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Sample records for csf flow artifacts

  1. Reduction of CSF flow artifact in fast fluid attenuated inversion recovery MR imaging. Study of excitation width in 180deg inversion pulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuchihashi, Toshio; Yoshizawa, Satoshi; Maki, Toshio; Kitagawa, Matsuo; Suzuki, Ken; Fujita, Isao

    1998-01-01

    A technique that increases slice thickness so that it becomes wider than the excitation width of the 180deg inversion pulse and in which TR is partitioned twice has been investigated with regard to fast FLAIR. This is a technique that reduces the flow artifact of CSF. It is thought that, with this technique, the flow artifact is reduced because the CSF that flows onto the slice reaches the null point. The cross talk effect of the 180deg inversion pulse appears as a high CSF signal. As a result, the number of slices needs to be partitioned two or three times before imaging. Thus the imaging time is doubled or tripled. Considering the cross talk effect of the 180deg inversion pulse and the imaging time needed for this technique, the optimal imaging technique would be one that uses an inversion pulse that is four times slice thickness plus slice space and for which the number of slices is partitioned twice. Furthermore, the null point of CSF was dependent on dividing TR in half. (author)

  2. The Connected Steady State Model and the Interdependence of the CSF Proteome and CSF Flow Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Fabian; Mischek, Daniel; Stoffers, Frédéric

    2017-01-01

    Here we show that the hydrodynamic radii-dependent entry of blood proteins into cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) can best be modeled with a diffusional system of consecutive interdependent steady states between barrier-restricted molecular flux and bulk flow of CSF. The connected steady state model fits precisely to experimental results and provides the theoretical backbone to calculate the in-vivo hydrodynamic radii of blood-derived proteins as well as individual barrier characteristics. As the experimental reference set we used a previously published large-scale patient cohort of CSF to serum quotient ratios of immunoglobulins in relation to the respective albumin quotients. We related the inter-individual variances of these quotient relationships to the individual CSF flow time and barrier characteristics. We claim that this new concept allows the diagnosis of inflammatory processes with Reibergrams derived from population-based thresholds to be shifted to individualized judgment, thereby improving diagnostic sensitivity. We further use the source-dependent gradient patterns of proteins in CSF as intrinsic tracers for CSF flow characteristics. We assume that the rostrocaudal gradient of blood-derived proteins is a consequence of CSF bulk flow, whereas the slope of the gradient is a consequence of the unidirectional bulk flow and bidirectional pulsatile flow of CSF. Unlike blood-derived proteins, the influence of CSF flow characteristics on brain-derived proteins in CSF has been insufficiently discussed to date. By critically reviewing existing experimental data and by reassessing their conformity to CSF flow assumptions we conclude that the biomarker potential of brain-derived proteins in CSF can be improved by considering individual subproteomic dynamics of the CSF system.

  3. Contributions of an adiabatic initial inversion pulse and K-space Re-ordered by inversion-time at each slice position (KRISP) to control of CSF artifacts and visualization of the brain in FLAIR magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curati, Walter L.; Oatridge, Angela; Herlihy, Amy H.; Hajnal, Joseph V.; Puri, Basant K.; Bydder, Graeme M.

    2001-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this study was to compare the performance of three fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) pulse sequences for control of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood flow artifacts in imaging of the brain. The first of these sequences had an initial sinc inversion pulse which was followed by conventional k-space mapping. The second had an initial sinc inversion pulse followed by k-space re-ordered by inversion time at each slice position (KRISP) and the third had an adiabatic initial inversion pulse followed by KRISP. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Ten patients with established disease were studied with all three pulse sequences. Seven were also studied with the adiabatic KRISP sequence after contrast enhancement. Their images were evaluated for patient motion artifact, CSF and blood flow artifact as well as conspicuity of the cortex, meninges, ventricular system, brainstem and cerebellum. The conspicuity of lesions and the degree of enhancement were also evaluated. RESULTS: Both the sinc and adiabatic KRISP FLAIR sequences showed better control of CSF and blood flow artifacts than the conventional FLAIR sequence. In addition the adiabatic KRISP FLAIR sequence showed better control of CSF artifact at the inferior aspect of the posterior fossa. The lesion conspicuity was similar for each of the FLAIR sequences as was the degree of contrast enhancement to that shown with a T 1 weighted spin echo sequence. CONCLUSION: The KRISP FLAIR sequence controls high signal artifacts from CSF flow and blood flow and the adiabatic pulse controls high signal artifacts due to inadequate inversion of the CSF magnetization at the periphery of the head transmitter coil. The KRISP FLAIR sequence also improves cortical and meningeal definition as a result of an edge enhancement effect. The effects are synergistic and can be usefully combined in a single pulse sequence. Curati, W.L. et al. (2001)

  4. Mathematical Modelling of CSF Pulsatile Flow in Aqueduct Cerebri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czosnyka, Zofia; Kim, Dong-Joo; Balédent, Olivier; Schmidt, Eric A; Smielewski, Peter; Czosnyka, Marek

    2018-01-01

    The phase-contrast MRI technique permits the non-invasive assessment of CSF movements in cerebrospinal fluid cavities of the central nervous system. Of particular interest is pulsatile cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow through the aqueduct cerebri. It is allegedly increased in hydrocephalus, having potential diagnostic value, although not all scientific reports contain unequivocally positive conclusions. For the mathematical simulation of CSF flow, we used a computational model of cerebrospinal blood/fluid circulation designed by a former student as his PhD project. With this model, cerebral blood flow and CSF may be simulated in various vessels using a system of non-linear differential equations as time-varying signals. The amplitude of CSF flow seems to be positively related to the amplitude of pulse waveforms of intracranial pressure (ICP) in situations where mean ICP increases, such as during simulated infusion tests and following step increases of resistance to CSF outflow. An additional positive association between the pulse amplitude of ICP and CSF flow can be seen during simulated increases in the amplitude of arterial pulses (without changes in mean arterial pressure, MAP). The opposite effect can be observed during step increases in the resistance of the aqueduct cerebri and with decreasing elasticity of the system, where the CSF flow amplitude and the ICP pulse amplitude are related inversely. Vasodilatation caused by both gradual decreases in MAP and by increases in PaCO2 provokes an elevation in the observed amplitude of pulsatile CSF flow. Preliminary results indicate that the pulsations of CSF flow may carry information about both CSF-circulatory and cerebral vasogenic components. In most cases, the pulsations of CSF flow are positively related to the pulse amplitudes of both arterial pressure and ICP and to a degree of cerebrovascular dilatation.

  5. Respiration and the watershed of spinal CSF flow in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreha-Kulaczewski, Steffi; Konopka, Mareen; Joseph, Arun A; Kollmeier, Jost; Merboldt, Klaus-Dietmar; Ludwig, Hans-Christoph; Gärtner, Jutta; Frahm, Jens

    2018-04-04

    The dynamics of human CSF in brain and upper spinal canal are regulated by inspiration and connected to the venous system through associated pressure changes. Upward CSF flow into the head during inspiration counterbalances venous flow out of the brain. Here, we investigated CSF motion along the spinal canal by real-time phase-contrast flow MRI at high spatial and temporal resolution. Results reveal a watershed of spinal CSF dynamics which divides flow behavior at about the level of the heart. While forced inspiration prompts upward surge of CSF flow volumes in the entire spinal canal, ensuing expiration leads to pronounced downward CSF flow, but only in the lower canal. The resulting pattern of net flow volumes during forced respiration yields upward CSF motion in the upper and downward flow in the lower spinal canal. These observations most likely reflect closely coupled CSF and venous systems as both large caval veins and their anastomosing vertebral plexus react to respiration-induced pressure changes.

  6. Interpretation and value of MR CSF flow studies for paediatric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Imaging techniques may be underutilised when clinicians are unaware of the technique or do not recognise its potential. Phase-contrast MR imaging (PC-MRI) is a rapid, simple and non-invasive technique that is sensitive to CSF flow. It demonstrates a mechanical coupling between cerebral blood and CSF flow throughout ...

  7. Observation of the CSF pulsatile flow on MRI, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohara, Shigeki; Nagai, Hajime; Suzuka, Tomonao; Matsumoto, Takashi; Banno, Tatsuo

    1988-01-01

    In a retrospective study of the MR images of 289 neurosurgical patients, a loss of the signal intensity (the signal-void phenomenon =SVP) of the cerebrospinal fluid in the mesencephalic aqueduct was observed in 77 patients. The CSF in the cranial cavity flows toward the spinal sac in a to-and-fro manner in response to the pulsations of the brain. Because the intracranial compliance is lower than the intraspinal compliance, the systolic expansions and diastolic reductions in the brain volume are buffered by the spinal cavity via this to-and-fro flow of CSF. The SVP reflects the CSF pulsatile flow forced out of the intracranial space into the intraspinal space by the brain's pulsations. Intracranial abnormalities can be divided into two categories according to the craniospinal compliance (CC): normal CC (communicating hydrocephalus) and decreased CC (supratentorial tumor). We may expect those conditions which increase compliance to increase the CSF flow and yield a more prominent SVP. Conversely, conditions which decrease compliance may be expected to decrease the flow and extinguish the SVP. Both the brain's pulsations and the compliance of the craniospinal cavity are closely related to the presence of the SVP in CSF, as revealed by MRI. The SVP in CSF may reflect the pressure-buffering capacity of the cranio-spinal cavity. If further investigation supports our hypothesis, it may be possible to estimate the intracranial pressure noninvasively. (author)

  8. Cine-MR imaging aqueductal CSF flow in normal pressure hydrocephalus syndrome before and after CSF shunt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mascalchi, M.; Arnetoli, G.; Inzitari, D.; Dal Pozzo, G.; Lolli, F.; Caramella, D.; Bartolozzi, C.

    1993-01-01

    Reproducibility of the aqueductal CSF signal intensity on a gradient echo cine-MR sequence exploiting through plane inflow enhancement was tested in 11 patients with normal or dilated ventricles. Seven patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) syndrome were investigated with the sequence before and after CSF shunting. Two patients exhibiting central flow void within a hyperintense aqueductal CSF improved after surgery and the flow void disappeared after shunting. One patient with increased maximum and minimum aqueductal CSF signal as compared to 18 healthy controls also improved and the aqueductal CSF signal was considerably decreased after shunting. Three patients with aqueductal CSF values similar to those in the controls did not improve, notwithstanding their maximum aqueductal CSF signals decreasing slightly after shunting. No appreciable aqueductal CSF flow related enhancement consistent with non-communicating hydrocephalus was found in the last NPH patient who improved after surgery. Cine-MR with inflow technique yields a reproducible evaluation of flow-related aqueductal CSF signal changes which might help in identifying shunt responsive NPH patients. These are likely to be those with hyperdynamic aqueductal CSF or aqueductal obstruction. (orig.)

  9. REVIEW Interpretation and value of MR CSF flow studies for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    children should be able to request this procedure from any MR imaging department, and should ... on all modern 1.5T scanners equipped with standard software and phase contrast magnetic resonance (PCMR) capabilities and analysis packages. .... Follow-up imaging demonstrates change in CSF flow to a unidirectional.

  10. CSF flow: Correlation between signal void and CSF velocity measured by gated velocity phase-encoded MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mark, A.S.; Feinberg, D.A.

    1986-01-01

    The direction of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow in the foramen of Monro (FOM) and aqueduct was determined in 15 normal volunteers (5 of whom had also been studied with gated spin-echo sequences) using a cardiac-gated Fourier transform velocity imaging technique (VMR). The VMR showed that the periodic pattern of flow void seen in the aqueduct and FOM on the gated spin-echo images was due to antegrade CSF flow from the lateral ventricles into the third ventricle and aqueduct during systole and retrograde flow from the aqueduct into the third ventricle and lateral ventricles during late diastole. These findings could not be explained if the CSF pulsations originated in the third ventricle, as had been previously proposed, and suggest the lateral ventricles play an important role in the pulsatile motion of CSF

  11. Qualitative analysis of intracranial CSF flow on cine-MR imaging, with special reference to signal ratio of CSF to fat tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadowaki, Chikafusa; Hara, Mitsuhiro; Numoto, Mitsuo; Takeuchi, Kazuo; Saito, Isamu

    1993-01-01

    Cine magnetic resonance images (MR) dramatically demonstrate the pulsatile flow of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) stimulated by the pulsatile motion of the brain following cardiac pulsation. Reduced signal intensity, frequently observed especially in the aqueduct of Sylvius, the third ventricle and the fourth ventricle, is believed to reflect the pulsatile motion of the CSF. Qualitative analysis of MR signal intensity of CSF on each cine frame is compared with CSF flow within the ventricles on real-time cine MR images. While the chronological changes in signal intensities of CSF within the ventricles show only marginal changes in signal intensity in the third ventricle related to downward flow of CSF passing through the foramen of Monro during the early stage of cardiac systole, these changes are thought to have no significant correlation with the CSF flow in the CSF pathway. The chronological changes in relative signal ratios, SR [signal intensities of CSF/signal intensities of fat] can show CSF flow and turbulence within the ventricles. Under normal conditions, within the third ventricle the SR decreases due to pulsatile CSF flow through the foramen of Monro during the early stage of cardiac systole, and decreases because of the flow of CSF from the anterior to the posterior part of the third ventricle, the downward flow of CSF through the aqueduct leads to a lower SR during cardiac diastole. These changes in the fourth ventricle are stimulated by the changes in SR in the third ventricle. The new method of analyzing chronological changes in the relative MR signal ratio of CSF to fat [SR] has the distinct advantage of providing an accurate evaluation of CSF dynamics, and it provides us with important diagnostic information leading to clarification of the pathophysiology of CSF dynamics. (author)

  12. Visualization and quantitative analysis of the CSF pulsatile flow with cine MR phase imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katayama, Shinji; Itoh, Takahiko; Kinugasa, Kazushi; Asari, Shoji; Nishimoto, Akira; Tsuchida, Shohei; Ono, Atsushi; Ikezaki, Yoshikazu; Yoshitome, Eiji.

    1991-01-01

    The visualization and the quantitative analysis of the CSF pulsatile flow were performed on ten healthy volunteers with cine MR phase imaging, a combination of the phase-contrast technique and the cardiac-gating technique. The velocities appropriate for the visualization and the quantitative analysis of the CSF pulsatile flow were from 6.0 cm/sec to 15.0 cm/sec. The applicability of this method for the quantitative analysis was proven with a steady-flow phantom. Phase images clearly demonstrated a to-and-fro motion of the CSF flow in the anterior subarachnoid space and in the posterior subarachnoid space. The flow pattern of CSF on healthy volunteers depends on the cardiac cycle. In the anterior subarachnoid space, the cephalic CSF flow continued until a 70-msec delay after the R-wave of the ECG and then reversed to caudal. At 130-190 msec, the caudal CSF flow reached its maximum velocity; thereafter it reversed again to cephalic. The same turn appeared following the phase, but then the amplitude decreased. The cephalic peaked at 370-430 msec, while the caudal peaked at 490-550 msec. The flow pattern of the CSF flow in the posterior subarachnoid space was almost identical to that in the anterior subarachnoid space. Cine MR phase imaging is thus useful for the visualization and the quantitative analysis of the CSF pulsative flow. (author)

  13. Intracranial CSF flow on cine-MR. 2. Qualitative analysis in CSF dynamics by MR signal ratio of CSF to fat tissue in healthy subjects and patients with aqueduct stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadowaki, Chikafusa; Hara, Mitsuhiro; Takeuchi, Kazuo; Saito, Isamu

    1994-01-01

    Changes in MR signal intensities (SIs) of CSF and relative MR signal ratios (SRs) of intraventricular CSF to fat tissue were evaluated in 5 healthy adults on cine MR images during a cardiac cycle in a study of normal intracranial CSF dynamics. The altered patterns of MR SIs and SRs in 6 patients with aqueduct stenosis were compared with normal CSF flow patterns in a demonstration of CSF dynamics changes. MR SIs of CSF within the ventricles were measured on each cine image obtained by cardiac gated, multiframe, cine MR imaging. Chronological changes in MR SIs and SRs during a cardiac cycle were compared with the actual CSF flow visualized on real cine images. In normal CSF circulation, MR SIs of CSF within the ventricles were reduced quickly following an R-wave on ECG to 15% of the R-R interval, after which SIs fluctuated slightly. These changes in MR SIs of CSF could only be related to the pulsatile CSF flow through the foramen of Monro into the anterior part of the third ventricle during early cardiac systole. MR SRs of CSF to fat tissue fluctuated according to the actual CSF flow within the ventricles during a cardiac cycle. MR SRs in the third ventricle decreased to 20-30% of the R-R interval following the R-wave due to downward CSF flow during early cardiac systole, and decreased again from late cardiac systole to diastole due to caudal CSF flow in the third ventricle. In the fourth ventricle, MR SRs of CSF decreased to 60-80% of the R-R interval because of the CSF flow through the aqueduct during cardiac diastole. In patients with aqueduct stenosis, MR SRs of CSF within the ventricles fluctuated randomly, and the amplitude of MR SRs was also greater than in subjects with a patent aqueduct. These changes were identified as turbulence and stagnation due to obstruction in the CSF pathway. Analysis of chronological changes in MR signal ratios of CSF to fat is useful in demonstrating the pathophysiologic features of intracranial CSF dynamics. (author) 52 refs

  14. Two-dimensional analysis of motion artifacts, including flow effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litt, A.M.; Brody, A.S.; Spangler, R.A.; Scott, P.D.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of motion on magnetic resonance images have been theoretically analyzed for the case of a point-like object in simple harmonic motion and for other one-dimensional trajectories. The authors of this paper extend this analysis to a generalized two-dimensional magnetization with an arbitrary motion trajectory. The authors provide specific solutions for the clinically relevant cases of the cross-sections of cylindrical objects in the body, such as the aorta, which has a roughly one-dimensional, simple harmonic motion during respiration. By extending the solution to include inhomogeneous magnetizations, the authors present a model which allows the effects of motion artifacts and flow artifacts to be analyzed simultaneously

  15. Artifacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Samantha

    2009-01-01

    NASA Headquarters sent a list of items to KSC that were deemed potential artifacts. These items played arole in the Shuttle Program's development and maintenance. Because these items are national assets, many are of interest to museums, schools, other government entities, etc. upon the Space Shuttle's retirement. The list contains over 500 items. All of these items need to be located, photographed, and catalogued with accompanying specific data that needs to be gathered. Initial research suggests that this is a time, labor, and cost intensive project. The purpose of my project was to focus on 20-60 of these 500 items, gather the necessary data, and compile them in a way that can be added to by other users when/if the project goes into full effect.

  16. CSF flow image using phase-contrast cine MR technique : preliminary clinical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyae Young; Choi, Hye Young; Baek, Seung Yeon; Lee, Sun Wha; Ko, Eun Joo; Lee, Myung Sook

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical usefulness of 2-D Cine PC (phase contrast) technique in visualizing the pattern and the site of abnormal CSF flow and to assess the effect of a third ventriculostomy in patients with hydrocephalus. The study group consisted of three normal controls and 13 patients with hydrocephalus, as shown on CT or MRI, and two patients who had undergone their third ventriculostomy. The technique was EKG-gated 2-D Cine PC MRI with velocity encoding 5cm/sec, TR 80msec, TE 12.3-15msec, and flip angle 15-60 degrees. Image quality was analyzed for variable sequences, and CSF flow was observed along the CSF flow pathway. We analyzed continuity and intensity of the CSF flow signal, and obstruction site and flow velocity degree were then defined. Systolic high and diastolic low signal intensity along the CSF flow-pathway, with normal asynchronicity and continuation, were clearly seen in normal controls. In three patients, there was obstruction at the ventricular level while others were either normal or showed a normal pattern with a weak signal. 'Normal' was defined as noncommunicating hydrocephalus and the latter as communicating hydrocephalus. In the two patients who had undergone ventriculostomy, a signal was in one case detected at the site of the third operation. A 2-D Cine PC CSF flow study enables us to see CSF flow signals noninvasively and to detect the site of obstruction of a CSF flow-pathway. It can therefore it can be useful for determining the application of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt and assessing the effect of a third ventriculostomy

  17. Evaluation of CSF flow in patients after endoscopic ventriculostomy of 3th ventricle with MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petkov, R.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Phase-contrast MR imaging is wide used for qualitative assessment and quantification of the CSF flow under normal and pathologic conditions. The increasing popularity of minimally invasive liquor derivation procedures - namely endoscopic ventriculostomy of 3-th ventricle - in neurosurgery raises the question of their actual effect on CSF flow in various types of hydrocephalus. We present our experience with 2D and 3D PC MRI in qualitative assessment and quantification of the CSF flow in 23 patients after endoscopic ventriculostomy of the 3-th ventricle for hyper- or normotensive hydrocephalus of various origins. We compare parameters of the CSF flow (direction, rate and net volume for one cardiac cycle) before and after the ventriculostomy

  18. CSF Flow in the Brain in the Context of Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, W G

    2015-05-01

    CSF normally flows back and forth through the aqueduct during the cardiac cycle. During systole, the brain and intracranial vasculature expand and compress the lateral and third ventricles, forcing CSF craniocaudad. During diastole, they contract and flow through the aqueduct reverses. Hyperdynamic CSF flow through the aqueduct is seen when there is ventricular enlargement without cerebral atrophy. Therefore, patients presenting with clinical normal pressure hydrocephalus who have hyperdynamic CSF flow have been found to respond better to ventriculoperitoneal shunting than those with normal or decreased CSF flow. Patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus have also been found to have larger intracranial volumes than sex-matched controls, suggesting that they may have had benign external hydrocephalus as infants. While their arachnoidal granulations clearly have decreased CSF resorptive capacity, it now appears that this is fixed and that the arachnoidal granulations are not merely immature. Such patients appear to develop a parallel pathway for CSF to exit the ventricles through the extracellular space of the brain and the venous side of the glymphatic system. This pathway remains functional until late adulthood when the patient develops deep white matter ischemia, which is characterized histologically by myelin pallor (ie, loss of lipid). The attraction between the bare myelin protein and the CSF increases resistance to the extracellular outflow of CSF, causing it to back up, resulting in hydrocephalus. Thus idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus appears to be a "2 hit" disease: benign external hydrocephalus in infancy followed by deep white matter ischemia in late adulthood. © 2015 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  19. Frequency analyses of CSF flow on cine MRI in normal pressure hydrocephalus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyati, Tosiaki; Kasuga, Toshio; Koshida, Kichiro; Sanada, Shigeru; Onoguchi, Masahisa [Department of Radiological Technology, School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Kanazawa University, 5-11-80, Kodatsuno, Kanazawa, Ishikawa 920-0942 (Japan); Mase, Mitsuhito; Yamada, Kazuo [Department of Neurosurgery, Nagoya City University Medical School, 1 Kawasumi, Mizuho-cho, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 467-8602 (Japan); Banno, Tatsuo [Department of Central Radiology, Nagoya City University Hospital, 1 Kawasumi, Mizuho-cho, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 467-8602 (Japan); Fujita, Hiroshi [Department of Information Science, Faculty of Engineering, Gifu University, Yanagido 1-1, Gifu 501-1193 (Japan)

    2003-05-01

    Our objective was to clarify intracranial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow dynamics in normal-pressure hydrocephalus (NPH). Frequency analyses of CSF flow measured with phase-contrast cine MRI were performed. The CSF flow spectra in the aqueduct were determined in patients (n=51) with NPH, brain atrophy or asymptomatic ventricular dilation (VD), and in healthy volunteers (control group; n=25). The changes in CSF flow spectra were also analyzed after intravenous injection of acetazolamide. Moreover, a phase transfer function (PTF) calculated from the spectra of the driving vascular pulsation and CSF flow in the aqueduct were assessed. These values were compared with the pressure volume response (PVR). The amplitude in the NPH group was significantly larger than that in the VD or control group because of a decrease in compliance. The phase in the NPH group was significantly different from that in either the VD or the control group, but no difference was found between the VD and control groups. The amplitude increased in all groups after acetazolamide injection. The PTF in the NPH group was significantly larger than in the control group, and a positive correlation was noted between PTF and PVR. Frequency analyses of CSF flow measured by cine MRI make it possible to noninvasively obtain a more detailed picture of the pathophysiology of NPH. (orig.)

  20. MR evaluation of cervical CSF flow. An examination in patients with spinal canal stenosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iida, Makoto [Miyoshi General Hospital, Hiroshima (Japan); Kajima, Toshio; Miyasaka, Kenji; Nakanishi, Tadashi; Ono, Chiaki; Ito, Katsuhide

    1999-06-01

    To evaluate the flow dynamics of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) throughout the cervical spine, 18 healthy controls and 14 patients with spinal canal stenosis were examined by phase-contrast cine MR. MR imaging was performed using a sagittal technique that is flow-sensitive in the craniocaudal direction. Flow encoding depicted craniocaudal flow as high intensity and caudocranial flow as low intensity. In this technique, either retrospective cardiac or peripheral gating was used to cover the complete cardiac cycle. This pulse sequence yielded 16 quantitative flow-encoded images per cardiac cycle. Using a region-of-interest cursor at each vertebral level, the graphs of flow-velocity versus time were generated. The recorded CSF at each vertebral level in the controls showed almost the same pattern in the change of flow in the craniocaudal direction, indicating that the onset of craniocaudal CSF flow was synchronous with the onset of cardiac systole in these subjects. At all vertebral levels, flow-velocity time curves showed the same variation in pattern. CSF flow was significantly lower in patients than in controls at each vertebral level (p<0.01). In addition, the flow patterns of the patients with spinal canal stenosis differed at each vertebral level. As a results, the total sum of the difference in velocity between graphs of two serial vertebrae at all sampling points (the area between the curves: ABC) per mean velocity amplitude in the patients was significantly higher than controls (p<0.05). Furthermore, the ABC per mean velocity amplitude at the stenotic level was significantly larger in the patients than that at the non-stenotic level (p<0.01). These data suggest that turbulent CSF flow occurs at the stenotic level. Thus, assessment of CSF flow dynamics is a useful adjunct to routine MRI in patients with spinal canal stenosis. (author)

  1. Variable impact of CSF flow suppression on quantitative 3.0T intracranial vessel wall measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogswell, Petrice M; Siero, Jeroen C W; Lants, Sarah K; Waddle, Spencer; Davis, L Taylor; Gilbert, Guillaume; Hendrikse, Jeroen; Donahue, Manus J

    2018-03-31

    Flow suppression techniques have been developed for intracranial (IC) vessel wall imaging (VWI) and optimized using simulations; however, simulation results may not translate in vivo. To evaluate experimentally how IC vessel wall and lumen measurements change in identical subjects when evaluated using the most commonly available blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow suppression modules and VWI sequences. Prospective. Healthy adults (n = 13; age = 37 ± 15 years) were enrolled. A 3.0T 3D T 1 /proton density (PD)-weighted turbo-spin-echo (TSE) acquisition with post-readout anti-driven equilibrium module, with and without Delay-Alternating-with-Nutation-for-Tailored-Excitation (DANTE) was applied. DANTE flip angle (8-12°) and TSE refocusing angle (sweep = 40-120° or 50-120°) were varied. Basilar artery and internal carotid artery (ICA) wall thicknesses, CSF signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and signal ratio (SR) were assessed. Measurements were made by two readers (radiology resident and board-certified neuroradiologist). A Wilcoxon signed-rank test was applied with corrected two-sided P CSF suppression. Addition of the DANTE preparation reduced CSF SNR from 17.4 to 6.7, thereby providing significant (P CSF suppression. The DANTE preparation also resulted in a significant (P CSF CNR improvement (P = 0.87). There was a trend for a difference in blood SNR with vs. without DANTE (P = 0.05). The outer vessel wall diameter and wall thickness values were lower (P CSF suppression and CNR of the approaches evaluated. However, improvements are heterogeneous, likely owing to intersubject vessel pulsatility and CSF flow variations, which can lead to variable flow suppression efficacy in these velocity-dependent modules. 2 Technical Efficacy: Stage 1 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2018. © 2018 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  2. Experimental study on quantitative evaluation of slow pulsatile flow of CSF with cine MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Masao

    1991-01-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the slow pulsatile flow of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) quantitatively with cine MRI in phantom experiment for the clinical application. The flow phantom was constructed from a plastic tube with a narrow channel to represent the central aqueduct. The phantom was filled with water to represent the CSF. The second tube filled with stationary water was positioned beside the flow phantom and acted as a control for no-flow signal strength. The ratio of signal intensity in regions of interest for the flow phantom and the control was measured. Not only the actual velocity curve of the flowing water through the phantom but also the temporal profile of signal intensity showed two main peaks with other small peaks in one cycle. This suggested a close relationship between signal intensity of cine MRI and flow velocity. A significant correlation between the signal intensity ratio and the velocity was obtained on cine MRI pulse sequences. Cine MRI was thus found to have the ability to give quantitative information about slow pulsatile flow. The most suitable pulse sequence was fast imaging with steady state free precession pulse sequence at the flip angle between 50 and 90 degrees. This preliminary study suggests that the slow pulsatile flow of CSF passing along the aqueduct can be visualized and measured. Thus, the sequence proposed has a potential for the investigation of normal and disturbed CSF circulation and the mapping of the flow pattern in different pathological conditions. (N.K.)

  3. Observation of the CSF pulsatile flow in the aqueduct using cine MRI with presaturation bolus tracking, 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Satoshi

    1992-01-01

    The to-and-fro motion patterns of the CSF flow in the aqueduct in ten normal adults, ten patients with secondary normal-pressure hydrocephalus (NPH), and fourteen patients with idiopathic ventriculomegaly were analyzed using cine MRI with presaturation bolus tracking. The to-and-fro motion patterns of the CSF flow in the aqueduct were thus classified into four types according to their maximum velocity and the relative time duration of their flow in the rostral and caudal directions. The correlation between the clinical symptoms, the CT findings, the RI-cisternography findings, the results of the ICP monitorings, and the CSF pulsatile-flow patterns were then analyzed. In secondary NPH disclosing frequent B waves on ICP monitoring, the maximum velocity of the CSF flow in the aqueduct was over 15 mm/sec, and the duration of the CSF flow was longer in the caudal direction than in the rostral direction. Furthermore, the faster the maximum velocity of the CSF flow, the larger the ventricular size on CT and the more severe the CSF malabsorption on cisternography. In idiopathic ventriculomegaly, only two cases demonstrated the same CSF flow pattern as was shown in secondary NPH; the other cases demonstrated other CSF flow patterns, which were considered to indicate hydrocephalus ex vacuo or arrested hydrocephalus. The CSF pulsatile-flow pattern was assumed to change according to the degree of the CSF circulatory disorder, its compensatory process, and the plasticity of the brain. The investigation of the CSF pulsatile flow gives important information for the evaluation of various hydrocephalic conditions. (author)

  4. Interpretation and value of MR CSF flow studies for paediatric neurosurgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samukelisiwe Sithembile Mbonane

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Imaging techniques may be underutilised when clinicians are unaware of the technique or do not recognise its potential. Phase-contrast MR imaging (PC-MRI is a rapid, simple and non-invasive technique that is sensitive to CSF flow. It demonstrates a mechanical coupling between cerebral blood and CSF flow throughout the cardiac cycle. Neurosurgeons should be able to request this procedure routinely as part of an MRI request. This paper gives an overview of the indications, technical requirements, technique and interpretation, using image examples. Indications for CSF flow studies include assessment and functionality of shunt treatment in patients with hydrocephalus; hydrocephalus associated with achondroplasia; Chiari I malformation; confirmation of aqueductal stenosis; and determining patency of a third ventriculostomy.

  5. Cerebral blood flow, glucose use, and CSF ionic regulation in potassium-depleted rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroek, H.; Kuschinsky, W.

    1988-01-01

    Rats were kept on a low-K + diet for 25 or 70 days. Local cerebral blood flow (LCBF) and local cerebral glucose utilization (LCGU) were measured in 31 different structures of the brain by means of the [ 14 C]iodoantipyrine and [ 14 C]2-deoxy-D-glucose method. After 25 and 70 days of K + depletion LCBF was decreased significantly in 27 and 30 structures, respectively, the average decrease being 19 and 25%. In contrast, average LCGU was not changed. Cisternal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) K + concentration decreased significantly from 2.65 ± 0.02 mM in controls to 2.55 ± 0.02 mM and 2.47 ± 0.02 mM in the two treated groups. CSF [HCO 3 - ], pH, and Pco 2 were increased in K + -depleted animals. These data show that K + depletion induces an increase in CSF pH and a decrease in CSF K + concentration, both of which cause a reduction in cerebral blood flow. The increased CSF Pco 2 is secondary to the reduction of blood flow, since brain metabolism and arterial Pco 2 remained constant

  6. Quantitative analysis of the aqueductal CSF flow dynamics with FLASH sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, Kouji; Tsuji, Shoji; Yuasa, Tatsuhiko; Miyatake, Tadashi.

    1993-01-01

    Aqueductal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow image and its dynamics were analyzed with 1.5 T MR system using ECG-gated Fast Low Flip Angle Shot (FLASH). High flip angle (90 degree) and short echo time (10 ms) were applicated. Seventeen ECG gated nine images were obtained in one cardiac cycle from the inferior midbrain. Axial imaging plane (across at 60 degree to the aqueduct) and 6 mm of slice thickness is available. The CSF flow velocity was estimated by a standard curve of signal intensity ratio, obtained by the running water in model tubes. Examinations of five normal subjects (male/female=2/3, 48.4±15 years old) were performed. The aqueductal flow signal had two peaks in one cardiac cycle. The latter oval signals within the diastolic phase represent the caudal (downward) CSF flow, and the former wedge shaped signals represent the cephalad (reverse) flow. The peak velocity of the caudal CSF flow is about 6.5 mm/s, the cephalad flow is about 4.5 mm/s. We defined two zero points of the to-and-fro curve as turning points, the first (caudal to cephalad) zero point as the 'first turning point', the second (cephalad to caudal) zero point as the 'second turning point'. In normal subjects, the first turning points are at 236±28 ms (±SD), the second turning points are at 723±67 ms (±SD) after ECG R wave. This new method is highly useful for the analyzing disorders with CSF flow abnormalities. (author)

  7. SU-E-I-51: Use of Blade Sequences in Cervical Spine MR Imaging for Eliminating Motion, Truncation and Flow Artifacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mavroidis, P [University of Texas Health Science Center, UTHSCSA, San Antonio, TX (United States); Lavdas, E; Kostopoulos, S; Ninos, C; Strikou, A; Glotsos, D; Vlachopoulou, A; Oikonomou, G [Technological Education Institute of Athens, Athens, Athens (Greece); Economopoulos, N [General University Hospital ATTIKON, Athens, Athens (Greece); Roka, V [Health Center of Farkadona, Trikala (Greece); Sakkas, G [Center for Research and Technology of Thessaly, Trikala (Greece); Tsagkalis, A; Batsikas, G [IASO Thessalias Hospital, Larissa (Greece); Statkahis, S [Cancer Therapy and Research Center, San Antonio, TX (United States); Papanikolaou, N [University of Texas HSC SA, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy of the BLADE technique to eliminate motion, truncation, flow and other artifacts in Cervical Spine MRI compared to the conventional technique. To study the ability of the examined sequences to reduce the indetention and wrap artifacts, which have been reported in BLADE sagittal sequences. Methods: Forty consecutive subjects, who had been routinely scanned for cervical spine examination using four different image acquisition techniques, were analyzed. More specifically, the following pairs of sequences were compared: a) T2 TSE SAG vs. T2 TSE SAG BLADE and b) T2 TIRM SAG vs. T2 TIRM SAG BLADE. A quantitative analysis was performed using the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and relative contrast (ReCon) measures. A qualitative analysis was also performed by two radiologists, who graded seven image characteristics on a 5-point scale (0:non-visualization; 1:poor; 2:average; 3:good; 4:excellent). The observers also evaluated the presence of image artifacts (motion, truncation, flow, indentation). Results: Based on the findings of the quantitative analysis, the ReCON values of the CSF (cerebrospinal fluid)/SC (spinal cord) between TIRM SAG and TIRM SAG BLADE were found to present statistical significant differences (p<0.001). Regarding motion and truncation artifacts, the T2 TSE SAG BLADE was superior compared to the T2 TSE SAG and the T2 TIRM SAG BLADE was superior compared to the T2 TIRM SAG. Regarding flow artifacts, T2 TIRM SAG BLADE eliminated more artifacts compared to the T2 TIRM SAG. Conclusion: The use of BLADE sequences in cervical spine MR examinations appears to be capable of potentially eliminating motion, pulsatile flow and trancation artifacts. Furthermore, BLADE sequences are proposed to be used in the standard examination protocols based on the fact that a significantly improved image quality could be achieved.

  8. SU-E-I-51: Use of Blade Sequences in Cervical Spine MR Imaging for Eliminating Motion, Truncation and Flow Artifacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mavroidis, P; Lavdas, E; Kostopoulos, S; Ninos, C; Strikou, A; Glotsos, D; Vlachopoulou, A; Oikonomou, G; Economopoulos, N; Roka, V; Sakkas, G; Tsagkalis, A; Batsikas, G; Statkahis, S; Papanikolaou, N

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy of the BLADE technique to eliminate motion, truncation, flow and other artifacts in Cervical Spine MRI compared to the conventional technique. To study the ability of the examined sequences to reduce the indetention and wrap artifacts, which have been reported in BLADE sagittal sequences. Methods: Forty consecutive subjects, who had been routinely scanned for cervical spine examination using four different image acquisition techniques, were analyzed. More specifically, the following pairs of sequences were compared: a) T2 TSE SAG vs. T2 TSE SAG BLADE and b) T2 TIRM SAG vs. T2 TIRM SAG BLADE. A quantitative analysis was performed using the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and relative contrast (ReCon) measures. A qualitative analysis was also performed by two radiologists, who graded seven image characteristics on a 5-point scale (0:non-visualization; 1:poor; 2:average; 3:good; 4:excellent). The observers also evaluated the presence of image artifacts (motion, truncation, flow, indentation). Results: Based on the findings of the quantitative analysis, the ReCON values of the CSF (cerebrospinal fluid)/SC (spinal cord) between TIRM SAG and TIRM SAG BLADE were found to present statistical significant differences (p<0.001). Regarding motion and truncation artifacts, the T2 TSE SAG BLADE was superior compared to the T2 TSE SAG and the T2 TIRM SAG BLADE was superior compared to the T2 TIRM SAG. Regarding flow artifacts, T2 TIRM SAG BLADE eliminated more artifacts compared to the T2 TIRM SAG. Conclusion: The use of BLADE sequences in cervical spine MR examinations appears to be capable of potentially eliminating motion, pulsatile flow and trancation artifacts. Furthermore, BLADE sequences are proposed to be used in the standard examination protocols based on the fact that a significantly improved image quality could be achieved

  9. Frequency analysis of CSF flow on cine-MRI in normal pressure hydrocephalus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyati, Tosiaki; Kasuga, Toshio; Imai, Hiroshi; Fujita, Hiroshi; Mase, Mitsuhito; Itikawa, Katuhiro

    2001-01-01

    To clarify the flow dynamics of intracranial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH), frequency analyses of CSF flow measured with an ECG-gated phase contrast cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were performed. The amplitude and phase in the CSF flow spectra in the aqueduct were determined in patients with NPH after a subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH-NPH group, n=26), an idiopathic NPH (I-NPH group, n=4), an asymptomatic ventricular dilation or a brain atrophy (VD group, n=21), and in healthy volunteers (control group, n=25). The changes of CSF flow spectra were also analyzed 5 and 15 minutes after an intravenous injection of acetazolamide. Moreover, a phase transfer function (PTF) calculated from the spectra of the driving vascular pulsation and CSF flow in the aqueduct were assessed in patients with SAH-NPH and control groups before and after acetazolamide injection. There values were compared with the pressure volume response (PVR). The amplitude of the 1st-3rd harmonics in the SAH-NPH or I-NPH group was significantly larger than in the control or VD group because of a decrease in compliance (increase in PVR). The phase of the 1st harmonic in the SAH-NPH group was significantly different from that in the control or VD group, but no difference was found between the control and VD groups. The amplitude of the 0-3rd harmonics increased, and the phase of the 1st harmonic changed in all groups after an acetazolamide injection. An evaluation of the time course of the direct current of CSF flow provided further information about the compensatory faculty of the cerebrospinal cavity. A PTF of the 1st harmonic in the SAH-NPH group was significantly larger than in the control group, and a positive correlation was noted between PTF of the 1st harmonic and PVR. In conclusion, frequency analyses of CSF flow measured by cine-MRI make it possible to obtain noninvasively a more detailed picture of the pathophysiology of NPH and of changes in intracranial

  10. Frequency analysis of CSF flow on cine-MRI in normal pressure hydrocephalus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyati, Tosiaki; Kasuga, Toshio; Imai, Hiroshi [Kanazawa Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine; Fujita, Hiroshi; Mase, Mitsuhito; Itikawa, Katuhiro

    2001-09-01

    To clarify the flow dynamics of intracranial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH), frequency analyses of CSF flow measured with an ECG-gated phase contrast cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were performed. The amplitude and phase in the CSF flow spectra in the aqueduct were determined in patients with NPH after a subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH-NPH group, n=26), an idiopathic NPH (I-NPH group, n=4), an asymptomatic ventricular dilation or a brain atrophy (VD group, n=21), and in healthy volunteers (control group, n=25). The changes of CSF flow spectra were also analyzed 5 and 15 minutes after an intravenous injection of acetazolamide. Moreover, a phase transfer function (PTF) calculated from the spectra of the driving vascular pulsation and CSF flow in the aqueduct were assessed in patients with SAH-NPH and control groups before and after acetazolamide injection. There values were compared with the pressure volume response (PVR). The amplitude of the 1st-3rd harmonics in the SAH-NPH or I-NPH group was significantly larger than in the control or VD group because of a decrease in compliance (increase in PVR). The phase of the 1st harmonic in the SAH-NPH group was significantly different from that in the control or VD group, but no difference was found between the control and VD groups. The amplitude of the 0-3rd harmonics increased, and the phase of the 1st harmonic changed in all groups after an acetazolamide injection. An evaluation of the time course of the direct current of CSF flow provided further information about the compensatory faculty of the cerebrospinal cavity. A PTF of the 1st harmonic in the SAH-NPH group was significantly larger than in the control group, and a positive correlation was noted between PTF of the 1st harmonic and PVR. In conclusion, frequency analyses of CSF flow measured by cine-MRI make it possible to obtain noninvasively a more detailed picture of the pathophysiology of NPH and of changes in intracranial

  11. Evaluations of CSF flow dynamics in elderly with dementia by metrizamide CT cisternography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nokura, Kazuya; Kabasawa, Hidehiro; Matsubara, Mitsutaka; Yamamoto, Masahiko; Nagai, Hajime

    1988-01-01

    We have investigated Metrizamide CT-cisternography in multi-infarct dementia (MID): 29 cases, senile dementia of the Alzheimer type (SDAT): 7 cases, normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH): 8 cases and spinocerebellar degeneration (SCD): 3 cases. By quantitative manner the differences of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flowdynamics in each group have been evaluated. In comparison with SCD which show normal CSF flow, MID show tendency to ventricular reflux and convexity stasis. No difference was seen between MID and SDAT. Though NPH shows stronger ventricular reflux than that or MID, the stasis in MID is more severe than that of NPH. In MID group subject of older than 70 years show more severe SCF flow disturbances. When divided into two groups by ADL (Activities of daily living) scale (full of 15 points) the group of less than 6 points show slight disturbances in comparison with that of more than 6 points. And the same is true in Hasegawas dementia rating scales, namely the group of less than 21 points (full of 32.5) shows slight disturbances in comparison with that of more than 21 points. The flow dynamics pattern of slight ventricular reflux in 24 hours and stasis in convexity from 24 to 48 hours seems to be typical in either MID or SDAT. But such a pattern has never been reported in SCF flow dynamics studies. These findings may suggest that CSF flow disturbances have a close relation with aging and dementia. (author)

  12. Evaluations of CSF flow dynamics in elderly with dementia by metrizamide CT cisternography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nokura, Kazuya; Kabasawa, Hidehiro; Matsubara, Mitsutaka; Yamamoto, Masahiko; Nagai, Hajime

    1988-06-01

    We have investigated Metrizamide CT-cisternography in multi-infarct dementia (MID): 29 cases, senile dementia of the Alzheimer type (SDAT): 7 cases, normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH): 8 cases and spinocerebellar degeneration (SCD): 3 cases. By quantitative manner the differences of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flowdynamics in each group have been evaluated. In comparison with SCD which show normal CSF flow, MID show tendency to ventricular reflux and convexity stasis. No difference was seen between MID and SDAT. Though NPH shows stronger ventricular reflux than that or MID, the stasis in MID is more severe than that of NPH. In MID group subject of older than 70 years show more severe SCF flow disturbances. When divided into two groups by ADL (Activities of daily living) scale (full of 15 points) the group of less than 6 points show slight disturbances in comparison with that of more than 6 points. And the same is true in Hasegawas dementia rating scales, namely the group of less than 21 points (full of 32.5) shows slight disturbances in comparison with that of more than 21 points. The flow dynamics pattern of slight ventricular reflux in 24 hours and stasis in convexity from 24 to 48 hours seems to be typical in either MID or SDAT. But such a pattern has never been reported in SCF flow dynamics studies. These findings may suggest that CSF flow disturbances have a close relation with aging and dementia.

  13. Bernoulli's Principle Applied to Brain Fluids: Intracranial Pressure Does Not Drive Cerebral Perfusion or CSF Flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Eric; Ros, Maxime; Moyse, Emmanuel; Lorthois, Sylvie; Swider, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    In line with the first law of thermodynamics, Bernoulli's principle states that the total energy in a fluid is the same at all points. We applied Bernoulli's principle to understand the relationship between intracranial pressure (ICP) and intracranial fluids. We analyzed simple fluid physics along a tube to describe the interplay between pressure and velocity. Bernoulli's equation demonstrates that a fluid does not flow along a gradient of pressure or velocity; a fluid flows along a gradient of energy from a high-energy region to a low-energy region. A fluid can even flow against a pressure gradient or a velocity gradient. Pressure and velocity represent part of the total energy. Cerebral blood perfusion is not driven by pressure but by energy: the blood flows from high-energy to lower-energy regions. Hydrocephalus is related to increased cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) resistance (i.e., energy transfer) at various points. Identification of the energy transfer within the CSF circuit is important in understanding and treating CSF-related disorders. Bernoulli's principle is not an abstract concept far from clinical practice. We should be aware that pressure is easy to measure, but it does not induce resumption of fluid flow. Even at the bedside, energy is the key to understanding ICP and fluid dynamics.

  14. Relationship between pineal cyst size and aqueductal CSF flow measured by phase contrast MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezuidenhout, Abraham F; Kasper, Ekkehard M; Baledent, Olivier; Rojas, Rafael; Bhadelia, Rafeeque A

    2018-02-23

    Most patients with pineal cysts referred for neurosurgical consultation have no specific symptoms or objective findings except for pineal cyst size to help in management decisions. Our purpose was to assess the relationship between pineal cyst size and aqueductal CSF flow using PC-MRI. Eleven adult patients with pineal cysts (> 1-cm in size) referred for neurosurgical consultations were included. Cyst volume was calculated using 3D T1 images. PC-MRI in axial plane with velocity encoding of 5 cm/sec was used to quantitatively assess CSF flow through the cerebral aqueduct to determine the aqueductal stroke volume, which was then correlated to cyst size using Pearson's correlation. Pineal cysts were grouped by size into small (6/11) and large (5/11) using the median value to compare aqueductal stroke volume using Mann-Whitney test. Patients were 39 ± 13 years (mean ± SD) of age, and 10/11 (91%) were female. There was significant negative correlation between cyst volume and aqueductal stroke volume (r=0.74; p=0.009). Volume of small cysts (4954±2157 mm3) was significantly different compared to large cysts (13752±3738 mm3; p= 0.008). The aqueductal stroke volume of patients harboring large cysts 33±8 μL/cardiac cycle was significantly lower than that of patients with small cysts 96±29 μL/cardiac cycle (p=0.008). Aqueductal CSF flow appears to decrease with increasing pineal cyst size. Our preliminary results provide first evidence that even in the absence of objective neurological findings or hydrocephalus; larger pineal cysts already display decreased CSF flow through the cerebral aqueduct.

  15. Artifacts in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krupa, Katarzyna; Bekiesińska-Figatowska, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Artifacts in magnetic resonance imaging and foreign bodies within the patient’s body may be confused with a pathology or may reduce the quality of examinations. Radiologists are frequently not informed about the medical history of patients and face postoperative/other images they are not familiar with. A gallery of such images was presented in this manuscript. A truncation artifact in the spinal cord could be misinterpreted as a syrinx. Motion artifacts caused by breathing, cardiac movement, CSF pulsation/blood flow create a ghost artifact which can be reduced by patient immobilization, or cardiac/respiratory gating. Aliasing artifacts can be eliminated by increasing the field of view. An artificially hyperintense signal on FLAIR images can result from magnetic susceptibility artifacts, CSF/vascular pulsation, motion, but can also be found in patients undergoing MRI examinations while receiving supplemental oxygen. Metallic and other foreign bodies which may be found on and in patients’ bodies are the main group of artifacts and these are the focus of this study: e.g. make-up, tattoos, hairbands, clothes, endovascular embolization, prostheses, surgical clips, intraorbital and other medical implants, etc. Knowledge of different types of artifacts and their origin, and of possible foreign bodies is necessary to eliminate them or to reduce their negative influence on MR images by adjusting acquisition parameters. It is also necessary to take them into consideration when interpreting the images. Some proposals of reducing artifacts have been mentioned. Describing in detail the procedures to avoid or limit the artifacts would go beyond the scope of this paper but technical ways to reduce them can be found in the cited literature

  16. Occult CSF flow disturbance of patients with Alzheimer type dementia and vascular dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kono, Kazuhiko; Sugita, Yasuko; Funaki, Chiaki

    1994-01-01

    We report results of Iotrolan CT-cisternography on 41 demented patients (13 males and 28 females) to find 'occult normal pressure hydrocephalus'. These patients were suspected to have CSF flow disturbance from clinical symptoms and simple brain CT scan findings. Their average age, duration of dementia, and score of Hasegawa's dementia scale (HDS) were 76.2 years, 5.9 years, 9.5/32.5,respectively. Before performing CT-cisternography, clinical diagnosis for their dementia were vascular dementia in 18 patients. Alzheimer type dementia in 12, suspect of NPH in 5, and other diagnoses in 6. From the results of cisternography, we found 13 patients with CSF flow disturbance (contrast material remained in the ventricle more than 48 hours after injection), and 17 patients with normal CSF flow. The former showed lower scores of HDS, higher urinary incontinence scores and smaller areas of the interhemispheric fissure on CT scan than the latter. But the former showed no significant difference from the latter in the average age, duration of dementia and width of the ventricles. (author)

  17. Spatial presaturation: Method for suppressing flow artifacts and improving depiction of vascular anatomy in clinical MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felmlee, J.P.; Ehman, R.; Julsrud, P.; Gray, J.

    1987-01-01

    MR images are often degraded by flow artifacts that obscure anatomic details and reduce contrast. Vascular structures are frequently depicted poorly because flow voids are obliterated by spurious intraluminal signals. This exhibit presents an analysis of the physical mechanisms of flow artifact formation and describes a presaturation technique for suppressing such artifacts. The technique incorporates additional spectrally shaped radio frequency pulses into standard imaging sequences. It has proved effective for reducing flow artifacts in experimental and clinical imaging studies. The technique is particularly helpful for high-resolution surface coil examinations of the neck, mediastinal imaging, and gated cardiac imaging, and for detecting thrombus and other intravastcular pathology

  18. Cine MR CSF flow study in hydrocephalus: What are the valuable parmeters?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hye Young; Kim, Myung Hyun

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the changes in diagnosis of intracranial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) dynamics in the hydrocephalus, we studied the various parameters of cine phase contrast (PC) magnetic resonance (MR) CSF flow images in cases of acutely progressive hydrocephalus, comparing them with those in normal CSF circulation. The MR images were obtained with a 1.5T (GE Signa, GE Medical Systems, Milwaukee, USA) unit using the 2 dimensional cine PC sequence with peripheral gating and gradient recalled echo imaging in ten cases of non-obstructive hydrocephalus(NOH), three of obstructive hydrocephalus(OH), and ten controls. The time-echo time-flip angle employed were 50 to 80 msec-11 to 15 msec-12 to 15 degrees. Temporal velocity information relating to cervical pericord CSF spaces, third and fourth ventricles, and the aqueduct were plotted as wave forms which were then analyzed for configuration, amplitude parameters(Vmax, Vmin, Vdif), and temporal parameters(R-S, R-SMV, R-D, R-DMV). The statistical significance of each parameter was examined using the paired t-test. All patients with OH underwent endoscopic third ventriculostomy, whereas all with NOH underwent shunting procedures. In five ROIs, distinct reproducible configuration features were obtained at aqueduct and cervical pericord spaces, but not at ventricular levels. We determined the statistically significant differences between controls and hydrocephalus patients using temporal, rather than amplitude parameters. In NOH, the graph showed R-DMV shortening (p<0.01) at the anterior cervical pericord space. In OH, there were R-DMV shortening (p<0.05) was seen at the anterior cervical pericord space, and R-DMV shortening (p<0.02) at the posterior cervical pericord space. In one case of OH, a typical change of configuration, mirror image, was obtained at aqueduct level, and in all OH cases, the level of obstruction could be determined. The results of cine PC MR CSF flow study may be valuable for points for determining the level

  19. Assessment of CSF dynamics and venous flow in the superior sagittal sinus by MRI in idiopathic intracranial hypertension: a preliminary study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gideon, P; Sørensen, P S; Thomsen, C

    1994-01-01

    A velocity-sensitive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) phase-mapping method was used for non-invasive study of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow in the cerebral aqueduct, for indirect calculation of supratentorial CSF production, and for measurement of blood flow in the superior sagittal sinus (SSS......, the MRI measurements suggested CSF hypersecretion in three patients, whereas increased transependymal passage of CSF could have been the cause of negative calculated CSF production rates in two others. A tendency towards lower mean blood flow in the SSS (mean 345 ml/min) in the patients than...

  20. Phase-contrast cine MR imaging of normal aqueductal CSF flow. Effect of aging and relation to CSF void on modulus MR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barkhof, F.; Kouwenhoven, M.; Scheltens, P.; Sprenger, M.; Algra, P.; Valk, J.

    1994-01-01

    Cine phase-contrast MR imaging was used to study pulsatile CSF flow in the aqueduct in 11 young controls (mean age 30 years) and 9 old controls (mean age 69 years). A high-resolution gradient echo technique and an oblique imaging plane, perpendicular to the aqueduct, was used to avoid volume averaging. Phantom studies confirmed that the technique was accurate. Aqueductal velocity and flux in old controls was higher than in young controls, but the differences were not significant. For all controls together, the averaged peak velocity was 4.2 ± 1.5 cm/s in rostral and -7.8 ± 4.9 cm/s in caudal direction; for the flux it was 0.16 ± 0.10 cm 3 /s in rostral and -0.29 ± 0.19 cm 3 /s in caudal direction. Phase-contrast measurements were significantly related to flow-void on modulus MR images, but not with ventricular size or cortical atrophy. The present technique avoids underestimation of aqueductal flow, and therefore reveals higher aqueductal velocity and flux values than previous studies. Factors other than age or atrophy seem to determine aqueductal CSF flow. (orig.)

  1. Flow pattern in the ventricle of brain with cilia beating and CSF circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong; Westendorf, Christian; Faubel, Regina; Eichele, Gregor; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    We recently discovered that cilia of the ventral third ventricle (v3V) of mammalian brain generate a complex flow network close to the wall. However, the flow pattern in the overall three dimensional v3V, especially under physiological condition, remains to be investigated. Computational fluid dynamics is arguably the best approach for such investigations. Several v3V geometries are reconstructed from different data for comparison study. The lattice Boltzmann method and immersed boundary method are used to reproduce the experimental set-up for an opened v3V firstly. The experimentally recorded cilia induced flow network is projected on the curved v3V wall. The flow maps obtained numerically at different heights from the v3V wall agree with the experimental data qualitatively. We then consider the entire v3V with ciliary flow network along the wall for boundary condition. Moreover, we add a time dependent flow rate to represent the CSF circulation, and study flow pattern in the ventricle. We thank the Max Planck Society (MPG) for financial support. This work is conducted within the Physics and Medicine Initiative at Goettingen Campus between MPG and University Medical Center.

  2. Constant flow ventilation as a novel approach to elimination of respiratory artifact in MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shtern, F.; Kersh, R.; Lee, A.; Venegas, J.; Brady, T.J.

    1988-01-01

    This pilot study was performed to evaluate constant flow ventilation (CFV) as a method of respiratory artifact suppression in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. In contrast to currently used methods of respiratory artifact suppression, CFV is able to provide adequate ventilation in the absence of any chest wall motion and thus obviates the need for respiratory gating. High-velocity jets of fresh gas delivered through two narrow (2-mm) intrabronchial cannulas promote gas exchange through airway turbulence and enhanced molecular diffusion. One mongrel dog (8.5 kg) was anesthetized with pentobarbital (35 mg/kg). For CFV, endobronchial cannulas were inserted with the aid of bronchoscopy and connected to a flow meter (flow rate, 500 mL/sec). Intrathoracic pressure was monitored via a pressure transducer connected to an air-filled intraesophageal balloon. Conventional ventilation (CV), with a tidal volume of 85 mL and ten breaths per minute, was provided through a cuffed endotracheal tube. After establishment of adequate ventilation (carbon dioxide pressure, 39), muscle paralysis was induced by succinylcholine at 0.1 mg/kg. T2-weighted [1,500/50 (repetition time msec/echo time msec), two excitations] gradient-echo and spin-echo images were obtained at 0.6T with both CV and CFV. MR images with CFV were free of respiratory motion artifact, which was present on all MR images with CV. This pilot study indicates that implementation of CFV results in elimination of respiratory motion artifact

  3. Phase-contrast cerebrospinal fluid flow magnetic resonance imaging in qualitative evaluation of patency of CSF flow pathways prior to infusion of chemotherapeutic and other agents into the fourth ventricle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Rajan P; Sitton, Clark W; Ketonen, Leena M; Hou, Ping; Johnson, Jason M; Romo, Seferino; Fletcher, Stephen; Shah, Manish N; Kerr, Marcia; Zaky, Wafik; Rytting, Michael E; Khatua, Soumen; Sandberg, David I

    2018-03-01

    Nuclear medicine studies have previously been utilized to assess for blockage of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow prior to intraventricular chemotherapy infusions. To assess CSF flow without nuclear medicine studies, we obtained cine phase-contrast MRI sequences that assess CSF flow from the fourth ventricle down to the sacrum. In three clinical trials, 18 patients with recurrent malignant posterior fossa tumors underwent implantation of a ventricular access device (VAD) into the fourth ventricle, either with or without simultaneous tumor resection. Prior to infusing therapeutic agents into the VAD, cine MRI phase-contrast CSF flow sequences of the brain and total spine were performed. Velocity encoding (VENC) of 5 and 10 cm/s was used to confirm CSF flow from the fourth ventricular outlets to the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine. Qualitative CSF flow was characterized by neuroradiologists as present or absent. All 18 patients demonstrated CSF flow from the outlets of the fourth ventricle down to the sacrum with no evidence of obstruction. One of these patients, after disease progression, subsequently showed obstruction of CSF flow. No patient required a nuclear medicine study to assess CSF flow prior to initiation of infusions. Fourteen patients have received infusions to date, and none has had neurological toxicity. CSF flow including the fourth ventricle and the total spine can be assessed noninvasively with phase-contrast MRI sequences. Advantages over nuclear medicine studies include avoiding both an invasive procedure and radiation exposure.

  4. Occult CSF flow disturbance of patients with Alzheimer type dementia and vascular dementia; Results from Iotrolan CT-cisternography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kono, Kazuhiko; Sugita, Yasuko; Funaki, Chiaki [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine; and others

    1994-04-01

    We report results of Iotrolan CT-cisternography on 41 demented patients (13 males and 28 females) to find 'occult normal pressure hydrocephalus'. These patients were suspected to have CSF flow disturbance from clinical symptoms and simple brain CT scan findings. Their average age, duration of dementia, and score of Hasegawa's dementia scale (HDS) were 76.2 years, 5.9 years, 9.5/32.5,respectively. Before performing CT-cisternography, clinical diagnosis for their dementia were vascular dementia in 18 patients. Alzheimer type dementia in 12, suspect of NPH in 5, and other diagnoses in 6. From the results of cisternography, we found 13 patients with CSF flow disturbance (contrast material remained in the ventricle more than 48 hours after injection), and 17 patients with normal CSF flow. The former showed lower scores of HDS, higher urinary incontinence scores and smaller areas of the interhemispheric fissure on CT scan than the latter. But the former showed no significant difference from the latter in the average age, duration of dementia and width of the ventricles. (author).

  5. Regulation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow in neurodegenerative, neurovascular and neuroinflammatory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Matthew J; Iliff, Jeffrey J

    2016-03-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) circulation and turnover provides a sink for the elimination of solutes from the brain interstitium, serving an important homeostatic role for the function of the central nervous system. Disruption of normal CSF circulation and turnover is believed to contribute to the development of many diseases, including neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimer's disease, ischemic and traumatic brain injury, and neuroinflammatory conditions such as multiple sclerosis. Recent insights into CSF biology suggesting that CSF and interstitial fluid exchange along a brain-wide network of perivascular spaces termed the 'glymphatic' system suggest that CSF circulation may interact intimately with glial and vascular function to regulate basic aspects of brain function. Dysfunction within this glial vascular network, which is a feature of the aging and injured brain, is a potentially critical link between brain injury, neuroinflammation and the development of chronic neurodegeneration. Ongoing research within this field may provide a powerful new framework for understanding the common links between neurodegenerative, neurovascular and neuroinflammatory disease, in addition to providing potentially novel therapeutic targets for these conditions. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Neuro Inflammation edited by Helga E. de Vries and Markus Schwaninger. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Mitigation of near-band balanced steady-state free precession through-plane flow artifacts using partial dephasing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Anjali; Cheng, Joseph Y; Hargreaves, Brian A; Baron, Corey A; Nishimura, Dwight G

    2018-06-01

    To mitigate artifacts from through-plane flow at the locations of steady-state stopbands in balanced steady-state free precession (SSFP) using partial dephasing. A 60° range in the phase accrual during a TR was created over the voxel by slightly unbalancing the slice-select dephaser. The spectral profiles of SSFP with partial dephasing for various constant flow rates and during pulsatile flow were simulated to determine if partial dephasing decreases through-plane flow artifacts originating near SSFP dark bands while maintaining on-resonant signal. Simulations were then validated in a flow phantom. Lastly, phase-cycled SSFP cardiac cine images were acquired with and without partial dephasing in six subjects. Partial dephasing decreased the strength and non-linearity of the dependence of the signal at the stopbands on the through-plane flow rate. It thus mitigated hyper-enhancement from out-of-slice signal contributions and transient-related artifacts caused by variable flow both in the phantom and in vivo. In six volunteers, partial dephasing noticeably decreased artifacts in all of the phase-cycled cardiac cine datasets. Partial dephasing can mitigate the flow artifacts seen at the stopbands in balanced SSFP while maintaining the sequence's desired signal. By mitigating hyper-enhancement and transient-related artifacts originating from the stopbands, partial dephasing facilitates robust multiple-acquisition phase-cycled SSFP in the heart. Magn Reson Med 79:2944-2953, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  7. CSF smear

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003768.htm CSF smear To use the sharing features on this ... around the spinal cord and brain. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) protects the brain and spinal cord from injury. ...

  8. SPAMM, cine phase contrast imaging and fast spin-echo T2-weighted imaging in the study of intracranial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connor, S.E.J.; O'Gorman, R.; Summers, P.; Simmons, A.; Moore, E.M.; Chandler, C.; Jarosz, J.M.

    2001-01-01

    AIM: To compare the qualitative assessment of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow using a SPAMM (spatial modulation of magnetization) technique with cine phase contrast images (cine PC) and fast spin echo (FSE) T2-weighted images. MATERIALS AND METHODS: SPAMM, PC and T2-weighted sequences were performed on 22 occasions in 19 patients. Eleven of the studies were performed following a neuroendoscopic third ventriculostomy (NTV), and in these cases, the success of the NTV was determined by clinical follow-up. Two observers used consensus to grade the presence of CSF flow at nine different sites for each study. RESULTS: At 14 of the 178 matched sites, which could be assessed by both SPAMM and cine PC, SPAMM CSF flow grade was higher than that of cine PC. At a further 14/178 matched sites, the cine PC grade was higher than that of SPAMM. There was definite CSF flow at 113/182 (62%) of all the cine PC sites assessed, and 110/181 (61%) of all SPAMM sites assessed whilst 108/198 (54%) of FSE T2-weighted image sites demonstrated flow voids. Cine PC grades were higher than SPAMM at the cerebral aqueduct (P < 0.05, Wilcoxon sign rank test). Definite CSF flow within the anterior third ventricle was present in 4/5 (SPAMM) and 3/5 (cine PC) successful NTVs, 0/2 (SPAMM and cine PC) unsuccessful NTVs and 1/10 (SPAMM and cine PC) patients without NTV. CONCLUSION: SPAMM provides a comparable assessment of intracranial CSF flow to that of cine phase contrast imaging at all CSF sites except the cerebral aqueduct. Connor, S.E.J. et al. (2001)

  9. CSF analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerebrospinal fluid analysis ... Analysis of CSF can help detect certain conditions and diseases. All of the following can be, but ... An abnormal CSF analysis result may be due to many different causes, ... Encephalitis (such as West Nile and Eastern Equine) Hepatic ...

  10. Relationship between Cough-Associated Changes in CSF Flow and Disease Severity in Chiari I Malformation: An Exploratory Study Using Real-Time MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezuidenhout, A F; Khatami, D; Heilman, C B; Kasper, E M; Patz, S; Madan, N; Zhao, Y; Bhadelia, R A

    2018-05-10

    Currently no quantitative objective test exists to determine disease severity in a patient with Chiari I malformation. Our aim was to correlate disease severity in symptomatic patients with Chiari I malformation with cough-associated changes in CSF flow as measured with real-time MR imaging. Thirteen symptomatic patients with Chiari I malformation (tonsillar herniation of ≥5 mm) were prospectively studied. A real-time, flow-sensitized pencil-beam MR imaging scan was used to measure CSF stroke volume during rest and immediately following coughing and relaxation periods (total scan time, 90 seconds). Multiple posterior fossa and craniocervical anatomic measurements were also obtained. Patients were classified into 2 groups by neurosurgeons blinded to MR imaging measurements: 1) nonspecific Chiari I malformation (5/13)-Chiari I malformation with nonspecific symptoms like non-cough-related or mild occasional cough-related headache, neck pain, dizziness, paresthesias, and/or trouble swallowing; 2) specific Chiari I malformation (8/13)-patients with Chiari I malformation with specific symptoms and/or objective findings like severe cough-related headache, myelopathy, syringomyelia, and muscle atrophy. The Spearman correlation was used to determine correlations between MR imaging measurements and disease severity, and both groups were also compared using a Mann-Whitney U test. There was a significant negative correlation between the percentage change in CSF stroke volume (resting to postcoughing) and Chiari I malformation disease severity ( R = 0.59; P = .03). Mann-Whitney comparisons showed the percentage change in CSF stroke volume (resting to postcoughing) to be significantly different between patient groups ( P = .04). No other CSF flow measurement or anatomic measure was significantly different between the groups. Our exploratory study suggests that assessment of CSF flow response to a coughing challenge has the potential to become a valuable objective noninvasive

  11. Regional cerebral blood flow and CSF pressures during Cushing response induced by a supratentorial expanding mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schrader, H.; Zwetnow, N.N.; Moerkrid, L.

    1985-01-01

    In order to delineate the critical blood flow pattern during the Cushing response in intracranial hypertension, regional cerebral blood flow was measured with radioactive microspheres in 12 anesthetized dogs at respiratory arrest caused either by expansion of an epidural supratentorial balloon or by cisternal infusion. Regional cerebrospinal fluid pressures were recorded and the local cerebral perfusion pressure calculated in various cerebrospinal compartments. In the 8 dogs of the balloon expansion group, the systemic arterial pressure was unmanipulated in 4, while it was kept at a constant low level (48 and 70 mm Hg) in 2 dogs and, in another 2 dogs, at a constant high level (150 and 160 mm Hg) induced by infusion of Aramine. At respiratory arrest, regional cerebral blood flow had a stereotyped pattern and was largely independent of the blood pressure level. In contrast, concomitant pressure gradients between the various cerebrospinal compartments varied markedly in the 3 animal groups increasing with higher arterial pressure. Flow decreased by 85-100% supratentorially and by 70-100% in the upper brain stem down to the level of the upper pons, while changes in the lower brain stem were minor, on the average 25%. When intracranial pressure was raised by cisternal infusion in 4 dogs, the supratentorial blood flow pattern at respiratory arrest was appriximately similar to the flow pattern in the balloon inflation group. However, blood flow decreased markedly (74-85%) also in the lower brain stem. The results constitute another argument in favour of the Cushing response in supratentorial expansion being caused by ischemia in the brain stem. The critical ischemic region seems to be located rostrally to the oblongate medulla, probably in the pons. (author)

  12. Penetrating Osseous Spicules Causing High-Flow Ventral CSF Leaks in the Setting of Relatively Low BMI : A Preliminary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosebrock, Richard E; Diehn, Felix E; Luetmer, Patrick H; Wald, John T; Lane, John I; Morris, Jonathan M; Lehman, Vance T; Carr, Carrie M; Mokri, Bahram; Thielen, Kent R

    2017-05-16

    We have anecdotally observed patients with high-flow ventral cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks resulting from penetrating osseous spicules or calcified discs to be relatively thin. The purpose of this study was to explore the validity of this observation and determine if a potential association exists between low body mass index (BMI) and high-flow spinal ventral CSF leaks resulting from such dura-penetrating lesions. Sixteen consecutive patients with precisely localized high-flow ventral spinal CSF leaks on dynamic myelography were identified. The cause of the CSF leak was determined. The BMI on the date nearest to and within 2 weeks of myelography was recorded. Utilizing exact sign test, the body mass index was compared to the average BMI from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (Centers for Disease Control), matched to sex and age-range. The cohort consisted of 10 males (63%) and 6 females with a mean age of 54 years (range 37-72 years). In all patients, a spiculated osteophyte/calcified disc was identified at the site of the leak. Fourteen patients (88%) had a BMI below the matched national average, while only two patients (13%) had values above the national average (p = 0.004). Patients with high-flow ventral CSF leaks resulting from spiculated osteophyte or calcified disc as identified by dynamic myelography are more likely to have a BMI below the U.S. national average, matched for gender and age-range. This exploratory analysis requires confirmation as well as further characterization of potential pathophysiologic mechanisms and impact on radiographic and clinical assessments.

  13. Modelling of the CSF flow in the spinal canal in cervical stenosis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kaczmarská, A.; Štěpáník, Z.; Vaněk, P.; Maršík, František; Převorovská, Světlana; Otáhal, J.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 40, - (2007), s. 477-477 ISSN 0021-9290 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : cerebrospinal fluid flow * spinal canal * cervical stenosis Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 2.897, year: 2007

  14. Cine phase-contrast MRI measurement of CSF flow in the cervical spine: a pilot study in patients with spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negahdar, MJ; Shakeri, M.; McDowell, E.; Wells, J.; Vitaz, T.; Harkema, S.; Amini, A.

    2011-03-01

    MRI velocimetry (also known as phase-contrast MRI) is a powerful tool for quantification of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow in various regions of the brain and craniospinal junction and has been accepted as a diagnostic tool to assist with the diagnosis of certain conditions such as hydrocephalus and chiari malformations. Cerebrospinal fluid is continually produced in the ventricles of the brain, flows through the ventricular system and then out and around the brain and spinal cord and is reabsorbed over the convexity of the brain. Any disease process which either impedes the normal pattern of flow or restricts the area where flow occurs can change the pattern of these waveforms with the direction and velocity of flow being determined by the pressure transmitted from the pulsation of the heart and circulation of blood within the central nervous system. Therefore, we hypothesized that phase-contrast MRI could eventually be used as a diagnostic aid in determining the degree of spinal cord compression following injury to the cervical or thoracic spine. In this study, we examined CSF flow in 3 normal subjects and 2 subjects with non-acute injuries in the cervical spine using Cine phasecontrast MRI. CSF flow analysis was performed using an in-house developed software. The flow waveform was calculated in both normal subjects (n=3) as well as subjects with spinal cord injury in the cervical spine (n=2). The bulk flow at C2 was measured to be 0.30 +/- 0.05 cc, at 5 cm distal to C2, it was 0.19+/- 0.07 cc, and at 10 cm distal to C2, it was 0.17+/- 0.05 cc. These results were in good agreement with previously published results. In patients with spinal cord injury, at the site of injury in the cervical spine, bulk flow was found to be 0.08 +/- 0.12 cc, at 5 cm proximal to the site of injury it was found to be 0.18 +/- 0.07 cc, and at 5 cm distal to the site of injury, it was found to be 0.12 +/- 0.01 cc.

  15. Decreased CSF-flow artefacts in T2 imaging of the cervical spine with periodically rotated overlapping parallel lines with enhanced reconstruction (PROPELLER/BLADE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ragoschke-Schumm, Andreas; Schmidt, Peter; Mayer, Thomas E.; Schumm, Julia; Reimann, Georg; Mentzel, Hans-Joachim; Kaiser, Werner A.

    2011-01-01

    The cervical spine is prone to artefacts in T2 MR-imaging due to patient movements and cerebrospinal fluid flow. The periodically rotated overlapping parallel lines with enhanced reconstruction (PROPELLER/BLADE) acquisition method was developed to reduce motion artefacts. We sought to determine if T2-BLADE is superior to T2-TSE with conventional k-space reading. Twenty-five patients were examined using a 1.5 T MR-scanner. T2-weighted imaging of the cervical spine in sagittal and axial orientation using conventional or BLADE k-space reading was performed. Spinal cord, subarachnoid space, vertebrae and discs were evaluated by two independent observers using a scale from 0 (non-diagnostic) to 3 (excellent). Interobserver correlation was assessed as Cohen's kappa. Results of Mann-Whitney U test with p < 0.05 were regarded as significant. Furthermore, the investigators were asked for subjective evaluation in consensus. Overall interobserver accuracy of κ = 0.91 was obtained. Comparison of sagittal images showed better values for all investigated structures in T2-BLADE: spinal cord (TSE/BLADE: 1.52/2.04; p < 0.001), subarachnoid space (1.36/2.06; p < 0.001) and vertebrae/discs (1.66/2.86; p < 0.001). Comparison of axial images showed better values in T2-BLADE for spinal cord (1.68/1.86; p = 0.149) and vertebrae/discs (1.0/1.96: p < 0.001) while subarachnoid space was better to be evaluated in conventional T2-TSE (1.94/1.12; p < 0.001). In sagittal orientation, motion- and CSF-flow artefacts were reduced in T2-BLADE. In axial orientation, however, CSF-flow artefacts were pronounced in T2-BLADE. The image quality of the sagittal T2-BLADE sequences was significantly better than the T2-TSE and acquired in less time. In axial orientation, increased CSF-flow artefacts may reduce accuracy of structures in the subarachnoid space. (orig.)

  16. CSF oligoclonal banding - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100145.htm CSF oligoclonal banding - series—Normal anatomy To use the ... 5 out of 5 Overview The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) serves to supply nutrients to the central nervous ...

  17. CSF coccidioides complement fixation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003526.htm CSF coccidioides complement fixation test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. CSF coccidioides complement fixation is a test that checks ...

  18. MR imaging of pulsatile CSF movement in hydrocephalus communicans before and after CSF shunt implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldmann, A.; Kunz, U.; Rotermund, F.; Friedrich, J.M.; Schnarkowski, P.

    1992-01-01

    16 patients with hydrocephalus communicans and 5 healthy volunteers were examined to demonstrate the pattern of the pulsatile CSF flow. After implantation of a CSF shunt system the same patients were examined again to show the influence of the shunt on the CSF pulsations. We used a flow-sensitised, cardiac-gated 2D FLASH sequence and analysed the phase and magnitude images. It could be shown that most patients (n=12) had a hyerdynamic pulsatile flow preoperatively. After shunt implantation the pulsatile CSF motion and the clinical symptoms were improved in 8 of these patients. MRI of pulsatile CSF flow movement seems to be a helpful noninvasive tool to estimate the prognosis of a shunt implantation in patients with hydrocephalus communicans. (orig.) [de

  19. Cine-MR imaging in determining the flow characteristics of CSF and blood in spinal and intracranial lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Post, M.J.D.; Quencer, R.M.; Green, B.A.; Hinks, R.S.; Sklar, E.M.L.; Patchen, S.J.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this prospective study was to determine the value of cine magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in assessing the flow patterns of patients with vascular cord neoplasms, spinal cord and subarachnoid cysts, obstructive hydrocephalus, and intracranial aneurysms. The authors' results in 26 patients showed that cine MR imaging can be used to (1) identify spinal neoplasms with prominent vascular supply; (2) help distinguish spinal cord cysts occurring above a spinal cord tumor from tumoral cysts; (3) determine which spinal cord or subarachnois cysts need shunting and, postoperatively, which cysts are adequately decompressed; (4) establish which tonsillar herniations in Chiari malformations may require resection; (5) determine the site of the block in obstructive hydrocephalus; and (6) determine the flow characteristics of an aneurysm

  20. Dynamics in artifact ecologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Susanne; Klokmose, Clemens Nylandsted

    2012-01-01

    We increasingly interact with multiple interactive artifacts with overlapping capabilities during our daily activities. It has previously been shown that the use of an interactive artifact cannot be understood in isolation, but artifacts must be understood as part of an artifact ecology, where...... artifacts influence the use of others. Understanding this interplay becomes more and more essential for interaction design as our artifact ecologies grow. This paper continues a recent discourse on artifact ecologies. Through interviews with iPhone users, we demonstrate that relationships between artifacts...... in artifact ecologies cannot be understood as static, instead they evolve dynamically over time. We provide activity theory-based concepts to explain these dynamics....

  1. Magnetic studies of archaeological obsidian: Variability of eruptive conditions within obsidian flows is key to high-resolution artifact sourcing (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinberg, J. M.; Frahm, E.; Muth, M.

    2013-12-01

    Previous studies have endeavored to use petrophysical traits of obsidian, particularly its magnetic properties, as an alternative to conventional geochemical sourcing, one of the greatest successes in archaeological science. Magnetic approaches, however, have not seen widespread application due to their mixed success. In a time when geochemical analyses can be conducted non-destructively, in the field, and in a minute or two, magnetic measurements of obsidian must offer novel archaeological insights to be worthwhile, not merely act as a less successful version of geochemistry. To this end, we report the findings of a large-scale study of obsidian magnetism, which includes 912 geological obsidian specimens and 97 artifacts measured for six simple magnetic parameters. Based on these results, we propose, rather than using magnetic properties to source artifacts to a particular obsidian flow (inter-flow sourcing), these properties are best used to differentiate quarrying sites within an individual flow (intra-flow sourcing). The magnetic properties within an individual flow are highly variable, due to the fact that a single flow experiences a wide array of cooling rates, absolute temperatures, viscosities, deformation, and oxidation. These conditions affect the concentrations, compositions, size distributions, shapes, and spatial arrangements of magnetic grains within an obsidian specimen and, thus, its intrinsic magnetic properties. This variability decreases dramatically at spatial scales of individual outcrops, and decreases even further at scales of hand samples. Thus, magnetic data appear to shift the scale of obsidian sourcing from flows to quarries and, in turn, enable new insights into raw-material procurement strategies, group mobility, lithic technology, and the organization of space and production. From a geologic perspective, the magnetic variability of obsidian can be broadly interpreted within the context of the igneous processes that were active during

  2. CSF-VDRL test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... test - CSF; Neurosyphilis - VDRL Images CSF test for syphilis References Chernecky CC, Berger BJ. Venereal disease research laboratory test (VDRL), test, cerebrospinal fluid – specimen. In: Chernecky CC, Berger BJ, eds. Laboratory Tests and Diagnostic Procedures . 6th ed. St Louis, MO: Elsevier Saunders; ...

  3. CSF total protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    CSF total protein is a test to determine the amount of protein in your spinal fluid, also called cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). ... The normal protein range varies from lab to lab, but is typically about 15 to 60 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) ...

  4. Traumatic orbital CSF leak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borumandi, Farzad

    2013-01-01

    Compared to the cerebrospinalfluid (CSF) leak through the nose and ear, the orbital CSF leak is a rare and underreported condition following head trauma. We present the case of a 49-year-old woman with oedematous eyelid swelling and ecchymosis after a seemingly trivial fall onto the right orbit. Apart from the above, she was clinically unremarkable. The CT scan revealed a minimally displaced fracture of the orbital roof with no emphysema or intracranial bleeding. The fractured orbital roof in combination with the oedematous eyelid swelling raised the suspicion for orbital CSF leak. The MRI of the neurocranium demonstrated a small-sized CSF fistula extending from the anterior cranial fossa to the right orbit. The patient was treated conservatively and the lid swelling resolved completely after 5 days. Although rare, orbital CSF leak needs to be included in the differential diagnosis of periorbital swelling following orbital trauma. PMID:24323381

  5. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) transient responses induced by hypercapnia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, M.J.

    1984-01-01

    CSF transient responses to CO 2 inhalation were measured before and after facilitated perfusate flow through subarachnoid spaces of anesthetized cats during ventriculocisternal perfusion with artificial CSF containing 14 C-dextran. Convective mixing of perfusate in subarachnoid spaces was augmented while infusion constant, either by impeding cisternal efflux of perfusate by raising the cisternal outflow cannula (high CSF pressure), or by preventing CSF outflow by clamping the cisternal outflow cannula (stopflow; S-F). CSF transients were also measured before and after systemic administration of phenoxybenzamine (PBZ) in order to evaluate the contribution of sympatho-adrenergic activity to craniospinal CSF redistribution and mixing. Results from high CSF pressure and S-F experiments indicate that unequilibrated CSF contributes significantly to the reduced tracer concentration in CSF volume (Vd) since SCF effluent tracer concentration (Cd) was decreased after subarachnoid facilitated flow. Further, results from S-F studies indicate that at least 50% of Cd is due to craniospinal fluid redistribution, a process which, along with CSF outflow transients, was unaffected by PBZ. Conversely, PBZ administration decreased steady state SCF formation and absorption through alpha-mediated cerebrovascular responses and/or through beta-adrenoceptor inhibition of metabolism of CSF secretory epithelium

  6. CSF LACTATE IN MENINGITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjampakuthikal Aboobekar Haris

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Meningitis is an infection within the subarachnoid space characterised by a CNS inflammatory reaction. It is a serious condition requiring immediate diagnosis and appropriate treatment to be started at the earliest to prevent mortality as well as irreversible neurological deficits. CSF lactate has been found useful in differentiating bacterial meningitis from viral meningitis in many studies in the western population, but studies in Indian population are limited. The aim of the study is to study whether CSF lactate can be used to distinguish bacterial from viral meningitis and to study the levels of CSF lactate in tuberculosis meningitis. MATERIALS AND METHODS This was a descriptive study conducted in a tertiary care hospital. In this study, 78 cases of meningitis were selected. Cases are patients with bacterial, viral or tuberculosis meningitis admitted to the hospital under the Department of Medicine and Neurology. Cases are grouped into bacterial, viral and tuberculosis meningitis based on clinical picture, CSF analysis and imaging characteristics. CSF lactate estimation was done by dry chemistry method. Using appropriate statistical methods and SPSS software, CSF lactate levels were compared among these groups and analysed for any association with the final outcome. RESULTS The levels of CSF lactate in bacterial meningitis were higher than viral meningitis with a statistical significance of p 35 mg/dL for bacterial meningitis in this study was 95% and 100% respectively and the positive predictive value was 100% and the negative predictive value was 96%. The mean CSF lactate values in bacterial, viral and tuberculosis meningitis were 124.40 ± 35.85 mg/dL, 24.34 ± 6.05 mg/dL and 50.13 ± 9.89 mg/dL, respectively. CONCLUSION CSF lactate level was significantly elevated in bacterial meningitis than tuberculosis or viral meningitis and can be used as a marker for differentiating bacterial from viral meningitis.

  7. Artifacts in digital radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Jung Whan [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Shin Gu University, Sungnam (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jung Min [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Hoi Woun [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Beakseok Culture University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    Digital Radiography is a big part of diagnostic radiology. Because uncorrected digital radiography image supported false effect of Patient’s health care. We must be manage the correct digital radiography image. Thus, the artifact images can have effect to make a wrong diagnosis. We report types of occurrence by analyzing the artifacts that occurs in digital radiography system. We had collected the artifacts occurred in digital radiography system of general hospital from 2007 to 2014. The collected data had analyzed and then had categorize as the occurred causes. The artifacts could be categorized by hardware artifacts, software artifacts, operating errors, system artifacts, and others. Hardware artifact from a Ghost artifact that is caused by lag effect occurred most frequently. The others cases are the artifacts caused by RF noise and foreign body in equipments. Software artifacts are many different types of reasons. The uncorrected processing artifacts and the image processing error artifacts occurred most frequently. Exposure data recognize (EDR) error artifacts, the processing error of commissural line, and etc., the software artifacts were caused by various reasons. Operating artifacts were caused when the user did not have the full understanding of the digital medical image system. System artifacts had appeared the error due to DICOM header information and the compression algorithm. The obvious artifacts should be re-examined, and it could result in increasing the exposure dose of the patient. The unclear artifact leads to a wrong diagnosis and added examination. The ability to correctly determine artifact are required. We have to reduce the artifact occurrences by understanding its characteristic and providing sustainable education as well as the maintenance of the equipments.

  8. Artifacts in digital radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, Jung Whan; Kim, Jung Min; Jeong, Hoi Woun

    2015-01-01

    Digital Radiography is a big part of diagnostic radiology. Because uncorrected digital radiography image supported false effect of Patient’s health care. We must be manage the correct digital radiography image. Thus, the artifact images can have effect to make a wrong diagnosis. We report types of occurrence by analyzing the artifacts that occurs in digital radiography system. We had collected the artifacts occurred in digital radiography system of general hospital from 2007 to 2014. The collected data had analyzed and then had categorize as the occurred causes. The artifacts could be categorized by hardware artifacts, software artifacts, operating errors, system artifacts, and others. Hardware artifact from a Ghost artifact that is caused by lag effect occurred most frequently. The others cases are the artifacts caused by RF noise and foreign body in equipments. Software artifacts are many different types of reasons. The uncorrected processing artifacts and the image processing error artifacts occurred most frequently. Exposure data recognize (EDR) error artifacts, the processing error of commissural line, and etc., the software artifacts were caused by various reasons. Operating artifacts were caused when the user did not have the full understanding of the digital medical image system. System artifacts had appeared the error due to DICOM header information and the compression algorithm. The obvious artifacts should be re-examined, and it could result in increasing the exposure dose of the patient. The unclear artifact leads to a wrong diagnosis and added examination. The ability to correctly determine artifact are required. We have to reduce the artifact occurrences by understanding its characteristic and providing sustainable education as well as the maintenance of the equipments

  9. Mesoscale hybrid calibration artifact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Hy D.; Claudet, Andre A.; Oliver, Andrew D.

    2010-09-07

    A mesoscale calibration artifact, also called a hybrid artifact, suitable for hybrid dimensional measurement and the method for make the artifact. The hybrid artifact has structural characteristics that make it suitable for dimensional measurement in both vision-based systems and touch-probe-based systems. The hybrid artifact employs the intersection of bulk-micromachined planes to fabricate edges that are sharp to the nanometer level and intersecting planes with crystal-lattice-defined angles.

  10. Artifacts in magnetic resonance imaging of the head

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwama, Toru; Andoh, Takashi; Sakai, Noboru; Yamada, Hiromu [Gifu Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine; Funakoshi, Takashi; Akiyama, Shigeru; Yoshida, Kakuro

    1989-08-01

    The results of 505 magnetic resonance (MR) imaging examinations of the head disclosed several different types of artifact. Various artifacts observed with two-dimentional Fourier transformation are described and illustrated. All images were obtained with a 0.5 Tesla superconducting MR imager. About 70% of all images contained artifacts. Phase encoding artifacts due to motion or flow were most frequently observed. Center, 'zipper,' truncation, radiofrequency, and ferromagnetic artifacts and contrast error on inversion recovery (IR) images were noted less frequently. Phase encoding artifacts and contrast errors on IR images totally degraded the images, and 'zipper' artifacts were regional. Center artifacts resembled small infarctions, and ferromagnetic artifacts sometimes mimicked hematmas. It is important to recognize these artifacts and to devise methods to avoid their influence on the region of interest. (author).

  11. CSF dynamics in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oi, Shizuo; Shose, Yoshiteru; Yamada, Hiroshi; Ijichi, Akihiro; Matsumoto, Satoshi.

    1986-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) dynamics in infants and children is still obscure. This paper aims to analyze the characteristics of CSF dynamics in the younger age group and to clarify the changes both in the acute/chronic hydrocephalic status and in the post-shunt condition on the basis of our experience with 118 cases of metrizamide CT cisternography. In order to pursue the CSF passive movements, the exact regional CT numbers were obtained by means of the ROI method in each case at 3, 6, and 24 hours after metrizamide injection. The results revealed that, in the normal CSF dynamics in both the major and minor pathways in children, it took more than 24 hours until the regional metrizamide was completely cleared up. In the acute hydrocephalic state, the ventricular reflux and stasis of the contrast was remarkable, and stagnation in the Sylvian fissure continued more than 24 hours. In the minor pathway, the contrast moved into the brain parenchyma, with there obviously being more in the subependymal layer and the adjacent white matter, and lasted more than 24 hours. On the other hand, these phenomena were very much less prominent in the chronic phase of hydrocephalus. This fact may suggest the hypothesis that a reconstituted active major or minor fluid pathway does not play an important role in the compensation of the acute high-pressure progressive hydrocephalic state. The CSF dynamics in a shunted hydrocephalus are obviously improved when in stasis or when stagnated inside or outside of the ventricular system. The timing of the metrizamide clear-up was within 24 hours after achieving a high accumulation of the contrast in the lateral ventricle where the shunt is placed. The contrast movement in the brain parenchyma as the minor pathway was significantly less in a shunted hydrocephalus, and there was almost none in cases of slit-like ventricles. (author)

  12. Production of Superoxide in Bacteria Is Stress- and Cell State-Dependent: A Gating-Optimized Flow Cytometry Method that Minimizes ROS Measurement Artifacts with Fluorescent Dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBee, Megan E; Chionh, Yok H; Sharaf, Mariam L; Ho, Peiying; Cai, Maggie W L; Dedon, Peter C

    2017-01-01

    The role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in microbial metabolism and stress response has emerged as a major theme in microbiology and infectious disease. Reactive fluorescent dyes have the potential to advance the study of ROS in the complex intracellular environment, especially for high-content and high-throughput analyses. However, current dye-based approaches to measuring intracellular ROS have the potential for significant artifacts. Here, we describe a robust platform for flow cytometric quantification of ROS in bacteria using fluorescent dyes, with ROS measurements in 10s-of-1000s of individual cells under a variety of conditions. False positives and variability among sample types (e.g., bacterial species, stress conditions) are reduced with a flexible four-step gating scheme that accounts for side- and forward-scattered light (morphological changes), background fluorescence, DNA content, and dye uptake to identify cells producing ROS. Using CellROX Green dye with Escherichia coli, Mycobacterium smegmatis , and Mycobacterium bovis BCG as diverse model bacteria, we show that (1) the generation of a quantifiable CellROX Green signal for superoxide, but not hydrogen peroxide-induced hydroxyl radicals, validates this dye as a superoxide detector; (2) the level of dye-detectable superoxide does not correlate with cytotoxicity or antibiotic sensitivity; (3) the non-replicating, antibiotic tolerant state of nutrient-deprived mycobacteria is associated with high levels of superoxide; and (4) antibiotic-induced production of superoxide is idiosyncratic with regard to both the species and the physiological state of the bacteria. We also show that the gating method is applicable to other fluorescent indicator dyes, such as the 5-carboxyfluorescein diacetate acetoxymethyl ester and 5-cyano-2,3-ditolyl tetrazolium chloride for cellular esterase and reductive respiratory activities, respectively. These results demonstrate that properly controlled flow cytometry coupled

  13. Small Artifacts - Big Technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreiner, Kristian

    2005-01-01

    The computer IC is the heart of the information and telecommunication technology. It is a tiny artifact, but with incredible organizing powers. We use this physical artifact as the location for studying central problems of the knowledge economy. First, the paper describes the history of chip design...

  14. Brain-in-Brain Artifact (BIBA) in a Patient with Hydranencepaly: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Sang Young; Kim, You Me; Lee, Seung Ha; Lee, Young Seok [College of Medicine Dankook University Hospital, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-03-15

    Hydranencephaly is a condition that is characterized by an absent brain mantle along with the subadjacent white matter, with replacement of the cerebral hemispheres by a thin-walled membranous sac containing CSF. During brain sonograpy in a neonate with hydranencephaly, we have found a brain-in-brain appearance as an unusual sonographic artifact. We report here on this interesting sonographic artifact in a neonate with hydranencephaly, and this artifact was due to multipath reflection artifact of the ultrasound beam/wave, and we explain the underlying physics

  15. Turquoise Artifact from Teotihuacan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spence, Michael W.; Harbottle, Garman; Weigand, Phil C.

    1999-07-01

    Turquoise artifacts appeared sporadically in Mesoamerica as early as the Formative period (Merry de Morales 1987:100, Figure 8.4; Weigand 1989:43). Most occurrences, however, postdate the collapse of Teotihuacan. In the Late Classic and Postclassic periods increasing quantities are found, often in the form of elaborate mosaics, in a wide variety of contexts in central, west and northwest Mexico. Neutron activation analysis has determined that much of this turquoise derives from sources in the southwestern United States (Weigand et al. 1977; Harbottle and Weigand 1992; Weigand and Harbottle 1993). Teotihuacan played a major role in Mesoamerica during the Terminal Formative and Early-Middle Classic periods. It was the dominant power in central Mexico from about the time of Christ to its collapse at about A.D. 650 (Millon 1988, 1992; Cowgill 1996). Throughout this period goods flowed into Teotihuacan from many parts of the Mesoamerican world. Despite this widespread economic interaction, only two pieces of turquoise have been recovered in the city. In the following pages, the context and implications of one of these finds will be examined.

  16. Molecular CsF 5 and CsF 2 +

    KAUST Repository

    Rogachev, Andrey Yu.; Miao, Mao-sheng; Merino, Gabriel; Hoffmann, Roald

    2015-01-01

    D5h star-like CsF5, formally isoelectronic with known XeF5− ion, is computed to be a local minimum on the potential energy surface of CsF5, surrounded by reasonably large activation energies for its exothermic decomposition to CsF+2 F2, or to CsF3 (three isomeric forms)+F2, or for rearrangement to a significantly more stable isomer, a classical Cs+ complex of F5−. Similarly the CsF2+ ion is computed to be metastable in two isomeric forms. In the more symmetrical structures of these molecules there is definite involvement in bonding of the formally core 5p levels of Cs.

  17. Molecular CsF 5 and CsF 2 +

    KAUST Repository

    Rogachev, Andrey Yu.

    2015-06-03

    D5h star-like CsF5, formally isoelectronic with known XeF5− ion, is computed to be a local minimum on the potential energy surface of CsF5, surrounded by reasonably large activation energies for its exothermic decomposition to CsF+2 F2, or to CsF3 (three isomeric forms)+F2, or for rearrangement to a significantly more stable isomer, a classical Cs+ complex of F5−. Similarly the CsF2+ ion is computed to be metastable in two isomeric forms. In the more symmetrical structures of these molecules there is definite involvement in bonding of the formally core 5p levels of Cs.

  18. Rostrocaudal Dynamics of CSF Biomarkers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tarnaris, A.; Toma, A.K.; Chapman, M.D.; Petzold, A.F.S.; Keir, G.; Kitchen, N.D.; Watkins, L.D.

    2011-01-01

    The rostrocaudal gradient (RCG) of markers present in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) has not been studied adequately due to lack of appropriate control populations and ethical restrictions. The aim of this study is to understand the rostrocaudal gradient of CSF biomarkers. We contacted a study comparing

  19. Comparison of cardiac gating and refocusing pulses for correction of cerebrospinal fluid pulsation artifacts in MR images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modic, M.T.; Haacke, E.M.; Lenz, G.W.; Masaryk, T.; Kaufman, B.; Ross, J.S.

    1986-01-01

    This study compared cardiac gating and additional refocusing gradient pulses in combination or alone for correction of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pulsation artifacts in both normal volunteers and in patients with suspected spinal pathology. Refocusing pulses or cardiac gating when used alone produced a decrease in ghosting artifacts on sagittal images and reduced the nonuniformity of the CSF signal on axial images. There is improved thin-section T2 imaging of the cord with long TEs and as few as one excitation. The refocusing pulses reduced ghosting artifacts also from respiratory motion and enhanced the CSF signal with shorter TRs leading to increased CSF contrast. When used together, the results were significantly better than either alone. Refocusing schemes can be used with any TR, do not require gating, and are now routinely employed at the authors' institution

  20. On the pulsatile nature of intracranial and spinal CSF-circulation demonstrated by MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greitz, D.; Franck, A.; Nordell, B.

    1993-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow was studied in 24 healthy volunteers using gated MR phase imaging. The subarachnoid space (SAS) was divided into 5 compartments depending on the magnitude of the pulsatile CSF flows: a high velocity compartment in the area of the brain stem and spinal cord, 2 slow ones at the upper and lower extremes of the SAS, and finally 2 intermediate velocity compartments in between. The main pulsatile spinal flow channel had a meandering pattern. The extraventricular CSF-circulation can be explained by pulsatile CSF flow without the necessity of assuming existence of a net flow. A successive time offset during the cardiac cycle has been found in the fronto-occipital direction of the interplay between the arterial expansion, brain expansion, volume changes of the CSF spaces and of the veins. It is proposed to name this time offset the intracranial ''volume wave'' (VoW). (orig.)

  1. Quantitative and clinical evaluation of whole CSF-axis RI image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomono, Yuji; Nose, Tadao; Maki, Yutaka

    1987-01-01

    Whole CSF-axis RI scintigraphy was evaluated in 122 adult patients intending to know not only intracranial CSF flow but also the dynamics of whole CSF axis, particularly of spinal CSF flow. The change of radioactivity in several compartments was studied quantitatively with a dataprocessor on 18 cases with dilated ventricles, and more practically, clinical features and the findings of the films were comparatively studied on all the cases. The results were as follows: (1) Roughly speaking, the findings were classified into two types, i.e. a type with early RI movement to the intracranial CSF space and another with stagnation of radioactivity in spinal space till late stage, even 48 hours after RI injection (spinal stasis). (2) Although majority of the cases with spinal stasis did not show ventricular stasis, a shunt operation was not effective even when ventricular stasis was observed. (3) Spinal stasis tended to increase with aging, and was observed more frequently in cases with possible severe cerebral damage, as severe cerebrovascular disease and severe deterioration of mental activity. (4) The clearance of radioactivity of whole CSF-axis was remarkably delayed. It is considered that the spinal CSF flow is generated by intracranial CSF pulsation and, so, that spinal stasis shows the condition of lowered CSF flow by pulsation due to cerebral parenchymal damages. (author)

  2. MR evaluation of CSF fistulae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, V.; Goyal, M.; Mishra, N.; Gaikwad, S.; Sharma, A.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the role of MR imaging in the localisation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) fistulae. Material and Methods: A total of 36 consecutive unselected patients with either clincally proven CSF leakage (n=26) or suspected CSF fistula (n=10) were prospectively evaluated by MR. All MR examinations included fast spin-echo T2-weighted images in the 3 orthogonal planes. Thin-section CT was performed following equivocal or negative MR examination. MR and CT findings were correlated with surgical results in 33 patients. Results: CSF fistula was visualised as a dural-bone defect with hyperintense fluid signal continuous with that in the basal cisterns on T2-weighted images. MR was positive in 26 cases, in 24 of which the fistula was confirmed surgically. In 2 patients the CSF leakage was directly demonstrated on MR. MR sensitivity of 80% compared favourably with the reported 46-81% of CT cisternography (CTC). No significant difference in MR sensitivity in detecting CSF fistula was found between active and inactive leaks. (orig.)

  3. Flow theory and MR techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Listerud, J.; Altas, S.W.; Axel, L.

    1991-01-01

    One of the unique characteristics of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is its depiction of flow, even without the administration of intravascular contrast agents. Flow-related phenomena were recognized early in the development of nuclear magnetic resonance, well before imaging techniques were even devised. The appearance of flowing fluid (e.g., blood or CSF) is important to understand for several reasons. First, its signal intensity is quite variable, even in normal physiologic states, so the possibility of misinterpreting normal findings as representing pathologic conditions, such as vascular thrombosis, is reduced if one has a solid conceptualization of the physical basis of flow effects. Second, signal emanating from flowing spins often generates significant artifacts that can obscure anatomy and degrade images, thereby reducing the radiologist's ability to interpret images and identify lesions. The understanding of flow artifacts allows one to recognize them and implement maneuvers to eliminate or compensate for such effects. Third, it has become apparent that the signal information from flow can be exploited to provide previously unavailable physiologic information

  4. The Information Systems Artifact

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chatterjee, Surtirtha; Xiao, Xiao; Elbanna, Amany

    2017-01-01

    Passionate debates regarding the defining characteristic of the “IT artifact” continue. Such debates, and also the lack of explicit consideration of the “information” element in the IT artifact, motivate us to propose a revised conception, drawing upon concepts from General Systems Theory (GST). ...

  5. PET measurements of cerebral metabolism corrected for CSF contributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chawluk, J.; Alavi, A.; Dann, R.; Kushner, M.J.; Hurtig, H.; Zimmerman, R.A.; Reivich, M.

    1984-01-01

    Thirty-three subjects have been studied with PET and anatomic imaging (proton-NMR and/or CT) in order to determine the effect of cerebral atrophy on calculations of metabolic rates. Subgroups of neurologic disease investigated include stroke, brain tumor, epilepsy, psychosis, and dementia. Anatomic images were digitized through a Vidicon camera and analyzed volumetrically. Relative areas for ventricles, sulci, and brain tissue were calculated. Preliminary analysis suggests that ventricular volumes as determined by NMR and CT are similar, while sulcal volumes are larger on NMR scans. Metabolic rates (18F-FDG) were calculated before and after correction for CSF spaces, with initial focus upon dementia and normal aging. Correction for atrophy led to a greater increase (%) in global metabolic rates in demented individuals (18.2 +- 5.3) compared to elderly controls (8.3 +- 3.0,p < .05). A trend towards significantly lower glucose metabolism in demented subjects before CSF correction was not seen following correction for atrophy. These data suggest that volumetric analysis of NMR images may more accurately reflect the degree of cerebral atrophy, since NMR does not suffer from beam hardening artifact due to bone-parenchyma juxtapositions. Furthermore, appropriate correction for CSF spaces should be employed if current resolution PET scanners are to accurately measure residual brain tissue metabolism in various pathological states

  6. An Additive Manufacturing Test Artifact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moylan, Shawn; Slotwinski, John; Cooke, April; Jurrens, Kevin; Donmez, M Alkan

    2014-01-01

    A test artifact, intended for standardization, is proposed for the purpose of evaluating the performance of additive manufacturing (AM) systems. A thorough analysis of previously proposed AM test artifacts as well as experience with machining test artifacts have inspired the design of the proposed test artifact. This new artifact is designed to provide a characterization of the capabilities and limitations of an AM system, as well as to allow system improvement by linking specific errors measured in the test artifact to specific sources in the AM system. The proposed test artifact has been built in multiple materials using multiple AM technologies. The results of several of the builds are discussed, demonstrating how the measurement results can be used to characterize and improve a specific AM system. PMID:26601039

  7. The Human-Artifact Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Susanne; Klokmose, Clemens Nylandsted

    2011-01-01

    Although devices of all shapes and sizes currently dominate the technological landscape, human–computer interaction (HCI) as a field is not yet theoretically equipped to match this reality. In this article we develop the human–artifact model, which has its roots in activity theoretical HCI....... By reinterpreting the activity theoretical foundation, we present a framework that helps addressing the analysis of individual interactive artifacts while embracing that they are part of a larger ecology of artifacts. We show how the human–artifact model helps structuring the understanding of an artifact's action......-possibilities in relation to the artifact ecology surrounding it. Essential to the model is that it provides four interconnected levels of analysis and addresses the possibilities and problems at these four levels. Artifacts and their use are constantly developing, and we address development in, and of, use. The framework...

  8. Acute hydrocephalus in nonaneurysmal perimesencephalic hemorrhage: evidence of CSF block at the tentorial hiatus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rinkel, G. J.; Wijdicks, E. F.; Vermeulen, M.; Tans, J. T.; Hasan, D.; van Gijn, J.

    1992-01-01

    The acute hydrocephalus in patients with nonaneurysmal perimesencephalic hemorrhage suggests an extraventricular obstruction of CSF flow. We studied the occurrence of acute hydrocephalus and the site of cisternal blood in 40 consecutive patients with perimesencephalic hemorrhage. In all 11 patients

  9. On Lifecycle Constraints of Artifact-Centric Workflows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucukoguz, Esra; Su, Jianwen

    Data plays a fundamental role in modeling and management of business processes and workflows. Among the recent "data-aware" workflow models, artifact-centric models are particularly interesting. (Business) artifacts are the key data entities that are used in workflows and can reflect both the business logic and the execution states of a running workflow. The notion of artifacts succinctly captures the fluidity aspect of data during workflow executions. However, much of the technical dimension concerning artifacts in workflows is not well understood. In this paper, we study a key concept of an artifact "lifecycle". In particular, we allow declarative specifications/constraints of artifact lifecycle in the spirit of DecSerFlow, and formulate the notion of lifecycle as the set of all possible paths an artifact can navigate through. We investigate two technical problems: (Compliance) does a given workflow (schema) contain only lifecycle allowed by a constraint? And (automated construction) from a given lifecycle specification (constraint), is it possible to construct a "compliant" workflow? The study is based on a new formal variant of artifact-centric workflow model called "ArtiNets" and two classes of lifecycle constraints named "regular" and "counting" constraints. We present a range of technical results concerning compliance and automated construction, including: (1) compliance is decidable when workflow is atomic or constraints are regular, (2) for each constraint, we can always construct a workflow that satisfies the constraint, and (3) sufficient conditions where atomic workflows can be constructed.

  10. IIH with normal CSF pressures?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soh Youn Suh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH is a condition of raised intracranial pressure (ICP in the absence of space occupying lesions. ICP is usually measured by lumbar puncture and a cerebrospinal fluid (CSF pressure above 250 mm H 2 O is one of the diagnostic criteria of IIH. Recently, we have encountered two patients who complained of headaches and exhibited disc swelling without an increased ICP. We prescribed acetazolamide and followed both patients frequently; because of the definite disc swelling with IIH related symptoms. Symptoms and signs resolved in both patients after they started taking acetazolamide. It is generally known that an elevated ICP, as measured by lumbar puncture, is the most important diagnostic sign of IIH. However, these cases caution even when CSF pressure is within the normal range, that suspicion should be raised when a patient has papilledema with related symptoms, since untreated papilledema may cause progressive and irreversible visual loss.

  11. Autocrine CSF-1 and CSF-1 Receptor Co-expression Promotes Renal Cell Carcinoma Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menke, Julia; Kriegsmann, Jörg; Schimanski, Carl Christoph; Schwartz, Melvin M.; Schwarting, Andreas; Kelley, Vicki R.

    2011-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma is increasing in incidence but the molecular mechanisms regulating its growth remain elusive. Co-expression of the monocytic growth factor CSF-1 and its receptor CSF-1R on renal tubular epithelial cells (TEC) will promote proliferation and anti-apoptosis during regeneration of renal tubules. Here we show that a CSF-1-dependent autocrine pathway is also responsible for the growth of renal cell carcinoma (RCC). CSF-1 and CSF-1R were co-expressed in RCC and TEC proximally adjacent to RCC. CSF-1 engagement of CSF-1R promoted RCC survival and proliferation and reduced apoptosis, in support of the likelihood that CSF-1R effector signals mediate RCC growth. In vivo CSF-1R blockade using a CSF-1R tyrosine kinase inhibitor decreased RCC proliferation and macrophage infiltration in a manner associated with a dramatic reduction in tumor mass. Further mechanistic investigations linked CSF-1 and EGF signaling in RCC. Taken together, our results suggest that budding RCC stimulates the proximal adjacent microenvironment in the kidney to release mediators of CSF-1, CSF-1R and EGF expression in RCC. Further, our findings imply that targeting CSF-1/CSF-1R signaling may be therapeutically effective in RCC. PMID:22052465

  12. From Ecological Sounding Artifacts Towards Sonic Artifact Ecologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erkut, Cumhur; Serafin, Stefania

    2016-01-01

    The discipline of sonic interaction design has been focused on the interaction between a single user and an artifact. This strongly limits one of the fundamental aspects of music as a social and interactive experience. In this paper we propose sonic artifact ecologies as a mean to examine interac...

  13. Inter-relationship between CSF dynamics and CSF to-and-fro movement in the cervical region as assessed by MR velocity imaging with phase encoding in hydrocephalic and normal patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudo, Sumio; Wachi, Akihiko; Sato, Kiyoshi; Sumie, Hirotoshi.

    1992-01-01

    The to-and-fro velocity of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) at C-1 and C-2 spinal-cord levels was measured by means of MR velocity-imaging technique, and the correlation of changes in velocity and various biophysical factors influencing the intracranial pressure environment were analyzed. Eight hydrocephalic patients, male and female, of different ages (both infants and adults), and 11 normal volunteers with a similar age range were investigated. The to-and-fro CSF movement was measured by means of phase-shift techniques with a bipolar gradient pulse. The cerebrospinal opening pressure was also recorded in 6 of the 8 hydrocephalic patients, either through a ventricular catheter reservoir or a spinal catheter inserted in the lumbosacral subarachnoid space; the CSF pulse amplitude, the pressure volume index (PVI), and the CSF outflow resistance (Ro) were also evaluated during the procedure. CSF flowed towards caudally in the early systolic phase of a cardiac stroke, but the flow direction was reversed in the early diastolic phase when the maximum flow rate was reached. Although such a flow pattern was commonly observed in all normal and hydrocephalic subjects, whatever the age, there was a marked difference in flow rate between the infants and the pediatric-adults groups, -i.e., it was 5-10 mm/sec for the former and 10-20 mm/sec for the latter. An abnormally high flow rate (33.0 mm/sec) was observed in the hydrocephalic patients when there was a malfunction of the ventriculoperitoneal shunt. A close correlation was found to exist among the changes in the CSF flow velocity, the CSF pressure amplitude, and the CSF outflow resistance (Ro), but not in the PVI. The measurement of the CSF flow velocity by MR velocity imaging appears to have an important role not only in the investigation of CSF dynamics, but also in the diagnosis and treatment of such pathologies as hydrocephalus and ventriculoperitoneal shunt malfunction. (author)

  14. Investigating media artifacts with children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chimirri, Niklas Alexander

    The dissertation’s aim is to explore the everyday relevance media artifacts have for young children. It discusses and further develops analytical concepts that are committed to taking the children’s perspectives on possibilities and limitations of such artifacts seriously. These conceptual...... developments are rooted in the author’s participation in a daycare practice in Berlin, Germany. The daycare’s situational approach precisely attempted to draw on the children’s everyday life experiences so as to engage in problem-oriented learning projects, on media artifacts and beyond....

  15. Archaic artifacts resembling celestial spheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrakoudis, S.; Papaspyrou, P.; Petoussis, V.; Moussas, X.

    We present several bronze artifacts from the Archaic Age in Greece (750-480 BC) that resemble celestial spheres or forms of other astronomical significance. They are studied in the context of the Dark Age transition from Mycenaean Age astronomical themes to the philosophical and practical revival of astronomy in the Classical Age with its plethora of astronomical devices. These artifacts, mostly votive in nature are spherical in shape and appear in a variety of forms their most striking characteristic being the depiction of meridians and/or an equator. Most of those artifacts come from Thessaly, and more specifically from the temple of Itonia Athena at Philia, a religious center of pan-Hellenic significance. Celestial spheres, similar in form to the small artifacts presented in this study, could be used to measure latitudes, or estimate the time at a known place, and were thus very useful in navigation.

  16. Study of cysticercosis in the fourth ventricle by CSF cinema MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Lianqing; Liu Lianxiang; Wu Jie; Wu Jing; Zhang Renshu; Wu Yujin

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic value of cysticercosis in the fourth ventricle by CSF cinema MRI. Materials and methods: Nine patients with intraventricular cysticercosis in the fourth ventricle were studied. The diagnosis was confirmed by surgery in all cases. All of these patients were examined systematically before the operation and studied with CSF cinema MRI in mid sagittal section and finger-gated scan technique. Results: (1) The path of CSF flow was directly displayed. All cysticercosis presented as a filling defect, and a cyst with a smooth wall. (2) The ventricular compliance was normal in cysticercosis. (3) The cysticercosis in active stage was free in the fourth ventricle and could be rolled over, its shape might change slightly within a cardiac cycle. In the degenerative stage, its wall could adhere to the ependyma and obstruct the CSF flow. Conclusion: CSF cinema MRI can demonstrate the degree of obstruction and pattern of CSF flow in cysticercosis of the fourth ventricle, thereby providing useful information for proper management

  17. MR cisternography: a new method for the diagnosis of CSF fistulae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eberhardt, K.E.W.; Tomandl, B.F.; Huk, W.J.; Hollenbach, H.P.; Deimling, M.

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare a new MRI method for detecting the existence of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) fistulae, i. e. MR cisternography, with CT cisternography. In a prospective study, 30 patients with post-traumatic CSF fistulae were examined. The MR examinations were performed with a 1.0-T whole-body MR system, using two T2 * -weighted sequences, a 3D PSIF (time-inversed fast imaging with steady-state precession, FISP) and a 3D constructive interference steady-state (CISS) sequence. The results of MRI and CT cisternography were compared with the surgical findings. The sensitivity in detecting CSF fistulae with MR cisternography (PSIF: 89.9 %; CISS: 93.6 %) was higher than with CT cisternography (72.3 %). The sensitivity of CT cisternography at detecting CSF fistulae in patients with a size of dural lesion less than 2 mm or in patients with multiple dural lesions is significantly lower compared with the MR method. Although the localization of CSF fistulae always proved possible with MR cisternography, this could only be accomplished wih CT in 70 % of cases. The MR cisternography technique is a new examination method with a higher sensitivity for the detection of CSF fistulae than CT cisternography. The CISS technique is superior compared with PSIF and should be used in patients with high-flow CSF fistulas. (orig.)

  18. The calculation of CSF spaces in CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hacker, H.; Artmann, H.

    1978-01-01

    Objective digital determination of CSF spaces is discussed, with ventricular and subarachnoid spaces handled separately. This method avoids the difficulty of visual definition of ventricular borders in planimetric measurements. The principle is to count automatically all pixels corresponding to CSF in a given region with a Hounsfield unit and to multiply this number by the pixel size. This will give the total surface area of CSF spaces in square millimeters. The calculation of pixel values for CSF spaces and brain tissue is experimentally formulated taking the intersection of the Gaussian curves for ventricular content and brain tissue. In practice, the determination of CSF spaces is done by first calculating a histogram of the total brain in a given slice defining all CSF spaces. Next a histogram of a region including ventricles with adjoining tissue is calculated and the ventricular size is calculated. By subtraction of the ventricle value from the total CSF space value, the subarachnoid space size is obtained. The advantages of this mehtod will be discussed. (orig.) [de

  19. CSF-1 Receptor Signaling in Myeloid Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, E. Richard; Chitu, Violeta

    2014-01-01

    The CSF-1 receptor (CSF-1R) is activated by the homodimeric growth factors colony-stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1) and interleukin-34 (IL-34). It plays important roles in development and in innate immunity by regulating the development of most tissue macrophages and osteoclasts, of Langerhans cells of the skin, of Paneth cells of the small intestine, and of brain microglia. It also regulates the differentiation of neural progenitor cells and controls functions of oocytes and trophoblastic cells in the female reproductive tract. Owing to this broad tissue expression pattern, it plays a central role in neoplastic, inflammatory, and neurological diseases. In this review we summarize the evolution, structure, and regulation of expression of the CSF-1R gene. We review, the structures of CSF-1, IL-34, and the CSF-1R and the mechanism of ligand binding to and activation of the receptor. We further describe the pathways regulating macrophage survival, proliferation, differentiation, and chemotaxis downstream from the CSF-1R. PMID:24890514

  20. Decompressive craniectomy and CSF disorders in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfiotto, Marie; Mottolese, Carmine; Szathmari, Alexandru; Beuriat, Pierre-Aurelien; Klein, Olivier; Vinchon, Matthieu; Gimbert, Edouard; Roujeau, Thomas; Scavarda, Didier; Zerah, Michel; Di Rocco, Federico

    2017-10-01

    Decompressive craniectomy (DC) is a lifesaving procedure but is associated to several post-operative complications, namely cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) dynamics impairment. The aim of this multicentric study was to evaluate the incidence of such CSF alterations after DC and review their impact on the overall outcome. We performed a retrospective multicentric study to analyze the CSF disorders occurring in children aged from 0 to 17 years who had undergone a DC for traumatic brain injury (TBI) in the major Departments of Pediatric Neurosurgery of France between January 2006 and August 2016. Out of 150 children, ranging in age between 7 months and 17 years, mean 10.75 years, who underwent a DC for TBI in 10 French pediatric neurosurgical centers. Sixteen (6 males, 10 females) (10.67%) developed CSF disorders following the surgical procedure and required an extrathecal CSF shunting. External ventricular drainage increased the risk of further complications, especially cranioplasty infection (p = 0.008). CSF disorders affect a minority of children after DC for TBI. They may develop early after the DC but they may develop several months after the cranioplasty (8 months), consequently indicating the necessity of clinical and radiological close follow-up after discharge from the neurosurgical unit. External ventricular drainage and permanent CSF shunt placement increase significantly the risk of cranioplasty infection.

  1. Calculation of CSF spaces in CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hacker, H; Artmann, H [Frankfurt Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Abt. fuer Neuroradiologie

    1978-01-01

    Objective digital determination of CSF spaces is discussed, with ventricular and subarachnoid spaces handled separately. This method avoids the difficulty of visual definition of ventricular borders in planimetric measurements. The principle is to count automatically all pixels corresponding to CSF in a given region with a Hounsfield unit and to multiply this number by the pixel size. This will give the total surface area of CSF spaces in square millimeters. The calculation of pixel values for CSF spaces and brain tissue is experimentally formulated taking the intersection of the Gaussian curves for ventricular content and brain tissue. In practice, the determination of CSF spaces is done by first calculating a histogram of the total brain in a given slice defining all CSF spaces. Next a histogram of a region including ventricles with adjoining tissue is calculated and the ventricular size is calculated. By subtraction of the ventricle value from the total CSF space value, the subarachnoid space size is obtained. The advantages of this mehtod will be discussed.

  2. Changes in Gene Expression during G-CSF-Induced Emergency Granulopoiesis in Humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Corinna C.; Borup, Rehannah; Fischer-Nielsen, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Emergency granulopoiesis refers to the increased production of neutrophils in bone marrow and their release into circulation induced by severe infection. Several studies point to a critical role for G-CSF as the main mediator of emergency granulopoiesis. However, the consequences of G-CSF...... stimulation on the transcriptome of neutrophils and their precursors have not yet been investigated in humans. In this work, we examine the changes in mRNA expression induced by administration of G-CSF in vivo, as a model of emergency granulopoiesis in humans. Blood samples were collected from healthy...... individuals after 5 d of G-CSF administration. Neutrophil precursors were sorted into discrete stages of maturation by flow cytometry, and RNA was subjected to microarray analysis. mRNA levels were compared with previously published expression levels in corresponding populations of neutrophil precursors...

  3. CSF Markers in Guillain-Barre Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A positive 14-3-3 protein assay of CSF was observed in 29 of 38 patients with GBS and in 4 with motor neuron disease and other neuropathies studied at Universities of Milan and Verona, Italy.

  4. CSF and plasma testosterone in attempted suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefansson, Jon; Chatzittofis, Andreas; Nordström, Peter; Arver, Stefan; Åsberg, Marie; Jokinen, Jussi

    2016-12-01

    Very few studies have assessed testosterone levels in the cerebrospinal fluid in suicide attempters. Aggressiveness and impulsivity are common behavioural traits in suicide attempters. Dual-hormone serotonergic theory on human impulsive aggression implies high testosterone/cortisol ratio acting on the amygdala and low serotonin in the prefrontal cortex. Our aim was to examine the CSF and plasma testosterone levels in suicide attempters and in healthy volunteers. We also assessed the relationship between the testosterone/cortisol ratio, aggressiveness and impulsivity in suicide attempters. 28 medication-free suicide attempters and 19 healthy volunteers participated in the study. CSF and plasma testosterone sulfate and cortisol levels were assessed with specific radio-immunoassays. The Karolinska Scales of Personality was used to assess impulsivity and aggressiveness. All patients were followed up for cause of death. The mean follow-up period was 21 years. Male suicide attempters had higher CSF and plasma testosterone levels than age- matched male healthy volunteers. There were no significant differences in CSF testosterone levels in female suicide attempters and healthy female volunteers. Testosterone levels did not differ significantly in suicide victims compared to survivors. In male suicide attempters, the CSF testosterone/cortisol ratio showed a significant positive correlation with both impulsivity and aggressiveness. Higher CSF testosterone levels may be associated with attempted suicide in young men through association with both aggressiveness and impulsivity, a key endophenotype in young male suicide attempters. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Checking behavioral conformance of artifacts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fahland, D.; Leoni, de M.; Dongen, van B.F.; Aalst, van der W.M.P.

    2011-01-01

    The usefulness of process models (e.g., for analysis, improvement, or execution) strongly depends on their ability to describe reality. Conformance checking is a technique to validate how good a given process model describes recorded executions of the actual process. Recently, artifacts have been

  6. Toddlers View Artifact Function Normatively

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casler, Krista; Terziyan, Treysi; Greene, Kimberly

    2009-01-01

    When children use objects like adults, are they simply tracking regularities in others' object use, or are they demonstrating a normatively defined awareness that there are right and wrong ways to act? This study provides the first evidence for the latter possibility. Young 2- and 3-year-olds (n = 32) learned functions of 6 artifacts, both…

  7. Artifacts in MR angiography of the intracranial vessels using the 3D TOF and 3D PC techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Dong Woo; Lee, Seung Ro; Hahm, Chang Kok; Kim, Yong Soo; Park, Choong Ki

    1997-01-01

    To classify artifacts and to assess their frequency in magnetic resonance angiography of intracranial vessels using three- dimensional time-of-flight and phase-contrast techniques. One hundred and eleven patients with suspected cerebrovascular disease were imaged on a 1.5T superconducting magnetic resonance machine employing three- dimensional time-of-flight and phase-contrast magnetic resonance angiographic techniques. We retrospectively reviewed the artifacts in three- dimensional time-of-flight and phase-contrast magnetic resonance angiography of the intracranial circulatory system, comparing them with routine spin-echo magnetic resonance images and magnetic resonance angiography source images, and partially with conventional angiography. Artifacts in magnetic resonance angiography were classified as flow-related, and flow-unrealted, by patient, hardware, magnetic resonance angiography acquisition and postprocessing techniques. Type and frequency of flow-related artifacts included saturation artifact (100%), dephasing artifact (100%), phase-encoding ghost artifact (97%), turbulence artifact (14%) and flow displacement artifact (5%) on three- dimensional time-of-flight and phase-contrast magnetic resonance angiography, and phase aliasing artifact (2%) on three-dimensional phase-contrast magnetic resonance angiography. Type and frequency of flow-unrelated artifacts included stair-step artifact (100%) by three- dimensional reconstruction process, magnetic susceptibility artifact by carotid canal (69%) and metal (4%), maximum intensity projection artifact (30%) by maximum intensity projection algorithm, and motion artifact by respiration (20%) and voluntary movement (8%); these were seen on both time-of-flight and phase-contrast magnetic resonance angiography. Paramagnetic substance artifact by fat and paranasal sinus mucosa (100%), hematoma (14%) and gadolinium (5%) were seen on time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography. In three- dimensional time-of-flight and

  8. CXCL13 is the major determinant for B cell recruitment to the CSF during neuroinflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kowarik Markus C

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The chemokines and cytokines CXCL13, CXCL12, CCL19, CCL21, BAFF and APRIL are believed to play a role in the recruitment of B cells to the central nervous system (CNS compartment during neuroinflammation. To determine which chemokines/cytokines show the strongest association with a humoral immune response in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, we measured their concentrations in the CSF and correlated them with immune cell subsets and antibody levels. Methods Cytokine/chemokine concentrations were measured in CSF and serum by ELISA in patients with non-inflammatory neurological diseases (NIND, n = 20, clinically isolated syndrome (CIS, n = 30, multiple sclerosis (MS, n = 20, Lyme neuroborreliosis (LNB, n = 8 and patients with other inflammatory neurological diseases (OIND, n = 30. Albumin, IgG, IgA and IgM were measured by nephelometry. CSF immune cell subsets were determined by seven-color flow cytometry. Results CXCL13 was significantly elevated in the CSF of all patient groups with inflammatory diseases. BAFF levels were significantly increased in patients with LNB and OIND. CXCL12 was significantly elevated in patients with LNB. B cells and plasmablasts were significantly elevated in the CSF of all patients with inflammatory diseases. CXCL13 showed the most consistent correlation with CSF B cells, plasmablasts and intrathecal Ig synthesis. Conclusions CXCL13 seems to be the major determinant for B cell recruitment to the CNS compartment in different neuroinflammatory diseases. Thus, elevated CSF CXCL13 levels rather reflect a strong humoral immune response in the CNS compartment than being specific for a particular disease entity.

  9. [Effect of G-CSF in vitro Stimulation on Distribution of Peripheral Lymphocyte Subsets in the Healthy Persons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Sha-Sha; Fang, Shu; Zhu, Cheng-Ying; Wang, Li-Li; Gao, Chun-Ji

    2018-02-01

    To investigate the effect of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) in vitro stimulation on the distribution of lymphocyte subset in healthy human. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNCs) were collected from 8 healthy volunteers by density gradient centrifugation on Ficoll-Paque TM . In vitro 200 ng/ml G-CSF or 200 ng/ml G-CSF plus 10 µg/ml ConA directly act on PBMNCs, then the colleted cells were cultivated for 3 days. Lymphocyte subsets were stained with the corresponding fluoresce labeled antibodies and detected by flow cytometry. The levels of T cells in G-CSF group and G-CSF+ConA group were both higher than that in the control group (PCSF on T cell subsets indicated that the levels of CD4 + T cells and CD8 + T cells in G-CSF group were both significantly higher than those in control group (PCSF and control group. Compared with the control group, the level of CD4 + T cells, CD8 + T cells and Treg cells in G-CSF+ConA group significantly increased (PCSF receptor (G-CSFR) expression showed that G-CSFR expression on T cells in G-CSF+ConA group dramatically increased, as compared with control group (PCSF stimulation. ConA can enhance the level of T cells and induce G-CSFR expression on T cells.

  10. Artifacts as Authoritative Actors in Educational Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    März, Virginie; Kelchtermans, Geert; Vermeir, Karen

    2017-01-01

    Educational reforms are often translated in and implemented through artifacts. Although research has frequently treated artifacts as merely functional, more recent work acknowledges the complex relationship between material artifacts and human/organizational behavior. This article aims at disentangling this relationship in order to deepen our…

  11. CSF free light chain identification of demyelinating disease: comparison with oligoclonal banding and other CSF indexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurtner, Kari M; Shosha, Eslam; Bryant, Sandra C; Andreguetto, Bruna D; Murray, David L; Pittock, Sean J; Willrich, Maria Alice V

    2018-02-19

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) used in immunoglobulin gamma (IgG) index testing and oligoclonal bands (OCBs) are common laboratory tests used in the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis. The measurement of CSF free light chains (FLC) could pose as an alternative to the labor-intensive isoelectric-focusing (IEF) gels used for OCBs. A total of 325 residual paired CSF and serum specimens were obtained after physician-ordered OCB IEF testing. CSF kappa (cKFLC) and lambda FLC (cLFLC), albumin and total IgG were measured. Calculations were performed based on combinations of analytes: CSF sum of kappa and lambda ([cKFLC+cLFLC]), kappa-index (K-index) ([cKFLC/sKFLC]/[CSF albumin/serum albumin]), kappa intrathecal fraction (KFLCIF) {([cKFLC/sKFLC]-[0.9358×CSF albumin/serum albumin]^[0.6687×sKFLC]/cKFLC)} and IgG-index ([CSF IgG/CSF albumin]/[serum IgG/serum albumin]). Patients were categorized as: demyelination (n=67), autoimmunity (n=53), non-inflammatory (n=50), inflammation (n=38), degeneration (n=28), peripheral neuropathy (n=24), infection (n=13), cancer (n=11), neuromyelitis optica (n=10) and others (n=31). cKFLC measurement used alone at a cutoff of 0.0611 mg/dL showed >90% agreement to OCBs, similar or better performance than all other calculations, reducing the number of analytes and variables. When cases of demyelinating disease were reviewed, cKFLC measurements showed 86% clinical sensitivity/77% specificity. cKFLC alone demonstrates comparable performance to OCBs along with increased sensitivity for demyelinating diseases. Replacing OCB with cKFLC would alleviate the need for serum and CSF IgG and albumin and calculated conversions. cKFLC can overcome challenges associated with performance, interpretation, and cost of traditional OCBs, reducing costs and maintaining sensitivity and specificity supporting MS diagnosis.

  12. Motion artifacts in computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, C.K.

    1979-01-01

    In the year 1972, the first Computed Tomography Scanner (or CT) was introduced and caused a revolution in the field of Diagnostic Radiology. A tomogram is a cross-sectional image of a three-dimensional object obtained through non-invasive measurements. The image that is presented is very similar to what would be seen if a thin cross-sectional slice of the patient was examined. In Computed Tomography, x-rays are passed through the body of a patient in many different directions and their attenuation is detected. By using some mathematical theorems, the attenuation information can be converted into the density of the patient along the x-ray path. Combined with modern sophisticated computer signal processing technology, a cross-sectional image can be generated and displayed on a TV monitor. Usually a good CT image relies on the patient not moving during the x-ray scanning. However, for some unconscious or severely ill patients, this is very difficult to achieve. Thus, the motion during the scan causes the so-called motion artifacts which distort the displayed image and sometimes these motion artifacts make diagnosis impossible. Today, to remove or avoid motion artifacts is one of the major efforts in developing new scanner systems. In this thesis, a better understanding of the motion artifacts problem in CT scaning is gained through computer simulations, real scanner experiments and theoretical analyses. The methods by which the distorted image can be improved are simulated also. In particular, it is assumed that perfect knowledge of the patient motion is known since this represents the theoretical limit on how well the distorted image can be improved

  13. Discrimination of common myocardial tomography artifacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Hongcheng; Chen Shaoliang; Yao Zhifeng; Zhu Weimin; Liu Wenguan

    2002-01-01

    To study the characteristics of common myocardial tomography artifacts so as to increase the diagnosis accuracy, 132 patients with myocardial perfusion were reviewed. With careful recognition of artifacts, the patients were re-diagnosed and compared with previous results. It was found that attenuation artifacts and motion artifacts were found frequently in thallium SPECT images. Artifacts caused by thoracic wall were frequent in female and showed a fixed defect in anterior or lateral wall; attenuation artifacts caused by left hemi diaphragm were always found in male and showed that the inferior wall became thinner gradually from apex to bottom in vertical long axis slices. The coexistence of defects and hot areas was the characteristics of motion artifacts. Artifacts caused by non-target organs, liver and/or gastrointestinal tracts, were frequently seen in 99m Tc-MIBI SPECT image. By recognizing the artifacts, misdiagnosis rate decreased significantly from 13.6% to 6.8%. Authors' studies show that all kinds of artifacts have their prevalence rate and imaging feature, the artifacts could be eliminated effectively by careful analysis and some correction measures

  14. Artifact

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    CONCEPTUAL TYPE: TYPE LED BY IDEAS 26/10/12“Where are the idealistic fonts, the artsy fonts, the non fonts, the political fonts, the funny fonts, the difficult fonts, the fonts that don’t look like fonts, the fonts that are frontiers of new beliefs? We would like to focus on the ideas and concept...

  15. Colony-stimulating factor (CSF) radioimmunoassay: detection of a CSF subclass stimulating macrophage production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanley, E.R.

    1979-01-01

    Colony-stimulating factors (CSFs) stimulate the differentiation of immature precursor cells to mature granulocytes and macrophages. Purified 125 I-labeled murine L cell CSF has been used to develop a radioimmunoassay (RIA) that detects a subclass of CSFs that stimulates macrophage production. Murine CSF preparations that contain this subclass of CSF compete for all of the CSF binding sites on anti-L cell CSF antibody. With the exception of mouse serum, which can contain inhibitors of the bioassay, there is complete correspondence between activities determined by RIA and those determined by bioassay. The RIA is slightly more sensitive than the bioassay, detecting approximately 0.3 fmol of purified L cell CSF. It can also detect this subclass of CSF in chickens, rats, and humans. In the mouse, the subclass is distinguished from other CSFs by a murine cell bioassay dose-response curve in which 90% of the response occurs over a 10-fold (rather than a 100-fold) increase in concentration, by stimulating the formations of colonies contaning a high proportion of mononuclear (rather than granulocytic) cells, and by certain physical characteristics

  16. Scinticisternography and scintiventriculography. A study of C.S.F. dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Front, Dov

    1971-01-01

    The problem of C.S.F. flow and absorption has attracted many different disciplines in medicine. The normal physiology and the pathology, which declares itself mainly by hydrocephalus, have been intensively studied by neurophysiologists, neurologists and neurosurgeons. The possibility of treating

  17. Disturbances of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) circulation - neuro psychiatric symptoms and neuroradiological contribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, E.; Becker, T.; Meixensberger, J.; Jackel, M.; Schneider, M.; Reichmann, H.

    1995-01-01

    The present study aims at relating dementia, pseudo-neurasthenic and affective organic brain syndromes to underlying types of CSF flow disorder and to the subsequent alteration of anatomy. T 2 * -weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the mid sagittal plane permitted an analysis of aqueductal CSF flow phenomena and hydrocephalus-induced elevation, thinning and dorsal impingement of the corpus callosum. Furthermore, the width of the third ventricle was measured on the transverse scout images. 72 patients with communicating hydrocephalus (increased aqueductal CSF pulsations) and 26 patients with aqueductal stenosis (absence of aqueductal flow phenomena) were compared with 22 controls. Dementia and affective disorders were distributed equally among both CSF flow subgroups whereas pseudo-neurasthenic syndromes were observed more frequently in non-communicating hydrocephalus (p < 0.03). Alzheimer-type and multi infarct dementia syndromes were found more frequently in communicating hydrocephalus whereas non-classifiable dementia showed some predilection for non-communicating hydrocephalus. Callosal height, area and third ventricular width did not predict affective or pseudo neurasthenic disorder whereas third ventricular width (p < 0.01) and callosal area (p < 0.05) discriminated between demented and non-demented patients. Dorsal impingement of the corpus callosum by the falx was a non-specific finding. (author)

  18. Effects of Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating (GM-CSF Factor on Corneal Epithelial Cells in Corneal Wound Healing Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Rae Rho

    Full Text Available Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF is a pleiotropic cytokine that activates granulocyte and macrophage cell lineages. It is also known to have an important function in wound healing. This study investigated the effect of GM-CSF in wound healing of human corneal epithelial cells (HCECs. We used human GM-CSF derived from rice cells (rice cell-derived recombinant human GM-CSF; rhGM-CSF. An in vitro migration assay was performed to investigate the migration rate of HCECs treated with various concentrations of rhGM-CSF (0.1, 1.0, and 10.0 μg/ml. MTT assay and flow cytometric analysis were used to evaluate the proliferative effect of rhGM-CSF. The protein level of p38MAPK was analyzed by western blotting. For in vivo analysis, 100 golden Syrian hamsters were divided into four groups, and their corneas were de-epithelialized with alcohol and a blade. The experimental groups were treated with 10, 20, or 50 μg/ml rhGM-CSF four times daily, and the control group was treated with phosphate-buffered saline. The corneal wound-healing rate was evaluated by fluorescein staining at the initial wounding and 12, 24, 36, and 48 hours after epithelial debridement. rhGM-CSF accelerated corneal epithelial wound healing both in vitro and in vivo. MTT assay and flow cytometric analysis revealed that rhGM-CSF treatment had no effects on HCEC proliferation. Western blot analysis demonstrated that the expression level of phosphorylated p38MAPK increased with rhGM-CSF treatment. These findings indicate that rhGM-CSF enhances corneal wound healing by accelerating cell migration.

  19. Stem Cell Mobilization with G-CSF versus Cyclophosphamide plus G-CSF in Mexican Children

    OpenAIRE

    Meraz, Jos? Eugenio V?zquez; Arellano-Galindo, Jos?; Avalos, Armando Mart?nez; Mendoza-Garc?a, Emma; Jim?nez-Hern?ndez, Elva

    2016-01-01

    Fifty-six aphaereses were performed in 23 pediatric patients with malignant hematological and solid tumors, following three different protocols for PBPC mobilization and distributed as follows: A: seventeen mobilized with 4?g/m2 of cyclophosphamide (CFA) and 10??g/kg/day of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), B: nineteen with CFA + G-CSF, and C: twenty only with G-CSF when the WBC count exceeded 10 ? 109/L. The average number of MNC/kg body weight (BW)/aphaeresis was 0.4 ? 108 (0.1...

  20. Intrasphenoidal encephalocele and spontaneous CSF rhinorrhoea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniilidis, J; Vlachtsis, K; Ferekidis, E; Dimitriadis, A

    1999-12-01

    Intrasphenoidal encephalocele is a rare clinical entity. In the international literature only 16 cases have been reported up today, with female predominance. Clinically they manifest at middle and advanced ages (40-67 years), when spontaneous CSF rhinorrhoea or recurrent meningitis occurs. We present our case, a 46 years old female, who had CSF rhinorrhoea from the right vestibule for 10 months. The diagnosis was based on the history and the high-resolution brain and skull base CT-scanning in conjunction with opaque fluid injection in the subarachnoidal space through a lumbar puncture. She was successfully treated with an operation, through an endonasal trans-ethmoid microendoscopic approach, using the Draf and Stammberger technique. We discuss the pathogenesis of the intrasphenoidal encephalocele, the existence of small occult defects in the skull base, which cause, at the middle and advanced ages, CSF fistula with spontaneous CSF rhinorrhoea and/or recurrent meningitis. Finally we emphasize the advantages of the endonasal surgical approach for the treatment of this condition.

  1. The inner CSF-brain barrier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Whish, Sophie; Dziegielewska, Katarzyna M; Møllgård, Kjeld

    2015-01-01

    outlining the inner CSF-brain interface from E16; most of these markers were not present in the adult ependyma. Claudin-5 was present in the apical-most part of radial glial cells and in endothelial cells in embryos, but only in endothelial cells including plexus endothelial cells in adults. Claudin-11...

  2. Use of cognitive artifacts in chemistry learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yengin, Ilker

    In everyday life, we interact with cognitive artifacts to receive and/or manipulate information so as to alter our thinking processes. CHEM/TEAC 869Q is a distance course that includes extensive explicit instruction in the use of a cognitive artifact. This study investigates issues related to the design of that online artifact. In order to understand design implications and how cognitive artifacts contribute to students' thinking and learning, a qualitative research methodology was engaged that utilized think aloud sessions. Participants' described constrained and structured cognitive models while using the artifact. The study also was informed by interviews and researcher's field notes. A purposeful sampling method led to the selection of participants, four males and two females, who had no prior history of using a course from the 869 series but who had experienced the scientific content covered by the CHEM869Q course. Analysis of the results showed both that a cognitive artifact may lead users' minds in decision making, and that problem solving processes were affected by cognitive artifact's design. When there is no design flaw, users generally thought that the cognitive artifact was helpful by simplifying steps, overcoming other limitations, and reducing errors in a reliable, effective, and easy to use way. Moreover, results showed that successful implementation of cognitive artifacts into teaching --learning practices depended on user willingness to transfer a task to the artifact. While users may like the idea of benefiting from a cognitive artifact, nevertheless, they may tend to limit their usage. They sometimes think that delegating a task to a cognitive artifact makes them dependent, and that they may not learn how to perform the tasks by themselves. They appear more willing to use a cognitive artifact after they have done the task by themselves.

  3. Artifacts that mimic ballistic magnetoresistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egelhoff, W.F. . E-mail : egelhoff@nist.gov; Gan, L.; Ettedgui, H.; Kadmon, Y.; Powell, C.J.; Chen, P.J.; Shapiro, A.J.; McMichael, R.D.; Mallett, J.J.; Moffat, T.P.; Stiles, M.D.; Svedberg, E.B.

    2005-01-01

    We have investigated the circumstances underlying recent reports of very large values of ballistic magnetoresistance (BMR) in nanocontacts between magnetic wires. We find that the geometries used are subject to artifacts due to motion of the wires that distort the nanocontact thereby changing its electrical resistance. Since these nanocontacts are often of atomic scale, reliable experiments would require stability on the atomic scale. No method for achieving such stability in macroscopic wires is apparent. We conclude that macroscopic magnetic wires cannot be used to establish the validity of the BMR effect

  4. Glymphatic distribution of CSF-derived apoE into brain is isoform specific and suppressed during sleep deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achariyar, Thiyagaragan M; Li, Baoman; Peng, Weiguo; Verghese, Philip B; Shi, Yang; McConnell, Evan; Benraiss, Abdellatif; Kasper, Tristan; Song, Wei; Takano, Takahiro; Holtzman, David M; Nedergaard, Maiken; Deane, Rashid

    2016-12-08

    Apolipoprotein E (apoE) is a major carrier of cholesterol and essential for synaptic plasticity. In brain, it's expressed by many cells but highly expressed by the choroid plexus and the predominant apolipoprotein in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The role of apoE in the CSF is unclear. Recently, the glymphatic system was described as a clearance system whereby CSF and ISF (interstitial fluid) is exchanged via the peri-arterial space and convective flow of ISF clearance is mediated by aquaporin 4 (AQP4), a water channel. We reasoned that this system also serves to distribute essential molecules in CSF into brain. The aim was to establish whether apoE in CSF, secreted by the choroid plexus, is distributed into brain, and whether this distribution pattern was altered by sleep deprivation. We used fluorescently labeled lipidated apoE isoforms, lenti-apoE3 delivered to the choroid plexus, immunohistochemistry to map apoE brain distribution, immunolabeled cells and proteins in brain, Western blot analysis and ELISA to determine apoE levels and radiolabeled molecules to quantify CSF inflow into brain and brain clearance in mice. Data were statistically analyzed using ANOVA or Student's t- test. We show that the glymphatic fluid transporting system contributes to the delivery of choroid plexus/CSF-derived human apoE to neurons. CSF-delivered human apoE entered brain via the perivascular space of penetrating arteries and flows radially around arteries, but not veins, in an isoform specific manner (apoE2 > apoE3 > apoE4). Flow of apoE around arteries was facilitated by AQP4, a characteristic feature of the glymphatic system. ApoE3, delivered by lentivirus to the choroid plexus and ependymal layer but not to the parenchymal cells, was present in the CSF, penetrating arteries and neurons. The inflow of CSF, which contains apoE, into brain and its clearance from the interstitium were severely suppressed by sleep deprivation compared to the sleep state. Thus, choroid plexus/CSF

  5. Correlation of isotopic cisternographic patterns in multiple sclerosis with CSF IgG values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartolini, S.; Inzitari, D.; Castagnoli, A.; Amaducci, L.

    1982-01-01

    Thirty-eight patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) were examined with isotopic cisternography (IC) in order to study cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) dynamics. Cisternography was also performed in 15 patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and in 14 with senile dementia of the Alzheimer type as controls. IC pattern of ''mixed'' type was found in 18 MS patients and all those with Alzheimer senile dementia examined, while the IC examination did not show abnormality in any of 15 patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. In MS patients, the abnormal IC picture proved to be significantly correlated with the CSF IgG values as calculated by Link's and Tourtelotte's formulas. The abnormal IC in MS may be due to altered CSF reabsorption or increased transependymal flow, or it may be related to the abnormal concentration of IgG

  6. The New PTB Caesium Fountain Clock CSF2

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wynands, R; Bauch, A; Griebsch, D; Schroeder, R; Weyers, S

    2005-01-01

    At PTB a second caesium fountain clock, CSF2, is in the process of being set up. It differs from the first PTB caesium fountain standard CSF1 in a number of details, which are consecutively specified...

  7. CSF-1R Inhibitor Development: Current Clinical Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyraud, Florent; Cousin, Sophie; Italiano, Antoine

    2017-09-05

    Colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF-1R) and its ligands, CSF-1 and interleukin 34 (IL-34), regulate the function and survival of tumor-associated macrophages, which are involved in tumorigenesis and in the suppression of antitumor immunity. Moreover, the CSF-1R/CSF-1 axis has been implicated in the pathogenesis of pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS), a benign tumor of the synovium. As advanced or metastatic malignant solid tumors and relapsed/refractory PVNS remain unresolved therapeutic problems, new approaches are needed to improve the outcome of patients with these conditions. In solid tumors, targeting CSF-1R via either small molecules or antibodies has shown interesting results in vitro but limited antitumor activity in vivo. Concerning PVNS, clinical trials assessing CSF-1R inhibitors have revealed promising initial outcomes. Blocking CSF-1/CSF-1R signaling represents a promising immunotherapy approach and several new potential combination therapies for future clinical testing.

  8. Association of Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) Insulin with Cognitive Performance and CSF Biomarkers of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geijselaers, Stefan L C; Aalten, Pauline; Ramakers, Inez H G B; De Deyn, Peter Paul; Heijboer, Annemieke C; Koek, Huiberdina L; OldeRikkert, Marcel G M; Papma, Janne M; Reesink, Fransje E; Smits, Lieke L; Stehouwer, Coen D A; Teunissen, Charlotte E; Verhey, Frans R J; van der Flier, Wiesje M; Biessels, Geert Jan

    2018-01-01

    Abnormal insulin signaling in the brain has been linked to Alzheimer's disease (AD). To evaluate whether cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) insulin levels are associated with cognitive performance and CSF amyloid-β and Tau. Additionally, we explore whether any such association differs by sex or APOE ɛ4 genotype. From 258 individuals participating in the Parelsnoer Institute Neurodegenerative Diseases, a nationwide multicenter memory clinic population, we selected 138 individuals (mean age 66±9 years, 65.2% male) diagnosed with subjective cognitive impairment (n = 45), amnestic mild cognitive impairment (n = 44), or AD (n = 49), who completed a neuropsychological assessment, including tests of global cognition and memory performance, and who underwent lumbar puncture. We measured CSF levels of insulin, amyloid-β1-42, total (t-)Tau, and phosphorylated (p-)Tau. CSF insulin levels did not differ between the diagnostic groups (p = 0.136). Across the whole study population, CSF insulin was unrelated to cognitive performance and CSF biomarkers of AD, after adjustment for age, sex, body mass index, diabetes status, and clinic site (all p≥0.131). Importantly, however, we observed effect modification by sex and APOE ɛ4 genotype. Specifically, among women, higher insulin levels in the CSF were associated with worse global cognition (standardized regression coefficient -0.483; p = 0.008) and higher p-Tau levels (0.353; p = 0.040). Among non-carriers of the APOE ɛ4 allele, higher CSF insulin was associated with higher t-Tau (0.287; p = 0.008) and p-Tau (0.246; p = 0.029). Our findings provide further evidence for a relationship between brain insulin signaling and AD pathology. It also highlights the need to consider sex and APOE ɛ4 genotype when assessing the role of insulin.

  9. CSF HYPOCRETIN CONCENTRATION IN VARIOUS NEUROLOGICAL AND SLEEP DISORDERS

    OpenAIRE

    Tsutsui, Kou; Kanbayashi, Takashi; Sawaishi, Yukio; Tokunaga, Jun; Sato, Masahiro; Shimizu, Tetsuo

    2011-01-01

    Recent CSF and postmortem brain hypocretin measurements in human narcolepsy suggest that hypocretin deficiency is involved in the pathophysiology of the disease. Thus, it is important to study whether neurological disorders also have abnormal CSF hypocretin levels. We therefore measured hypocretins in the CSF of various neurological disorders and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) to identify altered hypocretin levels. CSF hypocretin levels in patients with OSAS and neurological diseases...

  10. [Effects of cell-mediated immunity induced by intramuscular chitosan-pJME/ GM-CSF nano-DNA vaccine in BAlb/c mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Yong-Zhen; Zhou, Yan; Ma, Li; Feng, Guo-He

    2014-07-01

    This study aimed to investigate the immune adjuvant effect and mechanism induced by chitosan nanoparticles carrying pJME/GM-CSF. In this study, plasmid DNA (pJME/GM-CSF) was encapsulated in chitosan to prepare chitosan-pJME/GM-CSF nanoparticles using a complex coacervation process. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect the type of infiltrating cells at the site of intramuscular injection. The phenotype and functional changes of splenic DCs were measured by flow cytometry after different immunogens were injected intramuscularly. The killing activity of CTLs was assessed using the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release assay. The preparation of chitosan-pJME/GM-CSF nanoparticles matched the expected theoretical results. Our results also found that, after pJME/GM-CSF injection, the incoming cells were a mixture of macrophages, neutrophils, and immature DCs. Meanwhile, pJME/GM-CSF increased the expression of MHC class II molecules on splenic DCs, and enhanced their Ag capture and presentation functions. Cell-mediated immunity was induced by the vaccine. Furthermore, chitosan-pJME/GM-CSF nanoparticles outperformed the administration of standard pJME/GM-CSF in terms of DC recruitment, antigen processing and presentation, and vaccine enhancement. These findings reveal that chitosan could be used as delivery vector for DNA vaccine intramuscular immunizations, and enhance pJME/GM-CSF-induced cellular immune responses.

  11. MADR: metal artifact detection and reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiswal, Sunil Prasad; Ha, Sungsoo; Mueller, Klaus

    2016-04-01

    Metal in CT-imaged objects drastically reduces the quality of these images due to the severe artifacts it can cause. Most metal artifacts reduction (MAR) algorithms consider the metal-affected sinogram portions as the corrupted data and replace them via sophisticated interpolation methods. While these schemes are successful in removing the metal artifacts, they fail to recover some of the edge information. To address these problems, the frequency shift metal artifact reduction algorithm (FSMAR) was recently proposed. It exploits the information hidden in the uncorrected image and combines the high frequency (edge) components of the uncorrected image with the low frequency components of the corrected image. Although this can effectively transfer the edge information of the uncorrected image, it also introduces some unwanted artifacts. The essential problem of these algorithms is that they lack the capability of detecting the artifacts and as a result cannot discriminate between desired and undesired edges. We propose a scheme that does better in these respects. Our Metal Artifact Detection and Reduction (MADR) scheme constructs a weight map which stores whether a pixel in the uncorrected image belongs to an artifact region or a non-artifact region. This weight matrix is optimal in the Linear Minimum Mean Square Sense (LMMSE). Our results demonstrate that MADR outperforms the existing algorithms and ensures that the anatomical structures close to metal implants are better preserved.

  12. Evidence that iron accelerates Alzheimer's pathology: a CSF biomarker study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayton, Scott; Diouf, Ibrahima; Bush, Ashley Ian

    2018-05-01

    To investigate whether cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) ferritin (reporting brain iron) is associated with longitudinal changes in CSF β-amyloid (Aβ) and tau. Mixed-effects models of CSF Aβ 1-42 and tau were constructed using data from 296 participants who had baseline measurement of CSF ferritin and annual measurement of CSF tau and Aβ 1-42 for up to 5 years. In subjects with biomarker-confirmed Alzheimer's pathology, high CSF ferritin (>6.2 ng/mL) was associated with accelerated depreciation of CSF Aβ 1-42 (reporting increased plaque formation; p=0.0001). CSF ferritin was neither associated with changes in CSF tau in the same subjects, nor longitudinal changes in CSF tau or Aβ 1-42 in subjects with low baseline pathology. In simulation modelling of the natural history of Aβ deposition, which we estimated to occur over 31.4 years, we predicted that it would take 12.6 years to reach the pathology threshold value of CSF Aβ from healthy normal levels, and this interval is not affected by CSF ferritin. CSF ferritin influences the fall in CSF Aβ over the next phase, where high CSF ferritin accelerated the transition from threshold preclinical Aβ levels to the average level of Alzheimer's subjects from 18.8 to 10.8 years. Iron might facilitate Aβ deposition in Alzheimer's and accelerate the disease process. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  13. Correcting for motion artifact in handheld laser speckle images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lertsakdadet, Ben; Yang, Bruce Y.; Dunn, Cody E.; Ponticorvo, Adrien; Crouzet, Christian; Bernal, Nicole; Durkin, Anthony J.; Choi, Bernard

    2018-03-01

    Laser speckle imaging (LSI) is a wide-field optical technique that enables superficial blood flow quantification. LSI is normally performed in a mounted configuration to decrease the likelihood of motion artifact. However, mounted LSI systems are cumbersome and difficult to transport quickly in a clinical setting for which portability is essential in providing bedside patient care. To address this issue, we created a handheld LSI device using scientific grade components. To account for motion artifact of the LSI device used in a handheld setup, we incorporated a fiducial marker (FM) into our imaging protocol and determined the difference between highest and lowest speckle contrast values for the FM within each data set (Kbest and Kworst). The difference between Kbest and Kworst in mounted and handheld setups was 8% and 52%, respectively, thereby reinforcing the need for motion artifact quantification. When using a threshold FM speckle contrast value (KFM) to identify a subset of images with an acceptable level of motion artifact, mounted and handheld LSI measurements of speckle contrast of a flow region (KFLOW) in in vitro flow phantom experiments differed by 8%. Without the use of the FM, mounted and handheld KFLOW values differed by 20%. To further validate our handheld LSI device, we compared mounted and handheld data from an in vivo porcine burn model of superficial and full thickness burns. The speckle contrast within the burn region (KBURN) of the mounted and handheld LSI data differed by burns. Collectively, our results suggest the potential of handheld LSI with an FM as a suitable alternative to mounted LSI, especially in challenging clinical settings with space limitations such as the intensive care unit.

  14. A particle accelerator probes artifacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dran, J.C.; Calligaro, Th.; Salomon, J.

    2002-01-01

    The AGLAE system is made up of a 2 mega volts electrostatic accelerator and of 3 irradiation lines: one leads to a vacuum enclosure in which targets are irradiated and the 2 others lines are designed to irradiate targets under an air or helium atmosphere. The AGLAE system is located in the premises of the Louvre museum in Paris and is devoted to the study of cultural objects through ion beam analysis (IBA). 4 techniques are used: -) proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) -) proton-induced gamma ray (PIGE) -) Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (NRS) and -) nuclear reaction analysis (NRA). A decisive progress has permitted the direct analysis of artifacts without sampling. The object itself is set just a few millimeters away from the exit window of the beam in an air or helium atmosphere. The exit window must be resistant enough to bear the atmospheric pressure and the damages caused by the proton beam but must be thin enough to not deteriorate the quality of the beam. By using a 10 -7 m thick exit window made of Si 3 N 4 we get a beam whose diameter is 10 -5 m. This new technology presents 4 main advantages: 1) any object of any shape can be studied without sampling, 2) the analysis of very fragile artifacts that might be damaged by the vacuum setting is now possible, 3) a reduction of the thermal side-effects of the beam, and 4) the absence of accumulation of charges in isolating material allows to rid of covering the object with a conducting coating before irradiating it. (A.C.)

  15. WE-D-18C-01: Art of Imaging: Diagnostic Ultrasound Image Artifacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zagzebski, J [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Lu, Z [University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Assumptions followed during construction of B-mode and color flow images are that the pulse-echo transit time can be converted to reflector depth through uniform tissue models, echoes originate only from locations along the transmit-receive axes of pulse propagation, and first order correction schemes adequately account for acoustic wave attenuation and absorption. The latter allows the display brightness to encode tissue echogenicity. This course will challenge participants to identify imaging artifacts whose origins stem from the more complex and realistic propagating and scattering conditions common in clinical ultrasound. Speckle, a very common artifact but a clinically employed feature, originates from simultaneous echoes from diffuse scatterers and is a result of coherent detection of signals. One of the most bothersome artifacts are those due to reverberations especially that originating from superficial tissue interfaces. Methods to overcome these will be discussed. This presentation also will describe and illustrate speed of sound, refraction, enhancement, shadowing, mirroring, beam width, beam-forming, and slice thickness artifacts. All are useful examples of limitations introduced by acoustic waves propagating through complex tissue paths. New formats for physician board certification exams are demanding the inclusion of image-based examples of ultrasound physics. Instructors' knowledge of, and access to examples of ultrasound artifacts are important in this effort. The presentation will incorporate an audience response system to challenge participants in correct identification of some of these artifacts. Learning Objectives: Review basic mechanisms for producing ultrasound images. Identify the etiology of speckle, reverberation noise, beam width and slice thickness artifacts, and artifacts associated with pulse propagation. Discuss methods that reduce the impact of artifacts OR employ artifacts effectively to facilitate clinical diagnosis.

  16. The Many Faces of Computational Artifacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Lars Rune; Harper, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Building on data from fieldwork at a medical department, this paper focuses on the varied nature of computational artifacts in practice. It shows that medical practice relies on multiple heterogeneous computational artifacts that form complex constellations. In the hospital studied the computatio...

  17. Reducing artifacts from varying projection truncations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borg, Leise; Jørgensen, Jakob Sauer; Frikel, Jürgen

    We study samples with full and partial occlusion causing streak artifacts, and propose two modifications of filtered backprojection for artifact removal. Data is obtained by the SPring-8 synchrotron using a monochromatic parallel-beam scan [1]. Thresholding in the sinogram segments the metal...

  18. Conceptual Model of Artifacts for Design Science Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bækgaard, Lars

    2015-01-01

    We present a conceptual model of design science research artifacts. The model views an artifact at three levels. At the artifact level a selected artifact is viewed as a combination of material and immaterial aspects and a set of representations hereof. At the design level the selected artifact...

  19. Specific Contributions of CSF-1 and GM-CSF to the Dynamics of the Mononuclear Phagocyte System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, Cynthia; Cook, Andrew D; Lacey, Derek; Fleetwood, Andrew J; Vlahos, Ross; Anderson, Gary P; Hamilton, John A

    2015-07-01

    M-CSF (or CSF-1) and GM-CSF can regulate the development and function of the mononuclear phagocyte system (MPS). To address some of the outstanding and sometimes conflicting issues surrounding this biology, we undertook a comparative analysis of the effects of neutralizing mAbs to these CSFs on murine MPS populations in the steady-state and during acute inflammatory reactions. CSF-1 neutralization, but not of GM-CSF, in normal mice rapidly reduced the numbers of more mature Ly6C(-) monocytes in blood and bone marrow, without any effect on proliferating precursors, and also the numbers of the resident peritoneal macrophages, observations consistent with CSF-1 signaling being essential only at a relatively late state in steady-state MPS development; in contrast, GM-CSF neutralization had no effect on the numbers of these particular populations. In Ag-induced peritonitis (AIP), thioglycolate-induced peritonitis, and LPS-induced lung inflammation, CSF-1 neutralization lowered inflammatory macrophage number; in the AIP model, this reduced number was not due to suppressed proliferation. More detailed studies with the convenient AIP model indicated that CSF-1 neutralization led to a relatively uniform reduction in all inflammatory cell populations; GM-CSF neutralization, in contrast, was more selective, resulting in the preferential loss among the MPS populations of a cycling, monocyte-derived inflammatory dendritic cell population. Some mechanistic options for the specific CSF-dependent biologies enumerated are discussed. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  20. Distinct Properties of Human M-CSF and GM-CSF Monocyte-Derived Macrophages to Simulate Pathological Lung Conditions In Vitro: Application to Systemic and Inflammatory Disorders with Pulmonary Involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lescoat, Alain; Ballerie, Alice; Augagneur, Yu; Morzadec, Claudie; Vernhet, Laurent; Fardel, Olivier; Jégo, Patrick; Jouneau, Stéphane; Lecureur, Valérie

    2018-03-17

    Macrophages play a central role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory and fibrotic lung diseases. However, alveolar macrophages (AM) are poorly available in humans to perform in vitro studies due to a limited access to broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL). In this study, to identify the best alternative in vitro model for human AM, we compared the phenotype of AM obtained from BAL of patients suffering from three lung diseases (lung cancers, sarcoidosis and Systemic Sclerosis (SSc)-associated interstitial lung disease) to human blood monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) differentiated with M-CSF or GM-CSF. The expression of eight membrane markers was evaluated by flow cytometry. Globally, AM phenotype was closer to GM-CSF MDMs. However, the expression levels of CD163, CD169, CD204, CD64 and CD36 were significantly higher in SSc-ILD than in lung cancers. Considering the expression of CD204 and CD36, the phenotype of SSc-AM was closer to MDMs, from healthy donors or SSc patients, differentiated by M-CSF rather than GM-CSF. The comparative secretion of IL-6 by SSc-MDMs and SSc-AM is concordant with these phenotypic considerations. Altogether, these results support the M-CSF MDM model as a relevant in vitro alternative to simulate AM in fibrotic disorders such as SSc.

  1. Cerebrospinal fluid flow. Pt. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroth, G.; Klose, U.

    1992-01-01

    Cardiac- and respiration-related movements of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were investigated by MRI in 71 patients. In most patients with arteriosclerotic occlusive vascular disease CSF pulsations are normal. Decreased pulsatile flow is detectable in those with arteriovenous malformations, intracranial air and following lumbar puncture and withdrawal of CSF. Increased pulsatile flow in the cerebral aqueduct was found in 2 patients with large aneurysms, idiopathic communicating syringomyelia and in most cases of normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH). CSF flow in the cervical spinal canal is, however, reduced or normal in NPH, indicating reduction of the unfolding ability of the surface of the brain and/or inhibition of rapid CSF movements in the subrachnoid space over its convexity. (orig.)

  2. Cerebrospinal fluid flow and production in patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus studied by MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gideon, P; Ståhlberg, F; Thomsen, C

    1994-01-01

    An interleaved velocity-sensitised fast low-angle shot pulse sequence was used to study cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow in the cerebral aqueduct, and supratentorial CSF production in 9 patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) and 9 healthy volunteers. The peak aqueduct CSF flow, both caudal...

  3. Steady-streaming effects on the motion of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in the spinal canal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Jenna; Coenen, Wilfried; Sanchez, Antonio; Lasheras, Juan

    2017-11-01

    With each heart beat the oscillatory blood supply to the rigid cranial vault produces a time-periodic variation of the intracranial pressure that drives the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) periodically in and out of the compliant spinal canal. We have recently conducted an analysis of this flow-structure interaction problem taking advantage of the small compliance of the dura membrane bounding externally the CSF and of the disparity of length scales associated with the geometry of the subarachnoid space. We have shown in an idealized geometry that the steady-streaming motion associated with this periodic flow, resulting from the nonlinear cumulative effects of convective acceleration, causes a bulk recirculation of CSF inside the spinal canal, which has been observed in many radiological studies. We extend here our study to investigate the possible contribution arising from the flow around the nerve roots protruding from the spinal cord, an effect that was neglected in our previous work. For this purpose, we consider the oscillatory motion around a cylindrical post confined between two parallel plates. For large values of the relevant Strouhal number we find at leading order a harmonic Stokes flow, whereas steady-streaming effects enter in the first-order corrections, which are computed for realistic values of the Womersley number and of the cylinder height-to-radius ratio.

  4. Research Upregulation of CD23 (FcεRII Expression in Human Airway Smooth Muscle Cells (huASMC in Response to IL-4, GM-CSF, and IL-4/GM-CSF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lew D Betty

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Airway smooth muscle cells play a key role in remodeling that contributes to airway hyperreactivity. Airway smooth muscle remodeling includes hypertrophy and hyperplasia. It has been previously shown that the expression of CD23 on ASMC in rabbits can be induced by the IgE component of the atopic serum. We examined if other components of atopic serum are capable of inducing CD23 expression independent of IgE. Methods Serum starved huASMC were stimulated with either IL-4, GM-CSF, IL-13, IL-5, PGD2, LTD4, tryptase or a combination of IL-4, IL-5, IL-13 each with GM-CSF for a period of 24 h. CD23 expression was analyzed by flow cytometry, western blot, and indirect immunofluorescence. Results The CD23 protein expression was upregulated in huASMC in response to IL-4, GM-CSF, and IL-4/GM-CSF. The percentage of cells with increased fluorescence intensity above the control was 25.1 ± 4.2% (IL-4, 15.6 ± 2.7% (GM-CSF and 32.9 ± 13.9% (IL-4/GMCSF combination(n = 3. The protein content of IL-4/GMCSF stimulated cells was significantly elevated. Expression of CD23 in response to IL-4, GM-CSF, IL-4/GM-CSF was accompanied by changes in cell morphology including depolymerization of isoactin fibers, cell spreading, and membrane ruffling. Western blot revealed abundant expression of the IL-4Rα and a low level expression of IL-2Rγc in huASMC. Stimulation with IL-4 resulted in the phosphorylation of STAT-6 and an increase in the expression of the IL-2Rγc. Conclusion CD23 on huASMC is upregulated by IL-4, GM-CSF, and IL-4/GM-CSF. The expression of CD23 is accompanied by an increase in cell volume and an increase in protein content per cell, suggesting hypertrophy. Upregulation of CD23 by IL-4/GM-CSF results in phenotypic changes in huASMC that could play a role in cell migration or a change in the synthetic function of the cells. Upregulation of CD23 in huASMC by IL-4 and GM-CSF can contribute to changes in huASMC and may provide an avenue

  5. Image artifacts and technical limitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, W.M.

    1987-01-01

    The swift temporal progression of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) from experimental prototype design to sophisticated instrument production can be sharply contrasted to the more protracted time course that characterized the development of X-ray computed tomography (CT). Most notably, the current generation of CT scanners represents the product of more than a decade of design innovation and technologic improvement, punctuated by the introduction of a whole new ''generation'' of CT scanners at periodic intervals. The more rapid evolutionary changes unique to MRI have been permitted by the greater abundance of sophisticated technologic expertise and necessitated by economic considerations, especially the desire to avoid premature obsolescence. Quite clearly, ''state-of-the-art'' MRI units available today are intended to remain state of the art for many years into the future. In clinical trials, MRI has proved particularly effacacious for evaluation of suspected neurologic disease, prompting neuroradiologists to welcome this new non-invasive diagnostic tool with unprecedented enthusiasm. In early reports, the lack of ionizing radiation, apparent absence of significant biological hazards, and ''elimination'' of artifacts were all acclaimed as major technical advantages. Now, as this diagnostic modality is undergoing widespread dissemination and a large body of clinical experience begins to accumulate, increasing attention is being focused on the limitations of MRI

  6. A particle accelerator probes artifacts

    CERN Document Server

    Dran, J C; Salomon, J

    2002-01-01

    The AGLAE system is made up of a 2 mega volts electrostatic accelerator and of 3 irradiation lines: one leads to a vacuum enclosure in which targets are irradiated and the 2 others lines are designed to irradiate targets under an air or helium atmosphere. The AGLAE system is located in the premises of the Louvre museum in Paris and is devoted to the study of cultural objects through ion beam analysis (IBA). 4 techniques are used: -) proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) -) proton-induced gamma ray (PIGE) -) Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (NRS) and -) nuclear reaction analysis (NRA). A decisive progress has permitted the direct analysis of artifacts without sampling. The object itself is set just a few millimeters away from the exit window of the beam in an air or helium atmosphere. The exit window must be resistant enough to bear the atmospheric pressure and the damages caused by the proton beam but must be thin enough to not deteriorate the quality of the beam. By using a 10 sup - sup 7 m thick exit w...

  7. Timing of CSF-1/CSF-1R signaling blockade is critical to improving responses to CTLA-4 based immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmgaard, Rikke B.; Brachfeld, Alexandra; Gasmi, Billel; Jones, David R.; Mattar, Marissa; Doman, Thompson; Murphy, Mary; Schaer, David; Wolchok, Jedd D.; Merghoub, Taha

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Colony stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1) is produced by a variety of cancers and recruits myeloid cells that suppress antitumor immunity, including myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs.) Here, we show that both CSF-1 and its receptor (CSF-1R) are frequently expressed in tumors from cancer patients, and that this expression correlates with tumor-infiltration of MDSCs. Furthermore, we demonstrate that these tumor-infiltrating MDSCs are highly immunosuppressive but can be reprogrammed toward an antitumor phenotype in vitro upon CSF-1/CSF-1R signaling blockade. Supporting these findings, we show that inhibition of CSF-1/CSF-1R signaling using an anti-CSF-1R antibody can regulate both the number and the function of MDSCs in murine tumors in vivo. We further find that treatment with anti-CSF-1R antibody induces antitumor T-cell responses and tumor regression in multiple tumor models when combined with CTLA-4 blockade therapy. However, this occurs only when administered after or concurrent with CTLA-4 blockade, indicating that timing of each therapeutic intervention is critical for optimal antitumor responses. Importantly, MDSCs present within murine tumors after CTLA-4 blockade showed increased expression of CSF-1R and were capable of suppressing T cell proliferation, and CSF-1/CSF-1R expression in the human tumors was not reduced after treatment with CTLA-4 blockade immunotherapy. Taken together, our findings suggest that CSF-1R-expressing MDSCs can be targeted to modulate the tumor microenvironment and that timing of CSF-1/CSF-1R signaling blockade is critical to improving responses to checkpoint based immunotherapy. Significance: Infiltration by immunosuppressive myeloid cells contributes to tumor immune escape and can render patients resistant or less responsive to therapeutic intervention with checkpoint blocking antibodies. Our data demonstrate that blocking CSF-1/CSF-1R signaling using a monoclonal antibody directed to CSF-1R can regulate both the number

  8. Removal of the ballistocardiographic artifact from EEG-fMRI data: a canonical correlation approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assecondi, Sara; Hallez, Hans; Staelens, Steven; Lemahieu, Ignace; Bianchi, Anna M; Huiskamp, Geertjan M

    2009-01-01

    The simultaneous recording of electroencephalogram (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) can give new insights into how the brain functions. However, the strong electromagnetic field of the MR scanner generates artifacts that obscure the EEG and diminish its readability. Among them, the ballistocardiographic artifact (BCGa) that appears on the EEG is believed to be related to blood flow in scalp arteries leading to electrode movements. Average artifact subtraction (AAS) techniques, used to remove the BCGa, assume a deterministic nature of the artifact. This assumption may be too strong, considering the blood flow related nature of the phenomenon. In this work we propose a new method, based on canonical correlation analysis (CCA) and blind source separation (BSS) techniques, to reduce the BCGa from simultaneously recorded EEG-fMRI. We optimized the method to reduce the user's interaction to a minimum. When tested on six subjects, recorded in 1.5 T or 3 T, the average artifact extracted with BSS-CCA and AAS did not show significant differences, proving the absence of systematic errors. On the other hand, when compared on the basis of intra-subject variability, we found significant differences and better performance of the proposed method with respect to AAS. We demonstrated that our method deals with the intrinsic subject variability specific to the artifact that may cause averaging techniques to fail.

  9. The influence of protein malnutrition on the production of GM-CSF and M-CSF by macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalila Cunha de Oliveira

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT It is well established that protein malnutrition (PM impairs immune defenses and increases susceptibility to infection. Macrophages are cells that play a central role in innate immunity, constituting one of the first barriers against infections. Macrophages produce several soluble factors, including cytokines and growth factors, important to the immune response. Among those growth factors, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF. GM-CSF and M-CSF are important to monocyte and macrophage development and stimulation of the immune response process. Knowing the importance of GM-CSF and M-CSF, we sought to investigate the influence of PM on macrophage production of these growth factors. Two-month-old male BALB/c mice were subjected to PM with a low-protein diet (2% and compared to a control diet (12% mouse group. Nutritional status, hemogram and the number of peritoneal cells were evaluated. Additionally, peritoneal macrophages were cultured and the production of GM-CSF and M-CSF and mRNA expression were evaluated. To determine if PM altered macrophage production of GM-CSF and M-CSF, they were stimulated with TNF-α. The PM animals had anemia, leukopenia and a reduced number of peritoneal cells. The production of M-CSF was not different between groups; however, cells from PM animals, stimulated with or without TNF-α, presented reduced capability to produce GM-CSF. These data imply that PM interferes with the production of GM-CSF, and consequently would affect the production and maturation of hematopoietic cells and the immune response.

  10. Reduction of variable-truncation artifacts from beam occlusion during in situ x-ray tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borg, Leise; Jørgensen, Jakob Sauer; Frikel, Jürgen

    2017-01-01

    Many in situ x-ray tomography studies require experimental rigs which may partially occlude the beam and cause parts of the projection data to be missing. In a study of fluid flow in porous chalk using a percolation cell with four metal bars drastic streak artifacts arise in the filtered...... and artifact-reduction methods are designed in context of FBP reconstruction motivated by computational efficiency practical for large, real synchrotron data. While a specific variable-truncation case is considered, the proposed methods can be applied to general data cut-offs arising in different in situ x-ray...... backprojection (FBP) reconstruction at certain orientations. Projections with non-trivial variable truncation caused by the metal bars are the source of these variable-truncation artifacts. To understand the artifacts a mathematical model of variable-truncation data as a function of metal bar radius and distance...

  11. Ripple artifact reduction using slice overlap in slice encoding for metal artifact correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Harder, J Chiel; van Yperen, Gert H; Blume, Ulrike A; Bos, Clemens

    2015-01-01

    Multispectral imaging (MSI) significantly reduces metal artifacts. Yet, especially in techniques that use gradient selection, such as slice encoding for metal artifact correction (SEMAC), a residual ripple artifact may be prominent. Here, an analysis is presented of the ripple artifact and of slice overlap as an approach to reduce the artifact. The ripple artifact was analyzed theoretically to clarify its cause. Slice overlap, conceptually similar to spectral bin overlap in multi-acquisition with variable resonances image combination (MAVRIC), was achieved by reducing the selection gradient and, thus, increasing the slice profile width. Time domain simulations and phantom experiments were performed to validate the analyses and proposed solution. Discontinuities between slices are aggravated by signal displacement in the frequency encoding direction in areas with deviating B0. Specifically, it was demonstrated that ripple artifacts appear only where B0 varies both in-plane and through-plane. Simulations and phantom studies of metal implants confirmed the efficacy of slice overlap to reduce the artifact. The ripple artifact is an important limitation of gradient selection based MSI techniques, and can be understood using the presented simulations. At a scan-time penalty, slice overlap effectively addressed the artifact, thereby improving image quality near metal implants. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Pivotal Roles of GM-CSF in Autoimmunity and Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiomi, Aoi; Usui, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a hematopoietic growth factor, which stimulates the proliferation of granulocytes and macrophages from bone marrow precursor cells. In autoimmune and inflammatory diseases, Th17 cells have been considered as strong inducers of tissue inflammation. However, recent evidence indicates that GM-CSF has prominent proinflammatory functions and that this growth factor (not IL-17) is critical for the pathogenicity of CD4+ T cells. Therefore, the mechanism of GM-CSF-producing CD4+ T cell differentiation and the role of GM-CSF in the development of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases are gaining increasing attention. This review summarizes the latest knowledge of GM-CSF and its relationship with autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. The potential therapies targeting GM-CSF as well as their possible side effects have also been addressed in this review. PMID:25838639

  13. Comparison of the Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) Toluidine Red Unheated Serum Test and the CSF Rapid Plasma Reagin Test with the CSF Venereal Disease Research Laboratory Test for Diagnosis of Neurosyphilis among HIV-Negative Syphilis Patients in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lin; Gu, Xin; Peng, Rui-Rui; Wang, Cuini; Gao, Zixiao; Gao, Ying; Shi, Mei; Guan, Zhifang; Seña, Arlene C.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to investigate the performance of nontreponemal antibody tests in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) specimens from syphilis patients. From September 2009 to September 2012, CSF specimens were collected at the Shanghai Skin Disease Hospital in Shanghai, China, from 1,132 syphilis patients without HIV infection, including 154 with symptomatic and 56 with asymptomatic neurosyphilis. All of the CSF specimens underwent testing with a rapid plasma reagin (RPR) test, an RPR-V (commercial RPR antigen diluted 1:2 in 10% saline) test, the toluidine red unheated serum test (TRUST), and the Venereal Disease Research Laboratory (VDRL) test. Specificities, sensitivities, positive predictive values (PPVs), negative predictive values (NPVs), and kappa values were calculated to determine the performances of the tests. We compared results of the CSF-VDRL, CSF-RPR, CSF-RPR-V, and CSF-TRUST among patients with symptomatic and asymptomatic neurosyphilis who had reactive CSF-Treponema pallidum particle agglutination (TPPA) test results. Overall, the CSF-VDRL test was reactive in 261 patients (23.1%). There were no cases in which the CSF-VDRL was nonreactive and CSF-RPR, CSF-RPR-V, or CSF-TRUST was reactive. Agreement between the results of CSF-TRUST and CSF-RPR was almost perfect (κ = 0.861), with substantial agreement between the results of CSF-RPR and CSF-RPR-V (κ = 0.740). The sensitivities of CSF-VDRL, CSF-RPR, CSF-RPR-V, and CSF-TRUST were 81.4%, 76.2%, 79.5%, and 76.2%, respectively. Compared to CSF-VDRL, CSF-RPR, CSF-RPR-V, and CSF-TRUST had comparable PPVs and NPVs. However, the specificity of CSF-VDRL (90.3%) was significantly lower than those of the other tests (92.7 to 93.4%). Therefore, CSF-RPR, CSF-RPR-V, and CSF-TRUST can be considered alternative tests for neurosyphilis diagnosis in HIV-negative populations, particularly when the CSF-VDRL is not available. PMID:24335955

  14. Characterization of lipoproteins in human and canine cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitas, R.E.; Weisgraber, K.H.; Boyles, J.K.; Lee, S.; Mahley, R.W.

    1986-01-01

    Previously the authors demonstrated that rat brain astrocytes in vitro synthesize and secrete apo-E and possess apo-B,E(LDL) receptors. The apo-E secreted by astrocytes and apo-E in rat brain extracts differed from serum apo-E in two respects. Brain apo-E had a higher apparent molecular weight and a higher percentage of more acidic isoforms. To characterize further the apo-E within the central nervous system, apo-E in human and canine CSF was investigated. Compared to plasma apo-E, CSF apo-E had a higher apparent M/sub r/ and a higher percentage of acidic isoforms which were sialylated, as shown by neuraminidase digestion. The apo-E in human CSF was approx.5-10% of the plasma level. In CSF 60-80% of the apo-E was in lipoproteins with d = 1.09-1.15. The remainder of the apo-E was in the d > 1.21 fraction. Human CSF lipoproteins were primarily spherical (110-190 A) while canine CSF lipoproteins were a mixture of discs (205 x 65 A) while canine CSF lipoproteins were a mixture of discs (205 x 65 A) and spheres (100-150 A). The CSF also contained apo-AI in the d = 1.09-1.15 g/ml fraction. Human CSF lipoproteins containing both apo-E and apo-AI were isolated on an anti-apo-E affinity column, suggesting that apo-E and AI occurred in the same particles. The CSF apo-E-containing lipoproteins competed for binding of 125 I-LDL to the apo-B,E(LDL) receptor. There was no detectable apo-B in CSF. These data suggest that CSF lipoproteins might transport lipid and regulate lipid homeostasis within the brain

  15. Cilia driven flow networks in the brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong; Faubel, Regina; Westendorf, Chrsitian; Eichele, Gregor; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    Neurons exchange soluble substances via the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) that fills the ventricular system. The walls of the ventricular cavities are covered with motile cilia that constantly beat and thereby induce a directional flow. We recently discovered that cilia in the third ventricle generate a complex flow pattern leading to partitioning of the ventricular volume and site-directed transport paths along the walls. Transient and daily recurrent alterations in the cilia beating direction lead to changes in the flow pattern. This has consequences for delivery of CSF components along the near wall flow. The contribution of this cilia-induced flow to overall CSF flow remains to be investigated. The state-of-art lattice Boltzmann method is adapted for studying the CFS flow. The 3D geometry of the third ventricle at high resolution was reconstructed. Simulation of CSF flow without cilia in this geometry confirmed that the previous idea about unidirectional flow does not explain how different components of CSF can be delivered to their various target sites. We study the contribution of the cilia-induced flow pattern to overall CSF flow and identify target areas for site-specific delivery of CSF-constituents with respect to the temporal changes.

  16. Epithelial GM-CSF induction by Candida glabrata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L; Dongari-Bagtzoglou, A

    2009-08-01

    The main cytokine induced by the interaction of oral epithelial cells with C. glabrata is granulocyte monocyte colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF); however, the mechanisms regulating this response are unknown. Based on previously published information on the interactions of C. albicans with oral epithelial cells, we hypothesized that interaction with viable C. glabrata triggers GM-CSF synthesis via NF-kappaB activation. We found that C. glabrata-induced GM-CSF synthesis was adhesion-dependent, enhanced by endocytosis, and required fungal viability. NF-kappaB activation was noted during interaction of epithelial cells with C. glabrata, and pre-treatment with an NF-kappaB inhibitor partly inhibited GM-CSF synthesis. Blocking TLR4 with anti-TLR4 antibody did not inhibit GM-CSF production. In contrast, an anti-CDw17 antibody triggered significant inhibition of NF-kappaB activation and GM-CSF synthesis. beta-glucans did not stimulate GM-CSF synthesis, suggesting that the CDw17/NF-kappaB/GM-CSF pathway may be beta-glucan-independent. This study provides new insights into the mechanism of GM-CSF induction by C. glabrata.

  17. Radiologic assessment of spinal CSF leakage in spontaneous intracranial hypotension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Chang Jin; Kim, Ji Hyung; Kim, Jang Sung; Kim, Sun Yong; Suh, Jung Ho

    1999-01-01

    To assess the usefulness of imaging modalities in the detection of spinal CSF leakage in spontaneous intracranial hypotension. Fifteen patients who complained of postural headache without any preceding cause showed typical brain MR findings of intracranial hypotension, including radiologically confirmed CSF leakage. All fifteen underwent brain MRI and radionuclide cisternography. CT myelography was performed in eight patients and spinal MRI in six. Medical records, imaging findings and the incidence of spinal CSF leakage during each modality were retrospectively reviewed. CSF leakage was most common at the cervicothoracic junction, where in seven of 15 cases it was seen on radionuclide cisternography as increased focal paraspinal activity. Leakage was noted at the mid-tho-racic level in three patients, at the upper thoracic level in two, and at the cervical and lumbar levels in the remaining two. In two patients multiple CSF leaks were noted, and in all, early radioactive accumulation in the bladder was visualized. CT myelography revealed extrathecal and paraspinal contrast leakage in three of eight patients, and among those who underwent spinal MRI, dural enhancement was observed at the site of CSF leakage in all six, abnormal CSF signal in the neural foramen in one, and epidural CSF collection in one. Radionuclide cisternography is a useful method for the detection of CSF leakage in spontaneous intracranial hypotension. CT myelography and spinal MRI help determine the precise location of leakage

  18. Occurrence of occult CSF leaks during standard FESS procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucher, S; Kugler, A; Probst, E; Epprecht, L; Stadler, R S; Holzmann, D; Soyka, M B

    2018-03-18

    To determine the incidence of occult cerebrospinal fluid leaks (CSF) after functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS) and to evaluate the diagnostic performance of beta2-transferrin in blood-contaminated conditions. Prospective cohort study. An analysis of 57 intraoperative samples using hydrogel 6 beta2-transferrin assay after FESS was undertaken. In case of CSF positive samples and continuing rhinorrhea, reanalysis after more than 1 year was conducted. In-vivo analysis of a primary spontaneous CSF leak sample took place to verify difficulties in detecting beta2-transferrin in blood-contaminated settings. Own titrations were performed to evaluate detection limits of CSF by beta2-transferrin and beta-trace protein assays in these settings. An incidence of 13% for occult CSF leaks after FESS was found. In blood-contaminated conditions, routine beta2-transferrin assays showed low sensitivity. In over 1 year follow-up, all samples were negative for CSF and none of them developed clinical relevant CSF leaks or meningitis. Occult and clinically irrelevant CSF leaks do occur in a significant proportion of patients during and shortly after FESS. Intra- and postoperatively, routine beta2-transferrin assays show low sensitivity. They should not be used in these settings. The clinical course of patients with occult CSF leaks indicated possibility of an uneventful follow-up.

  19. Evaluating an artifact in design science research

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Herselman, M

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we describe the iterative evaluation of an artifact developed through the application of Design Science Research (DSR) methodology in a resource constrained environment. In the DSR process the aspect of evaluation is often done...

  20. Comparing the performance characteristics of CSF-TRUST and CSF-VDRL for syphilis: a cross-sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Gu, Weiming; Yang, Yang; Wu, Lei; Yang, Sheng; Ng, Lai-King

    2013-01-01

    Objective In this study, we aimed to determine the performance characteristics of toluidine red unheated serum test on cerebrospinal fluids (CSF-TRUST) as compared to venereal disease research laboratory test on cerebrospinal fluids (CSF-VDRL) for laboratory the diagnosis of neurosyphilis. Design A cross-sectional study. Setting Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) clinics. Participants and methods CSF and serum samples were collected from 824 individual STD clinic patients who have syphili...

  1. The effect of CSF-1 administration on lung maturation in a mouse model of neonatal hyperoxia exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Christina V; Alikhan, Maliha A; O'Reilly, Megan; Sozo, Foula; Williams, Timothy M; Harding, Richard; Jenkin, Graham; Ricardo, Sharon D

    2014-09-06

    Lung immaturity due to preterm birth is a significant complication affecting neonatal health. Despite the detrimental effects of supplemental oxygen on alveolar formation, it remains an important treatment for infants with respiratory distress. Macrophages are traditionally associated with the propagation of inflammatory insults, however increased appreciation of their diversity has revealed essential functions in development and regeneration. Macrophage regulatory cytokine Colony-Stimulating Factor-1 (CSF-1) was investigated in a model of neonatal hyperoxia exposure, with the aim of promoting macrophages associated with alveologenesis to protect/rescue lung development and function. Neonatal mice were exposed to normoxia (21% oxygen) or hyperoxia (Hyp; 65% oxygen); and administered CSF-1 (0.5 μg/g, daily × 5) or vehicle (PBS) in two treatment regimes; 1) after hyperoxia from postnatal day (P)7-11, or 2) concurrently with five days of hyperoxia from P1-5. Lung structure, function and macrophages were assessed using alveolar morphometry, barometric whole-body plethysmography and flow cytometry. Seven days of hyperoxia resulted in an 18% decrease in body weight and perturbation of lung structure and function. In regime 1, growth restriction persisted in the Hyp + PBS and Hyp + CSF-1 groups, although perturbations in respiratory function were resolved by P35. CSF-1 increased CSF-1R+/F4/80+ macrophage number by 34% at P11 compared to Hyp + PBS, but was not associated with growth or lung structural rescue. In regime 2, five days of hyperoxia did not cause initial growth restriction in the Hyp + PBS and Hyp + CSF-1 groups, although body weight was decreased at P35 with CSF-1. CSF-1 was not associated with increased macrophages, or with functional perturbation in the adult. Overall, CSF-1 did not rescue the growth and lung defects associated with hyperoxia in this model; however, an increase in CSF-1R+ macrophages was not associated with an

  2. Computed tomography in the CSF seeding of brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Yoshio; Fujimoto, Masahito; Naruse, Shoji; Ueda, Satoshi; Hirakawa, Kimiyoshi

    1981-01-01

    In the past three years nine cases of brain tumors with CSF seeding have been revealed by computed tomography (CT). We have been analyzing the CT pattern of CSF seeding, CSF cytology, and spinal metastasis. The brain tumors were classified as follows: five medulloblastomas, two glioblastomas, one germinoma, and one meningeal carcinomatosis. Their CT patterns were divided into three groups: 1) diffuse seeding of the basal cisterns. 2) invasion of the ventricular wall. 3) solitary metastasis in the ventricle. The subarachnoid seeding included four medulloblastomas and one meningeal carcinomatosis. The second type of seeding included two glioblastomas and one germinoma. One medulloblastoma had a single metastasis in the lateral ventricle. In the medulloblastomas, the diffuse seeding of the basal cisterns was more common than the invasion of the ventricular wall or solitary metastasis in the ventricle. Medulloblastomas were also accompanied by spinal metastasis. Because there were many cases of spinal metastasis in the first type of seeding, we concluded that there was a definite correlation between the CSF seeding of the basal cisterns and spinal metastasis. Needless to say, CT was the most important method for the diagnosis of the CSF seeding of brain tumors. However, because there was a case of CSF seeding which had not been demonstrated by CT, we also emphasized the importance of neurological examination and CSF cytology in the diagnosis of the CSF seeding of brain tumors. (author)

  3. MR phase imaging and cerebrospinal fluid flow in the head and spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, L.M.; Di Chiro, G.

    1990-01-01

    Motion of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in and around the brain spinal cord was examined in healthy subjects and in a number of patients with abnormalities of the CSF circulation. The pulsatile motion of the CSF was determined by spin echo phase (velocity) imaging, sometimes in combination with gradient echo phase contrast cine. Differences in flow patterns across CSF spaces were observed: Flow reversal in the cerebellomedullary cistern and lumbar area relative to cervical CSF, and in the posterior versus the anterior subarachnoid space in the spinal canal. Flow communication was demonstrated in known communicating cysts or cavities. Differences in flow were also noted across spinal narrowing or block, and across the walls of a variety of cystic lesions in the brain and spinal cord. MR phase imaging of CSF flow provides pathophysiological information of potential clinical importance for the assessment of diseases affecting the CSF circulation. (orig.)

  4. Capillary Electrophoresis Artifact Due to Eosin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Kathleen M.; Berg, Karin D.; Geiger, Tanya; Hafez, Michael; Flickinger, Katie A.; Cooper, Lisa; Pearson, Patrick; Eshleman, James R.

    2005-01-01

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) is a commonly used tool in the analysis of fluorescently labeled PCR amplification products. We have identified a CE artifact caused by the tissue stain eosin that can complicate the interpretation of CE data. The artifact was detected during routine analysis of a DNA sample isolated from a formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sample considered histologically suspicious for a B-cell neoplasm. A standard clinical PCR and CE assay for immunoglobulin heavy chain (IGH) gene rearrangement revealed a weak polyclonal population of rearranged IGH genes and a 71 base peak suspicious for IGH clonality. The spectral properties of the 71 base peak were unusual in that although the dominant fluorescence of the peak was blue, it also fluoresced in green and yellow (blue>green>yellow), raising the suspicion that the peak might represent an artifact. CE analysis of the genomic DNA sample without PCR amplification demonstrated the presence of the 71 base peak, suggesting that the artifact was caused by a contaminant within the DNA sample itself. We demonstrate that eosin, which was used to stain the formalin-fixed tissue during processing, yields a discrete 71 base peak of similar morphology to the contaminant peak on CE analysis. The data suggest that eosin in the fixed tissue was not completely eliminated during nucleic acid extraction, resulting in the artifact peak. We discuss the implications of this potentially common contaminant on the interpretation of CE data and demonstrate that artifacts caused by eosin can be avoided by using more stringent DNA purification steps. Histological dyes may fluoresce, and artifacts from them should be considered when primary peaks contain additional underlying peaks of other colors. PMID:15681487

  5. [Therapeutic use of hematopoietic growth factors. II. GM-CSF and G-CSF].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, B; Arock, M

    1998-01-01

    The second part of this review on haematopoietic growth factors is focused on the therapeutic use of GM-CSF and G-CSF. Such therapeutic applications have raised very great hopes for clinical haematology. However, it should not be forgotten that these haematopoietic growth factors, which are very costly, are powerful two-edged weapons capable of triggering a cascade of reactions, and have a field of activity that often goes beyond the single highly specific property which it is hoped they possess. The risks and costs of their use are currently being evaluated. Waited developments concerning these molecules focus on three axes: a best use of factors already commercialized, especially concerning adaptation of posologies and new indications, the development of hybrid molecules from already known haematopoietic growth factors, possessing the advantages of respective factors, but not their disadvantages, the discovery of new haematopoietic growth factors with potential therapeutic application.

  6. Human autologous in vitro models of glioma immunogene therapy using B7-2, GM-CSF, and IL12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parney, I.F.; Farr-Jones, M.A.; Kane, K.; Chang, L.-J.; Petruk, K.C.

    2002-01-01

    Cancer immunogene therapy is based on vaccination with radiated, autologous tumor cells transduced with immunostimulatory genes. To help determine an optimal glioma immunogene therapy strategy, we stimulated lymphocytes with autologous human glioma cells transduced with B7-2 (CD86), granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and/or interleukin-12 (IL12). A human glioma-derived cell culture (Ed147.BT) was transduced with B7-2, GM-CSF, and/or IL12 using retroviral vectors. Autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were co-cultured with irradiated gene-transduced tumor alone or a combination of radiated wild type and gene-transduced cells. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells proliferation was determined by serial cell counts. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells phenotype was assessed by flow cytometry for CD4, CD8, and CD16. Anti-tumor cytotoxicity was determined by chromium-51 ( 51 Cr) release assay. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells cell numbers all decreased during primary stimulation but tumor cells expressing B7-2 or GM-CSF consistently caused secondary proliferation. Tumors expressing B7-2 and GM-CSF or B7-2,GM-CSF,and IL12 consistently increased PBMC CD8+ (cytotoxic T) and CD16+ (natural killer) percentages. Interestingly, anti-tumor cytotoxicity only exceeded that of PBMC stimulated with wild type tumor alone when peripheral blood mononuclear cells were stimulated with both wild type tumor and B7-2/GM-CSF- (but not IL12) transduced cells. PBMC proliferation and phenotype is altered as expected by exposure to immunostimulatory gene-transduced tumor. However, transduced tumor cells alone do not stimulate greater anti-tumor cytotoxicity than wild type tumor. Only B7-2/GM-CSF-transduced cells combined with wild type produced increased cytotoxicity. This may reflect selection of turnor subclones with limited antigenic spectra during retrovirus-mediated gene transfer. (author)

  7. The pathway of subarachnoid CSF moving into the spinal parenchyma and the role of astrocytic aquaporin-4 in this process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Fang; Zhang, Cui; Xue, Rong; Shan, Lidong; Gong, Shan; Wang, Guoqing; Tao, Jin; Xu, Guangyin; Zhang, Guoxing; Wang, Linhui

    2017-08-01

    It has been proved that cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in the subarachnoid space could reenter the brain parenchyma via the perivascular space. The present study was designed to explore the pathway of subarachnoid CSF flux into the spinal cord and the potential role of aquaporin-4 (AQP4) in this process. Fluorescently tagged cadaverine, for the first time, was used to study CSF movement in mice. Following intracisternal infusion of CSF tracers, the cervical spinal cord was sliced and prepared for fluorescence imaging. Some sections were subject with immunostaining in order to observe tracer distribution and AQP4 expression. Fluorescently tagged cadaverine rapidly entered the spinal cord. Tracer influx into the spinal parenchyma was time dependent. At 10min post-infusion, cadaverine was largely distributed in the superficial tissue adjacent to the pial surface. At 70min post-infusion, cadaverine was distributed in the whole cord and especially concentrated in the gray matter. Furthermore, fluorescent tracer could enter the spinal parenchyma either along the perivascular space or across the pial surface. AQP4 was observed highly expressed in the astrocytic endfeet surrounding blood vessels and the pial surface. Blocking AQP4 by its specific inhibitor TGN-020 strikingly reduced the inflow of CSF tracers into the spinal cord. Subarachnoid CSF could flow into the spinal cord along the perivascular space or across the pial surface, in which AQP4 is involved. Our observation provides a basis for the study on CSF movement in the spinal cord when some neurological diseases occur. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. G-CSF treatment after myocardial infarction: impact on bone marrow-derived vs cardiac progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Stefan; Huber, Bruno C; Fischer, Rebekka; Groebner, Michael; Hacker, Marcus; David, Robert; Zaruba, Marc-Michael; Vallaster, Marcus; Rischpler, Christoph; Wilke, Andrea; Gerbitz, Armin; Franz, Wolfgang-Michael

    2008-06-01

    Besides its classical function in the field of autologous and allogenic stem cell transplantation, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) was shown to have protective effects after myocardial infarction (MI) by mobilization of bone marrow-derived progenitor cells (BMCs) and in addition by activation of multiple signaling pathways. In the present study, we focused on the impact of G-CSF on migration of BMCs and the impact on resident cardiac cells after MI. Mice (C57BL/6J) were sublethally irradiated, and BM from green fluorescent protein (GFP)-transgenic mice was transplanted. Coronary artery ligation was performed 10 weeks later. G-CSF (100 microg/kg) was daily injected for 6 days. Subpopulations of enhanced GFP(+) cells in peripheral blood, bone marrow, and heart were characterized by flow cytometry. Growth factor expression in the heart was analyzed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Perfusion was investigated in vivo by gated single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). G-CSF-treated animals revealed a reduced migration of c-kit(+) and CXCR-4(+) BMCs associated with decreased expression levels of the corresponding growth factors, namely stem cell factor and stromal-derived factor-1 alpha in ischemic myocardium. In contrast, the number of resident cardiac Sca-1(+) cells was significantly increased. However, SPECT-perfusion showed no differences in infarct size between G-CSF-treated and control animals 6 days after MI. Our study shows that G-CSF treatment after MI reduces migration capacity of BMCs into ischemic tissue, but increases the number of resident cardiac cells. To optimize homing capacity a combination of G-CSF with other agents may optimize cytokine therapy after MI.

  9. Risk score for identifying adults with CSF pleocytosis and negative CSF Gram stain at low risk for an urgent treatable cause

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hasbun, Rodrigo; Bijlsma, Merijn; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; Khoury, Nabil; Hadi, Christiane M.; van der Ende, Arie; Wootton, Susan H.; Salazar, Lucrecia; Hossain, Md Monir; Beilke, Mark; van de Beek, Diederik

    2013-01-01

    We aimed to derive and validate a risk score that identifies adults with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pleocytosis and a negative CSF Gram stain at low risk for an urgent treatable cause. Patients with CSF pleocytosis and a negative CSF Gram stain were stratified into a prospective derivation (n = 193)

  10. GM-CSF, IL-3 and G-CSF receptors on acute myeloid leukemia cells : function, regulation of expression, and ligand binding characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.M. Budel (Leo)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractIL-3, GM-CSF and G-CSF stimulate proliferation of human acute myeloid leukemia in vitro, but patterns of response among clinical cases are diverse. As described in Chapters 2 and 3, numbers and affinity of IL-3, GM-CSF and G-CSF receptors on cells of patients with AML were assessed and

  11. Stem Cell Mobilization with G-CSF versus Cyclophosphamide plus G-CSF in Mexican Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meraz, José Eugenio Vázquez; Arellano-Galindo, José; Avalos, Armando Martínez; Mendoza-García, Emma; Jiménez-Hernández, Elva

    2016-01-01

    Fifty-six aphaereses were performed in 23 pediatric patients with malignant hematological and solid tumors, following three different protocols for PBPC mobilization and distributed as follows: A: seventeen mobilized with 4 g/m(2) of cyclophosphamide (CFA) and 10 μg/kg/day of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), B: nineteen with CFA + G-CSF, and C: twenty only with G-CSF when the WBC count exceeded 10 × 10(9)/L. The average number of MNC/kg body weight (BW)/aphaeresis was 0.4 × 10(8) (0.1-1.4), 2.25 × 10(8) (0.56-6.28), and 1.02 × 10(8) (0.34-2.5) whereas the average number of CD34+ cells/kg BW/aphaeresis was 0.18 × 10(6)/kg (0.09-0.34), 1.04 × 10(6) (0.19-9.3), and 0.59 × 10(6) (0.17-0.87) and the count of CFU/kg BW/aphaeresis was 1.11 × 10(5) (0.31-2.12), 1.16 × 10(5) (0.64-2.97), and 1.12 × 10(5) (0.3-6.63) in groups A, B, and C, respectively. The collection was better in group B versus group A (p = 0.007 and p = 0.05, resp.) and in group C versus group A (p = 0.08 and p = 0.05, resp.). The collection of PBPCs was more effective in the group mobilized with CFM + G-CSF when the WBC exceeded 10 × 10(3)/μL in terms of MNC and CD34+ cells and there was no toxicity of the chemotherapy.

  12. Stem Cell Mobilization with G-CSF versus Cyclophosphamide plus G-CSF in Mexican Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Eugenio Vázquez Meraz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fifty-six aphaereses were performed in 23 pediatric patients with malignant hematological and solid tumors, following three different protocols for PBPC mobilization and distributed as follows: A: seventeen mobilized with 4 g/m2 of cyclophosphamide (CFA and 10 μg/kg/day of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF, B: nineteen with CFA + G-CSF, and C: twenty only with G-CSF when the WBC count exceeded 10 × 109/L. The average number of MNC/kg body weight (BW/aphaeresis was 0.4 × 108 (0.1–1.4, 2.25 × 108 (0.56–6.28, and 1.02 × 108 (0.34–2.5 whereas the average number of CD34+ cells/kg BW/aphaeresis was 0.18 × 106/kg (0.09–0.34, 1.04 × 106 (0.19–9.3, and 0.59 × 106 (0.17–0.87 and the count of CFU/kg BW/aphaeresis was 1.11 × 105 (0.31–2.12, 1.16 × 105 (0.64–2.97, and 1.12 × 105 (0.3–6.63 in groups A, B, and C, respectively. The collection was better in group B versus group A (p=0.007 and p=0.05, resp. and in group C versus group A (p=0.08 and p=0.05, resp.. The collection of PBPCs was more effective in the group mobilized with CFM + G-CSF when the WBC exceeded 10 × 103/μL in terms of MNC and CD34+ cells and there was no toxicity of the chemotherapy.

  13. Reduction of variable-truncation artifacts from beam occlusion during in situ x-ray tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borg, Leise; Jørgensen, Jakob S.; Frikel, Jürgen; Sporring, Jon

    2017-12-01

    Many in situ x-ray tomography studies require experimental rigs which may partially occlude the beam and cause parts of the projection data to be missing. In a study of fluid flow in porous chalk using a percolation cell with four metal bars drastic streak artifacts arise in the filtered backprojection (FBP) reconstruction at certain orientations. Projections with non-trivial variable truncation caused by the metal bars are the source of these variable-truncation artifacts. To understand the artifacts a mathematical model of variable-truncation data as a function of metal bar radius and distance to sample is derived and verified numerically and with experimental data. The model accurately describes the arising variable-truncation artifacts across simulated variations of the experimental setup. Three variable-truncation artifact-reduction methods are proposed, all aimed at addressing sinogram discontinuities that are shown to be the source of the streaks. The ‘reduction to limited angle’ (RLA) method simply keeps only non-truncated projections; the ‘detector-directed smoothing’ (DDS) method smooths the discontinuities; while the ‘reflexive boundary condition’ (RBC) method enforces a zero derivative at the discontinuities. Experimental results using both simulated and real data show that the proposed methods effectively reduce variable-truncation artifacts. The RBC method is found to provide the best artifact reduction and preservation of image features using both visual and quantitative assessment. The analysis and artifact-reduction methods are designed in context of FBP reconstruction motivated by computational efficiency practical for large, real synchrotron data. While a specific variable-truncation case is considered, the proposed methods can be applied to general data cut-offs arising in different in situ x-ray tomography experiments.

  14. Reduced aliasing artifacts using shaking projection k-space sampling trajectory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yan-Chun; Du, Jiang; Yang, Wen-Chao; Duan, Chai-Jie; Wang, Hao-Yu; Gao, Song; Bao, Shang-Lian

    2014-03-01

    Radial imaging techniques, such as projection-reconstruction (PR), are used in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for dynamic imaging, angiography, and short-T2 imaging. They are less sensitive to flow and motion artifacts, and support fast imaging with short echo times. However, aliasing and streaking artifacts are two main sources which degrade radial imaging quality. For a given fixed number of k-space projections, data distributions along radial and angular directions will influence the level of aliasing and streaking artifacts. Conventional radial k-space sampling trajectory introduces an aliasing artifact at the first principal ring of point spread function (PSF). In this paper, a shaking projection (SP) k-space sampling trajectory was proposed to reduce aliasing artifacts in MR images. SP sampling trajectory shifts the projection alternately along the k-space center, which separates k-space data in the azimuthal direction. Simulations based on conventional and SP sampling trajectories were compared with the same number projections. A significant reduction of aliasing artifacts was observed using the SP sampling trajectory. These two trajectories were also compared with different sampling frequencies. A SP trajectory has the same aliasing character when using half sampling frequency (or half data) for reconstruction. SNR comparisons with different white noise levels show that these two trajectories have the same SNR character. In conclusion, the SP trajectory can reduce the aliasing artifact without decreasing SNR and also provide a way for undersampling reconstruction. Furthermore, this method can be applied to three-dimensional (3D) hybrid or spherical radial k-space sampling for a more efficient reduction of aliasing artifacts.

  15. Reduced aliasing artifacts using shaking projection k-space sampling trajectory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Yan-Chun; Yang Wen-Chao; Wang Hao-Yu; Gao Song; Bao Shang-Lian; Du Jiang; Duan Chai-Jie

    2014-01-01

    Radial imaging techniques, such as projection-reconstruction (PR), are used in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for dynamic imaging, angiography, and short-T2 imaging. They are less sensitive to flow and motion artifacts, and support fast imaging with short echo times. However, aliasing and streaking artifacts are two main sources which degrade radial imaging quality. For a given fixed number of k-space projections, data distributions along radial and angular directions will influence the level of aliasing and streaking artifacts. Conventional radial k-space sampling trajectory introduces an aliasing artifact at the first principal ring of point spread function (PSF). In this paper, a shaking projection (SP) k-space sampling trajectory was proposed to reduce aliasing artifacts in MR images. SP sampling trajectory shifts the projection alternately along the k-space center, which separates k-space data in the azimuthal direction. Simulations based on conventional and SP sampling trajectories were compared with the same number projections. A significant reduction of aliasing artifacts was observed using the SP sampling trajectory. These two trajectories were also compared with different sampling frequencies. A SP trajectory has the same aliasing character when using half sampling frequency (or half data) for reconstruction. SNR comparisons with different white noise levels show that these two trajectories have the same SNR character. In conclusion, the SP trajectory can reduce the aliasing artifact without decreasing SNR and also provide a way for undersampling reconstruction. Furthermore, this method can be applied to three-dimensional (3D) hybrid or spherical radial k-space sampling for a more efficient reduction of aliasing artifacts

  16. Lens artifacts in human fetal eyes - the challenge of interpreting the histomorphology of human fetal lenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herwig, Martina C; Müller, Annette M; Klarmann-Schulz, Ute; Holz, Frank G; Loeffler, Karin U

    2014-01-01

    Evaluation of the lens, including cataractous changes, is often of paramount importance in the classification of fetal syndromes or forensic questions. On histology, the crystalline lens is - especially in fetal and infant eyes - an organ susceptible to numerous artifacts. Thus, the aim of our study was to study various factors (including fixatives) that might have an impact on lens histomorphology. Twenty eyes from ten fetuses (formalin fixation: n = 10, glutaraldehyde fixation: n = 10), matched for gestational age and abortion (spontaneous vs. induced), were investigated macroscopically and by light microscopy. Sections were stained with routine hematoxylin & eosin (H&E), and periodic acid schiff (PAS). The age of the fetal eyes ranged from 15 to 36 weeks of gestation. Lens artifacts were analyzed and compared to fetal and adult lenses with definitive cataractous changes. In addition, 34 eyes from 27 fetuses with trisomy 21 were investigated for lens changes. All lenses showed artifacts of varying extent, in particular globules, vacuoles, clefts, anterior/posterior capsular separation, subcapsular proteinaceous material, fragmentation of the lens capsule/epithelium, and a posterior umbilication. Glutaraldehyde-fixed lenses displayed less artifacts compared to those fixed in formalin. Slight differences in the appearance of artifacts were found dependent on the fixative (formaldehyde vs glutaraldehyde) and the kind of abortion (iatrogenous vs spontaneous). The gestational age did not have a significant influence on the type and extent of lens artifacts. The lenses from fetuses with trisomy 21 displayed similar lens artifacts with no specific findings. Alterations in fetal lens morphology are extremely frequent and variable. These artifacts have to be carefully taken into account when interpreting post-mortem findings. Thus, the postmortem diagnosis of a fetal cataract should be made with great caution, and should include, in adherence to our proposed

  17. The circulation of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in the spinal canal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Antonio L.; Martinez-Bazan, Carlos; Lasheras, Juan C.

    2016-11-01

    Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) is secreted in the choroid plexus in the lateral sinuses of the brain and fills the subarachnoid space bathing the external surfaces of the brain and the spinal canal. Absence of CSF circulation has been shown to impede its physiological function that includes, among others, supplying nutrients to neuronal and glial cells and removing the waste products of cellular metabolism. Radionuclide scanning images published by Di Chiro in 1964 showed upward migration of particle tracers from the lumbar region of the spinal canal, thereby suggesting the presence of an active bulk circulation responsible for bringing fresh CSF into the spinal canal and returning a portion of it to the cranial vault. However, the existence of this slow moving bulk circulation in the spinal canal has been a subject of dispute for the last 50 years. To date, there has been no physical explanation for the mechanism responsible for the establishment of such a bulk motion. We present a perturbation analysis of the flow in an idealized model of the spinal canal and show how steady streaming could be responsible for the establishment of such a circulation. The results of this analysis are compared to flow measurements conducted on in-vitro models of the spinal canal of adult humans.

  18. Variability of CSF Alzheimer's disease biomarkers: implications for clinical practice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie J B Vos

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF biomarkers are increasingly being used for diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD. OBJECTIVE: We investigated the influence of CSF intralaboratory and interlaboratory variability on diagnostic CSF-based AD classification of subjects and identified causes of this variation. METHODS: We measured CSF amyloid-β (Aβ 1-42, total tau (t-tau, and phosphorylated tau (p-tau by INNOTEST enzyme-linked-immunosorbent assays (ELISA in a memory clinic population (n = 126. Samples were measured twice in a single or two laboratories that served as reference labs for CSF analyses in the Netherlands. Predefined cut-offs were used to classify CSF biomarkers as normal or abnormal/AD pattern. RESULTS: CSF intralaboratory variability was higher for Aβ1-42 than for t-tau and p-tau. Reanalysis led to a change in biomarker classification (normal vs. abnormal of 26% of the subjects based on Aβ1-42, 10% based on t-tau, and 29% based on p-tau. The changes in absolute biomarker concentrations were paralleled by a similar change in levels of internal control samples between different assay lots. CSF interlaboratory variability was higher for p-tau than for Aβ1-42 and t-tau, and reanalysis led to a change in biomarker classification of 12% of the subjects based on Aβ1-42, 1% based on t-tau, and 22% based on p-tau. CONCLUSIONS: Intralaboratory and interlaboratory CSF variability frequently led to change in diagnostic CSF-based AD classification for Aβ1-42 and p-tau. Lot-to-lot variation was a major cause of intralaboratory variability. This will have implications for the use of these biomarkers in clinical practice.

  19. Pitfalls and artifacts in magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulkarni, M.V.; Patton, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    As a new imaging technique, MRI is subject to new and unfamiliar artifacts. Because of the wide range of pulse sequences used in MRI, the technique is prone to some artifacts, such as even echo rephasing, which are not found in other imaging systems. With newer and stronger magnetic fields, artifacts such as those caused by chemical shift will be more pronounced. For the maintenance of high quality images, new techniques controlling quality are essential. These techniques include the development of new phantoms and new procedures. The American Association of Physicists in Medicine is currently developing guidelines for quality assurance programs. As with other imaging modalities, these quality assurance guidelines could be unique to MRI. The daily or weekly evaluation of signal-to-noise ratio, image uniformity, signal linearity, spatial linearity, spatial resolution, frequencies, etc. is essential. Some guidelines are described in the current literature. With further modifications and improvements in MRI techniques, new artifacts may be discovered. Identification of these artifacts will improve the interpretation of the image and patient management

  20. Artifacts Quantification of Metal Implants in MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrachnis, I. N.; Vlachopoulos, G. F.; Maris, T. G.; Costaridou, L. I.

    2017-11-01

    The presence of materials with different magnetic properties, such as metal implants, causes distortion of the magnetic field locally, resulting in signal voids and pile ups, i.e. susceptibility artifacts in MRI. Quantitative and unbiased measurement of the artifact is prerequisite for optimization of acquisition parameters. In this study an image gradient based segmentation method is proposed for susceptibility artifact quantification. The method captures abrupt signal alterations by calculation of the image gradient. Then the artifact is quantified in terms of its extent by an automated cross entropy thresholding method as image area percentage. The proposed method for artifact quantification was tested in phantoms containing two orthopedic implants with significantly different magnetic permeabilities. The method was compared against a method proposed in the literature, considered as a reference, demonstrating moderate to good correlation (Spearman’s rho = 0.62 and 0.802 in case of titanium and stainless steel implants). The automated character of the proposed quantification method seems promising towards MRI acquisition parameter optimization.

  1. Metallic artifacts in magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Eiji; Okuyama, Koichiro; Ishikawa, Noriyuki; Hongo, Michio; Sato, Kozo; Sashi, Ryuji; Ishikawa, Eijiro.

    1995-01-01

    Seven metallic implants with different content of magnetic materials were compared in terms of the degree of MRI artifact. The degree of artifact well correlated with the total content of iron and cobalt than the total content of ferromagnets (iron, cobalt, nickel). No significant difference was observed regarding artifact among 4 titanium alloys containing very small amount of ferromagnet (0.058%-2.5%). Pedicle screws were made from different alloys in the same shape. Those screws were inserted into the swine vertebrae and artifact was evaluated by MRI. The degree of artifact was SUS316 (stainless steel)>MP-35N (cobalt alloy)>Ti-6AI-4V (titanium alloy), 1.5 Tesla>0.5 Tesla as for magnetic intensity, and T2 (gradient echo)>T2 (long SE)>proton density>T1 as for exposure condition. The condition of the site screw was inserted in the vertebral canal was detectable by T1-weighted images of titanium alloy and cobalt alloy in 0.5 Tesla and T1-weighted images of titanium alloy in 1.5 Tesla. (S.Y)

  2. Functional changes in CSF volume estimated using measurement of water T2 relaxation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piechnik, S.K.; Evans, J.; Bary, L.H.; Wise, R.G.; Jezzard, P.

    2009-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) provides hydraulic suspension for the brain. The general concept of bulk CSF production, circulation, and reabsorption is well established, but the mechanisms of momentary CSF volume variation corresponding to vasoreactive changes are far less understood. Nine individuals

  3. Indications for CSF shunting in normal pressure hydrocephalus following subarachnoid hemorrhage with lateral ventricular size change on cine-MR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujitsuka, Mitsuyuki [Kyorin Univ., Mitaka, Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    2002-09-01

    To clarify the indications for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) shunting in normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), the author investigated changes in the pulsatile brain motions during a cardiac cycle in 17 cases with ventriculomegaly following SAH on cardiac gated cine MR images comparing with those in 50 normal adults. In 15 of these seventeen cases, the lateral ventricles not only constricted immediately following the R-wave related to brain expansion but also expanded paradoxically over the initial size during a cardiac diastole. These patterns were different from those of normal adults, and eleven of them showed excellent response to CSF shunting. Theses findings in ventricular motion during a cardiac cycle indicate that the forceful intraventricular CSF flows and stagnancy expand the ventricular walls causing compression of the surrounding brain against the skull. In the remaining two, the lateral ventricles only constricted immediately following the R-wave and the ventricular size change was similar to those of normal adults, and they were diagnosed as not requiring CSF shunting. Assessing ventricular size change on cine-MR enables non-invasive differentiation of NPH from other form of ventriculomegaly, and evaluation of the benefit of CSF shunting is also possible by this technique preoperatively. (author)

  4. Cloning and expression of porcine Colony Stimulating Factor-1 (CSF-1) and Colony Stimulating Factor-1 Receptor (CSF-1R) and analysis of the species specificity of stimulation by CSF-1 and Interleukin 34

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gow, Deborah J.; Garceau, Valerie; Kapetanovic, Ronan; Sester, David P.; Fici, Greg J.; Shelly, John A.; Wilson, Thomas L.; Hume, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor (CSF-1) controls the survival, differentiation and proliferation of cells of the mononuclear phagocyte system. A second ligand for the CSF-1R, Interleukin 34 (IL-34), has been described, but its physiological role is not yet known. The domestic pig provides an alternative to traditional rodent models for evaluating potential therapeutic applications of CSF-1R agonists and antagonists. To enable such studies, we cloned and expressed active pig CSF-1. To provide a bioassay, pig CSF-1R was expressed in the factor-dependent Ba/F3 cell line. On this transfected cell line, recombinant porcine CSF-1 and human CSF-1 had identical activity. Mouse CSF-1 does not interact with the human CSF-1 receptor but was active on pig. By contrast, porcine CSF-1 was active on mouse, human, cat and dog cells. IL-34 was previously shown to be species-specific, with mouse and human proteins demonstrating limited cross-species activity. The pig CSF-1R was equally responsive to both mouse and human IL-34. Based upon the published crystal structures of CSF-1/CSF-1R and IL34/CSF-1R complexes, we discuss the molecular basis for the species specificity. PMID:22974529

  5. Pleocytosis is not fully responsible for low CSF glucose in meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baud, Maxime O; Vitt, Jeffrey R; Robbins, Nathaniel M; Wabl, Rafael; Wilson, Michael R; Chow, Felicia C; Gelfand, Jeffrey M; Josephson, S Andrew; Miller, Steve

    2018-01-01

    The mechanism of hypoglycorrhachia-low CSF glucose-in meningitis remains unknown. We sought to evaluate the relative contribution of CSF inflammation vs microorganisms (bacteria and fungi) in lowering CSF glucose levels. We retrospectively categorized CSF profiles into microbial and aseptic meningitis and analyzed CSF leukocyte count, glucose, and protein concentrations. We assessed the relationship between these markers using multivariate and stratified linear regression analysis for initial and repeated CSF sampling. We also calculated the receiver operating characteristics of CSF glucose and CSF-to-serum glucose ratios to presumptively diagnose microbial meningitis. We found that increasing levels of CSF inflammation were associated with decreased CSF glucose levels in the microbial but not aseptic category. Moreover, elevated CSF protein levels correlated more strongly than the leukocyte count with low CSF glucose levels on initial ( R 2 = 36%, p CSF sampling ( R 2 = 46%, p CSF glucose and CSF-to-serum glucose ratios had similar low sensitivity and moderate-to-high specificity in diagnosing microbial meningitis at thresholds commonly used. The main driver of hypoglycorrhachia appears to be a combination of microbial meningitis with moderate to high degrees of CSF inflammation and proteins, suggesting that the presence of microorganisms capable of catabolizing glucose is a determinant of hypoglycorrhachia in meningitis. A major notable exception is neurosarcoidosis. Low CSF glucose and CSF-to-serum glucose ratios are useful markers for the diagnosis of microbial meningitis.

  6. CSF circulation in subjects with the empty sella syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brismar, K.; Bergstrand, G.

    1981-01-01

    In the present study the CSF circulation was analyzed in 48 subjects with ESS with gamma cisternography, pneumoencephalography (PEG) und computed tomography (CT). In 80% of the subjects the CSF circulation was retarded with convexity block which was combined with widened CSF transport pathways and basal cisterns. These findings were correlated with the clinical signs and symptoms. Headache, psychiatric symptoms, visual field defects and obesity, however, were not related to the impaired CSF circulation. It is concluded that impaired CSF dynamics leading to intermittent increase of ICP has a major impact on the development of the ESS and that most of the patients' complaints are related to this disturbance. Thus is is important to obtain information of the CSF dynamics concurrent with the diagnosis of ESS. For this purpose PEG or CT may be used as the first examination. Moreover, the patient should be examined at least every second year for symptoms and signs of progressive impairments of the CSF circulation. (orig./MG)

  7. Measurement of CSF volume with 3D-FASE MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanayama, Shoichi; Calderon, A.; Makita, Jun-ichi; Ohara, Yukou; Tsunoda, Akira; Sato, Kiyoshi.

    1997-01-01

    A noninvasive and fast cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) volume measurement method has been developed using 3D-FASE MRI and a semi-automatic segmentation process. Images with a high CSF/(gray and white matter) ratio (about 10-20) were obtained with a heavily T 2 weighted 3D-FASE sequence. The CSF region was segmented with a region growing method and the volume was calculated from the number of segmented voxels with a signal intensity weighted summation. Total measurement time was about 30 minutes for each study. The errors of the measured volumes were within 10% for the phantom experiments. Intracranial CSF volumes of normal volunteers ranged between about 100 and 200 cc and the ventricle/intracranial CSF ratio was about 10%. 3D display of the segmented intracranial and ventricle CSF regions was also carried out and proved to be useful to understand the anatomy. Increased intracranial and/or ventricle CSF volumes were obtained for a hydrocephalic patient and one patient with probable cerebral atrophy. The results suggest that the developed method could be used for the diagnosis of patients with neurological diseases. (author)

  8. CSF glial markers correlate with survival in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Süssmuth, S D; Sperfeld, A D; Hinz, A; Brettschneider, J; Endruhn, S; Ludolph, A C; Tumani, H

    2010-03-23

    In neurodegenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), CSF biomarkers are increasingly studied to evaluate their relevance for differential diagnosis, disease progression, and understanding of pathophysiologic processes. To identify a biomarker profile of neuronal and glial CSF proteins to discriminate ALS from other motor neuron diseases (MND) and to assess whether baseline levels of CSF measures in ALS are associated with the course of the disease. A total of 122 consecutive subjects with MND were included in this cross-sectional study (ALS, n = 75; lower motor neuron syndrome, n = 39; upper motor neuron diseases, n = 8). Clinical follow-up included 76 patients. We determined baseline levels of protein tau and astroglial S100beta in CSF and microglial sCD14 in CSF and serum in relation to diagnosis, duration of disease, and survival. CSF tau was significantly elevated in ALS and upper motor neuron diseases as compared to lower motor neuron diseases and controls. CSF S100beta levels were significantly lower in lower motor neuron diseases as compared to other MND. CSF concentrations of S100beta and sCD14 correlated with the survival time in patients with ALS. In motor neuron diseases, CSF tau elevation indicates the degeneration of upper motor neurons, while S100 beta and sCD14 may indicate the activation of CNS glial cells. Because S100beta and sCD14 concentrations correlate with survival in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), we suppose that the combination of both markers may be useful to obtain prognostic information in patients with ALS.

  9. [E-MTAB-587] PCR_artifacts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muino Acuna, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    WARNING: This library was yield low amount of material and it was over-amplified by PCR. This libraries are used study the robustness of several statitical methods against PCR artifacts. ChIP experiments were performed on Arabidopsis wildtype inflorescences using an antibody raised against a

  10. Mediating Artifact in Teacher Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svendsen, Bodil

    2015-01-01

    This article focuses on teacher professional development (TPD) in natural science through the 5E model as mediating artifact. The study was conducted in an upper secondary school, grounded in a school-based intervention research project. My contribution to the field of research on TPD is founded on the hypothesis that teachers would be best…

  11. Cooperative learning, problem solving and mediating artifacts

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF.MIREKU

    10, 2012. 39. Cooperative learning, problem solving and mediating artifacts. F. Bahmaei6 & N. ... out cooperative learning in the end, post-test was done and by analyzing the tests it was concluded that ... Johnson et al, 1991 b, Reynolds et al. 1995, Vidakovic .... connection of mental constructs (Hiebert, Carpenter, 1992).

  12. Inhibiting the Ca2+ Influx Induced by Human CSF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Drews

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available One potential therapeutic strategy for Alzheimer’s disease (AD is to use antibodies that bind to small soluble protein aggregates to reduce their toxic effects. However, these therapies are rarely tested in human CSF before clinical trials because of the lack of sensitive methods that enable the measurement of aggregate-induced toxicity at low concentrations. We have developed highly sensitive single vesicle and single-cell-based assays that detect the Ca2+ influx caused by the CSF of individuals affected with AD and healthy controls, and we have found comparable effects for both types of samples. We also show that an extracellular chaperone clusterin; a nanobody specific to the amyloid-β peptide (Aβ; and bapineuzumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody raised against Aβ, could all reduce the Ca2+ influx caused by synthetic Aβ oligomers but are less effective in CSF. These assays could be used to characterize potential therapeutic agents in CSF before clinical trials.

  13. Chemical meningitis related to intra-CSF liposomal cytarabine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Bénédicte; Zairi, Fahed; Boulanger, Thomas; Bonneterre, Jacques; Mortier, Laurent; Le Rhun, Emilie

    2017-10-01

    Therapeutic options of leptomeningeal metastases include intra-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) chemotherapy. Among intra-CSF agents, liposomal cytarabine has advantages but can induce specific toxicities. A BRAF-V600E-mutated melanoma leptomeningeal metastases patient, treated by dabrafenib and liposomal cytarabine, presented after the first injection of liposomal cytarabine with hyperthermia and headaches. Despite sterile CSF/blood analyses, extended intravenous antibiotics were given and the second injection was delayed. The diagnosis of chemical meningitis was finally made. Dose reduction and appropriate symptomatic treatment permitted the administration of 15 injections of liposomal cytarabine combined with dabrafenib. A confirmation of the diagnosis of chemical meningitis is essential in order (1) not to delay intra-CSF or systemic chemotherapy or (2) to limit the administration of unnecessary but potentially toxic antibiotics.

  14. Application of RI-counting method for posttraumatic CSF rhinorrhea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Takahiko; Terai, Yoshinori; Fujimoto, Shunichiro; Kawauchi, Masamitsu.

    1987-01-01

    Numerous techniques and procedures have been reported for the evaluation of CSF fistulas. Especially metrizamide CT cisternography and radioisotope (RI) cisternography have been reported to be reliable for localizing the site of CSF leakage, however, it has been difficult to diagnose the existence and the site of CSF leakages in some cases. RI-counting method, measuring RI-count of intranasal cotton pledgets after the intrathecal injection of RI ( 111 In-DTPA) is thought to be the most reliable method for detecting the presence of CSF leakage in these cases. We used six cotton pledgets which were inserted into upper, middle, and lower meatuses on both side. Because the site of pledgets with ghest RI-count has anatomical relationship to the opening of the paranasal sinus, we can surmise the leakage of dural defect and CSF leakage. RI counting method was applied to two patients in whom it was difficult to diagnose the presence of CSF leakage with other procedures. The patients were free in position for four hours after the intrathecal injection of RI, and in the prone position for 30 minutes before RI-counting of intranasal cotton pledgets. After measuring the RI-counts of six pledgets, the counts were compared with each other. The cotton pledget inserted into left middle meatus showed the highest count in both cases. From this result and finding of conventional skull tomography we speculated the site of CSF leakage to be frontal sinus or ethmoid sinus. Operation demonstrated the opening of dura into the frontal sinus in one case, and ethmoid sinus in another case. As mentioned above, RI-counting method has the advantages of detecting the existence and the site of CSF leakage. (author)

  15. The European iNPH Multicentre Study on the predictive values of resistance to CSF outflow and the CSF Tap Test in patients with idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wikkelsø, Carsten; Hellström, Per; Klinge, Petra Margarete

    2013-01-01

    The objective was to determine the sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of the CSF Tap Test (CSF TT) and resistance to CSF outflow (Rout) for the outcome of shunting in a sample of patients with idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH).......The objective was to determine the sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of the CSF Tap Test (CSF TT) and resistance to CSF outflow (Rout) for the outcome of shunting in a sample of patients with idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH)....

  16. Delivery of GM-CSF to Protect against Influenza Pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Renuka; Hillberry, Zachary; Chen, Han; Feng, Yan; Fletcher, Kalyn; Neuenschwander, Pierre; Shams, Homayoun

    2015-01-01

    Background Since adaptive immunity is thought to be central to immunity against influenza A virus (IAV) pneumonias, preventive strategies have focused primarily on vaccines. However, vaccine efficacy has been variable, in part because of antigenic shift and drift in circulating influenza viruses. Recent studies have highlighted the importance of innate immunity in protecting against influenza. Methods Granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) contributes to maturation of mononuclear phagocytes, enhancing their capacity for phagocytosis and cytokine production. Results Overexpression of granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in the lung of transgenic mice provides remarkable protection against IAV, which depends on alveolar macrophages (AM). In this study, we report that pulmonary delivery of GM-CSF to wild type young and aged mice abrogated mortality from IAV. Conclusion We also demonstrate that protection is species specific and human GM-CSF do not protect the mice nor stimulates mouse immunity. We also show that IAV-induced lung injury is the culprit for side-effects of GM-CSF in treating mice after IAV infection, and introduce a novel strategy to deliver the GM-CSF to and retain it in the alveolar space even after IAV infection. PMID:25923215

  17. Delivery of GM-CSF to Protect against Influenza Pneumonia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renuka Subramaniam

    Full Text Available Since adaptive immunity is thought to be central to immunity against influenza A virus (IAV pneumonias, preventive strategies have focused primarily on vaccines. However, vaccine efficacy has been variable, in part because of antigenic shift and drift in circulating influenza viruses. Recent studies have highlighted the importance of innate immunity in protecting against influenza.Granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF contributes to maturation of mononuclear phagocytes, enhancing their capacity for phagocytosis and cytokine production.Overexpression of granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF in the lung of transgenic mice provides remarkable protection against IAV, which depends on alveolar macrophages (AM. In this study, we report that pulmonary delivery of GM-CSF to wild type young and aged mice abrogated mortality from IAV.We also demonstrate that protection is species specific and human GM-CSF do not protect the mice nor stimulates mouse immunity. We also show that IAV-induced lung injury is the culprit for side-effects of GM-CSF in treating mice after IAV infection, and introduce a novel strategy to deliver the GM-CSF to and retain it in the alveolar space even after IAV infection.

  18. Elimination of motion and pulsation artifacts using BLADE sequences in shoulder MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavdas, E.; Zaloni, E.; Vlychou, M.; Vassiou, K.; Fezoulidis, I.; Tsagkalis, A.; Dailiana, Z.

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the ability of proton-density with fat-suppression BLADE (proprietary name for periodically rotated overlapping parallel lines with enhanced reconstruction in MR systems from Siemens Healthcare, PDFS BLADE) and turbo inversion recovery magnitude-BLADE (TIRM BLADE) sequences to reduce motion and pulsation artifacts in shoulder magnetic resonance examinations. Forty-one consecutive patients who had been routinely scanned for shoulder examination participated in the study. The following pairs of sequences with and without BLADE were compared: (a) Oblique coronal proton-density sequence with fat saturation of 25 patients and (b) oblique sagittal T2 TIRM-weighed sequence of 20 patients. Qualitative analysis was performed by two experienced radiologists. Image motion and pulsation artifacts were also evaluated. In oblique coronal PDFS BLADE sequences, motion artifacts have been significantly eliminated, even in five cases of non-diagnostic value with conventional imaging. Similarly, in oblique sagittal T2 TIRM BLADE sequences, image quality has been improved, even in six cases of non-diagnostic value with conventional imaging. Furthermore, flow artifacts have been improved in more than 80% of all the cases. The use of BLADE sequences is recommended in shoulder imaging, especially in uncooperative patients because it effectively eliminates motion and pulsation artifacts. (orig.)

  19. Upfront plerixafor plus G-CSF versus cyclophosphamide plus G-CSF for stem cell mobilization in multiple myeloma: efficacy and cost analysis study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afifi, S; Adel, N G; Devlin, S; Duck, E; Vanak, J; Landau, H; Chung, D J; Lendvai, N; Lesokhin, A; Korde, N; Reich, L; Landgren, O; Giralt, S; Hassoun, H

    2016-04-01

    Cyclophosphamide plus G-CSF (C+G-CSF) is one of the most widely used stem cell (SC) mobilization regimens for patients with multiple myeloma (MM). Plerixafor plus G-CSF (P+G-CSF) has demonstrated superior SC mobilization efficacy when compared with G-CSF alone and has been shown to rescue patients who fail mobilization with G-CSF or C+G-CSF. Despite the proven efficacy of P+G-CSF in upfront SC mobilization, its use has been limited, mostly due to concerns of high price of the drug. However, a comprehensive comparison of the efficacy and cost effectiveness of SC mobilization using C+G-CSF versus P+G-CSF is not available. In this study, we compared 111 patients receiving C+G-CSF to 112 patients receiving P+G-CSF. The use of P+G-CSF was associated with a higher success rate of SC collection defined as ⩾5 × 10(6) CD34+ cells/kg (94 versus 83%, P=0.013) and less toxicities. Thirteen patients in the C+G-CSF arm were hospitalized owing to complications while none in the P+G-CSF group. C+G-CSF was associated with higher financial burden as assessed using institutional-specific costs and charges (P<0.001) as well as using Medicare reimbursement rates (P=0.27). Higher rate of hospitalization, increased need for salvage mobilization, and increased G-CSF use account for these differences.

  20. Csf1r-mApple Transgene Expression and Ligand Binding In Vivo Reveal Dynamics of CSF1R Expression within the Mononuclear Phagocyte System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawley, Catherine A; Rojo, Rocio; Raper, Anna; Sauter, Kristin A; Lisowski, Zofia M; Grabert, Kathleen; Bain, Calum C; Davis, Gemma M; Louwe, Pieter A; Ostrowski, Michael C; Hume, David A; Pridans, Clare; Jenkins, Stephen J

    2018-03-15

    CSF1 is the primary growth factor controlling macrophage numbers, but whether expression of the CSF1 receptor differs between discrete populations of mononuclear phagocytes remains unclear. We have generated a Csf1r -mApple transgenic fluorescent reporter mouse that, in combination with lineage tracing, Alexa Fluor 647-labeled CSF1-Fc and CSF1, and a modified Δ Csf1- enhanced cyan fluorescent protein (ECFP) transgene that lacks a 150 bp segment of the distal promoter, we have used to dissect the differentiation and CSF1 responsiveness of mononuclear phagocyte populations in situ. Consistent with previous Csf1r- driven reporter lines, Csf1r -mApple was expressed in blood monocytes and at higher levels in tissue macrophages, and was readily detectable in whole mounts or with multiphoton microscopy. In the liver and peritoneal cavity, uptake of labeled CSF1 largely reflected transgene expression, with greater receptor activity in mature macrophages than monocytes and tissue-specific expression in conventional dendritic cells. However, CSF1 uptake also differed between subsets of monocytes and discrete populations of tissue macrophages, which in macrophages correlated with their level of dependence on CSF1 receptor signaling for survival rather than degree of transgene expression. A double Δ Csf1r -ECFP- Csf1r -mApple transgenic mouse distinguished subpopulations of microglia in the brain, and permitted imaging of interstitial macrophages distinct from alveolar macrophages, and pulmonary monocytes and conventional dendritic cells. The Csf1r- mApple mice and fluorescently labeled CSF1 will be valuable resources for the study of macrophage and CSF1 biology, which are compatible with existing EGFP-based reporter lines. Copyright © 2018 The Authors.

  1. Teaching and Learning the Nature of Technical Artifacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederik, Ineke; Sonneveld, Wim; de Vries, Marc J.

    2011-01-01

    Artifacts are probably our most obvious everyday encounter with technology. Therefore, a good understanding of the nature of technical artifacts is a relevant part of technological literacy. In this article we draw from the philosophy of technology to develop a conceptualization of technical artifacts that can be used for educational purposes.…

  2. Guided interaction exploration in artifact-centric process models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eck, M.L.; Sidorova, N.; van der Aalst, W.M.P.

    2017-01-01

    Artifact-centric process models aim to describe complex processes as a collection of interacting artifacts. Recent development in process mining allow for the discovery of such models. However, the focus is often on the representation of the individual artifacts rather than their interactions. Based

  3. Supporting Knowledge Transfer through Decomposable Reasoning Artifacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pike, William A.; May, Richard A.; Turner, Alan E.

    2007-01-03

    Technology to support knowledge transfer and cooperative inquiry must offer its users the ability to effectively interpret knowledge structures produced by collaborators. Communicating the reasoning processes that underlie a finding is one method for enhancing interpretation, and can result in more effective evaluation and application of shared knowledge. In knowledge management tools, interpretation is aided by creating knowledge artifacts that can expose their provenance to scrutiny and that can be transformed into diverse representations that suit their consumers’ perspectives and preferences. We outline the information management needs of inquiring communities characterized by hypothesis generation tasks, and propose a model for communication, based in theories of hermeneutics, semiotics, and abduction, in which knowledge structures can be decomposed into the lower-level reasoning artifacts that produced them. We then present a proof-of-concept implementation for an environment to support the capture and communication of analytic products, with emphasis on the domain of intelligence analysis.

  4. A Language of Objects and Artifacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svabo, Connie

    This is a conceptual inquiry about materiality. It gives an introductory overview to the vocabulary of materiality in a chosen selection of theories. The paper shows a language of artifacts and objects as it is used within practice-based approaches to organizational knowing. The examined...... intellectual traditions are interpretive-cultural approaches; activity theory; and sociology of translation. Similarities and differences are presented in the way these three distinct intellectual traditions conceptualize the array of material objects and artifacts which are central in the tales of practice...... concepts do the theories attempt to grasp tools and design objects – furniture, graphics, flutes-in-making and built space? The paper shows which concepts are used and it demonstrates how the interaction between social and material realities are viewed. Furthermore it highlights some of the ontological...

  5. Panning artifacts in digital pathology images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avanaki, Ali R. N.; Lanciault, Christian; Espig, Kathryn S.; Xthona, Albert; Kimpe, Tom R. L.

    2017-03-01

    In making a pathologic diagnosis, a pathologist uses cognitive processes: perception, attention, memory, and search (Pena and Andrade-Filho, 2009). Typically, this involves focus while panning from one region of a slide to another, using either a microscope in a traditional workflow or software program and display in a digital pathology workflow (DICOM Standard Committee, 2010). We theorize that during panning operation, the pathologist receives information important to diagnosis efficiency and/or correctness. As compared to an optical microscope, panning in a digital pathology image involves some visual artifacts due to the following: (i) the frame rate is finite; (ii) time varying visual signals are reconstructed using imperfect zero-order hold. Specifically, after pixel's digital drive is changed, it takes time for a pixel to emit the expected amount of light. Previous work suggests that 49% of navigation is conducted in low-power/overview with digital pathology (Molin et al., 2015), but the influence of display factors has not been measured. We conducted a reader study to establish a relationship between display frame rate, panel response time, and threshold panning speed (above which the artifacts become noticeable). Our results suggest visual tasks that involve tissue structure are more impacted by the simulated panning artifacts than those that only involve color (e.g., staining intensity estimation), and that the panning artifacts versus normalized panning speed has a peak behavior which is surprising and may change for a diagnostic task. This is work in progress and our final findings should be considered in designing future digital pathology systems.

  6. An EEG Data Investigation Using Only Artifacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-22

    hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and...some conditions, an automation feature was implemented to help the participants find the HVT. When the HVT was within the sensor footprint, a tone...EEG Data Investigation Using Only Artifacts 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 1 Chelsey

  7. Clinical implications of medulloblastoma subgroups: incidence of CSF diversion surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Christian; Ramaswamy, Vijay; Kulkarni, Abhaya V; Rutka, James T; Remke, Marc; Tabori, Uri; Hawkins, Cynthia; Bouffet, Eric; Taylor, Michael D

    2015-03-01

    While medulloblastoma was initially thought to comprise a single homogeneous entity, it is now accepted that it in fact comprises 4 discrete subgroups, each with its own distinct demographics, clinical presentation, transcriptomics, genetics, and outcome. Hydrocephalus is a common complication of medulloblastoma and not infrequently requires CSF diversion. The authors report the incidence of CSF diversion surgery in each of the subgroups of medulloblastoma (Wnt, Shh, Group 3, and Group 4). The medical and imaging records for patients who underwent surgery for medulloblastoma at The Hospital for Sick Children were retrospectively reviewed. The primary outcome was the requirement for CSF diversion surgery either before or within 60 days of tumor resection. The modified Canadian Preoperative Prediction Rule for Hydrocephalus (mCPPRH) was compared among subgroups. Of 143 medulloblastoma patients, treated from 1991 to 2013, sufficient data were available for 130 patients (15 with Wnt, 30 with Shh, 30 with Group 3, and 55 with Group 4 medulloblastomas). Of these, 28 patients (22%) ultimately underwent CSF diversion surgery: 0% with Wnt, 29% with Shh, 29% with Group 3, and 43% with Group 4 tumors. Patients in the Wnt subgroup had a lower incidence of CSF diversion than all other patients combined (p = 0.04). Wnt patients had a lower mCPPRH score (lower risk of CSF diversion, p = 0.045), were older, had smaller ventricles at diagnosis, and had no leptomeningeal metastases. The overall rate of CSF diversion surgery for Shh, Group 3, and Group 4 medulloblastomas is around 30%, but no patients in the present series with a Wnt medulloblastoma required shunting. The low incidence of hydrocephalus in patients with Wnt medulloblastoma likely reflects both host factors (age) and disease factors (lack of metastases). The absence of hydrocephalus in patients with Wnt medulloblastomas likely contributes to their excellent rate of survival and may also contribute to a higher quality

  8. Awe and Artifacts: Religious and Scientific Endeavor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ionut Untea

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The article takes as its point of departure the reflections of Henry Adams and Jacques Ellul on the possible gradual replacement of objects used in religious worship with objects used in technological worship, and advances the hypothesis that such a substitution is unlikely. Using information from psychology, history of religions, and history of science, the perspective proposed is that of a parallel historical analogous development of both religious and scientific attitudes of awe by the use of artifacts carrying two functions: firstly, to coagulate social participation around questions dealing with humanity’s destiny and interpersonal relationships across communities, and secondly to offer cultural coherence through a communal sense of social stability, comfort, and security. I argue that, though animated by attitudes of awe (“awefull”, both leading scientists and religious founders have encountered the difficulty in representing and introducing this awe to the large public via “awesome” artifacts. The failure to represent coherently the initial awe via artifacts may give rise to “anomalous awefullness”: intolerance, persecutions, global conflicts.

  9. Voting strategy for artifact reduction in digital breast tomosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Tao; Moore, Richard H.; Kopans, Daniel B.

    2006-01-01

    Artifacts are observed in digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) reconstructions due to the small number of projections and the narrow angular range that are typically employed in tomosynthesis imaging. In this work, we investigate the reconstruction artifacts that are caused by high-attenuation features in breast and develop several artifact reduction methods based on a 'voting strategy'. The voting strategy identifies the projection(s) that would introduce artifacts to a voxel and rejects the projection(s) when reconstructing the voxel. Four approaches to the voting strategy were compared, including projection segmentation, maximum contribution deduction, one-step classification, and iterative classification. The projection segmentation method, based on segmentation of high-attenuation features from the projections, effectively reduces artifacts caused by metal and large calcifications that can be reliably detected and segmented from projections. The other three methods are based on the observation that contributions from artifact-inducing projections have higher value than those from normal projections. These methods attempt to identify the projection(s) that would cause artifacts by comparing contributions from different projections. Among the three methods, the iterative classification method provides the best artifact reduction; however, it can generate many false positive classifications that degrade the image quality. The maximum contribution deduction method and one-step classification method both reduce artifacts well from small calcifications, although the performance of artifact reduction is slightly better with the one-step classification. The combination of one-step classification and projection segmentation removes artifacts from both large and small calcifications

  10. 3D steady-state MR cisternography in CSF rhinorrhoea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayakumar, P.N.; Kovoor, J.M.E.; Srikanth, S.G.; Praharaj, S.S.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the utility of 3D steady-state MR cisternography in the demonstration and localisation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak in patients with clinically suspected CSF rhinorrhoea. Material and Methods: Six consecutive patients with clinically suspected CSF rhinorrhoea were examined with routine MR evaluation and MR cisternography (MRC). All MR examinations included fast spin-echo (SE) T1WI in axial and sagittal planes, fast SE T2WI in axial and coronal planes and fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images in the axial plane. 3D evaluation was done using the CISS technique with 0.7-mm thickness in the sagittal and coronal planes. The site and extent of the defect, and any brain herniation detected on MRC were correlated with surgical findings. Results: In the 6 patients who underwent surgical exploration and repair, intraoperative findings correlated with the defect revealed by MRC in all cases. Conclusion: In clinically suspected CSF rhinorrhoea, MRC is highly accurate in localising the site and extent of CSF fistula and may be used as the first investigation due to its efficacy and non-invasive nature

  11. CSF N-glycoproteomics for early diagnosis in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmigiano, Angelo; Barone, Rita; Sturiale, Luisa; Sanfilippo, Cristina; Bua, Rosaria Ornella; Romeo, Donata Agata; Messina, Angela; Capuana, Maria Luisa; Maci, Tiziana; Le Pira, Francesco; Zappia, Mario; Garozzo, Domenico

    2016-01-10

    This work aims at exploring the human CSF (Cerebrospinal fluid) N-glycome by MALDI MS techniques, in order to assess specific glycosylation pattern(s) in patients with Alzheimer's disease (n:24) and in subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) (n:11), these last as potential AD patients at a pre-dementia stage. For comparison, 21 healthy controls were studied. We identified a group of AD and MCI subjects (about 40-50% of the studied sample) showing significant alteration of CSF N-glycome profiling, consisting of a decrease in the overall sialylation degree and an increase in species bearing bisecting GlcNAc. Noteworthy, all the MCI patients that converted to AD within the clinical follow-up, had an abnormal CSF glycosylation profile. Based on the studied cohort, CSF glycosylation changes may occur before an AD clinical onset. Previous studies specifically focused on the key role of glycosyltransferase GnT-III on AD-pathogenesis, addressing the patho-mechanism to specific sugar modification of BACE-1 glycoprotein with bisecting GlcNAc. Our patients addressed protein N-glycosylation changes at an early phase of the whole biomolecular misregulation on AD, pointing to CSF N-glycome analyses as promising tool to enhance early detection of AD and also suggesting alternative therapeutics target molecules, such as specific glyco-enzymes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Flow cytometric characterization of cerebrospinal fluid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Graaf, Marieke T; de Jongste, Arjen H C; Kraan, Jaco; Boonstra, Joke G; Sillevis Smitt, Peter A E; Gratama, Jan W

    2011-09-01

    Flow cytometry facilitates the detection of a large spectrum of cellular characteristics on a per cell basis, determination of absolute cell numbers and detection of rare events with high sensitivity and specificity. White blood cell (WBC) counts in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) are important for the diagnosis of many neurological disorders. WBC counting and differential can be performed by microscopy, hematology analyzers, or flow cytometry. Flow cytometry of CSF is increasingly being considered as the method of choice in patients suspected of leptomeningeal localization of hematological malignancies. Additionally, in several neuroinflammatory diseases such as multiple sclerosis and paraneoplastic neurological syndromes, flow cytometry is commonly performed to obtain insight into the immunopathogenesis of these diseases. Technically, the low cellularity of CSF samples, combined with the rapidly declining WBC viability, makes CSF flow cytometry challenging. Comparison of flow cytometry with microscopic and molecular techniques shows that each technique has its own advantages and is ideally combined. We expect that increasing the number of flow cytometric parameters that can be simultaneously studied within one sample, will further refine the information on CSF cell subsets in low-cellular CSF samples and enable to define cell populations more accurately. Copyright © 2011 International Clinical Cytometry Society.

  13. Herpes Simplex Encephalitis Presenting with Normal CSF Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, R.; Kiani, I. G.; Shah, F.; Rehman, R. N.; Haq, M. E.

    2013-01-01

    A 28 years old female presented with headache, fever, altered sensorium and right side weakness for one week. She was febrile and drowsy with right sided hemiplegia and papilledema. Tuberculous or bacterial meningitis, tuberculoma and abscess were at the top of the diagnosis list followed by Herpes simplex meningo-encephalitis (HSE). MRI showed abnormal signal intensity of left temporal lobe without significant post-contrast enhancement and midline shift. CSF examination was normal, gram stain and Ziehl-Neelsen stain showed no micro-organism, or acid fast bacilli. CSF for MTB PCR was negative. PCR DNA for Herpes simplex 1 on CSF was detected. Acyclovir was started and the patient was discharged after full recovery. A high index of suspicion is required for HSE diagnosis in Pakistan where other infections predominantly affect the brain and HSE may be overlooked as a potential diagnosis. (author)

  14. ATYPICAL CSF PICTURE IN VIRAL MENINGITIS HSV- TYPE-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikram

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Acute infections of nervous system are among the most important problems in medicine because early recognition, efficient decision making and rapid institution of therapy can be lifesaving. Making a clinical diagnosis of acute meningitis depends on the cornerstone of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF examination. We present a case with the above-mentioned difficulty and the approach involved in establishing the exact diagnosis and institution of appropriate treatment. CONCLUSION About findings in viral meningitis one should be careful while evaluating a CSF report so as to not make a mistaken diagnosis and delay treatment. The most important analysis in patients whose symptoms are consistent with herpes simplex meningitis is the detection of Herpes simplex Virus deoxy-ribo-nucleic acid (HSV-DNA in CSF with Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR.

  15. Recent Advances of Colony-Stimulating Factor-1 Receptor (CSF-1R) Kinase and Its Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Gamal, Mohammed I; Al-Ameen, Shahad K; Al-Koumi, Dania M; Hamad, Mawadda G; Jalal, Nouran A; Oh, Chang-Hyun

    2018-01-17

    Colony stimulation factor-1 receptor (CSF-1R), which is also known as FMS kinase, plays an important role in initiating inflammatory, cancer, and bone disorders when it is overstimulated by its ligand, CSF-1. Innate immunity, as well as macrophage differentiation and survival, are regulated by the stimulation of the CSF-1R. Another ligand, interlukin-34 (IL-34), was recently reported to activate the CSF-1R receptor in a different manner. The relationship between CSF-1R and microglia has been reviewed. Both CSF-1 antibodies and small molecule CSF-1R kinase inhibitors have now been tested in animal models and in humans. In this Perspective, we discuss the role of CSF-1 and IL-34 in producing cancer, bone disorders, and inflammation. We also review the newly discovered and improved small molecule kinase inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies that have shown potent activity toward CSF-1R, reported from 2012 until 2017.

  16. Delivery of CSF-1R to the lumen of macropinosomes promotes its destruction in macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Jieqiong; Low-Nam, Shalini T.; Kerkvliet, Jason G.; Hoppe, Adam D.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Activation of the macrophage colony stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF-1R) by CSF-1 stimulates pronounced macropinocytosis and drives proliferation of macrophages. Although the role of macropinocytosis in CSF-1R signaling remains unknown, we show here that, despite internalizing large quantities of plasma membrane, macropinosomes contribute little to the internalization of the CSF-1–CSF-1R complex. Rather, internalization of the CSF-1R in small endocytic vesicles that are sensitive to clathrin disruption, outcompetes macropinosomes for CSF-1R endocytosis. Following internalization, small vesicles carrying the CSF-1R underwent homotypic fusion and then trafficked to newly formed macropinosomes bearing Rab5. As these macropinosomes matured, acquiring Rab7, the CSF-1R was transported into their lumen and degraded. Inhibition of macropinocytosis delayed receptor degradation despite no disruption to CSF-1R endocytosis. These data indicate that CSF-1-stimulated macropinosomes are sites of multivesicular body formation and accelerate CSF-1R degradation. Furthermore, we demonstrate that macropinocytosis and cell growth have a matching dose dependence on CSF-1, suggesting that macropinosomes might be a central mechanism coupling CSF-1R signaling and macrophage growth. PMID:25335894

  17. Application of smart differential pressure transmitters (DPTS) for containment studies facility (CSF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shanware, V.M.; Gole, N.V.; Sebastian, A.; Subramaniam, K.

    2001-01-01

    Containment Studies Facility (CSF) is being set up in BARC for studying various containment related thermal hydraulic and other processes during simulated conditions of pipe rupture. The set up consists of a model reactor containment vessel with a model primary heat transport system. Besides, provisions exist to introduce aerosols and hydrogen also in the containment model. The instrumentation includes measurement of the process temperatures, pressures, levels, flows, humidity, etc. Differential Pressure Transmitters (DPT) will be used for measurement of levels and flows in the CSF. The procured DPTs for this facility are smart. Conventional transmitters have a rangeability specification of 5 or 6. But the smart transmitters have rangeability varying between 40-100. Smart transmitters have facility to change its operating range online. This enables the provision of zooming in on the selected range and narrowing the range around the point of measurement. This facility can be exploited to realise the maximum possible accuracy at the smallest possible range around the point of measurement. This paper describes how the smart DPTs function, how the Highway Addressable Remote Transmitter (HART) protocol works and how we propose to use the on-line rangeability of these DPTs get the highest resolution in our measurements. (author)

  18. Cerebrospinal fluid pulsation amplitude and its quantitative relationship to cerebral blood flow pulsations: a phase-contrast MR flow imaging study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhadelia, R.A.; Bogdan, A.R.; Kaplan, R.F.; Wolpert, S.M.

    1997-01-01

    Our purpose in this investigation was to explain the heterogeneity in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow pulsation amplitudes. To this end, we determined the contributions of the cerebral arterial and jugular venous flow pulsations to the amplitude of the CSF pulsation. We examined 21 healthy subjects by cine phase-contrast MRI at the C2-3 disc level to demonstrate the CSF and vascular flows as waveforms. Multiple regression analysis was performed to calculate the contributions of (a) the arterial and venous waveform amplitudes and (b) the delay between the maximum systolic slopes of the arterial and venous waveforms (AV delay), in order to predict the amplitude of the CSF waveform. The contribution of the arterial waveform amplitude was positive (r = 0.61; p 0.003) to the CSF waveform amplitude and that of the venous waveform amplitude was negative (r = -0.50; p = 0.006). Both in combination accounted for 56 % of the variance in predicting the CSF waveform amplitude (p < 0.0006). The contribution of AV delay was not significant. The results show that the variance in the CSF flow pulsation amplitudes can be explained by concurrent evaluation of the CSF and vascular flows. Improvement in the techniques, and controlled experiments, may allow use of CSF flow pulsation amplitudes for clinical applications in the non-invasive assessment of intracranial dynamics by MRI. (orig.). With 3 figs., 2 tabs

  19. Contribution of isotopic data in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Askienazy, S.; Ducassou, D.

    The growing interest in isotopic CSF studies is explained by the fact that the mechanism and classification of hydrocephalus cases are based not only on anatomoclinical data but also on physiological information inaccessible by static image methods. This article shows the full importance of dynamic CSF research (ideal tracer: 111 In-DTPA); the possibilities of myeloscintigraphy to study the permeability of the medullary sub-arachnoid spaces (tracers used: sup(99m)Tc-DTPA in the liquid phase or xenon bubble technique in the gas phase); ventricular morphology; existence of meningeal gaps [fr

  20. Improving consensus structure by eliminating averaging artifacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KC Dukka B

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Common structural biology methods (i.e., NMR and molecular dynamics often produce ensembles of molecular structures. Consequently, averaging of 3D coordinates of molecular structures (proteins and RNA is a frequent approach to obtain a consensus structure that is representative of the ensemble. However, when the structures are averaged, artifacts can result in unrealistic local geometries, including unphysical bond lengths and angles. Results Herein, we describe a method to derive representative structures while limiting the number of artifacts. Our approach is based on a Monte Carlo simulation technique that drives a starting structure (an extended or a 'close-by' structure towards the 'averaged structure' using a harmonic pseudo energy function. To assess the performance of the algorithm, we applied our approach to Cα models of 1364 proteins generated by the TASSER structure prediction algorithm. The average RMSD of the refined model from the native structure for the set becomes worse by a mere 0.08 Å compared to the average RMSD of the averaged structures from the native structure (3.28 Å for refined structures and 3.36 A for the averaged structures. However, the percentage of atoms involved in clashes is greatly reduced (from 63% to 1%; in fact, the majority of the refined proteins had zero clashes. Moreover, a small number (38 of refined structures resulted in lower RMSD to the native protein versus the averaged structure. Finally, compared to PULCHRA 1, our approach produces representative structure of similar RMSD quality, but with much fewer clashes. Conclusion The benchmarking results demonstrate that our approach for removing averaging artifacts can be very beneficial for the structural biology community. Furthermore, the same approach can be applied to almost any problem where averaging of 3D coordinates is performed. Namely, structure averaging is also commonly performed in RNA secondary prediction 2, which

  1. Metallic artifact in MRI after removal of orthopedic implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagheri, Mohammad Hadi; Hosseini, Mehrdad Mohammad; Emami, Mohammad Jafar; Foroughi, Amin Aiboulhassani

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the metallic artifacts in MRI of the orthopedic patients after removal of metallic implants. Subjects and methods: From March to August 2009, 40 orthopedic patients operated for removal of orthopedic metallic implants were studied by post-operative MRI from the site of removal of implants. A grading scale of 0–3 was assigned for artifact in MR images whereby 0 was considered no artifact; and I–III were considered mild, moderate, and severe metallic artifacts, respectively. These grading records were correlated with other variables including the type, size, number, and composition of metallic devices; and the site and duration of orthopedic devices stay in the body. Results: Metallic susceptibly artifacts were detected in MRI of 18 of 40 cases (45%). Screws and pins in removed hardware were the most important factors for causing artifacts in MRI. The artifacts were found more frequently in the patients who had more screws and pins in the removed implants. Gender, age, site of implantation of the device, length of the hardware, composition of the metallic implants (stainless steel versus titanium), and duration of implantation of the hardware exerted no effect in producing metallic artifacts after removal of implants. Short TE sequences of MRI (such as T1 weighted) showed fewer artifacts. Conclusion: Susceptibility of metallic artifacts is a frequent phenomenon in MRI of patients upon removal of metallic orthopedic implants.

  2. Metallic artifact in MRI after removal of orthopedic implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Mohammad Hadi; Hosseini, Mehrdad Mohammad; Emami, Mohammad Jafar; Foroughi, Amin Aiboulhassani

    2012-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the metallic artifacts in MRI of the orthopedic patients after removal of metallic implants. From March to August 2009, 40 orthopedic patients operated for removal of orthopedic metallic implants were studied by post-operative MRI from the site of removal of implants. A grading scale of 0-3 was assigned for artifact in MR images whereby 0 was considered no artifact; and I-III were considered mild, moderate, and severe metallic artifacts, respectively. These grading records were correlated with other variables including the type, size, number, and composition of metallic devices; and the site and duration of orthopedic devices stay in the body. Metallic susceptibly artifacts were detected in MRI of 18 of 40 cases (45%). Screws and pins in removed hardware were the most important factors for causing artifacts in MRI. The artifacts were found more frequently in the patients who had more screws and pins in the removed implants. Gender, age, site of implantation of the device, length of the hardware, composition of the metallic implants (stainless steel versus titanium), and duration of implantation of the hardware exerted no effect in producing metallic artifacts after removal of implants. Short TE sequences of MRI (such as T1 weighted) showed fewer artifacts. Susceptibility of metallic artifacts is a frequent phenomenon in MRI of patients upon removal of metallic orthopedic implants. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Methods for the correction of vascular artifacts in PET O-15 water brain-mapping studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kewei; Reiman, E. M.; Lawson, M.; Yun, Lang-sheng; Bandy, D.; Palant, A.

    1996-12-01

    While positron emission tomographic (PET) measurements of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) can be used to map brain regions that are involved in normal and pathological human behaviors, measurements in the anteromedial temporal lobe can be confounded by the combined effects of radiotracer activity in neighboring arteries and partial-volume averaging. The authors now describe two simple methods to address this vascular artifact. One method utilizes the early frames of a dynamic PET study, while the other method utilizes a coregistered magnetic resonance image (MRI) to characterize the vascular region of interest (VROI). Both methods subsequently assign a common value to each pixel in the VROI for the control (baseline) scan and the activation scan. To study the vascular artifact and to demonstrate the ability of the proposed methods correcting the vascular artifact, four dynamic PET scans were performed in a single subject during the same behavioral state. For each of the four scans, a vascular scan containing vascular activity was computed as the summation of the images acquired 0-60 s after radiotracer administration, and a control scan containing minimal vascular activity was computed as the summation of the images acquired 20-80 s after radiotracer administration. t-score maps calculated from the four pairs of vascular and control scans were used to characterize regional blood flow differences related to vascular activity before and after the application of each vascular artifact correction method. Both methods eliminated the observed differences in vascular activity, as well as the vascular artifact observed in the anteromedial temporal lobes. Using PET data from a study of normal human emotion, these methods permitted the authors to identify rCBF increases in the anteromedial temporal lobe free from the potentially confounding, combined effects of vascular activity and partial-volume averaging.

  4. Methods for the correction of vascular artifacts in PET O-15 water brain-mapping studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, K.; Reiman, E.M.; Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center, Phoenix, AZ; Lawson, M.; Yun, L.S.; Bandy, D.

    1996-01-01

    While positron emission tomographic (PET) measurements of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) can be used to map brain regions that are involved in normal and pathological human behaviors, measurements in the anteromedial temporal lobe can be confounded by the combined effects of radiotracer activity in neighboring arteries and partial-volume averaging. The authors now describe two simple methods to address this vascular artifact. One method utilizes the early frames of a dynamic PET study, while the other method utilizes a coregistered magnetic resonance image (MRI) to characterize the vascular region of interest (VROI). Both methods subsequently assign a common value to each pixel in the VROI for the control scan and the activation scan. To study the vascular artifact and to demonstrate the ability of the proposed methods correcting the vascular artifact, four dynamic PET scans were performed in a single subject during the same behavioral state. For each of the four scans, a vascular scan containing vascular activity was computed as the summation of the images acquired 0--60 s after radiotracer administrations, and a control scan containing minimal vascular activity was computed as the summation of the images acquired 20--80 s after radiotracer administration. t-score maps calculated from the four pairs of vascular and control scans were used to characterize regional blood flow differences related to vascular activity before and after the applications of each vascular artifact correction method. Both methods eliminated the observed differences in vascular activity, as well as the vascular artifact observed in the anteromedial temporal lobes. Using PET data from a study of normal human emotion, these methods permitted us to identify rCBF increases in the anteromedial temporal lobe free from the potentially confounding, combined effects of vascular activity and partial-volume averaging

  5. Accessing Cultural Artifacts Through Digital Companions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehm, Matthias; Jensen, Martin Lynge

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a study that explores how the introduction of a digital companion agent for a museum exploration game changes children’s engagement with the presented artworks. To this end, a mobile application was developed featuring a monster agent that has eaten the artworks, which...... the children had now to find in the museum. Results show that in comparison to the paper-based version of the exploration game, children engaged in more interactions with the actual cultural artifacts and showed a significantly higher retention rate for details of the involved artworks....

  6. A holographic color camera for recording artifacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jith, Abhay

    2013-01-01

    Advent of 3D televisions has created a new wave of public interest in images with depth. Though these technologies create moving pictures with apparent depth, it lacks the visual appeal and a set of other positive aspects of color holographic images. The above new wave of interest in 3D will definitely help to fuel popularity of holograms. In view of this, a low cost and handy color holography camera is designed for recording color holograms of artifacts. It is believed that such cameras will help to record medium format color holograms outside conventional holography laboratories and to popularize color holography. The paper discusses the design and the results obtained.

  7. Detection of artifacts from high energy bursts in neonatal EEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Sourya; Biswas, Arunava; Mukherjee, Jayanta; Majumdar, Arun Kumar; Majumdar, Bandana; Mukherjee, Suchandra; Singh, Arun Kumar

    2013-11-01

    Detection of non-cerebral activities or artifacts, intermixed within the background EEG, is essential to discard them from subsequent pattern analysis. The problem is much harder in neonatal EEG, where the background EEG contains spikes, waves, and rapid fluctuations in amplitude and frequency. Existing artifact detection methods are mostly limited to detect only a subset of artifacts such as ocular, muscle or power line artifacts. Few methods integrate different modules, each for detection of one specific category of artifact. Furthermore, most of the reference approaches are implemented and tested on adult EEG recordings. Direct application of those methods on neonatal EEG causes performance deterioration, due to greater pattern variation and inherent complexity. A method for detection of a wide range of artifact categories in neonatal EEG is thus required. At the same time, the method should be specific enough to preserve the background EEG information. The current study describes a feature based classification approach to detect both repetitive (generated from ECG, EMG, pulse, respiration, etc.) and transient (generated from eye blinking, eye movement, patient movement, etc.) artifacts. It focuses on artifact detection within high energy burst patterns, instead of detecting artifacts within the complete background EEG with wide pattern variation. The objective is to find true burst patterns, which can later be used to identify the Burst-Suppression (BS) pattern, which is commonly observed during newborn seizure. Such selective artifact detection is proven to be more sensitive to artifacts and specific to bursts, compared to the existing artifact detection approaches applied on the complete background EEG. Several time domain, frequency domain, statistical features, and features generated by wavelet decomposition are analyzed to model the proposed bi-classification between burst and artifact segments. A feature selection method is also applied to select the

  8. Cerebrospinal fluid flow waveforms: effect of altered cranial venous outflow. A phase-contrast MR flow imaging study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhadelia, R.A.; Wolpert, S.M.

    1998-01-01

    Our purpose was to assess the effect of alterations in the cranial venous outflow on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow waveforms using phase-contrast MRI. Thirteen healthy subjects were assessed for CSF flow and cerebral vascular flow at the C2-3 level, both before and after jugular venous compression (JVC). The flow waveforms were assessed both as an aggregate, and after dividing subjects in two groups based on percent jugular venous flow (PJVF) i. e. jugular outflow expressed as percent of cerebral arterial inflow. Group 1: 7 subjects with PJVF more than and including median (predominantly jugular outflow); Group 2: 6 subjects with PJVF less than median (predominantly extra-jugular outflow). CSF waveforms: JVC produced rounding of contours and flattening of dicrotic waves, with the effect being greater in group 1 than group 2. In group 1, systolic upslopes of the waveforms increased. No significant aggregate amplitude changes were noted; amplidutes increased in group 1 (P = 0.001), and decreased in group 2 (P = 0.03). Temporal interval to the maximum CSF systolic flow significantly increased in group 1. Vascular flow: Arterial flow significantly decreased in group 1. Jugular flow significantly decreased in both groups. The results suggest that CSF flow waveforms are sensitive to alterations in the cranial venous outflow. Changes in group 1 are most likely because of an elevation in intracranial pressure. Analysis of CSF flow waveforms appears a promising noninvasive tool for assessment of cranial compartment. (orig.)

  9. Synovial CD4+ T-cell-derived GM-CSF supports the differentiation of an inflammatory dendritic cell population in rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, G; Gibbon, J R; Pratt, A G; Wood, M J; Coady, D; Raftery, G; Lorenzi, A R; Gray, A; Filer, A; Buckley, C D; Haniffa, M A; Isaacs, J D; Hilkens, C M U

    2016-01-01

    Objective A population of synovial inflammatory dendritic cells (infDCs) has recently been identified in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and is thought to be monocyte-derived. Here, we investigated the role and source of granulocyte macrophage-colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in the differentiation of synovial infDC in RA. Methods Production of GM-CSF by peripheral blood (PB) and synovial fluid (SF) CD4+ T cells was assessed by ELISA and flow cytometry. In vitro CD4+ T-cell polarisation experiments were performed with T-cell activating CD2/CD3/CD28-coated beads in the absence or presence of pro-Th1 or pro-Th17 cytokines. CD1c+ DC and CD16+ macrophage subsets were flow-sorted and analysed morphologically and functionally (T-cell stimulatory/polarising capacity). Results RA-SF CD4+ T cells produced abundant GM-CSF upon stimulation and significantly more than RA-SF mononuclear cells depleted of CD4+ T cells. GM-CSF-producing T cells were significantly increased in RA-SF compared with non-RA inflammatory arthritis SF, active RA PB and healthy donor PB. GM-CSF-producing CD4+ T cells were expanded by Th1-promoting but not Th17-promoting conditions. Following coculture with RA-SF CD4+ T cells, but not healthy donor PB CD4+ T cells, a subpopulation of monocytes differentiated into CD1c+ infDC; a process dependent on GM-CSF. These infDC displayed potent alloproliferative capacity and enhanced GM-CSF, interleukin-17 and interferon-γ production by CD4+ T cells. InfDC with an identical phenotype to in vitro generated cells were significantly enriched in RA-SF compared with non-RA-SF/tissue/PB. Conclusions We demonstrate a therapeutically tractable feedback loop of GM-CSF secreted by RA synovial CD4+ T cells promoting the differentiation of infDC with potent capacity to induce GM-CSF-producing CD4+ T cells. PMID:25923217

  10. Bacterial Isolates from Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) of Patients In a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The presence of bacteria in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) results in the inflammation of the meninges, a condition known as meningitis. The aim of the study is to determine the prevalence of bacteria, which causes meningitis and their susceptibility pattern. This study, which was prospective and cross sectional involved patients ...

  11. CSF biomarker variability in the Alzheimer's Association quality control program

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mattsson, N.; Andreasson, U.; Persson, S.; Carrillo, M.C.; Collins, S.; Chalbot, S.; Cutler, N.; Dufour-Rainfray, D.; Fagan, A.M.; Heegaard, N.H.H.; Robin Hsiung, G.Y.; Hyman, B.; Iqbal, K.; Lachno, D.R.; Lleo, A.; Lewczuk, P.; Molinuevo, J.L.; Parchi, P.; Regeniter, A.; Rissman, R.; Rosenmann, H.; Sancesario, G.; Schroder, J.; Shaw, L.M.; Teunissen, C.E.; Trojanowski, J.Q.; Vanderstichele, H.; Vandijck, M.; Verbeek, M.M.; Zetterberg, H.; Blennow, K.; Kaser, S.A.; et al.,

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers amyloid beta 1-42, total tau, and phosphorylated tau are used increasingly for Alzheimer's disease (AD) research and patient management. However, there are large variations in biomarker measurements among and within laboratories. METHODS: Data

  12. CSF biomarker variability in the Alzheimer's Association quality control program

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mattsson, N.; Andreasson, U.; Persson, S.; Carrillo, M.C.; Collins, S.; Chalbot, S.; Cutler, N.; Dufour-Rainfray, D.; Fagan, A.M.; Heegaard, N.H.H.; Hsiung, G.Y.R.; Hyman, B.; Iqbal, K.; Lachno, D.R.; Lleo, A.; Lewczuk, P.; Molinuevo, J.L.; Parchi, P.; Regeniter, A.; Rissman, R.; Rosenmann, H.; Sancesario, G.; Schroder, J.; Shaw, L.M.; Teunissen, C.E.; Trojanowski, J.Q.; Vanderstichele, H.; Vandijck, M.; Verbeek, M.M.; Zetterberg, H.; Blennow, K.; Kaser, S.A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers amyloid beta 1-42, total tau, and phosphorylated tau are used increasingly for Alzheimer's disease (AD) research and patient management. However, there are large variations in biomarker measurements among and within laboratories. Methods: Data

  13. The diagnosis of CSF fistulas with rhinorrhea by isotope cisternography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salar, G.; Carteri, A.; Zampieri, P.

    1978-01-01

    The experience with the use of RIHSA cisternography in cases of spontaneous of post-traumatic CSF rhinorrhea is reported. The utility of this method for identifying the fistulous tract so that the neurosurgeon can, as far as he is able, carry out a direct and not solely exploratory operation is pointed out. (orig.) [de

  14. Fatal cerebral edema associated with serine deficiency in CSF

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keularts, Irene M. L. W.; Leroy, Piet L. J. M.; Rubio-Gozalbo, Estela M.; Spaapen, Leo J. M.; Weber, Biene; Dorland, Bert; de Koning, Tom J.; Verhoeven-Duif, Nanda M.

    2010-01-01

    Two young girls without a notable medical history except for asthma presented with an acute toxic encephalopathy with very low serine concentrations both in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) comparable to patients with 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (3-PGDH) deficiency. Clinical symptoms and

  15. G-CSF Intrauterine for Thin Endometrium, and Pregnancy Outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ensieh Tehraninejad

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective:To evaluate effects ofG-CSF on a cancelled ART cycle due to thin endometrium.Materials and methods:In a nonrandomized clinical trial from January 2011 to January 2013 in two tertiary university based hospitals fifteen patients undergoing embryo transfer and with the history of cycle cancellation due to thin endometrium were studied. Intrauterine infusion of G-CSF was done on the day of oocyte pick-up or 5 days before embryo transfer. The primary outcome to be measured was an endometrium thickened to at least 6 mm and the secondary outcome was clinical pregnancy rate and consequently take-home baby. All previous cycles were considered as control for each patient.Results:The G-CSF was infused at the day of oocyte retrieval or 5 days before embryo transfer. The endometrial thickness reached from3.593±0.251 mm to 7.120±0.84 mm. The mean age, gravidity, parity, and FSH were 35.13± 9.531 years,3, 1 and32.78± 31.10 mIU/ml, respectively. The clinical pregnancy rate was 20%, and there was one missed abortion, a mother death at 34 weeks, and a preterm labor at 30 weeks due to PROM.Conclusion:G-CSF may increase endometrial thickness in the small group of patients who had no choice except cycle cancellation or surrogacy.

  16. Increased CSF Homocysteine in Pathological Gamblers Compared with Healthy Controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordin, Conny; Sjodin, Ingemar

    2009-01-01

    Neurocognitive disturbances suggesting a frontal lobe dysfunction have been observed in pathological gamblers and alcohol dependents. Given that a high homocysteine level has been suggested to be a mediating factor in alcohol-related cognitive decline, we have determined homocysteine and cobalamine in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) obtained from 11…

  17. Inherited biallelic CSF3R mutations in severe congenital neutropenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triot, Alexa; Järvinen, Päivi M; Arostegui, Juan I; Murugan, Dhaarini; Kohistani, Naschla; Dapena Díaz, José Luis; Racek, Tomas; Puchałka, Jacek; Gertz, E Michael; Schäffer, Alejandro A; Kotlarz, Daniel; Pfeifer, Dietmar; Díaz de Heredia Rubio, Cristina; Ozdemir, Mehmet Akif; Patiroglu, Turkan; Karakukcu, Musa; Sánchez de Toledo Codina, José; Yagüe, Jordi; Touw, Ivo P; Unal, Ekrem; Klein, Christoph

    2014-06-12

    Severe congenital neutropenia (SCN) is characterized by low numbers of peripheral neutrophil granulocytes and a predisposition to life-threatening bacterial infections. We describe a novel genetic SCN type in 2 unrelated families associated with recessively inherited loss-of-function mutations in CSF3R, encoding the granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) receptor. Family A, with 3 affected children, carried a homozygous missense mutation (NM_000760.3:c.922C>T, NP_000751.1:p.Arg308Cys), which resulted in perturbed N-glycosylation and aberrant localization to the cell surface. Family B, with 1 affected infant, carried compound heterozygous deletions provoking frameshifts and premature stop codons (NM_000760.3:c.948_963del, NP_000751.1:p.Gly316fsTer322 and NM_000760.3:c.1245del, NP_000751.1:p.Gly415fsTer432). Despite peripheral SCN, all patients had morphologic evidence of full myeloid cell maturation in bone marrow. None of the patients responded to treatment with recombinant human G-CSF. Our study highlights the genetic and morphologic SCN variability and provides evidence both for functional importance and redundancy of G-CSF receptor-mediated signaling in human granulopoiesis. © 2014 by The American Society of Hematology.

  18. CSF Amino Acids, Pterins and Mechanism of the Ketogenic Diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Gordon Millichap

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Investigators from Hospital Sant Joan de Deu, Barcelona, Spain, studied the relationship between the etiology of refractory childhood epilepsy, CSF neurotransmitters, pterins, and amino acids, and response to a ketogenic diet in 60 patients with refractory epilepsy, 83% focal and 52% idiopathic.

  19. Using CSF biomarkers to replicate genetic associations in Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schott, Jonathan M.; Abdi, Hervé; Abdul Hadi, Normi; Abdulkadir, Ahmed; Abdullah, Afnizanfaizal; Achuthan, Anusha; Adluru, Nagesh; Aggarwal, Namita; Aghajanian, Jania; Agyemang, Alex; Ahdidan, Jamila; Ahmad, Duaa; Ahmed, Fayeza; Ahmed, Shiek; Ahmed, Fareed; Akbarifar, Roshanak; Akhondi-Asl, Alireza; Aksu, Yaman; Alcauter, Sarael; Alexander, Daniel; Alin, Aylin; Alshuft, Hamza; Alvarez-Linera, Juan; Amin-Mansour, Ali; Anderson, Jeff; Anderson, Dallas; Andorn, Anne; Andrews, K. Abigail; Ang, Amma; Angersbach, Steve; Ansarian, Reza; Abhishek, Appaji M.; Appannah, Arti; Arfanakis, Konstantinos; Arif, Muhammad; Armentrout, Steven; Arrighi, Michael; Arumughababu, S. Vethanayaki; Arunagiri, Vidhya; Ashe-McNalley, Cody; Ashford, Wes; Le Page, Aurelie; Avants, Brian; Aviv, Richard; Avula, Ramesh; Ayache, Nicholas; Ayan-Oshodi, Mosun; Ayhan, Murat; Richard, Edo; Schmand, Ben

    2012-01-01

    Defining cases and controls on the basis of biomarkers rather than clinical diagnosis may reduce sample sizes required for genetic studies. The aim of this study was to assess whether characterizing case/control status on the basis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) profile would increase power to

  20. Picking Up Artifacts: Storyboarding as a Gateway to Reuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahid, Shahtab; Branham, Stacy M.; Cairco, Lauren; McCrickard, D. Scott; Harrison, Steve

    Storyboarding offers designers the opportunity to illustrate a visual narrative of use. Because designers often refer to past ideas, we argue storyboards can be constructed by reusing shared artifacts. We present a study in which we explore how designers reuse artifacts consisting of images and rationale during storyboard construction. We find images can aid in accessing rationale and that connections among features aid in deciding what to reuse, creating new artifacts, and constructing. Based on requirements derived from our findings, we present a storyboarding tool, PIC-UP, to facilitate artifact sharing and reuse and evaluate its use in an exploratory study. We conclude with remarks on facilitating reuse and future work.

  1. Comparison of the Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) Toluidine Red Unheated Serum Test and the CSF Rapid Plasma Reagin Test with the CSF Venereal Disease Research Laboratory Test for Diagnosis of Neurosyphilis among HIV-Negative Syphilis Patients in China

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Lin; Gu, Xin; Peng, Rui-Rui; Wang, Cuini; Gao, Zixiao; Zhou, Pingyu; Gao, Ying; Shi, Mei; Guan, Zhifang; Seña, Arlene C.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to investigate the performance of nontreponemal antibody tests in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) specimens from syphilis patients. From September 2009 to September 2012, CSF specimens were collected at the Shanghai Skin Disease Hospital in Shanghai, China, from 1,132 syphilis patients without HIV infection, including 154 with symptomatic and 56 with asymptomatic neurosyphilis. All of the CSF specimens underwent testing with a rapid plasma reagin (RPR) test, an RPR-V (commer...

  2. Biological role of granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) on cells of the myeloid lineage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushach, Irina; Zlotnik, Albert

    2016-01-01

    M-CSF and GM-CSF are 2 important cytokines that regulate macrophage numbers and function. Here, we review their known effects on cells of the macrophage-monocyte lineage. Important clues to their function come from their expression patterns. M-CSF exhibits a mostly homeostatic expression pattern, whereas GM-CSF is a product of cells activated during inflammatory or pathologic conditions. Accordingly, M-CSF regulates the numbers of various tissue macrophage and monocyte populations without altering their "activation" status. Conversely, GM-CSF induces activation of monocytes/macrophages and also mediates differentiation to other states that participate in immune responses [i.e., dendritic cells (DCs)]. Further insights into their function have come from analyses of mice deficient in either cytokine. M-CSF signals through its receptor (CSF-1R). Interestingly, mice deficient in CSF-1R expression exhibit a more significant phenotype than mice deficient in M-CSF. This observation was explained by the discovery of a novel cytokine (IL-34) that represents a second ligand of CSF-1R. Information about the function of these ligands/receptor system is still developing, but its complexity is intriguing and strongly suggests that more interesting biology remains to be elucidated. Based on our current knowledge, several therapeutic molecules targeting either the M-CSF or the GM-CSF pathways have been developed and are currently being tested in clinical trials targeting either autoimmune diseases or cancer. It is intriguing to consider how evolution has directed these pathways to develop; their complexity likely mirrors the multiple functions in which cells of the monocyte/macrophage system are involved. PMID:27354413

  3. Emerging Roles for CSF-1 Receptor and its Ligands in the Nervous System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitu, Violeta; Gokhan, Solen; Nandi, Sayan; Mehler, Mark F.; Stanley, E. Richard

    2016-01-01

    The colony stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF-1R) kinase regulates tissue macrophage homeostasis, osteoclastogenesis, and Paneth cell development. However, recent studies in mice have revealed that CSF-1R signaling directly controls the development and maintenance of microglia, and cell autonomously regulates neuronal differentiation and survival. While the CSF-1R-cognate ligands, CSF-1 and interleukin-34 (IL-34), compete for binding to the CSF-1R, they are expressed in a largely non-overlapping manner by mature neurons. The recent identification of a dominantly inherited, adult-onset, progressive dementia associated with inactivating mutations in the CSF-1R highlights the importance of CSF-1R signaling in the brain. We review the roles of the CSF-1R and its ligands in microglial and neural development and function, and their relevance to our understanding of neurodegenerative disease. PMID:27083478

  4. IL-34 and CSF-1 display an equivalent macrophage differentiation ability but a different polarization potential

    OpenAIRE

    Boulakirba, Sonia; Pfeifer, Anja; Mhaidly, Rana; Obba, Sandrine; Goulard, Michael; Schmitt, Thomas; Chaintreuil, Paul; Calleja, Anne; Furstoss, Nathan; Orange, François; Lacas-Gervais, Sandra; Boyer, Laurent; Marchetti, Sandrine; Verhoeyen, Els; Luciano, Frederic

    2018-01-01

    CSF-1 and IL-34 share the CSF-1 receptor and no differences have been reported in the signaling pathways triggered by both ligands in human monocytes. IL-34 promotes the differentiation and survival of monocytes, macrophages and osteoclasts, as CSF-1 does. However, IL-34 binds other receptors, suggesting that differences exist in the effect of both cytokines. In the present study, we compared the differentiation and polarization abilities of human primary monocytes in response to CSF-1 or IL-...

  5. Heterogeneous effects of M-CSF isoforms on the progression of MLL-AF9 leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rong; Feng, Wenli; Yang, Feifei; Yang, Xiao; Wang, Lina; Chen, Chong; Hu, Yuting; Ren, Qian; Zheng, Guoguang

    2018-02-01

    Macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) regulates both malignant cells and microenvironmental cells. Its splicing isoforms show functional heterogeneity. However, their roles on leukemia have not been well established. Here, the expression of total M-CSF in patients with hematopoietic malignancies was analyzed. The roles of M-CSF isoforms on the progression of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) were studied by establishing MLL-AF9-induced mouse AML models with high level membrane-bound M-CSF (mM-CSF) or soluble M-CSF (sM-CSF). Total M-CSF was highly expressed in myeloid leukemia patients. Furthermore, mM-CSF but not sM-CSF prolonged the survival of leukemia mice. While sM-CSF was more potent to promote proliferation and self-renew, mM-CSF was more potent to promote differentiation. Moreover, isoforms had different effects on leukemia-associated macrophages (LAMs) though they both increase monocytes/macrophages by growth-promoting and recruitment effects. In addition, mM-CSF promoted specific phagocytosis of leukemia cells by LAMs. RNA-seq analysis revealed that mM-CSF enhanced phagocytosis-associated genes and activated oxidative phosphorylation and metabolism pathway. These results highlight heterogeneous effects of M-CSF isoforms on AML progression and the mechanisms of mM-CSF, that is, intrinsically promoting AML cell differentiation and extrinsically enhancing infiltration of macrophages and phagocytosis by macrophages, which may provide potential clues for clinical diagnosis and therapy. © 2017 Australasian Society for Immunology Inc.

  6. Continuous positive airway pressure alters cranial blood flow and cerebrospinal fluid dynamics at the craniovertebral junction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theresia I. Yiallourou

    2015-09-01

    Conclusion: Application of CPAP via a full-fitted mask at 15 cm H2O was found to have a significant effect on intracranial venous outflow and spinal CSF flow at the C2 vertebral level in healthy adult-age awake volunteers. CPAP can be used to non-invasively provoke changes in intracranial and CSF flow dynamics.

  7. An extension to artifact-free projection overlaps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Jianyu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: In multipinhole single photon emission computed tomography, the overlapping of projections has been used to increase sensitivity. Avoiding artifacts in the reconstructed image associated with projection overlaps (multiplexing) is a critical issue. In our previous report, two types of artifact-free projection overlaps, i.e., projection overlaps that do not lead to artifacts in the reconstructed image, were formally defined and proved, and were validated via simulations. In this work, a new proposition is introduced to extend the previously defined type-II artifact-free projection overlaps so that a broader range of artifact-free overlaps is accommodated. One practical purpose of the new extension is to design a baffle window multipinhole system with artifact-free projection overlaps. Methods: First, the extended type-II artifact-free overlap was theoretically defined and proved. The new proposition accommodates the situation where the extended type-II artifact-free projection overlaps can be produced with incorrectly reconstructed portions in the reconstructed image. Next, to validate the theory, the extended-type-II artifact-free overlaps were employed in designing the multiplexing multipinhole spiral orbit imaging systems with a baffle window. Numerical validations were performed via simulations, where the corresponding 1-pinhole nonmultiplexing reconstruction results were used as the benchmark for artifact-free reconstructions. The mean square error (MSE) was the metric used for comparisons of noise-free reconstructed images. Noisy reconstructions were also performed as part of the validations. Results: Simulation results show that for noise-free reconstructions, the MSEs of the reconstructed images of the artifact-free multiplexing systems are very similar to those of the corresponding 1-pinhole systems. No artifacts were observed in the reconstructed images. Therefore, the testing results for artifact-free multiplexing systems designed using the

  8. Analysis of aliasing artifacts in 16-slice helical CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Wei; Liu Jingkang; Ou Xiaoguang; Li Wenzheng; Liao Weihua; Yan Ang

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To recognize the features of aliasing artifacts on CT images, and to investigate the effects of imaging parameters on the magnitude of this artifacts. Methods: An adult dry skull was placed in a plastic water-filled container and scanned with a PHILIPS 16-slice helical CT. All the acquired transaxial images by using several different acquisition or reconstruction parameters were examined for comparative assessment of the aliasing artifacts. Results: The aliasing artifacts could be seen in most instances and characterized as the spokewise patterns emanating from the edges of high contrast structure as its radius varies sharply in the longitudinal direction. The images that scanned with pitch of 0.3, 0.6 and 0.9, respectively, showed aliasing artifacts, and its severities increased with pitches escalated (detector combination 16 x 1.5, reconstruction thickness 2 mm); There were more significant aliasing artifacts on the images reconstructed with 0.8 mm slice width compared with 1-mm slice width, and no aliasing artifacts were observed on the images reconstructed with 2-mm slice width (detector combination 16 x 0.75, pitch 0.6); No artifacts were perceived on the images scanned with detector combination 16 x 0.75, while presented evidently with the use of detector combination 16 x 1.5 (pitch 0.6, reconstruction thickness 2 mm); The degrees of aliasing artifacts were unaltered when reconstruction interval and tube current changed. Conclusions: Aliasing artifacts are caused by undersampling. When the operator choose the thinner sampling thickness, lower pitch and a much wider reconstruction thickness judiciously, aliasing artifacts could be effectively mitigated or suppressed. (authors)

  9. Prior-based artifact correction (PBAC) in computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heußer, Thorsten; Brehm, Marcus; Ritschl, Ludwig; Sawall, Stefan; Kachelrieß, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Image quality in computed tomography (CT) often suffers from artifacts which may reduce the diagnostic value of the image. In many cases, these artifacts result from missing or corrupt regions in the projection data, e.g., in the case of metal, truncation, and limited angle artifacts. The authors propose a generalized correction method for different kinds of artifacts resulting from missing or corrupt data by making use of available prior knowledge to perform data completion. Methods: The proposed prior-based artifact correction (PBAC) method requires prior knowledge in form of a planning CT of the same patient or in form of a CT scan of a different patient showing the same body region. In both cases, the prior image is registered to the patient image using a deformable transformation. The registered prior is forward projected and data completion of the patient projections is performed using smooth sinogram inpainting. The obtained projection data are used to reconstruct the corrected image. Results: The authors investigate metal and truncation artifacts in patient data sets acquired with a clinical CT and limited angle artifacts in an anthropomorphic head phantom data set acquired with a gantry-based flat detector CT device. In all cases, the corrected images obtained by PBAC are nearly artifact-free. Compared to conventional correction methods, PBAC achieves better artifact suppression while preserving the patient-specific anatomy at the same time. Further, the authors show that prominent anatomical details in the prior image seem to have only minor impact on the correction result. Conclusions: The results show that PBAC has the potential to effectively correct for metal, truncation, and limited angle artifacts if adequate prior data are available. Since the proposed method makes use of a generalized algorithm, PBAC may also be applicable to other artifacts resulting from missing or corrupt data

  10. Aggregated particles caused by instrument artifact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Ashley M.; Loría-Salazar, S. Marcela; Arnott, W. Patrick; Edwards, Grant C.; Miller, Matthieu B.; Gustin, Mae S.

    2018-04-01

    Previous studies have indicated that superaggregates, clusters of aggregates of soot primary particles, can be formed in large-scale turbulent fires. Due to lower effective densities, higher porosity, and lower aerodynamic diameters, superaggregates may pass through inlets designed to remove particles 2.5 µm in aerodynamic diameter were collected on 36 out of 158 sample days. On preliminary analysis, it was thought that these aggregated particles were superaggregates, depositing past PM10 (particles wind speeds, as well as the use of generators on site. Samples with aggregated particles, referred to as aggregates, were analyzed using a scanning electron microscope for size and shape and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy was used for elemental analysis. It was determined, based on the high amounts of aluminum present in the aggregate samples, that a sampling artifact associated with the sample inlet and prolonged, high wind events was the probable reason for the observed aggregates.

  11. Medical image of the week: polysomnogram artifact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartell J

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A 54 year-old man with a past medical history of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD, low back pain, and paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia presented to the sleep laboratory for evaluation of sleep disordered breathing. Pertinent medications include fluoxetine, ambien, and clonazepam. His Epworth sleepiness score was 18. He had a total sleep time of 12 min. On the night of his sleep study, the patient was restless and repeatedly changed positions in bed. Figures 1 and 2 show the artifact determined to be lead displacement of O1M2 after the patient shifted in bed, inadvertently removing one of his scalp electrodes. The sine waves are 60 Hz in frequency. Once the problem was identified, the lead was quickly replaced to its proper position.

  12. Persuasion through artifacts: Sociological and psychological dimensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stroe Mihaela

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Research suggests that applicants use various impression management tactics during employment interviews to influence interviewers' evaluations of their performance. Yet, little research has examined inteviewers/perceptions of applicant's impression management and their degree of nonverbal influence. This PhD study examines these questions, using both quantitative and qualitative data: Do interviewers accurately perceive applicant's impression management tactics? How are these perceptions integrated into their evaluations of applicant's nonverbal behaviour? Is perception accuracy influenced by artifacts (professional clothing that interviewees wear? It has cross-cultural design, because describes the differences in European Commission interviewers' social perceptions and Romanian human resources managers on one hand, and between social perceptions of European Commission public servants and Romanian employees on the other hand, concerning 12 key concepts: persuasion, first impressions, professional image, credibility, authenticity, competence, self- confidence, self-management, self-presentation, self-promotion, impression management tactics, professional appearance.

  13. DMPD: CSF-1 and cell cycle control in macrophages. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 8981359 CSF-1 and cell cycle control in macrophages. Hamilton JA. Mol Reprod Dev. 1...997 Jan;46(1):19-23. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show CSF-1 and cell cycle control in macrophages. PubmedI...D 8981359 Title CSF-1 and cell cycle control in macrophages. Authors Hamilton JA. Publication Mol Reprod Dev

  14. Aggregated particles caused by instrument artifact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Pierce

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have indicated that superaggregates, clusters of aggregates of soot primary particles, can be formed in large-scale turbulent fires. Due to lower effective densities, higher porosity, and lower aerodynamic diameters, superaggregates may pass through inlets designed to remove particles  <  2.5 µm in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5. Ambient particulate matter samples were collected at Peavine Peak, NV, USA (2515 m northwest of Reno, NV, USA from June to November 2014. The Teledyne Advanced Pollution Instrumentation (TAPI 602 BetaPlus particulate monitor was used to collect PM2.5 on two filter types. During this time, aggregated particles  >  2.5 µm in aerodynamic diameter were collected on 36 out of 158 sample days. On preliminary analysis, it was thought that these aggregated particles were superaggregates, depositing past PM10 (particles  <  10 µm in aerodynamic diameter pre-impactors and PM2.5 cyclones. However, further analysis revealed that these aggregated particles were dissimilar to superaggregates observed in previous studies, both in morphology and in elemental composition. To determine if the aggregated particles were superaggregates or an instrument artifact, samples were investigated for the presence of certain elements, the occurrence of fires, high relative humidity and wind speeds, as well as the use of generators on site. Samples with aggregated particles, referred to as aggregates, were analyzed using a scanning electron microscope for size and shape and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy was used for elemental analysis. It was determined, based on the high amounts of aluminum present in the aggregate samples, that a sampling artifact associated with the sample inlet and prolonged, high wind events was the probable reason for the observed aggregates.

  15. Therapeutic use of recombinant human G-CSF (rhG-CSF) in a canine model of sublethal and lethal whole-body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacVittie, T.J.; Monroy, R.L.; Patchen, M.L.; Souza, L.M.

    1990-01-01

    Recombinant human G-CSF (rhG-CSF) was studied for its ability to modulate haemopoiesis in normal dogs as well as to decrease therapeutically the severity and duration of neutropenia in sublethally and lethally irradiated dogs. Data indicate that in the lethally irradiated dog, effective cytokine therapy with rhG-CSF will increase survival through the induction of earlier recovery of neutrophils and platelets. (author)

  16. Contrast artifacts in tapping tip atomic force microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kyhle, Anders; Sørensen, Alexis Hammer; Zandbergen, Julie Bjerring

    1998-01-01

    When recording images with an atomic force microscope using the resonant vibrating cantilever mode, surprising strange results are often achieved. Typical artifacts are strange contours, unexpected height shifts, and sudden changes of the apparent resolution in the acquired images. Such artifacts...

  17. How Do Artifact Models Help Direct SPI Projects?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhrmann, Marco; Richardson, Ita

    2015-01-01

    To overcome shortcomings associated with software process improvement (SPI), we previously recommended that process engineers focus on the artifacts to be developed in SPI projects. These artifacts should define desired outcomes, rather than specific methods. During this prior research, we develo...

  18. Metal and calcification artifact reduction for digital breast tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicklein, Julia; Jerebko, Anna; Ritschl, Ludwig; Mertelmeier, Thomas

    2017-03-01

    Tomosynthesis images of the breast suffer from artifacts caused by the presence of highly absorbing materials. These can be either induced by metal objects like needles or clips inserted during biopsy devices, or larger calcifications inside the examined breast. Mainly two different kinds of artifacts appear after the filtered backprojection procedure. The first type is undershooting artifacts near edges of high-contrast objects caused by the filtering step. The second type is out-of-plane (ripple) artifacts that appear even in slices where the metal object or macrocalcifications does not exist. Due to the limited angular range of tomosynthesis systems, overlapping structures have high influence on neighboring regions. To overcome these problems, a segmentation of artifact introducing objects is performed on the projection images. Both projection versions, with and without high-contrast objects are filtered independently to avoid undershootings. During backprojection a decision is made for each reconstructed voxel, if it is artifact or high-contrast object. This is based on a mask image, gained from the segmentation of high-contrast objects. This procedure avoids undershooting artifacts and additionally reduces out-of-plane ripple. Results are demonstrated for different kinds of artifact inducing objects and calcifications.

  19. Making Digital Artifacts on the Web Verifiable and Reliable

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuhn, T.; Dumontier, M.

    2015-01-01

    The current Web has no general mechanisms to make digital artifacts - such as datasets, code, texts, and images - verifiable and permanent. For digital artifacts that are supposed to be immutable, there is moreover no commonly accepted method to enforce this immutability. These shortcomings have a

  20. Incidental ferumoxytol artifacts in clinical brain MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowser, Bruce A.; Campeau, Norbert G.; Carr, Carrie M.; Diehn, Felix E.; McDonald, Jennifer S.; Miller, Gary M.; Kaufmann, Timothy J. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2016-11-15

    Ferumoxytol (Feraheme) is a parenteral therapy approved for treatment of iron deficiency anemia. The product insert for ferumoxytol states that it may affect the diagnostic ability of MRI for up to 3 months. However, the expected effects may not be commonly recognized among clinical neuroradiologists. Our purpose is to describe the artifacts we have seen at our institution during routine clinical practice. We reviewed the patients at our institution that had brain MRI performed within 90 days of receiving intravenous ferumoxytol. The imaging was reviewed for specific findings, including diffusion-weighted imaging vascular susceptibility artifact, gradient-echo echo-planar T2*-weighted vascular susceptibility artifact, SWI/SWAN vascular susceptibility artifact, hypointense vascular signal on T2-weighted images, pre-gadolinium contrast vascular enhancement on magnetization-prepared rapid acquisition gradient echo (MPRAGE) imaging, and effects on post-gadolinium contrast T1 imaging. Multiple artifacts were observed in patients having a brain MRI within 3 days of receiving intravenous ferumoxytol. These included susceptibility artifact on DWI, GRE, and SWAN/SWI imaging, pre-gadolinium contrast increased vascular signal on MPRAGE imaging, and decreased expected enhancement on post-gadolinium contrast T1-weighted imaging. Ferumoxytol can create imaging artifacts which complicate clinical interpretation when brain MRI is performed within 3 days of administration. Recognition of the constellation of artifacts produced by ferumoxytol is important in order to obviate additional unnecessary examinations and mitigate errors in interpretation. (orig.)

  1. Quantification of Rain Induced Artifacts on Digital Satellite Television ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The presence of artifacts on the high definition television (TV) content and the eventual loss of the digital TV signals to rain is still a major concern to satellite operators, digital satellite television (DSTV) and terrestrial television content providers. In this paper, the artifacts present in a typical DSTV signal is examined on a ...

  2. GM-CSF enhances tumor invasion by elevated MMP-2, -9, and -26 expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutschalk, Claudia M; Yanamandra, Archana K; Linde, Nina; Meides, Alice; Depner, Sofia; Mueller, Margareta M

    2013-01-01

    Granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) promotes tumor progression in different tumor models in an autocrine and paracrine manner. However, at the same time GM-CSF is used in cancer therapies to ameliorate neutropenia. We have previously shown in GM-CSF and G-CSF expressing or negative skin or head and neck squamous cell carcinoma that GM-CSF expression is associated with a highly angiogenic and invasive tumor phenotype. To determine the functional contribution of GM-CSF to tumor invasion, we stably transfected a GM-CSF negative colon adenocarcinoma cell line HT-29 with GM-CSF or treated the same cell line with exogenous GM-CSF. While GM-CSF overexpression and treatment reduced tumor cell proliferation and tumor growth in vitro and in vivo, respectively, it contributed to tumor progression. Together with an enhanced migratory capacity in vitro, we observed a striking increase in tumor cell invasion into the surrounding tissue concomitant with the induction of an activated tumor stroma in GM-CSF overexpressing or GM-CSF treated tumors. In a complex 3D in vitro model, enhanced GM-CSF expression was associated with a discontinued basement membrane deposition that might be mediated by the increased expression and activation of MMP-2, -9, and -26. Treatment with GM-CSF blocking antibodies reversed this effect. The increased presence and activity of these tumor cell derived proteases was confirmed in vivo. Here, expression of MMP-26 protein was predominantly located in pre- and early-invasive areas suggesting MMP-26 expression as an early event in promoting GM-CSF dependent tumor invasion

  3. Nucleolin Mediates MicroRNA-directed CSF-1 mRNA Deadenylation but Increases Translation of CSF-1 mRNA*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Ho-Hyung; Baker, Terri; Laszlo, Csaba; Chambers, Setsuko K.

    2013-01-01

    CSF-1 mRNA 3′UTR contains multiple unique motifs, including a common microRNA (miRNA) target in close proximity to a noncanonical G-quadruplex and AU-rich elements (AREs). Using a luciferase reporter system fused to CSF-1 mRNA 3′UTR, disruption of the miRNA target region, G-quadruplex, and AREs together dramatically increased reporter RNA levels, suggesting important roles for these cis-acting regulatory elements in the down-regulation of CSF-1 mRNA. We find that nucleolin, which binds both G-quadruplex and AREs, enhances deadenylation of CSF-1 mRNA, promoting CSF-1 mRNA decay, while having the capacity to increase translation of CSF-1 mRNA. Through interaction with the CSF-1 3′UTR miRNA common target, we find that miR-130a and miR-301a inhibit CSF-1 expression by enhancing mRNA decay. Silencing of nucleolin prevents the miRNA-directed mRNA decay, indicating a requirement for nucleolin in miRNA activity on CSF-1 mRNA. Downstream effects followed by miR-130a and miR-301a inhibition of directed cellular motility of ovarian cancer cells were found to be dependent on nucleolin. The paradoxical effects of nucleolin on miRNA-directed CSF-1 mRNA deadenylation and on translational activation were explored further. The nucleolin protein contains four acidic stretches, four RNA recognition motifs (RRMs), and nine RGG repeats. All three domains in nucleolin regulate CSF-1 mRNA and protein levels. RRMs increase CSF-1 mRNA, whereas the acidic and RGG domains decrease CSF-1 protein levels. This suggests that nucleolin has the capacity to differentially regulate both CSF-1 RNA and protein levels. Our finding that nucleolin interacts with Ago2 indirectly via RNA and with poly(A)-binding protein C (PABPC) directly suggests a nucleolin-Ago2-PABPC complex formation on mRNA. This complex is in keeping with our suggestion that nucleolin may work with PABPC as a double-edged sword on both mRNA deadenylation and translational activation. Our findings underscore the complexity of

  4. Distributed Cognition and Distributed Morality: Agency, Artifacts and Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heersmink, Richard

    2017-04-01

    There are various philosophical approaches and theories describing the intimate relation people have to artifacts. In this paper, I explore the relation between two such theories, namely distributed cognition and distributed morality theory. I point out a number of similarities and differences in these views regarding the ontological status they attribute to artifacts and the larger systems they are part of. Having evaluated and compared these views, I continue by focussing on the way cognitive artifacts are used in moral practice. I specifically conceptualise how such artifacts (a) scaffold and extend moral reasoning and decision-making processes, (b) have a certain moral status which is contingent on their cognitive status, and (c) whether responsibility can be attributed to distributed systems. This paper is primarily written for those interested in the intersection of cognitive and moral theory as it relates to artifacts, but also for those independently interested in philosophical debates in extended and distributed cognition and ethics of (cognitive) technology.

  5. Investigation of the saturation pulse artifact in non-enhanced MR angiography of the lower extremity arteries at 7 Tesla.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sören Johst

    Full Text Available When performing non-enhanced time-of-flight MR angiography of the lower extremity arteries at 7 T with cardiac triggering, the acquisition time is a crucial consideration. Therefore, in previous studies, saturation RF pulses were applied only every second TR. In the axial source images a slight artifact with an appearance similar to aliasing could be observed. The purpose of this study was to investigate the origin of this artifact. The reason for the artifact is supposed to be related to the two effective TRs during acquisition caused by the sparsely applied saturation RF pulse. Several sequence variants were simulated and implemented within the sequence source code to examine this hypothesis. An adaptation of the excitation flip angles for each TR as well as a correction factor for the k-space data was calculated. Additionally, a different ordering of the k-space data during acquisition was implemented as well as the combination of the latter with the k-space correction factor. The observations from the simulations were verified using both a static and a flow phantom and, finally, in a healthy volunteer using the same measurement setup as in previous volunteer and patient studies. Of all implemented techniques, only the reordering of the k-space was capable of suppressing the artifact almost completely at the cost of creating a ringing artifact. The phantom measurements showed the same results as the simulations and could thus confirm the hypothesis regarding the origin of the artifact. This was additionally verified in the healthy volunteer. The origin of the artifact could be confirmed to be the periodic signal variation caused by two effective TRs during acquisition.

  6. Investigation of the saturation pulse artifact in non-enhanced MR angiography of the lower extremity arteries at 7 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johst, Sören; Maderwald, Stefan; Fischer, Anja; Quick, Harald H; Ladd, Mark E; Orzada, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    When performing non-enhanced time-of-flight MR angiography of the lower extremity arteries at 7 T with cardiac triggering, the acquisition time is a crucial consideration. Therefore, in previous studies, saturation RF pulses were applied only every second TR. In the axial source images a slight artifact with an appearance similar to aliasing could be observed. The purpose of this study was to investigate the origin of this artifact. The reason for the artifact is supposed to be related to the two effective TRs during acquisition caused by the sparsely applied saturation RF pulse. Several sequence variants were simulated and implemented within the sequence source code to examine this hypothesis. An adaptation of the excitation flip angles for each TR as well as a correction factor for the k-space data was calculated. Additionally, a different ordering of the k-space data during acquisition was implemented as well as the combination of the latter with the k-space correction factor. The observations from the simulations were verified using both a static and a flow phantom and, finally, in a healthy volunteer using the same measurement setup as in previous volunteer and patient studies. Of all implemented techniques, only the reordering of the k-space was capable of suppressing the artifact almost completely at the cost of creating a ringing artifact. The phantom measurements showed the same results as the simulations and could thus confirm the hypothesis regarding the origin of the artifact. This was additionally verified in the healthy volunteer. The origin of the artifact could be confirmed to be the periodic signal variation caused by two effective TRs during acquisition.

  7. Developmental and functional significance of the CSF-1 proteoglycan chondroitin sulfate chain

    OpenAIRE

    Nandi, Sayan; Akhter, Mohammed P.; Seifert, Mark F.; Dai, Xu-Ming; Stanley, E. Richard

    2006-01-01

    The primary macrophage growth factor, colony-stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1), is homodimeric and exists in 3 biologically active isoforms: a membrane-spanning, cell-surface glycoprotein (csCSF-1) and secreted glycoprotein (sgCSF-1) and proteoglycan (spCSF-1) isoforms. To investigate the in vivo role of the chondroitin sulfate glycosaminoglycan (GAG) chain of spCSF-1, we created mice that exclusively express, in a normal tissue-specific and developmental manner, either the secreted precursor of s...

  8. G-CSF-primed BM for allogeneic SCT: revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pessach, I; Resnick, I; Shimoni, A; Nagler, A

    2015-07-01

    G-SCF-mobilized PBSC (GPB) grafts have a higher cell dose and somewhat more committed progenitor cells than steady-state BM (SBM), resulting in faster engraftment and faster immunological reconstitution. On the other hand, transplant related mortality (TRM), disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) are similar both for PB and for BM. In contrast to SBM, G-CSF-primed BM (GBM) grafts stimulate HSC proliferation, increasing cell dose and thus resulting in faster engraftment because of higher cell dose infused, or because of treatment with G-CSF. Furthermore, GBM may induce tolerance and functional modulations in donor hematopoiesis and immunity, further reducing GVHD incidence, which is already lower with SBM compared with GPB grafts. Overall, a growing body of clinical evidence suggests that GBM transplants may share the advantages of GPB transplantations, without the associated increased risk of GVHD, and might be an attractive graft source for allogeneic SCTs.

  9. Epidural blood patch for refractory low CSF pressure headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Søren Aalbæk; Fomsgaard, Jonna Storm; Jensen, Rigmor

    2011-01-01

    primary effect parameter was total headache burden defined as area under the curve (AUC: intensity × duration) and as secondary effect parameters we identified: intensity (VAS 0-10), frequency (days per month), duration in hours (total hours/month) and also medication days (days on medication...... of non-invasive/conservative measures and invasive measures with epidural blood patch providing the cornerstone of the invasive measures. In the present pilot study we therefore aimed to evaluate the treatment efficacy of epidural blood patch (EBP) in treatment-refractory low-pressure headache. Our......Once believed an exceedingly rare disorder, recent evidence suggests that low cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure headache has to be considered an important cause of new daily persistent headaches, particularly among young and middle-aged individuals. Treatment of low CSF pressure headache consists...

  10. Epidural blood patch for refractory low CSF pressure headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Søren Aalbæk; Fomsgaard, Jonna Storm; Jensen, Rigmor

    2011-01-01

    of non-invasive/conservative measures and invasive measures with epidural blood patch providing the cornerstone of the invasive measures. In the present pilot study we therefore aimed to evaluate the treatment efficacy of epidural blood patch (EBP) in treatment-refractory low-pressure headache. Our......Once believed an exceedingly rare disorder, recent evidence suggests that low cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure headache has to be considered an important cause of new daily persistent headaches, particularly among young and middle-aged individuals. Treatment of low CSF pressure headache consists...... primary effect parameter was total headache burden defined as area under the curve (AUC: intensity × duration) and as secondary effect parameters we identified: intensity (VAS 0-10), frequency (days per month), duration in hours (total hours/month) and also medication days (days on medication...

  11. The role of locally-designed organizational artifacts in supporting nurses’ work: an ethnographic study on the wards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talamo, Alessandra; Mellini, Barbara; Barbieri, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    This paper aims to describe how nurses' planning and coordination work is performed through the use of locally designed tools (i.e., diaries, planners, reminders, and organizers). These tools are investigated as the materialization of organizational work, thus offering a complementary perspective on nursing practice to that proposed by the professional mandate and supported by official artifacts in use. Ethnographic study. By analyzing locally designed artifacts, the rationale that enables nurses to make the flow of activities work is highlighted and explained. Evidence is provided by a description of how nurses' tacit knowledge is reified and embedded into objects produced by the nurses themselves. Implications for the design of digital systems supporting nursing practice are discussed. The analysis of these artifacts has allowed an understanding of practices used by the nurses to manage the workflow in the wards.

  12. Neurocysticercosis: relationship between Taenia antigen levels in CSF and MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abraham, Ronaldo; Livramento, Jose Antonio; Machado, Luis dos Ramos; Leite, Claudia da Costa; Pardini, Alessandra Xavier; Vaz, Adelaide Jose

    2010-01-01

    Objective: to determine the relationship between Taenia antigen (TA) detection in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in patients with definite diagnosis of neurocysticercosis (NC). Method: sixty-three patients with definite diagnosis of NC were submitted to a MRI of the brain, and to a CSF examination, with a meticulous search for TA by ELISA. Results: TA detection was positive in 36 patients (57.1%). A total of 836 lesions were analyzed, greatly within the cerebral parenchyma (98.7 of the lesions). Intact or non-degenerating cysts were the most common evolutive phase observed (50.4% of all lesions), 22.1% were degenerating cysts and 19.5% calcified cysts. We observed a significant relationship between TA levels detected and the total number of lesions and the number of non-degenerating cysts, but not with calcified lesions. Conclusion: according to our results, we propose at least four important types of contribution: TA detection may allow etiologic diagnosis in transitional phases of NC, with non-characteristic images; in final stages of evolution of cysticercoids in the CNS, lesions may not appear on CT or MRI, and TA detection may contribute to a definite etiologic diagnosis; TA detection may permit diagnosis of NC in some patients with previous negative tests for antibody detection in CSF; TA detection may represent an accurate marker of disease activity in the epileptic form of NC. (author)

  13. G-CSF-primed autologous and allogeneic bone marrow for transplantation in clinical oncology. Cell content and immunological characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grivtsova, L. Yu; Melkova, K. N.; Kupryshkina, N. A.; Vorotnikov, I. K.; Grigoryeva, T. A.; Selchuk, V. Yu; Grebennikova, O. P.; Titova, G. V.; Tupitsyn, N. N.

    2018-01-01

    60 samples of G-CSF-primed bone marrow (39 cancer patients and 21 healthy donors) to be used for transplantation to cancer patients were analyzed and compared by main characteristics with historical control and 13 bone marrow samples from control patient with mastopathy. Basing on morphological and multicolor flow cytometry findings certain characteristics of G-CSF-primed bone marrow were discovered, such as a significant increase in blast count in cancer patients as compared to donors and control patients (p<0.037), a higher neutrophil maturation index (p<0.001) and a lower percentage of mature lymphocytes (p<0.008) as compared to the control group. Among lymphocyte populations G-CSF-priming was associated with a significant increase in the total of mature CD3+ T-cells and CD8+ T-killers (p<0.0001) and a decrease in CD56+CD3- and/or CD16+CD3- NK-cells (p<0.006) both in cancer patients and healthy donors in comparison with the controls.

  14. Adiabatic Low-Pass J Filters for Artifact Suppression in Heteronuclear NMR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier, Sebastian; Benie, Andrew J; Duus, Jens Øllgaard

    2009-01-01

    NMR artifact purging: Modern NMR experiments depend on efficient coherence transfer pathways for their sensitivity and on suppression of undesired pathways leading to artifacts for their spectral clarity. A novel robust adiabatic element suppresses hard-to-get-at artifacts....

  15. Searching for alien artifacts on the moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, P. C. W.; Wagner, R. V.

    2013-08-01

    The Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) has a low probability of success, but it would have a high impact if successful. Therefore it makes sense to widen the search as much as possible within the confines of the modest budget and limited resources currently available. To date, SETI has been dominated by the paradigm of seeking deliberately beamed radio messages. However, indirect evidence for extraterrestrial intelligence could come from any incontrovertible signatures of non-human technology. Existing searchable databases from astronomy, biology, earth and planetary sciences all offer low-cost opportunities to seek a footprint of extraterrestrial technology. In this paper we take as a case study one particular new and rapidly-expanding database: the photographic mapping of the Moon's surface by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) to 0.5 m resolution. Although there is only a tiny probability that alien technology would have left traces on the moon in the form of an artifact or surface modification of lunar features, this location has the virtue of being close, and of preserving traces for an immense duration. Systematic scrutiny of the LRO photographic images is being routinely conducted anyway for planetary science purposes, and this program could readily be expanded and outsourced at little extra cost to accommodate SETI goals, after the fashion of the SETI@home and Galaxy Zoo projects.

  16. Colorectal Cancer "Methylator Phenotype": Fact or Artifact?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Anacleto

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available It has been proposed that human colorectal tumors can be classified into two groups: one in which methylation is rare, and another with methylation of several loci associated with a "CpG island methylated phenotype (CIMP," characterized by preferential proximal location in the colon, but otherwise poorly defined. There is considerable overlap between this putative methylator phenotype and the well-known mutator phenotype associated with microsatellite instability (MSI. We have examined hypermethylation of the promoter region of five genes (DAPK, MGMT, hMLH1, p16INK4a, and p14ARF in 106 primary colorectal cancers. A graph depicting the frequency of methylated loci in the series of tumors showed a continuous, monotonically decreasing distribution quite different from the previously claimed discontinuity. We observed a significant association between the presence of three or more methylated loci and the proximal location of the tumors. However, if we remove from analysis the tumors with hMLH1 methylation or those with MSI, the significance vanishes, suggesting that the association between multiple methylations and proximal location was indirect due to the correlation with MSI. Thus, our data do not support the independent existence of the so-called methylator phenotype and suggest that it rather may represent a statistical artifact caused by confounding of associations.

  17. Physiological artifacts in scalp EEG and ear-EEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappel, Simon L; Looney, David; Mandic, Danilo P; Kidmose, Preben

    2017-08-11

    A problem inherent to recording EEG is the interference arising from noise and artifacts. While in a laboratory environment, artifacts and interference can, to a large extent, be avoided or controlled, in real-life scenarios this is a challenge. Ear-EEG is a concept where EEG is acquired from electrodes in the ear. We present a characterization of physiological artifacts generated in a controlled environment for nine subjects. The influence of the artifacts was quantified in terms of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) deterioration of the auditory steady-state response. Alpha band modulation was also studied in an open/closed eyes paradigm. Artifacts related to jaw muscle contractions were present all over the scalp and in the ear, with the highest SNR deteriorations in the gamma band. The SNR deterioration for jaw artifacts were in general higher in the ear compared to the scalp. Whereas eye-blinking did not influence the SNR in the ear, it was significant for all groups of scalps electrodes in the delta and theta bands. Eye movements resulted in statistical significant SNR deterioration in both frontal, temporal and ear electrodes. Recordings of alpha band modulation showed increased power and coherence of the EEG for ear and scalp electrodes in the closed-eyes periods. Ear-EEG is a method developed for unobtrusive and discreet recording over long periods of time and in real-life environments. This study investigated the influence of the most important types of physiological artifacts, and demonstrated that spontaneous activity, in terms of alpha band oscillations, could be recorded from the ear-EEG platform. In its present form ear-EEG was more prone to jaw related artifacts and less prone to eye-blinking artifacts compared to state-of-the-art scalp based systems.

  18. Chimeric classical swine fever (CSF)-Japanese encephalitis (JE) viral particles as a non-transmissible bivalent marker vaccine candidate against CSF and JE infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    A trans-complemented CSF- JE chimeric viral replicon was constructed using an infectious cDNA clone of the CSF virus (CSFV) Alfort/187 strain. The E2 gene of CSFV Alfort/187 strain was deleted and the resultant plasmid pA187delE2 was inserted by a fragment containing the region coding for a truncate...

  19. Grain-boundary, glassy-phase identification and possible artifacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, Y.K.; Carter, C.B.; Sklad, P.; Bentley, J.

    1985-01-01

    Specimen artifacts such as grain boundary grooving, surface damage of the specimen, and Si contamination are shown experimentally to arise from the ion milling used in the preparation of transmission electron microscopy specimens. These artifacts in polycrystalline, ceramic specimens can cause clean grain boundaries to appear to contain a glassy phase when the dark-field diffuse scattering technique, the Fresnel fringe technique, and analytical electron microscopy (energy dispersive spectroscopy) are used to identify glassy phases at a grain boundary. The ambiguity in interpreting each of these techniques due to the ion milling artifacts will be discussed from a theoretical view point and compared to experimental results obtained for alumina

  20. Towards a concept of community artifact ecology in HCI?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saad-Sulonen, Joanna; Korsgaard, Henrik

    or workplaces do. This has implications on understanding how to research and design HCI for communities but also on refining the ecological perspective in HCI. We look in particular at examples from preliminary research on a local self-organised urban community and discuss what existing concepts in the ecology......In this paper we introduce the concept of community artifact ecology. We argue that taking a community perspective on the concept of artifact ecologies is relevant in HCI because communities are also dealing with multitudes of artifacts, in ways di↵erent that individuals, organizations...

  1. Thermoluminescent determination of prehistoric heat treatment of chert artifacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melcher, C.L.; Zimmerman, D.W.

    1977-01-01

    In recent years archeologists have become interested in the extent to which prehistoric peoples heat-treated chert prior to shaping it into tools. Thermoluminescent determination of the radiation dose accumulated by an artifact since it was formed or last heated provides a simple, reliable test for such heat treatment. This test can be applied to single artifacts without the need for raw source material for comparison. Results on 25 artifacts from four sites indicate that, for many chert sources, color and luster are not useful indicators of heat treatment by prehistoric peoples

  2. Artifacts Affecting Musculoskeletal Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Their Origins and Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Eira; Hoff, Michael; Richardson, Michael L; Ha, Alice S; Porrino, Jack

    2016-01-01

    Among articles within the radiology literature, few present the manifestations of magnetic resonance imaging artifacts in a clinically oriented manner. Recognizing such artifacts is imperative given the increasing clinical use of magnetic resonance imaging and the emphasis by the American Board of Radiology on practical physics applications. The purpose of this article is to present magnetic resonance physics principles visually and conceptually in the context of common musculoskeletal radiology artifacts and their solutions, described using nonmathematical explanations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Artifact in Pediatric Oculomotor Findings during Videonystagmography: A Retrospective Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doettl, Steven M; Plyler, Patrick N; McCaslin, Devin L

    2017-04-01

    Accurate measurement of oculomotor function using videonystagmography (VNG) is imperative for diagnosis and management of patients with reported dizziness. The oculomotor evaluation during VNG utilizes video-oculography providing valuable information regarding the central structures and pathways that control eye movements. Artifact may have an effect on the overall validity and reliability of VNG oculomotor tracings and can result from patient and/or recording errors. It is postulated that artifact could occur more frequently in the pediatric population due to both patient and equipment factors. The purpose of this study was to systematically evaluate the occurrence and impact of artifact on saccades, smooth pursuit, and optokinetic (OPK) testing in normal pediatric and adult subjects using commercially available clinical VNG equipment and standard clinical protocols for oculomotor testing. The present study utilized a retrospective analysis of a repeated measures design. Oculomotor results from a total of 62 participants were analyzed. Portions of these data have been presented in a previous research study. Group 1 consisted of twenty-nine 4- to 6-yr-olds with an average age of 4.86 (SD = 0.88) yr. Group 2 consisted of thirty-three 22- to 44-yr-olds with an average age of 25.2 (SD = 5.34) yr. Raw oculomotor recordings were analyzed "offline" by a single masked, trained investigator. Each tracing was evaluated for instances of artifact including eye blinks, eye closure, eyes moving in opposite direction of the target, eye tracking software problems, and overall poor morphology. The number of instances of artifact were noted and recorded for each participant in both groups. Individual eye movements not affected by artifact were included for final analysis. Artifact rejection techniques were also compared. The results indicated increased artifact for the pediatric group for saccade and smooth pursuit testing. Additionally, a significant decrease in instances of

  4. Post craniotomy extra-ventricular drain (EVD) associated nosocomial meningitis: CSF diagnostic criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Gómez, Sigridh; Wirkowski, Elizabeth; Cunha, Burke A

    2015-01-01

    Because external ventricular drains (EVDs) provide access to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), there is potential for EVD associated acute bacterial meningitis (EVD-AM). Post-craniotomy, in patients with EVDs, one or more CSF abnormalities are commonly present making the diagnosis of EVD-AM problematic. EVD-AM was defined as elevated CSF lactic acid (>6 nmol/L), plus CSF marked pleocytosis (>50 WBCs/mm(3)), plus a positive Gram stain (same morphology as CSF isolate), plus a positive CSF culture of neuropathogen (same morphology as Gram stained organism). We reviewed 22 adults with EVDs to determine if our four CSF parameters combined accurately identified EVD-AM. No single or combination of <4 CSF parameters correctly diagnosed or ruled out EVD-AM. Combined our four CSF parameters clearly differentiated EVD-AM from one case of pseudomeningitis due to E. cloacae. We conclude that our four CSF criteria combined are useful in diagnosing EVD-AM in adults. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) induces Fc receptor expression on macrophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magee, D.M.; Wing, E.J.; Waheed, A.; Shadduck, R.K.

    1986-01-01

    M-CSF is a glycoprotein that stimulates bone marrow progenitor cells to proliferate and differentiate into macrophages (M theta). In addition, M-CSF can modulate the function of mature M theta. In this study, the authors determined the effect of M-CSF on expression of receptors for IgG (Fc receptors). Murine resident peritoneal M theta monolayers were incubated with either M-CSF, recombinant gamma interferon (IFN), or left untreated for 48 hrs. Expression of Fc receptors was assessed by microscopy using an antibody coated sheet erythrocytes (EA) rosette assay. The results indicated that M-CSF treated M theta had significantly higher numbers of bound EA (7.1 erythrocytes/M theta), than IFN M theta (4.4), or untreated M theta (2.5) (p 51 Cr labelled EA assay, CSF M theta (16,411 cpm), IFN M theta (10,887), untreated M theta (6897) (p < 0.001). Additionally, the maximal response was noted between 10 and 500 units M-CSF. Purified anti-M-CSF IgG, when included in the cultures, ablated the enhancement of EA binding, whereas normal rabbit IgG did not. These findings indicate that M-CSF is a potent inducer of Fc receptor expression on M theta and supports other data concerning the role of M-CSF as a biological response modifier

  6. Timing and related artifacts in multidimensional NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marion, Dominique

    2012-01-01

    The information content of multidimensional NMR spectra is limited by the presence of several kinds of artifacts that originate from incorrect timing of evolution periods. The objective of this review is to provide tools for successful implementation of published pulse sequences, in which timing and pulse compensations are often implicit. We will analyze the constraints set by the use of Fourier transformation, the spin precession during rectangular or shaped pulses, the Bloch-Siegert effects due to pulse on other spins and the delay introduced by the filters for the acquisition dimension. A frequency dependent phase correction or an incorrect scaling of the first data point leads to baseline offsets or curvature due to the properties of the Fourier transform. Because any r.f. pulse has a finite length, chemical shift is always active during excitation, flip-back, inversion, and refocusing pulses. Rectangular or selective shaped pulses can be split into three periods: an ideal rotation surrounded by two chemical shift evolution periods, which should be subtracted from the adjacent delays to avoid linear phase correction. Bloch-Siegert effects originate from irradiation at frequencies near those observed in the spectrum and can lead to phase or frequency shifts. They can be minimized by simultaneous irradiation on both sides of the observed spins. In terms of timing, the very end of the pulse sequence the acquisition behaves differently since the data are filtered by either analog or digital means. This additional delay is filter and spectrometer specific and should be tuned to minimize the required phase correction. Combined together, all these adjustments lead to perfectly phased spectra with flat baseline and no peak shifts or distortion. (author)

  7. Cultural Artifact Detection in Long Wave Infrared Imagery.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Dylan Zachary [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Craven, Julia M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ramon, Eric [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Detection of cultural artifacts from airborne remotely sensed data is an important task in the context of on-site inspections. Airborne artifact detection can reduce the size of the search area the ground based inspection team must visit, thereby improving the efficiency of the inspection process. This report details two algorithms for detection of cultural artifacts in aerial long wave infrared imagery. The first algorithm creates an explicit model for cultural artifacts, and finds data that fits the model. The second algorithm creates a model of the background and finds data that does not fit the model. Both algorithms are applied to orthomosaic imagery generated as part of the MSFE13 data collection campaign under the spectral technology evaluation project.

  8. Ring artifact correction for high-resolution micro CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyriakou, Yiannis; Prell, Daniel; Kalender, Willi A

    2009-01-01

    In high-resolution micro CT using flat detectors (FD), imperfect or defect detector elements may cause concentric-ring artifacts due to their continuous over- or underestimation of attenuation values, which often disturb image quality. We here present a dedicated image-based ring artifact correction method for high-resolution micro CT, based on median filtering of the reconstructed image and working on a transformed version of the reconstructed images in polar coordinates. This post-processing method reduced ring artifacts in the reconstructed images and improved image quality for phantom and in in vivo scans. Noise and artifacts were reduced both in transversal and in multi-planar reformations along the longitudinal axis. (note)

  9. Adaptive noise canceling of electrocardiogram artifacts in single channel electroencephalogram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sung Pil; Song, Mi Hye; Park, Young Cheol; Choi, Ho Seon; Lee, Kyoung Joung

    2007-01-01

    A new method for estimating and eliminating electrocardiogram (ECG) artifacts from single channel scalp electroencephalogram (EEG) is proposed. The proposed method consists of emphasis of QRS complex from EEG using least squares acceleration (LSA) filter, generation of synchronized pulse with R-peak and ECG artifacts estimation and elimination using adaptive filter. The performance of the proposed method was evaluated using simulated and real EEG recordings, we found that the ECG artifacts were successfully estimated and eliminated in comparison with the conventional multi-channel techniques, which are independent component analysis (ICA) and ensemble average (EA) method. From this we can conclude that the proposed method is useful for the detecting and eliminating the ECG artifacts from single channel EEG and simple to use for ambulatory/portable EEG monitoring system.

  10. quantification of rain quantification of rain induced artifacts on digital

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    DSTV) ... satellite television, rain attenuation, digital artifacts, pixelation, rainfall rate. 1. ... screen and blocking are commonly observed in .... The precipitation data was collected using a self- ..... Networks: Comparison at Equatorial and Subtropical.

  11. Mitigation of artifacts in rtm with migration kernel decomposition

    KAUST Repository

    Zhan, Ge

    2012-01-01

    The migration kernel for reverse-time migration (RTM) can be decomposed into four component kernels using Born scattering and migration theory. Each component kernel has a unique physical interpretation and can be interpreted differently. In this paper, we present a generalized diffraction-stack migration approach for reducing RTM artifacts via decomposition of migration kernel. The decomposition leads to an improved understanding of migration artifacts and, therefore, presents us with opportunities for improving the quality of RTM images.

  12. Reduction of metal artifacts: beam hardening and photon starvation effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadava, Girijesh K.; Pal, Debashish; Hsieh, Jiang

    2014-03-01

    The presence of metal-artifacts in CT imaging can obscure relevant anatomy and interfere with disease diagnosis. The cause and occurrence of metal-artifacts are primarily due to beam hardening, scatter, partial volume and photon starvation; however, the contribution to the artifacts from each of them depends on the type of hardware. A comparison of CT images obtained with different metallic hardware in various applications, along with acquisition and reconstruction parameters, helps understand methods for reducing or overcoming such artifacts. In this work, a metal beam hardening correction (BHC) and a projection-completion based metal artifact reduction (MAR) algorithms were developed, and applied on phantom and clinical CT scans with various metallic implants. Stainless-steel and Titanium were used to model and correct for metal beam hardening effect. In the MAR algorithm, the corrupted projection samples are replaced by the combination of original projections and in-painted data obtained by forward projecting a prior image. The data included spine fixation screws, hip-implants, dental-filling, and body extremity fixations, covering range of clinically used metal implants. Comparison of BHC and MAR on different metallic implants was used to characterize dominant source of the artifacts, and conceivable methods to overcome those. Results of the study indicate that beam hardening could be a dominant source of artifact in many spine and extremity fixations, whereas dental and hip implants could be dominant source of photon starvation. The BHC algorithm could significantly improve image quality in CT scans with metallic screws, whereas MAR algorithm could alleviate artifacts in hip-implants and dentalfillings.

  13. Preliminary experimental insights into differential heat impact among lithic artifacts

    OpenAIRE

    Guillermo Bustos-Pérez; Javier Baena Preysler

    2016-01-01

    The presence of thermally altered and broken flint artifacts is common at archaeological sites. Most studies focus their attention on the effects of heat treatment on flint to improve knapping qualities, disregarding the effects of fire over flint under uncontrolled conditions. This paper aims to show how under uncontrolled heating processes flint artifacts develop different heat alterations (such as levels of breakage, presence of scales, etc.) as a result of vertical distribution, volume or...

  14. Adaptive cancellation of motion artifact in wearable biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefi, Rasoul; Nourani, Mehrdad; Panahi, Issa

    2012-01-01

    The performance of wearable biosensors is highly influenced by motion artifact. In this paper, a model is proposed for analysis of motion artifact in wearable photoplethysmography (PPG) sensors. Using this model, we proposed a robust real-time technique to estimate fundamental frequency and generate a noise reference signal. A Least Mean Square (LMS) adaptive noise canceler is then designed and validated using our synthetic noise generator. The analysis and results on proposed technique for noise cancellation shows promising performance.

  15. Cyber Event Artifact Investigation Training in a Virtual Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    information was desired in the logs as well as best practices provided by Microsoft: 1. Every Success or Failure for: Account Logon Events, Account ...use this artifact in conjunction with information discovered through investigation of other artifacts, such as logs and accounts . For instance, the...when coupled with logs, accounts , and process data, this information may provide enough evidence for transition into the reporting and Preliminary

  16. Mobilizing peripheral blood stem cells with high-dose G-CSF alone is as effective as with Dexa-BEAM plus G-CSF in lymphoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kröger, N; Zeller, W; Fehse, N; Hassan, H T; Krüger, W; Gutensohn, K; Lölliger, C; Zander, A R

    1998-09-01

    We compared retrospectively the efficacy of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) alone with chemotherapy plus G-CSF in mobilizing CD34-positive cells in patients with malignant lymphoma. 35 patients underwent peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) collection following mobilization either with 24 microg/kg G-CSF for 4 consecutive days (n = 18) or Dexa-BEAM chemotherapy plus 5 microg/kg G-CSF (n = 17). High-dose G-CSF was well tolerated with only slight bone pain and/or myalgia. The Dexa-BEAM therapy required hospitalization with a median duration of 21 d. The median number of apheresis procedures in both groups was two (range two to four), resulting in a median of 5.3 and 5.1 x 10(6) CD34+ cells/kg. No patients in the G-CSF group, but one in the Dexa-BEAM group, failed to reach the target of collecting >2.0 x 10(6) CD34+ cells/kg. The number of CFU-GM (10.4 v 6.0 x 10(5)/kg) and of BFU-E (10.6 v 4.5 x 10(5)/kg; P = 0.04) was higher in the G-CSF group than in the Dexa-BEAM group. A subset analysis of CD34+ cells was performed in 16 patients showing a higher mean of Thy-1 (CD90w) coexpression in the G-CSF than in the Dexa-BEAM group (4.8 v 1.8%, P = 0.12). Additionally the percentage of CD34+/CD38- cells was higher in the G-CSF group (10.66% v 8.8%). However, these differences were not statistically significant. The median time to leucocyte and platelet engraftment after high-dose chemotherapy was slightly shorter in the G-CSF than in the Dexa-BEAM group (9 v 10 and 12 v 13.5 d, respectively). These results demonstrate that high-dose G-CSF is as effective as Dexa-BEAM plus G-CSF in mobilizing peripheral blood stem cells and produces prompt engraftment. The major advantages of G-CSF mobilization were the safe outpatient self-application and the fixed-day apheresis.

  17. Assessment of hand blood flow: a modified technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirsh, J.C.; Tepperman, P.S.

    1985-01-01

    A blood flow artifact has been identified with the conventional bolus-injection technique in radionuclide studies of hand disorders. The artifact, consisting of increased blood flow on the injected side, was demonstrated in 22 of 25 subjects. Using a modified injection technique to allow time for local blood flow to return to the basal state, the artifact could be eliminated in 19 of 23 additional subjects. Use of this simple protocol should help avoid misinterpretation of blood flow asymmetry in the assessment of hand disorders

  18. Artifact removal from EEG signals using adaptive filters in cascade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcés Correa, A.; Laciar, E.; Patiño, H. D.; Valentinuzzi, M. E.

    2007-11-01

    Artifacts in EEG (electroencephalogram) records are caused by various factors, like line interference, EOG (electro-oculogram) and ECG (electrocardiogram). These noise sources increase the difficulty in analyzing the EEG and to obtaining clinical information. For this reason, it is necessary to design specific filters to decrease such artifacts in EEG records. In this paper, a cascade of three adaptive filters based on a least mean squares (LMS) algorithm is proposed. The first one eliminates line interference, the second adaptive filter removes the ECG artifacts and the last one cancels EOG spikes. Each stage uses a finite impulse response (FIR) filter, which adjusts its coefficients to produce an output similar to the artifacts present in the EEG. The proposed cascade adaptive filter was tested in five real EEG records acquired in polysomnographic studies. In all cases, line-frequency, ECG and EOG artifacts were attenuated. It is concluded that the proposed filter reduces the common artifacts present in EEG signals without removing significant information embedded in these records.

  19. Artifact removal from EEG signals using adaptive filters in cascade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garces Correa, A; Laciar, E; Patino, H D; Valentinuzzi, M E

    2007-01-01

    Artifacts in EEG (electroencephalogram) records are caused by various factors, like line interference, EOG (electro-oculogram) and ECG (electrocardiogram). These noise sources increase the difficulty in analyzing the EEG and to obtaining clinical information. For this reason, it is necessary to design specific filters to decrease such artifacts in EEG records. In this paper, a cascade of three adaptive filters based on a least mean squares (LMS) algorithm is proposed. The first one eliminates line interference, the second adaptive filter removes the ECG artifacts and the last one cancels EOG spikes. Each stage uses a finite impulse response (FIR) filter, which adjusts its coefficients to produce an output similar to the artifacts present in the EEG. The proposed cascade adaptive filter was tested in five real EEG records acquired in polysomnographic studies. In all cases, line-frequency, ECG and EOG artifacts were attenuated. It is concluded that the proposed filter reduces the common artifacts present in EEG signals without removing significant information embedded in these records

  20. Artifact removal from EEG signals using adaptive filters in cascade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garces Correa, A [Gabinete de TecnologIa Medica, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional de San Juan (Argentina); Laciar, E [Gabinete de TecnologIa Medica, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional de San Juan (Argentina); Patino, H D [Instituto de Automatica, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional de San Juan (Argentina); Valentinuzzi, M E [Instituto Superior de Investigaciones Biologicas (INSIBIO), UNT-CONICET, Tucuman (Argentina)

    2007-11-15

    Artifacts in EEG (electroencephalogram) records are caused by various factors, like line interference, EOG (electro-oculogram) and ECG (electrocardiogram). These noise sources increase the difficulty in analyzing the EEG and to obtaining clinical information. For this reason, it is necessary to design specific filters to decrease such artifacts in EEG records. In this paper, a cascade of three adaptive filters based on a least mean squares (LMS) algorithm is proposed. The first one eliminates line interference, the second adaptive filter removes the ECG artifacts and the last one cancels EOG spikes. Each stage uses a finite impulse response (FIR) filter, which adjusts its coefficients to produce an output similar to the artifacts present in the EEG. The proposed cascade adaptive filter was tested in five real EEG records acquired in polysomnographic studies. In all cases, line-frequency, ECG and EOG artifacts were attenuated. It is concluded that the proposed filter reduces the common artifacts present in EEG signals without removing significant information embedded in these records.

  1. Inhibition of CSF-1R supports T-cell mediated melanoma therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjolein Sluijter

    Full Text Available Tumor associated macrophages (TAM can promote angiogenesis, invasiveness and immunosuppression. The cytokine CSF-1 (or M-CSF is an important factor of TAM recruitment and differentiation and several pharmacological agents targeting the CSF-1 receptor (CSF-1R have been developed to regulate TAM in solid cancers. We show that the kinase inhibitor PLX3397 strongly dampened the systemic and local accumulation of macrophages driven by B16F10 melanomas, without affecting Gr-1(+ myeloid derived suppressor cells. Removal of intratumoral macrophages was remarkably efficient and a modest, but statistically significant, delay in melanoma outgrowth was observed. Importantly, CSF-1R inhibition strongly enhanced tumor control by immunotherapy using tumor-specific CD8 T cells. Elevated IFNγ production by T cells was observed in mice treated with the combination of PLX3397 and immunotherapy. These results support the combined use of CSF-1R inhibition with CD8 T cell immunotherapy, especially for macrophage-stimulating tumors.

  2. Laboratory-based clinical audit as a tool for continual improvement: an example from CSF chemistry turnaround time audit in a South-African teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imoh, Lucius C; Mutale, Mubanga; Parker, Christopher T; Erasmus, Rajiv T; Zemlin, Annalise E

    2016-01-01

    Timeliness of laboratory results is crucial to patient care and outcome. Monitoring turnaround times (TAT), especially for emergency tests, is important to measure the effectiveness and efficiency of laboratory services. Laboratory-based clinical audits reveal opportunities for improving quality. Our aim was to identify the most critical steps causing a high TAT for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) chemistry analysis in our laboratory. A 6-month retrospective audit was performed. The duration of each operational phase across the laboratory work flow was examined. A process-mapping audit trail of 60 randomly selected requests with a high TAT was conducted and reasons for high TAT were tested for significance. A total of 1505 CSF chemistry requests were analysed. Transport of samples to the laboratory was primarily responsible for the high average TAT (median TAT = 170 minutes). Labelling accounted for most delays within the laboratory (median TAT = 71 minutes) with most delays occurring after regular work hours (P audit identified sample transportation, work shift periods and use of inappropriate CSF sample tubes as drivers of high TAT for CSF chemistry in our laboratory. The results of this audit will be used to change pre-analytical practices in our laboratory with the aim of improving TAT and customer satisfaction.

  3. Computer tomography of the brain and spectrophotometry of the CSF in cerebral concussion and contusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergvall, U.; Kjellin, K.G.; Levander, B.; Svendsen, P.; Soederstroem, C.E.

    1978-01-01

    Computer tomography (CT) and spectrophotometry of CSF were performed in 30 patients with the clinical diagnosis of cerebral concussion or contusion. The patients with concussion all had normal CT-findings. Spectrophotometry of CSF was sometimes positive for cerebral contusion with normal CT-findings, but the two methods were complementary so that the extent of the lesion was determined by CT and spectrophotometry of CSF indicated the cause. (Auth.)

  4. CSF lactate alone is not a reliable indicator of bacterial ventriculitis in patients with ventriculostomies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Emily; Bleck, Thomas P; Singh, Kamaljit; Ouyang, Bichun; Busl, Katharina M

    2017-06-01

    In a febrile patient with a ventriculostomy, diagnosing or excluding bacterial or microbial ventriculitis is difficult, as conventional markers in analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) are not applicable due to presence of blood and inflammation. CSF lactate has been shown to be a useful indicator of bacterial meningitis in CSF obtained via lumbar puncture, but little and heterogenous data exist on patients with ventriculostomies. We reviewed all CSF analyses obtained via ventriculostomy in patients admitted to our tertiary medical center between 2008 and 2013, and constructed receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves to evaluate the accuracy of CSF lactate concentration in discriminating a positive CSF culture from a negative one in setting of ventriculostomy and prophylactic antibiosis. Among 467 CSF lactate values, there were 22 corresponding CSF cultures with bacterial growth. Sensitivities and specificities for CSF lactate at threshold values 3, 4, 5 and 6mmol/L showed sensitivity and specificity greater than 70% for CSF lactate threshold 4mmol/L. The lowest threshold value of 3mmol/L resulted in higher sensitivity of 81.8%, and the highest chosen threshold value resulted in high specificity of 94.2%, but these values had poor corresponding specificity and sensitivity, respectively. The area under the curve was 0.82 (95% CI 0.72, 0.91). Our data from a large sample of CSF studies in patients with ventriculostomy indicate that no single value of CSF lactate provided both sensitivity and specificity high enough to be regarded as reliable test. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. CSF findings in patients with anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui; Guan, Hong-Zhi; Ren, Hai-Tao; Wang, Wei; Hong, Zhen; Zhou, Dong

    2015-07-01

    Anti-NMDAR-encephalitis is a recently described form of autoimmune encephalitis. Here, we characterize CSF changes in Chinese patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis, and explore the relationship between CSF findings and disease outcome. The presence of NMDAR antibodies in serum or CSF samples was evaluated in patients diagnosed with encephalitis between October 1, 2010 and August 1, 2014 at the West China Hospital. All patients fulfilling our diagnostic criteria were included and CSF findings were analyzed. Patient outcome was assessed after 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, and 24 months using the modified Rankin scale (mRS). Out of 3000 people with encephalitis screened, 43 patients were anti-NMDAR antibody positive in CSF or serum and included in this study. 62.8% of the patients identified with positive CSFs had positive serum anti-NMDAR samples, while 100% patients with positive serum had positive CSF samples. In the CSF white cell counts were elevated in 58.1% of cases; protein was increased in 18.6%; QAlb>Qlim(Alb) of the blood-CSF barrier was found in 29.3%; intrathecal immunoglobulin synthesis was detected in 17.1%, and 39.5% patients exhibited increased CSF pressures. A longer follow-up period was associated with better outcomes. There was no relationship between changes in CSF findings and outcome. The sensitivity of NMDA receptor antibody testing is higher in CSF compared to serum. Other CSF abnormalities are present in some patients with Anti-NMDAR-encephalitis, however these changes do not appear to affect prognosis. Copyright © 2015 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A Low-Molecular-Weight Ferroxidase Is Increased in the CSF of sCJD Cases: CSF Ferroxidase and Transferrin as Diagnostic Biomarkers for sCJD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldar, Swati; Beveridge, ’Alim J.; Wong, Joseph; Singh, Ajay; Galimberti, Daniela; Borroni, Barbara; Zhu, Xiongwei; Blevins, Janis; Greenlee, Justin; Perry, George; Mukhopadhyay, Chinmay K.; Schmotzer, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Most biomarkers used for the premortem diagnosis of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) are surrogate in nature, and provide suboptimal sensitivity and specificity. Results: We report that CJD-associated brain iron dyshomeostasis is reflected in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), providing disease-specific diagnostic biomarkers. Analysis of 290 premortem CSF samples from confirmed cases of CJD, Alzheimer's disease, and other dementias (DMs), and 52 non-DM (ND) controls revealed a significant difference in ferroxidase (Frx) activity and transferrin (Tf) levels in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) relative to other DM and ND controls. A combination of CSF Frx and Tf discriminated sCJD from other DMs with a sensitivity of 86.8%, specificity of 92.5%, accuracy of 88.9%, and area-under-the receiver-operating-characteristic (ROC) curve of 0.94. This combination provided a similar diagnostic accuracy in discriminating CJD from rapidly progressing cases who died within 6 months of sample collection. Surprisingly, ceruloplasmin and amyloid precursor protein, the major brain Frxs, displayed minimal activity in the CSF. Most of the Frx activity was concentrated in the <3-kDa fraction in normal and diseased CSF, and resisted heat and proteinase-K treatment. Innovation: (i) A combination of CSF Frx and Tf provides disease-specific premortem diagnostic biomarkers for sCJD. (ii) A novel, nonenzymatic, nonprotein Frx predominates in human CSF that is distinct from the currently known CSF Frxs. Conclusion: The underlying cause of iron imbalance is distinct in sCJD relative to other DMs associated with the brain iron imbalance. Thus, change in the CSF levels of iron-management proteins can provide disease-specific biomarkers and insight into the cause of iron imbalance in neurodegenerative conditions. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 1662–1675. PMID:23379482

  7. Historical Artifact Collection at the East Tennessee Technology Park

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodpasture, S.T.; Wood, S.K.

    2009-01-01

    The East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) was originally built during World War II as part of the Manhattan Project. Known as the K-25 Site, its primary mission was to enrich uranium for use in atomic weapons. During the Cold War, the site's mission was changed to include the enrichment of uranium for nuclear reactor fuel elements and to recycle spent fuel. In the 1980's, a reduction in the demand for nuclear fuel resulted in the shutdown of the enrichment process and production ceased. The emphasis of the mission for the ETTP was then changed to environmental management and restoration operation. Beginning in the 1990's, re-industrialization (conversion of under-utilized government facilities for use by the private sector) became a major mission at the ETTP. These activities involve cleaning and demolishing facilities. Decommission and demolition (D and D) of facilities at the ETTP or Manhattan Project K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Plant on the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) presented significant challenges complying with the requirements of the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) that was negotiated with the stakeholders. Development of a process to identify, record and preserve the artifacts and the cooperation of several agencies and contractors were critical to completing the collection of the artifacts without impacting the D and D project schedule. Additional challenges included contaminated and classified artifacts, entry to facilities with hazardous conditions, schedule pressures and funding for collection and permanent storage. A process was developed to achieve compliance with the requirements of the NHPA. The NHPA requirements and implementing instruments at the ETTP as well as the process developed to preserve significant Manhattan Project era artifacts at the ETTP will be discussed. Implementation of the artifact collection process is also summarized. The challenge of complying with the

  8. MRT measurements of the CSF spaces in HIV associated cerebral atrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Handwerker, M.; Krahe, T.; Klinker, H.; Schindler, R.

    1992-01-01

    The CSF volume of 45 patients with HIV infection was measured at various clinical stages and the results compared with 24 normals. 60% of all patients showed increased CSF spaces as an indication of cerebral atrophy. Serial measurements were particularly valuable during the early stages of atrophy since there is marked variation in the normal CSF volume. Conventional measurements, with the exception of the width of the third ventricle, were much less sensitive than these quantitative measurements. Classification of HIF infection according to the clinical stage was useful since CSF volume and volume increase correlated with the stage of HIV infection. (orig.) [de

  9. CSF Venous Fistulas in Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension: Imaging Characteristics on Dynamic and CT Myelography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranz, Peter G; Amrhein, Timothy J; Gray, Linda

    2017-12-01

    The objective of this study is to describe the anatomic and imaging features of CSF venous fistulas, which are a recently reported cause of spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH). We retrospectively reviewed the records of patients with SIH caused by CSF venous fistulas who received treatment at our institution. The anatomic details of each fistula were recorded. Attenuation of the veins involved by the fistula was compared with that of adjacent control veins on CT myelography (CTM). Visibility of the CSF venous fistula on CTM and a modified conventional myelography technique we refer to as dynamic myelography was also compared. Twenty-two cases of CSF venous fistula were identified. The fistulas were located between T4 and L1. Ninety percent occurred without a concurrent epidural CSF leak. In most cases (82%), the CSF venous fistula originated from a nerve root sleeve diverticulum. On CTM, the abnormal veins associated with the CSF venous fistula were seen in a paravertebral location in 45% of cases, centrally within the epidural venous plexus in 32%, and lateral to the spine in 23%. Differences in attenuation between the fistula veins and the control veins was highly statistically significant (p CSF venous fistulas are an important cause of SIH that can be detected on both CTM and dynamic myelograph y and may occur without an epidural CSF leak. Familiarity with the imaging characteristics of these lesions is critical to providing appropriate treatment to patients with SIH.

  10. IL-34 and CSF-1 display an equivalent macrophage differentiation ability but a different polarization potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulakirba, Sonia; Pfeifer, Anja; Mhaidly, Rana; Obba, Sandrine; Goulard, Michael; Schmitt, Thomas; Chaintreuil, Paul; Calleja, Anne; Furstoss, Nathan; Orange, François; Lacas-Gervais, Sandra; Boyer, Laurent; Marchetti, Sandrine; Verhoeyen, Els; Luciano, Frederic; Robert, Guillaume; Auberger, Patrick; Jacquel, Arnaud

    2018-01-10

    CSF-1 and IL-34 share the CSF-1 receptor and no differences have been reported in the signaling pathways triggered by both ligands in human monocytes. IL-34 promotes the differentiation and survival of monocytes, macrophages and osteoclasts, as CSF-1 does. However, IL-34 binds other receptors, suggesting that differences exist in the effect of both cytokines. In the present study, we compared the differentiation and polarization abilities of human primary monocytes in response to CSF-1 or IL-34. CSF-1R engagement by one or the other ligands leads to AKT and caspase activation and autophagy induction through expression and activation of AMPK and ULK1. As no differences were detected on monocyte differentiation, we investigated the effect of CSF-1 and IL-34 on macrophage polarization into the M1 or M2 phenotype. We highlighted a striking increase in IL-10 and CCL17 secretion in M1 and M2 macrophages derived from IL-34 stimulated monocytes, respectively, compared to CSF-1 stimulated monocytes. Variations in the secretome induced by CSF-1 or IL-34 may account for their different ability to polarize naïve T cells into Th1 cells. In conclusion, our findings indicate that CSF-1 and IL-34 exhibit the same ability to induce human monocyte differentiation but may have a different ability to polarize macrophages.

  11. G-CSF loaded nanofiber/nanoparticle composite coated with collagen promotes wound healing in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanha, Shima; Rafiee-Tehrani, Morteza; Abdollahi, Mohamad; Vakilian, Saeid; Esmaili, Zahra; Naraghi, Zahra Safaei; Seyedjafari, Ehsan; Javar, Hamid Akbari

    2017-10-01

    Sustained release of functional growth factors can be considered as a beneficial methodology for wound healing. In this study, recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF)-loaded chitosan nanoparticles were incorporated in Poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) nanofibers, followed by surface coating with collagen type I. Physical and mechanical properties of the PCL nanofibers containing G-CSF loaded chitosan nanoparticles PCL/NP(G-CSF) and in vivo performance for wound healing were investigated. G-CSF structural stability was evaluated through SDS_PAGE, reversed phase (RP) HPLC and size-exclusion chromatography, as well as circular dichroism. Nanofiber/nanoparticle composite scaffold was demonstrated to have appropriate mechanical properties as a wound dresser and a sustained release of functional G-CSF. The PCL/NP(G-CSF) scaffold showed a suitable proliferation and well-adherent morphology of stem cells. In vivo study and histopathological evaluation outcome revealed that skin regeneration was dramatically accelerated under PCL/NP(G-CSF) as compared with control groups. Superior fibroblast maturation, enhanced collagen deposition and minimum inflammatory cells were also the beneficial properties of PCL/NP(G-CSF) over the commercial dressing. The synergistic effect of extracellular matrix-mimicking nanofibrous membrane and G-CSF could develop a suitable supportive substrate in order to extensive utilization for the healing of skin wounds. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 105A: 2830-2842, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Attenuative effects of G-CSF in radiation induced intestinal injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Joong Sun; Gong, Eun Ji; Kim, Sung Dae; Heo, Kyu; Ryoo, Seung Bum; Yang, Kwang Mo

    2011-01-01

    Granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) has been reported to protect from radiationinduced myelosuppression. Growing evidence suggests that G-CSF also has many important non-hematopoietic functions in other tissues, including the intestine (Kim et al., 2010; Kim et al., 2011). However, little is known about the influence of G-CSF on intestinal injury. Examination 12 hours after radiation (5 Gy) revealed that the G-CSF treated mice were significantly protected from apoptosis of jejunal crypt, compared with radiation controls. G-CSF treatment attenuated intestinal morphological changes such as decreased survival crypt, the number of villi, villous shortening, crypt depth and length of basal lamina of 10 enterocytes compared with the radiation control 3.5 days after radiation (10 Gy). G-CSF attenuated the change of peripheral blood from radiation-induced myelosuppression and displayed attenuation of mortality in lethally-irradiated (10 Gy) mice. The present results support the suggestion that G-CSF administrated prior to radiation plays an important role in the survival of irradiated mice, possibly due to the protection of hematopoietic cells and intestinal stem cells against radiation. The results indicate that G-CSF protects from radiation-mediated intestinal damage and from hematopoietic injury. G-CSF treatment may be useful clinically in the prevention of injury following radiation.

  13. Unique transcriptome signatures and GM-CSF expression in lymphocytes from patients with spondyloarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mossawi, M H; Chen, L; Fang, H; Ridley, A; de Wit, J; Yager, N; Hammitzsch, A; Pulyakhina, I; Fairfax, B P; Simone, D; Yi, Yao; Bandyopadhyay, S; Doig, K; Gundle, R; Kendrick, B; Powrie, F; Knight, J C; Bowness, P

    2017-11-15

    Spondyloarthritis encompasses a group of common inflammatory diseases thought to be driven by IL-17A-secreting type-17 lymphocytes. Here we show increased numbers of GM-CSF-producing CD4 and CD8 lymphocytes in the blood and joints of patients with spondyloarthritis, and increased numbers of IL-17A + GM-CSF + double-producing CD4, CD8, γδ and NK cells. GM-CSF production in CD4 T cells occurs both independently and in combination with classical Th1 and Th17 cytokines. Type 3 innate lymphoid cells producing predominantly GM-CSF are expanded in synovial tissues from patients with spondyloarthritis. GM-CSF + CD4 + cells, isolated using a triple cytokine capture approach, have a specific transcriptional signature. Both GM-CSF + and IL-17A + GM-CSF + double-producing CD4 T cells express increased levels of GPR65, a proton-sensing receptor associated with spondyloarthritis in genome-wide association studies and pathogenicity in murine inflammatory disease models. Silencing GPR65 in primary CD4 T cells reduces GM-CSF production. GM-CSF and GPR65 may thus serve as targets for therapeutic intervention of spondyloarthritis.

  14. Model-based optimization of G-CSF treatment during cytotoxic chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirm, Sibylle; Engel, Christoph; Loibl, Sibylle; Loeffler, Markus; Scholz, Markus

    2018-02-01

    Although G-CSF is widely used to prevent or ameliorate leukopenia during cytotoxic chemotherapies, its optimal use is still under debate and depends on many therapy parameters such as dosing and timing of cytotoxic drugs and G-CSF, G-CSF pharmaceuticals used and individual risk factors of patients. We integrate available biological knowledge and clinical data regarding cell kinetics of bone marrow granulopoiesis, the cytotoxic effects of chemotherapy and pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of G-CSF applications (filgrastim or pegfilgrastim) into a comprehensive model. The model explains leukocyte time courses of more than 70 therapy scenarios comprising 10 different cytotoxic drugs. It is applied to develop optimized G-CSF schedules for a variety of clinical scenarios. Clinical trial results showed validity of model predictions regarding alternative G-CSF schedules. We propose modifications of G-CSF treatment for the chemotherapies 'BEACOPP escalated' (Hodgkin's disease), 'ETC' (breast cancer), and risk-adapted schedules for 'CHOP-14' (aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in elderly patients). We conclude that we established a model of human granulopoiesis under chemotherapy which allows predictions of yet untested G-CSF schedules, comparisons between them, and optimization of filgrastim and pegfilgrastim treatment. As a general rule of thumb, G-CSF treatment should not be started too early and patients could profit from filgrastim treatment continued until the end of the chemotherapy cycle.

  15. Positron emission tomography with 68Ga-EDTA in the diagnosis and localization of CSF fistulas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergstrand, G.; Bergstroem, M.; Eriksson, L.; Edner, G.; Widen, L.

    1982-01-01

    Five patients with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) rhinorrhea were investigated with computed tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography (PET) to localize the site of a CSF fistula. After intrathecal injection of 10 MBq of 68 Ga-EDTA, radioactivity was demonstrated in the basal cisterns. In three cases, the site of the fistula was visualized with PET. It is not always possible to demonstrate a CSF leakage with CT cisternography (CTC) using metrizamide, particularly in cases with minute fistulas or intermittent CSF rhinorrhea. With further experience and improved PET techniques, it may be possible to detect even very small fistulas

  16. Beneficial effect of bilingualism on Alzheimer's disease CSF biomarkers and cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estanga, Ainara; Ecay-Torres, Mirian; Ibañez, Almudena; Izagirre, Andrea; Villanua, Jorge; Garcia-Sebastian, Maite; Iglesias Gaspar, M Teresa; Otaegui-Arrazola, Ane; Iriondo, Ane; Clerigue, Monserrat; Martinez-Lage, Pablo

    2017-02-01

    Bilingualism as a component of cognitive reserve has been claimed to delay the onset of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, its effect on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) AD-biomarkers has not been investigated. We assessed cognitive performance and CSF AD-biomarkers, and potential moderation effect of bilingualism on the association between age, CSF AD-biomarkers, and cognition. Cognitively healthy middle-aged participants classified as monolinguals (n = 100, n CSF  = 59), early (n = 81, n CSF  = 55) and late bilinguals (n = 97, n CSF  = 52) were evaluated. Models adjusted for confounders showed that bilinguals performed better than monolinguals on digits backwards (early-bilinguals p = 0.003), Judgment of Line Orientation (JLO) (early-bilinguals p = 0.018; late-bilinguals p = 0.004), and Trail Making Test-B (late-bilinguals p = 0.047). Early bilingualism was associated with lower CSF total-tau (p = 0.019) and lower prevalence of preclinical AD (NIA-AA classification) (p = 0.02). Bilingualism showed a moderation effect on the relationship between age and CSF AD-biomarkers and the relationship between age and executive function. We conclude that bilingualism contributes to cognitive reserve enhancing executive and visual-spatial functions. For the first time, this study reveals that early bilingualism is associated with more favorable CSF AD-biomarker profile. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Wastewater renovation using constructed soil filter (CSF): a novel approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemade, P D; Kadam, A M; Shankar, H S

    2009-10-30

    Constructed soil filter (CSF) also known as Soil Biotechnology (SBT) is a process for water renovation which makes use of formulated media with culture of soil macro- and microorganisms. CSF combines sedimentation, infiltration and biodegradation processes to remove oxidizable organics and inorganics of wastewater in a single facility. Operating experience shows hydraulic loading in the range of 0.05-0.25 m(3)/m(2) h and organic loading up to 200-680 g/m(2) d. The results show increase in dissolved oxygen levels, COD removal (from 352 mg/l to 20 mg/l); BOD removal (from 211 mg/l to 7.0 mg/l); suspended solids removal (from 293 mg/l to 16 mg/l); turbidity reduction (from 145 NTU to 5.3 NTU); iron (from 5 mg/l to 0.3 mg/l); arsenic (from 500 microg/l to 10 microg/l); total coliform and fecal coliform removal (from 145 x 10(5) to 55 CFU/100 mL and 150 x 10(8) to 110 CFU/100 mL respectively), with desired pathogen levels as per WHO standards, i.e. aeration and no odor, fish compatible water quality and evergreen ambience.

  18. Next-generation vision testing: the quick CSF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorr Michael

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The Contrast Sensitivity Function relates the spatial frequency and contrast of a spatial pattern to its visibility and thus provides a fundamental description of visual function. However, the current clinical standard of care typically restricts assessment to visual acuity, i.e. the smallest stimulus size that can be resolved at full contrast; alternatively, tests of contrast sensitivity are typically restricted to assessment of the lowest visible contrast for a fixed letter size. This restriction to one-dimensional subspaces of a two-dimensional space was necessary when stimuli were printed on paper charts and simple scoring rules were applied manually. More recently, however, computerized testing and electronic screens have enabled more flexible stimulus displays and more complex test algorithms. For example, the quick CSF method uses a Bayesian adaptive procedure and an information maximization criterion to select only informative stimuli; testing times to precisely estimate the whole contrast sensitivity function are reduced to 2-5 minutes. Here, we describe the implementation of the quick CSF method in a medical device. We make several usability enhancements to make it suitable for use in clinical settings. A first usability study shows excellent results, with a mean System Usability Scale score of 86.5.

  19. High interpatient variability of raltegravir CSF concentrations in HIV-positive patients: a pharmacogenetic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcagno, Andrea; Cusato, Jessica; Simiele, Marco; Motta, Ilaria; Audagnotto, Sabrina; Bracchi, Margherita; D'Avolio, Antonio; Di Perri, Giovanni; Bonora, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    To analyse the determinants of raltegravir CSF penetration, including the pharmacogenetics of drug transporters located at the blood-brain barrier or blood-CSF barrier. Plasma and CSF raltegravir concentrations were determined by a validated HPLC coupled with mass spectrometry method in adults on raltegravir-based combination antiretroviral therapy undergoing a lumbar puncture. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in the genes encoding drugs transporters (ABCB1 3435, SLCO1A2, ABCC2 and SLC22A6) and the gene encoding hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 α (HNF4α) were determined by real-time PCR. In 41 patients (73.2% male, 95.1% Caucasians), the median raltegravir plasma and CSF concentrations were 165 ng/mL (83-552) and 31 ng/mL (21-56), respectively. CSF-to-plasma ratios (CPRs) ranged from 0.005 to 1.33 (median 0.20, IQR 0.04-0.36). Raltegravir trough CSF concentrations (n = 35) correlated with raltegravir plasma levels (ρ = 0.395, P = 0.019); CPRs were higher in patients with blood-brain barrier damage (0.47 versus 0.18, P = 0.02). HNF4α 613 CG genotype carriers had lower trough CSF concentrations (20 versus 37 ng/mL, P = 0.03) and CPRs (0.12 versus 0.27, P = 0.02). Following multivariate linear regression analysis, the CSF-to-serum albumin ratio was the only independent predictor of raltegravir penetration into the CSF. Raltegravir penetration into the CSF shows a large interpatient variability, although CSF concentrations were above the wild-type IC50 in all patients (and above IC95 in 28.6%). In this cohort, blood-brain barrier permeability is the only independent predictor of raltegravir CPR. The impact of single nucleotide polymorphisms in selected genes on raltegravir penetration warrants further studies.

  20. MafB antagonizes phenotypic alteration induced by GM-CSF in microglia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koshida, Ryusuke, E-mail: rkoshida-myz@umin.ac.jp; Oishi, Hisashi, E-mail: hoishi@md.tsukuba.ac.jp; Hamada, Michito; Takahashi, Satoru

    2015-07-17

    Microglia are tissue-resident macrophages which are distributed throughout the central nervous system (CNS). Recent studies suggest that microglia are a unique myeloid population distinct from peripheral macrophages in terms of origin and gene expression signature. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), a pleiotropic cytokine regulating myeloid development, has been shown to stimulate proliferation and alter phenotype of microglia in vitro. However, how its signaling is modulated in microglia is poorly characterized. MafB, a bZip transcriptional factor, is highly expressed in monocyte-macrophage lineage cells including microglia, although its role in microglia is largely unknown. We investigated the crosstalk between GM-CSF signaling and MafB by analyzing primary microglia. We found that Mafb-deficient microglia grew more rapidly than wild-type microglia in response to GM-CSF. Moreover, the expression of genes associated with microglial differentiation was more downregulated in Mafb-deficient microglia cultured with GM-CSF. Notably, such differences between the genotypes were not observed in the presence of M-CSF. In addition, we found that Mafb-deficient microglia cultured with GM-CSF barely extended their membrane protrusions, probably due to abnormal activation of RhoA, a key regulator of cytoskeletal remodeling. Altogether, our study reveals that MafB is a negative regulator of GM-CSF signaling in microglia. These findings could provide new insight into the modulation of cytokine signaling by transcription factors in microglia. - Highlights: • GM-CSF alters the phenotype of microglia in vitro more potently than M-CSF. • Transcription factor MafB antagonizes the effect of GM-CSF on microglia in vitro. • MafB deficiency leads to RhoA activation in microglia in response to GM-CSF. • We show for the first time the function of MafB in microglia.

  1. Evaluation of prostaglandin D2 as a CSF leak marker: implications in safe epidural anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kondabolu S

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Sirish Kondabolu, Rishimani Adsumelli, Joy Schabel, Peter Glass, Srinivas PentyalaDepartment of Anesthesiology, School of Medicine, Stony Brook Medical Center, Stony Brook, New York, USABackground: It is accepted that there is a severe risk of dural puncture in epidural anesthesia. Of major concern to anesthesiologists is unintentional spinal block. Reliable identification of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF from the aspirate is crucial for safe epidural anesthesia. The aim of this study was to determine whether prostaglandin D2 could be clinically used as a marker for the detection of CSF traces.Methods: After obtaining Institutional Review Board approval and patient consent, CSF was obtained from patients undergoing spinal anesthesia, and blood, urine, and saliva were obtained from normal subjects and analyzed for prostaglandin D2 (PGD. CSF (n=5 samples were diluted with local anesthetic (bupivacaine, normal saline and blood in the ratios of 1:5 and 1:10. PGD levels in the CSF samples were analyzed with a PGD-Methoxime (MOX EIA Kit (Cayman Chemicals, MI. This assay is based on the conversion of PGD to a stable derivative, which is analyzed with antiserum specific for PGD-MOX. Results: Different concentrations of pure PGD-MOX conjugate were analyzed by EIA and a standard curve was derived. PGD levels in CSF and CSF with diluents were determined and the values were extrapolated onto the standard curve. Our results show a well-defined correlation for the presence of PGD both in straight CSF samples and in diluted CSF (dilution factor of 1:5 and 1:10. Conclusion: Prostaglandin D2 was reliably identified in CSF by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay when diluted with local anesthetic, saline, and serum, and can be used as a marker to identify the presence of CSF in epidural aspirates.Keywords: epidural, cerebrospinal fluid, leak, marker, prostaglandin D2

  2. Parathyroid hormone related protein concentration in human serum and CSF correlates with age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushnir, Mark M; Peterson, Lisa K; Strathmann, Frederick G

    2018-02-01

    Parathyroid Hormone-Related Protein (PTHrP) is involved in intracellular calcium (Ca) regulation, and has been demonstrated to participate in regulation of Ca in brain cells, activation of neurons, and modulation of pain. However, there are conflicting reports regarding the presence of PTHrP in CSF. PTHrP and Ca were quantified in paired CSF and serum samples using mass spectrometry-based methods. Associations between PTHrP and Ca concentrations with age, sex and concentrations of nine CSF diagnostic markers in a set of 140 paired serum and CSF patient samples were evaluated. The observed median PTHrP concentration in CSF was 51 times higher than in serum; the median concentration of Ca in CSF was 1.8 times lower than in serum. We observed positive correlation between concentrations of PTHrP in CSF and serum (p=0.013). Distribution of PTHrP concentrations in serum was associated with age (p=0.0068) and the concentrations were higher in women. In samples with serum calcium concentrations within the reference intervals (n=118), central 95% distribution of concentrations for Ca-CSF, PTHrP-serum and PTHrP-CSF were 5.4 (4.5-6.1) mg/dL, 1.2 (0.5-2.5) pmol/L, 62 (22-125) pmol/L, respectively. Our data demonstrate that PTHrP is a normal constituent of human CSF with median concentrations 51 fold higher than in serum. Elevated serum PTHrP concentrations were positively correlated with age and significantly higher in women. Our data suggest that CSF could be a significant source of circulating PTHrP. Copyright © 2017 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A short study to assess the potential of independent component analysis for motion artifact separation in wearable pulse oximeter signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jianchu; Warren, Steve

    2005-01-01

    Motion artifact reduction and separation become critical when medical sensors are used in wearable monitoring scenarios. Previous research has demonstrated that independent component analysis (ICA) can be applied to pulse oximeter signals to separate photoplethysmographic (PPG) data from motion artifacts, ambient light, and other interference in low-motion environments. However, ICA assumes that all source signal component pairs are mutually independent. It is important to assess the statistical independence of the source components in PPG data, especially if ICA is to be applied in ambulatory monitoring environments, where motion artifacts can have a substantial effect on the quality of data received from light-based sensors. This paper addresses the statistical relationship between motion artifacts and PPG data by calculating the correlation coefficients between arterial volume variations and motion over a range of stationary to high-motion conditions. Analyses indicate that motion significantly affects arterial flow, so care must be taken when applying ICA to light-based sensor data acquired from wearable platforms.

  4. Artifacts by dental materials on magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Hyun Sook; Choi, Deuk Lin; Kim, Ki Jung; Suh, Won Hyuck

    1992-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has proved to be a valuable method for evaluation of the head and neck. Unfortunately, metallic devices associated with certain dental fillings and appliances often cause variable artifacts that can obscure normal or pathologic conditions on MR and computed tomography. In this work, we assessed the MR appearance of dental prosthetic materials in vitro and in vivo including precious alloys, nonprecions alloys, resin, amalgam and titanium alloy. For in vivo studies, these materials were placed in healthy volunteer's mouths and then images were assessed. Analysis of the appearance of shape and extent of artifact, and observed influence of these artifacts on the image interpretation at 0.2 Tesla permanent type MR scanner were valuated. Material used as temporary or permanent filling of crowns such as amalgam, precious alloy and, microfilled resin did not cause artifact on the image. The size of the artifact produced by the nonprecious alloys was influenced by the ferromagnetism of the object and the volume prosthesis, and was related to the scanning sequence. Nonprecious alloys produced minimal local signal distortion, where precious alloys, and dental resin had no effect on the MR images in vivo. These results were mainly from a low field strength MR scanner used in this study

  5. Ensemble Artifact Design For Context Sensitive Decision Support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah J Miah

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Although an improvement of design knowledge is an essential goal of design research, current design research predominantly focuses on knowledge concerning the IT artifact (tool design process, rather than a more holistic understanding encompassing the dynamic usage contexts of a technological artifact. Conceptualising a design in context as an “ensemble artifact” (Sein et al., 2011 provides the basis for a more rigorous treatment. This paper describes an IS artifact design framework that has been generated from the development of several practitioner-oriented decision support systems (DSS in which contextual aspects relevant to practitioners’ decision making are considered as integral design themes. We describe five key dimensions of an ensemble artifact design and show their value in designing practitioner-oriented DSS. The features are user centredness, knowledge sharing, situation-specific customisation, reduced model orientation, and practice based secondary design abilities. It is argued that this understanding can contribute to design research knowledge more effectively both to develop dynamic DSS, and by its extensibility to other artifact designs.

  6. Motion Artifact in the MR imaging of temporomandibular disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamamura, Kiyoharu; Miyajima, Hisashi; Nihei, Yoshinobu; Nemoto, Ryuichi; Ohno, Tomoya

    1997-01-01

    Recently, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is indispensable for the diagnosis of temporomandibular disorders (TMD). Motion Artifacts of MRI occur more frequently than in other conventional methods, because it takes a long time to obtain the images. This paper reported on Motion Artifacts on MRI. MRI studies of 232 temporomandibular joints were performed in 116 patients with TMD by using a 0.5-T magnetic resonance (MR) scanner, with spin echo sequence: protondensity-weighted. And we took MRI slices at opening phase and closing phase. So 232 slices were gathered and we evaluated clinically the incidence of Motion Artifacts, that is to say, double and multiple images and other factors. The 103 slices in 56 patients showed Motion Artifacts. There is no significant difference between sexes. By age group, those in their teens were most frequent, followed by those in their fifties, forties, thirties and twenties. Also the same results were obtained for double image and multiple image. Incidence of Motion Artifact was most frequent at the opening phase. There is no significant difference between double and multiple image. (author)

  7. Metal artifact reduction method using metal streaks image subtraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pua, Rizza D.; Cho, Seung Ryong

    2014-01-01

    Many studies have been dedicated for metal artifact reduction (MAR); however, the methods are successful to varying degrees depending on situations. Sinogram in-painting, filtering, iterative method are some of the major categories of MAR. Each has its own merits and weaknesses. A combination of these methods or hybrid methods have also been developed to make use of the different benefits of two techniques and minimize the unfavorable results. Our method focuses on the in-paitning approach and a hybrid MAR described by Xia et al. Although in-painting scheme is an effective technique in reducing the primary metal artifacts, a major drawback is the reintroduction of new artifacts that can be caused by an inaccurate interpolation process. Furthermore, combining the segmented metal image to the corrected nonmetal image in the final step of a conventional inpainting approach causes an issue of incorrect metal pixel values. Our proposed method begins with a sinogram in-painting approach and ends with an image-based metal artifact reduction scheme. This work provides a simple, yet effective solution for reducing metal artifacts and acquiring the original metal pixel information. The proposed method demonstrated its effectiveness in a simulation setting. The proposed method showed image quality that is comparable to the standard MAR; however, quantitatively more accurate than the standard MAR

  8. Artifact detection in electrodermal activity using sparse recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsey, Malia; Palumbo, Richard Vincent; Urbaneja, Alberto; Akcakaya, Murat; Huang, Jeannie; Kleckner, Ian R.; Barrett, Lisa Feldman; Quigley, Karen S.; Sejdic, Ervin; Goodwin, Matthew S.

    2017-05-01

    Electrodermal Activity (EDA) - a peripheral index of sympathetic nervous system activity - is a primary measure used in psychophysiology. EDA is widely accepted as an indicator of physiological arousal, and it has been shown to reveal when psychologically novel events occur. Traditionally, EDA data is collected in controlled laboratory experiments. However, recent developments in wireless biosensing have led to an increase in out-of-lab studies. This transition to ambulatory data collection has introduced challenges. In particular, artifacts such as wearer motion, changes in temperature, and electrical interference can be misidentified as true EDA responses. The inability to distinguish artifact from signal hinders analyses of ambulatory EDA data. Though manual procedures for identifying and removing EDA artifacts exist, they are time consuming - which is problematic for the types of longitudinal data sets represented in modern ambulatory studies. This manuscript presents a novel technique to automatically identify and remove artifacts in EDA data using curve fitting and sparse recovery methods. Our method was evaluated using labeled data to determine the accuracy of artifact identification. Procedures, results, conclusions, and future directions are presented.

  9. Preliminary experimental insights into differential heat impact among lithic artifacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Bustos-Pérez

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The presence of thermally altered and broken flint artifacts is common at archaeological sites. Most studies focus their attention on the effects of heat treatment on flint to improve knapping qualities, disregarding the effects of fire over flint under uncontrolled conditions. This paper aims to show how under uncontrolled heating processes flint artifacts develop different heat alterations (such as levels of breakage, presence of scales, etc. as a result of vertical distribution, volume or raw material and to establish a gradient of rock changes and behavior. Artifacts where macroscopically analyzed and a series of uncontrolled heating experiments through the distribution of flint blanks under two hearths were carried out, allowing a comparison of the before and after of the blanks. Preliminary results show how levels of breakage, surface alteration or development of heat alteration features can be differentiated according to artifact volume, vertical distribution and level of surface alteration. Results also show how two different raw materials react differently to similar thermal impact, and how surface alteration reacts at different rhythm in the case of recycled artifacts. We conclude that levels of thermal alteration can be differentiated through macroscopic analysis of flint surface.

  10. Chimeric classical swine fever (CSF)-Japanese encephalitis (JE) viral replicon as a non-transmissible vaccine candidate against CSF and JE infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhenhua; Wu, Rui; Li, Robert W; Li, Ling; Xiong, Zhongliang; Zhao, Haizhong; Guo, Deyin; Pan, Zishu

    2012-04-01

    A trans-complemented chimeric CSF-JE virus replicon was constructed using an infectious cDNA clone of the CSF virus (CSFV) Alfort/187 strain. The CSFV E2 gene was deleted, and a fragment containing the region encoding a truncated envelope protein (tE, amino acid 292-402, domain III) of JE virus (JEV) was inserted into the resultant plasmid, pA187delE2, to generate the recombinant cDNA clone pA187delE2/JEV-tE. Porcine kidney 15 (PK15) cells that constitutively express the CSFV E2p7 proteins were then transfected with in vitro-transcribed RNA from pA187delE2/JEV-tE. As a result, the chimeric CSF-JE virus replicon particle (VRP), rv187delE2/JEV-tE, was rescued. In a mouse model, immunization with the chimeric CSF-JE VRP induced strong production of JEV-specific antibody and conferred protection against a lethal JEV challenge. Pigs immunized with CSF-JE VRP displayed strong anti-CSFV and anti-JEV antibody responses and protection against CSFV and JEV challenge infections. Our evidence suggests that E2-complemented CSF-JE VRP not only has potential as a live-attenuated non-transmissible vaccine candidate against CSF and JE but also serves as a potential DIVA (Differentiating Infected from Vaccinated Animals) vaccine for CSF in pigs. Together, our data suggest that the non-transmissible chimeric VRP expressing foreign antigenic proteins may represent a promising strategy for bivalent DIVA vaccine design. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Proximal Limb Weakness Reverting After CSF Diversion In Intracranial Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinha S

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We report about two young girls who developed progressive visual failure secondary to increased intracranial pressure and had significant proximal muscle weakness of limbs. Patients with elevated intracranial pressure (ICP may present with "false localizing signs", besides having headache, vomiting and papilledema. Radicular pain as a manifestation of raised ICP is rare and motor weakness attributable to polyradiculopathy is exceptional. Two patients with increased intracranial pressure without lateralizing signs′ had singnificant muscle weakness. Clinical evaluation and laboratory tests did not disclose any other cause for weakness. Following theco-peritoneal shunt, in both patients, there was variable recovery of vision but the proximal weakness and symptoms of elevated ICP improved rapidly. Recognition of this uncommon manifestation of raised ICP may obviate the need for unnecessary investigation and reduce morbidity due to weakness by CSF diversion procedure.

  12. Csf Based Non-Ground Points Extraction from LIDAR Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, A.; Zhang, W.; Shi, H.

    2017-09-01

    Region growing is a classical method of point cloud segmentation. Based on the idea of collecting the pixels with similar properties to form regions, region growing is widely used in many fields such as medicine, forestry and remote sensing. In this algorithm, there are two core problems. One is the selection of seed points, the other is the setting of the growth constraints, in which the selection of the seed points is the foundation. In this paper, we propose a CSF (Cloth Simulation Filtering) based method to extract the non-ground seed points effectively. The experiments have shown that this method can obtain a group of seed spots compared with the traditional methods. It is a new attempt to extract seed points

  13. Covering the CSF space: Does teaching make a difference?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, G.; Wynne, C.J.; Baggarley, S.

    1999-01-01

    Following a paediatric teaching course for radiation oncology registrars which specifically addressed the method for planning cranial irradiation, a lateral skull simulation film was sent to all attendees to assess the effect of the teaching. The method uses opposed lateral fields to encompass the entire clinical target volume: the brain, meninges and cerebro- spinal fluid (CSF) down to the level of the second vertebra. To assess current clinical practice in New Zealand, a copy of the same radiograph was sent to radiation oncologists who had not attended the course. Recommendations from the course were that 10-mm margins should be placed in the regions of the cribiform plate and the floor of the middle cranial fossa. However, only 6.9% of the attendees; marked the film with the recommended 10-mm margins. Dose profiles are also presented to support the use of 10-mm margins. Copyright (1999) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  14. Diagnostic accuracy of routine blood examinations and CSF lactate level for post-neurosurgical bacterial meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Zhang

    2017-06-01

    Conclusions: The PBM diagnostic accuracy of routine blood examinations was relatively low, whereas the accuracy of CSF lactate level was high. Some variables that are involved in the incidence of PBM can also affect the diagnostic accuracy for PBM. Taking into account the effects of these variables significantly improves the diagnostic accuracies of routine blood examinations and CSF lactate level.

  15. CSF protein profiling using Multiplex Immuno-assay : A potential new diagnostic tool for leptomeningeal metastases.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandsma, D.; Voest, E.E.; Jager, W. de; Bonfrer, H.; Algra, A.; Boogerd, W.; Korse, T.; Reijneveld, J.C.; Verbeek, M.M.; Rijkers, G.; Taphoorn, M.J.B.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The diagnosis of leptomeningeal metastases (LM) is based on clinical symptoms, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of brain and spine and cytological analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The clinical picture of LM is highly variable and both cytological CSF analysis and contrast-enhanced

  16. Correlation of MRI and CSF cytology in the diagnosis of medulloblastoma spinal metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, S.K.; Ditchfield, M.R.; Waters, K.

    1998-01-01

    Background. Medulloblastoma frequently spreads to involve the spinal cord, which significantly reduces patient survival and determines whether chemotherapy is utilised and the dose of irradiation to the neuraxis. Staging is usually achieved by MRI of the spine and/or cytology of CSF, both methods having their limitations. Objective. To determine whether there is a correlation between CSF cytology and the demonstration of spinal metastases by MRI and whether CSF cytology is useful when spinal MRI is equivocal. Materials and methods. All cases of medulloblastoma diagnosed at our hospital between 1992 and 1997 were identified. Of 26 cases, 11 presentations (age range 4 months to 12 years) had both CSF cytology (either from the cisterna magna or lumbar puncture) and spinal MRI. The MR studies were reviewed for the presence of metastases and the CSF cytology for the presence of tumour cells. Results. We found 100 % correlation between MRI and CSF cytology for samples taken by lumbar puncture (four negative and three positive on both investigations). No correlation was demonstrated when CSF samples were taken from the cisterna magna. Conclusions. Our data suggest that lumbar CSF cytology may be useful when the MRI is equivocal for the presence of metastatic involvement of the spine by medulloblastoma. (orig.)

  17. T2-weighted vs. intrathecal contrast-enhanced MR cisternography in the evaluation of CSF rhinorrhea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ecin, Gaye; Oner, A. Yusuf; Tokgoz, Nil; Ucar, Murat; Tali, Turgut; Aykol, Sukru

    2013-01-01

    Background: Endoscopic surgical approach is being more widely used in the treatment of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) rhinorrhea. Accurate localization of CSF fistulas prior to surgery is essential in increasing the success of dural repair and in decreasing negative or recurrent explorations. Purpose: To evaluate and compare intrathecal contrast medium-enhanced magnetic resonance cisternography (CEMRC) with T2-weighted MR cisternography (T2MRC) in identifying the presence and site of CSF rhinorrhea. Material and Methods: Sixty patients with suspected CSF rhinorrhea underwent MR cisternography including intrathecally enhanced fat-suppressed T1WI in three orthogonal planes and T2WI in the coronal plane. Both set of images were reviewed by two blinded radiologists for the presence and location of CSF leakage. Imaging data were compared with surgical findings and/or beta-2 transferrin testing. Results: With surgery proven CSF leakage in 20 instances as reference, CEMRC detected 18 (90%), whereas T2MRC reported only 13 (65%) correctly. Overall, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value in detecting CSF fistulas were 92%, 80%, 76%, and 93% for CEMRC, and 56%, 77%, 64%, and 71% for T2MRC, respectively. Conclusion: The minimally invasive CEMRC is an effective method with higher sensitivity and specificity than T2MRC in the evaluation of CSF fistulas

  18. MDSCs are involved in the protumorigenic potentials of GM-CSF in colitis-associated cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ning; Liu, Qilin; Hou, Lin; Wang, Yalin; Liu, Ziling

    2017-06-01

    Chronic inflammation is thought to be a major driving force for the development of colitis-associated colorectal cancer (CAC). As one member of proinflammatory cytokine family, granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) has been identified to play a key role in CAC pathogenesis recently. The underlying mechanisms, however, remain largely unknown. In this study, we found that myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) accumulated increasingly in the lesions during the progression from colitis to cancer, which was critical for CAC formation. Importantly, this MDSC accumulation was controlled by GM-CSF. MDSC number decreased significantly in GM-CSF-deficient mice suffering from CAC induction, and transfusion of MDSCs from wild-type CAC-bearing mice into GM-CSF-deficient counterparts led to recurrence of CAC. Furthermore, the supernatants of CAC lesions or GM-CSF alone was sufficient to differentiate hematopoietic precursors into MDSCs. Addition of neutralizing anti-GM-CSF antibody impaired the MDSC-differentiating effects of the supernatants of CAC lesions. Overall, these findings shed new insights into the mechanisms of GM-CSF underlying CAC development, by inducing/recruiting CAC-promoting MDSCs. Blocking GM-CSF activity or MDSC function may represent new therapeutic strategies for CAC in clinic.

  19. The Choroid Plexus of the Lateral Ventricle As the Origin of CSF Pulsation Is Questionable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takizawa, Ken; Matsumae, Mitsunori; Hayashi, Naokazu; Hirayama, Akihiro; Sano, Fumiya; Yatsushiro, Satoshi; Kuroda, Kagayaki

    2018-01-15

    The advent of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) enables noninvasive measurement of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) motion, and new information about CSF motion has now been acquired. The driving force of the CSF has long been thought to be choroid plexus (CP) pulsation, but to investigate whether this phenomenon actually occurs, CSF motion was observed in the ventricular system and subarachnoid space using MRI. Eleven healthy volunteers, ranging in age from 23 to 58 years, participated in this study. The MRI sequences used were four-dimensional phase-contrast (4D-PC) and time-spatial labeling inversion pulse (t-SLIP). The 4D-PC images included sagittal images in the cranial midline, coronal images focusing on the foramen of Monro (FOM), and oblique coronal images of the trigone to quantify CSF velocity and acceleration. These values were compared and analyzed as non-parametric data using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test and the Mann-Whitney U test. 4D-PC showed that the median CSF velocity was significantly lower in the posterior part of the lateral ventricle than in other regions. The quantitative analysis of velocity and acceleration showed that they were decreased around the CP in the trigone. Image analysis of both velocity mapping and t-SLIP showed suppressed CSF motion around the CP in the trigone. These findings cast doubt on CP pulsation being the driving force for CSF motion.

  20. Selected CSF biomarkers indicate no evidence of early neuroinflammation in Huntington disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther-Jensen, Tua; Börnsen, Lars Svend; Budtz-Jorgensen, Esben

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate CSF biomarkers of neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration in Huntington disease (HD) gene-expansion carriers compared to controls and to investigate these biomarkers in association with clinical HD rating scales and disease burden score. Methods: We collected CSF from 32...

  1. CSF studies facilitate DNA diagnosis in familial Alzheimer's disease due to a presenilin-1 mutation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bot, Susanne T; Kremer, H P H; Dooijes, Dennis; Verbeek, Marcel M

    2009-01-01

    In sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis is becoming increasingly relevant to establish an early diagnosis. We present a case of familial AD due to a presenilin-1 mutation in which CSF studies suggested appropriate DNA diagnostics. A 38 year old Dutch man presented

  2. Sunlight triggers cutaneous lupus through a CSF-1-dependent mechanism in MRL-Fas(lpr) mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menke, Julia; Hsu, Mei-Yu; Byrne, Katelyn T; Lucas, Julie A; Rabacal, Whitney A; Croker, Byron P; Zong, Xiao-Hua; Stanley, E Richard; Kelley, Vicki R

    2008-11-15

    Sunlight (UVB) triggers cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE) and systemic lupus through an unknown mechanism. We tested the hypothesis that UVB triggers CLE through a CSF-1-dependent, macrophage (Mø)-mediated mechanism in MRL-Fas(lpr) mice. By constructing mutant MRL-Fas(lpr) strains expressing varying levels of CSF-1 (high, intermediate, none), and use of an ex vivo gene transfer to deliver CSF-1 intradermally, we determined that CSF-1 induces CLE in lupus-susceptible MRL-Fas(lpr) mice, but not in lupus-resistant BALB/c mice. UVB incites an increase in Møs, apoptosis in the skin, and CLE in MRL-Fas(lpr), but not in CSF-1-deficient MRL-Fas(lpr) mice. Furthermore, UVB did not induce CLE in BALB/c mice. Probing further, UVB stimulates CSF-1 expression by keratinocytes leading to recruitment and activation of Møs that, in turn, release mediators, which induce apoptosis in keratinocytes. Thus, sunlight triggers a CSF-1-dependent, Mø-mediated destructive inflammation in the skin leading to CLE in lupus-susceptible MRL-Fas(lpr) but not lupus-resistant BALB/c mice. Taken together, CSF-1 is envisioned as the match and lupus susceptibility as the tinder leading to CLE.

  3. Different Cholinesterase Inhibitor Effects on CSF Cholinesterases in Alzheimer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordberg, Agneta; Darreh-Shori, Taher; Peskind, Elaine; Soininen, Hilkka; Mousavi, Malahat; Eagle, Gina; Lane, Roger

    2014-01-01

    Background The current study aimed to compare the effects of different cholinesterase inhibitors on acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE) activities and protein levels, in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of Alzheimer disease (AD) patients. Methods and Findings AD patients aged 50–85 years were randomized to open-label treatment with oral rivastigmine, donepezil or galantamine for 13 weeks. AChE and BuChE activities were assayed by Ellman’s colorimetric method. Protein levels were assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Primary analyses were based on the Completer population (randomized patients who completed Week 13 assessments). 63 patients were randomized to treatment. Rivastigmine was associated with decreased AChE activity by 42.6% and decreased AChE protein levels by 9.3%, and decreased BuChE activity by 45.6% and decreased BuChE protein levels by 21.8%. Galantamine decreased AChE activity by 2.1% and BuChE activity by 0.5%, but increased AChE protein levels by 51.2% and BuChE protein levels by10.5%. Donepezil increased AChE and BuChE activities by 11.8% and 2.8%, respectively. Donepezil caused a 215.2%increase in AChE and 0.4% increase in BuChE protein levels. Changes in mean AChE-Readthrough/Synaptic ratios, which might reflect underlying neurodegenerative processes, were 1.4, 0.6, and 0.4 for rivastigmine, donepezil and galantamine, respectively. Conclusion The findings suggest pharmacologically-induced differences between rivastigmine, donepezil and galantamine. Rivastigmine provides sustained inhibition of AChE and BuChE, while donepezil and galantamine do not inhibit BuChE and are associated with increases in CSF AChE protein levels. The clinical implications require evaluation. PMID:19199870

  4. Distinction of Fly Artifacts from Human Blood using Immunodetection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivers, David B; Acca, Gillian; Fink, Marc; Brogan, Rebecca; Chen, Dorothy; Schoeffield, Andrew

    2018-02-21

    Insect stains produced by necrophagous flies are indistinguishable morphologically from human bloodstains. At present, no diagnostic tests exist to overcome this deficiency. As the first step toward developing a chemical test to recognize fly artifacts, polyclonal antisera were generated in rats against three distinct antigenic sequences of fly cathepsin D-like proteinase, an enzyme that is structurally distinct in cyclorrhaphous Diptera from other animals. The resulting rat antisera bound to artifacts produced by Protophormia terraenovae and synthetic peptides used to generate the polyclonal antisera, but not with any type of mammalian blood tested in immunoassays. Among the three antisera, anti-md3 serum displayed the highest reactivity for fly stains, demonstrated cross-reactivity for all synthetic peptides representing antigenic sequences of the mature fly enzyme, and bound artifacts originating from the fly digestive tract. Further work is needed to determine whether the antisera are suitable for non-laboratory conditions. © 2018 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  5. Streak artifacts on Kidney CT: Ionic vs nonionic contrast media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Eun Ok; Kim, Won Hong; Jung, Myung Suk; Kim, Yong Hoon; Hur, Gham

    1993-01-01

    The authors reviewed findings of enhanced abdominal computed tomography (CT) scans to know the difference between a higher dose of conventional ionic contrast media(iothalamate meglumine) and a lower dose of a new, nonionic contrast material(ioversol). One hundred adult patients were divided into two groups. Each group consisted of 50 patients. Iothalamate meglumine and ioversol were intravenously administered in each group. The radio of the male to female in the former was 28:22, and the latter 29:21. We examine the degree of renal streak artifact and measure the Hounsfield number of urine in renal collecting system. There were significant differences of the degree of the streak artifact depending upon the osmolality of contrast media used and that was related with urine CT number(P value<0.005). We authors conclude that nonionic low osmolar contrast media is prone to cause streak artifacts and distortions of renal image than conventional ionic high osmolar contrast media

  6. Correction of ring artifacts in X-ray tomographic images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyckegaard, Allan; Johnson, G.; Tafforeau, P.

    2011-01-01

    Ring artifacts are systematic intensity distortions located on concentric circles in reconstructed tomographic X-ray images. When using X-ray tomography to study for instance low-contrast grain boundaries in metals it is crucial to correct for the ring artifacts in the images as they may have...... the same intensity level as the grain boundaries and thus make it impossible to perform grain segmentation. This paper describes an implementation of a method for correcting the ring artifacts in tomographic X-ray images of simple objects such as metal samples where the object and the background...... are separable. The method is implemented in Matlab, it works with very little user interaction and may run in parallel on a cluster if applied to a whole stack of images. The strength and robustness of the method implemented will be demonstrated on three tomographic X-ray data sets: a mono-phase β...

  7. Medical image of the week: DBS polysomnogram artifact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shetty S,

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A 79-year-old man with known Parkinson’s disease and status post deep brain stimulator (DBS implantation underwent an overnight polysomnogram for clinical suspicion of obstructive sleep apnea. Artifact was seen on the polysomnogram recording (Figures 1 & 2. Patient-related electrical artifacts may be seen from devices such as pacemakers, deep brain stimulators and vagal nerve simulators. Abrupt discontinuation of DBS is associated with a high likelihood of worsening of symptoms in patients with Parkinson’s disease (1. Patients with DBS are most commonly programmed in monopolar mode. Bipolar configuration, forms a short electrical dipole that affects a relatively smaller volume of tissue and generates far less artifact, suggesting that this may be an effective option in a Parkinsonian patient with indications for polysomnography (2.

  8. Microdialysis Monitoring of CSF Parameters in Severe Traumatic Brain Injury Patients: A Novel Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thelin, Eric P.; Nelson, David W.; Ghatan, Per Hamid; Bellander, Bo-Michael

    2014-01-01

    Background: Neuro-intensive care following traumatic brain injury (TBI) is focused on preventing secondary insults that may lead to irreversible brain damage. Microdialysis (MD) is used to detect deranged cerebral metabolism. The clinical usefulness of the MD is dependent on the regional localization of the MD catheter. The aim of this study was to analyze a new method of continuous cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) monitoring using the MD technique. The method was validated using conventional laboratory analysis of CSF samples. MD-CSF and regional MD-Brain samples were correlated to patient outcome. Materials and Methods: A total of 14 patients suffering from severe TBI were analyzed. They were monitored using (1) a MD catheter (CMA64-iView, n = 7448 MD samples) located in a CSF-pump connected to the ventricular drain and (2) an intraparenchymal MD catheter (CMA70, n = 8358 MD samples). CSF-lactate and CSF-glucose levels were monitored and were compared to MD-CSF samples. MD-CSF and MD-Brain parameters were correlated to favorable (Glasgow Outcome Score extended, GOSe 6–8) and unfavorable (GOSe 1–5) outcome. Results: Levels of glucose and lactate acquired with the CSF-MD technique could be correlated to conventional levels. The median MD recovery using the CMA64 catheter in CSF was 0.98 and 0.97 for glucose and lactate, respectively. Median MD-CSF (CMA 64) lactate (p = 0.0057) and pyruvate (p = 0.0011) levels were significantly lower in the favorable outcome group compared to the unfavorable group. No significant difference in outcome was found using the lactate:pyruvate ratio (LPR), or any of the regional MD-Brain monitoring in our analyzed cohort. Conclusion: This new technique of global MD-CSF monitoring correlates with conventional CSF levels of glucose and lactate, and the MD recovery is higher than previously described. Increase in lactate and pyruvate, without any effect on the LPR, correlates to unfavorable outcome, perhaps related to the

  9. Microdialysis monitoring of CSF parameters in severe traumatic brain injury patients: A novel approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Peter Thelin

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Neuro-intensive care following traumatic brain injury is focused on preventing secondary insults that may lead to irreversible brain damage. Microdialysis (MD is used to detect deranged cerebral metabolism. The clinical usefulness of the MD is dependent on the regional localization of the MD catheter. The aim of this study was to analyze a new method of continuous cerebral spinal fluid (CSF monitoring using the MD technique. The method was validated using conventional laboratory analysis of CSF samples. MD-CSF and regional MD-Brain samples were correlated to patient outcome.Materials and method: A total of 14 patients suffering from severe TBI were analyzed. They were monitored using 1. A MD catheter (CMA64-iView, n=7448 MD samples located in a CSF-pump connected to the ventricular drain and 2. An intraparenchymal MD catheter (CMA70, n=8358 MD samples. CSF-lactate and CSF-glucose levels were monitored and were compared to MD-CSF samples. MD-CSF and MD-Brain parameters were correlated to favorable (Glasgow Outcome Score extended, GOSe 6-8 and unfavorable (GOSe 1-5 outcome. Results: Levels of glucose and lactate acquired with the CSF-MD technique could be correlated to conventional levels. The median extraction ratio using the CMA64 catheter in CSF was 0.98 and 0.97 for glucose and lactate, respectively. Median MD-CSF (CMA 64 lactate- (p=0.0057 and pyruvate (p=0.0011 levels were significantly lower in the favorable outcome group compared to the unfavorable group. No significant difference in outcome was found using the lactate:pyruvate ratio (LPR, or any of the regional MD-Brain monitoring in our analyzed cohort. Conclusions: This new technique of global MD-CSF monitoring correlates with conventional CSF-levels of glucose and lactate and the extraction ratio for the MD catheter is higher than previously described. Increase in lactate and pyruvate in CSF, without any effect on the LPR, correlates to unfavorable outcome.

  10. Ring artifacts removal from synchrotron CT image slices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Zhouping; Chapman, Dean; Wiebe, Sheldon

    2013-01-01

    Ring artifacts can occur in reconstructed images from x-ray Computerized Tomography (CT) as full or partial concentric rings superimposed on the scanned structures. Due to the data corruption by those ring artifacts in CT images, qualitative and quantitative analysis of these images are compromised. In this paper, we propose to correct the ring artifacts on the reconstructed synchrotron radiation (SR) CT image slices. The proposed correction procedure includes the following steps: (1). transform the reconstructed CT images into polar coordinates; (2) apply discrete two-dimensional (2D) wavelet transform to the polar image to decompose it into four image components: low pass band image component, as well as the components from horizontal, vertical and diagonal details bands; (3). apply 2D Fourier transform to the vertical details band image component only, since the ring artifacts become vertical lines in the polar coordinates; (4). apply Gaussian filtering in Fourier domain along the abscissa direction to suppress the vertical lines, since the information of the vertical lines in Fourier domain is completely condensed to that direction; (5). perform inverse Fourier transform to get the corrected vertical details band image component; (6). perform inverse wavelet transform to get the corrected polar image; (7). transform the corrected polar image back to Cartesian coordinates to get the CT image slice with reduced ring artifacts. This approach has been successfully used on CT data acquired from the Biomedical Imaging and Therapy (BMIT) beamline in Canadian Light Source (CLS), and the results show that the ring artifacts in original SR CT images have been effectively suppressed with all the structure information in the image preserved.

  11. Simulation-based artifact correction (SBAC) for metrological computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Joscha; Leinweber, Carsten; Sawall, Stefan; Stoschus, Henning; Ballach, Frederic; Müller, Tobias; Hammer, Michael; Christoph, Ralf; Kachelrieß, Marc

    2017-06-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is a valuable tool for the metrolocical assessment of industrial components. However, the application of CT to the investigation of highly attenuating objects or multi-material components is often restricted by the presence of CT artifacts caused by beam hardening, x-ray scatter, off-focal radiation, partial volume effects or the cone-beam reconstruction itself. In order to overcome this limitation, this paper proposes an approach to calculate a correction term that compensates for the contribution of artifacts and thus enables an appropriate assessment of these components using CT. Therefore, we make use of computer simulations of the CT measurement process. Based on an appropriate model of the object, e.g. an initial reconstruction or a CAD model, two simulations are carried out. One simulation considers all physical effects that cause artifacts using dedicated analytic methods as well as Monte Carlo-based models. The other one represents an ideal CT measurement i.e. a measurement in parallel beam geometry with a monochromatic, point-like x-ray source and no x-ray scattering. Thus, the difference between these simulations is an estimate for the present artifacts and can be used to correct the acquired projection data or the corresponding CT reconstruction, respectively. The performance of the proposed approach is evaluated using simulated as well as measured data of single and multi-material components. Our approach yields CT reconstructions that are nearly free of artifacts and thereby clearly outperforms commonly used artifact reduction algorithms in terms of image quality. A comparison against tactile reference measurements demonstrates the ability of the proposed approach to increase the accuracy of the metrological assessment significantly.

  12. Highlights of the Global HIV-1 CSF Escape Consortium Meeting, 9 June 2016, Bethesda, MD, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Jeymohan; Cinque, Paola; Colosi, Deborah; Dravid, Ameet; Ene, Luminita; Fox, Howard; Gabuzda, Dana; Gisslen, Magnus; Beth Joseph, Sarah; Letendre, Scott; Mukerji, Shibani S; Nath, Avindra; Perez-Valero, Ignacio; Persaud, Deborah; Price, Richard W; Rao, Vasudev R; Sacktor, Ned; Swanstrom, Ronald; Winston, Alan; Wojna, Valerie; Wright, Edwina; Spudich, Serena

    2016-10-05

    CSF HIV escape is a recently recognised phenomenon that suggests that despite suppressive treatment, HIV RNA may be detected in the CNS compartment in some individuals. In rare cases this is associated with clinical neurological disease, while in most cases, neurological consequences are not apparent. Attempts at characterising the biological substrates of CSF escape and further investigating the neurological consequences need to be made to better understand the implications of this condition for the HIV cure agenda as well as for clinical outcomes. The Global CSF HIV-1 Escape Consortium meeting, convened by the US National Institute of Mental Health, was a first step to gather investigators from diverse sites to discuss opportunities for future collaborative work on this emerging issue. To better understand CSF HIV escape and allow cross-site data reconciliation, it will be useful to reach a consensus set of definitions of the distinct forms of CSF escape, without which concerted cross-site efforts are difficult.

  13. Prognosis of cerebral ischemia, significance of CSF-lactate-level and computerized tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busse, O.

    1982-01-01

    In patients (n = 120) with supratentorial ischemic cerebral infarction CSF lactate was determined and a CT was carried out on the 1st, 3rd and 7th day after the stroke. On the 3rd and 7th day the comparative investigation revealed a close correlation between the measure of the ischemic edema and the level of CSF-lactate. Thus the lactate-concentration can be regarded as a measure for the spread of the edema after cerebral infarction. Already on the 3rd day CT- and CSF-lactate results allow a relatively reliable prediction for the course of the stroke. An edema grade III in CT and a CSF-lactate concentration more than 4 mmol/l were prognostically critical. On the other hand good chances of survival were indicated by a CSF lactate level under 2.5 mmol/l and an edema grade I. (orig.) [de

  14. Persistent CSF Rhinorrhoea, Pneumocephalus, and Recurrent Meningitis Following Misdiagnosis of Olfactory Neuroblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil Barua

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A 41-year-old female patient was admitted with streptococcal meningitis on a background of 5-month history of CSF rhinorrhoea. Imaging revealed an extensive skull base lesion involving the sphenoid and ethmoid sinuses, the pituitary fossa with suprasellar extension and bony destruction. Histological examination of an endonasal transethmoidal biopsy suggested a diagnosis of olfactory neuroblastoma. A profuse CSF leak occurred and the patient developed coliform meningitis. A second endonasal endoscopic biopsy was undertaken which demonstrated the tumour to be a prolactinoma. Following endonasal repair of the CSF leak and lumbar drainage, she developed profound pneumocephalus. The patient underwent three further unsuccessful CSF leak repairs. Definitive control of the CSF leak was finally achieved through a transcranial approach with prolonged lumbar drainage. This case illustrates some of the potentially devastating complications which can occur as a consequence of complex skull base lesions. A multidisciplinary approach may be required to successfully manage such cases.

  15. Crystals seen on CSF microscopy in a case of suspected subarachnoid haemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiand, Daniel; Hanning, Ian; Mouhamadou, Moussa; Wearmouth, Debbie

    2015-01-01

    Although crystals are rarely identified on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) microscopy, their presence can be of significant diagnostic value. We report a case of oxalate crystals seen on CSF microscopy of a 43-year-old woman. The patient presented with headaches, nausea and vomiting. CT of the head showed a small focus of hyper-density, suspicious of haemorrhage, in the right side of the pontine cistern. CSF cell count was within the normal range. Although no organisms were seen on microscopy, copious oxalate crystals were seen. The same crystals were seen on microscopy of CSF collected in a fluoride oxalate container used for glucose analysis. A follow-up contrast-enhanced CT angiogram did not demonstrate any abnormalities. It transpired that excess CSF had been collected into a fluoride oxalate container. This had subsequently been decanted into a plain container for microbiological analysis. Correct specimen collection should be emphasised when teaching lumbar puncture technique. PMID:26139652

  16. Inter-deriving Semantic Artifacts for Object-Oriented Programming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danvy, Olivier; Johannsen, Jacob

    2008-01-01

    We present a new abstract machine for Abadi and Cardelli's untyped calculus of objects. What is special about this semantic artifact (i.e., man-made construct) is that is mechanically corresponds to both the reduction semantics (i.e., small-step operational semantics) and the natural semantics (i...... actual substitutions, we then represent object methods as closures and in the same inter-derivational spirit, we present three new semantic artifacts: a reduction semantics for a version of Abadi and Cardelli's untyped calculus of objects with explicit substitutions, an environment-based abstract machine...

  17. EEG Artifact Removal Using a Wavelet Neural Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hoang-Anh T.; Musson, John; Li, Jiang; McKenzie, Frederick; Zhang, Guangfan; Xu, Roger; Richey, Carl; Schnell, Tom

    2011-01-01

    !n this paper we developed a wavelet neural network. (WNN) algorithm for Electroencephalogram (EEG) artifact removal without electrooculographic (EOG) recordings. The algorithm combines the universal approximation characteristics of neural network and the time/frequency property of wavelet. We. compared the WNN algorithm with .the ICA technique ,and a wavelet thresholding method, which was realized by using the Stein's unbiased risk estimate (SURE) with an adaptive gradient-based optimal threshold. Experimental results on a driving test data set show that WNN can remove EEG artifacts effectively without diminishing useful EEG information even for very noisy data.

  18. ["Long-branch Attraction" artifact in phylogenetic reconstruction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi-Wei; Yu, Li; Zhang, Ya-Ping

    2007-06-01

    Phylogenetic reconstruction among various organisms not only helps understand their evolutionary history but also reveal several fundamental evolutionary questions. Understanding of the evolutionary relationships among organisms establishes the foundation for the investigations of other biological disciplines. However, almost all the widely used phylogenetic methods have limitations which fail to eliminate systematic errors effectively, preventing the reconstruction of true organismal relationships. "Long-branch Attraction" (LBA) artifact is one of the most disturbing factors in phylogenetic reconstruction. In this review, the conception and analytic method as well as the avoidance strategy of LBA were summarized. In addition, several typical examples were provided. The approach to avoid and resolve LBA artifact has been discussed.

  19. Successive approximation algorithm for cancellation of artifacts in DSA images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Funakami, Raiko; Hiroshima, Kyoichi; Nishino, Junji

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an algorithm for cancellation of artifacts in DSA images. We have already proposed an automatic registration method based on the detection of local movements. When motion of the object is large, it is difficult to estimate the exact movement, and the cancellation of artifacts may therefore fail. The algorithm we propose here is based on a simple rigid model. We present the results of applying the proposed method to a series of experimental X-ray images, as well as the results of applying the algorithm as preprocessing for a registration method based on local movement. (author)

  20. Analysis of main artifacts in scanning probe microscopy (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alekperov, S.D.; Alekperov, S.D.

    2012-01-01

    The analysis of experiment carrying methodology in the scanning probe microscopy (SPM) region is carried out, the main parameters influencing on image quality are revealed. In order to reveal the artifact reason the main components of SPM signal which are divided on 5 groups : the useful signal; noises connected with external influences and temperature drift; distortions connected with piezoceramics and piezo-scanner non-ideality; probe geometry influence; apparatus noises are considered. The main methods of removal and minimization of the given artifacts are considered. The second and third groups of main components of SPM signal are considered in the articles first part

  1. "Diabetes and literacy: negotiating control through artifacts of medicalization".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, David S

    2009-06-01

    My experience with the California Department of Motor Vehicles offers a case to explore how bureaucratic institutions monitor, classify, and control individuals. By examining artifacts created for and used by the DMV through the lens of literacy studies, I discuss the variety of rhetorical strategies used in each document and the effects and implications of those strategies, for example on subjectivity or identity, and move beyond the language of the artifacts themselves to attend to how they are invested with power in the management and control of populations.

  2. Depolarization artifacts in dual rotating-compensator Mueller matrix ellipsometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Weiqi; Zhang, Chuanwei; Jiang, Hao; Chen, Xiuguo; Liu, Shiyuan

    2016-01-01

    Noticeable depolarization effects are observed in the measurement of the air using an in-house developed dual rotating-compensator Mueller matrix ellipsometer. We demonstrate that these depolarization effects are essentially artifacts and mainly induced when the compensator with wavelength-dependent optical properties is integrated with the finite bandwidth detector. We define a general formula to represent the actual Mueller matrix of the compensator by taking into account the depolarization artifacts. After incorporating this formula into the system model, a correction method is further proposed, and consequently, improved accuracy can be achieved in the Mueller matrix measurement. (paper)

  3. False localizing sign of cervico-thoracic CSF leak in spontaneous intracranial hypotension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schievink, Wouter I; Maya, M Marcel; Chu, Ray M; Moser, Franklin G

    2015-06-16

    Spontaneous spinal CSF leaks are an important cause of new-onset headaches. Such leaks are reported to be particularly common at the cervico-thoracic junction. The authors undertook a study to determine the significance of these cervico-thoracic CSF leaks. The patient population consisted of a consecutive group of 13 patients who underwent surgery for CSF leak repair based on CT myelography showing CSF extravasation at the cervico-thoracic junction but without any evidence of an underlying structural lesion. The mean age of the 9 women and 4 men was 41.2 years. Extensive extrathecal longitudinal CSF collections were demonstrated in 11 patients. At surgery, small leaking arachnoid cysts were found in 2 patients. In the remaining 11 patients, no clear source of CSF leakage could be identified at surgery. Resolution of symptoms was achieved in both patients with leaking arachnoid cysts, but in only 3 of the 11 patients with negative intraoperative findings. Postoperative spinal imaging was performed in 9 of the 11 patients with negative intraoperative findings and showed persistence of the longitudinal intraspinal extradural CSF. Further imaging revealed the site of the CSF leak to be ventral to the thoracic spinal cord. Five of these patients underwent microsurgical repair of the ventral CSF leak with resolution of symptoms in all 5 patients. Cervico-thoracic extravasation of dye on myelography does not necessarily indicate the site of the CSF leak. Treatment directed at this site should not be expected to have a high probability of sustained improvement of symptoms. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  4. Identification of Ambiguous Activities in Radionuclide Cisternography Using SPECT/CT: Aspirated and Ingested CSF Rhinorrhea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dong Yun; Kim, Jae Seung [Univ. of Ulsan College of Medicine, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-15

    A 2 year-old little girl underwent Tc-99m diethylenthriamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) radionuclide cisternography to evaluate CSF rhinorrhea (Fig. 1). Cisternography clearly showed consecutive tracer activity in the nasal cavity and nasal tip, reflecting cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage. However, several unexpected activities appeared on the bilateral mid- and unilateral lower thorax on delayed images, respectively. We performed additional SPECT/CT to delineate the CSF leakage tract and identify the unexpected activities. Through SPECT/CT, we could confirm that the mid-thoracic activity was in the lung parenchyma, while the lower thoracic activity was in the stomach. Thus, we speculated that these unexpected activities were the result of aspirated and ingested CSF rhinorrhea. CSF rhinorrhea occurs when there is a fistula between the dura mater and the skull base and discharge of CSF from the nose. A spinal fluid leak from the intracranial space to the nasal respiratory tract is potentially very serious because of the risk of an ascending infection that could produce fulminant meningitis. Therefore, identification of the fistulous tract is helpful for patient management. Radionuclide cisternography is an important imaging modality to detect the site of leakage in patients with CSF rhinorrhea. The combination of radionuclide cistenography and SPECT/CT has led to a major improvement in the diagnostic accuracy for localization of CSF leakage. This case also shows an important role for SPECT/CT fusion imaging in radionuclide cisternography not only for localizing the primary CSF fistula tract, but also for evaluating ambiguous radiotracer activities in planar imaging; these ultimately turned out to be aspirated and ingested CSF rhinorrhea.

  5. GM-CSF augments the immunosuppressive capacity of neonatal spleen cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrissey, P.J.; Ireland, R.

    1991-01-01

    Addition of exogenous granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) to cultures of adult murine spleen cells with sheep red blood cells (SRBC) results in an augmented plaque forming cell (PFC) response. The influence of GM-CSF on the ability of neonatal spleen cells to suppress the anti-SRBC plaque forming response of adult spleen cells was tested by adding GM-CSF to cultures of neonatal and adult spleen cells. The suppressive capacity of the neonatal spleen cells was augmented by exogenous GM-CSF. The augmented suppression of the neonatal spleen cells was dependent on a G-10 adherent population since the addition of GM-CSF to cultures containing G-10 passed neonatal spleen cells resulted in an augmented PFC response and not suppression. Neonatal splenic glass adherent cells were also capable of suppressing the response. Neonatal spleen cells or purified neonatal glass adherent spleen cells cultured in the presence of GM-CSF had markedly increased levels of PGE2 in the culture supernatant. Neonatal spleen cells cultured with GM-CSF had increased numbers of morphologically identifiable macrophages after 48 hr of culture. Both irradiation and G-10 passage of the neonatal spleen diminished the numbers of macrophages formed in response to GM-CSF, and both of these manipulations resulted in reversal of suppression in response to GM-CSF. Thus, the augmented suppressive capacity of neonatal spleen cells in response to GM-CSF is probably mediated by its ability to drive monocyte to macrophage differentiation as well as increase the suppressive capacity of the existing neonatal splenic macrophages by increasing their production of PGE2

  6. Autocrine CSF-1R signaling drives mesothelioma chemoresistance via AKT activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cioce, M; Canino, C; Goparaju, C; Yang, H; Carbone, M; Pass, H I

    2014-01-01

    Clinical management of malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is very challenging because of the uncommon resistance of this tumor to chemotherapy. We report here increased expression of macrophage colony-stimulating-factor-1-receptor (M-CSF/CSF-1R) mRNA in mesothelioma versus normal tissue specimens and demonstrate that CSF-1R expression identifies chemoresistant cells of mesothelial nature in both primary cultures and mesothelioma cell lines. By using RNAi or ligand trapping, we demonstrate that the chemoresistance properties of those cells depend on autocrine CSF-1R signaling. At the single-cell level, the isolated CSF-1Rpos cells exhibit a complex repertoire of pluripotency, epithelial–mesenchymal transition and detoxifying factors, which define a clonogenic, chemoresistant, precursor-like cell sub-population. The simple activation of CSF-1R in untransformed mesothelial cells is sufficient to confer clonogenicity and resistance to pemetrexed, hallmarks of mesothelioma. In addition, this induced a gene expression profile highly mimicking that observed in the MPM cells endogenously expressing the receptor and the ligands, suggesting that CSF-1R expression is mainly responsible for the phenotype of the identified cell sub-populations. The survival of CSF1Rpos cells requires active AKT (v-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog 1) signaling, which contributed to increased levels of nuclear, transcriptionally competent β-catenin. Inhibition of AKT reduced the transcriptional activity of β-catenin-dependent reporters and sensitized the cells to senescence-induced clonogenic death after pemetrexed treatment. This work expands what is known on the non-macrophage functions of CSF-1R and its role in solid tumors, and suggests that CSF-1R signaling may have a critical pathogenic role in a prototypical, inflammation-related cancer such as MPM and therefore may represent a promising target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:24722292

  7. Identification of Ambiguous Activities in Radionuclide Cisternography Using SPECT/CT: Aspirated and Ingested CSF Rhinorrhea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Dong Yun; Kim, Jae Seung

    2014-01-01

    A 2 year-old little girl underwent Tc-99m diethylenthriamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) radionuclide cisternography to evaluate CSF rhinorrhea (Fig. 1). Cisternography clearly showed consecutive tracer activity in the nasal cavity and nasal tip, reflecting cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage. However, several unexpected activities appeared on the bilateral mid- and unilateral lower thorax on delayed images, respectively. We performed additional SPECT/CT to delineate the CSF leakage tract and identify the unexpected activities. Through SPECT/CT, we could confirm that the mid-thoracic activity was in the lung parenchyma, while the lower thoracic activity was in the stomach. Thus, we speculated that these unexpected activities were the result of aspirated and ingested CSF rhinorrhea. CSF rhinorrhea occurs when there is a fistula between the dura mater and the skull base and discharge of CSF from the nose. A spinal fluid leak from the intracranial space to the nasal respiratory tract is potentially very serious because of the risk of an ascending infection that could produce fulminant meningitis. Therefore, identification of the fistulous tract is helpful for patient management. Radionuclide cisternography is an important imaging modality to detect the site of leakage in patients with CSF rhinorrhea. The combination of radionuclide cistenography and SPECT/CT has led to a major improvement in the diagnostic accuracy for localization of CSF leakage. This case also shows an important role for SPECT/CT fusion imaging in radionuclide cisternography not only for localizing the primary CSF fistula tract, but also for evaluating ambiguous radiotracer activities in planar imaging; these ultimately turned out to be aspirated and ingested CSF rhinorrhea

  8. G-CSF/anti-G-CSF antibody complexes drive the potent recovery and expansion of CD11b+Gr-1+ myeloid cells without compromising CD8+ T cell immune responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Administration of recombinant G-CSF following cytoreductive therapy enhances the recovery of myeloid cells, minimizing the risk of opportunistic infection. Free G-CSF, however, is expensive, exhibits a short half-life, and has poor biological activity in vivo. Methods We evaluated whether the biological activity of G-CSF could be improved by pre-association with anti-G-CSF mAb prior to injection into mice. Results We find that the efficacy of G-CSF therapy can be enhanced more than 100-fold by pre-association of G-CSF with an anti-G-CSF monoclonal antibody (mAb). Compared with G-CSF alone, administration of G-CSF/anti-G-CSF mAb complexes induced the potent expansion of CD11b+Gr-1+ myeloid cells in mice with or without concomitant cytoreductive treatment including radiation or chemotherapy. Despite driving the dramatic expansion of myeloid cells, in vivo antigen-specific CD8+ T cell immune responses were not compromised. Furthermore, injection of G-CSF/anti-G-CSF mAb complexes heightened protective immunity to bacterial infection. As a measure of clinical value, we also found that antibody complexes improved G-CSF biological activity much more significantly than pegylation. Conclusions Our findings provide the first evidence that antibody cytokine complexes can effectively expand myeloid cells, and furthermore, that G-CSF/anti-G-CSF mAb complexes may provide an improved method for the administration of recombinant G-CSF. PMID:24279871

  9. Pulsatile flow in ventricular catheters for hydrocephalus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giménez, Á.; Galarza, M.; Thomale, U.; Schuhmann, M. U.; Valero, J.; Amigó, J. M.

    2017-05-01

    The obstruction of ventricular catheters (VCs) is a major problem in the standard treatment of hydrocephalus, the flow pattern of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) being one important factor thereof. As a first approach to this problem, some of the authors studied previously the CSF flow through VCs under time-independent boundary conditions by means of computational fluid dynamics in three-dimensional models. This allowed us to derive a few basic principles which led to designs with improved flow patterns regarding the obstruction problem. However, the flow of the CSF has actually a pulsatile nature because of the heart beating and blood flow. To address this fact, here we extend our previous computational study to models with oscillatory boundary conditions. The new results will be compared with the results for constant flows and discussed. It turns out that the corrections due to the pulsatility of the CSF are quantitatively small, which reinforces our previous findings and conclusions. This article is part of the themed issue `Mathematical methods in medicine: neuroscience, cardiology and pathology'.

  10. Arterial pseudoaneurysms of the shoulder mimicking other entities: utilization of pulsation artifact on musculoskeletal MR for accurate diagnosis in 2 cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samim, Mohammad [New York University, Department of Radiology, Hospital for Joint Disease, New York, NY (United States); Mandell, Jacob; Smith, Stacy; Kapoor, Neena; Czuczman, Gregory [Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2017-08-15

    We present two cases of pseudoaneurysm (PSA) about the shoulder mimicking more common clinical entities - soft tissue neoplasm and septic arthritis - for which biopsy of the mass and joint aspiration were requested respectively. We review the imaging findings of PSA with emphasis on findings in musculoskeletal protocol MRI, including the identification of pulsation artifact in both cases, which was critical to establishing the correct diagnosis. In the proper clinical setting, with imaging findings demonstrating a complex mass or fluid collection, MR images should be scrutinized for the presence of pulsation artifact, which can help diagnose a high-flow vascular lesion and avoid a potentially harmful invasive procedure such as biopsy. (orig.)

  11. Negligible motion artifacts in scalp electroencephalography (EEG during treadmill walking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin eNathan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent Mobile Brain/Body Imaging (MoBI techniques based on active electrode scalp electroencephalogram (EEG allow the acquisition and real-time analysis of brain dynamics during active unrestrained motor behavior involving whole body movements such as treadmill walking, over-ground walking and other locomotive and non-locomotive tasks. Unfortunately, MoBI protocols are prone to physiological and non-physiological artifacts, including motion artifacts that may contaminate the EEG recordings. A few attempts have been made to quantify these artifacts during locomotion tasks but with inconclusive results due in part to methodological pitfalls. In this paper, we investigate the potential contributions of motion artifacts in scalp EEG during treadmill walking at three different speeds (1.5, 3.0, and 4.5 km/h using a wireless 64 channel active EEG system and a wireless inertial sensor attached to the subject’s head. The experimental setup was designed according to good measurement practices using state-of-the-art commercially-available instruments, and the measurements were analyzed using Fourier analysis and wavelet coherence approaches. Contrary to prior claims, the subjects’ motion did not significantly affect their EEG during treadmill walking although precaution should be taken when gait speeds approach 4.5 km/h. Overall, these findings suggest how MoBI methods may be safely deployed in neural, cognitive, and rehabilitation engineering applications.

  12. Using an eye tracker for accurate eye movement artifact correction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kierkels, J.J.M.; Riani, J.; Bergmans, J.W.M.; Boxtel, van G.J.M.

    2007-01-01

    We present a new method to correct eye movement artifacts in electroencephalogram (EEG) data. By using an eye tracker, whose data cannot be corrupted by any electrophysiological signals, an accurate method for correction is developed. The eye-tracker data is used in a Kalman filter to estimate which

  13. Soft tissue artifact in canine kinematic gait analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwencke, M.; Smolders, L.A.; Bergknut, N.; Gustas, P.; Meij, B.P.; Hazewinkel, H.A.W.

    2012-01-01

    Vet Surg. 2012 Oct;41(7):829-37. doi: 10.1111/j.1532-950X.2012.01021.x. Soft tissue artifact in canine kinematic gait analysis. Schwencke M, Smolders LA, Bergknut N, Gustås P, Meij BP, Hazewinkel HA. Source Department of Clinical Sciences of Companion Animals,, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine,

  14. Interacting with piles of artifacts on digital tables

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aliakseyeu, D.; Lucero Vera, A.A.; Subramanian, S.

    2007-01-01

    Designers and architects regularly use piles to organise visual artifacts. Recent efforts have now made it possible for users to create piles in digital systems as well. However, there is still little understanding of how users shouldinteract with digital piles. In this paper we investigate this

  15. Interacting with piles of artifacts on digital tables

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aliakseyeu, D.; Subramanian, S.; Lucero Vera, A.A.; Gutwin, C.

    2006-01-01

    Designers and architects regularly use piles to organize visual artifacts. Recent efforts have now made it possible for users to create piles in digital systems as well. However, there is still little understanding of how users should interact with digital piles. In this paper we investigate this

  16. Image correction for computed tomography to remove crosstalk artifacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, K.F.

    1990-01-01

    A correction method and apparatus for Computed Tomography (CT) which removes ring and streak artifacts from images by correcting for data contamination by crosstalk errors comprises subtracting from the output S o of a detector, a crosstalk factor derived from outputs of adjacent detectors. The crosstalk factors are obtained by scanning an off-centre phantom. (author)

  17. Edge artifact correction for industrial computed tomography images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Yufang; Li Dan; Wang Jue

    2013-01-01

    To eliminate the edge artifacts of industrial CT images, and improve the identification ability of the image and the precision of the dimension measurement, a coefficient adjusting method for reducing crosstalk noise is proposed. It is concluded from theoretical analysis that crosstalk generated from adjacent detectors by Compton scattering is the major reason for the edge artifacts. According to the mathematic model of the detector crosstalk, we design a special detector system configuration and stair-step phantom for estimating the quantity of crosstalk noise. The relationship between crosstalk ratio and intensity of the incident X-ray is acquired by regressing experimental data with least square method. The experimental result shows that the first-order crosstalk ratio between detectors is about 9.0%, and the second-order crosstalk ratio is about 1.2%. Thus the first-order crosstalk is the main factor causing edge artifacts. The proposed method can reduce the edge artifacts significantly, and meanwhile maintain the detail and edge of CT images. (authors)

  18. Automatic correction of dental artifacts in PET/MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladefoged, Claes N.; Andersen, Flemming L.; Keller, Sune

    2015-01-01

    A challenge when using current magnetic resonance (MR)-based attenuation correction in positron emission tomography/MR imaging (PET/MRI) is that the MRIs can have a signal void around the dental fillings that is segmented as artificial air-regions in the attenuation map. For artifacts connected...

  19. Controlling simulations of human-artifact interaction with scenario bundles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Vegte, W.F.; Rusák, Z.

    2008-01-01

    We introduce a methodology for modeling and simulating fully virtual human-artifact systems, aiming to resolve two issues in virtual prototyping: (i) integration of distinct modeling and simulation approaches, and (ii) extending the deployability of simulations towards conceptual design. We are

  20. Artifacts as Stories: Understanding Families, Digital Literacies, and Storied Lives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis Ellison, Tisha

    2016-01-01

    This column focuses on the interactions during family and group conversation circles that not only helped participants talk about personal, emotional, and social issues in their digital stories but also helped them make sense of artifacts and the meanings that stories carry in shared spaces and practices. This work adds to the bourgeoning…

  1. Coevolution of variability models and related software artifacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Passos, Leonardo; Teixeira, Leopoldo; Dinztner, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    models coevolve with other artifact types, we study a large and complex real-world variant-rich software system: the Linux kernel. Specifically, we extract variability-coevolution patterns capturing changes in the variability model of the Linux kernel with subsequent changes in Makefiles and C source...

  2. 77 FR 40914 - Arts and Artifacts Indemnity Panel Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-11

    ... NATIONAL FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Arts and Artifacts Indemnity Panel Advisory Committee AGENCY: Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities, National Endowment for the Humanities, National Foundation on the Arts and the Humanities. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: Pursuant to section...

  3. 77 FR 64146 - Arts and Artifacts Indemnity Panel Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-18

    ... NATIONAL FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Arts and Artifacts Indemnity Panel Advisory Committee AGENCY: Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities, National Endowment for the Humanities... U.S.C. App.), notice is hereby given that the Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities will...

  4. 78 FR 4878 - Arts and Artifacts Indemnity Panel Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-23

    ... NATIONAL FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Arts and Artifacts Indemnity Panel Advisory Committee AGENCY: Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities; National Endowment for the Humanities... U.S.C. App.), notice is hereby given that the Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities will...

  5. Artifact suppression and analysis of brain activities with electroencephalography signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashed-Al-Mahfuz, Md; Islam, Md Rabiul; Hirose, Keikichi; Molla, Md Khademul Islam

    2013-06-05

    Brain-computer interface is a communication system that connects the brain with computer (or other devices) but is not dependent on the normal output of the brain (i.e., peripheral nerve and muscle). Electro-oculogram is a dominant artifact which has a significant negative influence on further analysis of real electroencephalography data. This paper presented a data adaptive technique for artifact suppression and brain wave extraction from electroencephalography signals to detect regional brain activities. Empirical mode decomposition based adaptive thresholding approach was employed here to suppress the electro-oculogram artifact. Fractional Gaussian noise was used to determine the threshold level derived from the analysis data without any training. The purified electroencephalography signal was composed of the brain waves also called rhythmic components which represent the brain activities. The rhythmic components were extracted from each electroencephalography channel using adaptive wiener filter with the original scale. The regional brain activities were mapped on the basis of the spatial distribution of rhythmic components, and the results showed that different regions of the brain are activated in response to different stimuli. This research analyzed the activities of a single rhythmic component, alpha with respect to different motor imaginations. The experimental results showed that the proposed method is very efficient in artifact suppression and identifying individual motor imagery based on the activities of alpha component.

  6. From Artifacts to Archives: Digging into a Community's Past.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Judy

    1991-01-01

    Presents a two-month historical research project for use in a sixth grade social studies class. Includes student use of artifacts, photographs, news clippings, maps, and oral histories obtained by interviews. Suggests that children compile a chronological history of their community to analyze, organize, and record what they have learned. (DK)

  7. Fast CSF MRI for brain segmentation; Cross-validation by comparison with 3D T1-based brain segmentation methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kleij, Lisa A; de Bresser, Jeroen; Hendrikse, Jeroen; Siero, Jeroen C W; Petersen, Esben T; De Vis, Jill B

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In previous work we have developed a fast sequence that focusses on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) based on the long T2 of CSF. By processing the data obtained with this CSF MRI sequence, brain parenchymal volume (BPV) and intracranial volume (ICV) can be automatically obtained. The aim of

  8. Elevated CSF Corticotropin-Releasing Factor Concentrations in Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremner, J. Douglas; Licinio, Julio; Darnell, Adam; Krystal, John H.; Owens, Michael J.; Southwick, Steven M.; Nemeroff, Charles B.; Charney, Dennis S.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and somatostatin both play important roles in mediating responses to acute and chronic stress. The purpose of this study was to measure CSF concentrations of CRF and somatostatin in patients with chronic combat-related post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and comparison subjects. Method Lumbar punctures for collection of CSF were performed in Vietnam combat veterans with PTSD (N=11) and comparison subjects (N=17). CSF concentrations of CRF and somatostatin were compared between the two groups. Results CSF concentrations of CRF were higher in the PTSD patients than in the comparison subjects (mean=29.0 pg/ml, SD=7.8, versus mean=21.9 pg/ml, SD=6.0). This group difference remained significant after covariance for age. CSF somatostatin concentrations in PTSD patients were higher than those of the comparison subjects (mean=19.9 pg/ml, SD=5.4, versus mean=13.7 pg/ml, SD=8.0). However, covarying for age reduced the level of significance. Conclusions Higher CSF CRF concentrations in patients with PTSD may reflect alterations in stress-related neurotransmitter systems. The higher CSF CRF concentrations may play a role in disturbances of arousal in patients with PTSD. PMID:9137116

  9. Inhibition of the CSF-1 receptor sensitizes ovarian cancer cells to cisplatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Rong; Jin, Hao; Jin, Congcong; Huang, Xuefeng; Lin, Jinju; Teng, Yili

    2018-03-01

    Ovarian cancer is one of the most common female malignancies, and cisplatin-based chemotherapy is routinely used in locally advanced ovarian cancer patients. Acquired or de novo cisplatin resistance remains the barrier to patient survival, and the mechanisms of cisplatin resistance are still not well understood. In the current study, we found that colony-stimulating-factor-1 receptor (CSF-1R) was upregulated in cisplatin-resistant SK-OV-3 and CaoV-3 cells. Colony-stimulating-factor-1 receptor knockdown suppressed proliferation and enhanced apoptosis in cisplatin-resistant SK-OV-3 and CaoV-3 cells. However, CSF-1R overexpression had inverse effects. While parental SK-OV-3 and CaoV-3 cells were more resistant to cisplatin after CSF-1R overexpression, CSF-1R knockdown in SK-OV-3 and CaoV-3 cells promoted cisplatin sensitivity. Overexpression and knockdown studies also showed that CSF-1R significantly promoted active AKT and ERK1/2 signalling pathways in cisplatin-resistant cells. Furthermore, a combination of cisplatin and CSF-1R inhibitor effectively inhibited tumour growth in xenografts. Taken together, our results provide the first evidence that CSF-1R inhibition can sensitize cisplatin-refractory ovarian cancer cells. This study may help to increase understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying cisplatin resistance in tumours. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Targeting the GM-CSF receptor for the treatment of CNS autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ifergan, Igal; Davidson, Todd S; Kebir, Hania; Xu, Dan; Palacios-Macapagal, Daphne; Cann, Jennifer; Rodgers, Jane M; Hunter, Zoe N; Pittet, Camille L; Beddow, Sara; Jones, Clare A; Prat, Alexandre; Sleeman, Matthew A; Miller, Stephen D

    2017-11-01

    In multiple sclerosis (MS), there is a growing interest in inhibiting the pro-inflammatory effects of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). We sought to evaluate the therapeutic potential and underlying mechanisms of GM-CSF receptor alpha (Rα) blockade in animal models of MS. We show that GM-CSF signaling inhibition at peak of chronic experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) results in amelioration of disease progression. Similarly, GM-CSF Rα blockade in relapsing-remitting (RR)-EAE model prevented disease relapses and inhibited T cell responses specific for both the inducing and spread myelin peptides, while reducing activation of mDCs and inflammatory monocytes. In situ immunostaining of lesions from human secondary progressive MS (SPMS), but not primary progressive MS patients shows extensive recruitment of GM-CSF Rα + myeloid cells. Collectively, this study reveals a pivotal role of GM-CSF in disease relapses and the benefit of GM-CSF Rα blockade as a potential novel therapeutic approach for treatment of RRMS and SPMS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Increased CSF-BACE1 activity associated with decreased hippocampus volume in Alzheimer's disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ewers, Michael

    2012-02-01

    The enzyme beta-secretase (BACE1) is essentially involved in the production of cerebral amyloidogenic pathology in Alzheimer\\'s disease (AD). The measurement of BACE1 activity in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) has been reported, which may render CSF measurement of BACE1 a potential biomarker candidate of AD. In order to investigate whether BACE1 protein activity is correlated with regional brain atrophy in AD, we investigated the association between CSF levels of BACE1 and MRI-assessed hippocampus volume in patients with AD (n = 30). An increase in CSF-BACE1 activity was associated with decreased left and right hippocampus volume corrected for global head volume in the AD patients. Boot-strapped regression analysis showed that increased CSF levels of BACE1 activity were associated with increased CSF concentration of total tau but not amyloid-beta1-42 in AD. White matter hyperintensities did not influence the results. BACE1 activity and protein levels were significantly increased in AD compared to 19 elderly healthy controls. Thus, the CSF biomarker candidate of BACE1 activity was associated with hippocampus atrophy in AD in a robust manner and may reflect neurotoxic amyloid-beta-related processes.

  12. CSF 5-HIAA and exposure to and expression of interpersonal violence in suicide attempters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moberg, T; Nordström, P; Forslund, K; Kristiansson, M; Asberg, M; Jokinen, J

    2011-07-01

    Serotonin is implicated in impaired impulse control, aggression and suicidal behaviour. Low cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentrations of the serotonin metabolite 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) have been found in violent suicide attempters, suicide victims and in violent offenders. CSF 5-HIAA concentrations have both genetic and environmental determinants. Childhood trauma may have an effect on central monoamine function as an adult. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship of CSF 5-HIAA and the exposure to and the expression of violence in childhood and during adult life measured with the Karolinska Interpersonal Violence Scale (KIVS). 42 medication free suicide attempters underwent lumbar puncture and were assessed with the Karolinska Interpersonal Violence Scale (KIVS) to assess history of childhood exposure to violence and lifetime expressed violent behaviour. In women, but not in men, CSF 5-HIAA showed a significant negative correlation to exposure to violence during childhood. Furthermore, suicide attempters with low CSF 5-HIAA were more prone to commit violent acts as an adult if exposed to violence as a child compared to suicide attempters with high CSF 5-HIAA. In the non-traumatized group, CSF 5-HIAA showed a significant negative correlation to expressed violent behaviour in childhood. Although central serotonergic function has important genetic determinants, exposure to childhood trauma may also affect serotonergic function. Low serotonergic function may facilitate impaired aggression control in traumatized suicide attempters. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Consensus Guidelines for CSF and Blood Biobanking for CNS Biomarker Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte E. Teunissen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a long history of research into body fluid biomarkers in neurodegenerative and neuroinflammatory diseases. However, only a few biomarkers in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF are being used in clinical practice. Anti-aquaporin-4 antibodies in serum are currently useful for the diagnosis of neuromyelitis optica (NMO, but we could expect novel CSF biomarkers that help define prognosis and response to treatment for this disease. One of the most critical factors in biomarker research is the inadequate powering of studies performed by single centers. Collaboration between investigators is needed to establish large biobanks of well-defined samples. A key issue in collaboration is to establish standardized protocols for biobanking to ensure that the statistical power gained by increasing the numbers of CSF samples is not compromised by pre-analytical factors. Here, consensus guidelines for CSF collection and biobanking are presented, based on the guidelines that have been published by the BioMS-eu network for CSF biomarker research. We focussed on CSF collection procedures, pre-analytical factors and high quality clinical and paraclinical information. Importantly, the biobanking protocols are applicable for CSF biobanks for research targeting any neurological disease.

  14. CSF and Serum Biomarkers Focusing on Cerebral Vasospasm and Ischemia after Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla S. Jung

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Delayed cerebral vasospasm (CVS and delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI remain severe complications after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH. Although focal changes in cerebral metabolism indicating ischemia are detectable by microdialysis, routinely used biomarkers are missing. We therefore sought to evaluate a panel of possible global markers in serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of patients after SAH. CSF and serum of SAH patients were analyzed retrospectively. In CSF, levels of inhibitory, excitatory, and structural amino acids were detected by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. In serum, neuron-specific enolase (NSE and S100B level were measured and examined in conjunction with CVS and DCI. CVS was detected by arteriography, and ischemic lesions were assessed by computed tomography (CT scans. All CSF amino acids were altered after SAH. CSF glutamate, glutamine, glycine, and histidine were significantly correlated with arteriographic CVS. CSF glutamate and serum S100B were significantly correlated with ischemic events after SAH; however, NSE did not correlate neither with ischemia nor with vasospasm. Glutamate, glutamine, glycine, and histidine might be used in CSF as markers for CVS. Glutamate also indicates ischemia. Serum S100B, but not NSE, is a suitable marker for ischemia. These results need to be validated in larger prospective cohorts.

  15. Noninvasive measurement of cerebrospinal fluid flow using an ultrasonic transit time flow sensor: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennell, Thomas; Yi, Juneyoung L; Kaufman, Bruce A; Krishnamurthy, Satish

    2016-03-01

    OBJECT Mechanical failure-which is the primary cause of CSF shunt malfunction-is not readily diagnosed, and the specific reasons for mechanical failure are not easily discerned. Prior attempts to measure CSF flow noninvasively have lacked the ability to either quantitatively or qualitatively obtain data. To address these needs, this preliminary study evaluates an ultrasonic transit time flow sensor in pediatric and adult patients with external ventricular drains (EVDs). One goal was to confirm the stated accuracy of the sensor in a clinical setting. A second goal was to observe the sensor's capability to record real-time continuous CSF flow. The final goal was to observe recordings during instances of flow blockage or lack of flow in order to determine the sensor's ability to identify these changes. METHODS A total of 5 pediatric and 11 adult patients who had received EVDs for the treatment of hydrocephalus were studied in a hospital setting. The primary EVD was connected to a secondary study EVD that contained a fluid-filled pressure transducer and an in-line transit time flow sensor. Comparisons were made between the weight of the drainage bag and the flow measured via the sensor in order to confirm its accuracy. Data from the pressure transducer and the flow sensor were recorded continuously at 100 Hz for a period of 24 hours by a data acquisition system, while the hourly CSF flow into the drip chamber was recorded manually. Changes in the patient's neurological status and their time points were noted. RESULTS The flow sensor demonstrated a proven accuracy of ± 15% or ± 2 ml/hr. The flow sensor allowed real-time continuous flow waveform data recordings. Dynamic analysis of CSF flow waveforms allowed the calculation of the pressure-volume index. Lastly, the sensor was able to diagnose a blocked catheter and distinguish between the blockage and lack of flow. CONCLUSIONS The Transonic flow sensor accurately measures CSF output within ± 15% or ± 2 ml

  16. Assessment of metal artifact reduction methods in pelvic CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdoli, Mehrsima [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Plesmanlaan 121, Amsterdam 1066 CX (Netherlands); Mehranian, Abolfazl [Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Geneva University Hospital, Geneva CH-1211 (Switzerland); Ailianou, Angeliki; Becker, Minerva [Division of Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Geneva CH-1211 (Switzerland); Zaidi, Habib, E-mail: habib.zaidi@hcuge.ch [Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Geneva University Hospital, Geneva CH-1211 (Switzerland); Geneva Neuroscience Center, Geneva University, Geneva CH-1205 (Switzerland); Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Hanzeplein 1, Groningen 9700 RB (Netherlands)

    2016-04-15

    Purpose: Metal artifact reduction (MAR) produces images with improved quality potentially leading to confident and reliable clinical diagnosis and therapy planning. In this work, the authors evaluate the performance of five MAR techniques for the assessment of computed tomography images of patients with hip prostheses. Methods: Five MAR algorithms were evaluated using simulation and clinical studies. The algorithms included one-dimensional linear interpolation (LI) of the corrupted projection bins in the sinogram, two-dimensional interpolation (2D), a normalized metal artifact reduction (NMAR) technique, a metal deletion technique, and a maximum a posteriori completion (MAPC) approach. The algorithms were applied to ten simulated datasets as well as 30 clinical studies of patients with metallic hip implants. Qualitative evaluations were performed by two blinded experienced radiologists who ranked overall artifact severity and pelvic organ recognition for each algorithm by assigning scores from zero to five (zero indicating totally obscured organs with no structures identifiable and five indicating recognition with high confidence). Results: Simulation studies revealed that 2D, NMAR, and MAPC techniques performed almost equally well in all regions. LI falls behind the other approaches in terms of reducing dark streaking artifacts as well as preserving unaffected regions (p < 0.05). Visual assessment of clinical datasets revealed the superiority of NMAR and MAPC in the evaluated pelvic organs and in terms of overall image quality. Conclusions: Overall, all methods, except LI, performed equally well in artifact-free regions. Considering both clinical and simulation studies, 2D, NMAR, and MAPC seem to outperform the other techniques.

  17. A study of metal artifacts on MR imaging. Evaluation of scanning parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashiro, Mitsuaki

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate scanning parameters on MR imaging for reducing metal artifacts using phantom study. Metal artifacts on sagittal images, perpendicular to static magnetic direction showed round shape in the relationship between shape of metal artifacts on MR images and scanning direction. Metal artifacts on both axial and coronal images, parallel to static magnetic direction showed oval shape in the direction of X-axis. In spin echo sequences, the largest dimension of metal artifacts was coronal image, followed by axial image and then sagittal image. In gradient echo sequences, the largest dimension of metal artifacts was axial image, followed by coronal image and then sagittal image. The best scanning plane for reducing metal artifacts was perpendicular to static magnetic direction. In scanning sequences, the largest dimensions of metal artifacts were gradient echo sequences, followed by T2-weighted spin echo sequence and then proton density-weighted and T1-weighted spin echo sequences. Large flip angle increased much metal artifacts on both axial and coronal images in gradient echo sequences. Small flip angle was useful for reducing metal artifacts on both axial and coronal images. The influence of flip angle on metal artifacts in sagittal images perpendicular static magnetic direction was less than for images in coronal and axial planes on gradient echo sequences. These results suggested that a study of metal artifacts on MR imaging about evaluation of scanning parameters was useful to reduce metal artifacts on MR images. (K.H.)

  18. Cytokine-primed bone marrow stem cells vs. peripheral blood stem cells for autologous transplantation: a randomized comparison of GM-CSF vs. G-CSF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisdorf, D; Miller, J; Verfaillie, C; Burns, L; Wagner, J; Blazar, B; Davies, S; Miller, W; Hannan, P; Steinbuch, M; Ramsay, N; McGlave, P

    1997-10-01

    Autologous transplantation for non-Hodgkins lymphoma and Hodgkin's disease is widely used as standard therapy for those with high-risk or relapsed tumor. Peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) collections have nearly completely replaced bone marrow stem cell (BMSC) harvests because of the perceived advantages of more rapid engraftment, less tumor contamination in the inoculum, and better survival after therapy. The advantage of PBSC, however, may derive from the hematopoietic stimulating cytokines used for PBSC mobilization. Therefore, we tested a randomized comparison of GM-CSF vs. G-CSF used to prime either BMSC or PBSC before collection for use in autologous transplantation. Sixty-two patients receiving transplants (31 PBSC; 31 BMSC) for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (n = 51) or Hodgkin's disease (n = 11) were treated. All patients received 6 days of randomly assigned cytokine. Those with cellular marrow in morphologic remission underwent BMSC harvest, while those with hypocellular marrow or microscopic marrow tumor involvement had PBSC collected. Neutrophil recovery was similarly rapid in all groups (median 14 days; range 10-23 days), though two patients had delayed neutrophil recovery using GM-CSF primed PBSC (p = 0.01). Red cell and platelet recovery were significantly quicker after BMSC mobilized with GM-CSF or PBSC mobilized with G-CSF. This speedier hematologic recovery resulted in earlier hospital discharge as well. However, in multivariate analysis, neither the stem cell source nor randomly assigned G-CSF vs. GM-CSF was independently associated with earlier multilineage hematologic recovery or shorter hospital stay. Relapse-free survival was not independently affected by either the assigned stem cell source or the randomly assigned priming cytokine, though malignant relapse was more frequent in those assigned to PBSC (RR of relapse 3.15, p = 0.03). These data document that BMSC, when collected following cytokine priming, can yield a similarly rapid hematologic

  19. Elevated body mass index and risk of postoperative CSF leak following transsphenoidal surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dlouhy, Brian J.; Madhavan, Karthik; Clinger, John D.; Reddy, Ambur; Dawson, Jeffrey D.; O’Brien, Erin K.; Chang, Eugene; Graham, Scott M.; Greenlee, Jeremy D. W.

    2012-01-01

    Object Postoperative CSF leakage can be a serious complication after a transsphenoidal surgical approach. An elevated body mass index (BMI) is a significant risk factor for spontaneous CSF leaks. However, there is no evidence correlating BMI with postoperative CSF leak after transsphenoidal surgery. The authors hypothesized that patients with elevated BMI would have a higher incidence of CSF leakage complications following transsphenoidal surgery. Methods The authors conducted a retrospective review of 121 patients who, between August 2005 and March 2010, underwent endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal surgeries for resection of primarily sellar masses. Patients requiring extended transsphenoidal approaches were excluded. A multivariate statistical analysis was performed to investigate the association of BMI and other risk factors with postoperative CSF leakage. Results In 92 patients, 96 endonasal endoscopic transsphenoidal surgeries were performed that met inclusion criteria. Thirteen postoperative leaks occurred and required subsequent treatment, including lumbar drainage and/or reoperation. The average BMI of patients with a postoperative CSF leak was significantly greater than that in patients with no postoperative CSF leak (39.2 vs 32.9 kg/m2, p = 0.006). Multivariate analyses indicate that for every 5-kg/m2 increase in BMI, patients undergoing a transsphenoidal approach for a primarily sellar mass have 1.61 times the odds (95% CI 1.10–2.29, p = 0.016, by multivariate logistic regression) of having a postoperative CSF leak. Conclusions Elevated BMI is an independent predictor of postoperative CSF leak after an endonasal endoscopic transsphenoidal approach. The authors recommend that patients with BMI greater than 30 kg/m2 have meticulous sellar reconstruction at surgery and close monitoring postoperatively. PMID:22443502

  20. GM-CSF ameliorates microvascular barrier integrity via pericyte-derived Ang-1 in wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Min; Hu, Yange; Yao, Min; Bao, Shisan; Fang, Yong

    2017-11-01

    Skin wound healing involves complex coordinated interactions of cells, tissues, and mediators. Maintaining microvascular barrier integrity is one of the key events for endothelial homeostasis during wound healing. Vasodilation is observed after vasoconstriction, which causes blood vessels to become porous, facilitates leukocyte infiltration and aids angiogenesis at the wound-area, postinjury. Eventually, vessel integrity has to be reestablished for vascular maturation. Numerous studies have found that granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) accelerates wound healing by inducing recruitment of repair cells into the injury area and releases of cytokines. However, whether GM-CSF is involving in the maintaining of microvascular barrier integrity and the underlying mechanism remain still unclear. Aim of this study was to investigate the effects of GM-CSF on modulation of microvascular permeability in wound healing and underlying mechanisms. Wound closure and microvascular leakage was investigated using a full-thickness skin wound mouse model after GM-CSF intervention. The endothelial permeability was measured by Evans blue assay in vivo and in vitro endothelium/pericyte co-culture system using a FITC-Dextran permeability assay. To identify the source of angiopoietin-1 (Ang-1), double staining is used in vivo and ELISA and qPCR are used in vitro. To determine the specific effect of Ang-1 on GM-CSF maintaining microvascular stabilization, Ang-1 siRNA was applied to inhibit Ang-1 production in vivo and in vitro. Wound closure was significantly accelerated and microvascular leakage was ameliorated after GM-CSF treatment in mouse wound sites. GM-CSF decreased endothelial permeability through tightening endothelial junctions and increased Ang-1 protein level that was derived by perictye. Furthermore, applications of siRNAAng-1 inhibited GM-CSF mediated protection of microvascular barrier integrity both in vivo and in vitro. Our data indicate that GM-CSF

  1. Longitudinal CSF biomarkers in patients with early Parkinson disease and healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollenhauer, Brit; Caspell-Garcia, Chelsea J; Coffey, Christopher S; Taylor, Peggy; Shaw, Leslie M; Trojanowski, John Q; Singleton, Andy; Frasier, Mark; Marek, Kenneth; Galasko, Douglas

    2017-11-07

    To analyze longitudinal levels of CSF biomarkers in drug-naive patients with Parkinson disease (PD) and healthy controls (HC), examine the extent to which these biomarker changes relate to clinical measures of PD, and identify what may influence them. CSF α-synuclein (α-syn), total and phosphorylated tau (t- and p-tau), and β-amyloid 1-42 (Aβ42) were measured at baseline and 6 and 12 months in 173 patients with PD and 112 matched HC in the international multicenter Parkinson's Progression Marker Initiative. Baseline clinical and demographic variables, PD medications, neuroimaging, and genetic variables were evaluated as potential predictors of CSF biomarker changes. CSF biomarkers were stable over 6 and 12 months, and there was a small but significant increase in CSF Aβ42 in both patients with patients with PD and HC from baseline to 12 months. The t-tau remained stable. The p-tau increased marginally more in patients with PD than in HC. α-syn remained relatively stable in patients with PD and HC. Ratios of p-tau/t-tau increased, while t-tau/Aβ42 decreased over 12 months in patients with PD. CSF biomarker changes did not correlate with changes in Movement Disorder Society-sponsored revision of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale motor scores or dopamine imaging. CSF α-syn levels at 12 months were lower in patients with PD treated with dopamine replacement therapy, especially dopamine agonists. These core CSF biomarkers remained stable over 6 and 12 months in patients with early PD and HC. PD medication use may influence CSF α-syn. Novel biomarkers are needed to better profile progressive neurodegeneration in PD. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. on behalf of the American Academy of Neurology.

  2. Relationship between intracranial pressure and antifungal agents levels in the CSF of patients with cryptococcal meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Fernanda; de Azevedo, Maria Isabel; Pilla, Carmen; Aquino, Valério Rodrigues; Neto, Gustavo Wissmann; Goldani, Luciano Zubaran

    2018-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of intracranial hypertension in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of amphotericin B and fluconazole levels of patients with cryptococcal meningitis. CSF samples and intracranial pressure were obtained by means of routine punctures performed at days 1, 7, and 14 of therapy, respectively. Amphotericin B and fluconazole CSF levels were measured by HPLC method as previously described. The minimum inhibitory concentration for amphotericin B, fluconazole, 5΄flucytosine, and voriconazole of each Cryptococcus isolate was performed according to CLSI. The predominant Cryptococcus species found was C. neoformans, and the major underlying condition was AIDS. Only one CSF sample had a detectable level for amphotericin B during the 14 days of therapy. Fluconazole CSF levels progressively increased from day 1 to day 14 of therapy for most cases. Fluconazole levels in the CSF were above the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) for Cryptococcus during the initial 14 days of antifungal therapy. Variations of intracranial pressure did not affect amphotericin B and fluconazole levels in the CSF. The generalized estimating correlation (GEE) and Spearman correlation test (SCT) showed no significant correlation between the amphotericin B or fluconazole concentrations in the CSF and intracranial pressure (P = .953 and P = .093, respectively for GEE test and P = .477 and P = .847, respectively, for SCT). Combination therapy of amphotericin B with fluconazole was effective in 60% of the patients considering CSF cultures were negative in 9 of 15 patients after 14 days of therapy. Further studies are necessary to evaluate the role of intracranial hypertension on the therapeutic efficacy of different antifungal agents in patients with cryptococcal meningitis.

  3. Ubiquitin fusion expression and tissue-dependent targeting of hG-CSF in transgenic tobacco

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (hG-CSF) is an important human cytokine which has been widely used in oncology and infection protection. To satisfy clinical needs, expression of recombinant hG-CSF has been studied in several organisms, including rice cell suspension culture and transient expression in tobacco leaves, but there was no published report on its expression in stably transformed plants which can serve as a more economical expression platform with potential industrial application. Results In this study, hG-CSF expression was investigated in transgenic tobacco leaves and seeds in which the accumulation of hG-CSF could be enhanced through fusion with ubiquitin by up to 7 fold in leaves and 2 fold in seeds, leading to an accumulation level of 2.5 mg/g total soluble protein (TSP) in leaves and 1.3 mg/g TSP in seeds, relative to hG-CSF expressed without a fusion partner. Immunoblot analysis showed that ubiquitin was processed from the final protein product, and ubiquitination was up-regulated in all transgenic plants analyzed. Driven by CaMV 35S promoter and phaseolin signal peptide, hG-CSF was observed to be secreted into apoplast in leaves but deposited in protein storage vacuole (PSV) in seeds, indicating that targeting of the hG-CSF was tissue-dependent in transgenic tobacco. Bioactivity assay showed that hG-CSF expressed in both seeds and leaves was bioactive to support the proliferation of NFS-60 cells. Conclusions In this study, the expression of bioactive hG-CSF in transgenic plants was improved through ubiquitin fusion strategy, demonstrating that protein expression can be enhanced in both plant leaves and seeds through fusion with ubiquitin and providing a typical case of tissue-dependent expression of recombinant protein in transgenic plants. PMID:21985646

  4. Beta-trace protein in ascites and pleural effusions: limits of CSF leakage detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietzel, Joanna; Krebs, Alexander; Böttcher, Dominique; Sieb, Manuela; Glocker, Michael O; Lüdemann, Jan; Roser, Markus; Dressel, Alexander

    2012-06-10

    Rhino- and/or otoliquorrhea can be diagnosed by detecting beta-trace protein (β-TP) in nasal or ear secretions, as β-TP is found in high concentrations in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) but not in serum. CSF fistulae following trauma or surgery can also occur at other anatomical sites, resulting in CSF leakage into the thoracic and abdominal cavities. By analogy, determination of ß-TP has also been used to diagnose CSF admixture in pleural effusions and ascites. However, no systematic study has yet evaluated the concentrations of β-TP in such fluids in the absence of CSF. To determine the validity of β-TP determination as a marker for the presence of CSF, we investigated β-TP concentrations in pleural effusions and ascites without CSF admixture. Patients from whom samples of ascites or pleural effusion and a paired plasma sample were available were investigated. One hundred sixty-four patients were prospectively recruited. ß-TP concentrations were determined by nephelometry. Mass spectrometric proteome analysis confirmed the presence of ß-TP in the samples. Median β-TP concentrations detected in ascites and pleural effusions (range, 0.014-26.5 mg/L, median 2.29 mg/L) exceeded the corresponding plasma concentrations 2.6-fold. According to cutoffs published to diagnose rhino- and otoliquorrhea, between 6.1% and 95.7% of the specimens would have been erroneously rated CSF-positive. Protein analysis confirmed the presence of β-TP in pleural effusion and ascites. Ascites and pleural effusion contain high concentrations of β-TP that exceed the levels in corresponding plasma. Therefore, β-TP is not a specific marker for the presence of CSF in these fluids.

  5. Electronegative L5-LDL induces the production of G-CSF and GM-CSF in human macrophages through LOX-1 involving NF-κB and ERK2 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tzu-Ching; Chang, Po-Yuan; Kuo, Tzu-Ling; Lu, Shao-Chun

    2017-12-01

    Circulating levels of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) are associated with the severity of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). However, what causes increases in G-CSF and GM-CSF is unclear. In this study, we investigated whether L5-low-density lipoprotein (LDL), a mildly oxidized LDL from AMI, can induce G-CSF and GM-CSF production in human macrophages. L1-LDL and L5-LDL were isolated through anion-exchange chromatography from AMI plasma. Human macrophages derived from THP-1 and peripheral blood mononuclear cells were treated with L1-LDL, L5-LDL, or copper-oxidized LDL (Cu-oxLDL) and G-CSF and GM-CSF protein levels in the medium were determined. In addition, the effects of L5-LDL on G-CSF and GM-CSF production were tested in lectin-type oxidized LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1), CD36, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1, and ERK2 knockdown THP-1 macrophages. L5-LDL but not L1-LDL or Cu-oxLDL significantly induced production of G-CSF and GM-CSF in macrophages. In vitro oxidation of L1-LDL and L5-LDL altered their ability to induce G-CSF and GM-CSF, suggesting that the degree of oxidation is critical for the effects. Knockdown and antibody neutralization experiments suggested that the effects were caused by LOX-1. In addition, nuclear factor (NF)-κB and ERK1/2 inhibition resulted in marked reductions of L5-LDL-induced G-CSF and GM-CSF production. Moreover, knockdown of ERK2, but not ERK1, hindered L5-LDL-induced G-CSF and GM-CSF production. The results indicate that L5-LDL, a naturally occurring mild oxidized LDL, induced G-CSF and GM-CSF production in human macrophages through LOX-1, ERK2, and NF-κB dependent pathways. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Total Variation-Based Reduction of Streak Artifacts, Ring Artifacts and Noise in 3D Reconstruction from Optical Projection Tomography

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Michálek, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 6 (2015), s. 1602-1615 ISSN 1431-9276 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LH13028; GA ČR(CZ) GA13-12412S Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : optical projection tomography * microscopy * artifacts * total variation * data mismatch Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 1.730, year: 2015

  7. CSF tapping also improves mental imagery of gait in normal pressure hydrocephalus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Bruno; Laidet, Magali; Armand, Stéphane; Assal, Frédéric; Allali, Gilles

    2017-11-01

    This study aims to compare the changes of Timed Up and Go (TUG) and its imagined version (iTUG) after CSF tapping between patients with idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH) and its mimics. TUG and iTUG were performed before and 24 h after CSF tapping in 117 patients (75.8 ± 6.9 years; 35% female) with suspicion of iNPH (68 iNPH and 49 mimics). Mental imagery of locomotion was modified after CSF tapping in iNPH patients, but not in the mimics.

  8. Cataplexy with Normal Sleep Studies and Normal CSF Hypocretin: An Explanation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drakatos, Panagis; Leschziner, Guy

    2016-03-01

    Patients with narcolepsy usually develop excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) before or coincide with the occurrence of cataplexy, with the latter most commonly associated with low cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) hypocretin-1 levels. Cataplexy preceding the development of other features of narcolepsy is a rare phenomenon. We describe a case of isolated cataplexy in the context of two non-diagnostic multiple sleep latency tests and normal CSF-hypocretin-1 levels (217 pg/mL) who gradually developed EDS and low CSF-hypocretin-1 (< 110 pg/mL). © 2016 American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

  9. Effects on proliferation and cell cycle of irradiated KG-1 cells stimulated by CM-CSF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Dehuang; Dong Bo; Wen Gengyun; Luo Qingliang; Mao Bingzhi

    2000-01-01

    In order to explore the variety of cell proliferation and cell cycle after exposure to ionizing radiation, the responses of irradiated KG-1 cells of the human myeloid leukemia stimulated by GM-CSF, the most common used cytokine in clinic, were investigated. The results showed that GM-CSF enhance KG-1 cells proliferation, reduce G0/G1 block, increase S phase and G2/M phase. The stimulation effects of the GM-CSF are more effective in irradiated group than in control group

  10. CSF abnormalities can be predicted by VEP and MRI pathology in the examination of optic neuritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinter, Matilda Degn; Nielsen, Signe Modvig; Larsson, Henrik B W

    2012-01-01

    be valuable in the evaluation of patients with ON. We analyzed CSF findings in patients referred with ON in the context of MRI and visual evoked potential (VEP) pathology. We assessed the possible contributory role of a lumbar puncture and weigh this against disadvantages of the procedure. Between February...... causes of their symptoms and patients with >3 months between onset and tests were excluded. All files were reviewed retrospectively. CSF leukocytes and the IgG index were elevated in 33 and 41 %, respectively, and OCBs were detected in 61 % of patients. CSF abnormalities correlated strongly with VEP...

  11. Non Invasive Microwave Sensor for the Detection of Lactic Acid in Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goh, J H; Mason, A; Al-Shamma'a, A I; Field, M; Shackcloth, M; Browning, P

    2011-01-01

    This research involves the use of a low power microwave sensor for analysis of lactic acid in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), an indicator of neurological impairment during aortic aneurysm surgery which could provide the basis for improved treatment regimes and better quality of care with more efficient use of resources. This paper presents initial work using standard lactate curves in water followed by lactate in s ynthetic CSF . A multi-modal spectral signature has been defined for lactate, forming the basis for subsequent development of microwave sensor platform that is able to detect concentrations of lactic acid in CSF of volumes less than 1ml.

  12. CSF neurofilament light chain is elevated in OMS (decreasing with immunotherapy) and other pediatric neuroinflammatory disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pranzatelli, Michael R; Tate, Elizabeth D; McGee, Nathan R; Verhulst, Steven J

    2014-01-15

    Using a panel of seven brain cell-specific biomarkers in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), pediatric opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome (OMS) (n=234) was compared to pediatric non-inflammatory neurological controls (n=84) and other inflammatory neurological disorders (OIND) (n=44). Only CSF NFL was elevated in untreated OMS versus controls (+83%). It was 87% higher in OIND than in OMS. On combination treatment with front-loaded ACTH, IVIg, rituximab, median CSF NFL decreased by 60% to control levels. These biochemical data suggest neuronal/axonal injury in some children with OMS without indicators of astrogliosis, and reduction on sufficient immunotherapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Correction of Non-Linear Propagation Artifact in Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound Imaging of Carotid Arteries: Methods and in Vitro Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiz, Yesna O; Eckersley, Robert J; Senior, Roxy; Lim, Adrian K P; Cosgrove, David; Tang, Meng-Xing

    2015-07-01

    Non-linear propagation of ultrasound creates artifacts in contrast-enhanced ultrasound images that significantly affect both qualitative and quantitative assessments of tissue perfusion. This article describes the development and evaluation of a new algorithm to correct for this artifact. The correction is a post-processing method that estimates and removes non-linear artifact in the contrast-specific image using the simultaneously acquired B-mode image data. The method is evaluated on carotid artery flow phantoms with large and small vessels containing microbubbles of various concentrations at different acoustic pressures. The algorithm significantly reduces non-linear artifacts while maintaining the contrast signal from bubbles to increase the contrast-to-tissue ratio by up to 11 dB. Contrast signal from a small vessel 600 μm in diameter buried in tissue artifacts before correction was recovered after the correction. Copyright © 2015 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Identification of a unique cause of ring artifact seen in computed tomography trans-axial images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jha, Ashish Kumar; Purandare, Nilendu C; Shah, Sneha; Agrawal, Archi; Puranik, Ameya D; Rangarajan, Venkatesh

    2013-01-01

    Artifacts present in computed tomography (CT) image often degrade the image quality and ultimately, the diagnostic outcome. Ring artifact in trans-axial image is caused by either miscalibrated or defective detector element of detector row, which is often categorized as scanner based artifact. A ring artifact detected on trans-axial CT image of positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT), was caused by contamination of CT tube aperture by droplet of injectable contrast medium. This artifact was corrected by removal of contrast droplet from CT tube aperture. The ring artifact is a very common artifact, commonly cited in the literature. Our case puts forward an uncommon cause of this artifact and its method of correction, which also, has no mention in the existing literature

  15. Changes in cerebral artery blood flow velocity after intermittent cerebrospinal fluid drainage.

    OpenAIRE

    Kempley, S T; Gamsu, H R

    1993-01-01

    Doppler ultrasound was used to measure blood flow velocity in the anterior cerebral artery of six premature infants with posthaemorrhagic hydrocephalus, before and after intermittent cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drainage, on 23 occasions. There was a significant increase in mean blood flow velocity after the drainage procedures (+5.6 cm/s, 95% confidence interval +2.9 to +8.3 cm/s), which was accompanied by a decrease in velocity waveform pulsatility. CSF pressure also fell significantly. In pat...

  16. CSF inflammatory biomarkers responsive to treatment in progressive multiple sclerosis capture residual inflammation associated with axonal damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romme Christensen, Jeppe; Komori, Mika; von Essen, Marina Rode; Ratzer, Rikke; Börnsen, Lars; Bielekova, Bibi; Sellebjerg, Finn

    2018-05-01

    Development of treatments for progressive multiple sclerosis (MS) is challenged by the lack of sensitive and treatment-responsive biomarkers of intrathecal inflammation. To validate the responsiveness of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) inflammatory biomarkers to treatment with natalizumab and methylprednisolone in progressive MS and to examine the relationship between CSF inflammatory and tissue damage biomarkers. CSF samples from two open-label phase II trials of natalizumab and methylprednisolone in primary and secondary progressive MS. CSF concentrations of 20 inflammatory biomarkers and CSF biomarkers of axonal damage (neurofilament light chain (NFL)) and demyelination were analysed using electrochemiluminescent assay and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In all, 17 natalizumab- and 23 methylprednisolone-treated patients had paired CSF samples. CSF sCD27 displayed superior standardised response means and highly significant decreases during both natalizumab and methylprednisolone treatment; however, post-treatment levels remained above healthy donor reference levels. Correlation analyses of CSF inflammatory biomarkers and NFL before, during and after treatment demonstrated that CSF sCD27 consistently correlates with NFL. These findings validate CSF sCD27 as a responsive and sensitive biomarker of intrathecal inflammation in progressive MS, capturing residual inflammation after treatment. Importantly, CSF sCD27 correlates with NFL, consistent with residual inflammation after anti-inflammatory treatment being associated with axonal damage.

  17. GM-CSF Controls Nonlymphoid Tissue Dendritic Cell Homeostasis but Is Dispensable for the Differentiation of Inflammatory Dendritic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greter, Melanie; Helft, Julie; Chow, Andrew; Hashimoto, Daigo; Mortha, Arthur; Agudo-Cantero, Judith; Bogunovic, Milena; Gautier, Emmanuel L.; Miller, Jennifer; Leboeuf, Marylene; Lu, Geming; Aloman, Costica; Brown, Brian D.; Pollard, Jeffrey W.; Xiong, Huabao; Randolph, Gwendalyn J.; Chipuk, Jerry E.; Frenette, Paul S.; Merad, Miriam

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY GM-CSF (Csf-2) is a critical cytokine for the in vitro generation of dendritic cells (DCs) and is thought to control the development of inflammatory DCs and resident CD103+ DCs in some tissues. Here we showed that in contrast to the current understanding, Csf-2 receptor acts in the steady state to promote the survival and homeostasis of nonlymphoid tissue-resident CD103+ and CD11b+ DCs. Absence of Csf-2 receptor on lung DCs abrogated the induction of CD8+ T cell immunity after immunization with particulate antigens. In contrast, Csf-2 receptor was dispensable for the differentiation and innate function of inflammatory DCs during acute injuries. Instead, inflammatory DCs required Csf-1 receptor for their development. Thus, Csf-2 is important in vaccine-induced CD8+ T cell immunity through the regulation of nonlymphoid tissue DC homeostasis rather than control of inflammatory DCs in vivo. PMID:22749353

  18. Stimulating effect of low dose radiation expression of G-CSF receptors in bone marrow cells in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Honglai; Liu Shuzheng; Zhang Ming

    1993-01-01

    The expression of G-CSF receptors in bone marrow cells (BMC) was studied by using 125 I labelled G-CSF ( 1 '2 5 I-G-CSF). The results showed that the reaction equilibrium of 125 I-G-CSF bound to BMC at 37 degree C was reached in 60 minutes, the maximum binding (Bmax) to 3 x 10 6 BMC being 15.1 pmol, the dissociation constant (Kd) being 78.6 pmol, and the estimated number of G-CSF receptors per cell being about 3100. The number of G-CSF receptors in BMC in mice 48 hours after whole body exposure to doses of 50, 75 and 100 mGy X-rays increased significantly to 161%, 169% and 342% of controls, respectively. The results suggested that the expression of G-CSF receptors in BMC was enhanced markedly following low dose radiation, which would lead to stimulation of BMC proliferation

  19. A generic EEG artifact removal algorithm based on the multi-channel Wiener filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somers, Ben; Francart, Tom; Bertrand, Alexander

    2018-06-01

    Objective. The electroencephalogram (EEG) is an essential neuro-monitoring tool for both clinical and research purposes, but is susceptible to a wide variety of undesired artifacts. Removal of these artifacts is often done using blind source separation techniques, relying on a purely data-driven transformation, which may sometimes fail to sufficiently isolate artifacts in only one or a few components. Furthermore, some algorithms perform well for specific artifacts, but not for others. In this paper, we aim to develop a generic EEG artifact removal algorithm, which allows the user to annotate a few artifact segments in the EEG recordings to inform the algorithm. Approach. We propose an algorithm based on the multi-channel Wiener filter (MWF), in which the artifact covariance matrix is replaced by a low-rank approximation based on the generalized eigenvalue decomposition. The algorithm is validated using both hybrid and real EEG data, and is compared to other algorithms frequently used for artifact removal. Main results. The MWF-based algorithm successfully removes a wide variety of artifacts with better performance than current state-of-the-art methods. Significance. Current EEG artifact removal techniques often have limited applicability due to their specificity to one kind of artifact, their complexity, or simply because they are too ‘blind’. This paper demonstrates a fast, robust and generic algorithm for removal of EEG artifacts of various types, i.e. those that were annotated as unwanted by the user.

  20. A dialectical take on artifact ecologies and the physical - digital divide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Susanne; Klokmose, Clemens Nylandsted

    In this position paper, we will present and discuss our understanding of artifact ecologies as we have developed it, rooted in activity theoretical HCI and dialectical thinking . Our basis is in the Human-Artifact Model, as well as well as cases where we have worked with artifact ecologies...

  1. Ultrafast dynamic computed tomography myelography for the precise identification of high-flow cerebrospinal fluid leaks caused by spiculated spinal osteophytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thielen, Kent R; Sillery, John C; Morris, Jonathan M; Hoxworth, Joseph M; Diehn, Felix E; Wald, John T; Rosebrock, Richard E; Yu, Lifeng; Luetmer, Patrick H

    2015-03-01

    Precise localization and understanding of the origin of spontaneous high-flow spinal CSF leaks is required prior to targeted treatment. This study demonstrates the utility of ultrafast dynamic CT myelography for the precise localization of high-flow CSF leaks caused by spiculated spinal osteophytes. This study reports a series of 14 patients with high-flow CSF leaks caused by spiculated spinal osteophytes who underwent ultrafast dynamic CT myelography between March 2009 and December 2010. There were 10 male and 4 female patients, with an average age of 49 years (range 37-74 years). The value of ultrafast dynamic CT myelography in depicting the CSF leak site was qualitatively assessed. In all 14 patients, ultrafast dynamic CT myelography was technically successful at precisely demonstrating the site of the CSF leak, the causative spiculated osteophyte piercing the dura, and the relationship of the implicated osteophyte to adjacent structures. Leak sites included 3 cervical, 11 thoracic, and 0 lumbar levels, with 86% of the leaks occurring from C-5 to T-7. Information obtained from the ultrafast dynamic CT myelogram was considered useful in all treated CSF leaks. Spinal osteophytes piercing the dura are a more frequent cause of high-flow CSF leaks than previously recognized. Ultrafast dynamic CT myelography adds value beyond standard dynamic myelography or digital subtraction myelography in the diagnosis and anatomical characterization of high-flow spinal CSF leaks caused by these osteophytes. This information allows for appropriate planning for percutaneous or surgical treatment.

  2. Dual display of flow/lambda results in xenon CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindstrom, W.W.; Gruenaver, L.M.; Dinewitz, I.J.

    1989-01-01

    Measurement of cortical blood flow has always been limited by the unavoidable inclusion of white matter and sulcal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in selected regions of interest. Xenon CT gives clear separation of anatomy, but precise ROI tracing is time consuming. CSF and gray and white matter have differing xenon solubilities (lambda), however, so the authors produce two-dimensional histograms of flow/lambda values within an ROI encompassing the desired anatomy and select lambda subregions for tissue-specific quantitative flow/lambda means and deviations. They report how this display is dynamic, allowing the physician to roam around the anatomy at will, with 1-second statistical updating

  3. Staphylococcus warneri ventriculoperitoneal shunt infection: failure of diagnosis by ventricular CSF sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Lage, Juan F; Martínez-Lage Azorín, Laura; Almagro, María-José

    2010-12-01

    The definite diagnosis of hydrocephalus valve infection is generally made by cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) sampling via the valve reservoir, which is considered to be more dependable than that of the CSF obtained by lumbar puncture. We treated a 17-year-old boy with an intra-abdominal pseudocyst due to ventriculoperitoneal shunt infection caused by Staphylococcus warneri whose ventricular CSF, obtained via the valve reservoir, was repeatedly sterile thus causing a considerable delay in the management of the complication. S. warneri constitutes an emergent contaminant of catheters and prostheses. We found only a detailed report of S. warneri infection of a ventriculoatrial shunt. If manifestations of peritoneal involvement in shunted patients would occur, the attention should be shifted to the distal component of the shunt hardware, even in the presence of a normal ventricular CSF as happened in our case to avoid unnecessary delay in diagnosis and management.

  4. Autophagy is required for stem cell mobilization by G-CSF

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leveque-El Mouttie, Lucie; Vu, Therese; Lineburg, Katie E.

    2015-01-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is widely used clinically to prevent neutropenia after cytotoxic chemotherapy and to mobilize hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) for transplantation. Autophagy, a process of cytoplasmic component recycling, maintains cellular homeostasis and protects...... the cell during periods of metabolic stress or nutrient deprivation. We have observed that G-CSF activates autophagy in neutrophils and HSCs from both mouse and human donors. Furthermore, G-CSF-induced neutrophil and HSC mobilization is impaired in the absence of autophagy. In contrast, autophagy...... is dispensable for direct HSC mobilization in response to the CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100. Altogether, these data demonstrate an important role for G-CSF in invoking autophagy within hematopoietic and myeloid cells and suggest that this pathway is critical for ensuring cell survival in response to clinically...

  5. Fibronectin changes in eosinophilic meningitis with blood-CSF barrier disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyu, Ling-Yuh; Hu, Ming-E; Chou, Chun-Hui; Chen, Ke-Min; Chiu, Ping-Sung; Lai, Shih-Chan

    2015-01-01

    Fibronectin, which is present at relatively low levels in healthy central nervous systems (CNS), shows increased levels in meningitis. In this study, fibronectin processing was correlated with the increased permeability of the blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier as well as with the formation of eosinophil infiltrates in angiostrongyliasis meningitis. The immunohistochemistry results show matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) is localized in the choroid plexus epithelium. Coimmunoprecipitation demonstrated fibronectin strongly binds MMP-9. Furthermore, treatment with the MMP-9 inhibitor GM6001 significantly inhibited fibronectin processing, reduced the blood-CSF barrier permeability, and decreased the eosinophil counts. The decreased fibronectin processing in CSF implies decreased cellular invasion of the subarachnoid space across the blood-CSF barrier. Therefore, increased fibronectin processing may be associated with barrier disruption and participate in the extravasation and migration of eosinophils into the CNS during experimental parasitic infection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. SPHENOID SINUS (SS ANTERIOR MEDIAL TEMPORAL LOBE ENCEPHALOCELE (AMTLE WITH SPONTANEOUS CSF RHINORRHOEA : A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laveena

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Cranial encephaloceles are the herniation of intracranial meninges and brain tissue through a defect in the cranium or skull base. These are rare conditions with an incidence of approximately 1 in 35,000 people, and are more common in the anterior cranial fossa than those in the middle one . 1,2 Temporal lobe herniation through a mid dle fossa defect into the lateral recess of the Sphenoid Sinus is even rarer than its medial representation. Intrasphenoidal encephaloceles are extremely rare findings 3 . Spontaneous, or primary, CSF fistula is a separate entity with no underlying cause of the CSF leak. Spontaneous CSF leaks are usually associated with a co - existing encephalocele of variable size 4 . We present a case of spontaneous CSF rhinorrhoea in a sphenoid sinus Anterior Medial Temporal lobe encephalocele herniating through a clinically silent lateral Craniopharyngeal canal.

  7. CSF neurofilament light concentration is increased in presymptomatic CHMP2B mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostgaard, Nina; Roos, Peter; Portelius, Erik

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: A rare cause of familial frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a mutation in the CHMP2B gene on chromosome 3 (FTD-3), described in a Danish family. Here we examine whether CSF biomarkers change in the preclinical phase of the disease. METHODS: In this cross-sectional explorative study, we...... analyzed CSF samples from 16 mutation carriers and 14 noncarriers from the Danish FTD-3 family. CSF biomarkers included total tau (t-tau) and neurofilament light chain (NfL) as a marker for neurodegeneration, phosphorylated tau (p-tau) as a marker for tau pathology, β-amyloid (Aβ) 38, 40, and 42 (Aβ38, Aβ......40, and Aβ42) to monitor Aβ metabolism, and YKL-40 as a marker of neuroinflammation. Aβ isoform concentrations were measured using a multiplexed immunoassay; t-tau, p-tau, NfL, and YKL-40 concentrations were measured using sandwich ELISAs. RESULTS: CSF NfL concentration was significantly increased...

  8. Proteomic investigations of the ventriculo-lumbar gradient in human CSF

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Anja Hviid; Bech, Sara Brynhild Winther; Laursen, Inga

    2010-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is an ideal biological material in which to search for new biomarkers for improved diagnosis of neurological diseases. During a lumbar puncture between 5 and 15 mL of CSF are obtained. Previous studies have assessed the ventriculo-lumbar concentration gradient of a number...... of specific proteins. In the present study we took a proteomics approach to investigate the possible concentration gradient of a panel of proteins and peptides in the CSF of 16 patients with neurodegenerative diseases. Using two different mass spectrometry techniques, matrix assisted laser desorption...... ionization time of flight (MALDI-TOF) and surface enhanced laser desorption ionization time of flight (SELDI-TOF), we found that only one of the investigated proteins, apolipoprotein CI, was significantly decreased between the 1st and the 10th mL of CSF. Furthermore, we confirmed previous results showing...

  9. Value of CSF gating for T2-weighted images of the temporal lobes and brain stem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enzmann, D.R.; O'Donohue, J.; Griffin, C.; Rubin, J.B.; Drace, J.; Wright, A.

    1987-01-01

    Ungated and CSF-gated long TR, long TE MR images of the temporal lobes, basal ganglia, and brain stem in health and disease were quantitatively compared. Twenty-five pair of images were evaluated for the following three parameters: signal-to-noise ratio (S/N), object contrast, and resolving power. Ungated sequences were performed in the same fashion as gated sequences for TR (TR = 2,000 msec, TE = 80 msec for ungated sequences; TR = 1,500-1,800 msec, TE = 80 msec for CSF-gated sequences). In both normal and pathologic brain tissue, the CSF-gated image was superior to the ungated image in object contrast and resolving power and equivalent in S/N. The major benefit of CSF gating was elimination of phase shift images arising from the basal cisterns and the third ventricle

  10. Magentic resonance imaging and characterization of normal and abnormal intracranial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) spaces: Initial observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brant-Zawadzki, M.; Kelly, W.; Kjos, B.; Newton, T.H.; Norman, D.; Dillon, W.; Sobel, D.

    1985-01-01

    A retrospective review of twenty-five normal MRI brain studies performed with the spin-echo technique focused special attention on the ventricular and extraventricular cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and revealed unique signal intensity characteristics in the two locations. In addition, MRI studies of ten patients with abnormal extraaxial fluid collections either missed with CT or indistinguishable from CSF on CT images were also analyzed. MRI is more sensitive when compared to CT in evaluating the composition of CSF. Unique signal intensity characterizes the two major CSF compartments and presumably reflects their known but subtle difference in protein concentration (10-15 mg%). Normal variant or abnormal developmental fluid collections can be better characterized with MRI than with CT. These preliminary observations are offered in view of their implications for patient management and suggest further investigation. (orig.)

  11. Efficient CsF interlayer for high and low bandgap polymer solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitul, Abu Farzan; Sarker, Jith; Adhikari, Nirmal; Mohammad, Lal; Wang, Qi; Khatiwada, Devendra; Qiao, Qiquan

    2018-02-01

    Low bandgap polymer solar cells have a great deal of importance in flexible photovoltaic market to absorb sun light more efficiently. Efficient wide bandgap solar cells are always available in nature to absorb visible photons. The development and incorporation of infrared photovoltaics (IR PV) with wide bandgap solar cells can improve overall solar device performance. Here, we have developed an efficient low bandgap polymer solar cell with CsF as interfacial layer in regular structure. Polymer solar cell devices with CsF shows enhanced performance than Ca as interfacial layer. The power conversion efficiency of 4.5% has been obtained for PDPP3T based polymer solar cell with CsF as interlayer. Finally, an optimal thickness with CsF as interfacial layer has been found to improve the efficiency in low bandgap polymer solar cells.

  12. Which clinical parameters predict a CSF diagnosis of meningitis in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-06-02

    Jun 2, 2014 ... Methods. Setting. Stanger Provincial Hospital is a regional centre located in ... terminal neck stiffness, photophobia, focal neurological signs, seizures, ..... As TB CSF culture was excluded from this study, direct comparisons.

  13. Prospective navigator-echo-based real-time triggering of fetal head movement for the reduction of artifacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonel, H; Frei, K A; Raio, L; Meyer-Wittkopf, M; Remonda, L; Wiest, R

    2008-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the neuroimaging quality and accuracy of prospective real-time navigator-echo acquisition correction versus untriggered intrauterine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques. Twenty women in whom fetal motion artifacts compromised the neuroimaging quality of fetal MRI taken during the 28.7 +/- 4 week of pregnancy below diagnostic levels were additionally investigated using a navigator-triggered half-Fourier acquired single-shot turbo-spin echo (HASTE) sequence. Imaging quality was evaluated by two blinded readers applying a rating scale from 1 (not diagnostic) to 5 (excellent). Diagnostic criteria included depiction of the germinal matrix, grey and white matter, CSF, brain stem and cerebellum. Signal-difference-to-noise ratios (SDNRs) in the white matter and germinal zone were quantitatively evaluated. Imaging quality improved in 18/20 patients using the navigator echo technique (2.4 +/- 0.58 vs. 3.65 +/- 0.73 SD, p < 0.01 for all evaluation criteria). In 2/20 patients fetal movement severely impaired image quality in conventional and navigated HASTE. Navigator-echo imaging revealed additional structural brain abnormalities and confirmed diagnosis in 8/20 patients. The accuracy improved from 50% to 90%. Average SDNR increased from 0.7 +/- 7.27 to 19.83 +/- 15.71 (p < 0.01). Navigator-echo-based real-time triggering of fetal head movement is a reliable technique that can deliver diagnostic fetal MR image quality despite vigorous fetal movement.

  14. CSF lactate level: a useful diagnostic tool to differentiate acute bacterial and viral meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abro, Ali Hassan; Abdou, Ahmed Saheh; Ustadi, Abdulla M; Saleh, Ahmed Alhaj; Younis, Nadeem Javeed; Doleh, Wafa F

    2009-08-01

    To evaluate the potential role of CSF lactate level in the diagnosis of acute bacterial meningitis and in the differentiation between viral and bacterial meningitis. This was a hospital based observational study, conducted at Infectious Diseases Unit, Rashid Hospital Dubai, United Arab Emirates, from July 2004 to June 2007. The patients with clinical diagnosis of acute bacterial meningitis and who had CSF Gram stain/culture positive, CSF analysis suggestive of bacterial meningitis with negative Gram stain and culture but blood culture positive for bacteria and patients with clinical diagnosis suggestive of viral meningitis supported by CSF chemical analysis with negative Gram stain and culture as well as negative blood culture for bacteria were included in the study. CT scan brain was done for all patients before lumber puncture and CSF and blood samples were collected immediately after admission. CSF chemical analysis including lactate level was done on first spinal tap. The CSF lactate level was tested by Enzymatic Colorimetric method. A total 95 adult patients of acute meningitis (53 bacterial and 42 viral) fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Among 53 bacterial meningitis patients, Neisseria meningitides were isolated in 29 (54.7%), Strept. Pneumoniae in 18 (33.96%), Staph. Aureus in 2 (3.77%), Klebsiell Pneumoniae in 2 (3.77%), Strept. Agalactiae in 1 (1.8%) and E. Coli in 1 (1.8%). All the patients with bacterial meningitis had CSF lactate > 3.8 mmol/l except one, whereas none of the patients with viral meningitis had lactate level > 3.8 mmol/l. The mean CSF lactate level in bacterial meningitis cases amounted to 16.51 +/- 6.14 mmol/l, whereas it was significantly lower in viral group 2.36 +/- 0.6 mmol/l, p < .0001. CSF lactate level was significantly high in bacterial than viral meningitis and it can provide pertinent, rapid and reliable diagnostic information. Furthermore, CSF lactate level can also differentiate bacterial meningitis from viral one in a quick

  15. GM-CSF-Producing Th Cells in Rats Sensitive and Resistant to Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojić-Vukanić, Zorica; Pilipović, Ivan; Vujnović, Ivana; Nacka-Aleksić, Mirjana; Petrović, Raisa; Arsenović-Ranin, Nevena; Dimitrijević, Mirjana; Leposavić, Gordana

    2016-01-01

    Given that granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is identified as the key factor to endow auto-reactive Th cells with the potential to induce neuroinflammation in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) models, the frequency and phenotype of GM-CSF-producing (GM-CSF+) Th cells in draining lymph nodes (dLNs) and spinal cord (SC) of Albino Oxford (AO) and Dark Agouti (DA) rats immunized for EAE were examined. The generation of neuroantigen-specific GM-CSF+ Th lymphocytes was impaired in dLNs of AO rats (relatively resistant to EAE induction) compared with their DA counterparts (susceptible to EAE) reflecting impaired CD4+ lymphocyte proliferation and less supportive of GM-CSF+ Th cell differentiation dLN cytokine microenvironment. Immunophenotyping of GM-CSF+ Th cells showed their phenotypic heterogeneity in both strains and revealed lower frequency of IL-17+IFN-γ+, IL-17+IFN-γ-, and IL-17-IFN-γ+ cells accompanied by higher frequency of IL-17-IFN-γ- cells among them in AO than in DA rats. Compared with DA, in AO rats was also found (i) slightly lower surface density of CCR2 (drives accumulation of highly pathogenic GM-CSF+IFN-γ+ Th17 cells in SC) on GM-CSF+IFN-γ+ Th17 lymphocytes from dLNs, and (ii) diminished CCL2 mRNA expression in SC tissue, suggesting their impaired migration into the SC. Moreover, dLN and SC cytokine environments in AO rats were shown to be less supportive of GM-CSF+IFN-γ+ Th17 cell differentiation (judging by lower expression of mRNAs for IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-23/p19). In accordance with the (i) lower frequency of GM-CSF+ Th cells in dLNs and SC of AO rats and their lower GM-CSF production, and (ii) impaired CCL2 expression in the SC tissue, the proportion of proinflammatory monocytes among peripheral blood cells and their progeny (CD45hi cells) among the SC CD11b+ cells were reduced in AO compared with DA rats. Collectively, the results indicate that the strain specificities in efficacy of several mechanisms

  16. One-carbon metabolism, cognitive impairment and CSF measures of Alzheimer pathology: homocysteine and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayon, Loïc; Guiraud, Seu Ping; Corthésy, John; Da Silva, Laeticia; Migliavacca, Eugenia; Tautvydaitė, Domilė; Oikonomidi, Aikaterini; Moullet, Barbara; Henry, Hugues; Métairon, Sylviane; Marquis, Julien; Descombes, Patrick; Collino, Sebastiano; Martin, François-Pierre J; Montoliu, Ivan; Kussmann, Martin; Wojcik, Jérôme; Bowman, Gene L; Popp, Julius

    2017-06-17

    Hyperhomocysteinemia is a risk factor for cognitive decline and dementia, including Alzheimer disease (AD). Homocysteine (Hcy) is a sulfur-containing amino acid and metabolite of the methionine pathway. The interrelated methionine, purine, and thymidylate cycles constitute the one-carbon metabolism that plays a critical role in the synthesis of DNA, neurotransmitters, phospholipids, and myelin. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that one-carbon metabolites beyond Hcy are relevant to cognitive function and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) measures of AD pathology in older adults. Cross-sectional analysis was performed on matched CSF and plasma collected from 120 older community-dwelling adults with (n = 72) or without (n = 48) cognitive impairment. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry was performed to quantify one-carbon metabolites and their cofactors. Least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO) regression was initially applied to clinical and biomarker measures that generate the highest diagnostic accuracy of a priori-defined cognitive impairment (Clinical Dementia Rating-based) and AD pathology (i.e., CSF tau phosphorylated at threonine 181 [p-tau181]/β-Amyloid 1-42 peptide chain [Aβ 1-42 ] >0.0779) to establish a reference benchmark. Two other LASSO-determined models were generated that included the one-carbon metabolites in CSF and then plasma. Correlations of CSF and plasma one-carbon metabolites with CSF amyloid and tau were explored. LASSO-determined models were stratified by apolipoprotein E (APOE) ε4 carrier status. The diagnostic accuracy of cognitive impairment for the reference model was 80.8% and included age, years of education, Aβ 1-42 , tau, and p-tau181. A model including CSF cystathionine, methionine, S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine (SAH), S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), serine, cysteine, and 5-methyltetrahydrofolate (5-MTHF) improved the diagnostic accuracy to 87.4%. A second model derived from plasma included cystathionine

  17. TH-C-BRD-06: A Novel MRI Based CT Artifact Correction Method for Improving Proton Range Calculation in the Presence of Severe CT Artifacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, P; Schreibmann, E; Fox, T; Roper, J; Elder, E; Tejani, M; Crocker, I; Curran, W; Dhabaan, A

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Severe CT artifacts can impair our ability to accurately calculate proton range thereby resulting in a clinically unacceptable treatment plan. In this work, we investigated a novel CT artifact correction method based on a coregistered MRI and investigated its ability to estimate CT HU and proton range in the presence of severe CT artifacts. Methods: The proposed method corrects corrupted CT data using a coregistered MRI to guide the mapping of CT values from a nearby artifact-free region. First patient MRI and CT images were registered using 3D deformable image registration software based on B-spline and mutual information. The CT slice with severe artifacts was selected as well as a nearby slice free of artifacts (e.g. 1cm away from the artifact). The two sets of paired MRI and CT images at different slice locations were further registered by applying 2D deformable image registration. Based on the artifact free paired MRI and CT images, a comprehensive geospatial analysis was performed to predict the correct CT HU of the CT image with severe artifact. For a proof of concept, a known artifact was introduced that changed the ground truth CT HU value up to 30% and up to 5cm error in proton range. The ability of the proposed method to recover the ground truth was quantified using a selected head and neck case. Results: A significant improvement in image quality was observed visually. Our proof of concept study showed that 90% of area that had 30% errors in CT HU was corrected to 3% of its ground truth value. Furthermore, the maximum proton range error up to 5cm was reduced to 4mm error. Conclusion: MRI based CT artifact correction method can improve CT image quality and proton range calculation for patients with severe CT artifacts

  18. Visualisation of cerebrospinal fluid flow patterns in albino Xenopus larvae in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mogi Kazue

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has long been known that cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, its composition and flow, play an important part in normal brain development, and ependymal cell ciliary beating as a possible driver of CSF flow has previously been studied in mammalian fetuses in vitro. Lower vertebrate animals are potential models for analysis of CSF flow during development because they are oviparous. Albino Xenopus laevis larvae are nearly transparent and have a straight, translucent brain that facilitates the observation of fluid flow within the ventricles. The aim of these experiments was to study CSF flow and circulation in vivo in the developing brain of living embryos, larvae and tadpoles of Xenopus laevis using a microinjection technique. Methods The development of Xenopus larval brain ventricles and the patterns of CSF flow were visualised after injection of quantum dot nanocrystals and polystyrene beads (3.1 or 5.8 μm in diameter into the fourth cerebral ventricle at embryonic/larval stages 30-53. Results The fluorescent nanocrystals showed the normal development of the cerebral ventricles from embryonic/larval stages 38 to 53. The polystyrene beads injected into stage 47-49 larvae revealed three CSF flow patterns, left-handed, right-handed and non-biased, in movement of the beads into the third ventricle from the cerebral aqueduct (aqueduct of Sylvius. In the lateral ventricles, anterior to the third ventricle, CSF flow moved anteriorly along the outer wall of the ventricle to the inner wall and then posteriorly, creating a semicircle. In the cerebral aqueduct, connecting the third and fourth cerebral ventricles, CSF flow moved rostrally in the dorsal region and caudally in the ventral region. Also in the fourth ventricle, clear dorso-ventral differences in fluid flow pattern were observed. Conclusions This is the first visualisation of the orchestrated CSF flow pattern in developing vertebrates using a live animal imaging approach. CSF flow

  19. Chimeric HIV-1 Envelope Glycoproteins with Potent Intrinsic Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor (GM-CSF) Activity*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boot, Maikel; Cobos Jiménez, Viviana; Kootstra, Neeltje A.; Sanders, Rogier W.

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 acquisition can be prevented by broadly neutralizing antibodies (BrNAbs) that target the envelope glycoprotein complex (Env). An ideal vaccine should therefore be able to induce BrNAbs that can provide immunity over a prolonged period of time, but the low intrinsic immunogenicity of HIV-1 Env makes the elicitation of such BrNAbs challenging. Co-stimulatory molecules can increase the immunogenicity of Env and we have engineered a soluble chimeric Env trimer with an embedded granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) domain. This chimeric molecule induced enhanced B and helper T cell responses in mice compared to Env without GM-CSF. We studied whether we could optimize the activity of the embedded GM-CSF as well as the antigenic structure of the Env component of the chimeric molecule. We assessed the effect of truncating GM-CSF, removing glycosylation-sites in GM-CSF, and adjusting the linker length between GM-CSF and Env. One of our designed EnvGM-CSF chimeras improved GM-CSF-dependent cell proliferation by 6-fold, reaching the same activity as soluble recombinant GM-CSF. In addition, we incorporated GM-CSF into a cleavable Env trimer and found that insertion of GM-CSF did not compromise Env cleavage, while Env cleavage did not compromise GM-CSF activity. Importantly, these optimized EnvGM-CSF proteins were able to differentiate human monocytes into cells with a macrophage-like phenotype. Chimeric EnvGM-CSF should be useful for improving humoral immunity against HIV-1 and these studies should inform the design of other chimeric proteins. PMID:23565193

  20. Chimeric HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins with potent intrinsic granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gözde Isik

    Full Text Available HIV-1 acquisition can be prevented by broadly neutralizing antibodies (BrNAbs that target the envelope glycoprotein complex (Env. An ideal vaccine should therefore be able to induce BrNAbs that can provide immunity over a prolonged period of time, but the low intrinsic immunogenicity of HIV-1 Env makes the elicitation of such BrNAbs challenging. Co-stimulatory molecules can increase the immunogenicity of Env and we have engineered a soluble chimeric Env trimer with an embedded granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF domain. This chimeric molecule induced enhanced B and helper T cell responses in mice compared to Env without GM-CSF. We studied whether we could optimize the activity of the embedded GM-CSF as well as the antigenic structure of the Env component of the chimeric molecule. We assessed the effect of truncating GM-CSF, removing glycosylation-sites in GM-CSF, and adjusting the linker length between GM-CSF and Env. One of our designed Env(GM-CSF chimeras improved GM-CSF-dependent cell proliferation by 6-fold, reaching the same activity as soluble recombinant GM-CSF. In addition, we incorporated GM-CSF into a cleavable Env trimer and found that insertion of GM-CSF did not compromise Env cleavage, while Env cleavage did not compromise GM-CSF activity. Importantly, these optimized Env(GM-CSF proteins were able to differentiate human monocytes into cells with a macrophage-like phenotype. Chimeric Env(GM-CSF should be useful for improving humoral immunity against HIV-1 and these studies should inform the design of other chimeric proteins.

  1. [Treatment of Chemotherapy Related Leukocytopenia by Oral Administration of Multiple Leucogenic Drugs Combined with G-CSF: an Experimental Study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xi-ping; Zhang, Xiang; Yang, Hong-jian; Zou, De-hong; He, Xiang-ming; Yu, Xing-fei; Li, Yong-feng

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate efficacies of three commonly used oral drugs including Berbamine Hydrochloride Tablet (B), Qijiao Shengbai Capsule (Q), and Leucogen Tablet (L) (by single drug, two drugs or three drugs) combined with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) for treat ment of chemotherapy related leukocytopenia in mice. Totally 156 Kunming male mice were divided into the normal control group (A, n=24), the model group (B, n=24), the G-CSF group (C, n =24), the G-CSF+Q group (D, n=12), G-CSF+ B (E, n=12), the G-CSF+L group (F, n=12), the G-CSF + Q + B group (G, n=12), the G-CSF + Q + L group (H, n=12), the G-CSF + L + B group (I, n=12), and the G-CSF + L + Q + B (J, n=12). Mouse models of chemotherapy related leukocytopenia were established by intraperitoneal injection of cyclophosphamide (CTX). A G-CSF group was set up as a positive control. Mice were treated by a single oral drug, a single oral drug combined with G-CSF, and two or three drugs combined with G-CSF respectively, and the death rate calculated. Hemocytes [such as white blood cells (WBC) and its classification, red blood cells (RBC), platelet (PLT), hemoglobin (Hb)] were calculated by hematology analyzer. Mice were anatomized and important organs weighed. Organ indices were calculated. There was no statistical difference in the mortality rate among all groups (P > 0.05). Compared with Group B, WBC was elevated in all other groups (P drug B and L (P chemotherapy related leukopenia or decreased three blood series was to administrate three commonly oral drugs combined with G-CSF. Authors speculated that G-CSF and Q might have a certain effect on CTX induced immune inhibition.

  2. Human Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor (hG-CSF) Expression in Plastids of Lactuca sativa

    OpenAIRE

    Sharifi Tabar, Mehdi; Habashi, Ali Akbar; Rajabi Memari, Hamid

    2013-01-01

    Background: Human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (hG-CSF) can serve as valuable biopharmaceutical for research and treatment of the human blood cancer. Transplastomic plants have been emerged as a new and high potential candidate for production of recombinant biopharmaceutical proteins in comparison with transgenic plants due to extremely high level expression, biosafety and many other advantages. Methods: hG-CSF gene was cloned into pCL vector between prrn16S promoter and TpsbA ter...

  3. Temporal T807 binding correlates with CSF tau and phospho-tau in normal elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhatwal, Jasmeer P; Schultz, Aaron P; Marshall, Gad A; Boot, Brendon; Gomez-Isla, Teresa; Dumurgier, Julien; LaPoint, Molly; Scherzer, Clemens; Roe, Allyson D; Hyman, Bradley T; Sperling, Reisa A; Johnson, Keith A

    2016-08-30

    To better understand cross-sectional relationships between CSF and PET measures of tau pathology, we compared regional and global measures of (18)F-T807 (AV-1451) PET to CSF protein levels of total tau (t-tau), phosphorylated tau (p-tau), and β-amyloid 1-42 (Aβ42). T-tau, p-tau, and Aβ42 levels were assessed using INNOTEST xMAP immunoassays. Linear regression was used to compare regional and global measures of (18)F-T807 standardized uptake value ratios (SUVR) to CSF protein levels using data from 31 cognitively unimpaired elderly participants in the Harvard Aging Brain study. After controlling for sex and age, total cortical (18)F-T807 binding was significantly correlated with p-tau (partial r = 0.48; p < 0.01) and at trend level with t-tau (partial r = 0.30; p = 0.12). Regional (18)F-T807 measures were more strongly correlated with CSF protein levels than the global measure, with both t-tau and p-tau significantly correlated with (18)F-T807 SUVR in entorhinal, parahippocampal, and inferior temporal cortical regions (partial r = 0.53-0.73). Peak correlations between CSF and PET measures of tau were similar to those between CSF and PET measures of amyloid burden. Finally, we observed significantly higher temporal T807 SUVR in individuals with high amyloid burden. These data support the link between (18)F-T807 PET and CSF measures of tau pathology. In these cognitively normal individuals with (18)F-T807 binding largely restricted to the temporal lobe, (18)F-T807 SUVR in temporal regions appeared more reflective of CSF t-tau and p-tau than a total cortical measure. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  4. Demonstration of conjugated dopamine in monkey CSF by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elchisak, M A; Powers, K H; Ebert, M H

    1982-09-01

    A method for measuring unconjugated and conjugated dopamine in body tissues and fluids is described. Conjugated dopamine was hydrolyzed in acid to unconjugated dopamine, separated from the sample matrix by alumina chromatography, and assayed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Conjugated dopamine was detected in greater concentrations than unconjugated dopamine in CSF taken from lateral ventricle or thecal sac of the Rhesus monkey. Haloperidol administration did not increase the levels of conjugated dopamine in lumbar CSF.

  5. Are Patients with Spontaneous CSF Otorrhea and Superior Canal Dehiscence Congenitally Predisposed to Their Disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Shawn M; Hock, Kiefer; Samy, Ravi N; Pensak, Myles L

    2018-04-01

    Objectives (1) Compare lateral skull base (LSB) height/thickness in patients with spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid otorrhea (CSF), superior canal dehiscence (SCD), acoustic neuromas (AN), and otosclerosis (OTO). (2) Perform correlations between age, body mass index (BMI), sex, and LSB height/thickness. Study Design Case series with chart review. Setting Tertiary referral center. Subjects and Methods Patients with CSF, SCD, AN, and OTO diagnosed from 2006 to 2016 were included if they had high-definition temporal bone computed tomography (CT) and absence of trauma, radiation, chronic ear disease, and/or congenital anomaly. CT-based measurements included LSB height/thickness and pneumatization rates overlaying the external auditory canal (EAC), tegmen tympani (TgT), perigeniculate region (PG), and internal auditory canal (IAC). LSB height/thickness, age, sex, and BMI were statistically correlated. In total, 256 patients and 493 ears (109 CSF, 115 SCD, 269 AN/OTO) were measured. Results Patients with CSF had significantly higher BMIs than the other groups ( P CSF and SCD had similar radiographic LSB phenotypes at most measured locations. Both groups exhibited a significantly lower LSB height compared to the AN and OTO groups (mean, 3.9-4.2 mm vs 4.9-5.6 mm; P CSF and SCD also demonstrated significantly lower pneumatization rates, as low as 17% to 23% overlaying the PG and IAC ( P CSF and SCD exhibit similar radiographic LSB phenotypes. Age, sex, and BMI do not significantly correlate with LSB height/thickness. These data support the theory that CSF and SCD arise via similar congenital pathoetiologic mechanisms.

  6. CSF neurofilament light chain and phosphorylated tau 181 predict disease progression in PSP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Julio C; Bang, Jee; Lobach, Iryna V; Tsai, Richard M; Rabinovici, Gil D; Miller, Bruce L; Boxer, Adam L

    2018-01-23

    To determine the ability of CSF biomarkers to predict disease progression in progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). We compared the ability of baseline CSF β-amyloid 1-42 , tau, phosphorylated tau 181 (p-tau), and neurofilament light chain (NfL) concentrations, measured by INNO-BIA AlzBio3 or ELISA, to predict 52-week changes in clinical (PSP Rating Scale [PSPRS] and Schwab and England Activities of Daily Living [SEADL]), neuropsychological, and regional brain volumes on MRI using linear mixed effects models controlled for age, sex, and baseline disease severity, and Fisher F density curves to compare effect sizes in 50 patients with PSP. Similar analyses were done using plasma NfL measured by single molecule arrays in 141 patients. Higher CSF NfL concentration predicted more rapid decline (biomarker × time interaction) over 52 weeks in PSPRS ( p = 0.004, false discovery rate-corrected) and SEADL ( p = 0.008), whereas lower baseline CSF p-tau predicted faster decline on PSPRS ( p = 0.004). Higher CSF tau concentrations predicted faster decline by SEADL ( p = 0.004). The CSF NfL/p-tau ratio was superior for predicting change in PSPRS, compared to p-tau ( p = 0.003) or NfL ( p = 0.001) alone. Higher NfL concentrations in CSF or blood were associated with greater superior cerebellar peduncle atrophy (fixed effect, p ≤ 0.029 and 0.008, respectively). Both CSF p-tau and NfL correlate with disease severity and rate of disease progression in PSP. The inverse correlation of p-tau with disease severity suggests a potentially different mechanism of tau pathology in PSP as compared to Alzheimer disease. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  7. Epidural blood patch for refractory low CSF pressure headache: a pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Madsen, Søren Aalbæk; Fomsgaard, Jonna Storm; Jensen, Rigmor

    2011-01-01

    Once believed an exceedingly rare disorder, recent evidence suggests that low cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure headache has to be considered an important cause of new daily persistent headaches, particularly among young and middle-aged individuals. Treatment of low CSF pressure headache consists of non-invasive/conservative measures and invasive measures with epidural blood patch providing the cornerstone of the invasive measures. In the present pilot study we therefore aimed to evaluate th...

  8. Proliferation and Differentiation of Murine Myeloid Precursor 32D/G-CSF-R Cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zjablovskaja, Polina; Daněk, Petr; Kardošová, Miroslava; Alberich-Jorda, Meritxell

    č. 132 (2018), č. článku e57033. ISSN 1940-087X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-03796S Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : 32D/G-CSF-R cells * murine myeloid precursor cells * liquid culture * differentiation * neutrophils * proliferation * cytokines * IL-3 * G-CSF Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.232, year: 2016

  9. Coulomb artifacts and bottomonium hyperfine splitting in lattice NRQCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, T. [Department of Physics, University of Alberta,11455 Saskatchewan Drive, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2J1 (Canada); Penin, A.A. [Department of Physics, University of Alberta,11455 Saskatchewan Drive, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2J1 (Canada); Institut für Theoretische Teilchenphysik, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology,Wolfgang-Gaede-Strasse 1, 76128 Karlsruhe (Germany); Rayyan, A. [Department of Physics, University of Alberta,11455 Saskatchewan Drive, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2J1 (Canada)

    2017-02-16

    We study the role of the lattice artifacts associated with the Coulomb binding effects in the analysis of the heavy quarkonium within lattice NRQCD. We find that a “naïve” perturbative matching generates spurious linear Coulomb artifacts, which result in a large systematic error in the lattice predictions for the heavy quarkonium spectrum. This effect is responsible, in particular, for the discrepancy between the recent determinations of the bottomonium hyperfine splitting in the radiatively improved lattice NRQCD (DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevD.92.054502; Arxiv:1309.5797). We show that the correct matching procedure which provides full control over discretization errors is based on the asymptotic expansion of the lattice theory about the continuum limit, which gives M{sub Υ(1S)}−M{sub η{sub b(1S)}}=52.9±5.5 MeV (DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevD.92.054502).

  10. Santeria and Palo Mayombe: skulls, mercury, and artifacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, James R; Rainwater, Christopher W; Adams, Bradley J

    2009-11-01

    Santeria and Palo Mayombe are syncretic religions created in the New World based upon African religious beliefs combined with Christianity. The main worship of Palo Mayombe involves religious receptacles that may contain earth, sticks, varied artifacts, and animal and human remains. Due to the use of human and nonhuman remains, discovery of these items often leads to involvement by the police due to a concern of homicide. We review in detail the medical examiner records of two of these ritualistic cases including the autopsy, anthropology, police, and investigators' reports. For the human remains, careful consideration of the context in which the remains were recovered, their state of preservation, and the associated artifacts (e.g., beads and mercury) are important in determining the appropriate level of forensic significance. Anthropological examination with particular attention to taphonomic characteristics also may help determine the origin and forensic significance.

  11. Inter-deriving Semantic Artifacts for Object-Oriented Programming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danvy, Olivier; Johannsen, Jacob

    2008-01-01

    .e., big-step operational semantics) specified in Abadi and Cardelli's monograph. This abstract machine therefore embodies the soundness of Abadi and Cardelli's reduction semantics and natural semantics relative to each other. To move closer to actual implementations, which use environments rather than......We present a new abstract machine for Abadi and Cardelli's untyped calculus of objects. What is special about this semantic artifact (i.e., man-made construct) is that is mechanically corresponds to both the reduction semantics (i.e., small-step operational semantics) and the natural semantics (i...... actual substitutions, we then represent object methods as closures and in the same inter-derivational spirit, we present three new semantic artifacts: a reduction semantics for a version of Abadi and Cardelli's untyped calculus of objects with explicit substitutions, an environment-based abstract machine...

  12. Interpolation strategies for reducing IFOV artifacts in microgrid polarimeter imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratliff, Bradley M; LaCasse, Charles F; Tyo, J Scott

    2009-05-25

    Microgrid polarimeters are composed of an array of micro-polarizing elements overlaid upon an FPA sensor. In the past decade systems have been designed and built in all regions of the optical spectrum. These systems have rugged, compact designs and the ability to obtain a complete set of polarimetric measurements during a single image capture. However, these systems acquire the polarization measurements through spatial modulation and each measurement has a varying instantaneous field-of-view (IFOV). When these measurements are combined to estimate the polarization images, strong edge artifacts are present that severely degrade the estimated polarization imagery. These artifacts can be reduced when interpolation strategies are first applied to the intensity data prior to Stokes vector estimation. Here we formally study IFOV error and the performance of several bilinear interpolation strategies used for reducing it.

  13. Essential Layers, Artifacts, and Dependencies of Enterprise Architecture

    OpenAIRE

    Winter, Robert; Fischer, Ronny

    2007-01-01

    After a period where implementation speed was more important than integration, consistency and reduction of complexity, architectural considerations have become a key issue of information management in recent years again. Enterprise architecture is widely accepted as an essential mechanism for ensuring agility and consistency, compliance and efficiency. Although standards like TOGAF and FEAF have developed, however, there is no common agreement on which architecture layers, which artifact typ...

  14. An Improved Method to Watermark Images Sensitive to Blocking Artifacts

    OpenAIRE

    Afzel Noore

    2007-01-01

    A new digital watermarking technique for images that are sensitive to blocking artifacts is presented. Experimental results show that the proposed MDCT based approach produces highly imperceptible watermarked images and is robust to attacks such as compression, noise, filtering and geometric transformations. The proposed MDCT watermarking technique is applied to fingerprints for ensuring security. The face image and demographic text data of an individual are used as multi...

  15. Carbon fiber intramedullary nails reduce artifact in postoperative advanced imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimel, Melissa N.; Hwang, Sinchun; Riedel, Elyn R.; Healey, John H.

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed whether radiolucent carbon fiber reinforced-polyetheretherketone (CFR-PEEK) intramedullary nails decreased hardware artifact on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) in vitro and in an oncologic patient population. In vitro and clinical evaluations were done. A qualitative assessment of metal artifact was performed using CFR-PEEK and titanium nail MRI phantoms. Eight patients with a femoral or tibial prophylactic CFR-PEEK nail were retrospectively identified. All patients had postoperative surveillance imaging by MRI, CT, and were followed for a median 20 months (range, 12-28 months). CFR-PEEK images were compared to images from a comparative group of patients with titanium femoral intramedullary nails who had a postoperative MRI or CT. A musculoskeletal-trained radiologist graded visualization of the cortex, corticomedullary junction, and bone-muscle interface, on T1-weighted (T1W), STIR, and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted fat-saturated (T1W FS) sequences of both groups with a five-point scale, performing independent reviews 4 months apart. Statistical analysis used the Wilcoxon rank-sum test and a weighted kappa. Substantially less MRI signal loss occurred in the CFR-PEEK phantom than in the titanium phantom simulation, particularly as the angle increased with respect to direction of the static magnetic field. CFR-PEEK nails had less MRI artifact than titanium nails on scored T1W, STIR, and contrast-enhanced T1W FS MRI sequences (p ≤ 0.03). The mean weighted kappa was 0.64, showing excellent intraobserver reliability between readings. CFR-PEEK intramedullary nail fixation is a superior alternative to minimize implant artifact on MRI or CT imaging for patients requiring long bone fixation. (orig.)

  16. Carbon fiber intramedullary nails reduce artifact in postoperative advanced imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimel, Melissa N. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Orthopaedic Surgery Service, Department of Surgery, New York, NY (United States); Hwang, Sinchun [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Riedel, Elyn R. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, New York, NY (United States); Healey, John H. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Orthopaedic Surgery Service, Department of Surgery, New York, NY (United States); Weill Medical College of Cornell University, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, New York, NY (United States)

    2015-09-15

    This study assessed whether radiolucent carbon fiber reinforced-polyetheretherketone (CFR-PEEK) intramedullary nails decreased hardware artifact on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) in vitro and in an oncologic patient population. In vitro and clinical evaluations were done. A qualitative assessment of metal artifact was performed using CFR-PEEK and titanium nail MRI phantoms. Eight patients with a femoral or tibial prophylactic CFR-PEEK nail were retrospectively identified. All patients had postoperative surveillance imaging by MRI, CT, and were followed for a median 20 months (range, 12-28 months). CFR-PEEK images were compared to images from a comparative group of patients with titanium femoral intramedullary nails who had a postoperative MRI or CT. A musculoskeletal-trained radiologist graded visualization of the cortex, corticomedullary junction, and bone-muscle interface, on T1-weighted (T1W), STIR, and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted fat-saturated (T1W FS) sequences of both groups with a five-point scale, performing independent reviews 4 months apart. Statistical analysis used the Wilcoxon rank-sum test and a weighted kappa. Substantially less MRI signal loss occurred in the CFR-PEEK phantom than in the titanium phantom simulation, particularly as the angle increased with respect to direction of the static magnetic field. CFR-PEEK nails had less MRI artifact than titanium nails on scored T1W, STIR, and contrast-enhanced T1W FS MRI sequences (p ≤ 0.03). The mean weighted kappa was 0.64, showing excellent intraobserver reliability between readings. CFR-PEEK intramedullary nail fixation is a superior alternative to minimize implant artifact on MRI or CT imaging for patients requiring long bone fixation. (orig.)

  17. Gait in normal pressure hydrocephalus: characteristics and effects of the CSF tap test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Krause Martinez de Souza

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH, described by Hakim and Adams in 1965, is characterized by gait apraxia, urinary incontinence, and dementia. It is associated with normal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF pressure and ventricular dilation that cannot be attributed to cerebral atrophy. Objectives: To evaluate gait characteristics in patients with idiopathic NPH and investigate the effect of the CSF tap test (CSF-TT on gait. Methods: Twenty-five patients diagnosed with probable idiopathic NPH were submitted to the CSF-TT. The procedure aimed to achieve changes in gait parameters. Results: Fifteen gait parameters were assessed before and after the CSF-TT. Five showed a statistically significant improvement (p < 0.05: walking speed (p < 0.001, cadence (p < 0.001, step length (p < 0.001, en bloc turning (p = 0.001, and step height (p = 0.004. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that gait speed was the most responsive parameter to the CSF-TT, followed by cadence, step length, en bloc turning, and step height.

  18. Human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (hG-CSF) expression in plastids of Lactuca sativa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifi Tabar, Mehdi; Habashi, Ali Akbar; Rajabi Memari, Hamid

    2013-01-01

    Human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (hG-CSF) can serve as valuable biopharmaceutical for research and treatment of the human blood cancer. Transplastomic plants have been emerged as a new and high potential candidate for production of recombinant biopharmaceutical proteins in comparison with transgenic plants due to extremely high level expression, biosafety and many other advantages. hG-CSF gene was cloned into pCL vector between prrn16S promoter and TpsbA terminator. The recombinant vector was coated on nanogold particles and transformed to lettuce chloroplasts through biolistic method. Callogenesis and regeneration of cotyledonary explants were obtained by Murashige and Skoog media containing 6-benzylaminopurine and 1-naphthaleneacetic acid hormones. The presence of hG-CSF gene in plastome was studied with four specific PCR primers and expression by Western immunoblotting. hG-CSF gene cloning was confirmed by digestion and sequencing. Transplastomic lettuce lines were regenerated and subjected to molecular analysis. The presence of hG-CSF in plastome was confirmed by PCR using specific primers designed from the plastid genome. Western immunoblotting of extracted protein from transplastomic plants showed a 20-kDa band, which verified the expression of recombinant protein in lettuce chloroplasts. This study is the first report that successfully express hG-CSF gene in lettuce chloroplast. The lettuce plastome can provide a cheap and safe expression platform for producing valuable biopharmaceuticals for research and treatment.

  19. Targeting Beta-Amyloid at the CSF: A New Therapeutic Strategy in Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menendez-Gonzalez, Manuel; Padilla-Zambrano, Huber S; Alvarez, Gabriel; Capetillo-Zarate, Estibaliz; Tomas-Zapico, Cristina; Costa, Agustin

    2018-01-01

    Although immunotherapies against the amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide tried so date failed to prove sufficient clinical benefit, Aβ still remains the main target in Alzheimer's disease (AD). This article aims to show the rationale of a new therapeutic strategy: clearing Aβ from the CSF continuously (the "CSF-sink" therapeutic strategy). First, we describe the physiologic mechanisms of Aβ clearance and the resulting AD pathology when these mechanisms are altered. Then, we review the experiences with peripheral Aβ-immunotherapy and discuss the related hypothesis of the mechanism of action of "peripheral sink." We also present Aβ-immunotherapies acting on the CNS directly. Finally, we introduce alternative methods of removing Aβ including the "CSF-sink" therapeutic strategy. As soluble peptides are in constant equilibrium between the ISF and the CSF, altering the levels of Aβ oligomers in the CSF would also alter the levels of such proteins in the brain parenchyma. We conclude that interventions based in a "CSF-sink" of Aβ will probably produce a steady clearance of Aβ in the ISF and therefore it may represent a new therapeutic strategy in AD.

  20. CSF and blood oxytocin concentration changes following intranasal delivery in macaque.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Dal Monte

    Full Text Available Oxytocin (OT in the central nervous system (CNS influences social cognition and behavior, making it a candidate for treating clinical disorders such as schizophrenia and autism. Intranasal administration has been proposed as a possible route of delivery to the CNS for molecules like OT. While intranasal administration of OT influences social cognition and behavior, it is not well established whether this is an effective means for delivering OT to CNS targets. We administered OT or its vehicle (saline to 15 primates (Macaca mulatta, using either intranasal spray or a nebulizer, and measured OT concentration changes in the cerebral spinal fluid (CSF and in blood. All subjects received both delivery methods and both drug conditions. Baseline samples of blood and CSF were taken immediately before drug administration. Blood was collected every 10 minutes after administration for 40 minutes and CSF was collected once post-delivery, at the 40 minutes time point. We found that intranasal administration of exogenous OT increased concentrations in both CSF and plasma compared to saline. Both delivery methods resulted in similar elevations of OT concentration in CSF, while the changes in plasma OT concentration were greater after nasal spray compared to nebulizer. In conclusion our study provides evidence that both nebulizer and nasal spray OT administration can elevate CSF OT levels.

  1. CSF protein changes associated with hippocampal sclerosis risk gene variants highlight impact of GRN/PGRN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fardo, David W; Katsumata, Yuriko; Kauwe, John S K; Deming, Yuetiva; Harari, Oscar; Cruchaga, Carlos; Nelson, Peter T

    2017-04-01

    Hippocampal sclerosis of aging (HS-Aging) is a common cause of dementia in older adults. We tested the variability in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) proteins associated with previously identified HS-Aging risk single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative cohort (ADNI; n=237) data, combining both multiplexed proteomics CSF and genotype data, were used to assess the association between CSF analytes and risk SNPs in four genes (SNPs): GRN (rs5848), TMEM106B (rs1990622), ABCC9 (rs704180), and KCNMB2 (rs9637454). For controls, non-HS-Aging SNPs in APOE (rs429358/rs7412) and MAPT (rs8070723) were also analyzed against Aβ1-42 and total tau CSF analytes. The GRN risk SNP (rs5848) status correlated with variation in CSF proteins, with the risk allele (T) associated with increased levels of AXL Receptor Tyrosine Kinase (AXL), TNF-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand Receptor 3 (TRAIL-R3), Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and clusterin (CLU) (all p<0.05 after Bonferroni correction). The TRAIL-R3 correlation was significant in meta-analysis with an additional dataset (p=5.05×10 -5 ). Further, the rs5848 SNP status was associated with increased CSF tau protein - a marker of neurodegeneration (p=0.015). These data are remarkable since this GRN SNP has been found to be a risk factor for multiple types of dementia-related brain pathologies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Chloride flux from blood to CSF: inhibition by furosemide and bumetanide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, D.C.; Singer, S.; Hoop, B.; Kazemi, H.

    1987-01-01

    Movement of chloride from blood to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is one of the factors that may be involved in regulation of CSF [Cl-], which is important to CSF acid-base balance. We made quantitative measurements of the unidirectional flux of radiolabeled chloride between blood and CSF in anesthetized dogs, using 38 Cl, a short-lived isotope (half-life 37.3 min). This allowed multiple studies to be performed in a given animal. A three-compartment model for the blood, CSF, brain extracellular fluid, and ventriculocisternal perfusion system was used to determine the flux rate. With normocapnia, the flux was 0.01.1 min-1. The influx could be reproducibly measured for three separate determinations in the same animal over a period of 6 h, being 98 +/- 6% of the control first run on the second run and 113 +/- 6% on the third. Furosemide and bumetanide, inhibitors of sodium-coupled chloride movement, lowered the flux to 43 +/- 3% and 55 +/- 6% of control, respectively. The combination of hypercapnia and furosemide lowered the influx to 63 +/- 9% of control. These results indicate that a major mechanism of chloride entry into CSF is sodium-coupled chloride transport

  3. CSF/serum albumin ratio in dementias: a cross-sectional study on 1861 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skillbäck, Tobias; Delsing, Louise; Synnergren, Jane; Mattsson, Niklas; Janelidze, Shorena; Nägga, Katarina; Kilander, Lena; Hicks, Ryan; Wimo, Anders; Winblad, Bengt; Hansson, Oskar; Blennow, Kaj; Eriksdotter, Maria; Zetterberg, Henrik

    2017-11-01

    A connection between dementias and blood-brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction has been suggested, but previous studies have yielded conflicting results. We examined cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)/serum albumin ratio in a large cohort of patients diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease (AD, early onset [EAD, n = 130], late onset AD [LAD, n = 666]), vascular dementia (VaD, n = 255), mixed AD and VaD (MIX, n = 362), Lewy body dementia (DLB, n = 50), frontotemporal dementia (FTD, n = 56), Parkinson's disease dementia (PDD, n = 23), other dementias (other, n = 48), and dementia not otherwise specified (NOS, n = 271). We compared CSF/serum albumin ratio to 2 healthy control groups (n = 292, n = 20), between dementia diagnoses, and tested biomarker associations. Patients in DLB, LAD, VaD, MIX, other, and NOS groups had higher CSF/serum albumin ratio than controls. CSF/serum albumin ratio correlated with CSF neurofilament light in LAD, MIX, VaD, and other groups but not with AD biomarkers. Our data show that BBB leakage is common in dementias. The lack of association between CSF/serum albumin ratio and AD biomarkers suggests that BBB dysfunction is not inherent to AD but might represent concomitant cerebrovascular pathology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. GM-CSF: An Immune Modulatory Cytokine that can Suppress Autoimmunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Palash; Thiruppathi, Muthusamy; Elshabrawy, Hatem A.; Alharshawi, Khaled; Kumar, Prabhakaran; Prabhakar, Bellur S.

    2015-01-01

    GM-CSF was originally identified as a colony stimulating factor (CSF) because of its ability to induce granulocyte and macrophage populations from precursor cells. Multiple studies have demonstrated that GM-CSF is also an immune-modulatory cytokine, capable of affecting not only the phenotype of myeloid lineage cells, but also T-cell activation through various myeloid intermediaries. This property has been implicated in the sustenance of several autoimmune diseases like arthritis and multiple sclerosis. In contrast, several studies using animal models have shown that GM-CSF is also capable of suppressing many autoimmune diseases like Crohn's disease, Type-1 diabetes, Myasthenia gravis and experimental autoimmune thyroiditis. Knockout mouse studies have suggested that the role of GM-CSF in maintaining granulocyte and macrophage populations in the physiological steady state is largely redundant. Instead, its immune-modulatory role plays a significant role in the development or resolution of autoimmune diseases. This is mediated either through the differentiation of precursor cells into specialized non-steady state granulocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells, or through the modulation of the phenotype of mature myeloid cells. Thus, outside of myelopoiesis, GM-CSF has a profound role in regulating the immune response and maintaining immunological tolerance. PMID:26113402

  5. Recombinant rabies virus expressing dog GM-CSF is an efficacious oral rabies vaccine for dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ming; Wang, Lei; Zhou, Songqin; Wang, Zhao; Ruan, Juncheng; Tang, Lijun; Jia, Ziming; Cui, Min; Zhao, Ling; Fu, Zhen F

    2015-11-17

    Developing efficacious oral rabies vaccines is an important step to increase immunization coverage for stray dogs, which are not accessible for parenteral vaccination. Our previous studies have demonstrated that recombinant rabies virus (RABV) expressing cytokines/chemokines induces robust protective immune responses after oral immunization in mice by recruiting and activating dendritic cells (DCs) and B cells. To develop an effective oral rabies vaccine for dogs, a recombinant attenuated RABV expressing dog GM-CSF, designated as LBNSE-dGM-CSF was constructed and used for oral vaccination in a dog model. Significantly more DCs or B cells were activated in the peripheral blood of dogs vaccinated orally with LBNSE-dGM-CSF than those vaccinated with the parent virus LBNSE, particularly at 3 days post immunization (dpi). As a result, significantly higher levels of virus neutralizing antibodies (VNAs) were detected in dogs immunized with LBNSE-dGM-CSF than with the parent virus. All the immunized dogs were protected against a lethal challenge with 4500 MICLD50 of wild-type RABV SXTYD01. LBNSE-dGM-CSF was found to replicate mainly in the tonsils after oral vaccination as detected by nested RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Taken together, our results indicate that LBNSE-dGM-CSF could be a promising oral rabies vaccine candidate for dogs.

  6. The effect of G-CSF on infertile women undergoing IVF treatment: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Mo, Sien; Chen, Yang

    2017-08-01

    Evidence for the effect of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) on infertile women undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF) remains inconsistent. This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of G-CSF on infertile women undergoing IVF. PubMed and EMBASE databases were searched before August 2016. Comparing the transvaginal perfusion of G-CSF and placebo or no treatment, the available studies were considered. The pooled risk ratio (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) was used in the analysis and six studies were included. Transvaginal perfusion of G-CSF was significantly associated with a higher clinical pregnancy rate versus the placebo (RR=1.563, 95%CI: 1.122, 2.176), especially for the Asian population. Among patients with a thin endometrium or repeated IVF failure, the implantation and biochemical pregnancy rates were also significantly increased in patients with the use of G-CSF (implantation rate: RR = 1.887, 95% CI: 1.256, 2.833; biochemical pregnancy rate: RR = 2.385, 95% CI: 1.414, 4.023). However, no statistical significance in increasing endometrial thickness was detected. Transvaginal perfusion of G-CSF for infertile women may play a critical role in assisting human reproduction, especially for patients with a thin endometrium or repeated IVF failure in the Asian population.

  7. Technical artifacts in chromatographic analysis of Tc-99m radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowalsky, R.J.; Creekmore, J.R.

    1982-01-01

    Technical artifacts produced during chromatographic analysis of technetium radiopharmaceuticals were investigated. Such artifacts are, we found, caused by improper spotting and drying techniques; these in turn produce spuriously high impurities in Tc-99m complexes of DTPA, MDP, PPi, and GH. The ITLC-SG/acetone system produces considerable streaking of Tc-complex if the applied spot is large and not dried before development. This results in activity in the solvent front portion of the chromatographic strip indicating falsely high levels of pertechnetate impurity. Proper drying of the applied spot eliminates the artifact. The ITLC-SG/saline system yields falsely high, hydrolyzed-reduced technetium impurities if the spot is allowed to enter the solvent during development. Correct spot placement and size eliminate this problem. Strips that are allowed to dry in room air for several minutes may indicate considerable pertechnetate impurity on the chromatogram; yet this may not actually be present in the radiopharmaceutical vial. Drying spots rapidly with hot air or in a nitrogen atmosphere before development eliminates this problem

  8. On removing interpolation and resampling artifacts in rigid image registration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aganj, Iman; Yeo, Boon Thye Thomas; Sabuncu, Mert R; Fischl, Bruce

    2013-02-01

    We show that image registration using conventional interpolation and summation approximations of continuous integrals can generally fail because of resampling artifacts. These artifacts negatively affect the accuracy of registration by producing local optima, altering the gradient, shifting the global optimum, and making rigid registration asymmetric. In this paper, after an extensive literature review, we demonstrate the causes of the artifacts by comparing inclusion and avoidance of resampling analytically. We show the sum-of-squared-differences cost function formulated as an integral to be more accurate compared with its traditional sum form in a simple case of image registration. We then discuss aliasing that occurs in rotation, which is due to the fact that an image represented in the Cartesian grid is sampled with different rates in different directions, and propose the use of oscillatory isotropic interpolation kernels, which allow better recovery of true global optima by overcoming this type of aliasing. Through our experiments on brain, fingerprint, and white noise images, we illustrate the superior performance of the integral registration cost function in both the Cartesian and spherical coordinates, and also validate the introduced radial interpolation kernel by demonstrating the improvement in registration.

  9. Reducing Interpolation Artifacts for Mutual Information Based Image Registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soleimani, H.; Khosravifard, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    Medical image registration methods which use mutual information as similarity measure have been improved in recent decades. Mutual Information is a basic concept of Information theory which indicates the dependency of two random variables (or two images). In order to evaluate the mutual information of two images their joint probability distribution is required. Several interpolation methods, such as Partial Volume (PV) and bilinear, are used to estimate joint probability distribution. Both of these two methods yield some artifacts on mutual information function. Partial Volume-Hanning window (PVH) and Generalized Partial Volume (GPV) methods are introduced to remove such artifacts. In this paper we show that the acceptable performance of these methods is not due to their kernel function. It's because of the number of pixels which incorporate in interpolation. Since using more pixels requires more complex and time consuming interpolation process, we propose a new interpolation method which uses only four pixels (the same as PV and bilinear interpolations) and removes most of the artifacts. Experimental results of the registration of Computed Tomography (CT) images show superiority of the proposed scheme. PMID:22606673

  10. Detection of movement artifact in recorded pulse oximeter saturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poets, C F; Stebbens, V A

    1997-10-01

    Movement artifact (MA) must be detected when analysing recordings of pulse oximeter saturation (SpO2). Visual analysis of individual pulse waveforms is the safest, but also the most tedious, method for this purpose. We wanted to test the reliability of a computer algorithm (Edentec Motion Annotation System), based on a comparison between pulse and heart rate, for MA detection. Ten 12-h recordings of SpO2, pulse waveforms and heart rate from ten preterm infants were analysed for the presence of MA on the pulse waveform signal. These data were used to determine the sensitivity and specificity of the computer algorithm, and of the oximeter itself, in detecting MA. Recordings were divided into segments of 2.5 s duration to compare the movement identification methods. Of the segments 31% +/- 6% (mean +/- SD) contained MA. The computer algorithm identified 95% +/- 3% of these segments, the pulse oximeter only 18% +/- 11%. Specificity was 85% +/- 4% and 99% +/- 0%, respectively. SpO2 was signal showed MA during this time, leaving a significant potential for erroneous identification of hypoxaemia. Recordings of SpO2 do not allow a reliable identification of MA. Without additional information about movement artifact, a significant proportion of recording time of pulse oximeter signal may be regarded as demonstrating hypoxaemia which, in fact, simply reflects poor measurement conditions. The computer algorithm used in this study identified periods of movement artifact reliably.

  11. Trails of meaning construction: Symbolic artifacts engage the social brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tylén, Kristian; Philipsen, Johanne Stege; Roepstorff, Andreas; Fusaroli, Riccardo

    2016-07-01

    Symbolic artifacts present a challenge to theories of neurocognitive processing due to their hybrid nature: they are at the same time physical objects and vehicles of intangible social meanings. While their physical properties can be read of their perceptual appearance, the meaning of symbolic artifacts depends on the perceiver's interpretative attitude and embeddedness in cultural practices. In this study, participants built models of LEGO bricks to illustrate their understanding of abstract concepts. They were then scanned with fMRI while presented to photographs of their own and others' models. When participants attended to the meaning of the models in contrast to their bare physical properties, we observed activations in mPFC and TPJ, areas often associated with social cognition, and IFG, possibly related to semantics. When contrasting own and others' models, we also found activations in precuneus, an area associated with autobiographical memory and agency, while looking at one's own collective models yielded interaction effects in rostral ACC, right IFG and left Insula. Interestingly, variability in the insula was predicted by individual differences in participants' feeling of relatedness to their fellow group members during LEGO construction activity. Our findings support a view of symbolic artifacts as neuro-cognitive trails of human social interactions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Correction of Bowtie-Filter Normalization and Crescent Artifacts for a Clinical CBCT System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong; Kong, Vic; Huang, Ke; Jin, Jian-Yue

    2017-02-01

    To present our experiences in understanding and minimizing bowtie-filter crescent artifacts and bowtie-filter normalization artifacts in a clinical cone beam computed tomography system. Bowtie-filter position and profile variations during gantry rotation were studied. Two previously proposed strategies (A and B) were applied to the clinical cone beam computed tomography system to correct bowtie-filter crescent artifacts. Physical calibration and analytical approaches were used to minimize the norm phantom misalignment and to correct for bowtie-filter normalization artifacts. A combined procedure to reduce bowtie-filter crescent artifacts and bowtie-filter normalization artifacts was proposed and tested on a norm phantom, CatPhan, and a patient and evaluated using standard deviation of Hounsfield unit along a sampling line. The bowtie-filter exhibited not only a translational shift but also an amplitude variation in its projection profile during gantry rotation. Strategy B was better than strategy A slightly in minimizing bowtie-filter crescent artifacts, possibly because it corrected the amplitude variation, suggesting that the amplitude variation plays a role in bowtie-filter crescent artifacts. The physical calibration largely reduced the misalignment-induced bowtie-filter normalization artifacts, and the analytical approach further reduced bowtie-filter normalization artifacts. The combined procedure minimized both bowtie-filter crescent artifacts and bowtie-filter normalization artifacts, with Hounsfield unit standard deviation being 63.2, 45.0, 35.0, and 18.8 Hounsfield unit for the best correction approaches of none, bowtie-filter crescent artifacts, bowtie-filter normalization artifacts, and bowtie-filter normalization artifacts + bowtie-filter crescent artifacts, respectively. The combined procedure also demonstrated reduction of bowtie-filter crescent artifacts and bowtie-filter normalization artifacts in a CatPhan and a patient. We have developed a step

  13. Metal Artifact Suppression in Dental Cone Beam Computed Tomography Images Using Image Processing Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johari, Masoumeh; Abdollahzadeh, Milad; Esmaeili, Farzad; Sakhamanesh, Vahideh

    2018-01-01

    Dental cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images suffer from severe metal artifacts. These artifacts degrade the quality of acquired image and in some cases make it unsuitable to use. Streaking artifacts and cavities around teeth are the main reason of degradation. In this article, we have proposed a new artifact reduction algorithm which has three parallel components. The first component extracts teeth based on the modeling of image histogram with a Gaussian mixture model. Striking artifact reduction component reduces artifacts using converting image into the polar domain and applying morphological filtering. The third component fills cavities through a simple but effective morphological filtering operation. Finally, results of these three components are combined into a fusion step to create a visually good image which is more compatible to human visual system. Results show that the proposed algorithm reduces artifacts of dental CBCT images and produces clean images.

  14. A novel method to calculate the extent and amount of drug transported into CSF after intranasal administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Zhenqi; Zhang, Qizhi; Jiang, Xinguo

    2005-01-31

    The aim of this paper is to establish a novel method to calculate the extent and amount of drug transported to brain after administration. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was chosen as the target region. The intranasal administration of meptazinol hydrochloride (MEP) was chosen as the model administration and intravenous administration was selected as reference. According to formula transform, the extent was measured by the equation of X(A)CSF, infinity/X0 = Cl(CSF) AUC(0-->infinity)CSF/X0 and the drug amount was calculated by multiplying the dose with the extent. The drug clearance in CSF (Cl(CSF)) was calculated by a method, in which a certain volume of MEP solution was injected directly into rat cistern magna and then clearance was assessed as the reciprocal of the zeroth moment of a CSF level-time curve normalized for dose. In order to testify the accurateness of the method, 14C-sucrose was chosen as reference because of its impermeable characteristic across blood-brain barrier (BBB). It was found out that the MEP concentrations in plasma and CSF after intranasal administration did not show significant difference with those after intravenous administration. However, the extent and amount of MEP transported to CSF was significantly lower compared with those to plasma after these two administrations. In conclusion, the method can be applied to measure the extent and amount of drug transported to CSF, which would be useful to evaluate brain-targeting drug delivery.

  15. Distribution of HIV RNA in CSF and Blood is linked to CD4/CD8 Ratio During Acute HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Phillip; Patel, Payal; Hellmuth, Joanna; Colby, Donn J; Kroon, Eugène; Sacdalan, Carlo; Pinyakorn, Suteeraporn; Jagodzinski, Linda; Krebs, Shelly; Ananworanich, Jintanat; Valcour, Victor; Spudich, Serena

    2018-05-07

    HIV RNA levels in the plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) are correlated in chronic HIV infection but their dynamics have not been characterized during acute infection. This study analyzed predictors of CSF HIV RNA and relative degree of CNS viral transmigration expressed as plasma minus CSF HIV log10 RNA (PCratio) during untreated acute HIV infection. CSF immune markers were compared between groups with different PCratio. 117 mostly male (97%) participants in the RV254 cohort in Bangkok, Thailand, had median age 28 years and an estimated median 18 days duration of infection; forty-three (37%) were Fiebig stages I/II. Twenty-seven (23%) had CSF HIV RNA CSF HIV RNA and PCratio of 3.76 and 2.36 Log10 copies/mL, respectively. HIV RNA peaked at Fiebig III in plasma and Fiebig IV in CSF. In multivariable analyses, plasma HIV RNA and CD4/CD8 ratio independently correlated with CSF HIV RNA (pCSF neopterin, sCD163, IL-6 and sCD14 levels (all pCSF HIV RNA and PCratio, suggesting that immune responses modulate CNS viral entry at early infection.

  16. Granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) signaling in spinal microglia drives visceral sensitization following colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basso, Lilian; Lapointe, Tamia K; Iftinca, Mircea; Marsters, Candace; Hollenberg, Morley D; Kurrasch, Deborah M; Altier, Christophe

    2017-10-17

    Pain is a main symptom of inflammatory diseases and often persists beyond clinical remission. Although we have a good understanding of the mechanisms of sensitization at the periphery during inflammation, little is known about the mediators that drive central sensitization. Recent reports have identified hematopoietic colony-stimulating factors as important regulators of tumor- and nerve injury-associated pain. Using a mouse model of colitis, we identify the proinflammatory cytokine granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF or Csf-3) as a key mediator of visceral sensitization. We report that G-CSF is specifically up-regulated in the thoracolumbar spinal cord of colitis-affected mice. Our results show that resident spinal microglia express the G-CSF receptor and that G-CSF signaling mediates microglial activation following colitis. Furthermore, healthy mice subjected to intrathecal injection of G-CSF exhibit pronounced visceral hypersensitivity, an effect that is abolished by microglial depletion. Mechanistically, we demonstrate that G-CSF injection increases Cathepsin S activity in spinal cord tissues. When cocultured with microglia BV-2 cells exposed to G-CSF, dorsal root ganglion (DRG) nociceptors become hyperexcitable. Blocking CX3CR1 or nitric oxide production during G-CSF treatment reduces excitability and G-CSF-induced visceral pain in vivo. Finally, administration of G-CSF-neutralizing antibody can prevent the establishment of persistent visceral pain postcolitis. Overall, our work uncovers a DRG neuron-microglia interaction that responds to G-CSF by engaging Cathepsin S-CX3CR1-inducible NOS signaling. This interaction represents a central step in visceral sensitization following colonic inflammation, thereby identifying spinal G-CSF as a target for treating chronic abdominal pain.

  17. Mapping of monoclonal antibody- and receptor-binding domains on human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rhGM-CSF) using a surface plasmon resonance-based biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laricchia-Robbio, L; Liedberg, B; Platou-Vikinge, T; Rovero, P; Beffy, P; Revoltella, R P

    1996-10-01

    An automated surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based biosensor system has been used for mapping antibody and receptor-binding regions on the recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rhGM-CSF) molecule. A rabbit antimouse IgG1-Fc antibody (RAM.Fc) was coupled to an extended carboxymethylated-hydrogel matrix attached to a gold surface in order to capture an anti-rhGM-CSF monoclonal antibody (MAb) injected over the sensing layer. rhGM-CSF was subsequently injected and allowed to bind to this antibody. Multisite binding assays were then performed, by flowing sequentially other antibodies and peptides over the surface, and the capacity of the latter to interact with the entrapped rhGM-CSF in a multimolecular complex was monitored in real time with SPR. Eleven MAb (all IgG1K), were analyzed: respectively, four antipeptide MAb raised against three distinct epitopes of the cytokine (two clones against residues 14-24, that includes part of the first alpha-helix toward the N-terminal region; one clone against peptide 30-41, an intrahelical loop; and one clone against residues 79-91, including part of the third alpha-helix) and seven antiprotein MAbs raised against the entire rhGM-CSF, whose target native epitopes are still undetermined. In addition, the binding capacity to rhGM-CSF of a synthetic peptide, corresponding to residues 238-254 of the extracellular human GM-CSF receptor alpha-chain, endowed with rhGM-CSF binding activity, was tested. The results from experiments performed with the biosensor were compared with those obtained by a sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), using the same reagents. The features of the biosensor technology (fully automated, measure in real time, sharpened yes/no response, less background disturbances, no need for washing step or labeling of the reagent) offered several advantages in these studies of MAb immunoreactivity and epitope mapping, giving a much better resolution and enabling more distinct

  18. Granulocyte-macrophage stimulating factor (GM-CSF increases circulating dendritic cells but does not abrogate suppression of adaptive cellular immunity in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer receiving chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martinez Micaela

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Advanced cancer and chemotherapy are both associated with immune system suppression. We initiated a clinical trial in patients receiving chemotherapy for metastatic colorectal cancer to determine if administration of GM-CSF in this setting was immunostimulatory. Methods Between June, 2003 and January, 2007, 20 patients were enrolled in a clinical trial (NCT00257322 in which they received 500 ug GM-CSF daily for 4 days starting 24 hours after each chemotherapy cycle. There were no toxicities or adverse events reported. Blood was obtained before chemotherapy/GM-CSF administration and 24 hours following the final dose of GM-CSF and evaluated for circulating dendritic cells and adaptive immune cellular subsets by flow cytometry. Peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC expression of γ-interferon and T-bet transcription factor (Tbx21 by quantitative real-time PCR was performed as a measure of Th1 adaptive cellular immunity. Pre- and post-treatment (i.e., chemotherapy and GM-CSF samples were evaluable for 16 patients, ranging from 1 to 5 cycles (median 3 cycles, 6 biologic sample time points. Dendritic cells were defined as lineage (- and MHC class II high (+. Results 73% of patients had significant increases in circulating dendritic cells of ~3x for the overall group (5.8% to 13.6%, p = 0.02 and ~5x excluding non-responders (3.2% to 14.5%, p Tbx21 levels declined by 75% following each chemotherapy cycle despite administration of GM-CSF (p = 0.02. PBMC γ-interferon expression, however was unchanged. Conclusions This clinical trial confirms the suppressive effects of chemotherapy on Th1 cellular immunity in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer but demonstrates that mid-cycle administration of GM-CSF can significantly increase the proportion of circulating dendritic cells. As the role of dendritic cells in anti-tumor immunity becomes better defined, GM-CSF administration may provide a non-toxic intervention to augment this arm

  19. Cerebral blood flow in normal pressure hydrocephalus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mamo, H.L.; Meric, P.C.; Ponsin, J.C.; Rey, A.C.; Luft, A.G.; Seylaz, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    A xenon-133 method was used to measure cerebral blood flow (CBF) before and after cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) removal in patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH). Preliminary results suggested that shunting should be performed on patients whose CBF increased after CSF removal. There was a significant increase in CBF in patients with NPH, which was confirmed by the favorable outcome of 88% of patients shunted. The majority of patients with senile and presenile dementia showed a decrease or no change in CBF after CSF removal. It is suggested that although changes in CBF and clinical symptoms of NPH may have the same cause, i.e., changes in the cerebral intraparenchymal pressure, there is no simple direct relation between these two events. The mechanism underlying the loss of autoregulation observed in NPH is also discussed

  20. Pitfalls and artifacts in measuring absorption spectra and kinetics: the effect of stray light in the UV and red regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czapski, Gideon; Ozeri, Yair; Goldstein, Sara

    2005-01-01

    Effects of stray light on absorption spectrum and kinetics are discussed. The extent of the stray light depends on the light source, monochromator, wavelength set by the instrument and the absorption of the sample at this wavelength. Effects of the stray light on the shape of the spectrum and the extinction coefficients are shown. Methods for determining the existence and extent of stray light are suggested and are especially relevant for studies using pulse radiolysis, flash photolysis, and stopped-flow techniques. The literature examples for artifacts due to stray light are presented for kinetics and absorption spectra

  1. Pharmacokinetics of methotrexate in the cerebrospinal fluid after intracerebroventricular administration in patients with meningeal carcinomatosis and altered cerebrospinal fluid flow dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, K.T.; Wilkinson, D.S.

    1989-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic parameters of the distribution and elimination of intracerebroventricularly administered methotrexate (MTX) were evaluated in three patients with meningeal carcinomatosis. Abnormal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow dynamics, which were not otherwise clinically evident, were diagnosed by 111In-diethylenetriaminepentaacetate radionuclide imaging. Alterations in CSF flow resulted in large changes in MTX distribution. Reduced cortical convexity (type III), spinal subarachnoid (type II), or ventricular (type I) CSF flow resulted in a prolongation of the single-pass mean residence time of MTX in the peripheral compartment by as much as eightfold and a reduction in intercompartmental clearance by 94-99%. Leptomeningeal carcinomatosis can affect both CSF MTX distribution and elimination, each to a different extent, within the same patient. Total MTX clearance from the CSF was reduced by 79-93% in the patients studied. A two-compartment pharmacokinetic model, with elimination occurring from the peripheral compartment, gave values for the distribution rate constant from the central to the peripheral compartment (k12), which decreased with the extent of CSF flow abnormality. However, the elimination rate constant from the peripheral compartment (k20) was reduced to an extent apparently independent of CSF flow abnormality (percentage reduction in k12 and k20, respectively: type III, 18 and 66; type II, 67 and 86; type I, 78 and 48). Inadequate distribution and locally high concentrations of MTX within the CSF may contribute to therapeutic failure and neurotoxicity. Monitoring of MTX levels in the CSF may be deceiving when samples are drawn from the site of injection, since the distribution kinetics are altered by abnormal CSF flow dynamics

  2. Validation of α-Synuclein as a CSF Biomarker for Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llorens, Franc; Kruse, Niels; Karch, André; Schmitz, Matthias; Zafar, Saima; Gotzmann, Nadine; Sun, Ting; Köchy, Silja; Knipper, Tobias; Cramm, Maria; Golanska, Ewa; Sikorska, Beata; Liberski, Pawel P; Sánchez-Valle, Raquel; Fischer, Andre; Mollenhauer, Brit; Zerr, Inga

    2018-03-01

    The analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers gains importance in the differential diagnosis of prion diseases. However, no single diagnostic tool or combination of them can unequivocally confirm prion disease diagnosis. Electrochemiluminescence (ECL)-based immunoassays have demonstrated to achieve high diagnostic accuracy in a variety of sample types due to their high sensitivity and dynamic range. Quantification of CSF α-synuclein (a-syn) by an in-house ECL-based ELISA assay has been recently reported as an excellent approach for the diagnosis of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD), the most prevalent form of human prion disease. In the present study, we validated a commercially available ECL-based a-syn ELISA platform as a diagnostic test for correct classification of sCJD cases. CSF a-syn was analysed in 203 sCJD cases with definite diagnosis and in 445 non-CJD cases. We investigated reproducibility and stability of CSF a-syn and made recommendations for its analysis in the sCJD diagnostic workup. A sensitivity of 98% and a specificity of 97% were achieved when using an optimal cut-off of 820 pg/mL a-syn. Moreover, we were able to show a negative correlation between a-syn levels and disease duration suggesting that CSF a-syn may be a good prognostic marker for sCJD patients. The present study validates the use of a-syn as a CSF biomarker of sCJD and establishes the clinical and pre-analytical parameters for its use in differential diagnosis in clinical routine. Additionally, the current test presents some advantages compared to other diagnostic approaches: it is fast, economic, requires minimal amount of CSF and a-syn levels are stable along disease progression.

  3. Fibronectin induces macrophage migration through a SFK-FAK/CSF-1R pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Digiacomo, Graziana; Tusa, Ignazia; Bacci, Marina; Cipolleschi, Maria Grazia; Dello Sbarba, Persio; Rovida, Elisabetta

    2017-07-04

    Integrins, following binding to proteins of the extracellular matrix (ECM) including collagen, laminin and fibronectin (FN), are able to transduce molecular signals inside the cells and to regulate several biological functions such as migration, proliferation and differentiation. Besides activation of adaptor molecules and kinases, integrins transactivate Receptor Tyrosine Kinases (RTK). In particular, adhesion to the ECM may promote RTK activation in the absence of growth factors. The Colony-Stimulating Factor-1 Receptor (CSF-1R) is a RTK that supports the survival, proliferation, and motility of monocytes/macrophages, which are essential components of innate immunity and cancer development. Macrophage interaction with FN is recognized as an important aspect of host defense and wound repair. The aim of the present study was to investigate on a possible cross-talk between FN-elicited signals and CSF-1R in macrophages. FN induced migration in BAC1.2F5 and J774 murine macrophage cell lines and in human primary macrophages. Adhesion to FN determined phosphorylation of the Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) and Src Family Kinases (SFK) and activation of the SFK/FAK complex, as witnessed by paxillin phosphorylation. SFK activity was necessary for FAK activation and macrophage migration. Moreover, FN-induced migration was dependent on FAK in either murine macrophage cell lines or human primary macrophages. FN also induced FAK-dependent/ligand-independent CSF-1R phosphorylation, as well as the interaction between CSF-1R and β1. CSF-1R activity was necessary for FN-induced macrophage migration. Indeed, genetic or pharmacological inhibition of CSF-1R prevented FN-induced macrophage migration. Our results identified a new SFK-FAK/CSF-1R signaling pathway that mediates FN-induced migration of macrophages.

  4. Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF biological actions on human dermal fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Montagnani

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Fibroblasts are involved in all pathologies characterized by increased ExtraCellularMatrix synthesis, from wound healing to fibrosis. Granulocyte Macrophage-Colony Stimulating Factor (GM-CSF is a cytokine isolated as an hemopoietic growth factor but recently indicated as a differentiative agent on endothelial cells. In this work we demonstrated the expression of the receptor for GM-CSF (GMCSFR on human normal skin fibroblasts from healthy subjects (NFPC and on a human normal fibroblast cell line (NHDF and we try to investigate the biological effects of this cytokine. Human normal fibroblasts were cultured with different doses of GM-CSF to study the effects of this factor on GMCSFR expression, on cell proliferation and adhesion structures. In addition we studied the production of some Extra-Cellular Matrix (ECM components such as Fibronectin, Tenascin and Collagen I. The growth rate of fibroblasts from healthy donors (NFPC is not augmented by GM-CSF stimulation in spite of increased expression of the GM-CSFR. On the contrary, the proliferation of normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDF cell line seems more influenced by high concentration of GM-CSF in the culture medium. The adhesion structures and the ECM components appear variously influenced by GM-CSF treatment as compared to fibroblasts cultured in basal condition, but newly only NHDF cells are really induced to increase their synthesis activity. We suggest that the in vitro treatment with GM-CSF can shift human normal fibroblasts towards a more differentiated state, due or accompanied by an increased expression of GM-CSFR and that such “differentiation” is an important event induced by such cytokine.

  5. Diagnostic accuracy of routine blood examinations and CSF lactate level for post-neurosurgical bacterial meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang; Xiao, Xiong; Zhang, Junting; Gao, Zhixian; Ji, Nan; Zhang, Liwei

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of routine blood examinations and Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) lactate level for Post-neurosurgical Bacterial Meningitis (PBM) at a large sample-size of post-neurosurgical patients. The diagnostic accuracies of routine blood examinations and CSF lactate level to distinguish between PAM and PBM were evaluated with the values of the Area Under the Curve of the Receiver Operating Characteristic (AUC -ROC ) by retrospectively analyzing the datasets of post-neurosurgical patients in the clinical information databases. The diagnostic accuracy of routine blood examinations was relatively low (AUC -ROC CSF lactate level achieved rather high diagnostic accuracy (AUC -ROC =0.891; CI 95%, 0.852-0.922). The variables of patient age, operation duration, surgical diagnosis and postoperative days (the interval days between the neurosurgery and examinations) were shown to affect the diagnostic accuracy of these examinations. The variables were integrated with routine blood examinations and CSF lactate level by Fisher discriminant analysis to improve their diagnostic accuracy. As a result, the diagnostic accuracy of blood examinations and CSF lactate level was significantly improved with an AUC -ROC value=0.760 (CI 95%, 0.737-0.782) and 0.921 (CI 95%, 0.887-0.948) respectively. The PBM diagnostic accuracy of routine blood examinations was relatively low, whereas the accuracy of CSF lactate level was high. Some variables that are involved in the incidence of PBM can also affect the diagnostic accuracy for PBM. Taking into account the effects of these variables significantly improves the diagnostic accuracies of routine blood examinations and CSF lactate level. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. Cellular specificity of the blood-CSF barrier for albumin transfer across the choroid plexus epithelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shane A Liddelow

    Full Text Available To maintain the precise internal milieu of the mammalian central nervous system, well-controlled transfer of molecules from periphery into brain is required. Recently the soluble and cell-surface albumin-binding glycoprotein SPARC (secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine has been implicated in albumin transport into developing brain, however the exact mechanism remains unknown. We postulate that SPARC is a docking site for albumin, mediating its uptake and transfer by choroid plexus epithelial cells from blood into cerebrospinal fluid (CSF. We used in vivo physiological measurements of transfer of endogenous (mouse and exogenous (human albumins, in situ Proximity Ligation Assay (in situ PLA, and qRT-PCR experiments to examine the cellular mechanism mediating protein transfer across the blood-CSF interface. We report that at all developmental stages mouse albumin and SPARC gave positive signals with in situ PLAs in plasma, CSF and within individual plexus cells suggesting a possible molecular interaction. In contrast, in situ PLA experiments in brain sections from mice injected with human albumin showed positive signals for human albumin in the vascular compartment that were only rarely identifiable within choroid plexus cells and only at older ages. Concentrations of both endogenous mouse albumin and exogenous (intraperitoneally injected human albumin were estimated in plasma and CSF and expressed as CSF/plasma concentration ratios. Human albumin was not transferred through the mouse blood-CSF barrier to the same extent as endogenous mouse albumin, confirming results from in situ PLA. During postnatal development Sparc gene expression was higher in early postnatal ages than in the adult and changed in response to altered levels of albumin in blood plasma in a differential and developmentally regulated manner. Here we propose a possible cellular route and mechanism by which albumin is transferred from blood into CSF across a sub

  7. Macrophage colony-stimulating factor, CSF-1, and its proto-oncogene-encoded receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherr, C.J.; Rettenmier, C.W.; Roussel, M.F.

    1988-01-01

    The macrophage colony-stimulating factor, CSF-1, or M-CSF, is one of a family of hematopoietic growth factors that stimulates the proliferation of monocytes, macrophages, and their committed bone marrow progenitors. Unlike pluripotent hemopoietins such as granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin-3 (IL-3 or multi-CSF), which affect the growth of myeloid cells of several different hematopoietic lineages, CSF-1 acts only on cells of the mononuclear phagocyte series to stimulate their growth and enhance their survival. Retroviral transduction of the feline c-fms gene in the Susan McDonough and Hardy Zuckerman-5 (HZ-5) strains of feline sarcoma virus (FeSV) led to genetic alterations that endowed the recombined viral oncogene (v-fms) with the ability to transform cells in culture morphologically and to induce firbrosarcomas and hematopoietic neoplasms in susceptible animals. The v-fms oncogene product differs from the normal CSF-1 receptor in certain of its cardinal biochemical properties, most notably in exhibiting constitutively high basal levels of tyrosine kinase activity in the absence of its ligand. Comparative studies of the c-fms and v-fms genes coupled with analyses of engineered mutants and receptor chimeras have begun to pinpoint pertinent genetic alterations in the normal receptor gene that unmask its latent oncogenic potential. In addition, the availability of biologically active c-fms, v-fms, and CSF-1 cDNAs has allowed these genes to be mobilized and expressed in naive cells, thereby facilitating assays for receptor coupling with downstream components of the mitogenic pathway in diverse cell types

  8. Effect of simvastatin on CSF Alzheimer disease biomarkers in cognitively normal adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ge; Mayer, Cynthia L; Morelli, Daniel; Millard, Steven P; Raskind, Wendy H; Petrie, Eric C; Cherrier, Monique; Fagan, Anne M; Raskind, Murray A; Peskind, Elaine R

    2017-09-19

    To examine potential disease-modifying effects of statin drugs, we conducted a 12-month randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial of simvastatin in cognitively normal adults using change in CSF Alzheimer disease biomarkers as primary outcome measure. Participants were 45-64 years old and statin-naive with normal cognition and normal or mildly elevated cholesterol. Forty-six participants completed the 1-year study per protocol (25 in the simvastatin and 21 in the placebo group). Simvastatin was titrated to 40 mg/d. CSF Aβ 42 , total tau, and p-tau 181 were measured at baseline and after 12 months of treatment using the INNO-BIA AlzBio3 assay. We used analysis of covariance to assess differences in biomarker change from baseline between treatment groups, adjusting for age, sex, and APOE ε4 status. Changes from baseline did not differ significantly between treatment groups for any CSF biomarker, with p values of 0.53, 0.36, and 0.25 for CSF Aβ 42 , total tau, and p-tau 181 , respectively. There was no significant modifying effect of sex, APOE ε4, or baseline high-density lipoprotein or triglycerides on treatment group for any of the biomarkers (all p > 0.18). However, a significant interaction between treatment group and baseline low-density lipoprotein (LDL) was observed for p-tau 181 ( p = 0.003), where greater decreases from baseline in CSF p-tau 181 concentrations were associated with higher baseline LDL level for the simvastatin group. Simvastatin-related reductions in CSF p-tau 181 concentrations may be modulated by LDL cholesterol. The potential disease-modifying effects of simvastatin on CSF phospho-tau should be further investigated in persons with hypercholesterolemia. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  9. Use of rhu-GM-CSF in pulmonary tuberculosis patients: results of a randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Brasil Pedral-Sampaio

    Full Text Available It has been postulated that deficient or incomplete clinical and/or microbiological response to tuberculosis treatment is associated with cell-mediated immunological dysfunction involving monocytes and macrophages. A phase 2 safety trial was conducted by treating patients with either recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rhu-GM-CSF or a placebo, both in combination with anti-tuberculosis chemotherapy. Thirty-one patients with documented pulmonary tuberculosis were treated with rifampin/isoniazid for six months, plus pyrazinamide for the first two months. At the beginning of treatment, rhu-GM-CSF (125µg/M² was randomly assigned to 16 patients and injected subcutaneously twice weekly for four weeks; the other 15 patients received a placebo. The patients were accompanied in the hospital for two weeks, then monthly on an out patient basis, for 12 months. Clinical outcomes were similar in both groups, with no difference in acid-fast bacilli (AFB clearance in sputum at the end of the fourth week of treatment. Nevertheless, a trend to faster conversion to negative was observed in the rhu-GM-CSF group until the eighth week of treatment (p=0.07, after which all patients converted to AFB negative. Adverse events in the rhu-GM-CSF group were local skin inflammation and an increase in the leukocyte count after each injection, returning to normal 72 hours after rhu-GM-CSF injection. Three patients developed SGOP and SGPT > 2.5 times the normal values. All patients included in the GM-CSF group were culture negative at six months, except one who had primary TB resistance. None of the patients had to discontinue the treatment in either group. We conclude that rhu-GM-CSF adjuvant immunotherapy could be safely explored in a phase 3 trial with patients who have active tuberculosis.

  10. Use of rhu-GM-CSF in pulmonary tuberculosis patients: results of a randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedral-Sampaio Diana Brasil

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been postulated that deficient or incomplete clinical and/or microbiological response to tuberculosis treatment is associated with cell-mediated immunological dysfunction involving monocytes and macrophages. A phase 2 safety trial was conducted by treating patients with e