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Sample records for ct based proton

  1. Optimization of Proton CT Detector System and Image Reconstruction Algorithm for On-Line Proton Therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chae Young Lee

    Full Text Available The purposes of this study were to optimize a proton computed tomography system (pCT for proton range verification and to confirm the pCT image reconstruction algorithm based on projection images generated with optimized parameters. For this purpose, we developed a new pCT scanner using the Geometry and Tracking (GEANT 4.9.6 simulation toolkit. GEANT4 simulations were performed to optimize the geometric parameters representing the detector thickness and the distance between the detectors for pCT. The system consisted of four silicon strip detectors for particle tracking and a calorimeter to measure the residual energies of the individual protons. The optimized pCT system design was then adjusted to ensure that the solution to a CS-based convex optimization problem would converge to yield the desired pCT images after a reasonable number of iterative corrections. In particular, we used a total variation-based formulation that has been useful in exploiting prior knowledge about the minimal variations of proton attenuation characteristics in the human body. Examinations performed using our CS algorithm showed that high-quality pCT images could be reconstructed using sets of 72 projections within 20 iterations and without any streaks or noise, which can be caused by under-sampling and proton starvation. Moreover, the images yielded by this CS algorithm were found to be of higher quality than those obtained using other reconstruction algorithms. The optimized pCT scanner system demonstrated the potential to perform high-quality pCT during on-line image-guided proton therapy, without increasing the imaging dose, by applying our CS based proton CT reconstruction algorithm. Further, we make our optimized detector system and CS-based proton CT reconstruction algorithm potentially useful in on-line proton therapy.

  2. TH-C-BRD-06: A Novel MRI Based CT Artifact Correction Method for Improving Proton Range Calculation in the Presence of Severe CT Artifacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, P; Schreibmann, E; Fox, T; Roper, J; Elder, E; Tejani, M; Crocker, I; Curran, W; Dhabaan, A

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Severe CT artifacts can impair our ability to accurately calculate proton range thereby resulting in a clinically unacceptable treatment plan. In this work, we investigated a novel CT artifact correction method based on a coregistered MRI and investigated its ability to estimate CT HU and proton range in the presence of severe CT artifacts. Methods: The proposed method corrects corrupted CT data using a coregistered MRI to guide the mapping of CT values from a nearby artifact-free region. First patient MRI and CT images were registered using 3D deformable image registration software based on B-spline and mutual information. The CT slice with severe artifacts was selected as well as a nearby slice free of artifacts (e.g. 1cm away from the artifact). The two sets of paired MRI and CT images at different slice locations were further registered by applying 2D deformable image registration. Based on the artifact free paired MRI and CT images, a comprehensive geospatial analysis was performed to predict the correct CT HU of the CT image with severe artifact. For a proof of concept, a known artifact was introduced that changed the ground truth CT HU value up to 30% and up to 5cm error in proton range. The ability of the proposed method to recover the ground truth was quantified using a selected head and neck case. Results: A significant improvement in image quality was observed visually. Our proof of concept study showed that 90% of area that had 30% errors in CT HU was corrected to 3% of its ground truth value. Furthermore, the maximum proton range error up to 5cm was reduced to 4mm error. Conclusion: MRI based CT artifact correction method can improve CT image quality and proton range calculation for patients with severe CT artifacts

  3. On proton CT reconstruction using MVCT-converted virtual proton projections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Dongxu; Mackie, T. Rockwell; Tome, Wolfgang A. [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 and Morgridge Institute of Research, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53715 (United States); Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 and Oncophysics Institute, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Yeshiva University, Bronx, New York 10461 (United States)

    2012-06-15

    Purpose: To describe a novel methodology of converting megavoltage x-ray projections into virtual proton projections that are otherwise missing due to the proton range limit. These converted virtual proton projections can be used in the reconstruction of proton computed tomography (pCT). Methods: Relations exist between proton projections and multispectral megavoltage x-ray projections for human tissue. Based on these relations, these tissues can be categorized into: (a) adipose tissue; (b) nonadipose soft tissues; and (c) bone. These three tissue categories can be visibly identified on a regular megavoltage x-ray computed tomography (MVCT) image. With an MVCT image and its projection data available, the x-ray projections through heterogeneous anatomy can be converted to the corresponding proton projections using predetermined calibration curves for individual materials, aided by a coarse segmentation on the x-ray CT image. To show the feasibility of this approach, mathematical simulations were carried out. The converted proton projections, plotted on a proton sinogram, were compared to the simulated ground truth. Proton stopping power images were reconstructed using either the virtual proton projections only or a blend of physically available proton projections and virtual proton projections that make up for those missing due to the range limit. These images were compared to a reference image reconstructed from theoretically calculated proton projections. Results: The converted virtual projections had an uncertainty of {+-}0.8% compared to the calculated ground truth. Proton stopping power images reconstructed using a blend of converted virtual projections (48%) and physically available projections (52%) had an uncertainty of {+-}0.86% compared with that reconstructed from theoretically calculated projections. Reconstruction solely from converted virtual proton projections had an uncertainty of {+-}1.1% compared with that reconstructed from theoretical projections

  4. On proton CT reconstruction using MVCT-converted virtual proton projections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Dongxu; Mackie, T. Rockwell; Tomé, Wolfgang A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To describe a novel methodology of converting megavoltage x-ray projections into virtual proton projections that are otherwise missing due to the proton range limit. These converted virtual proton projections can be used in the reconstruction of proton computed tomography (pCT). Methods: Relations exist between proton projections and multispectral megavoltage x-ray projections for human tissue. Based on these relations, these tissues can be categorized into: (a) adipose tissue; (b) nonadipose soft tissues; and (c) bone. These three tissue categories can be visibly identified on a regular megavoltage x-ray computed tomography (MVCT) image. With an MVCT image and its projection data available, the x-ray projections through heterogeneous anatomy can be converted to the corresponding proton projections using predetermined calibration curves for individual materials, aided by a coarse segmentation on the x-ray CT image. To show the feasibility of this approach, mathematical simulations were carried out. The converted proton projections, plotted on a proton sinogram, were compared to the simulated ground truth. Proton stopping power images were reconstructed using either the virtual proton projections only or a blend of physically available proton projections and virtual proton projections that make up for those missing due to the range limit. These images were compared to a reference image reconstructed from theoretically calculated proton projections. Results: The converted virtual projections had an uncertainty of ±0.8% compared to the calculated ground truth. Proton stopping power images reconstructed using a blend of converted virtual projections (48%) and physically available projections (52%) had an uncertainty of ±0.86% compared with that reconstructed from theoretically calculated projections. Reconstruction solely from converted virtual proton projections had an uncertainty of ±1.1% compared with that reconstructed from theoretical projections. If

  5. Proton tracking in a high-granularity Digital Tracking Calorimeter for proton CT purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettersen, H. E. S.; Alme, J.; Biegun, A.; van den Brink, A.; Chaar, M.; Fehlker, D.; Meric, I.; Odland, O. H.; Peitzmann, T.; Rocco, E.; Ullaland, K.; Wang, H.; Yang, S.; Zhang, C.; Röhrich, D.

    2017-07-01

    Radiation therapy with protons as of today utilizes information from x-ray CT in order to estimate the proton stopping power of the traversed tissue in a patient. The conversion from x-ray attenuation to proton stopping power in tissue introduces range uncertainties of the order of 2-3% of the range, uncertainties that are contributing to an increase of the necessary planning margins added to the target volume in a patient. Imaging methods and modalities, such as Dual Energy CT and proton CT, have come into consideration in the pursuit of obtaining an as good as possible estimate of the proton stopping power. In this study, a Digital Tracking Calorimeter is benchmarked for proof-of-concept for proton CT purposes. The Digital Tracking Calorimeter was originally designed for the reconstruction of high-energy electromagnetic showers for the ALICE-FoCal project. The presented prototype forms the basis for a proton CT system using a single technology for tracking and calorimetry. This advantage simplifies the setup and reduces the cost of a proton CT system assembly, and it is a unique feature of the Digital Tracking Calorimeter concept. Data from the AGORFIRM beamline at KVI-CART in Groningen in the Netherlands and Monte Carlo simulation results are used to in order to develop a tracking algorithm for the estimation of the residual ranges of a high number of concurrent proton tracks. High energy protons traversing the detector leave a track through the sensor layers. These tracks are spread out through charge diffusion processes. A charge diffusion model is applied for acquisition of estimates of the deposited energy of the protons in each sensor layer by using the size of the charge diffused area. A model fit of the Bragg Curve is applied to each reconstructed track and through this, estimating the residual range of each proton. The range of the individual protons can at present be estimated with a resolution of 4%. The readout system for this prototype is able to

  6. Proton tracking in a high-granularity Digital Tracking Calorimeter for proton CT purposes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pettersen, H.E.S., E-mail: helge.pettersen@helse-bergen.no [Department of Oncology and Medical Physics, Haukeland University Hospital, Postbox 1400, 5021 Bergen (Norway); Department of Physics and Technology, University of Bergen, Postbox 7803, 5020 Bergen (Norway); Alme, J. [Department of Physics and Technology, University of Bergen, Postbox 7803, 5020 Bergen (Norway); Biegun, A. [Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut, University of Groningen, NL-9747 AA Groningen (Netherlands); Brink, A. van den [Nikhef, Utrecht University, Postbox 41882, 1009 DB Amsterdam (Netherlands); Chaar, M.; Fehlker, D. [Department of Physics and Technology, University of Bergen, Postbox 7803, 5020 Bergen (Norway); Meric, I. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Bergen University College, Postbox 7030, 5020 Bergen (Norway); Odland, O.H. [Department of Oncology and Medical Physics, Haukeland University Hospital, Postbox 1400, 5021 Bergen (Norway); Peitzmann, T.; Rocco, E. [Nikhef, Utrecht University, Postbox 41882, 1009 DB Amsterdam (Netherlands); Ullaland, K. [Department of Physics and Technology, University of Bergen, Postbox 7803, 5020 Bergen (Norway); Wang, H. [Nikhef, Utrecht University, Postbox 41882, 1009 DB Amsterdam (Netherlands); Yang, S. [Department of Physics and Technology, University of Bergen, Postbox 7803, 5020 Bergen (Norway); Zhang, C. [Nikhef, Utrecht University, Postbox 41882, 1009 DB Amsterdam (Netherlands); Röhrich, D. [Department of Physics and Technology, University of Bergen, Postbox 7803, 5020 Bergen (Norway)

    2017-07-11

    Radiation therapy with protons as of today utilizes information from x-ray CT in order to estimate the proton stopping power of the traversed tissue in a patient. The conversion from x-ray attenuation to proton stopping power in tissue introduces range uncertainties of the order of 2–3% of the range, uncertainties that are contributing to an increase of the necessary planning margins added to the target volume in a patient. Imaging methods and modalities, such as Dual Energy CT and proton CT, have come into consideration in the pursuit of obtaining an as good as possible estimate of the proton stopping power. In this study, a Digital Tracking Calorimeter is benchmarked for proof-of-concept for proton CT purposes. The Digital Tracking Calorimeter was originally designed for the reconstruction of high-energy electromagnetic showers for the ALICE-FoCal project. The presented prototype forms the basis for a proton CT system using a single technology for tracking and calorimetry. This advantage simplifies the setup and reduces the cost of a proton CT system assembly, and it is a unique feature of the Digital Tracking Calorimeter concept. Data from the AGORFIRM beamline at KVI-CART in Groningen in the Netherlands and Monte Carlo simulation results are used to in order to develop a tracking algorithm for the estimation of the residual ranges of a high number of concurrent proton tracks. High energy protons traversing the detector leave a track through the sensor layers. These tracks are spread out through charge diffusion processes. A charge diffusion model is applied for acquisition of estimates of the deposited energy of the protons in each sensor layer by using the size of the charge diffused area. A model fit of the Bragg Curve is applied to each reconstructed track and through this, estimating the residual range of each proton. The range of the individual protons can at present be estimated with a resolution of 4%. The readout system for this prototype is able to

  7. A simulation study on proton computed tomography (CT) stopping power accuracy using dual energy CT scans as benchmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, David C; Seco, Joao; Sørensen, Thomas Sangild; Petersen, Jørgen Breede Baltzer; Wildberger, Joachim E; Verhaegen, Frank; Landry, Guillaume

    2015-01-01

    Accurate stopping power estimation is crucial for treatment planning in proton therapy, and the uncertainties in stopping power are currently the largest contributor to the employed dose margins. Dual energy x-ray computed tomography (CT) (clinically available) and proton CT (in development) have both been proposed as methods for obtaining patient stopping power maps. The purpose of this work was to assess the accuracy of proton CT using dual energy CT scans of phantoms to establish reference accuracy levels. A CT calibration phantom and an abdomen cross section phantom containing inserts were scanned with dual energy and single energy CT with a state-of-the-art dual energy CT scanner. Proton CT scans were simulated using Monte Carlo methods. The simulations followed the setup used in current prototype proton CT scanners and included realistic modeling of detectors and the corresponding noise characteristics. Stopping power maps were calculated for all three scans, and compared with the ground truth stopping power from the phantoms. Proton CT gave slightly better stopping power estimates than the dual energy CT method, with root mean square errors of 0.2% and 0.5% (for each phantom) compared to 0.5% and 0.9%. Single energy CT root mean square errors were 2.7% and 1.6%. Maximal errors for proton, dual energy and single energy CT were 0.51%, 1.7% and 7.4%, respectively. Better stopping power estimates could significantly reduce the range errors in proton therapy, but requires a large improvement in current methods which may be achievable with proton CT.

  8. SU-F-J-214: Dose Reduction by Spatially Optimized Image Quality Via Fluence Modulated Proton CT (FMpCT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Angelis, L; Landry, G; Dedes, G; Parodi, K; Hansen, D; Rit, S; Belka, C

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Proton CT (pCT) is a promising imaging modality for reducing range uncertainty in image-guided proton therapy. Range uncertainties partially originate from X-ray CT number conversion to stopping power ratio (SPR) and are limiting the exploitation of the full potential of proton therapy. In this study we explore the concept of spatially dependent fluence modulated proton CT (FMpCT), for achieving optimal image quality in a clinical region of interest (ROI), while reducing significantly the imaging dose to the patient. Methods: The study was based on simulated ideal pCT using pencil beam (PB) scanning. A set of 250 MeV protons PBs was used to create 360 projections of a cylindrical water phantom and a head and neck cancer patient. The tomographic images were reconstructed using a filtered backprojection (FBP) as well as an iterative algorithm (ITR). Different fluence modulation levels were investigated and their impact on the image was quantified in terms of SPR accuracy as well as noise within and outside selected ROIs, as a function of imaging dose. The unmodulated image served as reference. Results: Both FBP reconstruction and ITR without total variation (TV) yielded image quality in the ROIs similar to the reference images, for modulation down to 0.1 of the full proton fluence. The average dose was reduced by 75% for the water phantom and by 40% for the patient. FMpCT does not improve the noise for ITR with TV and modulation 0.1. Conclusion: This is the first work proposing and investigating FMpCT for producing optimal image quality for treatment planning and image guidance, while simultaneously reducing imaging dose. Future work will address spatial resolution effects and the impact of FMpCT on the quality of proton treatment plans for a prototype pCT scanner capable of list mode data acquisition. Acknowledgement: DFG-MAP DFG - Munich-Centre for Advanced Photonics (MAP)

  9. SU-F-J-214: Dose Reduction by Spatially Optimized Image Quality Via Fluence Modulated Proton CT (FMpCT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Angelis, L; Landry, G; Dedes, G; Parodi, K [Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen (LMU Munich), Garching b. Muenchen (Germany); Hansen, D [Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Jutland (Denmark); Rit, S [University Lyon, Lyon, Auvergne-Rhone-Alpes (France); Belka, C [LMU Munich, Munich (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Proton CT (pCT) is a promising imaging modality for reducing range uncertainty in image-guided proton therapy. Range uncertainties partially originate from X-ray CT number conversion to stopping power ratio (SPR) and are limiting the exploitation of the full potential of proton therapy. In this study we explore the concept of spatially dependent fluence modulated proton CT (FMpCT), for achieving optimal image quality in a clinical region of interest (ROI), while reducing significantly the imaging dose to the patient. Methods: The study was based on simulated ideal pCT using pencil beam (PB) scanning. A set of 250 MeV protons PBs was used to create 360 projections of a cylindrical water phantom and a head and neck cancer patient. The tomographic images were reconstructed using a filtered backprojection (FBP) as well as an iterative algorithm (ITR). Different fluence modulation levels were investigated and their impact on the image was quantified in terms of SPR accuracy as well as noise within and outside selected ROIs, as a function of imaging dose. The unmodulated image served as reference. Results: Both FBP reconstruction and ITR without total variation (TV) yielded image quality in the ROIs similar to the reference images, for modulation down to 0.1 of the full proton fluence. The average dose was reduced by 75% for the water phantom and by 40% for the patient. FMpCT does not improve the noise for ITR with TV and modulation 0.1. Conclusion: This is the first work proposing and investigating FMpCT for producing optimal image quality for treatment planning and image guidance, while simultaneously reducing imaging dose. Future work will address spatial resolution effects and the impact of FMpCT on the quality of proton treatment plans for a prototype pCT scanner capable of list mode data acquisition. Acknowledgement: DFG-MAP DFG - Munich-Centre for Advanced Photonics (MAP)

  10. A simulation study on proton computed tomography (CT) stopping power accuracy using dual energy CT scans as benchmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, David Christoffer; Seco, Joao; Sørensen, Thomas Sangild

    2015-01-01

    Background. Accurate stopping power estimation is crucial for treatment planning in proton therapy, and the uncertainties in stopping power are currently the largest contributor to the employed dose margins. Dual energy x-ray computed tomography (CT) (clinically available) and proton CT (in...... development) have both been proposed as methods for obtaining patient stopping power maps. The purpose of this work was to assess the accuracy of proton CT using dual energy CT scans of phantoms to establish reference accuracy levels. Material and methods. A CT calibration phantom and an abdomen cross section...... phantom containing inserts were scanned with dual energy and single energy CT with a state-of-the-art dual energy CT scanner. Proton CT scans were simulated using Monte Carlo methods. The simulations followed the setup used in current prototype proton CT scanners and included realistic modeling...

  11. MCNPX simulation of proton dose distribution in homogeneous and CT phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, C.C.; Lee, Y.J.; Tung, C.J.; Cheng, H.W.; Chao, T.C.

    2014-01-01

    A dose simulation system was constructed based on the MCNPX Monte Carlo package to simulate proton dose distribution in homogeneous and CT phantoms. Conversion from Hounsfield unit of a patient CT image set to material information necessary for Monte Carlo simulation is based on Schneider's approach. In order to validate this simulation system, inter-comparison of depth dose distributions among those obtained from the MCNPX, GEANT4 and FLUKA codes for a 160 MeV monoenergetic proton beam incident normally on the surface of a homogeneous water phantom was performed. For dose validation within the CT phantom, direct comparison with measurement is infeasible. Instead, this study took the approach to indirectly compare the 50% ranges (R 50% ) along the central axis by our system to the NIST CSDA ranges for beams with 160 and 115 MeV energies. Comparison result within the homogeneous phantom shows good agreement. Differences of simulated R 50% among the three codes are less than 1 mm. For results within the CT phantom, the MCNPX simulated water equivalent R eq,50% are compatible with the CSDA water equivalent ranges from the NIST database with differences of 0.7 and 4.1 mm for 160 and 115 MeV beams, respectively. - Highlights: ► Proton dose simulation based on the MCNPX 2.6.0 in homogeneous and CT phantoms. ► CT number (HU) conversion to electron density based on Schneider's approach. ► Good agreement among MCNPX, GEANT4 and FLUKA codes in a homogeneous water phantom. ► Water equivalent R 50 in CT phantoms are compatible to those of NIST database

  12. Filtered backprojection proton CT reconstruction along most likely paths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rit, Simon; Dedes, George; Freud, Nicolas; Sarrut, David; Letang, Jean Michel [Universite de Lyon, CREATIS, CNRS UMR5220, Inserm U1044, INSA-Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, Centre Leon Berard, 69008 Lyon (France)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: Proton CT (pCT) has the potential to accurately measure the electron density map of tissues at low doses but the spatial resolution is prohibitive if the curved paths of protons in matter is not accounted for. The authors propose to account for an estimate of the most likely path of protons in a filtered backprojection (FBP) reconstruction algorithm. Methods: The energy loss of protons is first binned in several proton radiographs at different distances to the proton source to exploit the depth-dependency of the estimate of the most likely path. This process is named the distance-driven binning. A voxel-specific backprojection is then used to select the adequate radiograph in the distance-driven binning in order to propagate in the pCT image the best achievable spatial resolution in proton radiographs. The improvement in spatial resolution is demonstrated using Monte Carlo simulations of resolution phantoms. Results: The spatial resolution in the distance-driven binning depended on the distance of the objects from the source and was optimal in the binned radiograph corresponding to that distance. The spatial resolution in the reconstructed pCT images decreased with the depth in the scanned object but it was always better than previous FBP algorithms assuming straight line paths. In a water cylinder with 20 cm diameter, the observed range of spatial resolutions was 0.7 - 1.6 mm compared to 1.0 - 2.4 mm at best with a straight line path assumption. The improvement was strongly enhanced in shorter 200 Degree-Sign scans. Conclusions: Improved spatial resolution was obtained in pCT images with filtered backprojection reconstruction using most likely path estimates of protons. The improvement in spatial resolution combined with the practicality of FBP algorithms compared to iterative reconstruction algorithms makes this new algorithm a candidate of choice for clinical pCT.

  13. Optimization of dual-energy CT acquisitions for proton therapy using projection-based decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilches-Freixas, Gloria; Létang, Jean Michel; Ducros, Nicolas; Rit, Simon

    2017-09-01

    Dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) has been presented as a valid alternative to single-energy CT to reduce the uncertainty of the conversion of patient CT numbers to proton stopping power ratio (SPR) of tissues relative to water. The aim of this work was to optimize DECT acquisition protocols from simulations of X-ray images for the treatment planning of proton therapy using a projection-based dual-energy decomposition algorithm. We have investigated the effect of various voltages and tin filtration combinations on the SPR map accuracy and precision, and the influence of the dose allocation between the low-energy (LE) and the high-energy (HE) acquisitions. For all spectra combinations, virtual CT projections of the Gammex phantom were simulated with a realistic energy-integrating detector response model. Two situations were simulated: an ideal case without noise (infinite dose) and a realistic situation with Poisson noise corresponding to a 20 mGy total central dose. To determine the optimal dose balance, the proportion of LE-dose with respect to the total dose was varied from 10% to 90% while keeping the central dose constant, for four dual-energy spectra. SPR images were derived using a two-step projection-based decomposition approach. The ranges of 70 MeV, 90 MeV, and 100 MeV proton beams onto the adult female (AF) reference computational phantom of the ICRP were analytically determined from the reconstructed SPR maps. The energy separation between the incident spectra had a strong impact on the SPR precision. Maximizing the incident energy gap reduced image noise. However, the energy gap was not a good metric to evaluate the accuracy of the SPR. In terms of SPR accuracy, a large variability of the optimal spectra was observed when studying each phantom material separately. The SPR accuracy was almost flat in the 30-70% LE-dose range, while the precision showed a minimum slightly shifted in favor of lower LE-dose. Photon noise in the SPR images (20 mGy dose

  14. Registration of pencil beam proton radiography data with X-ray CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deffet, Sylvain; Macq, Benoît; Righetto, Roberto; Vander Stappen, François; Farace, Paolo

    2017-10-01

    Proton radiography seems to be a promising tool for assessing the quality of the stopping power computation in proton therapy. However, range error maps obtained on the basis of proton radiographs are very sensitive to small misalignment between the planning CT and the proton radiography acquisitions. In order to be able to mitigate misalignment in postprocessing, the authors implemented a fast method for registration between pencil proton radiography data obtained with a multilayer ionization chamber (MLIC) and an X-ray CT acquired on a head phantom. The registration was performed by optimizing a cost function which performs a comparison between the acquired data and simulated integral depth-dose curves. Two methodologies were considered, one based on dual orthogonal projections and the other one on a single projection. For each methodology, the robustness of the registration algorithm with respect to three confounding factors (measurement noise, CT calibration errors, and spot spacing) was investigated by testing the accuracy of the method through simulations based on a CT scan of a head phantom. The present registration method showed robust convergence towards the optimal solution. For the level of measurement noise and the uncertainty in the stopping power computation expected in proton radiography using a MLIC, the accuracy appeared to be better than 0.3° for angles and 0.3 mm for translations by use of the appropriate cost function. The spot spacing analysis showed that a spacing larger than the 5 mm used by other authors for the investigation of a MLIC for proton radiography led to results with absolute accuracy better than 0.3° for angles and 1 mm for translations when orthogonal proton radiographs were fed into the algorithm. In the case of a single projection, 6 mm was the largest spot spacing presenting an acceptable registration accuracy. For registration of proton radiography data with X-ray CT, the use of a direct ray-tracing algorithm to compute

  15. The influence of CT image noise on proton range calculation in radiotherapy planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chvetsov, Alexei V; Paige, Sandra L

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this note is to evaluate the relationship between the stochastic errors in CT numbers and the standard deviation of the computed proton beam range in radiotherapy planning. The stochastic voxel-to-voxel variation in CT numbers called 'noise,' may be due to signal registration, processing and numerical image reconstruction technique. Noise in CT images may cause a deviation in the computed proton range from the physical proton range, even assuming that the error due to CT number-stopping power calibration is removed. To obtain the probability density function (PDF) of the computed proton range, we have used the continuing slowing down approximation (CSDA) and the uncorrelated white Gaussian noise along the proton path. The model of white noise was accepted because for the slice-based fan-beam CT scanner; the power-spectrum properties apply only to the axial (x, y) domain and the noise is uncorrelated in the z domain. However, the possible influence of the noise power spectrum on the standard deviation of the range should be investigated in the future. A random number generator was utilized for noise simulation and this procedure was iteratively repeated to obtain convergence of range PDF, which approached a Gaussian distribution. We showed that the standard deviation of the range, σ, increases linearly with the initial proton energy, computational grid size and standard deviation of the voxel values. The 95% confidence interval width of the range PDF, which is defined as 4σ, may reach 0.6 cm for the initial proton energy of 200 MeV, computational grid 0.25 cm and 5% standard deviation of CT voxel values. Our results show that the range uncertainty due to random errors in CT numbers may be significant and comparable to the uncertainties due to calibration of CT numbers. (note)

  16. SU-F-J-57: Effectiveness of Daily CT-Based Three-Dimensional Image Guided and Adaptive Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moriya, S [University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); National Cancer Center, Kashiwa, Chiba (Japan); Tachibana, H; Hotta, K; Baba, H; Kohno, R; Akimoto, T [National Cancer Center, Kashiwa, Chiba (Japan); Nakamura, N [National Cancer Center Hospital East, Kashiwa, Chiba (Japan); Miyakawa, S; Kurosawa, T [Komazawa University, Setagaya, Tokyo (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Daily CT-based three-dimensional image-guided and adaptive (CTIGRT-ART) proton therapy system was designed and developed. We also evaluated the effectiveness of the CTIGRT-ART. Methods: Retrospective analysis was performed in three lung cancer patients: Proton treatment planning was performed using CT image datasets acquired by Toshiba Aquilion ONE. Planning target volume and surrounding organs were contoured by a well-trained radiation oncologist. Dose distribution was optimized using 180-deg. and 270-deg. two fields in passive scattering proton therapy. Well commissioned Simplified Monte Carlo algorithm was used as dose calculation engine. Daily consecutive CT image datasets was acquired by an in-room CT (Toshiba Aquilion LB). In our in-house program, two image registrations for bone and tumor were performed to shift the isocenter using treatment CT image dataset. Subsequently, dose recalculation was performed after the shift of the isocenter. When the dose distribution after the tumor registration exhibits change of dosimetric parameter of CTV D90% compared to the initial plan, an additional process of was performed that the range shifter thickness was optimized. Dose distribution with CTV D90% for the bone registration, the tumor registration only and adaptive plan with the tumor registration was compared to the initial plan. Results: In the bone registration, tumor dose coverage was decreased by 16% on average (Maximum: 56%). The tumor registration shows better coverage than the bone registration, however the coverage was also decreased by 9% (Maximum: 22%) The adaptive plan shows similar dose coverage of the tumor (Average: 2%, Maximum: 7%). Conclusion: There is a high possibility that only image registration for bone and tumor may reduce tumor coverage. Thus, our proposed methodology of image guidance and adaptive planning using the range adaptation after tumor registration would be effective for proton therapy. This research is partially supported

  17. Proton tracking in a high-granularity Digital Tracking Calorimeter for proton CT purposes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pettersen, H. E. S.; Alme, J.; Biegun, A.; van den Brink, A.; Chaar, M.; Fehlker, D.; Meric, I.; Odland, O. H.; Peitzmann, T.; Rocco, E.; Ullaland, K.; Wang, H.; Yang, S.; Zhang, C.; Rohrich, D.

    2017-01-01

    Radiation therapy with protons as of today utilizes information from x-ray CT in order to estimate the proton stopping power of the traversed tissue in a patient. The conversion from x-ray attenuation to proton stopping power in tissue introduces range uncertainties of the order of 2-3% of the

  18. SU-E-J-35: Clinical Performance Evaluation of a Phase II Proton CT Scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandapaka, A; Ghebremedhin, A; Farley, D; Giacometti, V; Vence, N; Bashkirov, V; Patyal, B; Schulte, R; Plautz, T; Zatserklyaniy, A; Johnson, R; Sadrozinski, H

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To develop the methodology to evaluate the clinical performance of a Phase II Proton CT scanner Methods: Range errors on the order of 3%-5% constitute a major uncertainty in current charged particle treatment planning based on Hounsfield Unit (HU)-relative stopping power (RSP) calibration curves. Within our proton CT collaboration, we previously developed and built a Phase I proton CT scanner that provided a sensitive area of 9 cm (axial) × 18 cm (in-plane). This scanner served to get initial experience with this new treatment planning tool and to incorporate lessons learned into the next generation design. A Phase II scanner was recently completed and is now undergoing initial performance testing. It will increase the proton acquisition rate and provide a larger detection area of 9 cm x 36 cm. We are now designing a comprehensive evaluation program to test the image quality, imaging dose, and range uncertainty associated with this scanner. The testing will be performed along the lines of AAPM TG 66. Results: In our discussion of the evaluation protocol we identified the following priorities. The image quality of proton CT images, in particular spatial resolution and low-density contrast discrimination, will be evaluated with the Catphan600 phantom. Initial testing showed that the Catphan uniformity phantom did not provide sufficient uniformity; it was thus replaced by a cylindrical water phantom. The imaging dose will be tested with a Catphan dose module, and compared to a typical cone beam CT dose for comparable image quality. Lastly, we developed a dedicated dosimetry range phantom based on the CIRS pediatric head phantom HN715. Conclusion: A formal evaluation of proton CT as a new tool for proton treatment planning is an important task. The availability of the new Phase II proton CT scanner will allow us to perform this task. This research is supported by the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering of the NIH under award number R01

  19. Dosimetric comparison of stopping power calibration with dual-energy CT and single-energy CT in proton therapy treatment planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Jiahua [Department of Physics, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5005 (Australia); Penfold, Scott N., E-mail: scott.penfold@adelaide.edu.au [Department of Physics, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5005, Australia and Department of Medical Physics, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide, SA 5000 (Australia)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The accuracy of proton dose calculation is dependent on the ability to correctly characterize patient tissues with medical imaging. The most common method is to correlate computed tomography (CT) numbers obtained via single-energy CT (SECT) with proton stopping power ratio (SPR). CT numbers, however, cannot discriminate between a change in mass density and change in chemical composition of patient tissues. This limitation can have consequences on SPR calibration accuracy. Dual-energy CT (DECT) is receiving increasing interest as an alternative imaging modality for proton therapy treatment planning due to its ability to discriminate between changes in patient density and chemical composition. In the current work we use a phantom of known composition to demonstrate the dosimetric advantages of proton therapy treatment planning with DECT over SECT. Methods: A phantom of known composition was scanned with a clinical SECT radiotherapy CT-simulator. The phantom was rescanned at a lower X-ray tube potential to generate a complimentary DECT image set. A set of reference materials similar in composition to the phantom was used to perform a stoichiometric calibration of SECT CT number to proton SPRs. The same set of reference materials was used to perform a DECT stoichiometric calibration based on effective atomic number. The known composition of the phantom was used to assess the accuracy of SPR calibration with SECT and DECT. Intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) treatment plans were generated with the SECT and DECT image sets to assess the dosimetric effect of the imaging modality. Isodose difference maps and root mean square (RMS) error calculations were used to assess dose calculation accuracy. Results: SPR calculation accuracy was found to be superior, on average, with DECT relative to SECT. Maximum errors of 12.8% and 2.2% were found for SECT and DECT, respectively. Qualitative examination of dose difference maps clearly showed the dosimetric advantages

  20. Proton tracking in a high-granularity Digital Tracking Calorimeter for proton CT purposes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pettersen, H. E.S.; Alme, J.; Biegun, A.; van den Brink, A.; Chaar, M.; Fehlker, D.; Meric, I.; Odland, O. H.; Peitzmann, T.; Rocco, E.; Ullaland, K.; Wang, H.; Yang, S.; Zhang, C.; Röhrich, D.

    2017-01-01

    Radiation therapy with protons as of today utilizes information from x-ray CT in order to estimate the proton stopping power of the traversed tissue in a patient. The conversion from x-ray attenuation to proton stopping power in tissue introduces range uncertainties of the order of 2–3% of the

  1. From 2D to 3D: Proton Radiography and Proton CT in proton therapy: A simulation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Takatsu, J.; van der Graaf, E.R.; van Goethem, M.-J.; Brandenburg, S.; Biegun, Aleksandra

    (1) Purpose In order to reduce the uncertainty in translation of the X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) image into a map of proton stopping powers (3-4% and even up to 10% in regions containing bones [1-8]), proton radiography is being studied as an alternative imaging technique in proton therapy. We

  2. SU-F-J-194: Development of Dose-Based Image Guided Proton Therapy Workflow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pham, R; Sun, B; Zhao, T; Li, H; Yang, D; Grantham, K; Goddu, S; Santanam, L; Bradley, J; Mutic, S; Kandlakunta, P; Zhang, T [Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To implement image-guided proton therapy (IGPT) based on daily proton dose distribution. Methods: Unlike x-ray therapy, simple alignment based on anatomy cannot ensure proper dose coverage in proton therapy. Anatomy changes along the beam path may lead to underdosing the target, or overdosing the organ-at-risk (OAR). With an in-room mobile computed tomography (CT) system, we are developing a dose-based IGPT software tool that allows patient positioning and treatment adaption based on daily dose distributions. During an IGPT treatment, daily CT images are acquired in treatment position. After initial positioning based on rigid image registration, proton dose distribution is calculated on daily CT images. The target and OARs are automatically delineated via deformable image registration. Dose distributions are evaluated to decide if repositioning or plan adaptation is necessary in order to achieve proper coverage of the target and sparing of OARs. Besides online dose-based image guidance, the software tool can also map daily treatment doses to the treatment planning CT images for offline adaptive treatment. Results: An in-room helical CT system is commissioned for IGPT purposes. It produces accurate CT numbers that allow proton dose calculation. GPU-based deformable image registration algorithms are developed and evaluated for automatic ROI-delineation and dose mapping. The online and offline IGPT functionalities are evaluated with daily CT images of the proton patients. Conclusion: The online and offline IGPT software tool may improve the safety and quality of proton treatment by allowing dose-based IGPT and adaptive proton treatments. Research is partially supported by Mevion Medical Systems.

  3. TH-C-BRD-05: Reducing Proton Beam Range Uncertainty with Patient-Specific CT HU to RSP Calibrations Based On Single-Detector Proton Radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doolan, P [University College London, London (United Kingdom); Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Sharp, G; Testa, M; Lu, H-M [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Bentefour, E [Ion Beam Applications (IBA), Louvain la Neuve (Belgium); Royle, G [University College London, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Beam range uncertainty in proton treatment comes primarily from converting the patient's X-ray CT (xCT) dataset to relative stopping power (RSP). Current practices use a single curve for this conversion, produced by a stoichiometric calibration based on tissue composition data for average, healthy, adult humans, but not for the individual in question. Proton radiographs produce water-equivalent path length (WEPL) maps, dependent on the RSP of tissues within the specific patient. This work investigates the use of such WEPL maps to optimize patient-specific calibration curves for reducing beam range uncertainty. Methods: The optimization procedure works on the principle of minimizing the difference between the known WEPL map, obtained from a proton radiograph, and a digitally-reconstructed WEPL map (DRWM) through an RSP dataset, by altering the calibration curve that is used to convert the xCT into an RSP dataset. DRWMs were produced with Plastimatch, an in-house developed software, and an optimization procedure was implemented in Matlab. Tests were made on a range of systems including simulated datasets with computed WEPL maps and phantoms (anthropomorphic and real biological tissue) with WEPL maps measured by single detector proton radiography. Results: For the simulated datasets, the optimizer showed excellent results. It was able to either completely eradicate or significantly reduce the root-mean-square-error (RMSE) in the WEPL for the homogeneous phantoms (to zero for individual materials or from 1.5% to 0.2% for the simultaneous optimization of multiple materials). For the heterogeneous phantom the RMSE was reduced from 1.9% to 0.3%. Conclusion: An optimization procedure has been designed to produce patient-specific calibration curves. Test results on a range of systems with different complexities and sizes have been promising for accurate beam range control in patients. This project was funded equally by the Engineering and Physical Sciences

  4. The precision of proton range calculations in proton radiotherapy treatment planning: experimental verification of the relation between CT-HU and proton stopping power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaffner, B.; Pedroni, E.

    1998-01-01

    The precision in proton radiotherapy treatment planning depends on the accuracy of the information used to calculate the stopping power properties of the tissues in the patient's body. This information is obtained from computed tomography (CT) images using a calibration curve to convert CT Hounsfield units into relative proton stopping power values. The validity of a stoichiometric method to create the calibration curve has been verified by measuring pairs of Hounsfield units and stopping power values for animal tissue samples. It was found that the agreement between measurement and calibration curve is better than 1% if beam hardening effects in the acquisition of the CT images can be neglected. The influence of beam hardening effects on the quantitative reading of the CT measurements is discussed and an estimation for the overall range precision of proton beams is given. It is expected that the range of protons in the human body can be controlled to better than ±1.1% of the water equivalent range in soft tissue and ±1.8% in bone, which translates into a range precision of about 1-3 mm in typical treatment situations. (author)

  5. SU-C-207A-03: Development of Proton CT Imaging System Using Thick Scintillator and CCD Camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, S; Uesaka, M [The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Nishio, T; Tsuneda, M [Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Matsushita, K [Rikkyo University, Tokyo (Japan); Kabuki, S [Tokai University, Isehara (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: In the treatment planning of proton therapy, Water Equivalent Length (WEL), which is the parameter for the calculation of dose and the range of proton, is derived by X-ray CT (xCT) image and xCT-WEL conversion. However, about a few percent error in the accuracy of proton range calculation through this conversion has been reported. The purpose of this study is to construct a proton CT (pCT) imaging system for an evaluation of the error. Methods: The pCT imaging system was constructed with a thick scintillator and a cooled CCD camera, which acquires the two-dimensional image of integrated value of the scintillation light toward the beam direction. The pCT image is reconstructed by FBP method using a correction between the light intensity and residual range of proton beam. An experiment for the demonstration of this system was performed with 70-MeV proton beam provided by NIRS cyclotron. The pCT image of several objects reconstructed from the experimental data was evaluated quantitatively. Results: Three-dimensional pCT images of several objects were reconstructed experimentally. A finestructure of approximately 1 mm was clearly observed. The position resolution of pCT image was almost the same as that of xCT image. And the error of proton CT pixel value was up to 4%. The deterioration of image quality was caused mainly by the effect of multiple Coulomb scattering. Conclusion: We designed and constructed the pCT imaging system using a thick scintillator and a CCD camera. And the system was evaluated with the experiment by use of 70-MeV proton beam. Three-dimensional pCT images of several objects were acquired by the system. This work was supported by JST SENTAN Grant Number 13A1101 and JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 15H04912.

  6. MRI-Based Computed Tomography Metal Artifact Correction Method for Improving Proton Range Calculation Accuracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Peter C.; Schreibmann, Eduard; Roper, Justin; Elder, Eric; Crocker, Ian; Fox, Tim; Zhu, X. Ronald; Dong, Lei; Dhabaan, Anees

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Computed tomography (CT) artifacts can severely degrade dose calculation accuracy in proton therapy. Prompted by the recently increased popularity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the radiation therapy clinic, we developed an MRI-based CT artifact correction method for improving the accuracy of proton range calculations. Methods and Materials: The proposed method replaces corrupted CT data by mapping CT Hounsfield units (HU number) from a nearby artifact-free slice, using a coregistered MRI. MRI and CT volumetric images were registered with use of 3-dimensional (3D) deformable image registration (DIR). The registration was fine-tuned on a slice-by-slice basis by using 2D DIR. Based on the intensity of paired MRI pixel values and HU from an artifact-free slice, we performed a comprehensive analysis to predict the correct HU for the corrupted region. For a proof-of-concept validation, metal artifacts were simulated on a reference data set. Proton range was calculated using reference, artifactual, and corrected images to quantify the reduction in proton range error. The correction method was applied to 4 unique clinical cases. Results: The correction method resulted in substantial artifact reduction, both quantitatively and qualitatively. On respective simulated brain and head and neck CT images, the mean error was reduced from 495 and 370 HU to 108 and 92 HU after correction. Correspondingly, the absolute mean proton range errors of 2.4 cm and 1.7 cm were reduced to less than 2 mm in both cases. Conclusions: Our MRI-based CT artifact correction method can improve CT image quality and proton range calculation accuracy for patients with severe CT artifacts

  7. Feasibility of MR-only proton dose calculations for prostate cancer radiotherapy using a commercial pseudo-CT generation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maspero, Matteo; van den Berg, Cornelis A. T.; Landry, Guillaume; Belka, Claus; Parodi, Katia; Seevinck, Peter R.; Raaymakers, Bas W.; Kurz, Christopher

    2017-12-01

    A magnetic resonance (MR)-only radiotherapy workflow can reduce cost, radiation exposure and uncertainties introduced by CT-MRI registration. A crucial prerequisite is generating the so called pseudo-CT (pCT) images for accurate dose calculation and planning. Many pCT generation methods have been proposed in the scope of photon radiotherapy. This work aims at verifying for the first time whether a commercially available photon-oriented pCT generation method can be employed for accurate intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) dose calculation. A retrospective study was conducted on ten prostate cancer patients. For pCT generation from MR images, a commercial solution for creating bulk-assigned pCTs, called MR for Attenuation Correction (MRCAT), was employed. The assigned pseudo-Hounsfield Unit (HU) values were adapted to yield an increased agreement to the reference CT in terms of proton range. Internal air cavities were copied from the CT to minimise inter-scan differences. CT- and MRCAT-based dose calculations for opposing beam IMPT plans were compared by gamma analysis and evaluation of clinically relevant target and organ at risk dose volume histogram (DVH) parameters. The proton range in beam’s eye view (BEV) was compared using single field uniform dose (SFUD) plans. On average, a (2%, 2 mm) gamma pass rate of 98.4% was obtained using a 10% dose threshold after adaptation of the pseudo-HU values. Mean differences between CT- and MRCAT-based dose in the DVH parameters were below 1 Gy (radiotherapy, is feasible following adaptation of the assigned pseudo-HU values.

  8. Proton radiography to improve proton therapy treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Takatsu, J.; van der Graaf, E. R.; van Goethem, Marc-Jan; van Beuzekom, M.; Klaver, T.; Visser, Jan; Brandenburg, S.; Biegun, A. K.

    The quality of cancer treatment with protons critically depends on an accurate prediction of the proton stopping powers for the tissues traversed by the protons. Today, treatment planning in proton radiotherapy is based on stopping power calculations from densities of X-ray Computed Tomography (CT)

  9. SU-F-J-203: Retrospective Assessment of Delivered Proton Dose in Prostate Cancer Patients Based On Daily In-Room CT Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuetzer, K; Paessler, T [OncoRay - National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Medical Faculty and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Valentini, C; Thiele, J; Hoelscher, T [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Techenische Universitaet Dresden (Germany); Exner, F [OncoRay - National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Medical Faculty and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); now with: University of Wuerzburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Wuerzburg (Germany); Krause, M; Richter, C [OncoRay - National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Medical Faculty and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Techenische Universitaet Dresden (Germany); Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Radiooncology, Dresden (Germany); German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Dresden, Germany and German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Retrospective calculation of the delivered proton dose in prostate cancer patients based on a unique dataset of daily CT images. Methods: Inter-fractional motion in prostate cancer patients treated at our proton facility is counteracted by water-filled endorectal ballon and bladder filling protocol. Typical plans (XiO, Elekta Instruments AB, Stockholm) for 74 Gy(RBE) sequential boost treatment in 37 fractions include two series of opposing lateral double-scattered proton beams covering the respective iCTV. Stability of fiducial markers and anatomy were checked in 12 patients by daily scheduled in-room control CT (cCT) after immobilization and positioning according to bony anatomy utilizing orthogonal X-ray. In RayStation 4.6 (RaySearch Laboritories AB, Stockholm), all cCTs are delineated retrospectively and the treatment plans were recalculated on the planning CT and the registered cCTs. All fraction doses were accumulated on the planning CT after deformable registration. Parameters of delivered dose to iCTV (D98%>95%, D2%<107%), bladder (V75Gy<15%, V70Gy<25%, V65Gy<30%), rectum (V70Gy<10%, V50Gy<40%) and femoral heads (V50Gy<5%) are compared to those in the treatment plan. Intra-therapy variation is represented in DVH bands. Results: No alarming differences were observed between planned and retrospectively accumulated dose: iCTV constraints were met, except for one patient (D98%=94.6% in non-boosted iCTV). Considered bladder and femoral head values were below the limits. Rectum V70Gy was slightly exceeded (<11.3%) in two patients. First intra-therapy variability analysis in 4 patients showed no timedependent parameter drift, revealed strongest variability for bladder dose. In some fractions, iCTV coverage (D98%) and rectum V70Gy was missed. Conclusion: Double scattered proton plans are accurately delivered to prostate cancer patients due to fractionation effects and the applied precise positioning and immobilization protocols. As a result of rare

  10. WE-FG-202-03: Quantitative CT-Based Analysis to Assess Lung Injury Following Proton Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Underwood, T; Grassberger, C; Willers, H; MacDonald, S; Jimenez, R; Paganetti, H

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Relative to photon alternatives, the increased dose-conformity associated with proton therapy is expected to reduce the extent of radiation-induced lung toxicity. However, analysis of follow-up data is yet to be published in this area. In this study we retrospectively analyzed late-phase HU changes for proton therapy cohorts of chest wall and lung patients. Methods: From our institution’s register of patients treated using double-scattered protons, all chest wall and stereotactic lung cases (treated 2011–2012 and 2008–2014 respectively) were initially considered. Follow-up CT data were accessible for 10 chest wall cases (prescribed 50.4 GyRBE in 28 fractions) and 16 lung cases (prescribed 42–50 GyRBE in 3–4 fractions). CT time-points ranged from 0.5–3.5 years post-treatment. Planning doses were recalculated using TOPAS Monte Carlo simulations and mapped onto the follow-up images using deformable registration. Excluding internal target volumes, changes in HU between each patient’s planning and follow-up CT(s) were evaluated for dose bins of 2–30 GyRBE (2 GyRBE increments). Results: Linear increases in HU per unit dose, with correlations statistically significant at the 1% level (one-sided Spearman’s rank test), were evident for all 10 chest wall cases and 14/16 lung cases. The mean changes in HU/Gy were: 1.76 (SD=0.73) for the chest wall cohort, and 1.40 (SD=0.87) for the lung cohort. The median scan times post treatment were 21 and 12 months respectively. All 26 patients developed solid consolidation (scar-like radiographic opacities) within the exposed lung(s). Conclusion: Analysis of follow-up CTs revealed statistically significant correlations in HU-change/dose for two proton cohorts (lung and chest wall). Quantitatively, the late-phase changes we report broadly match published photon data. Further analysis of such radiographic changes, particularly via matched cohort studies drawing upon consistent imaging protocols, could play an

  11. WE-FG-202-03: Quantitative CT-Based Analysis to Assess Lung Injury Following Proton Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Underwood, T [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); University College London, London (United Kingdom); Grassberger, C; Willers, H; MacDonald, S; Jimenez, R; Paganetti, H [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Relative to photon alternatives, the increased dose-conformity associated with proton therapy is expected to reduce the extent of radiation-induced lung toxicity. However, analysis of follow-up data is yet to be published in this area. In this study we retrospectively analyzed late-phase HU changes for proton therapy cohorts of chest wall and lung patients. Methods: From our institution’s register of patients treated using double-scattered protons, all chest wall and stereotactic lung cases (treated 2011–2012 and 2008–2014 respectively) were initially considered. Follow-up CT data were accessible for 10 chest wall cases (prescribed 50.4 GyRBE in 28 fractions) and 16 lung cases (prescribed 42–50 GyRBE in 3–4 fractions). CT time-points ranged from 0.5–3.5 years post-treatment. Planning doses were recalculated using TOPAS Monte Carlo simulations and mapped onto the follow-up images using deformable registration. Excluding internal target volumes, changes in HU between each patient’s planning and follow-up CT(s) were evaluated for dose bins of 2–30 GyRBE (2 GyRBE increments). Results: Linear increases in HU per unit dose, with correlations statistically significant at the 1% level (one-sided Spearman’s rank test), were evident for all 10 chest wall cases and 14/16 lung cases. The mean changes in HU/Gy were: 1.76 (SD=0.73) for the chest wall cohort, and 1.40 (SD=0.87) for the lung cohort. The median scan times post treatment were 21 and 12 months respectively. All 26 patients developed solid consolidation (scar-like radiographic opacities) within the exposed lung(s). Conclusion: Analysis of follow-up CTs revealed statistically significant correlations in HU-change/dose for two proton cohorts (lung and chest wall). Quantitatively, the late-phase changes we report broadly match published photon data. Further analysis of such radiographic changes, particularly via matched cohort studies drawing upon consistent imaging protocols, could play an

  12. Investigating CT to CBCT image registration for head and neck proton therapy as a tool for daily dose recalculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landry, Guillaume, E-mail: g.landry@lmu.de [Department of Medical Physics, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich D85748, Germany and Department of Radiation Oncology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich D81377 (Germany); Nijhuis, Reinoud; Thieke, Christian; Reiner, Michael; Ganswindt, Ute; Belka, Claus [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich D81377 (Germany); Dedes, George; Handrack, Josefine; Parodi, Katia [Department of Medical Physics, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich D85748 (Germany); Janssens, Guillaume; Orban de Xivry, Jonathan [ICTEAM, Université Catholique de Louvain, Louvain-La-Neuve B1348 (Belgium); Kamp, Florian; Wilkens, Jan J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Technische Universität München, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich D81675, Germany and Physik-Department, Technische Universität München, Garching D85748 (Germany); Paganelli, Chiara; Riboldi, Marco; Baroni, Guido [Dipartimento di Elettronica Informazione e Bioingegneria, Politecnico di Milano, Milan 20133 (Italy)

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: Intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) of head and neck (H and N) cancer patients may be improved by plan adaptation. The decision to adapt the treatment plan based on a dose recalculation on the current anatomy requires a diagnostic quality computed tomography (CT) scan of the patient. As gantry-mounted cone beam CT (CBCT) scanners are currently being offered by vendors, they may offer daily or weekly updates of patient anatomy. CBCT image quality may not be sufficient for accurate proton dose calculation and it is likely necessary to perform CBCT CT number correction. In this work, the authors investigated deformable image registration (DIR) of the planning CT (pCT) to the CBCT to generate a virtual CT (vCT) to be used for proton dose recalculation. Methods: Datasets of six H and N cancer patients undergoing photon intensity modulated radiation therapy were used in this study to validate the vCT approach. Each dataset contained a CBCT acquired within 3 days of a replanning CT (rpCT), in addition to a pCT. The pCT and rpCT were delineated by a physician. A Morphons algorithm was employed in this work to perform DIR of the pCT to CBCT following a rigid registration of the two images. The contours from the pCT were deformed using the vector field resulting from DIR to yield a contoured vCT. The DIR accuracy was evaluated with a scale invariant feature transform (SIFT) algorithm comparing automatically identified matching features between vCT and CBCT. The rpCT was used as reference for evaluation of the vCT. The vCT and rpCT CT numbers were converted to stopping power ratio and the water equivalent thickness (WET) was calculated. IMPT dose distributions from treatment plans optimized on the pCT were recalculated with a Monte Carlo algorithm on the rpCT and vCT for comparison in terms of gamma index, dose volume histogram (DVH) statistics as well as proton range. The DIR generated contours on the vCT were compared to physician-drawn contours on the rpCT

  13. In vivo verification of proton beam path by using post-treatment PET/CT imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsi, Wen C; Indelicato, Daniel J; Vargas, Carlos; Duvvuri, Srividya; Li, Zuofeng; Palta, Jatinder

    2009-09-01

    , also show large misalignment between the field edge and the positron emission distribution in lipomatous tissues around the prostate. These motion-after-Tx cases correspond to patients with large changes in volume of rectal gas between the post-Tx and the post-PET CTs. The standard deviations for D(AP) and D(SI) are 5.0 and 3.0 mm, respectively, for these motion-after-Tx cases. The final seven studies, referred to as position-error cases, which had a large discordance but no misalignment, were found to have deviations of 4.6 and 3.6 mm in D(AP) and D(SI), respectively. The position-error cases correspond to a large discrepancy on the relative location between the centroid and pelvic bones seen in post-Tx CT and recorded x-ray radiographs. Systematic analyses of proton-activated positron emission distributions provide patient-specific information on prostate motion (sigmaM) and patient position variability (sigmap) during daily proton beam delivery. The less than 2 mm of displacement variations in the good cases indicates that population-based values of sigmap and sigmaM, used in margin algorithms for treatment planning at the authors' institution are valid for the majority of cases. However, a small fraction of PET/CT studies (approximately 14%) with -4 mm displacement variations may require different margins. Such data are useful in establishing patient-specific planning target volume margins.

  14. In vivo verification of proton beam path by using post-treatment PET/CT imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsi, Wen C.; Indelicato, Daniel J.; Vargas, Carlos; Duvvuri, Srividya; Li Zuofeng; Palta, Jatinder [Proton Therapy Institute, University of Florida, Jacksonville, Florida 32206 (United States); Boca Radiation Oncology Associates, Boca Raton, Florida 33431 (United States); Proton Therapy Institute, University of Florida, Jacksonville, Florida 32206 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32610 (United States)

    2009-09-15

    studies, referred as motion-after-Tx cases, also show large misalignment between the field edge and the positron emission distribution in lipomatous tissues around the prostate. These motion-after-Tx cases correspond to patients with large changes in volume of rectal gas between the post-Tx and the post-PET CTs. The standard deviations for D{sub AP} and D{sub SI} are 5.0 and 3.0 mm, respectively, for these motion-after-Tx cases. The final seven studies, referred to as position-error cases, which had a large discordance but no misalignment, were found to have deviations of 4.6 and 3.6 mm in D{sub AP} and D{sub SI}, respectively. The position-error cases correspond to a large discrepancy on the relative location between the centroid and pelvic bones seen in post-Tx CT and recorded x-ray radiographs. Conclusions: Systematic analyses of proton-activated positron emission distributions provide patient-specific information on prostate motion ({sigma}{sub M}) and patient position variability ({Sigma}{sub p}) during daily proton beam delivery. The less than 2 mm of displacement variations in the good cases indicates that population-based values of {Sigma}{sub p} and {sigma}{sub M} used in margin algorithms for treatment planning at the authors' institution are valid for the majority of cases. However, a small fraction of PET/CT studies (approximately 14%) with {approx}4 mm displacement variations may require different margins. Such data are useful in establishing patient-specific planning target volume margins.

  15. Feasibility of quantitative PET/CT dosimetry for proton therapy using polymer gels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeidan, O A; Hsi, W C; Lopatiuk-Tirpak, O; Sriprisan, S I; Meeks, S L; Kupelian, P A; Li, Z; Palta, J R, E-mail: lenatirpak@gmail.co

    2010-11-01

    A feasibility study of proton beam PET/CT off-line quantitative dosimetry using polymer gels is presented. A newly developed proton-sensitive polymer gel dosimeter (BANG( (registered)) 3-Pro2) is used as a dosimeter and a tissue-equivalent phantom medium for this study. We explore a new approach to correlating measured proton 3-dimensional (3D) dose distributions directly to measured positron emission from in the gel medium using PET/CT imaging. A large cylindrical volume (2.2 Litres) of the gel was irradiated with a clinical modulated proton beam using irregular-shaped aperture geometry. The gel was imaged in a nearby PET/CT unit immediately (<3 min) after irradiation. Dose distribution in the gel was generated using an optical tomography scanning system. Direct 3D spatial comparison of dose and positron emission distributions was then performed. Profiles along the beam path show that the distal fall-off of the dose is nearly 2 cm deeper than the activity profile which is comparable to previous studies with plastic phantoms and Monte Carlo simulations of activity distributions. Planar PET and dose distributions at depth and perpendicular to beam axis show a strong one-to-one spatial correlation. This phantom study demonstrates that the gel medium could be potentially useful for quantifying various physical factors that can influence the PET activity range verification method in patients.

  16. Dosimetric impact of a CT metal artefact suppression algorithm for proton, electron and photon therapies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Jikun; Sandison, George A; Hsi, W-C; Ringor, Michael; Lu Xiaoyi

    2006-01-01

    Accurate dose calculation is essential to precision radiation treatment planning and this accuracy depends upon anatomic and tissue electron density information. Modern treatment planning inhomogeneity corrections use x-ray CT images and calibrated scales of tissue CT number to electron density to provide this information. The presence of metal in the volume scanned by an x-ray CT scanner causes metal induced image artefacts that influence CT numbers and thereby introduce errors in the radiation dose distribution calculated. This paper investigates the dosimetric improvement achieved by a previously proposed x-ray CT metal artefact suppression technique when the suppressed images of a patient with bilateral hip prostheses are used in commercial treatment planning systems for proton, electron or photon therapies. For all these beam types, this clinical image and treatment planning study reveals that the target may be severely underdosed if a metal artefact-contaminated image is used for dose calculations instead of the artefact suppressed one. Of the three beam types studied, the metal artefact suppression is most important for proton therapy dose calculations, intermediate for electron therapy and least important for x-ray therapy but still significant. The study of a water phantom having a metal rod simulating a hip prosthesis indicates that CT numbers generated after image processing for metal artefact suppression are accurate and thus dose calculations based on the metal artefact suppressed images will be of high fidelity

  17. TU-FG-BRB-03: Basis Vector Model Based Method for Proton Stopping Power Estimation From Experimental Dual Energy CT Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, S; Politte, D; O’Sullivan, J [Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO (United States); Han, D; Porras-Chaverri, M; Williamson, J [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); Whiting, B [University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: This work aims at reducing the uncertainty in proton stopping power (SP) estimation by a novel combination of a linear, separable basis vector model (BVM) for stopping power calculation (Med Phys 43:600) and a statistical, model-based dual-energy CT (DECT) image reconstruction algorithm (TMI 35:685). The method was applied to experimental data. Methods: BVM assumes the photon attenuation coefficients, electron densities, and mean excitation energies (I-values) of unknown materials can be approximated by a combination of the corresponding quantities of two reference materials. The DECT projection data for a phantom with 5 different known materials was collected on a Philips Brilliance scanner using two scans at 90 kVp and 140 kVp. The line integral alternating minimization (LIAM) algorithm was used to recover the two BVM coefficient images using the measured source spectra. The proton stopping powers are then estimated from the Bethe-Bloch equation using electron densities and I-values derived from the BVM coefficients. The proton stopping powers and proton ranges for the phantom materials estimated via our BVM based DECT method are compared to ICRU reference values and a post-processing DECT analysis (Yang PMB 55:1343) applied to vendorreconstructed images using the Torikoshi parametric fit model (tPFM). Results: For the phantom materials, the average stopping power estimations for 175 MeV protons derived from our method are within 1% of the ICRU reference values (except for Teflon with a 1.48% error), with an average standard deviation of 0.46% over pixels. The resultant proton ranges agree with the reference values within 2 mm. Conclusion: Our principled DECT iterative reconstruction algorithm, incorporating optimal beam hardening and scatter corrections, in conjunction with a simple linear BVM model, achieves more accurate and robust proton stopping power maps than the post-processing, nonlinear tPFM based DECT analysis applied to conventional

  18. Quantitative assessment of the physical potential of proton beam range verification with PET/CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knopf, A.; Parodi, K.; Paganetti, H.; Cascio, E.; Bonab, A.; Bortfeld, T.

    2008-08-01

    A recent clinical pilot study demonstrated the feasibility of offline PET/CT range verification for proton therapy treatments. In vivo PET measurements are challenged by blood perfusion, variations of tissue compositions, patient motion and image co-registration uncertainties. Besides these biological and treatment specific factors, the accuracy of the method is constrained by the underlying physical processes. This phantom study distinguishes physical factors from other factors, assessing the reproducibility, consistency and sensitivity of the PET/CT range verification method. A spread-out Bragg-peak (SOBP) proton field was delivered to a phantom consisting of poly-methyl methacrylate (PMMA), lung and bone equivalent material slabs. PET data were acquired in listmode at a commercial PET/CT scanner available within 10 min walking distance from the proton therapy unit. The measured PET activity distributions were compared to simulations of the PET signal based on Geant4 and FLUKA Monte Carlo (MC) codes. To test the reproducibility of the measured PET signal, data from two independent measurements at the same geometrical position in the phantom were compared. Furthermore, activation depth profiles within identical material arrangements but at different positions within the irradiation field were compared to test the consistency of the measured PET signal. Finally, activation depth profiles through air/lung, air/bone and lung/bone interfaces parallel as well as at 6° to the beam direction were studied to investigate the sensitivity of the PET/CT range verification method. The reproducibility and the consistency of the measured PET signal were found to be of the same order of magnitude. They determine the physical accuracy of the PET measurement to be about 1 mm. However, range discrepancies up to 2.6 mm between two measurements and range variations up to 2.6 mm within one measurement were found at the beam edge and at the edge of the field of view (FOV) of the PET

  19. Quantitative assessment of the physical potential of proton beam range verification with PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knopf, A; Paganetti, H; Cascio, E; Bortfeld, T [Department of Radiation Oncology, MGH and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Parodi, K [Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Bonab, A [Department of Radiology, MGH and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114 (United States)

    2008-08-07

    A recent clinical pilot study demonstrated the feasibility of offline PET/CT range verification for proton therapy treatments. In vivo PET measurements are challenged by blood perfusion, variations of tissue compositions, patient motion and image co-registration uncertainties. Besides these biological and treatment specific factors, the accuracy of the method is constrained by the underlying physical processes. This phantom study distinguishes physical factors from other factors, assessing the reproducibility, consistency and sensitivity of the PET/CT range verification method. A spread-out Bragg-peak (SOBP) proton field was delivered to a phantom consisting of poly-methyl methacrylate (PMMA), lung and bone equivalent material slabs. PET data were acquired in listmode at a commercial PET/CT scanner available within 10 min walking distance from the proton therapy unit. The measured PET activity distributions were compared to simulations of the PET signal based on Geant4 and FLUKA Monte Carlo (MC) codes. To test the reproducibility of the measured PET signal, data from two independent measurements at the same geometrical position in the phantom were compared. Furthermore, activation depth profiles within identical material arrangements but at different positions within the irradiation field were compared to test the consistency of the measured PET signal. Finally, activation depth profiles through air/lung, air/bone and lung/bone interfaces parallel as well as at 6{sup 0} to the beam direction were studied to investigate the sensitivity of the PET/CT range verification method. The reproducibility and the consistency of the measured PET signal were found to be of the same order of magnitude. They determine the physical accuracy of the PET measurement to be about 1 mm. However, range discrepancies up to 2.6 mm between two measurements and range variations up to 2.6 mm within one measurement were found at the beam edge and at the edge of the field of view (FOV) of the

  20. Quantitative assessment of the physical potential of proton beam range verification with PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knopf, A; Parodi, K; Paganetti, H; Cascio, E; Bonab, A; Bortfeld, T

    2008-08-07

    A recent clinical pilot study demonstrated the feasibility of offline PET/CT range verification for proton therapy treatments. In vivo PET measurements are challenged by blood perfusion, variations of tissue compositions, patient motion and image co-registration uncertainties. Besides these biological and treatment specific factors, the accuracy of the method is constrained by the underlying physical processes. This phantom study distinguishes physical factors from other factors, assessing the reproducibility, consistency and sensitivity of the PET/CT range verification method. A spread-out Bragg-peak (SOBP) proton field was delivered to a phantom consisting of poly-methyl methacrylate (PMMA), lung and bone equivalent material slabs. PET data were acquired in listmode at a commercial PET/CT scanner available within 10 min walking distance from the proton therapy unit. The measured PET activity distributions were compared to simulations of the PET signal based on Geant4 and FLUKA Monte Carlo (MC) codes. To test the reproducibility of the measured PET signal, data from two independent measurements at the same geometrical position in the phantom were compared. Furthermore, activation depth profiles within identical material arrangements but at different positions within the irradiation field were compared to test the consistency of the measured PET signal. Finally, activation depth profiles through air/lung, air/bone and lung/bone interfaces parallel as well as at 6 degrees to the beam direction were studied to investigate the sensitivity of the PET/CT range verification method. The reproducibility and the consistency of the measured PET signal were found to be of the same order of magnitude. They determine the physical accuracy of the PET measurement to be about 1 mm. However, range discrepancies up to 2.6 mm between two measurements and range variations up to 2.6 mm within one measurement were found at the beam edge and at the edge of the field of view (FOV) of the

  1. Proton Radiography to Improve Proton Radiotherapy : Simulation Study at Different Proton Beam Energies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biegun, Aleksandra; Takatsu, Jun; van Goethem, Marc-Jan; van der Graaf, Emiel; van Beuzekom, Martin; Visser, Jan; Brandenburg, Sijtze

    To improve the quality of cancer treatment with protons, a translation of X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) images into a map of the proton stopping powers needs to be more accurate. Proton stopping powers determined from CT images have systematic uncertainties in the calculated proton range in a

  2. Proton range shift analysis on brain pseudo-CT generated from T1 and T2 MR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pileggi, Giampaolo; Speier, Christoph; Sharp, Gregory C; Izquierdo Garcia, David; Catana, Ciprian; Pursley, Jennifer; Amato, Francesco; Seco, Joao; Spadea, Maria Francesca

    2018-05-29

    In radiotherapy, MR imaging is only used because it has significantly better soft tissue contrast than CT, but it lacks electron density information needed for dose calculation. This work assesses the feasibility of using pseudo-CT (pCT) generated from T1w/T2w MR for proton treatment planning, where proton range comparisons are performed between standard CT and pCT. MR and CT data from 14 glioblastoma patients were used in this study. The pCT was generated by using conversion libraries obtained from tissue segmentation and anatomical regioning of the T1w/T2w MR. For each patient, a plan consisting of three 18 Gy beams was designed on the pCT, for a total of 42 analyzed beams. The plan was then transferred onto the CT that represented the ground truth. Range shift (RS) between pCT and CT was computed at R 80 over 10 slices. The acceptance threshold for RS was according to clinical guidelines of two institutions. A γ-index test was also performed on the total dose for each patient. Mean absolute error and bias for the pCT were 124 ± 10 and -16 ± 26 Hounsfield Units (HU), respectively. The median and interquartile range of RS was 0.5 and 1.4 mm, with highest absolute value being 4.4 mm. Of the 42 beams, 40 showed RS less than the clinical range margin. The two beams with larger RS were both in the cranio-caudal direction and had segmentation errors due to the partial volume effect, leading to misassignment of the HU. This study showed the feasibility of using T1w and T2w MRI to generate a pCT for proton therapy treatment, thus avoiding the use of a planning CT and allowing better target definition and possibilities for online adaptive therapies. Further improvements of the methodology are still required to improve the conversion from MRI intensities to HUs.

  3. Feasibility of MRI-only treatment planning for proton therapy in brain and prostate cancers: Dose calculation accuracy in substitute CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koivula, Lauri

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is increasingly used for radiotherapy target delineation, image guidance, and treatment response monitoring. Recent studies have shown that an entire external x-ray radiotherapy treatment planning (RTP) workflow for brain tumor or prostate cancer patients based only on MRI reference images is feasible. This study aims to show that a MRI-only based RTP workflow is also feasible for proton beam therapy plans generated in MRI-based substitute computed tomography (sCT) images of the head and the pelvis. Methods: The sCTs were constructed for ten prostate cancer and ten brain tumor patients primarily by transforming the intensity values of in-phase MR images to Hounsfield units (HUs) with a dual model HU conversion technique to enable heterogeneous tissue representation. HU conversion models for the pelvis were adopted from previous studies, further extended in this study also for head MRI by generating anatomical site-specific conversion models (a new training data set of ten other brain patients). This study also evaluated two other types of simplified sCT: dual bulk density (for bone and water) and homogeneous (water only). For every clinical case, intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plans robustly optimized in standard planning CTs were calculated in sCT for evaluation, and vice versa. Overall dose agreement was evaluated using dose–volume histogram parameters and 3D gamma criteria. Results: In heterogeneous sCTs, the mean absolute errors in HUs were 34 (soft tissues: 13, bones: 92) and 42 (soft tissues: 9, bones: 97) in the head and in the pelvis, respectively. The maximum absolute dose differences relative to CT in the brain tumor clinical target volume (CTV) were 1.4% for heterogeneous sCT, 1.8% for dual bulk sCT, and 8.9% for homogenous sCT. The corresponding maximum differences in the prostate CTV were 0.6%, 1.2%, and 3.6%, respectively. The percentages of dose points in the head and pelvis passing 1% and 1 mm

  4. Feasibility of MRI-only treatment planning for proton therapy in brain and prostate cancers: Dose calculation accuracy in substitute CT images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koivula, Lauri [Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Helsinki University Central Hospital, P.O. Box 180, Helsinki 00029 HUS (Finland)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is increasingly used for radiotherapy target delineation, image guidance, and treatment response monitoring. Recent studies have shown that an entire external x-ray radiotherapy treatment planning (RTP) workflow for brain tumor or prostate cancer patients based only on MRI reference images is feasible. This study aims to show that a MRI-only based RTP workflow is also feasible for proton beam therapy plans generated in MRI-based substitute computed tomography (sCT) images of the head and the pelvis. Methods: The sCTs were constructed for ten prostate cancer and ten brain tumor patients primarily by transforming the intensity values of in-phase MR images to Hounsfield units (HUs) with a dual model HU conversion technique to enable heterogeneous tissue representation. HU conversion models for the pelvis were adopted from previous studies, further extended in this study also for head MRI by generating anatomical site-specific conversion models (a new training data set of ten other brain patients). This study also evaluated two other types of simplified sCT: dual bulk density (for bone and water) and homogeneous (water only). For every clinical case, intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plans robustly optimized in standard planning CTs were calculated in sCT for evaluation, and vice versa. Overall dose agreement was evaluated using dose–volume histogram parameters and 3D gamma criteria. Results: In heterogeneous sCTs, the mean absolute errors in HUs were 34 (soft tissues: 13, bones: 92) and 42 (soft tissues: 9, bones: 97) in the head and in the pelvis, respectively. The maximum absolute dose differences relative to CT in the brain tumor clinical target volume (CTV) were 1.4% for heterogeneous sCT, 1.8% for dual bulk sCT, and 8.9% for homogenous sCT. The corresponding maximum differences in the prostate CTV were 0.6%, 1.2%, and 3.6%, respectively. The percentages of dose points in the head and pelvis passing 1% and 1 mm

  5. Ex vivo validation of a stoichiometric dual energy CT proton stopping power ratio calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yunhe; Ainsley, Christopher; Yin, Lingshu; Zou, Wei; McDonough, James; Solberg, Timothy D.; Lin, Alexander; Teo, Boon-Keng Kevin

    2018-03-01

    A major source of uncertainty in proton therapy is the conversion of Hounsfield unit (HU) to proton stopping power ratio relative to water (SPR). In this study, we measured and quantified the accuracy of a stoichiometric dual energy CT (DECT) SPR calibration. We applied a stoichiometric DECT calibration method to derive the SPR using CT images acquired sequentially at 80 kVp and 140 kVp . The dual energy index was derived based on the HUs of the paired spectral images and used to calculate the effective atomic number (Z eff), relative electron density ({{ρ }e} ), and SPRs of phantom and biological materials. Two methods were used to verify the derived SPRs. The first method measured the sample’s water equivalent thicknesses to deduce the SPRs using a multi-layer ion chamber (MLIC) device. The second method utilized Gafchromic EBT3 film to directly compare relative ranges between sample and water after proton pencil beam irradiation. Ex vivo validation was performed using five different types of frozen animal tissues with the MLIC and three types of fresh animal tissues using film. In addition, the residual ranges recorded on the film were used to compare with those from the treatment planning system using both DECT and SECT derived SPRs. Bland-Altman analysis indicates that the differences between DECT and SPR measurement of tissue surrogates, frozen and fresh animal tissues has a mean of 0.07% and standard deviation of 0.58% compared to 0.55% and 1.94% respectively for single energy CT (SECT) and SPR measurement. Our ex vivo study indicates that the stoichiometric DECT SPR calibration method has the potential to be more accurate than SECT calibration under ideal conditions although beam hardening effects and other image artifacts may increase this uncertainty.

  6. Proton dose calculation on scatter-corrected CBCT image: Feasibility study for adaptive proton therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Yang-Kyun, E-mail: ykpark@mgh.harvard.edu; Sharp, Gregory C.; Phillips, Justin; Winey, Brian A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Purpose: To demonstrate the feasibility of proton dose calculation on scatter-corrected cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) images for the purpose of adaptive proton therapy. Methods: CBCT projection images were acquired from anthropomorphic phantoms and a prostate patient using an on-board imaging system of an Elekta infinity linear accelerator. Two previously introduced techniques were used to correct the scattered x-rays in the raw projection images: uniform scatter correction (CBCT{sub us}) and a priori CT-based scatter correction (CBCT{sub ap}). CBCT images were reconstructed using a standard FDK algorithm and GPU-based reconstruction toolkit. Soft tissue ROI-based HU shifting was used to improve HU accuracy of the uncorrected CBCT images and CBCT{sub us}, while no HU change was applied to the CBCT{sub ap}. The degree of equivalence of the corrected CBCT images with respect to the reference CT image (CT{sub ref}) was evaluated by using angular profiles of water equivalent path length (WEPL) and passively scattered proton treatment plans. The CBCT{sub ap} was further evaluated in more realistic scenarios such as rectal filling and weight loss to assess the effect of mismatched prior information on the corrected images. Results: The uncorrected CBCT and CBCT{sub us} images demonstrated substantial WEPL discrepancies (7.3 ± 5.3 mm and 11.1 ± 6.6 mm, respectively) with respect to the CT{sub ref}, while the CBCT{sub ap} images showed substantially reduced WEPL errors (2.4 ± 2.0 mm). Similarly, the CBCT{sub ap}-based treatment plans demonstrated a high pass rate (96.0% ± 2.5% in 2 mm/2% criteria) in a 3D gamma analysis. Conclusions: A priori CT-based scatter correction technique was shown to be promising for adaptive proton therapy, as it achieved equivalent proton dose distributions and water equivalent path lengths compared to those of a reference CT in a selection of anthropomorphic phantoms.

  7. SU-E-T-396: Dosimetric Accuracy of Proton Therapy for Patients with Metal Implants in CT Scans Using Metal Deletion Technique (MDT) Artifacts Reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, X; Kantor, M; Zhu, X; Frank, S; Sahoo, N; Li, H

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the dosimetric accuracy for proton therapy patients with metal implants in CT using metal deletion technique (MDT) artifacts reduction. Methods: Proton dose accuracies under CT metal artifacts were first evaluated using a water phantom with cylindrical inserts of different materials (titanium and steel). Ranges and dose profiles along different beam angles were calculated using treatment planning system (Eclipse version 8.9) on uncorrected CT, MDT CT, and manually-corrected CT, where true Hounsfield units (water) were assigned to the streak artifacts. In patient studies, the treatment plans were developed on manually-corrected CTs, then recalculated on MDT and uncorrected CTs. DVH indices were compared between the dose distributions on all the CTs. Results: For water phantom study with 1/2 inch titanium insert, the proton range differences estimated by MDT CT were with 1% for all beam angles, while the range error can be up to 2.6% for uncorrected CT. For the study with 1 inch stainless steel insert, the maximum range error calculated by MDT CT was 1.09% among all the beam angles compared with maximum range error with 4.7% for uncorrected CT. The dose profiles calculated on MDT CTs for both titanium and steel inserts showed very good agreements with the ones calculated on manually-corrected CTs, while large dose discrepancies calculated using uncorrected CTs were observed in the distal end region of the proton beam. The patient study showed similar dose distribution and DVHs for organs near the metal artifacts recalculated on MDT CT compared with the ones calculated on manually-corrected CT, while the differences between uncorrected and corrected CTs were much pronounced. Conclusion: In proton therapy, large dose error could occur due to metal artifact. The MDT CT can be used for proton dose calculation to achieve similar dose accuracy as the current clinical practice using manual correction

  8. Calibration and GEANT4 Simulations of the Phase II Proton Compute Tomography (pCT) Range Stack Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uzunyan, S. A. [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States); Blazey, G. [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States); Boi, S. [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States); Coutrakon, G. [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States); Dyshkant, A. [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States); Francis, K. [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States); Hedin, D. [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States); Johnson, E. [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States); Kalnins, J. [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States); Zutshi, V. [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States); Ford, R. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Rauch, J. E. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Rubinov, P. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Sellberg, G. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Wilson, P. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Naimuddin, M. [Univ. of Delhi, New Delhi (India)

    2015-12-29

    Northern Illinois University in collaboration with Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) and Delhi University has been designing and building a proton CT scanner for applications in proton treatment planning. The Phase II proton CT scanner consists of eight planes of tracking detectors with two X and two Y coordinate measurements both before and after the patient. In addition, a range stack detector consisting of a stack of thin scintillator tiles, arranged in twelve eight-tile frames, is used to determine the water equivalent path length (WEPL) of each track through the patient. The X-Y coordinates and WEPL are required input for image reconstruction software to find the relative (proton) stopping powers (RSP) value of each voxel in the patient and generate a corresponding 3D image. In this Note we describe tests conducted in 2015 at the proton beam at the Central DuPage Hospital in Warrenville, IL, focusing on the range stack calibration procedure and comparisons with the GEANT~4 range stack simulation.

  9. Sparse-view proton computed tomography using modulated proton beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jiseoc; Kim, Changhwan; Cho, Seungryong, E-mail: scho@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Min, Byungjun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, 110–746 (Korea, Republic of); Kwak, Jungwon [Department of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, 138–736 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Seyjoon; Lee, Se Byeong [Proton Therapy Center, National Cancer Center, 410–769 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sungyong [Proton Therapy Center, McLaren Cancer Institute, Flint, Michigan 48532 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Proton imaging that uses a modulated proton beam and an intensity detector allows a relatively fast image acquisition compared to the imaging approach based on a trajectory tracking detector. In addition, it requires a relatively simple implementation in a conventional proton therapy equipment. The model of geometric straight ray assumed in conventional computed tomography (CT) image reconstruction is however challenged by multiple-Coulomb scattering and energy straggling in the proton imaging. Radiation dose to the patient is another important issue that has to be taken care of for practical applications. In this work, the authors have investigated iterative image reconstructions after a deconvolution of the sparsely view-sampled data to address these issues in proton CT. Methods: Proton projection images were acquired using the modulated proton beams and the EBT2 film as an intensity detector. Four electron-density cylinders representing normal soft tissues and bone were used as imaged object and scanned at 40 views that are equally separated over 360°. Digitized film images were converted to water-equivalent thickness by use of an empirically derived conversion curve. For improving the image quality, a deconvolution-based image deblurring with an empirically acquired point spread function was employed. They have implemented iterative image reconstruction algorithms such as adaptive steepest descent-projection onto convex sets (ASD-POCS), superiorization method–projection onto convex sets (SM-POCS), superiorization method–expectation maximization (SM-EM), and expectation maximization-total variation minimization (EM-TV). Performance of the four image reconstruction algorithms was analyzed and compared quantitatively via contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and root-mean-square-error (RMSE). Results: Objects of higher electron density have been reconstructed more accurately than those of lower density objects. The bone, for example, has been reconstructed

  10. Proton imaging apparatus for proton therapy application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sipala, V.; Lo Presti, D.; Brianzi, M.; Civinini, C.; Bruzzi, M.; Scaringella, M.; Talamonti, C.; Bucciolini, M.; Cirrone, G.A.P.; Cuttone, G.; Randazzo, N.; Stancampiano, C.; Tesi, M.

    2011-01-01

    Radiotherapy with protons, due to the physical properties of these particles, offers several advantages for cancer therapy as compared to the traditional radiotherapy and photons. In the clinical use of proton beams, a p CT (Proton Computer Tomography) apparatus can contribute to improve the accuracy of the patient positioning and dose distribution calculation. In this paper a p CT apparatus built by the Prima (Proton Imaging) Italian Collaboration will be presented and the preliminary results will be discussed.

  11. SU-F-J-201: Validation Study of Proton Radiography Against CT Data for Quantitative Imaging of Anatomical Changes in Head and Neck Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammi, A; Weber, D; Lomax, A

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: In clinical pencil-beam-scanned (PBS) proton therapy, the advantage of the characteristic sharp dose fall-off after the Bragg Peak (BP) becomes a disadvantage if the BP positions of a plan’s constituent pencil beams are shifted, eg.due to anatomical changes. Thus, for fractionated PBS proton therapy, accurate knowledge of the water equivalent path length (WEPL) of the traversed anatomy is critical. In this work we investigate the feasibility of using 2D proton range maps (proton radiography, PR) with the active-scanning gantry at PSI. Methods: We simulated our approach using Monte Carlo methods (MC) to simulate proton beam interactions in patients using clinical imaging data. We selected six head and neck cases having significant anatomical changes detected in per-treatment CTs.PRs (two at 0°/90°) were generated from MC simulations of low-dose pencil beams at 230MeV. Each beam’s residual depth-dose was propagated through the patient geometry (from CT) and detected on exiting the patient anatomy in an ideal depth-resolved detector (eg. range telescope). Firstly, to validate the technique, proton radiographs were compared to the ground truth, which was the WEPL from ray-tracing in the patient CT at the pencil beam location. Secondly, WEPL difference maps (per-treatment – planning imaging timepoints) were then generated to locate the anatomical changes, both in the CT (ground truth) and in the PRs. Binomial classification was performed to evaluate the efficacy of the technique relative to CT. Results: Over the projections simulated over all six patients, 70%, 79% and 95% of the grid points agreed with the ground truth proton range to within ±0.5%, ±1%, and ±3% respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, precision and accuracy were high (mean±1σ, 83±8%, 87±13%, 95±10%, 83±7% respectively). Conclusion: We show that proton-based radiographic images can accurately monitor patient positioning and in vivo range verification, while providing

  12. Contrast-Enhanced Proton Radiography for Patient Set-up by Using X-Ray CT Prior Knowledge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spadea, Maria Francesca, E-mail: mfspadea@unicz.it [Department of Experimental and Clinical Medicine, Magna Graecia University, Catanzaro (Italy); Fassi, Aurora [Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria, Politecnico di Milano, Milano (Italy); Zaffino, Paolo [Department of Experimental and Clinical Medicine, Magna Graecia University, Catanzaro (Italy); Riboldi, Marco; Baroni, Guido [Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria, Politecnico di Milano, Milano (Italy); Bioengineering Unit—CNAO Foundation, Pavia (Italy); Depauw, Nicolas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong (Australia); Seco, Joao [Department of Radiation Oncology, Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To obtain a contrasted image of the tumor region during the setup for proton therapy in lung patients, by using proton radiography and x-ray computed tomography (CT) prior knowledge. Methods and Materials: Six lung cancer patients' CT scans were preprocessed by masking out the gross tumor volume (GTV), and digitally reconstructed radiographs along the planned beam's eye view (BEV) were generated, for a total of 27 projections. Proton radiographies (PR) were also computed for the same BEV through Monte Carlo simulations. The digitally reconstructed radiograph was subtracted from the corresponding proton image, resulting in a contrast-enhanced proton radiography (CEPR). Michelson contrast analysis was performed both on PR and CEPR. The tumor region was then automatically segmented on CEPR and compared to the ground truth (GT) provided by physicians in terms of Dice coefficient, accuracy, precision, sensitivity, and specificity. Results: Contrast on CEPR was, on average, 4 times better than on PR. For 10 lateral projections (±45° off of 90° or 270°), although it was not possible to distinguish the tumor region in the PR, CEPR offers excellent GTV visibility. The median ± quartile values of Dice, precision, and accuracy indexes were 0.86 ± 0.03, 0.86 ± 0.06, and 0.88 ± 0.02, respectively, thus confirming the reliability of the method in highlighting tumor boundaries. Sensitivity and specificity analysis demonstrated that there is no systematic over- or underestimation of the tumor region. Identification of the tumor boundaries using CEPR resulted in a more accurate and precise definition of GTV compared to that obtained from pretreatment CT. Conclusions: In most proton centers, the current clinical protocol is to align the patient using kV imaging with bony anatomy as a reference. We demonstrated that CEPR can significantly improve tumor visualization, allowing better patient set-up and permitting image guided proton therapy (IGPT)

  13. TU-FG-BRB-01: Dual Energy CT Proton Stopping Power Ratio Calibration and Validation with Animal Tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Y; Yin, L; Ainsley, C; McDonough, J; Solberg, T; Lin, A; Teo, B [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The conversion of Hounsfield Unit (HU) to proton stopping power ratio (SPR) is a main source of uncertainty in proton therapy. In this study, the SPRs of animal tissues were measured and compared with prediction from dual energy CT (DECT) and single energy CT (SECT) calibrations. Methods: A stoichiometric calibration method for DECT was applied to predict the SPR using CT images acquired at 80 kVp and 140 kVp. The dual energy index was derived based on the HUs of the paired spectral images and used to calculate the SPRs of the materials. Tissue surrogates with known chemical compositions were used for calibration, and animal tissues (pig brain, liver, kidney; veal shank, muscle) were used for validation. The materials were irradiated with proton pencil beams, and SPRs were deduced from the residual proton range measured using a multi-layer ion chamber device. In addition, Gafchromic EBT3 films were used to measure the distal dose profiles after irradiation through the tissue samples and compared with those calculated by the treatment planning system using both DECT and SECT predicted SPRs. Results: The differences in SPR between DECT prediction and measurement were −0.31±0.36% for bone, 0.47±0.42% for brain, 0.67±0.15% for liver, 0.51±0.52% for kidney, and −0.96±0.15% for muscle. The corresponding results using SECT were 3.1±0.12%, 1.90±0.45%, −0.66±0.11%, 2.33±0.21%, and −1.70±0.17%. In the film measurements, average distances between film and calculated distal dose profiles were 0.35±0.12 mm for DECT calibration and −1.22±0.12 mm for SECT calibration for a beam with a range of 15.79 cm. Conclusion: Our study indicates that DECT is superior to SECT for proton SPR prediction and has the potential to reduce the range uncertainty to less than 2%. DECT may permit the use of tighter distal and proximal range uncertainty margins for treatment, thereby increasing the precision of proton therapy.

  14. A Simulation Study for Radiation Treatment Planning Based on the Atomic Physics of the Proton-Boron Fusion Reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sunmi; Yoon, Do-Kun; Shin, Han-Back; Jung, Joo-Young; Kim, Moo-Sub; Kim, Kyeong-Hyeon; Jang, Hong-Seok; Suh, Tae Suk [the Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    The purpose of this research is to demonstrate, based on a Monte Carlo simulation code, the procedure of radiation treatment planning for proton-boron fusion therapy (PBFT). A discrete proton beam (60 - 120 MeV) relevant to the Bragg peak was simulated using a Monte Carlo particle extended (MCNPX, Ver. 2.6.0, National Laboratory, Los Alamos NM, USA) simulation code. After computed tomography (CT) scanning of a virtual water phantom including air cavities, the acquired CT images were converted using the simulation source code. We set the boron uptake regions (BURs) in the simulated water phantom to achieve the proton-boron fusion reaction. Proton sources irradiated the BUR, in the phantom. The acquired dose maps were overlapped with the original CT image of the phantom to analyze the dose volume histogram (DVH). We successfully confirmed amplifications of the proton doses (average: 130%) at the target regions. From the DVH result for each simulation, we acquired a relatively accurate dose map for the treatment. A simulation was conducted to characterize the dose distribution and verify the feasibility of proton boron fusion therapy (PBFT). We observed a variation in proton range and developed a tumor targeting technique for treatment that was more accurate and powerful than both conventional proton therapy and boron-neutron capture therapy.

  15. PET/CT imaging for treatment verification after proton therapy: a study with plastic phantoms and metallic implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parodi, Katia; Paganetti, Harald; Cascio, Ethan; Flanz, Jacob B; Bonab, Ali A; Alpert, Nathaniel M; Lohmann, Kevin; Bortfeld, Thomas

    2007-02-01

    The feasibility of off-line positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) for routine three dimensional in-vivo treatment verification of proton radiation therapy is currently under investigation at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. In preparation for clinical trials, phantom experiments were carried out to investigate the sensitivity and accuracy of the method depending on irradiation and imaging parameters. Furthermore, they addressed the feasibility of PET/CT as a robust verification tool in the presence of metallic implants. These produce x-ray CT artifacts and fluence perturbations which may compromise the accuracy of treatment planning algorithms. Spread-out Bragg peak proton fields were delivered to different phantoms consisting of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), PMMA stacked with lung and bone equivalent materials, and PMMA with titanium rods to mimic implants in patients. PET data were acquired in list mode starting within 20 min after irradiation at a commercial luthetium-oxyorthosilicate (LSO)-based PET/CT scanner. The amount and spatial distribution of the measured activity could be well reproduced by calculations based on the GEANT4 and FLUKA Monte Carlo codes. This phantom study supports the potential of millimeter accuracy for range monitoring and lateral field position verification even after low therapeutic dose exposures of 2 Gy, despite the delay between irradiation and imaging. It also indicates the value of PET for treatment verification in the presence of metallic implants, demonstrating a higher sensitivity to fluence perturbations in comparison to a commercial analytical treatment planning system. Finally, it addresses the suitability of LSO-based PET detectors for hadron therapy monitoring. This unconventional application of PET involves countrates which are orders of magnitude lower than in diagnostic tracer imaging, i.e., the signal of interest is comparable to the noise originating from the intrinsic radioactivity of

  16. Proton computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, K.M.

    1978-01-01

    The use of protons or other heavy charged particles instead of x rays in computed tomography (CT) is explored. The results of an experimental implementation of proton CT are presented. High quality CT reconstructions are obtained at an average dose reduction factor compared with an EMI 5005 x-ray scanner of 10:1 for a 30-cm-diameter phantom and 3.5:1 for a 20-cm diameter. The spatial resolution is limited by multiple Coulomb scattering to about 3.7 mm FWHM. Further studies are planned in which proton and x-ray images of fresh human specimens will be compared. Design considerations indicate that a clinically useful proton CT scanner is eminently feasible

  17. SU-F-I-54: Spatial Resolution Studies in Proton CT Using a Phase-II Prototype Head Scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plautz, Tia E.; Johnson, R. P.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Zatserklyaniy, A. [University of California, Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); Bashkirov, V.; Hurley, R. F.; Schulte, R. W. [Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, CA (United States); Piersimoni, P. [University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Giacometti, V. [University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW (Australia)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To characterize the modulation transfer function (MTF) of the pre-clinical (phase II) head scanner developed for proton computed tomography (pCT) by the pCT collaboration. To evaluate the spatial resolution achievable by this system. Methods: Our phase II proton CT scanner prototype consists of two silicon telescopes that track individual protons upstream and downstream from a phantom, and a 5-stage scintillation detector that measures a combination of the residual energy and range of the proton. Residual energy is converted to water equivalent path length (WEPL) of the protons in the scanned object. The set of WEPL values and associated paths of protons passing through the object over a 360° angular scan is processed by an iterative parallelizable reconstruction algorithm that runs on GP-GPU hardware. A custom edge phantom composed of water-equivalent polymer and tissue-equivalent material inserts was constructed. The phantom was first simulated in Geant4 and then built to perform experimental beam tests with 200 MeV protons at the Northwestern Medicine Chicago Proton Center. The oversampling method was used to construct radial and azimuthal edge spread functions and modulation transfer functions. The spatial resolution was defined by the 10% point of the modulation transfer function in units of lp/cm. Results: The spatial resolution of the image was found to be strongly correlated with the radial position of the insert but independent of the relative stopping power of the insert. The spatial resolution varies between roughly 4 and 6 lp/cm in both the the radial and azimuthal directions depending on the radial displacement of the edge. Conclusion: The amount of image degradation due to our detector system is small compared with the effects of multiple Coulomb scattering, pixelation of the image and the reconstruction algorithm. Improvements in reconstruction will be made in order to achieve the theoretical limits of spatial resolution.

  18. Quantitative assessment of the physical potential of proton beam range verification with PET/CT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knopf, A; Parodi, K.; Paganetti, Harald; Lo Cascio, E; Bonab, A; Bortfeld, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    A recent clinical pilot study demonstrated the feasibility of offline PET/CT range verification for proton therapy treatments. In vivo PET measurements are challenged by blood perfusion, variations of tissue compositions, patient motion and image co-registration uncertainties. Besides these

  19. Material elemental decomposition in dual and multi-energy CT via a sparsity-dictionary approach for proton stopping power ratio calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chenyang; Li, Bin; Chen, Liyuan; Yang, Ming; Lou, Yifei; Jia, Xun

    2018-04-01

    Accurate calculation of proton stopping power ratio (SPR) relative to water is crucial to proton therapy treatment planning, since SPR affects prediction of beam range. Current standard practice derives SPR using a single CT scan. Recent studies showed that dual-energy CT (DECT) offers advantages to accurately determine SPR. One method to further improve accuracy is to incorporate prior knowledge on human tissue composition through a dictionary approach. In addition, it is also suggested that using CT images with multiple (more than two) energy channels, i.e., multi-energy CT (MECT), can further improve accuracy. In this paper, we proposed a sparse dictionary-based method to convert CT numbers of DECT or MECT to elemental composition (EC) and relative electron density (rED) for SPR computation. A dictionary was constructed to include materials generated based on human tissues of known compositions. For a voxel with CT numbers of different energy channels, its EC and rED are determined subject to a constraint that the resulting EC is a linear non-negative combination of only a few tissues in the dictionary. We formulated this as a non-convex optimization problem. A novel algorithm was designed to solve the problem. The proposed method has a unified structure to handle both DECT and MECT with different number of channels. We tested our method in both simulation and experimental studies. Average errors of SPR in experimental studies were 0.70% in DECT, 0.53% in MECT with three energy channels, and 0.45% in MECT with four channels. We also studied the impact of parameter values and established appropriate parameter values for our method. The proposed method can accurately calculate SPR using DECT and MECT. The results suggest that using more energy channels may improve the SPR estimation accuracy. © 2018 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  20. Microscopic Gold Particle-Based Fiducial Markers for Proton Therapy of Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Young Kyung; Kwak, Jungwon; Kim, Dong Wook; Shin, Dongho; Yoon, Myonggeun; Park, Soah; Kim, Jin Sung; Ahn, Sung Hwan; Shin, Jungwook; Lee, Se Byeong; Park, Sung Yong; Pyo, Hong Ryeol; Kim, Dae Yong M.D.; Cho, Kwan Ho

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: We examined the feasibility of using fiducial markers composed of microscopic gold particles and human-compatible polymers as a means to overcome current problems with conventional macroscopic gold fiducial markers, such as dose reduction and artifact generation, in proton therapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We examined two types of gold particle fiducial marker interactions: that with diagnostic X-rays and with a therapeutic proton beam. That is, we qualitatively and quantitatively compared the radiographic visibility of conventional gold and gold particle fiducial markers and the CT artifacts and dose reduction associated with their use. Results: The gold particle fiducials could be easily distinguished from high-density structures, such as the pelvic bone, in diagnostic X-rays but were nearly transparent to a proton beam. The proton dose distribution was distorted <5% by the gold particle fiducials with a 4.9% normalized gold density; this was the case even in the worst configuration (i.e., parallel alignment with a single-direction proton beam). In addition, CT artifacts were dramatically reduced for the gold particle mixture. Conclusion: Mixtures of microscopic gold particles and human-compatible polymers have excellent potential as fiducial markers for proton therapy for prostate cancer. These include good radiographic visibility, low distortion of the depth-dose distribution, and few CT artifacts.

  1. GEANT4 simulations for Proton computed tomography applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yevseyeva, Olga; Assis, Joaquim T. de; Evseev, Ivan; Schelin, Hugo R.; Shtejer Diaz, Katherin; Lopes, Ricardo T.

    2011-01-01

    Proton radiation therapy is a highly precise form of cancer treatment. In existing proton treatment centers, dose calculations are performed based on X-ray computed tomography (CT). Alternatively, one could image the tumor directly with proton CT (pCT). Proton beams in medical applications deal with relatively thick targets like the human head or trunk. Thus, the fidelity of proton computed tomography (pCT) simulations as a tool for proton therapy planning depends in the general case on the accuracy of results obtained for the proton interaction with thick absorbers. GEANT4 simulations of proton energy spectra after passing thick absorbers do not agree well with existing experimental data, as showed previously. The spectra simulated for the Bethe-Bloch domain showed an unexpected sensitivity to the choice of low-energy electromagnetic models during the code execution. These observations were done with the GEANT4 version 8.2 during our simulations for pCT. This work describes in more details the simulations of the proton passage through gold absorbers with varied thickness. The simulations were done by modifying only the geometry in the Hadron therapy Example, and for all available choices of the Electromagnetic Physics Models. As the most probable reasons for these effects is some specific feature in the code or some specific implicit parameters in the GEANT4 manual, we continued our study with version 9.2 of the code. Some improvements in comparison with our previous results were obtained. The simulations were performed considering further applications for pCT development. The authors want to thank CNPq, CAPES and 'Fundacao Araucaria' for financial support of this work. (Author)

  2. The measurement of proton stopping power using proton-cone-beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zygmanski, P.; Rabin, M.S.Z.; Gall, K.P.; Rosenthal, S.J.

    2000-01-01

    A cone-beam computed tomography (CT) system utilizing a proton beam has been developed and tested. The cone beam is produced by scattering a 160 MeV proton beam with a modifier that results in a signal in the detector system, which decreases monotonically with depth in the medium. The detector system consists of a Gd 2 O 2 S:Tb intensifying screen viewed by a cooled CCD camera. The Feldkamp-Davis-Kress cone-beam reconstruction algorithm is applied to the projection data to obtain the CT voxel data representing proton stopping power. The system described is capable of reconstructing data over a 16x16x16cm 3 volume into 512x512x512 voxels. A spatial and contrast resolution phantom was scanned to determine the performance of the system. Spatial resolution is significantly degraded by multiple Coulomb scattering effects. Comparison of the reconstructed proton CT values with x-ray CT derived proton stopping powers shows that there may be some advantage to obtaining stopping powers directly with proton CT. The system described suggests a possible practical method of obtaining this measurement in vivo. (author)

  3. The Monte Carlo SRNA-VOX code for 3D proton dose distribution in voxelized geometry using CT data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilic, Radovan D; Spasic-Jokic, Vesna; Belicev, Petar; Dragovic, Milos

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the application of the SRNA Monte Carlo package for proton transport simulations in complex geometry and different material compositions. The SRNA package was developed for 3D dose distribution calculation in proton therapy and dosimetry and it was based on the theory of multiple scattering. The decay of proton induced compound nuclei was simulated by the Russian MSDM model and our own using ICRU 63 data. The developed package consists of two codes: the SRNA-2KG, which simulates proton transport in combinatorial geometry and the SRNA-VOX, which uses the voxelized geometry using the CT data and conversion of the Hounsfield's data to tissue elemental composition. Transition probabilities for both codes are prepared by the SRNADAT code. The simulation of the proton beam characterization by multi-layer Faraday cup, spatial distribution of positron emitters obtained by the SRNA-2KG code and intercomparison of computational codes in radiation dosimetry, indicate immediate application of the Monte Carlo techniques in clinical practice. In this paper, we briefly present the physical model implemented in the SRNA package, the ISTAR proton dose planning software, as well as the results of the numerical experiments with proton beams to obtain 3D dose distribution in the eye and breast tumour

  4. SU-F-J-199: Predictive Models for Cone Beam CT-Based Online Verification of Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, L; Lin, A; Ahn, P; Solberg, T; McDonough, J; Teo, B [The Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Janssens, G [IBA, Louvain-la-neuve (Belgium)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To utilize online CBCT scans to develop models for predicting DVH metrics in proton therapy of head and neck tumors. Methods: Nine patients with locally advanced oropharyngeal cancer were retrospectively selected in this study. Deformable image registration was applied to the simulation CT, target volumes, and organs at risk (OARs) contours onto each weekly CBCT scan. Intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) treatment plans were created on the simulation CT and forward calculated onto each corrected CBCT scan. Thirty six potentially predictive metrics were extracted from each corrected CBCT. These features include minimum/maximum/mean over and under-ranges at the proximal and distal surface of PTV volumes, and geometrical and water equivalent distance between PTV and each OARs. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to reduce the dimension of the extracted features. Three principal components were found to account for over 90% of variances in those features. Datasets from eight patients were used to train a machine learning model to fit these principal components with DVH metrics (dose to 95% and 5% of PTV, mean dose or max dose to OARs) from the forward calculated dose on each corrected CBCT. The accuracy of this model was verified on the datasets from the 9th patient. Results: The predicted changes of DVH metrics from the model were in good agreement with actual values calculated on corrected CBCT images. Median differences were within 1 Gy for most DVH metrics except for larynx and constrictor mean dose. However, a large spread of the differences was observed, indicating additional training datasets and predictive features are needed to improve the model. Conclusion: Intensity corrected CBCT scans hold the potential to be used for online verification of proton therapy and prediction of delivered dose distributions.

  5. CMOS Active Pixel Sensors as energy-range detectors for proton Computed Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esposito, M.; Waltham, C.; Allinson, N.M.; Anaxagoras, T.; Evans, P.M.; Poludniowski, G.; Green, S.; Parker, D.J.; Price, T.; Manolopoulos, S.; Nieto-Camero, J.

    2015-01-01

    Since the first proof of concept in the early 70s, a number of technologies has been proposed to perform proton CT (pCT), as a means of mapping tissue stopping power for accurate treatment planning in proton therapy. Previous prototypes of energy-range detectors for pCT have been mainly based on the use of scintillator-based calorimeters, to measure proton residual energy after passing through the patient. However, such an approach is limited by the need for only a single proton passing through the energy-range detector in a read-out cycle. A novel approach to this problem could be the use of pixelated detectors, where the independent read-out of each pixel allows to measure simultaneously the residual energy of a number of protons in the same read-out cycle, facilitating a faster and more efficient pCT scan. This paper investigates the suitability of CMOS Active Pixel Sensors (APSs) to track individual protons as they go through a number of CMOS layers, forming an energy-range telescope. Measurements performed at the iThemba Laboratories will be presented and analysed in terms of correlation, to confirm capability of proton tracking for CMOS APSs

  6. CMOS Active Pixel Sensors as energy-range detectors for proton Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, M; Anaxagoras, T; Evans, P M; Green, S; Manolopoulos, S; Nieto-Camero, J; Parker, D J; Poludniowski, G; Price, T; Waltham, C; Allinson, N M

    2015-06-03

    Since the first proof of concept in the early 70s, a number of technologies has been proposed to perform proton CT (pCT), as a means of mapping tissue stopping power for accurate treatment planning in proton therapy. Previous prototypes of energy-range detectors for pCT have been mainly based on the use of scintillator-based calorimeters, to measure proton residual energy after passing through the patient. However, such an approach is limited by the need for only a single proton passing through the energy-range detector in a read-out cycle. A novel approach to this problem could be the use of pixelated detectors, where the independent read-out of each pixel allows to measure simultaneously the residual energy of a number of protons in the same read-out cycle, facilitating a faster and more efficient pCT scan. This paper investigates the suitability of CMOS Active Pixel Sensors (APSs) to track individual protons as they go through a number of CMOS layers, forming an energy-range telescope. Measurements performed at the iThemba Laboratories will be presented and analysed in terms of correlation, to confirm capability of proton tracking for CMOS APSs.

  7. A robotic C-arm cone beam CT system for image-guided proton therapy: design and performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Chiaho; Yao, Weiguang; Kidani, Takao; Tomida, Kazuo; Ozawa, Saori; Nishimura, Takenori; Fujisawa, Tatsuya; Shinagawa, Ryousuke; Merchant, Thomas E

    2017-11-01

    A ceiling-mounted robotic C-arm cone beam CT (CBCT) system was developed for use with a 190° proton gantry system and a 6-degree-of-freedom robotic patient positioner. We report on the mechanical design, system accuracy, image quality, image guidance accuracy, imaging dose, workflow, safety and collision-avoidance. The robotic CBCT system couples a rotating C-ring to the C-arm concentrically with a kV X-ray tube and a flat-panel imager mounted to the C-ring. CBCT images are acquired with flex correction and maximally 360° rotation for a 53 cm field of view. The system was designed for clinical use with three imaging locations. Anthropomorphic phantoms were imaged to evaluate the image guidance accuracy. The position accuracy and repeatability of the robotic C-arm was high (robotic CBCT system provides high-accuracy volumetric image guidance for proton therapy. Advances in knowledge: Ceiling-mounted robotic CBCT provides a viable option than CT on-rails for partial gantry and fixed-beam proton systems with the added advantage of acquiring images at the treatment isocentre.

  8. TU-FG-BRB-02: The Impact of Using Dual-Energy CT for Determining Proton Stopping Powers: Comparison Between Theory and Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baer, E; Jee, K [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Zhang, R; Yang, K; Sharp, G; Liu, B [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Lalonde, A [University of Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada); Royle, G [University College London, London, London (United Kingdom); Bouchard, H [Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada); Lu, H [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical performance of dual-energy CT (DECT) in determining proton stopping power ratios (SPR) and demonstrate advantages over conventional single-energy CT (SECT). Methods: SECT and DECT scans of tissue-equivalent plastics as well as animal meat samples are performed with a Siemens SOMATOM Definition Flash. The methods of Schneider et al. (1996) and Bourque et al. (2014) are used to determine proton SPR on SECT and DECT images, respectively. Waterequivalent path length (WEPL) measurements of plastics and tissue samples are performed with a 195 MeV proton beam. WEPL values are determined experimentally using the depth-dose shift and dose extinction methods. Results: Comparison between CT-based and experimental WEPL is performed for 12 tissue-equivalent plastic as well as 6 meat boxes containing animal liver, kidney, heart, stomach, muscle and bones. For plastic materials, results show a systematic improvement in determining SPR with DECT, with a mean absolute error of 0.4% compared to 1.7% for SECT. For the meat samples, preliminary results show the ability for DECT to determine WEPL with a mean absolute value of 1.1% over all meat boxes. Conclusion: This work demonstrates the potential in using DECT for determining proton SPR with plastic materials in a clinical context. Further work is required to show the benefits of DECT for tissue samples. While experimental uncertainties could be a limiting factor to show the benefits of DECT over SECT for the meat samples, further work is required to adapt the DECT formalism in the context of clinical use, where noise and artifacts play an important role.

  9. TU-FG-BRB-02: The Impact of Using Dual-Energy CT for Determining Proton Stopping Powers: Comparison Between Theory and Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baer, E; Jee, K; Zhang, R; Yang, K; Sharp, G; Liu, B; Lalonde, A; Royle, G; Bouchard, H; Lu, H

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical performance of dual-energy CT (DECT) in determining proton stopping power ratios (SPR) and demonstrate advantages over conventional single-energy CT (SECT). Methods: SECT and DECT scans of tissue-equivalent plastics as well as animal meat samples are performed with a Siemens SOMATOM Definition Flash. The methods of Schneider et al. (1996) and Bourque et al. (2014) are used to determine proton SPR on SECT and DECT images, respectively. Waterequivalent path length (WEPL) measurements of plastics and tissue samples are performed with a 195 MeV proton beam. WEPL values are determined experimentally using the depth-dose shift and dose extinction methods. Results: Comparison between CT-based and experimental WEPL is performed for 12 tissue-equivalent plastic as well as 6 meat boxes containing animal liver, kidney, heart, stomach, muscle and bones. For plastic materials, results show a systematic improvement in determining SPR with DECT, with a mean absolute error of 0.4% compared to 1.7% for SECT. For the meat samples, preliminary results show the ability for DECT to determine WEPL with a mean absolute value of 1.1% over all meat boxes. Conclusion: This work demonstrates the potential in using DECT for determining proton SPR with plastic materials in a clinical context. Further work is required to show the benefits of DECT for tissue samples. While experimental uncertainties could be a limiting factor to show the benefits of DECT over SECT for the meat samples, further work is required to adapt the DECT formalism in the context of clinical use, where noise and artifacts play an important role.

  10. Current and future applications of protons in medical imaging and treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulte, Reinhard W. [Loma Linda University Medical Center, CA (United States). Dept. of Radiation Medicine

    2011-07-01

    Protons have a more than 50-year history of applications in medical therapy and more recently also in imaging. Therapy with protons became possible after proton accelerators capable of accelerating protons to energies higher than 150 MeV had been built during the 1940s in a few places around the world. Proton radiography experiments started at the Harvard Cyclotron in the early 1960s. Physicist Allan Cormack, who shared the Nobel Prize for laying the foundation of computed tomography together with Sir Godfrey Hounsfield in 1979, suggested that protons can be used for tomographic imaging for the first time in 1963. Proton CT requires a rotating proton gantry, which did not become available until 1991, at our institution. The interest in proton CT has been renewed due to the fact that exact proton treatment planning is only possible with accurate knowledge of the relative proton stopping power distribution (with respect to water) of the patient, which is best derived by using protons for imaging. Early attempts to do proton CT were hampered by the lack of high-resolution particle trackers, fast data acquisition electronics, and sufficient computing power. Also, efficient proton CT reconstruction algorithms had to be developed that can handle reconstruction based on a large number of proton histories, taking into account the non-straight probabilistic paths of multiply scattered protons. Most of these challenges have been or are about to be solved with the help of high-energy and particle physicists, computer science engineers, and applied mathematicians. In this talk, I will give an update on the development of proton CT for applications in proton therapy. This is an update from a talk I gave at the Annual Brazilian Physics Meeting in 2001, when I first suggested that physicists should contribute to the development of modern proton CT. Brazilian physicists have provided many valuable ideas and discussions for this exciting development. (author)

  11. Current and future applications of protons in medical imaging and treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulte, Reinhard W.

    2011-01-01

    Protons have a more than 50-year history of applications in medical therapy and more recently also in imaging. Therapy with protons became possible after proton accelerators capable of accelerating protons to energies higher than 150 MeV had been built during the 1940s in a few places around the world. Proton radiography experiments started at the Harvard Cyclotron in the early 1960s. Physicist Allan Cormack, who shared the Nobel Prize for laying the foundation of computed tomography together with Sir Godfrey Hounsfield in 1979, suggested that protons can be used for tomographic imaging for the first time in 1963. Proton CT requires a rotating proton gantry, which did not become available until 1991, at our institution. The interest in proton CT has been renewed due to the fact that exact proton treatment planning is only possible with accurate knowledge of the relative proton stopping power distribution (with respect to water) of the patient, which is best derived by using protons for imaging. Early attempts to do proton CT were hampered by the lack of high-resolution particle trackers, fast data acquisition electronics, and sufficient computing power. Also, efficient proton CT reconstruction algorithms had to be developed that can handle reconstruction based on a large number of proton histories, taking into account the non-straight probabilistic paths of multiply scattered protons. Most of these challenges have been or are about to be solved with the help of high-energy and particle physicists, computer science engineers, and applied mathematicians. In this talk, I will give an update on the development of proton CT for applications in proton therapy. This is an update from a talk I gave at the Annual Brazilian Physics Meeting in 2001, when I first suggested that physicists should contribute to the development of modern proton CT. Brazilian physicists have provided many valuable ideas and discussions for this exciting development. (author)

  12. SU-E-T-391: Evaluation of Image Parameters Impact On the CT Calibration Curve for Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Z; Reyhan, M; Huang, Q; Zhang, M; Yue, N; Chen, T [Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The calibration of the Hounsfield units (HU) to relative proton stopping powers (RSP) is a crucial component in assuring the accurate delivery of proton therapy dose distributions to patients. The purpose of this work is to assess the uncertainty of CT calibration considering the impact of CT slice thickness, position of the plug within the phantom and phantom sizes. Methods: Stoichiometric calibration method was employed to develop the CT calibration curve. Gammex 467 tissue characterization phantom was scanned in Tomotherapy Cheese phantom and Gammex 451 phantom by using a GE CT scanner. Each plug was individually inserted into the same position of inner and outer ring of phantoms at each time, respectively. 1.25 mm and 2.5 mm slice thickness were used. Other parameters were same. Results: HU of selected human tissues were calculated based on fitted coefficient (Kph, Kcoh and KKN), and RSP were calculated according to the Bethe-Bloch equation. The calibration curve was obtained by fitting cheese phantom data with 1.25 mm thickness. There is no significant difference if the slice thickness, phantom size, position of plug changed in soft tissue. For boney structure, RSP increases up to 1% if the phantom size and the position of plug changed but keep the slice thickness the same. However, if the slice thickness varied from the one in the calibration curve, 0.5%–3% deviation would be expected depending on the plug position. The Inner position shows the obvious deviation (averagely about 2.5%). Conclusion: RSP shows a clinical insignificant deviation in soft tissue region. Special attention may be required when using a different slice thickness from the calibration curve for boney structure. It is clinically practical to address 3% deviation due to different thickness in the definition of clinical margins.

  13. Proton MRI in the evaluation of pulmonary sarcoidosis: Comparison to chest CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Jonathan H.; Little, Brent P.; Forssen, Anna V.; Yong, Jin; Nambu, Atsushi; Kazlouski, Demitry; Puderbach, Michael; Biederer, Juergen; Lynch, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility of proton MRI of the lung in sarcoidosis patients and the agreement between the imaging appearance of pulmonary sarcoidosis on MRI and CT. Materials and methods: Chest CT scans and dedicated pulmonary MRI scans (including HASTE, VIBE, and TrueFISP sequences) were performed within 90 days of each other in 29 patients. The scans were scored for gross parenchymal opacification, reticulation, nodules, and masses using a 3-point lobar scale. Total and subset scores for corresponding MRI and CT scans were compared using the Spearman correlation test, Bland–Altman plots, and Cohen's quadratic-weighted kappa analysis. MRI scores were compared to CT by lobe and disease category, using percentage agreement, Spearman rank correlation, and Cohen's quadratic-weighted kappa. Results: The mean (±s.d.) time between MRI and CT scans was 33 ± 32 days. There was substantial correlation and agreement between total disease scoring on MRI and CT with a Spearman correlation coefficient of 0.774 (p < 0.0001) and a Cohen's weighted kappa score of 0.646. Correlation and agreement were highest for gross parenchymal opacification (0.695, 0.528) and reticulation (0.609, 0.445), and lowest in the setting of nodules (0.501, 0.305). Agreement testing was not performed for mass scores due to low prevalence. Upper lobe scoring on MRI and CT demonstrated greater agreement compared to the lower lobes (average difference in Cohen's weighted kappa score of 0.112). Conclusion: There is substantial correlation and agreement between MRI and CT in the scoring of pulmonary sarcoidosis, though MRI evaluation in the upper lobes may be more accurate than in the lower lobes

  14. Focused radiation hepatitis after Bragg-peak proton therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma: CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okumura, Toshiyuki; Itai, Yuji; Tsuji, Hiroshi

    1994-01-01

    Radiation hepatitis is clearly demonstrated by noncontrast and contrast enhanced CT following radiotherapy for liver diseases. Radiation hepatitis is dependent on dose distribution and is usually demonstrated as nonsegmental bandlike lesion after photon therapy. We report a case of focused, oval-shaped radiation hepatitis that was induced by photon therapy. The attenuation difference was localized in a high-dose area caused by Bragg-peak proton therapy. 17 refs., 2 figs

  15. Combined influence of CT random noise and HU-RSP calibration curve nonlinearities on proton range systematic errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brousmiche, S.; Souris, K.; Orban de Xivry, J.; Lee, J. A.; Macq, B.; Seco, J.

    2017-11-01

    Proton range random and systematic uncertainties are the major factors undermining the advantages of proton therapy, namely, a sharp dose falloff and a better dose conformality for lower doses in normal tissues. The influence of CT artifacts such as beam hardening or scatter can easily be understood and estimated due to their large-scale effects on the CT image, like cupping and streaks. In comparison, the effects of weakly-correlated stochastic noise are more insidious and less attention is drawn on them partly due to the common belief that they only contribute to proton range uncertainties and not to systematic errors thanks to some averaging effects. A new source of systematic errors on the range and relative stopping powers (RSP) has been highlighted and proved not to be negligible compared to the 3.5% uncertainty reference value used for safety margin design. Hence, we demonstrate that the angular points in the HU-to-RSP calibration curve are an intrinsic source of proton range systematic error for typical levels of zero-mean stochastic CT noise. Systematic errors on RSP of up to 1% have been computed for these levels. We also show that the range uncertainty does not generally vary linearly with the noise standard deviation. We define a noise-dependent effective calibration curve that better describes, for a given material, the RSP value that is actually used. The statistics of the RSP and the range continuous slowing down approximation (CSDA) have been analytically derived for the general case of a calibration curve obtained by the stoichiometric calibration procedure. These models have been validated against actual CSDA simulations for homogeneous and heterogeneous synthetical objects as well as on actual patient CTs for prostate and head-and-neck treatment planning situations.

  16. Improved proton computed tomography by dual modality image reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, David C., E-mail: dch@ki.au.dk; Bassler, Niels [Experimental Clinical Oncology, Aarhus University, 8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Petersen, Jørgen Breede Baltzer [Medical Physics, Aarhus University Hospital, 8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Sørensen, Thomas Sangild [Computer Science, Aarhus University, 8000 Aarhus C, Denmark and Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University, 8200 Aarhus N (Denmark)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: Proton computed tomography (CT) is a promising image modality for improving the stopping power estimates and dose calculations for particle therapy. However, the finite range of about 33 cm of water of most commercial proton therapy systems limits the sites that can be scanned from a full 360° rotation. In this paper the authors propose a method to overcome the problem using a dual modality reconstruction (DMR) combining the proton data with a cone-beam x-ray prior. Methods: A Catphan 600 phantom was scanned using a cone beam x-ray CT scanner. A digital replica of the phantom was created in the Monte Carlo code Geant4 and a 360° proton CT scan was simulated, storing the entrance and exit position and momentum vector of every proton. Proton CT images were reconstructed using a varying number of angles from the scan. The proton CT images were reconstructed using a constrained nonlinear conjugate gradient algorithm, minimizing total variation and the x-ray CT prior while remaining consistent with the proton projection data. The proton histories were reconstructed along curved cubic-spline paths. Results: The spatial resolution of the cone beam CT prior was retained for the fully sampled case and the 90° interval case, with the MTF = 0.5 (modulation transfer function) ranging from 5.22 to 5.65 linepairs/cm. In the 45° interval case, the MTF = 0.5 dropped to 3.91 linepairs/cm For the fully sampled DMR, the maximal root mean square (RMS) error was 0.006 in units of relative stopping power. For the limited angle cases the maximal RMS error was 0.18, an almost five-fold improvement over the cone beam CT estimate. Conclusions: Dual modality reconstruction yields the high spatial resolution of cone beam x-ray CT while maintaining the improved stopping power estimation of proton CT. In the case of limited angles, the use of prior image proton CT greatly improves the resolution and stopping power estimate, but does not fully achieve the quality of a 360

  17. Improved proton computed tomography by dual modality image reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, David C.; Bassler, Niels; Petersen, Jørgen Breede Baltzer; Sørensen, Thomas Sangild

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Proton computed tomography (CT) is a promising image modality for improving the stopping power estimates and dose calculations for particle therapy. However, the finite range of about 33 cm of water of most commercial proton therapy systems limits the sites that can be scanned from a full 360° rotation. In this paper the authors propose a method to overcome the problem using a dual modality reconstruction (DMR) combining the proton data with a cone-beam x-ray prior. Methods: A Catphan 600 phantom was scanned using a cone beam x-ray CT scanner. A digital replica of the phantom was created in the Monte Carlo code Geant4 and a 360° proton CT scan was simulated, storing the entrance and exit position and momentum vector of every proton. Proton CT images were reconstructed using a varying number of angles from the scan. The proton CT images were reconstructed using a constrained nonlinear conjugate gradient algorithm, minimizing total variation and the x-ray CT prior while remaining consistent with the proton projection data. The proton histories were reconstructed along curved cubic-spline paths. Results: The spatial resolution of the cone beam CT prior was retained for the fully sampled case and the 90° interval case, with the MTF = 0.5 (modulation transfer function) ranging from 5.22 to 5.65 linepairs/cm. In the 45° interval case, the MTF = 0.5 dropped to 3.91 linepairs/cm For the fully sampled DMR, the maximal root mean square (RMS) error was 0.006 in units of relative stopping power. For the limited angle cases the maximal RMS error was 0.18, an almost five-fold improvement over the cone beam CT estimate. Conclusions: Dual modality reconstruction yields the high spatial resolution of cone beam x-ray CT while maintaining the improved stopping power estimation of proton CT. In the case of limited angles, the use of prior image proton CT greatly improves the resolution and stopping power estimate, but does not fully achieve the quality of a 360

  18. Application of fluence field modulation to proton computed tomography for proton therapy imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedes, G; De Angelis, L; Rit, S; Hansen, D; Belka, C; Bashkirov, V; Johnson, R P; Coutrakon, G; Schubert, K E; Schulte, R W; Parodi, K; Landry, G

    2017-07-12

    This simulation study presents the application of fluence field modulated computed tomography, initially developed for x-ray CT, to proton computed tomography (pCT). By using pencil beam (PB) scanning, fluence modulated pCT (FMpCT) may achieve variable image quality in a pCT image and imaging dose reduction. Three virtual phantoms, a uniform cylinder and two patients, were studied using Monte Carlo simulations of an ideal list-mode pCT scanner. Regions of interest (ROI) were selected for high image quality and only PBs intercepting them preserved full fluence (FF). Image quality was investigated in terms of accuracy (mean) and noise (standard deviation) of the reconstructed proton relative stopping power compared to reference values. Dose calculation accuracy on FMpCT images was evaluated in terms of dose volume histograms (DVH), range difference (RD) for beam-eye-view (BEV) dose profiles and gamma evaluation. Pseudo FMpCT scans were created from broad beam experimental data acquired with a list-mode pCT prototype. FMpCT noise in ROIs was equivalent to FF images and accuracy better than  -1.3%(-0.7%) by using 1% of FF for the cylinder (patients). Integral imaging dose reduction of 37% and 56% was achieved for the two patients for that level of modulation. Corresponding DVHs from proton dose calculation on FMpCT images agreed to those from reference images and 96% of BEV profiles had RD below 2 mm, compared to only 1% for uniform 1% of FF. Gamma pass rates (2%, 2 mm) were 98% for FMpCT while for uniform 1% of FF they were as low as 59%. Applying FMpCT to preliminary experimental data showed that low noise levels and accuracy could be preserved in a ROI, down to 30% modulation. We have shown, using both virtual and experimental pCT scans, that FMpCT is potentially feasible and may allow a means of imaging dose reduction for a pCT scanner operating in PB scanning mode. This may be of particular importance to proton therapy given the low integral dose found

  19. PET/CT-guided treatment planning for paediatric cancer patients: a simulation study of proton and conventional photon therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodin, N P; Björk-Eriksson, T; Birk Christensen, C; Kiil-Berthelsen, A; Aznar, M C; Hollensen, C; Markova, E; Munck af Rosenschöld, P

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the impact of including fluorine-18 fludeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) scanning in the planning of paediatric radiotherapy (RT). Methods: Target volumes were first delineated without and subsequently re-delineated with access to 18F-FDG PET scan information, on duplicate CT sets. RT plans were generated for three-dimensional conformal photon RT (3DCRT) and intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT). The results were evaluated by comparison of target volumes, target dose coverage parameters, normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) and estimated risk of secondary cancer (SC). Results: Considerable deviations between CT- and PET/CT-guided target volumes were seen in 3 out of the 11 patients studied. However, averaging over the whole cohort, CT or PET/CT guidance introduced no significant difference in the shape or size of the target volumes, target dose coverage, irradiated volumes, estimated NTCP or SC risk, neither for IMPT nor 3DCRT. Conclusion: Our results imply that the inclusion of PET/CT scans in the RT planning process could have considerable impact for individual patients. There were no general trends of increasing or decreasing irradiated volumes, suggesting that the long-term morbidity of RT in childhood would on average remain largely unaffected. Advances in knowledge: 18F-FDG PET-based RT planning does not systematically change NTCP or SC risk for paediatric cancer patients compared with CT only. 3 out of 11 patients had a distinct change of target volumes when PET-guided planning was introduced. Dice and mismatch metrics are not sufficient to assess the consequences of target volume differences in the context of RT. PMID:25494657

  20. SU-E-J-222: Feasibility Study of MRI-Only Proton Therapy Planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spadea, M; Izquierdo, D; Catana, C; Collins-Fekete, C; Bortfeld, T; Seco, J

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the dosimetric equivalence of MRI based proton planning vs. single energy x-ray CT. Methods: 8 glioblastoma patients were imaged with CT and MRI after surgical resection. T1-weighted 3DMPRAGE was used to delineate the GTV, which was subsequently rigidly registered to the CT volume. A pseudoCT was generated from the aligned MRI by combining segmentation and atlas-based approaches. The spatial resolution both for pseudo- and real CT was 0.6×0.6×2.5mm. Three orthogonal proton beams were simulated on the pseudoCT. Two co-planar beams were set on the axial plane. The third one was planned parallel to the cranio-caudal (CC) direction. Each beam was set to cover the GTV at 98% of the nominal dose (18Gy). The proton plan was copied and transferred to the real CT, including aperture/compensator geometry. Dose comparison between pseudoCT and CT plan was performed beam-by-beam by quantifying the range shift of dose profile on each slice of the GTV. The GTV’s V 98 was computed for the CT. Results: For beams in axial plane the median absolute value of the range shift was 0.3mm, with 0.9mm and 1.4mm as 95th percentile and maximum, respectively. Worst scenarios were found for the CC beam, where we measured 1.1mm (median), 2.7mm (95thpercentile) and 5mm (maximum). Regardless the direction, beams passing through the surgical site, where metal (Titanium MRI-compatible) staples were present, were mostly affected by range shift. GTV’s V 98 for CT was not lower than 99.3%. Conclusion: The study showed the clinical feasibility of an MRI-alone proton plan. Advantages include the possibility to rely on better soft tissue contrast for target and organs at risk delineation without the need of further CT scan and image registration. Additional investigation is required in presence of metal implants along the beam path and to account for partial volume effects due to slice thickness

  1. Reduced Calibration Curve for Proton Computed Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yevseyeva, Olga; Assis, Joaquim de; Evseev, Ivan; Schelin, Hugo; Paschuk, Sergei; Milhoretto, Edney; Setti, Joao; Diaz, Katherin; Hormaza, Joel; Lopes, Ricardo

    2010-01-01

    The pCT deals with relatively thick targets like the human head or trunk. Thus, the fidelity of pCT as a tool for proton therapy planning depends on the accuracy of physical formulas used for proton interaction with thick absorbers. Although the actual overall accuracy of the proton stopping power in the Bethe-Bloch domain is about 1%, the analytical calculations and the Monte Carlo simulations with codes like TRIM/SRIM, MCNPX and GEANT4 do not agreed with each other. A tentative to validate the codes against experimental data for thick absorbers bring some difficulties: only a few data is available and the existing data sets have been acquired at different initial proton energies, and for different absorber materials. In this work we compare the results of our Monte Carlo simulations with existing experimental data in terms of reduced calibration curve, i.e. the range - energy dependence normalized on the range scale by the full projected CSDA range for given initial proton energy in a given material, taken from the NIST PSTAR database, and on the final proton energy scale - by the given initial energy of protons. This approach is almost energy and material independent. The results of our analysis are important for pCT development because the contradictions observed at arbitrary low initial proton energies could be easily scaled now to typical pCT energies.

  2. A GPU-accelerated and Monte Carlo-based intensity modulated proton therapy optimization system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Jiasen, E-mail: ma.jiasen@mayo.edu; Beltran, Chris; Seum Wan Chan Tseung, Hok; Herman, Michael G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Division of Medical Physics, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street Southwest, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: Conventional spot scanning intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) treatment planning systems (TPSs) optimize proton spot weights based on analytical dose calculations. These analytical dose calculations have been shown to have severe limitations in heterogeneous materials. Monte Carlo (MC) methods do not have these limitations; however, MC-based systems have been of limited clinical use due to the large number of beam spots in IMPT and the extremely long calculation time of traditional MC techniques. In this work, the authors present a clinically applicable IMPT TPS that utilizes a very fast MC calculation. Methods: An in-house graphics processing unit (GPU)-based MC dose calculation engine was employed to generate the dose influence map for each proton spot. With the MC generated influence map, a modified least-squares optimization method was used to achieve the desired dose volume histograms (DVHs). The intrinsic CT image resolution was adopted for voxelization in simulation and optimization to preserve spatial resolution. The optimizations were computed on a multi-GPU framework to mitigate the memory limitation issues for the large dose influence maps that resulted from maintaining the intrinsic CT resolution. The effects of tail cutoff and starting condition were studied and minimized in this work. Results: For relatively large and complex three-field head and neck cases, i.e., >100 000 spots with a target volume of ∼1000 cm{sup 3} and multiple surrounding critical structures, the optimization together with the initial MC dose influence map calculation was done in a clinically viable time frame (less than 30 min) on a GPU cluster consisting of 24 Nvidia GeForce GTX Titan cards. The in-house MC TPS plans were comparable to a commercial TPS plans based on DVH comparisons. Conclusions: A MC-based treatment planning system was developed. The treatment planning can be performed in a clinically viable time frame on a hardware system costing around 45

  3. A GPU-accelerated and Monte Carlo-based intensity modulated proton therapy optimization system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jiasen; Beltran, Chris; Seum Wan Chan Tseung, Hok; Herman, Michael G

    2014-12-01

    Conventional spot scanning intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) treatment planning systems (TPSs) optimize proton spot weights based on analytical dose calculations. These analytical dose calculations have been shown to have severe limitations in heterogeneous materials. Monte Carlo (MC) methods do not have these limitations; however, MC-based systems have been of limited clinical use due to the large number of beam spots in IMPT and the extremely long calculation time of traditional MC techniques. In this work, the authors present a clinically applicable IMPT TPS that utilizes a very fast MC calculation. An in-house graphics processing unit (GPU)-based MC dose calculation engine was employed to generate the dose influence map for each proton spot. With the MC generated influence map, a modified least-squares optimization method was used to achieve the desired dose volume histograms (DVHs). The intrinsic CT image resolution was adopted for voxelization in simulation and optimization to preserve spatial resolution. The optimizations were computed on a multi-GPU framework to mitigate the memory limitation issues for the large dose influence maps that resulted from maintaining the intrinsic CT resolution. The effects of tail cutoff and starting condition were studied and minimized in this work. For relatively large and complex three-field head and neck cases, i.e., >100,000 spots with a target volume of ∼ 1000 cm(3) and multiple surrounding critical structures, the optimization together with the initial MC dose influence map calculation was done in a clinically viable time frame (less than 30 min) on a GPU cluster consisting of 24 Nvidia GeForce GTX Titan cards. The in-house MC TPS plans were comparable to a commercial TPS plans based on DVH comparisons. A MC-based treatment planning system was developed. The treatment planning can be performed in a clinically viable time frame on a hardware system costing around 45,000 dollars. The fast calculation and

  4. Bragg peak prediction from quantitative proton computed tomography using different path estimates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Dongxu; Mackie, T Rockwell; Tome, Wolfgang A

    2011-01-01

    This paper characterizes the performance of the straight-line path (SLP) and cubic spline path (CSP) as path estimates used in reconstruction of proton computed tomography (pCT). The GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulation toolkit is employed to simulate the imaging phantom and proton projections. SLP, CSP and the most-probable path (MPP) are constructed based on the entrance and exit information of each proton. The physical deviations of SLP, CSP and MPP from the real path are calculated. Using a conditional proton path probability map, the relative probability of SLP, CSP and MPP are calculated and compared. The depth dose and Bragg peak are predicted on the pCT images reconstructed using SLP, CSP, and MPP and compared with the simulation result. The root-mean-square physical deviations and the cumulative distribution of the physical deviations show that the performance of CSP is comparable to MPP while SLP is slightly inferior. About 90% of the SLP pixels and 99% of the CSP pixels lie in the 99% relative probability envelope of the MPP. Even at an imaging dose of ∼0.1 mGy the proton Bragg peak for a given incoming energy can be predicted on the pCT image reconstructed using SLP, CSP, or MPP with 1 mm accuracy. This study shows that SLP and CSP, like MPP, are adequate path estimates for pCT reconstruction, and therefore can be chosen as the path estimation method for pCT reconstruction, which can aid the treatment planning and range prediction of proton radiation therapy.

  5. Bragg peak prediction from quantitative proton computed tomography using different path estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Dongxu; Mackie, T Rockwell; Tome, Wolfgang A, E-mail: tome@humonc.wisc.edu [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI 53705 (United States)

    2011-02-07

    This paper characterizes the performance of the straight-line path (SLP) and cubic spline path (CSP) as path estimates used in reconstruction of proton computed tomography (pCT). The GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulation toolkit is employed to simulate the imaging phantom and proton projections. SLP, CSP and the most-probable path (MPP) are constructed based on the entrance and exit information of each proton. The physical deviations of SLP, CSP and MPP from the real path are calculated. Using a conditional proton path probability map, the relative probability of SLP, CSP and MPP are calculated and compared. The depth dose and Bragg peak are predicted on the pCT images reconstructed using SLP, CSP, and MPP and compared with the simulation result. The root-mean-square physical deviations and the cumulative distribution of the physical deviations show that the performance of CSP is comparable to MPP while SLP is slightly inferior. About 90% of the SLP pixels and 99% of the CSP pixels lie in the 99% relative probability envelope of the MPP. Even at an imaging dose of {approx}0.1 mGy the proton Bragg peak for a given incoming energy can be predicted on the pCT image reconstructed using SLP, CSP, or MPP with 1 mm accuracy. This study shows that SLP and CSP, like MPP, are adequate path estimates for pCT reconstruction, and therefore can be chosen as the path estimation method for pCT reconstruction, which can aid the treatment planning and range prediction of proton radiation therapy.

  6. Bragg peak prediction from quantitative proton computed tomography using different path estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dongxu; Mackie, T Rockwell

    2015-01-01

    This paper characterizes the performance of the straight-line path (SLP) and cubic spline path (CSP) as path estimates used in reconstruction of proton computed tomography (pCT). The GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulation toolkit is employed to simulate the imaging phantom and proton projections. SLP, CSP and the most-probable path (MPP) are constructed based on the entrance and exit information of each proton. The physical deviations of SLP, CSP and MPP from the real path are calculated. Using a conditional proton path probability map, the relative probability of SLP, CSP and MPP are calculated and compared. The depth dose and Bragg peak are predicted on the pCT images reconstructed using SLP, CSP, and MPP and compared with the simulation result. The root-mean-square physical deviations and the cumulative distribution of the physical deviations show that the performance of CSP is comparable to MPP while SLP is slightly inferior. About 90% of the SLP pixels and 99% of the CSP pixels lie in the 99% relative probability envelope of the MPP. Even at an imaging dose of ~0.1 mGy the proton Bragg peak for a given incoming energy can be predicted on the pCT image reconstructed using SLP, CSP, or MPP with 1 mm accuracy. This study shows that SLP and CSP, like MPP, are adequate path estimates for pCT reconstruction, and therefore can be chosen as the path estimation method for pCT reconstruction, which can aid the treatment planning and range prediction of proton radiation therapy. PMID:21212472

  7. SU-E-T-04: 3D Dose Based Patient Compensator QA Procedure for Proton Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou, W; Reyhan, M; Zhang, M; Davis, R; Jabbour, S; Khan, A; Yue, N

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: In proton double-scattering radiotherapy, compensators are the essential patient specific devices to contour the distal dose distribution to the tumor target. Traditional compensator QA is limited to checking the drilled surface profiles against the plan. In our work, a compensator QA process was established that assess the entire compensator including its internal structure for patient 3D dose verification. Methods: The fabricated patient compensators were CT scanned. Through mathematical image processing and geometric transformations, the CT images of the proton compensator were combined with the patient simulation CT images into a new series of CT images, in which the imaged compensator is placed at the planned location along the corresponding beam line. The new CT images were input into the Eclipse treatment planning system. The original plan was calculated to the combined CT image series without the plan compensator. The newly computed patient 3D dose from the combined patientcompensator images was verified against the original plan dose. Test plans include the compensators with defects intentionally created inside the fabricated compensators. Results: The calculated 3D dose with the combined compensator and patient CT images reflects the impact of the fabricated compensator to the patient. For the test cases in which no defects were created, the dose distributions were in agreement between our method and the corresponding original plans. For the compensator with the defects, the purposely changed material and a purposely created internal defect were successfully detected while not possible with just the traditional compensator profiles detection methods. Conclusion: We present here a 3D dose verification process to qualify the fabricated proton double-scattering compensator. Such compensator detection process assesses the patient 3D impact of the fabricated compensator surface profile as well as the compensator internal material and structure changes

  8. SU-E-J-222: Feasibility Study of MRI-Only Proton Therapy Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spadea, M [ImagEngLab, Magna Graecia University, Catanzaro (Italy); Izquierdo, D; Catana, C [Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Charlestown, MA (United States); Collins-Fekete, C; Bortfeld, T; Seco, J [Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To assess the dosimetric equivalence of MRI based proton planning vs. single energy x-ray CT. Methods: 8 glioblastoma patients were imaged with CT and MRI after surgical resection. T1-weighted 3DMPRAGE was used to delineate the GTV, which was subsequently rigidly registered to the CT volume. A pseudoCT was generated from the aligned MRI by combining segmentation and atlas-based approaches. The spatial resolution both for pseudo- and real CT was 0.6×0.6×2.5mm. Three orthogonal proton beams were simulated on the pseudoCT. Two co-planar beams were set on the axial plane. The third one was planned parallel to the cranio-caudal (CC) direction. Each beam was set to cover the GTV at 98% of the nominal dose (18Gy). The proton plan was copied and transferred to the real CT, including aperture/compensator geometry. Dose comparison between pseudoCT and CT plan was performed beam-by-beam by quantifying the range shift of dose profile on each slice of the GTV. The GTV’s V{sub 98} was computed for the CT. Results: For beams in axial plane the median absolute value of the range shift was 0.3mm, with 0.9mm and 1.4mm as 95th percentile and maximum, respectively. Worst scenarios were found for the CC beam, where we measured 1.1mm (median), 2.7mm (95thpercentile) and 5mm (maximum). Regardless the direction, beams passing through the surgical site, where metal (Titanium MRI-compatible) staples were present, were mostly affected by range shift. GTV’s V{sub 98} for CT was not lower than 99.3%. Conclusion: The study showed the clinical feasibility of an MRI-alone proton plan. Advantages include the possibility to rely on better soft tissue contrast for target and organs at risk delineation without the need of further CT scan and image registration. Additional investigation is required in presence of metal implants along the beam path and to account for partial volume effects due to slice thickness.

  9. An experimental approach to improve the Monte Carlo modelling of offline PET/CT-imaging of positron emitters induced by scanned proton beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, J.; Unholtz, D.; Kurz, C.; Parodi, K.

    2013-08-01

    We report on the experimental campaign carried out at the Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center (HIT) to optimize the Monte Carlo (MC) modelling of proton-induced positron-emitter production. The presented experimental strategy constitutes a pragmatic inverse approach to overcome the known uncertainties in the modelling of positron-emitter production due to the lack of reliable cross-section data for the relevant therapeutic energy range. This work is motivated by the clinical implementation of offline PET/CT-based treatment verification at our facility. Here, the irradiation induced tissue activation in the patient is monitored shortly after the treatment delivery by means of a commercial PET/CT scanner and compared to a MC simulated activity expectation, derived under the assumption of a correct treatment delivery. At HIT, the MC particle transport and interaction code FLUKA is used for the simulation of the expected positron-emitter yield. For this particular application, the code is coupled to externally provided cross-section data of several proton-induced reactions. Studying experimentally the positron-emitting radionuclide yield in homogeneous phantoms provides access to the fundamental production channels. Therefore, five different materials have been irradiated by monoenergetic proton pencil beams at various energies and the induced β+ activity subsequently acquired with a commercial full-ring PET/CT scanner. With the analysis of dynamically reconstructed PET images, we are able to determine separately the spatial distribution of different radionuclide concentrations at the starting time of the PET scan. The laterally integrated radionuclide yields in depth are used to tune the input cross-section data such that the impact of both the physical production and the imaging process on the various positron-emitter yields is reproduced. The resulting cross-section data sets allow to model the absolute level of measured β+ activity induced in the investigated

  10. Proton energy and scattering angle radiographs to improve proton treatment planning : a Monte Carlo study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biegun, Aleksandra; Takatsu, Jun; Nakaji, Taku; van Goethem, Marc-Jan; van der Graaf, Emiel; Koffeman, E.; Visser, Jan; Brandenburg, Sijtze

    2016-01-01

    The novel proton radiography imaging technique has a large potential to be used in direct measurement of the proton energy loss (proton stopping power, PSP) in various tissues in the patient. The uncertainty of PSPs, currently obtained from translation of X-ray Computed Tomography (xCT) images,

  11. Diagnostic accuracy of contrast-enhanced MR angiography and unenhanced proton MR imaging compared with CT pulmonary angiography in chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajaram, Smitha [Unit of Academic Radiology, University of Sheffield, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Academic Unit of Radiology, C Floor, Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Swift, Andrew J.; Wild, Jim M. [Unit of Academic Radiology, University of Sheffield, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Sheffield Cardiovascular Biomedical Research Unit, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Capener, David; Telfer, Adam [Unit of Academic Radiology, University of Sheffield, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Davies, Christine; Hill, Catherine [Sheffield Teaching Hospitals Trust, Department of Radiology, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Condliffe, Robin; Elliot, Charles; Kiely, David G. [Sheffield Pulmonary Vascular Disease Unit, Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Sheffield Cardiovascular Biomedical Research Unit, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Hurdman, Judith [Sheffield Pulmonary Vascular Disease Unit, Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Sheffield (United Kingdom)

    2012-02-15

    To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of contrast-enhanced MR angiography (CE-MRA) and the added benefit of unenhanced proton MR angiography compared with CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA) in patients with chronic thromboembolic disease (CTE). A 2 year retrospective study of 53 patients with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension who underwent CTPA and MRI for suspected pulmonary hypertension and a control group of 36 patients with no CT evidence of pulmonary embolism. The MRI was evaluated for CTE and the combined diagnostic accuracy of ce-MRA and unenhanced proton MRA was determined. CE-MRA generated lung perfusion maps were also assessed. The overall sensitivity and specificity of CE-MRA in diagnosing proximal and distal CTE were 98% and 94%, respectively. The sensitivity improved from 50% to 88% for central vessel disease when CE-MRA images were analysed with unenhanced proton MRA. The CE-MRA identified more stenoses (29/18), post-stenosis dilatation (23/7) and occlusions (37/29) compared with CTPA. The CE-MRA perfusion images showed a sensitivity of 92% for diagnosing CTE. CE-MRA has high sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing CTE. The sensitivity of CE-MRA for visualisation of adherent central and lobar thrombus significantly improves with the addition of unenhanced proton MRA which delineates the vessel wall. (orig.)

  12. Diagnostic accuracy of contrast-enhanced MR angiography and unenhanced proton MR imaging compared with CT pulmonary angiography in chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajaram, Smitha; Swift, Andrew J.; Wild, Jim M.; Capener, David; Telfer, Adam; Davies, Christine; Hill, Catherine; Condliffe, Robin; Elliot, Charles; Kiely, David G.; Hurdman, Judith

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of contrast-enhanced MR angiography (CE-MRA) and the added benefit of unenhanced proton MR angiography compared with CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA) in patients with chronic thromboembolic disease (CTE). A 2 year retrospective study of 53 patients with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension who underwent CTPA and MRI for suspected pulmonary hypertension and a control group of 36 patients with no CT evidence of pulmonary embolism. The MRI was evaluated for CTE and the combined diagnostic accuracy of ce-MRA and unenhanced proton MRA was determined. CE-MRA generated lung perfusion maps were also assessed. The overall sensitivity and specificity of CE-MRA in diagnosing proximal and distal CTE were 98% and 94%, respectively. The sensitivity improved from 50% to 88% for central vessel disease when CE-MRA images were analysed with unenhanced proton MRA. The CE-MRA identified more stenoses (29/18), post-stenosis dilatation (23/7) and occlusions (37/29) compared with CTPA. The CE-MRA perfusion images showed a sensitivity of 92% for diagnosing CTE. CE-MRA has high sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing CTE. The sensitivity of CE-MRA for visualisation of adherent central and lobar thrombus significantly improves with the addition of unenhanced proton MRA which delineates the vessel wall. (orig.)

  13. Influence of proton scattering angles on the energy radiograph in proton radiotherapy : A simulation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biegun, A.K.; Takatsu, J.; van Beuzekom, M.; van der Graaf, E.R.; van Goethem, M-J.; Klaver, T.; Visser, J.; Brandenburg, S.

    2015-01-01

    The treatment quality of cancer patients with a proton beam critically depends on accurate predictions of proton stopping powers. Uncertainties in proton range that occur from translation of an X-ray CT patient image, of typical 3–4% or more, lead to necessary enlargements of contours around the

  14. Evidence for proton-tagged, central semi-exclusive production of high-mass muon pairs at 13 TeV with the CMS-TOTEM Precision Proton Spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The process $pp \\rightarrow p \\mu^+\\mu^- p^{(*)}$ has been observed at the LHC for dimuon masses larger than $110~\\mathrm{GeV}$ in $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=13~\\mathrm{TeV}$. Here $p^{(*)}$ indicates that the second proton is undetected, and either remains intact or dissociates into a low-mass state $p^{*}$. The scattered proton has been measured in the CMS-TOTEM Precision Proton Spectrometer (CT-PPS), which operated for the first time in 2016. The measurement is based on an integrated luminosity of approximately $10~\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$ collected in regular, high-luminosity fills. A total of 12 candidates with $m(\\mu\\mu) > 110~\\mathrm{GeV}$, and matching forward proton kinematics, is observed. This corresponds to an excess of more than four standard deviations over the background. The spectrometer and its operation are described, along with the data and background estimation. The present results constitute the first evidence of this process at such masses. They also demonstrate that CT-PPS performs as expect...

  15. Proton therapy of uveal melanomas. Intercomparison of MRI-based and conventional treatment planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marnitz, S.; Hinkelbein, W. [Dept. of Radiooncology, Charite Univ. Medicine, Berlin (Germany); Cordini, D.; Heufelder, J.; Simiantonakis, I.; Kluge, H. [Eye Tumor Therapy, Hahn-Meitner Inst., Berlin (Germany); Bendl, R. [Dept. of Medical Physics, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Lemke, A.J. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Charite Univ. Medicine, Berlin (Germany); Bechrakis, N.E.; Foerster, M.H. [Dept. of Ophthalmology, Charite Univ. Medicine, Berlin (Germany)

    2006-07-15

    Background and purpose: proton therapy for uveal melanoma provides high-conformal dose application to the target volume and, thus, an optimal saving of the organs at risk nearby. Treatment planning is done with the model-based treatment-planning system eyeplan. Tumor reconstruction is based only on a fundus composite, which often leads to an overestimation of the clinical target volume (CTV). The purpose was to exploit MRI on trial in a proton therapy-planning system by using the novel image-based treatment-planning system octopus. Patients and methods: ten patients with uveal melanomas received both a high-resolution planning CT and MRI of the eye. MR examinations were made with an eye coil. Eyeplan requires eye geometry data for modeling, and tantalum marker clips for submillimeter positioning and additional information from ultrasound and 3-D imaging. By contrast, octopus provides the full integration of 3-D imaging (e.g., CT, MRI). CTVs were delineated in each slice. For all patients, CTVs (eyeplan vs. octopus) were compared intraindividually. Results: octopus planning led to a mean reduction of the target volume by a factor of 1.7 (T1-weighted [T1w]) and 2.2 (T2w) without compromising safety. The corresponding field size could be scaled down on average by a factor of 1.2 (T1w) and 1.4 (T2w), respectively. Conclusion: compared with the conventional eyeplan, MRI-based treatment planning of ocular tumors with octopus could be a powerful tool for reducing the CTV and, consequently, the treatment volume and the field size. This might be translated into a better patient compliance during treatment and a decreased late toxicity. (orig.)

  16. Proton therapy of uveal melanomas. Intercomparison of MRI-based and conventional treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marnitz, S.; Hinkelbein, W.; Cordini, D.; Heufelder, J.; Simiantonakis, I.; Kluge, H.; Bendl, R.; Lemke, A.J.; Bechrakis, N.E.; Foerster, M.H.

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: proton therapy for uveal melanoma provides high-conformal dose application to the target volume and, thus, an optimal saving of the organs at risk nearby. Treatment planning is done with the model-based treatment-planning system eyeplan. Tumor reconstruction is based only on a fundus composite, which often leads to an overestimation of the clinical target volume (CTV). The purpose was to exploit MRI on trial in a proton therapy-planning system by using the novel image-based treatment-planning system octopus. Patients and methods: ten patients with uveal melanomas received both a high-resolution planning CT and MRI of the eye. MR examinations were made with an eye coil. Eyeplan requires eye geometry data for modeling, and tantalum marker clips for submillimeter positioning and additional information from ultrasound and 3-D imaging. By contrast, octopus provides the full integration of 3-D imaging (e.g., CT, MRI). CTVs were delineated in each slice. For all patients, CTVs (eyeplan vs. octopus) were compared intraindividually. Results: octopus planning led to a mean reduction of the target volume by a factor of 1.7 (T1-weighted [T1w]) and 2.2 (T2w) without compromising safety. The corresponding field size could be scaled down on average by a factor of 1.2 (T1w) and 1.4 (T2w), respectively. Conclusion: compared with the conventional eyeplan, MRI-based treatment planning of ocular tumors with octopus could be a powerful tool for reducing the CTV and, consequently, the treatment volume and the field size. This might be translated into a better patient compliance during treatment and a decreased late toxicity. (orig.)

  17. A new timing detector for the CT-PPS project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arcidiacono, R. [INFN – Torino (Italy); Università del Piemonte Orientale (Italy)

    2017-02-11

    The CT-PPS detector will be installed close to the beam line on both sides of CMS, 200 m downstream the interaction point. This detector will measure forward scattered protons, allowing detailed studies of diffractive hadron physics and Central Exclusive Production. The main components of the CT-PPS detector are a silicon tracking system and a timing system. In this contribution we present the proposal of an innovative solution for the timing system, based on Ultra-Fast Silicon Detectors (UFSD). UFSD are a novel concept of silicon detectors potentially able to obtain the necessary time resolution (∼20 ps on the proton arrival time). The use of UFSD has also other attractive features as its material budget is small and the pixel geometries can be tailored to the precise physics distribution of protons. UFSD prototypes for CT-PPS have been designed by CNM (Barcelona) and FBK (Trento): we will present the status of the sensor productions and of the low-noise front-end electronics currently under development and test.

  18. Absolute measurements methods for proton beam dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laitano, R.F.

    1998-01-01

    A widespread interest in improving proton beam characteristics and related dosimetry became apparent in the recent years, even if the advantages of protons in radiotherapy were pointed out since 1946. The early treatments by proton beams were made for a long time on a small number of patients in very few accelerators sharing their use with nuclear-physics experiments. The first proton accelerator totally dedicated to radiotherapy was established just in 1990 at the Loma Linda Medical Center in the USA. A further reason of the slowly growing use of protons for therapy in the early years, was the lack of adequate means for accurate localization of the treatment volume. The potentialities of protons in imparting a largest part of their energy to very small volumes became exploitable only after the established clinical use of accurate imaging techniques such as based on CT, NMR, PET, etc

  19. LHC optics determination with proton tracks measured in the CT-PPS detectors in 2016, before TS2

    CERN Document Server

    Nemes, F

    2017-01-01

    Novel optics estimation methods have been developed for the CMS-TOTEM Precision Proton Spectrometer (CT-PPS), in order to determine the horizontal dispersion function $D_{x}$ and the orbit between IP5 and the Roman Pot detectors. The tools have been successfully applied at $\\sqrt{s} = $13 TeV collision energy and $\\beta^{*} = $0.4 m optics with $\\alpha = 370\\,\\mu$rad horizontal crossing angle (settings valid in 2016 before Technical Stop 2 - TS2).

  20. Proton computed tomography images with algebraic reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruzzi, M. [Physics and Astronomy Department, University of Florence, Florence (Italy); Civinini, C.; Scaringella, M. [INFN - Florence Division, Florence (Italy); Bonanno, D. [INFN - Catania Division, Catania (Italy); Brianzi, M. [INFN - Florence Division, Florence (Italy); Carpinelli, M. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Chemistry and Pharmacy Department, University of Sassari, Sassari (Italy); Cirrone, G.A.P.; Cuttone, G. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Presti, D. Lo [INFN - Catania Division, Catania (Italy); Physics and Astronomy Department, University of Catania, Catania (Italy); Maccioni, G. [INFN – Cagliari Division, Cagliari (Italy); Pallotta, S. [INFN - Florence Division, Florence (Italy); Department of Biomedical, Experimental and Clinical Sciences, University of Florence, Florence (Italy); SOD Fisica Medica, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Careggi, Firenze (Italy); Randazzo, N. [INFN - Catania Division, Catania (Italy); Romano, F. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Sipala, V. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Chemistry and Pharmacy Department, University of Sassari, Sassari (Italy); Talamonti, C. [INFN - Florence Division, Florence (Italy); Department of Biomedical, Experimental and Clinical Sciences, University of Florence, Florence (Italy); SOD Fisica Medica, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Careggi, Firenze (Italy); Vanzi, E. [Fisica Sanitaria, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Senese, Siena (Italy)

    2017-02-11

    A prototype of proton Computed Tomography (pCT) system for hadron-therapy has been manufactured and tested in a 175 MeV proton beam with a non-homogeneous phantom designed to simulate high-contrast material. BI-SART reconstruction algorithms have been implemented with GPU parallelism, taking into account of most likely paths of protons in matter. Reconstructed tomography images with density resolutions r.m.s. down to ~1% and spatial resolutions <1 mm, achieved within processing times of ~15′ for a 512×512 pixels image prove that this technique will be beneficial if used instead of X-CT in hadron-therapy.

  1. PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS OF MULTI-TURN EXTRACTION FROM THE PROTON SYNCHROTRON TO THE SUPER PROTON SYNCHROTRON

    CERN Document Server

    Abernethy, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Within CERN's accelerator complex, the extraction from the Proton Synchrotron to the Super Proton Synchrotron has been done using the so-called ``Continuous Transfer" (CT) method since the 1970's. A new technique, known as Multi-Turn Extraction (MTE), has now been implemented and is in full operation. This report examines a holistic performance analysis of the novel technique in multiple aspects of the accelerator complex, as well as a direct comparison with its predecessor, CT, from the implementation of MTE in 2010 until the end of 2015.

  2. SU-E-T-161: Characterization and Validation of CT Simulator Hounsfield Units to Relative Stopping Power Values for Proton Treatment Planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schnell, E; Ahmad, S; De La Fuente Herman, T

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a calibration curve that includes and minimizes the variations of Hounsfield Unit (HU) from a CT scanner to Relative Stopping Power (RSP) of tissues along the proton beam path. The variations are due to scanner and proton energy, technique, phantom size and placement, and tissue arrangement. Methods: A CIRS 062 M phantom with 10 plugs of known relative electron density (RED) was scanned through a 16 slice GE Discovery CT Simulator scanner. Three setup combinations of plug distributions and techniques clinically implemented for five treatment regions were scanned with energies of 100, 120, and 140 kV. Volumetric HU values were measured for each plug and scan. The RSP values derived through the Bethe-Bloch formula are currently being verified with parallel-plate ionization chamber measurements in water using 80, 150, and 225 MeV proton beam. Typical treatment plans for treatment regions of brain, head-&-neck, chest, abdomen, and pelvis are being planned and dose delivered will be compared with film and Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) measurements. Results: Percentage variations were determined for each variable. For tissues close to water, variations were <1% from any given parameter. Tissues far from water equivalence (lung and bone) showed the greatest sensitivity to change (7.4% maximum) with scanner energy and up to 5.3% with positioning of the phantom. No major variations were observed for proton energies within the treatment range. Conclusion: When deriving a calibration curve, attention should be placed to low and high HU values. A thorough verification process of calculated vs. water-phantom measured RSP values at different proton energies, followed by dose validation of planned vs. measured doses in phantom with film and OSL detectors are currently being undertaken

  3. Comparison of proton therapy treatment planning for head tumors with a pencil beam algorithm on dual and single energy CT images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hudobivnik, Nace; Dedes, George; Parodi, Katia; Landry, Guillaume, E-mail: g.landry@lmu.de [Department of Medical Physics, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich 85748 (Germany); Schwarz, Florian; Johnson, Thorsten; Sommer, Wieland H. [Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig Maximilians University Hospital Munich, 81377 Munich (Germany); Agolli, Linda [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich 81377, Germany and Radiation Oncology, Sant’ Andrea Hospital, Sapienza University, Rome 00189 (Italy); Tessonnier, Thomas [Department of Medical Physics, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich 85748, Germany and Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg (Germany); Verhaegen, Frank [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht 6229 ET, the Netherlands and Medical Physics Unit, Department of Oncology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H3A 0G4 (Canada); Thieke, Christian; Belka, Claus [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich 81377 (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: Dual energy CT (DECT) has recently been proposed as an improvement over single energy CT (SECT) for stopping power ratio (SPR) estimation for proton therapy treatment planning (TP), thereby potentially reducing range uncertainties. Published literature investigated phantoms. This study aims at performing proton therapy TP on SECT and DECT head images of the same patients and at evaluating whether the reported improved DECT SPR accuracy translates into clinically relevant range shifts in clinical head treatment scenarios. Methods: Two phantoms were scanned at a last generation dual source DECT scanner at 90 and 150 kVp with Sn filtration. The first phantom (Gammex phantom) was used to calibrate the scanner in terms of SPR while the second served as evaluation (CIRS phantom). DECT images of five head trauma patients were used as surrogate cancer patient images for TP of proton therapy. Pencil beam algorithm based TP was performed on SECT and DECT images and the dose distributions corresponding to the optimized proton plans were calculated using a Monte Carlo (MC) simulation platform using the same patient geometry for both plans obtained from conversion of the 150 kVp images. Range shifts between the MC dose distributions from SECT and DECT plans were assessed using 2D range maps. Results: SPR root mean square errors (RMSEs) for the inserts of the Gammex phantom were 1.9%, 1.8%, and 1.2% for SECT phantom calibration (SECT{sub phantom}), SECT stoichiometric calibration (SECT{sub stoichiometric}), and DECT calibration, respectively. For the CIRS phantom, these were 3.6%, 1.6%, and 1.0%. When investigating patient anatomy, group median range differences of up to −1.4% were observed for head cases when comparing SECT{sub stoichiometric} with DECT. For this calibration the 25th and 75th percentiles varied from −2% to 0% across the five patients. The group median was found to be limited to 0.5% when using SECT{sub phantom} and the 25th and 75th percentiles

  4. Proton-counting radiography for proton therapy: a proof of principle using CMOS APS technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poludniowski, G; Esposito, M; Evans, P M; Allinson, N M; Anaxagoras, T; Green, S; Parker, D J; Price, T; Manolopoulos, S; Nieto-Camero, J

    2014-01-01

    Despite the early recognition of the potential of proton imaging to assist proton therapy (Cormack 1963 J. Appl. Phys. 34 2722), the modality is still removed from clinical practice, with various approaches in development. For proton-counting radiography applications such as computed tomography (CT), the water-equivalent-path-length that each proton has travelled through an imaged object must be inferred. Typically, scintillator-based technology has been used in various energy/range telescope designs. Here we propose a very different alternative of using radiation-hard CMOS active pixel sensor technology. The ability of such a sensor to resolve the passage of individual protons in a therapy beam has not been previously shown. Here, such capability is demonstrated using a 36 MeV cyclotron beam (University of Birmingham Cyclotron, Birmingham, UK) and a 200 MeV clinical radiotherapy beam (iThemba LABS, Cape Town, SA). The feasibility of tracking individual protons through multiple CMOS layers is also demonstrated using a two-layer stack of sensors. The chief advantages of this solution are the spatial discrimination of events intrinsic to pixelated sensors, combined with the potential provision of information on both the range and residual energy of a proton. The challenges in developing a practical system are discussed. (paper)

  5. Proton-counting radiography for proton therapy: a proof of principle using CMOS APS technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poludniowski, G; Allinson, N M; Anaxagoras, T; Esposito, M; Green, S; Manolopoulos, S; Nieto-Camero, J; Parker, D J; Price, T; Evans, P M

    2014-06-07

    Despite the early recognition of the potential of proton imaging to assist proton therapy (Cormack 1963 J. Appl. Phys. 34 2722), the modality is still removed from clinical practice, with various approaches in development. For proton-counting radiography applications such as computed tomography (CT), the water-equivalent-path-length that each proton has travelled through an imaged object must be inferred. Typically, scintillator-based technology has been used in various energy/range telescope designs. Here we propose a very different alternative of using radiation-hard CMOS active pixel sensor technology. The ability of such a sensor to resolve the passage of individual protons in a therapy beam has not been previously shown. Here, such capability is demonstrated using a 36 MeV cyclotron beam (University of Birmingham Cyclotron, Birmingham, UK) and a 200 MeV clinical radiotherapy beam (iThemba LABS, Cape Town, SA). The feasibility of tracking individual protons through multiple CMOS layers is also demonstrated using a two-layer stack of sensors. The chief advantages of this solution are the spatial discrimination of events intrinsic to pixelated sensors, combined with the potential provision of information on both the range and residual energy of a proton. The challenges in developing a practical system are discussed.

  6. An experimental approach to improve the Monte Carlo modelling of offline PET/CT-imaging of positron emitters induced by scanned proton beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, J; Unholtz, D; Kurz, C; Parodi, K

    2013-01-01

    We report on the experimental campaign carried out at the Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center (HIT) to optimize the Monte Carlo (MC) modelling of proton-induced positron-emitter production. The presented experimental strategy constitutes a pragmatic inverse approach to overcome the known uncertainties in the modelling of positron-emitter production due to the lack of reliable cross-section data for the relevant therapeutic energy range. This work is motivated by the clinical implementation of offline PET/CT-based treatment verification at our facility. Here, the irradiation induced tissue activation in the patient is monitored shortly after the treatment delivery by means of a commercial PET/CT scanner and compared to a MC simulated activity expectation, derived under the assumption of a correct treatment delivery. At HIT, the MC particle transport and interaction code FLUKA is used for the simulation of the expected positron-emitter yield. For this particular application, the code is coupled to externally provided cross-section data of several proton-induced reactions. Studying experimentally the positron-emitting radionuclide yield in homogeneous phantoms provides access to the fundamental production channels. Therefore, five different materials have been irradiated by monoenergetic proton pencil beams at various energies and the induced β + activity subsequently acquired with a commercial full-ring PET/CT scanner. With the analysis of dynamically reconstructed PET images, we are able to determine separately the spatial distribution of different radionuclide concentrations at the starting time of the PET scan. The laterally integrated radionuclide yields in depth are used to tune the input cross-section data such that the impact of both the physical production and the imaging process on the various positron-emitter yields is reproduced. The resulting cross-section data sets allow to model the absolute level of measured β + activity induced in the investigated

  7. TU-FG-BRB-04: A New Optimization Method for Pre-Treatment Patient-Specific Stopping-Power by Combining Proton Radiography and X-Ray CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins-Fekete, C; Schulte, R; Beaulieu, L; Seco, J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The relative stopping power (RSP) uncertainty is the largest contributor to the range uncertainty in proton therapy. The purpose of this work is to develop a robust and systematic method that yields accurate patient specific RSPs by combining pre-treatment X-ray CT and daily proton radiography. Methods: The method is formulated as a penalized least squares optimization (PLSO) problem min(|Ax-B|). The matrix A represents the cumulative path-length crossed in each material computed by calculating proton trajectories through the X-ray CT. The material RSPs are denoted by x and B is the pRad, expressed as water equivalent thickness. The equation is solved using a convex-conic optimizer. Geant4 simulations were made to assess the feasibility of the method. RSP extracted from the Geant4 materials were used as a reference and the clinical HU-RSP curve as a comparison. The PLSO was first tested on a Gammex RMI-467 phantom. Then, anthropomorphic phantoms of the head, pelvis and lung were studied and resulting RSPs were evaluated. A pencil beam was generated in each phantom to evaluate the proton range accuracy achievable by using the optimized RSPs. Finally, experimental data of a pediatric head phantom (CIRS) were acquired using a recently completed experimental pCT scanner. Results: Numerical simulations showed precise RSP (<0.75%) for Gammex materials except low-density lung (LN-300) (1.2%). Accurate RSP have been obtained for the head (µ=−0.10%, 1.5σ=1.12%), lung (µ=−0.33, 1.5σ=1.02%) and pelvis anthropomorphic phantoms (µ=0.12, 1.5σ=0,99%). The range precision has been improved with an average R80 difference to the reference (µ±1.5σ) of −0.20±0.35%, −0.47±0.92% and −0.06±0.17% in the head, lung and pelvis phantoms respectively, compared to the 3.5% clinical margin. Experimental HU-RSP curve have been produced on the CIRS pediatric head. Conclusion: The proposed PLSO with prior knowledge X-ray CT shows promising potential (R80 σ<1.0% over

  8. Effects of organ motion on proton prostate treatments, as determined from analysis of daily CT imaging for patient positioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Yoshikazu; Sato, Yoshitaka; Shibata, Satoshi; Bou, Sayuri; Yamamoto, Kazutaka; Tamamura, Hiroyasu; Fuwa, Nobukazu; Takamatsu, Shigeyuki; Sasaki, Makoto; Tameshige, Yuji; Kume, Kyo; Minami, Hiroki; Saga, Yusuke; Saito, Makoto

    2018-05-01

    We quantified interfractional movements of the prostate, seminal vesicles (SVs), and rectum during computed tomography (CT) image-guided proton therapy for prostate cancer and studied the range variation in opposed lateral proton beams. We analyzed 375 sets of daily CT images acquired throughout the proton therapy treatment of ten patients. We analyzed daily movements of the prostate, SVs, and rectum by simulating three image-matching strategies: bone matching, prostate center (PC) matching, and prostate-rectum boundary (PRB) matching. In the PC matching, translational movements of the prostate center were corrected after bone matching. In the PRB matching, we performed PC matching and correction along the anterior-posterior direction to match the boundary between the prostate and the rectum's anterior region. In each strategy, we evaluated systematic errors (Σ) and random errors (σ) by measuring the daily movements of certain points on each anatomic structure. The average positional deviations in millimeter of each point were determined by the Van Herk formula of 2.5Σ + 0.7σ. Using these positional deviations, we created planning target volumes of the prostate and SVs and analyzed the daily variation in the water equivalent length (WEL) from the skin surface to the target along the lateral beam directions using the density converted from the daily CT number. Based on this analysis, we designed prostate cancer treatment planning and evaluated the dose volume histograms (DVHs) for these strategies. The SVs' daily movements showed large variations over the superior-inferior direction, as did the rectum's anterior region. The average positional deviations of the prostate in the anterior, posterior, superior, inferior, and lateral sides (mm) in bone matching, PC matching, and PRB matching were (8.9, 9.8, 7.5, 3.6, 1.6), (5.6, 6.1, 3.5, 4.5, 1.9), and (8.6, 3.2, 3.5, 4.5, 1.9) (mm), respectively. Moreover, the ones of the SV tip were similarly (22.5, 15.5, 11

  9. GEANT4 Tuning For pCT Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yevseyeva, Olga; Assis, Joaquim T. de; Evseev, Ivan; Schelin, Hugo R.; Paschuk, Sergei A.; Milhoretto, Edney; Setti, Joao A. P.; Diaz, Katherin S.; Hormaza, Joel M.; Lopes, Ricardo T.

    2011-01-01

    Proton beams in medical applications deal with relatively thick targets like the human head or trunk. Thus, the fidelity of proton computed tomography (pCT) simulations as a tool for proton therapy planning depends in the general case on the accuracy of results obtained for the proton interaction with thick absorbers. GEANT4 simulations of proton energy spectra after passing thick absorbers do not agree well with existing experimental data, as showed previously. Moreover, the spectra simulated for the Bethe-Bloch domain showed an unexpected sensitivity to the choice of low-energy electromagnetic models during the code execution. These observations were done with the GEANT4 version 8.2 during our simulations for pCT. This work describes in more details the simulations of the proton passage through aluminum absorbers with varied thickness. The simulations were done by modifying only the geometry in the Hadrontherapy Example, and for all available choices of the Electromagnetic Physics Models. As the most probable reasons for these effects is some specific feature in the code, or some specific implicit parameters in the GEANT4 manual, we continued our study with version 9.2 of the code. Some improvements in comparison with our previous results were obtained. The simulations were performed considering further applications for pCT development.

  10. SU-F-T-215: An Investigation Of Multi-Scanner CT Hounsfield Unit Calibration for Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy Using 3D Gamma Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, J; Li, X; Liu, G; Liu, Q; Liang, J; Ding, X

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: We compare and investigate the dosimetric impacts on pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton treatment plans generated with CT calibration curves from four different CT scanners and one averaged ‘global’ CT calibration curve. Methods: The four CT scanners are located at three different hospital locations within the same health system. CT density calibration curves were collected from these scanners using the same CT calibration phantom and acquisition parameters. Mass density to HU value tables were then commissioned in a commercial treatment planning system. Five disease sites were chosen for dosimetric comparisons at brain, lung, head and neck, adrenal, and prostate. Three types of PBS plans were generated at each treatment site using SFUD, IMPT, and robustness optimized IMPT techniques. 3D dose differences were investigated using 3D Gamma analysis. Results: The CT calibration curves for all four scanners display very similar shapes. Large HU differences were observed at both the high HU and low HU regions of the curves. Large dose differences were generally observed at the distal edges of the beams and they are beam angle dependent. Out of the five treatment sites, lung plans exhibits the most overall range uncertainties and prostate plans have the greatest dose discrepancy. There are no significant differences between the SFUD, IMPT, and the RO-IMPT methods. 3D gamma analysis with 3%, 3 mm criteria showed all plans with greater than 95% passing rate. Two of the scanners with close HU values have negligible dose difference except for lung. Conclusion: Our study shows that there are more than 5% dosimetric differences between different CT calibration curves. PBS treatment plans generated with SFUD, IMPT, and the robustness optimized IMPT has similar sensitivity to the CT density uncertainty. More patient data and tighter gamma criteria based on structure location and size will be used for further investigation.

  11. The optimal balance between quality and efficiency in proton radiography imaging technique at various proton beam energies : A Monte Carlo study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biegun, A K; van Goethem, M-J; van der Graaf, E R; van Beuzekom, M; Koffeman, E N; Nakaji, T; Takatsu, J; Visser, J; Brandenburg, S

    Proton radiography is a novel imaging modality that allows direct measurement of the proton energy loss in various tissues. Currently, due to the conversion of so-called Hounsfield units from X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) into relative proton stopping powers (RPSP), the uncertainties of RPSP are

  12. 4D Proton treatment planning strategy for mobile lung tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang Yixiu; Zhang Xiaodong; Chang, Joe Y.; Wang He; Wei Xiong; Liao Zhongxing; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D.; Balter, Peter A.; Liu, Helen; Zhu, X. Ronald; Mohan, Radhe; Dong Lei

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate strategies for designing compensator-based 3D proton treatment plans for mobile lung tumors using four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) images. Methods and Materials: Four-dimensional CT sets for 10 lung cancer patients were used in this study. The internal gross tumor volume (IGTV) was obtained by combining the tumor volumes at different phases of the respiratory cycle. For each patient, we evaluated four planning strategies based on the following dose calculations: (1) the average (AVE) CT; (2) the free-breathing (FB) CT; (3) the maximum intensity projection (MIP) CT; and (4) the AVE CT in which the CT voxel values inside the IGTV were replaced by a constant density (AVE R IGTV). For each strategy, the resulting cumulative dose distribution in a respiratory cycle was determined using a deformable image registration method. Results: There were dosimetric differences between the apparent dose distribution, calculated on a single CT dataset, and the motion-corrected 4D dose distribution, calculated by combining dose distributions delivered to each phase of the 4DCT. The AVE R IGTV plan using a 1-cm smearing parameter had the best overall target coverage and critical structure sparing. The MIP plan approach resulted in an unnecessarily large treatment volume. The AVE and FB plans using 1-cm smearing did not provide adequate 4D target coverage in all patients. By using a larger smearing value, adequate 4D target coverage could be achieved; however, critical organ doses were increased. Conclusion: The AVE R IGTV approach is an effective strategy for designing proton treatment plans for mobile lung tumors

  13. SU-E-J-72: Geant4 Simulations of Spot-Scanned Proton Beam Treatment Plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanehira, T; Sutherland, K; Matsuura, T; Umegaki, K; Shirato, H [Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate density inhomogeneities which can effect dose distributions for real-time image gated spot-scanning proton therapy (RGPT), a dose calculation system, using treatment planning system VQA (Hitachi Ltd., Tokyo) spot position data, was developed based on Geant4. Methods: A Geant4 application was developed to simulate spot-scanned proton beams at Hokkaido University Hospital. A CT scan (0.98 × 0.98 × 1.25 mm) was performed for prostate cancer treatment with three or four inserted gold markers (diameter 1.5 mm, volume 1.77 mm3) in or near the target tumor. The CT data was read into VQA. A spot scanning plan was generated and exported to text files, specifying the beam energy and position of each spot. The text files were converted and read into our Geant4-based software. The spot position was converted into steering magnet field strength (in Tesla) for our beam nozzle. Individual protons were tracked from the vacuum chamber, through the helium chamber, steering magnets, dose monitors, etc., in a straight, horizontal line. The patient CT data was converted into materials with variable density and placed in a parametrized volume at the isocenter. Gold fiducial markers were represented in the CT data by two adjacent voxels (volume 2.38 mm3). 600,000 proton histories were tracked for each target spot. As one beam contained about 1,000 spots, approximately 600 million histories were recorded for each beam on a blade server. Two plans were considered: two beam horizontal opposed (90 and 270 degree) and three beam (0, 90 and 270 degree). Results: We are able to convert spot scanning plans from VQA and simulate them with our Geant4-based code. Our system can be used to evaluate the effect of dose reduction caused by gold markers used for RGPT. Conclusion: Our Geant4 application is able to calculate dose distributions for spot scanned proton therapy.

  14. TH-A-19A-12: A GPU-Accelerated and Monte Carlo-Based Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy Optimization System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, J; Wan Chan Tseung, H; Beltran, C [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a clinically applicable intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) optimization system that utilizes more accurate Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation, rather than analytical dose calculation. Methods: A very fast in-house graphics processing unit (GPU) based MC dose calculation engine was employed to generate the dose influence map for each proton spot. With the MC generated influence map, a modified gradient based optimization method was used to achieve the desired dose volume histograms (DVH). The intrinsic CT image resolution was adopted for voxelization in simulation and optimization to preserve the spatial resolution. The optimizations were computed on a multi-GPU framework to mitigate the memory limitation issues for the large dose influence maps that Result from maintaining the intrinsic CT resolution and large number of proton spots. The dose effects were studied particularly in cases with heterogeneous materials in comparison with the commercial treatment planning system (TPS). Results: For a relatively large and complex three-field bi-lateral head and neck case (i.e. >100K spots with a target volume of ∼1000 cc and multiple surrounding critical structures), the optimization together with the initial MC dose influence map calculation can be done in a clinically viable time frame (i.e. less than 15 minutes) on a GPU cluster consisting of 24 Nvidia GeForce GTX Titan cards. The DVHs of the MC TPS plan compare favorably with those of a commercial treatment planning system. Conclusion: A GPU accelerated and MC-based IMPT optimization system was developed. The dose calculation and plan optimization can be performed in less than 15 minutes on a hardware system costing less than 45,000 dollars. The fast calculation and optimization makes the system easily expandable to robust and multi-criteria optimization. This work was funded in part by a grant from Varian Medical Systems, Inc.

  15. TH-A-19A-12: A GPU-Accelerated and Monte Carlo-Based Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy Optimization System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, J; Wan Chan Tseung, H; Beltran, C

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a clinically applicable intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) optimization system that utilizes more accurate Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation, rather than analytical dose calculation. Methods: A very fast in-house graphics processing unit (GPU) based MC dose calculation engine was employed to generate the dose influence map for each proton spot. With the MC generated influence map, a modified gradient based optimization method was used to achieve the desired dose volume histograms (DVH). The intrinsic CT image resolution was adopted for voxelization in simulation and optimization to preserve the spatial resolution. The optimizations were computed on a multi-GPU framework to mitigate the memory limitation issues for the large dose influence maps that Result from maintaining the intrinsic CT resolution and large number of proton spots. The dose effects were studied particularly in cases with heterogeneous materials in comparison with the commercial treatment planning system (TPS). Results: For a relatively large and complex three-field bi-lateral head and neck case (i.e. >100K spots with a target volume of ∼1000 cc and multiple surrounding critical structures), the optimization together with the initial MC dose influence map calculation can be done in a clinically viable time frame (i.e. less than 15 minutes) on a GPU cluster consisting of 24 Nvidia GeForce GTX Titan cards. The DVHs of the MC TPS plan compare favorably with those of a commercial treatment planning system. Conclusion: A GPU accelerated and MC-based IMPT optimization system was developed. The dose calculation and plan optimization can be performed in less than 15 minutes on a hardware system costing less than 45,000 dollars. The fast calculation and optimization makes the system easily expandable to robust and multi-criteria optimization. This work was funded in part by a grant from Varian Medical Systems, Inc

  16. Review of medical radiography and tomography with proton beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Robert P.

    2018-01-01

    The use of hadron beams, especially proton beams, in cancer radiotherapy has expanded rapidly in the past two decades. To fully realize the advantages of hadron therapy over traditional x-ray and gamma-ray therapy requires accurate positioning of the Bragg peak throughout the tumor being treated. A half century ago, suggestions had already been made to use protons themselves to develop images of tumors and surrounding tissue, to be used for treatment planning. The recent global expansion of hadron therapy, coupled with modern advances in computation and particle detection, has led several collaborations around the world to develop prototype detector systems and associated reconstruction codes for proton computed tomography (pCT), as well as more simple proton radiography, with the ultimate intent to use such systems in clinical treatment planning and verification. Recent imaging results of phantoms in hospital proton beams are encouraging, but many technical and programmatic challenges remain to be overcome before pCT scanners will be introduced into clinics. This review introduces hadron therapy and the perceived advantages of pCT and proton radiography for treatment planning, reviews its historical development, and discusses the physics related to proton imaging, the associated experimental and computation issues, the technologies used to attack the problem, contemporary efforts in detector and computational development, and the current status and outlook.

  17. CT atlas of the skull base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Hiroshi; Kawafuchi, Jun-ichi; Takahashi, Kazukuni

    1980-01-01

    Although CT is generally used for lesions of the face, the orbit, the nasal and paranasal cavity, and the skull base, a CT atlas of these regions has not been reported. Furthermore, the skull base, that lies nearly tangential to the conventional axial plane of CT, can not be precisely evaluated on ordinary horizontal pictures. For the purpose of a clear demonstration of the skull-base structures by CT, a model human skull was investigated. The results and its clinical value have previously been reported. For the CT atlas of the skull base, three model human skulls (embedded in agar gel containing iodine in a manner previously reported) were also examined by EMI-CT1010 with a 5 mm thickness. The magnification and wide-window techniques were also used for demonstration. Ordinary-0 sections (scanning plane at 0 0 to Reid's base line), ordinary-25 sections (+25 0 to RBL), reverse-20 sections (-20 0 to RBL), reverse-80 sections (-80 0 to RBL; coronal sections), and sagittal sections were selected in order to illustrate the anatomical details of the skull base. Pictures of the inner aspect and the outer aspect of the skull base were also provided. Clinically it is very important to recognize osseous change and the relationship between the lesion and the skull base in three dimensions. In evaluating lesions of the skull base and those of the tentorial notch a two-plane CT examination (ordinary-25 sections and reverse-20 sections) is usually used. This method is useful in determining the surgical approach, for instance, to decide between a transsphenoidal approach or intracranial approach for a sellar lesion, or between a subtemporal approach, posterior fossa approach, or combined approach for a lesion of the tentorial notch. It is also helpful to make a map of the lesin on a plain craniogram using this two-plane method in some cases for radiotherapy and stereotactic brain biopsy. (author)

  18. SU-F-T-136: Breath Hold Lung Phantom Study in Using CT Density Versus Relative Stopping Power Ratio for Proton Pencil Beam Scanning System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syh, J; Wu, H; Rosen, L [Willis-Knighton Medical Center, Shreveport, LA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate mass density effects of CT conversion table and its variation in current treatment planning system of spot scanning proton beam using an IROC proton lung phantom for this study. Methods: A proton lung phantom study was acquired to Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core Houston (IROC) Quality Assurance Center. Inside the lung phantom, GAF Chromic films and couples of thermal luminescent dosimeter (TLD) capsules embedded in specified PTV and adjacent structures to monitor delivered dosage and 3D dose distribution profiles. Various material such as cork (Lung), blue water (heart), Techron HPV (ribs) and organic material of balsa wood and cork as dosimetry inserts within phantom of solid water (soft tissue). Relative stopping power (RLSP) values were provided. Our treatment planning system (TPS) doesn’t require SP instead relative density was converted relative to water. However lung phantom was irradiated by planning with density override and the results were compared with IROC measurements. The second attempt was conducted without density override and compared with IROC’s. Results: The higher passing rate of imaging and measurement results of the lung phantom irradiation met the criteria by IROC without density override. The film at coronal plane was found to be shift due to inclined cylinder insertion. The converted CT density worked as expected to correlate relative stopping power. Conclusion: The proton lung phantom provided by IROC is a useful tool to qualify our commissioned proton pencil beam delivery with TPS within reliable confidence. The relative mass stopping power ratios of materials were converted from the relative physical density relative to water and the results were satisfied.

  19. An analysis of the NMR-CT image by the measurement of proton-relaxation times in tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naruse, Shoji; Horikawa, Yoshiharu; Tanaka, Chuzo; Hirakawa, Kimiyoshi; Nishikawa, Hiroyasu; Shimizu, Koji; Kiri, Motosada.

    1984-01-01

    NMR-CT images were analyzed by measuring the proton-relaxation times in tissues. The NMR-CT images were obtained in 10 normal volunteers and 16 patients with brain tumors with a prototype superconducting magnet (Shimadzu Corp., Japan) operating at 0.2 T and 0.375 T. A smooth T 1 relaxation curve was obtained in each part of the brain and the brain tumor by the use of the data of the NMR-CT image; consequently, the in vivo T 1 value was proved to be reliable. The in vivo T 1 value showed the specific value corresponding to each region of the normal brain in all cases. Cerebral gray matter normally had the longest T 1 value, followed by the medulla oblongata, the pons, and white matter. The T 1 value of each region of the brain varied to the same degree in proportion to the strength of the static magnetic field. The in vivo T 1 values of the brain tumor varied with the histological type. All were longer than any part of the brain parenchyma, being between 480 and 780 msec at 0.2 T. The prolongation of the T 1 value does not always correspond to the degree of the malignancy in a tumor. The in vitro T 1 and T 2 values were also prolonged in all tumors. Although the absolute value of T 1 did not coincide between the in vitro and in vivo data, the tendency of the prolongation was the same between them. This result indicated that the NMR-CT images could be analysed by the use of the data of the in vitro T 1 and T 2 values in the tumor tissues. It is important to analyse the NMR-CT image by both in vivo and in vitro examinations of the relaxation times. (J.P.N.)

  20. MO-A-BRD-10: A Fast and Accurate GPU-Based Proton Transport Monte Carlo Simulation for Validating Proton Therapy Treatment Plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan Chan Tseung, H; Ma, J; Beltran, C [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To build a GPU-based Monte Carlo (MC) simulation of proton transport with detailed modeling of elastic and non-elastic (NE) protonnucleus interactions, for use in a very fast and cost-effective proton therapy treatment plan verification system. Methods: Using the CUDA framework, we implemented kernels for the following tasks: (1) Simulation of beam spots from our possible scanning nozzle configurations, (2) Proton propagation through CT geometry, taking into account nuclear elastic and multiple scattering, as well as energy straggling, (3) Bertini-style modeling of the intranuclear cascade stage of NE interactions, and (4) Simulation of nuclear evaporation. To validate our MC, we performed: (1) Secondary particle yield calculations in NE collisions with therapeutically-relevant nuclei, (2) Pencil-beam dose calculations in homogeneous phantoms, (3) A large number of treatment plan dose recalculations, and compared with Geant4.9.6p2/TOPAS. A workflow was devised for calculating plans from a commercially available treatment planning system, with scripts for reading DICOM files and generating inputs for our MC. Results: Yields, energy and angular distributions of secondaries from NE collisions on various nuclei are in good agreement with the Geant4.9.6p2 Bertini and Binary cascade models. The 3D-gamma pass rate at 2%–2mm for 70–230 MeV pencil-beam dose distributions in water, soft tissue, bone and Ti phantoms is 100%. The pass rate at 2%–2mm for treatment plan calculations is typically above 98%. The net computational time on a NVIDIA GTX680 card, including all CPU-GPU data transfers, is around 20s for 1×10{sup 7} proton histories. Conclusion: Our GPU-based proton transport MC is the first of its kind to include a detailed nuclear model to handle NE interactions on any nucleus. Dosimetric calculations demonstrate very good agreement with Geant4.9.6p2/TOPAS. Our MC is being integrated into a framework to perform fast routine clinical QA of pencil

  1. Comparison of SPECT/CT, MRI and CT in diagnosis of skull base bone invasion in nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shu-xu; Han, Peng-hui; Zhang, Guo-qian; Wang, Rui-hao; Ge, Yong-bin; Ren, Zhi-gang; Li, Jian-sheng; Fu, Wen-hai

    2014-01-01

    Early detection of skull base invasion in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is crucial for correct staging, assessing treatment response and contouring the tumor target in radiotherapy planning, as well as improving the patient's prognosis. To compare the diagnostic efficacy of single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) imaging, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) for the detection of skull base invasion in NPC. Sixty untreated patients with histologically proven NPC underwent SPECT/CT imaging, contrast-enhanced MRI and CT. Of the 60 patients, 30 had skull base invasion confirmed by the final results of contrast-enhanced MRI, CT and six-month follow-up imaging (MRI and CT). The diagnostic efficacy of the three imaging modalities in detecting skull base invasion was evaluated. The rates of positive findings of skull base invasion for SPECT/CT, MRI and CT were 53.3%, 48.3% and 33.3%, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 93.3%, 86.7% and 90.0% for SPECT/CT fusion imaging, 96.7%, 100.0% and 98.3% for contrast-enhanced MRI, and 66.7%, 100.0% and 83.3% for contrast-enhanced CT. MRI showed the best performance for the diagnosis of skull base invasion in nasopharyngeal carcinoma, followed closely by SPECT/CT. SPECT/CT had poorer specificity than that of both MRI and CT, while CT had the lowest sensitivity.

  2. Laryngeal adenocystic carcinoma treated by proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiyama, Tomonori; Araki, Mamika; Fukukita, Kouhei; Yamada, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    Adenocystic carcinoma most commonly develops in the major salivary glands, on the other hand it is rare for adenocystic carcinoma to develop in the larynx. We report a case of adenocystic carcinoma in the larynx. A 54-year-old male was hospitalized with symptoms of hoarseness and dyspnea on exertion. He presented a tumor that developed at the base of the right arytenoid, and covered over the glottis. It was confirmed to be adenocystic carcinoma (solid type) by biopsy. Positron emission tomography (PET)-CT also revealed a left cervical lymph node metastasis and multiple pulmonary metastases (T1N2cM1). He was treated with proton therapy to the larynx to prevent airway obstruction by growth of the tumor and to preserve the larynx because he had uncontrollable pulmonary metastasis. Although the tumor vanished after the treatment, one month later he had halitosis, dyspnea and bilateral vocal cord palsy. Despite administration of an antibacterial drug and steroid, there was no improvement to the narrowness of the glottis. A tracheotomy was therefore performed three months after the proton therapy. PET-CT, which was performed after the tracheotomy, suggested growth of the residual tumor or laryngeal radionecrosis. This study confirmed that proton therapy is effective for adenocystic carcinoma in the larynx. However, proton therapy also was found to cause laryngeal radionecrosis. These results indicate the importance of evaluating the side effects of radiation therapy and providing that information to the patient. (author)

  3. Proton irradiation effects on gallium nitride-based devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmarkar, Aditya P.

    Proton radiation effects on state-of-the-art gallium nitride-based devices were studied using Schottky diodes and high electron-mobility transistors. The device degradation was studied over a wide range of proton fluences. This study allowed for a correlation between proton irradiation effects between different types of devices and enhanced the understanding of the mechanisms responsible for radiation damage in GaN-based devices. Proton irradiation causes reduced carrier concentration and increased series resistance and ideality factor in Schottky diodes. 1.0-MeV protons cause greater degradation than 1.8-MeV protons because of their higher non-ionizing energy loss. The displacement damage in Schottky diodes recovers during annealing. High electron-mobility transistors exhibit extremely high radiation tolerance, continuing to perform up to a fluence of ˜1014 cm-2 of 1.8-MeV protons. Proton irradiation creates defect complexes in the thin-film structure. Decreased sheet carrier mobility due to increased carrier scattering and decreased sheet carrier density due to carrier removal by the defect centers are the primary damage mechanisms. Interface disorder at either the Schottky or the Ohmic contact plays a relatively unimportant part in overall device degradation in both Schottky diodes and high electron-mobility transistors.

  4. Compensation techniques in NIRS proton beam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akanuma, A.; Majima, H.; Furukawa, S.

    1982-01-01

    Proton beam has the dose distribution advantage in radiation therapy, although it has little advantage in biological effects. One of the best advantages is its sharp fall off of dose after the peak. With proton beam, therefore, the dose can be given just to cover a target volume and potentially no dose is delivered thereafter in the beam direction. To utilize this advantage, bolus techniques in conjunction with CT scanning are employed in NIRS proton beam radiation therapy planning. A patient receives CT scanning first so that the target volume can be clearly marked and the radiation direction and fixation method can be determined. At the same time bolus dimensions are calculated. The bolus frames are made with dental paraffin sheets according to the dimensions. The paraffin frame is replaced with dental resin. Alginate (a dental impression material with favorable physical density and skin surface contact) is now employed for the bolus material. With fixation device and bolus on, which are constructed individually, the patient receives CT scanning again prior to a proton beam treatment in order to prove the devices are suitable. Alginate has to be poured into the frame right before each treatments. Further investigations are required to find better bolus materials and easier construction methods

  5. Compensation techniques in NIRS proton beam radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akanuma, A. (Univ. of Tokyo, Japan); Majima, H.; Furukawa, S.

    1982-09-01

    Proton beam has the dose distribution advantage in radiation therapy, although it has little advantage in biological effects. One of the best advantages is its sharp fall off of dose after the peak. With proton beam, therefore, the dose can be given just to cover a target volume and potentially no dose is delivered thereafter in the beam direction. To utilize this advantage, bolus techniques in conjunction with CT scanning are employed in NIRS proton beam radiation therapy planning. A patient receives CT scanning first so that the target volume can be clearly marked and the radiation direction and fixation method can be determined. At the same time bolus dimensions are calculated. The bolus frames are made with dental paraffin sheets according to the dimensions. The paraffin frame is replaced with dental resin. Alginate (a dental impression material with favorable physical density and skin surface contact) is now employed for the bolus material. With fixation device and bolus on, which are constructed individually, the patient receives CT scanning again prior to a proton beam treatment in order to prove the devices are suitable. Alginate has to be poured into the frame right before each treatments. Further investigations are required to find better bolus materials and easier construction methods.

  6. SU-G-TeP2-13: Patient-Specific Reduction of Range Uncertainties in Proton Therapy by Proton Radiography with a Multi-Layer Ionization Chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deffet, S; Macq, B; Farace, P; Righetto, R; Vander Stappen, F

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The conversion from Hounsfield units (HU) to stopping powers is a major source of range uncertainty in proton therapy (PT). Our contribution shows how proton radiographs (PR) acquired with a multi-layer ionization chamber in a PT center can be used for accurate patient positioning and subsequently for patient-specific optimization of the conversion from HU to stopping powers. Methods: A multi-layer ionization chamber was used to measure the integral depth-dose (IDD) of 220 MeV pencil beam spots passing through several anthropomorphic phantoms. The whole area of interest was imaged by repositioning the couch and by acquiring a 45×45 mm"2 frame for each position. A rigid registration algorithm was implemented to correct the positioning error between the proton radiographs and the planning CT. After registration, the stopping power map obtained from the planning CT with the calibration curve of the treatment planning system was used together with the water equivalent thickness gained from two proton radiographs to generate a phantom-specific stopping power map. Results: Our results show that it is possible to make a registration with submillimeter accuracy from proton radiography obtained by sending beamlets separated by more than 1 mm. This was made possible by the complex shape of the IDD due to the presence of lateral heterogeneities along the path of the beam. Submillimeter positioning was still possible with a 5 mm spot spacing. Phantom specific stopping power maps obtained by minimizing the range error were cross-verified by the acquisition of an additional proton radiography where the phantom was positioned in a random but known manner. Conclusion: Our results indicate that a CT-PR registration algorithm together with range-error based optimization can be used to produce a patient-specific stopping power map. Sylvain Deffet reports financial funding of its PhD thesis by Ion Beam Applications (IBA) during the confines of the study and outside the

  7. SU-G-TeP2-13: Patient-Specific Reduction of Range Uncertainties in Proton Therapy by Proton Radiography with a Multi-Layer Ionization Chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deffet, S; Macq, B [Universite catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Farace, P; Righetto, R [Trento Hospital / APSS, Trento (Italy); Vander Stappen, F [Ion Beam Applications (IBA), Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The conversion from Hounsfield units (HU) to stopping powers is a major source of range uncertainty in proton therapy (PT). Our contribution shows how proton radiographs (PR) acquired with a multi-layer ionization chamber in a PT center can be used for accurate patient positioning and subsequently for patient-specific optimization of the conversion from HU to stopping powers. Methods: A multi-layer ionization chamber was used to measure the integral depth-dose (IDD) of 220 MeV pencil beam spots passing through several anthropomorphic phantoms. The whole area of interest was imaged by repositioning the couch and by acquiring a 45×45 mm{sup 2} frame for each position. A rigid registration algorithm was implemented to correct the positioning error between the proton radiographs and the planning CT. After registration, the stopping power map obtained from the planning CT with the calibration curve of the treatment planning system was used together with the water equivalent thickness gained from two proton radiographs to generate a phantom-specific stopping power map. Results: Our results show that it is possible to make a registration with submillimeter accuracy from proton radiography obtained by sending beamlets separated by more than 1 mm. This was made possible by the complex shape of the IDD due to the presence of lateral heterogeneities along the path of the beam. Submillimeter positioning was still possible with a 5 mm spot spacing. Phantom specific stopping power maps obtained by minimizing the range error were cross-verified by the acquisition of an additional proton radiography where the phantom was positioned in a random but known manner. Conclusion: Our results indicate that a CT-PR registration algorithm together with range-error based optimization can be used to produce a patient-specific stopping power map. Sylvain Deffet reports financial funding of its PhD thesis by Ion Beam Applications (IBA) during the confines of the study and outside the

  8. Hydrated proton and hydroxide charge transfer at the liquid/vapor interface of water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soniat, Marielle; Rick, Steven W., E-mail: srick@uno.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of New Orleans, New Orleans, Louisiana 70148 (United States); Kumar, Revati [Department of Chemistry, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70808 (United States)

    2015-07-28

    The role of the solvated excess proton and hydroxide ions in interfacial properties is an interesting scientific question with applications in a variety of aqueous behaviors. The role that charge transfer (CT) plays in interfacial behavior is also an unsettled question. Quantum calculations are carried out on clusters of water with an excess proton or a missing proton (hydroxide) to determine their CT. The quantum results are applied to analysis of multi-state empirical valence bond trajectories. The polyatomic nature of the solvated excess proton and hydroxide ion results in directionally dependent CT, depending on whether a water molecule is a hydrogen bond donor or acceptor in relation to the ion. With polyatomic molecules, CT also depends on the intramolecular bond distances in addition to intermolecular distances. The hydrated proton and hydroxide affect water’s liquid/vapor interface in a manner similar to monatomic ions, in that they induce a hydrogen-bonding imbalance at the surface, which results in charged surface waters. This hydrogen bond imbalance, and thus the charged waters at the surface, persists until the ion is at least 10 Å away from the interface.

  9. Hydrated proton and hydroxide charge transfer at the liquid/vapor interface of water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soniat, Marielle; Rick, Steven W.; Kumar, Revati

    2015-01-01

    The role of the solvated excess proton and hydroxide ions in interfacial properties is an interesting scientific question with applications in a variety of aqueous behaviors. The role that charge transfer (CT) plays in interfacial behavior is also an unsettled question. Quantum calculations are carried out on clusters of water with an excess proton or a missing proton (hydroxide) to determine their CT. The quantum results are applied to analysis of multi-state empirical valence bond trajectories. The polyatomic nature of the solvated excess proton and hydroxide ion results in directionally dependent CT, depending on whether a water molecule is a hydrogen bond donor or acceptor in relation to the ion. With polyatomic molecules, CT also depends on the intramolecular bond distances in addition to intermolecular distances. The hydrated proton and hydroxide affect water’s liquid/vapor interface in a manner similar to monatomic ions, in that they induce a hydrogen-bonding imbalance at the surface, which results in charged surface waters. This hydrogen bond imbalance, and thus the charged waters at the surface, persists until the ion is at least 10 Å away from the interface

  10. Development and Integration of the CT-PPS Fast Simulation in the CMS Software

    OpenAIRE

    Fonseca De Souza, Sandro

    2017-01-01

    CT-PPS (CMS-TOTEM Precision Proton Spectrometer) is a joint project of the CMS and TOTEM collaborations with the goal of studying central exclusive production (CEP) in proton-proton collisions. A simplified simulation and reconstruction code for CT-PPS has been implemented in the CMS fast simulation package FastSim. Protons scattered at very low polar angles are propagated along the LHC beamlines from the generated vertex to the detectors by means of the beam transport package Hector. The rec...

  11. NMR experiments for the measurement of proton-proton and carbon-carbon residual dipolar couplings in uniformly labelled oligosaccharides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin-Pastor, Manuel [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Laboratorio Integral de Estructura de Biomoleculas Jose. R. Carracido, Unidade de Resonancia Magnetica, RIAIDT (Spain)], E-mail: mmartin@usc.es; Canales-Mayordomo, Angeles; Jimenez-Barbero, Jesus [Departamento de Estructura y funcion de proteinas, Centro de Investigaciones Biologicas, CSIC (Spain)], E-mail: jjbarbero@cib.csic.es

    2003-08-15

    A 2D-HSQC-carbon selective/proton selective-constant time COSY, 2D-HSQC-(sel C, sel H)-CT COSY experiment, which is applicable to uniformly {sup 13}C isotopically enriched samples (U-{sup 13}C) of oligosaccharides or oligonucleotides is proposed for the measurement of proton-proton RDC in crowded regions of 2D-spectra. In addition, a heteronuclear constant time-COSY experiment, {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C CT-COSY, is proposed for the measurement of one bond carbon-carbon RDC in these molecules. These two methods provide an extension, to U-{sup 13}C molecules, of the original homonuclear constant time-COSY experiment proposed by Tian et al. (1999) for saccharides. The combination of a number of these RDC with NOE data may provide the method of choice to study oligosaccharide conformation in the free and receptor-bound state.

  12. Prostate CT segmentation method based on nonrigid registration in ultrasound-guided CT-based HDR prostate brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Xiaofeng, E-mail: xyang43@emory.edu; Rossi, Peter; Ogunleye, Tomi; Marcus, David M.; Jani, Ashesh B.; Curran, Walter J.; Liu, Tian [Department of Radiation Oncology and Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States); Mao, Hui [Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: The technological advances in real-time ultrasound image guidance for high-dose-rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy have placed this treatment modality at the forefront of innovation in cancer radiotherapy. Prostate HDR treatment often involves placing the HDR catheters (needles) into the prostate gland under the transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guidance, then generating a radiation treatment plan based on CT prostate images, and subsequently delivering high dose of radiation through these catheters. The main challenge for this HDR procedure is to accurately segment the prostate volume in the CT images for the radiation treatment planning. In this study, the authors propose a novel approach that integrates the prostate volume from 3D TRUS images into the treatment planning CT images to provide an accurate prostate delineation for prostate HDR treatment. Methods: The authors’ approach requires acquisition of 3D TRUS prostate images in the operating room right after the HDR catheters are inserted, which takes 1–3 min. These TRUS images are used to create prostate contours. The HDR catheters are reconstructed from the intraoperative TRUS and postoperative CT images, and subsequently used as landmarks for the TRUS–CT image fusion. After TRUS–CT fusion, the TRUS-based prostate volume is deformed to the CT images for treatment planning. This method was first validated with a prostate-phantom study. In addition, a pilot study of ten patients undergoing HDR prostate brachytherapy was conducted to test its clinical feasibility. The accuracy of their approach was assessed through the locations of three implanted fiducial (gold) markers, as well as T2-weighted MR prostate images of patients. Results: For the phantom study, the target registration error (TRE) of gold-markers was 0.41 ± 0.11 mm. For the ten patients, the TRE of gold markers was 1.18 ± 0.26 mm; the prostate volume difference between the authors’ approach and the MRI-based volume was 7.28% ± 0

  13. Prostate CT segmentation method based on nonrigid registration in ultrasound-guided CT-based HDR prostate brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaofeng; Rossi, Peter; Ogunleye, Tomi; Marcus, David M.; Jani, Ashesh B.; Mao, Hui; Curran, Walter J.; Liu, Tian

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The technological advances in real-time ultrasound image guidance for high-dose-rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy have placed this treatment modality at the forefront of innovation in cancer radiotherapy. Prostate HDR treatment often involves placing the HDR catheters (needles) into the prostate gland under the transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guidance, then generating a radiation treatment plan based on CT prostate images, and subsequently delivering high dose of radiation through these catheters. The main challenge for this HDR procedure is to accurately segment the prostate volume in the CT images for the radiation treatment planning. In this study, the authors propose a novel approach that integrates the prostate volume from 3D TRUS images into the treatment planning CT images to provide an accurate prostate delineation for prostate HDR treatment. Methods: The authors’ approach requires acquisition of 3D TRUS prostate images in the operating room right after the HDR catheters are inserted, which takes 1–3 min. These TRUS images are used to create prostate contours. The HDR catheters are reconstructed from the intraoperative TRUS and postoperative CT images, and subsequently used as landmarks for the TRUS–CT image fusion. After TRUS–CT fusion, the TRUS-based prostate volume is deformed to the CT images for treatment planning. This method was first validated with a prostate-phantom study. In addition, a pilot study of ten patients undergoing HDR prostate brachytherapy was conducted to test its clinical feasibility. The accuracy of their approach was assessed through the locations of three implanted fiducial (gold) markers, as well as T2-weighted MR prostate images of patients. Results: For the phantom study, the target registration error (TRE) of gold-markers was 0.41 ± 0.11 mm. For the ten patients, the TRE of gold markers was 1.18 ± 0.26 mm; the prostate volume difference between the authors’ approach and the MRI-based volume was 7.28% ± 0

  14. Development and Integration of the CT-PPS Fast Simulation in the CMS Software

    CERN Document Server

    Fonseca De Souza, Sandro

    2017-01-01

    CT-PPS (CMS-TOTEM Precision Proton Spectrometer) is a joint project of the CMS and TOTEM collaborations with the goal of studying central exclusive production (CEP) in proton-proton collisions. A simplified simulation and reconstruction code for CT-PPS has been implemented in the CMS fast simulation package FastSim. Protons scattered at very low polar angles are propagated along the LHC beamlines from the generated vertex to the detectors by means of the beam transport package Hector. The reconstructed proton tracks are obtained from the simulated hits in the tracking detectors and are used to determine the proton kinematics at the vertex. The timing information is added to the tracks.

  15. CT-based injury classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirvis, S.E.; Whitley, N.O.; Vainright, J.; Gens, D.

    1988-01-01

    Review of preoperative abdominal CT scans obtained in adults after blunt trauma during a 2.5-year period demonstrated isolated or predominant liver injury in 35 patients and splenic injury in 33 patients. CT-based injury scores, consisting of five levels of hepatic injury and four levels of splenic injury, were correlated with clinical outcome and surgical findings. Hepatic injury grades I-III, present in 33 of 35 patients, were associated with successful nonsurgical management in 27 (82%) or with findings at celiotomy not requiring surgical intervention in four (12%). Higher grades of splenic injury generally required early operative intervention, but eight (36%) of 22 patients with initial grade III or IV injury were managed without surgery, while four (36%) of 11 patients with grade I or II injury required delayed celiotomy and splenectomy (three patients) or emergent rehospitalization (one patient). CT-based injury classification is useful in guiding the nonoperative management of blunt hepatic injury in hemodynamically stable adults but appears to be less reliable in predicting the outcome of blunt splenic injury

  16. Advanced proton imaging in computed tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Mattiazzo, S; Giubilato, P; Pantano, D; Pozzobon, N; Snoeys, W; Wyss, J

    2015-01-01

    In recent years the use of hadrons for cancer radiation treatment has grown in importance, and many facilities are currently operational or under construction worldwide. To fully exploit the therapeutic advantages offered by hadron therapy, precise body imaging for accurate beam delivery is decisive. Proton computed tomography (pCT) scanners, currently in their R&D phase, provide the ultimate 3D imaging for hadrons treatment guidance. A key component of a pCT scanner is the detector used to track the protons, which has great impact on the scanner performances and ultimately limits its maximum speed. In this article, a novel proton-tracking detector was presented that would have higher scanning speed, better spatial resolution and lower material budget with respect to present state-of-the-art detectors, leading to enhanced performances. This advancement in performances is achieved by employing the very latest development in monolithic active pixel detectors (to build high granularity, low material budget, ...

  17. SU-F-J-109: Generate Synthetic CT From Cone Beam CT for CBCT-Based Dose Calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, H; Barbee, D; Wang, W; Pennell, R; Hu, K; Osterman, K [Department of Radiation Oncology, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The use of CBCT for dose calculation is limited by its HU inaccuracy from increased scatter. This study presents a method to generate synthetic CT images from CBCT data by a probabilistic classification that may be robust to CBCT noise. The feasibility of using the synthetic CT for dose calculation is evaluated in IMRT for unilateral H&N cancer. Methods: In the training phase, a fuzzy c-means classification was performed on HU vectors (CBCT, CT) of planning CT and registered day-1 CBCT image pair. Using the resulting centroid CBCT and CT values for five classified “tissue” types, a synthetic CT for a daily CBCT was created by classifying each CBCT voxel to obtain its probability belonging to each tissue class, then assigning a CT HU with a probability-weighted summation of the classes’ CT centroids. Two synthetic CTs from a CBCT were generated: s-CT using the centroids from classification of individual patient CBCT/CT data; s2-CT using the same centroids for all patients to investigate the applicability of group-based centroids. IMRT dose calculations for five patients were performed on the synthetic CTs and compared with CT-planning doses by dose-volume statistics. Results: DVH curves of PTVs and critical organs calculated on s-CT and s2-CT agree with those from planning-CT within 3%, while doses calculated with heterogeneity off or on raw CBCT show DVH differences up to 15%. The differences in PTV D95% and spinal cord max are 0.6±0.6% and 0.6±0.3% for s-CT, and 1.6±1.7% and 1.9±1.7% for s2-CT. Gamma analysis (2%/2mm) shows 97.5±1.6% and 97.6±1.6% pass rates for using s-CTs and s2-CTs compared with CT-based doses, respectively. Conclusion: CBCT-synthesized CTs using individual or group-based centroids resulted in dose calculations that are comparable to CT-planning dose for unilateral H&N cancer. The method may provide a tool for accurate dose calculation based on daily CBCT.

  18. SU-F-J-109: Generate Synthetic CT From Cone Beam CT for CBCT-Based Dose Calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, H; Barbee, D; Wang, W; Pennell, R; Hu, K; Osterman, K

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The use of CBCT for dose calculation is limited by its HU inaccuracy from increased scatter. This study presents a method to generate synthetic CT images from CBCT data by a probabilistic classification that may be robust to CBCT noise. The feasibility of using the synthetic CT for dose calculation is evaluated in IMRT for unilateral H&N cancer. Methods: In the training phase, a fuzzy c-means classification was performed on HU vectors (CBCT, CT) of planning CT and registered day-1 CBCT image pair. Using the resulting centroid CBCT and CT values for five classified “tissue” types, a synthetic CT for a daily CBCT was created by classifying each CBCT voxel to obtain its probability belonging to each tissue class, then assigning a CT HU with a probability-weighted summation of the classes’ CT centroids. Two synthetic CTs from a CBCT were generated: s-CT using the centroids from classification of individual patient CBCT/CT data; s2-CT using the same centroids for all patients to investigate the applicability of group-based centroids. IMRT dose calculations for five patients were performed on the synthetic CTs and compared with CT-planning doses by dose-volume statistics. Results: DVH curves of PTVs and critical organs calculated on s-CT and s2-CT agree with those from planning-CT within 3%, while doses calculated with heterogeneity off or on raw CBCT show DVH differences up to 15%. The differences in PTV D95% and spinal cord max are 0.6±0.6% and 0.6±0.3% for s-CT, and 1.6±1.7% and 1.9±1.7% for s2-CT. Gamma analysis (2%/2mm) shows 97.5±1.6% and 97.6±1.6% pass rates for using s-CTs and s2-CTs compared with CT-based doses, respectively. Conclusion: CBCT-synthesized CTs using individual or group-based centroids resulted in dose calculations that are comparable to CT-planning dose for unilateral H&N cancer. The method may provide a tool for accurate dose calculation based on daily CBCT.

  19. SPECT/CT in the Diagnosis of Skull Base Osteomyelitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damle, Nishikant Avinash; Kumar, Rakesh; Kumar, Praveen; Jaganthan, Sriram; Patnecha, Manish; Bal, Chandrasekhar; Bandopadhyaya, Gurupad; Malhotra, Arun

    2011-01-01

    Skull base osteomyelitis is a potentially fatal disease. We demonstrate here the utility of SPECT/CT in diagnosing this entity, which was not obvious on a planar bone scan. A 99mT c MDP bone scan with SPECT/CT was carried out on a patient with clinically suspected skull base osteomyelitis. Findings were correlated with contrast enhanced CT (CECT) and MRI. Planar images were equivocal, but SPECT/CT showed intense uptake in the body of sphenoid and petrous temporal bone as well as the atlas corresponding to irregular bone destruction on CT and MRI. These findings indicate that SPECT/CT may have an additional role beyond planar imaging in the detection of skull base osteomyelitis.

  20. Measurement of high-mass dilepton production with the CMS-TOTEM Precision Proton Spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Shchelina, Ksenia

    2017-01-01

    The measurements of dilepton production in photon-photon fusion with the CMS-TOTEM Precision Proton Spectrometer (CT-PPS) are presented. For the first time, exclusive dilepton production at high masses have been observed in the CMS detector while one or two outgoing protons are measured in CT-PPS using around 10~${\\rm fb}^{-1}$ of data accumulated in 2016 during high-luminosity LHC operation. These first results show a good understanding, calibration and alignment of the new CT-PPS detectors installed in 2016.

  1. Photon and proton therapy planning comparison for malignant glioma based on CT, FDG-PET, DTI-MRI and fiber tracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munck af Rosenschoeld, Per; Engelholm, Silke; Ohlhues, Lars; Vogelius, Ivan; Engelholm, Svend Aage (Radiation Medicine Research Center, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark)), e-mail: per.munck@rh.regionh.dk; Law, Ian (Dept. of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear Medicine and PET, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark))

    2011-08-15

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to compare treatment plans generated using fixed beam Intensity Modulated photon Radiation Therapy (IMRT), inversely optimized arc therapy (RapidArc(R), RA) with spot-scanned Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy (IMPT) for high-grade glioma patients. Plans were compared with respect to target coverage and sparing of organs at risk (OARs), with special attention to the possibility of hippocampus sparing. Method. Fifteen consecutive patients diagnosed with grade III and IV glioma were selected for this study. The target and OARs were delineated based on computed tomography (CT), FDG-positron emission tomography (PET) and T1-, T2-weighted, and Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and fiber-tracking. In this study, a 6 MV photon beam on a linear accelerator with a multileaf collimator (MLC) with 2.5 mm leaves and a spot-scanning proton therapy machine were used. Two RA fields, using both a coplanar (clinical standard) and a non-coplanar, setup was compared to the IMRT and IMPT techniques. Three and three to four non-coplanar fields where used in the spot-scanned IMPT and IMRT plans, respectively. The same set of planning dose-volume optimizer objective values were used for the four techniques. The highest planning priority was given to the brainstem (maximum 54 Gy) followed by the PTV (prescription 60 Gy); the hippocampi, eyes, inner ears, brain and chiasm were given lower priority. Doses were recorded for the plans to targets and OARs and compared to our clinical standard technique using the Wilcoxon signed rank test. Result. The PTV coverage was significantly more conform for IMPT than the coplanar RA technique, while RA plans tended to be more conform than the IMRT plans, as measured by the standard deviation of the PTV dose. In the cases where the tumor was confined in one cerebral hemisphere (eight patients), the non-coplanar RA and IMPT techniques yielded borderline significantly lower doses to the

  2. Sci-Fri PM: Radiation Therapy, Planning, Imaging, and Special Techniques - 01: On the use of proton radiography to reduce beam range uncertainties and improve patient positioning accuracy in proton therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins-Fekete, Charles-Antoine; Beaulieu, Luc; Seco, Joao [Université Laval/ CHU de Québec, Université Laval/CHU de Québec, Massachussetts General Hospital/ Harvard Medical School (United States)

    2016-08-15

    To present two related developments of proton radiography (pRad) to minimize range uncertainty in proton therapy. The first combines a pRad with an X-ray CT to produce a patient-specific relative stopping power (RSP) map. The second aims to improve the pRad spatial resolution for accurate registration prior to the first. The enhanced-pRad can also be used in a novel proton-CT reconstruction algorithm. Monte Carlo pRad were computed from three phantoms; the Gammex, the Catphan and an anthropomorphic head. An optimized cubic-spline estimator derives the most likely path. The length crossed by the protons voxel-by-voxel was calculated by combining their estimated paths with the CT. The difference between the theoretical (length×RSP) and measured energy loss was minimized through a least squares optimization (LSO) algorithm yielding the RSP map. To increase pRad spatial resolution for registration with the CT, the phantom was discretized into voxels columns. The average column RSP was optimized to maximize the proton energy loss likelihood (MLE). Simulations showed precise RSP (<0.75%) for Gammex materials except low-density lung (<1.2%). For the head, accurate RSP were obtained (µ=−0.10%1.5σ=1.12%) and the range precision was improved (ΔR80 of −0.20±0.35%). Spatial resolution was increased in pRad (2.75 to 6.71 lp/cm) and pCT from MLE-enhanced pRad (2.83 to 5.86 lp/cm). The LSO decreases the range uncertainty (R80σ<1.0%) while the MLE-enhanced pRad spatial resolution (+244%) and is a great candidate for pCT reconstruction.

  3. Investigation of in vivo PIXE effect within superficial tumor model of high-Z metalnanoplatform for PIXE-based proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Ki; Seo, Seung Jun; Lee, Ju Hong

    2010-04-01

    Metallic nanoparticles (MNP) are able to release localized X-ray when activated with high energy proton beam by particle induced X-ray emissions (PIXE) effect. The exploitation of this phenomenon in the therapeutic irradiation of tumors has been investigated. PIXE-based X-ray emission directed at CT-26 tumor cells in vitro, when administered with either gold (average diameter, 2 nm and 13 nm) or iron (average diameter, 14 nm) nanoparticles, increased with MNP solution concentration over the range of 0.1-2 mg/mL. With irradiation by 45-MeV proton therapy (PT) beam, higher concentrations had a decreased cell survival fraction. An in vivo study with tumor regression assay demonstrated significant tumor dose enhancement, thought to be result of the PIXE effect when compared to conventional PT without MNP using a 45 MeV proton beam (p<0.01). These effects were observed for gold and iron MNP, injected in doses of 100-300mg/kg body weight into CT-26 mouse tumor models via tail vein. A therapeutic effective MNP concentration range, in vivo,was estimated at 30-79 μg/g tissue for both gold and iron nanoparticles. The tumor dose enhancement may compensate for an increase in entrance dose associated with conventional PT when treating large, solid tumors with a spread out Bragg peak (SOBP) technique. The use of combined high energy Bragg peak PT with PIXE generated by MNP, or PIXE alone may result in new treatment options for infiltrative metastatic tumors and other diffuse inflammatory diseases

  4. SU-E-J-158: Experimental Investigation of Proton Radiography Based On Time-Resolved Dose Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Testa, M; Paganetti, H; Lu, H-M [Massachusetts General Hospital ' Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Doolan, P [University College London (United Kingdom); H, Bentefour E [IBA, Warrenville, IL (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To use proton radiography for i) in-vivo range verification of the brain fields of medulloblastoma patients in order to reduce the exit dose to the cranial skin and thus the risk of permanent alopecia; ii) for performing patient specific optimization of the calibration from CT-Hounsfield units to proton relative stopping power in order to minimize uncertainties of proton rang Methods: We developed and tested a prototype proton radiography system based on a single-plane scintillation screen coupled with a fast CCD camera (1ms sampling rate, 0.29x0.29 mm{sup 2} pixel size, 30×30 cm{sup 2} field of view). The method is based on the principle that, for passively scattered beams, the radiological depth of any point in the plateau of a spread-out Bragg-Peak (SOBP) can be inferred from the time-pattern of the dose rate measurements. We performed detector characterization measurements using complex-shape homogeneous phantoms and an Alderson phanto Results: Detector characterization tests confirmed the robustness of the technique. The results of the phantom measurements are encouraging in terms of achievable accuracy of the water equivalent thickness. A technique to minimize the degradation of spatial resolution due to multiple Coulomb scattering is discussed. Our novel radiographic technique is rapid (100 ms) and simultaneous over the whole field. The dose required to produce one radiograph, with the current settings, is ∼3 cG Conclusion: The results obtained with this simple and innovative radiography method are promising and motivate further development of technique. The system requires only a single-plane 2D dosimeter and it uses the clinical beam for a fraction of second with low dose to the patient.

  5. Comparison of MRI-based and CT/MRI fusion-based postimplant dosimetric analysis of prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Osamu; Hayashi, Shinya; Matsuo, Masayuki; Sakurai, Kota; Nakano, Masahiro; Maeda, Sunaho; Kajita, Kimihiro R.T.; Deguchi, Takashi; Hoshi, Hiroaki

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to compare the outcomes between magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based and computed tomography (CT)/MRI fusion-based postimplant dosimetry methods in permanent prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Between October 2004 and March 2006, a total of 52 consecutive patients with prostate cancer were treated by brachytherapy, and postimplant dosimetry was performed using CT/MRI fusion. The accuracy and reproducibility were prospectively compared between MRI-based dosimetry and CT/MRI fusion-based dosimetry based on the dose-volume histogram (DVH) related parameters as recommended by the American Brachytherapy Society. Results: The prostate volume was 15.97 ± 6.17 cc (mean ± SD) in MRI-based dosimetry, and 15.97 ± 6.02 cc in CT/MRI fusion-based dosimetry without statistical difference. The prostate V100 was 94.5% and 93.0% in MRI-based and CT/MRI fusion-based dosimetry, respectively, and the difference was statistically significant (p = 0.002). The prostate D90 was 119.4% and 114.4% in MRI-based and CT/MRI fusion-based dosimetry, respectively, and the difference was statistically significant (p = 0.004). Conclusion: Our current results suggested that, as with fusion images, MR images allowed accurate contouring of the organs, but they tended to overestimate the analysis of postimplant dosimetry in comparison to CT/MRI fusion images. Although this MRI-based dosimetric discrepancy was negligible, MRI-based dosimetry was acceptable and reproducible in comparison to CT-based dosimetry, because the difference between MRI-based and CT/MRI fusion-based results was smaller than that between CT-based and CT/MRI fusion-based results as previously reported

  6. Parallel proton transfer pathways in aqueous acid-base reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cox, M.J.; Bakker, H.J.

    2008-01-01

    We study the mechanism of proton transfer (PT) between the photoacid 8-hydroxy-1,3, 6-pyrenetrisulfonic acid (HPTS) and the base chloroacetate in aqueous solution. We investigate both proton and deuteron transfer reactions in solutions with base concentrations ranging from 0.25M to 4M. Using

  7. Application of single- and dual-energy CT brain tissue segmentation to PET monitoring of proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berndt, Bianca; Landry, Guillaume; Schwarz, Florian; Tessonnier, Thomas; Kamp, Florian; Dedes, George; Thieke, Christian; Würl, Matthias; Kurz, Christopher; Ganswindt, Ute; Verhaegen, Frank; Debus, Jürgen; Belka, Claus; Sommer, Wieland; Reiser, Maximilian; Bauer, Julia; Parodi, Katia

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate the ability of single and dual energy computed tomography (SECT, DECT) to estimate tissue composition and density for usage in Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of irradiation induced β + activity distributions. This was done to assess the impact on positron emission tomography (PET) range verification in proton therapy. A DECT-based brain tissue segmentation method was developed for white matter (WM), grey matter (GM) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The elemental composition of reference tissues was assigned to closest CT numbers in DECT space (DECTdist). The method was also applied to SECT data (SECTdist). In a validation experiment, the proton irradiation induced PET activity of three brain equivalent solutions (BES) was compared to simulations based on different tissue segmentations. Five patients scanned with a dual source DECT scanner were analyzed to compare the different segmentation methods. A single magnetic resonance (MR) scan was used for comparison with an established segmentation toolkit. Additionally, one patient with SECT and post-treatment PET scans was investigated. For BES, DECTdist and SECTdist reduced differences to the reference simulation by up to 62% when compared to the conventional stoichiometric segmentation (SECTSchneider). In comparison to MR brain segmentation, Dice similarity coefficients for WM, GM and CSF were 0.61, 0.67 and 0.66 for DECTdist and 0.54, 0.41 and 0.66 for SECTdist. MC simulations of PET treatment verification in patients showed important differences between DECTdist/SECTdist and SECTSchneider for patients with large CSF areas within the treatment field but not in WM and GM. Differences could be misinterpreted as PET derived range shifts of up to 4 mm. DECTdist and SECTdist yielded comparable activity distributions, and comparison of SECTdist to a measured patient PET scan showed improved agreement when compared to SECTSchneider. The agreement between predicted and measured PET

  8. Degradation of proton depth dose distributions attributable to microstructures in lung-equivalent material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Titt, Uwe, E-mail: utitt@mdanderson.org; Mirkovic, Dragan; Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Sell, Martin [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 and Department of Medical Physics, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, Heidelberg 69120 (Germany); Unkelbach, Jan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, 55 Fruit Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States); Bangert, Mark [Department of Medical Physics, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, Heidelberg 69120 (Germany); Oelfke, Uwe [Department of Medical Physics, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, Heidelberg 69120, Germany and Department of Physics, The Institute of Cancer Research, 123 Old Brompton Road, London SW7 3RP (United Kingdom)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: The purpose of the work reported here was to investigate the influence of sub-millimeter size heterogeneities on the degradation of the distal edges of proton beams and to validate Monte Carlo (MC) methods’ ability to correctly predict such degradation. Methods: A custom-designed high-resolution plastic phantom approximating highly heterogeneous, lung-like structures was employed in measurements and in Monte Carlo simulations to evaluate the degradation of proton Bragg curves penetrating heterogeneous media. Results: Significant differences in distal falloff widths and in peak dose values were observed in the measured and the Monte Carlo simulated curves compared to pristine proton Bragg curves. Furthermore, differences between simulations of beams penetrating CT images of the phantom did not agree well with the corresponding experimental differences. The distal falloff widths in CT image-based geometries were underestimated by up to 0.2 cm in water (corresponding to 0.8–1.4 cm in lung tissue), and the peak dose values of pristine proton beams were overestimated by as much as ~35% compared to measured curves or depth-dose curves simulated on the basis of true geometry. The authors demonstrate that these discrepancies were caused by the limited spatial resolution of CT images that served as a basis for dose calculations and lead to underestimation of the impact of the fine structure of tissue heterogeneities. A convolution model was successfully applied to mitigate the underestimation. Conclusions: The results of this study justify further development of models to better represent heterogeneity effects in soft-tissue geometries, such as lung, and to correct systematic underestimation of the degradation of the distal edge of proton doses.

  9. Degradation of proton depth dose distributions attributable to microstructures in lung-equivalent material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Titt, Uwe; Mirkovic, Dragan; Mohan, Radhe; Sell, Martin; Unkelbach, Jan; Bangert, Mark; Oelfke, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the work reported here was to investigate the influence of sub-millimeter size heterogeneities on the degradation of the distal edges of proton beams and to validate Monte Carlo (MC) methods’ ability to correctly predict such degradation. Methods: A custom-designed high-resolution plastic phantom approximating highly heterogeneous, lung-like structures was employed in measurements and in Monte Carlo simulations to evaluate the degradation of proton Bragg curves penetrating heterogeneous media. Results: Significant differences in distal falloff widths and in peak dose values were observed in the measured and the Monte Carlo simulated curves compared to pristine proton Bragg curves. Furthermore, differences between simulations of beams penetrating CT images of the phantom did not agree well with the corresponding experimental differences. The distal falloff widths in CT image-based geometries were underestimated by up to 0.2 cm in water (corresponding to 0.8–1.4 cm in lung tissue), and the peak dose values of pristine proton beams were overestimated by as much as ~35% compared to measured curves or depth-dose curves simulated on the basis of true geometry. The authors demonstrate that these discrepancies were caused by the limited spatial resolution of CT images that served as a basis for dose calculations and lead to underestimation of the impact of the fine structure of tissue heterogeneities. A convolution model was successfully applied to mitigate the underestimation. Conclusions: The results of this study justify further development of models to better represent heterogeneity effects in soft-tissue geometries, such as lung, and to correct systematic underestimation of the degradation of the distal edge of proton doses

  10. MO-A-201-01: A Cliff’s Notes Version of Proton Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruse, J.

    2016-01-01

    Proton therapy is a rapidly growing modality in the fight against cancer. From a high-level perspective the process of proton therapy is identical to x-ray based external beam radiotherapy. However, this course is meant to illustrate for x-ray physicists the many differences between x-ray and proton based practices. Unlike in x-ray therapy, proton dose calculations use CT Hounsfield Units (HU) to determine proton stopping power and calculate the range of a beam in a patient. Errors in stopping power dominate the dosimetric uncertainty in the beam direction, while variations in patient position determine uncertainties orthogonal to the beam path. Mismatches between geometric and range errors lead to asymmetric uncertainties, and so while geometric uncertainties in x-ray therapy are mitigated through the use of a Planning Target Volume (PTV), this approach is not suitable for proton therapy. Robust treatment planning and evaluation are critical in proton therapy, and will be discussed in this course. Predicting the biological effect of a proton dose distribution within a patient is also a complex undertaking. The proton therapy community has generally regarded the Radiobiological Effectiveness (RBE) of a proton beam to be 1.1 everywhere in the patient, but there are increasing data to suggest that the RBE probably climbs higher than 1.1 near the end of a proton beam when the energy deposition density increases. This lecture will discuss the evidence for variable RBE in proton therapy and describe how this is incorporated into current proton treatment planning strategies. Finally, there are unique challenges presented by the delivery process of proton therapy. Many modern systems use a spot scanning technique which has several advantages over earlier scattered beam designs. However, the time dependence of the dose deposition leads to greater concern with organ motion than with scattered protons or x-rays. Image guidance techniques in proton therapy may also differ

  11. MO-A-201-00: A Cliff’s Notes Version of Proton Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    Proton therapy is a rapidly growing modality in the fight against cancer. From a high-level perspective the process of proton therapy is identical to x-ray based external beam radiotherapy. However, this course is meant to illustrate for x-ray physicists the many differences between x-ray and proton based practices. Unlike in x-ray therapy, proton dose calculations use CT Hounsfield Units (HU) to determine proton stopping power and calculate the range of a beam in a patient. Errors in stopping power dominate the dosimetric uncertainty in the beam direction, while variations in patient position determine uncertainties orthogonal to the beam path. Mismatches between geometric and range errors lead to asymmetric uncertainties, and so while geometric uncertainties in x-ray therapy are mitigated through the use of a Planning Target Volume (PTV), this approach is not suitable for proton therapy. Robust treatment planning and evaluation are critical in proton therapy, and will be discussed in this course. Predicting the biological effect of a proton dose distribution within a patient is also a complex undertaking. The proton therapy community has generally regarded the Radiobiological Effectiveness (RBE) of a proton beam to be 1.1 everywhere in the patient, but there are increasing data to suggest that the RBE probably climbs higher than 1.1 near the end of a proton beam when the energy deposition density increases. This lecture will discuss the evidence for variable RBE in proton therapy and describe how this is incorporated into current proton treatment planning strategies. Finally, there are unique challenges presented by the delivery process of proton therapy. Many modern systems use a spot scanning technique which has several advantages over earlier scattered beam designs. However, the time dependence of the dose deposition leads to greater concern with organ motion than with scattered protons or x-rays. Image guidance techniques in proton therapy may also differ

  12. MO-A-201-00: A Cliff’s Notes Version of Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2016-06-15

    Proton therapy is a rapidly growing modality in the fight against cancer. From a high-level perspective the process of proton therapy is identical to x-ray based external beam radiotherapy. However, this course is meant to illustrate for x-ray physicists the many differences between x-ray and proton based practices. Unlike in x-ray therapy, proton dose calculations use CT Hounsfield Units (HU) to determine proton stopping power and calculate the range of a beam in a patient. Errors in stopping power dominate the dosimetric uncertainty in the beam direction, while variations in patient position determine uncertainties orthogonal to the beam path. Mismatches between geometric and range errors lead to asymmetric uncertainties, and so while geometric uncertainties in x-ray therapy are mitigated through the use of a Planning Target Volume (PTV), this approach is not suitable for proton therapy. Robust treatment planning and evaluation are critical in proton therapy, and will be discussed in this course. Predicting the biological effect of a proton dose distribution within a patient is also a complex undertaking. The proton therapy community has generally regarded the Radiobiological Effectiveness (RBE) of a proton beam to be 1.1 everywhere in the patient, but there are increasing data to suggest that the RBE probably climbs higher than 1.1 near the end of a proton beam when the energy deposition density increases. This lecture will discuss the evidence for variable RBE in proton therapy and describe how this is incorporated into current proton treatment planning strategies. Finally, there are unique challenges presented by the delivery process of proton therapy. Many modern systems use a spot scanning technique which has several advantages over earlier scattered beam designs. However, the time dependence of the dose deposition leads to greater concern with organ motion than with scattered protons or x-rays. Image guidance techniques in proton therapy may also differ

  13. MO-A-201-01: A Cliff’s Notes Version of Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruse, J. [Mayo Clinic (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Proton therapy is a rapidly growing modality in the fight against cancer. From a high-level perspective the process of proton therapy is identical to x-ray based external beam radiotherapy. However, this course is meant to illustrate for x-ray physicists the many differences between x-ray and proton based practices. Unlike in x-ray therapy, proton dose calculations use CT Hounsfield Units (HU) to determine proton stopping power and calculate the range of a beam in a patient. Errors in stopping power dominate the dosimetric uncertainty in the beam direction, while variations in patient position determine uncertainties orthogonal to the beam path. Mismatches between geometric and range errors lead to asymmetric uncertainties, and so while geometric uncertainties in x-ray therapy are mitigated through the use of a Planning Target Volume (PTV), this approach is not suitable for proton therapy. Robust treatment planning and evaluation are critical in proton therapy, and will be discussed in this course. Predicting the biological effect of a proton dose distribution within a patient is also a complex undertaking. The proton therapy community has generally regarded the Radiobiological Effectiveness (RBE) of a proton beam to be 1.1 everywhere in the patient, but there are increasing data to suggest that the RBE probably climbs higher than 1.1 near the end of a proton beam when the energy deposition density increases. This lecture will discuss the evidence for variable RBE in proton therapy and describe how this is incorporated into current proton treatment planning strategies. Finally, there are unique challenges presented by the delivery process of proton therapy. Many modern systems use a spot scanning technique which has several advantages over earlier scattered beam designs. However, the time dependence of the dose deposition leads to greater concern with organ motion than with scattered protons or x-rays. Image guidance techniques in proton therapy may also differ

  14. TH-CD-202-05: DECT Based Tissue Segmentation as Input to Monte Carlo Simulations for Proton Treatment Verification Using PET Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berndt, B; Wuerl, M; Dedes, G; Landry, G; Parodi, K; Tessonnier, T; Schwarz, F; Kamp, F; Thieke, C; Belka, C; Reiser, M; Sommer, W; Bauer, J; Verhaegen, F

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To improve agreement of predicted and measured positron emitter yields in patients, after proton irradiation for PET-based treatment verification, using a novel dual energy CT (DECT) tissue segmentation approach, overcoming known deficiencies from single energy CT (SECT). Methods: DECT head scans of 5 trauma patients were segmented and compared to existing decomposition methods with a first focus on the brain. For validation purposes, three brain equivalent solutions [water, white matter (WM) and grey matter (GM) – equivalent with respect to their reference carbon and oxygen contents and CT numbers at 90kVp and 150kVp] were prepared from water, ethanol, sucrose and salt. The activities of all brain solutions, measured during a PET scan after uniform proton irradiation, were compared to Monte Carlo simulations. Simulation inputs were various solution compositions obtained from different segmentation approaches from DECT, SECT scans, and known reference composition. Virtual GM solution salt concentration corrections were applied based on DECT measurements of solutions with varying salt concentration. Results: The novel tissue segmentation showed qualitative improvements in %C for patient brain scans (ground truth unavailable). The activity simulations based on reference solution compositions agree with the measurement within 3–5% (4–8Bq/ml). These reference simulations showed an absolute activity difference between WM (20%C) and GM (10%C) to H2O (0%C) of 43 Bq/ml and 22 Bq/ml, respectively. Activity differences between reference simulations and segmented ones varied from −6 to 1 Bq/ml for DECT and −79 to 8 Bq/ml for SECT. Conclusion: Compared to the conventionally used SECT segmentation, the DECT based segmentation indicates a qualitative and quantitative improvement. In controlled solutions, a MC input based on DECT segmentation leads to better agreement with the reference. Future work will address the anticipated improvement of quantification

  15. TH-CD-202-05: DECT Based Tissue Segmentation as Input to Monte Carlo Simulations for Proton Treatment Verification Using PET Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berndt, B; Wuerl, M; Dedes, G; Landry, G; Parodi, K [Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Garching, DE (Germany); Tessonnier, T [Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Garching, DE (Germany); Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg, Heidelberg, DE (Germany); Schwarz, F; Kamp, F; Thieke, C; Belka, C; Reiser, M; Sommer, W [LMU Munich, Munich, DE (Germany); Bauer, J [Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg, Heidelberg, DE (Germany); Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center, Heidelberg, DE (Germany); Verhaegen, F [Maastro Clinic, Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To improve agreement of predicted and measured positron emitter yields in patients, after proton irradiation for PET-based treatment verification, using a novel dual energy CT (DECT) tissue segmentation approach, overcoming known deficiencies from single energy CT (SECT). Methods: DECT head scans of 5 trauma patients were segmented and compared to existing decomposition methods with a first focus on the brain. For validation purposes, three brain equivalent solutions [water, white matter (WM) and grey matter (GM) – equivalent with respect to their reference carbon and oxygen contents and CT numbers at 90kVp and 150kVp] were prepared from water, ethanol, sucrose and salt. The activities of all brain solutions, measured during a PET scan after uniform proton irradiation, were compared to Monte Carlo simulations. Simulation inputs were various solution compositions obtained from different segmentation approaches from DECT, SECT scans, and known reference composition. Virtual GM solution salt concentration corrections were applied based on DECT measurements of solutions with varying salt concentration. Results: The novel tissue segmentation showed qualitative improvements in %C for patient brain scans (ground truth unavailable). The activity simulations based on reference solution compositions agree with the measurement within 3–5% (4–8Bq/ml). These reference simulations showed an absolute activity difference between WM (20%C) and GM (10%C) to H2O (0%C) of 43 Bq/ml and 22 Bq/ml, respectively. Activity differences between reference simulations and segmented ones varied from −6 to 1 Bq/ml for DECT and −79 to 8 Bq/ml for SECT. Conclusion: Compared to the conventionally used SECT segmentation, the DECT based segmentation indicates a qualitative and quantitative improvement. In controlled solutions, a MC input based on DECT segmentation leads to better agreement with the reference. Future work will address the anticipated improvement of quantification

  16. Uncertainties in planned dose due to the limited voxel size of the planning CT when treating lung tumors with proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espana, Samuel; Paganetti, Harald

    2011-01-01

    Dose calculation for lung tumors can be challenging due to the low density and the fine structure of the geometry. The latter is not fully considered in the CT image resolution used in treatment planning causing the prediction of a more homogeneous tissue distribution. In proton therapy, this could result in predicting an unrealistically sharp distal dose falloff, i.e. an underestimation of the distal dose falloff degradation. The goal of this work was the quantification of such effects. Two computational phantoms resembling a two-dimensional heterogeneous random lung geometry and a swine lung were considered applying a variety of voxel sizes for dose calculation. Monte Carlo simulations were used to compare the dose distributions predicted with the voxel size typically used for the treatment planning procedure with those expected to be delivered using the finest resolution. The results show, for example, distal falloff position differences of up to 4 mm between planned and expected dose at the 90% level for the heterogeneous random lung (assuming treatment plan on a 2 x 2 x 2.5 mm 3 grid). For the swine lung, differences of up to 38 mm were seen when airways are present in the beam path when the treatment plan was done on a 0.8 x 0.8 x 2.4 mm 3 grid. The two-dimensional heterogeneous random lung phantom apparently does not describe the impact of the geometry adequately because of the lack of heterogeneities in the axial direction. The differences observed in the swine lung between planned and expected dose are presumably due to the poor axial resolution of the CT images used in clinical routine. In conclusion, when assigning margins for treatment planning for lung cancer, proton range uncertainties due to the heterogeneous lung geometry and CT image resolution need to be considered.

  17. PET/CT Based Dose Planning in Radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berthelsen, Anne Kiil; Jakobsen, Annika Loft; Sapru, Wendy

    2011-01-01

    radiotherapy planning with PET/CT prior to the treatment. The PET/CT, including the radiotherapy planning process as well as the radiotherapy process, is outlined in detail. The demanding collaboration between mould technicians, nuclear medicine physicians and technologists, radiologists and radiology......This mini-review describes how to perform PET/CT based radiotherapy dose planning and the advantages and possibilities obtained with the technique for radiation therapy. Our own experience since 2002 is briefly summarized from more than 2,500 patients with various malignant diseases undergoing...... technologists, radiation oncologists, physicists, and dosimetrists is emphasized. We strongly believe that PET/CT based radiotherapy planning will improve the therapeutic output in terms of target definition and non-target avoidance and will play an important role in future therapeutic interventions in many...

  18. Kinetics of proton migration in liquid water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hanning; Voth, Gregory A; Agmon, Noam

    2010-01-14

    We have utilized multistate empirical valence bond (MS-EVB3) simulations of protonated liquid water to calculate the relative mean-square displacement (MSD) and the history-independent time correlation function, c(t), of the hydrated proton center of excess charge (CEC) with respect to the water molecule on which it has initially resided. The MSD is nonlinear for the first 15 ps, suggesting that the relative diffusion coefficient increases from a small value, D(0), at short separations to its larger bulk value, D(infinity), at large separations. With the ensuing distance-dependent diffusion coefficient, D(r), the time dependence of both the MSD and c(t) agrees quantitatively with the solution of a diffusion equation for reversible geminate recombination. This suggests that the relative motion of the CEC is not independent from the nearby water molecules, in agreement with theoretical and experimental observations that large water clusters participate in the mechanism of proton mobility.

  19. Computing proton dose to irregularly moving targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, Justin; Gueorguiev, Gueorgui; Grassberger, Clemens; Dowdell, Stephen; Paganetti, Harald; Sharp, Gregory C; Shackleford, James A

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: While four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) and deformable registration can be used to assess the dose delivered to regularly moving targets, there are few methods available for irregularly moving targets. 4DCT captures an idealized waveform, but human respiration during treatment is characterized by gradual baseline shifts and other deviations from a periodic signal. This paper describes a method for computing the dose delivered to irregularly moving targets based on 1D or 3D waveforms captured at the time of delivery. Methods: The procedure uses CT or 4DCT images for dose calculation, and 1D or 3D respiratory waveforms of the target position at time of delivery. Dose volumes are converted from their Cartesian geometry into a beam-specific radiological depth space, parameterized in 2D by the beam aperture, and longitudinally by the radiological depth. In this new frame of reference, the proton doses are translated according to the motion found in the 1D or 3D trajectory. These translated dose volumes are weighted and summed, then transformed back into Cartesian space, yielding an estimate of the dose that includes the effect of the measured breathing motion. The method was validated using a synthetic lung phantom and a single representative patient CT. Simulated 4DCT was generated for the phantom with 2 cm peak-to-peak motion. Results: A passively-scattered proton treatment plan was generated using 6 mm and 5 mm smearing for the phantom and patient plans, respectively. The method was tested without motion, and with two simulated breathing signals: a 2 cm amplitude sinusoid, and a 2 cm amplitude sinusoid with 3 cm linear drift in the phantom. The tumor positions were equally weighted for the patient calculation. Motion-corrected dose was computed based on the mid-ventilation CT image in the phantom and the peak exhale position in the patient. Gamma evaluation was 97.8% without motion, 95.7% for 2 cm sinusoidal motion, 95.7% with 3 cm drift in

  20. Proton Therapy for Skull Base Chordomas: An Outcome Study from the University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute

    OpenAIRE

    Deraniyagala, Rohan L.; Yeung, Daniel; Mendenhall, William M.; Li, Zuofeng; Morris, Christopher G.; Mendenhall, Nancy P.; Okunieff, Paul; Malyapa, Robert S.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Skull base chordoma is a rare, locally aggressive tumor located adjacent to critical structures. Gross total resection is difficult to achieve, and proton therapy has the conformal advantage of delivering a high postoperative dose to the tumor bed. We present our experience using proton therapy to treat 33 patients with skull base chordomas.

  1. A modified VMAT adaptive radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal cancer patients based on CT-CT image fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Xiance; Han, Ce; Zhou, Yongqiang; Yi, Jinling; Yan, Huawei; Xie, Congying

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the feasibility and benefits of a modified adaptive radiotherapy (ART) by replanning in the initial CT (iCT) with new contours from a repeat CT (rCT) based on CT-CT image fusion for nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) patients underwent volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT). Nine NPC patients underwent VMAT treatment with a rCT at 23rd fraction were enrolled in this study. Dosimetric differences for replanning VMAT plans in the iCT and in the rCT were compared. Volumetric and dosimetric changes of gross tumor volume (GTV) and organs at risk (OARs) of this modified ART were also investigated. No dosimetric differences between replanning in the iCT and in the rCT were observed. The average volume of GTV decreased from 78.83 ± 38.42 cm 3 in the iCT to 71.44 ± 37.46 cm 3 in the rCT, but with no significant difference (p = 0.42).The average volume of the left and right parotid decreased from 19.91 ± 4.89 cm 3 and 21.58 ± 6.16 cm 3 in the iCT to 11.80 ± 2.79 cm 3 and 13.29 ± 4.17 cm 3 in the rCT (both p < 0.01), respectively. The volume of other OARs did not shrink very much. No significant differences on PTV GTV and PTV CTV coverage were observed for replanning with this modified ART. Compared to the initial plans, the average mean dose of the left and right parotid after re-optimization were decreased by 62.5 cGy (p = 0.05) and 67.3 cGy (p = 0.02), respectively, and the V5 (the volume receiving 5 Gy) of the left and right parotids were decreased by 7.8% (p = 0.01) and 11.2% (p = 0.001), respectively. There was no significant difference on the dose delivered to other OARs. Patients with NPC undergoing VMAT have significant anatomic and dosimetric changes to parotids. Repeat CT as an anatomic changes reference and re-optimization in the iCT based on CT-CT image fusion was accurate enough to identify the volume changes and to ensure safe dose to parotids

  2. SU-F-J-195: On the Performance of Four Dual Energy CT Formalisms for Extracting Proton Stopping Powers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baer, E; Royle, G [University College London, London (United Kingdom); Lalonde, A; Bouchard, H [University of Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Dual energy CT can predict stopping power ratios (SPR) for ion therapy treatment planning. Several approaches have been proposed recently, however accuracy and practicability in a clinical workflow are unaddressed. The aim of this work is to provide a fair comparison of available approaches in a human-like phantom to find the optimal method for tissue characterization in a clinical situation. Methods: The SPR determination accuracy is investigated using simulated DECT images. A virtual human-like phantom is created containing 14 different standard human tissues. SECT (120 kV) and DECT images (100 kV and 140 kV Sn) are simulated using the software ImaSim. The single energy CT (SECT) stoichiometric calibration method and four recently published calibration-based DECT methods are implemented and used to predict the SPRs from simulated images. The difference between SPR predictions and theoretical SPR are compared pixelwize. Mean, standard deviation and skewness of the SPR difference distributions are used as measures for bias, dispersion and symmetry. Results: The average SPR differences and standard deviations are (0.22 ± 1.27)% for SECT, and A) (−0.26 ± 1.30)%, B) (0.08 ± 1.12)%, C) (0.06 ± 1.15)% and D) (−0.05 ± 1.05)% for the four DECT methods. While SPR prediction using SECT is showing a systematic error on SPR, the DECT methods B, C and D are unbiased. The skewness of the SECT distribution is 0.57%, and A) −0.19%, B) −0.56%, C) −0.29% and D) −0.07% for DECT methods respectively. Conclusion: The here presented DECT methods B, C and D outperform the commonly used SECT stoichiometric calibration. These methods predict SPR accurately without a bias and within ± 1.2% (68th percentile). This indicates that DECT potentially improves accuracy of range predictions in proton therapy. A validation of these findings using clinical CT images of real tissues is necessary.

  3. SU-E-T-470: Importance of HU-Mass Density Calibration Technique in Proton Pencil Beam Dose Calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penfold, S; Miller, A [University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA (Australia)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Stoichiometric calibration of Hounsfield Units (HUs) for conversion to proton relative stopping powers (RStPs) is vital for accurate dose calculation in proton therapy. However proton dose distributions are not only dependent on RStP, but also on relative scattering power (RScP) of patient tissues. RScP is approximated from material density but a stoichiometric calibration of HU-density tables is commonly neglected. The purpose of this work was to quantify the difference in calculated dose of a commercial TPS when using HU-density tables based on tissue substitute materials and stoichiometric calibrated ICRU tissues. Methods: Two HU-density calibration tables were generated based on scans of the CIRS electron density phantom. The first table was based directly on measured HU and manufacturer quoted density of tissue substitute materials. The second was based on the same CT scan of the CIRS phantom followed by a stoichiometric calibration of ICRU44 tissue materials. The research version of Pinnacle{sup 3} proton therapy was used to compute dose in a patient CT data set utilizing both HU-density tables. Results: The two HU-density tables showed significant differences for bone tissues; the difference increasing with increasing HU. Differences in density calibration table translated to a difference in calculated RScP of −2.5% for ICRU skeletal muscle and 9.2% for ICRU femur. Dose-volume histogram analysis of a parallel opposed proton therapy prostate plan showed that the difference in calculated dose was negligible when using the two different HU-density calibration tables. Conclusion: The impact of HU-density calibration technique on proton therapy dose calculation was assessed. While differences were found in the calculated RScP of bony tissues, the difference in dose distribution for realistic treatment scenarios was found to be insignificant.

  4. Design and Construction of Detector and Data Acquisition Elements for Proton Computed Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fermi Research Alliance; Northern Illinois University

    2015-01-01

    Proton computed tomography (pCT) offers an alternative to x-ray imaging with potential for three-dimensional imaging, reduced radiation exposure, and in-situ imaging. Northern Illinois University (NIU) is developing a second-generation proton computed tomography system with a goal of demonstrating the feasibility of three-dimensional imaging within clinically realistic imaging times. The second-generation pCT system is comprised of a tracking system, a calorimeter, data acquisition, a computing farm, and software algorithms. The proton beam encounters the upstream tracking detectors, the patient or phantom, the downstream tracking detectors, and a calorimeter. The schematic layout of the PCT system is shown. The data acquisition sends the proton scattering information to an offline computing farm. Major innovations of the second generation pCT project involve an increased data acquisition rate ( MHz range) and development of three-dimensional imaging algorithms. The Fermilab Particle Physics Division and Northern Illinois Center for Accelerator and Detector Development at Northern Illinois University worked together to design and construct the tracking detectors, calorimeter, readout electronics and detector mounting system.

  5. Using a knowledge-based planning solution to select patients for proton therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, Alexander R; Dahele, Max; Tol, Jim P; Kuijper, Ingrid T; Slotman, Ben J; Verbakel, Wilko F A R

    2017-08-01

    Patient selection for proton therapy by comparing proton/photon treatment plans is time-consuming and prone to bias. RapidPlan™, a knowledge-based-planning solution, uses plan-libraries to model and predict organ-at-risk (OAR) dose-volume-histograms (DVHs). We investigated whether RapidPlan, utilizing an algorithm based only on photon beam characteristics, could generate proton DVH-predictions and whether these could correctly identify patients for proton therapy. Model PROT and Model PHOT comprised 30 head-and-neck cancer proton and photon plans, respectively. Proton and photon knowledge-based-plans (KBPs) were made for ten evaluation-patients. DVH-prediction accuracy was analyzed by comparing predicted-vs-achieved mean OAR doses. KBPs and manual plans were compared using salivary gland and swallowing muscle mean doses. For illustration, patients were selected for protons if predicted Model PHOT mean dose minus predicted Model PROT mean dose (ΔPrediction) for combined OARs was ≥6Gy, and benchmarked using achieved KBP doses. Achieved and predicted Model PROT /Model PHOT mean dose R 2 was 0.95/0.98. Generally, achieved mean dose for Model PHOT /Model PROT KBPs was respectively lower/higher than predicted. Comparing Model PROT /Model PHOT KBPs with manual plans, salivary and swallowing mean doses increased/decreased by <2Gy, on average. ΔPrediction≥6Gy correctly selected 4 of 5 patients for protons. Knowledge-based DVH-predictions can provide efficient, patient-specific selection for protons. A proton-specific RapidPlan-solution could improve results. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. SU-E-T-287: Robustness Study of Passive-Scattering Proton Therapy in Lung: Is Range and Setup Uncertainty Calculation On the Initial CT Enough to Predict the Plan Robustness?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, X; Dormer, J; Kenton, O; Liu, H; Simone, C; Solberg, T; Lin, L [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Plan robustness of the passive-scattering proton therapy treatment of lung tumors has been studied previously using combined uncertainties of 3.5% in CT number and 3 mm geometric shifts. In this study, we investigate whether this method is sufficient to predict proton plan robustness by comparing to plans performed on weekly verification CT scans. Methods: Ten lung cancer patients treated with passive-scattering proton therapy were randomly selected. All plans were prescribed 6660cGy in 37 fractions. Each initial plan was calculated using +/− 3.5% range and +/− 0.3cm setup uncertainty in x, y and z directions in Eclipse TPS(Method-A). Throughout the treatment course, patients received weekly verification CT scans to assess the daily treatment variation(Method-B). After contours and imaging registrations are verified by the physician, the initial plan with the same beamline and compensator was mapped into the verification CT. Dose volume histograms (DVH) were evaluated for robustness study. Results: Differences are observed between method A and B in terms of iCTV coverage and lung dose. Method-A shows all the iCTV D95 are within +/− 1% difference, while 20% of cases fall outside +/−1% range in Method-B. In the worst case scenario(WCS), the iCTV D95 is reduced by 2.5%. All lung V5 and V20 are within +/−5% in Method-A while 15% of V5 and 10% of V20 fall outside of +/−5% in Method-B. In the WCS, Lung V5 increased by 15% and V20 increased by 9%. Method A and B show good agreement with regard to cord maximum and Esophagus mean dose. Conclusion: This study suggests that using range and setup uncertainty calculation (+/−3.5% and +/−3mm) may not be sufficient to predict the WCS. In the absence of regular verification scans, expanding the conventional uncertainty parameters(e.g., to +/−3.5% and +/−4mm) may be needed to better reflect plan actual robustness.

  7. Proton-air and proton-proton cross sections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Ralf

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Different attempts to measure hadronic cross sections with cosmic ray data are reviewed. The major results are compared to each other and the differences in the corresponding analyses are discussed. Besides some important differences, it is crucial to see that all analyses are based on the same fundamental relation of longitudinal air shower development to the observed fluctuation of experimental observables. Furthermore, the relation of the measured proton-air to the more fundamental proton-proton cross section is discussed. The current global picture combines hadronic proton-proton cross section data from accelerator and cosmic ray measurements and indicates a good consistency with predictions of models up to the highest energies.

  8. SU-E-T-622: Planning Technique for Passively-Scattered Involved-Node Proton Therapy of Mediastinal Lymphoma with Consideration of Cardiac Motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flampouri, S; Li, Z; Hoppe, B [University of Florida Health Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, FL (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a treatment planning method for passively-scattered involved-node proton therapy of mediastinal lymphoma robust to breathing and cardiac motions. Methods: Beam-specific planning treatment volumes (bsPTV) are calculated for each proton field to incorporate pertinent uncertainties. Geometric margins are added laterally to each beam while margins for range uncertainty due to setup errors, breathing, and calibration curve uncertainties are added along each beam. The calculation of breathing motion and deformation effects on proton range includes all 4DCT phases. The anisotropic water equivalent margins are translated to distances on average 4DCT. Treatment plans are designed so each beam adequately covers the corresponding bsPTV. For targets close to the heart, cardiac motion effects on dosemaps are estimated by using a library of anonymous ECG-gated cardiac CTs (cCT). The cCT, originally contrast-enhanced, are partially overridden to allow meaningful proton dose calculations. Targets similar to the treatment targets are drawn on one or more cCT sets matching the anatomy of the patient. Plans based on the average cCT are calculated on individual phases, then deformed to the average and accumulated. When clinically significant dose discrepancies occur between planned and accumulated doses, the patient plan is modified to reduce the cardiac motion effects. Results: We found that bsPTVs as planning targets create dose distributions similar to the conventional proton planning distributions, while they are a valuable tool for visualization of the uncertainties. For large targets with variability in motion and depth, integral dose was reduced because of the anisotropic margins. In most cases, heart motion has a clinically insignificant effect on target coverage. Conclusion: A treatment planning method was developed and used for proton therapy of mediastinal lymphoma. The technique incorporates bsPTVs compensating for all common sources of uncertainties

  9. First Clinical Investigation of Cone Beam Computed Tomography and Deformable Registration for Adaptive Proton Therapy for Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veiga, Catarina [Proton and Advanced RadioTherapy Group, Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Janssens, Guillaume [Ion Beam Applications SA, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Teng, Ching-Ling [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Baudier, Thomas; Hotoiu, Lucian [iMagX Project, ICTEAM Institute, Université Catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); McClelland, Jamie R. [Centre for Medical Image Computing, Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Royle, Gary [Proton and Advanced RadioTherapy Group, Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Lin, Liyong; Yin, Lingshu; Metz, James; Solberg, Timothy D.; Tochner, Zelig; Simone, Charles B.; McDonough, James [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Kevin Teo, Boon-Keng, E-mail: teok@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: An adaptive proton therapy workflow using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is proposed. It consists of an online evaluation of a fast range-corrected dose distribution based on a virtual CT (vCT) scan. This can be followed by more accurate offline dose recalculation on the vCT scan, which can trigger a rescan CT (rCT) for replanning. Methods and Materials: The workflow was tested retrospectively for 20 consecutive lung cancer patients. A diffeomorphic Morphon algorithm was used to generate the lung vCT by deforming the average planning CT onto the CBCT scan. An additional correction step was applied to account for anatomic modifications that cannot be modeled by deformation alone. A set of clinical indicators for replanning were generated according to the water equivalent thickness (WET) and dose statistics and compared with those obtained on the rCT scan. The fast dose approximation consisted of warping the initial planned dose onto the vCT scan according to the changes in WET. The potential under- and over-ranges were assessed as a variation in WET at the target's distal surface. Results: The range-corrected dose from the vCT scan reproduced clinical indicators similar to those of the rCT scan. The workflow performed well under different clinical scenarios, including atelectasis, lung reinflation, and different types of tumor response. Between the vCT and rCT scans, we found a difference in the measured 95% percentile of the over-range distribution of 3.4 ± 2.7 mm. The limitations of the technique consisted of inherent uncertainties in deformable registration and the drawbacks of CBCT imaging. The correction step was adequate when gross errors occurred but could not recover subtle anatomic or density changes in tumors with complex topology. Conclusions: A proton therapy workflow based on CBCT provided clinical indicators similar to those using rCT for patients with lung cancer with considerable anatomic changes.

  10. Fan beam intensity modulated proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Patrick M.

    A fan beam proton therapy is developed which delivers intensity modulated proton therapy using distal edge tracking. The system may be retrofit onto existing proton therapy gantries without alterations to infrastructure in order to improve treatments through intensity modulation. A novel range and intensity modulation system is designed using acrylic leaves that are inserted or retracted from subsections of the fan beam. Leaf thicknesses are chosen in a base-2 system and motivated in a binary manner. Dose spots from individual beam channels range between 1 and 5 cm. Integrated collimators attempting to limit crosstalk among beam channels are investigated, but found to be inferior to uncollimated beam channel modulators. A treatment planning system performing data manipulation in MATLAB and dose calculation in MCNPX is developed. Beamlet dose is calculated on patient CT data and a fan beam source is manually defined to produce accurate results. An energy deposition tally follows the CT grid, allowing straightforward registration of dose and image data. Simulations of beam channels assume that a beam channel either delivers dose to a distal edge spot or is intensity modulated. A final calculation is performed separately to determine the deliverable dose accounting for all sources of scatter. Treatment plans investigate the effects that varying system parameters have on dose distributions. Beam channel apertures may be as large as 20 mm because the sharp distal falloff characteristic of proton dose provides sufficient intensity modulation to meet dose objectives, even in the presence of coarse lateral resolution. Dose conformity suffers only when treatments are delivered from less than 10 angles. Jaw widths of 1--2 cm produce comparable dose distributions, but a jaw width of 4 cm produces unacceptable target coverage when maintaining critical structure avoidance. Treatment time for a prostate delivery is estimated to be on the order of 10 minutes. Neutron production

  11. Comparing photon and proton-based hypofractioned SBRT for prostate cancer accounting for robustness and realistic treatment deliverability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goddard, Lee C; Brodin, N Patrik; Bodner, William R; Garg, Madhur K; Tomé, Wolfgang A

    2018-05-01

    To investigate whether photon or proton-based stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT is the preferred modality for high dose hypofractionation prostate cancer treatment. Achievable dose distributions were compared when uncertainties in target positioning and range uncertainties were appropriately accounted for. 10 patients with prostate cancer previously treated at our institution (Montefiore Medical Center) with photon SBRT using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) were identified. MRI images fused to the treatment planning CT allowed for accurate target and organ at risk (OAR) delineation. The clinical target volume was defined as the prostate gland plus the proximal seminal vesicles. Critical OARs include the bladder wall, bowel, femoral heads, neurovascular bundle, penile bulb, rectal wall, urethra and urogenital diaphragm. Photon plan robustness was evaluated by simulating 2 mm isotropic setup variations. Comparative proton SBRT plans employing intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) were generated using robust optimization. Plan robustness was evaluated by simulating 2 mm setup variations and 3% or 1% Hounsfield unit (HU) calibration uncertainties. Comparable maximum OAR doses are achievable between photon and proton SBRT, however, robust optimization results in higher maximum doses for proton SBRT. Rectal maximum doses are significantly higher for Robust proton SBRT with 1% HU uncertainty compared to photon SBRT (p = 0.03), whereas maximum doses were comparable for bladder wall (p = 0.43), urethra (p = 0.82) and urogenital diaphragm (p = 0.50). Mean doses to bladder and rectal wall are lower for proton SBRT, but higher for neurovascular bundle, urethra and urogenital diaphragm due to increased lateral scatter. Similar target conformality is achieved, albeit with slightly larger treated volume ratios for proton SBRT, >1.4 compared to 1.2 for photon SBRT. Similar treatment plans can be generated with IMPT compared to VMAT in terms of

  12. Pattern Recognition-Based Analysis of COPD in CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lauge Emil Borch Laurs

    recognition part is used to turn the texture measures, measured in a CT image of the lungs, into a quantitative measure of disease. This is done by applying a classifier that is trained on a training set of data examples with known lung tissue patterns. Different classification systems are considered, and we...... will in particular use the pattern recognition concepts of supervised learning, multiple instance learning, and dissimilarity representation-based classification. The proposed texture-based measures are applied to CT data from two different sources, one comprising low dose CT slices from subjects with manually...... annotated regions of emphysema and healthy tissue, and one comprising volumetric low dose CT images from subjects that are either healthy or suffer from COPD. Several experiments demonstrate that it is clearly beneficial to take the lung tissue texture into account when classifying or quantifying emphysema...

  13. Geometrical optimization of a particle tracking system for proton computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penfold, S.N.; Rosenfeld, A.B.; Schulte, R.W.; Sadrozinksi, H.-F.W.

    2011-01-01

    Proton computed tomography (pCT) is currently being developed as an imaging modality for improving the accuracy of treatment planning in proton therapy. A tracking telescope comprising eight planes of single-sided silicon strip detectors (SSDs) forms an integral part of our present pCT design. Due to the currently maximum available Si wafer size, the sensitive area of 9 cm × 18 cm of the pCT tracker requires each tracking plane to be composed of two individual SSDs, which creates potential reconstruction problems due to overlap or gaps of the sensitive SSD areas. Furthermore, the spacing of the tracking planes creates competing design requirements between compactness and spatial resolution. Two Monte Carlo simulations were performed to study the effect of tracking detector location on pCT image quality. It was found that a “shingled” detector design suppressed reconstruction artefacts and, for the spatial resolution of the current detector hardware, reconstructed spatial resolution was not improved with a tracking separation of greater than 8 cm.

  14. WE-AB-202-06: Correlating Lung CT HU with Transformation-Based and Xe-CT Derived Ventilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du, K; Patton, T; Bayouth, J; Reinhardt, J; Christensen, G

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Regional lung ventilation is useful to reduce radiation-induced function damage during lung cancer radiation therapy. Recently a new direct HU (Hounsfield unit)-based method was proposed to estimate the ventilation potential without image registration. The purpose of this study is to examine if there is a functional dependence between HU values and transformation-based or Xe-CT derived ventilation. Methods: 4DCT images acquired from 13 patients prior to radiation therapy and 4 mechanically ventilated sheep subjects which also have associated Xe-CT images were used for this analysis. Transformation-based ventilation was computed using Jacobian determinant of the transformation field between peak-exhale and peak-inhale 4DCT images. Both transformation and Xe-CT derived ventilation was computed for each HU bin. Color scatter plot and cumulative histogram were used to compare and validate the direct HU-based method. Results: There was little change of the center and shape of the HU histograms between free breathing CT and 4DCT average, with or without smoothing, and between the repeated 4DCT scans. HU of −750 and −630 were found to have the greatest transformation-based ventilation for human and sheep subjects, respectively. Maximum Xe-CT derived ventilation was found to locate at HU of −600 in sheep subjects. The curve between Xe-CT ventilation and HU was noisy for tissue above HU −400, possibly due to less intensity change of Xe gas during wash-out and wash-in phases. Conclusion: Both transformation-based and Xe-CT ventilation demonstrated that lung tissues with HU values in the range of (-750, −600) HU have the maximum ventilation potential. The correlation between HU and ventilation suggests that HU might be used to help guide the ventilation calculation and make it more robust to noise and image registration errors. Research support from NIH grants CA166703 and CA166119 and a gift from Roger Koch.

  15. WE-AB-202-06: Correlating Lung CT HU with Transformation-Based and Xe-CT Derived Ventilation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, K; Patton, T; Bayouth, J [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Reinhardt, J; Christensen, G [The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Regional lung ventilation is useful to reduce radiation-induced function damage during lung cancer radiation therapy. Recently a new direct HU (Hounsfield unit)-based method was proposed to estimate the ventilation potential without image registration. The purpose of this study is to examine if there is a functional dependence between HU values and transformation-based or Xe-CT derived ventilation. Methods: 4DCT images acquired from 13 patients prior to radiation therapy and 4 mechanically ventilated sheep subjects which also have associated Xe-CT images were used for this analysis. Transformation-based ventilation was computed using Jacobian determinant of the transformation field between peak-exhale and peak-inhale 4DCT images. Both transformation and Xe-CT derived ventilation was computed for each HU bin. Color scatter plot and cumulative histogram were used to compare and validate the direct HU-based method. Results: There was little change of the center and shape of the HU histograms between free breathing CT and 4DCT average, with or without smoothing, and between the repeated 4DCT scans. HU of −750 and −630 were found to have the greatest transformation-based ventilation for human and sheep subjects, respectively. Maximum Xe-CT derived ventilation was found to locate at HU of −600 in sheep subjects. The curve between Xe-CT ventilation and HU was noisy for tissue above HU −400, possibly due to less intensity change of Xe gas during wash-out and wash-in phases. Conclusion: Both transformation-based and Xe-CT ventilation demonstrated that lung tissues with HU values in the range of (-750, −600) HU have the maximum ventilation potential. The correlation between HU and ventilation suggests that HU might be used to help guide the ventilation calculation and make it more robust to noise and image registration errors. Research support from NIH grants CA166703 and CA166119 and a gift from Roger Koch.

  16. Low-dose CT image reconstruction using gain intervention-based dictionary learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Yadunath; Arya, K. V.; Tiwari, Shailendra

    2018-05-01

    Computed tomography (CT) approach is extensively utilized in clinical diagnoses. However, X-ray residue in human body may introduce somatic damage such as cancer. Owing to radiation risk, research has focused on the radiation exposure distributed to patients through CT investigations. Therefore, low-dose CT has become a significant research area. Many researchers have proposed different low-dose CT reconstruction techniques. But, these techniques suffer from various issues such as over smoothing, artifacts, noise, etc. Therefore, in this paper, we have proposed a novel integrated low-dose CT reconstruction technique. The proposed technique utilizes global dictionary-based statistical iterative reconstruction (GDSIR) and adaptive dictionary-based statistical iterative reconstruction (ADSIR)-based reconstruction techniques. In case the dictionary (D) is predetermined, then GDSIR can be used and if D is adaptively defined then ADSIR is appropriate choice. The gain intervention-based filter is also used as a post-processing technique for removing the artifacts from low-dose CT reconstructed images. Experiments have been done by considering the proposed and other low-dose CT reconstruction techniques on well-known benchmark CT images. Extensive experiments have shown that the proposed technique outperforms the available approaches.

  17. Determination of the initial energy in computerized tomography with proton beams; Determinacao da energia inicial em tomografia computadorizada com feixe de protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocha, Rodrigo Luis da

    2007-07-01

    In earliest works devoted to proton computed tomography it was shown that the advantage of pCT image reconstruction appears when the energy is close to the Bragg peak region, since the proton passes the object. This effect provided by the Bragg peak makes the computerized tomography with protons possible. However, when decreasing the initial proton energy, with the increase of the irradiation dose, there are two effects that work simultaneously in opposite ways. First, the energy loss of a proton in an object becomes bigger at small initial energy. At the same time decreasing of the proton energy results in the increase of the energy straggling, requiring a larger number of protons. In this work the radiation dose dependence on the proton initial energy was studied using analytical formulas and computer simulations. The investigation determined that the radiation dose practically does not depend on the initial energy, except in the energy region very close to the minimum energy necessary to pass the object. (author)

  18. Zero-Echo-Time and Dixon Deep Pseudo-CT (ZeDD CT): Direct Generation of Pseudo-CT Images for Pelvic PET/MRI Attenuation Correction Using Deep Convolutional Neural Networks with Multiparametric MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leynes, Andrew P; Yang, Jaewon; Wiesinger, Florian; Kaushik, Sandeep S; Shanbhag, Dattesh D; Seo, Youngho; Hope, Thomas A; Larson, Peder E Z

    2018-05-01

    Accurate quantification of uptake on PET images depends on accurate attenuation correction in reconstruction. Current MR-based attenuation correction methods for body PET use a fat and water map derived from a 2-echo Dixon MRI sequence in which bone is neglected. Ultrashort-echo-time or zero-echo-time (ZTE) pulse sequences can capture bone information. We propose the use of patient-specific multiparametric MRI consisting of Dixon MRI and proton-density-weighted ZTE MRI to directly synthesize pseudo-CT images with a deep learning model: we call this method ZTE and Dixon deep pseudo-CT (ZeDD CT). Methods: Twenty-six patients were scanned using an integrated 3-T time-of-flight PET/MRI system. Helical CT images of the patients were acquired separately. A deep convolutional neural network was trained to transform ZTE and Dixon MR images into pseudo-CT images. Ten patients were used for model training, and 16 patients were used for evaluation. Bone and soft-tissue lesions were identified, and the SUV max was measured. The root-mean-squared error (RMSE) was used to compare the MR-based attenuation correction with the ground-truth CT attenuation correction. Results: In total, 30 bone lesions and 60 soft-tissue lesions were evaluated. The RMSE in PET quantification was reduced by a factor of 4 for bone lesions (10.24% for Dixon PET and 2.68% for ZeDD PET) and by a factor of 1.5 for soft-tissue lesions (6.24% for Dixon PET and 4.07% for ZeDD PET). Conclusion: ZeDD CT produces natural-looking and quantitatively accurate pseudo-CT images and reduces error in pelvic PET/MRI attenuation correction compared with standard methods. © 2018 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  19. SU-E-J-78: Adaptive Planning Workflow in a Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blakey, M; Price, S; Robison, B; Niek, S; Moe, S; Renegar, J; Mark, A; Spenser, W [Provision Healthcare Partners, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The susceptibility of proton therapy to changes in patient setup and anatomy necessitates an adaptive planning process. With the right planning tools and clinical workflow, an adaptive plan can be created in a timely manner without adding significant workload to the treatment planning staff. Methods: In our center, a weekly QA CT is performed on most patients to assess setup, anatomy change, and tumor response. The QA CT is fused to the treatment planning CT, the contours are transferred via deformable registration, and the plan dose is recalculated on the QA CT. A physicist assesses the dose distribution, and an adaptive plan is requested based on tumor coverage or OAR dose changes. After the physician confirms or alters the deformed contours, a dosimetrist develops an adaptive plan using our TPS adaptation module. The plan is assessed for robustness and is then reviewed by the physician. Patient QA is performed within three days following the first adapted treatment. Results: Of the patients who received QA CTs, 19% required at least one adaptive plan (18.5% H&N, 18.5% brain, 11.1% breast, 14.8% chestwall, 14.8% lung, 18.5% pelvis and 3.8% abdomen). Of these patients, 14% went on a break, while the remainder was treated with the previous plan during the re-planning process. Adaptive plans were performed based on tumor shrinkage, anatomy change or positioning uncertainties for 37.9%, 44.8%, and 17.3% of the patients, respectively. On average, 3 full days are required between the QA CT and the first adapted plan treatment. Conclusion: Adaptive planning is a crucial component of proton therapy and should be applied to any site when the QA CT shows significant deviation from the plan. With an efficient workflow, an adaptive plan can be applied without delaying patient treatment or burdening the dosimetry and medical physics team.

  20. SU-E-J-78: Adaptive Planning Workflow in a Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blakey, M; Price, S; Robison, B; Niek, S; Moe, S; Renegar, J; Mark, A; Spenser, W

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The susceptibility of proton therapy to changes in patient setup and anatomy necessitates an adaptive planning process. With the right planning tools and clinical workflow, an adaptive plan can be created in a timely manner without adding significant workload to the treatment planning staff. Methods: In our center, a weekly QA CT is performed on most patients to assess setup, anatomy change, and tumor response. The QA CT is fused to the treatment planning CT, the contours are transferred via deformable registration, and the plan dose is recalculated on the QA CT. A physicist assesses the dose distribution, and an adaptive plan is requested based on tumor coverage or OAR dose changes. After the physician confirms or alters the deformed contours, a dosimetrist develops an adaptive plan using our TPS adaptation module. The plan is assessed for robustness and is then reviewed by the physician. Patient QA is performed within three days following the first adapted treatment. Results: Of the patients who received QA CTs, 19% required at least one adaptive plan (18.5% H&N, 18.5% brain, 11.1% breast, 14.8% chestwall, 14.8% lung, 18.5% pelvis and 3.8% abdomen). Of these patients, 14% went on a break, while the remainder was treated with the previous plan during the re-planning process. Adaptive plans were performed based on tumor shrinkage, anatomy change or positioning uncertainties for 37.9%, 44.8%, and 17.3% of the patients, respectively. On average, 3 full days are required between the QA CT and the first adapted plan treatment. Conclusion: Adaptive planning is a crucial component of proton therapy and should be applied to any site when the QA CT shows significant deviation from the plan. With an efficient workflow, an adaptive plan can be applied without delaying patient treatment or burdening the dosimetry and medical physics team

  1. A new anhydrous proton conductor based on polybenzimidazole and tridecyl phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Fengjing; Pu Hongting; Meyer, Wolfgang H.; Guan Yisi; Wan Decheng

    2008-01-01

    Most of the anhydrous proton conducting membranes are based on inorganic or partially inorganic materials, like SrCeO 3 membranes or polybenzimidazole (PBI)/H 3 PO 4 composite membranes. In present work, a new kind of anhydrous proton conducting membrane based on fully organic components of PBI and tridecyl phosphate (TP) was prepared. The interaction between PBI and TP is discussed. The temperature dependence of the proton conductivity of the composite membranes can be modeled by an Arrhenius relation. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) illustrates that these composite membranes are chemically stable up to 145 deg. C. The weight loss appearing at 145 deg. C is attributed to the selfcondensation of phosphate, which results in the proton conductivity drop of the membranes occurring at the same temperature. The DC conductivity of the composite membranes can reach ∼10 -4 S/cm for PBI/1.8TP at 140 deg. C and increases with increasing TP content. The proton conductivity of PBI/TP and PBI/H 3 PO 4 composite membranes is compared. The former have higher proton conductivity, however, the proton conductivity of the PBI/H 3 PO 4 membranes increases with temperature more significantly. Compared with PBI/H 3 PO 4 membranes, the migration stability of TP in PBI/TP membranes is improved significantly

  2. Comparison of CT and integrated PET-CT based radiation therapy planning in patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pehlivan, Berrin; Topkan, Erkan; Onal, Cem; Nursal, Gul Nihal; Yuksel, Oznur; Dolek, Yemliha; Yavuz, Melek Nur; Yavuz, Ali Aydin

    2009-01-01

    When combined with adequate tumoricidal doses, accurate target volume delineation remains to be the one of the most important predictive factors for radiotherapy (RT) success in locally advanced or medically inoperable malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) patients. Recently, 18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET) has demonstrated significant improvements in diagnosis and accurate staging of MPM. However, role of additional PET data has not been studied in RT planning (RTP) of patients with inoperable MPM or in those who refuse surgery. Therefore, we planned to compare CT with co-registered PET-CT as the basis for delineating target volumes in these patients group. Retrospectively, the CT and co-registered PET-CT data of 13 patients with histologically proven MPM were utilized to delineate target volumes separately. For each patient, target volumes (gross tumor volume [GTV], clinical target volume [CTV], and planning target volume [PTV]) were defined using the CT and PET-CT fusion data sets. The PTV was measured in two ways: PTV1 was CTV plus a 1-cm margin, and PTV2 was GTV plus a 1-cm margin. We analyzed differences in target volumes. In 12 of 13 patients, compared to CT-based delineation, PET-CT-based delineation resulted in a statistically significant decrease in the mean GTV, CTV, PTV1, and PTV2. In these 12 patients, mean GTV decreased by 47.1% ± 28.4%, mean CTV decreased by 38.7% ± 24.7%, mean PTV1 decreased by 31.1% ± 23.1%, and mean PTV2 decreased by 40.0% ± 24.0%. In 4 of 13 patients, hilar lymph nodes were identified by PET-CT that was not identified by CT alone, changing the nodal status of tumor staging in those patients. This study demonstrated the usefulness of PET-CT-based target volume delineation in patients with MPM. Co-registration of PET and CT information reduces the likelihood of geographic misses, and additionally, significant reductions observed in target volumes may potentially allow escalation of RT dose beyond

  3. Development of CT and 3D-CT Using Flat Panel Detector Based Real-Time Digital Radiography System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravindran, V. R.; Sreelakshmi, C.; Vibin

    2008-01-01

    The application of Digital Radiography in the Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) of space vehicle components is a recent development in India. A Real-time DR system based on amorphous silicon Flat Panel Detector has been developed for the NDE of solid rocket motors at Rocket Propellant Plant of VSSC in a few years back. The technique has been successfully established for the nondestructive evaluation of solid rocket motors. The DR images recorded for a few solid rocket specimens are presented in the paper. The Real-time DR system is capable of generating sufficient digital X-ray image data with object rotation for the CT image reconstruction. In this paper the indigenous development of CT imaging based on the Realtime DR system for solid rocket motor is presented. Studies are also carried out to generate 3D-CT image from a set of adjacent CT images of the rocket motor. The capability of revealing the spatial location and characterisation of defect is demonstrated by the CT and 3D-CT images generated.

  4. CT-based postimplant dosimetry of prostate brachytherapy. Comparison of 1-mm and 5-mm section CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Osamu; Hayashi, Shinya; Kanematsu, Masayuki; Matsuo, Masayuki; Hoshi, Hiroaki; Nakano, Masahiro; Maeda, Sanaho; Deguchi, Takashi; Hoshi, Hiroaki

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the outcomes between 1-mm and 5-mm section computed tomography (CT)-based postimplant dosimetry. A series of 21 consecutive patients underwent permanent prostate brachytherapy. The postimplant prostate volume was calculated using 1-mm and 5-mm section CT. One radiation oncologist contoured the prostate on CT images to obtain the reconstructed prostate volume (pVol), prostate V 100 (percent of the prostate volume receiving at least the full prescribed dose), and prostate D 90 (mean dose delivered to 90% of the prostate gland). The same radiation oncologist performed the contouring three times to evaluate intraobserver variation and subjectively scored the quality of the CT images. The mean ±1 standard deviation (SD) postimplant pVol was 20.17±6.66 cc by 1-mm section CT and 22.24±8.48 cc by 5-mm section CT; the difference in the mean values was 2.06 cc (P 100 was 80.44%±7.06% by 1-mm section CT and 77.33%±10.22% by 5-mm section CT. The mean postimplant prostate D 90 was 83.28%±10.81% by 1-mm section CT and 78.60%±15.75% by 5-mm section CT. In the evaluation of image quality, 5-mm section CT was assigned significantly higher scores than 1-mm section CT. In regard to intraobserver variation, 5-mm section CT revealed less intraobserver variation than 1-mm section CT. Our current results suggested that the outcomes of postimplant dosimetry using 1-mm section CT did not improved the results over those obtained using 5-mm section CT in terms of the quality of the CT image or reproducibility. (author)

  5. CT-based virtual tracheobronchoscopy in children - comparison with axial CT and multiplanar reconstruction: preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorantin, Erich; Lindbichler, Franz; Eber, Ernst; Schimpl, Guenther

    2002-01-01

    Background: 3D post-processing of spiral-CT (S-CT) data using perspective projection allows the generation of virtual views similar to endoscopy. Objective: To evaluate whether simultaneous reading of axial S-CT, multiplanar reconstruction (MPR) and virtual tracheobronchoscopy (VTB) is more precise and accurate than reading of axial S-CT and MPR alone in paediatric patients. Materials and methods: S-CT studies of 15 symptomatic and 4 normal patients were investigated. Two radiologists independently read two sets of images for airway abnormalities: first axial CT and MPR, followed by axial CT, MPR and VTB. A final decision was later made by consensus. All results were compared to fibre-optic bronchoscopy (FTB). Interobserver agreement was used as an indicator of precision for the display technique used. Results: At reading of axial S-CT and MPR an interobserver agreement of 89.5% (κ=0.776, P<0.00103) was found. Based on the consensus decision, a diagnostic accuracy of 89.5% at a sensitivity 86.6% and specificity of 100% (κ=0.776, 95% CI 0.491-1.062, P<0.00103) was achieved. At reporting on axial S-CT, MPR and VTB, all cases were classified correctly by both readers, indicating 100% accuracy, interobserver agreement, sensitivity and specificity (κ=1.00, 95% CI 1.0-1.0, P<0.000258). Conclusions: The simultaneous display of axial S-CT, MPR and VTB raises the precision, accuracy and sensitivity of radiological reports. (orig.)

  6. Clinical results of proton beam therapy for skull base chordoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igaki, Hiroshi; Tokuuye, Koichi; Okumura, Toshiyuki; Sugahara, Shinji; Kagei, Kenji; Hata, Masaharu; Ohara, Kiyoshi; Hashimoto, Takayuki; Tsuboi, Koji; Takano, Shingo; Matsumura, Akira; Akine, Yasuyuki

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate clinical results of proton beam therapy for patients with skull base chordoma. Methods and materials: Thirteen patients with skull base chordoma who were treated with proton beams with or without X-rays at the University of Tsukuba between 1989 and 2000 were retrospectively reviewed. A median total tumor dose of 72.0 Gy (range, 63.0-95.0 Gy) was delivered. The patients were followed for a median period of 69.3 months (range, 14.6-123.4 months). Results: The 5-year local control rate was 46.0%. Cause-specific, overall, and disease-free survival rates at 5 years were 72.2%, 66.7%, and 42.2%, respectively. The local control rate was higher, without statistical significance, for those with preoperative tumors <30 mL. Partial or subtotal tumor removal did not yield better local control rates than for patients who underwent biopsy only as the latest surgery. Conclusion: Proton beam therapy is effective for patients with skull base chordoma, especially for those with small tumors. For a patient with a tumor of <30 mL with no prior treatment, biopsy without tumor removal seems to be appropriate before proton beam therapy

  7. Diagnostic performance of a CT-based scoring system for diagnosis of anastomotic leakage after esophagectomy: comparison with subjective CT assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goense, Lucas; Rossum, Peter S.N. van [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Surgery, Utrecht (Netherlands); University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiation Oncology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Stassen, Pauline M.C.; Ruurda, Jelle P.; Hillegersberg, Richard van [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Surgery, Utrecht (Netherlands); Wessels, Frank J.; Leeuwen, Maarten S. van [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2017-10-15

    To develop a CT-based prediction score for anastomotic leakage after esophagectomy and compare it to subjective CT interpretation. Consecutive patients who underwent a CT scan for a clinical suspicion of anastomotic leakage after esophagectomy with cervical anastomosis between 2003 and 2014 were analyzed. The CT scans were systematically re-evaluated by two radiologists for the presence of specific CT findings and presence of an anastomotic leak. Also, the original CT interpretations were acquired. These results were compared to patients with and without a clinical confirmed leak. Out of 122 patients that underwent CT for a clinical suspicion of anastomotic leakage; 54 had a confirmed leak. In multivariable analysis, anastomotic leakage was associated with mediastinal fluid (OR = 3.4), esophagogastric wall discontinuity (OR = 4.9), mediastinal air (OR = 6.6), and a fistula (OR = 7.2). Based on these criteria, a prediction score was developed resulting in an area-under-the-curve (AUC) of 0.86, sensitivity of 80%, and specificity of 84%. The original interpretation and the systematic subjective CT assessment by two radiologists resulted in AUCs of 0.68 and 0.75 with sensitivities of 52% and 69%, and specificities of 84% and 82%, respectively. This CT-based score may provide improved diagnostic performance for diagnosis of anastomotic leakage after esophagectomy. (orig.)

  8. Proton exchange in acid–base complexes induced by reaction coordinates with heavy atom motions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alavi, Saman; Taghikhani, Mahdi

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Proton exchange in acid–base complexes is studied. ► The structures, binding energies, and normal mode vibrations are calculated. ► Transition state structures of proton exchange mechanism are determined. ► In the complexes studied, the reaction coordinate involves heavy atom rocking. ► The reaction coordinate is not simply localized in the proton movements. - Abstract: We extend previous work on nitric acid–ammonia and nitric acid–alkylamine complexes to illustrate that proton exchange reaction coordinates involve the rocking motion of the base moiety in many double hydrogen-bonded gas phase strong acid–strong base complexes. The complexes studied involve the biologically and atmospherically relevant glycine, formic, acetic, propionic, and sulfuric acids with ammonia/alkylamine bases. In these complexes, the magnitude of the imaginary frequencies associated with the proton exchange transition states are −1 . This contrasts with widely studied proton exchange reactions between symmetric carboxylic acid dimers or asymmetric DNA base pair and their analogs where the reaction coordinate is localized in proton motions and the magnitude of the imaginary frequencies for the transition states are >1100 cm −1 . Calculations on complexes of these acids with water are performed for comparison. Variations of normal vibration modes along the reaction coordinate in the complexes are described.

  9. TH-E-BRF-04: Characterizing the Response of Texture-Based CT Image Features for Quantification of Radiation-Induced Normal Lung Damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krafft, S; Court, L; Briere, T; Martel, M

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation induced lung damage (RILD) is an important dose-limiting toxicity for patients treated with radiation therapy. Scoring systems for RILD are subjective and limit our ability to find robust predictors of toxicity. We investigate the dose and time-related response for texture-based lung CT image features that serve as potential quantitative measures of RILD. Methods: Pre- and post-RT diagnostic imaging studies were collected for retrospective analysis of 21 patients treated with photon or proton radiotherapy for NSCLC. Total lung and selected isodose contours (0–5, 5–15, 15–25Gy, etc.) were deformably registered from the treatment planning scan to the pre-RT and available follow-up CT studies for each patient. A CT image analysis framework was utilized to extract 3698 unique texture-based features (including co-occurrence and run length matrices) for each region of interest defined by the isodose contours and the total lung volume. Linear mixed models were fit to determine the relationship between feature change (relative to pre-RT), planned dose and time post-RT. Results: Seventy-three follow-up CT scans from 21 patients (median: 3 scans/patient) were analyzed to describe CT image feature change. At the p=0.05 level, dose affected feature change in 2706 (73.1%) of the available features. Similarly, time affected feature change in 408 (11.0%) of the available features. Both dose and time were significant predictors of feature change in a total of 231 (6.2%) of the extracted image features. Conclusion: Characterizing the dose and time-related response of a large number of texture-based CT image features is the first step toward identifying objective measures of lung toxicity necessary for assessment and prediction of RILD. There is evidence that numerous features are sensitive to both the radiation dose and time after RT. Beyond characterizing feature response, further investigation is warranted to determine the utility of these features as

  10. Pseudo-diode based on protonic/electronic hybrid oxide transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yang Ming; Liu, Yang Hui; Zhu, Li Qiang; Xiao, Hui; Song, An Ran

    2018-01-01

    Current rectification behavior has been proved to be essential in modern electronics. Here, a pseudo-diode is proposed based on protonic/electronic hybrid indium-gallium-zinc oxide electric-double-layer (EDL) transistor. The oxide EDL transistors are fabricated by using phosphorous silicate glass (PSG) based proton conducting electrolyte as gate dielectric. A diode operation mode is established on the transistor, originating from field configurable proton fluxes within the PSG electrolyte. Current rectification ratios have been modulated to values ranged between ˜4 and ˜50 000 with gate electrode biased at voltages ranged between -0.7 V and 0.1 V. Interestingly, the proposed pseudo-diode also exhibits field reconfigurable threshold voltages. When the gate is biased at -0.5 V and 0.3 V, threshold voltages are set to ˜-1.3 V and -0.55 V, respectively. The proposed pseudo-diode may find potential applications in brain-inspired platforms and low-power portable systems.

  11. Proton irradiation of liquid crystal based adaptive optical devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buis, E.J.; Berkhout, G.C.G.; Love, G.D.; Kirby, A.K.; Taylor, J.M.; Hannemann, S.; Collon, M.J.

    2012-01-01

    To assess its radiation hardness, a liquid crystal based adaptive optical element has been irradiated using a 60 MeV proton beam. The device with the functionality of an optical beam steerer was characterised before, during and after the irradiation. A systematic set of measurements on the transmission and beam deflection angles was carried out. The measurements showed that the transmission decreased only marginally and that its optical performance degraded only after a very high proton fluence (10 10 p/cm 2 ). The device showed complete annealing in the functionality as a beam steerer, which leads to the conclusion that the liquid crystal technology for optical devices is not vulnerable to proton irradiation as expected in space.

  12. Proton irradiation of liquid crystal based adaptive optical devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buis, E.J., E-mail: ernst-jan.buis@tno.nl [cosine Science and Computing BV, Niels Bohrweg 11, 2333 CA Leiden (Netherlands); Berkhout, G.C.G. [cosine Science and Computing BV, Niels Bohrweg 11, 2333 CA Leiden (Netherlands); Huygens Laboratory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9504, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Love, G.D.; Kirby, A.K.; Taylor, J.M. [Department of Physics, Durham University, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Hannemann, S.; Collon, M.J. [cosine Research BV, Niels Bohrweg 11, 2333 CA Leiden (Netherlands)

    2012-01-01

    To assess its radiation hardness, a liquid crystal based adaptive optical element has been irradiated using a 60 MeV proton beam. The device with the functionality of an optical beam steerer was characterised before, during and after the irradiation. A systematic set of measurements on the transmission and beam deflection angles was carried out. The measurements showed that the transmission decreased only marginally and that its optical performance degraded only after a very high proton fluence (10{sup 10}p/cm{sup 2}). The device showed complete annealing in the functionality as a beam steerer, which leads to the conclusion that the liquid crystal technology for optical devices is not vulnerable to proton irradiation as expected in space.

  13. Anhydrous proton conductor based on composites of PEO and ATMP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Baoying; Qiu Xinping; Zhu Wentao

    2011-01-01

    A new type anhydrous PEM material based on Poly (ethylene oxide) (PEO)/Amino Trimethylene Phosphonic Acid (ATMP) composite was prepared. In this study, PEO assumed to 'grab' protons via hydrogen bond between PEO and ATMP. Based on this point, the PEO/ATMP composites were prepared firstly as the preliminary study to verify this proton conducting system. Then, PVDF was added to enhance the membrane's stability. The PVDF/PEO/ATMP composite membranes were thermally stable up to 200 o C in the studied composition ranges. The membrane had relatively compact structure by SEM images. Proton conductivity of 59% PVDF/29% PEO/12% ATMP was up to 6.71 x 10 -3 S cm -1 at 86 o C after doping with 7.9 wt% phosphoric acid without extra humidification.

  14. Efficiency of respiratory-gated delivery of synchrotron-based pulsed proton irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsunashima, Yoshikazu; Vedam, Sastry; Dong, Lei; Bues, Martin; Balter, Peter; Smith, Alfred; Mohan, Radhe; Umezawa, Masumi; Sakae, Takeji

    2008-01-01

    Significant differences exist in respiratory-gated proton beam delivery with a synchrotron-based accelerator system when compared to photon therapy with a conventional linear accelerator. Delivery of protons with a synchrotron accelerator is governed by a magnet excitation cycle pattern. Optimal synchronization of the magnet excitation cycle pattern with the respiratory motion pattern is critical to the efficiency of respiratory-gated proton delivery. There has been little systematic analysis to optimize the accelerator's operational parameters to improve gated treatment efficiency. The goal of this study was to estimate the overall efficiency of respiratory-gated synchrotron-based proton irradiation through realistic simulation. Using 62 respiratory motion traces from 38 patients, we simulated respiratory gating for duty cycles of 30%, 20% and 10% around peak exhalation for various fixed and variable magnet excitation patterns. In each case, the time required to deliver 100 monitor units in both non-gated and gated irradiation scenarios was determined. Based on results from this study, the minimum time required to deliver 100 MU was 1.1 min for non-gated irradiation. For respiratory-gated delivery at a 30% duty cycle around peak exhalation, corresponding average delivery times were typically three times longer with a fixed magnet excitation cycle pattern. However, when a variable excitation cycle was allowed in synchrony with the patient's respiratory cycle, the treatment time only doubled. Thus, respiratory-gated delivery of synchrotron-based pulsed proton irradiation is feasible and more efficient when a variable magnet excitation cycle pattern is used

  15. Initial clinical results for breath-hold CT-based processing of respiratory-gated PET acquisitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fin, Loic; Daouk, Joel; Morvan, Julie; Esper, Isabelle El; Saidi, Lazhar; Meyer, Marc-Etienne; Bailly, Pascal

    2008-01-01

    Respiratory motion causes uptake in positron emission tomography (PET) images of chest structures to spread out and misregister with the CT images. This misregistration can alter the attenuation correction and thus the quantisation of PET images. In this paper, we present the first clinical results for a respiratory-gated PET (RG-PET) processing method based on a single breath-hold CT (BH-CT) acquisition, which seeks to improve diagnostic accuracy via better PET-to-CT co-registration. We refer to this method as ''CT-based'' RG-PET processing. Thirteen lesions were studied. Patients underwent a standard clinical PET protocol and then the CT-based protocol, which consists of a 10-min List Mode RG-PET acquisition, followed by a shallow end-expiration BH-CT. The respective performances of the CT-based and clinical PET methods were evaluated by comparing the distances between the lesions' centroids on PET and CT images. SUV MAX and volume variations were also investigated. The CT-based method showed significantly lower (p=0.027) centroid distances (mean change relative to the clinical method =-49%; range =-100% to 0%). This led to higher SUV MAX (mean change =+33%; range =-4% to 69%). Lesion volumes were significantly lower (p=0.022) in CT-based PET volumes (mean change =-39%: range =-74% to -1%) compared with clinical ones. A CT-based RG-PET processing method can be implemented in clinical practice with a small increase in radiation exposure. It improves PET-CT co-registration of lung lesions and should lead to more accurate attenuation correction and thus SUV measurement. (orig.)

  16. WE-F-16A-02: Design, Fabrication, and Validation of a 3D-Printed Proton Filter for Range Spreading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remmes, N; Courneyea, L; Corner, S; Beltran, C; Kemp, B; Kruse, J; Herman, M; Stoker, J

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To design, fabricate and test a 3D-printed filter for proton range spreading in scanned proton beams. The narrow Bragg peak in lower-energy synchrotron-based scanned proton beams can result in longer treatment times for shallow targets due to energy switching time and plan quality degradation due to minimum monitor unit limitations. A filter with variable thicknesses patterned on the same scale as the beam's lateral spot size will widen the Bragg peak. Methods: The filter consists of pyramids dimensioned to have a Gaussian distribution in thickness. The pyramids are 2.5mm wide at the base, 0.6 mm wide at the peak, 5mm tall, and are repeated in a 2.5mm pseudo-hexagonal lattice. Monte Carlo simulations of the filter in a proton beam were run using TOPAS to assess the change in depth profiles and lateral beam profiles. The prototypes were constrained to a 2.5cm diameter disk to allow for micro-CT imaging of promising prototypes. Three different 3D printers were tested. Depth-doses with and without the prototype filter were then measured in a ~70MeV proton beam using a multilayer ion chamber. Results: The simulation results were consistent with design expectations. Prototypes printed on one printer were clearly unacceptable on visual inspection. Prototypes on a second printer looked acceptable, but the micro-CT image showed unacceptable voids within the pyramids. Prototypes from the third printer appeared acceptable visually and on micro-CT imaging. Depth dose scans using the prototype from the third printer were consistent with simulation results. Bragg peak width increased by about 3x. Conclusions: A prototype 3D printer pyramid filter for range spreading was successfully designed, fabricated and tested. The filter has greater design flexibility and lower prototyping and production costs compared to traditional ridge filters. Printer and material selection played a large role in the successful development of the filter

  17. WE-F-16A-02: Design, Fabrication, and Validation of a 3D-Printed Proton Filter for Range Spreading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Remmes, N; Courneyea, L; Corner, S; Beltran, C; Kemp, B; Kruse, J; Herman, M [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Stoker, J [MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To design, fabricate and test a 3D-printed filter for proton range spreading in scanned proton beams. The narrow Bragg peak in lower-energy synchrotron-based scanned proton beams can result in longer treatment times for shallow targets due to energy switching time and plan quality degradation due to minimum monitor unit limitations. A filter with variable thicknesses patterned on the same scale as the beam's lateral spot size will widen the Bragg peak. Methods: The filter consists of pyramids dimensioned to have a Gaussian distribution in thickness. The pyramids are 2.5mm wide at the base, 0.6 mm wide at the peak, 5mm tall, and are repeated in a 2.5mm pseudo-hexagonal lattice. Monte Carlo simulations of the filter in a proton beam were run using TOPAS to assess the change in depth profiles and lateral beam profiles. The prototypes were constrained to a 2.5cm diameter disk to allow for micro-CT imaging of promising prototypes. Three different 3D printers were tested. Depth-doses with and without the prototype filter were then measured in a ~70MeV proton beam using a multilayer ion chamber. Results: The simulation results were consistent with design expectations. Prototypes printed on one printer were clearly unacceptable on visual inspection. Prototypes on a second printer looked acceptable, but the micro-CT image showed unacceptable voids within the pyramids. Prototypes from the third printer appeared acceptable visually and on micro-CT imaging. Depth dose scans using the prototype from the third printer were consistent with simulation results. Bragg peak width increased by about 3x. Conclusions: A prototype 3D printer pyramid filter for range spreading was successfully designed, fabricated and tested. The filter has greater design flexibility and lower prototyping and production costs compared to traditional ridge filters. Printer and material selection played a large role in the successful development of the filter.

  18. PET/CT-guided treatment planning for paediatric cancer patients: a simulation study of proton and conventional photon therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kornerup, Josefine S.; Brodin, N. P.; Bjork-Eriksson, T.

    2015-01-01

    ) and estimated risk of secondary cancer (SC). RESULTS: Considerable deviations between CT- and PET/CT-guided target volumes were seen in 3 out of the 11 patients studied. However, averaging over the whole cohort, CT or PET/CT guidance introduced no significant difference in the shape or size of the target...... or decreasing irradiated volumes, suggesting that the long-term morbidity of RT in childhood would on average remain largely unaffected. ADVANCES IN KNOWLEDGE: (18)F-FDG PET-based RT planning does not systematically change NTCP or SC risk for paediatric cancer patients compared with CT only. 3 out of 11...... patients had a distinct change of target volumes when PET-guided planning was introduced. Dice and mismatch metrics are not sufficient to assess the consequences of target volume differences in the context of RT....

  19. arXiv Observation of proton-tagged, central (semi)exclusive production of high-mass lepton pairs in pp collisions at 13 TeV with the CMS-TOTEM precision proton spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Sirunyan, Albert M; CMS and TOTEM Collaborations; Adam, Wolfgang; Ambrogi, Federico; Asilar, Ece; Bergauer, Thomas; Brandstetter, Johannes; Brondolin, Erica; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Escalante Del Valle, Alberto; Flechl, Martin; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Grossmann, Johannes; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; König, Axel; Krammer, Natascha; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Madlener, Thomas; Mikulec, Ivan; Pree, Elias; Rad, Navid; Rohringer, Herbert; Schieck, Jochen; Schöfbeck, Robert; Spanring, Markus; Spitzbart, Daniel; Taurok, Anton; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Wittmann, Johannes; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Zarucki, Mateusz; Chekhovsky, Vladimir; Mossolov, Vladimir; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; De Wolf, Eddi A; Di Croce, Davide; Janssen, Xavier; Lauwers, Jasper; Pieters, Maxim; Van De Klundert, Merijn; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Abu Zeid, Shimaa; Blekman, Freya; D'Hondt, Jorgen; De Bruyn, Isabelle; De Clercq, Jarne; Deroover, Kevin; Flouris, Giannis; Lontkovskyi, Denys; Lowette, Steven; Marchesini, Ivan; Moortgat, Seth; Moreels, Lieselotte; Python, Quentin; Skovpen, Kirill; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Parijs, Isis; Beghin, Diego; Bilin, Bugra; Brun, Hugues; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Delannoy, Hugo; Dorney, Brian; Fasanella, Giuseppe; Favart, Laurent; Goldouzian, Reza; Grebenyuk, Anastasia; Kalsi, Amandeep Kaur; Lenzi, Thomas; Luetic, Jelena; Seva, Tomislav; Starling, Elizabeth; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Vannerom, David; Yonamine, Ryo; Cornelis, Tom; Dobur, Didar; Fagot, Alexis; Gul, Muhammad; Khvastunov, Illia; Poyraz, Deniz; Roskas, Christos; Trocino, Daniele; Tytgat, Michael; Verbeke, Willem; Vermassen, Basile; Vit, Martina; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Bondu, Olivier; Brochet, Sébastien; Bruno, Giacomo; Caputo, Claudio; Caudron, Adrien; David, Pieter; De Visscher, Simon; Delaere, Christophe; Delcourt, Martin; Francois, Brieuc; Giammanco, Andrea; Krintiras, Georgios; Lemaitre, Vincent; Magitteri, Alessio; Mertens, Alexandre; Musich, Marco; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Quertenmont, Loic; Saggio, Alessia; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Wertz, Sébastien; Zobec, Joze; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Alves, Fábio Lúcio; Alves, Gilvan; Brito, Lucas; Correia Silva, Gilson; Hensel, Carsten; Moraes, Arthur; Pol, Maria Elena; Rebello Teles, Patricia; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, Ewerton; Carvalho, Wagner; Chinellato, Jose; Coelho, Eduardo; Melo Da Costa, Eliza; Da Silveira, Gustavo Gil; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Malbouisson, Helena; Medina Jaime, Miguel; Melo De Almeida, Miqueias; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Sanchez Rosas, Luis Junior; Santoro, Alberto; Sznajder, Andre; Thiel, Mauricio; Tonelli Manganote, Edmilson José; Torres Da Silva De Araujo, Felipe; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Ahuja, Sudha; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; Calligaris, Luigi; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Mercadante, Pedro G; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Romero Abad, David; Ruiz Vargas, José Cupertino; Aleksandrov, Aleksandar; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Marinov, Andrey; Misheva, Milena; Rodozov, Mircho; Shopova, Mariana; Sultanov, Georgi; Dimitrov, Anton; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Fang, Wenxing; Gao, Xuyang; Yuan, Li; Ahmad, Muhammad; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Chen, Mingshui; Chen, Ye; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Leggat, Duncan; Liao, Hongbo; Liu, Zhenan; Romeo, Francesco; Shaheen, Sarmad Masood; Spiezia, Aniello; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Chunjie; Wang, Zheng; Yazgan, Efe; Zhang, Huaqiao; Zhao, Jingzhou; Ban, Yong; Chen, Geng; Li, Jing; Li, Qiang; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Wang, Dayong; Xu, Zijun; Wang, Yi; Avila, Carlos; Cabrera, Andrés; Carrillo Montoya, Camilo Andres; Chaparro Sierra, Luisa Fernanda; Florez, Carlos; González Hernández, Carlos Felipe; Segura Delgado, Manuel Alejandro; Courbon, Benoit; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Puljak, Ivica; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Sculac, Toni; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Ferencek, Dinko; Kadija, Kreso; Mesic, Benjamin; Starodumov, Andrei; Susa, Tatjana; Ather, Mohsan Waseem; Attikis, Alexandros; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Rykaczewski, Hans; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Carrera Jarrin, Edgar; Ellithi Kamel, Ali; Mohamed, Amr; Salama, Elsayed; Bhowmik, Sandeep; Dewanjee, Ram Krishna; Kadastik, Mario; Perrini, Lucia; Raidal, Martti; Veelken, Christian; Eerola, Paula; Kirschenmann, Henning; Pekkanen, Juska; Voutilainen, Mikko; Havukainen, Joona; Heikkilä, Jaana Kristiina; Jarvinen, Terhi; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Laurila, Santeri; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Mäenpää, Teppo; Siikonen, Hannu; Tuominen, Eija; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuuva, Tuure; Besancon, Marc; Couderc, Fabrice; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Faure, Jean-Louis; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Ghosh, Saranya; Givernaud, Alain; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Leloup, Clément; Locci, Elizabeth; Machet, Martina; Malcles, Julie; Negro, Giulia; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Sahin, Mehmet Özgür; Titov, Maksym; Abdulsalam, Abdulla; Amendola, Chiara; Antropov, Iurii; Baffioni, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Busson, Philippe; Cadamuro, Luca; Charlot, Claude; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Jo, Mihee; Kucher, Inna; Lisniak, Stanislav; Lobanov, Artur; Martin Blanco, Javier; Nguyen, Matthew; Ochando, Christophe; Ortona, Giacomo; Paganini, Pascal; Pigard, Philipp; Salerno, Roberto; Sauvan, Jean-Baptiste; Sirois, Yves; Stahl Leiton, Andre Govinda; Yilmaz, Yetkin; Zabi, Alexandre; Zghiche, Amina; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Andrea, Jeremy; Bloch, Daniel; Brom, Jean-Marie; Chabert, Eric Christian; Collard, Caroline; Conte, Eric; Coubez, Xavier; Drouhin, Frédéric; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Jansová, Markéta; Juillot, Pierre; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Tonon, Nicolas; Van Hove, Pierre; Gadrat, Sébastien; Beauceron, Stephanie; Bernet, Colin; Boudoul, Gaelle; Chanon, Nicolas; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Fay, Jean; Finco, Linda; Gascon, Susan; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Grenier, Gérald; Ille, Bernard; Lagarde, Francois; Laktineh, Imad Baptiste; Lattaud, Hugues; Lethuillier, Morgan; Mirabito, Laurent; Pequegnot, Anne-Laure; Perries, Stephane; Popov, Andrey; Sordini, Viola; Vander Donckt, Muriel; Viret, Sébastien; Zhang, Sijing; Toriashvili, Tengizi; Tsamalaidze, Zviad; Autermann, Christian; Feld, Lutz; Kiesel, Maximilian Knut; Klein, Katja; Lipinski, Martin; Preuten, Marius; Rauch, Max Philip; Schomakers, Christian; Schulz, Johannes; Teroerde, Marius; Wittmer, Bruno; Zhukov, Valery; Albert, Andreas; Duchardt, Deborah; Endres, Matthias; Erdmann, Martin; Erdweg, Sören; Esch, Thomas; Fischer, Robert; Güth, Andreas; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Knutzen, Simon; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Millet, Philipp; Mukherjee, Swagata; Pook, Tobias; Radziej, Markus; Reithler, Hans; Rieger, Marcel; Scheuch, Florian; Teyssier, Daniel; Thüer, Sebastian; Flügge, Günter; Kargoll, Bastian; Kress, Thomas; Künsken, Andreas; Müller, Thomas; Nehrkorn, Alexander; Nowack, Andreas; Pistone, Claudia; Pooth, Oliver; Stahl, Achim; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Arndt, Till; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Beernaert, Kelly; Behnke, Olaf; Behrens, Ulf; Bermúdez Martínez, Armando; Bin Anuar, Afiq Aizuddin; Borras, Kerstin; Botta, Valeria; Campbell, Alan; Connor, Patrick; Contreras-Campana, Christian; Costanza, Francesco; Danilov, Vladyslav; De Wit, Adinda; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Domínguez Damiani, Daniela; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Eichhorn, Thomas; Eren, Engin; Gallo, Elisabetta; Garay Garcia, Jasone; Geiser, Achim; Grados Luyando, Juan Manuel; Grohsjean, Alexander; Gunnellini, Paolo; Guthoff, Moritz; Harb, Ali; Hauk, Johannes; Hempel, Maria; Jung, Hannes; Kasemann, Matthias; Keaveney, James; Kleinwort, Claus; Knolle, Joscha; Korol, Ievgen; Krücker, Dirk; Lange, Wolfgang; Lelek, Aleksandra; Lenz, Teresa; Lipka, Katerina; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Mankel, Rainer; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Meyer, Mareike; Missiroli, Marino; Mittag, Gregor; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Pitzl, Daniel; Raspereza, Alexei; Savitskyi, Mykola; Saxena, Pooja; Shevchenko, Rostyslav; Stefaniuk, Nazar; Tholen, Heiner; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Walsh, Roberval; Wen, Yiwen; Wichmann, Katarzyna; Wissing, Christoph; Zenaiev, Oleksandr; Aggleton, Robin; Bein, Samuel; Blobel, Volker; Centis Vignali, Matteo; Dreyer, Torben; Garutti, Erika; Gonzalez, Daniel; Haller, Johannes; Hinzmann, Andreas; Hoffmann, Malte; Karavdina, Anastasia; Kasieczka, Gregor; Klanner, Robert; Kogler, Roman; Kovalchuk, Nataliia; Kurz, Simon; Marconi, Daniele; Multhaup, Jens; Niedziela, Marek; Nowatschin, Dominik; Peiffer, Thomas; Perieanu, Adrian; Reimers, Arne; Scharf, Christian; Schleper, Peter; Schmidt, Alexander; Schumann, Svenja; Schwandt, Joern; Sonneveld, Jory; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Stöver, Marc; Troendle, Daniel; Usai, Emanuele; Vanhoefer, Annika; Vormwald, Benedikt; Akbiyik, Melike; Barth, Christian; Baselga, Marta; Baur, Sebastian; Butz, Erik; Caspart, René; Chwalek, Thorsten; Colombo, Fabio; De Boer, Wim; Dierlamm, Alexander; Faltermann, Nils; Freund, Benedikt; Friese, Raphael; Giffels, Manuel; Harrendorf, Marco Alexander; Hartmann, Frank; Heindl, Stefan Michael; Husemann, Ulrich; Kassel, Florian; Kudella, Simon; Mildner, Hannes; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Müller, Thomas; Plagge, Michael; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Schröder, Matthias; Shvetsov, Ivan; Sieber, Georg; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Ulrich, Ralf; Wayand, Stefan; Weber, Marc; Weiler, Thomas; Williamson, Shawn; Wöhrmann, Clemens; Wolf, Roger; Anagnostou, Georgios; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Topsis-Giotis, Iasonas; Karathanasis, George; Kesisoglou, Stilianos; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Saoulidou, Niki; Tziaferi, Eirini; Kousouris, Konstantinos; Papakrivopoulos, Ioannis; Evangelou, Ioannis; Foudas, Costas; Gianneios, Paraskevas; Katsoulis, Panagiotis; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Mallios, Stavros; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Paradas, Evangelos; Strologas, John; Triantis, Frixos A; Tsitsonis, Dimitrios; Csanad, Mate; Filipovic, Nicolas; Pasztor, Gabriella; Surányi, Olivér; Veres, Gabor Istvan; Bencze, Gyorgy; Hajdu, Csaba; Horvath, Dezso; Hunyadi, Ádám; Sikler, Ferenc; Veszpremi, Viktor; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Vámi, Tamás Álmos; Beni, Noemi; Czellar, Sandor; Karancsi, János; Makovec, Alajos; Molnar, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Bartók, Márton; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Choudhury, Somnath; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Bahinipati, Seema; Mal, Prolay; Mandal, Koushik; Nayak, Aruna; Sahoo, Deepak Kumar; Swain, Sanjay Kumar; Bansal, Sunil; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Chauhan, Sushil; Chawla, Ridhi; Dhingra, Nitish; Gupta, Rajat; Kaur, Anterpreet; Kaur, Manjit; Kaur, Sandeep; Kumar, Ramandeep; Kumari, Priyanka; Lohan, Manisha; Mehta, Ankita; Sharma, Sandeep; Singh, Jasbir; Walia, Genius; Kumar, Ashok; Shah, Aashaq; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Garg, Rocky Bala; Keshri, Sumit; Kumar, Ajay; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Ranjan, Kirti; Sharma, Ramkrishna; Bhardwaj, Rishika; Bhattacharya, Rajarshi; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Bhawandeep, Bhawandeep; Bhowmik, Debabrata; Dey, Sourav; Dutt, Suneel; Dutta, Suchandra; Ghosh, Shamik; Majumdar, Nayana; Mondal, Kuntal; Mukhopadhyay, Supratik; Nandan, Saswati; Purohit, Arnab; Rout, Prasant Kumar; Roy, Ashim; Roy Chowdhury, Suvankar; Sarkar, Subir; Sharan, Manoj; Singh, Bipen; Thakur, Shalini; Behera, Prafulla Kumar; Chudasama, Ruchi; Dutta, Dipanwita; Jha, Vishwajeet; Kumar, Vineet; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Netrakanti, Pawan Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Topkar, Anita; Aziz, Tariq; Dugad, Shashikant; Mahakud, Bibhuprasad; Mitra, Soureek; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Sur, Nairit; Sutar, Bajrang; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Bhattacharya, Soham; Chatterjee, Suman; Das, Pallabi; Guchait, Monoranjan; Jain, Sandhya; Kumar, Sanjeev; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Sahoo, Niladribihari; Sarkar, Tanmay; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Chauhan, Shubhanshu; Dube, Sourabh; Hegde, Vinay; Kapoor, Anshul; Kothekar, Kunal; Pandey, Shubham; Rane, Aditee; Sharma, Seema; Chenarani, Shirin; Eskandari Tadavani, Esmaeel; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Naseri, Mohsen; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, Ferdos; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Felcini, Marta; Grunewald, Martin; Abbrescia, Marcello; Calabria, Cesare; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; Cristella, Leonardo; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Di Florio, Adriano; Errico, Filippo; Fiore, Luigi; Gelmi, Andrea; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Lezki, Samet; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; Marangelli, Bartolomeo; Miniello, Giorgia; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Radogna, Raffaella; Ranieri, Antonio; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Sharma, Archana; Silvestris, Lucia; Venditti, Rosamaria; Verwilligen, Piet; Zito, Giuseppe; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Battilana, Carlo; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Borgonovi, Lisa; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Campanini, Renato; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Chhibra, Simranjit Singh; Codispoti, Giuseppe; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Grandi, Claudio; Guiducci, Luigi; Iemmi, Fabio; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Perrotta, Andrea; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gian Piero; Tosi, Nicolò; Albergo, Sebastiano; Costa, Salvatore; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Giordano, Ferdinando; Potenza, Renato; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Chatterjee, Kalyanmoy; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Latino, Giuseppe; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Russo, Lorenzo; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Strom, Derek; Viliani, Lorenzo; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Primavera, Federica; Calvelli, Valerio; Ferro, Fabrizio; Ravera, Fabio; Robutti, Enrico; Tosi, Silvano; Benaglia, Andrea; Beschi, Andrea; Brianza, Luca; Brivio, Francesco; Ciriolo, Vincenzo; Dinardo, Mauro Emanuele; Fiorendi, Sara; Gennai, Simone; Ghezzi, Alessio; Govoni, Pietro; Malberti, Martina; Malvezzi, Sandra; Manzoni, Riccardo Andrea; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Paganoni, Marco; Pauwels, Kristof; Pedrini, Daniele; Pigazzini, Simone; Ragazzi, Stefano; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Buontempo, Salvatore; Cavallo, Nicola; Di Guida, Salvatore; Fabozzi, Francesco; Fienga, Francesco; Galati, Giuliana; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Khan, Wajid Ali; Lista, Luca; Meola, Sabino; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Sciacca, Crisostomo; Thyssen, Filip; Voevodina, Elena; Azzi, Patrizia; Bacchetta, Nicola; Benato, Lisa; Bisello, Dario; Boletti, Alessio; Carlin, Roberto; Carvalho Antunes De Oliveira, Alexandra; Checchia, Paolo; De Castro Manzano, Pablo; Dorigo, Tommaso; Dosselli, Umberto; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Gasparini, Ugo; Gozzelino, Andrea; Lacaprara, Stefano; Margoni, Martino; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Pozzobon, Nicola; Ronchese, Paolo; Rossin, Roberto; Simonetto, Franco; Tiko, Andres; Torassa, Ezio; Zanetti, Marco; Zotto, Pierluigi; Zumerle, Gianni; Braghieri, Alessandro; Magnani, Alice; Montagna, Paolo; Ratti, Sergio P; Re, Valerio; Ressegotti, Martina; Riccardi, Cristina; Salvini, Paola; Vai, Ilaria; Vitulo, Paolo; Alunni Solestizi, Luisa; Biasini, Maurizio; Bilei, Gian Mario; Cecchi, Claudia; Ciangottini, Diego; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Leonardi, Roberto; Manoni, Elisa; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Mariani, Valentina; Menichelli, Mauro; Rossi, Alessandro; Santocchia, Attilio; Spiga, Daniele; Androsov, Konstantin; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bianchini, Lorenzo; Boccali, Tommaso; Borrello, Laura; Castaldi, Rino; Ciocci, Maria Agnese; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Fedi, Giacomo; Giannini, Leonardo; Giassi, Alessandro; Grippo, Maria Teresa; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Manca, Elisabetta; Mandorli, Giulio; Messineo, Alberto; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzi, Andrea; Spagnolo, Paolo; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; Cipriani, Marco; Daci, Nadir; Del Re, Daniele; Di Marco, Emanuele; Diemoz, Marcella; Gelli, Simone; Longo, Egidio; Marzocchi, Badder; Meridiani, Paolo; Organtini, Giovanni; Pandolfi, Francesco; Paramatti, Riccardo; Preiato, Federico; Rahatlou, Shahram; Rovelli, Chiara; Santanastasio, Francesco; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Bartosik, Nazar; Bellan, Riccardo; Biino, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Castello, Roberto; Cenna, Francesca; Costa, Marco; Covarelli, Roberto; Degano, Alessandro; Demaria, Natale; Kiani, Bilal; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Monteil, Ennio; Monteno, Marco; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Pacher, Luca; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Pinna Angioni, Gian Luca; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Shchelina, Ksenia; Sola, Valentina; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Belforte, Stefano; Casarsa, Massimo; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Zanetti, Anna; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kim, Min Suk; Lee, Jeongeun; Lee, Sangeun; Lee, Seh Wook; Moon, Chang-Seong; Oh, Young Do; Sekmen, Sezen; Son, Dong-Chul; Yang, Yu Chul; Kim, Hyunchul; Moon, Dong Ho; Oh, Geonhee; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Goh, Junghwan; Kim, Tae Jeong; Cho, Sungwoong; Choi, Suyong; Go, Yeonju; Gyun, Dooyeon; Ha, Seungkyu; Hong, Byung-Sik; Jo, Youngkwon; Kim, Yongsun; Lee, Kisoo; Lee, Kyong Sei; Lee, Songkyo; Lim, Jaehoon; Park, Sung Keun; Roh, Youn; Almond, John; Kim, Junho; Kim, Jae Sung; Lee, Haneol; Lee, Kyeongpil; Nam, Kyungwook; Oh, Sung Bin; Radburn-Smith, Benjamin Charles; Seo, Seon-hee; Yang, Unki; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Yu, Geum Bong; Kim, Hyunyong; Kim, Ji Hyun; Lee, Jason Sang Hun; Park, Inkyu; Choi, Young-Il; Hwang, Chanwook; Lee, Jongseok; Yu, Intae; Dudenas, Vytautas; Juodagalvis, Andrius; Vaitkus, Juozas; Ahmed, Ijaz; Ibrahim, Zainol Abidin; Md Ali, Mohd Adli Bin; Mohamad Idris, Faridah; Wan Abdullah, Wan Ahmad Tajuddin; Yusli, Mohd Nizam; Zolkapli, Zukhaimira; Reyes-Almanza, Rogelio; Ramirez-Sanchez, Gabriel; Duran-Osuna, Cecilia; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-De La Cruz, Ivan; Rabadán-Trejo, Raúl Iraq; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Mejia Guisao, Jhovanny; Sánchez Hernández, Alberto; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Eysermans, Jan; Pedraza, Isabel; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Uribe Estrada, Cecilia; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Krofcheck, David; Butler, Philip H; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahmad, Muhammad; Hassan, Qamar; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Saddique, Asif; Shah, Mehar Ali; Shoaib, Muhammad; Waqas, Muhammad; Bialkowska, Helena; Bluj, Michal; Boimska, Bozena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Szleper, Michal; Traczyk, Piotr; Zalewski, Piotr; Bunkowski, Karol; Byszuk, Adrian; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Misiura, Maciej; Olszewski, Michal; Pyskir, Andrzej; Walczak, Marek; Bargassa, Pedrame; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, Cristóvão; Di Francesco, Agostino; Faccioli, Pietro; Galinhas, Bruno; Gallinaro, Michele; Hollar, Jonathan; Leonardo, Nuno; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Nemallapudi, Mythra Varun; Seixas, Joao; Strong, Giles; Toldaiev, Oleksii; Vadruccio, Daniele; Varela, Joao; Afanasiev, Serguei; Bunin, Pavel; Gavrilenko, Mikhail; Golutvin, Igor; Gorbunov, Ilya; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavin, Vladimir; Lanev, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexander; Matveev, Viktor; Moisenz, Petr; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Shmatov, Sergey; Shulha, Siarhei; Skatchkov, Nikolai; Smirnov, Vitaly; Voytishin, Nikolay; Zarubin, Anatoli; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Levchenko, Petr; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Smirnov, Igor; Sosnov, Dmitry; Sulimov, Valentin; Uvarov, Lev; Vavilov, Sergey; Vorobyev, Alexey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Karneyeu, Anton; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Tlisov, Danila; Toropin, Alexander; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Pozdnyakov, Ivan; Safronov, Grigory; Spiridonov, Alexander; Stepennov, Anton; Stolin, Viatcheslav; Toms, Maria; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Aushev, Tagir; Bylinkin, Alexander; Chadeeva, Marina; Chistov, Ruslan; Parygin, Pavel; Philippov, Dmitry; Polikarpov, Sergey; Tarkovskii, Evgenii; Zhemchugov, Evgenii; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Rusakov, Sergey V; Terkulov, Adel; Baskakov, Alexey; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Dubinin, Mikhail; Dudko, Lev; Ershov, Alexander; Gribushin, Andrey; Klyukhin, Vyacheslav; Kodolova, Olga; Lokhtin, Igor; Miagkov, Igor; Obraztsov, Stepan; Petrushanko, Sergey; Savrin, Viktor; Snigirev, Alexander; Blinov, Vladimir; Shtol, Dmitry; Skovpen, Yuri; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Elumakhov, Dmitry; Godizov, Anton; Kachanov, Vassili; Kalinin, Alexey; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Mandrik, Petr; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Babaev, Anton; Adzic, Petar; Cirkovic, Predrag; Devetak, Damir; Dordevic, Milos; Milosevic, Jovan; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Bachiller, Irene; Barrio Luna, Mar; Cerrada, Marcos; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Moran, Dermot; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, Antonio María; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Senghi Soares, Mara; Triossi, Andrea; Álvarez Fernández, Adrian; Albajar, Carmen; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Cuevas, Javier; Erice, Carlos; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Folgueras, Santiago; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; González Fernández, Juan Rodrigo; Palencia Cortezon, Enrique; Sanchez Cruz, Sergio; Vischia, Pietro; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Chazin Quero, Barbara; Duarte Campderros, Jordi; Fernandez, Marcos; Fernández Manteca, Pedro José; Garcia-Ferrero, Juan; García Alonso, Andrea; Gomez, Gervasio; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, Pablo; Matorras, Francisco; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Prieels, Cédric; Rodrigo, Teresa; Ruiz-Jimeno, Alberto; Scodellaro, Luca; Trevisani, Nicolò; Vila, Ivan; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Abbaneo, Duccio; Akgun, Bora; Auffray, Etiennette; Baillon, Paul; Ball, Austin; Barney, David; Bendavid, Joshua; Bianco, Michele; Bocci, Andrea; Botta, Cristina; Camporesi, Tiziano; Cepeda, Maria; Cerminara, Gianluca; Chapon, Emilien; Chen, Yi; D'Enterria, David; Dabrowski, Anne; Daponte, Vincenzo; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; De Gruttola, Michele; De Roeck, Albert; Deelen, Nikkie; Dobson, Marc; Du Pree, Tristan; Dünser, Marc; Dupont, Niels; Elliott-Peisert, Anna; Everaerts, Pieter; Fallavollita, Francesco; Franzoni, Giovanni; Fulcher, Jonathan; Funk, Wolfgang; Gigi, Dominique; Gilbert, Andrew; Gill, Karl; Glege, Frank; Gulhan, Doga; Hegeman, Jeroen; Innocente, Vincenzo; Jafari, Abideh; Janot, Patrick; Karacheban, Olena; Kieseler, Jan; Knünz, Valentin; Kornmayer, Andreas; Krammer, Manfred; Lange, Clemens; Lecoq, Paul; Lourenco, Carlos; Lucchini, Marco Toliman; Malgeri, Luca; Mannelli, Marcello; Martelli, Arabella; Meijers, Frans; Merlin, Jeremie Alexandre; Mersi, Stefano; Meschi, Emilio; Milenovic, Predrag; Moortgat, Filip; Mulders, Martijn; Neugebauer, Hannes; Ngadiuba, Jennifer; Orfanelli, Styliani; Orsini, Luciano; Pantaleo, Felice; Pape, Luc; Perez, Emmanuel; Peruzzi, Marco; Petrilli, Achille; Petrucciani, Giovanni; Pfeiffer, Andreas; Pierini, Maurizio; Pitters, Florian Michael; Rabady, Dinyar; Racz, Attila; Reis, Thomas; Rolandi, Gigi; Rovere, Marco; Sakulin, Hannes; Schäfer, Christoph; Schwick, Christoph; Seidel, Markus; Selvaggi, Michele; Sharma, Archana; Silva, Pedro; Sphicas, Paraskevas; Stakia, Anna; Steggemann, Jan; Stoye, Markus; Tosi, Mia; Treille, Daniel; Tsirou, Andromachi; Veckalns, Viesturs; Verweij, Marta; Zeuner, Wolfram Dietrich; Bertl, Willi; Caminada, Lea; Deiters, Konrad; Erdmann, Wolfram; Horisberger, Roland; Ingram, Quentin; Kaestli, Hans-Christian; Kotlinski, Danek; Langenegger, Urs; Rohe, Tilman; Wiederkehr, Stephan Albert; Backhaus, Malte; Bäni, Lukas; Berger, Pirmin; Casal, Bruno; Chernyavskaya, Nadezda; Dissertori, Günther; Dittmar, Michael; Donegà, Mauro; Dorfer, Christian; Grab, Christoph; Heidegger, Constantin; Hits, Dmitry; Hoss, Jan; Klijnsma, Thomas; Lustermann, Werner; Marionneau, Matthieu; Meinhard, Maren Tabea; Meister, Daniel; Micheli, Francesco; Musella, Pasquale; Nessi-Tedaldi, Francesca; Pata, Joosep; Pauss, Felicitas; Perrin, Gaël; Perrozzi, Luca; Quittnat, Milena; Reichmann, Michael; Ruini, Daniele; Sanz Becerra, Diego Alejandro; Schönenberger, Myriam; Shchutska, Lesya; Tavolaro, Vittorio Raoul; Theofilatos, Konstantinos; Vesterbacka Olsson, Minna Leonora; Wallny, Rainer; Zhu, De Hua; Aarrestad, Thea Klaeboe; Amsler, Claude; Brzhechko, Danyyl; Canelli, Maria Florencia; De Cosa, Annapaola; Del Burgo, Riccardo; Donato, Silvio; Galloni, Camilla; Hreus, Tomas; Kilminster, Benjamin; Neutelings, Izaak; Pinna, Deborah; Rauco, Giorgia; Robmann, Peter; Salerno, Daniel; Schweiger, Korbinian; Seitz, Claudia; Takahashi, Yuta; Zucchetta, Alberto; Candelise, Vieri; Chang, Yu-Hsiang; Cheng, Kai-yu; Doan, Thi Hien; Jain, Shilpi; Khurana, Raman; Kuo, Chia-Ming; Lin, Willis; Pozdnyakov, Andrey; Yu, Shin-Shan; Kumar, Arun; Chang, Paoti; Chao, Yuan; Chen, Kai-Feng; Chen, Po-Hsun; Fiori, Francesco; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Hsiung, Yee; Liu, Yueh-Feng; Lu, Rong-Shyang; Paganis, Efstathios; Psallidas, Andreas; Steen, Arnaud; Tsai, Jui-fa; Asavapibhop, Burin; Kovitanggoon, Kittikul; Singh, Gurpreet; Srimanobhas, Norraphat; Bat, Ayse; Boran, Fatma; Cerci, Salim; Damarseckin, Serdal; Demiroglu, Zuhal Seyma; Dozen, Candan; Dumanoglu, Isa; Girgis, Semiray; Gokbulut, Gul; Guler, Yalcin; Hos, Ilknur; Kangal, Evrim Ersin; Kara, Ozgun; Kayis Topaksu, Aysel; Kiminsu, Ugur; Oglakci, Mehmet; Onengut, Gulsen; Ozdemir, Kadri; Sunar Cerci, Deniz; Tali, Bayram; Tok, Ufuk Guney; Turkcapar, Semra; Zorbakir, Ibrahim Soner; Zorbilmez, Caglar; Karapinar, Guler; Ocalan, Kadir; Yalvac, Metin; Zeyrek, Mehmet; Gülmez, Erhan; Kaya, Mithat; Kaya, Ozlem; Tekten, Sevgi; Yetkin, Elif Asli; Agaras, Merve Nazlim; Atay, Serhat; Cakir, Altan; Cankocak, Kerem; Komurcu, Yildiray; Grynyov, Boris; Levchuk, Leonid; Ball, Fionn; Beck, Lana; Brooke, James John; Burns, Douglas; Clement, Emyr; Cussans, David; Davignon, Olivier; Flacher, Henning; Goldstein, Joel; Heath, Greg P; Heath, Helen F; Kreczko, Lukasz; Newbold, Dave M; Paramesvaran, Sudarshan; Sakuma, Tai; Seif El Nasr-storey, Sarah; Smith, Dominic; Smith, Vincent J; Bell, Ken W; Belyaev, Alexander; Brew, Christopher; Brown, Robert M; Cieri, Davide; Cockerill, David JA; Coughlan, John A; Harder, Kristian; Harper, Sam; Linacre, Jacob; Olaiya, Emmanuel; Petyt, David; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Thea, Alessandro; Tomalin, Ian R; Williams, Thomas; Womersley, William John; Auzinger, Georg; Bainbridge, Robert; Bloch, Philippe; Borg, Johan; Breeze, Shane; Buchmuller, Oliver; Bundock, Aaron; Casasso, Stefano; Colling, David; Corpe, Louie; Dauncey, Paul; Davies, Gavin; Della Negra, Michel; Di Maria, Riccardo; Elwood, Adam; Haddad, Yacine; Hall, Geoffrey; Iles, Gregory; James, Thomas; Komm, Matthias; Lane, Rebecca; Laner, Christian; Lyons, Louis; Magnan, Anne-Marie; Malik, Sarah; Mastrolorenzo, Luca; Matsushita, Takashi; Nash, Jordan; Nikitenko, Alexander; Palladino, Vito; Pesaresi, Mark; Richards, Alexander; Rose, Andrew; Scott, Edward; Seez, Christopher; Shtipliyski, Antoni; Strebler, Thomas; Summers, Sioni; Tapper, Alexander; Uchida, Kirika; Vazquez Acosta, Monica; Virdee, Tejinder; Wardle, Nicholas; Winterbottom, Daniel; Wright, Jack; Zenz, Seth Conrad; Cole, Joanne; Hobson, Peter R; Khan, Akram; Kyberd, Paul; Morton, Alexander; Reid, Ivan; Teodorescu, Liliana; Zahid, Sema; Borzou, Ahmad; Call, Kenneth; Dittmann, Jay; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Liu, Hongxuan; Pastika, Nathaniel; Smith, Caleb; Bartek, Rachel; Dominguez, Aaron; Buccilli, Andrew; Cooper, Seth; Henderson, Conor; Rumerio, Paolo; West, Christopher; Arcaro, Daniel; Avetisyan, Aram; Bose, Tulika; Gastler, Daniel; Rankin, Dylan; Richardson, Clint; Rohlf, James; Sulak, Lawrence; Zou, David; Benelli, Gabriele; Cutts, David; Hadley, Mary; Hakala, John; Heintz, Ulrich; Hogan, Julie Managan; Kwok, Ka Hei Martin; Laird, Edward; Landsberg, Greg; Lee, Jangbae; Mao, Zaixing; Narain, Meenakshi; Pazzini, Jacopo; Piperov, Stefan; Sagir, Sinan; Syarif, Rizki; Yu, David; Band, Reyer; Brainerd, Christopher; Breedon, Richard; Burns, Dustin; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, Manuel; Chertok, Maxwell; Conway, John; Conway, Rylan; Cox, Peter Timothy; Erbacher, Robin; Flores, Chad; Funk, Garrett; Ko, Winston; Lander, Richard; Mclean, Christine; Mulhearn, Michael; Pellett, Dave; Pilot, Justin; Shalhout, Shalhout; Shi, Mengyao; Smith, John; Stolp, Dustin; Taylor, Devin; Tos, Kyle; Tripathi, Mani; Wang, Zhangqier; Zhang, Fengwangdong; Bachtis, Michail; Bravo, Cameron; Cousins, Robert; Dasgupta, Abhigyan; Florent, Alice; Hauser, Jay; Ignatenko, Mikhail; Mccoll, Nickolas; Regnard, Simon; Saltzberg, David; Schnaible, Christian; Valuev, Vyacheslav; Bouvier, Elvire; Burt, Kira; Clare, Robert; Ellison, John Anthony; Gary, J William; Ghiasi Shirazi, Seyyed Mohammad Amin; Hanson, Gail; Karapostoli, Georgia; Kennedy, Elizabeth; Lacroix, Florent; Long, Owen Rosser; Olmedo Negrete, Manuel; Paneva, Mirena Ivova; Si, Weinan; Wang, Long; Wei, Hua; Wimpenny, Stephen; Yates, Brent; Branson, James G; Cittolin, Sergio; Derdzinski, Mark; Gerosa, Raffaele; Gilbert, Dylan; Hashemi, Bobak; Holzner, André; Klein, Daniel; Kole, Gouranga; Krutelyov, Vyacheslav; Letts, James; Masciovecchio, Mario; Olivito, Dominick; Padhi, Sanjay; Pieri, Marco; Sani, Matteo; Sharma, Vivek; Simon, Sean; Tadel, Matevz; Vartak, Adish; Wasserbaech, Steven; Wood, John; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avraham; Zevi Della Porta, Giovanni; Amin, Nick; Bhandari, Rohan; Bradmiller-Feld, John; Campagnari, Claudio; Citron, Matthew; Dishaw, Adam; Dutta, Valentina; Franco Sevilla, Manuel; Gouskos, Loukas; Heller, Ryan; Incandela, Joe; Ovcharova, Ana; Qu, Huilin; Richman, Jeffrey; Stuart, David; Suarez, Indara; Yoo, Jaehyeok; Anderson, Dustin; Bornheim, Adolf; Bunn, Julian; Lawhorn, Jay Mathew; Newman, Harvey B; Nguyen, Thong; Pena, Cristian; Spiropulu, Maria; Vlimant, Jean-Roch; Wilkinson, Richard; Xie, Si; Zhang, Zhicai; Zhu, Ren-Yuan; Andrews, Michael Benjamin; Ferguson, Thomas; Mudholkar, Tanmay; Paulini, Manfred; Russ, James; Sun, Menglei; Vogel, Helmut; Vorobiev, Igor; Weinberg, Marc; Cumalat, John Perry; Ford, William T; Jensen, Frank; Johnson, Andrew; Krohn, Michael; Leontsinis, Stefanos; MacDonald, Emily; Mulholland, Troy; Stenson, Kevin; Ulmer, Keith; Wagner, Stephen Robert; Alexander, James; Chaves, Jorge; Cheng, Yangyang; Chu, Jennifer; Datta, Abhisek; Mcdermott, Kevin; Mirman, Nathan; Patterson, Juliet Ritchie; Quach, Dan; Rinkevicius, Aurelijus; Ryd, Anders; Skinnari, Louise; Soffi, Livia; Tan, Shao Min; Tao, Zhengcheng; Thom, Julia; Tucker, Jordan; Wittich, Peter; Zientek, Margaret; Abdullin, Salavat; Albrow, Michael; Alyari, Maral; Apollinari, Giorgio; Apresyan, Artur; Apyan, Aram; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bauerdick, Lothar AT; Beretvas, Andrew; Berryhill, Jeffrey; Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Bolla, Gino; Burkett, Kevin; Butler, Joel Nathan; Canepa, Anadi; Cerati, Giuseppe Benedetto; Cheung, Harry; Chlebana, Frank; Cremonesi, Matteo; Duarte, Javier; Elvira, Victor Daniel; Freeman, Jim; Gecse, Zoltan; Gottschalk, Erik; Gray, Lindsey; Green, Dan; Grünendahl, Stefan; Gutsche, Oliver; Hanlon, Jim; Harris, Robert M; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hirschauer, James; Hu, Zhen; Jayatilaka, Bodhitha; Jindariani, Sergo; Johnson, Marvin; Joshi, Umesh; Klima, Boaz; Kortelainen, Matti J; Kreis, Benjamin; Lammel, Stephan; Lincoln, Don; Lipton, Ron; Liu, Miaoyuan; Liu, Tiehui; Lopes De Sá, Rafael; Lykken, Joseph; Maeshima, Kaori; Magini, Nicolo; Marraffino, John Michael; Mason, David; McBride, Patricia; Merkel, Petra; Mrenna, Stephen; Nahn, Steve; O'Dell, Vivian; Pedro, Kevin; Prokofyev, Oleg; Rakness, Gregory; Ristori, Luciano; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Schneider, Basil; Sexton-Kennedy, Elizabeth; Soha, Aron; Spalding, William J; Spiegel, Leonard; Stoynev, Stoyan; Strait, James; Strobbe, Nadja; Taylor, Lucas; Tkaczyk, Slawek; Tran, Nhan Viet; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Vaandering, Eric Wayne; Vernieri, Caterina; Verzocchi, Marco; Vidal, Richard; Wang, Michael; Weber, Hannsjoerg Artur; Whitbeck, Andrew; Wu, Weimin; Acosta, Darin; Avery, Paul; Bortignon, Pierluigi; Bourilkov, Dimitri; Brinkerhoff, Andrew; Carnes, Andrew; Carver, Matthew; Curry, David; Field, Richard D; Furic, Ivan-Kresimir; Gleyzer, Sergei V; Joshi, Bhargav Madhusudan; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Korytov, Andrey; Kotov, Khristian; Ma, Peisen; Matchev, Konstantin; Mei, Hualin; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Shi, Kun; Sperka, David; Terentyev, Nikolay; Thomas, Laurent; Wang, Jian; Wang, Sean-Jiun; Yelton, John; Joshi, Yagya Raj; Linn, Stephan; Markowitz, Pete; Rodriguez, Jorge Luis; Ackert, Andrew; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Johnson, Kurtis F; Kolberg, Ted; Martinez, German; Perry, Thomas; Prosper, Harrison; Saha, Anirban; Santra, Arka; Sharma, Varun; Yohay, Rachel; Baarmand, Marc M; Bhopatkar, Vallary; Colafranceschi, Stefano; Hohlmann, Marcus; Noonan, Daniel; Roy, Titas; Yumiceva, Francisco; Adams, Mark Raymond; Apanasevich, Leonard; Berry, Douglas; Betts, Russell Richard; Cavanaugh, Richard; Chen, Xuan; Dittmer, Susan; Evdokimov, Olga; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Hangal, Dhanush Anil; Hofman, David Jonathan; Jung, Kurt; Kamin, Jason; Sandoval Gonzalez, Irving Daniel; Tonjes, Marguerite; Varelas, Nikos; Wang, Hui; Wu, Zhenbin; Zhang, Jingyu; Bilki, Burak; Clarida, Warren; Dilsiz, Kamuran; Durgut, Süleyman; Gandrajula, Reddy Pratap; Haytmyradov, Maksat; Khristenko, Viktor; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mermerkaya, Hamit; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Moeller, Anthony; Nachtman, Jane; Ogul, Hasan; Onel, Yasar; Ozok, Ferhat; Penzo, Aldo; Snyder, Christina; Tiras, Emrah; Wetzel, James; Yi, Kai; Blumenfeld, Barry; Cocoros, Alice; Eminizer, Nicholas; Fehling, David; Feng, Lei; Gritsan, Andrei; Hung, Wai Ting; Maksimovic, Petar; Roskes, Jeffrey; Sarica, Ulascan; Swartz, Morris; Xiao, Meng; You, Can; Al-bataineh, Ayman; Baringer, Philip; Bean, Alice; Boren, Samuel; Bowen, James; Castle, James; Forthomme, Laurent; Khalil, Sadia; Kropivnitskaya, Anna; Majumder, Devdatta; Mcbrayer, William; Murray, Michael; Rogan, Christopher; Royon, Christophe; Sanders, Stephen; Schmitz, Erich; Tapia Takaki, Daniel; Wang, Quan; Ivanov, Andrew; Kaadze, Ketino; Maravin, Yurii; Modak, Atanu; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Saini, Lovedeep Kaur; Skhirtladze, Nikoloz; Rebassoo, Finn; Wright, Douglas; Baden, Drew; Baron, Owen; Belloni, Alberto; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Feng, Yongbin; Ferraioli, Charles; Hadley, Nicholas John; Jabeen, Shabnam; Jeng, Geng-Yuan; Kellogg, Richard G; Kunkle, Joshua; Mignerey, Alice; Ricci-Tam, Francesca; Shin, Young Ho; Skuja, Andris; Tonwar, Suresh C; Abercrombie, Daniel; Allen, Brandon; Azzolini, Virginia; Barbieri, Richard; Baty, Austin; Bauer, Gerry; Bi, Ran; Brandt, Stephanie; Busza, Wit; Cali, Ivan Amos; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; Demiragli, Zeynep; Gomez Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim; Harris, Philip; Hsu, Dylan; Hu, Miao; Iiyama, Yutaro; Innocenti, Gian Michele; Klute, Markus; Kovalskyi, Dmytro; Lee, Yen-Jie; Levin, Andrew; Luckey, Paul David; Maier, Benedikt; Marini, Andrea Carlo; Mcginn, Christopher; Mironov, Camelia; Narayanan, Siddharth; Niu, Xinmei; Paus, Christoph; Roland, Christof; Roland, Gunther; Stephans, George; Sumorok, Konstanty; Tatar, Kaya; Velicanu, Dragos; Wang, Jing; Wang, Ta-Wei; Wyslouch, Bolek; Zhaozhong, Shi; Benvenuti, Alberto; Chatterjee, Rajdeep Mohan; Evans, Andrew; Hansen, Peter; Kalafut, Sean; Kubota, Yuichi; Lesko, Zachary; Mans, Jeremy; Nourbakhsh, Shervin; Ruckstuhl, Nicole; Rusack, Roger; Turkewitz, Jared; Wadud, Mohammad Abrar; Acosta, John Gabriel; Oliveros, Sandra; Avdeeva, Ekaterina; Bloom, Kenneth; Claes, Daniel R; Fangmeier, Caleb; Golf, Frank; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Kamalieddin, Rami; Kravchenko, Ilya; Monroy, Jose; Siado, Joaquin Emilo; Snow, Gregory R; Stieger, Benjamin; Godshalk, Andrew; Harrington, Charles; Iashvili, Ia; Nguyen, Duong; Parker, Ashley; Rappoccio, Salvatore; Roozbahani, Bahareh; Alverson, George; Barberis, Emanuela; Freer, Chad; Hortiangtham, Apichart; Massironi, Andrea; Morse, David Michael; Orimoto, Toyoko; Teixeira De Lima, Rafael; Wamorkar, Tanvi; Wang, Bingran; Wisecarver, Andrew; Wood, Darien; Bhattacharya, Saptaparna; Charaf, Otman; Hahn, Kristan Allan; Mucia, Nicholas; Odell, Nathaniel; Schmitt, Michael Henry; Sung, Kevin; Trovato, Marco; Velasco, Mayda; Bucci, Rachael; Dev, Nabarun; Hildreth, Michael; Hurtado Anampa, Kenyi; Jessop, Colin; Karmgard, Daniel John; Kellams, Nathan; Lannon, Kevin; Li, Wenzhao; Loukas, Nikitas; Marinelli, Nancy; Meng, Fanbo; Mueller, Charles; Musienko, Yuri; Planer, Michael; Reinsvold, Allison; Ruchti, Randy; Siddireddy, Prasanna; Smith, Geoffrey; Taroni, Silvia; Wayne, Mitchell; Wightman, Andrew; Wolf, Matthias; Woodard, Anna; Alimena, Juliette; Antonelli, Louis; Bylsma, Ben; Durkin, Lloyd Stanley; Flowers, Sean; Francis, Brian; Hart, Andrew; Hill, Christopher; Ji, Weifeng; Ling, Ta-Yung; Luo, Wuming; Winer, Brian L; Wulsin, Howard Wells; Cooperstein, Stephane; Driga, Olga; Elmer, Peter; Hardenbrook, Joshua; Hebda, Philip; Higginbotham, Samuel; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Lange, David; Luo, Jingyu; Marlow, Daniel; Mei, Kelvin; Ojalvo, Isabel; Olsen, James; Palmer, Christopher; Piroué, Pierre; Salfeld-Nebgen, Jakob; Stickland, David; Tully, Christopher; Malik, Sudhir; Norberg, Scarlet; Barker, Anthony; Barnes, Virgil E; Das, Souvik; Gutay, Laszlo; Jones, Matthew; Jung, Andreas Werner; Khatiwada, Ajeeta; Miller, David Harry; Neumeister, Norbert; Peng, Cheng-Chieh; Qiu, Hao; Schulte, Jan-Frederik; Sun, Jian; Wang, Fuqiang; Xiao, Rui; Xie, Wei; Cheng, Tongguang; Dolen, James; Parashar, Neeti; Chen, Zhenyu; Ecklund, Karl Matthew; Freed, Sarah; Geurts, Frank JM; Guilbaud, Maxime; Kilpatrick, Matthew; Li, Wei; Michlin, Benjamin; Padley, Brian Paul; Roberts, Jay; Rorie, Jamal; Shi, Wei; Tu, Zhoudunming; Zabel, James; Zhang, Aobo; Bodek, Arie; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demina, Regina; Duh, Yi-ting; Ferbel, Thomas; Galanti, Mario; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Han, Jiyeon; Hindrichs, Otto; Khukhunaishvili, Aleko; Lo, Kin Ho; Tan, Ping; Verzetti, Mauro; Ciesielski, Robert; Goulianos, Konstantin; Mesropian, Christina; Agapitos, Antonis; Chou, John Paul; Gershtein, Yuri; Gómez Espinosa, Tirso Alejandro; Halkiadakis, Eva; Heindl, Maximilian; Hughes, Elliot; Kaplan, Steven; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, Raghav; Kyriacou, Savvas; Lath, Amitabh; Montalvo, Roy; Nash, Kevin; Osherson, Marc; Saka, Halil; Salur, Sevil; Schnetzer, Steve; Sheffield, David; Somalwar, Sunil; Stone, Robert; Thomas, Scott; Thomassen, Peter; Walker, Matthew; Delannoy, Andrés G; Heideman, Joseph; Riley, Grant; Rose, Keith; Spanier, Stefan; Thapa, Krishna; Bouhali, Othmane; Castaneda Hernandez, Alfredo; Celik, Ali; Dalchenko, Mykhailo; De Mattia, Marco; Delgado, Andrea; Dildick, Sven; Eusebi, Ricardo; Gilmore, Jason; Huang, Tao; Kamon, Teruki; Mueller, Ryan; Pakhotin, Yuriy; Patel, Rishi; Perloff, Alexx; Perniè, Luca; Rathjens, Denis; Safonov, Alexei; Tatarinov, Aysen; Akchurin, Nural; Damgov, Jordan; De Guio, Federico; Dudero, Phillip Russell; Faulkner, James; Gurpinar, Emine; Kunori, Shuichi; Lamichhane, Kamal; Lee, Sung Won; Mengke, Tielige; Muthumuni, Samila; Peltola, Timo; Undleeb, Sonaina; Volobouev, Igor; Wang, Zhixing; Greene, Senta; Gurrola, Alfredo; Janjam, Ravi; Johns, Willard; Maguire, Charles; Melo, Andrew; Ni, Hong; Padeken, Klaas; Ruiz Alvarez, José David; Sheldon, Paul; Tuo, Shengquan; Velkovska, Julia; Xu, Qiao; Arenton, Michael Wayne; Barria, Patrizia; Cox, Bradley; Hirosky, Robert; Joyce, Matthew; Ledovskoy, Alexander; Li, Hengne; Neu, Christopher; Sinthuprasith, Tutanon; Wang, Yanchu; Wolfe, Evan; Xia, Fan; Harr, Robert; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Poudyal, Nabin; Sturdy, Jared; Thapa, Prakash; Zaleski, Shawn; Brodski, Michael; Buchanan, James; Caillol, Cécile; Carlsmith, Duncan; Dasu, Sridhara; Dodd, Laura; Duric, Senka; Gomber, Bhawna; Grothe, Monika; Herndon, Matthew; Hervé, Alain; Hussain, Usama; Klabbers, Pamela; Lanaro, Armando; Levine, Aaron; Long, Kenneth; Loveless, Richard; Rekovic, Vladimir; Ruggles, Tyler; Savin, Alexander; Smith, Nicholas; Smith, Wesley H; Woods, Nathaniel; Antchev, G.; Aspell, P.; Atanassov, I.; Avati, V.; Baechler, J.; Baldenegro Barrera, C.; Berardi, V.; Berretti, M.; Bossini, E.; Bottigli, U.; Bozzo, M.; Cafagna, F.S.; Catanesi, M.G.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Deile, M.; De Leonardis, F.; D'Orazio, A.; Doubek, M.; Druzhkin, D.; Eggert, K.; Eremin, V.; Fiergolski, A.; Garcia, F.; Georgiev, V.; Giani, S.; Grzanka, L.; Hammerbauer, J.; Heino, J.; Isidori, T.; Ivanchenko, V.; Janda, M.; Karev, A.; Kašpar, J.; Kopal, J.; Kundrát, V.; Lami, S.; Latino, G.; Lauhakangas, R.; Linhart, R.; Lindsey, C.; Lokajíček, M.V.; Losurdo, L.; Lo Vetere, M.; Lucas Rodríguez, F.; Macrí, M.; Malawski, M.; Minafra, N.; Minutoli, S.; Naaranoja, T.; Nemes, F.; Niewiadomski, H.; Novák, T.; Oliveri, E.; Oljemark, F.; Oriunno, M.; Österberg, K.; Palazzi, P.; Passaro, V.; Peroutka, Z.; Procházka, J.; Quinto, M.; Radermacher, E.; Radicioni, E.; Ravotti, F.; Ruggiero, G.; Saarikko, H.; Scribano, A.; Siroky, J.; Smajek, J.; Snoeys, W.; Stefanovitch, R.; Sziklai, J.; Taylor, C.; Tcherniaev, E.; Turini, N.; Vacek, V.; Welti, J.; Williams, J.; Wyszkowski, P.; Zich, J.; Zielinski, K.

    2018-01-01

    The process pp$\\to\\ell^+\\ell^-$p$^{(*)}$, with $\\ell^+\\ell^-$ a muon or an electron pair produced at midrapidity with mass larger than 110 GeV, has been observed for the first time at the LHC in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s} =$ 13 TeV. One of the two scattered protons is measured in the CMS-TOTEM precision proton spectrometer (CT-PPS), which operated for the first time in 2016. The second proton either remains intact or is excited and then dissociates into a low-mass state p$^{*}$, which is undetected. The measurement is based on an integrated luminosity of 9.4 fb$^{-1}$ collected during standard, high-luminosity LHC operation. A total of 12 $\\mu^+\\mu^-$ and 8 e$^+$e$^-$ pairs with $m(\\ell^{+}\\ell^{-}) >$ 110 GeV, and matching forward proton kinematics, are observed, with expected backgrounds of 1.49 $\\pm$ 0.07 (stat) $\\pm$ 0.53 (syst) and 2.36 $\\pm$ 0.09 (stat) $\\pm$ 0.47 (syst), respectively. This corresponds to an excess of more than five standard deviations over the expected background. The present result co...

  20. Evaluation and comparison of New 4DCT based strategies for proton treatment planning for lung tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Ning; Patyal, Baldev; Ghebremedhin, Abiel; Bush, David

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate different strategies for proton lung treatment planning based on four-dimensional CT (4DCT) scans. Twelve cases, involving only gross tumor volumes (GTV), were evaluated. Single image sets of (1) maximum intensity projection (MIP3) of end inhale (EI), middle exhale (ME) and end exhale (EE) images; (2) average intensity projection (AVG) of all phase images; and (3) EE images from 4DCT scans were selected as primary images for proton treatment planning. Internal target volumes (ITVs) outlined by a clinician were imported into MIP3, AVG, and EE images as planning targets. Initially, treatment uncertainties were not included in planning. Each plan was imported into phase images of 4DCT scans. Relative volumes of GTVs covered by 95% of prescribed dose and mean ipsilateral lung dose of a phase image obtained by averaging the dose in inspiration and expiration phases were used to evaluate the quality of a plan for a particular case. For comparing different planning strategies, the mean of the averaged relative volumes of GTVs covered by 95% of prescribed dose and its standard deviation for each planning strategy for all cases were used. Then, treatment uncertainties were included in planning. Each plan was recalculated in phase images of 4DCT scans. Same strategies were used for plan evaluation except dose-volume histograms of the planning target volumes (PTVs) instead of GTVs were used and the mean and standard deviation of the relative volumes of PTVs covered by 95% of prescribed dose and the ipsilateral lung dose were used to compare different planning strategies. MIP3 plans without treatment uncertainties yielded 96.7% of the mean relative GTV covered by 95% of prescribed dose (standard deviations of 5.7% for all cases). With treatment uncertainties, MIP3 plans yielded 99.5% of mean relative PTV covered by 95% of prescribed dose (standard deviations of 0.7%). Inclusion of treatment uncertainties improved PTV dose coverage but also increased the ipsilateral

  1. SU-E-T-455: Characterization of 3D Printed Materials for Proton Beam Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou, W; Siderits, R; McKenna, M; Khan, A; Yue, N; McDonough, J; Yin, L; Teo, B; Fisher, T

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The widespread availability of low cost 3D printing technologies provides an alternative fabrication method for customized proton range modifying accessories such as compensators and boluses. However the material properties of the printed object are dependent on the printing technology used. In order to facilitate the application of 3D printing in proton therapy, this study investigated the stopping power of several printed materials using both proton pencil beam measurements and Monte Carlo simulations. Methods: Five 3–4 cm cubes fabricated using three 3D printing technologies (selective laser sintering, fused-deposition modeling and stereolithography) from five printers were investigated. The cubes were scanned on a CT scanner and the depth dose curves for a mono-energetic pencil beam passing through the material were measured using a large parallel plate ion chamber in a water tank. Each cube was measured from two directions (perpendicular and parallel to printing plane) to evaluate the effects of the anisotropic material layout. The results were compared with GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulation using the manufacturer specified material density and chemical composition data. Results: Compared with water, the differences from the range pull back by the printed blocks varied and corresponded well with the material CT Hounsfield unit. The measurement results were in agreement with Monte Carlo simulation. However, depending on the technology, inhomogeneity existed in the printed cubes evidenced from CT images. The effect of such inhomogeneity on the proton beam is to be investigated. Conclusion: Printed blocks by three different 3D printing technologies were characterized for proton beam with measurements and Monte Carlo simulation. The effects of the printing technologies in proton range and stopping power were studied. The derived results can be applied when specific devices are used in proton radiotherapy

  2. Anhydrous proton conductor based on composites of PEO and ATMP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun Baoying [Key Lab of Organic Optoelectronics and Molecular Engineering, Department of Chemistry, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Qiu Xinping, E-mail: qiuxp@tsinghua.edu.c [Key Lab of Organic Optoelectronics and Molecular Engineering, Department of Chemistry, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Zhu Wentao [Key Lab of Organic Optoelectronics and Molecular Engineering, Department of Chemistry, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2011-04-15

    A new type anhydrous PEM material based on Poly (ethylene oxide) (PEO)/Amino Trimethylene Phosphonic Acid (ATMP) composite was prepared. In this study, PEO assumed to 'grab' protons via hydrogen bond between PEO and ATMP. Based on this point, the PEO/ATMP composites were prepared firstly as the preliminary study to verify this proton conducting system. Then, PVDF was added to enhance the membrane's stability. The PVDF/PEO/ATMP composite membranes were thermally stable up to 200 {sup o}C in the studied composition ranges. The membrane had relatively compact structure by SEM images. Proton conductivity of 59% PVDF/29% PEO/12% ATMP was up to 6.71 x 10 {sup -3} S cm{sup -1} at 86 {sup o}C after doping with 7.9 wt% phosphoric acid without extra humidification.

  3. A voxel-based investigation for MRI-only radiotherapy of the brain using ultra short echo times

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edmund, Jens Morgenthaler; Kjer, Hans Martin; Van Leemput, Koen

    2014-01-01

    including or excluding additional spatial information. Approach 3 used a statistical regression correlating MRI voxels with their corresponding CT voxels. A similar photon and proton treatment plan was generated for a target positioned between the nasal cavity and the brainstem for all patients. The CT...... receiving cranial irradiation, each containing a co-registered MRI and CT scan, were included. An ultra short echo time MRI sequence for bone visualization was used. Six methods were investigated for three popular types of voxel-based approaches; (1) threshold-based segmentation, (2) Bayesian segmentation...... significantly better than the threshold and Bayesian segmentation methods (excluding spatial information). All methods agreed significantly better with CT than a reference water MRI comparison. The mean dosimetric deviation for photons and protons compared to the CT was about 2% and highest in the gradient dose...

  4. Ceramic membrane fuel cells based on solid proton electrolytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Guangyao; Ma, Qianli; Peng, Ranran; Liu, Xingqin [USTC Lab. for Solid State Chemistry and Inorganic Membranes, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Ma, Guilin [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Suzhou University, Suzhou 215123 (China)

    2007-04-15

    The development of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) has reached its new stage characterized with thin electrolytes on porous electrode support, and the most important fabrication techniques developed in which almost all are concerned with inorganic membranes, and so can be named as ceramic membrane fuel cells (CMFCs). CMFCs based on proton electrolytes (CMFC-H) may exhibit more advantages than CMFCs based on oxygen-ion electrolytes (CMFC-O) in many respects, such as energy efficiency and avoiding carbon deposit. Ammonia fuelled CMFC with proton-conducting BaCe{sub 0.8}Gd{sub 0.2}O{sub 2.9} (BCGO) electrolyte (50 {mu}m in thickness) is reported in this works, which showed the open current voltage (OCV) values close to theoretical ones and rather high power density. And also, we have found that the well known super oxide ion conductor, La{sub 0.9}Sr{sub 0.1}Ga{sub 0.8}Mg{sub 0.2}O{sub 3-{alpha}} (LSGM), is a pure proton conductor in H{sub 2} and mixed proton and oxide ion conductor in wet air, while it is a pure oxide ion conductor in oxygen or dry air. To demonstrate the CMFC-H concept to get high performance fuel cells the techniques for thin membranes, chemical vapor deposition (CVD), particularly novel CVD techniques, should be given more attention because of their many advantages. (author)

  5. Proton therapy Monte Carlo SRNA-VOX code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilić Radovan D.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The most powerful feature of the Monte Carlo method is the possibility of simulating all individual particle interactions in three dimensions and performing numerical experiments with a preset error. These facts were the motivation behind the development of a general-purpose Monte Carlo SRNA program for proton transport simulation in technical systems described by standard geometrical forms (plane, sphere, cone, cylinder, cube. Some of the possible applications of the SRNA program are: (a a general code for proton transport modeling, (b design of accelerator-driven systems, (c simulation of proton scattering and degrading shapes and composition, (d research on proton detectors; and (e radiation protection at accelerator installations. This wide range of possible applications of the program demands the development of various versions of SRNA-VOX codes for proton transport modeling in voxelized geometries and has, finally, resulted in the ISTAR package for the calculation of deposited energy distribution in patients on the basis of CT data in radiotherapy. All of the said codes are capable of using 3-D proton sources with an arbitrary energy spectrum in an interval of 100 keV to 250 MeV.

  6. SU-E-J-136: Investigation Into Robustness of Stopping Power Calculated by DECT and SECT for Proton Therapy Treatment Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, J [University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA (Australia); Penfold, S [University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA (Australia); Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide, SA (Australia)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the robustness of dual energy CT (DECT) and single energy CT (SECT) proton stopping power calibration techniques and quantify the associated errors when imaging a phantom differing in chemical composition to that used during stopping power calibration. Methods: The CIRS tissue substitute phantom was scanned in a CT-simulator at 90kV and 140kV. This image set was used to generate a DECT proton SPR calibration based on a relationship between effective atomic number and mean excitation energy. A SECT proton SPR calibration based only on Hounsfield units (HUs) was also generated. DECT and SECT scans of a second phantom of known density and chemical composition were performed. The SPR of the second phantom was calculated with the DECT approach (SPR-DECT),the SECT approach (SPR-SECT) and finally the known density and chemical composition of the phantom (SPR-ref). The DECT and SECT image sets were imported into the Pinnacle{sup 3} research release of proton therapy treatment planning. The difference in dose when exposed to a common pencil beam distribution was investigated. Results: SPR-DECT was found to be in better agreement with SPR-ref than SPR- SECT. The mean difference in SPR for all materials was 0.51% for DECT and 6.89% for SECT. With the exception of Teflon, SPR-DECT was found to agree with SPR-ref to within 1%. Significant differences in calculated dose were found when using the DECT image set or the SECT image set. Conclusion: The DECT calibration technique was found to be more robust to situations in which the physical properties of the test materials differed from the materials used during SPR calibration. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that the DECT and SECT SPR calibration techniques can Result in significantly different calculated dose distributions.

  7. Tensor-based Dictionary Learning for Spectral CT Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanbo; Wang, Ge

    2016-01-01

    Spectral computed tomography (CT) produces an energy-discriminative attenuation map of an object, extending a conventional image volume with a spectral dimension. In spectral CT, an image can be sparsely represented in each of multiple energy channels, and are highly correlated among energy channels. According to this characteristics, we propose a tensor-based dictionary learning method for spectral CT reconstruction. In our method, tensor patches are extracted from an image tensor, which is reconstructed using the filtered backprojection (FBP), to form a training dataset. With the Candecomp/Parafac decomposition, a tensor-based dictionary is trained, in which each atom is a rank-one tensor. Then, the trained dictionary is used to sparsely represent image tensor patches during an iterative reconstruction process, and the alternating minimization scheme is adapted for optimization. The effectiveness of our proposed method is validated with both numerically simulated and real preclinical mouse datasets. The results demonstrate that the proposed tensor-based method generally produces superior image quality, and leads to more accurate material decomposition than the currently popular popular methods. PMID:27541628

  8. Tensor-Based Dictionary Learning for Spectral CT Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanbo; Mou, Xuanqin; Wang, Ge; Yu, Hengyong

    2017-01-01

    Spectral computed tomography (CT) produces an energy-discriminative attenuation map of an object, extending a conventional image volume with a spectral dimension. In spectral CT, an image can be sparsely represented in each of multiple energy channels, and are highly correlated among energy channels. According to this characteristics, we propose a tensor-based dictionary learning method for spectral CT reconstruction. In our method, tensor patches are extracted from an image tensor, which is reconstructed using the filtered backprojection (FBP), to form a training dataset. With the Candecomp/Parafac decomposition, a tensor-based dictionary is trained, in which each atom is a rank-one tensor. Then, the trained dictionary is used to sparsely represent image tensor patches during an iterative reconstruction process, and the alternating minimization scheme is adapted for optimization. The effectiveness of our proposed method is validated with both numerically simulated and real preclinical mouse datasets. The results demonstrate that the proposed tensor-based method generally produces superior image quality, and leads to more accurate material decomposition than the currently popular popular methods.

  9. Model based rib-cage unfolding for trauma CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Berg, Jens; Klinder, Tobias; Lorenz, Cristian

    2018-03-01

    A CT rib-cage unfolding method is proposed that does not require to determine rib centerlines but determines the visceral cavity surface by model base segmentation. Image intensities are sampled across this surface that is flattened using a model based 3D thin-plate-spline registration. An average rib centerline model projected onto this surface serves as a reference system for registration. The flattening registration is designed so that ribs similar to the centerline model are mapped onto parallel lines preserving their relative length. Ribs deviating from this model appear deviating from straight parallel ribs in the unfolded view, accordingly. As the mapping is continuous also the details in intercostal space and those adjacent to the ribs are rendered well. The most beneficial application area is Trauma CT where a fast detection of rib fractures is a crucial task. Specifically in trauma, automatic rib centerline detection may not be guaranteed due to fractures and dislocations. The application by visual assessment on the large public LIDC data base of lung CT proved general feasibility of this early work.

  10. Detection of protonated non-Watson-Crick base pairs using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Riyoko; Iwahashi, Hideo

    2018-03-01

    Many studies have shown that protonated nucleic acid base pairs are involved in a wide variety of nucleic acid structures. However, little information is available on relative stability of hemiprotonated self- and non-self-dimers at monomer level. We used electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) to evaluate the relative stability under various concentrations of hydrogen ion. These enable conjecture of the formation of protonated non-Watson-Crick base pairs based on DNA and RNA base sequence. In the present study, we observed that ESI-MS peaks corresponded to respective self-dimers for all examined nucleosides except for adenosine. Peak heights depended on the concentration of hydrogen ion. The ESI-MS peak heights of the hemiprotonated cytidine dimers and the hemiprotonated thymidine dimer sharply increased with increased concentration of hydrogen ion, suggesting direct participation of hydrogen ion in dimer formations. In ESI-MS measurements of the solutions containing adenosine, cytidine, thymidine and guanosine, we observed protonated cytidine-guanosine dimer (CH+-G) and protonated cytidine-thymidine dimer (CH+-T) in addition to hemiprotonated cytidine-cytidine dimer (CH+-C) with following relative peak height, (CH+-C) > (CH+-G) ≈ (CH+-T) > (CH+-A). Additionally, in the ESI-MS measurements of solutions containing adenosine, thymidine and guanosine, we observed a considerable amount of protonated adenosine-guanosine (AH+-G) and protonated adenosine-thymidine (AH+-T).

  11. Proton exchange between oxymethyl radical and acids and bases: semiempirical quantum-chemical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Pustolaikina

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The reactions with proton participation are widely represented in the analytical, technological and biological chemistry. Quantum-chemical study of the exchange processes in hydrogen bonding complexes will allow us to achieve progress in the understanding of the elementary act mechanism of proton transfer in hydrogen bonding chain as well as the essence of the acid-base interactions. Oxymethyl radical •CH2ОН is small in size and comfortable as a model particle that well transmits protolytic properties of paramagnetic acids having more complex structure. Quantum-chemical modeling of proton exchange reaction oxymethyl radical ∙CH2OH and its diamagnetic analog CH3OH with amines, carboxylic acids and water was carried out using UAM1 method with the help of Gaussian-2009 program. QST2 method was used for the search of transition state, IRC procedure was applied for the calculation of descents along the reaction coordinate. The difference in the structure of transition states of ∙CH2OH/ CH3OH with bases and acids has been shown. It has been confirmed that in the case of bases, consecutive proton exchange mechanism was fixed, and in the case of complexes with carboxylic acids parallel proton exchange mechanism was fixed. The similarity in the reaction behavior of paramagnetic and diamagnetic systems in the proton exchange has been found. It was suggested that the mechanism of proton exchange reaction is determined by the structure of the hydrogen bonding cyclic complex, which is, in turn, depends from the nature of the acid-base interactions partners.

  12. Dosimetric assessment of the PRESAGE dosimeter for a proton pencil beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wuu, C-S; Qian, X; Xu, Y; Adamovics, J; Cascio, E; Lu, H-M

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study is to assess the feasibility of using PRESAGE dosimeters for proton pencil beam dosimetry. Two different formulations of phantom materials were tested for their suitability in characterizing a single proton pencil beam. The dosimetric response of PRESAGE was found to be linear up to 4Gy. First-generation optical CT scanner, OCTOPUS TM was used to implement dose distributions for proton pencil beams since it provides most accurate readout. Percentage depth dose curves and beam profiles for two proton energy, 110 MeV, and 93 MeV, were used to evaluate the dosimetric performance of two PRESAGE phantom formulas. The findings from this study show that the dosimetric properties of the phantom materials match with basic physics of proton beams.

  13. TOPAS: An innovative proton Monte Carlo platform for research and clinical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perl, J.; Shin, J.; Schuemann, J.; Faddegon, B.; Paganetti, H. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); University of California San Francisco Comprehensive Cancer Center, 1600 Divisadero Street, San Francisco, California 94143-1708 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States); University of California San Francisco Comprehensive Cancer Center, 1600 Divisadero Street, San Francisco, California 94143-1708 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: While Monte Carlo particle transport has proven useful in many areas (treatment head design, dose calculation, shielding design, and imaging studies) and has been particularly important for proton therapy (due to the conformal dose distributions and a finite beam range in the patient), the available general purpose Monte Carlo codes in proton therapy have been overly complex for most clinical medical physicists. The learning process has large costs not only in time but also in reliability. To address this issue, we developed an innovative proton Monte Carlo platform and tested the tool in a variety of proton therapy applications. Methods: Our approach was to take one of the already-established general purpose Monte Carlo codes and wrap and extend it to create a specialized user-friendly tool for proton therapy. The resulting tool, TOol for PArticle Simulation (TOPAS), should make Monte Carlo simulation more readily available for research and clinical physicists. TOPAS can model a passive scattering or scanning beam treatment head, model a patient geometry based on computed tomography (CT) images, score dose, fluence, etc., save and restart a phase space, provides advanced graphics, and is fully four-dimensional (4D) to handle variations in beam delivery and patient geometry during treatment. A custom-designed TOPAS parameter control system was placed at the heart of the code to meet requirements for ease of use, reliability, and repeatability without sacrificing flexibility. Results: We built and tested the TOPAS code. We have shown that the TOPAS parameter system provides easy yet flexible control over all key simulation areas such as geometry setup, particle source setup, scoring setup, etc. Through design consistency, we have insured that user experience gained in configuring one component, scorer or filter applies equally well to configuring any other component, scorer or filter. We have incorporated key lessons from safety management, proactively

  14. TOPAS: An innovative proton Monte Carlo platform for research and clinical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perl, J.; Shin, J.; Schümann, J.; Faddegon, B.; Paganetti, H.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: While Monte Carlo particle transport has proven useful in many areas (treatment head design, dose calculation, shielding design, and imaging studies) and has been particularly important for proton therapy (due to the conformal dose distributions and a finite beam range in the patient), the available general purpose Monte Carlo codes in proton therapy have been overly complex for most clinical medical physicists. The learning process has large costs not only in time but also in reliability. To address this issue, we developed an innovative proton Monte Carlo platform and tested the tool in a variety of proton therapy applications. Methods: Our approach was to take one of the already-established general purpose Monte Carlo codes and wrap and extend it to create a specialized user-friendly tool for proton therapy. The resulting tool, TOol for PArticle Simulation (TOPAS), should make Monte Carlo simulation more readily available for research and clinical physicists. TOPAS can model a passive scattering or scanning beam treatment head, model a patient geometry based on computed tomography (CT) images, score dose, fluence, etc., save and restart a phase space, provides advanced graphics, and is fully four-dimensional (4D) to handle variations in beam delivery and patient geometry during treatment. A custom-designed TOPAS parameter control system was placed at the heart of the code to meet requirements for ease of use, reliability, and repeatability without sacrificing flexibility. Results: We built and tested the TOPAS code. We have shown that the TOPAS parameter system provides easy yet flexible control over all key simulation areas such as geometry setup, particle source setup, scoring setup, etc. Through design consistency, we have insured that user experience gained in configuring one component, scorer or filter applies equally well to configuring any other component, scorer or filter. We have incorporated key lessons from safety management, proactively

  15. Protein proton-proton dynamics from amide proton spin flip rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weaver, Daniel S.; Zuiderweg, Erik R. P.

    2009-01-01

    Residue-specific amide proton spin-flip rates K were measured for peptide-free and peptide-bound calmodulin. K approximates the sum of NOE build-up rates between the amide proton and all other protons. This work outlines the theory of multi-proton relaxation, cross relaxation and cross correlation, and how to approximate it with a simple model based on a variable number of equidistant protons. This model is used to extract the sums of K-rates from the experimental data. Error in K is estimated using bootstrap methodology. We define a parameter Q as the ratio of experimental K-rates to theoretical K-rates, where the theoretical K-rates are computed from atomic coordinates. Q is 1 in the case of no local motion, but decreases to values as low as 0.5 with increasing domination of sidechain protons of the same residue to the amide proton flips. This establishes Q as a monotonous measure of local dynamics of the proton network surrounding the amide protons. The method is applied to the study of proton dynamics in Ca 2+ -saturated calmodulin, both free in solution and bound to smMLCK peptide. The mean Q is 0.81 ± 0.02 for free calmodulin and 0.88 ± 0.02 for peptide-bound calmodulin. This novel methodology thus reveals the presence of significant interproton disorder in this protein, while the increase in Q indicates rigidification of the proton network upon peptide binding, confirming the known high entropic cost of this process

  16. Introducing an on-line adaptive procedure for prostate image guided intensity modulate proton therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, M; Westerly, D C; Mackie, T R

    2011-08-07

    With on-line image guidance (IG), prostate shifts relative to the bony anatomy can be corrected by realigning the patient with respect to the treatment fields. In image guided intensity modulated proton therapy (IG-IMPT), because the proton range is more sensitive to the material it travels through, the realignment may introduce large dose variations. This effect is studied in this work and an on-line adaptive procedure is proposed to restore the planned dose to the target. A 2D anthropomorphic phantom was constructed from a real prostate patient's CT image. Two-field laterally opposing spot 3D-modulation and 24-field full arc distal edge tracking (DET) plans were generated with a prescription of 70 Gy to the planning target volume. For the simulated delivery, we considered two types of procedures: the non-adaptive procedure and the on-line adaptive procedure. In the non-adaptive procedure, only patient realignment to match the prostate location in the planning CT was performed. In the on-line adaptive procedure, on top of the patient realignment, the kinetic energy for each individual proton pencil beam was re-determined from the on-line CT image acquired after the realignment and subsequently used for delivery. Dose distributions were re-calculated for individual fractions for different plans and different delivery procedures. The results show, without adaptive, that both the 3D-modulation and the DET plans experienced delivered dose degradation by having large cold or hot spots in the prostate. The DET plan had worse dose degradation than the 3D-modulation plan. The adaptive procedure effectively restored the planned dose distribution in the DET plan, with delivered prostate D(98%), D(50%) and D(2%) values less than 1% from the prescription. In the 3D-modulation plan, in certain cases the adaptive procedure was not effective to reduce the delivered dose degradation and yield similar results as the non-adaptive procedure. In conclusion, based on this 2D phantom

  17. Determination of the initial energy in computerized tomography with proton beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocha, Rodrigo Luis da

    2007-01-01

    In earliest works devoted to proton computed tomography it was shown that the advantage of pCT image reconstruction appears when the energy is close to the Bragg peak region, since the proton passes the object. This effect provided by the Bragg peak makes the computerized tomography with protons possible. However, when decreasing the initial proton energy, with the increase of the irradiation dose, there are two effects that work simultaneously in opposite ways. First, the energy loss of a proton in an object becomes bigger at small initial energy. At the same time decreasing of the proton energy results in the increase of the energy straggling, requiring a larger number of protons. In this work the radiation dose dependence on the proton initial energy was studied using analytical formulas and computer simulations. The investigation determined that the radiation dose practically does not depend on the initial energy, except in the energy region very close to the minimum energy necessary to pass the object. (author)

  18. SU-F-T-209: Multicriteria Optimization Algorithm for Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Using Pencil Proton Beam Scanning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beltran, C; Kamal, H [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To provide a multicriteria optimization algorithm for intensity modulated radiation therapy using pencil proton beam scanning. Methods: Intensity modulated radiation therapy using pencil proton beam scanning requires efficient optimization algorithms to overcome the uncertainties in the Bragg peaks locations. This work is focused on optimization algorithms that are based on Monte Carlo simulation of the treatment planning and use the weights and the dose volume histogram (DVH) control points to steer toward desired plans. The proton beam treatment planning process based on single objective optimization (representing a weighted sum of multiple objectives) usually leads to time-consuming iterations involving treatment planning team members. We proved a time efficient multicriteria optimization algorithm that is developed to run on NVIDIA GPU (Graphical Processing Units) cluster. The multicriteria optimization algorithm running time benefits from up-sampling of the CT voxel size of the calculations without loss of fidelity. Results: We will present preliminary results of Multicriteria optimization for intensity modulated proton therapy based on DVH control points. The results will show optimization results of a phantom case and a brain tumor case. Conclusion: The multicriteria optimization of the intensity modulated radiation therapy using pencil proton beam scanning provides a novel tool for treatment planning. Work support by a grant from Varian Inc.

  19. SU-F-T-209: Multicriteria Optimization Algorithm for Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Using Pencil Proton Beam Scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beltran, C; Kamal, H

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a multicriteria optimization algorithm for intensity modulated radiation therapy using pencil proton beam scanning. Methods: Intensity modulated radiation therapy using pencil proton beam scanning requires efficient optimization algorithms to overcome the uncertainties in the Bragg peaks locations. This work is focused on optimization algorithms that are based on Monte Carlo simulation of the treatment planning and use the weights and the dose volume histogram (DVH) control points to steer toward desired plans. The proton beam treatment planning process based on single objective optimization (representing a weighted sum of multiple objectives) usually leads to time-consuming iterations involving treatment planning team members. We proved a time efficient multicriteria optimization algorithm that is developed to run on NVIDIA GPU (Graphical Processing Units) cluster. The multicriteria optimization algorithm running time benefits from up-sampling of the CT voxel size of the calculations without loss of fidelity. Results: We will present preliminary results of Multicriteria optimization for intensity modulated proton therapy based on DVH control points. The results will show optimization results of a phantom case and a brain tumor case. Conclusion: The multicriteria optimization of the intensity modulated radiation therapy using pencil proton beam scanning provides a novel tool for treatment planning. Work support by a grant from Varian Inc.

  20. Proton Conductivity and Operational Features Of PBI-Based Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qingfeng, Li; Jensen, Jens Oluf; Precht Noyé, Pernille

    2005-01-01

    As an approach to high temperature operation of PEMFCs, acid-doped PBI membranes are under active development. The membrane exhibits high proton conductivity under low water contents at temperatures up to 200°C. Mechanisms of proton conduction for the membranes have been proposed. Based on the me...... on the membranes fuel cell tests have been demonstrated. Operating features of the PBI cell include no humidification, high CO tolerance, better heat utilization and possible integration with fuel processing units. Issues for further development are also discussed....

  1. Patient study of in vivo verification of beam delivery and range, using positron emission tomography and computed tomography imaging after proton therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parodi, Katia; Paganetti, Harald; Shih, Helen A; Michaud, Susan; Loeffler, Jay S; DeLaney, Thomas F; Liebsch, Norbert J; Munzenrider, John E; Fischman, Alan J; Knopf, Antje; Bortfeld, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the feasibility and value of positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT) for treatment verification after proton radiotherapy. METHODS AND MATERIALS: This study included 9 patients with tumors in the cranial base, spine, orbit, and eye. Total doses of 1.8-3

  2. The Reconstruction Toolkit (RTK), an open-source cone-beam CT reconstruction toolkit based on the Insight Toolkit (ITK)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rit, S; Vila Oliva, M; Sarrut, D; Brousmiche, S; Labarbe, R; Sharp, G C

    2014-01-01

    We propose the Reconstruction Toolkit (RTK, http://www.openrtk.org), an open-source toolkit for fast cone-beam CT reconstruction, based on the Insight Toolkit (ITK) and using GPU code extracted from Plastimatch. RTK is developed by an open consortium (see affiliations) under the non-contaminating Apache 2.0 license. The quality of the platform is daily checked with regression tests in partnership with Kitware, the company supporting ITK. Several features are already available: Elekta, Varian and IBA inputs, multi-threaded Feldkamp-David-Kress reconstruction on CPU and GPU, Parker short scan weighting, multi-threaded CPU and GPU forward projectors, etc. Each feature is either accessible through command line tools or C++ classes that can be included in independent software. A MIDAS community has been opened to share CatPhan datasets of several vendors (Elekta, Varian and IBA). RTK will be used in the upcoming cone-beam CT scanner developed by IBA for proton therapy rooms. Many features are under development: new input format support, iterative reconstruction, hybrid Monte Carlo / deterministic CBCT simulation, etc. RTK has been built to freely share tomographic reconstruction developments between researchers and is open for new contributions.

  3. Large-Scale, Exhaustive Lattice-Based Structural Auditing of SNOMED CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guo-Qiang

    One criterion for the well-formedness of ontologies is that their hierarchical structure form a lattice. Formal Concept Analysis (FCA) has been used as a technique for assessing the quality of ontologies, but is not scalable to large ontologies such as SNOMED CT. We developed a methodology called Lattice-based Structural Auditing (LaSA), for auditing biomedical ontologies, implemented through automated SPARQL queries, in order to exhaustively identify all non-lattice pairs in SNOMED CT. The percentage of non-lattice pairs ranges from 0 to 1.66 among the 19 SNOMED CT hierarchies. Preliminary manual inspection of a limited portion of the 518K non-lattice pairs, among over 34 million candidate pairs, revealed inconsistent use of precoordination in SNOMED CT, but also a number of false positives. Our results are consistent with those based on FCA, with the advantage that the LaSA computational pipeline is scalable and applicable to ontological systems consisting mostly of taxonomic links. This work is based on collaboration with Olivier Bodenreider from the National Library of Medicine, Bethesda, USA.

  4. An easily sintered, chemically stable, barium zirconate-based proton conductor for high-performance proton-conducting solid oxide fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Wenping

    2014-07-25

    Yttrium and indium co-doped barium zirconate is investigated to develop a chemically stable and sintering active proton conductor for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). BaZr0.8Y0.2-xInxO3- δ possesses a pure cubic perovskite structure. The sintering activity of BaZr0.8Y0.2-xInxO3- δ increases significantly with In concentration. BaZr0.8Y0.15In0.05O3- δ (BZYI5) exhibits the highest total electrical conductivity among the sintered oxides. BZYI5 also retains high chemical stability against CO2, vapor, and reduction of H2. The good sintering activity, high conductivity, and chemical stability of BZYI5 facilitate the fabrication of durable SOFCs based on a highly conductive BZYI5 electrolyte film by cost-effective ceramic processes. Fully dense BZYI5 electrolyte film is successfully prepared on the anode substrate by a facile drop-coating technique followed by co-firing at 1400 °C for 5 h in air. The BZYI5 film exhibits one of the highest conductivity among the BaZrO3-based electrolyte films with various sintering aids. BZYI5-based single cells output very encouraging and by far the highest peak power density for BaZrO3-based proton-conducting SOFCs, reaching as high as 379 mW cm-2 at 700 °C. The results demonstrate that Y and In co-doping is an effective strategy for exploring sintering active and chemically stable BaZrO3-based proton conductors for high performance proton-conducting SOFCs. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. SU-C-207A-04: Accuracy of Acoustic-Based Proton Range Verification in Water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, KC; Sehgal, CM; Avery, S; Vander Stappen, F

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the accuracy and dose required for acoustic-based proton range verification (protoacoustics) in water. Methods: Proton pulses with 17 µs FWHM and instantaneous currents of 480 nA (5.6 × 10 7 protons/pulse, 8.9 cGy/pulse) were generated by a clinical, hospital-based cyclotron at the University of Pennsylvania. The protoacoustic signal generated in a water phantom by the 190 MeV proton pulses was measured with a hydrophone placed at multiple known positions surrounding the dose deposition. The background random noise was measured. The protoacoustic signal was simulated to compare to the experiments. Results: The maximum protoacoustic signal amplitude at 5 cm distance was 5.2 mPa per 1 × 10 7 protons (1.6 cGy at the Bragg peak). The background random noise of the measurement was 27 mPa. Comparison between simulation and experiment indicates that the hydrophone introduced a delay of 2.4 µs. For acoustic data collected with a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 21, deconvolution of the protoacoustic signal with the proton pulse provided the most precise time-of-flight range measurement (standard deviation of 2.0 mm), but a systematic error (−4.5 mm) was observed. Conclusion: Based on water phantom measurements at a clinical hospital-based cyclotron, protoacoustics is a potential technique for measuring the proton Bragg peak range with 2.0 mm standard deviation. Simultaneous use of multiple detectors is expected to reduce the standard deviation, but calibration is required to remove systematic error. Based on the measured background noise and protoacoustic amplitude, a SNR of 5.3 is projected for a deposited dose of 2 Gy.

  6. Deformable image registration based automatic CT-to-CT contour propagation for head and neck adaptive radiotherapy in the routine clinical setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumarasiri, Akila; Siddiqui, Farzan; Liu, Chang; Yechieli, Raphael; Shah, Mira; Pradhan, Deepak; Zhong, Hualiang; Chetty, Indrin J; Kim, Jinkoo

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate the clinical potential of deformable image registration (DIR)-based automatic propagation of physician-drawn contours from a planning CT to midtreatment CT images for head and neck (H&N) adaptive radiotherapy. Ten H&N patients, each with a planning CT (CT1) and a subsequent CT (CT2) taken approximately 3-4 week into treatment, were considered retrospectively. Clinically relevant organs and targets were manually delineated by a radiation oncologist on both sets of images. Four commercial DIR algorithms, two B-spline-based and two Demons-based, were used to deform CT1 and the relevant contour sets onto corresponding CT2 images. Agreement of the propagated contours with manually drawn contours on CT2 was visually rated by four radiation oncologists in a scale from 1 to 5, the volume overlap was quantified using Dice coefficients, and a distance analysis was done using center of mass (CoM) displacements and Hausdorff distances (HDs). Performance of these four commercial algorithms was validated using a parameter-optimized Elastix DIR algorithm. All algorithms attained Dice coefficients of >0.85 for organs with clear boundaries and those with volumes >9 cm(3). Organs with volumes <3 cm(3) and/or those with poorly defined boundaries showed Dice coefficients of ∼ 0.5-0.6. For the propagation of small organs (<3 cm(3)), the B-spline-based algorithms showed higher mean Dice values (Dice = 0.60) than the Demons-based algorithms (Dice = 0.54). For the gross and planning target volumes, the respective mean Dice coefficients were 0.8 and 0.9. There was no statistically significant difference in the Dice coefficients, CoM, or HD among investigated DIR algorithms. The mean radiation oncologist visual scores of the four algorithms ranged from 3.2 to 3.8, which indicated that the quality of transferred contours was "clinically acceptable with minor modification or major modification in a small number of contours." Use of DIR-based contour propagation in the routine

  7. Deformable image registration based automatic CT-to-CT contour propagation for head and neck adaptive radiotherapy in the routine clinical setting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumarasiri, Akila; Siddiqui, Farzan; Liu, Chang; Yechieli, Raphael; Shah, Mira; Pradhan, Deepak; Zhong, Hualiang; Chetty, Indrin J.; Kim, Jinkoo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical potential of deformable image registration (DIR)-based automatic propagation of physician-drawn contours from a planning CT to midtreatment CT images for head and neck (H and N) adaptive radiotherapy. Methods: Ten H and N patients, each with a planning CT (CT1) and a subsequent CT (CT2) taken approximately 3–4 week into treatment, were considered retrospectively. Clinically relevant organs and targets were manually delineated by a radiation oncologist on both sets of images. Four commercial DIR algorithms, two B-spline-based and two Demons-based, were used to deform CT1 and the relevant contour sets onto corresponding CT2 images. Agreement of the propagated contours with manually drawn contours on CT2 was visually rated by four radiation oncologists in a scale from 1 to 5, the volume overlap was quantified using Dice coefficients, and a distance analysis was done using center of mass (CoM) displacements and Hausdorff distances (HDs). Performance of these four commercial algorithms was validated using a parameter-optimized Elastix DIR algorithm. Results: All algorithms attained Dice coefficients of >0.85 for organs with clear boundaries and those with volumes >9 cm 3 . Organs with volumes <3 cm 3 and/or those with poorly defined boundaries showed Dice coefficients of ∼0.5–0.6. For the propagation of small organs (<3 cm 3 ), the B-spline-based algorithms showed higher mean Dice values (Dice = 0.60) than the Demons-based algorithms (Dice = 0.54). For the gross and planning target volumes, the respective mean Dice coefficients were 0.8 and 0.9. There was no statistically significant difference in the Dice coefficients, CoM, or HD among investigated DIR algorithms. The mean radiation oncologist visual scores of the four algorithms ranged from 3.2 to 3.8, which indicated that the quality of transferred contours was “clinically acceptable with minor modification or major modification in a small number of contours.” Conclusions

  8. Deformable image registration based automatic CT-to-CT contour propagation for head and neck adaptive radiotherapy in the routine clinical setting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumarasiri, Akila, E-mail: akumara1@hfhs.org; Siddiqui, Farzan; Liu, Chang; Yechieli, Raphael; Shah, Mira; Pradhan, Deepak; Zhong, Hualiang; Chetty, Indrin J.; Kim, Jinkoo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan 48202 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical potential of deformable image registration (DIR)-based automatic propagation of physician-drawn contours from a planning CT to midtreatment CT images for head and neck (H and N) adaptive radiotherapy. Methods: Ten H and N patients, each with a planning CT (CT1) and a subsequent CT (CT2) taken approximately 3–4 week into treatment, were considered retrospectively. Clinically relevant organs and targets were manually delineated by a radiation oncologist on both sets of images. Four commercial DIR algorithms, two B-spline-based and two Demons-based, were used to deform CT1 and the relevant contour sets onto corresponding CT2 images. Agreement of the propagated contours with manually drawn contours on CT2 was visually rated by four radiation oncologists in a scale from 1 to 5, the volume overlap was quantified using Dice coefficients, and a distance analysis was done using center of mass (CoM) displacements and Hausdorff distances (HDs). Performance of these four commercial algorithms was validated using a parameter-optimized Elastix DIR algorithm. Results: All algorithms attained Dice coefficients of >0.85 for organs with clear boundaries and those with volumes >9 cm{sup 3}. Organs with volumes <3 cm{sup 3} and/or those with poorly defined boundaries showed Dice coefficients of ∼0.5–0.6. For the propagation of small organs (<3 cm{sup 3}), the B-spline-based algorithms showed higher mean Dice values (Dice = 0.60) than the Demons-based algorithms (Dice = 0.54). For the gross and planning target volumes, the respective mean Dice coefficients were 0.8 and 0.9. There was no statistically significant difference in the Dice coefficients, CoM, or HD among investigated DIR algorithms. The mean radiation oncologist visual scores of the four algorithms ranged from 3.2 to 3.8, which indicated that the quality of transferred contours was “clinically acceptable with minor modification or major modification in a small number of contours

  9. Comparison of SPECT and CT in detecting skull base invasion in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Li; Wang Jinchuan; Pu Nuo; Song Wenzhong; Chen Mingxi

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the detecting ability of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and CT in skull base invasion in nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Methods: Sixty-three patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma were examined by whole body and skull base SPECT and CT of nasopharynx and skull base before radiotherapy. The results were double-blind compared and evaluated. Results: The overall positive rates of skull base invasion detected by SPECT and CT were 63.5% and 25.4%. In patients with headache, cranial nerve palsy and both, they were 87.9%, 93.3%, 92.3% and 42.4%, 46.7%, 46.2%. In patients with T 1 + T 2 and T 3 + T 4 lesions, they were 37.5%, 90.3% and 0.0%, 51.6%. In patients with N 0 + N 1 and N 2 + N 3 lesions, they were 63.9%, 63.0% and 19.4%, 33.3%. The positive rates of SPECT were higher than those of CT (McNemar Test, P < 0.05). The conformation rate between SPECT and CT was 61.9% and the dissimilitude rate was 38.1%. Binary Logistic regression analysis showed that headache and T stages were risk factors of positive SPECT rate (ORheadache = 3.864, ORTstage= 6.422) while Tstage and Nstage were the risk factors for positive CT rate (ORTstage = 48.932, ORNstage = 2.860). Conclusions: The detection sensitivity of SPECT in skull base invasion in nasopharyngeal carcinoma is superior to that of CT. But its specificity is inferior to that of CT. The detecting results in SPECT are better related to symptoms, signs and stage. Combining headache and cranial nerve palsy with T and N stage, the authors may much improve the results of SPECT and CT in the detection of skull base invasion in nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Further study is warranted

  10. Experimental observation of acoustic emissions generated by a pulsed proton beam from a hospital-based clinical cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, Kevin C.; Solberg, Timothy D.; Avery, Stephen; Vander Stappen, François; Janssens, Guillaume; Prieels, Damien; Bawiec, Christopher R.; Lewin, Peter A.; Sehgal, Chandra M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To measure the acoustic signal generated by a pulsed proton spill from a hospital-based clinical cyclotron. Methods: An electronic function generator modulated the IBA C230 isochronous cyclotron to create a pulsed proton beam. The acoustic emissions generated by the proton beam were measured in water using a hydrophone. The acoustic measurements were repeated with increasing proton current and increasing distance between detector and beam. Results: The cyclotron generated proton spills with rise times of 18 μs and a maximum measured instantaneous proton current of 790 nA. Acoustic emissions generated by the proton energy deposition were measured to be on the order of mPa. The origin of the acoustic wave was identified as the proton beam based on the correlation between acoustic emission arrival time and distance between the hydrophone and proton beam. The acoustic frequency spectrum peaked at 10 kHz, and the acoustic pressure amplitude increased monotonically with increasing proton current. Conclusions: The authors report the first observation of acoustic emissions generated by a proton beam from a hospital-based clinical cyclotron. When modulated by an electronic function generator, the cyclotron is capable of creating proton spills with fast rise times (18 μs) and high instantaneous currents (790 nA). Measurements of the proton-generated acoustic emissions in a clinical setting may provide a method for in vivo proton range verification and patient monitoring

  11. Comparative evaluation of CT-based and respiratory-gated PET/CT-based planning target volume (PTV) in the definition of radiation treatment planning in lung cancer: preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerra, Luca; Elisei, Federica [San Gerardo Hospital, Nuclear Medicine, Monza (Italy); Meregalli, Sofia; Niespolo, Rita [San Gerardo Hospital, Radiotherapy, Monza (Italy); Zorz, Alessandra; De Ponti, Elena; Morzenti, Sabrina; Crespi, Andrea [San Gerardo Hospital, Medical Physics, Monza (Italy); Brenna, Sarah [University of Milan-Bicocca, School of Radiation Oncology, Monza (Italy); Gardani, Gianstefano [San Gerardo Hospital, Radiotherapy, Monza (Italy); University of Milan-Bicocca, Milan (Italy); Messa, Cristina [San Gerardo Hospital, Nuclear Medicine, Monza (Italy); University of Milan-Bicocca, Tecnomed Foundation, Milan (Italy); National Research Council, Institute for Bioimaging and Molecular Physiology, Milan (Italy)

    2014-04-15

    The aim of this study was to compare planning target volume (PTV) defined on respiratory-gated positron emission tomography (PET)/CT (RG-PET/CT) to PTV based on ungated free-breathing CT and to evaluate if RG-PET/CT can be useful to personalize PTV by tailoring the target volume to the lesion motion in lung cancer patients. Thirteen lung cancer patients (six men, mean age 70.0 years, 1 small cell lung cancer, 12 non-small cell lung cancer) who were candidates for radiation therapy were prospectively enrolled and submitted to RG-PET/CT. Ungated free-breathing CT images obtained during a PET/CT study were visually contoured by the radiation oncologist to define standard clinical target volumes (CTV1). Standard PTV (PTV1) resulted from CTV1 with the addition of 1-cm expansion of margins in all directions. RG-PET/CT images were contoured by the nuclear medicine physician and radiation oncologist according to a standardized institutional protocol for contouring gated images. Each CT and PET image of the patient's respiratory cycle phases was contoured to obtain the RG-CT-based CTV (CTV2) and the RG-PET/CT-based CTV (CTV3), respectively. RG-CT-based and RG-PET/CT-based PTV (PTV2 and PTV3, respectively) were then derived from gated CTVs with a margin expansion of 7-8 mm in head to feet direction and 5 mm in anterior to posterior and left to right direction. The portions of gated PTV2 and PTV3 geometrically not encompassed in PTV1 (PTV2 out PTV1 and PTV3 out PTV1) were also calculated. Mean ± SD CTV1, CTV2 and CTV3 were 30.5 ± 33.2, 43.1 ± 43.2 and 44.8 ± 45.2 ml, respectively. CTV1 was significantly smaller than CTV2 and CTV3 (p = 0.017 and 0.009 with Student's t test, respectively). No significant difference was found between CTV2 and CTV3. Mean ± SD of PTV1, PTV2 and PTV3 were 118.7 ± 94.1, 93.8 ± 80.2 and 97.0 ± 83.9 ml, respectively. PTV1 was significantly larger than PTV2 and PTV3 (p = 0.038 and 0.043 with Student's t test, respectively). No

  12. Proton-beam writing channel based on an electrostatic accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapin, A. S.; Rebrov, V. A.; Kolin'ko, S. V.; Salivon, V. F.; Ponomarev, A. G.

    2016-09-01

    We have described the structure of the proton-beam writing channel as a continuation of a nuclear scanning microprobe channel. The problem of the accuracy of positioning a probe by constructing a new high-frequency electrostatic scanning system has been solved. Special attention has been paid to designing the probe-forming system and its various configurations have been considered. The probe-forming system that best corresponds to the conditions of the lithographic process has been found based on solving the problem of optimizing proton beam formation. A system for controlling beam scanning using multifunctional module of integrated programmable logic systems has been developed.

  13. Diagnostic performance of a Lattice Boltzmann-based method for CT-based fractional flow reserve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannopoulos, Andreas A; Tang, Anji; Ge, Yin; Cheezum, Michael K; Steigner, Michael L; Fujimoto, Shinichiro; Kumamaru, Kanako K; Chiappino, Dante; Della Latta, Daniele; Berti, Sergio; Chiappino, Sara; Rybicki, Frank J; Melchionna, Simone; Mitsouras, Dimitrios

    2018-02-20

    Fractional flow reserve (FFR) estimated from coronary computed tomography angiography (CT-FFR) offers non-invasive detection of lesion-specific ischaemia. We aimed to develop and validate a fast CT-FFR algorithm utilising the Lattice Boltzmann method for blood flow simulation (LBM CT-FFR). Sixty-four patients with clinically indicated CTA and invasive FFR measurement from three institutions were retrospectively analysed. CT-FFR was performed using an onsite tool interfacing with a commercial Lattice Boltzmann fluid dynamics cloud-based platform. Diagnostic accuracy of LBM CT-FFR ≤0.8 and percent diameter stenosis >50% by CTA to detect invasive FFR ≤0.8 were compared using area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Sixty patients successfully underwent LBM CT-FFR analysis; 29 of 73 lesions in 69 vessels had invasive FFR ≤0.8. Total time to perform LBM CT-FFR was 40±10 min. Compared to invasive FFR, LBM CT-FFR had good correlation (r=0.64), small bias (0.009) and good limits of agreement (-0.223 to 0.206). The AUC of LBM CT-FFR (AUC=0.894, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.792-0.996) was significantly higher than CTA (AUC=0.685, 95% CI: 0.576-0.794) to detect FFR ≤0.8 (p=0.0021). Per-lesion specificity, sensitivity, and accuracy of LBM CT-FFR were 97.7%, 79.3%, and 90.4%, respectively. LBM CT-FFR has very good diagnostic accuracy to detect lesion-specific ischaemia (FFR ≤0.8) and can be performed in less than one hour.

  14. Isotope effects for base-promoted, gas-phase proton transfer reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grabowski, J.J.; Cheng, Xueheng

    1991-01-01

    Proton transfer reactions are among the most basic, the most common and the most important of chemical transformations; despite their apparent simplicity, much is unknown about this most fundamental of all chemical processes. Active interest in understanding the underlying principles of organic proton transfer reactions continues because of efforts being made to develop the theory of elementary chemical processes, because of the resurgence of interest in mechanistic organic chemistry and because of the resurgence of interest in mechanistic organic chemistry processes, because of the resurgence of interest in mechanistic organic chemistry and because of the dynamic role played by proton transfers in biochemical transformations. As organic chemists, the authors have used the flowing afterglow technique to gain an appreciation of the fundamental issues involved in reaction mechanisms by examining such processes in a solvent-free environment under thermally-equilibrated (300 K) conditions. Recent characterization of the facile production of both acetate and the monoenolate anion from the interaction of hydroxide or fluoride with acetic acid reinforces the idea that much yet must be learned about proton transfers/proton abstractions in general. Earlier work by Riveros and co-workers on competitive H vs D abstraction from α-d 1 -toluenes and by Noest and Nibbering on competitive H vs D abstraction from α,α,α-d 3 -acetone, in combination with the acetic acid results, challenged the author's to assemble a comprehensive picture of the competitive nature of proton transfer reactions for anionic base-promoted processes

  15. A clinically feasible method for the detection of potential collision in proton therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou Wei; Lin Haibo; Plastaras, John P.; Wang Huanshu; Bui, Viet; Vapiwala, Neha; McDonough, James; Tochner, Zelig; Both, Stefan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States) and Department of Mechanical Engineering, Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: Potential collision between the patient/couch and the gantry could delay the start of the treatment and reduce clinical efficiency. The ability to accurately detect possible collisions during the treatment planning phase is desired. Such collision detection should account for the specific proton gantry design, the treatment beam configuration, couch orientation, and the patient specific geometry. In this paper the authors developed an approach to detect possible patient-machine collisions using patient treatment plan data. Methods: The geometry of the machine and the patient was reconstructed relative to the isocenter of the proton treatment room. The surface contour of the gantry was first captured from the proton computer aided design and reconstructed to account for specific gantry rotation, snout position, collimator rotation, and range compensator dimensions based on the patient treatment plan data. The patient body and couch contours were captured from the patient's CT DICOM structure file. They were reconstructed relative to the isocenter taking into account treatment couch rotation. For potential collision that occurs at body portions where no CT images exist, scout images are used to construct the body contour. A software program was developed using a ray casting algorithm that was applied to detect collisions by determining if any of the patient and couch contour points fall into the spatial polygons formed by the proton gantry surfaces. Results: Twenty-four patient plans with or without potential collisions were retrospectively identified and analyzed using the collision detection software. In addition, five collision cases were artificially generated using an anthropomorphic phantom. The program successfully detected the collisions in all cases. The calculation time for each case was within 20 s. The software program was implemented in the authors' clinic to detect patient-gantry or gantry-couch collisions in the treatment planning

  16. Proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Alfred R

    2006-01-01

    Proton therapy has become a subject of considerable interest in the radiation oncology community and it is expected that there will be a substantial growth in proton treatment facilities during the next decade. I was asked to write a historical review of proton therapy based on my personal experiences, which have all occurred in the United States, so therefore I have a somewhat parochial point of view. Space requirements did not permit me to mention all of the existing proton therapy facilities or the names of all of those who have contributed to proton therapy. (review)

  17. YAP(Ce) crystal characterization with proton beam up to 60 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randazzo, N. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Catania (I), Via S. Sofia, 64-I-95123 Catania (Italy)], E-mail: nunzio.randazzo@ct.infn.it; Sipala, V.; Aiello, S. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Catania (I), Via S. Sofia, 64-I-95123 Catania (Italy); Lo Presti, D. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Catania (I), Via S. Sofia, 64-I-95123 Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita di Catania, Catania (Italy); Cirrone, G.A.P.; Cuttone, G.; Di Rosa, F. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (Italy)

    2008-02-21

    A YAP(Ce) crystal was characterized with a proton beam up to 60 MeV. Tests were performed to investigate the possibility of using this detector as a proton calorimeter. The size of the crystal was chosen so that the proton energy is totally lost inside the medium. The authors propose to use the YAP(Ce) crystal in medical applications for proton therapy. In particular, in proton computed tomography (pCT) project it is necessary as a calorimeter in order to measure the proton residual energy after the phantom. Energy resolution, linearity, and light yield were measured in the Laboratori Nazionali del Sud with the CATANA proton beam [ (http://www.lns.infn.it/CATANA/CATANA)] and the results are shown in this paper. The crystal shows a good resolution (3% at 60 MeV proton beam) and it shows good linearity for different proton beam energies (1% at 30-60 MeV energy range). The crystal performances confirm that the YAP(Ce) crystal represents a good solution for these kinds of application.

  18. YAP(Ce) crystal characterization with proton beam up to 60 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randazzo, N.; Sipala, V.; Aiello, S.; Lo Presti, D.; Cirrone, G.A.P.; Cuttone, G.; Di Rosa, F.

    2008-01-01

    A YAP(Ce) crystal was characterized with a proton beam up to 60 MeV. Tests were performed to investigate the possibility of using this detector as a proton calorimeter. The size of the crystal was chosen so that the proton energy is totally lost inside the medium. The authors propose to use the YAP(Ce) crystal in medical applications for proton therapy. In particular, in proton computed tomography (pCT) project it is necessary as a calorimeter in order to measure the proton residual energy after the phantom. Energy resolution, linearity, and light yield were measured in the Laboratori Nazionali del Sud with the CATANA proton beam [ (http://www.lns.infn.it/CATANA/CATANA)] and the results are shown in this paper. The crystal shows a good resolution (3% at 60 MeV proton beam) and it shows good linearity for different proton beam energies (1% at 30-60 MeV energy range). The crystal performances confirm that the YAP(Ce) crystal represents a good solution for these kinds of application

  19. YAP(Ce) crystal characterization with proton beam up to 60 MeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randazzo, N.; Sipala, V.; Aiello, S.; Lo Presti, D.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cuttone, G.; Di Rosa, F.

    2008-02-01

    A YAP(Ce) crystal was characterized with a proton beam up to 60 MeV. Tests were performed to investigate the possibility of using this detector as a proton calorimeter. The size of the crystal was chosen so that the proton energy is totally lost inside the medium. The authors propose to use the YAP(Ce) crystal in medical applications for proton therapy. In particular, in proton computed tomography (pCT) project it is necessary as a calorimeter in order to measure the proton residual energy after the phantom. Energy resolution, linearity, and light yield were measured in the Laboratori Nazionali del Sud with the CATANA proton beam [ http://www.lns.infn.it/CATANA/CATANA] and the results are shown in this paper. The crystal shows a good resolution (3% at 60 MeV proton beam) and it shows good linearity for different proton beam energies (1% at 30-60 MeV energy range). The crystal performances confirm that the YAP(Ce) crystal represents a good solution for these kinds of application.

  20. Five years of proton therapy of tumours of the eye at Hahn-Meitner Institute, Berlin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heufelder, J.; Cordini, D.; Heese, J.; Homeyer, H.; Kluge, H.; Morgenstern, H.; Fuchs, H.; Hoecht, S.; Nausner, M.; Hinkelbein, W.; Bechrakis, N.E.; Foerster, M.H.

    2004-01-01

    Eye tumors (choroidal melanomas, iris melanomas, and choroidal hemangiomas) are being treated with 68 MeV protons since 1998 at the Ion Beam Laboratory of the Hahn-Meitner Institute of Berlin (Germany's first proton therapy center), in cooperation with the Charite University Hospital in Berlin, Campus Benjamin Franklin. The proton beam, generated via a combination of Van de Graaff accelerator and cyclotron, is prepared by passive shaping for conformal tumor irradiation. A digital X-ray verification of the tumor location with the patient in sitting position limits the position uncertainties to a maximum of 0,3 mm. The treatment planning is performed using the program EYEPLAN. OCTOPUS, a CT-based planning program developed in cooperation with the German Cancer Research Center of Heidelberg, is under pre-clinical testing. Thus far, more than 400 patients have been irradiated. The first results are comparable to those obtained in other proton therapy centers. At the end of 2002, the University Hospital of Essen has also become a cooperation partner of the Hahn-Meitner Institute. (orig.) [de

  1. Predictions of diffractive cross sections in proton-proton collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goulianos, Konstantin [Rockefeller University, 1230 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States)

    2013-04-15

    We review our pre-LHC predictions of the total, elastic, total-inelastic, and diffractive components of proton-proton cross sections at high energies, expressed in the form of unitarized expressions based on a special parton-model approach to diffraction employing inclusive proton parton distribution functions and QCD color factors and compare with recent LHC results.

  2. WE-F-16A-03: 3D Printer Application in Proton Therapy: A Novel Method to Deliver Passive-Scattering Proton Beams with a Fixed Range and Modulation for SRS and SRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, X; Witztum, A; Liang, X; Reiche, M; Lin, H; Teo, B; Yin, L; Fiene, J; McDonough, J; Kassaee, A

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To present a novel technique to deliver passive-scattering proton beam with fixed range and modulation using a 3D printed patient-specific bolus for proton stereotactic radiosurgery and radiotherapy. Methods: A CIRS head phantom was used to simulate a patient with a small brain lesion. A custom bolus was created in the Eclipse Treatment Planning System (TPS) to compensate for the different water equivalent depths from the patient surface to the target from multiple beam directions. To simulate arc therapy, a plan was created on the initial CT using three passive-scattering proton beams with a fixed range and modulations irradiating from different angles. The DICOM-RT structure file of the bolus was exported from the TPS and converted to STL format for 3D printing. The phantom was rescanned with the printed custom bolus and head cup to verify the dose distribution comparing to the initial plan. EBT3 films were placed in the sagital plane of the target to verify the delivered dose distribution. The relative stopping power of the printing material(ABSplus-P430) was measured using the Zebra multi-plate ion chamber. Results: The relative stopping power of the 3D printing material, ABSplus-P430 was 1.05 which is almost water equivalent. The dose difference between verification CT and Initial CT is almost negligible. Film measurement also confirmed the accuracy for this new proton delivery technique. Conclusion: Our method using 3D printed range modifiers simplify the treatment delivery of multiple passive-scattering beams in treatment of small lesion in brain. This technique makes delivery of multiple beam more efficient and can be extended to allow arc therapy with proton beams. The ability to create and construct complex patient specific bolus structures provides a new dimension in creating optimized quality treatment plans not only for proton therapy but also for electron and photon therapy

  3. WE-F-16A-03: 3D Printer Application in Proton Therapy: A Novel Method to Deliver Passive-Scattering Proton Beams with a Fixed Range and Modulation for SRS and SRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, X; Witztum, A; Liang, X; Reiche, M; Lin, H; Teo, B; Yin, L; Fiene, J; McDonough, J; Kassaee, A [University Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To present a novel technique to deliver passive-scattering proton beam with fixed range and modulation using a 3D printed patient-specific bolus for proton stereotactic radiosurgery and radiotherapy. Methods: A CIRS head phantom was used to simulate a patient with a small brain lesion. A custom bolus was created in the Eclipse Treatment Planning System (TPS) to compensate for the different water equivalent depths from the patient surface to the target from multiple beam directions. To simulate arc therapy, a plan was created on the initial CT using three passive-scattering proton beams with a fixed range and modulations irradiating from different angles. The DICOM-RT structure file of the bolus was exported from the TPS and converted to STL format for 3D printing. The phantom was rescanned with the printed custom bolus and head cup to verify the dose distribution comparing to the initial plan. EBT3 films were placed in the sagital plane of the target to verify the delivered dose distribution. The relative stopping power of the printing material(ABSplus-P430) was measured using the Zebra multi-plate ion chamber. Results: The relative stopping power of the 3D printing material, ABSplus-P430 was 1.05 which is almost water equivalent. The dose difference between verification CT and Initial CT is almost negligible. Film measurement also confirmed the accuracy for this new proton delivery technique. Conclusion: Our method using 3D printed range modifiers simplify the treatment delivery of multiple passive-scattering beams in treatment of small lesion in brain. This technique makes delivery of multiple beam more efficient and can be extended to allow arc therapy with proton beams. The ability to create and construct complex patient specific bolus structures provides a new dimension in creating optimized quality treatment plans not only for proton therapy but also for electron and photon therapy.

  4. Stereochemistry-Dependent Proton Conduction in Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thimmappa, Ravikumar; Devendrachari, Mruthyunjayachari Chattanahalli; Kottaichamy, Alagar Raja; Tiwari, Omshanker; Gaikwad, Pramod; Paswan, Bhuneshwar; Thotiyl, Musthafa Ottakam

    2016-01-12

    Graphene oxide (GO) is impermeable to H2 and O2 fuels while permitting H(+) shuttling, making it a potential candidate for proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC), albeit with a large anisotropy in their proton transport having a dominant in plane (σIP) contribution over the through plane (σTP). If GO-based membranes are ever to succeed in PEMFC, it inevitably should have a dominant through-plane proton shuttling capability (σTP), as it is the direction in which proton gets transported in a real fuel-cell configuration. Here we show that anisotropy in proton conduction in GO-based fuel cell membranes can be brought down by selectively tuning the geometric arrangement of functional groups around the dopant molecules. The results show that cis isomer causes a selective amplification of through-plane proton transport, σTP, pointing to a very strong geometry angle in ionic conduction. Intercalation of cis isomer causes significant expansion of GO (001) planes involved in σTP transport due to their mutual H-bonding interaction and efficient bridging of individual GO planes, bringing down the activation energy required for σTP, suggesting the dominance of a Grotthuss-type mechanism. This isomer-governed amplification of through-plane proton shuttling resulted in the overall boosting of fuel-cell performance, and it underlines that geometrical factors should be given prime consideration while selecting dopant molecules for bringing down the anisotropy in proton conduction and enhancing the fuel-cell performance in GO-based PEMFC.

  5. Proton Neutron Gamma-X Detection (PNGXD): An introduction to contrast agent detection during proton therapy via prompt gamma neutron activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gräfe, James L.

    2017-09-01

    Proton therapy is an alternative external beam cancer treatment modality to the conventional linear accelerator-based X-ray radiotherapy. An inherent by-product of proton-nuclear interactions is the production of secondary neutrons. These neutrons have long been thought of as a secondary contaminant, nuisance, and source of secondary cancer risk. In this paper, a method is proposed to use these neutrons to identify and localize the presence of the tumor through neutron capture reactions with the gadolinium-based MRI contrast agent. This could provide better confidence in tumor targeting by acting as an additional quality assurance tool of tumor position during treatment. This effectively results in a neutron induced nuclear medicine scan. Gadolinium (Gd), is an ideal candidate for this novel nuclear contrast imaging procedure due to its unique nuclear properties and its widespread use as a contrast agent in MRI. Gd has one of the largest thermal neutron capture cross sections of all the stable nuclides, and the gadolinium-based contrast agents localize in leaky tissues and tumors. Initial characteristics of this novel concept were explored using the Monte Carlo code MCNP6. The number of neutron capture reactions per Gy of proton dose was found to be approximately 50,000 neutron captures/Gy, for a 8 cm3 tumor containing 300 ppm Gd at 8 cm depth with a simple simulation designed to represent the active delivery method. Using the passive method it is estimated that this number can be up to an order of magnitude higher. The thermal neutron distribution was found to not be localized within the spread out Bragg peak (SOBP) for this geometrical configuration and therefore would not allow for the identification of a geometric miss of the tumor by the proton SOBP. However, this potential method combined with nuclear medicine imaging and fused with online CBCT and prior MRI or CT imaging could help to identify tumor position during treatment. More computational and

  6. The low-field MRI and CT of chronic subdural hematomas; An analysis of 52 cases with 78 hematomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawanishi, Masahiro; Kajikawa, Hiroshi; Tamura, Yoji; Hirota, Naoki; Takase, Takashi (Suisei-kai Kajikawa Hospital, Hiroshima (Japan))

    1991-06-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging was performed at a field strength of 0.2 T in 52 patients with 78 surgery-proven chronic subdural hematomas. Signal intensities of the lesions, which were obtained on T1- (n=74), T2- (n=73), and proton density-weighted (n=64) spin-echo sequences, were compared with concurrently available CT densities. Of 74 hematomas, 60, 10, and 4 had hyperintensities, isointensities, and hypointensities, respectively, on T1-weighted images. Of 22 hematomas having high density on CT, 17 were hyperintense and 5 were isointense on T1-weighted images. Similarly, 25 isodensity hematomas on CT consisted of 23 hyperintensities and two isointensities; and 27 low density hematomas consisted of 20 hyperintensities, 3 isointensities, and 4 hypointensities. Both T2- and proton density-weighted images revealed hyperintensity in all hematomas. Two spin-echo images, T{sub 1} and proton density, were useful in differentiating chronic subdural hematoma from edema. (N.K.).

  7. Molecular modeling of protonic acid doping of emeraldine base polyaniline for chemical sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, X.; Yuan, C.A.; Wong, C.K.Y.; Ye, H.; Leung, S.Y.Y.; Zhang, G.

    2012-01-01

    We proposed a molecular modeling methodology to study the protonic acid doping of emeraldine base polyaniline which can used in gas detection. The commercial forcefield COMPASS was used for the polymer and protonic acid molecules. The molecular model, which is capable of representing the polyaniline

  8. Memory and learning behaviors mimicked in nanogranular SiO2-based proton conductor gated oxide-based synaptic transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Chang Jin; Zhu, Li Qiang; Zhou, Ju Mei; Shi, Yi; Wan, Qing

    2013-11-07

    In neuroscience, signal processing, memory and learning function are established in the brain by modifying ionic fluxes in neurons and synapses. Emulation of memory and learning behaviors of biological systems by nanoscale ionic/electronic devices is highly desirable for building neuromorphic systems or even artificial neural networks. Here, novel artificial synapses based on junctionless oxide-based protonic/electronic hybrid transistors gated by nanogranular phosphorus-doped SiO2-based proton-conducting films are fabricated on glass substrates by a room-temperature process. Short-term memory (STM) and long-term memory (LTM) are mimicked by tuning the pulse gate voltage amplitude. The LTM process in such an artificial synapse is due to the proton-related interfacial electrochemical reaction. Our results are highly desirable for building future neuromorphic systems or even artificial networks via electronic elements.

  9. Proton MRI appearance of cystic fibrosis: Comparison to CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puderbach, Michael; Eichinger, Monika; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Gahr, Julie; Mueller, Frank-Michael; Ley, Sebastian; Tuengerthal, Siegfried; Schmaehl, Astrid; Fink, Christian; Plathow, Christian; Wiebel, Matthias

    2007-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most frequent inherited disorder leading to premature death in the Caucasian population. As life expectancy is limited by pulmonary complications, repeated imaging [chest X-ray, multislice high-resolution computed tomography (MS-HRCT)] is required in the follow-up. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the lung parenchyma is a promising new diagnostic tool. Its value for imaging lung changes caused by CF compared with CT is demonstrated. MRI performs well when compared with CT, which serves as the gold standard. Its lack in spatial resolution is obvious, but advantages in contrast and functional assessment compensate for this limitation. Thus, MRI is a reasonable alternative for imaging the CF lung and should be introduced as a radiation-free modality for follow-up studies in CF patients. For further evaluation of the impact of MRI, systematic studies comparing MRI and conventional imaging modalities are necessary. Furthermore, the value of the additional functional MRI (fMRI) information has to be studied, and a scoring system for the morphological and functional aspect of MRI has to be established. (orig.)

  10. Split-Bregman-based sparse-view CT reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandeghinste, Bert; Vandenberghe, Stefaan [Ghent Univ. (Belgium). Medical Image and Signal Processing (MEDISIP); Goossens, Bart; Pizurica, Aleksandra; Philips, Wilfried [Ghent Univ. (Belgium). Image Processing and Interpretation Research Group (IPI); Beenhouwer, Jan de [Ghent Univ. (Belgium). Medical Image and Signal Processing (MEDISIP); Antwerp Univ., Wilrijk (Belgium). The Vision Lab; Staelens, Steven [Ghent Univ. (Belgium). Medical Image and Signal Processing (MEDISIP); Antwerp Univ., Edegem (Belgium). Molecular Imaging Centre Antwerp

    2011-07-01

    Total variation minimization has been extensively researched for image denoising and sparse view reconstruction. These methods show superior denoising performance for simple images with little texture, but result in texture information loss when applied to more complex images. It could thus be beneficial to use other regularizers within medical imaging. We propose a general regularization method, based on a split-Bregman approach. We show results for this framework combined with a total variation denoising operator, in comparison to ASD-POCS. We show that sparse-view reconstruction and noise regularization is possible. This general method will allow us to investigate other regularizers in the context of regularized CT reconstruction, and decrease the acquisition times in {mu}CT. (orig.)

  11. Edge detection of solid motor' CT image based on gravitation model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Guanghui; Lu Hongyi; Zhu Min; Liu Xudong; Hou Zhiqiang

    2012-01-01

    In order to detect the edge of solid motor' CT image much better, a new edge detection operator base on gravitation model was put forward. The edge of CT image is got by the new operator. The superiority turned out by comparing the edge got by ordinary operator. The comparison among operators with different size shows that higher quality CT images need smaller size operator while the lower need the larger. (authors)

  12. A new silicon tracker for proton imaging and dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, J.T., E-mail: jtaylor@hep.ph.liv.ac.uk [Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Oxford Street, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Waltham, C. [Laboratory of Vision Engineering, School of Computer Science, University of Lincoln, Lincoln LN6 7TS (United Kingdom); Price, T. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B25 2TT (United Kingdom); Allinson, N.M. [Laboratory of Vision Engineering, School of Computer Science, University of Lincoln, Lincoln LN6 7TS (United Kingdom); Allport, P.P. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B25 2TT (United Kingdom); Casse, G.L. [Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Oxford Street, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Kacperek, A. [Douglas Cyclotron, The Clatterbridge Cancer Centre NHS Foundation Trust, Clatterbridge Road, Bebington, Wirral CH63 4JY (United Kingdom); Manger, S. [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Smith, N.A.; Tsurin, I. [Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Oxford Street, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom)

    2016-09-21

    For many years, silicon micro-strip detectors have been successfully used as tracking detectors for particle and nuclear physics experiments. A new application of this technology is to the field of particle therapy where radiotherapy is carried out by use of charged particles such as protons or carbon ions. Such a treatment has been shown to have advantages over standard x-ray radiotherapy and as a result of this, many new centres offering particle therapy are currently under construction around the world today. The Proton Radiotherapy, Verification and Dosimetry Applications (PRaVDA) consortium are developing instrumentation for particle therapy based upon technology from high-energy physics. The characteristics of a new silicon micro-strip tracker for particle therapy will be presented. The array uses specifically designed, large area sensors with technology choices that follow closely those taken for the ATLAS experiment at the HL-LHC. These detectors will be arranged into four units each with three layers in an x–u–v configuration to be suitable for fast proton tracking with minimal ambiguities. The sensors will form a tracker capable of tracing the path of ~200 MeV protons entering and exiting a patient allowing a new mode of imaging known as proton computed tomography (pCT). This will aid the accurate delivery of treatment doses and in addition, the tracker will also be used to monitor the beam profile and total dose delivered during the high fluences used for treatment. We present here details of the design, construction and assembly of one of the four units that will make up the complete tracker along with its characterisation using radiation tests carried out using a {sup 90}Sr source in the laboratory and a 60 MeV proton beam at the Clatterbridge Cancer Centre.

  13. Proton conduction based on intracrystalline chemical reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuck, G.; Lechner, R.E.; Langer, K.

    2002-01-01

    Proton conductivity in M 3 H(SeO 4 ) 2 crystals (M=K, Rb, Cs) is shown to be due to a dynamic disorder in the form of an intracrystalline chemical equilibrium reaction: alternation between the association of the monomers [HSeO 4 ] 1- and [SeO 4 ] 2- resulting in the dimer [H(SeO 4 ) 2 ] 3- (H-bond formation) and the dissociation of the latter into the two monomers (H-bond breaking). By a combination of quasielastic neutron scattering and FTIR spectroscopy, reaction rates were obtained, as well as rates of proton exchange between selenate ions, leading to diffusion. The results demonstrate that this reaction plays a central role in the mechanism of proton transport in these solid-state protonic conductors. (orig.)

  14. TU-AB-BRA-02: An Efficient Atlas-Based Synthetic CT Generation Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, X

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: A major obstacle for MR-only radiotherapy is the need to generate an accurate synthetic CT (sCT) from MR image(s) of a patient for the purposes of dose calculation and DRR generation. We propose here an accurate and efficient atlas-based sCT generation method, which has a computation speed largely independent of the number of atlases used. Methods: Atlas-based sCT generation requires a set of atlases with co-registered CT and MR images. Unlike existing methods that align each atlas to the new patient independently, we first create an average atlas and pre-align every atlas to the average atlas space. When a new patient arrives, we compute only one deformable image registration to align the patient MR image to the average atlas, which indirectly aligns the patient to all pre-aligned atlases. A patch-based non-local weighted fusion is performed in the average atlas space to generate the sCT for the patient, which is then warped back to the original patient space. We further adapt a PatchMatch algorithm that can quickly find top matches between patches of the patient image and all atlas images, which makes the patch fusion step also independent of the number of atlases used. Results: Nineteen brain tumour patients with both CT and T1-weighted MR images are used as testing data and a leave-one-out validation is performed. Each sCT generated is compared against the original CT image of the same patient on a voxel-by-voxel basis. The proposed method produces a mean absolute error (MAE) of 98.6±26.9 HU overall. The accuracy is comparable with a conventional implementation scheme, but the computation time is reduced from over an hour to four minutes. Conclusion: An average atlas space patch fusion approach can produce highly accurate sCT estimations very efficiently. Further validation on dose computation accuracy and using a larger patient cohort is warranted. The author is a full time employee of Elekta, Inc.

  15. Comparison of CT based-CTV plan and CT based-ICRU38 plan in brachytherapy planning of uterine cervix cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Jung Keun; Han, Tae Jong

    2007-01-01

    Purpose : In spite of recent remarkable improvement of diagnostic imaging modalities such as CT, MRI, and PET and radiation therapy planing systems, ICR plan of uterine cervix cancer, based on recommendation of ICRU38(2D film-based) such as point A, is still used widely. A 3-dimensional ICR plan based on CT image provides Dose-Volume Histogram(DVH) information of the tumor and normal tissue. In this study, we compared tumor-dose, rectal-dose and bladder-dose through an analysis of DVH between CTV plan and ICRU38 plan based on CT image. Method and Material : We analyzed 11 patients with a cervix cancer who received the ICR of Ir-192 HDR. After 40Gy of external beam radiation therapy, ICR plan was established using PLATO(Nucletron) v.14.2 planning system. CT scan was done to all the patients using CT-simulator(Ultra Z, Philips). We contoured CTV, rectum and bladder on the CT image and established CTV plan which delivers the 100% dose to CTV and ICRU plan which delivers the 100% dose to the point A. Result : The volume(average±SD) of CTV, rectum and bladder in all of 11 patients is 21.8±6.6cm 3 , 60.9±25.0cm 3 , 111.6±40.1cm 3 respectively. The volume covered by 100% isodose curve is 126.7±18.9cm 3 in ICRU plan and 98.2±74.5cm 3 in CTV plan(p=0.0001), respectively. In (On) ICRU planning 22.0cm 3 of CTV volume was not covered by 100% isodose curve in one patient whose residual tumor size is greater than 4cm, while more than 100% dose was irradiated unnecessarily to the normal organ of 62.2±4.8cm 3 other than the tumor in the remaining 10 patients with a residual tumor less than 4cm in size. Bladder dose recommended by ICRU 38 was 90.1±21.3% and 68.7±26.6% in ICRU plan and in CTV plan respectively(p=0.001) while rectal dose recommended by ICRU 38 was 86.4±18.3% and 76.9±15.6% in ICRU plan and in CTV plan, respectively(p=0.08). Bladder and rectum maximum dose was 137.2±50.1%, 101.1±41.8% in ICRU plan and 107.6±47.9%, 86.9±30.8% in CTV plan, respectively

  16. A patch-based pseudo-CT approach for MRI-only radiotherapy in the pelvis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Daniel; Van Leemput, Koen; Edmund, Jens M.

    2016-01-01

    . The authors benchmark the method against a baseline pCT strategy where all voxels inside the body contour are assigned a water-equivalent bulk density. Furthermore, the authors implement a parallelized approximate patch search strategy to speed up the pCT generation time to a more clinically relevant level....... The data consisted of CT and T 1-weighted MRI scans of 10 prostate patients. pCTs were generated using an approximate patch search algorithm in a leave-one-out fashion and compared with the CT using frequently described metrics such as the voxel-wise mean absolute error (MAEvox) and the deviation in water...... showed that a patch-based method based on affine registrations and T 1-weighted MRI could generate accurate pCTs of the pelvis. The main source of differences between pCT and CT was positional changes of air pockets and body outline....

  17. Stopping power accuracy and achievable spatial resolution of helium ion imaging using a prototype particle CT detector system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volz Lennart

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A precise relative stopping power map of the patient is crucial for accurate particle therapy. Charged particle imaging determines the stopping power either tomographically – particle computed tomography (pCT – or by combining prior knowledge from particle radiography (pRad and x-ray CT. Generally, multiple Coulomb scattering limits the spatial resolution. Compared to protons, heavier particles scatter less due to their lower charge/mass ratio. A theoretical framework to predict the most likely trajectory of particles in matter was developed for light ions up to carbon and was found to be the most accurate for helium comparing for fixed initial velocity. To further investigate the potential of helium in particle imaging, helium computed tomography (HeCT and radiography (HeRad were studied at the Heidel-berg Ion-Beam Therapy Centre (HIT using a prototype pCT detector system registering individual particles, originally developed by the U.S. pCT collaboration. Several phantoms were investigated: modules of the Catphan QA phantom for analysis of spatial resolution and achievable stopping power accuracy, a paediatric head phantom (CIRS and a custom-made phantom comprised of animal meat enclosed in a 2 % agarose mixture representing human tissue. The pCT images were reconstructed applying the CARP iterative reconstruction algorithm. The MTF10% was investigated using a sharp edge gradient technique. HeRad provides a spatial resolution above that of protons (MTF1010%=6.07 lp/cm for HeRad versus MTF10%=3.35 lp/cm for proton radiography. For HeCT, the spatial resolution was limited by the number of projections acquired (90 projections for a full scan. The RSP accuracy for all inserts of the Catphan CTP404 module was found to be 2.5% or better and is subject to further optimisation. In conclusion, helium imaging appears to offer higher spatial resolution compared to proton imaging. In future studies, the advantage of helium imaging compared to other

  18. Solar Wind Proton Temperature Anisotropy: Linear Theory and WIND/SWE Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellinger, P.; Travnicek, P.; Kasper, J. C.; Lazarus, A. J.

    2006-01-01

    We present a comparison between WIND/SWE observations (Kasper et al., 2006) of beta parallel to p and T perpendicular to p/T parallel to p (where beta parallel to p is the proton parallel beta and T perpendicular to p and T parallel to p are the perpendicular and parallel proton are the perpendicular and parallel proton temperatures, respectively; here parallel and perpendicular indicate directions with respect to the ambient magnetic field) and predictions of the Vlasov linear theory. In the slow solar wind, the observed proton temperature anisotropy seems to be constrained by oblique instabilities, by the mirror one and the oblique fire hose, contrary to the results of the linear theory which predicts a dominance of the proton cyclotron instability and the parallel fire hose. The fast solar wind core protons exhibit an anticorrelation between beta parallel to c and T perpendicular to c/T parallel to c (where beta parallel to c is the core proton parallel beta and T perpendicular to c and T parallel to c are the perpendicular and parallel core proton temperatures, respectively) similar to that observed in the HELIOS data (Marsch et al., 2004).

  19. SU-F-T-199: A New Strategy for Integrating Photon with Proton and Carbon Ion in the Treatment Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Z; Wang, J; Hu, W [Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai, Shanghai (China)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to develop a viable strategy to integrate photon plan and proton/carbon ion plan based on deformable registration. Methods: Two prostate cancer patients were enrolled in this study. Each patient has 2 CTs, which were input in the Raystation radiotherapy treatment planning system (TPS). CT1 was deformed to the second CT2 using the Hybrid deformation method. The dice similarity coefficient (DSC) parameter was used to evaluate the difference between the actual structures (bladder, rectum and CTV) and the corresponding deformed structures on CT2. The prescription dose was 63.02GyE to CTV, which included 49.32GyE for CTV1 with carbon and boost 13.7Gy for CTV2 with photon. The carbon plan was made first in Syngo TPS (Syngo PT Planning system, version VB10. Siemens, Germany) on CT1 and transferred to Raystation TPS. Selected Isodoses (23.5Gy, 36.8Gy, 39.1Gy, 47.0Gy and 49.3Gy) of carbon plan were converted to contours and then deformed to CT2, which was used as normal tissues for photon plan optimization on CT2. The final plan was the combination of photon plan and the carbon deformation plan on the CT2. The plan from this strategy was compared with direct optimization of the photon plan on CT2 added some clinical endpoints from carbon plan on CT1. Results: The new strategy with deformable registration is tested and combined plans were successfully obtained for the 2 patients. This strategy obtained both integrated DVH and dose distribution information. For patient 1, the rectum V30, V60 and bladder V63 were 45.8, 10.3 and 9.7 for the combined plan with deformation and 48.1, 11.0 and 12.0 for the direct photon plan. Conclusion: The new strategy for combining photon and carbon/proton is feasible. However, the clinical accuracy is still need more evaluation.

  20. SU-F-T-171: Manufacturing Cost Effective Heterogeneous Phantoms for Use in Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pruett, J; Chen, Y; Ahmad, S; Johnson, D [University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To study the feasibility of 3D printing cost effective heterogeneous phantoms for use in proton therapy treatment planning quality assurance. Methods: A desktop 3D printer was utilized to create a series of 2 cm × 2 cm × 4 cm PLA plastic blocks of varying fill materials and hexagonal fill pattern. The blocks were than tested when filled with air, polyurethane foam, paraffin, silicone, and caulk of calcium carbonate – acrylic polymer blend. The blocks were evaluated with a “GE Lightspeed” 16 slice CT scanner and average CT# of the materials’ centers evaluated. Blocks were then placed into a custom aperture fitted to a Mevion Proton system to determine the relative stopping power of each. Scans were performed in water tank with Marcus type parallel plate chamber under a beam with a range of 15 cm and modulation of 2 cm. Shifts in range occurring relative to the 80% distal edge of the open SOBP were evaluated. Results: The CT#s of the blocks were plotted against their measured relative stopping power. This curve was compared to that which is in clinical use. While the trend agrees generally, specific differences between the relative stopping powers were as great as 10%. Conclusion: We have demonstrated that it is possible to utilize different cost effective materials in the manufacturing of phantoms for use in proton therapy. While different materials may provide better agreement to established calibration curves, a custom curve specific to the materials used may be utilized to accurately predict proton treatment dose distributions.

  1. Alignment of CT images of skull dysmorphology using anatomy-based perpendicular axes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Sun K; Kim, Yong O; Kim, Hee-Joung; Kim, Nam H; Jang, Young Beom; Kim, Kee-Deog; Lee, Hye-Yeon

    2003-01-01

    Rigid body registration of 3D CT scans, based on manual identification of homologous landmarks, is useful for the visual analysis of skull dysmorphology. In this paper, a robust and simple alignment method was proposed to allow for the comparison of skull morphologies, within and between individuals with craniofacial anomalies, based on 3D CT scans, and the minimum number of anatomical landmarks, under rigidity and uniqueness constraints. Three perpendicular axes, extracted from anatomical landmarks, define the absolute coordinate system, through a rigid body transformation, to align multiple CT images for different patients and acquisition times. The accuracy of the alignment method depends on the accuracy of the localized landmarks and target points. The numerical simulation generalizes the accuracy requirements of the alignment method. Experiments using a human dried skull specimen, and ten sets of skull CT images (the pre- and post-operative CT scans of four plagiocephaly, and one fibrous dysplasia patients), demonstrated the feasibility of the technique in clinical practice

  2. TH-CD-209-08: Quantification of the Interplay Effect in Proton Pencil Beam Scanning Treatment of Lung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, M; Huang, S; Solberg, T; Teo, B; McDonough, J; Simone, C; Lin, L [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Mayer, R; Thomas, A [Walter Reed Military Hospital, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To quantify the dose degradation caused by the interplay effect based on a beam specific motion analysis in proton pencil beam scanning (PBS) treatment of lung tumors Methods: PBS plans were optimized on average CT using a beam-specific PTV method for 10 consecutive patients with locally advanced non-small-cell-lung-cancer (NSCLC) treated with proton therapy to 6660/180 cGy. End inhalation (CT0) and end exhalation (CT50) were selected as the two extreme scenarios to acquire the relative stopping power ratio difference (Δrsp) for a respiration cycle. The water equivalent difference (ΔWET) per radiological path was calculated from the surface of patient to the iCTV by integrating the Δrsp of each voxel. The motion magnitude of each voxel within the target follows a quasi-Gaussian distribution. A motion index (MI (>5mm WET)), defined as the percentage of target voxels with an absolute integral ΔWET larger than 5 mm, was adopted as a metric to characterize interplay. To simulate the treatment process, 4D dose was calculated by accumulating the spot dose on the corresponding respiration phase to the reference phase CT50 by deformable image registration based on spot timing and patient breathing phase. Results: The study indicated that the magnitude of target underdose in a single fraction plan is proportional to the MI (p<0.001), with larger motion equating to greater dose degradation and standard deviations. The target homogeneity, minimum, maximum and mean dose in the 4D dose accumulations of 37 fractions varied as a function of MI. Conclusion: The MI quantification metric can predict the level of dose degradation in PBS lung cancer treatment, which potentially serves as a clinical decision tool to assess whether patients are suitable to receive PBS treatment.

  3. TH-CD-209-08: Quantification of the Interplay Effect in Proton Pencil Beam Scanning Treatment of Lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, M; Huang, S; Solberg, T; Teo, B; McDonough, J; Simone, C; Lin, L; Mayer, R; Thomas, A

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify the dose degradation caused by the interplay effect based on a beam specific motion analysis in proton pencil beam scanning (PBS) treatment of lung tumors Methods: PBS plans were optimized on average CT using a beam-specific PTV method for 10 consecutive patients with locally advanced non-small-cell-lung-cancer (NSCLC) treated with proton therapy to 6660/180 cGy. End inhalation (CT0) and end exhalation (CT50) were selected as the two extreme scenarios to acquire the relative stopping power ratio difference (Δrsp) for a respiration cycle. The water equivalent difference (ΔWET) per radiological path was calculated from the surface of patient to the iCTV by integrating the Δrsp of each voxel. The motion magnitude of each voxel within the target follows a quasi-Gaussian distribution. A motion index (MI (>5mm WET)), defined as the percentage of target voxels with an absolute integral ΔWET larger than 5 mm, was adopted as a metric to characterize interplay. To simulate the treatment process, 4D dose was calculated by accumulating the spot dose on the corresponding respiration phase to the reference phase CT50 by deformable image registration based on spot timing and patient breathing phase. Results: The study indicated that the magnitude of target underdose in a single fraction plan is proportional to the MI (p<0.001), with larger motion equating to greater dose degradation and standard deviations. The target homogeneity, minimum, maximum and mean dose in the 4D dose accumulations of 37 fractions varied as a function of MI. Conclusion: The MI quantification metric can predict the level of dose degradation in PBS lung cancer treatment, which potentially serves as a clinical decision tool to assess whether patients are suitable to receive PBS treatment.

  4. Steam Electrolysis by Proton-Conducting Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells (SOECs) with Chemically Stable BaZrO3-Based Electrolytes

    KAUST Repository

    Bi, Lei; Traversa, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    BaZrO3-based material was applied as the electrolyte for proton-conducting solid oxide fuel cells (SOECs). Compared with the instability of BaCeO3-based proton-conductors, BaZrO3-based material could be a more promising candidate for proton

  5. The relevance of MRI for patient modeling in head and neck hyperthermia treatment planning: A comparison of CT and CT-MRI based tissue segmentation on simulated temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verhaart, René F.; Paulides, Margarethus M.; Fortunati, Valerio; Walsum, Theo van; Veenland, Jifke F.; Verduijn, Gerda M.; Lugt, Aad van der

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In current clinical practice, head and neck (H and N) hyperthermia treatment planning (HTP) is solely based on computed tomography (CT) images. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides superior soft-tissue contrast over CT. The purpose of the authors’ study is to investigate the relevance of using MRI in addition to CT for patient modeling in H and N HTP. Methods: CT and MRI scans were acquired for 11 patients in an immobilization mask. Three observers manually segmented on CT, MRI T1 weighted (MRI-T1w), and MRI T2 weighted (MRI-T2w) images the following thermo-sensitive tissues: cerebrum, cerebellum, brainstem, myelum, sclera, lens, vitreous humor, and the optical nerve. For these tissues that are used for patient modeling in H and N HTP, the interobserver variation of manual tissue segmentation in CT and MRI was quantified with the mean surface distance (MSD). Next, the authors compared the impact of CT and CT and MRI based patient models on the predicted temperatures. For each tissue, the modality was selected that led to the lowest observer variation and inserted this in the combined CT and MRI based patient model (CT and MRI), after a deformable image registration. In addition, a patient model with a detailed segmentation of brain tissues (including white matter, gray matter, and cerebrospinal fluid) was created (CT and MRI db ). To quantify the relevance of MRI based segmentation for H and N HTP, the authors compared the predicted maximum temperatures in the segmented tissues (T max ) and the corresponding specific absorption rate (SAR) of the patient models based on (1) CT, (2) CT and MRI, and (3) CT and MRI db . Results: In MRI, a similar or reduced interobserver variation was found compared to CT (maximum of median MSD in CT: 0.93 mm, MRI-T1w: 0.72 mm, MRI-T2w: 0.66 mm). Only for the optical nerve the interobserver variation is significantly lower in CT compared to MRI (median MSD in CT: 0.58 mm, MRI-T1w: 1.27 mm, MRI-T2w: 1.40 mm). Patient

  6. The relevance of MRI for patient modeling in head and neck hyperthermia treatment planning: A comparison of CT and CT-MRI based tissue segmentation on simulated temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verhaart, René F., E-mail: r.f.verhaart@erasmusmc.nl; Paulides, Margarethus M. [Hyperthermia Unit, Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC - Cancer Institute, Groene Hilledijk 301, Rotterdam 3008 AE (Netherlands); Fortunati, Valerio; Walsum, Theo van; Veenland, Jifke F. [Biomedical Imaging Group of Rotterdam, Department of Medical Informatics and Radiology, Erasmus MC, Dr. Molewaterplein 50/60, Rotterdam 3015 GE (Netherlands); Verduijn, Gerda M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus MC - Cancer Institute, Groene Hilledijk 301, Rotterdam 3008 AE (Netherlands); Lugt, Aad van der [Department of Radiology, Erasmus MC, Dr. Molewaterplein 50/60, Rotterdam 3015 GE (Netherlands)

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: In current clinical practice, head and neck (H and N) hyperthermia treatment planning (HTP) is solely based on computed tomography (CT) images. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides superior soft-tissue contrast over CT. The purpose of the authors’ study is to investigate the relevance of using MRI in addition to CT for patient modeling in H and N HTP. Methods: CT and MRI scans were acquired for 11 patients in an immobilization mask. Three observers manually segmented on CT, MRI T1 weighted (MRI-T1w), and MRI T2 weighted (MRI-T2w) images the following thermo-sensitive tissues: cerebrum, cerebellum, brainstem, myelum, sclera, lens, vitreous humor, and the optical nerve. For these tissues that are used for patient modeling in H and N HTP, the interobserver variation of manual tissue segmentation in CT and MRI was quantified with the mean surface distance (MSD). Next, the authors compared the impact of CT and CT and MRI based patient models on the predicted temperatures. For each tissue, the modality was selected that led to the lowest observer variation and inserted this in the combined CT and MRI based patient model (CT and MRI), after a deformable image registration. In addition, a patient model with a detailed segmentation of brain tissues (including white matter, gray matter, and cerebrospinal fluid) was created (CT and MRI{sub db}). To quantify the relevance of MRI based segmentation for H and N HTP, the authors compared the predicted maximum temperatures in the segmented tissues (T{sub max}) and the corresponding specific absorption rate (SAR) of the patient models based on (1) CT, (2) CT and MRI, and (3) CT and MRI{sub db}. Results: In MRI, a similar or reduced interobserver variation was found compared to CT (maximum of median MSD in CT: 0.93 mm, MRI-T1w: 0.72 mm, MRI-T2w: 0.66 mm). Only for the optical nerve the interobserver variation is significantly lower in CT compared to MRI (median MSD in CT: 0.58 mm, MRI-T1w: 1.27 mm, MRI-T2w: 1.40 mm

  7. The relevance of MRI for patient modeling in head and neck hyperthermia treatment planning: a comparison of CT and CT-MRI based tissue segmentation on simulated temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhaart, René F; Fortunati, Valerio; Verduijn, Gerda M; van der Lugt, Aad; van Walsum, Theo; Veenland, Jifke F; Paulides, Margarethus M

    2014-12-01

    In current clinical practice, head and neck (H&N) hyperthermia treatment planning (HTP) is solely based on computed tomography (CT) images. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides superior soft-tissue contrast over CT. The purpose of the authors' study is to investigate the relevance of using MRI in addition to CT for patient modeling in H&N HTP. CT and MRI scans were acquired for 11 patients in an immobilization mask. Three observers manually segmented on CT, MRI T1 weighted (MRI-T1w), and MRI T2 weighted (MRI-T2w) images the following thermo-sensitive tissues: cerebrum, cerebellum, brainstem, myelum, sclera, lens, vitreous humor, and the optical nerve. For these tissues that are used for patient modeling in H&N HTP, the interobserver variation of manual tissue segmentation in CT and MRI was quantified with the mean surface distance (MSD). Next, the authors compared the impact of CT and CT and MRI based patient models on the predicted temperatures. For each tissue, the modality was selected that led to the lowest observer variation and inserted this in the combined CT and MRI based patient model (CT and MRI), after a deformable image registration. In addition, a patient model with a detailed segmentation of brain tissues (including white matter, gray matter, and cerebrospinal fluid) was created (CT and MRIdb). To quantify the relevance of MRI based segmentation for H&N HTP, the authors compared the predicted maximum temperatures in the segmented tissues (Tmax) and the corresponding specific absorption rate (SAR) of the patient models based on (1) CT, (2) CT and MRI, and (3) CT and MRIdb. In MRI, a similar or reduced interobserver variation was found compared to CT (maximum of median MSD in CT: 0.93 mm, MRI-T1w: 0.72 mm, MRI-T2w: 0.66 mm). Only for the optical nerve the interobserver variation is significantly lower in CT compared to MRI (median MSD in CT: 0.58 mm, MRI-T1w: 1.27 mm, MRI-T2w: 1.40 mm). Patient models based on CT (Tmax: 38.0 °C) and CT and MRI

  8. The Quest for Evidence for Proton Therapy: Model-Based Approach and Precision Medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widder, Joachim, E-mail: j.widder@umcg.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Schaaf, Arjen van der [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Lambin, Philippe [Department of Radiation Oncology, School for Oncology and Developmental Biology (GROW), Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands); Marijnen, Corrie A.M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Pignol, Jean-Philippe [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus Medical Center Cancer Institute, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Rasch, Coen R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Slotman, Ben J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, VU Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Verheij, Marcel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Langendijk, Johannes A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: Reducing dose to normal tissues is the advantage of protons versus photons. We aimed to describe a method for translating this reduction into a clinically relevant benefit. Methods and Materials: Dutch scientific and health care governance bodies have recently issued landmark reports regarding generation of relevant evidence for new technologies in health care including proton therapy. An approach based on normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) models has been adopted to select patients who are most likely to experience fewer (serious) adverse events achievable by state-of-the-art proton treatment. Results: By analogy with biologically targeted therapies, the technology needs to be tested in enriched cohorts of patients exhibiting the decisive predictive marker: difference in normal tissue dosimetric signatures between proton and photon treatment plans. Expected clinical benefit is then estimated by virtue of multifactorial NTCP models. In this sense, high-tech radiation therapy falls under precision medicine. As a consequence, randomizing nonenriched populations between photons and protons is predictably inefficient and likely to produce confusing results. Conclusions: Validating NTCP models in appropriately composed cohorts treated with protons should be the primary research agenda leading to urgently needed evidence for proton therapy.

  9. MR-based synthetic CT generation using a deep convolutional neural network method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiao

    2017-04-01

    Interests have been rapidly growing in the field of radiotherapy to replace CT with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), due to superior soft tissue contrast offered by MRI and the desire to reduce unnecessary radiation dose. MR-only radiotherapy also simplifies clinical workflow and avoids uncertainties in aligning MR with CT. Methods, however, are needed to derive CT-equivalent representations, often known as synthetic CT (sCT), from patient MR images for dose calculation and DRR-based patient positioning. Synthetic CT estimation is also important for PET attenuation correction in hybrid PET-MR systems. We propose in this work a novel deep convolutional neural network (DCNN) method for sCT generation and evaluate its performance on a set of brain tumor patient images. The proposed method builds upon recent developments of deep learning and convolutional neural networks in the computer vision literature. The proposed DCNN model has 27 convolutional layers interleaved with pooling and unpooling layers and 35 million free parameters, which can be trained to learn a direct end-to-end mapping from MR images to their corresponding CTs. Training such a large model on our limited data is made possible through the principle of transfer learning and by initializing model weights from a pretrained model. Eighteen brain tumor patients with both CT and T1-weighted MR images are used as experimental data and a sixfold cross-validation study is performed. Each sCT generated is compared against the real CT image of the same patient on a voxel-by-voxel basis. Comparison is also made with respect to an atlas-based approach that involves deformable atlas registration and patch-based atlas fusion. The proposed DCNN method produced a mean absolute error (MAE) below 85 HU for 13 of the 18 test subjects. The overall average MAE was 84.8 ± 17.3 HU for all subjects, which was found to be significantly better than the average MAE of 94.5 ± 17.8 HU for the atlas-based method. The DCNN

  10. Model-based fault detection for proton exchange membrane fuel cell ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper, an intelligent model-based fault detection (FD) is developed for proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) dynamic systems using an independent radial basis function (RBF) networks. The novelty is that this RBF networks is used to model the PEMFC dynamic systems and residuals are generated based ...

  11. The first proton sponge-based amino acids: synthesis, acid-base properties and some reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozeryanskii, Valery A; Gorbacheva, Anastasia Yu; Pozharskii, Alexander F; Vlasenko, Marina P; Tereznikov, Alexander Yu; Chernov'yants, Margarita S

    2015-08-21

    The first hybrid base constructed from 1,8-bis(dimethylamino)naphthalene (proton sponge or DMAN) and glycine, N-methyl-N-(8-dimethylamino-1-naphthyl)aminoacetic acid, was synthesised in high yield and its hydrobromide was structurally characterised and used to determine the acid-base properties via potentiometric titration. It was found that the basic strength of the DMAN-glycine base (pKa = 11.57, H2O) is on the level of amidine amino acids like arginine and creatine and its structure, zwitterionic vs. neutral, based on the spectroscopic (IR, NMR, mass) and theoretical (DFT) approaches has a strong preference to the zwitterionic form. Unlike glycine, the DMAN-glycine zwitterion is N-chiral and is hydrolytically cleaved with the loss of glycolic acid on heating in DMSO. This reaction together with the mild decarboxylative conversion of proton sponge-based amino acids into 2,3-dihydroperimidinium salts under air-oxygen was monitored with the help of the DMAN-alanine amino acid. The newly devised amino acids are unique as they combine fluorescence, strongly basic and redox-active properties.

  12. Proton radiotherapy in management of pediatric base of skull tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hug, Eugen B.; Sweeney, Reinhart A.; Nurre, Pamela M.; Holloway, Kitty C.; Slater, Jerry D.; Munzenrider, John E.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: Primary skull base tumors of the developing child are rare and present a formidable challenge to both surgeons and radiation oncologists. Gross total resection with negative margins is rarely achieved, and the risks of functional, structural, and cosmetic deficits limit the radiation dose using conventional radiation techniques. Twenty-nine children and adolescents treated with conformal proton radiotherapy (proton RT) were analyzed to assess treatment efficacy and safety. Methods and Materials: Between July 1992 and April 1999, 29 patients with mesenchymal tumors underwent fractionated proton (13 patients) or fractionated combined proton and photon (16 patients) irradiation. The age at treatment ranged from 1 to 19 years (median 12); 14 patients were male and 15 female. Tumors were grouped as malignant or benign. Twenty patients had malignant histologic findings, including chordoma (n=10), chondrosarcoma (n=3), rhabdomyosarcoma (n=4), and other sarcomas (n=3). Target doses ranged between 50.4 and 78.6 Gy/cobalt Gray equivalent (CGE), delivered at doses of 1.8-2.0 Gy/CGE per fraction. The benign histologic findings included giant cell tumors (n=6), angiofibromas (n=2), and chondroblastoma (n=1). RT doses for this group ranged from 45.0 to 71.8 Gy/CGE. Despite maximal surgical resection, 28 (97%) of 29 patients had gross disease at the time of proton RT. Follow-up after proton RT ranged from 13 to 92 months (mean 40). Results: Of the 20 patients with malignant tumors, 5 (25%) had local failure; 1 patient had failure in the surgical access route and 3 patients developed distant metastases. Seven patients had died of progressive disease at the time of analysis. Local tumor control was maintained in 6 (60%) of 10 patients with chordoma, 3 (100%) of 3 with chondrosarcoma, 4 (100%) of 4 with rhabdomyosarcoma, and 2 (66%) of 3 with other sarcomas. The actuarial 5-year local control and overall survival rate was 72% and 56%, respectively, and the overall survival

  13. Angiography-based C-arm CT for the assessment of extrahepatic shunting before radioembolization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heusner, Till Alexander; Hahn, S.; Forsting, M.; Antoch, G.; Hamami, M.E.; Poeppel, T.; Bockisch, A.; Ertle, J.; Hilgard, P.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: to retrospectively assess the accuracy of angiography-based C-arm CT for the detection of extrahepatic shunting before SIRT. Materials and methods: 30 patients (mean age: 64 ± 12 years) with hypervascularized hepatic tumors underwent hepatic angiography, coil embolization of gastrointestinal collaterals and 99mTc-macroaggregated albumin (MAA) SPECT/CT before SIRT. Before MAA injection via a microcatheter from the intended treatment position, an angiography and angiography-based C-arm CT (XperCT trademark, Philips Healthcare) were acquired. Angiographies and XperCT trademark were performed from 48 microcatheter positions followed by MAA injections and MAA-SPECT/CT. MAA-SPECT/CT served as the reference standard for determining the accuracy of hepatic arteriography and C-arm CT for the detection of extrahepatic shunting. Results: MAA-SPECT/CT revealed extrahepatic shunting in 5 patients (17%). Hepatic arteriography yielded a true negative in 22 (73%), a false negative in 5 (17%), and an unclear result in 3 patients (10%). C-arm CT yielded a true positive in 3 (10%), true negative in 24 (80%), false positive in 1 (3%), and false negative in 2 patients (7%). The specificity and the NPV of hepatic arteriography for the detection of extrahepatic shunting were 88% and 81%, respectively. For C-arm CT the sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, and accuracy for the detection of extrahepatic shunting were 60%, 96%, 75%, 92%, and 90%, respectively. Conclusion: C-arm CT offers additional information to angiography when assessing SIRT patients for extrahepatic shunting. More accurate detection of extrahepatic shunting may optimize the workflow in SIRT preparations by avoiding unnecessary repeat angiographies. (orig.)

  14. Simulation of spatiotemporal CT data sets using a 4D MRI-based lung motion model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marx, Mirko; Ehrhardt, Jan; Werner, René; Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter; Handels, Heinz

    2014-05-01

    Four-dimensional CT imaging is widely used to account for motion-related effects during radiotherapy planning of lung cancer patients. However, 4D CT often contains motion artifacts, cannot be used to measure motion variability, and leads to higher dose exposure. In this article, we propose using 4D MRI to acquire motion information for the radiotherapy planning process. From the 4D MRI images, we derive a time-continuous model of the average patient-specific respiratory motion, which is then applied to simulate 4D CT data based on a static 3D CT. The idea of the motion model is to represent the average lung motion over a respiratory cycle by cyclic B-spline curves. The model generation consists of motion field estimation in the 4D MRI data by nonlinear registration, assigning respiratory phases to the motion fields, and applying a B-spline approximation on a voxel-by-voxel basis to describe the average voxel motion over a breathing cycle. To simulate a patient-specific 4D CT based on a static CT of the patient, a multi-modal registration strategy is introduced to transfer the motion model from MRI to the static CT coordinates. Differences between model-based estimated and measured motion vectors are on average 1.39 mm for amplitude-based binning of the 4D MRI data of three patients. In addition, the MRI-to-CT registration strategy is shown to be suitable for the model transformation. The application of our 4D MRI-based motion model for simulating 4D CT images provides advantages over standard 4D CT (less motion artifacts, radiation-free). This makes it interesting for radiotherapy planning.

  15. Randomised trial of proton vs. carbon ion radiation therapy in patients with low and intermediate grade chondrosarcoma of the skull base, clinical phase III study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikoghosyan, Anna V; Rauch, Geraldine; Münter, Marc W; Jensen, Alexandra D; Combs, Stephanie E; Kieser, Meinhard; Debus, Jürgen

    2010-01-01

    Low and intermediate grade chondrosarcomas are relative rare bone tumours. About 5-12% of all chondrosarcomas are localized in base of skull region. Low grade chondrosarcoma has a low incidence of distant metastasis but is potentially lethal disease. Therefore, local therapy is of crucial importance in the treatment of skull base chondrosarcomas. Surgical resection is the primary treatment standard. Unfortunately the late diagnosis and diagnosis at the extensive stage are common due to the slow and asymptomatic growth of the lesions. Consequently, complete resection is hindered due to close proximity to critical and hence dose limiting organs such as optic nerves, chiasm and brainstem. Adjuvant or additional radiation therapy is very important for the improvement of local control rates in the primary treatment. Proton therapy is the gold standard in the treatment of skull base chondrosarcomas. However, high-LET (linear energy transfer) beams such as carbon ions theoretically offer advantages by enhanced biologic effectiveness in slow-growing tumours. The study is a prospective randomised active-controlled clinical phase III trial. The trial will be carried out at Heidelberger Ionenstrahl-Therapie (HIT) centre as monocentric trial. Patients with skull base chondrosarcomas will be randomised to either proton or carbon ion radiation therapy. As a standard, patients will undergo non-invasive, rigid immobilization and target volume definition will be carried out based on CT and MRI data. The biologically isoeffective target dose to the PTV (planning target volume) in carbon ion treatment will be 60 Gy E ± 5% and 70 Gy E ± 5% (standard dose) in proton therapy respectively. The 5 year local-progression free survival (LPFS) rate will be analysed as primary end point. Overall survival, progression free and metastasis free survival, patterns of recurrence, local control rate and morbidity are the secondary end points. Up to now it was impossible to compare two different

  16. Clinical Investigations of a CT-based reconstruction and 3D-Treatment planning system in interstitial brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolotas, C; Zamboglou, N [Strahlenklinik, Stadtische Kliniken Offenbach, Offenbach (Germany)

    1999-12-31

    Purpose: Development, application and evaluation of a CT-guided implantation technique and a fully CT based treatment planning procedure for brachytherapy. Methods and Materials : A brachytherapy procedure based on CT-guided implantation technique and CT based treatment planning has been developed and clinically evaluated. For this purpose a software system (PROMETHEUS) for the 3D reconstruction of brachytherapy catheters and patient anatomy using only CT scans has been developed. An interface for the Nucletron Plato BPS treatment planning system for the optimisation and calculation of dose distribution has been devised. The planning target volume(s) are defined as sets of points using contouring tools and are for optimisation of the 3D dose distribution. Dose-volume histogram-based analysis of the dose distribution enables a clinically realistic evaluation of the brachytherapy application to be made. The CT-guided implantation of catheters and the CT-based treatment planning procedure has been performed for interstitial brachytherapy and for different tumour and anatomical localizations in 197 patients between 1996 and 1997. Results : The accuracy of the CT reconstruction was tested using a quality assurance phantom an an interstitial implant of 12 needles and compared with the results of reconstruction using radiographs[hs. Both methods give comparable results with regard to accuracy. The CT based reconstruction was faster. Clinical feasibility has been proven in pre-irradiated recurrences of brain tumour, in pre-treated recurrences or metastatic disease, and in breast carcinomas. The tumour volume treated ranged from 5.1 - 2741 cm3. Analysis of the implant quality showed a slight significant lower COIN value for the bone implants, but no differences in respect to the planning target volume. Conclusions : With the integration of CT imaging in the treatment planning and documentation of brachytherapy, we have a new CT based quality assurance method to evaluate

  17. Clinical Investigations of a CT-based reconstruction and 3D-Treatment planning system in interstitial brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolotas, C.; Zamboglou, N.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: Development, application and evaluation of a CT-guided implantation technique and a fully CT based treatment planning procedure for brachytherapy. Methods and Materials : A brachytherapy procedure based on CT-guided implantation technique and CT based treatment planning has been developed and clinically evaluated. For this purpose a software system (PROMETHEUS) for the 3D reconstruction of brachytherapy catheters and patient anatomy using only CT scans has been developed. An interface for the Nucletron Plato BPS treatment planning system for the optimisation and calculation of dose distribution has been devised. The planning target volume(s) are defined as sets of points using contouring tools and are for optimisation of the 3D dose distribution. Dose-volume histogram-based analysis of the dose distribution enables a clinically realistic evaluation of the brachytherapy application to be made. The CT-guided implantation of catheters and the CT-based treatment planning procedure has been performed for interstitial brachytherapy and for different tumour and anatomical localizations in 197 patients between 1996 and 1997. Results : The accuracy of the CT reconstruction was tested using a quality assurance phantom an an interstitial implant of 12 needles and compared with the results of reconstruction using radiographs[hs. Both methods give comparable results with regard to accuracy. The CT based reconstruction was faster. Clinical feasibility has been proven in pre-irradiated recurrences of brain tumour, in pre-treated recurrences or metastatic disease, and in breast carcinomas. The tumour volume treated ranged from 5.1 - 2741 cm3. Analysis of the implant quality showed a slight significant lower COIN value for the bone implants, but no differences in respect to the planning target volume. Conclusions : With the integration of CT imaging in the treatment planning and documentation of brachytherapy, we have a new CT based quality assurance method to evaluate

  18. Missing Mass Searches in Dimuon Events with CT-PPS

    CERN Document Server

    Mironova, Maria

    2017-01-01

    In this summer student project the feasibility of missing mass searches with the CMS TOTEM Precision Proton Spectrometer was studied. Using a combination of CMS and CT-PPS data and Monte Carlo simulations, cuts to reduce the Drell Yan background were made and the expected signal was estimated.

  19. A Time-Based Front End Readout System for PET & CT

    CERN Document Server

    Meyer, T C; Anghinolfi, F; Auffray, E; Dosanjh, M; Hillemanns, H; Hoffmann, H -F; Jarron, P; Kaplon, J; Kronberger, M; Lecoq, P; Moraes, D; Trummer, J

    2007-01-01

    In the framework of the European FP6's BioCare project, we develop a novel, time-based, photo-detector readout technique to increase sensitivity and timing precision for molecular imaging in PET and CT. The project aims to employ Avalanche Photo Diode (APD) arrays with state of the art, high speed, front end amplifiers and discrimination circuits developed for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) physics program at CERN, suitable to detect and process photons in a combined one-unit PET/CT detection head. In the so-called time-based approach our efforts focus on the system's timing performance with sub-nanosecond time-jitter and -walk, and yet also provide information on photon energy without resorting to analog to digital conversion. The bandwidth of the electronic circuitry is compatible with the scintillator's intrinsic light response (e.g. les40ns in LSO) and hence allows high rate CT operation in single-photon counting mode. Based on commercial LSO crystals and Hamamatsu S8550 APD arrays, we show the system pe...

  20. Comparison of CT based-CTV plan and CT based-ICRU38 plan in brachytherapy planning of uterine cervix cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shim, Jin Sup; Jo, Jung Kun; Si, Chang Keun; Lee, Ki Ho; Lee, Du Hyun; Choi, Kye Suk

    2004-01-01

    Although Improve of CT, MRI Radio-diagnosis and Radiation Therapy Planing, but we still use ICRU38 Planning system(2D film-based) broadly. 3-Dimensional ICR plan(CT image based) is not only offer tumor and normal tissue dose but also support DVH information. On this study, we plan irradiation-goal dose on CTV(CTV plan) and irradiation-goal dose on ICRU 38 point(ICRU38 plan) by use CT image. And compare with tumor-dose, rectal-dose, bladder-dose on both planning, and analysis DVH Sample 11 patients who treated by Ir-192 HDR. After 40 Gy external radiation therapy, ICR plan established. All the patients carry out CT-image scanned by CT-simulator. And we use PLATO(Nucletron) v.14.2 planing system. We draw CTV, rectum, bladder on the CT image. And establish plan irradiation- dose on CTV(CTV plan) and irradiation- dose on A-point(ICRU38 plan) CTV volume(average±SD) is 21.8±26.6 cm 3 , rectum volume(average±SD) is 60.9±25.0 cm 3 , bladder volume(average±SD) is 116.1±40.1cm 3 sampled 11 patients. The volume including 100% dose is 126.7±18.9 cm 3 on ICRU plan and 98.2±74.5 cm 3 on CTV plan. On ICRU planning, the other one's 22.0 cm 3 CTV volume who residual tumor size excess 4cm is not including 100% isodose. 8 patient's 12.9±5.9 cm 3 tumor volume who residual tumor size below 4 cm irradiated 100% dose. Bladder dose(recommended by ICRU 38) is 90.1±21.3 % on ICRU plan, 68.7±26.6% on CTV plan, and rectal dose is 86.4±18.3%, 76.9±15.6%. Bladder and Rectum maximum dose is 137.2±5.9%, 101.1±41.8% on ICRU plan, 107.6±47.9%, 86.9±30.8% on CTV plan. Therefore CTV plan more less normal issue-irradiated dose than ICRU plan. But one patient case who residual tumor size excess 4 cm, Normal tissue dose more higher than critical dose remarkably on CTV plan. 80% over-Irradiated rectal dose(V80rec) is 1.8±2.4 cm 3 on ICRU plan, 0.7±1.0 cm 3 on CTV plan. 80% over-Irradiated bladder dose(V80bla) is 12.2%±8.9 cm 3 on ICRU plan, 3.5±4.1 cm 3 on CTV plan. Likewise, CTV

  1. Using gEUD based plan analysis method to evaluate proton vs. photon plans for lung cancer radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Zhiyan; Zou, Wei J; Chen, Ting; Yue, Ning J; Jabbour, Salma K; Parikh, Rahul; Zhang, Miao

    2018-03-01

    The goal of this study was to exam the efficacy of current DVH based clinical guidelines draw from photon experience for lung cancer radiation therapy on proton therapy. Comparison proton plans and IMRT plans were generated for 10 lung patients treated in our proton facility. A gEUD based plan evaluation method was developed for plan evaluation. This evaluation method used normal lung gEUD(a) curve in which the model parameter "a" was sampled from the literature reported value. For all patients, the proton plans delivered lower normal lung V 5 Gy with similar V 20 Gy and similar target coverage. Based on current clinical guidelines, proton plans were ranked superior to IMRT plans for all 10 patients. However, the proton and IMRT normal lung gEUD(a) curves crossed for 8 patients within the tested range of "a", which means there was a possibility that proton plan would be worse than IMRT plan for lung sparing. A concept of deficiency index (DI) was introduced to quantify the probability of proton plans doing worse than IMRT plans. By applying threshold on DI, four patients' proton plan was ranked inferior to the IMRT plan. Meanwhile if a threshold to the location of curve crossing was applied, 6 patients' proton plan was ranked inferior to the IMRT plan. The contradictory ranking results between the current clinical guidelines and the gEUD(a) curve analysis demonstrated there is potential pitfalls by applying photon experience directly to the proton world. A comprehensive plan evaluation based on radio-biological models should be carried out to decide if a lung patient would really be benefit from proton therapy. © 2018 The Authors. Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  2. Proton-proton reaction rates at extreme energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagano, Motohiko

    1993-01-01

    Results on proton-antiproton reaction rates (total cross-section) at collision energies of 1.8 TeV from experiments at Fermilab have suggested a lower rate of increase with energy compared to the extrapolation based on results previously obtained at CERN's proton-antiproton collider (CERN Courier, October 1991). Now an independent estimate of the values for the proton-proton total cross-section for collision energies from 5 to 30 TeV has been provided by the analysis of cosmic ray shower data collected over ten years at the Akeno Observatory operated by the Institute for Cosmic Ray Research of University of Tokyo. These results are based on the inelastic cross-section for collisions of cosmic ray protons with air nuclei at energies in the range10 16-18 eV. A new extensive air shower experiment was started at Akeno, 150 km west of Tokyo, in 1979 with a large array of detectors, both on the ground and under a 1-metre concrete absorber. This measured the total numbers of electrons and muons of energies above 1GeV for individual showers with much better accuracy than before. Data collection was almost continuous for ten years without any change in the triggering criteria for showers above10 16 eV. The mean free path for proton-air nuclei collisions has been determined from the zenith angle of the observed frequency of air showers which have the same effective path length for development in the atmosphere and the same primary energy

  3. MRI-based treatment planning with pseudo CT generated through atlas registration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uh, Jinsoo; Merchant, Thomas E; Li, Yimei; Li, Xingyu; Hua, Chiaho

    2014-05-01

    To evaluate the feasibility and accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based treatment planning using pseudo CTs generated through atlas registration. A pseudo CT, providing electron density information for dose calculation, was generated by deforming atlas CT images previously acquired on other patients. The authors tested 4 schemes of synthesizing a pseudo CT from single or multiple deformed atlas images: use of a single arbitrarily selected atlas, arithmetic mean process using 6 atlases, and pattern recognition with Gaussian process (PRGP) using 6 or 12 atlases. The required deformation for atlas CT images was derived from a nonlinear registration of conjugated atlas MR images to that of the patient of interest. The contrasts of atlas MR images were adjusted by histogram matching to reduce the effect of different sets of acquisition parameters. For comparison, the authors also tested a simple scheme assigning the Hounsfield unit of water to the entire patient volume. All pseudo CT generating schemes were applied to 14 patients with common pediatric brain tumors. The image similarity of real patient-specific CT and pseudo CTs constructed by different schemes was compared. Differences in computation times were also calculated. The real CT in the treatment planning system was replaced with the pseudo CT, and the dose distribution was recalculated to determine the difference. The atlas approach generally performed better than assigning a bulk CT number to the entire patient volume. Comparing atlas-based schemes, those using multiple atlases outperformed the single atlas scheme. For multiple atlas schemes, the pseudo CTs were similar to the real CTs (correlation coefficient, 0.787-0.819). The calculated dose distribution was in close agreement with the original dose. Nearly the entire patient volume (98.3%-98.7%) satisfied the criteria of chi-evaluation (pediatric brain tumor patients. The doses calculated from pseudo CTs agreed well with those from real CTs

  4. SPL-based Proton Driver for a nu-Factory at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Benedetto, E; Garoby, R; Meddahi, M

    2010-01-01

    The conceptual design and feasibility studies for a nu-Factory Proton Driver based on the CERN Superconducting Proton Linac (SPL) have been com- pleted. In the proposed scenario, the 4 MW proton beam (H- beam) is acceler- ated with the upgraded High Power (HP)-SPL to 5 GeV, stored in an accumu- lator ring and Þnally transported to a compressor ring, where bunch rotation takes place, in order to achieve the speciÞc time structure. We here summa- rize the choices in terms of lattice, magnet technology and RF manipulations in the two rings. The possible critical issues, such as heating of the foil for the charge-exchange injection, space-charge problems in the compressor and beam stability in the accumulator ring, have been addressed and are shown not to be show-stoppers. The analysis focuses on the baseline scenario, consider- ing 6 bunches in the accumulator, and preliminary studies are discussed for the option of 3 or a single bunch per burst.

  5. A patch-based pseudo-CT approach for MRI-only radiotherapy in the pelvis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreasen, Daniel, E-mail: dana@dtu.dk [Department of Applied Mathematics and Computer Science, Technical University of Denmark, 2800 Kgs. Lyngby, Denmark and Radiotherapy Research Unit, Department of Oncology, Gentofte and Herlev Hospital, University of Copenhagen, 2730 Herlev (Denmark); Van Leemput, Koen [Department of Applied Mathematics and Computer Science, Technical University of Denmark, 2800 Kgs. Lyngby, Denmark and A.A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, Massachusetts 02129 (United States); Edmund, Jens M. [Radiotherapy Research Unit, Department of Oncology, Gentofte and Herlev Hospital, University of Copenhagen, 2730 Herlev (Denmark)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: In radiotherapy based only on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), knowledge about tissue electron densities must be derived from the MRI. This can be achieved by converting the MRI scan to the so-called pseudo-computed tomography (pCT). An obstacle is that the voxel intensities in conventional MRI scans are not uniquely related to electron density. The authors previously demonstrated that a patch-based method could produce accurate pCTs of the brain using conventional T{sub 1}-weighted MRI scans. The method was driven mainly by local patch similarities and relied on simple affine registrations between an atlas database of the co-registered MRI/CT scan pairs and the MRI scan to be converted. In this study, the authors investigate the applicability of the patch-based approach in the pelvis. This region is challenging for a method based on local similarities due to the greater inter-patient variation. The authors benchmark the method against a baseline pCT strategy where all voxels inside the body contour are assigned a water-equivalent bulk density. Furthermore, the authors implement a parallelized approximate patch search strategy to speed up the pCT generation time to a more clinically relevant level. Methods: The data consisted of CT and T{sub 1}-weighted MRI scans of 10 prostate patients. pCTs were generated using an approximate patch search algorithm in a leave-one-out fashion and compared with the CT using frequently described metrics such as the voxel-wise mean absolute error (MAE{sub vox}) and the deviation in water-equivalent path lengths. Furthermore, the dosimetric accuracy was tested for a volumetric modulated arc therapy plan using dose–volume histogram (DVH) point deviations and γ-index analysis. Results: The patch-based approach had an average MAE{sub vox} of 54 HU; median deviations of less than 0.4% in relevant DVH points and a γ-index pass rate of 0.97 using a 1%/1 mm criterion. The patch-based approach showed a significantly better

  6. Knowledge base technology for CT-DIMS: Report 1. [CT-DIMS (Cutting Tool - Database and Information Management System)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelley, E.E.

    1993-05-01

    This report discusses progress on the Cutting Tool-Database and Information Management System (CT-DIMS) project being conducted by the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) under contract to the Department of Energy. This project was initiated in October 1991 by UIUC. The Knowledge-Based Engineering Systems Research Laboratory (KBESRL) at UIUC is developing knowledge base technology and prototype software for the presentation and manipulation of the cutting tool databases at Allied-Signal Inc., Kansas City Division (KCD). The graphical tool selection capability being developed for CT-DIMS in the Intelligent Design Environment for Engineering Automation (IDEEA) will provide a concurrent environment for simultaneous access to tool databases, tool standard libraries, and cutting tool knowledge.

  7. TBIdoc: 3D content-based CT image retrieval system for traumatic brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shimiao; Gong, Tianxia; Wang, Jie; Liu, Ruizhe; Tan, Chew Lim; Leong, Tze Yun; Pang, Boon Chuan; Lim, C. C. Tchoyoson; Lee, Cheng Kiang; Tian, Qi; Zhang, Zhuo

    2010-03-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of death and disability. Computed Tomography (CT) scan is widely used in the diagnosis of TBI. Nowadays, large amount of TBI CT data is stacked in the hospital radiology department. Such data and the associated patient information contain valuable information for clinical diagnosis and outcome prediction. However, current hospital database system does not provide an efficient and intuitive tool for doctors to search out cases relevant to the current study case. In this paper, we present the TBIdoc system: a content-based image retrieval (CBIR) system which works on the TBI CT images. In this web-based system, user can query by uploading CT image slices from one study, retrieval result is a list of TBI cases ranked according to their 3D visual similarity to the query case. Specifically, cases of TBI CT images often present diffuse or focal lesions. In TBIdoc system, these pathological image features are represented as bin-based binary feature vectors. We use the Jaccard-Needham measure as the similarity measurement. Based on these, we propose a 3D similarity measure for computing the similarity score between two series of CT slices. nDCG is used to evaluate the system performance, which shows the system produces satisfactory retrieval results. The system is expected to improve the current hospital data management in TBI and to give better support for the clinical decision-making process. It may also contribute to the computer-aided education in TBI.

  8. Skull base osteomyelitis: role of three phase and hybrid SPECT/CT bone scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakraborty, D.; Bhattacharaya, A.; Kamaleshwaran, K.K.; Mittal, B.R.; Aggarwal, K.; Singh, B.; Bhoil, A.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Skull base osteomyelitis is the infection that has spread to the skull base, beyond the external auditory canal and seen in advanced stage of malignant otitis externa. Early diagnosis of this condition includes the use of bone scintigraphy since clinical assessment alone cannot differentiate the skull base osteomyelitis from the severe type of otitis externa in which there is no extension to the adjacent bone. Objective: To determine the role of three phase bone scintigraphy and delayed SPECT/CT in detection of skull base osteomyelitis in patients with malignant otitis externa. Material and Methods: Clinical records of 20 patients (14 Males and 6 Females; mean age 72 yrs) of otitis externa with suspected skull base involvement referred for bone scintigraphies were analyzed retrospectively. Three phase bone scintigraphy was acquired under dual detector gamma camera after intravenous injection of 20 mCi (740 MBq) 99m Tc-MDP followed by SPECT/CT of the skull. Scintigraphic findings were compared with clinical symptoms, signs and diagnostic CT scan findings. Results: All the patients except one were diabetic and having elevated ESR. 18 patients presented with bilateral symptoms and rest unilateral. Cranial nerves were involved in 8 patients (40%). Ear discharge culture sensitivity report was found in three patients; it was positive for Pseudomonas aeruginosa for two patients and in Diptheroids for one. In 9 patients (45%) increased flow of tracer and 10 patients (50%) increased blood pool phase in the temporal region was found. Delayed phase images showed increased uptake in skull bone in 19 patients (95%). Hybrid SPECT/CT of the skull localized areas of increased tracer uptake to the mastoid part in 15 patients (75%), petrous part in 11 patients (55%), sphenoid in 3 patients (15%) and zygomatic bone in one patient (5%) with CT showing destructive changes in 5 patients (25%) which were corroborated with diagnostic CT findings. SPECT/CT along with three phase

  9. An end-to-end assessment of range uncertainty in proton therapy using animal tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yuanshui; Kang, Yixiu; Zeidan, Omar; Schreuder, Niek

    2016-11-01

    Accurate assessment of range uncertainty is critical in proton therapy. However, there is a lack of data and consensus on how to evaluate the appropriate amount of uncertainty. The purpose of this study is to quantify the range uncertainty in various treatment conditions in proton therapy, using transmission measurements through various animal tissues. Animal tissues, including a pig head, beef steak, and lamb leg, were used in this study. For each tissue, an end-to-end test closely imitating patient treatments was performed. This included CT scan simulation, treatment planning, image-guided alignment, and beam delivery. Radio-chromic films were placed at various depths in the distal dose falloff region to measure depth dose. Comparisons between measured and calculated doses were used to evaluate range differences. The dose difference at the distal falloff between measurement and calculation depends on tissue type and treatment conditions. The estimated range difference was up to 5, 6 and 4 mm for the pig head, beef steak, and lamb leg irradiation, respectively. Our study shows that the TPS was able to calculate proton range within about 1.5% plus 1.5 mm. Accurate assessment of range uncertainty in treatment planning would allow better optimization of proton beam treatment, thus fully achieving proton beams’ superior dose advantage over conventional photon-based radiation therapy.

  10. Automatic CT-based finite element model generation for temperature-based death time estimation: feasibility study and sensitivity analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenkl, Sebastian; Muggenthaler, Holger; Hubig, Michael; Erdmann, Bodo; Weiser, Martin; Zachow, Stefan; Heinrich, Andreas; Güttler, Felix Victor; Teichgräber, Ulf; Mall, Gita

    2017-05-01

    Temperature-based death time estimation is based either on simple phenomenological models of corpse cooling or on detailed physical heat transfer models. The latter are much more complex but allow a higher accuracy of death time estimation, as in principle, all relevant cooling mechanisms can be taken into account.Here, a complete workflow for finite element-based cooling simulation is presented. The following steps are demonstrated on a CT phantom: Computer tomography (CT) scan Segmentation of the CT images for thermodynamically relevant features of individual geometries and compilation in a geometric computer-aided design (CAD) model Conversion of the segmentation result into a finite element (FE) simulation model Computation of the model cooling curve (MOD) Calculation of the cooling time (CTE) For the first time in FE-based cooling time estimation, the steps from the CT image over segmentation to FE model generation are performed semi-automatically. The cooling time calculation results are compared to cooling measurements performed on the phantoms under controlled conditions. In this context, the method is validated using a CT phantom. Some of the phantoms' thermodynamic material parameters had to be determined via independent experiments.Moreover, the impact of geometry and material parameter uncertainties on the estimated cooling time is investigated by a sensitivity analysis.

  11. Evaluation of GMI and PMI diffeomorphic-based demons algorithms for aligning PET and CT Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Juan; Wang, Hongjun; Zhang, You; Yin, Yong

    2015-07-08

    Fusion of anatomic information in computed tomography (CT) and functional information in 18F-FDG positron emission tomography (PET) is crucial for accurate differentiation of tumor from benign masses, designing radiotherapy treatment plan and staging of cancer. Although current PET and CT images can be acquired from combined 18F-FDG PET/CT scanner, the two acquisitions are scanned separately and take a long time, which may induce potential positional errors in global and local caused by respiratory motion or organ peristalsis. So registration (alignment) of whole-body PET and CT images is a prerequisite for their meaningful fusion. The purpose of this study was to assess the performance of two multimodal registration algorithms for aligning PET and CT images. The proposed gradient of mutual information (GMI)-based demons algorithm, which incorporated the GMI between two images as an external force to facilitate the alignment, was compared with the point-wise mutual information (PMI) diffeomorphic-based demons algorithm whose external force was modified by replacing the image intensity difference in diffeomorphic demons algorithm with the PMI to make it appropriate for multimodal image registration. Eight patients with esophageal cancer(s) were enrolled in this IRB-approved study. Whole-body PET and CT images were acquired from a combined 18F-FDG PET/CT scanner for each patient. The modified Hausdorff distance (d(MH)) was used to evaluate the registration accuracy of the two algorithms. Of all patients, the mean values and standard deviations (SDs) of d(MH) were 6.65 (± 1.90) voxels and 6.01 (± 1.90) after the GMI-based demons and the PMI diffeomorphic-based demons registration algorithms respectively. Preliminary results on oncological patients showed that the respiratory motion and organ peristalsis in PET/CT esophageal images could not be neglected, although a combined 18F-FDG PET/CT scanner was used for image acquisition. The PMI diffeomorphic-based demons

  12. A minimum spanning forest based classification method for dedicated breast CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pike, Robert; Sechopoulos, Ioannis; Fei, Baowei

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To develop and test an automated algorithm to classify different types of tissue in dedicated breast CT images. Methods: Images of a single breast of five different patients were acquired with a dedicated breast CT clinical prototype. The breast CT images were processed by a multiscale bilateral filter to reduce noise while keeping edge information and were corrected to overcome cupping artifacts. As skin and glandular tissue have similar CT values on breast CT images, morphologic processing is used to identify the skin based on its position information. A support vector machine (SVM) is trained and the resulting model used to create a pixelwise classification map of fat and glandular tissue. By combining the results of the skin mask with the SVM results, the breast tissue is classified as skin, fat, and glandular tissue. This map is then used to identify markers for a minimum spanning forest that is grown to segment the image using spatial and intensity information. To evaluate the authors’ classification method, they use DICE overlap ratios to compare the results of the automated classification to those obtained by manual segmentation on five patient images. Results: Comparison between the automatic and the manual segmentation shows that the minimum spanning forest based classification method was able to successfully classify dedicated breast CT image with average DICE ratios of 96.9%, 89.8%, and 89.5% for fat, glandular, and skin tissue, respectively. Conclusions: A 2D minimum spanning forest based classification method was proposed and evaluated for classifying the fat, skin, and glandular tissue in dedicated breast CT images. The classification method can be used for dense breast tissue quantification, radiation dose assessment, and other applications in breast imaging

  13. 4D CT sorting based on patient internal anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ruijiang; Lewis, John H.; Cerviño, Laura I.; Jiang, Steve B.

    2009-08-01

    Respiratory motion during free-breathing computed tomography (CT) scan may cause significant errors in target definition for tumors in the thorax and upper abdomen. A four-dimensional (4D) CT technique has been widely used for treatment simulation of thoracic and abdominal cancer radiotherapy. The current 4D CT techniques require retrospective sorting of the reconstructed CT slices oversampled at the same couch position. Most sorting methods depend on external surrogates of respiratory motion recorded by extra instruments. However, respiratory signals obtained from these external surrogates may not always accurately represent the internal target motion, especially when irregular breathing patterns occur. We have proposed a new sorting method based on multiple internal anatomical features for multi-slice CT scan acquired in the cine mode. Four features are analyzed in this study, including the air content, lung area, lung density and body area. We use a measure called spatial coherence to select the optimal internal feature at each couch position and to generate the respiratory signals for 4D CT sorting. The proposed method has been evaluated for ten cancer patients (eight with thoracic cancer and two with abdominal cancer). For nine patients, the respiratory signals generated from the combined internal features are well correlated to those from external surrogates recorded by the real-time position management (RPM) system (average correlation: 0.95 ± 0.02), which is better than any individual internal measures at 95% confidence level. For these nine patients, the 4D CT images sorted by the combined internal features are almost identical to those sorted by the RPM signal. For one patient with an irregular breathing pattern, the respiratory signals given by the combined internal features do not correlate well with those from RPM (correlation: 0.68 ± 0.42). In this case, the 4D CT image sorted by our method presents fewer artifacts than that from the RPM signal. Our

  14. Proton linac for hospital-based fast neutron therapy and radioisotope production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lennox, A.J.; Hendrickson, F.R.; Swenson, D.A.; Winje, R.A.; Young, D.E.

    1989-09-01

    Recent developments in linac technology have led to the design of a hospital-based proton linac for fast neutron therapy. The 180 microamp average current allows beam to be diverted for radioisotope production during treatments while maintaining an acceptable dose rate. During dedicated operation, dose rates greater than 280 neutron rads per minute are achievable at depth, DMAX = 1.6 cm with source to axis distance, SAD = 190 cm. Maximum machine energy is 70 MeV and several intermediate energies are available for optimizing production of isotopes for Positron Emission Tomography and other medical applications. The linac can be used to produce a horizontal or a gantry can be added to the downstream end of the linac for conventional patient positioning. The 70 MeV protons can also be used for proton therapy for ocular melanomas. 17 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  15. SU-F-207-06: CT-Based Assessment of Tumor Volume in Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qayyum, F; Armato, S; Straus, C; Husain, A; Vigneswaran, W; Kindler, H

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the potential utility of computed tomography (CT) scans in the assessment of physical tumor bulk in malignant pleural mesothelioma patients. Methods: Twenty-eight patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma were used for this study. A CT scan was acquired for each patient prior to surgical resection of the tumor (median time between scan and surgery: 27 days). After surgery, the ex-vivo tumor volume was measured by a pathologist using a water displacement method. Separately, a radiologist identified and outlined the tumor boundary on each CT section that demonstrated tumor. These outlines then were analyzed to determine the total volume of disease present, the number of sections with outlines, and the mean volume of disease per outlined section. Subsets of the initial patient cohort were defined based on these parameters, i.e. cases with at least 30 sections of disease with a mean disease volume of at least 3mL per section. For each subset, the R- squared correlation between CT-based tumor volume and physical ex-vivo tumor volume was calculated. Results: The full cohort of 28 patients yielded a modest correlation between CT-based tumor volume and the ex-vivo tumor volume with an R-squared value of 0.66. In general, as the mean tumor volume per section increased, the correlation of CT-based volume with the physical tumor volume improved substantially. For example, when cases with at least 40 CT sections presenting a mean of at least 2mL of disease per section were evaluated (n=20) the R-squared correlation increased to 0.79. Conclusion: While image-based volumetry for mesothelioma may not generally capture physical tumor volume as accurately as one might expect, there exists a set of conditions in which CT-based volume is highly correlated with the physical tumor volume. SGA receives royalties and licensing fees through the University of Chicago for computer-aided diagnosis technology

  16. SU-F-207-06: CT-Based Assessment of Tumor Volume in Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qayyum, F; Armato, S; Straus, C; Husain, A; Vigneswaran, W; Kindler, H [The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To determine the potential utility of computed tomography (CT) scans in the assessment of physical tumor bulk in malignant pleural mesothelioma patients. Methods: Twenty-eight patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma were used for this study. A CT scan was acquired for each patient prior to surgical resection of the tumor (median time between scan and surgery: 27 days). After surgery, the ex-vivo tumor volume was measured by a pathologist using a water displacement method. Separately, a radiologist identified and outlined the tumor boundary on each CT section that demonstrated tumor. These outlines then were analyzed to determine the total volume of disease present, the number of sections with outlines, and the mean volume of disease per outlined section. Subsets of the initial patient cohort were defined based on these parameters, i.e. cases with at least 30 sections of disease with a mean disease volume of at least 3mL per section. For each subset, the R- squared correlation between CT-based tumor volume and physical ex-vivo tumor volume was calculated. Results: The full cohort of 28 patients yielded a modest correlation between CT-based tumor volume and the ex-vivo tumor volume with an R-squared value of 0.66. In general, as the mean tumor volume per section increased, the correlation of CT-based volume with the physical tumor volume improved substantially. For example, when cases with at least 40 CT sections presenting a mean of at least 2mL of disease per section were evaluated (n=20) the R-squared correlation increased to 0.79. Conclusion: While image-based volumetry for mesothelioma may not generally capture physical tumor volume as accurately as one might expect, there exists a set of conditions in which CT-based volume is highly correlated with the physical tumor volume. SGA receives royalties and licensing fees through the University of Chicago for computer-aided diagnosis technology.

  17. Improving abdomen tumor low-dose CT images using a fast dictionary learning based processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yang; Shi Luyao; Shu Huazhong; Luo Limin; Coatrieux, Jean-Louis; Yin Xindao; Toumoulin, Christine

    2013-01-01

    In abdomen computed tomography (CT), repeated radiation exposures are often inevitable for cancer patients who receive surgery or radiotherapy guided by CT images. Low-dose scans should thus be considered in order to avoid the harm of accumulative x-ray radiation. This work is aimed at improving abdomen tumor CT images from low-dose scans by using a fast dictionary learning (DL) based processing. Stemming from sparse representation theory, the proposed patch-based DL approach allows effective suppression of both mottled noise and streak artifacts. The experiments carried out on clinical data show that the proposed method brings encouraging improvements in abdomen low-dose CT images with tumors. (paper)

  18. Feature-based US to CT registration of the aortic root

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Pencilla; Chen, Elvis C. S.; Guiraudon, Gerard M.; Jones, Doug L.; Bainbridge, Daniel; Chu, Michael W.; Drangova, Maria; Hata, Noby; Jain, Ameet; Peters, Terry M.

    2011-03-01

    A feature-based registration was developed to align biplane and tracked ultrasound images of the aortic root with a preoperative CT volume. In transcatheter aortic valve replacement, a prosthetic valve is inserted into the aortic annulus via a catheter. Poor anatomical visualization of the aortic root region can result in incorrect positioning, leading to significant morbidity and mortality. Registration of pre-operative CT to transesophageal ultrasound and fluoroscopy images is a major step towards providing augmented image guidance for this procedure. The proposed registration approach uses an iterative closest point algorithm to register a surface mesh generated from CT to 3D US points reconstructed from a single biplane US acquisition, or multiple tracked US images. The use of a single simultaneous acquisition biplane image eliminates reconstruction error introduced by cardiac gating and TEE probe tracking, creating potential for real-time intra-operative registration. A simple initialization procedure is used to minimize changes to operating room workflow. The algorithm is tested on images acquired from excised porcine hearts. Results demonstrate a clinically acceptable accuracy of 2.6mm and 5mm for tracked US to CT and biplane US to CT registration respectively.

  19. A detection system for very low-energy protons from {beta}-delayed proton decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spiridon, A.; Pollacco, E.; Trache, L.; Simmons, E.; McCleskey, M.; Roeder, B. T.; Tribble, R. E.; Pascovici, G.; Riallot, M.; Mols, J. P.; Kebbiri, M. [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843-3366 (United States); CEA/IRFU Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Cyclotron Institute, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843-3366 (United States); Institut fuer Kernphysik der Universitaet zu Koeln, D-50937 Koeln (Germany); CEA/IRFU Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2012-11-20

    We have recently developed a gas based detection system called AstroBox, motivated by nuclear astrophysics studies. The goal was to detect very low-energy protons from {beta}-delayed p-decay with reduced beta background and improved energy resolution. The detector was tested using the {beta}-delayed proton-emitter 23Al previously studied with a set-up based on thin double-sided Si strip detectors. The proton spectrum obtained with AstroBox showed no beta background down to {approx}80 keV. The low energy (206 keV, 267 keV) proton peaks were positively identified, well separated, and the resolution was improved.

  20. A detection system for very low-energy protons from β-delayed proton decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiridon, A.; Pollacco, E.; Trache, L.; Simmons, E.; McCleskey, M.; Roeder, B. T.; Tribble, R. E.; Pascovici, G.; Riallot, M.; Mols, J. P.; Kebbiri, M.

    2012-01-01

    We have recently developed a gas based detection system called AstroBox, motivated by nuclear astrophysics studies. The goal was to detect very low-energy protons from β-delayed p-decay with reduced beta background and improved energy resolution. The detector was tested using the β-delayed proton-emitter 23Al previously studied with a set-up based on thin double-sided Si strip detectors. The proton spectrum obtained with AstroBox showed no beta background down to ∼80 keV. The low energy (206 keV, 267 keV) proton peaks were positively identified, well separated, and the resolution was improved.

  1. Pentanol-based target material with polarized protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunyatova, E.I.

    1992-01-01

    1-pentanol is a promising material for a target with polarized protons owing to its high resistance to radiation damage. To develop the target, the solutions of 1-pentanol or 2-pentanol with complexes of pentavalent chromium ware investigated. The material based EHBA-Cr(V) solution in a glass-like matrix, consisting of 1-pentanol, 3-pentanol and 1,2-propanediol, was proposed as a target material. It was investigated by the electron paramagnetic resonance and differential scanning calorimetry methods. 24 refs.; 3 figs.; 1 tab

  2. Accuracy of Dual-Energy Virtual Monochromatic CT Numbers: Comparison between the Single-Source Projection-Based and Dual-Source Image-Based Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueguchi, Takashi; Ogihara, Ryota; Yamada, Sachiko

    2018-03-21

    To investigate the accuracy of dual-energy virtual monochromatic computed tomography (CT) numbers obtained by two typical hardware and software implementations: the single-source projection-based method and the dual-source image-based method. A phantom with different tissue equivalent inserts was scanned with both single-source and dual-source scanners. A fast kVp-switching feature was used on the single-source scanner, whereas a tin filter was used on the dual-source scanner. Virtual monochromatic CT images of the phantom at energy levels of 60, 100, and 140 keV were obtained by both projection-based (on the single-source scanner) and image-based (on the dual-source scanner) methods. The accuracy of virtual monochromatic CT numbers for all inserts was assessed by comparing measured values to their corresponding true values. Linear regression analysis was performed to evaluate the dependency of measured CT numbers on tissue attenuation, method, and their interaction. Root mean square values of systematic error over all inserts at 60, 100, and 140 keV were approximately 53, 21, and 29 Hounsfield unit (HU) with the single-source projection-based method, and 46, 7, and 6 HU with the dual-source image-based method, respectively. Linear regression analysis revealed that the interaction between the attenuation and the method had a statistically significant effect on the measured CT numbers at 100 and 140 keV. There were attenuation-, method-, and energy level-dependent systematic errors in the measured virtual monochromatic CT numbers. CT number reproducibility was comparable between the two scanners, and CT numbers had better accuracy with the dual-source image-based method at 100 and 140 keV. Copyright © 2018 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Thin-section CT of the skull base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyer-Enke, S.A.; Goerich, J.; Gamroth, A.; Tiedemann, K.

    1987-01-01

    High-resolution CT-images of the skull base are depicted and anatomical structures are described. A large variety of osseous and soft tissue structures can be differentiated in the temporal bone, nasopharynx and orbita. Knowledge of the anatomical structures is essential for the recognition of pathological changes and also plays an essential role for the diagnostically involved radiologist. (orig.) [de

  4. Dosimetric performance evaluation regarding proton beam incident angles of a lithium-based AB-BNCT design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Pei-Yi; Jiang, Shiang-Huei; Liu, Yuan-Hao

    2014-01-01

    The 7 Li(p,xn) 7 Be nuclear reaction, based on the low-energy protons, could produce soft neutrons for accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy (AB-BNCT). Based on the fact that the induced neutron field is relatively divergent, the relationship between the incident angle of proton beam and the neutron beam quality was evaluated in this study. To provide an intense epithermal neutron beam, a beam-shaping assembly (BSA) was designed. And a modified Snyder head phantom was used in the calculations for evaluating the dosimetric performance. From the calculated results, the intensity of epithermal neutrons increased with the increase in proton incident angle. Hence, either the irradiation time or the required proton current can be reduced. When the incident angle of 2.5-MeV proton beam is 120 deg., the required proton current is ∼13.3 mA for an irradiation time of half an hour. The results of this study show that the BSA designs can generate neutron beams with good intensity and penetrability. Using a 20-mA, 2.5-MeV proton beam as the source, the required irradiation time, to induce 60 RBE-Gy of maximum tumour dose, is less than half an hour in any proton beam alignments. On the premise that the dosimetric performances are similar, the intensity of epithermal neutrons can be increased by using non-collinear (e.g. 90 deg., 120 deg.) incident protons. Thus, either the irradiation time or the required proton current can be reduced. The use of 120 deg. BSA model shows the possibility to reduce the required proton current to ∼13.3 mA when the goal of irradiation time is 30 min. The decrease of required proton beam current certainly will make the use of lithium target much easier. In June 2013, a 5-MeV, 30-mA radio frequency quadruple (RFQ) accelerator for BNCT was built at INFN-LNL (Legnaro National Laboratories, Italy), which shows a possibility to build a suitable RFQ accelerator for the authors' design. In addition, a 2.5-MeV, 30-mA Tandem accelerator was

  5. Postnatal development of the anterior skull base and nasal septum: CT study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kwan Soo; Kim, Hyung Jin; Lee, Kyung Hee; Roh, Hong Gee; Lim, Myung Kwan

    2002-01-01

    To know the normal CT appearance of the anterior skull base and nasal septum after birth. Coronal CT scans with a helical mode were performed from the nasal bone to the sphenoid sinus in 99 children whose ages ranged from 27 days to 14 years. We investigated the CT appearance of the developing anterior skull base and nasal septum with particular attention to the anteroposterior length of the anterior skull base and the ossification patterns of the cribriform plate, perpendicular plate, crista galli, and vomer. The anteroposterior length of the anterior skull base statistically significantly increased with age. The cribriform plate showed partial or complete ossification in at least one segment at more than 3 months of age and in all three segments at more than 6 months of age. Ossification of the cribriform plate occurred earlier in the middle segment than in the anterior and posterior segments. It began exclusively in the region of the lateral mass of the ethmoid and proceeded medially toward the crista galli. Partial ossification of the perpendicular plate was noted as early as 9 months of age, and complete ossification as early as 13 months of age. All children at 18 months and older showed at least partial ossification of the perpendicular plate. Partial ossification of the crista galli was noted as early as 27 days of age, and complete ossification as early as 3 months of age. CT showed complete ossification of the crista galli in all but two children at 6 months and older. The superior aspect of the vomer exhibited a V- or Y-shape on all CT scans in 66%(65/99) of children at any age. It appeared as an undivided single lump anteriorly and a V or Y posteriorly in 34%(34/99). Knowledge of the normal developing patterns of ossification of the anterior skull base and nasal septum could help prevent errors in interpreting CT scans in this region, especially in infants and young children

  6. Basic features of proton-proton interactions at ultra-relativistic energies and RFT-based quark-gluon string model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zabrodin E.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Proton-proton collisions at energies from √s = 200 GeV up to √s = 14 TeV are studied within the microscopic quark-gluon string model. The model is based on Gribov’s Reggeon Field Theory accomplished by string phenomenology. Comparison with experimental data shows that QGSM describes well particle yields, rapidity - and transverse momentum spectra, rise of mean 〈 pT 〉 and forward-backward multiplicity correlations. The latter arise in QGSM because of the addition of various processes with different mean multiplicities. The model also indicates fulfillment of extended longitudinal scaling and violation of Koba-Nielsen-Olesen scaling at LHC. The origin of both features is traced to short-range particle correlations in the strings. Predictions are made for √s = 14 TeV.

  7. CT Image Sequence Restoration Based on Sparse and Low-Rank Decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, Shuiping; Wang, Yueyue; Wang, Zhilong; Peng, Yong; Zhang, Xiaopeng; Jiao, Licheng; Wu, Jianshe

    2013-01-01

    Blurry organ boundaries and soft tissue structures present a major challenge in biomedical image restoration. In this paper, we propose a low-rank decomposition-based method for computed tomography (CT) image sequence restoration, where the CT image sequence is decomposed into a sparse component and a low-rank component. A new point spread function of Weiner filter is employed to efficiently remove blur in the sparse component; a wiener filtering with the Gaussian PSF is used to recover the average image of the low-rank component. And then we get the recovered CT image sequence by combining the recovery low-rank image with all recovery sparse image sequence. Our method achieves restoration results with higher contrast, sharper organ boundaries and richer soft tissue structure information, compared with existing CT image restoration methods. The robustness of our method was assessed with numerical experiments using three different low-rank models: Robust Principle Component Analysis (RPCA), Linearized Alternating Direction Method with Adaptive Penalty (LADMAP) and Go Decomposition (GoDec). Experimental results demonstrated that the RPCA model was the most suitable for the small noise CT images whereas the GoDec model was the best for the large noisy CT images. PMID:24023764

  8. A method for evaluation of proton plan robustness towards inter-fractional motion applied to pelvic lymph node irradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Andreas G; Casares-Magaz, Oscar; Muren, Ludvig P

    2015-01-01

    of the pelvic lymph nodes (LNs) from different beam angles. Patient- versus population-specific patterns in dose deterioration were explored. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Patient data sets consisting of a planning computed tomography (pCT) as well as multiple repeat CT (rCT) scans for three patients were used......BACKGROUND: The benefit of proton therapy may be jeopardized by dose deterioration caused by water equivalent path length (WEPL) variations. In this study we introduced a method to evaluate robustness of proton therapy with respect to inter-fractional motion and applied it to irradiation...... in deterioration patterns were found for the investigated patients, with beam angles delivering less dose to rectum, bladder and overall normal tissue identified around 40° and around 150°-160° for the left LNs, and corresponding angles for the right LNs. These angles were also associated with low values of WEPL...

  9. Evaluation of GMI and PMI diffeomorphic‐based demons algorithms for aligning PET and CT Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Juan; Zhang, You; Yin, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Fusion of anatomic information in computed tomography (CT) and functional information in F18‐FDG positron emission tomography (PET) is crucial for accurate differentiation of tumor from benign masses, designing radiotherapy treatment plan and staging of cancer. Although current PET and CT images can be acquired from combined F18‐FDG PET/CT scanner, the two acquisitions are scanned separately and take a long time, which may induce potential positional errors in global and local caused by respiratory motion or organ peristalsis. So registration (alignment) of whole‐body PET and CT images is a prerequisite for their meaningful fusion. The purpose of this study was to assess the performance of two multimodal registration algorithms for aligning PET and CT images. The proposed gradient of mutual information (GMI)‐based demons algorithm, which incorporated the GMI between two images as an external force to facilitate the alignment, was compared with the point‐wise mutual information (PMI) diffeomorphic‐based demons algorithm whose external force was modified by replacing the image intensity difference in diffeomorphic demons algorithm with the PMI to make it appropriate for multimodal image registration. Eight patients with esophageal cancer(s) were enrolled in this IRB‐approved study. Whole‐body PET and CT images were acquired from a combined F18‐FDG PET/CT scanner for each patient. The modified Hausdorff distance (dMH) was used to evaluate the registration accuracy of the two algorithms. Of all patients, the mean values and standard deviations (SDs) of dMH were 6.65 (± 1.90) voxels and 6.01 (± 1.90) after the GMI‐based demons and the PMI diffeomorphic‐based demons registration algorithms respectively. Preliminary results on oncological patients showed that the respiratory motion and organ peristalsis in PET/CT esophageal images could not be neglected, although a combined F18‐FDG PET/CT scanner was used for image acquisition. The PMI

  10. A scintillator-based online detector for the angularly resolved measurement of laser-accelerated proton spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metzkes, J.; Kraft, S. D.; Sobiella, M.; Stiller, N.; Zeil, K.; Schramm, U.; Karsch, L.; Schürer, M.; Pawelke, J.; Richter, C.

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, a new generation of high repetition rate (∼10 Hz), high power (∼100 TW) laser systems has stimulated intense research on laser-driven sources for fast protons. Considering experimental instrumentation, this development requires online diagnostics for protons to be added to the established offline detection tools such as solid state track detectors or radiochromic films. In this article, we present the design and characterization of a scintillator-based online detector that gives access to the angularly resolved proton distribution along one spatial dimension and resolves 10 different proton energy ranges. Conceived as an online detector for key parameters in laser-proton acceleration, such as the maximum proton energy and the angular distribution, the detector features a spatial resolution of ∼1.3 mm and a spectral resolution better than 1.5 MeV for a maximum proton energy above 12 MeV in the current design. Regarding its areas of application, we consider the detector a useful complement to radiochromic films and Thomson parabola spectrometers, capable to give immediate feedback on the experimental performance. The detector was characterized at an electrostatic Van de Graaff tandetron accelerator and tested in a laser-proton acceleration experiment, proving its suitability as a diagnostic device for laser-accelerated protons.

  11. A scintillator-based online detector for the angularly resolved measurement of laser-accelerated proton spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzkes, J; Karsch, L; Kraft, S D; Pawelke, J; Richter, C; Schürer, M; Sobiella, M; Stiller, N; Zeil, K; Schramm, U

    2012-12-01

    In recent years, a new generation of high repetition rate (~10 Hz), high power (~100 TW) laser systems has stimulated intense research on laser-driven sources for fast protons. Considering experimental instrumentation, this development requires online diagnostics for protons to be added to the established offline detection tools such as solid state track detectors or radiochromic films. In this article, we present the design and characterization of a scintillator-based online detector that gives access to the angularly resolved proton distribution along one spatial dimension and resolves 10 different proton energy ranges. Conceived as an online detector for key parameters in laser-proton acceleration, such as the maximum proton energy and the angular distribution, the detector features a spatial resolution of ~1.3 mm and a spectral resolution better than 1.5 MeV for a maximum proton energy above 12 MeV in the current design. Regarding its areas of application, we consider the detector a useful complement to radiochromic films and Thomson parabola spectrometers, capable to give immediate feedback on the experimental performance. The detector was characterized at an electrostatic Van de Graaff tandetron accelerator and tested in a laser-proton acceleration experiment, proving its suitability as a diagnostic device for laser-accelerated protons.

  12. Parametric Model for Astrophysical Proton-Proton Interactions and Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karlsson, Niklas [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2007-01-01

    Observations of gamma-rays have been made from celestial sources such as active galaxies, gamma-ray bursts and supernova remnants as well as the Galactic ridge. The study of gamma rays can provide information about production mechanisms and cosmic-ray acceleration. In the high-energy regime, one of the dominant mechanisms for gamma-ray production is the decay of neutral pions produced in interactions of ultra-relativistic cosmic-ray nuclei and interstellar matter. Presented here is a parametric model for calculations of inclusive cross sections and transverse momentum distributions for secondary particles--gamma rays, e±, ve, $\\bar{v}$e, vμ and $\\bar{μ}$e--produced in proton-proton interactions. This parametric model is derived on the proton-proton interaction model proposed by Kamae et al.; it includes the diffraction dissociation process, Feynman-scaling violation and the logarithmically rising inelastic proton-proton cross section. To improve fidelity to experimental data for lower energies, two baryon resonance excitation processes were added; one representing the Δ(1232) and the other multiple resonances with masses around 1600 MeV/c2. The model predicts the power-law spectral index for all secondary particle to be about 0.05 lower in absolute value than that of the incident proton and their inclusive cross sections to be larger than those predicted by previous models based on the Feynman-scaling hypothesis. The applications of the presented model in astrophysics are plentiful. It has been implemented into the Galprop code to calculate the contribution due to pion decays in the Galactic plane. The model has also been used to estimate the cosmic-ray flux in the Large Magellanic Cloud based on HI, CO and gamma-ray observations. The transverse momentum distributions enable calculations when the proton distribution is anisotropic. It is shown that the gamma-ray spectrum and flux due to a

  13. Low-dose respiratory-gated PET/CT: based on 30 mA tube current

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Ping; Li Sijin; Zhang Yanlan; Hao Xinzhong; Qin Zhixing; Yan Min; Cheng Pengliang; Wu Zhifang

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To establish a low-dose but image-comparable respiratory-gated PET/CT (RG PET/CT) protocol based on 30 mA tube current plus other improved scanning parameters, such as the tube current, the number of respiratory phase and length of breathing cycle. Methods: Twenty-six patients with 18 F-FDG-intaking lung nodules underwent one-bed standard-dose PET/CT (120 mA, 2 min/bed) and low dose RG PET/CT (30 mA, 6 respiratory phases, 1 min/phase). The radiation dose and image quality were analyzed subsequently with signal to noise ratio (SNR) for PET and the homogeneity, noise level for CT in the water phantom respectively. Otherwise the CT images were both visual evaluated by two experienced doctors. In addition, different respiratory cycle was simulated to observe its relation with radiation dose. Results: The effective dose of low-dose RG PET/CT was 4.88∼7.69 mSv [mean (5.68±0.83) mSv]. The PET SNR showed no significance between groups. The homogeneity of 30 mA is good (< 5 HU), although noise level was high, the visual character like lobulation, speculation of lung nodule was superior in some respiratory phases. The radiation dose was positively correlated with respiratory cycle. Conclusions: The performance of low-dose RG PET/CT was comparable to those of standard-dose PET/CT based on a protocol with 30 mA tube current, 6 respiratory phases and breathing state of eupnoea. It produced a much lower radiation exposure and the image quality was enough for clinical use such as delineation of tumor active target, characterization and staging of lung nodules, etc. (authors)

  14. NMR characteristics of low-grade glioma. Comparison with CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asato, Reinin; Tokuriki, Yasuhiko; Nakano, Yoshihisa; Itoh, Harumi; Torizuka, Kanji; Ueda, Tohru; Yamashita, Junkoh; Handa, Hajime

    1985-08-01

    Sixteen low-grade gliomas were evaluated both with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging and with computed tomography (CT). In 13 cases (81%), the NMR images were much better in tissue contrast than the contrast-enhanced CT images. The tumors were shown as well-circumscribed oval lesions in the NMR, though they appeared as ill-defined, irregular, low-attenuation areas in the CT. The extent of the lesion, which was supposed to represent the active tumor tissue, was greater in the NMR than in the CT, because NMR tissue parameters (T/sub 1/, T/sub 2/) are more sensitive to pathological changes in brain tissue than is the X-ray attenuation coefficient. Though, in an optic glioma and a brain-stem astrocytoma, the CT with contrast enhancement displayed the contour of the mass as well as did NMR, it was inferior to the NMR in showing the cephalocaudal extension of the tumors. Calcification does not give a proton NMR signal under the present measuring conditions; thus the calcified cystic wall of a hypothalamic astrocytoma was displayed only in the CT images. In conclusion, the NMR imaging was apparently superior to contrast-enhanced CT in demonstrating the lesions due to low-grade glioma.

  15. Imaging of head and neck tumors -- methods: CT, spiral-CT, multislice-spiral-CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baum, Ulrich; Greess, Holger; Lell, Michael; Noemayr, Anton; Lenz, Martin

    2000-01-01

    Spiral-CT is standard for imaging neck tumors. In correspondence with other groups we routinely use spiral-CT with thin slices (3 mm), a pitch of 1.3-1.5 and an overlapping reconstruction increment (2-3 mm). In patients with dental fillings a short additional spiral parallel to the corpus of the mandible reduces artifacts behind the dental arches and improves the diagnostic value of CT. For the assessment of the base of the skull, the orbital floor, the palate and paranasal sinuses an additional examination in the coronal plane is helpful. Secondary coronal reconstructions of axial scans are helpful in the evaluation of the crossing of the midline by small tumors of the tongue base or palate. For an optimal vascular or tissue contrast a sufficient volume of contrast medium and a start delay greater than 70-80 s are necessary. In our opinion the best results can be achieved with a volume of 150 ml, a flow of 2.5 ml/s and a start delay of 80 s. Dynamic enhanced CT is only necessary in some special cases. There is clear indication for dynamic enhanced CT where a glomus tumor is suspected. Additional functional CT imaging during i-phonation and/or Valsalva's maneuver are of great importance to prove vocal cords mobility. Therefore, imaging during i-phonation is an elemental part of every thorough examination of the hypopharynx and larynx region. Multislice-spiral-CT allows almost isotropic imaging of the head and neck region and improves the assessment of tumor spread and lymph node metastases in arbitrary oblique planes. Thin structures (the base of the skull, the orbital floor, the hard palate) as well as the floor of the mouth can be evaluated sufficiently with multiplanar reformations. Usually, additional coronal scanning is not necessary with multislice-spiral-CT. Multislice-spiral-CT is especially advantageous in defining the critical relationships of tumor and lymph node metastases and for functional imaging of the hypopharynx and larynx not only in the

  16. Development and practice for a PACS-based interactive teaching model for CT image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Junzhang; Jiang Guihua; Zheng Liyin; Wang Ling; Wenhua; Liang Lianbao

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To explore the interactive teaching model for CT imaging based on PACS, and provide the clinician and young radiologist with continued medical education. Methods: 100 M trunk net was adopted in PACS and 10 M was exchanged on desktop. Teaching model was installed in browse and diagnosis workstation. Teaching contents were classified according to region and managed according to branch model. Text data derived from authoritative textbooks, monograph, and periodicals. Imaging data derived from cases proved by pathology and clinic. The data were obtained through digital camera and scanner or from PACS. After edited and transformed into standard digital image through DICOM server, they were saved in HD of PACS image server with file form. Results: Teaching model for CT imaging provided kinds of cases of CT sign, clinic characteristics, pathology and distinguishing diagnosis. Normal section anatomy, typical image, and its notation could be browsed real time. Teaching model for CT imaging could provide reference to teaching, diagnosis and report. Conclusion: PACS-based teaching model for CT imaging could provide interactive teaching and scientific research tool and improve work quality and efficiency

  17. Search for Sphalerons in Proton-Proton Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, John

    2016-04-14

    In a recent paper, Tye and Wong (TW) have argued that sphaleron-induced transitions in high-energy proton-proton collisions should be enhanced compared to previous calculations, based on a construction of a Bloch wave function in the periodic sphaleron potential and the corresponding pass band structure. Here we convolute the calculations of TW with parton distribution functions and simulations of final states to explore the signatures of sphaleron transitions at the LHC and possible future colliders. We calculate the increase of sphaleron transition rates in proton-proton collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 13/14/33/100 TeV for different sphaleron barrier heights, while recognising that the rates have large overall uncertainties. We use a simulation to show that LHC searches for microscopic black holes should have good efficiency for detecting sphaleron-induced final states, and discuss their experimental signatures and observability in Run 2 of the LHC and beyond. We recast the early ATLAS Run-2 search...

  18. Dosimetric evaluation of a novel polymer gel dosimeter for proton therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeidan, O. A.; Sriprisan, S. I.; Lopatiuk-Tirpak, O.; Kupelian, P. A.; Meeks, S. L.; Hsi, W. C.; Li, Z.; Palta, J. R.; Maryanski, M. J. [M. D. Anderson Cancer Center Orlando, Orlando, Florida 32806 (United States); University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, Florida 32206 (United States); MGS Research, Inc., Madison, Connecticut 06443 (United States)

    2010-05-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to evaluate the dosimetric performance of a newly developed proton-sensitive polymer gel formulation for proton therapy dosimetry. Methods: Using passive scattered modulated and nonmodulated proton beams, the dose response of the gel was assessed. A next-generation optical CT scanner is used as the readout mechanism of the radiation-induced absorbance in the gel medium. Comparison of relative dose profiles in the gel to ion chamber profiles in water is performed. A simple and easily reproducible calibration protocol is established for routine gel batch calibrations. Relative stopping power ratio measurement of the gel medium was performed to ensure accurate water-equivalent depth dose scaling. Measured dose distributions in the gel were compared to treatment planning system for benchmark irradiations and quality of agreement is assessed using clinically relevant gamma index criteria. Results: The dosimetric response of the gel was mapped up to 600 cGy using an electron-based calibration technique. Excellent dosimetric agreement is observed between ion chamber data and gel. The most notable result of this work is the fact that this gel has no observed dose quenching in the Bragg peak region. Quantitative dose distribution comparisons to treatment planning system calculations show that most (>97%) of the gel dose maps pass the 3%/3 mm gamma criterion. Conclusions: This study shows that the new proton-sensitive gel dosimeter is capable of reproducing ion chamber dose data for modulated and nonmodulated Bragg peak beams with different clinical beam energies. The findings suggest that the gel dosimeter can be used as QA tool for millimeter range verification of proton beam deliveries in the dosimeter medium.

  19. Dosimetric evaluation of a novel polymer gel dosimeter for proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeidan, O. A.; Sriprisan, S. I.; Lopatiuk-Tirpak, O.; Kupelian, P. A.; Meeks, S. L.; Hsi, W. C.; Li, Z.; Palta, J. R.; Maryanski, M. J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to evaluate the dosimetric performance of a newly developed proton-sensitive polymer gel formulation for proton therapy dosimetry. Methods: Using passive scattered modulated and nonmodulated proton beams, the dose response of the gel was assessed. A next-generation optical CT scanner is used as the readout mechanism of the radiation-induced absorbance in the gel medium. Comparison of relative dose profiles in the gel to ion chamber profiles in water is performed. A simple and easily reproducible calibration protocol is established for routine gel batch calibrations. Relative stopping power ratio measurement of the gel medium was performed to ensure accurate water-equivalent depth dose scaling. Measured dose distributions in the gel were compared to treatment planning system for benchmark irradiations and quality of agreement is assessed using clinically relevant gamma index criteria. Results: The dosimetric response of the gel was mapped up to 600 cGy using an electron-based calibration technique. Excellent dosimetric agreement is observed between ion chamber data and gel. The most notable result of this work is the fact that this gel has no observed dose quenching in the Bragg peak region. Quantitative dose distribution comparisons to treatment planning system calculations show that most (>97%) of the gel dose maps pass the 3%/3 mm gamma criterion. Conclusions: This study shows that the new proton-sensitive gel dosimeter is capable of reproducing ion chamber dose data for modulated and nonmodulated Bragg peak beams with different clinical beam energies. The findings suggest that the gel dosimeter can be used as QA tool for millimeter range verification of proton beam deliveries in the dosimeter medium.

  20. Design and implementation of a web-based PET-CT reporting assessment and e-portfolio tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subesinghe, M.; Goldstone, A.R.; Patel, C.N.; Chowdhury, F.U.; Scarsbrook, A.F.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We describe a simple internet-based reporting tool to enhance PET-CT training. • Automatically created competency based metrics are valuable in monitoring progress. • This tool provides robust evidence of competency in PET-CT reporting

  1. Generating patient specific pseudo-CT of the head from MR using atlas-based regression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sjölund, J; Forsberg, D; Andersson, M; Knutsson, H

    2015-01-01

    Radiotherapy planning and attenuation correction of PET images require simulation of radiation transport. The necessary physical properties are typically derived from computed tomography (CT) images, but in some cases, including stereotactic neurosurgery and combined PET/MR imaging, only magnetic resonance (MR) images are available. With these applications in mind, we describe how a realistic, patient-specific, pseudo-CT of the head can be derived from anatomical MR images. We refer to the method as atlas-based regression, because of its similarity to atlas-based segmentation. Given a target MR and an atlas database comprising MR and CT pairs, atlas-based regression works by registering each atlas MR to the target MR, applying the resulting displacement fields to the corresponding atlas CTs and, finally, fusing the deformed atlas CTs into a single pseudo-CT. We use a deformable registration algorithm known as the Morphon and augment it with a certainty mask that allows a tailoring of the influence certain regions are allowed to have on the registration. Moreover, we propose a novel method of fusion, wherein the collection of deformed CTs is iteratively registered to their joint mean and find that the resulting mean CT becomes more similar to the target CT. However, the voxelwise median provided even better results; at least as good as earlier work that required special MR imaging techniques. This makes atlas-based regression a good candidate for clinical use. (paper)

  2. SU-E-T-610: Phosphor-Based Fiber Optic Probes for Proton Beam Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darafsheh, A; Soldner, A; Liu, H; Kassaee, A; Zhu, T; Finlay, J [Univ Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate feasibility of using fiber optics probes with rare-earth-based phosphor tips for proton beam radiation dosimetry. We designed and fabricated a fiber probe with submillimeter resolution (<0.5 mm3) based on TbF3 phosphors and evaluated its performance for measurement of proton beam including profiles and range. Methods: The fiber optic probe with TbF3 phosphor tip, embedded in tissue-mimicking phantoms was irradiated with double scattering proton beam with energy of 180 MeV. Luminescence spectroscopy was performed by a CCD-coupled spectrograph to analyze the emission spectra of the fiber tip. In order to measure the spatial beam profile and percentage depth dose, we used singular value decomposition method to spectrally separate the phosphors ionoluminescence signal from the background Cerenkov radiation signal. Results: The spectra of the TbF3 fiber probe showed characteristic ionoluminescence emission peaks at 489, 542, 586, and 620 nm. By using singular value decomposition we found the contribution of the ionoluminescence signal to measure the percentage depth dose in phantoms and compared that with measurements performed with ion chamber. We observed quenching effect at the spread out Bragg peak region, manifested as under-responding of the signal, due to the high LET of the beam. However, the beam profiles were not dramatically affected by the quenching effect. Conclusion: We have evaluated the performance of a fiber optic probe with submillimeter resolution for proton beam dosimetry. We demonstrated feasibility of spectral separation of the Cerenkov radiation from the collected signal. Such fiber probes can be used for measurements of proton beams profile and range. The experimental apparatus and spectroscopy method developed in this work provide a robust platform for characterization of proton-irradiated nanophosphor particles for ultralow fluence photodynamic therapy or molecular imaging applications.

  3. Renal versus splenic maximum slope based perfusion CT modelling in patients with portal-hypertension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Michael A. [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Karolinska Institutet, Division of Medical Imaging and Technology, Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology (CLINTEC), Stockholm (Sweden); Brehmer, Katharina [Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Department of Radiology, Stockholm (Sweden); Svensson, Anders; Aspelin, Peter; Brismar, Torkel B. [Karolinska Institutet, Division of Medical Imaging and Technology, Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology (CLINTEC), Stockholm (Sweden); Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Department of Radiology, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2016-11-15

    To assess liver perfusion-CT (P-CT) parameters derived from peak-splenic (PSE) versus peak-renal enhancement (PRE) maximum slope-based modelling in different levels of portal-venous hypertension (PVH). Twenty-four patients (16 men; mean age 68 ± 10 years) who underwent dynamic P-CT for detection of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) were retrospectively divided into three groups: (1) without PVH (n = 8), (2) with PVH (n = 8), (3) with PVH and thrombosis (n = 8). Time to PSE and PRE and arterial liver perfusion (ALP), portal-venous liver perfusion (PLP) and hepatic perfusion-index (HPI) of the liver and HCC derived from PSE- versus PRE-based modelling were compared between the groups. Time to PSE was significantly longer in PVH groups 2 and 3 (P = 0.02), whereas PRE was similar in groups 1, 2 and 3 (P > 0.05). In group 1, liver and HCC perfusion parameters were similar for PSE- and PRE-based modelling (all P > 0.05), whereas significant differences were seen for PLP and HPI (liver only) in group 2 and ALP in group 3 (all P < 0.05). PSE is delayed in patients with PVH, resulting in a miscalculation of PSE-based P-CT parameters. Maximum slope-based P-CT might be improved by replacing PSE with PRE-modelling, whereas the difference between PSE and PRE might serve as a non-invasive biomarker of PVH. (orig.)

  4. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy and single photon emission CT in patients with olivopontocerebellar atrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikuta, Naomi

    1998-01-01

    Using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( 1 H-MRS) and single photon emission CT (SPECT), the cerebellum of patients with olivopontocerebellar atrophy (OPCA) and of age-matched control subjects was studied. A spectrum was collected from a 27 cm 3 (3 x 3 x 3 cm) voxel in the cerebellum containing white and gray matters in order to measure the distribution and relative signal intensities of N-acetylaspartate (NAA), creatine (Cre) and choline (Cho). In the cerebellum of the patients with OPCA, mean NAA/Cre ratios for OPCA patients were significantly decreased compared with normal control subjects (OPCA, 1.01±0.247; controls, 1.526±0.144: p<0.001). Mean NAA/Cho ratios for OPCA patients were slightly decreased (OPCA, 1.285±0.228; controls 1.702±0.469: p<0.06). Cho/Cre ratios valued in the cerebellum of OPCA patients were not significantly different from those in normal controls (OPCA, 0.793±0.186; controls, 0.946±0.219). The ratio of RI count in the cerebellum to that in the occipital lobe was significantly decreased in OPCA patients (OPCA, 0.947±0.096; controls, 1.06±0.063: p<0.01). Cerebellar signs were assessed including gait ataxia, limb ataxia, dysarthria, saccadic pursuit, and nystagmus separately or in combination. In patients with more severe ataxic gait and dysarthria, MRS revealed slightly lowered NAA/Cre ratio. There was no significant correlation between NAA/Cre ratio and severity of other clinical signs. The MRS and SPECT findings give a confirmative evidence of hypofunction in cerebellum of patients with OPCA. (author)

  5. MRI-based treatment planning with pseudo CT generated through atlas registration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uh, Jinsoo; Merchant, Thomas E.; Hua, Chiaho; Li, Yimei; Li, Xingyu

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility and accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based treatment planning using pseudo CTs generated through atlas registration. Methods: A pseudo CT, providing electron density information for dose calculation, was generated by deforming atlas CT images previously acquired on other patients. The authors tested 4 schemes of synthesizing a pseudo CT from single or multiple deformed atlas images: use of a single arbitrarily selected atlas, arithmetic mean process using 6 atlases, and pattern recognition with Gaussian process (PRGP) using 6 or 12 atlases. The required deformation for atlas CT images was derived from a nonlinear registration of conjugated atlas MR images to that of the patient of interest. The contrasts of atlas MR images were adjusted by histogram matching to reduce the effect of different sets of acquisition parameters. For comparison, the authors also tested a simple scheme assigning the Hounsfield unit of water to the entire patient volume. All pseudo CT generating schemes were applied to 14 patients with common pediatric brain tumors. The image similarity of real patient-specific CT and pseudo CTs constructed by different schemes was compared. Differences in computation times were also calculated. The real CT in the treatment planning system was replaced with the pseudo CT, and the dose distribution was recalculated to determine the difference. Results: The atlas approach generally performed better than assigning a bulk CT number to the entire patient volume. Comparing atlas-based schemes, those using multiple atlases outperformed the single atlas scheme. For multiple atlas schemes, the pseudo CTs were similar to the real CTs (correlation coefficient, 0.787–0.819). The calculated dose distribution was in close agreement with the original dose. Nearly the entire patient volume (98.3%–98.7%) satisfied the criteria of chi-evaluation (<2% maximum dose and 2 mm range). The dose to 95% of the volume and the

  6. MRI-based treatment planning with pseudo CT generated through atlas registration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uh, Jinsoo, E-mail: jinsoo.uh@stjude.org; Merchant, Thomas E.; Hua, Chiaho [Department of Radiological Sciences, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee 38105 (United States); Li, Yimei; Li, Xingyu [Department of Biostatistics, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee 38105 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility and accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based treatment planning using pseudo CTs generated through atlas registration. Methods: A pseudo CT, providing electron density information for dose calculation, was generated by deforming atlas CT images previously acquired on other patients. The authors tested 4 schemes of synthesizing a pseudo CT from single or multiple deformed atlas images: use of a single arbitrarily selected atlas, arithmetic mean process using 6 atlases, and pattern recognition with Gaussian process (PRGP) using 6 or 12 atlases. The required deformation for atlas CT images was derived from a nonlinear registration of conjugated atlas MR images to that of the patient of interest. The contrasts of atlas MR images were adjusted by histogram matching to reduce the effect of different sets of acquisition parameters. For comparison, the authors also tested a simple scheme assigning the Hounsfield unit of water to the entire patient volume. All pseudo CT generating schemes were applied to 14 patients with common pediatric brain tumors. The image similarity of real patient-specific CT and pseudo CTs constructed by different schemes was compared. Differences in computation times were also calculated. The real CT in the treatment planning system was replaced with the pseudo CT, and the dose distribution was recalculated to determine the difference. Results: The atlas approach generally performed better than assigning a bulk CT number to the entire patient volume. Comparing atlas-based schemes, those using multiple atlases outperformed the single atlas scheme. For multiple atlas schemes, the pseudo CTs were similar to the real CTs (correlation coefficient, 0.787–0.819). The calculated dose distribution was in close agreement with the original dose. Nearly the entire patient volume (98.3%–98.7%) satisfied the criteria of chi-evaluation (<2% maximum dose and 2 mm range). The dose to 95% of the volume and the

  7. A research plan based on high intensity proton accelerator Neutron Science Research Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizumoto, Motoharu

    1997-01-01

    A plan called Neutron Science Research Center (NSRC) has been proposed in JAERI. The center is a complex composed of research facilities based on a proton linac with an energy of 1.5GeV and an average current of 10mA. The research facilities will consist of Thermal/Cold Neutron Facility, Neutron Irradiation Facility, Neutron Physics Facility, OMEGA/Nuclear Energy Facility, Spallation RI Beam Facility, Meson/Muon Facility and Medium Energy Experiment Facility, where high intensity proton beam and secondary particle beams such as neutron, pion, muon and unstable radio isotope (RI) beams generated from the proton beam will be utilized for innovative researches in the fields on nuclear engineering and basic sciences. (author)

  8. A research plan based on high intensity proton accelerator Neutron Science Research Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizumoto, Motoharu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-03-01

    A plan called Neutron Science Research Center (NSRC) has been proposed in JAERI. The center is a complex composed of research facilities based on a proton linac with an energy of 1.5GeV and an average current of 10mA. The research facilities will consist of Thermal/Cold Neutron Facility, Neutron Irradiation Facility, Neutron Physics Facility, OMEGA/Nuclear Energy Facility, Spallation RI Beam Facility, Meson/Muon Facility and Medium Energy Experiment Facility, where high intensity proton beam and secondary particle beams such as neutron, pion, muon and unstable radio isotope (RI) beams generated from the proton beam will be utilized for innovative researches in the fields on nuclear engineering and basic sciences. (author)

  9. Reducing 4D CT artifacts using optimized sorting based on anatomic similarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Eric; Diehn, Maximilian; Murphy, James D; Loo, Billy W; Maxim, Peter G

    2011-05-01

    Four-dimensional (4D) computed tomography (CT) has been widely used as a tool to characterize respiratory motion in radiotherapy. The two most commonly used 4D CT algorithms sort images by the associated respiratory phase or displacement into a predefined number of bins, and are prone to image artifacts at transitions between bed positions. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate a method of reducing motion artifacts in 4D CT by incorporating anatomic similarity into phase or displacement based sorting protocols. Ten patient datasets were retrospectively sorted using both the displacement and phase based sorting algorithms. Conventional sorting methods allow selection of only the nearest-neighbor image in time or displacement within each bin. In our method, for each bed position either the displacement or the phase defines the center of a bin range about which several candidate images are selected. The two dimensional correlation coefficients between slices bordering the interface between adjacent couch positions are then calculated for all candidate pairings. Two slices have a high correlation if they are anatomically similar. Candidates from each bin are then selected to maximize the slice correlation over the entire data set using the Dijkstra's shortest path algorithm. To assess the reduction of artifacts, two thoracic radiation oncologists independently compared the resorted 4D datasets pairwise with conventionally sorted datasets, blinded to the sorting method, to choose which had the least motion artifacts. Agreement between reviewers was evaluated using the weighted kappa score. Anatomically based image selection resulted in 4D CT datasets with significantly reduced motion artifacts with both displacement (P = 0.0063) and phase sorting (P = 0.00022). There was good agreement between the two reviewers, with complete agreement 34 times and complete disagreement 6 times. Optimized sorting using anatomic similarity significantly reduces 4D CT motion

  10. MO-FG-CAMPUS-TeP3-01: A Model of Baseline Shift to Improve Robustness of Proton Therapy Treatments of Moving Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souris, K; Barragan Montero, A; Di Perri, D; Geets, X; Lee, J [Universite catholique de Louvain, Brussels (Belgium); Sterpin, E [Universite catholique de Louvain, Brussels (Belgium); KU Leuven, Leuven (Belgium)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The shift in mean position of a moving tumor also known as “baseline shift”, has been modeled, in order to automatically generate uncertainty scenarios for the assessment and robust optimization of proton therapy treatments in lung cancer. Methods: An average CT scan and a Mid-Position CT scan (MidPCT) of the patient at the planning time are first generated from a 4D-CT data. The mean position of the tumor along the breathing cycle is represented by the GTV contour in the MidPCT. Several studies reported both systematic and random variations of the mean tumor position from fraction to fraction. Our model can simulate this baseline shift by generating a local deformation field that moves the tumor on all phases of the 4D-CT, without creating any non-physical artifact. The deformation field is comprised of normal and tangential components with respect to the lung wall in order to allow the tumor to slip within the lung instead of deforming the lung surface. The deformation field is eventually smoothed in order to enforce its continuity. Two 4D-CT series acquired at 1 week of interval were used to validate the model. Results: Based on the first 4D-CT set, the model was able to generate a third 4D-CT that reproduced the 5.8 mm baseline-shift measured in the second 4D-CT. Water equivalent thickness (WET) of the voxels have been computed for the 3 average CTs. The root mean square deviation of the WET in the GTV is 0.34 mm between week 1 and week 2, and 0.08 mm between the simulated data and week 2. Conclusion: Our model can be used to automatically generate uncertainty scenarios for robustness analysis of a proton therapy plan. The generated scenarios can also feed a TPS equipped with a robust optimizer. Kevin Souris, Ana Barragan, and Dario Di Perri are financially supported by Televie Grants from F.R.S.-FNRS.

  11. SU-F-I-08: CT Image Ring Artifact Reduction Based On Prior Image

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, C; Qi, H; Chen, Z; Wu, S; Xu, Y; Zhou, L [Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: In computed tomography (CT) system, CT images with ring artifacts will be reconstructed when some adjacent bins of detector don’t work. The ring artifacts severely degrade CT image quality. We present a useful CT ring artifacts reduction based on projection data correction, aiming at estimating the missing data of projection data accurately, thus removing the ring artifacts of CT images. Methods: The method consists of ten steps: 1) Identification of abnormal pixel line in projection sinogram; 2) Linear interpolation within the pixel line of projection sinogram; 3) FBP reconstruction using interpolated projection data; 4) Filtering FBP image using mean filter; 5) Forwarding projection of filtered FBP image; 6) Subtraction forwarded projection from original projection; 7) Linear interpolation of abnormal pixel line area in the subtraction projection; 8) Adding the interpolated subtraction projection on the forwarded projection; 9) FBP reconstruction using corrected projection data; 10) Return to step 4 until the pre-set iteration number is reached. The method is validated on simulated and real data to restore missing projection data and reconstruct ring artifact-free CT images. Results: We have studied impact of amount of dead bins of CT detector on the accuracy of missing data estimation in projection sinogram. For the simulated case with a resolution of 256 by 256 Shepp-Logan phantom, three iterations are sufficient to restore projection data and reconstruct ring artifact-free images when the dead bins rating is under 30%. The dead-bin-induced artifacts are substantially reduced. More iteration number is needed to reconstruct satisfactory images while the rating of dead bins increases. Similar results were found for a real head phantom case. Conclusion: A practical CT image ring artifact correction scheme based on projection data is developed. This method can produce ring artifact-free CT images feasibly and effectively.

  12. SU-F-I-08: CT Image Ring Artifact Reduction Based On Prior Image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, C; Qi, H; Chen, Z; Wu, S; Xu, Y; Zhou, L

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: In computed tomography (CT) system, CT images with ring artifacts will be reconstructed when some adjacent bins of detector don’t work. The ring artifacts severely degrade CT image quality. We present a useful CT ring artifacts reduction based on projection data correction, aiming at estimating the missing data of projection data accurately, thus removing the ring artifacts of CT images. Methods: The method consists of ten steps: 1) Identification of abnormal pixel line in projection sinogram; 2) Linear interpolation within the pixel line of projection sinogram; 3) FBP reconstruction using interpolated projection data; 4) Filtering FBP image using mean filter; 5) Forwarding projection of filtered FBP image; 6) Subtraction forwarded projection from original projection; 7) Linear interpolation of abnormal pixel line area in the subtraction projection; 8) Adding the interpolated subtraction projection on the forwarded projection; 9) FBP reconstruction using corrected projection data; 10) Return to step 4 until the pre-set iteration number is reached. The method is validated on simulated and real data to restore missing projection data and reconstruct ring artifact-free CT images. Results: We have studied impact of amount of dead bins of CT detector on the accuracy of missing data estimation in projection sinogram. For the simulated case with a resolution of 256 by 256 Shepp-Logan phantom, three iterations are sufficient to restore projection data and reconstruct ring artifact-free images when the dead bins rating is under 30%. The dead-bin-induced artifacts are substantially reduced. More iteration number is needed to reconstruct satisfactory images while the rating of dead bins increases. Similar results were found for a real head phantom case. Conclusion: A practical CT image ring artifact correction scheme based on projection data is developed. This method can produce ring artifact-free CT images feasibly and effectively.

  13. A three-dimensional CT-based target definition for elective irradiation of the neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowak, Peter J.C.M.; Wijers, Oda B.; Lagerwaard, Frank J.; Levendag, Peter C.

    1999-01-01

    Introduction: Elective treatment of the clinically node-negative neck by radiation results in excellent control rates. However, radiation therapy with its organ-preserving properties is not without morbidity. Side effects of elective neck irradiation are mainly due to damage of the major and minor salivary glands, resulting in the dry mouth syndrome. Given that RT is the preferred treatment modality in case of elective treatment of the neck in many institutions, it is of utmost importance to try and reduce the associated sequelae of RT. Material and Methods: With the introduction of CT-planning systems and the development of 3D conformal radiation therapy (3D CRT) techniques, it has become feasible to deliver adequate doses of radiation to the target (neck) and at the same time saving (parts of) the salivary glands from doses beyond tolerance. A prerequisite for these techniques is that they require a precise knowledge of the target (i.e., of the elective neck) on CT. To be able to correlate borders of the surgical levels in the neck (I-VI) with structures seen on CT, an anatomical study, using two fixed (phenol, formaldehyde) human cadavers, was performed. Subsequently, the 6 potential lymph node regions in the neck on CT were defined. Results and Discussion: The reference for the current 3D CT-based definition of the lymph node regions in the neck is the official report of the American Academy of Otolaryngology, describing, based on surgical anatomy, the lymph node groups in the neck by Levels I-VI. The present investigation depicts reproducible landmarks on transversal CT images, corresponding to anatomical reference structures known from surgical levels (I-VI) and, this way, CT-based lymph node regions (1-6) were constructed

  14. TH-CD-206-09: Learning-Based MRI-CT Prostate Registration Using Spare Patch-Deformation Dictionary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, X; Jani, A; Rossi, P; Mao, H; Curran, W; Liu, T

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To enable MRI-guided prostate radiotherapy, MRI-CT deformable registration is required to map the MRI-defined tumor and key organ contours onto the CT images. Due to the intrinsic differences in grey-level intensity characteristics between MRI and CT images, the integration of MRI into CT-based radiotherapy is very challenging. We are developing a learning-based registration approach to address this technical challenge. Methods: We propose to estimate the deformation between MRI and CT images in a patch-wise fashion by using the sparse representation technique. Specifically, we assume that two image patches should follow the same deformation if their patch-wise appearance patterns are similar. We first extract a set of key points in the new CT image. Then, for each key point, we adaptively construct a coupled dictionary from the training MRI-CT images, where each coupled element includes both appearance and deformation of the same image patch. After calculating the sparse coefficients in representing the patch appearance of each key point based on the constructed dictionary, we can predict the deformation for this point by applying the same sparse coefficients to the respective deformations in the dictionary. Results: This registration technique was validated with 10 prostate-cancer patients’ data and its performance was compared with the commonly used free-form-deformation-based registration. Several landmarks in both images were identified to evaluate the accuracy of our approach. Overall, the averaged target registration error of the intensity-based registration and the proposed method was 3.8±0.4 mm and 1.9±0.3 mm, respectively. Conclusion: We have developed a novel prostate MR-CT registration approach based on patch-deformation dictionary, demonstrated its clinical feasibility, and validated its accuracy. This technique will either reduce or compensate for the effect of patient-specific treatment variation measured during the course of

  15. TH-CD-206-09: Learning-Based MRI-CT Prostate Registration Using Spare Patch-Deformation Dictionary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, X; Jani, A; Rossi, P; Mao, H; Curran, W; Liu, T [Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To enable MRI-guided prostate radiotherapy, MRI-CT deformable registration is required to map the MRI-defined tumor and key organ contours onto the CT images. Due to the intrinsic differences in grey-level intensity characteristics between MRI and CT images, the integration of MRI into CT-based radiotherapy is very challenging. We are developing a learning-based registration approach to address this technical challenge. Methods: We propose to estimate the deformation between MRI and CT images in a patch-wise fashion by using the sparse representation technique. Specifically, we assume that two image patches should follow the same deformation if their patch-wise appearance patterns are similar. We first extract a set of key points in the new CT image. Then, for each key point, we adaptively construct a coupled dictionary from the training MRI-CT images, where each coupled element includes both appearance and deformation of the same image patch. After calculating the sparse coefficients in representing the patch appearance of each key point based on the constructed dictionary, we can predict the deformation for this point by applying the same sparse coefficients to the respective deformations in the dictionary. Results: This registration technique was validated with 10 prostate-cancer patients’ data and its performance was compared with the commonly used free-form-deformation-based registration. Several landmarks in both images were identified to evaluate the accuracy of our approach. Overall, the averaged target registration error of the intensity-based registration and the proposed method was 3.8±0.4 mm and 1.9±0.3 mm, respectively. Conclusion: We have developed a novel prostate MR-CT registration approach based on patch-deformation dictionary, demonstrated its clinical feasibility, and validated its accuracy. This technique will either reduce or compensate for the effect of patient-specific treatment variation measured during the course of

  16. High intensity proton accelerator and its application (Proton Engineering Center)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Shun-ichi

    1995-01-01

    A plan called PROTON ENGINEERING CENTER has been proposed in JAERI. The center is a complex composed of research facilities and a beam shape and storage ring based on a proton linac with an energy of 1.5 GeV and an average current of 10 mA. The research facilities planned are OMEGA·Nuclear Energy Development Facility, Neutron Facility for Material Irradiation, Nuclear Data Experiment Facility, Neutron Factory, Meson Factory, Spallation Radioisotope Beam Facility, and Medium Energy Experiment Facility, where high intensity proton beam and secondary particle beams such as neutrons, π-mesons, muons, and unstable isotopes originated from the protons are available for promoting the innovative research of nuclear energy and basic science and technology. (author)

  17. Photoresponse of the protonated Schiff-base retinal chromophore in the gas phase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toker, Jonathan; Rahbek, Dennis Bo; Kiefer, H V

    2013-01-01

    The fragmentation, initiated by photoexcitation as well as collisionally-induced excitation, of several retinal chromophores was studied in the gas phase. The chromophore in the protonated Schiff-base form (RPSB), essential for mammalian vision, shows a remarkably selective photoresponse. The sel......The fragmentation, initiated by photoexcitation as well as collisionally-induced excitation, of several retinal chromophores was studied in the gas phase. The chromophore in the protonated Schiff-base form (RPSB), essential for mammalian vision, shows a remarkably selective photoresponse...... modifications of the chromophore. We propose that isomerizations play an important role in the photoresponse of gas-phase retinal chromophores and guide internal conversion through conical intersections. The role of protein interactions is then to control the specificity of the photoisomerization in the primary...

  18. Techniques for virtual lung nodule insertion: volumetric and morphometric comparison of projection-based and image-based methods for quantitative CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robins, Marthony; Solomon, Justin; Sahbaee, Pooyan; Sedlmair, Martin; Choudhury, Kingshuk Roy; Pezeshk, Aria; Sahiner, Berkman; Samei, Ehsan

    2017-09-01

    Virtual nodule insertion paves the way towards the development of standardized databases of hybrid CT images with known lesions. The purpose of this study was to assess three methods (an established and two newly developed techniques) for inserting virtual lung nodules into CT images. Assessment was done by comparing virtual nodule volume and shape to the CT-derived volume and shape of synthetic nodules. 24 synthetic nodules (three sizes, four morphologies, two repeats) were physically inserted into the lung cavity of an anthropomorphic chest phantom (KYOTO KAGAKU). The phantom was imaged with and without nodules on a commercial CT scanner (SOMATOM Definition Flash, Siemens) using a standard thoracic CT protocol at two dose levels (1.4 and 22 mGy CTDIvol). Raw projection data were saved and reconstructed with filtered back-projection and sinogram affirmed iterative reconstruction (SAFIRE, strength 5) at 0.6 mm slice thickness. Corresponding 3D idealized, virtual nodule models were co-registered with the CT images to determine each nodule’s location and orientation. Virtual nodules were voxelized, partial volume corrected, and inserted into nodule-free CT data (accounting for system imaging physics) using two methods: projection-based Technique A, and image-based Technique B. Also a third Technique C based on cropping a region of interest from the acquired image of the real nodule and blending it into the nodule-free image was tested. Nodule volumes were measured using a commercial segmentation tool (iNtuition, TeraRecon, Inc.) and deformation was assessed using the Hausdorff distance. Nodule volumes and deformations were compared between the idealized, CT-derived and virtual nodules using a linear mixed effects regression model which utilized the mean, standard deviation, and coefficient of variation (Mea{{n}RHD} , ST{{D}RHD} and C{{V}RHD}{) }~ of the regional Hausdorff distance. Overall, there was a close concordance between the volumes of the CT-derived and

  19. First Extraction of Transversity from a Global Analysis of Electron-Proton and Proton-Proton Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radici, Marco; Bacchetta, Alessandro

    2018-05-01

    We present the first extraction of the transversity distribution in the framework of collinear factorization based on the global analysis of pion-pair production in deep-inelastic scattering and in proton-proton collisions with a transversely polarized proton. The extraction relies on the knowledge of dihadron fragmentation functions, which are taken from the analysis of electron-positron annihilation data. For the first time, the transversity is extracted from a global analysis similar to what is usually done for the spin-averaged and helicity distributions. The knowledge of transversity is important for, among other things, detecting possible signals of new physics in high-precision low-energy experiments.

  20. Proton beam characterization by proton-induced acoustic emission: simulation studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, K C; Witztum, A; Avery, S; Sehgal, C M

    2014-01-01

    Due to their Bragg peak, proton beams are capable of delivering a targeted dose of radiation to a narrow volume, but range uncertainties currently limit their accuracy. One promising beam characterization technique, protoacoustic range verification, measures the acoustic emission generated by the proton beam. We simulated the pressure waves generated by proton radiation passing through water. We observed that the proton-induced acoustic signal consists of two peaks, labeled α and γ, with two originating sources. The α acoustic peak is generated by the pre-Bragg peak heated region whereas the source of the γ acoustic peak is the proton Bragg peak. The arrival time of the α and γ peaks at a transducer reveals the distance from the beam propagation axis and Bragg peak center, respectively. The maximum pressure is not observed directly above the Bragg peak due to interference of the acoustic signals. Range verification based on the arrival times is shown to be more effective than determining the Bragg peak position based on pressure amplitudes. The temporal width of the α and γ peaks are linearly proportional to the beam diameter and Bragg peak width, respectively. The temporal separation between compression and rarefaction peaks is proportional to the spill time width. The pressure wave expected from a spread out Bragg peak dose is characterized. The simulations also show that acoustic monitoring can verify the proton beam dose distribution and range by characterizing the Bragg peak position to within ∼1 mm. (paper)

  1. Radiation exposure during transmission measurements: comparison between CT- and germanium-based techniques with a current PET scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Tung-Hsin; Huang, Yung-Hui; Lee, Jason J.S.; Wang, Shih-Yuan; Wang, Su-Cheng; Su, Cheng-Tau; Chen, Liang-Kung; Chu, Tieh-Chi

    2004-01-01

    In positron emission tomographic (PET) scanning, transmission measurements for attenuation correction are commonly performed by using external germanium-68 rod sources. Recently, combined PET and computed tomographic (CT) scanners have been developed in which the CT data can be used for both anatomical-metabolic image formation and attenuation correction of the PET data. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the difference between germanium- and CT-based transmission scanning in terms of their radiation doses by using the same measurement technique and to compare the doses that patients receive during brain, cardiac and whole-body scans. Measurement of absorbed doses to organs was conducted by using a Rando Alderson phantom with thermoluminescent dosimeters. Effective doses were calculated according to the guidelines in the International Commission on Radiation Protection Publication Number 60. Compared with radionuclide doses used in routine 2-[fluorine-18]-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose PET imaging, doses absorbed during germanium-based transmission scans were almost negligible. On the other hand, absorbed doses from CT-based transmission scans were significantly higher, particularly with a whole-body scanning protocol. Effective doses were 8.81 mSv in the high-speed mode and 18.97 mSv in the high-quality mode for whole-body CT-based transmission scans. These measurements revealed that the doses received by a patient during CT-based transmission scanning are more than those received in a typical PET examination. Therefore, the radiation doses represent a limitation to the generalised use of CT-based transmission measurements with current PET/CT scanner systems. (orig.)

  2. Robustness of the Voluntary Breath-Hold Approach for the Treatment of Peripheral Lung Tumors Using Hypofractionated Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dueck, Jenny, E-mail: jenny.dueck@psi.ch [Section of Radiotherapy, Department of Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Center for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Knopf, Antje-Christin [Joint Department of Physics at the Institute of Cancer Research and the Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Lomax, Antony [Center for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Department of Physics, ETH Zürich, Zürich (Switzerland); Albertini, Francesca [Center for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Persson, Gitte F. [Department of Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Josipovic, Mirjana [Section of Radiotherapy, Department of Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Aznar, Marianne [Section of Radiotherapy, Department of Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Weber, Damien C. [Center for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen PSI (Switzerland); University of Zürich, Zürich (Switzerland); Munck af Rosenschöld, Per [Section of Radiotherapy, Department of Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: The safe clinical implementation of pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy for lung tumors is complicated by the delivery uncertainties caused by breathing motion. The purpose of this feasibility study was to investigate whether a voluntary breath-hold technique could limit the delivery uncertainties resulting from interfractional motion. Methods and Materials: Data from 15 patients with peripheral lung tumors previously treated with stereotactic radiation therapy were included in this study. The patients had 1 computed tomographic (CT) scan in voluntary breath-hold acquired before treatment and 3 scans during the treatment course. PBS proton treatment plans with 2 fields (2F) and 3 fields (3F), respectively, were calculated based on the planning CT scan and subsequently recalculated on the 3 repeated CT scans. Recalculated plans were considered robust if the V{sub 95%} (volume receiving ≥95% of the prescribed dose) of the gross target volume (GTV) was within 5% of what was expected from the planning CT data throughout the simulated treatment. Results: A total of 14/15 simulated treatments for both 2F and 3F met the robustness criteria. Reduced V{sub 95%} was associated with baseline shifts (2F, P=.056; 3F, P=.008) and tumor size (2F, P=.025; 3F, P=.025). Smaller tumors with large baseline shifts were also at risk for reduced V{sub 95%} (interaction term baseline/size: 2F, P=.005; 3F, P=.002). Conclusions: The breath-hold approach is a realistic clinical option for treating lung tumors with PBS proton therapy. Potential risk factors for reduced V{sub 95%} are small targets in combination with large baseline shifts. On the basis of these results, the baseline shift of the tumor should be monitored (eg, through image guided therapy), and appropriate measures should be taken accordingly. The intrafractional motion needs to be investigated to confirm that the breath-hold approach is robust.

  3. Robustness of the Voluntary Breath-Hold Approach for the Treatment of Peripheral Lung Tumors Using Hypofractionated Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dueck, Jenny; Knopf, Antje-Christin; Lomax, Antony; Albertini, Francesca; Persson, Gitte F.; Josipovic, Mirjana; Aznar, Marianne; Weber, Damien C.; Munck af Rosenschöld, Per

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The safe clinical implementation of pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy for lung tumors is complicated by the delivery uncertainties caused by breathing motion. The purpose of this feasibility study was to investigate whether a voluntary breath-hold technique could limit the delivery uncertainties resulting from interfractional motion. Methods and Materials: Data from 15 patients with peripheral lung tumors previously treated with stereotactic radiation therapy were included in this study. The patients had 1 computed tomographic (CT) scan in voluntary breath-hold acquired before treatment and 3 scans during the treatment course. PBS proton treatment plans with 2 fields (2F) and 3 fields (3F), respectively, were calculated based on the planning CT scan and subsequently recalculated on the 3 repeated CT scans. Recalculated plans were considered robust if the V 95% (volume receiving ≥95% of the prescribed dose) of the gross target volume (GTV) was within 5% of what was expected from the planning CT data throughout the simulated treatment. Results: A total of 14/15 simulated treatments for both 2F and 3F met the robustness criteria. Reduced V 95% was associated with baseline shifts (2F, P=.056; 3F, P=.008) and tumor size (2F, P=.025; 3F, P=.025). Smaller tumors with large baseline shifts were also at risk for reduced V 95% (interaction term baseline/size: 2F, P=.005; 3F, P=.002). Conclusions: The breath-hold approach is a realistic clinical option for treating lung tumors with PBS proton therapy. Potential risk factors for reduced V 95% are small targets in combination with large baseline shifts. On the basis of these results, the baseline shift of the tumor should be monitored (eg, through image guided therapy), and appropriate measures should be taken accordingly. The intrafractional motion needs to be investigated to confirm that the breath-hold approach is robust.

  4. MO-FG-CAMPUS-JeP1-05: Water Equivalent Path Length Calculations Using Scatter-Corrected Head and Neck CBCT Images to Evaluate Patients for Adaptive Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J; Park, Y; Sharp, G; Winey, B [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To establish a method to evaluate the dosimetric impact of anatomic changes in head and neck patients during proton therapy by using scatter-corrected cone-beam CT (CBCT) images. Methods: The water equivalent path length (WEPL) was calculated to the distal edge of PTV contours by using tomographic images available for six head and neck patients received photon therapy. The proton range variation was measured by calculating the difference between the distal WEPLs calculated with the planning CT and weekly treatment CBCT images. By performing an automatic rigid registration, six degrees-of-freedom (DOF) correction was made to the CBCT images to account for the patient setup uncertainty. For accurate WEPL calculations, an existing CBCT scatter correction algorithm, whose performance was already proven for phantom images, was calibrated for head and neck patient images. Specifically, two different image similarity measures, mutual information (MI) and mean square error (MSE), were tested for the deformable image registration (DIR) in the CBCT scatter correction algorithm. Results: The impact of weight loss was reflected in the distal WEPL differences with the aid of the automatic rigid registration reducing the influence of patient setup uncertainty on the WEPL calculation results. The WEPL difference averaged over distal area was 2.9 ± 2.9 (mm) across all fractions of six patients and its maximum, mostly found at the last available fraction, was 6.2 ± 3.4 (mm). The MSE-based DIR successfully registered each treatment CBCT image to the planning CT image. On the other hand, the MI-based DIR deformed the skin voxels in the planning CT image to the immobilization mask in the treatment CBCT image, most of which was cropped out of the planning CT image. Conclusion: The dosimetric impact of anatomic changes was evaluated by calculating the distal WEPL difference with the existing scatter-correction algorithm appropriately calibrated. Jihun Kim, Yang-Kyun Park

  5. Radiation sensors based on the generation of mobile protons in organic dielectrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapetanakis, Eleftherios; Douvas, Antonios M; Argitis, Panagiotis; Normand, Pascal

    2013-06-26

    A sensing scheme based on mobile protons generated by radiation, including ionizing radiation (IonR), in organic gate dielectrics is investigated for the development of metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS)-type dosimeters. Application of an electric field to the gate dielectric moves the protons and thereby alters the flat band voltage (VFB) of the MIS device. The shift in the VFB is proportional to the IonR-generated protons and, therefore, to the IonR total dose. Triphenylsulfonium nonaflate (TPSNF) photoacid generator (PAG)-containing poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) polymeric films was selected as radiation-sensitive gate dielectrics. The effects of UV (249 nm) and gamma (Co-60) irradiations on the high-frequency capacitance versus the gate voltage (C-VG) curves of the MIS devices were investigated for different total dose values. Systematic improvements in sensitivity can be accomplished by increasing the concentration of the TPSNF molecules embedded in the polymeric matrix.

  6. GPU-based fast pencil beam algorithm for proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimoto, Rintaro; Nagamine, Yoshihiko; Kurihara, Tsuneya

    2011-01-01

    Performance of a treatment planning system is an essential factor in making sophisticated plans. The dose calculation is a major time-consuming process in planning operations. The standard algorithm for proton dose calculations is the pencil beam algorithm which produces relatively accurate results, but is time consuming. In order to shorten the computational time, we have developed a GPU (graphics processing unit)-based pencil beam algorithm. We have implemented this algorithm and calculated dose distributions in the case of a water phantom. The results were compared to those obtained by a traditional method with respect to the computational time and discrepancy between the two methods. The new algorithm shows 5-20 times faster performance using the NVIDIA GeForce GTX 480 card in comparison with the Intel Core-i7 920 processor. The maximum discrepancy of the dose distribution is within 0.2%. Our results show that GPUs are effective for proton dose calculations.

  7. Proton-proton bremsstrahlung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fearing, H.W.

    1990-01-01

    We summarize some of the information about the nucleon-nucleon force which has been obtained by comparing recent calculations of proton-proton bremsstrahlung with cross section and analyzing power data from the new TRIUMF bremsstrahlung experiment. Some comments are made as to how these results can be extended to neutron-proton bremsstrahlung. (Author) 17 refs., 6 figs

  8. A Monte-Carlo study to assess the effect of 1.5 T magnetic fields on the overall robustness of pencil-beam scanning proton radiotherapy plans for prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurz, Christopher; Landry, Guillaume; Resch, Andreas F.; Dedes, George; Kamp, Florian; Ganswindt, Ute; Belka, Claus; Raaymakers, Bas W.; Parodi, Katia

    2017-11-01

    Combining magnetic-resonance imaging (MRI) and proton therapy (PT) using pencil-beam scanning (PBS) may improve image-guided radiotherapy. We aimed at assessing the impact of a magnetic field on PBS-PT plan quality and robustness. Specifically, the robustness against anatomical changes and positioning errors in an MRI-guided scenario with a 30 cm radius 1.5 T magnetic field was studied for prostate PT. Five prostate cancer patients with three consecutive CT images (CT1-3) were considered. Single-field uniform dose PBS-PT plans were generated on the segmented CT1 with Monte-Carlo-based treatment planning software for inverse optimization. Plans were optimized at 90° gantry angle without B-field (no B), with  ±1.5 T B-field (B and minus B), as well as at 81° gantry angle and  +1.5 T (B G81). Plans were re-calculated on aligned CT2 and CT3 to study the impact of anatomical changes. Dose distributions were compared in terms of changes in DVH parameters, proton range and gamma-index pass-rates. To assess the impact of positioning errors, DVH parameters were compared for  ±5 mm CT1 patient shifts in anterior-posterior (AP) and left-right (LR) direction. Proton beam deflection considerably reduced robustness against inter-fractional changes for the B scenario. Range agreement, gamma-index pass-rates and PTV V95% were significantly lower compared to no B. Improved robustness was obtained for minus B and B G81, the latter showing only minor differences to no B. The magnetic field introduced slight dosimetric changes under LR shifts. The impact of AP shifts was considerably larger, and equivalent for scenarios with and without B-field. Results suggest that robustness equivalent to PT without magnetic field can be achieved by adaptation of the treatment parameters, such as B-field orientation (minus B) with respect to the patient and/or gantry angle (B G81). MRI-guided PT for prostate cancer might thus be implemented without compromising robustness

  9. Accuracy of radiotherapy dose calculations based on cone-beam CT: comparison of deformable registration and image correction based methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchant, T. E.; Joshi, K. D.; Moore, C. J.

    2018-03-01

    Radiotherapy dose calculations based on cone-beam CT (CBCT) images can be inaccurate due to unreliable Hounsfield units (HU) in the CBCT. Deformable image registration of planning CT images to CBCT, and direct correction of CBCT image values are two methods proposed to allow heterogeneity corrected dose calculations based on CBCT. In this paper we compare the accuracy and robustness of these two approaches. CBCT images for 44 patients were used including pelvis, lung and head & neck sites. CBCT HU were corrected using a ‘shading correction’ algorithm and via deformable registration of planning CT to CBCT using either Elastix or Niftyreg. Radiotherapy dose distributions were re-calculated with heterogeneity correction based on the corrected CBCT and several relevant dose metrics for target and OAR volumes were calculated. Accuracy of CBCT based dose metrics was determined using an ‘override ratio’ method where the ratio of the dose metric to that calculated on a bulk-density assigned version of the same image is assumed to be constant for each patient, allowing comparison to the patient’s planning CT as a gold standard. Similar performance is achieved by shading corrected CBCT and both deformable registration algorithms, with mean and standard deviation of dose metric error less than 1% for all sites studied. For lung images, use of deformed CT leads to slightly larger standard deviation of dose metric error than shading corrected CBCT with more dose metric errors greater than 2% observed (7% versus 1%).

  10. Spectroscopy of Na-18: Bridging the two-proton radioactivity of Mg-19

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Assie, M.; de Oliveira Santos, F.; Achouri, L.; Angelique, J. C.; Borcea, C.; Borcea, R.; Caceres, L.; Chudoba, V.; Pang, D. Y.; Ducoin, D.; Fallot, M.; Kamalou, O.; Kiener, J.; Lam, Y.; Lefevre, A.; Lotay, G.; Mrázek, Jaromír; Perrot, L.; Sánchez, A.; Rotaru, F.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 712, č. 3 (2012), s. 198-202 ISSN 0370-2693 Grant - others:European Commission(XE) RII3-CT-2004-506065 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : two-proton radioactivity * resonant elastic scattering * (19)mg * Na-18 * Ne-17 Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 4.569, year: 2012

  11. Composite proton exchange membrane based on sulfonated organic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitia, Emmanuel Sokiri

    exchange was characterized with solid state 13C NMR spectroscopy, FTIR spectroscopy, TGA, elemental analysis, and titration. The results indicate the extent of ion exchange was ~ 70-80%. Due to the mass of QAA, the remaining QAA reduced the IEC of the nanoparticles to < 2.2 meq/g. In fabricating the composite membranes, the nanoparticles and polystyrene were solution cast in a continuous process with and without electric field. The electric field had no effect on the water uptake. Based on the morphology and the proton conductivity, it appears orientation of the nanoparticles did not occur. We hypothesize the lack of orientation was caused by swelling of the particles with the solvent. The solvent inside the particle minimized polarizability, and thus prevented orientation. The composite membranes were limited to low proton conductivity of ~ 10-5 S/cm due to low IEC of the nanoparticles, but good dispersion of the nanoparticles was achieved. Future work should look into eliminating the QAA during synthesis and developing a rigid core for the nanoparticles.

  12. Techniques and approaches to proton NMR imaging of the head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pykett, I.L.; Buonanno, F.S.; Brady, T.J.; Kistler, J.P.

    1983-01-01

    The next few years will undoubtedly see a refinement of proton imaging technology and a broader data base will indicate to what extent proton relaxation parameters are able to detect and characterize disease. In addition, it is likely that imaging of other nuclei (e.g. 31 P, 23 Na, 19 F) will become a reality, although it must be stated that due to their inherently lower sensitivity to NMR detection and/or lower physiological concentration, clinical images of nuclei other than 1 H will undoubtedly have a low spatial resolution and may require relatively long imaging times. Nonetheless, herein lies the exciting possibility of non-invasive metabolic or functional imaging. The realm of NMR contrast agents is just beginning to be explored, and developments in high-speed imaging indicate useful applications in cardiology. So whilst improvements in image quality can be expected, as was the case with X-ray CT, the application of NMR in medicine will diversify to yield information of a more specifically functional nature. This, together with the very low attendant biological risk, heralds a bright future for NMR in clinical diagnosis

  13. Prediction of CT Substitutes from MR Images Based on Local Diffeomorphic Mapping for Brain PET Attenuation Correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yao; Yang, Wei; Lu, Lijun; Lu, Zhentai; Zhong, Liming; Huang, Meiyan; Feng, Yanqiu; Feng, Qianjin; Chen, Wufan

    2016-10-01

    Attenuation correction is important for PET reconstruction. In PET/MR, MR intensities are not directly related to attenuation coefficients that are needed in PET imaging. The attenuation coefficient map can be derived from CT images. Therefore, prediction of CT substitutes from MR images is desired for attenuation correction in PET/MR. This study presents a patch-based method for CT prediction from MR images, generating attenuation maps for PET reconstruction. Because no global relation exists between MR and CT intensities, we propose local diffeomorphic mapping (LDM) for CT prediction. In LDM, we assume that MR and CT patches are located on 2 nonlinear manifolds, and the mapping from the MR manifold to the CT manifold approximates a diffeomorphism under a local constraint. Locality is important in LDM and is constrained by the following techniques. The first is local dictionary construction, wherein, for each patch in the testing MR image, a local search window is used to extract patches from training MR/CT pairs to construct MR and CT dictionaries. The k-nearest neighbors and an outlier detection strategy are then used to constrain the locality in MR and CT dictionaries. Second is local linear representation, wherein, local anchor embedding is used to solve MR dictionary coefficients when representing the MR testing sample. Under these local constraints, dictionary coefficients are linearly transferred from the MR manifold to the CT manifold and used to combine CT training samples to generate CT predictions. Our dataset contains 13 healthy subjects, each with T1- and T2-weighted MR and CT brain images. This method provides CT predictions with a mean absolute error of 110.1 Hounsfield units, Pearson linear correlation of 0.82, peak signal-to-noise ratio of 24.81 dB, and Dice in bone regions of 0.84 as compared with real CTs. CT substitute-based PET reconstruction has a regression slope of 1.0084 and R 2 of 0.9903 compared with real CT-based PET. In this method, no

  14. TU-AB-BRC-03: Accurate Tissue Characterization for Monte Carlo Dose Calculation Using Dual-and Multi-Energy CT Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lalonde, A; Bouchard, H [University of Montreal, Montreal, Qc (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a general method for human tissue characterization with dual-and multi-energy CT and evaluate its performance in determining elemental compositions and the associated proton stopping power relative to water (SPR) and photon mass absorption coefficients (EAC). Methods: Principal component analysis is used to extract an optimal basis of virtual materials from a reference dataset of tissues. These principal components (PC) are used to perform two-material decomposition using simulated DECT data. The elemental mass fraction and the electron density in each tissue is retrieved by measuring the fraction of each PC. A stoichiometric calibration method is adapted to the technique to make it suitable for clinical use. The present approach is compared with two others: parametrization and three-material decomposition using the water-lipid-protein (WLP) triplet. Results: Monte Carlo simulations using TOPAS for four reference tissues shows that characterizing them with only two PC is enough to get a submillimetric precision on proton range prediction. Based on the simulated DECT data of 43 references tissues, the proposed method is in agreement with theoretical values of protons SPR and low-kV EAC with a RMS error of 0.11% and 0.35%, respectively. In comparison, parametrization and WLP respectively yield RMS errors of 0.13% and 0.29% on SPR, and 2.72% and 2.19% on EAC. Furthermore, the proposed approach shows potential applications for spectral CT. Using five PC and five energy bins reduces the SPR RMS error to 0.03%. Conclusion: The proposed method shows good performance in determining elemental compositions from DECT data and physical quantities relevant to radiotherapy dose calculation and generally shows better accuracy and unbiased results compared to reference methods. The proposed method is particularly suitable for Monte Carlo calculations and shows promise in using more than two energies to characterize human tissue with CT.

  15. TU-AB-BRC-03: Accurate Tissue Characterization for Monte Carlo Dose Calculation Using Dual-and Multi-Energy CT Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lalonde, A; Bouchard, H

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a general method for human tissue characterization with dual-and multi-energy CT and evaluate its performance in determining elemental compositions and the associated proton stopping power relative to water (SPR) and photon mass absorption coefficients (EAC). Methods: Principal component analysis is used to extract an optimal basis of virtual materials from a reference dataset of tissues. These principal components (PC) are used to perform two-material decomposition using simulated DECT data. The elemental mass fraction and the electron density in each tissue is retrieved by measuring the fraction of each PC. A stoichiometric calibration method is adapted to the technique to make it suitable for clinical use. The present approach is compared with two others: parametrization and three-material decomposition using the water-lipid-protein (WLP) triplet. Results: Monte Carlo simulations using TOPAS for four reference tissues shows that characterizing them with only two PC is enough to get a submillimetric precision on proton range prediction. Based on the simulated DECT data of 43 references tissues, the proposed method is in agreement with theoretical values of protons SPR and low-kV EAC with a RMS error of 0.11% and 0.35%, respectively. In comparison, parametrization and WLP respectively yield RMS errors of 0.13% and 0.29% on SPR, and 2.72% and 2.19% on EAC. Furthermore, the proposed approach shows potential applications for spectral CT. Using five PC and five energy bins reduces the SPR RMS error to 0.03%. Conclusion: The proposed method shows good performance in determining elemental compositions from DECT data and physical quantities relevant to radiotherapy dose calculation and generally shows better accuracy and unbiased results compared to reference methods. The proposed method is particularly suitable for Monte Carlo calculations and shows promise in using more than two energies to characterize human tissue with CT.

  16. SU-F-J-186: Enabling Adaptive IMPT with CBCT-Based Dose Recalculation for H&N and Prostate Cancer Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurz, C [Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Garching b. Muenchen (Germany); LMU Munich, Munich (Germany); Park, Y; Winey, B; Sharp, G [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Kamp, F; Reiner, M; Nijhuis, R; Ganswindt, U; Thieke, C; Belka, C [LMU Munich, Munich (Germany); Rit, S [University Lyon, Lyon (France); Hansen, D [Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark); Parodi, K; Landry, G [Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Garching b. Muenchen (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To enable adaptive intensity modulated proton therapy for sites sensitive to inter-fractional changes on the basis of accurate CBCT-based proton dose calculations. To this aim two CBCT intensity correction methods are considered: planning CT (pCT) to CBCT DIR and projection correction based on pCT DIR prior. Methods: 3 H&N and 3 prostate cancer patients with CBCT images and corresponding projections were used in this study, in addition to pCT and re-planning CT (rpCT) images (H&N only). A virtual CT (vCT) was generated by pCT to CBCT DIR. In a second approach, the vCT was used as prior for scatter correction of the CBCT projections to yield a CBCTcor image. BEV 2D range maps of SFUD IMPT plans were compared. For the prostate cases, the geometric accuracy of the vCT was also evaluated by contour comparison to physician delineation of the CBCTcor and original CBCT. Results: SFUD dose calculations on vCT and CBCTcor were found to be within 3mm for 97% to 99% of 2D range maps. Median range differences compared to rpCT were below 0.5mm. Analysis showed that the DIR-based vCT approach exhibits inaccuracies in the pelvic region due to the very low soft-tissue contrast in the CBCT. The CBCTcor approach yielded results closer to the original CBCT in terms of DICE coefficients than the vCT (median 0.91 vs 0.81) for targets and OARs. In general, the CBCTcor approach was less affected by inaccuracies of the DIR used during the generation of the vCT prior. Conclusion: Both techniques yield 3D CBCT images with intensities equivalent to diagnostic CT and appear suitable for IMPT dose calculation for most sites. For H&N cases, no considerable differences between the two techniques were found, while improved results of the CBCTcor were observed for pelvic cases due to the reduced sensitivity to registration inaccuracies. Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (MAP); Bundesministerium fur Bildung und Forschung (01IB13001)

  17. [Accurate 3D free-form registration between fan-beam CT and cone-beam CT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yueqiang; Xu, Hongbing; Li, Baosheng; Li, Hongsheng; Yang, Fujun

    2012-06-01

    Because the X-ray scatters, the CT numbers in cone-beam CT cannot exactly correspond to the electron densities. This, therefore, results in registration error when the intensity-based registration algorithm is used to register planning fan-beam CT and cone-beam CT. In order to reduce the registration error, we have developed an accurate gradient-based registration algorithm. The gradient-based deformable registration problem is described as a minimization of energy functional. Through the calculus of variations and Gauss-Seidel finite difference method, we derived the iterative formula of the deformable registration. The algorithm was implemented by GPU through OpenCL framework, with which the registration time was greatly reduced. Our experimental results showed that the proposed gradient-based registration algorithm could register more accurately the clinical cone-beam CT and fan-beam CT images compared with the intensity-based algorithm. The GPU-accelerated algorithm meets the real-time requirement in the online adaptive radiotherapy.

  18. Proton radioactivity: the case for 53m Co proton-emitter isomer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavares, O.A.P.; Medeiros, E.L.

    2010-01-01

    The partial proton emission half-life for 53m Co unstable isomer is re-examined in the framework of a semiempirical model based on tunneling through a Coulomb-plus centrifugal- plus-overlapping potential barrier within the spherical nucleus approximation. It is shown that the known measured half-life value of 17 s is compatible with a large prolate shape for 53m Co proton emitter and a high angular momentum ι = 11 assigned to the proton transition to the ground-state of 52 Fe. (author)

  19. Activity-based cost analysis of hepatic tumor ablation using CT-guided high-dose rate brachytherapy or CT-guided radiofrequency ablation in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnapauff, D; Collettini, F; Steffen, I; Wieners, G; Hamm, B; Gebauer, B; Maurer, M H

    2016-02-25

    To analyse and compare the costs of hepatic tumor ablation with computed tomography (CT)-guided high-dose rate brachytherapy (CT-HDRBT) and CT-guided radiofrequency ablation (CT-RFA) as two alternative minimally invasive treatment options of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). An activity based process model was created determining working steps and required staff of CT-RFA and CT-HDRBT. Prorated costs of equipment use (purchase, depreciation, and maintenance), costs of staff, and expenditure for disposables were identified in a sample of 20 patients (10 treated by CT-RFA and 10 by CT-HDRBT) and compared. A sensitivity and break even analysis was performed to analyse the dependence of costs on the number of patients treated annually with both methods. Costs of CT-RFA were nearly stable with mean overall costs of approximately 1909 €, 1847 €, 1816 € and 1801 € per patient when treating 25, 50, 100 or 200 patients annually, as the main factor influencing the costs of this procedure was the single-use RFA probe. Mean costs of CT-HDRBT decreased significantly per patient ablation with a rising number of patients treated annually, with prorated costs of 3442 €, 1962 €, 1222 € and 852 € when treating 25, 50, 100 or 200 patients, due to low costs of single-use disposables compared to high annual fix-costs which proportionally decreased per patient with a higher number of patients treated annually. A break-even between both methods was reached when treating at least 55 patients annually. Although CT-HDRBT is a more complex procedure with more staff involved, it can be performed at lower costs per patient from the perspective of the medical provider when treating more than 55 patients compared to CT-RFA, mainly due to lower costs for disposables and a decreasing percentage of fixed costs with an increasing number of treatments.

  20. A framelet-based iterative maximum-likelihood reconstruction algorithm for spectral CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yingmei; Wang, Ge; Mao, Shuwei; Cong, Wenxiang; Ji, Zhilong; Cai, Jian-Feng; Ye, Yangbo

    2016-11-01

    Standard computed tomography (CT) cannot reproduce spectral information of an object. Hardware solutions include dual-energy CT which scans the object twice in different x-ray energy levels, and energy-discriminative detectors which can separate lower and higher energy levels from a single x-ray scan. In this paper, we propose a software solution and give an iterative algorithm that reconstructs an image with spectral information from just one scan with a standard energy-integrating detector. The spectral information obtained can be used to produce color CT images, spectral curves of the attenuation coefficient μ (r,E) at points inside the object, and photoelectric images, which are all valuable imaging tools in cancerous diagnosis. Our software solution requires no change on hardware of a CT machine. With the Shepp-Logan phantom, we have found that although the photoelectric and Compton components were not perfectly reconstructed, their composite effect was very accurately reconstructed as compared to the ground truth and the dual-energy CT counterpart. This means that our proposed method has an intrinsic benefit in beam hardening correction and metal artifact reduction. The algorithm is based on a nonlinear polychromatic acquisition model for x-ray CT. The key technique is a sparse representation of iterations in a framelet system. Convergence of the algorithm is studied. This is believed to be the first application of framelet imaging tools to a nonlinear inverse problem.

  1. Spectral CT metal artifact reduction with an optimization-based reconstruction algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilat Schmidt, Taly; Barber, Rina F.; Sidky, Emil Y.

    2017-03-01

    Metal objects cause artifacts in computed tomography (CT) images. This work investigated the feasibility of a spectral CT method to reduce metal artifacts. Spectral CT acquisition combined with optimization-based reconstruction is proposed to reduce artifacts by modeling the physical effects that cause metal artifacts and by providing the flexibility to selectively remove corrupted spectral measurements in the spectral-sinogram space. The proposed Constrained `One-Step' Spectral CT Image Reconstruction (cOSSCIR) algorithm directly estimates the basis material maps while enforcing convex constraints. The incorporation of constraints on the reconstructed basis material maps is expected to mitigate undersampling effects that occur when corrupted data is excluded from reconstruction. The feasibility of the cOSSCIR algorithm to reduce metal artifacts was investigated through simulations of a pelvis phantom. The cOSSCIR algorithm was investigated with and without the use of a third basis material representing metal. The effects of excluding data corrupted by metal were also investigated. The results demonstrated that the proposed cOSSCIR algorithm reduced metal artifacts and improved CT number accuracy. For example, CT number error in a bright shading artifact region was reduced from 403 HU in the reference filtered backprojection reconstruction to 33 HU using the proposed algorithm in simulation. In the dark shading regions, the error was reduced from 1141 HU to 25 HU. Of the investigated approaches, decomposing the data into three basis material maps and excluding the corrupted data demonstrated the greatest reduction in metal artifacts.

  2. Influence of Hydration on Proton Transfer in the Guanine-Cytosine Radical Cation (G•+-C) Base Pair: A Density Functional Theory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anil; Sevilla, Michael D.

    2009-01-01

    On one-electron oxidation all molecules including DNA bases become more acidic in nature. For the GC base pair experiments suggest that a facile proton transfer takes place in the G•+-C base pair from N1 of G•+ to N3 of cytosine. This intra-base pair proton transfer reaction has been extensively considered using theoretical methods for the gas phase and it is predicted that the proton transfer is slightly unfavorable in disagreement with experiment. In the present study, we consider the effect of the first hydration layer on the proton transfer reaction in G•+-C by the use of density functional theory (DFT), B3LYP/6-31+G** calculations of the G•+-C base pair in the presence of 6 and 11 water molecules. Under the influence of hydration of 11 waters, a facile proton transfer from N1 of G•+ to N3 of C is predicted. The zero point energy (ZPE) corrected forward and backward energy barriers, for the proton transfer from N1 of G•+ to N3 of C, was found to be 1.4 and 2.6 kcal/mol, respectively. The proton transferred G•-(H+)C + 11H2O was found to be 1.2 kcal/mol more stable than G•+-C + 11H2O in agreement with experiment. The present calculation demonstrates that the inclusion of the first hydration shell around G•+-C base pair has an important effect on the internal proton transfer energetics. PMID:19485319

  3. Nanostructure-based proton exchange membrane for fuel cell applications at high temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junsheng; Wang, Zhengbang; Li, Junrui; Pan, Mu; Tang, Haolin

    2014-02-01

    As a clean and highly efficient energy source, the proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) has been considered an ideal alternative to traditional fossil energy sources. Great efforts have been devoted to realizing the commercialization of the PEMFC in the past decade. To eliminate some technical problems that are associated with the low-temperature operation (such as catalyst poisoning and poor water management), PEMFCs are usually operated at elevated temperatures (e.g., > 100 degrees C). However, traditional proton exchange membrane (PEM) shows poor performance at elevated temperature. To achieve a high-performance PEM for high temperature fuel cell applications, novel PEMs, which are based on nanostructures, have been developed recently. In this review, we discuss and summarize the methods for fabricating the nanostructure-based PEMs for PEMFC operated at elevated temperatures and the high temperature performance of these PEMs. We also give an outlook on the rational design and development of the nanostructure-based PEMs.

  4. Current concepts in F18 FDG PET/CT-based Radiation Therapy planning for Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Percy eLee

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Radiation therapy is an important component of cancer therapy for early stage as well as locally advanced lung cancer. The use of F18 FDG PET/CT has come to the forefront of lung cancer staging and overall treatment decision-making. FDG PET/CT parameters such as standard uptake value and metabolic tumor volume provide important prognostic and predictive information in lung cancer. Importantly, FDG PET/CT for radiation planning has added biological information in defining the gross tumor volume as well as involved nodal disease. For example, accurate target delineation between tumor and atelectasis is facilitated by utilizing PET and CT imaging. Furthermore, there has been meaningful progress in incorporating metabolic information from FDG PET/CT imaging in radiation treatment planning strategies such as radiation dose escalation based on standard uptake value thresholds as well as using respiratory gated PET and CT planning for improved target delineation of moving targets. In addition, PET/CT based follow-up after radiation therapy has provided the possibility of early detection of local as well as distant recurrences after treatment. More research is needed to incorporate other biomarkers such as proliferative and hypoxia biomarkers in PET as well as integrating metabolic information in adaptive, patient-centered, tailored radiation therapy.

  5. Structure and functionality of PVdF/PAN based, composite proton conducting membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinelli, A.; Navarra, M.A.; Matic, A.; Panero, S.; Jacobsson, P.; Boerjesson, L.; Scrosati, B.

    2005-01-01

    We have investigated new poly-vinylidene fluoride/poly-acrylonitrile (PVdF/PAN) based proton conducting membranes by means of vibrational spectroscopy. We find that a complete phase inversion occurs during the preparation procedure, when the gelling solvents are replaced by an acidic solution, providing the proton conducting property. The uptake of acid is promoted both by the presence of PAN and the ceramic filler, Al 2 O 3 . No particular interaction between the polymer matrix and the acidic solution could be detected, supporting the picture of an inert matrix entrapping a liquid component. However, the dissociation degree of the acid is decreased due to the spatial confinement in the membrane. By comparing the dissociation degree and the actual amount of acid in the membrane to the conductivity, we conclude that the limiting factor for the conductivity is the long-range mobility of the protons, which is governed by the morphology of the membrane

  6. Daily fraction dose recalculation based on rigid registration using Cone Beam CT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Courtney Bosse

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To calculate the daily fraction dose for CBCT recalculations based on rigid registration and compare it to the planned CT doses.Methods: For this study, 30 patients that were previously treated (10 SBRT lung, 10 prostate and 10 abdomen were considered. The daily CBCT images were imported into the Pinnacle treatment planning system from Mosaic. Pinnacle was used to re-contour the regions of interest (ROI for the specific CBCT by copying the contours from the original CT plan, planned by the prescribing physician, onto each daily CBCT and then manually reshaping contours to match the ROIs. A new plan is then created with the re-contoured CBCT as primary image in order to calculate the daily dose delivered to each ROI. The DVH values are then exported into Excel and overlaid onto the original CT DVH to produce a graph.Results: For the SBRT lung patients, we found that there were small daily volume changes in the lungs, trachea and esophagus. For almost all regions of interest we found that the dose received each day was less than the predicted dose of the planned CT while the PTV dose was relatively the same each day. The results for the prostate patients were similar, showing slight differences in the DVH values for different days in the rectum and bladder but similar PTV.Conclusion: By comparing daily fraction dose between the re-contoured CBCT images and the original planned CT show that PTV coverage for both prostate and SBRT, it has been shown that for PTV coverage, a planned CT is adequate. However, there are differences between the dose for the organs surrounding the PTV. The dose difference is less than the planned in most instances.-----------------------Cite this article as: Bosse C, Tuohy R, Mavroidis P, Shi Z, Crownover R, Gutierrez A, Papanikolaou N, Stathakis S. Daily fraction dose recalculation based on rigid registration using Cone Beam CT. Int J Cancer Ther Oncol 2014; 2(2:020217. DOI: 10.14319/ijcto.0202.17

  7. Technical Note: FreeCT_ICD: An Open Source Implementation of a Model-Based Iterative Reconstruction Method using Coordinate Descent Optimization for CT Imaging Investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, John M; Noo, Frédéric; Young, Stefano; Hsieh, Scott S; McNitt-Gray, Michael

    2018-06-01

    To facilitate investigations into the impacts of acquisition and reconstruction parameters on quantitative imaging, radiomics and CAD using CT imaging, we previously released an open source implementation of a conventional weighted filtered backprojection reconstruction called FreeCT_wFBP. Our purpose was to extend that work by providing an open-source implementation of a model-based iterative reconstruction method using coordinate descent optimization, called FreeCT_ICD. Model-based iterative reconstruction offers the potential for substantial radiation dose reduction, but can impose substantial computational processing and storage requirements. FreeCT_ICD is an open source implementation of a model-based iterative reconstruction method that provides a reasonable tradeoff between these requirements. This was accomplished by adapting a previously proposed method that allows the system matrix to be stored with a reasonable memory requirement. The method amounts to describing the attenuation coefficient using rotating slices that follow the helical geometry. In the initially-proposed version, the rotating slices are themselves described using blobs. We have replaced this description by a unique model that relies on tri-linear interpolation together with the principles of Joseph's method. This model offers an improvement in memory requirement while still allowing highly accurate reconstruction for conventional CT geometries. The system matrix is stored column-wise and combined with an iterative coordinate descent (ICD) optimization. The result is FreeCT_ICD, which is a reconstruction program developed on the Linux platform using C++ libraries and the open source GNU GPL v2.0 license. The software is capable of reconstructing raw projection data of helical CT scans. In this work, the software has been described and evaluated by reconstructing datasets exported from a clinical scanner which consisted of an ACR accreditation phantom dataset and a clinical pediatric

  8. Quantitative Assessment of Degenerative Cartilage and Subchondral Bony Lesions in a Preserved Cadaveric Knee: Propagation-Based Phase-Contrast CT Versus Conventional MRI and CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geith, Tobias; Brun, Emmanuel; Mittone, Alberto; Gasilov, Sergei; Weber, Loriane; Adam-Neumair, Silvia; Bravin, Alberto; Reiser, Maximilian; Coan, Paola; Horng, Annie

    2018-04-09

    The aim of this study was to quantitatively assess hyaline cartilage and subchondral bone conditions in a fully preserved cadaveric human knee joint using high-resolution x-ray propagation-based phase-contrast imaging (PBI) CT and to compare the performance of the new technique with conventional CT and MRI. A cadaveric human knee was examined using an x-ray beam of 60 keV, a detector with a 90-mm 2 FOV, and a pixel size of 46 × 46 μm 2 . PBI CT images were reconstructed with both the filtered back projection algorithm and the equally sloped tomography method. Conventional 3-T MRI and CT were also performed. Measurements of cartilage thickness, cartilage lesions, International Cartilage Repair Society scoring, and detection of subchondral bone changes were evaluated. Visual inspection of the specimen akin to arthroscopy was conducted and served as a standard of reference for lesion detection. Loss of cartilage height was visible on PBI CT and MRI. Quantification of cartilage thickness showed a strong correlation between the two modalities. Cartilage lesions appeared darker than the adjacent cartilage on PBI CT. PBI CT showed similar agreement to MRI for depicting cartilage substance defects or lesions compared with the visual inspection. The assessment of subchondral bone cysts showed moderate to strong agreement between PBI CT and CT. In contrast to the standard clinical methods of MRI and CT, PBI CT is able to simultaneously depict cartilage and bony changes at high resolution. Though still an experimental technique, PBI CT is a promising high-resolution imaging method to evaluate comprehensive changes of osteoarthritic disease in a clinical setting.

  9. Dosimetry for ocular proton beam therapy at the Harvard Cyclotron Laboratory based on the ICRU Report 59

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newhauser, W.D.; Burns, J.; Smith, A.R.

    2002-01-01

    The Massachusetts General Hospital, the Harvard Cyclotron Laboratory (HCL), and the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary have treated almost 3000 patients with ocular disease using high-energy external-beam proton radiation therapy since 1975. The absorbed dose standard for ocular proton therapy beams at HCL was based on a fluence measurement with a Faraday cup (FC). A majority of proton therapy centers worldwide, however, use an absorbed dose standard that is based on an ionization chamber (IC) technique. The ion chamber calibration is deduced from a measurement in a reference 60 Co photon field together with a calculated correction factor that takes into account differences in a chamber's response in 60 Co and proton fields. In this work, we implemented an ionization chamber-based absolute dosimetry system for the HCL ocular beamline based on the recommendations given in Report 59 by the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements. Comparative measurements revealed that the FC system yields an absorbed dose to water value that is 1.1% higher than was obtained with the IC system. That difference is small compared with the experimental uncertainties and is clinically insignificant. In June of 1998, we adopted the IC-based method as our standard practice for the ocular beam

  10. Pattern recognition and data mining software based on artificial neural networks applied to proton transfer in aqueous environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tahat Amani; Marti Jordi; Khwaldeh Ali; Tahat Kaher

    2014-01-01

    In computational physics proton transfer phenomena could be viewed as pattern classification problems based on a set of input features allowing classification of the proton motion into two categories: transfer ‘occurred’ and transfer ‘not occurred’. The goal of this paper is to evaluate the use of artificial neural networks in the classification of proton transfer events, based on the feed-forward back propagation neural network, used as a classifier to distinguish between the two transfer cases. In this paper, we use a new developed data mining and pattern recognition tool for automating, controlling, and drawing charts of the output data of an Empirical Valence Bond existing code. The study analyzes the need for pattern recognition in aqueous proton transfer processes and how the learning approach in error back propagation (multilayer perceptron algorithms) could be satisfactorily employed in the present case. We present a tool for pattern recognition and validate the code including a real physical case study. The results of applying the artificial neural networks methodology to crowd patterns based upon selected physical properties (e.g., temperature, density) show the abilities of the network to learn proton transfer patterns corresponding to properties of the aqueous environments, which is in turn proved to be fully compatible with previous proton transfer studies. (condensed matter: structural, mechanical, and thermal properties)

  11. Automated CT-based segmentation and quantification of total intracranial volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguilar, Carlos; Wahlund, Lars-Olof; Westman, Eric [Karolinska Institute, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society (NVS), Division of Clinical Geriatrics, Stockholm (Sweden); Edholm, Kaijsa; Cavallin, Lena; Muller, Susanne; Axelsson, Rimma [Karolinska Institute, Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Division of Medical Imaging and Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Karolinska University Hospital in Huddinge, Department of Radiology, Stockholm (Sweden); Simmons, Andrew [King' s College London, Institute of Psychiatry, London (United Kingdom); NIHR Biomedical Research Centre for Mental Health and Biomedical Research Unit for Dementia, London (United Kingdom); Skoog, Ingmar [Gothenburg University, Department of Psychiatry and Neurochemistry, The Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg (Sweden); Larsson, Elna-Marie [Uppsala University, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology, Akademiska Sjukhuset, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2015-11-15

    To develop an algorithm to segment and obtain an estimate of total intracranial volume (tICV) from computed tomography (CT) images. Thirty-six CT examinations from 18 patients were included. Ten patients were examined twice the same day and eight patients twice six months apart (these patients also underwent MRI). The algorithm combines morphological operations, intensity thresholding and mixture modelling. The method was validated against manual delineation and its robustness assessed from repeated imaging examinations. Using automated MRI software, the comparability with MRI was investigated. Volumes were compared based on average relative volume differences and their magnitudes; agreement was shown by a Bland-Altman analysis graph. We observed good agreement between our algorithm and manual delineation of a trained radiologist: the Pearson's correlation coefficient was r = 0.94, tICVml[manual] = 1.05 x tICVml[automated] - 33.78 (R{sup 2} = 0.88). Bland-Altman analysis showed a bias of 31 mL and a standard deviation of 30 mL over a range of 1265 to 1526 mL. tICV measurements derived from CT using our proposed algorithm have shown to be reliable and consistent compared to manual delineation. However, it appears difficult to directly compare tICV measures between CT and MRI. (orig.)

  12. Automated CT-based segmentation and quantification of total intracranial volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguilar, Carlos; Wahlund, Lars-Olof; Westman, Eric; Edholm, Kaijsa; Cavallin, Lena; Muller, Susanne; Axelsson, Rimma; Simmons, Andrew; Skoog, Ingmar; Larsson, Elna-Marie

    2015-01-01

    To develop an algorithm to segment and obtain an estimate of total intracranial volume (tICV) from computed tomography (CT) images. Thirty-six CT examinations from 18 patients were included. Ten patients were examined twice the same day and eight patients twice six months apart (these patients also underwent MRI). The algorithm combines morphological operations, intensity thresholding and mixture modelling. The method was validated against manual delineation and its robustness assessed from repeated imaging examinations. Using automated MRI software, the comparability with MRI was investigated. Volumes were compared based on average relative volume differences and their magnitudes; agreement was shown by a Bland-Altman analysis graph. We observed good agreement between our algorithm and manual delineation of a trained radiologist: the Pearson's correlation coefficient was r = 0.94, tICVml[manual] = 1.05 x tICVml[automated] - 33.78 (R 2 = 0.88). Bland-Altman analysis showed a bias of 31 mL and a standard deviation of 30 mL over a range of 1265 to 1526 mL. tICV measurements derived from CT using our proposed algorithm have shown to be reliable and consistent compared to manual delineation. However, it appears difficult to directly compare tICV measures between CT and MRI. (orig.)

  13. Fast neutron spectrometry based on proton detection in CR-39 detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dajko, G.; Somogyi, G.

    1986-01-01

    The authors have developed a home-made proton-sensitive CR-39 track detector called MA-ND/p. Using this and the n-p scattering process the performance of a fast neutron spectrometer has been studied by applying two different methods. These are based on track density determinations by using varying radiator thicknesses at constant etching time and by using varying etching times at fixed radiator thickness, respectively. For both methods studied a computer programme is made to calculate the theoretically expected neutron sensitivity as a function of neutron energy. For both methods the neutron sensitivities, expressed in terms of observable etched proton tracks per neutron, are determined experimentally for 3.3 and 14.7 MeV neutron energies. The theoretical and experimental data obtained are compared.

  14. Fast neutron spectrometry based on proton detection in CR-39 detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dajko, G.; Somogyi, G.

    1986-01-01

    The authors have developed a home-made proton-sensitive CR-39 track detector called MA-ND/p. Using this and the n-p scattering process the performance of a fast neutron spectrometer has been studied by applying two different methods. These are based on track density determinations by using varying radiator thicknesses at constant etching time and by using varying etching times at fixed radiator thickness, respectively. For both methods studied a computer programme is made to calculate the theoretically expected neutron sensitivity as a function of neutron energy. For both methods the neutron sensitivities, expressed in terms of observable etched proton tracks per neutron, are determined experimentally for 3.3 and 14.7 MeV neutron energies. The theoretical and experimental data obtained are compared. (author)

  15. Tungsten oxide proton conducting films for low-voltage