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Sample records for csf pulsatile flow

  1. Mathematical Modelling of CSF Pulsatile Flow in Aqueduct Cerebri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czosnyka, Zofia; Kim, Dong-Joo; Balédent, Olivier; Schmidt, Eric A; Smielewski, Peter; Czosnyka, Marek

    2018-01-01

    The phase-contrast MRI technique permits the non-invasive assessment of CSF movements in cerebrospinal fluid cavities of the central nervous system. Of particular interest is pulsatile cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow through the aqueduct cerebri. It is allegedly increased in hydrocephalus, having potential diagnostic value, although not all scientific reports contain unequivocally positive conclusions. For the mathematical simulation of CSF flow, we used a computational model of cerebrospinal blood/fluid circulation designed by a former student as his PhD project. With this model, cerebral blood flow and CSF may be simulated in various vessels using a system of non-linear differential equations as time-varying signals. The amplitude of CSF flow seems to be positively related to the amplitude of pulse waveforms of intracranial pressure (ICP) in situations where mean ICP increases, such as during simulated infusion tests and following step increases of resistance to CSF outflow. An additional positive association between the pulse amplitude of ICP and CSF flow can be seen during simulated increases in the amplitude of arterial pulses (without changes in mean arterial pressure, MAP). The opposite effect can be observed during step increases in the resistance of the aqueduct cerebri and with decreasing elasticity of the system, where the CSF flow amplitude and the ICP pulse amplitude are related inversely. Vasodilatation caused by both gradual decreases in MAP and by increases in PaCO2 provokes an elevation in the observed amplitude of pulsatile CSF flow. Preliminary results indicate that the pulsations of CSF flow may carry information about both CSF-circulatory and cerebral vasogenic components. In most cases, the pulsations of CSF flow are positively related to the pulse amplitudes of both arterial pressure and ICP and to a degree of cerebrovascular dilatation.

  2. Observation of the CSF pulsatile flow on MRI, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohara, Shigeki; Nagai, Hajime; Suzuka, Tomonao; Matsumoto, Takashi; Banno, Tatsuo

    1988-01-01

    In a retrospective study of the MR images of 289 neurosurgical patients, a loss of the signal intensity (the signal-void phenomenon =SVP) of the cerebrospinal fluid in the mesencephalic aqueduct was observed in 77 patients. The CSF in the cranial cavity flows toward the spinal sac in a to-and-fro manner in response to the pulsations of the brain. Because the intracranial compliance is lower than the intraspinal compliance, the systolic expansions and diastolic reductions in the brain volume are buffered by the spinal cavity via this to-and-fro flow of CSF. The SVP reflects the CSF pulsatile flow forced out of the intracranial space into the intraspinal space by the brain's pulsations. Intracranial abnormalities can be divided into two categories according to the craniospinal compliance (CC): normal CC (communicating hydrocephalus) and decreased CC (supratentorial tumor). We may expect those conditions which increase compliance to increase the CSF flow and yield a more prominent SVP. Conversely, conditions which decrease compliance may be expected to decrease the flow and extinguish the SVP. Both the brain's pulsations and the compliance of the craniospinal cavity are closely related to the presence of the SVP in CSF, as revealed by MRI. The SVP in CSF may reflect the pressure-buffering capacity of the cranio-spinal cavity. If further investigation supports our hypothesis, it may be possible to estimate the intracranial pressure noninvasively. (author)

  3. Visualization and quantitative analysis of the CSF pulsatile flow with cine MR phase imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katayama, Shinji; Itoh, Takahiko; Kinugasa, Kazushi; Asari, Shoji; Nishimoto, Akira; Tsuchida, Shohei; Ono, Atsushi; Ikezaki, Yoshikazu; Yoshitome, Eiji.

    1991-01-01

    The visualization and the quantitative analysis of the CSF pulsatile flow were performed on ten healthy volunteers with cine MR phase imaging, a combination of the phase-contrast technique and the cardiac-gating technique. The velocities appropriate for the visualization and the quantitative analysis of the CSF pulsatile flow were from 6.0 cm/sec to 15.0 cm/sec. The applicability of this method for the quantitative analysis was proven with a steady-flow phantom. Phase images clearly demonstrated a to-and-fro motion of the CSF flow in the anterior subarachnoid space and in the posterior subarachnoid space. The flow pattern of CSF on healthy volunteers depends on the cardiac cycle. In the anterior subarachnoid space, the cephalic CSF flow continued until a 70-msec delay after the R-wave of the ECG and then reversed to caudal. At 130-190 msec, the caudal CSF flow reached its maximum velocity; thereafter it reversed again to cephalic. The same turn appeared following the phase, but then the amplitude decreased. The cephalic peaked at 370-430 msec, while the caudal peaked at 490-550 msec. The flow pattern of the CSF flow in the posterior subarachnoid space was almost identical to that in the anterior subarachnoid space. Cine MR phase imaging is thus useful for the visualization and the quantitative analysis of the CSF pulsative flow. (author)

  4. Experimental study on quantitative evaluation of slow pulsatile flow of CSF with cine MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Masao

    1991-01-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the slow pulsatile flow of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) quantitatively with cine MRI in phantom experiment for the clinical application. The flow phantom was constructed from a plastic tube with a narrow channel to represent the central aqueduct. The phantom was filled with water to represent the CSF. The second tube filled with stationary water was positioned beside the flow phantom and acted as a control for no-flow signal strength. The ratio of signal intensity in regions of interest for the flow phantom and the control was measured. Not only the actual velocity curve of the flowing water through the phantom but also the temporal profile of signal intensity showed two main peaks with other small peaks in one cycle. This suggested a close relationship between signal intensity of cine MRI and flow velocity. A significant correlation between the signal intensity ratio and the velocity was obtained on cine MRI pulse sequences. Cine MRI was thus found to have the ability to give quantitative information about slow pulsatile flow. The most suitable pulse sequence was fast imaging with steady state free precession pulse sequence at the flip angle between 50 and 90 degrees. This preliminary study suggests that the slow pulsatile flow of CSF passing along the aqueduct can be visualized and measured. Thus, the sequence proposed has a potential for the investigation of normal and disturbed CSF circulation and the mapping of the flow pattern in different pathological conditions. (N.K.)

  5. Observation of the CSF pulsatile flow in the aqueduct using cine MRI with presaturation bolus tracking, 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Satoshi

    1992-01-01

    The to-and-fro motion patterns of the CSF flow in the aqueduct in ten normal adults, ten patients with secondary normal-pressure hydrocephalus (NPH), and fourteen patients with idiopathic ventriculomegaly were analyzed using cine MRI with presaturation bolus tracking. The to-and-fro motion patterns of the CSF flow in the aqueduct were thus classified into four types according to their maximum velocity and the relative time duration of their flow in the rostral and caudal directions. The correlation between the clinical symptoms, the CT findings, the RI-cisternography findings, the results of the ICP monitorings, and the CSF pulsatile-flow patterns were then analyzed. In secondary NPH disclosing frequent B waves on ICP monitoring, the maximum velocity of the CSF flow in the aqueduct was over 15 mm/sec, and the duration of the CSF flow was longer in the caudal direction than in the rostral direction. Furthermore, the faster the maximum velocity of the CSF flow, the larger the ventricular size on CT and the more severe the CSF malabsorption on cisternography. In idiopathic ventriculomegaly, only two cases demonstrated the same CSF flow pattern as was shown in secondary NPH; the other cases demonstrated other CSF flow patterns, which were considered to indicate hydrocephalus ex vacuo or arrested hydrocephalus. The CSF pulsatile-flow pattern was assumed to change according to the degree of the CSF circulatory disorder, its compensatory process, and the plasticity of the brain. The investigation of the CSF pulsatile flow gives important information for the evaluation of various hydrocephalic conditions. (author)

  6. MR imaging of pulsatile CSF movement in hydrocephalus communicans before and after CSF shunt implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldmann, A.; Kunz, U.; Rotermund, F.; Friedrich, J.M.; Schnarkowski, P.

    1992-01-01

    16 patients with hydrocephalus communicans and 5 healthy volunteers were examined to demonstrate the pattern of the pulsatile CSF flow. After implantation of a CSF shunt system the same patients were examined again to show the influence of the shunt on the CSF pulsations. We used a flow-sensitised, cardiac-gated 2D FLASH sequence and analysed the phase and magnitude images. It could be shown that most patients (n=12) had a hyerdynamic pulsatile flow preoperatively. After shunt implantation the pulsatile CSF motion and the clinical symptoms were improved in 8 of these patients. MRI of pulsatile CSF flow movement seems to be a helpful noninvasive tool to estimate the prognosis of a shunt implantation in patients with hydrocephalus communicans. (orig.) [de

  7. On the pulsatile nature of intracranial and spinal CSF-circulation demonstrated by MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greitz, D.; Franck, A.; Nordell, B.

    1993-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow was studied in 24 healthy volunteers using gated MR phase imaging. The subarachnoid space (SAS) was divided into 5 compartments depending on the magnitude of the pulsatile CSF flows: a high velocity compartment in the area of the brain stem and spinal cord, 2 slow ones at the upper and lower extremes of the SAS, and finally 2 intermediate velocity compartments in between. The main pulsatile spinal flow channel had a meandering pattern. The extraventricular CSF-circulation can be explained by pulsatile CSF flow without the necessity of assuming existence of a net flow. A successive time offset during the cardiac cycle has been found in the fronto-occipital direction of the interplay between the arterial expansion, brain expansion, volume changes of the CSF spaces and of the veins. It is proposed to name this time offset the intracranial ''volume wave'' (VoW). (orig.)

  8. Pulsatile flow in ventricular catheters for hydrocephalus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giménez, Á.; Galarza, M.; Thomale, U.; Schuhmann, M. U.; Valero, J.; Amigó, J. M.

    2017-05-01

    The obstruction of ventricular catheters (VCs) is a major problem in the standard treatment of hydrocephalus, the flow pattern of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) being one important factor thereof. As a first approach to this problem, some of the authors studied previously the CSF flow through VCs under time-independent boundary conditions by means of computational fluid dynamics in three-dimensional models. This allowed us to derive a few basic principles which led to designs with improved flow patterns regarding the obstruction problem. However, the flow of the CSF has actually a pulsatile nature because of the heart beating and blood flow. To address this fact, here we extend our previous computational study to models with oscillatory boundary conditions. The new results will be compared with the results for constant flows and discussed. It turns out that the corrections due to the pulsatility of the CSF are quantitatively small, which reinforces our previous findings and conclusions. This article is part of the themed issue `Mathematical methods in medicine: neuroscience, cardiology and pathology'.

  9. Surface obstacles in pulsatile flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Ian A.; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2017-11-01

    Flows past obstacles mounted on flat surfaces have been widely studied due to their ubiquity in nature and engineering. For nearly all of these studies, the freestream flow over the obstacle was steady, i.e., constant velocity, unidirectional flow. Unsteady, pulsatile flows occur frequently in biology, geophysics, biomedical engineering, etc. Our study is aimed at extending the comprehensive knowledge base that exists for steady flows to considerably more complex pulsatile flows. Characterizing the vortex and wake dynamics of flows around surface obstacles embedded in pulsatile flows can provide insights into the underlying physics in all wake and junction flows. In this study, we experimentally investigate the wake of two canonical obstacles: a cube and a circular cylinder with an aspect ratio of unity. Our previous studies of a surface-mounted hemisphere in pulsatile flow are used as a baseline for these two new, more complex geometries. Phase-averaged PIV and hot-wire anemometry are used to characterize the dynamics of coherent structures in the wake and at the windward junction of the obstacles. Complex physics occur during the deceleration phase of the pulsatile inflow. We propose a framework for understanding these physics based on self-induced vortex propagation, similar to the phenomena exhibited by vortex rings.

  10. Pulsatile pipe flow transition: Flow waveform effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brindise, Melissa C.; Vlachos, Pavlos P.

    2018-01-01

    Although transition is known to exist in various hemodynamic environments, the mechanisms that govern this flow regime and their subsequent effects on biological parameters are not well understood. Previous studies have investigated transition in pulsatile pipe flow using non-physiological sinusoidal waveforms at various Womersley numbers but have produced conflicting results, and multiple input waveform shapes have yet to be explored. In this work, we investigate the effect of the input pulsatile waveform shape on the mechanisms that drive the onset and development of transition using particle image velocimetry, three pulsatile waveforms, and six mean Reynolds numbers. The turbulent kinetic energy budget including dissipation rate, production, and pressure diffusion was computed. The results show that the waveform with a longer deceleration phase duration induced the earliest onset of transition, while the waveform with a longer acceleration period delayed the onset of transition. In accord with the findings of prior studies, for all test cases, turbulence was observed to be produced at the wall and either dissipated or redistributed into the core flow by pressure waves, depending on the mean Reynolds number. Turbulent production increased with increasing temporal velocity gradients until an asymptotic limit was reached. The turbulence dissipation rate was shown to be independent of mean Reynolds number, but a relationship between the temporal gradients of the input velocity waveform and the rate of turbulence dissipation was found. In general, these results demonstrated that the shape of the input pulsatile waveform directly affected the onset and development of transition.

  11. AN OVERVIEW ON PULSATILE FLOW DYNAMICS

    OpenAIRE

    Çarpinlioğlu, Melda Özdinç

    2015-01-01

    Pulsatile flow dynamics in reference to the relevant experimental research on the manner between the time periods of 1997- 2015 is presented in this paper. The flow field under discussion is generated through a rigid circular cross-sectional pipe as an axial slightly- compressible and sinusoidal one in a controlled range of the oscillation parameters. Laminar and turbulent flow regimes are considered with a particular emphasis devoted to the transitional characteristics of laminar pulsatile f...

  12. 21 CFR 870.4320 - Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator... Cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass pulsatile flow generator is an electrically and pneumatically operated device used to create pulsatile blood flow. The...

  13. Investigation of the pulsatile pipe flow

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Adamec, J.; Nožička, J.; Kořenář, Josef

    2000-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 2 (2000), s. 17-22 ISSN 0392-8764 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2060917 Keywords : pulsatile flow * laminar-turbulent transition * reynolds normal stress Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics

  14. The Connected Steady State Model and the Interdependence of the CSF Proteome and CSF Flow Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Fabian; Mischek, Daniel; Stoffers, Frédéric

    2017-01-01

    Here we show that the hydrodynamic radii-dependent entry of blood proteins into cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) can best be modeled with a diffusional system of consecutive interdependent steady states between barrier-restricted molecular flux and bulk flow of CSF. The connected steady state model fits precisely to experimental results and provides the theoretical backbone to calculate the in-vivo hydrodynamic radii of blood-derived proteins as well as individual barrier characteristics. As the experimental reference set we used a previously published large-scale patient cohort of CSF to serum quotient ratios of immunoglobulins in relation to the respective albumin quotients. We related the inter-individual variances of these quotient relationships to the individual CSF flow time and barrier characteristics. We claim that this new concept allows the diagnosis of inflammatory processes with Reibergrams derived from population-based thresholds to be shifted to individualized judgment, thereby improving diagnostic sensitivity. We further use the source-dependent gradient patterns of proteins in CSF as intrinsic tracers for CSF flow characteristics. We assume that the rostrocaudal gradient of blood-derived proteins is a consequence of CSF bulk flow, whereas the slope of the gradient is a consequence of the unidirectional bulk flow and bidirectional pulsatile flow of CSF. Unlike blood-derived proteins, the influence of CSF flow characteristics on brain-derived proteins in CSF has been insufficiently discussed to date. By critically reviewing existing experimental data and by reassessing their conformity to CSF flow assumptions we conclude that the biomarker potential of brain-derived proteins in CSF can be improved by considering individual subproteomic dynamics of the CSF system.

  15. Qualitative analysis of intracranial CSF flow on cine-MR imaging, with special reference to signal ratio of CSF to fat tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadowaki, Chikafusa; Hara, Mitsuhiro; Numoto, Mitsuo; Takeuchi, Kazuo; Saito, Isamu

    1993-01-01

    Cine magnetic resonance images (MR) dramatically demonstrate the pulsatile flow of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) stimulated by the pulsatile motion of the brain following cardiac pulsation. Reduced signal intensity, frequently observed especially in the aqueduct of Sylvius, the third ventricle and the fourth ventricle, is believed to reflect the pulsatile motion of the CSF. Qualitative analysis of MR signal intensity of CSF on each cine frame is compared with CSF flow within the ventricles on real-time cine MR images. While the chronological changes in signal intensities of CSF within the ventricles show only marginal changes in signal intensity in the third ventricle related to downward flow of CSF passing through the foramen of Monro during the early stage of cardiac systole, these changes are thought to have no significant correlation with the CSF flow in the CSF pathway. The chronological changes in relative signal ratios, SR [signal intensities of CSF/signal intensities of fat] can show CSF flow and turbulence within the ventricles. Under normal conditions, within the third ventricle the SR decreases due to pulsatile CSF flow through the foramen of Monro during the early stage of cardiac systole, and decreases because of the flow of CSF from the anterior to the posterior part of the third ventricle, the downward flow of CSF through the aqueduct leads to a lower SR during cardiac diastole. These changes in the fourth ventricle are stimulated by the changes in SR in the third ventricle. The new method of analyzing chronological changes in the relative MR signal ratio of CSF to fat [SR] has the distinct advantage of providing an accurate evaluation of CSF dynamics, and it provides us with important diagnostic information leading to clarification of the pathophysiology of CSF dynamics. (author)

  16. Cerebral blood flow and intracranial pulsatility studied with MRI: measurement, physiological and pathophysiological aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waahlin, Anders

    2012-07-01

    During each cardiac cycle pulsatile arterial blood inflates the vascular bed of the brain, forcing cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and venous blood out of the cranium. Excessive arterial pulsatility may be part of a harmful mechanism causing cognitive decline among elderly. Additionally, restricted venous flow from the brain is suggested as the cause of multiple sclerosis. Addressing hypotheses derived from these observations requires accurate and reliable investigational methods. This work focused on assessing the pulsatile waveform of cerebral arterial, venous and CSF flows. The overall aim of this dissertation was to explore cerebral blood flow and intracranial pulsatility using MRI, with respect to measurement, physiological and pathophysiological aspects.Two-dimensional phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging (2D PCMRI) was used to assess the pulsatile waveforms of cerebral arterial, venous and CSF flow. The repeatability was assessed in healthy young subjects. The 2D PCMRI measurements of cerebral arterial, venous and CSF pulsatility were generally repeatable but the pulsatility decreased systematically during the investigation. A method combining 2D PCMRI measurements with invasive CSF infusion tests to determine the magnitude and distribution of compliance within the craniospinal system was developed and applied in a group of healthy elderly. The intracranial space contained approximately two thirds of the total craniospinal compliance. The magnitude of craniospinal compliance was less than suggested in previous studies. The vascular hypothesis for multiple sclerosis was tested. Venous drainage in the internal jugular veins was compared between healthy controls and multiple sclerosis patients using 2D PCMRI. For both groups, a great variability in the internal jugular flow was observed but no pattern specific to multiple sclerosis could be found. Relationships between regional brain volumes and potential biomarkers of intracranial cardiac-related pulsatile

  17. Cerebral blood flow and intracranial pulsatility studied with MRI: measurement, physiological and pathophysiological aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waahlin, Anders

    2012-01-01

    During each cardiac cycle pulsatile arterial blood inflates the vascular bed of the brain, forcing cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and venous blood out of the cranium. Excessive arterial pulsatility may be part of a harmful mechanism causing cognitive decline among elderly. Additionally, restricted venous flow from the brain is suggested as the cause of multiple sclerosis. Addressing hypotheses derived from these observations requires accurate and reliable investigational methods. This work focused on assessing the pulsatile waveform of cerebral arterial, venous and CSF flows. The overall aim of this dissertation was to explore cerebral blood flow and intracranial pulsatility using MRI, with respect to measurement, physiological and pathophysiological aspects.Two-dimensional phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging (2D PCMRI) was used to assess the pulsatile waveforms of cerebral arterial, venous and CSF flow. The repeatability was assessed in healthy young subjects. The 2D PCMRI measurements of cerebral arterial, venous and CSF pulsatility were generally repeatable but the pulsatility decreased systematically during the investigation. A method combining 2D PCMRI measurements with invasive CSF infusion tests to determine the magnitude and distribution of compliance within the craniospinal system was developed and applied in a group of healthy elderly. The intracranial space contained approximately two thirds of the total craniospinal compliance. The magnitude of craniospinal compliance was less than suggested in previous studies. The vascular hypothesis for multiple sclerosis was tested. Venous drainage in the internal jugular veins was compared between healthy controls and multiple sclerosis patients using 2D PCMRI. For both groups, a great variability in the internal jugular flow was observed but no pattern specific to multiple sclerosis could be found. Relationships between regional brain volumes and potential biomarkers of intracranial cardiac-related pulsatile

  18. Positron emission particle tracking in pulsatile flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, Nitant; Ruggles, Arthur [University of Tennessee-Knoxville, Department of Nuclear Engineering, Knoxville, TN (United States); Wiggins, Cody [University of Tennessee-Knoxville, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2017-05-15

    Positron emission particle tracking (PEPT) is increasingly used to understand the flow characteristics in complex systems. This research utilizes PEPT to measure pulsatile flow of frequency 2.1 Hz in an elastic Masterkleer PVC tube of 19 mm inner diameter and 3.2 mm wall thickness. Anion exchange resin beads are labeled with {sup 18}F and delivered to a pump driven flow loop with motorized ball valve used to develop the pulsatile flow. Data are collected in the tube with circular cross section, and measurements are also collected with a section of the tube pinched. Nominal flow velocities are near 1 m/s and Reynolds numbers near 20,000. Many thousand PEPT particle traces are collected and synchronized with the flow pulsation. These Lagrangian data are presented as a series of 20 still frames depicting the 3-D velocity field present during each phase of the flow pulsation. Pressure data are also collected to resolve the pressure wave front moving through the open elastic tube at velocity 15.2 m/s. (orig.)

  19. Pulsatile spiral blood flow through arterial stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linge, Fabian; Hye, Md Abdul; Paul, Manosh C

    2014-11-01

    Pulsatile spiral blood flow in a modelled three-dimensional arterial stenosis, with a 75% cross-sectional area reduction, is investigated by using numerical fluid dynamics. Two-equation k-ω model is used for the simulation of the transitional flow with Reynolds numbers 500 and 1000. It is found that the spiral component increases the static pressure in the vessel during the deceleration phase of the flow pulse. In addition, the spiral component reduces the turbulence intensity and wall shear stress found in the post-stenosis region of the vessel in the early stages of the flow pulse. Hence, the findings agree with the results of Stonebridge et al. (2004). In addition, the results of the effects of a spiral component on time-varying flow are presented and discussed along with the relevant pathological issues.

  20. CSF flow: Correlation between signal void and CSF velocity measured by gated velocity phase-encoded MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mark, A.S.; Feinberg, D.A.

    1986-01-01

    The direction of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow in the foramen of Monro (FOM) and aqueduct was determined in 15 normal volunteers (5 of whom had also been studied with gated spin-echo sequences) using a cardiac-gated Fourier transform velocity imaging technique (VMR). The VMR showed that the periodic pattern of flow void seen in the aqueduct and FOM on the gated spin-echo images was due to antegrade CSF flow from the lateral ventricles into the third ventricle and aqueduct during systole and retrograde flow from the aqueduct into the third ventricle and lateral ventricles during late diastole. These findings could not be explained if the CSF pulsations originated in the third ventricle, as had been previously proposed, and suggest the lateral ventricles play an important role in the pulsatile motion of CSF

  1. Arduino control of a pulsatile flow rig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drost, S; de Kruif, B J; Newport, D

    2018-01-01

    This note describes the design and testing of a programmable pulsatile flow pump using an Arduino micro-controller. The goal of this work is to build a compact and affordable system that can relatively easily be programmed to generate physiological waveforms. The system described here was designed to be used in an in-vitro set-up for vascular access hemodynamics research, and hence incorporates a gear pump that delivers a mean flow of 900 ml/min in a test flow loop, and a peak flow of 1106 ml/min. After a number of simple identification experiments to assess the dynamic behaviour of the system, a feed-forward control routine was implemented. The resulting system was shown to be able to produce the targeted representative waveform with less than 3.6% error. Finally, we outline how to further increase the accuracy of the system, and how to adapt it to specific user needs. Copyright © 2017 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Intracranial CSF flow on cine-MR. 2. Qualitative analysis in CSF dynamics by MR signal ratio of CSF to fat tissue in healthy subjects and patients with aqueduct stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadowaki, Chikafusa; Hara, Mitsuhiro; Takeuchi, Kazuo; Saito, Isamu

    1994-01-01

    Changes in MR signal intensities (SIs) of CSF and relative MR signal ratios (SRs) of intraventricular CSF to fat tissue were evaluated in 5 healthy adults on cine MR images during a cardiac cycle in a study of normal intracranial CSF dynamics. The altered patterns of MR SIs and SRs in 6 patients with aqueduct stenosis were compared with normal CSF flow patterns in a demonstration of CSF dynamics changes. MR SIs of CSF within the ventricles were measured on each cine image obtained by cardiac gated, multiframe, cine MR imaging. Chronological changes in MR SIs and SRs during a cardiac cycle were compared with the actual CSF flow visualized on real cine images. In normal CSF circulation, MR SIs of CSF within the ventricles were reduced quickly following an R-wave on ECG to 15% of the R-R interval, after which SIs fluctuated slightly. These changes in MR SIs of CSF could only be related to the pulsatile CSF flow through the foramen of Monro into the anterior part of the third ventricle during early cardiac systole. MR SRs of CSF to fat tissue fluctuated according to the actual CSF flow within the ventricles during a cardiac cycle. MR SRs in the third ventricle decreased to 20-30% of the R-R interval following the R-wave due to downward CSF flow during early cardiac systole, and decreased again from late cardiac systole to diastole due to caudal CSF flow in the third ventricle. In the fourth ventricle, MR SRs of CSF decreased to 60-80% of the R-R interval because of the CSF flow through the aqueduct during cardiac diastole. In patients with aqueduct stenosis, MR SRs of CSF within the ventricles fluctuated randomly, and the amplitude of MR SRs was also greater than in subjects with a patent aqueduct. These changes were identified as turbulence and stagnation due to obstruction in the CSF pathway. Analysis of chronological changes in MR signal ratios of CSF to fat is useful in demonstrating the pathophysiologic features of intracranial CSF dynamics. (author) 52 refs

  3. Experimental Investigation of Pulsatile Flow in Circular Tubes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Adamec, J.; Nožička, J.; Hanus, D.; Kořenář, Josef

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 5 (2001), s. 1133-1136 ISSN 0748-4658 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2060917 Keywords : pulsatile flow * laminar-turbulent transition * reynolds normal stress Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 0.418, year: 2001

  4. Leaback of Pulsatile Flow of Particle Fluid Suspension Model of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Leaback of Pulsatile Flow of Particle Fluid Suspension Model of Blood Under Periodic Body Acceleration. ... The variation in body acceleration amplitude though affects the velocity profile in the capillary tubes, it has no effect on the leakback in the tubes. Leakback is mainly determined by the balance of the viscous drag and ...

  5. Pulsatile blood flow, shear force, energy dissipation and Murray's Law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bengtsson Hans-Uno

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Murray's Law states that, when a parent blood vessel branches into daughter vessels, the cube of the radius of the parent vessel is equal to the sum of the cubes of the radii of daughter blood vessels. Murray derived this law by defining a cost function that is the sum of the energy cost of the blood in a vessel and the energy cost of pumping blood through the vessel. The cost is minimized when vessel radii are consistent with Murray's Law. This law has also been derived from the hypothesis that the shear force of moving blood on the inner walls of vessels is constant throughout the vascular system. However, this derivation, like Murray's earlier derivation, is based on the assumption of constant blood flow. Methods To determine the implications of the constant shear force hypothesis and to extend Murray's energy cost minimization to the pulsatile arterial system, a model of pulsatile flow in an elastic tube is analyzed. A new and exact solution for flow velocity, blood flow rate and shear force is derived. Results For medium and small arteries with pulsatile flow, Murray's energy minimization leads to Murray's Law. Furthermore, the hypothesis that the maximum shear force during the cycle of pulsatile flow is constant throughout the arterial system implies that Murray's Law is approximately true. The approximation is good for all but the largest vessels (aorta and its major branches of the arterial system. Conclusion A cellular mechanism that senses shear force at the inner wall of a blood vessel and triggers remodeling that increases the circumference of the wall when a shear force threshold is exceeded would result in the observed scaling of vessel radii described by Murray's Law.

  6. Pulsatility role in cylinder flow dynamics at low Reynolds number

    KAUST Repository

    Qamar, Adnan

    2012-01-01

    We present dynamics of pulsatile flow past a stationary cylinder characterized by three non-dimensional parameters: the Reynolds number (Re), non-dimensional amplitude (A) of the pulsatile flow velocity, and Keulegan-Carpenter number (KC = Uo/Dωc). This work is motivated by the development of total artificial lungs (TAL) device, which is envisioned to provide ambulatory support to patients. Results are presented for 0.2 ≤ A ≤ 0.6 and 0.57 ≤ KC ≤ 2 at Re = 5 and 10, which correspond to the operating range of TAL. Two distinct fluid regimes are identified. In both regimes, the size of the separated zone is much greater than the uniform flow case, the onset of separation is function of KC, and the separation vortex collapses rapidly during the last fraction of the pulsatile cycle. The vortex size is independent of KC, but with an exponential dependency on A. In regime I, the separation point remains attached to the cylinder surface. In regime II, the separation point migrates upstream of the cylinder. Two distinct vortex collapse mechanisms are observed. For A < 0.4 and all KC and Re values, collapse occurs on the cylinder surface, whereas for A > 0.4 the separation vortex detaches from the cylinder surface and collapses at a certain distance downstream of the cylinder. The average drag coefficient is found to be independent of A and KC, and depends only on Re. However, for A > 0.4, for a fraction of the pulsatile cycle, the instantaneous drag coefficient is negative indicating a thrust production. © 2012 American Institute of Physics.

  7. Pulsatile operation of a continuous-flow right ventricular assist device (RVAD) to improve vascular pulsatility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Boon C; Kleinheyer, Matthias; Smith, Peter A; Timms, Daniel; Cohn, William E; Lim, Einly

    2018-01-01

    Despite the widespread acceptance of rotary blood pump (RBP) in clinical use over the past decades, the diminished flow pulsatility generated by a fixed speed RBP has been regarded as a potential factor that may lead to adverse events such as vasculature stiffening and hemorrhagic strokes. In this study, we investigate the feasibility of generating physiological pulse pressure in the pulmonary circulation by modulating the speed of a right ventricular assist device (RVAD) in a mock circulation loop. A rectangular pulse profile with predetermined pulse width has been implemented as the pump speed pattern with two different phase shifts (0% and 50%) with respect to the ventricular contraction. In addition, the performance of the speed modulation strategy has been assessed under different cardiovascular states, including variation in ventricular contractility and pulmonary arterial compliance. Our results indicated that the proposed pulse profile with optimised parameters (Apulse = 10000 rpm and ωmin = 3000 rpm) was able to generate pulmonary arterial pulse pressure within the physiological range (9-15 mmHg) while avoiding undesirable pump backflow under both co- and counter-pulsation modes. As compared to co-pulsation, stroke work was reduced by over 44% under counter-pulsation, suggesting that mechanical workload of the right ventricle can be efficiently mitigated through counter-pulsing the pump speed. Furthermore, our results showed that improved ventricular contractility could potentially lead to higher risk of ventricular suction and pump backflow, while stiffening of the pulmonary artery resulted in increased pulse pressure. In conclusion, the proposed speed modulation strategy produces pulsatile hemodynamics, which is more physiologic than continuous blood flow. The findings also provide valuable insight into the interaction between RVAD speed modulation and the pulmonary circulation under various cardiovascular states.

  8. Pulsatile flow of viscous and viscoelastic fluids in constricted tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Javadzadegan, A.; Esmaeili, M.; Majidi, S. [University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Fakhimghanbarzadeh, B. [Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2009-09-15

    The unsteady flow of blood through stenosed artery, driven by an oscillatory pressure gradient, is studied. An appropriate shape of the time-dependent stenoses which are overlapped in the realm of the formation of arterial narrowing is constructed mathematically. A mathematical model is developed by treating blood as a non-Newtonian fluid characterized by the Oldroyd-B and Cross models. A numerical scheme has been used to solve the unsteady nonlinear Navier- stokes equations in cylindrical coordinate system governing flow, assuming axial symmetry under laminar flow condition so that the problem effectively becomes two-dimensional. Finite difference technique was used to investigate the effects of parameters such as pulsatility, non-Newtonian properties and the flow time on the velocity components, the rate of flow, and the wall shear stress through their graphical representations quantitatively at the end of the paper in order to validate the applicability of the present improved mathematical model under consideration

  9. Pulsatile flow of viscous and viscoelastic fluids in constricted tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Javadzadegan, A.; Esmaeili, M.; Majidi, S.; Fakhimghanbarzadeh, B.

    2009-01-01

    The unsteady flow of blood through stenosed artery, driven by an oscillatory pressure gradient, is studied. An appropriate shape of the time-dependent stenoses which are overlapped in the realm of the formation of arterial narrowing is constructed mathematically. A mathematical model is developed by treating blood as a non-Newtonian fluid characterized by the Oldroyd-B and Cross models. A numerical scheme has been used to solve the unsteady nonlinear Navier- stokes equations in cylindrical coordinate system governing flow, assuming axial symmetry under laminar flow condition so that the problem effectively becomes two-dimensional. Finite difference technique was used to investigate the effects of parameters such as pulsatility, non-Newtonian properties and the flow time on the velocity components, the rate of flow, and the wall shear stress through their graphical representations quantitatively at the end of the paper in order to validate the applicability of the present improved mathematical model under consideration

  10. Variable impact of CSF flow suppression on quantitative 3.0T intracranial vessel wall measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogswell, Petrice M; Siero, Jeroen C W; Lants, Sarah K; Waddle, Spencer; Davis, L Taylor; Gilbert, Guillaume; Hendrikse, Jeroen; Donahue, Manus J

    2018-03-31

    Flow suppression techniques have been developed for intracranial (IC) vessel wall imaging (VWI) and optimized using simulations; however, simulation results may not translate in vivo. To evaluate experimentally how IC vessel wall and lumen measurements change in identical subjects when evaluated using the most commonly available blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow suppression modules and VWI sequences. Prospective. Healthy adults (n = 13; age = 37 ± 15 years) were enrolled. A 3.0T 3D T 1 /proton density (PD)-weighted turbo-spin-echo (TSE) acquisition with post-readout anti-driven equilibrium module, with and without Delay-Alternating-with-Nutation-for-Tailored-Excitation (DANTE) was applied. DANTE flip angle (8-12°) and TSE refocusing angle (sweep = 40-120° or 50-120°) were varied. Basilar artery and internal carotid artery (ICA) wall thicknesses, CSF signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and signal ratio (SR) were assessed. Measurements were made by two readers (radiology resident and board-certified neuroradiologist). A Wilcoxon signed-rank test was applied with corrected two-sided P CSF suppression. Addition of the DANTE preparation reduced CSF SNR from 17.4 to 6.7, thereby providing significant (P CSF suppression. The DANTE preparation also resulted in a significant (P CSF CNR improvement (P = 0.87). There was a trend for a difference in blood SNR with vs. without DANTE (P = 0.05). The outer vessel wall diameter and wall thickness values were lower (P CSF suppression and CNR of the approaches evaluated. However, improvements are heterogeneous, likely owing to intersubject vessel pulsatility and CSF flow variations, which can lead to variable flow suppression efficacy in these velocity-dependent modules. 2 Technical Efficacy: Stage 1 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2018. © 2018 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  11. Heat Transfer to Pulsatile Slip Flow in a Porous Channel Filled With ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper investigate the effect of slip on the hydromagnetic pulsatile flow through a porous channel filled with saturated porous medium with time dependent boundary condition on the heated wall. Based on the pulsatile flow nature, the dimensionless flow governing equations are resolved to harmonic and non-harmonic ...

  12. A study of doppler waveform using pulsatile flow model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Hye Won; Chung, Myung Jin; Park, Jae Hyung; Chung, Jin Wook; Lee, Dong Hyuk; Min, Byoung Goo

    1997-01-01

    Through the construction of a pulsatile flow model using an artificial heart pump and stenosis to demonstrate triphasic Doppler waveform, which simulates in vivo conditions, and to evaluate the relationship between Doppler waveform and vascular compliance. The flow model was constructed using a flowmeter, rubber tube, glass tube with stenosis, and artificial heart pump. Doppler study was carried out at the prestenotic, poststenotic, and distal segments;compliance was changed by changing the length of the rubber tube. With increasing proximal compliance, Doppler waveforms show decreasing peak velocity of the first phase and slightly delayed acceleration time, but the waveform itself did not change significantly. Distal compliance influenced the second phase, and was important for the formation of pulsus tardus and parvus, which without poststenotic vascular compliance, did not develop. The peak velocity of the first phase was inversely proportional to proximal compliance, and those of the second and third phases were directly proportional to distal compliance. After constructing this pulsatile flow model, we were able to explain the relationship between vascular compliance and Doppler waveform, and also better understand the formation of pulsus tardus and parvus

  13. Pulsatile pressure driven rarefied gas flow in long rectangular ducts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsimpoukis, Alexandros; Valougeorgis, Dimitris

    2018-04-01

    The pulsatile pressure driven fully developed flow of a rarefied gas through an orthogonal duct is investigated, based on the time-dependent linear Bhatnagar, Gross, and Krook equation, by decomposing the flow into its steady and oscillatory parts. The investigation is focused on the oscillatory part, which is characterized by the gas rarefaction and oscillation parameters, the duct aspect ratio, and the accommodation coefficient. As the oscillation frequency is increased, the amplitude of all macroscopic quantities is decreased, while their phase angle lag is increased reaching the limiting value of π/2. As the gas becomes more rarefied, higher frequencies are needed to trigger this behavior. At small and moderate frequencies, there is a critical degree of gas rarefaction, where a maximum flow rate is obtained. As the duct aspect ratio is decreased and tends to zero, the flow rate and mean wall shear stress amplitudes are increased, while their phase angle lags are slightly affected. The accommodation coefficient has a significant effect on the amplitude and a very weak one on the phase angle of the macroscopic quantities. The computation of the inertia and viscous forces clarifies when the flow consists of only one oscillating viscous region or of two regions, namely, the inviscid piston flow in the core and the oscillating Stokes layer at the wall with the velocity overshooting. Finally, the time average oscillatory pumping power is increased as the oscillation frequency is reduced and its maximum value is one half of the corresponding steady one.

  14. Respiration and the watershed of spinal CSF flow in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreha-Kulaczewski, Steffi; Konopka, Mareen; Joseph, Arun A; Kollmeier, Jost; Merboldt, Klaus-Dietmar; Ludwig, Hans-Christoph; Gärtner, Jutta; Frahm, Jens

    2018-04-04

    The dynamics of human CSF in brain and upper spinal canal are regulated by inspiration and connected to the venous system through associated pressure changes. Upward CSF flow into the head during inspiration counterbalances venous flow out of the brain. Here, we investigated CSF motion along the spinal canal by real-time phase-contrast flow MRI at high spatial and temporal resolution. Results reveal a watershed of spinal CSF dynamics which divides flow behavior at about the level of the heart. While forced inspiration prompts upward surge of CSF flow volumes in the entire spinal canal, ensuing expiration leads to pronounced downward CSF flow, but only in the lower canal. The resulting pattern of net flow volumes during forced respiration yields upward CSF motion in the upper and downward flow in the lower spinal canal. These observations most likely reflect closely coupled CSF and venous systems as both large caval veins and their anastomosing vertebral plexus react to respiration-induced pressure changes.

  15. Interpretation and value of MR CSF flow studies for paediatric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Imaging techniques may be underutilised when clinicians are unaware of the technique or do not recognise its potential. Phase-contrast MR imaging (PC-MRI) is a rapid, simple and non-invasive technique that is sensitive to CSF flow. It demonstrates a mechanical coupling between cerebral blood and CSF flow throughout ...

  16. Modeling of pulsatile flow-dependent nitric oxide regulation in a realistic microvascular network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruofan; Pan, Qing; Kuebler, Wolfgang M; Li, John K-J; Pries, Axel R; Ning, Gangmin

    2017-09-01

    Hemodynamic pulsatility has been reported to regulate microcirculatory function. To quantitatively assess the impact of flow pulsatility on the microvasculature, a mathematical model was first developed to simulate the regulation of NO production by pulsatile flow in the microcirculation. Shear stress and pressure pulsatility were selected as regulators of endothelial NO production and NO-dependent vessel dilation as feedback to control microvascular hemodynamics. The model was then applied to a real microvascular network of the rat mesentery consisting of 546 microvessels. As compared to steady flow conditions, pulsatile flow increased the average NO concentration in arterioles from 256.8±93.1nM to 274.8±101.1nM (Pflow as compared to steady flow conditions. Network perfusion and flow heterogeneity were improved under pulsatile flow conditions, and vasodilation within the network was more sensitive to heart rate changes than pulse pressure amplitude. The proposed model simulates the role of flow pulsatility in the regulation of a complex microvascular network in terms of NO concentration and hemodynamics under varied physiological conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Effect of Acute Resistance Exercise on Carotid Artery Stiffness and Cerebral Blood Flow Pulsatility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wesley K Lefferts

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Arterial stiffness is associated with cerebral flow pulsatility. Arterial stiffness increases following acute resistance exercise (RE. Whether this acute RE-induced vascular stiffening affects cerebral pulsatility remains unknown. Purpose: To investigate the effects of acute RE on common carotid artery (CCA stiffness and cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFv pulsatility. Methods: Eighteen healthy men (22 ± 1 yr; 23.7 ± 0.5 kg∙m-2 underwent acute RE (5 sets, 5-RM bench press, 5 sets 10-RM bicep curls with 90 s rest intervals or a time control condition (seated rest in a randomized order. CCA stiffness (β-stiffness, Elastic Modulus (Ep and hemodynamics (pulsatility index, forward wave intensity and reflected wave intensity were assessed using a combination of Doppler ultrasound, wave intensity analysis and applanation tonometry at baseline and 3 times post-RE. CBFv pulsatility index was measured with transcranial Doppler at the middle cerebral artery (MCA. Results: CCA β-stiffness, Ep and CCA pulse pressure significantly increased post-RE and remained elevated throughout post-testing (p 0.05. There were significant increases in forward wave intensity post-RE (p0.05. Conclusion: Although acute RE increases CCA stiffness and pressure pulsatility, it may not affect CCA or MCA flow pulsatility. Increases in pressure pulsatility may be due to increased forward wave intensity and not pressure from wave reflections.

  18. Pulsatile flow effects on the hemodynamics of intracranial aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Trung B; Borazjani, Iman; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2010-11-01

    High-resolution numerical simulations are carried out to systematically investigate the effect of the incoming flow waveform on the hemodynamics and wall shear stress patterns of an anatomic sidewall intracranial aneurysm model. Various wave forms are constructed by appropriately scaling a typical human waveform such that the waveform maximum and time-averaged Reynolds numbers, the Womersley number (α), and the pulsatility index (PI) are systematically varied within the human physiologic range. We show that the waveform PI is the key parameter that governs the vortex dynamics across the aneurysm neck and the flow patterns within the dome. At low PI, the flow in the dome is similar to a driven cavity flow and is characterized by a quasi-stationary shear layer that delineates the parent artery flow from the recirculating flow within the dome. At high PI, on the other hand, the flow is dominated by vortex ring formation, transport across the neck, and impingement and breakdown at the distal wall of the aneurysm dome. We further show that the spatial and temporal characteristics of the wall shear stress field on the aneurysm dome are strongly correlated with the vortex dynamics across the neck. We finally argue that the ratio between the characteristic time scale of transport by the mean flow across the neck and the time scale of vortex ring formation can be used to predict for a given sidewall aneurysm model the critical value of the waveform PI for which the hemodynamics will transition from the cavity mode to the vortex ring mode.

  19. Measurement of real pulsatile blood flow using X-ray PIV technique with CO2 microbubbles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hanwook; Yeom, Eunseop; Seo, Seung-Jun; Lim, Jae-Hong; Lee, Sang-Joon

    2015-03-06

    Synchrotron X-ray imaging technique has been used to investigate biofluid flows in a non-destructive manner. This study aims to investigate the feasibility of the X-ray PIV technique with CO2 microbubbles as flow tracer for measurement of pulsatile blood flows under in vivo conditions. The traceability of CO2 microbubbles in a pulsatile flow was demonstrated through in vitro experiment. A rat extracorporeal bypass loop was used by connecting a tube between the abdominal aorta and jugular vein of a rat to obtain hemodynamic information of actual pulsatile blood flows without changing the hemorheological properties. The decrease in image contrast of the surrounding tissue was also investigated for in vivo applications of the proposed technique. This technique could be used to accurately measure whole velocity field information of real pulsatile blood flows and has strong potential for hemodynamic diagnosis of cardiovascular diseases.

  20. Measurement of real pulsatile blood flow using X-ray PIV technique with CO2 microbubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hanwook; Yeom, Eunseop; Seo, Seung-Jun; Lim, Jae-Hong; Lee, Sang-Joon

    2015-01-01

    Synchrotron X-ray imaging technique has been used to investigate biofluid flows in a non-destructive manner. This study aims to investigate the feasibility of the X-ray PIV technique with CO2 microbubbles as flow tracer for measurement of pulsatile blood flows under in vivo conditions. The traceability of CO2 microbubbles in a pulsatile flow was demonstrated through in vitro experiment. A rat extracorporeal bypass loop was used by connecting a tube between the abdominal aorta and jugular vein of a rat to obtain hemodynamic information of actual pulsatile blood flows without changing the hemorheological properties. The decrease in image contrast of the surrounding tissue was also investigated for in vivo applications of the proposed technique. This technique could be used to accurately measure whole velocity field information of real pulsatile blood flows and has strong potential for hemodynamic diagnosis of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25744850

  1. PLATELET ADHESION TO POLYURETHANE UREA UNDER PULSATILE FLOW CONDITIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navitsky, Michael A.; Taylor, Joshua O.; Smith, Alexander B.; Slattery, Margaret J.; Deutsch, Steven; Siedlecki, Christopher A.; Manning, Keefe B.

    2014-01-01

    Platelet adhesion to a polyurethane urea surface is a precursor to thrombus formation within blood-contacting cardiovascular devices, and platelets have been found to adhere strongly to polyurethane surfaces below a shear rate of approximately 500 s−1. The aim of the current work is to determine platelet adhesion properties to the polyurethane urea surface as a function of time varying shear exposure. A rotating disk system is used to study the influence of steady and pulsatile flow conditions (e.g. cardiac inflow and sawtooth waveforms) for platelet adhesion to the biomaterial surface. All experiments retain the same root mean square angular rotation velocity (29.63 rad/s) and waveform period. The disk is rotated in platelet rich bovine plasma for two hours with adhesion quantified by confocal microscopy measurements of immunofluorescently labeled bovine platelets. Platelet adhesion under pulsating flow is found to exponentially decay with increasing shear rate. Adhesion levels are found to depend upon peak platelet flux and shear rate regardless of rotational waveform. In combination with flow measurements, these results may be useful for predicting regions susceptible to thrombus formation within ventricular assist devices. PMID:24721222

  2. Enhancement of Arterial Pressure Pulsatility by Controlling Continuous-Flow Left Ventricular Assist Device Flow Rate in Mock Circulatory System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozkurt, Selim; van de Vosse, Frans N; Rutten, Marcel C M

    Continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices (CF-LVADs) generally operate at a constant speed, which reduces pulsatility in the arteries and may lead to complications such as functional changes in the vascular system, gastrointestinal bleeding, or both. The purpose of this study is to increase the arterial pulse pressure and pulsatility by controlling the CF-LVAD flow rate. A MicroMed DeBakey pump was used as the CF-LVAD. A model simulating the flow rate through the aortic valve was used as a reference model to drive the pump. A mock circulation containing two synchronized servomotor-operated piston pumps acting as left and right ventricles was used as a circulatory system. Proportional-integral control was used as the control method. First, the CF-LVAD was operated at a constant speed. With pulsatile-speed CF-LVAD assistance, the pump was driven such that the same mean pump output was generated. Continuous and pulsatile-speed CF-LVAD assistance provided the same mean arterial pressure and flow rate, while the index of pulsatility increased significantly for both arterial pressure and pump flow rate signals under pulsatile speed pump support. This study shows the possibility of improving the pulsatility of CF-LVAD support by regulating pump speed over a cardiac cycle without reducing the overall level of support.

  3. The Characteristics of Turbulence in Curved Pipes under Highly Pulsatile Flow Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalpakli, A.; Örlü, R.; Tillmark, N.; Alfredsson, P. Henrik

    High speed stereoscopic particle image velocimetry has been employed to provide unique data from a steady and highly pulsatile turbulent flow at the exit of a 90 degree pipe bend. Both the unsteady behaviour of the Dean cells under steady conditions, the so called "swirl switching" phenomenon, as well as the secondary flow under pulsations have been reconstructed through proper orthogonal decomposition. The present data set constitutes - to the authors' knowledge - the first detailed investigation of a turbulent, pulsatile flow through a pipe bend.

  4. Cine-MR imaging aqueductal CSF flow in normal pressure hydrocephalus syndrome before and after CSF shunt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mascalchi, M.; Arnetoli, G.; Inzitari, D.; Dal Pozzo, G.; Lolli, F.; Caramella, D.; Bartolozzi, C.

    1993-01-01

    Reproducibility of the aqueductal CSF signal intensity on a gradient echo cine-MR sequence exploiting through plane inflow enhancement was tested in 11 patients with normal or dilated ventricles. Seven patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) syndrome were investigated with the sequence before and after CSF shunting. Two patients exhibiting central flow void within a hyperintense aqueductal CSF improved after surgery and the flow void disappeared after shunting. One patient with increased maximum and minimum aqueductal CSF signal as compared to 18 healthy controls also improved and the aqueductal CSF signal was considerably decreased after shunting. Three patients with aqueductal CSF values similar to those in the controls did not improve, notwithstanding their maximum aqueductal CSF signals decreasing slightly after shunting. No appreciable aqueductal CSF flow related enhancement consistent with non-communicating hydrocephalus was found in the last NPH patient who improved after surgery. Cine-MR with inflow technique yields a reproducible evaluation of flow-related aqueductal CSF signal changes which might help in identifying shunt responsive NPH patients. These are likely to be those with hyperdynamic aqueductal CSF or aqueductal obstruction. (orig.)

  5. Phase-contrast cine MR imaging of normal aqueductal CSF flow. Effect of aging and relation to CSF void on modulus MR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barkhof, F.; Kouwenhoven, M.; Scheltens, P.; Sprenger, M.; Algra, P.; Valk, J.

    1994-01-01

    Cine phase-contrast MR imaging was used to study pulsatile CSF flow in the aqueduct in 11 young controls (mean age 30 years) and 9 old controls (mean age 69 years). A high-resolution gradient echo technique and an oblique imaging plane, perpendicular to the aqueduct, was used to avoid volume averaging. Phantom studies confirmed that the technique was accurate. Aqueductal velocity and flux in old controls was higher than in young controls, but the differences were not significant. For all controls together, the averaged peak velocity was 4.2 ± 1.5 cm/s in rostral and -7.8 ± 4.9 cm/s in caudal direction; for the flux it was 0.16 ± 0.10 cm 3 /s in rostral and -0.29 ± 0.19 cm 3 /s in caudal direction. Phase-contrast measurements were significantly related to flow-void on modulus MR images, but not with ventricular size or cortical atrophy. The present technique avoids underestimation of aqueductal flow, and therefore reveals higher aqueductal velocity and flux values than previous studies. Factors other than age or atrophy seem to determine aqueductal CSF flow. (orig.)

  6. An in vitro experimental study of flow past aortic valve under varied pulsatile conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruihang; Zhang, Yan

    2017-11-01

    Flow past aortic valve represents a complex fluid-structure interaction phenomenon that involves pulsatile, vortical, and turbulent conditions. The flow characteristics immediately downstream of the valve, such as the variation of pulsatile flow velocity, formation of vortices, distribution of shear stresses, are of particular interest to further elucidate the role of hemodynamics in various aortic diseases. However, the fluid dynamics of a realistic aortic valve is not fully understood. Particularly, it is unclear how the flow fields downstream of the aortic valve would change under varied pulsatile inlet boundary conditions. In this study, an in vitro experiment has been conducted to investigate the flow fields downstream of a silicone aortic valve model within a cardiovascular flow simulator. Phased-locked Particle Image Velocimetry measurements were performed to map the velocity fields and Reynolds normal and shear stresses at different phases in a cardiac cycle. Temporal variations of pressure across the valve model were measured using high frequency transducers. Results have been compared for different pulsatile inlet conditions, including varied frequencies (heart rates), magnitudes (stroke volumes), and cardiac contractile functions (shapes of waveforms).

  7. REVIEW Interpretation and value of MR CSF flow studies for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    children should be able to request this procedure from any MR imaging department, and should ... on all modern 1.5T scanners equipped with standard software and phase contrast magnetic resonance (PCMR) capabilities and analysis packages. .... Follow-up imaging demonstrates change in CSF flow to a unidirectional.

  8. Pulsatile turbulent flow through pipe bends at high Dean and Womersley numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalpakli, Athanasia; Örlü, Ramis; Tillmark, Nils; Alfredsson, P. Henrik

    2011-12-01

    Turbulent pulsatile flows through pipe bends are prevalent in internal combustion engine components which consist of bent pipe sections and branching conduits. Nonetheless, most of the studies related to pulsatile flows in pipe bends focus on incompressible, low Womersley and low Dean number flows, primarily because they aim in modeling blood flow, while internal combustion engine related flows have mainly been addressed in terms of integral quantities and consist of single point measurements. The present study aims at bridging the gap between these two fields by means of time-resolved stereoscopic particle image velocimetry measurements in a pipe bend with conditions that are close to those encountered in exhaust manifolds. The time/phase-resolved three-dimensional cross-sectional flow-field 3 pipe diameters downstream the pipe bend is captured and the interplay between different secondary motions throughout a pulse cycle is discussed.

  9. Pulsatile turbulent flow through pipe bends at high Dean and Womersley numbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalpakli, Athanasia; Örlü, Ramis; Tillmark, Nils; Alfredsson, P Henrik

    2011-01-01

    Turbulent pulsatile flows through pipe bends are prevalent in internal combustion engine components which consist of bent pipe sections and branching conduits. Nonetheless, most of the studies related to pulsatile flows in pipe bends focus on incompressible, low Womersley and low Dean number flows, primarily because they aim in modeling blood flow, while internal combustion engine related flows have mainly been addressed in terms of integral quantities and consist of single point measurements. The present study aims at bridging the gap between these two fields by means of time-resolved stereoscopic particle image velocimetry measurements in a pipe bend with conditions that are close to those encountered in exhaust manifolds. The time/phase-resolved three-dimensional cross-sectional flow-field 3 pipe diameters downstream the pipe bend is captured and the interplay between different secondary motions throughout a pulse cycle is discussed.

  10. Augmentative effect of pulsatility on the wall shear stress in tube flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, M; Tatsumi, E; Tsukiya, T; Taenaka, Y; Nishimura, T; Nishinaka, T; Takano, H; Masuzawa, T; Ohba, K

    1999-08-01

    Wall shear stress (WSS) has been considered to play an important role in the physiological and metabolic functions of the vascular endothelial cells. We investigated the effects of the pulse rate and the maximum flow rate on the WSS to clarify the influence of pulsatility. Water was perfused in a 1/2 inch transparent straight cylinder with a nonpulsatile centrifugal pump and a pulsatile pneumatic ventricular assist device (VAD). In nonpulsatile flow (NF), the flow rate was changed 1 to 6 L/min by 1 L/min increments to obtain standard values of WSS at each flow rate. In pulsatile flow (PF), the pulse rate was controlled at 40, 60, and 80 bpm, and the maximum flow rate was varied from 3.3 to 12.0 L/min while the mean flow rate was kept at 3 L/min. The WSS was estimated from the velocity profile at measuring points using the laser illuminated fluorescence method. In NF, the WSS was 12.0 dyne/cm2 at 3 L/min and 33.0 dyne/cm2 at 6 L/min. In PF, the pulse rate change with the same mean, and the maximum flow rate did not affect WSS. On the other hand, the increase in the maximum flow rate at the constant mean flow rate of 3 L/min augmented the mean WSS from 13.1 to 32.9 dyne/cm2. We concluded that the maximum flow rate exerted a substantial augmentative effect on WSS, and the maximum flow rate was a dominant factor of pulsatility in this effect.

  11. Numerical investigation of flow parameters for solid rigid spheroidal particle in a pulsatile pipe flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varghese, Joffin; Jayakumar, J. S.

    2017-09-01

    Quantifying, forecasting and analysing the displacement rates of suspended particles are essential while discussing about blood flow analysis. Because blood is one of the major organs in the body, which enables transport phenomena, comprising of numerous blood cells. In order to model the blood flow, a flow domain was created and numerically simulated. Flow field velocity in the stream is solved utilizing Finite Volume Method utilizing FVM unstructured solver. In pulsatile flow, the effect of parameters such as average Reynolds number, tube radius, particle size and Womersley number are taken into account. In this study spheroidal particle trajectory in axial direction is simulated at different values of pulsating frequency including 1.2 Hz, 3.33 Hz and 4.00 Hz and various densities including 1005 kg/m3 and 1025 kg/m3 for the flow domain. The analysis accomplishes the interaction study of blood constituents for different flow situations which have applications in diagnosis and treatment of cardio vascular related diseases.

  12. Precise position control of a helical magnetic robot in pulsatile flow using the rotating frequency of the external magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jongyul Kim

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We propose a position control method for a helical magnetic robot (HMR that uses the rotating frequency of the external rotating magnetic field (ERMF to minimize the position fluctuation of the HMR caused by pulsatile flow in human blood vessels. We prototyped the HMR and conducted several experiments in pseudo blood vessel environments with a peristaltic pump. We experimentally obtained the relation between the flow rate and the rotating frequency of the ERMF required to make the HMR stationary in a given pulsatile flow. Then we approximated the pulsatile flow by Fourier series and applied the required ERMF rotating frequency to the HMR in real time. Our proposed position control method drastically reduced the position fluctuation of the HMR under pulsatile flow.

  13. A pulsatile flow model for in vitro quantitative evaluation of prosthetic valve regurgitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Giuliatti

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available A pulsatile pressure-flow model was developed for in vitro quantitative color Doppler flow mapping studies of valvular regurgitation. The flow through the system was generated by a piston which was driven by stepper motors controlled by a computer. The piston was connected to acrylic chambers designed to simulate "ventricular" and "atrial" heart chambers. Inside the "ventricular" chamber, a prosthetic heart valve was placed at the inflow connection with the "atrial" chamber while another prosthetic valve was positioned at the outflow connection with flexible tubes, elastic balloons and a reservoir arranged to mimic the peripheral circulation. The flow model was filled with a 0.25% corn starch/water suspension to improve Doppler imaging. A continuous flow pump transferred the liquid from the peripheral reservoir to another one connected to the "atrial" chamber. The dimensions of the flow model were designed to permit adequate imaging by Doppler echocardiography. Acoustic windows allowed placement of transducers distal and perpendicular to the valves, so that the ultrasound beam could be positioned parallel to the valvular flow. Strain-gauge and electromagnetic transducers were used for measurements of pressure and flow in different segments of the system. The flow model was also designed to fit different sizes and types of prosthetic valves. This pulsatile flow model was able to generate pressure and flow in the physiological human range, with independent adjustment of pulse duration and rate as well as of stroke volume. This model mimics flow profiles observed in patients with regurgitant prosthetic valves.

  14. Computational model on pulsatile flow of blood through a tapered ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S PRIYADHARSHINI

    2017-11-02

    Nov 2, 2017 ... It is pertinent to note that the magnitudes of flow resistance are higher in the case of ... mathematical model on non-Newtonian flow of blood through a ..... The important predictions of the present investigation are enumerating the .... drug carriers for targeted drug delivery, reducing blood flow at the time of ...

  15. Enhancement of arterial pressure pulsatility by controlling continuous-flow left ventricular assist device flow rate in mock circulatory system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bozkurt, S.; van de Vosse, F.N.; Rutten, M.C.M.

    Continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices (CF-LVADs) generally operate at a constant speed, which reduces pulsatility in the arteries and may lead to complications such as functional changes in the vascular system, gastrointestinal bleeding, or both. The purpose of this study is to increase

  16. Pulsatile flow of blood and heat transfer with variable viscosity under magnetic and vibration environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shit, G.C.; Majee, Sreeparna

    2015-01-01

    Unsteady flow of blood and heat transfer characteristics in the neighborhood of an overlapping constricted artery have been investigated in the presence of magnetic field and whole body vibration. The laminar flow of blood is taken to be incompressible and Newtonian fluid with variable viscosity depending upon temperature with an aim to provide resemblance to the real situation in the physiological system. The unsteady flow mechanism in the constricted artery is subjected to a pulsatile pressure gradient arising from systematic functioning of the heart and from the periodic body acceleration. The numerical computation has been performed using finite difference method by developing Crank–Nicolson scheme. The results show that the volumetric flow rate, skin-friction and the rate of heat transfer at the wall are significantly altered in the downstream of the constricted region. The axial velocity profile, temperature and flow rate increases with increase in temperature dependent viscosity, while the opposite trend is observed in the case of skin-friction and flow impedance. - Highlights: • We have investigated the pulsatile MHD flow of blood and heat transfer in arteries. • The influence of periodic body acceleration has been taken into account. • The temperature dependent viscosity of blood is considered. • The variable viscosity has an increasing effect on blood flow and heat transfer. • The overall temperature distribution enhances in the presence of magnetic field

  17. Pulsatile flow of blood and heat transfer with variable viscosity under magnetic and vibration environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shit, G.C., E-mail: gopal_iitkgp@yahoo.co.in; Majee, Sreeparna

    2015-08-15

    Unsteady flow of blood and heat transfer characteristics in the neighborhood of an overlapping constricted artery have been investigated in the presence of magnetic field and whole body vibration. The laminar flow of blood is taken to be incompressible and Newtonian fluid with variable viscosity depending upon temperature with an aim to provide resemblance to the real situation in the physiological system. The unsteady flow mechanism in the constricted artery is subjected to a pulsatile pressure gradient arising from systematic functioning of the heart and from the periodic body acceleration. The numerical computation has been performed using finite difference method by developing Crank–Nicolson scheme. The results show that the volumetric flow rate, skin-friction and the rate of heat transfer at the wall are significantly altered in the downstream of the constricted region. The axial velocity profile, temperature and flow rate increases with increase in temperature dependent viscosity, while the opposite trend is observed in the case of skin-friction and flow impedance. - Highlights: • We have investigated the pulsatile MHD flow of blood and heat transfer in arteries. • The influence of periodic body acceleration has been taken into account. • The temperature dependent viscosity of blood is considered. • The variable viscosity has an increasing effect on blood flow and heat transfer. • The overall temperature distribution enhances in the presence of magnetic field.

  18. Computational fluid dynamics analysis and PIV validation of a bionic vortex flow pulsatile LVAD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Liang; Yang, Ming; Ye, Lin; Dong, Zhaopeng

    2015-01-01

    Hemocompatibility is highly affected by the flow field in Left Ventricular Assistant Devices (LVAD). An asymmetric inflow and outflow channel arrangement with a 45° intersection angle with respect to the blood chamber is proposed to approximate the vascular structure of the aorta and left atrium on the left ventricle. The structure is expected to develop uninterruptible vortex flow state which is similar to the flow state in human left ventricle. The Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) asymmetric model is simulated using ANSYS workbench. To validate the velocity field calculated by CFD, a Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) experiment is conducted. The CFD results show that the proposed blood chamber could generate a shifting vortex flow that would be redirected to the aorta during ejection to form a persistent recirculating flow state, which is similar to the echocardiographic flow state in left ventricle. Both the PIV and the CFD results show the development of a persistent vortex during the pulsatile period. Comparison of the qualitative flow pattern and quantitative probed velocity histories in a pulsatile period shows a good agreement between the CFD and PIV data. The goal of developing persistent quasi intra-ventricle vortex flow state in LVAD is realized.

  19. Generating pulsatility by pump speed modulation with continuous-flow total artificial heart in awake calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukamachi, Kiyotaka; Karimov, Jamshid H; Sunagawa, Gengo; Horvath, David J; Byram, Nicole; Kuban, Barry D; Dessoffy, Raymond; Sale, Shiva; Golding, Leonard A R; Moazami, Nader

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of sinusoidal pump speed modulation of the Cleveland Clinic continuous-flow total artificial heart (CFTAH) on hemodynamics and pump flow in an awake chronic calf model. The sinusoidal pump speed modulations, performed on the day of elective sacrifice, were set at ±15 and ± 25% of mean pump speed at 80 bpm in four awake calves with a CFTAH. The systemic and pulmonary arterial pulse pressures increased to 12.0 and 12.3 mmHg (±15% modulation) and to 15.9 and 15.7 mmHg (±25% modulation), respectively. The pulsatility index and surplus hemodynamic energy significantly increased, respectively, to 1.05 and 1346 ergs/cm at ±15% speed modulation and to 1.51 and 3381 ergs/cm at ±25% speed modulation. This study showed that it is feasible to generate pressure pulsatility with pump speed modulation; the platform is suitable for evaluating the physiologic impact of pulsatility and allows determination of the best speed modulations in terms of magnitude, frequency, and profiles.

  20. Laser Doppler anemometer measurements of pulsatile flow in a model carotid bifurcation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, D N; Giddens, D P

    1987-01-01

    Hemodynamics at the human carotid bifurcation is important to the understanding of atherosclerotic plaque initiation and progression as well as to the diagnosis of clinically important disease. Laser Doppler anemometry was performed in a large scale model of an average human carotid. Pulsatile waveforms and physiologic flow divisions were incorporated. Disturbance levels and shear stresses were computed from ensemble averages of the velocity waveform measurements. Flow in the common carotid was laminar and symmetric. Flow patterns in the sinus, however, were complex and varied considerably during the cycle. Strong helical patterns and outer wall flow separation waxed and waned during each systole. The changing flow patterns resulted in an oscillatory shear stress at the outer wall ranging from -13 to 9 dyn cm-2 during systole with a time-averaged mean of only -0.5 dyn cm-2. This contrasts markedly with an inner wall shear stress range of 17-50, (mean 26) dyn cm-2. The region of transient separation was confined to the carotid sinus outer wall with no reverse velocities detected in the distal internal carotid. Notable disturbance velocities were also time-dependent, occurring only during the deceleration phase of systole and the beginning of diastole. The present pulsatile flow studies have aided in identifying hemodynamic conditions which correlate with early intimal thickening and predict the physiologic level of flow disturbances in the bulb of undiseased internal carotid arteries.

  1. Pulsatility role in cylinder flow dynamics at low Reynolds number

    KAUST Repository

    Qamar, Adnan; Samtaney, Ravi; Bull, Joseph L.

    2012-01-01

    range of TAL. Two distinct fluid regimes are identified. In both regimes, the size of the separated zone is much greater than the uniform flow case, the onset of separation is function of KC, and the separation vortex collapses rapidly during the last

  2. On heat transfer to pulsatile flow of a two-phase fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. P. Chakraborty

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The problem of heat transfer to pulsatile flow of a two-phase fluid-particle system contained in a channel bounded by two infinitely long rigid impervious parallel walls has been studied in this paper. The solutions for the steady and the fluctuating temperature distributions are obtained. The rates of heat transfer at the walls are also calculated. The results are discussed numerically with graphical presentations. It is shown that the presence of the particles not only diminishes the steady and unsteady temperature fields but also decreases the reversal of heat flux at the hotter wall irrespective of the influences of other flow parameters.

  3. A High Performance Pulsatile Pump for Aortic Flow Experiments in 3-Dimensional Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhury, Rafeed A; Atlasman, Victor; Pathangey, Girish; Pracht, Nicholas; Adrian, Ronald J; Frakes, David H

    2016-06-01

    Aortic pathologies such as coarctation, dissection, and aneurysm represent a particularly emergent class of cardiovascular diseases. Computational simulations of aortic flows are growing increasingly important as tools for gaining understanding of these pathologies, as well as for planning their surgical repair. In vitro experiments are required to validate the simulations against real world data, and the experiments require a pulsatile flow pump system that can provide physiologic flow conditions characteristic of the aorta. We designed a newly capable piston-based pulsatile flow pump system that can generate high volume flow rates (850 mL/s), replicate physiologic waveforms, and pump high viscosity fluids against large impedances. The system is also compatible with a broad range of fluid types, and is operable in magnetic resonance imaging environments. Performance of the system was validated using image processing-based analysis of piston motion as well as particle image velocimetry. The new system represents a more capable pumping solution for aortic flow experiments than other available designs, and can be manufactured at a relatively low cost.

  4. Correlation between vortices and wall shear stress in a curved artery model under pulsatile flow conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Christopher; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2017-11-01

    One of the most physiologically relevant factors within the cardiovascular system is the wall shear stress. The wall shear stress affects endothelial cells via mechanotransduction and atherosclerotic regions are strongly correlated with curvature and branching in the human vasculature, where the shear stress is both oscillatory and multidirectional. Also, the combined effect of curvature and pulsatility in cardiovascular flows produces unsteady vortices. In this work, our goal is to assess the correlation between multiple vortex pairs and wall shear stress. To accomplish this, we use an in-house high-order flux reconstruction Navier-Stokes solver to simulate pulsatile flow of a Newtonian blood-analog fluid through a rigid 180° curved artery model. We use a physiologically relevant flow rate and generate results using both fully developed and uniform entrance conditions, the latter motivated by the fact that flow upstream to a curved artery may not be fully developed. Under these two inflow conditions, we characterize the evolution of various vortex pairs and their subsequent effect on several wall shear stress metrics. Supported by GW Center for Biomimetics and Bioinspired Engineering.

  5. Secondary flow structures in a 180∘ elastic curved vessel with torsion under steady and pulsatile inflow conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najjari, Mohammad Reza; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2017-11-01

    Secondary flow vortical structures were investigated in an elastic 180° curved pipe with and without torsion under steady and pulsatile flow using particle image velocimetry (PIV). The elastic thin-walled curved pipes were constructed using Sylgard 184, and inserted into a bath of refractive index matched fluid to perform PIV. A vortex identification method was employed to identify various vortical structures in the flow. The secondary flow structures in the planar compliant model with dilatation of 0.61%-3.23% under pulsatile flow rate were compared with the rigid vessel model results, and it was found that local vessel compliance has a negligible effect on secondary flow morphology. The secondary flow structures were found to be more sensitive to out of plane curvature (torsion) than to vessel compliance. Torsion distorts the symmetry of secondary flow and results in more complex vortical structures in both steady and pulsatile flows. In high Re number steady flow with torsion, a single dominant vortical structure can be detected at the middle of the 90° cross section. In pulsatile flow with torsion, the split-Dean and Lyne-type vortices with same rotation direction originating from opposite sides of the cross section tend to merge together. supported by GW Center for Biomimetics and Bioinspired Engineering.

  6. Ocular Perfusion Pressure and Pulsatile Ocular Blood Flow in Normal and Systemic Hypertensive Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanadani, Fabio N; Figueiredo, Carlos R; Miranda, Rafaela Morais; Cunha, Patricia Lt; M Kanadani, Tereza Cristina; Dorairaj, Syril

    2015-01-01

    Glaucomatous neuropathy can be a consequence of insufficient blood supply, increase in intraocular pressure (IOP), or other risk factors that diminish the ocular blood flow. To determine the ocular perfusion pressure (OPP) in normal and systemic hypertensive patients. One hundred and twenty-one patients were enrolled in this prospective and comparative study and underwent a complete ophthalmologic examination including slit lamp examination, Goldmann applanation tonometry, stereoscopic fundus examination, and pulsatile ocular blood flow (POBF) measurements. The OPP was calculated as being the medium systemic arterial pressure (MAP) less the IOP. Only right eye values were considered for calculations using Student's t-test. The mean age of the patients was 57.5 years (36-78), and 68.5% were women. There was a statistically significant difference in the OPP of the normal and systemic hypertensive patients (p cite this article: Kanadani FN, Figueiredo CR, Miranda RM, Cunha PLT, Kanadani TCM, Dorairaj S. Ocular Perfusion Pressure and Pulsatile Ocular Blood Flow in Normal and Systemic Hypertensive Patients. J Curr Glaucoma Pract 2015;9(1):16-19.

  7. Stability of Carotid Artery Under Steady-State and Pulsatile Blood Flow: A Fluid–Structure Interaction Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeid Khalafvand, Seyed; Han, Hai-Chao

    2015-01-01

    It has been shown that arteries may buckle into tortuous shapes under lumen pressure, which in turn could alter blood flow. However, the mechanisms of artery instability under pulsatile flow have not been fully understood. The objective of this study was to simulate the buckling and post-buckling behaviors of the carotid artery under pulsatile flow using a fully coupled fluid–structure interaction (FSI) method. The artery wall was modeled as a nonlinear material with a two-fiber strain-energy function. FSI simulations were performed under steady-state flow and pulsatile flow conditions with a prescribed flow velocity profile at the inlet and different pressures at the outlet to determine the critical buckling pressure. Simulations were performed for normal (160 ml/min) and high (350 ml/min) flow rates and normal (1.5) and reduced (1.3) axial stretch ratios to determine the effects of flow rate and axial tension on stability. The results showed that an artery buckled when the lumen pressure exceeded a critical value. The critical mean buckling pressure at pulsatile flow was 17–23% smaller than at steady-state flow. For both steady-state and pulsatile flow, the high flow rate had very little effect (<5%) on the critical buckling pressure. The fluid and wall stresses were drastically altered at the location with maximum deflection. The maximum lumen shear stress occurred at the inner side of the bend and maximum tensile wall stresses occurred at the outer side. These findings improve our understanding of artery instability in vivo. PMID:25761257

  8. Stability of carotid artery under steady-state and pulsatile blood flow: a fluid-structure interaction study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeid Khalafvand, Seyed; Han, Hai-Chao

    2015-06-01

    It has been shown that arteries may buckle into tortuous shapes under lumen pressure, which in turn could alter blood flow. However, the mechanisms of artery instability under pulsatile flow have not been fully understood. The objective of this study was to simulate the buckling and post-buckling behaviors of the carotid artery under pulsatile flow using a fully coupled fluid-structure interaction (FSI) method. The artery wall was modeled as a nonlinear material with a two-fiber strain-energy function. FSI simulations were performed under steady-state flow and pulsatile flow conditions with a prescribed flow velocity profile at the inlet and different pressures at the outlet to determine the critical buckling pressure. Simulations were performed for normal (160 ml/min) and high (350 ml/min) flow rates and normal (1.5) and reduced (1.3) axial stretch ratios to determine the effects of flow rate and axial tension on stability. The results showed that an artery buckled when the lumen pressure exceeded a critical value. The critical mean buckling pressure at pulsatile flow was 17-23% smaller than at steady-state flow. For both steady-state and pulsatile flow, the high flow rate had very little effect (<5%) on the critical buckling pressure. The fluid and wall stresses were drastically altered at the location with maximum deflection. The maximum lumen shear stress occurred at the inner side of the bend and maximum tensile wall stresses occurred at the outer side. These findings improve our understanding of artery instability in vivo.

  9. Transition to turbulence in pulsatile flow through heart valves--a modified stability approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluestein, D; Einav, S

    1994-11-01

    The presence of turbulence in the cardiovascular system is generally an indication of some type of abnormality. Most cardiologists agree that turbulence near a valve indicates either valvular stenosis or regurgitation, depending on the phase of its occurrence during the cardiac cycle. As no satisfying analytical solutions of the stability of turbulent pulsatile flow exist, accurate, unbiased flow stability criteria are needed for the identification of turbulence initiation. The traditional approach uses a stability diagram based upon the stability of a plane Stokes layer where alpha (the Womersley parameter) is defined by the fundamental heart rate. We suggest a modified approach that involves the decomposition of alpha into its frequency components, where alpha is derived from the preferred modes induced on the flow by interaction between flow pulsation and the valve. Transition to turbulence in pulsatile flow through heart values was investigated in a pulse duplicator system using three polymer aortic valve models representing a normal aortic valve, a 65 percent stenosed valve and a 90 percent severely stenosed valve, and two mitral valve models representing a normal mitral valve and a 65 percent stenosed valve. Valve characteristics were closely simulated as to mimic the conditions that alter flow stability and initiate turbulent flow conditions. Valvular velocity waveforms were measured by laser Doppler anemometry (LDA). Spectral analysis was performed on velocity signals at selected spatial and temporal points to produce the power density spectra, in which the preferred frequency modes were identified. The spectra obtained during the rapid closure stage of the valves were found to be governed by the stenosis geometry. A shift toward higher dominant frequencies was correlated with the severity of the stenosis. According to the modified approach, stability of the flow is represented by a cluster of points, each corresponding to a specific dominant mode apparent

  10. Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis of Pulsatile Blood Flow Behavior in Modelled Stenosed Vessels with Different Severities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Mehrabi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on the behavior of blood flow in the stenosed vessels. Blood is modelled as an incompressible non-Newtonian fluid which is based on the power law viscosity model. A numerical technique based on the finite difference method is developed to simulate the blood flow taking into account the transient periodic behaviour of the blood flow in cardiac cycles. Also, pulsatile blood flow in the stenosed vessel is based on the Womersley model, and fluid flow in the lumen region is governed by the continuity equation and the Navier-Stokes equations. In this study, the stenosis shape is cosine by using Tu and Devil model. Comparing the results obtained from three stenosed vessels with 30%, 50%, and 75% area severity, we find that higher percent-area severity of stenosis leads to higher extrapressure jumps and higher blood speeds around the stenosis site. Also, we observe that the size of the stenosis in stenosed vessels does influence the blood flow. A little change on the cross-sectional value makes vast change on the blood flow rate. This simulation helps the people working in the field of physiological fluid dynamics as well as the medical practitioners.

  11. Fluid-structure interaction modeling of aneurysmal arteries under steady-state and pulsatile blood flow: a stability analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharzehee, Mohammadali; Khalafvand, Seyed Saeid; Han, Hai-Chao

    2018-02-01

    Tortuous aneurysmal arteries are often associated with a higher risk of rupture but the mechanism remains unclear. The goal of this study was to analyze the buckling and post-buckling behaviors of aneurysmal arteries under pulsatile flow. To accomplish this goal, we analyzed the buckling behavior of model carotid and abdominal aorta with aneurysms by utilizing fluid-structure interaction (FSI) method with realistic waveforms boundary conditions. FSI simulations were done under steady-state and pulsatile flow for normal (1.5) and reduced (1.3) axial stretch ratios to investigate the influence of aneurysm, pulsatile lumen pressure and axial tension on stability. Our results indicated that aneurysmal artery buckled at the critical buckling pressure and its deflection nonlinearly increased with increasing lumen pressure. Buckling elevates the peak stress (up to 118%). The maximum aneurysm wall stress at pulsatile FSI flow was (29%) higher than under static pressure at the peak lumen pressure of 130 mmHg. Buckling results show an increase in lumen shear stress at the inner side of the maximum deflection. Vortex flow was dramatically enlarged with increasing lumen pressure and artery diameter. Aneurysmal arteries are more susceptible than normal arteries to mechanical instability which causes high stresses in the aneurysm wall that could lead to aneurysm rupture.

  12. A study of the pulsatile flow and its interaction with rectangular leaflets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledesma, Rene; Zenit, Roberto; Pulos, Guillermo

    2009-11-01

    To avoid the complexity and limited understanding of the 3D pulsatile flow field through heart valves, a cardiac-like flow circuit and a test channel were designed to study the behavior of bidimensional leaflets made of hyperelastic materials. We study a simple 2D arrangement to understand the basic physics of the flow-leaflet interaction. Creating a periodic pressure gradient, measurements of leaflet deflection were obtained for different flow conditions, geometries and materials. Using PIV and Phase Locking techniques, we have obtained the leaflet motion and the time-dependent flow velocity fields. The results show that two dimensionless parameters determine the performance of a simple bi-dimensional valve, in accordance with the flow conditions applied: π1=f(sw)^1/2(E/ρ)^1/2 and π2=V/(2slw), where f is the pulsation frequency, V is the stroke volume, s, w and l are the dimensions on the leaftlet and E and ρ are the elastic modulus and density of the material, respectively. Furthermore, we have identified the conditions for which the fluid stresses can be minimized. With these results we propose a new set of parameters to improve the performance of prosthetic heart valves and, in consequence, to reduce blood damage.

  13. PIV Measurement of Pulsatile Flows in 3D Curved Tubes Using Refractive Index Matching Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Hyeon Ji; Ji, Ho Seong; Kim, Kyung Chun [Pusan Nat’l Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    Three-dimensional models of stenosis blood vessels were prepared using a 3D printer. The models included a straight pipe with axisymmetric stenosis and a pipe that was bent 10° from the center of stenosis. A refractive index matching method was utilized to measure accurate velocity fields inside the 3D tubes. Three different pulsatile flows were generated and controlled by changing the rotational speed frequency of the peristaltic pump. Unsteady velocity fields were measured by a time-resolved particle image velocimetry method. Periodic shedding of vortices occurred and moves depended on the maximum velocity region. The sizes and the positions of the vortices and symmetry are influenced by mean Reynolds number and tube geometry. In the case of the bent pipe, a recirculation zone observed at the post-stenosis could explain the possibility of blood clot formation and blood clot adhesion in view of hemodynamics.

  14. PIV Measurement of Pulsatile Flows in 3D Curved Tubes Using Refractive Index Matching Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Hyeon Ji; Ji, Ho Seong; Kim, Kyung Chun

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional models of stenosis blood vessels were prepared using a 3D printer. The models included a straight pipe with axisymmetric stenosis and a pipe that was bent 10° from the center of stenosis. A refractive index matching method was utilized to measure accurate velocity fields inside the 3D tubes. Three different pulsatile flows were generated and controlled by changing the rotational speed frequency of the peristaltic pump. Unsteady velocity fields were measured by a time-resolved particle image velocimetry method. Periodic shedding of vortices occurred and moves depended on the maximum velocity region. The sizes and the positions of the vortices and symmetry are influenced by mean Reynolds number and tube geometry. In the case of the bent pipe, a recirculation zone observed at the post-stenosis could explain the possibility of blood clot formation and blood clot adhesion in view of hemodynamics.

  15. Verification of a computational cardiovascular system model comparing the hemodynamics of a continuous flow to a synchronous valveless pulsatile flow left ventricular assist device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gohean, Jeffrey R; George, Mitchell J; Pate, Thomas D; Kurusz, Mark; Longoria, Raul G; Smalling, Richard W

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to use a computational model to compare a synchronized valveless pulsatile left ventricular assist device with continuous flow left ventricular assist devices at the same level of device flow, and to verify the model with in vivo porcine data. A dynamic system model of the human cardiovascular system was developed to simulate the support of a healthy or failing native heart from a continuous flow left ventricular assist device or a synchronous pulsatile valveless dual-piston positive displacement pump. These results were compared with measurements made during in vivo porcine experiments. Results from the simulation model and from the in vivo counterpart show that the pulsatile pump provides higher cardiac output, left ventricular unloading, cardiac pulsatility, and aortic valve flow as compared with the continuous flow model at the same level of support. The dynamic system model developed for this investigation can effectively simulate human cardiovascular support by a synchronous pulsatile or continuous flow ventricular assist device.

  16. Pulsatile Flow and Transport of Blood past a Cylinder: Basic Transport for an Artificial Lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zierenberg, Jennifer R.

    2005-11-01

    The fluid mechanics and transport for flow of blood past a single cylinder is investigated using CFD. This work refers to an artificial lung in which oxygen travels through fibers oriented perpendicularly to the incoming blood flow. A pulsatile blood flow was considered: Ux=U0[ 1+A( φt ) ], where Ux is the velocity far from the cylinder. The Casson equation was used to describe the shear thinning and yield stress properties of blood. The presence of hemoglobin (i.e. facilitated diffusion) was considered. We examined the effect of A, U0 and φ on the flow and transport by varying the dimensionless parameters: A; Reynolds number, Re; and Womersley parameter, α. Two different feed gases were considered: pure O2 and air. The flow and concentration fields were computed for Re = 5, 10, and 40, 0 transport is found to primarily depend on Re and to increase with increasing Re, α and decreasing A. The presence of hemoglobin increases mass transport. Supported by NIH HL69420, NSF Fellowship

  17. On the Evolution of Pulsatile Flow Subject to a Transverse Impulse Body Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Labbio, Giuseppe; Keshavarz-Motamed, Zahra; Kadem, Lyes

    2014-11-01

    In the event of an unexpected abrupt traffic stop or car accident, automotive passengers will experience an abrupt body deceleration. This may lead to tearing or dissection of the aortic wall known as Blunt Traumatic Aortic Rupture (BTAR). BTAR is the second leading cause of death in automotive accidents and, although quite frequent, the mechanisms leading to BTAR are still not clearly identified, particularly the contribution of the flow field. As such, this work is intended to provide a fundamental framework for the investigation of the flow contribution to BTAR. In this fundamental study, pulsatile flow in a three-dimensional, straight pipe of circular cross-section is subjected to a unidirectional, transverse, impulse body force applied on a strictly bounded volume of fluid. These models were simulated using the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) software FLUENT. The evolution of fluid field characteristics was investigated during and after the application of the force. The application of the force significantly modified the flow field. The force induces a transverse pressure gradient causing the development of secondary flow structures that dissipate the energy added by the acceleration. Once the force ceases to act, these structures are carried downstream and gradually dissipate their excess energy.

  18. Tonsillar pulsatility before and after surgical decompression for children with Chiari malformation type 1: an application for true fast imaging with steady state precession

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radmanesh, Alireza; Greenberg, Jacob K.; Smyth, Matthew D.; Limbrick, David D.; Chatterjee, Arindam; Sharma, Aseem

    2015-01-01

    We hypothesize that surgical decompression for Chiari malformation type 1 (CM-1) is associated with statistically significant decrease in tonsillar pulsatility and that the degree of pulsatility can be reliably assessed regardless of the experience level of the reader. An Institutional Review Board (IRB)-approved Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA)-compliant retrospective study was performed on 22 children with CM-1 (8 males; mean age 11.4 years) who had cardiac-gated true-FISP sequence and phase-contrast cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow imaging as parts of routine magnetic resonance (MR) imaging before and after surgical decompression. The surgical technique (decompression with or without duraplasty) was recorded for each patient. Three independent radiologists with different experience levels assessed tonsillar pulsatility qualitatively and quantitatively and assessed peritonsillar CSF flow qualitatively. Results were analyzed. To evaluate reliability, Fleiss kappa for multiple raters on categorical variables and intra-class correlation for agreement in pulsatility ratings were calculated. After surgical decompression, the degree of tonsillar pulsatility appreciably decreased, confirmed by t test, both qualitatively (p values <0.001, <0.001, and 0.045 for three readers) and quantitatively (amount of decrease/p value for three readers 0.7 mm/<0.001, 0.7 mm/<0.001, and 0.5 mm/0.022). There was a better agreement among the readers in quantitative assessment of tonsillar pulsatility (kappa 0.753-0.834), compared to qualitative assessment of pulsatility (kappa 0.472-0.496) and qualitative assessment of flow (kappa 0.056 to 0.203). Posterior fossa decompression with duraplasty led to a larger decrease in tonsillar pulsatility, compared to posterior fossa decompression alone. Tonsillar pulsatility in CM-1 is significantly reduced after surgical decompression. Quantitative assessment of tonsillar pulsatility was more reliable across readers than

  19. Tonsillar pulsatility before and after surgical decompression for children with Chiari malformation type 1: an application for true fast imaging with steady state precession

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radmanesh, Alireza [University of California, San Francisco, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States); Washington University School of Medicine, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, St Louis, MO (United States); Greenberg, Jacob K.; Smyth, Matthew D.; Limbrick, David D. [Washington University School of Medicine, Department of Neurosurgery, St Louis, MO (United States); Chatterjee, Arindam; Sharma, Aseem [Washington University School of Medicine, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, St Louis, MO (United States)

    2015-04-01

    We hypothesize that surgical decompression for Chiari malformation type 1 (CM-1) is associated with statistically significant decrease in tonsillar pulsatility and that the degree of pulsatility can be reliably assessed regardless of the experience level of the reader. An Institutional Review Board (IRB)-approved Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA)-compliant retrospective study was performed on 22 children with CM-1 (8 males; mean age 11.4 years) who had cardiac-gated true-FISP sequence and phase-contrast cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow imaging as parts of routine magnetic resonance (MR) imaging before and after surgical decompression. The surgical technique (decompression with or without duraplasty) was recorded for each patient. Three independent radiologists with different experience levels assessed tonsillar pulsatility qualitatively and quantitatively and assessed peritonsillar CSF flow qualitatively. Results were analyzed. To evaluate reliability, Fleiss kappa for multiple raters on categorical variables and intra-class correlation for agreement in pulsatility ratings were calculated. After surgical decompression, the degree of tonsillar pulsatility appreciably decreased, confirmed by t test, both qualitatively (p values <0.001, <0.001, and 0.045 for three readers) and quantitatively (amount of decrease/p value for three readers 0.7 mm/<0.001, 0.7 mm/<0.001, and 0.5 mm/0.022). There was a better agreement among the readers in quantitative assessment of tonsillar pulsatility (kappa 0.753-0.834), compared to qualitative assessment of pulsatility (kappa 0.472-0.496) and qualitative assessment of flow (kappa 0.056 to 0.203). Posterior fossa decompression with duraplasty led to a larger decrease in tonsillar pulsatility, compared to posterior fossa decompression alone. Tonsillar pulsatility in CM-1 is significantly reduced after surgical decompression. Quantitative assessment of tonsillar pulsatility was more reliable across readers than

  20. Assessment of turbulence models for pulsatile flow inside a heart pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Azawy, Mohammed G; Turan, A; Revell, A

    2016-02-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is applied to study the unsteady flow inside a pulsatile pump left ventricular assist device, in order to assess the sensitivity to a range of commonly used turbulence models. Levels of strain and wall shear stress are directly relevant to the evaluation of risk from haemolysis and thrombosis, and thus understanding the sensitivity to these turbulence models is important in the assessment of uncertainty in CFD predictions. The study focuses on a positive displacement or pulsatile pump, and the CFD model includes valves and moving pusher plate. An unstructured dynamic layering method was employed to capture this cyclic motion, and valves were simulated in their fully open position to mimic the natural scenario, with in/outflow triggered at control planes away from the valves. Six turbulence models have been used, comprising three relevant to the low Reynolds number nature of this flow and three more intended to investigate different transport effects. In the first group, we consider the shear stress transport (SST) [Formula: see text] model in both its standard and transition-sensitive forms, and the 'laminar' model in which no turbulence model is used. In the second group, we compare the one equation Spalart-Almaras model, the standard two equation [Formula: see text] and the full Reynolds stress model (RSM). Following evaluation of spatial and temporal resolution requirements, results are compared with available experimental data. The model was operated at a systolic duration of 40% of the pumping cycle and a pumping rate of 86 BPM (beats per minute). Contrary to reasonable preconception, the 'transition' model, calibrated to incorporate additional physical modelling specifically for these flow conditions, was not noticeably superior to the standard form of the model. Indeed, observations of turbulent viscosity ratio reveal that the transition model initiates a premature increase of turbulence in this flow, when compared with

  1. Secondary flow vortical structures in a 180∘ elastic curved vessel with torsion under steady and pulsatile inflow conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najjari, Mohammad Reza; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2018-01-01

    Secondary flow structures in a 180∘ curved pipe model of an artery are studied using particle image velocimetry. Both steady and pulsatile inflow conditions are investigated. In planar curved pipes with steady flow, multiple (two, four, six) vortices are detected. For pulsatile flow, various pairs of vortices, i.e., Dean, deformed-Dean, Lyne-type, and split-Dean, are present in the cross section of the pipe at 90∘ into the bend. The effects of nonplanar curvature (torsion) and vessel dilatation on these vortical structures are studied. Torsion distorts the symmetric secondary flows (which exist in planar curvatures) and can result in formation of more complex vortical structures. For example, the split-Dean and Lyne-type vortices with same rotation direction originating from opposite sides of the cross section tend to merge together in pulsatile flow. The vortical structures in elastic vessels with dilatation (0.61%-3.23%) are also investigated and the results are compared with rigid model results. It was found that the secondary flow structures in rigid and elastic models are similar, and hence the local compliance of the vessel does not affect the morphology of secondary flow structures.

  2. CSF flow image using phase-contrast cine MR technique : preliminary clinical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyae Young; Choi, Hye Young; Baek, Seung Yeon; Lee, Sun Wha; Ko, Eun Joo; Lee, Myung Sook

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical usefulness of 2-D Cine PC (phase contrast) technique in visualizing the pattern and the site of abnormal CSF flow and to assess the effect of a third ventriculostomy in patients with hydrocephalus. The study group consisted of three normal controls and 13 patients with hydrocephalus, as shown on CT or MRI, and two patients who had undergone their third ventriculostomy. The technique was EKG-gated 2-D Cine PC MRI with velocity encoding 5cm/sec, TR 80msec, TE 12.3-15msec, and flip angle 15-60 degrees. Image quality was analyzed for variable sequences, and CSF flow was observed along the CSF flow pathway. We analyzed continuity and intensity of the CSF flow signal, and obstruction site and flow velocity degree were then defined. Systolic high and diastolic low signal intensity along the CSF flow-pathway, with normal asynchronicity and continuation, were clearly seen in normal controls. In three patients, there was obstruction at the ventricular level while others were either normal or showed a normal pattern with a weak signal. 'Normal' was defined as noncommunicating hydrocephalus and the latter as communicating hydrocephalus. In the two patients who had undergone ventriculostomy, a signal was in one case detected at the site of the third operation. A 2-D Cine PC CSF flow study enables us to see CSF flow signals noninvasively and to detect the site of obstruction of a CSF flow-pathway. It can therefore it can be useful for determining the application of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt and assessing the effect of a third ventriculostomy

  3. Evaluation of CSF flow in patients after endoscopic ventriculostomy of 3th ventricle with MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petkov, R.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Phase-contrast MR imaging is wide used for qualitative assessment and quantification of the CSF flow under normal and pathologic conditions. The increasing popularity of minimally invasive liquor derivation procedures - namely endoscopic ventriculostomy of 3-th ventricle - in neurosurgery raises the question of their actual effect on CSF flow in various types of hydrocephalus. We present our experience with 2D and 3D PC MRI in qualitative assessment and quantification of the CSF flow in 23 patients after endoscopic ventriculostomy of the 3-th ventricle for hyper- or normotensive hydrocephalus of various origins. We compare parameters of the CSF flow (direction, rate and net volume for one cardiac cycle) before and after the ventriculostomy

  4. Flow Visualization of Three-Dimensionality Inside the 12 cc Penn State Pulsatile Pediatric Ventricular Assist Device

    OpenAIRE

    Roszelle, Breigh N.; Deutsch, Steven; Manning, Keefe B.

    2010-01-01

    In order to aid the ongoing concern of limited organ availability for pediatric heart transplants, Penn State has continued development of a pulsatile Pediatric Ventricular Assist Device (PVAD). Initial studies of the PVAD observed an increase in thrombus formation due to differences in flow field physics when compared to adult sized devices, which included a higher degree of three-dimensionality. This unique flow field brings into question the use of 2D planar particle image velocimetry (PIV...

  5. CSF Flow in the Brain in the Context of Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, W G

    2015-05-01

    CSF normally flows back and forth through the aqueduct during the cardiac cycle. During systole, the brain and intracranial vasculature expand and compress the lateral and third ventricles, forcing CSF craniocaudad. During diastole, they contract and flow through the aqueduct reverses. Hyperdynamic CSF flow through the aqueduct is seen when there is ventricular enlargement without cerebral atrophy. Therefore, patients presenting with clinical normal pressure hydrocephalus who have hyperdynamic CSF flow have been found to respond better to ventriculoperitoneal shunting than those with normal or decreased CSF flow. Patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus have also been found to have larger intracranial volumes than sex-matched controls, suggesting that they may have had benign external hydrocephalus as infants. While their arachnoidal granulations clearly have decreased CSF resorptive capacity, it now appears that this is fixed and that the arachnoidal granulations are not merely immature. Such patients appear to develop a parallel pathway for CSF to exit the ventricles through the extracellular space of the brain and the venous side of the glymphatic system. This pathway remains functional until late adulthood when the patient develops deep white matter ischemia, which is characterized histologically by myelin pallor (ie, loss of lipid). The attraction between the bare myelin protein and the CSF increases resistance to the extracellular outflow of CSF, causing it to back up, resulting in hydrocephalus. Thus idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus appears to be a "2 hit" disease: benign external hydrocephalus in infancy followed by deep white matter ischemia in late adulthood. © 2015 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  6. Mathematical Modeling of Rotary Blood Pumps in a Pulsatile In Vitro Flow Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirbodaghi, Tohid

    2017-08-01

    Nowadays, sacrificing animals to develop medical devices and receive regulatory approval has become more common, which increases ethical concerns. Although in vivo tests are necessary for development and evaluation of new devices, nonetheless, with appropriate in vitro setups and mathematical models, a part of the validation process can be performed using these models to reduce the number of sacrificed animals. The main aim of this study is to present a mathematical model simulating the hydrodynamic function of a rotary blood pump (RBP) in a pulsatile in vitro flow environment. This model relates the pressure head of the RBP to the flow rate, rotational speed, and time derivatives of flow rate and rotational speed. To identify the model parameters, an in vitro setup was constructed consisting of a piston pump, a compliance chamber, a throttle, a buffer reservoir, and the CentriMag RBP. A 40% glycerin-water mixture as a blood analog fluid and deionized water were used in the hydraulic circuit to investigate the effect of viscosity and density of the working fluid on the model parameters. First, model variables were physically measured and digitally acquired. Second, an identification algorithm based on regression analysis was used to derive the model parameters. Third, the completed model was validated with a totally different set of in vitro data. The model is usable for both mathematical simulations of the interaction between the pump and heart and indirect pressure measurement in a clinical context. © 2017 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Frequency analyses of CSF flow on cine MRI in normal pressure hydrocephalus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyati, Tosiaki; Kasuga, Toshio; Koshida, Kichiro; Sanada, Shigeru; Onoguchi, Masahisa [Department of Radiological Technology, School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Kanazawa University, 5-11-80, Kodatsuno, Kanazawa, Ishikawa 920-0942 (Japan); Mase, Mitsuhito; Yamada, Kazuo [Department of Neurosurgery, Nagoya City University Medical School, 1 Kawasumi, Mizuho-cho, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 467-8602 (Japan); Banno, Tatsuo [Department of Central Radiology, Nagoya City University Hospital, 1 Kawasumi, Mizuho-cho, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 467-8602 (Japan); Fujita, Hiroshi [Department of Information Science, Faculty of Engineering, Gifu University, Yanagido 1-1, Gifu 501-1193 (Japan)

    2003-05-01

    Our objective was to clarify intracranial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow dynamics in normal-pressure hydrocephalus (NPH). Frequency analyses of CSF flow measured with phase-contrast cine MRI were performed. The CSF flow spectra in the aqueduct were determined in patients (n=51) with NPH, brain atrophy or asymptomatic ventricular dilation (VD), and in healthy volunteers (control group; n=25). The changes in CSF flow spectra were also analyzed after intravenous injection of acetazolamide. Moreover, a phase transfer function (PTF) calculated from the spectra of the driving vascular pulsation and CSF flow in the aqueduct were assessed. These values were compared with the pressure volume response (PVR). The amplitude in the NPH group was significantly larger than that in the VD or control group because of a decrease in compliance. The phase in the NPH group was significantly different from that in either the VD or the control group, but no difference was found between the VD and control groups. The amplitude increased in all groups after acetazolamide injection. The PTF in the NPH group was significantly larger than in the control group, and a positive correlation was noted between PTF and PVR. Frequency analyses of CSF flow measured by cine MRI make it possible to noninvasively obtain a more detailed picture of the pathophysiology of NPH. (orig.)

  8. MR evaluation of cervical CSF flow. An examination in patients with spinal canal stenosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iida, Makoto [Miyoshi General Hospital, Hiroshima (Japan); Kajima, Toshio; Miyasaka, Kenji; Nakanishi, Tadashi; Ono, Chiaki; Ito, Katsuhide

    1999-06-01

    To evaluate the flow dynamics of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) throughout the cervical spine, 18 healthy controls and 14 patients with spinal canal stenosis were examined by phase-contrast cine MR. MR imaging was performed using a sagittal technique that is flow-sensitive in the craniocaudal direction. Flow encoding depicted craniocaudal flow as high intensity and caudocranial flow as low intensity. In this technique, either retrospective cardiac or peripheral gating was used to cover the complete cardiac cycle. This pulse sequence yielded 16 quantitative flow-encoded images per cardiac cycle. Using a region-of-interest cursor at each vertebral level, the graphs of flow-velocity versus time were generated. The recorded CSF at each vertebral level in the controls showed almost the same pattern in the change of flow in the craniocaudal direction, indicating that the onset of craniocaudal CSF flow was synchronous with the onset of cardiac systole in these subjects. At all vertebral levels, flow-velocity time curves showed the same variation in pattern. CSF flow was significantly lower in patients than in controls at each vertebral level (p<0.01). In addition, the flow patterns of the patients with spinal canal stenosis differed at each vertebral level. As a results, the total sum of the difference in velocity between graphs of two serial vertebrae at all sampling points (the area between the curves: ABC) per mean velocity amplitude in the patients was significantly higher than controls (p<0.05). Furthermore, the ABC per mean velocity amplitude at the stenotic level was significantly larger in the patients than that at the non-stenotic level (p<0.01). These data suggest that turbulent CSF flow occurs at the stenotic level. Thus, assessment of CSF flow dynamics is a useful adjunct to routine MRI in patients with spinal canal stenosis. (author)

  9. Arterial stiffness, pressure and flow pulsatility and brain structure and function: the Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility--Reykjavik study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Gary F; van Buchem, Mark A; Sigurdsson, Sigurdur; Gotal, John D; Jonsdottir, Maria K; Kjartansson, Ólafur; Garcia, Melissa; Aspelund, Thor; Harris, Tamara B; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Launer, Lenore J

    2011-11-01

    Aortic stiffness increases with age and vascular risk factor exposure and is associated with increased risk for structural and functional abnormalities in the brain. High ambient flow and low impedance are thought to sensitize the cerebral microcirculation to harmful effects of excessive pressure and flow pulsatility. However, haemodynamic mechanisms contributing to structural brain lesions and cognitive impairment in the presence of high aortic stiffness remain unclear. We hypothesized that disproportionate stiffening of the proximal aorta as compared with the carotid arteries reduces wave reflection at this important interface and thereby facilitates transmission of excessive pulsatile energy into the cerebral microcirculation, leading to microvascular damage and impaired function. To assess this hypothesis, we evaluated carotid pressure and flow, carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity, brain magnetic resonance images and cognitive scores in participants in the community-based Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility--Reykjavik study who had no history of stroke, transient ischaemic attack or dementia (n = 668, 378 females, 69-93 years of age). Aortic characteristic impedance was assessed in a random subset (n = 422) and the reflection coefficient at the aorta-carotid interface was computed. Carotid flow pulsatility index was negatively related to the aorta-carotid reflection coefficient (R = -0.66, Pwave velocity were each associated with increased risk for silent subcortical infarcts (hazard ratios of 1.62-1.71 per standard deviation, Pwave velocity was associated with higher white matter hyperintensity volume (0.108 ± 0.045 SD/SD, P = 0.018). Pulsatility index was associated with lower whole brain (-0.127 ± 0.037 SD/SD, Pwave velocity (-0.095 ± 0.043 SD/SD, P = 0.028) and carotid pulse pressure (-0.114 ± 0.045 SD/SD, P = 0.013) were associated with lower memory scores. Pulsatility index was associated with lower memory scores (-0.165 ± 0.039 SD/SD, Pwave

  10. The Relationship Between Pulsatile Flow Impingement and Intraluminal Thrombus Deposition in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozowy, Richard J; Kuhn, David C S; Ducas, Annie A; Boyd, April J

    2017-03-01

    Direct numerical simulations were performed on four patient-specific abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) geometries and the resulting pulsatile blood flow dynamics were compared to aneurysm shape and correlated with intraluminal thrombus (ILT) deposition. For three of the cases, turbulent vortex structures impinged/sheared along the anterior wall and along the posterior wall a zone of recirculating blood formed. Within the impingement region the AAA wall was devoid of ILT and remote to this region there was an accumulation of ILT. The high wall shear stress (WSS) caused by the impact of vortexes is thought to prevent the attachment of ILT. WSS from impingement is comparable to peak-systolic WSS in a normal-sized aorta and therefore may not damage the wall. Expansion occurred to a greater extent in the direction of jet impingement and the wall-normal force from the continuous impact of vortexes may contribute to expansion. It was shown that the impingement region has low oscillatory shear index (OSI) and recirculation zones can have either low or high OSI. No correlation could be identified between OSI and ILT deposition since different flow dynamics can have similar OSI values.

  11. An original valveless artificial heart providing pulsatile flow tested in mock circulatory loops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozzi, Piergiorgio; Maertens, Audrey; Emery, Jonathan; Joseph, Samuel; Kirsch, Matthias; Avellan, François

    2017-11-24

    We present the test bench results of a valveless total artificial heart that is potentially compatible with the pediatric population. The RollingHeart is a valveless volumetric pump generating pulsatile flow. It consists of a single spherical cavity divided into 4 chambers by 2 rotating disks. The combined rotations of both disks produce changes in the volumes of the 4 cavities (suction and ejection). The blood enters/exits the spherical cavity through 4 openings that are symmetrical to the fixed rotation axis of the first disk.Mock circulatory system: The device pumps a 37% glycerin solution through 2 parallel circuits, simulating the pulmonary and systemic circulations. Flow rates are acquired with a magnetic inductive flowmeter, while pressure sensors collect pressure in the left and right outflow and inflow tracts.In vitro test protocol: The pump is run at speeds ranging from 20 to 180 ejections per minute. The waveform of the pressure generated at the inflow and outflow of the 4 chambers and the flow rate in the systemic circulation are measured. At an ejection rate of 178 min-1, the RollingHeart pumps 5.3 L/min for a systemic maximal pressure gradient of 174 mmHg and a pulmonary maximal pressure gradient of 75 mmHg. The power input was 14 W, corresponding to an efficiency of 21%. The RollingHeart represents a new approach in the domain of total artificial heart. This preliminary study endorses the feasibility of a single valveless device acting as a total artificial heart.

  12. Impedance cardiography: Pulsatile blood flow and the biophysical and electrodynamic basis for the stroke volume equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald P Bernstein

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Impedance cardiography (ICG is a branch of bioimpedance pimarily concerned with the determination of left ventricular stroke volume (SV. As implemented, using the transthoracic approach, the technique involves applying a current field longitudinally across a segment of thorax by means of a constant magnitude, high frequency, low amplitude alternating current (AC. By Ohm's Law, the voltage difference measured within the current field is proportional to the electrical impedance Z (Ω. Without ventilatory or cardiac activity, Z is known as the transthoracic, static base impedance Z0. Upon ventricular ejection, a characteristic time dependent cardiac-synchronous pulsatile impedance change is obtained, ΔZ(t, which, when placed electrically in parallel with Z0, constitutes the time-variable total transthoracic impedance Z(t. ΔZ(t represents a dual-element composite waveform, which comprises both the radially-oriented volumetric expansion of and axially-directed forward blood flow within both great thoracic arteries. In its majority, however, ΔZ(t is known to primarily emanate from the ascending aorta. Conceptually, commonly implemented methods assume a volumetric origin for the peak systolic upslope of ΔZ(t, (i.e. dZ/dtmax, with the presumed units of Ω·s-1. A recently introduced method assumes the rapid ejection of forward flowing blood in earliest systole causes significant changes in the velocity-induced blood resistivity variation (Δρb(t, Ωcm·s-1, and it is the peak rate of change of the blood resistivity variation dρb(t/dtmax (Ωcm·s-2 that is the origin of dZ/dtmax. As a consequence of dZ/dtmax peaking in the time domain of peak aortic blood acceleration, dv/dtmax (cm·s-2, it is suggested that dZ/dtmax is an ohmic mean acceleration analog (Ω·s-2 and not a mean flow or velocity surrogate as generally assumed. As conceptualized, the normalized value, dZ/dtmax/Z0, is a dimensionless ohmic mean acceleration equivalent (s-2

  13. Non-invasive estimation of pulsatile flow and differential pressure in an implantable rotary blood pump for heart failure patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AlOmari, A H; Savkin, A V; Karantonis, D M; Lim, E; Lovell, N H

    2009-01-01

    We propose dynamical models for pulsatile flow and head estimation in an implantable rotary blood pump. Pulsatile flow and head data were obtained using a circulatory mock loop where fluid solutions with different values of viscosities were used as a blood analogue with varying haematocrit (HCT). Noninvasive measurements of power and pump speed were used with HCT values as inputs to the flow model while the estimated flow was used with the speed as inputs to a head estimation model. Linear regression analysis between estimated and measured flows obtained from a mock loop resulted in a highly significant correlation (R 2 = 0.982) and a mean absolute error (e) of 0.323 L min −1 , while for head, R 2 = 0.933 and e = 7.682 mmHg were obtained. R 2 = 0.849 and e = 0.584 L min −1 were obtained when the same model derived in the mock loop was used for flow estimation in ex vivo porcine data (N = 6). Furthermore, in the steady state, the solution of the presented flow model can be described by a previously designed and verified static model. The models developed herein will play a vital role in developing a robust control system of the pump flow coping with changing physiological demands

  14. Interpretation and value of MR CSF flow studies for paediatric neurosurgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samukelisiwe Sithembile Mbonane

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Imaging techniques may be underutilised when clinicians are unaware of the technique or do not recognise its potential. Phase-contrast MR imaging (PC-MRI is a rapid, simple and non-invasive technique that is sensitive to CSF flow. It demonstrates a mechanical coupling between cerebral blood and CSF flow throughout the cardiac cycle. Neurosurgeons should be able to request this procedure routinely as part of an MRI request. This paper gives an overview of the indications, technical requirements, technique and interpretation, using image examples. Indications for CSF flow studies include assessment and functionality of shunt treatment in patients with hydrocephalus; hydrocephalus associated with achondroplasia; Chiari I malformation; confirmation of aqueductal stenosis; and determining patency of a third ventriculostomy.

  15. Nonlinear dynamics of shells conveying pulsatile flow with pulse-wave propagation. Theory and numerical results for a single harmonic pulsation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubaldi, Eleonora; Amabili, Marco; Païdoussis, Michael P.

    2017-05-01

    In deformable shells conveying pulsatile flow, oscillatory pressure changes cause local movements of the fluid and deformation of the shell wall, which propagate downstream in the form of a wave. In biomechanics, it is the propagation of the pulse that determines the pressure gradient during the flow at every location of the arterial tree. In this study, a woven Dacron aortic prosthesis is modelled as an orthotropic circular cylindrical shell described by means of the Novozhilov nonlinear shell theory. Flexible boundary conditions are considered to simulate connection with the remaining tissue. Nonlinear vibrations of the shell conveying pulsatile flow and subjected to pulsatile pressure are investigated taking into account the effects of the pulse-wave propagation. For the first time in literature, coupled fluid-structure Lagrange equations of motion for a non-material volume with wave propagation in case of pulsatile flow are developed. The fluid is modeled as a Newtonian inviscid pulsatile flow and it is formulated using a hybrid model based on the linear potential flow theory and considering the unsteady viscous effects obtained from the unsteady time-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. Contributions of pressure and velocity propagation are also considered in the pressure drop along the shell and in the pulsatile frictional traction on the internal wall in the axial direction. A numerical bifurcation analysis employs a refined reduced order model to investigate the dynamic behavior of a pressurized Dacron aortic graft conveying blood flow. A pulsatile time-dependent blood flow model is considered by applying the first harmonic of the physiological waveforms of velocity and pressure during the heart beating period. Geometrically nonlinear vibration response to pulsatile flow and transmural pulsatile pressure, considering the propagation of pressure and velocity changes inside the shell, is here presented via frequency-response curves, time histories, bifurcation

  16. Cerebral blood flow, glucose use, and CSF ionic regulation in potassium-depleted rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroek, H.; Kuschinsky, W.

    1988-01-01

    Rats were kept on a low-K + diet for 25 or 70 days. Local cerebral blood flow (LCBF) and local cerebral glucose utilization (LCGU) were measured in 31 different structures of the brain by means of the [ 14 C]iodoantipyrine and [ 14 C]2-deoxy-D-glucose method. After 25 and 70 days of K + depletion LCBF was decreased significantly in 27 and 30 structures, respectively, the average decrease being 19 and 25%. In contrast, average LCGU was not changed. Cisternal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) K + concentration decreased significantly from 2.65 ± 0.02 mM in controls to 2.55 ± 0.02 mM and 2.47 ± 0.02 mM in the two treated groups. CSF [HCO 3 - ], pH, and Pco 2 were increased in K + -depleted animals. These data show that K + depletion induces an increase in CSF pH and a decrease in CSF K + concentration, both of which cause a reduction in cerebral blood flow. The increased CSF Pco 2 is secondary to the reduction of blood flow, since brain metabolism and arterial Pco 2 remained constant

  17. Quantitative analysis of the aqueductal CSF flow dynamics with FLASH sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, Kouji; Tsuji, Shoji; Yuasa, Tatsuhiko; Miyatake, Tadashi.

    1993-01-01

    Aqueductal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow image and its dynamics were analyzed with 1.5 T MR system using ECG-gated Fast Low Flip Angle Shot (FLASH). High flip angle (90 degree) and short echo time (10 ms) were applicated. Seventeen ECG gated nine images were obtained in one cardiac cycle from the inferior midbrain. Axial imaging plane (across at 60 degree to the aqueduct) and 6 mm of slice thickness is available. The CSF flow velocity was estimated by a standard curve of signal intensity ratio, obtained by the running water in model tubes. Examinations of five normal subjects (male/female=2/3, 48.4±15 years old) were performed. The aqueductal flow signal had two peaks in one cardiac cycle. The latter oval signals within the diastolic phase represent the caudal (downward) CSF flow, and the former wedge shaped signals represent the cephalad (reverse) flow. The peak velocity of the caudal CSF flow is about 6.5 mm/s, the cephalad flow is about 4.5 mm/s. We defined two zero points of the to-and-fro curve as turning points, the first (caudal to cephalad) zero point as the 'first turning point', the second (cephalad to caudal) zero point as the 'second turning point'. In normal subjects, the first turning points are at 236±28 ms (±SD), the second turning points are at 723±67 ms (±SD) after ECG R wave. This new method is highly useful for the analyzing disorders with CSF flow abnormalities. (author)

  18. Pulsatility of Lenticulostriate Arteries Assessed by 7 Tesla Flow MRI-Measurement, Reproducibility, and Applicability to Aging Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnerr, Roald S; Jansen, Jacobus F A; Uludag, Kamil; Hofman, Paul A M; Wildberger, Joachim E; van Oostenbrugge, Robert J; Backes, Walter H

    2017-01-01

    Characterization of flow properties in cerebral arteries with 1.5 and 3 Tesla MRI is usually limited to large cerebral arteries and difficult to evaluate in the small perforating arteries due to insufficient spatial resolution. In this study, we assessed the feasibility to measure blood flow waveforms in the small lenticulostriate arteries with 7 Tesla velocity-sensitive MRI. The middle cerebral artery was included as reference. Imaging was performed in five young and five old healthy volunteers. Flow was calculated by integrating time-varying velocity values over the vascular cross-section. MRI acquisitions were performed twice in each subject to determine reproducibility. From the flow waveforms, the pulsatility index and damping factor were deduced. Reproducibility values, in terms of the intraclass correlation coefficients, were found to be good to excellent. Measured pulsatility index of the lenticulostriate arteries significantly increased and damping factor significantly decreased with age. In conclusion, we demonstrate that blood flow through the lenticostriate arteries can be precisely measured using 7 Tesla MRI and reveal effects of arterial stiffness due to aging. These findings hold promise to provide relevant insights into the pathologies involving perforating cerebral arteries.

  19. INFLUENCE OF PULSATILE FLOW ON THE BEHAVIOR OF HUMAN FIBROBLASTS ADHERED TO GLASS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANKOOTEN, TG; SCHAKENRAAD, JM; VANDERMEI, HC; BUSSCHER, HJ

    1993-01-01

    In the human body, cells contacting biomaterials surfaces are frequently exposed to pulsatile shear stresses, e.g. blood vessel prostheses. Most studies involving shear, however, try to achieve a steady, pulse-free shear stress in studying cell-biomaterial interactions. In this study, human

  20. Frequency analysis of CSF flow on cine-MRI in normal pressure hydrocephalus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyati, Tosiaki; Kasuga, Toshio; Imai, Hiroshi; Fujita, Hiroshi; Mase, Mitsuhito; Itikawa, Katuhiro

    2001-01-01

    To clarify the flow dynamics of intracranial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH), frequency analyses of CSF flow measured with an ECG-gated phase contrast cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were performed. The amplitude and phase in the CSF flow spectra in the aqueduct were determined in patients with NPH after a subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH-NPH group, n=26), an idiopathic NPH (I-NPH group, n=4), an asymptomatic ventricular dilation or a brain atrophy (VD group, n=21), and in healthy volunteers (control group, n=25). The changes of CSF flow spectra were also analyzed 5 and 15 minutes after an intravenous injection of acetazolamide. Moreover, a phase transfer function (PTF) calculated from the spectra of the driving vascular pulsation and CSF flow in the aqueduct were assessed in patients with SAH-NPH and control groups before and after acetazolamide injection. There values were compared with the pressure volume response (PVR). The amplitude of the 1st-3rd harmonics in the SAH-NPH or I-NPH group was significantly larger than in the control or VD group because of a decrease in compliance (increase in PVR). The phase of the 1st harmonic in the SAH-NPH group was significantly different from that in the control or VD group, but no difference was found between the control and VD groups. The amplitude of the 0-3rd harmonics increased, and the phase of the 1st harmonic changed in all groups after an acetazolamide injection. An evaluation of the time course of the direct current of CSF flow provided further information about the compensatory faculty of the cerebrospinal cavity. A PTF of the 1st harmonic in the SAH-NPH group was significantly larger than in the control group, and a positive correlation was noted between PTF of the 1st harmonic and PVR. In conclusion, frequency analyses of CSF flow measured by cine-MRI make it possible to obtain noninvasively a more detailed picture of the pathophysiology of NPH and of changes in intracranial

  1. Frequency analysis of CSF flow on cine-MRI in normal pressure hydrocephalus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyati, Tosiaki; Kasuga, Toshio; Imai, Hiroshi [Kanazawa Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine; Fujita, Hiroshi; Mase, Mitsuhito; Itikawa, Katuhiro

    2001-09-01

    To clarify the flow dynamics of intracranial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH), frequency analyses of CSF flow measured with an ECG-gated phase contrast cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were performed. The amplitude and phase in the CSF flow spectra in the aqueduct were determined in patients with NPH after a subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH-NPH group, n=26), an idiopathic NPH (I-NPH group, n=4), an asymptomatic ventricular dilation or a brain atrophy (VD group, n=21), and in healthy volunteers (control group, n=25). The changes of CSF flow spectra were also analyzed 5 and 15 minutes after an intravenous injection of acetazolamide. Moreover, a phase transfer function (PTF) calculated from the spectra of the driving vascular pulsation and CSF flow in the aqueduct were assessed in patients with SAH-NPH and control groups before and after acetazolamide injection. There values were compared with the pressure volume response (PVR). The amplitude of the 1st-3rd harmonics in the SAH-NPH or I-NPH group was significantly larger than in the control or VD group because of a decrease in compliance (increase in PVR). The phase of the 1st harmonic in the SAH-NPH group was significantly different from that in the control or VD group, but no difference was found between the control and VD groups. The amplitude of the 0-3rd harmonics increased, and the phase of the 1st harmonic changed in all groups after an acetazolamide injection. An evaluation of the time course of the direct current of CSF flow provided further information about the compensatory faculty of the cerebrospinal cavity. A PTF of the 1st harmonic in the SAH-NPH group was significantly larger than in the control group, and a positive correlation was noted between PTF of the 1st harmonic and PVR. In conclusion, frequency analyses of CSF flow measured by cine-MRI make it possible to obtain noninvasively a more detailed picture of the pathophysiology of NPH and of changes in intracranial

  2. Evaluations of CSF flow dynamics in elderly with dementia by metrizamide CT cisternography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nokura, Kazuya; Kabasawa, Hidehiro; Matsubara, Mitsutaka; Yamamoto, Masahiko; Nagai, Hajime

    1988-01-01

    We have investigated Metrizamide CT-cisternography in multi-infarct dementia (MID): 29 cases, senile dementia of the Alzheimer type (SDAT): 7 cases, normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH): 8 cases and spinocerebellar degeneration (SCD): 3 cases. By quantitative manner the differences of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flowdynamics in each group have been evaluated. In comparison with SCD which show normal CSF flow, MID show tendency to ventricular reflux and convexity stasis. No difference was seen between MID and SDAT. Though NPH shows stronger ventricular reflux than that or MID, the stasis in MID is more severe than that of NPH. In MID group subject of older than 70 years show more severe SCF flow disturbances. When divided into two groups by ADL (Activities of daily living) scale (full of 15 points) the group of less than 6 points show slight disturbances in comparison with that of more than 6 points. And the same is true in Hasegawas dementia rating scales, namely the group of less than 21 points (full of 32.5) shows slight disturbances in comparison with that of more than 21 points. The flow dynamics pattern of slight ventricular reflux in 24 hours and stasis in convexity from 24 to 48 hours seems to be typical in either MID or SDAT. But such a pattern has never been reported in SCF flow dynamics studies. These findings may suggest that CSF flow disturbances have a close relation with aging and dementia. (author)

  3. Evaluations of CSF flow dynamics in elderly with dementia by metrizamide CT cisternography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nokura, Kazuya; Kabasawa, Hidehiro; Matsubara, Mitsutaka; Yamamoto, Masahiko; Nagai, Hajime

    1988-06-01

    We have investigated Metrizamide CT-cisternography in multi-infarct dementia (MID): 29 cases, senile dementia of the Alzheimer type (SDAT): 7 cases, normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH): 8 cases and spinocerebellar degeneration (SCD): 3 cases. By quantitative manner the differences of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flowdynamics in each group have been evaluated. In comparison with SCD which show normal CSF flow, MID show tendency to ventricular reflux and convexity stasis. No difference was seen between MID and SDAT. Though NPH shows stronger ventricular reflux than that or MID, the stasis in MID is more severe than that of NPH. In MID group subject of older than 70 years show more severe SCF flow disturbances. When divided into two groups by ADL (Activities of daily living) scale (full of 15 points) the group of less than 6 points show slight disturbances in comparison with that of more than 6 points. And the same is true in Hasegawas dementia rating scales, namely the group of less than 21 points (full of 32.5) shows slight disturbances in comparison with that of more than 21 points. The flow dynamics pattern of slight ventricular reflux in 24 hours and stasis in convexity from 24 to 48 hours seems to be typical in either MID or SDAT. But such a pattern has never been reported in SCF flow dynamics studies. These findings may suggest that CSF flow disturbances have a close relation with aging and dementia.

  4. Bernoulli's Principle Applied to Brain Fluids: Intracranial Pressure Does Not Drive Cerebral Perfusion or CSF Flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Eric; Ros, Maxime; Moyse, Emmanuel; Lorthois, Sylvie; Swider, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    In line with the first law of thermodynamics, Bernoulli's principle states that the total energy in a fluid is the same at all points. We applied Bernoulli's principle to understand the relationship between intracranial pressure (ICP) and intracranial fluids. We analyzed simple fluid physics along a tube to describe the interplay between pressure and velocity. Bernoulli's equation demonstrates that a fluid does not flow along a gradient of pressure or velocity; a fluid flows along a gradient of energy from a high-energy region to a low-energy region. A fluid can even flow against a pressure gradient or a velocity gradient. Pressure and velocity represent part of the total energy. Cerebral blood perfusion is not driven by pressure but by energy: the blood flows from high-energy to lower-energy regions. Hydrocephalus is related to increased cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) resistance (i.e., energy transfer) at various points. Identification of the energy transfer within the CSF circuit is important in understanding and treating CSF-related disorders. Bernoulli's principle is not an abstract concept far from clinical practice. We should be aware that pressure is easy to measure, but it does not induce resumption of fluid flow. Even at the bedside, energy is the key to understanding ICP and fluid dynamics.

  5. Relationship between pineal cyst size and aqueductal CSF flow measured by phase contrast MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezuidenhout, Abraham F; Kasper, Ekkehard M; Baledent, Olivier; Rojas, Rafael; Bhadelia, Rafeeque A

    2018-02-23

    Most patients with pineal cysts referred for neurosurgical consultation have no specific symptoms or objective findings except for pineal cyst size to help in management decisions. Our purpose was to assess the relationship between pineal cyst size and aqueductal CSF flow using PC-MRI. Eleven adult patients with pineal cysts (> 1-cm in size) referred for neurosurgical consultations were included. Cyst volume was calculated using 3D T1 images. PC-MRI in axial plane with velocity encoding of 5 cm/sec was used to quantitatively assess CSF flow through the cerebral aqueduct to determine the aqueductal stroke volume, which was then correlated to cyst size using Pearson's correlation. Pineal cysts were grouped by size into small (6/11) and large (5/11) using the median value to compare aqueductal stroke volume using Mann-Whitney test. Patients were 39 ± 13 years (mean ± SD) of age, and 10/11 (91%) were female. There was significant negative correlation between cyst volume and aqueductal stroke volume (r=0.74; p=0.009). Volume of small cysts (4954±2157 mm3) was significantly different compared to large cysts (13752±3738 mm3; p= 0.008). The aqueductal stroke volume of patients harboring large cysts 33±8 μL/cardiac cycle was significantly lower than that of patients with small cysts 96±29 μL/cardiac cycle (p=0.008). Aqueductal CSF flow appears to decrease with increasing pineal cyst size. Our preliminary results provide first evidence that even in the absence of objective neurological findings or hydrocephalus; larger pineal cysts already display decreased CSF flow through the cerebral aqueduct.

  6. Cerebrospinal fluid flow. Pt. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroth, G.; Klose, U.

    1992-01-01

    Cardiac- and respiration-related movements of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were investigated by MRI in 71 patients. In most patients with arteriosclerotic occlusive vascular disease CSF pulsations are normal. Decreased pulsatile flow is detectable in those with arteriovenous malformations, intracranial air and following lumbar puncture and withdrawal of CSF. Increased pulsatile flow in the cerebral aqueduct was found in 2 patients with large aneurysms, idiopathic communicating syringomyelia and in most cases of normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH). CSF flow in the cervical spinal canal is, however, reduced or normal in NPH, indicating reduction of the unfolding ability of the surface of the brain and/or inhibition of rapid CSF movements in the subrachnoid space over its convexity. (orig.)

  7. Occult CSF flow disturbance of patients with Alzheimer type dementia and vascular dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kono, Kazuhiko; Sugita, Yasuko; Funaki, Chiaki

    1994-01-01

    We report results of Iotrolan CT-cisternography on 41 demented patients (13 males and 28 females) to find 'occult normal pressure hydrocephalus'. These patients were suspected to have CSF flow disturbance from clinical symptoms and simple brain CT scan findings. Their average age, duration of dementia, and score of Hasegawa's dementia scale (HDS) were 76.2 years, 5.9 years, 9.5/32.5,respectively. Before performing CT-cisternography, clinical diagnosis for their dementia were vascular dementia in 18 patients. Alzheimer type dementia in 12, suspect of NPH in 5, and other diagnoses in 6. From the results of cisternography, we found 13 patients with CSF flow disturbance (contrast material remained in the ventricle more than 48 hours after injection), and 17 patients with normal CSF flow. The former showed lower scores of HDS, higher urinary incontinence scores and smaller areas of the interhemispheric fissure on CT scan than the latter. But the former showed no significant difference from the latter in the average age, duration of dementia and width of the ventricles. (author)

  8. The Effect of Pulsatile Flow on bMSC-Derived Endothelial-Like Cells in a Small-Sized Artificial Vessel Made by 3-Dimensional Bioprinting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Woog Lee

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Replacement of small-sized vessels is still challenging. This study is aimed at investigating the possibility of small-sized artificial vessels made by 3-dimensional bioprinting and the effect of pulsatile flow on bMSC-derived endothelial-like cells. Cells were harvested from rabbit bone marrow and primary cultured with or without growth factors. Endothelial differentiation was confirmed by the Matrigel tube formation assay, Western blot, and qRT-PCR. In addition, embedment of endothelial-like cells in an artificial vessel was made by 3-dimensional bioprinting, and the pulsatile flow was performed. For pumped and nonpumped groups, qRT-PCR was performed on CD31 and VE-cadherin gene expression. Endothelial-like cells showed increased gene expression of CD31 and VE-cadherin, and tube formation is observed at each week. Endothelial-like cells grow well in a small-sized artificial vessel made by 3-dimensional bioprinting and even express higher endothelial cell markers when they undergo pulsatile flow condition. Moreover, the pulsatile flow condition gives a positive effect for cell observation not only on the sodium alginate hydrogel layer but also on the luminal surface of the artificial vessel wall. We have developed an artificial vessel, which is a mixture of cells and carriers using a 3-dimensional bioprinting method, and applied pulsatile flow using a peristaltic pump, and we also demonstrated cell growth and differentiation into endothelial cells. This study suggests guidelines regarding a small-sized artificial vessel in the field of tissue engineering.

  9. Flow visualization of three-dimensionality inside the 12 cc Penn State pulsatile pediatric ventricular assist device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roszelle, Breigh N; Deutsch, Steven; Manning, Keefe B

    2010-02-01

    In order to aid the ongoing concern of limited organ availability for pediatric heart transplants, Penn State has continued development of a pulsatile Pediatric Ventricular Assist Device (PVAD). Initial studies of the PVAD observed an increase in thrombus formation due to differences in flow field physics when compared to adult sized devices, which included a higher degree of three-dimensionality. This unique flow field brings into question the use of 2D planar particle image velocimetry (PIV) as a flow visualization technique, however the small size and high curvature of the PVAD make other tools such as stereoscopic PIV impractical. In order to test the reliability of the 2D results, we perform a pseudo-3D PIV study using planes both parallel and normal to the diaphragm employing a mock circulatory loop containing a viscoelastic fluid that mimics 40% hematocrit blood. We find that while the third component of velocity is extremely helpful to a physical understanding of the flow, particularly of the diastolic jet and the development of a desired rotational pattern, the flow data taken parallel to the diaphragm is sufficient to describe the wall shear rates, a critical aspect to the study of thrombosis and design of such pumps.

  10. Cardiac-driven Pulsatile Motion of Intracranial Cerebrospinal Fluid Visualized Based on a Correlation Mapping Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatsushiro, Satoshi; Sunohara, Saeko; Hayashi, Naokazu; Hirayama, Akihiro; Matsumae, Mitsunori; Atsumi, Hideki; Kuroda, Kagayaki

    2018-04-10

    A correlation mapping technique delineating delay time and maximum correlation for characterizing pulsatile cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) propagation was proposed. After proofing its technical concept, this technique was applied to healthy volunteers and idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH) patients. A time-resolved three dimensional-phase contrast (3D-PC) sampled the cardiac-driven CSF velocity at 32 temporal points per cardiac period at each spatial location using retrospective cardiac gating. The proposed technique visualized distributions of propagation delay and correlation coefficient of the PC-based CSF velocity waveform with reference to a waveform at a particular point in the CSF space. The delay time was obtained as the amount of time-shift, giving the maximum correlation for the velocity waveform at an arbitrary location with that at the reference location. The validity and accuracy of the technique were confirmed in a flow phantom equipped with a cardiovascular pump. The technique was then applied to evaluate the intracranial CSF motions in young, healthy (N = 13), and elderly, healthy (N = 13) volunteers and iNPH patients (N = 13). The phantom study demonstrated that root mean square error of the delay time was 2.27%, which was less than the temporal resolution of PC measurement used in this study (3.13% of a cardiac cycle). The human studies showed a significant difference (P correlation coefficient between the young, healthy group and the other two groups. A significant difference (P correlation coefficients in intracranial CSF space among all groups. The result suggests that the CSF space compliance of iNPH patients was lower than that of healthy volunteers. The correlation mapping technique allowed us to visualize pulsatile CSF velocity wave propagations as still images. The technique may help to classify diseases related to CSF dynamics, such as iNPH.

  11. Cine MR CSF flow study in hydrocephalus: What are the valuable parmeters?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hye Young; Kim, Myung Hyun

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the changes in diagnosis of intracranial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) dynamics in the hydrocephalus, we studied the various parameters of cine phase contrast (PC) magnetic resonance (MR) CSF flow images in cases of acutely progressive hydrocephalus, comparing them with those in normal CSF circulation. The MR images were obtained with a 1.5T (GE Signa, GE Medical Systems, Milwaukee, USA) unit using the 2 dimensional cine PC sequence with peripheral gating and gradient recalled echo imaging in ten cases of non-obstructive hydrocephalus(NOH), three of obstructive hydrocephalus(OH), and ten controls. The time-echo time-flip angle employed were 50 to 80 msec-11 to 15 msec-12 to 15 degrees. Temporal velocity information relating to cervical pericord CSF spaces, third and fourth ventricles, and the aqueduct were plotted as wave forms which were then analyzed for configuration, amplitude parameters(Vmax, Vmin, Vdif), and temporal parameters(R-S, R-SMV, R-D, R-DMV). The statistical significance of each parameter was examined using the paired t-test. All patients with OH underwent endoscopic third ventriculostomy, whereas all with NOH underwent shunting procedures. In five ROIs, distinct reproducible configuration features were obtained at aqueduct and cervical pericord spaces, but not at ventricular levels. We determined the statistically significant differences between controls and hydrocephalus patients using temporal, rather than amplitude parameters. In NOH, the graph showed R-DMV shortening (p<0.01) at the anterior cervical pericord space. In OH, there were R-DMV shortening (p<0.05) was seen at the anterior cervical pericord space, and R-DMV shortening (p<0.02) at the posterior cervical pericord space. In one case of OH, a typical change of configuration, mirror image, was obtained at aqueduct level, and in all OH cases, the level of obstruction could be determined. The results of cine PC MR CSF flow study may be valuable for points for determining the level

  12. Assessment of CSF dynamics and venous flow in the superior sagittal sinus by MRI in idiopathic intracranial hypertension: a preliminary study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gideon, P; Sørensen, P S; Thomsen, C

    1994-01-01

    A velocity-sensitive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) phase-mapping method was used for non-invasive study of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow in the cerebral aqueduct, for indirect calculation of supratentorial CSF production, and for measurement of blood flow in the superior sagittal sinus (SSS......, the MRI measurements suggested CSF hypersecretion in three patients, whereas increased transependymal passage of CSF could have been the cause of negative calculated CSF production rates in two others. A tendency towards lower mean blood flow in the SSS (mean 345 ml/min) in the patients than...

  13. Carotid flow pulsatility is higher in women with greater decrement in gait speed during multi-tasking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, Joaquin U; James, C Roger; Yang, Hyung Suk; Jensen, Daniel; Atkins, Lee; Al-Khalil, Kareem; O'Boyle, Michael

    2017-05-01

    Central arterial hemodynamics is associated with cognitive impairment. Reductions in gait speed during walking while performing concurrent tasks known as dual-tasking (DT) or multi-tasking (MT) is thought to reflect the cognitive cost that exceeds neural capacity to share resources. We hypothesized that central vascular function would associate with decrements in gait speed during DT or MT. Gait speed was measured using a motion capture system in 56 women (30-80y) without mild-cognitive impairment. Dual-tasking was considered walking at a fast-pace while balancing a tray. Multi-tasking was the DT condition plus subtracting by serial 7's. Applanation tonometry was used for measurement of aortic stiffness and central pulse pressure. Doppler-ultrasound was used to measure blood flow velocity and β-stiffness index in the common carotid artery. The percent change in gait speed was larger for MT than DT (14.1±11.2 vs. 8.7±9.6%, p decrement (third tertile) as compared to women with less decrement (first tertile) in gait speed during MT after adjusting for age, gait speed, and task error. Carotid pulse pressure and β-stiffness did not contribute to these tertile differences. Elevated carotid flow pulsatility and resistance are characteristics found in healthy women that show lower cognitive capacity to walk and perform multiple concurrent tasks. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Flow pattern in the ventricle of brain with cilia beating and CSF circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong; Westendorf, Christian; Faubel, Regina; Eichele, Gregor; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    We recently discovered that cilia of the ventral third ventricle (v3V) of mammalian brain generate a complex flow network close to the wall. However, the flow pattern in the overall three dimensional v3V, especially under physiological condition, remains to be investigated. Computational fluid dynamics is arguably the best approach for such investigations. Several v3V geometries are reconstructed from different data for comparison study. The lattice Boltzmann method and immersed boundary method are used to reproduce the experimental set-up for an opened v3V firstly. The experimentally recorded cilia induced flow network is projected on the curved v3V wall. The flow maps obtained numerically at different heights from the v3V wall agree with the experimental data qualitatively. We then consider the entire v3V with ciliary flow network along the wall for boundary condition. Moreover, we add a time dependent flow rate to represent the CSF circulation, and study flow pattern in the ventricle. We thank the Max Planck Society (MPG) for financial support. This work is conducted within the Physics and Medicine Initiative at Goettingen Campus between MPG and University Medical Center.

  15. Pulsatile blood flow in human bone assessed by laser-Doppler flowmetry and the interpretation of photoplethysmographic signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binzoni, Tiziano; Tchernin, David; Hyacinthe, Jean-Noël; Van De Ville, Dimitri; Richiardi, Jonas

    2013-01-01

    Human bone blood flow, mean blood speed and the number of moving red blood cells were assessed (in arbitrary units), as a function of time, during one cardiac cycle. The measurements were obtained non-invasively on five volunteers by laser-Doppler flowmetry at large interoptode spacing. The investigated bones included: patella, clavicle, tibial diaphysis and tibial malleolus. As hypothesized, we found that in all bones the number of moving cells remains constant during cardiac cycles. Therefore, we concluded that the pulsatile nature of blood flow must be completely determined by the mean blood speed and not by changes in blood volume (vessels dilation). Based on these results, it is finally demonstrated using a mathematical model (derived from the radiative transport theory) that photoplethysmographic (PPG) pulsations observed by others in the literature, cannot be generated by oscillations in blood oxygen saturation, which is physiologically linked to blood speed. In fact, possible oxygen saturation changes during pulsations decrease the amplitude of PPG pulsations due to specific features of the PPG light source. It is shown that a variation in blood oxygen saturation of 3% may induce a negative change of ∼1% in the PPG signal. It is concluded that PPG pulsations are determined by periodic ‘positive’ changes of the reduced scattering coefficient of the tissue and/or the absorption coefficient at constant blood volume. No explicit experimental PPG measurements have been performed. As a by-product of this study, an estimation of the arterial pulse wave velocity obtained from the analysis of the blood flow pulsations give a value of 7.8 m s −1 (95% confidence interval of the sample mean distribution: [6.7, 9.5] m s −1 ), which is perfectly compatible with data in the literature. We hope that this note will contribute to a better understanding of PPG signals and to further develop the domain of the vascular physiology of human bone. (note)

  16. Axial flow velocity patterns in a normal human pulmonary artery model: pulsatile in vitro studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, H W; Yoganathan, A P

    1990-01-01

    It has been clinically observed that the flow velocity patterns in the pulmonary artery are directly modified by disease. The present study addresses the hypothesis that altered velocity patterns relate to the severity of various diseases in the pulmonary artery. This paper lays a foundation for that analysis by providing a detailed description of flow velocity patterns in the normal pulmonary artery, using flow visualization and laser Doppler anemometry techniques. The studies were conducted in an in vitro rigid model in a right heart pulse duplicator system. In the main pulmonary artery, a broad central flow field was observed throughout systole. The maximum axial velocity (150 cm s-1) was measured at peak systole. In the left pulmonary artery, the axial velocities were approximately evenly distributed in the perpendicular plane. However, in the bifurcation plane, they were slightly skewed toward the inner wall at peak systole and during the deceleration phase. In the right pulmonary artery, the axial velocity in the perpendicular plane had a very marked M-shaped profile at peak systole and during the deceleration phase, due to a pair of strong secondary flows. In the bifurcation plane, higher axial velocities were observed along the inner wall, while lower axial velocities were observed along the outer wall and in the center. Overall, relatively low levels of turbulence were observed in all the branches during systole. The maximum turbulence intensity measured was at the boundary of the broad central flow field in the main pulmonary artery at peak systole.

  17. MR angiography of stenosis and aneurysm models in the pulsatile flow: variation with imaging parameters and concentration of contrast media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Kyung Joo; Park, Jae Hyung; Lee, Hak Jong; Won, Hyung Jin; Lee, Dong Hyuk; Min, Byung Goo; Chang, Kee Hyun

    1997-01-01

    The image quality of magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) varies according to the imaging techniques applied and the parameters affected by blood flow patterns, as well as by the shape of the blood vessels. This study was designed to assess the influence on signal intensity and its distribution of the geometry of these vessels, the imaging parameters, and the concentration of contrast media in MRA of stenosis and aneurysm models. MRA was performed in stenosis and aneurysm models made of glass tubes, using pulsatile flow with viscosity and flow profile similar to those of blood. Slice and maximum intensity projection (MIP) images were obtained using various imaging techniques and parameters;there was variation in repetition time, flip angle, imaging planes, and concentrations of contrast media. On slice images of three-dimensional (3D) time-of-flight (TOF) techniques, flow signal intensity was measured at five locations in the models, and contrast ratio was calculated as the difference between flow signal intensity (SI) and background signal intensity (SIb) divided by background signal intensity or (SI-SIb)/SIb. MIP images obtained by various techniques and using various parameters were also analyzed, with emphasis in the stenosis model on demonstrated degree of stenosis, severity of signal void and image distortion, and in the aneurysm model, on degree of visualization, distortion of contour and distribution of signals. In 3D TOF, the shortest TR (36 msec) and the largest FA (50 deg ) resulted in the highest contrast ratio, but larger flip angles did not effectively demonstrate the demonstration of the peripheral part of the aneurysm. Loss of signal was most prominent in images of the stenosis model obtained with parallel or oblique planes to the flow direction. The two-dimensional TOF technique also caused signal void in stenosis, but precisely demonstrated the aneurysm, with dense opacification of the peripheral part. The phase contrast technique showed some

  18. Numerical simulation of MHD pulsatile flow of a biofluid in a channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kashif Ali

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to numerically study the interaction of an external magnetic field with the flow of a biofluid through a Darcy-Forchhmeir porous channel, due to an oscillatory pressure gradient, in the presence of wall transpiration as well as chemical reaction considerations. We have noticed that if the Reynolds number of the wall transpiration flow is increased, the average (or maximum velocity of the main flow direction is raised. Similar effect has also been observed for the rheological parameter and the Darcy parameter, whereas an opposite trend has been noted for both the Forchheimer quadratic drag parameter and the magnetic parameter. Further, an increase in the Reynolds number results in straightening the concentration profile, thus making it an almost linear function of the dimensionless spatial variable.

  19. Characterization of a Twin-Entry Radial Turbine under Pulsatile Flow Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahfoudh Cerdoun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In automotive applications radial gas turbines are commonly fitted with a twin-entry volute connected to a divided exhaust manifold, ensuring a better scavenge process owing to less interference between engines’ cylinders. This paper is concerned with the study of the unsteady performances related to the pulsating flows of a twin-entry radial turbine in engine-like conditions and the hysteresis-like behaviour during the pulses period. The results show that the aerodynamic performances deviate noticeably from the steady state and depend mainly on the time shifting between the actual output power and the isentropic power, which is distantly related to the apparent length. The maximum of efficiency and output shaft power are accompanied by low entropy generation through the shroud entry side, and their instantaneous behaviours tend to follow mainly the inlet total pressure curve. As revealed a billow is created by the interaction between the main flow and the infiltrated flow, affecting the flow incidence at rotor entry and producing high losses.

  20. PIV-validated numerical modeling of pulsatile flows in distal coronary end-to-side anastomoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, F L; Chong, C K

    2007-01-01

    This study employed particle image velocimetry (PIV) to validate a numerical model in a complementary approach to quantify hemodynamic factors in distal coronary anastomoses and to gain more insights on their relationship with anastomotic geometry. Instantaneous flow fields and wall shear stresses (WSS) were obtained from PIV measurement in a modified life-size silastic anastomosis model adapted from a conventional geometry by incorporating a smooth graft-artery transition. The results were compared with those predicted by a concurrent numerical model. The numerical method was then used to calculate cycle-averaged WSS (WSS(cyc)) and spatial wall shear stress gradient (SWSSG), two critical hemodynamic factors in the pathogenesis of intimal thickening (IT), to compare the conventional and modified geometries. Excellent qualitative agreement and satisfactory quantitative agreement with averaged normalized error in WSS between 0.8% and 8.9% were achieved between the PIV experiment and numerical model. Compared to the conventional geometry, the modified geometry produces a more uniform WSS(cyc) distribution eliminating both high and low WSS(cyc) around the toe, critical in avoiding IT. Peak SWSSG on the artery floor of the modified model is less than one-half that in the conventional case, and high SWSSG at the toe is eliminated. The validated numerical model is useful for modeling unsteady coronary anastomotic flows and elucidating the significance of geometry regulated hemodynamics. The results suggest the clinical relevance of constructing smooth graft-artery transition in distal coronary anastomoses to improve their hemodynamic performance.

  1. Phase-contrast cerebrospinal fluid flow magnetic resonance imaging in qualitative evaluation of patency of CSF flow pathways prior to infusion of chemotherapeutic and other agents into the fourth ventricle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Rajan P; Sitton, Clark W; Ketonen, Leena M; Hou, Ping; Johnson, Jason M; Romo, Seferino; Fletcher, Stephen; Shah, Manish N; Kerr, Marcia; Zaky, Wafik; Rytting, Michael E; Khatua, Soumen; Sandberg, David I

    2018-03-01

    Nuclear medicine studies have previously been utilized to assess for blockage of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow prior to intraventricular chemotherapy infusions. To assess CSF flow without nuclear medicine studies, we obtained cine phase-contrast MRI sequences that assess CSF flow from the fourth ventricle down to the sacrum. In three clinical trials, 18 patients with recurrent malignant posterior fossa tumors underwent implantation of a ventricular access device (VAD) into the fourth ventricle, either with or without simultaneous tumor resection. Prior to infusing therapeutic agents into the VAD, cine MRI phase-contrast CSF flow sequences of the brain and total spine were performed. Velocity encoding (VENC) of 5 and 10 cm/s was used to confirm CSF flow from the fourth ventricular outlets to the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine. Qualitative CSF flow was characterized by neuroradiologists as present or absent. All 18 patients demonstrated CSF flow from the outlets of the fourth ventricle down to the sacrum with no evidence of obstruction. One of these patients, after disease progression, subsequently showed obstruction of CSF flow. No patient required a nuclear medicine study to assess CSF flow prior to initiation of infusions. Fourteen patients have received infusions to date, and none has had neurological toxicity. CSF flow including the fourth ventricle and the total spine can be assessed noninvasively with phase-contrast MRI sequences. Advantages over nuclear medicine studies include avoiding both an invasive procedure and radiation exposure.

  2. Velocity and shear stress distribution downstream of mechanical heart valves in pulsatile flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giersiepen, M; Krause, U; Knott, E; Reul, H; Rau, G

    1989-04-01

    Ten mechanical valves (TAD 27 mm): Starr-Edwards Silastic Ball, Björk-Shiley Standard, Björk-Shiley Concave-Convex, Björk-Shiley Monostrut, Hall-Kaster (Medtronic-Hall), OmniCarbon, Bicer Val, Sorin, Saint-Jude Medical and Hemex (Duromedics) are investigated in a comparative in vitro study. The velocity and turbulent shear stress profiles of the valves were determined by Laser Doppler anemometry in two different downstream axes within a model aortic root. Depending on the individual valve design, velocity peaks up to 1.5 m/s and turbulent shear stress peaks up to 150 N/m2 were measured during the systolic phase. These shear stress peaks mainly occurred in areas of flow separation and intense momentum exchange. Directly downstream of the valves (measuring axis 0.55.dAorta) turbulent shear stress peaks occurred at peak systole and during the deceleration phase, while in the second measuring axis (1.5.dAorta) turbulence levels were lower. Shear stress levels were high at the borders of the fluid jets. The results are discussed from a fluid-dynamic point of view.

  3. MR phase imaging and cerebrospinal fluid flow in the head and spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, L.M.; Di Chiro, G.

    1990-01-01

    Motion of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in and around the brain spinal cord was examined in healthy subjects and in a number of patients with abnormalities of the CSF circulation. The pulsatile motion of the CSF was determined by spin echo phase (velocity) imaging, sometimes in combination with gradient echo phase contrast cine. Differences in flow patterns across CSF spaces were observed: Flow reversal in the cerebellomedullary cistern and lumbar area relative to cervical CSF, and in the posterior versus the anterior subarachnoid space in the spinal canal. Flow communication was demonstrated in known communicating cysts or cavities. Differences in flow were also noted across spinal narrowing or block, and across the walls of a variety of cystic lesions in the brain and spinal cord. MR phase imaging of CSF flow provides pathophysiological information of potential clinical importance for the assessment of diseases affecting the CSF circulation. (orig.)

  4. Safety and efficacy of the Aperio thrombectomy device when compared to the Solitaire AB/FR and the Revive devices in a pulsatile flow system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Mahdi; Spence, John Nathan; Nayak, Sanjeev; Pearce, Gillian; Tennuci, Christopher; Roffe, Christine

    2012-01-01

    There are a limited number of studies comparing the Aperio mechanical thrombectomy device to other stent-based devices. In this paper, we compared the Aperio thrombectomy device to the Solitaire AB, FR and Revive devices in a model of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) within a modified pulsatile flow system. Thrombi made of lamb's blood were placed into a pulsatile flow system perfused with Hartmann's solution at 80 bpm with a mean pressure of 90 mm Hg. 30 experiments were run with each device. Recanalization rates were similar for all three devices (90% with the Solitaire AB, FR, 80% with the Revive, and 90% with the Aperio). The mean number of attempts to retrieve the thrombus was also similar for all three devices (1.7 with the Solitaire AB, FR, 2.1 with the Revive, 1.6 with the Aperio). Clot fragmentation and embolization rates revealed no statistical significance but there was a trend towards lower embolization rates with the Aperio (23% compared to 40% with the Solitaire AB, FR and 47% with the Revive). The Aperio was the fastest to recanalize the MCA (mean of 66 seconds compared to 186 seconds for the Solitaire AB, FR and 169 seconds for the Revive). In this in vitro setting, the Aperio device seems to be an efficacious and safe device when compared to other similar clinically used mechanical thrombectomy devices. Larger clinical trials are warranted.

  5. Occult CSF flow disturbance of patients with Alzheimer type dementia and vascular dementia; Results from Iotrolan CT-cisternography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kono, Kazuhiko; Sugita, Yasuko; Funaki, Chiaki [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine; and others

    1994-04-01

    We report results of Iotrolan CT-cisternography on 41 demented patients (13 males and 28 females) to find 'occult normal pressure hydrocephalus'. These patients were suspected to have CSF flow disturbance from clinical symptoms and simple brain CT scan findings. Their average age, duration of dementia, and score of Hasegawa's dementia scale (HDS) were 76.2 years, 5.9 years, 9.5/32.5,respectively. Before performing CT-cisternography, clinical diagnosis for their dementia were vascular dementia in 18 patients. Alzheimer type dementia in 12, suspect of NPH in 5, and other diagnoses in 6. From the results of cisternography, we found 13 patients with CSF flow disturbance (contrast material remained in the ventricle more than 48 hours after injection), and 17 patients with normal CSF flow. The former showed lower scores of HDS, higher urinary incontinence scores and smaller areas of the interhemispheric fissure on CT scan than the latter. But the former showed no significant difference from the latter in the average age, duration of dementia and width of the ventricles. (author).

  6. Regulation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow in neurodegenerative, neurovascular and neuroinflammatory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Matthew J; Iliff, Jeffrey J

    2016-03-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) circulation and turnover provides a sink for the elimination of solutes from the brain interstitium, serving an important homeostatic role for the function of the central nervous system. Disruption of normal CSF circulation and turnover is believed to contribute to the development of many diseases, including neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimer's disease, ischemic and traumatic brain injury, and neuroinflammatory conditions such as multiple sclerosis. Recent insights into CSF biology suggesting that CSF and interstitial fluid exchange along a brain-wide network of perivascular spaces termed the 'glymphatic' system suggest that CSF circulation may interact intimately with glial and vascular function to regulate basic aspects of brain function. Dysfunction within this glial vascular network, which is a feature of the aging and injured brain, is a potentially critical link between brain injury, neuroinflammation and the development of chronic neurodegeneration. Ongoing research within this field may provide a powerful new framework for understanding the common links between neurodegenerative, neurovascular and neuroinflammatory disease, in addition to providing potentially novel therapeutic targets for these conditions. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Neuro Inflammation edited by Helga E. de Vries and Markus Schwaninger. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Central Pulsatile Pressure and Flow Relationship in the Time and Frequency Domain to Characterise Hydraulic Input to the Brain and Cerebral Vascular Impedance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mi Ok; O'Rourke, Michael F; Adji, Audrey; Avolio, Alberto P

    2016-01-01

    In the time domain, pulsatile flow and pressure can be characterised as the ratio of the late systolic boost of flow or pressure to the pulse amplitude so as to estimate the hydraulic input to the brain. While vascular impedance has been widely used to represent the load presented to the heart by the systemic circulation, it has not been applied to the cerebral circulation.We set out to study the relationship between the pressure and the flow augmentation index (AIx) in the time domain and to determine cerebral vascular impedance using aortic blood pressure and cerebral blood flow waveforms in the frequency domain. Twenty-four young subjects (aged 21-39 years) were recruited; aortic pressure was derived using SphygmoCor from radial pressure. Flow waveforms were recorded from the middle cerebral artery. In three subjects, we performed the Valsalva manoeuvre to investigate their response to physiological intervention. There was a linear relationship between flow and pressure AIx, and cerebral impedance values were similar to those estimated for low resistance vascular beds. Substantial change in pressure and flow wave contour was observed during the Valsalva manoeuvre; however, the relationship in both the time and the frequency domains were unchanged. This confirms that aortic pressure and cerebral flow waveform can be used to study cerebral impedance.

  8. Changes in cerebral artery blood flow velocity after intermittent cerebrospinal fluid drainage.

    OpenAIRE

    Kempley, S T; Gamsu, H R

    1993-01-01

    Doppler ultrasound was used to measure blood flow velocity in the anterior cerebral artery of six premature infants with posthaemorrhagic hydrocephalus, before and after intermittent cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drainage, on 23 occasions. There was a significant increase in mean blood flow velocity after the drainage procedures (+5.6 cm/s, 95% confidence interval +2.9 to +8.3 cm/s), which was accompanied by a decrease in velocity waveform pulsatility. CSF pressure also fell significantly. In pat...

  9. CSF smear

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003768.htm CSF smear To use the sharing features on this ... around the spinal cord and brain. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) protects the brain and spinal cord from injury. ...

  10. Basic study of intrinsic elastography: Relationship between tissue stiffness and propagation velocity of deformation induced by pulsatile flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaoka, Ryo; Iwasaki, Ryosuke; Arakawa, Mototaka; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro; Saijo, Yoshifumi

    2015-07-01

    We proposed an estimation method for a tissue stiffness from deformations induced by arterial pulsation, and named this proposed method intrinsic elastography (IE). In IE, assuming that the velocity of the deformation propagation in tissues is closely related to the stiffness, the propagation velocity (PV) was estimated by spatial compound ultrasound imaging with a high temporal resolution of 1 ms. However, the relationship between tissue stiffness and PV has not been revealed yet. In this study, the PV of the deformation induced by the pulsatile pump was measured by IE in three different poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) phantoms of different stiffnesses. The measured PV was compared with the shear wave velocity (SWV) measured by shear wave imaging (SWI). The measured PV has trends similar to the measured SWV. These results obtained by IE in a healthy male show the possibility that the mechanical properties of living tissues could be evaluated by IE.

  11. SPAMM, cine phase contrast imaging and fast spin-echo T2-weighted imaging in the study of intracranial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connor, S.E.J.; O'Gorman, R.; Summers, P.; Simmons, A.; Moore, E.M.; Chandler, C.; Jarosz, J.M.

    2001-01-01

    AIM: To compare the qualitative assessment of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow using a SPAMM (spatial modulation of magnetization) technique with cine phase contrast images (cine PC) and fast spin echo (FSE) T2-weighted images. MATERIALS AND METHODS: SPAMM, PC and T2-weighted sequences were performed on 22 occasions in 19 patients. Eleven of the studies were performed following a neuroendoscopic third ventriculostomy (NTV), and in these cases, the success of the NTV was determined by clinical follow-up. Two observers used consensus to grade the presence of CSF flow at nine different sites for each study. RESULTS: At 14 of the 178 matched sites, which could be assessed by both SPAMM and cine PC, SPAMM CSF flow grade was higher than that of cine PC. At a further 14/178 matched sites, the cine PC grade was higher than that of SPAMM. There was definite CSF flow at 113/182 (62%) of all the cine PC sites assessed, and 110/181 (61%) of all SPAMM sites assessed whilst 108/198 (54%) of FSE T2-weighted image sites demonstrated flow voids. Cine PC grades were higher than SPAMM at the cerebral aqueduct (P < 0.05, Wilcoxon sign rank test). Definite CSF flow within the anterior third ventricle was present in 4/5 (SPAMM) and 3/5 (cine PC) successful NTVs, 0/2 (SPAMM and cine PC) unsuccessful NTVs and 1/10 (SPAMM and cine PC) patients without NTV. CONCLUSION: SPAMM provides a comparable assessment of intracranial CSF flow to that of cine phase contrast imaging at all CSF sites except the cerebral aqueduct. Connor, S.E.J. et al. (2001)

  12. Demonstration of uneven distribution of intracranial pulsatility in hydrocephalus patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eide, Per K

    2008-11-01

    Data from intracranial pressure (ICP) recordings in patients with hydrocephalus were reviewed to determine whether intracranial pulsatility within the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of cerebral ventricles (ICP(LV)) may differ from that within the brain parenchyma (ICP(PAR)), and whether pulsatility may differ between noncommunicating ventricles. The authors retrieved data from recordings previously obtained in 7 patients with hydrocephalus (noncommunicating in 4 and communicating in 3) and shunt failure who received both an external ventricular drainage (EVD) and an ICP sensor as part of surveillance during intensive care. Simultaneous ICP(LV) and ICP(PAR) signals were available in 6 cases, and simultaneous signals from the lateral and fourth ventricles (ICP(LV) and ICP4V, respectively) were recorded in 1 case. The recordings with both signals were parsed into 6-second time windows. Pulsatility was characterized by the wave amplitude and rise time coefficient, and differences in pulsatility between the ICP(LV) and ICP(PAR) signals (6 cases) or ICP(LV) and ICP4V signals (1 case) were determined. There was uneven distribution of intracranial pulsatility in all 7 patients, shown as significantly elevated pulsatility (that is, higher wave amplitudes and rise time coefficients) within the ventricles (ICP(LV)) than within brain parenchyma (ICP(PAR)) in 6 patients, and significantly higher pulsatility in the fourth (ICP4V) than in the lateral (ICP(LV)) ventricles in 1 patient. Differences > or = 1 mm Hg in ICP wave amplitude were found in 0.5-100% (median 9.4%) of observations in the 7 patients (total number of 6-second time windows, 68,242). The present observations demonstrate uneven distribution of intracranial pulsatility in patients with hydrocephalus, higher pulse pressure amplitudes within the ventricular CSF (ICP(LV)) than within the brain parenchyma (ICP(PAR)). This may be one mechanism behind ventricular enlargement in hydrocephalus.

  13. Numerical modelling on pulsatile flow of Casson nanofluid through an inclined artery with stenosis and tapering under the influence of magnetic field and periodic body acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponalagusamy, R.; Priyadharshini, S.

    2017-11-01

    The present study investigates the pulsatile flow of Casson nanofluid through an inclined and stenosed artery with tapering in the presence of magnetic field and periodic body acceleration. The iron oxide nanoparticles are allowed to flow along with it. The governing equations for the flow of Casson fluid when the artery is tapered slightly having mild stenosis are highly non-linear and the momentum equations for temperature and concentration are coupled and are solved using finite difference numerical schemes in order to find the solutions for velocity, temperature, concentration, wall shear stress, and resistance to blood flow. The aim of the present study is to analyze the effects of flow parameters on the flow of nanofluid through an inclined arterial stenosis with tapering. These effects are represented graphically and concluded that the wall shear stress profiles enhance with increase in yield stress, magnetic field, thermophoresis parameter and decreases with Brownian motion parameter, local temperature Grashof number, local nanoparticle Grashof number. The significance of the model is the existence of yield stress and it is examined that when the rheology of blood changes from Newtonian to Casson fluid, the percentage of decrease in the flow resistance is higher with respect to the increase in the parameters local temperature Grashof number, local nanoparticle Grashof number, Brownian motion parameter, and Prandtl number. It is pertinent to observe that increase in the Brownian motion parameter leads to increment in concentration and temperature profiles. It is observed that the concentration of nanoparticles decreases with increase in the value of thermophoresis parameter.

  14. Imaging in pulsatile tinnitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madani, G.; Connor, S.E.J.

    2009-01-01

    Tinnitus may be continuous or pulsatile. Vascular lesions are the most frequent radiologically demonstrable cause of pulsatile tinnitus. These include congenital vascular anomalies (which may be arterial or venous), vascular tumours, and a variety of acquired vasculopathies. The choice of imaging depends on the clinical findings. If a mass is present at otoscopy, thin-section computed tomography (CT) is indicated. In the otoscopically normal patient, there is a range of possible imaging approaches. However, combined CT angiography and venography is particularly useful

  15. Imaging in pulsatile tinnitus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madani, G. [Radiology Department, St Mary' s Hospital, London (United Kingdom)], E-mail: gittamadani@yahoo.com; Connor, S E.J. [Neuroradiology Department, King' s College Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    2009-03-15

    Tinnitus may be continuous or pulsatile. Vascular lesions are the most frequent radiologically demonstrable cause of pulsatile tinnitus. These include congenital vascular anomalies (which may be arterial or venous), vascular tumours, and a variety of acquired vasculopathies. The choice of imaging depends on the clinical findings. If a mass is present at otoscopy, thin-section computed tomography (CT) is indicated. In the otoscopically normal patient, there is a range of possible imaging approaches. However, combined CT angiography and venography is particularly useful.

  16. CSF analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerebrospinal fluid analysis ... Analysis of CSF can help detect certain conditions and diseases. All of the following can be, but ... An abnormal CSF analysis result may be due to many different causes, ... Encephalitis (such as West Nile and Eastern Equine) Hepatic ...

  17. Spatial-temporal three-dimensional ultrasound plane-by-plane active cavitation mapping for high-intensity focused ultrasound in free field and pulsatile flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Ting; Hu, Hong; Bai, Chen; Guo, Shifang; Yang, Miao; Wang, Supin; Wan, Mingxi

    2016-07-01

    Cavitation plays important roles in almost all high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) applications. However, current two-dimensional (2D) cavitation mapping could only provide cavitation activity in one plane. This study proposed a three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound plane-by-plane active cavitation mapping (3D-UPACM) for HIFU in free field and pulsatile flow. The acquisition of channel-domain raw radio-frequency (RF) data in 3D space was performed by sequential plane-by-plane 2D ultrafast active cavitation mapping. Between two adjacent unit locations, there was a waiting time to make cavitation nuclei distribution of the liquid back to the original state. The 3D cavitation map equivalent to the one detected at one time and over the entire volume could be reconstructed by Marching Cube algorithm. Minimum variance (MV) adaptive beamforming was combined with coherence factor (CF) weighting (MVCF) or compressive sensing (CS) method (MVCS) to process the raw RF data for improved beamforming or more rapid data processing. The feasibility of 3D-UPACM was demonstrated in tap-water and a phantom vessel with pulsatile flow. The time interval between temporal evolutions of cavitation bubble cloud could be several microseconds. MVCF beamformer had a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) at 14.17dB higher, lateral and axial resolution at 2.88times and 1.88times, respectively, which were compared with those of B-mode active cavitation mapping. MVCS beamformer had only 14.94% time penalty of that of MVCF beamformer. This 3D-UPACM technique employs the linear array of a current ultrasound diagnosis system rather than a 2D array transducer to decrease the cost of the instrument. Moreover, although the application is limited by the requirement for a gassy fluid medium or a constant supply of new cavitation nuclei that allows replenishment of nuclei between HIFU exposures, this technique may exhibit a useful tool in 3D cavitation mapping for HIFU with high speed, precision and resolution

  18. Relationship between Cough-Associated Changes in CSF Flow and Disease Severity in Chiari I Malformation: An Exploratory Study Using Real-Time MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezuidenhout, A F; Khatami, D; Heilman, C B; Kasper, E M; Patz, S; Madan, N; Zhao, Y; Bhadelia, R A

    2018-05-10

    Currently no quantitative objective test exists to determine disease severity in a patient with Chiari I malformation. Our aim was to correlate disease severity in symptomatic patients with Chiari I malformation with cough-associated changes in CSF flow as measured with real-time MR imaging. Thirteen symptomatic patients with Chiari I malformation (tonsillar herniation of ≥5 mm) were prospectively studied. A real-time, flow-sensitized pencil-beam MR imaging scan was used to measure CSF stroke volume during rest and immediately following coughing and relaxation periods (total scan time, 90 seconds). Multiple posterior fossa and craniocervical anatomic measurements were also obtained. Patients were classified into 2 groups by neurosurgeons blinded to MR imaging measurements: 1) nonspecific Chiari I malformation (5/13)-Chiari I malformation with nonspecific symptoms like non-cough-related or mild occasional cough-related headache, neck pain, dizziness, paresthesias, and/or trouble swallowing; 2) specific Chiari I malformation (8/13)-patients with Chiari I malformation with specific symptoms and/or objective findings like severe cough-related headache, myelopathy, syringomyelia, and muscle atrophy. The Spearman correlation was used to determine correlations between MR imaging measurements and disease severity, and both groups were also compared using a Mann-Whitney U test. There was a significant negative correlation between the percentage change in CSF stroke volume (resting to postcoughing) and Chiari I malformation disease severity ( R = 0.59; P = .03). Mann-Whitney comparisons showed the percentage change in CSF stroke volume (resting to postcoughing) to be significantly different between patient groups ( P = .04). No other CSF flow measurement or anatomic measure was significantly different between the groups. Our exploratory study suggests that assessment of CSF flow response to a coughing challenge has the potential to become a valuable objective noninvasive

  19. An innovative, sensorless, pulsatile, continuous-flow total artificial heart: device design and initial in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukamachi, Kiyotaka; Horvath, David J; Massiello, Alex L; Fumoto, Hideyuki; Horai, Tetsuya; Rao, Santosh; Golding, Leonard A R

    2010-01-01

    We are developing a very small, innovative, continuous-flow total artificial heart (CFTAH) that passively self-balances left and right pump flows and atrial pressures without sensors. This report details the CFTAH design concept and our initial in vitro data. System performance of the CFTAH was evaluated using a mock circulatory loop to determine the range of systemic and pulmonary vascular resistance (SVR and PVR) levels over which the design goal of a maximum absolute atrial pressure difference of 10 mm Hg is achieved for a steady-state flow condition. Pump speed was then modulated at 2,600 +/- 900 rpm to induce flow and arterial pressure pulsation to evaluate the effects of speed pulsations on the system performance. An automatic control mode was also evaluated. Using only passive self-regulation, pump flows were balanced and absolute atrial pressure differences were maintained at mode adjusted pump speed to achieve targeted pump flows based on sensorless calculations of SVR and CFTAH flow. The initial in vitro testing of the CFTAH with a single, valveless, continuous-flow pump demonstrated its passive self-regulation of flows and atrial pressures and a new automatic control mode. Copyright (c) 2010 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Analytical solution for pulsatile viscous flow in a straight elliptic annulus and application to the motion of the cerebrospinal fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sumeet; Poulikakos, Dimos; Kurtcuoglu, Vartan

    2008-09-01

    We present here the analytical solution of transient, laminar, viscous flow of an incompressible, Newtonian fluid driven by a harmonically oscillating pressure gradient in a straight elliptic annulus. The analytical formulation is based on the exact solution of the governing fluid flow equations known as Navier-Stokes equations. We validate the analytical solution using a finite-volume computational fluid dynamics approach. As the analytical solution includes Mathieu and modified Mathieu functions, we also present a stepwise procedure for their evaluation for large complex arguments typically associated with viscous flows. We further outline the procedure for evaluating the associated Fourier coefficients and their eigenvalues. We finally apply the analytical solution to investigate the cerebrospinal fluid flow in the human spinal cavity, which features a shape similar to an elliptic annulus.

  1. The effect of varying degrees of stenosis on the characteristics of turbulent pulsatile flow through heart valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluestein, D; Einav, S

    1995-08-01

    Many problems and complications associated with heart valves are related to the dynamic behavior of the valve and the resultant unsteady flow patterns. An accurate depiction of the spatial and temporal velocity and rms distributions imparts better understanding of flow related valve complications, and may be used as a guideline in valve design. While the generalized correlation between increased turbulence level and the severity of the stenosis is well established, few studies addressed the issue of the intermittent nature of turbulence and its timing in the cardiac cycle, and almost none assessed the effect of a progressive stenosis on the flow characteristics through heart valves. In this experimental work we simulated the type of flow which is present in normal and stenosed valves and conducted a comprehensive investigation of valve hemodynamics, valvular turbulence and morphology under varying degrees of stenosis. The characteristics of valves and stenoses were simulated closely, to achieve the flow conditions that initiate turbulent flow conditions. Laser Doppler anemometry (LDA) measurements were carried out in a pulse duplicator system distal to trileaflet polyurethane prosthetic heart valves, installed at mitral and aortic positions. The effect of the degree of the stenosis was comparatively studied through the structure of the turbulent jets emerging from normal and stenotic heart valves. Maximum turbulence level was achieved during the decelerating phase and correlated to the severity of the stenosis, followed by relaminarization of the flow during the acceleration phase. The intermittent nature of the turbulence emphasized the importance of realizing the timing of the turbulence production and its spatial location for optimizing current valve designs. The plug flow through the normal aortic valve prosthesis was replaced by jet like behavior for a 65% stenosis, with the jet becoming narrower and stronger for a 90% stenosis. The morphology of the velocity

  2. Reduction of CSF flow artifact in fast fluid attenuated inversion recovery MR imaging. Study of excitation width in 180deg inversion pulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuchihashi, Toshio; Yoshizawa, Satoshi; Maki, Toshio; Kitagawa, Matsuo; Suzuki, Ken; Fujita, Isao

    1998-01-01

    A technique that increases slice thickness so that it becomes wider than the excitation width of the 180deg inversion pulse and in which TR is partitioned twice has been investigated with regard to fast FLAIR. This is a technique that reduces the flow artifact of CSF. It is thought that, with this technique, the flow artifact is reduced because the CSF that flows onto the slice reaches the null point. The cross talk effect of the 180deg inversion pulse appears as a high CSF signal. As a result, the number of slices needs to be partitioned two or three times before imaging. Thus the imaging time is doubled or tripled. Considering the cross talk effect of the 180deg inversion pulse and the imaging time needed for this technique, the optimal imaging technique would be one that uses an inversion pulse that is four times slice thickness plus slice space and for which the number of slices is partitioned twice. Furthermore, the null point of CSF was dependent on dividing TR in half. (author)

  3. Regional cerebral blood flow and CSF pressures during Cushing response induced by a supratentorial expanding mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schrader, H.; Zwetnow, N.N.; Moerkrid, L.

    1985-01-01

    In order to delineate the critical blood flow pattern during the Cushing response in intracranial hypertension, regional cerebral blood flow was measured with radioactive microspheres in 12 anesthetized dogs at respiratory arrest caused either by expansion of an epidural supratentorial balloon or by cisternal infusion. Regional cerebrospinal fluid pressures were recorded and the local cerebral perfusion pressure calculated in various cerebrospinal compartments. In the 8 dogs of the balloon expansion group, the systemic arterial pressure was unmanipulated in 4, while it was kept at a constant low level (48 and 70 mm Hg) in 2 dogs and, in another 2 dogs, at a constant high level (150 and 160 mm Hg) induced by infusion of Aramine. At respiratory arrest, regional cerebral blood flow had a stereotyped pattern and was largely independent of the blood pressure level. In contrast, concomitant pressure gradients between the various cerebrospinal compartments varied markedly in the 3 animal groups increasing with higher arterial pressure. Flow decreased by 85-100% supratentorially and by 70-100% in the upper brain stem down to the level of the upper pons, while changes in the lower brain stem were minor, on the average 25%. When intracranial pressure was raised by cisternal infusion in 4 dogs, the supratentorial blood flow pattern at respiratory arrest was appriximately similar to the flow pattern in the balloon inflation group. However, blood flow decreased markedly (74-85%) also in the lower brain stem. The results constitute another argument in favour of the Cushing response in supratentorial expansion being caused by ischemia in the brain stem. The critical ischemic region seems to be located rostrally to the oblongate medulla, probably in the pons. (author)

  4. Penetrating Osseous Spicules Causing High-Flow Ventral CSF Leaks in the Setting of Relatively Low BMI : A Preliminary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosebrock, Richard E; Diehn, Felix E; Luetmer, Patrick H; Wald, John T; Lane, John I; Morris, Jonathan M; Lehman, Vance T; Carr, Carrie M; Mokri, Bahram; Thielen, Kent R

    2017-05-16

    We have anecdotally observed patients with high-flow ventral cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks resulting from penetrating osseous spicules or calcified discs to be relatively thin. The purpose of this study was to explore the validity of this observation and determine if a potential association exists between low body mass index (BMI) and high-flow spinal ventral CSF leaks resulting from such dura-penetrating lesions. Sixteen consecutive patients with precisely localized high-flow ventral spinal CSF leaks on dynamic myelography were identified. The cause of the CSF leak was determined. The BMI on the date nearest to and within 2 weeks of myelography was recorded. Utilizing exact sign test, the body mass index was compared to the average BMI from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (Centers for Disease Control), matched to sex and age-range. The cohort consisted of 10 males (63%) and 6 females with a mean age of 54 years (range 37-72 years). In all patients, a spiculated osteophyte/calcified disc was identified at the site of the leak. Fourteen patients (88%) had a BMI below the matched national average, while only two patients (13%) had values above the national average (p = 0.004). Patients with high-flow ventral CSF leaks resulting from spiculated osteophyte or calcified disc as identified by dynamic myelography are more likely to have a BMI below the U.S. national average, matched for gender and age-range. This exploratory analysis requires confirmation as well as further characterization of potential pathophysiologic mechanisms and impact on radiographic and clinical assessments.

  5. Modelling of the CSF flow in the spinal canal in cervical stenosis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kaczmarská, A.; Štěpáník, Z.; Vaněk, P.; Maršík, František; Převorovská, Světlana; Otáhal, J.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 40, - (2007), s. 477-477 ISSN 0021-9290 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : cerebrospinal fluid flow * spinal canal * cervical stenosis Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 2.897, year: 2007

  6. Preliminary design of the internal geometry in a minimally invasive left ventricular assist device under pulsatile-flow conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, P Alex; Wang, Yaxin; Metcalfe, Ralph W; Sampaio, Luiz C; Timms, Daniel L; Cohn, William E; Frazier, O H

    2018-03-01

    A minimally invasive, partial-assist, intra-atrial blood pump has been proposed, which would unload the left ventricle with a flow path from the left atrium to the arterial system. Flow modulation is a common strategy for ensuring washout in the pump, but it can increase power consumption because it is typically achieved through motor-speed variation. However, if a pump's performance curve had the proper gradient, flow modulation could be realized passively. To achieve this goal, we propose a pump performance operating curve as an alternative to the more standard operating point. Mean-line theory was employed to generate an initial set of geometries that were then tested on a hydraulic test rig at ~20,000 r/min. Experimental results show that the intra-atrial blood pump performed below the operating region; however, it was determined that smaller hub diameter and longer chord length bring the performance of the intra-atrial blood pump device closer to the operating curve. We found that it is possible to shape the pump performance curve for specifically targeted gradients over the operating region through geometric variations inside the pump.

  7. Calculation of arterial wall temperature in atherosclerotic arteries: effect of pulsatile flow, arterial geometry, and plaque structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Taehong

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This paper presents calculations of the temperature distribution in an atherosclerotic plaque experiencing an inflammatory process; it analyzes the presence of hot spots in the plaque region and their relationship to blood flow, arterial geometry, and inflammatory cell distribution. Determination of the plaque temperature has become an important topic because plaques showing a temperature inhomogeneity have a higher likelihood of rupture. As a result, monitoring plaque temperature and knowing the factors affecting it can help in the prevention of sudden rupture. Methods The transient temperature profile in inflamed atherosclerotic plaques is calculated by solving an energy equation and the Navier-Stokes equations in 2D idealized arterial models of a bending artery and an arterial bifurcation. For obtaining the numerical solution, the commercial package COMSOL 3.2 was used. The calculations correspond to a parametric study where arterial type and size, as well as plaque geometry and composition, are varied. These calculations are used to analyze the contribution of different factors affecting arterial wall temperature measurements. The main factors considered are the metabolic heat production of inflammatory cells, atherosclerotic plaque length lp, inflammatory cell layer length lmp, and inflammatory cell layer thickness dmp. Results The calculations indicate that the best location to perform the temperature measurement is at the back region of the plaque (0.5 ≤ l/lp ≤ 0.7. The location of the maximum temperature, or hot spot, at the plaque surface can move during the cardiac cycle depending on the arterial geometry and is a direct result of the blood flow pattern. For the bending artery, the hot spot moves 0.6 millimeters along the longitudinal direction; for the arterial bifurcation, the hot spot is concentrated at a single location due to the flow recirculation observed at both ends of the plaque. Focusing on the

  8. Near-infrared spectroscopy measurement of the pulsatile component of cerebral blood flow and volume from arterial oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Themelis, George; D'Arceuil, Helen; Diamond, Solomon G.; Thaker, Sonal; Huppert, Theodore J.; Boas, David A.

    2009-01-01

    We describe a near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) method to noninvasively measure relative changes in the pulsate components of cerebral blood flow (pCBF) and volume (pCBV) from the shape of heartbeat oscillations. We present a model that is used and data to show the feasibility of the method. We use a continuous-wave NIRS system to measure the arterial oscillations originating in the brains of piglets. Changes in the animals' CBF are induced by adding CO2 to the breathing gas. To study the influence of scalp on our measurements, comparative, invasive measurements are performed on one side of the head simultaneously with noninvasive measurements on the other side. We also did comparative measurements of CBF using a laser Doppler system to validate the results of our method. The results indicate that for sufficient source-detector separation, the signal contribution of the scalp is minimal and the measurements are representative of the cerebral hemodynamics. Moreover, good correlation between the results of the laser Doppler system and the NIRS system indicate that the presented method is capable of measuring relative changes in CBF. Preliminary results show the potential of this NIRS method to measure pCBF and pCBV relative changes in neonatal pigs. PMID:17343508

  9. Indications for CSF shunting in normal pressure hydrocephalus following subarachnoid hemorrhage with lateral ventricular size change on cine-MR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujitsuka, Mitsuyuki [Kyorin Univ., Mitaka, Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    2002-09-01

    To clarify the indications for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) shunting in normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), the author investigated changes in the pulsatile brain motions during a cardiac cycle in 17 cases with ventriculomegaly following SAH on cardiac gated cine MR images comparing with those in 50 normal adults. In 15 of these seventeen cases, the lateral ventricles not only constricted immediately following the R-wave related to brain expansion but also expanded paradoxically over the initial size during a cardiac diastole. These patterns were different from those of normal adults, and eleven of them showed excellent response to CSF shunting. Theses findings in ventricular motion during a cardiac cycle indicate that the forceful intraventricular CSF flows and stagnancy expand the ventricular walls causing compression of the surrounding brain against the skull. In the remaining two, the lateral ventricles only constricted immediately following the R-wave and the ventricular size change was similar to those of normal adults, and they were diagnosed as not requiring CSF shunting. Assessing ventricular size change on cine-MR enables non-invasive differentiation of NPH from other form of ventriculomegaly, and evaluation of the benefit of CSF shunting is also possible by this technique preoperatively. (author)

  10. Cine phase-contrast MRI measurement of CSF flow in the cervical spine: a pilot study in patients with spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negahdar, MJ; Shakeri, M.; McDowell, E.; Wells, J.; Vitaz, T.; Harkema, S.; Amini, A.

    2011-03-01

    MRI velocimetry (also known as phase-contrast MRI) is a powerful tool for quantification of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow in various regions of the brain and craniospinal junction and has been accepted as a diagnostic tool to assist with the diagnosis of certain conditions such as hydrocephalus and chiari malformations. Cerebrospinal fluid is continually produced in the ventricles of the brain, flows through the ventricular system and then out and around the brain and spinal cord and is reabsorbed over the convexity of the brain. Any disease process which either impedes the normal pattern of flow or restricts the area where flow occurs can change the pattern of these waveforms with the direction and velocity of flow being determined by the pressure transmitted from the pulsation of the heart and circulation of blood within the central nervous system. Therefore, we hypothesized that phase-contrast MRI could eventually be used as a diagnostic aid in determining the degree of spinal cord compression following injury to the cervical or thoracic spine. In this study, we examined CSF flow in 3 normal subjects and 2 subjects with non-acute injuries in the cervical spine using Cine phasecontrast MRI. CSF flow analysis was performed using an in-house developed software. The flow waveform was calculated in both normal subjects (n=3) as well as subjects with spinal cord injury in the cervical spine (n=2). The bulk flow at C2 was measured to be 0.30 +/- 0.05 cc, at 5 cm distal to C2, it was 0.19+/- 0.07 cc, and at 10 cm distal to C2, it was 0.17+/- 0.05 cc. These results were in good agreement with previously published results. In patients with spinal cord injury, at the site of injury in the cervical spine, bulk flow was found to be 0.08 +/- 0.12 cc, at 5 cm proximal to the site of injury it was found to be 0.18 +/- 0.07 cc, and at 5 cm distal to the site of injury, it was found to be 0.12 +/- 0.01 cc.

  11. Decreased CSF-flow artefacts in T2 imaging of the cervical spine with periodically rotated overlapping parallel lines with enhanced reconstruction (PROPELLER/BLADE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ragoschke-Schumm, Andreas; Schmidt, Peter; Mayer, Thomas E.; Schumm, Julia; Reimann, Georg; Mentzel, Hans-Joachim; Kaiser, Werner A.

    2011-01-01

    The cervical spine is prone to artefacts in T2 MR-imaging due to patient movements and cerebrospinal fluid flow. The periodically rotated overlapping parallel lines with enhanced reconstruction (PROPELLER/BLADE) acquisition method was developed to reduce motion artefacts. We sought to determine if T2-BLADE is superior to T2-TSE with conventional k-space reading. Twenty-five patients were examined using a 1.5 T MR-scanner. T2-weighted imaging of the cervical spine in sagittal and axial orientation using conventional or BLADE k-space reading was performed. Spinal cord, subarachnoid space, vertebrae and discs were evaluated by two independent observers using a scale from 0 (non-diagnostic) to 3 (excellent). Interobserver correlation was assessed as Cohen's kappa. Results of Mann-Whitney U test with p < 0.05 were regarded as significant. Furthermore, the investigators were asked for subjective evaluation in consensus. Overall interobserver accuracy of κ = 0.91 was obtained. Comparison of sagittal images showed better values for all investigated structures in T2-BLADE: spinal cord (TSE/BLADE: 1.52/2.04; p < 0.001), subarachnoid space (1.36/2.06; p < 0.001) and vertebrae/discs (1.66/2.86; p < 0.001). Comparison of axial images showed better values in T2-BLADE for spinal cord (1.68/1.86; p = 0.149) and vertebrae/discs (1.0/1.96: p < 0.001) while subarachnoid space was better to be evaluated in conventional T2-TSE (1.94/1.12; p < 0.001). In sagittal orientation, motion- and CSF-flow artefacts were reduced in T2-BLADE. In axial orientation, however, CSF-flow artefacts were pronounced in T2-BLADE. The image quality of the sagittal T2-BLADE sequences was significantly better than the T2-TSE and acquired in less time. In axial orientation, increased CSF-flow artefacts may reduce accuracy of structures in the subarachnoid space. (orig.)

  12. Generation of tunable and pulsatile concentration gradients via microfluidic network

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Bingpu

    2014-06-04

    We demonstrate a compact Polydimethylsiloxane microfluidic chip which can quickly generate ten different chemical concentrations simultaneously. The concentration magnitude of each branch can be flexibly regulated based on the flow rate ratios of the two injecting streams. The temporal/pulsatile concentration gradients are achieved by integrating on-chip pneumatic actuated valves controlled by the external signals. The temporal concentration gradients can also be tuned precisely by varying applied frequency and duty cycle of the trigger signal. It is believed that such microdevice will be potentially used for some application areas of producing stable chemical gradients as well as allowing fast, pulsatile gradient transformation in seconds.

  13. Pulmonary O2 transfer during pulsatile and non-pulsatile perfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauge, A; Nicolaysen, G

    1980-07-01

    The importance of the perfusion pattern for the oxygen transfer has been examined in isolated rabbit lungs perfused with plasma at constant volume inflow. The lungs were ventilated with constant tidal volume and constant end-expiratory pressure. Following a standardized rise in FIO2 the rate of rise in pulmonary venous PO2 (delta PO2/delta t) was measured during alternately pulsatile and non-pulsatile perfusion in normal lungs and in lungs made edematous by elevation of left atrial pressure. In normal lungs there was no difference in delta PO2/delta t when the two modes of perfusion were compared. In edematous lungs delta PO/delta t was statistically higher during pulsatile perfusion, indicating a beneficial effect of flow- and pressure pulsations, e.g. a better distribution of V/Q ratios throughout the lungs. In a separate series of expts. the advancement of a high O2 front through the airways was measured, and the two perfusion patterns compared. Since no difference was found, we suggest that the phenomenon of "cardiogenic gas mixing" in the airways in vivo is a result of a direct action of the heart on the lungs rather than arterial pulsations.

  14. CSF oligoclonal banding - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100145.htm CSF oligoclonal banding - series—Normal anatomy To use the ... 5 out of 5 Overview The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) serves to supply nutrients to the central nervous ...

  15. CSF coccidioides complement fixation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003526.htm CSF coccidioides complement fixation test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. CSF coccidioides complement fixation is a test that checks ...

  16. Better and faster velocity pulsatility assessment in cerebral white matter perforating arteries with 7T quantitative flow MRI through improved slice profile, acquisition scheme, and postprocessing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geurts, Lennart; Biessels, Geert Jan; Luijten, Peter; Zwanenburg, Jaco

    2018-03-01

    A previously published cardiac-gated 2D Qflow protocol at 7 T in cerebral perforating arteries was optimized to reduce velocity underestimation and improve temporal resolution. First, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) gain of the velocity measurement (SNR v ) was tested for two signal averages versus one. Second, the decrease in velocity underestimation with a tilted optimized nonsaturating excitation (TONE) pulse was tested. Third, the decrease in pulsatility index (PI) underestimation through improved temporal resolution was tested. Test-retest agreement was measured for the resulting acquisition in older volunteers (mean age 63 years), and the results were compared with the other volunteers (mean age 26 years). Using two signal averages increased SNR v by only 12% (P = 0.04), probably due to motion of the subvoxel-size arteries. The TONE decreased velocity underestimation, thereby increasing the mean velocity from 0.52 to 0.67 cm/s (P < 0.001). The PI increased substantially with increasing temporal resolution. The test-retest agreement showed good coefficients of repeatability of 0.18 cm/s for velocity and 0.14 for PI. The measured velocity was lower in the older group: 0.42 versus 0.51 cm/s (P = 0.05). The optimized sequence yields better velocity and PI estimates in small vessels, has twice as good test-retest agreement, and has a suitable scan time for use in patients. Magn Reson Med 79:1473-1482, 2018. © 2017 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited and is not used for commercial purposes. © 2017 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for

  17. Pulsatile fluidic pump demonstration and predictive model application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, J.G.; Holland, W.D.

    1986-04-01

    Pulsatile fluidic pumps were developed as a remotely controlled method of transferring or mixing feed solutions. A test in the Integrated Equipment Test facility demonstrated the performance of a critically safe geometry pump suitable for use in a 0.1-ton/d heavy metal (HM) fuel reprocessing plant. A predictive model was developed to calculate output flows under a wide range of external system conditions. Predictive and experimental flow rates are compared for both submerged and unsubmerged fluidic pump cases

  18. Numerical study of magnetohydrodynamic pulsatile flow of Sutterby fluid through an inclined overlapping arterial stenosis in the presence of periodic body acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Z.; Shabbir, M. S.; Ali, N.

    2018-06-01

    In the present theoretical investigation, we have numerically simulated the problem of blood flow through an overlapping stenosed arterial blood vessel under the action of externally applied body acceleration and the periodic pressure gradient. The rheology of blood is characterized by the Sutterby fluid model. The blood is considered as an electrically conducting fluid. A steady uniform magnetic field is applied in the radial direction of the blood vessel. The governing nonlinear partial differential equations of the present flow together with prescribed boundary conditions are solved by employing explicit finite difference scheme. Results concerning the temporal distribution of velocity, flow rate, shear stress and resistance to the flow are displayed through graphs. The effects of various emerging parameters on the flow variables are analyzed and discussed in detail. The analysis reveals that the applied magnetic field and periodic body acceleration have considerable effects on the flow field.

  19. Cirurgia de Glenn bidirecional: importância da manutenção de fluxo "pulsátil" na artéria pulmonar Bidirectional Glenn procedure: the importance of "pulsatile" flow in the pulmonary artery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Antônio Fantini

    1995-03-01

    In order to evaluate the effects of pulsatile flow in the pulmonary artery of patients undergoing bidirectional cavopulmonary shunts (BCS, we reviewed the data of 36 patients operated upon from October 1990 to July 1994. Age at operation ranged from 11 months to 14 years (mean 4.4 ± 3.4 years and diagnoses were as follows: tricuspid atresia (18, single ventricle (16, mitral atresia (1 and pulmonary atresia with intact ventricular septum (1. A total of 19 (52.8% patients had a prior palliative operation done. Cardiopulmonary bypass was used in every case, with mild hypothermia in 11 cases and profound hypothermia and circulatory arrest in the remaining. The surgical technique was an anastomosis between the superior vena cava and the ipsilateral pulmonary artery in an end-to-side fashion. The main pulmonary artery was ligated only if the mean pressure taken at the site of the anastomosis was higher than 15 mmHg but in 2 recent cases with a very high mean pulmonary pressure, the main pulmonary artery was banded, adjusting the pressure to the desirable levels. The overall hospital survival was 91.7% (33 patients. One patient required a systemic to pulmonary shunt due to persistent low arterial oxygen saturation, 7 days after the BCS. Twenty-eight patients were followed for a mean of 1.8 ± 1.2 years (3 months to 4.1 years and were divided in 2 groups: A-18 patients without pulsatile flow in the pulmonary artery, and B-10 patients with pulsatile flow. In Group B, the mean arterial saturation has ranged from 80% to 90% (mean 86 ± 3.8% and is significantly higher than in Group A (68 to 85%, mean, 77.6 ± 5.5 (p<0.001. Two patients of Group A are in NYHA functional class III, whereas all patients of Group B are in class I or II (p=0.05. There was one late death and one patient required a subsequent Fontan procedure, both of Group A. Thus, the presence of pulsatile flow in the pulmonary artery improved the arterial oxigen saturation and exercise tolerance in patients submitted to

  20. The quantification of hemodynamic parameters downstream of a Gianturco Zenith stent wire using newtonian and non-newtonian analog fluids in a pulsatile flow environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Andrew M; Johnston, Clifton R; Rival, David E

    2012-11-01

    Although deployed in the vasculature to expand vessel diameter and improve blood flow, protruding stent struts can create complex flow environments associated with flow separation and oscillating shear gradients. Given the association between magnitude and direction of wall shear stress (WSS) and endothelial phenotype expression, accurate representation of stent-induced flow patterns is critical if we are to predict sites susceptible to intimal hyperplasia. Despite the number of stents approved for clinical use, quantification on the alteration of hemodynamic flow parameters associated with the Gianturco Z-stent is limited in the literature. In using experimental and computational models to quantify strut-induced flow, the majority of past work has assumed blood or representative analogs to behave as Newtonian fluids. However, recent studies have challenged the validity of this assumption. We present here the experimental quantification of flow through a Gianturco Z-stent wire in representative Newtonian and non-Newtonian blood analog environments using particle image velocimetry (PIV). Fluid analogs were circulated through a closed flow loop at physiologically appropriate flow rates whereupon PIV snapshots were acquired downstream of the wire housed in an acrylic tube with a diameter characteristic of the carotid artery. Hemodynamic parameters including WSS, oscillatory shear index (OSI), and Reynolds shear stresses (RSS) were measured. Our findings show that the introduction of the stent wire altered downstream hemodynamic parameters through a reduction in WSS and increases in OSI and RSS from nonstented flow. The Newtonian analog solution of glycerol and water underestimated WSS while increasing the spatial coverage of flow reversal and oscillatory shear compared to a non-Newtonian fluid of glycerol, water, and xanthan gum. Peak RSS were increased with the Newtonian fluid, although peak values were similar upon a doubling of flow rate. The introduction of the

  1. Cine-MR imaging in determining the flow characteristics of CSF and blood in spinal and intracranial lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Post, M.J.D.; Quencer, R.M.; Green, B.A.; Hinks, R.S.; Sklar, E.M.L.; Patchen, S.J.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this prospective study was to determine the value of cine magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in assessing the flow patterns of patients with vascular cord neoplasms, spinal cord and subarachnoid cysts, obstructive hydrocephalus, and intracranial aneurysms. The authors' results in 26 patients showed that cine MR imaging can be used to (1) identify spinal neoplasms with prominent vascular supply; (2) help distinguish spinal cord cysts occurring above a spinal cord tumor from tumoral cysts; (3) determine which spinal cord or subarachnois cysts need shunting and, postoperatively, which cysts are adequately decompressed; (4) establish which tonsillar herniations in Chiari malformations may require resection; (5) determine the site of the block in obstructive hydrocephalus; and (6) determine the flow characteristics of an aneurysm

  2. Pulsatile versus steady infusions for hepatic artery chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, E.E.; Haynie, T.P.; Wright, K.C.; Chaynsangavej, C.; Gianturco, C.; Lamki, L.; Wallace, S.

    1984-01-01

    Hepatic artery chemotherapy for unresectable liver tumors requires an even distribution of the drugs in the tumor or vascular bed. This cannot be determined angiographically because the drugs are infused at a much lower rate than the contrast media. It is easy, however, to determine the quality of the perfusion by injecting a small volume of Tc-99m MAA in one of the side ports while chemotherapeutic agent is being infused at the same rate. Usually this shows a uniform, satisfactory distribution of isotope. Occasionally, however, some areas fail to receive Tc-99m in spite of what appears to be a good position of the catheter tip. Since ''streaming'' of the infused drugs has been blamed for their uneven distribution, the authors decided to compare the usual steady flow infusions with infusions made pulsatile by the addition of a pulsing device (Gianturco Pump) attached to the infusion tubing. Eighty-three patients were studied with steady as well as pulsatile infusions. In 16 of these patients the perfusion pattern was definitely changed by the pulsatile infusion. In one patient the pulsatile mode resulted in an unwanted gastric perfusion. In 5 patients the distribution was improved in one hepatic lobe and in 10 patients it was improved in both lobes. These results show that hepatic artery perfusions can occasionally be improved by pulsing the infusate. However, pulsing can produce the unwanted perfusion of extra-hepatic areas

  3. CSF-VDRL test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... test - CSF; Neurosyphilis - VDRL Images CSF test for syphilis References Chernecky CC, Berger BJ. Venereal disease research laboratory test (VDRL), test, cerebrospinal fluid – specimen. In: Chernecky CC, Berger BJ, eds. Laboratory Tests and Diagnostic Procedures . 6th ed. St Louis, MO: Elsevier Saunders; ...

  4. CSF total protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    CSF total protein is a test to determine the amount of protein in your spinal fluid, also called cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). ... The normal protein range varies from lab to lab, but is typically about 15 to 60 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) ...

  5. Traumatic orbital CSF leak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borumandi, Farzad

    2013-01-01

    Compared to the cerebrospinalfluid (CSF) leak through the nose and ear, the orbital CSF leak is a rare and underreported condition following head trauma. We present the case of a 49-year-old woman with oedematous eyelid swelling and ecchymosis after a seemingly trivial fall onto the right orbit. Apart from the above, she was clinically unremarkable. The CT scan revealed a minimally displaced fracture of the orbital roof with no emphysema or intracranial bleeding. The fractured orbital roof in combination with the oedematous eyelid swelling raised the suspicion for orbital CSF leak. The MRI of the neurocranium demonstrated a small-sized CSF fistula extending from the anterior cranial fossa to the right orbit. The patient was treated conservatively and the lid swelling resolved completely after 5 days. Although rare, orbital CSF leak needs to be included in the differential diagnosis of periorbital swelling following orbital trauma. PMID:24323381

  6. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) transient responses induced by hypercapnia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, M.J.

    1984-01-01

    CSF transient responses to CO 2 inhalation were measured before and after facilitated perfusate flow through subarachnoid spaces of anesthetized cats during ventriculocisternal perfusion with artificial CSF containing 14 C-dextran. Convective mixing of perfusate in subarachnoid spaces was augmented while infusion constant, either by impeding cisternal efflux of perfusate by raising the cisternal outflow cannula (high CSF pressure), or by preventing CSF outflow by clamping the cisternal outflow cannula (stopflow; S-F). CSF transients were also measured before and after systemic administration of phenoxybenzamine (PBZ) in order to evaluate the contribution of sympatho-adrenergic activity to craniospinal CSF redistribution and mixing. Results from high CSF pressure and S-F experiments indicate that unequilibrated CSF contributes significantly to the reduced tracer concentration in CSF volume (Vd) since SCF effluent tracer concentration (Cd) was decreased after subarachnoid facilitated flow. Further, results from S-F studies indicate that at least 50% of Cd is due to craniospinal fluid redistribution, a process which, along with CSF outflow transients, was unaffected by PBZ. Conversely, PBZ administration decreased steady state SCF formation and absorption through alpha-mediated cerebrovascular responses and/or through beta-adrenoceptor inhibition of metabolism of CSF secretory epithelium

  7. CSF LACTATE IN MENINGITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjampakuthikal Aboobekar Haris

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Meningitis is an infection within the subarachnoid space characterised by a CNS inflammatory reaction. It is a serious condition requiring immediate diagnosis and appropriate treatment to be started at the earliest to prevent mortality as well as irreversible neurological deficits. CSF lactate has been found useful in differentiating bacterial meningitis from viral meningitis in many studies in the western population, but studies in Indian population are limited. The aim of the study is to study whether CSF lactate can be used to distinguish bacterial from viral meningitis and to study the levels of CSF lactate in tuberculosis meningitis. MATERIALS AND METHODS This was a descriptive study conducted in a tertiary care hospital. In this study, 78 cases of meningitis were selected. Cases are patients with bacterial, viral or tuberculosis meningitis admitted to the hospital under the Department of Medicine and Neurology. Cases are grouped into bacterial, viral and tuberculosis meningitis based on clinical picture, CSF analysis and imaging characteristics. CSF lactate estimation was done by dry chemistry method. Using appropriate statistical methods and SPSS software, CSF lactate levels were compared among these groups and analysed for any association with the final outcome. RESULTS The levels of CSF lactate in bacterial meningitis were higher than viral meningitis with a statistical significance of p 35 mg/dL for bacterial meningitis in this study was 95% and 100% respectively and the positive predictive value was 100% and the negative predictive value was 96%. The mean CSF lactate values in bacterial, viral and tuberculosis meningitis were 124.40 ± 35.85 mg/dL, 24.34 ± 6.05 mg/dL and 50.13 ± 9.89 mg/dL, respectively. CONCLUSION CSF lactate level was significantly elevated in bacterial meningitis than tuberculosis or viral meningitis and can be used as a marker for differentiating bacterial from viral meningitis.

  8. Superior vena cava syndrome after pulsatile bidirectional Glenn shunt procedure: Perioperative implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neema Praveen

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Bidirectional superior cavopulmonary shunt (bidirectional Glenn shunt is generally performed in many congenital cardiac anomalies where complete two ventricle circulations cannot be easily achieved. The advantages of BDG shunt are achieved by partially separating the pulmonary and systemic venous circuits, and include reduced ventricular preload and long-term preservation of myocardium. The benefits of additional pulsatile pulmonary blood flow include the potential growth of pulmonary arteries, possible improvement in arterial oxygen saturation, and possible prevention of development of pulmonary arteriovenous malformations. However, increase in the systemic venous pressure after BDG with additional pulsatile blood flow is known. We describe the peri-operative implications of severe flow reversal in the superior vena cava after pulsatile BDG shunt construction in a child who presented for surgical interruption of the main pulmonary artery.

  9. Tissue Doppler Imaging in the evaluation of abdominal aortic pulsatility: a useful tool for the neonatologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valerio, Enrico; Grison, Alessandra; Capretta, Anna; Golin, Rosanna; Ferrarese, Paola; Bellettato, Massimo

    2017-03-01

    Sonographic cardiac evaluation of newborns with suspected aortic coarctation (AoC) should tend to demonstrate a good phasic and pulsatile flow and the absence of pressure gradient along a normally conformed aortic arch from the modified left parasternal and suprasternal echocardiographic views; these findings, however, may not necessarily rule out a more distal coarctation in the descending aorta. For this reason, the sonographic exam of newborns with suspected AoC should always include a Doppler evaluation of abdominal aortic blood flow from the subcostal view. Occasionally, however, a clearly pulsatile Doppler flow trace in abdominal aorta may be difficult to obtain due to the bad insonation angle existing between the probe and the vessel. In such suboptimal ultrasonic alignment situation, the use of Tissue Doppler Imaging instead of classic Doppler flow imaging may reveal a preserved aortic pulsatility by sampling the aortic wall motion induced by normal flow. We propose to take advantage of the TDI pattern as a surrogate of a normal pulsatile Doppler flow trace in abdominal aorta when the latter is difficult to obtain due to malalignment with the insonated vessel.

  10. CSF dynamics in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oi, Shizuo; Shose, Yoshiteru; Yamada, Hiroshi; Ijichi, Akihiro; Matsumoto, Satoshi.

    1986-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) dynamics in infants and children is still obscure. This paper aims to analyze the characteristics of CSF dynamics in the younger age group and to clarify the changes both in the acute/chronic hydrocephalic status and in the post-shunt condition on the basis of our experience with 118 cases of metrizamide CT cisternography. In order to pursue the CSF passive movements, the exact regional CT numbers were obtained by means of the ROI method in each case at 3, 6, and 24 hours after metrizamide injection. The results revealed that, in the normal CSF dynamics in both the major and minor pathways in children, it took more than 24 hours until the regional metrizamide was completely cleared up. In the acute hydrocephalic state, the ventricular reflux and stasis of the contrast was remarkable, and stagnation in the Sylvian fissure continued more than 24 hours. In the minor pathway, the contrast moved into the brain parenchyma, with there obviously being more in the subependymal layer and the adjacent white matter, and lasted more than 24 hours. On the other hand, these phenomena were very much less prominent in the chronic phase of hydrocephalus. This fact may suggest the hypothesis that a reconstituted active major or minor fluid pathway does not play an important role in the compensation of the acute high-pressure progressive hydrocephalic state. The CSF dynamics in a shunted hydrocephalus are obviously improved when in stasis or when stagnated inside or outside of the ventricular system. The timing of the metrizamide clear-up was within 24 hours after achieving a high accumulation of the contrast in the lateral ventricle where the shunt is placed. The contrast movement in the brain parenchyma as the minor pathway was significantly less in a shunted hydrocephalus, and there was almost none in cases of slit-like ventricles. (author)

  11. Flowing cerebrospinal fluid in normal and hydrocephalic states: Appearance on MR images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradley, W.G.; Kortman, K.E.; Burgoyne, B.; Eng, D.

    1986-01-01

    The signal intensity of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in the cerebral aqueduct and lateral ventricles on magnetic resonance (MR) images was evaluated in 16 healthy individuals and in 32 patients with various forms of hydrocephalus (20 with chronic normal pressure hydrocephalus [NPH], seven with acute communicating hydrocephalus, and five with hydrocephalus ex vacuo [atrophy]). The low signal intensity frequently observed in the cerebral aqueduct is believed to reflect the pulsatile motion of CSF, which is related to the cardiac cycle. While this aqueductal flow void phenomenon can be observed in healthy individuals, it is most pronounced in patients with chronic, communicating NPH; is less evident in patients with acute, communicating hydrocephalus and is least evident in patients with atrophy. Ventricular compliance is known to be essentially normal in atrophy, mildly decreased in acute, communicating hydrocephalus; and severely decreased in NPH. The degree of aqueductal signal loss is believed to reflect the velocity of the pulsatile CSF motion, which in turn depends on the relative ventricular compliance and surface area

  12. Non-invasive assessment of pulsatile intracranial pressure with phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geir Ringstad

    Full Text Available Invasive monitoring of pulsatile intracranial pressure can accurately predict shunt response in patients with idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus, but may potentially cause complications such as bleeding and infection. We tested how a proposed surrogate parameter for pulsatile intracranial pressure, the phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging derived pulse pressure gradient, compared with its invasive counterpart. In 22 patients with suspected idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus, preceding invasive intracranial pressure monitoring, and any surgical shunt procedure, we calculated the pulse pressure gradient from phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging derived cerebrospinal fluid flow velocities obtained at the upper cervical spinal canal using a simplified Navier-Stokes equation. Repeated measurements of the pulse pressure gradient were also undertaken in four healthy controls. Of 17 shunted patients, 16 responded, indicating high proportion of "true" normal pressure hydrocephalus in the patient cohort. However, there was no correlation between the magnetic resonance imaging derived pulse pressure gradient and pulsatile intracranial pressure (R = -.18, P = .43. Pulse pressure gradients were also similar in patients and healthy controls (P = .26, and did not differ between individuals with pulsatile intracranial pressure above or below established thresholds for shunt treatment (P = .97. Assessment of pulse pressure gradient at level C2 was therefore not found feasible to replace invasive monitoring of pulsatile intracranial pressure in selection of patients with idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus for surgical shunting. Unlike invasive, overnight monitoring, the pulse pressure gradient from magnetic resonance imaging comprises short-term pressure fluctuations only. Moreover, complexity of cervical cerebrospinal fluid flow and -pulsatility at the upper cervical spinal canal may render the pulse pressure gradient a poor surrogate

  13. Does Flexible Arterial Tubing Retain More Hemodynamic Energy During Pediatric Pulsatile Extracorporeal Life Support?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shigang; Kunselman, Allen R; Ündar, Akif

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the hemodynamic performance and energy transmission of flexible arterial tubing as the arterial line in a simulated pediatric pulsatile extracorporeal life support (ECLS) system. The ECLS circuit consisted of a Medos Deltastream DP3 diagonal pump head, Medos Hilite 2400 LT oxygenator, Biomedicus arterial/venous cannula (10 Fr/14 Fr), 3 feet of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) arterial tubing or latex rubber arterial tubing, primed with lactated Ringer's solution and packed red blood cells (hematocrit 40%). Trials were conducted at flow rates of 300 to 1200 mL/min (300 mL/min increments) under nonpulsatile and pulsatile modes at 36°C using either PVC arterial tubing (PVC group) or latex rubber tubing (Latex group). Real-time pressure and flow data were recorded using a custom-based data acquisition system. Mean pressures and energy equivalent pressures (EEP) were the same under nonpulsatile mode between the two groups. Under pulsatile mode, EEPs were significantly great than mean pressure, especially in the Latex group (P tubing retained more hemodynamic energy passing through it under pulsatile mode while mean pressures and pressure drops across the ECLS circuit were similar between PVC and latex rubber arterial tubing. Further studies are warranted to verify our findings. © 2016 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Molecular CsF 5 and CsF 2 +

    KAUST Repository

    Rogachev, Andrey Yu.; Miao, Mao-sheng; Merino, Gabriel; Hoffmann, Roald

    2015-01-01

    D5h star-like CsF5, formally isoelectronic with known XeF5− ion, is computed to be a local minimum on the potential energy surface of CsF5, surrounded by reasonably large activation energies for its exothermic decomposition to CsF+2 F2, or to CsF3 (three isomeric forms)+F2, or for rearrangement to a significantly more stable isomer, a classical Cs+ complex of F5−. Similarly the CsF2+ ion is computed to be metastable in two isomeric forms. In the more symmetrical structures of these molecules there is definite involvement in bonding of the formally core 5p levels of Cs.

  15. Molecular CsF 5 and CsF 2 +

    KAUST Repository

    Rogachev, Andrey Yu.

    2015-06-03

    D5h star-like CsF5, formally isoelectronic with known XeF5− ion, is computed to be a local minimum on the potential energy surface of CsF5, surrounded by reasonably large activation energies for its exothermic decomposition to CsF+2 F2, or to CsF3 (three isomeric forms)+F2, or for rearrangement to a significantly more stable isomer, a classical Cs+ complex of F5−. Similarly the CsF2+ ion is computed to be metastable in two isomeric forms. In the more symmetrical structures of these molecules there is definite involvement in bonding of the formally core 5p levels of Cs.

  16. Quantitative measurement of normal and hydrocephalic cerebrospinal fluid flow using phase contrast cine MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katayama, Shinji; Asari, Shoji; Ohmoto, Takashi

    1993-01-01

    Measurements of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow using phase contrast cine magnetic resonance (MR) imaging were performed on a phantom, 12 normal subjects and 20 patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH). The phantom study demonstrated the applicability of phase contrast in quantitative measurement of the slow flow. The CSF flows of the normal subjects showed a consistent pattern with a to-and-fro movement of the flow in the anterior subarachnoid space at the C2/3 level, and they were dependent on the cardiac cycle in all subjects. However, the patients with NPH showed variable patterns of the CSF pulsatile flow and these patterns could be divided into four types according to velocity and amplitude. The amplitudes of each type were as follows: type 0 (n=1), 87.6 mm; type I (n=2), 58.2 mm (mean); type II (n=6), 48.0±5.0 mm (mean±SEM); and type III (n=11), 19.9±1.8 mm (mean±SEM). The decrease of the amplitudes correlated to a worsening of the clinical symptoms. After the shunting operation, the amplitude of to-and-fro movement of the CSF increased again in the patients with NPH who improved clinically. Some of the type III cases were reclassified type II, I and 0 and also one of the type II cases changed type I after the shunting operation. We conclude that the phase contrast cine MR imaging is a practically and clinically applicable technique for the quantitative measurement of the CSF flow. (author)

  17. Rostrocaudal Dynamics of CSF Biomarkers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tarnaris, A.; Toma, A.K.; Chapman, M.D.; Petzold, A.F.S.; Keir, G.; Kitchen, N.D.; Watkins, L.D.

    2011-01-01

    The rostrocaudal gradient (RCG) of markers present in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) has not been studied adequately due to lack of appropriate control populations and ethical restrictions. The aim of this study is to understand the rostrocaudal gradient of CSF biomarkers. We contacted a study comparing

  18. Chrono pharmacotherapy: A pulsatile Drug Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huma Hameed

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronopharmacotherapy refers to a treatment in which controlled drug delivery is achieved according to circadian rhythms of disease by enhancing therapeutic outcomes and minimizing side effects. Colon targeting has gained great importance not only for the treatment of local diseases such as Crohn’s disease, inflammatory bowel disease and ulcerative colitis but also very important in systemic delivery of proteins/peptides, antiasthmatic drugs, antidiabetic agents and antihypertensive drugs, which mostly show their efficacy based on circadian rhythms of the body.Colon drug delivery is one of the difficult approaches to achieve the targeted and desired outcomes through pulsatile drug delivery by avoiding dose dumping.The main reasonbehind the use of pulsatile delivery is provision ofconstant drug release where a zero-order release is notpreferred. Chronopharmacotherapy in colon targeting play its role bymany systems such ascapsular systems, pulsatile system and osmotic systems, which are based on use of rupturable membranes and biodegradable polymers.The objective of this review article is to provide latest knowledge about drugs with chrono-pharmacological behavior entails night time dosing specially to the colon.

  19. Quantitative and clinical evaluation of whole CSF-axis RI image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomono, Yuji; Nose, Tadao; Maki, Yutaka

    1987-01-01

    Whole CSF-axis RI scintigraphy was evaluated in 122 adult patients intending to know not only intracranial CSF flow but also the dynamics of whole CSF axis, particularly of spinal CSF flow. The change of radioactivity in several compartments was studied quantitatively with a dataprocessor on 18 cases with dilated ventricles, and more practically, clinical features and the findings of the films were comparatively studied on all the cases. The results were as follows: (1) Roughly speaking, the findings were classified into two types, i.e. a type with early RI movement to the intracranial CSF space and another with stagnation of radioactivity in spinal space till late stage, even 48 hours after RI injection (spinal stasis). (2) Although majority of the cases with spinal stasis did not show ventricular stasis, a shunt operation was not effective even when ventricular stasis was observed. (3) Spinal stasis tended to increase with aging, and was observed more frequently in cases with possible severe cerebral damage, as severe cerebrovascular disease and severe deterioration of mental activity. (4) The clearance of radioactivity of whole CSF-axis was remarkably delayed. It is considered that the spinal CSF flow is generated by intracranial CSF pulsation and, so, that spinal stasis shows the condition of lowered CSF flow by pulsation due to cerebral parenchymal damages. (author)

  20. MR evaluation of CSF fistulae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, V.; Goyal, M.; Mishra, N.; Gaikwad, S.; Sharma, A.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the role of MR imaging in the localisation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) fistulae. Material and Methods: A total of 36 consecutive unselected patients with either clincally proven CSF leakage (n=26) or suspected CSF fistula (n=10) were prospectively evaluated by MR. All MR examinations included fast spin-echo T2-weighted images in the 3 orthogonal planes. Thin-section CT was performed following equivocal or negative MR examination. MR and CT findings were correlated with surgical results in 33 patients. Results: CSF fistula was visualised as a dural-bone defect with hyperintense fluid signal continuous with that in the basal cisterns on T2-weighted images. MR was positive in 26 cases, in 24 of which the fistula was confirmed surgically. In 2 patients the CSF leakage was directly demonstrated on MR. MR sensitivity of 80% compared favourably with the reported 46-81% of CT cisternography (CTC). No significant difference in MR sensitivity in detecting CSF fistula was found between active and inactive leaks. (orig.)

  1. Renal artery pulsatility index and renal volume: Normal fetuses versus growth-retarded fetuses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kyung Soon; Woo, Bock Hi

    2001-01-01

    To evaluate the blood flow velocity waveform of the renal artery and renal volume of growth-retarded fetuses and to compare them with those of normal fetuses. Pulsatility index of the renal artery and renal volume measured by three-dimensional ultrasonography were obtained from seventy eight normal fetuses at the gestational age from twenty five to thirty nine weeks and eighteen intrauterine growth retarded fetuses whose weight was below ten percentile at birth. We studied changes of the pulsatility index of the renal artery and renal volume according to the gestational age and compared with those of growth-retarded fetuses. Pulsatility index (PI) of the fetal renal artery decreased throughout the gestational period (r=0.703, p<0.0001). In growth-retarded fetuses, despite of abnormal doppler velocity waveform of the middle cerebral artery, which was showing fetal hypoxia, the renal PI was not increased significantly. The fetal renal volume increased throughout the gestational period (r=0.834, p<0.0001) whereas in growth-retarded fetuses, all renal volume was below fifth percentile of normal fetuses. In growth-retarded fetuses, fetal renal volume was decreased significantly without change of the renal vascular flow. Therefore, the fetal renal volume measured by three-dimensional ultrasonography may be a helpful parameter in the diagnosis of growth-retarded fetuses.

  2. Renal artery pulsatility index and renal volume: Normal fetuses versus growth-retarded fetuses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyung Soon; Woo, Bock Hi [Ewha Womans University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-06-15

    To evaluate the blood flow velocity waveform of the renal artery and renal volume of growth-retarded fetuses and to compare them with those of normal fetuses. Pulsatility index of the renal artery and renal volume measured by three-dimensional ultrasonography were obtained from seventy eight normal fetuses at the gestational age from twenty five to thirty nine weeks and eighteen intrauterine growth retarded fetuses whose weight was below ten percentile at birth. We studied changes of the pulsatility index of the renal artery and renal volume according to the gestational age and compared with those of growth-retarded fetuses. Pulsatility index (PI) of the fetal renal artery decreased throughout the gestational period (r=0.703, p<0.0001). In growth-retarded fetuses, despite of abnormal doppler velocity waveform of the middle cerebral artery, which was showing fetal hypoxia, the renal PI was not increased significantly. The fetal renal volume increased throughout the gestational period (r=0.834, p<0.0001) whereas in growth-retarded fetuses, all renal volume was below fifth percentile of normal fetuses. In growth-retarded fetuses, fetal renal volume was decreased significantly without change of the renal vascular flow. Therefore, the fetal renal volume measured by three-dimensional ultrasonography may be a helpful parameter in the diagnosis of growth-retarded fetuses.

  3. Pulsatile atheroprone shear stress affects the expression of transient receptor potential channels in human endothelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thilo, Florian; Vorderwülbecke, Bernd J; Marki, Alex

    2012-01-01

    in comparison with endothelial cells grown under static conditions. There was a significant association between the expression of TRPC6 and tumor necrosis factor-α mRNA in human vascular tissue. No-flow and atheroprone flow conditions are equally characterized by an increase in the expression of tumor necrosis......The goal of the study was to assess whether pulsatile atheroprone shear stress modulates the expression of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels, TRPC3, TRPC6, TRPM7, and TRPV1 mRNA, in human umbilical vascular endothelial cells. Exposure of cultured vascular endothelial cells to defined...

  4. Non-dimensional physics of pulsatile cardiovascular networks and energy efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yigit, Berk; Pekkan, Kerem

    2016-01-01

    In Nature, there exist a variety of cardiovascular circulation networks in which the energetic ventricular load has both steady and pulsatile components. Steady load is related to the mean cardiac output (CO) and the haemodynamic resistance of the peripheral vascular system. On the other hand, the pulsatile load is determined by the simultaneous pressure and flow waveforms at the ventricular outlet, which in turn are governed through arterial wave dynamics (transmission) and pulse decay characteristics (windkessel effect). Both the steady and pulsatile contributions of the haemodynamic power load are critical for characterizing/comparing disease states and for predicting the performance of cardiovascular devices. However, haemodynamic performance parameters vary significantly from subject to subject because of body size, heart rate and subject-specific CO. Therefore, a 'normalized' energy dissipation index, as a function of the 'non-dimensional' physical parameters that govern the circulation networks, is needed for comparative/integrative biological studies and clinical decision-making. In this paper, a complete network-independent non-dimensional formulation that incorporates pulsatile flow regimes is developed. Mechanical design variables of cardiovascular flow systems are identified and the Buckingham Pi theorem is formally applied to obtain the corresponding non-dimensional scaling parameter sets. Two scaling approaches are considered to address both the lumped parameter networks and the distributed circulation components. The validity of these non-dimensional number sets is tested extensively through the existing empirical allometric scaling laws of circulation systems. Additional validation studies are performed using a parametric numerical arterial model that represents the transmission and windkessel characteristics, which are adjusted to represent different body sizes and non-dimensional haemodynamic states. Simulations demonstrate that the proposed non

  5. A durability study of a paracorporeal pulsatile electro-mechanical pneumatic biventricular assist device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyuk; Lee, Heung-Man; Nam, Kyoung Won; Choi, Jaesoon; Lee, Jung-Joo; Kim, Ho Chul; Song, Seung Joon; Ahn, Chi Bum; Son, Ho Sung; Lim, Choon Hak; Son, Kuk Hui; Park, Yong Doo; Jeong, Gi Seok; Sun, Kyung

    2011-06-01

    In 2002, the paracorporeal pulsatile electro-mechanical pneumatic ventricular assist device (VAD) began to be developed by the Korea Artificial Organ Center at Korea University under a Health & Medical Technology Research and Development program which finished in 2008. In vitro durability testing was conducted on the paracorporeal pulsatile pneumatic VAD to determine device durability and to evaluate device failures. The 1- and 2-year reliability of the paracorporeal pulsatile pneumatic VAD was shown to be 91.2% and 54.9%, respectively, with an 80% confidence level. Failure modes were analyzed using fault tree analysis, with customized software continuously acquiring data during the test period. After this period, 21 in vivo animal tests were done, with 14 cases of left atrium to left ventricle (LV) inflow cannulation (36Fr)/outflow grafting to descending aorta, and seven cases of apex cannulation of LV to descending aorta (12 mm). The longest postoperative day (182 days) in Korea was recently recorded in in vivo animal testing (bovine, 90 kg, male, 3.5-4.0 L/min flow rate, and 55 bpm). © 2011, Copyright the Authors. Artificial Organs © 2011, International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Investigation of pulsatile flowfield in healthy thoracic aorta models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Chih-Yung; Yang, An-Shik; Tseng, Li-Yu; Chai, Jyh-Wen

    2010-02-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the primary cause of morbidity and mortality in the western world. Complex hemodynamics plays a critical role in the development of aortic dissection and atherosclerosis, as well as many other diseases. Since fundamental fluid mechanics are important for the understanding of the blood flow in the cardiovascular circulatory system of the human body aspects, a joint experimental and numerical study was conducted in this study to determine the distributions of wall shear stress and pressure and oscillatory WSS index, and to examine their correlation with the aortic disorders, especially dissection. Experimentally, the Phase-Contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging (PC-MRI) method was used to acquire the true geometry of a normal human thoracic aorta, which was readily converted into a transparent thoracic aorta model by the rapid prototyping (RP) technique. The thoracic aorta model was then used in the in vitro experiments and computations. Simulations were performed using the computational fluid dynamic (CFD) code ACE+((R)) to determine flow characteristics of the three-dimensional, pulsatile, incompressible, and Newtonian fluid in the thoracic aorta model. The unsteady boundary conditions at the inlet and the outlet of the aortic flow were specified from the measured flowrate and pressure results during in vitro experiments. For the code validation, the predicted axial velocity reasonably agrees with the PC-MRI experimental data in the oblique sagittal plane of the thoracic aorta model. The thorough analyses of the thoracic aorta flow, WSSs, WSS index (OSI), and wall pressures are presented. The predicted locations of the maxima of WSS and the wall pressure can be then correlated with that of the thoracic aorta dissection, and thereby may lead to a useful biological significance. The numerical results also suggest that the effects of low WSS and high OSI tend to cause wall thickening occurred along the inferior wall of the aortic arch and the

  7. Acute hydrocephalus in nonaneurysmal perimesencephalic hemorrhage: evidence of CSF block at the tentorial hiatus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rinkel, G. J.; Wijdicks, E. F.; Vermeulen, M.; Tans, J. T.; Hasan, D.; van Gijn, J.

    1992-01-01

    The acute hydrocephalus in patients with nonaneurysmal perimesencephalic hemorrhage suggests an extraventricular obstruction of CSF flow. We studied the occurrence of acute hydrocephalus and the site of cisternal blood in 40 consecutive patients with perimesencephalic hemorrhage. In all 11 patients

  8. IIH with normal CSF pressures?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soh Youn Suh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH is a condition of raised intracranial pressure (ICP in the absence of space occupying lesions. ICP is usually measured by lumbar puncture and a cerebrospinal fluid (CSF pressure above 250 mm H 2 O is one of the diagnostic criteria of IIH. Recently, we have encountered two patients who complained of headaches and exhibited disc swelling without an increased ICP. We prescribed acetazolamide and followed both patients frequently; because of the definite disc swelling with IIH related symptoms. Symptoms and signs resolved in both patients after they started taking acetazolamide. It is generally known that an elevated ICP, as measured by lumbar puncture, is the most important diagnostic sign of IIH. However, these cases caution even when CSF pressure is within the normal range, that suspicion should be raised when a patient has papilledema with related symptoms, since untreated papilledema may cause progressive and irreversible visual loss.

  9. Measuring pulsatile forces on the human cranium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Cory S; Antonyshyn, Oleh; Midha, Rajiv; Fialkov, Jeffrey A

    2005-01-01

    The cyclic stresses in the cranium caused by pulsation of the brain play an important role in the design of materials for cranioplasty, as well as craniofacial development. However, these stresses have never been quantified. In this study, the force in the epidural space against the cranium was measured intraoperatively in 10 patients using a miniature force probe. Heart and ventilatory rates computed from the force tracing correlated closely with the corresponding measured values in the patients, confirming that the forces measured were indeed a result of brain pulsation. The mean outward systolic normal and tangential stresses were 54.2 kilo-Pascals (kPa) and 345.4 kPa, respectively. The systolic shear stress was 199.8 kPa. Through mechanotransduction, these stresses play a role in cranial development. The calculated yield stress of a cranioplasty repair was 0.4 MPa, which is within one order of magnitude of the known strength of common calcium-phosphate cements. This indicates a possible relation of these pulsatile forces and occult failure of calcium-phosphate cement cranioplasties through material fatigue.

  10. Autocrine CSF-1 and CSF-1 Receptor Co-expression Promotes Renal Cell Carcinoma Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menke, Julia; Kriegsmann, Jörg; Schimanski, Carl Christoph; Schwartz, Melvin M.; Schwarting, Andreas; Kelley, Vicki R.

    2011-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma is increasing in incidence but the molecular mechanisms regulating its growth remain elusive. Co-expression of the monocytic growth factor CSF-1 and its receptor CSF-1R on renal tubular epithelial cells (TEC) will promote proliferation and anti-apoptosis during regeneration of renal tubules. Here we show that a CSF-1-dependent autocrine pathway is also responsible for the growth of renal cell carcinoma (RCC). CSF-1 and CSF-1R were co-expressed in RCC and TEC proximally adjacent to RCC. CSF-1 engagement of CSF-1R promoted RCC survival and proliferation and reduced apoptosis, in support of the likelihood that CSF-1R effector signals mediate RCC growth. In vivo CSF-1R blockade using a CSF-1R tyrosine kinase inhibitor decreased RCC proliferation and macrophage infiltration in a manner associated with a dramatic reduction in tumor mass. Further mechanistic investigations linked CSF-1 and EGF signaling in RCC. Taken together, our results suggest that budding RCC stimulates the proximal adjacent microenvironment in the kidney to release mediators of CSF-1, CSF-1R and EGF expression in RCC. Further, our findings imply that targeting CSF-1/CSF-1R signaling may be therapeutically effective in RCC. PMID:22052465

  11. Estimating right ventricular stroke work and the pulsatile work fraction in pulmonary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemla, Denis; Castelain, Vincent; Zhu, Kaixian; Papelier, Yves; Creuzé, Nicolas; Hoette, Susana; Parent, Florence; Simonneau, Gérald; Humbert, Marc; Herve, Philippe

    2013-05-01

    The mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP) replaces mean systolic ejection pressure (msePAP) in the classic formula of right ventricular stroke work (RVSW) = (mPAP - RAP) × stroke volume, where RAP is mean right atrial pressure. Only the steady work is thus taken into account, not the pulsatile work, whereas pulmonary circulation is highly pulsatile. Our retrospective, high-fidelity pressure study tested the hypothesis that msePAP was proportional to mPAP, and looked at the implications for RVSW. Eleven patients with severe, precapillary pulmonary hypertension (PH) (six patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension and five with chronic thromboembolic PH; mPAP = 57 ± 10 mm Hg) were studied at rest and during mild to moderate exercise. Eight non-PH control subjects were also studied at rest (mPAP = 16 ± 2 mm Hg). The msePAP was averaged from end diastole to dicrotic notch. In the full data set (53 pressure-flow points), mPAP ranged from 14 to 99.5 mm Hg, cardiac output from 2.38 to 11.1 L/min, and heart rate from 53 to 163 beats/min. There was a linear relationship between msePAP and mPAP (r² = 0.99). The msePAP matched 1.25 mPAP (bias, -0.5 ± 2.6 mm Hg). Results were similar in the resting non-PH group and in resting and the exercising PH group. This implies that the classic formula markedly underestimates RVSW and that the pulsatile work may be a variable 20% to 55% fraction of RVSW, depending on RAP and mPAP. At rest, RVSW in patients with PH was twice as high as that of the non-PH group (P work fraction was similar between the two groups (26 ± 4% vs 24 ± 1%) because of the counterbalancing effects of high RAP (11 ± 5 mm Hg vs 4 ± 2 mm Hg), which increases the fraction, and high mPAP, which decreases the fraction. Our study favored the use of an improved formula that takes into account the variable pulsatile work fraction: RVSW = (1.25 mPAP - RAP) × stroke volume. Increased RAP and increased mPAP have opposite effects on the pulsatile work

  12. Inter-relationship between CSF dynamics and CSF to-and-fro movement in the cervical region as assessed by MR velocity imaging with phase encoding in hydrocephalic and normal patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudo, Sumio; Wachi, Akihiko; Sato, Kiyoshi; Sumie, Hirotoshi.

    1992-01-01

    The to-and-fro velocity of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) at C-1 and C-2 spinal-cord levels was measured by means of MR velocity-imaging technique, and the correlation of changes in velocity and various biophysical factors influencing the intracranial pressure environment were analyzed. Eight hydrocephalic patients, male and female, of different ages (both infants and adults), and 11 normal volunteers with a similar age range were investigated. The to-and-fro CSF movement was measured by means of phase-shift techniques with a bipolar gradient pulse. The cerebrospinal opening pressure was also recorded in 6 of the 8 hydrocephalic patients, either through a ventricular catheter reservoir or a spinal catheter inserted in the lumbosacral subarachnoid space; the CSF pulse amplitude, the pressure volume index (PVI), and the CSF outflow resistance (Ro) were also evaluated during the procedure. CSF flowed towards caudally in the early systolic phase of a cardiac stroke, but the flow direction was reversed in the early diastolic phase when the maximum flow rate was reached. Although such a flow pattern was commonly observed in all normal and hydrocephalic subjects, whatever the age, there was a marked difference in flow rate between the infants and the pediatric-adults groups, -i.e., it was 5-10 mm/sec for the former and 10-20 mm/sec for the latter. An abnormally high flow rate (33.0 mm/sec) was observed in the hydrocephalic patients when there was a malfunction of the ventriculoperitoneal shunt. A close correlation was found to exist among the changes in the CSF flow velocity, the CSF pressure amplitude, and the CSF outflow resistance (Ro), but not in the PVI. The measurement of the CSF flow velocity by MR velocity imaging appears to have an important role not only in the investigation of CSF dynamics, but also in the diagnosis and treatment of such pathologies as hydrocephalus and ventriculoperitoneal shunt malfunction. (author)

  13. Impaired crosstalk between pulsatile insulin and glucagon secretion in prediabetic individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohrer, Stefan; Menge, Björn A; Grüber, Lena

    2012-01-01

    Postprandial hyperglucagonemia is frequently found in patients with diabetes. Recently, a loss of the inverse relationship between pulsatile insulin and glucagon secretion has been reported in patients with type 2 diabetes. The crosstalk between pulsatile islet hormone secretion in prediabetic...

  14. Cerebrovascular pulsatility in patients with sleep-disordered breathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Alberto R; Cabral, Digna; Lee, David J; Sacco, Ralph L; Rundek, Tatjana

    2013-05-01

    The aim of our study is to determine the association between the pulsatility index (PI), a surrogate of cerebral small vessel disease and sleep-disordered breathing (SDB). We conducted a transcranial Doppler ultrasound (TCD) study of 19 consecutive patients free of stroke and cardiovascular disease, referred for the evaluation of SDB. TCD was performed by a certified technologist. Subsequent polysomnography was performed according to the practice parameters of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine. We evaluated the association between the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI), the oxygen nadir, the blood flow velocities, and the Gosling PI, for the middle cerebral artery. We performed Spearman's rank correlation and nonparametric regression to evaluate the relationship between AHI, oxygen levels, and the PI. Median age was 48 years (range 37-83), with 52 % male sex (n = 10), and median BMI of 29.9 (range 25-40.4). The median AHI was 16.4 (0.2-69). The median PI was 0.97 (0.72-1.89) cm/s. The PI correlated with the AHI (rho = 0.44; p = 0.004) and with age (rho = 0.57; p = 0.001). Nonparametric regression adjusting for age showed a positive association between the AHI and the PI (standardized estimate = 0.88; p = 0.002). There was no relation between the oxygen nadir and the PI. We observed increased PI in patients with SDB during wakefulness. The PI could potentially be an estimate of cerebral small vessel disease in patients with SDB and hence allow evaluating cerebral hemodynamics during wakefulness with a clinically relevant device.

  15. Loss of inverse relationship between pulsatile insulin and glucagon secretion in patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Menge, Björn A; Grüber, Lena; Jørgensen, Signe M

    2011-01-01

    In patients with type 2 diabetes, glucagon levels are often increased. Furthermore, pulsatile secretion of insulin is disturbed in such patients. Whether pulsatile glucagon secretion is altered in type 2 diabetes is not known.......In patients with type 2 diabetes, glucagon levels are often increased. Furthermore, pulsatile secretion of insulin is disturbed in such patients. Whether pulsatile glucagon secretion is altered in type 2 diabetes is not known....

  16. Leaback of Pulsatile Flow of Particle Fluid Suspension Model of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

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  17. Does the location of a vascular loop in the cerebellopontine angle explain pulsatile and non-pulsatile tinnitus?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowe, V.; Wang, X.L.; Gielen, J.; Goethem, J.Van; Oezsarlak, Oe.; De Schepper, A.M.; Parizel, P.M.; Ridder, D. De; Heyning, P.H.Van de

    2004-01-01

    The purpose was to investigate patients with unexplained pulsatile and non-pulsatile tinnitus by means of MR imaging of the cerebellopontine angle (CPA) and to correlate the clinical subtype of tinnitus with the location of a blood vessel (in the internal auditory canal or at the cisternal part of the VIIIth cranial nerve). Clinical presentation of tinnitus and perceptive hearing loss were correlated. In 47 patients with unexplained tinnitus, an MR examination of the CPA was performed. Virtual endoscopy reconstructions were obtained using a 3D axial thin-section high-resolution heavily T2-weighted gradient echo constructive interference in steady state (CISS) data-set. High-resolution T2-weighted CISS images showed a significantly higher number of vascular loops in the internal auditory canal in patients with arterial pulsatile tinnitus compared to patients with non-pulsatile tinnitus (P<0.00001). Virtual endoscopy images were used to investigate vascular contacts at the cisternal part of the VIIIth cranial nerve in patients with low pitch and high pitch non-pulsatile tinnitus. A significantly different distribution of the vascular contacts (P=0.0320) was found. Furthermore, a correlation between the clinical presentation of non-pulsatile tinnitus (high pitch and low pitch) and the perceptive hearing loss was found (P=0.0235). High-resolution heavily T2-weighted CISS images and virtual endoscopy of the CPA can be used to evaluate whether a vascular contact is present in the internal auditory canal or at the cisternal part of the VIIIth cranial nerve and whether the location of the vascular contact correlates with the clinical subtype of tinnitus. Our findings suggest that there is a tonotopical structure of the cisternal part of the VIIIth cranial nerve. A correlation between the clinical presentation of tinnitus and hearing loss was found. (orig.)

  18. Does the location of a vascular loop in the cerebellopontine angle explain pulsatile and non-pulsatile tinnitus?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nowe, V; Wang, X L; Gielen, J; Goethem, J Van; Oezsarlak, Oe; De Schepper, A M; Parizel, P M [University of Antwerp, Department of Radiology, Edegem (Belgium); Ridder, D De [University of Antwerp, Department of Neurosurgery, Edegem (Belgium); Heyning, P.H.Van de [University of Antwerp, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Edegem (Belgium)

    2004-12-01

    The purpose was to investigate patients with unexplained pulsatile and non-pulsatile tinnitus by means of MR imaging of the cerebellopontine angle (CPA) and to correlate the clinical subtype of tinnitus with the location of a blood vessel (in the internal auditory canal or at the cisternal part of the VIIIth cranial nerve). Clinical presentation of tinnitus and perceptive hearing loss were correlated. In 47 patients with unexplained tinnitus, an MR examination of the CPA was performed. Virtual endoscopy reconstructions were obtained using a 3D axial thin-section high-resolution heavily T2-weighted gradient echo constructive interference in steady state (CISS) data-set. High-resolution T2-weighted CISS images showed a significantly higher number of vascular loops in the internal auditory canal in patients with arterial pulsatile tinnitus compared to patients with non-pulsatile tinnitus (P<0.00001). Virtual endoscopy images were used to investigate vascular contacts at the cisternal part of the VIIIth cranial nerve in patients with low pitch and high pitch non-pulsatile tinnitus. A significantly different distribution of the vascular contacts (P=0.0320) was found. Furthermore, a correlation between the clinical presentation of non-pulsatile tinnitus (high pitch and low pitch) and the perceptive hearing loss was found (P=0.0235). High-resolution heavily T2-weighted CISS images and virtual endoscopy of the CPA can be used to evaluate whether a vascular contact is present in the internal auditory canal or at the cisternal part of the VIIIth cranial nerve and whether the location of the vascular contact correlates with the clinical subtype of tinnitus. Our findings suggest that there is a tonotopical structure of the cisternal part of the VIIIth cranial nerve. A correlation between the clinical presentation of tinnitus and hearing loss was found. (orig.)

  19. Kisspeptin and LH pulsatile temporal coupling in PCOS patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katulski, Krzysztof; Podfigurna, Agnieszka; Czyzyk, Adam; Meczekalski, Blazej; Genazzani, Alessandro D

    2018-05-04

    To evaluate the temporal coupling between spontaneous kisspeptin and luteinizing hormone (LH) pulsatile releases in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) patients. We examined 71 patients diagnosed with PCOS. A 2 h pulsatility study was performed to evaluate serum kisspeptin and LH pulse frequency and concentration, sampled every 10 min; baseline follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), estradiol (E2), prolactin (PRL), cortisol, 17-hydroksy-progesterone (17OHP), testosterone (T), free testosterone index (FTI, and insulin levels were also measured. Detect and Specific Concordance (SC) algorithms were used to evaluate the temporal coupling associations between spontaneous episodic secretion of kisspeptin and LH. All PCOS patients demonstrated LH and kisspeptin pulsatile secretions. When the SC index was calculated across the sample of PCOS patients (n = 71), no temporal coupling was observed between kisspeptin and LH pulses. When PCOS patients were subdivided according to their menstrual cyclicity, oligomenorrheic patients demonstrated elevated kisspeptin pulse frequency. Additionally, the SC index reveled a temporal coupling between kisspeptin and LH secretory peaks only in eumenorrheic patients (n = 30, intermenstrual interval PCOS patients (intermenstrual interval > 45 days) did not demonstrate temporal coupling between kisspeptin and LH secretory peaks. The study of the endogenous kisspeptin and LH pulsatile release revealed the temporal coupling of kisspeptin with LH secretory pulses only in eumenorrheic. This data supports the hypothesis that neuroendocrine impairments in PCOS affect the coupling of kisspeptin with LH pulses and potentially worsen as the disease progresses, becoming unequivocally evident in oligomenorrheic PCOS patients.

  20. Pulsatile thyrotropin secretion in patients with Cushing's syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adriaanse, R.; Brabant, G.; Endert, E.; Wiersinga, W. M.

    1994-01-01

    Pulsatile and circadian thyrotropin (TSH) secretion were studied in 16 healthy controls and in three patients with Cushing's syndrome who were studied twice (before and after treatment). Blood was sampled every 10 minutes over 24 hours for TSH (immunoradiometric assay [IRMA]). Mean 24-hour TSH in

  1. Study of cysticercosis in the fourth ventricle by CSF cinema MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Lianqing; Liu Lianxiang; Wu Jie; Wu Jing; Zhang Renshu; Wu Yujin

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic value of cysticercosis in the fourth ventricle by CSF cinema MRI. Materials and methods: Nine patients with intraventricular cysticercosis in the fourth ventricle were studied. The diagnosis was confirmed by surgery in all cases. All of these patients were examined systematically before the operation and studied with CSF cinema MRI in mid sagittal section and finger-gated scan technique. Results: (1) The path of CSF flow was directly displayed. All cysticercosis presented as a filling defect, and a cyst with a smooth wall. (2) The ventricular compliance was normal in cysticercosis. (3) The cysticercosis in active stage was free in the fourth ventricle and could be rolled over, its shape might change slightly within a cardiac cycle. In the degenerative stage, its wall could adhere to the ependyma and obstruct the CSF flow. Conclusion: CSF cinema MRI can demonstrate the degree of obstruction and pattern of CSF flow in cysticercosis of the fourth ventricle, thereby providing useful information for proper management

  2. MR cisternography: a new method for the diagnosis of CSF fistulae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eberhardt, K.E.W.; Tomandl, B.F.; Huk, W.J.; Hollenbach, H.P.; Deimling, M.

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare a new MRI method for detecting the existence of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) fistulae, i. e. MR cisternography, with CT cisternography. In a prospective study, 30 patients with post-traumatic CSF fistulae were examined. The MR examinations were performed with a 1.0-T whole-body MR system, using two T2 * -weighted sequences, a 3D PSIF (time-inversed fast imaging with steady-state precession, FISP) and a 3D constructive interference steady-state (CISS) sequence. The results of MRI and CT cisternography were compared with the surgical findings. The sensitivity in detecting CSF fistulae with MR cisternography (PSIF: 89.9 %; CISS: 93.6 %) was higher than with CT cisternography (72.3 %). The sensitivity of CT cisternography at detecting CSF fistulae in patients with a size of dural lesion less than 2 mm or in patients with multiple dural lesions is significantly lower compared with the MR method. Although the localization of CSF fistulae always proved possible with MR cisternography, this could only be accomplished wih CT in 70 % of cases. The MR cisternography technique is a new examination method with a higher sensitivity for the detection of CSF fistulae than CT cisternography. The CISS technique is superior compared with PSIF and should be used in patients with high-flow CSF fistulas. (orig.)

  3. Long-Term Durability Test for the Left Ventricular Assist System EVAHEART under the Physiologic Pulsatile Load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitano, Tomoya; Iwasaki, Kiyotaka

    The EVAHEART Left Ventricular Assist System (LVAS) was designed for the long-term support of a patient with severe heart failure. It has an original water lubrication system for seal and bearing and wear on these parts was considered one of its critical failure modes. A durability test focusing on wear was designed herein. We developed a mock loop, which generates a physiologic pulsatile flow and is sufficiently durable for a long-term test. The pulsatile load and the low fluid viscosity enable the creation of a severe condition for the mechanical seal. A total of 18 EVAHEART blood pumps completed 2 years of operation under the pulsatile condition without any failure. It indicated the EVAHEART blood pump had a greater than 90% reliability with a 88% confidence level. The test was continued with six blood pumps and achieved an average of 8.6 years, which was longer than the longest clinical use in Japan. The test result showed that no catastrophic, critical, marginal, or minor failures of the blood pump or their symptoms were observed. The seal performance was maintained after the test. Moreover, the surface roughness did not change, which showed any burn or abnormal wear occurred. The original water lubrication system equipped in EVAHEART LVAS prevent severe wear on the seal and the bearing, and it can be used in the bridge to transplant and destination therapy.

  4. The calculation of CSF spaces in CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hacker, H.; Artmann, H.

    1978-01-01

    Objective digital determination of CSF spaces is discussed, with ventricular and subarachnoid spaces handled separately. This method avoids the difficulty of visual definition of ventricular borders in planimetric measurements. The principle is to count automatically all pixels corresponding to CSF in a given region with a Hounsfield unit and to multiply this number by the pixel size. This will give the total surface area of CSF spaces in square millimeters. The calculation of pixel values for CSF spaces and brain tissue is experimentally formulated taking the intersection of the Gaussian curves for ventricular content and brain tissue. In practice, the determination of CSF spaces is done by first calculating a histogram of the total brain in a given slice defining all CSF spaces. Next a histogram of a region including ventricles with adjoining tissue is calculated and the ventricular size is calculated. By subtraction of the ventricle value from the total CSF space value, the subarachnoid space size is obtained. The advantages of this mehtod will be discussed. (orig.) [de

  5. CSF-1 Receptor Signaling in Myeloid Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, E. Richard; Chitu, Violeta

    2014-01-01

    The CSF-1 receptor (CSF-1R) is activated by the homodimeric growth factors colony-stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1) and interleukin-34 (IL-34). It plays important roles in development and in innate immunity by regulating the development of most tissue macrophages and osteoclasts, of Langerhans cells of the skin, of Paneth cells of the small intestine, and of brain microglia. It also regulates the differentiation of neural progenitor cells and controls functions of oocytes and trophoblastic cells in the female reproductive tract. Owing to this broad tissue expression pattern, it plays a central role in neoplastic, inflammatory, and neurological diseases. In this review we summarize the evolution, structure, and regulation of expression of the CSF-1R gene. We review, the structures of CSF-1, IL-34, and the CSF-1R and the mechanism of ligand binding to and activation of the receptor. We further describe the pathways regulating macrophage survival, proliferation, differentiation, and chemotaxis downstream from the CSF-1R. PMID:24890514

  6. Decompressive craniectomy and CSF disorders in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfiotto, Marie; Mottolese, Carmine; Szathmari, Alexandru; Beuriat, Pierre-Aurelien; Klein, Olivier; Vinchon, Matthieu; Gimbert, Edouard; Roujeau, Thomas; Scavarda, Didier; Zerah, Michel; Di Rocco, Federico

    2017-10-01

    Decompressive craniectomy (DC) is a lifesaving procedure but is associated to several post-operative complications, namely cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) dynamics impairment. The aim of this multicentric study was to evaluate the incidence of such CSF alterations after DC and review their impact on the overall outcome. We performed a retrospective multicentric study to analyze the CSF disorders occurring in children aged from 0 to 17 years who had undergone a DC for traumatic brain injury (TBI) in the major Departments of Pediatric Neurosurgery of France between January 2006 and August 2016. Out of 150 children, ranging in age between 7 months and 17 years, mean 10.75 years, who underwent a DC for TBI in 10 French pediatric neurosurgical centers. Sixteen (6 males, 10 females) (10.67%) developed CSF disorders following the surgical procedure and required an extrathecal CSF shunting. External ventricular drainage increased the risk of further complications, especially cranioplasty infection (p = 0.008). CSF disorders affect a minority of children after DC for TBI. They may develop early after the DC but they may develop several months after the cranioplasty (8 months), consequently indicating the necessity of clinical and radiological close follow-up after discharge from the neurosurgical unit. External ventricular drainage and permanent CSF shunt placement increase significantly the risk of cranioplasty infection.

  7. Calculation of CSF spaces in CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hacker, H; Artmann, H [Frankfurt Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Abt. fuer Neuroradiologie

    1978-01-01

    Objective digital determination of CSF spaces is discussed, with ventricular and subarachnoid spaces handled separately. This method avoids the difficulty of visual definition of ventricular borders in planimetric measurements. The principle is to count automatically all pixels corresponding to CSF in a given region with a Hounsfield unit and to multiply this number by the pixel size. This will give the total surface area of CSF spaces in square millimeters. The calculation of pixel values for CSF spaces and brain tissue is experimentally formulated taking the intersection of the Gaussian curves for ventricular content and brain tissue. In practice, the determination of CSF spaces is done by first calculating a histogram of the total brain in a given slice defining all CSF spaces. Next a histogram of a region including ventricles with adjoining tissue is calculated and the ventricular size is calculated. By subtraction of the ventricle value from the total CSF space value, the subarachnoid space size is obtained. The advantages of this mehtod will be discussed.

  8. Changes in Gene Expression during G-CSF-Induced Emergency Granulopoiesis in Humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Corinna C.; Borup, Rehannah; Fischer-Nielsen, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Emergency granulopoiesis refers to the increased production of neutrophils in bone marrow and their release into circulation induced by severe infection. Several studies point to a critical role for G-CSF as the main mediator of emergency granulopoiesis. However, the consequences of G-CSF...... stimulation on the transcriptome of neutrophils and their precursors have not yet been investigated in humans. In this work, we examine the changes in mRNA expression induced by administration of G-CSF in vivo, as a model of emergency granulopoiesis in humans. Blood samples were collected from healthy...... individuals after 5 d of G-CSF administration. Neutrophil precursors were sorted into discrete stages of maturation by flow cytometry, and RNA was subjected to microarray analysis. mRNA levels were compared with previously published expression levels in corresponding populations of neutrophil precursors...

  9. CSF Markers in Guillain-Barre Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A positive 14-3-3 protein assay of CSF was observed in 29 of 38 patients with GBS and in 4 with motor neuron disease and other neuropathies studied at Universities of Milan and Verona, Italy.

  10. Imaging findings of pulsatile tinnitus caused by sigmoid sinus abnormalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Xihong; Wang Zhenchang; Gong Shusheng; Xia Yin; Wang Zhengyu; Yang Bentao; Yan Fei; Li Jing; Xian Junfang; Chen Guangli

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To study a rare CT finding of pulsatile tinnitus (PT) caused by sigmoid sinus abnormalities. Methods: The imaging data of PT caused by sigmoid sinus abnormalities were analyzed retrospectively in 15 patients (15 female). The median age was 45 years (24 to 63 years). The duration of persistence pulsatile tinnitus was from 0.5 year to 36.0 years (median time, 2.0 years). The tinnitus was at left side in 5 patients and right side in 10 patients. Fifteen patients underwent HRCT of the temporal bone. Of them, 12 patients underwent cerebral CT angiography and CT venogram (CTA/CTV), and 9 patients underwent cerebral digital subtraction angiography (DSA). Nine patients underwent transmastoid reconstruction surgery of the sigmoid sinus. Of them, the tinnitus was at left side in 2 patients and right side in 7 patients. Paired rank sum test was used to compare the cross-sectional area of the sigmoid sinus of the tinnitus side and normal side.Results: On HRCT, foca bony coarse defect is shown in the anterior sigmoid wall in 11 patients and anterolateral sigmoid wall in 4 patients. On CTA/CTV, the sigmoid sinus focally protuded into the adjacent mastoid air cells and formed diverticulum in 10 patients. The pulsatile tinnitus disappeared immediately after transmastoid reconstruction surgery of the sigmoid sinus in all 9 patients. The cross-sectional area of the sigmoid sinus of the tinnitus side was 100.6 (41.5-96.2)mm 2 , it was 77.0 (92.1-122.4)mm 2 in the nonmal side (Z=2.158, P=0.031). Conclusion: Focal bony defect of the sigmoid wall with sigmoid sinus diverticula is one of the causes which lead to pulsatile tinnitus, which can be easily identified by imaging examination. (authors)

  11. Imaging findings of pulsatile tinnitus caused by sigmoid sinus abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xihong, Liang; Zhenchang, Wang; Shusheng, Gong; Yin, Xia; Zhengyu, Wang; Bentao, Yang; Fei, Yan; Jing, Li; Junfang, Xian; Guangli, Chen [Department of Radiology, Beijing Tongren Hospital, Capital University of Medical Science, Beijing (China)

    2010-04-15

    Objective: To study a rare CT finding of pulsatile tinnitus (PT) caused by sigmoid sinus abnormalities. Methods: The imaging data of PT caused by sigmoid sinus abnormalities were analyzed retrospectively in 15 patients (15 female). The median age was 45 years (24 to 63 years). The duration of persistence pulsatile tinnitus was from 0.5 year to 36.0 years (median time, 2.0 years). The tinnitus was at left side in 5 patients and right side in 10 patients. Fifteen patients underwent HRCT of the temporal bone. Of them, 12 patients underwent cerebral CT angiography and CT venogram (CTA/CTV), and 9 patients underwent cerebral digital subtraction angiography (DSA). Nine patients underwent transmastoid reconstruction surgery of the sigmoid sinus. Of them, the tinnitus was at left side in 2 patients and right side in 7 patients. Paired rank sum test was used to compare the cross-sectional area of the sigmoid sinus of the tinnitus side and normal side.Results: On HRCT, foca bony coarse defect is shown in the anterior sigmoid wall in 11 patients and anterolateral sigmoid wall in 4 patients. On CTA/CTV, the sigmoid sinus focally protuded into the adjacent mastoid air cells and formed diverticulum in 10 patients. The pulsatile tinnitus disappeared immediately after transmastoid reconstruction surgery of the sigmoid sinus in all 9 patients. The cross-sectional area of the sigmoid sinus of the tinnitus side was 100.6 (41.5-96.2)mm{sup 2}, it was 77.0 (92.1-122.4)mm{sup 2} in the nonmal side (Z=2.158, P=0.031). Conclusion: Focal bony defect of the sigmoid wall with sigmoid sinus diverticula is one of the causes which lead to pulsatile tinnitus, which can be easily identified by imaging examination. (authors)

  12. Pulsatility Index as a Diagnostic Parameter of Reciprocating Wall Shear Stress Parameters in Physiological Pulsating Waveforms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idit Avrahami

    Full Text Available Arterial wall shear stress (WSS parameters are widely used for prediction of the initiation and development of atherosclerosis and arterial pathologies. Traditional clinical evaluation of arterial condition relies on correlations of WSS parameters with average flow rate (Q and heart rate (HR measurements. We show that for pulsating flow waveforms in a straight tube with flow reversals that lead to significant reciprocating WSS, the measurements of HR and Q are not sufficient for prediction of WSS parameters. Therefore, we suggest adding a third quantity-known as the pulsatility index (PI-which is defined as the peak-to-peak flow rate amplitude normalized by Q. We examine several pulsating flow waveforms with and without flow reversals using a simulation of a Womersley model in a straight rigid tube and validate the simulations through experimental study using particle image velocimetry (PIV. The results indicate that clinically relevant WSS parameters such as the percentage of negative WSS (P[%], oscillating shear index (OSI and the ratio of minimum to maximum shear stress rates (min/max, are better predicted when the PI is used in conjunction with HR and Q. Therefore, we propose to use PI as an additional and essential diagnostic quantity for improved predictability of the reciprocating WSS.

  13. Closing in on the Mechanisms of Pulsatile Insulin Secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertram, Richard; Satin, Leslie S; Sherman, Arthur S

    2018-03-01

    Insulin secretion from pancreatic islet β-cells occurs in a pulsatile fashion, with a typical period of ∼5 min. The basis of this pulsatility in mouse islets has been investigated for more than four decades, and the various theories have been described as either qualitative or mathematical models. In many cases the models differ in their mechanisms for rhythmogenesis, as well as other less important details. In this Perspective, we describe two main classes of models: those in which oscillations in the intracellular Ca 2+ concentration drive oscillations in metabolism, and those in which intrinsic metabolic oscillations drive oscillations in Ca 2+ concentration and electrical activity. We then discuss nine canonical experimental findings that provide key insights into the mechanism of islet oscillations and list the models that can account for each finding. Finally, we describe a new model that integrates features from multiple earlier models and is thus called the Integrated Oscillator Model. In this model, intracellular Ca 2+ acts on the glycolytic pathway in the generation of oscillations, and it is thus a hybrid of the two main classes of models. It alone among models proposed to date can explain all nine key experimental findings, and it serves as a good starting point for future studies of pulsatile insulin secretion from human islets. © 2018 by the American Diabetes Association.

  14. Development of a gastroretentive pulsatile drug delivery platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thitinan, Sumalee; McConville, Jason T

    2012-04-01

    To develop a novel gastroretentive pulsatile drug delivery platform by combining the advantages of floating dosage forms for the stomach and pulsatile drug delivery systems. A gastric fluid impermeable capsule body was used as a vessel to contain one or more drug layer(s) as well as one or more lag-time controlling layer(s). A controlled amount of air was sealed in the innermost portion of the capsule body to reduce the overall density of the drug delivery platform, enabling gastric floatation. An optimal mass fill inside the gastric fluid impermeable capsule body enabled buoyancy in a vertical orientation to provide a constant surface area for controlled erosion of the lag-time controlling layer. The lag-time controlling layer consisted of a swellable polymer, which rapidly formed a gel to seal the mouth of capsule body and act as a barrier to gastric fluid ingress. By varying the composition of the lag-time controlling layer, it was possible to selectively program the onset of the pulsatile delivery of a drug. This new delivery platform offers a new method of delivery for a variety of suitable drugs targeted in chronopharmaceutical therapy. This strategy could ultimately improve drug efficacy and patient compliance, and reduce harmful side effects by scaling back doses of drug administered. © 2012 The Authors. JPP © 2012 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  15. CSF and plasma testosterone in attempted suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefansson, Jon; Chatzittofis, Andreas; Nordström, Peter; Arver, Stefan; Åsberg, Marie; Jokinen, Jussi

    2016-12-01

    Very few studies have assessed testosterone levels in the cerebrospinal fluid in suicide attempters. Aggressiveness and impulsivity are common behavioural traits in suicide attempters. Dual-hormone serotonergic theory on human impulsive aggression implies high testosterone/cortisol ratio acting on the amygdala and low serotonin in the prefrontal cortex. Our aim was to examine the CSF and plasma testosterone levels in suicide attempters and in healthy volunteers. We also assessed the relationship between the testosterone/cortisol ratio, aggressiveness and impulsivity in suicide attempters. 28 medication-free suicide attempters and 19 healthy volunteers participated in the study. CSF and plasma testosterone sulfate and cortisol levels were assessed with specific radio-immunoassays. The Karolinska Scales of Personality was used to assess impulsivity and aggressiveness. All patients were followed up for cause of death. The mean follow-up period was 21 years. Male suicide attempters had higher CSF and plasma testosterone levels than age- matched male healthy volunteers. There were no significant differences in CSF testosterone levels in female suicide attempters and healthy female volunteers. Testosterone levels did not differ significantly in suicide victims compared to survivors. In male suicide attempters, the CSF testosterone/cortisol ratio showed a significant positive correlation with both impulsivity and aggressiveness. Higher CSF testosterone levels may be associated with attempted suicide in young men through association with both aggressiveness and impulsivity, a key endophenotype in young male suicide attempters. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. CXCL13 is the major determinant for B cell recruitment to the CSF during neuroinflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kowarik Markus C

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The chemokines and cytokines CXCL13, CXCL12, CCL19, CCL21, BAFF and APRIL are believed to play a role in the recruitment of B cells to the central nervous system (CNS compartment during neuroinflammation. To determine which chemokines/cytokines show the strongest association with a humoral immune response in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, we measured their concentrations in the CSF and correlated them with immune cell subsets and antibody levels. Methods Cytokine/chemokine concentrations were measured in CSF and serum by ELISA in patients with non-inflammatory neurological diseases (NIND, n = 20, clinically isolated syndrome (CIS, n = 30, multiple sclerosis (MS, n = 20, Lyme neuroborreliosis (LNB, n = 8 and patients with other inflammatory neurological diseases (OIND, n = 30. Albumin, IgG, IgA and IgM were measured by nephelometry. CSF immune cell subsets were determined by seven-color flow cytometry. Results CXCL13 was significantly elevated in the CSF of all patient groups with inflammatory diseases. BAFF levels were significantly increased in patients with LNB and OIND. CXCL12 was significantly elevated in patients with LNB. B cells and plasmablasts were significantly elevated in the CSF of all patients with inflammatory diseases. CXCL13 showed the most consistent correlation with CSF B cells, plasmablasts and intrathecal Ig synthesis. Conclusions CXCL13 seems to be the major determinant for B cell recruitment to the CNS compartment in different neuroinflammatory diseases. Thus, elevated CSF CXCL13 levels rather reflect a strong humoral immune response in the CNS compartment than being specific for a particular disease entity.

  17. [Effect of G-CSF in vitro Stimulation on Distribution of Peripheral Lymphocyte Subsets in the Healthy Persons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Sha-Sha; Fang, Shu; Zhu, Cheng-Ying; Wang, Li-Li; Gao, Chun-Ji

    2018-02-01

    To investigate the effect of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) in vitro stimulation on the distribution of lymphocyte subset in healthy human. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNCs) were collected from 8 healthy volunteers by density gradient centrifugation on Ficoll-Paque TM . In vitro 200 ng/ml G-CSF or 200 ng/ml G-CSF plus 10 µg/ml ConA directly act on PBMNCs, then the colleted cells were cultivated for 3 days. Lymphocyte subsets were stained with the corresponding fluoresce labeled antibodies and detected by flow cytometry. The levels of T cells in G-CSF group and G-CSF+ConA group were both higher than that in the control group (PCSF on T cell subsets indicated that the levels of CD4 + T cells and CD8 + T cells in G-CSF group were both significantly higher than those in control group (PCSF and control group. Compared with the control group, the level of CD4 + T cells, CD8 + T cells and Treg cells in G-CSF+ConA group significantly increased (PCSF receptor (G-CSFR) expression showed that G-CSFR expression on T cells in G-CSF+ConA group dramatically increased, as compared with control group (PCSF stimulation. ConA can enhance the level of T cells and induce G-CSFR expression on T cells.

  18. The pulsatility index and the resistive index in renal arteries. Associations with long-term progression in chronic renal failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, L J; Petersen, J R; Talleruphuus, U

    1997-01-01

    The pulsatility index (PI) and the resistive index (RI) are used as pulsed-wave Doppler measurements of downstream renal artery resistance. PI and RI have been found to correlate with renal vascular resistance, filtration fraction and effective renal plasma flow in chronic renal failure. The aim...... of the present study was to evaluate the potential relationship between these indices and the rate of decline in renal function, as reflected by changes in different parameters of renal function in patients with chronic renal failure....

  19. Pulsatility index variations using two different transit-time flowmeters in coronary artery bypass surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordgaard, Håvard B; Vitale, Nicola; Astudillo, Rafael; Renzulli, Attilio; Romundstad, Pål; Haaverstad, Rune

    2010-05-01

    Transit-time flow measurement is widely accepted as an intra-operative assessment in coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). However, the two most commonly applied flowmeters, manufactured by MediStim ASA and Transonic Inc., have different default filter settings of 20 and 10 Hz, respectively. This may cause different flow measurements, which will influence the reported results. The aim was to compare pulsatility index (PI) values recorded by the MediStim and Transonic flowmeters in two different clinical settings: (1) analysis of the flow patterns recorded simultaneously by both flowmeters in the same CABGs; and (2) evaluation of flow patterns under different levels of filter settings in the same grafts. Graft flow and PI were measured using the two different flowmeters simultaneously in 19 bypass grafts. Finally, eight grafts were assessed under different digital filter settings at 5, 10, 20, 30, 50 and 100 Hz. The Transonic flowmeter provided substantially lower PI as compared with the MediStim flowmeter. By increasing the filter setting in the flowmeter, PI increased considerably. The Transonic flowmeter displayed a lower PI than the MediStim, due to a lower filter setting. In the Transonic,flow signals are filtered at a lower level, rendering a 'smoother' pattern of flow curves. Because different filter settings determine different PIs, caution must be taken when flow values and flowmeters are compared. The type of flowmeter should be indicated whenever graft flow measurements and derived indexes are provided [corrected]. Copyright 2009 European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  20. CSF free light chain identification of demyelinating disease: comparison with oligoclonal banding and other CSF indexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurtner, Kari M; Shosha, Eslam; Bryant, Sandra C; Andreguetto, Bruna D; Murray, David L; Pittock, Sean J; Willrich, Maria Alice V

    2018-02-19

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) used in immunoglobulin gamma (IgG) index testing and oligoclonal bands (OCBs) are common laboratory tests used in the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis. The measurement of CSF free light chains (FLC) could pose as an alternative to the labor-intensive isoelectric-focusing (IEF) gels used for OCBs. A total of 325 residual paired CSF and serum specimens were obtained after physician-ordered OCB IEF testing. CSF kappa (cKFLC) and lambda FLC (cLFLC), albumin and total IgG were measured. Calculations were performed based on combinations of analytes: CSF sum of kappa and lambda ([cKFLC+cLFLC]), kappa-index (K-index) ([cKFLC/sKFLC]/[CSF albumin/serum albumin]), kappa intrathecal fraction (KFLCIF) {([cKFLC/sKFLC]-[0.9358×CSF albumin/serum albumin]^[0.6687×sKFLC]/cKFLC)} and IgG-index ([CSF IgG/CSF albumin]/[serum IgG/serum albumin]). Patients were categorized as: demyelination (n=67), autoimmunity (n=53), non-inflammatory (n=50), inflammation (n=38), degeneration (n=28), peripheral neuropathy (n=24), infection (n=13), cancer (n=11), neuromyelitis optica (n=10) and others (n=31). cKFLC measurement used alone at a cutoff of 0.0611 mg/dL showed >90% agreement to OCBs, similar or better performance than all other calculations, reducing the number of analytes and variables. When cases of demyelinating disease were reviewed, cKFLC measurements showed 86% clinical sensitivity/77% specificity. cKFLC alone demonstrates comparable performance to OCBs along with increased sensitivity for demyelinating diseases. Replacing OCB with cKFLC would alleviate the need for serum and CSF IgG and albumin and calculated conversions. cKFLC can overcome challenges associated with performance, interpretation, and cost of traditional OCBs, reducing costs and maintaining sensitivity and specificity supporting MS diagnosis.

  1. Colony-stimulating factor (CSF) radioimmunoassay: detection of a CSF subclass stimulating macrophage production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanley, E.R.

    1979-01-01

    Colony-stimulating factors (CSFs) stimulate the differentiation of immature precursor cells to mature granulocytes and macrophages. Purified 125 I-labeled murine L cell CSF has been used to develop a radioimmunoassay (RIA) that detects a subclass of CSFs that stimulates macrophage production. Murine CSF preparations that contain this subclass of CSF compete for all of the CSF binding sites on anti-L cell CSF antibody. With the exception of mouse serum, which can contain inhibitors of the bioassay, there is complete correspondence between activities determined by RIA and those determined by bioassay. The RIA is slightly more sensitive than the bioassay, detecting approximately 0.3 fmol of purified L cell CSF. It can also detect this subclass of CSF in chickens, rats, and humans. In the mouse, the subclass is distinguished from other CSFs by a murine cell bioassay dose-response curve in which 90% of the response occurs over a 10-fold (rather than a 100-fold) increase in concentration, by stimulating the formations of colonies contaning a high proportion of mononuclear (rather than granulocytic) cells, and by certain physical characteristics

  2. Scinticisternography and scintiventriculography. A study of C.S.F. dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Front, Dov

    1971-01-01

    The problem of C.S.F. flow and absorption has attracted many different disciplines in medicine. The normal physiology and the pathology, which declares itself mainly by hydrocephalus, have been intensively studied by neurophysiologists, neurologists and neurosurgeons. The possibility of treating

  3. Disturbances of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) circulation - neuro psychiatric symptoms and neuroradiological contribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, E.; Becker, T.; Meixensberger, J.; Jackel, M.; Schneider, M.; Reichmann, H.

    1995-01-01

    The present study aims at relating dementia, pseudo-neurasthenic and affective organic brain syndromes to underlying types of CSF flow disorder and to the subsequent alteration of anatomy. T 2 * -weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the mid sagittal plane permitted an analysis of aqueductal CSF flow phenomena and hydrocephalus-induced elevation, thinning and dorsal impingement of the corpus callosum. Furthermore, the width of the third ventricle was measured on the transverse scout images. 72 patients with communicating hydrocephalus (increased aqueductal CSF pulsations) and 26 patients with aqueductal stenosis (absence of aqueductal flow phenomena) were compared with 22 controls. Dementia and affective disorders were distributed equally among both CSF flow subgroups whereas pseudo-neurasthenic syndromes were observed more frequently in non-communicating hydrocephalus (p < 0.03). Alzheimer-type and multi infarct dementia syndromes were found more frequently in communicating hydrocephalus whereas non-classifiable dementia showed some predilection for non-communicating hydrocephalus. Callosal height, area and third ventricular width did not predict affective or pseudo neurasthenic disorder whereas third ventricular width (p < 0.01) and callosal area (p < 0.05) discriminated between demented and non-demented patients. Dorsal impingement of the corpus callosum by the falx was a non-specific finding. (author)

  4. Effects of Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating (GM-CSF Factor on Corneal Epithelial Cells in Corneal Wound Healing Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Rae Rho

    Full Text Available Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF is a pleiotropic cytokine that activates granulocyte and macrophage cell lineages. It is also known to have an important function in wound healing. This study investigated the effect of GM-CSF in wound healing of human corneal epithelial cells (HCECs. We used human GM-CSF derived from rice cells (rice cell-derived recombinant human GM-CSF; rhGM-CSF. An in vitro migration assay was performed to investigate the migration rate of HCECs treated with various concentrations of rhGM-CSF (0.1, 1.0, and 10.0 μg/ml. MTT assay and flow cytometric analysis were used to evaluate the proliferative effect of rhGM-CSF. The protein level of p38MAPK was analyzed by western blotting. For in vivo analysis, 100 golden Syrian hamsters were divided into four groups, and their corneas were de-epithelialized with alcohol and a blade. The experimental groups were treated with 10, 20, or 50 μg/ml rhGM-CSF four times daily, and the control group was treated with phosphate-buffered saline. The corneal wound-healing rate was evaluated by fluorescein staining at the initial wounding and 12, 24, 36, and 48 hours after epithelial debridement. rhGM-CSF accelerated corneal epithelial wound healing both in vitro and in vivo. MTT assay and flow cytometric analysis revealed that rhGM-CSF treatment had no effects on HCEC proliferation. Western blot analysis demonstrated that the expression level of phosphorylated p38MAPK increased with rhGM-CSF treatment. These findings indicate that rhGM-CSF enhances corneal wound healing by accelerating cell migration.

  5. Pulsatile luteinising hormone releasing hormone for ovulation induction in subfertility associated with polycystic ovary syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bayram, N.; van Wely, M.; Vandekerckhove, P.; Lilford, R.; van der Veen, F.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In normal menstrual cycles, gonadotrophin releasing hormone (GnRH) secretion is pulsatile, with intervals of 60-120 minutes in the follicular phase. Treatment with pulsatile GnRH infusion by the intra-venous or subcutaneous route using a portable pump has been used successfully in

  6. Pulsatile gonadotrophin releasing hormone for ovulation induction in subfertility associated with polycystic ovary syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bayram, N.; van Wely, M.; van der Veen, F.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In normal menstrual cycles, gonadotrophin releasing hormone (GnRH) secretion is pulsatile, with intervals of 60-120 minutes in the follicular phase. Treatment with pulsatile GnRH infusion by the intravenous or subcutaneous route using a portable pump has been used successfully in

  7. Stem Cell Mobilization with G-CSF versus Cyclophosphamide plus G-CSF in Mexican Children

    OpenAIRE

    Meraz, Jos? Eugenio V?zquez; Arellano-Galindo, Jos?; Avalos, Armando Mart?nez; Mendoza-Garc?a, Emma; Jim?nez-Hern?ndez, Elva

    2016-01-01

    Fifty-six aphaereses were performed in 23 pediatric patients with malignant hematological and solid tumors, following three different protocols for PBPC mobilization and distributed as follows: A: seventeen mobilized with 4?g/m2 of cyclophosphamide (CFA) and 10??g/kg/day of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), B: nineteen with CFA + G-CSF, and C: twenty only with G-CSF when the WBC count exceeded 10 ? 109/L. The average number of MNC/kg body weight (BW)/aphaeresis was 0.4 ? 108 (0.1...

  8. Induction of pulsatile secretion of leptin in horses following thyroidectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buff, Preston R; Messer, Nat T; Cogswell, Andria M; Wilson, David A; Johnson, Philip J; Keisler, Duane H; Ganjam, Venkataseshu K

    2007-02-01

    Endocrine characteristics of Quarter Horse-type mares were determined during a 68 h feed deprivation and again in the same mares following surgical thyroidectomy (THX). A crossover experimental design was implemented, in which mares received brome hay available ad libitum (FED) or were food deprived (RES) for 68 h. Blood samples were collected every 20 min for 48 h, beginning 20 h after the onset of food deprivation. Concentrations of triiodothyronine and thyroxine were undetectable post-THX. Plasma concentrations of thyrotropin were greater post-THX versus pre-THX (P<0 x 001). Plasma concentrations of leptin were greater in the THX FED group than in the THX RES group (P<0 x 01). The existence of leptin pulse secretion was found only in post-THX compared with the same horses pre-THX (P=0 x 02). We theorize that non-pulsatile secretion of leptin may have contributed to the survival of this species, as it evolved in the regions of seasonal availability of food. Lack of pulsatile secretion of leptin may contribute to the accumulation of energy stores by modulating leptin sensitivity.

  9. Intrasphenoidal encephalocele and spontaneous CSF rhinorrhoea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniilidis, J; Vlachtsis, K; Ferekidis, E; Dimitriadis, A

    1999-12-01

    Intrasphenoidal encephalocele is a rare clinical entity. In the international literature only 16 cases have been reported up today, with female predominance. Clinically they manifest at middle and advanced ages (40-67 years), when spontaneous CSF rhinorrhoea or recurrent meningitis occurs. We present our case, a 46 years old female, who had CSF rhinorrhoea from the right vestibule for 10 months. The diagnosis was based on the history and the high-resolution brain and skull base CT-scanning in conjunction with opaque fluid injection in the subarachnoidal space through a lumbar puncture. She was successfully treated with an operation, through an endonasal trans-ethmoid microendoscopic approach, using the Draf and Stammberger technique. We discuss the pathogenesis of the intrasphenoidal encephalocele, the existence of small occult defects in the skull base, which cause, at the middle and advanced ages, CSF fistula with spontaneous CSF rhinorrhoea and/or recurrent meningitis. Finally we emphasize the advantages of the endonasal surgical approach for the treatment of this condition.

  10. The inner CSF-brain barrier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Whish, Sophie; Dziegielewska, Katarzyna M; Møllgård, Kjeld

    2015-01-01

    outlining the inner CSF-brain interface from E16; most of these markers were not present in the adult ependyma. Claudin-5 was present in the apical-most part of radial glial cells and in endothelial cells in embryos, but only in endothelial cells including plexus endothelial cells in adults. Claudin-11...

  11. Glymphatic distribution of CSF-derived apoE into brain is isoform specific and suppressed during sleep deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achariyar, Thiyagaragan M; Li, Baoman; Peng, Weiguo; Verghese, Philip B; Shi, Yang; McConnell, Evan; Benraiss, Abdellatif; Kasper, Tristan; Song, Wei; Takano, Takahiro; Holtzman, David M; Nedergaard, Maiken; Deane, Rashid

    2016-12-08

    Apolipoprotein E (apoE) is a major carrier of cholesterol and essential for synaptic plasticity. In brain, it's expressed by many cells but highly expressed by the choroid plexus and the predominant apolipoprotein in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The role of apoE in the CSF is unclear. Recently, the glymphatic system was described as a clearance system whereby CSF and ISF (interstitial fluid) is exchanged via the peri-arterial space and convective flow of ISF clearance is mediated by aquaporin 4 (AQP4), a water channel. We reasoned that this system also serves to distribute essential molecules in CSF into brain. The aim was to establish whether apoE in CSF, secreted by the choroid plexus, is distributed into brain, and whether this distribution pattern was altered by sleep deprivation. We used fluorescently labeled lipidated apoE isoforms, lenti-apoE3 delivered to the choroid plexus, immunohistochemistry to map apoE brain distribution, immunolabeled cells and proteins in brain, Western blot analysis and ELISA to determine apoE levels and radiolabeled molecules to quantify CSF inflow into brain and brain clearance in mice. Data were statistically analyzed using ANOVA or Student's t- test. We show that the glymphatic fluid transporting system contributes to the delivery of choroid plexus/CSF-derived human apoE to neurons. CSF-delivered human apoE entered brain via the perivascular space of penetrating arteries and flows radially around arteries, but not veins, in an isoform specific manner (apoE2 > apoE3 > apoE4). Flow of apoE around arteries was facilitated by AQP4, a characteristic feature of the glymphatic system. ApoE3, delivered by lentivirus to the choroid plexus and ependymal layer but not to the parenchymal cells, was present in the CSF, penetrating arteries and neurons. The inflow of CSF, which contains apoE, into brain and its clearance from the interstitium were severely suppressed by sleep deprivation compared to the sleep state. Thus, choroid plexus/CSF

  12. Correlation of isotopic cisternographic patterns in multiple sclerosis with CSF IgG values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartolini, S.; Inzitari, D.; Castagnoli, A.; Amaducci, L.

    1982-01-01

    Thirty-eight patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) were examined with isotopic cisternography (IC) in order to study cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) dynamics. Cisternography was also performed in 15 patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and in 14 with senile dementia of the Alzheimer type as controls. IC pattern of ''mixed'' type was found in 18 MS patients and all those with Alzheimer senile dementia examined, while the IC examination did not show abnormality in any of 15 patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. In MS patients, the abnormal IC picture proved to be significantly correlated with the CSF IgG values as calculated by Link's and Tourtelotte's formulas. The abnormal IC in MS may be due to altered CSF reabsorption or increased transependymal flow, or it may be related to the abnormal concentration of IgG

  13. The New PTB Caesium Fountain Clock CSF2

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wynands, R; Bauch, A; Griebsch, D; Schroeder, R; Weyers, S

    2005-01-01

    At PTB a second caesium fountain clock, CSF2, is in the process of being set up. It differs from the first PTB caesium fountain standard CSF1 in a number of details, which are consecutively specified...

  14. CSF-1R Inhibitor Development: Current Clinical Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyraud, Florent; Cousin, Sophie; Italiano, Antoine

    2017-09-05

    Colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF-1R) and its ligands, CSF-1 and interleukin 34 (IL-34), regulate the function and survival of tumor-associated macrophages, which are involved in tumorigenesis and in the suppression of antitumor immunity. Moreover, the CSF-1R/CSF-1 axis has been implicated in the pathogenesis of pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS), a benign tumor of the synovium. As advanced or metastatic malignant solid tumors and relapsed/refractory PVNS remain unresolved therapeutic problems, new approaches are needed to improve the outcome of patients with these conditions. In solid tumors, targeting CSF-1R via either small molecules or antibodies has shown interesting results in vitro but limited antitumor activity in vivo. Concerning PVNS, clinical trials assessing CSF-1R inhibitors have revealed promising initial outcomes. Blocking CSF-1/CSF-1R signaling represents a promising immunotherapy approach and several new potential combination therapies for future clinical testing.

  15. Association of Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) Insulin with Cognitive Performance and CSF Biomarkers of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geijselaers, Stefan L C; Aalten, Pauline; Ramakers, Inez H G B; De Deyn, Peter Paul; Heijboer, Annemieke C; Koek, Huiberdina L; OldeRikkert, Marcel G M; Papma, Janne M; Reesink, Fransje E; Smits, Lieke L; Stehouwer, Coen D A; Teunissen, Charlotte E; Verhey, Frans R J; van der Flier, Wiesje M; Biessels, Geert Jan

    2018-01-01

    Abnormal insulin signaling in the brain has been linked to Alzheimer's disease (AD). To evaluate whether cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) insulin levels are associated with cognitive performance and CSF amyloid-β and Tau. Additionally, we explore whether any such association differs by sex or APOE ɛ4 genotype. From 258 individuals participating in the Parelsnoer Institute Neurodegenerative Diseases, a nationwide multicenter memory clinic population, we selected 138 individuals (mean age 66±9 years, 65.2% male) diagnosed with subjective cognitive impairment (n = 45), amnestic mild cognitive impairment (n = 44), or AD (n = 49), who completed a neuropsychological assessment, including tests of global cognition and memory performance, and who underwent lumbar puncture. We measured CSF levels of insulin, amyloid-β1-42, total (t-)Tau, and phosphorylated (p-)Tau. CSF insulin levels did not differ between the diagnostic groups (p = 0.136). Across the whole study population, CSF insulin was unrelated to cognitive performance and CSF biomarkers of AD, after adjustment for age, sex, body mass index, diabetes status, and clinic site (all p≥0.131). Importantly, however, we observed effect modification by sex and APOE ɛ4 genotype. Specifically, among women, higher insulin levels in the CSF were associated with worse global cognition (standardized regression coefficient -0.483; p = 0.008) and higher p-Tau levels (0.353; p = 0.040). Among non-carriers of the APOE ɛ4 allele, higher CSF insulin was associated with higher t-Tau (0.287; p = 0.008) and p-Tau (0.246; p = 0.029). Our findings provide further evidence for a relationship between brain insulin signaling and AD pathology. It also highlights the need to consider sex and APOE ɛ4 genotype when assessing the role of insulin.

  16. Reference Curve for the Mean Uterine Artery Pulsatility Index in Singleton Pregnancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weichert, Alexander; Hagen, Andreas; Tchirikov, Michael; Fuchs, Ilka B; Henrich, Wolfgang; Entezami, Michael

    2017-05-01

    Doppler sonography of the uterine artery (UA) is done to monitor pregnancies, because the detected flow patterns are useful to draw inferences about possible disorders of trophoblast invasion. Increased resistance in the UA is associated with an increased risk of preeclampsia and/or intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) and perinatal mortality. In the absence of standardized figures, the normal ranges of the various available reference curves sometimes differ quite substantially from one another. The causes for this are differences in the flow patterns of the UA depending on the position of the pulsed Doppler gates as well as branching of the UA. Because of the discrepancies between the different reference curves and the practical problems this poses for guideline recommendations, we thought it would be useful to create our own reference curves for Doppler measurements of the UA obtained from a singleton cohort under standardized conditions. This retrospective cohort study was carried out in the Department of Obstetrics of the Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, the Department for Obstetrics and Prenatal Medicine of the University Hospital Halle (Saale) and the Center for Prenatal Diagnostics and Human Genetics Kurfürstendamm 199. Available datasets from the three study locations were identified and reference curves were generated using the LMS method. Measured values were correlated with age of gestation, and a cubic model and Box-Cox power transformation (L), the median (M) and the coefficient of variation (S) were used to smooth the curves. 103 720 Doppler examinations of the UA carried out in singleton pregnancies from the 11th week of gestation (10 + 1 GW) were analyzed. The mean pulsatility index (Mean PI) showed a continuous decline over the course of pregnancy, dropping to a plateau of around 0.84 between the 23rd and 27th GW, after which it decreased again. Age of gestation, placental position, position of pulsed Doppler gates and branching of

  17. CSF HYPOCRETIN CONCENTRATION IN VARIOUS NEUROLOGICAL AND SLEEP DISORDERS

    OpenAIRE

    Tsutsui, Kou; Kanbayashi, Takashi; Sawaishi, Yukio; Tokunaga, Jun; Sato, Masahiro; Shimizu, Tetsuo

    2011-01-01

    Recent CSF and postmortem brain hypocretin measurements in human narcolepsy suggest that hypocretin deficiency is involved in the pathophysiology of the disease. Thus, it is important to study whether neurological disorders also have abnormal CSF hypocretin levels. We therefore measured hypocretins in the CSF of various neurological disorders and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) to identify altered hypocretin levels. CSF hypocretin levels in patients with OSAS and neurological diseases...

  18. [Effects of cell-mediated immunity induced by intramuscular chitosan-pJME/ GM-CSF nano-DNA vaccine in BAlb/c mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Yong-Zhen; Zhou, Yan; Ma, Li; Feng, Guo-He

    2014-07-01

    This study aimed to investigate the immune adjuvant effect and mechanism induced by chitosan nanoparticles carrying pJME/GM-CSF. In this study, plasmid DNA (pJME/GM-CSF) was encapsulated in chitosan to prepare chitosan-pJME/GM-CSF nanoparticles using a complex coacervation process. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect the type of infiltrating cells at the site of intramuscular injection. The phenotype and functional changes of splenic DCs were measured by flow cytometry after different immunogens were injected intramuscularly. The killing activity of CTLs was assessed using the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release assay. The preparation of chitosan-pJME/GM-CSF nanoparticles matched the expected theoretical results. Our results also found that, after pJME/GM-CSF injection, the incoming cells were a mixture of macrophages, neutrophils, and immature DCs. Meanwhile, pJME/GM-CSF increased the expression of MHC class II molecules on splenic DCs, and enhanced their Ag capture and presentation functions. Cell-mediated immunity was induced by the vaccine. Furthermore, chitosan-pJME/GM-CSF nanoparticles outperformed the administration of standard pJME/GM-CSF in terms of DC recruitment, antigen processing and presentation, and vaccine enhancement. These findings reveal that chitosan could be used as delivery vector for DNA vaccine intramuscular immunizations, and enhance pJME/GM-CSF-induced cellular immune responses.

  19. Evidence that iron accelerates Alzheimer's pathology: a CSF biomarker study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayton, Scott; Diouf, Ibrahima; Bush, Ashley Ian

    2018-05-01

    To investigate whether cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) ferritin (reporting brain iron) is associated with longitudinal changes in CSF β-amyloid (Aβ) and tau. Mixed-effects models of CSF Aβ 1-42 and tau were constructed using data from 296 participants who had baseline measurement of CSF ferritin and annual measurement of CSF tau and Aβ 1-42 for up to 5 years. In subjects with biomarker-confirmed Alzheimer's pathology, high CSF ferritin (>6.2 ng/mL) was associated with accelerated depreciation of CSF Aβ 1-42 (reporting increased plaque formation; p=0.0001). CSF ferritin was neither associated with changes in CSF tau in the same subjects, nor longitudinal changes in CSF tau or Aβ 1-42 in subjects with low baseline pathology. In simulation modelling of the natural history of Aβ deposition, which we estimated to occur over 31.4 years, we predicted that it would take 12.6 years to reach the pathology threshold value of CSF Aβ from healthy normal levels, and this interval is not affected by CSF ferritin. CSF ferritin influences the fall in CSF Aβ over the next phase, where high CSF ferritin accelerated the transition from threshold preclinical Aβ levels to the average level of Alzheimer's subjects from 18.8 to 10.8 years. Iron might facilitate Aβ deposition in Alzheimer's and accelerate the disease process. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  20. Experience With a Long-term Pulsatile Ventricular Assist Device as a Bridge to Heart Transplant in Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez Bueno, Manuel; Segovia Cubero, Javier; Serrano Fiz, Santiago; Ugarte Basterrechea, Juan; Hernández Pérez, Francisco José; Goirigolzarri Artaza, Josebe; Castedo Mejuto, Evaristo; Burgos Lázaro, Raúl; García Montero, Carlos; Moñivas Palomero, Vanessa; Mingo Santos, Susana; González Román, Ana Isabel; Álvarez Avelló, José Manuel; Vidal Fernández, Mercedes; Forteza Gil, Alberto; Alonso-Pulpón, Luis

    2017-09-01

    Most long-term ventricular assist devices (VADs) that are currently implanted are intracorporeal continuous-flow devices. Their main limitations include their high cost and inability to provide biventricular support. The aim of this study was to describe the results of using paracorporeal pulsatile-flow VADs as a bridge to transplant (BTT) in adult patients. Retrospective analysis of the characteristics, complications, and outcomes of a single-center case series of consecutive patients treated with the EXCOR VAD as BTT between 2009 and 2015. During the study period, 25 VADs were implanted, 6 of them biventricular. Ventricular assist devices were indicated directly as a BTT in 12 patients and as a bridge to decision in 13 due to the presence of potentially reversible contraindications or chance of heart function recovery. Twenty patients (80%) were successfully bridged to heart transplant after a median of 112 days (range, 8-239). The main complications included infectious (52% of patients), neurological events (32%, half of them fatal), bleeding (28%), and VAD malfunction requiring component replacement (28%). Eighty percent of patients with the EXCOR VAD as BTT achieved the goal after an average of almost 4 months of support. The most frequent complications were infectious, and the most severe were neurological. In our enivonment, the use of these pulsatile-flow VAD as BTT is a feasible strategy that obtains similar outcomes to those of intracorporeal continuous-flow devices. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Rectification of pulsatile stress on soft tissues: a mechanism for normal-pressure hydrocephalus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalikop, Shreyas; Hilgenfeldt, Sascha

    2011-11-01

    Hydrocephalus is a pathological condition of the brain that occurs when cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) accumulates excessively in the brain cavities, resulting in compression of the brain parenchyma. Counter-intuitively, normal-pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) does not show elevated pressure differences across the compressed parenchyma. We investigate the effects of nonlinear tissue mechanics and periodic driving in this system. The latter is due to the cardiac cycle, which provides significant intracranial pressure and volume flow rate fluctuations. Nonlinear rectification of the periodic driving within a model of fluid flow in poroelastic material can lead to compression or expansion of the parenchyma, and this effect does not rely on changes in the mean intracranial pressure. The rectification effects can occur gradually over several days, in agreement with clinical studies of NPH.

  2. FEATURES OF LONG-TERM MECHANICAL CIRCULATORY SUPPORT WITH CONTINUOUS-FLOW PUMP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. P. Itkin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In a review of the comparative analysis of methods and tools for long-term mechanical circulatory support with continuous flow and pulsatile flow implantable pumps. Particular attention is paid to the choice of the optimal modes of the operation of pumps based on the physical principles of the interaction between a the steady flow of blood to the pulsatile mechanics of the heart chambers. 

  3. Gas exchange efficiency of an oxygenator with integrated pulsatile displacement blood pump for neonatal patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlanstein, Peter C; Borchardt, Ralf; Mager, Ilona; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Steinseifer, Ulrich; Arens, Jutta

    2014-01-01

    Oxygenators have been used in neonatal extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) since the 1970s. The need to develop a more effective oxygenator for this patient cohort exists due to their size and blood volume limitations. This study sought to validate the next design iteration of a novel oxygenator for neonatal ECMO with an integrated pulsatile displacement pump, thereby superseding an additional blood pump. Pulsating blood flow within the oxygenator is generated by synchronized active air flow expansion and contraction of integrated silicone pump tubes and hose pinching valves located at the oxygenator inlet and outlet. The current redesign improved upon previous prototypes by optimizing silicone pump tube distribution within the oxygenator fiber bundle; introduction of an oval shaped inner fiber bundle core, and housing; and a higher fiber packing density, all of which in combination reduced the priming volume by about 50% (50 to 27 mL and 41 to 20 mL, respectively). Gas exchange efficiency was tested for two new oxygenators manufactured with different fiber materials: one with coating and one with smaller pore size, both capable of long-term use (OXYPLUS® and CELGARD®). Results demonstrated that the oxygen transfer for both oxygenators was 5.3-24.7 mlO2/min for blood flow ranges of 100-500 mlblood/min. Carbon dioxide transfer for both oxygenators was 3.7-26.3 mlCO2/min for the same blood flow range. These preliminary results validated the oxygenator redesign by demonstrating an increase in packing density and thus in gas transfer, an increase in pumping capacity and a reduction in priming volume.

  4. Specific Contributions of CSF-1 and GM-CSF to the Dynamics of the Mononuclear Phagocyte System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, Cynthia; Cook, Andrew D; Lacey, Derek; Fleetwood, Andrew J; Vlahos, Ross; Anderson, Gary P; Hamilton, John A

    2015-07-01

    M-CSF (or CSF-1) and GM-CSF can regulate the development and function of the mononuclear phagocyte system (MPS). To address some of the outstanding and sometimes conflicting issues surrounding this biology, we undertook a comparative analysis of the effects of neutralizing mAbs to these CSFs on murine MPS populations in the steady-state and during acute inflammatory reactions. CSF-1 neutralization, but not of GM-CSF, in normal mice rapidly reduced the numbers of more mature Ly6C(-) monocytes in blood and bone marrow, without any effect on proliferating precursors, and also the numbers of the resident peritoneal macrophages, observations consistent with CSF-1 signaling being essential only at a relatively late state in steady-state MPS development; in contrast, GM-CSF neutralization had no effect on the numbers of these particular populations. In Ag-induced peritonitis (AIP), thioglycolate-induced peritonitis, and LPS-induced lung inflammation, CSF-1 neutralization lowered inflammatory macrophage number; in the AIP model, this reduced number was not due to suppressed proliferation. More detailed studies with the convenient AIP model indicated that CSF-1 neutralization led to a relatively uniform reduction in all inflammatory cell populations; GM-CSF neutralization, in contrast, was more selective, resulting in the preferential loss among the MPS populations of a cycling, monocyte-derived inflammatory dendritic cell population. Some mechanistic options for the specific CSF-dependent biologies enumerated are discussed. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  5. Distinct Properties of Human M-CSF and GM-CSF Monocyte-Derived Macrophages to Simulate Pathological Lung Conditions In Vitro: Application to Systemic and Inflammatory Disorders with Pulmonary Involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lescoat, Alain; Ballerie, Alice; Augagneur, Yu; Morzadec, Claudie; Vernhet, Laurent; Fardel, Olivier; Jégo, Patrick; Jouneau, Stéphane; Lecureur, Valérie

    2018-03-17

    Macrophages play a central role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory and fibrotic lung diseases. However, alveolar macrophages (AM) are poorly available in humans to perform in vitro studies due to a limited access to broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL). In this study, to identify the best alternative in vitro model for human AM, we compared the phenotype of AM obtained from BAL of patients suffering from three lung diseases (lung cancers, sarcoidosis and Systemic Sclerosis (SSc)-associated interstitial lung disease) to human blood monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) differentiated with M-CSF or GM-CSF. The expression of eight membrane markers was evaluated by flow cytometry. Globally, AM phenotype was closer to GM-CSF MDMs. However, the expression levels of CD163, CD169, CD204, CD64 and CD36 were significantly higher in SSc-ILD than in lung cancers. Considering the expression of CD204 and CD36, the phenotype of SSc-AM was closer to MDMs, from healthy donors or SSc patients, differentiated by M-CSF rather than GM-CSF. The comparative secretion of IL-6 by SSc-MDMs and SSc-AM is concordant with these phenotypic considerations. Altogether, these results support the M-CSF MDM model as a relevant in vitro alternative to simulate AM in fibrotic disorders such as SSc.

  6. Cerebrospinal fluid flow and production in patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus studied by MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gideon, P; Ståhlberg, F; Thomsen, C

    1994-01-01

    An interleaved velocity-sensitised fast low-angle shot pulse sequence was used to study cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow in the cerebral aqueduct, and supratentorial CSF production in 9 patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) and 9 healthy volunteers. The peak aqueduct CSF flow, both caudal...

  7. Steady-streaming effects on the motion of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in the spinal canal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Jenna; Coenen, Wilfried; Sanchez, Antonio; Lasheras, Juan

    2017-11-01

    With each heart beat the oscillatory blood supply to the rigid cranial vault produces a time-periodic variation of the intracranial pressure that drives the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) periodically in and out of the compliant spinal canal. We have recently conducted an analysis of this flow-structure interaction problem taking advantage of the small compliance of the dura membrane bounding externally the CSF and of the disparity of length scales associated with the geometry of the subarachnoid space. We have shown in an idealized geometry that the steady-streaming motion associated with this periodic flow, resulting from the nonlinear cumulative effects of convective acceleration, causes a bulk recirculation of CSF inside the spinal canal, which has been observed in many radiological studies. We extend here our study to investigate the possible contribution arising from the flow around the nerve roots protruding from the spinal cord, an effect that was neglected in our previous work. For this purpose, we consider the oscillatory motion around a cylindrical post confined between two parallel plates. For large values of the relevant Strouhal number we find at leading order a harmonic Stokes flow, whereas steady-streaming effects enter in the first-order corrections, which are computed for realistic values of the Womersley number and of the cylinder height-to-radius ratio.

  8. Dynamic time warping and machine learning for signal quality assessment of pulsatile signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Q; Clifford, G D

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we describe a beat-by-beat method for assessing the clinical utility of pulsatile waveforms, primarily recorded from cardiovascular blood volume or pressure changes, concentrating on the photoplethysmogram (PPG). Physiological blood flow is nonstationary, with pulses changing in height, width and morphology due to changes in heart rate, cardiac output, sensor type and hardware or software pre-processing requirements. Moreover, considerable inter-individual and sensor-location variability exists. Simple template matching methods are therefore inappropriate, and a patient-specific adaptive initialization is therefore required. We introduce dynamic time warping to stretch each beat to match a running template and combine it with several other features related to signal quality, including correlation and the percentage of the beat that appeared to be clipped. The features were then presented to a multi-layer perceptron neural network to learn the relationships between the parameters in the presence of good- and bad-quality pulses. An expert-labeled database of 1055 segments of PPG, each 6 s long, recorded from 104 separate critical care admissions during both normal and verified arrhythmic events, was used to train and test our algorithms. An accuracy of 97.5% on the training set and 95.2% on test set was found. The algorithm could be deployed as a stand-alone signal quality assessment algorithm for vetting the clinical utility of PPG traces or any similar quasi-periodic signal. (paper)

  9. Dynamic time warping and machine learning for signal quality assessment of pulsatile signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Q; Clifford, G D

    2012-09-01

    In this work, we describe a beat-by-beat method for assessing the clinical utility of pulsatile waveforms, primarily recorded from cardiovascular blood volume or pressure changes, concentrating on the photoplethysmogram (PPG). Physiological blood flow is nonstationary, with pulses changing in height, width and morphology due to changes in heart rate, cardiac output, sensor type and hardware or software pre-processing requirements. Moreover, considerable inter-individual and sensor-location variability exists. Simple template matching methods are therefore inappropriate, and a patient-specific adaptive initialization is therefore required. We introduce dynamic time warping to stretch each beat to match a running template and combine it with several other features related to signal quality, including correlation and the percentage of the beat that appeared to be clipped. The features were then presented to a multi-layer perceptron neural network to learn the relationships between the parameters in the presence of good- and bad-quality pulses. An expert-labeled database of 1055 segments of PPG, each 6 s long, recorded from 104 separate critical care admissions during both normal and verified arrhythmic events, was used to train and test our algorithms. An accuracy of 97.5% on the training set and 95.2% on test set was found. The algorithm could be deployed as a stand-alone signal quality assessment algorithm for vetting the clinical utility of PPG traces or any similar quasi-periodic signal.

  10. Recent Advancement and Technological Aspects of Pulsatile Drug Delivery System - A Laconic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandit, Vinay; Kumar, Ajay; Ashawat, Mahendra S; Verma, Chander P; Kumar, Pravin

    2017-01-01

    Pulsatile drug delivery system (PDDS) shows potential significance in the field of drug delivery to release the maximum amount of drug at a definite site and at specific time. PDDS are mainly time controlled delivery devices having a definite pause period for drug release, which is not affected by acidity, alkalinity, motility and enzymes present in the gastrointestinal tract. Pulsatile medication possess the potential to deliver the drugs in the therapy of diseases where drug dose is essential during sleep, drugs having greater first pass metabolism and absorption at precise location in digestive tract. The review article, discuss the general concepts, marketed formulations and patents or any other recent advancement in pulsatile release technology. It also highlights on diseases requiring therapy by pulsatile release, various researches on herbal pulsatile formulations and quality control aspects of PDDS. Pulsatile medication possess the potential to deliver the drugs in the therapy of diseases where drug dose is essential during sleep, drugs having greater first pass metabolism and absorption at precise location in digestive tract. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  11. Cerebrovascular blood oxygenation level dependent pulsatility at baseline and following acute exercise among healthy adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theyers, Athena E; Goldstein, Benjamin I; Metcalfe, Arron Ws; Robertson, Andrew D; MacIntosh, Bradley J

    2018-01-01

    Arterial stiffness is linked to cerebral small vessel damage and neurodegeneration, but barriers to accessing deep cerebrovascular anatomy limit our ability to assess the brain. This study describes an adaptation of a cardiac-related scrubbing method as a means of generating blood oxygenation level-dependent pulsatility maps based on the cardiac cycle. We examine BOLD pulsatility at rest, based on the non-parametric deviation from null metric, as well as changes following acute physiological stress from 20 min of moderate-intensity cycling in 45 healthy adolescents. We evaluate the influence of repetition time (TR) and echo time (TE) using simulated and multi-echo empirical data, respectively. There were tissue-specific and voxel-wise BOLD pulsatility decreases 20 min following exercise cessation. BOLD pulsatility detection was comparable over a range of TR and TE values when scan volumes were kept constant; however, short TRs (≤500 ms) and TEs (∼14 ms) acquisitions would yield the most efficient detection. Results suggest cardiac-related BOLD pulsatility may represent a robust and easily adopted method of mapping cerebrovascular pulsatility with voxel-wise resolution.

  12. Research Upregulation of CD23 (FcεRII Expression in Human Airway Smooth Muscle Cells (huASMC in Response to IL-4, GM-CSF, and IL-4/GM-CSF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lew D Betty

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Airway smooth muscle cells play a key role in remodeling that contributes to airway hyperreactivity. Airway smooth muscle remodeling includes hypertrophy and hyperplasia. It has been previously shown that the expression of CD23 on ASMC in rabbits can be induced by the IgE component of the atopic serum. We examined if other components of atopic serum are capable of inducing CD23 expression independent of IgE. Methods Serum starved huASMC were stimulated with either IL-4, GM-CSF, IL-13, IL-5, PGD2, LTD4, tryptase or a combination of IL-4, IL-5, IL-13 each with GM-CSF for a period of 24 h. CD23 expression was analyzed by flow cytometry, western blot, and indirect immunofluorescence. Results The CD23 protein expression was upregulated in huASMC in response to IL-4, GM-CSF, and IL-4/GM-CSF. The percentage of cells with increased fluorescence intensity above the control was 25.1 ± 4.2% (IL-4, 15.6 ± 2.7% (GM-CSF and 32.9 ± 13.9% (IL-4/GMCSF combination(n = 3. The protein content of IL-4/GMCSF stimulated cells was significantly elevated. Expression of CD23 in response to IL-4, GM-CSF, IL-4/GM-CSF was accompanied by changes in cell morphology including depolymerization of isoactin fibers, cell spreading, and membrane ruffling. Western blot revealed abundant expression of the IL-4Rα and a low level expression of IL-2Rγc in huASMC. Stimulation with IL-4 resulted in the phosphorylation of STAT-6 and an increase in the expression of the IL-2Rγc. Conclusion CD23 on huASMC is upregulated by IL-4, GM-CSF, and IL-4/GM-CSF. The expression of CD23 is accompanied by an increase in cell volume and an increase in protein content per cell, suggesting hypertrophy. Upregulation of CD23 by IL-4/GM-CSF results in phenotypic changes in huASMC that could play a role in cell migration or a change in the synthetic function of the cells. Upregulation of CD23 in huASMC by IL-4 and GM-CSF can contribute to changes in huASMC and may provide an avenue

  13. Timing of CSF-1/CSF-1R signaling blockade is critical to improving responses to CTLA-4 based immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmgaard, Rikke B.; Brachfeld, Alexandra; Gasmi, Billel; Jones, David R.; Mattar, Marissa; Doman, Thompson; Murphy, Mary; Schaer, David; Wolchok, Jedd D.; Merghoub, Taha

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Colony stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1) is produced by a variety of cancers and recruits myeloid cells that suppress antitumor immunity, including myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs.) Here, we show that both CSF-1 and its receptor (CSF-1R) are frequently expressed in tumors from cancer patients, and that this expression correlates with tumor-infiltration of MDSCs. Furthermore, we demonstrate that these tumor-infiltrating MDSCs are highly immunosuppressive but can be reprogrammed toward an antitumor phenotype in vitro upon CSF-1/CSF-1R signaling blockade. Supporting these findings, we show that inhibition of CSF-1/CSF-1R signaling using an anti-CSF-1R antibody can regulate both the number and the function of MDSCs in murine tumors in vivo. We further find that treatment with anti-CSF-1R antibody induces antitumor T-cell responses and tumor regression in multiple tumor models when combined with CTLA-4 blockade therapy. However, this occurs only when administered after or concurrent with CTLA-4 blockade, indicating that timing of each therapeutic intervention is critical for optimal antitumor responses. Importantly, MDSCs present within murine tumors after CTLA-4 blockade showed increased expression of CSF-1R and were capable of suppressing T cell proliferation, and CSF-1/CSF-1R expression in the human tumors was not reduced after treatment with CTLA-4 blockade immunotherapy. Taken together, our findings suggest that CSF-1R-expressing MDSCs can be targeted to modulate the tumor microenvironment and that timing of CSF-1/CSF-1R signaling blockade is critical to improving responses to checkpoint based immunotherapy. Significance: Infiltration by immunosuppressive myeloid cells contributes to tumor immune escape and can render patients resistant or less responsive to therapeutic intervention with checkpoint blocking antibodies. Our data demonstrate that blocking CSF-1/CSF-1R signaling using a monoclonal antibody directed to CSF-1R can regulate both the number

  14. The influence of protein malnutrition on the production of GM-CSF and M-CSF by macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalila Cunha de Oliveira

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT It is well established that protein malnutrition (PM impairs immune defenses and increases susceptibility to infection. Macrophages are cells that play a central role in innate immunity, constituting one of the first barriers against infections. Macrophages produce several soluble factors, including cytokines and growth factors, important to the immune response. Among those growth factors, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF. GM-CSF and M-CSF are important to monocyte and macrophage development and stimulation of the immune response process. Knowing the importance of GM-CSF and M-CSF, we sought to investigate the influence of PM on macrophage production of these growth factors. Two-month-old male BALB/c mice were subjected to PM with a low-protein diet (2% and compared to a control diet (12% mouse group. Nutritional status, hemogram and the number of peritoneal cells were evaluated. Additionally, peritoneal macrophages were cultured and the production of GM-CSF and M-CSF and mRNA expression were evaluated. To determine if PM altered macrophage production of GM-CSF and M-CSF, they were stimulated with TNF-α. The PM animals had anemia, leukopenia and a reduced number of peritoneal cells. The production of M-CSF was not different between groups; however, cells from PM animals, stimulated with or without TNF-α, presented reduced capability to produce GM-CSF. These data imply that PM interferes with the production of GM-CSF, and consequently would affect the production and maturation of hematopoietic cells and the immune response.

  15. Pivotal Roles of GM-CSF in Autoimmunity and Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiomi, Aoi; Usui, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a hematopoietic growth factor, which stimulates the proliferation of granulocytes and macrophages from bone marrow precursor cells. In autoimmune and inflammatory diseases, Th17 cells have been considered as strong inducers of tissue inflammation. However, recent evidence indicates that GM-CSF has prominent proinflammatory functions and that this growth factor (not IL-17) is critical for the pathogenicity of CD4+ T cells. Therefore, the mechanism of GM-CSF-producing CD4+ T cell differentiation and the role of GM-CSF in the development of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases are gaining increasing attention. This review summarizes the latest knowledge of GM-CSF and its relationship with autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. The potential therapies targeting GM-CSF as well as their possible side effects have also been addressed in this review. PMID:25838639

  16. Comparison of the Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) Toluidine Red Unheated Serum Test and the CSF Rapid Plasma Reagin Test with the CSF Venereal Disease Research Laboratory Test for Diagnosis of Neurosyphilis among HIV-Negative Syphilis Patients in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lin; Gu, Xin; Peng, Rui-Rui; Wang, Cuini; Gao, Zixiao; Gao, Ying; Shi, Mei; Guan, Zhifang; Seña, Arlene C.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to investigate the performance of nontreponemal antibody tests in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) specimens from syphilis patients. From September 2009 to September 2012, CSF specimens were collected at the Shanghai Skin Disease Hospital in Shanghai, China, from 1,132 syphilis patients without HIV infection, including 154 with symptomatic and 56 with asymptomatic neurosyphilis. All of the CSF specimens underwent testing with a rapid plasma reagin (RPR) test, an RPR-V (commercial RPR antigen diluted 1:2 in 10% saline) test, the toluidine red unheated serum test (TRUST), and the Venereal Disease Research Laboratory (VDRL) test. Specificities, sensitivities, positive predictive values (PPVs), negative predictive values (NPVs), and kappa values were calculated to determine the performances of the tests. We compared results of the CSF-VDRL, CSF-RPR, CSF-RPR-V, and CSF-TRUST among patients with symptomatic and asymptomatic neurosyphilis who had reactive CSF-Treponema pallidum particle agglutination (TPPA) test results. Overall, the CSF-VDRL test was reactive in 261 patients (23.1%). There were no cases in which the CSF-VDRL was nonreactive and CSF-RPR, CSF-RPR-V, or CSF-TRUST was reactive. Agreement between the results of CSF-TRUST and CSF-RPR was almost perfect (κ = 0.861), with substantial agreement between the results of CSF-RPR and CSF-RPR-V (κ = 0.740). The sensitivities of CSF-VDRL, CSF-RPR, CSF-RPR-V, and CSF-TRUST were 81.4%, 76.2%, 79.5%, and 76.2%, respectively. Compared to CSF-VDRL, CSF-RPR, CSF-RPR-V, and CSF-TRUST had comparable PPVs and NPVs. However, the specificity of CSF-VDRL (90.3%) was significantly lower than those of the other tests (92.7 to 93.4%). Therefore, CSF-RPR, CSF-RPR-V, and CSF-TRUST can be considered alternative tests for neurosyphilis diagnosis in HIV-negative populations, particularly when the CSF-VDRL is not available. PMID:24335955

  17. Characterization of lipoproteins in human and canine cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitas, R.E.; Weisgraber, K.H.; Boyles, J.K.; Lee, S.; Mahley, R.W.

    1986-01-01

    Previously the authors demonstrated that rat brain astrocytes in vitro synthesize and secrete apo-E and possess apo-B,E(LDL) receptors. The apo-E secreted by astrocytes and apo-E in rat brain extracts differed from serum apo-E in two respects. Brain apo-E had a higher apparent molecular weight and a higher percentage of more acidic isoforms. To characterize further the apo-E within the central nervous system, apo-E in human and canine CSF was investigated. Compared to plasma apo-E, CSF apo-E had a higher apparent M/sub r/ and a higher percentage of acidic isoforms which were sialylated, as shown by neuraminidase digestion. The apo-E in human CSF was approx.5-10% of the plasma level. In CSF 60-80% of the apo-E was in lipoproteins with d = 1.09-1.15. The remainder of the apo-E was in the d > 1.21 fraction. Human CSF lipoproteins were primarily spherical (110-190 A) while canine CSF lipoproteins were a mixture of discs (205 x 65 A) while canine CSF lipoproteins were a mixture of discs (205 x 65 A) and spheres (100-150 A). The CSF also contained apo-AI in the d = 1.09-1.15 g/ml fraction. Human CSF lipoproteins containing both apo-E and apo-AI were isolated on an anti-apo-E affinity column, suggesting that apo-E and AI occurred in the same particles. The CSF apo-E-containing lipoproteins competed for binding of 125 I-LDL to the apo-B,E(LDL) receptor. There was no detectable apo-B in CSF. These data suggest that CSF lipoproteins might transport lipid and regulate lipid homeostasis within the brain

  18. Cilia driven flow networks in the brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong; Faubel, Regina; Westendorf, Chrsitian; Eichele, Gregor; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    Neurons exchange soluble substances via the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) that fills the ventricular system. The walls of the ventricular cavities are covered with motile cilia that constantly beat and thereby induce a directional flow. We recently discovered that cilia in the third ventricle generate a complex flow pattern leading to partitioning of the ventricular volume and site-directed transport paths along the walls. Transient and daily recurrent alterations in the cilia beating direction lead to changes in the flow pattern. This has consequences for delivery of CSF components along the near wall flow. The contribution of this cilia-induced flow to overall CSF flow remains to be investigated. The state-of-art lattice Boltzmann method is adapted for studying the CFS flow. The 3D geometry of the third ventricle at high resolution was reconstructed. Simulation of CSF flow without cilia in this geometry confirmed that the previous idea about unidirectional flow does not explain how different components of CSF can be delivered to their various target sites. We study the contribution of the cilia-induced flow pattern to overall CSF flow and identify target areas for site-specific delivery of CSF-constituents with respect to the temporal changes.

  19. CT evaluation of sigmoid plate dehiscence causing pulsatile tinnitus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Pengfei; Lv, Han; Dong, Cheng; Wang, Zhenchang [Capital Medical University, Department of Radiology, Beijing Friendship Hospital, Beijing (China); Niu, Yantao; Xian, Junfang [Capital Medical University, Department of Radiology, Beijing Tongren Hospital, Beijing (China)

    2016-01-15

    To evaluate the characteristics of sigmoid plate dehiscence (SPD) causing pulsatile tinnitus (PT) on CT arteriography and venography (CTA + V). Thirty PT patients treated successfully with SPD reconstruction were enrolled. Sixty asymptomatic patients were matched. The location, extent, number of SPD cases and concomitant signs, including venous outflow dominance, transverse sinus stenosis, high jugular bulb, temporal bone pneumatization, height of pituitary gland and pituitary fossa, abnormal mastoid emissary vein, were detected and compared using CTA + V. More than one SPD was found on the symptomatic side in 13/30 PT patients (43.3 %). The upper segment of the sigmoid plate was involved in 29/44 SPDs in the vertical direction (65.9 %); the lateral wall was involved in 38/44 SPDs in the horizontal direction (86.4 %). Singular SPD was detected in 3/60 asymptomatic patients (1.67 ± 0.35 mm{sup 2}), less so in PT patients (7.97 ± 5.17 mm{sup 2}). Compared with the control group, ipsilateral venous outflow dominance, high jugular bulb and bilateral transverse sinus stenosis were more common in the PT group, together with deeper pituitary fossa and flatter pituitary glands. SPD causing PT has characteristic CT findings. It may be generated by vascular or intracranial pressure abnormalities and act as a common key to triggering PT's perception. (orig.)

  20. Measurement of pulsatile motion with millisecond resolution by MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souchon, Rémi; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael; Salomir, Rares; Chapelon, Jean-Yves; Rouvière, Olivier

    2012-06-01

    We investigated a technique based on phase-contrast cine MRI combined with deconvolution of the phase shift waveforms to measure rapidly varying pulsatile motion waveforms. The technique does not require steady-state displacement during motion encoding. Simulations and experiments were performed in porcine liver samples in view of a specific application, namely the observation of transient displacements induced by acoustic radiation force. Simulations illustrate the advantages and shortcomings of the methods. For experimental validation, the waveforms were acquired with an ultrafast ultrasound scanner (Supersonic Imagine Aixplorer), and the rates of decay of the waveforms (relaxation time) were compared. With bipolar motion-encoding gradient of 8.4 ms, the method was able to measure displacement waveforms with a temporal resolution of 1 ms over a time course of 40 ms. Reasonable agreement was found between the rate of decay of the waveforms measured in ultrasound (2.8 ms) and in MRI (2.7-3.3 ms). Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. CT evaluation of sigmoid plate dehiscence causing pulsatile tinnitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Pengfei; Lv, Han; Dong, Cheng; Wang, Zhenchang; Niu, Yantao; Xian, Junfang

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the characteristics of sigmoid plate dehiscence (SPD) causing pulsatile tinnitus (PT) on CT arteriography and venography (CTA + V). Thirty PT patients treated successfully with SPD reconstruction were enrolled. Sixty asymptomatic patients were matched. The location, extent, number of SPD cases and concomitant signs, including venous outflow dominance, transverse sinus stenosis, high jugular bulb, temporal bone pneumatization, height of pituitary gland and pituitary fossa, abnormal mastoid emissary vein, were detected and compared using CTA + V. More than one SPD was found on the symptomatic side in 13/30 PT patients (43.3 %). The upper segment of the sigmoid plate was involved in 29/44 SPDs in the vertical direction (65.9 %); the lateral wall was involved in 38/44 SPDs in the horizontal direction (86.4 %). Singular SPD was detected in 3/60 asymptomatic patients (1.67 ± 0.35 mm 2 ), less so in PT patients (7.97 ± 5.17 mm 2 ). Compared with the control group, ipsilateral venous outflow dominance, high jugular bulb and bilateral transverse sinus stenosis were more common in the PT group, together with deeper pituitary fossa and flatter pituitary glands. SPD causing PT has characteristic CT findings. It may be generated by vascular or intracranial pressure abnormalities and act as a common key to triggering PT's perception. (orig.)

  2. Epithelial GM-CSF induction by Candida glabrata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L; Dongari-Bagtzoglou, A

    2009-08-01

    The main cytokine induced by the interaction of oral epithelial cells with C. glabrata is granulocyte monocyte colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF); however, the mechanisms regulating this response are unknown. Based on previously published information on the interactions of C. albicans with oral epithelial cells, we hypothesized that interaction with viable C. glabrata triggers GM-CSF synthesis via NF-kappaB activation. We found that C. glabrata-induced GM-CSF synthesis was adhesion-dependent, enhanced by endocytosis, and required fungal viability. NF-kappaB activation was noted during interaction of epithelial cells with C. glabrata, and pre-treatment with an NF-kappaB inhibitor partly inhibited GM-CSF synthesis. Blocking TLR4 with anti-TLR4 antibody did not inhibit GM-CSF production. In contrast, an anti-CDw17 antibody triggered significant inhibition of NF-kappaB activation and GM-CSF synthesis. beta-glucans did not stimulate GM-CSF synthesis, suggesting that the CDw17/NF-kappaB/GM-CSF pathway may be beta-glucan-independent. This study provides new insights into the mechanism of GM-CSF induction by C. glabrata.

  3. Radiologic assessment of spinal CSF leakage in spontaneous intracranial hypotension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Chang Jin; Kim, Ji Hyung; Kim, Jang Sung; Kim, Sun Yong; Suh, Jung Ho

    1999-01-01

    To assess the usefulness of imaging modalities in the detection of spinal CSF leakage in spontaneous intracranial hypotension. Fifteen patients who complained of postural headache without any preceding cause showed typical brain MR findings of intracranial hypotension, including radiologically confirmed CSF leakage. All fifteen underwent brain MRI and radionuclide cisternography. CT myelography was performed in eight patients and spinal MRI in six. Medical records, imaging findings and the incidence of spinal CSF leakage during each modality were retrospectively reviewed. CSF leakage was most common at the cervicothoracic junction, where in seven of 15 cases it was seen on radionuclide cisternography as increased focal paraspinal activity. Leakage was noted at the mid-tho-racic level in three patients, at the upper thoracic level in two, and at the cervical and lumbar levels in the remaining two. In two patients multiple CSF leaks were noted, and in all, early radioactive accumulation in the bladder was visualized. CT myelography revealed extrathecal and paraspinal contrast leakage in three of eight patients, and among those who underwent spinal MRI, dural enhancement was observed at the site of CSF leakage in all six, abnormal CSF signal in the neural foramen in one, and epidural CSF collection in one. Radionuclide cisternography is a useful method for the detection of CSF leakage in spontaneous intracranial hypotension. CT myelography and spinal MRI help determine the precise location of leakage

  4. Occurrence of occult CSF leaks during standard FESS procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucher, S; Kugler, A; Probst, E; Epprecht, L; Stadler, R S; Holzmann, D; Soyka, M B

    2018-03-18

    To determine the incidence of occult cerebrospinal fluid leaks (CSF) after functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS) and to evaluate the diagnostic performance of beta2-transferrin in blood-contaminated conditions. Prospective cohort study. An analysis of 57 intraoperative samples using hydrogel 6 beta2-transferrin assay after FESS was undertaken. In case of CSF positive samples and continuing rhinorrhea, reanalysis after more than 1 year was conducted. In-vivo analysis of a primary spontaneous CSF leak sample took place to verify difficulties in detecting beta2-transferrin in blood-contaminated settings. Own titrations were performed to evaluate detection limits of CSF by beta2-transferrin and beta-trace protein assays in these settings. An incidence of 13% for occult CSF leaks after FESS was found. In blood-contaminated conditions, routine beta2-transferrin assays showed low sensitivity. In over 1 year follow-up, all samples were negative for CSF and none of them developed clinical relevant CSF leaks or meningitis. Occult and clinically irrelevant CSF leaks do occur in a significant proportion of patients during and shortly after FESS. Intra- and postoperatively, routine beta2-transferrin assays show low sensitivity. They should not be used in these settings. The clinical course of patients with occult CSF leaks indicated possibility of an uneventful follow-up.

  5. Comparing the performance characteristics of CSF-TRUST and CSF-VDRL for syphilis: a cross-sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Gu, Weiming; Yang, Yang; Wu, Lei; Yang, Sheng; Ng, Lai-King

    2013-01-01

    Objective In this study, we aimed to determine the performance characteristics of toluidine red unheated serum test on cerebrospinal fluids (CSF-TRUST) as compared to venereal disease research laboratory test on cerebrospinal fluids (CSF-VDRL) for laboratory the diagnosis of neurosyphilis. Design A cross-sectional study. Setting Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) clinics. Participants and methods CSF and serum samples were collected from 824 individual STD clinic patients who have syphili...

  6. The effect of CSF-1 administration on lung maturation in a mouse model of neonatal hyperoxia exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Christina V; Alikhan, Maliha A; O'Reilly, Megan; Sozo, Foula; Williams, Timothy M; Harding, Richard; Jenkin, Graham; Ricardo, Sharon D

    2014-09-06

    Lung immaturity due to preterm birth is a significant complication affecting neonatal health. Despite the detrimental effects of supplemental oxygen on alveolar formation, it remains an important treatment for infants with respiratory distress. Macrophages are traditionally associated with the propagation of inflammatory insults, however increased appreciation of their diversity has revealed essential functions in development and regeneration. Macrophage regulatory cytokine Colony-Stimulating Factor-1 (CSF-1) was investigated in a model of neonatal hyperoxia exposure, with the aim of promoting macrophages associated with alveologenesis to protect/rescue lung development and function. Neonatal mice were exposed to normoxia (21% oxygen) or hyperoxia (Hyp; 65% oxygen); and administered CSF-1 (0.5 μg/g, daily × 5) or vehicle (PBS) in two treatment regimes; 1) after hyperoxia from postnatal day (P)7-11, or 2) concurrently with five days of hyperoxia from P1-5. Lung structure, function and macrophages were assessed using alveolar morphometry, barometric whole-body plethysmography and flow cytometry. Seven days of hyperoxia resulted in an 18% decrease in body weight and perturbation of lung structure and function. In regime 1, growth restriction persisted in the Hyp + PBS and Hyp + CSF-1 groups, although perturbations in respiratory function were resolved by P35. CSF-1 increased CSF-1R+/F4/80+ macrophage number by 34% at P11 compared to Hyp + PBS, but was not associated with growth or lung structural rescue. In regime 2, five days of hyperoxia did not cause initial growth restriction in the Hyp + PBS and Hyp + CSF-1 groups, although body weight was decreased at P35 with CSF-1. CSF-1 was not associated with increased macrophages, or with functional perturbation in the adult. Overall, CSF-1 did not rescue the growth and lung defects associated with hyperoxia in this model; however, an increase in CSF-1R+ macrophages was not associated with an

  7. Uric acid association with pulsatile and steady components of central and peripheral blood pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepeytre, Fanny; Lavoie, Pierre-Luc; Troyanov, Stéphan; Madore, François; Agharazii, Mohsen; Goupil, Rémi

    2018-03-01

    Whether the cardiovascular risk attributed to elevated uric acid levels may be explained by changes in central and peripheral pulsatile and/or steady blood pressure (BP) components remains controversial. In a cross-sectional analysis of normotensive and untreated hypertensive participants of the CARTaGENE populational cohort, we examined the relationship between uric acid, and both pulsatile and steady components of peripheral and central BP, using sex-stratified linear regressions. Of the 20 004 participants, 10 161 individuals without antihypertensive or uric acid-lowering drugs had valid pulse wave analysis and serum uric acid levels. In multivariate analysis, pulsatile components of BP were not associated with uric acid levels, whereas steady components [mean BP (MBP), peripheral and central DBP] were all associated with higher levels of uric acid levels in women and men (all P uric acid levels but not for MBP-adjusted cSBP. Peripheral and cSBP, which are aggregate measures of pulsatile and steady BP, were also associated with uric acid levels in women (β = 0.063 and 0.072, respectively, both P uric acid levels. Serum uric acid levels appear to be associated with both central and peripheral steady but not pulsatile BP, regardless of sex.

  8. Computed tomography in the CSF seeding of brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Yoshio; Fujimoto, Masahito; Naruse, Shoji; Ueda, Satoshi; Hirakawa, Kimiyoshi

    1981-01-01

    In the past three years nine cases of brain tumors with CSF seeding have been revealed by computed tomography (CT). We have been analyzing the CT pattern of CSF seeding, CSF cytology, and spinal metastasis. The brain tumors were classified as follows: five medulloblastomas, two glioblastomas, one germinoma, and one meningeal carcinomatosis. Their CT patterns were divided into three groups: 1) diffuse seeding of the basal cisterns. 2) invasion of the ventricular wall. 3) solitary metastasis in the ventricle. The subarachnoid seeding included four medulloblastomas and one meningeal carcinomatosis. The second type of seeding included two glioblastomas and one germinoma. One medulloblastoma had a single metastasis in the lateral ventricle. In the medulloblastomas, the diffuse seeding of the basal cisterns was more common than the invasion of the ventricular wall or solitary metastasis in the ventricle. Medulloblastomas were also accompanied by spinal metastasis. Because there were many cases of spinal metastasis in the first type of seeding, we concluded that there was a definite correlation between the CSF seeding of the basal cisterns and spinal metastasis. Needless to say, CT was the most important method for the diagnosis of the CSF seeding of brain tumors. However, because there was a case of CSF seeding which had not been demonstrated by CT, we also emphasized the importance of neurological examination and CSF cytology in the diagnosis of the CSF seeding of brain tumors. (author)

  9. [Therapeutic use of hematopoietic growth factors. II. GM-CSF and G-CSF].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, B; Arock, M

    1998-01-01

    The second part of this review on haematopoietic growth factors is focused on the therapeutic use of GM-CSF and G-CSF. Such therapeutic applications have raised very great hopes for clinical haematology. However, it should not be forgotten that these haematopoietic growth factors, which are very costly, are powerful two-edged weapons capable of triggering a cascade of reactions, and have a field of activity that often goes beyond the single highly specific property which it is hoped they possess. The risks and costs of their use are currently being evaluated. Waited developments concerning these molecules focus on three axes: a best use of factors already commercialized, especially concerning adaptation of posologies and new indications, the development of hybrid molecules from already known haematopoietic growth factors, possessing the advantages of respective factors, but not their disadvantages, the discovery of new haematopoietic growth factors with potential therapeutic application.

  10. Human autologous in vitro models of glioma immunogene therapy using B7-2, GM-CSF, and IL12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parney, I.F.; Farr-Jones, M.A.; Kane, K.; Chang, L.-J.; Petruk, K.C.

    2002-01-01

    Cancer immunogene therapy is based on vaccination with radiated, autologous tumor cells transduced with immunostimulatory genes. To help determine an optimal glioma immunogene therapy strategy, we stimulated lymphocytes with autologous human glioma cells transduced with B7-2 (CD86), granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and/or interleukin-12 (IL12). A human glioma-derived cell culture (Ed147.BT) was transduced with B7-2, GM-CSF, and/or IL12 using retroviral vectors. Autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were co-cultured with irradiated gene-transduced tumor alone or a combination of radiated wild type and gene-transduced cells. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells proliferation was determined by serial cell counts. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells phenotype was assessed by flow cytometry for CD4, CD8, and CD16. Anti-tumor cytotoxicity was determined by chromium-51 ( 51 Cr) release assay. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells cell numbers all decreased during primary stimulation but tumor cells expressing B7-2 or GM-CSF consistently caused secondary proliferation. Tumors expressing B7-2 and GM-CSF or B7-2,GM-CSF,and IL12 consistently increased PBMC CD8+ (cytotoxic T) and CD16+ (natural killer) percentages. Interestingly, anti-tumor cytotoxicity only exceeded that of PBMC stimulated with wild type tumor alone when peripheral blood mononuclear cells were stimulated with both wild type tumor and B7-2/GM-CSF- (but not IL12) transduced cells. PBMC proliferation and phenotype is altered as expected by exposure to immunostimulatory gene-transduced tumor. However, transduced tumor cells alone do not stimulate greater anti-tumor cytotoxicity than wild type tumor. Only B7-2/GM-CSF-transduced cells combined with wild type produced increased cytotoxicity. This may reflect selection of turnor subclones with limited antigenic spectra during retrovirus-mediated gene transfer. (author)

  11. The pathway of subarachnoid CSF moving into the spinal parenchyma and the role of astrocytic aquaporin-4 in this process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Fang; Zhang, Cui; Xue, Rong; Shan, Lidong; Gong, Shan; Wang, Guoqing; Tao, Jin; Xu, Guangyin; Zhang, Guoxing; Wang, Linhui

    2017-08-01

    It has been proved that cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in the subarachnoid space could reenter the brain parenchyma via the perivascular space. The present study was designed to explore the pathway of subarachnoid CSF flux into the spinal cord and the potential role of aquaporin-4 (AQP4) in this process. Fluorescently tagged cadaverine, for the first time, was used to study CSF movement in mice. Following intracisternal infusion of CSF tracers, the cervical spinal cord was sliced and prepared for fluorescence imaging. Some sections were subject with immunostaining in order to observe tracer distribution and AQP4 expression. Fluorescently tagged cadaverine rapidly entered the spinal cord. Tracer influx into the spinal parenchyma was time dependent. At 10min post-infusion, cadaverine was largely distributed in the superficial tissue adjacent to the pial surface. At 70min post-infusion, cadaverine was distributed in the whole cord and especially concentrated in the gray matter. Furthermore, fluorescent tracer could enter the spinal parenchyma either along the perivascular space or across the pial surface. AQP4 was observed highly expressed in the astrocytic endfeet surrounding blood vessels and the pial surface. Blocking AQP4 by its specific inhibitor TGN-020 strikingly reduced the inflow of CSF tracers into the spinal cord. Subarachnoid CSF could flow into the spinal cord along the perivascular space or across the pial surface, in which AQP4 is involved. Our observation provides a basis for the study on CSF movement in the spinal cord when some neurological diseases occur. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. G-CSF treatment after myocardial infarction: impact on bone marrow-derived vs cardiac progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Stefan; Huber, Bruno C; Fischer, Rebekka; Groebner, Michael; Hacker, Marcus; David, Robert; Zaruba, Marc-Michael; Vallaster, Marcus; Rischpler, Christoph; Wilke, Andrea; Gerbitz, Armin; Franz, Wolfgang-Michael

    2008-06-01

    Besides its classical function in the field of autologous and allogenic stem cell transplantation, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) was shown to have protective effects after myocardial infarction (MI) by mobilization of bone marrow-derived progenitor cells (BMCs) and in addition by activation of multiple signaling pathways. In the present study, we focused on the impact of G-CSF on migration of BMCs and the impact on resident cardiac cells after MI. Mice (C57BL/6J) were sublethally irradiated, and BM from green fluorescent protein (GFP)-transgenic mice was transplanted. Coronary artery ligation was performed 10 weeks later. G-CSF (100 microg/kg) was daily injected for 6 days. Subpopulations of enhanced GFP(+) cells in peripheral blood, bone marrow, and heart were characterized by flow cytometry. Growth factor expression in the heart was analyzed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Perfusion was investigated in vivo by gated single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). G-CSF-treated animals revealed a reduced migration of c-kit(+) and CXCR-4(+) BMCs associated with decreased expression levels of the corresponding growth factors, namely stem cell factor and stromal-derived factor-1 alpha in ischemic myocardium. In contrast, the number of resident cardiac Sca-1(+) cells was significantly increased. However, SPECT-perfusion showed no differences in infarct size between G-CSF-treated and control animals 6 days after MI. Our study shows that G-CSF treatment after MI reduces migration capacity of BMCs into ischemic tissue, but increases the number of resident cardiac cells. To optimize homing capacity a combination of G-CSF with other agents may optimize cytokine therapy after MI.

  13. Risk score for identifying adults with CSF pleocytosis and negative CSF Gram stain at low risk for an urgent treatable cause

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hasbun, Rodrigo; Bijlsma, Merijn; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; Khoury, Nabil; Hadi, Christiane M.; van der Ende, Arie; Wootton, Susan H.; Salazar, Lucrecia; Hossain, Md Monir; Beilke, Mark; van de Beek, Diederik

    2013-01-01

    We aimed to derive and validate a risk score that identifies adults with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pleocytosis and a negative CSF Gram stain at low risk for an urgent treatable cause. Patients with CSF pleocytosis and a negative CSF Gram stain were stratified into a prospective derivation (n = 193)

  14. GM-CSF, IL-3 and G-CSF receptors on acute myeloid leukemia cells : function, regulation of expression, and ligand binding characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.M. Budel (Leo)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractIL-3, GM-CSF and G-CSF stimulate proliferation of human acute myeloid leukemia in vitro, but patterns of response among clinical cases are diverse. As described in Chapters 2 and 3, numbers and affinity of IL-3, GM-CSF and G-CSF receptors on cells of patients with AML were assessed and

  15. Stem Cell Mobilization with G-CSF versus Cyclophosphamide plus G-CSF in Mexican Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meraz, José Eugenio Vázquez; Arellano-Galindo, José; Avalos, Armando Martínez; Mendoza-García, Emma; Jiménez-Hernández, Elva

    2016-01-01

    Fifty-six aphaereses were performed in 23 pediatric patients with malignant hematological and solid tumors, following three different protocols for PBPC mobilization and distributed as follows: A: seventeen mobilized with 4 g/m(2) of cyclophosphamide (CFA) and 10 μg/kg/day of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), B: nineteen with CFA + G-CSF, and C: twenty only with G-CSF when the WBC count exceeded 10 × 10(9)/L. The average number of MNC/kg body weight (BW)/aphaeresis was 0.4 × 10(8) (0.1-1.4), 2.25 × 10(8) (0.56-6.28), and 1.02 × 10(8) (0.34-2.5) whereas the average number of CD34+ cells/kg BW/aphaeresis was 0.18 × 10(6)/kg (0.09-0.34), 1.04 × 10(6) (0.19-9.3), and 0.59 × 10(6) (0.17-0.87) and the count of CFU/kg BW/aphaeresis was 1.11 × 10(5) (0.31-2.12), 1.16 × 10(5) (0.64-2.97), and 1.12 × 10(5) (0.3-6.63) in groups A, B, and C, respectively. The collection was better in group B versus group A (p = 0.007 and p = 0.05, resp.) and in group C versus group A (p = 0.08 and p = 0.05, resp.). The collection of PBPCs was more effective in the group mobilized with CFM + G-CSF when the WBC exceeded 10 × 10(3)/μL in terms of MNC and CD34+ cells and there was no toxicity of the chemotherapy.

  16. Stem Cell Mobilization with G-CSF versus Cyclophosphamide plus G-CSF in Mexican Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Eugenio Vázquez Meraz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fifty-six aphaereses were performed in 23 pediatric patients with malignant hematological and solid tumors, following three different protocols for PBPC mobilization and distributed as follows: A: seventeen mobilized with 4 g/m2 of cyclophosphamide (CFA and 10 μg/kg/day of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF, B: nineteen with CFA + G-CSF, and C: twenty only with G-CSF when the WBC count exceeded 10 × 109/L. The average number of MNC/kg body weight (BW/aphaeresis was 0.4 × 108 (0.1–1.4, 2.25 × 108 (0.56–6.28, and 1.02 × 108 (0.34–2.5 whereas the average number of CD34+ cells/kg BW/aphaeresis was 0.18 × 106/kg (0.09–0.34, 1.04 × 106 (0.19–9.3, and 0.59 × 106 (0.17–0.87 and the count of CFU/kg BW/aphaeresis was 1.11 × 105 (0.31–2.12, 1.16 × 105 (0.64–2.97, and 1.12 × 105 (0.3–6.63 in groups A, B, and C, respectively. The collection was better in group B versus group A (p=0.007 and p=0.05, resp. and in group C versus group A (p=0.08 and p=0.05, resp.. The collection of PBPCs was more effective in the group mobilized with CFM + G-CSF when the WBC exceeded 10 × 103/μL in terms of MNC and CD34+ cells and there was no toxicity of the chemotherapy.

  17. The circulation of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in the spinal canal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Antonio L.; Martinez-Bazan, Carlos; Lasheras, Juan C.

    2016-11-01

    Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) is secreted in the choroid plexus in the lateral sinuses of the brain and fills the subarachnoid space bathing the external surfaces of the brain and the spinal canal. Absence of CSF circulation has been shown to impede its physiological function that includes, among others, supplying nutrients to neuronal and glial cells and removing the waste products of cellular metabolism. Radionuclide scanning images published by Di Chiro in 1964 showed upward migration of particle tracers from the lumbar region of the spinal canal, thereby suggesting the presence of an active bulk circulation responsible for bringing fresh CSF into the spinal canal and returning a portion of it to the cranial vault. However, the existence of this slow moving bulk circulation in the spinal canal has been a subject of dispute for the last 50 years. To date, there has been no physical explanation for the mechanism responsible for the establishment of such a bulk motion. We present a perturbation analysis of the flow in an idealized model of the spinal canal and show how steady streaming could be responsible for the establishment of such a circulation. The results of this analysis are compared to flow measurements conducted on in-vitro models of the spinal canal of adult humans.

  18. Variability of CSF Alzheimer's disease biomarkers: implications for clinical practice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie J B Vos

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF biomarkers are increasingly being used for diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD. OBJECTIVE: We investigated the influence of CSF intralaboratory and interlaboratory variability on diagnostic CSF-based AD classification of subjects and identified causes of this variation. METHODS: We measured CSF amyloid-β (Aβ 1-42, total tau (t-tau, and phosphorylated tau (p-tau by INNOTEST enzyme-linked-immunosorbent assays (ELISA in a memory clinic population (n = 126. Samples were measured twice in a single or two laboratories that served as reference labs for CSF analyses in the Netherlands. Predefined cut-offs were used to classify CSF biomarkers as normal or abnormal/AD pattern. RESULTS: CSF intralaboratory variability was higher for Aβ1-42 than for t-tau and p-tau. Reanalysis led to a change in biomarker classification (normal vs. abnormal of 26% of the subjects based on Aβ1-42, 10% based on t-tau, and 29% based on p-tau. The changes in absolute biomarker concentrations were paralleled by a similar change in levels of internal control samples between different assay lots. CSF interlaboratory variability was higher for p-tau than for Aβ1-42 and t-tau, and reanalysis led to a change in biomarker classification of 12% of the subjects based on Aβ1-42, 1% based on t-tau, and 22% based on p-tau. CONCLUSIONS: Intralaboratory and interlaboratory CSF variability frequently led to change in diagnostic CSF-based AD classification for Aβ1-42 and p-tau. Lot-to-lot variation was a major cause of intralaboratory variability. This will have implications for the use of these biomarkers in clinical practice.

  19. Functional changes in CSF volume estimated using measurement of water T2 relaxation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piechnik, S.K.; Evans, J.; Bary, L.H.; Wise, R.G.; Jezzard, P.

    2009-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) provides hydraulic suspension for the brain. The general concept of bulk CSF production, circulation, and reabsorption is well established, but the mechanisms of momentary CSF volume variation corresponding to vasoreactive changes are far less understood. Nine individuals

  20. Hypersensitivity reaction with intravenous GnRH after pulsatile subcutaneous GnRH treatment in male hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism.

    OpenAIRE

    Popović, V.; Milosević, Z.; Djukanović, R.; Micić, D.; Nesović, M.; Manojlović, D.; Djordjević, P.; Mićić, J.

    1988-01-01

    Chronic pulsatile subcutaneous administration of low doses of gonadotrophin releasing hormone (GnRH) is an effective therapy for men with hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism. Hypersensitivity reactions to GnRH are rare. We wish to report hypersensitivity reactions with intravenous GnRH after low dose subcutaneous pulsatile GnRH treatment in two men with hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism due to suprasellar disease.

  1. Simulation of a pulsatile total artificial heart: Development of a partitioned Fluid Structure Interaction model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonntag, Simon J.; Kaufmann, Tim A. S.; Büsen, Martin R.; Laumen, Marco; Linde, Torsten; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Steinseifer, Ulrich

    2013-04-01

    Heart disease is one of the leading causes of death in the world. Due to a shortage in donor organs artificial hearts can be a bridge to transplantation or even serve as a destination therapy for patients with terminal heart insufficiency. A pusher plate driven pulsatile membrane pump, the Total Artificial Heart (TAH) ReinHeart, is currently under development at the Institute of Applied Medical Engineering of RWTH Aachen University.This paper presents the methodology of a fully coupled three-dimensional time-dependent Fluid Structure Interaction (FSI) simulation of the TAH using a commercial partitioned block-Gauss-Seidel coupling package. Partitioned coupling of the incompressible fluid with the slender flexible membrane as well as a high fluid/structure density ratio of about unity led inherently to a deterioration of the stability (‘artificial added mass instability’). The objective was to conduct a stable simulation with high accuracy of the pumping process. In order to achieve stability, a combined resistance and pressure outlet boundary condition as well as the interface artificial compressibility method was applied. An analysis of the contact algorithm and turbulence condition is presented. Independence tests are performed for the structural and the fluid mesh, the time step size and the number of pulse cycles. Because of the large deformation of the fluid domain, a variable mesh stiffness depending on certain mesh properties was specified for the fluid elements. Adaptive remeshing was avoided. Different approaches for the mesh stiffness function are compared with respect to convergence, preservation of mesh topology and mesh quality. The resulting mesh aspect ratios, mesh expansion factors and mesh orthogonalities are evaluated in detail. The membrane motion and flow distribution of the coupled simulations are compared with a top-view recording and stereo Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) measurements, respectively, of the actual pump.

  2. [Effectiveness and safety of pulsatile GnRH pump therapy on female patients with IHH].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhaoxiang; Mao, Jiangfeng; Wu, Xueyan; Nie, Min; Huang, Bingkun; Xu, Hongli; Wang, Xi; Zheng, Junjie

    2015-11-10

    To investigate the therapeutic effect of pulsatile GnRH (gonadorelin) pump on female patients with idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (IHH). In this retrospective study, five female IHH patients were recruited. Patients were treated with pulsatile gonadorelin (10 µg per 90 min) via a pump for at least 12 weeks. Serum gonadotropins and sex steroid levels were measured, and menses were recorded. After one-week treatment, luteinizing hormone (LH) level increased from (2.2 ± 2.0) U/L to (5.4 ± 2.5) U/L (P=0.028), follicle-stimulating hormone(FSH) level increased from (3.7 ± 2.7) U/L to(6.3 ± 1.0) U/L (P=0.162), and estradiol (E2) level increased from (58 ± 13) pmol/L to (260 ± 97) pmol/L (P=0.011). Menstrual bleeding was observed in 4 patients after starting treatment for 35-55 days and two natural pregnancies were reported. No menstrual bleeding was reported in another patient. The frequency of pulsatile GnRH had to be adjusted according to endogenous GnRH secretion during the follicular phase of normal women and regular menses were induced. Pulsatile GnRH is effective in treating female IHH. A constant frequency of pulsatile GnRH is suitable for most of IHH patients. However, for those who failed to produce regular menses, adjusting pulsatile frequency to imitate the physiological rhythm of GnRH may be an alternative option.

  3. Evaluation of hepatic venous pulsatility and portal venous velocity with doppler ultrasonography during the puerperium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pekindil, Goekhan [Department of Radiology, Trakya University School of Medicine, 22030 Edirne (Turkey); Varol, Fuesun G. [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Trakya University School of Medicine, 22030 Edirne (Turkey); Ali Yuece, M. [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Trakya University School of Medicine, 22030 Edirne (Turkey); Yardim, Turgut [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Trakya University School of Medicine, 22030 Edirne (Turkey)

    1999-03-01

    Objective: The aim of this study is to evaluate pregnancy-induced changes of hepatic venous pulsatility and portal venous velocity in the puerperium and to determine if these changes disappeared by the end of the puerperium. Methods and material: Healthy normal volunteers (90) were examined on the 2nd and 7th days of puerperium and between the 6th and 8th weeks postpartum. Doppler waveform patterns were obtained in the middle hepatic vein and main portal vein. The hepatic venous pulsatility was named as normal, damped or flat. Results: On the 2nd day postpartum, the hepatic vein pulsatility was shown as normal in 8 (26%), damped in 11 (37%) and flat in 11 (37%) cases. On the 7th day postpartum, 15 (50%) cases had normal, 9 (30%) cases had dampened, and 6 (20%) cases had still flat pattern. The majority of the cases (60%) displayed normal hepatic venous pulsatility in the 6th and 8th weeks of puerperium, whereas 23% had still dampened and 17% had flat patterns. There was a trend toward normal pulsatility with increasing puerperal age. The mean portal venous velocity was still higher than the non-pregnant levels and did not showed significant alterations during puerperium. Conclusion: This study emphasised that, since pregnancy-induced alterations in hepatic venous pulsatility and portal venous velocity had not completely returned to normal in most cases until the end of the puerperium, these physiological changes should be considered whenever hepatic and portal systems are interpreted with Doppler sonography during the puerperal period.

  4. Evaluation of hepatic venous pulsatility and portal venous velocity with doppler ultrasonography during the puerperium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pekindil, Goekhan; Varol, Fuesun G.; Ali Yuece, M.; Yardim, Turgut

    1999-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study is to evaluate pregnancy-induced changes of hepatic venous pulsatility and portal venous velocity in the puerperium and to determine if these changes disappeared by the end of the puerperium. Methods and material: Healthy normal volunteers (90) were examined on the 2nd and 7th days of puerperium and between the 6th and 8th weeks postpartum. Doppler waveform patterns were obtained in the middle hepatic vein and main portal vein. The hepatic venous pulsatility was named as normal, damped or flat. Results: On the 2nd day postpartum, the hepatic vein pulsatility was shown as normal in 8 (26%), damped in 11 (37%) and flat in 11 (37%) cases. On the 7th day postpartum, 15 (50%) cases had normal, 9 (30%) cases had dampened, and 6 (20%) cases had still flat pattern. The majority of the cases (60%) displayed normal hepatic venous pulsatility in the 6th and 8th weeks of puerperium, whereas 23% had still dampened and 17% had flat patterns. There was a trend toward normal pulsatility with increasing puerperal age. The mean portal venous velocity was still higher than the non-pregnant levels and did not showed significant alterations during puerperium. Conclusion: This study emphasised that, since pregnancy-induced alterations in hepatic venous pulsatility and portal venous velocity had not completely returned to normal in most cases until the end of the puerperium, these physiological changes should be considered whenever hepatic and portal systems are interpreted with Doppler sonography during the puerperal period

  5. Cloning and expression of porcine Colony Stimulating Factor-1 (CSF-1) and Colony Stimulating Factor-1 Receptor (CSF-1R) and analysis of the species specificity of stimulation by CSF-1 and Interleukin 34

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gow, Deborah J.; Garceau, Valerie; Kapetanovic, Ronan; Sester, David P.; Fici, Greg J.; Shelly, John A.; Wilson, Thomas L.; Hume, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor (CSF-1) controls the survival, differentiation and proliferation of cells of the mononuclear phagocyte system. A second ligand for the CSF-1R, Interleukin 34 (IL-34), has been described, but its physiological role is not yet known. The domestic pig provides an alternative to traditional rodent models for evaluating potential therapeutic applications of CSF-1R agonists and antagonists. To enable such studies, we cloned and expressed active pig CSF-1. To provide a bioassay, pig CSF-1R was expressed in the factor-dependent Ba/F3 cell line. On this transfected cell line, recombinant porcine CSF-1 and human CSF-1 had identical activity. Mouse CSF-1 does not interact with the human CSF-1 receptor but was active on pig. By contrast, porcine CSF-1 was active on mouse, human, cat and dog cells. IL-34 was previously shown to be species-specific, with mouse and human proteins demonstrating limited cross-species activity. The pig CSF-1R was equally responsive to both mouse and human IL-34. Based upon the published crystal structures of CSF-1/CSF-1R and IL34/CSF-1R complexes, we discuss the molecular basis for the species specificity. PMID:22974529

  6. Obstructive Hydrocephalus Secondary to Enlarged Virchow-Robin Spaces: A Rare Cause of Pulsatile Tinnitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, Christopher; Chatha, Gurkirat; Chandra, Ronil V; Goldschlager, Tony

    2017-05-01

    Obstructive hydrocephalus secondary to enlarged Virchow-Robin Spaces (VRS) is a rare entity, with only a few cases reported in the literature. Presenting symptoms vary widely from headaches to dizziness. We report a case of a 31-year-old man who presented with pulsatile tinnitus and magnetic resonance imaging showing obstructive hydrocephalus secondary to tumefactive VRS. After a cerebrospinal fluid diversion procedure in the form of an endoscopic third ventriculostomy, he had almost complete resolution of his symptoms. This is the first case of obstructive hydrocephalus secondary to enlarged VRS, presenting with pulsatile tinnitus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Pleocytosis is not fully responsible for low CSF glucose in meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baud, Maxime O; Vitt, Jeffrey R; Robbins, Nathaniel M; Wabl, Rafael; Wilson, Michael R; Chow, Felicia C; Gelfand, Jeffrey M; Josephson, S Andrew; Miller, Steve

    2018-01-01

    The mechanism of hypoglycorrhachia-low CSF glucose-in meningitis remains unknown. We sought to evaluate the relative contribution of CSF inflammation vs microorganisms (bacteria and fungi) in lowering CSF glucose levels. We retrospectively categorized CSF profiles into microbial and aseptic meningitis and analyzed CSF leukocyte count, glucose, and protein concentrations. We assessed the relationship between these markers using multivariate and stratified linear regression analysis for initial and repeated CSF sampling. We also calculated the receiver operating characteristics of CSF glucose and CSF-to-serum glucose ratios to presumptively diagnose microbial meningitis. We found that increasing levels of CSF inflammation were associated with decreased CSF glucose levels in the microbial but not aseptic category. Moreover, elevated CSF protein levels correlated more strongly than the leukocyte count with low CSF glucose levels on initial ( R 2 = 36%, p CSF sampling ( R 2 = 46%, p CSF glucose and CSF-to-serum glucose ratios had similar low sensitivity and moderate-to-high specificity in diagnosing microbial meningitis at thresholds commonly used. The main driver of hypoglycorrhachia appears to be a combination of microbial meningitis with moderate to high degrees of CSF inflammation and proteins, suggesting that the presence of microorganisms capable of catabolizing glucose is a determinant of hypoglycorrhachia in meningitis. A major notable exception is neurosarcoidosis. Low CSF glucose and CSF-to-serum glucose ratios are useful markers for the diagnosis of microbial meningitis.

  8. CSF circulation in subjects with the empty sella syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brismar, K.; Bergstrand, G.

    1981-01-01

    In the present study the CSF circulation was analyzed in 48 subjects with ESS with gamma cisternography, pneumoencephalography (PEG) und computed tomography (CT). In 80% of the subjects the CSF circulation was retarded with convexity block which was combined with widened CSF transport pathways and basal cisterns. These findings were correlated with the clinical signs and symptoms. Headache, psychiatric symptoms, visual field defects and obesity, however, were not related to the impaired CSF circulation. It is concluded that impaired CSF dynamics leading to intermittent increase of ICP has a major impact on the development of the ESS and that most of the patients' complaints are related to this disturbance. Thus is is important to obtain information of the CSF dynamics concurrent with the diagnosis of ESS. For this purpose PEG or CT may be used as the first examination. Moreover, the patient should be examined at least every second year for symptoms and signs of progressive impairments of the CSF circulation. (orig./MG)

  9. Measurement of CSF volume with 3D-FASE MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanayama, Shoichi; Calderon, A.; Makita, Jun-ichi; Ohara, Yukou; Tsunoda, Akira; Sato, Kiyoshi.

    1997-01-01

    A noninvasive and fast cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) volume measurement method has been developed using 3D-FASE MRI and a semi-automatic segmentation process. Images with a high CSF/(gray and white matter) ratio (about 10-20) were obtained with a heavily T 2 weighted 3D-FASE sequence. The CSF region was segmented with a region growing method and the volume was calculated from the number of segmented voxels with a signal intensity weighted summation. Total measurement time was about 30 minutes for each study. The errors of the measured volumes were within 10% for the phantom experiments. Intracranial CSF volumes of normal volunteers ranged between about 100 and 200 cc and the ventricle/intracranial CSF ratio was about 10%. 3D display of the segmented intracranial and ventricle CSF regions was also carried out and proved to be useful to understand the anatomy. Increased intracranial and/or ventricle CSF volumes were obtained for a hydrocephalic patient and one patient with probable cerebral atrophy. The results suggest that the developed method could be used for the diagnosis of patients with neurological diseases. (author)

  10. CSF glial markers correlate with survival in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Süssmuth, S D; Sperfeld, A D; Hinz, A; Brettschneider, J; Endruhn, S; Ludolph, A C; Tumani, H

    2010-03-23

    In neurodegenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), CSF biomarkers are increasingly studied to evaluate their relevance for differential diagnosis, disease progression, and understanding of pathophysiologic processes. To identify a biomarker profile of neuronal and glial CSF proteins to discriminate ALS from other motor neuron diseases (MND) and to assess whether baseline levels of CSF measures in ALS are associated with the course of the disease. A total of 122 consecutive subjects with MND were included in this cross-sectional study (ALS, n = 75; lower motor neuron syndrome, n = 39; upper motor neuron diseases, n = 8). Clinical follow-up included 76 patients. We determined baseline levels of protein tau and astroglial S100beta in CSF and microglial sCD14 in CSF and serum in relation to diagnosis, duration of disease, and survival. CSF tau was significantly elevated in ALS and upper motor neuron diseases as compared to lower motor neuron diseases and controls. CSF S100beta levels were significantly lower in lower motor neuron diseases as compared to other MND. CSF concentrations of S100beta and sCD14 correlated with the survival time in patients with ALS. In motor neuron diseases, CSF tau elevation indicates the degeneration of upper motor neurons, while S100 beta and sCD14 may indicate the activation of CNS glial cells. Because S100beta and sCD14 concentrations correlate with survival in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), we suppose that the combination of both markers may be useful to obtain prognostic information in patients with ALS.

  11. Pulsatile secretion of thyrotropin during fasting: a decrease of thyrotropin pulse amplitude

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Romijn, J. A.; Adriaanse, R.; Brabant, G.; Prank, K.; Endert, E.; Wiersinga, W. M.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of fasting on circadian and pulsatile TSH secretion was investigated in eight healthy subjects (four men and four women in the follicular phase). Each subject was studied twice, once during 24 h with normal food intake and once during the last 24 h of a 60-h fast. Blood was sampled every

  12. Partial thickness autologus calvarial bone orbitocranioplasty for a sphenorbital encephalocele presenting as pulsatile exophthalmos

    OpenAIRE

    Trivedi, Adarsh; Garg, Amrish Kumar; Hiran, Subodh

    2015-01-01

    Basal encephalocele accounts only 1.5% of all encephaloceles. But Sphenorbital encephalocele is the rarest cause of herniation of brain into orbit leading to pulsatile exphothalmos. Authors presenting a case of sphenorbital encephalocele in a 16 yrs old girl successsfully managed by orbitcranioplasty by partilal thickness autologus calvarial bone graft.

  13. Pulsatile hyperglucagonemia fails to increase hepatic glucose production in normal man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paolisso, G.; Scheen, A.J.; Luyckx, A.S.; Lefebvre, P.J.

    1987-01-01

    To study the metabolic effects of pulsatile glucagon administration, six male volunteers were submitted to a 260-min glucose-controlled glucose intravenous infusion using the Biostator. The endogenous secretion of the pancreatic hormones was inhibited by somatostatin, basal insulin secretion was replaced by a continuous insulin infusion, and glucagon was infused intravenously in two conditions at random: either continuously or intermittently. Blood glucose levels and glucose infusion rate were monitored continuously by the Biostator, and classical methodology using a D-[3- 3 H]glucose infusion allowed the authors to study glucose turnover. While basal plasma glucagon levels were similar in both conditions, they plateaued at 189 +/- 38 pg ml -1 during continuous infusion and varied between 95 and 501 pg x ml -1 during pulsatile infusion. When compared with continuous administration, pulsatile glucagon infusion 1) initially induced a similar increase in endogenous (hepatic) glucose production and blood glucose, 2) did not prevent the so-called evanescent effect of glucagon on blood glucose, and 3) after 3 h tended to reduce rather than increase hepatic glucose production. In conclusion, in vivo pulsatile hyperglucanemia in normal man fails to increase hepatic glucose production

  14. Tolerance to continuous intrathecal baclofen infusion can be reversed by pulsatile bolus infusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heetla, H. W.; Staal, M. J.; van Laar, T.

    Study design: Pilot study. Objective: To study the effect of pulsatile bolus infusion of intrathecal baclofen (ITB) on daily ITB dose, in patients showing dose increases, probably due to tolerance. Setting: Department of neurology and neurosurgery, University Medical Center Groningen, the

  15. Inhibiting the Ca2+ Influx Induced by Human CSF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Drews

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available One potential therapeutic strategy for Alzheimer’s disease (AD is to use antibodies that bind to small soluble protein aggregates to reduce their toxic effects. However, these therapies are rarely tested in human CSF before clinical trials because of the lack of sensitive methods that enable the measurement of aggregate-induced toxicity at low concentrations. We have developed highly sensitive single vesicle and single-cell-based assays that detect the Ca2+ influx caused by the CSF of individuals affected with AD and healthy controls, and we have found comparable effects for both types of samples. We also show that an extracellular chaperone clusterin; a nanobody specific to the amyloid-β peptide (Aβ; and bapineuzumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody raised against Aβ, could all reduce the Ca2+ influx caused by synthetic Aβ oligomers but are less effective in CSF. These assays could be used to characterize potential therapeutic agents in CSF before clinical trials.

  16. Chemical meningitis related to intra-CSF liposomal cytarabine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Bénédicte; Zairi, Fahed; Boulanger, Thomas; Bonneterre, Jacques; Mortier, Laurent; Le Rhun, Emilie

    2017-10-01

    Therapeutic options of leptomeningeal metastases include intra-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) chemotherapy. Among intra-CSF agents, liposomal cytarabine has advantages but can induce specific toxicities. A BRAF-V600E-mutated melanoma leptomeningeal metastases patient, treated by dabrafenib and liposomal cytarabine, presented after the first injection of liposomal cytarabine with hyperthermia and headaches. Despite sterile CSF/blood analyses, extended intravenous antibiotics were given and the second injection was delayed. The diagnosis of chemical meningitis was finally made. Dose reduction and appropriate symptomatic treatment permitted the administration of 15 injections of liposomal cytarabine combined with dabrafenib. A confirmation of the diagnosis of chemical meningitis is essential in order (1) not to delay intra-CSF or systemic chemotherapy or (2) to limit the administration of unnecessary but potentially toxic antibiotics.

  17. Pulsatile Lavage of Musculoskeletal Wounds Causes Muscle Necrosis and Dystrophic Calcification in a Rat Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiaramonti, Alexander M; Robertson, Astor D; Nguyen, Thao P; Jaffe, David E; Hanna, E Lex; Holmes, Robert; Barfield, William R; Fourney, William L; Stains, Joseph P; Pellegrini, Vincent D

    2017-11-01

    Adequate irrigation of open musculoskeletal injuries is considered the standard of care to decrease bacterial load and other contaminants. While the benefit of debris removal compared with the risk of further seeding by high-pressure lavage has been studied, the effects of irrigation on muscle have been infrequently reported. Our aim in the present study was to assess relative damage to muscle by pulsatile lavage compared with bulb-syringe irrigation. In an animal model of heterotopic ossification, 24 Sprague-Dawley rats underwent hindlimb blast amputation via detonation of a submerged explosive, with subsequent through-the-knee surgical amputation proximal to the zone of injury. All wounds were irrigated and underwent primary closure. In 12 of the animals, pulsatile lavage (20 psi [138 kPa]) was used as the irrigation method, and in the other 12 animals, bulb-syringe irrigation was performed. A third group of 6 rats did not undergo the blast procedure but instead underwent surgical incision into the left thigh muscle followed by pulsatile lavage. Serial radiographs of the animals were made to monitor the formation of soft-tissue radiopaque lesions until euthanasia at 6 months. Image-guided muscle biopsies were performed at 8 weeks and 6 months (at euthanasia) on representative animals from each group. Histological analysis was performed with hematoxylin and eosin, alizarin red, and von Kossa staining on interval biopsy and postmortem specimens. All animals managed with pulsatile lavage, with or without blast injury, developed soft-tissue radiopaque lesions, whereas no animal that had bulb-syringe irrigation developed these lesions (p = 0.001). Five of the 12 animals that underwent blast amputation with pulsatile lavage experienced wound complications, whereas no animal in the other 2 groups experienced wound complications (p = 0.014). Radiopaque lesions appeared approximately 10 days postoperatively, increased in density until approximately 16 weeks, then

  18. Application of RI-counting method for posttraumatic CSF rhinorrhea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Takahiko; Terai, Yoshinori; Fujimoto, Shunichiro; Kawauchi, Masamitsu.

    1987-01-01

    Numerous techniques and procedures have been reported for the evaluation of CSF fistulas. Especially metrizamide CT cisternography and radioisotope (RI) cisternography have been reported to be reliable for localizing the site of CSF leakage, however, it has been difficult to diagnose the existence and the site of CSF leakages in some cases. RI-counting method, measuring RI-count of intranasal cotton pledgets after the intrathecal injection of RI ( 111 In-DTPA) is thought to be the most reliable method for detecting the presence of CSF leakage in these cases. We used six cotton pledgets which were inserted into upper, middle, and lower meatuses on both side. Because the site of pledgets with ghest RI-count has anatomical relationship to the opening of the paranasal sinus, we can surmise the leakage of dural defect and CSF leakage. RI counting method was applied to two patients in whom it was difficult to diagnose the presence of CSF leakage with other procedures. The patients were free in position for four hours after the intrathecal injection of RI, and in the prone position for 30 minutes before RI-counting of intranasal cotton pledgets. After measuring the RI-counts of six pledgets, the counts were compared with each other. The cotton pledget inserted into left middle meatus showed the highest count in both cases. From this result and finding of conventional skull tomography we speculated the site of CSF leakage to be frontal sinus or ethmoid sinus. Operation demonstrated the opening of dura into the frontal sinus in one case, and ethmoid sinus in another case. As mentioned above, RI-counting method has the advantages of detecting the existence and the site of CSF leakage. (author)

  19. The European iNPH Multicentre Study on the predictive values of resistance to CSF outflow and the CSF Tap Test in patients with idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wikkelsø, Carsten; Hellström, Per; Klinge, Petra Margarete

    2013-01-01

    The objective was to determine the sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of the CSF Tap Test (CSF TT) and resistance to CSF outflow (Rout) for the outcome of shunting in a sample of patients with idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH).......The objective was to determine the sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of the CSF Tap Test (CSF TT) and resistance to CSF outflow (Rout) for the outcome of shunting in a sample of patients with idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH)....

  20. Increasing awareness with recognition of pulsatile tinnitus for nurse practitioners in the primary care setting: A case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecchiarelli, Kelly; Amar, Arun Paul; Emanuele, Donna

    2017-09-01

    Pulsatile tinnitus is a whooshing sound heard synchronous with the heartbeat. It is an uncommon symptom affecting fewer than 10% of patients with tinnitus. It often goes unrecognized in the primary care setting. Failure to recognize this symptom can result in a missed or delayed diagnosis of a potentially life-threatening condition known as a dural arteriovenous fistula. The purpose of this case study is to provide a structured approach to the identification of pulsatile tinnitus and provide management recommendations. A case study and review of pertinent literature. Pulsatile tinnitus usually has a vascular treatable cause. A comprehensive history and physical examination will alert the nurse practitioner (NP) when pulsatile tinnitus is present. Auscultation in specific areas of the head can detect audible or objective pulsatile tinnitus. Pulsatile tinnitus that is audible to the examiner is an urgent medical condition requiring immediate consultation and referral. Knowledge of pulsatile tinnitus and awareness of this often treatable condition directs the NP to perform a detailed assessment when patients present with tinnitus, directs appropriate referral for care and treatment, and can reduce the risk of delayed or missed diagnosis. ©2017 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  1. Delivery of GM-CSF to Protect against Influenza Pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Renuka; Hillberry, Zachary; Chen, Han; Feng, Yan; Fletcher, Kalyn; Neuenschwander, Pierre; Shams, Homayoun

    2015-01-01

    Background Since adaptive immunity is thought to be central to immunity against influenza A virus (IAV) pneumonias, preventive strategies have focused primarily on vaccines. However, vaccine efficacy has been variable, in part because of antigenic shift and drift in circulating influenza viruses. Recent studies have highlighted the importance of innate immunity in protecting against influenza. Methods Granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) contributes to maturation of mononuclear phagocytes, enhancing their capacity for phagocytosis and cytokine production. Results Overexpression of granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in the lung of transgenic mice provides remarkable protection against IAV, which depends on alveolar macrophages (AM). In this study, we report that pulmonary delivery of GM-CSF to wild type young and aged mice abrogated mortality from IAV. Conclusion We also demonstrate that protection is species specific and human GM-CSF do not protect the mice nor stimulates mouse immunity. We also show that IAV-induced lung injury is the culprit for side-effects of GM-CSF in treating mice after IAV infection, and introduce a novel strategy to deliver the GM-CSF to and retain it in the alveolar space even after IAV infection. PMID:25923215

  2. Delivery of GM-CSF to Protect against Influenza Pneumonia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renuka Subramaniam

    Full Text Available Since adaptive immunity is thought to be central to immunity against influenza A virus (IAV pneumonias, preventive strategies have focused primarily on vaccines. However, vaccine efficacy has been variable, in part because of antigenic shift and drift in circulating influenza viruses. Recent studies have highlighted the importance of innate immunity in protecting against influenza.Granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF contributes to maturation of mononuclear phagocytes, enhancing their capacity for phagocytosis and cytokine production.Overexpression of granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF in the lung of transgenic mice provides remarkable protection against IAV, which depends on alveolar macrophages (AM. In this study, we report that pulmonary delivery of GM-CSF to wild type young and aged mice abrogated mortality from IAV.We also demonstrate that protection is species specific and human GM-CSF do not protect the mice nor stimulates mouse immunity. We also show that IAV-induced lung injury is the culprit for side-effects of GM-CSF in treating mice after IAV infection, and introduce a novel strategy to deliver the GM-CSF to and retain it in the alveolar space even after IAV infection.

  3. Influence of hormonal control on LH pulsatility and secretion in women with classical congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachelot, Anne; Chakhtoura, Zeina; Plu-Bureau, Geneviève; Coudert, Mathieu; Coussieu, Christiane; Badachi, Yasmina; Dulon, Jérome; Charbit, Beny; Touraine, Philippe

    2012-10-01

    Women with classical congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) exhibit reduced fertility due to several factors including anovulation. This has been attributed to a disturbed gonadotropic axis as in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), but there is no precise evaluation. Our aim was to evaluate the gonadotropic axis and LH pulsatility patterns and to determine factor(s) that could account for the potential abnormality of LH pulsatility. Case/control study. Sixteen CAH women (11 with the salt-wasting form and five with the simple virilizing form), aged from 18 to 40 years, and 16 age-matched women, with regular menstrual cycles (28 ± 3 days), were included. LH pulse patterns over 6 h were determined in patients and controls. No differences were observed between patients and controls in terms of mean LH levels, LH pulse amplitude, or LH frequency. In CAH patients, LH pulsatility patterns were heterogeneous, leading us to perform a clustering analysis of LH data, resulting in a two-cluster partition. Patients in cluster 1 had similar LH pulsatility patterns to the controls. Patients in cluster 2 had: lower LH pulse amplitude and frequency and presented menstrual cycle disturbances more frequently; higher 17-OH progesterone, testosterone, progesterone, and androstenedione levels; and lower FSH levels. LH pulsatility may be normal in CAH women well controlled by hormonal treatment. Undertreatment is responsible for hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, with low LH pulse levels and frequency, but not PCOS. Suppression of progesterone and androgen concentrations during the follicular phase of the menstrual cycle should be a major objective in these patients.

  4. Is the use of low-pressure pulsatile lavage for pressure ulcer management associated with environmental contamination with Acinetobacter baumannii?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Chester H; Johnson, Tova; Miklacic, Joan; Donskey, Curtis J

    2009-10-01

    Ho CH, Johnson T, Miklacic J, Donskey CJ. Is the use of low-pressure pulsatile lavage for pressure ulcer management associated with environmental contamination with Acinetobacter baumannii? To determine the extent of environmental contamination associated with low-pressure pulsatile lavage of stage III or IV pressure ulcers in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) when routine infection control precautions are used for wounds colonized or infected with Acinetobacter baumannii. Prospective investigation in which pressure ulcer cultures and environmental cultures were obtained before and after low-pressure pulsatile lavage treatment, and before and after regular dressing changes. Environmental cultures included the patient's bedrail and settle plates placed 0.6, 1.5, and 2.4m from the wound to assess airborne spread of A. baumannii. SCI inpatient unit in a Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Inpatients (N=15) with SCI receiving daily low-pressure pulsatile lavage treatment for stage III or IV pressure ulcers with standard dressing change, as well as regular dressing changes without low-pressure pulsatile lavage at other times of the day. Standard, regular dressing changes and dressing changes with low-pressure pulsatile lavage. Comparison of frequency of environmental contamination with A. baumannii associated with low-pressure pulsatile lavage versus regular dressing changes. Of the 15 SCI inpatients meeting inclusion criteria, 9 (60%) grew A. baumannii from their wounds. Of the 9 patients with wound cultures positive for A. baumannii, only 1 (11%) had environmental contamination with this organism after performance of low-pressure pulsatile lavage, and the same patient had environmental contamination after a standard dressing change. The antibiotic susceptibility patterns of the wound and environmental A. baumannii isolates were identical. Low-pressure pulsatile lavage using the infection control methods described is not associated with an increased

  5. Effects of acute aerobic exercise on arterial stiffness and cerebrovascular pulsatility in adults with and without hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefferts, Wesley K; DeBlois, Jacob P; Receno, Candace N; Barreira, Tiago V; Brutsaert, Tom D; Carhart, Robert L; Heffernan, Kevin S

    2018-04-19

    Stiffer central arteries, as seen in hypertension (HTN), foster transmission of pulsatile hemodynamics into fragile cerebral vessels. Aerobic exercise is recommended for adults with HTN, but its effects on arterial stiffness and pulsatility in this group are unclear. This study sought to investigate the effect of acute aerobic exercise on arterial stiffness and cerebrovascular pulsatility in 30 adults with treated HTN and 30 age, sex, and BMI-matched adults without HTN (56 ± 6 years, BMI 28.2 ± 2.9 kg/m; 28 women). Patients underwent hemodynamic measures before/after 30-min cycling (≈55% peak oxygen consumption). Aortic stiffness was measured using carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity, and carotid artery stiffness was assessed with β-stiffness via ultrasound. Aortic/carotid pulse pressure (aortic via radial generalized transfer function) was measured by tonometry and calibrated to brachial mean pressure and diastolic pressure. Carotid/middle cerebral artery (MCA) blood velocity pulsatility indices were measured using Doppler. Carotid wave intensity analysis was used to derive forward wave intensity (W1). Exercise impacted hemodynamics similarly in HTN compared to no-HTN. Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity, MCA pulsatility index, carotid pulsatility index, and W1 increased similarly after exercise in both groups (P < 0.05). Carotid pulse pressure and β-stiffness were unaltered after exercise. Postexercise changes in W1 were positively associated with carotid pulsatility index, which was further associated with MCA pulsatility index. These data suggest adults with treated HTN experience similar increases in aortic stiffness and cerebrovascular hemodynamic pulsatility during early recovery from acute aerobic exercise as their counterparts without HTN.

  6. Sigmoid Sinus Diverticulum, Dehiscence, and Venous Sinus Stenosis: Potential Causes of Pulsatile Tinnitus in Patients with Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lansley, J A; Tucker, W; Eriksen, M R; Riordan-Eva, P; Connor, S E J

    2017-09-01

    Pulsatile tinnitus is experienced by most patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension. The pathophysiology remains uncertain; however, transverse sinus stenosis and sigmoid sinus diverticulum/dehiscence have been proposed as potential etiologies. We aimed to determine whether the prevalence of transverse sinus stenosis and sigmoid sinus diverticulum/dehiscence was increased in patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension and pulsatile tinnitus relative to those without pulsatile tinnitus and a control group. CT vascular studies of patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension with pulsatile tinnitus ( n = 42), without pulsatile tinnitus ( n = 37), and controls ( n = 75) were independently reviewed for the presence of severe transverse sinus stenosis and sigmoid sinus diverticulum/dehiscence according to published criteria. The prevalence of transverse sinus stenosis and sigmoid sinus diverticulum/dehiscence in patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension with pulsatile tinnitus was compared with that in the nonpulsatile tinnitus idiopathic intracranial hypertension group and the control group. Further comparisons included differing degrees of transverse sinus stenosis (50% and 75%), laterality of transverse sinus stenosis/sigmoid sinus diverticulum/dehiscence, and ipsilateral transverse sinus stenosis combined with sigmoid sinus diverticulum/dehiscence. Severe bilateral transverse sinus stenoses were more frequent in patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension than in controls ( P tinnitus within the idiopathic intracranial hypertension group. Sigmoid sinus dehiscence (right- or left-sided) was also more common in patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension compared with controls ( P = .01), but there was no significant association with pulsatile tinnitus within the idiopathic intracranial hypertension group. While our data corroborate previous studies demonstrating increased prevalence of sigmoid sinus diverticulum

  7. Dynamic exercise enhances regional cerebral artery mean flow velocity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linkis, P; Jørgensen, L G; Olesen, H L

    1995-01-01

    Dynamic exercise enhances regional cerebral artery mean flow velocity. J. Appl. Physiol. 78(1): 12-16, 1995.--Anterior (ACA) and middle (MCA) cerebral artery mean flow velocities (Vmean) and pulsatility indexes were determined using transcranial Doppler in 14 subjects during dynamic exercise afte...

  8. Generation of tunable and pulsatile concentration gradients via microfluidic network

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Bingpu; Xu, Wei; Wang, Cong; Chau, Yeungyeung; Zeng, Xiping; Zhang, Xixiang; Shen, Rong; Wen, Weijia

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate a compact Polydimethylsiloxane microfluidic chip which can quickly generate ten different chemical concentrations simultaneously. The concentration magnitude of each branch can be flexibly regulated based on the flow rate ratios

  9. Upfront plerixafor plus G-CSF versus cyclophosphamide plus G-CSF for stem cell mobilization in multiple myeloma: efficacy and cost analysis study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afifi, S; Adel, N G; Devlin, S; Duck, E; Vanak, J; Landau, H; Chung, D J; Lendvai, N; Lesokhin, A; Korde, N; Reich, L; Landgren, O; Giralt, S; Hassoun, H

    2016-04-01

    Cyclophosphamide plus G-CSF (C+G-CSF) is one of the most widely used stem cell (SC) mobilization regimens for patients with multiple myeloma (MM). Plerixafor plus G-CSF (P+G-CSF) has demonstrated superior SC mobilization efficacy when compared with G-CSF alone and has been shown to rescue patients who fail mobilization with G-CSF or C+G-CSF. Despite the proven efficacy of P+G-CSF in upfront SC mobilization, its use has been limited, mostly due to concerns of high price of the drug. However, a comprehensive comparison of the efficacy and cost effectiveness of SC mobilization using C+G-CSF versus P+G-CSF is not available. In this study, we compared 111 patients receiving C+G-CSF to 112 patients receiving P+G-CSF. The use of P+G-CSF was associated with a higher success rate of SC collection defined as ⩾5 × 10(6) CD34+ cells/kg (94 versus 83%, P=0.013) and less toxicities. Thirteen patients in the C+G-CSF arm were hospitalized owing to complications while none in the P+G-CSF group. C+G-CSF was associated with higher financial burden as assessed using institutional-specific costs and charges (P<0.001) as well as using Medicare reimbursement rates (P=0.27). Higher rate of hospitalization, increased need for salvage mobilization, and increased G-CSF use account for these differences.

  10. Csf1r-mApple Transgene Expression and Ligand Binding In Vivo Reveal Dynamics of CSF1R Expression within the Mononuclear Phagocyte System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawley, Catherine A; Rojo, Rocio; Raper, Anna; Sauter, Kristin A; Lisowski, Zofia M; Grabert, Kathleen; Bain, Calum C; Davis, Gemma M; Louwe, Pieter A; Ostrowski, Michael C; Hume, David A; Pridans, Clare; Jenkins, Stephen J

    2018-03-15

    CSF1 is the primary growth factor controlling macrophage numbers, but whether expression of the CSF1 receptor differs between discrete populations of mononuclear phagocytes remains unclear. We have generated a Csf1r -mApple transgenic fluorescent reporter mouse that, in combination with lineage tracing, Alexa Fluor 647-labeled CSF1-Fc and CSF1, and a modified Δ Csf1- enhanced cyan fluorescent protein (ECFP) transgene that lacks a 150 bp segment of the distal promoter, we have used to dissect the differentiation and CSF1 responsiveness of mononuclear phagocyte populations in situ. Consistent with previous Csf1r- driven reporter lines, Csf1r -mApple was expressed in blood monocytes and at higher levels in tissue macrophages, and was readily detectable in whole mounts or with multiphoton microscopy. In the liver and peritoneal cavity, uptake of labeled CSF1 largely reflected transgene expression, with greater receptor activity in mature macrophages than monocytes and tissue-specific expression in conventional dendritic cells. However, CSF1 uptake also differed between subsets of monocytes and discrete populations of tissue macrophages, which in macrophages correlated with their level of dependence on CSF1 receptor signaling for survival rather than degree of transgene expression. A double Δ Csf1r -ECFP- Csf1r -mApple transgenic mouse distinguished subpopulations of microglia in the brain, and permitted imaging of interstitial macrophages distinct from alveolar macrophages, and pulmonary monocytes and conventional dendritic cells. The Csf1r- mApple mice and fluorescently labeled CSF1 will be valuable resources for the study of macrophage and CSF1 biology, which are compatible with existing EGFP-based reporter lines. Copyright © 2018 The Authors.

  11. Clinical implications of medulloblastoma subgroups: incidence of CSF diversion surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Christian; Ramaswamy, Vijay; Kulkarni, Abhaya V; Rutka, James T; Remke, Marc; Tabori, Uri; Hawkins, Cynthia; Bouffet, Eric; Taylor, Michael D

    2015-03-01

    While medulloblastoma was initially thought to comprise a single homogeneous entity, it is now accepted that it in fact comprises 4 discrete subgroups, each with its own distinct demographics, clinical presentation, transcriptomics, genetics, and outcome. Hydrocephalus is a common complication of medulloblastoma and not infrequently requires CSF diversion. The authors report the incidence of CSF diversion surgery in each of the subgroups of medulloblastoma (Wnt, Shh, Group 3, and Group 4). The medical and imaging records for patients who underwent surgery for medulloblastoma at The Hospital for Sick Children were retrospectively reviewed. The primary outcome was the requirement for CSF diversion surgery either before or within 60 days of tumor resection. The modified Canadian Preoperative Prediction Rule for Hydrocephalus (mCPPRH) was compared among subgroups. Of 143 medulloblastoma patients, treated from 1991 to 2013, sufficient data were available for 130 patients (15 with Wnt, 30 with Shh, 30 with Group 3, and 55 with Group 4 medulloblastomas). Of these, 28 patients (22%) ultimately underwent CSF diversion surgery: 0% with Wnt, 29% with Shh, 29% with Group 3, and 43% with Group 4 tumors. Patients in the Wnt subgroup had a lower incidence of CSF diversion than all other patients combined (p = 0.04). Wnt patients had a lower mCPPRH score (lower risk of CSF diversion, p = 0.045), were older, had smaller ventricles at diagnosis, and had no leptomeningeal metastases. The overall rate of CSF diversion surgery for Shh, Group 3, and Group 4 medulloblastomas is around 30%, but no patients in the present series with a Wnt medulloblastoma required shunting. The low incidence of hydrocephalus in patients with Wnt medulloblastoma likely reflects both host factors (age) and disease factors (lack of metastases). The absence of hydrocephalus in patients with Wnt medulloblastomas likely contributes to their excellent rate of survival and may also contribute to a higher quality

  12. Reference ranges for uterine artery pulsatility index during the menstrual cycle: a cross-sectional study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Guedes-Martins

    Full Text Available Cyclic endometrial neoangiogenesis contributes to changes in local vascular patterns and is amenable to non-invasive assessment with Doppler sonography. We hypothesize that the uterine artery (UtA impedance, measured by its pulsatility index (PI, exhibits a regular pattern during the normal menstrual cycle. Therefore, the main study objective was to derive normative new day-cycle-based reference ranges for the UtA-PI during the entire cycle from days 1 to 34 according to the isolated time effect and potential confounders such as age and parity.From January 2009 to December 2012, a cross-sectional study of 1,821 healthy women undergoing routine gynaecological ultrasound was performed. The Doppler flow of the right and left UtA-PI was studied transvaginally by colour and pulsed Doppler imaging. The mean right and left values and the presence or absence of a bilateral protodiastolic notch were recorded. Reference intervals for the PI according to the cycle day were generated by classical linear regression.The majority of patients (97.5% presented unilateral or bilateral UtA notches. The crude 5th, 50th, and 95th reference percentile curves of the UtA-PI at 1-34 days of the normal menstrual cycle were derived. In all curves, a progressive significant decrease occurred during the first 13 days, followed by an increase and recovery in the UtA-PI. The adjusted 5th, 50th, and 95th reference percentile curves for the effects of age and parity were also obtained. These two conditions generated an approximately identical UtA-PI pattern during the cycle, except with small but significant reductions at the temporal extremes.The median, 5th, and the 95th percentiles of the UtA-PI decrease during the first third of the menstrual cycle and recover to their initial values during the last two thirds of the cycle. The rates of decrease and recovery depend significantly on age and parity.

  13. Low-Dose Pulsatile Interleukin-6 As a Treatment Option for Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gautam Ghatnekar

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN remains one of the most common and serious complications of diabetes. Currently, pharmacological agents are limited to treating the pain associated with DPN, and do not address the underlying pathological mechanisms driving nerve damage, thus leaving a significant unmet medical need. Interestingly, research conducted using exercise as a treatment for DPN has revealed interleukin-6 (IL-6 signaling to be associated with many positive benefits such as enhanced blood flow and lipid metabolism, decreased chronic inflammation, and peripheral nerve fiber regeneration. IL-6, once known solely as a pro-inflammatory cytokine, is now understood to signal as a multifunctional cytokine, capable of eliciting both pro- and anti-inflammatory responses in a context-dependent fashion. IL-6 released from muscle in response to exercise signals as a myokine and as such has a unique kinetic profile, whereby levels are transiently elevated up to 100-fold and return to baseline levels within 4 h. Importantly, this kinetic profile is in stark contrast to long-term IL-6 elevation that is associated with pro-inflammatory states. Given exercise induces IL-6 myokine signaling, and exercise has been shown to elicit numerous beneficial effects for the treatment of DPN, a causal link has been suggested. Here, we discuss both the clinical and preclinical literature related to the application of IL-6 as a treatment strategy for DPN. In addition, we discuss how IL-6 may directly modulate Schwann and nerve cells to explore a mechanistic understanding of how this treatment elicits a neuroprotective and/or regenerative response. Collectively, studies suggest that IL-6, when administered in a low-dose pulsatile strategy to mimic the body’s natural response to exercise, may prove to be an effective treatment for the protection and/or restoration of peripheral nerve function in DPN. This review highlights the studies supporting this assertion and

  14. Pulsatile dry cupping in chronic low back pain - a randomized three-armed controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teut, M; Ullmann, A; Ortiz, M; Rotter, G; Binting, S; Cree, M; Lotz, F; Roll, S; Brinkhaus, B

    2018-04-02

    We aimed to investigate the effectiveness of two different forms of dry pulsatile cupping in patients with chronic low back pain (cLBP) compared to medication on demand only in a three-armed randomized trial. 110 cLBP patients were randomized to regular pulsatile cupping with 8 treatments plus paracetamol on demand (n = 37), minimal cupping with 8 treatments plus paracetamol on demand (n = 36) or the control group with paracetamol on demand only (n = 37). Primary outcome was the pain intensity on a visual analogue scale (VAS, 0-100 mm) after 4 weeks, secondary outcome parameter included VAS pain intensity after 12 weeks, back function as measured with the 'Funktionsfragebogen Hannover Rücken' (FFbH-R) and health related quality of life questionnaire Short form 36 (SF-36) after 4 and 12 weeks. The mean baseline-adjusted VAS after 4 weeks was 34.9 mm (95% CI: 28.7; 41.2) for pulsatile cupping, 40.4 (34.2; 46.7) for minimal cupping and 56.1 (49.8; 62.4) for control group, resulting in statistically significant differences between pulsatile cupping vs. control (21.2 (12.2; 30.1); p back function after 4 weeks, but not after 12 weeks (- 5.4 (- 11.7;0.8); p = 0.088), pulsatile cupping also showed better improvements on SF-36 physical component scale compared to control at 4 and 12 weeks (- 5.6 (- 9.3;-2.0); p = 0.003; - 6.1 (- 9.9;-2.4); p = 0.002). For back function and quality of life minimal cupping group was not statistically different to control after 4 and 12 weeks. Paracetamol intake did not differ between the groups (cupping vs. control (7.3 (- 0.4;15.0); p = 0.063); minimal cupping vs. control (6.3 (- 2.0;14.5); p = 0.133). Both forms of cupping were effective in cLBP without showing significant differences in direct comparison after four weeks, only pulsatile cupping showed effects compared to control after 12 weeks. The study was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (identifier: NCT02090686 ).

  15. 3D steady-state MR cisternography in CSF rhinorrhoea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayakumar, P.N.; Kovoor, J.M.E.; Srikanth, S.G.; Praharaj, S.S.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the utility of 3D steady-state MR cisternography in the demonstration and localisation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak in patients with clinically suspected CSF rhinorrhoea. Material and Methods: Six consecutive patients with clinically suspected CSF rhinorrhoea were examined with routine MR evaluation and MR cisternography (MRC). All MR examinations included fast spin-echo (SE) T1WI in axial and sagittal planes, fast SE T2WI in axial and coronal planes and fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images in the axial plane. 3D evaluation was done using the CISS technique with 0.7-mm thickness in the sagittal and coronal planes. The site and extent of the defect, and any brain herniation detected on MRC were correlated with surgical findings. Results: In the 6 patients who underwent surgical exploration and repair, intraoperative findings correlated with the defect revealed by MRC in all cases. Conclusion: In clinically suspected CSF rhinorrhoea, MRC is highly accurate in localising the site and extent of CSF fistula and may be used as the first investigation due to its efficacy and non-invasive nature

  16. CSF N-glycoproteomics for early diagnosis in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmigiano, Angelo; Barone, Rita; Sturiale, Luisa; Sanfilippo, Cristina; Bua, Rosaria Ornella; Romeo, Donata Agata; Messina, Angela; Capuana, Maria Luisa; Maci, Tiziana; Le Pira, Francesco; Zappia, Mario; Garozzo, Domenico

    2016-01-10

    This work aims at exploring the human CSF (Cerebrospinal fluid) N-glycome by MALDI MS techniques, in order to assess specific glycosylation pattern(s) in patients with Alzheimer's disease (n:24) and in subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) (n:11), these last as potential AD patients at a pre-dementia stage. For comparison, 21 healthy controls were studied. We identified a group of AD and MCI subjects (about 40-50% of the studied sample) showing significant alteration of CSF N-glycome profiling, consisting of a decrease in the overall sialylation degree and an increase in species bearing bisecting GlcNAc. Noteworthy, all the MCI patients that converted to AD within the clinical follow-up, had an abnormal CSF glycosylation profile. Based on the studied cohort, CSF glycosylation changes may occur before an AD clinical onset. Previous studies specifically focused on the key role of glycosyltransferase GnT-III on AD-pathogenesis, addressing the patho-mechanism to specific sugar modification of BACE-1 glycoprotein with bisecting GlcNAc. Our patients addressed protein N-glycosylation changes at an early phase of the whole biomolecular misregulation on AD, pointing to CSF N-glycome analyses as promising tool to enhance early detection of AD and also suggesting alternative therapeutics target molecules, such as specific glyco-enzymes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Flow cytometric characterization of cerebrospinal fluid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Graaf, Marieke T; de Jongste, Arjen H C; Kraan, Jaco; Boonstra, Joke G; Sillevis Smitt, Peter A E; Gratama, Jan W

    2011-09-01

    Flow cytometry facilitates the detection of a large spectrum of cellular characteristics on a per cell basis, determination of absolute cell numbers and detection of rare events with high sensitivity and specificity. White blood cell (WBC) counts in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) are important for the diagnosis of many neurological disorders. WBC counting and differential can be performed by microscopy, hematology analyzers, or flow cytometry. Flow cytometry of CSF is increasingly being considered as the method of choice in patients suspected of leptomeningeal localization of hematological malignancies. Additionally, in several neuroinflammatory diseases such as multiple sclerosis and paraneoplastic neurological syndromes, flow cytometry is commonly performed to obtain insight into the immunopathogenesis of these diseases. Technically, the low cellularity of CSF samples, combined with the rapidly declining WBC viability, makes CSF flow cytometry challenging. Comparison of flow cytometry with microscopic and molecular techniques shows that each technique has its own advantages and is ideally combined. We expect that increasing the number of flow cytometric parameters that can be simultaneously studied within one sample, will further refine the information on CSF cell subsets in low-cellular CSF samples and enable to define cell populations more accurately. Copyright © 2011 International Clinical Cytometry Society.

  18. Nanoscaffold matrices for size-controlled, pulsatile transdermal testosterone delivery: nanosize effects on the time dimension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malik, Ritu; Misra, Amit; Tondwal, Shailesh; Venkatesh, K S

    2008-01-01

    Pulsatile transdermal testosterone (T) has applications in hormone supplementation and male contraception. Pulsatile T delivery was achieved by assembling crystalline and nanoparticulate T in nucleation-inhibiting polymer matrices of controlled porosity. Different interference patterns observed from various polymeric films containing T were due to the various particle sizes of T present in the polymer matrices. Scanning electron microscopy was used to determine the size and shape of T crystals. Skin-adherent films containing T nanoparticles of any size between 10-500 nm could be prepared using pharmaceutically acceptable vinylic polymers. Drug release and skin permeation profiles were studied. The dissolution-diffusion behavior of nanoparticles differed from crystalline and molecular states. Nanosize may thus be used to engineer chronopharmacologically relevant drug delivery.

  19. Nanoscaffold matrices for size-controlled, pulsatile transdermal testosterone delivery: nanosize effects on the time dimension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Ritu; Tondwal, Shailesh; Venkatesh, K. S.; Misra, Amit

    2008-10-01

    Pulsatile transdermal testosterone (T) has applications in hormone supplementation and male contraception. Pulsatile T delivery was achieved by assembling crystalline and nanoparticulate T in nucleation-inhibiting polymer matrices of controlled porosity. Different interference patterns observed from various polymeric films containing T were due to the various particle sizes of T present in the polymer matrices. Scanning electron microscopy was used to determine the size and shape of T crystals. Skin-adherent films containing T nanoparticles of any size between 10-500 nm could be prepared using pharmaceutically acceptable vinylic polymers. Drug release and skin permeation profiles were studied. The dissolution-diffusion behavior of nanoparticles differed from crystalline and molecular states. Nanosize may thus be used to engineer chronopharmacologically relevant drug delivery.

  20. Herpes Simplex Encephalitis Presenting with Normal CSF Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, R.; Kiani, I. G.; Shah, F.; Rehman, R. N.; Haq, M. E.

    2013-01-01

    A 28 years old female presented with headache, fever, altered sensorium and right side weakness for one week. She was febrile and drowsy with right sided hemiplegia and papilledema. Tuberculous or bacterial meningitis, tuberculoma and abscess were at the top of the diagnosis list followed by Herpes simplex meningo-encephalitis (HSE). MRI showed abnormal signal intensity of left temporal lobe without significant post-contrast enhancement and midline shift. CSF examination was normal, gram stain and Ziehl-Neelsen stain showed no micro-organism, or acid fast bacilli. CSF for MTB PCR was negative. PCR DNA for Herpes simplex 1 on CSF was detected. Acyclovir was started and the patient was discharged after full recovery. A high index of suspicion is required for HSE diagnosis in Pakistan where other infections predominantly affect the brain and HSE may be overlooked as a potential diagnosis. (author)

  1. ATYPICAL CSF PICTURE IN VIRAL MENINGITIS HSV- TYPE-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikram

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Acute infections of nervous system are among the most important problems in medicine because early recognition, efficient decision making and rapid institution of therapy can be lifesaving. Making a clinical diagnosis of acute meningitis depends on the cornerstone of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF examination. We present a case with the above-mentioned difficulty and the approach involved in establishing the exact diagnosis and institution of appropriate treatment. CONCLUSION About findings in viral meningitis one should be careful while evaluating a CSF report so as to not make a mistaken diagnosis and delay treatment. The most important analysis in patients whose symptoms are consistent with herpes simplex meningitis is the detection of Herpes simplex Virus deoxy-ribo-nucleic acid (HSV-DNA in CSF with Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR.

  2. Recent Advances of Colony-Stimulating Factor-1 Receptor (CSF-1R) Kinase and Its Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Gamal, Mohammed I; Al-Ameen, Shahad K; Al-Koumi, Dania M; Hamad, Mawadda G; Jalal, Nouran A; Oh, Chang-Hyun

    2018-01-17

    Colony stimulation factor-1 receptor (CSF-1R), which is also known as FMS kinase, plays an important role in initiating inflammatory, cancer, and bone disorders when it is overstimulated by its ligand, CSF-1. Innate immunity, as well as macrophage differentiation and survival, are regulated by the stimulation of the CSF-1R. Another ligand, interlukin-34 (IL-34), was recently reported to activate the CSF-1R receptor in a different manner. The relationship between CSF-1R and microglia has been reviewed. Both CSF-1 antibodies and small molecule CSF-1R kinase inhibitors have now been tested in animal models and in humans. In this Perspective, we discuss the role of CSF-1 and IL-34 in producing cancer, bone disorders, and inflammation. We also review the newly discovered and improved small molecule kinase inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies that have shown potent activity toward CSF-1R, reported from 2012 until 2017.

  3. Colon-specific pulsatile drug release provided by electrospun shellac nanocoating on hydrophilic amorphous composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yao-Yao; Liu, Zhe-Peng; Yu, Deng-Guang; Wang, Ke; Liu, Ping; Chen, Xiaohong

    2018-01-01

    Colon-specific pulsatile drug release, as a combined drug controlled-release model, is a useful drug delivery manner for a series of diseases. New nanomedicines and related preparation methods are highly desired. With diclofenac sodium (DS) as a model drug, a new type of structural nanocomposite (SC), in which composite polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)-DS core was coated by shellac, was fabricated via modified coaxial electrospinning. For comparison, traditional PVP-DS monolithic hydrophilic nanocomposites (HCs) were generated using a traditional blending process. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR), water contact angle (WCA), and in vitro dissolution and ex vivo permeation tests were conducted to characterize the composites. SEM images demonstrated that both composites were linear nanofibers with smooth surface morphology and cross sections. TEM disclosed that the SCs had a thin shellac sheath layer of approximately 12 nm. XRD and ATR-FTIR results demonstrated that the crystalline DS was converted into amorphous composites with PVP because of favorable secondary interactions. WCA and in vitro dissolution tests demonstrated that the sheath shellac layers in SC could resist acid conditions and provide typical colon-specific pulsatile release, rather than a pulsatile release of HC under acid conditions. Ex vivo permeation results demonstrated that the SCs were able to furnish a tenfold drug permeation rate than the DS particles on the colon membrane. A new SC with a shellac coating on hydrophilic amorphous nanocomposites could furnish a colon-specific pulsatile drug release profile. The modified coaxial process can be exploited as a useful tool to create nanocoatings.

  4. Feasibility Study of Ex Ovo Chick Chorioallantoic Artery Model for Investigating Pulsatile Variation of Arterial Geometry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kweon-Ho Nam

    Full Text Available Despite considerable research efforts on the relationship between arterial geometry and cardiovascular pathology, information is lacking on the pulsatile geometrical variation caused by arterial distensibility and cardiomotility because of the lack of suitable in vivo experimental models and the methodological difficulties in examining the arterial dynamics. We aimed to investigate the feasibility of using a chick embryo system as an experimental model for basic research on the pulsatile variation of arterial geometry. Optical microscope video images of various arterial shapes in chick chorioallantoic circulation were recorded from different locations and different embryo samples. The high optical transparency of the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM allowed clear observation of tiny vessels and their movements. Systolic and diastolic changes in arterial geometry were visualized by detecting the wall boundaries from binary images. Several to hundreds of microns of wall displacement variations were recognized during a pulsatile cycle. The spatial maps of the wall motion harmonics and magnitude ratio of harmonic components were obtained by analyzing the temporal brightness variation at each pixel in sequential grayscale images using spectral analysis techniques. The local variations in the spectral characteristics of the arterial wall motion were reflected well in the analysis results. In addition, mapping the phase angle of the fundamental frequency identified the regional variations in the wall motion directivity and phase shift. Regional variations in wall motion phase angle and fundamental-to-second harmonic ratio were remarkable near the bifurcation area. In summary, wall motion in various arterial geometry including straight, curved and bifurcated shapes was well observed in the CAM artery model, and their local and cyclic variations could be characterized by Fourier and wavelet transforms of the acquired video images. The CAM artery model with

  5. Delivery of CSF-1R to the lumen of macropinosomes promotes its destruction in macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Jieqiong; Low-Nam, Shalini T.; Kerkvliet, Jason G.; Hoppe, Adam D.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Activation of the macrophage colony stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF-1R) by CSF-1 stimulates pronounced macropinocytosis and drives proliferation of macrophages. Although the role of macropinocytosis in CSF-1R signaling remains unknown, we show here that, despite internalizing large quantities of plasma membrane, macropinosomes contribute little to the internalization of the CSF-1–CSF-1R complex. Rather, internalization of the CSF-1R in small endocytic vesicles that are sensitive to clathrin disruption, outcompetes macropinosomes for CSF-1R endocytosis. Following internalization, small vesicles carrying the CSF-1R underwent homotypic fusion and then trafficked to newly formed macropinosomes bearing Rab5. As these macropinosomes matured, acquiring Rab7, the CSF-1R was transported into their lumen and degraded. Inhibition of macropinocytosis delayed receptor degradation despite no disruption to CSF-1R endocytosis. These data indicate that CSF-1-stimulated macropinosomes are sites of multivesicular body formation and accelerate CSF-1R degradation. Furthermore, we demonstrate that macropinocytosis and cell growth have a matching dose dependence on CSF-1, suggesting that macropinosomes might be a central mechanism coupling CSF-1R signaling and macrophage growth. PMID:25335894

  6. Flow pumping system for physiological waveforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, William; Savaş, Omer

    2010-02-01

    A pulsatile flow pumping system is developed to replicate flow waveforms with reasonable accuracy for experiments simulating physiological blood flows at numerous points in the body. The system divides the task of flow waveform generation between two pumps: a gear pump generates the mean component and a piston pump generates the oscillatory component. The system is driven by two programmable servo controllers. The frequency response of the system is used to characterize its operation. The system has been successfully tested in vascular flow experiments where sinusoidal, carotid, and coronary flow waveforms are replicated.

  7. Application of smart differential pressure transmitters (DPTS) for containment studies facility (CSF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shanware, V.M.; Gole, N.V.; Sebastian, A.; Subramaniam, K.

    2001-01-01

    Containment Studies Facility (CSF) is being set up in BARC for studying various containment related thermal hydraulic and other processes during simulated conditions of pipe rupture. The set up consists of a model reactor containment vessel with a model primary heat transport system. Besides, provisions exist to introduce aerosols and hydrogen also in the containment model. The instrumentation includes measurement of the process temperatures, pressures, levels, flows, humidity, etc. Differential Pressure Transmitters (DPT) will be used for measurement of levels and flows in the CSF. The procured DPTs for this facility are smart. Conventional transmitters have a rangeability specification of 5 or 6. But the smart transmitters have rangeability varying between 40-100. Smart transmitters have facility to change its operating range online. This enables the provision of zooming in on the selected range and narrowing the range around the point of measurement. This facility can be exploited to realise the maximum possible accuracy at the smallest possible range around the point of measurement. This paper describes how the smart DPTs function, how the Highway Addressable Remote Transmitter (HART) protocol works and how we propose to use the on-line rangeability of these DPTs get the highest resolution in our measurements. (author)

  8. Cerebrospinal fluid pulsation amplitude and its quantitative relationship to cerebral blood flow pulsations: a phase-contrast MR flow imaging study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhadelia, R.A.; Bogdan, A.R.; Kaplan, R.F.; Wolpert, S.M.

    1997-01-01

    Our purpose in this investigation was to explain the heterogeneity in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow pulsation amplitudes. To this end, we determined the contributions of the cerebral arterial and jugular venous flow pulsations to the amplitude of the CSF pulsation. We examined 21 healthy subjects by cine phase-contrast MRI at the C2-3 disc level to demonstrate the CSF and vascular flows as waveforms. Multiple regression analysis was performed to calculate the contributions of (a) the arterial and venous waveform amplitudes and (b) the delay between the maximum systolic slopes of the arterial and venous waveforms (AV delay), in order to predict the amplitude of the CSF waveform. The contribution of the arterial waveform amplitude was positive (r = 0.61; p 0.003) to the CSF waveform amplitude and that of the venous waveform amplitude was negative (r = -0.50; p = 0.006). Both in combination accounted for 56 % of the variance in predicting the CSF waveform amplitude (p < 0.0006). The contribution of AV delay was not significant. The results show that the variance in the CSF flow pulsation amplitudes can be explained by concurrent evaluation of the CSF and vascular flows. Improvement in the techniques, and controlled experiments, may allow use of CSF flow pulsation amplitudes for clinical applications in the non-invasive assessment of intracranial dynamics by MRI. (orig.). With 3 figs., 2 tabs

  9. An intriguing design concept to enhance the pulsatile fatigue life of self-expanding stents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Hao-Ming; Yin, Ming-Ting

    2014-02-01

    Intravascular stenting has emerged as the primary treatment for vascular diseases and has received great attention from the medical community since its introduction two decades ago. The endovascular self-expanding stent is used to treat peripheral artery diseases; however, once implanted, these stents suffer from various cyclic motions caused by pulsatile blood pressure and daily activities. Due to this challenging environment, fatigue performance has become a critical issue for stent design. In this paper, a simple yet intriguing concept of stent design aimed at enhancing pulsatile fatigue life is investigated. The concept of this design is to shift the highly concentrated stresses/strains away from the crown and re-distribute them along the stress-free bar arm by tapering its strut width. Finite element models were developed to evaluate the mechanical integrity and pulsatile fatigue resistance of the stent to various loading conditions. Results show that the fatigue safety factor jumped to 2.5-3.0 times that of the standard stent with constant strut width. This is astonishing considering that the stent profile and scaffolding were not compromised. The findings of this paper provide an excellent approach to the optimization of future stent design to greatly improve stent fatigue performance.

  10. Contribution of isotopic data in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Askienazy, S.; Ducassou, D.

    The growing interest in isotopic CSF studies is explained by the fact that the mechanism and classification of hydrocephalus cases are based not only on anatomoclinical data but also on physiological information inaccessible by static image methods. This article shows the full importance of dynamic CSF research (ideal tracer: 111 In-DTPA); the possibilities of myeloscintigraphy to study the permeability of the medullary sub-arachnoid spaces (tracers used: sup(99m)Tc-DTPA in the liquid phase or xenon bubble technique in the gas phase); ventricular morphology; existence of meningeal gaps [fr

  11. In-vivo imaging of blood flow dynamics using color Doppler optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdanfar, Siavash; Rollins, Andrew M.; Izatt, Joseph A.

    2000-04-01

    Noninvasive quantitation of blood flow in the retinal micro circulation may elucidate the progression and treatment of ocular disorders including diabetic retinopathy, age-related degeneration, and glaucoma. Color Doppler optical coherence tomography was recently introduced as a technique allowing simultaneous micron-scale resolution cross-sectional imaging of tissue micro structure and blood flow in the human retina. Here, time-resolved imaging of dynamics of blood flow profiles was performed to measure cardiac pulsatility within retinal vessels. Retinal pulsatility has been shown to decrease throughout the progression of diabetic retinopathy.

  12. Cerebrospinal fluid flow waveforms: effect of altered cranial venous outflow. A phase-contrast MR flow imaging study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhadelia, R.A.; Wolpert, S.M.

    1998-01-01

    Our purpose was to assess the effect of alterations in the cranial venous outflow on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow waveforms using phase-contrast MRI. Thirteen healthy subjects were assessed for CSF flow and cerebral vascular flow at the C2-3 level, both before and after jugular venous compression (JVC). The flow waveforms were assessed both as an aggregate, and after dividing subjects in two groups based on percent jugular venous flow (PJVF) i. e. jugular outflow expressed as percent of cerebral arterial inflow. Group 1: 7 subjects with PJVF more than and including median (predominantly jugular outflow); Group 2: 6 subjects with PJVF less than median (predominantly extra-jugular outflow). CSF waveforms: JVC produced rounding of contours and flattening of dicrotic waves, with the effect being greater in group 1 than group 2. In group 1, systolic upslopes of the waveforms increased. No significant aggregate amplitude changes were noted; amplidutes increased in group 1 (P = 0.001), and decreased in group 2 (P = 0.03). Temporal interval to the maximum CSF systolic flow significantly increased in group 1. Vascular flow: Arterial flow significantly decreased in group 1. Jugular flow significantly decreased in both groups. The results suggest that CSF flow waveforms are sensitive to alterations in the cranial venous outflow. Changes in group 1 are most likely because of an elevation in intracranial pressure. Analysis of CSF flow waveforms appears a promising noninvasive tool for assessment of cranial compartment. (orig.)

  13. Synovial CD4+ T-cell-derived GM-CSF supports the differentiation of an inflammatory dendritic cell population in rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, G; Gibbon, J R; Pratt, A G; Wood, M J; Coady, D; Raftery, G; Lorenzi, A R; Gray, A; Filer, A; Buckley, C D; Haniffa, M A; Isaacs, J D; Hilkens, C M U

    2016-01-01

    Objective A population of synovial inflammatory dendritic cells (infDCs) has recently been identified in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and is thought to be monocyte-derived. Here, we investigated the role and source of granulocyte macrophage-colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in the differentiation of synovial infDC in RA. Methods Production of GM-CSF by peripheral blood (PB) and synovial fluid (SF) CD4+ T cells was assessed by ELISA and flow cytometry. In vitro CD4+ T-cell polarisation experiments were performed with T-cell activating CD2/CD3/CD28-coated beads in the absence or presence of pro-Th1 or pro-Th17 cytokines. CD1c+ DC and CD16+ macrophage subsets were flow-sorted and analysed morphologically and functionally (T-cell stimulatory/polarising capacity). Results RA-SF CD4+ T cells produced abundant GM-CSF upon stimulation and significantly more than RA-SF mononuclear cells depleted of CD4+ T cells. GM-CSF-producing T cells were significantly increased in RA-SF compared with non-RA inflammatory arthritis SF, active RA PB and healthy donor PB. GM-CSF-producing CD4+ T cells were expanded by Th1-promoting but not Th17-promoting conditions. Following coculture with RA-SF CD4+ T cells, but not healthy donor PB CD4+ T cells, a subpopulation of monocytes differentiated into CD1c+ infDC; a process dependent on GM-CSF. These infDC displayed potent alloproliferative capacity and enhanced GM-CSF, interleukin-17 and interferon-γ production by CD4+ T cells. InfDC with an identical phenotype to in vitro generated cells were significantly enriched in RA-SF compared with non-RA-SF/tissue/PB. Conclusions We demonstrate a therapeutically tractable feedback loop of GM-CSF secreted by RA synovial CD4+ T cells promoting the differentiation of infDC with potent capacity to induce GM-CSF-producing CD4+ T cells. PMID:25923217

  14. Bacterial Isolates from Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) of Patients In a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The presence of bacteria in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) results in the inflammation of the meninges, a condition known as meningitis. The aim of the study is to determine the prevalence of bacteria, which causes meningitis and their susceptibility pattern. This study, which was prospective and cross sectional involved patients ...

  15. CSF biomarker variability in the Alzheimer's Association quality control program

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mattsson, N.; Andreasson, U.; Persson, S.; Carrillo, M.C.; Collins, S.; Chalbot, S.; Cutler, N.; Dufour-Rainfray, D.; Fagan, A.M.; Heegaard, N.H.H.; Robin Hsiung, G.Y.; Hyman, B.; Iqbal, K.; Lachno, D.R.; Lleo, A.; Lewczuk, P.; Molinuevo, J.L.; Parchi, P.; Regeniter, A.; Rissman, R.; Rosenmann, H.; Sancesario, G.; Schroder, J.; Shaw, L.M.; Teunissen, C.E.; Trojanowski, J.Q.; Vanderstichele, H.; Vandijck, M.; Verbeek, M.M.; Zetterberg, H.; Blennow, K.; Kaser, S.A.; et al.,

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers amyloid beta 1-42, total tau, and phosphorylated tau are used increasingly for Alzheimer's disease (AD) research and patient management. However, there are large variations in biomarker measurements among and within laboratories. METHODS: Data

  16. CSF biomarker variability in the Alzheimer's Association quality control program

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mattsson, N.; Andreasson, U.; Persson, S.; Carrillo, M.C.; Collins, S.; Chalbot, S.; Cutler, N.; Dufour-Rainfray, D.; Fagan, A.M.; Heegaard, N.H.H.; Hsiung, G.Y.R.; Hyman, B.; Iqbal, K.; Lachno, D.R.; Lleo, A.; Lewczuk, P.; Molinuevo, J.L.; Parchi, P.; Regeniter, A.; Rissman, R.; Rosenmann, H.; Sancesario, G.; Schroder, J.; Shaw, L.M.; Teunissen, C.E.; Trojanowski, J.Q.; Vanderstichele, H.; Vandijck, M.; Verbeek, M.M.; Zetterberg, H.; Blennow, K.; Kaser, S.A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers amyloid beta 1-42, total tau, and phosphorylated tau are used increasingly for Alzheimer's disease (AD) research and patient management. However, there are large variations in biomarker measurements among and within laboratories. Methods: Data

  17. The diagnosis of CSF fistulas with rhinorrhea by isotope cisternography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salar, G.; Carteri, A.; Zampieri, P.

    1978-01-01

    The experience with the use of RIHSA cisternography in cases of spontaneous of post-traumatic CSF rhinorrhea is reported. The utility of this method for identifying the fistulous tract so that the neurosurgeon can, as far as he is able, carry out a direct and not solely exploratory operation is pointed out. (orig.) [de

  18. Fatal cerebral edema associated with serine deficiency in CSF

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keularts, Irene M. L. W.; Leroy, Piet L. J. M.; Rubio-Gozalbo, Estela M.; Spaapen, Leo J. M.; Weber, Biene; Dorland, Bert; de Koning, Tom J.; Verhoeven-Duif, Nanda M.

    2010-01-01

    Two young girls without a notable medical history except for asthma presented with an acute toxic encephalopathy with very low serine concentrations both in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) comparable to patients with 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (3-PGDH) deficiency. Clinical symptoms and

  19. G-CSF Intrauterine for Thin Endometrium, and Pregnancy Outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ensieh Tehraninejad

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective:To evaluate effects ofG-CSF on a cancelled ART cycle due to thin endometrium.Materials and methods:In a nonrandomized clinical trial from January 2011 to January 2013 in two tertiary university based hospitals fifteen patients undergoing embryo transfer and with the history of cycle cancellation due to thin endometrium were studied. Intrauterine infusion of G-CSF was done on the day of oocyte pick-up or 5 days before embryo transfer. The primary outcome to be measured was an endometrium thickened to at least 6 mm and the secondary outcome was clinical pregnancy rate and consequently take-home baby. All previous cycles were considered as control for each patient.Results:The G-CSF was infused at the day of oocyte retrieval or 5 days before embryo transfer. The endometrial thickness reached from3.593±0.251 mm to 7.120±0.84 mm. The mean age, gravidity, parity, and FSH were 35.13± 9.531 years,3, 1 and32.78± 31.10 mIU/ml, respectively. The clinical pregnancy rate was 20%, and there was one missed abortion, a mother death at 34 weeks, and a preterm labor at 30 weeks due to PROM.Conclusion:G-CSF may increase endometrial thickness in the small group of patients who had no choice except cycle cancellation or surrogacy.

  20. Increased CSF Homocysteine in Pathological Gamblers Compared with Healthy Controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordin, Conny; Sjodin, Ingemar

    2009-01-01

    Neurocognitive disturbances suggesting a frontal lobe dysfunction have been observed in pathological gamblers and alcohol dependents. Given that a high homocysteine level has been suggested to be a mediating factor in alcohol-related cognitive decline, we have determined homocysteine and cobalamine in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) obtained from 11…

  1. Inherited biallelic CSF3R mutations in severe congenital neutropenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triot, Alexa; Järvinen, Päivi M; Arostegui, Juan I; Murugan, Dhaarini; Kohistani, Naschla; Dapena Díaz, José Luis; Racek, Tomas; Puchałka, Jacek; Gertz, E Michael; Schäffer, Alejandro A; Kotlarz, Daniel; Pfeifer, Dietmar; Díaz de Heredia Rubio, Cristina; Ozdemir, Mehmet Akif; Patiroglu, Turkan; Karakukcu, Musa; Sánchez de Toledo Codina, José; Yagüe, Jordi; Touw, Ivo P; Unal, Ekrem; Klein, Christoph

    2014-06-12

    Severe congenital neutropenia (SCN) is characterized by low numbers of peripheral neutrophil granulocytes and a predisposition to life-threatening bacterial infections. We describe a novel genetic SCN type in 2 unrelated families associated with recessively inherited loss-of-function mutations in CSF3R, encoding the granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) receptor. Family A, with 3 affected children, carried a homozygous missense mutation (NM_000760.3:c.922C>T, NP_000751.1:p.Arg308Cys), which resulted in perturbed N-glycosylation and aberrant localization to the cell surface. Family B, with 1 affected infant, carried compound heterozygous deletions provoking frameshifts and premature stop codons (NM_000760.3:c.948_963del, NP_000751.1:p.Gly316fsTer322 and NM_000760.3:c.1245del, NP_000751.1:p.Gly415fsTer432). Despite peripheral SCN, all patients had morphologic evidence of full myeloid cell maturation in bone marrow. None of the patients responded to treatment with recombinant human G-CSF. Our study highlights the genetic and morphologic SCN variability and provides evidence both for functional importance and redundancy of G-CSF receptor-mediated signaling in human granulopoiesis. © 2014 by The American Society of Hematology.

  2. CSF Amino Acids, Pterins and Mechanism of the Ketogenic Diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Gordon Millichap

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Investigators from Hospital Sant Joan de Deu, Barcelona, Spain, studied the relationship between the etiology of refractory childhood epilepsy, CSF neurotransmitters, pterins, and amino acids, and response to a ketogenic diet in 60 patients with refractory epilepsy, 83% focal and 52% idiopathic.

  3. Using CSF biomarkers to replicate genetic associations in Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schott, Jonathan M.; Abdi, Hervé; Abdul Hadi, Normi; Abdulkadir, Ahmed; Abdullah, Afnizanfaizal; Achuthan, Anusha; Adluru, Nagesh; Aggarwal, Namita; Aghajanian, Jania; Agyemang, Alex; Ahdidan, Jamila; Ahmad, Duaa; Ahmed, Fayeza; Ahmed, Shiek; Ahmed, Fareed; Akbarifar, Roshanak; Akhondi-Asl, Alireza; Aksu, Yaman; Alcauter, Sarael; Alexander, Daniel; Alin, Aylin; Alshuft, Hamza; Alvarez-Linera, Juan; Amin-Mansour, Ali; Anderson, Jeff; Anderson, Dallas; Andorn, Anne; Andrews, K. Abigail; Ang, Amma; Angersbach, Steve; Ansarian, Reza; Abhishek, Appaji M.; Appannah, Arti; Arfanakis, Konstantinos; Arif, Muhammad; Armentrout, Steven; Arrighi, Michael; Arumughababu, S. Vethanayaki; Arunagiri, Vidhya; Ashe-McNalley, Cody; Ashford, Wes; Le Page, Aurelie; Avants, Brian; Aviv, Richard; Avula, Ramesh; Ayache, Nicholas; Ayan-Oshodi, Mosun; Ayhan, Murat; Richard, Edo; Schmand, Ben

    2012-01-01

    Defining cases and controls on the basis of biomarkers rather than clinical diagnosis may reduce sample sizes required for genetic studies. The aim of this study was to assess whether characterizing case/control status on the basis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) profile would increase power to

  4. Comparison of the Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) Toluidine Red Unheated Serum Test and the CSF Rapid Plasma Reagin Test with the CSF Venereal Disease Research Laboratory Test for Diagnosis of Neurosyphilis among HIV-Negative Syphilis Patients in China

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Lin; Gu, Xin; Peng, Rui-Rui; Wang, Cuini; Gao, Zixiao; Zhou, Pingyu; Gao, Ying; Shi, Mei; Guan, Zhifang; Seña, Arlene C.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to investigate the performance of nontreponemal antibody tests in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) specimens from syphilis patients. From September 2009 to September 2012, CSF specimens were collected at the Shanghai Skin Disease Hospital in Shanghai, China, from 1,132 syphilis patients without HIV infection, including 154 with symptomatic and 56 with asymptomatic neurosyphilis. All of the CSF specimens underwent testing with a rapid plasma reagin (RPR) test, an RPR-V (commer...

  5. Biological role of granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) on cells of the myeloid lineage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushach, Irina; Zlotnik, Albert

    2016-01-01

    M-CSF and GM-CSF are 2 important cytokines that regulate macrophage numbers and function. Here, we review their known effects on cells of the macrophage-monocyte lineage. Important clues to their function come from their expression patterns. M-CSF exhibits a mostly homeostatic expression pattern, whereas GM-CSF is a product of cells activated during inflammatory or pathologic conditions. Accordingly, M-CSF regulates the numbers of various tissue macrophage and monocyte populations without altering their "activation" status. Conversely, GM-CSF induces activation of monocytes/macrophages and also mediates differentiation to other states that participate in immune responses [i.e., dendritic cells (DCs)]. Further insights into their function have come from analyses of mice deficient in either cytokine. M-CSF signals through its receptor (CSF-1R). Interestingly, mice deficient in CSF-1R expression exhibit a more significant phenotype than mice deficient in M-CSF. This observation was explained by the discovery of a novel cytokine (IL-34) that represents a second ligand of CSF-1R. Information about the function of these ligands/receptor system is still developing, but its complexity is intriguing and strongly suggests that more interesting biology remains to be elucidated. Based on our current knowledge, several therapeutic molecules targeting either the M-CSF or the GM-CSF pathways have been developed and are currently being tested in clinical trials targeting either autoimmune diseases or cancer. It is intriguing to consider how evolution has directed these pathways to develop; their complexity likely mirrors the multiple functions in which cells of the monocyte/macrophage system are involved. PMID:27354413

  6. Emerging Roles for CSF-1 Receptor and its Ligands in the Nervous System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitu, Violeta; Gokhan, Solen; Nandi, Sayan; Mehler, Mark F.; Stanley, E. Richard

    2016-01-01

    The colony stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF-1R) kinase regulates tissue macrophage homeostasis, osteoclastogenesis, and Paneth cell development. However, recent studies in mice have revealed that CSF-1R signaling directly controls the development and maintenance of microglia, and cell autonomously regulates neuronal differentiation and survival. While the CSF-1R-cognate ligands, CSF-1 and interleukin-34 (IL-34), compete for binding to the CSF-1R, they are expressed in a largely non-overlapping manner by mature neurons. The recent identification of a dominantly inherited, adult-onset, progressive dementia associated with inactivating mutations in the CSF-1R highlights the importance of CSF-1R signaling in the brain. We review the roles of the CSF-1R and its ligands in microglial and neural development and function, and their relevance to our understanding of neurodegenerative disease. PMID:27083478

  7. IL-34 and CSF-1 display an equivalent macrophage differentiation ability but a different polarization potential

    OpenAIRE

    Boulakirba, Sonia; Pfeifer, Anja; Mhaidly, Rana; Obba, Sandrine; Goulard, Michael; Schmitt, Thomas; Chaintreuil, Paul; Calleja, Anne; Furstoss, Nathan; Orange, François; Lacas-Gervais, Sandra; Boyer, Laurent; Marchetti, Sandrine; Verhoeyen, Els; Luciano, Frederic

    2018-01-01

    CSF-1 and IL-34 share the CSF-1 receptor and no differences have been reported in the signaling pathways triggered by both ligands in human monocytes. IL-34 promotes the differentiation and survival of monocytes, macrophages and osteoclasts, as CSF-1 does. However, IL-34 binds other receptors, suggesting that differences exist in the effect of both cytokines. In the present study, we compared the differentiation and polarization abilities of human primary monocytes in response to CSF-1 or IL-...

  8. Heterogeneous effects of M-CSF isoforms on the progression of MLL-AF9 leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rong; Feng, Wenli; Yang, Feifei; Yang, Xiao; Wang, Lina; Chen, Chong; Hu, Yuting; Ren, Qian; Zheng, Guoguang

    2018-02-01

    Macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) regulates both malignant cells and microenvironmental cells. Its splicing isoforms show functional heterogeneity. However, their roles on leukemia have not been well established. Here, the expression of total M-CSF in patients with hematopoietic malignancies was analyzed. The roles of M-CSF isoforms on the progression of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) were studied by establishing MLL-AF9-induced mouse AML models with high level membrane-bound M-CSF (mM-CSF) or soluble M-CSF (sM-CSF). Total M-CSF was highly expressed in myeloid leukemia patients. Furthermore, mM-CSF but not sM-CSF prolonged the survival of leukemia mice. While sM-CSF was more potent to promote proliferation and self-renew, mM-CSF was more potent to promote differentiation. Moreover, isoforms had different effects on leukemia-associated macrophages (LAMs) though they both increase monocytes/macrophages by growth-promoting and recruitment effects. In addition, mM-CSF promoted specific phagocytosis of leukemia cells by LAMs. RNA-seq analysis revealed that mM-CSF enhanced phagocytosis-associated genes and activated oxidative phosphorylation and metabolism pathway. These results highlight heterogeneous effects of M-CSF isoforms on AML progression and the mechanisms of mM-CSF, that is, intrinsically promoting AML cell differentiation and extrinsically enhancing infiltration of macrophages and phagocytosis by macrophages, which may provide potential clues for clinical diagnosis and therapy. © 2017 Australasian Society for Immunology Inc.

  9. Continuous positive airway pressure alters cranial blood flow and cerebrospinal fluid dynamics at the craniovertebral junction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theresia I. Yiallourou

    2015-09-01

    Conclusion: Application of CPAP via a full-fitted mask at 15 cm H2O was found to have a significant effect on intracranial venous outflow and spinal CSF flow at the C2 vertebral level in healthy adult-age awake volunteers. CPAP can be used to non-invasively provoke changes in intracranial and CSF flow dynamics.

  10. DMPD: CSF-1 and cell cycle control in macrophages. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 8981359 CSF-1 and cell cycle control in macrophages. Hamilton JA. Mol Reprod Dev. 1...997 Jan;46(1):19-23. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show CSF-1 and cell cycle control in macrophages. PubmedI...D 8981359 Title CSF-1 and cell cycle control in macrophages. Authors Hamilton JA. Publication Mol Reprod Dev

  11. Therapeutic use of recombinant human G-CSF (rhG-CSF) in a canine model of sublethal and lethal whole-body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacVittie, T.J.; Monroy, R.L.; Patchen, M.L.; Souza, L.M.

    1990-01-01

    Recombinant human G-CSF (rhG-CSF) was studied for its ability to modulate haemopoiesis in normal dogs as well as to decrease therapeutically the severity and duration of neutropenia in sublethally and lethally irradiated dogs. Data indicate that in the lethally irradiated dog, effective cytokine therapy with rhG-CSF will increase survival through the induction of earlier recovery of neutrophils and platelets. (author)

  12. A neurokinin 3 receptor-selective agonist accelerates pulsatile luteinizing hormone secretion in lactating cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Sho; Wakabayashi, Yoshihiro; Yamamura, Takashi; Ohkura, Satoshi; Matsuyama, Shuichi

    2017-07-01

    Pulsatile gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) secretion, which is indispensable for follicular development, is suppressed in lactating dairy and beef cattle. Neurokinin B (NKB) neurons in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus are considered to play an essential role in generating the pulsatile mode of GnRH/luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion. The present study aimed to clarify the role of NKB-neurokinin 3 receptor (NK3R) signaling in the pulsatile pattern of GnRH/gonadotropin secretion in postpartum lactating cattle. We examined the effects of the administration of an NK3R-selective agonist, senktide, on gonadotropin secretion in lactating cattle. The lactating cattle, at approximately 7 days postpartum, were intravenously infused with senktide (30 or 300 nmol/min) or vehicle for 24 h. The administration of 30 or 300 nmol/min senktide significantly increased LH pulse frequency compared to in the control group during 0-4 or 20-24 h after infusion, respectively. Moreover, LH and follicle-stimulating hormone levels were gradually increased by 300 nmol/min administration of senktide during the 0-4-h sampling period. Ultrasonography of the ovaries was performed to identify the first postpartum ovulation in senktide-administered lactating cattle. The interval from calving to first postpartum ovulation was significantly shorter in the 300 nmol/min senktide-administered group than in the control group. Taken together, these findings suggest that senktide infusion elicits an increase in LH pulse frequency that may stimulate follicular development and, in turn, induce the first postpartum ovulation in lactating cattle. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Society for the Study of Reproduction. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. SU-E-I-51: Use of Blade Sequences in Cervical Spine MR Imaging for Eliminating Motion, Truncation and Flow Artifacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mavroidis, P [University of Texas Health Science Center, UTHSCSA, San Antonio, TX (United States); Lavdas, E; Kostopoulos, S; Ninos, C; Strikou, A; Glotsos, D; Vlachopoulou, A; Oikonomou, G [Technological Education Institute of Athens, Athens, Athens (Greece); Economopoulos, N [General University Hospital ATTIKON, Athens, Athens (Greece); Roka, V [Health Center of Farkadona, Trikala (Greece); Sakkas, G [Center for Research and Technology of Thessaly, Trikala (Greece); Tsagkalis, A; Batsikas, G [IASO Thessalias Hospital, Larissa (Greece); Statkahis, S [Cancer Therapy and Research Center, San Antonio, TX (United States); Papanikolaou, N [University of Texas HSC SA, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy of the BLADE technique to eliminate motion, truncation, flow and other artifacts in Cervical Spine MRI compared to the conventional technique. To study the ability of the examined sequences to reduce the indetention and wrap artifacts, which have been reported in BLADE sagittal sequences. Methods: Forty consecutive subjects, who had been routinely scanned for cervical spine examination using four different image acquisition techniques, were analyzed. More specifically, the following pairs of sequences were compared: a) T2 TSE SAG vs. T2 TSE SAG BLADE and b) T2 TIRM SAG vs. T2 TIRM SAG BLADE. A quantitative analysis was performed using the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and relative contrast (ReCon) measures. A qualitative analysis was also performed by two radiologists, who graded seven image characteristics on a 5-point scale (0:non-visualization; 1:poor; 2:average; 3:good; 4:excellent). The observers also evaluated the presence of image artifacts (motion, truncation, flow, indentation). Results: Based on the findings of the quantitative analysis, the ReCON values of the CSF (cerebrospinal fluid)/SC (spinal cord) between TIRM SAG and TIRM SAG BLADE were found to present statistical significant differences (p<0.001). Regarding motion and truncation artifacts, the T2 TSE SAG BLADE was superior compared to the T2 TSE SAG and the T2 TIRM SAG BLADE was superior compared to the T2 TIRM SAG. Regarding flow artifacts, T2 TIRM SAG BLADE eliminated more artifacts compared to the T2 TIRM SAG. Conclusion: The use of BLADE sequences in cervical spine MR examinations appears to be capable of potentially eliminating motion, pulsatile flow and trancation artifacts. Furthermore, BLADE sequences are proposed to be used in the standard examination protocols based on the fact that a significantly improved image quality could be achieved.

  14. SU-E-I-51: Use of Blade Sequences in Cervical Spine MR Imaging for Eliminating Motion, Truncation and Flow Artifacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mavroidis, P; Lavdas, E; Kostopoulos, S; Ninos, C; Strikou, A; Glotsos, D; Vlachopoulou, A; Oikonomou, G; Economopoulos, N; Roka, V; Sakkas, G; Tsagkalis, A; Batsikas, G; Statkahis, S; Papanikolaou, N

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy of the BLADE technique to eliminate motion, truncation, flow and other artifacts in Cervical Spine MRI compared to the conventional technique. To study the ability of the examined sequences to reduce the indetention and wrap artifacts, which have been reported in BLADE sagittal sequences. Methods: Forty consecutive subjects, who had been routinely scanned for cervical spine examination using four different image acquisition techniques, were analyzed. More specifically, the following pairs of sequences were compared: a) T2 TSE SAG vs. T2 TSE SAG BLADE and b) T2 TIRM SAG vs. T2 TIRM SAG BLADE. A quantitative analysis was performed using the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and relative contrast (ReCon) measures. A qualitative analysis was also performed by two radiologists, who graded seven image characteristics on a 5-point scale (0:non-visualization; 1:poor; 2:average; 3:good; 4:excellent). The observers also evaluated the presence of image artifacts (motion, truncation, flow, indentation). Results: Based on the findings of the quantitative analysis, the ReCON values of the CSF (cerebrospinal fluid)/SC (spinal cord) between TIRM SAG and TIRM SAG BLADE were found to present statistical significant differences (p<0.001). Regarding motion and truncation artifacts, the T2 TSE SAG BLADE was superior compared to the T2 TSE SAG and the T2 TIRM SAG BLADE was superior compared to the T2 TIRM SAG. Regarding flow artifacts, T2 TIRM SAG BLADE eliminated more artifacts compared to the T2 TIRM SAG. Conclusion: The use of BLADE sequences in cervical spine MR examinations appears to be capable of potentially eliminating motion, pulsatile flow and trancation artifacts. Furthermore, BLADE sequences are proposed to be used in the standard examination protocols based on the fact that a significantly improved image quality could be achieved

  15. Electroresponsive polymer-carbon nanotube hydrogel hybrids for pulsatile drug delivery in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servant, Ania; Methven, Laura; Williams, Rhodri P; Kostarelos, Kostas

    2013-06-01

    Drug release triggered by an external non-invasive stimulus is of great interest for the development of new drug delivery systems. The preparation of an electroresponsive multiwalled carbon nanotube/poly(methylacrylic acid) (MWNT/PMAA)-based hybrid material is reported. The hydrogel hybrids achieve a controlled drug release upon the ON/OFF application of an electric field, giving rise to in vitro and in vivo pulsatile release profiles. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Pulsatile luteinizing hormone secretion in patients with Addison's disease. Impact of glucocorticoid substitution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hangaard, J; Andersen, M; Grodum, E

    1998-01-01

    The physiological and pathophysiological role of cortisol in pulsatile LH release was investigated in 14 patients (5 men, 6 premenopausal women, and 3 postmenopausal women) with Addison's disease. The explicit effect of cortisol in relation to the effect of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF......), ACTH, and opioids was ensured by hypo-, normo-, and hypercortisolism. Hypocortisolism was obtained by 24-h discontinuation of hydrocortisone (HC) followed by 23-h saline infusion. Eucortisolism was secured by infusion of HC (0.5 mg/kg) over 23 h. Stress-appropriate hypercortisolism was obtained...

  17. Pulsatile and steady-state hemodynamics of the human patella bone by diffuse optical spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farzam, Parisa; Zirak, Peyman; Durduran, Turgut; Binzoni, Tiziano

    2013-01-01

    The cardiac cycle related pulsatile behavior of the absorption and scattering coefficients of diffuse light and the corresponding alterations in hemoglobin concentrations in the human patella was studied. The pulsations in scattering is considerably smaller than absorption. The difference in amplitude of absorption coefficient pulsations for different wavelengths was translated to pulsations in oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin, which leads to strong pulsations in the total hemoglobin concentration and oxygen saturation. The physiological origin of the observed signals was confirmed by applying a thigh-cuff. Moreover, we have investigated the optical and physiological properties of the patella bone and their changes in response to arterial cuff occlusion. (paper)

  18. Pulsatile and steady-state hemodynamics of the human patella bone by diffuse optical spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzam, Parisa; Zirak, Peyman; Binzoni, Tiziano; Durduran, Turgut

    2013-08-01

    The cardiac cycle related pulsatile behavior of the absorption and scattering coefficients of diffuse light and the corresponding alterations in hemoglobin concentrations in the human patella was studied. The pulsations in scattering is considerably smaller than absorption. The difference in amplitude of absorption coefficient pulsations for different wavelengths was translated to pulsations in oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin, which leads to strong pulsations in the total hemoglobin concentration and oxygen saturation. The physiological origin of the observed signals was confirmed by applying a thigh-cuff. Moreover, we have investigated the optical and physiological properties of the patella bone and their changes in response to arterial cuff occlusion.

  19. GM-CSF enhances tumor invasion by elevated MMP-2, -9, and -26 expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutschalk, Claudia M; Yanamandra, Archana K; Linde, Nina; Meides, Alice; Depner, Sofia; Mueller, Margareta M

    2013-01-01

    Granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) promotes tumor progression in different tumor models in an autocrine and paracrine manner. However, at the same time GM-CSF is used in cancer therapies to ameliorate neutropenia. We have previously shown in GM-CSF and G-CSF expressing or negative skin or head and neck squamous cell carcinoma that GM-CSF expression is associated with a highly angiogenic and invasive tumor phenotype. To determine the functional contribution of GM-CSF to tumor invasion, we stably transfected a GM-CSF negative colon adenocarcinoma cell line HT-29 with GM-CSF or treated the same cell line with exogenous GM-CSF. While GM-CSF overexpression and treatment reduced tumor cell proliferation and tumor growth in vitro and in vivo, respectively, it contributed to tumor progression. Together with an enhanced migratory capacity in vitro, we observed a striking increase in tumor cell invasion into the surrounding tissue concomitant with the induction of an activated tumor stroma in GM-CSF overexpressing or GM-CSF treated tumors. In a complex 3D in vitro model, enhanced GM-CSF expression was associated with a discontinued basement membrane deposition that might be mediated by the increased expression and activation of MMP-2, -9, and -26. Treatment with GM-CSF blocking antibodies reversed this effect. The increased presence and activity of these tumor cell derived proteases was confirmed in vivo. Here, expression of MMP-26 protein was predominantly located in pre- and early-invasive areas suggesting MMP-26 expression as an early event in promoting GM-CSF dependent tumor invasion

  20. Nucleolin Mediates MicroRNA-directed CSF-1 mRNA Deadenylation but Increases Translation of CSF-1 mRNA*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Ho-Hyung; Baker, Terri; Laszlo, Csaba; Chambers, Setsuko K.

    2013-01-01

    CSF-1 mRNA 3′UTR contains multiple unique motifs, including a common microRNA (miRNA) target in close proximity to a noncanonical G-quadruplex and AU-rich elements (AREs). Using a luciferase reporter system fused to CSF-1 mRNA 3′UTR, disruption of the miRNA target region, G-quadruplex, and AREs together dramatically increased reporter RNA levels, suggesting important roles for these cis-acting regulatory elements in the down-regulation of CSF-1 mRNA. We find that nucleolin, which binds both G-quadruplex and AREs, enhances deadenylation of CSF-1 mRNA, promoting CSF-1 mRNA decay, while having the capacity to increase translation of CSF-1 mRNA. Through interaction with the CSF-1 3′UTR miRNA common target, we find that miR-130a and miR-301a inhibit CSF-1 expression by enhancing mRNA decay. Silencing of nucleolin prevents the miRNA-directed mRNA decay, indicating a requirement for nucleolin in miRNA activity on CSF-1 mRNA. Downstream effects followed by miR-130a and miR-301a inhibition of directed cellular motility of ovarian cancer cells were found to be dependent on nucleolin. The paradoxical effects of nucleolin on miRNA-directed CSF-1 mRNA deadenylation and on translational activation were explored further. The nucleolin protein contains four acidic stretches, four RNA recognition motifs (RRMs), and nine RGG repeats. All three domains in nucleolin regulate CSF-1 mRNA and protein levels. RRMs increase CSF-1 mRNA, whereas the acidic and RGG domains decrease CSF-1 protein levels. This suggests that nucleolin has the capacity to differentially regulate both CSF-1 RNA and protein levels. Our finding that nucleolin interacts with Ago2 indirectly via RNA and with poly(A)-binding protein C (PABPC) directly suggests a nucleolin-Ago2-PABPC complex formation on mRNA. This complex is in keeping with our suggestion that nucleolin may work with PABPC as a double-edged sword on both mRNA deadenylation and translational activation. Our findings underscore the complexity of

  1. Developmental and functional significance of the CSF-1 proteoglycan chondroitin sulfate chain

    OpenAIRE

    Nandi, Sayan; Akhter, Mohammed P.; Seifert, Mark F.; Dai, Xu-Ming; Stanley, E. Richard

    2006-01-01

    The primary macrophage growth factor, colony-stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1), is homodimeric and exists in 3 biologically active isoforms: a membrane-spanning, cell-surface glycoprotein (csCSF-1) and secreted glycoprotein (sgCSF-1) and proteoglycan (spCSF-1) isoforms. To investigate the in vivo role of the chondroitin sulfate glycosaminoglycan (GAG) chain of spCSF-1, we created mice that exclusively express, in a normal tissue-specific and developmental manner, either the secreted precursor of s...

  2. G-CSF-primed BM for allogeneic SCT: revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pessach, I; Resnick, I; Shimoni, A; Nagler, A

    2015-07-01

    G-SCF-mobilized PBSC (GPB) grafts have a higher cell dose and somewhat more committed progenitor cells than steady-state BM (SBM), resulting in faster engraftment and faster immunological reconstitution. On the other hand, transplant related mortality (TRM), disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) are similar both for PB and for BM. In contrast to SBM, G-CSF-primed BM (GBM) grafts stimulate HSC proliferation, increasing cell dose and thus resulting in faster engraftment because of higher cell dose infused, or because of treatment with G-CSF. Furthermore, GBM may induce tolerance and functional modulations in donor hematopoiesis and immunity, further reducing GVHD incidence, which is already lower with SBM compared with GPB grafts. Overall, a growing body of clinical evidence suggests that GBM transplants may share the advantages of GPB transplantations, without the associated increased risk of GVHD, and might be an attractive graft source for allogeneic SCTs.

  3. Epidural blood patch for refractory low CSF pressure headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Søren Aalbæk; Fomsgaard, Jonna Storm; Jensen, Rigmor

    2011-01-01

    primary effect parameter was total headache burden defined as area under the curve (AUC: intensity × duration) and as secondary effect parameters we identified: intensity (VAS 0-10), frequency (days per month), duration in hours (total hours/month) and also medication days (days on medication...... of non-invasive/conservative measures and invasive measures with epidural blood patch providing the cornerstone of the invasive measures. In the present pilot study we therefore aimed to evaluate the treatment efficacy of epidural blood patch (EBP) in treatment-refractory low-pressure headache. Our......Once believed an exceedingly rare disorder, recent evidence suggests that low cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure headache has to be considered an important cause of new daily persistent headaches, particularly among young and middle-aged individuals. Treatment of low CSF pressure headache consists...

  4. Epidural blood patch for refractory low CSF pressure headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Søren Aalbæk; Fomsgaard, Jonna Storm; Jensen, Rigmor

    2011-01-01

    of non-invasive/conservative measures and invasive measures with epidural blood patch providing the cornerstone of the invasive measures. In the present pilot study we therefore aimed to evaluate the treatment efficacy of epidural blood patch (EBP) in treatment-refractory low-pressure headache. Our......Once believed an exceedingly rare disorder, recent evidence suggests that low cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure headache has to be considered an important cause of new daily persistent headaches, particularly among young and middle-aged individuals. Treatment of low CSF pressure headache consists...... primary effect parameter was total headache burden defined as area under the curve (AUC: intensity × duration) and as secondary effect parameters we identified: intensity (VAS 0-10), frequency (days per month), duration in hours (total hours/month) and also medication days (days on medication...

  5. Association between the extent of sigmoid sinus dehiscence and an occurrence of pulsatile tinnitus: a retrospective imaging study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, C.; Zhao, P.; Liu, Z.; Xu, W.; Lv, H.; Pang, S.; Wang, Z.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To assess the extent of sigmoid sinus dehiscence (SSD) on high-resolution computed tomography venography (HRCTV) or high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) images in pulsatile tinnitus (PT) and non-PT groups to determine whether there is an association between the extent of SSD and occurrence of PT. Materials and methods: Twenty-eight SSD patients with ipsilateral PT and 28 age- and gender-matched SSD patients without PT who underwent HRCTV or HRCT were enrolled in this study and categorised into two groups: “PT group” and “non-PT group”. The extent of SSD in each group was calculated and compared. Results: The largest transverse diameter and largest vertical diameter of SSD in the PT group were 6.21±1.7 and 6.15±2.19 mm, respectively. The largest transverse diameter and largest vertical diameter of SSD in the non-PT group were 3.06±1.38 and 2.51±1.03 mm, respectively. The extent of SSD was statistically different between the two groups (p<0.001; p<0.001). Conclusions: As a cause of PT, SSD can also occur in individuals without PT symptoms. Preliminary findings suggest that there may be a potential correlation between the extent of SSD and an occurrence of PT. - Highlights: • We compared the extent of sigmoid sinus dehiscence in pulsatile tinnitus and non-pulsatile tinnitus groups. • The sigmoid sinus dehiscence in the pulsatile tinnitus patients was larger than those in non-pulsatile tinnitus patients. • There may be a potential correlation between the extent of sigmoid sinus dehiscence and an occurrence of pulsatile tinnitus.

  6. PET measurements of cerebral metabolism corrected for CSF contributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chawluk, J.; Alavi, A.; Dann, R.; Kushner, M.J.; Hurtig, H.; Zimmerman, R.A.; Reivich, M.

    1984-01-01

    Thirty-three subjects have been studied with PET and anatomic imaging (proton-NMR and/or CT) in order to determine the effect of cerebral atrophy on calculations of metabolic rates. Subgroups of neurologic disease investigated include stroke, brain tumor, epilepsy, psychosis, and dementia. Anatomic images were digitized through a Vidicon camera and analyzed volumetrically. Relative areas for ventricles, sulci, and brain tissue were calculated. Preliminary analysis suggests that ventricular volumes as determined by NMR and CT are similar, while sulcal volumes are larger on NMR scans. Metabolic rates (18F-FDG) were calculated before and after correction for CSF spaces, with initial focus upon dementia and normal aging. Correction for atrophy led to a greater increase (%) in global metabolic rates in demented individuals (18.2 +- 5.3) compared to elderly controls (8.3 +- 3.0,p < .05). A trend towards significantly lower glucose metabolism in demented subjects before CSF correction was not seen following correction for atrophy. These data suggest that volumetric analysis of NMR images may more accurately reflect the degree of cerebral atrophy, since NMR does not suffer from beam hardening artifact due to bone-parenchyma juxtapositions. Furthermore, appropriate correction for CSF spaces should be employed if current resolution PET scanners are to accurately measure residual brain tissue metabolism in various pathological states

  7. Neurocysticercosis: relationship between Taenia antigen levels in CSF and MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abraham, Ronaldo; Livramento, Jose Antonio; Machado, Luis dos Ramos; Leite, Claudia da Costa; Pardini, Alessandra Xavier; Vaz, Adelaide Jose

    2010-01-01

    Objective: to determine the relationship between Taenia antigen (TA) detection in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in patients with definite diagnosis of neurocysticercosis (NC). Method: sixty-three patients with definite diagnosis of NC were submitted to a MRI of the brain, and to a CSF examination, with a meticulous search for TA by ELISA. Results: TA detection was positive in 36 patients (57.1%). A total of 836 lesions were analyzed, greatly within the cerebral parenchyma (98.7 of the lesions). Intact or non-degenerating cysts were the most common evolutive phase observed (50.4% of all lesions), 22.1% were degenerating cysts and 19.5% calcified cysts. We observed a significant relationship between TA levels detected and the total number of lesions and the number of non-degenerating cysts, but not with calcified lesions. Conclusion: according to our results, we propose at least four important types of contribution: TA detection may allow etiologic diagnosis in transitional phases of NC, with non-characteristic images; in final stages of evolution of cysticercoids in the CNS, lesions may not appear on CT or MRI, and TA detection may contribute to a definite etiologic diagnosis; TA detection may permit diagnosis of NC in some patients with previous negative tests for antibody detection in CSF; TA detection may represent an accurate marker of disease activity in the epileptic form of NC. (author)

  8. G-CSF-primed autologous and allogeneic bone marrow for transplantation in clinical oncology. Cell content and immunological characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grivtsova, L. Yu; Melkova, K. N.; Kupryshkina, N. A.; Vorotnikov, I. K.; Grigoryeva, T. A.; Selchuk, V. Yu; Grebennikova, O. P.; Titova, G. V.; Tupitsyn, N. N.

    2018-01-01

    60 samples of G-CSF-primed bone marrow (39 cancer patients and 21 healthy donors) to be used for transplantation to cancer patients were analyzed and compared by main characteristics with historical control and 13 bone marrow samples from control patient with mastopathy. Basing on morphological and multicolor flow cytometry findings certain characteristics of G-CSF-primed bone marrow were discovered, such as a significant increase in blast count in cancer patients as compared to donors and control patients (p<0.037), a higher neutrophil maturation index (p<0.001) and a lower percentage of mature lymphocytes (p<0.008) as compared to the control group. Among lymphocyte populations G-CSF-priming was associated with a significant increase in the total of mature CD3+ T-cells and CD8+ T-killers (p<0.0001) and a decrease in CD56+CD3- and/or CD16+CD3- NK-cells (p<0.006) both in cancer patients and healthy donors in comparison with the controls.

  9. Anti-inflammatory effect with high intensity focused ultrasound-mediated pulsatile delivery of diclofenac.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chih-Yu; Yang, Chih-Hui; Lin, Yung-Sheng; Chen, Chih-Hsin; Huang, Keng-Shiang

    2012-02-01

    A pulsatile ultrasound controlled drug release platform with diclofenac-loaded alginate microcapsules (fabricated with a home-made electrostatic device, 75% embedded rate) was established to evaluate anti-inflammation efficiency. Better anti-inflammation efficiency was found using the ultrasound system and the drug delivery can be adjusted based on the programmed ultrasound cycle. The results of the in vitro study show that an approx. 30% higher drug release rate was obtained by using continuous ultrasound irradiation (9-Watt, 180 min), and an approx. 16% higher drug release rate was obtained by using pulsatile ultrasound irradiation (9-Watt, 60 min) compared to without ultrasound activation. For the in vivo study, the anti-inflammatory test with carrageenan-induced rat's paw edema shows that diclofenac-loaded microcapsules followed by ultrasound irradiation (9-Watt, 60 min) contributed to an 81% inhibition rate, which was significantly higher than diclofenac only (approx. 60% higher). In addition, because of their heat conducting properties, gold nanoparticles encapsulated in the diclofenac-loaded microcapsules resulted in better drug release efficiency, but tended to depress the anti-inflammation effect. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Biological time series analysis using a context free language: applicability to pulsatile hormone data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis A Dean

    Full Text Available We present a novel approach for analyzing biological time-series data using a context-free language (CFL representation that allows the extraction and quantification of important features from the time-series. This representation results in Hierarchically AdaPtive (HAP analysis, a suite of multiple complementary techniques that enable rapid analysis of data and does not require the user to set parameters. HAP analysis generates hierarchically organized parameter distributions that allow multi-scale components of the time-series to be quantified and includes a data analysis pipeline that applies recursive analyses to generate hierarchically organized results that extend traditional outcome measures such as pharmacokinetics and inter-pulse interval. Pulsicons, a novel text-based time-series representation also derived from the CFL approach, are introduced as an objective qualitative comparison nomenclature. We apply HAP to the analysis of 24 hours of frequently sampled pulsatile cortisol hormone data, which has known analysis challenges, from 14 healthy women. HAP analysis generated results in seconds and produced dozens of figures for each participant. The results quantify the observed qualitative features of cortisol data as a series of pulse clusters, each consisting of one or more embedded pulses, and identify two ultradian phenotypes in this dataset. HAP analysis is designed to be robust to individual differences and to missing data and may be applied to other pulsatile hormones. Future work can extend HAP analysis to other time-series data types, including oscillatory and other periodic physiological signals.

  11. Chronotherapeutically Modulated Pulsatile System of Valsartan Nanocrystals-an In Vitro and In Vivo Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Nikhil; Kuotsu, Ketousetuo

    2017-02-01

    The objective was to improve the dissolution of valsartan by developing valsartan nanocrystals and design a pulsed release system for the chronotherapy of hypertension. Valsartan nanocrystals were prepared by sonication-anti-solvent precipitation method and lyophilized to obtain dry powder. Nanocrystals were directly compressed to minitablets and coated to achieve pulsatile valsartan release. Pharmacokinetic profiles of optimized and commercial formulations were compared in rabbit model. The mean particle size and PDI of the optimized nanocrystal batch V4 was reported as 211 nm and 0.117, respectively. DSC and PXRD analysis confirmed the crystalline nature of valsartan in nanocrystals. The dissolution extent of valsartan was markedly enhanced with both nanocrystals and minitablets as compared to pure valsartan irrespective of pH of the medium. Core minitablet V4F containing 5% w/w polyplasdone XL showed quickest release of valsartan, over 90% within 15 min. Coated formulation CV4F showed two spikes in release profile after successive lag times of 235 and 390 min. The pharmacokinetic study revealed that the bioavailability of optimized formulation (72.90%) was significantly higher than the commercial Diovan tablet (30.18%). The accelerated stability studies showed no significant changes in physicochemical properties, release behavior, and bioavialability of CV4F formulation. The formulation was successfully designed to achieve enhanced bioavailability and dual pulsatile release. Bedtime dosing will more efficiently control the circadian spikes of hypertension in the morning.

  12. Aneurysm pulsatility after endovascular exclusion: an experimental study using human aortic aneurysms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussein Amin Orra

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To measure the pulsatility of human aneurysms before and after complete exclusion with an endograft. METHOD: Five aortic aneurysms obtained during necropsy were submitted to pulsatile perfusion before and after implantation of a bifurcated endograft. The specimens were contained in a closed chamber filled with saline solution. A vertical tube attached to the chamber was used to measure volume dislocation in each systole. Mural thrombus was kept intact, and the space around the device was filled with human blood. After each experiment, the aneurysm was opened to check for the correct positioning and attachment of the device. RESULTS: The level of the saline column oscillated during pulsation in each case, with respective amplitudes of 17, 16, 13, 7, and 25 cm before the endograft insertion. After the insertion, the amplitudes dropped to 13, 12, 9, 3.5, and 23 cm, respectively. The differences were not significant. During the post-experimental examination, all devices were found to be in position and well attached to the neck and iliacs. No endoleak was detected during perfusion or by visual inspection. CONCLUSION: Pulsation of an endograft is transmitted to the aneurysm wall even in the absence of endoleak, and should not be interpreted as procedural failure.

  13. Effects of continuous and pulsatile PTH treatments on rat bone marrow stromal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Chiming; Frei, Hanspeter; Burt, Helen M.; Rossi, Fabio

    2009-01-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (MSCs) differentiation and proliferation are controlled by numerous growth factors and hormones. Continuous parathyroid hormone (PTH) treatment has been shown to decrease osteoblast differentiation, whereas pulsatile PTH increases osteoblast differentiation. However, the effects of PTH treatments on MSCs have not been investigated. This study showed continuous PTH treatment in the presence of dexamethasone (DEX) promoted osteogenic differentiation of rat MSCs in vitro, as demonstrated by increased alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, number of ALP expressing cells, and up-regulation of PTH receptor-1, ALP, and osteocalcin mRNA expressions. In contrast, pulsatile PTH treatment was found to suppress osteogenesis of rat MSCs, possibly by promoting the maintenance of undifferentiated cells. Additionally, the observed effects of PTH were strongly dependent on the presence of DEX. MSC proliferation however was not influenced by PTH independent of treatment regimen and presence or absence of DEX. Furthermore, our work raised the possibility that PTH treatment may modulate stem/progenitor cell activity within MSC cultures.

  14. Clinical impact of quantitative left atrial vortex flow analysis in patients with atrial fibrillation: a comparison with invasive left atrial voltage mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung Myung; Hong, Geu-Ru; Pak, Hui-Nam; Shim, Chi Young; Houle, Helene; Vannan, Mani A; Kim, Minji; Chung, Namsik

    2015-08-01

    Recently, left atrial (LA) vortex flow analysis using contrast transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) has been shown to be feasible and has demonstrated significant differences in vortex flow morphology and pulsatility between normal subjects and patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). However, the relationship between LA vortex flow and electrophysiological properties and the clinical significance of LA vortex flow are unknown. The aims of this study were (1) to compare LA vortex flow parameters with LA voltage and (2) to assess the predictive value of LA vortex flow parameters for the recurrence of AF after radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA). Thirty-nine patients with symptomatic non-valvular AF underwent contrast TEE before undergoing RFCA for AF. Quantitative LA vortex flow parameters were analyzed by Omega flow (Siemens Medical Solution, Mountain View, CA, USA). The morphology and pulsatility of LA vortex flow were compared with electrophysiologic parameters that were measured invasively. Hemodynamic, electrophysiological, and vortex flow parameters were compared between patients with and without early recurrence of AF after RFCA. Morphologic parameters, including LA vortex depth, length, width, and sphericity index were not associated with LA voltage or hemodynamic parameters. The relative strength (RS), which represents the pulsatility power of LA, was positively correlated with LA voltage (R = 0.53, p = 0.01) and LA appendage flow velocity (R = 0.73, p vortex flow analysis, especially RS, correlated well with LA voltage. Decreased pulsatility strength in the LA was associated with recurrent AF. LA vortex may have incremental value in predicting the recurrence of AF.

  15. Chimeric classical swine fever (CSF)-Japanese encephalitis (JE) viral particles as a non-transmissible bivalent marker vaccine candidate against CSF and JE infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    A trans-complemented CSF- JE chimeric viral replicon was constructed using an infectious cDNA clone of the CSF virus (CSFV) Alfort/187 strain. The E2 gene of CSFV Alfort/187 strain was deleted and the resultant plasmid pA187delE2 was inserted by a fragment containing the region coding for a truncate...

  16. Post craniotomy extra-ventricular drain (EVD) associated nosocomial meningitis: CSF diagnostic criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Gómez, Sigridh; Wirkowski, Elizabeth; Cunha, Burke A

    2015-01-01

    Because external ventricular drains (EVDs) provide access to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), there is potential for EVD associated acute bacterial meningitis (EVD-AM). Post-craniotomy, in patients with EVDs, one or more CSF abnormalities are commonly present making the diagnosis of EVD-AM problematic. EVD-AM was defined as elevated CSF lactic acid (>6 nmol/L), plus CSF marked pleocytosis (>50 WBCs/mm(3)), plus a positive Gram stain (same morphology as CSF isolate), plus a positive CSF culture of neuropathogen (same morphology as Gram stained organism). We reviewed 22 adults with EVDs to determine if our four CSF parameters combined accurately identified EVD-AM. No single or combination of <4 CSF parameters correctly diagnosed or ruled out EVD-AM. Combined our four CSF parameters clearly differentiated EVD-AM from one case of pseudomeningitis due to E. cloacae. We conclude that our four CSF criteria combined are useful in diagnosing EVD-AM in adults. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) induces Fc receptor expression on macrophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magee, D.M.; Wing, E.J.; Waheed, A.; Shadduck, R.K.

    1986-01-01

    M-CSF is a glycoprotein that stimulates bone marrow progenitor cells to proliferate and differentiate into macrophages (M theta). In addition, M-CSF can modulate the function of mature M theta. In this study, the authors determined the effect of M-CSF on expression of receptors for IgG (Fc receptors). Murine resident peritoneal M theta monolayers were incubated with either M-CSF, recombinant gamma interferon (IFN), or left untreated for 48 hrs. Expression of Fc receptors was assessed by microscopy using an antibody coated sheet erythrocytes (EA) rosette assay. The results indicated that M-CSF treated M theta had significantly higher numbers of bound EA (7.1 erythrocytes/M theta), than IFN M theta (4.4), or untreated M theta (2.5) (p 51 Cr labelled EA assay, CSF M theta (16,411 cpm), IFN M theta (10,887), untreated M theta (6897) (p < 0.001). Additionally, the maximal response was noted between 10 and 500 units M-CSF. Purified anti-M-CSF IgG, when included in the cultures, ablated the enhancement of EA binding, whereas normal rabbit IgG did not. These findings indicate that M-CSF is a potent inducer of Fc receptor expression on M theta and supports other data concerning the role of M-CSF as a biological response modifier

  18. Contributions of an adiabatic initial inversion pulse and K-space Re-ordered by inversion-time at each slice position (KRISP) to control of CSF artifacts and visualization of the brain in FLAIR magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curati, Walter L.; Oatridge, Angela; Herlihy, Amy H.; Hajnal, Joseph V.; Puri, Basant K.; Bydder, Graeme M.

    2001-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this study was to compare the performance of three fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) pulse sequences for control of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood flow artifacts in imaging of the brain. The first of these sequences had an initial sinc inversion pulse which was followed by conventional k-space mapping. The second had an initial sinc inversion pulse followed by k-space re-ordered by inversion time at each slice position (KRISP) and the third had an adiabatic initial inversion pulse followed by KRISP. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Ten patients with established disease were studied with all three pulse sequences. Seven were also studied with the adiabatic KRISP sequence after contrast enhancement. Their images were evaluated for patient motion artifact, CSF and blood flow artifact as well as conspicuity of the cortex, meninges, ventricular system, brainstem and cerebellum. The conspicuity of lesions and the degree of enhancement were also evaluated. RESULTS: Both the sinc and adiabatic KRISP FLAIR sequences showed better control of CSF and blood flow artifacts than the conventional FLAIR sequence. In addition the adiabatic KRISP FLAIR sequence showed better control of CSF artifact at the inferior aspect of the posterior fossa. The lesion conspicuity was similar for each of the FLAIR sequences as was the degree of contrast enhancement to that shown with a T 1 weighted spin echo sequence. CONCLUSION: The KRISP FLAIR sequence controls high signal artifacts from CSF flow and blood flow and the adiabatic pulse controls high signal artifacts due to inadequate inversion of the CSF magnetization at the periphery of the head transmitter coil. The KRISP FLAIR sequence also improves cortical and meningeal definition as a result of an edge enhancement effect. The effects are synergistic and can be usefully combined in a single pulse sequence. Curati, W.L. et al. (2001)

  19. Jointly Amplified Basal and Pulsatile Growth Hormone (GH) Secretion and Increased Process Irregularity in Women with Anorexia Nervosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Støving, R K; Veldhuis, J D; Flyvbjerg, A

    1999-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is associated with multiple endocrine alterations. In the majority of AN patients, basal and GHRH-stimulated serum GH levels are increased. The metabolic effects of GH are known to be related to its pulsatile secretory pattern. The present study was performed to examine GH...

  20. Pulsatile drug delivery to ileo-colonic segments by structured incorporation of disintegrants in pH-responsive polymer coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellekens, R.C.A.; Stellaard, F.; Mitrovic, D.; Stuurman, F.E.; Kosterink, J.G.W.; Frijlink, H.W.

    2008-01-01

    Conventional pH-responsive coatings used for oral drug delivery to the lower parts of the gastro-intestinal tract often show a poor performance. A new system for site-specific pulsatile delivery in the ileo-colonic regions is described. The system is based on the non-percolating incorporation of

  1. Polycystic ovarian disease unmasked by pulsatile GnRH therapy in a subgroup of women with hypothalamic amenorrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattle, Verena; Bilgyicildirim, Aysen; Hadziomerovic, Dijana; Ott, Helmut W; Zervomanolakis, Ioannis; Leyendecker, Gerhard; Wildt, Ludwig

    2008-02-01

    To present the observation in six out of 120 women treated with pulsatile GnRH for ovulation induction, who developed hyperandrogenemia and polycystic ovaries during treatment. Clinical observation. Department of Gynecologic Endocrinology and Reproductive Medicine, Medical University of Innsbruck, Austria. A total of 120 women initially diagnosed as suffering from primary or secondary hypothalamic amenorrhea were treated for ovulation induction with pulsatile administration of GnRH for up to 140 days. There was no indication of the presence of polycystic ovaries or hyperandrogenemia before therapy. Pulsatile GnRH therapy using the Zyklomat pump. Ovulatory menstrual cycles. Initially, all patients responded to pulsatile GnRH administration with ovulation and corpus luteum formation. During continuation of treatment, 6 patients developed an increase in LH and LH/FSH ratio as well as a progressive rise in serum T levels resulting in hyperandrogenemia. This was accompanied by the development of polycystic ovaries and cessation of follicular maturation. We conclude from these observations that restoration of normal GnRH stimulation of the pituitary gland can result in the development of hyperandrogenemia and polycystic ovaries, suggesting a pituitary or ovarian defect underlying the pathogenesis of this disorder.

  2. Pulsatile delivery of a leucine supplement during long-term continuous enteral feeding enhances lean growth in term neonatal pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neonatal pigs are used as a model to study and optimize the clinical treatment of infants who are unable to maintain oral feeding. Using this model, we have previously shown that pulsatile administration of leucine during continuous feeding over 24 h via orogastric tube enhanced protein synthesis in...

  3. Force Trends and Pulsatility for Catheter Contact Identification in Intracardiac Electrograms during Arrhythmia Ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas-Lalaleo, David; Muñoz-Romero, Sergio; Huerta, Mónica; Erazo-Rodas, Mayra; Sánchez-Muñoz, Juan José; Rojo-Álvarez, José Luis; García-Alberola, Arcadi

    2018-05-02

    The intracardiac electrical activation maps are commonly used as a guide in the ablation of cardiac arrhythmias. The use of catheters with force sensors has been proposed in order to know if the electrode is in contact with the tissue during the registration of intracardiac electrograms (EGM). Although threshold criteria on force signals are often used to determine the catheter contact, this may be a limited criterion due to the complexity of the heart dynamics and cardiac vorticity. The present paper is devoted to determining the criteria and force signal profiles that guarantee the contact of the electrode with the tissue. In this study, we analyzed 1391 force signals and their associated EGM recorded during 2 and 8 s, respectively, in 17 patients (82 ± 60 points per patient). We aimed to establish a contact pattern by first visually examining and classifying the signals, according to their likely-contact joint profile and following the suggestions from experts in the doubtful cases. First, we used Principal Component Analysis to scrutinize the force signal dynamics by analyzing the main eigen-directions, first globally and then grouped according to the certainty of their tissue-catheter contact. Second, we used two different linear classifiers (Fisher discriminant and support vector machines) to identify the most relevant components of the previous signal models. We obtained three main types of eigenvectors, namely, pulsatile relevant, non-pulsatile relevant, and irrelevant components. The classifiers reached a moderate to sufficient discrimination capacity (areas under the curve between 0.84 and 0.95 depending on the contact certainty and on the classifier), which allowed us to analyze the relevant properties in the force signals. We conclude that the catheter-tissue contact profiles in force recordings are complex and do not depend only on the signal intensity being above a threshold at a single time instant, but also on time pulsatility and trends. These

  4. Mobilizing peripheral blood stem cells with high-dose G-CSF alone is as effective as with Dexa-BEAM plus G-CSF in lymphoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kröger, N; Zeller, W; Fehse, N; Hassan, H T; Krüger, W; Gutensohn, K; Lölliger, C; Zander, A R

    1998-09-01

    We compared retrospectively the efficacy of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) alone with chemotherapy plus G-CSF in mobilizing CD34-positive cells in patients with malignant lymphoma. 35 patients underwent peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) collection following mobilization either with 24 microg/kg G-CSF for 4 consecutive days (n = 18) or Dexa-BEAM chemotherapy plus 5 microg/kg G-CSF (n = 17). High-dose G-CSF was well tolerated with only slight bone pain and/or myalgia. The Dexa-BEAM therapy required hospitalization with a median duration of 21 d. The median number of apheresis procedures in both groups was two (range two to four), resulting in a median of 5.3 and 5.1 x 10(6) CD34+ cells/kg. No patients in the G-CSF group, but one in the Dexa-BEAM group, failed to reach the target of collecting >2.0 x 10(6) CD34+ cells/kg. The number of CFU-GM (10.4 v 6.0 x 10(5)/kg) and of BFU-E (10.6 v 4.5 x 10(5)/kg; P = 0.04) was higher in the G-CSF group than in the Dexa-BEAM group. A subset analysis of CD34+ cells was performed in 16 patients showing a higher mean of Thy-1 (CD90w) coexpression in the G-CSF than in the Dexa-BEAM group (4.8 v 1.8%, P = 0.12). Additionally the percentage of CD34+/CD38- cells was higher in the G-CSF group (10.66% v 8.8%). However, these differences were not statistically significant. The median time to leucocyte and platelet engraftment after high-dose chemotherapy was slightly shorter in the G-CSF than in the Dexa-BEAM group (9 v 10 and 12 v 13.5 d, respectively). These results demonstrate that high-dose G-CSF is as effective as Dexa-BEAM plus G-CSF in mobilizing peripheral blood stem cells and produces prompt engraftment. The major advantages of G-CSF mobilization were the safe outpatient self-application and the fixed-day apheresis.

  5. A Novel Approach to Flurbiprofen Pulsatile Colonic Release: Formulation and Pharmacokinetics of Double-Compression-Coated Mini-Tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vemula, Sateesh Kumar

    2015-12-01

    A significant plan is executed in the present study to study the effect of double-compression coating on flurbiprofen core mini-tablets to achieve the pulsatile colonic delivery to deliver the drug at a specific time as per the patho-physiological need of the disease that results in improved therapeutic efficacy. In this study, pulsatile double-compression-coated tablets were prepared based on time-controlled hydroxypropyl methylcellulose K100M inner compression coat and pH-sensitive Eudragit S100 outer compression coat. Then, the tablets were evaluated for both physical evaluation and drug-release studies, and to prove these results, in vivo pharmacokinetic studies in human volunteers were conducted. From the in vitro drug-release studies, F6 tablets were considered as the best formulation, which retarded the drug release in the stomach and small intestine (3.42 ± 0.12% in 5 h) and progressively released to the colon (99.78 ± 0.74% in 24 h). The release process followed zero-order release kinetics, and from the stability studies, similarity factor between dissolution data before and after storage was found to be 88.86. From the pharmacokinetic evaluation, core mini-tablets producing peak plasma concentration (C max) was 14,677.51 ± 12.16 ng/ml at 3 h T max and pulsatile colonic tablets showed C max = 12,374.67 ± 16.72 ng/ml at 12 h T max. The area under the curve for the mini and pulsatile tablets was 41,238.52 and 72,369.24 ng-h/ml, and the mean resident time was 3.43 and 10.61 h, respectively. In conclusion, development of double-compression-coated tablets is a promising way to achieve the pulsatile colonic release of flurbiprofen.

  6. Does polycystic ovarian morphology influence the response to treatment with pulsatile GnRH in functional hypothalamic amenorrhea?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, Agathe; Dewailly, Didier; Plouvier, Pauline; Catteau-Jonard, Sophie; Robin, Geoffroy

    2016-04-29

    Pulsatile GnRH therapy is the gold standard treatment for ovulation induction in women having functional hypothalamic amenorrhea (FHA). The use of pulsatile GnRH therapy in FHA patients with polycystic ovarian morphology (PCOM), called "FHA-PCOM", has been little studied in the literature and results remain contradictory. The aim of this study was to compare the outcomes of pulsatile GnRH therapy for ovulation induction between FHA and "FHA-PCOM" patients in order to search for an eventual impact of PCOM. Retrospective study from August 2002 to June 2015, including 27 patients with FHA and 40 "FHA-PCOM" patients (85 and 104 initiated cycles, respectively) treated by pulsatile GnRH therapy for induction ovulation. The two groups were similar except for markers of PCOM (follicle number per ovary, serum Anti-Müllerian Hormone level and ovarian area), which were significantly higher in patients with "FHA-PCOM". There was no significant difference between the groups concerning the ovarian response: with equivalent doses of GnRH, both groups had similar ovulation (80.8 vs 77.7 %, NS) and excessive response rates (12.5 vs 10.6 %, NS). There was no significant difference in on-going pregnancy rates (26.9 vs 20 % per initiated cycle, NS), as well as in miscarriage, multiple pregnancy or biochemical pregnancy rates. Pulsatile GnRH seems to be a successful and safe method for ovulation induction in "FHA-PCOM" patients. If results were confirmed by prospective studies, GnRH therapy could therefore become a first-line treatment for this specific population, just as it is for women with FHA without PCOM.

  7. Inhibition of CSF-1R supports T-cell mediated melanoma therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjolein Sluijter

    Full Text Available Tumor associated macrophages (TAM can promote angiogenesis, invasiveness and immunosuppression. The cytokine CSF-1 (or M-CSF is an important factor of TAM recruitment and differentiation and several pharmacological agents targeting the CSF-1 receptor (CSF-1R have been developed to regulate TAM in solid cancers. We show that the kinase inhibitor PLX3397 strongly dampened the systemic and local accumulation of macrophages driven by B16F10 melanomas, without affecting Gr-1(+ myeloid derived suppressor cells. Removal of intratumoral macrophages was remarkably efficient and a modest, but statistically significant, delay in melanoma outgrowth was observed. Importantly, CSF-1R inhibition strongly enhanced tumor control by immunotherapy using tumor-specific CD8 T cells. Elevated IFNγ production by T cells was observed in mice treated with the combination of PLX3397 and immunotherapy. These results support the combined use of CSF-1R inhibition with CD8 T cell immunotherapy, especially for macrophage-stimulating tumors.

  8. Laboratory-based clinical audit as a tool for continual improvement: an example from CSF chemistry turnaround time audit in a South-African teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imoh, Lucius C; Mutale, Mubanga; Parker, Christopher T; Erasmus, Rajiv T; Zemlin, Annalise E

    2016-01-01

    Timeliness of laboratory results is crucial to patient care and outcome. Monitoring turnaround times (TAT), especially for emergency tests, is important to measure the effectiveness and efficiency of laboratory services. Laboratory-based clinical audits reveal opportunities for improving quality. Our aim was to identify the most critical steps causing a high TAT for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) chemistry analysis in our laboratory. A 6-month retrospective audit was performed. The duration of each operational phase across the laboratory work flow was examined. A process-mapping audit trail of 60 randomly selected requests with a high TAT was conducted and reasons for high TAT were tested for significance. A total of 1505 CSF chemistry requests were analysed. Transport of samples to the laboratory was primarily responsible for the high average TAT (median TAT = 170 minutes). Labelling accounted for most delays within the laboratory (median TAT = 71 minutes) with most delays occurring after regular work hours (P audit identified sample transportation, work shift periods and use of inappropriate CSF sample tubes as drivers of high TAT for CSF chemistry in our laboratory. The results of this audit will be used to change pre-analytical practices in our laboratory with the aim of improving TAT and customer satisfaction.

  9. Implantable batteryless device for on-demand and pulsatile insulin administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Ho; Lee, Young Bin; Kim, Byung Hwi; Lee, Cheol; Cho, Young Min; Kim, Se-Na; Park, Chun Gwon; Cho, Yong-Chan; Choy, Young Bin

    2017-04-01

    Many implantable systems have been designed for long-term, pulsatile delivery of insulin, but the lifetime of these devices is limited by the need for battery replacement and consequent replacement surgery. Here we propose a batteryless, fully implantable insulin pump that can be actuated by a magnetic field. The pump is prepared by simple-assembly of magnets and constituent units and comprises a drug reservoir and actuator equipped with a plunger and barrel, each assembled with a magnet. The plunger moves to noninvasively infuse insulin only when a magnetic field is applied on the exterior surface of the body. Here we show that the dose is easily controlled by varying the number of magnet applications. Also, pump implantation in diabetic rats results in profiles of insulin concentration and decreased blood glucose levels similar to those observed in rats treated with conventional subcutaneous insulin injections.

  10. Computer tomography of the brain and spectrophotometry of the CSF in cerebral concussion and contusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergvall, U.; Kjellin, K.G.; Levander, B.; Svendsen, P.; Soederstroem, C.E.

    1978-01-01

    Computer tomography (CT) and spectrophotometry of CSF were performed in 30 patients with the clinical diagnosis of cerebral concussion or contusion. The patients with concussion all had normal CT-findings. Spectrophotometry of CSF was sometimes positive for cerebral contusion with normal CT-findings, but the two methods were complementary so that the extent of the lesion was determined by CT and spectrophotometry of CSF indicated the cause. (Auth.)

  11. CSF lactate alone is not a reliable indicator of bacterial ventriculitis in patients with ventriculostomies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Emily; Bleck, Thomas P; Singh, Kamaljit; Ouyang, Bichun; Busl, Katharina M

    2017-06-01

    In a febrile patient with a ventriculostomy, diagnosing or excluding bacterial or microbial ventriculitis is difficult, as conventional markers in analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) are not applicable due to presence of blood and inflammation. CSF lactate has been shown to be a useful indicator of bacterial meningitis in CSF obtained via lumbar puncture, but little and heterogenous data exist on patients with ventriculostomies. We reviewed all CSF analyses obtained via ventriculostomy in patients admitted to our tertiary medical center between 2008 and 2013, and constructed receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves to evaluate the accuracy of CSF lactate concentration in discriminating a positive CSF culture from a negative one in setting of ventriculostomy and prophylactic antibiosis. Among 467 CSF lactate values, there were 22 corresponding CSF cultures with bacterial growth. Sensitivities and specificities for CSF lactate at threshold values 3, 4, 5 and 6mmol/L showed sensitivity and specificity greater than 70% for CSF lactate threshold 4mmol/L. The lowest threshold value of 3mmol/L resulted in higher sensitivity of 81.8%, and the highest chosen threshold value resulted in high specificity of 94.2%, but these values had poor corresponding specificity and sensitivity, respectively. The area under the curve was 0.82 (95% CI 0.72, 0.91). Our data from a large sample of CSF studies in patients with ventriculostomy indicate that no single value of CSF lactate provided both sensitivity and specificity high enough to be regarded as reliable test. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. CSF findings in patients with anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui; Guan, Hong-Zhi; Ren, Hai-Tao; Wang, Wei; Hong, Zhen; Zhou, Dong

    2015-07-01

    Anti-NMDAR-encephalitis is a recently described form of autoimmune encephalitis. Here, we characterize CSF changes in Chinese patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis, and explore the relationship between CSF findings and disease outcome. The presence of NMDAR antibodies in serum or CSF samples was evaluated in patients diagnosed with encephalitis between October 1, 2010 and August 1, 2014 at the West China Hospital. All patients fulfilling our diagnostic criteria were included and CSF findings were analyzed. Patient outcome was assessed after 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, and 24 months using the modified Rankin scale (mRS). Out of 3000 people with encephalitis screened, 43 patients were anti-NMDAR antibody positive in CSF or serum and included in this study. 62.8% of the patients identified with positive CSFs had positive serum anti-NMDAR samples, while 100% patients with positive serum had positive CSF samples. In the CSF white cell counts were elevated in 58.1% of cases; protein was increased in 18.6%; QAlb>Qlim(Alb) of the blood-CSF barrier was found in 29.3%; intrathecal immunoglobulin synthesis was detected in 17.1%, and 39.5% patients exhibited increased CSF pressures. A longer follow-up period was associated with better outcomes. There was no relationship between changes in CSF findings and outcome. The sensitivity of NMDA receptor antibody testing is higher in CSF compared to serum. Other CSF abnormalities are present in some patients with Anti-NMDAR-encephalitis, however these changes do not appear to affect prognosis. Copyright © 2015 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Seasonal and pulsatile dynamics of thyrotropin and leptin in mares maintained under a constant energy balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buff, P R; Messer, N T; Cogswell, A M; Johnson, P J; Keisler, D H; Ganjam, V K

    2007-11-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if seasonal and/or pulsatile variations occur in plasma concentrations of thyrotropin (TSH) and leptin in mares while maintaining a constant energy balance. Blood samples were collected every 20 min during a 24h period in winter and again in summer from six Quarter Horse type mares. Plasma concentrations of TSH, leptin, and T(4) were determined by radioimmunoassay. No differences were observed in body weight between winter (388.1+/-12.5 kg) and summer (406.2+/-12.5 kg; P=0.11). Plasma concentrations of TSH were greater in the summer (2.80+/-0.07 ng/ml) when compared to winter (0.97+/-0.07 ng/ml; P<0.001). Pulse frequency of TSH was not different between winter (6.17+/-0.78 pulses/24h) and summer (5.33+/-0.78 pulses/24h; P=0.49). Mean TSH pulse amplitude, pulse area, and area under the curve were all greater in summer compared to winter (3.11+/-0.10 ng/ml versus 1.20+/-0.10 ng/ml, 24.86+/-0.10 ng/ml min versus 13.46+/-1.90 ng/ml min, 3936+/-72.93 ng/ml versus 1284+/-72.93 ng/ml, respectively; P<0.01). Mean concentrations of leptin were greater in summer (2.48+/-0.17 ng/ml) compared to winter (0.65+/-0.17 ng/ml; P<0.001). Pulsatile secretion patterns of leptin were not observed in any horses during experimentation. Mean concentrations of T(4) were greater in winter (20.3+/-0.4 ng/ml) compared to summer (18.2+/-0.4 ng/ml; P<0.001). These seasonal differences between winter and summer provide evidence of possible seasonal regulation of TSH and leptin.

  14. [Spermatogenesis of pulsatile gonadotropin-releasing hormone infusion versus gonadotropin therapy in male idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bingkun; Mao, Jiangfeng; Xu, Hongli; Wang, Xi; Liu, Zhaoxiang; Nie, Min; Wu, Xueyan

    2015-05-26

    To compare the efficacies of pulsatile gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) versus human chorionic gonadotropin/human menopausal gonadotropin (HCG/HMG) for spermatogenesis in male idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (IHH). For this retrospective study, a total of 92 male IHH outpatients from May 2010 to October 2014 were recruited and categorized into GnRH (n = 40) and HCG/HMG (n = 52) groups. Each subject selected one specific therapy voluntarily. The gonadotropin levels were measured in the first week and monthly post-treatment in GnRH group. And serum total testosterone (TT), testicular volume (TV) and rate of spermatogenesis were observed monthly post-treatment in two groups. Spermatogenesis, TT and TV were compared between two groups. All IHH patients were treated for over 3 months. The median follow-up periods in GnRH and HCG/HMG groups was 8.2 (3.0-18.4) and 9.2 (3.0-18.6) months respectively (P = 0.413). In GnRH group, LH ((0.5 ± 0.6) vs (3.4 ± 2.4) U/L, P treatment. In GnRH group, at the end of follow-up, TT ((1.0 ± 1.0) vs (7.4 ± 5.2) nmol/L, P treatment time for initial sperm appearance than HCG/HMG group ((6.5 ± 3.1) vs (10.8 ± 3.7) months, P = 0.001). Pulsatile GnRH requires a shorter time for initiation of spermatogenesis than gonadotropin therapy in IHH male patients.

  15. Secondary flow in a curved artery model with Newtonian and non-Newtonian blood-analog fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najjari, Mohammad Reza; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2016-11-01

    Steady and pulsatile flows of Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids through a 180°-curved pipe were investigated using particle image velocimetry (PIV). The experiment was inspired by physiological pulsatile flow through large curved arteries, with a carotid artery flow rate imposed. Sodium iodide (NaI) and sodium thiocyanate (NaSCN) were added to the working fluids to match the refractive index (RI) of the test section to eliminate optical distortion. Rheological measurements revealed that adding NaI or NaSCN changes the viscoelastic properties of non-Newtonian solutions and reduces their shear-thinning property. Measured centerline velocity profiles in the upstream straight pipe agreed well with an analytical solution. In the pulsatile case, secondary flow structures, i.e. deformed-Dean, Dean, Wall and Lyne vortices, were observed in various cross sections along the curved pipe. Vortical structures at each cross section were detected using the d2 vortex identification method. Circulation analysis was performed on each vortex separately during the systolic deceleration phase, and showed that vortices split and rejoin. Secondary flow structures in steady flows were found to be morphologically similar to those in pulsatile flows for sufficiently high Dean number. supported by the George Washington University Center for Biomimetics and Bioinspired Engineering.

  16. A Low-Molecular-Weight Ferroxidase Is Increased in the CSF of sCJD Cases: CSF Ferroxidase and Transferrin as Diagnostic Biomarkers for sCJD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldar, Swati; Beveridge, ’Alim J.; Wong, Joseph; Singh, Ajay; Galimberti, Daniela; Borroni, Barbara; Zhu, Xiongwei; Blevins, Janis; Greenlee, Justin; Perry, George; Mukhopadhyay, Chinmay K.; Schmotzer, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Most biomarkers used for the premortem diagnosis of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) are surrogate in nature, and provide suboptimal sensitivity and specificity. Results: We report that CJD-associated brain iron dyshomeostasis is reflected in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), providing disease-specific diagnostic biomarkers. Analysis of 290 premortem CSF samples from confirmed cases of CJD, Alzheimer's disease, and other dementias (DMs), and 52 non-DM (ND) controls revealed a significant difference in ferroxidase (Frx) activity and transferrin (Tf) levels in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) relative to other DM and ND controls. A combination of CSF Frx and Tf discriminated sCJD from other DMs with a sensitivity of 86.8%, specificity of 92.5%, accuracy of 88.9%, and area-under-the receiver-operating-characteristic (ROC) curve of 0.94. This combination provided a similar diagnostic accuracy in discriminating CJD from rapidly progressing cases who died within 6 months of sample collection. Surprisingly, ceruloplasmin and amyloid precursor protein, the major brain Frxs, displayed minimal activity in the CSF. Most of the Frx activity was concentrated in the <3-kDa fraction in normal and diseased CSF, and resisted heat and proteinase-K treatment. Innovation: (i) A combination of CSF Frx and Tf provides disease-specific premortem diagnostic biomarkers for sCJD. (ii) A novel, nonenzymatic, nonprotein Frx predominates in human CSF that is distinct from the currently known CSF Frxs. Conclusion: The underlying cause of iron imbalance is distinct in sCJD relative to other DMs associated with the brain iron imbalance. Thus, change in the CSF levels of iron-management proteins can provide disease-specific biomarkers and insight into the cause of iron imbalance in neurodegenerative conditions. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 1662–1675. PMID:23379482

  17. Luteinizing hormone pulsatility in females following radiation therapy for central nervous system malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brasacchio, R.A.; Constine, L.S.; Woolf, P.; Raubertas, R.F.; Veldhuis, J.D.; Muhs, A.G.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Females incidentally irradiated to the hypothalamic-pituitary axis (H/P-A) during radiation therapy (RT) for brain tumors may become oligoamenorrheic. We previously demonstrated that these women are hypoestrogenemic but frequently have near normal or only moderately decreased basal luteinizing hormone (LH) levels and maintain appropriate peak pituitary responses to exogenous gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH). We postulated that hypothalamic injury resulting in abnormal LH pulsatility could explain this complex of findings. This investigation intended to characterize this hypothalamic injury and test two potentially corrective pharmacologic interventions. Catecholamines (specifically dopamine) and opiates are known to suppress pituitary LH release through inhibition of the pituitary gonadotropes or of the GnRH neuronal terminals in the hypothalamus. Radiation-induced dysfunction of the catecholaminergic or opiate control mechanisms might translate into an increase in dopamine or opiate release or receptor responsiveness, which in turn would inhibit pulsatile gonadotropin secretion, leading to reduced LH pulsatility and to gonadal dysfunction. We therefore determined the pattern of LH release in normal controls and in patients, at baseline as well as after administration of the dopamine receptor antagonist metoclopramide (MCP), and the opiate-receptor antagonist naloxone (NAL). Methods: Patient eligibility criteria included RT to the H/P-A for a non-H/P-A CNS tumor, usually astrocytoma, with subsequent hypoestrogenemia and oligo-amenorrhea. Patients and normal volunteers were studied first under control conditions and then using MCP and NAL in a randomized cross-over manner at monthly intervals. Serum samples for LH determination were taken every 10 minutes for 12 hours during an overnight hospital stay. MCP (10 mg) was administered as an IV bolus every 4.5 hours, and NAL was administered as a continuous infusion (1.6 mg/hour). The following morning each

  18. MRT measurements of the CSF spaces in HIV associated cerebral atrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Handwerker, M.; Krahe, T.; Klinker, H.; Schindler, R.

    1992-01-01

    The CSF volume of 45 patients with HIV infection was measured at various clinical stages and the results compared with 24 normals. 60% of all patients showed increased CSF spaces as an indication of cerebral atrophy. Serial measurements were particularly valuable during the early stages of atrophy since there is marked variation in the normal CSF volume. Conventional measurements, with the exception of the width of the third ventricle, were much less sensitive than these quantitative measurements. Classification of HIF infection according to the clinical stage was useful since CSF volume and volume increase correlated with the stage of HIV infection. (orig.) [de

  19. CSF Venous Fistulas in Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension: Imaging Characteristics on Dynamic and CT Myelography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranz, Peter G; Amrhein, Timothy J; Gray, Linda

    2017-12-01

    The objective of this study is to describe the anatomic and imaging features of CSF venous fistulas, which are a recently reported cause of spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH). We retrospectively reviewed the records of patients with SIH caused by CSF venous fistulas who received treatment at our institution. The anatomic details of each fistula were recorded. Attenuation of the veins involved by the fistula was compared with that of adjacent control veins on CT myelography (CTM). Visibility of the CSF venous fistula on CTM and a modified conventional myelography technique we refer to as dynamic myelography was also compared. Twenty-two cases of CSF venous fistula were identified. The fistulas were located between T4 and L1. Ninety percent occurred without a concurrent epidural CSF leak. In most cases (82%), the CSF venous fistula originated from a nerve root sleeve diverticulum. On CTM, the abnormal veins associated with the CSF venous fistula were seen in a paravertebral location in 45% of cases, centrally within the epidural venous plexus in 32%, and lateral to the spine in 23%. Differences in attenuation between the fistula veins and the control veins was highly statistically significant (p CSF venous fistulas are an important cause of SIH that can be detected on both CTM and dynamic myelograph y and may occur without an epidural CSF leak. Familiarity with the imaging characteristics of these lesions is critical to providing appropriate treatment to patients with SIH.

  20. IL-34 and CSF-1 display an equivalent macrophage differentiation ability but a different polarization potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulakirba, Sonia; Pfeifer, Anja; Mhaidly, Rana; Obba, Sandrine; Goulard, Michael; Schmitt, Thomas; Chaintreuil, Paul; Calleja, Anne; Furstoss, Nathan; Orange, François; Lacas-Gervais, Sandra; Boyer, Laurent; Marchetti, Sandrine; Verhoeyen, Els; Luciano, Frederic; Robert, Guillaume; Auberger, Patrick; Jacquel, Arnaud

    2018-01-10

    CSF-1 and IL-34 share the CSF-1 receptor and no differences have been reported in the signaling pathways triggered by both ligands in human monocytes. IL-34 promotes the differentiation and survival of monocytes, macrophages and osteoclasts, as CSF-1 does. However, IL-34 binds other receptors, suggesting that differences exist in the effect of both cytokines. In the present study, we compared the differentiation and polarization abilities of human primary monocytes in response to CSF-1 or IL-34. CSF-1R engagement by one or the other ligands leads to AKT and caspase activation and autophagy induction through expression and activation of AMPK and ULK1. As no differences were detected on monocyte differentiation, we investigated the effect of CSF-1 and IL-34 on macrophage polarization into the M1 or M2 phenotype. We highlighted a striking increase in IL-10 and CCL17 secretion in M1 and M2 macrophages derived from IL-34 stimulated monocytes, respectively, compared to CSF-1 stimulated monocytes. Variations in the secretome induced by CSF-1 or IL-34 may account for their different ability to polarize naïve T cells into Th1 cells. In conclusion, our findings indicate that CSF-1 and IL-34 exhibit the same ability to induce human monocyte differentiation but may have a different ability to polarize macrophages.

  1. G-CSF loaded nanofiber/nanoparticle composite coated with collagen promotes wound healing in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanha, Shima; Rafiee-Tehrani, Morteza; Abdollahi, Mohamad; Vakilian, Saeid; Esmaili, Zahra; Naraghi, Zahra Safaei; Seyedjafari, Ehsan; Javar, Hamid Akbari

    2017-10-01

    Sustained release of functional growth factors can be considered as a beneficial methodology for wound healing. In this study, recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF)-loaded chitosan nanoparticles were incorporated in Poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) nanofibers, followed by surface coating with collagen type I. Physical and mechanical properties of the PCL nanofibers containing G-CSF loaded chitosan nanoparticles PCL/NP(G-CSF) and in vivo performance for wound healing were investigated. G-CSF structural stability was evaluated through SDS_PAGE, reversed phase (RP) HPLC and size-exclusion chromatography, as well as circular dichroism. Nanofiber/nanoparticle composite scaffold was demonstrated to have appropriate mechanical properties as a wound dresser and a sustained release of functional G-CSF. The PCL/NP(G-CSF) scaffold showed a suitable proliferation and well-adherent morphology of stem cells. In vivo study and histopathological evaluation outcome revealed that skin regeneration was dramatically accelerated under PCL/NP(G-CSF) as compared with control groups. Superior fibroblast maturation, enhanced collagen deposition and minimum inflammatory cells were also the beneficial properties of PCL/NP(G-CSF) over the commercial dressing. The synergistic effect of extracellular matrix-mimicking nanofibrous membrane and G-CSF could develop a suitable supportive substrate in order to extensive utilization for the healing of skin wounds. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 105A: 2830-2842, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Attenuative effects of G-CSF in radiation induced intestinal injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Joong Sun; Gong, Eun Ji; Kim, Sung Dae; Heo, Kyu; Ryoo, Seung Bum; Yang, Kwang Mo

    2011-01-01

    Granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) has been reported to protect from radiationinduced myelosuppression. Growing evidence suggests that G-CSF also has many important non-hematopoietic functions in other tissues, including the intestine (Kim et al., 2010; Kim et al., 2011). However, little is known about the influence of G-CSF on intestinal injury. Examination 12 hours after radiation (5 Gy) revealed that the G-CSF treated mice were significantly protected from apoptosis of jejunal crypt, compared with radiation controls. G-CSF treatment attenuated intestinal morphological changes such as decreased survival crypt, the number of villi, villous shortening, crypt depth and length of basal lamina of 10 enterocytes compared with the radiation control 3.5 days after radiation (10 Gy). G-CSF attenuated the change of peripheral blood from radiation-induced myelosuppression and displayed attenuation of mortality in lethally-irradiated (10 Gy) mice. The present results support the suggestion that G-CSF administrated prior to radiation plays an important role in the survival of irradiated mice, possibly due to the protection of hematopoietic cells and intestinal stem cells against radiation. The results indicate that G-CSF protects from radiation-mediated intestinal damage and from hematopoietic injury. G-CSF treatment may be useful clinically in the prevention of injury following radiation.

  3. Unique transcriptome signatures and GM-CSF expression in lymphocytes from patients with spondyloarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mossawi, M H; Chen, L; Fang, H; Ridley, A; de Wit, J; Yager, N; Hammitzsch, A; Pulyakhina, I; Fairfax, B P; Simone, D; Yi, Yao; Bandyopadhyay, S; Doig, K; Gundle, R; Kendrick, B; Powrie, F; Knight, J C; Bowness, P

    2017-11-15

    Spondyloarthritis encompasses a group of common inflammatory diseases thought to be driven by IL-17A-secreting type-17 lymphocytes. Here we show increased numbers of GM-CSF-producing CD4 and CD8 lymphocytes in the blood and joints of patients with spondyloarthritis, and increased numbers of IL-17A + GM-CSF + double-producing CD4, CD8, γδ and NK cells. GM-CSF production in CD4 T cells occurs both independently and in combination with classical Th1 and Th17 cytokines. Type 3 innate lymphoid cells producing predominantly GM-CSF are expanded in synovial tissues from patients with spondyloarthritis. GM-CSF + CD4 + cells, isolated using a triple cytokine capture approach, have a specific transcriptional signature. Both GM-CSF + and IL-17A + GM-CSF + double-producing CD4 T cells express increased levels of GPR65, a proton-sensing receptor associated with spondyloarthritis in genome-wide association studies and pathogenicity in murine inflammatory disease models. Silencing GPR65 in primary CD4 T cells reduces GM-CSF production. GM-CSF and GPR65 may thus serve as targets for therapeutic intervention of spondyloarthritis.

  4. Model-based optimization of G-CSF treatment during cytotoxic chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirm, Sibylle; Engel, Christoph; Loibl, Sibylle; Loeffler, Markus; Scholz, Markus

    2018-02-01

    Although G-CSF is widely used to prevent or ameliorate leukopenia during cytotoxic chemotherapies, its optimal use is still under debate and depends on many therapy parameters such as dosing and timing of cytotoxic drugs and G-CSF, G-CSF pharmaceuticals used and individual risk factors of patients. We integrate available biological knowledge and clinical data regarding cell kinetics of bone marrow granulopoiesis, the cytotoxic effects of chemotherapy and pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of G-CSF applications (filgrastim or pegfilgrastim) into a comprehensive model. The model explains leukocyte time courses of more than 70 therapy scenarios comprising 10 different cytotoxic drugs. It is applied to develop optimized G-CSF schedules for a variety of clinical scenarios. Clinical trial results showed validity of model predictions regarding alternative G-CSF schedules. We propose modifications of G-CSF treatment for the chemotherapies 'BEACOPP escalated' (Hodgkin's disease), 'ETC' (breast cancer), and risk-adapted schedules for 'CHOP-14' (aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in elderly patients). We conclude that we established a model of human granulopoiesis under chemotherapy which allows predictions of yet untested G-CSF schedules, comparisons between them, and optimization of filgrastim and pegfilgrastim treatment. As a general rule of thumb, G-CSF treatment should not be started too early and patients could profit from filgrastim treatment continued until the end of the chemotherapy cycle.

  5. Positron emission tomography with 68Ga-EDTA in the diagnosis and localization of CSF fistulas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergstrand, G.; Bergstroem, M.; Eriksson, L.; Edner, G.; Widen, L.

    1982-01-01

    Five patients with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) rhinorrhea were investigated with computed tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography (PET) to localize the site of a CSF fistula. After intrathecal injection of 10 MBq of 68 Ga-EDTA, radioactivity was demonstrated in the basal cisterns. In three cases, the site of the fistula was visualized with PET. It is not always possible to demonstrate a CSF leakage with CT cisternography (CTC) using metrizamide, particularly in cases with minute fistulas or intermittent CSF rhinorrhea. With further experience and improved PET techniques, it may be possible to detect even very small fistulas

  6. Beneficial effect of bilingualism on Alzheimer's disease CSF biomarkers and cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estanga, Ainara; Ecay-Torres, Mirian; Ibañez, Almudena; Izagirre, Andrea; Villanua, Jorge; Garcia-Sebastian, Maite; Iglesias Gaspar, M Teresa; Otaegui-Arrazola, Ane; Iriondo, Ane; Clerigue, Monserrat; Martinez-Lage, Pablo

    2017-02-01

    Bilingualism as a component of cognitive reserve has been claimed to delay the onset of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, its effect on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) AD-biomarkers has not been investigated. We assessed cognitive performance and CSF AD-biomarkers, and potential moderation effect of bilingualism on the association between age, CSF AD-biomarkers, and cognition. Cognitively healthy middle-aged participants classified as monolinguals (n = 100, n CSF  = 59), early (n = 81, n CSF  = 55) and late bilinguals (n = 97, n CSF  = 52) were evaluated. Models adjusted for confounders showed that bilinguals performed better than monolinguals on digits backwards (early-bilinguals p = 0.003), Judgment of Line Orientation (JLO) (early-bilinguals p = 0.018; late-bilinguals p = 0.004), and Trail Making Test-B (late-bilinguals p = 0.047). Early bilingualism was associated with lower CSF total-tau (p = 0.019) and lower prevalence of preclinical AD (NIA-AA classification) (p = 0.02). Bilingualism showed a moderation effect on the relationship between age and CSF AD-biomarkers and the relationship between age and executive function. We conclude that bilingualism contributes to cognitive reserve enhancing executive and visual-spatial functions. For the first time, this study reveals that early bilingualism is associated with more favorable CSF AD-biomarker profile. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Wastewater renovation using constructed soil filter (CSF): a novel approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemade, P D; Kadam, A M; Shankar, H S

    2009-10-30

    Constructed soil filter (CSF) also known as Soil Biotechnology (SBT) is a process for water renovation which makes use of formulated media with culture of soil macro- and microorganisms. CSF combines sedimentation, infiltration and biodegradation processes to remove oxidizable organics and inorganics of wastewater in a single facility. Operating experience shows hydraulic loading in the range of 0.05-0.25 m(3)/m(2) h and organic loading up to 200-680 g/m(2) d. The results show increase in dissolved oxygen levels, COD removal (from 352 mg/l to 20 mg/l); BOD removal (from 211 mg/l to 7.0 mg/l); suspended solids removal (from 293 mg/l to 16 mg/l); turbidity reduction (from 145 NTU to 5.3 NTU); iron (from 5 mg/l to 0.3 mg/l); arsenic (from 500 microg/l to 10 microg/l); total coliform and fecal coliform removal (from 145 x 10(5) to 55 CFU/100 mL and 150 x 10(8) to 110 CFU/100 mL respectively), with desired pathogen levels as per WHO standards, i.e. aeration and no odor, fish compatible water quality and evergreen ambience.

  8. Next-generation vision testing: the quick CSF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorr Michael

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The Contrast Sensitivity Function relates the spatial frequency and contrast of a spatial pattern to its visibility and thus provides a fundamental description of visual function. However, the current clinical standard of care typically restricts assessment to visual acuity, i.e. the smallest stimulus size that can be resolved at full contrast; alternatively, tests of contrast sensitivity are typically restricted to assessment of the lowest visible contrast for a fixed letter size. This restriction to one-dimensional subspaces of a two-dimensional space was necessary when stimuli were printed on paper charts and simple scoring rules were applied manually. More recently, however, computerized testing and electronic screens have enabled more flexible stimulus displays and more complex test algorithms. For example, the quick CSF method uses a Bayesian adaptive procedure and an information maximization criterion to select only informative stimuli; testing times to precisely estimate the whole contrast sensitivity function are reduced to 2-5 minutes. Here, we describe the implementation of the quick CSF method in a medical device. We make several usability enhancements to make it suitable for use in clinical settings. A first usability study shows excellent results, with a mean System Usability Scale score of 86.5.

  9. High interpatient variability of raltegravir CSF concentrations in HIV-positive patients: a pharmacogenetic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcagno, Andrea; Cusato, Jessica; Simiele, Marco; Motta, Ilaria; Audagnotto, Sabrina; Bracchi, Margherita; D'Avolio, Antonio; Di Perri, Giovanni; Bonora, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    To analyse the determinants of raltegravir CSF penetration, including the pharmacogenetics of drug transporters located at the blood-brain barrier or blood-CSF barrier. Plasma and CSF raltegravir concentrations were determined by a validated HPLC coupled with mass spectrometry method in adults on raltegravir-based combination antiretroviral therapy undergoing a lumbar puncture. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in the genes encoding drugs transporters (ABCB1 3435, SLCO1A2, ABCC2 and SLC22A6) and the gene encoding hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 α (HNF4α) were determined by real-time PCR. In 41 patients (73.2% male, 95.1% Caucasians), the median raltegravir plasma and CSF concentrations were 165 ng/mL (83-552) and 31 ng/mL (21-56), respectively. CSF-to-plasma ratios (CPRs) ranged from 0.005 to 1.33 (median 0.20, IQR 0.04-0.36). Raltegravir trough CSF concentrations (n = 35) correlated with raltegravir plasma levels (ρ = 0.395, P = 0.019); CPRs were higher in patients with blood-brain barrier damage (0.47 versus 0.18, P = 0.02). HNF4α 613 CG genotype carriers had lower trough CSF concentrations (20 versus 37 ng/mL, P = 0.03) and CPRs (0.12 versus 0.27, P = 0.02). Following multivariate linear regression analysis, the CSF-to-serum albumin ratio was the only independent predictor of raltegravir penetration into the CSF. Raltegravir penetration into the CSF shows a large interpatient variability, although CSF concentrations were above the wild-type IC50 in all patients (and above IC95 in 28.6%). In this cohort, blood-brain barrier permeability is the only independent predictor of raltegravir CPR. The impact of single nucleotide polymorphisms in selected genes on raltegravir penetration warrants further studies.

  10. MafB antagonizes phenotypic alteration induced by GM-CSF in microglia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koshida, Ryusuke, E-mail: rkoshida-myz@umin.ac.jp; Oishi, Hisashi, E-mail: hoishi@md.tsukuba.ac.jp; Hamada, Michito; Takahashi, Satoru

    2015-07-17

    Microglia are tissue-resident macrophages which are distributed throughout the central nervous system (CNS). Recent studies suggest that microglia are a unique myeloid population distinct from peripheral macrophages in terms of origin and gene expression signature. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), a pleiotropic cytokine regulating myeloid development, has been shown to stimulate proliferation and alter phenotype of microglia in vitro. However, how its signaling is modulated in microglia is poorly characterized. MafB, a bZip transcriptional factor, is highly expressed in monocyte-macrophage lineage cells including microglia, although its role in microglia is largely unknown. We investigated the crosstalk between GM-CSF signaling and MafB by analyzing primary microglia. We found that Mafb-deficient microglia grew more rapidly than wild-type microglia in response to GM-CSF. Moreover, the expression of genes associated with microglial differentiation was more downregulated in Mafb-deficient microglia cultured with GM-CSF. Notably, such differences between the genotypes were not observed in the presence of M-CSF. In addition, we found that Mafb-deficient microglia cultured with GM-CSF barely extended their membrane protrusions, probably due to abnormal activation of RhoA, a key regulator of cytoskeletal remodeling. Altogether, our study reveals that MafB is a negative regulator of GM-CSF signaling in microglia. These findings could provide new insight into the modulation of cytokine signaling by transcription factors in microglia. - Highlights: • GM-CSF alters the phenotype of microglia in vitro more potently than M-CSF. • Transcription factor MafB antagonizes the effect of GM-CSF on microglia in vitro. • MafB deficiency leads to RhoA activation in microglia in response to GM-CSF. • We show for the first time the function of MafB in microglia.

  11. Evaluation of prostaglandin D2 as a CSF leak marker: implications in safe epidural anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kondabolu S

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Sirish Kondabolu, Rishimani Adsumelli, Joy Schabel, Peter Glass, Srinivas PentyalaDepartment of Anesthesiology, School of Medicine, Stony Brook Medical Center, Stony Brook, New York, USABackground: It is accepted that there is a severe risk of dural puncture in epidural anesthesia. Of major concern to anesthesiologists is unintentional spinal block. Reliable identification of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF from the aspirate is crucial for safe epidural anesthesia. The aim of this study was to determine whether prostaglandin D2 could be clinically used as a marker for the detection of CSF traces.Methods: After obtaining Institutional Review Board approval and patient consent, CSF was obtained from patients undergoing spinal anesthesia, and blood, urine, and saliva were obtained from normal subjects and analyzed for prostaglandin D2 (PGD. CSF (n=5 samples were diluted with local anesthetic (bupivacaine, normal saline and blood in the ratios of 1:5 and 1:10. PGD levels in the CSF samples were analyzed with a PGD-Methoxime (MOX EIA Kit (Cayman Chemicals, MI. This assay is based on the conversion of PGD to a stable derivative, which is analyzed with antiserum specific for PGD-MOX. Results: Different concentrations of pure PGD-MOX conjugate were analyzed by EIA and a standard curve was derived. PGD levels in CSF and CSF with diluents were determined and the values were extrapolated onto the standard curve. Our results show a well-defined correlation for the presence of PGD both in straight CSF samples and in diluted CSF (dilution factor of 1:5 and 1:10. Conclusion: Prostaglandin D2 was reliably identified in CSF by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay when diluted with local anesthetic, saline, and serum, and can be used as a marker to identify the presence of CSF in epidural aspirates.Keywords: epidural, cerebrospinal fluid, leak, marker, prostaglandin D2

  12. Parathyroid hormone related protein concentration in human serum and CSF correlates with age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushnir, Mark M; Peterson, Lisa K; Strathmann, Frederick G

    2018-02-01

    Parathyroid Hormone-Related Protein (PTHrP) is involved in intracellular calcium (Ca) regulation, and has been demonstrated to participate in regulation of Ca in brain cells, activation of neurons, and modulation of pain. However, there are conflicting reports regarding the presence of PTHrP in CSF. PTHrP and Ca were quantified in paired CSF and serum samples using mass spectrometry-based methods. Associations between PTHrP and Ca concentrations with age, sex and concentrations of nine CSF diagnostic markers in a set of 140 paired serum and CSF patient samples were evaluated. The observed median PTHrP concentration in CSF was 51 times higher than in serum; the median concentration of Ca in CSF was 1.8 times lower than in serum. We observed positive correlation between concentrations of PTHrP in CSF and serum (p=0.013). Distribution of PTHrP concentrations in serum was associated with age (p=0.0068) and the concentrations were higher in women. In samples with serum calcium concentrations within the reference intervals (n=118), central 95% distribution of concentrations for Ca-CSF, PTHrP-serum and PTHrP-CSF were 5.4 (4.5-6.1) mg/dL, 1.2 (0.5-2.5) pmol/L, 62 (22-125) pmol/L, respectively. Our data demonstrate that PTHrP is a normal constituent of human CSF with median concentrations 51 fold higher than in serum. Elevated serum PTHrP concentrations were positively correlated with age and significantly higher in women. Our data suggest that CSF could be a significant source of circulating PTHrP. Copyright © 2017 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Chimeric classical swine fever (CSF)-Japanese encephalitis (JE) viral replicon as a non-transmissible vaccine candidate against CSF and JE infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhenhua; Wu, Rui; Li, Robert W; Li, Ling; Xiong, Zhongliang; Zhao, Haizhong; Guo, Deyin; Pan, Zishu

    2012-04-01

    A trans-complemented chimeric CSF-JE virus replicon was constructed using an infectious cDNA clone of the CSF virus (CSFV) Alfort/187 strain. The CSFV E2 gene was deleted, and a fragment containing the region encoding a truncated envelope protein (tE, amino acid 292-402, domain III) of JE virus (JEV) was inserted into the resultant plasmid, pA187delE2, to generate the recombinant cDNA clone pA187delE2/JEV-tE. Porcine kidney 15 (PK15) cells that constitutively express the CSFV E2p7 proteins were then transfected with in vitro-transcribed RNA from pA187delE2/JEV-tE. As a result, the chimeric CSF-JE virus replicon particle (VRP), rv187delE2/JEV-tE, was rescued. In a mouse model, immunization with the chimeric CSF-JE VRP induced strong production of JEV-specific antibody and conferred protection against a lethal JEV challenge. Pigs immunized with CSF-JE VRP displayed strong anti-CSFV and anti-JEV antibody responses and protection against CSFV and JEV challenge infections. Our evidence suggests that E2-complemented CSF-JE VRP not only has potential as a live-attenuated non-transmissible vaccine candidate against CSF and JE but also serves as a potential DIVA (Differentiating Infected from Vaccinated Animals) vaccine for CSF in pigs. Together, our data suggest that the non-transmissible chimeric VRP expressing foreign antigenic proteins may represent a promising strategy for bivalent DIVA vaccine design. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. A perturbation model for the oscillatory flow of a Bingham plastic in rigid and periodically displaced tubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Chant, L J

    1999-10-01

    An approximate analytical model for the pulsatile flow of an ideal Bingham plastic fluid in both a rigid and a periodically displaced tube has been developed using regular perturbation methods. Relationships are derived for the velocity field and dimensionless flow rate. The solution compares adequately with available experimentally measured oscillatory non-Newtonian fluid flow data. These solutions provide useful analytical models supporting experimental and computation studies of arterial blood flow.

  15. Proximal Limb Weakness Reverting After CSF Diversion In Intracranial Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinha S

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We report about two young girls who developed progressive visual failure secondary to increased intracranial pressure and had significant proximal muscle weakness of limbs. Patients with elevated intracranial pressure (ICP may present with "false localizing signs", besides having headache, vomiting and papilledema. Radicular pain as a manifestation of raised ICP is rare and motor weakness attributable to polyradiculopathy is exceptional. Two patients with increased intracranial pressure without lateralizing signs′ had singnificant muscle weakness. Clinical evaluation and laboratory tests did not disclose any other cause for weakness. Following theco-peritoneal shunt, in both patients, there was variable recovery of vision but the proximal weakness and symptoms of elevated ICP improved rapidly. Recognition of this uncommon manifestation of raised ICP may obviate the need for unnecessary investigation and reduce morbidity due to weakness by CSF diversion procedure.

  16. Csf Based Non-Ground Points Extraction from LIDAR Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, A.; Zhang, W.; Shi, H.

    2017-09-01

    Region growing is a classical method of point cloud segmentation. Based on the idea of collecting the pixels with similar properties to form regions, region growing is widely used in many fields such as medicine, forestry and remote sensing. In this algorithm, there are two core problems. One is the selection of seed points, the other is the setting of the growth constraints, in which the selection of the seed points is the foundation. In this paper, we propose a CSF (Cloth Simulation Filtering) based method to extract the non-ground seed points effectively. The experiments have shown that this method can obtain a group of seed spots compared with the traditional methods. It is a new attempt to extract seed points

  17. Covering the CSF space: Does teaching make a difference?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, G.; Wynne, C.J.; Baggarley, S.

    1999-01-01

    Following a paediatric teaching course for radiation oncology registrars which specifically addressed the method for planning cranial irradiation, a lateral skull simulation film was sent to all attendees to assess the effect of the teaching. The method uses opposed lateral fields to encompass the entire clinical target volume: the brain, meninges and cerebro- spinal fluid (CSF) down to the level of the second vertebra. To assess current clinical practice in New Zealand, a copy of the same radiograph was sent to radiation oncologists who had not attended the course. Recommendations from the course were that 10-mm margins should be placed in the regions of the cribiform plate and the floor of the middle cranial fossa. However, only 6.9% of the attendees; marked the film with the recommended 10-mm margins. Dose profiles are also presented to support the use of 10-mm margins. Copyright (1999) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  18. Diagnostic accuracy of routine blood examinations and CSF lactate level for post-neurosurgical bacterial meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Zhang

    2017-06-01

    Conclusions: The PBM diagnostic accuracy of routine blood examinations was relatively low, whereas the accuracy of CSF lactate level was high. Some variables that are involved in the incidence of PBM can also affect the diagnostic accuracy for PBM. Taking into account the effects of these variables significantly improves the diagnostic accuracies of routine blood examinations and CSF lactate level.

  19. CSF protein profiling using Multiplex Immuno-assay : A potential new diagnostic tool for leptomeningeal metastases.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandsma, D.; Voest, E.E.; Jager, W. de; Bonfrer, H.; Algra, A.; Boogerd, W.; Korse, T.; Reijneveld, J.C.; Verbeek, M.M.; Rijkers, G.; Taphoorn, M.J.B.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The diagnosis of leptomeningeal metastases (LM) is based on clinical symptoms, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of brain and spine and cytological analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The clinical picture of LM is highly variable and both cytological CSF analysis and contrast-enhanced

  20. Correlation of MRI and CSF cytology in the diagnosis of medulloblastoma spinal metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, S.K.; Ditchfield, M.R.; Waters, K.

    1998-01-01

    Background. Medulloblastoma frequently spreads to involve the spinal cord, which significantly reduces patient survival and determines whether chemotherapy is utilised and the dose of irradiation to the neuraxis. Staging is usually achieved by MRI of the spine and/or cytology of CSF, both methods having their limitations. Objective. To determine whether there is a correlation between CSF cytology and the demonstration of spinal metastases by MRI and whether CSF cytology is useful when spinal MRI is equivocal. Materials and methods. All cases of medulloblastoma diagnosed at our hospital between 1992 and 1997 were identified. Of 26 cases, 11 presentations (age range 4 months to 12 years) had both CSF cytology (either from the cisterna magna or lumbar puncture) and spinal MRI. The MR studies were reviewed for the presence of metastases and the CSF cytology for the presence of tumour cells. Results. We found 100 % correlation between MRI and CSF cytology for samples taken by lumbar puncture (four negative and three positive on both investigations). No correlation was demonstrated when CSF samples were taken from the cisterna magna. Conclusions. Our data suggest that lumbar CSF cytology may be useful when the MRI is equivocal for the presence of metastatic involvement of the spine by medulloblastoma. (orig.)

  1. T2-weighted vs. intrathecal contrast-enhanced MR cisternography in the evaluation of CSF rhinorrhea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ecin, Gaye; Oner, A. Yusuf; Tokgoz, Nil; Ucar, Murat; Tali, Turgut; Aykol, Sukru

    2013-01-01

    Background: Endoscopic surgical approach is being more widely used in the treatment of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) rhinorrhea. Accurate localization of CSF fistulas prior to surgery is essential in increasing the success of dural repair and in decreasing negative or recurrent explorations. Purpose: To evaluate and compare intrathecal contrast medium-enhanced magnetic resonance cisternography (CEMRC) with T2-weighted MR cisternography (T2MRC) in identifying the presence and site of CSF rhinorrhea. Material and Methods: Sixty patients with suspected CSF rhinorrhea underwent MR cisternography including intrathecally enhanced fat-suppressed T1WI in three orthogonal planes and T2WI in the coronal plane. Both set of images were reviewed by two blinded radiologists for the presence and location of CSF leakage. Imaging data were compared with surgical findings and/or beta-2 transferrin testing. Results: With surgery proven CSF leakage in 20 instances as reference, CEMRC detected 18 (90%), whereas T2MRC reported only 13 (65%) correctly. Overall, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value in detecting CSF fistulas were 92%, 80%, 76%, and 93% for CEMRC, and 56%, 77%, 64%, and 71% for T2MRC, respectively. Conclusion: The minimally invasive CEMRC is an effective method with higher sensitivity and specificity than T2MRC in the evaluation of CSF fistulas

  2. MDSCs are involved in the protumorigenic potentials of GM-CSF in colitis-associated cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ning; Liu, Qilin; Hou, Lin; Wang, Yalin; Liu, Ziling

    2017-06-01

    Chronic inflammation is thought to be a major driving force for the development of colitis-associated colorectal cancer (CAC). As one member of proinflammatory cytokine family, granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) has been identified to play a key role in CAC pathogenesis recently. The underlying mechanisms, however, remain largely unknown. In this study, we found that myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) accumulated increasingly in the lesions during the progression from colitis to cancer, which was critical for CAC formation. Importantly, this MDSC accumulation was controlled by GM-CSF. MDSC number decreased significantly in GM-CSF-deficient mice suffering from CAC induction, and transfusion of MDSCs from wild-type CAC-bearing mice into GM-CSF-deficient counterparts led to recurrence of CAC. Furthermore, the supernatants of CAC lesions or GM-CSF alone was sufficient to differentiate hematopoietic precursors into MDSCs. Addition of neutralizing anti-GM-CSF antibody impaired the MDSC-differentiating effects of the supernatants of CAC lesions. Overall, these findings shed new insights into the mechanisms of GM-CSF underlying CAC development, by inducing/recruiting CAC-promoting MDSCs. Blocking GM-CSF activity or MDSC function may represent new therapeutic strategies for CAC in clinic.

  3. The Choroid Plexus of the Lateral Ventricle As the Origin of CSF Pulsation Is Questionable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takizawa, Ken; Matsumae, Mitsunori; Hayashi, Naokazu; Hirayama, Akihiro; Sano, Fumiya; Yatsushiro, Satoshi; Kuroda, Kagayaki

    2018-01-15

    The advent of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) enables noninvasive measurement of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) motion, and new information about CSF motion has now been acquired. The driving force of the CSF has long been thought to be choroid plexus (CP) pulsation, but to investigate whether this phenomenon actually occurs, CSF motion was observed in the ventricular system and subarachnoid space using MRI. Eleven healthy volunteers, ranging in age from 23 to 58 years, participated in this study. The MRI sequences used were four-dimensional phase-contrast (4D-PC) and time-spatial labeling inversion pulse (t-SLIP). The 4D-PC images included sagittal images in the cranial midline, coronal images focusing on the foramen of Monro (FOM), and oblique coronal images of the trigone to quantify CSF velocity and acceleration. These values were compared and analyzed as non-parametric data using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test and the Mann-Whitney U test. 4D-PC showed that the median CSF velocity was significantly lower in the posterior part of the lateral ventricle than in other regions. The quantitative analysis of velocity and acceleration showed that they were decreased around the CP in the trigone. Image analysis of both velocity mapping and t-SLIP showed suppressed CSF motion around the CP in the trigone. These findings cast doubt on CP pulsation being the driving force for CSF motion.

  4. Selected CSF biomarkers indicate no evidence of early neuroinflammation in Huntington disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther-Jensen, Tua; Börnsen, Lars Svend; Budtz-Jorgensen, Esben

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate CSF biomarkers of neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration in Huntington disease (HD) gene-expansion carriers compared to controls and to investigate these biomarkers in association with clinical HD rating scales and disease burden score. Methods: We collected CSF from 32...

  5. CSF studies facilitate DNA diagnosis in familial Alzheimer's disease due to a presenilin-1 mutation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bot, Susanne T; Kremer, H P H; Dooijes, Dennis; Verbeek, Marcel M

    2009-01-01

    In sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis is becoming increasingly relevant to establish an early diagnosis. We present a case of familial AD due to a presenilin-1 mutation in which CSF studies suggested appropriate DNA diagnostics. A 38 year old Dutch man presented

  6. Sunlight triggers cutaneous lupus through a CSF-1-dependent mechanism in MRL-Fas(lpr) mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menke, Julia; Hsu, Mei-Yu; Byrne, Katelyn T; Lucas, Julie A; Rabacal, Whitney A; Croker, Byron P; Zong, Xiao-Hua; Stanley, E Richard; Kelley, Vicki R

    2008-11-15

    Sunlight (UVB) triggers cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE) and systemic lupus through an unknown mechanism. We tested the hypothesis that UVB triggers CLE through a CSF-1-dependent, macrophage (Mø)-mediated mechanism in MRL-Fas(lpr) mice. By constructing mutant MRL-Fas(lpr) strains expressing varying levels of CSF-1 (high, intermediate, none), and use of an ex vivo gene transfer to deliver CSF-1 intradermally, we determined that CSF-1 induces CLE in lupus-susceptible MRL-Fas(lpr) mice, but not in lupus-resistant BALB/c mice. UVB incites an increase in Møs, apoptosis in the skin, and CLE in MRL-Fas(lpr), but not in CSF-1-deficient MRL-Fas(lpr) mice. Furthermore, UVB did not induce CLE in BALB/c mice. Probing further, UVB stimulates CSF-1 expression by keratinocytes leading to recruitment and activation of Møs that, in turn, release mediators, which induce apoptosis in keratinocytes. Thus, sunlight triggers a CSF-1-dependent, Mø-mediated destructive inflammation in the skin leading to CLE in lupus-susceptible MRL-Fas(lpr) but not lupus-resistant BALB/c mice. Taken together, CSF-1 is envisioned as the match and lupus susceptibility as the tinder leading to CLE.

  7. Different Cholinesterase Inhibitor Effects on CSF Cholinesterases in Alzheimer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordberg, Agneta; Darreh-Shori, Taher; Peskind, Elaine; Soininen, Hilkka; Mousavi, Malahat; Eagle, Gina; Lane, Roger

    2014-01-01

    Background The current study aimed to compare the effects of different cholinesterase inhibitors on acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE) activities and protein levels, in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of Alzheimer disease (AD) patients. Methods and Findings AD patients aged 50–85 years were randomized to open-label treatment with oral rivastigmine, donepezil or galantamine for 13 weeks. AChE and BuChE activities were assayed by Ellman’s colorimetric method. Protein levels were assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Primary analyses were based on the Completer population (randomized patients who completed Week 13 assessments). 63 patients were randomized to treatment. Rivastigmine was associated with decreased AChE activity by 42.6% and decreased AChE protein levels by 9.3%, and decreased BuChE activity by 45.6% and decreased BuChE protein levels by 21.8%. Galantamine decreased AChE activity by 2.1% and BuChE activity by 0.5%, but increased AChE protein levels by 51.2% and BuChE protein levels by10.5%. Donepezil increased AChE and BuChE activities by 11.8% and 2.8%, respectively. Donepezil caused a 215.2%increase in AChE and 0.4% increase in BuChE protein levels. Changes in mean AChE-Readthrough/Synaptic ratios, which might reflect underlying neurodegenerative processes, were 1.4, 0.6, and 0.4 for rivastigmine, donepezil and galantamine, respectively. Conclusion The findings suggest pharmacologically-induced differences between rivastigmine, donepezil and galantamine. Rivastigmine provides sustained inhibition of AChE and BuChE, while donepezil and galantamine do not inhibit BuChE and are associated with increases in CSF AChE protein levels. The clinical implications require evaluation. PMID:19199870

  8. Menstrual phase-related differences in the pulsatility index on the central retinal artery suggest an oestrogen vasodilatation effect that antagonizes with progesterone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viana, Luiz Carlos; Faria, Marcos; Pettersen, Heverton; Sampaio, Marcos; Geber, Selmo

    2011-03-01

    The actual effect of steroid hormones on cerebral microcirculation is still controversial. Therefore, the aim of our study was to investigate vascular flow variations in the central retinal artery that may exist during the ovulatory menstrual cycle. A total of 34 healthy women were included in this observational, longitudinal, and prospective study. All participants were submitted to dopplerfluxometric evaluation of the eyes in order to study the pulsatility index (PI) of the central retinal arteries, during four phases of the menstrual cycle: early follicular, mid follicular, periovulatory, and mid luteal phases. Subjects' ages ranged from 14 to 47 years old (mean: 29.7 ± 10.1) and PI did not differ among age groups. The PI of the central retinal artery was different among the four phases of the menstrual cycle. PI showed a significant decrease from early follicular phase (1.72) to mid follicular phase (1.57) (p = 0.037), and was similar during periovulatory phase (1.56) and significantly increased in mid luteal phase (1.70). After that it returned to the values observed in the early follicular phase. Our results suggest the existence of an oestrogen vasodilatation effect on the central retinal artery that is menstrual phase-related and antagonized by progesterone.

  9. Analysis of pulsatile retinal movements by spectral-domain low-coherence interferometry: influence of age and glaucoma on the pulse wave.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyne Dion

    Full Text Available Recent studies have shown that ocular hemodynamics and eye tissue biomechanical properties play an important role in the pathophysiology of glaucoma. Nevertheless, better, non-invasive methods to assess these characteristics in vivo are essential for a thorough understanding of degenerative mechanisms. Here, we propose to measure ocular tissue movements induced by cardiac pulsations and study the ocular pulse waveform as an indicator of tissue compliance. Using a novel, low-cost and non-invasive device based on spectral-domain low coherence interferometry (SD-LCI, we demonstrate the potential of this technique to differentiate ocular hemodynamic and biomechanical properties. We measured the axial movement of the retina driven by the pulsatile ocular blood flow in 11 young healthy individuals, 12 older healthy individuals and 15 older treated glaucoma patients using our custom-made SD-OCT apparatus. The cardiac pulse was simultaneously measured through the use of an oximeter to allow comparison. Spectral components up to the second harmonic were obtained and analyzed. For the different cohorts, we computed a few parameters that characterize the three groups of individuals by analyzing the movement of the retinal tissue at two locations, using this simple, low-cost interferometric device. Our pilot study indicates that spectral analysis of the fundus pulsation has potential for the study of ocular biomechanical and vascular properties, as well as for the study of ocular disease.

  10. [Ovulation induction by pulsatile GnRH therapy in 2014: literature review and synthesis of current practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gronier, H; Peigné, M; Catteau-Jonard, S; Dewailly, D; Robin, G

    2014-10-01

    The hypogonadotropic hypogonadism is an easily treatable form of female infertility. The most common cause of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism is functional hypothalamic amenorrhea. The GnRH pump is a simple and effective treatment to restore fertility of patients with hypothalamic amenorrhea: cumulative pregnancy rate is estimated between 70 and 100% after 6 cycles, compared to a low rate of complications and multiple pregnancies. While only 2.8 cycles are on average required to achieve a pregnancy with a pump, this induction of ovulation stays underused in France. The objective of this paper is to propose a practical manual of pulsatile GnRH, in order to improve the accessibility of pulsatile GnRH for patients with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Prediction of low birth weight: the placental T2* estimated by MRI versus the uterine artery pulsatility index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sinding, Marianne Munk; Peters, David Alberg; Frøkjær, Jens Brøndum

    (MRI) variable T2* reflects the placental oxygenation and thereby placental function. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate the performance of placental T2* in the prediction of low birth weight using the uterine artery (UtA) pulsatility index (PI) as gold standard. Methods: The study population......CONTROL ID: 2516296 ABSTRACT FINAL ID: P22.05 TITLE: Prediction of low birth weight: the placental T2* estimated by MRI versus the uterine artery pulsatility index AUTHORS (FIRST NAME, LAST NAME): Marianne Sinding1, David Peters2, Jens B. Frøkjær3, 4, Ole B. Christiansen1, 4, Astrid Petersen5...... had an EFW T2* was measured by MRI at 1.5T. A gradient recalled echo MRI sequence with readout at 16 echo times was used, and the placental T2* value was obtained by fitting the signal intensity as a function of the echo times...

  12. Microdialysis Monitoring of CSF Parameters in Severe Traumatic Brain Injury Patients: A Novel Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thelin, Eric P.; Nelson, David W.; Ghatan, Per Hamid; Bellander, Bo-Michael

    2014-01-01

    Background: Neuro-intensive care following traumatic brain injury (TBI) is focused on preventing secondary insults that may lead to irreversible brain damage. Microdialysis (MD) is used to detect deranged cerebral metabolism. The clinical usefulness of the MD is dependent on the regional localization of the MD catheter. The aim of this study was to analyze a new method of continuous cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) monitoring using the MD technique. The method was validated using conventional laboratory analysis of CSF samples. MD-CSF and regional MD-Brain samples were correlated to patient outcome. Materials and Methods: A total of 14 patients suffering from severe TBI were analyzed. They were monitored using (1) a MD catheter (CMA64-iView, n = 7448 MD samples) located in a CSF-pump connected to the ventricular drain and (2) an intraparenchymal MD catheter (CMA70, n = 8358 MD samples). CSF-lactate and CSF-glucose levels were monitored and were compared to MD-CSF samples. MD-CSF and MD-Brain parameters were correlated to favorable (Glasgow Outcome Score extended, GOSe 6–8) and unfavorable (GOSe 1–5) outcome. Results: Levels of glucose and lactate acquired with the CSF-MD technique could be correlated to conventional levels. The median MD recovery using the CMA64 catheter in CSF was 0.98 and 0.97 for glucose and lactate, respectively. Median MD-CSF (CMA 64) lactate (p = 0.0057) and pyruvate (p = 0.0011) levels were significantly lower in the favorable outcome group compared to the unfavorable group. No significant difference in outcome was found using the lactate:pyruvate ratio (LPR), or any of the regional MD-Brain monitoring in our analyzed cohort. Conclusion: This new technique of global MD-CSF monitoring correlates with conventional CSF levels of glucose and lactate, and the MD recovery is higher than previously described. Increase in lactate and pyruvate, without any effect on the LPR, correlates to unfavorable outcome, perhaps related to the

  13. Microdialysis monitoring of CSF parameters in severe traumatic brain injury patients: A novel approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Peter Thelin

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Neuro-intensive care following traumatic brain injury is focused on preventing secondary insults that may lead to irreversible brain damage. Microdialysis (MD is used to detect deranged cerebral metabolism. The clinical usefulness of the MD is dependent on the regional localization of the MD catheter. The aim of this study was to analyze a new method of continuous cerebral spinal fluid (CSF monitoring using the MD technique. The method was validated using conventional laboratory analysis of CSF samples. MD-CSF and regional MD-Brain samples were correlated to patient outcome.Materials and method: A total of 14 patients suffering from severe TBI were analyzed. They were monitored using 1. A MD catheter (CMA64-iView, n=7448 MD samples located in a CSF-pump connected to the ventricular drain and 2. An intraparenchymal MD catheter (CMA70, n=8358 MD samples. CSF-lactate and CSF-glucose levels were monitored and were compared to MD-CSF samples. MD-CSF and MD-Brain parameters were correlated to favorable (Glasgow Outcome Score extended, GOSe 6-8 and unfavorable (GOSe 1-5 outcome. Results: Levels of glucose and lactate acquired with the CSF-MD technique could be correlated to conventional levels. The median extraction ratio using the CMA64 catheter in CSF was 0.98 and 0.97 for glucose and lactate, respectively. Median MD-CSF (CMA 64 lactate- (p=0.0057 and pyruvate (p=0.0011 levels were significantly lower in the favorable outcome group compared to the unfavorable group. No significant difference in outcome was found using the lactate:pyruvate ratio (LPR, or any of the regional MD-Brain monitoring in our analyzed cohort. Conclusions: This new technique of global MD-CSF monitoring correlates with conventional CSF-levels of glucose and lactate and the extraction ratio for the MD catheter is higher than previously described. Increase in lactate and pyruvate in CSF, without any effect on the LPR, correlates to unfavorable outcome.

  14. Highlights of the Global HIV-1 CSF Escape Consortium Meeting, 9 June 2016, Bethesda, MD, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Jeymohan; Cinque, Paola; Colosi, Deborah; Dravid, Ameet; Ene, Luminita; Fox, Howard; Gabuzda, Dana; Gisslen, Magnus; Beth Joseph, Sarah; Letendre, Scott; Mukerji, Shibani S; Nath, Avindra; Perez-Valero, Ignacio; Persaud, Deborah; Price, Richard W; Rao, Vasudev R; Sacktor, Ned; Swanstrom, Ronald; Winston, Alan; Wojna, Valerie; Wright, Edwina; Spudich, Serena

    2016-10-05

    CSF HIV escape is a recently recognised phenomenon that suggests that despite suppressive treatment, HIV RNA may be detected in the CNS compartment in some individuals. In rare cases this is associated with clinical neurological disease, while in most cases, neurological consequences are not apparent. Attempts at characterising the biological substrates of CSF escape and further investigating the neurological consequences need to be made to better understand the implications of this condition for the HIV cure agenda as well as for clinical outcomes. The Global CSF HIV-1 Escape Consortium meeting, convened by the US National Institute of Mental Health, was a first step to gather investigators from diverse sites to discuss opportunities for future collaborative work on this emerging issue. To better understand CSF HIV escape and allow cross-site data reconciliation, it will be useful to reach a consensus set of definitions of the distinct forms of CSF escape, without which concerted cross-site efforts are difficult.

  15. Prognosis of cerebral ischemia, significance of CSF-lactate-level and computerized tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busse, O.

    1982-01-01

    In patients (n = 120) with supratentorial ischemic cerebral infarction CSF lactate was determined and a CT was carried out on the 1st, 3rd and 7th day after the stroke. On the 3rd and 7th day the comparative investigation revealed a close correlation between the measure of the ischemic edema and the level of CSF-lactate. Thus the lactate-concentration can be regarded as a measure for the spread of the edema after cerebral infarction. Already on the 3rd day CT- and CSF-lactate results allow a relatively reliable prediction for the course of the stroke. An edema grade III in CT and a CSF-lactate concentration more than 4 mmol/l were prognostically critical. On the other hand good chances of survival were indicated by a CSF lactate level under 2.5 mmol/l and an edema grade I. (orig.) [de

  16. Persistent CSF Rhinorrhoea, Pneumocephalus, and Recurrent Meningitis Following Misdiagnosis of Olfactory Neuroblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil Barua

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A 41-year-old female patient was admitted with streptococcal meningitis on a background of 5-month history of CSF rhinorrhoea. Imaging revealed an extensive skull base lesion involving the sphenoid and ethmoid sinuses, the pituitary fossa with suprasellar extension and bony destruction. Histological examination of an endonasal transethmoidal biopsy suggested a diagnosis of olfactory neuroblastoma. A profuse CSF leak occurred and the patient developed coliform meningitis. A second endonasal endoscopic biopsy was undertaken which demonstrated the tumour to be a prolactinoma. Following endonasal repair of the CSF leak and lumbar drainage, she developed profound pneumocephalus. The patient underwent three further unsuccessful CSF leak repairs. Definitive control of the CSF leak was finally achieved through a transcranial approach with prolonged lumbar drainage. This case illustrates some of the potentially devastating complications which can occur as a consequence of complex skull base lesions. A multidisciplinary approach may be required to successfully manage such cases.

  17. Crystals seen on CSF microscopy in a case of suspected subarachnoid haemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiand, Daniel; Hanning, Ian; Mouhamadou, Moussa; Wearmouth, Debbie

    2015-01-01

    Although crystals are rarely identified on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) microscopy, their presence can be of significant diagnostic value. We report a case of oxalate crystals seen on CSF microscopy of a 43-year-old woman. The patient presented with headaches, nausea and vomiting. CT of the head showed a small focus of hyper-density, suspicious of haemorrhage, in the right side of the pontine cistern. CSF cell count was within the normal range. Although no organisms were seen on microscopy, copious oxalate crystals were seen. The same crystals were seen on microscopy of CSF collected in a fluoride oxalate container used for glucose analysis. A follow-up contrast-enhanced CT angiogram did not demonstrate any abnormalities. It transpired that excess CSF had been collected into a fluoride oxalate container. This had subsequently been decanted into a plain container for microbiological analysis. Correct specimen collection should be emphasised when teaching lumbar puncture technique. PMID:26139652

  18. Treatment of cellulite with a bipolar radiofrequency, infrared heat, and pulsatile suction device: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanitphakdeedecha, Rungsima; Manuskiatti, Woraphong

    2006-12-01

    Very few therapeutic options have proven effective in the treatment of cellulite. To evaluate the effectiveness and adverse effects of a bipolar radiofrequency (RF), infrared (IR) heat and pulsatile suction device for the treatment of cellulite. Twelve subjects were treated with the RF-light-based device. All subjects were treated twice weekly for a total number of eight to nine treatments. Subjects were evaluated using standardized photographs, and measurements of body weight and circumference of treatment sites at baseline, immediately after the last treatment, and four weeks and one year after the last treatment. Clinical improvement scores of comparable photographs using a quartile grading scale (0 = 75% improvement) were judged independently by two non-treating dermatologists after the series of treatment. The average body weights at baseline, immediately after the last treatment, and four weeks and one year after the complete treatment were 56.30, 56.05, 56.23, and 56.53 kg, respectively. The average circumferential reductions of the abdomen and thigh at the last treatment visit were 5.17 +/- 1.04 cm (6.32%+/- 1.82%) and 3.50 +/- 2.16 cm (6.23 +/- 3.58%), respectively. At four weeks after the last treatment, the average circumferential reductions of the abdomen and thigh were sustained at 3.17 +/- 2.75 cm (4.04%+/- 3.69%) and 3.50 +/- 2.04 cm (6.26%+/- 3.52%), respectively. At one year follow-up visit, the average circumferential reductions of the abdomen and thigh were maintained at 3.83 +/- 0.76 cm (4.64%+/- 1.15%) and 3.13 +/- 3.54 (5.50%+/- 6.12%), respectively. Average clinical improvement scores of the abdomen and thigh after the series of treatments were 0.75 (corresponding to approximately 25% improvement), and 1.75 (corresponding to approximately 50% improvement), respectively. A bipolar RF, IR heat and pulsatile suction device provides a beneficial effect on reduction of abdomen and thigh circumference, and smoothening of the cellulite.

  19. EIT based pulsatile impedance monitoring during spontaneous breathing in cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger-Ziolek, Sabine; Schullcke, Benjamin; Gong, Bo; Müller-Lisse, Ullrich; Moeller, Knut

    2017-06-01

    Evaluating the lung function in patients with obstructive lung disease by electrical impedance tomography (EIT) usually requires breathing maneuvers containing deep inspirations and forced expirations. Since these maneuvers strongly depend on the patient's co-operation and health status, normal tidal breathing was investigated in an attempt to develop continuous maneuver-free measurements. Ventilation related and pulsatile impedance changes were systematically analyzed during normal tidal breathing in 12 cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and 12 lung-healthy controls (HL). Tidal breaths were subdivided into three inspiratory (In1, In2, In3) and three expiratory (Ex1, Ex2, Ex3) sections of the same amplitude of global impedance change. Maximal changes of the ventilation and the pulsatile impedance signal occurring during these sections were determined (▵I V and ▵I P ). Differences in ▵I V and ▵I P among sections were ascertained in relation to the first inspiratory section. In addition, ▵I V /▵I P was calculated for each section. Medians of changes in ▵I V were  <0.05% in all sections for both subject groups. Both groups showed a similar pattern of ▵I P changes during tidal breathing. Changes in ▵I P first decreased during inspiration (In2), then increased towards the end of inspiration (In3) and reached a maximum at the beginning of expiration (Ex1). During the last two sections of expiration (Ex2, Ex3) ▵I P changes decreased. The CF patients showed higher variations in ▵I P changes compared to the controls (CF:  -426.5%, HL:  -158.1%, coefficient of variation). Furthermore, ▵I V /▵I P significantly differed between expiratory sections for the CF patients (Ex1-Ex2, p  <  0.01; Ex1-Ex3, p  <  0.001; Ex2-Ex3, p  <  0.05), but not for the controls. No significant differences in ▵I V /▵I P between inspiratory sections were determined for both groups. Differences in ▵I P changes and in ▵I V /▵I P between

  20. False localizing sign of cervico-thoracic CSF leak in spontaneous intracranial hypotension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schievink, Wouter I; Maya, M Marcel; Chu, Ray M; Moser, Franklin G

    2015-06-16

    Spontaneous spinal CSF leaks are an important cause of new-onset headaches. Such leaks are reported to be particularly common at the cervico-thoracic junction. The authors undertook a study to determine the significance of these cervico-thoracic CSF leaks. The patient population consisted of a consecutive group of 13 patients who underwent surgery for CSF leak repair based on CT myelography showing CSF extravasation at the cervico-thoracic junction but without any evidence of an underlying structural lesion. The mean age of the 9 women and 4 men was 41.2 years. Extensive extrathecal longitudinal CSF collections were demonstrated in 11 patients. At surgery, small leaking arachnoid cysts were found in 2 patients. In the remaining 11 patients, no clear source of CSF leakage could be identified at surgery. Resolution of symptoms was achieved in both patients with leaking arachnoid cysts, but in only 3 of the 11 patients with negative intraoperative findings. Postoperative spinal imaging was performed in 9 of the 11 patients with negative intraoperative findings and showed persistence of the longitudinal intraspinal extradural CSF. Further imaging revealed the site of the CSF leak to be ventral to the thoracic spinal cord. Five of these patients underwent microsurgical repair of the ventral CSF leak with resolution of symptoms in all 5 patients. Cervico-thoracic extravasation of dye on myelography does not necessarily indicate the site of the CSF leak. Treatment directed at this site should not be expected to have a high probability of sustained improvement of symptoms. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  1. Identification of Ambiguous Activities in Radionuclide Cisternography Using SPECT/CT: Aspirated and Ingested CSF Rhinorrhea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dong Yun; Kim, Jae Seung [Univ. of Ulsan College of Medicine, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-15

    A 2 year-old little girl underwent Tc-99m diethylenthriamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) radionuclide cisternography to evaluate CSF rhinorrhea (Fig. 1). Cisternography clearly showed consecutive tracer activity in the nasal cavity and nasal tip, reflecting cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage. However, several unexpected activities appeared on the bilateral mid- and unilateral lower thorax on delayed images, respectively. We performed additional SPECT/CT to delineate the CSF leakage tract and identify the unexpected activities. Through SPECT/CT, we could confirm that the mid-thoracic activity was in the lung parenchyma, while the lower thoracic activity was in the stomach. Thus, we speculated that these unexpected activities were the result of aspirated and ingested CSF rhinorrhea. CSF rhinorrhea occurs when there is a fistula between the dura mater and the skull base and discharge of CSF from the nose. A spinal fluid leak from the intracranial space to the nasal respiratory tract is potentially very serious because of the risk of an ascending infection that could produce fulminant meningitis. Therefore, identification of the fistulous tract is helpful for patient management. Radionuclide cisternography is an important imaging modality to detect the site of leakage in patients with CSF rhinorrhea. The combination of radionuclide cistenography and SPECT/CT has led to a major improvement in the diagnostic accuracy for localization of CSF leakage. This case also shows an important role for SPECT/CT fusion imaging in radionuclide cisternography not only for localizing the primary CSF fistula tract, but also for evaluating ambiguous radiotracer activities in planar imaging; these ultimately turned out to be aspirated and ingested CSF rhinorrhea.

  2. GM-CSF augments the immunosuppressive capacity of neonatal spleen cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrissey, P.J.; Ireland, R.

    1991-01-01

    Addition of exogenous granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) to cultures of adult murine spleen cells with sheep red blood cells (SRBC) results in an augmented plaque forming cell (PFC) response. The influence of GM-CSF on the ability of neonatal spleen cells to suppress the anti-SRBC plaque forming response of adult spleen cells was tested by adding GM-CSF to cultures of neonatal and adult spleen cells. The suppressive capacity of the neonatal spleen cells was augmented by exogenous GM-CSF. The augmented suppression of the neonatal spleen cells was dependent on a G-10 adherent population since the addition of GM-CSF to cultures containing G-10 passed neonatal spleen cells resulted in an augmented PFC response and not suppression. Neonatal splenic glass adherent cells were also capable of suppressing the response. Neonatal spleen cells or purified neonatal glass adherent spleen cells cultured in the presence of GM-CSF had markedly increased levels of PGE2 in the culture supernatant. Neonatal spleen cells cultured with GM-CSF had increased numbers of morphologically identifiable macrophages after 48 hr of culture. Both irradiation and G-10 passage of the neonatal spleen diminished the numbers of macrophages formed in response to GM-CSF, and both of these manipulations resulted in reversal of suppression in response to GM-CSF. Thus, the augmented suppressive capacity of neonatal spleen cells in response to GM-CSF is probably mediated by its ability to drive monocyte to macrophage differentiation as well as increase the suppressive capacity of the existing neonatal splenic macrophages by increasing their production of PGE2

  3. Autocrine CSF-1R signaling drives mesothelioma chemoresistance via AKT activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cioce, M; Canino, C; Goparaju, C; Yang, H; Carbone, M; Pass, H I

    2014-01-01

    Clinical management of malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is very challenging because of the uncommon resistance of this tumor to chemotherapy. We report here increased expression of macrophage colony-stimulating-factor-1-receptor (M-CSF/CSF-1R) mRNA in mesothelioma versus normal tissue specimens and demonstrate that CSF-1R expression identifies chemoresistant cells of mesothelial nature in both primary cultures and mesothelioma cell lines. By using RNAi or ligand trapping, we demonstrate that the chemoresistance properties of those cells depend on autocrine CSF-1R signaling. At the single-cell level, the isolated CSF-1Rpos cells exhibit a complex repertoire of pluripotency, epithelial–mesenchymal transition and detoxifying factors, which define a clonogenic, chemoresistant, precursor-like cell sub-population. The simple activation of CSF-1R in untransformed mesothelial cells is sufficient to confer clonogenicity and resistance to pemetrexed, hallmarks of mesothelioma. In addition, this induced a gene expression profile highly mimicking that observed in the MPM cells endogenously expressing the receptor and the ligands, suggesting that CSF-1R expression is mainly responsible for the phenotype of the identified cell sub-populations. The survival of CSF1Rpos cells requires active AKT (v-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog 1) signaling, which contributed to increased levels of nuclear, transcriptionally competent β-catenin. Inhibition of AKT reduced the transcriptional activity of β-catenin-dependent reporters and sensitized the cells to senescence-induced clonogenic death after pemetrexed treatment. This work expands what is known on the non-macrophage functions of CSF-1R and its role in solid tumors, and suggests that CSF-1R signaling may have a critical pathogenic role in a prototypical, inflammation-related cancer such as MPM and therefore may represent a promising target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:24722292

  4. Identification of Ambiguous Activities in Radionuclide Cisternography Using SPECT/CT: Aspirated and Ingested CSF Rhinorrhea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Dong Yun; Kim, Jae Seung

    2014-01-01

    A 2 year-old little girl underwent Tc-99m diethylenthriamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) radionuclide cisternography to evaluate CSF rhinorrhea (Fig. 1). Cisternography clearly showed consecutive tracer activity in the nasal cavity and nasal tip, reflecting cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage. However, several unexpected activities appeared on the bilateral mid- and unilateral lower thorax on delayed images, respectively. We performed additional SPECT/CT to delineate the CSF leakage tract and identify the unexpected activities. Through SPECT/CT, we could confirm that the mid-thoracic activity was in the lung parenchyma, while the lower thoracic activity was in the stomach. Thus, we speculated that these unexpected activities were the result of aspirated and ingested CSF rhinorrhea. CSF rhinorrhea occurs when there is a fistula between the dura mater and the skull base and discharge of CSF from the nose. A spinal fluid leak from the intracranial space to the nasal respiratory tract is potentially very serious because of the risk of an ascending infection that could produce fulminant meningitis. Therefore, identification of the fistulous tract is helpful for patient management. Radionuclide cisternography is an important imaging modality to detect the site of leakage in patients with CSF rhinorrhea. The combination of radionuclide cistenography and SPECT/CT has led to a major improvement in the diagnostic accuracy for localization of CSF leakage. This case also shows an important role for SPECT/CT fusion imaging in radionuclide cisternography not only for localizing the primary CSF fistula tract, but also for evaluating ambiguous radiotracer activities in planar imaging; these ultimately turned out to be aspirated and ingested CSF rhinorrhea

  5. Neuroanatomical Alterations in Patients with Early Stage of Unilateral Pulsatile Tinnitus: A Voxel-Based Morphometry Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yawen Liu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available During the past several years, the rapid development of neuroimaging techniques has contributed greatly in the noninvasive imaging studies of tinnitus. The aim of the present study was to explore the brain anatomical alterations in patients with right-sided unilateral pulsatile tinnitus (PT in the early stage of PT symptom using voxel-based morphometry (VBM analysis. Twenty-four patients with right-sided pulsatile tinnitus and 24 age- and gender-matched normal controls were recruited to this study. Structural image data preprocessing was performed using VBM8 toolbox. Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (THI score was acquired in the tinnitus group to assess the severity of tinnitus and tinnitus-related distress. Two-sample t-test and Pearson’s correlation analysis were used in statistical analysis. Patients with unilateral pulsatile tinnitus had significantly increased gray matter (GM volume in bilateral superior temporal gyrus compared with the normal controls. However, the left cerebellum posterior lobe, left frontal superior orbital lobe (gyrus rectus, right middle occipital gyrus (MOG, and bilateral putamen showed significantly decreased brain volumes. This was the first study which demonstrated the features of neuroanatomical changes in patients with unilateral PT during their early stages of the symptom.

  6. Glucose uptake and pulsatile insulin infusion: euglycaemic clamp and [3-3H]glucose studies in healthy subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitz, O.; Arnfred, J.; Hother Nielsen, O.; Beck-Nielsen, H.; Oerskov, H.

    1986-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that insulin has a greater effect on glucose metabolism when given as pulsatile than as continuous infusion, a 354-min euglycaemic clamp study was carried out in 8 healthy subjects. At random order soluble insulin was given intravenously either at a constant rate of 0.45mU/kg · min or in identical amounts in pulses of 1 1 / 2 to 2 1 / 4 min followed by intervals of 10 1 / 2 to 9 3 / 4 min. Average serum insulin levels were similar during the two infusion protocols, but pulsatile administration induced oscillations ranging between 15 and 62 μU/ml. Glucose uptake expressed as metabolic clearance rate (MCR) for glucose was significantly increased during pulsatile insulin delivery as compared with continuous administration (270-294 min: 8.7±0.7 vs 6.8±0.9 ml/kg · min, P 3 H]glucose infusion technique was suppressed to insignificant values. Finally, the effect of insulin on endogenous insulin secretion and lipolysis as assessed by changes in serum C-peptide and serum FFA was uninfluenced by the infusion mode. In conclusion, insulin infusion resulting in physiological serum insulin levels enhances glucose uptake in peripheral tissues in healthy subjects to a higher degree when given in a pulsed pattern mimicking that of the normal endocrine pancreas than when given as a continuous infusion. (author)

  7. Local pulsatile contractions are an intrinsic property of the myosin 2A motor in the cortical cytoskeleton of adherent cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Michelle A; Billington, Neil; Wang, Aibing; Adelstein, Robert S; Sellers, James R; Fischer, Robert S; Waterman, Clare M

    2017-01-15

    The role of nonmuscle myosin 2 (NM2) pulsatile dynamics in generating contractile forces required for developmental morphogenesis has been characterized, but whether these pulsatile contractions are an intrinsic property of all actomyosin networks is not known. Here we used live-cell fluorescence imaging to show that transient, local assembly of NM2A "pulses" occurs in the cortical cytoskeleton of single adherent cells of mesenchymal, epithelial, and sarcoma origin, independent of developmental signaling cues and cell-cell or cell-ECM interactions. We show that pulses in the cortical cytoskeleton require Rho-associated kinase- or myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) activity, increases in cytosolic calcium, and NM2 ATPase activity. Surprisingly, we find that cortical cytoskeleton pulses specifically require the head domain of NM2A, as they do not occur with either NM2B or a 2B-head-2A-tail chimera. Our results thus suggest that pulsatile contractions in the cortical cytoskeleton are an intrinsic property of the NM2A motor that may mediate its role in homeostatic maintenance of tension in the cortical cytoskeleton of adherent cells. © 2017 Baird et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  8. G-CSF/anti-G-CSF antibody complexes drive the potent recovery and expansion of CD11b+Gr-1+ myeloid cells without compromising CD8+ T cell immune responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Administration of recombinant G-CSF following cytoreductive therapy enhances the recovery of myeloid cells, minimizing the risk of opportunistic infection. Free G-CSF, however, is expensive, exhibits a short half-life, and has poor biological activity in vivo. Methods We evaluated whether the biological activity of G-CSF could be improved by pre-association with anti-G-CSF mAb prior to injection into mice. Results We find that the efficacy of G-CSF therapy can be enhanced more than 100-fold by pre-association of G-CSF with an anti-G-CSF monoclonal antibody (mAb). Compared with G-CSF alone, administration of G-CSF/anti-G-CSF mAb complexes induced the potent expansion of CD11b+Gr-1+ myeloid cells in mice with or without concomitant cytoreductive treatment including radiation or chemotherapy. Despite driving the dramatic expansion of myeloid cells, in vivo antigen-specific CD8+ T cell immune responses were not compromised. Furthermore, injection of G-CSF/anti-G-CSF mAb complexes heightened protective immunity to bacterial infection. As a measure of clinical value, we also found that antibody complexes improved G-CSF biological activity much more significantly than pegylation. Conclusions Our findings provide the first evidence that antibody cytokine complexes can effectively expand myeloid cells, and furthermore, that G-CSF/anti-G-CSF mAb complexes may provide an improved method for the administration of recombinant G-CSF. PMID:24279871

  9. Um sistema de ventrículo pulmonar produzindo pressão pulsátil em único ventrículo: modelo experimental A pulmonary ventricle system producing pulsatile pressure in single ventricle: experimental model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilgein Emrecan

    2006-09-01

    systolic and diastolic pulmonary artery pressures were 15,6 ± 2.0 mmHg and 4.5 ± 1.5 mmHg. The mean of the left ventricular systolic pressure was mean 76.6 ± 4.4 mmHg. CONCLUSION: A ventricle producing pulsatile pressure is necessary for regulating the pulmonary artery flow with high central venous pressure and low non-pulsatile pulmonary pressure in the anomalies with functional single ventricles.

  10. Low-pressure sequential compression of lower limbs enhances forearm skin blood flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amah, Guy; Voicu, Sebastian; Bonnin, Philippe; Kubis, Nathalie

    2016-12-01

    We investigated whether forearm skin blood flow could be improved when a multilayer pulsatile inflatable suit was applied at a low pressure to the lower limbs and abdomen. We hypothesized that a non-invasive purely mechanical stimulation of the lower limbs could induce remote forearm blood flow modifications. The pulsatile suit induced a sequential compartmentalized low compression (65 mmHg), which was synchronized with each diastole of the cardiac cycle with each phase evolving centripetally (lower limbs to abdomen). Modifications of the forearm skin blood flow were continuously recorded by laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) at baseline and during the pulsatile suit application. Endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent vasodilations of the forearm skin microcirculation were measured by LDF in response to a local transdermal iontophoretic application of acetylcholine (ACh-test) and to hyperthermia (hyperT- test). Twenty-four healthy volunteers, 12 men and 12 women (43±14 years) were included in the study. LDF responses increased 1) under pulsatile suit (97±106%, p.

  11. A Novel Pulsatile Bioreactor for Mechanical Stimulation of Tissue Engineered Cardiac Constructs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Günther Eissner

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available After myocardial infarction, the implantation of stem cell seeded scaffolds on the ischemic zone represents a promising strategy for restoration of heart function. However, mechanical integrity and functionality of tissue engineered constructs need to be determined prior to implantation. Therefore, in this study a novel pulsatile bioreactor mimicking the myocardial contraction was developed to analyze the behavior of mesenchymal stem cells derived from umbilical cord tissue (UCMSC colonized on titanium-coated polytetrafluorethylene scaffolds to friction stress. The design of the bioreactor enables a simple handling and defined mechanical forces on three seeded scaffolds at physiological conditions. The compact system made of acrylic glass, Teflon®, silicone, and stainless steel allows the comparison of different media, cells and scaffolds. The bioreactor can be gas sterilized and actuated in a standard incubator. Macroscopic observations and pressure-measurements showed a uniformly sinusoidal pulsation, indicating that the bioreactor performed well. Preliminary experiments to determine the adherence rate and morphology of UCMSC after mechanical loadings showed an almost confluent cellular coating without damage on the cell surface. In summary, the bioreactor is an adequate tool for the mechanical stress of seeded scaffolds and offers dynamic stimuli for pre-conditioning of cardiac tissue engineered constructs in vitro.

  12. Development and optimization of press coated tablets of release engineered valsartan for pulsatile delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Sunny; Patel, Romik; Soniwala, Moinuddin; Chavda, Jayant

    2015-01-01

    The present work is aimed to develop and optimize pulsatile delivery during dissolution of an improved formulation of valsartan to coordinate the drug release with circadian rhythm. Preliminary studies suggested that β cyclodextrin could improve the solubility of valsartan and showed AL type solubility curve. A 1:1 stoichiometric ratio of valsartan to β cyclodextrin was revealed from phase solubility studies and Job's plot. The prepared complex showed significantly better dissolution efficiency (p valsartan β cyclodextrin complex was significantly higher (p valsartan β cyclodextrin complex were subsequently prepared and application of the Plackett-Burman screening design revealed that HPMC K4M and EC showed significant effect on lag time. A 3(2) full factorial design was used to measure the response of HPMC K4M and EC on lag time and time taken for 90% drug release (T90). The optimized batch prepared according to the levels obtained from the desirability function had a lag time of 6 h and consisted of HPMC K4M:ethylcellulose in a 1:1.5 ratio with 180 mg of coating and revealed a close agreement between observed and predicted value (R(2 )= 0.9694).

  13. Cerebral Pulsatility Index Is Elevated in Patients with Elevated Right Atrial Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahiri, Shouri; Schlick, Konrad H; Padrick, Matthew M; Rinsky, Brenda; Gonzalez, Nestor; Jones, Heather; Mayer, Stephan A; Lyden, Patrick D

    2018-01-01

    Extracerebral venous congestion can precipitate intracranial hypertension due to obstruction of cerebral blood outflow. Conditions that increase right atrial pressure, such as hypervolemia, are thought to increase resistance to jugular venous outflow and contribute to cerebro-venous congestion. Cerebral pulsatility index (CPI) is considered a surrogate marker of distal cerebrovascular resistance and is elevated with intracranial hypertension. Thus, we sought to test the hypothesis that elevated right atrial pressure is associated with increased CPI compared to normal right atrial pressure. We retrospectively reviewed 61 consecutive patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage. We calculated CPI from transcranial Doppler studies and correlated these with echocardiographic measures of right atrial pressure. CPIs were compared from patients with elevated and normal right atrial pressure. There was a significant difference between CPI obtained from all patients with elevated right atrial pressure compared to those with normal right atrial pressure (P right and left hemispheric CPI from patients with both elevated and normal right atrial pressure. Patients with elevated right atrial pressure had significantly higher CPI compared to patients with normal right atrial pressure. These findings suggest that cerebro-venous congestion due to impaired jugular venous outflow may increase distal cerebrovascular resistance as measured by CPI. Since elevated CPI is associated with poor outcome in numerous neurological conditions, future studies are needed to elucidate the significance of these results in other populations. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Neuroimaging.

  14. Obesity, serum steroid levels, and pulsatile gonadotropin secretion in polycystic ovarian disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laatikainen, T; Tulenheimo, A; Andersson, B; Kärkkäinen, J

    1983-04-01

    Serum binding capacity of sex-hormone binding globulin (SHBG-BC), steroid concentrations, and secretion patterns of LH and FSH were compared between groups of seven nonobese and seven obese patients with polycystic ovarian disease (PCOD). Obese patients with PCOD differed from those with normal weight in having very low SHBG-BC and elevated serum levels of free and albumin bound testosterone. Compared to healthy women in the follicular phase, both nonobese and obese patients with PCOD showed equally elevated serum levels of androstenedione, estrone, and albumin-bound and free estradiol. Pattern of gonadotropin secretion was studied from blood samples taken at 15 min intervals for 6 h. In 6 patients of both groups low pulses of FSH were found coincidently with pulses of LH. Serum level of LH showed a clear pulsatile pattern in all patients with PCOD, varying from 4.5 to 7.5 pulses per 6 h. The mean pulse rate in the groups of nonobese and obese patients with PCOD was similar, 5.9 pulses per 6 h. In the obese patients the mean LH levels were, however, less elevated and the pulse amplitudes were smaller than those in the nonobese patients. We suggest that this difference is due to high levels of biologically active testosterone in obese patients with PCOD.

  15. Bioavailability assessment of hydroxymethylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitor utilizing pulsatile drug delivery system: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Ehab I

    2016-09-01

    Chronotherapy or pulsatile drug delivery system could be achieved by increasing drug plasma concentration exactly at the time of disease incidence. Cholesterol synthesis shows a circadian rhythm being high at late night and early in the morning. Simvastatin (SIM) inhibits hydroxymethylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, which is responsible for cholesterol synthesis. In this study, SIM lipid-based formulation filled in gelatin capsules and coated with aqueous Eudragit® S100 dispersion was prepared for chronotherapeutic treatment of hypercholesterolemia. The pharmacokinetic parameters of SIM capsules were studied in human volunteers after a single oral dose and compared with that of Zocor® tablets as a reference in a randomized cross-over study. Pharmacokinetic parameters such as AUC 0-∞ , C max , T max , t 1/2 and elimination rate constant were determined from plasma concentration-time profile for both formulations. The tested formulation had the ability to delay drug absorption and provide higher drug concentrations from 3 up to 10 h after oral administration compared to that of commercial tablets. The data in this study revealed that the prepared formulation could be effective in chronotherapeutic treatment of hypercholesterolemia. Moreover, the tested formulation was found to enhance SIM bioavailability by 29% over the reference tablets.

  16. Fast CSF MRI for brain segmentation; Cross-validation by comparison with 3D T1-based brain segmentation methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kleij, Lisa A; de Bresser, Jeroen; Hendrikse, Jeroen; Siero, Jeroen C W; Petersen, Esben T; De Vis, Jill B

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In previous work we have developed a fast sequence that focusses on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) based on the long T2 of CSF. By processing the data obtained with this CSF MRI sequence, brain parenchymal volume (BPV) and intracranial volume (ICV) can be automatically obtained. The aim of

  17. Elevated CSF Corticotropin-Releasing Factor Concentrations in Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremner, J. Douglas; Licinio, Julio; Darnell, Adam; Krystal, John H.; Owens, Michael J.; Southwick, Steven M.; Nemeroff, Charles B.; Charney, Dennis S.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and somatostatin both play important roles in mediating responses to acute and chronic stress. The purpose of this study was to measure CSF concentrations of CRF and somatostatin in patients with chronic combat-related post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and comparison subjects. Method Lumbar punctures for collection of CSF were performed in Vietnam combat veterans with PTSD (N=11) and comparison subjects (N=17). CSF concentrations of CRF and somatostatin were compared between the two groups. Results CSF concentrations of CRF were higher in the PTSD patients than in the comparison subjects (mean=29.0 pg/ml, SD=7.8, versus mean=21.9 pg/ml, SD=6.0). This group difference remained significant after covariance for age. CSF somatostatin concentrations in PTSD patients were higher than those of the comparison subjects (mean=19.9 pg/ml, SD=5.4, versus mean=13.7 pg/ml, SD=8.0). However, covarying for age reduced the level of significance. Conclusions Higher CSF CRF concentrations in patients with PTSD may reflect alterations in stress-related neurotransmitter systems. The higher CSF CRF concentrations may play a role in disturbances of arousal in patients with PTSD. PMID:9137116

  18. Inhibition of the CSF-1 receptor sensitizes ovarian cancer cells to cisplatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Rong; Jin, Hao; Jin, Congcong; Huang, Xuefeng; Lin, Jinju; Teng, Yili

    2018-03-01

    Ovarian cancer is one of the most common female malignancies, and cisplatin-based chemotherapy is routinely used in locally advanced ovarian cancer patients. Acquired or de novo cisplatin resistance remains the barrier to patient survival, and the mechanisms of cisplatin resistance are still not well understood. In the current study, we found that colony-stimulating-factor-1 receptor (CSF-1R) was upregulated in cisplatin-resistant SK-OV-3 and CaoV-3 cells. Colony-stimulating-factor-1 receptor knockdown suppressed proliferation and enhanced apoptosis in cisplatin-resistant SK-OV-3 and CaoV-3 cells. However, CSF-1R overexpression had inverse effects. While parental SK-OV-3 and CaoV-3 cells were more resistant to cisplatin after CSF-1R overexpression, CSF-1R knockdown in SK-OV-3 and CaoV-3 cells promoted cisplatin sensitivity. Overexpression and knockdown studies also showed that CSF-1R significantly promoted active AKT and ERK1/2 signalling pathways in cisplatin-resistant cells. Furthermore, a combination of cisplatin and CSF-1R inhibitor effectively inhibited tumour growth in xenografts. Taken together, our results provide the first evidence that CSF-1R inhibition can sensitize cisplatin-refractory ovarian cancer cells. This study may help to increase understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying cisplatin resistance in tumours. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Targeting the GM-CSF receptor for the treatment of CNS autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ifergan, Igal; Davidson, Todd S; Kebir, Hania; Xu, Dan; Palacios-Macapagal, Daphne; Cann, Jennifer; Rodgers, Jane M; Hunter, Zoe N; Pittet, Camille L; Beddow, Sara; Jones, Clare A; Prat, Alexandre; Sleeman, Matthew A; Miller, Stephen D

    2017-11-01

    In multiple sclerosis (MS), there is a growing interest in inhibiting the pro-inflammatory effects of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). We sought to evaluate the therapeutic potential and underlying mechanisms of GM-CSF receptor alpha (Rα) blockade in animal models of MS. We show that GM-CSF signaling inhibition at peak of chronic experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) results in amelioration of disease progression. Similarly, GM-CSF Rα blockade in relapsing-remitting (RR)-EAE model prevented disease relapses and inhibited T cell responses specific for both the inducing and spread myelin peptides, while reducing activation of mDCs and inflammatory monocytes. In situ immunostaining of lesions from human secondary progressive MS (SPMS), but not primary progressive MS patients shows extensive recruitment of GM-CSF Rα + myeloid cells. Collectively, this study reveals a pivotal role of GM-CSF in disease relapses and the benefit of GM-CSF Rα blockade as a potential novel therapeutic approach for treatment of RRMS and SPMS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Increased CSF-BACE1 activity associated with decreased hippocampus volume in Alzheimer's disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ewers, Michael

    2012-02-01

    The enzyme beta-secretase (BACE1) is essentially involved in the production of cerebral amyloidogenic pathology in Alzheimer\\'s disease (AD). The measurement of BACE1 activity in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) has been reported, which may render CSF measurement of BACE1 a potential biomarker candidate of AD. In order to investigate whether BACE1 protein activity is correlated with regional brain atrophy in AD, we investigated the association between CSF levels of BACE1 and MRI-assessed hippocampus volume in patients with AD (n = 30). An increase in CSF-BACE1 activity was associated with decreased left and right hippocampus volume corrected for global head volume in the AD patients. Boot-strapped regression analysis showed that increased CSF levels of BACE1 activity were associated with increased CSF concentration of total tau but not amyloid-beta1-42 in AD. White matter hyperintensities did not influence the results. BACE1 activity and protein levels were significantly increased in AD compared to 19 elderly healthy controls. Thus, the CSF biomarker candidate of BACE1 activity was associated with hippocampus atrophy in AD in a robust manner and may reflect neurotoxic amyloid-beta-related processes.

  1. CSF 5-HIAA and exposure to and expression of interpersonal violence in suicide attempters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moberg, T; Nordström, P; Forslund, K; Kristiansson, M; Asberg, M; Jokinen, J

    2011-07-01

    Serotonin is implicated in impaired impulse control, aggression and suicidal behaviour. Low cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentrations of the serotonin metabolite 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) have been found in violent suicide attempters, suicide victims and in violent offenders. CSF 5-HIAA concentrations have both genetic and environmental determinants. Childhood trauma may have an effect on central monoamine function as an adult. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship of CSF 5-HIAA and the exposure to and the expression of violence in childhood and during adult life measured with the Karolinska Interpersonal Violence Scale (KIVS). 42 medication free suicide attempters underwent lumbar puncture and were assessed with the Karolinska Interpersonal Violence Scale (KIVS) to assess history of childhood exposure to violence and lifetime expressed violent behaviour. In women, but not in men, CSF 5-HIAA showed a significant negative correlation to exposure to violence during childhood. Furthermore, suicide attempters with low CSF 5-HIAA were more prone to commit violent acts as an adult if exposed to violence as a child compared to suicide attempters with high CSF 5-HIAA. In the non-traumatized group, CSF 5-HIAA showed a significant negative correlation to expressed violent behaviour in childhood. Although central serotonergic function has important genetic determinants, exposure to childhood trauma may also affect serotonergic function. Low serotonergic function may facilitate impaired aggression control in traumatized suicide attempters. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Consensus Guidelines for CSF and Blood Biobanking for CNS Biomarker Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte E. Teunissen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a long history of research into body fluid biomarkers in neurodegenerative and neuroinflammatory diseases. However, only a few biomarkers in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF are being used in clinical practice. Anti-aquaporin-4 antibodies in serum are currently useful for the diagnosis of neuromyelitis optica (NMO, but we could expect novel CSF biomarkers that help define prognosis and response to treatment for this disease. One of the most critical factors in biomarker research is the inadequate powering of studies performed by single centers. Collaboration between investigators is needed to establish large biobanks of well-defined samples. A key issue in collaboration is to establish standardized protocols for biobanking to ensure that the statistical power gained by increasing the numbers of CSF samples is not compromised by pre-analytical factors. Here, consensus guidelines for CSF collection and biobanking are presented, based on the guidelines that have been published by the BioMS-eu network for CSF biomarker research. We focussed on CSF collection procedures, pre-analytical factors and high quality clinical and paraclinical information. Importantly, the biobanking protocols are applicable for CSF biobanks for research targeting any neurological disease.

  3. CSF and Serum Biomarkers Focusing on Cerebral Vasospasm and Ischemia after Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla S. Jung

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Delayed cerebral vasospasm (CVS and delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI remain severe complications after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH. Although focal changes in cerebral metabolism indicating ischemia are detectable by microdialysis, routinely used biomarkers are missing. We therefore sought to evaluate a panel of possible global markers in serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of patients after SAH. CSF and serum of SAH patients were analyzed retrospectively. In CSF, levels of inhibitory, excitatory, and structural amino acids were detected by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. In serum, neuron-specific enolase (NSE and S100B level were measured and examined in conjunction with CVS and DCI. CVS was detected by arteriography, and ischemic lesions were assessed by computed tomography (CT scans. All CSF amino acids were altered after SAH. CSF glutamate, glutamine, glycine, and histidine were significantly correlated with arteriographic CVS. CSF glutamate and serum S100B were significantly correlated with ischemic events after SAH; however, NSE did not correlate neither with ischemia nor with vasospasm. Glutamate, glutamine, glycine, and histidine might be used in CSF as markers for CVS. Glutamate also indicates ischemia. Serum S100B, but not NSE, is a suitable marker for ischemia. These results need to be validated in larger prospective cohorts.

  4. Noninvasive measurement of cerebrospinal fluid flow using an ultrasonic transit time flow sensor: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennell, Thomas; Yi, Juneyoung L; Kaufman, Bruce A; Krishnamurthy, Satish

    2016-03-01

    OBJECT Mechanical failure-which is the primary cause of CSF shunt malfunction-is not readily diagnosed, and the specific reasons for mechanical failure are not easily discerned. Prior attempts to measure CSF flow noninvasively have lacked the ability to either quantitatively or qualitatively obtain data. To address these needs, this preliminary study evaluates an ultrasonic transit time flow sensor in pediatric and adult patients with external ventricular drains (EVDs). One goal was to confirm the stated accuracy of the sensor in a clinical setting. A second goal was to observe the sensor's capability to record real-time continuous CSF flow. The final goal was to observe recordings during instances of flow blockage or lack of flow in order to determine the sensor's ability to identify these changes. METHODS A total of 5 pediatric and 11 adult patients who had received EVDs for the treatment of hydrocephalus were studied in a hospital setting. The primary EVD was connected to a secondary study EVD that contained a fluid-filled pressure transducer and an in-line transit time flow sensor. Comparisons were made between the weight of the drainage bag and the flow measured via the sensor in order to confirm its accuracy. Data from the pressure transducer and the flow sensor were recorded continuously at 100 Hz for a period of 24 hours by a data acquisition system, while the hourly CSF flow into the drip chamber was recorded manually. Changes in the patient's neurological status and their time points were noted. RESULTS The flow sensor demonstrated a proven accuracy of ± 15% or ± 2 ml/hr. The flow sensor allowed real-time continuous flow waveform data recordings. Dynamic analysis of CSF flow waveforms allowed the calculation of the pressure-volume index. Lastly, the sensor was able to diagnose a blocked catheter and distinguish between the blockage and lack of flow. CONCLUSIONS The Transonic flow sensor accurately measures CSF output within ± 15% or ± 2 ml

  5. Cytokine-primed bone marrow stem cells vs. peripheral blood stem cells for autologous transplantation: a randomized comparison of GM-CSF vs. G-CSF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisdorf, D; Miller, J; Verfaillie, C; Burns, L; Wagner, J; Blazar, B; Davies, S; Miller, W; Hannan, P; Steinbuch, M; Ramsay, N; McGlave, P

    1997-10-01

    Autologous transplantation for non-Hodgkins lymphoma and Hodgkin's disease is widely used as standard therapy for those with high-risk or relapsed tumor. Peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) collections have nearly completely replaced bone marrow stem cell (BMSC) harvests because of the perceived advantages of more rapid engraftment, less tumor contamination in the inoculum, and better survival after therapy. The advantage of PBSC, however, may derive from the hematopoietic stimulating cytokines used for PBSC mobilization. Therefore, we tested a randomized comparison of GM-CSF vs. G-CSF used to prime either BMSC or PBSC before collection for use in autologous transplantation. Sixty-two patients receiving transplants (31 PBSC; 31 BMSC) for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (n = 51) or Hodgkin's disease (n = 11) were treated. All patients received 6 days of randomly assigned cytokine. Those with cellular marrow in morphologic remission underwent BMSC harvest, while those with hypocellular marrow or microscopic marrow tumor involvement had PBSC collected. Neutrophil recovery was similarly rapid in all groups (median 14 days; range 10-23 days), though two patients had delayed neutrophil recovery using GM-CSF primed PBSC (p = 0.01). Red cell and platelet recovery were significantly quicker after BMSC mobilized with GM-CSF or PBSC mobilized with G-CSF. This speedier hematologic recovery resulted in earlier hospital discharge as well. However, in multivariate analysis, neither the stem cell source nor randomly assigned G-CSF vs. GM-CSF was independently associated with earlier multilineage hematologic recovery or shorter hospital stay. Relapse-free survival was not independently affected by either the assigned stem cell source or the randomly assigned priming cytokine, though malignant relapse was more frequent in those assigned to PBSC (RR of relapse 3.15, p = 0.03). These data document that BMSC, when collected following cytokine priming, can yield a similarly rapid hematologic

  6. Elevated body mass index and risk of postoperative CSF leak following transsphenoidal surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dlouhy, Brian J.; Madhavan, Karthik; Clinger, John D.; Reddy, Ambur; Dawson, Jeffrey D.; O’Brien, Erin K.; Chang, Eugene; Graham, Scott M.; Greenlee, Jeremy D. W.

    2012-01-01

    Object Postoperative CSF leakage can be a serious complication after a transsphenoidal surgical approach. An elevated body mass index (BMI) is a significant risk factor for spontaneous CSF leaks. However, there is no evidence correlating BMI with postoperative CSF leak after transsphenoidal surgery. The authors hypothesized that patients with elevated BMI would have a higher incidence of CSF leakage complications following transsphenoidal surgery. Methods The authors conducted a retrospective review of 121 patients who, between August 2005 and March 2010, underwent endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal surgeries for resection of primarily sellar masses. Patients requiring extended transsphenoidal approaches were excluded. A multivariate statistical analysis was performed to investigate the association of BMI and other risk factors with postoperative CSF leakage. Results In 92 patients, 96 endonasal endoscopic transsphenoidal surgeries were performed that met inclusion criteria. Thirteen postoperative leaks occurred and required subsequent treatment, including lumbar drainage and/or reoperation. The average BMI of patients with a postoperative CSF leak was significantly greater than that in patients with no postoperative CSF leak (39.2 vs 32.9 kg/m2, p = 0.006). Multivariate analyses indicate that for every 5-kg/m2 increase in BMI, patients undergoing a transsphenoidal approach for a primarily sellar mass have 1.61 times the odds (95% CI 1.10–2.29, p = 0.016, by multivariate logistic regression) of having a postoperative CSF leak. Conclusions Elevated BMI is an independent predictor of postoperative CSF leak after an endonasal endoscopic transsphenoidal approach. The authors recommend that patients with BMI greater than 30 kg/m2 have meticulous sellar reconstruction at surgery and close monitoring postoperatively. PMID:22443502

  7. GM-CSF ameliorates microvascular barrier integrity via pericyte-derived Ang-1 in wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Min; Hu, Yange; Yao, Min; Bao, Shisan; Fang, Yong

    2017-11-01

    Skin wound healing involves complex coordinated interactions of cells, tissues, and mediators. Maintaining microvascular barrier integrity is one of the key events for endothelial homeostasis during wound healing. Vasodilation is observed after vasoconstriction, which causes blood vessels to become porous, facilitates leukocyte infiltration and aids angiogenesis at the wound-area, postinjury. Eventually, vessel integrity has to be reestablished for vascular maturation. Numerous studies have found that granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) accelerates wound healing by inducing recruitment of repair cells into the injury area and releases of cytokines. However, whether GM-CSF is involving in the maintaining of microvascular barrier integrity and the underlying mechanism remain still unclear. Aim of this study was to investigate the effects of GM-CSF on modulation of microvascular permeability in wound healing and underlying mechanisms. Wound closure and microvascular leakage was investigated using a full-thickness skin wound mouse model after GM-CSF intervention. The endothelial permeability was measured by Evans blue assay in vivo and in vitro endothelium/pericyte co-culture system using a FITC-Dextran permeability assay. To identify the source of angiopoietin-1 (Ang-1), double staining is used in vivo and ELISA and qPCR are used in vitro. To determine the specific effect of Ang-1 on GM-CSF maintaining microvascular stabilization, Ang-1 siRNA was applied to inhibit Ang-1 production in vivo and in vitro. Wound closure was significantly accelerated and microvascular leakage was ameliorated after GM-CSF treatment in mouse wound sites. GM-CSF decreased endothelial permeability through tightening endothelial junctions and increased Ang-1 protein level that was derived by perictye. Furthermore, applications of siRNAAng-1 inhibited GM-CSF mediated protection of microvascular barrier integrity both in vivo and in vitro. Our data indicate that GM-CSF

  8. Longitudinal CSF biomarkers in patients with early Parkinson disease and healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollenhauer, Brit; Caspell-Garcia, Chelsea J; Coffey, Christopher S; Taylor, Peggy; Shaw, Leslie M; Trojanowski, John Q; Singleton, Andy; Frasier, Mark; Marek, Kenneth; Galasko, Douglas

    2017-11-07

    To analyze longitudinal levels of CSF biomarkers in drug-naive patients with Parkinson disease (PD) and healthy controls (HC), examine the extent to which these biomarker changes relate to clinical measures of PD, and identify what may influence them. CSF α-synuclein (α-syn), total and phosphorylated tau (t- and p-tau), and β-amyloid 1-42 (Aβ42) were measured at baseline and 6 and 12 months in 173 patients with PD and 112 matched HC in the international multicenter Parkinson's Progression Marker Initiative. Baseline clinical and demographic variables, PD medications, neuroimaging, and genetic variables were evaluated as potential predictors of CSF biomarker changes. CSF biomarkers were stable over 6 and 12 months, and there was a small but significant increase in CSF Aβ42 in both patients with patients with PD and HC from baseline to 12 months. The t-tau remained stable. The p-tau increased marginally more in patients with PD than in HC. α-syn remained relatively stable in patients with PD and HC. Ratios of p-tau/t-tau increased, while t-tau/Aβ42 decreased over 12 months in patients with PD. CSF biomarker changes did not correlate with changes in Movement Disorder Society-sponsored revision of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale motor scores or dopamine imaging. CSF α-syn levels at 12 months were lower in patients with PD treated with dopamine replacement therapy, especially dopamine agonists. These core CSF biomarkers remained stable over 6 and 12 months in patients with early PD and HC. PD medication use may influence CSF α-syn. Novel biomarkers are needed to better profile progressive neurodegeneration in PD. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. on behalf of the American Academy of Neurology.

  9. Relationship between intracranial pressure and antifungal agents levels in the CSF of patients with cryptococcal meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Fernanda; de Azevedo, Maria Isabel; Pilla, Carmen; Aquino, Valério Rodrigues; Neto, Gustavo Wissmann; Goldani, Luciano Zubaran

    2018-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of intracranial hypertension in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of amphotericin B and fluconazole levels of patients with cryptococcal meningitis. CSF samples and intracranial pressure were obtained by means of routine punctures performed at days 1, 7, and 14 of therapy, respectively. Amphotericin B and fluconazole CSF levels were measured by HPLC method as previously described. The minimum inhibitory concentration for amphotericin B, fluconazole, 5΄flucytosine, and voriconazole of each Cryptococcus isolate was performed according to CLSI. The predominant Cryptococcus species found was C. neoformans, and the major underlying condition was AIDS. Only one CSF sample had a detectable level for amphotericin B during the 14 days of therapy. Fluconazole CSF levels progressively increased from day 1 to day 14 of therapy for most cases. Fluconazole levels in the CSF were above the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) for Cryptococcus during the initial 14 days of antifungal therapy. Variations of intracranial pressure did not affect amphotericin B and fluconazole levels in the CSF. The generalized estimating correlation (GEE) and Spearman correlation test (SCT) showed no significant correlation between the amphotericin B or fluconazole concentrations in the CSF and intracranial pressure (P = .953 and P = .093, respectively for GEE test and P = .477 and P = .847, respectively, for SCT). Combination therapy of amphotericin B with fluconazole was effective in 60% of the patients considering CSF cultures were negative in 9 of 15 patients after 14 days of therapy. Further studies are necessary to evaluate the role of intracranial hypertension on the therapeutic efficacy of different antifungal agents in patients with cryptococcal meningitis.

  10. Ubiquitin fusion expression and tissue-dependent targeting of hG-CSF in transgenic tobacco

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (hG-CSF) is an important human cytokine which has been widely used in oncology and infection protection. To satisfy clinical needs, expression of recombinant hG-CSF has been studied in several organisms, including rice cell suspension culture and transient expression in tobacco leaves, but there was no published report on its expression in stably transformed plants which can serve as a more economical expression platform with potential industrial application. Results In this study, hG-CSF expression was investigated in transgenic tobacco leaves and seeds in which the accumulation of hG-CSF could be enhanced through fusion with ubiquitin by up to 7 fold in leaves and 2 fold in seeds, leading to an accumulation level of 2.5 mg/g total soluble protein (TSP) in leaves and 1.3 mg/g TSP in seeds, relative to hG-CSF expressed wi