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  1. CSF Biomarkers for Alzheimer's Disease Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Anoop

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is the most common form of dementia that affects several million people worldwide. The major neuropathological hallmarks of AD are the presence of extracellular amyloid plaques that are composed of Aβ40 and Aβ42 and intracellular neurofibrillary tangles (NFT, which is composed of hyperphosphorylated protein Tau. While the amyloid plaques and NFT could define the disease progression involving neuronal loss and dysfunction, significant cognitive decline occurs before their appearance. Although significant advances in neuroimaging techniques provide the structure and physiology of brain of AD cases, the biomarker studies based on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF and plasma represent the most direct and convenient means to study the disease progression. Biomarkers are useful in detecting the preclinical as well as symptomatic stages of AD. In this paper, we discuss the recent advancements of various biomarkers with particular emphasis on CSF biomarkers for monitoring the early development of AD before significant cognitive dysfunction.

  2. Variability of CSF Alzheimer's disease biomarkers: implications for clinical practice.

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    Stephanie J B Vos

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF biomarkers are increasingly being used for diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD. OBJECTIVE: We investigated the influence of CSF intralaboratory and interlaboratory variability on diagnostic CSF-based AD classification of subjects and identified causes of this variation. METHODS: We measured CSF amyloid-β (Aβ 1-42, total tau (t-tau, and phosphorylated tau (p-tau by INNOTEST enzyme-linked-immunosorbent assays (ELISA in a memory clinic population (n = 126. Samples were measured twice in a single or two laboratories that served as reference labs for CSF analyses in the Netherlands. Predefined cut-offs were used to classify CSF biomarkers as normal or abnormal/AD pattern. RESULTS: CSF intralaboratory variability was higher for Aβ1-42 than for t-tau and p-tau. Reanalysis led to a change in biomarker classification (normal vs. abnormal of 26% of the subjects based on Aβ1-42, 10% based on t-tau, and 29% based on p-tau. The changes in absolute biomarker concentrations were paralleled by a similar change in levels of internal control samples between different assay lots. CSF interlaboratory variability was higher for p-tau than for Aβ1-42 and t-tau, and reanalysis led to a change in biomarker classification of 12% of the subjects based on Aβ1-42, 1% based on t-tau, and 22% based on p-tau. CONCLUSIONS: Intralaboratory and interlaboratory CSF variability frequently led to change in diagnostic CSF-based AD classification for Aβ1-42 and p-tau. Lot-to-lot variation was a major cause of intralaboratory variability. This will have implications for the use of these biomarkers in clinical practice.

  3. CSF biomarkers cutoffs: the importance of coincident neuropathological diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledo, Jon B; Brettschneider, Johannes; Grossman, Murray; Arnold, Steven E; Hu, William T; Xie, Sharon X; Lee, Virginia M-Y; Shaw, Leslie M; Trojanowski, John Q

    2012-07-01

    The effects of applying clinical versus neuropathological diagnosis and the inclusion of cases with coincident neuropathological diagnoses have not been assessed specifically when studying cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarker classification cutoffs for patients with neurodegenerative diseases that cause dementia. Thus, 142 neuropathologically diagnosed neurodegenerative dementia patients [71 Alzheimer's disease (AD), 29 frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD), 3 amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, 7 dementia with Lewy bodies, 32 of which cases also had coincident diagnoses] were studied. 96 % had enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) CSF data and 77 % had Luminex CSF data, with 43 and 46 controls for comparison, respectively. Aβ(42), total, and phosphorylated tau(181) were measured. Clinical and neuropathological diagnoses showed an 81.4 % overall agreement. Both assays showed high sensitivity and specificity to classify AD subjects against FTLD subjects and controls, and moderate sensitivity and specificity for classifying FTLD subjects against controls. However, among the cases with neuropathological diagnoses of AD plus another pathology (26.8 % of the sample), 69.4 % (ELISA) and 96.4 % (Luminex) were classified as AD according to their biomarker profiles. Use of clinical diagnosis instead of neuropathological diagnosis led to a 14-17 % underestimation of the biomarker accuracy. These results show that while CSF Aβ and tau assays are useful for diagnosis of AD and neurodegenerative diseases even at MCI stages, CSF diagnostic analyte panels that establish a positive diagnosis of Lewy body disease and FTLD are also needed, and must be established based on neuropathological rather than clinical diagnoses.

  4. Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Encephalitis : CSF Biomarkers of SIV Encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissel, Stephanie J; Kofler, Julia; Nyaundi, Julia; Murphey-Corb, Michael; Wisniewski, Stephen R; Wiley, Clayton A

    2016-06-01

    Antiretroviral therapy has led to increased survival of HIV-infected patients but also increased prevalence of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. We previously identified YKL40 as a potential cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarker of lentiviral central nervous system (CNS) disease in HIV-infected patients and in the macaque model of HIV encephalitis. The aim of this study was to define the specificity and sensitivity along with the predictive value of YKL40 as a biomarker of encephalitis and to assess its relationship to CSF viral load. CSF YKL40 and SIV RNA concentrations were analyzed over the course of infection in 19 SIV-infected pigtailed macaques and statistical analyses were performed to evaluate the relationship to encephalitis. Using these relationships, CSF alterations of 31 neuroimmune markers were studied pre-infection, during acute and asymptomatic infection, at the onset of encephalitis, and at necropsy. YKL40 CSF concentrations above 1122 ng/ml were found to be a specific and sensitive biomarker for the presence of encephalitis and were highly correlated with CSF viral load. Macaques that developed encephalitis had evidence of chronic CNS immune activation during early, asymptomatic, and end stages of infection. At the onset of encephalitis, CSF demonstrated a rise of neuroimmune markers associated with macrophage recruitment, activation and interferon response. CSF YKL40 concentration and viral load are valuable biomarkers to define the onset of encephalitis. Chronic CNS immune activation precedes the development of encephalitis while some responses suggest protection from CNS lentiviral disease.

  5. Neuropsychological and behavioural correlates of CSF biomarkers in dementia.

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    Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; Maertens, Karen; Vloeberghs, Ellen; Aerts, Tony; Somers, Nore; Mariën, Peter; De Deyn, Peter P

    2006-03-01

    To improve clinical, neuropsychological and behavioural characterisation of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers beta-amyloid((1-42)) protein (Abeta42), protein tau (tau) and tau phosphorylated at threonine 181 (P-tau181) across diagnostic dementia categories, a prospective study was set up. Patients with probable Alzheimer's disease (AD) (n=201), AD with cerebrovascular disease (CVD) (AD+CVD) (n=33), frontotemporal dementia (FTD) (n=27), dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) (n=22) and healthy controls (n=148) were included. All patients underwent neuropsychological examination and behavioural assessment by means of a battery of behavioural assessment scales. CSF was obtained by lumbar puncture and levels of Abeta42, tau and P-tau181 were determined with commercially available ELISA kits. Negative correlations between CSF Abeta42 levels and aggressiveness (Spearman: r=-0.223; p=0.002) and positive correlations with age at inclusion (r=0.195; p=0.006), age at onset (r=0.205; p=0.003) and MMSE scores (r=0.198; p=0.005) were found in AD. In AD+CVD, CSF Abeta42 levels were correlated with MMSE (r=0.482; p=0.006), Hierarchic Dementia Scale (r=0.503; p=0.017) and Boston Naming Test (r=0.516; p=0.012) scores. In controls, age was positively correlated with CSF tau (r=0.465; pbiomarker levels were obtained in healthy controls compared to AD patients, indicating that AD-induced pathophysiological processes change age-dependent regulation of CSF biomarker levels.

  6. Multiplexed immunoassay panel identifies novel CSF biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease diagnosis and prognosis.

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    Rebecca Craig-Schapiro

    Full Text Available Clinicopathological studies suggest that Alzheimer's disease (AD pathology begins ∼10-15 years before the resulting cognitive impairment draws medical attention. Biomarkers that can detect AD pathology in its early stages and predict dementia onset would, therefore, be invaluable for patient care and efficient clinical trial design. We utilized a targeted proteomics approach to discover novel cerebrospinal fluid (CSF biomarkers that can augment the diagnostic and prognostic accuracy of current leading CSF biomarkers (Aβ42, tau, p-tau181.Using a multiplexed Luminex platform, 190 analytes were measured in 333 CSF samples from cognitively normal (Clinical Dementia Rating [CDR] 0, very mildly demented (CDR 0.5, and mildly demented (CDR 1 individuals. Mean levels of 37 analytes (12 after Bonferroni correction were found to differ between CDR 0 and CDR>0 groups. Receiver-operating characteristic curve analyses revealed that small combinations of a subset of these markers (cystatin C, VEGF, TRAIL-R3, PAI-1, PP, NT-proBNP, MMP-10, MIF, GRO-α, fibrinogen, FAS, eotaxin-3 enhanced the ability of the best-performing established CSF biomarker, the tau/Aβ42 ratio, to discriminate CDR>0 from CDR 0 individuals. Multiple machine learning algorithms likewise showed that the novel biomarker panels improved the diagnostic performance of the current leading biomarkers. Importantly, most of the markers that best discriminated CDR 0 from CDR>0 individuals in the more targeted ROC analyses were also identified as top predictors in the machine learning models, reconfirming their potential as biomarkers for early-stage AD. Cox proportional hazards models demonstrated that an optimal panel of markers for predicting risk of developing cognitive impairment (CDR 0 to CDR>0 conversion consisted of calbindin, Aβ42, and age.Using a targeted proteomic screen, we identified novel candidate biomarkers that complement the best current CSF biomarkers for distinguishing very

  7. Association between cortical thickness and CSF biomarkers in mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer’s disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohades, Sara; Dubois, Jonathan; Parent, Maxime

    Background: The dynamic biomarker hypothesis predicts that fluid biomarker abnormalities precede brain morphological changes observed in AD by many years. However, the link between early CSF abnormalities and late structural changes remains under debate. Here we investigated the association betwe...

  8. Do CSF Biomarkers Predict Progression to Cognitive Impairment in Parkinson's disease patients? A Systematic Review.

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    Leaver, Katherine; Poston, Kathleen L

    2015-12-01

    Many patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) will develop cognitive impairment. Cross-sectional studies have shown that certain protein levels are altered in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of PD patients with dementia and are thought to represent potential biomarkers of underlying pathogenesis. Recent studies suggest that CSF biomarker levels may be predictive of future risk of cognitive decline in non-demented PD patients. However, the strength of this evidence and difference between specific CSF biomarkers is not well delineated. We therefore performed a systematic review to assess if levels of specific CSF protein biomarkers are predictive of progression to cognitive impairment. Nine articles were identified that met inclusion criteria for the review. Findings from the review suggest a convergence of evidence that a low baseline Aβ42 in the CSF of non-demented PD patients predicts development of cognitive impairment over time. Conversely, there is limited evidence that CSF levels of tau, either total tau or phosphorylated tau, is a useful predictive biomarker. There are mixed results for other CSF biomarkers such as α-synuclein, Neurofilament light chain, and Heart fatty acid-binding protein. Overall the results of this review show that certain CSF biomarkers have better predictive ability to identify PD patients who are at risk for developing cognitive impairment. Given the interest in developing disease-modifying therapies, identifying this group will be important for clinical trials as initiation of therapy prior to the onset of cognitive decline is likely to be more efficacious.

  9. Selected CSF biomarkers indicate no evidence of early neuroinflammation in Huntington disease

    OpenAIRE

    Vinther-Jensen, Tua; Börnsen, Lars; Budtz-Jørgensen, Esben; Ammitzbøll, Cecilie; Larsen, Ida U; Hjermind, Lena E; Sellebjerg, Finn; Nielsen, Jørgen E

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate CSF biomarkers of neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration in Huntington disease (HD) gene-expansion carriers compared to controls and to investigate these biomarkers in association with clinical HD rating scales and disease burden score. Methods: We collected CSF from 32 premanifest and 48 manifest HD gene-expansion carriers and 24 gene-expansion negative at-risk controls. We examined biomarkers of neuroinflammation (matrix metalloproteinase 9, C-X-C motif chemokine ...

  10. Untargeted 1H-NMR metabolomics in CSF: toward a diagnostic biomarker for motor neuron disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasco, Hélène; Nadal-Desbarats, Lydie; Pradat, Pierre-François; Gordon, Paul H; Antar, Catherine; Veyrat-Durebex, Charlotte; Moreau, Caroline; Devos, David; Mavel, Sylvie; Emond, Patrick; Andres, Christian R; Corcia, Philippe

    2014-04-01

    To develop a CSF metabolomics signature for motor neuron disease (MND) using (1)H-NMR spectroscopy and to evaluate the predictive value of the profile in a separate cohort. We collected CSF from patients with MND and controls and analyzed the samples using (1)H-NMR spectroscopy. We divided the total patient sample in a 4:1 ratio into a training cohort and a test cohort. First, a metabolomics signature was created by statistical modeling in the training cohort, and then the analyses tested the predictive value of the signature in the test cohort. We conducted 10 independent trials for each step. Finally, we identified the compounds that contributed most consistently to the metabolome profile. Analysis of CSF from 95 patients and 86 controls identified a diagnostic profile for MND (R(2)X > 22%, R(2)Y > 93%, Q(2) > 66%). The best model selected the correct diagnosis with mean probability of 99.31% in the training cohort. The profile discriminated between diagnostic groups with 78.9% sensitivity and 76.5% specificity in the test cohort. Metabolites linked to pathophysiologic pathways in MND (i.e., threonine, histidine, and molecules related to the metabolism of branched amino acids) were among the discriminant compounds. CSF metabolomics using (1)H-NMR spectroscopy can detect a reproducible metabolic signature for MND with reasonable performance. To our knowledge, this is the first metabolomics study that shows that a validation in separate cohorts is feasible. These data should be considered in future biomarker studies. This study provides Class III evidence that CSF metabolomics accurately distinguishes MNDs from other neurologic diseases.

  11. Consensus Guidelines for CSF and Blood Biobanking for CNS Biomarker Studies

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    Charlotte E. Teunissen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a long history of research into body fluid biomarkers in neurodegenerative and neuroinflammatory diseases. However, only a few biomarkers in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF are being used in clinical practice. Anti-aquaporin-4 antibodies in serum are currently useful for the diagnosis of neuromyelitis optica (NMO, but we could expect novel CSF biomarkers that help define prognosis and response to treatment for this disease. One of the most critical factors in biomarker research is the inadequate powering of studies performed by single centers. Collaboration between investigators is needed to establish large biobanks of well-defined samples. A key issue in collaboration is to establish standardized protocols for biobanking to ensure that the statistical power gained by increasing the numbers of CSF samples is not compromised by pre-analytical factors. Here, consensus guidelines for CSF collection and biobanking are presented, based on the guidelines that have been published by the BioMS-eu network for CSF biomarker research. We focussed on CSF collection procedures, pre-analytical factors and high quality clinical and paraclinical information. Importantly, the biobanking protocols are applicable for CSF biobanks for research targeting any neurological disease.

  12. Approach to Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) Biomarker Discovery and Evaluation in HIV Infection

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    Price, Richard W.; Peterson, Julia; Fuchs, Dietmar; Angel, Thomas E.; Zetterberg, Henrik; Hagberg, Lars; Spudich, Serena S.; Smith, Richard D.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Brown, Joseph N.; Gisslen, Magnus

    2013-12-13

    Central nervous system (CNS) infection is a nearly universal facet of systemic HIV infection that varies in character and neurological consequences. While clinical staging and neuropsychological test performance have been helpful in evaluating patients, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers present a valuable and objective approach to more accurate diagnosis, assessment of treatment effects and understanding of evolving pathobiology. We review some lessons from our recent experience with CSF biomarker studies. We have used two approaches to biomarker analysis: targeted, hypothesis-driven and non-targeted exploratory discovery methods. We illustrate the first with data from a cross-sectional study of defined subject groups across the spectrum of systemic and CNS disease progression and the second with a longitudinal study of the CSF proteome in subjects initiating antiretroviral treatment. Both approaches can be useful and, indeed, complementary. The first is helpful in assessing known or hypothesized biomarkers while the second can identify novel biomarkers and point to broad interactions in pathogenesis. Common to both is the need for well-defined samples and subjects that span a spectrum of biological activity and biomarker concentrations. Previouslydefined guide biomarkers of CNS infection, inflammation and neural injury are useful in categorizing samples for analysis and providing critical biological context for biomarker discovery studies. CSF biomarkers represent an underutilized but valuable approach to understanding the interactions of HIV and the CNS and to more objective diagnosis and assessment of disease activity. Both hypothesis-based and discovery methods can be useful in advancing the definition and use of these biomarkers.

  13. Mapping CSF biomarker profiles onto NIA-AA guidelines for Alzheimer's disease.

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    Alexopoulos, Panagiotis; Roesler, Jennifer; Thierjung, Nathalie; Werle, Lukas; Buck, Dorothea; Yakushev, Igor; Gleixner, Lena; Kagerbauer, Simone; Ortner, Marion; Grimmer, Timo; Kübler, Hubert; Martin, Jan; Laskaris, Nikolaos; Kurz, Alexander; Perneczky, Robert

    2016-10-01

    The National Institute on Aging-Alzheimer's Association (NIA-AA) guidelines for Alzheimer's disease (AD) propose the categorization of individuals according to their biomarker constellation. Though the NIA-AA criteria for preclinical AD and AD dementia have already been applied in conjunction with imaging AD biomarkers, the application of the criteria using comprehensive cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarker information has not been thoroughly studied yet. The study included a monocentric cohort with healthy (N = 41) and disease (N = 22) controls and patients with AD dementia (N = 119), and a multicentric sample with healthy controls (N = 116) and patients with AD dementia (N = 102). The CSF biomarkers β-amyloid 1-42, total tau, and phosphorylated tau at threonine 181 were measured with commercially available assays. Biomarker values were trichotomized into positive for AD, negative, or borderline. In controls the presence of normal CSF profiles varied between 13.6 and 25.4 % across the studied groups, while up to 8.6 % of them had abnormal CSF biomarkers. In 40.3-52.9 % of patients with AD dementia, a typical CSF profile for AD was detected. Approximately 40 % of the potential biomarker constellations are not considered in the NIA-AA guidelines, and more than 40 % of participants could not be classified into the NIA-AA categories with distinct biomarker constellations. Here, a refined scheme covering all potential biomarker constellations is proposed. These results enrich the discussion on the NIA-AA guidelines and point to a discordance between clinical symptomatology and CSF biomarkers even in patients with full-blown AD dementia, who are supposed to have a clearly positive for AD neurochemical profile.

  14. Beneficial effect of bilingualism on Alzheimer's disease CSF biomarkers and cognition.

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    Estanga, Ainara; Ecay-Torres, Mirian; Ibañez, Almudena; Izagirre, Andrea; Villanua, Jorge; Garcia-Sebastian, Maite; Iglesias Gaspar, M Teresa; Otaegui-Arrazola, Ane; Iriondo, Ane; Clerigue, Monserrat; Martinez-Lage, Pablo

    2017-02-01

    Bilingualism as a component of cognitive reserve has been claimed to delay the onset of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, its effect on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) AD-biomarkers has not been investigated. We assessed cognitive performance and CSF AD-biomarkers, and potential moderation effect of bilingualism on the association between age, CSF AD-biomarkers, and cognition. Cognitively healthy middle-aged participants classified as monolinguals (n = 100, nCSF = 59), early (n = 81, nCSF = 55) and late bilinguals (n = 97, nCSF = 52) were evaluated. Models adjusted for confounders showed that bilinguals performed better than monolinguals on digits backwards (early-bilinguals p = 0.003), Judgment of Line Orientation (JLO) (early-bilinguals p = 0.018; late-bilinguals p = 0.004), and Trail Making Test-B (late-bilinguals p = 0.047). Early bilingualism was associated with lower CSF total-tau (p = 0.019) and lower prevalence of preclinical AD (NIA-AA classification) (p = 0.02). Bilingualism showed a moderation effect on the relationship between age and CSF AD-biomarkers and the relationship between age and executive function. We conclude that bilingualism contributes to cognitive reserve enhancing executive and visual-spatial functions. For the first time, this study reveals that early bilingualism is associated with more favorable CSF AD-biomarker profile.

  15. Chasing the Effects of Pre-Analytical Confounders - A Multicenter Study on CSF-AD Biomarkers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leitão, Maria João; Baldeiras, Inês; Herukka, Sanna-Kaisa

    2015-01-01

    play an important role in the reliable measurement of these biomarkers across laboratories. AIM: In this study, we aim to surpass the efforts from previous studies, by employing a multicenter approach to assess the impact of less studied CSF pre-analytical confounders in AD-biomarkers quantification...

  16. Selected CSF biomarkers indicate no evidence of early neuroinflammation in Huntington disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther-Jensen, Tua; Börnsen, Lars Svend; Budtz-Jorgensen, Esben

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate CSF biomarkers of neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration in Huntington disease (HD) gene-expansion carriers compared to controls and to investigate these biomarkers in association with clinical HD rating scales and disease burden score. Methods: We collected CSF from 32...... premanifest and 48 manifest HD gene-expansion carriers and 24 gene-expansion negative at-risk controls. We examined biomarkers of neuroinflammation (matrix metalloproteinase 9, C-X-C motif chemokine 13, terminal complement complex, chitinase-3-like-protein 1 [CHI3L1], and osteopontin [OPN...... was the only biomarker that increased in premanifest stages and no evidence of early involvement of neuroinflammation in HD was found. However, we found that the biomarkers for neurodegeneration, MBP and tau, increased during the disease course in manifest HD gene-expansion carriers and were associated...

  17. Approach to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarker discovery and evaluation in HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Richard W; Peterson, Julia; Fuchs, Dietmar; Angel, Thomas E; Zetterberg, Henrik; Hagberg, Lars; Spudich, Serena; Smith, Richard D; Jacobs, Jon M; Brown, Joseph N; Gisslen, Magnus

    2013-12-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) infection is a nearly universal facet of systemic HIV infection that varies in character and neurological consequences. While clinical staging and neuropsychological test performance have been helpful in evaluating patients, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers present a valuable and objective approach to more accurate diagnosis, assessment of treatment effects and understanding of evolving pathobiology. We review some lessons from our recent experience with CSF biomarker studies. We have used two approaches to biomarker analysis: targeted, hypothesis-driven and non-targeted exploratory discovery methods. We illustrate the first with data from a cross-sectional study of defined subject groups across the spectrum of systemic and CNS disease progression and the second with a longitudinal study of the CSF proteome in subjects initiating antiretroviral treatment. Both approaches can be useful and, indeed, complementary. The first is helpful in assessing known or hypothesized biomarkers while the second can identify novel biomarkers and point to broad interactions in pathogenesis. Common to both is the need for well-defined samples and subjects that span a spectrum of biological activity and biomarker concentrations. Previously-defined guide biomarkers of CNS infection, inflammation and neural injury are useful in categorizing samples for analysis and providing critical biological context for biomarker discovery studies. CSF biomarkers represent an underutilized but valuable approach to understanding the interactions of HIV and the CNS and to more objective diagnosis and assessment of disease activity. Both hypothesis-based and discovery methods can be useful in advancing the definition and use of these biomarkers.

  18. Chasing the effects of Pre-analytical Confounders - a Multicentre Study on CSF-AD biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Joao Leitao

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Core cerebrospinal fluid (CSF biomarkers-Aβ42, Tau and pTau–have been recently incorporated in the revised criteria for Alzheimer’s disease (AD. However, their widespread clinical application lacks standardization. Pre-analytical sample handling and storage play an important role in the reliable measurement of these biomarkers across laboratories. In this study, we aim to surpass the efforts from previous studies, by employing a multicentre approach to assess the impact of less studied CSF pre-analytical confounders in AD-biomarkers quantification. Four different centres participated in this study and followed the same established protocol. CSF samples were analysed for three biomarkers (Aβ42, Tau and pTau and tested for different spinning conditions (temperature: Room temperature (RT vs. 4oC; speed: 500g vs. 2000g vs. 3000g, storage volume variations (25%, 50% and 75% of tube total volume as well as freezing-thaw cycles (up to 5 cyles. The influence of sample routine parameters, inter-centre variability and relative value of each biomarker (reported as normal/abnormal, was analysed. Centrifugation conditions did not influence biomarkers levels, except for samples with a high CSF total protein content, where either non centrifugation or centrifugation at RT, compared to 4ºC, led to higher Aβ42 levels. Reducing CSF storage volume from 75% to 50% of total tube capacity, decreased Aβ42 concentration (within analytical CV of the assay, whereas no change in Tau or pTau was observed. Moreover, the concentration of Tau and pTau appears to be stable up to 5 freeze-thaw cycles, whereas Aβ42 levels decrease if CSF is freeze-thawed more than 3 times. This systematic study reinforces the need for CSF centrifugation at 4ºC prior to storage and highlights the influence of storage conditions in Aβ42 levels. This study contributes to the establishment of harmonized standard operating procedures that will help reducing inter-lab variability of CSF

  19. Influence of APOE Genotype on Alzheimer’s Disease CSF Biomarkers in a Spanish Population

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    J. A. Monge-Argilés

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To evaluate the association between apolipoprotein E (APOE genotype and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF levels of Alzheimer’s disease (AD biomarkers and to study the influence of APOE genotype on the development of AD in a Spanish population. Material and Methods. The study comprised 29 amnestic mild cognitive impairment (MCI patients and 27 control subjects. Using ELISA methodology, CSF biomarkers and tau/Aβ ratios were obtained. ANOVA and adjusted odds ratios were calculated. Results. We observed the effect of APOE genotype and age on CSF AD variables. The progression to AD was more clearly influenced by CSF AD variables than by age or APOE status. Conclusions. APOE status influences CSF AD variables. However, the presence of APOE ε4 does not appear to be a deterministic factor for the development of AD, because CSF variables have a greater influence on progression to the disease. These results confirm previous observations and, to our knowledge, are the first published in a Spanish population.

  20. Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) Neuronal Biomarkers across the Spectrum of HIV Infection: Hierarchy of Injury and Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Julia; Gisslen, Magnus; Zetterberg, Henrik; Fuchs, Dietmar; Shacklett, Barbara L.; Hagberg, Lars; Yiannoutsos, Constantin T.; Spudich, Serena S.; Price, Richard W.

    2014-01-01

    The character of central nervous system (CNS) HIV infection and its effects on neuronal integrity vary with evolving systemic infection. Using a cross-sectional design and archived samples, we compared concentrations of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) neuronal biomarkers in 143 samples from 8 HIV-infected subject groups representing a spectrum of untreated systemic HIV progression and viral suppression: primary infection; four groups of chronic HIV infection neuroasymptomatic (NA) subjects defined by blood CD4+ T cells of >350, 200–349, 50–199, and NFL), total and phosphorylated tau (t-tau, p-tau), soluble amyloid precursor proteins alpha and beta (sAPPα, sAPPβ) and amyloid beta (Aβ) fragments 1–42, 1–40 and 1–38. Comparison of the biomarker changes showed a hierarchy of sensitivity in detection and suggested evolving mechanisms with progressive injury. NFL was the most sensitive neuronal biomarker. Its CSF concentration exceeded age-adjusted norms in all HAD patients, 75% of NA CD4NFL with CD4 decline in the absence of HAD, and were not decreased in PHI. The CSF Aβ peptides and p-tau concentrations did not differ among the groups, distinguishing the HIV CNS injury profile from Alzheimer's disease. These CSF biomarkers can serve as useful tools in selected research and clinical settings for patient classification, pathogenetic analysis, diagnosis and management. PMID:25541953

  1. Validation of soluble amyloid-beta precursor protein assays as diagnostic CSF biomarkers for neurodegenerative diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waalwijk van Doorn, L.L.C. van; Koel-Simmelink, M.J.; Haussmann, U.; Klafki, H.; Struyfs, H.; Linning, P.; Knolker, H.J.; Twaalfhoven, H.; Kuiperij, H.B.; Engelborghs, S.; Scheltens, P.; Verbeek, M.M.; Vanmechelen, E.; Wiltfang, J.; Teunissen, C.E.

    2016-01-01

    Analytical validation of a biomarker assay is essential before implementation in clinical practice can occur. In this study, we analytically validated the performance of assays detecting soluble amyloid-beta precursor protein (sAPP) alpha and beta in CSF in two laboratories according to previously

  2. Transmembrane amyloid-related proteins in CSF as potential biomarkers for Alzheimer’s disease

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    Inmaculada eLopez-Font

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In the continuing search for new cerebrospinal fluid (CSF biomarkers for Alzheimer’s disease (AD, reasonable candidates are the secretase enzymes involved in the processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP, as well as the large proteolytic cleavage fragments sAPPα and sAPPβ. The enzymatic activities of some of these secretases, such as BACE1 and TACE, have been investigated as potential AD biomarkers, and it has been assumed that these activities present in human CSF result from the soluble truncated forms of the membrane-bound enzymes. However, we and others recently identified soluble forms of BACE1 and APP in CSF containing the intracellular domains, as well as the multi-pass transmembrane presenilin-1 (PS1 and other subunits of γ-secretase. We also review recent findings that suggest that most of these soluble transmembrane proteins could display self-association properties based on hydrophobic and/or ionic interactions leading to the formation of heteromeric complexes. The oligomerization state of these potential new biomarkers needs to be taken into consideration for assessing their real potential as CSF biomarkers for AD by adequate molecular tools.

  3. Cognitive Reserve Modifies Age-Related Alterations in CSF Biomarkers of Alzheimer's Disease

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    Almeida, Rodrigo P.; Schultz, Stephanie A.; Austin, Benjamin P.; Boots, Elizabeth A.; Dowling, N. Maritza; Gleason, Carey E.; Bendlin, Barbara B.; Sager, Mark; Hermann, Bruce P.; Zetterberg, Henrik; Carlsson, Cindy; Johnson, Sterling; Asthana, Sanjay; Okonkwo, Ozioma C.

    2015-01-01

    Importance Although advancing age is the strongest risk factor for the development of symptomatic Alzheimer's disease (AD), recent studies have shown that there are individual differences in susceptibility to age-related alterations in the biomarkers of AD pathophysiology. Objective In this study, we investigated whether cognitive reserve modifies the adverse influence of age on key cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers of AD. Design, Setting, and Participants Cross-sectional cohort of 268 individuals (211 cognitively normal and 57 cognitively impaired) from the Wisconsin Registry for Alzheimer's Prevention and the Wisconsin Alzheimer's Disease Research Center participated in this study. They underwent lumbar puncture for collection of CSF samples, from which amyloid-β 42 (Aβ42), total tau (t-tau), and phosphorylated tau (p-tau) were immunoassayed. Additionally, we computed t-tau/Aβ42 and p-tau/Aβ42 ratios. Cognitive reserve was indexed by years of education, with ≥16 years taken to confer high reserve. Covariate-adjusted regression analyses were used to test whether the effect of age on CSF biomarkers was modified by cognitive reserve. Main outcome measures CSF levels of Aβ42, t-tau, p-tau, t-tau/Aβ42, and p-tau/Aβ42. Results There were significant age*cognitive reserve interactions for CSF t-tau (p=.019), p-tau (p=.009), t-tau/Aβ42 (p=.021), and p-tau/Aβ42 (p=.004). Specifically, with advancing age, individuals with high cognitive reserve exhibited attenuated adverse alterations in these CSF biomarkers compared with individuals with low cognitive reserve. This attenuation of age effects by cognitive reserve tended to be more pronounced in the cognitively-impaired group compared with the cognitively-normal group. Lastly, there was modest evidence of a dose response relationship such that the effect of age on the biomarkers was progressively attenuated given additional years of schooling. Conclusions and Relevance In a sample comprised of both cognitively

  4. NIA-AA staging of preclinical Alzheimer disease: discordance and concordance of CSF and imaging biomarkers.

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    Vos, Stephanie J B; Gordon, Brian A; Su, Yi; Visser, Pieter Jelle; Holtzman, David M; Morris, John C; Fagan, Anne M; Benzinger, Tammie L S

    2016-08-01

    The National Institute of Aging and Alzheimer's Association (NIA-AA) criteria for Alzheimer disease (AD) treat neuroimaging and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) markers of AD pathology as if they would be interchangeable. We tested this assumption in 212 cognitively normal participants who have both neuroimaging and CSF measures of β-amyloid (CSF Aβ1-42 and positron emission tomography imaging with Pittsburgh Compound B) and neuronal injury (CSF t-tau and p-tau and structural magnetic resonance imaging) with longitudinal clinical follow-up. Participants were classified in preclinical AD stage 1 (β-amyloidosis) or preclinical AD stage 2+ (β-amyloidosis and neuronal injury) using the NIA-AA criteria, or in the normal or suspected non-Alzheimer disease pathophysiology group (neuronal injury without β-amyloidosis). At baseline, 21% of participants had preclinical AD based on CSF and 28% based on neuroimaging. Between modalities, staging was concordant in only 47% of participants. Disagreement resulted from low concordance between biomarkers of neuronal injury. Still, individuals in stage 2+ using either criterion had an increased risk for clinical decline. This highlights the heterogeneity of the definition of neuronal injury and has important implications for clinical trials using biomarkers for enrollment or as surrogate end point measures. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Sphingomyelin as a myelin biomarker in CSF of acquired demyelinating neuropathies.

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    Capodivento, Giovanna; Visigalli, Davide; Garnero, Martina; Fancellu, Roberto; Ferrara, Michela Demetra; Basit, Abdul; Hamid, Zeeshan; Pastore, Vito Paolo; Garibaldi, Silvano; Armirotti, Andrea; Mancardi, Gianluigi; Serrati, Carlo; Capello, Elisabetta; Schenone, Angelo; Nobbio, Lucilla

    2017-08-10

    Fast, accurate and reliable methods to quantify the amount of myelin still lack, both in humans and experimental models. The overall objective of the present study was to demonstrate that sphingomyelin (SM) in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients affected by demyelinating neuropathies is a myelin biomarker. We found that SM levels mirror both peripheral myelination during development and small myelin rearrangements in experimental models. As in acquired demyelinating peripheral neuropathies myelin breakdown occurs, SM amount in the CSF of these patients might detect the myelin loss. Indeed, quantification of SM in 262 neurological patients showed a significant increase in patients with peripheral demyelination (p = 3.81 * 10 - 8) compared to subjects affected by non-demyelinating disorders. Interestingly, SM alone was able to distinguish demyelinating from axonal neuropathies and differs from the principal CSF indexes, confirming the novelty of this potential CSF index. In conclusion, SM is a specific and sensitive biomarker to monitor myelin pathology in the CSF of peripheral neuropathies. Most importantly, SM assay is simple, fast, inexpensive, and promising to be used in clinical practice and drug development.

  6. CSF biomarkers associated with disease heterogeneity in early Parkinson's disease: the Parkinson's Progression Markers Initiative study.

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    Kang, Ju-Hee; Mollenhauer, Brit; Coffey, Christopher S; Toledo, Jon B; Weintraub, Daniel; Galasko, Douglas R; Irwin, David J; Van Deerlin, Vivianna; Chen-Plotkin, Alice S; Caspell-Garcia, Chelsea; Waligórska, Teresa; Taylor, Peggy; Shah, Nirali; Pan, Sarah; Zero, Pawel; Frasier, Mark; Marek, Kenneth; Kieburtz, Karl; Jennings, Danna; Tanner, Caroline M; Simuni, Tanya; Singleton, Andrew; Toga, Arthur W; Chowdhury, Sohini; Trojanowski, John Q; Shaw, Leslie M

    2016-06-01

    The development of biomarkers to predict the progression of Parkinson's disease (PD) from its earliest stage through its heterogeneous course is critical for research and therapeutic development. The Parkinson's Progression Markers Initiative (PPMI) study is an ongoing international multicenter, prospective study to validate biomarkers in drug-naïve PD patients and matched healthy controls (HC). We quantified cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) alpha-synuclein (α-syn), amyloid-beta1-42 (Aβ1-42), total tau (t-tau), and tau phosphorylated at Thr181 (p-tau) in 660 PPMI subjects at baseline, and correlated these data with measures of the clinical features of these subjects. We found that CSF α-syn, t-tau and p-tau levels, but not Aβ1-42, were significantly lower in PD compared with HC, while the diagnostic value of the individual CSF biomarkers for PD diagnosis was limited due to large overlap. The level of α-syn, but not other biomarkers, was significantly lower in PD patients with non-tremor-dominant phenotype compared with tremor-dominant phenotype. In addition, in PD patients the lowest Aβ1-42, or highest t-tau/Aβ1-42 and t-tau/α-syn quintile in PD patients were associated with more severe non-motor dysfunction compared with the highest or lowest quintiles, respectively. In a multivariate regression model, lower α-syn was significantly associated with worse cognitive test performance. APOE ε4 genotype was associated with lower levels of Aβ1-42, but neither with PD diagnosis nor cognition. Our data suggest that the measurement of CSF biomarkers in early-stage PD patients may relate to disease heterogeneity seen in PD. Longitudinal observations in PPMI subjects are needed to define their prognostic performance.

  7. Characterization of novel CSF Tau and ptau biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease.

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    Jere E Meredith

    Full Text Available Cerebral spinal fluid (CSF Aβ42, tau and p181tau are widely accepted biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease (AD. Numerous studies show that CSF tau and p181tau levels are elevated in mild-to-moderate AD compared to age-matched controls. In addition, these increases might predict preclinical AD in cognitively normal elderly. Despite their importance as biomarkers, the molecular nature of CSF tau and ptau is not known. In the current study, reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography was used to enrich and concentrate tau prior to western-blot analysis. Multiple N-terminal and mid-domain fragments of tau were detected in pooled CSF with apparent sizes ranging from <20 kDa to ~40 kDa. The pattern of tau fragments in AD and control samples were similar. In contrast, full-length tau and C-terminal-containing fragments were not detected. To quantify levels, five tau ELISAs and three ptau ELISAs were developed to detect different overlapping regions of the protein. The discriminatory potential of each assay was determined using 20 AD and 20 age-matched control CSF samples. Of the tau ELISAs, the two assays specific for tau containing N-terminal sequences, amino acids 9-198 (numbering based on tau 441 and 9-163, exhibited the most significant differences between AD and control samples. In contrast, CSF tau was not detected with an ELISA specific for a more C-terminal region (amino acids 159-335. Significant discrimination was also observed with ptau assays measuring amino acids 159-p181 and 159-p231. Interestingly, the discriminatory potential of p181 was reduced when measured in the context of tau species containing amino acids 9-p181. Taken together, these results demonstrate that tau in CSF occurs as a series of fragments and that discrimination of AD from control is dependent on the subset of tau species measured. These assays provide novel tools to investigate CSF tau and ptau as biomarkers for other neurodegenerative diseases.

  8. Neurological assessment and its relationship to CSF biomarkers in amateur boxers.

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    Sanna Neselius

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mild traumatic brain injury (TBI or concussion is common in many sports. Today, neuropsychological evaluation is recommended in the monitoring of a concussion and in return-to-play considerations. To investigate the sensitivity of neuropsychological assessment, we tested amateur boxers post bout and compared with controls. Further the relationship between neuropsychological test results and brain injury biomarkers in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF were investigated. METHOD: Thirty amateur boxers on high elite level with a minimum of 45 bouts and 25 non-boxing matched controls were included. Memory tests (Rey Osterrieth Complex Figure, Listening Span, Digit Span, Controlled Word Association Test, and computerized testing of episodic memory, tests of processing speed and executive functions (Trail Making, Reaction Time, and Finger Tapping were performed and related to previously published CSF biomarker results for the axonal injury marker neurofilament light (NFL. RESULTS: The neurological assessment showed no significant differences between boxers and controls, although elevated CSF NFL, as a sign of axonal injury, was detected in about 80% of the boxers 1-6 days post bout. The investigation of the relationship between neuropsychological evaluation and CSF NFL concentrations revealed that boxers with persisting NFL concentration elevation after at least 14 days resting time post bout, had a significantly poorer performance on Trail Making A (p = 0.041 and Simple Reaction Time (p = 0.042 compared to other boxers. CONCLUSION: This is the first study showing traumatic axonal brain injury can be present without measureable cognitive impairment. The repetitive, subconcussive head trauma in amateur boxing causes axonal injury that can be detected with analysis of CSF NFL, but is not sufficient to produce impairment in memory tests, tests of processing speed, or executive functions. The association of prolonged CSF NFL increase in

  9. CSF-biomarkers in Olympic boxing: diagnosis and effects of repetitive head trauma.

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    Sanna Neselius

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sports-related head trauma is common but still there is no established laboratory test used in the diagnostics of minimal or mild traumatic brain injuries. Further the effects of recurrent head trauma on brain injury markers are unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between Olympic (amateur boxing and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF brain injury biomarkers. METHODS: The study was designed as a prospective cohort study. Thirty Olympic boxers with a minimum of 45 bouts and 25 non-boxing matched controls were included in the study. CSF samples were collected by lumbar puncture 1-6 days after a bout and after a rest period for at least 14 days. The controls were tested once. Biomarkers for acute and chronic brain injury were analysed. RESULTS: NFL (mean ± SD, 532±553 vs 135±51 ng/L p = 0.001, GFAP (496±238 vs 247±147 ng/L p80% of the boxers demonstrate that both the acute and the cumulative effect of head trauma in Olympic boxing may induce CSF biomarker changes that suggest minor central nervous injuries. The lack of normalization of NFL and GFAP after the rest period in a subgroup of boxers may indicate ongoing degeneration. The recurrent head trauma in boxing may be associated with increased risk of chronic traumatic brain injury.

  10. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF neuronal biomarkers across the spectrum of HIV infection: hierarchy of injury and detection.

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    Julia Peterson

    Full Text Available The character of central nervous system (CNS HIV infection and its effects on neuronal integrity vary with evolving systemic infection. Using a cross-sectional design and archived samples, we compared concentrations of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF neuronal biomarkers in 143 samples from 8 HIV-infected subject groups representing a spectrum of untreated systemic HIV progression and viral suppression: primary infection; four groups of chronic HIV infection neuroasymptomatic (NA subjects defined by blood CD4+ T cells of >350, 200-349, 50-199, and <50 cells/µL; HAD; treatment-induced viral suppression; and 'elite' controllers. Samples from 20 HIV-uninfected controls were also examined. The neuronal biomarkers included neurofilament light chain protein (NFL, total and phosphorylated tau (t-tau, p-tau, soluble amyloid precursor proteins alpha and beta (sAPPα, sAPPβ and amyloid beta (Aβ fragments 1-42, 1-40 and 1-38. Comparison of the biomarker changes showed a hierarchy of sensitivity in detection and suggested evolving mechanisms with progressive injury. NFL was the most sensitive neuronal biomarker. Its CSF concentration exceeded age-adjusted norms in all HAD patients, 75% of NA CD4<50, 40% of NA CD4 50-199, and 42% of primary infection, indicating common neuronal injury with untreated systemic HIV disease progression as well as transiently during early infection. By contrast, only 75% of HAD subjects had abnormal CSF t-tau levels, and there were no significant differences in t-tau levels among the remaining groups. sAPPα and β were also abnormal (decreased in HAD, showed less marked change than NFL with CD4 decline in the absence of HAD, and were not decreased in PHI. The CSF Aβ peptides and p-tau concentrations did not differ among the groups, distinguishing the HIV CNS injury profile from Alzheimer's disease. These CSF biomarkers can serve as useful tools in selected research and clinical settings for patient classification, pathogenetic

  11. Selected CSF biomarkers indicate no evidence of early neuroinflammation in Huntington disease

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    Vinther-Jensen, Tua; Börnsen, Lars; Budtz-Jørgensen, Esben; Ammitzbøll, Cecilie; Larsen, Ida U.; Hjermind, Lena E.; Sellebjerg, Finn

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate CSF biomarkers of neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration in Huntington disease (HD) gene-expansion carriers compared to controls and to investigate these biomarkers in association with clinical HD rating scales and disease burden score. Methods: We collected CSF from 32 premanifest and 48 manifest HD gene-expansion carriers and 24 gene-expansion negative at-risk controls. We examined biomarkers of neuroinflammation (matrix metalloproteinase 9, C-X-C motif chemokine 13, terminal complement complex, chitinase-3-like-protein 1 [CHI3L1], and osteopontin [OPN]) and neurodegeneration (microtubule-associated protein tau, neurofilament light polypeptide [NFL], and myelin basic protein [MBP]). The study was approved by the Ethics Committee of the Capital Region of Denmark (H2-2011-085) and written informed consent was obtained from each participant before enrollment. Results: NFL was the only biomarker that increased in premanifest stages and no evidence of early involvement of neuroinflammation in HD was found. However, we found that the biomarkers for neurodegeneration, MBP and tau, increased during the disease course in manifest HD gene-expansion carriers and were associated with an increase of the neuroinflammation biomarkers CHI3L1 and OPN. Tau was also increased in all gene-expansion carriers with psychiatric symptoms compared to gene-expansion carriers without psychiatric symptoms. Conclusions: Neuroinflammation, which seems not to be an early event in our cohort, may be secondary to neurodegeneration in late HD. NFL is a possible disease burden correlate in HD, reflecting neuronal loss even before motor symptom onset, and may be useful as a dynamic biomarker in intervention studies. PMID:27734023

  12. CSF-biomarkers in Olympic boxing: diagnosis and effects of repetitive head trauma.

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    Neselius, Sanna; Brisby, Helena; Theodorsson, Annette; Blennow, Kaj; Zetterberg, Henrik; Marcusson, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Sports-related head trauma is common but still there is no established laboratory test used in the diagnostics of minimal or mild traumatic brain injuries. Further the effects of recurrent head trauma on brain injury markers are unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between Olympic (amateur) boxing and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) brain injury biomarkers. The study was designed as a prospective cohort study. Thirty Olympic boxers with a minimum of 45 bouts and 25 non-boxing matched controls were included in the study. CSF samples were collected by lumbar puncture 1-6 days after a bout and after a rest period for at least 14 days. The controls were tested once. Biomarkers for acute and chronic brain injury were analysed. NFL (mean ± SD, 532±553 vs 135±51 ng/L p = 0.001), GFAP (496±238 vs 247±147 ng/L pboxing compared to controls. NFL (402±434 ng/L p = 0.004) and GFAP (369±113 ng/L p = 0.001) concentrations remained elevated after the rest period. Increased CSF levels of T-tau, NFL, GFAP, and S-100B in >80% of the boxers demonstrate that both the acute and the cumulative effect of head trauma in Olympic boxing may induce CSF biomarker changes that suggest minor central nervous injuries. The lack of normalization of NFL and GFAP after the rest period in a subgroup of boxers may indicate ongoing degeneration. The recurrent head trauma in boxing may be associated with increased risk of chronic traumatic brain injury.

  13. CSF xanthine, homovanillic acid, and their ratio as biomarkers of Parkinson's disease.

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    LeWitt, Peter; Schultz, Lonni; Auinger, Peggy; Lu, Mei

    2011-08-23

    Diminished nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurotransmission is a biochemical hallmark of Parkinson's disease. Despite this, a reliable trait biomarker of sporadic Parkinson's disease has not emerged from measurements of cerebrospinal fluid dopamine metabolites. Previous studies have highlighted strong neurochemical relationships between dopamine and various purine compounds. In this study, we analyzed cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of homovanillic acid (the major catabolite of dopamine) and the purine compound xanthine for a comparison of 217 unmedicated Parkinson's disease subjects and 26 healthy controls. These compounds were highly correlated for both the Parkinson's disease subjects (r=0.68) and for controls (r=0.73; both groups, pParkinson's disease from controls, their ratio did. For controls, the mean [xanthine]/[homovanillic acid] quotient was 13.1±5.5 as compared to the Parkinson's disease value of 17.4±6.7 at an initial lumbar CSF collection (p=0.0017), and 19.7±8.7 (pParkinson's disease subjects differed as a function of disease severity, as measured by the sum of Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale Activities of Daily Living and Motor Exam ratings. The [xanthine]/[homovanillic acid] ratio also increased between the first and second CSF collections, suggesting that this quotient provides both a state and trait biomarker of Parkinson's disease. These observations add to other neurochemical evidence that links purine metabolism to Parkinson's disease.

  14. Neurofilaments in CSF as diagnostic biomarkers in motor neuron disease: a meta-analysis

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    Dawei Li

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available AbstractObjective: Neurofilaments in CSF are promising biomarkers which might help in the diagnosis of motor neuron disease (MND. We aim to assess the diagnostic value of neurofilaments in CSF for MND.Methods: Pubmed, Emabase and Web of Science were searched for relevant studies systematically. Articles in English that evaluated the utility of neurofilaments in CSF in the diagnosis of MND were included. Data were extracted by two independent investigators. Diagnostic indexes for neurofilament light chain (NFL and phosphorylated neurofilament heavy chain (pNFH were calculated separately. Stata 12.0 software with a bivariate mixed-effects model was used to summarize the diagnostic indexes from eligible studies.Results: Five studies on NFL and eight studies on pNFH met inclusion criteria. For NFL, the pooled sensitivity and specificity were 81% (95% confidence interval CI, 72%-88% and 85% (95%CI, 76%-91%, respectively; the positive likelihood ratio (PLR and negative likelihood ratio (NLR were 5.5 (95%CI, 3.1-9.8 and 0.22 (95%CI, 0.14-0.35, respectively; the summary diagnostic odds ratio (DOR was 25 (95%CI, 9-70, and the area under summary receiver operator characteristic curve (AUC was 0.90 (95%CI, 0.87-0.92. For pNFH, the pooled sensitivity, specificity, PLR and NLR were 85% (95% CI, 80%-88%, 85% (95%CI, 77%-90%, 5.5 (95%CI, 3.6-8.4 and 0.18 (95%CI, 0.13-0.25 respectively; the DOR was 30 (95%CI, 16-58, and the AUC was 0.91 (95%CI, 0.88-0.93.Conclusion: Neurofilaments in CSF have a high value in the diagnosis of MND, though the optimal cutoff value remains to be further investigated.

  15. Metallomics study in CSF for putative biomarkers to predict cerebral vasospasm.

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    Zhang, Yaofang; Clark, Joseph F; Pyne-Geithman, Gail; Caruso, Joseph

    2010-09-01

    suggested protein similarities or differences across the three CSF sample types. Six protein families with possible protein markers were further identified, and may be considered as possible focus areas for discovering valuable biomarkers to preclude the debilitating or deadly vasospasm.

  16. (18)F-AV-1451 and CSF T-tau and P-tau as biomarkers in Alzheimer's disease.

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    Mattsson, Niklas; Schöll, Michael; Strandberg, Olof; Smith, Ruben; Palmqvist, Sebastian; Insel, Philip S; Hägerström, Douglas; Ohlsson, Tomas; Zetterberg, Henrik; Jögi, Jonas; Blennow, Kaj; Hansson, Oskar

    2017-09-01

    To elucidate the relationship between cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) total-tau (T-tau) and phosphorylated tau (P-tau) with the tau PET ligand (18)F-AV-1451 in Alzheimer's disease (AD), we examined 30 cognitively healthy elderly (15 with preclinical AD), 14 prodromal AD, and 39 AD dementia patients. CSF T-tau and P-tau were highly correlated (R = 0.92, P AV-1451, and mainly in demented AD patients. (18)F-AV-1451, but not CSF T-tau or P-tau, was strongly associated with atrophy and cognitive impairment. CSF tau was increased in preclinical AD, despite normal (18)F-AV-1451 retention. However, not all dementia AD patients exhibited increased CSF tau, even though (18)F-AV-1451 retention was always increased at this disease stage. We conclude that CSF T-tau and P-tau mainly behave as biomarkers of "disease state", since they appear to be increased in many cases of AD at all disease stages, already before the emergence of tau aggregates. In contrast, (18)F-AV-1451 is a biomarker of "disease stage", since it is increased in clinical stages of the disease, and is associated with brain atrophy and cognitive decline. © 2017 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  17. Frontal presentation of Alzheimer's disease: A series of patients with biological evidence by CSF biomarkers

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    Leonardo Cruz de Souza

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Besides its typical amnesic presentation, focal atypical presentations of Alzheimer's disease (AD have been described in neuropathological studies. These phenotypical variants of AD (so-called "atypical AD" do not follow the typical amnestic pattern and include non-amnestic focal cortical syndromes, such as posterior cortical atrophy and frontal variant AD. These variants exhibit characteristic histological lesions of Alzheimer pathology at post-mortem exam. By using physiopathological markers, such as cerebrospinal fluid markers, it is now possible to establish in vivo a biological diagnosis of AD in these focal cortical syndromes. We report a series of eight patients who were diagnosed with behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia based on their clinical, neuropsychological and neuroimaging findings, while CSF biomarkers showed an AD biological profile, thus supporting a diagnosis of frontal variant of AD.

  18. CSF cytokines/chemokines as biomarkers in neuroinflammatory CNS disorders: A systematic review.

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    Kothur, Kavitha; Wienholt, Louise; Brilot, Fabienne; Dale, Russell C

    2016-01-01

    Despite improved understanding of the pathogenesis of neuroinflammatory disorders of the brain and development of new diagnostic markers, our biomarker repertoire to demonstrate and monitor inflammation remains limited. Using PubMed database, we reviewed 83 studies on CSF cytokines and chemokines and describe the pattern of elevation and possible role of cytokines/chemokines as biomarkers in viral and autoimmune inflammatory neurological disorders of the CNS. Despite inconsistencies and overlap of cytokines and chemokines in different neuroinflammation syndromes, there are some trends regarding the pattern of cytokines/chemokine elevation. Namely B cell markers, such as CXCL13 and BAFF are predominantly investigated and found to be elevated in autoantibody-associated disorders, whereas interferon gamma (IFN-γ) is elevated mainly in viral encephalitis. Th2 and Th17 cytokines are frequently elevated in acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) and neuromyelitis optica (NMO), whereas Th1 and Th17 cytokines are more commonly elevated in multiple sclerosis (MS). Cytokine/chemokine profiling might provide new insights into disease pathogenesis, and improve our ability to monitor inflammation and response to treatment.

  19. Association between FDG uptake, CSF biomarkers and cognitive performance in patients with probable Alzheimer's disease

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    Arlt, Soenke; Jahn, Holger; Eichenlaub, Martin [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Hamburg (Germany); Brassen, Stefanie [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Institute for Systems Neuroscience, Hamburg (Germany); Wilke, Florian; Apostolova, Ivayla; Buchert, Ralph [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hamburg (Germany); Wenzel, Fabian; Young, Stewart [Philips Research, Digital Imaging Department, Hamburg (Germany); Thiele, Frank [Philips Research, Molecular Imaging Department, Aachen (Germany)

    2009-07-15

    Brain imaging of FDG uptake and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentration of amyloid-beta 1-42 (A{beta}{sub 1-42}) or tau proteins are promising biomarkers in the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). There is still uncertainty regarding any association between decreased FDG uptake and alterations in CSF markers. The relationship between FDG uptake, CSF A{beta}{sub 1-42} and total tau (T-tau), as well as the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score was investigated in 34 subjects with probable AD using step-wise linear regression. FDG uptake was scaled to the pons. Scaled FDG uptake was significantly reduced in the probable AD subjects compared to 17 controls bilaterally in the precuneus/posterior cingulate area, angular gyrus/inferior parietal cortex, inferior temporal/midtemporal cortex, midfrontal cortex, and left caudate. Voxel-based single-subject analysis of the probable AD subjects at p < 0.001 (uncorrected) revealed a total volume of significant hypometabolism ranging from 0 to 452 ml (median 70 ml). The total hypometabolic volume was negatively correlated with the MMSE score, but it was not correlated with the CSF measures. VOI-based step-wise linear regression revealed that scaled FDG uptake in the precuneus/posterior cingulate was negatively correlated with CSF A{beta}{sub 1-42}. Scaled FDG uptake in the caudate was positively correlated with CSF T-tau. The extent and local severity of the reduction in FDG uptake in probable AD subjects are associated with cognitive impairment. In addition, there appears to be a relationship between local FDG uptake and CSF biomarkers which differs between different brain regions. (orig.)

  20. CSF biomarkers associated with disease heterogeneity in early Parkinson’s disease: the Parkinson’s Progression Markers Initiative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Ju-Hee; Mollenhauer, Brit; Coffey, Christopher S.; Toledo, Jon B.; Weintraub, Daniel; Galasko, Douglas R.; Irwin, David J.; Van Deerlin, Vivianna; Chen-Plotkin, Alice S.; Caspell-Garcia, Chelsea; Waligórska, Teresa; Taylor, Peggy; Shah, Nirali; Pan, Sarah; Zero, Pawel; Frasier, Mark; Marek, Kenneth; Kieburtz, Karl; Jennings, Danna; Tanner, Caroline M.; Simuni, Tanya; Singleton, Andrew; Toga, Arthur W.; Chowdhury, Sohini; Trojanowski, John Q.; Shaw, Leslie M.

    2016-01-01

    The development of biomarkers to predict the progression of Parkinson’s disease (PD) from its earliest stage through its heterogeneous course is critical for research and therapeutic development. The Parkinson’s Progression Markers Initiative (PPMI) study is an ongoing international multicenter, prospective study to validate biomarkers in drug-naïve PD patients and matched healthy controls (HC). We quantified cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) alpha-synuclein (α-syn), amyloid-beta1–42 (Aβ1–42), total tau (t-tau), and tau phosphorylated at Thr181 (p-tau) in 660 PPMI subjects at baseline, and correlated these data with measures of the clinical features of these subjects. We found that CSF α-syn, t-tau and p-tau levels, but not Aβ1–42, were significantly lower in PD compared with HC, while the diagnostic value of the individual CSF biomarkers for PD diagnosis was limited due to large overlap. The level of α-syn, but not other biomarkers, was significantly lower in PD patients with non-tremor-dominant phenotype compared with tremor-dominant phenotype. In addition, in PD patients the lowest Aβ1–42, or highest t-tau/Aβ1–42 and t-tau/α-syn quintile in PD patients were associated with more severe non-motor dysfunction compared with the highest or lowest quintiles, respectively. In a multivariate regression model, lower α-syn was significantly associated with worse cognitive test performance. APOE ε4 genotype was associated with lower levels of Aβ1–42, but neither with PD diagnosis nor cognition. Our data suggest that the measurement of CSF biomarkers in early-stage PD patients may relate to disease heterogeneity seen in PD. Longitudinal observations in PPMI subjects are needed to define their prognostic performance. PMID:27021906

  1. CSF CXCL10, CXCL9, and neopterin as candidate prognostic biomarkers for HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis.

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    Tomoo Sato

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1 -associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP is a rare chronic neuroinflammatory disease. Since the disease course of HAM/TSP varies among patients, there is a dire need for biomarkers capable of predicting the rate of disease progression. However, there have been no studies to date that have compared the prognostic values of multiple potential biomarkers for HAM/TSP. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Peripheral blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF samples from HAM/TSP patients and HTLV-1-infected control subjects were obtained and tested retrospectively for several potential biomarkers, including chemokines and other cytokines, and nine optimal candidates were selected based on receiver operating characteristic (ROC analysis. Next, we evaluated the relationship between these candidates and the rate of disease progression in HAM/TSP patients, beginning with a first cohort of 30 patients (Training Set and proceeding to a second cohort of 23 patients (Test Set. We defined "deteriorating HAM/TSP" as distinctly worsening function (≥3 grades on Osame's Motor Disability Score (OMDS over four years and "stable HAM/TSP" as unchanged or only slightly worsened function (1 grade on OMDS over four years, and we compared the levels of the candidate biomarkers in patients divided into these two groups. The CSF levels of chemokine (C-X-C motif ligand 10 (CXCL10, CXCL9, and neopterin were well-correlated with disease progression, better even than HTLV-1 proviral load in PBMCs. Importantly, these results were validated using the Test Set. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: As the CSF levels of CXCL10, CXCL9, and neopterin were the most strongly correlated with rate of disease progression, they represent the most viable candidates for HAM/TSP prognostic biomarkers. The identification of effective prognostic biomarkers could lead to earlier detection of high-risk patients, more patient-specific treatment

  2. MicroRNA Profiling of CSF Reveals Potential Biomarkers to Detect Alzheimer`s Disease.

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    Johannes Denk

    Full Text Available The miRBase-21 database currently lists 1881 microRNA (miRNA precursors and 2585 unique mature human miRNAs. Since their discovery, miRNAs have proved to present a new level of epigenetic post-transcriptional control of protein synthesis. Initial results point to a possible involvement of miRNA in Alzheimer's disease (AD. We applied OpenArray technology to profile the expression of 1178 unique miRNAs in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF samples of AD patients (n = 22 and controls (n = 28. Using a Cq of 34 as cut-off, we identified positive signals for 441 miRNAs, while 729 miRNAs could not be detected, indicating that at least 37% of miRNAs are present in the brain. We found 74 miRNAs being down- and 74 miRNAs being up-regulated in AD using a 1.5 fold change threshold. By applying the new explorative "Measure of relevance" method, 6 reliable and 9 informative biomarkers were identified. Confirmatory MANCOVA revealed reliable miR-100, miR-146a and miR-1274a as differentially expressed in AD reaching Bonferroni corrected significance. MANCOVA also confirmed differential expression of informative miR-103, miR-375, miR-505#, miR-708, miR-4467, miR-219, miR-296, miR-766 and miR-3622b-3p. Discrimination analysis using a combination of miR-100, miR-103 and miR-375 was able to detect AD in CSF by positively classifying controls and AD cases with 96.4% and 95.5% accuracy, respectively. Referring to the Ingenuity database we could identify a set of AD associated genes that are targeted by these miRNAs. Highly predicted targets included genes involved in the regulation of tau and amyloid pathways in AD like MAPT, BACE1 and mTOR.

  3. Meta-Review of CSF core biomarkers in Alzheimer’s disease: the state-of-the-art after the new revised diagnostic criteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel eFerreira

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Current research criteria for Alzheimer’s disease (AD include Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF biomarkers into the diagnostic algorithm. However, spreading their use to the clinical routine is still questionable. Objective: To provide an updated, systematic and critical review on the diagnostic utility of the CSF core biomarkers for AD. Data sources: MEDLINE, PreMedline, EMBASE, PsycInfo, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, and CRD.Eligibility criteria: 1a Systematic reviews with meta-analysis; 1b Primary studies published after the new revised diagnostic criteria; 2 Evaluation of the diagnostic performance of at least one CSF core biomarker.Results: The diagnostic performance of CSF biomarkers is generally satisfactory. They are optimal for discriminating AD patients from healthy controls. Their combination may also be suitable for Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI prognosis. However, CSF biomarkers fail to distinguish AD from other forms of dementia. Limitations: 1 use of clinical diagnosis as standard instead of pathological postmortem confirmation; 2 variability of methodological aspects; 3 insufficiently long follow-up periods in MCI studies; and 4 lower diagnostic accuracy in primary care compared with memory clinics. Conclusions: Additional work needs to be done to validate the application of CSF core biomarkers as they are proposed in the new revised diagnostic criteria. The use of CSF core biomarkers in clinical routine is more likely if these limitations are overcome. Early diagnosis is going to be of utmost importance when effective pharmacological treatment will be available and the CSF core biomarkers can also be implemented in clinical trials for drug development.

  4. Meta-Review of CSF Core Biomarkers in Alzheimer’s Disease: The State-of-the-Art after the New Revised Diagnostic Criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Daniel; Perestelo-Pérez, Lilisbeth; Westman, Eric; Wahlund, Lars-Olof; Sarría, Antonio; Serrano-Aguilar, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Background: Current research criteria for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) include cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers into the diagnostic algorithm. However, spreading their use to the clinical routine is still questionable. Objective: To provide an updated, systematic and critical review on the diagnostic utility of the CSF core biomarkers for AD. Data sources: MEDLINE, PreMedline, EMBASE, PsycInfo, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, and CRD. Eligibility criteria: (1a) Systematic reviews with meta-analysis; (1b) Primary studies published after the new revised diagnostic criteria; (2) Evaluation of the diagnostic performance of at least one CSF core biomarker. Results: The diagnostic performance of CSF biomarkers is generally satisfactory. They are optimal for discriminating AD patients from healthy controls. Their combination may also be suitable for mild cognitive impairment (MCI) prognosis. However, CSF biomarkers fail to distinguish AD from other forms of dementia. Limitations: (1) Use of clinical diagnosis as standard instead of pathological postmortem confirmation; (2) variability of methodological aspects; (3) insufficiently long follow-up periods in MCI studies; and (4) lower diagnostic accuracy in primary care compared with memory clinics. Conclusion: Additional work needs to be done to validate the application of CSF core biomarkers as they are proposed in the new revised diagnostic criteria. The use of CSF core biomarkers in clinical routine is more likely if these limitations are overcome. Early diagnosis is going to be of utmost importance when effective pharmacological treatment will be available and the CSF core biomarkers can also be implemented in clinical trials for drug development. PMID:24715863

  5. CSF Biomarkers of Monocyte Activation and Chemotaxis correlate with Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Metabolites during Chronic HIV Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Albert M.; Fennema-Notestine, Christine; Umlauf, Anya; Taylor, Michael J.; Clifford, David B.; Marra, Christina M.; Collier, Ann C.; Gelman, Benjamin B.; McArthur, Justin C.; McCutchan, J. Allen; Simpson, David M.; Morgello, Susan; Grant, Igor; Letendre, Scott L.

    2015-01-01

    Background HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) persist despite combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), supporting the need to better understand HIV neuropathogenesis. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) of the brain has demonstrated abnormalities in HIV-infected individuals despite cART. We examined the associations between MRS metabolites and selected cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers reflecting monocyte/macrophage activation and chemotaxis. Methods A multicenter cross-sectional study involving five sites in the United States was conducted. The following CSF biomarkers were measured: soluble CD14 (sCD14), monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1), interferon inducible protein 10 (IP-10), and stromal cell derived growth factor 1 alpha (SDF-1α). The following MRS metabolites were measured from basal ganglia (BG), frontal white matter (FWM) and frontal gray matter (FGM): N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA), Myo-inositol (MI), Choline (Cho), and Creatine (Cr). CSF biomarkers were compared to absolute MRS metabolites as well as metabolite/Cr ratios using linear regression. Results 83 HIV-infected individuals were included, 78% on cART and 37% with HAND. The most robust positive correlations were between MCP-1 and Cho in BG (R2 0.179, p<0.001) as well as MCP-1 and MI in FWM (R2 0.137, p=0.002). Higher Cr levels in FWM were associated with MCP-1 (R2 0. 075, p=0.01) and IP-10 (R2 0.106, p=0.003). Comparing biomarkers to MRS metabolite/Cr ratios impacted some relationships, e.g., higher sCD14 levels were associated with lower Cho/Cr ratios in FGM (R2 0.224, p<0.001), although higher MCP-1 levels remained associated with Cho/Cr in BG. Conclusion These findings provide evidence that monocyte activation and chemotaxis continue to contribute to HIV-associated brain abnormalities in cART-treated individuals. PMID:26069183

  6. CSF Biomarkers and Its Associations with 18F-AV133 Cerebral VMAT2 Binding in Parkinson’s Disease—A Preliminary Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Rui; Zhang, Guangjian; Chen, Xueqi; Yang, Aimin; Smith, Gwenn; Wong, Dean F.; Zhou, Yun

    2016-01-01

    Objective Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers, such as α-synuclein (α-syn), amyloid beta peptide 1–42 (Aβ1–42), phosphorylated tau (181P) (p-tau), and total tau (t-tau), have long been associated with the development of Parkinson disease (PD) and other neurodegenerative diseases. In this investigation, we reported the assessment of CSF biomarkers and their correlations with vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) bindings measured with 18F-9-fluoropropyl-(+)-dihydrotetrabenazine (18F-AV133) that is being developed as a biomarker for PD. We test the hypothesis that monoaminergic degeneration was correlated with CSF biomarker levels in untreated PD patients. Methods The available online data from the Parkinson’s Progression Markers Initiative study (PPMI) project were collected and analyzed, which include demographic information, clinical evaluations, CSF biomarkers (α-syn, Aβ1–42, p-tau, and t-tau), 18F-AV133 brain PET, and T1 weighted MRIs. Region of interest (ROI) and voxel-wise Pearson correlation between standardized uptake value ratio (SUVR) and CSF biomarkers were calculated. Results Our major findings are: 1) Compared with controls, CSF α-syn and tau levels decreased significantly in PD; 2) α-syn was closely correlated with Aβ1–42 and tau in PD, especially in early-onset patients; and 3) hypothesis-driven ROI analysis found a significant negative correlation between CSF Aβ1–42 levels and VMAT2 densities in post cingulate, left caudate, left anterior putamen, and left ventral striatum in PDs. CSF t-tau and p-tau levels were significantly negatively related to VMAT2 SUVRs in substantia nigra and left ventral striatum, respectively. Voxel-wise analysis showed that left caudate, parahippocampal gyrus, insula and temporal lobe were negatively correlated with Aβ1–42. In addition, superior frontal gyrus and transverse temporal gyrus were negatively correlated with CSF p-tau levels. Conclusion These results suggest that monoaminergic

  7. The past and the future of Alzheimer’s disease CSF biomarkers – a journey towards validated biochemical tests covering the whole spectra of molecular events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaj eBlennow

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper gives a short review on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF biomarkers for Alzheimer’s disease (AD, from early developments to high-precision validated assays on fully automated lab analyzers. We also discuss developments on novel biomarkers, such as synaptic proteins and Aβ oligomers. Our vision for the future is that assaying a set of biomarkers in a single CSF tube can monitor the whole spectra of AD molecular pathogenic events. CSF biomarkers will have a central position not only for clinical diagnosis, but also for the understanding of the sequence of molecular events in the pathogenic process underlying AD and as tools to monitor the effects of novel drug candidates targeting these different mechanisms.

  8. Association between cortical thickness and CSF biomarkers in mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer’s disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohades, Sara; Dubois, Jonathan; Parent, Maxime;

    between cortical thinning, amyloidosis or tau hyperphosphorylation depends on cortical regions and clinical stages of AD. Methods: T1-weighed MRIs and associated CSF markers from individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI; 16), Alzheimer Disease (AD; n¼7) and age-matched cognitively normal subjects...... regional cortical thinning (CT) measured by Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and brain amyloidosis (measured by CSF Ab 1-42 concentrations), or tau hyperphosphorylation (tau 181; p-tau) in Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) and Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) patients. We test the hypothesis that the association...... (CN; n¼8) were obtained from the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) cohort. Cortical surface reconstruction and group registration were generated using Freesurfer. A general linear model was used to conduct regressions between CSF markers and cortical thickness. Results: Correlation...

  9. Recommendations for CSF AD biomarkers in the diagnostic evaluation of dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Anja Hviid; Herukka, Sanna-Kaisa; Andreasen, Niels

    2017-01-01

    This article presents recommendations, based on the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation method, for the clinical application of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) amyloid-β1-42, tau, and phosphorylated tau in the diagnostic evaluation of patients with dementia. The recommen...

  10. Integration and relative value of biomarkers for prediction of MCI to AD progression: Spatial patterns of brain atrophy, cognitive scores, APOE genotype and CSF biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Da

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluates the individual, as well as relative and joint value of indices obtained from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI patterns of brain atrophy (quantified by the SPARE-AD index, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF biomarkers, APOE genotype, and cognitive performance (ADAS-Cog in progression from mild cognitive impairment (MCI to Alzheimer's disease (AD within a variable follow-up period up to 6 years, using data from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative-1 (ADNI-1. SPARE-AD was first established as a highly sensitive and specific MRI-marker of AD vs. cognitively normal (CN subjects (AUC = 0.98. Baseline predictive values of all aforementioned indices were then compared using survival analysis on 381 MCI subjects. SPARE-AD and ADAS-Cog were found to have similar predictive value, and their combination was significantly better than their individual performance. APOE genotype did not significantly improve prediction, although the combination of SPARE-AD, ADAS-Cog and APOE ε4 provided the highest hazard ratio estimates of 17.8 (last vs. first quartile. In a subset of 192 MCI patients who also had CSF biomarkers, the addition of Aβ1–42, t-tau, and p-tau181p to the previous model did not improve predictive value significantly over SPARE-AD and ADAS-Cog combined. Importantly, in amyloid-negative patients with MCI, SPARE-AD had high predictive power of clinical progression. Our findings suggest that SPARE-AD and ADAS-Cog in combination offer the highest predictive power of conversion from MCI to AD, which is improved, albeit not significantly, by APOE genotype. The finding that SPARE-AD in amyloid-negative MCI patients was predictive of clinical progression is not expected under the amyloid hypothesis and merits further investigation.

  11. Integration and relative value of biomarkers for prediction of MCI to AD progression: spatial patterns of brain atrophy, cognitive scores, APOE genotype and CSF biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da, Xiao; Toledo, Jon B; Zee, Jarcy; Wolk, David A; Xie, Sharon X; Ou, Yangming; Shacklett, Amanda; Parmpi, Paraskevi; Shaw, Leslie; Trojanowski, John Q; Davatzikos, Christos

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluates the individual, as well as relative and joint value of indices obtained from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) patterns of brain atrophy (quantified by the SPARE-AD index), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers, APOE genotype, and cognitive performance (ADAS-Cog) in progression from mild cognitive impairment (MCI) to Alzheimer's disease (AD) within a variable follow-up period up to 6 years, using data from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative-1 (ADNI-1). SPARE-AD was first established as a highly sensitive and specific MRI-marker of AD vs. cognitively normal (CN) subjects (AUC = 0.98). Baseline predictive values of all aforementioned indices were then compared using survival analysis on 381 MCI subjects. SPARE-AD and ADAS-Cog were found to have similar predictive value, and their combination was significantly better than their individual performance. APOE genotype did not significantly improve prediction, although the combination of SPARE-AD, ADAS-Cog and APOE ε4 provided the highest hazard ratio estimates of 17.8 (last vs. first quartile). In a subset of 192 MCI patients who also had CSF biomarkers, the addition of Aβ1-42, t-tau, and p-tau181p to the previous model did not improve predictive value significantly over SPARE-AD and ADAS-Cog combined. Importantly, in amyloid-negative patients with MCI, SPARE-AD had high predictive power of clinical progression. Our findings suggest that SPARE-AD and ADAS-Cog in combination offer the highest predictive power of conversion from MCI to AD, which is improved, albeit not significantly, by APOE genotype. The finding that SPARE-AD in amyloid-negative MCI patients was predictive of clinical progression is not expected under the amyloid hypothesis and merits further investigation.

  12. Increasing consistency of disease biomarker prediction across datasets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria D Chikina

    Full Text Available Microarray studies with human subjects often have limited sample sizes which hampers the ability to detect reliable biomarkers associated with disease and motivates the need to aggregate data across studies. However, human gene expression measurements may be influenced by many non-random factors such as genetics, sample preparations, and tissue heterogeneity. These factors can contribute to a lack of agreement among related studies, limiting the utility of their aggregation. We show that it is feasible to carry out an automatic correction of individual datasets to reduce the effect of such 'latent variables' (without prior knowledge of the variables in such a way that datasets addressing the same condition show better agreement once each is corrected. We build our approach on the method of surrogate variable analysis but we demonstrate that the original algorithm is unsuitable for the analysis of human tissue samples that are mixtures of different cell types. We propose a modification to SVA that is crucial to obtaining the improvement in agreement that we observe. We develop our method on a compendium of multiple sclerosis data and verify it on an independent compendium of Parkinson's disease datasets. In both cases, we show that our method is able to improve agreement across varying study designs, platforms, and tissues. This approach has the potential for wide applicability to any field where lack of inter-study agreement has been a concern.

  13. The Glycan Role in the Glycopeptide Immunogenicity Revealed by Atomistic Simulations and Spectroscopic Experiments on the Multiple Sclerosis Biomarker CSF114(Glc)

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    Bruno, Agostino; Scrima, Mario; Novellino, Ettore; D'Errico, Gerardino; D'Ursi, Anna Maria; Limongelli, Vittorio

    2015-03-01

    Glycoproteins are often recognized as not-self molecules by antibodies triggering the onset of severe autoimmune diseases such as Multiple Sclerosis (MS). Thus, the development of antigen-mimicking biomarkers represents an attractive strategy for an early diagnosis of the disease. An example is the synthetic glycopeptide CSF114(Glc), which was designed and tested as MS biomarker and whose clinical application was limited by its reduced ability to detect autoantibodies in MS patients. In the attempt to improve the efficacy of CSF114(Glc), we have characterized all the events leading to the final binding of the biomarker to the autoantibody using atomistic simulations, ESR and NMR experiments. The glycosydic moiety plays a primary role in the whole process. In particular, in an environment mimicking that used in the clinical tests the glycopeptide assumes a α-helix structure that is functional for the interaction with the antibody. In this conformation CSF114(Glc) binds the monoclonal antibody mAb8-18C5 similarly to the myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein MOG, which is a known MS auto-antigen, thus explaining its diagnostic activity. Our study offers new molecular bases to design more effective biomarkers and provides a most valid protocol to investigate other systems where the environment effect is determinant for the biological activity.

  14. Biomarkers of inflammation and axonal degeneration/damage in patients with newly diagnosed multiple sclerosis: contributions of the soluble CD163 CSF/serum ratio to a biomarker panel.

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    Morten Stilund

    Full Text Available Expression of soluble CD163 (sCD163, a macrophage/microglia biomarker, is increased in inflammatory conditions, and sCD163 levels in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF have recently been shown to be elevated in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS: the sCD163 CSF/serum ratio was elevated in patients with relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS, primary progressive MS (PPMS, and clinically isolated syndrome (CIS compared with symptomatic controls.To investigate the contributions of the sCD163 CSF/serum ratio to a biomarker panel focusing on inflammation and axonal degeneration in newly diagnosed MS; thus optimising a diagnostic biomarker panel for MS.After a full MS diagnostic work-up, including collection of paired samples of CSF and serum, 125 patients were included in this study. Patients were divided into groups based on their diagnosis, and patients with normal clinical and paraclinical findings were defined as symptomatic controls. Serum and CSF levels, ratios, and indices of sCD163, CXCL13, osteopontin, neopterin, and CSF levels of neurofilament light polypeptide were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs. For sCD163 the results constitute a post-hoc analysis of already published data.All tested biomarkers, notably the sCD163 ratio, the CXCL13 ratio, the NEO ratio, the CSF level of NfL, the IgG index, and the serum level of OPN, were significantly correlated to RRMS, PPMS, and/or CIS. The individual biomarkers in single tests had a lower performance than the IgG index, however, their combined receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve demonstrated excellent diagnostic discriminatory power.The biomarker panel showed distinct profiles for each patient group and could be a valuable tool for clinical differentiation of MS subgroups. The combined ROC analysis showed that sCD163 contributes positively as a diagnostic marker to a panel of established MS biomarkers. Patients with PPMS were demonstrated to have significantly elevated levels of

  15. GM-CSF/IL-3/IL-5 receptor common β chain (CD131 expression as a biomarker of antigen-stimulated CD8+ T cells

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    Maric Dragan

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Upon Ag-activation cytotoxic T cells (CTLs produce IFN-γ GM-CSF and TNF-α, which deliver simultaneously pro-apoptotic and pro-inflammatory signals to the surrounding microenvironment. Whether this secretion affects in an autocrine loop the CTLs themselves is unknown. Methods Here, we compared the transcriptional profile of Ag-activated, Flu-specific CTL stimulated with the FLU M1:58-66 peptide to that of convivial CTLs expanded in vitro in the same culture. PBMCs from 6 HLA-A*0201 expressing donors were expanded for 7 days in culture following Flu M1:58-66 stimulation in the presence of 300 IU/ml of interleukin-2 and than sorted by high speed sorting to high purity CD8+ expressing T cells gated according to FluM1:58-66 tetrameric human leukocyte antigen complexes expression. Results Ag-activated CTLs displayed higher levels of IFN-γ, GM-CSF (CSF2 and GM-CSF/IL-3/IL-5 receptor common β- chain (CD131 but lacked completely expression of IFN-γ receptor-II and IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs. This observation suggested that Ag-activated CTLs in preparation for the release of IFN-γ and GM-CSF shield themselves from the potentially apoptotic effects of the former entrusting their survival to GM-SCF. In vitro phenotyping confirmed the selective surface expression of CD131 by Ag-activated CTLs and their increased proliferation upon exogenous administration of GM-CSF. Conclusion The selective responsiveness of Ag-activated CTLs to GM-CSF may provide an alternative explanation to the usefulness of this chemokine as an adjuvant for T cell aimed vaccines. Moreover, the selective expression of CD131 by Ag-activated CTLs proposes CD131 as a novel biomarker of Ag-dependent CTL activation.

  16. Development and Evaluation of a Multiplexed Mass Spectrometry-Based Assay for Measuring Candidate Peptide Biomarkers in Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) CSF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spellman, Daniel S.; Wildsmith, Kristin R.; Honigberg, Lee A.; Tuefferd, Marianne; Baker, David; Raghavan, Nandini; Nairn, Angus C.; Croteau, Pascal; Schirm, Michael; Allard, Rene; Lamontagne, Julie; Chelsky, Daniel; Hoffmann, Steven; Potter, William Z.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We describe the outcome of the Biomarkers Consortium CSF Proteomics Project, a public-private partnership of government, academia, non-profit, and industry. The goal of this study was to evaluate a multiplexed mass spectrometry-based approach for the qualification of candidate Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) biomarkers using CSF samples from the AD Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI). Experimental Design Reproducibility of sample processing, analytic variability, and ability to detect a variety of analytes of interest were thoroughly investigated. Multiple approaches to statistical analyses assessed whether panel analytes were associated with baseline pathology (MCI, AD) vs. Healthy Controls (CN) or associated with progression for MCI patients, and included: (i) univariate association analyses, (ii) univariate prediction models, (iii) exploratory multivariate analyses, and (iv) supervised multivariate analysis. Results A robust targeted mass spectrometry-based approach for the qualification of candidate AD biomarkers was developed. The results identified several peptides with potential diagnostic or predictive utility, with the most significant differences observed for the following peptides for differentiating (including peptides from Hemoglobin A (HBA), Hemoglobin B (HBB), and Superoxide dismutase (SODE)) or predicting (including peptides from Neuronal pentraxin-2 (NPTX2), Neurosecretory protein VGF (VGF), and Secretogranin-2 (SCG2)) progression vs. non-progression from mild cognitive impairment to AD. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance These data provide potential insights into the biology of CSF in AD and MCI progression and provide a novel tool for AD researchers and clinicians working to improve diagnostic accuracy, evaluation of treatment efficacy, and early diagnosis. PMID:25676562

  17. Transthyretin as a potential CSF biomarker for Alzheimer's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies: effects of treatment with cholinesterase inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, K; Nilsson, K; Nielsen, Jørgen Erik

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous studies have indicated that transthyretin (TTR) levels in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) are altered in depression and dementia. The present study aimed to investigate whether CSF TTR can be used to discriminate between patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and patients with deme......BACKGROUND: Previous studies have indicated that transthyretin (TTR) levels in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) are altered in depression and dementia. The present study aimed to investigate whether CSF TTR can be used to discriminate between patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and patients...... with dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) with or without medication, as well as to reveal whether CSF TTR correlates with depression in dementia. METHODS: CSF samples from 59 patients with AD, 13 patients with DLB and 13 healthy controls were collected, and biochemical analysis was performed. Subjects were assessed...... for the presence of depression. RESULTS: No significant differences in CSF TTR were found between AD, DLB, and control subjects or between depressed and non-depressed dementia patients. Interestingly, we found a significant reduction in CSF TTR (14%) in AD patients who were medicated with cholinesterase inhibitors...

  18. Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers for Huntington's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Lauren M; Wild, Edward J

    2016-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is enriched in brain-derived components and represents an accessible and appealing means of interrogating the CNS milieu to study neurodegenerative diseases and identify biomarkers to facilitate the development of novel therapeutics. Many such CSF biomarkers have been proposed for Huntington's disease (HD) but none has been validated for clinical trial use. Across many studies proposing dozens of biomarker candidates, there is a notable lack of statistical power, consistency, rigor and validation. Here we review proposed CSF biomarkers including neurotransmitters, transglutaminase activity, kynurenine pathway metabolites, oxidative stress markers, inflammatory markers, neuroendocrine markers, protein markers of neuronal death, proteomic approaches and mutant huntingtin protein itself. We reflect on the need for large-scale, standardized CSF collections with detailed phenotypic data to validate and qualify much-needed CSF biomarkers for clinical trial use in HD.

  19. Plasma Biomarker Profiles Differ Depending on Breast Cancer Subtype but RANTES is Consistently Increased

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzales, Rachel M.; Daly, Don S.; Tan, Ruimin; Marks, Jeffrey R.; Zangar, Richard C.

    2011-07-01

    Background: Current biomarkers for breast cancer have little potential for detection. We determined if breast cancer subtypes influence circulating protein biomarkers. Methods: A sandwich-ELISA microarray platform was used to evaluate 23 candidate biomarkers in plasma samples that were obtained from subjects with either benign breast disease or invasive breast cancer. All plasma samples were collected at the time of biopsy, after a referral due to a suspicious screen (e.g., mammography). Cancer samples were evaluated based on breast cancer subtypes, as defined by the HER2 and estrogen receptor statuses. Results: Ten proteins were statistically altered in at least one breast cancer subtype, including four epidermal growth factor receptor ligands, two matrix metalloproteases, two cytokines, and two angiogenic factors. Only one cytokine, RANTES, was significantly increased (P<0.01 for each analysis) in all four subtypes, with areas under receiver operating characteristic curves (AUC) that ranged from 0.76 to 0.82, depending on cancer subtype. The best AUC values were observed for analyses that combined data from multiple biomarkers, with values ranging from 0.70 to 0.99, depending on the cancer subtype. Although the results for RANTES are consistent with previous publications, the multi-assay results need to be validated in independent sample sets. Conclusions: Different breast cancer subtypes produce distinct biomarker profiles, and circulating protein biomarkers have potential to differentiate between true and false positive screens for breast cancer. Impact: Subtype-specific biomarker panels may be useful for detecting breast cancer or as an adjunct assay to improve the accuracy of current screening methods.

  20. Correlation between Cognitive Impairment and CSF Biomarkers in Amnesic MCI, non-Amnesic MCI, and Alzheimer's Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haldenwanger, A.; Eling, P.A.T.M.; Kastrup, A.; Hildebrandt, H.

    2010-01-01

    Decreased delayed recall, decreased amyloid-beta peptides (A beta(1-42)), and increased tau protein concentration in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) are generally regarded to be valid neuropsychological and biological markers for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Previous studies failed to demonstrate clear-cut c

  1. Evaluation of CART peptide level in rat plasma and CSF: Possible role as a biomarker in opioid addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhtazad, Atefeh; Vousooghi, Nasim; Garmabi, Behzad; Zarrindast, Mohammad Reza

    2016-10-01

    It has been shown previously that cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) peptide has a modulatory role and homeostatic regulatory effect in motivation to and reward of the drugs of abuse specially psychostimulants. Recent data also showed that in addition to psychostimulants, CART is critically involved in the different stages of opioid addiction. Here we have evaluated the fluctuations in the level of CART peptide in plasma and CSF in different phases of opioid addiction to find out whether CART can serve as a suitable marker in opioid addiction studies. Male rats were randomly distributed in groups of control, acute low-dose (10mg/kg) morphine, acute high-dose morphine (80mg/kg), chronic escalating doses of morphine, withdrawal syndrome precipitated by administration of naloxone (1mg/kg), and abstinent after long-term drug-free maintenance of addicted animals. The level of CART peptide in CSF and plasma samples was measured by enzyme immunoassay. CART peptide concentration in the CSF and plasma was significantly elevated in acute high-dose morphine and withdrawal state animals and down-regulated in addicted rats. In abstinent group, CART peptide level was up-regulated in plasma but not in CSF samples. As the observed results are in agreement with data regarding the CART mRNA and protein expression in the brain reward pathway in opioid addiction phases, it may be suggested that evaluation of CART peptide level in CSF or plasma could be a suitable marker which reflects the rises and falls of the peptide concentration in brain in the development of opioid addiction.

  2. Biomarker patterns in present-day vegetation: consistency and variation - A study on plaggen soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkels, Frédérique; Jansen, Boris; Kalbitz, Karsten

    2013-04-01

    Biomarker patterns in present-day vegetation are commonly used as proxies to reconstruct paleo-vegetation composition, land use history and to elucidate carbon cycling. Plaggen soils are formed by diverse vegetational inputs during century-long plaggen (i.e. sod) application associated with plaggen-agriculture on poor soils in north-western Europe. This resulted in remarkably stable organic matter. Plant source identification by biomarkers could provide insight in yet unknown stabilization mechanisms and the fate of organic matter upon ongoing land use change. The current rationale behind biomarker-based source identification is that patterns observed in present-day vegetation are generally representative with little random variation. However, our knowledge on variability and consistency of biomarker patterns is yet scarce. Therefore, to assess the applicability of biomarkers for source identification in plaggen soils, we analyzed published n-alkane and n-alcohol patterns of species and their various parts which contribute(d) input to plaggen soils. We considered shrubs, trees and grass species and evaluated rescaled patterns (i.e. relative abundances in chain-length range C17-36), odd-over-even predominance (OEP) and predominant n-alkanes. In addition, we explicitly looked into potential sources of systematic variation, e.g. spatial variation (climate, site conditions), temporal variation (seasonality, ontogeny) and laboratory methodology (extraction technique: washing/shaking, Soxhlet/ASE, saponification). We found meaningful clustering of n-alkanes C27, C29, C31 and C33, allowing for clear distinction of input by shrubs, trees and grasses to plaggen soils. Combination of these homologues with complete n-alkane patterns (C17-36) and OEP enabled further differentiation, while n-alcohols patterns were less distinct. Current limitation is the lack of extended and diverse quantitative records on biomarker patterns, especially for n-alcohols, non-leaf and belowground

  3. Are CSF Biomarkers Useful as Prognostic Indicators in Diagnostically Unresolved Cognitively Impaired Patients in a Normal Clinical Setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Malene Schjønning; Simonsen, Anja Hviid; Siersma, Volkert

    2016-01-01

    in diagnostically unresolved patients. METHODS: Data on 348 patients were retrospectively evaluated. All participants had a standardized diagnostic workup and follow-up in a memory clinic. RESULTS: Aβ42 levels and Aβ42/p-tau ratios were reduced and levels of t-tau and p-tau as well as the t-tau × p-tau/Aβ42 ratio......BACKGROUND: Despite an extensive evaluation program, patients may remain diagnostically unresolved with regard to the etiology of their cognitive dysfunction. Cerebrospinal fluid neuroinflammation and Alzheimer disease (AD) biomarkers may act as indicators of neurodegenerative disorders...... were elevated in diagnostically unresolved patients who clinically progressed, compared to a stable group. No differences in neuroinflammatory parameters were found. CONCLUSION: AD biomarkers - in particular the Aβ42/p-tau ratio, but not neuroinflammatory parameters - predicted clinical progression...

  4. CSF analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerebrospinal fluid analysis ... Analysis of CSF can help detect certain conditions and diseases. All of the following can be, but ... An abnormal CSF analysis result may be due to many different causes, ... Encephalitis (such as West Nile and Eastern Equine) Hepatic ...

  5. Standardization of Assay Procedures for Analysis of the CSF Biomarkers Amyloid β(1-42, Tau, and Phosphorylated Tau in Alzheimer's Disease: Report of an International Workshop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte E. Teunissen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Large variation in assay performance and outcomes of CSF Aβ1-42, total Tau (Tau, and phosphorylated Tau (pTau (at amino acid 181 levels is observed between laboratories. The aim of this study was to assess the differences in assay procedures between several experienced international laboratories, as potential sources of error. 14 groups performed the Aβ42, Tau, and pTau assays according to the guidelines of the manufacturer. Differences in analytical procedures between the laboratories were monitored. At least 23 items in assay procedures were identified that varied between the laboratories, including procedures for washing, pipetting, incubation, finishing, and sample handing. In general, the inter- and intra-assay variation between the groups was generally below 10% for all three assays. We concluded that 17 international centers that use the same assays for Aβ42, Tau and pTau on a regular basis do not uniformly adhere to the procedures recommended by the manufacturer. For harmonization of intercenter results of these biomarkers standardization of protocols is highly needed.

  6. CSF Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a chronic disease, such as multiple sclerosis or Alzheimer disease . Depending on a person's history, a healthcare provider may order CSF analysis when some combination of the following signs and symptoms appear, especially when accompanied by flu-like symptoms ...

  7. CSF leak

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... rarely). Drainage of CSF from the nose (rarely). Exams and Tests The health care provider will perform ... usually recommended. Drinking more fluids, especially drinks with caffeine, can help slow or stop the leak and ...

  8. Diagnostic Utility of CSF Tau and A in Dementia: A Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachna Agarwal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available CSF tau and Aβ42 are considered as important markers to diagnose Alzheimer’s disease in early stages. Hence, it is important to assess their status in different types of dementia. The main objective of this study was to assess whether these CSF biomarkers can be used to make the differential diagnosis of AD. In the present study, articles published from 1998 till 2009 were taken and meta-analysis was performed to clarify the consistency in trends of biomarkers- CSF tau and Aβ42 in AD and other dementias and whether the same can be used as diagnostic biomarkers for its early diagnosis. 11 out of 60 for CSF tau and 07 out of 40 for CSF Aβ42, dementia case-control studies were selected for final analysis. Descriptive statistics shows that median effect size (raw mean difference of CSF tau was 429 pg/mL (range: 32 to 910 pg/mL in AD whereas in Dementia due to other causes (DOC studies it was 69 pg/mL (range: −53 to 518 pg/mL. Similarly the median effect size of CSF Aβ42 levels was −442 pg/mL (range: −652 to −41.200 pg/mL whereas in DOC studies it was −193 pg/mL (range: −356 to −33 pg/mL.

  9. CSF neurofilament protein analysis in the differential diagnosis of ALS.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijn, T.S.M.; Abdo, W.; Schelhaas, H.J.; Verbeek, M.M.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers have been studied to differentiate between patients with ALS and neurological controls, but not in comparison to clinically more relevant disorders mimicking ALS. METHODS: In this retrospective study, CSF concentrations of various brain-specific

  10. Mechanically stimulated biomarkers signal cartilage changes over 5 years consistent with disease progression in medial knee osteoarthritis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Constance R; Sheth, Shikha; Erhart-Hledik, Jennifer C; Do, Bao; Titchenal, Matthew R; Andriacchi, Thomas P

    2017-09-01

    Using serum biomarkers to assess osteoarthritis (OA) disease state and risks of progression remain challenging. This study tested the hypothesis that changes to serum biomarkers in response to a mechanical stimulus in patients with medial knee OA signal cartilage thickness changes five years later. Specifically, serum concentrations of a collagen degradation marker (C1,2C) and a chondroitin sulfate synthesis marker (CS846) were measured 0.5 and 5.5 hours after a 30-minute walk in 16 patients. Regional cartilage thickness changes measured from magnetic resonance images obtained at study entry and at 5-year follow-up were tested for correlations with baseline biomarker changes after mechanical stimulus, and for differences between groups stratified based on whether biomarker levels increased or decreased. Results showed that an increase in the degradation biomarker C1,2C correlated with cartilage thinning of the lateral tibia (R=-0.63, P=0.009), whereas an increase in the synthesis marker CS846 correlated with cartilage thickening of the lateral femur (R=0.76, P=0.001). Changes in C1,2C and CS846 were correlated (R(2) =0.28, P=0.037). Subjects with increased C1,2C had greater (P=0.05) medial tibial cartilage thinning than those with decreased C1,2C. In conclusion, the mechanical stimulus appeared to metabolically link the biomarker responses where biomarker increases signaled more active OA disease states. The findings of medial cartilage thinning for patients with increases in the degradation marker and correlation of cartilage thickening in the less involved lateral femur with increases in the synthetic marker were consistent with progression of medial compartment OA. Thus, the mechanical stimulus facilitated assessing OA disease states using serum biomarkers. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  11. Chronic Inflammation: Synergistic Interactions of Recruiting Macrophages (TAMs and Eosinophils (Eos with Host Mast Cells (MCs and Tumorigenesis in CALTs. M-CSF, Suitable Biomarker for Cancer Diagnosis!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahin Khatami

    2014-01-01

    dysfunction in the direction of tumorigenesis. Activated MFs (TAMs or M2 and Eos that are recruited by tissues (e.g., conjunctiva or perhaps lung airways whose principal resident immune cells are MCs and lymphocytes are suggested to play crucial synergistic roles in enhancing growth promoting capacities of host toward tumorigenesis. Under oxidative stress, M-CSF may produce signals that are cumulative/synergistic with host mediators (e.g., low levels of histamine, facilitating tumor-directed expression of decoy receptors and immune suppressive factors (e.g., dTNFR, IL-5, IL-10, TGF-b, PGE2. M-CSF, possessing superior sensitivity and specificity, compared with conventional markers (e.g., CA-125, CA-19-9 is potentially a suitable biomarker for cancer diagnosis and technology development. Systematic monitoring of interactions between resident and recruited cells should provide key information not only about early events in loss of immune surveillance, but it would help making informed decisions for balancing the inherent tumoricidal (Yin and tumorigenic (Yang properties of immune system and effective preventive and therapeutic approaches and accurate risk assessment toward improvement of public health.

  12. Chronic Inflammation: Synergistic Interactions of Recruiting Macrophages (TAMs) and Eosinophils (Eos) with Host Mast Cells (MCs) and Tumorigenesis in CALTs. M-CSF, Suitable Biomarker for Cancer Diagnosis!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatami, Mahin

    2014-01-27

    tumorigenesis. Activated MFs (TAMs or M2) and Eos that are recruited by tissues (e.g., conjunctiva or perhaps lung airways) whose principal resident immune cells are MCs and lymphocytes are suggested to play crucial synergistic roles in enhancing growth promoting capacities of host toward tumorigenesis. Under oxidative stress, M-CSF may produce signals that are cumulative/synergistic with host mediators (e.g., low levels of histamine), facilitating tumor-directed expression of decoy receptors and immune suppressive factors (e.g., dTNFR, IL-5, IL-10, TGF-b, PGE2). M-CSF, possessing superior sensitivity and specificity, compared with conventional markers (e.g., CA-125, CA-19-9) is potentially a suitable biomarker for cancer diagnosis and technology development. Systematic monitoring of interactions between resident and recruited cells should provide key information not only about early events in loss of immune surveillance, but it would help making informed decisions for balancing the inherent tumoricidal (Yin) and tumorigenic (Yang) properties of immune system and effective preventive and therapeutic approaches and accurate risk assessment toward improvement of public health.

  13. Chronic Inflammation: Synergistic Interactions of Recruiting Macrophages (TAMs) and Eosinophils (Eos) with Host Mast Cells (MCs) and Tumorigenesis in CALTs. M-CSF, Suitable Biomarker for Cancer Diagnosis!

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khatami, Mahin [Inflammation and Cancer Biology, National Cancer Institute (Ret), the National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20817 (United States)

    2014-01-27

    dysfunction in the direction of tumorigenesis. Activated MFs (TAMs or M2) and Eos that are recruited by tissues (e.g., conjunctiva or perhaps lung airways) whose principal resident immune cells are MCs and lymphocytes are suggested to play crucial synergistic roles in enhancing growth promoting capacities of host toward tumorigenesis. Under oxidative stress, M-CSF may produce signals that are cumulative/synergistic with host mediators (e.g., low levels of histamine), facilitating tumor-directed expression of decoy receptors and immune suppressive factors (e.g., dTNFR, IL-5, IL-10, TGF-β, PGE2). M-CSF, possessing superior sensitivity and specificity, compared with conventional markers (e.g., CA-125, CA-19-9) is potentially a suitable biomarker for cancer diagnosis and technology development. Systematic monitoring of interactions between resident and recruited cells should provide key information not only about early events in loss of immune surveillance, but it would help making informed decisions for balancing the inherent tumoricidal (Yin) and tumorigenic (Yang) properties of immune system and effective preventive and therapeutic approaches and accurate risk assessment toward improvement of public health.

  14. CSF clearance in Alzheimer Disease measured with dynamic PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Leon, Mony J; Li, Yi; Okamura, Nobuyuki; Tsui, Wai H; Saint Louis, Les A; Glodzik, Lidia; Osorio, Ricardo S; Fortea, Juan; Butler, Tracy; Pirraglia, Elizabeth; Fossati, Silvia; Kim, Hee-Jin; Carare, Roxana O; Nedergaard, Maiken; Benveniste, Helene; Rusinek, Henry

    2017-03-16

    Evidence supporting the hypothesis that reduced cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) clearance is involved in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD) comes from primarily from rodent models. However, unlike rodents where predominant extra-cranial CSF egress is via olfactory nerves traversing the cribriform plate, human CSF clearance pathways are not well characterized. Using dynamic Positron Emission Tomography (PET) with (18)F-THK5117 a tracer for tau pathology, the ventricular CSF time activity was used as a biomarker for CSF clearance. We tested three hypotheses: 1. Extra-cranial CSF is detected at the superior turbinates; 2. CSF clearance is reduced in AD; and 3. CSF clearance is inversely associated with amyloid deposition. Methods: 15 subjects, 8 with AD and 7 normal control volunteers were examined with (18)F-THK5117. 10 subjects additionally received (11)C-PiB PET scans and 8 were PiB positive. Ventricular time activity curves (TAC) of (18)F-THK5117 were used to identify highly correlated TAC from extra-cranial voxels. Results: For all subjects, the greatest density of CSF positive extra-cranial voxels was in the nasal turbinates. Tracer concentration analyses validated the superior nasal turbinate CSF signal intensity. AD patients showed ventricular tracer clearance reduced by 23% and 66% fewer superior turbinate CSF egress sites. Ventricular CSF clearance was inversely associated with amyloid deposition. Conclusion: The human nasal turbinate is part of the CSF clearance system. Lateral ventricle and superior nasal turbinates CSF clearance abnormalities are found in AD. Ventricular CSF clearance reductions are associated with increased brain amyloid depositions. These data suggest that PET measured CSF clearance is a biomarker of potential interest in AD and other neurodegenerative diseases.

  15. Neurofilament Light Chain in Blood and CSF as Marker of Disease Progression in Mouse Models and in Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacioglu, Mehtap; Maia, Luis F; Preische, Oliver; Schelle, Juliane; Apel, Anja; Kaeser, Stephan A; Schweighauser, Manuel; Eninger, Timo; Lambert, Marius; Pilotto, Andrea; Shimshek, Derya R; Neumann, Ulf; Kahle, Philipp J; Staufenbiel, Matthias; Neumann, Manuela; Maetzler, Walter; Kuhle, Jens; Jucker, Mathias

    2016-07-01

    A majority of current disease-modifying therapeutic approaches for age-related neurodegenerative diseases target their characteristic proteopathic lesions (α-synuclein, Tau, Aβ). To monitor such treatments, fluid biomarkers reflecting the underlying disease process are crucial. We found robust increases of neurofilament light chain (NfL) in CSF and blood in murine models of α-synucleinopathies, tauopathy, and β-amyloidosis. Blood and CSF NfL levels were strongly correlated, and NfL increases coincided with the onset and progression of the corresponding proteopathic lesions in brain. Experimental induction of α-synuclein lesions increased CSF and blood NfL levels, while blocking Aβ lesions attenuated the NfL increase. Consistently, we also found NfL increases in CSF and blood of human α-synucleinopathies, tauopathies, and Alzheimer's disease. Our results suggest that CSF and particularly blood NfL can serve as a reliable and easily accessible biomarker to monitor disease progression and treatment response in mouse models and potentially in human proteopathic neurodegenerative diseases.

  16. CSF alpha-synuclein does not discriminate dementia with lewy bodies from Alzheimer's disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reesink, F.E.; Lemstra, A.W.; Dijk, K.D. van; Berendse, H.W.; Berg, W.D. van de; Klein, M.; Blankenstein, M.A.; Scheltens, P.; Verbeek, M.M.; Flier, W.M. van der

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we assessed whether cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of the biomarker alpha-synuclein have a diagnostic value in differential diagnosis of dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). We also analyzed associations between CSF biomarkers and cognitive performance in DL

  17. Biomarker validation of a cued recall memory deficit in prodromal Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, M; Wolf, S; Reischies, F M; Daerr, M; Wolfsgruber, S; Jessen, F; Popp, J; Maier, W; Hüll, M; Frölich, L; Hampel, H; Perneczky, R; Peters, O; Jahn, H; Luckhaus, C; Gertz, H-J; Schröder, J; Pantel, J; Lewczuk, P; Kornhuber, J; Wiltfang, J

    2012-02-07

    To compare cued recall measures with other memory and nonmemory tests regarding their association with a biomarker profile indicative of Alzheimer disease (AD) in CSF among patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Data were obtained by the German Dementia Competence Network. A total of 185 memory clinic patients fulfilling broad criteria for MCI (1 SD deficit in memory tests or in nonmemory tests) were assessed with an extended neuropsychological battery, which included the Free and Cued Selective Reminding Test (FCSRT), the word list learning task from the Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's Disease neuropsychological battery (CERAD-NP), and the Logical Memory (LM) paragraph recall test from the Wechsler Memory Scale-Revised. CSF was obtained from all patients. A total of 74 out of 185 subjects with MCI (40%) had a CSF profile consistent with AD (Aβ(1-42)/tau ratio; CSF AD+ group). FCSRT measures reflecting both free and cued recall discriminated best between CSF AD+ and CSF AD- patients, and significantly improved CSF AD classification accuracy, as compared with CERAD delayed recall and LM delayed recall. Cued recall deficits are most closely associated with CSF biomarkers indicative of AD in subjects with MCI. This novel finding complements results from prospective clinical studies and provides further empirical support for cued recall as a specific indicator of prodromal AD, in line with recently proposed research criteria.

  18. CSF total protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    CSF total protein is a test to determine the amount of protein in your spinal fluid, also called cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). ... The normal protein range varies from lab to lab, but is typically about 15 to 60 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) ...

  19. Fluid biomarkers in multiple system atrophy: A review of the MSA Biomarker Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurens, Brice; Constantinescu, Radu; Freeman, Roy; Gerhard, Alexander; Jellinger, Kurt; Jeromin, Andreas; Krismer, Florian; Mollenhauer, Brit; Schlossmacher, Michael G; Shaw, Leslie M; Verbeek, Marcel M; Wenning, Gregor K; Winge, Kristian; Zhang, Jing; Meissner, Wassilios G

    2015-08-01

    Despite growing research efforts, no reliable biomarker currently exists for the diagnosis and prognosis of multiple system atrophy (MSA). Such biomarkers are urgently needed to improve diagnostic accuracy, prognostic guidance and also to serve as efficacy measures or surrogates of target engagement for future clinical trials. We here review candidate fluid biomarkers for MSA and provide considerations for further developments and harmonization of standard operating procedures. A PubMed search was performed until April 24, 2015 to review the literature with regard to candidate blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers for MSA. Abstracts of 1760 studies were retrieved and screened for eligibility. The final list included 60 studies assessing fluid biomarkers in patients with MSA. Most studies have focused on alpha-synuclein, markers of axonal degeneration or catecholamines. Their results suggest that combining several CSF fluid biomarkers may be more successful than using single markers, at least for the diagnosis. Currently, the clinically most useful markers may comprise a combination of the light chain of neurofilament (which is consistently elevated in MSA compared to controls and Parkinson's disease), metabolites of the catecholamine pathway and proteins such as α-synuclein, DJ-1 and total-tau. Beyond future efforts in biomarker discovery, the harmonization of standard operating procedures will be crucial for future success.

  20. Cerebrospinal fluid IL-12p40, CXCL13 and IL-8 as a combinatorial biomarker of active intrathecal inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bibiana Bielekova

    Full Text Available Diagnosis and management of the neuroinflammatory diseases of the central nervous system (CNS are hindered by the lack of reliable biomarkers of active intrathecal inflammation. We hypothesized that measuring several putative inflammatory biomarkers simultaneously will augment specificity and sensitivity of the biomarker to the clinically useful range. Based on our pilot experiment in which we measured 18 inflammatory biomarkers in 10-fold concentrated cerebrospinal fluid (CSF derived from 16 untreated patients with highly active multiple sclerosis (MS we selected a combination of three CSF biomarkers, IL-12p40, CXCL13 and IL-8, for further validation.Concentrations of IL-12p40, CXCL13 and IL-8 were determined in a blinded fashion in CSF samples from an initial cohort (n = 72 and a confirmatory cohort (n = 167 of prospectively collected, untreated subjects presenting for a diagnostic work-up of possible neuroimmunological disorder. Diagnostic conclusion was based on a thorough clinical workup, which included laboratory assessment of the blood and CSF, neuroimaging and longitudinal follow-up. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve analysis in conjunction with principal component analysis (PCA, which was used to combine information from all three biomarkers, assessed the diagnostic value of measured biomarkers.Each of the three biomarkers was significantly increased in MS and other inflammatory neurological disease (OIND in comparison to non-inflammatory neurological disorder patients (NIND at least in one cohort. However, considering all three biomarkers together improved accuracy of predicting the presence of intrathecal inflammation to the consistently good to excellent range (area under the ROC curve = 0.868-0.924.Future clinical studies will determine if a combinatorial biomarker consisting of CSF IL-12p40, CXCL13 and IL-8 provides utility in determining the presence of active intrathecal inflammation in diagnostically

  1. Cerebrospinal fluid P-tau(181P) : biomarker for improved differential dementia diagnosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Struyfs, Hanne; Niemantsverdriet, Ellis; Goossens, Joery; Fransen, Erik; Martin, Jean-Jacques; De Deyn, Peter P.; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study is to investigate the value of tau phosphorylated at threonine 181 (P-tau(181p)) in the Alzheimer's disease (AD) cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarker panel for differential dementia diagnosis in autopsy confirmed AD and non-AD patients. The study population consisted of 140 aut

  2. [Biomarkers in Alzheimer's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Ribas, G; López-Sendón Moreno, J L; García-Caldentey, J

    2014-04-01

    The new diagnostic criteria for Alzheimer's disease (AD) include brain imaging and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers, with the aim of increasing the certainty of whether a patient has an ongoing AD neuropathologic process or not. Three CSF biomarkers, Aß42, total tau, and phosphorylated tau, reflect the core pathological features of AD. It is already known that these pathological processes of AD starts decades before the first symptoms, so these biomarkers may provide means of early disease detection. At least three stages of AD could be identified: preclinical AD, mild cognitive impairment due to AD, and dementia due to AD. In this review, we aim to summarize the CSF biomarker data available for each of these stages. We also review the actual research on blood-based biomarkers. Recent studies on healthy elderly subjects and on carriers of dominantly inherited AD mutations have also found biomarker changes that allow separate groups in these preclinical stages. These studies may aid for segregate populations in clinical trials and objectively evaluate if there are changes over the pathological processes of AD. Limits to widespread use of CSF biomarkers, apart from the invasive nature of the process itself, is the higher coefficient of variation for the analyses between centres. It requires strict pre-analytical and analytical procedures that may make feasible multi-centre studies and global cut-off points for the different stages of AD.

  3. CSF neurofilament concentration reflects disease severity in frontotemporal degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherling, Carole S.; Hall, Tracey; Berisha, Flora; Klepac, Kristen; Karydas, Anna; Coppola, Giovanni; Kramer, Joel H.; Rabinovici, Gil; Ahlijanian, Michael; Miller, Bruce L.; Seeley, William; Grinberg, Lea T.; Rosen, Howard; Meredith, Jere; Boxer, Adam L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) neurofilament light chain (NfL) concentration is elevated in neurological disorders including frontotemporal degeneration (FTD). We investigated the clinical correlates of elevated CSF NfL levels in FTD. Methods CSF NfL, amyloid-β42 (Aβ42), tau and phosphorylated tau (ptau) concentrations were compared in 47 normal controls (NC), 8 asymptomatic gene carriers (NC2) of FTD-causing mutations, 79 FTD (45 behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia [bvFTD], 18 progressive nonfluent aphasia [PNFA], 16 semantic dementia [SD]), 22 progressive supranuclear palsy, 50 Alzheimer’s disease, 6 Parkinson’s disease and 17 corticobasal syndrome patients. Correlations between CSF analyte levels were performed with neuropsychological measures and the Clinical Dementia Rating scale sum of boxes (CDRsb). Voxel-based morphometry of structural MR images determined the relationship between brain volume and CSF NfL. Results Mean CSF NfL concentrations were higher in bvFTD, SD and PNFA than other groups. NfL in NC2 was similar to NC. CSF NfL, but not other CSF measures, correlated with CDRsb and neuropsychological measures in FTD, and not in other diagnostic groups. Analyses in two independent FTD cohorts and a group of autopsy verified or biomarker enriched cases confirmed the larger group analysis. In FTD, gray and white matter volume negatively correlated with CSF NfL concentration, such that individuals with highest NfL levels exhibited the most atrophy. Interpretation CSF NfL is elevated in symptomatic FTD and correlates with disease severity. This measurement may be a useful surrogate endpoint of disease severity in FTD clinical trials. Longitudinal studies of CSF NfL in FTD are warranted. PMID:24242746

  4. Chemokines in CSF of Alzheimer's disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jôice Dias Corrêa

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Some studies have linked the presence of chemokines to the early stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD. Then, the identification of these mediators may contribute to diagnosis. Our objective was to evaluate the levels of beta-amyloid (BA, tau, phospho-tau (p-tau and chemokines (CCL2, CXCL8 and CXCL10 in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of patients with AD and healthy controls. The correlation of these markers with clinical parameters was also evaluated. The levels of p-tau were higher in AD compared to controls, while the tau/p-tau ratio was decreased. The expression of CCL2 was increased in AD. A positive correlation was observed between BA levels and all chemokines studied, and between CCL2 and p-tau levels. Our results suggest that levels of CCL2 in CSF are involved in the pathogenesis of AD and it may be an additional useful biomarker for monitoring disease progression.

  5. Synovial tissue sublining CD68 expression is a biomarker of therapeutic response in rheumatoid arthritis clinical trials: consistency across centers.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bresnihan, Barry

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether the correlation between the mean change in disease activity and the mean change in synovial sublining (sl) CD68 expression could be demonstrated across different academic centers. METHODS: Synovial biopsies obtained at arthroscopy from patients with rheumatoid arthritis before and 160 days after rituximab therapy were selected and coded. Paired sections were processed independently at Amsterdam Medical Center (AMC) and at St. Vincent\\'s University Hospital (SVUH), Dublin. Digital image analysis (DIA) was employed at both centers to quantify sublining CD68 expression. RESULTS: After analysis of CD68sl expression at centers in 2 different countries, high levels of intracenter and intercenter agreement were observed. For the pooled sections stained at AMC, the correlation between 2 investigators was R = 0.942, p = 0.000, and for sections stained at SVUH, R = 0.899, p = 0.001. Similarly, the intracenter correlations for DeltaCD68sl expression after treatment were R = 0.998, p = 0.000, for sections stained at AMC and R = 0.880, p = 0.000, for sections stained at SVUH. The intercenter correlation for the pooled scores of sections stained at AMC was R = 0.85, p = 0.000, and for the sections stained at SVUH, R = 0.62, p = 0.001. The consistent correlation between DeltaDAS (Disease Activity Score) and DeltaCD68sl expression across different studies (Pearson correlation = 0.895, p < 0.001) was confirmed. The standardized response mean values for DeltaCD68sl, calculated from analyses at both AMC and SVUH, were consistently 0.5 or greater, indicating a moderate to high potential to detect change. CONCLUSION: The correlation between mean DeltaDAS and mean DeltaCD68sl expression was confirmed across 2 centers. Examination of serial biopsy samples can be used reliably to screen for interesting biological effects at the site of inflammation at an early stage of drug development.

  6. Cine-MR imaging aqueductal CSF flow in normal pressure hydrocephalus syndrome before and after CSF shunt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mascalchi, M. (Sezione di Radiodiagnostica, Dipt. di Fisiopatologia Clinica, and Dipt. di Scienze Neurologiche, Florence Univ. (Italy)); Arnetoli, G. (Sezione di Radiodiagnostica, Dipt. di Fisiopatologia Clinica, and Dipt. di Scienze Neurologiche, Florence Univ. (Italy)); Inzitari, D. (Sezione di Radiodiagnostica, Dipt. di Fisiopatologia Clinica, and Dipt. di Scienze Neurologiche, Florence Univ. (Italy)); Dal Pozzo, G. (Sezione di Radiodiagnostica, Dipt. di Fisiopatologia Clinica, and Dipt. di Scienze Neurologiche, Florence Univ. (Italy)); Lolli, F. (Sezione di Radiodiagnostica, Dipt. di Fisiopatologia Clinica, and Dipt. di Scienze Neurologiche, Florence Univ. (Italy)); Caramella, D. (Sezione di Radiodiagnostica, Dipt. di Fisiopatologia Clinica, and Dipt. di Scienze Neurologiche, Florence Univ. (Italy)); Bartolozzi, C. (Sezione di Radiodiagnostica, Dipt. di Fisiopatologia Clinica, and Dipt. di Scienze Neurologiche, Florence Univ. (Italy))

    1993-11-01

    Reproducibility of the aqueductal CSF signal intensity on a gradient echo cine-MR sequence exploiting through plane inflow enhancement was tested in 11 patients with normal or dilated ventricles. Seven patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) syndrome were investigated with the sequence before and after CSF shunting. Two patients exhibiting central flow void within a hyperintense aqueductal CSF improved after surgery and the flow void disappeared after shunting. One patient with increased maximum and minimum aqueductal CSF signal as compared to 18 healthy controls also improved and the aqueductal CSF signal was considerably decreased after shunting. Three patients with aqueductal CSF values similar to those in the controls did not improve, notwithstanding their maximum aqueductal CSF signals decreasing slightly after shunting. No appreciable aqueductal CSF flow related enhancement consistent with non-communicating hydrocephalus was found in the last NPH patient who improved after surgery. Cine-MR with inflow technique yields a reproducible evaluation of flow-related aqueductal CSF signal changes which might help in identifying shunt responsive NPH patients. These are likely to be those with hyperdynamic aqueductal CSF or aqueductal obstruction. (orig.).

  7. CEREBROSPINAL FLUID BIOCHEMICAL STUDIES IN PATIENTS WITH PARKINSON’S DISEASE: TOWARDS A POTENTIAL SEARCH FOR BIOMARKERS FOR THIS DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Félix Javier eJiménez-Jiménez

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The blood-brain barrier supplies brain tissues with nutrients and filters certain compounds from the brain back to the bloodstream. In several neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson’s disease (PD, there are disruptions of the blood-brain barrier. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF has been widely investigated in PD and in other parkinsonian syndromes with the aim of establishing useful biomarkers for an accurate differential diagnosis among these syndromes. This review article summarizes the studies reported on CSF levels of many potential biomarkers of PD. The most consistent findings are: (a the possible role of CSF urate on the progression of the disease; (b the possible relations of CSF total tau and phosphotau protein with the progression of PD and with the preservation of cognitive function in PD patients; (c the possible value of CSF beta-amyloid 1-42 as a useful marker of further cognitive decline in PD patients, and (d the potential usefulness of CSF neurofilament (NFL protein levels in the differential diagnosis between PD and other parkinsonian syndromes. Future multicentric, longitudinal, prospective studies with long-term follow-up and neuropathological confirmation would be useful inestablishing appropriate biomarkers for PD.

  8. Increased CSF alpha-synuclein levels in Alzheimer's disease : Correlation with tau levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slaets, Sylvie; Vanmechelen, Eugeen; Le Bastard, Nathalie; Decraemer, Hilde; Vandijck, Manu; Martin, Jean-Jacques; De Deyn, Peter Paul; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan

    2014-01-01

    Background: Given the difficult clinical differential diagnosis between Alzheimer's disease (AD) and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), growing interest resulted in research on alpha-synuclein as a potential cerebrospinal fluid biomarker (CSF) for synucleinopathies. Methods: CSF alpha-synuclein-140 co

  9. Proteomic investigations of the ventriculo-lumbar gradient in human CSF

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Anja Hviid; Bech, Sara Brynhild Winther; Laursen, Inga

    2010-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is an ideal biological material in which to search for new biomarkers for improved diagnosis of neurological diseases. During a lumbar puncture between 5 and 15 mL of CSF are obtained. Previous studies have assessed the ventriculo-lumbar concentration gradient of a number...

  10. Cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers in neurological diseases in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahim, Pashtun; Månsson, Jan-Eric; Darin, Niklas; Zetterberg, Henrik; Mattsson, Niklas

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers is an integral part of neurology. Basic CSF biomarkers, such as CSF/serum albumin ratio and CSF cell counts, have been used to diagnose inflammatory and infectious CNS disorders in adults and children for decades. During recent years, however, numerous biomarkers for neuronal and astroglial injury, as well as disease-specific protein inclusions, have been developed for neurodegenerative disorders in adults. The overall aim of this paper is to give an updated overview of some of these biomarkers with special focus on their possible relevance to neurological disorders in children and adolescents.

  11. Body mass index is associated with biological CSF markers of core brain pathology of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewers, Michael; Schmitz, Susanne; Hansson, Oskar; Walsh, Cathal; Fitzpatrick, Annette; Bennett, David; Minthon, Lennart; Trojanowski, John Q; Shaw, Leslie M; Faluyi, Yetunde O; Vellas, Bruno; Dubois, Bruno; Blennow, Kaj; Buerger, Katharina; Teipel, Stefan J; Weiner, Michael; Hampel, Harald

    2012-08-01

    Weight changes are common in aging and Alzheimer's disease (AD) and postmortem findings suggest a relation between lower body mass index (BMI) and increased AD brain pathology. In the current multicenter study, we tested whether lower BMI is associated with higher core AD brain pathology as assessed by cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)-based biological markers of AD in 751 living subjects: 308 patients with AD, 296 subjects with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and 147 elderly healthy controls (HC). Based upon a priori cutoff values on CSF concentration of total tau and beta-amyloid (Aβ(1-42)), subjects were binarized into a group with abnormal CSF biomarker signature (CSF+) and those without (CSF-). Results showed that BMI was significantly lower in the CSF+ when compared with the CSF- group (F = 27.7, df = 746, p < 0.001). There was no interaction between CSF signature and diagnosis or apolipoprotein E (ApoE) genotype. In conclusion, lower BMI is indicative of AD pathology as assessed with CSF-based biomarkers in demented and nondemented elderly subjects.

  12. CSF neurofilament light chain reflects corticospinal tract degeneration in ALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menke, Ricarda A L; Gray, Elizabeth; Lu, Ching-Hua; Kuhle, Jens; Talbot, Kevin; Malaspina, Andrea; Turner, Martin R

    2015-01-01

    Objective Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is sensitive to white matter tract pathology. A core signature involving the corticospinal tracts (CSTs) has been identified in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Raised neurofilament light chain protein (NfL) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is thought to reflect axonal damage in a range of neurological disorders. The relationship between these two measures was explored. Methods CSF and serum NfL concentrations and DTI acquired at 3 Tesla on the same day were obtained from ALS patients (n = 25 CSF, 40 serum) and healthy, age-similar controls (n = 17 CSF, 25 serum). Within-group correlations between NfL and DTI measures of microstructural integrity in major white matter tracts (CSTs, superior longitudinal fasciculi [SLF], and corpus callosum) were performed using tract-based spatial statistics. Results NfL levels were higher in patients compared to controls. CSF levels correlated with clinical upper motor neuron burden and rate of disease progression. Higher NfL levels were significantly associated with lower DTI fractional anisotropy and increased radial diffusivity in the CSTs of ALS patients, but not in controls. Interpretation Elevated CSF and serum NfL is, in part, a result of CST degeneration in ALS. This highlights the wider potential for combining neurochemical and neuroimaging-based biomarkers in neurological disease. PMID:26273687

  13. Molecular CsF 5 and CsF 2 +

    KAUST Repository

    Rogachev, Andrey Yu.

    2015-06-03

    D5h star-like CsF5, formally isoelectronic with known XeF5− ion, is computed to be a local minimum on the potential energy surface of CsF5, surrounded by reasonably large activation energies for its exothermic decomposition to CsF+2 F2, or to CsF3 (three isomeric forms)+F2, or for rearrangement to a significantly more stable isomer, a classical Cs+ complex of F5−. Similarly the CsF2+ ion is computed to be metastable in two isomeric forms. In the more symmetrical structures of these molecules there is definite involvement in bonding of the formally core 5p levels of Cs.

  14. CSF α-synuclein improves diagnostic and prognostic performance of CSF tau and Aβ in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledo, Jon B; Korff, Ane; Shaw, Leslie M; Trojanowski, John Q; Zhang, Jing

    2013-11-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Lewy body diseases (LBD), e.g., Parkinson's disease (PD) dementia and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), are common causes of geriatric cognitive impairments. In addition, AD and LBD are often found in the same patients at autopsy; therefore, biomarkers that can detect the presence of both pathologies in living subjects are needed. In this investigation, we report the assessment of α-synuclein (α-syn) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and its association with CSF total tau (t-tau), phosphorylated tau181 (p-tau181), and amyloid beta1-42 (Aβ1-42) in subjects of the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI; n = 389), with longitudinal clinical assessments. A strong correlation was noted between α-syn and t-tau in controls, as well as in patients with AD and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). However, the correlation is not specific to subjects in the ADNI cohort, as it was also seen in PD patients and controls enrolled in the Parkinson's Progression Markers Initiative (PPMI; n = 102). A bimodal distribution of CSF α-syn levels was observed in the ADNI cohort, with high levels of α-syn in the subjects with abnormally increased t-tau values. Although a correlation was also noted between α-syn and p-tau181, there was a mismatch (α-syn-p-tau181-Mis), i.e., higher p-tau181 levels accompanied by lower α-syn levels in a subset of ADNI patients. We hypothesize that this α-syn-p-tau181-Mis is a CSF signature of concomitant LBD pathology in AD patients. Hence, we suggest that inclusion of measures of CSF α-syn and calculation of α-syn-p-tau181-Mis improves the diagnostic sensitivity/specificity of classic CSF AD biomarkers and better predicts longitudinal cognitive changes.

  15. Translocation and expression of CSF1 in pigmented villonodular synovitis, tenosynovial giant cell tumor, rheumatoid arthritis and other reactive synovitides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cupp, John S; Miller, Melinda A; Montgomery, Kelli D; Nielsen, Torsten O; O'Connell, John X; Huntsman, David; van de Rijn, Matt; Gilks, Cyril B; West, Robert B

    2007-06-01

    We recently demonstrated that CSF1, the ligand of the tyrosine kinase receptor, CSF1R, can be translocated in pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) and tenosynovial giant cell tumor (TGCT). In this study, we evaluated the staining characteristics of PVNS/TGCT and reactive synovitides for CSF1 and CSF1R by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry on tissue microarrays and correlated these findings with the recently described translocation. We collected specimens of TGCT/PVNS from 60 patients and of rheumatoid arthritis and other reactive synovitides from 74 patients. We identify 2 groups of PVNS and TGCT cases by the presence of CSF1 translocation and CSF1 expression. The first group (35 of 57 cases; 61%) had both the CSF1 translocation and high expression of CSF1 RNA, confirming our previous findings. Interestingly, a second group (22 of 57 cases; 39%) was identified that showed high expression of CSF1 RNA or CSF1 protein but did not have the translocation. The rheumatoid arthritis and reactive synovitis specimens showed localization of CSF1 RNA and protein to the synovial lining cells, implying a possible role for CSF1 in the pathogenesis of these lesions. As the CSF1 translocation is postulated to play an important role in the biology of PVNS/TGCT, the consistent presence of CSF1 expression in translocation-negative cases implies that other mechanisms can lead to CSF1 up-regulation. The consistent presence of CSF1 overexpression in all cases of PVNS/TGCT and reactive synovitides suggests both an important role for CSF1 in the spectrum of synovial pathologies and the possibility of targeting the CSF1/CSF1R interaction therapeutically.

  16. Plasmin system of Alzheimer's disease patients: CSF analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martorana, Alessandro; Sancesario, Giulia M; Esposito, Zaira; Nuccetelli, Marzia; Sorge, Roberto; Formosa, Amanda; Dinallo, Vincenzo; Bernardi, Giorgio; Bernardini, Sergio; Sancesario, Giuseppe

    2012-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a multifactorial neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the extracellular deposit of Amyloid beta (Aβ), mainly of the Amyloid beta(1-42) (Aβ(1-42)) peptide in the hippocampus and neocortex leading to progressive cognitive decline and dementia. The possible imbalance between the Aβ production/degradation process was suggested to contribute to the pathogenesis of AD. Among others, the serine protease plasmin has shown to be involved in Aβ(1-42) clearance, a hypothesis strengthened by neuropathological studies on AD brains. To explore whether there is a change in plasmin system in CSF of AD patients, we analyzed CSF samples from AD and age-matched controls, looking at plasminogen, tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI-1) protein levels and t-PA and urokinase plasminogen activator (u-PA) enzymatic activities. We also measured Aβ(1-42), total-tau and phospho-tau (181) CSF levels and sought for a possible relationship between them and plasmin system values. Our findings showed that t-PA, plasminogen and PAI-1 levels, as t-PA enzymatic activity, remained unchanged in AD with respect to controls; u-PA activity was not detected. We conclude that CSF analysis of plasminogen system does not reflect changes observed post-mortem. Unfortunately, the CSF detection of plasmin system could not be a useful biomarker for either AD diagnosis or disease progression. However, these findings do not exclude the possible involvement of the plasmin system in AD.

  17. Epidural blood patch for refractory low CSF pressure headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Søren Aalbæk; Fomsgaard, Jonna Storm; Jensen, Rigmor

    2011-01-01

    of non-invasive/conservative measures and invasive measures with epidural blood patch providing the cornerstone of the invasive measures. In the present pilot study we therefore aimed to evaluate the treatment efficacy of epidural blood patch (EBP) in treatment-refractory low-pressure headache. Our...... reduction in frequency. An increase in days with use of medication was found. Increased awareness of low CSF pressure headache is emphasized and a controlled larger randomized study is needed to confirm the results. However the present results, allows us to conclude that EBP in treatment-refractory low CSF......Once believed an exceedingly rare disorder, recent evidence suggests that low cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure headache has to be considered an important cause of new daily persistent headaches, particularly among young and middle-aged individuals. Treatment of low CSF pressure headache consists...

  18. Epidural blood patch for refractory low CSF pressure headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Søren Aalbæk; Fomsgaard, Jonna Storm; Jensen, Rigmor

    2011-01-01

    of non-invasive/conservative measures and invasive measures with epidural blood patch providing the cornerstone of the invasive measures. In the present pilot study we therefore aimed to evaluate the treatment efficacy of epidural blood patch (EBP) in treatment-refractory low-pressure headache. Our......Once believed an exceedingly rare disorder, recent evidence suggests that low cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure headache has to be considered an important cause of new daily persistent headaches, particularly among young and middle-aged individuals. Treatment of low CSF pressure headache consists...... reduction in frequency. An increase in days with use of medication was found. Increased awareness of low CSF pressure headache is emphasized and a controlled larger randomized study is needed to confirm the results. However the present results, allows us to conclude that EBP in treatment-refractory low CSF...

  19. CSF neurofilament light chain is elevated in OMS (decreasing with immunotherapy) and other pediatric neuroinflammatory disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pranzatelli, Michael R; Tate, Elizabeth D; McGee, Nathan R; Verhulst, Steven J

    2014-01-15

    Using a panel of seven brain cell-specific biomarkers in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), pediatric opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome (OMS) (n=234) was compared to pediatric non-inflammatory neurological controls (n=84) and other inflammatory neurological disorders (OIND) (n=44). Only CSF NFL was elevated in untreated OMS versus controls (+83%). It was 87% higher in OIND than in OMS. On combination treatment with front-loaded ACTH, IVIg, rituximab, median CSF NFL decreased by 60% to control levels. These biochemical data suggest neuronal/axonal injury in some children with OMS without indicators of astrogliosis, and reduction on sufficient immunotherapy.

  20. Increased CSF-BACE1 activity associated with decreased hippocampus volume in Alzheimer's disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ewers, Michael

    2012-02-01

    The enzyme beta-secretase (BACE1) is essentially involved in the production of cerebral amyloidogenic pathology in Alzheimer\\'s disease (AD). The measurement of BACE1 activity in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) has been reported, which may render CSF measurement of BACE1 a potential biomarker candidate of AD. In order to investigate whether BACE1 protein activity is correlated with regional brain atrophy in AD, we investigated the association between CSF levels of BACE1 and MRI-assessed hippocampus volume in patients with AD (n = 30). An increase in CSF-BACE1 activity was associated with decreased left and right hippocampus volume corrected for global head volume in the AD patients. Boot-strapped regression analysis showed that increased CSF levels of BACE1 activity were associated with increased CSF concentration of total tau but not amyloid-beta1-42 in AD. White matter hyperintensities did not influence the results. BACE1 activity and protein levels were significantly increased in AD compared to 19 elderly healthy controls. Thus, the CSF biomarker candidate of BACE1 activity was associated with hippocampus atrophy in AD in a robust manner and may reflect neurotoxic amyloid-beta-related processes.

  1. Harnessing Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers in Clinical Trials for Treating Alzheimer's and Parkinson's Diseases: Potential and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dana; Kim, Young Sam; Shin, Dong Wun; Park, Chang Shin; Kang, Ju Hee

    2016-10-01

    No disease-modifying therapies (DMT) for neurodegenerative diseases (NDs) have been established, particularly for Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD). It is unclear why candidate drugs that successfully demonstrate therapeutic effects in animal models fail to show disease-modifying effects in clinical trials. To overcome this hurdle, patients with homogeneous pathologies should be detected as early as possible. The early detection of AD patients using sufficiently tested biomarkers could demonstrate the potential usefulness of combining biomarkers with clinical measures as a diagnostic tool. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers for NDs are being incorporated in clinical trials designed with the aim of detecting patients earlier, evaluating target engagement, collecting homogeneous patients, facilitating prevention trials, and testing the potential of surrogate markers relative to clinical measures. In this review we summarize the latest information on CSF biomarkers in NDs, particularly AD and PD, and their use in clinical trials. The large number of issues related to CSF biomarker measurements and applications has resulted in relatively few clinical trials on CSF biomarkers being conducted. However, the available CSF biomarker data obtained in clinical trials support the advantages of incorporating CSF biomarkers in clinical trials, even though the data have mostly been obtained in AD trials. We describe the current issues with and ongoing efforts for the use of CSF biomarkers in clinical trials and the plans to harness CSF biomarkers for the development of DMT and clinical routines. This effort requires nationwide, global, and multidisciplinary efforts in academia, industry, and regulatory agencies to facilitate a new era.

  2. Harnessing Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers in Clinical Trials for Treating Alzheimer's and Parkinson's Diseases: Potential and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dana; Kim, Young-Sam; Shin, Dong Wun; Park, Chang-Shin

    2016-01-01

    No disease-modifying therapies (DMT) for neurodegenerative diseases (NDs) have been established, particularly for Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD). It is unclear why candidate drugs that successfully demonstrate therapeutic effects in animal models fail to show disease-modifying effects in clinical trials. To overcome this hurdle, patients with homogeneous pathologies should be detected as early as possible. The early detection of AD patients using sufficiently tested biomarkers could demonstrate the potential usefulness of combining biomarkers with clinical measures as a diagnostic tool. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers for NDs are being incorporated in clinical trials designed with the aim of detecting patients earlier, evaluating target engagement, collecting homogeneous patients, facilitating prevention trials, and testing the potential of surrogate markers relative to clinical measures. In this review we summarize the latest information on CSF biomarkers in NDs, particularly AD and PD, and their use in clinical trials. The large number of issues related to CSF biomarker measurements and applications has resulted in relatively few clinical trials on CSF biomarkers being conducted. However, the available CSF biomarker data obtained in clinical trials support the advantages of incorporating CSF biomarkers in clinical trials, even though the data have mostly been obtained in AD trials. We describe the current issues with and ongoing efforts for the use of CSF biomarkers in clinical trials and the plans to harness CSF biomarkers for the development of DMT and clinical routines. This effort requires nationwide, global, and multidisciplinary efforts in academia, industry, and regulatory agencies to facilitate a new era.

  3. Total-tau and neurofilament light in CSF reflect spinal cord ischaemia after endovascular aortic repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merisson, Edyta; Mattsson, Niklas; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Pikwer, Andreas; Mehmedagic, Irma; Acosta, Stefan; Åkeson, Jonas

    2016-02-01

    Repair of extensive aortic disease may be associated with spinal cord ischaemia (SCI). Here we test if levels of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers for neuronal injury are altered in patients with SCI after advanced endovascular repair in extensive aortic disease. CSF was sampled for up to 48 h in ten patients undergoing endovascular aortic repair and analyzed for the axonal damage markers total-tau (T-tau) and neurofilament light (NFL). Six of ten patients developed SCI (clinically present within 3-6 h). CSF levels of NFL increased up to 37-fold in patients with, but were stable in patients without, SCI. CSF levels of T-tau also increased in patients with SCI, but with some overlap with patients without SCI. Levels of NFL and T-tau did not increase until after the appearance of clinical signs of neurological dysfunction (12-48 h after aortic repair). The CSF biomarkers NFL and T-tau both reflect development of SCI after endovascular aortic repair, but do not rise until after clinical signs of SCI appear. Future studies are desirable to further evaluate potential use of these biomarkers for assessment of the severity of SCI, and also to identify earlier biomarkers of SCI. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Heart-type fatty acid binding protein and vascular endothelial growth factor: cerebrospinal fluid biomarker candidates for Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Liang-Hao; Alexopoulos, Panagiotis; Perneczky, Robert

    2013-10-01

    The main objective of the study was to validate the findings of previous cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) proteomic studies for the differentiation between Alzheimer's disease (AD) dementia and physiological ageing. The most consistently significant proteins in the separation between AD dementia versus normal controls using CSF proteomics were identified in the literature. The classification performance of the four pre-selected proteins was explored in 92 controls, 149 patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and 69 patients with AD dementia. Heart-type fatty acid binding protein (hFABP) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) CSF concentrations distinguished between healthy controls and patients with AD dementia with a sensitivity and specificity of 57 and 35%, and 76 and 84%, respectively. The optimal classification was achieved by a combination of the two additional CSF biomarker candidates in conjunction with the three established markers Amyloid-β (Aβ)1-42, total-Tau (tTau), and phosphorylated-Tau (pTau)181, which resulted in a sensitivity of 83% and a specificity of 86%. hFABP also predicted the progression from MCI to AD dementia. The present study provides evidence in support of hFABP and VEGF in CSF as AD biomarker candidates to be used in combination with the established markers Aβ1-42, tTau, and pTau181.

  5. Effects of CSF proteins on brain atrophy rates in cognitively healthy older adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattsson, Niklas; Insel, Philip; Nosheny, Rachel; Trojanowski, John Q.; Shaw, Leslie M.; Jack, Clifford R.; Tosun, Duygu; Weiner, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Biomarkers associated with Alzheimer’s disease (AD)-like brain atrophy in healthy people may identify mechanisms involved in early stage AD. Aside from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) β-amyloid42 (Aβ42) and tau, no studies have tested associations between CSF proteins and AD-like brain atrophy. We studied 90 healthy elders, who underwent lumbar puncture at baseline, and serial magnetic resonance imaging scans for up to 4 years. We tested statistical effects of baseline CSF proteins (N=70 proteins related to Aβ42-metabolism, microglial activity and synaptic/neuronal function) on atrophy rates in 7 AD-related regions. Besides effects of Aβ42 and phosphorylated tau (P-tau) that were seen in several regions, novel CSF proteins were found to have effects in inferior and middle temporal cortex (including Apolipoprotein CIII, Apolipoprotein D and Apolipoprotein H). Several proteins (including S100β and Matrix Metalloproteinase-3) had effects that depended on the presence of brain Aβ pathology, as measured by CSF Aβ42. Other proteins (including P-tau and Apolipoprotein D) had effects even after adjusting for CSF Aβ42. The statistical effects in this exploratory study were mild and not significant after correction for multiple comparisons, but some of the identified proteins may be associated with brain atrophy in healthy people. Proteins interacting with CSF Aβ42 may be related to Aβ brain pathology, while proteins associated with atrophy even after adjusting for CSF Aβ42 may be related to Aβ-independent mechanisms. PMID:24094581

  6. Crystallization of M-CSF.alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandit, Jayvardhan; Jancarik, Jarmila; Kim, Sung-Hou; Koths, Kirston; Halenbeck, Robert; Fear, Anna Lisa; Taylor, Eric; Yamamoto, Ralph; Bohm, Andrew

    1999-01-01

    The present invention is directed to methods for crystallizing macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) and to a crystalline M-CSF produced thereby. The present invention is also directed to methods for designing and producing M-CSF agonists and antagonists using information derived from the crystallographic structure of M-CSF. The invention is also directed to methods for screening M-CSF agonists and antagonists. In addition, the present invention is directed to an isolated, purified, soluble and functional M-CSF receptor.

  7. Cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers of neurodegeneration in chronic neurological diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumani, Hayrettin; Teunissen, Charlotte; Süssmuth, Sigurd; Otto, Markus; Ludolph, Albert C; Brettschneider, Johannes

    2008-07-01

    Chronic neurological diseases (CND) like amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), dementia or multiple sclerosis (MS) share a chronic progressive course of disease that frequently leads to the common pathological pathway of neurodegeneration, including neuroaxonal damage, apoptosis and gliosis. There is an ongoing search for biomarkers that could support early diagnosis of CND and help to identify responders to interventions in therapeutic treatment trials. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is a promising source of biomarkers in CND, since the CSF compartment is in close anatomical contact with the brain interstitial fluid, where biochemical changes related to CND are reflected. We review recent advances in CSF biomarkers research in CND and thereby focus on markers associated with neurodegeneration.

  8. Cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers in trials for Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lleó, Alberto; Cavedo, Enrica; Parnetti, Lucilla; Vanderstichele, Hugo; Herukka, Sanna Kaisa; Andreasen, Niels; Ghidoni, Roberta; Lewczuk, Piotr; Jeromin, Andreas; Winblad, Bengt; Tsolaki, Magda; Mroczko, Barbara; Visser, Pieter Jelle; Santana, Isabel; Svenningsson, Per; Blennow, Kaj; Aarsland, Dag; Molinuevo, José Luis; Zetterberg, Henrik; Mollenhauer, Brit

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) and Parkinson disease (PD) are the most common neurodegenerative disorders. For both diseases, early intervention is thought to be essential to the success of disease-modifying treatments. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) can reflect some of the pathophysiological changes that occur in the brain, and the number of CSF biomarkers under investigation in neurodegenerative conditions has grown rapidly in the past 20 years. In AD, CSF biomarkers are increasingly being used in clinical practice, and have been incorporated into the majority of clinical trials to demonstrate target engagement, to enrich or stratify patient groups, and to find evidence of disease modification. In PD, CSF biomarkers have not yet reached the clinic, but are being studied in patients with parkinsonism, and are being used in clinical trials either to monitor progression or to demonstrate target engagement and downstream effects of drugs. CSF biomarkers might also serve as surrogate markers of clinical benefit after a specific therapeutic intervention, although additional data are required. It is anticipated that CSF biomarkers will have an important role in trials aimed at disease modification in the near future. In this Review, we provide an overview of CSF biomarkers in AD and PD, and discuss their role in clinical trials.

  9. Consistency and inconsistency in testing biomarkers in breast cancer. A GRELL study in cut-off variability in the Romance language countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crocetti, Emanuele; Caldarella, Adele; Ferretti, Stefano; Ardanaz, Eva; Arveux, Patrick; Bara, Simona; Barrios, Enrique; Bento, Maria J; Bordoni, Andrea; Buzzoni, Carlotta; Candela, Giuseppina; Colombani, Françoise; Delafosse, Patricia; Federico, Massimo; Francart, Julie; Giacomin, Adriano; Grosclaude, Pascale; Guizard, Anne V; Izarzugaza, Isabel; Konzelmann, Isabelle; La Rosa, Francesco; Lapotre, Benedicte; Leone, Nathalie; Ligier, Karine; Mangone, Lucia; Marcos-Gragera, R; Martinez, Ruth; Michelena, Maria J; Michiara, Maria; Miranda, Ana; Molinié, Florence; Mugarza-Gomez, Conception; Paci, Eugenio; Piffer, Silvano; Puig-Vives, Montserrat; Sacchettini, Claudio; Sánchez, Maria J; Traina, Adele; Tretarre, Brigitte; Tumino, Rosario; Van Vaerenbergh, Elke; Velten, Michel; Woronoff, Anne S

    2013-08-01

    Biological markers are crucial factors in order to differentiate female breast cancers and to determine the right therapy. This study aims at evaluating whether testing for biomarkers for female breast cancer has similar frequency and characteristics across and within countries. Population-based cancer registries of the Association for cancer registration and epidemiology in Romance language countries (GRELL) were asked to complete a questionnaire on biomarkers testing. The data collected referred to invasive female breast cancer cases diagnosed between 2004 and 2009. The investigation focused on 1) the overexpression and amplification of the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 oncogene (HER2); 2) the expression of oestrogen (ER) and progesterone (PgR) receptors; and 3) the proliferation index (PI). Weighted percentages, the heterogeneity among and within countries, and the correlation between responses and calendar years were evaluated. The study was based on 19,644 breast cancers. Overall, 85.9% of the cases were tested for HER2, 91.8% for both ER and PgR, and 74.1% for proliferative markers. For HER2 and ER-PgR, the frequency of testing increased from 2004 to 2009. Testing varied among countries (HER2 from 82.0% to 95.9%, ER-PgR from 89.3% to 98.9%, PI from 10% to 92%) and also within the same country (e.g. HER2 in Italy from 51% to 99%) as well as within single cancer registries. The most relevant differences were in the scores for positive/negative/not clearly defined HER2 (e.g. HER2 was defined positive if IHC 3+ in 21/33 registries), and in the cut-off of positive cells for ER/PgR (from >0% to >30%) and PI positivity (from >0% to >20%). Biological markers are widely tested in the Romance language countries; however, the parameters defining their positivity may vary, raising concerns about homogeneity in breast cancer classification and treatment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Screening for New Biomarkers for Subcortical Vascular Dementia and Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annika Öhrfelt

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Novel biomarkers are important for identifying as well as differentiating subcortical vascular dementia (SVD and Alzheimer’s disease (AD at an early stage in the disease process. Methods: In two independent cohorts, a multiplex immunoassay was utilized to analyze 90 proteins in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF samples from dementia patients and patients at risk of developing dementia (mild cognitive impairment. Results: The levels of several CSF proteins were increased in SVD and its incipient state, and in moderate-to-severe AD compared with the control group. In contrast, some CSF proteins were altered in AD, but not in SVD. The levels of heart-type fatty acid binding protein (H-FABP were consistently increased in all groups with dementia but only in some of their incipient states. Conclusions: In summary, these results support the notion that SVD and AD are driven by different pathophysiological mechanisms reflected in the CSF protein profile and that H-FABP in CSF is a general marker of neurodegeneration.

  11. Serial CSF sampling over a period of 30 h via an indwelling spinal catheter in healthy volunteers : headache, back pain, tolerability and measured acetylcholine profile

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Daas, Izaak; Wemer, Johan; Abou Farha, Khalid; Tamminga, Wim; de Boer, Theo; Spanjersberg, Rob; Struys, Michel M. R. F.; Absalom, Anthony R.

    2013-01-01

    Timed interval cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) sampling by indwelling catheterization can be a valuable corroborative tool for the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic assessment of drugs. CSF sampling in studies on drug candidates for Alzheimer's disease have been conducted in evaluations of the biomarker

  12. GM-CSF and TNF alpha modulate protein expression of human neutrophils visualized by fluorescence two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langereis, Jeroen D.; Franciosi, Lorenza; Ulfman, Laurien H.; Koenderman, Leo

    2011-01-01

    Increased serum levels of TNF alpha and GM-CSF are found in various chronic inflammatory diseases and these cytokines affect the function of circulating and tissue neutrophils. TNF alpha- and GM-CSF-induced protein expression profiles could, therefore, serve as biomarker for the action of these cyto

  13. IIH with normal CSF pressures?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soh Youn Suh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH is a condition of raised intracranial pressure (ICP in the absence of space occupying lesions. ICP is usually measured by lumbar puncture and a cerebrospinal fluid (CSF pressure above 250 mm H 2 O is one of the diagnostic criteria of IIH. Recently, we have encountered two patients who complained of headaches and exhibited disc swelling without an increased ICP. We prescribed acetazolamide and followed both patients frequently; because of the definite disc swelling with IIH related symptoms. Symptoms and signs resolved in both patients after they started taking acetazolamide. It is generally known that an elevated ICP, as measured by lumbar puncture, is the most important diagnostic sign of IIH. However, these cases caution even when CSF pressure is within the normal range, that suspicion should be raised when a patient has papilledema with related symptoms, since untreated papilledema may cause progressive and irreversible visual loss.

  14. CSF analysis differentiates multiple-system atrophy from idiopathic late-onset cerebellar ataxia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abdo, W.; Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de; Munneke, M.; Geel, W.J.A. van; Bloem, B.R.; Kremer, H.P.H.; Verbeek, M.M.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Differentiating idiopathic late-onset cerebellar ataxia (ILOCA) from ataxia due to the cerebellar subtype of multiple-system atrophy (MSA-C) can be difficult in the early stages of the disease METHODS: The authors analyzed the levels of various CSF biomarkers in 27 patients with MSA-C

  15. CSF inflammation and axonal damage are increased and correlate in progressive multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Romme Christensen, Jeppe; Börnsen, Lars; Khademi, Mohsen

    2013-01-01

    was increased in RRMS and SPMS patients. Biomarkers of axonal damage (NFL) and demyelination (MBP) were increased in all MS patients. In progressive MS patients CSF levels of osteopontin and CXCL13 correlated with NFL while osteopontin and MMP9 correlated with MBP. MBP8298 treatment did not affect the levels...

  16. CSF d-serine concentrations are similar in Alzheimer's disease, other dementias, and elderly controls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biemans, Elisanne A L M; Verhoeven-Duif, Nanda M; Gerrits, Johan; Claassen, Jurgen A H R; Kuiperij, H Bea; Verbeek, Marcel M

    2016-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of d-serine were recently reported as a potential new biomarker for Alzheimer's disease (AD), showing a perfect distinction between AD patients and healthy controls. In this study, we aimed to confirm these results and extend these previous findings to dementia with

  17. Ischemic cardiac complications following G-CSF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckman, Peter M; Bertog, Stefan C; Wilson, Robert F; Henry, Timothy D

    2010-07-01

    Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) is commonly used in bone marrow transplant donors to increase the number of circulating progenitor cells. G-CSF has also been studied following myocardial infarction, but concern has been raised about the risks of G-CSF administration in patients with coronary artery disease. We present two cases of ischemic cardiac complications that are likely to be related to administration of G-CSF and provide a contemporary overview of the literature on the cardiovascular risks of G-CSF.

  18. Reduced CSF CART in dementia with Lewy bodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, Kristofer; Wiehager, Sara; Nilsson, Karin

    2009-01-01

    Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) is the second most common form of neurodegenerative dementia after Alzheimer's disease (AD). The underlying neurobiological mechanism of DLB is not fully understood and no generally accepted biomarkers are yet available for the diagnosis of DLB. In a recent MRI study......, DLB patients displayed hypothalamic atrophy whereas this region was not affected in AD patients. Cocaine and amphetamine regulated transcript (CART) is a neuropeptide expressed selectively in neurons in the hypothalamus. Here, we found that CSF CART levels were significantly reduced by 30% in DLB...

  19. ATYPICAL CSF PICTURE IN VIRAL MENINGITIS HSV- TYPE-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikram

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Acute infections of nervous system are among the most important problems in medicine because early recognition, efficient decision making and rapid institution of therapy can be lifesaving. Making a clinical diagnosis of acute meningitis depends on the cornerstone of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF examination. We present a case with the above-mentioned difficulty and the approach involved in establishing the exact diagnosis and institution of appropriate treatment. CONCLUSION About findings in viral meningitis one should be careful while evaluating a CSF report so as to not make a mistaken diagnosis and delay treatment. The most important analysis in patients whose symptoms are consistent with herpes simplex meningitis is the detection of Herpes simplex Virus deoxy-ribo-nucleic acid (HSV-DNA in CSF with Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR.

  20. Neprilysin-Like Activity Correlates with CSF-Tau and Phospho-Tau in Patients with Alzheimer's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Katrine Christa Nordskov; Simonsen, Anja Hviid; Holmetoft, Ulla Bachmann

    2013-01-01

    the level and enzyme activity of NEP in serum and CSF, using a sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and a fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay, respectively, in patients with AD, frontotemporal dementia (FTD), Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), and depression. Results were correlated...... with the levels of CSF AD biomarkers Aβ42, hyperphosphorylated tau (p-tau), and total tau (t-tau). In serum, we found no differences in NEP-like activity or concentration between the groups and there were no correlations between NEP and AD biomarkers. In CSF, no influence of age or gender on NEP levels or enzyme...... activity was seen. However, NEP concentration was lower and the specific activity was higher in FTD compared to AD. Aβ42 levels in CSF did not correlate with NEP concentration or activity in the AD, CJD, or depression groups, but NEP-like activity and Aβ42 levels correlated significantly in the FTD group...

  1. Biomarkers of the Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikio Shoji

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in biomarker studies on dementia are summarized here. CSF Aβ40, Aβ42, total tau, and phosphorylated tau are the most sensitive biomarkers for diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD and prediction of onset of AD from mild cognitive impairment (MCI. Based on this progress, new diagnostic criteria for AD, MCI, and preclinical AD were proposed by National Institute of Aging (NIA and Alzheimer's Association in August 2010. In these new criteria, progress in biomarker identification and amyloid imaging studies in the past 10 years have added critical information. Huge contributions of basic and clinical studies have established clinical evidence supporting these markers. Based on this progress, essential therapy for cure of AD is urgently expected.

  2. Update on the core and developing cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers for Alzheimer disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babić, Mirjana; Švob Štrac, Dubravka; Mück-Šeler, Dorotea; Pivac, Nela; Stanić, Gabrijela; Hof, Patrick R.; Šimić, Goran

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a complex neurodegenerative disorder, whose prevalence will dramatically rise by 2050. Despite numerous clinical trials investigating this disease, there is still no effective treatment. Many trials showed negative or inconclusive results, possibly because they recruited only patients with severe disease, who had not undergone disease-modifying therapies in preclinical stages of AD before severe degeneration occurred. Detection of AD in asymptomatic at risk individuals (and a few presymptomatic individuals who carry an autosomal dominant monogenic AD mutation) remains impractical in many of clinical situations and is possible only with reliable biomarkers. In addition to early diagnosis of AD, biomarkers should serve for monitoring disease progression and response to therapy. To date, the most promising biomarkers are cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and neuroimaging biomarkers. Core CSF biomarkers (amyloid β1-42, total tau, and phosphorylated tau) showed a high diagnostic accuracy but were still unreliable for preclinical detection of AD. Hence, there is an urgent need for detection and validation of novel CSF biomarkers that would enable early diagnosis of AD in asymptomatic individuals. This article reviews recent research advances on biomarkers for AD, focusing mainly on the CSF biomarkers. In addition to core CSF biomarkers, the potential usefulness of novel CSF biomarkers is discussed. PMID:25165049

  3. Update on the core and developing cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers for Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babić, Mirjana; Svob Štrac, Dubravka; Mück-Šeler, Dorotea; Pivac, Nela; Stanić, Gabrijela; Hof, Patrick R; Simić, Goran

    2014-08-28

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a complex neurodegenerative disorder, whose prevalence will dramatically rise by 2050. Despite numerous clinical trials investigating this disease, there is still no effective treatment. Many trials showed negative or inconclusive results, possibly because they recruited only patients with severe disease, who had not undergone disease-modifying therapies in preclinical stages of AD before severe degeneration occurred. Detection of AD in asymptomatic at risk individuals (and a few presymptomatic individuals who carry an autosomal dominant monogenic AD mutation) remains impractical in many of clinical situations and is possible only with reliable biomarkers. In addition to early diagnosis of AD, biomarkers should serve for monitoring disease progression and response to therapy. To date, the most promising biomarkers are cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and neuroimaging biomarkers. Core CSF biomarkers (amyloid β1-42, total tau, and phosphorylated tau) showed a high diagnostic accuracy but were still unreliable for preclinical detection of AD. Hence, there is an urgent need for detection and validation of novel CSF biomarkers that would enable early diagnosis of AD in asymptomatic individuals. This article reviews recent research advances on biomarkers for AD, focusing mainly on the CSF biomarkers. In addition to core CSF biomarkers, the potential usefulness of novel CSF biomarkers is discussed.

  4. Biomarkers for neuromyelitis optica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Kuo-Hsuan; Ro, Long-Sun; Lyu, Rong-Kuo; Chen, Chiung-Mei

    2015-02-02

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is an acquired, heterogeneous inflammatory disorder, which is characterized by recurrent optic neuritis and longitudinally extensive spinal cord lesions. The discovery of the serum autoantibody marker, anti-aquaporin 4 (anti-AQP4) antibody, revolutionizes our understanding of pathogenesis of NMO. In addition to anti-AQP4 antibody, other biomarkers for NMO are also reported. These candidate biomarkers are particularly involved in T helper (Th)17 and astrocytic damages, which play a critical role in the development of NMO lesions. Among them, IL-6 in the peripheral blood is associated with anti-AQP4 antibody production. Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in CSF demonstrates good correlations with clinical severity of NMO relapses. Detecting these useful biomarkers may be useful in the diagnosis and evaluation of disease activity of NMO. Development of compounds targeting these biomarkers may provide novel therapeutic strategies for NMO. This article will review the related biomarker studies in NMO and discuss the potential therapeutics targeting these biomarkers.

  5. Impact of cerebro-spinal fluid biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease in clinical practice: a multicentric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouton-Liger, François; Wallon, David; Troussière, Anne-Cécile; Yatimi, Rachida; Dumurgier, Julien; Magnin, Eloi; de la Sayette, Vincent; Duron, Emannuelle; Philippi, Nathalie; Beaufils, Emilie; Gabelle, Audrey; Croisile, Bernard; Robert, Philippe; Pasquier, Florence; Hannequin, Didier; Hugon, Jacques; Paquet, Claire

    2014-01-01

    CSF biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease are well validated in clinical research; however, their pragmatic utility in daily practice is still unappreciated. These biomarkers are used in routine practice according to Health Authority Recommendations. In 604 consecutive patients explored for cognitive disorders, questionnaires were prospectively proposed and filled. Before and after CSF biomarker results, clinicians provided a diagnosis and an estimate of their diagnostic confidence. Analysis has compared the frequency of diagnosis before and after CSF biomarker results using the net reclassification improvement (NRI) method. We have evaluated external validity comparing with data of French Bank National of AD (BNA). A total of 561 patients [Alzheimer's disease (AD), n = 253; non-AD, n = 308] were included (mean age, 68.6 years; women, 52 %). Clinically suspected diagnosis and CSF results were concordant in 65.2 % of cases. When clinical hypothesis and biological results were discordant, a reclassification occurred in favour of CSF biomarkers results in 76.9 %. The NRI was 39.5 %. In addition, the results show a statistically significant improvement in clinician confidence for their diagnosis. In comparison with BNA data, patients were younger and more frequently diagnosed with AD. Clinicians tend to heavily rely on the CSF AD biomarkers results and are more confident in their diagnoses using CSF AD biomarkers. Thus, these biomarkers appear as a key tool in clinical practice.

  6. Detection of Soluble Amyloid-β Oligomers and Insoluble High-Molecular-Weight Particles in CSF: Development of Methods with Potential for Diagnosis and Therapy Monitoring of Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Aileen Funke

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The diagnosis of probable Alzheimer's disease (AD can be established premortem based on clinical criteria like neuropsychological tests. Post mortem, specific neuropathological changes like amyloid plaques define AD. However, the standard criteria based on medical history and mental status examinations do not take into account the long preclinical features of the disease, and a biomarker for improved diagnosis of AD is urgently needed. In a large number of studies, amyloid-β (Aβ monomer concentrations in CSF of AD patients are consistently and significantly reduced when compared to healthy controls. Therefore, monomeric Aβ in CSF was suggested to be a helpful biomarker for the diagnosis of preclinical AD. However, not the monomeric form, but Aβ oligomers have been shown to be the toxic species in AD pathology, and their quantification and characterization could facilitate AD diagnosis and therapy monitoring. Here, we review the current status of assay development to reliably and routinely detect Aβ oligomers and high-molecular-weight particles in CSF.

  7. Metallomic Biomarkers in Cerebrospinal fluid and Serum in patients with Parkinson’s disease in Indian population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanyal, Jaya; Ahmed, Shiek S. S. J.; Ng, Hon Keung Tony; Naiya, Tufan; Ghosh, Epsita; Banerjee, Tapas Kumar; Lakshmi, Jaya; Guha, Gautam; Rao, Vadlamudi Raghavendra

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disease with the absence of markers for diagnosis. Several studies on PD reported the elements imbalance in biofluids as biomarkers. However, their results remained inconclusive. This study integrates metallomics, multivariate and artificial neural network (ANN) to understand element variations in CSF and serum of PD patients from the largest cohort of Indian population to solve the inconsistent results of previous studies. Also, this study is aimed to (1) ascertain a common element signature between CSF and serum. (2) Assess cross sectional element variation with clinical symptoms. (3) Develop ANN models for rapid diagnosis. A metallomic profile of 110 CSF and 530 serum samples showed significant variations in 10 elements of CSF and six in serum of patients compared to controls. Consistent variations in elements pattern were noticed for Calcium, Magnesium and Iron in both the fluids of PD, which provides feasible diagnosis from serum. Furthermore, implementing multivariate analyses showed clear classification between normal and PD in both the fluids. Also, ANN provides 99% accuracy in detection of disease from CSF and serum. Overall, our analyses demonstrate that elements profile in biofluids of PD will be useful in development of diagnostic markers for PD. PMID:27752066

  8. CSF T-Tau/Aβ42 predicts white matter microstructure in healthy adults at risk for Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara B Bendlin

    Full Text Available Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF biomarkers T-Tau and Aβ(42 are linked with Alzheimer's disease (AD, yet little is known about the relationship between CSF biomarkers and structural brain alteration in healthy adults. In this study we examined the extent to which AD biomarkers measured in CSF predict brain microstructure indexed by diffusion tensor imaging (DTI and volume indexed by T1-weighted imaging. Forty-three middle-aged adults with parental family history of AD received baseline lumbar puncture and MRI approximately 3.5 years later. Voxel-wise image analysis methods were used to test whether baseline CSF Aβ(42, total tau (T-Tau, phosphorylated tau (P-Tau and neurofilament light protein predicted brain microstructure as indexed by DTI and gray matter volume indexed by T1-weighted imaging. T-Tau and T-Tau/Aβ(42 were widely correlated with indices of brain microstructure (mean, axial, and radial diffusivity, notably in white matter regions adjacent to gray matter structures affected in the earliest stages of AD. None of the CSF biomarkers were related to gray matter volume. Elevated P-Tau and P-Tau/Aβ(42 levels were associated with lower recognition performance on the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test. Overall, the results suggest that CSF biomarkers are related to brain microstructure in healthy adults with elevated risk of developing AD. Furthermore, the results clearly suggest that early pathological changes in AD can be detected with DTI and occur not only in cortex, but also in white matter.

  9. Comparing the performance characteristics of CSF-TRUST and CSF-VDRL for syphilis: a cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Weiming; Yang, Yang; Wu, Lei; Yang, Sheng; Ng, Lai-King

    2013-01-01

    Objective In this study, we aimed to determine the performance characteristics of toluidine red unheated serum test on cerebrospinal fluids (CSF-TRUST) as compared to venereal disease research laboratory test on cerebrospinal fluids (CSF-VDRL) for laboratory the diagnosis of neurosyphilis. Design A cross-sectional study. Setting Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) clinics. Participants and methods CSF and serum samples were collected from 824 individual STD clinic patients who have syphilis and are suspected to progress to neurosyphilis within a 9-month period. CSF-VDRL and CSF-TRUST were performed parallelly on the same day when collected. Treponema pallidum particle agglutination (TPPA) tests were also performed on the CSF and the serum samples, and biochemical analysis of the CSF samples was also performed. Results The overall agreement between CSF-TRUST and CSF-VDRL was 97.3%. The reactive ratios of the CSF samples were 22.1% by CSF-TRUST and 24.8% by CSF-VDRL, respectively. All CSF-TRUST-reactive cases were reactive in the CSF-VDRL. Twenty-two samples with CSF-TRUST-negative were tested CSF-VDRL-reactive with low titres (1 : 1 to 1 : 4). Over 97% of the double-reactive CSF samples (CSF-VDRL and CSF-TRUST) had an identical titre or a titre within a two-fold difference. The agreement of CSF-TPPA and CSF-VDRL was 71.9%. Similarly, the agreement of CSF-TPPA and CSF-TRUST was 69.2%. Conclusions Our results revealed that CSF-TRUST could be used as an option for CSF examination in settings without CSF-VDRL in place. PMID:23430600

  10. Comparing the performance characteristics of CSF-TRUST and CSF-VDRL for syphilis: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Weiming; Yang, Yang; Wu, Lei; Yang, Sheng; Ng, Lai-King

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to determine the performance characteristics of toluidine red unheated serum test on cerebrospinal fluids (CSF-TRUST) as compared to venereal disease research laboratory test on cerebrospinal fluids (CSF-VDRL) for laboratory the diagnosis of neurosyphilis. A cross-sectional study. Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) clinics. CSF and serum samples were collected from 824 individual STD clinic patients who have syphilis and are suspected to progress to neurosyphilis within a 9-month period. CSF-VDRL and CSF-TRUST were performed parallelly on the same day when collected. Treponema pallidum particle agglutination (TPPA) tests were also performed on the CSF and the serum samples, and biochemical analysis of the CSF samples was also performed. The overall agreement between CSF-TRUST and CSF-VDRL was 97.3%. The reactive ratios of the CSF samples were 22.1% by CSF-TRUST and 24.8% by CSF-VDRL, respectively. All CSF-TRUST-reactive cases were reactive in the CSF-VDRL. Twenty-two samples with CSF-TRUST-negative were tested CSF-VDRL-reactive with low titres (1 : 1 to 1 : 4). Over 97% of the double-reactive CSF samples (CSF-VDRL and CSF-TRUST) had an identical titre or a titre within a two-fold difference. The agreement of CSF-TPPA and CSF-VDRL was 71.9%. Similarly, the agreement of CSF-TPPA and CSF-TRUST was 69.2%. Our results revealed that CSF-TRUST could be used as an option for CSF examination in settings without CSF-VDRL in place.

  11. Recommendations to standardize preanalytical confounding factors in Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Campo, Marta; Mollenhauer, Brit; Bertolotto, Antonio; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; Hampel, Harald; Simonsen, Anja Hviid; Kapaki, Elisabeth; Kruse, Niels; Le Bastard, Nathalie; Lehmann, Sylvain; Molinuevo, Jose L; Parnetti, Lucilla; Perret-Liaudet, Armand; Sáez-Valero, Javier; Saka, Esen; Urbani, Andrea; Vanmechelen, Eugeen; Verbeek, Marcel; Visser, Pieter Jelle; Teunissen, Charlotte

    2012-08-01

    Early diagnosis of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's (AD) or Parkinson's disease (PD) is needed to slow down or halt the disease at the earliest stage. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers can be a good tool for early diagnosis. However, their use in clinical practice is challenging due to the high variability found between centers in the concentrations of both AD CSF biomarkers (Aβ42, total tau and phosphorylated tau) and PD CSF biomarker (α-synuclein). Such a variability has been partially attributed to different preanalytical procedures between laboratories, thus highlighting the need to establish standardized operating procedures. Here, we merge two previous consensus guidelines for preanalytical confounding factors in order to achieve one exhaustive guideline updated with new evidence for Aβ42, total tau and phosphorylated tau, and α-synuclein. The proposed standardized operating procedures are applicable not only to novel CSF biomarkers in AD and PD, but also to biomarkers for other neurodegenerative disorders.

  12. Alzheimer's Disease Cerebrospinal Fluid and Neuroimaging Biomarkers: Diagnostic Accuracy and Relationship to Drug Efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Tapan K; Alkon, Daniel L

    2015-01-01

    Widely researched Alzheimer's disease (AD) biomarkers include in vivo brain imaging with PET and MRI, imaging of amyloid plaques, and biochemical assays of Aβ 1 - 42, total tau, and phosphorylated tau (p-tau-181) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). In this review, we critically evaluate these biomarkers and discuss their clinical utility for the differential diagnosis of AD. Current AD biomarker tests are either highly invasive (requiring CSF collection) or expensive and labor-intensive (neuroimaging), making them unsuitable for use in the primary care, clinical office-based setting, or to assess drug efficacy in clinical trials. In addition, CSF and neuroimaging biomarkers continue to face challenges in achieving required sensitivity and specificity and minimizing center-to-center variability (for CSF-Aβ 1 - 42 biomarkers CV = 26.5% ; http://www.alzforum.org/news/conference-coverage/paris-standardization-hurdle-spinal-fluid-imaging-markers). Although potentially useful for selecting patient populations for inclusion in AD clinical trials, the utility of CSF biomarkers and neuroimaging techniques as surrogate endpoints of drug efficacy needs to be validated. Recent trials of β- and γ-secretase inhibitors and Aβ immunization-based therapies in AD showed no significant cognitive improvements, despite changes in CSF and neuroimaging biomarkers. As we learn more about the dysfunctional cellular and molecular signaling processes that occur in AD, and how these processes are manifested in tissues outside of the brain, new peripheral biomarkers may also be validated as non-invasive tests to diagnose preclinical and clinical AD.

  13. Biomarkers of Alzheimer’s disease in body fluids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Various innovative diagnostic methods for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) have been developed in view of the increasing preva-lence and consequences of later-life dementia. Biomarkers in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood for AD are primarily based on the detection of components derived from amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs). Published reports on CSF and blood biomarkers in AD indicate that although biomarkers in body fluids may be utilized in the clinical diagnosis of AD, there are no specific markers that permit accurate and reliable diagnosis of early-stage AD or the monitoring of disease pro-gression.

  14. Increased CSF levels of phosphorylated neurofilament heavy protein following bout in amateur boxers.

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    Sanna Neselius

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Diagnosis of mild TBI is hampered by the lack of imaging or biochemical measurements for identifying or quantifying mild TBI in a clinical setting. We have previously shown increased biomarker levels of protein reflecting axonal (neurofilament light protein and tau and glial (GFAP and S-100B damage in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF after a boxing bout. The aims of this study were to find other biomarkers of mild TBI, which may help clinicians diagnose and monitor mild TBI, and to calculate the role of APOE ε4 allele genotype which has been associated with poor outcome after TBI. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty amateur boxers with a minimum of 45 bouts and 25 non-boxing matched controls were included in a prospective cohort study. CSF and blood were collected at one occasion between 1 and 6 days after a bout, and after a rest period for at least 14 days (follow up. The controls were tested once. CSF levels of neurofilament heavy (pNFH, amyloid precursor proteins (sAPPα and sAPPβ, ApoE and ApoA1 were analyzed. In blood, plasma levels of Aβ42 and ApoE genotype were analyzed. RESULTS: CSF levels of pNFH were significantly increased between 1 and 6 days after boxing as compared with controls (p<0.001. The concentrations decreased at follow up but were still significantly increased compared to controls (p = 0.018. CSF pNFH concentrations correlated with NFL (r =  0.57 after bout and 0.64 at follow up, p<0.001. No significant change was found in the other biomarkers, as compared to controls. Boxers carrying the APOE ε4 allele had similar biomarker concentrations as non-carriers. CONCLUSIONS: Subconcussive repetitive trauma in amateur boxing causes a mild TBI that may be diagnosed by CSF analysis of pNFH, even without unconsciousness or concussion symptoms. Possession of the APOE ε4 allele was not found to influence biomarker levels after acute TBI.

  15. Neoplastic Meningitis: How MRI and CSF Cytology Are Influenced by CSF Cell Count and Tumor Type

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    P. Prömmel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Although CSF cytology and MRI are standard methods to diagnose neoplastic meningitis (NM, this complication of neoplastic disease remains difficult to detect. We therefore reevaluated the sensitivity of gadolinium (GD-enhanced MRI and cerebrospinal-fluid (CSF-cytology and the relevance of tumor type and CSF cell count. Methods. We retrospectively identified 111 cases of NM diagnosed in our CSF laboratory since 1990 with complete documentation of both MRI and CSF cytology. 37 had haematological and 74 solid neoplasms. CSF cell counts were increased in 74 and normal in 37 patients. Results. In hematological neoplasms, MRI was positive in 49% and CSF cytology in 97%. In solid tumors, the sensitivity of MRI was 80% and of cytology 78%. With normal CSF cell counts, MRI was positive in 59% (50% hematological, 72% solid malignancies and CSF cytology in 76% (92% in hematological, 68% in solid neoplasms. In cases of elevated cell counts, the sensitivity of MRI was 72% (50% for hematological, 83% for solid malignancies and of CSF cytology 91% (100% for haematological and 85% for solid neoplasms. 91% of cytologically positive cases were diagnosed at first and another 7% at second lumbar puncture. Routine protein analyses had a low sensitivity in detecting NM. Conclusions. The high overall sensitivity of MRI was only confirmed for NM from solid tumors and for elevated CSF cell counts. With normal cell counts and haematological neoplasms, CSF-cytology was superior to MRI. None of the analysed routine CSF proteins had an acceptable sensitivity and specificity in detecting leptomeningeal disease.

  16. Amyloid and tau cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers in HIV infection

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    Rosengren Lars

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Because of the emerging intersections of HIV infection and Alzheimer's disease, we examined cerebrospinal fluid (CSF biomarkers related of amyloid and tau metabolism in HIV-infected patients. Methods In this cross-sectional study we measured soluble amyloid precursor proteins alpha and beta (sAPPα and sAPPβ, amyloid beta fragment 1-42 (Aβ1-42, and total and hyperphosphorylated tau (t-tau and p-tau in CSF of 86 HIV-infected (HIV+ subjects, including 21 with AIDS dementia complex (ADC, 25 with central nervous system (CNS opportunistic infections and 40 without neurological symptoms and signs. We also measured these CSF biomarkers in 64 uninfected (HIV- subjects, including 21 with Alzheimer's disease, and both younger and older controls without neurological disease. Results CSF sAPPα and sAPPβ concentrations were highly correlated and reduced in patients with ADC and opportunistic infections compared to the other groups. The opportunistic infection group but not the ADC patients had lower CSF Aβ1-42 in comparison to the other HIV+ subjects. CSF t-tau levels were high in some ADC patients, but did not differ significantly from the HIV+ neuroasymptomatic group, while CSF p-tau was not increased in any of the HIV+ groups. Together, CSF amyloid and tau markers segregated the ADC patients from both HIV+ and HIV- neuroasymptomatics and from Alzheimer's disease patients, but not from those with opportunistic infections. Conclusions Parallel reductions of CSF sAPPα and sAPPβ in ADC and CNS opportunistic infections suggest an effect of CNS immune activation or inflammation on neuronal amyloid synthesis or processing. Elevation of CSF t-tau in some ADC and CNS infection patients without concomitant increase in p-tau indicates neural injury without preferential accumulation of hyperphosphorylated tau as found in Alzheimer's disease. These biomarker changes define pathogenetic pathways to brain injury in ADC that differ from those

  17. Antibody-free quantification of seven tau peptides in human CSF using targeted mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline eBros

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Tau protein concentration in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF is currently used as a sensitive and specific biomarker for Alzheimer's disease. Its detection currently relies on ELISA but the perspective of using mass spectrometry (MS to detect its different proteoforms represents an interesting alternative. This is however an analytical challenge because of its low concentration in the CSF, a biological fluid collected in small volume by lumbar puncture, and with a high structural heterogeneity. To overcome these issues, instead of using immunocapture as previously done, we rather relied on an original two steps pre-fractionation technique of CSF: perchloric acid followed by micro solid phase extraction (µSPE. We could then measure seven tau trypsic peptides by Multiple Reaction Monitoring (MRM on a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. Quantification was performed using isotopically labelled 15N- recombinant Tau protein as internal standard and validated using CSF pools with low, medium or high tau concentrations. Repeatability, intermediate precision, linearity, limit of quantification and recovery were calculated for the different peptides. This new MRM assay, which allowed for the first time CSF tau protein quantification without immunocapture, has important potential application to follow tau metabolism in both diagnostic and therapeutic research.

  18. Antibody-free quantification of seven tau peptides in human CSF using targeted mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bros, Pauline; Vialaret, Jérôme; Barthelemy, Nicolas; Delatour, Vincent; Gabelle, Audrey; Lehmann, Sylvain; Hirtz, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Tau protein concentration in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is currently used as a sensitive and specific biomarker for Alzheimer's disease. Its detection currently relies on ELISA but the perspective of using mass spectrometry (MS) to detect its different proteoforms represents an interesting alternative. This is however an analytical challenge because of its low concentration in the CSF, a biological fluid collected in small volume by lumbar puncture, and with a high structural heterogeneity. To overcome these issues, instead of using immunocapture as previously done, we rather relied on an original two steps pre-fractionation technique of CSF: perchloric acid (PCA) followed by micro solid phase extraction (μSPE). We could then measure seven tau trypsic peptides by Multiple Reaction Monitoring (MRM) on a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. Quantification was performed using isotopically labeled (15)N- recombinant tau protein as internal standard and validated using CSF pools with low, medium, or high tau concentrations (HTCs). Repeatability, intermediate precision, linearity, limit of quantification (LOQ), and recovery were calculated for the different peptides. This new MRM assay, which allowed for the first time CSF tau protein quantification without immunocapture, has important potential application to follow tau metabolism in both diagnostic and therapeutic research.

  19. CSF and brain structural imaging markers of the Alzheimer's pathological cascade.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianfeng Yang

    Full Text Available Cerebral spinal fluid (CSF and structural imaging markers are suggested as biomarkers amended to existing diagnostic criteria of mild cognitive impairment (MCI and Alzheimer's disease (AD. But there is no clear instruction on which markers should be used at which stage of dementia. This study aimed to first investigate associations of the CSF markers as well as volumes and shapes of the hippocampus and lateral ventricles with MCI and AD at the baseline and secondly apply these baseline markers to predict MCI conversion in a two-year time using the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI cohort. Our results suggested that the CSF markers, including Aβ42, t-tau, and p-tau, distinguished MCI or AD from NC, while the Aβ42 CSF marker contributed to the differentiation between MCI and AD. The hippocampal shapes performed better than the hippocampal volumes in classifying NC and MCI, NC and AD, as well as MCI and AD. Interestingly, the ventricular volumes were better than the ventricular shapes to distinguish MCI or AD from NC, while the ventricular shapes showed better accuracy than the ventricular volumes in classifying MCI and AD. As the CSF markers and the structural markers are complementary, the combination of them showed great improvements in the classification accuracies of MCI and AD. Moreover, the combination of these markers showed high sensitivity but low specificity for predicting conversion from MCI to AD in two years. Hence, it is feasible to employ a cross-sectional sample to investigate dynamic associations of the CSF and imaging markers with MCI and AD and to predict future MCI conversion. In particular, the volumetric information may be good for the early stage of AD, while morphological shapes should be considered as markers in the prediction of MCI conversion to AD together with the CSF markers.

  20. Monitoring CSF proteome alterations in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: obstacles and perspectives in translating a novel marker panel to the clinic.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nils von Neuhoff

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a fatal disorder of the motor neuron system with poor prognosis and marginal therapeutic options. Current clinical diagnostic criteria are based on electrophysiological examination and exclusion of other ALS-mimicking conditions. Neuroprotective treatments are, however, most promising in early disease stages. Identification of disease-specific CSF biomarkers and associated biochemical pathways is therefore most relevant to monitor disease progression, response to neuroprotective agents and to enable early inclusion of patients into clinical trials. METHODS AND FINDINGS: CSF from 35 patients with ALS diagnosed according to the revised El Escorial criteria and 23 age-matched controls was processed using paramagnetic bead chromatography for protein isolation and subsequently analyzed by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. CSF protein profiles were integrated into a Random Forest model constructed from 153 mass peaks. After reducing this peak set to the top 25%, a classifier was built which enabled prediction of ALS with high accuracy, sensitivity and specificity. Further analysis of the identified peptides resulted in a panel of five highly sensitive ALS biomarkers. Upregulation of secreted phosphoprotein 1 in ALS-CSF samples was confirmed by univariate analysis of ELISA and mass spectrometry data. Further quantitative validation of the five biomarkers was achieved in an 80-plex Multiple Reaction Monitoring mass spectrometry assay. CONCLUSIONS: ALS classification based on the CSF biomarker panel proposed in this study could become a valuable predictive tool for early clinical risk stratification. Of the numerous CSF proteins identified, many have putative roles in ALS-related metabolic processes, particularly in chromogranin-mediated secretion signaling pathways. While a stand-alone clinical application of this classifier will only be possible after further validation and a multicenter trial, it could be

  1. CSF 5-HIAA and DST non-suppression--orthogonal biologic risk factors for suicide in male mood disorder inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokinen, Jussi; Nordström, Anna-Lena; Nordström, Peter

    2009-01-30

    Two biomarkers of suicide risk; non-suppression in the dexamethasone suppression test (DST) and low 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) have been reported to be predictors of suicide in mood disorders. The interrelation of the two systems seems to be different in suicide attempters compared with depressed inpatients who have not made a suicide attempt, indicating that the two biomarkers may be seen as independent. This investigation examined the interrelation of low CSF 5-HIAA and DST non-suppression in suicide victims with mood disorder. Fifty-eight mood disorder inpatients not receiving any treatment with antidepressants underwent lumbar puncture and the DST. Plasma cortisol levels at 8:00 a.m., 4:00 p.m. and 11:00 p.m. were analysed in relation to CSF 5-HIAA. All patients were followed up for causes of death and suicides were verified with death certificates. During follow-up (mean 21 years), 11 (19%) patients had committed suicide. In male suicide victims (n=6), the serum cortisol level at 4:00 p.m. showed a significant positive correlation with CSF 5-HIAA. Low CSF 5-HIAA predicted all early suicides (within 1 year), whereas all males who committed suicide after 1 year were DST non-suppressors. In female suicide victims (n=5), the post-DST serum cortisol did not correlate with CSF 5-HIAA. Low CSF 5-HIAA and DST non-suppression are orthogonal biologic risk factors for suicide in male mood disorder inpatients. CSF 5-HIAA is associated with short-term suicide risk; dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis seems to be a long-term suicide predictor.

  2. Identification of the Upward Movement of Human CSF In Vivo and its Relation to the Brain Venous System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreha-Kulaczewski, Steffi; Joseph, Arun A; Merboldt, Klaus-Dietmar; Ludwig, Hans-Christoph; Gärtner, Jutta; Frahm, Jens

    2017-03-01

    CSF flux is involved in the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative diseases and cognitive impairment after traumatic brain injury, all hallmarked by the accumulation of cellular metabolic waste. Its effective disposal via various CSF routes has been demonstrated in animal models. In contrast, the CSF dynamics in humans are still poorly understood. Using novel real-time MRI, forced inspiration has been identified recently as a main driving force of CSF flow in the human brain. Exploiting technical advances toward real-time phase-contrast MRI, the current work analyzed directions, velocities, and volumes of human CSF flow within the brain aqueduct as part of the internal ventricular system and in the spinal canal during respiratory cycles. A consistent upward CSF movement toward the brain in response to forced inspiration was seen in all subjects at the aqueduct, in 11/12 subjects at thoracic level 2, and in 4/12 subjects at thoracic level 5. Concomitant analyses of CSF dynamics and cerebral venous blood flow, that is, in epidural veins at cervical level 3, uniquely demonstrated CSF and venous flow to be closely communicating cerebral fluid systems in which inspiration-induced downward flow of venous blood due to reduced intrathoracic pressure is counterbalanced by an upward movement of CSF. The results extend our understanding of human CSF flux and open important clinical implications, including concepts for drug delivery and new classifications and therapeutic options for various forms of hydrocephalus and idiopathic intracranial hypertension.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Effective disposal of brain cellular waste products via CSF has been demonstrated repeatedly in animal models. However, CSF dynamics in humans are still poorly understood. A novel quantitative real-time MRI technique yielded in vivo CSF flow directions, velocities, and volumes in the human brain and upper spinal canal. CSF moved upward toward the head in response to forced inspiration. Concomitant analysis

  3. CSF Markers in Guillain-Barre Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A positive 14-3-3 protein assay of CSF was observed in 29 of 38 patients with GBS and in 4 with motor neuron disease and other neuropathies studied at Universities of Milan and Verona, Italy.

  4. CSF Obstruction and Malabsorption in Congenital Hydrocephalus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available The relative contribution of CSF malabsorption and obstruction in three different etiological groups of neonatal high-pressure hydrocephalus (HC was assessed in a study at University of Bonn, Germany, and University of Groningen, The Netherlands.

  5. Confirmed viral meningitis with normal CSF findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawood, Naghum; Desjobert, Edouard; Lumley, Janine; Webster, Daniel; Jacobs, Michael

    2014-07-17

    An 18-year-old woman presented with a progressively worsening headache, photophobia feverishness and vomiting. Three weeks previously she had returned to the UK from a trip to Peru. At presentation, she had clinical signs of meningism. On admission, blood tests showed a mild lymphopenia, with a normal C reactive protein and white cell count. Chest X-ray and CT of the head were normal. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) microscopy was normal. CSF protein and glucose were in the normal range. MRI of the head and cerebral angiography were also normal. Subsequent molecular testing of CSF detected enterovirus RNA by reverse transcriptase PCR. The patient's clinical syndrome correlated with her virological diagnosis and no other cause of her symptoms was found. Her symptoms were self-limiting and improved with supportive management. This case illustrates an important example of viral central nervous system infection presenting clinically as meningitis but with normal CSF microscopy.

  6. Advances in Biomarker Research in Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Shyamal H; Adler, Charles H

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disease, and the numbers are projected to double in the next two decades with the increase in the aging population. An important focus of current research is to develop interventions to slow the progression of the disease. However, prerequisites to it include the development of reliable biomarkers for early diagnosis which would identify at-risk groups and disease progression. In this review, we present updated evidence of already known clinical biomarkers (such as hyposmia and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD)) and neuroimaging biomarkers, as well as newer possible markers in the blood, CSF, and other tissues. While several promising candidates and methods to assess these biomarkers are on the horizon, it is becoming increasingly clear that no one candidate will clearly fulfill all the roles as a single biomarker. A multimodal and combinatorial approach to develop a battery of biomarkers will likely be necessary in the future.

  7. A surgical method to improve the homeostasis of CSF for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Qin

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Reduced cerebrospinal fluid (CSF production and increased resistance to CSF outflow are considered to be associated with aging, and are also characteristics of Alzheimer disease (AD. These changes probably result in a decrease in the efficiency of the mechanism by which CSF removes toxic molecules such as amyloid-β (Aβ and tau from the interstitial fluid space. Soluble Aβ is potently neurotoxic and dysfunction in CSF circulation can accelerate the progression of AD. Current therapies for AD exhibit poor efficiency; therefore, a surgical method to improve the homeostasis of CSF is worthy of investigation. To achieve this, we conceived a novel device, which consists of a ventriculo-peritoneal shunt, an injection port and a portable infusion pump. Artificial CSF is pumped into the ventricles and the artificial CSF composition, infusion modes and pressure threshold of shunting can be adjusted according to the intracranial pressure and CSF contents. We hypothesize that this active treatment for CSF circulation dysfunction will significantly retard the progression of AD.

  8. CSF concentration gradients of monoamine metabolites in patients with hydrocephalus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malm, J; Kristensen, B; Ekstedt, J; Wester, P

    1994-09-01

    Concentration gradients of homovanillic acid (HVA), 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), and 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol (MHPG), were assessed in 762 successive CSF fractions (2 ml lumbar CSF) from 15 patients with the adult hydrocephalus syndrome (AHS) and 11 patients with hydrocephalus of other causes (mixed group). A mean volume of 49.6 (SD 11.8) ml CSF was removed in the AHS group and 56.4 (10.2) ml in the mixed group. The CSF was collected with a specially designed carousel fraction collector and the corresponding CSF dynamics were continuously registered by a constant pressure CSF infusion method. Pronounced gradients in CSF HVA and CSF 5-HIAA were seen in both patient groups in the first 25 ml of CSF removed. The concentration curves levelled off, despite the removal of larger amounts of CSF and stabilised at about twice the initial concentrations. This phenomenon has not been described before. Concentrations of HVA and 5-HIAA in the first CSF fraction correlated strongly with concentrations in fractions up to about 40 ml. A positive correlation between the first fraction of CSF HVA and CSF 5-HIAA concentrations and CSF outflow conductance was found in the AHS group. There was no gradient in MHPG. It is suggested that the rostrocaudal gradients in CSF HVA and 5-HIAA may be explained by a downward flow of CSF along the spinal cord with absorption of metabolites occurring during passage. Mixing of CSF from different CSF compartments, extraventricular production sites of CSF, clearance of metabolites to venous blood or extracellular fluid, and CSF outflow conductance are probably important determinants of the plateau phase in patients with hydrocephalus. It is concluded that lumbar CSF does not exclusively reflect the concentrations of HVA, 5-HIAA, or MHPG in the ventricles. It should be noted that these results obtained in patients with hydrocephalus may not be applicable to other groups of patients or normal subjects.

  9. Soluble triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 1: a biomarker for bacterial meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.M. Determann; M. Weisfelt; J. de Gans; A. van der Ende; M.J. Schultz; D. van de Beek

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate whether soluble triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 1 (sTREM-1) in CSF can serve as a biomarker for the presence of bacterial meningitis and outcome in patients with this disease. Design: Retrospective study of diagnostic accuracy. Setting and patients: CSF was coll

  10. Comprehensive Phenotyping in Multiple Sclerosis: Discovery Based Proteomics and the Current Understanding of Putative Biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin C. O’Connor

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, there is no single test for multiple sclerosis (MS. Diagnosis is confirmed through clinical evaluation, abnormalities revealed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, and analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF chemistry. The early and accurate diagnosis of the disease, monitoring of progression, and gauging of therapeutic intervention are important but elusive elements of patient care. Moreover, a deeper understanding of the disease pathology is needed, including discovery of accurate biomarkers for MS. Herein we review putative biomarkers of MS relating to neurodegeneration and contributions to neuropathology, with particular focus on autoimmunity. In addition, novel assessments of biomarkers not driven by hypotheses are discussed, featuring our application of advanced proteomics and metabolomics for comprehensive phenotyping of CSF and blood. This strategy allows comparison of component expression levels in CSF and serum between MS and control groups. Examination of these preliminary data suggests that several CSF proteins in MS are differentially expressed, and thus, represent putative biomarkers deserving of further evaluation.

  11. GM-CSF Differentially Regulates Eosinophil and Neutrophil Adhesive Interactions with Vascular Endothelium in Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nooshin Sheikh Bahaie

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Allergic airway inflammation is characterized by elaboration of cytokines and chemokines leading to recruitment of inflammatory leukocytes, predominantly eosinophils, to the airways. Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF is generated in the lungs of human subjects with asthma in response to allergen challenge and is necessary for the development of allergen-induced bronchial eosinophilia in mice. The effect of GM-CSF on human eosinophil and neutrophil interactions with the vascular endothelium under conditions of blood flow was investigated in post-capillary venules of the rabbit mesentery by intravital microscopy.While GM-CSF significantly reduced the rolling fraction of neutrophils in vivo and induced consistent shedding of neutrophil L-selectin in vitro, its effect on eosinophil rolling was variable. Eosinophils from 57% of the donors demonstrated inhibition of rolling, while eosinophils from the remaining 43% of donors demonstrated no inhibition or increased rolling. The variable effect of GM-CSF on inhibition of eosinophil rolling was associated with variable shedding of L-selectin in vitro. In contrast to the differential effect of GM-CSF on neutrophils versus eosinophils, stimulation with phorbol myristate acetate demonstrated a similar degree of inhibition of rolling and L-selectin shedding by neutrophils and eosinophils suggesting that there was no defect in L-selectin shedding in the eosinophil donors who did not respond to GM-CSF. Overall, these studies demonstrate that GM-CSF consistently inhibits interaction of neutrophils with endothelium in vivo, whereas its effect on eosinophil-endothelial interactions is variable. GM-CSF may thus be one factor accounting for the varying percentage of eosinophils and neutrophils recruited to sites of allergic inflammation in different individuals.

  12. CSF Neurofilament Light Chain but not FLT3 Ligand Discriminates Parkinsonian Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, Megan K.; Aerts, Marjolein B.; Beenes, Marijke; Norgren, Niklas; Esselink, Rianne A. J.; Bloem, Bastiaan R.; Kuiperij, H. Bea; Verbeek, Marcel M.

    2015-01-01

    The differentiation between multiple system atrophy (MSA) and Parkinson’s disease (PD) is difficult, particularly in early disease stages. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate the diagnostic value of neurofilament light chain (NFL), fms-like tyrosine kinase ligand (FLT3L), and total tau protein (t-tau) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) as biomarkers to discriminate MSA from PD. Using commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, we measured CSF levels of NFL, FLT3L, and t-tau in a discovery cohort of 36 PD patients, 27 MSA patients, and 57 non-neurological controls and in a validation cohort of 32 PD patients, 25 MSA patients, 15 PSP patients, 5 CBS patients, and 56 non-neurological controls. Cut-offs obtained from individual assays and binary logistic regression models developed from combinations of biomarkers were assessed. CSF levels of NFL were substantially increased in MSA and discriminated between MSA and PD with a sensitivity of 74% and specificity of 92% (AUC = 0.85) in the discovery cohort and with 80% sensitivity and 97% specificity (AUC = 0.94) in the validation cohort. FLT3L levels in CSF were significantly lower in both PD and MSA compared to controls in the discovery cohort, but not in the validation cohort. t-tau levels were significantly higher in MSA than PD and controls. Addition of either FLT3L or t-tau to NFL did not improve discrimination of PD from MSA above NFL alone. Our findings show that increased levels of NFL in CSF offer clinically relevant, high accuracy discrimination between PD and MSA. PMID:25999911

  13. CSF neurofilament light chain but not FLT3 ligand discriminates Parkinsonian disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan Kristy Herbert

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The differentiation between multiple system atrophy (MSA and Parkinson’s disease (PD is difficult, particularly in early disease stages. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate the diagnostic value of neurofilament light chain (NFL, fms-like tyrosine kinase ligand (FLT3L and total tau protein (t-tau in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF as biomarkers to discriminate MSA from PD. Using commercially available enzyme-linked immunoassays (ELISAs, we measured CSF levels of NFL, FLT3L and t-tau in a discovery cohort of 36 PD patients, 27 MSA patients and 57 non-neurological controls and in a validation cohort of 32 PD patients, 25 MSA patients, 15 PSP patients, 5 CBS patients, and 56 non-neurological controls. Cut-offs obtained from individual assays and binary logistic regression models developed from combinations of biomarkers were assessed. CSF levels of NFL were substantially increased in MSA and discriminated between MSA and PD with a sensitivity of 74% and specificity of 92% (AUC = 0.85 in the discovery cohort and with 80% sensitivity and 97% specificity (AUC = 0.94 in the validation cohort. FLT3L levels in CSF were significantly lower in both PD and MSA compared to controls in the discovery cohort, but not in the validation cohort. T-tau levels were significantly higher in MSA than PD and controls. Addition of either FLT3L or t-tau to NFL did not improve discrimination of PD from MSA above NFL alone. Our findings show that increased levels of NFL in CSF offer clinically relevant, high accuracy discrimination between PD and MSA.

  14. Neurofilament light chain: a biomarker for genetic frontotemporal dementia

    OpenAIRE

    Meeter, Lieke H.; Dopper, Elise G.; Jiskoot, Lize C.; Sanchez-Valle, Raquel; Graff, Caroline; Benussi, Luisa; Ghidoni, Roberta; Pijnenburg, Yolande A; Borroni, Barbara; Galimberti, Daniela; Laforce, Robert Jr; Masellis, Mario; Vandenberghe, Rik; Le Ber, Isabelle; Otto, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To evaluate cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum neurofilament light chain (NfL) levels in genetic frontotemporal dementia (FTD) as a potential biomarker in the presymptomatic stage and during the conversion into the symptomatic stage. Additionally, to correlate NfL levels to clinical and neuroimaging parameters. Methods In this multicenter case?control study, we investigated CSF NfL in 174 subjects (48 controls, 40 presymptomatic carriers and 86 patients with microtubule?as...

  15. Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers in Idiopathic Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ville Leinonen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The diagnosis of idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH is still challenging. Alzheimer's disease (AD, along with vascular dementia, the most important differential diagnosis for iNPH, has several potential cerebrospinal fluid (CSF biomarkers which might help in the selection of patients for shunt treatment. The aim of this study was to compare a battery of CSF biomarkers including well-known AD-related proteins with CSF from patients with suspected iNPH collected from the external lumbar drainage test (ELD. A total of 35 patients with suspected iNPH patients were evaluated with ELD. CSF was collected in the beginning of the test, and the concentrations of total tau, ptau181, Aβ42, NFL, TNF-α, TGFβ1, and VEGF were analysed by ELISA. Twenty-six patients had a positive ELD result—that is, their gait symptoms improved; 9 patients had negative ELD. The levels of all analyzed CSF biomarkers were similar between the groups and none of them predicted the ELD result in these patients. Contrary to expectations lumbar CSF TNF-α concentration was low in iNPH patients.

  16. Cystatin C: a candidate biomarker for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meghan E Wilson

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a fatal neurologic disease characterized by progressive motor neuron degeneration. Clinical disease management is hindered by both a lengthy diagnostic process and the absence of effective treatments. Reliable panels of diagnostic, surrogate, and prognostic biomarkers are needed to accelerate disease diagnosis and expedite drug development. The cysteine protease inhibitor cystatin C has recently gained interest as a candidate diagnostic biomarker for ALS, but further studies are required to fully characterize its biomarker utility. We used quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA to assess initial and longitudinal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF and plasma cystatin C levels in 104 ALS patients and controls. Cystatin C levels in ALS patients were significantly elevated in plasma and reduced in CSF compared to healthy controls, but did not differ significantly from neurologic disease controls. In addition, the direction of longitudinal change in CSF cystatin C levels correlated to the rate of ALS disease progression, and initial CSF cystatin C levels were predictive of patient survival, suggesting that cystatin C may function as a surrogate marker of disease progression and survival. These data verify prior results for reduced cystatin C levels in the CSF of ALS patients, identify increased cystatin C levels in the plasma of ALS patients, and reveal correlations between CSF cystatin C levels to both ALS disease progression and patient survival.

  17. rhCSF3 accelerates the proliferation of human melanocytes in culture through binding CSF3R and the expression of CSF3R transcripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yan; Guo, Ze; Zhou, Mei-Hua; Li, Xue; Sun, Jie; Gong, Qing-Li; Zhu, Wen-Yuan

    2015-05-01

    Melanogenic paracrine and autocrine cytokine networks have recently been discovered in vitro between melanocytes and other types of skin cells. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor (CSF3R) controls the survival, proliferation and differentiation of many kinds of cells, including neutrophils. To understand the function of CSF3R and recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhCSF3) on melanocyte proliferation, this study compared the expression of CSF3R and the effects of rhCSF3 in primary human melanocytes, neutrophils and HEL 92.1.7 cells. The results show that CSF3R is localized in the cytoplasm and on cell membranes of melanocytes and neutrophils. The percentage of CSF3R(+) melanocytes was higher than CSF3R(+) HEL 92.1.7 cells, but was lower than CSF3R(+) neutrophils. Both CSF3R mRNA and CSF3R protein levels in melanocytes were higher than in HEL 92.1.7 cells, but were lower than in neutrophils. Treatment with rhCSF3 increased the proliferation of human melanocytes, but not their tyrosinase activity. Transcripts of CSF3R in human melanocytes, M14, A375 melanoma and A431 squamous cell carcinoma cells were also detected. Expression of the CSF3R V3 transcript was lower in melanocytes than in M14, A375 melanoma and A431 squamous cell carcinoma cells. In conclusion, rhCSF3 can promote melanocyte proliferation through CSF3R without affecting tyrosinase activity.

  18. Instructive role of M-CSF on commitment of bipotent myeloid cells involves ERK-dependent positive and negative signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carras, Sylvain; Valayer, Alexandre; Moratal, Claudine; Weiss-Gayet, Michèle; Pages, Gilles; Morlé, François; Mouchiroud, Guy; Gobert, Stéphanie

    2016-02-01

    M-CSF and G-CSF are instructive cytokines that specifically induce differentiation of bipotent myeloid progenitors into macrophages and granulocytes, respectively. Through morphology and colony assay studies, flow cytometry analysis of specific markers, and expression of myeloid transcription factors, we show here that the Eger/Fms cell line is composed of cells whose differentiation fate is instructed by M-CSF and G-CSF, thus representing a good in vitro model of myeloid bipotent progenitors. Consistent with the essential role of ERK1/2 during macrophage differentiation and defects of macrophagic differentiation in native ERK1(-/-) progenitors, ERK signaling is strongly activated in Eger/Fms cells upon M-CSF-induced macrophagic differentiation but only to a very small extent during G-CSF-induced granulocytic differentiation. Previous in vivo studies indicated a key role of Fli-1 in myeloid differentiation and demonstrated its weak expression during macrophagic differentiation with a strong expression during granulocytic differentiation. Here, we demonstrated that this effect could be mediated by a differential regulation of protein kinase Cδ (PKCd) on Fli-1 expression in response to M-CSF and G-CSF. With the use of knockdown of PKCd by small interfering RNA, we demonstrated that M-CSF activates PKCd, which in turn, inhibits Fli-1 expression and granulocytic differentiation. Finally, we studied the connection between ERK and PKCd and showed that in the presence of the MEK inhibitor U0126, PKCd expression is decreased, and Fli-1 expression is increased in response to M-CSF. Altogether, we demonstrated that in bipotent myeloid cells, M-CSF promotes macrophagic over granulocytic differentiation by inducing ERK activation but also PKCd expression, which in turn, down-regulates Fli-1 expression and prevents granulocytic differentiation.

  19. Neurofilament light chain: a biomarker for genetic frontotemporal dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeter, Lieke H; Dopper, Elise G; Jiskoot, Lize C; Sanchez-Valle, Raquel; Graff, Caroline; Benussi, Luisa; Ghidoni, Roberta; Pijnenburg, Yolande A; Borroni, Barbara; Galimberti, Daniela; Laforce, Robert Jr; Masellis, Mario; Vandenberghe, Rik; Ber, Isabelle Le; Otto, Markus; van Minkelen, Rick; Papma, Janne M; Rombouts, Serge A; Balasa, Mircea; Öijerstedt, Linn; Jelic, Vesna; Dick, Katrina M; Cash, David M; Harding, Sophie R; Jorge Cardoso, M; Ourselin, Sebastien; Rossor, Martin N; Padovani, Alessandro; Scarpini, Elio; Fenoglio, Chiara; Tartaglia, Maria C; Lamari, Foudil; Barro, Christian; Kuhle, Jens; Rohrer, Jonathan D; Teunissen, Charlotte E; van Swieten, John C

    2016-08-01

    To evaluate cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum neurofilament light chain (NfL) levels in genetic frontotemporal dementia (FTD) as a potential biomarker in the presymptomatic stage and during the conversion into the symptomatic stage. Additionally, to correlate NfL levels to clinical and neuroimaging parameters. In this multicenter case-control study, we investigated CSF NfL in 174 subjects (48 controls, 40 presymptomatic carriers and 86 patients with microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT), progranulin (GRN), and chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 (C9orf72) mutations), and serum NfL in 118 subjects (39 controls, 44 presymptomatic carriers, 35 patients). In 55 subjects both CSF and serum was determined. In two subjects CSF was available before and after symptom onset (converters). Additionally, NfL levels were correlated with clinical parameters, survival, and regional brain atrophy. CSF NfL levels in patients (median 6762 pg/mL, interquartile range 3186-9309 pg/mL) were strongly elevated compared with presymptomatic carriers (804 pg/mL, 627-1173 pg/mL, P NfL correlated highly with CSF NfL (r s = 0.87, P NfL after disease onset. Additionally, NfL levels in patients correlated with disease severity, brain atrophy, annualized brain atrophy rate and survival. NfL in both serum and CSF has the potential to serve as a biomarker for clinical disease onset and has a prognostic value in genetic FTD.

  20. Incorporating the use of GM-CSF in the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrajoli, Alessandra

    2009-03-01

    We evaluated the clinical activity of GM-CSF in combination with standard dose rituximab in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). The rationale for exploring this combination is provided by the ability of GM-CSF to increase surface expression of CD20 in CLL cells and potentially render them a better target for rituximab. GM-CSF also enhances antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity against CLL cells. The combination of GM-CSF and rituximab was evaluated as initial treatment in elderly patients with indication for treatment and in patients at high risk for progression identified by elevated beta(2) microglobulin. This combination was also evaluated in patients with recurrent CLL. On the basis of the results of 118 patients, we observed an overall response rate of 65 and 9% complete remission and these results compare favourably with the results obtained with rituximab single agent. This combination was well tolerated with the most common toxicity consisting in mild GM-CSF injection site erythema. On the basis of this experience, we are currently evaluating the use of GM-CSF in combination with the chemoimmunotherapy regimen fludarabine, cyclophosphamide and rituximab.

  1. Fluid biomarkers in multiple system atrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurens, Brice; Constantinescu, Radu; Freeman, Roy

    2015-01-01

    Despite growing research efforts, no reliable biomarker currently exists for the diagnosis and prognosis of multiple system atrophy (MSA). Such biomarkers are urgently needed to improve diagnostic accuracy, prognostic guidance and also to serve as efficacy measures or surrogates of target...... engagement for future clinical trials. We here review candidate fluid biomarkers for MSA and provide considerations for further developments and harmonization of standard operating procedures. A PubMed search was performed until April 24, 2015 to review the literature with regard to candidate blood...... and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers for MSA. Abstracts of 1760 studies were retrieved and screened for eligibility. The final list included 60 studies assessing fluid biomarkers in patients with MSA. Most studies have focused on alpha-synuclein, markers of axonal degeneration or catecholamines. Their results...

  2. CXCL13 is the major determinant for B cell recruitment to the CSF during neuroinflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kowarik Markus C

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The chemokines and cytokines CXCL13, CXCL12, CCL19, CCL21, BAFF and APRIL are believed to play a role in the recruitment of B cells to the central nervous system (CNS compartment during neuroinflammation. To determine which chemokines/cytokines show the strongest association with a humoral immune response in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, we measured their concentrations in the CSF and correlated them with immune cell subsets and antibody levels. Methods Cytokine/chemokine concentrations were measured in CSF and serum by ELISA in patients with non-inflammatory neurological diseases (NIND, n = 20, clinically isolated syndrome (CIS, n = 30, multiple sclerosis (MS, n = 20, Lyme neuroborreliosis (LNB, n = 8 and patients with other inflammatory neurological diseases (OIND, n = 30. Albumin, IgG, IgA and IgM were measured by nephelometry. CSF immune cell subsets were determined by seven-color flow cytometry. Results CXCL13 was significantly elevated in the CSF of all patient groups with inflammatory diseases. BAFF levels were significantly increased in patients with LNB and OIND. CXCL12 was significantly elevated in patients with LNB. B cells and plasmablasts were significantly elevated in the CSF of all patients with inflammatory diseases. CXCL13 showed the most consistent correlation with CSF B cells, plasmablasts and intrathecal Ig synthesis. Conclusions CXCL13 seems to be the major determinant for B cell recruitment to the CNS compartment in different neuroinflammatory diseases. Thus, elevated CSF CXCL13 levels rather reflect a strong humoral immune response in the CNS compartment than being specific for a particular disease entity.

  3. Sputum biomarkers and the prediction of clinical outcomes in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodore G Liou

    Full Text Available Lung function, acute pulmonary exacerbations (APE, and weight are the best clinical predictors of survival in cystic fibrosis (CF; however, underlying mechanisms are incompletely understood. Biomarkers of current disease state predictive of future outcomes might identify mechanisms and provide treatment targets, trial endpoints and objective clinical monitoring tools. Such CF-specific biomarkers have previously been elusive. Using observational and validation cohorts comprising 97 non-transplanted consecutively-recruited adult CF patients at the Intermountain Adult CF Center, University of Utah, we identified biomarkers informative of current disease and predictive of future clinical outcomes. Patients represented the majority of sputum producers. They were recruited March 2004-April 2007 and followed through May 2011. Sputum biomarker concentrations were measured and clinical outcomes meticulously recorded for a median 5.9 (interquartile range 5.0 to 6.6 years to study associations between biomarkers and future APE and time-to-lung transplantation or death. After multivariate modeling, only high mobility group box-1 protein (HMGB-1, mean=5.84 [log ng/ml], standard deviation [SD] =1.75 predicted time-to-first APE (hazard ratio [HR] per log-unit HMGB-1=1.56, p-value=0.005, number of future APE within 5 years (0.338 APE per log-unit HMGB-1, p<0.001 by quasi-Poisson regression and time-to-lung transplantation or death (HR=1.59, p=0.02. At APE onset, sputum granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF, mean 4.8 [log pg/ml], SD=1.26 was significantly associated with APE-associated declines in lung function (-10.8 FEV(1% points per log-unit GM-CSF, p<0.001 by linear regression. Evaluation of validation cohorts produced similar results that passed tests of mutual consistency. In CF sputum, high HMGB-1 predicts incidence and recurrence of APE and survival, plausibly because it mediates long-term airway inflammation. High APE-associated GM-CSF

  4. Interface Consistency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staunstrup, Jørgen

    1998-01-01

    This paper proposes that Interface Consistency is an important issue for the development of modular designs. Byproviding a precise specification of component interfaces it becomes possible to check that separately developedcomponents use a common interface in a coherent matter thus avoiding a very...... significant source of design errors. Awide range of interface specifications are possible, the simplest form is a syntactical check of parameter types.However, today it is possible to do more sophisticated forms involving semantic checks....

  5. Diagnostic cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers for Parkinson's disease: a pathogenetically based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, Karin D; Teunissen, Charlotte E; Drukarch, Benjamin; Jimenez, Connie R; Groenewegen, Henk J; Berendse, Henk W; van de Berg, Wilma D J

    2010-09-01

    The inaccuracy of the early diagnosis of Parkinson's disease (PD) has been a major incentive for studies aimed at the identification of biomarkers. Brain-derived cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) proteins are potential biomarkers considering the major role that proteins play in PD pathogenesis. In this review, we discuss the current hypotheses about the pathogenesis of PD and identify the most promising candidate biomarkers among the CSF proteins studied so far. The list of potential markers includes proteins involved in various pathogenetic processes, such as oxidative stress and protein aggregation. This list will undoubtedly grow in the near future by application of CSF proteomics and subsequent validation of identified proteins. Probably a single biomarker will not suffice to reach high sensitivity and specificity, because PD is pathogenetically heterogeneous and shares etiological factors with other neurodegenerative diseases. Furthermore, identified candidate biomarkers will have to be thoroughly validated before they can be implemented as diagnostic aids.

  6. Solid consistency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordin, Lorenzo; Creminelli, Paolo; Mirbabayi, Mehrdad; Noreña, Jorge

    2017-03-01

    We argue that isotropic scalar fluctuations in solid inflation are adiabatic in the super-horizon limit. During the solid phase this adiabatic mode has peculiar features: constant energy-density slices and comoving slices do not coincide, and their curvatures, parameterized respectively by ζ and Script R, both evolve in time. The existence of this adiabatic mode implies that Maldacena's squeezed limit consistency relation holds after angular average over the long mode. The correlation functions of a long-wavelength spherical scalar mode with several short scalar or tensor modes is fixed by the scaling behavior of the correlators of short modes, independently of the solid inflation action or dynamics of reheating.

  7. Therapeutic applications of macrophage colony-stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1) and antagonists of CSF-1 receptor (CSF-1R) signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hume, David A; MacDonald, Kelli P A

    2012-02-23

    Macrophage-colony stimulating factor (CSF-1) signaling through its receptor (CSF-1R) promotes the differentiation of myeloid progenitors into heterogeneous populations of monocytes, macrophages, dendritic cells, and bone-resorbing osteoclasts. In the periphery, CSF-1 regulates the migration, proliferation, function, and survival of macrophages, which function at multiple levels within the innate and adaptive immune systems. Macrophage populations elicited by CSF-1 are associated with, and exacerbate, a broad spectrum of pathologies, including cancer, inflammation, and bone disease. Conversely, macrophages can also contribute to immunosuppression, disease resolution, and tissue repair. Recombinant CSF-1, antibodies against the ligand and the receptor, and specific inhibitors of CSF-1R kinase activity have been each been tested in a range of animal models and in some cases, in patients. This review examines the potential clinical uses of modulators of the CSF-1/CSF-1R system. We conclude that CSF-1 promotes a resident-type macrophage phenotype. As a treatment, CSF-1 has therapeutic potential in tissue repair. Conversely, inhibition of CSF-1R is unlikely to be effective in inflammatory disease but may have utility in cancer.

  8. The promotion of breast cancer metastasis caused by inhibition of CSF-1R/CSF-1 signaling is blocked by targeting the G-CSF receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swierczak, Agnieszka; Cook, Andrew D; Lenzo, Jason C; Restall, Christina M; Doherty, Judy P; Anderson, Robin L; Hamilton, John A

    2014-08-01

    Treatment options are limited for patients with breast cancer presenting with metastatic disease. Targeting of tumor-associated macrophages through the inhibition of colony-stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF-1R), a key macrophage signaling pathway, has been reported to reduce tumor growth and metastasis, and these treatments are now in clinical trials. Here, we report that, surprisingly, treatment with neutralizing anti-CSF-1R and anti-CSF-1 antibodies, or with two different small-molecule inhibitors of CSF-1R, could actually increase spontaneous metastasis without altering primary tumor growth in mice bearing two independently derived mammary tumors. The blockade of CSF-1R or CSF-1 led to increased levels of serum G-CSF, increased frequency of neutrophils in the primary tumor and in the metastasis-associated lung, as well as increased numbers of neutrophils and Ly6C(hi) monocytes in the peripheral blood. Neutralizing antibody against the G-CSF receptor, which regulates neutrophil development and function, reduced the enhanced metastasis and neutrophil numbers that resulted from CSF-1R blockade. These results indicate that the role of the CSF-1R/CSF-1 system in breast cancer is far more complex than originally proposed, and requires further investigation as a therapeutic target.

  9. [MRI evaluation of cervicothoracic CSF hypotension].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maraval, A; Brugieres, P; Combes, C; Thomas, P; Blanc, R; Gaston, A

    2006-06-01

    We propose studying signs of cervicothoracic CSF hypotension by MRI. Axial T1-weighted GRE sequence with and without saturation bands positioned above and below the selected image plane, MR venography and MR Angiography with contrast administration are helpful to confirm the venous nature of the epidural thickening and to make the differential diagnosis with infectious or neoplastic epiduritis.

  10. CXCL13, CXCL10 and CXCL8 as Potential Biomarkers for the Diagnosis of Neurosyphilis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cuini; Wu, Kaiqi; Yu, Qian; Zhang, Sufang; Gao, Zixiao; Liu, Yudan; Ni, Liyan; Cheng, Yuanyuan; Guan, Zhifang; Shi, Mei; Lu, Haikong; Lou, Yongliang; Zhou, Pingyu

    2016-09-21

    At present, diagnosis for neurosyphilis remains a major clinical challenge. Venereal Disease Research Laboratory (VDRL) titer of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is suboptimally sensitive to diagnose neurosyphilis, which can be negative in neurosyphilis patients, especially in asymptomatic neurosyphilis patients. In the search for biomarkers of neurosyphilis, we investigated the chemokine profile in CSF of neurosyphilis patients and found that the concentrations of CXCL13, CXCL10 and CXCL8 were selectively elevated in neurosyphilis patients and correlated with CSF protein concentration and CSF-VDRL titer. After antibiotic treatment, the concentration of these chemokines was dramatically reduced. The area under the ROC curve (AUC) of CSF CXCL13, CXCL8,CXCL10 and the CSF/serum ratio of CXCL13, CXCL8,CXCL10 in the diagnosis of neurosyphilis were 0.940, 0.899, 0.915, 0.963, 0.846 and 0.926, respectively. The corresponding sensitivities/specificities of CSF CXCL13, CXCL8,CXCL10 and the CSF/serum ratio of CXCL13, CXCL8,CXCL10 in diagnosis of neurosyphilis were 85.4%/89.1%, 79%/90.1% and 79.6%/91.1%, 86.6%/99%, 79%/73.3% and 86%/92.1%, respectively. Our results suggest that the elevated concentrations of CXCL13, CXCL8, and CXCL10 or their increasing CSF/serum ratios may be potential biomarkers of neurosyphilis, particularly for asymptomatic neurosyphilis. Reduced concentration of these chemokines may indicate the prognosis of antibiotic therapy.

  11. Effects of baseline CSF α-synuclein on regional brain atrophy rates in healthy elders, mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niklas Mattsson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF α-synuclein is reduced in synucleinopathies, including dementia with Lewy bodies, and some studies have found increased CSF α-synuclein in Alzheimer's disease (AD. No study has explored effects of CSF α-synuclein on brain atrophy. Here we tested if baseline CSF α-synuclein affects brain atrophy rates and if these effects vary across brain regions, and across the cognitive spectrum from healthy elders (NL, to patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI and AD. METHODS: Baseline CSF α-synuclein measurements and longitudinal structural brain magnetic resonance imaging was performed in 74 NL, 118 MCI patients and 55 AD patients. Effects of baseline CSF α-synuclein on regional atrophy rates were tested in 1 four pre-hoc defined regions possibly associated with Lewy body and/or AD pathology (amygdala, caudate, hippocampus, brainstem, and 2 all available regions of interest. Differences across diagnoses were tested by assessing the interaction of CSF α-synuclein and diagnosis (testing NL versus MCI, and NL versus AD. RESULTS: The effects of CSF α-synuclein on longitudinal atrophy rates were not significant after correction for multiple comparisons. There were tendencies for effects in AD in caudate (higher atrophy rates in subjects with higher CSF α-synuclein, P=0.046 and brainstem (higher atrophy rates in subjects with lower CSF α-synuclein, P=0.063. CSF α-synuclein had significantly different effects on atrophy rates in NL and AD in brainstem (P=0.037 and caudate (P=0.006. DISCUSSION: With the possible exception of caudate and brainstem, the overall weak effects of CSF α-synuclein on atrophy rates in NL, MCI and AD argues against CSF α-synuclein as a biomarker related to longitudinal brain atrophy in these diagnostic groups. Any effects of CSF α-synuclein may be attenuated by possible simultaneous occurrence of AD-related neuronal injury and concomitant Lewy body pathology, which may elevate and

  12. Absence of systemic oxidative stress and increased CSF prostaglandin F2α in progressive MS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lam, Magda A.; Maghzal, Ghassan J.; Khademi, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    Objective: We aimed to investigate the role of oxidative stress in the progression of multiple sclerosis (MS).  Methods: We determined by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry nonenzymatic (F2-isoprostanes) and enzymatic oxidation products of arachidonic acid (prostaglandin F2α [PGF2α......]) in plasma and CSF of 45 controls (other neurologic disease [OND] with no signs of inflammation) and 62 patients with MS. Oxidation products were correlated with disease severity and validated biomarkers of inflammation (chemokine ligand 13; matrix metalloproteinase-9; osteopontin) and axonal damage...... (neurofilament light protein).  Results: Compared with OND controls, plasma concentrations of F2-isoprostanes and PGF2α were significantly lower in patients with progressive disease, and decreased with increasing disability score (Expanded Disability Status Scale). In contrast, CSF concentrations of PGF2α...

  13. Homovanillic acid and 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid as biomarkers for dementia with Lewy bodies and coincident Alzheimer’s disease: An autopsy-confirmed study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takao, Masaki; Hatsuta, Hiroyuki; Nishina, Yasushi; Komiya, Tadashi; Sengoku, Renpei; Nakano, Yuta; Uchino, Akiko; Sumikura, Hiroyuki; Saito, Yuko; Kanemaru, Kazutomi; Murayama, Shigeo

    2017-01-01

    Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) and Alzheimer’s disease (AD) are the two most common causes of dementia. Both pathologies often coexist, and AD patients with concomitant neocortical LB pathology (referred to as the Lewy body variant of AD) generally show faster cognitive decline and accelerated mortality relative to patients with pure AD. Thus, discriminating among patients with DLB, AD, and coincident DLB and AD is important in clinical practice. We examined levels of homovanillic acid (HVA), 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid (5-HIAA), tau, phosphorylated tau (p-tau), and beta-amyloid (Aβ) 1–42 in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) to evaluate their viability as biomarkers to discriminate among different forms of dementia. We obtained a total of 3498 CSF samples from patients admitted to our hospital during the period from 1996 to 2015. Of these patients, we were able to carry out a brain autopsy in 94 cases. Finally, 78 neuropathologically diagnosed cases (10 AD, six DLB, five DLB with AD, five controls without neurological diseases, and 52 cases with other neurological diseases) were studied. CSF levels of HVA and 5-HIAA were consistently decreased in pathologically advanced Lewy body disorder (LBD; Braak LB stages >3) compared with pathologically incipient LBD (Braak LB stages <2). These results suggest that if an individual has LB pathology in the central nervous system, CSF levels of HVA and 5-HIAA may decrease after the onset of clinical symptoms. In addition, CSF levels of HVA and 5-HIAA decreased with LB pathology, and were especially low in cases of DLB and DLB with AD. Furthermore, the combination of HVA, 5-HIAA, and brain specific proteins t-tau, p-tau, and Aβ 1–42 in CSF were useful for discriminating among DLB, DLB with AD, and AD with high diagnostic accuracy. PMID:28166276

  14. CSF neurofilament proteins in the differential diagnosis of dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, D; Jansen, R W M M; Pijnenburg, Y A L; van Geel, W J A; Borm, G F; Kremer, Berry; Verbeek, M.

    BACKGROUND: Neurofilament (NF) proteins are major cytoskeletal constituents of neurons. Increased CSF NF levels may reflect neuronal degeneration. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the diagnostic value of CSF NF analysis to discriminate in relatively young dementia patients between frontotemporal lobe

  15. CSF neurofilament proteins in the differential diagnosis of dementia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, D. de; Jansen, R.W.M.M.; Pijnenburg, Y.A.; Geel, W.J.A. van; Borm, G.F.; Kremer, H.P.H.; Verbeek, M.M.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neurofilament (NF) proteins are major cytoskeletal constituents of neurons. Increased CSF NF levels may reflect neuronal degeneration. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the diagnostic value of CSF NF analysis to discriminate in relatively young dementia patients between frontotemporal lobe

  16. CSF-1R Inhibitor Development: Current Clinical Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyraud, Florent; Cousin, Sophie; Italiano, Antoine

    2017-09-05

    Colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF-1R) and its ligands, CSF-1 and interleukin 34 (IL-34), regulate the function and survival of tumor-associated macrophages, which are involved in tumorigenesis and in the suppression of antitumor immunity. Moreover, the CSF-1R/CSF-1 axis has been implicated in the pathogenesis of pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS), a benign tumor of the synovium. As advanced or metastatic malignant solid tumors and relapsed/refractory PVNS remain unresolved therapeutic problems, new approaches are needed to improve the outcome of patients with these conditions. In solid tumors, targeting CSF-1R via either small molecules or antibodies has shown interesting results in vitro but limited antitumor activity in vivo. Concerning PVNS, clinical trials assessing CSF-1R inhibitors have revealed promising initial outcomes. Blocking CSF-1/CSF-1R signaling represents a promising immunotherapy approach and several new potential combination therapies for future clinical testing.

  17. Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers for the Diagnosis of Alzheimer Disease in South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Won Seok; Kim, Hyeong Jun; Shin, Ho Sik; Kim, Saeromi; Im, Ji Young; Ahn, Sang Il; Min, Kyoung Dae; Yim, Soo Jae; Ye, Byoung Seok; Seo, Sang Won; Jeong, Jee Hyang; Park, Kyung Won; Choi, Seong Hye; Na, Duk L.

    2017-01-01

    Laboratory-specific reference values for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) Alzheimer disease (AD) biomarkers are necessary. Our objective was to apply well-known CSF biomarkers and redetermine their diagnostic cutoff values for AD in South Korea. CSF samples from matched control subjects (n=71), patients with AD dementia (ADD, n=76), and other neurological disorders with cognitive decline (OND, n=47) were obtained from 6 Korean dementia clinics according to a standardized protocol. CSF biomarker concentrations were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. CSF biomarkers differed significantly between the ADD and control groups (P<0.001 for all), and between the ADD and OND groups (P<0.001 for all). The areas under the curve in differentiation of ADD from control subjects were 0.97 for Aβ42, 0.93 for total tau (tTau), 0.86 for pTau, and 0.99 for both tTau/Aβ42 and pTau/Aβ42 ratios. Our revised cutoff value for Aβ42 was higher than our previous one, whereas the values for the Tau proteins were similar. The tTau/Aβ42 ratio had the highest accuracy, 97%. Our findings highlight the usefulness of CSF AD biomarkers in South Korea, and the necessity of continually testing the reliability of cutoff values. PMID:28030437

  18. CSF monoamine metabolites, cholinesterases and lactate in the adult hydrocephalus syndrome (normal pressure hydrocephalus) related to CSF hydrodynamic parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malm, J; Kristensen, B; Ekstedt, J; Adolfsson, R; Wester, P

    1991-03-01

    Monoamine metabolites, cholinesterases and lactic acid in lumbar cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were investigated on patients with the adult hydrocephalus syndrome (idiopathic normal pressure syndrome; AHS, n = 15), Alzheimer's disease (AD, n = 14), multi-infarct dementia (MID, n = 13) and controls (n = 21). Patients had clinical and CSF hydrodynamic investigations. Monoamine concentrations were determined by reversed-phase liquid chromatography, cholinesterases and lactate were determined photometrically. In the AHS patients, CSF monoamine concentrations were not significantly different compared with controls, AD or MID patients. AHS and AD patients showed a similar reduction of CSF acetylcholinesterase activity compared with controls. Positive correlations were found in concentrations of CSF homovanillic acid, CSF 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid and CSF lactic acid versus CSF outflow conductance (that is, resistance against CSF outflow) in the AHS patients. A similar pattern was observed in a subgroup of MID patients characterised by dilated ventricles and disturbed CSF hydrodynamics. These data suggest that a low CSF outflow conductance may facilitate the clearance of acidic substances from the arachnoid space at the probenecid sensitive active transport site. Alternative explanations would be that a pathologically low CSF outflow conductance is accompanied by an inverse caudorostral flow of CSF or a compromised trans-ependymal diffusion.

  19. Biomarkers in Alzheimer's Disease-Recent Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sushil; Lipincott, Walter

    2017-02-20

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is an age-related neurodegenerative disorder, characterized by loss of memory and cognitive function. It is the common cause of dementia in elderly and is a global health concern as the population of people aged 85 and older, is growing alarmingly. Although pharmacotherapy for the treatment of AD has improved, lot of work remains to treat this devastating disease. AD pathology begins even before the onset of clinical symptoms. Because therapies could be more effective if implemented early in the disease progression, it is highly prudent to discover reliable biomarkers, to detect its exact pathophysiology during pre-symptomatic stage. Biomarker(s) with high sensitivity and specificity would facilitate AD diagnosis at early stages. Currently, CSF amyloid β 1-42, total tau, and phosphorylated tau181 are used as AD biomarkers. This report describes conventional and potential in-vitro and in-vivo biomarkers of AD. Particularly, in-vitro transcriptomic, proteomic, lipidomic, and metabolomic; body fluid biomarkers (C-reactive proteins, homocysteine, α-sunuclein index, and dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate) from blood, serum, plasma, CSF, and saliva; and neuronal, platelets, and lymphocyte microRNA, mtDNA, and Charnoly body are detected. In-vivo physiological and neurobehavioral biomarkers are evaluated by analyzing computerized EEG, event-related potentials, circadian rhythm, and multimodality fusion imaging including: CT, MRI, SPECT, and PET. More specifically, PET imaging biomarkers representing reduced fronto-temporal 18FdG uptake, increased 11C or 18F-PIB uptake, 11C-PBR28 to measure 18 kDa translocator protein (TSPO), a biomarker for inflammation; and 3-D MRI (ventriculomegaly)/MRS are performed for early and effective clinical management of AD.

  20. ANAESTHESIA MANAGEMENT OF CSF RHINORRHEA REPAIR : A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirti Arvind

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Anaesthesiologist plays a major role in Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF rhinorrhea repair surgery as the prognosis of which is dependent on provision of clear bloodless surgical field and surgeons satisfaction. Anaesthesiologist also plays vital role in the management of CSF Lumbar drain. This case highlights the importance of hypotensive anaesthesia during endoscopic repair of a case of spontaneous CSF Rhinorrhea with successful perioperative management of Lumbar drainage of CSF

  1. Neurosyphilis in AIDS patients: initial CSF VDRL may be negative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feraru, E R; Aronow, H A; Lipton, R B

    1990-03-01

    We report 2 HIV-seropositive patients with neurosyphilis whose initial CSF VDRL tests were negative. The CSF VDRL became positive after 12 days of IV penicillin treatment for syphilitic meningitis in the 1st patient. The 2nd patient developed syphilitic polyradiculopathy and a positive CSF VDRL 3 months after treatment with IV penicillin. Serial CSF VDRL determinations may be required in AIDS patients when a diagnosis of neurosyphilis is suspected.

  2. Cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers of infantile congenital hydrocephalus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limbrick, David D.; Baksh, Brandon; Morgan, Clinton D.; Habiyaremye, Gakwaya; McAllister, James P.; Inder, Terrie E.; Mercer, Deanna; Holtzman, David M.; Strahle, Jennifer; Wallendorf, Michael J.; Morales, Diego M.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Hydrocephalus is a complex neurological disorder with a pervasive impact on the central nervous system. Previous work has demonstrated derangements in the biochemical profile of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in hydrocephalus, particularly in infants and children, in whom neurodevelopment is progressing in parallel with concomitant neurological injury. The objective of this study was to examine the CSF of children with congenital hydrocephalus (CHC) to gain insight into the pathophysiology of hydrocephalus and identify candidate biomarkers of CHC with potential diagnostic and therapeutic value. Methods CSF levels of amyloid precursor protein (APP) and derivative isoforms (sAPPα, sAPPβ, Aβ42), tau, phosphorylated tau (pTau), L1CAM, NCAM-1, aquaporin 4 (AQP4), and total protein (TP) were measured by ELISA in 20 children with CHC. Two comparative groups were included: age-matched controls and children with other neurological diseases. Demographic parameters, ventricular frontal-occipital horn ratio, associated brain malformations, genetic alterations, and surgical treatments were recorded. Logistic regression analysis and receiver operating characteristic curves were used to examine the association of each CSF protein with CHC. Results CSF levels of APP, sAPPα, sAPPβ, Aβ42, tau, pTau, L1CAM, and NCAM-1 but not AQP4 or TP were increased in untreated CHC. CSF TP and normalized L1CAM levels were associated with FOR in CHC subjects, while normalized CSF tau levels were associated with FOR in control subjects. Predictive ability for CHC was strongest for sAPPα, especially in subjects ≤12 months of age (p<0.0001 and AUC = 0.99), followed by normalized sAPPβ (p = 0.0001, AUC = 0.95), tau, APP, and L1CAM. Among subjects ≤12 months, a normalized CSF sAPPα cut-point of 0.41 provided the best prediction of CHC (odds ratio = 528, sensitivity = 0.94, specificity = 0.97); these infants were 32 times more likely to have CHC. Conclusions CSF proteins such as s

  3. What is the Clinical Significance of Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers in Parkinson's disease? Is the Significance Diagnostic or Prognostic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dana; Paik, Jin Hui; Shin, Dong-Woon; Kim, Hak-Su; Park, Chang-Shin; Kang, Ju-Hee

    2014-12-01

    The clinical diagnostic criteria of Parkinson's disease (PD) have limitations in detecting the disease at early stage and in differentiating heterogeneous clinical progression. The lack of reliable biomarker(s) for early diagnosis and prediction of prognosis is a major hurdle to achieve optimal clinical care of patients and efficient design of clinical trials for disease-modifying therapeutics. Numerous efforts to discover PD biomarkers in CSF were conducted. In this review, we describe the molecular pathogenesis of PD and discuss its implication to develop PD biomarkers in CSF. Next, we summarize the clinical utility of CSF biomarkers including alpha-synuclein for early and differential diagnosis, and prediction of PD progression. Given the heterogeneity in the clinical features of PD and none of the CSF biomarkers for an early diagnosis have been developed, research efforts to develop biomarkers to predict heterogeneous disease progression is on-going. Notably, a rapid cognitive decline followed by the development of dementia is a risk factor of poor prognosis in PD. In connection to this, CSF levels of Alzheimer's disease (AD) biomarkers have received considerable attention. However, we still need long-term longitudinal observational studies employing large cohorts to evaluate the clinical utility of CSF biomarkers reflecting Lewy body pathology and AD pathology in the brain. We believe that current research efforts including the Parkinson's Progression Markers Initiative will resolve the current needs of early diagnosis and/or prediction of disease progression using CSF biomarkers, and which will further accelerate the development of disease-modifying therapeutics and optimize the clinical management of PD patients.

  4. VENTRICULAR MAPS IN 804 SUBJECTS CORRELATE WITH COGNITIVE DECLINE, CSF PATHOLOGY, AND IMMINENT ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Yi-Yu; Leporé, Natasha; Madsen, Sarah K.; Saharan, Priya; Hua, Xue; Jack, Clifford R.; Shaw, Leslie M.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Weiner, Michael W.; Toga, Arthur W.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2017-01-01

    There is an urgent need for neuroimaging biomarkers of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) that correlate with cognitive decline, and with accepted measures of pathology detectable in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Ideal biomarkers should also be able to predict future decline, and should be computable automatically from hundreds to thousands of images without user intervention. Here we used our multi-atlas fluid image alignment method (MAFIA [1]), to automatically segment parametric 3D surface models of the lateral ventricles in brain MRI scans from 184 AD, 391 MCI, and 229 healthy elderly controls. Radial expansion of the ventricles, computed pointwise, was correlated with measures of (1) clinical decline, (2) pathology from CSF, and (3) future deterioration. Surface–based correlation maps were assessed using a cumulative distribution function method to rank influential covariates according to their effect sizes. The resulting approach is highly automated, and boosts the power of fluid image registration by integrating multiple independent registrations to reduce segmentation errors.

  5. Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers in Familial Forms of Alzheimer's Disease and Frontotemporal Dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostgaard, Nina; Waldemar, Gunhild; Nielsen, Jørgen Erik;

    2015-01-01

    and are important when developing new therapies. Today, the core protein biomarkers amyloid-β42, total tau and phosphorylated tau in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) are used to diagnose Alzheimer's disease (AD), because these biomarkers have shown to reflect the underlying amyloid and tau pathology. However...

  6. The Alzheimer's Association external quality control program for cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mattsson, N.; Andreasson, U.; Persson, S.; Arai, H.; Batish, S.D.; Bernardini, S.; Bocchio-Chiavetto, L.; Blankenstein, M.A.; Carrillo, M.C.; Chalbot, S.; Coart, E.; Chiasserini, D.; Cutler, N.; Dahlfors, G.; Duller, S.; Fagan, A.M.; Forlenza, O.; Frisoni, G.B.; Galasko, D.; Galimberti, D.; Hampel, H.; Handberg, A.; Heneka, M.T.; Herskovits, A.Z.; Herukka, S.K.; Holtzman, D.M.; Humpel, C.; Hyman, B.T.; Iqbal, K.; Jucker, M.; Kaeser, S.A.; Kaiser, E.; Kapaki, E.; Kidd, D.; Klivenyi, P.; Knudsen, C.S.; Kummer, M.P.; Lui, J.; Llado, A.; Lewczuk, P.; Li, Q.X.; Martins, R.; Masters, C.; McAuliffe, J.; Mercken, M.; Moghekar, A.; Molinuevo, J.L.; Montine, T.J.; Nowatzke, W.; O'Brien, R.; Otto, M.; Paraskevas, G.P.; Parnetti, L.; Petersen, R.C.; Prvulovic, D.; Reus, H.P. de; Rissman, R.A.; Scarpini, E.; Stefani, A.; Soininen, H.; Schroder, J.; Shaw, L.M.; Skinningsrud, A.; Skrogstad, B.; Spreer, A.; Talib, L.; Teunissen, C.; Trojanowski, J.Q.; Tumani, H.; Umek, R.M.; Broeck, B. Van; Vanderstichele, H.; Vecsei, L.; Verbeek, M.M.; Windisch, M.; Zhang, Jing; Zetterberg, H.; Blennow, K.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers amyloid beta (Abeta)-42, total-tau (T-tau), and phosphorylated-tau (P-tau) demonstrate good diagnostic accuracy for Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, there are large variations in biomarker measurements between studies, and between and within lab

  7. The Alzheimer's Association external quality control program for cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mattsson, Niklas; Andreasson, Ulf; Persson, Staffan

    2011-01-01

    The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers amyloid β (Aβ)-42, total-tau (T-tau), and phosphorylated-tau (P-tau) demonstrate good diagnostic accuracy for Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, there are large variations in biomarker measurements between studies, and between and within laboratories. The ...

  8. Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers in Dementia Patients with Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-feng Li; Fang-fang Ge; Yong Zhang; Hui You; Zhen-xin Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Objective To study the changes of biomarkers in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) dementia and Alzheimer's disease. Methods Levels of amyloid proteinβ (Aβ42, Aβ40) and phosphorylated Tau-protein (P-tau) in CSF and ratio of Aβ42/Aβ40 were tested in 5 cases with CAA dementia and 20 cases with Alzheimer's disease collected at Peking Union Medical College Hospital from December 2001 to March 2011. Results The levels of Aβ42, Aβ40, and P-tau in CSF and ratio of Aβ42/Aβ40 were (660.4±265.2) ng/L, (7111.0±1033.4) ng/L, (71.8±51.5) ng/L, and 0.077±0.033, respectively in CAA dementia and (663.6±365.6) ng/L, (5115.0±2931.1) ng/L, (47.7±38.8) ng/L, and 0.192±0.140, respectively in Alzheimer's disease patients. There were no statistically significant differences between CAA dementia and Alzheimer's disease in terms of these CSF biomarkers (allP>0.05). Conclusion Measurements of CSF biomarkers may not be helpful in differential diagnosis of CAA and Alzheimer's disease.

  9. Cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers in Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases-From pathophysiology to clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blennow, Kaj; Biscetti, Leonardo; Eusebi, Paolo; Parnetti, Lucilla

    2016-06-01

    This review provides an update on the role, development, and validation of CSF biomarkers in the diagnosis and prognosis of Alzheimer's disease and PD. Some recent developments on novel biomarkers are also discussed. We also give an overview of methodological/technical factors still hampering the global validation and standardization of CSF Alzheimer's disease and PD biomarkers. CSF biomarkers have the potential to improve the diagnostic accuracy at the early stages not only for Alzheimer's disease but also for PD. This step is essential in view of the availability of disease-modifying treatments. Our vision for the future is that analyzing biomarker panels on a minute amount of CSF could provide important information on the whole spectrum of the molecular pathogenic events characterizing these neurodegenerative disorders. CSF core biomarkers have already been included in the diagnostic criteria for Alzheimer's disease, and they are also under consideration as tools to monitor the effects of disease-modifying drugs. With respect to PD, their potential for improving diagnostic accuracy in early diagnosis is under intense research, resembling the same path followed for Alzheimer's disease. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  10. Validation of Alzheimer's disease CSF and plasma biological markers: the multicentre reliability study of the pilot European Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (E-ADNI)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buerger, Katharina; Frisoni, Giovanni; Uspenskaya, Olga

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiatives ("ADNI") aim to validate neuroimaging and biochemical markers of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Data of the pilot European-ADNI (E-ADNI) biological marker programme of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and plasma candidate biomarkers are reported. METHODS...

  11. Comparative peptidome analyses of the profiles of the peptides ranging from 1-10 KD in CSF samples pooled from probable sporadic CJD and non-CJD patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cao; Xiao, Di; Zhou, Wei; Zhang, Yong-Chan; Shi, Qi; Tian, Chan; Zhang, Jin; Zhou, Chun-Xi; Zhang, Jian-Zhong; Dong, Xiao-Ping

    2012-01-01

    The shotgun strategy applying tandem mass spectrometry has been widely used to identify the proteins that are differentially distributed among diseases for its high reliability and efficiency. To find out the potential difference of protein profiles in cerebrospinal fluids (CSF) between Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) and non-CJD patients, especially in the fraction ranging from 1-10 KD, the CSF samples of 40 probable sporadic CJD (sCJD) patients, 32 non-CJD cases with dementia and 17 non-CJD cases without dementia were separately pooled and enriched by the magnetic beads based weak cation exchange chromatography (MB-WCX). After trypsin digestion, each enriched CSF was separated and identified by RP-HPLC-ESI-QTOF MS/MS. In total, 42, 53 and 47 signals of proteins were identified in the pooled CSF fraction less than 10 KD of probable sCJD, non-CJD with dementia and non-CJD without dementia, respectively. Compared with that of probable sCJD, the similarity of CSF protein profiles of non-CJD with dementia (76.2%) were higher than that of non-CJD without dementia (57.1%). Nine CSF proteins were found to be specially observed in probable sCJD group. Those data may help to select the potential biomarkers for diagnosis of CJD. Additionally, further studies of the small segments of cellular proteins in CSF of CJD patients may also provide scientific clues for understanding the neuropathogenesis of TSEs.

  12. Draft genome sequence of the fish pathogen Flavobacterium columnare strain CSF-298-10

    Science.gov (United States)

    We announce the genome assembly of Flavobacterium columnare strain CSF-298-10, a strain isolated from an outbreak of Columnaris disease at a commercial trout farm in Snake River Valley Idaho, USA. The complete genome consists of 13 contigs totaling 3,284,579 bp, average G+C content of 31.5% and 2933...

  13. Intracerebral GM-CSF contributes to transendothelial monocyte migration in APP/PS1 Alzheimer's disease mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, De S; Yang, Yi M; Zhang, Hu; Tian, Li; Jiang, Jiu S; Dong, Yan B; Zhang, Ke; Li, Bo; Zhao, Wei D; Fang, Wen G; Chen, Yu H

    2016-11-01

    Although tight junctions between human brain microvascular endothelial cells in the blood-brain barrier prevent molecules or cells in the bloodstream from entering the brain, in Alzheimer's disease, peripheral blood monocytes can "open" these tight junctions and trigger subsequent transendothelial migration. However, the mechanism underlying this migration is unclear. Here, we found that the CSF2RB, but not CSF2RA, subunit of the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor was overexpressed on monocytes from Alzheimer's disease patients. CSF2RB contributes to granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor-induced transendothelial monocyte migration. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor triggers human brain microvascular endothelial cells monolayer tight junction disassembly by downregulating ZO-1 expression via transcription modulation and claudin-5 expression via the ubiquitination pathway. Interestingly, intracerebral granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor blockade abolished the increased monocyte infiltration in the brains of APP/PS1 Alzheimer's disease model mice. Our results suggest that in Alzheimer's disease patients, high granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor levels in the brain parenchyma and cerebrospinal fluid induced blood-brain barrier opening, facilitating the infiltration of CSF2RB-expressing peripheral monocytes across blood-brain barrier and into the brain. CSF2RB might be useful as an Alzheimer's disease biomarker. Thus, our findings will help to understand the mechanism of monocyte infiltration in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis.

  14. Proteomics for Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarker Identification in Parkinsons Disease: Methods and Critical Aspects

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    Antonio Conti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD, similar with other neurodegenerative disorders, would benefit from the identification of early biomarkers for differential diagnosis and prognosis to address prompt clinical treatments. Together with hypothesis driven approaches, PD has been investigated by high-throughput differential proteomic analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF protein content. The principal methodologies and techniques utilized in the proteomics field for PD biomarker discovery from CSF are presented in this mini review. The positive aspects and challenges in proteome-based biomarker research are also discussed.

  15. Detection of virus in CSF from the cases with meningoencephalitis by next-generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Hongzhi; Shen, Ao; Lv, Xia; Yang, Xunzhe; Ren, Haitao; Zhao, Yanhuan; Zhang, Yinxin; Gong, Yanping; Ni, Peixiang; Wu, Honglong; Zhu, Yicheng; Cui, Liying

    2016-04-01

    We screened for viral DNA in cerebrospinal fluid samples using next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology to diagnose CNS viral infections. We collected CSF samples from four cases with clinically suspected viral meningoencephalitis. DNA extracted from the samples was analyzed with NGS, and the results were further validated using PCR. Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) was detected in the CSF of two patients, HSV-2 and human herpes virus type 3 (HHV-3, VZV) in the CSF of two other patients separately. The number of unique reads of the identified viral genes ranged from 144 to 44205 (93.51 to 99.57%). The coverage of identified viral genes ranged from 12 to 98% with a depth value of 1.1 to 35, respectively. The results were further confirmed using PCR in three cases. The clinical presentation and outcomes of these four cases were consistent with the diagnostic results of NGS. NGS of CSF samples can be used as a diagnostic assay for CNS viral infection. Its further application for "pan-viral" or even "pan-microbial" screening of CSF might influence the diagnosis of CNS infectious diseases.

  16. The progress of cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers in patients with neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Wei-zhi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases include a heterogeneous group of diseases with complicated and overlapped clinical phenotypes. It is difficult to diagnose or identify this kind of disease due to insidious onset and chronic and progressive development. Since processes in the brain can be monitored by analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, abundant research efforts focus on the efficacy of biomarkers in CSF to indicate specific neurodegenerative lesions and to assist the diagnosis process, assessing whether one biomarker or several biomarkers together could be the reliable tools for diagnosis of specific neurodegenerative diseases. This article mainly reviews the research status and supplementary value in diagnosis and differentiation of CSF biomarkers in common degenerative diseases [e.g. multiple sclerosis (MS, Alzheimer's disease (AD, Parkinson's disease (PD, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS].

  17. Low CSF levels of both α-synuclein and the α-synuclein cleaving enzyme neurosin in patients with synucleinopathy.

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    Malin Wennström

    Full Text Available Neurosin is a protease that in vitro degrades α-synuclein, the main constituent of Lewy bodies found in brains of patients with synucleinopathy including Parkinson's disease (PD and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB. Several studies have reported reduced cerebrospinal fluid (CSF levels of α-synuclein in synucleinopathy patients and recent data also proposes a significant role of α-synuclein in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD. To investigate potential links between neurosin and its substrate α-synuclein in vivo we used a commercially available sandwich ELISA and an in-house developed direct ELISA to quantify CSF levels of α-synuclein and neurosin in patients diagnosed with DLB, PD and PD dementia (PDD versus AD patients and non-demented controls. We found that patients with synucleinopathy displayed lower CSF levels of neurosin and α-synuclein compared to controls and AD patients. In contrast, AD patients demonstrated significantly increased CSF α-synuclein but similar neurosin levels compared to non-demented controls. Further, CSF neurosin and α-synuclein concentrations were positively associated in controls, PD and PDD patients and both proteins were highly correlated to CSF levels of phosphorylated tau in all investigated groups. We observed no effect of gender or presence of the apolipoprotein Eε4 allele on neither neurosin or α-synuclein CSF levels. In concordance with the current literature our study demonstrates decreased CSF levels of α-synuclein in synucleinopathy patients versus AD patients and controls. Importantly, decreased α-synuclein levels in patients with synucleinopathy appear linked to low levels of the α-synuclein cleaving enzyme neurosin. In contrast, elevated levels of α-synuclein in AD patients were not related to any altered CSF neurosin levels. Thus, altered CSF levels of α-synuclein and neurosin in patients with synucleinopathy versus AD may not only mirror disease-specific neuropathological

  18. Usability of cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers in a tertiary memory clinic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, C.; Bahl, J.C.; Heegaard, N.H.

    2008-01-01

    AIM: Assays for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of total tau, phospho-tau protein and beta-amyloid 1-42 have been available for some years. The aim of the study was to assess the usability of these biomarkers in a mixed population of tertiary dementia referral patients in a university-based memory...

  19. CSF hydrothorax without intrathoracic catheter migration in children with ventriculoperitoneal shunt

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    Joon-Hyung Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Thoracic complications of ventriculoperitoneal (VP shunts have been extensively reported in the literature. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF hydrothorax without catheter migration, however, has been rarely described and poorly understood. Case Description: We describe development of pleural effusion and respiratory distress in a 3-year-old boy with no evidence of VP shunt catheter displacement on plain radiograph and stable ventricle size on rapid sequence magnetic resonance imaging (MRI brain. Chest X-ray revealed complete opacity of right hemithorax. Pleural effusion was consistent with transudate. Beta-2 transferrin returned positive. The patient underwent externalization of VP shunt, and upon resolution of effusion, re-internalization with new distal shunt catheter. A literature review of CSF hydrothorax in children without intrathoracic shunt migration was performed. Eleven cases were identified in the English literature. Age at VP shunt placement ranged from birth to 8 years of age. Interval from VP shunt placement to CSF hydrothorax ranged from 1.5 months to 5 years. History of shunt revision was reported in two cases. Presenting symptoms also included ascites and inguinal hernia or hydrocele. Reported diagnostic studies consist of CSF culture, radionuclide shuntogram, beta-2 transferrin, and beta-trace protein. Laterality of the VP shunt and development of pleural effusion were predominantly right sided. Definitive surgical treatment included VA shunt, repositioning of the peritoneal catheter, and endoscopic choroid plexus coagulation. Conclusion: CSF hydrothorax is a rare thoracic complication of VP shunt placement with no radiographic evidence of shunt migration or malfunction. Postulated mechanisms include limited peritoneal capacity to resorb CSF in children and microscopic communications present in congenital diaphragmatic hiatuses.

  20. Biomarkers in Parkinson's disease (recent update).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sushil; Moon, Carolyn Seungyoun; Khogali, Azza; Haidous, Ali; Chabenne, Anthony; Ojo, Comfort; Jelebinkov, Miriana; Kurdi, Yousef; Ebadi, Manuchair

    2013-09-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder mostly affecting the aging population over sixty. Cardinal symptoms including, tremors, muscle rigidity, drooping posture, drooling, walking difficulty, and autonomic symptoms appear when a significant number of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons are already destroyed. Hence we need early, sensitive, specific, and economical peripheral and/or central biomarker(s) for the differential diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of PD. These can be classified as clinical, biochemical, genetic, proteomic, and neuroimaging biomarkers. Novel discoveries of genetic as well as nongenetic biomarkers may be utilized for the personalized treatment of PD during preclinical (premotor) and clinical (motor) stages. Premotor biomarkers including hyper-echogenicity of substantia nigra, olfactory and autonomic dysfunction, depression, hyposmia, deafness, REM sleep disorder, and impulsive behavior may be noticed during preclinical stage. Neuroimaging biomarkers (PET, SPECT, MRI), and neuropsychological deficits can facilitate differential diagnosis. Single-cell profiling of dopaminergic neurons has identified pyridoxal kinase and lysosomal ATPase as biomarker genes for PD prognosis. Promising biomarkers include: fluid biomarkers, neuromelanin antibodies, pathological forms of α-Syn, DJ-1, amyloid β and tau in the CSF, patterns of gene expression, metabolomics, urate, as well as protein profiling in the blood and CSF samples. Reduced brain regional N-acetyl-aspartate is a biomarker for the in vivo assessment of neuronal loss using magnetic resonance spectroscopy and T2 relaxation time with MRI. To confirm PD diagnosis, the PET biomarkers include [(18)F]-DOPA for estimating dopaminergic neurotransmission, [(18)F]dG for mitochondrial bioenergetics, [(18)F]BMS for mitochondrial complex-1, [(11)C](R)-PK11195 for microglial activation, SPECT imaging with (123)Iflupane and βCIT for dopamine transporter, and urinary

  1. Neuroimaging and Other Biomarkers for Alzheimer's Disease: The Changing Landscape of Early Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risacher, Shannon L.; Saykin, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this review is to provide an overview of biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease (AD), with emphasis on neuroimaging and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers. We first review biomarker changes in patients with late-onset AD, including findings from studies using structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), advanced MRI techniques (diffusion tensor imaging, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, perfusion), positron emission tomography with fluorodeoxyglucose, amyloid tracers, and other neurochemical tracers, and CSF protein levels. Next, we evaluate findings from these biomarkers in preclinical and prodromal stages of AD including mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and pre-MCI conditions conferring elevated risk. We then discuss related findings in patients with dominantly inherited AD. We conclude with a discussion of the current theoretical framework for the role of biomarkers in AD and emergent directions for AD biomarker research. PMID:23297785

  2. Cerebrovascular Biomarker Profile Is Related to White Matter Disease and Ventricular Dilation in a LADIS Substudy

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    Maria Bjerke

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Small vessel disease (SVD represents a common often progressive condition in elderly people contributing to cognitive disability. The relationship between cerebrospinal fluid (CSF biomarkers and imaging correlates of SVD was investigated, and the findings were hypothesized to be associated with a neuropsychological profile of SVD. Methods: CSF SVD-related biomarkers [neurofilament light (NF-L, myelin basic protein (MBP, soluble amyloid precursor protein-β (sAPPβ, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs, and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP] were analysed in 46 non-demented elderly with imaging findings of SVD. We assessed the relationship between the CSF biomarkers and white matter hyperintensity (WMH volume, diffusion-weighted imaging and atrophy as well as their association with neuropsychological profiles. Results: The WMH volume correlated with ventricular dilation, which was associated with executive function and speed and attention. Increased WMH and ventricular dilation were related to increased CSF levels of TIMP-1, NF-L and MBP and to decreased sAPPβ. A positive correlation was found between the CSF biomarker MMP-9 and WMH progression. Conclusions: The link between progressive WMH and MMP-9 suggests an involvement of the enzyme in white matter degeneration. CSF TIMP-1, NF-L, MBP and sAPPβ may function as biological markers of white matter damage.

  3. The Clinical Use of Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers for Alzheimer's Disease Diagnosis: The Italian Selfie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sancesario, Giulia M; Toniolo, Sofia; Chiasserini, Davide; Di Santo, Simona G; Zegeer, Josh; Bernardi, Gaetano; Musicco, Massimo; Caltagirone, Carlo; Parnetti, Lucilla; Bernardini, Sergio

    2017-01-01

    Although the use of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) amyloid β1-42 (Aβ42), tau (T-tau), and phosphorylated tau (p-tau181) gives added diagnostic and prognostic values, the diffusion is still limited in clinical practice and only a restricted number of patients receive an integrated clinico-biological diagnosis. By a survey, we aimed to do a "selfie" of the use and diffusion of CSF biomarkers of dementia in Italy, the standardization of pre-analytical procedures, the harmonization of ranges, and the participation to Quality Control programs. An online questionnaire was sent to the members of SIBioC and SINdem-ITALPLANED and to main neurological clinics all over Italy. In Italy, 25 laboratories provide biomarkers analysis in addition to a network of 15 neighboring hospitals. In sum, 40 neurological centers require CSF analyses. 7/20 regions (35%) lack CSF laboratories. Standardization of pre-analytical procedures is present in 62.02% of the laboratories; only 56.00% of the laboratories participate in International Quality Control. There is no harmonization of cut-offs. In Italy, the use of CSF biomarkers is still limited in clinical practice. Standardization and harmonization of normal ranges are needed. To optimize and expand the use of CSF biomarkers, a cost-benefit analysis should be promoted by scientific societies and national health services.

  4. Biomarkers in chronic adult hydrocephalus

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    Kitchen Neil D

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Awareness of the importance of chronic adult hydrocephalus has been raised again with the recent emergence of epidemiological studies. It is estimated that between 5 and 10% of patients suffering from dementia might, in fact, have chronic hydrocephalus. Although, surgical diversion of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF represents the only known procedure able to treat the symptoms of this condition, the selection of surgical patients has always been problematic. In the last 40 years, we have become wiser in using appropriate diagnostic tests for the selection of these patients; however, the area of biological markers has so far been overlooked in this condition, in contrast to that for other neurodegenerative disorders and dementias. Biomarkers are biological substances that may be used to indicate either the onset or the presence, and the progression of a clinical condition, being closely linked to its pathophysiology. In such a setting they might assist in the more appropriate selection of patients for shunt surgery. In this article, we have reviewed research carried out in the last 25 years regarding the identification of serum and CSF biomarkers for chronic hydrocephalus, discussed the potential for each one, and finally discussed the limitations for use, as well as future directions and possibilities in this field. It is concluded that tumour-necrosis factor, tau protein, lactate, sulfatide and neurofilament triple protein are the most promising CSF markers for chronic hydrocephalus. At present however, none of these meet the criteria required to justify a change clinical practice. In the future, collaborative multi-centre projects will be needed to obtain more substantial data that overcome the problems that arise from small individual and uncoordinated studies.

  5. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration and CSF acetylcholinesterase activity are reduced in patients with Alzheimer's disease.

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    Per Johansson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Little is known of vitamin D concentration in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF in Alzheimer's disease (AD and its relation with CSF acetylcholinesterase (AChE activity, a marker of cholinergic function. METHODS: A cross-sectional study of 52 consecutive patients under primary evaluation of cognitive impairment and 17 healthy controls. The patients had AD dementia or mild cognitive impairment (MCI diagnosed with AD dementia upon follow-up (n = 28, other dementias (n = 12, and stable MCI (SMCI, n = 12. We determined serum and CSF concentrations of calcium, parathyroid hormone (PTH, 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD, and CSF activities of AChE and butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE. FINDINGS: CSF 25OHD level was reduced in AD patients (P < 0.05, and CSF AChE activity was decreased both in patients with AD (P < 0.05 and other dementias (P < 0.01 compared to healthy controls. None of the measured variables differed between BuChE K-variant genotypes whereas the participants that were homozygous in terms of the apolipoprotein E (APOE ε4 allele had decreased CSF AChE activity compared to subjects lacking the APOE ε4 allele (P = 0.01. In AD patients (n=28, CSF AChE activity correlated positively with CSF levels of total tau (T-tau (r = 0.44, P < 0.05 and phosphorylated tau protein (P-tau (r = 0.50, P < 0.01, but CSF activities of AChE or BuChE did not correlate with serum or CSF levels of 25OHD. CONCLUSIONS: In this pilot study, both CSF 25OHD level and CSF AChE activity were reduced in AD patients. However, the lack of correlations between 25OHD levels and CSF activities of AChE or BuChE might suggest different mechanisms of action, which could have implications for treatment trials.

  6. CSF levels of DJ-1 and tau distinguish MSA patients from PD patients and controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, Megan K; Eeftens, Jorine M; Aerts, Marjolein B; Esselink, Rianne A J; Bloem, Bastiaan R; Kuiperij, H Bea; Verbeek, Marcel M

    2014-01-01

    Differential diagnosis between Parkinson's disease (PD) and multiple system atrophy (MSA) is difficult, particularly at early disease stages, but is important for therapeutic management. The protein DJ-1 is implicated in the pathology of PD but little is known about its involvement in MSA. We aimed to determine the diagnostic value of CSF DJ-1 and tau proteins for discriminating PD and MSA. DJ-1 and total tau levels were quantified in the CSF of 43 PD patients, 23 MSA patients and 30 non-neurological controls matched for age and gender. Patients were part of a study with a 3-year prospective design with extended case-review follow-up of up to 9 years, ensuring maximum accuracy of the clinical diagnosis. Our results showed that CSF DJ-1 levels could distinguish MSA from PD with a 78% sensitivity and 78% specificity (AUC = 0.84). The combination of DJ-1 and tau proteins significantly improved this discrimination to 82% sensitivity and 81% specificity to identify MSA from PD (AUC = 0.92). Our results highlight the potential benefits of a combination of DJ-1 and total tau as biomarkers for differential diagnosis of MSA and PD.

  7. Concordance between brain (18)F-FDG PET and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers in diagnosing Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubí, S; Noguera, A; Tarongí, S; Oporto, M; García, A; Vico, H; Espino, A; Picado, M J; Mas, A; Peña, C; Amer, G

    2017-06-20

    Cortical posterior hypometabolism on PET imaging with (18)F-FDG (FDG-PET), and altered levels of Aß1-42 peptide, total Tau (tTau) and phosphorylated Tau (pTau) proteins in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) are established diagnostic biomarkers in Alzheimer's disease (AD). An evaluation has been made of the concordance and relationship between the results of FDG-PET and CSF biomarkers in symptomatic patients with suspected AD. A retrospective review was carried out on 120 patients with cognitive impairment referred to our Cognitive Neurology Unit, and who were evaluated by brain FDG-PET and a lumbar puncture for CSF biomarkers. In order to calculate their Kappa coefficient of concordance, the result of the FDG-PET and the set of the three CSF biomarkers in each patient was classified as normal, inconclusive, or AD-compatible. The relationship between the results of both methods was further assessed using logistic regression analysis, including the Aß1-42, tTau and pTau levels as quantitative predictors, and the FDG-PET result as the dependent variable. The weighted Kappa coefficient between FDG-PET and CSF biomarkers was 0.46 (95% CI: 0.35-0.57). Logistic regression analysis showed that the Aß1-42 and tTau values together were capable of discriminating an FDG-PET result metabolically suggestive of AD from one non-suggestive of AD, with a 91% sensitivity and 93% specificity at the cut-off line Aß1-42=44+1.3×tTau. The level of concordance between FDG-PET and CSF biomarkers was moderate, indicating their complementary value in diagnosing AD. The Aß1-42 and tTau levels in CSF help to predict the patient FDG-PET cortical metabolic status. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  8. Routine CSF analysis in coccidioidomycosis is not required.

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    George Thompson

    Full Text Available Although routinely done, there has been no evaluation of the utility of performing routine cerebrospinal fluid (CSF examination in patients with active coccidioidomycosis and high complement fixation (IgG antibody titers or other risk factors for disseminated infection. In our review 100% of patients diagnosed with coccidioidal meningitis had at least one sign or symptom consistent with infection of the central nervous system, headache was present in 100% of those with meningitis, while no patients without signs/symptoms of CNS infection were found to have coccidioidal meningitis, irrespective of antibody titers or other risk factors. Thus routine lumbar puncture may be unnecessary for patients with coccidioidomycosis who lack suggestive clinical symptoms.

  9. Increased CSF levels of endorphines in chronic psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terenius, L; Wahlström, A; Lindström, L; Widerlöv, E

    1976-10-01

    The levels of two endorphines, endogenously occurring morphinomimetic peptides, were measured in serial samples of CSF from seven psychiatric patients. Four cases with chronic schizophrenia were studied before and after treatment with the antipsychotic agent clozapine (Leponex). Supernormal fraction II levels were found on at least one sampling occasion in each patient. Two patients, who responded well to clozapine treatment, showed a clear-cut drop in fraction II levels, whereas two patients showed increased levels which paralleled a deterioration of the schizophrenic symptoms. Three manic-depressive cases showed abnormally high levels of endorphine fraction I in the manic phase which declined during normal or depressed phases. Levels of fraction II varied in a less consistent manner and appeared to be at maximum during the apparently normal phases. Although preliminary, the data indicate that endorphines may reach supernormal levels in patients with chronic psychoses.

  10. Combined dementia-risk biomarkers in Parkinson's disease: a prospective longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compta, Yaroslau; Pereira, Joana B; Ríos, Jose; Ibarretxe-Bilbao, Naroa; Junqué, Carme; Bargalló, Núria; Cámara, Ana; Buongiorno, Mariateresa; Fernández, Manel; Pont-Sunyer, Claustre; Martí, Maria J

    2013-08-01

    Neuropsychological (mostly posterior-cortical) deficits, quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) atrophy patterns, and low cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of amyloid-β have been separately related to worsening cognition in Parkinson's disease (PD). However, these biomarkers have not been longitudinally assessed in combination as PD-dementia predictors. In this prospective longitudinal study, 27 non-demented PD patients underwent CSF, neuropsychological and 3-T brain-MRI studies at baseline and were re-assessed 18 months later in terms of progression to dementia (primary outcome) and longitudinal neuropsychological and cortical thickness changes (secondary outcomes). At follow-up 11 patients (41%) had progressed to dementia. Lower CSF amyloid-β, worse verbal learning, semantic fluency and visuoperceptual scores, and thinner superior-frontal/anterior cingulate and precentral regions were significant baseline dementia predictors in binary logistic regressions as quantitative and/or dichotomised traits. All participants without baseline biomarker abnormalities remained non-demented whereas all with abnormalities in each biomarker type progressed to dementia, with intermediate risk for those showing abnormalities in a single to two biomarker types (p = 0.006). Both the dementia-outcome and low baseline CSF amyloid-β were prospectively associated with limbic and posterior-cortical neuropsychological decline and frontal, limbic and posterior-cortical thinning from baseline to follow-up. These findings suggest that the combination of CSF amyloid-β, neuropsychological and cortical thickness biomarkers might provide a basis for dementia-risk stratification and progression monitoring in PD.

  11. Cancer Biomarkers

    OpenAIRE

    Kamel, Hala Fawzy Mohamed; Al-Amodi, Hiba Saeed Bagader

    2016-01-01

    Biomarkers have many potential applications in oncology, including risk assessment, screening, differential diagnosis, determination of prognosis, prediction of response to treatment, and monitoring of progression of disease. Because of the critical role that biomarkers play at all stages of disease, it is important that they undergo rigorous evaluation, including analytical validation, clinical validation, and assessment of clinical utility, prior to incorporation into routine clinical care....

  12. Early cost-utility analysis of general and cerebrospinal fluid-specific Alzheimer's disease biomarkers for hypothetical disease-modifying treatment decision in mild cognitive impairment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Handels, Ron L. H.; Joore, Manuela A.; Tran-Duy, An; Wimo, Anders; Wolfs, Claire A. G.; Verhey, Frans R. J.; Severens, Johan L.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The study aimed to determine the room for improvement of a perfect cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarker and the societal incremental net monetary benefit of CSF in subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) assuming a hypothetical disease-modifying Alzheimer's disease (AD) treatment.

  13. Comparison of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) toluidine red unheated serum test and the CSF rapid plasma reagin test with the CSF venereal disease research laboratory test for diagnosis of neurosyphilis among HIV-negative syphilis patients in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lin; Gu, Xin; Peng, Rui-Rui; Wang, Cuini; Gao, Zixiao; Zhou, Pingyu; Gao, Ying; Shi, Mei; Guan, Zhifang; Seña, Arlene C

    2014-03-01

    In this study, we aimed to investigate the performance of nontreponemal antibody tests in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) specimens from syphilis patients. From September 2009 to September 2012, CSF specimens were collected at the Shanghai Skin Disease Hospital in Shanghai, China, from 1,132 syphilis patients without HIV infection, including 154 with symptomatic and 56 with asymptomatic neurosyphilis. All of the CSF specimens underwent testing with a rapid plasma reagin (RPR) test, an RPR-V (commercial RPR antigen diluted 1:2 in 10% saline) test, the toluidine red unheated serum test (TRUST), and the Venereal Disease Research Laboratory (VDRL) test. Specificities, sensitivities, positive predictive values (PPVs), negative predictive values (NPVs), and kappa values were calculated to determine the performances of the tests. We compared results of the CSF-VDRL, CSF-RPR, CSF-RPR-V, and CSF-TRUST among patients with symptomatic and asymptomatic neurosyphilis who had reactive CSF-Treponema pallidum particle agglutination (TPPA) test results. Overall, the CSF-VDRL test was reactive in 261 patients (23.1%). There were no cases in which the CSF-VDRL was nonreactive and CSF-RPR, CSF-RPR-V, or CSF-TRUST was reactive. Agreement between the results of CSF-TRUST and CSF-RPR was almost perfect (κ=0.861), with substantial agreement between the results of CSF-RPR and CSF-RPR-V (κ=0.740). The sensitivities of CSF-VDRL, CSF-RPR, CSF-RPR-V, and CSF-TRUST were 81.4%, 76.2%, 79.5%, and 76.2%, respectively. Compared to CSF-VDRL, CSF-RPR, CSF-RPR-V, and CSF-TRUST had comparable PPVs and NPVs. However, the specificity of CSF-VDRL (90.3%) was significantly lower than those of the other tests (92.7 to 93.4%). Therefore, CSF-RPR, CSF-RPR-V, and CSF-TRUST can be considered alternative tests for neurosyphilis diagnosis in HIV-negative populations, particularly when the CSF-VDRL is not available.

  14. Cerebrospinal fluid neopterin: an informative biomarker of central nervous system immune activation in HIV-1 infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bestetti Arabella

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract HIV-1 invades the central nervous system (CNS in the context of acute infection, persists thereafter in the absence of treatment, and leads to chronic intrathecal immunoactivation that can be measured by the macrophage activation marker, neopterin, in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF. In this review we describe our experience with CSF neopterin measurements in 382 untreated HIV-infected patients across the spectrum of immunosuppression and HIV-related neurological diseases, in 73 untreated AIDS patients with opportunistic CNS infections, and in 233 treated patients. In untreated patients, CSF neopterin concentrations are almost always elevated and increase progressively as immunosuppression worsens and blood CD4 cell counts fall. However, patients with HIV dementia exhibit particularly high CSF neopterin concentrations, above those of patients without neurological disease, though patients with CNS opportunistic infections, including CMV encephalitis and cryptococcal meningitis, also exhibit high levels of CSF neopterin. Combination antiretroviral therapy, with its potent effect on CNS HIV infection and CSF HIV RNA, mitigates both intrathecal immunoactivation and lowers CSF neopterin. However, despite suppression of plasma and CSF HIV RNA to below the detection limits of clinical assays ( Although nonspecific, CSF neopterin can serve as a useful biomarker in the diagnosis of HIV dementia in the setting of confounding conditions, in monitoring the CNS inflammatory effects of antiretroviral treatment, and give valuable information to the cause of ongoing brain injury.

  15. Characterization of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and plasma NPY levels in normal volunteers over a 24-h timeframe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Dewleen G; Bertram, Tobias Moeller; Patel, Piyush M; Barkauskas, Donald A; Clopton, Paul; Patel, Sejal; Geracioti, Thomas D; Haji, Uzair; O'Connor, Daniel T; Nievergelt, Caroline M; Hauger, Richard L

    2013-10-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is abundant in mammals, where it contributes to diverse behavioral and physiological functions, centrally and peripherally, but little information is available in regard to NPY cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)/plasma concentration relationships and dynamics. Since plasma NPY levels are commonly used as proxy "biomarkers" for central NPY activity in stress and mental health research in humans this study aims to better characterize the CSF/plasma NPY relationships. Subjects were eleven healthy male volunteers, admitted to the clinical research center for placement of an indwelling CSF catheter, as well as venous catheter, for 24-h collection of CSF NPY (cNPY) and plasma NPY (pNPY) samples. As observed in prior studies, group mean (SE) cNPY concentrations [792.1 (7.80) pg/mL] were higher than pNPY concentrations [220.0 (3.63) pg/mL]. For the eleven normal volunteers who had sufficient common (hourly) pNPY and cNPY data points, analysis of pNPY/cNPY concentration ratios and lagged cross-correlation analysis was completed. Average pNPY/cNPY concentration ratios ranged from .20 to .40 across study subjects, with a mean of .29. pNPY/cNPY cross correlation analyses, computed at varying time lags, were non-significant. An attempt was made to analyze the circadian rhythmicity of NPY secretion, but circadian components were not detectable. Using 24-h data collection, we characterized CSF/plasma NPY relationships, including presentation of evidence of weak CSF and plasma correlations, an important consideration for study design of NPY in stress or mental health.

  16. Does serum uric acid act as a modulator of cerebrospinal fluid Alzheimer's disease biomarker related cognitive decline?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, B S; Lee, W W; Ham, J H; Lee, J J; Lee, P H; Sohn, Y H

    2016-05-01

    The association of serum uric acid, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and longitudinal cognitive decline was evaluated using the AD Neuroimaging Initiative database. In 271 healthy subjects, 596 mild cognitive impairment patients and 197 AD patients, serum uric acid and CSF AD biomarkers were measured at baseline, and Mini-Mental State Examination and AD Assessment Scale - Cognitive Subscale (ADAS-cog) were assessed serially (mean duration, 2.9 years). The effect of uric acid on longitudinal cognitive decline was evaluated using linear mixed effect models for Mini-Mental State Examination and ADAS-cog scores in female and male subjects separately, with possible confounders controlled (model 1). To determine the effects of uric acid independent of CSF biomarker (Aβ1-42 or tau) and to test whether the detrimental effects of CSF biomarker differ according to uric acid, CSF biomarker and its interaction with uric acid were further included in model 1 (model 2). Higher levels of uric acid were associated with slower cognitive decline, particularly in the mild cognitive impairment and dementia subgroups, and more prominently in female subjects. Model 2 with CSF Aβ1-42 showed that higher levels of uric acid were associated with a slower cognitive decline and alleviated the detrimental effect of Aβ1-42 on cognitive decline. Model 2 with CSF tau showed that higher levels of uric acid alleviated the detrimental effect of tau on cognitive decline in female subjects but not in male subjects. Higher levels of uric acid had protective effects on longitudinal cognitive decline independent of and interactively with CSF AD biomarkers. © 2016 EAN.

  17. GRANULOCYTE COLONY-STIMULATING FACTOR (G-CSF) UPREGULATES β1 INTEGRIN AND INCREASES MIGRATION OF HUMAN TROPHOBLAST SWAN 71 CELLS VIA PI3K AND MAPK ACTIVATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furmento, Verónica A.; Marino, Julieta; Blank, Viviana C.; Cayrol, María Florencia; Cremaschi, Graciela A.; Aguilar, Rubén C.; Roguin, Leonor P.

    2017-01-01

    Multiple cytokines and growth factors expressed at the fetal-maternal interface are involved in the regulation of trophoblast functions and placental growth, but the role of G-CSF has not been completely established. Based on our previous study showing that G-CSF increases the activity of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and the release of vascular endothelial growth factor in Swan 71 human trophoblast cells, in this work we explore the possible contribution of G-CSF to cell migration and the G-CSF-triggered signaling pathway. We found that G-CSF induced morphological changes on actin cytoskeleton consistent with a migratory cell phenotype. G-CSF also up-regulated the expression levels of β1 integrin and promoted Swan 71 cell migration. By using selective pharmacological inhibitors and dominant negative mutants we showed that PI3K, Erk 1/2 and p38 pathways are required for promoting Swan 71 cell motility. It was also demonstrated that PI3K behaved as an upstream regulator of Erk 1/2 and p38 MAPK. In addition, the increase of β1 integrin expression was dependent on PI3K activation. In conclusion, our results indicate that G-CSF stimulates β1 integrin expression and Swan 71 cell migration by activating PI3K and MAPK signaling pathways, suggesting that G-CSF should be considered as an additional regulatory factor that contributes to a successful embryo implantation and to the placenta development. PMID:26992288

  18. Biomarkers of Guillain-Barré Syndrome: Some Recent Progress, More Still to Be Explored

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS, the axonal subtype of which is mainly triggered by C. jejuni with ganglioside-mimicking lipooligosaccharides (LOS, is an immune-mediated disorder in the peripheral nervous system (PNS accompanied by the disruption of the blood-nerve barrier (BNB and the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier (B-CSF-B. Biomarkers of GBS have been extensively explored and some of them are proved to assist in the clinical diagnosis and in monitoring disease progression as well as in assessing the efficacy of immunotherapy. Herein, we systemically review the literature on biomarkers of GBS, including infection-/immune-/BNB, B-CSF-B, and PNS damage-associated biomarkers, aiming at providing an overview of GBS biomarkers and guiding further investigations. Furthermore, we point out further directions for studies on GBS biomarkers.

  19. Decreased IL-8 levels in CSF and serum of AD patients and negative correlation of MMSE and IL-1β.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesse, Raphael; Wahler, Anke; Gummert, Pauline; Kirschmer, Stefanie; Otto, Markus; Tumani, Hayrettin; Lewerenz, Jan; Schnack, Cathrin; von Arnim, Christine A F

    2016-09-26

    It is widely accepted that neuroinflammatory processes play an important role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and high levels of cytokines and chemokines are detected around Aβ plaques. As neuroinflammation is involved in the development and progression of AD, we measured the pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin 1β (IL-1β), IL-8 and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) in serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from 45 AD patients and 53 age-matched control subjects using a highly sensitive multiplex electrochemiluminescence assay. To address the association with disease progression we correlated cognitive status with cytokine levels. CSF as well as serum IL-8 levels were found to be significantly lower in AD patients than in controls (p = 0.02). A statistically significant inverse correlation was observed between the CSF level of IL-1β and the MMSE score (rs = -0.03, p = 0.02). We therefore stratified the AD patients by their MMSE scores into three equal groups and found that in the AD group with the most severe cognitive impairment CSF-IL-1β was significantly increased compared to age-matched controls (p < 0.05), whereas in the other investigated groups the increase was not statistically significant. Our results confirm data suggesting that cytokine alterations are involved in AD pathogenesis and may be helpful as a biomarker for monitoring disease progression.

  20. The use of biomarkers for the etiologic diagnosis of MCI in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bocchetta, Martina; Galluzzi, Samantha; Kehoe, Patrick Gavin

    2015-01-01

    usefulness of markers of brain amyloidosis (amyloid positron emission tomography [PET], cerebrospinal fluid [CSF] Aβ42) and neurodegeneration (medial temporal atrophy [MTA] on MR, fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography [FDG-PET], CSF tau). The most frequently used biomarker is visually rated MTA (75......% of the 37 responders reported using it "always/frequently") followed by CSF markers (22%), FDG-PET (16%), and amyloid-PET (3%). Only 45% of responders perceive MTA as contributing to diagnostic confidence, where the contribution was rated as "moderate". Seventy-nine percent of responders felt "very...

  1. CSF-endorphines in acute and chronic brain lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamel, E

    1988-01-01

    In order to answer the question of an opioid influence on consciousness, a radio-immuno-assay (n = 852) of beta-endorphin and beta-LPH (beta-lipotropic hormone) in both ventricular CSF and blood plasma was carried out in 101 neurosurgical patients. The following results were obtained: I) beta-END and beta-LPH levels were found to be lower in the CSF than in blood plasma. II) beta-END and beta-LPH in the CSF was the same in both sexes. III) beta-END levels in the CSF decreased with age. IV) beta-END and beta-LPH levels showed a diurnal rhythm with a maximum in the late a. m. hours. V) beta-END levels in the ventricular CSF tend to decrease parallel to a drop in conciousness as well as with longlasting comatous states. VI) beta-END in ventricular CSF becomes higher with increasing systolic arterial blood pressure. VII) beta-END and beta-LPH levels in ventricular CSF are not correlated with the type of the disease, CSF pressure, body temperature or respiratory changes.

  2. Comprehensive Soldier Fitness (CSF) Experiment: Research Biases in the Development of the CSF

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-13

    and teens can compare, and ultimately be transposed through the CSF, to developing resiliency of deployed Soldiers in combat zones. These studies...added pressure of a shortened development time may contribute to unintended biases or unmitigated biases. This study will look at all of their...units. They recommended that the units designate proponents to manage the suicide prevention program, maintain vigilance by leaders and Soldier peers

  3. Stem Cell Mobilization with G-CSF versus Cyclophosphamide plus G-CSF in Mexican Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Eugenio Vázquez Meraz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fifty-six aphaereses were performed in 23 pediatric patients with malignant hematological and solid tumors, following three different protocols for PBPC mobilization and distributed as follows: A: seventeen mobilized with 4 g/m2 of cyclophosphamide (CFA and 10 μg/kg/day of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF, B: nineteen with CFA + G-CSF, and C: twenty only with G-CSF when the WBC count exceeded 10 × 109/L. The average number of MNC/kg body weight (BW/aphaeresis was 0.4 × 108 (0.1–1.4, 2.25 × 108 (0.56–6.28, and 1.02 × 108 (0.34–2.5 whereas the average number of CD34+ cells/kg BW/aphaeresis was 0.18 × 106/kg (0.09–0.34, 1.04 × 106 (0.19–9.3, and 0.59 × 106 (0.17–0.87 and the count of CFU/kg BW/aphaeresis was 1.11 × 105 (0.31–2.12, 1.16 × 105 (0.64–2.97, and 1.12 × 105 (0.3–6.63 in groups A, B, and C, respectively. The collection was better in group B versus group A (p=0.007 and p=0.05, resp. and in group C versus group A (p=0.08 and p=0.05, resp.. The collection of PBPCs was more effective in the group mobilized with CFM + G-CSF when the WBC exceeded 10 × 103/μL in terms of MNC and CD34+ cells and there was no toxicity of the chemotherapy.

  4. Biomarker-based dissection of neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Bob; Zetterberg, Henrik; Hampel, Harald; Blennow, Kaj

    2011-12-01

    The diagnosis of neurodegenerative diseases within neurology and psychiatry are hampered by the difficulty in getting biopsies and thereby validating the diagnosis by pathological findings. Biomarkers for other types of disease have been readily adopted into the clinical practice where for instance troponins are standard tests when myocardial infarction is suspected. However, the use of biomarkers for neurodegeneration has not been fully incorporated into the clinical routine. With the development of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers that reflect pathological events within the central nervous system (CNS), important clinical diagnostic tools are becoming available. This review summarizes the most promising biomarker candidates that may be used to monitor different types of neurodegeneration and protein inclusions, as well as different types of metabolic changes, in living patients in relation to the clinical phenotype and disease progression over time. Our aim is to provide the reader with an updated lexicon on currently available biomarker candidates, how far they have come in development and how well they reflect pathogenic processes in different neurodegenerative diseases. Biomarkers for specific pathogenetic processes would also be valuable tools both to study disease pathogenesis directly in patients and to identify and monitor the effect of novel treatment strategies.

  5. Human autologous in vitro models of glioma immunogene therapy using B7-2, GM-CSF, and IL12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parney, I.F.; Farr-Jones, M.A. [Univ. of Alberta, Div. of Neurosurgery, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Kane, K.; Chang, L.-J. [Univ. of Alberta, Dept. of Surgery and Dept. of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Petruk, K.C. [Univ. of Alberta, Div. of Neurosurgery, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)

    2002-08-01

    Cancer immunogene therapy is based on vaccination with radiated, autologous tumor cells transduced with immunostimulatory genes. To help determine an optimal glioma immunogene therapy strategy, we stimulated lymphocytes with autologous human glioma cells transduced with B7-2 (CD86), granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and/or interleukin-12 (IL12). A human glioma-derived cell culture (Ed147.BT) was transduced with B7-2, GM-CSF, and/or IL12 using retroviral vectors. Autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were co-cultured with irradiated gene-transduced tumor alone or a combination of radiated wild type and gene-transduced cells. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells proliferation was determined by serial cell counts. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells phenotype was assessed by flow cytometry for CD4, CD8, and CD16. Anti-tumor cytotoxicity was determined by chromium-51 ({sup 51}Cr) release assay. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells cell numbers all decreased during primary stimulation but tumor cells expressing B7-2 or GM-CSF consistently caused secondary proliferation. Tumors expressing B7-2 and GM-CSF or B7-2,GM-CSF,and IL12 consistently increased PBMC CD8+ (cytotoxic T) and CD16+ (natural killer) percentages. Interestingly, anti-tumor cytotoxicity only exceeded that of PBMC stimulated with wild type tumor alone when peripheral blood mononuclear cells were stimulated with both wild type tumor and B7-2/GM-CSF- (but not IL12) transduced cells. PBMC proliferation and phenotype is altered as expected by exposure to immunostimulatory gene-transduced tumor. However, transduced tumor cells alone do not stimulate greater anti-tumor cytotoxicity than wild type tumor. Only B7-2/GM-CSF-transduced cells combined with wild type produced increased cytotoxicity. This may reflect selection of turnor subclones with limited antigenic spectra during retrovirus-mediated gene transfer. (author)

  6. EXPRESSION OF RHGM-CSF GENE IN EUKARYOCYTE BY LIPOFECTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    objective: To recombinant the nearly natural humangranulocyte-macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) for supplying more safe and steady expressed cytokine in clinic. Method: The eukaryotic recombinant pcDNA3.1-GM-CSF plasmid which was controlled by the CMV promoter was transferred into CHO cell by lipofectamine, selected by G418 and the positive clones was got. The recombinant vector which was rejoined into the groups of DNA of CHO was identified by PCR. Results: The results showed that the protein of rhGM-CSF was about 28 KD by using ELISA, SDS-PAGE and Western blot. Conclusion: rhGM-CSF was expressed steadily and highly. The rhGM-CSF will be of more use value.

  7. Low CSF oxytocin reflects high intent in suicide attempters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokinen, Jussi; Chatzittofis, Andreas; Hellström, Christer; Nordström, Peter; Uvnäs-Moberg, Kerstin; Asberg, Marie

    2012-04-01

    Data from animal studies suggest that oxytocin is an important modulating neuropeptide in regulation of social interaction. One human study has reported a negative correlation between CSF oxytocin levels, life history of aggression and suicidal behaviour. We hypothesized that CSF oxytocin levels would be related to suicidal behaviour, suicide intent, lifetime interpersonal violence and suicide risk. 28 medication free suicide attempters and 19 healthy volunteers participated in this cross sectional and longitudinal study. CSF and plasma morning basal levels of oxytocin were assessed with specific radio-immunoassays. The Beck Suicide Intent Scale (SIS), the Freeman scale and the Karolinska Interpersonal Violence Scale (KIVS) were used to assess suicide intent and lifetime violent behaviour. All patients were followed up for cause of death. The mean follow-up was 21 years. Suicide attempters had lower CSF oxytocin levels compared to healthy volunteers p=0.077. In suicide attempters CSF oxytocin showed a significant negative correlation with the planning subscale of SIS. CSF oxytocin showed a significant negative correlation with suicide intent, the planning subscale of SIS and Freeman interruption probability in male suicide attempters. Correlations between plasma oxytocin levels and the planning subscale of SIS and Freeman interruption probability were significant in male suicide attempters. Lifetime violent behaviour showed a trend to negative correlation with CSF oxytocin. In the regression analysis suicide intent remained a significant predictor of CSF oxytocin corrected for age and gender whereas lifetime violent behaviour showed a trend to be a predictor of CSF oxytocin. Oxytocin levels did not differ significantly in suicide victims compared to survivors. CSF oxytocin may be an important modulator of suicide intent and interpersonal violence in suicide attempters.

  8. Baseline CSF p-tau levels independently predict progression of hippocampal atrophy in Alzheimer disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henneman, W J.P.; Vrenken, H; Barnes, J; Sluimer, I C.; Verwey, N A.; Blankenstein, M A.; Klein, M; Fox, N C.; Scheltens, P; Barkhof, F; van der Flier, W M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether baseline CSF biomarkers are associated with hippocampal atrophy rate as a measure of disease progression in patients with Alzheimer disease (AD), patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and controls, controlling for baseline neuropsychological and MRI findings. Methods: We assessed data from 31 patients with AD, 25 patients with MCI, and 19 controls (mean age 68 ± 8 years; 39 [52%] female) who visited our memory clinic and had received serial MRI scanning (scan interval 1.7 ± 0.7 years). At baseline, CSF biomarkers (amyloid β 1-42, tau, and tau phosphorylated at threonine 181 [p-tau]) were obtained, as well as neuropsychological data. Baseline MRI scans were assessed using visual rating scales for medial temporal lobe atrophy (MTA), global cortical atrophy, and white matter hyperintensities. Hippocampal atrophy rates were estimated using regional nonlinear “fluid” registration of follow-up scan to baseline scan. Results: Stepwise multiple linear regression, adjusted for age and sex, showed that increased CSF p-tau levels (β [standard error]: −0.79 [0.35]) at baseline was independently associated with higher subsequent hippocampal atrophy rates (p < 0.05), together with poorer memory performance (0.09 [0.04]) and more severe MTA (−0.60 [0.21]). The association of memory function with hippocampal atrophy rate was explained by the link with diagnosis, because it disappeared from the model after we additionally corrected for diagnosis. Conclusions: Baseline CSF levels of tau phosphorylated at threonine 181 are independently associated with subsequent disease progression, as reflected by hippocampal atrophy rate. This effect is independent of baseline neuropsychological and MRI predictors. Our results imply that predicting disease progression can best be achieved by combining information from different modalities. GLOSSARY Aβ1-42 = amyloid β 1-42; AD = Alzheimer disease; FOV = field of view; GCA = global cortical

  9. Investigation of Tear Biomarkers as an Indicator of Human Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Stephen; Tucker, Bethany; Crucian, Brian; Steinberg, Susan; Hagan, Suzanne

    2017-01-01

    Scientific literature suggests that tear biomarkers can be used as a guide towards clinical diagnosis of human health (Hagan et al., 2016). This study will investigate whether tear biomarkers represents a research and clinical opportunity to assess human health prior to, during, and after exposure to the spaceflight environment. The focus of this study is to compare biomarkers previously identified as potentially relevant to both ocular and brain health against unique physiological outcomes of exposure to the space flight environment. Study subjects suffering from terrestrial conditions thought to be similar to Spaceflight Associated Neuro-ocular Syndrome (SANS: formerly VIIP), e.g. patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) and optic neuritis may be relevant to conditions associated with spaceflight. This study will review methodologies, tear biomarkers related to state of ocular and brain health, the strengths and weakness of using tear fluid biomarkers versus other body fluid samples, and will survey current tear fluid biomarker knowledge in research and clinical practice. A strength of using tear biomarkers is that sampling is non-invasive and used as a guide in understanding pathologies, including ocular and systemic inflammatory conditions (Cocho et al., 2016)., Salvisberg et al., 2014). Moreover, tear biomarkers may reflect diseases affecting the central nervous system (CNS) (Salvisberg et al., 2014). For example, in multiple sclerosis (MS), the concordance rate between tear biomarkers versus cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is approximately 83%, indicating that, in the majority of cases, tears are at least as effective as CSF in potentially identifying novel MS biomarkers (Devos et al., 2001).

  10. Acute CSF interleukin-6 trajectories after TBI: associations with neuroinflammation, polytrauma, and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, R G; Diamond, M L; Boles, J A; Berger, R P; Tisherman, S A; Kochanek, P M; Wagner, A K

    2015-03-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) results in a significant inflammatory burden that perpetuates the production of inflammatory mediators and biomarkers. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is a pro-inflammatory cytokine known to be elevated after trauma, and a major contributor to the inflammatory response following TBI. Previous studies have investigated associations between IL-6 and outcome following TBI, but to date, studies have been inconsistent in their conclusions. We hypothesized that cohort heterogeneity, temporal inflammatory profiles, and concurrent inflammatory marker associations are critical to characterize when targeting subpopulations for anti-inflammatory therapies. Toward this objective, we used serial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples to generate temporal acute IL-6 trajectory (TRAJ) profiles in a prospective cohort of adults with severe TBI (n=114). We examined the impact of injury type on IL-6 profiles, and how IL-6 profiles impact sub-acute (2weeks-3months) serum inflammatory marker load and long-term global outcome 6-12months post-injury. There were two distinct acute CSF IL-6 profiles, a high and low TRAJ group. Individuals in the high TRAJ had increased odds of unfavorable Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) scores at 6months (adjusted OR=3.436, 95% CI: 1.259, 9.380). Individuals in the high TRAJ also had higher mean acute CSF inflammatory load compared to individuals in the low TRAJ (p⩽0.05). The two groups did not differ with respect acute serum profiles; however, individuals in the high CSF IL-6 TRAJ also had higher mean sub-acute serum IL-1β and IL-6 levels compared with the low TRAJ group (p⩽0.05). Lastly, injury type (isolated TBI vs. TBI+polytrauma) was associated with IL-6 TRAJ group (χ(2)=5.31, p=0.02). Specifically, there was 70% concordance between those with TBI+polytrauma and the low TRAJ; in contrast, isolated TBI was similarly distributed between TRAJ groups. These data provide evidence that sustained, elevated levels of CSF IL-6 are associated

  11. Imaging Biomarkers or Biomarker Imaging?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Mitterhauser

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Since biomarker imaging is traditionally understood as imaging of molecular probes, we highly recommend to avoid any confusion with the previously defined term “imaging biomarkers” and, therefore, only use “molecular probe imaging (MPI” in that context. Molecular probes (MPs comprise all kinds of molecules administered to an organism which inherently carry a signalling moiety. This review highlights the basic concepts and differences of molecular probe imaging using specific biomarkers. In particular, PET radiopharmaceuticals are discussed in more detail. Specific radiochemical and radiopharmacological aspects as well as some legal issues are presented.

  12. Cerebrospinal fluid lactate: a differential biomarker for bacterial and viral meningitis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazir, Mudasir; Wani, Wasim Ahmad; Malik, Muzaffar Ahmad; Mir, Mohd Rafiq; Ashraf, Younis; Kawoosa, Khalid; Ali, Syed Wajid

    2017-08-30

    To assess the performance of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) lactate as a biomarker to differentiate bacterial meningitis from viral meningitis in children, and to define an optimal CSF lactate concentration that can be called significant for the differentiation. Children with clinical findings compatible with meningitis were studied. CSF lactate and other conventional CSF parameters were recorded. At a cut-off value of 3mmol/L, CSF lactate had a sensitivity of 0.90, specificity of 1.0, positive predictive value of 1.0, and negative predictive value of 0.963, with an accuracy of 0.972. The positive and negative likelihood ratios were 23.6 and 0.1, respectively. When comparing between bacterial and viral meningitis, the area under the curve for CSF lactate was 0.979. The authors concluded that CSF lactate has high sensitivity and specificity in differentiating bacterial from viral meningitis. While at a cut-off value of 3mmol/L, CSF lactate has high diagnostic accuracy for bacterial meningitis, mean levels in viral meningitis remain essentially below 2mmol/L. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  13. Biomarkers in translational research of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarawneh, Rawan; Holtzman, David M

    2010-01-01

    The identification and characterization of amyloid-beta (Abeta) and tau as the main pathological substrates of Alzheimer's disease (AD) have driven many efforts in search for suitable biomarkers for AD. In the last decade, research in this area has focused on developing a better understanding of the principles that govern protein deposition, mechanisms that link aggregation to toxicity and neuronal death, and a better understanding of protein dynamics in brain tissue, interstitial fluid and CSF. While Abeta and tau represent the two key pathological mediators of disease, other aspects of this multifaceted disease (e.g. oxidative stress, calcium-mediated toxicity, and neuroinflammation) are being unraveled, with the hope to develop a more comprehensive approach in exploring disease mechanisms. This has not only expanded possible areas for disease-modifying therapies, but has also allowed the introduction of novel, and potentially useful, fluid and radiological markers for the presence and progression of AD pathology. There is no doubt that the identification of several fluid and imaging biomarkers that can reliably detect the early stages of AD will have great implications in the design of clinical trials, in the selection of homogenous research populations, and in the assessment of disease outcomes. Markers with good diagnostic specificity will aid researchers in differentiating individuals with preclinical and probable AD from individuals who do not have AD pathology or have other dementing disorders. Markers that change with disease progression may offer utility in assessing the rates of disease progression and the efficacy of potential therapeutic agents on AD pathology. For both of these purposes, CSF Abeta42, amyloid imaging, and CSF tau appear to be very good markers of the presence of AD pathology as well as predictive of who will progress from MCI to AD. Volumetric MRI is also good at separating individuals with MCI and AD from controls and is predictive of

  14. Circulating Biomarker Panels in Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafari, Sachli; Backes, Christina; Meese, Eckart; Keller, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The early diagnosis of diseases frequently represents an important unmet clinical need supporting in-time treatment of pathologies. This also applies to neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common form of dementia, estimated to affect millions of individuals worldwide. The respective diagnostic and prognostic markers, especially for the preclinical stages of AD, are expected to improve patients' outcome significantly. In the last decades, many approaches to detecting AD have been developed, including markers to discover changes in amyloid-β levels [from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) or using positron emission tomography] or other brain imaging technologies such as structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), functional-connectivity MRI or task-related functional MRI. A major challenge is the detection of AD using minimally or even noninvasive biomarkers from body fluids such as plasma or serum. Circulating biomarker candidates based on mRNAs or proteins measured from blood cells, plasma or serum have been proposed for various pathologies including AD. As for other diseases, there is a tendency to use marker signatures obtained by high-throughput approaches, which allow the generation of profiles of hundreds to thousands of biomarkers simultaneously [microarrays, mass spectrometry or next-generation sequencing (NGS)]. Beyond mRNAs and proteins, recent approaches have measured small noncoding RNA (so-called microRNA) profiles in AD patients' blood samples using NGS or array-based technologies. Generally, the development of marker panels is in its early stages and requires further, substantial clinical validation. In this review, we provide an overview of different circulating AD biomarkers, starting with a brief summary of CSF markers and focusing on novel biomarker signatures such as small noncoding RNA profiles.

  15. The Search for Biomarkers in Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Meiliana

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: As population demographic shift and the number of individuals with Alzheimer Disease (AD continue to increase, the challenge is to develop targeted, effective treatments and our ability to recognize early symptoms. In view of this, the need for specific AD biomarker is crucial. CONTENT: In recent years it has become evident that CSF concentrations of some brain-specific proteins are related to underlying disease pathogenesis and may therefore aid clinical investigation. Among several, we have focused on three candidates that have been suggested to fulfil the requirements for biomarkers of AD: β-amyloid 42 (Aβ42, total Tau (T-tau and tau phosphorylated at various epitopes (P-tau. An increasing number of studies suggest that supplementary use of these CSF markers, preferably in combination, adds to the accuracy of an AD diagnosis. More recently visinin-like protein (VLP-1, a marker for neuronal cell injury has been studied. CSF VLP-1 concentrations were 50% higher in AD patients than in the control population. SUMMARY: The number of studies aimed at the identification of new biomarkers for AD is expected to increase rapidly, not only because of the increasing insights into the pathological mechanisms underlying this disease, but also because new therapies have been developed or are under consideration now, which warrant an early and specific diagnosis for effective treatment of the patients. KEYWORDS: dementia, amyloid plaque, neurofibrillary tangels, amyloid β-peptide 42 (Aβ42, total tau (T-tau, phosphorylated tau (P-tau, visinin–like protein 1 (VLP-1.

  16. CSF cortisol in Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popp, Julius; Schaper, Karsten; Kölsch, Heike; Cvetanovska, Gabriela; Rommel, Fatima; Klingmüller, Dietrich; Dodel, Richard; Wüllner, Ullrich; Jessen, Frank

    2009-03-01

    Hypercortisolaemia occurs in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and may be involved in the AD related neurodegenerative process. In order to determine whether brain structures are exposed to high cortisol concentrations early in AD, we measured cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cortisol in 66 subjects with AD, 33 subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and 34 control subjects. CSF cortisol concentrations were higher in AD subjects compared to controls (pcortisol in MCI subjects compared with controls suggesting that the increase of CSF cortisol is not an early event in the course of AD.

  17. CSF Ascites: Review of articles and a case presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Pourkhalili

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF ascites is a rare complication after ventriculopritoneal (VP shunts. Most patients have gradual abdominal protrusion without any neurological sign or symptom of shunt malfunction. We presented a girl with posterior third ventricle glioblastoma and acute hydrocephalus who developed increasingly abdominal protrusion one month after VP shunt operation. Ascites fluid examination showed characteristic findings similar to CSF with no evidence of infection or malignant cells. Ventriculo-atrial shunt revision cured patient's ascites. Review articles of patients with CSF ascites after VP shunt were presented in details. Key words: Cerebrospinal fluid, Ascites, Ventriculopritoneal Shunt

  18. CXCL13, CXCL10 and CXCL8 as Potential Biomarkers for the Diagnosis of Neurosyphilis Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cuini; Wu, Kaiqi; Yu, Qian; Zhang, Sufang; Gao, Zixiao; Liu, Yudan; Ni, Liyan; Cheng, Yuanyuan; Guan, Zhifang; Shi, Mei; Lu, Haikong; Lou, Yongliang; Zhou, Pingyu

    2016-01-01

    At present, diagnosis for neurosyphilis remains a major clinical challenge. Venereal Disease Research Laboratory (VDRL) titer of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is suboptimally sensitive to diagnose neurosyphilis, which can be negative in neurosyphilis patients, especially in asymptomatic neurosyphilis patients. In the search for biomarkers of neurosyphilis, we investigated the chemokine profile in CSF of neurosyphilis patients and found that the concentrations of CXCL13, CXCL10 and CXCL8 were selectively elevated in neurosyphilis patients and correlated with CSF protein concentration and CSF-VDRL titer. After antibiotic treatment, the concentration of these chemokines was dramatically reduced. The area under the ROC curve (AUC) of CSF CXCL13, CXCL8,CXCL10 and the CSF/serum ratio of CXCL13, CXCL8,CXCL10 in the diagnosis of neurosyphilis were 0.940, 0.899, 0.915, 0.963, 0.846 and 0.926, respectively. The corresponding sensitivities/specificities of CSF CXCL13, CXCL8,CXCL10 and the CSF/serum ratio of CXCL13, CXCL8,CXCL10 in diagnosis of neurosyphilis were 85.4%/89.1%, 79%/90.1% and 79.6%/91.1%, 86.6%/99%, 79%/73.3% and 86%/92.1%, respectively. Our results suggest that the elevated concentrations of CXCL13, CXCL8, and CXCL10 or their increasing CSF/serum ratios may be potential biomarkers of neurosyphilis, particularly for asymptomatic neurosyphilis. Reduced concentration of these chemokines may indicate the prognosis of antibiotic therapy. PMID:27650493

  19. The NINDS Parkinson’s Disease Biomarkers Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Liana S.; Drake, Daniel; Alcalay, Roy N.; Babcock, Debra; Bowman, F. DuBois; Chen-Plotkin, Alice; Dawson, Ted M.; Dewey, Richard B.; German, Dwight; Huang, Xuemei; Landin, Barry; McAuliffe, Matthew; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Scherzer, Clemens R.; St Hillaire-Clarke, Coryse; Sieber, Beth-Anne; Sutherland, Margaret; Tarn, Chi; West, Andrew; Vaillancourt, David; Zhang, Jing; Gwinn, Katrina

    2015-01-01

    Background Neuroprotection for Parkinson Disease (PD) remains elusive. Biomarkers hold the promise of removing roadblocks to therapy development. The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke has therefore established the Parkinson’s Disease Biomarkers Program to promote discovery of PD biomarkers for use in phase II-III clinical trials. Methods Utilizing a novel consortium design, the Parkinson’s Disease Biomarker Program is focused on the development of clinical and laboratory-based biomarkers for PD diagnosis, progression, and prognosis. Standardized operating procedures and pooled reference samples were created to allow cross-project comparisons and assessment of batch effects. A web-based Data Management Resource facilitates rapid sharing of data and biosamples across the research community for additional biomarker projects. Results Eleven consortium projects are ongoing, seven of which recruit participants and obtain biosamples. As of October 2014, 1082 participants have enrolled (620 PD, 101 with other causes of parkinsonism, 23 essential tremor, and 338 controls), 1040 of whom have at least one biosample. There are 6898 total biosamples from baseline, 6, 12, and 18-month visits: 1006 DNA, 1661 RNA, 1419 whole blood, 1382 plasma, 1200 serum, and 230 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Quality control analysis of plasma, serum, and CSF samples indicates almost all samples are high quality (24 of 2812 samples exceed acceptable hemoglobin levels). Conclusions By making samples and data widely available, using stringent operating procedures based upon existing standards, hypothesis testing for biomarker discovery, and providing a resource which complements existing programs, the Parkinson’s Disease Biomarker Program will accelerate the pace of PD biomarker research. PMID:26442452

  20. Inter-laboratory consistency and variability in the buccal micronucleus cytome assay depends on biomarker scored and laboratory experience: results from the HUMNxl international inter-laboratory scoring exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolognesi, Claudia; Knasmueller, Siegfried; Nersesyan, Armen; Roggieri, Paola; Ceppi, Marcello; Bruzzone, Marco; Blaszczyk, Ewa; Mielzynska-Svach, Danuta; Milic, Mirta; Bonassi, Stefano; Benedetti, Danieli; Da Silva, Juliana; Toledo, Raphael; Salvadori, Daisy Maria Fávero; Groot de Restrepo, Helena; Filipic, Metka; Hercog, Klara; Aktas, Ayça; Burgaz, Sema; Kundi, Michael; Grummt, Tamara; Thomas, Philip; Hor, Maryam; Escudero-Fung, Maria; Holland, Nina; Fenech, Michael

    2017-03-01

    The buccal micronucleus cytome (BMNcyt) assay in uncultured exfoliated epithelial cells from oral mucosa is widely applied in biomonitoring human exposures to genotoxic agents and is also proposed as a suitable test for prescreening and follow-up of precancerous oral lesions. The main limitation of the assay is the large variability observed in the baseline values of micronuclei (MNi) and other nuclear anomalies mainly related to different scoring criteria. The aim of this international collaborative study, involving laboratories with different level of experience, was to evaluate the inter- and intra-laboratory variations in the BMNcyt parameters, using recently implemented guidelines, in scoring cells from the same pooled samples obtained from healthy subjects (control group) and from cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy (treated group). The results indicate that all laboratories correctly discriminated samples from the two groups by a significant increase of micronucleus (MN) and nuclear bud (NBUD) frequencies and differentiated binucleated (BN) cells, associated with the exposure to ionizing radiation. The experience of the laboratories was shown to play an important role in the identification of the different cell types and nuclear anomalies. MN frequency in differentiated mononucleated (MONO) and BN cells showed the greatest consistency among the laboratories and low variability was also detected in the frequencies of MONO and BN cells. A larger variability was observed in classifying the different cell types, indicating the subjectivity in the interpretation of some of the scoring criteria while reproducibility of the results between scoring sessions was very good. An inter-laboratory calibration exercise is strongly recommended before starting studies with BMNcyt assay involving multiple research centers. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the UK Environmental Mutagen Society. All rights reserved. For permissions

  1. Automated quantification of cerebral edema following hemispheric infarction: Application of a machine-learning algorithm to evaluate CSF shifts on serial head CTs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yasheng; Dhar, Rajat; Heitsch, Laura; Ford, Andria; Fernandez-Cadenas, Israel; Carrera, Caty; Montaner, Joan; Lin, Weili; Shen, Dinggang; An, Hongyu; Lee, Jin-Moo

    2016-01-01

    Although cerebral edema is a major cause of death and deterioration following hemispheric stroke, there remains no validated biomarker that captures the full spectrum of this critical complication. We recently demonstrated that reduction in intracranial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) volume (∆ CSF) on serial computed tomography (CT) scans provides an accurate measure of cerebral edema severity, which may aid in early triaging of stroke patients for craniectomy. However, application of such a volumetric approach would be too cumbersome to perform manually on serial scans in a real-world setting. We developed and validated an automated technique for CSF segmentation via integration of random forest (RF) based machine learning with geodesic active contour (GAC) segmentation. The proposed RF + GAC approach was compared to conventional Hounsfield Unit (HU) thresholding and RF segmentation methods using Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) and the correlation of volumetric measurements, with manual delineation serving as the ground truth. CSF spaces were outlined on scans performed at baseline (line of identity in RF + GAC. When we applied the algorithm trained from images of one stroke center to segment CTs from another center, similar findings held. In conclusion, we have developed and validated an accurate automated approach to segment CSF and calculate its shifts on serial CT scans. This algorithm will allow us to efficiently and accurately measure the evolution of cerebral edema in future studies including large multi-site patient populations.

  2. Oral Fluids that Detect Cardiovascular Disease Biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Joseph D.; Sneed, J. Darrell; Steinhubl, Steven R; Kolasa, Justin; Ebersole, Jeffrey L.; Lin, Yushun; Kryscio, Richard J.; McDevitt, John T.; Campbell, Charles L.; Miller, Craig S.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the utility of oral fluids for assessment of coronary and cardiovascular (CVD) health. Study Design Twenty-nine patients with pre-existing CVD disease underwent an invasive cardiac procedure (alcohol septal ablation or percutaneous coronary intervention) and provided unstimulated whole saliva (UWS), sublingual swabs (LS), gingival swabs (GS) and serum at 0, 8, 16, 24, 48 hr. Concentrations of 13 relevant biomarkers were determined and correlated with levels in serum and the oral fluids. Results Concentrations of the majority of biomarkers were higher in UWS than LS and GS. Coronary and CVD disease biomarkers in UWS correlated better with serum than LS and GS based on group status and measures of time effect. Seven biomarkers demonstrated time effect changes consistent with serum biomarkers, including C-reactive protein and troponin I. Conclusions Changes in serum biomarker profiles are reflected in oral fluids suggesting that oral fluid biomarkers could aid in the assessment of cardiac ischemia/necrosis. PMID:22769406

  3. A/T/N: An unbiased descriptive classification scheme for Alzheimer disease biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, David A.; Blennow, Kaj; Carrillo, Maria C.; Feldman, Howard H.; Frisoni, Giovanni B.; Hampel, Harald; Jagust, William J.; Johnson, Keith A.; Knopman, David S.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Scheltens, Philip; Sperling, Reisa A.; Dubois, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Biomarkers have become an essential component of Alzheimer disease (AD) research and because of the pervasiveness of AD pathology in the elderly, the same biomarkers are used in cognitive aging research. A number of current issues suggest that an unbiased descriptive classification scheme for these biomarkers would be useful. We propose the “A/T/N” system in which 7 major AD biomarkers are divided into 3 binary categories based on the nature of the pathophysiology that each measures. “A” refers to the value of a β-amyloid biomarker (amyloid PET or CSF Aβ42); “T,” the value of a tau biomarker (CSF phospho tau, or tau PET); and “N,” biomarkers of neurodegeneration or neuronal injury ([18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose–PET, structural MRI, or CSF total tau). Each biomarker category is rated as positive or negative. An individual score might appear as A+/T+/N−, or A+/T−/N−, etc. The A/T/N system includes the new modality tau PET. It is agnostic to the temporal ordering of mechanisms underlying AD pathogenesis. It includes all individuals in any population regardless of the mix of biomarker findings and therefore is suited to population studies of cognitive aging. It does not specify disease labels and thus is not a diagnostic classification system. It is a descriptive system for categorizing multidomain biomarker findings at the individual person level in a format that is easy to understand and use. Given the present lack of consensus among AD specialists on terminology across the clinically normal to dementia spectrum, a biomarker classification scheme will have broadest acceptance if it is independent from any one clinically defined diagnostic scheme. PMID:27371494

  4. A/T/N: An unbiased descriptive classification scheme for Alzheimer disease biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack, Clifford R; Bennett, David A; Blennow, Kaj; Carrillo, Maria C; Feldman, Howard H; Frisoni, Giovanni B; Hampel, Harald; Jagust, William J; Johnson, Keith A; Knopman, David S; Petersen, Ronald C; Scheltens, Philip; Sperling, Reisa A; Dubois, Bruno

    2016-08-02

    Biomarkers have become an essential component of Alzheimer disease (AD) research and because of the pervasiveness of AD pathology in the elderly, the same biomarkers are used in cognitive aging research. A number of current issues suggest that an unbiased descriptive classification scheme for these biomarkers would be useful. We propose the "A/T/N" system in which 7 major AD biomarkers are divided into 3 binary categories based on the nature of the pathophysiology that each measures. "A" refers to the value of a β-amyloid biomarker (amyloid PET or CSF Aβ42); "T," the value of a tau biomarker (CSF phospho tau, or tau PET); and "N," biomarkers of neurodegeneration or neuronal injury ([(18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucose-PET, structural MRI, or CSF total tau). Each biomarker category is rated as positive or negative. An individual score might appear as A+/T+/N-, or A+/T-/N-, etc. The A/T/N system includes the new modality tau PET. It is agnostic to the temporal ordering of mechanisms underlying AD pathogenesis. It includes all individuals in any population regardless of the mix of biomarker findings and therefore is suited to population studies of cognitive aging. It does not specify disease labels and thus is not a diagnostic classification system. It is a descriptive system for categorizing multidomain biomarker findings at the individual person level in a format that is easy to understand and use. Given the present lack of consensus among AD specialists on terminology across the clinically normal to dementia spectrum, a biomarker classification scheme will have broadest acceptance if it is independent from any one clinically defined diagnostic scheme.

  5. Effects of bromocriptine on CSF proteins and amines in patients with empty sella syndrome, acromegaly and prolactin producing pituitary adenomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brismar, K; Sidén, A; Werner, S

    1981-01-01

    The effect of the dopamine agonist bromocriptine (5-40 mg/day) on cerebrospinal fluid proteins and amines was studied in 7 hyperprolactinemic patients, 4 with empty sella syndrome and 3 patients with pituitary adenoma. Small as well as high doses of bromocriptine depressed the endogenously formed dopamine, noradrenalin and adrenalin. Five patients initially exhibited changes consistent with slight to marked blood-cerebrospinal-fluid (CSF) barrier disturbances and 5 abnormal CSF-protein fractions. One CSF-protein fraction (isolelectric points (pI) approximately 5.3 pH-units) became more prominent during bromocriptine treatment. Analyses of his fraction indicated that it represented a transferrin component. It is stated that bromocriptine treatment besides affecting amine and trace metal metabolism also affects protein metabolism.

  6. REVIEW Interpretation and value of MR CSF flow studies for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    more specific uses of CSF flow studies is to gain information relating ... phase contrast magnetic resonance (PCMR) capabilities and analysis packages.[6] Imaging .... Note that the black or white signal for systole and diastole or representation.

  7. CSF neurofilament light chain reflects corticospinal tract degeneration in ALS

    OpenAIRE

    Menke, Ricarda A.L.; Gray, Elizabeth; Lu, Ching-Hua; Kuhle, Jens; Talbot, Kevin; Malaspina, Andrea; Turner, Martin R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is sensitive to white matter tract pathology. A core signature involving the corticospinal tracts (CSTs) has been identified in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Raised neurofilament light chain protein (NfL) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is thought to reflect axonal damage in a range of neurological disorders. The relationship between these two measures was explored. Methods CSF and serum NfL concentrations and DTI acquired at 3?Tesla on the same da...

  8. CSF ascites : a rare complication of ventriculoperitoneal shunt surgery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chidambaram B

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available CSF ascites is a very rare complication of ventriculoperitoneal (VP shunt procedure. No definite explanation has been offered for the inability of the peritoneum to absorb the CSF. Two children who underwent VP shunting for hydrocephalus, presented with ascites 3 (1/2 years and 4 months respectively, after the shunt was placed. The treatment of choice is conversion of the VP shunt to a ventriculoatrial shunt.

  9. Delivery of GM-CSF to Protect against Influenza Pneumonia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renuka Subramaniam

    Full Text Available Since adaptive immunity is thought to be central to immunity against influenza A virus (IAV pneumonias, preventive strategies have focused primarily on vaccines. However, vaccine efficacy has been variable, in part because of antigenic shift and drift in circulating influenza viruses. Recent studies have highlighted the importance of innate immunity in protecting against influenza.Granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF contributes to maturation of mononuclear phagocytes, enhancing their capacity for phagocytosis and cytokine production.Overexpression of granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF in the lung of transgenic mice provides remarkable protection against IAV, which depends on alveolar macrophages (AM. In this study, we report that pulmonary delivery of GM-CSF to wild type young and aged mice abrogated mortality from IAV.We also demonstrate that protection is species specific and human GM-CSF do not protect the mice nor stimulates mouse immunity. We also show that IAV-induced lung injury is the culprit for side-effects of GM-CSF in treating mice after IAV infection, and introduce a novel strategy to deliver the GM-CSF to and retain it in the alveolar space even after IAV infection.

  10. Effect of CSF Suppression for Diffusional Kurtosis Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Alicia W.; Jensen, Jens H.; Hu, Caixia C.; Tabesh, Ali; Falangola, Maria F.; Helpern, Joseph A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) partial volume effect on diffusional kurtosis imaging (DKI) metrics in white matter and cortical gray matter. Materials and Methods Four healthy volunteers participated in this study. Standard DKI and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) DKI experiments were performed using a twice-refocused-spin-echo diffusion sequence. The conventional diffusional tensor imaging (DTI) metrics of fractional anisotropy (FA), mean, axial, and radial diffusivity (MD, D∥, D⊥) together with DKI metrics of mean, axial and radial kurtosis (MK, K∥, K⊥) were measured and compared. Single image slices located above the lateral ventricles, with similar anatomical features for each subject, were selected to minimize the effect of CSF from the ventricles. Results In white matter, differences of less than 10% were observed between diffusion metrics measured with standard DKI and FLAIR-DKI sequences, suggesting minimal CSF contamination. For gray matter, conventional DTI metrics differed by 19% to 52%, reflecting significant CSF partial volume effect. Kurtosis metrics, however, changed by 11% or less, indicating greater robustness with respect to CSF contamination. Conclusion Kurtosis metrics are less sensitive to CSF partial voluming in cortical gray matter than conventional diffusion metrics. The kurtosis metrics may then be more specific indicators of changes in tissue microstructure, provided the effect sizes for the changes are comparable. PMID:23034866

  11. The European iNPH Multicentre Study on the predictive values of resistance to CSF outflow and the CSF Tap Test in patients with idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wikkelsø, Carsten; Hellström, Per; Klinge, Petra Margarete

    2013-01-01

    The objective was to determine the sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of the CSF Tap Test (CSF TT) and resistance to CSF outflow (Rout) for the outcome of shunting in a sample of patients with idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH).......The objective was to determine the sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of the CSF Tap Test (CSF TT) and resistance to CSF outflow (Rout) for the outcome of shunting in a sample of patients with idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH)....

  12. Biomarkers of Traumatic Injury Are Transported from Brain to Blood via the Glymphatic System

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    The nonspecific and variable presentation of traumatic brain injury (TBI) has motivated an intense search for blood-based biomarkers that can objectively predict the severity of injury. However, it is not known how cytosolic proteins released from traumatized brain tissue reach the peripheral blood. Here we show in a murine TBI model that CSF movement through the recently characterized glymphatic pathway transports biomarkers to blood via the cervical lymphatics. Clinically relevant manipulat...

  13. Biomarker evidence of axonal injury in neuroasymptomatic HIV-1 patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Jessen Krut

    Full Text Available Prevalence of neurocognitive impairment in HIV-1 infected patients is reported to be high. Whether this is a result of active HIV-related neurodegeneration is unclear. We examined axonal injury in HIV-1 patients by measuring the light subunit of neurofilament protein (NFL in CSF with a novel, sensitive method.With a cross-sectional design, CSF concentrations of neurofilament protein light (NFL (marker of neuronal injury, neopterin (intrathecal immunoactivation and CSF/Plasma albumin ratio (blood-brain barrier integrity were analyzed on CSF from 252 HIV-infected patients, subdivided into untreated neuroasymptomatics (n = 200, HIV-associated dementia (HAD (n = 14 and on combinations antiretroviral treatment (cART (n = 85, and healthy controls (n = 204. 46 HIV-infected patients were included in both treated and untreated groups, but sampled at different timepoints. Furthermore, 78 neuroasymptomatic patients were analyzed before and after treatment initiation.While HAD patients had the highest NFL concentrations, elevated CSF NFL was also found in 33% of untreated neuroasymptomatic patients, mainly in those with blood CD4+ cell counts below 250 cells/μL. CSF NFL concentrations in the untreated neuroasymptomatics and treated groups were equivalent to controls 18.5 and 3.9 years older, respectively. Neopterin correlated with NFL levels in untreated groups while the albumin ratio correlated with NFL in both untreated and treated groups.Increased CSF NFL indicates ongoing axonal injury in many neuroasymptomatic patients. Treatment decreases NFL, but treated patients retain higher levels than controls, indicating either continued virus-related injury or an aging-like effect of HIV infection. NFL correlates with neopterin and albumin ratio, suggesting an association between axonal injury, neuroinflammation and blood-brain barrier permeability. NFL appears to be a sensitive biomarker of subclinical and clinical brain injury in HIV and warrants further

  14. Biomarker Evidence of Axonal Injury in Neuroasymptomatic HIV-1 Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Richard W.; Hagberg, Lars; Fuchs, Dietmar; Rosengren, Lars; Nilsson, Staffan; Zetterberg, Henrik; Gisslén, Magnus

    2014-01-01

    Background Prevalence of neurocognitive impairment in HIV-1 infected patients is reported to be high. Whether this is a result of active HIV-related neurodegeneration is unclear. We examined axonal injury in HIV-1 patients by measuring the light subunit of neurofilament protein (NFL) in CSF with a novel, sensitive method. Methods With a cross-sectional design, CSF concentrations of neurofilament protein light (NFL) (marker of neuronal injury), neopterin (intrathecal immunoactivation) and CSF/Plasma albumin ratio (blood-brain barrier integrity) were analyzed on CSF from 252 HIV-infected patients, subdivided into untreated neuroasymptomatics (n = 200), HIV-associated dementia (HAD) (n = 14) and on combinations antiretroviral treatment (cART) (n = 85), and healthy controls (n = 204). 46 HIV-infected patients were included in both treated and untreated groups, but sampled at different timepoints. Furthermore, 78 neuroasymptomatic patients were analyzed before and after treatment initiation. Results While HAD patients had the highest NFL concentrations, elevated CSF NFL was also found in 33% of untreated neuroasymptomatic patients, mainly in those with blood CD4+ cell counts below 250 cells/μL. CSF NFL concentrations in the untreated neuroasymptomatics and treated groups were equivalent to controls 18.5 and 3.9 years older, respectively. Neopterin correlated with NFL levels in untreated groups while the albumin ratio correlated with NFL in both untreated and treated groups. Conclusions Increased CSF NFL indicates ongoing axonal injury in many neuroasymptomatic patients. Treatment decreases NFL, but treated patients retain higher levels than controls, indicating either continued virus-related injury or an aging-like effect of HIV infection. NFL correlates with neopterin and albumin ratio, suggesting an association between axonal injury, neuroinflammation and blood-brain barrier permeability. NFL appears to be a sensitive biomarker of subclinical and

  15. Ocular biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaton, George R; Davis, Benjamin M; Turner, Lisa A; Cordeiro, Maria F

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a devastating neurodegenerative disease characterised clinically by a progressive decline in executive functions, memory and cognition. Classic neuropathological hallmarks of AD include intracellular hyper-phosphorylated tau protein which forms neurofibrillary tangles (NFT), and extracellular deposits of amyloid β (Aβ) protein, the primary constituent of senile plaques (SP). The gradual process of pathogenic amyloid accumulation is thought to occur 10-20 years prior to symptomatic manifestation. Advance detection of these deposits therefore offers a highly promising avenue for prodromal AD diagnosis. Currently, the most sophisticated method of 'probable AD' diagnosis is via neuroimaging or cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) biomarker analysis. Whilst these methods have reported a high degree of diagnostic specificity and accuracy, they fall significantly short in terms of practicality; they are often highly invasive, expensive or unsuitable for large-scale population screening. In recent years, ocular screening has received substantial attention from the scientific community due to its potential for non-invasive and inexpensive central nervous system (CNS) imaging. In this appraisal we build upon our previous reviews detailing ocular structural and functional changes in AD (Retinal manifestations of Alzheimer's disease, Alzheimer's disease and Retinal Neurodegeneration) and consider their use as biomarkers. In addition, we present an overview of current advances in the use of fluorescent reporters to detect AD pathology through non-invasive retinal imaging.

  16. Elevated CSF outflow resistance associated with impaired lymphatic CSF absorption in a rat model of kaolin-induced communicating hydrocephalus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Jie

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We recently reported a lymphatic cerebrospinal fluid (CSF absorption deficit in a kaolin model of communicating hydrocephalus in rats with ventricular expansion correlating negatively with the magnitude of the impediment to lymphatic function. However, it is possible that CSF drainage was not significantly altered if absorption at other sites compensated for the lymphatic defect. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of the lymphatic absorption deficit on global CSF absorption (CSF outflow resistance. Methods Kaolin was injected into the basal cisterns of Sprague Dawley rats. The development of hydrocephalus was assessed using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. In one group of animals at about 3 weeks after injection, the movement of intraventricularly injected iodinated human serum albumin (125I-HSA into the olfactory turbinates provided an estimate of CSF transport through the cribriform plate into nasal lymphatics (n = 18. Control animals received saline in place of kaolin (n = 10. In a second group at about 3.5 weeks after kaolin injection, intraventricular pressure was measured continuously during infusion of saline into the spinal subarachnoid space at various flow rates (n = 9. CSF outflow resistance was calculated as the slope of the steady-state pressure versus flow rate. Control animals for this group either received no injections (intact: n = 11 or received saline in place of kaolin (n = 8. Results Compared to saline injected controls, lateral ventricular volume in the kaolin group was significantly greater (0.087 ± 0.013 ml, n = 27 versus 0.015 ± 0.001 ml, n = 17 and lymphatic function was significantly less (2.14 ± 0.72% injected/g, n = 18 versus 6.38 ± 0.60% injected/g, n = 10. Additionally, the CSF outflow resistance was significantly greater in the kaolin group (0.46 ± 0.04 cm H2O.μL-1.min, n = 9 than in saline injected (0.28 ± 0.03 cm H2O.μL-1.min, n = 8 or intact animals (0.18 ± 0

  17. Upfront plerixafor plus G-CSF versus cyclophosphamide plus G-CSF for stem cell mobilization in multiple myeloma: efficacy and cost analysis study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afifi, S; Adel, N G; Devlin, S; Duck, E; Vanak, J; Landau, H; Chung, D J; Lendvai, N; Lesokhin, A; Korde, N; Reich, L; Landgren, O; Giralt, S; Hassoun, H

    2016-04-01

    Cyclophosphamide plus G-CSF (C+G-CSF) is one of the most widely used stem cell (SC) mobilization regimens for patients with multiple myeloma (MM). Plerixafor plus G-CSF (P+G-CSF) has demonstrated superior SC mobilization efficacy when compared with G-CSF alone and has been shown to rescue patients who fail mobilization with G-CSF or C+G-CSF. Despite the proven efficacy of P+G-CSF in upfront SC mobilization, its use has been limited, mostly due to concerns of high price of the drug. However, a comprehensive comparison of the efficacy and cost effectiveness of SC mobilization using C+G-CSF versus P+G-CSF is not available. In this study, we compared 111 patients receiving C+G-CSF to 112 patients receiving P+G-CSF. The use of P+G-CSF was associated with a higher success rate of SC collection defined as ⩾5 × 10(6) CD34+ cells/kg (94 versus 83%, P=0.013) and less toxicities. Thirteen patients in the C+G-CSF arm were hospitalized owing to complications while none in the P+G-CSF group. C+G-CSF was associated with higher financial burden as assessed using institutional-specific costs and charges (P<0.001) as well as using Medicare reimbursement rates (P=0.27). Higher rate of hospitalization, increased need for salvage mobilization, and increased G-CSF use account for these differences.

  18. Is Abeta a sufficient Biomarker for monitoring anti-Abeta clinical studies? A critical review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens eMoreth

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid-beta (Aβ in Alzheimer’s disease (AD appeared to be a promising target for disease-modifying therapeutic strategies like passive immunotherapy with anti-Aβ monoclonal antibodies (mAbs. Biochemical markers in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF include alterations of Aβ that allow the diagnosis of AD. Biomarker strategies, such as the levels of Aβ in CSF and plasma, currently play an important role in early clinical trials for AD. Indeed, these strategies have a relevant impact on the outcome of such studies, since the biomarkers are used to monitor the bioactivity of anti-Aβ mAbs. The clinical trials of Solanezumab were mainly based on the readout of Aβ levels in CSF and plasma, whereas those of Bapineuzumab were based on cognition; however, little is known about the mechanisms altering these biomarker levels, and no biomarker has yet been proven to be a successful predictor for AD therapy. In addition, the Aβ biomarkers allow for the determination of free and bound anti-Aβ mAb in order to monitor the available amount of bioactive drug and could give hints to the mechanism of action. In this review, we discuss clinical Aβ biomarker data and the latest regulatory strategies.

  19. Post craniotomy extra-ventricular drain (EVD) associated nosocomial meningitis: CSF diagnostic criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Gómez, Sigridh; Wirkowski, Elizabeth; Cunha, Burke A

    2015-01-01

    Because external ventricular drains (EVDs) provide access to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), there is potential for EVD associated acute bacterial meningitis (EVD-AM). Post-craniotomy, in patients with EVDs, one or more CSF abnormalities are commonly present making the diagnosis of EVD-AM problematic. EVD-AM was defined as elevated CSF lactic acid (>6 nmol/L), plus CSF marked pleocytosis (>50 WBCs/mm(3)), plus a positive Gram stain (same morphology as CSF isolate), plus a positive CSF culture of neuropathogen (same morphology as Gram stained organism). We reviewed 22 adults with EVDs to determine if our four CSF parameters combined accurately identified EVD-AM. No single or combination of <4 CSF parameters correctly diagnosed or ruled out EVD-AM. Combined our four CSF parameters clearly differentiated EVD-AM from one case of pseudomeningitis due to E. cloacae. We conclude that our four CSF criteria combined are useful in diagnosing EVD-AM in adults.

  20. PEGylation of G-CSF using cleavable oligo-lactic acid linkage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seung Ho; Lee, Haeshin; Park, Tae Gwan

    2003-04-29

    A new class of methoxy-poly(ethylene glycol) (mPEG) derivatives having a cleavable group of oligo-lactic acid (OLA) was synthesized by ring opening polymerization of L-lactide using a terminal hydroxyl end of mPEG as an initiator. The synthesized mPEG derivatives had 0.8 and 3.6 lactic acid units based on the MALDI-TOF data. A terminal end group of mPEG-OLA was further activated with p-nitrophenyl chloroformate to produce mPEG-OLA-p-nitrophenyl carbonate (PC). mPEG-OLA-PC derivatives were conjugated to primary amine groups of recombinant human granulocyte-colony stimulating factor. PEGylated G-CSF conjugated with mPEG-OLA-PC derivatives consisted of native, mono-, di-, and tri-PEGylated species, and they did not show any apparent conformational changes even after PEGylation. When incubating in pH 7.4 buffer at 37 degrees C for 2 days, mPEG-OLA-G-CSF conjugates liberated mPEG by cleaving the OLA spacer, resulting in the gradual regeneration of G-CSF.

  1. Recommendations to standardize preanalytical confounding factors in Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers: an update

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Del Campo, M.; Mollenhauer, B.; Bertolotto, A.; Engelborghs, S.; Hampel, H.; Simonsen, A.H.; Kapaki, E.; Kruse, N.; Bastard, N. le; Lehmann, S.; Molinuevo, J.L.; Parnetti, L.; Perret-Liaudet, A.; Saez-Valero, J.; Saka, E.; Urbani, A.; Vanmechelen, E.; Verbeek, M.M.; Visser, P.J.; Teunissen, C.

    2012-01-01

    Early diagnosis of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's (AD) or Parkinson's disease (PD) is needed to slow down or halt the disease at the earliest stage. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers can be a good tool for early diagnosis. However, their use in clinical practice is challenging du

  2. Recommendations for cerebrospinal fluid Alzheimer's disease biomarkers in the diagnostic evaluation of mild cognitive impairment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herukka, Sanna-Kaisa; Simonsen, Anja Hviid; Andreasen, Niels

    2017-01-01

    ) patient counseling. The working group recommended using CSF AD biomarkers in the diagnostic workup of MCI patients, after prebiomarker counseling, as an add-on to clinical evaluation to predict functional decline or conversion to AD dementia and to guide disease management. Because of insufficient...

  3. Recommendations to standardize preanalytical confounding factors in Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers: an update

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Del Campo, M.; Mollenhauer, B.; Bertolotto, A.; Engelborghs, S.; Hampel, H.; Simonsen, A.H.; Kapaki, E.; Kruse, N.; Bastard, N. le; Lehmann, S.; Molinuevo, J.L.; Parnetti, L.; Perret-Liaudet, A.; Saez-Valero, J.; Saka, E.; Urbani, A.; Vanmechelen, E.; Verbeek, M.M.; Visser, P.J.; Teunissen, C.

    2012-01-01

    Early diagnosis of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's (AD) or Parkinson's disease (PD) is needed to slow down or halt the disease at the earliest stage. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers can be a good tool for early diagnosis. However, their use in clinical practice is challenging du

  4. CSF concentrations of cAMP and cGMP are lower in patients with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease but not Parkinson's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

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    Patrick Oeckl

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The cyclic nucleotides cyclic adenosine-3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP and cyclic guanosine-3',5'-monophosphate (cGMP are important second messengers and are potential biomarkers for Parkinson's disease (PD, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we investigated by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF concentrations of cAMP and cGMP of 82 patients and evaluated their diagnostic potency as biomarkers. For comparison with a well-accepted biomarker, we measured tau concentrations in CSF of CJD and control patients. CJD patients (n = 15 had lower cAMP (-70% and cGMP (-55% concentrations in CSF compared with controls (n = 11. There was no difference in PD, PD dementia (PDD and ALS cases. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve analyses confirmed cAMP and cGMP as valuable diagnostic markers for CJD indicated by the area under the curve (AUC of 0.86 (cAMP and 0.85 (cGMP. We calculated a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 64% for cAMP and a sensitivity of 67% and specificity of 100% for cGMP. The combination of both nucleotides increased the sensitivity to 80% and specificity to 91% for the term cAMPxcGMP (AUC 0.92 and to 93% and 100% for the ratio tau/cAMP (AUC 0.99. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that the CSF determination of cAMP and cGMP may easily be included in the diagnosis of CJD and could be helpful in monitoring disease progression as well as in therapy control.

  5. GM-CSF alters dendritic cells in autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bao-Zhu; Ye, Qian-Ling; Xu, Wang-Dong; Li, Jie-Hua; Ye, Dong-Qing; Xu, Yuekang

    2013-11-01

    Autoimmune diseases arise from an inappropriate immune response against self components, including macromolecules, cells, tissues, organs etc. They are often triggered or accompanied by inflammation, during which the levels of granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) are elevated. GM-CSF is an inflammatory cytokine that has profound impact on the differentiation of immune system cells of myeloid lineage, especially dendritic cells (DCs) that play critical roles in immune initiation and tolerance, and is involved in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. Although GM-CSF was discovered decades ago, recent studies with some new findings have shed an interesting light on the old hematopoietic growth factor. In the inflammatory autoimmune diseases, GM-CSF redirects the normal developmental pathway of DCs, conditions their antigen presentation capacities and endows them with unique cytokine signatures to affect autoimmune responses. Here we review the latest advances in the field, with the aim of demonstrating the effects of GM-CSF on DCs and their influences on autoimmune diseases. The summarized knowledge will help to design DC-based strategies for the treatment of autoimmune diseases.

  6. Biomarkers in Japanese Encephalitis: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kant Upadhyay, Ravi

    2013-01-01

    JE is a flavivirus generated dreadful CNS disease which causes high mortality in various pediatric groups. JE disease is currently diagnosed by measuring the level of viral antigens and virus neutralization IgM antibodies in blood serum and CSF by ELISA. However, it is not possible to measure various disease-identifying molecules, structural and molecular changes occurred in tissues, and cells by using such routine methods. However, few important biomarkers such as cerebrospinal fluid, plasma, neuro-imaging, brain mapping, immunotyping, expression of nonstructural viral proteins, systematic mRNA profiling, DNA and protein microarrays, active caspase-3 activity, reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species, levels of stress-associated signaling molecules, and proinflammatory cytokines could be used to confirm the disease at an earlier stage. These biomarkers may also help to diagnose mutant based environment specific alterations in JEV genotypes causing high pathogenesis and have immense future applications in diagnostics. There is an utmost need for the development of new more authentic, appropriate, and reliable physiological, immunological, biochemical, biophysical, molecular, and therapeutic biomarkers to confirm the disease well in time to start the clinical aid to the patients. Hence, the present review aims to discuss new emerging biomarkers that could facilitate more authentic and fast diagnosis of JE disease and its related disorders in the future. PMID:24455705

  7. Biomarkers of satiation and satiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Graaf, Cees; Blom, Wendy A M; Smeets, Paul A M; Stafleu, Annette; Hendriks, Henk F J

    2004-06-01

    This review's objective is to give a critical summary of studies that focused on physiologic measures relating to subjectively rated appetite, actual food intake, or both. Biomarkers of satiation and satiety may be used as a tool for assessing the satiating efficiency of foods and for understanding the regulation of food intake and energy balance. We made a distinction between biomarkers of satiation or meal termination and those of meal initiation related to satiety and between markers in the brain [central nervous system (CNS)] and those related to signals from the periphery to the CNS. Various studies showed that physicochemical measures related to stomach distension and blood concentrations of cholecystokinin and glucagon-like peptide 1 are peripheral biomarkers associated with meal termination. CNS biomarkers related to meal termination identified by functional magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography are indicators of neural activity related to sensory-specific satiety. These measures cannot yet serve as a tool for assessing the satiating effect of foods, because they are not yet feasible. CNS biomarkers related to satiety are not yet specific enough to serve as biomarkers, although they can distinguish between extreme hunger and fullness. Three currently available biomarkers for satiety are decreases in blood glucose in the short term (2-4 d) negative energy balance; and ghrelin concentrations, which have been implicated in both short-term and long-term energy balance. The next challenge in this research area is to identify food ingredients that have an effect on biomarkers of satiation, satiety, or both. These ingredients may help consumers to maintain their energy intake at a level consistent with a healthy body weight.

  8. Phosphorylated tau as a candidate biomarker for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Murray; Elman, Lauren; McCluskey, Leo; McMillan, Corey T; Boller, Ashley; Powers, John; Rascovsky, Katya; Hu, William; Shaw, Les; Irwin, David J; Lee, Virginia M-Y; Trojanowski, John Q

    2014-04-01

    An increasingly varied clinical spectrum of cases with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) has been identified, and objective criteria for clinical trial eligibility are necessary. To develop a cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarker sensitive and specific for the diagnosis of ALS. A case-control study including 51 individuals with ALS and 23 individuals with a disorder associated with a 4-repeat tauopathy was conducted at an academic medical center. The CSF level of tau phosphorylated at threonine 181 (ptau) and ratio of ptau to total tau (ttau). Using a cross-validation prediction procedure, we found significantly reduced CSF levels of ptau and the ptau:ttau ratio in ALS relative to 4-repeat tauopathy and to controls. In the validation cohort, the receiver operating characteristic area under the curve for the ptau:ttau ratio was 0.916, and the comparison of ALS with 4-repeat tauopathy showed 92.0% sensitivity and 91.7% specificity. Correct classification based on a low CSF ptau:ttau ratio was confirmed in 18 of 21 cases (86%) with autopsy-proved or genetically determined disease. In patients with available measures, ptau:ttau in ALS correlated with clinical measures of disease severity, such as the Mini-Mental State Examination (n = 51) and ALS Functional Rating Scale-Revised (n = 42), and regression analyses related the ptau:ttau ratio to magnetic resonance imaging (n = 10) evidence of disease in the corticospinal tract and white matter projections involving the prefrontal cortex. The CSF ptau:ttau ratio may be a candidate biomarker to provide objective support for the diagnosis of ALS.

  9. PHOSPHORYLATED TAU: CANDIDATE BIOMARKER FOR AMYOTROPHIC LATERAL SCLEROSIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Murray; Elman, Lauren; McCluskey, Leo; McMillan, Corey T.; Boller, Ashley; Powers, John; Rascovsky, Katya; Hu, William; Shaw, Les; Irwin, David J.; Lee, Virginia M.-Y.; Trojanowski, John Q.

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE An increasingly varied clinical spectrum of cases with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) has been identified, and objective criteria for clinical trial eligibility is necessary. OBJECTIVE We sought to develop a cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarker sensitive and specific for the diagnosis of ALS. DESIGN Case-control study. SETTING Academic medical center. PARTICIPANTS 51 individuals with ALS and 23 individuals with a disorder associated with a four-repeat tauopathy (4R-tau). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE CSF level of tau phosophorylated at threonine 181 (ptau), and ratio of ptau to total tau (ttau). RESULTS Using a cross-validation prediction procedure, we found significantly reduced CSF levels of ptau and ptau:ttau in ALS relative to 4R-tau and to controls. In the validation cohort, the receiver operating characteristic area under the curve for the ptau:ttau ratio was 0.916, and the comparison of ALS to 4R-tau showed sensitivity=92% and specificity=91.7%. Correct classification based on low CSF ptau:ttau was confirmed in 18 (85.7%) of 21 cases with autopsy-proven or genetically-determined disease. In patients with available measures, ptau:ttau in ALS correlated with clinical measures of disease severity such as Mini Mental State Exam (n=51) and ALS Functional Rating Scale-Revised (n=42), and regression analyses related ptau:ttau to MRI (n=10) evidence of disease in the corticospinal tract and white matter projections involving prefrontal cortex. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE CSF ptau:ttau may be a candidate biomarker to provide objective support for the diagnosis of ALS. PMID:24492862

  10. CSF biomarker profiles do not differentiate between the cerebellar and parkinsonian phenotypes of multiple system atrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abdo, W F; van de Warrenburg, B P C; Kremer, H P H; Bloem, B R; Verbeek, M M

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Multiple system atrophy (MSA) can clinically be divided into the cerebellar (MSA-C) and the parkinsonian (MSA-P) variants. It is unknown whether the variation in clinical expression is also reflected by a different underlying neurochemical profile. METHODS: We analyzed brain specific pro

  11. Echocardiographic findings in patients with spontaneous CSF leak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimienta, Allen L; Rimoin, David L; Pariani, Mitchel; Schievink, Wouter I; Reinstein, Eyal

    2014-10-01

    The presence of cardiovascular abnormalities in patients with spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks are not well-documented in the literature, as cardiovascular evaluation is not generally pursued if a patient does not exhibit additional clinical features suggesting an inherited connective tissue disorder. We aimed to assess this association, enrolling a consecutive group of 50 patients referred for spinal CSF leak consultation. Through echocardiographic evaluation and detailed medical history, we estimate that up to 20% of patients presenting with a spontaneous CSF leak may have some type of cardiovascular abnormality. Further, the increase in prevalence of aortic dilatation in our cohort was statistically significant in comparison to the estimated population prevalence. This supports a clinical basis for echocardiographic screening of these individuals for cardiovascular manifestations that may have otherwise gone unnoticed or evolved into a more severe manifestation.

  12. [Two cases of spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) otorrhea with meningitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mada, Yusuke; Ueki, Yuji; Konno, Akiyoshi

    2012-09-01

    We report on two cases of spontaneous CSF otorrhea, which were considered to have been caused by enlarged arachnoid granulation with bone erosion of the posterior fossa. Both cases visited us complaining of severe headache, due to bacterial meningitis. In the first patient, a 68-year-old male, a high resolution CT scan showed a bony defect in the posterior fossa plate in the right temporal bone, where CSF leakage was confirmed during the operation. In the second patient, a 54-year-old female, a bony defect was located in the posterior fossa in the left temporal bone. In both cases, the bony defects were repaired by occlusion with the pedicled temporal muscles after the meningitis had been treated. CSF otorrhea disappeared after the surgery, and has not recurred during the postoperative observation period of 1 to 3 years.

  13. Alzheimer’s Biomarkers are Correlated with Brain Connectivity in Older Adults Differentially during Resting and Task States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang eJiang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ß-amyloid (Aß plaques and tau-related neurodegeneration are pathologic hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease (AD. The utility of AD biomarkers, including those measured in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, in predicting future AD risk and cognitive decline is still being refined. Here we explored potential relationships between functional connectivity patterns within the default-mode network (DMN, age, CSF biomarkers (Aß42 and pTau181 and cognitive status in older adults. Multiple measures of functional connectivity were explored including a novel time series based measure (Total Interdependence; TI. In our sample of 27 cognitively normal older adults, no significant associations were found between levels of Aß42 or pTau181 and cognitive scores or regional brain volumes. However, we observed several novel relationships between these biomarkers and measures of functional connectivity in DMN during both resting-state and a short-term memory task. First, increased connectivity between bilateral anterior middle temporal gyri was associated with higher levels of CSF Aβ42 and Aβ42/pTau181 ratio (reflecting lower AD risk during both rest and task. Second, increased bilateral parietal connectivity during the short-term memory task, but not during rest, was associated with higher levels of CSF pTau181 (reflecting higher AD risk. Third, increased connectivity between left middle temporal and left parietal cortices during the active task was associated with decreased global cognitive status but not CSF biomarkers. Lastly, we found that our new TI method was more sensitive to the CSF Aβ42-connectivity relationship whereas the traditional cross-correlation method was more sensitive to levels of CSF pTau181 and cognitive status. With further refinement, resting-state connectivity and task-driven connectivity measures hold promise as non-invasive neuroimaging markers of Aβ and pTau burden in cognitively normal older adults.

  14. Chiral Biomarkers in Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Richard B.

    2010-01-01

    The chirality of organic molecules with the asymmetric location of group radicals was discovered in 1848 by Louis Pasteur during his investigations of the rotation of the plane of polarization of light by crystals of sodium ammonium paratartrate. It is well established that the amino acids in proteins are exclusively Levorotary (L-aminos) and the sugars in DNA and RNA are Dextrorotary (D-sugars). This phenomenon of homochirality of biological polymers is a fundamental property of all life known on Earth. Furthermore, abiotic production mechanisms typically yield recemic mixtures (i.e. equal amounts of the two enantiomers). When amino acids were first detected in carbonaceous meteorites, it was concluded that they were racemates. This conclusion was taken as evidence that they were extraterrestrial and produced by abiologically. Subsequent studies by numerous researchers have revealed that many of the amino acids in carbonaceous meteorites exhibit a significant L-excess. The observed chirality is much greater than that produced by any currently known abiotic processes (e.g. Linearly polarized light from neutron stars; Circularly polarized ultraviolet light from faint stars; optically active quartz powders; inclusion polymerization in clay minerals; Vester-Ulbricht hypothesis of parity violations, etc.). This paper compares the measured chirality detected in the amino acids of carbonaceous meteorites with the effect of these diverse abiotic processes. IT is concluded that the levels observed are inconsistent with post-arrival biological contamination or with any of the currently known abiotic production mechanisms. However, they are consistent with ancient biological processes on the meteorite parent body. This paper will consider these chiral biomarkers in view of the detection of possible microfossils found in the Orgueil and Murchison carbonaceous meteorites. Energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) data obtained on these morphological biomarkers will be

  15. CSF Leakage "Radiology, Neuroradiology and Head and Neck, ENT"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalal Jalal Shokouhi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Leak of CSF is a relatively common complication in skull base fractures and it is rarely seen during skull base tumors and pituitary gland pathologies "Adenomas and empty sellae syndrome"."nThe common site of CSF leakage is related to the site of fracture but it is more common in cribriform plate fractures. Other sites are frontal sinus fractures and rarely sphenoid sinus lesions related to pituitary gland site pathology. Evaluation of the cribriform plate and the posterior wall of the frontal sinus is an imaging key point."nOther rare conditions of CSF leak are related to temporal bone fractures leading to otorrhea and in a paradoxical feature with rhinorrhea "intact tympanic membrane with temporal bone fracture and eustachian tube transmission of fluid"."nEthiology "nTrauma and skull base fractures epecially in the cribriform plate."nParanasal sinus fractures specially in the frontal and sphenoidal sinuses."nTemporal bone fractures."nEmpty sellae and intrasellar tumors."nPost-op stage in the skull base tumors."nDiagnosis"nNasal CSF leakage laboratory."nRadioneucleid imaging: This way is sensitive but non-specific."nMethylen blue injection into CSF via lumbar puncture "non-specific" and rarely used."nHigh resolution axial, coronal and sagittal reconstructed images of skull base as a modality of choice"nIn case of positive CSF leak but negative spiral ultra-high resolution CT in PNS, ethmoidal region and cribriform plate also temporal bone cuts we need linear and pleuridirectional X-ray tomography."nIn case of positive CSF leakage and negative radiology and imaging it needs exploration surgery to direct vision of anterior fossa floor bones for fracture."n-Companion complication could be recurrent meningitis."n- No 3D-CT or MRI is necessary for bone fractures but MRI could be"nnecessary for related brain contusion or soft tissue lesions and tumor."nX-ray CT-cisternography"nAlthough more than 90% of fractures could be detected by

  16. Combined Analysis of CSF Tau, Aβ42, Aβ1–42% and Aβ1–40ox% in Alzheimer's Disease, Dementia with Lewy Bodies and Parkinson's Disease Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirko Bibl

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We studied the diagnostic value of CSF Aβ42/tau versus low Aβ1–42% and high Aβ1–40ox% levels for differential diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB, respectively. CSF of 45 patients with AD, 15 with DLB, 21 with Parkinson's disease dementia (PDD, and 40 nondemented disease controls (NDC was analyzed by Aβ-SDS-PAGE/immunoblot and ELISAs (Aβ42 and tau. Aβ42/tau lacked specificity in discriminating AD from DLB and PDD. Best discriminating biomarkers were Aβ1–42% and Aβ1–40ox% for AD and DLB, respectively. AD and DLB could be differentiated by both Aβ1–42% and Aβ1–40ox% with an accuracy of 80% at minimum. Thus, we consider Aβ1–42% and Aβ1–40ox% to be useful biomarkers for AD and DLB, respectively. We propose further studies on the integration of Aβ1–42% and Aβ1–40ox% into conventional assay formats. Moreover, future studies should investigate the combination of Aβ1–40ox% and CSF alpha-synuclein for the diagnosis of DLB.

  17. Limited agreement between biomarkers of neuronal injury at different stages of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexopoulos, Panagiotis; Kriett, Laura; Haller, Bernhard; Klupp, Elisabeth; Gray, Katherine; Grimmer, Timo; Laskaris, Nikolaos; Förster, Stefan; Perneczky, Robert; Kurz, Alexander; Drzezga, Alexander; Fellgiebel, Andreas; Yakushev, Igor

    2014-11-01

    New diagnostic criteria for Alzheimer's disease (AD) treat different biomarkers of neuronal injury as equivalent. Here, we quantified the degree of agreement between hippocampal volume on structural magnetic resonance imaging, regional glucose metabolism on positron emission tomography, and levels of phosphorylated tau in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in 585 subjects from all phases of the AD Neuroimaging Initiative. The overall chance-corrected agreement was poor (Cohen κ, 0.24-0.34), in accord with a high rate of conflicting findings (26%-41%). Neither diagnosis nor APOE ε4 status significantly influenced the distribution of agreement between the biomarkers. The degree of agreement tended to be higher in individuals with abnormal versus normal CSF β-amyloid (Aβ1-42) levels. Prospective diagnostic criteria for AD should address the relative importance of markers of neuronal injury and elaborate a way of dealing with conflicting biomarker findings.

  18. Role of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) in human granulosa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Song; Zhang, Zhifen; Xia, Li-Xia; Huang, Jian

    2016-12-01

    Macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) has been proved to have a positive role in the follicular development. We investigated its effect on human granulosa cells and found that M-CSF could stimulate the production of E2. The production of FSH receptors was enhanced by M-CSF in vitro in a dose-dependent manner with or without the addition of tamoxifen (p M-CSF and its receptor (p M-CSF (p M-CSF has a role in regulating the response of granulosa cells to gonadotropins. Its function is associated with JAK/STAT-signaling pathway.

  19. [Aiming to develop biochemical biomarkers for Parkinson's disease and related disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokuda, Takahiko

    2012-01-01

    In Parkinson's disease (PD), its diagnosis, measurement of progression and response to therapeutic intervention currently rely upon clinical observation. However, there remains a critical need for validated biomarkers for PD. Among proteins in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) there is ample biochemical, pathological, and genetic evidence that the metabolism of α-synuclein (α-syn) plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of PD. We first reported that PD patients had significantly lower α-syn levels in their CSF than the control groups. We then investigated the levels of α-syn oligomers in CSF using a specific self-developed ELISA. The levels of α-syn oligomers were significantly higher in the PD compared to the controls, with a sensitivity of 75.0% and a specificity of 87.5% for the diagnosis of PD, demonstrating that CSF α-syn oligomers can be a useful biomarker for diagnosis of PD. We have recently developed a proteomic profiling strategy for PD. CSF proteins were purified with C8 magnetic beads, and mass spectra were obtained by mass spectrometry. By building a Support vector machine classifier, PD and multiple system atrophy (MSA) were classified effectively with good cross-validation accuracy. A proteomic pattern classification method can increase the accuracy of clinical diagnosis of PD and MSA.

  20. CSF Amino Acids, Pterins and Mechanism of the Ketogenic Diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Gordon Millichap

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Investigators from Hospital Sant Joan de Deu, Barcelona, Spain, studied the relationship between the etiology of refractory childhood epilepsy, CSF neurotransmitters, pterins, and amino acids, and response to a ketogenic diet in 60 patients with refractory epilepsy, 83% focal and 52% idiopathic.

  1. O G-CSF na terapia do acidente vascular cerebral The potential role of G-CSF in stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo L. Maset

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available O fator estimulador de colônias granulocitárias (G-CSF é uma glicoproteína descrita há mais de vinte anos, e é largamente utilizada para tratamento de estados neutropênicos e no transplante de medula óssea. O G-CSF estimula células-tronco hematopoéticas e regula crucialmente a sobrevivência de neutrófilos maduros, pós-mitóticos, através da inibição da apoptose. Além do efeito sistêmico, mais recentemente tem-se demonstrado uma surpreendente atividade do G-CSF no sistema nervoso central. A administração de G-CSF mobiliza células-tronco e progenitoras da medula óssea para o sangue periférico, que, por sua vez, atravessa a barreira hemato-encefálica (BHE e se dirige à área acometida do cérebro. A atividade do G-CSF no sistema nervoso central tem sido caracterizada como multimodal, pois, além do efeito mobilizador de células da medula óssea, demonstrou uma ação direta neuroprotetora através de diferentes mecanismos, tais como a atividade antiapoptótica em neurônios, regeneração da vascularização, efeito anti-inflamatório e estimulação da neurogênese endógena. Este relato sumariza a ação do G-CSF no sistema nervoso central e aborda seu potencial para o emprego no acidente vascular cerebral.The granulocyte colony-stimulating-factor (G-CSF is a glycoproteina which has been described for decades, and it is commonly utilized in the treatment of neutropenic states and bone marrow transplants. G-CSF stimulates hematopoietic stem-cels e crucially regulates the survival of mature neutrophils through a mechanism of apoptosis inhibition. Beyond its systemic effect, recently it has been shown its surprising activity in the central nervous system (CNS. G-CSF administration mobilizes bone marrow stem cells para systemic blood, and those cells cross the blood-brain-barrier e target brain's damaged area. G-CSF's activity in the CNS has been defined as multimodal, because additionally it has been demonstrated a direct

  2. Ongoing search for diagnostic biomarkers in idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarnaris, Andrew; Toma, Ahmed K; Kitchen, Neil D; Watkins, Laurence D

    2009-12-01

    Idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus is a syndrome, which typically has a clinical presentation of gait/balance disturbance, often accompanied by cognitive decline and/or urinary incontinence. Its diagnosis is based on relevant history and clinical examination, appropriate imaging findings and physiological testing. The clinical picture of idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus may occasionally be difficult to distinguish from that of Alzheimer's dementia, subcortical ischemic vascular dementia and Parkinson's disease. The aim of this article is to systematically review the literature from the last 29 years in order to identify cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) or imaging biomarkers that may aid in the diagnosis of the syndrome. The authors concluded that no CSF or imaging biomarker is currently fulfilling the criteria required to aid in the diagnosis of the condition. However, a few studies have revealed promising CSF and imaging markers that need to be verified by independent groups. The reasons that the progress in this field has been slow so far is also commented on, as well as steps required to apply the current evidence in the design of future studies within the field.

  3. Cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers for differentiation of frontotemporal lobar degeneration from Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, David J; Trojanowski, John Q; Grossman, Murray

    2013-01-01

    Accurate ante mortem diagnosis in frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) is crucial to the development and implementation of etiology-based therapies. Several neurodegenerative disease-associated proteins, including the major protein constituents of inclusions in Alzheimer's disease (AD) associated with amyloid-beta (Aβ(1-42)) plaque and tau neurofibrillary tangle pathology, can be measured in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) for diagnostic applications. Comparative studies using autopsy-confirmed samples suggest that CSF total-tau (t-tau) and Aβ(1-42) levels can accurately distinguish FTLD from AD, with a high t-tau to Aβ(1-42) ratio diagnostic of AD; however, there is also an urgent need for FTLD-specific biomarkers. These analytes will require validation in large autopsy-confirmed cohorts and face challenges of standardization of within- and between-laboratory sources of error. In addition, CSF biomarkers with prognostic utility and longitudinal study of CSF biomarker levels over the course of disease are also needed. Current goals in the field include identification of analytes that are easily and reliably measured and can be used alone or in a multi-modal approach to provide an accurate prediction of underlying neuropathology for use in clinical trials of disease modifying treatments in FTLD. To achieve these goals it will be of the utmost importance to view neurodegenerative disease, including FTLD, as a clinicopathological entity, rather than exclusively a clinical syndrome.

  4. Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers for Differentiation of Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration from Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J Irwin

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Accurate ante mortem diagnosis in frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD is crucial to the development and implementation of etiology-based therapies. Several neurodegenerative disease-associated proteins, including the major protein constituents of inclusions in Alzheimer’s disease (AD associated with amyloid-beta (Aβ1-42 plaque and tau neurofibrillary tangle pathology, can be measured in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF for diagnostic applications. Comparative studies using autopsy-confirmed samples suggest that CSF total-tau (t-tau and Aβ1-42 levels can accurately distinguish FTLD from AD, with a high t-tau to Aβ1-42 ratio diagnostic of AD; however, there is also an urgent need for FTLD-specific biomarkers. These analytes will require validation in large autopsy-confirmed cohorts and face challenges of standardization of within- and between-laboratory sources of error. In addition, CSF biomarkers with prognostic utility and longitudinal study of CSF biomarker levels over the course of disease are also needed. Current goals in the field include identification of analytes that are easily and reliably measured and can be used alone or in a multi-modal approach to provide an accurate prediction of underlying neuropathology for use in clinical trials of disease modifying treatments in FTLD. To achieve these goals it will be of the utmost importance to view neurodegenerative disease, including FTLD, as a clinicopathological entity, rather than exclusively a clinical syndrome.

  5. Cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers for differentiation of frontotemporal lobar degeneration from Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, David J.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Grossman, Murray

    2013-01-01

    Accurate ante mortem diagnosis in frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) is crucial to the development and implementation of etiology-based therapies. Several neurodegenerative disease-associated proteins, including the major protein constituents of inclusions in Alzheimer's disease (AD) associated with amyloid-beta (Aβ1−42) plaque and tau neurofibrillary tangle pathology, can be measured in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) for diagnostic applications. Comparative studies using autopsy-confirmed samples suggest that CSF total-tau (t-tau) and Aβ1−42 levels can accurately distinguish FTLD from AD, with a high t-tau to Aβ1−42 ratio diagnostic of AD; however, there is also an urgent need for FTLD-specific biomarkers. These analytes will require validation in large autopsy-confirmed cohorts and face challenges of standardization of within- and between-laboratory sources of error. In addition, CSF biomarkers with prognostic utility and longitudinal study of CSF biomarker levels over the course of disease are also needed. Current goals in the field include identification of analytes that are easily and reliably measured and can be used alone or in a multi-modal approach to provide an accurate prediction of underlying neuropathology for use in clinical trials of disease modifying treatments in FTLD. To achieve these goals it will be of the utmost importance to view neurodegenerative disease, including FTLD, as a clinicopathological entity, rather than exclusively a clinical syndrome. PMID:23440936

  6. CSF ADENOSINE DEAMINASE (ADA ACTIVITY IN PATIENTS WITH MENINGITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Meningitis is inflammation of the meninges (pia, arachnoid and dura mater covering the brain and the spinal cord. ADA is an enzyme in the purine salvage pathway which is found in abundance in active T-lymphocytes. Hence, an attempt was made to estimate the CSF ADA level in patients with suspected meningitis and throw light on its use in differentiating the various types of meningitis. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES To estimate the level of CSF adenosine deaminase level in different types of meningitis. To assess its usefulness in differentiating the various types (bacterial, viral and tuberculous of meningitis. MATERIALS AND METHODS The study was conducted at the medical wards of Govt. Rajaji Hospital, Madurai, a prospective analytical study from a period of April 2012 to September 2012. OBSERVATION AND RESULTS Tuberculous meningitis occurred more in the age group of 21–40 years. Bacterial meningitis was seen mainly in patients < 20 years of age. Viral meningitis was seen in all age groups. CSF ADA level was highest in tuberculous meningitis, the mean value being 24.5 U/L. The mean value of ADA in bacterial meningitis was 4.54 U/L and viral meningitis patients had lowest mean ADA value of 2.65 U/L. CONCLUSION In our study, 50 patients with meningitis admitted in Government Rajaji Hospital from April 2012 to September 2012 were evaluated. Meningitis predominantly affected people in the age group of 20-40 years in our study with a male: female ratio of 1.9:1. Cases of tuberculous meningitis constituted 48% of the study group and bacterial and viral meningitis were 26% each. CSF protein values were higher and sugar values lower in patients with tuberculous and bacterial meningitis. CSF cell counts were higher in patients with bacterial meningitis.

  7. Comparison of the Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) Toluidine Red Unheated Serum Test and the CSF Rapid Plasma Reagin Test with the CSF Venereal Disease Research Laboratory Test for Diagnosis of Neurosyphilis among HIV-Negative Syphilis Patients in China

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to investigate the performance of nontreponemal antibody tests in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) specimens from syphilis patients. From September 2009 to September 2012, CSF specimens were collected at the Shanghai Skin Disease Hospital in Shanghai, China, from 1,132 syphilis patients without HIV infection, including 154 with symptomatic and 56 with asymptomatic neurosyphilis. All of the CSF specimens underwent testing with a rapid plasma reagin (RPR) test, an RPR-V (commer...

  8. A comparison of early diagnostic utility of Alzheimer disease biomarkers in brain magnetic resonance and cerebrospinal fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monge Argilés, J A; Blanco Cantó, M A; Leiva Salinas, C; Flors, L; Muñoz Ruiz, C; Sánchez Payá, J; Gasparini Berenguer, R; Leiva Santana, C

    2014-09-01

    The goals of this study were to compare the early diagnostic utility of Alzheimer disease biomarkers in the CSF with those in brain MRI in conditions found in our clinical practice, and to ascertain the diagnostic accuracy of both techniques used together. Between 2008 and 2009, we included 30 patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) who were examined using 1.5 Tesla brain MRI and AD biomarker analysis in CSF. MRI studies were evaluated by 2 radiologists according to the Korf́s visual scale. CSF biomarkers were analysed using INNOTEST reagents for Aβ1-42, total-tau and phospho-tau181p. We evaluated clinical changes 2 years after inclusion. By 2 years after inclusion, 15 of the original 30 patients (50%) had developed AD (NINCDS-ADRA criteria). The predictive utility of AD biomarkers in CSF (RR 2.7; 95% CI, 1.1-6.7; P<.01) was greater than that of MRI (RR 1.5; 95% CI 95%, 0.7-3.4; P<.2); using both techniques together yielded a sensitivity and a negative predictive value of 100%. Normal results on both complementary tests ruled out progression to AD (100%) within 2 years of inclusion. Our results show that the diagnostic accuracy of biomarkers in CSF is higher than that of biomarkers in MRI. Combined use of both techniques is highly accurate for either early diagnosis or exclusion of AD in patients with MCI. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  9. Free copper, ferroxidase and SOD1 activities, lipid peroxidation and NO(x) content in the CSF. A different marker profile in four neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boll, Marie-Catherine; Alcaraz-Zubeldia, Mireya; Montes, Sergio; Rios, Camilo

    2008-09-01

    The understanding of oxidative damage in different neurodegenerative diseases could enhance therapeutic strategies. Our objective was to quantify lipoperoxidation and other oxidative products as well as the activity of antioxidant enzymes and cofactors in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples. We recorded data from all new patients with a diagnosis of either one of the four most frequent neurodegenerative diseases: Parkinson's disease (PD), Alzheimer's disease (AD), Huntington's disease (HD) and lateral amyotrophic sclerosis (ALS). The sum of nitrites and nitrates as end products of nitric oxide (NO) were increased in the four degenerative diseases and fluorescent lipoperoxidation products in three (excepting ALS). A decreased Cu/Zn-dependent superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity characterized the four diseases. A significantly decreased ferroxidase activity was found in PD, HD and AD, agreeing with findings of iron deposition in these entities, while free copper was found to be increased in CSF and appeared to be a good biomarker of PD.

  10. Cerebrospinal Fluid Levels of Amyloid Beta 1-43 Mirror 1-42 in Relation to Imaging Biomarkers of Alzheimer’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almdahl, Ina S.; Lauridsen, Camilla; Selnes, Per; Kalheim, Lisa F.; Coello, Christopher; Gajdzik, Beata; Møller, Ina; Wettergreen, Marianne; Grambaite, Ramune; Bjørnerud, Atle; Bråthen, Geir; Sando, Sigrid B.; White, Linda R.; Fladby, Tormod

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Amyloid beta 1-43 (Aβ43), with its additional C-terminal threonine residue, is hypothesized to play a role in early Alzheimer’s disease pathology possibly different from that of amyloid beta 1-42 (Aβ42). Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) Aβ43 has been suggested as a potential novel biomarker for predicting conversion from mild cognitive impairment (MCI) to dementia in Alzheimer’s disease. However, the relationship between CSF Aβ43 and established imaging biomarkers of Alzheimer’s disease has never been assessed. Materials and Methods: In this observational study, CSF Aβ43 was measured with ELISA in 89 subjects; 34 with subjective cognitive decline (SCD), 51 with MCI, and four with resolution of previous cognitive complaints. All subjects underwent structural MRI; 40 subjects on a 3T and 50 on a 1.5T scanner. Forty subjects, including 24 with SCD and 12 with MCI, underwent 18F-Flutemetamol PET. Seventy-eight subjects were assessed with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET (21 SCD/7 MCI and 11 SCD/39 MCI on two different scanners). Ten subjects with SCD and 39 with MCI also underwent diffusion tensor imaging. Results: Cerebrospinal fluid Aβ43 was both alone and together with p-tau a significant predictor of the distinction between SCD and MCI. There was a marked difference in CSF Aβ43 between subjects with 18F-Flutemetamol PET scans visually interpreted as negative (37 pg/ml, n = 27) and positive (15 pg/ml, n = 9), p < 0.001. Both CSF Aβ43 and Aβ42 were negatively correlated with standardized uptake value ratios for all analyzed regions; CSF Aβ43 average rho -0.73, Aβ42 -0.74. Both CSF Aβ peptides correlated significantly with hippocampal volume, inferior parietal and frontal cortical thickness and axial diffusivity in the corticospinal tract. There was a trend toward CSF Aβ42 being better correlated with cortical glucose metabolism. None of the studied correlations between CSF Aβ43/42 and imaging biomarkers were significantly different for the two A

  11. G-CSF receptor (CSF3R) mutations in X-linked neutropenia evolving to acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplasia

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    This paper shows for the first time that patients with X-linked neutropenia, caused by mutations in the Wiskott Aldrich syndrome gene, developed myelodysplasia/acute myeloid leukemia with acquisition of mutations in the CSF3R gene and loss of chromosome 7. See related perspective article on page 1333.

  12. Emerging Roles for CSF-1 Receptor and its Ligands in the Nervous System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitu, Violeta; Gokhan, Şölen; Nandi, Sayan; Mehler, Mark F; Stanley, E Richard

    2016-06-01

    The colony-stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF-1R) kinase regulates tissue macrophage homeostasis, osteoclastogenesis, and Paneth cell development. However, recent studies in mice have revealed that CSF-1R signaling directly controls the development and maintenance of microglia, and cell autonomously regulates neuronal differentiation and survival. While the CSF-1R-cognate ligands, CSF-1 and interleukin-34 (IL-34) compete for binding to the CSF-1R, they are expressed in a largely non-overlapping manner by mature neurons. The recent identification of a dominantly inherited, adult-onset, progressive dementia associated with inactivating mutations in the CSF-1R highlights the importance of CSF-1R signaling in the brain. We review the roles of the CSF-1R and its ligands in microglial and neural development and function, and their relevance to our understanding of neurodegenerative disease.

  13. Cerebrospinal fluid biomarker and brain biopsy findings in idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okko T Pyykkö

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The significance of amyloid precursor protein (APP and neuroinflammation in idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH and Alzheimer's disease (AD is unknown. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the role of soluble APP (sAPP and amyloid beta (Aβ isoforms, proinflammatory cytokines, and biomarkers of neuronal damage in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF in relation to brain biopsy Aβ and hyperphosphorylated tau (HPτ findings. METHODS: The study population comprised 102 patients with possible NPH with cortical brain biopsies, ventricular and lumbar CSF samples, and DNA available. The final clinical diagnoses were: 53 iNPH (91% shunt-responders, 26 AD (10 mixed iNPH+AD, and 23 others. Biopsy samples were immunostained against Aβ and HPτ. CSF levels of AD-related biomarkers (Aβ42, p-tau, total tau, non-AD-related Aβ isoforms (Aβ38, Aβ40, sAPP isoforms (sAPPα, sAPPβ, proinflammatory cytokines (several interleukins (IL, interferon-gamma, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, tumor necrosis factor-alpha and biomarkers of neuronal damage (neurofilament light and myelin basic protein were measured. All patients were genotyped for APOE. RESULTS: Lumbar CSF levels of sAPPα were lower (p<0.05 in patients with shunt-responsive iNPH compared to non-iNPH patients. sAPPβ showed a similar trend (p = 0.06. CSF sAPP isoform levels showed no association to Aβ or HPτ in the brain biopsy. Quantified Aβ load in the brain biopsy showed a negative correlation with CSF levels of Aβ42 in ventricular (r = -0.295, p = 0.003 and lumbar (r = -0.356, p = 0.01 samples, while the levels of Aβ38 and Aβ40 showed no correlation. CSF levels of proinflammatory cytokines and biomarkers of neuronal damage did not associate to the brain biopsy findings, diagnosis, or shunt response. Higher lumbar/ventricular CSF IL-8 ratios (p<0.001 were seen in lumbar samples collected after ventriculostomy compared to the samples collected before the procedure

  14. Chip Multithreaded Consistency Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zu-Song Li; Dan-Dan Huan; Wei-Wu Hu; Zhi-Min Tang

    2008-01-01

    Multithreaded technique is the developing trend of high performance processor. Memory consistency model is essential to the correctness, performance and complexity of multithreaded processor. The chip multithreaded consistency model adapting to multithreaded processor is proposed in this paper. The restriction imposed on memory event ordering by chip multithreaded consistency is presented and formalized. With the idea of critical cycle built by Wei-Wu Hu, we prove that the proposed chip multithreaded consistency model satisfies the criterion of correct execution of sequential consistency model. Chip multithreaded consistency model provides a way of achieving high performance compared with sequential consistency model and ensures the compatibility of software that the execution result in multithreaded processor is the same as the execution result in uniprocessor. The implementation strategy of chip multithreaded consistency model in Godson-2 SMT processor is also proposed. Godson-2 SMT processor supports chip multithreaded consistency model correctly by exception scheme based on the sequential memory access queue of each thread.

  15. Systematic review: new serological markers (anti-glycan, anti-GP2, anti-GM-CSF Ab) in the prediction of IBD patient outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonneau, J; Dumestre-Perard, C; Rinaudo-Gaujous, M; Genin, C; Sparrow, M; Roblin, X; Paul, S

    2015-03-01

    Traditionally, IBD diagnosis is based on clinical, radiological, endoscopic, and histological criteria. Biomarkers are needed in cases of uncertain diagnosis, or to predict disease course and therapeutic response. No guideline recommends the detection of antibodies (including ASCA and ANCA) for diagnosis or prognosis of IBD to date. However, many recent data suggest the potential role of new serological markers (anti-glycan (ACCA, ALCA, AMCA, anti-L and anti-C), anti-GP2 and anti-GM-CSF Ab). This review focuses on clinical utility of these new serological markers in diagnosis, prognosis and therapeutic monitoring of IBD. Literature review of anti-glycan, anti-GP2 and anti-GM-CSF Ab and their impact on diagnosis, prognosis and prediction of therapeutic response was performed in PubMed/MEDLINE up to June 2014. Anti-glycan, anti-GP2 and anti-GM-CSF Ab are especially associated with CD and seem to be correlated with complicated disease phenotypes even if results differ between studies. Although anti-glycan Ab and anti-GP2 Ab have low sensitivity in diagnosis of IBD, they could identify a small number of CD patients not detected by other tests such as ASCA. Anti-glycan Abs are associated with a progression to a more severe disease course and a higher risk for IBD-related surgery. Anti-GP2 Ab could particularly contribute to better stratify cases of pouchitis. Anti-GM-CSF Ab seems to be correlated with disease activity and could help predict relapses. These new promising biomarkers could particularly be useful in stratification of patients according to disease phenotype and risk of complications. They could be a valuable aid in prediction of disease course and therapeutic response but more prospective studies are needed.

  16. Biomarkers in major depressive disorder: the role of mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Alisa G; Iosifescu, Dan V; Darie, Costel C

    2014-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is common. Despite numerous available treatments, many individuals fail to improve clinically. MDD continues to be diagnosed exclusively via behavioral rather than biological methods. Biomarkers-which include measurements of genes, proteins, and patterns of brain activity-may provide an important objective tool for the diagnosis of MDD or in the rational selection of treatments. Proteomic analysis and validation of its results as biomarkers is less explored than other areas of biomarker research in MDD. Mass spectrometry (MS) is a comprehensive, unbiased means of proteomic analysis, which can be complemented by directed protein measurements, such as Western Blotting. Prior studies have focused on MS analysis of several human biomaterials in MDD, including human post-mortem brain, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), blood components, and urine. Further studies utilizing MS and proteomic analysis in MDD may help solidify and establish biomarkers for use in diagnosis, identification of new treatment targets, and understanding of the disorder. The ultimate goal is the validation of a biomarker or a biomarker signature that facilitates a convenient and inexpensive predictive test for depression treatment response and helps clinicians in the rational selection of next-step treatments.

  17. Rethinking on the concept of biomarkers in preclinical Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berti, Valentina; Polito, Cristina; Lombardi, Gemma; Ferrari, Camilla; Sorbi, Sandro; Pupi, Alberto

    2016-05-01

    The neuropathological processes eventually leading to Alzheimer's disease (AD) are thought to start decades before the appearance of clinical symptoms and the clinical diagnosis of AD dementia. The term "preclinical AD" has been recently introduced to identify this "silent stage" of AD, when the disease is already present, but symptoms are not yet clinically evident. Advances in AD biomarkers have dramatically improved the ability to detect AD pathological processes in vivo in cognitively intact subjects, thus demonstrating the presence of AD pathology in the preclinical phase. This review focuses on the recent advances in the field of neuroimaging and CSF AD biomarkers specifically in the preclinical phase of AD, and aims to discuss the significance that such biomarkers could have in cognitively intact subjects. Even though the use of such biomarkers in AD preclinical phase has contributed to improve our understanding of AD early pathological processes, it raised also a number of new challenges that still remain to be overcome, such as a better definition of the clinical and individual significance of currently known biomarkers in preclinical stages and the development of novel biomarkers of different early AD-related events.

  18. Timely withdrawal of G-CSF reduces the occurrence of thrombocytopenia during dose-dense chemotherapy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmer-Bonte, A.; Mulder, P.H.M. de; Peer, P.G.M.; Beex, L.V.A.M.; Tjan-Heijnen, V.C.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Post chemotherapy Granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) reduces leucopenia, while G-CSF priming shortly before chemotherapy increases myelotoxicity. We performed a trial with a two-schedule crossover design to determine the optimal G-CSF schedule for densified 2-weekly chemothera

  19. Experiments and analytical studies related to blowdown and containment thermal hydraulics on CSF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutta, Anu, E-mail: adutta@barc.gov.in; Thangamani, I.; Shanware, V.M.; Rao, K.S.; Gera, B.; Ravi Kiran, A.; Goyal, P.; Verma, Vishnu; Sharma, P.K.; Agrawal, M.K.; Ganju, S.; Singh, R.K.

    2015-12-01

    Highlights: • Blowdown and containment thermal hydraulics experiments conducted in CSF. • RELAP5, ASTEC and CONTRAN codes used for analysis. • Containment peak pressure and temp predicted close to experimental values. • CONTRAN and ASTEC codes predict early containment depressurization. • Numerical procedure, benchmarked for loss of coolant accident in nuclear reactors. - Abstract: Containment Studies Facility (CSF) is volumetrically scaled down model of Indian Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (IPHWR) containment for simulating LOCA/MSLB conditions which consists of concrete containment model (CM) and Primary Heat Transport Model (PHTM) vessel. Blowdown experiments at different initial vessel pressure conditions were recently conducted at CSF and the vessel and containment parameters such as pressure, temperature and level transients have been recorded during the experiments. The experimental results have been used for benchmarking of numerical procedure adopted for evaluating LOCA/MSLB conditions in nuclear containment. The numerical procedure involves simulation of blowdown phenomena using RELAP5 code for evaluating mass and energy discharge rates, which are then used for calculating containment pressure–temperature transients using ASTEC and in-house CONTRAN codes. Predictions of major parameters of vessel and containment model were found to be in good agreement with that of experimental data. In containment thermal hydraulic calculations, condensation heat transfer coefficient affects the containment pressure–temperature transients. Various empirical condensation models like Tagami, Uchida and Diffusion models have been incorporated in CONTRAN code and suitable condensation model has been identified for which predicted pressure values are close to the experimental one. The details of the experimental and analytical studies conducted are presented in this paper.

  20. Combination of biomarkers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thurfjell, Lennart; Lötjönen, Jyrki; Lundqvist, Roger

    2012-01-01

    The New National Institute on Aging-Alzheimer's Association diagnostic guidelines for Alzheimer's disease (AD) incorporate biomarkers in the diagnostic criteria and suggest division of biomarkers into two categories: Aβ accumulation and neuronal degeneration or injury....

  1. The handbook of biomarkers

    CERN Document Server

    Jain, Kewal K

    2010-01-01

    This handbook describes many different types of biomarkers and their discovery. It also presents the background information needed for the evaluation of biomarkers as well as the essential procedures for their validation and use in clinical trials.

  2. Tau Rather than TDP-43 Proteins are Potential Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers for Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration Subtypes: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuiperij, H Bea; Versleijen, Alexandra A M; Beenes, Marijke; Verwey, Nicolaas A; Benussi, Luisa; Paterlini, Anna; Binetti, Giuliano; Teunissen, Charlotte E; Raaphorst, Joost; Schelhaas, Helenius J; Küsters, Benno; Pijnenburg, Yolande A L; Ghidoni, Roberta; Verbeek, Marcel M

    2017-01-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a heterogeneous disease both at the clinical, genetic, and pathobiological level. The underlying pathological spectrum (termed FTLD, frontotemporal lobar degeneration) is in most cases defined by accumulation of either tau (FTLD-tau) or TDP-43 proteins (FTLD-TDP). Biomarkers to differentiate these subtypes are not yet available, whereas these are essential requirements to study the natural course of disease and for homogeneous inclusion of patients in clinical studies. To study if a combination of total (t-) and phosphorylated (p-)tau, and t-TDP-43 and p-TDP-43 proteins in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is suitable to discriminate FTLD-tau and FTLD-TDP subtypes. We developed immunoassays for the quantification of t-TDP-43 and p-TDP-43 proteins and used commercially available assays for the quantification of t-tau and p-tau proteins. We quantified these proteins in ventricular CSF samples from neuropathologically defined FTLD-tau and FTLD-TDP cases to study the reflection of underlying brain pathology in CSF composition, and in lumbar CSF samples from FTLD-tau and FTLD-TDP patients to study the diagnostic potential of CSF biomarkers. In ventricular CSF, t-TDP-43 and t-tau levels, when combined into one model, were significantly different between neuropathologically-defined FTLD-tau and FTLD-TDP cases. In a pilot study using lumbar CSF, the p-tau/t-tau ratio, but not t-TDP-43 levels, were significantly different between FTLD-TDP and FTLD-tau patients. We conclude that with current available methods, CSF tau, rather than TDP-43 proteins, may have diagnostic value in the differentiation of FTLD patients with either tau or TDP-43 pathology.

  3. Biomarkers in Veterinary Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Michael J; Smith, Emily R; Turfle, Phillip G

    2017-02-08

    This article summarizes the relevant definitions related to biomarkers; reviews the general processes related to biomarker discovery and ultimate acceptance and use; and finally summarizes and reviews, to the extent possible, examples of the types of biomarkers used in animal species within veterinary clinical practice and human and veterinary drug development. We highlight opportunities for collaboration and coordination of research within the veterinary community and leveraging of resources from human medicine to support biomarker discovery and validation efforts for veterinary medicine.

  4. α-Synuclein and DJ-1 as potential biological fluid biomarkers for Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waragai, Masaaki; Sekiyama, Kazunari; Sekigawa, Akio; Takamatsu, Yoshiki; Fujita, Masayo; Hashimoto, Makoto

    2010-10-29

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the most common form of movement disorder and affects approximately 4% of the population aged over 80 years old. Currently, PD cannot be prevented or cured, and no single diagnostic biomarkers are available. Notably, recent studies suggest that two familial PD-linked molecules, α-synuclein and DJ-1, are present in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and that their levels may be altered during the progression of PD. In this regard, sensitive and accurate methods for evaluation of α-synuclein and DJ-1 levels in the CSF and blood have been developed, and the results suggest that the levels of both molecules are significantly decreased in the CSF in patients with PD compared with age-matched controls. Furthermore, specific detection and quantification of neurotoxic oligometric forms of α-synuclein in the blood using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays might be expected as potential peripheral biomarkers for PD, although further validation is required. Currently, neither α-synuclein nor DJ-1 is satisfactory as a single biomarker for PD, but combinatory evaluation of these biological fluid molecules with other biomarkers and imaging techniques may provide reliable information for diagnosis of PD.

  5. Neurofilament light chain: A prognostic biomarker in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ching-Hua; Macdonald-Wallis, Corrie; Gray, Elizabeth; Pearce, Neil; Petzold, Axel; Norgren, Niklas; Giovannoni, Gavin; Fratta, Pietro; Sidle, Katie; Fish, Mark; Orrell, Richard; Howard, Robin; Talbot, Kevin; Greensmith, Linda; Kuhle, Jens; Turner, Martin R; Malaspina, Andrea

    2015-06-02

    To test blood and CSF neurofilament light chain (NfL) levels in relation to disease progression and survival in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Using an electrochemiluminescence immunoassay, NfL levels were measured in samples from 2 cohorts of patients with sporadic ALS and healthy controls, recruited in London (ALS/control, plasma: n = 103/42) and Oxford (ALS/control, serum: n = 64/36; paired CSF: n = 38/20). NfL levels in patients were measured at regular intervals for up to 3 years. Change in ALS Functional Rating Scale-Revised score was used to assess disease progression. Survival was evaluated using Cox regression and Kaplan-Meier analysis. CSF, serum, and plasma NfL discriminated patients with ALS from healthy controls with high sensitivity (97%, 89%, 90%, respectively) and specificity (95%, 75%, 71%, respectively). CSF NfL was highly correlated with serum levels (r = 0.78, p NfL levels were approximately 4 times as high in patients with ALS compared with controls in both cohorts, and maintained a relatively constant expression during follow-up. Blood NfL levels at recruitment were strong, independent predictors of survival. The highest tertile of blood NfL at baseline had a mortality hazard ratio of 3.91 (95% confidence interval 1.98-7.94, p NfL level is an easily accessible biomarker with prognostic value in ALS. The individually relatively stable levels longitudinally offer potential for NfL as a pharmacodynamic biomarker in future therapeutic trials. This report provides Class III evidence that the NfL electrochemiluminescence immunoassay accurately distinguishes patients with sporadic ALS from healthy controls. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  6. G-CSF protects motoneurons against axotomy-induced apoptotic death in neonatal mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pitzer Claudia

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF is a growth factor essential for generation of neutrophilic granulocytes. Apart from this hematopoietic function, we have recently uncovered potent neuroprotective and regenerative properties of G-CSF in the central nervous system (CNS. The G-CSF receptor and G-CSF itself are expressed in α motoneurons, G-CSF protects motoneurons, and improves outcome in the SOD1(G93A transgenic mouse model for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS. In vitro, G-CSF acts anti-apoptotically on motoneuronal cells. Due to the pleiotrophic effects of G-CSF and the complexity of the SOD1 transgenic ALS models it was however not possible to clearly distinguish between directly mediated anti-apoptotic and indirectly protective effects on motoneurons. Here we studied whether G-CSF is able to protect motoneurons from purely apoptotic cell death induced by a monocausal paradigm, neonatal sciatic nerve axotomy. Results We performed sciatic nerve axotomy in neonatal mice overexpressing G-CSF in the CNS and found that G-CSF transgenic mice displayed significantly higher numbers of surviving lumbar motoneurons 4 days following axotomy than their littermate controls. Also, surviving motoneurons in G-CSF overexpressing animals were larger, suggesting additional trophic effects of this growth factor. Conclusions In this model of pure apoptotic cell death the protective effects of G-CSF indicate direct actions of G-CSF on motoneurons in vivo. This shows that G-CSF exerts potent anti-apoptotic activities towards motoneurons in vivo and suggests that the protection offered by G-CSF in ALS mouse models is due to its direct neuroprotective activity.

  7. Fatal cerebral edema associated with serine deficiency in CSF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keularts, Irene M L W; Leroy, Piet L J M; Rubio-Gozalbo, Estela M; Spaapen, Leo J M; Weber, Biene; Dorland, Bert; de Koning, Tom J; Verhoeven-Duif, Nanda M

    2010-12-01

    Two young girls without a notable medical history except for asthma presented with an acute toxic encephalopathy with very low serine concentrations both in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) comparable to patients with 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (3-PGDH) deficiency. Clinical symptoms and enzyme measurement (in one patient) excluded 3-PGDH deficiency. Deficiencies in other serine biosynthesis enzymes were highly unlikely on clinical grounds. On basis of the fasting state, ketone bodies and lactate in plasma, urine and CSF, we speculate that reduced serine levels were due to its use as gluconeogenic substrate, conversion to pyruvate by brain serine racemase or decreased L-serine production because of a lack of glucose. These are the first strikingly similar cases of patients with a clear secondary serine deficiency associated with a toxic encephalopathy.

  8. An Alzheimer's Disease-Derived Biomarker Signature Identifies Parkinson's Disease Patients with Dementia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yosef Berlyand

    Full Text Available Biomarkers from multiple modalities have been shown to correlate with cognition in Parkinson's disease (PD and in Alzheimer's disease (AD. However, the relationships of these markers with each other, and the use of multiple markers in concert to predict an outcome of interest, are areas that are much less explored. Our objectives in this study were (1 to evaluate relationships among 17 biomarkers previously reported to associate with cognition in PD or AD and (2 to test performance of a five-biomarker classifier trained to recognize AD in identifying PD with dementia (PDD. To do this, we evaluated a cross-sectional cohort of PD patients (n = 75 across a spectrum of cognitive abilities. All PD participants had 17 baseline biomarkers from clinical, genetic, biochemical, and imaging modalities measured, and correlations among biomarkers were assessed by Spearman's rho and by hierarchical clustering. We found that internal correlation among all 17 candidate biomarkers was modest, showing a maximum pairwise correlation coefficient of 0.51. However, a five-marker subset panel derived from AD (CSF total tau, CSF phosphorylated tau, CSF amyloid beta 42, APOE genotype, and SPARE-AD imaging score discriminated cognitively normal PD patients vs. PDD patients with 80% accuracy, when employed in a classifier originally trained to recognize AD. Thus, an AD-derived biomarker signature may identify PDD patients with moderately high accuracy, suggesting mechanisms shared with AD in some PDD patients. Based on five measures readily obtained during life, this AD-derived signature may prove useful in identifying PDD patients most likely to respond to AD-based crossover therapies.

  9. Inflammatory biomarkers for AMD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, Chloe M; Wright, Alan F

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness worldwide, affecting an estimated 50 million individuals aged over 65 years.Environmental and genetic risk-factors implicate chronic inflammation in the etiology of AMD, contributing to the formation of drusen, retinal pigment epithelial cell dysfunction and photoreceptor cell death. Consistent with a role for chronic inflammation in AMD pathogenesis, several inflammatory mediators, including complement components, chemokines and cytokines, are elevated at both the local and systemic levels in AMD patients. These mediators have diverse roles in the alternative complement pathway, including recruitment of inflammatory cells, activation of the inflammasome, promotion of neovascularisation and in the resolution of inflammation. The utility of inflammatory biomarkers in assessing individual risk and progression of the disease is controversial. However, understanding the role of these inflammatory mediators in AMD onset, progression and response to treatment may increase our knowledge of disease pathogenesis and provide novel therapeutic options in the future.

  10. Endoscopic endonasal multilayer repair of traumatic CSF rhinorrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Ahmed Aly; Okasha, Mohamed; Elwany, Samy

    2016-04-01

    The incidence of traumatic CSF has increased in recent years due to increased incidence of road traffic accidents (RTA) as well the increasing number of endoscopic sinus surgeries (ESS). The objective of this study is to present our experience in management of traumatic CSF leaks using the endoscopic multilayer repair technique. Forty-two patients (aged 10-75 years, 30 males and 12 females) presenting with confirmed post-traumatic CSF rhinorrhea were operated upon between January 2007 and December 2013. The endoscopic multilayer technique was used in all cases. Electromagnetic navigation was used in some cases. All cases presented with intermittent watery rhinorrhea. The duration of the rhinorrhea ranged from 3 days to 1 year before repair. One case presented after 10 years from the causative trauma. Ten cases had a history of meningitis. Nine cases had more than one defect. Iatrogenic defects were larger than defects following accidental trauma. Two cases, following RTA, developed pseudo-aneurysm of internal carotid artery. Ten cases had associated pneumocephalus. The mean duration of postoperative hospitalization was 6 days (range 4-8 days). The mean follow-up duration was 31.2 +/- 11.4 months (range 16-48 months). None of our patient developed serious intra- or postoperative complications. Only one case required another surgery to repair a missed second defect. Post-traumatic CSF leaks can be successfully managed via the endonasal endoscopic route using the multilayer repair technique. It is important to look for multiple defects in these cases. CT angiography is recommended for traumatic leaks involving the lateral wall of the sphenoid sinus to diagnose or exclude the development of pseudo-aneurysm of the internal carotid artery.

  11. [Differential diagnosis of corticobasal syndrome (CBS) and its biomarkers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokuda, Takahiko

    2013-01-01

    Corticobasal degeneration (CBD) was initially thought to represent a clinicopathological entity, but recent studies have shown its considerable clinicopathological heterogeneity. Thus, the constellation of the findings initially considered characteristic of CBD is now named "corticobasal syndrome" (CBS), while the term "CBD" is used for the histopathological disorder. Multiple phenotypes associated with CBD pathology and multiple diseases associated with CBS, the latter of which are called "CBD mimickers," make the correct diagnosis of these conditions on the basis of only clinical symptoms and signs difficult. Therefore, the development of specific biomarkers for diagnosing each causative disease of CBS is extremely important. Abnormal accumulations of the microtubule-associated tau protein are found in both neurons and glia, and CBD is thus considered one of the tauopathies. Although some studies have measured total and phosphorylated tau in the CSF of patients with CBS, their results are inconclusive. Disease-specific truncation and/or phosphorylation of tau protein and its fragments in the CSF would be a promising biomarker candidate; however, its effectiveness still needs to be confirmed by further studies. Progress in biomarker development to differentiate CBD from CBD mimickers has been slow, but it is essential to improve diagnostic accuracy and to develop disease-modifying therapies.

  12. Metabolic profiling of CSF: evidence that early intervention may impact on disease progression and outcome in schizophrenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine Holmes

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The identification of schizophrenia biomarkers is a crucial step towards improving current diagnosis, developing new presymptomatic treatments, identifying high-risk individuals and disease subgroups, and assessing the efficacy of preventative interventions at a rate that is not currently possible. METHODS AND FINDINGS: (1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in conjunction with computerized pattern recognition analysis were employed to investigate metabolic profiles of a total of 152 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF samples from drug-naïve or minimally treated patients with first-onset paranoid schizophrenia (referred to as "schizophrenia" in the following text and healthy controls. Partial least square discriminant analysis showed a highly significant separation of patients with first-onset schizophrenia away from healthy controls. Short-term treatment with antipsychotic medication resulted in a normalization of the disease signature in over half the patients, well before overt clinical improvement. No normalization was observed in patients in which treatment had not been initiated at first presentation, providing the first molecular evidence for the importance of early intervention for psychotic disorders. Furthermore, the alterations identified in drug-naïve patients could be validated in a test sample set achieving a sensitivity and specificity of 82% and 85%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest brain-specific alterations in glucoregulatory processes in the CSF of drug-naïve patients with first-onset schizophrenia, implying that these abnormalities are intrinsic to the disease, rather than a side effect of antipsychotic medication. Short-term treatment with atypical antipsychotic medication resulted in a normalization of the CSF disease signature in half the patients well before a clinical improvement would be expected. Furthermore, our results suggest that the initiation of antipsychotic treatment during a first

  13. Consistent model driven architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niepostyn, Stanisław J.

    2015-09-01

    The goal of the MDA is to produce software systems from abstract models in a way where human interaction is restricted to a minimum. These abstract models are based on the UML language. However, the semantics of UML models is defined in a natural language. Subsequently the verification of consistency of these diagrams is needed in order to identify errors in requirements at the early stage of the development process. The verification of consistency is difficult due to a semi-formal nature of UML diagrams. We propose automatic verification of consistency of the series of UML diagrams originating from abstract models implemented with our consistency rules. This Consistent Model Driven Architecture approach enables us to generate automatically complete workflow applications from consistent and complete models developed from abstract models (e.g. Business Context Diagram). Therefore, our method can be used to check practicability (feasibility) of software architecture models.

  14. Potential oxidative stress biomarkers of mild cognitive impairment due to Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Blanco, Ana; Baquero, Miguel; Vento, Máximo; Gil, Esperanza; Bataller, Luis; Cháfer-Pericás, Consuelo

    2017-02-15

    The high and increasing incidence of Alzheimer Disease (AD) worldwide is a major global concern. Classical diagnosis is carried out in the dementia phase, often in the moderate stages when treatment efficacy is limited. Nowadays, early diagnosis, even in pre-dementia stages, is possible in selected cases within an appropriate clinical setting, employing cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) sample analysis and neuroimaging procedures. In spite of the accurate diagnosis achieved by novel CSF biomarkers or positron emission tomography beta-amyloid tracers, these tests are invasive and expensive. Therefore, important work is being carried out to discover reliable biomarkers in peripheral biofluids (blood, plasma, urine) to be incorporated in clinical routine for early AD diagnosis. Although the nature of AD pathogenesis is complex, it is known that oxidative stress plays a key role, for which biomarkers are easily determined in peripheral biofluids. This review summarizes recent research on oxidative stress biomarkers in mild cognitive impairment due to AD. Among them, a promising research line is the study of the relationship between lipid peroxidation biomarkers and early AD clinical features. Results show a pronounced imbalance between scientific production and clinical reality due to the lack of clinical validation. We conclude that an important field in oxidative stress biomarkers could be developed with the aim to help clinicians in early disease diagnosis, effective treatment initiation and reliable disease monitoring. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. PET measurements of cerebral metabolism corrected for CSF contributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chawluk, J.; Alavi, A.; Dann, R.; Kushner, M.J.; Hurtig, H.; Zimmerman, R.A.; Reivich, M.

    1984-01-01

    Thirty-three subjects have been studied with PET and anatomic imaging (proton-NMR and/or CT) in order to determine the effect of cerebral atrophy on calculations of metabolic rates. Subgroups of neurologic disease investigated include stroke, brain tumor, epilepsy, psychosis, and dementia. Anatomic images were digitized through a Vidicon camera and analyzed volumetrically. Relative areas for ventricles, sulci, and brain tissue were calculated. Preliminary analysis suggests that ventricular volumes as determined by NMR and CT are similar, while sulcal volumes are larger on NMR scans. Metabolic rates (18F-FDG) were calculated before and after correction for CSF spaces, with initial focus upon dementia and normal aging. Correction for atrophy led to a greater increase (%) in global metabolic rates in demented individuals (18.2 +- 5.3) compared to elderly controls (8.3 +- 3.0,p < .05). A trend towards significantly lower glucose metabolism in demented subjects before CSF correction was not seen following correction for atrophy. These data suggest that volumetric analysis of NMR images may more accurately reflect the degree of cerebral atrophy, since NMR does not suffer from beam hardening artifact due to bone-parenchyma juxtapositions. Furthermore, appropriate correction for CSF spaces should be employed if current resolution PET scanners are to accurately measure residual brain tissue metabolism in various pathological states.

  16. Neurocysticercosis: relationship between Taenia antigen levels in CSF and MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abraham, Ronaldo, E-mail: rnabraham@uol.com.b [University of Taubate (UNITAU), Taubate, SP (Brazil). Medicine Dept.; Livramento, Jose Antonio; Machado, Luis dos Ramos [University of Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Medical School. Neurology Dept.; Leite, Claudia da Costa [University of Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Medical School. Radiology Dept.; Pardini, Alessandra Xavier; Vaz, Adelaide Jose [University of Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Biomedical Science Institute. Immunology Dept.

    2010-02-15

    Objective: to determine the relationship between Taenia antigen (TA) detection in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in patients with definite diagnosis of neurocysticercosis (NC). Method: sixty-three patients with definite diagnosis of NC were submitted to a MRI of the brain, and to a CSF examination, with a meticulous search for TA by ELISA. Results: TA detection was positive in 36 patients (57.1%). A total of 836 lesions were analyzed, greatly within the cerebral parenchyma (98.7 of the lesions). Intact or non-degenerating cysts were the most common evolutive phase observed (50.4% of all lesions), 22.1% were degenerating cysts and 19.5% calcified cysts. We observed a significant relationship between TA levels detected and the total number of lesions and the number of non-degenerating cysts, but not with calcified lesions. Conclusion: according to our results, we propose at least four important types of contribution: TA detection may allow etiologic diagnosis in transitional phases of NC, with non-characteristic images; in final stages of evolution of cysticercoids in the CNS, lesions may not appear on CT or MRI, and TA detection may contribute to a definite etiologic diagnosis; TA detection may permit diagnosis of NC in some patients with previous negative tests for antibody detection in CSF; TA detection may represent an accurate marker of disease activity in the epileptic form of NC. (author)

  17. Silencing of microRNA-155 in mice during acute inflammatory response leads to derepression of c/ebp Beta and down-regulation of G-CSF

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Worm, Jesper; Stenvang, Jan; Petri, Andreas;

    2009-01-01

    microRNA-155 (miR-155) has been implicated as a central regulator of the immune system, but its function during acute inflammatory responses is still poorly understood. Here we show that exposure of cultured macrophages and mice to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) leads to up-regulation of miR-155......-stimulating factor (G-CSF), a central regulator of granulopoiesis during inflammatory responses. Consistent with these data, we show that silencing of miR-155 in LPS-treated mice by systemically administered LNA-antimiR results in derepression of the c/ebp Beta isoforms and down-regulation of G-CSF expression...

  18. New sepsis biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolores Limongi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Sepsis remains a leading cause of death in the intensive care units and in all age groups worldwide. Early recognition and diagnosis are key to achieving improved outcomes. Therefore, novel biomarkers that might better inform clinicians treating such patients are surely needed. The main attributes of successful biomarkers would be high sensitivity, specificity, possibility of bedside monitoring and financial accessibility. A panel of sepsis biomarkers along with currently used laboratory tests will facilitate earlier diagnosis, timely treatment and improved outcome may be more effective than single biomarkers. In this review, we summarize the most recent advances on sepsis biomarkers evaluated in clinical and experimental studies.

  19. New sepsis biomarkers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dolores Limongi; Cartesio D’Agostini; Marco Ciotti

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis remains a leading cause of death in the intensive care units and in all age groups worldwide. Early recognition and diagnosis are key to achieving improved outcomes.Therefore, novel biomarkers that might better inform clinicians treating such patients are surely needed. The main attributes of successful biomarkers would be high sensitivity,specificity, possibility of bedside monitoring and financial accessibility. A panel of sepsis biomarkers along with currently used laboratory tests will facilitate earlier diagnosis,timely treatment and improved outcome may be more effective than single biomarkers. In this review, we summarize the most recent advances on sepsis biomarkers evaluated in clinical and experimental studies.

  20. New sepsis biomarkers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dolores Limongi; Cartesio DAgostini; Marco Ciotti

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis remains a leading cause of death in the intensive care units and in all age groups worldwide. Early recognition and diagnosis are key to achieving improved outcomes. Therefore, novel biomarkers that might better inform clinicians treating such patients are surely needed. The main attributes of successful biomarkers would be high sensitivity, specificity, possibility of bedside monitoring and financial accessibility. A panel of sepsis biomarkers along with currently used laboratory tests will facilitate earlier diagnosis, timely treatment and improved outcome may be more effective than single biomarkers. In this review, we summarize the most recent advances on sepsis biomarkers evaluated in clinical and experimental studies.

  1. Coma from wall suction-induced CSF leak complicating spinal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehnel, Corey R; Razmara, Ali; Feske, Steven K

    2014-03-12

    A 72-year-old woman was admitted for elective L4/L5 laminectomy. The operative procedure was extradural, and a Jackson-Pratt (JP) drain was placed in the tissue bed and set to wall suction during skin closure. During closure, the patient developed a 15 s period of asystole. The patient was haemodynamically stable, but was comatose for 3 days postoperatively. Cardiac enzymes and EEG were unrevealing. Head CT showed traces of subarachnoid haemorrhage and signs suggestive of cerebral anoxia. JP drain at the incision produced 170-210 mL/day of fluid, positive for β-2 transferrin, indicating cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The patient fully returned to baseline on hospital day 10. MRI on hospital day 8 normalised. The reversible coma and radiographic findings were most consistent with acute intracranial hypotension relating to acute loss of CSF. Because radiographic findings can mimic hypoxic-ischaemic injury, acute intracranial hypotension should be considered in the differential diagnosis of postoperative coma after cranial or spinal surgery.

  2. No consistent bimetric gravity?

    CERN Document Server

    Deser, S; Waldron, A

    2013-01-01

    We discuss the prospects for a consistent, nonlinear, partially massless (PM), gauge symmetry of bimetric gravity (BMG). Just as for single metric massive gravity, ultimate consistency of both BMG and the putative PM BMG theory relies crucially on this gauge symmetry. We argue, however, that it does not exist.

  3. The effects of natalizumab on inflammatory mediators in multiple sclerosis: prospects for treatment-sensitive biomarkers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khademi, M.; Bornsen, L.; Rafatnia, F.;

    2009-01-01

    increased production of the anti-inflammatory mediator IL-10. The increased systemic cytokines may impede the improvement of certain clinical measures like fatigue. The affected mediators seem to be sensitive to an immune-modifying treatment which could be used as biomarkers for this therapy Udgivelsesdato......BACKGROUND: Natalizumab affects systemic cytokine expressions and clinical course in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). We analyzed levels of inflammatory cytokines in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), levels of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP......)-9 and osteopontin (OPN) in CSF, and clinical outcome measures in 22 natalizumab-treated RRMS patients. METHODS: mRNA levels of cytokines in cells were detected with real-time RT-PCR. Protein levels of OPN and MMP-9 were measured by ELISA. RESULTS: Natalizumab reduced CSF cell counts (P

  4. Autoantibody profiling on human proteome microarray for biomarker discovery in cerebrospinal fluid and sera of neuropsychiatric lupus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaojun Hu

    Full Text Available Autoantibodies in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF from patients with neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus (NPSLE may be potential biomarkers for prediction, diagnosis, or prognosis of NPSLE. We used a human proteome microarray with~17,000 unique full-length human proteins to investigate autoantibodies associated with NPSLE. Twenty-nine CSF specimens from 12 NPSLE, 7 non-NPSLE, and 10 control (non-systemic lupus erythematosuspatients were screened for NPSLE-associated autoantibodies with proteome microarrays. A focused autoantigen microarray of candidate NPSLE autoantigens was applied to profile a larger cohort of CSF with patient-matched sera. We identified 137 autoantigens associated with NPSLE. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis revealed that these autoantigens were enriched for functions involved in neurological diseases (score = 43.Anti-proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA was found in the CSF of NPSLE and non-NPSLE patients. The positive rates of 4 autoantibodies in CSF specimens were significantly different between the SLE (i.e., NPSLE and non-NPSLE and control groups: anti-ribosomal protein RPLP0, anti-RPLP1, anti-RPLP2, and anti-TROVE2 (also known as anti-Ro/SS-A. The positive rate for anti-SS-A associated with NPSLE was higher than that for non-NPSLE (31.11% cf. 10.71%; P = 0.045.Further analysis showed that anti-SS-A in CSF specimens was related to neuropsychiatric syndromes of the central nervous system in SLE (P = 0.009. Analysis with Spearman's rank correlation coefficient indicated that the titers of anti-RPLP2 and anti-SS-A in paired CSF and serum specimens significantly correlated. Human proteome microarrays offer a powerful platform to discover novel autoantibodies in CSF samples. Anti-SS-A autoantibodies may be potential CSF markers for NPSLE.

  5. Cell cycle and aging, morphogenesis, and response to stimuli genes are individualized biomarkers of glioblastoma progression and survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Southey Bruce R

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glioblastoma is a complex multifactorial disorder that has swift and devastating consequences. Few genes have been consistently identified as prognostic biomarkers of glioblastoma survival. The goal of this study was to identify general and clinical-dependent biomarker genes and biological processes of three complementary events: lifetime, overall and progression-free glioblastoma survival. Methods A novel analytical strategy was developed to identify general associations between the biomarkers and glioblastoma, and associations that depend on cohort groups, such as race, gender, and therapy. Gene network inference, cross-validation and functional analyses further supported the identified biomarkers. Results A total of 61, 47 and 60 gene expression profiles were significantly associated with lifetime, overall, and progression-free survival, respectively. The vast majority of these genes have been previously reported to be associated with glioblastoma (35, 24, and 35 genes, respectively or with other cancers (10, 19, and 15 genes, respectively and the rest (16, 4, and 10 genes, respectively are novel associations. Pik3r1, E2f3, Akr1c3, Csf1, Jag2, Plcg1, Rpl37a, Sod2, Topors, Hras, Mdm2, Camk2g, Fstl1, Il13ra1, Mtap and Tp53 were associated with multiple survival events. Most genes (from 90 to 96% were associated with survival in a general or cohort-independent manner and thus the same trend is observed across all clinical levels studied. The most extreme associations between profiles and survival were observed for Syne1, Pdcd4, Ighg1, Tgfa, Pla2g7, and Paics. Several genes were found to have a cohort-dependent association with survival and these associations are the basis for individualized prognostic and gene-based therapies. C2, Egfr, Prkcb, Igf2bp3, and Gdf10 had gender-dependent associations; Sox10, Rps20, Rab31, and Vav3 had race-dependent associations; Chi3l1, Prkcb, Polr2d, and Apool had therapy-dependent associations

  6. European Mitochondrial DNA Haplogroups are Associated with Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers of Inflammation in HIV Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuels, David C.; Kallianpur, Asha R.; Ellis, Ronald J.; Bush, William S.; Letendre, Scott; Franklin, Donald; Grant, Igor; Hulgan, Todd

    2017-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroups are ancestry-related patterns of single-nucleotide polymorphisms that are associated with differential mitochondrial function in model systems, neurodegenerative diseases in HIV-negative populations, and chronic complications of HIV infection, including neurocognitive impairment. We hypothesized that mtDNA haplogroups are associated with neuroinflammation in HIV-infected adults. Methods CNS HIV Antiretroviral Therapy Effects Research (CHARTER) is a US-based observational study of HIV-infected adults who underwent standardized neurocognitive assessments. Participants who consented to DNA collection underwent whole blood mtDNA sequencing, and a subset also underwent lumbar puncture. IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α (high-sensitivity), and IP-10 were measured in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) by immunoassay. Multivariable regression of mtDNA haplogroups and log-transformed CSF biomarkers were stratified by genetic ancestry using whole-genome nuclear DNA genotyping (European [EA], African [AA], or Hispanic ancestry [HA]), and adjusted for age, sex, antiretroviral therapy (ART), detectable CSF HIV RNA, and CD4 nadir. A total of 384 participants had both CSF cytokine measures and genetic data (45% EA, 44% AA, 11% HA, 22% female, median age 43 years, 74% on ART). Results In analyses stratified by the 3 continental ancestry groups, no haplogroups were significantly associated with the 4 biomarkers. In the subgroup of participants with undetectable plasma HIV RNA on ART, European haplogroup H participants had significantly lower CSF TNF-α (P = 0.001). Conclusions Lower CSF TNF-α may indicate lower neuroinflammation in the haplogroup H participants with well-controlled HIV on ART.

  7. Prizes for consistency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiscock, S.

    1986-07-01

    The importance of consistency in coal quality has become of increasing significance recently, with the current trend towards using coal from a range of sources. A significant development has been the swing in responsibilities for coal quality. The increasing demand for consistency in quality has led to a re-examination of where in the trade and transport chain the quality should be assessed and where further upgrading of inspection and preparation facilities are required. Changes are in progress throughout the whole coal transport chain which will improve consistency of delivered coal quality. These include installation of beneficiation plant at coal mines, export terminals, and on the premises of end users. It is suggested that one of the keys to success for the coal industry will be the ability to provide coal of a consistent quality.

  8. Chimeric classical swine fever (CSF)-Japanese encephalitis (JE) viral particles as a non-transmissible bivalent marker vaccine candidate against CSF and JE infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    A trans-complemented CSF- JE chimeric viral replicon was constructed using an infectious cDNA clone of the CSF virus (CSFV) Alfort/187 strain. The E2 gene of CSFV Alfort/187 strain was deleted and the resultant plasmid pA187delE2 was inserted by a fragment containing the region coding for a truncate...

  9. Neurofilaments as Biomarkers for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Robert David; David, Michael; McCombe, Pamela Ann

    2016-01-01

    Background To allow early diagnosis and monitoring of disease progression, there is a need for biomarkers in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Neurofilaments (NF) are emerging protein biomarkers in other neurological diseases, and are of possible use in ALS. Objective The aim of this study is to evaluate the utility of NF levels as blood or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarker in patients with ALS. Methods A systematic search of Pubmed, Embase and Scopus was performed. Methodological quality assessment was applied to refine the final search results. Meta-analysis of the data was performed. Results Level of NF heavy chain and light chains were significantly elevated in the CSF of ALS patients compared to healthy controls/controls without parenchymal central nervous system (CNS) involvement and ALS mimic disease patients. NF light chain level in CSF was higher in ALS patients than in neurological patients with CNS involvement (SMD = 1.352, P = 0.01). NF light chain concentration in blood was higher in ALS patients than healthy controls/controls without CNS involvement (SMD = 1.448, P<0.0001). NF heavy chain levels in CSF were negatively correlated disease duration and ALSFRS-R ((r = -0.447, P<0.0001; r = -0.486, P<0.0001). NF light chain levels in CSF were negatively correlated with disease duration (r = -0.273, P = 0.011). Conclusion NF heavy and light chain levels have potential use as a marker of neural degeneration in ALS, but are not specific for the disease, and are more likely to be used as measures of disease progression. PMID:27732645

  10. Metabolomics Identifies Multiple Candidate Biomarkers to Diagnose and Stage Human African Trypanosomiasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Isabel M.; Daly, Rónán; Courtioux, Bertrand; Cattanach, Amy M.; Biéler, Sylvain; Ndung’u, Joseph M.; Bisser, Sylvie; Barrett, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    Treatment for human African trypanosomiasis is dependent on the species of trypanosome causing the disease and the stage of the disease (stage 1 defined by parasites being present in blood and lymphatics whilst for stage 2, parasites are found beyond the blood-brain barrier in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)). Currently, staging relies upon detecting the very low number of parasites or elevated white blood cell numbers in CSF. Improved staging is desirable, as is the elimination of the need for lumbar puncture. Here we use metabolomics to probe samples of CSF, plasma and urine from 40 Angolan patients infected with Trypanosoma brucei gambiense, at different disease stages. Urine samples provided no robust markers indicative of infection or stage of infection due to inherent variability in urine concentrations. Biomarkers in CSF were able to distinguish patients at stage 1 or advanced stage 2 with absolute specificity. Eleven metabolites clearly distinguished the stage in most patients and two of these (neopterin and 5-hydroxytryptophan) showed 100% specificity and sensitivity between our stage 1 and advanced stage 2 samples. Neopterin is an inflammatory biomarker previously shown in CSF of stage 2 but not stage 1 patients. 5-hydroxytryptophan is an important metabolite in the serotonin synthetic pathway, the key pathway in determining somnolence, thus offering a possible link to the eponymous symptoms of “sleeping sickness”. Plasma also yielded several biomarkers clearly indicative of the presence (87% sensitivity and 95% specificity) and stage of disease (92% sensitivity and 81% specificity). A logistic regression model including these metabolites showed clear separation of patients being either at stage 1 or advanced stage 2 or indeed diseased (both stages) versus control. PMID:27941966

  11. Consistent sets contradict

    CERN Document Server

    Kent, A

    1996-01-01

    In the consistent histories formulation of quantum theory, the probabilistic predictions and retrodictions made from observed data depend on the choice of a consistent set. We show that this freedom allows the formalism to retrodict several contradictory propositions which correspond to orthogonal commuting projections and which all have probability one. We also show that the formalism makes contradictory probability one predictions when applied to generalised time-symmetric quantum mechanics.

  12. The Vegetation Red Edge Spectroscopic Feature as a Surface Biomarker

    CERN Document Server

    Seager, S

    2002-01-01

    The search for Earth-like extrasolar planets is in part motivated by the potential detection of spectroscopic biomarkers. Spectroscopic biomarkers are spectral features that are either consistent with life, indicative of habitability, or provide clues to a planet's habitability. Most attention so far has been given to atmospheric biomarkers, gases such as O2, O3, H2O, CO, and CH4. Here we discuss surface biomarkers. Surface biomarkers that have large, distinct, abrupt changes in their spectra may be detectable in an extrasolar planet's spectrum at wavelengths that penetrate to the planetary surface. Earth has such a surface biomarker: the vegetation "red edge" spectroscopic feature. Recent interest in Earth's surface biomarker has motivated Earthshine observations of the spatially unresolved Earth and two recent studies may have detected the vegetation red edge feature in Earth's hemispherically integrated spectrum. A photometric time series in different colors should help in detecting unusual surface feature...

  13. Biomarkers in clinical medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao-He; Huang, Shuwen; Kerr, David

    2011-01-01

    Biomarkers have been used in clinical medicine for decades. With the rise of genomics and other advances in molecular biology, biomarker studies have entered a whole new era and hold promise for early diagnosis and effective treatment of many diseases. A biomarker is a characteristic that is objectively measured and evaluated as an indicator of normal biological processes, pathogenic processes or pharmacologic responses to a therapeutic intervention (1). They can be classified into five categories based on their application in different disease stages: 1) antecedent biomarkers to identify the risk of developing an illness, 2) screening biomarkers to screen for subclinical disease, 3) diagnostic biomarkers to recognize overt disease, 4) staging biomarkers to categorise disease severity, and 5) prognostic biomarkers to predict future disease course, including recurrence, response to therapy, and monitoring efficacy of therapy (1). Biomarkers can indicate a variety of health or disease characteristics, including the level or type of exposure to an environmental factor, genetic susceptibility, genetic responses to environmental exposures, markers of subclinical or clinical disease, or indicators of response to therapy. This chapter will focus on how these biomarkers have been used in preventive medicine, diagnostics, therapeutics and prognostics, as well as public health and their current status in clinical practice.

  14. Biomarkers of Parkinson's disease and Dementia with Lewy bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henchcliffe, Claire; Dodel, Richard; Beal, M Flint

    2011-12-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) and Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) are progressive and disabling neurodegenerative disorders, in which signs and symptoms overlap with each other and with other neurodegenerative conditions. Currently, diagnosis, measurement of progression, and response to therapeutic intervention rely upon clinical observation. However, there remains a critical need for validated biomarkers in each of these areas. A definitive diagnostic test would improve clinical management and enrollment into clinical trials. An objective measure of progression is vitally important in identifying neuroprotective interventions. Biomarkers may also provide insight into pathogenesis, and might therefore suggest possible novel targets for therapeutic intervention. In addition, certain biomarkers might be of use in monitoring the biochemical and physiological effects of therapeutic interventions. Development of diagnostic biomarkers has focused until recently upon imaging techniques based upon measuring loss of dopamine neurons. Additionally, advances in understanding the genetic contribution to neurodegenerative disorders, in particular in PD, have identified multiple causative genes and risk factors that in some cases may help estimate PD risk. However, recent availability of increasingly sophisticated bioinformatics technology has rendered development of fluid biomarkers feasible, opening the possibility of generally accessible blood or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) tests that could impact upon diagnosis, management, and research in PD, PDD, and DLB.

  15. MR imaging of pulsatile CSF movement in hydrocephalus communicans before and after CSF shunt implantation. Magnetresonanztomographische Darstellung der Liquorpulsbewegung bei Hydrozephalus communicans vor und nach Shuntanlage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldmann, A. (Abt. Radiologie 1, Ulm Univ. (Germany)); Kunz, U. (Abt. Neurochirurgie, Bundeswehrkrankenhaus Ulm (Germany)); Rotermund, F. (Abt. Neurochirurgie, Bundeswehrkrankenhaus Ulm (Germany)); Friedrich, J.M. (Abt. Radiologie 1, Ulm Univ. (Germany)); Schnarkowski, P. (Abt. Radiologie 1, Ulm Univ. (Germany))

    1992-12-01

    16 patients with hydrocephalus communicans and 5 healthy volunteers were examined to demonstrate the pattern of the pulsatile CSF flow. After implantation of a CSF shunt system the same patients were examined again to show the influence of the shunt on the CSF pulsations. We used a flow-sensitised, cardiac-gated 2D FLASH sequence and analysed the phase and magnitude images. It could be shown that most patients (n=12) had a hyerdynamic pulsatile flow preoperatively. After shunt implantation the pulsatile CSF motion and the clinical symptoms were improved in 8 of these patients. MRI of pulsatile CSF flow movement seems to be a helpful noninvasive tool to estimate the prognosis of a shunt implantation in patients with hydrocephalus communicans. (orig.)

  16. Cerebrospinal Fluid Inflammatory Biomarkers Reflect Clinical Severity in Huntington’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Lauren M.; McColgan, Peter; Robertson, Nicola; Tabrizi, Sarah J.; Zetterberg, Henrik; Wild, Edward J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Immune system activation is involved in Huntington’s disease (HD) pathogenesis and biomarkers for this process could be relevant to study the disease and characterise the therapeutic response to specific interventions. We aimed to study inflammatory cytokines and microglial markers in the CSF of HD patients. Methods CSF TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, YKL-40, chitotriosidase, total tau and neurofilament light chain (NFL) from 23 mutation carriers and 14 healthy controls were assayed. Results CSF TNF-α and IL-1β were below the limit of detection. Mutation carriers had higher YKL-40 (p = 0.003), chitotriosidase (p = 0.015) and IL-6 (p = 0.041) than controls. YKL-40 significantly correlated with disease stage (p = 0.007), UHDRS total functional capacity score (r = -0.46, p = 0.016), and UHDRS total motor score (r = 0.59, p = 4.5*10−4) after adjustment for age. Conclusion YKL-40 levels in CSF may, after further study, come to have a role as biomarkers for some aspects of HD. Further investigation is needed to support our exploratory findings. PMID:27657730

  17. [Alzheimer's disease cerebro-spinal fluid biomarkers: A clinical research tool sometimes useful in daily clinical practice of memory clinics for the diagnosis of complex cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnin, E; Dumurgier, J; Bouaziz-Amar, E; Bombois, S; Wallon, D; Gabelle, A; Lehmann, S; Blanc, F; Bousiges, O; Hannequin, D; Jung, B; Miguet-Alfonsi, C; Quillard, M; Pasquier, F; Peoc'h, K; Laplanche, J-L; Hugon, J; Paquet, C

    2017-04-01

    The role of biomarkers in clinical research was recently highlighted in the new criteria for the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. Cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers (total Tau protein, threonine 181 phosphorylated Tau protein and amyloid Aβ1-42 peptide) are associated with cerebral neuropathological lesions observed in Alzheimer's disease (neuronal death, neurofibrillary tangle with abnormal Tau deposits and amyloid plaque). Aβ1-40 amyloid peptide dosage helps to interpret Aβ1-42 results. As suggested in the latest international criteria and the French HAS (Haute Autorité de santé) recommendations, using theses CSF biomarkers should not be systematic but sometimes could be performed to improve confidence about the diagnostic of Alzheimer's disease in young subjects or in complex clinical situations. Future biomarkers actually in development will additionally help in diagnostic process (differential diagnosis) and in prognostic evaluation of neurodegenerative diseases.

  18. Phorbol ester-treated human acute myeloid leukemia cells secrete G-CSF, GM-CSF and erythroid differentiation factor into serum-free media in primary culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scher, W; Eto, Y; Ejima, D; Den, T; Svet-Moldavsky, I A

    1990-12-10

    Upon treatment with the phorbol ester, tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (PMA), peripheral mononuclear blood cells from patients with acute myeloid leukemia secrete into serum-free cell-conditioned media (PMA-CCM) at least three distinct nondialysable 'hematopoietic' factors: granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), granulocyte/macrophage-colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and erythroid differentiation factor (EDF, activin A). G-CSF was identified by its stimulation of [3H]thymidine incorporation into a G-CSF-responsive cell line, NSF-60, and the inhibition of its stimulation by a G-CSF-specific monoclonal antibody (MAB). GM-CSF was identified by its stimulation of [3H]thymidine incorporation into a GM-CSF-responsive line, TALL-101, and the inhibition of its stimulation by a GM-CSF-specific MAB. EDF was identified by its ability to stimulate erythroid differentiation in mouse erythroleukemia cell lines, its identical retention times to those of authentic EDF on three successive reverse-phase HPLC columns and characterization of its penultimate N-terminal residue as leucine which is the same as that of authentic EDF. Both authentic EDF and the erythroid-stimulating activity in PMA-CCM were found to act synergistically with a suboptimal inducing concentration of a well-studied inducing agent, dimethyl sulfoxide, in inducing erythroid differentiation. In addition, a fourth activity was observed in PMA-CCM: normal human fetal bone marrow cell-proliferation stimulating activity (FBMC-PSA). FBMC-PSA was identified by its ability to stimulate the growth of granulocytes and macrophages in FBMC suspension cultures, which neither recombinant G-CSF or GM-CSF were found to do.

  19. Sepsis biomarkers: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Biomarkers can be useful for identifying or ruling out sepsis, identifying patients who may benefit from specific therapies or assessing the response to therapy. Methods We used an electronic search of the PubMed database using the key words "sepsis" and "biomarker" to identify clinical and experimental studies which evaluated a biomarker in sepsis. Results The search retrieved 3370 references covering 178 different biomarkers. Conclusions Many biomarkers have been evaluated for use in sepsis. Most of the biomarkers had been tested clinically, primarily as prognostic markers in sepsis; relatively few have been used for diagnosis. None has sufficient specificity or sensitivity to be routinely employed in clinical practice. PCT and CRP have been most widely used, but even these have limited ability to distinguish sepsis from other inflammatory conditions or to predict outcome. PMID:20144219

  20. Biomarkers in sarcoidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Amit; Kalkanis, Alexandros; Judson, Marc A

    2016-11-01

    Numerous biomarkers have been evaluated for the diagnosis, assessment of disease activity, prognosis, and response to treatment in sarcoidosis. In this report, we discuss the clinical and research utility of several biomarkers used to evaluate sarcoidosis. Areas covered: The sarcoidosis biomarkers discussed include serologic tests, imaging studies, identification of inflammatory cells and genetic analyses. Literature was obtained from medical databases including PubMed and Web of Science. Expert commentary: Most of the biomarkers examined in sarcoidosis are not adequately specific or sensitive to be used in isolation to make clinical decisions. However, several sarcoidosis biomarkers have an important role in the clinical management of sarcoidosis when they are coupled with clinical data including the results of other biomarkers.

  1. Genetic loci associated with Alzheimer's disease and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers in a Finnish case-control cohort.

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    Lyzel S Elias-Sonnenschein

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To understand the relation between risk genes for Alzheimer's disease (AD and their influence on biomarkers for AD, we examined the association of AD in the Finnish cohort with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs from top AlzGene loci, genome-wide association studies (GWAS, and candidate gene studies; and tested the correlation between these SNPs and AD markers Aβ(1-42, total tau (t-tau, and phosphorylated tau (p-tau in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF. METHODS: We tested 25 SNPs for genetic association with clinical AD in our cohort comprised of 890 AD patients and 701-age matched healthy controls using logistic regression. For the correlational study with biomarkers, we tested 36 SNPs in a subset of 222 AD patients with available CSF using mixed models. Statistical analyses were adjusted for age, gender and APOE status. False discovery rate for multiple testing was applied. All participants were from academic hospital and research institutions in Finland. RESULTS: APOE-ε4, CLU rs11136000, and MS4A4A rs2304933 correlated with significantly decreased Aβ(1-42 (corrected p0.05. CONCLUSIONS: We provide evidence that APOE-ε4, CLU and MS4A4A, which have been identified in GWAS to be associated with AD, also significantly reduced CSF Aβ1-42 in AD. None of the other AlzGene and GWAS loci showed significant effects on CSF tau. The effects of other SNPs on CSF biomarkers and clinical AD diagnosis did not reach statistical significance. Our findings suggest that APOE-ε4, CLU and MS4A4A influence both AD risk and CSF Aβ1-42.

  2. T Lymphocytes and Inflammatory Mediators in the Interplay between Brain and Blood in Alzheimer's Disease: Potential Pools of New Biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mietelska-Porowska, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a chronic neurodegenerative disorder and the main cause of dementia. The disease is among the leading medical concerns of the modern world, because only symptomatic therapies are available, and no reliable, easily accessible biomarkers exist for AD detection and monitoring. Therefore extensive research is conducted to elucidate the mechanisms of AD pathogenesis, which seems to be heterogeneous and multifactorial. Recently much attention has been given to the neuroinflammation and activation of glial cells in the AD brain. Reports also highlighted the proinflammatory role of T lymphocytes infiltrating the AD brain. However, in AD molecular and cellular alterations involving T cells and immune mediators occur not only in the brain, but also in the blood and the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Here we review alterations concerning T lymphocytes and related immune mediators in the AD brain, CSF, and blood and the mechanisms by which peripheral T cells cross the blood brain barrier and the blood-CSF barrier. This knowledge is relevant for better AD therapies and for identification of novel biomarkers for improved AD diagnostics in the blood and the CSF. The data will be reviewed with the special emphasis on possibilities for development of AD biomarkers.

  3. Neurocognitive and Biomarker Evaluation of Combination mTBI from Blast Overpressure and Traumatic Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Definitions BOP: Blast overpressure. In our procedure, we are using three exposures at 75 kPa (~10.8 psi). CER: Conditioned emotional response. With...Tissue Harvesting. 4.1 Euthanasia . A single dose mixture containing 70 mg/kg ketamine and 6 mg/kg xylazine was administered to the rat via...forceps. In all rats, blood and CSF samples are taken for biomarker analysis. Additionally, after euthanasia , brain tissue from each rat is collected for

  4. Neurocognitive and Biomarker Evaluation of Combination mTBI from Blast Overpressure and Traumatic Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Tissue Harvesting. 1.1. Euthanasia . A single-dose mixture containing 70 mg/kg ketamine and 6 mg/kg xylazine was administered to the rat via...In all rats, blood and CSF samples are taken for biomarker analysis. Additionally, after euthanasia , brain tissue from each rat is collected for...during the production process errors may be discovered which could affect the content, and all legal disclaimers that apply to the journal pertain

  5. Biomarkers for Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherer, Todd B

    2011-04-20

    Biomarkers for detecting the early stages of Parkinson's disease (PD) could accelerate development of new treatments. Such biomarkers could be used to identify individuals at risk for developing PD, to improve early diagnosis, to track disease progression with precision, and to test the efficacy of new treatments. Although some progress has been made, there are many challenges associated with developing biomarkers for detecting PD in its earliest stages.

  6. Network Consistent Data Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Anirban; Das, Abir; Roy-Chowdhury, Amit K

    2016-09-01

    Existing data association techniques mostly focus on matching pairs of data-point sets and then repeating this process along space-time to achieve long term correspondences. However, in many problems such as person re-identification, a set of data-points may be observed at multiple spatio-temporal locations and/or by multiple agents in a network and simply combining the local pairwise association results between sets of data-points often leads to inconsistencies over the global space-time horizons. In this paper, we propose a Novel Network Consistent Data Association (NCDA) framework formulated as an optimization problem that not only maintains consistency in association results across the network, but also improves the pairwise data association accuracies. The proposed NCDA can be solved as a binary integer program leading to a globally optimal solution and is capable of handling the challenging data-association scenario where the number of data-points varies across different sets of instances in the network. We also present an online implementation of NCDA method that can dynamically associate new observations to already observed data-points in an iterative fashion, while maintaining network consistency. We have tested both the batch and the online NCDA in two application areas-person re-identification and spatio-temporal cell tracking and observed consistent and highly accurate data association results in all the cases.

  7. Glycoscience aids in biomarker discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serenus Hua1,2 & Hyun Joo An1,2,*

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The glycome consists of all glycans (or carbohydrates within abiological system, and modulates a wide range of important biologicalactivities, from protein folding to cellular communications.The mining of the glycome for disease markers representsa new paradigm for biomarker discovery; however, this effortis severely complicated by the vast complexity and structuraldiversity of glycans. This review summarizes recent developmentsin analytical technology and methodology as applied tothe fields of glycomics and glycoproteomics. Mass spectrometricstrategies for glycan compositional profiling are described, as arepotential refinements which allow structure-specific profiling.Analytical methods that can discern protein glycosylation at aspecific site of modification are also discussed in detail.Biomarker discovery applications are shown at each level ofanalysis, highlighting the key role that glycoscience can play inhelping scientists understand disease biology.

  8. Impact of the 2008-2012 French Alzheimer Plan on the use of cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers in research memory center: the PLM Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabelle, Audrey; Dumurgier, Julien; Vercruysse, Olivier; Paquet, Claire; Bombois, Stéphanie; Laplanche, Jean-Louis; Peoc'h, Katell; Schraen, Susanna; Buée, Luc; Pasquier, Florence; Hugon, Jacques; Touchon, Jacques; Lehmann, Sylvain

    2013-01-01

    The French Alzheimer's Disease Plan aims, in an unprecedented national effort, to develop research, promote optimal diagnosis, and take better care of patients. In order to evaluate the clinical interest and use of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers, a data-sharing project, the PLM (Paris-North, Lille and Montpellier) study has emerged through collaboration between these memory centers, already involved in this field. The revised Alzheimer's disease (AD) diagnosis criteria include CSF biomarkers, but little is known about their use in routine clinical practice. To evaluate their interest and diagnostic accuracy in routine AD diagnosis, a cohort of 677 patients from Montpellier was first analyzed. The results were then validated through the analysis of a second cohort of 638 patients from Lille and Paris-Nord. Diagnoses of AD and other dementias were established by multidisciplinary expert teams, based on neuropsychological exams and structural brain imaging, blinded from CSF results. CSF amyloid-β, tau, and p-tau concentrations were measured for all patients. Receiver-operating characteristic curves were used to define cut-offs and evaluate the ability of each biomarker to discriminate AD from other diagnoses. We showed that p-tau outperformed other biomarkers for discriminating AD from non-AD patients and presents a clear clinical interest. The other biomarkers also showed relevant variations especially when the differential AD diagnoses were taken into account. Altogether we could demonstrate in both mono-centric and multi-centric cohorts from memory clinics the capacity of CSF biomarkers to discriminate AD from non-AD patients in clinical routine with a high sensitivity and specificity.

  9. Quantitative imaging biomarker ontology (QIBO) for knowledge representation of biomedical imaging biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckler, Andrew J; Liu, Tiffany Ting; Savig, Erica; Suzek, Baris E; Ouellette, M; Danagoulian, J; Wernsing, G; Rubin, Daniel L; Paik, David

    2013-08-01

    A widening array of novel imaging biomarkers is being developed using ever more powerful clinical and preclinical imaging modalities. These biomarkers have demonstrated effectiveness in quantifying biological processes as they occur in vivo and in the early prediction of therapeutic outcomes. However, quantitative imaging biomarker data and knowledge are not standardized, representing a critical barrier to accumulating medical knowledge based on quantitative imaging data. We use an ontology to represent, integrate, and harmonize heterogeneous knowledge across the domain of imaging biomarkers. This advances the goal of developing applications to (1) improve precision and recall of storage and retrieval of quantitative imaging-related data using standardized terminology; (2) streamline the discovery and development of novel imaging biomarkers by normalizing knowledge across heterogeneous resources; (3) effectively annotate imaging experiments thus aiding comprehension, re-use, and reproducibility; and (4) provide validation frameworks through rigorous specification as a basis for testable hypotheses and compliance tests. We have developed the Quantitative Imaging Biomarker Ontology (QIBO), which currently consists of 488 terms spanning the following upper classes: experimental subject, biological intervention, imaging agent, imaging instrument, image post-processing algorithm, biological target, indicated biology, and biomarker application. We have demonstrated that QIBO can be used to annotate imaging experiments with standardized terms in the ontology and to generate hypotheses for novel imaging biomarker-disease associations. Our results established the utility of QIBO in enabling integrated analysis of quantitative imaging data.

  10. The potential for bio-mediators and biomarkers in pediatric traumatic brain injury and neurocritical care

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    Patrick M. Kochanek

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The use of biomarkers of brain injury in pediatric neurocritical care has been explored for at least 15 years. Two general lines of research on biomarkers in pediatric brain injury have been pursued, 1 studies of bio-mediators in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of children after traumatic brain injury (TBI to explore the components of the secondary injury cascades in an attempt to identify potential therapeutic targets and 2 studies of the release of structural proteins into the CSF, serum, or urine in order to diagnose, monitor, and/or prognosticate in patients with TBI or other pediatric neurocritical care conditions. Unique age-related differences in brain biology, disease processes, and clinical applications mandate the development and testing of brain injury bio-mediators and biomarkers specifically in pediatric neurocritical care applications. Finally, although much of the early work on biomarkers of brain injury in pediatrics has focused on TBI, new applications are emerging across a wide range of applications specifically for pediatric neurocritical care including abusive head trauma, cardiopulmonary arrest, septic shock, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, hydrocephalus, and cardiopulmonary bypass. The potential scope of the utility of biomarkers in pediatric neurocritical care is thus also discussed.

  11. Biomarkers of Alzheimer disease: current and future applications to diagnostic criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperling, Reisa; Johnson, Keith

    2013-04-01

    This article reviews recent advances in imaging and fluid biomarkers for Alzheimer disease (AD) and their application to newly proposed diagnostic criteria across the continuum of AD. There have been remarkable developments in neuroimaging markers for AD over the past decade, most notably the advent of positron emission tomography (PET) amyloid imaging using radiotracers that label fibrillar forms of amyloid-β (Aβ). Similarly, new research in CSF markers suggests CSF levels of Aβ1-42 and phosphorylated tau may be useful in the early diagnosis of AD and prediction of cognitive decline. The National Institute on Aging and the Alzheimer's Association recently convened three workgroups to develop joint recommendations for new diagnostic guidelines across the spectrum of AD. These recommendations incorporate biomarkers and propose updated criteria for the previously recognized stage of AD dementia, the evolving definition of mild cognitive impairment, and a newly proposed concept of stages of preclinical AD. Recent advances in AD biomarkers have increased the ability to detect evidence of early AD pathology in vivo. These biomarkers have been incorporated into new diagnostic recommendations, but a number of challenges remain for the biomarkers to become widely applied in clinical practice.

  12. A Csf1r-EGFP Transgene Provides a Novel Marker for Monocyte Subsets in Sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pridans, Clare; Davis, Gemma M; Sauter, Kristin A; Lisowski, Zofia M; Corripio-Miyar, Yolanda; Raper, Anna; Lefevre, Lucas; Young, Rachel; McCulloch, Mary E; Lillico, Simon; Milne, Elspeth; Whitelaw, Bruce; Hume, David A

    2016-09-15

    Expression of Csf1r in adults is restricted to cells of the macrophage lineage. Transgenic reporters based upon the Csf1r locus require inclusion of the highly conserved Fms-intronic regulatory element for expression. We have created Csf1r-EGFP transgenic sheep via lentiviral transgenesis of a construct containing elements of the mouse Fms-intronic regulatory element and Csf1r promoter. Committed bone marrow macrophage precursors and blood monocytes express EGFP in these animals. Sheep monocytes were divided into three populations, similar to classical, intermediate, and nonclassical monocytes in humans, based upon CD14 and CD16 expression. All expressed EGFP, with increased levels in the nonclassical subset. Because Csf1r expression coincides with the earliest commitment to the macrophage lineage, Csf1r-EGFP bone marrow provides a tool for studying the earliest events in myelopoiesis using the sheep as a model.

  13. CSF1R mutations in hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with spheroids are loss of function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pridans, Clare; Sauter, Kristin A.; Baer, Kristin; Kissel, Holger; Hume, David A.

    2013-10-01

    Hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with spheroids (HDLS) in humans is a rare autosomal dominant disease characterized by giant neuroaxonal swellings (spheroids) within the CNS white matter. Symptoms are variable and can include personality and behavioural changes. Patients with this disease have mutations in the protein kinase domain of the colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R) which is a tyrosine kinase receptor essential for microglia development. We investigated the effects of these mutations on Csf1r signalling using a factor dependent cell line. Corresponding mutant forms of murine Csf1r were expressed on the cell surface at normal levels, and bound CSF1, but were not able to sustain cell proliferation. Since Csf1r signaling requires receptor dimerization initiated by CSF1 binding, the data suggest a mechanism for phenotypic dominance of the mutant allele in HDLS.

  14. Inhibition of CSF-1R supports T-cell mediated melanoma therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjolein Sluijter

    Full Text Available Tumor associated macrophages (TAM can promote angiogenesis, invasiveness and immunosuppression. The cytokine CSF-1 (or M-CSF is an important factor of TAM recruitment and differentiation and several pharmacological agents targeting the CSF-1 receptor (CSF-1R have been developed to regulate TAM in solid cancers. We show that the kinase inhibitor PLX3397 strongly dampened the systemic and local accumulation of macrophages driven by B16F10 melanomas, without affecting Gr-1(+ myeloid derived suppressor cells. Removal of intratumoral macrophages was remarkably efficient and a modest, but statistically significant, delay in melanoma outgrowth was observed. Importantly, CSF-1R inhibition strongly enhanced tumor control by immunotherapy using tumor-specific CD8 T cells. Elevated IFNγ production by T cells was observed in mice treated with the combination of PLX3397 and immunotherapy. These results support the combined use of CSF-1R inhibition with CD8 T cell immunotherapy, especially for macrophage-stimulating tumors.

  15. BACE1 gene variants do not influence BACE1 activity, levels of APP or Aβ isoforms in CSF in Alzheimer's disease

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    Minthon Lennart

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The BACE1 gene encodes the beta-site APP-cleaving enzyme 1 and has been associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD. BACE1 is the most important β-secretase responsible for the generation of Alzheimer-associated amyloid β-proteins (Aβ and may play a role in the amyloidogenic process in AD. We hypothesized that BACE1 gene variants might influence BACE1 activity or other markers for APP metabolism in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF and thereby contribute to the development of AD. We genotyped a Swedish sample of 269 AD patients for the rs638405 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP in the BACE1 gene and correlated genotype data to a broad range of amyloid-related biomarkers in CSF, including BACE1 activity, levels of Aβ40, Aβ42, α- and β-cleaved soluble APP (α-sAPP and β-sAPP, as well as markers for Alzheimer-type axonal degeneration, i.e., total-tau and phospho-tau181. Gene variants of BACE1 were neither associated with amyloid-related biomarkers, nor with markers for axonal degeneration in AD.

  16. Neuronal and Glia-Related Biomarkers in Cerebrospinal Fluid of Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke

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    Clara Hjalmarsson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Cerebral ischemia promotes morphological reactions of the neurons, astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, and microglia in experimental studies. Our aim was to examine the profile of CSF (cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers and their relation to stroke severity and degree of white matter lesions (WML. Methods A total of 20 patients (mean age 76 years were included within 5–10 days after acute ischemic stroke (AIS onset. Stroke severity was assessed using NIHSS (National Institute of Health stroke scale. The age-related white matter changes (ARWMC scale was used to evaluate the extent of WML on CT-scans. The concentrations of specific CSF biomarkers were analyzed. Results Patients with AIS had significantly higher levels of NFL (neurofilament, light, T-tau, myelin basic protein (MBP, YKL-40, and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP compared with controls; T-Tau, MBP, GFAP, and YKL-40 correlated with clinical stroke severity, whereas NFL correlated with severity of WML (tested by Mann–Whitney test. Conclusions Several CSF biomarkers increase in AIS, and they correlate to clinical stroke severity. However, only NFL was found to be a marker of degree of WML.

  17. Interaction between personality traits and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease pathology modulates cognitive performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tautvydaitė, Domilė; Kukreja, Deepti; Antonietti, Jean-Philippe; Henry, Hugues; von Gunten, Armin; Popp, Julius

    2017-02-02

    During adulthood, personality characteristics may contribute to the individual capacity to compensate the impact of developing cerebral Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology on cognitive impairment in later life. In this study we aimed to investigate whether and how premorbid personality traits interact with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) markers of AD pathology to predict cognitive performance in subjects with mild cognitive impairment or mild AD dementia and in participants with normal cognition. One hundred and ten subjects, of whom 66 were patients with mild cognitive impairment or mild AD dementia and 44 were healthy controls, had a comprehensive medical and neuropsychological examination as well as lumbar puncture to measure CSF biomarkers of AD pathology (amyloid beta1-42, phosphorylated tau and total-tau). Participants' proxies completed the Revised NEO Personality Inventory, Form R to retrospectively assess subjects' premorbid personality. In hierarchical multivariate regression analyses, including age, gender, education, APOEε4 status and cognitive level, premorbid neuroticism, conscientiousness and agreeableness modulated the effect of CSF biomarkers on cognitive performance. Low premorbid openness independently predicted lower levels of cognitive functioning after controlling for biomarker concentrations. Our findings suggest that specific premorbid personality traits are associated with cerebral AD pathology and modulate its impact on cognitive performance. Considering personality characteristics may help to appraise a person's cognitive reserve and the risk of cognitive decline in later life.

  18. Cerebrospinal fluid proteomics and protein biomarkers in frontotemporal lobar degeneration: Current status and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oeckl, Patrick; Steinacker, Petra; Feneberg, Emily; Otto, Markus

    2015-07-01

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) comprises a spectrum of rare neurodegenerative diseases with an estimated prevalence of 15-22 cases per 100,000 persons including the behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), progressive non-fluent aphasia (PNFA), semantic dementia (SD), FTD with motor neuron disease (FTD-MND), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and corticobasal syndrome (CBS). The pathogenesis of the diseases is still unclear and clinical diagnosis of FTLD is hampered by overlapping symptoms within the FTLD subtypes and with other neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD). Intracellular protein aggregates in the brain are a major hallmark of FTLD and implicate alterations in protein metabolism or function in the disease's pathogenesis. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) which surrounds the brain can be used to study changes in neurodegenerative diseases and to identify disease-related mechanisms or neurochemical biomarkers for diagnosis. In the present review, we will give an overview of the current literature on proteomic studies in CSF of FTLD patients. Reports of targeted and unbiased proteomic approaches are included and the results are discussed in regard of their informative value about disease pathology and the suitability to be used as diagnostic biomarkers. Finally, we will give some future perspectives on CSF proteomics and a list of candidate biomarkers which might be interesting for validation in further studies. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Neuroproteomics: Applications in neuroscience and neurology.

  19. Predicting missing biomarker data in a longitudinal study of Alzheimer disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagust, William J.; Aisen, Paul; Jack, Clifford R.; Toga, Arthur W.; Beckett, Laurel; Gamst, Anthony; Soares, Holly; C. Green, Robert; Montine, Tom; Thomas, Ronald G.; Donohue, Michael; Walter, Sarah; Dale, Anders; Bernstein, Matthew; Felmlee, Joel; Fox, Nick; Thompson, Paul; Schuff, Norbert; Alexander, Gene; DeCarli, Charles; Bandy, Dan; Chen, Kewei; Morris, John; Lee, Virginia M.-Y.; Korecka, Magdalena; Crawford, Karen; Neu, Scott; Harvey, Danielle; Kornak, John; Saykin, Andrew J.; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Potkin, Steven; Shen, Li; Buckholtz, Neil; Kaye, Jeffrey; Dolen, Sara; Quinn, Joseph; Schneider, Lon; Pawluczyk, Sonia; Spann, Bryan M.; Brewer, James; Vanderswag, Helen; Heidebrink, Judith L.; Lord, Joanne L.; Petersen, Ronald; Johnson, Kris; Doody, Rachelle S.; Villanueva-Meyer, Javier; Chowdhury, Munir; Stern, Yaakov; Honig, Lawrence S.; Bell, Karen L.; Morris, John C.; Mintun, Mark A.; Schneider, Stacy; Marson, Daniel; Griffith, Randall; Clark, David; Grossman, Hillel; Tang, Cheuk; Marzloff, George; Toledo-Morrell, Leylade; Shah, Raj C.; Duara, Ranjan; Varon, Daniel; Roberts, Peggy; Albert, Marilyn S.; Pedroso, Julia; Toroney, Jaimie; Rusinek, Henry; de Leon, Mony J; De Santi, Susan M; Doraiswamy, P. Murali; Petrella, Jeffrey R.; Aiello, Marilyn; Clark, Christopher M.; Pham, Cassie; Nunez, Jessica; Smith, Charles D.; Given, Curtis A.; Hardy, Peter; Lopez, Oscar L.; Oakley, MaryAnn; Simpson, Donna M.; Ismail, M. Saleem; Brand, Connie; Richard, Jennifer; Mulnard, Ruth A.; Thai, Gaby; Mc-Adams-Ortiz, Catherine; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; Martin-Cook, Kristen; DeVous, Michael; Levey, Allan I.; Lah, James J.; Cellar, Janet S.; Burns, Jeffrey M.; Anderson, Heather S.; Laubinger, Mary M.; Bartzokis, George; Silverman, Daniel H.S.; Lu, Po H.; Graff-Radford MBBCH, Neill R; Parfitt, Francine; Johnson, Heather; Farlow, Martin; Herring, Scott; Hake, Ann M.; van Dyck, Christopher H.; MacAvoy, Martha G.; Benincasa, Amanda L.; Chertkow, Howard; Bergman, Howard; Hosein, Chris; Black, Sandra; Graham, Simon; Caldwell, Curtis; Hsiung, Ging-Yuek Robin; Feldman, Howard; Assaly, Michele; Kertesz, Andrew; Rogers, John; Trost, Dick; Bernick, Charles; Munic, Donna; Wu, Chuang-Kuo; Johnson, Nancy; Mesulam, Marsel; Sadowsky, Carl; Martinez, Walter; Villena, Teresa; Turner, Scott; Johnson, Kathleen B.; Behan, Kelly E.; Sperling, Reisa A.; Rentz, Dorene M.; Johnson, Keith A.; Rosen, Allyson; Tinklenberg, Jared; Ashford, Wes; Sabbagh, Marwan; Connor, Donald; Jacobson, Sandra; Killiany, Ronald; Norbash, Alexander; Nair, Anil; Obisesan, Thomas O.; Jayam-Trouth, Annapurni; Wang, Paul; Lerner, Alan; Hudson, Leon; Ogrocki, Paula; DeCarli, Charles; Fletcher, Evan; Carmichael, Owen; Kittur, Smita; Mirje, Seema; Borrie, Michael; Lee, T-Y; Bartha, Dr Rob; Johnson, Sterling; Asthana, Sanjay; Carlsson, Cynthia M.; Potkin, Steven G.; Preda, Adrian; Nguyen, Dana; Tariot, Pierre; Fleisher, Adam; Reeder, Stephanie; Bates, Vernice; Capote, Horacio; Rainka, Michelle; Hendin, Barry A.; Scharre, Douglas W.; Kataki, Maria; Zimmerman, Earl A.; Celmins, Dzintra; Brown, Alice D.; Gandy, Sam; Marenberg, Marjorie E.; Rovner, Barry W.; Pearlson, Godfrey; Anderson, Karen; Saykin, Andrew J.; Santulli, Robert B.; Englert, Jessica; Williamson, Jeff D.; Sink, Kaycee M.; Watkins, Franklin; Ott, Brian R.; Wu, Chuang-Kuo; Cohen, Ronald; Salloway, Stephen; Malloy, Paul; Correia, Stephen; Rosen, Howard J.; Miller, Bruce L.; Mintzer, Jacobo

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate predictors of missing data in a longitudinal study of Alzheimer disease (AD). Methods: The Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) is a clinic-based, multicenter, longitudinal study with blood, CSF, PET, and MRI scans repeatedly measured in 229 participants with normal cognition (NC), 397 with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and 193 with mild AD during 2005–2007. We used univariate and multivariable logistic regression models to examine the associations between baseline demographic/clinical features and loss of biomarker follow-ups in ADNI. Results: CSF studies tended to recruit and retain patients with MCI with more AD-like features, including lower levels of baseline CSF Aβ42. Depression was the major predictor for MCI dropouts, while family history of AD kept more patients with AD enrolled in PET and MRI studies. Poor cognitive performance was associated with loss of follow-up in most biomarker studies, even among NC participants. The presence of vascular risk factors seemed more critical than cognitive function for predicting dropouts in AD. Conclusion: The missing data are not missing completely at random in ADNI and likely conditional on certain features in addition to cognitive function. Missing data predictors vary across biomarkers and even MCI and AD groups do not share the same missing data pattern. Understanding the missing data structure may help in the design of future longitudinal studies and clinical trials in AD. PMID:22491869

  20. Reporting consistently on CSR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Christa; Nielsen, Anne Ellerup

    2006-01-01

    of a case study showing that companies use different and not necessarily consistent strategies for reporting on CSR. Finally, the implications for managerial practice are discussed. The chapter concludes by highlighting the value and awareness of the discourse and the discourse types adopted......This chapter first outlines theory and literature on CSR and Stakeholder Relations focusing on the different perspectives and the contextual and dynamic character of the CSR concept. CSR reporting challenges are discussed and a model of analysis is proposed. Next, our paper presents the results...... in the reporting material. By implementing consistent discourse strategies that interact according to a well-defined pattern or order, it is possible to communicate a strong social commitment on the one hand, and to take into consideration the expectations of the shareholders and the other stakeholders...

  1. A Magnetic Consistency Relation

    CERN Document Server

    Jain, Rajeev Kumar

    2012-01-01

    If cosmic magnetic fields are indeed produced during inflation, they are likely to be correlated with the scalar metric perturbations that are responsible for the Cosmic Microwave Background anisotropies and Large Scale Structure. Within an archetypical model of inflationary magnetogenesis, we show that there exists a new simple consistency relation for the non-Gaussian cross correlation function of the scalar metric perturbation with two powers of the magnetic field in the squeezed limit where the momentum of the metric perturbation vanishes. We emphasize that such a consistency relation turns out to be extremely useful to test some recent calculations in the literature. Apart from primordial non-Gaussianity induced by the curvature perturbations, such a cross correlation might provide a new observational probe of inflation and can in principle reveal the primordial nature of cosmic magnetic fields.

  2. Consistency in Distributed Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Kemme, Bettina; Ramalingam, Ganesan; Schiper, André; Shapiro, Marc; Vaswani, Kapil

    2013-01-01

    International audience; In distributed systems, there exists a fundamental trade-off between data consistency, availability, and the ability to tolerate failures. This trade-off has significant implications on the design of the entire distributed computing infrastructure such as storage systems, compilers and runtimes, application development frameworks and programming languages. Unfortunately, it also has significant, and poorly understood, implications for the designers and developers of en...

  3. Geometrically Consistent Mesh Modification

    KAUST Repository

    Bonito, A.

    2010-01-01

    A new paradigm of adaptivity is to execute refinement, coarsening, and smoothing of meshes on manifolds with incomplete information about their geometry and yet preserve position and curvature accuracy. We refer to this collectively as geometrically consistent (GC) mesh modification. We discuss the concept of discrete GC, show the failure of naive approaches, and propose and analyze a simple algorithm that is GC and accuracy preserving. © 2010 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

  4. Consistent wind Facilitates Vection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaki Ogawa

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available We examined whether a consistent haptic cue suggesting forward self-motion facilitated vection. We used a fan with no blades (Dyson, AM01 providing a wind of constant strength and direction (wind speed was 6.37 m/s to the subjects' faces with the visual stimuli visible through the fan. We used an optic flow of expansion or contraction created by positioning 16,000 dots at random inside a simulated cube (length 20 m, and moving the observer's viewpoint to simulate forward or backward self-motion of 16 m/s. we tested three conditions for fan operation, which were normal operation, normal operation with the fan reversed (ie, no wind, and no operation (no wind and no sound. Vection was facilitated by the wind (shorter latency, longer duration and larger magnitude values with the expansion stimuli. The fan noise did not facilitate vection. The wind neither facilitated nor inhibited vection with the contraction stimuli, perhaps because a headwind is not consistent with backward self-motion. We speculate that the consistency between multi modalities is a key factor in facilitating vection.

  5. Automated quantification of cerebral edema following hemispheric infarction: Application of a machine-learning algorithm to evaluate CSF shifts on serial head CTs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasheng Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although cerebral edema is a major cause of death and deterioration following hemispheric stroke, there remains no validated biomarker that captures the full spectrum of this critical complication. We recently demonstrated that reduction in intracranial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF volume (∆CSF on serial computed tomography (CT scans provides an accurate measure of cerebral edema severity, which may aid in early triaging of stroke patients for craniectomy. However, application of such a volumetric approach would be too cumbersome to perform manually on serial scans in a real-world setting. We developed and validated an automated technique for CSF segmentation via integration of random forest (RF based machine learning with geodesic active contour (GAC segmentation. The proposed RF + GAC approach was compared to conventional Hounsfield Unit (HU thresholding and RF segmentation methods using Dice similarity coefficient (DSC and the correlation of volumetric measurements, with manual delineation serving as the ground truth. CSF spaces were outlined on scans performed at baseline (<6 h after stroke onset and early follow-up (FU (closest to 24 h in 38 acute ischemic stroke patients. RF performed significantly better than optimized HU thresholding (p < 10−4 in baseline and p < 10−5 in FU and RF + GAC performed significantly better than RF (p < 10−3 in baseline and p < 10−5 in FU. Pearson correlation coefficients between the automatically detected ∆CSF and the ground truth were r = 0.178 (p = 0.285, r = 0.876 (p < 10−6 and r = 0.879 (p < 10−6 for thresholding, RF and RF + GAC, respectively, with a slope closer to the line of identity in RF + GAC. When we applied the algorithm trained from images of one stroke center to segment CTs from another center, similar findings held. In conclusion, we have developed and validated an accurate automated approach to segment CSF and calculate its shifts on serial CT scans

  6. Conductance to outflow of CSF in normal pressure hydrocephalus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Børgesen, S E

    1984-01-01

    Normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) is defined as a combination of dementia, gait disturbances and/or urinary incontinence, hydrocephalus, and a normal intracranial mean pressure. The clinical effect of CSF shunting in patients with this syndrome is sometimes striking, but generally only 50-60% of the shunted patients benefit from the treatment. It is assumed that the condition is caused by reduced conductance to outflow of CSF ( Cout ). A clinically usable method for the measurement of Cout has been developed. Cout has been measured in 80 patients with NPH. The results of clinical examination, computed tomography (CT), long-term intracranial pressure recording, isotope cisternography (ICG), and Cout have been compared to the clinical results of shunting 3 and 12 months after operation. Among the preoperative investigations Cout proved to have the best diagnostic specificity and sensitivity. Thus, selection of patients for shunting on the basis of Cout should lead to a satisfyingly high success rate. The different methods for measurement of Cout are discussed, and a theory on the pathophysiology of NPH is proposed. A clinical investigational programme, based on the results from clinical examination, CT, pressure recording, and measurements of Cout is suggested.

  7. Proinflammatory cytokines and matrix metalloproteinases in CSF of patients with VZV vasculopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Dallas; Alvarez, Enrique; Selva, Sean; Gilden, Don; Nagel, Maria A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the levels of proinflammatory cytokines and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in the CSF of patients with virologically verified varicella zoster virus (VZV) vasculopathy. Methods: CSF from 30 patients with virologically verified VZV vasculopathy was analyzed for levels of proinflammatory cytokines and MMPs using the Meso Scale Discovery multiplex ELISA platform. Positive CNS inflammatory disease controls were provided by CSF from 30 patients with multiple sclerosis. Ne...

  8. "Flow comp off": An easy technique to confirm CSF flow within syrinx and aqueduct

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anitha Sen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Flow compensation, a gradient pulse used for artifact reduction, often used to suppress cerebrospinal fluid (CSF flow artifacts in spinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, can be switched off to make the CSF flow voids within syrinx (syringomyelia and within aqueduct [normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH] more obvious (thus confirming CSF flow. It is a simple method which does not require much time or expertise.

  9. Serum neurofilament light chain in early relapsing remitting MS is increased and correlates with CSF levels and with MRI measures of disease severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhle, Jens; Barro, Christian; Disanto, Giulio; Mathias, Amandine; Soneson, Charlotte; Bonnier, Guillaume; Yaldizli, Özguer; Regeniter, Axel; Derfuss, Tobias; Canales, Mathieu; Schluep, Myriam; Du Pasquier, Renaud; Krueger, Gunnar; Granziera, Cristina

    2016-10-01

    Neurofilament light chain (NfL) levels in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients correlate with the degree of neuronal injury. To date, little is known about NfL concentrations in the serum of relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) patients and their relationship with CSF levels and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measures of disease severity. We aimed to validate the quantification of NfL in serum samples of RRMS, as a biofluid source easily accessible for longitudinal studies. A total of 31 RRMS patients underwent CSF and serum sampling. After a median time of 3.6 years, 19 of these RRMS patients, 10 newly recruited RRMS patients and 18 healthy controls had a 3T MRI and serum sampling. NfL concentrations were determined by electrochemiluminescence immunoassay. NfL levels in serum were highly correlated to levels in CSF (r = 0.62, p = 0.0002). Concentrations in serum were higher in patients than in controls at baseline (p = 0.004) and follow-up (p = 0.0009) and did not change over time (p = 0.56). Serum NfL levels correlated with white matter (WM) lesion volume (r = 0.68, p NfL levels were highly correlated, and serum concentrations were increased in RRMS. Serum NfL levels correlated with MRI markers of WM disease severity. Our findings further support longitudinal studies of serum NfL as a potential biomarker of on-going disease progression and as a potential surrogate to quantify effects of neuroprotective drugs in clinical trials. © The Author(s), 2016.

  10. Plasma levels of M-CSF are increased in ANCA-associated vasculitides with active nephritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe A. Ramirez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Anti-Neutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibodies (ANCA-associated vasculitides (AAV are characterized by small vessel injury and in some cases granulomatous lesions and glomerular inflammation. The pathogenic bases of these clinical phenotypes are incompletely understood, but evidence from patients with AAV and other inflammatory diseases suggest a role for monocyte/macrophages in the perpetuation of tissue injury. Macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF is a promoter of monocyte recruitment and macrophage proliferation, involved in mesangial cell proliferation and experimental nephritis development. Serum concentrations of M-CSF mark and herald the onset of lupus nephritis. Plasma samples from 29 patients with AAV (18 granulomatosis with polyangiitis, GPA, 6 eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis, EGPA, and 5 microscopic polyangiitis, MPA and from 10 healthy controls were collected together with clinical data. Patients with AAV had higher levels of M-CSF when compared to controls. M-CSF levels correlated positively with the BVAS, serum C-reactive protein and erythrocyte sedimentation rate, while haemoglobin correlated inversely with M-CSF. Patients with active renal disease had significantly higher levels of M-CSF when compared to the other subgroups. M-CSF levels did not differ between ANCA subserotypes and were not associated with the involvement of other organs. In conclusion, M-CSF is higher in patients with AAV and active nephritis and could contribute to the pathogenesis of these diseases. In addition, M-CSF could behave as a useful marker of renal involvement in AAV.

  11. M-CSF TARGETING INTO LCL NUCLEUS BEHAVES AS A MALIGNANCY PROMOTOR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹震宇; 吴克复; 宋玉华; 李戈; 林永敏; 饶青; 马小彤

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the functions of nM-CSF in malignant cells. Methods: recombinant M-CSF was targeted into cell nucleus by employing a eukaryotic expression plasmid vector pCMV/myc/nuc. The constructed plasmid was transfected into cells of EBV transformed lymphoblastoid cell line (LCL). RT-PCR, Western blot and immunofluorescent staining showed that recombinant M-CSF was localized into LCL cell nucleus. The transgenic cells showed elevated proliferation potential, enhanced resistance to apoptosis and increased ability of in vitro migration. Conclusion: Nucleus presenting M-CSF might act as a promoting factor in the processes of cell malignancy.

  12. G-CSF loaded nanofiber/nanoparticle composite coated with collagen promotes wound healing in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanha, Shima; Rafiee-Tehrani, Morteza; Abdollahi, Mohamad; Vakilian, Saeid; Esmaili, Zahra; Naraghi, Zahra Safaei; Seyedjafari, Ehsan; Javar, Hamid Akbari

    2017-10-01

    Sustained release of functional growth factors can be considered as a beneficial methodology for wound healing. In this study, recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF)-loaded chitosan nanoparticles were incorporated in Poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) nanofibers, followed by surface coating with collagen type I. Physical and mechanical properties of the PCL nanofibers containing G-CSF loaded chitosan nanoparticles PCL/NP(G-CSF) and in vivo performance for wound healing were investigated. G-CSF structural stability was evaluated through SDS_PAGE, reversed phase (RP) HPLC and size-exclusion chromatography, as well as circular dichroism. Nanofiber/nanoparticle composite scaffold was demonstrated to have appropriate mechanical properties as a wound dresser and a sustained release of functional G-CSF. The PCL/NP(G-CSF) scaffold showed a suitable proliferation and well-adherent morphology of stem cells. In vivo study and histopathological evaluation outcome revealed that skin regeneration was dramatically accelerated under PCL/NP(G-CSF) as compared with control groups. Superior fibroblast maturation, enhanced collagen deposition and minimum inflammatory cells were also the beneficial properties of PCL/NP(G-CSF) over the commercial dressing. The synergistic effect of extracellular matrix-mimicking nanofibrous membrane and G-CSF could develop a suitable supportive substrate in order to extensive utilization for the healing of skin wounds. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 105A: 2830-2842, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Pleiotropic effects of extended blockade of CSF1R signaling in adult mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauter, Kristin A; Pridans, Clare; Sehgal, Anuj; Tsai, Yi Ting; Bradford, Barry M; Raza, Sobia; Moffat, Lindsey; Gow, Deborah J; Beard, Philippa M; Mabbott, Neil A; Smith, Lee B; Hume, David A

    2014-08-01

    We investigated the role of CSF1R signaling in adult mice using prolonged treatment with anti-CSF1R antibody. Mutation of the CSF1 gene in the op/op mouse produces numerous developmental abnormalities. Mutation of the CSF1R has an even more penetrant phenotype, including perinatal lethality, because of the existence of a second ligand, IL-34. These effects on development provide limited insight into functions of CSF1R signaling in adult homeostasis. The carcass weight and weight of several organs (spleen, kidney, and liver) were reduced in the treated mice, but overall body weight gain was increased. Despite the complete loss of Kupffer cells, there was no effect on liver gene expression. The treatment ablated OCL, increased bone density and trabecular volume, and prevented the decline in bone mass seen in female mice with age. The op/op mouse has a deficiency in pancreatic β cells and in Paneth cells in the gut wall. Only the latter was reproduced by the antibody treatment and was associated with increased goblet cell number but no change in villus architecture. Male op/op mice are infertile as a result of testosterone insufficiency. Anti-CSF1R treatment ablated interstitial macrophages in the testis, but there was no sustained effect on testosterone or LH. The results indicate an ongoing requirement for CSF1R signaling in macrophage and OCL homeostasis but indicate that most effects of CSF1 and CSF1R mutations are due to effects on development.

  14. Cdc42 inhibitor ML141 enhances G-CSF-induced hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell mobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chong; Song, Xuguang; Ma, Sha; Wang, Xue; Xu, Jie; Zhang, Huanxin; Wu, Qingyun; Zhao, Kai; Cao, Jiang; Qiao, Jianlin; Sun, Xiaoshen; Li, Depeng; Zeng, Lingyu; Li, Zhengyu; Xu, Kailin

    2015-01-01

    G-CSF is the most often used agent in clinical hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) mobilization. However, in about 10 % of patients, G-CSF does not efficiently mobilize HSPC in clinically sufficient amounts. Cdc42 activity is involved in HSPC mobilization. In the present study, we explore the impact of Cdc42 inhibitor ML141 on G-CSF-mediated HSPC mobilization in mice. We found that the use of ML141 alone only triggered modest HSPC mobilization effect in mice. However, combination of G-CSF and ML141 significantly promoted HPSC counts and colony forming units in peripheral blood, as compared to mice treated with G-CSF alone. ML141 did not significantly alter the levels of SDF-1 and MMP-9 in the bone marrow, when used alone or in combination with G-CSF. We also found that G-CSF administration significantly increases the level of GTP-bound Cdc42, but does not alter the expression of Cdc42 in the bone marrow. Our data indicate that the Cdc42 signal is a negative regulator in G-CSF-mediated HSPC mobilization, and that inhibition of the Cdc42 signal efficiently improves mobilization efficiency. These findings may provide a new strategy for efficient HSPC mobilization, especially in patients with poor G-CSF response.

  15. Construction and characterization of hGM-CSF-expressing K-562 cell line

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objective The whole process of vaccine preparation is time-consuming and technically challenging. Here the hGM-CSF-engineered K-562 cell line was constructed to simplify tumor vaccine preparation process. Methods The eukaryocyte expressing plasmid pcDNA3.1/GM-CSF was first constructed and its accuracy was verified through sequencing. The pcDNA3.1/GM-CSF was transfected into COS-7 cells to verify GM-CSF expression and cytokine activity using TF-1 cell line. Then the plasmid was transfected into K-562 cell li...

  16. CSF Flow in the Brain in the Context of Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, W G

    2015-05-01

    CSF normally flows back and forth through the aqueduct during the cardiac cycle. During systole, the brain and intracranial vasculature expand and compress the lateral and third ventricles, forcing CSF craniocaudad. During diastole, they contract and flow through the aqueduct reverses. Hyperdynamic CSF flow through the aqueduct is seen when there is ventricular enlargement without cerebral atrophy. Therefore, patients presenting with clinical normal pressure hydrocephalus who have hyperdynamic CSF flow have been found to respond better to ventriculoperitoneal shunting than those with normal or decreased CSF flow. Patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus have also been found to have larger intracranial volumes than sex-matched controls, suggesting that they may have had benign external hydrocephalus as infants. While their arachnoidal granulations clearly have decreased CSF resorptive capacity, it now appears that this is fixed and that the arachnoidal granulations are not merely immature. Such patients appear to develop a parallel pathway for CSF to exit the ventricles through the extracellular space of the brain and the venous side of the glymphatic system. This pathway remains functional until late adulthood when the patient develops deep white matter ischemia, which is characterized histologically by myelin pallor (ie, loss of lipid). The attraction between the bare myelin protein and the CSF increases resistance to the extracellular outflow of CSF, causing it to back up, resulting in hydrocephalus. Thus idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus appears to be a "2 hit" disease: benign external hydrocephalus in infancy followed by deep white matter ischemia in late adulthood.

  17. Analysis of the GM-CSF and GM-CSF/IL-3/IL-5 receptor common beta chain in a patient with pulmonary alveolar proteinosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Objective To investigate the expression of the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and GM-CSF/IL-3/IL-5 receptor common beta chain (βc receptor) in an adult patient with idiopathic pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP), so as to demonstrate the possible association of the GM-CSF and βc receptor with the pathogenesis of human PAP. Methods The GM-CSF levels were measured with a commercial ELISA kit (sensitivity 5?pg/ml) and the βc receptor expression on the cell surface was detected by flow cytometry analysis. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis was employed to detect the expression of the GM-CSF mRNA and the βc receptor mRNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and alveolar macrophages. The entire coding regions of the GM-CSF cDNA and the βc receptor cDNA were sequenced by the Sanger dideoxy-mediated chain termination method to detect possible mutations. Results The patient with PAP failed to release the GM-CSF protein either from circulating mononuclear cells or from alveolar macrophages. The expression of the GM-CSF mRNA was normal after the stimulation of lipopolysaccharide, whereas a point mutation at position 382 of the GM-CSF cDNA from “T" to “C" was revealed by cDNA sequencing, which caused a change in amino acid 117 of the protein from isoleucine to threonine. The βc receptor expression on the cell surface was normal, and the βc receptor mRNA expression and the sequence of the entire coding region of the βc receptor were also normal. Conclusions The decreased GM-CSF production is associated with the pathogenesis of human PAP. A point mutation of the GM-CSF cDNA may contribute to the decreased GM-CSF production in our adult PAP patient. The mutation of the βc receptor in some of paediatric patients with PAP may not be a common problem in adult patients.

  18. Post-traumatic hypoxia is associated with prolonged cerebral cytokine production, higher serum biomarker levels, and poor outcome in patients with severe traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Edwin B; Satgunaseelan, Laveniya; Paul, Eldho; Bye, Nicole; Nguyen, Phuong; Agyapomaa, Doreen; Kossmann, Thomas; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey V; Morganti-Kossmann, Maria Cristina

    2014-04-01

    Secondary hypoxia is a known contributor to adverse outcomes in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Based on the evidence that hypoxia and TBI in isolation induce neuroinflammation, we investigated whether TBI combined with hypoxia enhances cerebral cytokine production. We also explored whether increased concentrations of injury biomarkers discriminate between hypoxic (Hx) and normoxic (Nx) patients, correlate to worse outcome, and depend on blood-brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction. Forty-two TBI patients with Glasgow Coma Scale ≤8 were recruited. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum were collected over 6 days. Patients were divided into Hx (n=22) and Nx (n=20) groups. Eight cytokines were measured in the CSF; albumin, S100, myelin basic protein (MBP) and neuronal specific enolase (NSE) were quantified in serum. CSF/serum albumin quotient was calculated for BBB function. Glasgow Outcome Scale Extended (GOSE) was assessed at 6 months post-TBI. Production of granulocye macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) was higher, and profiles of GM-CSF, interferon (IFN)-γ and, to a lesser extent, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), were prolonged in the CSF of Hx but not Nx patients at 4-5 days post-TBI. Interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, IL-6, and IL-10 increased similarly in both Hx and Nx groups. S100, MBP, and NSE were significantly higher in Hx patients with unfavorable outcome. Among these three biomarkers, S100 showed the strongest correlations to GOSE after TBI-Hx. Elevated CSF/serum albumin quotients lasted for 5 days post-TBI and displayed similar profiles in Hx and Nx patients. We demonstrate for the first time that post-TBI hypoxia is associated with prolonged neuroinflammation, amplified extravasation of biomarkers, and poor outcome. S100 and MBP could be implemented to track the occurrence of post-TBI hypoxia, and prompt adequate treatment.

  19. Infanticide and moral consistency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahan, Jeff

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this essay is to show that there are no easy options for those who are disturbed by the suggestion that infanticide may on occasion be morally permissible. The belief that infanticide is always wrong is doubtfully compatible with a range of widely shared moral beliefs that underlie various commonly accepted practices. Any set of beliefs about the morality of abortion, infanticide and the killing of animals that is internally consistent and even minimally credible will therefore unavoidably contain some beliefs that are counterintuitive.

  20. The Rucio Consistency Service

    CERN Document Server

    Serfon, Cedric; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    One of the biggest challenge with Large scale data management system is to ensure the consistency between the global file catalog and what is physically on all storage elements. To tackle this issue, the Rucio software which is used by the ATLAS Distributed Data Management system has been extended to automatically handle lost or unregistered files (aka Dark Data). This system automatically detects these inconsistencies and take actions like recovery or deletion of unneeded files in a central manner. In this talk, we will present this system, explain the internals and give some results.

  1. Respiratory Toxicity Biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    The advancement in high throughput genomic, proteomic and metabolomic techniques have accelerated pace of lung biomarker discovery. A recent growth in the discovery of new lung toxicity/disease biomarkers have led to significant advances in our understanding of pathological proce...

  2. The MacBlue binary transgene (csf1r-gal4VP16/UAS-ECFP provides a novel marker for visualisation of subsets of monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells and responsiveness to CSF1 administration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin A Sauter

    Full Text Available The MacBlue transgenic mouse uses the Csf1r promoter and first intron to drive expression of gal4-VP16, which in turn drives a cointegrated gal4-responsive UAS-ECFP cassette. The Csf1r promoter region used contains a deletion of a 150 bp conserved region covering trophoblast and osteoclast-specific transcription start sites. In this study, we examined expression of the transgene in embryos and adult mice. In embryos, ECFP was expressed in the large majority of macrophages derived from the yolk sac, and as the liver became a major site of monocytopoiesis. In adults, ECFP was detected at high levels in both Ly6C+ and Ly6C- monocytes and distinguished them from Ly6C+, F4/80+, CSF1R+ immature myeloid cells in peripheral blood. ECFP was also detected in the large majority of microglia and Langerhans cells. However, expression was lost from the majority of tissue macrophages, including Kupffer cells in the liver and F4/80+ macrophages of the lung, kidney, spleen and intestine. The small numbers of positive cells isolated from the liver resembled blood monocytes. In the gut, ECFP+ cells were identified primarily as classical dendritic cells or blood monocytes in disaggregated cell preparations. Immunohistochemistry showed large numbers of ECFP+ cells in the Peyer's patch and isolated lymphoid follicles. The MacBlue transgene was used to investigate the effect of treatment with CSF1-Fc, a form of the growth factor with longer half-life and efficacy. CSF1-Fc massively expanded both the immature myeloid cell (ECFP- and Ly6C+ monocyte populations, but had a smaller effect on Ly6C- monocytes. There were proportional increases in ECFP+ cells detected in lung and liver, consistent with monocyte infiltration, but no generation of ECFP+ Kupffer cells. In the gut, there was selective infiltration of large numbers of cells into the lamina propria and Peyer's patches. We discuss the use of the MacBlue transgene as a marker of monocyte/macrophage/dendritic cell

  3. When is holography consistent?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McInnes, Brett, E-mail: matmcinn@nus.edu.sg [National University of Singapore (Singapore); Ong, Yen Chin, E-mail: yenchin.ong@nordita.org [Nordita, KTH Royal Institute of Technology and Stockholm University, Roslagstullsbacken 23, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2015-09-15

    Holographic duality relates two radically different kinds of theory: one with gravity, one without. The very existence of such an equivalence imposes strong consistency conditions which are, in the nature of the case, hard to satisfy. Recently a particularly deep condition of this kind, relating the minimum of a probe brane action to a gravitational bulk action (in a Euclidean formulation), has been recognized; and the question arises as to the circumstances under which it, and its Lorentzian counterpart, is satisfied. We discuss the fact that there are physically interesting situations in which one or both versions might, in principle, not be satisfied. These arise in two distinct circumstances: first, when the bulk is not an Einstein manifold and, second, in the presence of angular momentum. Focusing on the application of holography to the quark–gluon plasma (of the various forms arising in the early Universe and in heavy-ion collisions), we find that these potential violations never actually occur. This suggests that the consistency condition is a “law of physics” expressing a particular aspect of holography.

  4. Cerebrospinal fluid and serum biomarkers of cerebral malaria mortality in Ghanaian children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiredu Edwin K

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plasmodium falciparum can cause a diffuse encephalopathy known as cerebral malaria (CM, a major contributor to malaria associated mortality. Despite treatment, mortality due to CM can be as high as 30% while 10% of survivors of the disease may experience short- and long-term neurological complications. The pathogenesis of CM and other forms of severe malaria is multi-factorial and appear to involve cytokine and chemokine homeostasis, inflammation and vascular injury/repair. Identification of prognostic markers that can predict CM severity will enable development of better intervention. Methods Postmortem serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF samples were obtained within 2–4 hours of death in Ghanaian children dying of CM, severe malarial anemia (SMA, and non-malarial (NM causes. Serum and CSF levels of 36 different biomarkers (IL-1β, IL-1ra, IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-7, IL-8, IL-9, IL-10, IL-12 (p70, IL-13, IL-15, IL-17, Eotaxin, FGF basic protein, CRP, G-CSF, GM-CSF, IFN-γ, TNF-α, IP-10, MCP-1 (MCAF, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, RANTES, SDF-1α, CXCL11 (I-TAC, Fas-ligand [Fas-L], soluble Fas [sFas], sTNF-R1 (p55, sTNF-R2 (p75, MMP-9, TGF-β1, PDGF bb and VEGF were measured and the results compared between the 3 groups. Results After Bonferroni adjustment for other biomarkers, IP-10 was the only serum biomarker independently associated with CM mortality when compared to SMA and NM deaths. Eight CSF biomarkers (IL-1ra, IL-8, IP-10, PDGFbb, MIP-1β, Fas-L, sTNF-R1, and sTNF-R2 were significantly elevated in CM mortality group when compared to SMA and NM deaths. Additionally, CSF IP-10/PDGFbb median ratio was statistically significantly higher in the CM group compared to SMA and NM groups. Conclusion The parasite-induced local cerebral dysregulation in the production of IP-10, 1L-8, MIP-1β, PDGFbb, IL-1ra, Fas-L, sTNF-R1, and sTNF-R2 may be involved in CM neuropathology, and their immunoassay may have potential utility in predicting

  5. Biomarkers of Reflux Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kia, Leila; Pandolfino, John E; Kahrilas, Peter J

    2016-06-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) encompasses an array of disorders unified by the reflux of gastric contents. Because there are many potential disease manifestations, esophageal and extraesophageal, there is no single biomarker of the entire disease spectrum; a set of GERD biomarkers that each quantifies specific aspects of GERD-related pathology might be needed. We review recent reports of biomarkers of GERD, specifically in relation to endoscopically negative esophageal disease and excluding conventional pH-impedance monitoring. We consider histopathologic biomarkers, baseline impedance, and serologic assays to determine that most markers are based on manifestations of impaired esophageal mucosal integrity, which is based on increased ionic and molecular permeability, and/or destruction of tight junctions. Impaired mucosal integrity quantified by baseline mucosal impedance, proteolytic fragments of junctional proteins, or histopathologic features has emerged as a promising GERD biomarker.

  6. Biomarkers in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, John C; Mehta, Shyamal H; Sethi, Kapil D

    2010-11-01

    Biomarkers are objectively measured characteristics that are indicators of normal biological processes, pathogenic processes, or responses to therapeutic interventions. To date, clinical assessment remains the gold standard in the diagnosis of Parkinson's disease (PD) and clinical rating scales are well established as the gold standard for tracking progression of PD. Researchers have identified numerous potential biomarkers that may aid in the differential diagnosis of PD and/or tracking disease progression. Clinical, genetic, blood and cerebrospinal fluid (proteomics, transcriptomics, metabolomics), and neuroimaging biomarkers may provide useful tools in the diagnosis of PD and in measuring disease progression and response to therapies. Some potential biomarkers are inexpensive and do not require much technical expertise, whereas others are expensive or require specialized equipment and technical skills. Many potential biomarkers in PD show great promise; however, they need to be assessed for their sensitivity and specificity over time in large and varied samples of patients with and without PD.

  7. On consensus biomarker selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gambin Anna

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent development of mass spectrometry technology enabled the analysis of complex peptide mixtures. A lot of effort is currently devoted to the identification of biomarkers in human body fluids like serum or plasma, based on which new diagnostic tests for different diseases could be constructed. Various biomarker selection procedures have been exploited in recent studies. It has been noted that they often lead to different biomarker lists and as a consequence, the patient classification may also vary. Results Here we propose a new approach to the biomarker selection problem: to apply several competing feature ranking procedures and compute a consensus list of features based on their outcomes. We validate our methods on two proteomic datasets for the diagnosis of ovarian and prostate cancer. Conclusion The proposed methodology can improve the classification results and at the same time provide a unified biomarker list for further biological examinations and interpretation.

  8. Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers in Spinocerebellar Ataxia: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley M. Brouillette

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases, including the spinocerebellar ataxias (SCA, would benefit from the identification of reliable biomarkers that could serve as disease subtype-specific and stage-specific indicators for the development and monitoring of treatments. We analyzed the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF level of tau, α-synuclein, DJ-1, and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, proteins previously associated with neurodegenerative processes, in patients with the autosomal dominant SCA1, SCA2, and SCA6, and the sporadic disease multiple system atrophy, cerebellar type (MSA-C, compared with age-matched controls. We estimated disease severity using the Scale for the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia (SARA. Most proteins measured trended higher in disease versus control group yet did not reach statistical significance. We found the levels of tau in both SCA2 and MSA-C patients were significantly higher than control. We found that α-synuclein levels were lower with higher SARA scores in SCA1 and tau levels were higher with greater SARA in MSA-C, although this final correlation did not reach statistical significance after post hoc correction. Additional studies with larger sample sizes are needed to improve the power of these studies and validate the use of CSF biomarkers in SCA and MSA-C.

  9. Consistent quantum measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Robert B.

    2015-11-01

    In response to recent criticisms by Okon and Sudarsky, various aspects of the consistent histories (CH) resolution of the quantum measurement problem(s) are discussed using a simple Stern-Gerlach device, and compared with the alternative approaches to the measurement problem provided by spontaneous localization (GRW), Bohmian mechanics, many worlds, and standard (textbook) quantum mechanics. Among these CH is unique in solving the second measurement problem: inferring from the measurement outcome a property of the measured system at a time before the measurement took place, as is done routinely by experimental physicists. The main respect in which CH differs from other quantum interpretations is in allowing multiple stochastic descriptions of a given measurement situation, from which one (or more) can be selected on the basis of its utility. This requires abandoning a principle (termed unicity), central to classical physics, that at any instant of time there is only a single correct description of the world.

  10. Reducing CSF shunt placement in patients with spinal myelomeningocele

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Sankhla

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Object: The incidence of hydrocephalus requiring shunts in children with myelomeningocele (MMC is reported to be very high. Shunt-related complications are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in this population. In order to minimize shunt placements, we used very rigid clinical selection criteria and followed them in all patients who had myelomeningocele and enlarged ventricles. The follow-up outcome of this retrospective study is reported. Methods: From 2000 to 2007, 23 patients with myelomeningocele and variable degree of hydrocephalus were treated at our institute with primary surgical closure of their myelomeningoceles without a CSF diversion procedure. Patients with severe hydrocephalus who required immediate shunt insertion, and those with no significant associated hydrocephalus were not included in this study. Data regarding the surgical results and complications, postoperative management, and the outcome at follow-up were obtained from their hospital records. Results: Initially increased size of the ventricular system was found to have decreased or stabilized in 17 (81% patients postoperatively. However, ventriculomegaly continued to progress further in 4 (19% out of 21 patients. Of 11 patients who presented with enlarged head, eight (73% patients showed reduction or stabilization in their head circumference. Three (27% children continued to have progressive head enlargement in the postoperative period and required shunt placement. Signs of raised intracranial pressure observed in six patients on admission, improved in two (33% and persisted or worsened in four (67% patients who eventually improved after the insertion of a shunt. Eight (35% patients experienced wound-related complications following closure of the MMC, including CSF leak in four, wound infection in three, wound breakdown in three, and pseudomeningocele in two patients. Shunt placement was required in the postoperative period in 13 (56.5% patients to treat

  11. MafB antagonizes phenotypic alteration induced by GM-CSF in microglia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koshida, Ryusuke, E-mail: rkoshida-myz@umin.ac.jp; Oishi, Hisashi, E-mail: hoishi@md.tsukuba.ac.jp; Hamada, Michito; Takahashi, Satoru

    2015-07-17

    Microglia are tissue-resident macrophages which are distributed throughout the central nervous system (CNS). Recent studies suggest that microglia are a unique myeloid population distinct from peripheral macrophages in terms of origin and gene expression signature. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), a pleiotropic cytokine regulating myeloid development, has been shown to stimulate proliferation and alter phenotype of microglia in vitro. However, how its signaling is modulated in microglia is poorly characterized. MafB, a bZip transcriptional factor, is highly expressed in monocyte-macrophage lineage cells including microglia, although its role in microglia is largely unknown. We investigated the crosstalk between GM-CSF signaling and MafB by analyzing primary microglia. We found that Mafb-deficient microglia grew more rapidly than wild-type microglia in response to GM-CSF. Moreover, the expression of genes associated with microglial differentiation was more downregulated in Mafb-deficient microglia cultured with GM-CSF. Notably, such differences between the genotypes were not observed in the presence of M-CSF. In addition, we found that Mafb-deficient microglia cultured with GM-CSF barely extended their membrane protrusions, probably due to abnormal activation of RhoA, a key regulator of cytoskeletal remodeling. Altogether, our study reveals that MafB is a negative regulator of GM-CSF signaling in microglia. These findings could provide new insight into the modulation of cytokine signaling by transcription factors in microglia. - Highlights: • GM-CSF alters the phenotype of microglia in vitro more potently than M-CSF. • Transcription factor MafB antagonizes the effect of GM-CSF on microglia in vitro. • MafB deficiency leads to RhoA activation in microglia in response to GM-CSF. • We show for the first time the function of MafB in microglia.

  12. Evaluation of prostaglandin D2 as a CSF leak marker: implications in safe epidural anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kondabolu S

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Sirish Kondabolu, Rishimani Adsumelli, Joy Schabel, Peter Glass, Srinivas PentyalaDepartment of Anesthesiology, School of Medicine, Stony Brook Medical Center, Stony Brook, New York, USABackground: It is accepted that there is a severe risk of dural puncture in epidural anesthesia. Of major concern to anesthesiologists is unintentional spinal block. Reliable identification of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF from the aspirate is crucial for safe epidural anesthesia. The aim of this study was to determine whether prostaglandin D2 could be clinically used as a marker for the detection of CSF traces.Methods: After obtaining Institutional Review Board approval and patient consent, CSF was obtained from patients undergoing spinal anesthesia, and blood, urine, and saliva were obtained from normal subjects and analyzed for prostaglandin D2 (PGD. CSF (n=5 samples were diluted with local anesthetic (bupivacaine, normal saline and blood in the ratios of 1:5 and 1:10. PGD levels in the CSF samples were analyzed with a PGD-Methoxime (MOX EIA Kit (Cayman Chemicals, MI. This assay is based on the conversion of PGD to a stable derivative, which is analyzed with antiserum specific for PGD-MOX. Results: Different concentrations of pure PGD-MOX conjugate were analyzed by EIA and a standard curve was derived. PGD levels in CSF and CSF with diluents were determined and the values were extrapolated onto the standard curve. Our results show a well-defined correlation for the presence of PGD both in straight CSF samples and in diluted CSF (dilution factor of 1:5 and 1:10. Conclusion: Prostaglandin D2 was reliably identified in CSF by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay when diluted with local anesthetic, saline, and serum, and can be used as a marker to identify the presence of CSF in epidural aspirates.Keywords: epidural, cerebrospinal fluid, leak, marker, prostaglandin D2

  13. Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Subcutaneous Single Doses of Pegylated Human G-CSF Mutant (PEG30-rhG-CSF) in Beagle Dogs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yongming Cai; Zhengmin Chen; Ling Jiang; Ming Li; Changxiao Liu

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To compare the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of PEG30-rhG-CSF administered to beagle dogs at three different dosages with PEG20-rhG-CSF administered at one dosage,and to provide an experimental basis for clinical trials.METHODS Beagle dogs received single,subcutaneous doses of PEG30-rhG-CSF at 100,200 and 400 μg/kg or PEG20-rhG-CSF at 200 μg/kg.PEG30-rhG-CSF and PEG20-rhG-CSF concentrations in serum were analyzed using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA).WBC,ANC and PLT counts of whole blood samples were measured using fully automated analytic instrumentation.Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters were calculated using DAS 2.0 statistical analysis software.RESULTS The pharmacokinetic parameters of PEG30-rhG-CSF calculated from the serum concentration data determined by ELISA were as follows:the mean elimination half-life (t1/2ke) was 40.6 h (33.5~45.4 h);the mean time to reach peak concentration (Tmax) was 19.2 h (11.7~24.0 h);the drug clearance from the serum (CL) was decreased with increasing doses:the peak concentration (Cmax) and the area under the serum concentration-time curve (AUC) were increased with increasing doses.For PEG20-rhG-CSF,the half-life was shorter (12 h) and Tmax was achieved much earlier (10 h) relative to PEG30-rhG-CSF.The AUC of PEG30-rhG-CSF was much greater than that of PEG20-rhG-CSF,and the relative bioavailability with a subcutaneous injection was 158.7%.Administration of single doses of PEG30-rhG-CSF resulted in substantial increases in the absolute neutrophil count (ANC).The time to reach ANCmax (ANCTmax) was 72 h.The maximum observed absolute neutrophil counts (ANCmax) and the area over the baseline effect curve (AOBEC) was increased with increasing doses.The effect-elimination half-life (t1/2E) ranged from 60 h to 80 h after subcutaneous administration.The PLT count was slightly elevated 8-12 h after s.c.injection,and declined after 24 h.CONCLUSION The mean elimination half-life of PEG30-rhG-CSF

  14. Biomarkers for dementia and mild cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Alvarado, Manuel; Gago, Belén; Navalpotro-Gomez, Irene; Jiménez-Urbieta, Haritz; Rodriguez-Oroz, María C

    2016-06-01

    Cognitive decline is one of the most frequent and disabling nonmotor features of Parkinson's disease. Around 30% of patients with Parkinson's disease experience mild cognitive impairment, a well-established risk factor for the development of dementia. However, mild cognitive impairment in patients with Parkinson's disease is a heterogeneous entity that involves different types and extents of cognitive deficits. Because it is not currently known which type of mild cognitive impairment confers a higher risk of progression to dementia, it would be useful to define biomarkers that could identify these patients to better study disease progression and possible interventions. In this sense, the identification among patients with Parkinson's disease and mild cognitive impairment of biomarkers associated with dementia would allow the early detection of this process. This review summarizes studies from the past 25 years that have assessed the potential biomarkers of dementia and mild cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease patients. Despite the potential importance, no biomarker has as yet been validated. However, features such as low levels of epidermal and insulin-like growth factors or uric acid in plasma/serum and of Aß in CSF, reduction of cerebral cholinergic innervation and metabolism measured by PET mainly in posterior areas, and hippocampal atrophy in MRI might be indicative of distinct deficits with a distinct risk of dementia in subgroups of patients. Longitudinal studies combining the existing techniques and new approaches are needed to identify patients at higher risk of dementia. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  15. Imaging biomarkers in acute ischemic stroke trials: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harston, G W J; Rane, N; Shaya, G; Thandeswaran, S; Cellerini, M; Sheerin, F; Kennedy, J

    2015-05-01

    Imaging biomarkers are increasingly used to provide a better understanding of the pathophysiology of acute ischemic stroke. However, this approach of routinely using imaging biomarkers to inform treatment decisions has yet to be translated into successful randomized trials. The aim of this study was to systematically review the use of imaging biomarkers in randomized controlled trials in patients with acute ischemic stroke, exploring the purposes for which the imaging biomarkers were used. We performed a systematic review of imaging biomarkers used in randomized controlled trials of acute ischemic stroke, in which a therapeutic intervention was trialed within 48 hours of symptom onset. Data bases searched included MEDLINE, EMBASE, strokecenter.org, and the Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive (1995-2014). Eighty-four studies met the criteria, of which 49 used imaging to select patients; 31, for subgroup analysis; and 49, as an outcome measure. Imaging biomarkers were broadly used for 8 purposes. There was marked heterogeneity in the definitions and uses of imaging biomarkers and significant publication bias among post hoc analyses. Imaging biomarkers offer the opportunity to refine the trial cohort by minimizing participant variation, to decrease sample size, and to personalize treatment approaches for those who stand to benefit most. However, within imaging modalities, there has been little consistency between stroke trials. Greater effort to prospectively use consistent imaging biomarkers should help improve the development of novel treatment strategies in acute stroke and improve comparison between studies. © 2015 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  16. Proximal Limb Weakness Reverting After CSF Diversion In Intracranial Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinha S

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We report about two young girls who developed progressive visual failure secondary to increased intracranial pressure and had significant proximal muscle weakness of limbs. Patients with elevated intracranial pressure (ICP may present with "false localizing signs", besides having headache, vomiting and papilledema. Radicular pain as a manifestation of raised ICP is rare and motor weakness attributable to polyradiculopathy is exceptional. Two patients with increased intracranial pressure without lateralizing signs′ had singnificant muscle weakness. Clinical evaluation and laboratory tests did not disclose any other cause for weakness. Following theco-peritoneal shunt, in both patients, there was variable recovery of vision but the proximal weakness and symptoms of elevated ICP improved rapidly. Recognition of this uncommon manifestation of raised ICP may obviate the need for unnecessary investigation and reduce morbidity due to weakness by CSF diversion procedure.

  17. Chimeric classical swine fever (CSF)-Japanese encephalitis (JE) viral replicon as a non-transmissible vaccine candidate against CSF and JE infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhenhua; Wu, Rui; Li, Robert W; Li, Ling; Xiong, Zhongliang; Zhao, Haizhong; Guo, Deyin; Pan, Zishu

    2012-04-01

    A trans-complemented chimeric CSF-JE virus replicon was constructed using an infectious cDNA clone of the CSF virus (CSFV) Alfort/187 strain. The CSFV E2 gene was deleted, and a fragment containing the region encoding a truncated envelope protein (tE, amino acid 292-402, domain III) of JE virus (JEV) was inserted into the resultant plasmid, pA187delE2, to generate the recombinant cDNA clone pA187delE2/JEV-tE. Porcine kidney 15 (PK15) cells that constitutively express the CSFV E2p7 proteins were then transfected with in vitro-transcribed RNA from pA187delE2/JEV-tE. As a result, the chimeric CSF-JE virus replicon particle (VRP), rv187delE2/JEV-tE, was rescued. In a mouse model, immunization with the chimeric CSF-JE VRP induced strong production of JEV-specific antibody and conferred protection against a lethal JEV challenge. Pigs immunized with CSF-JE VRP displayed strong anti-CSFV and anti-JEV antibody responses and protection against CSFV and JEV challenge infections. Our evidence suggests that E2-complemented CSF-JE VRP not only has potential as a live-attenuated non-transmissible vaccine candidate against CSF and JE but also serves as a potential DIVA (Differentiating Infected from Vaccinated Animals) vaccine for CSF in pigs. Together, our data suggest that the non-transmissible chimeric VRP expressing foreign antigenic proteins may represent a promising strategy for bivalent DIVA vaccine design. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. When Is Holography Consistent?

    CERN Document Server

    McInnes, Brett

    2015-01-01

    Holographic duality relates two radically different kinds of theory: one with gravity, one without. The very existence of such an equivalence imposes strong consistency conditions which are, in the nature of the case, hard to satisfy. Recently a particularly deep condition of this kind, relating the minimum of a probe brane action to a gravitational bulk action (in a Euclidean formulation), has been recognised; and the question arises as to the circumstances under which it, and its Lorentzian counterpart, are satisfied. We discuss the fact that there are physically interesting situations in which one or both versions might, in principle, \\emph{not} be satisfied. These arise in two distinct circumstances: first, when the bulk is not an Einstein manifold, and, second, in the presence of angular momentum. Focusing on the application of holography to the quark-gluon plasma (of the various forms arising in the early Universe and in heavy-ion collisions), we find that these potential violations never actually occur...

  19. CSF metabolic and proteomic profiles in patients prodromal for psychosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey T-J Huang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The initial prodromal state of psychosis (IPS is defined as an early disease stage prior to the onset of overt psychosis characterized by sub-threshold or more unspecific psychiatric symptoms. Little is known regarding the biochemical changes during this period. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We investigated the metabolic/proteomic profiles of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of first-onset drug naïve paranoid schizophrenia patients (n = 54 and individuals presenting with initial prodromal symptoms (n = 24, alongside healthy volunteers (n = 70 using proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1H-NMR spectroscopy and surface enhanced laser desorption ionization (SELDI mass spectrometry, respectively. Partial least square discriminant analysis (PLS-DA showed that 36%/29% of IPS patients displayed proteomic/metabolic profiles characteristic of first-onset, drug naïve schizophrenia, i.e., changes in levels of glucose and lactate as well as changes in a VGF-derived peptide (VGF23-62 and transthyretin protein concentrations. However, only 29% (n = 7 of the investigated IPS patients (who to date have been followed up for up to three years have so far received a diagnosis of schizophrenia. The presence of biochemical alterations in the IPS group did not correlate with the risk to develop schizophrenia. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results imply that schizophrenia-related biochemical disease processes can be traced in CSF of prodromal patients. However, the biochemical disturbances identified in IPS patients, at least when measured at a single time point, may not be sufficient to predict clinical outcome.

  20. Paediatric Crohn disease patients with stricturing behaviour exhibit ileal granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) autoantibody production and reduced neutrophil bacterial killing and GM-CSF bioactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurickova, I; Collins, M H; Chalk, C; Seese, A; Bezold, R; Lake, K; Allmen, D; Frischer, J S; Falcone, R A; Trapnell, B C; Denson, L A

    2013-01-01

    Granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) autoantibodies are associated with stricturing behaviour in Crohn disease (CD). We hypothesized that CD ileal lamina propria mononuclear cells (LPMC) would produce GM-CSF autoantibodies and peripheral blood (PB) samples would contain GM-CSF neutralizing capacity (NC). Paediatric CD and control PBMC and ileal biopsies or LPMC were isolated and cultured and GM-CSF, immunoglobulin (Ig)G and GM-CSF autoantibodies production were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Basal and GM-CSF-primed neutrophil bacterial killing and signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) tyrosine phosphorylation (pSTAT5) were measured by flow cytometry. GM-CSF autoantibodies were enriched within total IgG for LPMC isolated from CD ileal strictures and proximal margins compared to control ileum. Neutrophil bacterial killing was reduced in CD patients compared to controls. Within CD, neutrophil GM-CSF-dependent STAT5 activation and bacterial killing were reduced as GM-CSF autoantibodies increased. GM-CSF stimulation of pSTAT5 did not vary between controls and CD patients in washed PB granulocytes in which serum was removed. However, GM-CSF stimulation of pSTAT5 was reduced in whole PB samples from CD patients. These data were used to calculate the GM-CSF NC. CD patients with GM-CSF NC greater than 25% exhibited a fourfold higher rate of stricturing behaviour and surgery. The likelihood ratio (95% confidence interval) for stricturing behaviour for patients with elevation in both GM-CSF autoantibodies and GM-CSF NC was equal to 5 (2, 11). GM-CSF autoantibodies are produced by LPMC isolated from CD ileal resection specimens and are associated with reduced neutrophil bacterial killing. CD peripheral blood contains GM-CSF NC, which is associated with increased rates of stricturing behaviour. PMID:23600834

  1. G-CSF plus preemptive plerixafor vs hyperfractionated CY plus G-CSF for autologous stem cell mobilization in multiple myeloma: effectiveness, safety and cost analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antar, A; Otrock, Z K; Kharfan-Dabaja, M A; Ghaddara, H A; Kreidieh, N; Mahfouz, R; Bazarbachi, A

    2015-06-01

    The optimal stem cell mobilization regimen for patients with multiple myeloma (MM) remains undefined. We retrospectively compared our experience in hematopoietic cell mobilization in 83 MM patients using fractionated high-dose CY and G-CSF with G-CSF plus preemptive plerixafor. All patients in the CY group (n=56) received fractionated high-dose CY (5 g/m(2) divided into five doses of 1 g/m(2) every 3 h) with G-CSF. All patients in the plerixafor group (n=27) received G-CSF and plerixafor preemptively based on an established algorithm. Compared with plerixafor, CY use was associated with higher total CD34+ cell yield (7.5 × 10(6) vs 15.5 × 10(6) cells/kg, P=0.005). All patients in both groups yielded ⩾4 × 10(6) CD34+ cells/kg. Conversely, CY use was associated with high frequency of febrile neutropenia, blood and platelet transfusions need and hospitalizations. The average total cost of mobilization in Lebanon was slightly higher in the plerixafor group ($7886 vs $7536; P=0.16). Our data indicate robust stem cell mobilization in MM patients with either fractionated high-dose CY and G-CSF or G-CSF alone with preemptive plerixafor. The chemo-mobilization approach was associated with twofold stem cell yield, slightly lower cost but significantly increased toxicity.

  2. G-CSF preferentially supports the generation of gut-homing Gr-1high macrophages in M-CSF-treated bone marrow cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshkibaf, Shahab; Gower, Mark William; Dekaban, Gregory A; Kim, Sung Ouk

    2014-10-01

    The G-CSF is best known for its activity in the generation and activation of neutrophils. In addition, studies on G-CSF(-/-) or G-CSFR(-/-) mice and BMC cultures suggested a role of G-CSF in macrophage generation. However, our understanding on the role of G-CSF in macrophage development is limited. Here, using in vitro BMC models, we demonstrated that G-CSF promoted the generation of Gr-1(high)/F4/80(+) macrophage-like cells in M-BMCs, likely through suppressing cell death and enhancing generation of Gr-1(high)/F4/80(+) macrophage-like cells. These Gr-1(high) macrophage-like cells produced "M2-like" cytokines and surface markers in response to LPS and IL-4/IL-13, respectively. Adoptive transfer of EGFP-expressing (EGFP(+)) M-BMCs showed a dominant, gut-homing phenotype. The small intestinal lamina propria of G-CSFR(-/-) mice also harbored significantly reduced numbers of Gr-1(high)/F4/80(+) macrophages compared with those of WT mice, but levels of Gr-1(+)/F4/80(-) neutrophil-like cells were similar between these mice. Collectively, these results suggest a novel function of G-CSF in the generation of gut-homing, M2-like macrophages.

  3. Commentary: statistics for biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovell, David P

    2012-05-01

    This short commentary discusses Biomarkers' requirements for the reporting of statistical analyses in submitted papers. It is expected that submitters will follow the general instructions of the journal, the more detailed guidance given by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors, the specific guidelines developed by the EQUATOR network, and those of various specialist groups. Biomarkers expects that the study design and subsequent statistical analyses are clearly reported and that the data reported can be made available for independent assessment. The journal recognizes that there is continuing debate about different approaches to statistical science. Biomarkers appreciates that the field continues to develop rapidly and encourages the use of new methodologies.

  4. Metabolic products as biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melancon, M.J.; Alscher, R.; Benson, W.; Kruzynski, G.; Lee, R.F.; Sikka, H.C.; Spies, R.B.; Huggett, Robert J.; Kimerle, Richard A.; Mehrle, Paul M.=; Bergman, Harold L.

    1992-01-01

    Ideally, endogenous biomarkers would indicate both exposure and environmental effects of toxic chemicals; however, such comprehensive biochemical and physiological indices are currently being developed and, at the present time, are unavailable for use in environmental monitoring programs. Continued work is required to validate the use of biochemical and physiological stress indices as useful components of monitoring programs. Of the compounds discussed only phytochelatins and porphyrins are currently in biomarkers in a useful state; however, glutathione,metallothioneins, stress ethylene, and polyamines are promising as biomarkers in environmental monitoring.

  5. Sunlight triggers cutaneous lupus through a CSF-1-dependent mechanism in MRL-Fas(lpr) mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menke, Julia; Hsu, Mei-Yu; Byrne, Katelyn T; Lucas, Julie A; Rabacal, Whitney A; Croker, Byron P; Zong, Xiao-Hua; Stanley, E Richard; Kelley, Vicki R

    2008-11-15

    Sunlight (UVB) triggers cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE) and systemic lupus through an unknown mechanism. We tested the hypothesis that UVB triggers CLE through a CSF-1-dependent, macrophage (Mø)-mediated mechanism in MRL-Fas(lpr) mice. By constructing mutant MRL-Fas(lpr) strains expressing varying levels of CSF-1 (high, intermediate, none), and use of an ex vivo gene transfer to deliver CSF-1 intradermally, we determined that CSF-1 induces CLE in lupus-susceptible MRL-Fas(lpr) mice, but not in lupus-resistant BALB/c mice. UVB incites an increase in Møs, apoptosis in the skin, and CLE in MRL-Fas(lpr), but not in CSF-1-deficient MRL-Fas(lpr) mice. Furthermore, UVB did not induce CLE in BALB/c mice. Probing further, UVB stimulates CSF-1 expression by keratinocytes leading to recruitment and activation of Møs that, in turn, release mediators, which induce apoptosis in keratinocytes. Thus, sunlight triggers a CSF-1-dependent, Mø-mediated destructive inflammation in the skin leading to CLE in lupus-susceptible MRL-Fas(lpr) but not lupus-resistant BALB/c mice. Taken together, CSF-1 is envisioned as the match and lupus susceptibility as the tinder leading to CLE.

  6. Benign meningioma metastasizing through CSF pathways : a case report and review of literature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramakrishnamurthy T

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Metastasis of intraventricular meningiomas through CSF pathways is a rarity and only 4 cases have been reported in world literature describing meningiomas which were intraventricular and malignant. Here we report a case of benign intraventricular meningioma which had spread through CSF pathways, the recurrences as well as the primary tumor being benign in nature.

  7. G-CSF for mobilizing transplanted bone marrow stem cells in rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safari, Manouchehr; Jafari, Behnaz; Zarbakhsh, Sam; Sameni, Hamidreza; Vafaei, Abbas Ali; Mohammadi, Nasrin Khan; Ghahari, Laya

    2016-12-01

    Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) is used in clinical practice for the treatment of neutropenia and to stimulate generation of hematopoietic stem cells in bone marrow donors. In the present study, the ability of G-CSF in mobilizing exogenous bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs) from peripheral blood into the brain was tested. We for the first time injected a small amount of BMSCs through the tail vein. We choose 25 male Wistar rats (200-250 g) were lesioned by 6-OHDA injected into the left substantia nigra, pars compacta (SNpc). G-CSF (70 µg/kg/day) was given from the 7(th) day after lesion for five days. The BMSCs (2×10(5)) were injected through the dorsal tail vein on the 7(th) day after lesion. The number of rotations was significantly lower in the stem cell therapy group than in the control group. In the third test in the received G-CSF and G-CSF+stem cells groups, animals displayed significant behavioral recovery compared with the control group (Pstem cells groups. We didn't detect any labeling stem cells in SNpc. G-CSF can't mobilize low amounts of exogenous BMSCs from the blood stream to injured SNpc. But G-CSF (70 µg/kg) is more neuroprotective than BMSCs (2×10(5) number[w1] of BMSCs). Results of our study suggest that G-CSF alone is more neuroprotective than BMSCs.

  8. T2-weighted vs. intrathecal contrast-enhanced MR cisternography in the evaluation of CSF rhinorrhea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ecin, Gaye; Oner, A. Yusuf; Tokgoz, Nil; Ucar, Murat; Tali, Turgut [Dept. of Radiology, Gazi Univ. School of Medicine, Ankara (Turkey)], e-mail: gayeecin@hotmail.com; Aykol, Sukru [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Gazi Univ. School of Medicine, Ankara (Turkey)

    2013-07-15

    Background: Endoscopic surgical approach is being more widely used in the treatment of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) rhinorrhea. Accurate localization of CSF fistulas prior to surgery is essential in increasing the success of dural repair and in decreasing negative or recurrent explorations. Purpose: To evaluate and compare intrathecal contrast medium-enhanced magnetic resonance cisternography (CEMRC) with T2-weighted MR cisternography (T2MRC) in identifying the presence and site of CSF rhinorrhea. Material and Methods: Sixty patients with suspected CSF rhinorrhea underwent MR cisternography including intrathecally enhanced fat-suppressed T1WI in three orthogonal planes and T2WI in the coronal plane. Both set of images were reviewed by two blinded radiologists for the presence and location of CSF leakage. Imaging data were compared with surgical findings and/or beta-2 transferrin testing. Results: With surgery proven CSF leakage in 20 instances as reference, CEMRC detected 18 (90%), whereas T2MRC reported only 13 (65%) correctly. Overall, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value in detecting CSF fistulas were 92%, 80%, 76%, and 93% for CEMRC, and 56%, 77%, 64%, and 71% for T2MRC, respectively. Conclusion: The minimally invasive CEMRC is an effective method with higher sensitivity and specificity than T2MRC in the evaluation of CSF fistulas.

  9. G-CSF in Peg-IFN induced neutropenia in liver transplanted patients with HCV recurrence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Francesca Lodato; Francesco Azzaroli; Maria Rosa Tamè; Maria Di Girolamo; Federica Buonfiglioli; Natalia Mazzella; Paolo Cecinato; Enrico Roda; Giuseppe Mazzella

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the efficacy of granulocyte colony stimulating factors (G-CSF) in liver transplanted patients with hepatitis C (HCV) recurrence and Pegylated-IFN α-2b induced neutropenia, and to evaluate the impact of G-CSF administration on virological response.METHODS: Sixty-eight patients undergoing antiviral treatment for post-liver transplantation (OLT) HCV recurrence were enrolled.All patients developing neutropenia received G-CSF.RESULTS: Twenty three (34%) received G-CSF.Mean neutrophil count at the onset of neutropenia was 700/mmc (range 400-750/mmc); after 1 mo of G-CSF it increased to 1210/mmc (range 300-5590/mmc) ( P < 0.0001).Three patients did not respond to G-CSF.Treatment duration was similar in neutropenic and non-neutropenic patients.No differences in the rate of discontinuation, infections or virological response were observed between the two groups.G-CSF was protective for the onset of de novo autoimmune hepatitis ( P < 0.003).CONCLUSION: G-CSF administration is effective in the case of Peg-IFN induced neutropenia increasing neutrophil count, prolonging treatment and leading to sustained virological response (SVR) rates comparable to non-neutropenic patients.It prevents the occurrence of de novo autoimmune hepatitis.

  10. Issues in cerebrospinal fluid management. CSF Venereal Disease Research Laboratory testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albright, R E; Christenson, R H; Emlet, J L; Graham, C B; Estevez, E G; Wilson, M L; Reller, L B; Schneider, K A

    1991-03-01

    Three policies for decreasing unnecessary cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) management Venereal Disease Research Laboratory (VDRL) tests were compared. The first policy attempted to educate physicians about the use of serologic tests for diagnosing neurosyphilis but allowed the CSF VDRL to be performed either as a screening test or as a retrospective test. The second policy required that the CSF VDRL be performed as a retrospective test without regard to the patient's serologic status. The third policy required that a patient be seropositive by either rapid plasma reagin (RPR) or fluorescent treponemal antibody absorbance (FTA-ABS) before a CSF VDRL could be performed. Before these policies were instituted, VDRL testing was performed on 18.2% of all CSF samples. The optional and required retrospective policies decreased the CSF VDRL rate to 13.0% and 8.5%, respectively, but the percentages of seropositive patients for whom these procedures were performed were only 7.3% and 12.9%. The third policy decreased the CSF VDRL test rate to 1.8% (P less than 0.001) with seropositivity improving to 90%. To assure serologic tests are obtained in the evaluation of neurosyphilis, requirement for seropositivity must be implemented with the use of retrospective CSF VDRL testing.

  11. Biomarkers of fever: from bench to bedside

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Limper (Maarten)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ This thesis aims to study biomarkers in inflammation and infection, with a special focus on the distinction between infectious and non-infectious fever. The thesis consists of three parts, part I being this introduction, in which the concept of fever in infectious and n

  12. Detection of Listeria monocytogenes in CSF from Three Patients with Meningoencephalitis by Next-Generation Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Ming; Zhou, Jiali; Zhu, Yicheng; Zhang, Yinxin; Lv, Xia; Sun, Ruixue; Shen, Ao; Ren, Haitao; Cui, Liying

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Encephalitis caused by Listeria monocytogenes (L. monocytogenes) is rare but sometimes fatal. Early diagnosis is difficult using routine cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) tests, while next-generation sequencing (NGS) is increasingly being used for the detection and characterization of pathogens. Methods This study set up and applied unbiased NGS to detect L. monocytogenes in CSF collected from three cases of clinically suspected listeria meningoencephalitis. Results Three cases of patients with acute/subacute meningoencephalitis are reported. Magnetic resonance imaging and blood cultures led to a suspected diagnosis of L. monocytogenes, while the CSF cultures were negative. Unbiased NGS of CSF identified and sequenced reads corresponding to L. monocytogenes in all three cases. Conclusions This is the first report highlighting the feasibility of applying NGS of CSF as a diagnostic method for central nervous system (CNS) L. monocytogenes infection. Routine application of this technology in clinical microbiology will significantly improve diagnostic methods for CNS infectious diseases.

  13. Persistent CSF Rhinorrhoea, Pneumocephalus, and Recurrent Meningitis Following Misdiagnosis of Olfactory Neuroblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil Barua

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A 41-year-old female patient was admitted with streptococcal meningitis on a background of 5-month history of CSF rhinorrhoea. Imaging revealed an extensive skull base lesion involving the sphenoid and ethmoid sinuses, the pituitary fossa with suprasellar extension and bony destruction. Histological examination of an endonasal transethmoidal biopsy suggested a diagnosis of olfactory neuroblastoma. A profuse CSF leak occurred and the patient developed coliform meningitis. A second endonasal endoscopic biopsy was undertaken which demonstrated the tumour to be a prolactinoma. Following endonasal repair of the CSF leak and lumbar drainage, she developed profound pneumocephalus. The patient underwent three further unsuccessful CSF leak repairs. Definitive control of the CSF leak was finally achieved through a transcranial approach with prolonged lumbar drainage. This case illustrates some of the potentially devastating complications which can occur as a consequence of complex skull base lesions. A multidisciplinary approach may be required to successfully manage such cases.

  14. Combinatorial G-CSF/AMD3100 treatment in cardiac repair after myocardial infarction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantin Rüder

    Full Text Available Several studies suggest that circulating bone marrow derived stem cells promote the regeneration of ischemic tissues. For hematopoietic stem cell transplantation combinatorial granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF/Plerixafor (AMD3100 administration was shown to enhance mobilization of bone marrow derived stem cells compared to G-CSF monotherapy. Here we tested the hypothesis whether combinatorial G-CSF/AMD3100 therapy has beneficial effects in cardiac recovery in a mouse model of myocardial infarction.We analyzed the effect of single G-CSF (250 µg/kg/day and combinatorial G-CSF/AMD3100 (100 µg/kg/day treatment on cardiac morphology, vascularization, and hemodynamics 28 days after permanent ligation of the left anterior descending artery (LAD. G-CSF treatment started directly after induction of myocardial infarction (MI for 3 consecutive days followed by a single AMD3100 application on day three after MI in the G-CSF/AMD3100 group. Cell mobilization was assessed by flow cytometry of blood samples drawn from tail vein on day 0, 7, and 14.Peripheral blood analysis 7 days after MI showed enhanced mobilization of white blood cells (WBC and endothelial progenitor cells (EPC upon G-CSF and combinatorial G-CSF/AMD3100 treatment. However, single or combinatorial treatment showed no improvement in survival, left ventricular function, and infarction size compared to the saline treated control group 28 days after MI. Furthermore, no differences in histology and vascularization of infarcted hearts could be observed.Although the implemented treatment regimen caused no adverse effects, our data show that combinatorial G-CSF/AMD therapy does not promote myocardial regeneration after permanent LAD occlusion.

  15. CSF/serum quotient graphs for the evaluation of intrathecal C4 synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rey Alexis

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF/serum quotient graphs have been used previously to determine local synthesis in brain of immunoglobulins and C3 complement component. The aim of this study was to use the same technique to construct quotient graphs, or Reibergrams, for the beta globulin C4 and to evaluate the method for assessing intrathecal synthesis in neurological disease. Methods The constants in the previously-defined Reibergram for immunoglobulin IgA were used to calculate the CSF/serum quotient for C4. CSF and serum were analyzed for C4, IgA and albumin from a total of 12 patients with meningoencephalitis caused by encapsulated microorganisms and 10 subjects without infections or inflammatory neurological disease, some of which had dysfunction of the blood-CSF barrier, Results The formula and C4 Reibergram with the constants previously found for IgA, determined the intrathecal C4 synthesis in CSF. The intrathecal C4 fraction in CSF (C4 loc in mg/l was compared to the C4-Index (fraction of CSF: serum for C 4/fraction of CSF: serum for albumin. There was a significant correlation between the two formulae. The CSF/Serum quotient graph was superior for detecting intrathecal synthesis of C4 under variable conditions of blood-CSF barrier permeability. Conclusion The C4 Reibergram can be used to quantify the intrathecal synthesis of this component of the complement system in different infectious diseases of the central nervous system and is especially useful for patients with blood-brain barrier dysfunction.

  16. Identification of Ambiguous Activities in Radionuclide Cisternography Using SPECT/CT: Aspirated and Ingested CSF Rhinorrhea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dong Yun; Kim, Jae Seung [Univ. of Ulsan College of Medicine, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-15

    A 2 year-old little girl underwent Tc-99m diethylenthriamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) radionuclide cisternography to evaluate CSF rhinorrhea (Fig. 1). Cisternography clearly showed consecutive tracer activity in the nasal cavity and nasal tip, reflecting cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage. However, several unexpected activities appeared on the bilateral mid- and unilateral lower thorax on delayed images, respectively. We performed additional SPECT/CT to delineate the CSF leakage tract and identify the unexpected activities. Through SPECT/CT, we could confirm that the mid-thoracic activity was in the lung parenchyma, while the lower thoracic activity was in the stomach. Thus, we speculated that these unexpected activities were the result of aspirated and ingested CSF rhinorrhea. CSF rhinorrhea occurs when there is a fistula between the dura mater and the skull base and discharge of CSF from the nose. A spinal fluid leak from the intracranial space to the nasal respiratory tract is potentially very serious because of the risk of an ascending infection that could produce fulminant meningitis. Therefore, identification of the fistulous tract is helpful for patient management. Radionuclide cisternography is an important imaging modality to detect the site of leakage in patients with CSF rhinorrhea. The combination of radionuclide cistenography and SPECT/CT has led to a major improvement in the diagnostic accuracy for localization of CSF leakage. This case also shows an important role for SPECT/CT fusion imaging in radionuclide cisternography not only for localizing the primary CSF fistula tract, but also for evaluating ambiguous radiotracer activities in planar imaging; these ultimately turned out to be aspirated and ingested CSF rhinorrhea.

  17. A Novel Point-of-Care Biomarker Recognition Method: Validation by Detecting Marker for Diabetic Nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahana Pentyala

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Biological fluid collection to identify and analyze different disease markers is a routine and normal procedure in health care settings. Body fluids are as varied as urine, blood, mucus, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, tears, semen, etc. The volumes of the collected fluids range from micro liters (e.g., tears, CSF to tens and hundreds of milliliters (blood, urine, etc.. In some manifestations, a disease marker (particularly protein markers can occur in trace amounts, yet the fluids collected are in large volumes. To identify these trace markers, cumbersome methods, expensive instruments, and trained personnel are required. We developed an easy method to rapidly capture, concentrate, and identify protein markers in large volumes of test fluids. This method involves the utilization of two antibodies recognizing two different epitopes of the protein biomarker. Antibody-1 helps to capture and concentrate the biomarker and Antibody-2 adsorbed or conjugated to nanogold beads will detect the biomarker. This method was validated in capturing and detecting lipocalin type prostaglandin-D2 synthase, a marker in urine that implicates diabetic nephropathy. A one-step collection, concentration, and detection device was designed based on this method. This device can replace many of the normal body fluid collection devices such as tubes and containers. A one-step fluid collection and biomarker capture and concentration device for rapid diagnosis of diseases has tremendous advantage in terms of cost and providing timely results.

  18. Biomarker time out.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzold, Axel; Bowser, Robert; Calabresi, Paolo; Zetterberg, Henrik; Uitdehaag, Bernard M J

    2014-10-01

    The advancement of knowledge relies on scientific investigations. The timing between asking a question and data collection defines if a study is prospective or retrospective. Prospective studies look forward from a point in time, are less prone to bias and are considered superior to retrospective studies. This conceptual framework conflicts with the nature of biomarker research. New candidate biomarkers are discovered in a retrospective manner. There are neither resources nor time for prospective testing in all cases. Relevant sources for bias are not covered. Ethical questions arise through the time penalty of an overly dogmatic concept. The timing of sample collection can be separated from testing biomarkers. Therefore the moment of formulating a hypothesis may be after sample collection was completed. A conceptual framework permissive to asking research questions without the obligation to bow to the human concept of calendar time would simplify biomarker research, but will require new safeguards against bias.

  19. Biomarkers in Airway Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janice M Leung

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The inherent limitations of spirometry and clinical history have prompted clinicians and scientists to search for surrogate markers of airway diseases. Although few biomarkers have been widely accepted into the clinical armamentarium, the authors explore three sources of biomarkers that have shown promise as indicators of disease severity and treatment response. In asthma, exhaled nitric oxide measurements can predict steroid responsiveness and sputum eosinophil counts have been used to titrate anti-inflammatory therapies. In chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, inflammatory plasma biomarkers, such as fibrinogen, club cell secretory protein-16 and surfactant protein D, can denote greater severity and predict the risk of exacerbations. While the multitude of disease phenotypes in respiratory medicine make biomarker development especially challenging, these three may soon play key roles in the diagnosis and management of airway diseases.

  20. amphibian_biomarker_data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Amphibian metabolite data used in Snyder, M.N., Henderson, W.M., Glinski, D.G., Purucker, S. T., 2017. Biomarker analysis of american toad (Anaxyrus americanus) and...

  1. Cost and clinical analysis of autologous hematopoietic stem cell mobilization with G-CSF and plerixafor compared to G-CSF and cyclophosphamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaughnessy, Paul; Islas-Ohlmayer, Miguel; Murphy, Julie; Hougham, Maureen; MacPherson, Jill; Winkler, Kurt; Silva, Matthew; Steinberg, Michael; Matous, Jeffrey; Selvey, Sheryl; Maris, Michael; McSweeney, Peter A

    2011-05-01

    Plerixafor plus granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) has been shown to mobilize more CD34(+) cells than G-CSF alone for autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). However, many centers use chemotherapy followed by G-CSF to mobilize CD34(+) cells prior to HSCT. We performed a retrospective study of patients who participated in the expanded access program (EAP) of plerixafor and G-CSF for initial mobilization of CD34(+) cells, and compared outcomes to matched historic controls mobilized with cyclophosphamide 3-5 g/m(2) and G-CSF at 2 centers that participated in the EAP Control patients were matched for age, sex, disease, disease stage, and number of prior therapies. Mobilization costs were defined to be the costs of medical procedures, resource utilization, and medications. Median national CMS reimbursement rates were used to establish the costs of procedures, hospitalization, provider visits, apheresis, CD34(+) cell processing and cryopreservation. Average sale price was used for G-CSF, plerixafor, cyclophosphamide, MESNA, antiemetics, and antimicrobials. A total of 33 patients from the EAP and 33 matched controls were studied. Two patients in the control group were hospitalized for neutropenic fever during the mobilization period. Apheresis started on the scheduled day in 33 (100%) study patients and in 29 (88%) control patients (P = 0.04). Sixteen (48%) control patients required weekend apheresis. There was no difference in number of CD34(+) cells collected between the groups, and all patients proceeded to HSCT with no difference in engraftment outcomes. Median total cost of mobilization was not different between the plerixafor/G-CSF and control groups ($14,224 versus $18,824; P = .45). In conclusion, plerixafor/G-CSF and cyclophosphamide/G-CSF for upfront mobilization of CD34(-) cells resulted in similar numbers of cells collected, costs of mobilization, and clinical outcomes. Additionally, plerixafor/G-CSF mobilization resulted in more

  2. Potential fluid biomarkers for pathological brain changes in Alzheimer's disease: Implication for the screening of cognitive frailty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Qingwei; D'Onofrio, Grazia; Sancarlo, Daniele; Greco, Antonio; Yu, Zhuowei

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive frailty (CF) overlaps with early neuropathological alterations associated with aging-related major neurocognitive disorders, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Fluid biomarkers for these pathological brain alterations allow for early diagnosis in the preclinical stages of AD, and for objective prognostic assessments in clinical intervention trials. These biomarkers may also be helpful in the screening of CF. The present study reviewed the literature and identified systematic reviews of cohort studies and other authoritative reports. The selection criteria for potentially suitable fluid biomarkers included: i) Frequent use in studies of fluid-derived markers and ii) evidence of novel measurement techniques for fluid-derived markers. The present study focused on studies that assessed these biomarkers in AD, mild cognitive impairment and non-AD demented subjects. At present, widely used fluid biomarkers include cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), total tau, phosphorylated tau and amyloid-β levels. With the development of novel measurement techniques and improvements in understanding regarding the mechanisms underlying aging-related major neurocognitive disorders, numerous novel biomarkers associated with various aspects of AD neuropathology are being explored. These include specific measurements of Aβ oligomer or monomer forms, tau proteins in the peripheral plasma and CSF, and novel markers of synaptic dysfunction, neuronal damage and apoptosis, neuronal activity alteration, neuroinflammation, blood brain barrier dysfunction, oxidative stress, metabolites, mitochondrial function and aberrant lipid metabolism. The proposed panels of fluid biomarkers may be useful in the early diagnosis of AD, prediction of the progression of AD from preclinical stages to the dementia stage, and the differentiation of AD from non-AD dementia. In combination with physical frailty, the present study surmised that these biomarkers may also be used as biomarkers for CF, thus contribute

  3. Theranostic Biomarkers for Schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolac Perkovic, Matea; Nedic Erjavec, Gordana; Svob Strac, Dubravka; Uzun, Suzana; Kozumplik, Oliver; Pivac, Nela

    2017-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a highly heritable, chronic, severe, disabling neurodevelopmental brain disorder with a heterogeneous genetic and neurobiological background, which is still poorly understood. To allow better diagnostic procedures and therapeutic strategies in schizophrenia patients, use of easy accessible biomarkers is suggested. The most frequently used biomarkers in schizophrenia are those associated with the neuroimmune and neuroendocrine system, metabolism, different neurotransmitter systems and neurotrophic factors. However, there are still no validated and reliable biomarkers in clinical use for schizophrenia. This review will address potential biomarkers in schizophrenia. It will discuss biomarkers in schizophrenia and propose the use of specific blood-based panels that will include a set of markers associated with immune processes, metabolic disorders, and neuroendocrine/neurotrophin/neurotransmitter alterations. The combination of different markers, or complex multi-marker panels, might help in the discrimination of patients with different underlying pathologies and in the better classification of the more homogenous groups. Therefore, the development of the diagnostic, prognostic and theranostic biomarkers is an urgent and an unmet need in psychiatry, with the aim of improving diagnosis, therapy monitoring, prediction of treatment outcome and focus on the personal medicine approach in order to improve the quality of life in patients with schizophrenia and decrease health costs worldwide. PMID:28358316

  4. Theranostic Biomarkers for Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkovic, Matea Nikolac; Erjavec, Gordana Nedic; Strac, Dubravka Svob; Uzun, Suzana; Kozumplik, Oliver; Pivac, Nela

    2017-03-30

    Schizophrenia is a highly heritable, chronic, severe, disabling neurodevelopmental brain disorder with a heterogeneous genetic and neurobiological background, which is still poorly understood. To allow better diagnostic procedures and therapeutic strategies in schizophrenia patients, use of easy accessible biomarkers is suggested. The most frequently used biomarkers in schizophrenia are those associated with the neuroimmune and neuroendocrine system, metabolism, different neurotransmitter systems and neurotrophic factors. However, there are still no validated and reliable biomarkers in clinical use for schizophrenia. This review will address potential biomarkers in schizophrenia. It will discuss biomarkers in schizophrenia and propose the use of specific blood-based panels that will include a set of markers associated with immune processes, metabolic disorders, and neuroendocrine/neurotrophin/neurotransmitter alterations. The combination of different markers, or complex multi-marker panels, might help in the discrimination of patients with different underlying pathologies and in the better classification of the more homogenous groups. Therefore, the development of the diagnostic, prognostic and theranostic biomarkers is an urgent and an unmet need in psychiatry, with the aim of improving diagnosis, therapy monitoring, prediction of treatment outcome and focus on the personal medicine approach in order to improve the quality of life in patients with schizophrenia and decrease health costs worldwide.

  5. TNF alpha acts in synergy with GM-CSF to induce proliferation of acute myeloid leukemia cells by up-regulating the GM-CSF receptor and GM-CSF gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brailly, H; Pebusque, M J; Tabilio, A; Mannoni, P

    1993-10-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells are dependent for their survival and proliferation on hematopoietic growth factors. As tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha) can increase the proliferation of primary cultures of AML cells, we have investigated the effect of TNF alpha on the autocrine and/or paracrine growth control by one of the major AML growth factor, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). First, a panel of AML cells were analysed with respect to their proliferative response to TNF alpha. We provide experimental evidence that TNF alpha induces both GM-CSF gene expression and up-regulation of high-affinity GM-CSF membrane receptor in TNF alpha-responsive cells. This effect is not restricted to the malignant phenotype, although it could account for the selective growth advantage of the leukemic clone over the normal cells upon TNF alpha stimulation.

  6. Advances in biomarkers of major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tiao-Lai; Lin, Chin-Chuen

    2015-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is characterized by mood, vegetative, cognitive, and even psychotic symptoms and signs that can cause substantial impairments in quality of life and functioning. Biomarkers are measurable indicators that could help diagnosing MDD or predicting treatment response. In this chapter, lipid profiles, immune/inflammation, and neurotrophic factor pathways that have long been implicated in the pathogenesis of MDD are discussed. Then, pharmacogenetics and epigenetics of serotonin transport and its metabolism pathway, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and abnormality of hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical axis also revealed new biomarkers. Lastly, new techniques, such as proteomics and metabolomics, which allow researchers to approach the studying of MDD with new directions and make new discoveries are addressed. In the future, more data are needed regarding pathophysiology of MDD, including protein levels, single nucleotide polymorphism, epigenetic regulation, and clinical data in order to better identify reliable and consistent biomarkers for diagnosis, treatment choice, and outcome prediction.

  7. DMPD: Molecular aspects of anti-inflammatory action of G-CSF. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 12005202 Molecular aspects of anti-inflammatory action of G-CSF. Boneberg EM, Hartu...ng T. Inflamm Res. 2002 Mar;51(3):119-28. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Molecular aspects of anti-infla...mmatory action of G-CSF. PubmedID 12005202 Title Molecular aspects of anti-inflammatory action of G-CSF. Aut

  8. 9 CFR 98.38 - Restrictions on the importation of swine semen from the APHIS-defined EU CSF region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... swine semen from the APHIS-defined EU CSF region. 98.38 Section 98.38 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL... Semen § 98.38 Restrictions on the importation of swine semen from the APHIS-defined EU CSF region. In...-defined EU CSF region must meet the following conditions, except as noted in paragraph (h) of this...

  9. Biomarkers of traumatic injury are transported from brain to blood via the glymphatic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plog, Benjamin A; Dashnaw, Matthew L; Hitomi, Emi; Peng, Weiguo; Liao, Yonghong; Lou, Nanhong; Deane, Rashid; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2015-01-14

    The nonspecific and variable presentation of traumatic brain injury (TBI) has motivated an intense search for blood-based biomarkers that can objectively predict the severity of injury. However, it is not known how cytosolic proteins released from traumatized brain tissue reach the peripheral blood. Here we show in a murine TBI model that CSF movement through the recently characterized glymphatic pathway transports biomarkers to blood via the cervical lymphatics. Clinically relevant manipulation of glymphatic activity, including sleep deprivation and cisternotomy, suppressed or eliminated TBI-induced increases in serum S100β, GFAP, and neuron specific enolase. We conclude that routine TBI patient management may limit the clinical utility of blood-based biomarkers because their brain-to-blood transport depends on glymphatic activity.

  10. Antiretroviral treatment reduces increased CSF neurofilament protein (NFL) in HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellgren, A; Price, R W; Hagberg, L; Rosengren, L; Brew, B J; Gisslén, M

    2007-10-09

    Increased levels of the light-chain neurofilament protein (NFL) in CSF provide a marker of CNS injury in several neurodegenerative disorders and have been reported in the AIDS dementia complex (ADC). We examined the effects of highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART) on CSF NFL in HIV-1-infected subjects with and without ADC who underwent repeated lumbar punctures (LPs). NFL was measured by ELISA (normal reference value NFL at baseline, with a median level of 780 ng/L and an intraquartile range (IQR) of 480 to 7300. After 3 months of treatment, NFL concentrations had fallen to normal in 48% (10/21), and the median decreased to 340 ng/L (IQR NFL levels. Thirty-two subjects had normal NFL at baseline, and all but one remained normal at follow-up. These effects on CSF NFL were seen in association with clinical improvement in ADC patients, decreases in plasma and CSF HIV-1 RNA and CSF neopterin, and increases in blood CD4 T cell counts. HAART seems to halt the neurodegenerative process(es) caused by HIV-1, as shown by the significant decrease in CSF NFL after treatment initiation. CSF NFL may serve as a useful marker in monitoring CNS injury in HIV-1 infection and in evaluating CNS efficacy of antiretroviral therapy.

  11. Colony stimulating factor (CSF) from human leukemic urine: affinity chromatography and isoelectric focusing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellar, K L; Vogler, W R; Kinkade, J M

    1975-12-01

    Biological activities associated with colony-stimulating factor (CSF) from human leukemic urine were found to be selectively retained on an affinity adsorbent of Con A-Sepharose. Elution of activity was achieved using a linear gradient of eith alpha-methyl-D-mannopyranoside (alphaMM) or alpha-methyl-D-glucopyranoside (alphaMG), and resulted in significant increases in specific biological activity. Rechromatography of appropriate fractions indicated that retention of CSF activities was not artifactual. Pretreatment of the affinity matrix with alphaMM completely inhibited binding of CSF. Affinity chromatography of CSF on a Blue Dextran-Sepharose adsorbent was found to be an effective method for removing albumin, a major protein contaminant in urinary preparations. Treatment of CSF with neuraminidase had no effect on its in vitro activity; however, such treatment resulted in an increase in the isoelectric point of CSF from pH 3.5 to pH 4.7, as determined using both sucrose and polyacrylamide gel stabilized pH gradients. Relatively broad regions of biological activity were observed following isoelectric focusing of both neuraminidase-treated and untreated CSF, suggesting that activity was associated with a heterogeneous/polydisperse population of molecular species.

  12. MafB antagonizes phenotypic alteration induced by GM-CSF in microglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshida, Ryusuke; Oishi, Hisashi; Hamada, Michito; Takahashi, Satoru

    Microglia are tissue-resident macrophages which are distributed throughout the central nervous system (CNS). Recent studies suggest that microglia are a unique myeloid population distinct from peripheral macrophages in terms of origin and gene expression signature. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), a pleiotropic cytokine regulating myeloid development, has been shown to stimulate proliferation and alter phenotype of microglia in vitro. However, how its signaling is modulated in microglia is poorly characterized. MafB, a bZip transcriptional factor, is highly expressed in monocyte-macrophage lineage cells including microglia, although its role in microglia is largely unknown. We investigated the crosstalk between GM-CSF signaling and MafB by analyzing primary microglia. We found that Mafb-deficient microglia grew more rapidly than wild-type microglia in response to GM-CSF. Moreover, the expression of genes associated with microglial differentiation was more downregulated in Mafb-deficient microglia cultured with GM-CSF. Notably, such differences between the genotypes were not observed in the presence of M-CSF. In addition, we found that Mafb-deficient microglia cultured with GM-CSF barely extended their membrane protrusions, probably due to abnormal activation of RhoA, a key regulator of cytoskeletal remodeling. Altogether, our study reveals that MafB is a negative regulator of GM-CSF signaling in microglia. These findings could provide new insight into the modulation of cytokine signaling by transcription factors in microglia.

  13. Chimeric Rabies Virus-Like Particles Containing Membrane-Anchored GM-CSF Enhances the Immune Response against Rabies Virus

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    Hongtao Kang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Rabies remains an important public health threat in most developing countries. To develop a more effective and safe vaccine against rabies, we have constructed a chimeric rabies virus-like particle (VLP, which containing glycoprotein (G and matrix protein (M of rabies virus (RABV Evelyn-Rokitnicki-Abelseth (ERA strain, and membrane-anchored granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF, and it was named of EVLP-G. The immunogenicity and protective efficacy of EVLP-G against RABV were evaluated by intramuscular administration in a mouse model. The EVLP-G was successfully produced in insect cells by coinfection with three recombinant baculoviruses expressing G, M, and GM-CSF, respectively. The membrane-anchored GM-CSF possesses a strong adjuvant activity. More B cells and dendritic cells (DCs were recruited and/or activated in inguinal lymph nodes in mice immunized with EVLP-G. EVLP-G was found to induce a significantly increased RABV-specific virus-neutralizing antibody and elicit a larger and broader antibody subclass responses compared with the standard rabies VLP (sRVLP, consisting of G and M. The EVLP-G also elicited significantly more IFN-γ- or IL-4-secreting CD4+ and CD8+ T cells than the sRVLP. Moreover, the immune responses induced by EVLP-G protect all vaccinated mice from lethal challenge with RABV. These results suggest that EVLP-G has the potential to be developed as a novel vaccine candidate for the prevention and control of animal rabies.

  14. MicroRNAs in Cerebrospinal Fluid as Potential Biomarkers for Parkinson's Disease and Multiple System Atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Tainá M; Kuiperij, H Bea; Bruinsma, Ilona B; van Rumund, Anouke; Aerts, Marjolein B; Esselink, Rianne A J; Bloem, Bas R; Verbeek, Marcel M

    2016-11-14

    Parkinson's disease (PD) and multiple system atrophy (MSA) are both part of the spectrum of neurodegenerative movement disorders and α-synucleinopathies with overlap of symptoms especially at early stages of the disease but with distinct disease progression and responses to dopaminergic treatment. Therefore, having biomarkers that specifically classify patients, which could discriminate PD from MSA, would be very useful. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate protein translation and are observed in biological fluids, including cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and may therefore have potential as biomarkers of disease. The aim of our study was to determine if miRNAs in CSF could be used as biomarkers for either PD or MSA. Using quantitative PCR (qPCR), we evaluated expression levels of 10 miRNAs in CSF patient samples from PD (n = 28), MSA (n = 17), and non-neurological controls (n = 28). We identified two miRNAs (miR-24 and miR-205) that distinguished PD from controls and four miRNAs that differentiated MSA from controls (miR-19a, miR-19b, miR-24, and miR-34c). Combinations of miRNAs accurately discriminated either PD (area under the curve (AUC) = 0.96) or MSA (AUC = 0.86) from controls. In MSA, we also observed that miR-24 and miR-148b correlated with cerebellar ataxia symptoms, suggesting that these miRNAs are involved in cerebellar degeneration in MSA. Our findings support the potential of miRNA panels as biomarkers for movement disorders and may provide more insights into the pathological mechanisms related to these disorders.

  15. Aβ40 oligomers identified as a potential biomarker for the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol Man Gao

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's Disease (AD is the most prevalent form of dementia worldwide, yet the development of therapeutics has been hampered by the absence of suitable biomarkers to diagnose the disease in its early stages prior to the formation of amyloid plaques and the occurrence of irreversible neuronal damage. Since oligomeric Aβ species have been implicated in the pathophysiology of AD, we reasoned that they may correlate with the onset of disease. As such, we have developed a novel misfolded protein assay for the detection of soluble oligomers composed of Aβ x-40 and x-42 peptide (hereafter Aβ40 and Aβ42 from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF. Preliminary validation of this assay with 36 clinical samples demonstrated the presence of aggregated Aβ40 in the CSF of AD patients. Together with measurements of total Aβ42, diagnostic sensitivity and specificity greater than 95% and 90%, respectively, were achieved. Although larger sample populations will be needed to confirm this diagnostic sensitivity, our studies demonstrate a sensitive method of detecting circulating Aβ40 oligomers from AD CSF and suggest that these oligomers could be a powerful new biomarker for the early detection of AD.

  16. Flow cytometry of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) lymphocytes: alterations of blood/CSF ratios of lymphocyte subsets in inflammation disorders of human central nervous system (CNS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleine, T O; Albrecht, J; Zöfel, P

    1999-03-01

    Flow cytometry was adapted to measure lymphocytes in human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The method was sufficiently precise, reproducible and accurate despite low cell counts. In lumbar CSF of controls with 500 to 3500 (10(3)/l) leukocytes, lymphocyte counts correlated with those in corresponding venous blood: blood/CSF ratios of approximately 2000 : 1 were found for total T cells (CD3+) and CD3+ HLA-DR-, CD3+4+, CD3+8+ subsets, ratios were increased for the lymphocyte subsets CD3+ HLA-DR+ blood-brain and blood-CSF barriers) to blood lymphocyte subsets which favor the transfer of T subsets. Correlation of the subset ratios to the CD3+ ratio indicates distinct barrier properties which changed differently with acute and subacute inflammations and neuroimmunological diseases of central nervous system (CNS) in lumbar or ventricular CSF, but not with simple protein barrier disturbance. HLA DR+ T ratios were higher than HLA DR- T ratios only with controls and some neuroimmunological diseases. Lymphocyte barrier characteristics were related to protein leakage situated at the same barriers, indicating for the lymphocyte subsets selective transfer routes in control subjects and non-selective routes in patients with CNS inflammation where altered ratios revealed a mixture of both routes.

  17. Validation of New Cancer Biomarkers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duffy, Michael J; Sturgeon, Catherine M; Söletormos, Georg

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Biomarkers are playing increasingly important roles in the detection and management of patients with cancer. Despite an enormous number of publications on cancer biomarkers, few of these biomarkers are in widespread clinical use. CONTENT: In this review, we discuss the key steps...... in advancing a newly discovered cancer candidate biomarker from pilot studies to clinical application. Four main steps are necessary for a biomarker to reach the clinic: analytical validation of the biomarker assay, clinical validation of the biomarker test, demonstration of clinical value from performance...... initiation of the study. SUMMARY: Application of the methodology outlined above should result in a more efficient and effective approach to the development of cancer biomarkers as well as the reporting of cancer biomarker studies. With rigorous application, all stakeholders, and especially patients, would...

  18. Circulating U2 small nuclear RNA fragments as a novel diagnostic biomarker for primary central nervous system lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baraniskin, Alexander; Zaslavska, Elena; Nöpel-Dünnebacke, Stefanie; Ahle, Guido; Seidel, Sabine; Schlegel, Uwe; Schmiegel, Wolff; Hahn, Stephan; Schroers, Roland

    2016-03-01

    Primary central nervous system lymphomas (PCNSLs) are highly aggressive tumors. Chemotherapy has improved prognosis significantly; however, early diagnosis is crucial for effective treatment. Presently, the diagnosis of PCNSL depends on histopathology of tumor biopsies. We have previously demonstrated differential expression of microRNAs in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from patients with PCNSL. Based on promising findings about circulating U2 small nuclear RNA fragments (RNU2-1f) as novel blood-based biomarkers for pancreatic, colorectal, and lung cancer, we investigated RNU2-1f in the CSF of PCNSL patients. CSF was collected from patients with PCNSL (n = 72) and control patients with various neurologic disorders (n = 47). Sequential CSF samples were collected from 9 PCNSL patients. RNU2-1f levels were measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Measurement of RNU2-1f levels in CSF enabled the differentiation of patients with PCNSL from controls with an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.909 with a sensitivity of 68.1% and a specificity of 91.4%. The diagnostic accuracy was further improved by combined determination of RNU2-1f and miR-21, resulting in AUC of 0.987 with a sensitivity of 91.7% and a specificity of 95.7%. In consecutive measurements of RNU2-1f, which were performed in 9 patients at different stages of the disease course, RNU2-1f CSF levels paralleled the course of the disease. Our data suggest that the measurement of RNU2-1f detected in CSF can be used as a diagnostic marker and also as a possible marker for treatment monitoring. These promising results need to be evaluated within a larger patient cohort. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. The cytokine network of wallerian degeneration: IL-10 and GM-CSF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Be'eri, H; Reichert, F; Saada, A; Rotshenker, S

    1998-08-01

    Wallerian degeneration (WD) is the inflammatory response of peripheral nerves to injury. Evidence is provided that granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) contributes to the initiation and progression of WD by activating macrophages and Schwann, whereas IL-10 down-regulates WD by inhibiting GM-CSF production. A significant role of activated macrophages and Schwann for future regeneration is myelin removal by phagocytosis and degradation. We studied the timing and magnitude of GM-CSF and IL-10 production, macrophage and Schwann activation, and myelin degradation in C57BL/6NHSD and C57BL/6-WLD/OLA/NHSD mice that display normal rapid-WD and abnormal slow-WD, respectively. We observed the following events in rapid-WD. The onset of GM-CSF production is within 5 h after injury. Production is steadily augmented during the first 3 days, but is attenuated thereafter. The onset of production of the macrophage and Schwann activation marker Galectin-3/MAC-2 succeeds that of GM-CSF. Galectin-3/MAC-2 production is up-regulated during the first 6 days, but is down-regulated thereafter. The onset of myelin degradation succeeds that of Galectin-3/MAC-2, and is almost complete within 1 week. IL-10 production displays two phases. An immediate low followed by a high that begins on the fourth day, reaching highest levels on the seventh. The timing and magnitude of GM-CSF production thus enable the rapid activation of macrophages and Schwann that consequently phagocytose and degrade myelin. The timing and magnitude of IL-10 production suggest a role in down-regulating WD after myelin is removed. In contrast, slow-WD nerves produce low inefficient levels of GM-CSF and IL-10 throughout. Therefore, deficient IL-10 levels cannot account for inefficient GM-CSF production, whereas deficient GM-CSF levels may account, in part, for slow-WD.

  20. Serum concentrations of GM-CSF and G-CSF correlate with the Th1/Th2 cytokine response in cystic fibrosis patients with chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moser, Claus; Jensen, Peter Ø; Pressler, Tacjana;

    2005-01-01

    mobilizing monocytes and PMNs from the bone marrow, GM-CSF, G-CSF and IL-3 select subsets of dendritic cells, which subsequently induce distinct Th responses. Therefore, the present study examines the correlation between the mobilizing cytokines in serum and the Th responses. The IFN-gamma and IL-4...... lung function. In addition, an inverse correlation between IL-3 and IFN-gamma was observed. The results indicate involvement of endogenous GM-CSF, G-CSF and IL-3 in the skewed Th response in CF, and change to a Th1-dominated response might be achieved with GM-CSF treatment....

  1. Biomarkers of sepsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Sepsis is an unusual systemic reaction to what is sometimes an otherwise ordinary infection, and it probably represents a pattern of response by the immune system to injury. A hyper-inflammatory response is followed by an immunosuppressive phase during which multiple organ dysfunction is present and the patient is susceptible to nosocomial infection. Biomarkers to diagnose sepsis may allow early intervention which, although primarily supportive, can reduce the risk of death. Although lactate is currently the most commonly used biomarker to identify sepsis, other biomarkers may help to enhance lactate’s effectiveness; these include markers of the hyper-inflammatory phase of sepsis, such as pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines; proteins such as C-reactive protein and procalcitonin which are synthesized in response to infection and inflammation; and markers of neutrophil and monocyte activation. Recently, markers of the immunosuppressive phase of sepsis, such as anti-inflammatory cytokines, and alterations of the cell surface markers of monocytes and lymphocytes have been examined. Combinations of pro- and anti-inflammatory biomarkers in a multi-marker panel may help identify patients who are developing severe sepsis before organ dysfunction has advanced too far. Combined with innovative approaches to treatment that target the immunosuppressive phase, these biomarkers may help to reduce the mortality rate associated with severe sepsis which, despite advances in supportive measures, remains high. PMID:23480440

  2. Mass spectrometry for biomarker development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Chaochao; Liu, Tao; Baker, Erin Shammel; Rodland, Karin D.; Smith, Richard D.

    2015-06-19

    Biomarkers potentially play a crucial role in early disease diagnosis, prognosis and targeted therapy. In the past decade, mass spectrometry based proteomics has become increasingly important in biomarker development due to large advances in technology and associated methods. This chapter mainly focuses on the application of broad (e.g. shotgun) proteomics in biomarker discovery and the utility of targeted proteomics in biomarker verification and validation. A range of mass spectrometry methodologies are discussed emphasizing their efficacy in the different stages in biomarker development, with a particular emphasis on blood biomarker development.

  3. Biomarkers intersect with the exposome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappaport, Stephen M

    2012-09-01

    The exposome concept promotes use of omic tools for discovering biomarkers of exposure and biomarkers of disease in studies of diseased and healthy populations. A two-stage scheme is presented for profiling omic features in serum to discover molecular biomarkers and then for applying these biomarkers in follow-up studies. The initial component, referred to as an exposome-wide-association study (EWAS), employs metabolomics and proteomics to interrogate the serum exposome and, ultimately, to identify, validate and differentiate biomarkers of exposure and biomarkers of disease. Follow-up studies employ knowledge-driven designs to explore disease causality, prevention, diagnosis, prognosis and treatment.

  4. Inflammatory biomarkers and cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Line Jee Hartmann; Schultz, Martin; Gaardsting, Anne

    2017-01-01

    In Denmark, patients with serious nonspecific symptoms and signs of cancer (NSSC) are referred to the diagnostic outpatient clinics (DOCs) where an accelerated cancer diagnostic program is initiated. Various immunological and inflammatory biomarkers have been associated with cancer, including...... soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) and the pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) pentraxin-3, mannose-binding lectin, ficolin-1, ficolin-2 and ficolin-3. We aimed to evaluate these biomarkers and compare their diagnostic ability to classical biomarkers for diagnosing cancer...... in patients with NSSC. Patients were included from the DOC, Department of Infectious Diseases, Copenhagen University Hospital Hvidovre. Patients were given a final diagnosis based on the combined results from scans, blood work and physical examination. Weight loss, Charlson score and previous cancer were...

  5. Robust changes in expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA and protein across the brain do not translate to detectable changes in BDNF levels in CSF or plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanz, Thomas A; Bove, Susan E; Pilsmaker, Catherine D; Mariga, Abigail; Drummond, Elena M; Cadelina, Gregory W; Adamowicz, Wendy O; Swetter, Brentt J; Carmel, Sharon; Dumin, Jo Ann; Kleiman, Robin J

    2012-09-01

    Adult rats were treated acutely with peripheral kainic acid (KA), and changes in brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA and protein were tracked over time across multiple brain regions. Despite robust elevation in both mRNA and protein in multiple brain regions, plasma BDNF was unchanged and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) BDNF levels remained undetectable. Primary neurons were then treated with KA. BDNF was similarly elevated within neurons, but was undetectable in neuronal media. Thus, while deficits in BDNF signaling have been implicated in a number of diseases, these data suggest that extracellular concentrations of BDNF may not be a facile biomarker for changes in neurons.

  6. Fluid Biomarkers of Traumatic Brain Injury and Intended Context of Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogoslovsky, Tanya; Gill, Jessica; Jeromin, Andreas; Davis, Cora; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is one of the leading causes of death and disability around the world. The lack of validated biomarkers for TBI is a major impediment to developing effective therapies and improving clinical practice, as well as stimulating much work in this area. In this review, we focus on different settings of TBI management where blood or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers could be utilized for predicting clinically-relevant consequences and guiding management decisions. Requirements that the biomarker must fulfill differ based on the intended context of use (CoU). Specifically, we focus on fluid biomarkers in order to: (1) identify patients who may require acute neuroimaging (cranial computerized tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI); (2) select patients at risk for secondary brain injury processes; (3) aid in counseling patients about their symptoms at discharge; (4) identify patients at risk for developing postconcussive syndrome (PCS), posttraumatic epilepsy (PTE) or chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE); (5) predict outcomes with respect to poor or good recovery; (6) inform counseling as to return to work (RTW) or to play. Despite significant advances already made from biomarker-based studies of TBI, there is an immediate need for further large-scale studies focused on identifying and innovating sensitive and reliable TBI biomarkers. These studies should be designed with the intended CoU in mind. PMID:27763536

  7. Fluid Biomarkers of Traumatic Brain Injury and Intended Context of Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanya Bogoslovsky

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI is one of the leading causes of death and disability around the world. The lack of validated biomarkers for TBI is a major impediment to developing effective therapies and improving clinical practice, as well as stimulating much work in this area. In this review, we focus on different settings of TBI management where blood or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF biomarkers could be utilized for predicting clinically-relevant consequences and guiding management decisions. Requirements that the biomarker must fulfill differ based on the intended context of use (CoU. Specifically, we focus on fluid biomarkers in order to: (1 identify patients who may require acute neuroimaging (cranial computerized tomography (CT or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI; (2 select patients at risk for secondary brain injury processes; (3 aid in counseling patients about their symptoms at discharge; (4 identify patients at risk for developing postconcussive syndrome (PCS, posttraumatic epilepsy (PTE or chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE; (5 predict outcomes with respect to poor or good recovery; (6 inform counseling as to return to work (RTW or to play. Despite significant advances already made from biomarker-based studies of TBI, there is an immediate need for further large-scale studies focused on identifying and innovating sensitive and reliable TBI biomarkers. These studies should be designed with the intended CoU in mind.

  8. New and emerging prognostic and predictive genetic biomarkers in B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorman, Anthony V.

    2016-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a heterogeneous disease at the genetic level. Chromosomal abnormalities are used as diagnostic, prognostic and predictive biomarkers to provide subtype, outcome and drug response information. t(12;21)/ETV6-RUNX1 and high hyper-diploidy are good-risk prognostic biomarkers whereas KMT2A (MLL) translocations, t(17;19)/TCF3-HLF, haploidy or low hypodiploidy are high-risk biomarkers. t(9;22)/BCR-ABL1 patients require targeted treatment (imatinib/dasatinib), whereas iAMP21 patients achieve better outcomes when treated intensively. High-risk genetic biomarkers are four times more prevalent in adults compared to children. The application of genomic technologies to cases without an established abnormality (B-other) reveals copy number alterations which can be used either individually or in combination as prognostic biomarkers. Transcriptome sequencing studies have identified a network of fusion genes involving kinase genes - ABL1, ABL2, PDGFRB, CSF1R, CRLF2, JAK2 and EPOR. In vitro and in vivo studies along with emerging clinical observations indicate that patients with a kinase-activating aberration may respond to treatment with small molecular inhibitors like imatinib/dasatinib and ruxolitinib. Further work is required to determine the true frequency of these abnormalities across the age spectrum and the optimal way to incorporate such inhibitors into protocols. In conclusion, genetic biomarkers are playing an increasingly important role in the management of patients with ALL. PMID:27033238

  9. Retrocerebellar arachnoid cyst resulting in syringomyelia in a patient without tonsillar herniation: successful surgical treatment with reconstruction of CSF flow in the foramen magnum region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Liyong; Emich, Stephan; Fu, Wenzhuo; Chen, Zan; Hao, Wu; Ling, Feng; Jian, Fengzeng

    2016-04-01

    A retrocerebellar arachnoid cyst causing syringomyelia is extremely rare without tonsillar herniation. The authors present a 44-year-old woman with symptoms of foramen magnum compression and syringomyelia. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a large retrocerebellar arachnoid cyst with a large cervicothoracic syrinx but no signs of tonsillar herniation or hydrocephalus. The patient underwent a foramen magnum decompression with C1 laminectomy, microsurgical fenestration of the cyst, and duraplasty. After successful reconstruction of CSF flow, the patient experienced a relief of symptoms and a significant reduction of the syrinx. The intraoperative findings support the theory of a piston mechanism in the development of syringomyelia. Additional arachnoidal adhesions may also obstruct the CSF flow around the craniocervical junction. We recommend the surgical treatment should consist of an adequate decompression of the foramen magnum, wide microsurgical arachnoidal debridement, and duraplasty with autologous grafts sutured in a watertight way.

  10. Relationship between cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers for inflammation, demyelination and neurodegeneration in acute optic neuritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Signe Modvig

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Various inflammatory biomarkers show prognostic potential for multiple sclerosis (MS-risk after clinically isolated syndromes. However, biomarkers are often examined singly and their interrelation and precise aspects of their associated pathological processes remain unclear. Clarification of these relationships could aid the appropriate implementation of prognostic biomarkers in clinical practice. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the interrelation between biomarkers of inflammation, demyelination and neurodegeneration in acute optic neuritis and to assess their association to measures of MS risk. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A prospective study at a tertiary referral centre from June 2011 to December 2012 of 56 patients with optic neuritis as a first demyelinating symptom and 27 healthy volunteers. Lumbar puncture was performed within 28 (median 16 days of onset. CSF levels of CXCL13, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-9, CXCL10, CCL-2, osteopontin and chitinase-3-like-1, myelin basic protein (MBP and neurofilament light-chain (NF-L were determined. MS-risk outcome measures were dissemination in space (DIS of white matter lesions on cerebral MRI, CSF oligoclonal bands and elevated IgG-index. RESULTS: IN THE INTERRELATION ANALYSIS THE BIOMARKERS SHOWED CLOSE CORRELATIONS WITHIN TWO DISTINCT GROUPS: Biomarkers of leukocyte infiltration (CXCL13, MMP-9 and CXCL10 were strongly associated (p<0.0001 for all. Osteopontin and chitinase-3-like-1 were also tightly associated (p<0.0001 and correlated strongly to tissue damage markers (NF-L and MBP. The biomarkers of leukocyte infiltration all associated strongly with MS-risk parameters, whereas CHI3L1 and MBP correlated with MRI DIS, but not with CSF MS-risk parameters and osteopontin and NF-L did not correlate with any MS-risk parameters. CONCLUSIONS: OUR FINDINGS SUGGEST TWO DISTINCT INFLAMMATORY PROCESSES: one of leukocyte infiltration, represented by CXCL13, CXCL10 and MMP-9, strongly associated with and

  11. Extending the Serum Half-Life of G-CSF via Fusion with the Domain III of Human Serum Albumin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuqiang Zhao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein fusion technology is one of the most commonly used methods to extend the half-life of therapeutic proteins. In this study, in order to prolong the half-life of Granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF, the domain III of human serum albumin (3DHSA was genetically fused to the N-terminal of G-CSF. The 3DHSA-G-CSF fusion gene was cloned into pPICZαA along with the open reading frame of the α-factor signal under the control of the AOX1 promoter. The recombinant expression vector was transformed into Pichia pastoris GS115, and the recombinant strains were screened by SDS-PAGE. As expected, the 3DHSA-G-CSF showed high binding affinity with HSA antibody and G-CSF antibody, and the natural N-terminal of 3DHSA was detected by N-terminal sequencing. The bioactivity and pharmacokinetic studies of 3DHSA-G-CSF were respectively determined using neutropenia model mice and human G-CSF ELISA kit. The results demonstrated that 3DHSA-G-CSF has the ability to increase the peripheral white blood cell (WBC counts of neutropenia model mice, and the half-life of 3DHSA-G-CSF is longer than that of native G-CSF. In conclusion, 3DHSA can be used to extend the half-life of G-CSF.

  12. Autophagy is required for stem cell mobilization by G-CSF

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leveque-El Mouttie, Lucie; Vu, Therese; Lineburg, Katie E.

    2015-01-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is widely used clinically to prevent neutropenia after cytotoxic chemotherapy and to mobilize hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) for transplantation. Autophagy, a process of cytoplasmic component recycling, maintains cellular homeostasis and protects...... the cell during periods of metabolic stress or nutrient deprivation. We have observed that G-CSF activates autophagy in neutrophils and HSCs from both mouse and human donors. Furthermore, G-CSF-induced neutrophil and HSC mobilization is impaired in the absence of autophagy. In contrast, autophagy...... is dispensable for direct HSC mobilization in response to the CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100. Altogether, these data demonstrate an important role for G-CSF in invoking autophagy within hematopoietic and myeloid cells and suggest that this pathway is critical for ensuring cell survival in response to clinically...

  13. CSF markers for diagnosis of bacterial meningitis in neurosurgical postoperative patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tavares Wagner Malagó

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the diagnostic usefulness of cerebral spinal fluid (CSF cellularity, protein, neutrophils, glucose and lactate for detection of postoperative bacterial meningitis. METHOD: This prospective study was conducted in 28 postoperative neurosurgical patients from 2002 to 2005 at University of São Paulo. The CSF markers were plotted in a receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve to evaluate their accuracy. RESULTS: Based on the area under ROC curve CSF glucose, cellularity, and lactate were considered good tests. Polymorphonuclear and protein did not achieve enough accuracy to be used clinically. CONCLUSION: The CSF glucose, lactate, and cellularity can be used for the diagnosis of bacterial meningitis. Moreover, it can be helpful to differentiate bacterial from aseptic meningitis.

  14. Isotope cisternography and conductance to outflow of CSF in normal pressure hydrocephalus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Børgesen, S E; Westergård, L; Gjerris, F

    1981-01-01

    In 50 patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) the findings on lumbar isotope cisternography (IGG) were compared to the conductance to outflow of CSF (Cout) as measured by lumbo-ventricular perfusion. The purpose was to identify those ICG-characteristics that imply a low Cout and thus may indicate CSF shunting therapy. Normal ICG was found only in three patients, where Cout was not, or only moderately, decreased. There was a significant correlation between a low Cout and occurrence of ventricular retention and absent parasagittal accumulation at 24 hours or later, following injection. These findings may, however, also be present in patients with no, or only moderate, decreased Cout, where CSF shunting may seen unjustified. It is concluded, that the indication for CSF shunting cannot be based on the results of ICG alone.

  15. Fibronectin changes in eosinophilic meningitis with blood-CSF barrier disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyu, Ling-Yuh; Hu, Ming-E; Chou, Chun-Hui; Chen, Ke-Min; Chiu, Ping-Sung; Lai, Shih-Chan

    2015-01-01

    Fibronectin, which is present at relatively low levels in healthy central nervous systems (CNS), shows increased levels in meningitis. In this study, fibronectin processing was correlated with the increased permeability of the blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier as well as with the formation of eosinophil infiltrates in angiostrongyliasis meningitis. The immunohistochemistry results show matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) is localized in the choroid plexus epithelium. Coimmunoprecipitation demonstrated fibronectin strongly binds MMP-9. Furthermore, treatment with the MMP-9 inhibitor GM6001 significantly inhibited fibronectin processing, reduced the blood-CSF barrier permeability, and decreased the eosinophil counts. The decreased fibronectin processing in CSF implies decreased cellular invasion of the subarachnoid space across the blood-CSF barrier. Therefore, increased fibronectin processing may be associated with barrier disruption and participate in the extravasation and migration of eosinophils into the CNS during experimental parasitic infection.

  16. A differentially expressed set of microRNAs in cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF) can diagnose CNS malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drusco, Alessandra; Bottoni, Arianna; Laganà, Alessandro; Acunzo, Mario; Fassan, Matteo; Cascione, Luciano; Antenucci, Anna; Kumchala, Prasanthi; Vicentini, Caterina; Gardiman, Marina P; Alder, Hansjuerg; Carosi, Mariantonia A; Ammirati, Mario; Gherardi, Stefano; Luscrì, Marilena; Carapella, Carmine; Zanesi, Nicola; Croce, Carlo M

    2015-08-28

    Central Nervous System malignancies often require stereotactic biopsy or biopsy for differential diagnosis, and for tumor staging and grading. Furthermore, stereotactic biopsy can be non-diagnostic or underestimate grading. Hence, there is a compelling need of new diagnostic biomarkers to avoid such invasive procedures. Several biological markers have been proposed, but they can only identify specific prognostic subtype of Central Nervous System tumors, and none of them has found a standardized clinical application.The aim of the study was to identify a Cerebro-Spinal Fluid microRNA signature that could differentiate among Central Nervous System malignancies.CSF total RNA of 34 neoplastic and of 14 non-diseased patients was processed by NanoString. Comparison among groups (Normal, Benign, Glioblastoma, Medulloblastoma, Metastasis and Lymphoma) lead to the identification of a microRNA profile that was further confirmed by RT-PCR and in situ hybridization.Hsa-miR-451, -711, 935, -223 and -125b were significantly differentially expressed among the above mentioned groups, allowing us to draw an hypothetical diagnostic chart for Central Nervous System malignancies.This is the first study to employ the NanoString technique for Cerebro-Spinal Fluid microRNA profiling. In this article, we demonstrated that Cerebro-Spinal Fluid microRNA profiling mirrors Central Nervous System physiologic or pathologic conditions. Although more cases need to be tested, we identified a diagnostic Cerebro-Spinal Fluid microRNA signature with good perspectives for future diagnostic clinical applications.

  17. Biomarkers for systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahearn, Joseph M; Liu, Chau-Ching; Kao, Amy H; Manzi, Susan

    2012-04-01

    The urgent need for lupus biomarkers was demonstrated in September 2011 during a Workshop sponsored by the Food and Drug Administration: Potential Biomarkers Predictive of Disease Flare. After 2 days of discussion and more than 2 dozen presentations from thought leaders in both industry and academia, it became apparent that highly sought biomarkers to predict lupus flare have not yet been identified. Even short of the elusive biomarker of flare, few biomarkers for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) diagnosis, monitoring, and stratification have been validated and employed for making clinical decisions. This lack of reliable, specific biomarkers for SLE hampers proper clinical management of patients with SLE and impedes development of new lupus therapeutics. As such, the intensity of investigation to identify lupus biomarkers is climbing a steep trajectory, lending cautious optimism that a validated panel of biomarkers for lupus diagnosis, monitoring, stratification, and prediction of flare may soon be in hand.

  18. Biomarkers in Barrett's esophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Brian J; Blount, Patricia L; Rabinovitch, Peter S

    2003-04-01

    This article provides a framework for clinicians who are attempting the difficult task of interpreting the Barrett's biomarker literature with the goal of improving care for their patients. Although many articles. including more that 60 proposed biomarkers, have been published on this subject, only a few describe phase 3 and 4 studies that are of interest to the clinical gastroenterologist (Table 1). For year, dysplasia grade has been the sole means of risk stratification for patients with BE, and it likely will continue to be used in the foreseeable future. The current authors believe that dysplasia classification can be valuable using the team management approach and quality controls described previously. Significant problems, however, have emerged in phase 2 through 4 studies of dysplasia that make it imperative for the Barrett's field to incorporate additional biomarkers as they are validated. These problems include poor reproducibility of dysplasia interpretations, poor predictive value for negative, indefinite, and low-grade dysplasia, and inconsistent results for HGD in different centers, all of which makes it virtually impossible to develop national guidelines for surveillance. Some studies have even suggested that endoscopic biopsy surveillance using dysplasia may not be worthwhile. Currently, flow cytometric tetraploidy and aneuploidy have progressed furthest in biomarker validation (see Table 1). With proper handling, endoscopic biopsy specimens can be shipped to reference laboratories that have the instruments, computer analytic methods, and expertise to reproducibly detect tetraploidy and aneuploidy. The results of phase 4 studies indicate that flow cytometry appears to be useful in detecting a subset of patients who do not have HGD and yet have an increased risk of progression to cancer that cannot be identified by dysplasia grade. For many reasons, the authors anticipate that the number of validated biomarkers will increase substantially in the

  19. Mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer patients display different levels of redox-active CSF iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavados, Manuel; Guillón, Marta; Mujica, María Cristina; Rojo, Leonel E; Fuentes, Patricio; Maccioni, Ricardo B

    2008-03-01

    Oxidative stress constitutes a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recent studies also point to redox active metals such as iron, copper and zinc in mediating oxidative stress in AD pathogenesis. However, the reactivity of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) iron and its possible correlation with the severity of cognitive decline in both Alzheimer's patients and subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is still unknown. Here we show that different stages of cognitive and functional impairment are associated with changes in CSF reactive iron. In this work, we compared CSF samples from 56 elders, classified into 4 groups according to their scores on the Clinical Dementia Rating scale (CDR). Total CSF iron was analyzed by atomic absorption spectrometry. Redox-active iron was analyzed by a novel fluorimetric assay. One-way ANOVA was used to test differences in mean values, and Newman-Keuls Multiple Comparison Test was used for multi group comparisons. No difference in total CSF iron was found between different groups. Significant amounts of redox-active iron were found in CSF and their levels correlated with the extent of cognitive impairment. Redox-active CSF iron levels increased with the degree of cognitive impairment from normal to MCI subjects, while AD patients showed an abrupt decrease to levels close to zero. Given the relevance of oxidative damage in neurodegeneration, it might be possible to associate the development of cognitive and functional decline with the presence of redox-active iron in the CSF. The decrease in redox-active iron found in AD patients may represent a terminal situation, whereby the central nervous system attempts to minimize iron-associated toxicity.

  20. CSF-contacting neurons regulate locomotion by relaying mechanical stimuli to spinal circuits

    OpenAIRE

    Böhm, Urs Lucas; Prendergast, Andrew; Djenoune, Lydia; Nunes Figueiredo, Sophie; Gomez, Johanna; Stokes, Caleb; Kaiser, Sonya; Suster, Maximilliano; Kawakami, Koichi; Charpentier, Marine; Concordet, Jean-Paul; Rio, Jean-Paul; Del Bene, Filippo; Wyart, Claire

    2016-01-01

    International audience; Throughout vertebrates, cerebrospinal fluid-contacting neurons (CSF-cNs) are ciliated cells surrounding the central canal in the ventral spinal cord. Their contribution to modulate locomotion remains undetermined. Recently, we have shown CSF-cNs modulate locomotion by directly projecting onto the locomotor central pattern generators (CPGs), but the sensory modality these cells convey to spinal circuits and their relevance to innate locomotion remain elusive. Here, we d...

  1. CSF1R mutations link POLD and HDLS as a single disease entity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Alexandra M; Baker, Matt C; Finch, Nicole A; Rutherford, Nicola J; Wider, Christian; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Nelson, Peter T; Clark, H Brent; Wszolek, Zbigniew K; Dickson, Dennis W; Knopman, David S; Rademakers, Rosa

    2013-03-12

    Pigmented orthochromatic leukodystrophy (POLD) and hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids (HDLS) are rare neurodegenerative disorders characterized by cerebral white matter abnormalities, myelin loss, and axonal swellings. The striking overlap of clinical and pathologic features of these disorders suggested a common pathogenesis; however, no genetic or mechanistic link between POLD and HDLS has been established. Recently, we reported that mutations in the colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R) gene cause HDLS. In this study, we determined whether CSF1R mutations are also a cause of POLD. We performed sequencing of CSF1R in 2 pathologically confirmed POLD families. For the largest family (FTD368), a detailed case report was provided and brain samples from 2 affected family members previously diagnosed with POLD were re-evaluated to determine whether they had HDLS features. In vitro functional characterization of wild-type and mutant CSF1R was also performed. We identified CSF1R mutations in both POLD families: in family 5901, we found c.2297T>C (p.M766T), previously reported by us in HDLS family CA1, and in family FTD368, we identified c.2345G>A (p.R782H), recently reported in a biopsy-proven HDLS case. Immunohistochemical examination in family FTD368 showed the typical neuronal and glial findings of HDLS. Functional analyses of CSF1R mutant p.R782H (identified in this study) and p.M875T (previously observed in HDLS), showed a similar loss of CSF1R autophosphorylation of selected tyrosine residues in the kinase domain for both mutations when compared with wild-type CSF1R. We provide the first genetic and mechanistic evidence that POLD and HDLS are a single clinicopathologic entity.

  2. Chimeric HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins with potent intrinsic granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gözde Isik

    Full Text Available HIV-1 acquisition can be prevented by broadly neutralizing antibodies (BrNAbs that target the envelope glycoprotein complex (Env. An ideal vaccine should therefore be able to induce BrNAbs that can provide immunity over a prolonged period of time, but the low intrinsic immunogenicity of HIV-1 Env makes the elicitation of such BrNAbs challenging. Co-stimulatory molecules can increase the immunogenicity of Env and we have engineered a soluble chimeric Env trimer with an embedded granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF domain. This chimeric molecule induced enhanced B and helper T cell responses in mice compared to Env without GM-CSF. We studied whether we could optimize the activity of the embedded GM-CSF as well as the antigenic structure of the Env component of the chimeric molecule. We assessed the effect of truncating GM-CSF, removing glycosylation-sites in GM-CSF, and adjusting the linker length between GM-CSF and Env. One of our designed Env(GM-CSF chimeras improved GM-CSF-dependent cell proliferation by 6-fold, reaching the same activity as soluble recombinant GM-CSF. In addition, we incorporated GM-CSF into a cleavable Env trimer and found that insertion of GM-CSF did not compromise Env cleavage, while Env cleavage did not compromise GM-CSF activity. Importantly, these optimized Env(GM-CSF proteins were able to differentiate human monocytes into cells with a macrophage-like phenotype. Chimeric Env(GM-CSF should be useful for improving humoral immunity against HIV-1 and these studies should inform the design of other chimeric proteins.

  3. Urinary Sugars--A Biomarker of Total Sugars Intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasevska, Natasha

    2015-07-01

    Measurement error in self-reported sugars intake may explain the lack of consistency in the epidemiologic evidence on the association between sugars and disease risk. This review describes the development and applications of a biomarker of sugars intake, informs its future use and recommends directions for future research. Recently, 24 h urinary sucrose and fructose were suggested as a predictive biomarker for total sugars intake, based on findings from three highly controlled feeding studies conducted in the United Kingdom. From this work, a calibration equation for the biomarker that provides an unbiased measure of sugars intake was generated that has since been used in two US-based studies with free-living individuals to assess measurement error in dietary self-reports and to develop regression calibration equations that could be used in future diet-disease analyses. Further applications of the biomarker include its use as a surrogate measure of intake in diet-disease association studies. Although this biomarker has great potential and exhibits favorable characteristics, available data come from a few controlled studies with limited sample sizes conducted in the UK. Larger feeding studies conducted in different populations are needed to further explore biomarker characteristics and stability of its biases, compare its performance, and generate a unique, or population-specific biomarker calibration equations to be applied in future studies. A validated sugars biomarker is critical for informed interpretation of sugars-disease association studies.

  4. CSF and blood oxytocin concentration changes following intranasal delivery in macaque.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Dal Monte

    Full Text Available Oxytocin (OT in the central nervous system (CNS influences social cognition and behavior, making it a candidate for treating clinical disorders such as schizophrenia and autism. Intranasal administration has been proposed as a possible route of delivery to the CNS for molecules like OT. While intranasal administration of OT influences social cognition and behavior, it is not well established whether this is an effective means for delivering OT to CNS targets. We administered OT or its vehicle (saline to 15 primates (Macaca mulatta, using either intranasal spray or a nebulizer, and measured OT concentration changes in the cerebral spinal fluid (CSF and in blood. All subjects received both delivery methods and both drug conditions. Baseline samples of blood and CSF were taken immediately before drug administration. Blood was collected every 10 minutes after administration for 40 minutes and CSF was collected once post-delivery, at the 40 minutes time point. We found that intranasal administration of exogenous OT increased concentrations in both CSF and plasma compared to saline. Both delivery methods resulted in similar elevations of OT concentration in CSF, while the changes in plasma OT concentration were greater after nasal spray compared to nebulizer. In conclusion our study provides evidence that both nebulizer and nasal spray OT administration can elevate CSF OT levels.

  5. cAMP Modulates Macrophage Development by Suppressing M-CSF-Induced MAPKs Activation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ning Zhu; Jian Cui; Chunxia Qiao; Yan Li; Yuanfang Ma; Jiyan Zhang; Beifen Shen

    2008-01-01

    M-CSF is a key cytokine in macrophage development by inducing MAPKs activation, and cAMP can inhibit MAPKs activation induced by inflammatory stimuli. To explore the effects of cAMP on M-CSF-induced MAPKs activation and on macrophage development, the model of bone marrow-derived murine macrophages (BMMs) was used. The effects of cAMP on M-CSF-induced MAPKs activation were analyzed by Western blotting assay, and the effects of cAMP on CD14 and F4/80 expression during macrophage development were examined by FACS analysis.Macrophage morphology showed the successful establishment of the model of macrophage development. Western blotting assay revealed that M-CSF activated ERK, JNK and p38 in both mature and immature macrophages, and cAMP inhibited M-CSF-induced ERK, JNK and p38 activation in a time-dependent manner. FACS analysis revealed that macrophage development was impaired with cAMP pretreatment. In conclusion, cAMP modulates macrophage development by suppressing M-CSF-induced MAPKs activation.

  6. Frequency analyses of CSF flow on cine MRI in normal pressure hydrocephalus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyati, Tosiaki; Kasuga, Toshio; Koshida, Kichiro; Sanada, Shigeru; Onoguchi, Masahisa [Department of Radiological Technology, School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Kanazawa University, 5-11-80, Kodatsuno, Kanazawa, Ishikawa 920-0942 (Japan); Mase, Mitsuhito; Yamada, Kazuo [Department of Neurosurgery, Nagoya City University Medical School, 1 Kawasumi, Mizuho-cho, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 467-8602 (Japan); Banno, Tatsuo [Department of Central Radiology, Nagoya City University Hospital, 1 Kawasumi, Mizuho-cho, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 467-8602 (Japan); Fujita, Hiroshi [Department of Information Science, Faculty of Engineering, Gifu University, Yanagido 1-1, Gifu 501-1193 (Japan)

    2003-05-01

    Our objective was to clarify intracranial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow dynamics in normal-pressure hydrocephalus (NPH). Frequency analyses of CSF flow measured with phase-contrast cine MRI were performed. The CSF flow spectra in the aqueduct were determined in patients (n=51) with NPH, brain atrophy or asymptomatic ventricular dilation (VD), and in healthy volunteers (control group; n=25). The changes in CSF flow spectra were also analyzed after intravenous injection of acetazolamide. Moreover, a phase transfer function (PTF) calculated from the spectra of the driving vascular pulsation and CSF flow in the aqueduct were assessed. These values were compared with the pressure volume response (PVR). The amplitude in the NPH group was significantly larger than that in the VD or control group because of a decrease in compliance. The phase in the NPH group was significantly different from that in either the VD or the control group, but no difference was found between the VD and control groups. The amplitude increased in all groups after acetazolamide injection. The PTF in the NPH group was significantly larger than in the control group, and a positive correlation was noted between PTF and PVR. Frequency analyses of CSF flow measured by cine MRI make it possible to noninvasively obtain a more detailed picture of the pathophysiology of NPH. (orig.)

  7. Expression,Purification,and Refolding of Recombinant Fusion Protein Hil-2/Mgm-CSF

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAN WEN; LI MA; WEI LUO; MING-QIAN ZHOU; XIAO-NING WANG

    2008-01-01

    To study the activities of interleukin (IL)-2 and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) (hIL-2/mGM-CSF).Methods SOE PCR was used to change the linker of the fusion protein for higher activities.The fusion protein was expressed in Escherichia coli (E.coli) BL21 (DE3) in inclusion body (IB) form.After IB was extracted and clarified,it was denatured and purified by affinity chromatography.The protein was refolded by dilution in a L-arginine refolding buffer and refined by anion chromatography.The protein activity was detected by cytokine-dependent cell proliferation assay Results The expression of hlL-2/mGM-CSF in E.coil yielded approximately 20 mg protein/L culture and the purity was about 90%.The specific activities of IL-2 and GM-CSF were 5.4×106 IU/mg and 7.1×106 IU/mg,respectively.Conclusion This research provides important information about the anti-tumor activity of hIL-2/mGM-CSF in vivo,thus facilitating future clinical research on hIL-2/mGM-CSF used in immune therapy.

  8. GM-CSF GENE OR B7-1 GENE MODIFIED MURINE EL-4 CELLS VACCINE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张清媛; 李殿俊; 王志华

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To study the vaccine potency of gene-modified tumor cells. Methods: The EL-4 lymphoma was transduced with recombinant retrovirus containing the murine GM-CSF gene or B7-1 gene. The effect of gene transduction on antitumor immunity was investigated. Results: Flow cytometry analysis showed that expression of their surface marker between wild-type EL-4 cells and gene transduced tumor cells was the same except for CD80 positive in B7-1 gene transduced cells. GM-CSF gene or B7-1 gene transduced EL-4 cells resulted in remarkable loss of tumorigenicity in syngenetic mice. The systemic protective immunity was induced against the challenge with EL-4/wt cells. Therapeutic vaccine with EL-4/GM-CSF or EL/7-1 cells could retard the growth of established early-stage EL-4/wt tumor significantly, but not retard the growth of late-stage EL-4/wt tumor. Irradiated GM-CSF gene transduced EL-4 cells showed strong vaccine effect against EL-4 cell challenge, but irradiated B7-1 gene transduced EL-4 cells showed weak vaccine effect. Remarkable cooperative antitumor effect against EL-4 cell challenge was observed when both irradiated EL-4/GM-CSF and EL-4/B7-1 were inoculated together. Conclusion: GM-CSF gene or B7-1 gene transduced combination of the two kinds of vaccine may have potential application value in human cancer treatment.

  9. Oligosymptomatic neurosyphilis with false negative CSF-VDRL in HIV-infected individuals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malessa, R; Agelink, M W; Hengge, U; Mertins, L; Gastpar, M; Brockmeyer, N H

    1996-03-19

    The true prevalence of neurosyphilis in HIV-infection is unknown, since a sufficiently sensitive and specific test is lacking. In a prospective study we found reactive serum TPHA and FTA-ABS IgG tests in 95 (31%) of 307 HIV-infected patients. Three of 11 patients with latent syphilis revealed reactive CSF-VDRL tests, six others only demonstrated CSF abnormalities. Resolution of CSF abnormalities during a six month follow up after high dose antibiotic therapy led to the diagnosis of oligosymptomatic or asymptomatic neurosyphilis in all nine patients. Thus, the specificity of the CSF-VDRL was 100%, but the sensitivity was only 33%. The overall prevalence of neurosyphilis was 2.9%, increasing to 9.5% in patients with a reactive serum TPHA. Our study emphasizes the importance of antibiotic therapy for presumptive neurosyphilis in HIV-infected patients with latent syphilis and CSF abnormalities but nonreactive CSF-VDRL tests, even if they are neurologically asymptomatic or present with complaints inconclusive of neurosyphilis.

  10. Cerebral arterial pulsation drives paravascular CSF-interstitial fluid exchange in the murine brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliff, Jeffrey J; Wang, Minghuan; Zeppenfeld, Douglas M; Venkataraman, Arun; Plog, Benjamin A; Liao, Yonghong; Deane, Rashid; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2013-11-13

    CSF from the subarachnoid space moves rapidly into the brain along paravascular routes surrounding penetrating cerebral arteries, exchanging with brain interstitial fluid (ISF) and facilitating the clearance of interstitial solutes, such as amyloid β, in a pathway that we have termed the "glymphatic" system. Prior reports have suggested that paravascular bulk flow of CSF or ISF may be driven by arterial pulsation. However, cerebral arterial pulsation could not be directly assessed. In the present study, we use in vivo two-photon microscopy in mice to visualize vascular wall pulsatility in penetrating intracortical arteries. We observed that unilateral ligation of the internal carotid artery significantly reduced arterial pulsatility by ~50%, while systemic administration of the adrenergic agonist dobutamine increased pulsatility of penetrating arteries by ~60%. When paravascular CSF-ISF exchange was evaluated in real time using in vivo two-photon and ex vivo f