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Sample records for csis pace university

  1. Unintended Outcomes of University-Community Partnerships: Building Organizational Capacity with PACE International Partners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Kate; Clark, Lindie; Hammersley, Laura; Baker, Michaela; Rawlings-Sanaei, Felicity; D'ath, Emily

    2015-01-01

    Professional and Community Engagement (PACE) at Macquarie University provides experiential opportunities for students and staff to contribute to more just, inclusive and sustainable societies by engaging in activities with partner organizations. PACE International offers a range of opportunities with partners overseas. Underpinning PACE is a…

  2. The Student Experience of PACE at Macquarie University: Understanding Motivations for Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLachlan, Kath; Rawlings-Sanaei, Felicity; Mason, Colina; Haski-Levanthal, Debbie; Nabeel, Hussein

    2017-01-01

    Professional and Community Engagement (PACE) at Macquarie University offers undergraduate students experiential learning opportunities with local, regional and international partners. Through PACE, students work on mutually beneficial projects that both meet the partner's organizational goals and enable students to strengthen graduate capabilities…

  3. PPARC: Grid technology helps astronomers keep pace with the Universe

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "Intelligent Agent" computer programs are roaming the Internet and watching the skies. These programs, using Grid computing technology, will help astronomers detect some of the most dramatic events in the universe, such as massive supernova explosions (1 page).

  4. Self-Paced E-Training in E-Learning for University Teaching Staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norah Ahmed Al-Malki

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The shift towards adopting e-training methods and practices in the workplace to equip staff with soft and hard skills have become an essential component of training in many Higher Education institutions. The aim of this paper is to advocate such a shift in Saudi universities through presenting the preliminary outcomes of a short-scale pilot study conducted by the Deanship of E-learning and Distance Education (DELDE during August 2014. Basically, the paper introduces the results of a first run of a self-paced e-training program focusing on introducing topics related to e-learning development and instruction. The paper 1 explores the pedagogical motivation for adopting the self-paced learning model, 2 outlines the elements of the developed course, and 3 discusses the results of the first run of the e-training program.

  5. President Ilves at CSIS Statesmen's Forum in Washington / Toomas Hendrik Ilves

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Ilves, Toomas Hendrik, 1953-

    2007-01-01

    Järg 9. aug. 2007, lk. 12; 16. aug. 2007, lk. 12; 23. aug. 2007, lk. 12. President Toomas Hendrik Ilvese sõnavõtt mõttekoja Center for Strategic & International Studies (CSIS) korraldatud foorumil Washingtonis 27. juunil 2007. Eesti riigipea kõneles "uue Euroopa" definitsioonist ning vastas küsimustele energia- ja küberjulgeoleku teemadel. Presidendi sõnavõtu juhatas sisse CSIS nõunik Zbigniew Brzezinski

  6. President Ilves at CSIS Statesmen's Forum in Washington / Toomas Hendrik Ilves

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Ilves, Toomas Hendrik, 1953-

    2007-01-01

    Järg 9. aug. 2007, lk. 12; 16. aug. 2007, lk. 12; 23. aug. 2007, lk. 12. President Toomas Hendrik Ilvese sõnavõtt mõttekoja Center for Strategic & International Studies (CSIS) korraldatud foorumil Washingtonis 27. juunil 2007. Eesti riigipea kõneles "uue Euroopa" definitsioonist ning vastas küsimustele energia- ja küberjulgeoleku teemadel. Presidendi sõnavõtu juhatas sisse CSIS nõunik Zbigniew Brzezinski

  7. A Project Based CS/IS-1 Course with an Active Learning Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Suvineetha Herath

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available High level programming languages use system defined data types and the user defined data types in computations. We have developed a project-based CS/IS-1 course to substitute the traditional lecture based classroom to help students design and use at least two user defined data types in their computations to solve real world problems. Abstract data types and basic programming constructs are introduced efficiently to the students in an active learning environment using games. To assess and evaluate the changes made we distributed the course module among our students and other instructors. This paper describes our experience in developing the project based active learning environment.

  8. Temporary pacing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.J. Workman

    1983-09-01

    Full Text Available Artificial cardiac pacing, the use of electrical stimuli to cause contraction of heart muscle, is a sophisticated therapeutic and diagnostic tool. Its rapid technologic improvement since first developed in the late 1930’s by Hyman, has made it possible not only to avoid certain cases of death due to heart block, but also to extend and improve the quality of life. Pacemaker therapy is generally used to treat heart rate or rhythm disturbances, being either tachy- or bradyarrhythmias that produce a detrimental drop in cardiac output. Of the many different types of pacemakers and electrodes currently available, ventricular demand pacing is the most commonly used.

  9. Keeping Pace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Nancy

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the struggles of two tough moms who team up to start their own company. Fed up with a lack of stylish, properly-fitting shoes for their children with cerebral palsy, they established "Keeping Pace" which currently offers a selection of stylish girls' and boys' athletic sneakers and casual dress shoes for boys, all sold…

  10. In vivo incisional wound healing augmented by platelet-derived growth factor and recombinant c-sis gene homodimeric proteins

    OpenAIRE

    1988-01-01

    Human platelet-derived growth factor (hPDGF) is likely to be important in stimulating tissue repair, based upon its in vivo chemotactic and stimulatory activities for inflammatory cells and fibroblasts and upon the presence of PDGF and related proteins in platelets, macrophages, and activated fibroblasts, cell types that make up the milieu of the healing wound. Recombinant human c-sis (rPDGF-B), homodimers of the B chain of PDGF, were compared with hPDGF in vitro. rPDGF-B was immunologically ...

  11. Factors influencing pacing in triathlon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu SSX

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Sam SX Wu,1 Jeremiah J Peiffer,2 Jeanick Brisswalter,3 Kazunori Nosaka,1 Chris R Abbiss1 1Centre for Exercise and Sports Science Research, School of Exercise and Health Sciences, Edith Cowan University, Perth, WA, Australia; 2School of Psychology and Exercise Science, Murdoch University, Perth, WA, Australia; 3Laboratory of Human Motricity, Education Sport and Health, University of Nice Sophia Antipolis, Nice, France Abstract: Triathlon is a multisport event consisting of sequential swim, cycle, and run disciplines performed over a variety of distances. This complex and unique sport requires athletes to appropriately distribute their speed or energy expenditure (ie, pacing within each discipline as well as over the entire event. As with most physical activity, the regulation of pacing in triathlon may be influenced by a multitude of intrinsic and extrinsic factors. The majority of current research focuses mainly on the Olympic distance, whilst much less literature is available on other triathlon distances such as the sprint, half-Ironman, and Ironman distances. Furthermore, little is understood regarding the specific physiological, environmental, and interdisciplinary effects on pacing. Therefore, this article discusses the pacing strategies observed in triathlon across different distances, and elucidates the possible factors influencing pacing within the three specific disciplines of a triathlon. Keywords: cycle, endurance, multisport, pacing strategy, run, swim

  12. Access under Siege: Are the Gains of Open Education Keeping Pace with the Growing Barriers to University Access?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olcott, Don, Jr.

    2013-01-01

    Traditional and affordable access to a university education is under siege from all sides. National realpolitiks and global economic downturns have driven open education into the mainstream to stand against educational elitism, the growing digital divide, and to support the core values that give education its fundamental credence as a human right.…

  13. Universal real-time control framework and Internet of Things for fast-paced research and development based production environments

    KAUST Repository

    Chaoui, Hicham

    2017-05-13

    This paper introduces a universal real-time control platform for complex research and development (R&D) based products design. The inherent complexity in R&D projects makes products development a difficult task to undertake. The use of state of the art development tools for modeling, simulation, and hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) validation contributes to a complexity reduction. However, R&D projects still require significant development time since many design iterations are usually necessary before final solution, which increases the cost. In most R&D processes, these tools are not used beyond rapid prototyping since development for mass production is usually performed in another environment, using different tools. This paper presents a fast and cost effective way of R&D-based products development, speeding-up time to market.

  14. Analysis of the Pace University Center for Environmental Legal Studies report of September 1990 entitled, {open_quotes}Environmental costs of electicity{close_quotes} by R.L. Ottinger, D.R. Wooley, N.A. Robinson, D.R. Hodas, Babb, S.E.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catlin, R.J. [Univ. of Texas, Houston, TX (United States)

    1992-06-01

    This report evaluates the figures used by Pace University in its September 1990 report entitled `Environmental Costs of Electricity` and the conclusions the Pace authors come to using those figures. The data Paces uses in its report is given on pages 379-381 of the US DOE report entitled `Health and Environmental Consequences of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Accident.` 10 refs., 1 fig., 22 tabs.

  15. Pacing in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harinder R Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The implantation of cardiac pacing devices in children and young adults can be challenging and different from the adult population due to their smaller size, their longer life expectancy, and anatomical variations associated with congenital heart defects. A knowledge of indications, pacing leads and devices, anatomical variations, and the technical skills are important for those who implant and care for children with pacemakers. In this review we attempt to discuss these specific points of cardiac pacing in children and young adults.

  16. Transvenous Temporary Cardiac Pacing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Emmanouil Poulidakis; Antonis S Manolis

    2014-01-01

      Transvenous temporary cardiac pacing is a rather old but still contemporary life-saving technique, with a unique value in the treatment of critically ill patients suffering from rhythm disturbances...

  17. Pacing for Dramaturgy

    OpenAIRE

    Pensjö, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    This thesis is a study on how game mechanics affect dramaturgy through pacing within the multiplayer MOBA genre of video games and serves as an addition to ease dramaturgic design for future games. The thesis contains an introduction of drama and some of related terms in addition to the MOBA game genre, its format and a short history of the genre. To compare the observations and analysis made in this study, previous work on both dramaturgy and pacing have been recollected.

  18. Pacing stress echocardiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agrusta Marco

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High-rate pacing is a valid stress test to be used in conjunction with echocardiography; it is independent of physical exercise and does not require drug administration. There are two main applications of pacing stress in the echo lab: the noninvasive detection of coronary artery disease through induction of a regional transient dysfunction; and the assessment of contractile reserve through peak systolic pressure/ end-systolic volume relationship at increasing heart rates to assess global left ventricular contractility. Methods The pathophysiologic rationale of pacing stress for noninvasive detection of coronary artery disease is obvious, with the stress determined by a controlled increase in heart rate, which is a major determinant of myocardial oxygen demand, and thereby tachycardia may exceed a fixed coronary flow reserve in the presence of hemodynamically significant coronary artery disease. The use of pacing stress echo to assess left ventricular contractile reserve is less established, but promising. Positive inotropic interventions are mirrored by smaller end-systolic volumes and higher end-systolic pressures. An increased heart rate progressively increases the force of ventricular contraction (Bowditch treppe or staircase phenomenon. To build the force-frequency relationship, the force is determined at different heart rate steps as the ratio of the systolic pressure (cuff sphygmomanometer/end-systolic volume index (biplane Simpson rule. The heart rate is determined from ECG. Conclusion Two-dimensional echocardiography during pacing is a useful tool in the detection of coronary artery disease. Because of its safety and ease of repeatability noninvasive pacing stress echo can be the first-line stress test in patients with permanent pacemaker. The force-frequency can be defined as up- sloping (normal when the peak stress pacing systolic pressure/end-systolic volume index is higher than baseline and intermediate stress

  19. PACE Status Update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M., Zimring,; Hoffman, I.; Fuller, M.

    2010-08-11

    The Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA) regulates Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac, and the 12 Federal Home Loan Banks (the government-sponsored enterprises - GSEs). On July 6, 2010, FHFA and the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (OCC) concluded that Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) programs 'present significant safety and soundness concerns' to the housing finance industry. This statement came after a year of discussions with state and federal agencies in which PACE, a novel mechanism for financing energy efficiency and renewable energy improvements, has gone from receiving support from the White House, canonization as one of Scientific American's 'World Changing Ideas' and legislative adoption in 24 states to questionable relevance, at least in the residential sector. Whether PACE resumes its expansion as an innovative tool for financing energy efficiency and clean generation depends on outcomes in each of the three branches of government - discussions on a PACE pilot phase among federal agencies, litigation in federal court, and legislation in Congress - all highly uncertain. This policy brief addresses the practical impacts of these possible outcomes on existing and emerging PACE programs across the United States and potential paths forward.

  20. Graybar – pace project

    OpenAIRE

    Morillo Peres, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Proyecto Final de Carrera en el se presenta una memoria del trabajo realizado en la empresa Graybar de implantación de un sistema de Gestión de la Cadena de Suministro Mètodes basat en investigació operativa per agilitzar la logística interna d´industries Graybar.Projecte PACE

  1. [Advances in cardiac pacing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carranza, María-José Sancho-Tello; Fidalgo-Andrés, María Luisa; Ferrer, José Martínez; Mateas, Francisco Ruiz

    2012-01-01

    This article contains a review of the current status of remote monitoring and follow-up involving cardiac pacing devices and of the latest developments in cardiac resynchronization therapy. In addition, the most important articles published in the last year are discussed.

  2. Cardiac pacing and aviation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toff, W D; Edhag, O K; Camm, A J

    1992-12-01

    Certain applicants with stable disturbances of rhythm or conduction requiring cardiac pacing, in whom no other disqualifying condition is present, may be considered fit for medical certification restricted to multi-crew operations. The reliability of modern pacing systems appears adequate to permit restricted certification even in pacemaker dependent subjects except for certain models of pacemakers and leads known to be at increased risk of failure. These are to be avoided. There is little evidence to suggest that newer devices are any more reliable than their predecessors. Single and dual chamber systems appear to have similar reliability up to 4 years, after which time significant attrition of dual chamber devices occurs, principally due to battery depletion. All devices require increased scrutiny as they approach their end of life as predicted from longevity data and pacing characteristics. Unipolar and bipolar leads are of similar reliability, apart from a number of specific bipolar polyurethane leads which have been identified. Atrial leads, particularly those without active fixation, are less secure than ventricular leads and applicants who are dependent on atrial sensing or pacing should be denied certification. Bipolar leads are to be preferred due to the lower risk of myopotential and exogenous EMI. Sensor-driven adaptive-rate pacing systems using active sensors may have reduced longevity and require close scrutiny. Activity-sensing devices using piezoelectric crystal sensors may be subject to significant rate rises in rotary wing aircraft. The impracticality of restricted certification in helicopters will, in any event, preclude certification. Such devices would best be avoided in hovercraft (air cushioned vehicle) pilots. Only minor rate rises are likely in fixed-wing aircraft which are unlikely to be of significance. Anti-tachycardia devices and implanted defibrillators are inconsistent with any form of certification to fly.

  3. Recent developments in cardiac pacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodak, D J

    1995-10-01

    Indications for cardiac pacing continue to expand. Pacing to improve functional capacity, which is now common, relies on careful patient selection and technical improvements, such as complex software algorithms and diagnostic capabilities.

  4. A dual-chamber pacing mode to minimize ventricular pacing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Rakovec

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Though patients with sick sinus syndrome theoretically need an atrial pacemaker only, they usually receive a ventricular or a dual-chamber pacemaker because of possible developement of atrioventricular conduction abnormalities. Right ventricular pacing produces left bundle branch block (i.e. pacing-induced ventricular desynchronization, promoting heart failure and atrial fibrillation. This problem can be solved by a special pacing mode which on one hand preserves the safety of dual-chamber pacing and on the other hand minimizes right ventricular pacing.

  5. TCP Pacing Developed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivancic, William D.

    2002-01-01

    Transmission control protocol (TCP) was conceived and designed to run over a variety of communication links, including wireless and high-bandwidth links. However, with recent technological advances in satellite and fiber-optic networks, researchers are reevaluating the flexibility of TCP. The TCP pacing and packet pair probing implementation may help overcome two of the major obstacles identified for efficient bandwidth utilization over communication links with large delay-bandwidth products.

  6. Effects of Modality and Pace on Achievement, Mental Effort, and Positive Affect in Multimedia Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izmirli, Serkan; Kurt, Adile Askim

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the effects of instruction given with different multimedia modalities (written text + animation or narration + animation) on the academic achievement, cognitive load, and positive affect in different paces (learner-paced or system-paced); 97 freshmen university students divided into four groups taught in…

  7. Marathon pacing and elevation change

    CERN Document Server

    Elliott, J B

    2012-01-01

    An analysis of marathon pacing and elevation change is presented. It is based on an empirical observation of how the pace of elite and non-elite marathon runners change over the course of the marathon and a simple approximation of the energy cost of ascent and decent. It was observed that the pace of the runners slowed in a regular manner that could be broken up into four regions. That observation can be used to project target paces for a desired marathon finish time. However, that estimate fails to take in to account the energetic costs of elevation changes (hills) along the marathon course. Several approximations are made to give a coarse estimate of target paces for marathon run on courses with significant elevation changes, i.e. a hilly course. The 2012 Oakland Marathon course is used as and example of a hilly course and the times of 23 finishers are examined.

  8. Factors influencing pacing in triathlon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Sam Sx; Peiffer, Jeremiah J; Brisswalter, Jeanick; Nosaka, Kazunori; Abbiss, Chris R

    2014-01-01

    Triathlon is a multisport event consisting of sequential swim, cycle, and run disciplines performed over a variety of distances. This complex and unique sport requires athletes to appropriately distribute their speed or energy expenditure (ie, pacing) within each discipline as well as over the entire event. As with most physical activity, the regulation of pacing in triathlon may be influenced by a multitude of intrinsic and extrinsic factors. The majority of current research focuses mainly on the Olympic distance, whilst much less literature is available on other triathlon distances such as the sprint, half-Ironman, and Ironman distances. Furthermore, little is understood regarding the specific physiological, environmental, and interdisciplinary effects on pacing. Therefore, this article discusses the pacing strategies observed in triathlon across different distances, and elucidates the possible factors influencing pacing within the three specific disciplines of a triathlon.

  9. Pneumothorax in cardiac pacing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkfeldt, Rikke Esberg; Johansen, Jens Brock; Nohr, Ellen Aagaard;

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To identify risk factors for pneumothorax treated with a chest tube after cardiac pacing device implantation in a population-based cohort.METHODS AND RESULTS: A nationwide cohort study was performed based on data on 28 860 patients from the Danish Pacemaker Register, which included all Danish...... patients who received their first pacemaker (PM) or cardiac resynchronization device from 1997 to 2008. Multiple logistic regression was used to estimate adjusted odds ratios (aOR) with 95% confidence intervals for the association between risk factors and pneumothorax treated with a chest tube. The median...... age was 77 years (25th and 75th percentile: 69-84) and 55% were male (n = 15 785). A total of 190 patients (0.66%) were treated for pneumothorax, which was more often in women [aOR 1.9 (1.4-2.6)], and in patients with age >80 years [aOR 1.4 (1.0-1.9)], a prior history of chronic obstructive pulmonary...

  10. Presentation Time Concerning System-Paced Multimedia Instructions and the Superiority of Learner Pacing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiller, Klaus D.; Petzold, Kirstin; Zinnbauer, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The superiority of learner-paced over system-paced instructions was demonstrated in multiple experiments. In these experiments, the system-paced presentations were highly speeded, causing cognitive overload, while the learner-paced instructions allowed adjustments of the presentational flow to the learner's needs by pacing facilities, mostly…

  11. Diagnostic accuracy of pace spikes in the electrocardiogram to diagnose paced rhythm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Hedvig; Hansen, Marco Bo; Thorsberger, Mads;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine how often cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) pacing systems generate visible pace spikes in the electrocardiogram (ECG). METHODS: In 46 patients treated with CRT pacing systems, we recorded ECGs during intrinsic rhythm, atrial pacing and ventricular pacing. ECGs were...

  12. Self-Paced Economics Instruction: A Large-Scale Disaggregated Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soper, John C.; Thorton, Richard M.

    1976-01-01

    This paper reports on an evaluation of the Sterling Institute self-paced macroeconomics course at Northern Illinois University. Results show that a completely self-paced teaching format for macroeconomics is inferior to a well-directed, concept-oriented, graduate-student instructed, lecture-discussion taught course. (Author/RM)

  13. The pace and shape of ageing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baudisch, Annette

    2011-01-01

    dimensions of age-specific change - the pace and the shape of ageing. 2.Based on the two axes of pace and shape, I introduce a new conceptual framework to classify how species age. 3.With this method, I rank species according to how strongly they age (shape) and how fast they age (pace). Depending on whether...... they are ranked by pace or by shape, species are ordered differently. 4.Alternative pace measures turn out to be highly correlated. Alternative shape measures are also highly correlated. The correlation between pace and shape ranking is negative but weak. Among the examples here, no species is long lived yet...

  14. Low atrial septum pacing in pacemaker patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voogt, Willem Gijsbert de

    2006-01-01

    In patients with an indication for anti bradycardia pacing, atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common arrhythmia (30-50%) even in the absence of atrial tachy arrhythmias before pacemaker implantation. Pace prevention and pace intervention for atrial tachy arrhythmias could be an interesting adjuvant trea

  15. Low atrial septum pacing in pacemaker patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voogt, Willem Gijsbert de

    2006-01-01

    In patients with an indication for anti bradycardia pacing, atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common arrhythmia (30-50%) even in the absence of atrial tachy arrhythmias before pacemaker implantation. Pace prevention and pace intervention for atrial tachy arrhythmias could be an interesting adjuvant

  16. The Downside of Right Ventricular Apical Pacing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Brenyo, MD

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The right ventricular (RV apex has been the standard pacing site since the development of implantable pacemaker technology. Although RV pacing was initially only utilized for the treatment of severe bradyarrhythmias usually due to complete heart block, today the indications for and implantation of RV pacing devices is dramatically larger. Recently, the adverse effects of chronic RV apical pacing have been described including an increased risk of heart failure and death. This review details the detrimental effects of RV apical pacing and their shared hemodynamic pathophysiology. In particular, the role of RV apical pacing induced ventricular dyssynchrony is highlighted with a specific focus on differential outcome based upon QRS morphology at implant.

  17. Permanent cardiac pacing in pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotfy, Wael; Hegazy, Ranya; AbdElAziz, Osama; Sobhy, Rodina; Hasanein, Hossam; Shaltout, Fawzan

    2013-02-01

    Pediatric pacemaker (PM) implants comprise less than 1 % of all PM implants. This study aimed to investigate permanent cardiac pacing among the pediatric population, identifying different indications and complications of pediatric cardiac pacing, especially focusing on the effect of the pacing sites, the PM lead type, and the indications for pacing. The current work is a cross-sectional study of 103 procedures for permanent PM insertion in pediatric patients between January 2001 and December 2010. The patients were followed up 1, 3, and 6 months after implantation, then every 6 months or as needed. Evaluation included routine clinical examination, electrocardiography, chest X-ray, echocardiography, and a full analysis of the pacing system measurements. The ages of the patients ranged from 0.09 to 12 years (median, 2.3 years). The most common indication for pacing was postoperative complete heart bock, noted in 54 patients (52.4 %). Transvenous endocardial PM insertion was performed in 92 procedures (89.3 %), whereas transthoracic epicardial insertion was performed in 11 procedures (10.7 %). The most common site of pacing was the right ventricular apex (n = 64, 62 %), followed by the right ventricular outflow tract (n = 25, 24.3 %). Transthoracic epicardial PM insertion was associated with a significantly higher percentage and greater severity of complications. In this study, 65 % of the patients with left ventricle (LV) dilation before pacing showed a significant improvement in LV dimensions and function after pacing. This was noted only in those with endocardially inserted PM leads in both the congenital and the postoperative groups regardless of the pacing site. Endocardial PM insertion in children is a safe procedure with fewer complications and a lower ventricular threshold than the epicardial route. Permanent single-chamber right ventricle pacing is safe and can lead to significant improvement in LV function and dimensions. However, long-term follow

  18. An Undergraduate Intern Program at PACES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starks, Scott A.

    1997-01-01

    The University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) established the Pan American Center for Earth and Environmental Studies (PACES) in 1995 to conduct basic and applied research that contributes to NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. Specifically, PACES provides a repository of remote sensing and other information that supports investigations into an improved understanding of geological, ecological and environmental processes occurring in the southwestern United States and Northern Mexico. Approximately 85% of UTEP's students come from El Paso County, a fast growing urban region representative of many large cities in the Southwest that have, or will soon have, a majority of their population composed of groups currently underrepresented in the scientific and technical workforce. UTEP's student population has an ethnic distribution (63% Hispanic, 32% Anglo, 3% African American, 1.5 % Asian American, and less than 1% Native American) that closely matches the demographics of the region it serves. Thus, UTEP has a mission to serve a multicultural population where minority students comprise the majority. Most Hispanic students at UTEP are primarily of Mexican origin. A large number are first or second-generation U.S. citizens. Characteristics that unite Hispanic students, in particular those of Mexican-origin, are a strong sense of family loyalty and a belief that all family members are responsible for contributing to the economic stability and well-being of the family. Most of their families are larger in number than the national average, and a variety of generations live together or share considerable resources. Thus, many young people feel an obligation and a desire to go to work at a young age and to continue working while in college, thereby assisting their parents and other family members. Older siblings understand that they have responsibilities to do household chores, to aid their younger siblings economically, and to assist elderly family members. This "work ethic" within the

  19. Update in cardiac arrhythmias and pacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Bolao, Ignacio; Ruiz-Mateas, Francisco; Bazan, Victor; Berruezo, Antonio; Alcalde, Oscar; Leal del Ojo, Juan; Acosta, Juan; Martínez Sellés, Manuel; Mosquera, Ignacio

    2015-03-01

    This article discusses the main advances in cardiac arrhythmias and pacing published between 2013 and 2014. Special attention is given to the interventional treatment of atrial fibrillation and ventricular arrhythmias, and on advances in cardiac pacing and implantable cardioverter defibrillators, with particular reference to the elderly patient.

  20. Transcolonic Migration of Retained Epicardial Pacing Wires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Gonzales

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Temporary epicardial pacing wires are associated with rare complications. Most of these occur in the chest. Even rarer are complications that occur within the abdomen. We report a case of migrating epicardial pacing wires entering the abdomen and penetrating the transverse colon found incidentally on colonoscopy in an asymptomatic patient.

  1. Improved access to temporary pacing in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alhede, Christina; Weisz, Mathilde; Diederichsen, Axel

    2012-01-01

    The aim was to illustrate current use of temporary pacing (TP) in Denmark by replicating a questionnaire study from 1986 and to compare the results of the two studies.......The aim was to illustrate current use of temporary pacing (TP) in Denmark by replicating a questionnaire study from 1986 and to compare the results of the two studies....

  2. 42 CFR 460.60 - PACE organizational structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false PACE organizational structure. 460.60 Section 460... ELDERLY (PACE) PACE Administrative Requirements § 460.60 PACE organizational structure. (a) A PACE... planning a change in organizational structure must notify CMS and the State administering agency, in...

  3. Ethical Practice in Learning through Participation: Showcasing and Evaluating the PACE Ethical Practice Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Michaela; Beale, Alison; Hammersley, Laura; Lloyd, Kate; Semple, Anne-Louise; White, Karolyn

    2013-01-01

    In 2008, Macquarie University instituted the Participation and Community Engagement (PACE) initiative. This initiative embeds units in the curriculum that involve learning through participation (LTP) that is mutually beneficial to the student, the University and the organisation or community in which student participation activities take place.…

  4. Simulating PACE Global Ocean Radiances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, Watson W.; Rousseaux, Cecile S.

    2017-01-01

    The NASA PACE mission is a hyper-spectral radiometer planned for launch in the next decade. It is intended to provide new information on ocean biogeochemical constituents by parsing the details of high resolution spectral absorption and scattering. It is the first of its kind for global applications and as such, poses challenges for design and operation. To support pre-launch mission development and assess on-orbit capabilities, the NASA Global Modeling and Assimilation Office has developed a dynamic simulation of global water-leaving radiances, using an ocean model containing multiple ocean phytoplankton groups, particulate detritus, particulate inorganic carbon (PIC), and chromophoric dissolved organic carbon (CDOC) along with optical absorption and scattering processes at 1 nm spectral resolution. The purpose here is to assess the skill of the dynamic model and derived global radiances. Global bias, uncertainty, and correlation are derived using available modern satellite radiances at moderate spectral resolution. Total chlorophyll, PIC, and the absorption coefficient of CDOC (aCDOC), are simultaneously assimilated to improve the fidelity of the optical constituent fields. A 5-year simulation showed statistically significant (P leaving radiances at 1 nm for the spectral range 250-800 nm. These unassimilated radiances were within 0.074 mW/sq cm/micron/sr of MODIS-Aqua radiances at 412, 443, 488, 531, 547, and 667 nm. This difference represented a bias of 10.4% (model low). A mean correlation of 0.706 (P leaving radiances, biogeochemical model, radiative transfer model

  5. Recovery in ERG gene expression with biventricular pacing in a rabbit model of myocardial infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saba S

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Samir Saba,* Haider Mehdi,* William Barrington, Fardeen Mehdi, Zahid Islam, Barry LondonCardiovascular Institute of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA, USA*These authors contributed equally to this workBackground: Improved clinical and echocardiographic parameters have been documented with biventricular (BIV pacing in patients after myocardial infarction (MI. We investigated the changes in gene expression in cardiac tissue with BIV pacing, using a rabbit model of MI.Method: New Zealand White rabbits were divided into four groups: sham-operated controls, MI with no pacing, MI with right ventricle (RV pacing (MI + RV, and MI with BIV pacing (MI + BIV. Pacing was initiated 1–2 weeks after the coronary ligation. At 5 weeks, the hearts were excised. The tissue extracted from the left ventricle (LV and RV underwent analysis for protein and messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA levels.Results: The ether-a-go-go-related gene (ERG protein levels recovered from the base of the LV away from the MI area were two- to threefold lower in the MI and the MI + RV compared with the MI + BIV groups (P = 0.07. The ERG protein levels were similar between the MI + BIV and the control groups. However, the RNA levels were comparable between the four study groups, suggesting that a posttranscriptional mechanism accounted for the difference in protein levels.Conclusion: In this rabbit model of MI, we demonstrated a recovery in ERG protein levels with BIV pacing, after MI. This recovery may underlie some of the benefits seen with BIV pacing in ischemic cardiomyopathy.Keywords: heart failure, biventricular pacing, cardiac reverse remodeling, ether-a-go-go-related gene

  6. Effect of age and performance on pacing of marathon runners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaidis PT

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Pantelis Theodoros Nikolaidis,1 Beat Knechtle2,3 1Exercise Physiology Laboratory, Attiki, Greece; 2Gesundheitszentrum St. Gallen, St. Gallen, 3Institute of Primary Care, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland Abstract: Pacing strategies in marathon runners have previously been examined, especially with regard to age and performance level separately. However, less information about the age × performance interaction on pacing in age-group runners exists. The aim of the present study was to examine whether runners with similar race time and at different age differ for pacing. Data (women, n=117,595; men, n=180,487 from the “New York City Marathon” between 2006 and 2016 were analyzed. A between–within subjects analysis of variance showed a large main effect of split on race speed (p<0.001, η2=0.538 with the fastest speed in the 5–10 km split and the slowest in the 35–40 km. A small sex × split interaction on race speed was found (p<0.001, η2=0.035 with men showing larger increase in speed at 5 km and women at 25 km and 40 km (end spurt. An age-group × performance group interaction on Δspeed was shown for both sexes at 5 km, 10 km, 15 km, 20 km, 25 km, 30 km, 35 km, and 40 km (p<0.001, 0.001≤η2≤0.004, where athletes in older age-groups presented a relatively more even pace compared with athletes in younger age-groups, a trend that was more remarkable in the relatively slow performance groups. So far, the present study is the first one to observe an age × performance interaction on pacing; ie, older runners pace differently (smaller changes than younger runners with similar race time. These findings are of great practical interest for coaches working with marathon runners of different age, but similar race time. Keywords: running, master athlete, endurance, aerobic capacity, fatigue, gender, race time

  7. Simulating PACE Global Ocean Radiances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, Watson W.; Rousseaux, Cecile S.

    2017-01-01

    The NASA PACE mission is a hyper-spectral radiometer planned for launch in the next decade. It is intended to provide new information on ocean biogeochemical constituents by parsing the details of high resolution spectral absorption and scattering. It is the first of its kind for global applications and as such, poses challenges for design and operation. To support pre-launch mission development and assess on-orbit capabilities, the NASA Global Modeling and Assimilation Office has developed a dynamic simulation of global water-leaving radiances, using an ocean model containing multiple ocean phytoplankton groups, particulate detritus, particulate inorganic carbon (PIC), and chromophoric dissolved organic carbon (CDOC) along with optical absorption and scattering processes at 1 nm spectral resolution. The purpose here is to assess the skill of the dynamic model and derived global radiances. Global bias, uncertainty, and correlation are derived using available modern satellite radiances at moderate spectral resolution. Total chlorophyll, PIC, and the absorption coefficient of CDOC (aCDOC), are simultaneously assimilated to improve the fidelity of the optical constituent fields. A 5-year simulation showed statistically significant (P Ocean-Atmosphere Spectral Irradiance Model, OASIM) to estimate normalized water-leaving radiances at 1 nm for the spectral range 250-800 nm. These unassimilated radiances were within 0.074 mW/sq cm/micron/sr of MODIS-Aqua radiances at 412, 443, 488, 531, 547, and 667 nm. This difference represented a bias of 10.4% (model low). A mean correlation of 0.706 (P ocean color, water-leaving radiances, biogeochemical model, radiative transfer model

  8. Factors affecting the regulation of pacing: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauger AR

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Alexis R Mauger Endurance Research Group, School of Sport and Exercise Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of Kent, Chatham, UK Abstract: During prolonged dynamic and rhythmic exercise, muscular pain and discomfort arises as a result of an increased concentration of deleterious metabolites. Sensed by peripheral nociceptors and transmitted via afferent feedback to the brain, this provides important information regarding the physiological state of the muscle. These sensations ultimately contribute to what is termed "exercise-induced pain". Despite being well recognized by athletes and coaches, and suggested to be integral to exercise performance, this construct has largely escaped attention in experimental work. This perspective article highlights the current understanding of pacing in endurance performance, and the causes of exercise-induced pain. A new perspective is described, which proposes how exercise-induced pain may be a contributing factor in helping individuals to regulate their work rate during exercise and thus provides an important construct in pacing. Keywords: pain, exercise-induced pain, discomfort, exercise performance, self-paced

  9. Pollution Abatement and Control Expenditures Survey (PACE)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Pollution Abatement Costs and Expenditures (PACE) survey is the most comprehensive national source of pollution abatement costs and expenditures related to...

  10. Transferring PACE Assessments Upon Home Sale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Coughlin, Jason; Fuller, Merrian; Zimring, Mark

    2010-04-12

    A significant barrier to investing in renewable energy and comprehensive energy efficiency improvements to homes across the country is the initial capital cost. Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) financing is one of several new financial models broadening access to clean energy by addressing this upfront cost issue. Recently, the White House cited PACE programs as an important element of its 'Recovery through Retrofit' plan. The residential PACE model involves the creation of a special clean energy financing district that homeowners elect to opt into. Once opted in, the local government (usually at the city or county level) finances the upfront investment of the renewable energy installation and/or energy efficiency improvements. A special lien is attached to the property and the assessment is paid back as a line item on the property tax bill. As of April 2010, 17 states have passed legislation to allow their local governments to create PACE programs, two already have the authority to set up PACE programs, and over 10 additional states are actively developing enabling legislation. This policy brief analyzes one of the advantages of PACE, which is the transferability of the special assessment from one homeowner to the next when the home is sold. This analysis focuses on the potential for the outstanding lien to impact the sales negotiation process, rather than the legal nature of the lien transfer itself. The goal of this paper is to consider what implications a PACE lien may have on the home sales negotiation process so that it can be addressed upfront rather than risk a future backlash to PACE programs. If PACE programs do expand at a rapid rate, the chances are high that there will be other cases where prospective buyers uses PACE liens to negotiate lower home prices or require repayment of the lien as a condition of sale. As a result, PACE programs should highlight this issue as a potential risk factor for the sake of full disclosure. A good example

  11. Cardiac pacing in pediatrics: Is still the right ventricle the optimal pacing site?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Cabrera Ortega

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Permanent cardiac pacing is frequently indicated in pediatric patients due to atrioventricular block. Traditionally, the right ventricle has been the pacing site because it is readily accessible, and provides lead stability and optimal chronic pacing thresholds. However, it is associated with a dyssynchrony pattern of ventricular activation, that may cause remodeling and impairment of left ventricular function. In pediatric patients, paced from an early age and with a long life expectancy, the preservation of cardiac function is a premise. Therefore, the prevention of dyssynchrony, using possible alternative sites, is not just a priority, is a challenge. The aim of the article is to show the effects of chronic right ventricular pacing as well as the evidence of benefits provided by alternatives pacing sites in pediatric population and their clinical and practical implications.

  12. Optogenetic pacing in Drosophila melanogaster (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alex, Aneesh; Li, Airong; Men, Jing; Jerwick, Jason; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Zhou, Chao

    2016-03-01

    A non-invasive, contact-less cardiac pacing technology can be a powerful tool in basic cardiac research and in clinics. Currently, electrical pacing is the gold standard for cardiac pacing. Although highly effective in controlling the cardiac function, the invasive nature, non-specificity to cardiac tissues and possible tissue damage limits its capabilities. Optical pacing of heart is a promising alternative, which is non-invasive and more specific, has high spatial and temporal precision, and avoids shortcomings in electrical stimulation. Optical coherence tomography has been proved to be an effective technique in non-invasive imaging in vivo with ultrahigh resolution and imaging speed. In the last several years, non-invasive specific optical pacing in animal hearts has been reported in quail, zebrafish, and rabbit models. However, Drosophila Melanogaster, which is a significant model with orthologs of 75% of human disease genes, has rarely been studied concerning their optical pacing in heart. Here, we combined optogenetic control of Drosophila heartbeat with optical coherence microscopy (OCM) technique for the first time. The light-gated cation channel, channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) was specifically expressed by transgene as a pacemaker in drosophila heart. By stimulating the pacemaker with 472 nm pulsed laser light at different frequencies, we achieved non-invasive and more specific optical control of the Drosophila heart rhythm, which demonstrates the wide potential of optical pacing for studying cardiac dynamics and development. Imaging capability of our customized OCM system was also involved to observe the pacing effect visually. No tissue damage was found after long exposure to laser pulses, which proved the safety of optogenetic control of Drosophila heart.

  13. Synchronization of ventricular fibrillation with electrical pacing guided by optical signals: comparison of pacing locations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Heidy; Hwang, Gyo-Seung; Lin, Shien-Fong

    2006-02-01

    Wavefront synchronization is an important aspect preceding the termination of ventricular fibrillation (VF). We designed a novel approach using multi-electrode pacing that could reduce the energy consumption of successful defibrillation by more than 100-fold. We compared the efficacy of a synchronized pacing algorithm using optical recording-guided pacing at the right ventricle and the posterior left ventricle in isolated rabbit hearts. Two modes of pacing were used in the study. The electrodes were individually controlled (independent mode, ISyncP) or fired together (simultaneous mode, SSyncP) when triggered by tissue polarization at a reference site separate from the pacing sites. The hearts were stained with voltage-sensitive dye and illuminated with laser for epifluorescence imaging during pacing. The number of phase singularities of VF propagation was used to estimate the complexity of VF. A decrease in the number of PS signified a higher degree of VF organization. We found that the pacing algorithm was more effective if the pacing was applied to the posterior left ventricle than to the right ventricle. Pacing in the posterior left ventricle resulted in a 25.3% decrease in the number of PS for ISyncP and a 31% decrease for SSyncP. Pacing in the right ventricle resulted in a 29.0% decrease for ISyncP and a 2.3% increase for SSyncP. The 5mA current reflected a 27.8% decrease for ISyncP and a 32.2% decrease for SSyncP, whereas the 10mA current reflected a 27.2% decrease for ISyncP and a 5.2% increase for SSyncP. We conclude that synchronized pacing can induce VF organization, and the efficacy is higher when pacing in the left ventricle with 5 mA.

  14. The Manipulation of Pace within Endurance Sport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skorski, Sabrina; Abbiss, Chris R.

    2017-01-01

    In any athletic event, the ability to appropriately distribute energy is essential to prevent premature fatigue prior to the completion of the event. In sport science literature this is termed “pacing.” Within the past decade, research aiming to better understand the underlying mechanisms influencing the selection of an athlete's pacing during exercise has dramatically increased. It is suggested that pacing is a combination of anticipation, knowledge of the end-point, prior experience and sensory feedback. In order to better understand the role each of these factors have in the regulation of pace, studies have often manipulated various conditions known to influence performance such as the feedback provided to participants, the starting strategy or environmental conditions. As with all research there are several factors that should be considered in the interpretation of results from these studies. Thus, this review aims at discussing the pacing literature examining the manipulation of: (i) energy expenditure and pacing strategies, (ii) kinematics or biomechanics, (iii) exercise environment, and (iv) fatigue development. PMID:28289392

  15. Temporary Epicardial Pacing After Adult Cardiac Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arzu Antal Dönmez

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Temporary epicardial pacing wires (TEPW have been routinely used in cardiac surgery in early postoperative period. Purpose of the study is to determine predictors for need of temporary pacing wires after surgery that will safely limit their usage and to document complications associated with the wires.Patients and Methods: This prospective study involved 112 patients operated at our institution from April 2010 to October 2010, who received TEPW following surgery. Surgical procedures included 34 isolated coronary revascularization, 51 valve replacement, 11 revascularization with valve replacement, 14 mitral reconstruction, 2 ascending aorta replacement.Results: Among 112 patients, 93 (83.1% were never paced. Nineteen (16.9% patients required pacing during weaning and 10 patients, required further pacing in intensive care unit. Indications for pacing included atrioventricular block in 7 (36.8%, sinus bradycardia in 2 (10.5%, junctional rhythm in 9 (47.4% and low cardiac output in 1 (5.2% patient. Atrioventricular block, junctional rhythm, postperfusion atrial fibrillation, inotropic agent requirement leaving the operating room, pacing requirement during weaning and mitral surgery are found to be the predictors for requirement of TEPWs. No complications were observed related with the use or removal of TEPWs.Conclusion: Routine placement of TEPWs is not necessary after cardiac surgery. Patients having rhythm disturbances after procedure and requiring pacemacer support during weaning of cardiopulmonary by-pass, require further pacemaker support in intensive care unit with higher probability. Depending on our data, because of potential complications related with use of wires, selective use of TEPWs for patients with identified predictors can be recommended.

  16. Optimal pacing for symptomatic AV block: a comparison of VDD and DDD pacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Max; Krahn, Andrew D; Yee, Raymond; Klein, George J; Skanes, Allan C

    2004-01-01

    VDD pacing provides the physiological benefits of atrioventricular synchronous pacing with the convenience of a single lead system, but is hampered by uncertainty regarding long term atrial sensing and potential development of sinus node disease. To examine the long-term reliability and complication rates of VDD pacing, we compared the outcome of 112 consecutive patients (age 70 +/- 13 years, 59% men) with symptomatic AV block who received a single pass bipolar VDD system, to 80 patients (age 63 +/- 16 years, 70% men) who received DDD pacing for the same indication. All patients were judged to have intact sinus node function based on submitted ECGs and monitoring results at the time of implant. Implant time was reduced in VDD patients compared to DDD patients (63 +/- 20 vs 97 +/- 36 minutes, P DDD patients compared to 3 (3%) VDD patients (P = 0.15). The implant P wave was lower with VDD pacing compared to DDD patients (2.91 +/- 1.48 vs 4.0 +/- 1.7 mv, P DDD patients. Physiological atrioventricular activation was maintained in 94%-99% of beats throughout the follow-up period in the VDD group. VDD pacing is an excellent strategy for treatment of patients with symptomatic AV block. The lower cost, high reliability, and abbreviated implantation time suggest that VDD pacing is a viable alternative to DDD pacing in patients with high degree AV block and normal sinus node function.

  17. Temporary emergency pacing-an orphan in district hospitals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjesdal, Knut; Johansen, Jens Brock; Gadler, Fredrik

    2012-01-01

    . The procedure times were long and complications were frequent. The organization of emergency pacing is discussed, and we suggest that unless qualified physicians can establish transvenous pacing, the patients who need that should be transferred with transcutaneous pacing as back-up during transport...... to a hospital with more available competence. Ideally, those who need pacing immediately, including those who need permanent pacing, should be offered permanent implantation on a 24 hours/7 days per week base....

  18. A Simulation Study of Paced TCP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulik, Joanna; Coulter, Robert; Rockwell, Dennis; Partridge, Craig

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, we study the performance of paced TCP, a modified version of TCP designed especially for high delay- bandwidth networks. In typical networks, TCP optimizes its send-rate by transmitting increasingly large bursts, or windows, of packets, one burst per round-trip time, until it reaches a maximum window-size, which corresponds to the full capacity of the network. In a network with a high delay-bandwidth product, however, Transmission Control Protocol's (TCPs) maximum window-size may be larger than the queue size of the intermediate routers, and routers will begin to drop packets as soon as the windows become too large for the router queues. The TCP sender then concludes that the bottleneck capacity of the network has been reached, and it limits its send-rate accordingly. Partridge proposed paced TCP as a means of solving the problem of queueing bottlenecks. A sender using paced TCP would release packets in multiple, small bursts during a round-trip time in which ordinary TCP would release a single, large burst of packets. This approach allows the sender to increase its send-rate to the maximum window size without encountering queueing bottlenecks. This paper describes the performance of paced TCP in a simulated network and discusses implementation details that can affect the performance of paced TCP.

  19. Fast Paced, Low Cost Projects at MSFC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson-Morgan, Lisa; Clinton, Raymond

    2012-01-01

    What does an orbiting microsatellite, a robotic lander and a ruggedized camera and telescope have in common? They are all fast paced, low cost projects managed by Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) teamed with successful industry partners. MSFC has long been synonymous with human space flight large propulsion programs, engineering acumen and risk intolerance. However, there is a growing portfolio/product line within MSFC that focuses on these smaller, fast paced projects. While launching anything into space is expensive, using a managed risk posture, holding to schedule and keeping costs low by stopping at egood enough f were key elements to their success. Risk is defined as the possibility of loss or failure per Merriam Webster. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) defines risk using procedural requirement 8705.4 and establishes eclasses f to discern the acceptable risk per a project. It states a Class D risk has a medium to significant risk of not achieving mission success. MSFC, along with industry partners, has created a niche in Class D efforts. How did the big, cautious MSFC succeed on these projects that embodied the antithesis of its heritage in human space flight? A key factor toward these successful projects was innovative industry partners such as Dynetics Corporation, University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAHuntsville), Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU APL), Teledyne Brown Engineering (TBE), Von Braun Center for Science and Innovation (VCSI), SAIC, and Jacobs. Fast Affordable Satellite Technology (FastSat HSV01) is a low earth orbit microsatellite that houses six instruments with the primary scientific objective of earth observation and technology demonstration. The team was comprised of Dynetics, UAHuntsvile, SAIC, Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) and VCSI with the United States Air Force Space Test Program as the customer. The team completed design, development, manufacturing, environmental test and integration in

  20. Self-Paced Instruction: Hello, Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leuba, Richard J.; Flammer, Gordon H.

    1975-01-01

    Answers criticisms of self-paced instruction (SPI) by citing advantages of SPI over lecture methods. Concludes that criticisms of SPI are useful since they indicate in which areas further research should be conducted to improve this method of instruction. (MLH)

  1. Social Interaction in Self-paced Distance Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terry Anderson

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present a case study of a self-paced university course that was originally designed to support independent, self-paced study at distance. We developed a social media intervention, in design-based research terms, that allows these independent students to contribute archived content to enhance the course, to engage in discussions with other students and to share as little or as much personal information with each other as they wished. We describe the learning design for the intervention and present survey data of student and tutor perception of value and content analysis of the archived contributions. The results indicate that the intervention was positively received by tutors and by the majority (but not all students and that the archive created by the students’ contributions was adding value to the course. We conclude that the intervention was a modest, yet manageable example of a learning enhancement to a traditional cognitive-behavioral, course that has positive impact and potential with little negative impact on workload.

  2. 42 CFR 460.122 - PACE organization's appeals process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...) PACE organization's written appeals process. The PACE organization must have a formal written appeals... process must include written procedures for the following: (1) Timely preparation and processing of a... writing. (e) Services furnished during appeals process. During the appeals process, the PACE...

  3. Multi-Leu PACE4 Inhibitor Retention within Cells Is PACE4 Dependent and a Prerequisite for Antiproliferative Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric Couture

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The overexpression as well as the critical implication of the proprotein convertase PACE4 in prostate cancer progression has been previously reported and supported the development of peptide inhibitors. The multi-Leu peptide, a PACE4-specific inhibitor, was further generated and its capability to be uptaken by tumor xenograft was demonstrated with regard to its PACE4 expression status. To investigate whether the uptake of this inhibitor was directly dependent of PACE4 levels, uptake and efflux from cancer cells were evaluated and correlations were established with PACE4 contents on both wild type and PACE4-knockdown cell lines. PACE4-knockdown associated growth deficiencies were established on the knockdown HepG2, Huh7, and HT1080 cells as well as the antiproliferative effects of the multi-Leu peptide supporting the growth capabilities of PACE4 in cancer cells.

  4. Visual aided pacing in respiratory maneuvers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rambaudi, L R [Laboratorio de Biofisica y Fisiologia ' Antonio Sadi Frumento' (Argentina); Rossi, E [Catedra de Bioingenieria II (Argentina); Mantaras, M C [Catedra de Bioingenieria II (Argentina); Perrone, M S [Laboratorio de Biofisica y Fisiologia ' Antonio Sadi Frumento' (Argentina); Siri, L Nicola [Catedra de Bioingenieria II (Argentina)

    2007-11-15

    A visual aid to pace self-controlled respiratory cycles in humans is presented. Respiratory manoeuvres need to be accomplished in several clinic and research procedures, among others, the studies on Heart Rate Variability. Free running respiration turns to be difficult to correlate with other physiologic variables. Because of this fact, voluntary self-control is asked from the individuals under study. Currently, an acoustic metronome is used to pace respiratory frequency, its main limitation being the impossibility to induce predetermined timing in the stages within the respiratory cycle. In the present work, visual driven self-control was provided, with separate timing for the four stages of a normal respiratory cycle. This visual metronome (ViMet) was based on a microcontroller which power-ON and -OFF an eight-LED bar, in a four-stage respiratory cycle time series handset by the operator. The precise timing is also exhibited on an alphanumeric display.

  5. Cardiac pacing in heart failure patients with left bundle branch block: impact of pacing site for optimizing left ventricular resynchronization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappone, C; Rosanio, S; Oreto, G; Tocchi, M; Gulletta, S; Salvati, A; Dicandia, C; Santinelli, V; Mazzone, P; Veglia, F; Ding, J; Sallusti, L; Spinelli, J; Vicedomini, G

    2000-07-01

    Acute left ventricular pacing has been associated with hemodynamic improvement in patients with congestive heart failure and wide QRS complex. We hypothesized that pacing two left ventricular sites simultaneously would produce faster activation and better systolic function than single-site pacing. We selected 14 heart failure patients (NYHA functional class III or IV) in normal sinus rhythm with left bundle branch block and QRS > 150 ms. An 8F dual micromanometer catheter was placed in the aorta for measuring +dP/dt (mmHg/s), aortic pulse pressure (mmHg), and end-diastolic pressure (mmHg). Pacing leads were positioned via coronary veins at the posterior base and lateral wall. Patients were acutely paced VDD at the posterior base, lateral wall, and both sites (dual-site) with 5 atrioventricular delays (from 8 ms to PR -30 ms). Pacing sequences were executed in randomized order using a custom external computer (FlexStim, Guidant CRM). Dual-site pacing increased peak +dP/dt significantly more than posterior base and lateral wall pacing. Dual-site and posterior base pacing raised aortic pulse pressure significantly more than lateral wall pacing. Dual-site pacing shortened QRS duration by 22 %, whereas posterior base and lateral wall pacing increased it by 2 and 12%, respectively (p = 0.006). In heart failure patients with left bundle branch block, dual-site pacing improves systolic function more than single-site stimulation. Improved ventricular activation synchrony, expressed by paced QRS narrowing, may account for the additional benefit of dual- vs single-site pacing in enhancing contractility. This novel approach deserves consideration for future heart failure pacing studies.

  6. PACE: Proactively Secure Accumulo with Cryptographic Enforcement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-27

    modify data using digital signatures . The contributions of our work include: • Cryptographic enforcement of access control. The PACE library allows...the impact of encryption and signatures on operation throughput. I. INTRODUCTION Over the last several years, many companies have moved their...second). This evaluation demonstrates that while encryp- tion and signatures have an impact on throughput, the impact is small enough to be

  7. Almanac 2013: cardiac arrhythmias and pacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, Reginald

    2013-10-01

    Important advances have been made in the past few years in the fields of clinical cardiac electrophysiology and pacing. Researchers and clinicians have a greater understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying atrial fibrillation (AF), which has transpired into improved methods of detection, risk stratification, and treatments. The introduction of novel oral anticoagulants has provided clinicians with alternative options in managing patients with AF at moderate to high thromboembolic risk and further data has been emerging on the use of catheter ablation for the treatment of symptomatic AF. Another area of intense research in the field of cardiac arrhythmias and pacing is in the use of cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT) for the treatment of patients with heart failure. Following the publication of major landmark randomised controlled trials reporting that CRT confers a survival advantage in patients with severe heart failure and improves symptoms, many subsequent studies have been performed to further refine the selection of patients for CRT and determine the clinical characteristics associated with a favourable response. The field of sudden cardiac death and implantable cardioverter defibrillators also continues to be actively researched, with important new epidemiological and clinical data emerging on improved methods for patient selection, risk stratification, and management. This review covers the major recent advances in these areas related to cardiac arrhythmias and pacing.

  8. Post operative temporary epicardial pacing: When, how and why?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batra Anjan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Temporary epicardial pacing is commonly used for the diagnosis and treatment of arrhythmias in the acute post operative period after surgery for congenital heart disease. Temporary epicardial pacemakers have become increasingly sophisticated over the years and have evolved from simple single chamber devices with few programmable parameters to complex dual chamber devices capable of adjustable parameters similar to permanent pacemakers. This review will describe the various indications for temporary pacing, technical considerations for both the choice of pacing wires and pacemaker modes, complications with temporary pacing and our current practice with temporary pacing.

  9. Impact of pacing modality and biventricular pacing on cardiac output and coronary conduit flow in the post-cardiotomy patient.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Healy, David G

    2012-02-03

    We have previously demonstrated the role of univentricular pacing modalities in influencing coronary conduit flow in the immediate post-operative period in the cardiac surgery patient. We wanted to determine the mechanism of this improved coronary conduit and, in addition, to explore the possible benefits with biventricular pacing. Sixteen patients undergoing first time elective coronary artery bypass grafting who required pacing following surgery were recruited. Comparison of cardiac output and coronary conduit flow was performed between VVI and DDD pacing with a single right ventricular lead and biventricular pacing lead placement. Cardiac output was measured using arterial pulse waveform analysis while conduit flow was measured using ultrasonic transit time methodology. Cardiac output was greatest with DDD pacing using right ventricular lead placement only [DDD-univentricular 5.42 l (0.7), DDD-biventricular 5.33 l (0.8), VVI-univentricular 4.71 l (0.8), VVI-biventricular 4.68 l (0.6)]. DDD-univentricular pacing was significantly better than VVI-univentricular (P=0.023) and VVI-biventricular pacing (P=0.001) but there was no significant advantage to DDD-biventricular pacing (P=0.45). In relation to coronary conduit flow, DDD pacing again had the highest flow [DDD-univentricular 55 ml\\/min (24), DDD-biventricular 52 ml\\/min (25), VVI-univentricular 47 ml\\/min (23), VVI-biventricular 50 ml\\/min (26)]. DDD-univentricular pacing was significantly better than VVI-univentricular (P=0.006) pacing but not significantly different to VVI-biventricular pacing (P=0.109) or DDD-biventricular pacing (P=0.171). Pacing with a DDD modality offers the optimal coronary conduit flow by maximising cardiac output. Biventricular lead placement offered no significant benefit to coronary conduit flow or cardiac output.

  10. Universe

    CERN Document Server

    2011-01-01

    Updated for 2011, the Universe, is one book in the Britannica Illustrated Science Library Series that covers today's most popular science topics, from digital TV to microchips to touchscreens and beyond. Perennial subjects in earth science, life science, and physical science are all explored in detail. Amazing graphics-more than 1,000 per title-combined with concise summaries help students understand complex subjects. Correlated to the science curriculum in grades 5-9, each title also contains a glossary with full definitions for vocabulary.

  11. Universe

    CERN Document Server

    2009-01-01

    The Universe, is one book in the Britannica Illustrated Science Library Series that is correlated to the science curriculum in grades 5-8. The Britannica Illustrated Science Library is a visually compelling set that covers earth science, life science, and physical science in 16 volumes.  Created for ages 10 and up, each volume provides an overview on a subject and thoroughly explains it through detailed and powerful graphics-more than 1,000 per volume-that turn complex subjects into information that students can grasp.  Each volume contains a glossary with full definitions for vocabulary help and an index.

  12. Optimized pacing mode for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: Impact of ECG fusion during pacing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berruezo, A.; Penela, D.; Burgos, F.; Evertz, R.; Fernandez-Armenta, J.; Roca, J.; Doltra, A.; Acosta, J.; Francino, A.; Sitges, M.; Alsina, X.; Ordonez, A.; Villuendas, R.; Brugada, R.; Mont, L.; Brugada, J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Electrocardiographic (ECG) fusion with intrinsic QRS could reduce the benefit of atrial synchronous biventricular pacing (AS-BiVP) in patients with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM). OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to assess the benefit of AS-BiVP and the influence

  13. Enact legislation supporting residential property assessed clean energy financing (PACE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saha, Devashree

    2012-11-15

    Congress should enact legislation that supports residential property assessed clean energy (PACE) programs in the nation’s states and metropolitan areas. Such legislation should require the Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA) to allow Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac to purchase residential mortgages with PACE assessments while at the same time providing responsible underwriting standards and a set of benchmarks for residential PACE assessments in order to minimize financial risks to mortgage holders. Congressional support of residential PACE financing will improve energy efficiency, encourage job creation, and foster economic growth in the nation’s state and metropolitan areas.

  14. Pace bowlers in cricket with history of lumbar stress fracture have increased risk of lower limb muscle strains, particularly calf strains

    OpenAIRE

    John Orchard; Patrick Farhart; Alex Kountouris; et al.

    2010-01-01

    John Orchard1, Patrick Farhart2, Alex Kountouris3, Trefor James3, Marc Portus31School of Public Health, University of Sydney, Australia; 2Punjab Kings XI team, Indian Premier League, India; 3Cricket Australia, Melbourne, AustraliaObjective: To assess whether a history of lumbar stress fracture in pace bowlers in cricket is a risk factor for lower limb muscle strains.Methods: This was a prospective cohort risk factor study, conducted using injury data from contracted first class pace bowlers i...

  15. Effect of atrial pacing therapy with selective pacing algorithms on paroxysmal atrial fibrillation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘晓宏; 张雪华; 徐耕; 傅国胜; 单江

    2004-01-01

    @@ Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia among the elderly. Its incidence increases dramatically with increasing age and decreasing left ventricular function, peaking in subjects with overt congestive heart failure.1 Because of the unsatisfactory efficacy and possible serious side effects of clinically available anti-AF drugs for AF patients with sick sinus syndrome, pacing techniques have recently been applied in the treatment of AF. The cardiac pacemaker Vitatron Selection 900E has special AF diagnostic and prophylactic therapy algorithms. The objective of this study was to use the diagnostic information concerning the onset mechanisms of AF to program the preventive pacing algorithms for each patient individually and to find out whether a reduction in AF burden could be achieved.

  16. Far field pacing supersedes anti-tachycardia pacing in a generic model of excitable media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bittihn, Philip; Parlitz, Ulrich [Drittes Physikalisches Institut, Goettingen University, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Goettingen (Germany); Luther, Gisela; Bodenschatz, Eberhard; Krinsky, Valentin; Luther, Stefan [Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization, Bunsenstrasse 10, 37073 Goettingen (Germany)], E-mail: bittihn@physik3.gwdg.de

    2008-10-15

    Removing anchored spirals from obstacles is an important step in terminating cardiac arrhythmia. Conventional anti-tachycardia pacing (ATP) has this ability, but only under very restrictive conditions. In a generic model of excitable media, we demonstrate that for unpinning spiral waves from obstacles this profound limitation of ATP can be overcome by far field pacing (FFP). More specifically, an argument is presented for why FFP includes and thus can only extend the capabilities of ATP in the configurations considered. By numerical simulations, we show that in the model there exists a parameter region in which unpinning is possible by FFP but not by ATP. The relevance of this result regarding clinical applications is discussed.

  17. PACE3 - front-end chip for the CMS Preshower

    CERN Multimedia

    Aspel, Paul

    2003-01-01

    This is PACE3 which is the front-end chip for the CMS Preshower. In fact PACE3 is the combination of two ASICs called Delta3 and PACEAM3. Delta3 is on the left and PACEAM3 is on the right. The two ASICs are bonded together and then packaged within a single 196 pin fpBGA package.

  18. Is Self-Paced Instruction Really Worth It?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberson, J. A.; Crowe, C. T.

    1975-01-01

    Describes a self-paced, learning-for-mastery course in undergraduate fluid mechanics. Includes the method of course assessment, method of student evaluation, and a description of the instructor's role and work load. Summarizes aspects of self-paced instruction considered favorable and unfavorable. (GS)

  19. A comparison of single-lead atrial pacing with dual-chamber pacing in sick sinus syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Cosedis; Thomsen, Poul Erik B; Højberg, Søren

    2011-01-01

    In patients with sick sinus syndrome, bradycardia can be treated with a single-lead pacemaker or a dual-chamber pacemaker. Previous trials have revealed that pacing modes preserving atrio-ventricular synchrony are superior to single-lead ventricular pacing, but it remains unclear if there is any ...

  20. Atrial-based pacing has no benefit over ventricular pacing in preventing atrial arrhythmias in adults with congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Opic, P.; Yap, S.C.; Kranenburg, M. van; Dijk, A.P.J. van; Budts, W.; Vliegen, H.W.; Erven, L. van; Can, A.; Sahin, G.; Groot, N.M. de; Witsenburg, M.; Roos-Hesselink, J.W.

    2013-01-01

    AIMS: To determine whether atrial-based pacing prevents atrial arrhythmias in adults with congenital heart disease (CHD) compared with ventricular pacing. METHODS AND RESULTS: All adult CHD patients from four participating centres with a permanent pacemaker were identified. Patients with permanent a

  1. Altering embryonic cardiac dynamics with optical pacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, L M; McPheeters, M; Barwick, L; Gu, S; Rollins, A M; Jenkins, M W

    2012-01-01

    Several studies have shown that altering blood flow early in development leads to congenital heart defects. In these studies the perturbations to hemodynamics were very gross manipulations (vessel ligation, conotruncal banding, etc.) that would be inappropriate for probing the delicate mechanisms responsible for mechanically-transduced signaling. Also, these perturbations lacked feedback from a monitoring system to determine the exact degree of alteration and the location of its effect. Here, we employed optical pacing (OP) to alter the heart rate in quail embryos and optical coherence tomography (OCT) to measure the resultant shear forces on the endocardium. OP is a new technique utilizing pulsed 1.851 µm infrared laser light to noninvasively capture the heart rate to the pulse frequency of the laser without the use of exogenous agents. To measure shear stress on the endocardium, we extended our previous OCT algorithms to enable the production of 4-D shear maps. 4-D shear maps allowed observation of the spatial and temporal distribution of shear stress. Employing both OCT and OP, we were able to develop perturbation protocols that increase regurgitant flow and greatly modify the oscillatory shear index (OSI) in a region of the heart tube where future valves will develop. Regurgitant flow has been linked with valve development and precise perturbations may allow one to determine the role of hemodynamics in valvulogenesis.

  2. The evolution of pace in popular movies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutting, James E

    2016-01-01

    Movies have changed dramatically over the last 100 years. Several of these changes in popular English-language filmmaking practice are reflected in patterns of film style as distributed over the length of movies. In particular, arrangements of shot durations, motion, and luminance have altered and come to reflect aspects of the narrative form. Narrative form, on the other hand, appears to have been relatively unchanged over that time and is often characterized as having four more or less equal duration parts, sometimes called acts - setup, complication, development, and climax. The altered patterns in film style found here affect a movie's pace: increasing shot durations and decreasing motion in the setup, darkening across the complication and development followed by brightening across the climax, decreasing shot durations and increasing motion during the first part of the climax followed by increasing shot durations and decreasing motion at the end of the climax. Decreasing shot durations mean more cuts; more cuts mean potentially more saccades that drive attention; more motion also captures attention; and brighter and darker images are associated with positive and negative emotions. Coupled with narrative form, all of these may serve to increase the engagement of the movie viewer.

  3. Pushing the pace of tree species migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eli D Lazarus

    Full Text Available Plants and animals have responded to past climate changes by migrating with habitable environments, sometimes shifting the boundaries of their geographic ranges by tens of kilometers per year or more. Species migrating in response to present climate conditions, however, must contend with landscapes fragmented by anthropogenic disturbance. We consider this problem in the context of wind-dispersed tree species. Mechanisms of long-distance seed dispersal make these species capable of rapid migration rates. Models of species-front migration suggest that even tree species with the capacity for long-distance dispersal will be unable to keep pace with future spatial changes in temperature gradients, exclusive of habitat fragmentation effects. Here we present a numerical model that captures the salient dynamics of migration by long-distance dispersal for a generic tree species. We then use the model to explore the possible effects of assisted colonization within a fragmented landscape under a simulated tree-planting scheme. Our results suggest that an assisted-colonization program could accelerate species-front migration rates enough to match the speed of climate change, but such a program would involve an environmental-sustainability intervention at a massive scale.

  4. A Review of Temporary Cardiac Pacing Wires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: This review aims to tabulate data from all available studies of temporary cardiac pacing wires. Particular aims were to determine the best route of venous access and find ways to reduce complications. The review set out to see if specialist doctors are better at inserting wires than non-specialist doctors. In addition, a contemporary study of wire insertion has been performed to compare modern practice in the UK with the previous studies.Methods: A literature search produced 15 studies available for inclusion. Over 3700 patients from 1973 to 2004 were included. The data was tabulated and attention was given to the route of venous access, the complication rates and whether a specialist or non-specialist doctor had inserted the wire. Results: Internal jugular veins are associated with lowest complication rates and ease of access. Antecubital fossa veins have the highest complication rates. Complication rates are high, especially infections and failure to secure access. Specialist doctors have lower rates of complications than non-specialist doctors. Elderly patient suffer the highest complication rate. Our study showed comparable results to the previous studies.Conclusions: Internal jugular veins are the preferred route for access followed by subclavian and femoral veins. The right side should be used when possible. The use of antibiotics and ultrasound probes must be contemplated for all wire insertions. Alternatives to wire insertion (especially in the elderly must be seriously considered. Setting up an on-call rota would provide experienced doctors to reduce complication rates.

  5. The pace of aging: Intrinsic time scales in demography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Wrycza

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The pace of aging is a concept that captures the time-related aspect of aging. It formalizesthe idea of a characteristic life span or intrinsic population time scale. In the rapidly developing field of comparative biodemography, measures that account for inter-speciesdifferences in life span are needed to compare how species age. Objective: We aim to provide a mathematical foundation for the concept of pace. We derive desiredmathematical properties of pace measures and suggest candidates which satisfy these properties. Subsequently, we introduce the concept of pace-standardization, which reveals differences in demographic quantities that are not due to pace. Examples and consequences are discussed. Conclusions: Mean life span (i.e., life expectancy from birth or from maturity is intuitively appealing,theoretically justified, and the most appropriate measure of pace. Pace-standardizationprovides a serviceable method for comparative aging studies to explore differences indemographic patterns of aging across species, and it may considerably alter conclusionsabout the strength of aging.

  6. The road to right ventricular septal pacing: techniques and tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mond, Harry G

    2010-07-01

    Prolonged right ventricular (RV) apical pacing is associated with progressive left ventricular dysfunction due to dysynchronous ventricular activation and contraction. RV septal pacing allows a narrower QRS compared to RV apical pacing, which might reflect a more physiological and synchronous ventricular activation. Previous clinical studies, which did not consistently achieve RV septal pacing, were not confirmatory and need to be repeated. This review summarizes the anatomy of the RV septum, the radiographic appearances of pacing leads in the RV, the electrocardiograph correlates of RV septal lead positioning, and the techniques and tools required for implantation of an active-fixation lead onto the RV septum. Using the described techniques and tools, conventional active-fixation leads can now be reliably secured to either the RV outflow tract septum or mid-RV septum with very low complication rates and good long-term performance. Even though physiologic and hemodynamic studies on true RV septal pacing have not been completed, the detrimental effects of long-term RV apical pacing are significant enough to suggest that it is now time to leave the RV apex and secure all RV leads onto the septum.

  7. Pacing: a concept analysis of the chronic pain intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamieson-Lega, Kathryn; Berry, Robyn; Brown, Cary A

    2013-01-01

    The intervention of pacing is regularly recommended for chronic pain patients. However, pacing is poorly defined and appears to be interpreted in varying, potentially contradictory manners within the field of chronic pain. This conceptual lack of clarity has implications for effective service delivery and for researchers' ability to conduct rigorous study. An examination of the background literature demonstrates that while pacing is often one part of a multidisciplinary pain management program, outcome research is hindered by a lack of a clear and shared definition of this currently ill-defined construct. To conduct a formal concept analysis of the term 'pacing'. A standardized concept analysis process (including literature scoping to identify all uses of the concept, analysis to determine defining attributes of the concept and identification of model, borderline and contrary cases) was used to determine what the concept of pacing does and does not represent within the current evidence base. A conceptual model including the core attributes of action, time, balance, learning and self-management emerged. From these attributes, an evidence-based definition for pacing was composed and distributed to stakeholders for review. After consideration of stakeholder feedback, the emergent definition of pacing was finalized as follows: "Pacing is an active self-management strategy whereby individuals learn to balance time spent on activity and rest for the purpose of achieving increased function and participation in meaningful activities". The findings of the present concept analysis will help to standardize the use and definition of the term pacing across disciplines for the purposes of both pain management and research.

  8. Pacing: A Concept Analysis of a Chronic Pain Intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn Jamieson-Lega

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The intervention of pacing is regularly recommended for chronic pain patients. However, pacing is poorly defined and appears to be interpreted in varying, potentially contradictory manners within the field of chronic pain. This conceptual lack of clarity has implications for effective service delivery and for researchers’ ability to conduct rigorous study. An examination of the background literature demonstrates that while pacing is often one part of a multidisciplinary pain management program, outcome research is hindered by a lack of a clear and shared definition of this currently ill-defined construct.

  9. Direct His-bundle pacing: present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshmukh, Pramod M; Romanyshyn, Mary

    2004-06-01

    Direct His-bundle pacing (DHBP) produces rapid sequential multisite synchronous ventricular activation and, therefore, would be an ideal alternative to right ventricular apical (RVA) pacing. In 54 patients with cardiomyopathy, ejection fraction (EF) 0.23 +/- 0.11, persistent atrial fibrillation, and normal QRS Treppe effect) was investigated. Twelve patients who also received a RVA lead underwent cardiopulmonary testing. After a mean follow-up of 42 months, 29 patients are still alive with EF improving from 0.23 +/- 0.11 to 0.33 +/- 0.15. Functional class improved from 3.5 to 2.2. DP/dt increased at each pacing site (P Treppe effect and increased cardiopulmonary reserve when compared to RVA pacing.

  10. Tracking the path traversed by temporary pacing lead

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kapoor, Aditya; Moorthy, Nagaraja; Khanna, Roopali; Kumar, Sudeep

    2012-01-01

    ... of stylets and considerable lead maneuvering. We describe an interesting case wherein a temporary pacemaker lead after entering the PLSVC followed an unusual fluoroscopic course with demonstrable pacing in right ventricle (RV), right atrium (RA...

  11. Impedance to transesophageal atrial pacing: significance regarding power sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, C R; Chung, D C; Wickham, G; Jameson, M; Vorderbrugge, S

    1989-06-01

    Transesophageal stimulation is an expeditious method of atrial pacing. Using pulse widths of 10 msec results in reduction of current requirement to values that are usually less than 15 mA. An unknown variable in transesophageal atrial pacing has been impedance. In this study, we investigated the impedance to transesophageal atrial pacing in ten patients using a stimulator with a 63 V power source capable of delivering constant current to 20 mA against an impedance of 2,000 ohms. A bipolar electrode was used to deliver stimuli with a current of 15 mA. Voltage across a known resistance and current were measured on an oscilloscope and the impedance was calculated. Pacing thresholds were also performed and ranged from 6.2 to 16.5 mA (mean 9.4 +/- 2.9 mA, SD). Impedance varied between 720 and 2,670 ohms (mean 1,750 +/- 540 ohms). The stimulator used to measure impedance in man and two other commercially available stimulators were bench tested against known resistances of 500 to 2,000 ohms. The other stimulators with power sources of 12.5 and 15 V had attenuation of the delivered current at resistances of between 1,000 and 2,000 ohms. Thus, this study has demonstrated that transesophageal atrial pacing incurs impedances two to five times greater than incurred with intracardiac pacing leads. Therefore stimulators with high power sources are required to deliver the programmed current against these impedances.

  12. PACE and the Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimring, Mark; Fuller, Merrian

    2010-03-17

    The FHFA regulates Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac, and the 12 Federal Home Loan Banks (the government-sponsored enterprises - GSEs). On June 18, 2009, James B. Lockhart III, then Director of FHFA, released a letter expressing concern about the negative impact of energy loan tax assessment programs (ELTAPs) - also known as Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) programs - on both the housing finance system and homeowner program participants. Subsequently, a number of PACE proponents responded to the concerns laid out in the FHFA letter. In early Fall 2009, word circulated that FHFA was planning to follow its June letter with guidance to other agencies, possibly including Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, discouraging them from buying loans on properties subject to PACE-type assessment liens. This triggered a second round of stakeholder letters, several of which were addressed to President Obama. On October 18, 2009, the White House, in what some believe was an attempt to obviate the need for FHFA guidance, released a Policy Framework for PACE Financing Programs that outlined best practices guidance for homeowner and lender protection. As of February 2010, FHFA and the GSEs have agreed to monitor PACE programs and work with stakeholders and the Administration to consider additional guidance beyond the Policy Framework and to collect more information on PACE program efficacy and risks. A summary of the communications timeline and highlights of the communications are provided.

  13. Pacing and time allocation at the micro- and meso-level within the class hour: Why pacing is important, how to study it, and what it implies for individual lesson planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua Goldsmith

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The topic of pacing at the level of the individual class hour has received relatively little coverage in research literature. In order to provide a research-based take on the issue, the current work surveys the existing literature, develops terminology and draws a key distinction between macro-, meso-, and micro-levels of pacing, sequencing, grading, and transitioning. In order to focus on one of pacing’s constituent sub-topics—the allocation of classroom time—this article presents a case study of a first semester college-level introductory German class at a top-tier American university. The data come from two hours of class, one each from the beginning and end of the semester, in an attempt to discover not only how pacing affects teaching synchronically but also how it might change diachronically. Utterances and gestures were transcribed in order to segment the class into activities and sub-activities, and a model for using verbal and gestural cues to perform this kind of segmentation is proposed. The paper also discusses how the teacher allocates time to different kinds of activities, considering pacing strategies that help keep students focused and “on plan” and how these pacing strategies can allow for more time and activities spent on communicative, pair-based work. It is argued that because of the case study teacher’s focus on pacing and use of various strategies to pace the class, not only researchers but also teachers might be able to generalize the micro- and meso-pacing model described in this study to the pacing of individual lessons in their own classrooms.-------------------------------------------------------------------- L’anàlisi detallada del pacing en una hora de classe és un aspecte poc tractat en la literatura científica. Per garantir una perspectiva basada en resultats empírics, aquest estudi es proposa fer un repàs a la literatura ja publicada sobre el tema, desenvolupar-ne la terminologia i distingir

  14. Comparing maximum rate and sustainability of pacing by mechanical vs. electrical stimulation in the Langendorff-perfused rabbit heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, T Alexander; Kohl, Peter

    2016-12-01

    Mechanical stimulation (MS) represents a readily available, non-invasive means of pacing the asystolic or bradycardic heart in patients, but benefits of MS at higher heart rates are unclear. Our aim was to assess the maximum rate and sustainability of excitation by MS vs. electrical stimulation (ES) in the isolated heart under normal physiological conditions. Trains of local MS or ES at rates exceeding intrinsic sinus rhythm (overdrive pacing; lowest pacing rates 2.5±0.5 Hz) were applied to the same mid-left ventricular free-wall site on the epicardium of Langendorff-perfused rabbit hearts. Stimulation rates were progressively increased, with a recovery period of normal sinus rhythm between each stimulation period. Trains of MS caused repeated focal ventricular excitation from the site of stimulation. The maximum rate at which MS achieved 1:1 capture was lower than during ES (4.2±0.2 vs. 5.9±0.2 Hz, respectively). At all overdrive pacing rates for which repetitive MS was possible, 1:1 capture was reversibly lost after a finite number of cycles, even though same-site capture by ES remained possible. The number of MS cycles until loss of capture decreased with rising stimulation rate. If interspersed with ES, the number of MS to failure of capture was lower than for MS only. In this study, we demonstrate that the maximum pacing rate at which MS can be sustained is lower than that for same-site ES in isolated heart, and that, in contrast to ES, the sustainability of successful 1:1 capture by MS is limited. The mechanism(s) of differences in MS vs. ES pacing ability, potentially important for emergency heart rhythm management, are currently unknown, thus warranting further investigation. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology.

  15. The Pace of Perceivable Extreme Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, X.; Gan, T. Y.

    2015-12-01

    When will the signal of obvious changes in extreme climate emerge over climate variability (Time of Emergence, ToE) is a key question for planning and implementing measures to mitigate the potential impact of climate change to natural and human systems that are generally adapted to potential changes from current variability. We estimated ToEs for the magnitude, duration and frequency of global extreme climate represented by 24 extreme climate indices (16 for temperature and 8 for precipitation) with different thresholds of the signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio based on projections of CMIP5 global climate models under RCP8.5 and RCP4.5 for the 21st century. The uncertainty of ToE is assessed by using 3 different methods to calculate S/N for each extreme index. Results show that ToEs of the projected extreme climate indices based on the RCP4.5 climate scenarios are generally projected to happen about 20 years later than that for the RCP8.5 climate scenarios. Under RCP8.5, the projected magnitude, duration and frequency of extreme temperature on Earth will all exceed 2 standard deviations by 2100, and the empirical 50th percentile of the global ToE for the frequency and magnitude of hot (cold) extreme are about 2040 and 2054 (2064 and 2054) for S/N > 2, respectively. The 50th percentile of global ToE for the intensity of extreme precipitation is about 2030 and 2058 for S/N >0.5 and S/N >1, respectively. We further evaluated the exposure of ecosystems and human societies to the pace of extreme climate change by determining the year of ToE for various extreme climate indices projected to occur over terrestrial biomes, marine realms and major urban areas with large populations. This was done by overlaying terrestrial, ecoregions and population maps with maps of ToE derived, to extract ToEs for these regions. Possible relationships between GDP per person and ToE are also investigated by relating the mean ToE for each country and its average value of GDP per person.

  16. Effects of gastric pacing on gastric emptying and plasma motilin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Yang; Dian-Chun Fang; Qian-Wei Li; Nian-Xu Sun; Qing-Lin Long; Jian-Feng Sui; Lu Gan

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To invertigate the effects of gastric pacing on gastric emptying and plasma motilin level in a canine model of gastric motility disorders and the correlation between gastric emptying and plasma motilin level.METHODS: Ten healthy Mongrel dogs were divided into:experimental group of six dogs and control group of four dogs. A model of gastric motility disorders was established in the experimental group undergone truncal vagotomy combined with injection of glucagon. Gastric half-emptying time (GEt1/2) was monitored with single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT), and the half-solid test meal was labeled with an isotope-99m Tc sulfur colloid. Plasma motilin concentration was measured with radioimmunoassay (RIA) kit. Surface gastric pacing at 1.1-1.2 times the intrinsic slow-wave frequency and a superimposed series of high frequency pulses (10-30 Hz) was performed for 45 min daily for a month in conscious dogs.RESULTS: After surgery, GEt1/2 in dogs undergone truncal vagotomy was increased significantly from 56.35±2.99 min to 79.42±l.91 min (P<0.001), but surface gastric pacing markedly accelerated gastric emptying and significantly decreased GEt1/2 to 64,94±l.75 min (P<0.001) in animals undergone vagotomy. There was a significant increase of plasma level of motilin at the phase of IMCⅢ (interdigertive myoelectrical complex, IMCⅢ) in the dogs undergone bilateral truncal vagotomy (baseline vs vagotomy, 184.29±9.81 pg/ml vs 242.09±17,22 pg/ml; P<0.01). But plasma motilin concentration (212.55±11.20 pg/ml; P<0.02) was decreased significantly after a long-term treatment with gastric pacing.Before gastric pacing, GEt1/2 and plasma motilin concentration of the dogs undergone vagotomy showed a positive correlation (r=0.867, P<0.01), but after a long-term gastric pacing, GEt1/2 and motilin level showed a negative correlation (r=-0.733, P<0,04).CONCLUSION: Surface gastric pacing with optimal pacing parameters can improve gastric emptying

  17. Right ventricular pacing: the best site is yet to be defined

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li ZHOU; Brian Olshansky

    2005-01-01

    @@ The right ventricular (RV) apex is the traditional site to provide stable and reliable chronic ventricular pacing. Interest in alternate site pacing has grown since RV apical pacing has been associated with increased mortality and morbidity compared to normal atrio-ventricular conduction. 1-4 Alternate pacing sites include the RV septum and outflow tract.

  18. Effect of left ventricular pacing mode and site on hemodynamic, torsional and strain indices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savvas Toumanidis

    2016-05-01

    Conclusions: LV pacing at the apical or lateral wall, in the ischemic myocardium, leads to a suboptimal response in comparison to sinus rhythm. LV pacing at the apex outside the ischemic area exhibits a better response than pacing at the lateral wall, possibly because pacing from this site leads to a more physiological propagation of electrical conduction.

  19. Temporary Pacing in the Correction of Drug-Induced Bradycardia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. E. Khoronenko

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to reduce the risk from surgical treatment in geriatric cancer patients with severe concomitant cardiovascular (CV diseases through the differentiated intra- and postoperative use of pacing technologies for correction of life-threatening cardiac rhythm and conduction disturbances.Subjects and methods. Two hundred and eight patients (mean age 72.0±5.8 years receiving pulse-reducing cardiotropic therapy to compensate for CV disorders, who had undergone extensive radical surgical interventions for abdominal and small pelvic malignancies of mainly Stage III (mean duration 4.2±1.6 hours under multimodal general anesthesia, were examined. A pacing technique was chosen depending on the pattern of arrhythmia and antrioventricular (AV block.Results. During CV therapy, bradycardia at a heart rate of 44 to 57 beats per min was identified in 71 (34.1% patients. Perioperative pacing correction of bradycardia was required in 58 (27.9% patients, of them 46 had no AV conduction disturbances, which permitted the use of transesophageal atrial pacing (TEAC. Endocardial pacing was performed in 12 patients with impaired AV conduction and bradysystole in the presence of persistent atrial fibrillation during and early after surgery. In the postoperative period, it was necessary to continue long-term (more than 20 hours TEAC in the asynchronous mode in 7 patients. Extensive surgical interventions of the planned volume were made in all the patients being examined. None patient had any CV events, including pacing complications.Conclusion. Temporary pacing techniques are effective in correcting critical circulatory disorders during surgical treatment in elderly patients with persistent drug-induced bradycardia when they are treated with cardiotropic drugs. 

  20. T wave alternans during exercise and atrial pacing in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohnloser, S. H.; Klingenheben, T.; Zabel, M.; Li, Y. G.; Albrecht, P.; Cohen, R. J.

    1997-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Evidence is accumulating that microvolt T wave alternans (TWA) is a marker of increased risk for ventricular tachyarrhythmias. Initially, atrial pacing was used to elevate heart rate and elicit TWA. More recently, a noninvasive approach has been developed that elevates heart rate using exercise. METHODS AND RESULTS: In 30 consecutive patients with a history of ventricular tachyarrhythmias, the spectral method was used to detect TWA during both atrial pacing and submaximal exercise testing. The concordance rate for the presence or absence of TWA using the two measurement methods was 84%. There was a patient-specific heart rate threshold for the detection of TWA that averaged 100 +/- 14 beats/min during exercise compared with 97 +/- 9 beats/min during right atrial pacing (P = NS). Beyond this threshold, there was a significant and comparable increase in level of TWA with decreasing pacing cycle length and increasing exercise heart rates. CONCLUSIONS: The present study is the first to demonstrate that microvolt TWA can be assessed reliably and noninvasively during exercise stress. There is a patient-specific heart rate threshold beyond which TWA continues to increase with increasing heart rates. Heart rate thresholds for the onset of TWA measured during atrial pacing and exercise stress were comparable, indicating that heart rate alone appears to be the main factor of determining the onset of TWA during submaximal exercise stress.

  1. Cardiac pacing in left bundle branch/ bifascicular block patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maddali Madan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The primary concern in patients with bifascicular block is the increased risk of progression to complete heart block. Further, an additional first-degree A-V block in patients with bifascicular block or LBBB might increase the risk of block progression. Anesthesia, monitoring and surgical techniques can induce conduction defects and bradyarrhythmias in patients with pre-existing bundle branch block. In the setting of an acute MI, several different types of conduction disturbance may become manifest and complete heart block occurs usually in patients with acute myocardial infarction more commonly if there is pre-existing or new bundle branch block. The question that arises is whether it is necessary to insert a temporary pacing catheter in patients with bifascicular block undergoing anesthesia. It is important that an anesthesiologist should be aware of the indications for temporary cardiac pacing as well as the current recommendations for permanent pacing in patients with chronic bifascicular and trifascicular block. This article also highlights the recent guidelines for temporary transvenous pacing in the setting of acute MI and the different pacing modalities that are available for an anesthesiologist.

  2. Cardiac Pacing and Defibrillation in Children and Young Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harinder R. Singh, MD, CCDS

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The population of children and young adults requiring a cardiac pacing device has been consistently increasing. The current generation of devices are small with a longer battery life, programming capabilities that can cater to the demands of the young patients and ability to treat brady and tachyarrhythmias as well as heart failure. This has increased the scope and clinical indications of using these devices. As patients with congenital heart disease (CHD comprise majority of these patients requiring devices, the knowledge of indications, pacing leads and devices, anatomical variations and the technical skills required are different than that required in the adult population. In this review we attempt to discuss these specific points in detail to improve the understanding of cardiac pacing in children and young adults.

  3. Optogenetics for in vivo cardiac pacing and resynchronization therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nussinovitch, Udi; Gepstein, Lior

    2015-07-01

    Abnormalities in the specialized cardiac conduction system may result in slow heart rate or mechanical dyssynchrony. Here we apply optogenetics, widely used to modulate neuronal excitability, for cardiac pacing and resynchronization. We used adeno-associated virus (AAV) 9 to express the Channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) transgene at one or more ventricular sites in rats. This allowed optogenetic pacing of the hearts at different beating frequencies with blue-light illumination both in vivo and in isolated perfused hearts. Optical mapping confirmed that the source of the new pacemaker activity was the site of ChR2 transgene delivery. Notably, diffuse illumination of hearts where the ChR2 transgene was delivered to several ventricular sites resulted in electrical synchronization and significant shortening of ventricular activation times. These findings highlight the unique potential of optogenetics for cardiac pacing and resynchronization therapies.

  4. Pacing during an ultramarathon running event in hilly terrain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo A. Kerhervé

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose The dynamics of speed selection as a function of distance, or pacing, are used in recreational, competitive, and scientific research situations as an indirect measure of the psycho-physiological status of an individual. The purpose of this study was to determine pacing on level, uphill and downhill sections of participants in a long (>80 km ultramarathon performed on trails in hilly terrain. Methods Fifteen ultramarathon runners competed in a  173 km event (five finished at  103 km carrying a Global-Positioning System (GPS device. Using the GPS data, we determined the speed, relative to average total speed, in level (LEV, uphill (UH and downhill (DH gradient categories as a function of total distance, as well as the correlation between overall performance and speed variability, speed loss, and total time stopped. Results There were no significant differences in normality, variances or means in the relative speed in 173-km and 103-km participants. Relative speed decreased in LEV, UH and DH. The main component of speed loss occurred between 5% and 50% of the event distance in LEV, and between 5% and 95% in UH and DH. There were no significant correlations between overall performance and speed loss, the variability of speed, or total time stopped. Conclusions Positive pacing was observed at all gradients, with the main component of speed loss occurring earlier (mixed pacing in LEV compared to UH and DH. A speed reserve (increased speed in the last section was observed in LEV and UH. The decrease in speed and variability of speed were more important in LEV and DH than in UH. The absence of a significant correlation between overall performance and descriptors of pacing is novel and indicates that pacing in ultramarathons in trails and hilly terrain differs to other types of running events.

  5. [Anesthesic management of thoracic aortic stent graft deployment using rapid ventricular pacing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagishi, Akio; Kunisawa, Takayuki; Katsumi, Norifumi; Nagashima, Michio; Takahata, Osamu; Iwasaki, Hiroshi

    2008-08-01

    Controlled hypotension is useful for accurate deployment of an aortic endograft. We describe the use of rapid ventricular pacing during thoracic aortic stent graft deployment. Anesthesia was induced and maintained with intravenous propofol and remifentanil. A pulmonary artery catheter with pacing function was introduced, and rapid ventricular pacing was started before stent graft deployment. Pacing mode was VVI and pacing rate was 120-160 beats min(-1). Aortic pressure and flow decreased immediately and were maintained at low levels during surgical manipulation. After stopping rapid ventricular pacing, heart rate and aortic pressure recovered immediately. Rapid ventricular pacing was performed 4 times, and there were no complications such as entailed arrhythmia. With rapid ventricular pacing maneuver, which is thought to cause a rapid change in cardiac output, continuous cardiac output measurement can be a useful monitor. This procedure has advantages over pharmacologic or other methods of aortic pressure reduction. Rapid ventricular pacing is safe and effective during stent graft positioning and deployment.

  6. "Set the Pace": Nutrition Education DVD for Head Start Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adedze, Pascasie; Orr, Robin A.; Chapman-Novakofski, Karen; Donovan, Sharon M.

    2013-01-01

    Childhood overweight remains a major public health problem and innovative nutrition education programs are still needed. Thus, the "Set the Pace" is a nutrition education DVD for Head Start parents which provides visual nutrition education and physical activities to incorporate in their daily routines. (Contains 1 table.)

  7. Hardware packet pacing using a DMA in a parallel computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dong; Heidelberger, Phillip; Vranas, Pavlos

    2013-08-13

    Method and system for hardware packet pacing using a direct memory access controller in a parallel computer which, in one aspect, keeps track of a total number of bytes put on the network as a result of a remote get operation, using a hardware token counter.

  8. Design Recommendations for Self-Paced Online Faculty Development Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzuto, Melissa

    2017-01-01

    An increased need for self-paced, online professional development opportunities in higher education has emerged from a variety of factors including dispersed geographic locations of faculty, full teaching loads, and institutional evaluation requirements. This article is a report of the examination of the design and evaluation of a self-paced…

  9. How do we perceive activity pacing in rheumatology care?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cuperus, N.; Vliet Vlieland, T.; Brodin, N.

    2015-01-01

    that future research should focus on the effectiveness of activity pacing interventions and on appropriate outcome measures to assess its effectiveness, as selected by 64% and 82% of the panellists, respectively. Conclusions: The diversity and number of items included in the consensual list developed...

  10. 'Human paced' walking: Followers adopt stride time dynamics of leaders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marmelat, V.C.M.; Delignières, D.; Torre, K.; Beek, P.J.; Daffertshofer, A.

    2014-01-01

    Isochronous cueing is widely used in gait rehabilitation even though it alters the stride-time dynamics toward anti-persistent rather than the persistent, fractal fluctuations characteristic of human walking. In the present experiment we tested an alternative cueing method: pacing by a human. To thi

  11. 42 CFR 460.180 - Medicare payment to PACE organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... risk adjustment model. (5) CMS may adjust the monthly capitation amount to take into account other... or Federal workers' compensation, any no-fault insurance, or any liability insurance policy or plan, including a self-insured plan, the PACE organization may charge any of the following: (i) The...

  12. Self-Paced Instruction Methods in a Required Sophomore Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Franklin G.; Hossain, Muhammad A.

    1984-01-01

    Compares a personalized system of instruction (PSI) to the lecture method and linear self-paced instruction (LSPI) of teaching stoichiometry to undergraduate students. Discusses the methods used to assess student achievement which includes: the use of common midterms and final examinations; and modules, mini-courses and mini-course final exams.…

  13. The Effects of Self-Paced Blended Learning of Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balentyne, Phoebe; Varga, Mary Alice

    2016-01-01

    As online and blended learning gain more popularity in education, it becomes more important to understand their effects on student learning. The purpose of this study was to explore the effects of self-paced blended learning of mathematics on the attitudes and achievement of 26 high ability middle school students, and investigate the relationship…

  14. "Set the Pace": Nutrition Education DVD for Head Start Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adedze, Pascasie; Orr, Robin A.; Chapman-Novakofski, Karen; Donovan, Sharon M.

    2013-01-01

    Childhood overweight remains a major public health problem and innovative nutrition education programs are still needed. Thus, the "Set the Pace" is a nutrition education DVD for Head Start parents which provides visual nutrition education and physical activities to incorporate in their daily routines. (Contains 1 table.)

  15. Entrainment of Activation during Ventricular Fibrillation (VF) by Distributed Pacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yiping; Moghe, Sachin; Patwardhan, Abhijit

    2002-03-01

    Optical mapping and pacing studies show excitable gaps during VF. This observation supports entrainment of activation by spatially distributed pacing. Such pacing approach would be enhanced by availability of an index of spatio-temporal heterogeneity in activation. We use simulations to demonstrate feasibility of entraining activations and of using spatially averaged coherence as an index of uniformity in activation. We used a Luo-Rudy model to simulate VF in a matrix of 400x400 cells. Stimuli were delivered from 8 rows of electrodes. Trans-membrane voltages from nine locations spanning the entrained area were used to compute 6 time-coherencies. Average of 6 coherencies was used as an index of uniformity of activations. Results showed that when stimuli were delivered at cycle lengths slightly shorter than intrinsic activation intervals, activations during VF could be entrained into a planar pattern. As expected, average coherence was low during native VF and increased during entrainment. Thus, distributed pacing and time-coherence may be used to entrain and modify activation during VF.

  16. 77 FR 3958 - Mortgage Assets Affected by PACE Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-26

    ... that would flow from the same project if financed in any other manner? Question 7: How does the effect... cash flow to service the PACE obligation in addition to the homeowner-borrower's pre-existing financial... prepare environmental impact statement; request for scoping comments. SUMMARY: The Federal Housing Finance...

  17. The pace of shifting climate in marine and terrestrial ecosystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burrows, Michael T.; Schoeman, David S.; Buckley, Lauren B.

    2011-01-01

    Climate change challenges organisms to adapt or move to track changes in environments in space and time. We used two measures of thermal shifts from analyses of global temperatures over the past 50 years to describe the pace of climate change that species should track: the velocity of climate cha...

  18. Gait coordination after stroke: Benefits of acoustically paced treadmill walking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roerdink, Melvyn; Lamoth, Claudine J.C.; Kwakkel, Gert; Van Wieringen, Piet C.W.; Beek, Peter J.

    2007-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Gait coordination often is compromised after stroke. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of acoustically paced treadmill walking as a method for improving gait coordination in people after stroke. Participants: Ten people after stroke volunteered for the st

  19. Gait coordination after stroke: benefits of acoustically paced treadmill walking.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roerdink, M.; Lamoth, C.J.; Kwakkel, G.; Wieringen, P.C. van; Beek, P.J.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Gait coordination often is compromised after stroke. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of acoustically paced treadmill walking as a method for improving gait coordination in people after stroke. PARTICIPANTS: Ten people after stroke volunteered for the st

  20. Kentucky's Parent and Child Education (PACE) Program. Innovations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devlin, Kevin M.

    A lack of education is a major cause of poverty among many Kentucky citizens. In 1986, Kentucky's dropout rate was the second highest of the 50 states. That same year, Kentucky established the Parent and Child Education (PACE) Program in an effort to combat the problems of insufficient education and poverty that tend to be perpetuated from…

  1. Ventricular pacing in single ventricles-A bad combination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulic, Anica; Zimmerman, Frank J; Ceresnak, Scott R; Shetty, Ira; Motonaga, Kara S; Freter, Anne; Trela, Anthony V; Hanisch, Deb; Russo, Lisa; Avasarala, Kishor; Dubin, Anne M

    2017-06-01

    Chronic ventricular pacing (VP) is associated with systolic dysfunction in a subset of pediatric patients with heart block and structurally normal hearts. The effect of chronic VP in congenital heart disease is less well understood, specifically in the single-ventricle (SV) population. To determine the longitudinal effect of VP in SV patients. SV patients with heart block and dual-chamber pacemakers requiring >50% VP were compared with nonpaced (controls) SV patients matched for age, sex, and SV morphology. Patients were excluded if a prepacing echocardiogram was not available. Echocardiogram and clinical parameters were compared at baseline (prepacing) and at last follow-up in the paced group, and in controls when they were at ages similar to those of their paced-group matches. Twenty-two paced and 53 control patients from 2 institutions were followed for similar durations (6.6±5 years vs 7.6±7.6 years; P = .59). There was no difference between groups regarding baseline ventricular function or the presence of moderate-to-severe atrioventricular valvar regurgitation (AVVR). Paced patients were more likely to develop moderate-to-severe systolic dysfunction (68% vs 15%; P < .01) and AVVR (55% vs 8%; P < .001) and require heart failure medications (65% vs 21%; P < .001). Chronic VP was also associated with a higher risk of transplantation or death (odds ratio, 4.9; 95% confidence interval, 1.05-22.7; P = .04). SV patients requiring chronic VP are at higher risk of developing moderate-to-severe ventricular dysfunction and AVVR with an increased risk of death or transplantation compared with controls. New strategies to either limit VP or improve synchronization in this vulnerable population is imperative. Copyright © 2017 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. SolarPaces: genealogy of an international research program; SolarPaces: genealogie d`un programme international de recherche

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pharabod, F.; Lede, J. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 75 - Paris (France); Lefevre, P.; D`Humieres, B.; Forget, F.

    1998-07-01

    What are the stakes of SolarPaces, the solar research program of the International Energy Agency (IEA)? The explanations are given by Francais Pharabod and Jacques Lede which analyze the France joining conditions in this program and evoke the industrial repercussions. (O.M.)

  3. Chronic atrial fibrillation and stroke in paced patients with sick sinus syndrome. Relevance of clinical characteristics and pacing modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgarbossa, E B; Pinski, S L; Maloney, J D; Simmons, T W; Wilkoff, B L; Castle, L W; Trohman, R G

    1993-09-01

    The goal of the report was to study the long-term incidence and the independent predictors for chronic atrial fibrillation and stroke in 507 paced patients with sick sinus syndrome, adjusting for differences in baseline clinical variables with multivariate analysis. From 1980 to 1989, we implanted 376 dual-chamber, 19 atrial, and 112 ventricular pacemakers to treat patients with sick sinus syndrome. After a maximum follow-up of 134 months (mean: 59 +/- 38 months for chronic atrial fibrillation, 65 +/- 37 months for stroke), actuarial incidence of chronic atrial fibrillation was 7% at 1 year, 16% at 5 years, and 28% at 10 years. Independent predictors for this event, from Cox's proportional hazards model, were history of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (P < .001; hazard ratio [HR] = 16.84), use of antiarrhythmic drugs before pacemaker implant (P < .001; HR = 2.25), ventricular pacing mode (P = .003; HR = 1.98), age (P = .005; HR = 1.03), and valvular heart disease (P = .008; HR = 2.05). For patients with preimplant history of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation, independent predictors were prolonged episodes of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (P < .001; HR = 2.56), long history of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (P = .004; HR = 2.05), ventricular pacing mode (P = .025; HR = 1.69), use of antiarrhythmic drugs before pacemaker implant (P = .024; HR = 1.71), and age (P = .04; HR = 1.02). Actuarial incidence of stroke was 3% at 1 year, 5% at 5 years, and 13% at 10 years. Independent predictors for stroke were history of cerebrovascular disease (P < .001; HR = 5.22), ventricular pacing mode (P = .008; HR = 2.61), and history of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (P = .037; HR = 2.81). Development of chronic atrial fibrillation and stroke in paced patients with sick sinus syndrome are strongly determined by clinical variables and secondarily by the pacing modality. Ventricular pacing mode predicts chronic atrial fibrillation in patients with preimplant paroxysmal atrial fibrillation

  4. Reader Comment: A Realistic Appraisal of First Efforts at Self-Paced Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craver, W. Lionel, Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Examines a number of reasons for the apparent failure of self-paced instruction when it is first adopted by enthusiastic engineering instructors, and describes how and why the typical self-paced course improves during the second offering. (JR)

  5. Impact of the permanent ventricular pacing site on left ventricular function in children : a retrospective multicentre survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Geldorp, Irene E.; Delhaas, Tammo; Gebauer, Roman A.; Frias, Patrick; Tomaske, Maren; Friedberg, Mark K.; Tisma-Dupanovic, Svjetlana; Elders, Jan; Fruh, Andreas; Gabbarini, Fulvio; Kubus, Petr; Illikova, Viera; Tsao, Sabrina; Blank, Andreas Christian; Hiippala, Anita; Sluysmans, Thierry; Karpawich, Peter; Clur, Sally-Ann; Ganame, Xavier; Collins, Kathryn K.; Dann, Gisela; Thambo, Jean-Benoit; Trigo, Conceicao; Nagel, Bert; Papagiannis, John; Rackowitz, Annette; Marek, Jan; Nuernberg, Jan-Hendrik; Vanagt, Ward Y.; Prinzen, Frits W.; Janousek, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Background Chronic right ventricular (RV) pacing is associated with deleterious effects on cardiac function. Objective In an observational multicentre study in children with isolated atrioventricular (AV) block receiving chronic ventricular pacing, the importance of the ventricular pacing site on le

  6. "U-Pace" Instruction: Improving Student Success by Integrating Content Mastery and Amplified Assistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Diane M.; Pfeiffer, Heidi M.; Fleming, Raymond; Ports, Katie A.; Pedrick, Laura E.; Barnack-Tavlaris, Jessica L.; Jirovec, Danielle L.; Helion, Alicia M.; Swain, Rodney A.

    2013-01-01

    "U-Pace," an instructional intervention, has potential for widespread implementation because student behavior recorded in any learning management system is used by "U-Pace" instructors to tailor coaching of student learning based on students' strengths and motivations. "U-Pace" utilizes an online learning environment…

  7. Japanese Flagship Universities at a Crossroads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonezawa, Akiyoshi

    2007-01-01

    The increasing pace and scope of global structural change has left Japanese flagship universities at a crossroads. Reflecting upon historical trends, current policy changes and respective institutional strategies for global marketing among Japanese top research universities, the author discusses possible future directions for these institutions…

  8. Biventricular pacing as bridge to rapid recovery in infancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragulescu, Andreea; Bilska, Karolina; Van Doorn, Catharina; Goldman, Allan; Marek, Jan

    2010-09-01

    The authors present the unique case of an 8-month-old baby diagnosed with severe left ventricular failure of unknown etiology. Due to a lack of organ availability for this age, a mechanical assist device and assessment for cardiac transplantation were not offered. Subsequent comprehensive echocardiographic dyssynchrony assessment and the presence of left bundle branch block were suggestive of response to cardiac resynchronization therapy. Dual-chamber epicardial pacing was initiated, resulting in prompt marked clinical and echocardiographic improvement, which continued until complete normalization of cardiac function. The pacing system was safely turned off 6 months after its implantation. In conclusion, cardiac resynchronization therapy should be considered as a treatment option even in infancy, regardless of the etiology of disease and/or patient age. 2010 American Society of Echocardiography. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. 640 X 480 Pace HgCdTe FPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlowski, Lester J.; Bailey, Robert B.; Cabelli, Scott A.; Cooper, Donald E.; McComas, Gail D.; Vural, Kadri; Tennant, William E.

    1992-12-01

    A hybrid HgCdTe 640 X 480 infrared (IR) focal plane array (FPA) that meets the sensitivity, resolution, and field-of-view requirements of high-performance medium wavelength infrared (MWIR) imaging systems has been developed. The key technology making this large, high sensitivity device producible is the epitaxial growth of HgCdTe on a CdTe-buffered, sapphire substrate (referred to as PACE, for Producible Alternative to CdTe for Epitaxy; PACE-I refers to sapphire). The device offers TV resolution with excellent sensitivity at temperatures below 120 K. Mean NE(Delta) T as low as 13 mK has been achieved at operating temperatures nonuniformity compensation.

  10. The pace of vocabulary growth helps predict later vocabulary skill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Meredith L; Raudenbush, Stephen W; Goldin-Meadow, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Children vary widely in the rate at which they acquire words--some start slow and speed up, others start fast and continue at a steady pace. Do early developmental variations of this sort help predict vocabulary skill just prior to kindergarten entry? This longitudinal study starts by examining important predictors (socioeconomic status [SES], parent input, child gesture) of vocabulary growth between 14 and 46 months (n = 62) and then uses growth estimates to predict children's vocabulary at 54 months. Velocity and acceleration in vocabulary development at 30 months predicted later vocabulary, particularly for children from low-SES backgrounds. Understanding the pace of early vocabulary growth thus improves our ability to predict school readiness and may help identify children at risk for starting behind.

  11. De pace fidei: de la libertad a la tolerancia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enzo Solari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Este articulo resume las articulaciones fundamentales de De pace fidei, luego de lo cual muestra algunas de sus mejores interpretaciones recientes y plantea ciertas cuestiones que adn merece la pena explorar en aquella obra, particularmente la de su conexión con la filosofia de la libertad del Cusano y la del reflejo ya renacentista que tal filosofia halla en la oratio de Pico della Mirandola.This article summarizes the fundamental reasonings in De pace fidei and goes on to show some of their most relevant recent readings, to finally lay down some questions which are still worth exploring in the cited work, in particular its connection with the philosophy of freedom of the Cusanus and the reflection, with renaissance spirit, which such philosophy finds in the oratio of Pico della Mirandola.

  12. The Pace and Shape of Senescence in Angiosperms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baudisch, Annette; Salguero-Gómez, Roberto; Jones, Owen

    2013-01-01

    age-specific trajectories from 290 angiosperm species of various growth forms distributed globally. From these trajectories, we survey pace and shape values and investigate how growth form and ecoregion influence these two aspects of mortality using a Bayesian regression analysis that accounts...... for phylogenetic relationships using a resolved supertree. 4. In contrast to the animal kingdom, most angiosperms (93%) show no senescence. Senescence is observed among phanerophytes (i.e. trees), but not among any other growth form (e.g. epiphytes, chamaephytes or cryptopyhtes). Yet, most phanerophytes (81%) do...... not senesce. We find that growth form relates to differences in pace, that is, life span, as woody plants are typically longer lived than nonwoody plants, while differences in shape, that is, whether or not angiosperms senesce, are related to ancestral history. 5. Synthesis: The age trajectory of mortality...

  13. Alternate Pacing of Border-Collision Period-Doubling Bifurcations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaopeng; Schaeffer, David G

    2007-11-01

    Unlike classical bifurcations, border-collision bifurcations occur when, for example, a fixed point of a continuous, piecewise C1 map crosses a boundary in state space. Although classical bifurcations have been much studied, border-collision bifurcations are not well understood. This paper considers a particular class of border-collision bifurcations, i.e., border-collision period-doubling bifurcations. We apply a subharmonic perturbation to the bifurcation parameter, which is also known as alternate pacing, and we investigate the response under such pacing near the original bifurcation point. The resulting behavior is characterized quantitatively by a gain, which is the ratio of the response amplitude to the applied perturbation amplitude. The gain in a border-collision period-doubling bifurcation has a qualitatively different dependence on parameters from that of a classical period-doubling bifurcation. Perhaps surprisingly, the differences are more readily apparent if the gain is plotted vs. the perturbation amplitude (with the bifurcation parameter fixed) than if plotted vs. the bifurcation parameter (with the perturbation amplitude fixed). When this observation is exploited, the gain under alternate pacing provides a useful experimental tool to identify a border-collision period-doubling bifurcation.

  14. Tropical birds have a slow pace of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiersma, Popko; Muñoz-Garcia, Agustí; Walker, Amy; Williams, Joseph B

    2007-05-29

    Tropical birds are relatively long-lived and produce few offspring, which develop slowly and mature relatively late in life, the slow end of the life-history axis, whereas temperate birds lie at the opposite end of this continuum. We tested the hypothesis that tropical birds have evolved a reduced basal metabolic rate (BMR). We measured BMR of 69 species of tropical birds, the largest data set amassed on metabolic rates of tropical birds, and compared these measurements with 59 estimates of BMR for temperate birds. Our analyses included conventional least squares regression, regressions based on phylogenetic independent contrasts, and a comparison of BMR of 13 phylogenetically matched pairs, one species from the tropics and one from northerly temperate areas. Our triptych showed that tropical birds had a reduced BMR, compelling evidence for a connection between the life history of tropical birds and a slow pace of life. Further, tropical migrants breeding in temperate habitats had a lower BMR than did temperate residents, suggesting that these migrants have physiological traits consistent with a slow pace of life. In addition, we determined that tropical birds had a lower cold-induced peak metabolic rate and thermogenic metabolic scope than temperate species, a finding that is consistent with the hypothesis that their environment has not selected for high levels of thermogenesis, or alternatively, that a slow pace of life may be incompatible with high thermogenic capacity. We conclude that physiological function correlates with the suite of life-history traits.

  15. Speed, pacing strategy and aerodynamic drafting in Thoroughbred horse racing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, Andrew J; Thurman, Andrew S; Maher, Michael J; Wilson, Alan M

    2012-08-23

    Choice of pacing strategy and the benefit of aerodynamic drafting are thought to be key determinants of racing performance. These effects have largely been analysed without reference to final outcome, in small datasets with low temporal resolution, and a focus on human swimming, cycling and running. Here, we determined the position and speed of 44,803 racehorses, once per second, in 3,357 races ranging in length from 1006 to 4225 m (50.9-292.9 seconds duration) using a validated radio tracking system. We find that aerodynamic drafting has a marked effect on horse performance, and hence racing outcome. Furthermore, we demonstrate that race length-dependent pacing strategies are correlated with the fastest racing times, with some horses reaching a maximum speed in excess of 19 m s(-1). The higher speeds seen with certain pacing strategies may arise due to the nature of pack racing itself, or may be a reflection of individual capabilities, that is, corresponding to horses that perform well in roles suited to their 'front-running' or 'chaser' personality traits.

  16. Unilateral Laryngeal Pacing System and Its Functional Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taiping Zeng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Goal. To establish a reliable instrumental system for synchronized reactivation of a unilaterally paralyzed vocal fold and evaluate its functional feasibility. Methods. Unilateral vocal fold paralysis model was induced by destruction of the left recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN in anesthetized dogs. With a micro controller-based electronic system, electromyography (EMG signals from cricothyroid (CT muscle on the ipsilateral side were recorded and used to trigger pacing of paralyzed vocalis muscles. The dynamic movement of vocal folds was continuously monitored using an endoscope, and the opening and closing of the glottis were quantified with customized imaging processing software. Results. The recorded video images showed that left side vocal fold was obviously paralyzed after destructing the RLN. Using the pacing system with feedback triggering EMG signals from the ipsilateral CT muscle, the paralyzed vocal fold was successfully reactivated, and its movement was shown to be synchronized with the healthy side. Significance. The developed unilateral laryngeal pacing system triggered by EMG from the ipsilateral side CT muscle could be successfully used in unilateral vocal fold paralysis with the advantage of avoiding disturbance to the healthy side muscles.

  17. MRI with cardiac pacing devices – Safety in clinical practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaasalainen, Touko, E-mail: touko.kaasalainen@hus.fi [HUS Medical Imaging Center, Helsinki University Central Hospital, POB 340 (Haartmaninkatu 4), 00290 Helsinki (Finland); Department of Physics, University of Helsinki (Finland); Pakarinen, Sami, E-mail: sami.pakarinen@hus.fi [HUS Department of Cardiology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, POB 340 (Haartmaninkatu 4), 00290 Helsinki (Finland); Kivistö, Sari, E-mail: sari.kivisto@hus.fi [HUS Medical Imaging Center, Helsinki University Central Hospital, POB 340 (Haartmaninkatu 4), 00290 Helsinki (Finland); Holmström, Miia, E-mail: miia.holmstrom@hus.fi [HUS Medical Imaging Center, Helsinki University Central Hospital, POB 340 (Haartmaninkatu 4), 00290 Helsinki (Finland); Hänninen, Helena, E-mail: helena.hanninen@hus.fi [HUS Department of Cardiology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, POB 340 (Haartmaninkatu 4), 00290 Helsinki (Finland); Peltonen, Juha, E-mail: juha.peltonen@hus.fi [HUS Medical Imaging Center, Helsinki University Central Hospital, POB 340 (Haartmaninkatu 4), 00290 Helsinki (Finland); Department of Biomedical Engineering and Computational Science, School of Science, Aalto University, Helsinki (Finland); Lauerma, Kirsi, E-mail: kirsi.lauerma@hus.fi [HUS Medical Imaging Center, Helsinki University Central Hospital, POB 340 (Haartmaninkatu 4), 00290 Helsinki (Finland); Sipilä, Outi, E-mail: outi.sipila@hus.fi [HUS Medical Imaging Center, Helsinki University Central Hospital, POB 340 (Haartmaninkatu 4), 00290 Helsinki (Finland)

    2014-08-15

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to introduce a single centre “real life” experience of performing MRI examinations in clinical practice on patients with cardiac pacemaker systems. Additionally, we aimed to evaluate the safety of using a dedicated safety protocol for these patients. Materials and methods: We used a 1.5 T MRI scanner to conduct 68 MRI scans of different body regions in patients with pacing systems. Of the cardiac devices, 32% were MR-conditional, whereas the remaining 68% were MR-unsafe. We recorded the functional parameters of the devices prior, immediately after, and approximately one month after the MRI scanning, and compared the device parameters to the baseline values. Results: All MRI examinations were completed safely, and each device could be interrogated normally following the MRI. We observed no changes in the programmed parameters of the devices. For most of the participants, the distributions of the immediate and one-month changes in the device parameters were within 20% of the baseline values, although some changes approached clinically important thresholds. Furthermore, we observed no differences in the variable changes between MR-conditional and MR-unsafe pacing systems, or between scans of the thorax area and other scanned areas. Conclusion: MRI in patients with MR-conditional pacing systems and selected MR-unsafe systems could be performed safely under strict conditions in this study.

  18. Combined obliquity and precession pacing of late Pleistocene deglaciations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huybers, Peter

    2011-12-08

    Milankovitch proposed that Earth resides in an interglacial state when its spin axis both tilts to a high obliquity and precesses to align the Northern Hemisphere summer with Earth's nearest approach to the Sun. This general concept has been elaborated into hypotheses that precession, obliquity or combinations of both could pace deglaciations during the late Pleistocene. Earlier tests have shown that obliquity paces the late Pleistocene glacial cycles but have been inconclusive with regard to precession, whose shorter period of about 20,000 years makes phasing more sensitive to timing errors. No quantitative test has provided firm evidence for a dual effect. Here I show that both obliquity and precession pace late Pleistocene glacial cycles. Deficiencies in time control that have long stymied efforts to establish orbital effects on deglaciation are overcome using a new statistical test that focuses on maxima in orbital forcing. The results are fully consistent with Milankovitch's proposal but also admit the possibility that long Southern Hemisphere summers contribute to deglaciation.

  19. Diritto internazionale umanitario, guerra e pace, diritti delle persone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Barberini

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available SOMMARIO: 1. Il diritto umanitario nei conflitti armati - 2. La codificazione del diritto umanitario - 3. Diritto della guerra e diritto della pace - 4. L’articolo 11 della costituzione italiana - 5. La protezione internazionale dei diritti e delle libertà della persona - 6. Conclusioni. Abstract: The military operators must also assure the peace with the weapons and, above all, the persons responsible of the operations must give test of great sensibility because busy to conjugate laws and rules war with the objectives of pacification. The authorities responsible for the operations at any time they need to know what they can or must do and what orders impart; they must know what it cannot do or what should be avoided. The international humanitarian law, important part of the international law, is constituted by conventional and consuetudinary norms that are applied in the relationships among States with a specific objective: to protect in time of armed conflict the people who do not take part or do not take more part in hostilities and impose bans or limits to the use of means offensive, of sophisticated weapons and methods of warfare in situations of armed conflict in act or to avoid sleepwalking. The codification of the international humanitarian law is initiated in the century XIX, above all when it was tried to introduce with the Declaration of Petersbourg in 1868 a principle that individualized in the contrariety to the laws of the humanity the impassable limit to respect in the armed conflicts. The codification has received then force and importance after the second world conflict that the consciences of the people had struck with the systematic practice of the most merciless violence making to record million of deads. The fundamental importance of the 1949 Geneva four Conventions is unanimously recognized. They are based on ratio of the existence and the responsibilities of the Organization of United Nations; they have properly

  20. The 4-percent universe

    CERN Document Server

    Panek, Richard

    2012-01-01

    It is one of the most disturbing aspects of our universe: only four per cent of it consists of the matter that makes up every star, planet, and every book. The rest is completely unknown. Acclaimed science writer Richard Panek tells the story of the handful of scientists who have spent the past few decades on a quest to unlock the secrets of “dark matter" and the even stranger substance called “dark energy". These are perhaps the greatest mysteries in science,and solving them will reshape our understanding of the universe and our place in it. The stakes could not be higher. Panek's fast-paced

  1. Walking Pace and the Risk of Cognitive Decline and Dementia in Elderly Populations: A Meta-analysis of Prospective Cohort Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Minghui; Xun, Pengcheng; Chen, Cheng; Wen, Ju; Wang, Yiyu; Wang, Ru; Chen, Peijie; He, Ka

    2017-02-01

    Data on the longitudinal association of walking pace with the risk of cognitive decline and dementia are inconsistent and inconclusive. Therefore, researchers conducted a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies to quantitatively assess the association of walking pace with the risk of cognitive decline and dementia among elderly populations. Eligible studies were searched in PubMed and EMBASE through April 22, 2016. Additional information was retrieved through Google Scholar or hand review of the reference lists from the relevant studies. Prospective cohort studies were included if they reported relative risk (RR) and the corresponding 95% confidence interval (CI) of cognitive decline or dementia in relation to walking pace. Seventeen studies were identified, including 10 studies reporting the RR of cognitive decline (9,949 participants and 2,547 events) and 10 presenting the RR of dementia (14,140 participants and 1,903 events). Comparing the lowest to the highest category of walking pace, the pooled RR was 1.89 (95% CI = 1.54-2.31) for cognitive decline and 1.66 (95% CI = 1.43-1.92) for dementia. With every 1 dm/s (360 m/h) decrement in walking pace, the risk of dementia was increased by 13% (RR = 1.13; 95% CI = 1.08-1.18). This meta-analysis provides accumulated evidence supporting that slow or decreased walking pace is significantly associated with elevated risk of cognitive decline and dementia in elderly populations. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Universities as Intermediaries: Impact Investing and Social Entrepreneurship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekula, Rebecca; Shah, Archana; Jhamb, Jordan

    2015-01-01

    Metropolitan universities are well poised in communities to be intermediaries among various actors involved in social innovation. Pace University established one of the first institutes on social entrepreneurship. Its unique position at the university level allows programming to transcend certain institutional challenges. The emerging field of…

  3. Acute impact of pacing at different cardiac sites on left ventricular rotation and twist in dogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Wen Zhou

    Full Text Available We evaluated the acute impact of different cardiac pacing sites on two-dimensional speckle-tracking echocardiography (STE derived left ventricular (LV rotation and twist in healthy dogs.Twelve dogs were used in this study. The steerable pacing electrodes were positioned into right heart through the superior or inferior vena cava, into LV through aorta across the aortic valve. The steerable pacing electrodes were positioned individually in the right atrium (RA, right ventricular apex (RVA, RV outflow tract (RVOT, His bundle (HB, LV apex (LVA and LV high septum (LVS, individual pacing mode was applied at 10 minutes interval for at least 5 minutes from each position under fluoroscopy and ultrasound guidance and at stabilized hemodynamic conditions. LV short-axis images at the apical and basal levels were obtained during sinus rhythm and pacing. Offline STE analysis was performed. Rotation, twist, time to peak rotation (TPR, time to peak twist (TPT, and apical-basal rotation delay (rotational synchronization index, RSI values were compared at various conditions. LV pressure was monitored simultaneously.Anesthetic death occurred in 1 dog, and another dog was excluded because of bad imaging quality. Data from 10 dogs were analyzed. RVA, RVOT, HB, LVA, LVS, RARV (RA+RVA pacing resulted in significantly reduced apical and basal rotation and twist, significantly prolonged apical TPR, TPT and RSI compared to pre-pacing and RA pacing (all P<0.05. The apical and basal rotation and twist values were significantly higher during HB pacing than during pacing at ventricular sites (all P<0.05, except basal rotation at RVA pacing. The apical TPR during HB pacing was significantly shorter than during RVOT and RVA pacing (both P<0.05. The LV end systolic pressure (LVESP was significantly lower during ventricular pacing than during pre-pacing and RA pacing.Our results show that RA and HB pacing results in less acute reduction on LV twist, rotation and LVESP compared

  4. Transformational Learning and Community Development: Early Reflections on Professional and Community Engagement at Macquarie University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawlings-Sanaei, Felicity; Sachs, Judyth

    2014-01-01

    Professional and Community Engagement (PACE) at Macquarie University offers undergraduate students experiential learning opportunities with local, regional, and international partners. In PACE projects, students work toward meeting the partner's organizational goals while they develop their capabilities, learn through the process of engagement,…

  5. Biventricular / Left Ventricular Pacing in Hypertrophic Obstructive Cardiomyopathy: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radu Vatasescu, MD

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM is an autosomal dominant inherited genetic disease characterized by compensatory pathological left ventricle (LV hypertrophy due to sarcomere dysfunction. In an important proportion of patients with HCM, the site and extent of cardiac hypertrophy results in severe obstruction to LV outflow tract (LVOT, contributing to disabling symptoms and increasing the risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD. In patients with progressive and/or refractory symptoms despite optimal pharmacological treatment, invasive therapies that diminish or abolish LVOT obstruction relieve heart failure-related symptoms, improve quality of life and could be associated with long-term survival similar to that observed in the general population. The gold standard in this respect is surgical septal myectomy, which might be supplementary associated with a reduction in SCD. Percutaneous techniques, particularly alcohol septal ablation (ASA and more recently radiofrequency (RF septal ablation, can achieve LVOT gradient reduction and symptomatic benefit in a large proportion of HOCM patients at the cost of a supposedly limited septal myocardial necrosis and a 10-20% risk of chronic atrioventricular block. After an initial period of enthusiasm, standard DDD pacing failed to show in randomized trials significant LVOT gradient reductions and objective improvement in exercise capacity. However, case reports and recent small pilot studies suggested that atrial synchronous LV or biventricular (biV pacing significantly reduce LVOT obstruction and improve symptoms (acutely as well as long-term in a large proportion of severely symptomatic HOCM patients not suitable to other gradient reduction therapies. Moreover, biV/LV pacing in HOCM seems to be associated with significant LV reverse remodelling.

  6. Successful pacing using a batteryless sunlight-powered pacemaker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeberlin, Andreas; Zurbuchen, Adrian; Schaerer, Jakob; Wagner, Joerg; Walpen, Sébastien; Huber, Christoph; Haeberlin, Heinrich; Fuhrer, Juerg; Vogel, Rolf

    2014-10-01

    Today's cardiac pacemakers are powered by batteries with limited energy capacity. As the battery's lifetime ends, the pacemaker needs to be replaced. This surgical re-intervention is costly and bears the risk of complications. Thus, a pacemaker without primary batteries is desirable. The goal of this study was to test whether transcutaneous solar light could power a pacemaker. We used a three-step approach to investigate the feasibility of sunlight-powered cardiac pacing. First, the harvestable power was estimated. Theoretically, a subcutaneously implanted 1 cm(2) solar module may harvest ∼2500 µW from sunlight (3 mm implantation depth). Secondly, ex vivo measurements were performed with solar cells placed under pig skin flaps exposed to a solar simulator and real sunlight. Ex vivo measurements under real sunlight resulted in a median output power of 4941 µW/cm(2) [interquartile range (IQR) 3767-5598 µW/cm(2), median skin flap thickness 3.0 mm (IQR 2.7-3.3 mm)]. The output power strongly depended on implantation depth (ρSpearman = -0.86, P pacemaker powered by a 3.24 cm(2) solar module was implanted in vivo in a pig to measure output power and to pace. In vivo measurements showed a median output power of >3500 µW/cm(2) (skin flap thickness 2.8-3.84 mm). Successful batteryless VVI pacing using a subcutaneously implanted solar module was performed. Based on our results, we estimate that a few minutes of direct sunlight (irradiating an implanted solar module) allow powering a pacemaker for 24 h using a suitable energy storage. Thus, powering a pacemaker by sunlight is feasible and may be an alternative energy supply for tomorrow's pacemakers. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2014. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Pajarito Aerosol Couplings to Ecosystems (PACE) Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubey, M [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Laboratory (LANL) worked on the Pajarito Aerosol Couplings to Ecosystems (PACE) intensive operational period (IOP). PACE’s primary goal was to demonstrate routine Mobile Aerosol Observing System (MAOS) field operations and improve instrumental and operational performance. LANL operated the instruments efficiently and effectively with remote guidance by the instrument mentors. This was the first time a complex suite of instruments had been operated under the ARM model and it proved to be a very successful and cost-effective model to build upon.

  8. Structural analysis of cell wall polysaccharides using PACE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mortimer, Jennifer C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Joint BioEnergy Institute

    2017-01-01

    The plant cell wall is composed of many complex polysaccharides. The composition and structure of the polysaccharides affect various cell properties including cell shape, cell function and cell adhesion. Many techniques to characterize polysaccharide structure are complicated, requiring expensive equipment and specialized operators e.g. NMR, MALDI-MS. PACE (Polysaccharide Analysis using Carbohydrate gel Electrophoresis) uses a simple, rapid technique to analyze polysaccharide quantity and structure (Goubet et al. 2002). Whilst the method here describes xylan analysis, it can be applied (by use of the appropriate glycosyl hydrolase) to any cell wall polysaccharide.

  9. Paced QRS duration and myocardial scar amount: predictors of long-term outcome of right ventricular apical pacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung-Ah; Cha, Myung-Jin; Cho, Youngjin; Oh, Il-Young; Choi, Eue-Keun; Oh, Seil

    2016-07-01

    Long-term right ventricular apical pacing (RVAP) is reportedly associated with heart failure (HF) development. However, the predictors of pacing-induced HF (PHF) remained unclear. We retrospectively enrolled 234 patients without structural heart disease who underwent a permanent pacemaker implantation with RVAP between 1982 and 2004. RVAP-induced HF was defined as left ventricular ejection fraction decrease >5 % with HF symptom without other HF development etiology. The QRS duration of a paced beat (pQRSd) and myocardial scar score were analyzed from each patient's 12-lead ECG. During a mean 15.6 years (range 3.3-30.0 years), 48 patients (20.5 %) patients developed RVAP-induced HF. The PHF group patients had a longer pQRSd (192.4 ± 13.5 vs. 175.7 ± 14.7 ms in non-PHF patients, p scar score (5.2 ± 1.9 vs. 2.7 ± 1.9, respectively p scar score (HR 1.23, 95 % CI 1.03-1.49, p = 0.037), and a higher percentage of ventricular pacing (HR 1.31, 95 % CI 1.01-1.49, p = 0.010) were independent predictors of PHF. Based on the results of the receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve, the pQRSd cutoff was 185 ms (AUC 0.79, sensitivity 66.7 %, specificity 76.3 %) and myocardial scar score cutoff value was 4 (AUC 0.81, sensitivity 81.3 %, specificity 66.1 %). The pQRSd was positively correlated with scar score (r = 0.70, p scar score ≥4 might be independent long-term prognostic markers of PHF.

  10. Data reproducibility of pace strategy in a laboratory test run

    Science.gov (United States)

    de França, Elias; Xavier, Ana Paula; Hirota, Vinicius Barroso; Côrrea, Sônia Cavalcanti; Caperuto, Érico Chagas

    2016-01-01

    This data paper contains data related to a reproducibility test for running pacing strategy in an intermittent running test until exhaustion. Ten participants underwent a crossover study (test and retest) with an intermittent running test. The test was composed of three-minute sets (at 1 km/h above Onset Blood Lactate Accumulation) until volitional exhaustion. To assess pace strategy change, in the first test participants chose the rest time interval (RTI) between sets (ranging from 30 to 60 s) and in the second test the maximum RTI values were either the RTI chosen in the first test (maximum RTI value), or less if desired. To verify the reproducibility of the test, rating perceived exertion (RPE), heart rate (HR) and blood plasma lactate concentration ([La]p) were collected at rest, immediately after each set and at the end of the tests. As results, RTI, RPE, HR, [La]p and time to exhaustion were not statistically different (p>0.05) between test and retest, as well as they demonstrated good intraclass correlation. PMID:27081672

  11. Pilot trial of an age-paced parenting newsletter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, Brigid; Waterston, Tony; McConachie, Helen; Towner, Elizabeth; Cook, Margaret; Birks, Eileen

    2005-10-01

    Supporting parents in the first three years of a child's life has the potential to produce successful outcomes. Present government initiatives such as Sure Start focus on this age group. An American educational intervention, in the style of a monthly newsletter, was adapted for use in the UK for parents of young children. Topics were presented in an easy-to-read format and focused on infant emotional development, parent interaction and play. Newsletters, called Baby Express were posted at monthly intervals to the family home providing age-paced information which could meet the specific needs of parents at that stage of their child's life. The aim of the study was to determine the applicability of the newsletter to UK parents and evaluate their satisfaction. Sixty home-based interviews were conducted and 95 per cent of mothers reported reading all or part of the newsletter. Changes in parenting style were spontaneously reported by 28 per cent of mothers. This study found that an aged-paced parenting newsletter was an acceptable and useful method of supporting parents in the early months of a child's life and promotes positive changes in parenting behaviour.

  12. Self-paced model learning for robust visual tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wenhui; Gu, Jason; Ma, Xin; Li, Yibin

    2017-01-01

    In visual tracking, learning a robust and efficient appearance model is a challenging task. Model learning determines both the strategy and the frequency of model updating, which contains many details that could affect the tracking results. Self-paced learning (SPL) has recently been attracting considerable interest in the fields of machine learning and computer vision. SPL is inspired by the learning principle underlying the cognitive process of humans, whose learning process is generally from easier samples to more complex aspects of a task. We propose a tracking method that integrates the learning paradigm of SPL into visual tracking, so reliable samples can be automatically selected for model learning. In contrast to many existing model learning strategies in visual tracking, we discover the missing link between sample selection and model learning, which are combined into a single objective function in our approach. Sample weights and model parameters can be learned by minimizing this single objective function. Additionally, to solve the real-valued learning weight of samples, an error-tolerant self-paced function that considers the characteristics of visual tracking is proposed. We demonstrate the robustness and efficiency of our tracker on a recent tracking benchmark data set with 50 video sequences.

  13. Pacing a data transfer operation between compute nodes on a parallel computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blocksome, Michael A.

    2011-09-13

    Methods, systems, and products are disclosed for pacing a data transfer between compute nodes on a parallel computer that include: transferring, by an origin compute node, a chunk of an application message to a target compute node; sending, by the origin compute node, a pacing request to a target direct memory access (`DMA`) engine on the target compute node using a remote get DMA operation; determining, by the origin compute node, whether a pacing response to the pacing request has been received from the target DMA engine; and transferring, by the origin compute node, a next chunk of the application message if the pacing response to the pacing request has been received from the target DMA engine.

  14. Presence of notched QRS on paced electrocardiographs as a predictor of poor response to cardiac resynchronization therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Jiayu; Zhang Ping; Li Xuebin; Zhu Tiangang; Li Hua; Wang Long; Li Ding

    2014-01-01

    Background Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) on patients with advanced and refractory heart failure has made remarkable progress.Clinically,notched QRS (nQRS) is commonly seen on electrocardiographs (ECGs) with bundle branch block morphology and on paced ECGs after implantation of a CRT device,which may reflect the heterogeneity of ventricular myocardial depolarization and electrical activity.The aim of this study was to determine whether patients with more nQRS myocardial segments on paced ECGs had a worse response to CRT than patients with fewer nQRS myocardial segments.Methods We prospectively enrolled 56 patients of CRT with chronic heart failure from People's Hospital affiliated to Peking University from January 2007 to October 2013.Based on nQRS segments on ECGs before CRT,we allocated them to two groups:fewer nQRS (<2) myocardial segments (lateral,inferior,anterior segments) group (F-nQRS,G1,n=23) and more nQRS (≥2) myocardial segments group (M-nQRS,G2,n=33).Then according to nQRS segments on ECGs after CRT,we divided them into two groups similarly:fewer nQRS (<2) myocardial segments group (G3,n=24) and more nQRS (≥2) myocardial segments group (G4,n=32).This study was approved by the ethics committee of People's Hospital.Results At 6 months in the baseline-ECG group,there was a greater absolute increase in left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) in G2 than in G1 ((11.5±8.9)% vs.(5.5±10.4)%,P=0.023),with the incidence of nonresponse lower in G2than in G1 (9.1% vs.39.1%,P=0.018).In the paced-ECG group,the absolute increase in LVEF was less in G4 than in G3 ((6.4±8.8)% vs.(12.5±10.4)%,P=0.024) and the incidence of nonresponse was higher in G4 than in G3 (31.3% vs.8.3%,P=0.039).Multivariate analysis showed that fewer nQRS (<2) myocardial segments on paced ECGs (odds ratio 13.920) was a predictor of positive response to CRT.Conclusion nQRS ≥2 myocardial segments (lateral,inferior,anterior) on paced ECGs may predict a poor

  15. The influence of sex, age, and race experience on pacing profiles during the 90 km Vasaloppet ski race

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlsson M

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Magnus Carlsson,1,2 Hannes Assarsson,1 Tomas Carlsson1,2 1School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Dalarna University, 2Dala Sports Academy, Falun, Sweden Abstract: The purpose of this study was to investigate pacing-profile differences during the 90 km Vasaloppet ski race related to the categories of sex, age, and race experience. Skiing times from eight sections (S1 to S8 were analyzed. For each of the three categories, 400 pairs of skiers were matched to have a finish time within 60 seconds, the same start group, and an assignment to the same group for the other two categories. Paired-samples Student’s t-tests were used to investigate sectional pacing-profile differences between the subgroups. Results showed that males skied faster in S2 (P=0.0042, S3 (P=0.0049, S4 (P=0.010, and S1–S4 (P<0.001, whereas females skied faster in S6 (P<0.001, S7 (P<0.001, S8 (P=0.0088, and S5–S8 (P<0.001. For the age category, old subjects (40 to 59 years skied faster than young subjects (19 to 39 years in S3 (P=0.0029, and for the other sections, there were no differences. Experienced subjects (≥4 Vasaloppet ski race completions skied faster in S1 (P<0.001 and S1–S4 (P=0.0054; inexperienced skiers (<4 Vasaloppet ski race completions had a shorter mean skiing time in S5–S8 (P=0.0063. In conclusion, females had a more even pacing profile than that of males with the same finish time, start group, age, and race experience. No clear age-related pacing-profile difference was identified for the matched subgroups. Moreover, experienced skiers skied faster in the first half whereas inexperienced skiers had higher skiing speeds during the second half of the race. Keywords: pacing strategy, cross-country skiing, endurance performance, sex difference

  16. Hemodynamic improvement by right ventricular septal pacing in elderly patients with chronic atrial fibrillation and slow ventricular response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei HUA; Shidong GUO; Shu ZHANG; Fangzheng WANG; Lida ZHI; Hongxia NIU; Xin CHEN

    2005-01-01

    Background and objectives Right ventricular apical (RVA) pacing has been reported impairing left ventricular (LV)performance. Alternative pacing sites in right ventricle (RV) has been explored to obtain better cardiac function. Our study was designed to compare the hemodynamic effects of right ventricular septal (RVS) pacing with RVA pacing. Methods Ten elderly patients with chronic atrial fibrillation (AF) and long RR interval or slow ventricular response (VR) received VVI pacing. The hemodynamic difference between RVS and RVA pacing were examined by transthoracic echocardiography (TTE). Results Pacing leads were implanted successfully at the RVA and then RVS in all patients without complication. The left ventricular (LV) parameters,measured during RVA pacing including left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), FS, stroke volume (SV) and peak E wave velocity (EV) were decreased significantly compared to baseline data, while during RVS pacing, they were significantly better than those during RVA pacing. However, after 3-6 weeks there was no statistical significant difference between pre- and post- RVS pacing.Conclusions The LV hemodynamic parameters during RVA pacing were significantly worse than baseline data. The short term LV hemodynamic parameters of RVS pacing were significantly better than those of RVA pacing; RVS pacing could improve the hemodynamic effect through maintaining normal ventricular activation sequence and biventricular contraction synchrony in patients with chronic AF and slow ventricular response.

  17. Controlling Spiral Dynamics in Excitable Media by a Weakly Localized Pacing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Bing-Wei; SUN Li-Li; CHEN Bin; YING He-Ping

    2007-01-01

    @@ Spiral dynamics controlled by a weakly localized pacing around the spiral tip is investigated. Numerical simulations show two distinct characteristics when the pacing is applied with the weak amplitude for suitable frequencies:for a rigidly rotating spiral, a transition from rigid rotation to meandering motion is observed, and for unstable spiral waves, spiral breakup can be prevented. Successfully preventing spiral breakup is relevant to the modulation of the tip trajectory induced by a localized pacing.

  18. Coronary grafts flow and cardiac pacing modalities: how to improve perioperative myocardial perfusion.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    D'Ancona, Giuseppe

    2012-02-03

    OBJECTIVE: Aim of this study was to investigate modifications of coronary grafts flow during different pacing modalities after CABG. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Two separate prospective studies were conducted in patients undergoing CABG and requiring intraoperative epicardial pacing. In a first study (22 patients) coronary grafts flows were measured during dual chamber pacing (DDD) and during ventricular pacing (VVI). In a second study (10 patients) flows were measured during DDD pacing at different atrio-ventricular (A-V) delay periods. A-V delay was adjusted in 25 ms increments from 25 to 250 ms and flow measurements were performed for each A-V delay increment. A transit time flowmeter was used for the measurements. RESULTS: An average of 3.4 grafts\\/patient were performed. In the first study, average coronary graft flow was 47.4+\\/-20.8 ml\\/min during DDD pacing and 41.8+\\/-18.2 ml\\/min during VVI pacing (P = 0.0004). Furthermore average systolic pressure was 94.3+\\/-10.1 mmHg during DDD pacing and 89.6+\\/-12.2 mmHg during VVV pacing (P = 0.0007). No significant differences in diastolic pressure were recorded during the two different pacing modalities. In the second study, maximal flows were achieved during DDD pacing with an A-V delay of 175 ms (54+\\/-9.6 ml\\/min) and minimal flows were detected at 25 ms A-V delay (38.1+\\/-4.7 ml\\/min) (P=ns). No significant differences in systolic or diastolic blood pressure were noticed during the different A-V delays. CONCLUSION: Grafts flowmetry provides an extra tool to direct supportive measures such as cardiac pacing after CABG. DDD mode with A-V delay around 175 ms. should be preferred to allow for maximal myocardial perfusion via the grafts.

  19. Exploring the relationship between university internationalization and university autonomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turcan, Romeo V.; Gullieva, Valeria

    This paper explores a research gap at the intersection of university internationalization and university autonomy. A process model of university internationalization is put forward whereby the process of university internationalization is mediated by university internationalization capacity...... and moderated by target country institutional autonomy and globalization; and entry modes, timing and pace, as well as product mix of internationalization define university’s internationalization pattern. A systematic review is conducted to identify empirical studies at this intersection. One of the questions...... this paper is addressing is whether there is a scope for international business theories in explaining university internationalization or in light of recent findings from successes and failures of university internationalization international business theories ought to be revised?...

  20. Pacing and Self-regulation: Important Skills for Talent Development in Endurance Sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elferink-Gemser, Marije T; Hettinga, Florentina J

    2017-07-01

    Pacing has been characterized as a multifaceted goal-directed process of decision making in which athletes need to decide how and when to invest their energy during the race, a process essential for optimal performance. Both physiological and psychological characteristics associated with adequate pacing and performance are known to develop with age. Consequently, the multifaceted skill of pacing might be under construction throughout adolescence, as well. Therefore, the authors propose that the complex skill of pacing is a potential important performance characteristic for talented youth athletes that needs to be developed throughout adolescence. To explore whether pacing is a marker for talent and how talented athletes develop this skill in middle-distance and endurance sports, they aim to bring together literature on pacing and literature on talent development and self-regulation of learning. Subsequently, by applying the cyclical process of self-regulation to pacing, they propose a practical model for the development of performance in endurance sports in youth athletes. Not only is self-regulation essential throughout the process of reaching the long-term goal of athletic excellence, but it also seems crucial for the development of pacing skills within a race and the development of a refined performance template based on previous experiences. Coaches and trainers are advised to incorporate pacing as a performance characteristic in their talent-development programs by stimulating their athletes to reflect, plan, monitor, and evaluate their races on a regular basis to build performance templates and, as such, improve their performance.

  1. Effects of Amiodarone plus Losartan on Electrical Remodeling in Rapid Atrial Pacing in Rabbits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liye Wei; Yue Xia; Guoqing Qi; Qingwen Zhang

    2008-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the electrical remodeling and the effects of amiodarone and losartan on electrical remode-ling in rapid atrial pacing on rabbit model. Methods 40 normal rabbits were randomly divided into 4 groups: the sa-line group (control group), amiodarone group, losartan group, ami + los group. All rabbits were raised drugs in a week. The atrial effective refractory period (AERP) was measured. Then, take a rapid atrial pacing (600 bpm) and the AERP was measured after 0. 5, 1, 2, 4, 6 and 8 hours pacing and 30 minutes after the termination of rapid pacing. Results ① In control group, after 8 hours rapid pacing, AERP 200 and AERP 150 were significantly shortened 16. 11%± 3. 1% (P <0. 01) and 9. 99%±4. 2% (P <0. 01). And the degree of AERP shortening induced by rapid pacing was greater at basic cycle lengths of 200 ms (BCL200) than that at BCL150. The AERP of amiodarone, losartan group and anti + los group were not shortened during rapid pacing.② In the control group, after the termination of rapid pacing, the AERP gradually increased. The AERP at all of the BCLS examined recovered to almost the 95.78% and 96. 76% of baseline values within the first 10 minutes and recovered to almost the 99. 07% and 99. 39% of baseline values within the first 30 minutes. Condusions Short-term atrial rapid pacing can induce the atrial electrical remodeling. Amiodarone and losartan can prevent the electrical remodeling.

  2. Feasibility of dual-chamber (DDD) pacing via a single-pass (VDD) pacing lead employing a floating atrial ring (dipole): case series, future considerations, and refinements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassotis, John; Voigt, Louis; Mongwa, Mbu; Reddy, C V R

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the feasibility of DDD pacing from a standard single-pass VDD pacemaker system. Over the past 2 decades significant advances have been made in the development of single-pass VDD pacing systems. These have been shown in long-term prospective studies to effectively preserve atrioventricular (AV)synchrony in patients with AV block and normal sinus node function. What remains problematic is the development of a single-pass pacing system capable of DDD pacing. Such a lead configuration would be useful in those patients with peripheral venous anomalies and in younger patients with congenital anomalies, which may require lead revisions in the future. In addition, with the increased use of resynchronization (biventricular pacing) therapy, the availability of a reliable single-pass lead will minimize operative time, enhance patient safety, and minimize the amount of hardware within the heart. The feasibility of DDD pacing via a Medtronic Capsure VDD-2 (Model #5038) pacing lead was evaluated. Twenty patients who presented with AV block and normal sinus node function were recruited for this study. Atrial pacing thresholds and sensitivities were assessed intraoperatively in the supine position with various respiratory maneuvers. Five patients who agreed to participate in long-term follow-up received a dual-chamber generator and were evaluated periodically over a 12-month period. Mean atrial sensitivity was 2.35 +/- 0.83 mV at the time of implantation. Effective atrial stimulation was possible in all patients at the time of implantation (mean stimulation threshold 3.08 +/- 1.04 V at 0.5 ms [bipolar], 3.34 +/- 0.95 V at 0.5 ms [unipolar]). Five of the 20 patients received a Kappa KDR701 generator, and atrial electrical properties were followed up over a 1-year period. There was no significant change in atrial pacing threshold or incidence of phrenic nerve stimulation over the 1-year follow-up. A standard single-pass VDD pacing lead

  3. Sex differences in pacing during ‘Ultraman Hawaii’

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    Beat Knechtle

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background To date, little is known for pacing in ultra-endurance athletes competing in a non-stop event and in a multi-stage event, and especially, about pacing in a multi-stage event with different disciplines during the stages. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to examine the effect of age, sex and calendar year on triathlon performance and variation of performance by events (i.e., swimming, cycling 1, cycling 2 and running in ‘Ultraman Hawaii’ held between 1983 and 2015. Methods Within each sex, participants were grouped in quartiles (i.e., Q1, Q2, Q3 and Q4 with Q1 being the fastest (i.e., lowest overall time and Q4 the slowest (i.e., highest overall time. To compare performance among events (i.e., swimming, cycling 1, cycling 2 and running, race time in each event was converted in z score and this value was used for further analysis. Results A between-within subjects ANOVA showed a large sex × event (p = 0.015, η2 = 0.014 and a medium performance group × event interaction (p = 0.001, η2 = 0.012. No main effect of event on performance was observed (p = 0.174, η2 = 0.007. With regard to the sex × event interaction, three female performance groups (i.e., Q2, Q3 and Q4 increased race time from swimming to cycling 1, whereas only one male performance group (Q4 revealed a similar trend. From cycling 1 to cycling 2, the two slower female groups (Q3 and Q4 and the slowest male group (Q4 increased raced time. In women, the fastest group decreased (i.e., improved race time from swimming to cycling 1 and thereafter, maintained performance, whereas in men, the fastest group decreased race time till cycling 2 and increased it in the running. Conclusion In summary, women pace differently than men during ‘Ultraman Hawaii’ where the fastest women decreased performance on day 1 and could then maintain on day 2 and 3, whereas the fastest men worsened performance on day 1 and 2 but improved on day 3.

  4. Right ventricular septal pacing: Safety and efficacy in a long term follow up

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eraldo; Occhetta; Gianluca; Quirino; Lara; Baduena; Rosaria; Nappo; Chiara; Cavallino; Emanuela; Facchini; Paolo; Pistelli; Andrea; Magnani; Miriam; Bortnik; Gabriella; Francalacci; Gabriele; Dell’Era; Laura; Plebani; Paolo; Marino

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of the permanent high interventricular septal pacing in a long term follow up, as alternative to right ventricular apical pacing. METHODS: We retrospectively evaluated:(1) 244 patients(74 ± 8 years; 169 men, 75 women) implanted with a single(132 pts) or dual chamber(112 pts) pacemaker(PM) with ventricular screw-in lead placed at the right ventricular high septal parahisian site(SEPTAL pacing);(2) 22 patients with permanent pacemaker and low percentage of pacing(< 20%)(NO pacing);(3) 33 patients with high percentage(> 80%) right ventricular apical pacing(RVA). All patients had a narrow spontaneous QRS(101 ± 14 ms). We evaluated New York Heart Association(NYHA) class, quality of life(Qo L), 6 min walking test(6MWT) and left ventricular function(end-diastolic volume, LV-EDV; end-systolic volume, LVESV; ejection fraction, LV-EF) with 2D-echocardiography. RESULTS: Pacing parameters were stable duringfollow up(21 mo/patient). In SEPTAL pacing group we observed an improvement in NYHA class, Qo L score and 6MWT. While LV-EDV didn’t significantly increase(104 ± 40 m L vs 100 ± 37 m L; P = 0.35), LV-ESV slightly increased(55 ± 31 m L vs 49 ± 27 m L; P = 0.05) and LV-EF slightly decreased(49% ± 11% vs 53% ± 11%; P = 0.001) but never falling < 45%. In the RVA pacing control group we observed a worsening of NYHA class and an important reduction of LV-EF(from 56% ± 6% to 43% ± 9%, P < 0.0001).CONCLUSION: Right ventricular permanent high septal pacing is safe and effective in a long term follow up evaluation; it could be a good alternative to the conventional RVA pacing in order to avoid its deleterious effects.

  5. The pace of shifting climate in marine and terrestrial ecosystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burrows, Michael T.; Schoeman, David S.; Buckley, Lauren B.

    2011-01-01

    Climate change challenges organisms to adapt or move to track changes in environments in space and time. We used two measures of thermal shifts from analyses of global temperatures over the past 50 years to describe the pace of climate change that species should track: the velocity of climate...... change (geographic shifts of isotherms over time) and the shift in seasonal timing of temperatures. Both measures are higher in the ocean than on land at some latitudes, despite slower ocean warming. These indices give a complex mosaic of predicted range shifts and phenology changes that deviate from...... simple poleward migration and earlier springs or later falls. They also emphasize potential conservation concerns, because areas of high marine biodiversity often have greater velocities of climate change and seasonal shifts....

  6. Percutaneously injectable fetal pacemaker: electronics, pacing thresholds, and power budget.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Adriana; Chmait, Ramen; Bar-Cohen, Yaniv; Zheng, Kaihui; Loeb, Gerald E

    2012-01-01

    We are developing a cardiac pacemaker that is designed to be implanted percutaneously into a fetus to treat complete heart block and consequent hydrops fetalis, which is otherwise fatal. One of the most significant considerations for this device is the technical challenges presented by the battery and charging system. The size of the device is limited to about 3 mm in diameter; batteries on this scale have very small charge capacities. The smaller capacity means that the device needs to be designed so that it uses as little current as possible and so that its battery can be recharged wirelessly. We determined the pacing thresholds for a simple relaxation oscillator that can be assembled from discrete, surface mount components and analyzed the power consumption of the device given different electrode configurations and stimulus parameters. An inductive recharging system will be required for some patients; it is feasible within the package constraints and under development.

  7. Specific Intensity for Peaking: Is Race Pace the Best Option?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munoz

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background The peaking period for endurance competition is characterized for a relative increase of the intensity of training, after a longer period of training relatively dominated by lower intensity and higher volume Objectives The present study was designed to compare physiological and 10 km performance effects of high intensity training (HIT versus race pace interval training (RP during peaking for competition in well-trained runners. Patients and Methods 13 athletes took part in the study, they were divided into two groups: HIT and RP. HIT performed short intervals at ~105% of the maximal aerobic velocity (MAV, while RP trained longer intervals at a speed of ~90% of the MAV (a speed approximating 10 km race pace. After 12 weeks of baseline training, the athletes trained for 6 weeks under one of the two peaking regimes. Subjects performed 10 km prior to and after the intervention period. The total load of training was matched between groups during the treatment phase. Subjects completed a graded treadmill running test until volitional exhaustion prior to each 10 km race. MAV was determined as the minimal velocity eliciting maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max. Results Both groups significantly improved their 10 km time (35 minutes 29 seconds ± 1 minutes 41 seconds vs 34 minutes 53 seconds ± 1 minutes 55 seconds, P 0.05. In contrast, running economy decreased significantly after HIT (210 ± 6 ml.Kg-1.km-1 vs 218 ± 9, P < 0.05. Conclusions A 6 week period of training at either 105% of MAV or 90% of MAV yielded similar performance gains in a 10km race performed at ~90% MAV. Therefore, the physiological impact of HIT training seems to be positive for VO2max but negative for running economy.

  8. Evaluation of the effects of transvenous pacing site on left ventricular function and synchrony in healthy anesthetized dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maisenbacher, Herbert W; Estrada, Amara H; Prosek, Robert; Shih, Andre C; Vangilder, James M

    2009-04-01

    OBJECTIVE-To compare the acute effects of cardiac pacing from various transvenous pacing sites on left ventricular (LV) function and synchrony in clinically normal dogs. ANIMALS-10 healthy adult mixed-breed dogs. PROCEDURES-Dogs were anesthetized, and dual-chamber transvenous biventricular pacing systems were implanted. Dogs were paced in single-chamber mode from the right atrial appendage (RAA) alone and in dual-chamber mode from the right ventricular apex (RVA), from the left ventricular free wall (LVFW), and simultaneously from the RVA and LVFW (BiV). Standard ECG and echocardiographic measurements, cardiac output measured with the lithium dilution method (LiDCO), and tissue Doppler-derived measurements of LV synchrony were obtained during each of the pacing configurations. RESULTS-Placement of the biventricular pacing systems was possible in 8 of the 10 dogs. The QRS duration was significantly different among all pacing sites, and the order of increasing duration was RAA, BiV, LVFW, and RVA. Pacing sites did not differ with respect to fractional shortening; however, pacing from the RVA resulted in a significantly lower ejection fraction than pacing from all other sites. During RVA and LVFW pacing, LiDCO was significantly lower than that at other sites; there was no significant difference between RAA and BiV pacing with respect to LiDCO. Although the degree of dyssynchrony was significantly lower during pacing from the RAA versus other ventricular pacing sites, it was not significantly different among sites. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE-Ventricular activation by RAA pacing provided the best LV function and synchrony. Pacing from the RVA worsened LV function, and although pacing from the LVFW improved it, BiV pacing may provide additional improvement.

  9. Atrioventricular Left Ventricular Apical Pacing Improves Haemodynamic, Rotational, and Deformation Variables in Comparison to Pacing at the Lateral Wall in Intact Myocardium: Experimental Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savvas Toumanidis

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To assess the effect on left ventricular (LV function of atrioventricular (AV and ventricular pacing at the LV apical or lateral wall and to compare the normal torsional and deformation pattern of the intact LV myocardium with those created by the aforementioned LV pacing modes and sites. Methods. Experiments were conducted in pigs (n=21 with normal LV function to investigate the acute hemodynamic effects of epicardial AV and ventricular LV pacing at the LV apical or lateral wall. Torsional and deformation indices of LV function were assessed using speckle tracking echocardiography. Results. AV pacing at the apex revealed a significant reduction in the radial strain of the base (P<0.03, without affecting significantly the ejection fraction and the LV torsion or twist. In contrast, AV pacing at the lateral wall produced, in addition to the reduction of the radial strain of the base (P<0.01, significant reduction of the circumferential and the radial strain of the apex (both P<0.01 as well as of the ejection fraction (P<0.002 and twist (P<0.05. Conclusions. In pig hearts with intact myocardium, LV function is maintained at sinus rhythm level when AV pacing is performed at the LV apex.

  10. Effect of right ventricular pacing on ventricular rhythm during atrial fibrillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wittkampf, F.H.M.; Jongste, M.J.L. de; Lie, H.I.; Meijler, F.L.

    1988-01-01

    In 13 patients with atrial fibrillation, the effect of right ventricular pacing at various rates on spontaneous RR intervals was studied. Five hundred consecutive RR intervals were recorded and measured before and during varying right ventricular pacing rates. As anticipated, all RR intervals longer

  11. Differential effects of film on preschool children's behaviour dependent on editing pace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostyrka-Allchorne, Katarzyna; Cooper, Nicholas R; Gossmann, Anna Maria; Barber, Katy J; Simpson, Andrew

    2017-05-01

    Evidence on how the pace of television and film editing affects children's behaviour and attention is inconclusive. We examined whether a fast-paced film affected how preschool-aged children interacted with toys. The study comprised 70 children (36 girls) aged two to four-and-a-half years who attended preschools in Essex, United Kingdom. The children were paired up and tested with either a fast- or a slow-paced film of a narrator reading a children's story. The fast-paced version had 102 camera cuts and 16 still images, and the slow-paced version had 22 camera cuts and four still images. Each dyad took part in two video-recorded free-play sessions, before and after they watched one of the specially edited four-minute films. The number of toys the children played with before and after the film sessions was recorded. Before they watched the films, the children's behaviour did not differ between the groups. However, after watching the film, the children in the fast-paced group shifted their attention between toys more frequently than the children who watched the slow-paced film. Even a brief exposure to differently paced films had an immediate effect on how the children interacted with their toys. ©2017 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Improvement of pacing induced regional myocardial ischemia by Solcoseryl in conscious dogs with coronary stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, T; Sasayama, S; Takahashi, M; Osakada, G; Kawai, C

    1984-02-01

    The effects of Solcoseryl on regional myocardial function were studied in 5 conscious dogs with partial coronary constriction, in which temporary ischemia was induced by rapid cardiac pacing. During the coronary artery constriction, the percent shortening of the ischemic segment decreased by 9%. When the heart rate was increased by pacing, the percent shortening of the ischemic segments was further reduced by 57%. On cessation of cardiac pacing, the early potentiation of dP/dt and of control segment shortening became evident and was followed by exponential decay in the subsequent several beats. In the ischemic segment, the percent shortening was significantly improved in the first post-pacing beat but was more severely depressed at five seconds. Thirty minutes after administration of Solcoseryl, the cardiac pacing was repeated in the same manner but the pacing-induced hypokinesia of the ischemic segment were less marked, the percent shortening being at an average of 9.1% during control pacing and 12.7% during the second pacing after Solcoseryl (p less than 0.05). Postpacing deterioration of the ischemic segment shortening was also significantly improved from 9.8 to 11.8% at 5 seconds (p less than 0.05). These findings indicate that Solcoseryl exerts protective effects on the ischemic myocardium by promoting a rapid recovery from ischemia, probably due to the improvement of oxygen utility through activated cellular respiration.

  13. Effects of Priming and Pacing Strategy on Oxygen-Uptake Kinetics and Cycling Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Stephen J; Vanhatalo, Anni; Black, Matthew I; DiMenna, Fred J; Jones, Andrew M

    2016-05-01

    To assess whether combining prior "priming" exercise with an all-out pacing strategy is more effective at improving oxygen-uptake (VO2) kinetics and cycling performance than either intervention administered independently. Nine men completed target-work cycling performance trials using a self-paced or all-out pacing strategy with or without prior severe-intensity (70%Δ) priming exercise. Breath-by-breath pulmonary VO2 and cycling power output were measured during all trials. Compared with the self-paced unprimed control trial (22 ± 5 s), the VO2 mean response time (MRT) was shorter (VO2 kinetics were faster) with all-out pacing (17 ± 4 s) and priming (17 ± 3 s), with the lowest VO2 MRT observed when all-out pacing and priming were combined (15 ± 4 s) (P primed trials (P primed (93 ± 8 s) and all-out primed (92 ± 8 s) trials (P .05). These findings suggest that combining an all-out start with severe-intensity priming exercise additively improves VO2 MRT but not total O2 consumption and cycling performance since these were improved by a similar magnitude in both primed trials relative to the self-paced unprimed control condition. Therefore, these results support the use of priming exercise as a precompetition intervention to improve oxidative metabolism and performance during short-duration high-intensity cycling exercise, independent of the pacing strategy adopted.

  14. Effects of permanent dual chamber pacing on myocardial perfusion in symptomatic hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Posma, JL; Blanksma, PK; VanderWall, EE; Vaalburg, W; Crijns, HJGM; Lie, KI

    1996-01-01

    Objective-Angina and the presence of myocardial ischaemia are common in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Dual chamber pacing results in clinical improvement in these patients. This study evaluates the effects of permanent dual chamber pacing on absolute regional myocardial perfusion and perfusion

  15. TEE-guided left ventricular epicardial pacing lead placement for cardiac resynchronization therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Chand Arya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Biventricular pacing has demonstrated improvement in cardiac functions in treating congestive cardiac failure patients. Recent trials have proven the clinical and functional benefits of cardiac resynchronization therapy in severe heart failure and intraventricular cardiac delays, mainly left bundle branch block. Biventricular pacing improves the exercise tolerance, quality of life, systolic heart function, reduces hospitalization and slows progression of the disease. A 54-year-old lady, a known case of dilated cardiomyopathy, was on biventricular pacing since 2 years. She presented in emergency with sudden deterioration of dyspnea to NYHA class III/IV. When investigated, the coronary sinus lead was found displaced; thus, left ventricle (LV was not getting paced. After multiple failures to reposition the coronary sinus lead, it was decided to surgically place the epicardial lead for LV pacing under general anesthesia. Lateral thoracotomy was done and LV pacing lead was placed at different sites with simultaneous monitoring of cardiac output (CO and stroke volume (SV by transesophageal echocardiography (TEE. Baseline CO and SV were 1.9 l/min and 19.48 ml respectively and increased at different sites of pacing at LV, the best CO and SV were 4.2 l/min and 42.39 ml respectively on lateral surface. Intraoperative TEE can calculate beat to beat stroke volume and thus CO and helps to choose optimal site for placement of epicardial pacing lead.

  16. The effect of work pace on workload, motor variability and fatigue during simulated light assembly work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, T; Mathiassen, S E; Visser, B; de Looze, M P; van Dieën, J H

    2011-02-01

    This study investigated the effect of work pace on workload, motor variability and fatigue during light assembly work. Upper extremity kinematics and electromyography (EMG) were obtained on a cycle-to-cycle basis for eight participants during two conditions, corresponding to "normal" and "high" work pace according to a predetermined time system for engineering. Indicators of fatigue, pain sensitivity and performance were recorded before, during and after the task. The level and variability of muscle activity did not differ according to work pace, and manifestations of muscle fatigue or changed pain sensitivity were not observed. In the high work pace, however, participants moved more efficiently, they showed more variability in wrist speed and acceleration, but they also made more errors. These results suggest that an increased work pace, within the range addressed here, will not have any substantial adverse effects on acute motor performance and fatigue in light, cyclic assembly work. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: In the manufacturing industry, work pace is a key issue in production system design and hence of interest to ergonomists as well as engineers. In this laboratory study, increasing the work pace did not show adverse effects in terms of biomechanical exposures and muscle fatigue, but it did lead to more errors. For the industrial engineer, this observation suggests that an increase in work pace might diminish production quality, even without any noticeable fatigue being experienced by the operators.

  17. New method for cardiac resynchronization therapy: Transapical endocardial lead implantation for left ventricular free wall pacing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Kassai (Imre); C. Foldesi (Csaba); A. Szekely (Andrea); T. Szili-Torok (Tamas)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractCoronary sinus lead placement for transvenous left ventricular (LV) pacing in cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) has a significant failure rate at implant and a significant dislocation rate during follow-up. For these patients, epicardial pacing lead implantation is the most frequen

  18. Effects of permanent dual chamber pacing on myocardial perfusion in symptomatic hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Posma, JL; Blanksma, PK; VanderWall, EE; Vaalburg, W; Crijns, HJGM; Lie, KI

    1996-01-01

    Objective-Angina and the presence of myocardial ischaemia are common in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Dual chamber pacing results in clinical improvement in these patients. This study evaluates the effects of permanent dual chamber pacing on absolute regional myocardial perfusion and perfusion reserv

  19. Right ventricular outflow and apical pacing comparably worsen the echocardioghraphic normal left ventricle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.J.F. ten Cate (Tim); M.G. Scheffer (Michael); G.R. Sutherland (George); J.F. Verzijlbergen (Fred); N.M. van Hemel (Norbert)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractAims: A depressed left ventricular function (LVF) is sometimes observed during right ventricular apical (RVA) pacing, but any prediction of this adverse effect cannot be done. Right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) pacing is thought to deteriorate LVF less frequently because of a more no

  20. Beyond a Unitary Conception of Pedagogic Pace: Quantitative Measurement and Ethnographic Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefstein, Adam; Snell, Julia

    2013-01-01

    English education policy-makers have targeted classroom time as a key area for regulation and intervention, with "brisk pace" widely accepted as a feature of good teaching practice. We problematise this conventional wisdom through an exploration of objective and subjective dimensions of lesson pace in a corpus of 30 Key Stage 2 literacy…

  1. New method for cardiac resynchronization therapy: Transapical endocardial lead implantation for left ventricular free wall pacing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Kassai (Imre); C. Foldesi (Csaba); A. Szekely (Andrea); T. Szili-Torok (Tamas)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractCoronary sinus lead placement for transvenous left ventricular (LV) pacing in cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) has a significant failure rate at implant and a significant dislocation rate during follow-up. For these patients, epicardial pacing lead implantation is the most

  2. Working on something else for a while: pacing in creative design projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eerde, W.; Beeftink, F.; Rutte, C.G.

    2015-01-01

    In an interview study among 25 architects we investigated how activities were allocated over time in the design phase of an architectural project. Specifically, linking the literatures about pacing behavior and incubation, we set out to identify patterns related to how the interviewees paced their a

  3. Working on something else for a while : Pacing in creative design projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Eerde, Wendelien; Beeftink, Flora; Rutte, C.G.

    2016-01-01

    In an interview study among 25 architects we investigated how activities were allocated over time in the design phase of an architectural project. Specifically, linking the literatures about pacing behavior and incubation, we set out to identify patterns related to how the interviewees paced their a

  4. Research on Electrical Remodeling After Short Term Pacing in Canine Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kebbati A Hafid; Huang Congxin; Wang Xi; Zhao Qingyan

    2007-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the changes in atrial effective refractory period (AERP) proprieties and in ionic currents in PVs myocytes from dogs subjected to rapid atrial pacing in PVs and right atrial appendage (RAA) and to relate these changes to the ability to induce AF. Methods Twelve mongrel dogs in normal sinus rhythm were paced from the superior left PVs or RAA at 500 bpm for 4 hours. Electrophysiologic studies conducted to determine changes in AERP, dispersion and rhythm. Ionic currents were studies with the patch clamp technique in single PVs myocytes in sham operated dogs and compared with those from PVs pacing and RAA pacing groups. Results The presence of rapid atrial pacing was associated with a marked shortening in AERP in both PVs and RAA pacing group with a marked increase of AERP dispersion in PVs pacing. Both L-type calcium current (ICa, L) and the transient outward current (Ito)were reduced in both groups with an increased significance in PVs pacing group. The density of ICa-L WaS decreased significantly from ( - 6.03 ± 0.63 ) pA/pF in the control group to ( -3.21±0.34) pA/pF in PVs pacing group and ( - 4,75 ± 0.41 ) pA/pF in RAA pacing group (n = 6, P<0.05) while the density of Ito was decreased significantly from (8.45±0.71 ) pA/pF in the control group to (5.21 ±0.763 ) pA/pF in PVs pacing group and (6,84 ± 0.69) pA/pF in RAA pacing group (n = 6, P<0.05). Conclusions Our findings provide likely ionic mechanisms of shortened repolarization in induced atrial tachycardia with a decrease in Ica,L and Ito current densities which is the likely mechanism for a decrease in Action potential duration (APD) rate adaptation in the canine rapid pacing model more pronounced in PVs pacing group underlying the crucial role of PVs in initiating AF.

  5. Periprocedural temporary pacing in primary percutaneous coronary intervention for patients with acute inferior myocardial infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwang YM

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available You Mi Hwang,1 Chul-Min Kim,2 Keon-Woong Moon2 1Department of Cardiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, 2Department of Internal Medicine, St Vincent’s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea, Suwon, South KoreaObjective: High-degree atrioventricular block (AVB, including complete AVB in acute inferior ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI, is not uncommon. However, there is no study evaluating the clinical differences between patients who have undergone temporary pacing (TP and patients who have not. The present study was designed to investigate whether TP has any prognostic significance in inferior STEMI complicated by complete AVB.Methods: From January 2009 to December 2014, 295 consecutive patients diagnosed with inferior wall STEMI in a university hospital were reviewed. All of them underwent primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI. Among the 295 patients, there were 72 patients with complete AVB. The clinical characteristics, procedural data, and long-term major adverse cardiocerebrovascular events were compared in patients with and without TP.Results: Baseline clinical and procedural characteristics were similar between patients with and without TP. Patients with TP were more likely to present with cardiogenic shock; thus, additional interventions were attempted via a femoral approach, as patients received further treatment with intra-aortic balloon pumps and were subjected to additional cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Most cases of complete AVB were primarily caused by right coronary artery occlusion. After a median follow-up period of 344 (range, 105.5–641 days, major adverse cardiocerebrovascular events did not differ between the groups (P=0.528.Conclusion: We conclude that primary PCI without TP is acceptable in complete AVB-complicated acute inferior STEMI. To avoid delay in reperfusion, we suggest that primary PCI should be the first priority therapy rather than treating

  6. Temporary neonatal atrial pacing through the umbilical venous route: A novel technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiren N Doshi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Atrial pacing in the neonate is rarely done due to constraints of equipment, technical knowhow, and risk of complications. We describe a novel method of atrial pacing in the new born using equipment readily available in any intensive care unit. Atrial pacing can be achieved using an adult bipolar pacing wire directly introduced through the umbilical venous route. We have used this method in 5 neonates, and achieved atrial capture in 4 patients. Temporary atrial pacing is a therapeutic option in a few neonatal arrhythmias, such as atrial flutter, a few types of re-entrant tachycardias, such as accessory pathway mediated tachycardia and junctional reciprocating tachycardia, and has a limited role in cardiopulmonary resuscitation where sinoatrial node dysfunction is suspected.

  7. Effects of right atrial and ventricular DDD pacing on cardiac function and ventricular contraction synchrony

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    支力大; 华伟; 张澍; 史蓉芳; 王方正; 陈新

    2004-01-01

    Background Right ventricular apical pacing has been reported to reduce cardiac performance. But there are few reports on the effects of dual chamber (DDD) pacing on cardiac function compared to sinus rhythm. In this study, we evaluated the effects of right atrial and ventricular DDD pacing on cardiac function and ventricular contraction synchrony using equilibrium radionuclide angiography.Methods Ten patients implanted with a right atrial and ventricular DDD pacemaker underwent equilibrium radionuclide angiography. The scintigraphic data were obtained during sinus rhythm and pacing rhythm. Cardiac function parameters were obtained semimanually. Phase analysis was used to study the ventricular activation sequence and ventricular synchrony.Results The left ventricular 1/3 ejection fraction decreased significantly during pacing compared with that during sinus rhythm[(23.4 ±6.1)% vs(27.7 ±4.5)%, P =0.01]. Regional ejection fraction also decreased during pacing, although the difference was not statistically significant. Phase analysis showed that the right ventricle was activated earlier than the left ventricle during pacing, and that the phase shift was significantly greater during pacing than that during sinus rhythm[64.13°±16.80° vs 52.88°± 9.26°, P =0.007]. The activation of both ventricles occurred simultaneously during sinus rhythm, with the activation sequence from proximal septum or base of left ventricle to apex. The earliest activation during pacing occurred at the right ventricular apex, and subsequently spread to the base and left ventricle.Conclusion Right atrial and ventricular DDD pacing impairs left ventricular systolic function and ventricular synchrony.

  8. Development of Pacing, Electrophysiology and Defibrillation in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohan Nair

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available History of cardiac pacing in India dates back to late 1960s. Kar1 reported that cardiac pacing was introduced in India in 1966. Basu2 while discussing on cardiac pacemaking in Calcutta, mentions that the first pacing was performed in April 1967 at the Institute of Post Graduate Medical Education and Research (IPGME&R. Bhatia et al3 started pacemaker implantation at AIIMS, New Delhi in 1968. Their first patient was a doctor from Assam and the pulse generator was supplied by Medtronic Inc. The pulse generator was powered by a mercury-iodide battery which lasted for about 2 ½ years, after which the patient underwent pulse generator replacement. Unfortunately he succumbed to miliary tuberculosis about a year after that. Currently around 8000 pacemakers are being implanted annually in India, in various centers around the country. G.B. Pant Hospital New Delhi has been the pioneering center in the field of Invasive Cardiac Electrophysiology in the country. Bhatia M.L et al9 and Khalilullah M et al 10,11,12,13 were the pioneers in His bundle electrography in the country. Prof. K.K. Sethi was the first to perform catheter ablation in the country. Direct Current ablation was started in 1988 followed by Radio Frequency (RF ablation later on. The number of centres having electrophysiology setup in the country has increased from about 10 in 1997 to around 30 in 2001 (Fig 4. The number of RF ablations being performed in the country has gone up from 800 to 2000 during the same period. Newer insights in the field of atrial fibrillation in rheumatic heart disease have been obtained by electrophysiological studies from the country. Atrial disease due to rheumatic carditis is an important parameter, in addition to valvular involvement in the genesis of atrial fibrillation. Multiple substrates for atrial fibrillation are present in these cases, namely: stretch, fibrosis, raised pressures, increased atrial size and increased anisotropy. Atrial fibrillation in

  9. Impact of the permanent ventricular pacing site on left ventricular function in children: A retrospective multicentre survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.E. van Geldorp (Irene); T. Delhaas (Tammo); R.A. Gebauer (Roman); P. Frias (Patrick); M. Tomaske (Maren); M.K. Friedberg (Mark); S. Tisma-Dupanovic (Svjetlana); J. Elders (Jan); A. Früh (Andreas); F. Gabbarini (Fulvio); P. Kubuš (Petr); V. Illikova (Viera); E.C. Tsao (Elisa); A.C. Blank (Andreas Christian); A. Hiippala (Anita); T. Sluysmans (Thierry); P. Karpawich (Peter); S.A. Clur (Sally-Ann); X. Ganame (Xavier); K.K. Collins (Kathryn); G.C. Dann (Greg); J.-B. Thambo (Jean-Benoît); C. Trigo (Conceição); B. Nagel (Bert); J. Papagiannis (John); A. Rackowitz (Annette); J. Marek (Josef); J.-H. Nürnberg (Jan-Hendrik); W.Y. Vanagt (Ward); F.W. Prinzen (Frits); J. Janousek (Jan)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Chronic right ventricular (RV) pacing is associated with deleterious effects on cardiac function. Objective In an observational multicentre study in children with isolated atrioventricular (AV) block receiving chronic ventricular pacing, the importance of the ventricular paci

  10. Electrical Pacing of Cardiac Tissue Including Potassium Inward Rectification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galappaththige, Suran; Roth, Bradley J

    2015-01-01

    In this study cardiac tissue is stimulated electrically through a small unipolar electrode. Numerical simulations predict that around an electrode are adjacent regions of depolarization and hyperpolarization. Experiments have shown that during pacing of resting cardiac tissue the hyperpolarization is often inhibited. Our goal is to determine if the inward rectifying potassium current (IK1) causes the inhibition of hyperpolarization. Numerical simulations were carried out using the bidomain model with potassium dynamics specified to be inward rectifying. In the simulations, adjacent regions of depolarization and hyperpolarization were observed surrounding the electrode. For cathodal currents the virtual anode produces a hyperpolarization that decreases over time. For long duration pulses the current-voltage curve is non-linear, with very small hyperpolarization compared to depolarization. For short pulses, the hyperpolarization is more prominent. Without the inward potassium rectification, the current voltage curve is linear and the hyperpolarization is evident for both long and short pulses. In conclusion, the inward rectification of the potassium current explains the inhibition of hyperpolarization for long duration stimulus pulses, but not for short duration pulses.

  11. Electrical Pacing of Cardiac Tissue Including Potassium Inward Rectification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suran Galappaththige

    Full Text Available In this study cardiac tissue is stimulated electrically through a small unipolar electrode. Numerical simulations predict that around an electrode are adjacent regions of depolarization and hyperpolarization. Experiments have shown that during pacing of resting cardiac tissue the hyperpolarization is often inhibited. Our goal is to determine if the inward rectifying potassium current (IK1 causes the inhibition of hyperpolarization. Numerical simulations were carried out using the bidomain model with potassium dynamics specified to be inward rectifying. In the simulations, adjacent regions of depolarization and hyperpolarization were observed surrounding the electrode. For cathodal currents the virtual anode produces a hyperpolarization that decreases over time. For long duration pulses the current-voltage curve is non-linear, with very small hyperpolarization compared to depolarization. For short pulses, the hyperpolarization is more prominent. Without the inward potassium rectification, the current voltage curve is linear and the hyperpolarization is evident for both long and short pulses. In conclusion, the inward rectification of the potassium current explains the inhibition of hyperpolarization for long duration stimulus pulses, but not for short duration pulses.

  12. Antitachycardia pacing programming in implantable cardioverter defibrillator: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Maria, Elia; Giacopelli, Daniele; Borghi, Ambra; Modonesi, Letizia; Cappelli, Stefano

    2017-05-26

    Implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) programming involves several parameters. In recent years antitachycardia pacing (ATP) has gained an increasing importance in the treatment of ventricular arrhythmias, whether slow or fast. It reduces the number of unnecessary and inappropriate shocks and improves both patient's quality of life and device longevity. There is no clear indication regarding the type of ATP to be used, except for the treatment of fast ventricular tachycardias (188 bpm-250 bpm) where it has been shown a greater efficacy and safety of burst compared to ramp; 8 impulses in each sequence of ATP appears to be the best programming option in this setting. Beyond ATP use, excellent clinical results were obtained with programming standardization following these principles: extended detection time in ventricular fibrillation (VF) zone; supraventricular discrimination criteria up to 200 bpm; first shock in VF zone at the maximum energy in order to reduce the risk of multiple shocks. The MADIT-RIT trial and some observational registries have also recently demonstrated that programming with a widespread use of ATP, higher cut-off rates or delayed intervention reduces the number of inappropriate and unnecessary therapies and improves the survival of patients during mid-term follow-up.

  13. Predictors of left ventricular remodelling and failure in right ventricular pacing in the young

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebauer, Roman A.; Tomek, Viktor; Salameh, Aida; Marek, Jan; Chaloupecký, Václav; Gebauer, Roman; Matějka, Tomáš; Vojtovič, Pavel; Janoušek, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Aims To identify risk factors for left ventricular (LV) dysfunction in right ventricular (RV) pacing in the young. Methods and results Left ventricular function was evaluated in 82 paediatric patients with either non-surgical (n = 41) or surgical (n= 41) complete atrioventricular block who have been 100% RV paced for a mean period of 7.4 years. Left ventricular shortening fraction (SF) decreased from a median (range) of 39 (24–62)% prior to implantation to 32 (8–49)% at last follow-up (P +2z-values) and dysfunction (SF < 0.26) was found to increase from 1.3% prior to pacemaker implantation to 13.4% (11/82 patients) at last follow-up (P = 0.01). Ten of these 11 patients had progressive LV remodelling and 8 of 11 were symptomatic. The only significant risk factor for the development of LV dilatation and dysfunction was the presence of epicardial RV free wall pacing (OR = 14.3, P < 0.001). Other pre-implantation demographic, diagnostic, and haemodynamic factors including block aetiology, pacing variables, and pacing duration did not show independent significance. Conclusion Right ventricular pacing leads to pathologic LV remodelling in a significant proportion of paediatric patients. The major independent risk factor is the presence of epicardial RV free wall pacing, which should be avoided whenever possible. PMID:19286675

  14. [Competitive pacing in a patient with DDD pacemaker and bigeminal ventricular extrasystoles].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, Vincenzo; Candelmo, Fiore; Todaro, Chiara; Oreto, Giuseppe

    2008-11-01

    The ECG recorded from a patient with DDD pacemaker showed variable responses of the pacing system to bigeminal ventricular extrasystoles, dependent on the coupling interval of premature beats. For relatively short coupling intervals, the premature spontaneous event was detected by the pacemaker, inhibiting both atrial and ventricular output, and resulting in a relatively long pacing pause. In slightly less premature end-diastolic extrasystoles, in contrast, the pacing system delivered an atrial spike that was superimposed upon the spontaneous premature QRS complex (pseudo-pseudofusion); under these circumstances, the atrial spike was followed, at the end of the programmed atrioventricular interval, by a ventricular spike falling on the extrasystolic T wave apex (competitive ventricular pacing). This phenomenon, however, did not express a sensing malfunction, but was due to post-atrial ventricular blanking (PAVB), a short period initiated by the atrial spike during which ventricular sensing is temporarily disabled, so that no signal can be detected. Finally, whenever premature end-diastolic impulses occurred after PAVB, during the brief interval defined ventricular safety pacing, the spontaneous event was sensed, being followed by an earlier-than-expected ventricular spike, whose prematurity was aimed at avoiding the occurrence of an artificial impulse upon the T wave of extrasystole. In conclusion, despite several not sensed ventricular extrasystoles and competitive pacing, no sensing malfunction was present. This case demonstrates how complex can be the electrocardiographic analysis of a DDD pacemaker, owing to the many complicating phenomena related to this pacing mechanism.

  15. The interrelations among stochastic pacing, stability, and memory in the heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvir, Hila; Zlochiver, Sharon

    2014-08-19

    Low pacing variability in the heart has been clinically reported as a risk factor for lethal cardiac arrhythmias and arrhythmic death. In ia previous simulation study, we demonstrated that stochastic pacing sustains an antiarrhythmic effect by moderating the slope of the action potential duration (APD) restitution curve, by reducing the propensity of APD alternans, converting discordant to concordant alternans, and ultimately preventing wavebreaks. However, the dynamic mechanisms relating pacing stochasticity to tissue stability are not yet known. In this work, we develop a mathematical framework to describe the APD signal using an autoregressive stochastic model, and we establish the interrelations between stochastic pacing, cardiac memory, and cardiac stability, as manifested by the degree of APD alternans. Employing stability analysis tools, we show that increased stochasticity in the ventricular tissue activation sequence works to lower the maximal absolute eigenvalues of the stochastic model, thereby contributing to increased stability. We also show that the memory coefficients of the autoregressive model are modulated by pacing stochasticity in a nonlinear, biphasic way, so that for exceedingly high levels of pacing stochasticity, the antiarrhythmic effect is hampered by increasing APD variance. This work may contribute to establishment of an optimal antiarrhythmic pacing protocol in a future study. Copyright © 2014 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Cardiomyopathy induced by artificial cardiac pacing: myth or reality sustained by evidence?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Di Leoni Ferrari

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Implantable cardiac pacing systems are a safe and effective treatment for symptomatic irreversible bradycardia. Under the proper indications, cardiac pacing might bring significant clinical benefit. Evidences from literature state that the action of the artificial pacing system, mainly when the ventricular lead is located at the apex of the right ventricle, produces negative effects to cardiac structure (remodeling, dilatation and function (dissinchrony. Patients with previously compromised left ventricular function would benefit the least with conventional right ventricle apical pacing, and are exposed to the risk of developing higher incidence of morbidity and mortality for heart failure. However, after almost 6 decades of cardiac pacing, just a reduced portion of patients in general would develop these alterations. In this context, there are not completely clear some issues related to cardiac pacing and the development of this cardiomyopathy. Causality relationships among QRS widening with a left bundle branch block morphology, contractility alterations within the left ventricle, and certain substrates or clinical (previous systolic dysfunction, structural heart disease, time from implant or electrical conditions (QRS duration, percentage of ventricular stimulation are still subjecte of debate. This review analyses contemporary data regarding this new entity, and discusses alternatives of how to use cardiac pacing in this context, emphasizing cardiac resynchronization therapy.

  17. Differences in atrial septal activation with an intrasinoatrial nodal pacemaker and epicardial sinoatrial nodal pacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, J M

    1979-01-01

    Changes in Intra-SA nodal pacemaker localization were produced through stimulation of the decentralized cervical vagi and stellate ganglia in the anesthetized dog. Shifts in pacemaker to the rostral, middle, or caudal regions of the SA node produced a change in the timing as well as a change in the sequence of activation of recording sites overlying the AV node. Epicardial pacing with a plaque electrode from either the rostral, middle, or caudal regions of the SA node produced the same activation sequence of the AV nodal electrodes irrespective of the epicardial SA nodal pacing site. The inability of epicardial SA nodal pacing to precisely reproduce the activation pattern of the atrial septum overlying the AV node observed with a natural SA nodal pacemaker can be explained by the geographic relationship of the pacemaker cells within the node to the preferential internodal pathways and the area of atrial tissue stimulated by pacing. Pacing activates a large mass of tissue, whereas an intrinsic pacemaker probably acts as a more localized focus. The inability of pacing to reproduce the activation pattern seen with spontaneous rhythm may be a determinant in the varied P wave morphology seen with coronary sinus or AV nodal junctional rhythms, as compared with more consistent morphology seen with pacing.

  18. High-resolution entrainment mapping of gastric pacing: a new analytical tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Grady, Gregory; Du, Peng; Lammers, Wim J E P; Egbuji, John U; Mithraratne, Pulasthi; Chen, Jiande D Z; Cheng, Leo K; Windsor, John A; Pullan, Andrew J

    2010-02-01

    Gastric pacing has been investigated as a potential treatment for gastroparesis. New pacing protocols are required to improve symptom and motility outcomes; however, research progress has been constrained by a limited understanding of the effects of electrical stimulation on slow-wave activity. This study introduces high-resolution (HR) "entrainment mapping" for the analysis of gastric pacing and presents four demonstrations. Gastric pacing was initiated in a porcine model (typical amplitude 4 mA, pulse width 400 ms, period 17 s). Entrainment mapping was performed using flexible multielectrode arrays (entrainment onset was quantified over successive waves in spatiotemporal detail. In the second demonstration, slow-wave velocity was accurately determined with HR field analysis, and paced propagation was found to be anisotropic (longitudinal 2.6 +/- 1.7 vs. circumferential 4.5 +/- 0.6 mm/s; P Entrainment mapping enables an accurate quantification of the effects of gastric pacing on slow-wave activity, offering an improved method to assess whether pacing protocols are likely to achieve physiologically and clinically useful outcomes.

  19. Cardiac optogenetic pacing in drosophila melanogaster using red-shifted opsins (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Men, Jing; Li, Airong; Jerwick, Jason; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Zhou, Chao

    2017-02-01

    Electrical pacing is the current gold standard for investigation of mammalian cardiac electrical conduction systems as well as for treatment of certain cardiac pathologies. However, this method requires an invasive surgical procedure to implant the pacing electrodes. Recently, optogenetic pacing has been developed as an alternative, non-invasive method for heartbeat pacing in animals. It induces heartbeats by shining pulsed light on transgene-generated microbial opsins which in turn activate light gated ion channels in animal hearts. However, commonly used opsins, such as channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2), require short light wavelength stimulation (475 nm), which is strongly absorbed and scattered by tissue. Here, we expressed recently engineered red-shifted opsins, ReaChR and CsChrimson, in the heart of a well-developed animal model, Drosophila melanogaster, for the first time. Optogenetic pacing was successfully conducted in both ReaChR and CsChrimson flies at their larval, pupal, and adult stages using 617 nm excitation light pulse, enabling a much deeper tissue penetration compared to blue stimulation light. A customized high speed and ultrahigh resolution OCM system was used to non-invasively monitor the heartbeat pacing in Drosophila. Compared to previous studies on optogenetic pacing of Drosophila, higher penetration depth of optogenetic excitation light was achieved in opaque late pupal flies. Lower stimulating power density is needed for excitation at each developmental stage of both groups, which improves the safety of this technique for heart rhythm studies.

  20. Helping Girls Get Back on Track: An Implementation Study of the PACE Center for Girls. Executive Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treskon, Louisa; Millenky, Megan; Freedman, Lily

    2017-01-01

    PACE Center for Girls is a unique program that provides academic and social services to girls ages 11 to 18. Girls eligible for PACE exhibit multiple health, safety, and delinquency risk factors, such as poor academic performance, exposure to abuse or violence, truancy, risky sexual behavior, and substance abuse. PACE seeks to help them onto a…

  1. Facility Composer (Trademark) and PACES (Trademark) Integration: Development of an XML Interface Based on Industry Foundation Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-01

    Density Parameters. ...............................111 Figure C5. PACES Facilities Values editing screen, Shell Quantity Parameters...112 Figure C6. PACES Facilities Values editing screen, Shell Descriptive Parameters...........................113 Figure C7. PACES import... COCOA B1 12008 FL COCOA B2 12009 FL COCOA OC 12010 FL FT PIERCE 12011 FL JONATHAN 12012 FL MALABAR 12013 FL MELBOURN 12014 FL STUART 12015 FL

  2. Echocardiographic estimation of acute haemodynamic response during optimization of multisite pace-maker using different pacing modalities and atrioventricular delays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šalinger-Martinović Sonja

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT improves ventricular dyssynchrony and is associated with an improvement in symptoms, quality of life and prognosis in patients with severe heart failure and intraventricular conduction delay. Different pacing modalities produce variable activation patterns and may be a cause of different haemodynamic changes. The aim of our study was to investigate acute haemodynamic changes with different CRT configurations during optimization procedure. Methods. This study included 30 patients with severe left ventricular systolic dysfunction and left bundle branch block with wide QRS (EF 24.33 ± 3.7%, QRS 159 ± 17.3 ms, New York Heart Association III/IV 25/5 with implanted CRT device. The whole group of patients had severe mitral regurgitation in order to measure dP/dt. After implantation and before discharge all the patients underwent optimization procedure guided by Doppler echocardiography. Left and right ventricular pre-ejection intervals (LVPEI and RVPEI, interventricular mechanical delay (IVD and the maximal rate of ventricular pressure rise during early systole (max dP/dt were measured during left and biventricular pacing with three different atrioventricular (AV delays. Results. After CRT device optimization, optimal AV delay and CRT mode were defined. Left ventricular pre-ejection intervals changed from 170.5 ± 24.6 to 145.9 ± 9.5 (p < 0.001, RVPEI from 102.4 ± 15.9 to 119.8 ± 10.9 (p < 0.001, IVD from 68.1 ± 18.3 to 26.5 ± 8.2 (p < 0.001 and dP/dt from 524.2 ± 67 to 678.2 ± 88.5 (p < 0.01. Conclusion. In patients receiving CRT echocardiographic assessment of the acute haemodynamic response to CRT is a useful tool in optimization procedure. The variability of Doppler parameters with different CRT modalities emphasizes the necessity of individualized approach in optimization procedure.

  3. Successful treatment with biventricular pacing in a patient with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Ji-qiang; JIANG Teng-yong; WANG Yun-long; WANG Yan; L(U) Shu-zheng

    2011-01-01

    We report the effects of biventricular pacing in a patient with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM) refractory to medical therapy. A 58-year-old man with HOCM had suffered from dyspnea,chest pain and palpitation for 5 years. Cardiac catheterization showed a left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) gradient of 80 mmHg. He refused septal myomectomy and the septal ablation was not available. Based on intraoperative pressure measurements,he was implanted with biventricular pacing and LVOT gradient decreased to 10 mmHg. During the follow-up period of 6 months, the patient's symptoms were markedly improved. Biventricular pacing may be an alternative therapy for patients with HOCM.

  4. Earlier Right Ventricular Pacing in Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy for a Patient with Right Axis Deviation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Yusuke; Ishibashi, Kohei; Noda, Takashi; Okamura, Hideo; Kanzaki, Hideaki; Anzai, Toshihisa; Yasuda, Satoshi; Kusano, Kengo

    2017-09-01

    We describe the case of a 37-year-old woman who presented with complete right bundle branch block and right axis deviation. She was admitted to our hospital due to severe heart failure and was dependent on inotropic agents. Cardiac resynchronization therapy was initiated but did not improve her condition. After the optimization of the pacing timing, we performed earlier right ventricular pacing, which led to an improvement of her heart failure. Earlier right ventricular pacing should be considered in patients with complete right bundle branch block and right axis deviation when cardiac resynchronization therapy is not effective.

  5. Pace: an advanced structure for handling multi-technique NDT; Pace: une structure avancee pour la gestion de donnees CND multitechniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayos, M.; Guisnel, F.

    1995-08-01

    The growing extent and complexity of NDT data analysis has reached a stage where dedicated systems are required. In the context of a European research program, EDF participated from 1992 to 1994 in one of the first international projects in this field, TRAPPIST and, in 1993, began developing An application for the electricity generating industry, giving rise to the PACE project. The prime objective specially targets the French electricity generating industry, where PACE was to be the reference system for analysis of NDE data concerning EdF power plants. The second objective is to promote the adoption of PACE by other industrial sectors and other countries. The analysis of needs shows that the required system must be designed to analyze data from widely different sources. The PACE entry point consequently has to be a standard format compatible with geometrical data as well as those provided by NDT. The TRAPPIST format constitutes the first version of this standard and is the first step towards European standardization in this respect. Consideration of the different user modes defined for PACE led to the design of a 2-part user structure comprising a database management system (Ingres/Windows 4GL) and a display/processing tool (AVS), also usable to construct analysis scenarios. The structure of PACE is defined nd seems well suited to industrial requirements, but before it is possible to proceed further towards its adoption for actual power plant inspections, it has to be validated on a more realistic application, the eddy current and ultrasonic testing of a full-scale T-joint. This is already under way, whilst work on format standardization and industrialization preparatory procedures are proceeding in parallel. (authors). 4 refs., 6 figs.

  6. Review of cardiac pacing at Maribor teaching hospital since 1972

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zlatko Pehnec

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Number of implanted pacemakers is in continuous increase in Maribor General Hospital. The first four pacemakers in 1972 were followed by 50 pacemakers annually in the first 10 years. In 1988 the number first exceeded 100 implanted pacemakers and in the year 2004 achieved number 372. Altogether, till the end of the year 2004 there were 4232 pacemakers implanted. Analyses of the implanted pacemakers according to pacing mode since 1986 shows small number of DDD/VDD(R pacemakers till the year 1995. Since that year its number was increasing and in the year 1998 and 1999 exceeded half of all implanted pacemakers. In period of thirty years, there were 48.3% VVI, 22.3%VVIR, 16.4% DDD, 5.8% DDDR, 6.1% VDD and 1% AAIR pacemakers implanted. We have done analysis of the all outpatients within the 30-year period (1972–2001. For this purpose 2206 records were reviewed and 2176 patients analysed. According to gender, there were 51.4% male and 48.6% female. Average age at the time of implantation was 71 years (range from 13–96 years. Most patients (58% were between 65 and 79 years of age, there were 20% younger than 65 years and 22% older than 80 years of age. There were more men in the group till 79 years of age and more women in the group older than 80 years. Average survival of the patients with pacemaker (1771 was 94.7% after one year, 56.9% after five years and 31.5% after ten years. Survival is influenced by the age of the patients and accompanying diseases of the patients at the time of implantation, especially heart failure. In patients younger than 65 years, five years survival from implantation, was 75.4% and after ten years 54.3%. In older than 80 years, five years survival from implantation was 34.4% and after ten years 11.5%. Survival of the patients with heart failure, five years after implantation was 10% and after ten years 8% worse than those without it. In 30-year period, 271 patients had two or more pacemakers implanted

  7. Study on Problems and Countermeasures of Textbook Management in China Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Lihua

    2011-01-01

    Textbook management in universities is an integral component of teaching management. With gradual development of university education teaching, textbook management in China universities can no longer keep pace with the steps of the teaching management, and the work of textbook management is faced up with new challenges. This article makes an…

  8. Obliquity-paced Pliocene West Antarctic ice sheet oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naish, T.; Powell, R.; Levy, R.; Wilson, G.; Scherer, R.; Talarico, F.; Krissek, L.; Niessen, F.; Pompilio, M.; Wilson, T.; Carter, L.; DeConto, R.; Huybers, P.; McKay, R.; Pollard, D.; Ross, J.; Winter, D.; Barrett, P.; Browne, G.; Cody, R.; Cowan, E.; Crampton, J.; Dunbar, G.; Dunbar, N.; Florindo, F.; Gebhardt, C.; Graham, I.; Hannah, M.; Hansaraj, D.; Harwood, D.; Helling, D.; Henrys, S.; Hinnov, L.; Kuhn, G.; Kyle, P.; Laufer, A.; Maffioli, P.; Magens, D.; Mandernack, K.; McIntosh, W.; Millan, C.; Morin, R.; Ohneiser, C.; Paulsen, T.; Persico, D.; Raine, I.; Reed, J.; Riesselman, C.; Sagnotti, L.; Schmitt, D.; Sjunneskog, C.; Strong, P.; Taviani, M.; Vogel, S.; Wilch, T.; Williams, T.

    2009-01-01

    Thirty years after oxygen isotope records from microfossils deposited in ocean sediments confirmed the hypothesis that variations in the Earth's orbital geometry control the ice ages, fundamental questions remain over the response of the Antarctic ice sheets to orbital cycles. Furthermore, an understanding of the behaviour of the marine-based West Antarctic ice sheet (WAIS) during the 'warmer-than-present' early-Pliocene epoch (???5-3 Myr ago) is needed to better constrain the possible range of ice-sheet behaviour in the context of future global warming. Here we present a marine glacial record from the upper 600 m of the AND-1B sediment core recovered from beneath the northwest part of the Ross ice shelf by the ANDRILL programme and demonstrate well-dated, ???40-kyr cyclic variations in ice-sheet extent linked to cycles in insolation influenced by changes in the Earth's axial tilt (obliquity) during the Pliocene. Our data provide direct evidence for orbitally induced oscillations in the WAIS, which periodically collapsed, resulting in a switch from grounded ice, or ice shelves, to open waters in the Ross embayment when planetary temperatures were up to ???3??C warmer than today and atmospheric CO 2 concentration was as high as ???400 p.p.m.v. (refs 5, 6). The evidence is consistent with a new ice-sheet/ice-shelf model that simulates fluctuations in Antarctic ice volume of up to +7 m in equivalent sea level associated with the loss of the WAIS and up to +3 m in equivalent sea level from the East Antarctic ice sheet, in response to ocean-induced melting paced by obliquity. During interglacial times, diatomaceous sediments indicate high surface-water productivity, minimal summer sea ice and air temperatures above freezing, suggesting an additional influence of surface melt under conditions of elevated CO2. ??2009 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  9. Addio a Fubini, fisico di pace tra ebrei e arabi

    CERN Multimedia

    Molinari, Ida

    2005-01-01

    Professor at the Torino University, Sergio Fubini was not only a theorician physicist very well known in the field of elementar particles and the theory of strings. He was aslo a Wise person, with hebrew humour and italian modesty

  10. Optical recording-guided pacing to create functional line of block during ventricular fibrillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravi, Krishna; Nihei, Motoki; Willmer, Anjuli; Hayashi, Hideki; Lin, Shien-Fong

    2006-03-01

    Low-energy defibrillation is very desirable in cardiac rhythm management. We previously reported that ventricular fibrillation (VF) can be synchronized with a novel synchronized pacing technique (SyncP) using low-energy pacing pulses. This study sought to create a line of block during VF using SyncP. SyncP was performed in six isolated rabbit hearts during VF using optical recording to control the delivery of pacing pulses in real time. Four pacing electrodes with interelectrode distances of 5 mm were configured in a line along and across the myocardial fiber direction. The electrodes were controlled independently (independent mode) or fired together (simultaneous mode). Significant wavefront synchronization was observed along the electrode line as indicated by a decrease in variance. With the independent SyncP protocol, the decrease in the variance was 19.3 and 13.7% (Pventricular defibrillation.

  11. Conditioning of the diaphragm by phrenic nerve pacing in primary alveolar hypoventilation.

    OpenAIRE

    Wilcox, P G; Paré, P D; Fleetham, J A

    1988-01-01

    A patient with respiratory muscle weakness due to alveolar hypoventilation was treated with nocturnal bilateral phrenic nerve pacing for one year. Treatment was associated with a progressive increase in diaphragmatic strength and endurance.

  12. Self-Paced Mathematics Instruction: How Effective Has it Been in Secondary and Postsecondary Schools?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoen, Harold L.

    1976-01-01

    Seventeen studies of self-paced instruction in algebra, geometry, trigonometry, and college mathematics courses are reviewed. In general these studies did not find the individualized programs to be superior to theregular instruction with which they were compared. (SD)

  13. Photovoltaics (PV) as an Eligible Measure in Residential PACE Programs: Benefits and Challenges (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coughlin, J.

    2010-06-01

    Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) financing is one of several new financial models broadening access to clean energy by addressing the barrier of initial capital cost. The majority of the PACE programs in the market today include PV as an eligible measure. PV appeals to homeowners as a way to reduce utility bills, self-generate sustainable power, increase energy independence and demonstrate a commitment to the environment. If substantial state incentives for PV exist, PV projects can be economic under PACE, especially when partnered with good net metering policies. At the same time, PV is expensive relative to other eligible measures with a return on investment horizon that might exceed program targets. This fact sheet reviews the benefits and potential challenges of including PV in PACE programs.

  14. Self-Paced Mathematics Instruction: How Effective Has it Been in Secondary and Postsecondary Schools?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoen, Harold L.

    1976-01-01

    Seventeen studies of self-paced instruction in algebra, geometry, trigonometry, and college mathematics courses are reviewed. In general these studies did not find the individualized programs to be superior to theregular instruction with which they were compared. (SD)

  15. Synchronous intra-myocardial ventricular pacing without crossing the tricuspid valve or entering the coronary sinus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konecny, Tomas; DeSimone, Christopher V.; Friedman, Paul A.; Bruce, Charles [Department of Medicine, Cardiovascular Diseases, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Asirvatham, Samuel J., E-mail: asirvatham.samuel@mayo.edu [Department of Medicine, Cardiovascular Diseases, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Department of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, Pediatric Cardiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2013-05-15

    Ventricular pacing is most commonly performed at the right ventricular (RV) apex. This is not without risk as placement requires crossing the tricuspid valve (TV) and may cause valvular dysfunction and dyssynchronous activation of the ventricles. The fact that the tricuspid valve lies more apically than the mitral valve allows for the possibility of pacing the ventricles from the right atrium (RA) via the “atrio-ventricular septum” without crossing the TV or entering the coronary sinus (CS). In order to mitigate far field activation inherent to current pacing technology, we constructed a novel lead in which the cathode and anode are both intra-myocardial. We demonstrate safety and efficacy of this novel lead for ventricular pacing at the atrio-ventricular septum in canines, including improved synchronous activation of both ventricles, improved differentiation in ventricular versus atrial sensing, while providing reliable ventricular capture, opening novel and a potentially safer alternative to human cardiac resynchronization therapy.

  16. Left ventricular pacing improves haemodynamic variables in patients with heart failure with a normal QRS duration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, M S; Bleasdale, R A; Mumford, C E; Frenneaux, M P; Morris-Thurgood, J A

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: To assess whether patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) and a normal QRS duration can benefit from left ventricular (VDD-LV) pacing. Design: Cardiac resynchronisation is reserved for patients with a broad QRS duration on the premise that systolic resynchronisation is the mechanism of benefit, yet improvement from pacing correlates poorly with QRS duration. In CHF patients with a broad QRS duration, those with a high resting pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) > 15 mm Hg benefit. In this acute haemodynamic VDD-LV pacing study, patients with CHF with a normal QRS duration were divided into two groups—patients with a resting PCWP > 15 mm Hg and patients with a resting PCWP 15 mm Hg (n  =  10), cardiac output increased from 3.9 (1.5) to 4.5 (1.65) l/min (p 15 mm Hg derive acute haemodynamic benefit from VDD-LV pacing. PMID:15084543

  17. Classifying running-related injuries based upon etiology, with emphasis on volume and pace

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rasmus Oestergaard; Nohr, Ellen Aagaard; Rasmussen, Sten;

    2013-01-01

    of patellofemoral pain syndrome, iliotibial band syndrome, and patellar tendinopathy, while change in running pace may be associated with the development of achilles tendinopathy, gastrocnemius injuries, and plantar fasciitis. DISCUSSIONRELATION TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: If this assertion is correct, bias may...

  18. Effects of Bepridil on Atrial Electrical Remodeling in Short-Term Rapid Pacing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroto Tsuchiya, MD

    2009-01-01

    Conclusions: Bepridil prevented the shortening of the ERP and MAPD90 induced by rapid atrial pacing in the acute phase. The results of this study might explain the efficacy of bepridil for preventing the recurrence of paroxysmal AF.

  19. Transvenous right ventricular pacing in a patient with tricuspid mechanical prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubio José

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We report a patient in whom permanent endocardial pacing was accomplished by passage of the electrode through a mechanical tricuspid valve. Echocardiography study showed a minimal tricuspid regurgitation.

  20. The formation of bronchocutaneous fistulae due to retained epicardial pacing wires: A literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasileios Patris

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Temporary epicardial pacing wires during open-heart surgery are routinely used both for diagnostic and treatment purposes. In complicated cases where patients are unstable or the wires are difficult to remove, the pacing wires are cut at the skin level and allowed to retract by themselves. This procedure rarely causes complications. However, there have been cases reporting that retained pacing wires are linked to the formation of sterno-bronchial fistulae, which may present a while after the date of operation and are usually infected. This review aims to study the cases presenting sterno-bronchial fistulae due to retained epicardial pacing wires and to highlight the important factors associated with these. It is important to note these complications, as fistulae may cause a variety of problems to the patient if undiagnosed and left untreated. With the aid of scans such as fistulography, fistulae can be identified and treated and will improve the patients' health dramatically.

  1. EFFECT OF ADAPTIVE PACED CARDIOLOCOMOTOR SYNCHRONIZATION DURING RUNNING: A PRELIMINARY STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bill Phillips

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Cardiolocomotor synchronization (CLS has been well established for individuals engaged in rhythmic activity, such as walking, running, or cycling. When frequency of the activity is at or near the heart rate, entrainment occurs. CLS has been shown in many cases to improve the efficiency of locomotor activity, improving stroke volume, reducing blood pressure variability, and lowering the oxygen uptake (VO2. Instead of a 1:1 frequency ratio of activity to heart rate, an investigation was performed to determine if different harmonic coupling at other simple integer ratios (e.g. 1:2, 2:3, 3:2 could achieve any performance benefits. CLS was ensured by pacing the stride rate according to the measured heartbeat (i.e., adaptive paced CLS, or forced CLS. An algorithm was designed that determined the simplest ratio (lowest denominator that, when multiplied by the heart rate will fall within an individualized, predetermined comfortable pacing range for the user. The algorithm was implemented on an iPhone 4, which generated a 'tick-tock' sound through the iPhone's headphones. A sham-controlled crossover study was performed with 15 volunteers of various fitness levels. Subjects ran a 3 mile (4.83 km simulated training run at their normal pace on two consecutive days (randomized one adaptive pacing, one sham. Adaptive pacing resulted in faster runs run times, with subjects running an average of 26:03 ± 3:23 for adaptive pacing and 26:38 ± 3:31 for sham (F = 5.46, p < 0.05. The increase in heart rate from the start of the race as estimated by an exponential time constant was significantly longer during adaptive pacing, τ = 0.99 ± 0.30, compared to sham, τ = 1.53 ± 0.34 (t = -6.62, p < 0.01. Eighty-seven percent of runners found it easy to adjust their stride length to match the pacing signal with seventy-nine percent reporting that pacing helped their performance. These results suggest that adaptive paced CLS may have a beneficial effect on running

  2. The effect of visitor number and spice provisioning in pacing expression by jaguars evaluated through a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. S. Vidal

    Full Text Available Abstract Captive animals exhibit stereotypic pacing in response to multiple causes, including the inability to escape from human contact. Environmental enrichment techniques can minimize pacing expression. By using an individual-based approach, we addressed whether the amount of time two males and a female jaguar (Panthera onca devote to pacing varied with the number of visitors and tested the effectiveness of cinnamon and black pepper in reducing pacing. The amount of time that all jaguars engaged in pacing increased significantly with the number of visitors. Despite the difference between the males regarding age and housing conditions, both devoted significantly less time to pacing following the addition of both spices, which indicates their suitability as enrichment techniques. Mean time devoted to pacing among the treatments did not differ for the female. Our findings pointed out to the validity of individual-based approaches, as they can reveal how suitable olfactory stimuli are to minimizing stereotypies irrespective of particular traits.

  3. The effect of visitor number and spice provisioning in pacing expression by jaguars evaluated through a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, L S; Guilherme, F R; Silva, V F; Faccio, M C S R; Martins, M M; Briani, D C

    2016-06-01

    Captive animals exhibit stereotypic pacing in response to multiple causes, including the inability to escape from human contact. Environmental enrichment techniques can minimize pacing expression. By using an individual-based approach, we addressed whether the amount of time two males and a female jaguar (Panthera onca) devote to pacing varied with the number of visitors and tested the effectiveness of cinnamon and black pepper in reducing pacing. The amount of time that all jaguars engaged in pacing increased significantly with the number of visitors. Despite the difference between the males regarding age and housing conditions, both devoted significantly less time to pacing following the addition of both spices, which indicates their suitability as enrichment techniques. Mean time devoted to pacing among the treatments did not differ for the female. Our findings pointed out to the validity of individual-based approaches, as they can reveal how suitable olfactory stimuli are to minimizing stereotypies irrespective of particular traits.

  4. Active avoidance but not activity pacing is associated with disability in fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karsdorp, Petra A; Vlaeyen, Johan W S

    2009-12-15

    Activity pacing has been suggested as a behavioural strategy that may protect patients with fibromyalgia (FM) against activity dysregulation and disability. The aim of the present study was to empirically test whether the construct of activity pacing is distinct from other behavioural strategies assessed with the Chronic Pain Coping Inventory (CPCI), such as guarding, resting, asking for assistance, relaxation, task persistence, exercise/stretch, seeking social support, and coping self-statements. The second objective was to test whether pacing was associated with physical disability when controlling for pain catastrophizing, pain severity and the other behavioural strategies as measured with CPCI. A random sample of patients with FM (N=409) completed the CPCI, the Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS), the Physical Index of the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ-PH) and the Pain Disability Index (PDI). The results demonstrated that the Dutch version of the CPCI including the pacing subscale has adequate internal consistency and construct validity. Moreover, guarding and asking for assistance, but not pacing, were associated with disability. These findings are in line with fear-avoidance models and suggest that specifically active avoidance behaviours are detrimental in FM. The authors recommend developing cognitive-behavioural and exposure-based interventions and challenge the idea that pacing as an intervention is essential in pain self-management programs.

  5. TPEN prevents rapid pacing-induced calcium overload and nitration stress in HL-1 myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shusen; Xu, Wenjing; Dong, Zengxiang; Zhou, Mo; Lin, Chaolan; Jin, Hongbo; Su, Yafen; Li, Qingyu; Wang, Xu; Chang, Huiying; Han, Wei

    2015-08-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia. However, the current drug interference of antiarrhythmia has limited efficacy and off-target effects. Accumulating evidence has implicated a potential role of nitration stress in the pathogenesis of AF. The aim of the study was to determine whether TPEN provided antinitration effects on atrial myocytes during AF, especially under circumstances of nitration stress. We utilized a rapid paced HL-1 cells model for AF. The changes of electrophysiological characteristics and structure of paced HL-1 cells were determined by a patch clamp and a TEM method. The effects of TPEN on pacing and ONOO(-) pretreated HL-1 cells were examined using MTT assay, TUNEL technique, confocal microscope experiment, and Western blot analysis. The results revealed that ONOO(-) reduced the viability of HL-1 cells in a dose-dependent manner, and 1 μmol/L TPEN significantly ameliorated the damage caused by 50 μmol/L ONOO(-) (P nitration caused by pacing or pacing plus ONOO(-) (P nitration stress in HL-1 atrial myocytes during rapid pacing and circumstances of nitration stress. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Time pacing: competing in markets that won't stand still.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenhardt, K M; Brown, S L

    1998-01-01

    Most companies change in reaction to events such as moves by the competition, shifts in technology, or new customer demands. In fairly stable markets, "event pacing" is an effective way to deal with change. But successful companies in rapidly changing, intensely competitive industries take a different approach. They change proactively, through regular deadlines. The authors call this strategy time pacing. Like a metronome, time pacing creates a rhythm to which managers can synchronize the speed and intensity of their efforts. For example, 3M dictates that 25% of its revenues every year will come from new products, Netscape introduces a new product about every six months, and Intel adds a new fabrication facility to its operations approximately every nine months. Time pacing creates a relentless sense of urgency around meeting deadlines and concentrates people on a common set of goals. Its predictability also provides people with a sense of control in otherwise chaotic markets. The authors show how companies such as Banc One, Cisco Systems, Dell Computer, Emerson Electric, Gillette, Intel, Netscape, Shiseido, and Sony implement the two essentials of time pacing. The first is managing transitions--the shift, for example, from one new-product-development project to the next. The second is setting the right rhythm for change. Companies that march to the rhythm of time pacing build momentum, and companies that effectively manage transitions sustain that momentum without missing important beats.

  7. Hemodynamic effects of chronic prenatal ventricular pacing for the treatment of complete atrioventricular block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddicoat, J R; Klein, J R; Reddy, V M; Klautz, R J; Teitel, D F; Hanley, F L

    1997-08-05

    Increasing the heart rate of the fetus with cardiac failure caused by complete AV block (CAVB) may allow delivery of a full-term, stable neonate with preserved ventricular function. Direct fetal pacing may be a feasible method to achieve this, but the effect of pacing on the structure and function of the rapidly developing fetal heart is unknown. CAVB was created in fetal lambs at 80% gestation by cryoablating the AV node. Epicardial ventricular pacing at 130 bpm was achieved by use of a pacemaker placed under the pectoral muscles. The fetus was returned to the uterus and allowed to continue to term. Ventricular function was assessed 1 week after birth in 7 lambs with CAVB and 10 control lambs. By use of the conductance catheter technique, the end-systolic pressure-volume relationship was determined at different heart rates, pacing conditions, and inotropic states. The contractility was not different between the two groups at their baseline heart rates and rhythms or when they were paced synchronously compared with asynchronously. Also, both groups responded significantly and similarly to inotropic manipulation, indicating preserved contractile reserve. Finally, in both groups, increased heart rates were associated with increased contractility, indicating an intact force-frequency relationship. We conclude that chronic epicardial ventricular pacing is well tolerated by the fetus, can be successfully applied as a treatment for CAVB, and does not adversely affect myocardial function in the rapidly developing, immature heart.

  8. Paralympic athletes with cerebral palsy display altered pacing strategies in distance-deceived shuttle running trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runciman, P; Tucker, R; Ferreira, S; Albertus-Kajee, Y; Derman, W

    2016-10-01

    This study investigated performance and physiology to understand pacing strategies in elite Paralympic athletes with cerebral palsy (CP). Six Paralympic athletes with CP and 13 able-bodied (AB) athletes performed two trials of eight sets of 10 shuttles (total 1600m). One trial was distance-deceived (DEC, 1000 m + 600 m) one trial was nondeceived (N-DEC, 1600 m). Time (s), heart rate (HR, bpm), ratings of perceived exertion (RPE, units), and electromyography of five bilateral muscles (EMG) were recorded for each set of both trials. The CP group ran slower than the AB group, and pacing differences were seen in the CP DEC trial, presenting as a flat pacing profile over the trial (P < 0.05). HR was higher and RPE was lower in the CP group in both trials (P < 0.05). EMG showed small differences between groups, sides, and trials. The present study provides evidence for a possible pacing strategy underlying exercise performance and fatigue in CP. The results of this study show (1) underperformance of the CP group, and (2) altered pacing strategy utilization in the CP group. We proposed that even at high levels of performance, the residual effects of CP may negatively affect performance through selection of conservative pacing strategies during exercise.

  9. Impact of the permanent ventricular pacing site on left ventricular function in children: a retrospective multicentre survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Geldorp, Irene E; Delhaas, Tammo; Gebauer, Roman A; Frias, Patrick; Tomaske, Maren; Friedberg, Mark K; Tisma-Dupanovic, Svjetlana; Elders, Jan; Früh, Andreas; Gabbarini, Fulvio; Kubus, Petr; Illikova, Viera; Tsao, Sabrina; Blank, Andreas Christian; Hiippala, Anita; Sluysmans, Thierry; Karpawich, Peter; Clur, Sally-Ann; Ganame, Xavier; Collins, Kathryn K; Dann, Gisela; Thambo, Jean-Benoît; Trigo, Conceição; Nagel, Bert; Papagiannis, John; Rackowitz, Annette; Marek, Jan; Nürnberg, Jan-Hendrik; Vanagt, Ward Y; Prinzen, Frits W; Janousek, Jan

    2011-12-01

    Chronic right ventricular (RV) pacing is associated with deleterious effects on cardiac function. In an observational multicentre study in children with isolated atrioventricular (AV) block receiving chronic ventricular pacing, the importance of the ventricular pacing site on left ventricular (LV) function was investigated. Demographics, maternal autoantibody status and echocardiographic measurements on LV end-diastolic and end-systolic dimensions and volumes at age 1 year) for isolated AV block. LV fractional shortening (LVFS) and, if possible LV ejection fraction (LVEF) were calculated. Linear regression analyses were adjusted for patient characteristics. From 27 centres, 297 children were included, in whom pacing was applied at the RV epicardium (RVepi, n = 147), RV endocardium (RVendo, n = 113) or LV epicardium (LVepi, n = 37). LVFS was significantly affected by pacing site (p = 0.001), and not by maternal autoantibody status (p = 0.266). LVFS in LVepi (39 ± 5%) was significantly higher than in RVendo (33 ± 7%, p < 0.001) and RVepi (35 ± 8%, p = 0.001; no significant difference between RV-paced groups, p = 0.275). Subnormal LVFS (LVFS < 28%) was seen in 16/113 (14%) RVendo-paced and 21/147 (14%) RVepi-paced children, while LVFS was normal (LVFS ≥ 28%) in all LVepi-paced children (p = 0.049). These results are supported by the findings for LVEF (n = 122): LVEF was <50% in 17/69 (25%) RVendo- and in 10/35 (29%) RVepi-paced patients, while LVEF was ≥ 50% in 17/18 (94%) LVepi-paced patients. In children with isolated AV block, permanent ventricular pacing site is an important determinant of LV function, with LVFS being significantly higher with LV pacing than with RV pacing.

  10. Climatic controls on the pace of glacier erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppes, Michele; Hallet, Bernard; Rignot, Eric; Mouginot, Jeremie; Wellner, Julia; Love, Katherine

    2016-04-01

    precipitation rates at the end of glaciations favor the production of water from rainfall, surface melting and internal melting, which promotes sliding, erosion and sediment production and evacuation from under the ice. Hence, climatic variation, more than the extent of ice cover or ice volume, controls the pace at which glaciers shape mountains.

  11. Effect of adaptive paced cardiolocomotor synchronization during running: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Bill; Jin, Yi

    2013-01-01

    Cardiolocomotor synchronization (CLS) has been well established for individuals engaged in rhythmic activity, such as walking, running, or cycling. When frequency of the activity is at or near the heart rate, entrainment occurs. CLS has been shown in many cases to improve the efficiency of locomotor activity, improving stroke volume, reducing blood pressure variability, and lowering the oxygen uptake (VO2). Instead of a 1:1 frequency ratio of activity to heart rate, an investigation was performed to determine if different harmonic coupling at other simple integer ratios (e.g. 1:2, 2:3, 3:2) could achieve any performance benefits. CLS was ensured by pacing the stride rate according to the measured heartbeat (i.e., adaptive paced CLS, or forced CLS). An algorithm was designed that determined the simplest ratio (lowest denominator) that, when multiplied by the heart rate will fall within an individualized, predetermined comfortable pacing range for the user. The algorithm was implemented on an iPhone 4, which generated a 'tick-tock' sound through the iPhone's headphones. A sham-controlled crossover study was performed with 15 volunteers of various fitness levels. Subjects ran a 3 mile (4.83 km) simulated training run at their normal pace on two consecutive days (randomized one adaptive pacing, one sham). Adaptive pacing resulted in faster runs run times, with subjects running an average of 26:03 ± 3:23 for adaptive pacing and 26:38 ± 3:31 for sham (F = 5.46, p increase in heart rate from the start of the race as estimated by an exponential time constant was significantly longer during adaptive pacing, τ = 0.99 ± 0.30, compared to sham, τ = 1.53 ± 0.34 (t = -6.62, p running performance and may be useful as a training aid. Key PointsSham-controlled crossover study using 15 experienced runners running 3 miles (4.83 km).Adaptive CLS pacing resulted in statistically significant 35 second average decrease in run-time (p Increase in heart rate during the run was

  12. Can Pacing Be Regulated by Post-Activation Potentiation? Insights from a Self-Paced 30 km Trial in Half-Marathon Runners.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastián Del Rosso

    Full Text Available Given the co-existence of post-activation potentiation (PAP and fatigue within muscle, it is not known whether PAP could influence performance and pacing during distance running by moderating fatigue. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of PAP on pacing, jumping and other physiological measures during a self-paced 30 km trial.Eleven male endurance-trained runners (half-marathon runners volunteered to participate in this study. Runners participated in a multi-stage 30 km trial. Before the trial started, determination of baseline blood lactate (bLa and countermovement jump (CMJ height was performed. The self-paced 30 km trial consisted of 6 × 5 km splits. At the end of each 5 km split (60 s break, data on time to complete the split, CMJ height, Rating of Perceived Exertion (RPE and blood lactate were collected while heart rate was continuously monitored.There was a significant decrease in speed (e.g. positive pacing strategy after the 4th split, p<0.05 with a progressive increase in RPE throughout the trial. Compared with baseline, CMJ height was significantly (p<0.05 greater than baseline and was maintained until the end of the trial with an increase after the 5th split, concomitant with a significant reduction in speed and an increase in RPE. Significant correlations were found between ΔCMJ and ΔSPEED (r = 0.77 to 0.87, p<0.05 at different time points as well as between RPE and speed (r = -0.61 to -0.82, p<0.05.Our results indicates that fatigue and potentiation co-exist during long lasting endurance events, and that the observed increase in jump performance towards the end of the trial could be reflecting a greater potentiation potentially perhaps counteracting the effects of fatigue and preventing further reductions in speed.

  13. U-Pace: Facilitating Academic Success for All Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Diane M.; Fleming, Raymond; Pedrick, Laura E.; Ports, Katie A.; Barnack-Tavlaris, Jessica L.; Helion, Alicia M.; Swain, Rodney A.

    2011-01-01

    Because the transition to a knowledge-based economy requires an educated workforce, colleges and universities have made retention of students--particularly those who are academically underprepared--an institutional priority. College completion leads to economic and social advancement for students and is also critical to the nation's economic and…

  14. Running at Double Pace: Women in Dual-Profession Marriages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arfken, Deborah Elwell

    Although the problems facing dual-profession couples are almost universally acknowledged, studies on dual-profession couples have only recently emerged from those on dual-worker or dual-career families. To explore the perceptions that women in dual-profession marriages have of their roles, conflicts, and coping strategies, focus group interviews…

  15. Improvement of Left Ventricular Function by Permanent Direct His-Bundle Pacing in a Case with Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukiko Sashida, MD

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The patient was a 67-year-old female diagnosed with dilated cardiomyopathy. She had chronic atrial fibrillation (AF with bradycardia and low left ventricular function (left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF 40%. She was admitted for congestive heart failure. She remained New York Heart Association (NYHA functional class III due to AF bradycardia. Pacemaker implantation was necessary for treatment of heart failure and administration of dose intensive β-blockers. As she had normal His-Purkinje activation, we examined the optimal pacing sites. Hemodynamics of His-bundle pacing and biventricular pacing were compared. Pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP was significantly lower on Hisbundle pacing than right ventricular (RV apical pacing and biventricular pacing (13mmHg, 19mmHg, and 19mmHg, respectively with an almost equal cardiac index. Based on the examination we implanted a permanent pacemaker for Direct His-bundle pacing (DHBP. After the DHBP implantation, the LVEF immediately improved from 40% to 55%, and BNP level decreased from 422 pg/ml to 42 pg/ml. The number of premature ventricular complex (PVC was decreased, and non sustained ventricular tachycardia (NSVT disappeared. Pacing threshold for His-bundle pacing has remained at the same level. His-bundle pacing has been maintained during 27 months and her long-term DHBP can improve cardiac function and the NYHA functional class.

  16. The effect of right ventricular pacing on myocardial oxidative metabolism and efficiency: relation with left ventricular dyssynchrony

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ukkonen, Heikki; Saraste, Antti; Koistinen, Juhani [Turku University Hospital, Department of Medicine, P.O. Box 52, Turku (Finland); Tops, Laurens; Bax, Jeroen [Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Naum, Alexander [University of Turku, Turku PET Centre, Turku (Finland); Knuuti, Juhani [University of Turku, Turku PET Centre, Turku (Finland); Turku University Hospital, Turku PET Centre, P.O. Box 52, Turku (Finland)

    2009-12-15

    Right ventricular (RV) apical pacing induces dyssynchrony by a left bundle branch block type electrical activation sequence in the heart and may impair left ventricular (LV) function. Whether these functional changes are accompanied by changes in myocardial perfusion, oxidative metabolism and efficiency, and the relation with the induction of LV dyssynchrony are unknown. Our study was designed to investigate the acute effects of RV pacing on these parameters. Ten patients with normal LV ejection fraction and VVI/DDD pacemaker were studied during AAI pacing/sinus rhythm without RV pacing (pacing-OFF) and with RV pacing (pacing-ON) at the same heart rate. Dynamic [{sup 15}O]water and [{sup 11}C]acetate positron emission tomography was used to measure perfusion and oxidative metabolism (k{sub mono}) of the LV. An echocardiographic examination was used to assess LV stroke volume (SV) and LV dyssynchrony. Myocardial efficiency of forward work was calculated as systolic blood pressure x cardiac output/LV mass/k{sub mono}. RV pacing decreased SV in all subjects (mean decrease 13%, from 76 {+-} 7 to 66 {+-} 7 ml, p = 0.004), but global perfusion and k{sub mono} were unchanged. The efficiency tended to be lower with pacing-ON (70 {+-} 20 vs 81 {+-} 21 mmHg l/g, p = 0.066). In patients with dyssynchrony during pacing (n = 6) efficiency decreased by 23% (from 78 {+-} 25 to 60 {+-} 14 mmHg l/g, p = 0.02), but in patients without dyssynchrony no change in efficiency was detected. Accordingly, heterogeneity in myocardial perfusion and oxidative metabolism was detected during pacing in patients with dyssynchrony but not in those without dyssynchrony. RV pacing resulted in a significant decrease in SV. However, deleterious effects on LV oxidative metabolism and efficiency were observed only in patients with dyssynchrony during RV pacing. (orig.)

  17. A fast-start pacing strategy speeds pulmonary oxygen uptake kinetics and improves supramaximal running performance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago Turnes

    Full Text Available The focus of the present study was to investigate the effects of a fast-start pacing strategy on running performance and pulmonary oxygen uptake (VO2 kinetics at the upper boundary of the severe-intensity domain. Eleven active male participants (28±10 years, 70±5 kg, 176±6 cm, 57±4 mL/kg/min visited the laboratory for a series of tests that were performed until exhaustion: 1 an incremental test; 2 three laboratory test sessions performed at 95, 100 and 110% of the maximal aerobic speed; 3 two to four constant speed tests for the determination of the highest constant speed (HS that still allowed achieving maximal oxygen uptake; and 4 an exercise based on the HS using a higher initial speed followed by a subsequent decrease. To predict equalized performance values for the constant pace, the relationship between time and distance/speed through log-log modelling was used. When a fast-start was utilized, subjects were able to cover a greater distance in a performance of similar duration in comparison with a constant-pace performance (constant pace: 670 m±22%; fast-start: 683 m±22%; P = 0.029; subjects also demonstrated a higher exercise tolerance at a similar average speed when compared with constant-pace performance (constant pace: 114 s±30%; fast-start: 125 s±26%; P = 0.037. Moreover, the mean VO2 response time was reduced after a fast start (constant pace: 22.2 s±28%; fast-start: 19.3 s±29%; P = 0.025. In conclusion, middle-distance running performances with a duration of 2-3 min are improved and VO2 response time is faster when a fast-start is adopted.

  18. Short-term pacing in the mouse alters cardiac expression of connexin43

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rindler Michael J

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiac insults such as ischemia, infarction, hypertrophy and dilatation are often accompanied by altered abundance and/or localization of the connexin43 gap junction protein, which may predispose towards arrhythmic complications. Models of chronic dyssynchronous cardiac activation have also been shown to result in redistribution of connexin43 in cardiomyocytes. We hypothesized that alterations in connexin43 expression and localization in the mouse heart might be induced by ventricular pacing over a short period of time. Results The subdiaphragmatic approach was used to pace a series of wild type mice for six hours before the hearts were removed for analysis. Mice were paced at 10–15% above their average anesthetized sinus rate and monitored to ensure 1:1 capture. Short-term pacing resulted in a significant reduction in connexin43 mRNA abundance, a partial redistribution of connexin43 from the sarcolemma to a non-sarcolemmal fraction, and accumulation of ubiquitinated connexin43 without a significant change in overall connexin43 protein levels. These early pacing-induced changes in connexin43 expression were not accompanied by decreased cardiac function, prolonged refractoriness or increased inducibility into sustained arrhythmias. Conclusion Our data suggest that short-term pacing is associated with incipient changes in the expression of the connexin43 gap junction, possibly including decreased production and a slowed rate of degradation. This murine model may facilitate the study of early molecular changes induced by pacing and may ultimately assist in the development of strategies to prevent gap junction remodeling and the associated arrhythmic complications of cardiac disease.

  19. Pacing-induced congenital heart defects assessed by OCT (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Stephanie M.; McPheeters, Matt T.; Wang, Yves T.; Gu, Shi; Doughman, Yong Qiu; Strainic, James P.; Rollins, Andrew M.; Watanabe, Michiko; Jenkins, Michael W.

    2016-03-01

    The role of hemodynamics in early heart development is poorly understood. In order to successfully assess the impact of hemodynamics on development, we need to monitor and perturb blood flow, and quantify the resultant effects on morphology. Here, we have utilized cardiac optical pacing to create regurgitant flow in embryonic hearts and OCT to quantify regurgitation percentage and resultant morphology. Embryonic quail in a shell-less culture were optically paced at 3 Hz (well above the intrinsic rate or 1.33-1.67 Hz) on day 2 of development (3-4 weeks human) for 5 minutes. The pacing fatigued the heart and led to a prolonged period (> 1 hour) of increased regurgitant flow. Embryos were kept alive until day 3 (cardiac looping - 4-5 weeks human) or day 8 (4 chambered heart - 8 weeks human) to quantify resultant morphologic changes with OCT. All paced embryos imaged at day 3 displayed cardiac defects. The extent of regurgitant flow immediately after pacing was correlated with cardiac cushion size 24-hours post pacing (p-value congenital heart defects (CHDs) including 11/18 with valve defects, 5/18 with ventricular septal defects and 5/18 with hypoplastic right ventricles. Our data suggests that regurgitant flow leads to smaller cushions, which develop into abnormal valves and septa. Our model produces similar phenotypes as found in our fetal alcohol syndrome and velo-cardio-facial/DiGeorge syndrome models suggesting that hemodynamics plays a role in these syndromes as well. Utilizing OCT and optical pacing to understand hemodynamics in development is an important step towards determining CHD mechanisms and ultimately developing earlier treatments.

  20. In Heart Failure Patients with Left Bundle Branch Block Single Lead MultiSpot Left Ventricular Pacing Does Not Improve Acute Hemodynamic Response To Conventional Biventricular Pacing. A Multicenter Prospective, Interventional, Non-Randomized Study

    OpenAIRE

    Maciej Sterliński; Adam Sokal; Radosław Lenarczyk; Frederic Van Heuverswyn; Aldo Rinaldi, C.; Marc Vanderheyden; Vladimir Khalameizer; Darrel Francis; Joeri Heynens; Berthold Stegemann; Richard Cornelussen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Recent efforts to increase CRT response by multiSPOT pacing (MSP) from multiple bipols on the same left ventricular lead are still inconclusive. Aim The Left Ventricular (LV) MultiSPOTpacing for CRT (iSPOT) study compared the acute hemodynamic response of MSP pacing by using 3 electrodes on a quadripolar lead compared with conventional biventricular pacing (BiV). Methods Patients with left bundle branch block (LBBB) underwent an acute hemodynamic study to determine the %change in...

  1. Left ventricular performance during triggered left ventricular pacing in patients with cardiac resynchronization therapy and left bundle branch block

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Witt, Christoffer Tobias; Kronborg, Mads Brix; Nohr, Ellen Aagaard;

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess the acute effect of triggered left ventricular pacing (tLVp) on left ventricular performance and contraction pattern in patients with heart failure, left bundle branch block (LBBB), and cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). METHODS: Twenty-three patients with pre-implant QRS...... conduction, tLVp, and BiV pacing and compared as paired data. Echocardiographic analysis was done blinded with respect to pacing mode. RESULTS: LVEF was significantly higher during BiV pacing (47 ± 11 %) compared with intrinsic conduction (43 ± 13 %, P = 0.001) and tLVp (44 ± 13 %, P = 0.001), while......V pacing. CONCLUSIONS: The acute effect of tLVp on LV systolic function and contraction pattern is significantly lower than the effect of BiV pacing and not different from intrinsic conduction in patients with LBBB and CRT....

  2. Deviation from goal pace, body temperature and body mass loss as predictors of road race performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, William M; Hosokawa, Yuri; Belval, Luke N; Huggins, Robert A; Stearns, Rebecca L; Casa, Douglas J

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between pacing, gastrointestinal temperature (TGI), and percent body mass loss (%BML) on relative race performance during a warm weather 11.3km road race. Observational study of a sample of active runners competing in the 2014 Falmouth Road Race. Participants ingested a TGI pill and donned a GPS enabled watch with heart rate monitoring capabilities prior to the start of the race. Percent off predicted pace (%OFF) was calculated for seven segments of the race. Separate linear regression analyses were used to assess the relationship between pace, T​GI, and %BML on relative race performance. One-way ANOVA was used to analyse post race TGI (≥40°C vs 0.05). There was a trend in a slower pace (p=0.055) and greater %OFF (p=0.056) in runners finishing the race with a TGI>40°C. Overall, finish time was influenced by greater variations in pace during the first two miles of the race. In addition, runners who minimized fluid losses and had lower TGI were associated with meeting self-predicted goals. Copyright © 2016 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Potential Effect of Physical Activity Calorie Equivalent (PACE Labeling on Adult Fast Food Ordering and Exercise.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ray Antonelli

    Full Text Available Numeric calorie content labels show limited efficacy in reducing the number of calories ordered from fast food meals. Physical activity calorie equivalent (PACE labels are an alternative that may reduce the number of calories ordered in fast food meals while encouraging patrons to exercise.A total of 1000 adults from 47 US states were randomly assigned via internet survey to one of four generic fast food menus: no label, calories only, calories + minutes, or calories + miles necessary to walk to burn off the calories. After completing hypothetical orders participants were asked to rate the likelihood of calorie-only and PACE labels to influence (1 food choice and (2 physical activity.Respondents (n = 823 ordered a median of 1580 calories from the no-label menu, 1200 from the calories-only menu, 1140 from the calories + minutes menu, and 1210 from the calories + miles menu (p = 0.0001. 40% of respondents reported that PACE labels were "very likely" to influence food item choice vs. 28% for calorie-only labels (p<0.0001. 64% of participants reported that PACE labels were "somewhat likely" or "very likely" to influence their level of physical activity vs. 49% for calorie-only labels (p<0.0001.PACE labels may be helpful in reducing the number of calories ordered in fast food meals and may have the added benefit of encouraging exercise.

  4. A biophysically-based finite state machine model for analysing gastric experimental entrainment and pacing recordings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathar, Shameer; Trew, Mark L.; Du, Peng; O’ Grady, Greg; Cheng, Leo K.

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal motility is coordinated by slow waves (SWs) generated by the interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC). Experimental studies have shown that SWs spontaneously activate at different intrinsic frequencies in isolated tissue, whereas in intact tissues they are entrained to a single frequency. Gastric pacing has been used in an attempt to improve motility in disorders such as gastroparesis by modulating entrainment, but the optimal methods of pacing are currently unknown. Computational models can aid in the interpretation of complex in-vivo recordings and help to determine optical pacing strategies. However, previous computational models of SW entrainment are limited to the intrinsic pacing frequency as the primary determinant of the conduction velocity, and are not able to accurately represent the effects of external stimuli and electrical anisotropies. In this paper, we present a novel computationally efficient method for modelling SW propagation through the ICC network while accounting for conductivity parameters and fiber orientations. The method successfully reproduced experimental recordings of entrainment following gastric transection and the effects of gastric pacing on SW activity. It provides a reliable new tool for investigating gastric electrophysiology in normal and diseased states, and to guide and focus future experimental studies. PMID:24276722

  5. Physiological and psychological effects of deception on pacing strategy and performance: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Hollie S; Williams, Emily L; Bridge, Craig A; Marchant, Dave; Midgley, Adrian W; Micklewright, Dominic; Mc Naughton, Lars R

    2013-12-01

    The aim of an optimal pacing strategy during exercise is to enhance performance whilst ensuring physiological limits are not surpassed, which has been shown to result in a metabolic reserve at the end of the exercise. There has been debate surrounding the theoretical models that have been proposed to explain how pace is regulated, with more recent research investigating a central control of exercise regulation. Deception has recently emerged as a common, practical approach to manipulate key variables during exercise. There are a number of ways in which deception interventions have been designed, each intending to gain particular insights into pacing behaviour and performance. Deception methodologies can be conceptualised according to a number of dimensions such as deception timing (prior to or during exercise), presentation frequency (blind, discontinuous or continuous) and type of deception (performance, biofeedback or environmental feedback). However, research evidence on the effects of deception has been perplexing and the use of complex designs and varied methodologies makes it difficult to draw any definitive conclusions about how pacing strategy and performance are affected by deception. This review examines existing research in the area of deception and pacing strategies, and provides a critical appraisal of the different methodological approaches used to date. It is hoped that this analysis will inform the direction and methodology of future investigations in this area by addressing the mechanisms through which deception impacts upon performance and by elucidating the potential application of deception techniques in training and competitive settings.

  6. Provenance Context Entity (PaCE): Scalable Provenance Tracking for Scientific RDF Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Satya S; Bodenreider, Olivier; Hitzler, Pascal; Sheth, Amit; Thirunarayan, Krishnaprasad

    The Resource Description Framework (RDF) format is being used by a large number of scientific applications to store and disseminate their datasets. The provenance information, describing the source or lineage of the datasets, is playing an increasingly significant role in ensuring data quality, computing trust value of the datasets, and ranking query results. Current provenance tracking approaches using the RDF reification vocabulary suffer from a number of known issues, including lack of formal semantics, use of blank nodes, and application-dependent interpretation of reified RDF triples. In this paper, we introduce a new approach called Provenance Context Entity (PaCE) that uses the notion of provenance context to create provenance-aware RDF triples. We also define the formal semantics of PaCE through a simple extension of the existing RDF(S) semantics that ensures compatibility of PaCE with existing Semantic Web tools and implementations. We have implemented the PaCE approach in the Biomedical Knowledge Repository (BKR) project at the US National Library of Medicine. The evaluations demonstrate a minimum of 49% reduction in total number of provenance-specific RDF triples generated using the PaCE approach as compared to RDF reification. In addition, performance for complex queries improves by three orders of magnitude and remains comparable to the RDF reification approach for simpler provenance queries.

  7. Application of PACE Principles for Population Health Management of Frail Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanacci, Richard G; Reich, Shelley; Casiano, Alex

    2015-10-01

    To determine which practices would have the most impact on reducing hospital and emergency department admissions and nursing home placement among older adults with multiple comorbid conditions, a literature search and survey were conducted to identify and prioritize comprehensive care principles as practiced in the Program of All-inclusive Care for the Elderly (PACE). PACE medical directors and members of the PACE interdisciplinary team (IDT) were surveyed to gain their insights on the most impactful practices, which were identified as: End-of-Life Management, Caregiver Support, Management of Red Flags, Medication Management, Participant and Caregiver Health Care System Literacy, and Care Coordination. In addition, this research evaluated measures that could be used to assess an organization's level of success with regard to each of the 6 PACE practices identified. The results reported in this article, found through a survey with PACE medical directors and IDT members concerning effective interventions, can be viewed as strategies to improve care for older adults, enabling them to maintain their independence in the community, avoid the expense of facility-based care, and enhance their quality of life.

  8. Ventricular evoked response in patients with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy treated with DDD pacing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Ricardo M. Sant'Anna

    1999-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the changes in ventricular evoked responses (VER produced by the decrease in left ventricular outflow tract gradient (LVOTG in patients with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM treated with dual-chamber (DDD pacing. METHODS: A pulse generator Physios CTM (Biotronik, Germany was implanted in 9 patients with severe drug-refractory HOCM. After implantation, the following conditions were assessed: 1 Baseline evaluation: different AV delay (ranging from 150ms to 50 ms were sequentially programmed during 5 to 10 minutes, and the LVOTG (as determined by Doppler echocardiography and VER recorded; 2 standard evaluation, when the best AV delay (resulting in the lowest LVOTG programmed at the initial evaluation was maintained so that its effect on VER and LVOTG could be assessed during each chronic pacing evaluation. RESULTS: LVOTG decreased after DDD pacing, with a mean value of 59 ± 24 mmHg after dual chamber pacemaker, which was significantly less than the gradient before pacing (98 + 22mmHg. An AV delay >100ms produced a significantly lower decrease in VER depolarization duration (VER DD when compared to an AV delay <=100ms. Linear regression analyses showed a significant correlation between the LVOTG values and the magnitude of VER (r=0.69; p<0.05 in the 9 studied patients. CONCLUSION: The telemetry obtained intramyocardial electrogram is a sensitive means to assess left ventricular dynamics in patients with HOCM treated with DDD pacing.

  9. Understanding a Resistance to Change: A Challenge for Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruth, Gail D.; Caruth, Donald L.

    2013-01-01

    Change is inevitable. Today more than ever the pace of change is accelerating. Where there is organizational change there will be resistance to this change. To deal with the resistance effectively university administrators must understand the nature and causes of resistance to change. Only by dealing effectively with resistance to change can…

  10. Bilateral sternobronchial fistula after coronary surgery – are the retained epicardial pacing wires responsible? a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panagiotakopoulos Victor

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Temporary epicardial pacing wires are routinely used during cardiac surgery; they are dependable in controlling postoperative arrhythmias and are associated with low morbitity. Case report We report a case of sternobronchial fistula formation induced by the existence of retained epicardial pacing wires in a patient who underwent coronary surgery ten years ago. Conclusion Reported complications of retained epicardial pacing wires are unusual. We present this case in order to include it to the potential complications of the epicardial pacing wires.

  11. Constant DI pacing suppresses cardiac alternans formation in numerical cable models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlochiver, S.; Johnson, C.; Tolkacheva, E. G.

    2017-09-01

    Cardiac repolarization alternans describe the sequential alternation of the action potential duration (APD) and can develop during rapid pacing. In the ventricles, such alternans may rapidly turn into life risking arrhythmias under conditions of spatial heterogeneity. Thus, suppression of alternans by artificial pacing protocols, or alternans control, has been the subject of numerous theoretical, numerical, and experimental studies. Yet, previous attempts that were inspired by chaos control theories were successful only for a short spatial extent (sense that the onset of alternans is further shifted to higher activation rates. Overall, these results support the potential clinical applicability of such type of pacing in improving protocols of implanted pacemakers, in order to reduce the risk of life-threatening arrhythmias. Future research should be conducted in order to experimentally validate these promising results.

  12. NSTX ELM Pacing and L-H Threshold Experiments for ITER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canik, J. M.; Maingi, R.; Sontag, A. C.; Gerhardt, S. P.; Kaye, S.; Bell, R. E.; Gates, D.; Goldston, R.; Leblanc, B. P.; Menard, J.; Park, J.-K.; Evans, T.; Osborne, T.; Sabbagh, S.; Unterberg, E. A.

    2009-11-01

    We present a summary of recent edge-localized mode (ELM) pacing and L-H power threshold (PLH) experiments performed in NSTX in support of ITER. ELM triggering using 3D magnetic perturbations was used to perform pacing during ELM-free H-modes induced by lithium conditioning, mitigating the impurity accumulation typically observed in these conditions. The waveform of the applied field has been tailored to provide high reliability triggering at frequencies of >60 Hz to reduce the average ELM size. ELM pacing was also performed using vertical position oscillations, with the ELM frequency increased to ˜30 Hz from a natural frequency of ˜15 Hz. PLH is reduced by ˜50% at low triangularity, and also decreased by ˜50% during discharge with thick lithium wall coatings. PLH was observed to increase strongly with plasma current during sustained H-modes. The influence of heating method, non-axisymmetric fields, and magnetic balance on PLH will be presented.

  13. Preparative activities in posterior parietal cortex for self-paced movement in monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemba, Hisae; Matsuura-Nakao, Kazuko; Matsuzaki, Ryuichi

    2004-02-26

    Cortical field potentials were recorded by electrodes implanted chronically on the surface and at a 2.0-3.0 mm depth in various cortices in monkeys performing self-paced finger, toe, mouth, hand or trunk movements. Surface-negative, depth-positive potentials (readiness potential) appeared in the posterior parietal cortex about 1.0 s before onset of every self-paced movement, as well as in the premotor, motor and somatosensory cortices. Somatotopical distribution was seen in the readiness potential in the posterior parietal cortex, although it was not so distinct as that in the motor or somatosensory cortex. This suggests that the posterior parietal cortex is involved in preparation for self-paced movement of any body part. This study contributes to the investigation of central nervous mechanisms of voluntary movements initiated by internal stimulus.

  14. Prevention awareness counselling and evaluation (PACE) diabetes project: a mega multi-pronged program for diabetes awareness and prevention in South India (PACE- 5).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somannavar, S; Lanthorn, H; Pradeepa, R; Narayanan, V; Rema, M; Mohan, V

    2008-06-01

    The Prevention Awareness Counselling Evaluation (PACE) Diabetes Project is a large scale community based project carried out to increase awareness of diabetes and its complications in Chennai city (population: 4.7 million) through 1) public education 2) media campaigns 3) general practitioner training 4) blood sugar screening and 5) community based "real life" prevention program Education took place in multiple forms and venues over the three-year period of the PACE project between 2004-2007. With the help of the community, awareness programs were conducted at residential sites, worksites, places of worship, public places and educational institutions through lectures, skits and street plays. Messages were also conveyed through popular local television and radio channels and print media. The General Practitioners (GPs) program included training in diabetes prevention, treatment and the advantages of early detection of complications. Free random capillary blood glucose testing was done for individuals who attended the awareness programs using glucose meter. Over a three-year period, we conducted 774 education sessions, 675 of which were coupled with opportunistic blood glucose screening. A total of 76,645 individuals underwent blood glucose screening. We also set up 176 "PACE Diabetes Education Counters" across Chennai, which were regularly replenished with educational materials. In addition, we trained 232 general practitioners in diabetology prevention, treatment and screening for complications. Multiple television and radio shows were given and messages about diabetes sent as Short Message Service (SMS) through mobile phones. Overall, we estimate that we reached diabetes prevention messages to nearly two million people in Chennai through the PACE Diabetes Project, making it one of the largest diabetes awareness and prevention programs ever conducted in India. Mass awareness and screening programs are feasible and, through community empowerment, can help in

  15. The Influence of Mid-Event Deception on Psychophysiological Status and Pacing Can Persist across Consecutive Disciplines and Enhance Self-paced Multi-modal Endurance Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Daniel; Smith, Mark F.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the effects of deceptively aggressive bike pacing on performance, pacing, and associated physiological and perceptual responses during simulated sprint-distance triathlon. Methods: Ten non-elite, competitive male triathletes completed three simulated sprint-distance triathlons (0.75 km swim, 500 kJ bike, 5 km run), the first of which established personal best “baseline” performance (BL). During the remaining two trials athletes maintained a cycling power output 5% greater than BL, before completing the run as quickly as possible. However, participants were informed of this aggressive cycling strategy before and during only one of the two trials (HON). Prior to the alternate trial (DEC), participants were misinformed that cycling power output would equal that of BL, with on-screen feedback manipulated to reinforce this deception. Results: Compared to BL, a significantly faster run performance was observed following DEC cycling (p triathlon performance to be quicker during DEC (4339 ± 395 s) compared to HON (4356 ± 384 s), the only significant and almost certainly meaningful differences were between each of these trials and BL (4465 ± 420 s; p triathlon run. Conclusions: The present study is the first to show that mid-event pace deception can have a practically meaningful effect on multi-modal endurance performance, though the relative importance of different psychophysiological and emotional responses remains unclear. Whilst our findings support the view that some form of anticipatory “template” may be used by athletes to interpret levels of psychophysiological and emotional strain, and regulate exercise intensity accordingly, they would also suggest that individual constructs such as RPE and affect may be more loosely tied with pacing than previously suggested. PMID:28174540

  16. Coronary hemodynamics and myocardial metabolism during and after pacing stress in normal humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camici, P; Marraccini, P; Marzilli, M; Lorenzoni, R; Buzzigoli, G; Puntoni, R; Boni, C; Bellina, C R; Klassen, G A; L'Abbate, A

    1989-09-01

    We investigated coronary hemodynamics, myocardial utilization of circulating substrates (by coronary sinus catheterization), and overall use of oxidative fuels (by regional indirect calorimetry) in healthy adults during incremental atrial pacing (up to 159 +/- 9 beats/min), and during 25 min of recovery. Great cardiac vein flow (thermodilution) increased from 52 +/- 9 to 115 +/- 15 ml/min (P less than 0.001) with pacing; myocardial O2 uptake (301 +/- 53 to 593 +/- 71 mumol/min, P less than 0.001) and CO2 production (225 +/- 37 to 518 +/- 66 mumol/min, P less than 0.005) paralleled the pacing-induced rise in rate-pressure product (9.4 +/- 0.9 to 21.1 +/- 1.1 mmHg.beat. min-1.10(-3), P less than 0.001). During recovery, all the above variables returned to base line within 5 min, but myocardial O2 extraction remained depressed (67 +/- 2 vs. 71 +/- 3%, P less than 0.05). Circulating glucose uptake rose linearly with pacing (P less than 0.05) and remained above base line throughout recovery. By contrast, free fatty acid (FFA) uptake (10 mumol/min) did not increase with pacing and fell during recovery (P less than 0.01). Calorimetry, however, showed that net lipid oxidation exceeded FFA uptake throughout the study, whereas net carbohydrate oxidation was small at base line, rose significantly at maximal pacing (62% of myocardial energy output), and remained above base line during recovery (32% of energy output). In the basal state as well as during recovery, myocardial uptake of glucose equivalents (lactate plus glucose plus pyruvate) was in excess of carbohydrate oxidation, indicating nonoxidative disposal of these substrates.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Physiological demand and pacing strategy during the new combined event in elite pentathletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Meur, Yann; Dorel, Sylvain; Baup, Yann; Guyomarch, Jean Pierre; Roudaut, Christian; Hausswirth, Christophe

    2012-07-01

    To evaluate the physiological demands and effects of different pacing strategies on performance during the new combined event (CE) of the modern pentathlon (consisting of three pistol shooting sessions interspersed by three 1-km running legs). Nine elite pentathletes realised five tests: a free-paced CE during an international competition; an incremental running test to determine [Formula: see text] and its related velocity ([Formula: see text]) and three experimental time-trial CE, where the pacing strategy was manipulated (CE(ref), CE(100%), CE(105%)). CE(ref) reproduced the international competition strategy with a 170-m fast running start within the first 2 km. CE(100%) and CE(105%) imposed a constant strategy over km-1 and km-2 with a velocity of 100 and 105% of the mean speed adopted over the same sections during the international competition, respectively. Km-3 was always self-paced. The subjects ran CE(ref) at 99 ± 4% of [Formula: see text] and reached 100 ± 5, 100 ± 7, 99 ± 8% of [Formula: see text] at the end of kilometres 1, 2 and 3, respectively ([Formula: see text]: 72 ± 6 mL O(2) min(-1) kg(-1)), with a peak blood lactate concentration of 13.6 ± 1.5 mmol L(-1). No significant differences in overall performance were found between the pacing conditions (753 ± 30, 770 ± 39, 768 ± 27 s for CE(ref), CE(100%) and CE(105%), respectively, p = 0.63), but all of the shooting performance parameters were only stable in CE(ref). Completion of CE by elite pentathletes elicits a maximal aerobic contribution coupled with a high glycolytic supply. Manipulating the mean running speed over km-1 and km-2 had strong influence on the overall pacing strategy and induced minor differences in shooting performance, but it did not affect overall performance.

  18. Developmental Differences in Effects of Task Pacing on Implicit Sequence Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Sue Hodel

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Although there is now substantial evidence that developmental change occurs in implicit learning abilities over the lifespan, disparate results exist regarding the specific developmental trajectory of implicit learning skills. One possible reason for discrepancies across implicit learning studies may be that younger children show an increased sensitivity to variations in implicit learning task procedures and demands relative to adults. Studies using serial-reaction time (SRT tasks have suggested that in adults, measurements of implicit learning are robust across variations in task procedures. Most classic SRT tasks have used response-contingent pacing in which the participant’s own reaction time determines the duration of each trial. However, recent paradigms with adults and children have used fixed trial pacing, which leads to alterations in both response and attention demands, accuracy feedback, perceived agency, and task motivation for participants. In the current study, we compared learning on fixed-paced and self-paced versions of a spatial sequence learning paradigm in 4-year-old children and adults. Results indicated that preschool-aged children showed reduced evidence of implicit sequence learning in comparison to adults, regardless of the SRT paradigm used. In addition, we found the preschoolers showed significantly greater learning when stimulus presentation was self-paced. These data provide evidence for developmental differences in implicit sequence learning that are dependent on specific task demands such as stimulus pacing, which may be related to developmental changes in the impact of broader constructs such as attention and task motivation on implicit learning.

  19. A Monetary Reward Alters Pacing but Not Performance in Competitive Cyclists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Skorski

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Money has frequently been used as an extrinsic motivator since it is assumed that humans are willing to invest more effort for financial reward. However, the influence of a monetary reward on pacing and performance in trained athletes is not well-understood. Therefore, the aim of this study was to analyse the influence of a monetary reward in well-trained cyclists on their pacing and performance during short and long cycling time trials (TT. Twentythree cyclists (6 ♀, 17 ♂ completed 4 self-paced time trials (TTs, 2 short: 4 km and 6 min; 2 long: 20 km and 30 min; in a randomized order. Participants were separated into parallel, non-randomized “rewarded” and “non-rewarded” groups. Cyclists in the rewarded group received a monetary reward based on highest mean power output across all TTs. Cyclists in the non-rewarded group did not receive a monetary reward. Overall performance was not significantly different between groups in short or long TTs (p > 0.48. Power output showed moderatly lower effect sizes at comencement of the short TTs (Pmeandiff = 36.6 W; d > 0.44 and the 20 km TT (Pmeandiff = 22.6 W; d = 0.44 in the rewarded group. No difference was observed in pacing during the 30 min TT (p = 0.95. An external reward seems to have influenced pacing at the commencement of time trials. Participants in the non-rewarded group adopted a typical parabolic shaped pattern, whereas participants in the rewarded group started trials more conservatively. Results raise the possibility that using money as an extrinsic reward may interfere with regulatory processes required for effective pacing.

  20. Temporary epicardial left ventricular and biventricular pacing improves cardiac output after cardiopulmonary bypass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García-Bengochea Jose B

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To evaluate, with different pacing modes, acute changes in left ventricular systolic function, obtained by continuous cardiac output thermodilution in various subsets of patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. Increments of mean arterial pressure and cardiac output were considered the end point. Methods Fifty cases electively submitted to cardiac surgery were analyzed. Isolated valve surgery 62%, coronary revascularization 30% and 8% mixed disease. Left ventricular ejection fraction was preserved in 50%,36% had moderate depression,(EF 36%-50% whereas 14% had severe depression (EF  Results Right atrium-right ventricular pacing, decreased significantly mean arterial pressure and cardiac output (2.3% in the overall population and in the subgroups studied. Right atrium-left ventricle, increased mean arterial pressure and cardiac output in 79% of patients and yielded cardiac output increments of 7.5% (0.40 l/m in the low ejection fraction subgroup and 7.3% (0.43 l/m in the left bundle branch block subset. In atrial fibrillation patients, left ventricular and biventricular pacing produced a significant increase in cardiac output 8.5% (0.39 l/min and 11.6% (0.53 l/min respectively. The dP/dt max increased significantly with both modes (p = 0.021,p = 0.028. Conclusion Right atrial-right ventricular pacing generated adverse hemodynamic effects. Right atrium-left ventricular pacing produced significant CO improvement particularly in cases with depressed ventricular function and left bundle branch block. The greatest increments were observed with left ventricular or biventricular pacing in atrial fibrillation with depressed ejection fraction.

  1. First observation of ELM pacing with vertical jogs in a spherical torus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerhardt, S.P. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Ahn, Joon-Wook [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Canik, John [ORNL; Maingi, R. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Bell, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Gates, D. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Goldston, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Hawryluk, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Le Blanc, B. P. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Menard, J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Sontag, Aaron C [ORNL; Sabbagh, S. A. [Columbia University; Tritz, K. [Johns Hopkins University

    2010-01-01

    Experiments in a number of conventional aspect ratio tokamaks have been successful in pacing edge localized modes (ELMs) by rapid vertical jogging of the plasma. This paper demonstrates the first pacing of ELMs in a spherical torus plasma. Applied 30 Hz vertical jogs synchronized the ELMs with the upward motion of the plasma. 45 Hz jogs also lead to an increase in the ELM frequency, though the synchronization of the ELMs and jogs was unclear. A reduction in the ELM energy was observed at the higher driven ELM frequencies.

  2. First observation of ELM pacing with vertical jogs in a spherical torus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhardt, S. P.; Ahn, J.-W.; Canik, J. M.; Maingi, R.; Bell, R.; Gates, D.; Goldston, R.; Hawryluk, R.; Le Blanc, B. P.; Menard, J.; Sontag, A. C.; Sabbagh, S.; Tritz, K.

    2010-06-01

    Experiments in a number of conventional aspect ratio tokamaks have been successful in pacing edge localized modes (ELMs) by rapid vertical jogging of the plasma. This paper demonstrates the first pacing of ELMs in a spherical torus plasma. Applied 30 Hz vertical jogs synchronized the ELMs with the upward motion of the plasma. 45 Hz jogs also lead to an increase in the ELM frequency, though the synchronization of the ELMs and jogs was unclear. A reduction in the ELM energy was observed at the higher driven ELM frequencies.

  3. Single lead atrial vs. dual chamber pacing in sick sinus syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Niels H; Kirkfeldt, Rikke Esberg; Nielsen, Jens Cosedis

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: The DANPACE trial randomized patients with sick sinus syndrome (SSS) to single lead atrial (AAIR) or dual chamber (DDDR) pacemaker (PM). After 5 years follow-up, no difference in overall survival, stroke or heart failure (HF) was observed, whereas risk of atrial fibrillation (AF) and PM....... CONCLUSION: This register-based long-term follow-up study indicates that there is no difference in mortality among patients with SSS randomized to AAIR or DDDR pacing, even with very long follow-up. Nor is there any difference in risk of AF hospitalization, stroke or HF. The higher rate of pacing mode...

  4. The role of pacing modality in determining long-term survival in the sick sinus syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgarbossa, E B; Pinski, S L; Maloney, J D

    1993-09-01

    To determine whether the atrial-based pacing modalities ("physiologic pacing") improve survival when compared with single-chamber ventricular pacing in patients with the sick sinus syndrome. Retrospective, nonrandomized study. A tertiary care teaching hospital. A total of 507 patients with a mean age of 66 years who received an initial pacemaker for the sick sinus syndrome between January 1980 and December 1989. Pacing modes were ventricular (22%), atrial (4%), and dual-chamber (74%). Total and cardiovascular mortality rates. Mean follow-up was 66 months. Independent predictors of total mortality by the Cox proportional hazards model were 1) New York Heart Association functional class (hazard ratio = 1.67/class; 95% Cl, 1.31 to 2.11); 2) age (hazard ratio = 1.62/12-year increment; Cl, 1.28 to 2.05); 3) peripheral vascular disease (hazard ratio = 2.21; Cl, 1.42 to 3.42); 4) bundle branch block (hazard ratio = 2.04; Cl, 1.33 to 3.13); 5) coronary artery disease (hazard ratio = 1.66; Cl, 1.15 to 2.39); and 6) valvular heart disease (hazard ratio = 1.71; Cl, 1.08 to 2.69). The same variables were independent predictors of cardiovascular mortality, with cerebrovascular disease reaching borderline statistical significance (hazard ratio = 1.69; Cl, 1.00 to 2.86). Using univariate analysis, single-chamber ventricular pacing had more than 40% increased risk for both total and cardiovascular death, but the difference was of borderline statistical significance (total mortality: P = 0.053; hazard ratio = 1.43; Cl, 0.99 to 2.07; cardiovascular mortality: P = 0.15; hazard ratio = 1.41; Cl = 0.87 to 2.29). Because the role of the ventricular pacing mode as a long-term predictor of total and cardiovascular mortality remains inconclusive, a large, randomized study is necessary to confirm whether physiologic pacing provides a substantial reduction in mortality when compared with ventricular pacing.

  5. First Observation Of ELM Pacing With Vertical Jogs In A Spherical Torus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerhardt, S P; Canik, J M; Maingi, R; Bell, R; Gates, d; Goldston, R; Hawryluk, R; Le Blanc, B P; Menard, J; Sontag, A C; Sabbagh, S

    2010-07-15

    Experiments in a number of conventional aspect ratio tokamaks have been successful in pacing edge localized modes (ELMs) by rapid vertical jogging of the plasma. This paper demonstrates the first pacing of ELMs in a spherical torus plasma. Applied 30 Hz vertical jogs synchronized the ELMs with the upward motion of the plasma. 45 Hz jogs also lead to an increase in the ELM frequency, though the synchronization of the ELMs and jogs was unclear. A reduction in the ELM energy was observed at the higher driven ELM frequencies. __________________________________________________

  6. Pacing Lead-Induced Granuloma in the Atrium: A Foreign Body Reaction to Polyurethane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinagawa Yoko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We described a case of an 82-year-old male who presented with a granuloma entrapping the polyurethane-coated pacing lead at the site of contact on the atrium. He had been paced for 8 years without symptoms or signs suggestive of an allergic reaction to the pacemaker system and died from thrombosis of the superior mesenteric artery and heart failure. A histological examination of the nodule showed an incidental granuloma with multinucleated giant cells. No granuloma was found in the heart or the lung.

  7. MCTS self-paced training kit (exam 70-680) configuring Windows 7

    CERN Document Server

    McLean, Ian

    2010-01-01

    NOTE: The most recent printings of this title incorporate corrections to errors found in the earlier printings. This Self-Paced Training Kit is designed to help maximize your performance on 70-680, the required exam for the Microsoft® Certified Technology Specialist (MCTS): Windows 7, Configuration certification.This 2-in-1 kit includes the official Microsoft study guide, plus practice tests on CD to help you assess your skills. It comes packed with the tools and features exam candidates want most-including in-depth, self-paced training based on final exam content; rigorous, objective-by-obj

  8. Pacing the Cell: Walking and Productivity in the Work of Bruce Nauman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Burgon

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available After graduating from art school in the late 1960s Bruce Nauman found himself pacing his studio, unsure how to produce work as a professional artist. Out of this practice arose several films and videos recording these performances of studio pacing. This paper draws upon Michel Foucault’s Discipline and Punish (1975, translated into English 1977 to shed light upon the aesthetic of confinement and incarceration found in Nauman’s use of the walking body in this early work.

  9. 'PACE-Gate': When clinical trial evidence meets open data access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geraghty, Keith J

    2017-08-01

    Science is not always plain sailing and sometimes the voyage is across an angry sea. A recent clinical trial of treatments for chronic fatigue syndrome (the PACE trial) has whipped up a storm of controversy. Patients claim the lead authors overstated the effectiveness of cognitive behavioural therapy and graded exercise therapy by lowering the thresholds they used to determine improvement. In this extraordinary case, patients discovered that the treatments tested had much lower efficacy after an information tribunal ordered the release of data from the PACE trial to a patient who had requested access using a freedom of information request.

  10. Unification of Frequency direction Pilot-symbol Aided Channel Estimation (PACE) for OFDM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rom, Christian; Manchón, Carles Navarro; Deneire, Luc

    2007-01-01

    Frequency direction Pilot-symbol Aided Channel Estimation (PACE) for Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM) is crucial in high-rate wireless systems. The choice of an estimator for upcoming standards, such as the Long Term Evolution (LTE) of UTRA, has to take into account their specifi......Frequency direction Pilot-symbol Aided Channel Estimation (PACE) for Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM) is crucial in high-rate wireless systems. The choice of an estimator for upcoming standards, such as the Long Term Evolution (LTE) of UTRA, has to take into account...

  11. Dual-Chamber Pacing for Cardiac Arrhythmias: Controversies in Cloning the Conduction System

    OpenAIRE

    Parsonnet, Victor; Bernstein, Alan D.; Norman, John C.

    1984-01-01

    From the outset, the art and science of cardiac pacing has been beset with a variety of problems. With the passage of time and concentrated effort in the interrelated sciences, many have been solved. We no longer are concerned with premature battery failure or leaking pulse-generator capsules, but now focus on an entirely new set of issues that beg for resolution. Foremost among these is the true role of dual-chamber pacing in the treatment of slow and fast cardiac arrhythmias of a multitude ...

  12. Failure of communication and capture: The perils of temporary unipolar pacing system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efe Sahinoglu, BChE

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of a patient with pacemaker dependence secondary to complete heart block who developed loss of capture of her temporary pacemaker. Patient developed torsades de pointes then ventricular fibrillation, requiring CPR and external cardioversion. After patient was stabilized, it was noticed that loss of capture of pacemaker corresponded with nursing care, when the pulse generator was lifted off patient׳s chest wall, and that patient׳s temporary pacing system had been programmed to unipolar mode without knowledge of attending cardiologist. This case highlights the importance of communication ensuring all caregivers are aware of mode of the temporary pacing system.

  13. This Is My Story: Participatory Performance for HIV and AIDS Education at the University of Malawi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaganath, D.; Mulenga, C.; Hoffman, R. M.; Hamilton, J.; Boneh, G.

    2014-01-01

    University students represent a subset of young men and women at risk for HIV in high prevalence settings. Innovative programs are needed to raise awareness on the unique issues around HIV and AIDS in the university campus, while training student leaders for peer-based education. The Process and Collaboration for Empowerment and Discussion (PACED)…

  14. This Is My Story: Participatory Performance for HIV and AIDS Education at the University of Malawi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaganath, D.; Mulenga, C.; Hoffman, R. M.; Hamilton, J.; Boneh, G.

    2014-01-01

    University students represent a subset of young men and women at risk for HIV in high prevalence settings. Innovative programs are needed to raise awareness on the unique issues around HIV and AIDS in the university campus, while training student leaders for peer-based education. The Process and Collaboration for Empowerment and Discussion (PACED)…

  15. Team Performance and Risk-Adjusted Health Outcomes in the Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly (PACE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukamel, Dana B.; Temkin-Greener, Helena; Delavan, Rachel; Peterson, Derick R.; Gross, Diane; Kunitz, Stephen; Williams, T. Franklin

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly (PACE) is a community-based program providing primary, acute, and long-term care to frail elderly individuals. A central component of the PACE model is the interdisciplinary care team, which includes both professionals and non-professionals. The purpose of this study was to examine the…

  16. The pace of vocabulary growth during preschool predicts cortical structure at school age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asaridou, Salomi S; Demir-Lira, Özlem Ece; Goldin-Meadow, Susan; Small, Steven L

    2017-04-01

    Children vary greatly in their vocabulary development during preschool years. Importantly, the pace of this early vocabulary growth predicts vocabulary size at school entrance. Despite its importance for later academic success, not much is known about the relation between individual differences in early vocabulary development and later brain structure and function. Here we examined the association between vocabulary growth in children, as estimated from longitudinal measurements from 14 to 58 months, and individual differences in brain structure measured in 3rd and 4th grade (8-10 years old). Our results show that the pace of vocabulary growth uniquely predicts cortical thickness in the left supramarginal gyrus. Probabilistic tractography revealed that this region is directly connected to the inferior frontal gyrus (pars opercularis) and the ventral premotor cortex, via what is most probably the superior longitudinal fasciculus III. Our findings demonstrate, for the first time, the relation between the pace of vocabulary learning in children and a specific change in the structure of the cerebral cortex, specifically, cortical thickness in the left supramarginal gyrus. They also highlight the fact that differences in the pace of vocabulary growth are associated with the dorsal language stream, which is thought to support speech perception and articulation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Evaluation of Parent and Child Enhancement (PACE) Program: Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Cynthia; Tsang, Sandra; Lo, Cyrus

    2017-01-01

    Objective: This study examined the efficacy of the Parent and Child Enhancement (PACE) program on child learning, child behavior problems, and parental stress, using randomized controlled trial design, in social services centers. Methods: Eligibility criteria were (1) children aged 2 years at program commencement, (2) low-income, new immigrant, or…

  18. Managing after-work stress: paced breathing while watching video content (abstract)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tijs, T.J.W.; Weda, J.; Weffers-Albu, M.A.; Hoogenstraaten, W.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. After a hard day’s work, we need to recover from work stress. Two frequently reported activities to relieve stress are television (TV) watching and paced breathing exercises. We investigated the potential of combining these techniques. Method. Two explorativeexperiments were conducted.

  19. Pacing and Self-regulation : Important Skills for Talent Development in Endurance Sports

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elferink-Gemser, Marije T.; Hettinga, Florentine J.

    Pacing has been characterized as a multifaceted goal-directed process of decision making in which athletes need to decide how and when to invest their energy during the race, a process essential for optimal performance. Both physiological and psychological characteristics associated with adequate

  20. VDDR pacing after His-bundle ablation for paroxysmal atrial fibrillation : A pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buys, EM; van Hemel, NM; Jessurun, ER; Bakema, L; Kingma, JH

    1998-01-01

    His-bundle ablation followed by pacemaker implantation is today a widely accepted therapeutic choice when drug refractoriness of symptomatic AF is evident. The selection of pacing mode in patients suffering from paroxysmal AF is still controversial. Preservation of AV synchrony is an attractive opti

  1. PERMANENT CARDIAC PACING IN CHILDREN - MORBIDITY AND EFFICACY OF FOLLOW-UP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KERSTJENSFREDERIKSE, MWS; BINKBOELKENS, MTE; DEJONGSTE, MJL; VANDERHEIDE, JNH

    1991-01-01

    The data from 50 permanently paced children [mean standard deviation follow-up 5.3 +/- 3.7 years] were reviewed, with special attention being paid to the cause of complications and the efficacy of follow-up. The 5-year survival (SD) of the patients was 78 +/- 6%; mortality was mainly due to the unde

  2. Investigating the Effects of Concurrent Performance of Physical and Cognitive Demanding Task in Paced Assembly Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shakil Ahmed Shaikh

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The study was undertaken to investigate the effects of pacing on aspects of performance at an assembly task and on the operators' responses related to work behaviour, perceived workload and perceived stress. A particular objective of the study was to investigate whether physical and cognitive demands may interact in their influences on these effects. An assembly task was simulated in the laboratory and the level of pacing imposed, work height and memory load within the task were all varied. The results showed that the type of pacing commonly imposed (as is common with a lean manufacturing Takt time system in industry can significantly affect both performance and perceived workload and stress. Physical demands (through work height affecting posture and mental demand (through memory load were also found to have significant effects, as would be expected from the many studies of these in the literature. More importantly, some interactions were found between pacing and work height in their effects on quality of assembly and the operator's own rating of performance, and between work height and memory load in their effects on errors. These findings will need to be taken into account by companies when implementing Takt time systems.

  3. Self-Paced Learners Meet Social Software: An Exploration of Learners' Attitudes, Expectations and Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Terry; Poellhuber, Bruno; McKerlich, Ross

    2010-01-01

    Social networking and communications tools have become widely used in entertainment and social applications and there is growing interest in their use in formal education applications. Distance education and especially those types that are based on self-paced programming models may be the biggest beneficiaries of the use of these new tools to…

  4. Early Sensitivity to Discourse-Level Anomalies: Evidence from Self-Paced Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Andrew J.; Kidd, Evan; Haigh, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    Two word-by-word, self-paced reading experiments investigated the speed with which readers were sensitive to discourse-level anomalies. An account arguing for delayed sensitivity (Guzman & Klin, 2000) was contrasted with one allowing for rapid sensitivity (Myers & O'Brien, 1998). Anomalies related to spatial information (Experiment 1) and…

  5. Rapid Application Development of a Self-Paced Pre-Service Teacher Technology Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohr, Linda; Javeri, Manisha; Mahoney, Chris; Strongin, Dawn; Gall, James

    With technology changing rapidly, instruction on its use must change rapidly as well. Instructional designers are thus increasingly dependent on the use of rapid application development (RAD) procedures for producing timely instruction related to technology use. In recent years, the use of self-paced instruction in the educational environment has…

  6. Developmental Pacing as an Alternative to Ability Grouping in a Primary Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piel, John A.

    An alternative to ability grouping for instructional purposes exists. Cognitive developmental grouping (CDG), sometimes labeled "tracking" or "pacing," organizes students in terms of similar learning styles and takes into consideration the child's intellectual maturation rather than performance within a particular curriculum…

  7. Constitutive innate immunity is a component of the pace-of-life syndrome in tropical birds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tieleman, BI; Williams, JB; Ricklefs, RE; Klasing, KC; Williams, Joseph B.; Ricklefs, Robert E.; Klasing, Kirk C.

    2005-01-01

    We studied the relationship between one component of immune function and basal metabolic rate (BMR), an indicator of the 'pace-of-life syndrome', among 12 tropical bird species and among individuals of the tropical house wren (Troglodytes aedon), to gain insights into functional connections between

  8. On the Cutting Edge (of Torpor): Innovation and the Pace of Change in American Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Gordon

    2008-01-01

    This article considers the pace of innovation and technology adoption in higher education and suggests that the rate of change on 21st century campuses is remarkably similar to earlier centuries when it may have taken over 30 years to introduce "modern" inventions like the telescope, microscope, and barometer to students. The literature shows that…

  9. Optimal Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy Pacing Rate in Non-Ischemic Heart Failure Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghotbi, Adam Ali; Sander, Mikael; Køber, Lars

    2015-01-01

    by microneurography (MSNA), peak oxygen consumption (pVO2), N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (p-NT-proBNP), echocardiography and QoL. RESULTS: DDD-80 pacing for 3 months increased the mean heart rate from 77.3 to 86.1 (p = 0.001) and reduced sympathetic activity compared to DDD-60 (51±14 bursts/100 cardiac......BACKGROUND: The optimal pacing rate during cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is unknown. Therefore, we investigated the impact of changing basal pacing frequencies on autonomic nerve function, cardiopulmonary exercise capacity and self-perceived quality of life (QoL). METHODS: Twelve CRT...... patients with non-ischemic heart failure (NYHA class II-III) were enrolled in a randomized, double-blind, crossover trial, in which the basal pacing rate was set at DDD-60 and DDD-80 for 3 months (DDD-R for 2 patients). At baseline, 3 months and 6 months, we assessed sympathetic nerve activity...

  10. Unusual QRS morphology on ECG: a rare condition and an interesting response to pacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gula, Lorne J; Eckart, Robert E; Klein, George J; Peralta, Adelqui

    2005-08-01

    We present the interesting case of a young man with borderline wide QRS complexes noted on electrocardiogram (ECG). The diagnosis of an unusual form of preexcitation was reached using observations from intracardiac tracings at electrophysiology study. Atrial pacing consistently resulted in further widening of the first conducted QRS complex, and the physiology underlying this unusual finding is explored.

  11. Self-Pacing a Gross Motor Skills Course: Crawler Tractor Operator, MOS 62E20.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Mark F.; Taylor, John E.

    As part of the Army's emphasis on performance-oriented instruction in training centers, a study was conducted to determine the feasibility of using self-paced instruction in a gross motor skills course. The Crawler Tractor Operator Course, a seven-week heavy equipment course conducted at Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri was selected for the study…

  12. Pacing Behavior and Tactical Positioning in 500-and 1000-m Short-Track Speed Skating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noorbergen, Olaf S.; Konings, Marco J.; Micklewright, Dominic; Elferink-Gemser, Marge T.; Hettinga, Florentina J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To explore pacing behavior and tactical positioning during the shorter 500- and 1000-m short-track competitions. Methods: Lap times and intermediate rankings of elite 500- and 1000-m short-track-skating competitors were collected over the 2012-13 season. First, lap times were analyzed using

  13. Diagnostic accuracy of metronome-paced tachypnea to detect dynamic hyperinflation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lahaije, A.J.M.C.; Willems, L.M.; Hees, H.W. van; Dekhuijzen, P.N.R.; Helvoort, H.A.C. van; Heijdra, Y.F.

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: This prospective study was carried out to investigate if metronome-paced tachypnea (MPT) can serve as an accurate diagnostic tool to identify patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) who are susceptible to develop dynamic hyperinflation during exercise. Commonly, this

  14. Dynamic hyperinflation after metronome-paced hyperventilation in COPD--a 2 year follow-up.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hannink, J.D.C.; Lahaije, A.; Bischoff, E.W.M.A.; Helvoort, H.A.C. van; Dekhuijzen, R.; Schermer, T.R.J.; Heijdra, Y.F.

    2010-01-01

    In contrast to the decline in FEV(1), the behavior of dynamic hyperinflation (DH) over time is unknown in patients with COPD. Metronome-paced hyperventilation (MPH) is a simple applicable surrogate for exercise to detect DH. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate changes in MPH-induced DH during two years follow-up

  15. Pacing, the missing piece of the puzzle to high-intensity interval training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadow, E K; Gordon, N; Abbiss, C R; Peiffer, J J

    2015-03-01

    This study examined physiological and perceptual responses to matched work high-intensity interval training using all-out and 2 even-paced methodologies. 15 trained male cyclists performed 3 interval sessions of three 3-min efforts with 3 min of active recovery between efforts. The initial interval session was completed using all-out pacing, with the following 2 sessions being completed with computer- and athlete-controlled pacing in a randomised and semi-counterbalanced manner. Computer- and athlete-controlled intervals were completed at the mean power from the corresponding interval during the all-out trial. Oxygen consumption and ratings of perceived exertion were recorded during each effort. 20 min following each session, participants completed a 4-km time trial and provided sessional rating of perceived exertion. Oxygen consumption was greater during all-out (54.1±6.6 ml.kg(-1).min(-1); pintervals. Distribution of pace throughout high-intensity interval training can influence perceptual and metabolic stress along with subsequent performance and should be considered during the prescription of such training.

  16. Pacing Strategy, Muscle Fatigue and Technique in 1500m Speed Skating and Cycling Time-Trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoter, Inge K; MacIntosh, Brian R; Fletcher, Jared R; Pootz, Spencer; Zijdewind, Inge; Hettinga, Florentina J

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate pacing behavior and peripheral and central contributions to muscle fatigue in 1500m speed skating and cycling time-trials, when a faster or slower start is instructed. METHODS: Nine speed skaters and nine cyclists, all competing at regional or national level, performed two 1500m

  17. Cricket pace bowling: The trade-off between optimising knee angle ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Knee angle and ball release (BR) speed of injury-free premier league (club level) cricket pace bowlers over the age of 18 years were measured at the start and end of the cricket season. Kinematic .... Light-reflective markers were attached with ...

  18. Stress echocardiography in octogenarians: transesophageal atrial pacing is accurate, safe, and well tolerated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobal, Sergio L; Pollick, Charles; Atar, Shaul; Miyamoto, Takashi; Aslanian, Noune; Neuman, Yoram; Tolstrup, Kirsten; Naqvi, Tasneem Z; Luo, Huai; Macrum, Bruce; Siegel, Robert J

    2006-08-01

    The feasibility and diagnostic accuracy of transesophageal pacing stress echocardiography for detection of inducible myocardial ischemia were evaluated in 161 patients 80 years of age or older (mean 84 +/- 3.9, range 80-97). The pacing time was 5.5 +/- 2.5 minutes with a total test time of 37 +/- 7 minutes. The mean achieved heart rate was 96 +/- 7% (83%-121%) of maximum predicted with an average rate pressure product of 21,560 +/- 5175 beats/min x mm Hg. There were minor adverse events in 8% of cases and no major complications occurred. Patient acceptance was high. When compared with myocardial single photon emission computed tomography, pacing stress echocardiography had a sensitivity of 89% and a specificity of 93% for the detection of myocardial ischemia, and 91% agreement (kappa = 0.80, P < .001). We demonstrate that pacing stress echocardiography is safe and accurate for detection of myocardial ischemia and, thus, a reliable substitute to exercise and pharmacologic stress testing in octogenarians.

  19. Modeling Pacing Behavior and Test Speededness Using Latent Growth Curve Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahraman, Nilufer; Cuddy, Monica M.; Clauser, Brian E.

    2013-01-01

    This research explores the usefulness of latent growth curve modeling in the study of pacing behavior and test speededness. Examinee response times from a high-stakes, computerized examination, collected before and after the examination was subjected to a timing change, were analyzed using a series of latent growth curve models to detect…

  20. Prolonged self-paced exercise in the heat - environmental factors affecting performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Junge, Nicklas; Jørgensen, Rasmus; Flouris, Andreas D

    2016-01-01

    In this review we examine how self-paced performance is affected by environmental heat stress factors during cycling time trial performance as well as considering the effects of exercise mode and heat acclimatization. Mean power output during prolonged cycling time trials in the heat (≥30°C) was ...

  1. Molecular mechanisms of early atrial remodeling by rapid atrial pacing in rabbits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To establish a rabbit atrial fibrillation model with rapid atrial pacing (RAP) and investigate its ultrastructural changes and expressions of L-type calcium channel subunits and potassium channel Ky4.3. Methods: Thirty-six rabbits were performed electrical stimulation through bipolar endocardial led by surgical technique, 600 beat per min from 0 to 48 h. Atrial ultrastructure was observed by transmission electron microscope (TEM) after different pacing times. mRNA were measured by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Results: Atrial ultrastructure had alteration after 3 hours' pacing, such as mitochondria vacuolization, myofilament lysis and glucogen aggregation. The mRNA of the Ca2+ channel β1 and α1 subunits began to decrease after pacing of 6 h, which were paralleled with the change of Kv4.3 mRNA. But the auxiliary subunit α2 were not affected. Conclusion: Ultrastructural changes and mRNA levels of L-type calcium channel subunits and potassium channel Kv4.3 are decreased after RAP, with a mechanism of transcriptional down-regulation of underlying ion channels due to calcium overloading after RAP.

  2. China's Manufacturing Expands at Slowest Pace in 28 Months

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    The manufacturing sector expanded at its slowest pace in 28 months in June, with the Purchasing Managers Index (PMI) falling 1.1 percentage points monthon-month to 50.9 percent, according to the China Federation of Logistics and Purchasing (CFLP).

  3. Language switch costs in sentence comprehension depend on language dominance: Evidence from self-paced reading

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bultena, S.S.; Dijkstra, A.F.J.; Hell, J.G. van

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated two prominent issues in the comprehension of language switches. First, how does language switching direction affect switch costs in sentence context? Second, are switch costs modulated by L2 proficiency and cross-linguistic activation? We conducted a self-paced reading task

  4. Exercise capacity in children with isolated congenital complete atrioventricular block: does pacing make a difference?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blank, A.C.; Hakim, S.; Strengers, J.L.; Tanke, R.B.; Veen, T.A. van; Vos, M.E. de; Takken, T.

    2012-01-01

    The management of patients with isolated congenital complete atrioventricular block (CCAVB) has changed during the last decades. The current policy is to pace the majority of patients based on a variety of criteria, among which is limited exercise capacity. Data regarding exercise capacity in this p

  5. Exercise Capacity in Children With Isolated Congenital Complete Atrioventricular Block : Does Pacing Make a Difference?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blank, A. Christian; Hakim, Sara; Strengers, Jan L.; Tanke, Ronald B.; van Veen, Toon A.; Vos, Marc A.; Takken, Tim

    2012-01-01

    The management of patients with isolated congenital complete atrioventricular block (CCAVB) has changed during the last decades. The current policy is to pace the majority of patients based on a variety of criteria, among which is limited exercise capacity. Data regarding exercise capacity in this p

  6. Using "U-Pace" Instruction to Improve the Academic Performance of Economically Disadvantaged Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, R.; Stoiber, L. C.; Pfeiffer, H. M.; Kienzler, S. E.; Fleming, R. R.; Pedrick, L. E.; Barth, D. J.; Reddy, D. .

    2016-01-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate whether the student success associated with the "U-Pace" instructional approach, which integrates mastery-based learning with proactive instructor support in an online learning environment, would replicate for both economically disadvantaged students and students who are not economically…

  7. Children's Use of Self-Paced Slideshows: An Extension of the Video Deficit Effect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sage, Kara D.; Baldwin, Dare

    2015-01-01

    Past research has established that children typically learn better from live demonstrations than from two-dimensional (2D) media. In the present set of experiments, we investigated the efficacy of a new 2D learning medium-the self-paced slideshow. A primary goal was to determine whether the "video deficit effect" extended to self-paced…

  8. Effect of heat and heat acclimatization on cycling time trial performance and pacing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Racinais, Sebastien; Périard, Julien D; Karlsen, Anders;

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine the effects of heat-acclimatization on performance and pacing during outdoor cycling time-trials (TT, 43.4km) in the heat. METHODS: Nine cyclists performed 3 TTs in hot ambient conditions (TTH, ∼37ºC) on the first (TTH-1), sixth (TTH-2) and fourteenth (TTH-3) days of trainin...

  9. VDDR pacing after His-bundle ablation for paroxysmal atrial fibrillation : A pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buys, EM; van Hemel, NM; Jessurun, ER; Bakema, L; Kingma, JH

    1998-01-01

    His-bundle ablation followed by pacemaker implantation is today a widely accepted therapeutic choice when drug refractoriness of symptomatic AF is evident. The selection of pacing mode in patients suffering from paroxysmal AF is still controversial. Preservation of AV synchrony is an attractive

  10. Mobitz type I atrio-ventricular block in dengue myocarditis, requiring temporary pacing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. de Mel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of dengue myocarditis related Mobitz type I atrio-ventricular (A-V block. To our knowledge, this is the first report of such a patient requiring pacing. An early response to methylprednisolone suggests the possibility of a therapeutic role for steroids in these patients.

  11. Effects of wind application on thermal perception and self-paced performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teunissen, L.P.J.; Haan, A. de; Koning, J.J. de; Daanen, H.A.M.

    2013-01-01

    Physiological and perceptual effects of wind cooling are often intertwined and have scarcely been studied in self-paced exercise. Therefore, we aimed to investigate (1) the independent perceptual effect of wind cooling and its impact on performance and (2) the responses to temporary wind cooling

  12. Pacing Profiles in Competitive Track Races: Regulation of Exercise Intensity is related to Cognitive Ability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debbie Van Biesen

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Pacing has been defined as the goal-directed regulation of exercise intensity over an exercise bout, in which athletes need to decide how and when to invest their energy. The purpose of this study was to explore if the regulation of exercise intensity during competitive track races is different between runners with and without intellectual impairment, which is characterized by significant limitations in intellectual functioning (IQ≤75 and adaptive behavioral deficits, diagnosed before the age of 18. The samples included elite runners with intellectual impairment (N= 36 and a comparison group of world class runners without impairment (N= 39, of which 47 were 400m runners (all male and 28 were 1500m-runners (15 male and 13 female. Pacing was analysed by means of 100m split times (for 400m races and 200m split times (for 1500m races. Based on the split times, the average velocity was calculated for four segments of the races. Velocity fluctuations were defined as the differences in velocity between consecutive race segments. A mixed model ANOVA revealed significant differences in pacing profiles between runners with and without intellectual impairment (p<.05. Maximal velocity of elite 400m runners with intellectual impairment in the first race segment (7.9 ± 0.3 m/s was well below the top-velocity reached by world level 400m runners without intellectual impairment (8.9 ±0.2 m/s, and their overall pace was slower (F=120.7, p<.05. In addition, both groups followed a different pacing profile and inter-individual differences in pacing profiles were larger, with differences most pronounced for 1500m races. Whereas male 1500m-runners without intellectual impairment reached a high velocity in the first 100m (7.2±0.1 m/s, slowly decelerated in the second race segment (-0.6±0.1 m/s, and finished with an end sprint (+0.9±0.1 m/s; the 1500m runners with intellectual impairment started slower (6.1±0.3 m/s, accelerated in the second segment (+ 0.2±0

  13. Effect of Peripheral Communication Pace on Attention Allocation in a Dual-Task Situation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueddana, Sofiane; Roussel, Nicolas

    Peripheral displays allow continuous awareness of information while performing other activities. Monitoring such a display while performing a central task has a cognitive cost that depends on its perceptual salience and the distraction it causes, i.e. the amount of attention it attracts away from the user’s primary action. This paper considers the particular case of peripheral displays for interpersonal communication. It reports on an experiment that studied the effect of peripheral communication pace on subjects’ allocation of attention in a dual-task situation: a snapshot-based peripheral monitoring task where participants need to assess the presence of a remote person, and a central text-correcting task against the clock. Our results show that the addition of the peripheral task caused a drop in the success rate of the central task. As the pace of snapshots increased, success rate decreased on the peripheral task while on the central one, success rate remained the same but failures to reply in time occurred more frequently. These results suggest that the increase in pace of snapshots caused participants to change their strategy for the central task and allocate more attention to the peripheral one, not enough to maintain peripheral performance but also not to the point where it would affect central performance. Overall, our work suggests that peripheral communication pace subtly influences attention allocation in dual-task situations. We conclude by discussing how control over information pace could help users of communication systems to adjust their local distraction as well as the attention they draw from remote users.

  14. Long-term performance of epimyocardial pacing leads in adults: comparison with endocardial leads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helguera, M E; Maloney, J D; Woscoboinik, J R; Trohman, R G; McCarthy, P M; Morant, V A; Wilkoff, B L; Castle, L W; Pinski, S L

    1993-03-01

    The long-term performance of epimyocardial pacing leads in children is well established, but few studies have analyzed the performance in adults. This issue has clinical relevance in view of the increased use of epimyocardial leads with implantable cardioverter defibrillator and antitachycardia pacing systems. We analyzed 93 epimyocardial pacing "systems" (121 leads: 65 unipolar, 28 bipolar) in adult patients (age 57 +/- 16 years), implanted since January 1980. Two different models were studied: Medtronic 4951 "Stab-on" (n = 35) and Medtronic 6917/6917A "Screw-in" (n = 58). A control group was created by randomly matching each epimyocardial system with two endocardial leads, according to age and year of implant. Epimyocardial and endocardial leads were followed-up for 44 +/- 35 and 43 +/- 35 months, respectively (P = NS). Freedom from failure for epimyocardial leads was 0.91 (95% Confidence Interval [95% CI] = 0.82 to 0.96) at 5 years, and 0.91 (95% CI = 0.69 to 0.98) at 10 years. No difference was found between the two analyzed models. Freedom from failure for endocardial leads was 0.97 (95% CI = 0.93 to 0.99) and 0.90 (95% CI = 0.61 to 0.97) at 5 and 10 years, respectively. Epimyocardial leads had a significantly poorer short-term survival than endocardial leads, secondarily to earlier "technique related" failures (P = 0.03; relative risk 3.0; Wilcoxon test). However, overall long-term performance was similar to endocardial leads. Epimyocardial pacing leads, meticulously implanted and tested, have a long-term performance similar to endocardial pacing leads.

  15. Remote Sensing Ocean Color Observations from NASA's PACE Mission: Applications and Societal Benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzortziou, M.; Omar, A. H.; Turner, W.

    2014-12-01

    The PACE (Pre- Aerosol, Clouds and ocean Ecosystems) mission is a strategic Climate Continuity mission, included in NASA's 2010 plan: "Responding to the Challenge of Climate and Environmental Change: NASA's Plan for a Climate-Centric Architecture for Earth Observations and Applications from Space". On a polar orbit, PACE will make climate-quality global measurements that are essential for understanding ocean biology, biogeochemistry and ecology, and determining how the ocean's role in global biogeochemical cycling and ocean ecology both affects and is affected by climate change. With advanced global remote sensing capabilities that include high spectral-resolution imaging, extended spectral coverage to the UV and SWIR, improved spatial resolution in inland, estuarine and coastal waters, enhanced atmospheric correction and higher signal-to-noise, PACE is expected to provide high quality observations that, over the long-term, will contribute to an extended time series of records on inland, coastal, and ocean ecosystems—all of which have substantial value beyond basic science and research. The combination of climate-quality, global atmospheric and oceanic observations provided by the PACE mission will provide a unique capability to help understand changes that affect our ecosystem services, implement science-based management strategies of coastal, marine and inland aquatic resources, and support assessments, policy analyses, and design approaches to plan adaptation and responses to impacts of climate change. Here we discuss the PACE applications program, the new capabilities afforded by this future satellite mission, and how they could potentially advance applications across a range of areas, including Oceans, Climate, Water Resources, Ecological Forecasting, Disasters, Human Health and Air Quality.

  16. The effect of three recovery protocols on blood lactate clearance after race-paced swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomax, Mitch

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of the present study was to assess the impact of 3 recovery protocols on blood lactate clearance after maximal intensity swimming. Thirty-three regional standard swimmers were tested throughout the course a year and were required to complete a race-paced 200-m swim in their main stroke or individual medley. After the race-paced swim, swimmers were assigned a self-paced continuous steady rate swim of 20 minutes (self-prescribed); a 20-minute coach-administered modified warm-up consisting of various swimming modes, intensities, and rest intervals (coach prescribed); or a 20-minute land-based recovery consisting of light-intensity walking, skipping, and stretching (land based). Blood lactate concentration was measured from the fingertip before and after the race-paced swim and after the recovery activity. The concentration of blood lactate was higher (p swimming (range of 10.5-11.0 mmol·L(-1)) compared with baseline (range 1.3-1.4 mmol·L(-1)). However, there were no differences (p > 0.05) between the groups (recovery protocols) at these time points. Conversely, differences were observed between groups after the recovery activities (p swimming protocols. The results of the present study suggest that it does not matter whether a self-paced continuous steady rate swimming velocity or a swimming recovery consisting of various strokes, intensities, and rest intervals is adopted as a recovery activity. As both swimming recoveries removed more blood lactate than the land-based recovery, swimmers should therefore be advised to undertake a swimming-based recovery rather than a land-based recovery.

  17. [Effects of temporary dual-chamber cardiac pacing in refractory cardiac failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanu, P; Lecluse, E; Michel, L; Bureau, G; Saloux, E; Cleron, S; Valette, B; Grollier, G; Potier, J C; Foucault, J P

    1996-12-01

    The authors studied 18 patients (15 men, 3 women) with an average age of 67 +/- 8 years with refractory cardiac failure. In order to determine the potential of pacing to raise cardiac output in severe cardiac failure. The average ejection fraction was 26 +/- 6.5%. All patients were in sinus rhythm:resting cardiac output was 3.35 l/min. Two temporary pacing catheters were positioned in the right atrium and at the apex of the right ventricle for dual-chamber mode pacing triggered by the spontaneous P waves. Changes in cardiac output were measured by Doppler echocardiography at different values of atrioventricular delay. Patients were considered to be responders if their cardiac outputs rose by 15%. In 7 patients meeting this criterion, the average increase in cardiac output was 27% (2.99 +/- 0.7 to 3.81 +/- 0.86 l/mn; p < 0.01); all had dilated cardiomyopathies with left bundle branch block and the optimal AV delay was 103 +/- 21 ms (80-140 ms); the duration of diastolic filling increased from 212 +/- 98 to 292 +/- 116 ms (p = 0.02). In the non-responding group (11 patients with an increase of cardiac output of only 3.6 +/- 0.09 to 3.9 +/- 0.92 l/mn; p < 0.01), the underlying disease process was mainly ischaemic. Two predictive factors of efficacy of dual-chamber pacing were identified: a short ventricular filling period (29 +/- 8% of the RR interval in the responders vs 44 +/- 9% in the non-responders; p < 0.01) and the presence of 1st degree atrioventricular block. Dual-chamber pacing could be a valuable method of increasing resting cardiac outputs in a selected group of patients with severe, refractory, cardiac failure.

  18. Challenge of engaging all students via self-paced interactive electronic learning tutorials for introductory physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVore, Seth; Marshman, Emily; Singh, Chandralekha

    2017-06-01

    As research-based, self-paced electronic learning tools become increasingly available, a critical issue educators encounter is implementing strategies to ensure that all students engage with them as intended. Here, we first discuss the effectiveness of electronic learning tutorials as self-paced learning tools in large enrollment brick and mortar introductory physics courses and then propose a framework for helping students engage effectively with the learning tools. The tutorials were developed via research in physics education and were found to be effective for a diverse group of introductory physics students in one-on-one implementation. Instructors encouraged the use of these tools in a self-paced learning environment by telling students that they would be helpful for solving the assigned homework problems and that the underlying physics principles in the tutorial problems would be similar to those in the in-class quizzes (which we call paired problems). We find that many students in the courses in which these interactive electronic learning tutorials were assigned as a self-study tool performed poorly on the paired problems. In contrast, a majority of student volunteers in one-on-one implementation greatly benefited from the tutorials and performed well on the paired problems. The significantly lower overall performance on paired problems administered as an in-class quiz compared to the performance of student volunteers who used the research-based tutorials in one-on-one implementation suggests that many students enrolled in introductory physics courses did not effectively engage with the tutorials outside of class and may have only used them superficially. The findings suggest that many students in need of out-of-class remediation via self-paced learning tools may have difficulty motivating themselves and may lack the self-regulation and time-management skills to engage effectively with tools specially designed to help them learn at their own pace. We

  19. Sequential biventricular pacing improves regional contractility, longitudinal function and dyssynchrony in patients with heart failure and prolonged QRS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ring Margareta

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aims Biventricular pacing (BiP is an effective treatment in systolic heart failure (HF patients with prolonged QRS. However, approximately 35% of the patients receiving BiP are classified as non-responders. The aim of this study is to evaluate the acute effects of VV-optimization on systolic heart function. Methods Twenty-one HF patients aged 72 (46-88 years, QRS 154 (120-190 ms, were studied with echocardiography, Tissue Doppler Imaging (TDI and 3D-echo the first day after receiving a BiP device. TDI was performed; during simultaneous pacing (LV-lead pacing 4 ms before the RV-lead and during sequential pacing (LV 20 and 40 ms before RV and RV 20 and 40 ms before LV-lead pacing. Systolic heart function was studied by tissue tracking (TT for longitudinal function and systolic maximal velocity (SMV for regional contractility and signs of dyssynchrony assessed by time-delays standard deviation of aortic valve opening to SMV, AVO-SMV/SD and tissue synchronization imaging (TSI. Results The TT mean value preoperatively was 4,2 ± 1,5 and increased at simultaneous pacing to 5,0 ± 1,2 mm (p Conclusions VV-optimization in the acute phase improves systolic heart function more than simultaneous BiP pacing. Long-term effects should be evaluated in prospective randomized trials.

  20. Acute left ventricular dysfunction secondary to right ventricular septal pacing in a woman with initial preserved contractility: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gribaa Rim

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Right ventricular apical pacing-related heart failure is reported in some patients after long-term pacing. The exact mechanism is not yet clear but may be related to left ventricular dyssynchrony induced by right ventricular apical pacing. Right ventricular septal pacing is thought to deteriorate left ventricular function less frequently because of a more normal left ventricular activation pattern. Case presentation We report the case of a 55-year-old Tunisian woman with preserved ventricular function, implanted with a dual-chamber pacemaker for complete atrioventricular block. Right ventricular septal pacing induced a major ventricular dyssynchrony, severe left ventricular ejection fraction deterioration and symptoms of congestive heart failure. Upgrading to a biventricular device was associated with a decrease in the symptoms and the ventricular dyssynchrony, and an increase of left ventricular ejection fraction. Conclusion Right ventricular septal pacing can induce reversible left ventricular dysfunction and heart failure secondary to left ventricular dyssynchrony. This complication remains an unpredictable complication of right ventricular septal pacing.

  1. Non-invasive red light optogenetic pacing and optical coherence microscopy (OCM) imaging for drosophila melanogaster (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Men, Jing; Li, Airong; Jerwick, Jason; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Zhou, Chao

    2017-02-01

    Cardiac pacing could be a powerful tool for investigating mammalian cardiac electrical conduction systems as well as for treatment of certain cardiac pathologies. However, traditional electrical pacing using pacemaker requires an invasive surgical procedure. Electrical currents from the implanted electrodes can also cause damage to heart tissue, further restricting its utility. Optogenetic pacing has been developed as a promising, non-invasive alternative to electrical stimulation for controlling animal heart rhythms. It induces heart contractions by shining pulsed light on transgene-generated microbial opsins, which in turn activate the light gated ion channels in animal hearts. However, commonly used opsins in optogenetic pacing, such as channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2), require short light wavelength stimulation (475 nm), which is strongly absorbed and scattered by tissue. Here, we performed optogenetic pacing by expression of recently engineered red-shifted microbial opsins, ReaChR and CsChrimson, in a well-established animal model, Drosophila melanogaster, using the 617 nm stimulation light pulses. The OCM technique enables non-invasive optical imaging of animal hearts with high speed and ultrahigh axial and transverse resolutions. We integrated a customized OCM system with the optical stimulation system to monitor the optogenetic pacing noninvasively. The use of red-sifted opsins enabled deeper penetration of simulating light at lower power, which is promising for applications of optogenetic pacing in mammalian cardiac pathology studies or clinical treatments in the future.

  2. A randomised trial of adaptive pacing therapy, cognitive behaviour therapy, graded exercise, and specialist medical care for chronic fatigue syndrome (PACE): statistical analysis plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The publication of protocols by medical journals is increasingly becoming an accepted means for promoting good quality research and maximising transparency. Recently, Finfer and Bellomo have suggested the publication of statistical analysis plans (SAPs).The aim of this paper is to make public and to report in detail the planned analyses that were approved by the Trial Steering Committee in May 2010 for the principal papers of the PACE (Pacing, graded Activity, and Cognitive behaviour therapy: a randomised Evaluation) trial, a treatment trial for chronic fatigue syndrome. It illustrates planned analyses of a complex intervention trial that allows for the impact of clustering by care providers, where multiple care-providers are present for each patient in some but not all arms of the trial. Results The trial design, objectives and data collection are reported. Considerations relating to blinding, samples, adherence to the protocol, stratification, centre and other clustering effects, missing data, multiplicity and compliance are described. Descriptive, interim and final analyses of the primary and secondary outcomes are then outlined. Conclusions This SAP maximises transparency, providing a record of all planned analyses, and it may be a resource for those who are developing SAPs, acting as an illustrative example for teaching and methodological research. It is not the sum of the statistical analysis sections of the principal papers, being completed well before individual papers were drafted. Trial registration ISRCTN54285094 assigned 22 May 2003; First participant was randomised on 18 March 2005. PMID:24225069

  3. A randomised trial of adaptive pacing therapy, cognitive behaviour therapy, graded exercise, and specialist medical care for chronic fatigue syndrome (PACE): statistical analysis plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walwyn, Rebecca; Potts, Laura; McCrone, Paul; Johnson, Anthony L; DeCesare, Julia C; Baber, Hannah; Goldsmith, Kimberley; Sharpe, Michael; Chalder, Trudie; White, Peter D

    2013-11-13

    The publication of protocols by medical journals is increasingly becoming an accepted means for promoting good quality research and maximising transparency. Recently, Finfer and Bellomo have suggested the publication of statistical analysis plans (SAPs).The aim of this paper is to make public and to report in detail the planned analyses that were approved by the Trial Steering Committee in May 2010 for the principal papers of the PACE (Pacing, graded Activity, and Cognitive behaviour therapy: a randomised Evaluation) trial, a treatment trial for chronic fatigue syndrome. It illustrates planned analyses of a complex intervention trial that allows for the impact of clustering by care providers, where multiple care-providers are present for each patient in some but not all arms of the trial. The trial design, objectives and data collection are reported. Considerations relating to blinding, samples, adherence to the protocol, stratification, centre and other clustering effects, missing data, multiplicity and compliance are described. Descriptive, interim and final analyses of the primary and secondary outcomes are then outlined. This SAP maximises transparency, providing a record of all planned analyses, and it may be a resource for those who are developing SAPs, acting as an illustrative example for teaching and methodological research. It is not the sum of the statistical analysis sections of the principal papers, being completed well before individual papers were drafted. ISRCTN54285094 assigned 22 May 2003; First participant was randomised on 18 March 2005.

  4. Do immunological, endocrine and metabolic traits fall on a single Pace-of-Life axis? Covariation and constraints among physiological systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versteegh, M. A.; Schwabl, I.; Jaquier, S.; Tieleman, B. I.

    2012-01-01

    Variation in demographic and physiological attributes of life history is thought to fall on one single axis, a phenomenon termed the Pace-of-Life. A slow Pace-of-Life is characterized by low annual reproduction, long life span and low metabolic rate, a fast Pace-of-Life by the opposite characteristi

  5. Temporary epicardial cardiac resynchronisation versus conventional right ventricular pacing after cardiac surgery: study protocol for a randomised control trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell Stuart J

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Heart failure patients with stable angina, acute coronary syndromes and valvular heart disease may benefit from revascularisation and/or valve surgery. However, the mortality rate is increased- 5-30%. Biventricular pacing using temporary epicardial wires after surgery is a potential mechanism to improve cardiac function and clinical endpoints. Method/design A multi-centred, prospective, randomised, single-blinded, intervention-control trial of temporary biventricular pacing versus standard pacing. Patients with ischaemic cardiomyopathy, valvular heart disease or both, an ejection fraction ≤ 35% and a conventional indication for cardiac surgery will be recruited from 2 cardiac centres. Baseline investigations will include: an electrocardiogram to confirm sinus rhythm and measure QRS duration; echocardiogram to evaluate left ventricular function and markers of mechanical dyssynchrony; dobutamine echocardiogram for viability and blood tests for renal function and biomarkers of myocardial injury- troponin T and brain naturetic peptide. Blood tests will be repeated at 18, 48 and 72 hours. The principal exclusions will be subjects with permanent atrial arrhythmias, permanent pacemakers, infective endocarditis or end-stage renal disease. After surgery, temporary pacing wires will be attached to the postero-lateral wall of the left ventricle, the right atrium and right ventricle and connected to a triple chamber temporary pacemaker. Subjects will be randomised to receive either temporary biventricular pacing or standard pacing (atrial inhibited pacing or atrial-synchronous right ventricular pacing for 48 hours. The primary endpoint will be the duration of level 3 care. In brief, this is the requirement for invasive ventilation, multi-organ support or more than one inotrope/vasoconstrictor. Haemodynamic studies will be performed at baseline, 6, 18 and 24 hours after surgery using a pulmonary arterial catheter. Measurements will be

  6. Interaction Equivalency in Self-Paced Online Learning Environments: An Exploration of Learner Preferences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason F. Rhode

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available This mixed methods study explored the dynamics of interaction within a self-paced online learning environment. It used rich media and a mix of traditional and emerging asynchronous computer-mediated communication tools to determine what forms of interaction learners in a self-paced online course value most and what impact they perceive interaction to have on their overall learning experience. This study demonstrated that depending on the specific circumstance, not all forms of interaction may be either equally valued by learners or effective. Participants differentiated among the various learning interactions available and indicated that informal interactions were as important as formal interactions in determining the quality of the online learning experience. Participants also reported the activity of blogging as being equally valued and in some ways superior to instructor-directed asynchronous discussion via the discussion board in a learning management system.

  7. Leave-one-out prediction error of systolic arterial pressure time series under paced breathing

    CERN Document Server

    Ancona, N; Marinazzo, D; Nitti, L; Pellicoro, M; Pinna, G D; Stramaglia, S

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we show that different physiological states and pathological conditions may be characterized in terms of predictability of time series signals from the underlying biological system. In particular we consider systolic arterial pressure time series from healthy subjects and Chronic Heart Failure patients, undergoing paced respiration. We model time series by the regularized least squares approach and quantify predictability by the leave-one-out error. We find that the entrainment mechanism connected to paced breath, that renders the arterial blood pressure signal more regular, thus more predictable, is less effective in patients, and this effect correlates with the seriousness of the heart failure. The leave-one-out error separates controls from patients and, when all orders of nonlinearity are taken into account, alive patients from patients for which cardiac death occurred.

  8. Towards Development of a 3-State Self-Paced Brain-Computer Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Bashashati

    2007-01-01

    the presence of a right- or a left-hand movement and the second classifies the detected movement as a right or a left one. In an offline analysis of the EEG data collected from four able-bodied individuals, the 3-state brain-computer interface shows a comparable performance with a 2-state system and significant performance improvement if used as a 2-state BCI, that is, in detecting the presence of a right- or a left-hand movement (regardless of the type of movement. It has an average true positive rate of 37.5% and 42.8% (at false positives rate of 1% in detecting right- and left-hand extensions, respectively, in the context of a 3-state self-paced BCI and average detection rate of 58.1% (at false positive rate of 1% in the context of a 2-state self-paced BCI.

  9. Self-monitoring of pace to improve math fluency of high school students with disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Anthony; McDougall, Dennis

    2008-01-01

    This study illustrates how a behavioral self-management intervention, which combined tactile and visual cued self-monitoring, self-graphing, and goal setting, improved the math fluency of five high school students with various disabilities during independent math practice. The intervention helped students monitor, adjust, and increase the pace at which they produced answers to simple addition and subtraction problems during daily 3-minute sessions. Using the self-management techniques, the students systematically increased the number and pace of correct responses, and concurrently, kept the number of error responses minimal and maintained or improved accuracy of responses. The paper includes recommendations for teaching students how to monitor their own academic performances rather than relying on teachers.

  10. Trame di Pace. Simboli, carte, azioni di un’utopia possibile. 1945-2003

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Baiesi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available La mostra racconta la storia degli uomini e delle donne che hanno ragionato di pace non più come di una nobile speranza, ma come dell’unica chance di salvezza per l’umanità. La scansione cronologica, per decenni, parte dal 1945 e arriva al 2003 con la diffusione della bandiera arcobaleno in occasione della campagna «Pace da tutti i balconi», nata per scongiurare il secondo conflitto in Iraq. Al centro della mostra un percorso sui simboli che sono stati inventati, ripresi, risignificati in diversi contesti, movimenti radicali del pacifismo antimilitarista e nonviolento e movimenti contro singole guerre. Accompagnano i materiali iconografici (bandiere e manifesti originali, opere d’arte del maestro Anastasi, due percorsi documentari con immagini d’epoca, locandine, testi di decreti, opuscoli, volantini, articoli di quotidiani e riviste.

  11. Classifying running-related injuries based upon etiology, with emphasis on volume and pace

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rasmus Oestergaard; Nohr, Ellen Aagaard; Rasmussen, Sten

    2013-01-01

    be prevented in future studies by categorizing injuries into volume or pacing injuries. However, more work is needed to provide further evidence in support of this approach. Future investigations of the link between training patterns and injury development should be designed as large-scale prospective studies......BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Many researchers acknowledge the importance of "training errors" as the main cause of running-related injuries. The purpose of this clinical commentary is to present a theoretical framework for the assumption that some running-related injuries among rear-foot strikers...... of patellofemoral pain syndrome, iliotibial band syndrome, and patellar tendinopathy, while change in running pace may be associated with the development of achilles tendinopathy, gastrocnemius injuries, and plantar fasciitis. DISCUSSIONRELATION TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: If this assertion is correct, bias may...

  12. Permanent pacing system malfunction due to hidden adjacent fractures of atrial and ventricular leads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L; Davis, M J

    1997-03-01

    Periods of failure of ventricular pacing and atrial sensing were discovered on Holter recording in a 10-year-old boy 4 years after the implantation of a dual-chamber pacemaker with endocardial bipolar leads brought out through the right atrial wall. The old generator was explanted and the old leads tested. There was considerable atrial oversensing of an electrical artefact. The pacing threshold of ventricular lead was 1.8 V compared with 0.3 V 6 days post implantation. Post-operative lateral chest X-ray disclosed fractures of both atrial and ventricular leads at the approximate site of exit from the right atriotomy. Review of the preoperative lateral film showed that the fractures had been hidden by an ECG electrode.

  13. Metabolic Responses and Pacing Strategies during Successive Sprint Skiing Time Trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Erik; Holmberg, Hans-Christer; Ørtenblad, Niels

    2016-01-01

    to estimate the anaerobic energy supply. RESULTS: The individual trial-to-trial variability in STT performance time was 1.3%, where variations in O2 deficit and V˙O2 explained 69% (P 0.05) of the variation in performance. The first and last STTs were equally fast (228 ± 10 s), and ~ 1...... on the first than second course half. In addition, metabolic rates were substantially higher (~_30%) for uphill than for flat skiing, indicating that pacing was regulated to the terrain. CONCLUSIONS: The fastest STTs were characterized primarily by a greater anaerobic energy production, which also explained 69......% of the individual variation in performance. Moreover, the skiers employed positive pacing and a variable exercise intensity according to the course profile, yielding an irregular distribution of anaerobic energy production....

  14. Pellet Fueling, ELM pacing, and Disruption Mitigation Technology Development for ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baylor, Larry R [ORNL; Combs, Stephen Kirk [ORNL; Foust, Charles R [ORNL; Jernigan, Thomas C [ORNL; Meitner, S. J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Parks, P. B. [General Atomics; Caughman, John B [ORNL; Maruyama, S. [ITER International Team, Garching, Germany; Qualls, A L [ORNL; Rasmussen, David A [ORNL; ThomasJr., C. E. [Third Dimension Technologies, LLC, Knoxville, TN

    2009-01-01

    Plasma fueling with pellet injection, pacing of edge localized modes (ELMs) by small frequent pellets, and disruption mitigation with gas jets or injected pellets are some of the most important technological capabilities needed for successful operation of ITER. Tools are being developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory that can be employed on ITER to provide the necessary core pellet fueling and the mitigation of ELMs and disruptions. Here we present progress on the development of the technology to provide reliable high throughput inner wall pellet fueling, pellet ELM pacing with high frequency small pellets, and disruption mitigation with gas jets and pellets. Examples of how these tools can be employed on ITER are discussed.

  15. Interventricular cardiac resynchronization with right ventricular apical pacing in a patient with Ebstein's defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffe, Stefano; Perucca, Antonello; Paffoni, Paola; Signorotti, Fabiana; Pardo, Nicolò Franchetti; Dellavesa, Pierfranco; Parravicini, Umberto; Zenone, Franco; Paino, Anna Maria; Bielli, Massimo; Carola, Federico; Zanetta, Marco

    2008-06-01

    We present the case of a patient with Ebstein's defect surgically corrected, and a complete right bundle branch block (RBBB) documented on echocardiogram. After an episode of near syncope due to a high-grade atrioventricular (AV) block, the patient was assisted with a bicameral DDDR pacemaker implanted with traditional right ventricular apical pacing. After the DDDR, and after stimulation with an AV delay of 180 ms, a narrow QRS complex was observed. Meanwhile, the typical left bundle branch block morphology of the right ventricular pacing and the native RBBB morphology were missing. The QRS complex narrowing persisted, even with physical activity and also with the heart rate progression. An echocardiographic study confirmed an improvement of the cardiac resynchronization parameters with this programmed stimulation.

  16. IN VIVO CHARACTERIZATION OF ATTACHMENT SAFETY BETWEEN CARDIAC PACING LEAD AND CANINE HEART MUSCLE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In vivo experiments of screwing the electrode of canine hearts and assigning external excitation on the lead-myocardium interface was carried out to evaluate the lead/myocardium adherence safety. The electrode is specially designed to host a measurement unit of strain gauges.We obtained the lead/heart interactions data from 12 dogs under natural heart beating and beating with external excitations. The data recorded from the acute phase and the chronic phase of pulling out pacing leads were compared with each other. The electrode/heart interaction is caused by the heart beat and influenced by the lung breath. This process induced tolerable damage to the lead or myocardium. The interaction decreases as the frequency of external excitations increases. The lead is more likely to be detached from myocardium under higher excitation frequency. At the same implanting sites, safer pacing lead/myocardium attachment can be realized in the chronic tests than in the acute tests.

  17. Learning discriminative patterns for self-paced EEG-based motor imagery detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haihong eZhang

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Detecting motor imagery activities versus non-control in brain signals is the basis of self-paced brain-computer interfaces (BCIs, but also poses a considerable challenge to signal processing due to the complex and non-stationary characteristics of motor imagery as well as non-control. This paper presents a self-paced BCI based on a robust learning mechanism that extracts and selects spatio-spectral features for differentiating multiple EEG classes. It also employs a nonlinear regression and post-processing technique for predicting the time-series of class labels from the spatio-spectral features. The method was validated in the {BCI Competition IV} on {Dataset I} where it produced the lowest prediction error of class labels continuously. This report also presents and discusses analysis of the method using the competition data set.

  18. Pacing, packing and sex-based differences in Olympic and IAAF World Championship marathons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, Brian

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to describe pacing profiles and packing behaviours of athletes in Olympic and World Championship marathons. Finishing and split times were collated for 673 men and 549 women across nine competitions. The mean speeds for each intermediate 5 km and end 2.2 km segments were calculated. Medallists of both sexes maintained even-paced running from 10 km onwards whereas slower finishers dropped off the lead pack at approximately half-distance. Athletes who ran with the same opponents throughout slowed the least in the second half (P medal positions. Marathon runners are advised to identify rivals with similar abilities and ambitions to run alongside provided they start conservatively. Coaches should note important sex-based differences in tactics adopted and design training programmes accordingly.

  19. Memory effects, transient growth, and wave breakup in a model of paced atrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garzón, Alejandro; Grigoriev, Roman O.

    2017-09-01

    The mechanisms underlying cardiac fibrillation have been investigated for over a century, but we are still finding surprising results that change our view of this phenomenon. The present study focuses on the transition from normal rhythm to spiral wave chaos associated with a gradual increase in the pacing rate. While some of our findings are consistent with existing experimental, numerical, and theoretical studies of this problem, one result appears to contradict the accepted picture. Specifically we show that, in a two-dimensional model of paced homogeneous atrial tissue, transition from discordant alternans to conduction block, wave breakup, reentry, and spiral wave chaos is associated with the transient growth of finite amplitude disturbances rather than a conventional instability. It is mathematically very similar to subcritical, or bypass, transition from laminar fluid flow to turbulence, which allows many of the tools developed in the context of fluid turbulence to be used for improving our understanding of cardiac arrhythmias.

  20. Noninvasive respiratory management and diaphragm and electrophrenic pacing in neuromuscular disease and spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, John R

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this monograph is to describe noninvasive management of respiratory muscle weakness/paralysis for patients with neuromuscular disease (NMD) and spinal cord injury (SCI). Noninvasive ventilation (NIV) assists and supports inspiratory muscles, whereas mechanically assisted coughing (MAC) simulates an effective cough. Long-term outcomes will be reviewed as well as the use of NIV, MAC, and electrophrenic pacing (EPP) and diaphragm pacing (DP) to facilitate extubation and decannulation. Although EPP and DP can facilitate decannulation and maintain alveolar ventilation for high-level SCI patients when they cannot use NIV because of lack of access to oral interfaces, there is no evidence that they have any place in the management of NMD. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Effects of Long-term Right Ventricular Apical Pacing on Left Ventricular Remodeling and Cardiac Function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the impacts of long-term right ventricular apical pacing on the ventricular remodeling and cardiac functions of patients with high-grade and third-degree atrioventricular blockage with normal heart structures and cardiac functions. In addition, we provide many evidences for choosing an optimal electrode implantation site.Methods: Study participants included patients who were admitted for pacemaker replacements and revisited for examinations of implanted pacemakers at outpatient. Pa...

  2. The impact of the perception of rhythmic music on oscillatory self-paced movements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu ePeckel

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Inspired by theories of perception-action coupling and embodied music cognition, we investigated how rhythmic music perception impacts self-paced oscillatory movements. In a pilot study, we examined the kinematic parameters of self-paced oscillatory movements, walking and finger tapping using optical motion capture. In accordance with biomechanical constraints accounts of motion, we found that movements followed a hierarchical organization depending on the proximal/distal characteristic of the limb used. Based on these findings, we were interested in knowing how and when the perception of rhythmic music could resonate with the motor system in the context of these constrained oscillatory movements. In order to test this, we conducted an experiment where participants performed four different effector-specific movements (lower leg, whole arm and forearm oscillation and finger tapping while rhythmic music was playing in the background. Musical stimuli consisted of computer-generated MIDI musical pieces with a 4/4 metrical structure. The musical tempo of each song increased from 60 BPM to 120 BPM by 6 BPM increments. A specific tempo was maintained for 20s before a 2s transition to the higher tempo. The task of the participant was to maintain a comfortable pace for the four movements (self-paced while not paying attention to the music. No instruction on whether to synchronize with the music was given. Results showed that participants were distinctively influenced by the background music depending on the movement used with the tapping task being consistently the most influenced. Furthermore, eight strategies put in place by participants to cope with task were unveiled. Despite not instructed to do so, participants also occasionally synchronized with music. Results are discussed in terms of the link between perception and action (i.e. motor/perceptual resonance. In general, our results give support to the notion that rhythmic music is processed in a

  3. Pacing Profiles in Competitive Track Races: Regulation of Exercise Intensity Is Related to Cognitive Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Biesen, Debbie; Hettinga, Florentina J.; McCulloch, Katina; Vanlandewijck, Yves

    2016-01-01

    Pacing has been defined as the goal-directed regulation of exercise intensity over an exercise bout, in which athletes need to decide how and when to invest their energy. The purpose of this study was to explore if the regulation of exercise intensity during competitive track races is different between runners with and without intellectual impairment, which is characterized by significant limitations in intellectual functioning (IQ ≤ 75) and adaptive behavioral deficits, diagnosed before the age of 18. The samples included elite runners with intellectual impairment (N = 36) and a comparison group of world class runners without impairment (N = 39), of which 47 were 400 m runners (all male) and 28 were 1500 m-runners (15 male and 13 female). Pacing was analyzed by means of 100 m split times (for 400 m races) and 200 m split times (for 1500 m races). Based on the split times, the average velocity was calculated for four segments of the races. Velocity fluctuations were defined as the differences in velocity between consecutive race segments. A mixed model ANOVA revealed significant differences in pacing profiles between runners with and without intellectual impairment (p 100 m (7.2 ± 0.1 m/s), slowly decelerated in the second race segment (−0.6 ± 0.1 m/s), and finished with an end sprint (+0.9 ± 0.1 m/s); the 1500 m runners with intellectual impairment started slower (6.1 ± 0.3 m/s), accelerated in the second segment (+0.2 ± 0.7 m/s), and then slowly decreased until the finish (F = 6.8, p < 0.05). Our findings support the hypothesis that runners with intellectual impairment have difficulties to efficiently self-regulate their exercise intensity. Their limited cognitive resources may constrain the successful integration of appropriate pacing strategies during competitive races. PMID:28066258

  4. PACE-GATE: An alternative view on a study with a poor trial protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stouten, Bart

    2017-08-01

    The controversies surrounding the effectiveness of cognitive behavioural therapy and graded exercise therapy for chronic fatigue syndrome are explained using Cohen's d effect sizes rather than arbitrary thresholds for 'success'. This article shows that the treatment effects vanish when switching to objective outcomes. The preference for subjective outcomes by the PACE trial team leads to false hope. This article provides a more realistic view, which will help patients and their doctors to evaluate the pros and cons.

  5. A self-paced oral feeding system that enhances preterm infants' oral feeding skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, C; Fucile, S; Schanler, R J

    2015-06-01

    Very low birth weight (VLBW) infants have difficulty transitioning to independent oral feeding, be they breast- or bottle-feeding. We developed a 'self-paced' feeding system that eliminates the natural presence of the positive hydrostatic pressure and internal vacuum build-up within a bottle during feeding. Such system enhanced these infants' oral feeding performance as monitored by overall transfer (OT; % ml taken/ml prescribed), rate of transfer (RT; ml/min over an entire feeding). This study hypothesizes that the improvements observed in these infants resulted from their ability to use more mature oral feeding skills (OFS). 'Feeders and growers' born between 26-29 weeks gestation were assigned to a control or experimental group fed with a standard or self-paced bottle, respectively. They were monitored when taking 1-2 and 6-8 oral feedings/day. OFS was monitored using our recently published non-invasive assessment scale that identifies 4 maturity levels based on infants' RT and proficiency (PRO; % ml taken during the first 5 min of a feeding/total ml prescribed) during bottle feeding. Infants oral feeding outcomes, i.e., OT, RT, PRO, and OFS maturity levels were enhanced in infants fed with the self-paced vs. standard bottle (p ≤ 0.007). The improved oral feeding performance of VLBW infants correlated with enhanced OFS. This study is a first to recognize that VLBW infants' true OFS are more mature than recognized. We speculate that the physical properties inherent to standard bottles that are eliminated with the self-paced system interfere with the display of their true oral feeding potential thereby hindering their overall oral feeding performance.

  6. Structured Approach vs. Self-Paced Modular Approach in Teaching Trigonometry

    OpenAIRE

    Rodin M. Paspasan

    2015-01-01

    The study aimed to determine which approach in the teaching of Mathematics allowed students to achieve a higher mathematical performance and to establish the learning styles of the students to showed greater confidence on a written posttest - the self-paced modular approach or the structured lecture demonstration based approach. The instruments used in the study are Trigonometry Achievement Test (PTAT) designed by the researcher and the Grasha - Reichmann Student Learning Style Survey. Hence....

  7. Basal metabolism in tropical birds: Latitude, altitude, and the 'pace of life'

    OpenAIRE

    Londoño, GA; Chappell, MA; Castañeda, MDR; Jankowski, JE; Robinson, SK

    2015-01-01

    © 2014 The Authors. Life history varies across latitudes, with the 'pace of life' being 'slower' in tropical regions. Because life history is coupled to energy metabolism via allocation tradeoffs and links between performance capacity and energy use, low metabolic intensity is expected in tropical animals. Low metabolism has been reported for lowland tropical birds, but it is unclear if this is due to 'slow' life history or to a warm, stable environment. We measured basal metabolic rates (BMR...

  8. Effect of Environmental and Feedback Interventions on Pacing Profiles in Cycling: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Michael J.; Clark, Bradley; Welvaert, Marijke; Skorski, Sabrina; Garvican-Lewis, Laura A.; Saunders, Philo; Thompson, Kevin G.

    2016-01-01

    In search of their optimal performance athletes will alter their pacing strategy according to intrinsic and extrinsic physiological, psychological and environmental factors. However, the effect of some of these variables on pacing and exercise performance remains somewhat unclear. Therefore, the aim of this meta-analysis was to provide an overview as to how manipulation of different extrinsic factors affects pacing strategy and exercise performance. Only self-paced exercise studies that provided control and intervention group(s), reported trial variance for power output, disclosed the type of feedback received or withheld, and where time-trial power output data could be segmented into start, middle and end sections; were included in the meta-analysis. Studies with similar themes were grouped together to determine the mean difference (MD) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) between control and intervention trials for: hypoxia, hyperoxia, heat-stress, pre-cooling, and various forms of feedback. A total of 26 studies with cycling as the exercise modality were included in the meta-analysis. Of these, four studies manipulated oxygen availability, eleven manipulated heat-stress, four implemented pre-cooling interventions and seven studies manipulated various forms of feedback. Mean power output (MPO) was significantly reduced in the middle and end sections (p 0.05). Negative feedback improved overall trial MPO and MPO in the middle section of trials (p 0.05). The available data suggests exercise regulation in hypoxia and heat-stress is delayed in the start section of trials, before significant reductions in MPO occur in the middle and end of the trial. Additionally, negative feedback involving performance deception may afford an upward shift in MPO in the middle section of the trial improving overall performance. Finally, performance improvements can be retained when participants are informed of the deception. PMID:27994554

  9. Turismo di guerra, turismo di pace: sguardi incrociati su Italia e Francia

    OpenAIRE

    Elisa Tizzoni

    2015-01-01

    L’articolo offre alcune riflessioni sul rapporto del turismo con i concetti di guerra e pace in occasione dei due conflitti mondiali, analizzando in chiave comparata il contesto francese e quello italiano. Dopo una sintetica introduzione circa le principali ripercussioni dei conflitti contemporanei sul turismo e sui caratteri che esso può assumere in contesti di guerra, l’attenzione viene rivolta al fenomeno del cosiddetto “turismo di guerra”, sviluppatosi nella fase finale e negli anni immed...

  10. Response of atrial flutter to overdrive atrial pacing and intravenous disopyramide phosphate, singly and in combination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camm, J; Ward, D; Spurrell, R

    1980-01-01

    Ten patients who suffered spontaneous paroxysms of atrial flutter were investigated by electrophysiological techniques. Two had overt Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome; three Lown-Ganong-Levine syndrome; and one a concealed accessory atrioventricular connection. Atrial flutter was initiated, at study, by right atrial pacing and electrograms from the right atrium and coronary sinus were observed for at least five minutes to ensure stable flutter in both atria. Atrial flutter was terminated by 2.5 s or 5 s bursts of atrial pacing at rates 10, 50, or 100 beats/min faster than the intrinsic flutter rate in only two patients. Atrial flutter, which was reinitiated in two patients, was then treated with intravenous disopyramide phosphate, 2 mg/kg body weight, infused over five minutes. In all 10 patients the atrial rate slowed from a mean of 310 +/- 39 beats/min to 217 +/- 27 beats/min and atrial flutter terminated in one case. Though the mean ventricular rate fell from 161 +/- 52 beats/min to 156 +/- 45 beats/min the atrioventricular conduction ratio fell from 2.17 +/- 0.86 to 1.55 +/- 0.59 and four patients were left with symptomatically significant increases of ventricular rate. In seven of nine patients overdrive atrial pacing, repeated after disopryamide, resulted in the conversion of atrial flutter to sinus rhythm. In this study, overdrive atrial pacing and intravenous disopyramide, singly and in combination, terminated atrial flutter in nine of the 10 patients and it is suggested that this method may provide an effective alternative to direct current cardioversion. PMID:7426181

  11. The effects of joint torque, pace and work:rest ratio on powered hand tool operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jia-Hua; McGorry, Raymond W; Maikala, Rammohan V

    2012-01-01

    Repetitive use of hand-held power tools is associated with work-related upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders. Using a pneumatic nutrunner, 21 men completed twelve 360 repetitive fastener-driving sessions on three joints (hard, soft and control) at slow and fast pace, and two different work:rest patterns. Handgrip force and perceived exertions were collected throughout each session. For the control joint, the mean grip force exerted was 39.6% of maximum voluntary exertion (MVE) whereas during hard and soft joint sessions it was 48.9% MVE and 56.9% MVE, respectively. Throughout each session, the grip force decreased, more while operating soft and hard joints as compared with the control joint (regression slope: -0.022 and -0.023, compared with -0.007 N/drive, respectively), suggesting considerable upper extremity muscular effort by participants during torque buildup. Fast work pace resulted in higher average grip forces by participants but a greater decrease in the force as the session progressed. Providing rest breaks reduced perceived exertions. The findings gain additional knowledge for assembly task design to possibly reduce the hand/arm injury risks for the operator. Practitioner Summary: Powered hand tools are widely used in assembly and manufacturing industries. However, the nature of their repetitive use on human operator biomechanical and perceptual responses is not fully understood. This study examined work-related risk factors such as joint torque, pace and work:rest ratios on powered hand tool performance.

  12. Obliquity-paced climate change recorded in Antarctic debris-covered glaciers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackay, Sean L; Marchant, David R

    2017-02-10

    The degree to which debris-covered glaciers record past environmental conditions is debated. Here we describe a novel palaeoclimate archive derived from the surface morphology and internal debris within cold-based debris-covered glaciers in Antarctica. Results show that subtle changes in mass balance impart major changes in the concentration of englacial debris and corresponding surface topography, and that over the past ∼220 ka, at least, the changes are related to obliquity-paced solar radiation, manifest as variations in total summer energy. Our findings emphasize solar radiation as a significant driver of mass balance changes in high-latitude mountain systems, and demonstrate that debris-covered glaciers are among the most sensitive recorders of obliquity-paced climate variability in interior Antarctica, in contrast to most other Antarctic archives that favour eccentricity-paced forcing over the same time period. Furthermore, our results open the possibility that similar-appearing debris-covered glaciers on Mars may likewise hold clues to environmental change.

  13. Making time for soil: Technoscientific futurity and the pace of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Bellacasa, Maria Puig

    2015-10-01

    The dominant drive for understanding soil has been to pace its fertility with human demand. Today, warnings about soil's exhaustion and endangered ecology raise concerns marked by fears of gloomy environmental futures, prompting scientists and soil practitioners urgently to develop better ways of taking care of soils. Yet the pace required by ecological soil care could be at odds with the predominant temporal orientation of technoscientific intervention, which is driven by an inherently progressivist, productionist and restless mode of futurity. Through a conceptual and historical approach to the soil sciences and other domains of soil knowledge, this article looks for soil ontologies and relations to soil care that are obscured by the predominant timescape. Contemporary discussions of the future of the soil sciences expose tensions between 'progress as usual'--by intensifying productivity--and the need to protect the pace of soil renewal. The intimate relation of soil science with productionism is being interrogated, as ecology attempts to engage with soil as a living community rather than a receptacle for crops. In this context, and beyond science, the 'foodweb' model of soil ecology has become a figure of alternative human-soil relations that involve environmental practitioners in the soil community. Reading these ways of making time for soil as a form of 'care time' helps to reveal a diversity of more-than-human interdependent temporalities, disrupting the anthropocentric appeal of predominant timescales of technoscientific futurity and their reductive notion of innovation.

  14. Evidence for a Border-Collision Bifurcation in Paced Cardiac Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Carolyn

    2005-11-01

    Bifurcations in the electrical response of cardiac tissue can destabilize spatial-temporal waves of electrical activity in the heart, leading to tachycardia or even fibrillation. Therefore, it is important to characterize the types of bifurcations occurring in cardiac tissue. Our goal is to classify the bifurcation that occurs in cardiac cells when a change in pacing rate induces a transition from 1:1 to 2:2 phase-locked behavior. Current mathematical models predict that the bifurcation mediating the transition is a supercritical pitchfork type. For such a bifurcation, small random noise is predicted to be amplified by greater amounts as the bifurcation is approached (Weisenfeld). However, our experimental observations of paced bullfrog myocardium driven by small beat-to-beat alternations in the pacing rate (rather than driven by noise) displays de-amplification as the bifurcation is approached. To explain this surprising result, we hypothesize that the transition to 2:2 behavior is mediated by border-collision bifurcation, which is predicted to show little noise amplification. Wiesenfeld, K. Phys. Rev. A 32, 1744 (1985).

  15. Obliquity-paced climate change recorded in Antarctic debris-covered glaciers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackay, Sean L.; Marchant, David R.

    2017-01-01

    The degree to which debris-covered glaciers record past environmental conditions is debated. Here we describe a novel palaeoclimate archive derived from the surface morphology and internal debris within cold-based debris-covered glaciers in Antarctica. Results show that subtle changes in mass balance impart major changes in the concentration of englacial debris and corresponding surface topography, and that over the past ∼220 ka, at least, the changes are related to obliquity-paced solar radiation, manifest as variations in total summer energy. Our findings emphasize solar radiation as a significant driver of mass balance changes in high-latitude mountain systems, and demonstrate that debris-covered glaciers are among the most sensitive recorders of obliquity-paced climate variability in interior Antarctica, in contrast to most other Antarctic archives that favour eccentricity-paced forcing over the same time period. Furthermore, our results open the possibility that similar-appearing debris-covered glaciers on Mars may likewise hold clues to environmental change. PMID:28186094

  16. Continued obliquity pacing of East Asian summer precipitation after the mid-Pleistocene transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tao; Liu, Fei; Abels, Hemmo A.; You, Chen-Feng; Zhang, Zeke; Chen, Jun; Ji, Junfeng; Li, Laifeng; Li, Le; Liu, Hou-Chun; Ren, Chao; Xia, Renyuan; Zhao, Liang; Zhang, Wenfang; Li, Gaojun

    2017-01-01

    Records from natural archives show that the strength of the East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) strongly depends on the orbital configuration of the Earth. However, the dominant orbital cycles driving EASM have been found to be spatially different. Speleothem stable oxygen isotopic records from southern China, which are believed to reflect large-scale changes in the Asian monsoon system, are dominated by climatic precession cycles. Further north, on the Chinese Loess Plateau (CLP), loess-and-paleosol sequences, which are argued to be controlled by monsoon intensity, are in pace with global ice volume changes dominated by obliquity, and after the mid-Pleistocene transition by 100-kyr cycles. To understand these critical discrepancies, here we apply a novel proxy based on the trace metal compositions of pedogenic carbonate in the eolian deposits on the CLP to reconstruct summer precipitation over the last 1.5 million years. Our reconstructions show that summer precipitation on the CLP is dominantly forced by obliquity not in pace with the ice-volume-imprinted loess-paleosol sequences before and after the mid-Pleistocene transition or with the precession-paced speleothem oxygen isotopic records. Coupled with climate model results, we suggest that the obliquity-driven variations of summer precipitation may originate from the gradient of boreal insolation that modulates the thermal contrast between the Asian continent and surrounding oceans.

  17. Non-invasive cardiac pacing with image-guided focused ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquet, Fabrice; Bour, Pierre; Vaillant, Fanny; Amraoui, Sana; Dubois, Rémi; Ritter, Philippe; Haïssaguerre, Michel; Hocini, Mélèze; Bernus, Olivier; Quesson, Bruno

    2016-11-01

    Currently, no non-invasive cardiac pacing device acceptable for prolonged use in conscious patients exists. High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) can be used to perform remote pacing using reversibility of electromechanical coupling of cardiomyocytes. Here we described an extracorporeal cardiac stimulation device and study its efficacy and safety. We conducted experiments ex vivo and in vivo in a large animal model (pig) to evaluate clinical potential of such a technique. The stimulation threshold was determined in 10 different ex vivo hearts and different clinically relevant electrical effects such as consecutive stimulations of different heart chambers with a single ultrasonic probe, continuous pacing or the inducibility of ventricular tachycardia were shown. Using ultrasonic contrast agent, consistent cardiac stimulation was achievable in vivo for up to 1 hour sessions in 4 different animals. No damage was observed in inversion-recovery MR sequences performed in vivo in the 4 animals. Histological analysis revealed no differences between stimulated and control regions, for all ex vivo and in vivo cases.

  18. Obliquity-paced climate change recorded in Antarctic debris-covered glaciers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackay, Sean L.; Marchant, David R.

    2017-02-01

    The degree to which debris-covered glaciers record past environmental conditions is debated. Here we describe a novel palaeoclimate archive derived from the surface morphology and internal debris within cold-based debris-covered glaciers in Antarctica. Results show that subtle changes in mass balance impart major changes in the concentration of englacial debris and corresponding surface topography, and that over the past ~220 ka, at least, the changes are related to obliquity-paced solar radiation, manifest as variations in total summer energy. Our findings emphasize solar radiation as a significant driver of mass balance changes in high-latitude mountain systems, and demonstrate that debris-covered glaciers are among the most sensitive recorders of obliquity-paced climate variability in interior Antarctica, in contrast to most other Antarctic archives that favour eccentricity-paced forcing over the same time period. Furthermore, our results open the possibility that similar-appearing debris-covered glaciers on Mars may likewise hold clues to environmental change.

  19. Spontaneous Velocity Effect of Musical Expression on Self-Paced Walking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeska Buhmann

    Full Text Available The expressive features of music can influence the velocity of walking. So far, studies used instructed (and intended synchronization. But is this velocity effect still present with non-instructed (spontaneous synchronization? To figure that out, participants were instructed to walk in their own comfort tempo on an indoor track, first in silence and then with tempo-matched music. We compared velocities of silence and music conditions. The results show that some music has an activating influence, increasing velocity and motivation, while other music has a relaxing influence, decreasing velocity and motivation. The influence of musical expression on the velocity of self-paced walking can be predicted with a regression model using only three sonic features explaining 56% of the variance. Phase-coherence between footfall and beat did not contribute to the velocity effect, due to its implied fixed pacing. The findings suggest that the velocity effect depends on vigor entrainment that influences both stride length and pacing. Our findings are relevant for preventing injuries, for gait improvement in walking rehabilitation, and for improving performance in sports activities.

  20. Compatibility of temporary pacemaker myocardial pacing leads with magnetic resonance imaging: an ex vivo tissue study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeil, Alexander; Drobnik, Stefanie; Rzanny, Reinhard; Aboud, Anas; Böttcher, Joachim; Schmidt, Peter; Ortmann, Christian; Mall, Gita; Hekmat, Khosro; Brehm, Bernhard; Reichenbach, Juergen; Mayer, Thomas E; Wolf, Gunter; Hansch, Andreas

    2012-02-01

    The presence of temporary myocardial pacing leads is considered a safety contraindication for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The aim of this ex vivo tissue study was to measure the heating effects at the tip of the leads using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)HMRS) thermometry. The tissue effects were verified by histological analyses. Pig hearts with implanted temporary pacemaker myocardial pacing leads were examined by whole-body MRI at 1.5 Tesla. The tests were performed either by a sequence with high specific absorption rate (SAR) or by standard clinical sequences with lower SAR. Temperature changes were detected via (1)HMRS thermometry, by monitoring the frequency difference between water protons and the reference signals of N-methyl protons of creatine/phosphocreatine (Cr/PCr) and trimethylamine (TMA). Histology was performed using several staining techniques. Standard low-SAR and high-SAR sequences did not cause significant temperature increases in the myocardial tissue surrounding the implanted leads. There were no histopathological signs of thermal damage around the tips of the leads in any of the hearts or in a control implanted heart not subjected to MRI. The present data suggest that temporary pacemaker myocardial pacing leads may be compatible with MR scanning at 1.5 Tesla. However, further in vivo studies and carefully monitored patient studies are needed before final safety recommendations can be made.

  1. Ventricular resynchronization through biventricular cardiac pacing for the treatment of refractory heart failure in dilated cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silas S. Galvão Fº

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The biventricular pacing (BVP approach has good results in the treatment of congestive heart failure (CHF in patients (pts with disorders of intraventricular conduction. METHODS: We have applied BVP to 28 pts, with left ventricular pacing using minitoracotomy in 3 pts and the transvenous aproach via coronary sinus in 25 pts. The mean duration of the QRS complexes was 187 ms, in the presence of the left branch block in 22 pts, and right branch block + divisional hemiblock in 6 pts. All pts had been considerated candidates to cardiac transplantation, and were under optimized drug therapy. Sixteen pts were in Functional Class (NYHA IV, and 12 in class III. The ejection fraction varied from 22 to 46% (average = 34%. The pacing mode employed was biventricular triple-chamber in 22 pts, and bi-ventricular dual-chamber in 6 pts (one with ICD. RESULTS: The pts were followed up for a period that ranged from 10 days to 14 months (mean 5 months. All pts presented clinical improvement after implant, chaging the NYHA Functional Class at the end of follow-up to Class I (9pts, Class II (10 pts and Class III (6 pts. The initial mean ejection fraction have-raised to 37%. Two pts died suddenly. One patient died due to a pulmonary fungal infection. CONCLUSION: Ventricular resynchronization through BVP, improved significantly the Functional Class and, therefore, the quality of life. Assessments of myocardial function acutely performed do not reflect the clinical improvement observed.

  2. The role of emotions on pacing strategies and performance in middle and long duration sport events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, B; Moullan, F; Deruelle, F; Noakes, T D

    2011-05-01

    Thepacing strategy may be defined as the process in which the total energy expenditure during exercise is regulated on a moment-to-moment basis in order to ensure that the exercise bout can be completed in a minimum time and without a catastrophic biological failure. Experienced athletes develop a stable template of the power outputs they are able to sustain for different durations of exercise, but it is not known how they originally develop this template or how that template changes with training and experience. While it is understood that the athlete's physiological state makes an important contribution to this process, there has been much less interest in the contribution that the athlete's emotional status makes. The aim of this review is to evaluate the literature of physiological, neurophysiological and perceptual responses during exercise in order to propose a complex model interpretation of this process which may be a critical factor determining success in middle- and long-duration sporting competitions. We describe unconscious/physiological and conscious/emotional mechanisms of control, the focus of which are to ensure that exercise terminates before catastrophic failure occurs in any bodily system. We suggest that training sessions teach the athlete to select optimal pacing strategies by associating a level of emotion with the ability to maintain that pace for exercise of different durations. That pacing strategy is then adopted in future events. Finally, we propose novel perspectives to maximise performance and to avoid overtraining by paying attention also to the emotional state in training process.

  3. Running Pace Decrease during a Marathon Is Positively Related to Blood Markers of Muscle Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Coso, Juan; Fernández, David; Abián-Vicen, Javier; Salinero, Juan José; González-Millán, Cristina; Areces, Francisco; Ruiz, Diana; Gallo, César; Calleja-González, Julio; Pérez-González, Benito

    2013-01-01

    Background Completing a marathon is one of the most challenging sports activities, yet the source of running fatigue during this event is not completely understood. The aim of this investigation was to determine the cause(s) of running fatigue during a marathon in warm weather. Methodology/Principal Findings We recruited 40 amateur runners (34 men and 6 women) for the study. Before the race, body core temperature, body mass, leg muscle power output during a countermovement jump, and blood samples were obtained. During the marathon (27 °C; 27% relative humidity) running fatigue was measured as the pace reduction from the first 5-km to the end of the race. Within 3 min after the marathon, the same pre-exercise variables were obtained. Results Marathoners reduced their running pace from 3.5 ± 0.4 m/s after 5-km to 2.9 ± 0.6 m/s at the end of the race (P 15% pace reduction) had elevated post-race myoglobin (1318 ± 1411 v 623 ± 391 µg L−1; P<0.05), lactate dehydrogenase (687 ± 151 v 583 ± 117 U L−1; P<0.05), and creatine kinase (564 ± 469 v 363 ± 158 U L−1; P = 0.07) in comparison with marathoners that preserved their running pace reasonably well throughout the race. However, they did not differ in their body mass change (−3.1 ± 1.0 v −3.0 ± 1.0%; P = 0.60) or post-race body temperature (38.7 ± 0.7 v 38.9 ± 0.9 °C; P = 0.35). Conclusions/Significance Running pace decline during a marathon was positively related with muscle breakdown blood markers. To elucidate if muscle damage during a marathon is related to mechanistic or metabolic factors requires further investigation. PMID:23460881

  4. Running pace decrease during a marathon is positively related to blood markers of muscle damage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Del Coso

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Completing a marathon is one of the most challenging sports activities, yet the source of running fatigue during this event is not completely understood. The aim of this investigation was to determine the cause(s of running fatigue during a marathon in warm weather. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We recruited 40 amateur runners (34 men and 6 women for the study. Before the race, body core temperature, body mass, leg muscle power output during a countermovement jump, and blood samples were obtained. During the marathon (27 °C; 27% relative humidity running fatigue was measured as the pace reduction from the first 5-km to the end of the race. Within 3 min after the marathon, the same pre-exercise variables were obtained. RESULTS: Marathoners reduced their running pace from 3.5 ± 0.4 m/s after 5-km to 2.9 ± 0.6 m/s at the end of the race (P 15% pace reduction had elevated post-race myoglobin (1318 ± 1411 v 623 ± 391 µg L(-1; P<0.05, lactate dehydrogenase (687 ± 151 v 583 ± 117 U L(-1; P<0.05, and creatine kinase (564 ± 469 v 363 ± 158 U L(-1; P = 0.07 in comparison with marathoners that preserved their running pace reasonably well throughout the race. However, they did not differ in their body mass change (-3.1 ± 1.0 v -3.0 ± 1.0%; P = 0.60 or post-race body temperature (38.7 ± 0.7 v 38.9 ± 0.9 °C; P = 0.35. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Running pace decline during a marathon was positively related with muscle breakdown blood markers. To elucidate if muscle damage during a marathon is related to mechanistic or metabolic factors requires further investigation.

  5. Effects of Reduced Strength on Self-Selected Pacing for Long-Duration Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxton, Roxanne E.; Ryder, Jeffrey W.; English, Kirk E.; Guined, Jamie R.; Ploutz-Snyder, Lori L.

    2015-01-01

    Strength and aerobic capacity are predictors of astronaut performance for extravehicular activities (EVA) during exploration missions. It is expected that astronauts will self-select a pace below their ventilatory threshold (VT). PURPOSE: To determine the percentage of VT that subjects self-select for prolonged occupational tasks. METHODS: Maximal aerobic capacity and a variety of lower-body strength and power variables were assessed in 17 subjects who climbed 480 rungs on a ladder ergometer and then completed 10 km on a treadmill as quickly as possible using a self-selected pace. The tasks were performed on 4 days, with a weighted suit providing 0% (suit fabric only), 40%, 60%, and 80% of additional bodyweight (BW), thereby altering the strength to BW ratio. Oxygen consumption and heart rate were continuously measured. Repeated measures ANOVA and post-hoc comparisons were performed on the percent of VT values under each suited condition. RESULTS: Subjects consistently self-paced at or below VT for both tasks and the pace was related to suit weight. At the midpoint for the ladder climb the 80% BW condition elicited the lowest metabolic cost (-19+/-14% below VT), significantly different than the 0% BW (-3+/-16%, P=0.002) and the 40% BW conditions (-5+/-22%, P=0.023). The 60% BW condition (-13+/-19%) was different than the 40% BW condition (P=0.034). Upon completion of the ladder task there were no differences among the conditions (0%BW: 3+/-18%; 40%BW: 3+/-21%; 60%BW: - 8+/-25%; 80%BW: -10+/-18%). All subjects failed to complete 5km at 80%BW. At the midpoint of the treadmill test the three remaining conditions were all significantly different (0%BW: -20+/-15%; 40%BW: - 33+/-15%; 60%BW: -41+/-19%). Upon completion of the treadmill test the 60% BW condition (-38+/-12%) was significantly different than the 40% BW (-28+/-15%, P=0.024). CONCLUSIONS: Decreasing relative strength results in progressive and disproportionate decreases (relative to VT) in self-selected pacing

  6. Heart failure in patients with sick sinus syndrome treated with single lead atrial or dual-chamber pacing:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riahi, Sam; Nielsen, Jens Cosedis; Hjortshøj, Søren

    2012-01-01

    AIMS: Previous studies indicate that ventricular pacing may precipitate heart failure (HF). We investigated occurrence of HF during long-term follow-up among patients with sick sinus syndrome (SSS) randomized to AAIR or DDDR pacing. Furthermore, we investigated effects of percentage of ventricular...... patients (17%) with the leads in a non-apical position, HR 0.67, CI 0.45-1.00, P = 0.05. After adjustments this difference was non-significant. The incidence of HF was not associated with %VP (P = 0.57).CONCLUSION: In patients with SSS, HF was not associated with pacing mode, %VP, or ventricular lead...... localization. This suggests that DDDR pacing is safe in patients with SSS without precipitating HF....

  7. The PACE study: a randomised clinical trial of cognitive activity (CA) for older adults with mild cognitive impairment (MCI)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vidovich, Mandy R; Lautenschlager, Nicola T; Flicker, Leon; Clare, Linda; Almeida, Osvaldo P

    2009-01-01

    .... The Promoting Healthy Ageing with Cognitive Exercise (PACE) study has been designed to determine whether a cognitive activity intervention decreases the rate of cognitive decline amongst older adults with mild cognitive impairment (MCI...

  8. Cortical field potentials preceding self-paced forelimb movements and influences of cerebellectomy upon them in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohishi, Hiroko; Ichikawa, Jun; Matsuzaki, Ryuichi; Kyuhou, Shin ichi; Matsuura-Nakao, Kazuko; Seki, Tomomi; Gemba, Hisae

    2003-11-27

    Seven rats were well trained to move lever to the left by right forelimb at self-pace (self-paced forelimb movements). Cortical field potentials associated with self-paced forelimb movements were recorded by electrodes implanted chronically on the surface and at a 2.0 mm depth in the forelimb motor cortex on the left side. A surface-negative, depth-positive potential starting about 1.0 s prior to the movement was recorded in the rostral part of the forelimb motor cortex. Further we found that the premovement potential was eliminated by the cerebellar hemispherectomy on the right side. This suggests the participation of the cerebellar hemisphere in preparing the activity of the motor cortex before self-paced forelimb movements in rats, by cerebello-thalamo-cortical projections.

  9. Allopurinol enhances the contractile response to dobutamine and exercise in dogs with pacing-induced heart failure

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ukai, T; Cheng, C P; Tachibana, H; Igawa, A; Zhang, Z S; Cheng, H J; Little, W C

    2001-01-01

    .... We studied the effect of allopurinol on the contractile response to dobutamine and exercise in 7 chronically instrumented conscious dogs before and after producing CHF by rapid pacing. Left ventricular (LV...

  10. Utility and safety of temporary pacing using active fixation leads and externalized re-usable permanent pacemakers after lead extraction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kawata, Hiro; Pretorius, Victor; Phan, Huy; Mulpuru, Siva; Gadiyaram, Varuna; Patel, Jigar; Steltzner, Dawna; Krummen, David; Feld, Gregory; Birgersdotter-Green, Ulrika

    2013-01-01

    .... The use of an externalized permanent active-fixation pacemaker lead connected to a permanent pacemaker generator for temporary pacing may be beneficial because of improved lead stability, and greater...

  11. Universal Usability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Sarah; Leventhal, Laura

    Universal usability of World Wide Web (Web) environments—that is, having 90% of households as successful users—requires universal access, usability, and universal design. Factors such as Web technology and user-centered design contribute to universal access and usability, but key to universal usability is a universal design methodology. Universal design principles for the Web follow from universal design principles for the built environment, and emphasize perceptibility, self-explanation, and tailorability for the user. Universally usable Web environments offer the benefit of expanded participation, as well as the unanticipated benefits that generally follow from innovative design initiatives. However, to achieve Web universal usability, Web designers need tools that facilitate the design of intuitive interfaces without sacrificing universal access.

  12. Gradual Pace

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    China pledges to promote steady development of its financial sector and prevent possible risks pointed out by the IMF The People’s Bank of China,the central bank,recently responded to a report-Financial Sector Assessment for China-jointly issued by the International Monetary Fund(IMF) and the

  13. PACE4-Based Molecular Targeting of Prostate Cancer Using an Engineered 64Cu-Radiolabeled Peptide Inhibitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric Couture

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The potential of PACE4 as a pharmacological target in prostate cancer has been demonstrated as this proprotein convertase is strongly overexpressed in human prostate cancer tissues and its inhibition, using molecular or pharmacological approaches, results in reduced cell proliferation and tumor progression in mouse tumor xenograft models. We developed a PACE4 high-affinity peptide inhibitor, namely, the multi-leucine (ML, and sought to determine whether this peptide could be exploited for the targeting of prostate cancer for diagnostic or molecular imaging purposes. We conjugated a bifunctional chelator 1,4,7-triazacyclononane-1,4,7- triacetic acid (NOTA to the ML peptide for copper-64 (64Cu labeling and positron emission tomography (PET– based prostate cancer detection. Enzyme kinetic assays against recombinant PACE4 showed that the NOTA-modified ML peptide displays identical inhibitory properties compared to the unmodified peptide. In vivo biodistribution of the 64Cu/NOTA-ML peptide evaluated in athymic nude mice bearing xenografts of two human prostate carcinoma cell lines showed a rapid and high uptake in PACE4-expressing LNCaP tumor at an early time point and in PACE4-rich organs. Co-injection of unlabeled peptide confirmed that tumor uptake was target-specific. PACE4-negative tumors displayed no tracer uptake 15 minutes after injection, while the kidneys, demonstrated high uptake due to rapid renal clearance of the peptide. The present study supports the feasibility of using a 64Cu/NOTA-ML peptide for PACE4-targeted prostate cancer detection and PACE4 status determination by PET imaging but also provides evidence that ML inhibitor–based drugs would readily reach tumor sites under in vivo conditions for pharmacological intervention or targeted radiation therapy.

  14. Sequential biventricular pacing improves regional contractility, longitudinal function and dyssynchrony in patients with heart failure and prolonged QRS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edner, Magnus; Ring, Margareta; Särev, Tooomas

    2010-04-12

    Biventricular pacing (BiP) is an effective treatment in systolic heart failure (HF) patients with prolonged QRS. However, approximately 35% of the patients receiving BiP are classified as non-responders. The aim of this study is to evaluate the acute effects of VV-optimization on systolic heart function. Twenty-one HF patients aged 72 (46-88) years, QRS 154 (120-190) ms, were studied with echocardiography, Tissue Doppler Imaging (TDI) and 3D-echo the first day after receiving a BiP device. TDI was performed; during simultaneous pacing (LV-lead pacing 4 ms before the RV-lead) and during sequential pacing (LV 20 and 40 ms before RV and RV 20 and 40 ms before LV-lead pacing). Systolic heart function was studied by tissue tracking (TT) for longitudinal function and systolic maximal velocity (SMV) for regional contractility and signs of dyssynchrony assessed by time-delays standard deviation of aortic valve opening to SMV, AVO-SMV/SD and tissue synchronization imaging (TSI). The TT mean value preoperatively was 4.2 +/- 1.5 and increased at simultaneous pacing to 5.0 +/- 1.2 mm (p < 0.05), and at best VV-interval to 5.4 +/- 1.2 (p < 0.001). Simultaneous pacing achieved better TT distance compared with preoperative in 16 patients (76%). However, it was still higher after VV-optimization in 12 patients 57%. Corresponding figures for SMV were 3.0 +/- 0.7, 3.5 +/- 0.8 (p < 0,01), and 3.6 +/- 0.8 (p < 0.001). Also dyssynchrony improved. VV-optimization in the acute phase improves systolic heart function more than simultaneous BiP pacing. Long-term effects should be evaluated in prospective randomized trials.

  15. Minority Universities Systems Engineering (MUSE) Program at the University of Texas at El Paso

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Mary Clare; Usevitch, Bryan; Starks, Scott A.

    1997-01-01

    In 1995, The University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) responded to the suggestion of NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (NASA JPL) to form a consortium comprised of California State University at Los Angeles (CSULA), North Carolina Agricultural and Technical University (NCAT), and UTEP from which developed the Minority Universities Systems Engineering (MUSE) Program. The mission of this consortium is to develop a unique position for minority universities in providing the nation's future system architects and engineers as well as enhance JPL's system design capability. The goals of this collaboration include the development of a system engineering curriculum which includes hands-on project engineering and design experiences. UTEP is in a unique position to take full advantage of this program since UTEP has been named a Model Institution for Excellence (MIE) by the National Science Foundation. The purpose of MIE is to produce leaders in Science, Math, and Engineering. Furthermore, UTEP has also been selected as the site for two new centers including the Pan American Center for Earth and Environmental Sciences (PACES) directed by Dr. Scott Starks and the FAST Center for Structural Integrity of Aerospace Systems directed by Dr. Roberto Osegueda. The UTEP MUSE Program operates under the auspices of the PACES Center.

  16. Optimizing paced ventricular function in patients with and without repaired congenital heart disease by contractility-guided lead implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpawich, Peter P; Singh, Harinder; Zelin, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluates the concept of optimizing ventricular pacing in regard to functional cardiac response. Lead implant based on physiologic variables of contractility at various sites was performed in patients with and without congenital heart disease (CHD). Since right ventricular apical pacing may adversely alter contractility and myocellular function, septal and outflow tract pacing have been advocated. However, there are few studies in the young and essentially none in those with CHD. A total of 113 consecutive patients with and without repaired CHD, aged two to 51 (median 16), some with preexisting epicardial pacemakers, underwent transvenous pacemaker implant using standard sensing/pacing indices plus measurements of pressures, QRS, and contractility responses at each of five predefined potential ventricular implant sites: apex, inflow-, low-, mid-, and infundibular/outflow-septal with each patient serving as his/her own control. Implant was at the site of best contractility with active-fixation, low-threshold steroid-eluting leads. Measured contractility indices varied up to 31% (mean 12%) between sites per patient. Septal regions (mid-, inflow-, and low-) were associated with the most optimal and right ventricular epicardial showed the worst contractility (P implant sites are patient and CHD variable. Current lead designs ensure chronic stability/performance regardless of site. Proactive contractility-guided pacing implant can optimize chronic paced ventricular function. ©2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Investigating the pace of temperature change and its implications over the twenty-first century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavaillaz, Y.; Joussaume, S.; Braconnot, P.; Vautard, R.

    2015-12-01

    In most studies, climate change is approached by focusing on the evolution between a fixed current baseline and the future, emphasizing stronger warming as we move further from the current climate. Under climate conditions that are continuously evolving, human systems might have to constantly adapt to a changing target. We propose here an alternative approach, and consider indicators of the pace of temperature change and its effects on temperature distributions estimated from projections of an ensemble of 18 General Circulation Models. The pace is represented by a rate defined by the difference between two subsequent 20-year periods. Under the strongest emission pathway (RCP 8.5), the warming rate strongly increases over the twenty-first century, with a maximum reached before 2080. Whilst northern high-latitudes witness the highest temperature rise, all other latitudes highlight at least a doubling in the warming rate compared to the current period. The spatial extent of significant shifts in annual temperature distributions between two subsequent 20-year periods is projected to be at least four times larger than in the current period. They are mainly located in tropical areas, such as West Africa and South-East Asia. The fraction of the world population exposed to these shifts grows from 8% to 60% from around 2060 onwards, i.e. reaching 6 billions people. In contrast, low mitigation measures (RCP 6.0) are sufficient to keep the warming rate similar to current values. Under the medium mitigation pathway (RCP 4.5), population exposure to significant shifts drops to negligible values by the end of the century. Strong mitigation measures (RCP 2.6) are the only option that generates a global return to historical conditions regarding our indicators. Considering the pace of change can bring an alternative way to interact with climate impacts and adaptation communities.

  18. Uncovering the dynamics of cardiac systems using stochastic pacing and frequency domain analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemay, Mathieu; de Lange, Enno; Kucera, Jan P

    2012-01-01

    Alternans of cardiac action potential duration (APD) is a well-known arrhythmogenic mechanism which results from dynamical instabilities. The propensity to alternans is classically investigated by examining APD restitution and by deriving APD restitution slopes as predictive markers. However, experiments have shown that such markers are not always accurate for the prediction of alternans. Using a mathematical ventricular cell model known to exhibit unstable dynamics of both membrane potential and Ca²⁺ cycling, we demonstrate that an accurate marker can be obtained by pacing at cycle lengths (CLs) varying randomly around a basic CL (BCL) and by evaluating the transfer function between the time series of CLs and APDs using an autoregressive-moving-average (ARMA) model. The first pole of this transfer function corresponds to the eigenvalue (λ(alt)) of the dominant eigenmode of the cardiac system, which predicts that alternans occurs when λ(alt) ≤ -1. For different BCLs, control values of λ(alt) were obtained using eigenmode analysis and compared to the first pole of the transfer function estimated using ARMA model fitting in simulations of random pacing protocols. In all versions of the cell model, this pole provided an accurate estimation of λ(alt). Furthermore, during slow ramp decreases of BCL or simulated drug application, this approach predicted the onset of alternans by extrapolating the time course of the estimated λ(alt). In conclusion, stochastic pacing and ARMA model identification represents a novel approach to predict alternans without making any assumptions about its ionic mechanisms. It should therefore be applicable experimentally for any type of myocardial cell.

  19. Uncovering the dynamics of cardiac systems using stochastic pacing and frequency domain analyses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Lemay

    Full Text Available Alternans of cardiac action potential duration (APD is a well-known arrhythmogenic mechanism which results from dynamical instabilities. The propensity to alternans is classically investigated by examining APD restitution and by deriving APD restitution slopes as predictive markers. However, experiments have shown that such markers are not always accurate for the prediction of alternans. Using a mathematical ventricular cell model known to exhibit unstable dynamics of both membrane potential and Ca²⁺ cycling, we demonstrate that an accurate marker can be obtained by pacing at cycle lengths (CLs varying randomly around a basic CL (BCL and by evaluating the transfer function between the time series of CLs and APDs using an autoregressive-moving-average (ARMA model. The first pole of this transfer function corresponds to the eigenvalue (λ(alt of the dominant eigenmode of the cardiac system, which predicts that alternans occurs when λ(alt ≤ -1. For different BCLs, control values of λ(alt were obtained using eigenmode analysis and compared to the first pole of the transfer function estimated using ARMA model fitting in simulations of random pacing protocols. In all versions of the cell model, this pole provided an accurate estimation of λ(alt. Furthermore, during slow ramp decreases of BCL or simulated drug application, this approach predicted the onset of alternans by extrapolating the time course of the estimated λ(alt. In conclusion, stochastic pacing and ARMA model identification represents a novel approach to predict alternans without making any assumptions about its ionic mechanisms. It should therefore be applicable experimentally for any type of myocardial cell.

  20. .VO2max is not altered by self-pacing during incremental exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chidnok, Weerapong; Dimenna, Fred J; Bailey, Stephen J; Burnley, Mark; Wilkerson, Daryl P; Vanhatalo, Anni; Jones, Andrew M

    2013-02-01

    We tested the hypothesis that incremental cycling to exhaustion that is paced using clamps of the rating of perceived exertion (RPE) elicits higher .VO2max values compared to a conventional ramp incremental protocol when test duration is matched. Seven males completed three incremental tests to exhaustion to measure .VO2max. The incremental protocols were of similar duration and included: a ramp test at 30 W min(-1) with constant cadence (RAMP1); a ramp test at 30 W min(-1) with cadence free to fluctuate according to subject preference (RAMP2); and a self-paced incremental test in which the power output was selected by the subject according to prescribed increments in RPE (SPT). The subjects also completed a .VO2max 'verification' test at a fixed high-intensity power output and a 3-min all-out test. No difference was found for .VO2max between the incremental protocols (RAMP1 = 4.33 ± 0.60 L min(-1); RAMP2 = 4.31 ± 0.62 L min(-1); SPT = 4.36 ± 0.59 L min(-1); P > 0.05) nor between the incremental protocols and the peak.VO2max measured during the 3-min all-out test (4.33 ± 0.68 L min(-1)) or the .VO2max measured in the verification test (4.32 ± 0.69 L min(-1)). The integrated electromyogram, blood lactate concentration, heart rate and minute ventilation at exhaustion were not different (P > 0.05) between the incremental protocols. In conclusion, when test duration is matched, SPT does not elicit a higher .VO2max compared to conventional incremental protocols. The striking similarity of .VO2max measured across an array of exercise protocols indicates that there are physiological limits to the attainment of .VO2max that cannot be exceeded by self-pacing.

  1. Influence of gender on pacing adopted by elite triathletes during a competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Meur, Yann; Hausswirth, Christophe; Dorel, Sylvain; Bignet, Frank; Brisswalter, Jeanick; Bernard, Thierry

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the pacing strategies adopted by women and men during a World Cup ITU triathlon. Twelve elite triathletes (6 females, 6 males) competed in a World Cup Olympic distance competition where speed and heart rate (HR) were measured in the three events. The power output (PO) was recorded in cycling to determine the time spent in five intensity zones ([0-10% VT1]; [10% VT1-VT1]; [VT1-VT2]; [VT2-MAP] and > or =MAP) [ventilatory threshold (VT); maximal aerobic power (MAP)]. Swimming and running speeds decreased similarly for both genders (P < 0.05) and HR values were similar through the whole race (92 +/- 2 and 92 +/- 3% of maximal HR for women and men, respectively). The distribution of time spent in the five zones during the cycling leg was the same for both genders. The men's speed and PO decreased after the first bike lap (P < 0.05) and the women spent relatively more time above MAP in the hilly sections (45 +/- 4 vs. 32 +/- 4%). The men's running speed decreased significantly over the whole circuit, whereas the women slowed only over the uphill and downhill sections (P < 0.05). This study indicates that both female and male elite triathletes adopted similar positive pacing strategies during swimming and running legs. Men pushed the pace harder during the swim-to-cycle transition contrary to the women and female triathletes were more affected by changes in slope during the cycling and running phases.

  2. Matrine Inhibits Pacing Induced Atrial Fibrillation by Modulating IKM3 and ICa-L

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuhong Zhou, Wei Xu, Ruyi Han, Jiaying Zhou, Zhenwei Pan, Huo Rong, Junnan Li, Changqing Xu, Guofen Qiao, Yanjie Lu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To elucidate the protective effects of Matrine on atrial fibrillation (AF induced by electric pacing in mice and underlying molecular and ion channel mechanisms.Methods: AF was introduced by electric pacing in mice and the incidence and duration of AF were evaluated. Functional expression of M3 receptor (M3-R and Cav1.2 were explored by western and Real-time PCR, action potential (AP and the density of (IKM3 L-type calcium channel (ICa-L were both recorded using whole-cell patch in isolated atrial cardiomyocytes.Results: In control group, incidence and duration of AF induced by electric pacing were 50 ± 17% and 3.68 ± 1.84 s, respectively; after application of carbachol 50 µg/kg both incidence and duration of AF were significantly increased to 86 ± 24% and 65.2 ± 29.0 s. Compared with control group, pretreatment of Matrine for 15 days significantly reduced AF incidence and duration in dose-dependent manner. Atrial membrane-protein expression of M3-R was decreased and membrane Cav1.2 expression was up-regulated. In single Matrine-treated atrial cardiomyocyte the density of IKM3 was significantly decreased by 39% as well compared with control group, P Ca-L density of atrium was increased by 40%.Conclusion: These data demonstrated at the first time that the anti-AF effects of Matrine may due, at least in part, to down-regulation of IKM3 density and M3-R expression and up-regulation of ICa-L density and α1C/Cav1.2 expression.

  3. Bike and run pacing on downhill segments predict Ironman triathlon relative success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Evan C; Pryor, J Luke; Casa, Douglas J; Belval, Luke N; Vance, James S; DeMartini, Julie K; Maresh, Carl M; Armstrong, Lawrence E

    2015-01-01

    Determine if performance and physiological based pacing characteristics over the varied terrain of a triathlon predicted relative bike, run, and/or overall success. Poor self-regulation of intensity during long distance (Full Iron) triathlon can manifest in adverse discontinuities in performance. Observational study of a random sample of Ironman World Championship athletes. High performing and low performing groups were established upon race completion. Participants wore global positioning system and heart rate enabled watches during the race. Percentage difference from pre-race disclosed goal pace (%off) and mean HR were calculated for nine segments of the bike and 11 segments of the run. Normalized graded running pace (accounting for changes in elevation) was computed via analysis software. Step-wise regression analyses identified segments predictive of relative success and HP and LP were compared at these segments to confirm importance. %Off of goal velocity during two downhill segments of the bike (HP: -6.8±3.2%, -14.2±2.6% versus LP: -1.2±4.2%, -5.1±11.5%; p<0.020) and %off from NGP during one downhill segment of the run (HP: 4.8±5.2% versus LP: 33.3±38.7%; p=0.033) significantly predicted relative performance. Also, HP displayed more consistency in mean HR (141±12 to 138±11 bpm) compared to LP (139±17 to 131±16 bpm; p=0.019) over the climb and descent from the turn-around point during the bike component. Athletes who maintained faster relative speeds on downhill segments, and who had smaller changes in HR between consecutive up and downhill segments were more successful relative to their goal times. Copyright © 2013 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. In vivo mechanical study of helical cardiac pacing electrode interacting with canine myocardium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiangming Zhang; Nianke Ma; Hualin Fan; Guodong Niu; Wei Yang

    2007-01-01

    Cardiac pacing is a medical device to help human to overcome arrhythmia and to recover the regular beats of heart. A helical configuration of electrode tip is a new type of cardiac pacing lead distal tip. The helical electrode attaches itself to the desired site of heart by screwing its helical tip into the myocardium. In vivo experiments on anesthetized dogs were carried out to measure the acute interactions between helical electrode and myocardium during screw-in and pull-out processes. These data would be helpful for electrode tip design and electrode/myocardium adherence safety evaluation. They also provide reliability data for clinical site choice of human heart to implant and to fix the pacing lead.A special design of the helical tip using strain gauges is instrumented for the measurement of the screw-in and pull-out forces. We obtained the data of screw-in torques and pull-out forces for five different types of helical electrodes at nine designed sites on ten canine hearts. The results indicate that the screw-in torques increased steplike while the torque-time curves presente saw-tooth fashion. The maximum torque has a range of 0.3-1.9N mm. Obvious differences are observed for different types of helical tips and for different test sites.Large pull-out forces are frequently obtained at epicardium of left ventricle and right ventricle lateral wall, and the forces obtained at right ventricle apex and outflow tract of right ventricle are normally small. The differences in pull-out forces are dictated by the geometrical configuration of helix and regional structures of heart muscle.

  5. Contribution of ultraviolet and shortwave infrared observations to atmospheric correction of PACE ocean-color imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frouin, Robert J.; Gross-Colzy, Lydwine S.

    2016-05-01

    The Pre-Aerosol, Cloud, and ocean Ecosystem (PACE) mission will carry into space a spectrometer measuring at 5 nm resolution in the ultraviolet (UV) to near infrared (NIR) and at lower resolution in spectral bands in the NIR and shortwave infrared (SWIR). These observations have great potential for improving estimates of marine reflectance in the post-EOS era. In view of this, we evaluate, using simulations with a coupled radiation transfer code, the gain in marine reflectance accuracy expected by including observations in the UV and SWIR compared with just using observations in the visible to NIR. The study is performed for the PACE threshold aggregate bands with respect to the standard set of bands used to generate ocean color products. The top-of-atmosphere (TOA) signal measured by the PACE spectrometer is simulated for a variety of realistic atmospheric and oceanic conditions. The TOA reflectance and the marine reflectance of the simulated ensemble are decomposed into principal components, and the components of the TOA reflectance sensitive to the ocean signal identified. Inverse models are constructed to retrieve the principal components of the marine reflectance, allowing a reconstruction, therefore an estimation of the marine reflectance. Theoretical performance is quantified as a function of angular geometry, aerosol properties, and water type, showing a significant improvement in retrieval accuracy when using the extended spectral range. On average over all the situations considered (including sun glint), the RMS error is reduced from 0.0037 to 0.0024 at 412 nm, from 0.0013 to 0.0007 at 665 nm, and from 0.0010 to 0.0004 at 865 nm (Case 2 waters are better handled). The performance is degraded at large zenith angles and aerosol optical thickness, is better at scattering angles around 120-130 degrees, and exhibits little dependence on aerosol single scattering albedo and aerosol scale height.

  6. Evaluation of the Undergraduate Physics Programme at Indira Gandhi National Open University: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Arundhati; Vijayshri; Garg, Suresh

    2009-01-01

    The undergraduate science programme was launched at the Indira Gandhi National Open University (IGNOU) in 1991-92 with an enrolment of 1,210 students. The programme was well received, and enrolments increased over the years. However, the success rates have not kept pace with enrolment. In this paper, the authors report the results of an evaluation…

  7. Characterizing the concept of activity pacing as a non-pharmacological intervention in rheumatology care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cuperus, N; Vliet Vlieland, Tpm; Brodin, N

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop a consensual list of the most important aspects of activity pacing (AP) as an intervention within the context of non-pharmacological rheumatology care. METHOD: An international, multidisciplinary expert panel comprising 60 clinicians and/or healthcare providers experienced...... the most important aspects of AP interventions in non-pharmacological rheumatology care. Nine topics for future research on AP with the highest ranking were included in a research agenda highlighting that future research should focus on the effectiveness of AP interventions and on appropriate outcome...... more transparency and homogeneity in the concept of AP in both rheumatology daily clinical practice and research....

  8. Effect of nifekalant on acute electrical remodelling in rapid atrial pacing canine model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Min; ZHANG Shu; SUN Qi; HUA Wei; HUANG Cong-xin

    2006-01-01

    Background Nifekalant may prevent atrial fibrillation (AF) and possibly be useful in treatment of atrial tachyarrhythmia in patients with severe heart failure. This study investigated the electophysiologic effect of nifekalant on the acute atrial remodeling in rapid atrial pacing (RAP) model of canine.Methods Twelve mongrel dogs subjected to rapid stimulation (400 beats/min) at left atrial appendage (LAA)for 24 hours, were randomized into the control group (rapid pacing only, n=6) and the nifekalant group (intravenous nifekalant therapy immediately after RAP, n=6). Atrial electrophysiological parameters were measured in right atrium, coronary sinus, LAA, posterior wall of left atrium (PWLA) and left superior pulmonary vein (LSPV), before and after the RAP.Results In the control group, the effective refractory periods (ERP) were shortened greatly at all sites, paced dogs had substantially shorter ERPs in the high right atrium, LAA, and LSPV, but fewer changes in the PWLA,the coefficient variation of ERP (COV ERP) was increased significantly. After rapid atrial stimulation, the inducibility of AF increased significantly [induction number: pre-RAP vs post-RAP, 1.00± 0.89 vs 8.17 ± 2.79,P<0.01; duration of AF: pre-RAP vs post-RAP, (450.34± 362.59) ms vs (9975.77 ±4376.99) ms, P<0.01]. In the nifekalant group, although the ERPs were prolonged at all sites compared with those in pre-RAP state, only the value at LSPV differed significantly from that in pre-RAP state [pre-RAP vs post-RAP, (102.50±5.24) ms vs (132.51 ±5.20) ms, P<0.01]; the COV ERP did not change statistically in this group. The inducibility of AF slightly increased but insignificantly after pacing [induction number: pre-RAP vs post-RAP, 0.83 ±0.75 vs 1.67±0.82, P=0.19; duration of AF: pre-RAP vs post-RAP, (378.67±317.88) ms vs (1124.08±1109.77) ms,P=0.06]. Conduction time values did not alter significantly in either of the two groups after RAP.Conclusions In canine RAP model, nifekalant

  9. Basal metabolism in tropical birds: latitude, altitude, and the ‘pace of life’

    OpenAIRE

    Londoño, Gustavo Adolfo

    2016-01-01

    Life history varies across latitudes, with the ‘pace of life’ being ‘slower’ in tropical regions. Because life history is coupled to energy metabolism via allocation tradeoffs and links between performance capacity and energy use, low metabolic intensity is expected in tropical animals. Low metabolism has been reported for lowland tropical birds, but it is unclear if this is due to ‘slow’ life history or to a warm, stable environment. We measured basal metabolic rates (BMR) of 253 bird spe...

  10. Non-physiological increase of AV conduction time in sinus disease patients programmed in AAIR-based pacing mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabo, Philippe; Cebron, Jean-Pierre; Solnon, Aude; Tassin, Aude; Graindorge, Laurence; Gras, Daniel

    2012-11-01

    The EVOCAV(DS) trial aimed to quantify the paradoxal atrioventricular (AV) conduction time lengthening in sinus node (SD) patients (pts) paced in AAIR-based pacing mode. SD pts, implanted with dual-chamber pacemaker programmed in AAIR-based pacing mode, were randomized in two arms for a 1-month period: the low atrial pacing (LAP; basic rate at 60 bpm, dual sensor with minimal slope) and the high atrial pacing (HAP; basic rate at 70 bpm, dual sensor with optimized slope, overdrive pacing) arm. At 1 month, crossover was performed for an additional 1-month period. AV conduction time, AV block occurrence and AV conduction time adaptation during exercise were ascertained from device memories at each follow-up. Seventy-nine pts participated to the analysis (75 ± 8 years; 32 male; PR = 184 ± 38 ms; bundle branch block n = 12; AF history n = 36; antiarrhythmic treatment n = 53; beta-blockers n = 27; class III/Ic n = 18; both n = 8). The mean AV conduction time was significantly greater during the HAP (275 ± 51 ms) vs. LAP (263 ± 49 ms) period (p AV blocks occurred in 49 % of pts in the HAP vs. 19 % in the LAP period (p AV conduction time during exercise. AAIR-based pacing in SD pts may induce a significant lengthening of pts' AV conduction time, including frequent abnormal adaptation of AV conduction time during exercise.

  11. Single surgical procedure combining epicardial pacemaker implantation and subsequent extraction of the infected pacing system for pacemaker-dependent patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amraoui, Sana; Barandon, Laurent; Whinnett, Zachary; Ploux, Sylvain; Labrousse, Louis; Denis, Arnaud; Oses, Pierre; Ritter, Philippe; Haissaguerre, Michel; Bordachar, Pierre

    2013-08-01

    Management of pacemaker infection in pacing-dependent patients is often challenging. Typically, temporary pacing is used while antibiotic therapy is given for a number of days before reimplantation of a new endocardial system. This results in a prolonged hospital stay and complications associated with temporary pacing. In this study, we examine the feasibility of performing a single combined procedure of epicardial pacemaker implantation followed by system extraction. One hundred consecutive infected pacemaker-dependent patients underwent implantation of 2 epicardial ventricular leads and were converted to a ventricular demand pacing system. The infected pacing system was then extracted during the same procedure. Patients were followed up for 12 months. Significant pericardial bleeding developed during the procedure in 3 patients. The presence of the pericardial drain positioned during the implantation of the epicardial pacing system meant that cardiac tamponade did not occur, allowing surgical repair with sternotomy to be carried out under stable hemodynamic conditions. Two of these 100 patients died in the 30-day postoperative period; 1 death was due to septic shock and 1 to pulmonary distress. Median 1-year epicardial pacing thresholds were stable and excellent (1.4 ± 0.9 volts). However, 1 of the 2 leads developed increased thresholds in 6 patients, which led to the exclusive use of other ventricular lead. A single combined procedure of surgical epicardial pacemaker implantation and pacemaker system extraction appears to be a safe and effective method for managing pacemaker-dependent patients with infected pacemakers. Copyright © 2013 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Pace bowlers in cricket with history of lumbar stress fracture have increased risk of lower limb muscle strains, particularly calf strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Orchard

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available John Orchard1, Patrick Farhart2, Alex Kountouris3, Trefor James3, Marc Portus31School of Public Health, University of Sydney, Australia; 2Punjab Kings XI team, Indian Premier League, India; 3Cricket Australia, Melbourne, AustraliaObjective: To assess whether a history of lumbar stress fracture in pace bowlers in cricket is a risk factor for lower limb muscle strains.Methods: This was a prospective cohort risk factor study, conducted using injury data from contracted first class pace bowlers in Australia during seasons 1998–1999 to 2008–2009 inclusive. There were 205 pace bowlers, 33 of whom suffered a lumbar stress fracture when playing first class cricket. Risk ratios ([RR] with 95% confidence intervals[CI] were calculated to compare the seasonal incidence of various injuries between bowlers with a prior history of lumbar stress fracture and those with no history of lumbar stress fracture.Results: Risk of calf strain was strongly associated with prior lumbar stress fracture injury history (RR = 4.1; 95% CI: 2.4–7.1. Risks of both hamstring strain (RR = 1.5; 95% CI: 1.03–2.1 and quadriceps strain (RR = 2.0; 95% CI: 1.1–3.5 were somewhat associated with history of lumbar stress fracture. Risk of groin strain was not associated with history of lumbar stress fracture (RR = 0.7; 95% CI: 0.4–1.1. Other injuries showed little association with prior lumbar stress fracture, although knee cartilage injuries were more likely in the non-stress fracture group.Conclusion: Bony hypertrophy associated with lumbar stress fracture healing may lead to subsequent lumbar nerve root impingement, making lower limb muscle strains more likely to occur. Confounders may be responsible for some of the findings. In particular, bowling speed is likely to be independently correlated with risk of lumbar stress fracture and risk of muscle strain. However, as the relationship between lumbar stress fracture history and calf strain was very strong, and that there is a

  13. Zhejiang University

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    玄之

    2008-01-01

    In September 1998,a new Zhejiang University was established on the basis of the amalgamation of the four former individual universities,namely Zhejiang University,Hangzhou University,Zhejiang Agricultural University and Zhejiang Medical University,which were all located in the garden city of Hangzhou.Approved by the State Council,the founding of the new Zhejiang University has been a significant move in the reform and development of China’s higher education.The four universities have grown out of the same ancestry,the Qiushi(with the literal meaning of "seeking truth" in Chinese) Academy,which was founded a century ago as one of the earliest institutions of higher learning in China.As a result,they have all inherited from it the spirit of "Qiushi" and at the same time,built up their owndistinctive features in teaching and research.

  14. Fractal universe

    CERN Document Server

    Khokhlov, D L

    1999-01-01

    The model of the universe is considered in which background of the universe is not defined by the matter but is a priori specified as a homogenous and isotropic flat space. The scale factor of the universe follows the linear law. The scale of mass changes proportional to the scale factor. This leads to that the universe has the fractal structure with a power index of 2.

  15. Inspiratory muscle fatigue after race-paced swimming is not restricted to the front crawl stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomax, Mitch; Iggleden, Colin; Tourell, Alice; Castle, Sophie; Honey, Jo

    2012-10-01

    The occurrence of inspiratory muscle fatigue (IMF) has been documented after front crawl (FC) swimming of various distances. Whether IMF occurs after other competitive swimming strokes is not known. The aim of the present study was to assess the impact of all 4 competitive swimming strokes on the occurrence of IMF after race-paced swimming and to determine whether the magnitude of IMF was related to the breathing pattern adopted and hence breathing frequency (f(b)). Eleven, nationally ranked, youth swimmers completed four 200-m swims (one in each competitive stroke) on separate occasions. The order of the swims, which consisted of FC, backstroke (BK), breaststroke (BR), and butterfly (FLY), was randomized. Maximal inspiratory mouth pressure (MIP) was assessed before (after a swimming and inspiratory muscle warm-up) and after each swim with f(b) calculated post swim from recorded data. Inspiratory muscle fatigue was evident after each 200-m swim (p 0.05) was observed between f(b) and the change in MIP (FC: r = -0.456; BK: r = 0.218; BR: r = 0.218; and FLY: r = 0.312). These results demonstrate that IMF occurs in response to 200-m race-paced swimming in all strokes and that the magnitude of IMF is similar between strokes when breathing is ad libitum occurring no less than 1 breath (inhalation) every third stroke.

  16. VARIABILITY OF COORDINATION PARAMETERS AT 400-M FRONT CRAWL SWIMMING PACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Schnitzler

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the variability of physiological, perceptual, stroke and coordination parameters in both genders during several swim trials at the 400-m pace speed. Twelve national level competitors (6 men, 6 women swam 400-m at maximal speed. They then swam three additional trials (100, 200 and 300-m at the pace (speed of the previous 400-m. Three cameras were used to determine stroke cycle [speed (V, stroke length (SL, stroke rate (SR] and coordination [index of coordination (IdC, stroke phases] parameters. Physiological [heart rate (HR and lactate [La-] and perceptual [subjective workload (TWL] parameters were assessed after each swim trial. Inter-trial data indicated that HR, [La-] and TWL increased significantly with the distance swum (p 0.05. Thus, despite changes in both physiological and perceptual responses consecutive to increasing fatigue, coordination parameters remained stable during an all-out 400-m freestyle swim. The examination of these parameters based on short-distance trials appears then to be valid, which offers interesting perspectives for swim testing.

  17. Investigation on Walking and Pacing Stability of German Shepherd Dog for Different Locomotion Speeds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weijun Tian; Qian Cong; Carlo Menon

    2011-01-01

    The motion of three German Shepherd Dogs on a treadmill was recorded using a three-dimensional motion capture system.The locomotion speed of the dog was respectively set at 4 km·h-1, 5.5 km·h-1, 7 km·h-1 and 8.5 km·h-1 By processing the acquired data, the joint trajectories of the dogs' hind limbs were computed and a time series analysis was conducted. Joint angle-angle diagrams were obtained and the Lyapunov exponents were computed. Results show that the stability decreased when speed increased, which can be attributed to the decrease in the stance phase respect to the swing phase when speed is increased. Results also show that the dogs changed gait during the tests, namely walking in the range of 4 km·h-1 to 7 km·h-1 and pacing at 8.5 km·h-1. A significant drop in stability was observed from walking to pacing.

  18. Usefulness of Hemodynamic Sensors for Physiologic Cardiac Pacing in Heart Failure Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eraldo Occhetta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The rate adaptive sensors applied to cardiac pacing should respond as promptly as the normal sinus node with an highly specific and sensitive detection of the need of increasing heart rate. Sensors operating alone may not provide optimal heart responsiveness: central venous pH sensing, variations in the oxygen content of mixed venous blood, QT interval, breathing rate and pulmonary minute ventilation monitored by thoracic impedance variations, activity sensors. Using sensors that have different attributes but that work in a complementary manners offers distinct advantages. However, complicated sensors interactions may occur. Hemodynamic sensors detect changes in the hemodynamic performances of the heart, which partially depends on the autonomic nervous system-induced inotropic regulation of myocardial fibers. Specific hemodynamic sensors have been designed to measure different expression of the cardiac contraction strength: Peak Endocardial Acceleration (PEA, Closed Loop Stimulation (CLS and TransValvular Impedance (TVI, guided by intraventricular impedance variations. Rate-responsive pacing is just one of the potential applications of hemodynamic sensors in implantable pacemakers. Other issues discussed in the paper include: hemodynamic monitoring for the optimal programmation and follow up of patients with cardiac resynchronization therapy; hemodynamic deterioration impact of tachyarrhythmias; hemodynamic upper rate limit control; monitoring and prevention of vasovagal malignant syncopes.

  19. Biological early diagenesis and insolation-paced paleoproductivity signified in deep core sediment organic matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Meilian; Kim, Ji-Hoon; Choi, Jiyoung; Lee, Yun Kyung; Hur, Jin

    2017-05-08

    The dynamics of a large stock of organic matter contained in deep sediments of marginal seas plays pivotal role in global carbon cycle, yet it is poorly constrained. Here, dissolved organic matter (DOM) in sediments was investigated for core sediment up to ~240 meters deep in the East/Japan Sea. The upper downcore profile (≤118 mbsf, or meters below seafloor) at a non-chimney site (U1) featured the exponential production of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and optically active DOM with time in the pore water above sulfate-methane-transition-zone (SMTZ), concurrent with the increases of nutrients and alkalinity, and the reduction of sulfate. Such depth profiles signify a biological pathway of the DOM production during the early diagenesis of particulate organic matter presumably dominated by sulfate reduction. Below the SMTZ, an insolation-paced oscillation of DOM in a ~405-Kyr cycle of orbital eccentricity was observed at site U1, implying astronomically paced paleoproductivity stimulated by light availability. Furthermore, DOM dynamics of the deep sediments were likely governed by intensive humification as revealed by the less pronounced protein-like fluorescence and the lower H/C and O/C ratios below SMTZ among 15,281 formulas identified. Our findings here provide novel insights into organic matter dynamics in deep sediments.

  20. Effect of external auditory pacing on the neural activity of stuttering speakers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyomura, Akira; Fujii, Tetsunoshin; Kuriki, Shinya

    2011-08-15

    External auditory pacing, such as metronome sound and speaking in unison with others, has a fluency-enhancing effect in stuttering speakers. The present study investigated the neural mechanism of the fluency-enhancing effect by using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). 12 stuttering speakers and 12 nonstuttering controls were scanned while performing metronome-timed speech, choral speech, and normal speech. Compared to nonstuttering controls, stuttering speakers showed a significantly greater increase in activation in the superior temporal gyrus under both metronome-timed and choral speech conditions relative to a normal speech condition. The caudate, globus pallidus, and putamen of the basal ganglia showed clearly different patterns of signal change from rest among the different conditions and between stuttering and nonstuttering speakers. The signal change of stuttering speakers was significantly lower than that of nonstuttering controls under the normal speech condition but was raised to the level of the controls, with no intergroup difference, in metronome-timed speech. In contrast, under the chorus condition the signal change of stuttering speakers remained lower than that of the controls. Correlation analysis further showed that the signal change of the basal ganglia and motor areas was negatively correlated with stuttering severity, but it was not significantly correlated with the stuttering rate during MRI scanning. These findings shed light on the specific neural processing of stuttering speakers when they time their speech to auditory stimuli, and provide additional evidence of the efficacy of external auditory pacing. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Metabolite toxicity determines the pace of molecular evolution within microbial populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilja, Elin E; Johnson, David R

    2017-02-14

    The production of toxic metabolites has shaped the spatial and temporal arrangement of metabolic processes within microbial cells. While diverse solutions to mitigate metabolite toxicity have evolved, less is known about how evolution itself is affected by metabolite toxicity. We hypothesized that the pace of molecular evolution should increase as metabolite toxicity increases. At least two mechanisms could cause this. First, metabolite toxicity could increase the mutation rate. Second, metabolite toxicity could increase the number of available mutations with large beneficial effects that selection could act upon (e.g., mutations that provide tolerance to toxicity), which consequently would increase the rate at which those mutations increase in frequency. We tested this hypothesis by experimentally evolving the bacterium Pseudomonas stutzeri under denitrifying conditions. The metabolite nitrite accumulates during denitrification and has pH-dependent toxic effects, which allowed us to evolve P. stutzeri at different magnitudes of nitrite toxicity. We demonstrate that increased nitrite toxicity results in an increased pace of molecular evolution. We further demonstrate that this increase is generally due to an increased number of available mutations with large beneficial effects and not to an increased mutation rate. Our results demonstrate that the production of toxic metabolites can have important impacts on the evolutionary processes of microbial cells. Given the ubiquity of toxic metabolites, they could also have implications for understanding the evolutionary histories of biological organisms.

  2. Utilizing solid impurity granules for ELM pacing in NSTX-U

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunsford, Robert; Roquemore, L.; Jaworski, M. A.; Kaita, R.; Maingi, R.; NSTX-U Team

    2015-11-01

    Periodic edge localized modes (ELMs) rapidly transport stored energy from the edge plasma to the divertor. These events result in abrupt heating of the plasma facing components (PFCs) which reduces their effective lifetime as well as generating a strong impurity influx. If the frequency of these ELMs can be increased through controlled triggering, also known as pacing, then the inverse relationship between the peak heat flux and the frequency of the ELMs can be utilized to prevent material damage that could result from otherwise unmitigated ELMs. At NSTX, the ability of small (300 - 1000 micron) impurity granules to trigger and pace these ELMs is being explored. In these experiments, ELMs are triggered by seeding a density perturbation within the edge-pedestal region through low speed injection and ablation of impurity granules, thus generating a localized instability. Granules are dropped from a reservoir and transit a vertical flight tube at which point a rotating impeller imparts horizontal momentum into the falling granules. This drives them into the edge of the discharge at speeds ranging from 50-150 m/s and average injection frequencies of up to 200 Hz depending upon the settings of the injector. Results from the initial laboratory injection tests of lithium, boron carbide (B4C) and vitreous carbon granules and their subsequent implementation in NSTX-U experiments will be discussed. Work supported by DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  3. Structured Approach vs. Self-Paced Modular Approach in Teaching Trigonometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodin M. Paspasan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to determine which approach in the teaching of Mathematics allowed students to achieve a higher mathematical performance and to establish the learning styles of the students to showed greater confidence on a written posttest - the self-paced modular approach or the structured lecture demonstration based approach. The instruments used in the study are Trigonometry Achievement Test (PTAT designed by the researcher and the Grasha - Reichmann Student Learning Style Survey. Hence. the result shows on the test of significant difference on the respondents learning styles and level of performance established independent learning conditions and demonstrate remarkably higher mathematical performance, respectively. In the light of the statistical analysis and the findings of the study, it could be generalized that SPMA made the students learning styles more independent because they prefer to work at their own pace. Hence, SPMA help them also improve their level of performance in relation to plane trigonometry regardless of their mathematical abilities compared to structured approach. Along these lines, the subsequent recommendations are presented for consideration: The teachers should use collective learning style inventories so that students remain interested throughout their mathematics course. And should use SPMA in teaching trigonometry and other disciplines in the field of mathematics.

  4. Characterizing Spatial Dynamics of Bifurcation to Alternans in Isolated Whole Rabbit Hearts Based on Alternate Pacing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanchan Kulkarni

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sudden cardiac death instigated by ventricular fibrillation (VF is the largest cause of natural death in the USA. Alternans, a beat-to-beat alternation in the action potential duration, has been implicated as being proarrhythmic. The onset of alternans is mediated via a bifurcation, which may occur through either a smooth or a border-collision mechanism. The objective of this study was to characterize the mechanism of bifurcation to alternans based on experiments in isolated whole rabbit hearts. High resolution optical mapping was performed and the electrical activity was recorded from the left ventricle (LV epicardial surface of the heart. Each heart was paced using an “alternate pacing protocol,” where the basic cycle length (BCL was alternatively perturbed by ±δ. Local onset of alternans in the heart, BCLstart, was measured in the absence of perturbations (δ=0 and was defined as the BCL at which 10% of LV exhibited alternans. The influences of perturbation size were investigated at two BCLs: one prior to BCLstart (BCLprior=BCLstart+20 ms and one preceding BCLprior (BCLfar=BCLstart+40 ms. Our results demonstrate significant spatial correlation of the region exhibiting alternans with smooth bifurcation characteristics, indicating that transition to alternans in isolated rabbit hearts occurs predominantly through smooth bifurcation.

  5. Learning from feedback training data at a self-paced brain-computer interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haihong; Liyanage, Sidath Ravindra; Wang, Chuanchu; Guan, Cuntai

    2011-08-01

    Inherent changes that appear in brain signals when transferring from calibration to feedback sessions are a challenging but critical issue in brain-computer interface (BCI) applications. While previous studies have mostly focused on the adaptation of classifiers, in this paper we study the feasibility and the importance of the adaptation of feature extraction in a self-paced BCI paradigm. First, we conduct calibration and feedback training on able-bodied naïve subjects using a new self-paced motor imagery BCI including the idle state. The online results suggest that the feature space constructed from calibration data may become ineffective during feedback sessions. Hence, we propose a new supervised method that learns from a feedback session to construct a more appropriate feature space, on the basis of the maximum mutual information principle between feedback signal, target signal and EEG. Specifically, we formulate the learning objective as maximizing a kernel-based mutual information estimate with respect to the spatial-spectral filtering parameters. We then derive a gradient-based optimization algorithm for the learning task. An experimental study is conducted using offline simulation. The results show that the proposed method is able to construct effective feature spaces to capture the discriminative information in feedback training data and, consequently, the prediction error can be significantly reduced using the new features.

  6. Constitutive innate immunity is a component of the pace-of-life syndrome in tropical birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irene Tieleman, B; Williams, Joseph B; Ricklefs, Robert E; Klasing, Kirk C

    2005-08-22

    We studied the relationship between one component of immune function and basal metabolic rate (BMR), an indicator of the 'pace-of-life syndrome', among 12 tropical bird species and among individuals of the tropical house wren (Troglodytes aedon), to gain insights into functional connections between life history and physiology. To assess constitutive innate immunity we introduced a new technique in the field of ecological and evolutionary immunology that quantifies the bactericidal activity of whole blood. This in vitro assay utilises a single blood sample to provide a functional, integrated measure of constitutive innate immunity. We found that the bactericidal activity of whole blood varied considerably among species and among individuals within a species. This variation was not correlated with body mass or whole-organism BMR. However, among species, bacteria killing activity was negatively correlated with mass-adjusted BMR, suggesting that species with a slower pace-of-life have evolved a more robust constitutive innate immune capability. Among individuals of a single species, the house wren, bacteria killing activity was positively correlated with mass-adjusted BMR, pointing to physiological differences in individual quality on which natural selection potentially could act.

  7. The Integration and Functional Evaluation of Rabbit Pacing Cells Transplanted into the Left Ventricular Free Wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhihui Zhang, Zhiyuan Song, Jun Cheng, Yaoming Nong, Lu Wei, Changhai Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the feasibility of cell transplantation to treat bradyarrhythmia, we analyzed the in vivo integration and pacing function after transplantation of mHCN4-modified rabbit bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs into the rabbit left ventricle free wall epicardium. In our investigation, we injected MSCs transduced with or without mHCN4 into the rabbit left ventricle free wall epicardium. Chemical ablation of the sinoatrial node was performed and bilateral vagus nerves were sequentially stimulated to observe premature left ventricular contraction or left ventricular rhythm. We found that the mHCN4-transduced MSC group had a significantly higher ventricular rate and a shorter QRS duration than that of the control and EGFP group. Furthermore, the mHCN4-transduced MSCs, but not the control cells, gradually adapted long-spindle morphology and became indistinguishable from adjacent ventricle myocytes. The modified MSCs showed pacing function approximately 1 week after transplantation and persisted at least 4 weeks after transplantation. In conclusion, a bradyarrhythmia model can be successfully established by chemical ablation of the sinoatrial node and sequential bilateral vagus nerve stimulation. The mHCN4-modified rabbit MSCs displayed evident dynamic morphology changes after being transplanted into rabbit left ventricle free wall epicardium. Our studies may provide a promising strategy of using modified stem cell transplantation to treat bradyarrhythmia.

  8. Continuous renal replacement therapy. Keeping pace with changes in technology and technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Ian

    2002-01-01

    The rapidly changing nature of new technologies and techniques in acute health care means it can be difficult keeping pace. Most facilities, large or small, are usually in continuous evaluation of a new technology. Published reviews and professional group guidelines can assist the process of change for continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) technologies and techniques. The current techniques and technologies are a mixed application of old and new technologies providing a combination of convective and diffusive solute clearance methods. There are a variety of anticoagulation approaches. New, purpose-built CRRT machines offer many advantages over old technology but their costs can be prohibitive and users do not always meet them with rapid behavioral change. Reading journal publications and texts, scientific meetings, education and training, Internet web site review/participation, quality improvement activities and an accurate local data base are the keys to keeping pace with changes and identifying whether a benefit can be anticipated and demonstrated. Possible changes for the future of techniques and technologies may be in the areas of modified approaches to continuous therapy with tailored approaches for specific patient care settings. Improved membrane characteristics for wider indications and the bio-artificial kidney are emerging along with blood pump and circuit design improvements, with new machine/operator interfaces.

  9. The Self-Paced Graz Brain-Computer Interface: Methods and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinhold Scherer

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the self-paced 3-class Graz brain-computer interface (BCI which is based on the detection of sensorimotor electroencephalogram (EEG rhythms induced by motor imagery. Self-paced operation means that the BCI is able to determine whether the ongoing brain activity is intended as control signal (intentional control or not (non-control state. The presented system is able to automatically reduce electrooculogram (EOG artifacts, to detect electromyographic (EMG activity, and uses only three bipolar EEG channels. Two applications are presented: the freeSpace virtual environment (VE and the Brainloop interface. The freeSpace is a computer-game-like application where subjects have to navigate through the environment and collect coins by autonomously selecting navigation commands. Three subjects participated in these feedback experiments and each learned to navigate through the VE and collect coins. Two out of the three succeeded in collecting all three coins. The Brainloop interface provides an interface between the Graz-BCI and Google Earth.

  10. A Combination of Pre- and Postprocessing Techniques to Enhance Self-Paced BCIs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raheleh Mohammadi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mental task onset detection from the continuous electroencephalogram (EEG in real time is a critical issue in self-paced brain computer interface (BCI design. The paper shows that self-paced BCI performance can be significantly improved by combining a range of simple techniques including (1 constant-Q filters with varying bandwidth size depending on the center frequency, instead of constant bandwidth filters for frequency decomposition of the EEG signal in the 6 to 36 Hz band; (2 subject-specific postprocessing parameter optimization consisting of dwell time and threshold, and (3 debiasing before postprocessing by readjusting the classification output based on the current and previous brain states, to reduce the number of false detections. This debiasing block is shown to be optimal when activated only in special cases which are predetermined during the training phase. Analysis of the data recorded from seven subjects executing foot movement shows a statistically significant 10% ( average improvement in true positive rate (TPR and a 1% reduction in false positive rate (FPR detections compared with previous work on the same data.

  11. Metabolic rate covaries with fitness and the pace of the life history in the field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettersen, Amanda K; White, Craig R; Marshall, Dustin J

    2016-05-25

    Metabolic rate reflects the 'pace of life' in every organism. Metabolic rate is related to an organism's capacity for essential maintenance, growth and reproduction-all of which interact to affect fitness. Although thousands of measurements of metabolic rate have been made, the microevolutionary forces that shape metabolic rate remain poorly resolved. The relationship between metabolic rate and components of fitness are often inconsistent, possibly because these fitness components incompletely map to actual fitness and often negatively covary with each other. Here we measure metabolic rate across ontogeny and monitor its effects on actual fitness (lifetime reproductive output) for a marine bryozoan in the field. We also measure key components of fitness throughout the entire life history including growth rate, longevity and age at the onset of reproduction. We found that correlational selection favours individuals with higher metabolic rates in one stage and lower metabolic rates in the other-individuals with similar metabolic rates in each developmental stage displayed the lowest fitness. Furthermore, individuals with the lowest metabolic rates lived for longer and reproduced more, but they also grew more slowly and took longer to reproduce initially. That metabolic rate is related to the pace of the life history in nature has long been suggested by macroevolutionary patterns but this study reveals the microevolutionary processes that probably generated these patterns.

  12. A 'slow pace of life' in Australian old-endemic passerine birds is not accompanied by low basal metabolic rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bech, Claus; Chappell, Mark A; Astheimer, Lee B; Londoño, Gustavo A; Buttemer, William A

    2016-05-01

    Life history theory suggests that species experiencing high extrinsic mortality rates allocate more resources toward reproduction relative to self-maintenance and reach maturity earlier ('fast pace of life') than those having greater life expectancy and reproducing at a lower rate ('slow pace of life'). Among birds, many studies have shown that tropical species have a slower pace of life than temperate-breeding species. The pace of life has been hypothesized to affect metabolism and, as predicted, tropical birds have lower basal metabolic rates (BMR) than temperate-breeding birds. However, many temperate-breeding Australian passerines belong to lineages that evolved in Australia and share 'slow' life-history traits that are typical of tropical birds. We obtained BMR from 30 of these 'old-endemics' and ten sympatric species of more recently arrived passerine lineages (derived from Afro-Asian origins or introduced by Europeans) with 'faster' life histories. The BMR of 'slow' temperate-breeding old-endemics was indistinguishable from that of new-arrivals and was not lower than the BMR of 'fast' temperate-breeding non-Australian passerines. Old-endemics had substantially smaller clutches and longer maximal life spans in the wild than new arrivals, but neither clutch size nor maximum life span was correlated with BMR. Our results suggest that low BMR in tropical birds is not functionally linked to their 'slow pace of life' and instead may be a consequence of differences in annual thermal conditions experienced by tropical versus temperate species.

  13. Kinematics of the forefoot in the horizontal plane during progressive pace barefoot racewalking on a treadmill after aerobic exercise load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongzhao; Huo, Ming; An, Xiangde; Li, Yong; Onoda, Ko; Li, Desheng; Huang, Qiuchen; Chen, De; Yin, Lu; Maruyama, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to measure the changes in forefoot maximum medial/lateral rotation in the horizontal plane during progressive pace barefoot racewalking on a treadmill after a physically demanding aerobic exercise load (a fatigue protocol). [Subjects] Eleven junior racewalking men participated in this study. [Methods] To identify changes in forefoot maximum medial/lateral rotation in the horizontal plane after physically demanding aerobic exercise load, an 8 ch wireless Motion Recorder (MVP-RF8-BC) was utilized. [Results] Forefoot maximum medial/lateral rotation in the horizontal plane was significantly associated with increased paces during progressive pace treadmill racewalking. Significant increases in forefoot maximum medial/lateral rotation were observed during progressive pace barefoot racewalking on the instrumented treadmill at 8 km/h and 10 km/h after a physically demanding aerobic exercise load. [Conclusion] The findings of this study indicated that forefoot maximum medial/lateral rotation increased during progressive pace barefoot racewalking in the fatigue state after a physically demanding aerobic exercise load, which implies that the kinematic features of the forefoot are changed in the fatigue state.

  14. Direct left ventricular endocardial pacing: an alternative when traditional resynchronization via coronary sinus is not feasible or effective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriña-Vázquez, Pablo; Roa-Garrido, Jessica; Fernández-Gómez, Juan M; Venegas-Gamero, José; Pichardo, Rafael B; Carranza, Manuel H

    2013-06-01

    Biventricular pacing through the coronary sinus (CS) is effective for the treatment of patients with heart failure and left bundle-branch block. However, this approach is not always feasible. Although surgical epicardial lead implantation is an alternative, the technique may be deleterious in some patients. Thus, direct left ventricular (LV) endocardial pacing under local anesthesia may be an option. We describe our technique and analyze the results of direct LV endocardial pacing. Fourteen patients with failed resynchronization via CS (April 2006-September 2011) were selected. Using a femoral approach, we performed transseptal puncture and LV mapping, then fixed the active lead where the longest electrical delay was observed; the generator was placed in the anterior thigh. For resynchronization, eight patients with a device previously implanted through the upper veins received a single-chamber generator that was set to the VVT mode to sense the subclavian pacing spike. Six patients received a complete femoral resynchronization system with either a defibrillator or pacemaker. Patients were followed for 6-54 months. The LV lead was successfully implanted in all cases. Two patients experienced excessive bleeding and two died during follow-up. All except one improved at least one New York Heart Association class and experienced improved left ventricle ejection fraction. One patient with recurrent episodes of ventricular fibrillation was asymptomatic. Direct LV endocardial pacing is safe and may be a less risky, more efficient alternative than surgical epicardial lead implantation for resynchronization via CS. ©2013, The Authors. Journal compilation ©2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Speckle-tracking echocardiography elucidates the effect of pacing site on left ventricular synchronization in the normal and infarcted rat myocardium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Mor

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Right ventricular (RV pacing generates regional disparities in electrical activation and mechanical function (ventricular dyssynchrony. In contrast, left ventricular (LV or biventricular (BIV pacing can improve cardiac efficiency in the setting of ventricular dyssynchrony, constituting the rationale for cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT. Animal models of ventricular dyssynchrony and CRT currently relay on large mammals which are expensive and not readily available to most researchers. We developed a methodology for double-site epicardial pacing in conscious rats. Here, following post-operative recovery, we compared the effects of various pacing modes on LV dyssynchrony in normal rats and in rats with ischemic cardiomyopathy. METHODS: Two bipolar electrodes were implanted in rats as follows: Group A (n = 6 right atrial (RA and RV sites; Group B (n = 7 RV and LV sites; Group C (n = 8 as in group B in combination with left coronary artery ligation. Electrodes were exteriorized through the back. Following post-operative recovery, two-dimensional transthoracic echocardiography was performed during pacing through the different electrodes. Segmental systolic circumferential strain (Ecc was used to evaluate LV dyssynchrony. RESULTS: In normal rats, RV pacing induced marked LV dyssynchrony compared to RA pacing or sinus rhythm, as measured by the standard deviation (SD of segmental time to peak Ecc, SD of peak Ecc, and the average delay between opposing ventricular segments. LV pacing and, to a greater extend BIV pacing diminished the LV dyssynchrony compared to RV pacing. In rats with extensive MI, the effects of LV and BIV pacing were markedly attenuated, and the response of individual animals was variable. CONCLUSIONS: Rodent cardiac pacing mimics important features seen in humans. This model may be developed as a simple new tool to study the pathophysiology of ventricular dyssynchrony and CRT.

  16. University Internationalization and University Autonomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    Turcan and Gulieva deepen our theoretical understanding of the process of university internationalisation by exploring the relationship between university internationalisation and university autonomy. They conjecture that the process of university internationalisation and its sustainability are d......, dissimilar, and sometimes conflicting dimensions of the financial, legal, organisational, staffing, and academic autonomy of the host country, are compromising key aspects of their own autonomy and core mission?...

  17. Implantation of Lumenless Pacing Leads at the Inter-atrial Septum and Right Ventricular Outflow Tract with Deflectable Catheter-sheath

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rong BAI; Ruth KAM; Chi Keong CHING; Li Fern HSU; Wee Siong TEO

    2008-01-01

    Current permanent fight ventricular and fight atrial endocardial pacing leads are implanted utilizing a central lumen stylet. Right ventricular apex pacing initiates an abnormal asyno chronous electrical activation pattern, which results in asynchronous ventricular contraction and re-laxation. When pacing from right atrial appendage, the conduction time between two atria will be prolonged, which results in heterogeneity for both depolarization and repolarization. Six patients with Class Ⅰ indication for permanent pacing were implanted with either single chamber or dual chamber pacemaker. The SelectSecure 3830 4-French (Fr) lumenless lead and the SelectSite C304 8.5-Fr steerable catheter-sheath (Medtronic Inc., USA) were used. Pre-selected pacing sites included inter-atrial septum and right ventricular outflow tract, which were defined by ECG and fluoroscopic criteria. All the implanting procedures were successful without complication. Testing results (mean atrial pacing threshold: 0.87 V; mean P wave amplitude: 2.28 mV; mean ventricular pacing threshold:0.53V; mean R wave amplitude: 8.75 mV) were satisfactory. It is concluded that implantation of a 4-Fr lumenless pacing lead by using a streerable catheter-sheath to achieve inter-atrial septum or right ventricular outflow tract pacing is safe and feasible.

  18. Environmental effects on the behavior of zoo-housed lions and tigers, with a case study of the effects of a visual barrier on pacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashaw, Meredith J; Kelling, Angela S; Bloomsmith, Mollie A; Maple, Terry L

    2007-01-01

    Tigers and lions in the wild are nocturnal nonhuman animals who may hunt and mate opportunistically during daylight hours. In captivity, they spend most time on exhibit sleeping or pacing. To better understand their activity budget, this study examined the daily behavior patterns of 2 Sumatran tigers and 3 African lions in different housings. The proportion of scans the large felids spent engaged in stereotypic pacing varied by time of day and environment. The tigers spent different amounts of time pacing when housed in different exhibits; the lions paced more in off-exhibit housing than when on exhibit. These differences suggest changes to the cats' immediate housing environment may decrease pacing but provide little insight into altering specifics. Carnivores' pacing relates to their inability to control sensory access to social partners. Both environments with increased pacing contained chain-link fencing. allowing uncontrolled sensory contact. Where the tigers paced, the study placed a visual barrier between one female and keepers' or conspecifics' cues. This did not significantly decrease pacing. However, the study suggests considering sensory access and environmental variables when designing environments for captive carnivores.

  19. Immune investment is explained by sexual selection and pace-of-life, but not longevity in parrots (Psittaciformes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darryl B Edwards

    Full Text Available Investment in current reproduction should come at the expense of traits promoting future reproduction, such as immunity and longevity. To date, comparative studies of pace-of-life traits have provided some support for this, with slower paced species having greater immune function. Another means of investment in current reproduction is through secondary sexual characters (SSC. Investment in SSC's is considered costly, both in terms of immunity and longevity, with greater costs being borne by species with more elaborate traits. Yet within species, females prefer more ornate males and those males are typically immunologically superior. Because of this, predictions about the relationship between immunity and SSC's across species are not clear. If traits are costly, brighter species should have reduced immune function, but the opposite is true if SSC's arise from selection for more immunocompetent individuals. My approach was to investigate immune investment in relation to SSC's, pace-of-life and longevity while considering potentially confounding ecological factors. To do so I assessed leukocyte counts from in a novel group, the Psittaciformes. Investment in SSC's best explained investment in immunity: species with brighter plumage had higher leukocyte counts and those with a greater degree of sexual dichromatism had fewer. Ecological variables and pace-of-life models tended to be poor predictors of immune investment. However, shorter incubation periods were associated with lower leukocyte counts supporting the notion that species with a fast pace-of-life invest less in immunity. These results suggest that investment in reproduction in terms of fast pace-of-life and sexual dichromatism results in reduced immunity; however, investment in plumage colour per se does not impose a cost on immunity across species.

  20. Immune investment is explained by sexual selection and pace-of-life, but not longevity in parrots (Psittaciformes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Darryl B

    2012-01-01

    Investment in current reproduction should come at the expense of traits promoting future reproduction, such as immunity and longevity. To date, comparative studies of pace-of-life traits have provided some support for this, with slower paced species having greater immune function. Another means of investment in current reproduction is through secondary sexual characters (SSC). Investment in SSC's is considered costly, both in terms of immunity and longevity, with greater costs being borne by species with more elaborate traits. Yet within species, females prefer more ornate males and those males are typically immunologically superior. Because of this, predictions about the relationship between immunity and SSC's across species are not clear. If traits are costly, brighter species should have reduced immune function, but the opposite is true if SSC's arise from selection for more immunocompetent individuals. My approach was to investigate immune investment in relation to SSC's, pace-of-life and longevity while considering potentially confounding ecological factors. To do so I assessed leukocyte counts from in a novel group, the Psittaciformes. Investment in SSC's best explained investment in immunity: species with brighter plumage had higher leukocyte counts and those with a greater degree of sexual dichromatism had fewer. Ecological variables and pace-of-life models tended to be poor predictors of immune investment. However, shorter incubation periods were associated with lower leukocyte counts supporting the notion that species with a fast pace-of-life invest less in immunity. These results suggest that investment in reproduction in terms of fast pace-of-life and sexual dichromatism results in reduced immunity; however, investment in plumage colour per se does not impose a cost on immunity across species.

  1. Application synergies between the NASA Pre- Aerosol Cloud and ocean Ecosystem (PACE) and Hyperspectral Infrared Imager (HyspIRI) missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C. M.; Omar, A. H.; Hook, S. J.; Tzortziou, M.; Luvall, J. C.; Turner, W. W.

    2016-02-01

    Observations from the Pre-Aerosol Cloud and ocean Ecosystem (PACE) and Hyperspectral InfraRed Imager (HyspIRI) satellite missions are highly complementary and have the potential to significantly advance understanding of various science and applications challenges in the ocean sciences and water quality communities. Scheduled for launch in the 2022 timeframe, PACE is designed to make climate-quality global measurements essential for understanding ocean biology, biogeochemistry and ecology, and determining the role of the ocean in global biogeochemical cycling and ocean ecology, and how it affects and is affected by climate change. PACE will provide high signal-to-noise, hyperspectral observations over an extended spectral range (UV to SWIR) and will have global coverage every 1-2 days, at approximately 1 km spatial resolution; furthermore, PACE is currently designed to include a polarimeter, which will vastly improve atmospheric correction algorithms over water bodies. The PACE mission will enable advances in applications across a range of areas, including oceans, climate, water resources, ecological forecasting, disasters, human health and air quality. HyspIRI, with contiguous measurements in VSWIR, and multispectral measurements in TIR, will be able to provide detailed spectral observations and higher spatial resolution (30 to 60-m) over aquatic systems, but at a temporal resolution that is approximately 5-16 days. HyspIRI would enable improved, detailed studies of aquatic ecosystems, including benthic communities, algal blooms, coral reefs, and wetland species distribution as well as studies of water quality indicators or pollutants such as oil spills, suspended sediment, and colored dissolved organic matter. Together, PACE and HyspIRI will be able to address numerous applications and science priorities, including improving and extending climate data records, and studies of inland, coastal and ocean environments.

  2. Large animal model of functional tricuspid regurgitation in pacing induced end-stage heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinowski, Marcin; Proudfoot, Alistair G; Langholz, David; Eberhart, Lenora; Brown, Michael; Schubert, Hans; Wodarek, Jeremy; Timek, Tomasz A

    2017-06-01

    Functional tricuspid regurgitation (FTR) is common in patients with advanced heart failure and frequently complicates left ventricular assist device implantation yet remains poorly understood. We set out to establish large animal model of FTR that could serve as a research platform to investigate the pathogenesis of FTR associated with end-stage heart failure. : Through right thoracotomy, ten adult sheep underwent implantation of pacemaker with epicardial LV lead, five sonomicrometry crystals on the right ventricle, and left and right ventricular telemetry pressure sensors during a beating heart off-pump procedure. After 5 ± 1 days of recovery, baseline haemodynamic, echocardiographic and sonomicrometry data were collected. Animals were paced thereafter at a rate of 220-240 beats/min until the development of heart failure and concomitant tricuspid regurgitation. : Three animals died during early recovery period and one during the pacing phase. Six surviving animals were paced for a mean of 14 ± 5 days. Cardiac function was significantly depressed compared to baseline, with LV ejection fraction falling from 69 ± 2% to 22 ± 4% ( P  < 0.001) and RV fractional area change from 52 ± 11% to 25 ± 9% ( P  = 0.005). All animals developed significant enlargement of tricuspid annulus (from 29.5 ± 1.6 to 36.5 ± 4.5 mm; P  = 0.01) and right ventricle (from 21.9 ± 0.2 to 30.3 ± 0.6 mm; P  = 0.03). Sonomicrometry derived contractility of RV free wall was depressed and at least moderate tricuspid insufficiency developed in all animals. : Biventricular dysfunction, tricuspid annular dilatation and significant FTR were observed in our model of ovine tachycardia induced cardiomyopathy. This animal model reflects the clinical situation of end-stage heart failure patients presenting for mechanical support.

  3. Oxford and Cambridge Boat Race: Performance, Pacing and Tactics Between 1890 and 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Andrew M; Guy, Joshua H; Hettinga, Florentina J

    2016-10-01

    Currently no studies have examined the historical performances of Oxford and Cambridge Boat Race crews in the context of performance, pacing and tactics which is surprising as the event has routinely taken place annually for over 150 years on the same course. The purpose of this study was twofold, to firstly examine the historical development of performances and physical characteristics of crews over 124 years of the Oxford and Cambridge Boat Race between 1890 and 2014 and secondly to investigate the pacing and tactics employed by crews over that period. Linear regression modelling was applied to investigate the development of performance and body size for crews of eight male individuals over time from Boat Race archive data. Performance change over time was further assessed in 10-year clusters while four intra-race checkpoints were used to examine pacing and tactics. Significant correlations were observed between performance and time (1890-2014) for both Oxford (r = -0.67; p Cambridge (r = -0.64; p Cambridge (1168 ± 89.8 s) during 1890-2014. Crew performance times improved over time with significant gains from baseline achieved in the 1950s (Cambridge) and the 1960s (Oxford), which coincided with significant change in the physicality of the competing crews (p < 0.01). There was no tactical advantage from commencing on either the Surrey or Middlesex station beyond chance alone; however, all crews (n = 228) adopted a fast-start strategy, with 81 % of victories achieved by the crew leading the race at the first intra-race checkpoint (24 % of total distance). Crews leading the race at the final checkpoint (83 % of total distance; 1143 m) achieved victory on 94 % of occasions. Performances and physical characteristics of the crews have changed markedly since 1890, with faster heavier crews now common. Tactically, gaining the early lead position with a fast-start strategy seems particularly meaningful to success in the Boat Race throughout the years

  4. Deceptive manipulation of competitive starting strategies influences subsequent pacing, physiological status and perceptual responses during cycling time trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily L Williams

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Little is currently known regarding competitor influence on pacing at the start of an event and in particular the subsequent effect on the remaining distance. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the influence of starting pace on the physiological and psychological responses during cycling time trials (TT utilising an innovative approach allowing pace to be accurately and dynamically replicated, as well as deceptively manipulated. Ten competitive male cyclists completed five 16.1 km TT, two baseline trials performed alone (BLs, and three with a simulated, dynamic avatar of which they were to match the pace of for the initial 4 km. The avatar represented either the cyclist’s fastest BL performance (NORM, 105% (FAST, or 95% (SLOW, of fastest BL performance (FBL. Physiological and psychological responses were measured every quartile of the TT. Despite manipulating a starting speed of ± 5% of fastest previous performance, there was no effect on overall 16.1 km TT performance. Manipulated starting strategies did however evoke different physiological and perceptual responses. Whole trial differences found that SLOW produced lower HR, VO2, BLa and RPE than FBL (p ≤ 0.03 and higher SE than FAST (p ≤ 0.03. Additionally, FAST had greater internal attention than NORM (p < 0.04. Over time all psychological and physiological variables had a significant condition x quartile interaction in the initial or second quartile mediated by the prescribed starting strategies. Furthermore, RPE, affect and internal attention remained elevated throughout FAST despite an attenuation in pace during self-selection of pace. There were no differences in performance time when manipulating a 16.1km cycling TT starting strategy. A slow start, encouraged greater positive perceptions, less negative physiological consequences than a faster start, and produces no impairment to performance time. It would therefore be considered an advantage in a non

  5. [Despite medication, overdrive pacing is required to stabilize the electrical storm associated with acute coronary syndrome: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umeda, Masanobu; Morimoto, Atsushi; Yokoyama, Kaori; Tateishi, Emi; Makino, Kanako; Yamamoto, Kazuo; Nakagawa, Yoko; Fukuhara, Shinya; Takase, Eiji

    2007-10-01

    A 75-year-old female complained of severe chest pain and was emergently admitted to our hospital because of anterior acute myocardial infarction. Emergent coronary angiography was performed and revealed occlusion in segment 7, so a stent was implanted. Lidocaine, carvedilol, amiodarone, magnesium, and nifekalant were administered successively because non-sustained ventricular tachycardia (NSVT) frequently appeared like an electrical storm. After nifekalant administration, QTc was significantly prolonged and torsades de pointes was induced. Overdrive pacing was performed and finally the NSVT was completely controlled. If fatal arrhythmias such as NSVT show resistance to medication, overdrive pacing should be considered to stabilize the arrhythmia associated with acute coronary syndrome.

  6. High pacing rates for management of aortic insufficiency after balloon aortic valvuloplasty or transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Omar; Salinger, Michael H; Levisay, Justin P; Feldman, Ted

    2014-01-01

    Aortic insufficiency (AI) after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is difficult to manage when associated with congestive heart failure. AI after balloon aortic valvuloplasty (BAV) may be catastrophic, especially in patients who are not candidates for TAVR. We describe the use of urgent temporary pacing, followed by permanent pacing, to increase the heart rate to diminish diastolic filling time for the short term management of AI after BAV or TAVR. The strategy is particularly useful in patients who already have permanent pacemakers, which are common in this population.

  7. Comparison of adaptive pacing therapy, cognitive behaviour therapy, graded exercise therapy, and specialist medical care for chronic fatigue syndrome (PACE): a randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, P D; Goldsmith, K A; Johnson, A L; Potts, L; Walwyn, R; DeCesare, J C; Baber, H L; Burgess, M; Clark, L V; Cox, D L; Bavinton, J; Angus, B J; Murphy, G; Murphy, M; O'Dowd, H; Wilks, D; McCrone, P; Chalder, T; Sharpe, M

    2011-03-05

    Trial findings show cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) and graded exercise therapy (GET) can be effective treatments for chronic fatigue syndrome, but patients' organisations have reported that these treatments can be harmful and favour pacing and specialist health care. We aimed to assess effectiveness and safety of all four treatments. In our parallel-group randomised trial, patients meeting Oxford criteria for chronic fatigue syndrome were recruited from six secondary-care clinics in the UK and randomly allocated by computer-generated sequence to receive specialist medical care (SMC) alone or with adaptive pacing therapy (APT), CBT, or GET. Primary outcomes were fatigue (measured by Chalder fatigue questionnaire score) and physical function (measured by short form-36 subscale score) up to 52 weeks after randomisation, and safety was assessed primarily by recording all serious adverse events, including serious adverse reactions to trial treatments. Primary outcomes were rated by participants, who were necessarily unmasked to treatment assignment; the statistician was masked to treatment assignment for the analysis of primary outcomes. We used longitudinal regression models to compare SMC alone with other treatments, APT with CBT, and APT with GET. The final analysis included all participants for whom we had data for primary outcomes. This trial is registered at http://isrctn.org, number ISRCTN54285094. We recruited 641 eligible patients, of whom 160 were assigned to the APT group, 161 to the CBT group, 160 to the GET group, and 160 to the SMC-alone group. Compared with SMC alone, mean fatigue scores at 52 weeks were 3·4 (95% CI 1·8 to 5·0) points lower for CBT (p = 0·0001) and 3·2 (1·7 to 4·8) points lower for GET (p = 0·0003), but did not differ for APT (0·7 [-0·9 to 2·3] points lower; p = 0·38). Compared with SMC alone, mean physical function scores were 7·1 (2·0 to 12·1) points higher for CBT (p = 0·0068) and 9·4 (4·4 to 14·4) points higher

  8. Stanford University

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李琳

    2007-01-01

    The Leland Stanford Junior University,commonly known as Stanford University (or simply Stanford),is a private university located approximately 37 miles (60 kilometers) southeast of San Francisco and approximately 20 miles northwest of San Joséin an unincorporated area of Santa Clara County.Situated adjacent to the city of Palo Alto,California,Stanford lies at the heart of the Silicon Valley,both geographically and historically.

  9. Activity Pacing Self-Management in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kos, Daphne; van Eupen, Inge; Meirte, Jill; Van Cauwenbergh, Deborah; Moorkens, Greta; Meeus, Mira; Nijs, Jo

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of an activity pacing self-management (APSM) intervention in improving performance of daily life activities in women with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). A total of 33 women with CFS (age 41.1±11.2 yr) were randomly allocated to APSM (experimental group; n=16) or relaxation (control group; n=17). Main outcome measures included the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM; primary) and Checklist Individual Strength (CIS). COPM scores changed significantly over time in both groups (p=.03). The change in Satisfaction scores showed a significant difference in favor only of APSM (effect size=0.74 [0.11, 1.4]). CIS scores decreased significantly in the experimental group only (peffective in optimizing participation in desired daily life activities in women with CFS. Replication in a larger sample with long-term follow-up is required. Copyright © 2015 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.

  10. Task-Difficulty Homeostasis in Car Following Models: Experimental Validation Using Self-Paced Visual Occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekkanen, Jami; Lappi, Otto; Itkonen, Teemu H; Summala, Heikki

    2017-01-01

    Car following (CF) models used in traffic engineering are often criticized for not incorporating "human factors" well known to affect driving. Some recent work has addressed this by augmenting the CF models with the Task-Capability Interface (TCI) model, by dynamically changing driving parameters as function of driver capability. We examined assumptions of these models experimentally using a self-paced visual occlusion paradigm in a simulated car following task. The results show strong, approximately one-to-one, correspondence between occlusion duration and increase in time headway. The correspondence was found between subjects and within subjects, on aggregate and individual sample level. The long time scale aggregate results support TCI-CF models that assume a linear increase in time headway in response to increased distraction. The short time scale individual sample level results suggest that drivers also adapt their visual sampling in response to transient changes in time headway, a mechanism which isn't incorporated in the current models.

  11. Rapid ventricular pacing for a basilar artery pseudoaneurysm in a pediatric patient: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimjee, Shahid M; Smith, Tony P; Kanter, Ronald J; Ames, Warwick; Machovec, Kelly A; Grant, Gerald A; Zomorodi, Ali R

    2015-06-01

    Large cerebral aneurysms of the basilar apex are difficult to treat. Recently, endovascular treatment has mitigated much of the morbidity associated with treating these lesions. However, the morphology of aneurysms of the vertebrobasilar system can preclude endovascular treatment. Rapid ventricular pacing (RVP) facilitates open surgical treatment of cerebral aneurysms. It can assist in reducing the pressure of the neck of the aneurysm, allowing safe application of a clip. The authors present a case of a pediatric patient who developed a basilar artery pseudoaneurysm that required surgery. Given the large size of the aneurysm, RVP was performed, allowing the surgeons to dissect the dome of the aneurysm from the surrounding tissue and pontine perforating branches away from the lesion to safely clip the lesion. The patient had an uneventful recovery. To the authors' knowledge, this represents the first known case of RVP to aid in basilar artery clip occlusion in a pediatric patient.

  12. Entrepreneurial Call for Strategic Agility in Fast-Paced Business Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arslan Ayub

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The 21st century came with blending of threats and opportunities of deep-rooted obstructions of fast-paced business environment. Research on strategic management has consequently increased and grabbed the attention of both academicians and strategic policy makers. The current study is therefore directed to analyze the multifaceted influence of entrepreneurial orientation on strategic agility and organizational performance. The study uses exploratory approach; primary data is collected from 323 professional working in private sectors in twin cities of Islamabad and Rawalpindi, Pakistan. The study found significantly positive relationship between entrepreneurial orientation and strategic agility, entrepreneurial orientation and organizational performance, and strategic agility and organizational performance. The study discusses important implications regarding entrepreneurs‘ deployment of entrepreneurial orientation and strategic agility for enhancing organizational performance.

  13. Monitoring physicians' prescription patterns on electronic health record: the prescription pattern around clinical event (PACE) algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Dukyong; Park, Inwhee; Park, Man Young; Hong, Seung Kwon; Park, Rae Woong

    2013-01-01

    Electronic health records (EHRs) have gained attention as a valuable data source for medical research, as its adoption rate continues to rise. However, no method for the monitoring of physicians' prescription patterns has been established. Since EHR maintain all prescription data as well as clinical events that occur during the care of patients, we hypothesized that a physician's prescription pattern can be monitored from EHR. In this study, we developed a novel algorithm named PACE, Prescription pattern Around Clinical Event. This algorithm analyzes distribution of the prescription of specific drugs around the time of a clinical event. In the proof of concept study, prescription changes with regard to hyperkalemia were well represented by the algorithm, and the observed patterns well correlated with the physician's knowledge on hyperkalemia (Cohen's kappa, 0.457-0.653). We expect that this algorithm can be used to monitor the guideline adherence of physicians.

  14. Los bonos educativos en el programa Paces en Colombia, 1992-1998: una experiencia fallida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piedad Patricia Restrepo

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Esta investigación muestra que, a través de un análisis del diseño institucional e implementación, el programa de bonos educativos Paces en Colombia, en el periodo 1992-1998, estuvo lejos de cumplir sus objetivos de corto y largo plazo. La no inclusión dentro del valor del bono del costo de oportunidad por los ingresos laborales perdidos, la escasa regulación y monitoreo de los colegios participantes, en especial de aquellos que surgieron a raíz del programa, son algunos de los factores que incidieron en sus resultados. Al final, se presentan algunas propuestas para mejorar el diseño de este tipo de programas que permitan alcanzar los objetivos planteados en cuanto a cobertura, calidad y equidad.

  15. Rising to the challenge: accelerated pace of discovery transforms marine virology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brum, Jennifer R; Sullivan, Matthew B

    2015-03-01

    Marine viruses have important roles in microbial mortality, gene transfer, metabolic reprogramming and biogeochemical cycling. In this Review, we discuss recent technological advances in marine virology including the use of near-quantitative, reproducible metagenomics for large-scale investigation of viral communities and the emergence of gene-based viral ecology. We also describe the reprogramming of microbially driven processes by viral metabolic genes, the identification of novel viruses using cultivation-dependent and cultivation-independent tools, and the potential for modelling studies to provide a framework for studying virus-host interactions. These transformative advances have set a rapid pace in exploring and predicting how marine viruses manipulate and respond to their environment.

  16. Self-pacing direct memory access data transfer operations for compute nodes in a parallel computer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blocksome, Michael A

    2015-02-17

    Methods, apparatus, and products are disclosed for self-pacing DMA data transfer operations for nodes in a parallel computer that include: transferring, by an origin DMA on an origin node, a RTS message to a target node, the RTS message specifying an message on the origin node for transfer to the target node; receiving, in an origin injection FIFO for the origin DMA from a target DMA on the target node in response to transferring the RTS message, a target RGET descriptor followed by a DMA transfer operation descriptor, the DMA descriptor for transmitting a message portion to the target node, the target RGET descriptor specifying an origin RGET descriptor on the origin node that specifies an additional DMA descriptor for transmitting an additional message portion to the target node; processing, by the origin DMA, the target RGET descriptor; and processing, by the origin DMA, the DMA transfer operation descriptor.

  17. The pace of plant community change is accelerating in remnant prairies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alstad, Amy O; Damschen, Ellen I; Givnish, Thomas J; Harrington, John A; Leach, Mark K; Rogers, David A; Waller, Donald M

    2016-02-01

    Patterns of biodiversity are changing rapidly. "Legacy studies" use historical data to document changes between past and present communities, revealing long-term trends that can often be linked to particular drivers of ecological change. However, a single pair of historical samples cannot ascertain whether rates of change are consistent or whether the impact and identity of drivers have shifted. Using data from a second resurvey of 47 Wisconsin prairie remnants, we show that the pace of community change has increased with shifts in the strength of particular drivers. Annual rates of local colonization and extinction accelerated by 129 and 214%, respectively, between 1950 and 1987 and between 1987 and 2012. Two anthropogenic drivers-patch area and fire history-increased in importance between these periods. As the strength and number of anthropogenic forces increase, rates of biodiversity change are likely to accelerate in other ecosystems as well.

  18. Tooth microstructure tracks the pace of human life-history evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher Dean, M

    2006-11-22

    A number of fundamental milestones define the pace at which animals develop, mature, reproduce and age. These include the length of gestation, the age at weaning and at sexual maturity, the number of offspring produced over a lifetime and the length of life itself. Because a time-scale for dental development can be retrieved from the internal structure of teeth and many of these life-history variables tend to be highly correlated, we can discover more than might be imagined about fossil primates and more, in particular, about fossil hominids and our own evolutionary history. Some insights into the evolutionary processes underlying changes in dental development are emerging from a better understanding of the mechanisms controlling enamel and dentine formation. Our own 18-20-year period of growth and development probably evolved quite recently after ca 17 million years of a more ape-like life-history profile.

  19. Do changes in the pace of events affect one-off judgments of duration?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah M Darlow

    Full Text Available Five experiments examined whether changes in the pace of external events influence people's judgments of duration. In Experiments 1a-1c, participants heard pieces of music whose tempo accelerated, decelerated, or remained constant. In Experiment 2, participants completed a visuo-motor task in which the rate of stimulus presentation accelerated, decelerated, or remained constant. In Experiment 3, participants completed a reading task in which facts appeared on-screen at accelerating, decelerating, or constant rates. In all experiments, the physical duration of the to-be-judged interval was the same across conditions. We found no significant effects of temporal structure on duration judgments in any of the experiments, either when participants knew that a time estimate would be required (prospective judgments or when they did not (retrospective judgments. These results provide a starting point for the investigation of how temporal structure affects one-off judgments of duration like those typically made in natural settings.

  20. Social Class, Gender and the Pace of Academic Life: What Kind of Solution is Slow?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather Mendick

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available My starting point for this article is the increasing pace of academic life. As the other articles in this special section evidence, the Slow movement, which seeks to challenge our contemporary obsession with speed, is being taken up by many in order to intervene into "fast academia". However, in this article, I suggest we should pause and question what kind of a solution this offers to the current crisis of speed. Working auto/biographically and using examples drawn from popular culture, I argue that Slow is both classed and gendered, re/producing wider patterns of inclusion and exclusion. Specifically, I suggest that Slow naturalises a particular relationship to self which requires not just stability of employment but an individualist way of being, constituting selves that calculate and invest in them-selves for the future. URN: http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs140374

  1. Increases in myocardial workload induced by rapid atrial pacing trigger alterations in global metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aslan T Turer

    Full Text Available To determine whether increases in cardiac work lead to alterations in the plasma metabolome and whether such changes arise from the heart or peripheral organs.There is growing evidence that the heart influences systemic metabolism through endocrine effects and affecting pathways involved in energy homeostasis.Nineteen patients referred for cardiac catheterization were enrolled. Peripheral and selective coronary sinus (CS blood sampling was performed at serial timepoints following the initiation of pacing, and metabolite profiling was performed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS.Pacing-stress resulted in a 225% increase in the median rate·pressure product from baseline. Increased myocardial work induced significant changes in the peripheral concentration of 43 of 125 metabolites assayed, including large changes in purine [adenosine (+99%, p = 0.006, ADP (+42%, p = 0.01, AMP (+79%, p = 0.004, GDP (+69%, p = 0.003, GMP (+58%, p = 0.01, IMP (+50%, p = 0.03, xanthine (+61%, p = 0.0006], and several bile acid metabolites. The CS changes in metabolites qualitatively mirrored those in the peripheral blood in both timing and magnitude, suggesting the heart was not the major source of the metabolite release.Isolated increases in myocardial work can induce changes in the plasma metabolome, but these changes do not appear to be directly cardiac in origin. A number of these dynamic metabolites have known signaling functions. Our study provides additional evidence to a growing body of literature on metabolic 'cross-talk' between the heart and other organs.

  2. Functional remodeling of Ca2+-activated Cl- channel in pacing induced canine failing heart

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ning Li; Kejuan Ma; Siyong Teng; Jonathan C.Makielski; Jielin Pu

    2008-01-01

    Objective To determine whether Ca2+ activated Cl- current(Icl(Ca)) contributes to the functional remodeling of the failing heart.Methods Whole cell patch-clamp recording technique was employed to record the Icl(Ca) in cardiac myocytes enzymatically isolatedfrom rapidly pacing induced canine failing hearts at room temperature and compared that of the normal hearts (Nor).Results Thecurrent density of DIDS(200M)sensitive Icl(Ca) induced by intracellular Ca2+ release trigged by L-type Ca2+ current(Ica,L)wassignificantly decreased in heart failare(HE)cells compared to Nor cells.At membrane voltage of 20mV,the Icl(Ca) density was 3.02±0.54 pA/pF in Nor(n=6)vs.1.31±0.25 pA/pF in HF(n=8)cells,(P<0.01),while the averaged Ica,L density did not show differencebetween two groups.The time constant of current decay of Icl(Ca) was similar in both types of cells.On the other hand,in intra cellularCa2+ clamped mode,where the[Ca2+];was maintained at 100nmol/L,Icl(Ca) density be increased significantly in HF cells when themembrane voltage at+30mV or higher.Conclusions Our results suggest that Icl(Ca) density was decreased in pacing induced failingheart but the channel function be enhanced.Impaired Ca2+ handing in HF cells rather than reduced,Icl(Ca) channel function itself may havecaused this abnormality.The Icl(Ca) density reduction might contribute to the prolongation of action potential in failing heart.The Icl(Ca)channel function up-rugulation is likely to cause cardiac arrhythmia by inducing a delayed after depolarization,when Ca2+ overloadoccurred in diastolic failing heart cells.

  3. BK channels regulate sinoatrial node firing rate and cardiac pacing in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Michael H; Wu, Yuejin; Gao, Zhan; Anderson, Mark E; Dalziel, Julie E; Meredith, Andrea L

    2014-11-01

    Large-conductance Ca(2+)- and voltage-activated K(+) (BK) channels play prominent roles in shaping muscle and neuronal excitability. In the cardiovascular system, BK channels promote vascular relaxation and protect against ischemic injury. Recently, inhibition of BK channels has been shown to lower heart rate in intact rodents and isolated hearts, suggesting a novel role in heart function. However, the underlying mechanism is unclear. In the present study, we recorded ECGs from mice injected with paxilline (PAX), a membrane-permeable BK channel antagonist, and examined changes in cardiac conduction. ECGs revealed a 19 ± 4% PAX-induced reduction in heart rate in wild-type but not BK channel knockout (Kcnma1(-/-)) mice. The heart rate decrease was associated with slowed cardiac pacing due to elongation of the sinus interval. Action potential firing recorded from isolated sinoatrial node cells (SANCs) was reduced by 55 ± 15% and 28 ± 9% by application of PAX (3 μM) and iberiotoxin (230 nM), respectively. Furthermore, baseline firing rates from Kcnma1(-/-) SANCs were 33% lower than wild-type SANCs. The slowed firing upon BK current inhibition or genetic deletion was due to lengthening of the diastolic depolarization phase of the SANC action potential. Finally, BK channel immunoreactivity and PAX-sensitive currents were identified in SANCs with HCN4 expression and pacemaker current, respectively, and BK channels cloned from SANCs recapitulated similar activation as the PAX-sensitive current. Together, these data localize BK channels to SANCs and demonstrate that loss of BK current decreases SANC automaticity, consistent with slowed sinus pacing after PAX injection in vivo. Furthermore, these findings suggest BK channels are potential therapeutic targets for disorders of heart rate.

  4. Faster self-paced rate of drinking for alcohol mixed with energy drinks versus alcohol alone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marczinski, Cecile A; Fillmore, Mark T; Maloney, Sarah F; Stamates, Amy L

    2017-03-01

    The consumption of alcohol mixed with energy drinks (AmED) has been associated with higher rates of binge drinking and impaired driving when compared with alcohol alone. However, it remains unclear why the risks of use of AmED are heightened compared with alcohol alone even when the doses of alcohol consumed are similar. Therefore, the purpose of this laboratory study was to investigate if the rate of self-paced beverage consumption was faster for a dose of AmED versus alcohol alone using a double-blind, within-subjects, placebo-controlled study design. Participants (n = 16) of equal gender who were social drinkers attended 4 separate test sessions that involved consumption of alcohol (1.97 ml/kg vodka) and energy drinks, alone and in combination. On each test day, the dose assigned was divided into 10 cups. Participants were informed that they would have a 2-h period to consume the 10 drinks. After the self-paced drinking period, participants completed a cued go/no-go reaction time (RT) task and subjective ratings of stimulation and sedation. The results indicated that participants consumed the AmED dose significantly faster (by ∼16 min) than the alcohol dose. For the performance task, participants' mean RTs were slower in the alcohol conditions and faster in the energy-drink conditions. In conclusion, alcohol consumers should be made aware that rapid drinking might occur for AmED beverages, thus heightening alcohol-related safety risks. The fast rate of drinking may be related to the generalized speeding of responses after energy-drink consumption. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. Dehydration: cause of fatigue or sign of pacing in elite soccer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Andrew M; Noakes, Timothy D

    2009-01-01

    Numerous studies have suggested that dehydration is a causal factor to fatigue across a range of sports such as soccer; however, empirical evidence is equivocal on this point. It is also possible that exercise-induced moderate dehydration is purely an outcome of significant metabolic activity during a game. The diverse yet sustained physical activities in soccer undoubtedly threaten homeostasis, but research suggests that under most environmental conditions, match-play fluid loss is minimal ( approximately 1-2% loss of body mass), metabolite accumulation remains fairly constant, and core temperatures do not reach levels considered sufficiently critical to require the immediate cessation of exercise. A complex (central) metabolic control system which ensures that no one (peripheral) physiological system is maximally utilized may explain the diversity of research findings concerning the impact of individual factors such as dehydration on elite soccer performance. In consideration of the existing literature, we propose a new interpretative pacing model to explain the self-regulation of elite soccer performance and, in which, players behaviourally modulate efforts according to a subconscious strategy. This strategy is based on both pre-match (intrinsic and extrinsic factors) and dynamic considerations during the game (such as skin temperature, thirst, accumulation of metabolites in the muscles, plasma osmolality and substrate availability), which enables players to avoid total failure of any single peripheral physiological system either prematurely or at the conclusion of a match. In summary, we suggest that dehydration is only an outcome of complex physiological control (operating a pacing plan) and no single metabolic factor is causal of fatigue in elite soccer.

  6. The People with Arthritis Can Exercise (PACE Program: A Qualitative Evaluation of Participant Satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leigh F. Callahan, PhD

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Developed by the Arthritis Foundation, People with Arthritis Can Exercise is a community-based exercise program for individuals with arthritis. This qualitative study was designed to assess participant satisfaction with the program and examine motivators and barriers to attending program classes. Methods We conducted an 8-week randomized controlled trial of People with Arthritis Can Exercise among 347 participants residing in 18 urban and rural communities across North Carolina. Semistructured telephone interviews were conducted with 51 of the participants. Participants were asked about their overall satisfaction with the program. Motivating factors and barriers to attending the classes, including content, instructor, location, and schedule, were examined. Results Of the 51 participants interviewed, 96% were female, with an average age in years of 67 (range, 32–90 years. Participants reported deriving considerable social support from exercising in a group with others who have arthritis. They identified two main factors that motivated them to continue participating in the exercise class: ability to work at their own pace during the class and confidence that they could do different kinds of exercise safely. Participants also reported that the instructor played a vital role in sustaining their motivation to exercise. Among the participants, noncompleters of the program reported arthritis-related illness or insufficient physical challenge as key barriers to class participation. Conclusion This study suggests that a group exercise program for older adults with arthritis promotes a sense of social support and increases self-efficacy for exercise by allowing participants to work at their own pace.

  7. Orbitally paced phosphogenesis in Mediterranean shallow marine carbonates during the middle Miocene Monterey event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auer, Gerald; Hauzenberger, Christoph A.; Reuter, Markus; Piller, Werner E.

    2016-04-01

    During the Oligo-Miocene, major phases of phosphogenesis occurred in the Earth's oceans. However, most phosphate deposits represent condensed or allochthonous hemipelagic deposits, formed by complex physical and chemical enrichment processes, limiting their applicability for the study regarding the temporal pacing of Miocene phosphogenesis. The Oligo-Miocene Decontra section located on the Maiella Platform (central Apennines, Italy) is a widely continuous carbonate succession deposited in a mostly middle to outer neritic setting. Of particular interest are the well-winnowed grain to packstones of the middle Miocene Bryozoan Limestone, where occurrences of authigenic phosphate grains coincide with the prominent carbon isotope excursion of the Monterey event. This unique setting allows the analysis of orbital forcing on phosphogenesis, within a bio, chemo, and cyclostratigraphically constrained age-model. LA-ICP-MS analyses revealed a significant enrichment of uranium in the studied authigenic phosphates compared to the surrounding carbonates, allowing natural gamma-radiation (GR) to be used as a qualitative proxy for autochthonous phosphate content. Time series analyses indicate a strong 405 kyr eccentricity forcing of GR in the Bryozoan Limestone. These results link maxima in the GR record and thus phosphate content to orbitally paced increases in the burial of organic carbon, particularly during the carbon isotope maxima of the Monterey event. Thus, phosphogenesis during the middle Miocene in the Mediterranean was controlled by the 405 kyr eccentricity and its influence on large-scale paleoproductivity patterns. Rare earth element data were used as a tool to reconstruct the formation conditions of the investigated phosphates, indicating generally oxic formation conditions, which are consistent with microbially mediated phosphogenesis.

  8. PACE Continuous Innovation Indicators-a novel tool to measure progress in cancer treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paddock, Silvia; Brum, Lauren; Sorrow, Kathleen; Thomas, Samuel; Spence, Susan; Maulbecker-Armstrong, Catharina; Goodman, Clifford; Peake, Michael; McVie, Gordon; Geipel, Gary; Li, Rose

    2015-01-01

    Concerns about rising health care costs and the often incremental nature of improvements in health outcomes continue to fuel intense debates about 'progress' and 'value' in cancer research. In times of tightening fiscal constraints, it is increasingly important for patients and their representatives to define what constitutes 'value' to them. It is clear that diverse stakeholders have different priorities. Harmonisation of values may be neither possible nor desirable. Stakeholders lack tools to visualise or otherwise express these differences and to track progress in cancer treatments based on variable sets of values. The Patient Access to Cancer care Excellence (PACE) Continuous Innovation Indicators are novel, scientifically rigorous progress trackers that employ a three-step process to quantify progress in cancer treatments: 1) mine the literature to determine the strength of the evidence supporting each treatment; 2) allow users to weight the analysis according to their priorities and values; and 3) calculate Evidence Scores (E-Scores), a novel measure to track progress, based on the strength of the evidence weighted by the assigned value. We herein introduce a novel, flexible value model, show how the values from the model can be used to weight the evidence from the scientific literature to obtain E-Scores, and illustrate how assigning different values to new treatments influences the E-Scores. The Indicators allow users to learn how differing values lead to differing assessments of progress in cancer research and to check whether current incentives for innovation are aligned with their value model. By comparing E-Scores generated by this tool, users are able to visualise the relative pace of innovation across areas of cancer research and how stepwise innovation can contribute to substantial progress against cancer over time. Learning from experience and mapping current unmet needs will help to support a broad audience of stakeholders in their efforts to

  9. Integrating mobile technology with routine dietetic practice: the case of myPace for weight management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harricharan, Michelle; Gemen, Raymond; Celemín, Laura Fernández; Fletcher, David; de Looy, Anne E; Wills, Josephine; Barnett, Julie

    2015-05-01

    The field of Mobile health (mHealth), which includes mobile phone applications (apps), is growing rapidly and has the potential to transform healthcare by increasing its quality and efficiency. The present paper focuses particularly on mobile technology for body weight management, including mobile phone apps for weight loss and the available evidence on their effectiveness. Translation of behaviour change theory into weight management strategies, including integration in mobile technology is also discussed. Moreover, the paper presents and discusses the myPace platform as a case in point. There is little clinical evidence on the effectiveness of currently available mobile phone apps in enabling behaviour change and improving health-related outcomes, including sustained body weight loss. Moreover, it is unclear to what extent these apps have been developed in collaboration with health professionals, such as dietitians, and the extent to which apps draw on and operationalise behaviour change techniques has not been explored. Furthermore, presently weight management apps are not built for use as part of dietetic practice, or indeed healthcare more widely, where face-to-face engagement is fundamental for instituting the building blocks for sustained lifestyle change. myPace is an innovative mobile technology for weight management meant to be embedded into and to enhance dietetic practice. Developed out of systematic, iterative stages of engagement with dietitians and consumers, it is uniquely designed to complement and support the trusted health practitioner-patient relationship. Future mHealth technology would benefit if engagement with health professionals and/or targeted patient groups, and behaviour change theory stood as the basis for technology development. Particularly, integrating technology into routine health care practice, rather than replacing one with the other, could be the way forward.

  10. Normalisation of left ventricular systolic function after change from VVI pacing to biventricular pacing in a child with congenital complete atrioventricular block, long-QT syndrome, and congenital muscular dystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellesøe, Sabrina G; Reimers, Jesper I; Andersen, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Development of dilated cardiomyopathy in patients with congenital complete atrioventricular block with or without pacemaker is well described. We report a case of dilated cardiomyopathy in a child with congenital complete atrioventricular block, long-QT syndrome, and VVI pacemaker. Temporary pacing...

  11. A comparative study of right ventricular outflow tract pacing and right ventricular apical pacing in children%儿童右室流出道起搏与右室心尖起搏的对比研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈晶; 曾国洪; 曾少颖; 王树水

    2014-01-01

    目的:回顾性对比研究儿童行VVI起搏治疗的右室流出道起搏与右室心尖部起搏对近期心功能、QRS波时限及起搏参数的影响。方法:回顾2006年7月至2013年11月,在我科行VVI起搏治疗的38例患儿病例资料,根据术中记录螺旋电极植入的部位分为右室流出道组(n=22)和右室心尖部组(n=16)。记录术前和术后的心脏彩超心功能指标及QRS波时限,术中与术后起搏参数指标进行比较。结果:右室流出道组与右室心尖组在术前及术后心功能指标、术中及术后的起搏阈值差值、导线阻抗差值、R波幅度差值差异无统计学意义。右室流出道起搏组与右室心尖起搏组术后QRS波时限增宽,差异有统计学意义。术前与术后的QRS波时限差值[(134.95±12.86)ms vs(147.44±22.35)ms,t=1.35,P=0.01],差异有统计学意义。结论:儿童右室流出道起搏安全可行,两者起搏术后QRS波时限增宽,但右室心尖起搏组QRS波时限增宽更明显。%Objective To compare the impacts of right ventricular outflow tract pacing and right ventricular apical pacing on short-term cardiac function, QRS duration and pacing parameters in children undergoing VVI pacemaker therapy. Methods The clinical data of 38 children undergoing VVI pacemaker treatment in our department from July 2006 to November 2013 were retrospectively reviewed and analyzed to make grouping: 22 with right ventricular outflow tract pacing based on the operational records were assigned in one group and 16 with right ventricular apical pacing as the other group. The two groups were compared in terms of cardiac function indexes , QRS complex width and intra- and post- operative parameters of the implanted pacemakers. Results There were no significant differences between the two groups in pre-and post-operative cardiac function indexes , intra- and post-operative difference in pacing thresholds

  12. Harvard University

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李琳

    2007-01-01

    Harvard University, which celebrated its 370th anniversary in 2006, is the oldest institution of higher learning in the United States. Founded 16 years after the arrival of the Pilgrims at Plymouth, the University has grown from nine students with a

  13. Overseas Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inter-University Council for Higher Education Overseas, London (England).

    The following articles and reports are presented in this publication of "Overseas Universities:""Appropriate Technology and University Education," by John Twidell; "The Training of Engineering Staff for Higher Education Institutions in Developing Countries," by D. W. Daniel, C. A. Leal, J. H. Maynes and T. Wilmore;…

  14. Innovative Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsi, Louis M.; Kaebnick, Gweneth W.

    1989-01-01

    The phenomenon of innovation within the university is examined, noting the possibility of innovation as a key to college vitality. A study was conducted using a group of institutions that demonstrated recent innovative spirit. Members of the American Association of State Colleges and Universities (AASCU), each has been recognized in an annual…

  15. Redistribution of myocardial perfusion during permanent dual chamber pacing in symptomatic non-obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy : A quantitative positron emission tomography study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Posma, JL; Blanksma, PK; vanderWall, EE

    1996-01-01

    Dual chamber pacing causes significant symptomatic improvement in many patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The mechanism behind this beneficial response is not fully understood. Positron emission tomography showed a redistribution of myocardial flow during pacing in a patient with non-obstruc

  16. Impact of right-ventricular apical pacing on the optimal left-ventricular lead positions measured by phase analysis of SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hung, Guang-Uei [Chang Bing Show Chwan Memorial Hospital, Changhua (China); China Medical University, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Science, Taichung (China); Huang, Jin-Long [Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Cardiovascular Center, Taichung (China); School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Institute of Clinical Medicine, and Cardiovascular Research Institute, Department of Medicine, Taipei (China); Chung-Shan Medical University, Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, Taichung (China); Lin, Wan-Yu; Tsai, Shih-Chung [Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Taichung (China); Wang, Kuo-Yang [Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Cardiovascular Center, Taichung (China); Chung-Shan Medical University, Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, Taichung (China); Chen, Shih-Ann [School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Institute of Clinical Medicine, and Cardiovascular Research Institute, Department of Medicine, Taipei (China); Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Taipei (China); Lloyd, Michael S.; Chen, Ji [Emory University, Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    The use of SPECT phase analysis to optimize left-ventricular (LV) lead positions for cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) was performed at baseline, but CRT works as simultaneous right ventricular (RV) and LV pacing. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of RV apical (RVA) pacing on optimal LV lead positions measured by SPECT phase analysis. This study prospectively enrolled 46 patients. Two SPECT myocardial perfusion scans were acquired under sinus rhythm with complete left bundle branch block and RVA pacing, respectively, following a single injection of {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi. LV dyssynchrony parameters and optimal LV lead positions were measured by the phase analysis technique and then compared between the two scans. The LV dyssynchrony parameters were significantly larger with RVA pacing than with sinus rhythm (p ∝0.01). In 39 of the 46 patients, the optimal LV lead positions were the same between RVA pacing and sinus rhythm (kappa = 0.861). In 6 of the remaining 7 patients, the optimal LV lead positions were along the same radial direction, but RVA pacing shifted the optimal LV lead positions toward the base. The optimal LV lead positions measured by SPECT phase analysis were consistent, no matter whether the SPECT images were acquired under sinus rhythm or RVA pacing. In some patients, RVA pacing shifted the optimal LV lead positions toward the base. This study supports the use of baseline SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging to optimize LV lead positions to increase CRT efficacy. (orig.)

  17. Effect of Low-level Vagus Nerve Stimulation on Cardiac Remodeling in a Rapid Atrial Pacing-induced Canine Model of Atrial Fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yanmei; Sun, Juan; Zhou, Xianhui; Zhang, Ling; Ma, Mei; Tang, Baopeng

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to establish a rapid atrial pacing-induced canine model of atrial fibrillation in studying the effects of low-level vagus nerve stimulation (LLVNS) on atrial fibrillation and the underlying mechanisms for those effects. Adult beagle dogs were randomly assigned to 3 groups: a sham operation group (sham group), a fast left atrial appendage 12-hour pacing group (pacing group), and a 12-hour pacing + LLVNS group (LLVNS group). All dogs underwent tests for their left and right atrial effective refractory period at various time points, after which they were killed, and samples of atrial and anterior right ganglionated plexi tissue were removed and microscopically examined. As pacing times increased, the mean effective refractory period in the pacing group became significantly shortened. The pacing group and the LLVNS group did show significant differences (P nerve growth factor and neurturin (NRTN) in the sham group and the LLVNS group were lower than those in the pacing group (nerve growth factor in 3 groups were (36.35 ± 6.18) × 1000, (86.35 ± 5.63) × 1000, and (40.50 ± 7.24) × 1000 μm²/mm², P nerves.

  18. The coordination of shoulder girdle muscles during repetitive arm movements at either slow or fast pace among women with or without neck-shoulder pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Januario, Leticia Bergamin; Oliveira, Ana Beatriz; Cid, Marina Machado; Madeleine, Pascal; Samani, Afshin

    2017-09-11

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the coordination of the shoulder girdle muscles among subjects with or without neck-shoulder pain performing repetitive arm movement at either a slow or fast pace. Thirty female adults were allocated to one of two groups-healthy controls or cases with neck-shoulder pain. Surface electromyography (sEMG) signals from the clavicular, acromial, middle and lower trapezius portions and the serratus anterior muscles were recorded during a task performed for 20min at a slow pace and 20min at a fast pace. The root mean square (RMS), relative rest time (RRT) and normalised mutual information (NMI, an index of functional connectivity between two muscles in a pair) were computed. No significant differences on RMS, RRT and NMI were found between groups. For both groups, the fast movement pace resulted in increased levels of RMS, lower degrees of RRT and higher NMI compared to the slow pace. No interaction between group and movement pace was found. This study highlights the change in sEMG activity of muscles to meet the demands of performing a task at fast movement pace. The fast pace imposed a higher muscle demand evidenced by increased sEMG amplitude, low degree of muscle rest and increased functional connectivity for subjects in both the case and control groups. No indication of impaired sEMG activity was found in individuals with neck-shoulder pain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. An integrated optical coherence microscopy imaging and optical stimulation system for optogenetic pacing in Drosophila melanogaster (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alex, Aneesh; Li, Airong; Men, Jing; Jerwick, Jason; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Zhou, Chao

    2016-03-01

    Electrical stimulation is the clinical standard for cardiac pacing. Although highly effective in controlling cardiac rhythm, the invasive nature, non-specificity to cardiac tissues and possible tissue damage limits its applications. Optogenetic pacing of the heart is a promising alternative, which is non-invasive and more specific, has high spatial and temporal precision, and avoids the shortcomings in electrical stimulation. Drosophila melanogaster, which is a powerful model organism with orthologs of nearly 75% of human disease genes, has not been studied for optogenetic pacing in the heart. Here, we developed a non-invasive integrated optical pacing and optical coherence microscopy (OCM) imaging system to control the heart rhythm of Drosophila at different developmental stages using light. The OCM system is capable of providing high imaging speed (130 frames/s) and ultrahigh imaging resolutions (1.5 μm and 3.9 μm for axial and transverse resolutions, respectively). A light-sensitive pacemaker was developed in Drosophila by specifically expressing the light-gated cation channel, channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) in transgenic Drosophila heart. We achieved non-invasive and specific optical control of the Drosophila heart rhythm throughout the fly's life cycle (larva, pupa, and adult) by stimulating the heart with 475 nm pulsed laser light. Heart response to stimulation pulses was monitored non-invasively with OCM. This integrated non-invasive optogenetic control and in vivo imaging technique provides a novel platform for performing research studies in developmental cardiology.

  20. 77 FR 60732 - PACE Select Advisors Trust and UBS Global Asset Management (Americas) Inc.; Notice of Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-04

    ... COMMISSION PACE Select Advisors Trust and UBS Global Asset Management (Americas) Inc.; Notice of Application... Global Asset Management (Americas) Inc. (the ``Adviser'') (collectively, ``Applicants''). Filing Dates... Global Asset Management (Americas) Inc., 1285 Avenue of the Americas, New York, NY 10019-6028....

  1. Observation of functional remodeling of Ca2+-activated Cl- channel in pacing-induced canine failing heart

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    浦介麟

    2006-01-01

    Objective To study whether Ca2+-activated Cl-current (Ito2) contributes to the functional remodeling of the failing heart. Methods The cardiac myocytes were isolated enzymatically from rapidly pacing-induced failing canine hearts (HF) at room temperature. Patch-Clamp whole cell recording technique was employed to record the Ito2.The Cl- transport blocker 4,4’-diisothiocyanos-

  2. The challenge of engaging all students via self-paced interactive e-learning tutorials for introductory physics

    CERN Document Server

    DeVore, Seth; Singh, Chandralekha

    2016-01-01

    As research-based self-paced e-learning tools become increasingly available, a critical issue educators encounter is implementing strategies to ensure that all students engage with them as intended. Here, we discuss the effectiveness of research-based e-learning tutorials as self-paced learning tools in large enrollment brick and mortar introductory physics courses. These interactive tutorials were developed via research in physics education and were found to be effective for a diverse group of introductory physics students in one-on-one implementation. Instructors encouraged the use of these self-paced tools in a self-paced learning environment by telling students that they would be helpful for solving the assigned homework problems and that the underlying physics principles in the tutorial problems would be similar to those in the in-class quizzes (which we call paired problems). We find that many students, who struggled in the courses in which these adaptive e-learning tutorials were assigned as a self-stu...

  3. High-Rate Pacing Reduces Variability of Repolarization and Prevents Repolarization-Dependent Arrhythmias in Dogs With Chronic AV Block

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oosterhoff, Peter; Thomsen, Morten Bækgaard; Maas, Joep N

    2010-01-01

    rates (60–65 bpm vs 100–110 bpm) in 7 dogs with chronic atrioventricular block, while recording right and left ventricular (LV) monophasic action potential (MAP) and LV electrogram (EGM). Simulations showed a sampling frequency of 500 Hz is sufficient to capture relevant STV values. High-rate pacing...

  4. Peri-infarct zone pacing to prevent adverse left ventricular remodelling in patients with large myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stone, Gregg W; Chung, Eugene S; Stancak, Branislav;

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: We sought to determine whether peri-infarct pacing prevents left ventricular (LV) remodelling and improves functional and clinical outcomes in patients with large first myocardial infarction (MI). METHODS AND RESULTS: A total of 126 patients at 27 international sites within 10 days of onset...

  5. The influence of sex, age, and race experience on pacing profiles during the 90 km Vasaloppet ski race.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, Magnus; Assarsson, Hannes; Carlsson, Tomas

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate pacing-profile differences during the 90 km Vasaloppet ski race related to the categories of sex, age, and race experience. Skiing times from eight sections (S1 to S8) were analyzed. For each of the three categories, 400 pairs of skiers were matched to have a finish time within 60 seconds, the same start group, and an assignment to the same group for the other two categories. Paired-samples Student's t-tests were used to investigate sectional pacing-profile differences between the subgroups. Results showed that males skied faster in S2 (P=0.0042), S3 (P=0.0049), S4 (P=0.010), and S1-S4 (PS7 (PS8 (P=0.0088), and S5-S8 (PS3 (P=0.0029), and for the other sections, there were no differences. Experienced subjects (≥4 Vasaloppet ski race completions) skied faster in S1 (PS1-S4 (P=0.0054); inexperienced skiers (S8 (P=0.0063). In conclusion, females had a more even pacing profile than that of males with the same finish time, start group, age, and race experience. No clear age-related pacing-profile difference was identified for the matched subgroups. Moreover, experienced skiers skied faster in the first half whereas inexperienced skiers had higher skiing speeds during the second half of the race.

  6. The Role of Perceived User-Interface Design in Continued Usage Intention of Self-Paced E-Learning Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Vincent; Cheng, T. C. Edwin; Lai, W. M. Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    While past studies on user-interface design focused on a particular system or application using the experimental approach, we propose a theoretical model to assess the impact of perceived user-interface design (PUID) on continued usage intention (CUI) of self-paced e-learning tools in general. We argue that the impact of PUID is mediated by two…

  7. Major League Baseball pace-of-play rules and their influence on predicted muscle fatigue during simulated baseball games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonne, Michael W L; Keir, Peter J

    2016-11-01

    Major League Baseball (MLB) has proposed rule changes to speed up baseball games. Reducing the time between pitches may impair recovery from fatigue. Fatigue is a known precursor to injury and may jeopardise joint stability. This study examined how fatigue accumulated during baseball games and how different pace of play initiatives may influence fatigue. Pitcher data were retrieved from a public database. A predictive model of muscle fatigue estimated muscle fatigue in 8 arm muscles. A self-selected pace (22.7 s), 12 s pace (Rule 8.04 from the MLB) and a 20 s rest (a pitch clock examined in the 2014 Arizona Fall League (AFL)) were examined. Significantly more muscle fatigue existed in both the AFL and Rule 8.04 conditions, when compared to the self-selected pace condition (5.01 ± 1.73%, 3.95 ± 1.20% and 3.70 ± 1.10% MVC force lost, respectively). Elevated levels of muscle fatigue are predicted in the flexor-pronator mass, which is responsible for providing elbow stability. Reduced effectiveness of the flexor-pronator mass may reduce the active contributions to joint rotational stiffness, increasing strain on the ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) and possibly increasing injury risk.

  8. The influence of right ventricular apical pacing on left atrial volume in patients with normal left ventricular function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AR Moaref1

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Right ventricular apical (RVA pacing has been reported to induce several deleterious effects particularly in the presence of structural heart disease but can also involve patients with normal left ventricular (LV function. Left atrial (LA enlargement is one of these effects, but the majority of studies have measured LA dimension rather than volume.Objective: The present prospective study was designed to assess the effect of RVA pacing on LA volume in patients with normal LV function.Patients and Methods: The study comprised 41 consecutive patients with LV ejection fraction ≥ 45% and LV end diastolic dimension ≤ 56 mm who underwent single-or dual- chamber pacemaker implantation in RVA and followed for LA volume measurement and pacemaker analysis at least during the ensuing 4.2 months. Results: In all, 21 patients were excluded from the study due to five spontaneous wide QRS complex (≥120msec, one recent acute coronary syndrome,one significant valvular heart disease, three pacing frequency <90%, eight death or losing follow up in three cases. In remaining 20 patients, LA volume ragned from 21 to 54 mm3 with mean of 37.3±9.7 mm3 prior to pacemaker implantation that increased to 31 to 103 mm3 (54.3±17.0 during follow-up (P<0.001.Conclusion: RVA pacing might lead to an increase in LA volume even in patients with normal LV function.

  9. Comparing E-Learning Tools' Success: The Case of Instructor-Student Interactive vs. Self-Paced Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Po-An J.; Cho, Vincent

    2011-01-01

    e-Learning tools have profoundly transformed modern pedagogical approaches. Vendors provide different types of systems, such as self-paced (SP) and instructor-student interactive (ISI) e-Learning tools. Although both types of tools represent promising solutions to facilitate the learning process, it is important to theoretically identify a…

  10. Examining the Effectiveness of a Semi-Self-Paced Flipped Learning Format in a College General Chemistry Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibbard, Lisa; Sung, Shannon; Wells, Breche´

    2016-01-01

    Flipped learning has come to the forefront in education. It maximizes learning by moving content delivery online, where learning can be self-paced, allowing for class time to focus on student-centered active learning. This five-year cross-sectional study assessed student performance in a college general chemistry for majors sequence taught by a…

  11. Exercise capacity after His bundle ablation and rate response ventricular pacing for drug refractory chronic atrial fibrillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buys, EM; vanHemel, NM; Keider, JC; Ascoop, CAPL; vanDessel, PFHM; Bakema, L; Kingma, JH

    Objective-To evaluate exercise capacity of patients with chronic atrial fibrillation in whom His bundle ablation followed by ventricular rate response pacing (VVIR) was carried out because of drug refractoriness. Design-Prospective study. Patients-25 consecutive patients, all with chronic

  12. Pacing and decision making in sport and exercise : The roles of perception and action in the regulation of exercise intensity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, Benjamin L. M.; Pepping, Gert-Jan; Hettinga, Florentina J.

    In pursuit of optimal performance, athletes and physical exercisers alike have to make decisions about how and when to invest their energy. The process of pacing has been associated with the goal-directed regulation of exercise intensity across an exercise bout. The current review explores divergent

  13. Creatine kinase and creatine kinase subunit-B in coronary sinus blood in pacing-induced angina pectoris

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, J P; Ingerslev, J; Heinsvig, E M

    1982-01-01

    In nine out of 10 patients with angiographic documented coronary artery disease, pacing-induced angina pectoris provoked myocardial production of lactate, whereas no significant release of either creatine kinase or creatine kinase subunit-B to coronary sinus and peripheral venous blood could...

  14. Self-Paced Tutorial Courses for Mineral Science - Metallurgy Departments. Final Progress Report (July 1975-August 1980).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twidwell, L. G.

    Four courses in extractive metallurgy (Pyrometallurgy, Hydrometallurgy, Electrometallurgy; and Physical Chemistry of Iron and Steel) were prepared in a modular, self-paced format. Development of the course materials included: (1) preparation of course outlines by unit coordinators and advisory committees; (2) approval of course outlines (included…

  15. Testing Age-Paced Parenting Newsletters up to Age 3: Greater Impact on First-Time Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostergren, Carol S.; Riley, David A.

    2012-01-01

    An age-paced newsletter for parents of toddlers was evaluated. Mothers reported the newsletters were as useful as information from doctors or nurses and more useful than other sources of information. We hypothesized and found that first-time mothers reported the newsletters more useful than experienced mothers--reading more of the newsletters and…

  16. How Adults Learn from Self-Paced, Technology-Based Corporate Training: New Focus for Learners, New Focus for Designers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrovolny, Jackie

    2006-01-01

    "How" do adults learn from self-paced, technology-based corporate training, which they select based on its relevance to their current employment responsibilities? Specifically, "how" do adults use the following learning strategies: prior experience, reflection, metacognition, conversations, generative learning strategies, and authentic…

  17. Understanding the Nature of Small Business. PACE Revised. Level 3. Unit 1. Research & Development Series No. 240CB1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashmore, M. Catherine; Pritz, Sandra G.

    This individualized, competency-based unit on understanding the nature of small business, the first of 18 modules, is on the third level of the revised Program for Acquiring Competence in Entrepreneurship (PACE). Intended for the advanced secondary and postsecondary levels and for adults wanting training or retraining, this unit, together with the…

  18. Right Ventricular Pacing and Sensing Function in High Posterior Septal and Apical Lead Placement in Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.M. Kristiansen, MD

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: The RV-HS lead position demonstrated stable and acceptable long-term pacing and sensing function, with rates of complications comparable to conventional RV-A lead position in CRT. The RV-HS lead position is feasible in CRT-P.

  19. At Their Own Pace: Interim Findings from an Evaluation of a Computer-Assisted, Modular Approach to Developmental Math

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardenhire, Alissa; Diamond, John; Headlam, Camielle; Weiss, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Community colleges nationwide are looking for solutions to help students complete developmental (remedial) math--a known barrier to graduation. Some are offering computer-assisted, modular developmental math courses that allow students to earn credits incrementally and move through the curriculum at their own pace. One of these modularized…

  20. Pseudo-postpacing interval of diastolic potential after entrainment pacing of remote bystander pathway in reentrant ventricular tachycardia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Yoshiaki; Nakajima, Tadashi; Irie, Tadanobu; Igawa, Osamu; Iijima, Takafumi; Ota, Masaki; Tamura, Mio; Iizuka, Takashi; Tamura, Shuntaro; Saito, Akihiro; Kurabayashi, Masahiko

    2014-09-01

    After entrainment pacing, the postpacing interval of a diastolic potential may be misinterpreted if the distal tip of the ablation catheter captures a remote bystander pathway adjacent to the critical isthmus of a complex reentrant circuit in a structurally diseased heart. We discuss this possible pitfall of entrainment mapping of reentrant ventricular tachycardia, observed after a healed myocardial infarction.

  1. Pseudo-postpacing interval of diastolic potential after entrainment pacing of remote bystander pathway in reentrant ventricular tachycardia

    OpenAIRE

    Kaneko, Yoshiaki; Nakajima, Tadashi; Irie, Tadanobu; Igawa, Osamu; Iijima, Takafumi; Ota, Masaki; Tamura, Mio; Iizuka, Takashi; Tamura, Shuntaro; Saito, Akihiro; Kurabayashi, Masahiko

    2013-01-01

    After entrainment pacing, the postpacing interval of a diastolic potential may be misinterpreted if the distal tip of the ablation catheter captures a remote bystander pathway adjacent to the critical isthmus of a complex reentrant circuit in a structurally diseased heart. We discuss this possible pitfall of entrainment mapping of reentrant ventricular tachycardia, observed after a healed myocardial infarction.

  2. Examining the Effectiveness of a Semi-Self-Paced Flipped Learning Format in a College General Chemistry Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibbard, Lisa; Sung, Shannon; Wells, Breche´

    2016-01-01

    Flipped learning has come to the forefront in education. It maximizes learning by moving content delivery online, where learning can be self-paced, allowing for class time to focus on student-centered active learning. This five-year cross-sectional study assessed student performance in a college general chemistry for majors sequence taught by a…

  3. Characterization and comparison of polysaccharides from Lycium barbarum in China using saccharide mapping based on PACE and HPTLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ding-Tao; Cheong, Kit-Leong; Deng, Yong; Lin, Peng-Cheng; Wei, Feng; Lv, Xiao-Jie; Long, Ze-Rong; Zhao, Jing; Ma, Shuang-Cheng; Li, Shao-Ping

    2015-12-10

    Water-soluble polysaccharides from 51 batches of fruits of L. barbarum (wolfberry) in China were investigated and compared using saccharide mapping, partial acid hydrolysis, single and composite enzymatic digestion, followed by polysaccharide analysis by using carbohydrate gel electrophoresis (PACE) analysis and high performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC) analysis, respectively. Results showed that multiple PACE and HPTLC fingerprints of partial acid and enzymatic hydrolysates of polysaccharides from L. barbarum in China were similar, respectively. In addition, results indicated that β-1,3-glucosidic, α-1,4-galactosiduronic and α-1,5-arabinosidic linkages existed in polysaccharides from L. barbarum collected in China, and the similarity of polysaccharides in L. barbarum collected from different regions of China was pretty high, which are helpful for the improvement of the performance of polysaccharides from L. barbarum in functional/health foods area. Furthermore, polysaccharides from Panax notoginseng, Angelica sinensis, and Astragalus membranaceus var. mongholicus were successfully distinguished from those of L. barbarum based on their PACE fingerprints. These results were beneficial to improve the quality control of polysaccharides from L. barabrum and their products, which suggested that saccharide mapping based on PACE and HPTLC analysis could be a routine approach for quality control of polysaccharides.

  4. The Evolution of Discovery Systems in Academic Libraries: A Case Study at the University of Houston Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guajardo, Richard; Brett, Kelsey; Young, Frederick

    2017-01-01

    For the past several years academic libraries have been adopting discovery systems to provide a search experience that reflects user expectations and improves access to electronic resources. University of Houston Libraries has kept pace with this evolving trend by pursuing various discovery options; these include an open-source tool, a federated…

  5. The specialized role of the RN in the Program of All-inclusive Care for the Elderly (PACE) interdisciplinary care team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madden, Karen A; Waldo, Mary; Cleeter, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    There is an increasing volume of literature supporting the Program of All-inclusive Care for the Elderly (PACE) as an innovative model of health care delivery for frail seniors. Registered Nurses (RN) hold an essential position among the PACE interdisciplinary teams (IDT) which serve as the foundational practice approach to patient care. There are currently 97 PACE programs in 31 states. Federal and respective state laws provide comprehensive specifications for IDT composition, minimum qualification of team members and services provided. The role of the RN is not fully defined beyond the requirement of periodic assessments. The intent of this study was to explore and describe the role of the nurse in PACE and to compare nursing care delivery models. Focused interviews and survey results show great variation in nursing roles as well as some common themes among nursing leaders for the vision of PACE nurses.

  6. Universe Awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankatsing Nava, Tibisay; Russo, Pedro

    2015-08-01

    Universe Awareness (UNAWE) is an educational programme coordinated by Leiden University that uses the beauty and grandeur of the Universe to encourage young children, particularly those from an underprivileged background, to have an interest in science and technology and foster their sense of global citizenship from the earliest age.UNAWE's twofold vision uses our Universe to inspire and motivate very young children: the excitement of the Universe provides an exciting introduction to science and technology, while the vastness and beauty of the Universe helps broaden the mind and stimulate a sense of global citizenship and tolerance. UNAWE's goals are accomplished through four main activities: the coordination of a global network of more than 1000 astronomers, teachers and educators from more than 60 countries, development of educational resources, teacher training activities and evaluation of educational activities.Between 2011 and 2013, EU-UNAWE, the European branch of UNAWE, was funded by the European Commission to implement a project in 5 EU countries and South Africa. This project has been concluded successfully. Since then, the global project Universe Awareness has continued to grow with an expanding international network, new educational resources and teacher trainings and a planned International Workshop in collaboration with ESA in October 2015, among other activities.

  7. The rationale and design of the Micra Transcatheter Pacing Study: safety and efficacy of a novel miniaturized pacemaker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Philippe; Duray, Gabor Z; Zhang, Shu; Narasimhan, Calambur; Soejima, Kyoko; Omar, Razali; Laager, Verla; Stromberg, Kurt; Williams, Eric; Reynolds, Dwight

    2015-05-01

    Recent advances in miniaturization technologies and battery chemistries have made it possible to develop a pacemaker small enough to implant within the heart while still aiming to provide similar battery longevity to conventional pacemakers. The Micra Transcatheter Pacing System is a miniaturized single-chamber pacemaker system that is delivered via catheter through the femoral vein. The pacemaker is implanted directly inside the right ventricle of the heart, eliminating the need for a device pocket and insertion of a pacing lead, thereby potentially avoiding some of the complications associated with traditional pacing systems. The Micra Transcatheter Pacing Study is currently undergoing evaluation in a prospective, multi-site, single-arm study. Approximately 720 patients will be implanted at up to 70 centres around the world. The study is designed to have a continuously growing body of evidence and data analyses are planned at various time points. The primary safety and efficacy objectives at 6-month post-implant are to demonstrate that (i) the percentage of Micra patients free from major complications related to the Micra system or implant procedure is significantly higher than 83% and (ii) the percentage of Micra patients with both low and stable thresholds is significantly higher than 80%. The safety performance benchmark is based on a reference dataset of 977 subjects from 6 recent pacemaker studies. The Micra Transcatheter Pacing Study will assess the safety and efficacy of a miniaturized, totally endocardial pacemaker in patients with an indication for implantation of a single-chamber ventricular pacemaker. NCT02004873. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Cardiac Pacing in Cienfuegos from 2005 to 2009 Comportamiento de la estimulación cardiaca en Cienfuegos durante el quinquenio 2005 – 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanier Coll Muñoz

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: permanent artificial pacemaker implantation improves cardiac function and life quality of patients requiring cardiac pacing. Objective: to describe the characteristics of patients undergoing permanent artificial pacemaker implantation and their results, in the period from January 2005 to December 2009 in the General University Hospital “Dr. Gustavo Aldereguía Lima". Methods: a descriptive study was conducted. The sample consisted of 300 patients who were implanted with permanent artificial pacemakers in the Cardiology Service of the General University Hospital “Dr. Gustavo Aldereguía Lima" in Cienfuegos, from 2005 to 2009. General data were collected from patients such as diagnosis, pacing mode used, surgical approach and complications. Results: the predominant age group was that of elderlies over 75 years old, and mostly males were predominant. The main action taken was that of a first implant using the cephalic vein dissection. The most common causes of implant were blocks the atrioventricular conduction and sinus node disease. The type of stimulation used was the VV-VVIR. Major complications included displacement of the electrode, hematomas and the pacemaker syndrome. Conclusion: the number of patients requiring cardiac electrical stimulation continues to increase in Cienfuegos. Elderly patients and the type of single-chamber pacing are predominant. Good results have been obtained with few complications.Introducción: la implantación de un marcapaso permanente mejora la función cardiaca y la calidad de vida de los pacientes con necesidad de estimulación eléctrica cardiaca. Objetivo: describir las características de los pacientes sometidos a implante de marcapasos permanentes y sus resultados, en el quinquenio de enero de 2005 a diciembre de 2009 en el Hospital General Universitario ¨Dr. Gustavo

  9. The universe

    CERN Document Server

    Osborne, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Where did the Universe come from? The single biggest and most difficult question that there is. From early religions through Greek Philosophy and Western Science man has attempted to discover the meaning of our place in the Universe. In the last twenty years these debates have been cast in a new light by amazing discoveries, big bang theory and ideas about new sub-atomic layers. The nature of Time and Space are truly up for grabs. With a witty and accessible style Osborne leads us on a historical and informative journey through the philosophies of the universe including the importance

  10. Fast self paced listening times in syntactic comprehension is aphasia -- implications for deficits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Michaud

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Sixty one people with aphasia (pwa and forty one matched controls were tested for the ability to understand sentences that required the ability to assign particular syntactic structures. Participants paced themselves word-by-word through twenty examples of eleven spoken sentence types and indicated which of two pictures corresponded to the meaning of each sentence. Sentences were developed in pairs such that comprehension of the experimental version of a pair required an aspect of syntactic processing not required in the corresponding baseline sentence. The need for the syntactic operations required only in the experimental version was triggered at a “critical word” in the experimental sentence. Listening times for critical words in experimental sentences were compared to those for corresponding words in the corresponding baseline sentences. We adjusted self paced listening times for word duration by subtracting word durations from tag-to-tag self paced listening times to correct for word duration, yielding what we have previously called “corrected listening times.” Corrected listening times above ceiling (10,000 msec for sentence-final words and 5,000 msec for all other words were discarded. For controls, this led to 0.2% of data being discarded and for PWAs 2.2% were discarded. Corrected listening times that were more than 3 standard deviations above or below the mean for that sentence type for each subject were adjusted either down to the upper limit or up to the lower limit of the 3SD range (not discarded. For accurate sentences, 1.7% of the control data were adjusted and 1.8% of the aphasic data were adjusted. For inaccurate sentences, 10% of the corrected listening times were adjusted for controls and 3.3% for aphasics. Our interest is in incremental parsing and interpretation. The measure we used of this process was the residual of a regression of corrected self paced listening times for critical words in experimental sentences

  11. PACE4 is an important driver of ZR-75-1 estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer proliferation and tumor progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panet, François; Couture, Frédéric; Kwiatkowska, Anna; Desjardins, Roxane; Guérin, Brigitte; Day, Robert

    2017-08-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequent and deadly malignancy in women worldwide. Despite national screening programs combined with new treatments relapse rate remain high and new therapies are needed. From previous work, we identified PACE4, a member of the proprotein convertase (PCs) family of endoproteases, as a novel therapeutic target in prostate cancer. In the present study we asked the question if PACE4 could also be a potential target in breast cancer. In clinical samples of breast adenocarcinoma, we observed a specific overexpression of PACE4 in the estrogen-receptor (ER) positive subtype. We therefore looked for a breast cancer cell line model which would be representative and thus focused on the ZR-75-1 since it both expresses PACE4 and is estrogen-receptor positive. We compared stable knockdowns of furin, PACE4 and PC7 in the estrogen-receptor-positive cell line ZR-75-1 to evaluate their respective contribution to cell growth and tumor progression. PACE4 was the only PC displaying an impact on cell growth. A PACE4 peptide-based inhibitor (C23) was tested and shown to decrease proliferation of ZR-75-1 cells in cell based assays. C23 also had potent effects of tumor progression in vivo on xenografts of the ZR-75-1 cell line in athymic nude mice. Thus, PACE4-silencing and systemic administration of a PACE4 inhibitor resulted in hindered tumor progression with reduction in proliferative indices and increased cell quiescence assessed with biomarkers. Our results suggest that PACE4 is a promising target for estrogen-receptor-positive breast cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. Sustainable Universities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grindsted, Thomas Skou

    2011-01-01

    , has put a counter pressure on the university, forcing it to review its role as a driver for sustainable development. Today, universities and intergovernmental institutions have developed more than 31 SHE declarations, and more than 1400 universities have signed a SHE declaration globally. However....... Declarations tend to have impact on three trends. Firstly, there is emerging international consensus on the university’s role and function in relation to sustainable development; secondly, the emergence of national legislation, and thirdly, an emerging international competition to be leader in sustainable......Declarations on Sustainability in Higher Education (SHE) can be viewed as a piece of international regulation. Over the past 30 years research at universities has produced convincing data to warn about deterioration of the environment, resource scarcity and the need for sustainability. This in turn...

  13. USAID University

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — USAID University is USAID's learning management system. Features include 1) Access online courses 2) Register for instructor-led courses 3)Access your student...

  14. PEKING UNIVERSITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Type of Company: Government institution. New Preparartions and Late-Model Drug Delivery System Technical Plaform of Peking University School of Pharmaceutical Sciences is a national technical plaform for developing new and important drugs. The person in charge for the platform is a pharmaceutical science professor of Peking University School of Pharmaceutical Sciences. The plaform selects the following as the main research areas: late-model carrier drug delivery system, biotechnological drug delivery system,

  15. Undulant Universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barenboim, Gabriela; /Valencia U.; Mena, Olga; Quigg, Chris; /Fermilab

    2004-12-01

    If the equation of state for ''dark energy'' varies periodically, the expansion of the Universe may have undergone alternating eras of acceleration and deceleration. We examine a specific form that survives existing observational tests, does not single out the present state of the Universe as exceptional, and suggests a future much like the matter-dominated past: a smooth expansion without a final inflationary epoch.

  16. Infrared-based blink-detecting glasses for facial pacing: toward a bionic blink.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frigerio, Alice; Hadlock, Tessa A; Murray, Elizabeth H; Heaton, James T

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Facial paralysis remains one of the most challenging conditions to effectively manage, often causing life-altering deficits in both function and appearance. Facial rehabilitation via pacing and robotic technology has great yet unmet potential. A critical first step toward reanimating symmetrical facial movement in cases of unilateral paralysis is the detection of healthy movement to use as a trigger for stimulated movement. OBJECTIVE To test a blink detection system that can be attached to standard eyeglasses and used as part of a closed-loop facial pacing system. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Standard safety glasses were equipped with an infrared (IR) emitter-detector unit, oriented horizontally across the palpebral fissure, creating a monitored IR beam that became interrupted when the eyelids closed, and were tested in 24 healthy volunteers from a tertiary care facial nerve center community. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Video-quantified blinking was compared with both IR sensor signal magnitude and rate of change in healthy participants with their gaze in repose, while they shifted their gaze from central to far-peripheral positions, and during the production of particular facial expressions. RESULTS Blink detection based on signal magnitude achieved 100% sensitivity in forward gaze but generated false detections on downward gaze. Calculations of peak rate of signal change (first derivative) typically distinguished blinks from gaze-related eyelid movements. During forward gaze, 87% of detected blink events were true positives, 11% were false positives, and 2% were false negatives. Of the 11% false positives, 6% were associated with partial eyelid closures. During gaze changes, false blink detection occurred 6% of the time during lateral eye movements, 10% of the time during upward movements, 47% of the time during downward movements, and 6% of the time for movements from an upward or downward gaze back to the primary gaze. Facial expressions

  17. Automatic artefact removal in a self-paced hybrid brain- computer interface system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Xinyi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A novel artefact removal algorithm is proposed for a self-paced hybrid brain-computer interface (BCI system. This hybrid system combines a self-paced BCI with an eye-tracker to operate a virtual keyboard. To select a letter, the user must gaze at the target for at least a specific period of time (dwell time and then activate the BCI by performing a mental task. Unfortunately, electroencephalogram (EEG signals are often contaminated with artefacts. Artefacts change the quality of EEG signals and subsequently degrade the BCI’s performance. Methods To remove artefacts in EEG signals, the proposed algorithm uses the stationary wavelet transform combined with a new adaptive thresholding mechanism. To evaluate the performance of the proposed algorithm and other artefact handling/removal methods, semi-simulated EEG signals (i.e., real EEG signals mixed with simulated artefacts and real EEG signals obtained from seven participants are used. For real EEG signals, the hybrid BCI system’s performance is evaluated in an online-like manner, i.e., using the continuous data from the last session as in a real-time environment. Results With semi-simulated EEG signals, we show that the proposed algorithm achieves lower signal distortion in both time and frequency domains. With real EEG signals, we demonstrate that for dwell time of 0.0s, the number of false-positives/minute is 2 and the true positive rate (TPR achieved by the proposed algorithm is 44.7%, which is more than 15.0% higher compared to other state-of-the-art artefact handling methods. As dwell time increases to 1.0s, the TPR increases to 73.1%. Conclusions The proposed artefact removal algorithm greatly improves the BCI’s performance. It also has the following advantages: a it does not require additional electrooculogram/electromyogram channels, long data segments or a large number of EEG channels, b it allows real-time processing, and c it reduces signal distortion.

  18. UNDERSTANDING RESISTANCE TO CHANGE: A Challenge for Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gail D. CARUTH

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Change is inevitable. Today more than ever the pace of change is accelerating. Where there is organizational change there will be resistance to this change. To deal with the resistance effectively university administrators must understand the nature and causes of resistance to change. Only by dealing effectively with resistance to change can organizational change be implemented successfully. This paper explores organizational change and the challenge it poses for universities. Because universities are slow to change due to maintaining a balance of tradition and change successful implementation of change will continue to be a challenge both now and in the future. The challenge of change is real but the task is not impossible. Historically, universities have met the challenges that faced them; they must be prepared to confront this challenge too.

  19. Positive pacing strategies are utilised by elite male and female para-cyclists in short time trials in the velodrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Lindsey Wright

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In para-cycling, competitors are classed based on functional impairment resulting in cyclists with neurological and locomotor impairments competing against each other. In Paralympic competition, classes are combined by using a factoring adjustment to race times to produce the overall medallists. Pacing in short-duration track cycling events is proposed to utilise an all-out strategy in able-bodied competition. However, pacing in para-cycling may vary depending on the level of impairment. Analysis of the pacing strategies employed by different classification groups may offer scope for optimal performance; therefore, this study investigated the pacing strategy adopted during the 1-km time trial (TT and 500-m TT in elite C1 to C3 para-cyclists and able-bodied cyclists. Total times and intermediate split times (125-m intervals; measured to 0.001s were obtained from the C1-C3 men’s 1-km TT (n=28 and women’s 500-m TT (n=9 from the 2012 Paralympic Games and the men’s 1-km TT (n=19 and women’s 500-m TT (n=12 from the 2013 UCI World Track Championships from publically available video. Split times were expressed as actual time, factored time (for the para-cyclists and as a percentage of total time. A two-way analysis of variance was used to investigate differences in split times between the different classifications and the able-bodied cyclists in the men’s 1-km TT and between the para-cyclists and able-bodied cyclists in the women’s 500-m TT. The importance of position at the first split was investigated with Kendall’s Tau-b correlation. The first 125-m split time was the slowest for all cyclists, representing the acceleration phase from a standing start. C2 cyclists were slowest at this 125-m split, probably due to a combination of remaining seated in this acceleration phase and a high proportion of cyclists in this group being trans-femoral amputees. Not all cyclists used aero-bars, preferring to use drop, flat or bullhorn handlebars

  20. Positive Pacing Strategies Are Utilized by Elite Male and Female Para-cyclists in Short Time Trials in the Velodrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Rachel L.

    2016-01-01

    In para-cycling, competitors are classed based on functional impairment resulting in cyclists with neurological and locomotor impairments competing against each other. In Paralympic competition, classes are combined by using a factoring adjustment to race times to produce the overall medallists. Pacing in short-duration track cycling events is proposed to utilize an “all-out” strategy in able-bodied competition. However, pacing in para-cycling may vary depending on the level of impairment. Analysis of the pacing strategies employed by different classification groups may offer scope for optimal performance; therefore, this study investigated the pacing strategy adopted during the 1-km time trial (TT) and 500-m TT in elite C1 to C3 para-cyclists and able-bodied cyclists. Total times and intermediate split times (125-m intervals; measured to 0.001 s) were obtained from the C1-C3 men's 1-km TT (n = 28) and women's 500-m TT (n = 9) from the 2012 Paralympic Games and the men's 1-km TT (n = 19) and women's 500-m TT (n = 12) from the 2013 UCI World Track Championships from publically available video. Split times were expressed as actual time, factored time (for the para-cyclists) and as a percentage of total time. A two-way analysis of variance was used to investigate differences in split times between the different classifications and the able-bodied cyclists in the men's 1-km TT and between the para-cyclists and able-bodied cyclists in the women's 500-m TT. The importance of position at the first split was investigated with Kendall's Tau-b correlation. The first 125-m split time was the slowest for all cyclists, representing the acceleration phase from a standing start. C2 cyclists were slowest at this 125-m split, probably due to a combination of remaining seated in this acceleration phase and a high proportion of cyclists in this group being trans-femoral amputees. Not all cyclists used aero-bars, preferring to use drop, flat or bullhorn handlebars. Split times