scintigraphy (PS) and SPECT/CT included report of SN location according to lymph node territory. In case of a territorial PS-SPECT/CT mismatch, surgery was adjusted according to SPECT/CT findings. SPECT/CT SN visualization rate was higher than PS (53.3 % vs. 43.4 %, p n.s.) with, in total, 19 additional SN (118 vs. 99, p n.s.). PS-SPECT/CT territory mismatch, found in 60 % (39/65) of patients with SN visualization, led to surgical adjustment in 21.3 % (26/122) of patients. The SN procedure was finally performed in 104 patients resulting in a 65.7 % surgical retrieval rate with a total of 132 removed SNs (1.86/patient). SN metastases were found in 17/71 patients (23.9 %), in 16 of them (94 %) in ipsilateral basins outside the axilla or in the contralateral axilla. Using SPECT/CT there is a trend to visualize more SNs in LBCR, providing at the same time important anatomical information to adjust intraoperative SN procedures. The addition of SPECT/CT to the standard imaging protocol may lead to better staging mainly in patients presenting drainage outside the ipsilateral axilla. (orig.)

  2. Comparison of the diagnostic value of FDG-PET/CT and axillary ultrasound for the detection of lymph node metastases in breast cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riegger, Carolin; Heusner, Till A.; Koeninger, Angela; Kimmig, Rainer; Hartung, Verena; Bockisch, Andreas; Otterbach, Friedrich; Forsting, Michael; Antoch, Gerald

    2012-01-01

    Background. FDG-PET/CT is increasingly being used for breast cancer staging. Its diagnostic accuracy in comparison to ultrasound as the standard non-invasive imaging modality for the evaluation of axillary lymph nodes has yet not been evaluated. Purpose. To retrospectively compare the diagnostic value of full-dose, intravenously contrast-enhanced FDG-PET/CT and ultrasound for the detection of lymph node metastases in breast cancer patients. Material and Methods. Ninety patients (one patient with a bilateral carcinoma) (89 women, one man; mean age, 55.5 ± 16.6 years) suffering from primary breast cancer underwent whole-body FDG-PET/CT and axillary ultrasound. The ipsilateral axillary fossa (n = 91) was evaluated for metastatic spread. The sensitivity, specificity, the positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and accuracy of both methods were calculated. The sensitivity and accuracy were statistically compared using the McNemar Test (P <0.05). Analyses were made on a patient basis. The number of patients with extra-axillary locoregional lymph node metastases exclusively detected by FDG-PET/CT was evaluated. For axillary lymph node metastases histopathology served as the reference standard. Results. The sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, and accuracy of FDG-PET/CT for the detection of axillary lymph node metastases were 54%, 89%, 77%, 74%, and 75%, respectively. For ultrasound it was 38%, 78%, 54%, 65%, and 62%, respectively. FDG-PET/CT was significantly more accurate than ultrasound for the detection of axillary lymph node metastases (P = 0.019). There was no statistically significant difference between the sensitivity of both modalities (P = 0.0578). FDG-PET/CT detected extra-axillary locoregional lymph node metastases in seven patients (8%) that had not been detected by another imaging modality. Conclusion. Though more accurate compared to ultrasound for evaluating the axillary lymph node status FDG-PET/CT is only as sensitive as

  3. The Royal College of Radiologists Breast Group breast imaging classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maxwell, A.J.; Ridley, N.T.; Rubin, G.; Wallis, M.G.; Gilbert, F.J.; Michell, M.J.

    2009-01-01

    Standardisation of the classification of breast imaging reports will improve communication between the referrer and the radiologist and avoid ambiguity, which may otherwise lead to mismanagement of patients. Following wide consultation, Royal College of Radiologists Breast Group has produced a scoring system for the classification of breast imaging. This will facilitate audit and the development of nationally agreed standards for the investigation of women with breast disease. This five-point system is as follows: 1, normal; 2, benign findings; 3, indeterminate/probably benign findings; 4, findings suspicious of malignancy; 5, findings highly suspicious of malignancy. It is recommended that this be used in the reporting of all breast imaging examinations in the UK.

  4. Diagnostic performance of fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography of breast cancer in detecting axillary lymph node metastasis. Comparison with ultrasonography and contrast-enhanced CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monzawa, Shuichi; Adachi, Shuji; Suzuki, Kayo; Hirokaga, Koichi; Takao, Shintaro; Sakuma, Toshiko; Hanioka, Keisuke

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate the diagnostic performance of positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) with fluorine-18-labeled 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) in comparison with that of ultrasonography and contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) in detecting axillary lymph node metastasis in patients with breast cancer. Fifty patients with invasive breast cancer were recruited. They had received no neoadjuvant chemotherapy and underwent PET/CT, ultrasonography and contrast-enhanced CT before mastectomy. The clinical stage was I in 34 patients, II in 15 patients, and III in one patient. The images of these modalities were interpreted in usual practice before surgery and the diagnostic reports were reviewed for analysis. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of each modality were obtained taking histopathological results of axillary lymph node dissection or sentinel lymph node biopsy as the reference standard. Axillary lymph node metastasis was confirmed in 15 of 50 patients by histopathological studies. PET/CT identified lymph node metastasis in three of these 15 patients. The overall sensitivity and specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of PET/CT in the diagnosis of axillary lymph node metastasis were 20, 97, 75, and 74%, and those of ultrasonography were 33, 94, 71, and 77% and those of contrast-enhanced CT were 27, 97, 80, and 76%, respectively. PET/CT showed poor sensitivity and high specificity in the detection of axillary lymph node metastasis of breast cancer. Diagnostic performance of PET/CT was not superior to that of ultrasonography and contrast-enhanced CT. (author)

  5. Diagnostic accuracy of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT compared with that of contrast-enhanced MRI of the breast at 3 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magometschnigg, Heinrich F.; Baltzer, Pascal A.; Fueger, Barbara; Helbich, Thomas H.; Weber, Michael [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Division of Molecular and Gender Imaging, Vienna (Austria); Karanikas, Georgios [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Vienna (Austria); Dubsky, Peter [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Surgery, Vienna (Austria); Rudas, Margaretha [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Pathology, Vienna (Austria); Pinker, Katja [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Division of Molecular and Gender Imaging, Vienna (Austria); Molecular Imaging and Therapy Service, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York (United States)

    2015-10-15

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy of prone {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT with that of contrast-enhanced MRI (CE-MRI) at 3 T in suspicious breast lesions. To evaluate the influence of tumour size on diagnostic accuracy and the use of maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub MAX}) thresholds to differentiate malignant from benign breast lesions. A total of 172 consecutive patients with an imaging abnormality were included in this IRB-approved prospective study. All patients underwent {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and CE-MRI of the breast at 3 T in the prone position. Two reader teams independently evaluated the likelihood of malignancy as determined by {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and CE-MRI independently. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT data were qualitatively evaluated by visual interpretation. Quantitative assessment was performed by calculation of SUV{sub MAX}. Sensitivity, specificity, diagnostic accuracy, area under the curve and interreader agreement were calculated for all lesions and for lesions <10 mm. Histopathology was used as the standard of reference. There were 132 malignant and 40 benign lesions; 23 lesions (13.4 %) were <10 mm. Both {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and CE-MRI achieved an overall diagnostic accuracy of 93 %. There were no significant differences in sensitivity (p = 0.125), specificity (p = 0.344) or diagnostic accuracy (p = 1). For lesions <10 mm, diagnostic accuracy deteriorated to 91 % with both {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and CE-MRI. Although no significant difference was found for lesions <10 mm, CE-MRI at 3 T seemed to be more sensitive but less specific than {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT. Interreader agreement was excellent (κ = 0.85 and κ = 0.92). SUV{sub MAX} threshold was not helpful in differentiating benign from malignant lesions. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and CE-MRI at 3 T showed equal diagnostic accuracies in breast cancer diagnosis. For lesions <10 mm, diagnostic accuracy deteriorated, but was equal for {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and CE-MRI at 3 T. For lesions <10 mm, CE-MRI at 3 T seemed

  6. Incidence of Internal Mammary Lymph Nodes with Silicone Breast Implants at MR Imaging after Oncoplastic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Elizabeth J; Watson, Elizabeth J; Gibbons, Girard; Goldman, Debra A; Moskowitz, Chaya S; Jochelson, Maxine S; Dershaw, D David; Morris, Elizabeth A

    2015-11-01

    To assess the incidence of benign and malignant internal mammary lymph nodes (IMLNs) at magnetic resonance (MR) imaging among women with a history of treated breast cancer and silicone implant reconstruction. The institutional review board approved this HIPAA-compliant retrospective study and waived informed consent. Women were identified who (a) had breast cancer, (b) underwent silicone implant oncoplastic surgery, and (c) underwent postoperative implant-protocol MR imaging with or without positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) between 2000 and 2013. The largest IMLNs were measured. A benign IMLN was pathologically proven or defined as showing 1 year of imaging stability and/or no clinical evidence of disease. Malignant IMLNs were pathologically proven. Incidence of IMLN and positive predictive value (PPV) were calculated on a per-patient level by using proportions and exact 95% confidence intervals (CIs). The Wilcoxon rank sum test was used to assess the difference in axis size. In total, 923 women with breast cancer and silicone implants were included (median age, 46 years; range, 22-89 years). The median time between reconstructive surgery and first MR imaging examination was 49 months (range, 5-513 months). Of the 923 women, 347 (37.6%) had IMLNs at MR imaging. Median short- and long-axis measurements were 0.40 cm (range, 0.20-1.70 cm) and 0.70 cm (range, 0.30-1.90 cm), respectively. Two hundred seven of 923 patients (22.4%) had adequate follow-up; only one of the 207 IMLNs was malignant, with a PPV of 0.005 (95% CI: 0.000, 0.027). Fifty-eight of 923 patients (6.3%) had undergone PET/CT; of these, 39 (67.2%) had IMLN at MR imaging. Twelve of the 58 patients (20.7%) with adequate follow-up had fluorine 18 fluorodeoxyglucose-avid IMLN, with a median standardized uptake value of 2.30 (range, 1.20-6.10). Only one of the 12 of the fluorodeoxyglucose-avid IMLNs was malignant, with a PPV of 0.083 (95% CI: 0.002, 0.385). IMLNs identified at

  7. Ultrasound and PET-CT image fusion for prostate brachytherapy image guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasford, F.

    2015-01-01

    Fusion of medical images between different cross-sectional modalities is widely used, mostly where functional images are fused with anatomical data. Ultrasound has for some time now been the standard imaging technique used for treatment planning of prostate cancer cases. While this approach is laudable and has yielded some positive results, latest developments have been the integration of images from ultrasound and other modalities such as PET-CT to compliment missing properties of ultrasound images. This study has sought to enhance diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancers by developing MATLAB algorithms to fuse ultrasound and PET-CT images. The fused ultrasound-PET-CT image has shown to contain improved quality of information than the individual input images. The fused image has the property of reduced uncertainty, increased reliability, robust system performance, and compact representation of information. The objective of co-registering the ultrasound and PET-CT images was achieved by conducting performance evaluation of the ultrasound and PET-CT imaging systems, developing image contrast enhancement algorithm, developing MATLAB image fusion algorithm, and assessing accuracy of the fusion algorithm. Performance evaluation of the ultrasound brachytherapy system produced satisfactory results in accordance with set tolerances as recommended by AAPM TG 128. Using an ultrasound brachytherapy quality assurance phantom, average axial distance measurement of 10.11 ± 0.11 mm was estimated. Average lateral distance measurements of 10.08 ± 0.07 mm, 20.01 ± 0.06 mm, 29.89 ± 0.03 mm and 39.84 ± 0.37 mm were estimated for the inter-target distances corresponding to 10 mm, 20 mm, 30 mm and 40 mm respectively. Volume accuracy assessment produced measurements of 3.97 cm 3 , 8.86 cm 3 and 20.11 cm 3 for known standard volumes of 4 cm 3 , 9 cm 3 and 20 cm 3 respectively. Depth of penetration assessment of the ultrasound system produced an estimate of 5.37 ± 0.02 cm

  8. Imaging and PET - PET/CT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Von Schulthess, G.K.; Hany, Th.F.

    2008-01-01

    PET/CT has grown because the lack of anatomic landmarks in PET makes 'hardware-fusion' to anatomic cross-sectional data extremely useful. Addition of CT to PET improves specificity, but also sensitivity, and adding PET to CT adds sensitivity and specificity in tumor imaging. The synergistic advantage of adding CT is that the attenuation correction needed for PET data can also be derived from the CT data. This makes PET-CT 25-30% faster than PET alone, leading to higher patient throughput and a more comfortable examination for patients typically lasting 20 minutes or less. FDG-PET-CT appears to provide relevant information in the staging and therapy monitoring of many tumors, such as lung carcinoma, colorectal cancer, lymphoma, gynaecological cancers, melanoma and many others, with the notable exception of prostatic cancer. for this cancer, choline derivatives may possibly become useful radiopharmaceuticals. The published literature on the applications of FDG-PET-CT in oncology is still limited but several designed studies have demonstrated the benefits of PET-CT. (authors)

  9. Integration of PET-CT and cone-beam CT for image-guided radiotherapy with high image quality and registration accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, T.-H.; Liang, C.-H.; Wu, J.-K.; Lien, C.-Y.; Yang, B.-H.; Huang, Y.-H.; Lee, J. J. S.

    2009-07-01

    Hybrid positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) system enhances better differentiation of tissue uptake of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) and provides much more diagnostic value in the non-small-cell lung cancer and nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). In PET-CT, high quality CT images not only offer diagnostic value on anatomic delineation of the tissues but also shorten the acquisition time for attenuation correction (AC) compared with PET-alone imaging. The linear accelerators equipped with the X-ray cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging system for image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) provides excellent verification on position setup error. The purposes of our study were to optimize the CT acquisition protocols of PET-CT and to integrate the PET-CT and CBCT for IGRT. The CT imaging parameters were modified in PET-CT for increasing the image quality in order to enhance the diagnostic value on tumour delineation. Reproducibility and registration accuracy via bone co-registration algorithm between the PET-CT and CBCT were evaluated by using a head phantom to simulate a head and neck treatment condition. Dose measurement in computed tomography dose index (CTDI) was also estimated. Optimization of the CT acquisition protocols of PET-CT was feasible in this study. Co-registration accuracy between CBCT and PET-CT on axial and helical modes was in the range of 1.06 to 2.08 and 0.99 to 2.05 mm, respectively. In our result, it revealed that the accuracy of the co-registration with CBCT on helical mode was more accurate than that on axial mode. Radiation doses in CTDI were 4.76 to 18.5 mGy and 4.83 to 18.79 mGy on axial and helical modes, respectively. Registration between PET-CT and CBCT is a state-of-the-art registration technology which could provide much information on diagnosis and accurate tumour contouring on radiotherapy while implementing radiotherapy procedures. This novelty technology of PET-CT and cone-beam CT integration for IGRT may have a

  10. Integration of PET-CT and cone-beam CT for image-guided radiotherapy with high image quality and registration accuracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, T-H; Liang, C-H; Wu, J-K; Lien, C-Y; Yang, B-H; Lee, J J S; Huang, Y-H

    2009-01-01

    Hybrid positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) system enhances better differentiation of tissue uptake of 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG) and provides much more diagnostic value in the non-small-cell lung cancer and nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). In PET-CT, high quality CT images not only offer diagnostic value on anatomic delineation of the tissues but also shorten the acquisition time for attenuation correction (AC) compared with PET-alone imaging. The linear accelerators equipped with the X-ray cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging system for image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) provides excellent verification on position setup error. The purposes of our study were to optimize the CT acquisition protocols of PET-CT and to integrate the PET-CT and CBCT for IGRT. The CT imaging parameters were modified in PET-CT for increasing the image quality in order to enhance the diagnostic value on tumour delineation. Reproducibility and registration accuracy via bone co-registration algorithm between the PET-CT and CBCT were evaluated by using a head phantom to simulate a head and neck treatment condition. Dose measurement in computed tomography dose index (CTDI) was also estimated. Optimization of the CT acquisition protocols of PET-CT was feasible in this study. Co-registration accuracy between CBCT and PET-CT on axial and helical modes was in the range of 1.06 to 2.08 and 0.99 to 2.05 mm, respectively. In our result, it revealed that the accuracy of the co-registration with CBCT on helical mode was more accurate than that on axial mode. Radiation doses in CTDI were 4.76 to 18.5 mGy and 4.83 to 18.79 mGy on axial and helical modes, respectively. Registration between PET-CT and CBCT is a state-of-the-art registration technology which could provide much information on diagnosis and accurate tumour contouring on radiotherapy while implementing radiotherapy procedures. This novelty technology of PET-CT and cone-beam CT integration for IGRT may have a

  11. Clinical assessment of SPECT/CT co-registration image fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Wen; Luan Zhaosheng; Peng Yong

    2004-01-01

    Objective: Study the methodology of the SPECT/CT co-registration image fusion, and Assessment the Clinical application value. Method: 172 patients who underwent SPECT/CT image fusion during 2001-2003 were studied, 119 men, 53 women. 51 patients underwent 18FDG image +CT, 26 patients underwent 99m Tc-RBC Liver pool image +CT, 43 patients underwent 99mTc-MDP Bone image +CT, 18 patients underwent 99m Tc-MAA Lung perfusion image +CT. The machine is Millium VG SPECT of GE Company. All patients have been taken three steps image: X-ray survey, X-ray transmission and nuclear emission image (Including planer imaging, SPECT or 18 F-FDG of dual head camera) without changing the position of the patients. We reconstruct the emission image with X-ray map and do reconstruction, 18FDG with COSEM and 99mTc with OSEM. Then combine the transmission image and the reconstructed emission image. We use different process parameters in deferent image methods. The accurate rate of SPECT/CT image fusion were statistics, and compare their accurate with that of single nuclear emission image. Results: The nuclear image which have been reconstructed by X-ray attenuation and OSEM are apparent better than pre-reconstructed. The post-reconstructed emission images have no scatter lines around the organs. The outline between different issues is more clear than before. The validity of All post-reconstructed images is better than pre-reconstructed. SPECT/CT image fusion make localization have worthy bases. 138 patients, the accuracy of SPECT/CT image fusion is 91.3% (126/138), whereas 60(88.2%) were found through SPECT/CT image fusion, There are significant difference between them(P 99m Tc- RBC-SPECT +CT image fusion, but 21 of them were inspected by emission image. In BONE 99m Tc -MDP-SPECT +CT image fusion, 4 patients' removed bone(1-6 months after surgery) and their relay with normal bone had activity, their morphologic and density in CT were different from normal bones. 11 of 20 patients who could

  12. Improving image quality in portal venography with spectral CT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Li-qin; He, Wen; Li, Jian-ying; Chen, Jiang-hong; Wang, Ke-yang; Tan, Li

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of energy spectral CT on the image quality of CT portal venography in cirrhosis patients. Materials and methods: 30 portal hypertension patients underwent spectral CT examination using a single-tube, fast dual tube voltage switching technique. 101 sets of monochromatic images were generated from 40 keV to 140 keV. Image noise and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) for portal veins from the monochromatic images were measured. An optimal monochromatic image set was selected for obtaining the best CNR for portal veins. The image noise and CNR of the intra-hepatic portal vein and extra-hepatic main stem at the selected monochromatic level were compared with those from the conventional polychromatic images. Image quality was also assessed and compared. Results: The monochromatic images at 51 keV were found to provide the best CNR for both the intra-hepatic and extra-hepatic portal veins. At this energy level, the monochromatic images had about 100% higher CNR than the polychromatic images with a moderate 30% noise increase. The qualitative image quality assessment was also statistically higher with monochromatic images at 51 keV. Conclusion: Monochromatic images at 51 keV for CT portal venography could improve CNR for displaying hepatic portal veins and improve the overall image quality.

  13. Improving image quality in portal venography with spectral CT imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Li-qin, E-mail: zhaolqzr@sohu.com [Department of Radiology, Beijing Friendship Hospital Affiliated to Capital Medical University, Beijing,100050 (China); He, Wen, E-mail: hewen1724@sina.com [Department of Radiology, Beijing Friendship Hospital Affiliated to Capital Medical University, Beijing,100050 (China); Li, Jian-ying, E-mail: jianying.li@med.ge.com [CT Advanced Application and Research, GE Healthcare, 100176 China (China); Chen, Jiang-hong, E-mail: chenjianghong1973@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Beijing Friendship Hospital Affiliated to Capital Medical University, Beijing,100050 (China); Wang, Ke-yang, E-mail: ke7ke@sina.com [Department of Radiology, Beijing Friendship Hospital Affiliated to Capital Medical University, Beijing,100050 (China); Tan, Li, E-mail: Litan@ge.com [CT product, GE Healthcare, 100176 China (China)

    2012-08-15

    Objective: To investigate the effect of energy spectral CT on the image quality of CT portal venography in cirrhosis patients. Materials and methods: 30 portal hypertension patients underwent spectral CT examination using a single-tube, fast dual tube voltage switching technique. 101 sets of monochromatic images were generated from 40 keV to 140 keV. Image noise and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) for portal veins from the monochromatic images were measured. An optimal monochromatic image set was selected for obtaining the best CNR for portal veins. The image noise and CNR of the intra-hepatic portal vein and extra-hepatic main stem at the selected monochromatic level were compared with those from the conventional polychromatic images. Image quality was also assessed and compared. Results: The monochromatic images at 51 keV were found to provide the best CNR for both the intra-hepatic and extra-hepatic portal veins. At this energy level, the monochromatic images had about 100% higher CNR than the polychromatic images with a moderate 30% noise increase. The qualitative image quality assessment was also statistically higher with monochromatic images at 51 keV. Conclusion: Monochromatic images at 51 keV for CT portal venography could improve CNR for displaying hepatic portal veins and improve the overall image quality.

  14. Prospective evaluation of fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography scan (FDG-PET/CT) for axillary staging in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Masahide; Noguchi, Akinori; Tani, Naoki

    2008-01-01

    Seventy-two patients from 2005 October to 2007 February with operative breast cancer underwent fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography scan (FDG-PET/CT) of chest and body, ultrasound scan (US) and enhanced computed tomography scan (CT) followed by sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) and axillary lymph node dissection (ALND). The results of PET/CT were compared with histopathological diagnosis of SLNB and ALND. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of PET/CT for detection of axillary lymph node metastases were 61%, 96% and 88%, respectively. Seven false-negative and two false-positive of PET/CT results were found. In patients with false-negative of PET/CT results there are two skin-invasive breast cancer patients and axillary lymph node metastases were detected in three patients with US, in one with CT and in four with SLNB. In clinical method for diagnosis of axillary lymph node metastases SLNB should be recommended because sensitivity of PET/CT for early breast cancer patients were low and positive diagnosis of axillary lymph node metastases with PET needs more than 1 cm size of lesion. PET/CT is useful for not-early breast cancer patients. To decide the operation of axillary lymph node disection needs total diagnosis of US, CT, SLNB and clinical findings. (author)

  15. Computer-Aided Diagnosis with Deep Learning Architecture: Applications to Breast Lesions in US Images and Pulmonary Nodules in CT Scans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jie-Zhi; Ni, Dong; Chou, Yi-Hong; Qin, Jing; Tiu, Chui-Mei; Chang, Yeun-Chung; Huang, Chiun-Sheng; Shen, Dinggang; Chen, Chung-Ming

    2016-04-15

    This paper performs a comprehensive study on the deep-learning-based computer-aided diagnosis (CADx) for the differential diagnosis of benign and malignant nodules/lesions by avoiding the potential errors caused by inaccurate image processing results (e.g., boundary segmentation), as well as the classification bias resulting from a less robust feature set, as involved in most conventional CADx algorithms. Specifically, the stacked denoising auto-encoder (SDAE) is exploited on the two CADx applications for the differentiation of breast ultrasound lesions and lung CT nodules. The SDAE architecture is well equipped with the automatic feature exploration mechanism and noise tolerance advantage, and hence may be suitable to deal with the intrinsically noisy property of medical image data from various imaging modalities. To show the outperformance of SDAE-based CADx over the conventional scheme, two latest conventional CADx algorithms are implemented for comparison. 10 times of 10-fold cross-validations are conducted to illustrate the efficacy of the SDAE-based CADx algorithm. The experimental results show the significant performance boost by the SDAE-based CADx algorithm over the two conventional methods, suggesting that deep learning techniques can potentially change the design paradigm of the CADx systems without the need of explicit design and selection of problem-oriented features.

  16. 90Y microsphere therapy: does 90Y PET/CT imaging obviate the need for 90Y Bremsstrahlung SPECT/CT imaging?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zade, Anand A; Rangarajan, Venkatesh; Purandare, Nilendu C; Shah, Sneha A; Agrawal, Archi R; Kulkarni, Suyash S; Shetty, Nitin

    2013-11-01

    Transarterial radioembolization using Y microspheres is a novel therapeutic option for inoperable hepatic malignancies. As these spheres are radiolucent, real-time assessment of their distribution during the infusion process under fluoroscopic guidance is not possible. Bremsstrahlung radiations arising from 90Y have conventionally been used for imaging its biodistribution. Recent studies have proved that sources of 90Y also emit positrons, which can further be used for PET/computed tomography (CT) imaging. This study aimed to assess the feasibility of 90Y PET/CT imaging in evaluating microsphere distributions and to compare its findings with those of Bremsstrahlung imaging. Thirty-five sessions of 90Y microsphere transarterial radioembolization were performed on 30 patients with hepatic malignancies. 90Y PET/CT imaging was performed within 3 h of therapy. Bremsstrahlung imaging was also performed for each patient. The imaging findings were compared for concordance in the distribution of microspheres. Exact one-to-one correspondence between 90Y PET/CT imaging and 90Y Bremsstrahlung imaging was observed in 97.14% of cases (i.e. in 34/35 cases). Discordance was observed only in one case in which 90Y PET/CT imaging resolved the microsphere uptake in the inferior vena cava tumor thrombus, which was, however, not visualized on Bremsstrahlung imaging. There is good concordance in the imaging findings of 90Y PET/CT and 90Y Bremsstrahlung imaging. 90Y PET/CT imaging scores over the conventionally used Bremsstrahlung imaging in terms of better resolution, ease of technique, and comparable image acquisition time. This makes it a preferred imaging modality for assessment of the distribution of 90Y microspheres.

  17. PET/CT imaging in head and neck tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roedel, R.; Palmedo, H.; Reichmann, K.; Reinhardt, M.J.; Biersack, H.J.; Straehler-Pohl, H.J.; Jaeger, U.

    2004-01-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of combined PET/CT examinations for detection of malignant tumors and their metastases in head and neck oncology. 51 patients received whole body scans on a dual modality PET/CT system. CT was performed without i.v. contrast. The results were compared concerning the diagnostic impact of native CT scan on FDG-PET images and the additional value of fused imaging. From 153 lesions were 97 classified as malignant on CT and 136 on FDG/PET images, as suspicious for malignancy in 33 on CT and 7 on FDG-PET and as benign in 23 on CT and 10 on FDG-PET. With combined PET/CT all primary and recurrent tumors could be found, the detection rate in patients with unknown primary tumors was 45%. Compared to PET or CT alone the sensitivity, specifity and accuracy could be significantly improved by means of combined PET/CT. Fused PET/CT imaging with [F18]-FDG and native CT-scanning enables accurate diagnosis in 93% of lesions and 90% of patients with head and neck oncology. (orig.) [de

  18. An attenuation correction method for PET/CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ue, Hidenori; Yamazaki, Tomohiro; Haneishi, Hideaki

    2006-01-01

    In PET/CT systems, accurate attenuation correction can be achieved by creating an attenuation map from an X-ray CT image. On the other hand, respiratory-gated PET acquisition is an effective method for avoiding motion blurring of the thoracic and abdominal organs caused by respiratory motion. In PET/CT systems employing respiratory-gated PET, using an X-ray CT image acquired during breath-holding for attenuation correction may have a large effect on the voxel values, especially in regions with substantial respiratory motion. In this report, we propose an attenuation correction method in which, as the first step, a set of respiratory-gated PET images is reconstructed without attenuation correction, as the second step, the motion of each phase PET image from the PET image in the same phase as the CT acquisition timing is estimated by the previously proposed method, as the third step, the CT image corresponding to each respiratory phase is generated from the original CT image by deformation according to the motion vector maps, and as the final step, attenuation correction using these CT images and reconstruction are performed. The effectiveness of the proposed method was evaluated using 4D-NCAT phantoms, and good stability of the voxel values near the diaphragm was observed. (author)

  19. 18F-FDG-PET/CT in staging, restaging, and treatment response assessment of male breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groheux, David; Hindié, Elif; Marty, Michel; Espié, Marc; Rubello, Domenico; Vercellino, Laetitia; Bousquet, Guilhem; Ohnona, Jessica; Toubert, Marie-Elisabeth; Merlet, Pascal; Misset, Jean-Louis

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Male breast cancer (BC) is a rare disease, with patterns different from those found in women. Most tumors are detected at more advanced stages than in women. The aim of this study was to analyze the performance of [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ( 18 F-FDG-PET/CT) in staging, restaging, and therapy response assessment. Methods: We performed a systematic analysis in the database of Saint-Louis Hospital to identify male patients with BC referred for PET/CT. 18 F-FDG-PET/CT findings considered suspicious for malignancy were compared to biopsy results, further work-up and/or patient follow-up of at least 6 months. Performances of 18 F-FDG-PET/CT were compared to that of conventional imaging (CI) using the McNemar test. The impact of PET/CT on management was evaluated. Results: During 6 consecutive years, among 12,692 18 F-FDG-PET/CT oncology studies, 30 were performed in 15 men with BC: 7 examinations for initial staging, 11 for restaging, and 12 for response assessment. Tumors profile was ER+ and one had HER2 overexpression. PET/CT sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accuracy to detect distant metastases were 100%, 67%, 86%, 100% and 89%, respectively. PET/CT was more informative than CI in 40% of studies (p = 0.03; 95% confidence interval: 3.26 – 40%). Findings from 18 F-FDG-PET/CT led to modification in the planned treatment in 13/30 cases (43%). Conclusion: Although all the tumors were ER+, primary lesions and metastases were diagnosed with high sensitivity. 18 F-FDG-PET/CT seems to be a powerful imaging method to perform staging, restaging and treatment response assessment in male patients with BC

  20. Finite-element modeling of compression and gravity on a population of breast phantoms for multimodality imaging simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturgeon, Gregory M; Kiarashi, Nooshin; Lo, Joseph Y; Samei, E; Segars, W P

    2016-05-01

    The authors are developing a series of computational breast phantoms based on breast CT data for imaging research. In this work, the authors develop a program that will allow a user to alter the phantoms to simulate the effect of gravity and compression of the breast (craniocaudal or mediolateral oblique) making the phantoms applicable to multimodality imaging. This application utilizes a template finite-element (FE) breast model that can be applied to their presegmented voxelized breast phantoms. The FE model is automatically fit to the geometry of a given breast phantom, and the material properties of each element are set based on the segmented voxels contained within the element. The loading and boundary conditions, which include gravity, are then assigned based on a user-defined position and compression. The effect of applying these loads to the breast is computed using a multistage contact analysis in FEBio, a freely available and well-validated FE software package specifically designed for biomedical applications. The resulting deformation of the breast is then applied to a boundary mesh representation of the phantom that can be used for simulating medical images. An efficient script performs the above actions seamlessly. The user only needs to specify which voxelized breast phantom to use, the compressed thickness, and orientation of the breast. The authors utilized their FE application to simulate compressed states of the breast indicative of mammography and tomosynthesis. Gravity and compression were simulated on example phantoms and used to generate mammograms in the craniocaudal or mediolateral oblique views. The simulated mammograms show a high degree of realism illustrating the utility of the FE method in simulating imaging data of repositioned and compressed breasts. The breast phantoms and the compression software can become a useful resource to the breast imaging research community. These phantoms can then be used to evaluate and compare imaging

  1. Dual source CT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidensticker, Peter R.; Hofmann, Lars K.

    2008-01-01

    The introduction of Dual Source Computed Tomography (DSCT) in 2005 was an evolutionary leap in the field of CT imaging. Two x-ray sources operated simultaneously enable heart-rate independent temporal resolution and routine spiral dual energy imaging. The precise delivery of contrast media is a critical part of the contrast-enhanced CT procedure. This book provides an introduction to DSCT technology and to the basics of contrast media administration followed by 25 in-depth clinical scan and contrast media injection protocols. All were developed in consensus by selected physicians on the Dual Source CT Expert Panel. Each protocol is complemented by individual considerations, tricks and pitfalls, and by clinical examples from several of the world's best radiologists and cardiologists. This extensive CME-accredited manual is intended to help readers to achieve consistently high image quality, optimal patient care, and a solid starting point for the development of their own unique protocols. (orig.)

  2. Tumour bed delineation for partial breast/breast boost radiotherapy: What is the optimal number of implanted markers?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirby, Anna NM.; Jena, Rajesh; Harris, Emma J.; Evans, Phil M.; Crowley, Clare; Gregory, Deborah L.; Coles, Charlotte E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: International consensus has not been reached regarding the optimal number of implanted tumour bed (TB) markers for partial breast/breast boost radiotherapy target volume delineation. Four common methods are: insertion of 6 clips (4 radial, 1 deep and 1 superficial), 5 clips (4 radial and 1 deep), 1 clip at the chest wall, and no clips. We compared TB volumes delineated using 6, 5, 1 and 0 clips in women who have undergone wide-local excision (WLE) of breast cancer (BC) with full-thickness closure of the excision cavity, in order to determine the additional margin required for breast boost or partial breast irradiation (PBI) when fewer than 6 clips are used. Methods: Ten patients with invasive ductal BC who had undergone WLE followed by implantation of six fiducial markers (titanium clips) each underwent CT imaging for radiotherapy planning purposes. Retrospective processing of the DICOM image datasets was performed to remove markers and associated imaging artefacts, using an in-house software algorithm. Four observers outlined TB volumes on four different datasets for each case: (1) all markers present (CT 6M ); (2) the superficial marker removed (CT 5M ); (3) all but the chest wall marker removed (CT CW ); (4) all markers removed (CT 0M ). For each observer, the additional margin required around each of TB 0M , TB CW , and TB 5M in order to encompass TB 6M was calculated. The conformity level index (CLI) and differences in centre-of-mass (COM) between observers were quantified for CT 0M , CT CW , CT 5M , CT 6M . Results: The overall median additional margins required to encompass TB 6M were 8 mm (range 0–28 mm) for TB 0M , 5 mm (range 1–13 mm) for TB CW , and 2 mm (range 0–7 mm) for TB 5M . CLI were higher for TB volumes delineated using CT 6M (0.31) CT 5M (0.32) than for CT CW (0.19) and CT 0M (0.15). Conclusions: In women who have undergone WLE of breast cancer with full-thickness closure of the excision cavity and who are proceeding to PBI or

  3. Fibrous dysplasia mimicking bone metastasis on both bone scintigraphy and 18F FDG PET CT: Diagnostic dilemma in a patient with breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KC, Sud Hir Suman; Sharma, Punit; Singh, Har Man Deep; Bal, Chand Rasekhar; Kumar, Rake Sh

    2012-01-01

    Bone is the most common distant site to which breast cancer metastasizes. Commonly used imaging modalities for imaging bone metastasis are bone scintigraphy, plain radiography, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and positron emission tomography (PET). Although bone scintigraphy gas high sensitivity for detecting bone metastasis, its specificity is low. This is because of the fact that bone scintigraphy images secondary changes in bone rather than just tumor cells 18 F fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F FDG) PET CT, on the other hand, directly images the tumor cells' glucose metabolism. Unfortunately, similar to bone scintigraphy, benign bone conditions can also show increased 18 F FDG uptake on PET CT, and PET positive asymptomatic fibrous dysplasia can be misinterpreted as a metastasis. Fibrous dysplasia of bone has wide skeletal distribution, with variability of 18 F FDG uptake and CT appearance. It is therefore important to recognize the characteristics of this skeletal dysplasia, to allow differentiation from skeletal metastasis. Bone lesions with 18 F FDG uptake need to be carefully interpreted when evaluating patients with known malignancy. In doubtful cases, fibrous dysplasia should be given as a differential diagnosis and histopathological diagnosis may be warranted, as highlighted in the present case

  4. Breast-specific gamma-imaging: molecular imaging of the breast using 99mTc-sestamibi and a small-field-of-view gamma-camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Elizabeth A; Phan, Trinh D; Blanchard, Deborah A; Miley, Abbe

    2009-12-01

    Breast-specific gamma-imaging (BSGI), also known as molecular breast imaging, is breast scintigraphy using a small-field-of-view gamma-camera and (99m)Tc-sestamibi. There are many different types of breast cancer, and many have characteristics making them challenging to detect by mammography and ultrasound. BSGI is a cost-effective, highly sensitive and specific technique that complements other imaging modalities currently being used to identify malignant lesions in the breast. Using the current Society of Nuclear Medicine guidelines for breast scintigraphy, Legacy Good Samaritan Hospital began conducting BSGI, breast scintigraphy with a breast-optimized gamma-camera. In our experience, optimal imaging has been conducted in the Breast Center by a nuclear medicine technologist. In addition, the breast radiologists read the BSGI images in correlation with the mammograms, ultrasounds, and other imaging studies performed. By modifying the current Society of Nuclear Medicine protocol to adapt it to the practice of breast scintigraphy with these new systems and by providing image interpretation in conjunction with the other breast imaging studies, our center has found BSGI to be a valuable adjunctive procedure in the diagnosis of breast cancer. The development of a small-field-of-view gamma-camera, designed to optimize breast imaging, has resulted in improved detection capabilities, particularly for lesions less than 1 cm. Our experience with this procedure has proven to aid in the clinical work-up of many of our breast patients. After reading this article, the reader should understand the history of breast scintigraphy, the pharmaceutical used, patient preparation and positioning, imaging protocol guidelines, clinical indications, and the role of breast scintigraphy in breast cancer diagnosis.

  5. PET/CT. Dose-escalated image fusion?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brix, G.; Beyer, T.

    2005-01-01

    Clinical studies demonstrate a gain in diagnostic accuracy by employing combined PET/CT instead of separate CT and PET imaging. However, whole-body PET/CT examinations result in a comparatively high radiation burden to patients and thus require a proper justification and optimization to avoid repeated exposure or over-exposure of patients. This review article summarizes relevant data concerning radiation exposure of patients resulting from the different components of a combined PET/CT examination and presents different imaging strategies that can help to balance the diagnostic needs and the radiation protection requirements. In addition various dose reduction measures are discussed, some of which can be adopted from CT practice, while others mandate modifications to the existing hard- and software of PET/CT systems. (orig.)

  6. Correlation of breast image alignment using biomechanical modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Angela; Rajagopal, Vijay; Bier, Peter; Nielsen, Poul M. F.; Nash, Martyn P.

    2009-02-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common causes of cancer death among women around the world. Researchers have found that a combination of imaging modalities (such as x-ray mammography, magnetic resonance, and ultrasound) leads to more effective diagnosis and management of breast cancers because each imaging modality displays different information about the breast tissues. In order to aid clinicians in interpreting the breast images from different modalities, we have developed a computational framework for generating individual-specific, 3D, finite element (FE) models of the breast. Medical images are embedded into this model, which is subsequently used to simulate the large deformations that the breasts undergo during different imaging procedures, thus warping the medical images to the deformed views of the breast in the different modalities. In this way, medical images of the breast taken in different geometric configurations (compression, gravity, etc.) can be aligned according to physically feasible transformations. In order to analyse the accuracy of the biomechanical model predictions, squared normalised cross correlation (NCC2) was used to provide both local and global comparisons of the model-warped images with clinical images of the breast subject to different gravity loaded states. The local comparison results were helpful in indicating the areas for improvement in the biomechanical model. To improve the modelling accuracy, we will need to investigate the incorporation of breast tissue heterogeneity into the model and altering the boundary conditions for the breast model. A biomechanical image registration tool of this kind will help radiologists to provide more reliable diagnosis and localisation of breast cancer.

  7. Image mottle in abdominal CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ende, J F; Huda, W; Ros, P R; Litwiller, A L

    1999-04-01

    To investigate image mottle in conventional CT images of the abdomen as a function of radiographic technique factors and patient size. Water-filled phantoms simulating the abdomens of adult (32 cm in diameter) and pediatric (16 cm in diameter) patients were used to investigate image mottle in CT as a function of x-ray tube potential and mAs. CT images from 39 consecutive patients with noncontrast liver scans and 49 patients with iodine contrast scans were analyzed retrospectively. Measurements were made of the mean liver parenchyma Hounsfield unit value and the corresponding image mottle. For a given water phantom and x-ray tube potential, image mottle was proportional to the mAs-0.5. Increasing the phantom diameter from 16 cm (pediatric) to 32 cm increased the mottle by a factor of 2.4, and increasing the x-ray tube potential from 80 kVp to 140 kVp reduced the mottle by a factor of 2.5. All patients were scanned at 120 kVp, with no correlation between patient size and the x-ray tube mAs. The mean mottle level was 7.8 +/- 2.2 and 10.0 +/- 2.5 for the noncontrast and contrast studies, respectively. An increase in patient diameter of 3 cm would require approximately 65% more mAs to maintain the same level of image mottle. The mottle in abdominal CT images may be controlled by adjusting radiographic technique factors, which should be adjusted to take into account the size of the patient undergoing the examination.

  8. Dual energy CT: New horizon in medical imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goo, Hyun Woo [Dept. of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Goo, Jin Mo [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-08-01

    Dual-energy CT has remained underutilized over the past decade probably due to a cumbersome workflow issue and current technical limitations. Clinical radiologists should be made aware of the potential clinical benefits of dual-energy CT over single-energy CT. To accomplish this aim, the basic principle, current acquisition methods with advantages and disadvantages, and various material-specific imaging methods as clinical applications of dual-energy CT should be addressed in detail. Current dual-energy CT acquisition methods include dual tubes with or without beam filtration, rapid voltage switching, dual-layer detector, split filter technique, and sequential scanning. Dual-energy material-specific imaging methods include virtual monoenergetic or monochromatic imaging, effective atomic number map, virtual non-contrast or unenhanced imaging, virtual non-calcium imaging, iodine map, inhaled xenon map, uric acid imaging, automatic bone removal, and lung vessels analysis. In this review, we focus on dual-energy CT imaging including related issues of radiation exposure to patients, scanning and post-processing options, and potential clinical benefits mainly to improve the understanding of clinical radiologists and thus, expand the clinical use of dual-energy CT; in addition, we briefly describe the current technical limitations of dual-energy CT and the current developments of photon-counting detector.

  9. Dual-Energy CT: New Horizon in Medical Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goo, Hyun Woo; Goo, Jin Mo

    2017-01-01

    Dual-energy CT has remained underutilized over the past decade probably due to a cumbersome workflow issue and current technical limitations. Clinical radiologists should be made aware of the potential clinical benefits of dual-energy CT over single-energy CT. To accomplish this aim, the basic principle, current acquisition methods with advantages and disadvantages, and various material-specific imaging methods as clinical applications of dual-energy CT should be addressed in detail. Current dual-energy CT acquisition methods include dual tubes with or without beam filtration, rapid voltage switching, dual-layer detector, split filter technique, and sequential scanning. Dual-energy material-specific imaging methods include virtual monoenergetic or monochromatic imaging, effective atomic number map, virtual non-contrast or unenhanced imaging, virtual non-calcium imaging, iodine map, inhaled xenon map, uric acid imaging, automatic bone removal, and lung vessels analysis. In this review, we focus on dual-energy CT imaging including related issues of radiation exposure to patients, scanning and post-processing options, and potential clinical benefits mainly to improve the understanding of clinical radiologists and thus, expand the clinical use of dual-energy CT; in addition, we briefly describe the current technical limitations of dual-energy CT and the current developments of photon-counting detector.

  10. An approach for quantitative image quality analysis for CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, Amir; Cochran, Joe; Mooney, Doug; Regensburger, Joe

    2016-03-01

    An objective and standardized approach to assess image quality of Compute Tomography (CT) systems is required in a wide variety of imaging processes to identify CT systems appropriate for a given application. We present an overview of the framework we have developed to help standardize and to objectively assess CT image quality for different models of CT scanners used for security applications. Within this framework, we have developed methods to quantitatively measure metrics that should correlate with feature identification, detection accuracy and precision, and image registration capabilities of CT machines and to identify strengths and weaknesses in different CT imaging technologies in transportation security. To that end we have designed, developed and constructed phantoms that allow for systematic and repeatable measurements of roughly 88 image quality metrics, representing modulation transfer function, noise equivalent quanta, noise power spectra, slice sensitivity profiles, streak artifacts, CT number uniformity, CT number consistency, object length accuracy, CT number path length consistency, and object registration. Furthermore, we have developed a sophisticated MATLAB based image analysis tool kit to analyze CT generated images of phantoms and report these metrics in a format that is standardized across the considered models of CT scanners, allowing for comparative image quality analysis within a CT model or between different CT models. In addition, we have developed a modified sparse principal component analysis (SPCA) method to generate a modified set of PCA components as compared to the standard principal component analysis (PCA) with sparse loadings in conjunction with Hotelling T2 statistical analysis method to compare, qualify, and detect faults in the tested systems.

  11. CT perfusion: the clinical application in the diagnosis of breast diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Zhaoxiang; Song Xiuyu; Xiao Jianyu

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To assess the CT perfusion characteristics of breast diseases. Methods: Twenty-two patients with fibroadenoma accompanied with cyst (n=1), other benign diseases (n=5), and carcinomas (n=16) underwent breast CT scan. CT perfusion was performed for breast with cine mode (0.5 s per rotation ) on a multislice CT scanner, 120 kV, 60 mA, 4 x 5 mm collimation. Contrast injection was done by using 50 ml nonionic contrast agent (300 mg I/ml ), at a flow rate of 4 ml/s with a power injector, 5 seconds delay, and data acquisition lasted for 50 seconds. These data were processed on a GE AW 4.1 workstation using perfusion 3 software package, and the mean BF, BV, MTT and PS were measured and statistically analyzed. Results: The mean BF, BV, MTT and PS in carcinoma were (33.55 ± 28.40) ml·min -1 ·100 g -1 , (5.60±3.08) ml/100 g, (15.37±6.41) s, (18.71±10.42) ml· min -1 ·100 g -1 . The mean BF, BV, MTT and PS in contralateral normal breast of carcinoma were (10.36 ± 9.44) ml·min -1 ·100 g -1 , (0.70±0.22) ml/100 g, (13.55 ± 7.27) s, (1.54±1.74) ml·min -1 ·100 g -1 . The mean BF, BV, and PS between carcinoma and normal breast were statistically significant (P 0.05). The mean BF, BV, MTT and PS in fibroadenoma were (62.57 ± 19.62) ml·min -1 ·100 g -1 , (7.37 ±1.30) ml/100 g, (11.24 ± 3.34) s, (27.63 ± 3.87) ml·min -1 ·100 g -1 . The mean PS between carcinoma and fibroadenoma was statistically significant (P 0.05). The mean BF, BV, MTT and PS in benign lesion were (7.65 ± 10.24) ml·min -1 ·100 g -1 , (1.23 ± 0.97) ml/100 g, (14.94 ± 10.68) s, (1.81 ± 1.72) ml·min -1 ·100 g -1 . The mean BF, BV, and PS between carcinoma and benign lesion were statistically significant (P 0.05). Conclusion: MSCT perfusion may reflect the features of breast diseases, and provide valuable hemodynamic message. These parameters have a value in diagnosis of breast diseases and are helpful for differential diagnosis. (authors)

  12. Microwave Imaging for Breast Cancer Detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rubæk, Tonny; Fhager, Andreas; Jensen, Peter Damsgaard

    2011-01-01

    Still more research groups are promoting microwave imaging as a viable supplement or substitution to more conventional imaging modalities. A widespread approach for microwave imaging of the breast is tomographic imaging in which one seeks to reconstruct the distributions of permittivity and condu......Still more research groups are promoting microwave imaging as a viable supplement or substitution to more conventional imaging modalities. A widespread approach for microwave imaging of the breast is tomographic imaging in which one seeks to reconstruct the distributions of permittivity...... and conductivity in the breast. In this paper two nonlinear tomographic algorithms are compared – one is a single-frequency algorithm and the other is a time-domain algorithm....

  13. Pulmonary hypertension CT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nedevska, A.

    2013-01-01

    Full text: The right heart catheterization is the gold standard in the diagnosis and determines the severity of pulmonary hypertension. The significant technical progress of noninvasive diagnostic imaging methods significantly improves the pixel density and spatial resolution in the study of cardiovascular structures, thus changes their role and place in the overall diagnostic plan. Learning points: What is the etiology, clinical manifestation and general pathophysiological disorders in pulmonary hypertension. What are the established diagnostic methods in the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with pulmonary hypertension. What is the recommended protocol for CT scanning for patients with clinically suspected or documented pulmonary hypertension. What are the important diagnostic findings in CT scan of a patient with pulmonary hypertension. Discussion: The prospect of instantaneous complex - anatomical and functional cardiopulmonary and vascular diagnostics seems extremely attractive. The contrast enhanced multislice computed (CT ) and magnetic resonance imaging are very suitable methods for imaging the structures of the right heart, with the possibility of obtaining multiple projections and three-dimensional imaging reconstructions . There are specific morphological features that, if carefully analyzed, provide diagnostic information. Thus, it is possible to avoid or at least reduce the frequency of use of invasive diagnostic cardiac catheterization in patients with pulmonary hypertension. Conclusion: This review focuses on the use of contrast-enhanced CT for comprehensive evaluation of patients with pulmonary hypertension and presents the observed characteristic changes in the chest, lung parenchyma , the structures of the right half of the heart and pulmonary vessels

  14. Synchrotron nanoscopy imaging study of scalp hair in breast cancer patients and healthy individuals: Difference in medulla loss and cortical membrane enhancements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sung-Mi; Chikawa, Jun-Ichi; Jeon, Jae-Kun; Hwang, Min-Young; Lim, Jun; Jeong, Young-Ju; Park, Sung-Hwan; Kim, Hong-Tae; Jheon, Sanghoon; Kim, Jong-Ki

    2016-01-01

    Nanoscopic synchrotron X-ray imaging was performed on scalp hair samples of patients with breast cancer and healthy individuals to investigate any structural differences as diagnostic tool. Hair strands were divided into 2-3 segments along the strands from root to tip, followed by imaging either in projection or in CT scanning with a monochromatic 6.78-keV X-ray using zone-plate optics with a resolving power of 60 nm. All the examined cancer hairs exhibited medulla loss with cancer stage-dependent pattern; complete loss, discontinuous or trace along the strands. In contrast, medullas were well retained without complete loss in the healthy hair. In the CT-scanned axial images, the cortical spindle compartments had no contrast in the healthy hair, but appeared hypointense in contrast to the surrounding hyperintense cortical membrane complex in the cancer hair. In conclusion, observation of medulla loss and cortical membrane enhancements in the hair strands of breast cancer patients demonstrated structural variations in the cancer hair, providing a new platform for further synchrotron X-ray imaging study of screening breast cancer patients. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Ring artifacts removal from synchrotron CT image slices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Zhouping; Chapman, Dean; Wiebe, Sheldon

    2013-01-01

    Ring artifacts can occur in reconstructed images from x-ray Computerized Tomography (CT) as full or partial concentric rings superimposed on the scanned structures. Due to the data corruption by those ring artifacts in CT images, qualitative and quantitative analysis of these images are compromised. In this paper, we propose to correct the ring artifacts on the reconstructed synchrotron radiation (SR) CT image slices. The proposed correction procedure includes the following steps: (1). transform the reconstructed CT images into polar coordinates; (2) apply discrete two-dimensional (2D) wavelet transform to the polar image to decompose it into four image components: low pass band image component, as well as the components from horizontal, vertical and diagonal details bands; (3). apply 2D Fourier transform to the vertical details band image component only, since the ring artifacts become vertical lines in the polar coordinates; (4). apply Gaussian filtering in Fourier domain along the abscissa direction to suppress the vertical lines, since the information of the vertical lines in Fourier domain is completely condensed to that direction; (5). perform inverse Fourier transform to get the corrected vertical details band image component; (6). perform inverse wavelet transform to get the corrected polar image; (7). transform the corrected polar image back to Cartesian coordinates to get the CT image slice with reduced ring artifacts. This approach has been successfully used on CT data acquired from the Biomedical Imaging and Therapy (BMIT) beamline in Canadian Light Source (CLS), and the results show that the ring artifacts in original SR CT images have been effectively suppressed with all the structure information in the image preserved.

  16. Tomosynthesis Breast Imaging Early Detection and Characterization of Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hamberg, Leena

    2000-01-01

    A digital tomosynthesis mammography method was developed with which to obtain tomographic images of the breast by acquiring a series of low radiation dose images as the x-ray tube moves in an arc above the breast...

  17. CT-image based conformal brachytherapy of breast cancer. The significance of semi-3-D and 3-D treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polgar, C.; Major, T.; Somogyi, A.; Takacsi-Nagy, Z.; Mangel, L.C.; Fodor, J.; Nemeth, G.; Forrai, G.; Sulyok, Z.

    2000-01-01

    In 103 patients with T1-2, N0-1 breast cancer the tumor bed was clipped during breast conserving surgery. Fifty-two of them received boost brachytherapy after 46 to 50 Gy teletherapy and 51 patients were treated with brachytherapy alone via flexible implant tubes. Single double and triple plane implant was used in 6,89 and 8 cases, respectively. The dose of boost brachytherapy and sole brachytherapy prescribed to dose reference points was 3 times 4.75 Gy and 7 times 5.2 Gy, respectively. The positions of dose reference points varied according to the level (2-D, semi-3-D and 3-D) of treatment planning performed. The treatment planning was based on the 3-D reconstruction of the surgical clips, implant tubes and skin points. In all cases the implantations were planned with a semi-3-D technique aided by simulator. In 10 cases a recently developed CT-guided 3-D planning system was used. The semi-3D and 3-D treatment plans were compared to hypothetical 2-D plans using dose-volume histograms and dose non-uniformity ratios. The values of mean central dose, mean skin dose, minimal clip dose, proportion of underdosaged clips and mean target surface dose were evaluated. The accuracy of tumor bed localization and the conformity of planning target volume and treated volume were also analyzed in each technique. Results: With the help of conformal semi-3D and 3D brachytherapy planning we could define reference dose points, active source positions and dwell times individually. This technique decreased the mean skin dose with 22.2% and reduced the possibility of geographical miss. We could achieve the best conformity between the planning target volume and the treated volume with the CT-image based 3-D treatment planning, at the cost of worse dose homogeneity. The mean treated volume was reduced by 25.1% with semi-3-D planning, however, its was increased by 16.2% with 3-D planning, compared to the 2-D planning. (orig.) [de

  18. CT urethrography. New imaging technique of the urethra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeyama, Nobuyuki; Munechika, Hirotsugu

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to assess the usefulness of CT urethrography for evaluation of the posterior urethra and surrounding structures. The CT images were performed with 4 channel multidetector row CT unit. Twenty-six cases (12 cases of CT urethrography and 14 cases of conventional urethrography) were included in this study. 3D-volume rendering (VR) images and VR-multiplaner reconstruction (MPR) sagittal images were compared with conventional retrograde urethrography (RUG) images to evaluate the following anatomical structures; the inferior wall of bladder, the neck of bladder, the posterior urethra, and the prostate. Two radiologists undertook a task of evaluation of the images. There was no significant difference in image quality between RUG and 3D-VR. However, VR-MPR sagittal images were significantly better than RUG or 3D-VR images in any anatomical structures set up beforehand for evaluation. CT urerthrography was useful for evaluation of the posterior urethra and surrounding structures. (author)

  19. Lymphoscintigraphy and SPECT/CT in multicentric and multifocal breast cancer: does each tumour have a separate drainage pattern? Results of a Dutch multicentre study (MULTISENT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brouwer, O.R. [Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Antoni van Leeuwenhoekhospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Vermeeren, L.; Valdes Olmos, R.A. [Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Ploeg, I.M.C. van der; Rutgers, E.J.T.; Oldenburg, H.S.A. [Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Surgery, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Loo, C.E. [Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Radiology, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Pereira-Bouda, L.M.; Smit, F. [Rijnland Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Leiderdorp (Netherlands); Neijenhuis, P. [Rijnland Hospital, Department of Surgery, Leiderdorp (Netherlands); Vrouenraets, B.C. [Sint Lucas Andreas Hospital, Department of Surgery, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Sivro-Prndelj, F. [Sint Lucas Andreas Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Jap-a-Joe, S.M.; Borgstein, P.J. [Onze Lieve Vrouwe Gasthuis, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-07-15

    To investigate whether lymphoscintigraphy and SPECT/CT after intralesional injection of radiopharmaceutical into each tumour separately in patients with multiple malignancies in one breast yields additional sentinel nodes compared to intralesional injection of the largest tumour only. Patients were included prospectively at four centres in The Netherlands. Lymphatic flow was studied using planar lymphoscintigraphy and SPECT/CT until 4 h after administration of {sup 99m}Tc-nanocolloid in the largest tumour. Subsequently, the smaller tumour(s) was injected intratumorally followed by the same imaging sequence. Sentinel nodes were intraoperatively localized using a gamma ray detection probe and vital blue dye. Included in the study were 50 patients. Additional lymphatic drainage was depicted after the second and/or third injection in 32 patients (64 %). Comparison of planar images and SPECT/CT images after consecutive injections enabled visualization of the number and location of additional sentinel nodes (32 axillary, 11 internal mammary chain, 2 intramammary, and 1 interpectoral. A sentinel node contained metastases in 17 patients (34 %)). In five patients with a tumour-positive node in the axilla that was visualized after the first injection, an additional involved axillary node was found after the second injection. In two patients, isolated tumour cells were found in sentinel nodes that were only visualized after the second injection, whilst the sentinel nodes identified after the first injection were tumour-negative. Lymphoscintigraphy and SPECT/CT after consecutive intratumoral injections of tracer enable lymphatic mapping of each tumour separately in patients with multiple malignancies within one breast. The high incidence of additional sentinel nodes draining from tumours other than the largest one suggests that separate tumour-related tracer injections may be a more accurate approach to mapping and sampling of sentinel nodes in patients with multicentric or

  20. Lymphoscintigraphy and SPECT/CT in multicentric and multifocal breast cancer: does each tumour have a separate drainage pattern? Results of a Dutch multicentre study (MULTISENT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouwer, O R; Vermeeren, L; van der Ploeg, I M C; Valdés Olmos, R A; Loo, C E; Pereira-Bouda, L M; Smit, F; Neijenhuis, P; Vrouenraets, B C; Sivro-Prndelj, F; Jap-a-Joe, S M; Borgstein, P J; Rutgers, E J Th; Oldenburg, H S A

    2012-07-01

    To investigate whether lymphoscintigraphy and SPECT/CT after intralesional injection of radiopharmaceutical into each tumour separately in patients with multiple malignancies in one breast yields additional sentinel nodes compared to intralesional injection of the largest tumour only. Patients were included prospectively at four centres in The Netherlands. Lymphatic flow was studied using planar lymphoscintigraphy and SPECT/CT until 4 h after administration of (99m)Tc-nanocolloid in the largest tumour. Subsequently, the smaller tumour(s) was injected intratumorally followed by the same imaging sequence. Sentinel nodes were intraoperatively localized using a gamma ray detection probe and vital blue dye. Included in the study were 50 patients. Additional lymphatic drainage was depicted after the second and/or third injection in 32 patients (64%). Comparison of planar images and SPECT/CT images after consecutive injections enabled visualization of the number and location of additional sentinel nodes (32 axillary, 11 internal mammary chain, 2 intramammary, and 1 interpectoral. A sentinel node contained metastases in 17 patients (34%). In five patients with a tumour-positive node in the axilla that was visualized after the first injection, an additional involved axillary node was found after the second injection. In two patients, isolated tumour cells were found in sentinel nodes that were only visualized after the second injection, whilst the sentinel nodes identified after the first injection were tumour-negative. Lymphoscintigraphy and SPECT/CT after consecutive intratumoral injections of tracer enable lymphatic mapping of each tumour separately in patients with multiple malignancies within one breast. The high incidence of additional sentinel nodes draining from tumours other than the largest one suggests that separate tumour-related tracer injections may be a more accurate approach to mapping and sampling of sentinel nodes in patients with multicentric or

  1. Evaluation of Marfan syndrome: MR imaging versus CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soulen, R.L.; Fishman, E.K.; Pyeritz, R.E.; Gott, V.L.; Zerhouni, E.A.

    1986-01-01

    Twenty-five patients with Marfan, syndrome underwent both CT and MR imaging. MR imaging were interpreted in blinded fashion and then compared with CT scans MR imaging was found to be equivalent to CT in the detection of aortic, dural, and hip abnormalities in patients not operated on. MR imaging was superior to CT in the evaluation of postoperative patients because the artifact produced by Bjork-Shirley or St. Jude valves precludes adequate evaluation of the aortic root on CT while producing only a small inferior field distortion (a ''pseudo-ventricular septal defect'') on MR imaging. The absence of radiation exposure is another major advantage of MR imaging in this relatively young population requiring serial studies. The authors conclude that MR imaging is the modality of choice for the evaluation and follow-up of patients with Marfan syndrome and offers an appropriate means of screening their kindred

  2. Optical computed tomography for imaging the breast: first look

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grable, Richard J.; Ponder, Steven L.; Gkanatsios, Nikolaos A.; Dieckmann, William; Olivier, Patrick F.; Wake, Robert H.; Zeng, Yueping

    2000-07-01

    The purpose of the study is to compare computed tomography optical imaging with traditional breast imaging techniques. Images produced by computed tomography laser mammography (CTLMTM) scanner are compared with images obtained from mammography, and in some cases ultrasound and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). During the CTLM procedure, a near infrared laser irradiates the breast and an array of photodiodes detectors records light scattered through the breast tissue. The laser and detectors rotate synchronously around the breast to acquire a series of slice data along the coronal place. The procedure is performed without any breast compression or optical matching fluid. Cross-sectional slices of the breast are produced using a reconstruction algorithm. Reconstruction based on the diffusion theory is used to produce cross-sectional slices of the breast. Multiple slice images are combined to produce a three dimensional volumetric array of the imaged breast. This array is used to derive axial and sagittal images of the breast corresponding to cranio-caudal and medio-lateral images used in mammography. Over 200 women and 3 men have been scanned in clinical trials. The most obvious features seen in images produced by the optical tomography scanner are vascularization and significant lesions. Breast features caused by fibrocystic changes and cysts are less obvious. Breast density does not appear to be a significant factor in the quality of the image. We see correlation of the optical image structure with that seen with traditional breast imaging techniques. Further testing is being conducted to explore the sensitivity and specificity of optical tomography of the breast.

  3. Mass preserving image registration for lung CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorbunova, Vladlena; Sporring, Jon; Lo, Pechin Chien Pau

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a mass preserving image registration algorithm for lung CT images. To account for the local change in lung tissue intensity during the breathing cycle, a tissue appearance model based on the principle of preservation of total lung mass is proposed. This model is incorporated...... on four groups of data: 44 pairs of longitudinal inspiratory chest CT scans with small difference in lung volume; 44 pairs of longitudinal inspiratory chest CT scans with large difference in lung volume; 16 pairs of expiratory and inspiratory CT scans; and 5 pairs of images extracted at end exhale and end...

  4. [Diagnostic imaging of breast cancer : An update].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funke, M

    2016-10-01

    Advances in imaging of the female breast have substantially influenced the diagnosis and probably also the therapy and prognosis of breast cancer in the past few years. This article gives an overview of the most important imaging modalities in the diagnosis of breast cancer. Digital mammography is considered to be the gold standard for the early detection of breast cancer. Digital breast tomosynthesis can increase the diagnostic accuracy of mammography and is used for the assessment of equivocal or suspicious mammography findings. Other modalities, such as ultrasound and contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) play an important role in the diagnostics, staging and follow-up of breast cancer. Percutaneous needle biopsy is a rapid and minimally invasive method for the histological verification of breast cancer. New breast imaging modalities, such as contrast-enhanced spectral mammography, diffusion-weighted MRI and MR spectroscopy can possibly further improve breast cancer diagnostics; however, further studies are necessary to prove the advantages of these methods so that they cannot yet be recommended for routine clinical use.

  5. In vivo microCT imaging of rodent cerebral vasculature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Youngho; Hasegawa, Bruce H; Hashimoto, Tomoki; Nuki, Yoshitsugu

    2008-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) remains a critical diagnostic tool for evaluating patients with cerebrovascular disease, and the advent of specialized systems for imaging rodents has extended these techniques to small animal models of these diseases. We therefore have evaluated in vivo methods of imaging rat models of hemorrhagic stroke using a high resolution compact computed tomography ('microCT') system (FLEX(tm) X-O(tm), Gamma Medica-Ideas, Northridge, CA). For all in vivo studies, the head of the anesthetized rat was secured in a custom immobilization device for microCT imaging with 512 projections over 2 min at 60 kVp and 0.530 mA (I tube x t/rotation = 63.6 mAs). First, imaging without iodinated contrast was performed (a) to differentiate the effect of contrast agent in contrast-enhanced CT and (b) to examine the effectiveness of the immobilization device between two time points of CT acquisitions. Then, contrast-enhanced CT was performed with continuous administration of iopromide (300 mgI ml -1 at 1.2 ml min -1 ) to visualize aneurysms and other vascular formations in the carotid and cerebral arteries that may precede subarachnoid hemorrhage. The accuracy of registration between the noncontrast and contrast-enhanced CT images with the immobilization device was compared against the images aligned with normalized mutual information using FMRIB's linear image registration tool (FLIRT). Translations and rotations were examined between the FLIRT-aligned noncontrast CT image and the nonaligned noncontrast CT image. These two data sets demonstrated translational and rotational differences of less than 0.5 voxel (∼85 μm) and 0.5 deg., respectively. Noncontrast CT demonstrated a very small volume (0.1 ml) of femoral arterial blood introduced surgically into the rodent brain. Continuous administration of iopromide during the CT acquisition produced consistent vascular contrast in the reconstructed CT images. As a result, carotid arteries and major cerebral blood vessels

  6. In vivo microCT imaging of rodent cerebral vasculature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Youngho; Hasegawa, Bruce H [Center for Molecular and Functional Imaging, Department of Radiology, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94143 (United States); Hashimoto, Tomoki; Nuki, Yoshitsugu [Center for Cerebrovascular Research, Department of Anesthesia and Perioperative Care, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94143 (United States)], E-mail: youngho.seo@radiology.ucsf.edu

    2008-04-07

    Computed tomography (CT) remains a critical diagnostic tool for evaluating patients with cerebrovascular disease, and the advent of specialized systems for imaging rodents has extended these techniques to small animal models of these diseases. We therefore have evaluated in vivo methods of imaging rat models of hemorrhagic stroke using a high resolution compact computed tomography ('microCT') system (FLEX(tm) X-O(tm), Gamma Medica-Ideas, Northridge, CA). For all in vivo studies, the head of the anesthetized rat was secured in a custom immobilization device for microCT imaging with 512 projections over 2 min at 60 kVp and 0.530 mA (I{sub tube} x t/rotation = 63.6 mAs). First, imaging without iodinated contrast was performed (a) to differentiate the effect of contrast agent in contrast-enhanced CT and (b) to examine the effectiveness of the immobilization device between two time points of CT acquisitions. Then, contrast-enhanced CT was performed with continuous administration of iopromide (300 mgI ml{sup -1} at 1.2 ml min{sup -1}) to visualize aneurysms and other vascular formations in the carotid and cerebral arteries that may precede subarachnoid hemorrhage. The accuracy of registration between the noncontrast and contrast-enhanced CT images with the immobilization device was compared against the images aligned with normalized mutual information using FMRIB's linear image registration tool (FLIRT). Translations and rotations were examined between the FLIRT-aligned noncontrast CT image and the nonaligned noncontrast CT image. These two data sets demonstrated translational and rotational differences of less than 0.5 voxel ({approx}85 {mu}m) and 0.5 deg., respectively. Noncontrast CT demonstrated a very small volume (0.1 ml) of femoral arterial blood introduced surgically into the rodent brain. Continuous administration of iopromide during the CT acquisition produced consistent vascular contrast in the reconstructed CT images. As a result, carotid

  7. An evaluation of in-plane shields during thoracic CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, S J; McEntee, M F; Rainford, L A

    2013-08-01

    The object of this study was to compare organ dose and image quality effects of using bismuth and barium vinyl in-plane shields with standard and low tube current thoracic CT protocols. A RANDO phantom was scanned using a 64-slice CT scanner and three different thoracic protocols. Thermoluminescent dosemeters were positioned in six locations to record surface and absorbed breast and lung doses. Image quality was assessed quantitatively using region of interest measurements. Scanning was repeated using bismuth and barium vinyl in-plane shields to cover the breasts and the results were compared with standard and reduced dose protocols. Dose reductions were most evident in the breast, skin and anterior lung when shielding was used, with mean reductions of 34, 33 and 10 % for bismuth and 23, 18 and 11 % for barium, respectively. Bismuth was associated with significant increases in both noise and CT attenuation values for all the three protocols, especially anteriorly and centrally. Barium shielding had a reduced impact on image quality. Reducing the overall tube current reduced doses in all the locations by 20-27 % with similar increases in noise as shielding, without impacting on attenuation values. Reducing the overall tube current best optimises dose with minimal image quality impact. In-plane shields increase noise and attenuation values, while reducing anterior organ doses primarily. Shielding remains a useful optimisation tool in CT and barium is an effective alternative to bismuth especially when image quality is of concern.

  8. Neural network and its application to CT imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikravesh, M.; Kovscek, A.R.; Patzek, T.W. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-02-01

    We present an integrated approach to imaging the progress of air displacement by spontaneous imbibition of oil into sandstone. We combine Computerized Tomography (CT) scanning and neural network image processing. The main aspects of our approach are (I) visualization of the distribution of oil and air saturation by CT, (II) interpretation of CT scans using neural networks, and (III) reconstruction of 3-D images of oil saturation from the CT scans with a neural network model. Excellent agreement between the actual images and the neural network predictions is found.

  9. {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT in staging, restaging, and treatment response assessment of male breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groheux, David, E-mail: dgroheux@yahoo.fr [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Saint-Louis Hospital, Paris (France); Doctoral School of Biology and Biotechnology, University Institute of Hematology, University of Paris VII, Paris (France); Hindié, Elif [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Haut-Lévêque Hospital, CHU Bordeaux, University Bordeaux-Segalen, Bordeaux (France); Marty, Michel [Breast Diseases Unit and Department of Medical Oncology, Saint-Louis Hospital, Paris (France); Centre for Therapeutic Innovation, Saint-Louis Hospital, Paris (France); Espié, Marc [Breast Diseases Unit and Department of Medical Oncology, Saint-Louis Hospital, Paris (France); Rubello, Domenico [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Santa Maria della Misericordia, Rovigo Hospital, Rovigo (Italy); Vercellino, Laetitia [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Saint-Louis Hospital, Paris (France); Doctoral School of Biology and Biotechnology, University Institute of Hematology, University of Paris VII, Paris (France); Bousquet, Guilhem [Breast Diseases Unit and Department of Medical Oncology, Saint-Louis Hospital, Paris (France); INSERM U728, University Institute of Hematology, University of Paris VII, Paris (France); Ohnona, Jessica; Toubert, Marie-Elisabeth [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Saint-Louis Hospital, Paris (France); Merlet, Pascal [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Saint-Louis Hospital, Paris (France); Doctoral School of Biology and Biotechnology, University Institute of Hematology, University of Paris VII, Paris (France); Misset, Jean-Louis [Breast Diseases Unit and Department of Medical Oncology, Saint-Louis Hospital, Paris (France)

    2014-10-15

    Purpose: Male breast cancer (BC) is a rare disease, with patterns different from those found in women. Most tumors are detected at more advanced stages than in women. The aim of this study was to analyze the performance of [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ({sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT) in staging, restaging, and therapy response assessment. Methods: We performed a systematic analysis in the database of Saint-Louis Hospital to identify male patients with BC referred for PET/CT. {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT findings considered suspicious for malignancy were compared to biopsy results, further work-up and/or patient follow-up of at least 6 months. Performances of {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT were compared to that of conventional imaging (CI) using the McNemar test. The impact of PET/CT on management was evaluated. Results: During 6 consecutive years, among 12,692 {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT oncology studies, 30 were performed in 15 men with BC: 7 examinations for initial staging, 11 for restaging, and 12 for response assessment. Tumors profile was ER+ and one had HER2 overexpression. PET/CT sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accuracy to detect distant metastases were 100%, 67%, 86%, 100% and 89%, respectively. PET/CT was more informative than CI in 40% of studies (p = 0.03; 95% confidence interval: 3.26 – 40%). Findings from {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT led to modification in the planned treatment in 13/30 cases (43%). Conclusion: Although all the tumors were ER+, primary lesions and metastases were diagnosed with high sensitivity. {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT seems to be a powerful imaging method to perform staging, restaging and treatment response assessment in male patients with BC.

  10. MicroPET/CT Imaging of AXL Downregulation by HSP90 Inhibition in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanqin Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available AXL receptor tyrosine kinase is overexpressed in a number of solid tumor types including triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC. AXL is considered an important regulator of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT and a potential therapeutic target for TNBC. In this work, we used microPET/CT with 64Cu-labeled anti-human AXL antibody (64Cu-anti-hAXL to noninvasively interrogate the degradation of AXL in vivo in response to 17-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG, a potent inhibitor of HSP90. 17-AAG treatment caused significant decline in AXL expression in orthotopic TNBC MDA-MB-231 tumors, inhibited EMT, and delayed tumor growth in vivo, resulting in significant reduction in tumor uptake of 64Cu-anti-hAXL as clearly visualized by microPET/CT. Our data indicate that 64Cu-anti-hAXL can be useful for monitoring anti-AXL therapies and for assessing inhibition of HSP90 molecular chaperone using AXL as a molecular surrogate.

  11. Multi-institutional MicroCT image comparison of image-guided small animal irradiators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, Chris D.; Lindsay, Patricia; E Graves, Edward; Wong, Eugene; Perez, Jessica R.; Poirier, Yannick; Ben-Bouchta, Youssef; Kanesalingam, Thilakshan; Chen, Haijian; E Rubinstein, Ashley; Sheng, Ke; Bazalova-Carter, Magdalena

    2017-07-01

    To recommend imaging protocols and establish tolerance levels for microCT image quality assurance (QA) performed on conformal image-guided small animal irradiators. A fully automated QA software SAPA (small animal phantom analyzer) for image analysis of the commercial Shelley micro-CT MCTP 610 phantom was developed, in which quantitative analyses of CT number linearity, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), uniformity and noise, geometric accuracy, spatial resolution by means of modulation transfer function (MTF), and CT contrast were performed. Phantom microCT scans from eleven institutions acquired with four image-guided small animal irradiator units (including the commercial PXi X-RAD SmART and Xstrahl SARRP systems) with varying parameters used for routine small animal imaging were analyzed. Multi-institutional data sets were compared using SAPA, based on which tolerance levels for each QA test were established and imaging protocols for QA were recommended. By analyzing microCT data from 11 institutions, we established image QA tolerance levels for all image quality tests. CT number linearity set to R 2  >  0.990 was acceptable in microCT data acquired at all but three institutions. Acceptable SNR  >  36 and noise levels  1.5 lp mm-1 for MTF  =  0.2) was obtained at all but four institutions due to their large image voxel size used (>0.275 mm). Ten of the eleven institutions passed the set QA tolerance for geometric accuracy (2000 HU for 30 mgI ml-1). We recommend performing imaging QA with 70 kVp, 1.5 mA, 120 s imaging time, 0.20 mm voxel size, and a frame rate of 5 fps for the PXi X-RAD SmART. For the Xstrahl SARRP, we recommend using 60 kVp, 1.0 mA, 240 s imaging time, 0.20 mm voxel size, and 6 fps. These imaging protocols should result in high quality images that pass the set tolerance levels on all systems. Average SAPA computation time for complete QA analysis for a 0.20 mm voxel, 400 slice Shelley phantom microCT data set

  12. Direct-Conversion Molecular Breast Imaging of Invasive Breast Cancer: Imaging Features, Extent of Invasive Disease, and Comparison Between Invasive Ductal and Lobular Histology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conners, Amy Lynn; Jones, Katie N; Hruska, Carrie B; Geske, Jennifer R; Boughey, Judy C; Rhodes, Deborah J

    2015-09-01

    The purposes of this study were to compare the tumor appearance of invasive breast cancer on direct-conversion molecular breast imaging using a standardized lexicon and to determine how often direct-conversion molecular breast imaging identifies all known invasive tumor foci in the breast, and whether this differs for invasive ductal versus lobular histologic profiles. Patients with prior invasive breast cancer and concurrent direct-conversion molecular breast imaging examinations were retrospectively reviewed. Blinded review of direct-conversion molecular breast imaging examinations was performed by one of two radiologists, according to a validated lexicon. Direct-conversion molecular breast imaging findings were matched with lesions described on the pathology report to exclude benign reasons for direct-conversion molecular breast imaging findings and to document direct-conversion molecular breast imaging-occult tumor foci. Associations between direct-conversion molecular breast imaging findings and tumor histologic profiles were examined using chi-square tests. In 286 patients, 390 invasive tumor foci were present in 294 breasts. A corresponding direct-conversion molecular breast imaging finding was present for 341 of 390 (87%) tumor foci described on the pathology report. Invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) tumor foci were more likely to be a mass (40% IDC vs 15% invasive lobular carcinoma [ILC]; p < 0.001) and to have marked intensity than were ILC foci (63% IDC vs 32% ILC; p < 0.001). Direct-conversion molecular breast imaging correctly revealed all pathology-proven foci of invasive disease in 79.8% of cases and was more likely to do so for IDC than for ILC (86.1% vs 56.7%; p < 0.0001). Overall, direct-conversion molecular breast imaging showed all known invasive foci in 249 of 286 (87%) patients. Direct-conversion molecular breast imaging features of invasive cancer, including lesion type and intensity, differ by histologic subtype. Direct-conversion molecular

  13. Image quality of conventional images of dual-layer SPECTRAL CT: a phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ommen, F; Bennink, E; Vlassenbroek, A; Dankbaar, J W; Schilham, A M R; Viergever, M A; de Jong, H W A M

    2018-05-10

    Spectral CT using a dual layer detector offers the possibility of retrospectively introducing spectral information to conventional CT images. In theory, the dual-layer technology should not come with a dose or image quality penalty for conventional images. In this study, we evaluate the influence of a dual-layer detector (IQon Spectral CT, Philips) on the image quality of conventional CT images, by comparing these images with those of a conventional but otherwise technically comparable single-layer CT scanner (Brilliance iCT, Philips), by means of phantom experiments. For both CT scanners conventional CT images were acquired using four adult scanning protocols: i) body helical, ii) body axial, iii) head helical and iv) head axial. A CATPHAN 600 phantom was scanned to conduct an assessment of image quality metrics at equivalent (CTDI) dose levels. Noise was characterized by means of noise power spectra (NPS) and standard deviation (SD) of a uniform region, and spatial resolution was evaluated with modulation transfer functions (MTF) of a tungsten wire. In addition, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), image uniformity, CT number linearity, slice thickness, slice spacing, and spatial linearity were measured and evaluated. Additional measurements of CNR, resolution and noise were performed in two larger phantoms. The resolution levels at 50%, 10% and 5% MTF of the iCT and IQon showed small but significant differences up to 0.25 lp/cm for body scans, and up to 0.2 lp/cm for head scans in favor of the IQon. The iCT and IQon showed perfect CT linearity for body scans, but for head scans both scanners showed an underestimation of the CT numbers of materials with a high opacity. Slice thickness was slightly overestimated for both scanners. Slice spacing was comparable and reconstructed correctly. In addition, spatial linearity was excellent for both scanners, with a maximum error of 0.11 mm. CNR was higher on the IQon compared to the iCT for both normal and larger phantoms with

  14. Image reconstruction design of industrial CT instrument for teaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou Yongning; Cai Yufang

    2009-01-01

    Industrial CT instrument for teaching is applied to teaching and study in field of physics and radiology major, image reconstruction is an important part of software on CT instrument. The paper expatiate on CT physical theory and first generation CT reconstruction algorithm, describe scan process of industrial CT instrument for teaching; analyze image artifact as result of displacement of rotation center, implement method of center displacement correcting, design and complete image reconstruction software, application shows that reconstructed image is very clear and qualitatively high. (authors)

  15. Improving the false-negative rate of CT in acute appendicitis-Reassessment of CT images by body imaging radiologists: A blinded prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poortman, Pieter; Lohle, Paul N.M.; Schoemaker, Cees M.; Cuesta, Miguel A.; Oostvogel, Henk J.M.; Lange-de Klerk, Elly S.M. de; Hamming, Jaap F.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the accuracy of computed tomography (CT) analyzed by individual radiology staff members and body imaging radiologists in a non-academic teaching hospital for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis. Patients and methods: In a prospective study 199 patients with suspected acute appendicitis were examined with unenhanced CT. CT images were pre-operatively analyzed by one of the 12 members of the radiology staff. In a later stage two body imaging radiologist reassessed all CT images without knowledge of the surgical findings and without knowledge of the primary CT diagnosis. The results, independently reported, were correlated with surgical and histopathologic findings. Results: In 132 patients (66%) acute appendicitis was found at surgery, in 67 patients (34%) a normal appendix was found. The sensitivity of the primary CT analysis and of the reassessment was 76% and 88%, respectively; the specificity was 84% and 87%; the positive predictive value was 90% and 93%; the negative predictive value was 64% and 78%; and the accuracy was 78% and 87%. Conclusion: Reassessment of CT images for acute appendicitis by body imaging radiologists results in a significant improvement of sensitivity, negative predictive value and accuracy. To prevent false-negative interpretation of CT images in acute appendicitis the expertise of the attending radiologist should be considered.

  16. Improving the false-negative rate of CT in acute appendicitis-Reassessment of CT images by body imaging radiologists: A blinded prospective study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poortman, Pieter [Department of Surgery, St Elisabeth Hospital, Tilburg (Netherlands)], E-mail: ppoortman@wlz.nl; Lohle, Paul N.M. [Department of Surgery, St Elisabeth Hospital, Tilburg (Netherlands)], E-mail: plohle@elisabeth.nl; Schoemaker, Cees M. [Department of Surgery, St Elisabeth Hospital, Tilburg (Netherlands)], E-mail: mcschoemaker@elisabeth.nl; Cuesta, Miguel A. [Department of Surgery, VU Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands)], E-mail: ma.cuesta@vumc.nl; Oostvogel, Henk J.M. [Department of Surgery, St Elisabeth Hospital, Tilburg (Netherlands)], E-mail: h.oostvogel@elisabeth.nl; Lange-de Klerk, Elly S.M. de [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, VU Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands)], E-mail: esm.delange@vumc.nl; Hamming, Jaap F. [Department of Surgery, Leiden University Medical Centre (Netherlands)], E-mail: j.f.hamming@lumc.nl

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To compare the accuracy of computed tomography (CT) analyzed by individual radiology staff members and body imaging radiologists in a non-academic teaching hospital for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis. Patients and methods: In a prospective study 199 patients with suspected acute appendicitis were examined with unenhanced CT. CT images were pre-operatively analyzed by one of the 12 members of the radiology staff. In a later stage two body imaging radiologist reassessed all CT images without knowledge of the surgical findings and without knowledge of the primary CT diagnosis. The results, independently reported, were correlated with surgical and histopathologic findings. Results: In 132 patients (66%) acute appendicitis was found at surgery, in 67 patients (34%) a normal appendix was found. The sensitivity of the primary CT analysis and of the reassessment was 76% and 88%, respectively; the specificity was 84% and 87%; the positive predictive value was 90% and 93%; the negative predictive value was 64% and 78%; and the accuracy was 78% and 87%. Conclusion: Reassessment of CT images for acute appendicitis by body imaging radiologists results in a significant improvement of sensitivity, negative predictive value and accuracy. To prevent false-negative interpretation of CT images in acute appendicitis the expertise of the attending radiologist should be considered.

  17. Image-guided stereotactic surgery using ultrasonography and reconstructive three-dimensional CT-imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Hirotsune; Iseki, Hiroshi; Umezawa, Yoshihiro

    1991-01-01

    A new simulation and navigation system utilizing three-dimensional CT images has been developed for image-guided stereotactic surgery. Preoperative CT images are not always useful in predicting the intraoperative location of lesions, for cerebral lesions are easily displaced or distorted by gravity, brain retraction, and/or CSF aspiration during operative procedure. This new system, however, has the advantage that the intraoperative locations of intracranial lesions or the anatomical structures of the brain can be precisely confirmed during stereotactic surgery. Serial CT images were obtained from a patient whose head had been fixed to the ISEKI CT-guided stereotactic frame. The data of serial CT images were saved on a floppy disc and then transferred to the work station (IRIS) using the off line. In order to find the best approach angle for ultrasound-guided stereotactic surgery, three-dimenstional CT images were reconstructed using the work station. The site of the craniotomy or the angle of the trajectory of the ultrasound probe was measured preoperatively based on the three-dimensional CT images. Then, in the operating room, the patient's head was fixed to the ISEKI frame with the subframe at the same position as before according to the measurement of the CT images. In a case of cystic glioma, the predicable ultrasonograms from three-dimensional reconstructive CT images were ascertained to correspond well to the actual ultrasound images during ultrasound-guided stereotactic surgery. Therefore, the new simulation and navigation system can be judged to be a powerful operative supporting modality for correcting the locations of cerebral lesions; it allows one to perform stereotactic surgery more accurately and less invasively. (author)

  18. Phase contrast imaging of the breast. Basic principles and steps towards clinical implementation; Phasenkontrastbildgebung der Brust. Grundlagen und Schritte zur klinischen Implementierbarkeit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grandl, S.; Sztrokay-Gaul, A.; Auweter, S.D.; Hellerhoff, K. [Klinikum der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Campus Grosshadern, Institut fuer Klinische Radiologie, Muenchen (Germany)

    2014-03-15

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer and the leading cause of cancer deaths in women worldwide. Mammography is the only imaging technique approved for nationwide breast cancer screening. Digital full field mammography has improved mammographic image quality. Nevertheless, mammography has a low positive predictive value and a low sensitivity especially in mammographically dense breasts. One of the major limitations is the inherently low contrast between healthy breast parenchyma and breast cancer. Phase contrast imaging is based on the phase shift that occurs when X-rays encounter a change in refractive index between different materials. The improved soft tissue contrast makes the technology particularly promising for breast diagnostics. The studies presented here suggest that phase contrast imaging provides additional diagnostic information both using phase contrast mammography and phase contrast computed tomography (CT). This paper provides an overview of the basic principles of the phase contrast imaging and describes recent developments towards in vivo and ex vivo phase contrast imaging of the breast. (orig.) [German] Brustkrebs ist weltweit die haeufigste Tumorerkrankung und die haeufigste Krebstodesursache der Frau. Die Mammographie ist die einzige zugelassene bildgebende Methode zur Brustkrebsfrueherkennung im Rahmen flaechendeckender Screeningprogramme. Trotz Verbesserung der Bildqualitaet und der Befundungsperformance durch die Einfuehrung der digitalen Vollfeldmammographie sind der positiv-praediktive Wert und die Sensitivitaet der Mammographie insbesondere bei mammographisch dichtem Druesenkoerper eingeschraenkt. Dies ist u. a. auf die geringen Dichteunterschiede zwischen gesundem Brustdruesengewebe und intramammaeren Malignomen zurueckzufuehren. Die Phasenkontrastbildgebung macht sich die Phasenverschiebung von Roentgenstrahlen zunutze, die an Materialgrenzen mit unterschiedlichen Brechungsindizes entsteht. Die Technik bietet einen potenziell

  19. Research of ART method in CT image reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zhipeng; Cong Peng; Wu Haifeng

    2005-01-01

    This paper studied Algebraic Reconstruction Technique (ART) in CT image reconstruction. Discussed the ray number influence on image quality. And the adopting of smooth method got high quality CT image. (authors)

  20. Primary Rectal Adenocarcinoma Metastasizing to Bilateral Breast - a Rare Case Demonstrated by {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soundararajan, Ramya; Arora, Saurabh; Das, Chandan Jyoti; Roy, Maitrayee; Kumar, Rakesh; Bal, Chandrasekhar [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi (India)

    2016-06-15

    A 22-year-old female presented with multiple painless bilateral breast masses for the past 2 months. On Further questioning she had hematochezia and constipation for three months. On digital rectal examination, thickening of rectal mucosa at 5 cm from the anal verge was found. On physical examination, multiple firm, non-tender, nodular lesions were found in bilateral breasts. Metastatic breast disease from extra mammary primaries is uncommon and it constitutes 0.5 - 6% of all breast malignancies. melanomas, lymphomas, leukemias, ands sarcomas are the most common malignancies causing breast metastases. Infrequently, carcinomas of the lung, stomach, ovary, liver, tonsil, pleura, pancreas, cervix, perineum, endometrium, bladder, carcinoid tumors and renal cell carcinomas can cause metastatic breast disease. Metastatic breast disease from colorectal cancer is characterised by disseminated metastatic disease and a poor prognosis. In this case, It was essential to distinguish between metastatic breast disease primary breast carcinoma to plan appropriate management. Because of its rare incidence and high index of clinical suspicion, appropriate radiological investigations and histopathology is essential for accurate diagnosis. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT, being a whole-body metabolic functional imaging modality, helped us determine the extent of the primary and metastatic disease. In view of disseminated metastases, the bilateral breast disease was also considered as metastatic involvement, Which was proven by histopathology.

  1. Automatic anatomy recognition in whole-body PET/CT images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Huiqian [College of Optoelectronic Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044, China and Medical Image Processing Group Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Udupa, Jayaram K., E-mail: jay@mail.med.upenn.edu; Odhner, Dewey; Tong, Yubing; Torigian, Drew A. [Medical Image Processing Group Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Zhao, Liming [Medical Image Processing Group Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 and Research Center of Intelligent System and Robotics, Chongqing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Chongqing 400065 (China)

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: Whole-body positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) has become a standard method of imaging patients with various disease conditions, especially cancer. Body-wide accurate quantification of disease burden in PET/CT images is important for characterizing lesions, staging disease, prognosticating patient outcome, planning treatment, and evaluating disease response to therapeutic interventions. However, body-wide anatomy recognition in PET/CT is a critical first step for accurately and automatically quantifying disease body-wide, body-region-wise, and organwise. This latter process, however, has remained a challenge due to the lower quality of the anatomic information portrayed in the CT component of this imaging modality and the paucity of anatomic details in the PET component. In this paper, the authors demonstrate the adaptation of a recently developed automatic anatomy recognition (AAR) methodology [Udupa et al., “Body-wide hierarchical fuzzy modeling, recognition, and delineation of anatomy in medical images,” Med. Image Anal. 18, 752–771 (2014)] to PET/CT images. Their goal was to test what level of object localization accuracy can be achieved on PET/CT compared to that achieved on diagnostic CT images. Methods: The authors advance the AAR approach in this work in three fronts: (i) from body-region-wise treatment in the work of Udupa et al. to whole body; (ii) from the use of image intensity in optimal object recognition in the work of Udupa et al. to intensity plus object-specific texture properties, and (iii) from the intramodality model-building-recognition strategy to the intermodality approach. The whole-body approach allows consideration of relationships among objects in different body regions, which was previously not possible. Consideration of object texture allows generalizing the previous optimal threshold-based fuzzy model recognition method from intensity images to any derived fuzzy membership image, and in the process

  2. Automatic anatomy recognition in whole-body PET/CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Huiqian; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Odhner, Dewey; Tong, Yubing; Torigian, Drew A.; Zhao, Liming

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Whole-body positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) has become a standard method of imaging patients with various disease conditions, especially cancer. Body-wide accurate quantification of disease burden in PET/CT images is important for characterizing lesions, staging disease, prognosticating patient outcome, planning treatment, and evaluating disease response to therapeutic interventions. However, body-wide anatomy recognition in PET/CT is a critical first step for accurately and automatically quantifying disease body-wide, body-region-wise, and organwise. This latter process, however, has remained a challenge due to the lower quality of the anatomic information portrayed in the CT component of this imaging modality and the paucity of anatomic details in the PET component. In this paper, the authors demonstrate the adaptation of a recently developed automatic anatomy recognition (AAR) methodology [Udupa et al., “Body-wide hierarchical fuzzy modeling, recognition, and delineation of anatomy in medical images,” Med. Image Anal. 18, 752–771 (2014)] to PET/CT images. Their goal was to test what level of object localization accuracy can be achieved on PET/CT compared to that achieved on diagnostic CT images. Methods: The authors advance the AAR approach in this work in three fronts: (i) from body-region-wise treatment in the work of Udupa et al. to whole body; (ii) from the use of image intensity in optimal object recognition in the work of Udupa et al. to intensity plus object-specific texture properties, and (iii) from the intramodality model-building-recognition strategy to the intermodality approach. The whole-body approach allows consideration of relationships among objects in different body regions, which was previously not possible. Consideration of object texture allows generalizing the previous optimal threshold-based fuzzy model recognition method from intensity images to any derived fuzzy membership image, and in the process

  3. Monitoring tumor response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy using MRI and 18F-FDG PET/CT in breast cancer subtypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmitz, Alexander M. Th; Teixeira, Suzana C.; Pengel, Kenneth E.; Loo, Claudette E.; Vogel, Wouter V.; Wesseling, Jelle; Rutgers, Emiel J. Th; Valdés Olmos, Renato A.; Sonke, Gabe S.; Rodenhuis, Sjoerd; Vrancken Peeters, Marie Jeanne T. F. D.; Gilhuijs, Kenneth G. A.

    2017-01-01

    To explore guidelines on the use of MRI and PET/CT monitoring primary tumor response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC), taking breast cancer subtype into account. In this prospective cohort study, 188 women were included with stages II and III breast cancer. MRI and 18F-FDG-PET/CT were acquired

  4. Detection of bone metastases in breast cancer patients in the PET/CT era: Do we still need the bone scan?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caglar, M; Kupik, O; Karabulut, E; Høilund-Carlsen, P F

    2016-01-01

    To examine the value of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) for the detection of bone metastasis in breast cancer patients and assess whether whole body bone scan (BS) with (99m)Tc-methylene diphosphonate provides any additional information. Study group comprised 150 patients, mean age 52 years (range 27-85) with breast cancer, suspected of having bone metastases. All patients had undergone both FDG-PET/CT and BS with or without single photon emission tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) within a period of 6 weeks. The final diagnosis of bone metastasis was established by histopathological findings, additional imaging, or clinical follow-up longer than 10 months. Cancer antigen 15-3 (CA15-3) and carcinoembryogenic antigen (CEA) were measured in all patients. Histologically 83%, 7% and 10% had infiltrating ductal, lobular and mixed carcinoma respectively. Confirmed bone metastases were present in 86 patients (57.3%) and absent in 64 (42.7%). Mean CA15-3 and CEA values in patients with bone metastases were 74.6ng/mL and 60.4U/mL respectively, compared to 21.3ng/mL and 3.2U/mL without metastases (p<0.001). The sensitivity of FDG-PET/CT for the detection of bone metastases was 97.6% compared to 89.5% with SPECT/CT. In 57 patients, FDG-PET/CT correctly identified additional pulmonary, hepatic, nodal and other soft tissue metastases, not detected by BS. Our findings suggest that FDG-PET/CT is superior to BS with or without SPECT/CT. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  5. The role of cone-beam breast-CT for breast cancer detection relative to breast density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wienbeck, Susanne; Uhlig, Johannes; Luftner-Nagel, Susanne; Zapf, Antonia; Surov, Alexey; von Fintel, Eva; Stahnke, Vera; Lotz, Joachim; Fischer, Uwe

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate the impact of breast density on the diagnostic accuracy of non-contrast cone-beam breast computed tomography (CBBCT) in comparison to mammography for the detection of breast masses. A retrospective study was conducted from August 2015 to July 2016. Fifty-nine patients (65 breasts, 112 lesions) with BI-RADS, 5th edition 4 or 5 assessment in mammography and/or ultrasound of the breast received an additional non-contrast CBBCT. Independent double blind reading by two radiologists was performed for mammography and CBBCT imaging. Sensitivity, specificity and AUC were compared between the modalities. Breast lesions were histologically examined in 85 of 112 lesions (76%). The overall sensitivity for CBBCT (reader 1: 91%, reader 2: 88%) was higher than in mammography (both: 68%, pdensity group (pdensity breasts. • Overall sensitivity for non-contrast CBBCT ranged between 88%-91%. • Sensitivity was higher for CBBCT than mammography in both density types (pdensity types (pdensity types (p<0.001).

  6. CT planning of boost irradiation in radiotherapy of breast cancer after conservative surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messer, Peter M.; Kirikuta, Ion C.; Bratengeier, Klaus; Flentje, Michael

    1997-01-01

    Background and purpose: A study was performed to compare the accuracy of clinical treatment set-up and CT planning of boost irradiation in radiotherapy of breast cancer. Material and methods: Between September 1993 and October 1994, 45 women who underwent breast conserving surgery and irradiation containing a boost to the tumour bed were investigated. Prospective evaluation of CT planning of the boost was carried out. The target volume/boost field, electron energy and treatment set-up had been defined on the basis of clinical examination, initial and postsurgical mammograms by one radiotherapist. Next, a planning CT was performed in treatment position and a CT-based treatment plan was calculated according to a target volume defined by another radiotherapist. The clinical treatment set-up was imported into our computer planning system and the resulting isodose plots were compared with those from CT planning and reviewed critically. Results: The clinically defined treatment set-up had to be modified in 80% of the patients. Most discrepancies observed were related to the size of the boost field itself and the chosen electron energy. Minor changes had to be made with respect to angle of table and gantry. Conclusions: Critical review of the isodose plots from both methods showed clear advantages for CT planning. Guidelines for target definition in CT planning of boost irradiation and subgroups of patients benefiting from this technique are described

  7. Evaluation of pulmonary emphysema by the fused image of CT image and ventilation SPECT image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuda, Ituko; Maruno, Hiromasa; Mori, Kazuaki; Kohno, Tadashi; Kokubo, Takashi

    2007-01-01

    We evaluated pulmonary emphysema using a diagnostic device that could obtain a CT image, a ventilation single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) image and a lung perfusion SPECT image in one examination. The fused image made from the CT image and SPECT image had very little position gap between images, and the precision was high. From the fused image, we were able to detect the areas in which emphysematous change was the most marked in the CT image, while the accumulation decrease was most remarkable in the ventilation SPECT image. Thus it was possible to obtain an accurate status of pulmonary emphysema, and our method was regarded as a useful technique. (author)

  8. Cone-beam micro computed tomography dedicated to the breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarno, Antonio; Mettivier, Giovanni; Di Lillo, Francesca; Cesarelli, Mario; Bifulco, Paolo; Russo, Paolo

    2016-12-01

    We developed a scanner for micro computed tomography dedicated to the breast (BµCT) with a high resolution flat-panel detector and a microfocus X-ray tube. We evaluated the system spatial resolution via the 3D modulation transfer function (MTF). In addition to conventional absorption-based X-ray imaging, such a prototype showed capabilities for propagation-based phase-contrast and related edge enhancement effects in 3D imaging. The system limiting spatial resolution is 6.2mm -1 (MTF at 10%) in the vertical direction and 3.8mm -1 in the radial direction, values which compare favorably with the spatial resolution reached by mini focus breast CT scanners of other groups. The BµCT scanner was able to detect both microcalcification clusters and masses in an anthropomorphic breast phantom at a dose comparable to that of two-view mammography. The use of a breast holder is proposed in order to have 1-2min long scan times without breast motion artifacts. Copyright © 2016 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. MRI fused with prone FDG PET/CT improves the primary tumour staging of patients with breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Velloso, Maria J.; Ribelles, Maria J.; Rodriguez, Macarena; Sancho, Lidia; Prieto, Elena [Clinica Universidad de Navarra, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Pamplona (Spain); Fernandez-Montero, Alejandro [Clinica Universidad de Navarra, Department of Occupational Medicine, Pamplona (Spain); Santisteban, Marta [Clinica Universidad de Navarra, Department of Oncology, Pamplona (Spain); Rodriguez-Spiteri, Natalia; Martinez-Regueira, Fernando [Clinica Universidad de Navarra, Department of Surgery, Pamplona (Spain); Idoate, Miguel A. [Clinica Universidad de Navarra, Department of Pathology, Pamplona (Spain); Elizalde, Arlette; Pina, Luis J. [Clinica Universidad de Navarra, Department of Radiology, Pamplona (Spain)

    2017-08-15

    Our aim was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) fused with prone 2-[fluorine-18]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) in primary tumour staging of patients with breast cancer. This retrospective study evaluated 45 women with 49 pathologically proven breast carcinomas. MRI and prone PET-CT scans with time-of-flight and point-spread-function reconstruction were performed with the same dedicated breast coil. The studies were assessed by a radiologist and a nuclear medicine physician, and evaluation of fused images was made by consensus. The final diagnosis was based on pathology (90 lesions) or follow-up ≥ 24 months (17 lesions). The study assessed 72 malignant and 35 benign lesions with a median size of 1.8 cm (range 0.3-8.4 cm): 31 focal, nine multifocal and nine multicentric cases. In lesion-by-lesion analysis, sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values were 97%, 80%, 91% and 93% for MRI, 96%, 71%, 87%, and 89% for prone PET, and 97%. 94%, 97% and 94% for MRI fused with PET. Areas under the curve (AUC) were 0.953, 0.850, and 0.983, respectively (p < 0.01). MRI fused with FDG-PET is more accurate than FDG-PET in primary tumour staging of breast cancer patients and increases the specificity of MRI. (orig.)

  10. Experimental and computational development of a natural breast phantom for dosimetry studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nogueira, Luciana B.; Campos, Tarcisio P.R.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the experimental and computational development of a natural breast phantom, anthropomorphic and anthropometric for studies in dosimetry of brachytherapy and teletherapy of breast. The natural breast phantom developed corresponding to fibroadipose breasts of women aged 30 to 50 years, presenting radiographically medium density. The experimental breast phantom was constituted of three tissue-equivalents (TE's): glandular TE, adipose TE and skin TE. These TE's were developed according to chemical composition of human breast and present radiological response to exposure. Completed the construction of experimental breast phantom this was mounted on a thorax phantom previously developed by the research group NRI/UFMG. Then the computational breast phantom was constructed by performing a computed tomography (CT) by axial slices of the chest phantom. Through the images generated by CT a computational model of voxels of the thorax phantom was developed by SISCODES computational program, being the computational breast phantom represented by the same TE's of the experimental breast phantom. The images generated by CT allowed evaluating the radiological equivalence of the tissues. The breast phantom is being used in studies of experimental dosimetry both in brachytherapy as in teletherapy of breast. Dosimetry studies by MCNP-5 code using the computational model of the phantom breast are in progress. (author)

  11. Three-dimensional multislice CT imaging of otitis media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Miyako; Yoshikawa, Hiroshi; Hosokawa, Akira; Furukawa, Tomoyasu; Ichikawa, Ginichiro; Wada, Akihiro; Ando, Ichiro

    2002-01-01

    In recent years, the multislice CT system has come into practical use that enables table movement of half mm, resulting in a significant improvement in resolution. The use of this CT system enables to depict the entire auditory ossicles, including the stapes. 3D reconstruction was performed using helical CT data in 5 patients with chronic otitis media and 5 patients with cholesteatoma. An Aquilion Multi (Toshiba) multislice helical CT scanner and a Xtension (Toshiba) image workstation were used in this study. We demonstrated the 3D display with axial, coronal and sagittal images. Compared with the normal ears, it was necessary to set a higher threshold for the affected ears. It is important to select suitable threshold for demonstration of 3D images optimally. Bone destruction of the stapes was confirmed at surgery in 2 ears. The stapes was observed at 3D-CT imaging in other 18 ears. It was found that the 3D images of the ossicular destruction in ears with cholesteatoma were consistent with surgical findings. It is therefore concluded that 3D imaging of the middle ear using a multislice CT scanner is clinically useful. (author)

  12. Three-dimensional multislice CT imaging of otitis media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Miyako [Yanagibasi Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Yoshikawa, Hiroshi; Hosokawa, Akira; Furukawa, Tomoyasu; Ichikawa, Ginichiro [Juntendo Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine; Wada, Akihiro; Ando, Ichiro [Juntendo Univ., Chiba (Japan). Urayasu Hospital

    2002-07-01

    In recent years, the multislice CT system has come into practical use that enables table movement of half mm, resulting in a significant improvement in resolution. The use of this CT system enables to depict the entire auditory ossicles, including the stapes. 3D reconstruction was performed using helical CT data in 5 patients with chronic otitis media and 5 patients with cholesteatoma. An Aquilion Multi (Toshiba) multislice helical CT scanner and a Xtension (Toshiba) image workstation were used in this study. We demonstrated the 3D display with axial, coronal and sagittal images. Compared with the normal ears, it was necessary to set a higher threshold for the affected ears. It is important to select suitable threshold for demonstration of 3D images optimally. Bone destruction of the stapes was confirmed at surgery in 2 ears. The stapes was observed at 3D-CT imaging in other 18 ears. It was found that the 3D images of the ossicular destruction in ears with cholesteatoma were consistent with surgical findings. It is therefore concluded that 3D imaging of the middle ear using a multislice CT scanner is clinically useful. (author)

  13. SU-F-I-08: CT Image Ring Artifact Reduction Based On Prior Image

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, C; Qi, H; Chen, Z; Wu, S; Xu, Y; Zhou, L [Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: In computed tomography (CT) system, CT images with ring artifacts will be reconstructed when some adjacent bins of detector don’t work. The ring artifacts severely degrade CT image quality. We present a useful CT ring artifacts reduction based on projection data correction, aiming at estimating the missing data of projection data accurately, thus removing the ring artifacts of CT images. Methods: The method consists of ten steps: 1) Identification of abnormal pixel line in projection sinogram; 2) Linear interpolation within the pixel line of projection sinogram; 3) FBP reconstruction using interpolated projection data; 4) Filtering FBP image using mean filter; 5) Forwarding projection of filtered FBP image; 6) Subtraction forwarded projection from original projection; 7) Linear interpolation of abnormal pixel line area in the subtraction projection; 8) Adding the interpolated subtraction projection on the forwarded projection; 9) FBP reconstruction using corrected projection data; 10) Return to step 4 until the pre-set iteration number is reached. The method is validated on simulated and real data to restore missing projection data and reconstruct ring artifact-free CT images. Results: We have studied impact of amount of dead bins of CT detector on the accuracy of missing data estimation in projection sinogram. For the simulated case with a resolution of 256 by 256 Shepp-Logan phantom, three iterations are sufficient to restore projection data and reconstruct ring artifact-free images when the dead bins rating is under 30%. The dead-bin-induced artifacts are substantially reduced. More iteration number is needed to reconstruct satisfactory images while the rating of dead bins increases. Similar results were found for a real head phantom case. Conclusion: A practical CT image ring artifact correction scheme based on projection data is developed. This method can produce ring artifact-free CT images feasibly and effectively.

  14. SU-F-I-08: CT Image Ring Artifact Reduction Based On Prior Image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, C; Qi, H; Chen, Z; Wu, S; Xu, Y; Zhou, L

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: In computed tomography (CT) system, CT images with ring artifacts will be reconstructed when some adjacent bins of detector don’t work. The ring artifacts severely degrade CT image quality. We present a useful CT ring artifacts reduction based on projection data correction, aiming at estimating the missing data of projection data accurately, thus removing the ring artifacts of CT images. Methods: The method consists of ten steps: 1) Identification of abnormal pixel line in projection sinogram; 2) Linear interpolation within the pixel line of projection sinogram; 3) FBP reconstruction using interpolated projection data; 4) Filtering FBP image using mean filter; 5) Forwarding projection of filtered FBP image; 6) Subtraction forwarded projection from original projection; 7) Linear interpolation of abnormal pixel line area in the subtraction projection; 8) Adding the interpolated subtraction projection on the forwarded projection; 9) FBP reconstruction using corrected projection data; 10) Return to step 4 until the pre-set iteration number is reached. The method is validated on simulated and real data to restore missing projection data and reconstruct ring artifact-free CT images. Results: We have studied impact of amount of dead bins of CT detector on the accuracy of missing data estimation in projection sinogram. For the simulated case with a resolution of 256 by 256 Shepp-Logan phantom, three iterations are sufficient to restore projection data and reconstruct ring artifact-free images when the dead bins rating is under 30%. The dead-bin-induced artifacts are substantially reduced. More iteration number is needed to reconstruct satisfactory images while the rating of dead bins increases. Similar results were found for a real head phantom case. Conclusion: A practical CT image ring artifact correction scheme based on projection data is developed. This method can produce ring artifact-free CT images feasibly and effectively.

  15. Skeletal scintigraphy and SPECT/CT in orthopedic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klaeser, B.; Walter, M.; Krause, T.

    2011-01-01

    Multi-modality imaging with SPECT-CT in orthopaedics combines the excellent sensitivity of scintigraphy with the morphological information of CT as a key for specific interpretation of findings in bone scans. The result is an imaging modality with the clear potential to prove of value even in a competitive setting dominated by MRI, and to significantly add to diagnostic imaging in orthopaedics. SPECT-CT is of great value in the diagnostic evaluation after fractures, and - in contrast to MRI - it is well suited for imaging in patients with osteosyntheses and metallic implants. In sports medicine, SPECT-CT allows for a sensitive and specific detection of osseous stress reactions before morphological changes become detectable by CT or MRI. In patients with osseous pain syndromes, actively evolving degenerative changes as a cause of pain can be identified and accurately localized. Further, particularly prospective diagnostic studies providing comparative data are needed to strengthen the position of nuclear imaging in orthopaedics and sports medicine and to help implementing SPECT/CT in diagnostic algorithms. (orig.)

  16. Dose performance and image quality: Dual source CT versus single source CT in cardiac CT angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Min; Qi Hengtao; Wang Ximing; Wang Tao; Chen, Jiu-Hong; Liu Cheng

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate dose performance and image quality of 64-slice dual source CT (DSCT) in comparison to 64-slice single source CT (SSCT) in cardiac CT angiography (CTA). Methods: 100 patients examined by DSCT and 60 patients scanned by SSCT were included in this study. Objective indices such as image noise, contrast-to-noise ratio and signal-to-noise ratio were analyzed. Subjective image quality was assessed by two cardiovascular radiologists in consensus using a four-point scale (1 = excellent to 4 = not acceptable). Estimation of effective dose was performed on the basis of dose length product (DLP). Results: At low heart rates ( 0.05), but, at high heart rates (>70 bpm), DSCT provided robust image quality (P 70 bpm), DSCT is able to provide robust diagnostic image quality at doses far below that of SSCT.

  17. A review of biomechanically informed breast image registration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hipwell, John H; Vavourakis, Vasileios; Mertzanidou, Thomy; Eiben, Björn; Hawkes, David J; Han, Lianghao

    2016-01-01

    Breast radiology encompasses the full range of imaging modalities from routine imaging via x-ray mammography, magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound (both two- and three-dimensional), to more recent technologies such as digital breast tomosynthesis, and dedicated breast imaging systems for positron emission mammography and ultrasound tomography. In addition new and experimental modalities, such as Photoacoustics, Near Infrared Spectroscopy and Electrical Impedance Tomography etc, are emerging. The breast is a highly deformable structure however, and this greatly complicates visual comparison of imaging modalities for the purposes of breast screening, cancer diagnosis (including image guided biopsy), tumour staging, treatment monitoring, surgical planning and simulation of the effects of surgery and wound healing etc. Due primarily to the challenges posed by these gross, non-rigid deformations, development of automated methods which enable registration, and hence fusion, of information within and across breast imaging modalities, and between the images and the physical space of the breast during interventions, remains an active research field which has yet to translate suitable methods into clinical practice. This review describes current research in the field of breast biomechanical modelling and identifies relevant publications where the resulting models have been incorporated into breast image registration and simulation algorithms. Despite these developments there remain a number of issues that limit clinical application of biomechanical modelling. These include the accuracy of constitutive modelling, implementation of representative boundary conditions, failure to meet clinically acceptable levels of computational cost, challenges associated with automating patient-specific model generation (i.e. robust image segmentation and mesh generation) and the complexity of applying biomechanical modelling methods in routine clinical practice. (topical review)

  18. Quantitative analysis of breast echotexture patterns in automated breast ultrasound images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Ruey-Feng; Hou, Yu-Ling; Lo, Chung-Ming; Huang, Chiun-Sheng; Chen, Jeon-Hor; Kim, Won Hwa; Chang, Jung Min; Bae, Min Sun; Moon, Woo Kyung

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Breast tissue composition is considered to be associated with breast cancer risk. This study aimed to develop a computer-aided classification (CAC) system to automatically classify echotexture patterns as heterogeneous or homogeneous using automated breast ultrasound (ABUS) images. Methods: A CAC system was proposed that can recognize breast echotexture patterns in ABUS images. For each case, the echotexture pattern was assessed by two expert radiologists and classified as heterogeneous or homogeneous. After neutrosophic image transformation and fuzzy c-mean clusterings, the lower and upper boundaries of the fibroglandular tissues were defined. Then, the number of hypoechoic regions and histogram features were extracted from the fibroglandular tissues, and the support vector machine model with the leave-one-out cross-validation method was utilized as the classifier. The authors’ database included a total of 208 ABUS images of the breasts of 104 females. Results: The accuracies of the proposed system for the classification of heterogeneous and homogeneous echotexture patterns were 93.48% (43/46) and 92.59% (150/162), respectively, with an overall Az (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve) of 0.9786. The agreement between the radiologists and the proposed system was almost perfect, with a kappa value of 0.814. Conclusions: The use of ABUS and the proposed method can provide quantitative information on the echotexture patterns of the breast and can be used to evaluate whether breast echotexture patterns are associated with breast cancer risk in the future

  19. Quantitative analysis of breast echotexture patterns in automated breast ultrasound images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Ruey-Feng [Graduate Institute of Biomedical Electronics and Bioinformatics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan and Department of Computer Science and Information Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Hou, Yu-Ling [Graduate Institute of Biomedical Electronics and Bioinformatics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Lo, Chung-Ming [Department of Computer Science and Information Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Huang, Chiun-Sheng [Department of Surgery, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Chen, Jeon-Hor [Department of Radiology, E-Da Hospital and I-Shou University, Kaohsiung 82445, Taiwan and Tu and Yuen Center for Functional Onco-Imaging and Department of Radiological Science, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Kim, Won Hwa; Chang, Jung Min; Bae, Min Sun; Moon, Woo Kyung, E-mail: moonwk@snu.ac.kr [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    Purpose: Breast tissue composition is considered to be associated with breast cancer risk. This study aimed to develop a computer-aided classification (CAC) system to automatically classify echotexture patterns as heterogeneous or homogeneous using automated breast ultrasound (ABUS) images. Methods: A CAC system was proposed that can recognize breast echotexture patterns in ABUS images. For each case, the echotexture pattern was assessed by two expert radiologists and classified as heterogeneous or homogeneous. After neutrosophic image transformation and fuzzy c-mean clusterings, the lower and upper boundaries of the fibroglandular tissues were defined. Then, the number of hypoechoic regions and histogram features were extracted from the fibroglandular tissues, and the support vector machine model with the leave-one-out cross-validation method was utilized as the classifier. The authors’ database included a total of 208 ABUS images of the breasts of 104 females. Results: The accuracies of the proposed system for the classification of heterogeneous and homogeneous echotexture patterns were 93.48% (43/46) and 92.59% (150/162), respectively, with an overall Az (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve) of 0.9786. The agreement between the radiologists and the proposed system was almost perfect, with a kappa value of 0.814. Conclusions: The use of ABUS and the proposed method can provide quantitative information on the echotexture patterns of the breast and can be used to evaluate whether breast echotexture patterns are associated with breast cancer risk in the future.

  20. Initial Results of a Prospective Clinical Trial of 18F-Fluciclovine PET/CT in Newly Diagnosed Invasive Ductal and Invasive Lobular Breast Cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulaner, Gary A; Goldman, Debra A; Gönen, Mithat; Pham, Hanh; Castillo, Raychel; Lyashchenko, Serge K; Lewis, Jason S; Dang, Chau

    2016-09-01

    (18)F-labeled 1-amino-3-fluorocyclobutane-1-carboxylic acid ((18)F-fluciclovine) is a leucine analog PET/CT radiotracer that depicts amino acid transport into cells. Amino acid transport proteins have been shown to be upregulated in breast malignancies by microarray and immunohistochemical analysis, so we hypothesized that (18)F-fluciclovine may provide a novel method of visualizing breast cancer and now report a prospective clinical trial of (18)F-fluciclovine PET/CT in newly diagnosed advanced local invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) and invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC). Twenty-seven women with a new diagnosis of locally advanced IDC (n = 19) or ILC (n = 8) underwent PET/CT of the chest after intravenous administration of 370 MBq of (18)F-fluciclovine. The SUVmax, SUVmean, metabolic tumor volume, and total lesion avidity were obtained for the primary breast tumor, axillary lymph nodes, and extraaxillary lymph nodes. Sites of previously unsuspected malignancy were recorded and confirmed by pathology. Results of (18)F-fluciclovine PET/CT were compared with those of (18)F-FDG PET/CT, when available, using the concordance correlation coefficient. All locally advanced breast cancers were (18)F-fluciclovine-avid. Of 21 patients with pathologically proven axillary nodal metastases, (18)F-fluciclovine-avid axillary nodes were seen in 20. (18)F-fluciclovine detected pathologically proven extraaxillary nodal metastases in 3 patients, including 2 previously unsuspected internal mammary nodes. Fourteen patients underwent (18)F-FDG PET/CT for comparison with (18)F-fluciclovine. Concordance for metabolic tumor volume between (18)F-fluciclovine and (18)F-FDG was strong (concordance correlation coefficient, 0.89; 95% confidence interval, 0.73-0.96), but concordance for SUVmax was weak (concordance correlation coefficient, 0.04; 95% confidence interval, -0.16-0.24). In patients with both modalities available (n = 14), primary ILCs (n = 4) demonstrated (18)F-fluciclovine avidity

  1. Image to physical space registration of supine breast MRI for image guided breast surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conley, Rebekah H.; Meszoely, Ingrid M.; Pheiffer, Thomas S.; Weis, Jared A.; Yankeelov, Thomas E.; Miga, Michael I.

    2014-03-01

    Breast conservation therapy (BCT) is a desirable option for many women diagnosed with early stage breast cancer and involves a lumpectomy followed by radiotherapy. However, approximately 50% of eligible women will elect for mastectomy over BCT despite equal survival benefit (provided margins of excised tissue are cancer free) due to uncertainty in outcome with regards to complete excision of cancerous cells, risk of local recurrence, and cosmesis. Determining surgical margins intraoperatively is difficult and achieving negative margins is not as robust as it needs to be, resulting in high re-operation rates and often mastectomy. Magnetic resonance images (MRI) can provide detailed information about tumor margin extents, however diagnostic images are acquired in a fundamentally different patient presentation than that used in surgery. Therefore, the high quality diagnostic MRIs taken in the prone position with pendant breast are not optimal for use in surgical planning/guidance due to the drastic shape change between preoperative images and the common supine surgical position. This work proposes to investigate the value of supine MRI in an effort to localize tumors intraoperatively using image-guidance. Mock intraoperative setups (realistic patient positioning in non-sterile environment) and preoperative imaging data were collected from a patient scheduled for a lumpectomy. The mock intraoperative data included a tracked laser range scan of the patient's breast surface, tracked center points of MR visible fiducials on the patient's breast, and tracked B-mode ultrasound and strain images. The preoperative data included a supine MRI with visible fiducial markers. Fiducial markers localized in the MRI were rigidly registered to their mock intraoperative counterparts using an optically tracked stylus. The root mean square (RMS) fiducial registration error using the tracked markers was 3.4mm. Following registration, the average closest point distance between the MR

  2. Radiation doses in volume-of-interest breast computed tomography—A Monte Carlo simulation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, Chao-Jen, E-mail: cjlai3711@gmail.com; Zhong, Yuncheng; Yi, Ying; Wang, Tianpeng; Shaw, Chris C. [Department of Imaging Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030-4009 (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Cone beam breast computed tomography (breast CT) with true three-dimensional, nearly isotropic spatial resolution has been developed and investigated over the past decade to overcome the problem of lesions overlapping with breast anatomical structures on two-dimensional mammographic images. However, the ability of breast CT to detect small objects, such as tissue structure edges and small calcifications, is limited. To resolve this problem, the authors proposed and developed a volume-of-interest (VOI) breast CT technique to image a small VOI using a higher radiation dose to improve that region’s visibility. In this study, the authors performed Monte Carlo simulations to estimate average breast dose and average glandular dose (AGD) for the VOI breast CT technique. Methods: Electron–Gamma-Shower system code-based Monte Carlo codes were used to simulate breast CT. The Monte Carlo codes estimated were validated using physical measurements of air kerma ratios and point doses in phantoms with an ion chamber and optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters. The validated full cone x-ray source was then collimated to simulate half cone beam x-rays to image digital pendant-geometry, hemi-ellipsoidal, homogeneous breast phantoms and to estimate breast doses with full field scans. 13-cm in diameter, 10-cm long hemi-ellipsoidal homogeneous phantoms were used to simulate median breasts. Breast compositions of 25% and 50% volumetric glandular fractions (VGFs) were used to investigate the influence on breast dose. The simulated half cone beam x-rays were then collimated to a narrow x-ray beam with an area of 2.5 × 2.5 cm{sup 2} field of view at the isocenter plane and to perform VOI field scans. The Monte Carlo results for the full field scans and the VOI field scans were then used to estimate the AGD for the VOI breast CT technique. Results: The ratios of air kerma ratios and dose measurement results from the Monte Carlo simulation to those from the physical

  3. Fibrous dysplasia mimicking bone metastasis on both bone scintigraphy and {sup 18}F FDG PET CT: Diagnostic dilemma in a patient with breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KC, Sud Hir Suman; Sharma, Punit; Singh, Har Man Deep; Bal, Chand Rasekhar; Kumar, Rake Sh [India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi (India)

    2012-12-15

    Bone is the most common distant site to which breast cancer metastasizes. Commonly used imaging modalities for imaging bone metastasis are bone scintigraphy, plain radiography, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and positron emission tomography (PET). Although bone scintigraphy gas high sensitivity for detecting bone metastasis, its specificity is low. This is because of the fact that bone scintigraphy images secondary changes in bone rather than just tumor cells {sup 18}F fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}F FDG) PET CT, on the other hand, directly images the tumor cells' glucose metabolism. Unfortunately, similar to bone scintigraphy, benign bone conditions can also show increased {sup 18}F FDG uptake on PET CT, and PET positive asymptomatic fibrous dysplasia can be misinterpreted as a metastasis. Fibrous dysplasia of bone has wide skeletal distribution, with variability of {sup 18}F FDG uptake and CT appearance. It is therefore important to recognize the characteristics of this skeletal dysplasia, to allow differentiation from skeletal metastasis. Bone lesions with {sup 18}F FDG uptake need to be carefully interpreted when evaluating patients with known malignancy. In doubtful cases, fibrous dysplasia should be given as a differential diagnosis and histopathological diagnosis may be warranted, as highlighted in the present case.

  4. Appearance of untreated bone metastases from breast cancer on FDG PET/CT: importance of histologic subtype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dashevsky, Brittany Z.; Parsons, Molly [Weill Cornell Medical College, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Goldman, Debra A.; Goenen, Mithat [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, New York, NY (United States); Corben, Adriana D. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Pathology, New York, NY (United States); Jochelson, Maxine S.; Ulaner, Gary A. [Weill Cornell Medical College, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Hudis, Clifford A. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Morrow, Monica [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Surgery, New York, NY (United States)

    2015-10-15

    To determine if the histology of a breast malignancy influences the appearance of untreated osseous metastases on FDG PET/CT. This retrospective study was performed under IRB waiver. Our Hospital Information System was screened for breast cancer patients who presented with osseous metastases, who underwent FDG PET/CT prior to systemic therapy or radiotherapy from 2009 to 2012. Patients with invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC), invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC), or mixed ductal/lobular (MDL) histology were included. Patients with a history of other malignancies were excluded. PET/CT was evaluated, blinded to histology, to classify osseous metastases on a per-patient basis as sclerotic, lytic, mixed lytic/sclerotic, or occult on CT, and to record SUVmax for osseous metastases on PET. Following screening, 95 patients who met the inclusion criteria (74 IDC, 13 ILC, and 8 MDL) were included. ILC osseous metastases were more commonly sclerotic and demonstrated lower SUVmax than IDC metastases. In all IDC and MDL patients with osseous metastases, at least one was FDG-avid. For ILC, all patients with lytic or mixed osseous metastases demonstrated at least one FDG-avid metastasis; however, in only three of seven patients were sclerotic osseous metastases apparent on FDG PET. The histologic subtype of breast cancer affects the appearance of untreated osseous metastases on FDG PET/CT. In particular, non-FDG-avid sclerotic osseous metastases were more common in patients with ILC than in patients with IDC. Breast cancer histology should be considered when interpreting non-FDG-avid sclerotic osseous lesions on PET/CT, which may be more suspicious for metastases (rather than benign lesions) in patients with ILC. (orig.)

  5. Appearance of untreated bone metastases from breast cancer on FDG PET/CT: importance of histologic subtype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dashevsky, Brittany Z.; Parsons, Molly; Goldman, Debra A.; Goenen, Mithat; Corben, Adriana D.; Jochelson, Maxine S.; Ulaner, Gary A.; Hudis, Clifford A.; Morrow, Monica

    2015-01-01

    To determine if the histology of a breast malignancy influences the appearance of untreated osseous metastases on FDG PET/CT. This retrospective study was performed under IRB waiver. Our Hospital Information System was screened for breast cancer patients who presented with osseous metastases, who underwent FDG PET/CT prior to systemic therapy or radiotherapy from 2009 to 2012. Patients with invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC), invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC), or mixed ductal/lobular (MDL) histology were included. Patients with a history of other malignancies were excluded. PET/CT was evaluated, blinded to histology, to classify osseous metastases on a per-patient basis as sclerotic, lytic, mixed lytic/sclerotic, or occult on CT, and to record SUVmax for osseous metastases on PET. Following screening, 95 patients who met the inclusion criteria (74 IDC, 13 ILC, and 8 MDL) were included. ILC osseous metastases were more commonly sclerotic and demonstrated lower SUVmax than IDC metastases. In all IDC and MDL patients with osseous metastases, at least one was FDG-avid. For ILC, all patients with lytic or mixed osseous metastases demonstrated at least one FDG-avid metastasis; however, in only three of seven patients were sclerotic osseous metastases apparent on FDG PET. The histologic subtype of breast cancer affects the appearance of untreated osseous metastases on FDG PET/CT. In particular, non-FDG-avid sclerotic osseous metastases were more common in patients with ILC than in patients with IDC. Breast cancer histology should be considered when interpreting non-FDG-avid sclerotic osseous lesions on PET/CT, which may be more suspicious for metastases (rather than benign lesions) in patients with ILC. (orig.)

  6. TU-AB-204-00: Advances in Cone-Beam CT and Emerging Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    assessment of novel therapies. Finally, Dr. J. Boone (UC Davis) will present on the topic: Advances in CBCT for Breast Imaging. Breast CT has been studied as an imaging tool for diagnostic breast evaluation and for potential breast cancer screening. The breast CT application lends itself to CBCT because of the small dimensions of the breast, the tapered shape of the breast towards higher cone angle, and the fact that there are no bones in the breast. The performance of various generations of breast CT scanners developed in recent years will be discussed, focusing on advances in spatial resolution and image noise characteristics. The results will also demonstrate the results of clinical trials using both computer and human observers. Learning Objectives: Understand the challenges, key technological advances, and emerging opportunities of CBCT in: Brain perfusion imaging, including assessment of ischemic stroke Cardiac imaging for functional assessment in cardiac interventions Orthopedics imaging for evaluation of musculoskeletal trauma, arthritis, and osteoporosis Breast imaging for screening and diagnosis of breast cancer. Work presented in this symposium includes research support by: Siemens Healthcare (Dr. Chen); NIH and Siemens Healthcare (Dr. Fahrig); NIH and Carestream Health (Dr. Zbijewski); and NIH (Dr. Boone)

  7. TU-AB-204-00: Advances in Cone-Beam CT and Emerging Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2015-06-15

    assessment of novel therapies. Finally, Dr. J. Boone (UC Davis) will present on the topic: Advances in CBCT for Breast Imaging. Breast CT has been studied as an imaging tool for diagnostic breast evaluation and for potential breast cancer screening. The breast CT application lends itself to CBCT because of the small dimensions of the breast, the tapered shape of the breast towards higher cone angle, and the fact that there are no bones in the breast. The performance of various generations of breast CT scanners developed in recent years will be discussed, focusing on advances in spatial resolution and image noise characteristics. The results will also demonstrate the results of clinical trials using both computer and human observers. Learning Objectives: Understand the challenges, key technological advances, and emerging opportunities of CBCT in: Brain perfusion imaging, including assessment of ischemic stroke Cardiac imaging for functional assessment in cardiac interventions Orthopedics imaging for evaluation of musculoskeletal trauma, arthritis, and osteoporosis Breast imaging for screening and diagnosis of breast cancer. Work presented in this symposium includes research support by: Siemens Healthcare (Dr. Chen); NIH and Siemens Healthcare (Dr. Fahrig); NIH and Carestream Health (Dr. Zbijewski); and NIH (Dr. Boone)

  8. CT measurement of breast glandular tissue and its association with testicular cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klang, Eyal [Tel Aviv University, Department of Radiology, Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel Aviv (Israel); The Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer (Israel); Rozendorn, Noa; Raskin, Steve; Portnoy, Orith; Sklair, Miri; Marom, Edith M.; Konen, Eli; Amitai, Michal M. [Tel Aviv University, Department of Radiology, Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel Aviv (Israel)

    2017-02-15

    To evaluate the associations between breast glandular tissues diameters as determined by CT and b-hCG levels, histological types, tumour spread and prognosis in patients with testicular germ cell tumour. Ninety-four patients with pre-treatment CT scan and markers (b-hCG, AFP, LDH) were retrospectively collected. A radiologist measured diameters in all CT examinations and correlation between diameters and log (b-hCG) was assessed (Pearson's coefficient). The ability of measured diameters to predict lymphatic and distant haematogenous metastatic spread was evaluated (ROC curves). The associations between measured diameter cut-off values of 20 and 25 mm and International Germ Cell Cancer Collaborative Group (IGCCCG) classification, lymphatic and distant haematogenous metastatic spread and histological subtypes were evaluated (chi squared test). Breast glandular diameters correlated to log(b-hCG) (r = 0.579) and predicted distant haematogenous metastatic spread (AUC = 0.78). Worse prognosis (intermediate or poor IGCCCG) was shown for 20 mm (27.3 vs. 4.2 %, p = 0.005) and 25 mm (33.3 vs. 6.1 %, p = 0.014). A diameter of 25 mm was associated with non-seminoma (91.7 vs. 48.8 %, p = 0.005). Breast glandular tissue diameters correlated with log(b-hCG) and predicted distant haematogenous metastases. Twenty and 25 mm were associated with worse prognosis and 25 mm was able to distinguish between seminoma and non-seminoma. (orig.)

  9. Evaluating Surveillance Breast Imaging and Biopsy in Older Breast Cancer Survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracy Onega

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Patterns of surveillance among breast cancer survivors are not well characterized and lack evidence-based practice guidelines, particularly for imaging modalities other than mammography. We characterized breast imaging and related biopsy longitudinally among breast cancer survivors in relation to women’s characteristics. Methods. Using data from a state-wide (New Hampshire breast cancer screening registry linked to Medicare claims, we examined use of mammography, ultrasound (US, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, and biopsy among breast cancer survivors. We used generalized estimating equations (GEE to model associations of breast surveillance with women’s characteristics. Results. The proportion of women with mammography was high over the follow-up period (81.5% at 78 months, but use of US or MRI was much lower (8.0%—first follow-up window, 4.7% by 78 months. Biopsy use was consistent throughout surveillance periods (7.4%–9.4%. Surveillance was lower among older women and for those with a higher stage of diagnosis. Primary therapy was significantly associated with greater likelihood of breast surveillance. Conclusions. Breast cancer surveillance patterns for mammography, US, MRI, and related biopsy seem to be associated with age, stage, and treatment, but need a larger evidence-base for clinical recommendations.

  10. MR images of rupture and leakage of breast implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang Ling; Liu Pengcheng; Huang Rong; Hu Huaxin; Chen Zaizhong; Du Duanming; Liu Hanqiao; Feng Fei

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the diagnostic value of magnetic resonance imaging in detecting rupture and leakage of breast implants. Methods: Seventeen cases with breast implants were imaged by MR scanner. 1 normal silicone breast implant outside the body was scanned by MR as an consultative standard. MR images of silicone implants and polypropylene acyl amine implants were classified and analyzed. Results: In 7 cases, 12 single lumen silicone implants were intact, among them 8 were silicone gel-filled implants, 4 were physiological saline-filled implants. 2 physiological saline-filled implants ruptured, among them 1 belonged to intracapsular silicone implant rupture with subsided silicone gel capsule which presented as long T 1 signal and short T 2 signal on MR images; The other belonged to extracapsular silicone implant rapture with physiological saline granule outside breast on MR images. 20 breast implants in 10 cases were injected by polypropylene acyl amine, among them 2 breast implants were intact, 16 breast implants ruptured completely with pieces and nodes of long T 1 signal and long T 2 signal on MR images, 14 of 16 also presented polypropylene acyl amine granule outside breast; 2 breast implants splited inside with linguine sign. Conclusion: The magnetic resonance imaging can make clear the type and the seat of breast implants, the type of rupture of breast implants, and the distribution of leakage material. Therefore magnetic resonance imaging can be an effective guidance for clinical operation and can be an consultative standard for follow-up

  11. Correlative Imaging in a Patient with Cystic Thymoma: CT, MR and PET/CT Comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romeo, Valeria; Esposito, Alfredo; Maurea, Simone; Camera, Luigi; Mainenti, Pier Paolo; Palmieri, Giovannella; Buonerba, Carlo; Salvatore, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Cystic thymoma is a rare variant of thymic neoplasm characterized by almost complete cystic degeneration with mixed internal structure. We describe a case of a 60 year-old woman with a cystic thymoma studied with advanced tomographic imaging stydies. CT, MRI and PET/CT with 18 F-FDG were performed; volumetric CT and MRI images provided better anatomic evaluation for pre-operative assessment, while PET/CT was helpful for lesion characterization based on 18 F-FDG uptake. Although imaging studies are mandatory for pre-operative evaluation of cystic thymoma, final diagnosis still remains surgical. A 60-year-old woman with recent chest pain and no history of previous disease was admitted to our departement to investigate the result of a previous chest X-ray that showed bilateral mediastinal enlargement; for this purpose, enhanced chest CT scan was performed using a 64-rows scanner (Toshiba, Aquilion 64, Japan) before and after intravenous bolus administration of iodinated non ionic contrast agent; CT images demonstrated the presence of a large mediastinal mass (11×8 cm) located in the anterior mediastinum who extended from the anonymous vein to the cardio-phrenic space, compressing the left atrium and causing medium lobe atelectasis; bilateral pleural effusion was also present. In conclusion, correlative imaging plays a foundamental role for the diagnostic evaluation of patient with cystic thymoma. In particular, volumetric CT and MRI studies can provide better anatomic informations regarding internal structure and local tumor spread for pre-operative assessment. Conversely, metabolic imaging using 18 F-FDG PET/CT is helpful for lesion characterization differentiating benign from malignant lesion on the basis of intense tracer uptake. The role of PET/MRI is still under investigation. However, final diagnosis still remains surgical even though imaging studies are mandatory for pre-operative patient management

  12. Pulmonary function-morphologic relationships assessed by SPECT-CT fusion images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suga, Kazuyoshi

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary single photon emission computed tomography-computed tomography (SPECT-CT) fusion images provide objective and comprehensive assessment of pulmonary function and morphology relationships at cross-sectional lungs. This article reviewed the noteworthy findings of lung pathophysiology in wide-spectral lung disorders, which have been revealed on SPECT-CT fusion images in 8 years of experience. The fusion images confirmed the fundamental pathophysiologic appearance of lung low CT attenuation caused by airway obstruction-induced hypoxic vasoconstriction and that caused by direct pulmonary arterial obstruction as in acute pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE). The fusion images showed better correlation of lung perfusion distribution with lung CT attenuation changes at lung mosaic CT attenuation (MCA) compared with regional ventilation in the wide-spectral lung disorders, indicating that lung heterogeneous perfusion distribution may be a dominant mechanism of MCA on CT. SPECT-CT angiography fusion images revealed occasional dissociation between lung perfusion defects and intravascular clots in acute PTE, indicating the importance of assessment of actual effect of intravascular colts on peripheral lung perfusion. Perfusion SPECT-CT fusion images revealed the characteristic and preferential location of pulmonary infarction in acute PTE. The fusion images showed occasional unexpected perfusion defects in normal lung areas on CT in chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases and interstitial lung diseases, indicating the ability of perfusion SPECT superior to CT for detection of mild lesions in these disorders. The fusion images showed frequent ''steal phenomenon''-induced perfusion defects extending to the surrounding normal lung of arteriovenous fistulas and those at normal lungs on CT in hepatopulmonary syndrome. Comprehensive assessment of lung function-CT morphology on fusion images will lead to more profound understanding of lung pathophysiology in wide-spectral lung

  13. 3D Interpolation Method for CT Images of the Lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriaki Asada

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available A 3-D image can be reconstructed from numerous CT images of the lung. The procedure reconstructs a solid from multiple cross section images, which are collected during pulsation of the heart. Thus the motion of the heart is a special factor that must be taken into consideration during reconstruction. The lung exhibits a repeating transformation synchronized to the beating of the heart as an elastic body. There are discontinuities among neighboring CT images due to the beating of the heart, if no special techniques are used in taking CT images. The 3-D heart image is reconstructed from numerous CT images in which both the heart and the lung are taken. Although the outline shape of the reconstructed 3-D heart is quite unnatural, the envelope of the 3-D unnatural heart is fit to the shape of the standard heart. The envelopes of the lung in the CT images are calculated after the section images of the best fitting standard heart are located at the same positions of the CT images. Thus the CT images are geometrically transformed to the optimal CT images fitting best to the standard heart. Since correct transformation of images is required, an Area oriented interpolation method proposed by us is used for interpolation of transformed images. An attempt to reconstruct a 3-D lung image by a series of such operations without discontinuity is shown. Additionally, the same geometrical transformation method to the original projection images is proposed as a more advanced method.

  14. Dynamic CT myocardial perfusion imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caruso, Damiano; Eid, Marwen; Schoepf, U. Joseph; Jin, Kwang Nam; Varga-Szemes, Akos; Tesche, Christian; Mangold, Stefanie

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • CT myocardial perfusion provides functional assessment of the myocardium. • CCTA is limited in determining the hemodynamic significance of coronary stenosis. • CT-MPI can accurately detect hemodynamically significant coronary artery stenosis. - Abstract: Non-invasive cardiac imaging has rapidly evolved during the last decade due to advancements in CT based technologies. Coronary CT angiography has been shown to reliably assess coronary anatomy and detect high risk coronary artery disease. However, this technique is limited to anatomical assessment, thus non-invasive techniques for functional assessment of the heart are necessary. CT myocardial perfusion is a new CT based technique that provides functional assessment of the myocardium and allows for a comprehensive assessment of coronary artery disease with a single modality when combined with CTA. This review aims to discuss dynamic CT myocardial perfusion as a new technique in the assessment of CAD.

  15. Dynamic CT myocardial perfusion imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caruso, Damiano [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Department of Radiological Sciences, Oncological and Pathological Sciences, University of Rome “Sapienza”, Latina (Italy); Eid, Marwen [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Schoepf, U. Joseph, E-mail: schoepf@musc.edu [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Jin, Kwang Nam [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Department of Radiology, Seoul Metropolitan Government-Seoul National University Boramae Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Varga-Szemes, Akos [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Tesche, Christian [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Department of Cardiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Heart Center Munich-Bogenhausen, Munich (Germany); Mangold, Stefanie [Division of Cardiovascular Imaging, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital of Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany); and others

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • CT myocardial perfusion provides functional assessment of the myocardium. • CCTA is limited in determining the hemodynamic significance of coronary stenosis. • CT-MPI can accurately detect hemodynamically significant coronary artery stenosis. - Abstract: Non-invasive cardiac imaging has rapidly evolved during the last decade due to advancements in CT based technologies. Coronary CT angiography has been shown to reliably assess coronary anatomy and detect high risk coronary artery disease. However, this technique is limited to anatomical assessment, thus non-invasive techniques for functional assessment of the heart are necessary. CT myocardial perfusion is a new CT based technique that provides functional assessment of the myocardium and allows for a comprehensive assessment of coronary artery disease with a single modality when combined with CTA. This review aims to discuss dynamic CT myocardial perfusion as a new technique in the assessment of CAD.

  16. PET/CT in the complex estimation of the patient after breast cancer therapy - case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziolkowska, E.; Lozynska-Podhrebelna, D.; Zarzycka, M.; Malkowski, B.

    2007-01-01

    The connection of positron emission tomography (PET) and computer tomography (CT) with the use of FDG is finding wider application to the diagnostics, monitoring and treatment of breast cancer. The use of PET/CT improves the effectiveness of recurrence, metastases to the bones and distant internal organs diagnostics, and in some patients outdistances the presence of lesions which in conventional diagnostic examinations are described considerably later. This work presents the case of a 50-year-old woman with diagnosed breast cancer, after surgery treatment and complementary chemotherapy and radiotherapy. There was a suspicion of local recurrence in postoperative scar (in 18 th month after finished radiotherapy) and the absence of oncocytes in cytological examination in this patient and PET/CT was performed. The recurrence in postoperative scar and signs of dissemination to the bones and the liver was shown in this examination despite the negative tumour marker profile. CT and scintigraphy were performed additionally and they confirmed only the existence of metastatic changes in S1 vertebra and VI rib on the left side. Thanks to PET/CT examination both palliative radiotherapy and chemotherapy were applied immediately. After 5 months the control PET/CT examination was performed which showed a partial response to the applied treatment. The result of the examination and further growth of CA 15-3 marker were reasons for the inclusion of the next two series of chemotherapy. Bone scintigraphy, which was performed after completion of chemotherapy, showed the progression of metastatic changes. The patient was referred for radioisotopic treatment. The introduced case confirms the suitability of PET/CT in the complex assessment of a patient with diagnosed breast cancer. The use of PET/CT is a valuable element of recurrence and dissemination in neoplasmic disease quick diagnostics and directs the ways of the optimum antineoplasmic treatment. (authors)

  17. CT simulation in nodal positive breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horst, E.; Schuck, A.; Moustakis, C.; Schaefer, U.; Micke, O.; Kronholz, H.L.; Willich, N.

    2001-01-01

    Background: A variety of solutions are used to match tangential fields and opposed lymph node fields in irradiation of nodal positive breast cancer. The choice is depending on the technical equipment which is available and the clinical situation. The CT simulation of a non-monoisocentric technique was evaluated in terms of accuracy and reproducibility. Patients, Material and Methods: The field match parameters were adjusted virtually at CT simulation and were compared with parameters derived mathematically. The coordinate transfer from the CT simulator to the conventional simulator was analyzed in 25 consecutive patients. Results: The angles adjusted virtually for a geometrically exact coplanar field match corresponded with the angles calculated for each set-up. The mean isocenter displacement was 5.7 mm and the total uncertainty of the coordinate transfer was 6.7 mm (1 SD). Limitations in the patient set-up became obvious because of the steep arm abduction necessary to fit the 70 cm CT gantry aperture. Required modifications of the arm position and coordinate transfer errors led to a significant shift of the marked matchline of >1.0 cm in eight of 25 patients (32%). Conclusion: The virtual CT simulation allows a precise and graphic definition of the field match parameters. However, modifications of the virtual set-up basically due to technical limitations were required in a total of 32% of cases, so that a hybrid technique was adapted at present that combines virtual adjustment of the ideal field alignment parameters with conventional simulation. (orig.) [de

  18. Breast Imaging: The Face of Imaging 3.0.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, Ray Cody; Parikh, Jay R

    2016-08-01

    In preparation for impending changes to the health care delivery and reimbursement models, the ACR has provided a roadmap for success via the Imaging 3.0 (®)platform. The authors illustrate how the field of breast imaging demonstrates the following Imaging 3.0 concepts: value, patient-centered care, clinical integration, structured reporting, outcome metrics, and radiology's role in the accountable care organization environment. Much of breast imaging's success may be adapted and adopted by other fields in radiology to ensure that all radiologists become more visible and provide the value sought by patients and payers. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Setup errors and effectiveness of Optical Laser 3D Surface imaging system (Sentinel) in postoperative radiotherapy of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiaobo; Liu, Mengjiao; Ding, Yun; Li, Qilin; Cheng, Changhai; Zong, Xian; Yin, Wenming; Chen, Jie; Gu, Wendong

    2018-05-08

    Breast-conserving surgery (BCS) plus postoperative radiotherapy has become the standard treatment for early-stage breast cancer. The aim of this study was to compare the setup accuracy of optical surface imaging by the Sentinel system with cone-beam computerized tomography (CBCT) imaging currently used in our clinic for patients received BCS. Two optical surface scans were acquired before and immediately after couch movement correction. The correlation between the setup errors as determined by the initial optical surface scan and CBCT was analyzed. The deviation of the second optical surface scan from the reference planning CT was considered an estimate for the residual errors for the new method for patient setup correction. The consequences in terms for necessary planning target volume (PTV) margins for treatment sessions without setup correction applied. We analyzed 145 scans in 27 patients treated for early stage breast cancer. The setup errors of skin marker based patient alignment by optical surface scan and CBCT were correlated, and the residual setup errors as determined by the optical surface scan after couch movement correction were reduced. Optical surface imaging provides a convenient method for improving the setup accuracy for breast cancer patient without unnecessary imaging dose.

  20. Skeletal scintigraphy and SPECT/CT in orthopedic imaging; Knochenszintigrafie und SPECT/CT bei orthopaedischen Fragestellungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klaeser, B.; Walter, M.; Krause, T. [Inselspital Bern (Switzerland). Universitaetsklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    2011-03-15

    Multi-modality imaging with SPECT-CT in orthopaedics combines the excellent sensitivity of scintigraphy with the morphological information of CT as a key for specific interpretation of findings in bone scans. The result is an imaging modality with the clear potential to prove of value even in a competitive setting dominated by MRI, and to significantly add to diagnostic imaging in orthopaedics. SPECT-CT is of great value in the diagnostic evaluation after fractures, and - in contrast to MRI - it is well suited for imaging in patients with osteosyntheses and metallic implants. In sports medicine, SPECT-CT allows for a sensitive and specific detection of osseous stress reactions before morphological changes become detectable by CT or MRI. In patients with osseous pain syndromes, actively evolving degenerative changes as a cause of pain can be identified and accurately localized. Further, particularly prospective diagnostic studies providing comparative data are needed to strengthen the position of nuclear imaging in orthopaedics and sports medicine and to help implementing SPECT/CT in diagnostic algorithms. (orig.)

  1. Subtraction and dynamic MR images of breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murakami, Yoshitaka; Aoki, Manabu; Harada, Junta (Jikei Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1993-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic effectiveness of subtraction and dynamic MR imaging in patients with breast masses. In 23 breast cancers and six fibroadenomas, spin echo T1 images were obtained at 0.2 Tesla before and every minute after intravenous injection of Gd-DTPA (0.1 or 0.2 mmol/kg). Subtraction images were obtained sequentially on the CRT monitor. All breast masses were enhanced after gadolinium and stood out as bright lesions on subtraction images. The tumor margin and its extension were more precisely evaluated on subtraction MR images than on conventional postcontrast MR images. Breast cancer showed a characteristic time-intensity curve with an early peak, in contrast to fibroadenoma, which showed a gradual increase in signal intensity. Subtraction MR imaging is a simple method for the evaluation of breast masses, and further, the time-intensity curve obtained by dynamic study is helpful in the differential diagnosis of lesions. (author).

  2. Incorporating multislice imaging into x-ray CT polymer gel dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, H., E-mail: holly.johnston@utsw.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia V8W 2Y2 (Canada); Hilts, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia V8W 2Y2, Canada and Medical Physics, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver Island Centre, Victoria, British Columbia V8R 6V5 (Canada); Jirasek, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia V8W 2Y2, Canada and Department of Physics, University of British Columbia—Okanagan Campus, Kelowna, British Columbia V1V 1V7 (Canada)

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: To evaluate multislice computed tomography (CT) scanning for fast and reliable readout of radiation therapy (RT) dose distributions using CT polymer gel dosimetry (PGD) and to establish a baseline assessment of image noise and uniformity in an unirradiated gel dosimeter. Methods: A 16-slice CT scanner was used to acquire images through a 1 L cylinder filled with water. Additional images were collected using a single slice machine. The variability in CT number (N{sub CT}) associated with the anode heel effect was evaluated and used to define a new slice-by-slice background subtraction artifact removal technique for CT PGD. Image quality was assessed for the multislice system by evaluating image noise and uniformity. The agreement in N{sub CT} for slices acquired simultaneously using the multislice detector array was also examined. Further study was performed to assess the effects of increasing x-ray tube load on the constancy of measured N{sub CT} and overall scan time. In all cases, results were compared to the single slice machine. Finally, images were collected throughout the volume of an unirradiated gel dosimeter to quantify image noise and uniformity before radiation is delivered. Results: Slice-by-slice background subtraction effectively removes the variability in N{sub CT} observed across images acquired simultaneously using the multislice scanner and is the recommended background subtraction method when using a multislice CT system. Image noise was higher for the multislice system compared to the single slice scanner, but overall image quality was comparable between the two systems. Further study showed N{sub CT} was consistent across image slices acquired simultaneously using the multislice detector array for each detector configuration of the slice thicknesses examined. In addition, the multislice system was found to eliminate variations in N{sub CT} due to increasing x-ray tube load and reduce scanning time by a factor of 4 when compared to

  3. MR imaging and CT findings after liver transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langer, M.; Langer, R.; Scholz, A.; Zwicker, C.; Astinet, F.

    1990-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to evaluate MR imaging and dynamic CT as noninvasive procedures to image signs of graft failure after an orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). Thirty MR studies and 50 dynamic CT examinations were performed within 20 days after OLT. MR examinations were performed with a 0.5-T Siemens Magnetom. CT scans were obtained by using a Siemens Somatom Plus. In all patients, MR images demonstrated a perivascular rim of intermediate signal intensity on T1-weighted and increased signal intensity on T2-weighted images in the hilum of the liver; in 20/26, this was seen in peripheral areas also. In all patients, a perivascular area of low attenuation was diagnosed at angio-CT

  4. Supine MRI for regional breast radiotherapy: imaging axillary lymph nodes before and after sentinel-node biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Heijst, Tristan C. F.; Eschbach-Zandbergen, Debora; Hoekstra, Nienke; van Asselen, Bram; Lagendijk, Jan J. W.; Verkooijen, Helena M.; Pijnappel, Ruud M.; de Waard, Stephanie N.; Witkamp, Arjen J.; van Dalen, Thijs; Desirée van den Bongard, H. J. G.; Philippens, Marielle E. P.

    2017-08-01

    Regional radiotherapy (RT) is increasingly used in breast cancer treatment. Conventionally, computed tomography (CT) is performed for RT planning. Lymph node (LN) target levels are delineated according to anatomical boundaries. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could enable individual LN delineation. The purpose was to evaluate the applicability of MRI for LN detection in supine treatment position, before and after sentinel-node biopsy (SNB). Twenty-three female breast cancer patients (cTis-3N0M0) underwent 1.5 T MRI, before and after SNB, in addition to CT. Endurance for MRI was monitored. Axillary levels were delineated. LNs were identified and delineated on MRI from before and after SNB, and on CT, and compared by Wilcoxon signed-rank tests. LN locations and LN-based volumes were related to axillary delineations and associated volumes. Although postoperative effects were visible, LN numbers on postoperative MRI (median 26 LNs) were highly reproducible compared to preoperative MRI when adding excised sentinel nodes, and higher than on CT (median 11, p  <  0.001). LN-based volumes were considerably smaller than respective axillary levels. Supine MRI of LNs is feasible and reproducible before and after SNB. This may lead to more accurate RT target definition compared to CT, with potentially lower toxicity. With the MRI techniques described here, initiation of novel MRI-guided RT strategies aiming at individual LNs could be possible.

  5. Radiologic and pathological correlation of adenoid cystic carcinoma of the breast; A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jung Gyu; Kim, Shin Young; Jung, Hae Yoen; Kim, Sung Yong; Lee, Deuk Young; Park, Sang Hyun [Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Cheonan Hospital, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sang Hyun [Dept. of Radiology, Plus Internal Medicine Clinic, Suncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) is a subtype of adenocarcinoma that is usually seen in the salivary glands. It has also been reported in other organs including the breast, skin, tracheobronchial tree, cervix, larynx, and Bartholin gland. ACC in the breast is rare, accounting for less than 0.1% of all breast cancers. Furthermore, the imaging characteristics of ACC of the breast have not been well described in the literature, especially regarding the findings with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Here, we report radiologic findings of a rare case of ACC in the breast by mammography, sonography, computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography/CT, and MRI with pathologic correlation and a review of the literature.

  6. CT and MR imaging findings of sinonasal angiomatous polyps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, Jing [Department of Radiology, The Affiliated Hospital of Qingdao University, Qingdao, Shandong (China); Man, Fengyuan [Department of Radiology, Beijing Tongren Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing (China); Deng, Kai [Department of Radiology, Qingdao No. 4 People' s Hospital, Qingdao, Shandong (China); Zheng, Yuanyuan [Department of Radiology, The Affiliated Hospital of Qingdao University, Qingdao, Shandong (China); Hao, Dapeng, E-mail: haodp_2009@163.com [Department of Radiology, The Affiliated Hospital of Qingdao University, Qingdao, Shandong (China); Xu, Wenjian, E-mail: cjr.xuwenjian@vip.163.com [Department of Radiology, The Affiliated Hospital of Qingdao University, Qingdao, Shandong (China)

    2014-03-15

    Objective: To characterize the CT and MR imaging findings of patients with sinonasal angiomatous polyps (SAPs) and evaluate their respective clinical value in the diagnosis of SAP. Methods: CT and MR imaging findings of 15 patients with pathologically proven SAP were examined. Assessed image features included location, size, margin, attenuation, and change of the bony walls of the sinonasal cavity on CT, and signal intensity and enhancement pattern on MR. Results: On CT, the SAP was mostly isoattenuated with patches of slight hyperattenuation. Most lesions caused changes in the adjacent bone, including expansile remodeling (n = 8), defect or destruction (n = 7), and hyperostosis (n = 6). All lesions examined by MR showed heterogeneous isointense signal intensity on T1-weighted images and mixed obvious hyperintense and hypointense signal intensity with linear hypointense septum internally (n = 10), and hypointense peripheral rim on T2-weighted images (n = 10). Postcontrast MR images demonstrated areas of heterogeneous and marked enhancement with an unenhanced hypointense rim and septa (n = 7). Conclusions: CT and MR imaging have respective advantages in the diagnosis of SAP. Combined application of CT and MR examinations is necessary for patients with suspected SAP.

  7. CT and MR imaging findings of sinonasal angiomatous polyps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou, Jing; Man, Fengyuan; Deng, Kai; Zheng, Yuanyuan; Hao, Dapeng; Xu, Wenjian

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To characterize the CT and MR imaging findings of patients with sinonasal angiomatous polyps (SAPs) and evaluate their respective clinical value in the diagnosis of SAP. Methods: CT and MR imaging findings of 15 patient