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Sample records for csd conflict behavior

  1. Stimulus conflict triggers behavioral avoidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dignath, David; Eder, Andreas B

    2015-12-01

    According to a recent extension of the conflict-monitoring theory, conflict between two competing response tendencies is registered as an aversive event and triggers a motivation to avoid the source of conflict. In the present study, we tested this assumption. Over five experiments, we examined whether conflict is associated with an avoidance motivation and whether stimulus conflict or response conflict triggers an avoidance tendency. Participants first performed a color Stroop task. In a subsequent motivation test, participants responded to Stroop stimuli with approach- and avoidance-related lever movements. These results showed that Stroop-conflict stimuli increased the frequency of avoidance responses in a free-choice motivation test, and also increased the speed of avoidance relative to approach responses in a forced-choice test. High and low proportions of response conflict in the Stroop task had no effect on avoidance in the motivation test. Avoidance of conflict was, however, obtained even with new conflict stimuli that had not been presented before in a Stroop task, and when the Stroop task was replaced with an unrelated filler task. Taken together, these results suggest that stimulus conflict is sufficient to trigger avoidance.

  2. Substantive and relational effectiveness of organizational conflict behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Euwema, M C; Van de Vliert, E; Bakker, A B

    2003-01-01

    In this observation study the theory of conglomerated conflict behavior is tested. The impact of seven conflict behaviors on substantive and relational conflict outcomes is examined through multiple independent observations of 103 Dutch nurse managers handling a standardized conflict. Results show t

  3. Marital Conflict Behaviors and Implications for Divorce over 16 Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birditt, Kira S.; Brown, Edna; Orbuch, Terri L.; McIlvane, Jessica M.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined self-reported marital conflict behaviors and their implications for divorce. Husbands and wives (N = 373 couples; 47% White American, 53% Black American) reported conflict behaviors in Years 1, 3, 7, and 16 of their marriages. Individual behaviors (e.g., destructive behaviors) and patterns of behaviors between partners (e.g.,…

  4. Violent Conflict and Behavior: a Field Experiment in Burundi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voors, M.J.; Nillesen, E.E.M.; Bulte, E.H.; Lensink, B.W.; Verwimp, P.; Soest, van D.P.

    2012-01-01

    We use a series of field experiments in rural Burundi to examine the impact of exposure to conflict on social, risk, and time preferences. We find that conflict affects behavior: individuals exposed to violence display more altruistic behavior towards their neighbors, are more risk-seeking, and have

  5. Violent conflict and behavior : A field experiment in Burundi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voors, M.J.; Nillesen, E.E.M.; Verwimp, P.; Bulte, E.H.; Lensink, B.W.; van Soest, D.P.

    2012-01-01

    We use a series of field experiments in rural Burundi to examine the impact of exposure to conflict on social, risk, and time preferences. We find that conflict affects behavior: individuals exposed to violence display more altruistic behavior towards their neighbors, are more risk-seeking, and have

  6. Within-Family Conflict Behaviors as Predictors of Conflict in Adolescent Romantic Relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darling, Nancy; Cohan, Catherine L.; Burns, Andrew; Thompson, Louisa

    2008-01-01

    Continuity in conflict behaviors from (a) adolescents' behavior with parents and their behavior with romantic partners and (b) from parents' marriage to adolescents' romantic relationships were examined in a sample of 58 mother-father-adolescent families and the adolescents' romantic partners. The social relations model was used to analyze…

  7. Agreeableness and activeness as components of conflict behaviors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van de Vliert, E; Euwema, M C

    1994-01-01

    Handling social conflict is usually described in terms of 2 dimensions that either cause the behavior (concern for one's own and others' goals) or that result from it (integration and distribution). In contrast, agreeableness and activeness are common factors of modes and taxonomies of conflict beha

  8. FAMILY CONFLICT MODERATES EARLY PARENT-CHILD BEHAVIORAL TRANSACTIONS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschall, Katherine W; Barnett, Melissa A; Mastergeorge, Ann M; Mortensen, Jennifer A

    2017-09-01

    The reciprocal transactions that shape early parent-child relationships are influenced by contextual stress, such as family conflict. Although family conflict is a salient stressor to the family system, few studies have considered how parent-child transactions vary according to exposure to family conflict. The present study examined how family conflict alters early parent-child behavioral transactions. We utilized three waves of data from a multisite longitudinal study of low-income families (N = 2, 876), child age 14 months, 24 months, and 36 months, to identify behavioral transactions of positive and negative maternal (supportiveness, negative regard) and child (engagement, negativity) behaviors. Results indicated that family conflict at 14 months diminished the positive association between maternal supportiveness and child engagement, and amplified the inverse association between maternal negativity and child engagement. Family conflict at 14 months also was associated with increased stability of child negativity and subsequent increased maternal negative regard at 36 months, in part via increases in 24-month child negativity. In sum, family conflict occurring early in childhood predicted and moderated behavioral transactions between young children and their mothers. © 2017 Michigan Association for Infant Mental Health.

  9. Heart rate during conflicts predicts post-conflict stress-related behavior in greylag geese.

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    Claudia A F Wascher

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Social stressors are known to be among the most potent stressors in group-living animals. This is not only manifested in individual physiology (heart rate, glucocorticoids, but also in how individuals behave directly after a conflict. Certain 'stress-related behaviors' such as autopreening, body shaking, scratching and vigilance have been suggested to indicate an individual's emotional state. Such behaviors may also alleviate stress, but the behavioral context and physiological basis of those behaviors is still poorly understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We recorded beat-to-beat heart rates (HR of 22 greylag geese in response to agonistic encounters using fully implanted sensor-transmitter packages. Additionally, for 143 major events we analyzed the behavior shown by our focal animals in the first two minutes after an interaction. Our results show that the HR during encounters and characteristics of the interaction predicted the frequency and duration of behaviors shown after a conflict. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: To our knowledge this is the first study to quantify the physiological and behavioral responses to single agonistic encounters and to link this to post conflict behavior. Our results demonstrate that 'stress-related behaviors' are flexibly modulated by the characteristics of the preceding aggressive interaction and reflect the individual's emotional strain, which is linked to autonomic arousal. We found no support for the stress-alleviating hypothesis, but we propose that stress-related behaviors may play a role in communication with other group members, particularly with pair-partners.

  10. GABA-B receptor activation and conflict behavior

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    Ketelaars, C.E.J.; Bollen, E.L.; Rigter, H.; Bruinvels, J.

    1988-01-01

    Baclofen and oxazepam enhance extinction of conflict behavior in the Geller-Seifter test while baclofen and diazepam release punished behavior in Vogel's conflict test. In order to investigate the possibility that the effect of the selective GABA-B receptor agonist baclofen is mediated indirectly via the GABA-A/benzodiazepine receptor complex, the effect of pretreatment of rats with baclofen on (/sup 3/H)-diazepam binding to washed and unwashed cortical and cerebellar membranes of rats has been studied. Baclofen pretreatment increase Bmax in washed cerebellar membranes when bicuculline was present in the incubation mixture. No effect was seen in cortical membranes. The present results render it unlikely that the effect of baclofen on extinction of conflict behavior and punished drinking is mediated via the GABA-A/benzodiazepine receptor complex. 50 references, 1 figure, 4 tables.

  11. Asymmetries in Altruistic Behavior during Violent Intergroup Conflict

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    Hannes Rusch

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent theoretical and experimental investigations of altruistic behavior in intergroup conflict in humans frequently make use of the assumption that warfare can be modeled as a symmetrical n-person prisoner's dilemma, abstracting away the strategic differences between attack and defense. In contrast, some empirical studies on intergroup conflict in hunter-gatherer societies and chimpanzees indicate that fitness relevant risks and potential benefits of attacks and defenses might have differed substantially under ancestral conditions. Drawing on these studies, it is hypothesized that the success of defenses was much more important for individual and kin survival and that a disposition to act altruistically during intergroup conflict is thus more likely to evolve for the strategic situation of defense. It is then investigated empirically if such asymmetries in the occurrence of altruistic behavior during intergroup conflict can be found. Analyzing detailed historical case data from 20th century wars, this study finds that altruistic behavior towards members of the in-group indeed seems to occur more frequently when soldiers are defending themselves and their comrades against enemy attacks. It is proposed that this asymmetry reflects adaptive behavioral responses to the materially different strategic character of attacks and defenses under ancestral conditions. If true, this would call for a refinement of theories of the evolutionary interaction of intergroup conflict and altruism.

  12. Radical Behaviorism and Buddhism: Complementarities and Conflicts

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    Diller, James W.; Lattal, Kennon A.

    2008-01-01

    Comparisons have been made between Buddhism and the philosophy of science in general, but there have been only a few attempts to draw comparisons directly with the philosophy of radical behaviorism. The present review therefore considers heretofore unconsidered points of comparison between Buddhism and radical behaviorism in terms of their…

  13. Radical Behaviorism and Buddhism: Complementarities and Conflicts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diller, James W.; Lattal, Kennon A.

    2008-01-01

    Comparisons have been made between Buddhism and the philosophy of science in general, but there have been only a few attempts to draw comparisons directly with the philosophy of radical behaviorism. The present review therefore considers heretofore unconsidered points of comparison between Buddhism and radical behaviorism in terms of their…

  14. Too Much of a Good Thing? Emotional Intelligence and Interpersonal Conflict Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeller, Christin; Kwantes, Catherine T

    2015-01-01

    Research suggests that the outcomes of interpersonal conflict are determined not only by the conflict itself, but also by the way in which it is handled. Confrontational and domineering tactics have been found to magnify the adverse impact of conflict. Thus, investigations of determinants of aggressive conflict management behaviors are of considerable interest. This study extends the literature by examining the relationship between conflict management preferences and conflict management behaviors and by examining how emotional intelligence (EI) shapes this preference-behavior relationship. Individuals' conflict management preferences predicted actual conflict management behaviors. EI was found to moderate this relationship. However, some of these moderating effects run contrary to the popular view of EI as a prosocial concept. Specifically, some EI facets were found to strengthen the link between aggressive conflict management preferences and subsequent conflict management behaviors.

  15. Antisocial behavior: Connection with bullying/cyberbullying and conflict resolution

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    Maite Garaigordobil

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this work was to explore the relations among antisocial behavior, engagement in bullying/cyberbullying, and conflict resolution skills. The sample comprised 3,026 Spanish participants, aged between 12 and 18years (48.5% males, 51.5% females, enrolled in various public (45.6% and private (54.4% schools of the Basque Country. Using a descriptive and correlational design, 4 assessment instruments were administered to measure the variables under study (antisocial behavior, bullying/cyberbullying, and conflict resolution skills. The correlational analyses and analyses of variance confirmed that adolescents and youth of both sexes with high scores in antisocial behavior were significantly more involved in all the roles of bullies and cyberbullies (victims, bullies, and bystanders and they used significantly more aggressive strategies as an interpersonal conflict resolution technique. The study identifies relevant variables for the design of intervention programs. The discussion focuses on the importance of implementing psychoeducational prevention and intervention programs targeting antisocial behavior, as well as the role of the family and society.

  16. Impact of Conflict Management Strategies on the Generation Mechanism of Miners' Unsafe Behavior Tendency

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    Li, Ji-Zu; Zhang, Ya-Ping; Liu, Xiao-Guang; Liu, Yao-Long; Wang, Tian-Ri

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we examine the relationship between the generation mechanism of miners' unsafe behavior tendency and conflict management strategies, including cooperative conflict management strategy, competitive conflict management strategy and avoidant conflict management strategy. Miners from 3 collieries in Shanxi province completed a…

  17. Conflicts and missed signals in psychoanalysis, behaviorism, and Gestalt psychology.

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    Murray, D J; Kilgour, A R; Wasylkiw, L

    2000-04-01

    At the turn of the 20th century, European psychologists found themselves in conflict situations with respect to the role that private mental states should play in a scientific psychology. Out of this conflict arose 3 of the best-known schools of the 20th century: psychoanalysis, behaviorism, and Gestalt psychology. Each of these schools is discussed with respect to two characteristics. First, the authors discuss the attitude of each school on the meaning of the word unconscious as it was understood around 1900. Second, the authors discuss the influence of each school on the reception accorded to books written around 1900 espousing viewpoints that did not cohere with the school's beliefs. Such books may be considered "missed signals" in the history of psychology. "Hits" associated with each school are also highlighted.

  18. Intragroup conflict and the interpersonal leadership circumplex: matching leadership behaviors to conflict types

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.C. Homan; M. Redeker; R.E. de Vries

    2014-01-01

    Conflicts have been found to often negatively affect the functioning of teams (De Wit et al., 2012), which makes the effective management of conflicts crucial. Because of their influential positions, leaders might hold the key to successful conflict management in teams (Yukl, 2010). We will zoom in

  19. Intragroup conflict and the interpersonal leadership circumplex: matching leadership behaviors to conflict types

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Homan, A.C.; Redeker, M.; de Vries, R.E.; Ayoko, O.B.; Ashkanasy, N.M.; Jehn, K.A.

    2014-01-01

    Conflicts have been found to often negatively affect the functioning of teams (De Wit et al., 2012), which makes the effective management of conflicts crucial. Because of their influential positions, leaders might hold the key to successful conflict management in teams (Yukl, 2010). We will zoom in

  20. Conflict Beliefs, Goals, and Behavior in Romantic Relationships during Late Adolescence

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    Simon, Valerie A.; Kobielski, Sarah J.; Martin, Sarah

    2008-01-01

    Little is known about social cognition regarding conflict in romantic relationships during late adolescence. The current study examined beliefs, social goals, and behavioral strategies for conflict in romantic relationships and their associations with relationship quality among a sample of 494 college students. Two dimensions of conflict beliefs,…

  1. Emotion and goal-directed behavior: ERP evidence on cognitive and emotional conflict.

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    Zinchenko, Artyom; Kanske, Philipp; Obermeier, Christian; Schröger, Erich; Kotz, Sonja A

    2015-11-01

    Cognitive control supports goal-directed behavior by resolving conflict among opposing action tendencies. Emotion can trigger cognitive control processes, thus speeding up conflict processing when the target dimension of stimuli is emotional. However, it is unclear what role emotionality of the target dimension plays in the processing of emotional conflict (e.g. in irony). In two EEG experiments, we compared the influence of emotional valence of the target (emotional, neutral) in cognitive and emotional conflict processing. To maximally approximate real-life communication, we used audiovisual stimuli. Participants either categorized spoken vowels (cognitive conflict) or their emotional valence (emotional conflict), while visual information was congruent or incongruent. Emotional target dimension facilitated both cognitive and emotional conflict processing, as shown in a reduced reaction time conflict effect. In contrast, the N100 in the event-related potentials showed a conflict-specific reversal: the conflict effect was larger for emotional compared with neutral trials in cognitive conflict and smaller in emotional conflict. Additionally, domain-general conflict effects were observed in the P200 and N200 responses. The current findings confirm that emotions have a strong influence on cognitive and emotional conflict processing. They also highlight the complexity and heterogeneity of the interaction of emotion with different types of conflict. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Interparental Conflict Styles and Parenting Behaviors: Associations with Overt and Relational Aggression among Chinese Children

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    Li, Yan; Putallaz, Martha; Su, Yanjie

    2011-01-01

    This study examined how interparental conflict styles related to Chinese children's overt and relational aggression directly and indirectly through parenting behaviors. Mothers (n = 670) and fathers (n = 570) reported their overt and covert interparental conflict styles and different parenting behaviors. Children's (n = 671) aggression was…

  3. Interparental Conflict Styles and Parenting Behaviors: Associations with Overt and Relational Aggression among Chinese Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Putallaz, Martha; Su, Yanjie

    2011-01-01

    This study examined how interparental conflict styles related to Chinese children's overt and relational aggression directly and indirectly through parenting behaviors. Mothers (n = 670) and fathers (n = 570) reported their overt and covert interparental conflict styles and different parenting behaviors. Children's (n = 671) aggression was…

  4. The Functionality of Conflict Behaviors and the Popularity of Those Who Engage in Them.

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    Tezer, Esin

    1999-01-01

    Responses from students after reading a story about a five-person group and their conflict behaviors indicate that the person in the story who engaged in compromise was rated as most successful both in accomplished goals and in establishing interpersonal relationships. States that relationship between attraction and conflict behaviors was found to…

  5. Reciprocal Relations between Student-Teacher Conflict, Children's Social Skills and Externalizing Behavior

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    Skalická, Vera; Stenseng, Frode; Wichstrøm, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Research suggests that the relation between student-teacher conflict and children's externalizing behavior might be reciprocal, and possibly also between student-teacher conflict and children's social skills. Because children with externalizing behavior also tend to display low levels of social skills, we do not know if one or both of these…

  6. Parental Divorce, Marital Conflict and Children's Behavior Problems: A Comparison of Adopted and Biological Children

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    Amato, Paul R.; Cheadle, Jacob E.

    2008-01-01

    We used adopted and biological children from Waves 1 and 2 of the National Survey of Families and Households to study the links between parents' marital conflict, divorce and children's behavior problems. The standard family environment model assumes that marital conflict and divorce increase the risk of children's behavior problems. The passive…

  7. A Helping Hand? The Moderating Role of Leaders' Conflict Management Behavior on the Conflict–Stress Relationship of Employees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Romer, M.; Rispens, Sonja; Giebels, E.; Euwema, M.C.

    2012-01-01

    Interpersonal conflict between colleagues within organizations negatively affects employee well-being (e.g., stress). It is unclear how leaders' third-party conflict management behaviors influence the relationship between employee conflict and well-being. In this study, we examine the effects of lea

  8. Emotion and goal-directed behavior: ERP evidence on cognitive and emotional conflict

    OpenAIRE

    Zinchenko, Artyom; Kanske, Philipp; Obermeier, Christian; Schröger, Erich; Kotz, Sonja A.

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive control supports goal-directed behavior by resolving conflict among opposing action tendencies. Emotion can trigger cognitive control processes, thus speeding up conflict processing when the target dimension of stimuli is emotional. However, it is unclear what role emotionality of the target dimension plays in the processing of emotional conflict (e.g. in irony). In two EEG experiments, we compared the influence of emotional valence of the target (emotional, neutral) in cognitive an...

  9. A theoretical model to address organizational human conflict and disruptive behavior in health care organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, Llewellyn E

    2006-01-01

    This article proposes a theoretical model for leaders to use to address organizational human conflict and disruptive behavior in health care organizations. Leadership is needed to improve interpersonal relationships within the workforce. A workforce with a culture of internal conflict will be unable to achieve its full potential to delivery quality patient care.

  10. Conflict and expectancies interact to predict sexual behavior under the influence among gay and bisexual men.

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    Wells, Brooke E; Starks, Tyrel J; Parsons, Jeffrey T; Golub, Sarit

    2014-07-01

    As the mechanisms of the associations between substance use and risky sex remain unclear, this study investigates the interactive roles of conflicts about casual sex and condom use and expectancies of the sexual effects of substances in those associations among gay men. Conflict interacted with expectancies to predict sexual behavior under the influence; low casual sex conflict coupled with high expectancies predicted the highest number of casual partners, and high condom use conflict and high expectancies predicted the highest number of unprotected sex acts. Results have implications for intervention efforts that aim to improve sexual decision-making and reduce sexual expectancies. © The Author(s) 2013.

  11. Organizational citizenship pressure, compulsory citizenship behavior, and work--family conflict

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhao, Hongdan; Liu, Yinbin; Sheard, Geoff

    2017-01-01

    We sought to explore the mediating effect of compulsory citizenship behavior in the relationship between organizational citizenship pressure and work--family conflict, and the moderating role of job...

  12. The effects of affective and cognitive empathy on adolescents’ behavior and outcomes in conflicts with mothers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Lissa, Caspar J.; Hawk, Skyler T.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304354562; Meeus, Wim H.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/070442215

    2017-01-01

    The current study investigated whether manipulations of affective and cognitive empathy have differential effects on observed behavior and self-reported outcomes in adolescent–mother conflict discussions. We further examined how these situational empathy inductions interact with preexisting empathic

  13. Polymorphism analysis of csd gene in six Apis mellifera subspecies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zilong; Liu, Zhiyong; Wu, Xiaobo; Yan, Weiyu; Zeng, Zhijiang

    2012-03-01

    The complementary sex determination (csd) gene is the primary gene determining the gender of honey bees (Apis spp). In this study we analyzed the polymorphism of csd gene in six Apis mellifera subspecies. The genomic region 3 of csd gene in these six A. mellifera was cloned, and identified. A total of 79 haplotypes were obtained from these six subspecies. Analysis showed that region 3 of csd gene has a high level of polymorphism in all the six A. mellifera subspecies. The A. m. anatolica subspecies has a slightly higher nucleotide diversity (π) than other subspecies, while the π values showed no significant difference among the other five subspecies. The phylogenetic tree showed that all the csd haplotypes from different A. mellifera subspecies are scattered throughout the tree, without forming six different clades. Population differentiation analysis showed that there are significant genetic differentiations among some of the subspecies. The NJ phylogenetic tree showed that the A. m. caucasica and A. m. carnica have the closest relationship, followed by A. m. ssp, A. m. ligustica, A. m. carpatica and A. m. anatolica that were gathered in the tree in turn.

  14. CONFLICTS AMONG STUDENTS FROM 8 TO 9 YEARS OLD: TEASING AND ANNOYING BEHAVIOR

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    Lívia Maria Ferreira da Silva

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Based on the Piagetian perspective, this qualitative and quantitative study sought to investigate the causes of conflicts among primary school students. Thirty children aged 8 and 9 from a primary school, selected according to the criterion of convenience. Data were collected through 23 sessions of observation of the interactions between the children in different moments of the school routine until the saturation of the data, criterion chosen to leave the field. In some situations, it was necessary to have an informal conversation with the participants to better understand the conflict. The results indicated that the main cause of conflict among students was teasing, annoying behavior and physical dispute. It discusses the influence of cognitive, affective and moral development, as well as the cultural aspects that influence the experience of the conflict. It is recommended the implementation of educational interventions that, in addition to approaching conflicts with students, invest in strategies for valuing ethical coexistence.

  15. Religious Conflict, Sexual Identity, and Suicidal Behaviors among LGBT Young Adults.

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    Gibbs, Jeremy J; Goldbach, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    This is the first known study to explore how religious identity conflict impacts suicidal behaviors among lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) young adults and to test internalized homophobia as a mediator. A secondary analysis of 2,949 youth was conducted using a national dataset collected by OutProud in 2000. Three indicators of identity conflict and an internalized-homophobia scale (mediator), were included in logistic regressions with three different suicide variable outcomes. Internalized homophobia fully mediates one conflict indicator and partially mediates the other two indicators' relationship with suicidal thoughts. Internalized homophobia also fully mediates the relationship between one conflict indicator and chronic suicidal thoughts. Two indicators were associated with twice the odds of a suicide attempt. LGBT young adults who mature in religious contexts have higher odds of suicidal thoughts, and more specifically chronic suicidal thoughts, as well as suicide attempt compared to other LGBT young adults. Internalized homophobia only accounts for portions of this conflict.

  16. Mindfulness during romantic conflict moderates the impact of negative partner behaviors on cortisol responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, Heidemarie K; Hertz, Robin; Nelson, Benjamin; Laurent, Sean M

    2016-03-01

    This study was designed to test whether romantic partners' mindfulness-present moment, nonjudgmental awareness-during a conflict discussion could buffer the effects of negative partner behaviors on neuroendocrine stress responses. Heterosexual couples (n=88 dyads) provided 5 saliva samples for cortisol assay during a laboratory session involving a conflict discussion task. Conflict behaviors were coded by outside observers using the System for Coding Interactions in Dyads, and partners rated their mindfulness during the task using the Toronto Mindfulness Scale. Interactions tested using multilevel modeling revealed that participants with higher levels of mindfulness during the conflict showed either quicker cortisol recovery or an absence of slowed recovery in the presence of more negative partner behaviors. Whereas the attitudinal component of mindfulness (curiosity) moderated effects of negative partner engagement in the conflict (i.e., attempts to control, coerciveness, negativity and conflict), the attentional component of mindfulness (decentering) moderated the effect of partner disengagement (i.e., withdrawal). These findings lend support to the idea that mindfulness during a stressful interaction can mitigate the physiological impacts of negative behaviors.

  17. Teaching Students with Behavioral Disorders to Use a Negotiation Procedure: Impact on Classroom Behavior and Conflict Resolution Strategy

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    Bullock, Cathy

    2012-01-01

    The impact of the instruction of a six-step problem solving negotiation procedure on the conflict resolution strategies and classroom behavior of six elementary students with challenging behaviors was examined. Moderately positive effects were found for the following negotiation strategies used by students: independent problem solving, problem…

  18. Sibling differences in parent-child conflict and risky behavior: a three-wave longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Chun Bun; Solmeyer, Anna R; McHale, Susan M

    2012-08-01

    To better understand why siblings growing up in the same family are often as different as unrelated individuals, this study explored the role of differential experiences with parents in the development of sibling differences. Cross-lagged models tested directions of effect by examining whether differential parent-child conflict predicted sibling differences in risky behavior over time, or vice versa. Participants were mothers, fathers, and the 2 eldest adolescent siblings (mean ages at Time 1 = 15.12 and 12.58 years) from 355 European American, working- and middle-class families. On 3 occasions over a 2-year period, mothers and fathers reported on their conflict with each of the 2 siblings, and siblings reported on their own risky behavior. Results revealed that, controlling for sibling age differences and average levels of conflict and risky behavior at Time 1, youths who had more conflict with their mothers and fathers in relation to their siblings subsequently engaged in relatively more risky behavior. Also, youths who engaged in more risky behavior in relation to their siblings experienced relatively more conflict with their fathers, but not mothers, at later time points. Findings highlight the importance of examining both family dynamics and child characteristics in understanding sibling differentiation, and illuminate potential differences in parenting processes involving mothers versus fathers.

  19. A Helping Hand? The Moderating Role of Leaders' Conflict Management Behavior on the Conflict–Stress Relationship of Employees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Romer, M.; Rispens, Sonja; Giebels, Ellen; Euwema, M.C.

    2012-01-01

    Interpersonal conflict between colleagues within organizations negatively affects employee well-being (e.g., stress). It is unclear how leaders' third-party conflict management behaviors influence the relationship between employee conflict and well-being. In this study, we examine the effects of

  20. Effects of Cognitive Versus Cognitive-Behavioral Divorce-Parenting Programs on Parental Conflict, Intimate Violence, Parental Communication, Divorce-Related Parental Behaviors and Children's Behavioral Problems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Whitworth, James

    2000-01-01

    .... The two-group pretest- posttest design with a three-month follow-up measured parents knowledge of divorce-related parenting behaviors, reports of intimate violence, destructive conflict tactics...

  1. Patterns of suicidal ideation and behavior in Northern Ireland and associations with conflict related trauma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siobhan O'Neill

    Full Text Available In this study, data from the World Mental Health Survey's Northern Ireland (NI Study of Health and Stress (NISHS was used to assess the associations between conflict- and non-conflict-related traumatic events and suicidal behaviour, controlling for age and gender and the effects of mental disorders in NI. DSM mental disorders and suicidal ideation, plans and attempts were assessed using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI in a multi-stage, clustered area probability household sample (N = 4,340, response rate 68.4%. The traumatic event categories were based on event types listed in the PTSD section of the CIDI. Suicidal ideation and attempts were more common in women than men, however, rates of suicide plans were similar for both genders. People with mood, anxiety and substance disorders were significantly more likely than those without to endorse suicidal ideation, plan or attempt. The highest odds ratios for all suicidal behaviors were for people with any mental disorder. However, the odds of seriously considering suicide were significantly higher for people with conflict and non-conflict-related traumatic events compared with people who had not experienced a traumatic event. The odds of having a suicide plan remain significantly higher for people with conflict-related traumatic events compared to those with only non-conflict-related events and no traumatic events. Finally, the odds of suicide attempt were significantly higher for people who have only non-conflict-related traumatic events compared with the other two categories. The results suggest that traumatic events associated with the NI conflict may be associated with suicidal ideation and plans, and this effect appears to be in addition to that explained by the presence of mental disorders. The reduced rates of suicide attempts among people who have had a conflict-related traumatic event may reflect a higher rate of single, fatal suicide attempts in this population.

  2. STUDY OF MEDICINE STUDENTS‟ BEHAVIORAL STRATEGIES IN INTERPERSONAL CONFLICTS ON THEIR FIRST YEARS OF EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. N. Vasilyeva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents theoretical calculations that were used as a base of an empirical study of behavior that medicine students demonstrate in interpersonal conflicts on their first years of medicinal education. Behavior in the situation of a conflict is the important part of professional ethics and an important skill for a doctor, because doctors interact with patients and colleagues on daily basis; so the study was made to analyze the differences in behavioral strategies of different specialties students when in interpersonal conflict. The study was based on a five strategies concept by K.U. Thomas and R.H. Kilmann. In the article only the first year students are described, but the further research is already planned to track the dynamics of a phenomenon on the different stages of future doctors‟ professional becoming. The results of a study are also presented. Also, there is a comparative analysis of behavioral strategies of different specialties students, such as dentists, therapists and pediatricians; there are important differences in their behavior in a situation of a conflict, on the first year of education already. There is also a comparative analysis of those specialties students by a gender; there are important differences, too. 

  3. Pain-Based Behavior with Children and Adolescents in Conflict

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anglin, James P.

    2014-01-01

    Many actions of troubled children and adolescents can disguise and conceal their ever-present and deep-seated psycho-emotional pain. Adults living and working with these youth may overlook this pain in a strategy of avoidance. Labelling troubling behavior as "outbursts," "explosions," or "acting out," ignores the…

  4. Dysfunctional Relationship Beliefs in Parent-Late Adolescent Relationship and Conflict Resolution Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamamci, Zeynep

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the role of dysfunctional relationships beliefs on both the perceptions of their relationships with the parents and conflict resolution behaviors of late adolescence. The sample was consisted of 372 Turkish university students (248 women and 124 men). Interpersonal Cognitive Distortions Scale,…

  5. The Relationship between Parent-Child Conflict and Adolescent Antisocial Behavior: Confirming Shared Environmental Mediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klahr, Ashlea M.; Rueter, Martha A.; McGue, Matt; Iacono, William G.; Burt, S. Alexandra

    2011-01-01

    Prior studies have indicated that the relationship between parent-child conflict and adolescent antisocial behavior is at least partially shared environmental in origin. However, all available research on this topic (to our knowledge) relies exclusively on parent and/or adolescent informant-reports, both of which are subject to various forms of…

  6. The Relationship between Parent-Child Conflict and Adolescent Antisocial Behavior: Confirming Shared Environmental Mediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klahr, Ashlea M.; Rueter, Martha A.; McGue, Matt; Iacono, William G.; Burt, S. Alexandra

    2011-01-01

    Prior studies have indicated that the relationship between parent-child conflict and adolescent antisocial behavior is at least partially shared environmental in origin. However, all available research on this topic (to our knowledge) relies exclusively on parent and/or adolescent informant-reports, both of which are subject to various forms of…

  7. Sexual conflict predicts morphology and behavior in two species of penduline tits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komdeur Jan

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The evolutionary interests of males and females rarely coincide (sexual conflict, and these conflicting interests influence morphology, behavior and speciation in various organisms. We examined consequences of variation in sexual conflict in two closely-related passerine birds with contrasting breeding systems: the Eurasian penduline tit Remiz pendulinus (EPT exhibiting a highly polygamous breeding system with sexually antagonistic interests over parental care, and the socially monogamous Cape penduline tit Anthoscopus minutus (CPT. We derived four a priori predictions from sexual conflict theory and tested these using data collected in Central Europe (EPT and South Africa (CPT. Firstly, we predicted that EPTs exhibit more sexually dimorphic plumage than CPTs due to more intense sexual selection. Secondly, we expected brighter EPT males to provide less care than duller males. Thirdly, since song is a sexually selected trait in many birds, male EPTs were expected to exhibit more complex songs than CPT males. Finally, intense sexual conflict in EPT was expected to lead to low nest attendance as an indication of sexually antagonistic interests, whereas we expected more cooperation between parents in CPT consistent with their socially monogamous breeding system. Results Consistent with our predictions EPTs exhibited greater sexual dimorphism in plumage and more complex song than CPTs, and brighter EPT males provided less care than duller ones. EPT parents attended the nest less frequently and less simultaneously than CPT parents. Conclusions These results are consistent with sexual conflict theory: species in which sexual conflict is more manifested (EPT exhibited a stronger sexual dimorphism and more elaborated sexually selected traits than species with less intense sexual conflict (CPT. Our results are also consistent with the notion that EPTs attempt to force their partner to work harder as expected under sexual conflict: each

  8. Nexans advances in all CSD route for REBCO coated conductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bock, J.; Ehrenberg, J.; Hoppe, B.; Isfort, D.; Klein, M.; Rikel, M. [Nexans SuperConductors, Chemiepark Knapsack, Huerth (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    Development of REBCO coated conductors (CC) at Nexans SuperConductors (NSC) is focused on all chemical solution deposition (CSD) route that promises the best performance-to-price ratio in long lengths. The feasibility of all CSD approach is shown on the lab scale: using metalorganic deposition (MOD), NSC was able to produce YBCO/CeO{sub 2}/LZO/NiW CCs with J{sub c}(77 K,sf)=0.5 MA/cm{sup 2}. The major advance of NSC on a semi-industrial scale is the use of MOD route for production of high-quality La{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} (LZO) coated NiW RABITS in lengths up to 12 m. With those substrates, it is possible to produce CCs with the simplest (one-buffer) architecture by depositing REBCO using other techniques (ISD at Theva, Ismaning; MOCVD at IOT, Braunschweig; HLPE at University of Cambridge, UK). The best short sample I{sub c}=280, 120 and 100 A/cm-width for HLPE, ISD, and MOCVD, respectively First long-length conductors show transport I{sub c}=40 A (10m-long, ISD). Further work is focused on optimisation of the already established mixed (MOD+PVD) approaches, understanding optimum architecture and processing conditions for the all-CSD route and developing tools for scaling those conditions to long-length production. (orig.)

  9. Molecular analysis of the chloroplast Cu/Zn-SOD gene (AhCSD2) in peanut

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiurong Zhang; Qian Wan; Fengzhen Liu⁎; Kun Zhang; Aiqing Sun; Bing Luo; Li Sun; Yongshan Wan⁎⁎

    2015-01-01

    Superoxide dismutase (SOD, EC 1.15.1.1) plays a key role in response to drought stress, and differences in SOD activity changes among cultivars are important under drought conditions. We obtained the full-length DNA of the chloroplast Cu/Zn-SOD gene (AhCSD2) from 11 allotetraploid cultivars and 5 diploid wild species in peanut. BLAST search against the peanut genome showed that the AhCSD2 genes gCSD2-1 and gCSD2-2 are located at the tops of chromosome A03 (A genome) and B03 (B genome), respectively, and both contain 8 exons and 7 introns. Nucleotide sequence analyses indicated that gCSD2-2 sequences were identical among all the tested cultivars, while gCSD2-1 sequences showed allelic variations. The amino acid sequences deduced from gCSD2-1 and gCSD2-2 both contain a chloroplast transit peptide and are distinguished by 6 amino acid (aa) residue differences. The other 2 aa residue variations in the mature peptide regions give rise to three-dimensional structure changes of the protein deduced from the genes gCSD2-1 and gCSD2-2. Sequences analyses of cultivars and wild species showed that gCSD2-2 of Arachis hypogaea and gAipCSD2 (Arachis ipaensis) are identical, and despite the abundant polymorphic loci between gCSD2-1 of A. hypogaea and sequences from A genome wild species, the deduced amino acid sequence of AhCSD2-1 (A. hypogaea) is identical to that of AduCSD2 (Arachis duranensis), whereas AcoCSD2 (Arachis correntina) and AcaCSD2 (Arachis cardenasii) both have 2 aa differences in the transit peptide region compared with AhCSD2-1 (A. hypogaea). Based on the Peanut Genome Project, promoter prediction revealed many stress-related cis-acting elements within the potential promoter regions (pp-A and pp-B). pp-A contains more binding sites for drought-associated transcriptional factors than pp-B. We hypothesize that the marked changes in SOD activity in different cultivars under drought stress are tightly regulated by transcription factors through transcription and

  10. Molecular analysis of the chloroplast Cu/Zn-SOD gene(AhCSD2) in peanut

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiurong; Zhang; Qian; Wan; Fengzhen; Liu; Kun; Zhang; Aiqing; Sun; Bing; Luo; Li; Sun; Yongshan; Wan

    2015-01-01

    Superoxide dismutase(SOD, EC 1.15.1.1) plays a key role in response to drought stress, and differences in SOD activity changes among cultivars are important under drought conditions. We obtained the full-length DNA of the chloroplast Cu/Zn-SOD gene(Ah CSD2)from 11 allotetraploid cultivars and 5 diploid wild species in peanut. BLAST search against the peanut genome showed that the Ah CSD2 genes g CSD2-1 and g CSD2-2 are located at the tops of chromosome A03(A genome) and B03(B genome), respectively, and both contain 8exons and 7 introns. Nucleotide sequence analyses indicated that g CSD2-2 sequences were identical among all the tested cultivars, while g CSD2-1 sequences showed allelic variations.The amino acid sequences deduced from g CSD2-1 and g CSD2-2 both contain a chloroplast transit peptide and are distinguished by 6 amino acid(aa) residue differences. The other 2aa residue variations in the mature peptide regions give rise to three-dimensional structure changes of the protein deduced from the genes g CSD2-1 and g CSD2-2. Sequences analyses of cultivars and wild species showed that g CSD2-2 of Arachis hypogaea and g Aip CSD2(Arachis ipaensis) are identical, and despite the abundant polymorphic loci between g CSD2-1 of A.hypogaea and sequences from A genome wild species, the deduced amino acid sequence of Ah CSD2-1(A. hypogaea) is identical to that of Adu CSD2(Arachis duranensis), whereas Aco CSD2(Arachis correntina) and Aca CSD2(Arachis cardenasii) both have 2 aa differences in the transit peptide region compared with Ah CSD2-1(A. hypogaea). Based on the Peanut Genome Project, promoter prediction revealed many stress-related cis-acting elements within the potential promoter regions(pp-A and pp-B). pp-A contains more binding sites for drought-associated transcriptional factors than pp-B. We hypothesize that the marked changes in SOD activity in different cultivars under drought stress are tightly regulated by transcription factors through transcription and

  11. Relationships between conflict, affect and deviant sexual behaviors in rapists and pedophiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKibben, A; Proulx, J; Lusignan, R

    1994-06-01

    The aim of the current study was to determine the relationship in sexual offenders between conflict, affective states and particular sexual behaviors (fantasies and masturbatory activities while having such fantasies). To this end we developed the "Fantasy Report", a self-assessment method for recording affective components and sexual behaviors. Thirteen rapists and 9 pedophiles filled out the Fantasy Report every 2 days for a period of 60 days. In rapists, negative mood and the presence of conflicts coincided with both overwhelming deviant sexual fantasies and increased masturbatory activities while having such fantasies. Furthermore, the emotions most frequently reported by rapists following conflicts were loneliness, humiliation, anger and feelings of inadequacy and rejection. Affective components, however, were not associated with nondeviant sexual behaviors. For the pedophiles, the data revealed a significant relationship only between negative moods and deviant sexual fantasies. These data are interpreted to mean that, in sexual offenders, negative affect is a crucial component in the chain that leads to deviant sexual behaviors.

  12. 1D Current Source Density (CSD) Estimation in Inverse Theory: A Unified Framework for Higher-Order Spectral Regularization of Quadrature and Expansion-Type CSD Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kropf, Pascal; Shmuel, Amir

    2016-07-01

    Estimation of current source density (CSD) from the low-frequency part of extracellular electric potential recordings is an unstable linear inverse problem. To make the estimation possible in an experimental setting where recordings are contaminated with noise, it is necessary to stabilize the inversion. Here we present a unified framework for zero- and higher-order singular-value-decomposition (SVD)-based spectral regularization of 1D (linear) CSD estimation from local field potentials. The framework is based on two general approaches commonly employed for solving inverse problems: quadrature and basis function expansion. We first show that both inverse CSD (iCSD) and kernel CSD (kCSD) fall into the category of basis function expansion methods. We then use these general categories to introduce two new estimation methods, quadrature CSD (qCSD), based on discretizing the CSD integral equation with a chosen quadrature rule, and representer CSD (rCSD), an even-determined basis function expansion method that uses the problem's data kernels (representers) as basis functions. To determine the best candidate methods to use in the analysis of experimental data, we compared the different methods on simulations under three regularization schemes (Tikhonov, tSVD, and dSVD), three regularization parameter selection methods (NCP, L-curve, and GCV), and seven different a priori spatial smoothness constraints on the CSD distribution. This resulted in a comparison of 531 estimation schemes. We evaluated the estimation schemes according to their source reconstruction accuracy by testing them using different simulated noise levels, lateral source diameters, and CSD depth profiles. We found that ranking schemes according to the average error over all tested conditions results in a reproducible ranking, where the top schemes are found to perform well in the majority of tested conditions. However, there is no single best estimation scheme that outperforms all others under all tested

  13. Work-Family Conflict, Family-Supportive Supervisor Behaviors (FSSB), and Sleep Outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Crain, Tori L.; Hammer, Leslie B.; Bodner, Todd; KOSSEK, ELLEN ERNST; Moen, Phyllis; Lilienthal, Richard; Buxton, Orfeu M.

    2014-01-01

    Although critical to health and well-being, relatively little research has been conducted in the organizational literature on linkages between the work-family interface and sleep. Drawing on Conservation of Resources theory, we use a sample of 623 information technology workers to examine the relationships between work-family conflict, family-supportive supervisor behaviors (FSSB), and sleep quality and quantity. Validated wrist actigraphy methods were used to collect objective sleep quality ...

  14. Sibling Differences in Parent-Child Conflict and Risky Behavior: A 3-Wave Longitudinal Study

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    To better understand why siblings growing up in the same family are often as different as unrelated individuals, this study explored the role of differential experiences with parents in the development of sibling differences. Cross-lagged models tested directions of effect by examining whether differential parent-child conflict predicted sibling differences in risky behavior over time, or vice versa. Participants were mothers, fathers, and the two eldest adolescent siblings (mean ages at Time...

  15. Parental separation and children's behavioral/emotional problems: the impact of parental representations and family conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadelmann, Stephanie; Perren, Sonja; Groeben, Maureen; von Klitzing, Kai

    2010-03-01

    In this longitudinal study, we examine whether the effect of parental separation on kindergarten children's behavioral/emotional problems varies according to the level of family conflict, and children's parental representations. One hundred and eighty seven children were assessed at ages 5 and 6. Family conflict was assessed using parents' ratings. Children's parental representations were assessed using a story-stem task. A multiinformant approach (parent, teacher, child) was employed to assess children's behavioral/emotional problems. Bivariate results showed that separation, family conflict, and negative parental representations were associated with children's behavioral/emotional problems. However, in multivariate analyses, when controlling for gender and symptoms at age 5, we found that children of separated parents who showed negative parental representations had a significantly greater increase in conduct problems between 5 and 6 than all other children. In terms of emotional symptoms and hyperactivity, symptoms at 5 and (for hyperactivity only) gender were the only predictors for symptoms 1 year later. Our results suggest that kindergarten children's representations of parent-child relationships moderate the impact of parental separation on the development of conduct problems, and underline play and narration as a possible route to access the thoughts and feelings of young children faced with parental separation.

  16. School District Cabinet Member Task and Relationship Conflict Behavior during Budget Development in a State Fiscal Crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickerson, John

    2009-01-01

    Purpose. The first purpose of this study was to determine to what extent task and relationship conflict occurred in school district cabinets during budget development in a state budget crisis. The second purpose was to determine which cabinet member task and relationship conflict behaviors were demonstrated during budget development in a state…

  17. Work-family conflict, family-supportive supervisor behaviors (FSSB), and sleep outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crain, Tori L; Hammer, Leslie B; Bodner, Todd; Kossek, Ellen Ernst; Moen, Phyllis; Lilienthal, Richard; Buxton, Orfeu M

    2014-04-01

    Although critical to health and well-being, relatively little research has been conducted in the organizational literature on linkages between the work-family interface and sleep. Drawing on conservation of resources theory, we use a sample of 623 information technology workers to examine the relationships between work-family conflict, family-supportive supervisor behaviors (FSSB), and sleep quality and quantity. Validated wrist actigraphy methods were used to collect objective sleep quality and quantity data over a 1 week period of time, and survey methods were used to collect information on self-reported work-family conflict, FSSB, and sleep quality and quantity. Results demonstrated that the combination of predictors (i.e., work-to-family conflict, family-to-work conflict, FSSB) was significantly related to both objective and self-report measures of sleep quantity and quality. Future research should further examine the work-family interface to sleep link and make use of interventions targeting the work-family interface as a means for improving sleep health.

  18. The Critical Roles of Task Conflict and Job Autonomy in the Relationship Between Proactive Personalities and Innovative Employee Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Giebels, Ellen; de Reuver, R. S.M.; Rispens, Sonja; Elze G Ufkes

    2016-01-01

    We examine why and when proactive personality is beneficial for innovative behavior at work. Based on a survey among 166 employees working in 35 departments of a large municipality in the Netherlands we show that an increase in task conflicts explains the positive relation between a proactive personality and innovative employee behavior. This process is moderated by job autonomy in such a way that the relationship between proactive personality and task conflict is particularly strong under lo...

  19. Efficient Cfd/csd Coupling Methods for Aeroelastic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Long; Xu, Tianhao; Xie, Jing

    2016-06-01

    A fast aeroelastic numerical simulation method using CFD/CSD coupling are developed. Generally, aeroelastic numerical simulation costs much time and significant hardware resources with CFD/CSD coupling. In this paper, dynamic grid method, full implicit scheme, parallel technology and improved coupling method are researched for efficiency simulation. An improved Delaunay graph mapping method is proposed for efficient dynamic grid deform. Hybrid grid finite volume method is used to solve unsteady flow fields. The dual time stepping method based on parallel implicit scheme is used in temporal discretization for efficiency simulation. An approximate system of linear equations is solved by the GMRES algorithm with a LU-SGS preconditioner. This method leads to a significant increase in performance over the explicit and LU-SGS implicit methods. A modification of LU-SGS is proposed to improve the parallel performance. Parallel computing overs a very effective way to improve our productivity in doing CFD/CFD coupling analysis. Improved loose coupling method is an efficiency way over the loose coupling method and tight coupling method. 3D wing's aeroelastic phenomenon is simulated by solving Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations using improved loose coupling method. The flutter boundary is calculated and agrees well with experimental data. The transonic hole is very clear in numerical simulation results.

  20. Marital satisfaction and communication behaviors during sexual and nonsexual conflict discussions in newlywed couples: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Uzma S; Janssen, Erick; Newhouse, Sarah; Heiman, Julia; Holtzworth-Munroe, Amy; Fallis, Erin; Rafaeli, Eshkol

    2011-01-01

    The way couples communicate during conflict discussions has been found to be a reliable predictor of marital satisfaction. However, in previous research, there has been little experimental control over the selection of topics. The present study examined, in a sample of 15 newlywed couples, whether affective displays during the discussion of a sexual and a nonsexual conflict topic differentially predict current marital satisfaction. Communication behaviors were coded using an adaptation of the Specific Affect Coding System, resulting in composite "negative behavior" and "positive behavior" categories. Data were analyzed using multilevel modeling. Negative behaviors displayed during the nonsexual conflict discussions were not significantly related to concurrent self-reported relationship satisfaction. In contrast, for wives, negative behaviors displayed during the discussion of a sexual problem were significantly related to lower levels of relationship satisfaction. For the sexual and nonsexual conflict discussions, positive behaviors were positively associated with relationship satisfaction, although this effect did not reach statistical significance. Overall, the authors' findings emphasize the importance of incorporating sexual variables in the study of marriage. Furthermore, their study represents an important step in recognizing that marital research benefits from an examination of specific topics of conflict as a factor to consider in studies of marital functioning.

  1. Impact of goal priority and goal conflict on the intention-health-behavior relationship: Tests on physical activity and other health behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conner, Mark; Abraham, Charles; Prestwich, Andrew; Hutter, Russell; Hallam, Jennifer; Sykes-Muskett, Bianca; Morris, Benjamin; Hurling, Robert

    2016-09-01

    Goal intentions are the key proximal determinant of behavior in a number of key models applied to predicting health behavior. However, relatively little previous research has examined how characteristics of goals moderate the intention-health-behavior relations. The present research examined the effects of goal priority and goal conflict as moderators of the intention-health-behavior relationship. The main outcome measures were self-reported performance of physical activity (Studies 1, 2, and 3) and other health behaviors (Study 4), and objectively measured physical activity (Study 3). Studies 1 and 4 used prospective correlational designs to predict later behavior from earlier cognitions. Studies 2 and 3 were experimental studies manipulating goal priority and goal conflict. Studies 1 and 2 used between-subjects designs while Studies 3 and 4 used within-subjects designs. Goal priority significantly moderated the intention-health-behavior relationship for physical activity (Study 1) and a range of protective and risk health behaviors (Study 4). Manipulations of goal priority significantly increased the intention-physical-activity relationship when self-reported (Study 2) and objectively measured (Study 3). In contrast, inconsistent effects were observed for goal conflict as an intention-behavior moderator. When goal priority is high, then intentions are strong predictors of health behaviors. Further studies testing manipulations of goal conflict and in particular goal priority in combination with goal intentions are required to confirm their value as a means to change health behavior. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  2. Multiple Ising models coupled to 2-d gravity: a CSD analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowick, Mark; Falcioni, Marco; Harris, Geoffrey; Marinari, Enzo

    1994-04-01

    We simulate single and multiple Ising models coupled to 2-d gravity and we measure critical slowing down (CSD) with the standard methods. We find that the Swendsen-Wang and Wolff cluster algorithms do not eliminate CSD. We interpret the result as an effect of the mesh dynamics.

  3. Cross-cultural analysis of the verbal conflict behavior of the graduate mining engineers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pevneva Inna

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the crucial issue of the interpersonal communication skills of engineering graduates and studies the verbal behavior of the graduates majoring in mining engineering in conflict professional communication considered in a cross-cultural aspect. The research is based on the needs that future mining engineers have for conducting successful communication, work in teams and run an effective discourse both verbally and in writing. Verbal communication involves a strategic process by which a speaker defines the language resources for its implementation. By choosing a strategy which should contribute to the goals and objectives of the interaction a speaker makes the process of communication either successful or leading to a communicative failure. The scientific importance of this work is in multidiscipline approach and cross-cultural study of ethnic and cultural influences, gender and other characteristics of the verbal behavior of Russian and American engineering graduates.

  4. Intergenerational Cultural Dissonance, Parent–Child Conflict and Bonding, and Youth Problem Behaviors among Vietnamese and Cambodian Immigrant Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Michael; Harachi, Tracy W.

    2008-01-01

    Intergenerational cultural dissonance (ICD)—a clash between parents and children over cultural values—is a frequent issue for Asian American youth. Using longitudinal data from the Cross Cultural Families Project, this study examines the mechanisms by which ICD contributes to problem behaviors, including whether ICD predicts parent–child conflict, whether parent–child conflict then has a direct effect on youth problem behavior, and whether positive bonding with parents mediates the effects of such conflict on youth problem behaviors among Vietnamese (n = 164) and Cambodian (n = 163) families with adolescents [average age = 15.2 years (SD = 1.05)]. The results from the path analyses show that, in both groups, ICD indirectly predicts problem behaviors by increasing parent–child conflict, which in turn weakens positive parent–child bonding. Interventions that target youths' perception of intergenerational cultural gaps, help them manage conflict, and help strengthen bonds with parents may prevent problem behaviors among Cambodian and Vietnamese families. This study contributes to inform how to effectively prevent problems and difficulties among these families. PMID:18645631

  5. Conflict processing in the rat brain: behavioral analysis and functional µPET imaging using [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine eMarx

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Conflicts in spatial stimulus-response tasks occur when the task-relevant feature of a stimulus implies a response towards a certain location which does not match the location of stimulus presentation. This conflict leads to increased error rates and longer reaction times, which has been termed Simon effect. A model of dual-route processing (automatic and intentional of stimulus features has been proposed, predicting response conflicts if the two routes are incongruent. Although there is evidence that the prefrontal cortex, notably the anterior cingulate cortex, plays a crucial role in conflict processing, the neuronal basis of dual-route architecture is still unknown. In this study, we pursue a novel approach using positron emission tomography (PET to identify relevant brain areas in a rat model of an auditory Simon task, a neuropsychological interference task, which is commonly used to study conflict processing in humans. For combination with PET we used the metabolic tracer [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose, which accumulates in metabolically active brain cells during the behavioral task. Brain areas involved in conflict processing are supposed to be activated when automatic and intentional route processing lead to different responses (dual route model. Analysis of PET data revealed specific activation patterns for different task settings applicable to the dual route model as established for response conflict processing. The rat motor cortex (M1 may be part of the automatic route or involved in its facilitation, while premotor (M2, prelimbic (PLC and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC seemed to be essential for inhibiting the incorrect, automatic response, indicating conflict monitoring functions. Our findings and the remarkable similarities to the pattern of activated regions reported during conflict processing in humans demonstrate that our rodent model opens novel opportunities to investigate the anatomical basis of conflict processing and dual

  6. Conflict Processing in the Rat Brain: Behavioral Analysis and Functional μPET Imaging Using [F]Fluorodeoxyglucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marx, Christine; Lex, Björn; Calaminus, Carsten; Hauber, Wolfgang; Backes, Heiko; Neumaier, Bernd; Mies, Günter; Graf, Rudolf; Endepols, Heike

    2012-01-01

    Conflicts in spatial stimulus-response tasks occur when the task-relevant feature of a stimulus implies a response toward a certain location which does not match the location of stimulus presentation. This conflict leads to increased error rates and longer reaction times, which has been termed Simon effect. A model of dual route processing (automatic and intentional) of stimulus features has been proposed, predicting response conflicts if the two routes are incongruent. Although there is evidence that the prefrontal cortex, notably the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), plays a crucial role in conflict processing, the neuronal basis of dual route architecture is still unknown. In this study, we pursue a novel approach using positron emission tomography (PET) to identify relevant brain areas in a rat model of an auditory Simon task, a neuropsychological interference task, which is commonly used to study conflict processing in humans. For combination with PET we used the metabolic tracer [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose, which accumulates in metabolically active brain cells during the behavioral task. Brain areas involved in conflict processing are supposed to be activated when automatic and intentional route processing lead to different responses (dual route model). Analysis of PET data revealed specific activation patterns for different task settings applicable to the dual route model as established for response conflict processing. The rat motor cortex (M1) may be part of the automatic route or involved in its facilitation, while premotor (M2), prelimbic, and ACC seemed to be essential for inhibiting the incorrect, automatic response, indicating conflict monitoring functions. Our findings and the remarkable similarities to the pattern of activated regions reported during conflict processing in humans demonstrate that our rodent model opens novel opportunities to investigate the anatomical basis of conflict processing and dual route architecture.

  7. Patterns of Theta Activity in Limbic Anxiety Circuit Preceding Exploratory Behavior in Approach-Avoidance Conflict

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacinto, Luis R.; Cerqueira, João J.; Sousa, Nuno

    2016-01-01

    Theta oscillations within the hippocampus-amygdala-medial prefrontal cortex (HPC-AMY-mPFC) circuit have been consistently implicated in the regulation of anxiety behaviors, including risk-assessment. To study if theta activity during risk-assessment was correlated with exploratory behavior in an approach/avoidance paradigm we recorded simultaneous local field potentials from this circuit in rats exploring the elevated-plus maze (EPM). Opposing patterns of power variations in the ventral hippocampus (vHPC), basolateral amygdala (BLA), and prelimbic (PrL) mPFC, but not in the dorsal hippocampus (dHPC), during exploratory risk-assessment of the open arms preceded further exploration of the open arms or retreat back to the safer closed arms. The same patterns of theta power variations in the HPC-BLA-mPFC(PrL) circuit were also displayed by animals submitted to chronic unpredictable stress protocol known to induce an anxious state. Diverging patterns of vHPC-mPFC(PrL) theta coherence were also significantly correlated with forthcoming approach or avoidance behavior in the conflict situation in both controls and stressed animals; interestingly, vHPC-BLA, and BLA-mPFC(PrL) theta coherence correlated with future behavior only in stressed animals, underlying the pivotal role of the amygdala on the stress response. PMID:27713693

  8. Patterns of Theta Activity in Limbic Anxiety Circuit Preceding Exploratory Behavior in Approach-Avoidance Conflict

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis R Jacinto

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Theta oscillations within the hippocampus-amygdala-medial prefrontal cortex (HPC-AMY-mPFC(PrL circuit have been consistently implicated in the regulation of anxiety behaviors, including risk-assessment. To study if theta activity during risk-assessment was correlated with exploratory behavior in an approach/avoidance paradigm we recorded simultaneous local field potentials from this circuit in rats exploring the elevated-plus maze (EPM. Opposing patterns of power variations in the ventral hippocampus (vHPC, basolateral amygdala (BLA and prelimbic (PrL mPFC, but not in the dorsal hippocampus (dHPC, during exploratory risk-assessment of the open arms preceded further exploration of the open arms or retreat back to the safer closed arms. The same patterns of theta power variations in the HPC-BLA-mPFC(PrL circuit were also displayed by animals submitted to chronic unpredictable stress protocol known to induce an anxious state. Diverging patterns of vHPC-mPFC(PrL theta coherence were also significantly correlated with forthcoming approach or avoidance behavior in the conflict situation in both controls and stressed animals; interestingly, vHPC-BLA and BLA-mPFC(PrL theta coherence correlated with future behavior only in stressed animals, underlying the pivotal role of the amygdala on the stress response.

  9. Buton macaques (Macaca ochreata brunnescens): crops, conflict, and behavior on farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priston, Nancy E C; Wyper, Rebecca M; Lee, Phyllis C

    2012-01-01

    One consequence of anthropogenic habitat alteration is that many nonhuman primates are forced into conflict interactions with humans and their livelihood activities, especially through crop raiding. These problems are particularly acute for the endemic and threatened Buton Island macaque (Macaca ochreata brunnescens), in southeast Sulawesi, Indonesia. Our study investigated the crop raiding behavior of this species over time. Foods eaten and the behavioral repertoire exhibited by macaques during crop raiding at and inside farm perimeters were observed over a period of 8 years (2002-2009). Storage organ crops (e.g. sweet potato) were abundant and most frequently raided by macaques. Individual macaques were most commonly observed to raid close (0-10 m) to farm perimeters. Activities such as feeding, resting, moving, and social interaction varied significantly as a function of penetration distance into the farm, but only marginally between age-sex classes. The annual average raid frequency per farm decreased over the latter years of the study period, raising questions about changes in macaque foraging and ranging behavior over time and their response to farm management and mitigation strategies.

  10. Interrelations of maternal expressed emotion, maltreatment, and separation/divorce and links to family conflict and children's externalizing behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Angela; Cicchetti, Dante; Rogosch, Fred A; Toth, Sheree L

    2015-02-01

    Research has documented that maternal expressed emotion-criticism (EE-Crit) from the Five-Minute Speech Sample (FMSS) predicts family conflict and children's externalizing behavior in clinical and community samples. However, studies have not examined EE-Crit in maltreating or separated/divorced families, or whether these family risks exacerbate the links between EE-Crit and family conflict and externalizing behavior. The current study examined the associations between maternal EE-Crit, maltreatment, and separation/divorce, and whether maltreatment and separation/divorce moderated associations between EE-Crit and children's externalizing problems, and EE-Crit and family conflict. Participants included 123 children (M = 8.01 years, SD = 1.58; 64.2 % males) from maltreating (n = 83) or low-income, comparison (n = 40) families, and 123 mothers (n = 48 separated/divorced). Mothers completed the FMSS for EE-Crit and the Family Environment Scale for family conflict. Maltreatment was coded with the Maltreatment Classification System using information from official Child Protection Services (CPS) reports from the Department of Human Services (DHS). Trained summer camp counselors rated children's externalizing behavior. Maltreatment was directly associated with higher externalizing problems, and separation/divorce, but not maltreatment, moderated the association between EE-Crit and externalizing behavior. Analyses pertaining to family conflict were not significant. Findings indicate that maltreatment is a direct risk factor for children's externalizing behavior and separation/divorce is a vulnerability factor for externalizing behavior in family contexts with high maternal EE-Crit. Intervention, prevention, and policy efforts to promote resilience in high-risk families may be effective in targeting maltreating and critical parents, especially those with co-occurring separation/divorce. Key Words: expressed emotion, EE-Crit, Five-Minute Speech Sample; maltreatment, divorce

  11. Dopamine receptors antagonistically regulate behavioral choice between conflicting alternatives in C. elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daoyong Wang

    Full Text Available Caenorhabditis elegans is a useful model to study the neuronal or molecular basis for behavioral choice, a specific form of decision-making. Although it has been implied that both D1-like and D2-like dopamine receptors may contribute to the control of decision-making in mammals, the genetic interactions between D1-like and D2-like dopamine receptors in regulating decision-making are still largely unclear. In the present study, we investigated the molecular control of behavioral choice between conflicting alternatives (diacetyl and Cu2+ by D1-like and D2-like dopamine receptors and their possible genetic interactions with C. elegans as the assay system. In the behavioral choice assay system, mutation of dop-1 gene encoding D1-like dopamine receptor resulted in the enhanced tendency to cross the Cu2+ barrier compared with wild-type. In contrast, mutations of dop-2 or dop-3 gene encoding D2-like dopamine receptor caused the weak tendency to cross the Cu2+ barrier compared with wild-type. During the control of behavioral choice, DOP-3 antagonistically regulated the function of DOP-1. The behavioral choice phenotype of dop-2; dop-1dop-3 triple mutant further confirmed the possible antagonistic function of D2-like dopamine receptor on D1-like dopamine receptor in regulating behavioral choice. The genetic assays further demonstrate that DOP-3 might act through Gαo signaling pathway encoded by GOA-1 and EGL-10, and DOP-1 might act through Gαq signaling pathway encoded by EGL-30 and EAT-16 to regulate the behavioral choice. DOP-1 might function in cholinergic neurons to regulate the behavioral choice, whereas DOP-3 might function in GABAergic neurons, RIC, and SIA neurons to regulate the behavioral choice. In this study, we provide the genetic evidence to indicate the antagonistic relationship between D1-like dopamine receptor and D2-like dopamine receptor in regulating the decision-making of animals. Our data will be useful for understanding the

  12. The Critical Roles of Task Conflict and Job Autonomy in the Relationship Between Proactive Personalities and Innovative Employee Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giebels, Ellen; de Reuver, Renee S M; Rispens, Sonja; Ufkes, Elze G

    2016-09-01

    We examine why and when proactive personality is beneficial for innovative behavior at work. Based on a survey among 166 employees working in 35 departments of a large municipality in the Netherlands we show that an increase in task conflicts explains the positive relation between a proactive personality and innovative employee behavior. This process is moderated by job autonomy in such a way that the relationship between proactive personality and task conflict is particularly strong under low compared with high autonomy. The present research contributes to the discussion on the potential benefits of task conflict for change processes and highlights the importance of examining the interplay between personality and work context for understanding innovation practices.

  13. Driver braking behavior analysis to improve autonomous emergency braking systems in typical Chinese vehicle-bicycle conflicts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Jingliang; Li, Renjie; Hou, Lian; Wang, Wenjun; Li, Guofa; Li, Shengbo Eben; Cheng, Bo; Gao, Hongbo

    2017-08-28

    Bicycling is one of the fundamental modes of transportation especially in developing countries. Because of the lack of effective protection for bicyclists, vehicle-bicycle (V-B) accident has become a primary contributor to traffic fatalities. Although AEB (Autonomous Emergency Braking) systems have been developed to avoid or mitigate collisions, they need to be further adapted in various conflict situations. This paper analyzes the driver's braking behavior in typical V-B conflicts of China to improve the performance of Bicyclist-AEB systems. Naturalistic driving data were collected, from which the top three scenarios of V-B accidents in China were extracted, including SCR (a bicycle crossing the road from right while a car is driving straight), SCL (a bicycle crossing the road from left while a car is driving straight) and SSR (a bicycle swerving in front of the car from right while a car is driving straight). For safety and data reliability, a driving simulator was employed to reconstruct these three scenarios and some 25 licensed drivers were recruited for braking behavior analysis. Results revealed that driver's braking behavior was significantly influenced by V-B conflict types. Pre-decelerating behaviors were found in SCL and SSR conflicts, whereas in SCR the subjects were less vigilant. The brake reaction time and brake severity in lateral V-B conflicts (SCR and SCL) was shorter and higher than that in longitudinal conflicts (SSR). The findings improve their applications in the Bicyclist-AEB and test protocol enactment to enhance the performance of Bicyclist-AEB systems in mixed traffic situations especially for developing countries. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The Critical Roles of Task Conflict and Job Autonomy in the Relationship Between Proactive Personalities and Innovative Employee Behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giebels, Ellen; Reuver, de Renee S.M.; Rispens, Sonja; Ufkes, Elze G.

    2016-01-01

    We examine why and when proactive personality is beneficial for innovative behavior at work. Based on a survey among 166 employees working in 35 departments of a large municipality in the Netherlands we show that an increase in task conflicts explains the positive relation between a proactive person

  15. Aggressive Behaviors in Social Interaction and Developmental Adaptation: A Narrative Analysis of Interpersonal Conflicts during Early Adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Hongling; Swift, Dylan J.; Cairns, Beverley D.; Cairns, Robert B.

    2002-01-01

    Investigated interactional properties and developmental functions of the following four types of aggressive behaviors in adolescents: social aggression, direct relational aggression, physical aggression, and verbal aggression. Found that the majority of conflict interactions involved more than a dyad, and that social aggression was an initiating…

  16. How intragroup dynamics affect behavior in intergroup conflict: the role of group norms, prototypicality, and need to belong

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steinel, W.; van Kleef, G.A.; van Knippenberg, D.; Hogg, M.A.; Homan, A.C.; Moffit, G.

    2010-01-01

    This study explores the role of intragroup dynamics in intergroup conflict. In a computer-mediated negotiation experiment (N = 107), we investigated how a group representative’s standing in the group, group norm, and the representative’s need to belong influence behavior in intergroup negotiations.

  17. Structure of Csd3 from Helicobacter pylori, a cell shape-determining metallopeptidase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Doo Ri [Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyoun Sook [Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University, Seoul 151 742 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jieun; Im, Ha Na; Yoon, Hye Jin; Yoon, Ji Young; Jang, Jun Young [Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Hesek, Dusan; Lee, Mijoon; Mobashery, Shahriar [University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Kim, Soon-Jong [Mokpo National University, Chonnam 534-729 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Byung Il [National Cancer Center, Gyeonggi 410-769 (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Se Won, E-mail: sewonsuh@snu.ac.kr [Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-01

    H. pylori Csd3 (HP0506), together with other peptidoglycan hydrolases, plays an important role in determining cell shape. Its crystal structure in the latent state is reported. Helicobacter pylori is associated with various gastrointestinal diseases such as gastritis, ulcers and gastric cancer. Its colonization of the human gastric mucosa requires high motility, which depends on its helical cell shape. Seven cell shape-determining genes (csd1, csd2, csd3/hdpA, ccmA, csd4, csd5 and csd6) have been identified in H. pylori. Their proteins play key roles in determining the cell shape through modifications of the cell-wall peptidoglycan by the alteration of cross-linking or by the trimming of peptidoglycan muropeptides. Among them, Csd3 (also known as HdpA) is a bifunctional enzyme. Its d, d-endopeptidase activity cleaves the d-Ala{sup 4}-mDAP{sup 3} peptide bond between cross-linked muramyl tetrapeptides and pentapeptides. It is also a d, d-carboxypeptidase that cleaves off the terminal d-Ala{sup 5} from the muramyl pentapeptide. Here, the crystal structure of this protein has been determined, revealing the organization of its three domains in a latent and inactive state. The N-terminal domain 1 and the core of domain 2 share the same fold despite a very low level of sequence identity, and their surface-charge distributions are different. The C-terminal LytM domain contains the catalytic site with a Zn{sup 2+} ion, like the similar domains of other M23 metallopeptidases. Domain 1 occludes the active site of the LytM domain. The core of domain 2 is held against the LytM domain by the C-terminal tail region that protrudes from the LytM domain.

  18. Discrepancies between multi-electrode LFP and CSD phase-patterns: A forward modeling study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rikkert Hindriks

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Multi-electrode recordings of local field potentials (LFP's provide the opportunity to investigate the spatiotemporal organization of neural activity on the scale of several millimeters. In particular, the phases of oscillatory LFP's allow studying the coordination of neural oscillations in time and space and to tie it to cognitive processing. Given the computational roles of LFP phases, it is important to know how they relate to the phases of the underlying current source densities (CSD's that generate them.Although CSD's and LFP's are distinct physical quantities, they are often (implicitly identified when interpreting experimental observations.That this identification is problematic is clear from the fact that LFP phases change when switching to different electrode montages, while the underlying CSD phases remain unchanged. In this study we use a volume-conductor model to characterize discrepancies between LFP and CSD phase-patterns, to identify the contributing factors, and to assessthe effect of different electrode montages. Although we focus on cortical LFP's recorded with two-dimensional (Utah arrays, our findings are also relevant for other electrode configurations. We found that the main factors that determine the discrepancy between CSD and LFP phase-patterns are the frequency of the neural oscillations and the extent to which the laminar CSD profile is balanced. Furthermore, the presence of laminar phase-differences in cortical oscillations, as commonly observed in experiments, precludes identifying LFP phases with those of the oscillations at a given cortical depth. This observation potentially complicates the interpretation of spike-LFP coherence and spike-triggered CSD averages. With respect to reference strategies, we found that the average-reference montage leads to larger discrepancies between LFP and CSD phases as compared with the referential montage, while the Laplacian montage reduces these discrepancies.

  19. Etiological contributions to the covariation between children's perceptions of inter-parental conflict and child behavioral problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolas, Molly; Klump, Kelly L; Burt, S Alexandra

    2013-02-01

    Prior work has suggested that inter-parental conflict likely plays an etiological role in child behavior problems. However, family-level measurement of inter-parental conflict in most traditional child twin studies has made it difficult to tease apart the specific causal mechanisms underlying this association. The Children's Perception of Inter-parental Conflict scale (CPIC) provides a child-specific measurement tool for examining these questions, as its subscales tap multiple dimensions of conflict assessed from the child's (rather than the parent's) perspective. The current study examined (1) the degree of genetic and environmental influence on each of the CPIC subscales, and (2) etiological contributions to the covariation between the CPIC scales and parental reports of child behavioral problems. The CPIC was completed by 1,200 child twins (aged 6-11 years) from the Michigan State University Twin Registry (MSUTR). Parents completed the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) to assess child internalizing and externalizing behavior problems. Multivariate models were examined to evaluate the relative contributions of genetic and environmental factors to both the CPIC scales and to their overlap with child behavioral outcomes. Modeling results indicated no significant moderation of sex or age. Significant environmental overlap emerged between the CPIC conflict properties scale and child internalizing and externalizing problems. By contrast, significant genetic correlations emerged between the CPIC self-blame scale and externalizing problems as well as between the CPIC threat scale and internalizing problems. Overall, findings suggest that the subscales of the CPIC are somewhat etiologically diverse and may provide a useful tool for future investigations of possible gene-environment interplay.

  20. Fundamental frequency during couple conflict: an analysis of physiological, behavioral, and sex-linked information encoded in vocal expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weusthoff, Sarah; Baucom, Brian R; Hahlweg, Kurt

    2013-04-01

    The human voice is one of the sounds most frequently experienced by human beings. During couple conflict, higher fundamental frequency (f0), a physical property of human speech, has been linked to an increased risk of divorce, less beneficial response to couple therapy, and higher levels of dysfunctional communication behavior. F0 is generally considered to be a measure of emotional arousal, but it is not currently clear whether this interpretation is appropriate for understanding spouses' f0 during couple interaction. The goal of the current article is to clarify what forms of information are encoded in f0 during couple conflict by examining the relations between f0 range, physiological variables, and communication behavior during the conflict discussions of 67 German couples. In line with evolutionary models of speech production, associations emerged in the expected directions between f0 and: (a) physiological variables (e.g., heart rate, blood pressure, and cortisol); (b) self-reported communication behavior; and (c) observationally coded communication behavior. Additionally, simultaneous examination of physiological variables and observationally coded communication behaviors revealed that associations between both sets of variables and f0 range were largely independent of one another. Furthermore, women's range of f0 was significantly greater than men's range of f0. With regard to social signaling theories, f0 range can be understood as a nonverbal transmission of distress. Implications for future research on and use of f0 are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. Mechanical Conflict System: A Novel Operant Method for the Assessment of Nociceptive Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harte, Steven E; Meyers, Jessica B; Donahue, Renee R; Taylor, Bradley K; Morrow, Thomas J

    2016-01-01

    A new operant test for preclinical pain research, termed the Mechanical Conflict System (MCS), is presented. Rats were given a choice either to remain in a brightly lit compartment or to escape to a dark compartment by crossing an array of height-adjustable nociceptive probes. Latency to escape the light compartment was evaluated with varying probe heights (0, .5, 1, 2, 3, and 4 mm above compartment floor) in rats with neuropathic pain induced by constriction nerve injury (CCI) and in naive control rats. Escape responses in CCI rats were assessed following intraperitoneal administration of pregabalin (10 and 30 mg/kg), morphine (2.5 and 5 mg/kg), and the tachykinin NK1 receptor antagonist, RP 67580 (1 and 10 mg/kg). Results indicate that escape latency increased as a function of probe height in both naive and CCI rats. Pregabalin (10 and 30 mg/kg) and morphine (5 mg/kg), but not RP 67580, decreased latency to escape in CCI rats suggesting an antinociceptive effect. In contrast, morphine (10 mg/kg) but not pregabalin (30 mg/kg) increased escape latency in naive rats suggesting a possible anxiolytic action of morphine in response to light-induced fear. No order effects following multiple test sessions were observed. We conclude that the MCS is a valid method to assess behavioral signs of affective pain in rodents.

  2. After the war: An experimental study of post-conflict behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Lacomba; F.M. Lagos; E. Reuben; F. van Winden

    2008-01-01

    Most models of conflict concentrate on how players allocate resources between productive and fighting efforts. After a conflict, the winner is assumed to take control of all the resources of the loser. In this paper we show experimentally that this simplification misses an important component of a c

  3. Why Most Dieters Fail but Some Succeed: A Goal Conflict Model of Eating Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroebe, Wolfgang; van Koningsbruggen, Guido M.; Papies, Esther K.; Aarts, Henk

    2013-01-01

    Theories of eating regulation often attribute overweight to a malfunction of homeostatic regulation of body weight. With the goal conflict model of eating, we present a new perspective that attributes the difficulty of chronic dieters (i.e., restrained eaters) in regulating their food intake to a conflict between 2 incompatible goals--namely,…

  4. Intentions for cooperative conflict resolution in groups : An application of the theory of planned behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dodoiu, Gabriela

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was twofold: first, to test to what extent a cooperative conflict management style can be related to attitudes, norms and perceived volitional control. Second, because conflict resolution is an activity that unfolds at the team level, the validity of the theoretical

  5. The Interactive Effect of Diabetes Family Conflict and Depression on Insulin Bolusing Behaviors for Youth

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Maliszewski, Genevieve; Patton, Susana R; Midyett, L. Kurt; Clements, Mark A

    2016-01-01

    ... relationship with his or her parents, causing family conflict and declines in diabetes outcomes.5 In fact, numerous studies have shown that increased levels of diabetes family conflict are associated with higher glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels,6,7 less frequent blood glucose monitoring,8 and poorer overall glycemic control.9 Youth diagnosed with ...

  6. Toll-Like Receptor 4 Deficiency Causes Reduced Exploratory Behavior in Mice Under Approach-Avoidance Conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunlu; Yan, Yixiu; Cheng, Jingjing; Xiao, Gang; Gu, Jueqing; Zhang, Luqi; Yuan, Siyu; Wang, Junlu; Shen, Yi; Zhou, Yu-Dong

    2016-04-01

    Abnormal approach-avoidance behavior has been linked to deficits in the mesolimbic dopamine (DA) system of the brain. Recently, increasing evidence has indicated that toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), an important pattern-recognition receptor in the innate immune system, can be directly activated by substances of abuse, resulting in an increase of the extracellular DA level in the nucleus accumbens. We thus hypothesized that TLR4-dependent signaling might regulate approach-avoidance behavior. To test this hypothesis, we compared the novelty-seeking and social interaction behaviors of TLR4-deficient (TLR4(-/-)) and wild-type (WT) mice in an approach-avoidance conflict situation in which the positive motivation to explore a novel object or interact with an unfamiliar mouse was counteracted by the negative motivation to hide in exposed, large spaces. We found that TLR4(-/-) mice exhibited reduced novelty-seeking and social interaction in the large open spaces. In less stressful test apparatuses similar in size to the mouse cage, however, TLR4(-/-) mice performed normally in both novelty-seeking and social interaction tests. The reduced exploratory behaviors under approach-avoidance conflict were not due to a high anxiety level or an enhanced fear response in the TLR4(-/-) mice, as these mice showed normal anxiety and fear responses in the open field and passive avoidance tests, respectively. Importantly, the novelty-seeking behavior in the large open field induced a higher level of c-Fos activation in the nucleus accumbens shell (NAcSh) in TLR4(-/-) mice than in WT mice. Partially inactivating the NAcSh via infusion of GABA receptor agonists restored the novelty-seeking behavior of TLR4(-/-) mice. These data suggested that TLR4 is crucial for positive motivational behavior under approach-avoidance conflict. TLR4-dependent activation of neurons in the NAcSh may contribute to this phenomenon.

  7. Correlation between signs of temporomandibular (TMD) and cervical spine (CSD) disorders in asthmatic children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Thaís Cristina; Grossi, Débora Bevilaqua; de Oliveira, Anamaria Siriani; Bertolli, Fabiana; Holtz, Amanda; Costa, Dirceu

    2005-01-01

    Neck accessory respiratory muscles and mouth breathing suggest a direct relationship among asthma, Temporomandibular (TMD) and Cervical Spine (CSD) Disorders. This study was performed to evaluate and correlate TMD, CSD in asthmatic and non-asthmatic. Thirty asthmatic children (7.1 +/- 2.6 years old), 30 non-asthmatic predominantly mouth breathing children (Mouth Breathing Group - MBG) (8.80 +/- 1.61 years) and 30 non-asthmatic predominantly nasal breathing children (Nasal breathing Group - NBG) (9.00 +/- 1.64 years) participated in this study and they were submitted to clinical index to evaluate stomatognathic and cervical systems. Spearman correlation test and Chi-square were used. The level of significance was set at p temporomandibular joint (TMJ), TMJ sounds, pain during cervical extension and rotation, palpatory tenderness of sternocleidomastoids and paravertabrae muscles and a severe reduction in cervical range of motion were observed in AG. Both AG and MBG groups demonstrated palpatory tenderness of posterior TMJ, medial and lateral pterygoid, and trapezius muscles when compared to NBG. Results showed a positive correlation between the severity of TMD and CSD signs in asthmatic children (r = 0.48). No child was considered normal to CSD and cervical mobility. The possible shortening of neck accessory muscles of respiration and mouth breathing could explain the relationship observed between TMD, CSD signs in asthmatic children and emphasize the importance of the assessment of temporomandibular and cervical spine regions in asthmatic children.

  8. When Do Personality and Emotion Predict Destructive Behavior During Relationship Conflict? The Role of Perceived Commitment Asymmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemay, Edward P; Dobush, Sarah

    2015-10-01

    The current research examined whether perceived asymmetries in relationship commitment moderate the associations of personality traits and emotional states with enactment of hostile behavior during relationship conflicts. Participants included both members of 53 heterosexual romantic couples (Mage  = 25.5 years). Participants completed questionnaire measures assessing personality traits, emotional states, relationship commitment, and perceptions of their partner's commitment. Participants then had an observed conflict discussion with their partner, which was rated by a panel of objective observers for hostile behavior. When participants perceived that they were less committed than their partners, their enactment of hostile behavior was predicted by traits and states that are associated with antisocial and pro-social orientations (i.e., agreeableness, trait anger, chronic jealousy, and state negative emotion). In contrast, participants who perceived that they were more committed than their partners tended to refrain from hostile behavior, despite traits or states that may suggest hostile inclinations. These results suggest that perceiving that one is less committed than one's partner promotes behavioral expression of interpersonal dispositions and emotions, whereas perceiving that one is more committed than one's partner motivates inhibition of hostile behavior. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Associations between sexual abuse and family conflict/violence, self-injurious behavior, and substance use: the mediating role of depressed mood and anger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgeirsdottir, Bryndis Bjork; Sigfusdottir, Inga Dora; Gudjonsson, Gisli H; Sigurdsson, Jon Fridrik

    2011-03-01

    To examine whether depressed mood and anger mediate the effects of sexual abuse and family conflict/violence on self-injurious behavior and substance use. A cross-sectional national survey was conducted including 9,085 16-19 year old students attending all high schools in Iceland in 2004. Participants reported frequency of sexual abuse, family conflict/violence, self-injurious behavior, substance use, depressed mood, and anger. Sexual abuse and family conflict/violence had direct effects on self-injurious behavior and substance use among both genders, when controlling for age, family structure, parental education, anger, and depressed mood. More importantly, the indirect effects of sexual abuse and family conflict/violence on self-injurious behavior among both males and females were twice as strong through depressed mood as through anger, while the indirect effects of sexual abuse and family conflict/violence on substance use were only significant through anger. These results indicate that in cases of sexual abuse and family conflict/violence, substance use is similar to externalizing behavior, where anger seems to be a key mediating variable, opposed to internalizing behavior such as self-injurious behavior, where depressed mood is a more critical mediator. Practical implications highlight the importance of focusing on a range of emotions, including depressed mood and anger, when working with stressed adolescents in prevention and treatment programs for self-injurious behavior and substance use. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Conflict behavior in the squirrel monkey: effects of chlordiazepoxide, diazepam and N-desmethyldiazepam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepinwall, J; Grodsky, F S; Cook, L

    1978-01-01

    Dose-response profiles were determined for chlordiazepoxide, diazepam and N-desmethyldiazepam in a squirrel monkey punishment (conflict) procedure. The monkeys were trained to lever press under a food-maintained concurrent schedule consisting of an unpunished 6-minute variable interval (VI) schedule, and a 1.5-minute VI schedule, on which responses were punished intermittently (24 response variable ratio) with electric footshocks. The three benzodiazepines effectively increased responding that had been suppressed by punishment; they had inverted U-shaped dose-effect curves. The minimum effective doses for increasing punished responding were: diazepam less than or equal to 0.31 mg/kg p.o.; N-desmethyldiazepam = chlordiazepoxide = 0.62 mg/kg. As a model to assess potential antianxiety activity, this procedure possessed excellent sensitivity and reliability. The following observations were also made. 1) During initial training, as shock intensity was increased and punished responding became suppressed, some monkeys exhibited an increase in unpunished response rates. This may have represented "positive behavioral contrast," but response rate changes were associated with changes in the amount of time the monkeys allocated to each schedule. 2) At certain dose levels, all three compounds exerted antipunishment effects 24 hours after administration. 3) As was reported previously for rats, when the monkeys had no previous drug experience ("drug-naive") they were more sensitive to the depressant effects of the benzodiazepines. With repeated administration, there was a reduction in this sedation and a concomitant increase in the antipunishment effect. This phenomenon was dose- and animal-dependent.

  11. Discrepancies between Multi-Electrode LFP and CSD Phase-Patterns: A Forward Modeling Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindriks, Rikkert; Arsiwalla, Xerxes D; Panagiotaropoulos, Theofanis; Besserve, Michel; Verschure, Paul F M J; Logothetis, Nikos K; Deco, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    Multi-electrode recordings of local field potentials (LFPs) provide the opportunity to investigate the spatiotemporal organization of neural activity on the scale of several millimeters. In particular, the phases of oscillatory LFPs allow studying the coordination of neural oscillations in time and space and to tie it to cognitive processing. Given the computational roles of LFP phases, it is important to know how they relate to the phases of the underlying current source densities (CSDs) that generate them. Although CSDs and LFPs are distinct physical quantities, they are often (implicitly) identified when interpreting experimental observations. That this identification is problematic is clear from the fact that LFP phases change when switching to different electrode montages, while the underlying CSD phases remain unchanged. In this study we use a volume-conductor model to characterize discrepancies between LFP and CSD phase-patterns, to identify the contributing factors, and to assess the effect of different electrode montages. Although we focus on cortical LFPs recorded with two-dimensional (Utah) arrays, our findings are also relevant for other electrode configurations. We found that the main factors that determine the discrepancy between CSD and LFP phase-patterns are the frequency of the neural oscillations and the extent to which the laminar CSD profile is balanced. Furthermore, the presence of laminar phase-differences in cortical oscillations, as commonly observed in experiments, precludes identifying LFP phases with those of the CSD oscillations at a given cortical depth. This observation potentially complicates the interpretation of spike-LFP coherence and spike-triggered LFP averages. With respect to reference strategies, we found that the average-reference montage leads to larger discrepancies between LFP and CSD phases as compared with the referential montage, while the Laplacian montage reduces these discrepancies. We therefore advice to conduct

  12. Interrelations of Maternal Expressed Emotion, Maltreatment, and Separation/Divorce and Links to Family Conflict and Children’s Externalizing Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Narayan, Angela; Cicchetti, Dante; Rogosch, Fred A.; Toth, Sheree L.

    2015-01-01

    Research has documented that maternal expressed emotion-criticism (EE-Crit) from the Five-Minute Speech Sample (FMSS) predicts family conflict and children’s externalizing behavior in clinical and community samples. However, studies have not examined EE-Crit in maltreating or separated/divorced families, or whether these family risks exacerbate the links between EE-Crit and family conflict and externalizing behavior. The current study examined the associations between maternal EE-Crit, maltre...

  13. The Effects of Being an Only Child, Family Cohesion, and Family Conflict on Behavioral Problems among Adolescents with Physically Ill Parents

    OpenAIRE

    Guo-Yuan Sui; Jia-Na Wang; Guang-Cong Liu; Lie Wang

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study aimed to examine the parental physical illness’ effect on behavioral problems among adolescents, and the effects of being an only child, family cohesion, and family conflict on behavioral problems among adolescents with physically ill parents in Liaoning province, China. Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed in 2009. A questionnaire including two dimensions of the Family Environment Scale (family cohesion and family conflict), self-reported Strength and Diff...

  14. Systematic procedure for generating operational policies to achieve target crystal size distribution (CSD) in batch cooling crystallization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdul Samad, Noor Asma Fazli; Singh, Ravendra; Sin, Gürkan

    2011-01-01

    A systematic procedure to achieve a target crystal size distribution (CSD) under generated operational policies in batch cooling crystallization is presented. An analytical CSD estimator has been employed in the systematic procedure to generate the necessary operational policies to achieve the ta...

  15. Marital Conflict and Children's Externalizing Behavior: Interactions between Parasympathetic and Sympathetic Nervous System Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sheikh, Mona; Kouros, Chrystyna D.; Erath, Stephen; Cummings, E. Mark; Keller, Peggy; Staton, Lori

    2009-01-01

    Toward greater specificity in the prediction of externalizing problems in the context of interparental conflict, interactions between children's parasympathetic and sympathetic nervous system (PNS and SNS) activity were examined as moderators. PNS activity was indexed by respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) and RSA reactivity (RSA-R) to lab…

  16. Marital Conflict and Children's Externalizing Behavior: Interactions between Parasympathetic and Sympathetic Nervous System Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sheikh, Mona; Kouros, Chrystyna D.; Erath, Stephen; Cummings, E. Mark; Keller, Peggy; Staton, Lori

    2009-01-01

    Toward greater specificity in the prediction of externalizing problems in the context of interparental conflict, interactions between children's parasympathetic and sympathetic nervous system (PNS and SNS) activity were examined as moderators. PNS activity was indexed by respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) and RSA reactivity (RSA-R) to lab…

  17. Mother-Adolescent Conflict as a Mediator between Adolescent Problem Behaviors and Maternal Psychological Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steeger, Christine M.; Gondoli, Dawn M.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined mother-adolescent conflict as a mediator of longitudinal reciprocal relations between adolescent aggression and depressive symptoms and maternal psychological control. Motivated by family systems theory and the transactions that occur between individual and dyadic levels of the family system, we examined the connections among…

  18. Can Children with SLI Detect Cognitive Conflict? Behavioral and Electrophysiological Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Baila; Shafer, Valerie L.; Melara, Robert D.; Schwartz, Richard G.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined whether children with specific language impairment (SLI) are deficient in detecting cognitive conflict between competing response tendencies in a GO/No-GO task. Method: Twelve children with SLI (ages 10--12), 22 children with typical language development matched group-wise on age (TLD-A), and 16 younger children with…

  19. Interparental conflict, parent psychopathology, hostile parenting, and child antisocial behavior: examining the role of maternal versus paternal influences using a novel genetically sensitive research design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harold, Gordon T; Elam, Kit K; Lewis, Gemma; Rice, Frances; Thapar, Anita

    2012-11-01

    Past research has linked interparental conflict, parent psychopathology, hostile parenting, and externalizing behavior problems in childhood. However, few studies have examined these relationships while simultaneously allowing the contribution of common genetic factors underlying associations between family- and parent-level variables on child psychopathology to be controlled. Using the attributes of a genetically sensitive in vitro fertilization research design, the present study examined associations among interparental conflict, parents' antisocial behavior problems, parents' anxiety symptoms, and hostile parenting on children's antisocial behavior problems among genetically related and genetically unrelated mother-child and father-child groupings. Path analyses revealed that for genetically related mothers, interparental conflict and maternal antisocial behavior indirectly influenced child antisocial behavior through mother-to-child hostility. For genetically unrelated mothers, effects were apparent only for maternal antisocial behavior on child antisocial behavior through mother-to-child hostility. For both genetically related and genetically unrelated fathers and children, interparental conflict and paternal antisocial behavior influenced child antisocial behavior through father-to-child hostility. Effects of parental anxiety symptoms on child antisocial behavior were apparent only for genetically related mothers and children. Results are discussed with respect to the relative role of passive genotype-environment correlation as a possible confounding factor underlying family process influences on childhood psychopathology.

  20. Unconsciously triggered conflict adaptation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon van Gaal

    Full Text Available In conflict tasks such as the Stroop, the Eriksen flanker or the Simon task, it is generally observed that the detection of conflict in the current trial reduces the impact of conflicting information in the subsequent trial; a phenomenon termed conflict adaptation. This higher-order cognitive control function has been assumed to be restricted to cases where conflict is experienced consciously. In the present experiment we manipulated the awareness of conflict-inducing stimuli in a metacontrast masking paradigm to directly test this assumption. Conflicting response tendencies were elicited either consciously (through primes that were weakly masked or unconsciously (strongly masked primes. We demonstrate trial-by-trial conflict adaptation effects after conscious as well as unconscious conflict, which could not be explained by direct stimulus/response repetitions. These findings show that unconscious information can have a longer-lasting influence on our behavior than previously thought and further stretch the functional boundaries of unconscious cognition.

  1. Behavioral consequences of conflict-oriented health news coverage: the 2009 mammography guideline controversy and online information seeking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, Brian E; Friedenberg, Laura M; Southwell, Brian G; Slater, Jonathan S

    2012-01-01

    Building on channel complementarity theory and media-system dependency theory, this study explores the impact of conflict-oriented news coverage of health issues on information seeking online. Using Google search data as a measure of behavior, we demonstrate that controversial news coverage of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force's November 2009 recommendations for changes in breast cancer screening guidelines strongly predicted the volume of same-day online searches for information about mammograms. We also found that this relationship did not exist 1 year prior to the coverage, during which mammography news coverage did not focus on the guideline controversy, suggesting that the controversy frame may have driven search behavior. We discuss the implications of these results for health communication scholars and practitioners.

  2. csd alleles in the red dwarf honey bee (Apis florea,Hymenoptera: Apidae) show exceptionally high nucleotide diversity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Yong Liu; Zi-Long Wang; Xiao-Bo Wu; Wei-Yu Yan; Zhi-Jiang Zeng

    2011-01-01

    The single locus complementary sex determination (sl-csd) gene is the primary gene determining the gender of honey bees (Apis spp.).While the csd gene has been well studied in the Western honey bee (Apis mellifera),and comparable data exist in both the Eastern honey bee (Apis cerana) and the giant honey bee (Apis dorsata),no studies have been conducted in the red dwarf honey bee,Apisflorea.In this study we cloned the genomic region 3 of the A.florea csd gene from 60 workers,and identified 12 csd alleles.Analysis showed that similar to A.mellifera,region 3 of the csd gene contains a RS domain at the N terminal,a proline-rich domain at the C terminal,and a hypervariable region in the middle.However,the A.florea csd gene possessed a much higher level of nucleotide diversity,compared to A.mellifera,A.cerana and Apis dorsata.We also show that similar to the other three Apis species,in A.florea,nonsynonymous mutations in the csd gene are selectively favored in young alleles.

  3. A coupling VWM/CFD/CSD method for rotor airload prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongjie Shi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available A coupling fluid-structure method with a combination of viscous wake model (VWM, computational fluid dynamics (CFD and comprehensive structural dynamics (CSD modules is developed in this paper for rotor unsteady airload prediction. The hybrid VWM/CFD solver is employed to model the nonlinear aerodynamic phenomena and complicated rotor wake dynamics; the moderate deflection beam theory is implemented to predict the blade structural deformation; the loose coupling strategy based on the ‘delt method’ is used to couple the fluid and structure solvers. Several cases of Helishape 7A rotor are performed first to investigate the effect of elastic deformation on airloads. Then, two challenging forward flight conditions of UH-60A helicopter rotor are investigated, and the simulated results of wake geometry, chordwise pressure distribution and sectional normal force show excellent agreement with available test data; a comparison with traditional CFD/CSD method is also presented to illustrate the efficiency of the developed method.

  4. Progress of long coated conductors fabrication with fluorine-free CSD method at SWJTU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Y., E-mail: yzhao@swjtu.edu.cn [Key Lab of Advanced Materials Technologies, Key Lab of Magnetic Levitation Technologies and Maglev Trains (Ministry of Education), Superconductivity and New Energy Center (SNEC), Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney 2052, NSW (Australia); Wang, W.T.; Lei, M.; Pu, M.H.; Zhang, Y. [Key Lab of Advanced Materials Technologies, Key Lab of Magnetic Levitation Technologies and Maglev Trains (Ministry of Education), Superconductivity and New Energy Center (SNEC), Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); Cheng, C.H. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney 2052, NSW (Australia)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • Recent progress on the long coated conductors fabrication by F-free CSD method is presented. • Single buffer and partial-melting technology and slot-die coating methods have been developed. • Reel-to-reel facilities for continuous process have been achieved. -- Abstract: Recent progress on the fabrication of long high-T{sub c} superconducting coated conductors with a fluorine-free chemical solution deposition (CSD) method is presented. Developments including such novel methods as single buffer technology, partial-melting process on YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} (YBCO), slot-die coating and drying; reel-to-reel facilities for continuous process have been achieved in the effort on high-T{sub c} superconducting coated conductors at SWJTU, which form a comprehensive technology to fabricate long coated tapes with high performances.

  5. HART-II Acoustic Predictions using a Coupled CFD/CSD Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, D. Douglas, Jr.

    2009-01-01

    This paper documents results to date from the Rotorcraft Acoustic Characterization and Mitigation activity under the NASA Subsonic Rotary Wing Project. The primary goal of this activity is to develop a NASA rotorcraft impulsive noise prediction capability which uses first principles fluid dynamics and structural dynamics. During this effort, elastic blade motion and co-processing capabilities have been included in a recent version of the computational fluid dynamics code (CFD). The CFD code is loosely coupled to computational structural dynamics (CSD) code using new interface codes. The CFD/CSD coupled solution is then used to compute impulsive noise on a plane under the rotor using the Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings solver. This code system is then applied to a range of cases from the Higher Harmonic Aeroacoustic Rotor Test II (HART-II) experiment. For all cases presented, the full experimental configuration (i.e., rotor and wind tunnel sting mount) are used in the coupled CFD/CSD solutions. Results show good correlation between measured and predicted loading and loading time derivative at the only measured radial station. A contributing factor for a typically seen loading mean-value offset between measured data and predictions data is examined. Impulsive noise predictions on the measured microphone plane under the rotor compare favorably with measured mid-frequency noise for all cases. Flow visualization of the BL and MN cases shows that vortex structures generated in the prediction method are consist with measurements. Future application of the prediction method is discussed.

  6. Choice, Communication, and Conflict. A System's Approach to the Study of Human Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackoff, Russell L.

    This book presents a teleological analysis of the concepts of human behavior. Through distinctions and definitions, a model or system is developed, upon which all aspects of behavior are interrelated. The model of choice or purposeful state is discussed with its underlying concepts. Human communication and feeling, and cooperation and conflict…

  7. Motivation and Organizational Behavior. Staff between Value Added and ConflictGenerating Losses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mircea A. Udrescu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In an organization work together two categories of motivations, the organization's management and the employees' one, the workers' one. It is often stated that the competitive added value has the particular way in which the employees are motivated and also their skills within the organization. The authors believe that the added value in a competitive market is the result of the synergy of the two types of motivations, the entrepreneurial and managerial ones and employee's own motivation. In situations where a synergy between the interests of workers and the organization's ones, the global interests of the company's is characterized by continuous growth of value added, while lack of motivation generates unequivocally conflicting states that diminishes the aspects of the outcome activities quality.

  8. An Assessment of CFD/CSD Prediction State-of-the-Art by Using the HART II International Workshop Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Marilyn J.; Lim, Joon W.; vanderWall, Berend G.; Baeder, James D.; Biedron, Robert T.; Boyd, D. Douglas, Jr.; Jayaraman, Buvana; Jung, Sung N.; Min, Byung-Young

    2012-01-01

    Over the past decade, there have been significant advancements in the accuracy of rotor aeroelastic simulations with the application of computational fluid dynamics methods coupled with computational structural dynamics codes (CFD/CSD). The HART II International Workshop database, which includes descent operating conditions with strong blade-vortex interactions (BVI), provides a unique opportunity to assess the ability of CFD/CSD to capture these physics. In addition to a baseline case with BVI, two additional cases with 3/rev higher harmonic blade root pitch control (HHC) are available for comparison. The collaboration during the workshop permits assessment of structured, unstructured, and hybrid overset CFD/CSD methods from across the globe on the dynamics, aerodynamics, and wake structure. Evaluation of the plethora of CFD/CSD methods indicate that the most important numerical variables associated with most accurately capturing BVI are a two-equation or detached eddy simulation (DES)-based turbulence model and a sufficiently small time step. An appropriate trade-off between grid fidelity and spatial accuracy schemes also appears to be pertinent for capturing BVI on the advancing rotor disk. Overall, the CFD/CSD methods generally fall within the same accuracy; cost-effective hybrid Navier-Stokes/Lagrangian wake methods provide accuracies within 50% the full CFD/CSD methods for most parameters of interest, except for those highly influenced by torsion. The importance of modeling the fuselage is observed, and other computational requirements are discussed.

  9. Interrelations of Maternal Expressed Emotion, Maltreatment, and Separation/Divorce and Links to Family Conflict and Children’s Externalizing Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Angela; Cicchetti, Dante; Rogosch, Fred A.; Toth, Sheree L.

    2014-01-01

    Research has documented that maternal expressed emotion-criticism (EE-Crit) from the Five-Minute Speech Sample (FMSS) predicts family conflict and children’s externalizing behavior in clinical and community samples. However, studies have not examined EE-Crit in maltreating or separated/divorced families, or whether these family risks exacerbate the links between EE-Crit and family conflict and externalizing behavior. The current study examined the associations between maternal EE-Crit, maltreatment, and separation/divorce, and whether maltreatment and separation/divorce moderated associations between EE-Crit and children’s externalizing problems, and EE-Crit and family conflict. Participants included 123 children (M = 8.01 years, SD = 1.58; 64.2% males) from maltreating (n = 83) or low-income, comparison (n = 40) families, and 123 mothers (n = 48 separated/divorced). Mothers completed the FMSS for EE-Crit and the Family Environment Scale for family conflict. Maltreatment was coded with the Maltreatment Classification System using information from official Child Protection Services (CPS) reports from the Department of Human Services (DHS). Trained summer camp counselors rated children’s externalizing behavior. Maltreatment was directly associated with higher externalizing problems, and separation/divorce, but not maltreatment, moderated the association between EE-Crit and externalizing behavior. Analyses pertaining to family conflict were not significant. Findings indicate that maltreatment is a direct risk factor for children’s externalizing behavior and separation/divorce is a vulnerability factor for externalizing behavior in family contexts with high maternal EE-Crit. Intervention, prevention, and policy efforts to promote resilience in high-risk families may be effective in targeting maltreating and critical parents, especially those with co-occurring separation/divorce. PMID:25037461

  10. The Influence of Crystal Size Distributions (CSD) on the Rheology of Magma: New Insights from Analogue Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, J.; Mueller, S.; Castro, J. M.

    2016-12-01

    Knowing the flow properties, or rheology, of magma is of great importance for volcanological research. It is vital for understanding eruptive and depositional features, modelling magma flow rates and distances, interpreting pre-eruptive volcanic unrest and earthquakes, and ultimately predicting volcanic hazards related to magma motion. Despite its key role in governing volcanic processes, magma rheology is extremely difficult to constrain in time and space within a natural volcanic system, because it is dependent upon so many variables. Therefore, both analogue and experimental studies of permissible yet simplified scenarios are needed to isolate different rheological influences. Despite significant progress in understanding the rheological properties of silicate melts and two-phase mixtures (e.g. melt + crystals), as well as the impact of the volume fraction (e.g. Pinkerton & Stevenson, 1992; Caricchi et al., 2007; Mueller et al., 2010) and shape (Mueller et al., 2011) of crystals on magma rheology, the effect of the crystal size distribution (CSD) is still poorly constrained. A highly disperse CSD (i.e., a great variety of different crystal sizes) leads to a much more efficient packing of crystals in a flowing magma which predominantly controls the rheological behavior of magma in a sheared particle Accounting for, or neglecting, the size distribution of crystals can therefore make a considerable difference in magma flow models. We present the results of systematic rheometric experiments using multimodal analogue particle suspensions of well-defined size fractions of micrometer-sized glass beads in silicone oil as magma-analogue material. Starting with simple bimodal distributions (i.e. particles of two distinct sizes), the complexity of the samples' particle size distribution has been successively increased and evaluated towards tetramodal distributions (four distinct size fractions). Statistical values of the given suspensions have been calculated and

  11. The Relationships between Organizational Justice, Confidence, Commitment, and Evaluating the Manager and the Perceptions of Conflict Management at the Context of Organizational Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozgan, Habib

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the perceptions related to strategies of conflict management, organizational confidence, organizational justice, organizational commitment and evaluating the manager which are effective on the organizational behavior of teachers are studied. The research is a discretional study in the model of survey. The high-schools in the center…

  12. Associations between Sexual Abuse and Family Conflict/Violence, Self-Injurious Behavior, and Substance Use: The Mediating Role of Depressed Mood and Anger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgeirsdottir, Bryndis Bjork; Sigfusdottir, Inga Dora; Gudjonsson, Gisli H.; Sigurdsson, Jon Fridrik

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To examine whether depressed mood and anger mediate the effects of sexual abuse and family conflict/violence on self-injurious behavior and substance use. Methods: A cross-sectional national survey was conducted including 9,085 16-19 year old students attending all high schools in Iceland in 2004. Participants reported frequency of…

  13. Managing Conflict during Divorce

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... managed conflict between parents increases children’s risk of behavior problems, depression, substance abuse and dependence, poor social ... doctor, a change in the parenting plan, or involvement of a new stepparent. This ... AAMFT Consumer Update "Managing Conflict During Divorce" pamphlets to market ...

  14. Environment-friendly type energy and coordinated community development project. Feasibility study for industrialization of the high efficiency waste-fired power generation system using CSD; Kankyo chowagata energy community keisei sokushin. Kokoritsu haikibutsu hatsuden (CSD riyo) jigyoka FS chosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    For the current treatment of disused cars, valuable materials are recovered after scrapping them, and residual car shredder dust (CSD) is reclaimed. The load of land reclamation can be reduced by decreasing its volume and weight through incineration of combustibles in the CSD. Thermal energy obtained during the incineration can be converted into electric power. CSD-fired power generation plant has been planned, by which the obtained power is sold to electric power companies. It was assumed that the power generation plant is constructed at a certain city of Ibaraki Prefecture. Two cases of plant scales, i.e., 200 t/d and 400 t/d, were investigated by considering the collecting quantity of CSD fuel and the area of sites. The CSD fuel with 4,500 kcal/kg of lower calorific value contains rather high contents of chlorine and sulfur, which are around 3% and 1.6%, respectively. Therefore, the system should have measures, such as the exhaust gas treatment, dioxin treatment, and prevention of corrosion for high efficiency. It was concluded that about 300 t/d scale plant provides a feasibility. 27 refs., 21 tabs.

  15. Motorcycles entering from access points and merging with traffic on primary roads in Malaysia: behavioral and road environment influence on the occurrence of traffic conflicts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Manan, Muhammad Marizwan

    2014-09-01

    This paper uses data from an observational study, conducted at access points in straight sections of primary roads in Malaysia in 2012, to investigate the effects of motorcyclists' behavior and road environment attributes on the occurrence of serious traffic conflicts involving motorcyclists entering primary roads via access points. In order to handle the unobserved heterogeneity in the small sample data size, this study applies mixed effects logistic regression with multilevel bootstrapping. Two statistically significant models (Model 2 and Model 3) are produced, with 2 levels of random effect parameters, i.e. motorcyclists' attributes and behavior at Level 1, and road environment attributes at Level 2. Among all the road environment attributes tested, the traffic volume and the speed limit are found to be statistically significant, only contributing to 26-29% of the variations affecting the traffic conflict outcome. The implication is that 71-74% of the unmeasured or undescribed attributes and behavior of motorcyclists still have an importance in predicting the outcome: a serious traffic conflict. As for the fixed effect parameters, both models show that the risk of motorcyclists being involved in a serious traffic conflict is 2-4 times more likely if they accept a shorter gap to a single approaching vehicle (time lag road from the access point. A road environment factor, such as a narrow lane (seen in Model 2), and a behavioral factor, such as stopping at the stop line (seen in Model 3), also influence the occurrence of a serious traffic conflict compared to those entering into a wider lane road and without stopping at the stop line, respectively. A discussion of the possible reasons for this seemingly strange result, including a recommendation for further research, concludes the paper.

  16. Conflict Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, William; Koue, Glen

    1991-01-01

    Discusses general issues involved in conflict management and provides more specific examples of conflict management in libraries. Causes of conflict are considered, including organizational structure, departmentalization, performance appraisal, poor communication, and technological change; and methods of dealing with conflict are described,…

  17. Comparison of sunshine duration measurements from Campbell-Stokes sunshine recorder and CSD1 sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Grzegorz; Zając, Ireneusz

    2017-07-01

    Paper presents comparative analysis of sunshine duration measurement results obtained using Campbell-Stokes sunshine recorder (CS) and electronic sensor (CSD1). The comparison is based on data from 2009 to 2010 collected at seven weather stations (Leszno, Wrocław-Strachowice, Legnica, Opole, Zielona Góra, Jelenia Góra, Kłodzko) operated by the Institute of Meteorology and Water Management—National Research Institute (IMWM-NRI) in south-western Poland. Results obtained in Opole and Legnica stations are erroneous. In case of other stations, the relationship between daily total sunshine duration as measured by CS and CSD1 was strong. Coefficients of determination were 0.96-0.97. Mean differences in daily totals of sunshine duration were ±0.3 h. Differences of mean monthly and annual totals were both positive and negative with no pattern of occurrences. Implementation of permanent corrections is not possible. The highest consistency between both measurement devices was found during winter months.

  18. Comparison of sunshine duration measurements from Campbell-Stokes sunshine recorder and CSD1 sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Grzegorz; Zając, Ireneusz

    2016-03-01

    Paper presents comparative analysis of sunshine duration measurement results obtained using Campbell-Stokes sunshine recorder (CS) and electronic sensor (CSD1). The comparison is based on data from 2009 to 2010 collected at seven weather stations (Leszno, Wrocław-Strachowice, Legnica, Opole, Zielona Góra, Jelenia Góra, Kłodzko) operated by the Institute of Meteorology and Water Management—National Research Institute (IMWM-NRI) in south-western Poland. Results obtained in Opole and Legnica stations are erroneous. In case of other stations, the relationship between daily total sunshine duration as measured by CS and CSD1 was strong. Coefficients of determination were 0.96-0.97. Mean differences in daily totals of sunshine duration were ±0.3 h. Differences of mean monthly and annual totals were both positive and negative with no pattern of occurrences. Implementation of permanent corrections is not possible. The highest consistency between both measurement devices was found during winter months.

  19. High fidelity CFD-CSD aeroelastic analysis of slender bladed horizontal-axis wind turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayed, M.; Lutz, Th.; Krämer, E.; Shayegan, Sh.; Ghantasala, A.; Wüchner, R.; Bletzinger, K.-U.

    2016-09-01

    The aeroelastic response of large multi-megawatt slender horizontal-axis wind turbine blades is investigated by means of a time-accurate CFD-CSD coupling approach. A loose coupling approach is implemented and used to perform the simulations. The block- structured CFD solver FLOWer is utilized to obtain the aerodynamic blade loads based on the time-accurate solution of the unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. The CSD solver Carat++ is applied to acquire the blade elastic deformations based on non-linear beam elements. In this contribution, the presented coupling approach is utilized to study the aeroelastic response of the generic DTU 10MW wind turbine. Moreover, the effect of the coupled results on the wind turbine performance is discussed. The results are compared to the aeroelastic response predicted by FLOWer coupled to the MBS tool SIMPACK as well as the response predicted by SIMPACK coupled to a Blade Element Momentum code for aerodynamic predictions. A comparative study among the different modelling approaches for this coupled problem is discussed to quantify the coupling effects of the structural models on the aeroelastic response.

  20. The Relationship between Supervisor Conflict Management Behavior and Employee Forgiveness%上司冲突管理行为与员工宽恕的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张军伟; 龙立荣

    2013-01-01

    Based on social information processing theory , we examined the relations between supervisor conflict management be-havior (collaborative behavior, dominating behavior and avoidant behavior ) and employee forgiveness, and moderating effects of perceived supervisory status , leader-member exchange (LMX) and supervisor employee dyadic tenure between them .We exam-ined the hypotheses with field data collected from 295 employees of 11 companies in Guizhou, Zhejiang and Guangdong prov-inces.Hierarchical regression analysis , correlation analysis and confirmatory factor analysis were applied to test our hypotheses . The results revealed that supervisor collaborative conflict management behavior was positively related to employee forgiveness , su-pervisor dominating conflict management behavior was negatively related to employee forgiveness , and supervisor avoidant conflict management behavior was unrelated to employee forgiveness .When employee perceived higher supervisory status , supervisor col-laborative conflict management behavior was more positively related to employee forgiveness , while supervisor dominating conflict management behavior was more negatively related to employee forgiveness .For the employee with high quality of leader-member exchange, supervisor collaborative conflict management behavior was significantly and positively related to employee forgiveness , while supervisor dominating conflict management behavior was negatively related to employee forgiveness .For the employee with poor leader-member exchange, supervisor collaborative conflict management behavior was significantly and negatively related to employee forgiveness, while supervisor dominating conflict management behavior was unrelated to employee forgiveness .For the employee with high supervisor employee dyadic tenure , supervisor collaborative conflict management behavior was more positively related to employee forgiveness , while supervisor dominating conflict management behavior was

  1. Tassement des déchets en CSD de classe II : du site au modèle

    OpenAIRE

    Olivier, Franck

    2003-01-01

    Les CSD ( Centre de Stockage de Déchet (CSD) de classe II) deviennent des ouvrages de plus en plus techniques au sein desquels interagissent des matériaux naturels (argile, sable), artificiels (géosynthétiques) et des déchets dont le comportement est variable à la fois dans le temps et dans l'espace. Ces interactions restent relativement méconnues car, si l'on appréhende relativement bien le comportement des argiles ou des géosynthétiques en conditions dites normales, le comportement des déch...

  2. Irrational beliefs and marital conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möller, A T; de Beer, Z C

    1998-02-01

    To test the hypothesis that the major irrational evaluative beliefs postulated by Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy are related to marital conflict, 15 married couples participated in a thought-listing procedure. During this procedure, three idiosyncratic scenes portraying marital conflict and three control scenes free of conflict were identified for and presented to each member of the dyad. Analysis indicated that the conflict-portraying scenes were associated with significantly more irrational evaluative beliefs and significantly fewer rational cognitions than the control scenes.

  3. Aggression and prosocial behaviors in social conflicts mediating the influence of cold social intelligence and affective empathy on children's social preference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreras, M R; Braza, P; Muñoz, J M; Braza, F; Azurmendi, A; Pascual-Sagastizabal, E; Cardas, J; Sánchez-Martín, J R

    2014-08-01

    This study proposes a model in which aggressive and prosocial behaviors exhibited in social conflicts mediate the influence of empathy and social intelligence to children's social preference by same-sex peers. Data were obtained from kindergarten to the end of the first grade. The sample yielded 117 Spanish children (64 girls and 53 boys) with a mean age of 62.8 months (SD = 3.3) at the beginning of the study. For boys, affective empathy contributed to boys' social preference through a decrease in physical aggression as responses to social conflict. For girls, affective empathy had an indirect effect on girls' preference by increasing assistance to others in their conflicts. No mediating effect in the contribution of social intelligence on girls' social preference was detected. Our results suggest that, only for girls, cold social intelligence can promote both indirect aggression (coercive strategic that do not leave social preference, at least at these ages) and behaviors that lead social preference (such as prosocial behaviors).

  4. A double injection ADSA-CSD methodology for lung surfactant inhibition and reversal studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Sameh M I; Policova, Zdenka; Dang, Andrew; Acosta, Edgar J; Hair, Michael L; Neumann, A Wilhelm

    2009-10-15

    This paper presents a continuation of the development of a drop shape method for film studies, ADSA-CSD (Axisymmetric Drop Shape Analysis-Constrained Sessile Drop). ADSA-CSD has certain advantages over conventional methods. The development presented here allows complete exchange of the subphase of a spread or adsorbed film. This feature allows certain studies relevant to lung surfactant research that cannot be readily performed by other means. The key feature of the design is a second capillary into the bulk of the drop to facilitate addition or removal of a secondary liquid. The development will be illustrated through studies concerning lung surfactant inhibition. After forming a sessile drop of a basic lung surfactant preparation, the bulk phase can be removed and exchanged for one containing different inhibitors. Such studies mimic the leakage of plasma and blood proteins into the alveolar spaces altering the surface activity of lung surfactant in a phenomenon called surfactant inhibition. The resistance of the lung surfactant to specific inhibitors can be readily evaluated using the method. The new method is also useful for surfactant reversal studies, i.e. the ability to restore the normal surface activity of an inhibited lung surfactant film by using special additives. Results show a distinctive difference between the inhibition when an inhibitor is mixed with and when it is injected under a preformed surfactant film. None of the inhibitors studied (serum, albumin, fibrinogen, and cholesterol) were able to penetrate a preexisting film formed by the basic preparation (BLES and protasan), while all of them can alter the surface activity of such preparation when mixed with the preparation. Preliminary results show that reversal of serum inhibition can be easily achieved and evaluated using the modified methodology.

  5. Systematic Procedure for Generating Operational Policies to Achieve Target Crystal Size Distribution (CSD) in Batch Cooling Crystallization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdul Samad, Noor Asma Fazli; Singh, Ravendra; Sin, Gürkan

    Batch cooling crystallization is one of the important unit operations involving separation of solid-liquid phases. Usually the most common crystal product qualities are directly related to the crystal size distribution (CSD). However the main difficulty in batch crystallization is to obtain a uni...

  6. High-conflict divorce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, J R

    1994-01-01

    This article reviews available research studies of high-conflict divorce and its effects on children. Interparental conflict after divorce (defined as verbal and physical aggression, overt hostility, and distrust) and the primary parent's emotional distress are jointly predictive of more problematic parent-child relationships and greater child emotional and behavioral maladjustment. As a group, children of high-conflict divorce as defined above, especially boys, are two to four times more likely to be clinically disturbed in emotions and behavior compared with national norms. Court-ordered joint physical custody and frequent visitation arrangements in high-conflict divorce tend to be associated with poorer child outcomes, especially for girls. Types of intervention programs and social policy appropriate for these kinds of families are presented.

  7. Model Behavior Analysis of HPN Based on Conflict Decision and Elimination%基于冲突判定的混杂Petri网模型行为分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆建波; 廖伟志

    2011-01-01

    为了分析基本混杂Petri网模型行为,提出了基本混杂Petri网各迁移间的冲突判定定理,讨论了消解策略,并给出了基于冲突判定和消解的基本混杂Petri网模型行为分析算法。理论分析证明了所提出定理的正确性,实例分析和比较说明了所提出算法的有效性。%To analyse the model behavior of hybrid petri nets(HPN), the theorem to determine the conflict of a HPN is proposed , and the method to eliminate conflict is developed. A model behavior analysis algorithm for HPN based on conflict decision and elimination is presented. Through analysis and case study, the effectiveness of the developed approach and algorithm are illustrated.

  8. Ozeane: Ergebnisse der 7. Sitzung der Kommission für nachhaltige Entwicklung (CSD) der Vereinten Nationen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlimm, Jutta; Stietzel, Hans-Joachim

    1999-12-01

    The 7th session of the United Nations Commission on Sustainable Development (CSD) was organised from 19 30 April in the UN Headquarters in New York. The Commission on Sustainable Development was established in 1992 with the aim to implement the comprehensive action programme of Agenda 21. The topics on the agenda of this year’s CSD session included: oceans, tourism as well as consumption and production patterms with a special focus on the oceans item. The 7th Session covered two weeks. It began with the so-called “High Level Segment” during the first week when 89 ministers and high-ranking government representatives stated their points of view on various themes-sometimes also in interaction with the chairman. Concerning the topic of oceans CSD 7 focussed on a few main items of special priority for the implementation of the Agenda 21, both during the preparatory “Intersessional Working Group” and in the final document. These main items are: the conservation and integrated as well as sustainable management of fisheries and marine resources, including the ecosystem of the oceans, the prevention of pollution and degradation of the marine environment through land-based and other acticities, the improvement of the scientific knowledge on oceans and the interaction between the oceans and the global climate system. The decisions of CSD 7 adressed detailed and for the major part concrete proposals for action, appeals or requests to the international organisations and the interntional community with regard to these main items. Summarizing the 7th session, it can be said that in the oceans sector CSD 7 was quite successful in fullilling the task to study the implementation of Agenda 21, to set priorities and to address actors and the necessary actions.

  9. Disengaging from Conflict Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Nicholas J.

    2014-01-01

    Youth in pain often show self-defeating and destructive patterns of behavior which should be seen as calls for help and positive support. Instead, deep-seated brain programs and cultural beliefs about discipline can trigger angry or avoidant behavior by adults who deal with these young people. This brief introduction to the Conflict Cycle…

  10. Interparental Conflict, Parenting Behavior, and Children's Friendship Quality as Correlates of Peer Aggression and Peer Victimization Among Aggressor/Victim Subgroups in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jung-Hee; Hong, Jun Sung; Yoon, Jina; Espelage, Dorothy L

    2014-07-01

    The focus of this study was to examine whether interparental conflict, maternal parenting behaviors, and children's friendship quality varied as a function of peer aggression/victim subgroups among a sample of 227 elementary school children and their mothers in South Korea. Both self-report and peer-report data indicated that the majority of the students were uninvolved in peer aggression situations, and the number of participants in the subgroups (aggressors, victims, and aggressor-victims) varied depending on the source of report. According to the self-report data, victims and aggressor-victims reported a higher level of maternal rejection than uninvolved youth. Aggressors, victims, and aggressor-victims reported higher maternal neglect than uninvolved youth. The highest level of interparental conflict was reported by victims, followed by aggressors. Interestingly, no significant differences were found in positive functioning of friendship quality among the subgroups, although results indicated a significant difference among groups in negative friendship quality.

  11. The Effects of Being an Only Child, Family Cohesion, and Family Conflict on Behavioral Problems among Adolescents with Physically Ill Parents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-Yuan Sui

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study aimed to examine the parental physical illness’ effect on behavioral problems among adolescents, and the effects of being an only child, family cohesion, and family conflict on behavioral problems among adolescents with physically ill parents in Liaoning province, China. Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed in 2009. A questionnaire including two dimensions of the Family Environment Scale (family cohesion and family conflict, self-reported Strength and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ, and demographic factors was distributed to the subjects. Results: Among the 5220 adolescents, 308 adolescents lived with physically ill parents. The adolescents with physically ill parents had more behavioral problems than adolescents with healthy parents. Among the girls who lived in families with physically ill parents, the SDQ score and the prevalence of SDQ syndromes were higher in the girls with siblings than the girls without siblings after adjusting for variables; the effect of family cohesion on SDQ was significant after adjusting for variables. Conclusion: Interventions targeting family cohesion may be effective to reduce behavioral problems of adolescents with physically ill parents.

  12. A Study of Preferred Conflict-Management Behaviors among Small-School Principals: Effects of Gender and Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vestal, Brad; Torres, Mario

    2016-01-01

    It cannot be overstated the broad skill set managers must have to manage conflict in modern organizations (Lang, 2009; Ramani & Zhimin, 2010). Few studies have explored this topic in smaller organizational settings where leaders often assume a greater number of roles and responsibilities. For this reason, this study analyzed preferred conflict…

  13. A Study of Preferred Conflict-Management Behaviors among Small-School Principals: Effects of Gender and Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vestal, Brad; Torres, Mario

    2016-01-01

    It cannot be overstated the broad skill set managers must have to manage conflict in modern organizations (Lang, 2009; Ramani & Zhimin, 2010). Few studies have explored this topic in smaller organizational settings where leaders often assume a greater number of roles and responsibilities. For this reason, this study analyzed preferred conflict…

  14. Conflict: Organizational

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clegg, Stewart; Mikkelsen, Elisabeth Naima; Sewell, Graham

    2015-01-01

    . In contrast, anthropological treatments take a more socially and historically embedded approach to organizational conflict, focusing on how organizational actors establish negotiated orders of understanding. In a break with the social psychological and anthropological approaches, neo-Darwinians explain......This article examines four contemporary treatments of the problem of organizational conflict: social psychological, anthropological, neo-Darwinian, and neo-Machiavellian. Social psychological treatments of organizational conflict focus on the dyadic relationship between individual disputants...

  15. Cloning, Characterization and Expression Pattern Analysis of a Cytosolic Copper/Zinc Superoxide Dismutase (SaCSD1 in a Highly Salt Tolerant Mangrove (Sonneratia alba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enze Yang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Mangroves are critical marine resources for their remarkable ability to tolerate seawater. Antioxidant enzymes play an especially significant role in eliminating reactive oxygen species and conferring abiotic stress tolerance. In this study, a cytosolic copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (SaCSD1 cDNA of Sonneratia alba, a mangrove species with high salt tolerance, was successfully cloned and then expressed in Escherichia coli Rosetta-gami (designated as SaCSD1. SaCSD1 comprised a complete open reading frame (ORF of 459 bp which encoded a protein of 152 amino acids. Its mature protein is predicted to be 15.32 kDa and the deduced isoelectric point is 5.78. SaCSD1 has high sequence similarity (85%–90% with the superoxide dismutase (CSD of some other plant species. SaCSD1 was expressed with 30.6% yield regarding total protein content after being introduced into the pET-15b (Sma I vector for expression in Rosetta-gami and being induced with IPTG. After affinity chromatography on Ni-NTA, recombinant SaCSD1 was obtained with 3.2-fold purification and a specific activity of 2200 U/mg. SaCSD1 showed good activity as well as stability in the ranges of pH between 3 and 7 and temperature between 25 and 55 °C. The activity of recombinant SaCSD1 was stable in 0.25 M NaCl, Dimethyl Sulphoxide (DMSO, glycerol, and chloroform, and was reduced to a great extent in β-mercaptoethanol, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS, H2O2, and phenol. Moreover, the SaCSD1 protein was very susceptive to pepsin digestion. Real-time Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR assay demonstrated that SaCSD1 was expressed in leaf, stem, flower, and fruit organs, with the highest expression in fruits. Under 0.25 M and 0.5 M salt stress, the expression of SaCSD1 was down-regulated in roots, but up-regulated in leaves.

  16. Crystal Structure of a NifS Homologue CsdB from Escherichia coli (MOLECULAR BIOLOGY AND INFORMATION-Biopolymer Structure)

    OpenAIRE

    Fujii, Tomomi; Hata, Yasuo

    2001-01-01

    Escherichia coli CsdB is a dimeric NifS-homologue belonging to the fold-type I family of PLPdependent enzymes, and catalyzes the decomposition of L-selenocysteine into selenium and L-alanine with specificity higher than that for a substrate of cysteine. The structure of the enzyme has been determined at 2.8 A resolution by an X-ray crystallographic method. The subunit of CsdB comprises a large domain, a small domain, and an N-terminal segment. A remarkable structural feature of CsdB is that a...

  17. Resolving Marital Conflicts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Islami Hatixhe

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Couple relations are characterized as relations of an intimate nature dominated by constant interaction or strong interdependence and mutual influence of intense feelings between spouses. In marriages where there is conflict, there are typical examples of interaction, which result in high proportion of negative communicative acts that affect the quality of marital relationships such as: loss of confidence, the emergence of frustration, feelings of anxiety, discomfort, leading to escalation of marital conflicts. Communication as a variable has a large impact on the resolution of marital conflicts. The obtained results of our research indicate that the choice of different strategies of behavior in conflict situations among our respondents primarily depend on: the degree of persistence in the pursuit of its own interests and level of cooperation in addressing the interests of others.

  18. Novelty P3 reductions in depression: characterization using principal components analysis (PCA) of current source density (CSD) waveforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenke, Craig E; Kayser, Jürgen; Stewart, Jonathan W; Bruder, Gerard E

    2010-01-01

    We previously reported a novelty P3 reduction in depressed patients compared to healthy controls (n=20 per group) in a novelty oddball task using a 31-channel montage. In an independent replication and extension using a 67-channel montage (n=49 per group), reference-free current source density (CSD) waveforms were simplified and quantified by a temporal, covariance-based principal components analysis (PCA) (unrestricted Varimax rotation), yielding factor solutions consistent with other oddball tasks. A factor with a loadings peak at 343 ms summarized the target P3b source as well as a secondary midline frontocentral source for novels and targets. An earlier novelty vertex source (NVS) at 241 ms was present for novels, but not targets, and was reduced in patients. Compatible CSD-PCA findings were also confirmed for the original low-density sample. Results are consistent with a reduced novelty response in clinical depression, involving the early phase of the frontocentral novelty P3.

  19. Conflict Resolution

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and shift the focus more to the social impact of growth ana away from growth .... Perspectives on, and approaches towards, conflict and conflict resolution .... transformation, and changes in values and ethical approaches (such as nepotism ... education, life expectancy, employment, childbirth survival and similar indica-.

  20. The Impact of Psychological Defense Strategies in Communication on the Type of Behavior in Conflict Situations with Teenage Volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nodar S. Kikava

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Communication is viewed as one of the fundamental and leading types of activity a person can master. A modern teenager lives in a new information reality. And it is teenagers who deal with perhaps different characteristics and difficulties of communication than representatives of older generations. So what are the characteristics of teenage communication? What psychological defense strategies does a modern teenager adopt in communication when one gets in a conflict situation?

  1. Isotopomer-selective spectra of a single intact H2O molecule in the Cs+(D2O)5H2O isotopologue: Going beyond pattern recognition to harvest the structural information encoded in vibrational spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolke, Conrad T.; Fournier, Joseph A.; Miliordos, Evangelos; Kathmann, Shawn M.; Xantheas, Sotiris S.; Johnson, Mark A.

    2016-02-01

    We report the vibrational signatures of a single H2O molecule occupying distinct sites of the hydration network in the Cs+(H2O)6 cluster. This is accomplished using isotopomer-selective IR-IR hole-burning on the Cs+(D2O)5(H2O) clusters formed by gas-phase exchange of a single, intact H2O molecule for D2O in the Cs+(D2O)6 ion. The OH stretching pattern of the Cs+(H2O)6 isotopologue is accurately recovered by superposition of the isotopomer spectra, thus establishing that the H2O incorporation is random and that the OH stretching manifold is largely due to contributions from decoupled water molecules. This behavior enables a powerful new way to extract structural information from vibrational spectra of size-selected clusters by explicitly identifying the local environments responsible for specific infrared features. The Cs+(H2O)6 structure was unambiguously assigned to the 4.1.1 isomer (a homodromic water tetramer with two additional flanking water molecules) from the fact that its computed IR spectrum matches the observed overall pattern and recovers the embedded correlations in the two OH stretching bands of the water molecule in the Cs+(D2O)5(H2O) isotopomers. The 4.1.1 isomer is the lowest in energy among other candidate networks at advanced (e.g., CCSD(T)) levels of theoretical treatment after corrections for (anharmonic) zero-point energy. With the structure in hand, we then explore the mechanical origin of the various band locations using a local electric field formalism. This approach promises to provide a transferrable scheme for the prediction of the OH stretching fundamentals displayed by water networks in close proximity to solute ions.

  2. Isotopomer-selective spectra of a single intact H2O molecule in the Cs(+)(D2O)5H2O isotopologue: Going beyond pattern recognition to harvest the structural information encoded in vibrational spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolke, Conrad T; Fournier, Joseph A; Miliordos, Evangelos; Kathmann, Shawn M; Xantheas, Sotiris S; Johnson, Mark A

    2016-02-21

    We report the vibrational signatures of a single H2O molecule occupying distinct sites of the hydration network in the Cs(+)(H2O)6 cluster. This is accomplished using isotopomer-selective IR-IR hole-burning on the Cs(+)(D2O)5(H2O) clusters formed by gas-phase exchange of a single, intact H2O molecule for D2O in the Cs(+)(D2O)6 ion. The OH stretching pattern of the Cs(+)(H2O)6 isotopologue is accurately recovered by superposition of the isotopomer spectra, thus establishing that the H2O incorporation is random and that the OH stretching manifold is largely due to contributions from decoupled water molecules. This behavior enables a powerful new way to extract structural information from vibrational spectra of size-selected clusters by explicitly identifying the local environments responsible for specific infrared features. The Cs(+)(H2O)6 structure was unambiguously assigned to the 4.1.1 isomer (a homodromic water tetramer with two additional flanking water molecules) from the fact that its computed IR spectrum matches the observed overall pattern and recovers the embedded correlations in the two OH stretching bands of the water molecule in the Cs(+)(D2O)5(H2O) isotopomers. The 4.1.1 isomer is the lowest in energy among other candidate networks at advanced (e.g., CCSD(T)) levels of theoretical treatment after corrections for (anharmonic) zero-point energy. With the structure in hand, we then explore the mechanical origin of the various band locations using a local electric field formalism. This approach promises to provide a transferrable scheme for the prediction of the OH stretching fundamentals displayed by water networks in close proximity to solute ions.

  3. Isotopomer-selective spectra of a single intact H2O molecule in the Cs+(D2O)5H2O isotopologue: Going beyond pattern recognition to harvest the structural information encoded in vibrational spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolke, Conrad T.; Fournier, Joseph A.; Miliordos, Evangelos; Kathmann, Shawn M.; Xantheas, Sotiris S.; Johnson, Mark A.

    2016-02-21

    We report the vibrational signatures of a single H2O water molecule occupying distinct sites of the hydration network in the Cs+(H2O)6 cluster. This is accomplished using isotopomer selective IR-IR hole-burning on the Cs+(D2O)5(H2O) clusters formed by gas-phase exchange of a single, intact H2O molecule for D2O in the Cs+(D2O)6 ion. The OH stretching pattern of the Cs+(H2O)6 isotopologue is accurately recovered by superposition of the isotopomer spectra, thus establishing that the H2O incorporation is random and that the OH stretching manifold is largely due to contributions from decoupled water molecules. This behavior enables a powerful new way to extract structural information from vibrational spectra of size-selected clusters by explicitly identifying the local environments responsible for specific infrared features. The Cs+(H2O)6 structure was unambiguously assigned to the 4.1.1 isomer (a homodromic water tetramer with two additional flanking water molecules) from the fact that its computed IR spectrum matches the observed overall pattern and recovers the embedded correlations in the two OH stretching bands of the water molecule in the Cs+(D2O)5(H2O) isotopomers. The 4.1.1 isomer is the lowest in energy among other candidate networks at advanced (e.g., CCSD(T)) levels of theoretical treatment after corrections for (anharmonic) zero-point energy (ZPE). With the structure in hand, we then explore the mechanical origin of the various band locations using a local electric field formalism. This approach promises to provide a transferrable scheme for the prediction of the OH stretching fundamentals displayed by water networks in close proximity to solute ions.

  4. Axisymmetric drop shape analysis-constrained sessile drop (ADSA-CSD): a film balance technique for high collapse pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Sameh M I; Policova, Zdenka; Acosta, Edgar J; Neumann, A Wilhelm

    2008-10-07

    Collapse pressure of insoluble monolayers is a property determined from surface pressure/area isotherms. Such isotherms are commonly measured by a Langmuir film balance or a drop shape technique using a pendant drop constellation (ADSA-PD). Here, a different embodiment of a drop shape analysis, called axisymmetric drop shape analysis-constrained sessile drop (ADSA-CSD) is used as a film balance. It is shown that ADSA-CSD has certain advantages over conventional methods. The ability to measure very low surface tension values (e.g., drop setup, and leak-proof design make the constrained sessile drop constellation a better choice than the pendant drop constellation in many situations. Results of compression isotherms are obtained on three different monolayers: octadecanol, dipalmitoyl-phosphatidyl-choline (DPPC), and dipalmitoyl-phosphatidyl-glycerol (DPPG). The collapse pressures are found to be reproducible and in agreement with previous methods. For example, the collapse pressure of DPPC is found to be 70.2 mJ/m2. Such values are not achievable with a pendant drop. The collapse pressure of octadecanol is found to be 61.3 mJ/m2, while that of DPPG is 59.0 mJ/m2. The physical reasons for these differences are discussed. The results also show a distinctive difference between the onset of collapse and the ultimate collapse pressure (ultimate strength) of these films. ADSA-CSD allows detailed study of this collapse region.

  5. Leadership Strategies for Managing Conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kormanski, Chuck

    1982-01-01

    Discusses the impact of conflict in small group development theory. Views conflict as a positive, normally occurring behavior and presents leadership strategies involving withdrawal, suppression, integration, compromise, and power. Examines situational contingencies and presents a rationale for strategy selection and intervention. (Author)

  6. Early effect of NEURAPAS® balance on current source density (CSD of human EEG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koch Klaus

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Psychiatric patients often suffer from stress, anxiety and depression. Various plant extracts are known to fight stress (valerian, anxiety (passion flower or depression (St. John's wort. NEURAPAS® balance is a mixture of these three extracts and has been designed to cover this complex of psychiatric conditions. The study was initiated to quantitatively assess the effect of this combination on brain electric activity. Method Quantitative electroencephalogram (EEG current source density (CSD recording from 16 healthy male and female human volunteers (average age 49 years was used in a randomized, placebo-controlled cross over study. Recordings were performed 0. 5, 1. 5, 3 and 4 hours after administration of the preparations under the conditions of 6 min eyes open and 5 min d2 concentration test, mathematical calculation test and memory test, respectively. All variables (electric power within 6 frequency ranges at 17 electrode positions were fed into a linear discriminant analysis (eyes open condition. In the presence of mental load these variables were used to construct brain maps of frequency changes. Results Under the condition of mental load, centro-parietal spectral power remained statistically significantly lower within alpha1, alpha2 and beta1 frequencies in the presence of verum in comparison to placebo. Discriminant analysis revealed a difference to placebo 3 and 4 hours after intake of 6 tablets of NEURAPAS® balance. Data location within the polydimensional space was projected into the area of the effects of sedative and anti-depressive reference drugs tested earlier under identical conditions. Results appeared closer to the effects of fluoxetine than to St. John's wort. Conclusions Analysis of the neurophysiological changes following the intake of NEURAPAS® balance revealed a similarity of frequency changes to those of calming and anti-depressive drugs on the EEG without impairment of cognition. Trial registration Clinical

  7. Conflict exposure and competitiveness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cecchi, Francesco; Leuveld, Koen; Voors, Maarten

    2016-01-01

    We use data from a street football tournament and a series of lab-in-field experiments in postconflict Sierra Leone to examine the impact of exposure to conflict violence on competitive behavior. We find that football players who experienced more intense exposure to violence are more likely to get a

  8. Conflict exposure and competitiveness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cecchi, Francesco; Leuveld, Koen; Voors, Maarten

    2016-01-01

    We use data from a street football tournament and a series of lab-in-field experiments in postconflict Sierra Leone to examine the impact of exposure to conflict violence on competitive behavior. We find that football players who experienced more intense exposure to violence are more likely to get a

  9. 基于非惯性系的悬停状态旋翼CFD/CSD 耦合气动分析%CFD/CSD cpupling analysis pn aerpdynamic characteristics pf rptpr in hpver based pn npn-inertial frame

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖宇; 徐国华; 招启军

    2014-01-01

    旨在提高先进旋翼气动特性的分析精度,在旋翼高精度 CFD 分析中耦合气动弹性效应,取代传统方法中的刚性桨叶假设,并考虑悬停状态旋翼流场准定常的特性,在非惯性坐标系下建立了一套适合于悬停状态旋翼气动特性计算的 CFD/CSD 耦合分析方法。旋翼气动载荷通过求解三维 Navier-Stokes 方程求得,空间离散及通量计算采用 Jameson 中心格式,时间方向则选用五步 Runge-Kutta 迭代求解,湍流模型采用 B-L 模型;基于 Hamilton 原理建立了描述旋翼弹性运动的非线性微分方程,针对旋翼悬停状态的工作特点,采用 Raphson 迭代方法求解获得旋翼桨叶的弹性变形量。在 CFD/CSD 耦合计算中,旋翼桨叶交接面载荷及变形信息通过 CFD 与 CSD 模块进行传递,同时为提高桨叶弹性变形后贴体网格生成的效率和质量,采用基于网格点坐标转换的网格变形方法。在CFD 和 CSD 程序分别验证基础上,采用建立的旋翼 CFD/CSD 耦合分析方法计算了先进的 UH-60A 直升机旋翼的表面压强及气动载荷。计算结果表明,与刚性旋翼 CFD 模拟结果比较,本文建立的 CFD/CSD 耦合分析模型可以更准确地预估旋翼气动载荷和性能。%In order to enhance the analytical accuracy of advanced rotor aerodynamic characteristics,the aero-elastic effects are coupled into high fidelity CFD analysis method instead of rigid blade assumption.Con-sidering the quasi-steady characteristics of rotor flowfield in hover,a CFD/CSD coupling analysis model for the helicopter rotor is developed based on the non-inertia frame.Airloads are obtained through solving 3-D Navier-Stokes equations with Jameson central difference scheme used in spatial discretization,five-step Runge-Kutta method adopted in temporal integration and B-L turbulent model.Based on the Hamilton prin-ciple,nonlinear differential equations which describe the elastic

  10. Sibling Conflict Resolution Skills: Assessment and Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Brett W.; Roberts, Mark W.

    2009-01-01

    Sibling conflict can rise to the level of a clinical problem. In Phase 1 a lengthy behavioral role-play analog sampling child reactions to normal sibling conflicts was successfully shortened. In Phase 2 normal children who lacked sibling conflict resolution skills were randomly assigned to a Training or Measurement Only condition. Training…

  11. Observed Infant Reactions during Live Interparental Conflict

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du Rocher Schudlich, Tina D.; White, Clare R.; Fleischhauer, Emily A.; Fitzgerald, Kelly A.

    2011-01-01

    Associations between interparental conflict and infant reactions were examined. Infants' history of exposure to interparental conflict and infant reactive temperament were examined as moderators. A community sample of 74 infants, aged 6-14 months, participated with their parents. Behavioral observations were made of parents' marital conflict and…

  12. Inductive Game Theory and the Dynamics of Animal Conflict

    OpenAIRE

    Simon DeDeo; Krakauer, David C; Jessica C. Flack

    2010-01-01

    Author Summary Persistent conflict is one of the most important contemporary challenges to the integrity of society and to individual quality of life. Yet surprisingly little is understood about conflict. Is resource scarcity and competition the major cause of conflict, or are other factors, such as memory for past conflicts, the drivers of turbulent periods? How do individual behaviors and decision-making rules promote conflict? To date, most studies of conflict use simple, elegant models ba...

  13. Current status on behavioral and biological markers of PTSD: a search for clarity in a conflicting literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoladz, Phillip R; Diamond, David M

    2013-06-01

    Extensive research has identified stereotypic behavioral and biological abnormalities in post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), such as heightened autonomic activity, an exaggerated startle response, reduced basal cortisol levels and cognitive impairments. We have reviewed primary research in this area, noting that factors involved in the susceptibility and expression of PTSD symptoms are more complex and heterogeneous than is commonly stated, with extensive findings which are inconsistent with the stereotypic behavioral and biological profile of the PTSD patient. A thorough assessment of the literature indicates that interactions among myriad susceptibility factors, including social support, early life stress, sex, age, peri- and post-traumatic dissociation, cognitive appraisal of trauma, neuroendocrine abnormalities and gene polymorphisms, in conjunction with the inconsistent expression of the disorder across studies, confounds attempts to characterize PTSD as a monolithic disorder. Overall, our assessment of the literature addresses the great challenge in developing a behavioral and biomarker-based diagnosis of PTSD. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Flexibility conflict?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delsen, L.W.M.

    2002-01-01

    The chapter deals with the presupposed conflict of interests between employers and employees resulting from a decoupling of operating hours and working times. It starts from the notion that both long operating hours and flexibility are relative concepts. As there is some discretion, the ultimate

  15. conflict Liberia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction. “War is hell... it has an impact on the people who take part that ... end of civil war there is a 44% likelihood of return to conflict.3 .... sample key informants, and lack of evidence based responses.15 ... economies will experience civil war, in contrast to the 1% risk for ..... Evidence,. Practice and Emerging Concepts.

  16. Plotting Conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Margaret Ann; Wilkinson, John Provost

    1997-01-01

    Conflict management theory is illustrated in a series of hypothetical scenarios, typical of library situations. Each scenario is discussed in terms of a specific management theory and the theories are transposed into useful management tools by plotting each situation along relevant axes. (Author/AEF)

  17. Emplacement of a Thick Mafic Extrusive Body: A CSD Solution to a Map-Generated Question

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, M.; Sloan, J. A.; Siler, D. L.; Karson, J.

    2011-12-01

    A petrological study of crystallization in thick extrusive bodies is motivated by the geologic mapping of glacially excavated volcanic crust exposed along the Vatnsdalsfjall mountain range in northwest Iceland. Vatnsdalsfjall reveals a regional flexure zone, in which ~7 Ma lava flows dip 5-10° westward toward the extinct Skagi-Hunafloi rift axis. The regional flexure is disrupted by a local bowl-shaped depression, where lava flows steepen to ~50° as they dip below a ~250 m thick, ~3 km long igneous unit known as the Hjallin lens (HL). Its lenticular shape and well-developed columnar jointing most likely led Annels (1968) to initially map the HL as a shallow-level intrusion. However, more recent field investigations by McClanahan and Wobus (2004) reveal that the HL is an extrusive body, as evidenced by a distinct basal contact that consists of a flow-banded rhyolitic ash flow tuff underlain by a sedimentary layer containing organic material. Based on preliminary petrologic and geochemical analyses, McClanahan and Wobus (2004) describe the HL as a fine-grained, aphyric basalt that is nearly uniform in mineralogy, texture, and composition. Further field work by Siler (2011) shows that the HL overlies basaltic lavas that thicken toward the center of the bowl-shaped depression, indicating that the lava flows were emplaced during subsidence. The mapped relationship of the HL to the underlying lava flows suggests that the lens is a syn- (or post-) subsidence extrusion emplaced into an existing paleotopographic low. When considered with the field relationships, the homogeneous and fine-grained character of the lens naturally presents a petrological question: Was the anomalously thick extrusive body emplaced in a single eruptive event or is the HL the product of multiple flows that erupted in rapid succession? To understand the formation the HL, we measured the crystal size distribution (CSD) of plagioclase in backscattered electron (BSE) images of 20 samples from three

  18. Intergenerational Cultural Dissonance, Parent-Child Conflict and Bonding, and Youth Problem Behaviors among Vietnamese and Cambodian Immigrant Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yoonsun; He, Michael; Harachi, Tracy W.

    2008-01-01

    Intergenerational cultural dissonance (ICD)--a clash between parents and children over cultural values--is a frequent issue for Asian American youth. Using longitudinal data from the Cross Cultural Families Project, this study examines the mechanisms by which ICD contributes to problem behaviors, including whether ICD predicts parent-child…

  19. Preschool-Age Problem Behavior and Teacher-Child Conflict in School: Direct and Moderation Effects by Preschool Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skalická, Vera; Belsky, Jay; Stenseng, Frode; Wichstrøm, Lars

    2015-01-01

    The hypothesis was tested that the new open-group Norwegian day-care centers would more than traditionally organized centers negatively affect (a) current and (b) future teacher-child relationships, and (c) the developmental legacy of preschool problem behavior. The focus was on eight hundred and fifty 4-year-olds from 153 centers who were…

  20. The morphological and behavioral analysis of geographically separated Rammeihippus turcicus (Orthoptera: Acrididae: Gomphocerinae) populations: data result in taxonomical conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şirin, Deniz; Mol, Abbas; Akyıldız, Gürkan

    2014-10-15

    Rammeihippus Woznessenskij, 1996 (Orthoptera: Acrididae: Gomphocerinae) is a genus represented by two species. Rammeihippus turcicus (Ramme, 1939) is the only known species of the genus from Anatolia. As for most of the Gomphocerinae species in Anatolia, all populations of the species are intermittently distributed at high altitudes. In this study, three populations of R. turcicus were studied for the first time to determine the song and mating behavior. Males of the species produce typical calling song for Gomphocerinae and complex courtship songs and mating behavior. Thus, an accurate taxonomy requires extensive material and different character sources. In this study, the Anatolian Rammeihippus was re-examined on the basis of qualitative and morphometric morphology, male songs, and behavioral characteristics. There was no agreement between the results of the song and morphology. Acoustic analysis suggested one species and patchy distribution in the area, whereas morphology pointed out that each population was a different taxonomical unit. The results of the study show that the aberrant morphology does not necessarily indicate a new species in the Gomphocerinae genus. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Entomological Society of America.

  1. Analysis of the E. coli NifS CsdB protein at 2.0 A reveals the structural basis for perselenide and persulfide intermediate formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Christopher D

    2002-02-01

    The Escherichia coli NifS CsdB protein is a member of the homodimeric pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent family of enzymes. These enzymes are capable of decomposing cysteine or selenocysteine into L-alanine and sulfur or selenium, respectively. E. coli NifS CsdB has a high specificity for L-selenocysteine in comparison to l-cysteine, suggesting a role for this enzyme is selenium metabolism. The 2.0 A crystal structure of E. coli NifS CsdB reveals a high-resolution view of the active site of this enzyme in apo-, persulfide, perselenide, and selenocysteine-bound intermediates, suggesting a mechanism for the stabilization of the enzyme persulfide and perselenide intermediates during catalysis, a necessary intermediate in the formation of sulfur and selenium containing metabolites.

  2. Making sense of all the conflict: a theoretical review and critique of conflict-related ERPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Michael J; Clayson, Peter E; Clawson, Ann

    2014-09-01

    Cognitive control theory suggests that goal-directed behavior is governed by a dynamic interplay between areas of the prefrontal cortex. Critical to cognitive control is the detection and resolution of competing stimulus or response representations (i.e., conflict). Event-related potential (ERP) research provides a window into the nature and precise temporal sequence of conflict monitoring. We critically review the research on conflict-related ERPs, including the error-related negativity (ERN), Flanker N2, Stroop N450 and conflict slow potential (conflict SP or negative slow wave [NSW]), and provide an analysis of how these ERPs inform conflict monitoring theory. Overall, there is considerable evidence that amplitude of the ERN is sensitive to the degree of response conflict, consistent with a role in conflict monitoring. It remains unclear, however, to what degree contextual, individual, affective, and motivational factors influence ERN amplitudes and how ERN amplitudes are related to regulative changes in behavior. The Flanker N2, Stroop N450, and conflict SP ERPs represent distinct conflict-monitoring processes that reflect conflict detection (N2, N450) and conflict adjustment or resolution processes (N2, conflict SP). The investigation of conflict adaptation effects (i.e., sequence or sequential trial effects) shows that the N2 and conflict SP reflect post-conflict adjustments in cognitive control, but the N450 generally does not. Conflict-related ERP research provides a promising avenue for understanding the effects of individual differences on cognitive control processes in healthy, neurologic and psychiatric populations. Comparisons between the major conflict-related ERPs and suggestions for future studies to clarify the nature of conflict-related neural processes are provided. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. 目睹父母间冲突与儿童行为问题%Witnessing Parents Conflicts and Children's Behavior Problems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏英; 洪炜; 崔轶

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the relationship of witnessing parents conflicts and children's behavior problems.Methods:In Domestic Violence Survey for adult men and women in Hunan and Inner Mongolia,respondents were asked to fill in demography information of children and "the Rutter Children's Behavior Questionnaire for Parents,RCBQ" if they had children aged from 6 to 18.Totally 740 questionnaires were sent out and 688 valid questionnaires were taken back.There were 135 valid RCBQ.Results:RCBQ mean score was 6.22±5.44,negatively correlated with age,r=-0.330,P<0.001.Mean RCBQ Mores of children who had been maltreated (7.85±5.94) were significantly higher than that of those who had never been maltreated (4.93±4.65),t=-3.158,P=0.002.Mean RCBQ scores of children who had witnessed parents' conflicts directly or indirectly were higher than that of those children who had never witnessed,regardless whether they had been maltreated themselves.In all children,it was 8.14±6.26 vs.4.84±4.36,t=-3.396,P=0.001; in those who had never been maltreated,and it was 6.62±5.35 vs.3.93±4.03,t=-2.325,P=0.023; in those who had been maltreated,it was 9.57±6.82 vs.6.23±4.58,t=-2.252,P=0.028.Conclusion:Witnessing conflicts between parents may have a negative impact on children's behavior.%目的:探讨目睹父母间冲突与儿童行为问题的关系.方法:在湖南和内蒙两地,针对成年人实施的家庭内暴力现状调查中,若被调查者有6-18岁子女,填写“儿童一般情况”和Rutter儿童行为问卷(父母用卷);两地实际发放问卷740份,收回有效问卷688份,其中有效儿童情况问卷135份.结果:Rutter问卷总分6.22±5.44,与年龄显著负相关,r=-0.330,P<0.001.曾受到打骂儿童Rutter问卷总分(7.85±5.94)显著高于从未受打骂儿童(4.93±4.65),t=-3.158,P=0.002;无论是否曾遭受打骂,间接或直接目睹父母间冲突儿童的Rutter总分都显著高于从未目睹的儿童(全体儿童8.14±6.26 vs.4.84±4.36,t=-3

  4. Conceptions of Conflict in Organizational Conflict Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Elisabeth Naima; Clegg, Stewart

    2017-01-01

    Diverse and often unacknowledged assumptions underlie organizational conflict research. In this essay, we identify distinct ways of conceptualizing conflict in the theoretical domain of organizational conflict with the aim of setting a new critical agenda for reflexivity in conflict research....... In doing so, we first apply a genealogical approach to study conceptions of conflict, and we find that three distinct and essentially contested conceptions frame studies of conflict at work. Second, we employ two empirical examples of conflict to illustrate how organizational conflict research can benefit...... from a more reflexive approach and advance our understanding of conflict. In this essay, we emphasize how philosophical and political assumptions about conflict frame knowledge production within the field and we encourage future theory development to build on different notions of conflict to become...

  5. Characterization of the mechanism of protection mediated by CS-D7, a monoclonal antibody to Staphylococcus aureus iron regulated surface determinant B (IsdB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory ePancari

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We previously reported the development of a human monoclonal antibody (CS-D7, IgG1 with specificity and affinity for the iron regulated surface determinant B (IsdB of Staphylococcus aureus. CS-D7 mediates opsonophagocytic killing in vitro and protection in a murine sepsis model. In light of recent data indicating that IsdB specific T cells (CD4+, Th17, not Ab, mediate protection after vaccination with IsdB, it is important to investigate the mechanism of protection mediated by CS-D7. The mAb was examined to determine if it blocked heme binding to IsdB in vitro. The mAb was not found to have heme blocking activity, nor did it prevent bacterial growth under in vivo conditions, in an implanted growth chamber. To assess the role of the mAb Fc a point mutation was introduced at aa 297 (CS-D7●N297A. This point mutation removes Fc effector functions. In vitro analysis of the mutein confirmed that it lacked measurable binding to FcγR, and that it did not fix complement. The mutein had dramatically reduced in vitro opsonic OP activity compared to CS-D7. Nonetheless, the mutein conferred protection equivalent to the wild type mAb in the murine sepsis model. Both wild type and mutein mAbs were efficacious in FcγR deletion mice (including both FcγRII-/- mice and FcγRIII-/- mice, indicating that these receptors were not essential for mAb mediated protection in vivo. Protection mediated by CS-D7 was lost in Balb/c mice depleted of C3 with cobra venom factor (CFV, was lost in mice depleted of superoxide dismutase (SOD in P47phox deletion mice, and was absent in SCID mice. Enhanced clearance of S. aureus in the liver of CS-D7 treated mice and enhanced production of INF-γ, but not of IL17, may play a role in the mechanism of protection mediated by the mAb. CS-D7 apparently mediates survival in challenged mice through a mechanism involving complement, phagocytes, and lymphocytes, but which does not depend on interaction with FcγR, or on blocking heme

  6. Consumer Behavior Under Conflicting Information Provided by Interested Parties: Implications for Equilibrium in the Market for Credence Goods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Carlo; Tufi, Eleonora

    2016-01-01

    Incomplete information in food consumption is a relevant topic in agricultural economics. This paper proposes a theoretical model describing consumer behavior, market equilibrium and public intervention in an industry where consumers must rely on the information of interested parties such as producers or associations. We provide simple game theory model showing the link between price competition and the strategic use of information. If information are unverifiable (as in the case of credence attributes) firms may have no incentive to advertise true claims and consumer decisions may be biased. Our model incorporates the opportunistic behavior of self-interested information providers. The result is a model of competition in prices and information finding a potential for market failure and public intervention. In the paper we discuss the efficiency of three possible regulations: banning false claims, subsidizing advertising campaigns, and public statement if favor of true claims. In that context, some recent patents related to both the regulatory compliance in communication and to the reduction of asymmetric information between producers and consumers have been considered. Finally, we found that the efficiency of these policy tools is affected by the reputation of trustworthiness of the firms.

  7. The crystal structure and small-angle X-ray analysis of CsdL/TcdA reveal a new tRNA binding motif in the MoeB/E1 superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Estepa, Miguel; Ardá, Ana; Savko, Martin; Round, Adam; Shepard, William E; Bruix, Marta; Coll, Miquel; Fernández, Francisco J; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; Vega, M Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic N6-threonylcarbamoyladenosine ('cyclic t6A', ct(6)A) is a non-thiolated hypermodification found in transfer RNAs (tRNAs) in bacteria, protists, fungi and plants. In bacteria and yeast cells ct(6)A has been shown to enhance translation fidelity and efficiency of ANN codons by improving the faithful discrimination of aminoacylated tRNAs by the ribosome. To further the understanding of ct(6)A biology we have determined the high-resolution crystal structures of CsdL/TcdA in complex with AMP and ATP, an E1-like activating enzyme from Escherichia coli, which catalyzes the ATP-dependent dehydration of t6A to form ct(6)A. CsdL/TcdA is a dimer whose structural integrity and dimer interface depend critically on strongly bound K+ and Na+ cations. By using biochemical assays and small-angle X-ray scattering we show that CsdL/TcdA can associate with tRNA with a 1:1 stoichiometry and with the proper position and orientation for the cyclization of t6A. Furthermore, we show by nuclear magnetic resonance that CsdL/TcdA engages in transient interactions with CsdA and CsdE, which, in the latter case, involve catalytically important residues. These short-lived interactions may underpin the precise channeling of sulfur atoms from cysteine to CsdL/TcdA as previously characterized. In summary, the combination of structural, biophysical and biochemical methods applied to CsdL/TcdA has afforded a more thorough understanding of how the structure of this E1-like enzyme has been fine tuned to accomplish ct(6)A synthesis on tRNAs while providing support for the notion that CsdA and CsdE are able to functionally interact with CsdL/TcdA.

  8. The Crystal Structure and Small-Angle X-Ray Analysis of CsdL/TcdA Reveal a New tRNA Binding Motif in the MoeB/E1 Superfamily

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Estepa, Miguel; Ardá, Ana; Savko, Martin; Round, Adam; Shepard, William E.; Bruix, Marta; Coll, Miquel; Fernández, Francisco J.; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; Vega, M. Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic N6-threonylcarbamoyladenosine (‘cyclic t6A’, ct6A) is a non-thiolated hypermodification found in transfer RNAs (tRNAs) in bacteria, protists, fungi and plants. In bacteria and yeast cells ct6A has been shown to enhance translation fidelity and efficiency of ANN codons by improving the faithful discrimination of aminoacylated tRNAs by the ribosome. To further the understanding of ct6A biology we have determined the high-resolution crystal structures of CsdL/TcdA in complex with AMP and ATP, an E1-like activating enzyme from Escherichia coli, which catalyzes the ATP-dependent dehydration of t6A to form ct6A. CsdL/TcdA is a dimer whose structural integrity and dimer interface depend critically on strongly bound K+ and Na+ cations. By using biochemical assays and small-angle X-ray scattering we show that CsdL/TcdA can associate with tRNA with a 1:1 stoichiometry and with the proper position and orientation for the cyclization of t6A. Furthermore, we show by nuclear magnetic resonance that CsdL/TcdA engages in transient interactions with CsdA and CsdE, which, in the latter case, involve catalytically important residues. These short-lived interactions may underpin the precise channeling of sulfur atoms from cysteine to CsdL/TcdA as previously characterized. In summary, the combination of structural, biophysical and biochemical methods applied to CsdL/TcdA has afforded a more thorough understanding of how the structure of this E1-like enzyme has been fine tuned to accomplish ct6A synthesis on tRNAs while providing support for the notion that CsdA and CsdE are able to functionally interact with CsdL/TcdA. PMID:25897750

  9. The crystal structure and small-angle X-ray analysis of CsdL/TcdA reveal a new tRNA binding motif in the MoeB/E1 superfamily.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel López-Estepa

    Full Text Available Cyclic N6-threonylcarbamoyladenosine ('cyclic t6A', ct(6A is a non-thiolated hypermodification found in transfer RNAs (tRNAs in bacteria, protists, fungi and plants. In bacteria and yeast cells ct(6A has been shown to enhance translation fidelity and efficiency of ANN codons by improving the faithful discrimination of aminoacylated tRNAs by the ribosome. To further the understanding of ct(6A biology we have determined the high-resolution crystal structures of CsdL/TcdA in complex with AMP and ATP, an E1-like activating enzyme from Escherichia coli, which catalyzes the ATP-dependent dehydration of t6A to form ct(6A. CsdL/TcdA is a dimer whose structural integrity and dimer interface depend critically on strongly bound K+ and Na+ cations. By using biochemical assays and small-angle X-ray scattering we show that CsdL/TcdA can associate with tRNA with a 1:1 stoichiometry and with the proper position and orientation for the cyclization of t6A. Furthermore, we show by nuclear magnetic resonance that CsdL/TcdA engages in transient interactions with CsdA and CsdE, which, in the latter case, involve catalytically important residues. These short-lived interactions may underpin the precise channeling of sulfur atoms from cysteine to CsdL/TcdA as previously characterized. In summary, the combination of structural, biophysical and biochemical methods applied to CsdL/TcdA has afforded a more thorough understanding of how the structure of this E1-like enzyme has been fine tuned to accomplish ct(6A synthesis on tRNAs while providing support for the notion that CsdA and CsdE are able to functionally interact with CsdL/TcdA.

  10. 集成突变论和演化博弈的企业员工冲突行为研究%Research on Conflict Behavior between Enterprises and Employees Based on Catastrophe Theory and Evolutionary Game

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵旭; 胡斌

    2014-01-01

    To make dynamic analysis of conflict incidents between enterprises and employees is the premise and key for conflict management .From the new perspective of catastrophe theory and evolutionary game , this article constructs the Cusp Catastrophe evolutionary Model of enterprises-employees ’ conflict behaviors and reasonably explains the employees ’ conflict behaviors ’ change process under the influence of the two dependent variables:interest and emotion .According to the theory , we discuss the evolution rules of conflict decisions between enter-prises-employees and developmental characteristics of the conflict situations , thereby putting forward measures of conflict management.The research reveals the main results as follows .Firstly, employees’ conflict behaviors may occur under the influence of interest factors and emotional factors .Interest factors decide whether the con-flict will happen and emotional factors decide when it will happen and its degrees .Secondly , it is short-sighted for enterprises to adopt a tough attitude to the employees ’ reasonable claim On the contrary , it is better for the enterprises to give benefits to employees from the view of humanism management .Thirdly, in the extreme con-flict, if the full benefit the enterprises give to employees still cannot quell the dispute , they need to pay more additional cost.Finally, when employees show extreme behaviors , they should be dealt with according to relevant laws and regulations .Otherwise , the vicious conflict incidents tend to be expanded if the enterprises try to elimi-nate its effects by blind concession .However , it is very effective for the enterprises to cope with conflict by advo-cating positive and unified corporate values .%对企业员工冲突行为的动态分析是开展冲突管理的前提和关键。本文从突变理论和演化博弈相结合的全新视角,构建了企业员工冲突突变行为演化模型,解释了员工冲突行

  11. A Study on the Relationship between the Effects of the Conflict Management Behavior and Team Learning Behavior on Employees'Innovative Behavior%冲突管理方式与团队学习行为对员工创新行为的交互效应研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于静静; 蒋守芬; 赵曙明

    2015-01-01

    转型经济时期,员工创新行为是组织获取竞争优势的关键。工作场所冲突兼具积极与消极影响。采用问卷调查的方法,以河南、山东、江苏、上海等省份30多家企业的430名员工为研究对象,采用层级回归法进行数据分析。研究发现,合作型冲突管理方式、竞争型冲突管理方式、回避型冲突管理方式对员工创新行为均具有显著的正向影响;并显著地正向调节合作型冲突管理对员工创新行为的影响,团队学习行为会显著地负向调节回避型冲突管理对员工创新行为的影响。%In the period of transition economy ,employee's creativity is the key factors for enterprises and organizations to obtain competitive advantages .Workplace conflict has not only a negative effect ,but also a positive impact .This study u‐ses the questionnaire survey method to investigate 430 employees in more than 30 enterprises from Henan ,Shandong ,Jian‐gsu Province and Shanghai .The results show that cooperative conflict management ,avoidance conflict management ,com‐petitive conflict management behavior all have significant positive effects on employee's creativity ;Team learning behavior has the positive moderating effect on the relationship between cooperative conflict management and employee's creativity , whereas it has negative moderating effect on the relationship between avoidance conflict management and employee's crea‐tivity .

  12. CONFLICT PERSONALITY AS A PARTICIPANT OF CONFLICT DISCOURSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyranyan Margarita Yuryevna

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The conflict discourse as a communicative event reveals the characteristics of its participants as linguistic personalities. In this respect, this study enables us to reveal and describe their personal and social features. Undoubtedly, the individual characteristics of participants, their cultural and ideological differences and similarities have a great impact on the interaction process in general and on the use of linguistic means in particular. To better understand the nature of conflict discourse, its causes and consequences, one should take into account that adverse behaviour depends on the personality type and the role the speaker plays in different situations. Conflict personality is referred to as an archetype, transcendental phenomenon common to everybody. The research revealed such key characteristics typical of conflict personality as: verbal (use of language units with "conflict" connotation, the "manipulation" of speech means that convey negative, conflict meaning in particular contexts and non-verbal (communicative aim, communication medium, pre- and post-supposition of the speaker and the listener, mode of behaviour. It also proved that conflict patterns of behavior may lead to confrontation and/or transfer of collaborative interaction into an adverse one.

  13. Conflict Adaptation Is Independent of Consciousness:Behavioral and ERP Evidence%冲突适应独立于意识:来自行为和ERP的证据

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋军; 向玲; 张庆林; 陈安涛

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that some cognitive control functions such as inhibition control and task switching were independent of consciousness, but it is unclear whether consciousness is necessary for conflict adaptation. Prior studies in consciousness domain showed that conflict adaptation reflected on behavioral measures and ERP components (N2 and P3). The purpose of current study is to test whether consciousness is necessary for conflict control. If conflict control was independent of consciousness, we would observe that the conflict effect indexed on reaction times and N2 and P3 amplitude modulated by previous trial congruency regardless of consciousness. If these hypotheses were verified, it could deepen our understanding of unconscious information processing and give us insight into the function of consciousness. To test our hypotheses, we obtained the behavioral and electroencephalogram (EEG) data from 18 subjects using an arrow version meta-contrast masking task, in which the primes fitted exactly within the inner contour of the target. By manipulating the time interval of prime and target and the presentation time of primes, the prime can be weakly or strongly masked. One subject was excluded from further analysis due to too many artifacts. To exclude the alternative interpretation of conflict adaptation by stimulus/response repetitions, stimulus or (and) response repetitions trials were removed before further analysis. After removing the artifacts included in the EEG segments, the ERPs were obtained according to each condition. The negative peak of N2 was averaged during 240-320 ms across fronto-central ROI electrode sites, while the P3 was averaged during the time 350-500 ms across centro-parietal ROI electrode sites. All analyses were performed separately based on the conditions of consciousness. The results showed that there was reliable conflict effect on reaction times and N2 and P3 amplitudes under conscious and unconscious conditions, and

  14. National report for CSD-16 The Netherlands: A review of sustainable development in agriculture, land and rural development, drought and desertification, and Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. Andriesse; K. Boone; C. de Bont; J. Brouwers; M. Hack-Ten Broeke; G. Migchels; O. Oenema; G. van de Peet; I. Pinxterhuis; A. Smit; M. Stuiver; W. Sukkel; W. Verkerke; S. Verzandvoort; A. Visser; K. Zwart; M. Damen

    2008-01-01

    This report forms the Netherlands’ contribution to CSD-16 (2008) of the UN Commission on Sustainable Development. It comprises an overview of the Netherlands’ policies, priorities and activities with regard to sustainable development in the fields of agriculture, land and rural development, drought

  15. Effect of a Multicomponent Behavioral Intervention in Adults Impaired by Psychological Distress in a Conflict-Affected Area of Pakistan: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Atif; Hamdani, Syed Usman; Awan, Naila Riaz; Bryant, Richard A; Dawson, Katie S; Khan, Muhammad Firaz; Azeemi, Mian Mukhtar-Ul-Haq; Akhtar, Parveen; Nazir, Huma; Chiumento, Anna; Sijbrandij, Marit; Wang, Duolao; Farooq, Saeed; van Ommeren, Mark

    2016-12-27

    The mental health consequences of conflict and violence are wide-ranging and pervasive. Scalable interventions to address a range of mental health problems are needed. To test the effectiveness of a multicomponent behavioral intervention delivered by lay health workers to adults with psychological distress in primary care settings. A randomized clinical trial was conducted from November 1, 2014, through January 28, 2016, in 3 primary care centers in Peshawar, Pakistan, that included 346 adult primary care attendees with high levels of both psychological distress and functional impairment according to the 12-item General Health Questionnaire and the World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule 2.0 (WHODAS 2.0). Lay health workers administered 5 weekly 90-minute individual sessions that included empirically supported strategies of problem solving, behavioral activation, strengthening social support, and stress management. The control was enhanced usual care. Primary outcomes, anxiety and depression symptoms, were independently measured at 3 months with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Secondary outcomes were posttraumatic stress symptoms (Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist for DSM-5), functional impairment (WHODAS 2.0), progress on problems for which the person sought help (Psychological Outcome Profiles), and symptoms of depressive disorder (9-item Patient Health Questionnaire). Among 346 patients (mean [SD] age, 33.0 [11.8] years; 78.9% women), 172 were randomly assigned to the intervention and 174 to enhanced usual care; among them, 146 and 160 completed the study, respectively. At baseline, the intervention and control groups had similar mean (SD) HADS scores on symptoms of anxiety (14.16 [3.17] vs 13.64 [3.20]; adjusted mean difference [AMD], 0.52; 95% CI, -0.22 to 1.27) and depression (12.67 [3.27] vs 12.49 [3.34]; AMD, 0.17, 95% CI, -0.54 to 0.89). After 3 months of treatment, the intervention group had significantly lower

  16. Structure of external aldimine of Escherichia coli CsdB, an IscS/NifS homolog: implications for its specificity toward selenocysteine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihara, Hisaaki; Fujii, Tomomi; Kato, Shin-Ichiro; Kurihara, Tatsuo; Hata, Yasuo; Esaki, Nobuyoshi

    2002-05-01

    Escherichia coli CsdB is a pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme that catalyzes both cysteine desulfuration and selenocysteine deselenation. The enzyme has a high specific activity for L-selenocysteine relative to L-cysteine. On the other hand, its paralog, IscS, exhibits higher activity for L-cysteine, which acts as a sulfur donor during the biosynthesis of the iron-sulfur cluster and 4-thiouridine. The structure of CsdB complexed with L-propargylglycine was determined by X-ray crystallography at 2.8 A resolution. The overall polypeptide fold of the complex is similar to that of the uncomplexed enzyme, indicating that no significant structural change occurs upon formation of the complex. In the complex, propargylglycine forms a Schiff base with PLP, providing the features of the external aldimine formed in the active site. The Cys364 residue, which is essential for the activity of CsdB toward L-cysteine but not toward L-selenocysteine, is clearly visible on a loop of the extended lobe (Thr362-Arg375) in all enzyme forms studied, in contrast to the corresponding disordered loop (Ser321-Arg332) of the Thermotoga maritima NifS-like protein, which is closely related to IscS. The extended lobe of CsdB has an 11-residue deletion compared with that of the NifS-like protein. These facts suggest that the restricted flexibility of the Cys364-anchoring extended lobe in CsdB may be responsible for the ability of the enzyme to discriminate between selenium and sulfur.

  17. Celebritizing Conflict

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richey, Lisa Ann; Budabin, Alexandra Cosima

    2016-01-01

    From serving as United Nations ambassadors to appearing as spokespersons for major NGO campaigns, global celebrities have become increasingly important in international development assistance. Acting as “aid celebrities,” they are indelibly linked with humanitarian work and public engagement.2 In......, conflict, and development in Africa.......From serving as United Nations ambassadors to appearing as spokespersons for major NGO campaigns, global celebrities have become increasingly important in international development assistance. Acting as “aid celebrities,” they are indelibly linked with humanitarian work and public engagement.2...... In the policy realm, celebrity endorsement may shift attention, shape decisions, and build or erode key alliances. Meanwhile, the figure of the celebrity offers an enticing lens to refract critical issues of power, influence, and voice within neoliberal north-south relations. This essay, using emerging...

  18. Conflict Resolution, Can It Really Make a Difference in the Classroom: Conflict Resolution Strategies for Classroom Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollan, Savannah; Wilson-Younger, Dylinda

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses conflict and provides five resolutions for teachers on managing negative behaviors within the classroom. Acknowledging and implementing conflict resolution strategies in the classroom enables every student to fully participate in the learning process.

  19. FUZZY PREFERENCES IN CONFLICTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mubarak S. AL-MUTAIRI; Keith W. HIPEL; Mohamed S. KAMEL

    2008-01-01

    A systematic fuzzy approach is developed to model fuzziness and uncertainties in the preferences of decision makers involved in a conflict. This unique fuzzy preference formulation is used within the paradigm of the Graph Model for Conflict Resolution in which a given dispute is modeled in terms of decision makers, each decision maker's courses of actions or options, and each decision maker's preferences concerning the states or outcomes which could take place. In order to be able to determine the stability of each state for each decision maker and the possible equilibria or resolutions, a range of solution concepts describing potential human behavior under conflict are defined for use with fuzzy preferences. More specifically, strong and weak definitions of stability are provided for the solution concepts called Nash, general metarational, symmetric metarational, and sequential stability. To illustrate how these solution concepts can be conveniently used in practice, they are applied to a dispute over the contamination of an aquifer by a chemical company located in Elmira, Ontario, Canada.

  20. Children in Conflict Zones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, A N; Prasad, P L

    2009-04-01

    The nature of war has changed dramatically. Today's conflicts happen where people live and they take a brutal toll on children. Heavy bombardment and destruction in war creates a humanitarian crisis where there is lack of adequate food, clean water and medicine. The consequences of war can have major impact on the health of children for years to come. Traumatic events can have a profound and lasting impact on the emotional, cognitive, behavioral and physiological functioning of an individual. Depending on the circumstances, the psychosocial impacts of disasters can range from mild stress reactions to problems such as anxiety, depression, substance abuse and post traumatic stress disorders (PTSD).

  1. Varieties of Organizational Conflict

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pondy, Louis R.

    1969-01-01

    The viewpoints and findings of the seven empirical studies of organizational conflict contained in this issue are compared and contrasted. A distinction is made between conflict within a stable organization structure and conflict aimed at changing the organization structure. (Author)

  2. Healthy Conflict Management

    OpenAIRE

    Brower, Naomi

    2012-01-01

    Without healthy conflict management skills, conflict can often escalate or intensify over time. This fact sheet gives tips on utilizing key negotiation skills to help individuals effectively address and cope with conflict and potentially build stronger relationships with others.

  3. Trauma Symptoms, Perceived Social Support, Emotional Competence and Self-Esteem as Predictors of Nursing School Teachers' Behavior Styles in Social Conflicts

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nataša Vlah; Sanja Tatalović Vorkapić

    2017-01-01

    .... One hundred and seven students of Early and Preschool Education in Rijeka (M=23 years, 98% female students) completed a questionnaire that integrated the Scale of Attitudes Towards Behavioural Styles in Social Conflicts...

  4. Study on trans-boundary water resource conflict based on behavioral geography%基于行为地理的跨界水资源冲突研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范虹; 牛文娟; 牛富

    2014-01-01

    According to the different characteristics caused by geographical location differences of the left and right(LR) banks along a river and upstream and downstream (UD) of the river,the evolutionary game mathematical model of the trans-boundary water resource conflict of the LR banks and the UD of river were established to study the generation mechanism of trans-boundary water resource conflict on the basis of behavioral geography theory. The study shows that the water resource conflict of LR banks and that of UD have different water resource conflict evolutionary laws,so different management strategies should be adopted for the two kinds of water resource conflicts. LR bank evolutionary game has two evolutionary stable strategies(conflict, conflict and negotiation,negotiation). In LR bank evolutionary game,it is the relative benefits of both sides but not the absolute benefits of the individuals to decide the evolutionary direction of the game. In UD evolutionary game,“conflict,conflict”is un-stable strategy and“conflict,negotiation”is the unique evolutionary stable strategy. Increasing negotiation costs and decreasing conflict costs will lead to a proportion growth of the individuals adopting conflict action.%基于行为地理学理论,根据跨界水资源冲突中左右岸和上下游的冲突由于冲突主体地理位置差异而呈现不同特点,建立了左右岸和上下游跨界水资源冲突演化博弈数理模型,研究跨界水资源冲突事件产生机理。理论研究和数值分析表明:上下游水资源冲突与左右岸水资源冲突具有不同的发展演化规律,需要在水资源冲突管理的实践中对上下游水资源冲突和左右岸水资源冲突采取不同的管理策略;左右岸演化博弈有(冲突,冲突)和(协商,协商)两个演化稳定策略,博弈双方个体的相对收益而不是个体在博弈中的收益对博弈演化的方向有重要的影响。在上下游演化博弈中

  5. The dissociable neural dynamics of cognitive conflict and emotional conflict control: An ERP study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Song; Li, Yu; Kong, Xia; He, Qiaolin; Liu, Jia; Qiu, Jiang

    2016-04-21

    This study investigated differences in the neural time-course of cognitive conflict and emotional conflict control, using event-related potentials (ERPs). Although imaging studies have provided some evidence that distinct, dissociable neural systems underlie emotional and nonemotional conflict resolution, no ERP study has directly compared these two types of conflict. Therefore, the present study used a modified face-word Stroop task to explore the electrophysiological correlates of cognitive and emotional conflict control. The behavioral data showed that the difference in response time of congruency (incongruent condition minus the congruent condition) was larger in the cognitive conflict task than in the emotional conflict task, which indicated that cognitive conflict was stronger than the emotional conflict in the present tasks. Analysis of the ERP data revealed a main effect of task type on N2, which may be associated with top-down attention. The N450 results showed an interaction between cognitive and emotional conflict, which might be related to conflict detection. In addition, we found the incongruent condition elicited a larger SP than the congruent condition, which might be related to conflict resolution.

  6. Political power, control and organizational conflict

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Eslampanah

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available There used to be an assumption that any conflict has negative and destructive influences and we must remove it from the system. However, recent studies indicate that conflict is the result of interaction with different people having various personalities, social and cultural behaviors and this is an unavoidable issue. The existence of conflict is not necessarily a bad thing; in fact, there are many evidences, which show that organizations with no conflict may fail. In other words, people who work for business units with no conflict are most likely so disparate that they cannot fit themselves to environmental conditions. In this paper, we discuss how to handle a conflict in any organization and lead the business units to organizations that are more productive.

  7. Teaching about Marriage: Some Principles for Effective Conflict Resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surra, Catherine A.; Asmussen, Linda A.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses three principles of effective conflict resolution that can be taught in the classroom: communication occurs in two channels, verbal and nonverbal; certain behaviors or skills employed by mates during conflict resolution have been found to discriminate between happy and unhappy spouses; and marital discussions during conflict have three…

  8. Sexual conflict between parents: offspring desertion and asymmetrical parental care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Székely, Tamás

    2014-09-25

    Parental care is an immensely variable social behavior, and sexual conflict offers a powerful paradigm to understand this diversity. Conflict over care (usually considered as a type of postzygotic sexual conflict) is common, because the evolutionary interests of male and female parents are rarely identical. I investigate how sexual conflict over care may facilitate the emergence and maintenance of diverse parenting strategies and argue that researchers should combine two fundamental concepts in social behavior to understand care patterns: cooperation and conflict. Behavioral evidence of conflict over care is well established, studies have estimated specific fitness implications of conflict for males or females, and experiments have investigated specific components of conflict. However, studies are long overdue to reveal the full implications of conflict for both males and females. Manipulating (or harming) the opposite sex seems less common in postzygotic conflicts than in prezygotic conflicts because by manipulating, coercing, or harming the opposite sex, the reproductive interest of the actor is also reduced. Parental care is a complex trait, although few studies have yet considered the implications of multidimensionality for parental conflict. Future research in parental conflict will benefit from understanding the behavioral interactions between male and female parents (e.g., negotiation, learning, and coercion), the genetic and neurogenomic bases of parental behavior, and the influence of social environment on parental strategies. Empirical studies are needed to put sexual conflict in a population context and reveal feedback between mate choice, pair bonds and parenting strategies, and their demographic consequences for the population such as mortalities and sex ratios. Taken together, sexual conflict offers a fascinating avenue for understanding the causes and consequences of parenting behavior, sex roles, and breeding system evolution.

  9. Error Negativity Does Not Reflect Conflict: A Reappraisal of Conflict Monitoring and Anterior Cingulate Cortex Activity

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Our ability to detect and correct errors is essential for our adaptive behavior. The conflict-loop theory states that the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) plays a key role in detecting the need to increase control through conflict monitoring. Such monitoring is assumed to manifest itself in an electroencephalographic (EEG) component, the "error negativity" (Ne or "error-related negativity" [ERN]). We have directly tested the hypothesis that the ACC monitors conflict through simulation and expe...

  10. Quality of Parent-Child Relationship, Family Conflict, Peer Pressure, and Drinking Behaviors of Adolescents in an Asian Context: The Case of Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Hyekyung; Shek, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Analyzing data from a probability sample representative of secondary school students in Singapore (N = 1,599), this study examined the independent impact between the quality of mother-child relationship, the quality of father-child relationship and family conflict on the frequency of drinking and drunkenness, and whether each dyadic parent-child…

  11. Quality of Parent-Child Relationship, Family Conflict, Peer Pressure, and Drinking Behaviors of Adolescents in an Asian Context: The Case of Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Hyekyung; Shek, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Analyzing data from a probability sample representative of secondary school students in Singapore (N = 1,599), this study examined the independent impact between the quality of mother-child relationship, the quality of father-child relationship and family conflict on the frequency of drinking and drunkenness, and whether each dyadic parent-child…

  12. Trauma Symptoms, Perceived Social Support, Emotional Competence and Self-Esteem as Predictors of Nursing School Teachers' Behavior Styles in Social Conflicts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataša Vlah

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The aims of the study were to analyse the relationship between three styles used in social conflicts (cooperation, avoiding/adapting and winning and some personality traits shared by future nursery school teachers, and to explore the possibility of predicting styles used in social conflicts on the basis of these traits. One hundred and seven students of Early and Preschool Education in Rijeka (M=23 years, 98% female students completed a questionnaire that integrated the Scale of Attitudes Towards Behavioural Styles in Social Conflicts (Vlah, 2013, Trauma Symptoms Checklist (Šimić, Sesar, & Barišić, 2012, Social Support Appraisals Scale (Kurtović, 2013, Emotional Skills and Competence Questionnaire (Takšić, 2002, and Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (1979. Descriptive, correlation and regression analyses were used to analyse the data. All three styles used in social conflicts were correlated to other research variables. Older students and those more competent in perceiving and understanding emotions and those with higher self-esteem with regard to oneself are significantly more oriented towards the cooperation style. The avoiding/adapting style can be predicted on the basis of students' somatic symptoms, while trauma symptoms present in students predict the winning style.

  13. One for All and All for One: Using Multiple Identification Theory Simulations to Build Cooperative Attitudes and Behaviors in a Middle Eastern Conflict Scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Robert Howard; Williams, Alexander Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    The authors previously developed multiple identification theory (MIT) as a system of simulation game design intended to promote attitude change. The present study further tests MIT's effectiveness. The authors created a game (CULTURE & CREED) via MIT as a complex simulation of Middle Eastern conflict resolution, designed to change attitudes and…

  14. Neural Correlates of Decision-Making Under Ambiguity and Conflict

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pushkarskaya, Helen; Smithson, Michael; Joseph, Jane E.; Corbly, Christine; Levy, Ifat

    2015-01-01

    HIGHLIGHTS We use a simple gambles design in an fMRI study to compare two conditions: ambiguity and conflict.Participants were more conflict averse than ambiguity averse.Ambiguity aversion did not correlate with conflict aversion.Activation in the medial prefrontal cortex correlated with ambiguity level and ambiguity aversion.Activation in the ventral striatum correlated with conflict level and conflict aversion. Studies of decision making under uncertainty generally focus on imprecise information about outcome probabilities (“ambiguity”). It is not clear, however, whether conflicting information about outcome probabilities affects decision making in the same manner as ambiguity does. Here we combine functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and a simple gamble design to study this question. In this design the levels of ambiguity and conflict are parametrically varied, and ambiguity and conflict gambles are matched on expected value. Behaviorally, participants avoided conflict more than ambiguity, and attitudes toward ambiguity and conflict did not correlate across participants. Neurally, regional brain activation was differentially modulated by ambiguity level and aversion to ambiguity and by conflict level and aversion to conflict. Activation in the medial prefrontal cortex was correlated with the level of ambiguity and with ambiguity aversion, whereas activation in the ventral striatum was correlated with the level of conflict and with conflict aversion. These novel results indicate that decision makers process imprecise and conflicting information differently, a finding that has important implications for basic and clinical research. PMID:26640434

  15. Initial Aerodynamic and Acoustic Study of an Active Twist Rotor Using a Loosely Coupled CFD/CSD Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, David D. Jr.

    2009-01-01

    Preliminary aerodynamic and performance predictions for an active twist rotor for a HART-II type of configuration are performed using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code, OVERFLOW2, and a computational structural dynamics (CSD) code, CAMRAD -II. These codes are loosely coupled to compute a consistent set of aerodynamics and elastic blade motions. Resultant aerodynamic and blade motion data are then used in the Ffowcs-Williams Hawkins solver, PSU-WOPWOP, to compute noise on an observer plane under the rotor. Active twist of the rotor blade is achieved in CAMRAD-II by application of a periodic torsional moment couple (of equal and opposite sign) at the blade root and tip at a specified frequency and amplitude. To provide confidence in these particular active twist predictions for which no measured data is available, the rotor system geometry and computational set up examined here are identical to that used in a previous successful Higher Harmonic Control (HHC) computational study. For a single frequency equal to three times the blade passage frequency (3P), active twist is applied across a range of control phase angles at two different amplitudes. Predicted results indicate that there are control phase angles where the maximum mid-frequency noise level and the 4P non -rotating hub vibrations can be reduced, potentially, both at the same time. However, these calculated reductions are predicted to come with a performance penalty in the form of a reduction in rotor lift-to-drag ratio due to an increase in rotor profile power.

  16. Interparental Conflict and Adolescents' Romantic Relationship Conflict

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Valerie A.; Furman, Wyndol

    2010-01-01

    This study examined associations between interparental conflict and adolescents' romantic relationship conflict. High school seniors (N = 183) who lived with married parents completed questionnaires about their parents' marriage and their own romantic relationships. A subset of 88 adolescents was also observed interacting with their romantic…

  17. Child Characteristics, Parent Education and Depressive Symptoms, and Marital Conflict Predicting Trajectories of Parenting Behavior from Childhood Through Early Adolescence in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Yi-Ping; Dopkins Stright, Anne; Yen, Lee-Lan

    2017-09-01

    The study examined how child and parent characteristics, and contextual sources of stress, such as marital conflict predict initial status and trajectories of parent involvement, support, and harsh control, over a 4-year period in families in Taiwan (n = 4,754). Based on Belsky's (1984) ecological model of parenting, three domains predicting parenting were tested, child characteristics (age cohort and gender), father and mother characteristics (education and depressive symptoms), and contextual sources of stress (marital conflict). The study followed two cohorts of children; the younger cohort was followed from first to fourth grade and the older cohort from fourth to seventh grade. Initially, fourth graders reported more parental involvement, support, and harsh control than first graders. However, involvement, support, and harsh control decreased across the 4 years for the older cohort as they transitioned to early adolescence. In the first year, girls reported more parental involvement and support and less harsh control than boys. Across the 4 years, involvement and support increased, and harsh control decreased for boys; whereas involvement stayed the same, support slightly decreased, and harsh control slightly increased for girls. Children whose parents were more educated reported more parent involvement, support, and harsh control in the first year. Children whose fathers were chronically depressed and whose parents were experiencing marital conflict reported decreasing parent involvement and support over the years. © 2016 Family Process Institute.

  18. The Introduction of Effect Mechanism among Organizational TMT'S Behavior Integration,Team Conflict and Performance%企业高管团队行为整合、冲突与绩效的作用机制初探

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜娟

    2011-01-01

    本文基于高管团队的“高阶梯队理论”以及高管团队的特质性研究,分析探讨了企业高管团队的特质、行为整合、团队冲突及其与绩效之间的作用机制.同时,提出了高管团队行为整合、冲突与绩效的作用机制概念模型,为进一步展开实证研究提供了理论基础,也对企业高管团队的管理、培训与激励起到了借鉴作用.%Based on "Upper Echelon Theory" of TMT and their heterogeneity research, this paper analyses the heterogeneity of organizational TMT, behavior integration, team conflict and effect mechanism with performance. At the same time, the paper puts forward a conceptual model about the relationship among behavior integration, team conflict and performance, which will be the basis for the future empirical research, and meanwhile helps the management, training and motivation of organizational TMT.

  19. From Conflict to Congruence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michlowski, Aida A.

    1999-01-01

    Conflict resolution has moved into the classroom. Peaceful conflict resolution includes negotiation, peer mediation, and arbitration. Data on conflict-resolution programs have turned up interesting objectives and outcomes. Curriculum approaches include classroom discipline, peace education, multicultural perspective, and just community. Teaching…

  20. Conflict cultures in organizations: how leaders shape conflict cultures and their organizational-level consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelfand, Michele J; Leslie, Lisa M; Keller, Kirsten; de Dreu, Carsten

    2012-11-01

    Anecdotal evidence abounds that organizations have distinct conflict cultures, or socially shared norms for how conflict should be managed. However, research to date has largely focused on conflict management styles at the individual and small group level, and has yet to examine whether organizations create socially shared and normative ways to manage conflict. In a sample of leaders and members from 92 branches of a large bank, factor analysis and aggregation analyses show that 3 conflict cultures-collaborative, dominating, and avoidant-operate at the unit level of analysis. Building on Lewin, Lippitt, and White's (1939) classic work, we find that leaders' own conflict management behaviors are associated with distinct unit conflict cultures. The results also demonstrate that conflict cultures have implications for macro branch-level outcomes, including branch viability (i.e., cohesion, potency, and burnout) and branch performance (i.e., creativity and customer service). A conflict culture perspective moves beyond the individual level and provides new insight into the dynamics of conflict management in organizational contexts.

  1. Parent-offspring conflict theory: an evolutionary framework for understanding conflict within human families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlomer, Gabriel L; Del Giudice, Marco; Ellis, Bruce J

    2011-07-01

    Decades of research demonstrate that conflict shapes and permeates a broad range of family processes. In the current article, we argue that greater insight, integration of knowledge, and empirical achievement in the study of family conflict can be realized by utilizing a powerful theory from evolutionary biology that is barely known within psychology: parent-offspring conflict theory (POCT). In the current article, we articulate POCT for psychological scientists, extend its scope by connecting it to the broader framework of life history theory, and draw out its implications for understanding conflict within human families. We specifically apply POCT to 2 instances of early mother-offspring interaction (prenatal conflict and weaning conflict); discuss the effects of genetic relatedness on behavioral conflict between parents, children, and their siblings; review the emerging literature on parent-offspring conflict over the choice of mates and spouses; and examine parent-offspring conflict from the perspective of imprinted genes. This review demonstrates the utility of POCT, not only for explaining what is known about conflict within families but also for generating novel hypotheses, suggesting new lines of research, and moving us toward the "big picture" by integrating across biological and psychological domains of knowledge.

  2. Boy Crisis? Sex Differences in Self-Injurious Behaviors and the Effects of Gender Role Conflicts Among College Students in China

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chao, Qiuling; Yang, Xueyan; Luo, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    In Western research, self-injurious behaviors are commonly viewed as “feminine” behavior. In this present study, using the data from a survey administered to 960 first- and second-year students...

  3. Conflict resolution in adolescent relationships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Doorn, M.D.

    2008-01-01

    Conflict is an inevitable feature of social relationships. When people interact, disagreements may arise. Especially in close relationships, people sometimes disagree. Although conflict might jeopardize relationships, conflict is not necessarily detrimental. The way conflicts are handled is importan

  4. Prediction of BVI Noise for an Active Twist Rotor Using a Loosely Coupled CFD/CSD Method and Comparison to Experimental Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogarty, David E.; Wilbur, Matthew L.; Sekula, Martin K.; Boyd, David Douglas, Jr.

    2012-01-01

    Numerical predictions of the acoustic characteristics of an Active Twist Rotor (ATR), using two methods to compute the rotor blade aerodynamics and elastic blade motion are compared to experimental data from a wind tunnel test in the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) in 2000. The first method, a loosely coupled iterative method, utilizes the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code OVERFLOW 2 and the Computational Structural Dynamics (CSD) code CAMRAD II. The second method utilizes the CAMRAD II free-wake model only. The harmonic active-twist control to the main rotor blade system is identified with three parameters - harmonic actuation frequency, actuation amplitude, and control phase angle. The resulting aerodynamics and blade motion data from the two methods are then used in the acoustics code PSU-WOPWOP to predict acoustic pressure on a spherical array of equally spaced observers surrounding the rotor. This spherical distribution of pressure is used to compute the sound power level representing baseline and actuated conditions. Sound power levels for three categories of noise are defined as - blade-vortex interaction sound power level (BVIPWL), low frequency sound power level (LFPWL), and overall sound power level, OAPWL. Comparisons with measured data indicate the CFD/CSD analysis successfully captures the trends in sound power levels and the effects of active-twist control at advance ratios of 0.14 and 0.17. The free-wake model predictions show inconsistent sound power levels relative to the trends in the experimental and CFD data. This paper presents the first ever comparison between CFD/CSD acoustic predictions for an active-twist rotor and experimental measurements.

  5. Conflict or Consensus?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agger, Annika; Poulsen, Birgitte

    forms of institutional design of citizen participation processes, less attention has been paid to the role of public administrators, and their role in facilitating processes of citizen participation. Public administrators have to work with diverse groups of citizens with diverging, and often conflicting......, interests. However, many public administrators have not been adequately exposed to the rationales of conflicts and the skills in resolving conflicts. The aim of this paper is to analyse the different types of conflicts that public administrators experience in formal processes of citizen involvement. Whereas...... the literature of deliberative democracy claims that consensus is most often the result of rational deliberative processes, the claim of this paper is that conflicts is more likely a natural and integrated part of such deliberative acts. Conflicts are, thus, seen as inevitable. Also conflicts may function...

  6. Managing intercultural conflict effectively

    CERN Document Server

    Ting-Toomey, Stella

    2001-01-01

    In this volume, Ting-Toomey and Oetzel accomplish two objectives: to explain the culture-based situational conflict model, including the relationship among conflict, ethnicity, and culture; and, second, integrate theory and practice in the discussion of interpersonal conflict in culture, ethnic, and gender contexts. While the book is theoretically directed, it is also a down-to-earth practical book that contains ample examples, conflict dialogues, and critical incidents. Managing Intercultural Conflict Effectively helps to illustrate the complexity of intercultural conflict interactions and readers will gain a broad yet integrative perspective in assessing intercultural conflict situations. The book is a multidisciplinary text that draws from the research work of a variety of disciplines such as cross-cultural psychology, social psychology, sociology, marital and family studies, international management, and communication.

  7. 基于前景理论与多Agent模拟的KIBS员工合作与冲突行为研究%Research on KIBS Employees’ Cooperate and Conflict Behavior Based on Prospect Theory and Multi-Agent Simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    付玓瓅; 胡斌

    2013-01-01

    Along with the globalization of knowledge economy,knowledge-intensive business service(KIBS)has become the focus of industrial restructuring in the major western developed countries and regions as well as a hot topic in management research recently.This paper investigates the generating mechanism and evolutionary law of KIBS employees' cooperate and conflict behavior.A behavior model of KIBS employees’ cooperate and conflict is proposed in accordance with theories of personality psychology,prospecttheory and game theory.Then Anylogic 6.5.0 is used to implement this multi-Agent simulation model.Parameters of income and group communication are analyzed in the later simulation experiment.The result shows that they affect the cooperate and conflict behavior of KIBS employees in different ways.%随着知识经济时代的到来,知识密集型服务业(KIBS)已经成为西方主要发达国家和地区产业结构调整关注的重点方向和近年来学术界的研究热点之一.文章研究了KIBS员工合作与冲突行为产生机理与演化规律,首先结合了人格心理学、前景理论和博弈论的相关理论,设计了KIBS员工合作与冲突行为决策模型.之后在仿真软件Anylogic 6.5.0上建立了相应的多Agent模拟模型,并针对收益参数和群体沟通这两种影响因素设计了模拟实验.最后对模拟结果进行了分析,发现收益参数中除了惩罚系数,控制因子对最终行为比例也产生影响,而沟通概率则对演化过程行为变化的幅度产生影响.

  8. Can conflict be energizing? a study of task conflict, positive emotions, and job satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todorova, Gergana; Bear, Julia B; Weingart, Laurie R

    2014-05-01

    Scholars have assumed that the presence of negative emotions during task conflict implies the absence of positive emotions. However, emotions researchers have shown that positive and negative emotions are not 2 ends of a bipolar continuum; rather, they represent 2 separate, orthogonal dimensions. Drawing on affective events theory, we develop and test hypotheses about the effects of task conflict on positive emotions and job satisfaction. To this end, we distinguish among the frequency, intensity, and information gained from task conflict. Using field data from 232 employees in a long-term health care organization, we find that more frequent mild task conflict expression engenders more information acquisition, but more frequent intense task conflict expression hinders it. Because of the information gains from mild task conflict expression, employees feel more active, energized, interested, and excited, and these positive active emotions increase job satisfaction. The information gained during task conflict, however, is not always energizing: It depends on the extent to which the behavioral context involves active learning and whether the conflict is cross-functional. We discuss theoretical implications for conflict, emotions, and job satisfaction in organizations.

  9. Functional csdA is needed for effective adaptation and initiation of growth of Clostridium botulinum ATCC 3502 at suboptimal temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söderholm, Henna; Derman, Yağmur; Lindström, Miia; Korkeala, Hannu

    2015-09-02

    The activity of RNA helicase csdA (cbo2802) after temperature downshift was compared to its activity at optimal growth temperature, and the effect of sense and antisense oriented insertional inactivation of cbo2802 on the growth of ATCC 3502 at suboptimal temperature was evaluated. The relative cbo2802 transcript level was significantly induced for 30min to 5h after cold shock. In contrast, a significant decrease in the relative transcript level of cbo2802 was observed within the same time frame at 37°C. Inactivation of cbo2802 led to an extensive delay in initiation of exponential growth at 20°C but not at 37°C. In addition, the mean minimum growth temperatures of the mutant strains were higher than those of the wild-type strain. During a 24-hour incubation at 37°C, all strains were motile, whereas at 20°C the mutant strains showed severely impaired motility compared to the wild-type strain. This study shows that a functional csdA is needed for effective adaptation and initiation of growth and motility of Clostridium botulinum ATCC 3502 at suboptimal temperature.

  10. Conflict in organizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kesting, Peter; Smolinski, Remigiusz; Speakman, Ian

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this conceptual paper is to apply the insights of recent routine research in the area of conflict and conflict management. As a result, the authors identify four different types of conflict sources that are rooted in routines and the specific difficulties connected with their change......: the repetitive character of routine, disagreement over the “validity” of the existing routines, disagreement concerning the definition of new targets, and resistance towards change processes. Further the authors point to the inherent tendency to routinize conflict management strategies and the risks...... that are associated with this process. As a result, this paper offers new insights into the causes and structure of conflicts triggered by change processes as well as into the management of repetitive conflicts....

  11. Interpersonal Conflict: A Substantial Factor to Organizational Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malikeh Beheshtifar

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Interpersonal conflict is conflict that occurs between two or more individuals that work together in groups or teams. This is a conflict that occurs between two or more individuals. Many individual differences lead to interpersonal conflict, including personalities, culture, attitudes, values, perceptions, and the other differences. Conflict arises due to a variety of factors. Individual differences in goals, expectations, values, proposed courses of action, and suggestions about how to best handle a situation are unavoidable. Moreover, identifying the factors which cause conflict in any organization is considered the main stage in the process of conflict management. The management of interpersonal conflict involves changes in the attitudes, behavior, and organization structure, so that the organizational members can work with each other effectively for attaining their individual and/or joint goals. The management of interpersonal conflict essentially involves teaching organizational members the styles of handling interpersonal conflict to deal with different situations effectively and setting up appropriate mechanisms so that unresolved issues are dealt with properly. The researcher recommends other scholars to identify the other factors of organizational conflict, such as identifying a list of factors causing intrapersonal conflict.

  12. Peer Conflict and Intrafamily Conflict: Are They Conceptual Bridges?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccoby, Eleanor E.

    1996-01-01

    Reviews the articles on peer and intrafamily conflict in this issue, focusing on ways in which conflict in these two different settings might be related to one another. Notes that although conflict-resolution styles may carry over to some extent from conflict among family members to conflict among peers, there are some important differences. (MDM)

  13. Towards managing diversity: Cultural aspects of conflict management in organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorothea Hamdorf

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated cultural aspects of conflict management in organizations in response to the growing need for an understanding of how people from diverse cultural backgrounds can work together without the often-resulting problem of intercultural conflict. Culture was evaluated through self-assessments of how independent or interdependent the subjects were (Markus & Kitayama, 1991, and conflict behavior through eight conflict management styles: dominating, integrating, compromising, avoiding, obliging, emotion, neglect and third-party help (Rahim, 1983; Ting-Toomey et al., 2000. Furthermore, drawing upon face-negotiation theory (Ting-Toomey, 1988; Ting-Toomey & Kurogi, 1998, a test was made of whether self-face, other-face and mutual-face concerns could explain cultural differences in conflict behavior. A total of 185 professionals from different countries completed an Internet questionnaire. An exploratory factor analysis of the eight styles revealed three factors which seem to describe direct, indirect and integrating plus compromising conflict behaviors. In line with this study's hypotheses, persons with a tendency to act independently mentioned direct styles, as well as integrating, and persons with a tendency to act interdependently mentioned indirect styles in addition to integrating and compromising. Furthermore, a concern for self-face maintenance was related to direct conflict behavior, a concern for other-face maintenance to indirect conflict behavior, and a concern for mutual-face maintenance to integrating and compromising. However, persons with a tendency to act independently do not seem to be particularly concerned about self-face maintenance. Persons with a tendency to act interdependently, on the other hand, show other- and mutual-face concerns in conflict situations. It was concluded that face concerns do play a crucial role, but mainly in explaining the conflict behavior of persons with a tendency to act interdependently

  14. Trust: An innovative tool for investigating marital conflict in response to a novel stressor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas-Thompson, Rachel G; George, Melissa W; Quinn-Sparks, Amy R

    2016-08-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate an innovative approach to elicit marital conflict behaviors in response to a novel stressor. Past research has relied exclusively on assessments of marital conflict that measure reoccurring or past conflict. Couples engaged in 2 interactions: (a) a standardized conflict discussion and (b) the Timed Reconstruction of Unseen Structures Together (TRUST) task, in which couples worked together to solve an unfamiliar problem. Results indicated that the TRUST task was effective at eliciting both positive and negative conflict behaviors and explained unique variance in self-reports of marital conflict and resolution after controlling for behavior during the standardized conflict discussion. Couples on average displayed more positive and fewer negative conflict behaviors during the TRUST task relative to the conflict discussion task and also rated the novel task as more difficult and stressful. In bivariate analyses, negative behaviors during the TRUST task were related to self-reports of marital conflict and resolution in expected directions for both men and women. In contrast, men who displayed more positive behaviors during the TRUST task self-reported more frequent and intense marital conflict; positive behaviors during the TRUST task were unrelated to women's self-reports of marital conflict or resolution. Implications and directions for future research are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record

  15. Exploring how Conflict Management Training Changes Workplace Conflicts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Elisabeth Naima

    2012-01-01

    as a catalyst for the development of new sensemakings about workplace conflicts. These included increasing acknowledgement of workplace conflicts, recognition of interdependent and context embedded relationships in interpersonal conflicts, and enactment of active resistance in a subordinated occupational group...

  16. Climate shocks and conflict

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Papaioannou, Kostadis J.

    2016-01-01

    This paper offers a historical micro-level analysis of the impact of climate shocks on the incidence of civil conflict in colonial Nigeria (1912-1945). Primary historical sources on court cases, prisoners and homicides are used to capture conflict. To measure climate shocks we use the deviation f

  17. Multicultural team conflict management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krystyna Heinz

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the potential problems related to conflict resolution while cooperating in multicultural teams. Special attention is paid to specific character of such teams as well as to the concept of productive conflict and the ways of resolving it. The experiences gained in the Erasmus Intenstive Programme - Effective Working in Multicultural Teams were used.

  18. Multicultural team conflict management

    OpenAIRE

    Krystyna Heinz

    2014-01-01

    The article presents the potential problems related to conflict resolution while cooperating in multicultural teams. Special attention is paid to specific character of such teams as well as to the concept of productive conflict and the ways of resolving it. The experiences gained in the Erasmus Intenstive Programme - Effective Working in Multicultural Teams were used.

  19. Conflicts as Aversive Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreisbach, Gesine; Fischer, Rico

    2012-01-01

    Theories of human action control deal with the question of how cognitive control is dynamically adjusted to task demands. The conflict monitoring theory of anterior cingulate (ACC) function suggests that the ACC monitors for response conflicts in the ongoing processing stream thereby triggering the mobilization of cognitive control. Alternatively,…

  20. High-Conflict Divorce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Janet R.

    1994-01-01

    Reviews available research studies of high-conflict divorce and its effects on children. Factors believed to contribute to high-conflict divorce are explored, and a model of their interrelationships is proposed. Dispute resolution, intervention, and prevention programs are discussed, and implications for social policy are outlined. (SLD)

  1. Conflicts as Aversive Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreisbach, Gesine; Fischer, Rico

    2012-01-01

    Theories of human action control deal with the question of how cognitive control is dynamically adjusted to task demands. The conflict monitoring theory of anterior cingulate (ACC) function suggests that the ACC monitors for response conflicts in the ongoing processing stream thereby triggering the mobilization of cognitive control. Alternatively,…

  2. Conflicts in Anna Karenina

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨恋

    2011-01-01

    Anna Karenina is a huge classic tragedy which is created by Tolstoy.This paper mainly talks about the conflict in the classic fictional story of Anna Karenina,which involves the conflicts between religious ethics,capitalistic new ideas,bravery and limitation,love for son and love for a lover,plus the variances between rural custom culture and urban culture.

  3. Conflicts in Anna Karenina

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨恋

    2011-01-01

    Anna Karenina is a huge classic tragedy which is created by Tolstoy. This paper mainly talks about the conflict in the classic fictional story of Anna Karenina, which involves the conflicts between religious ethics, capitalistic new ideas, bravery and limitation, love for son and love for a lover, plus the variances between rural custom culture and urban culture.

  4. Flutter and dynamic analysis based on CFD/CSD coupling method%基于CFD/CSD耦合的颤振与动载荷分析方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢亮; 徐敏; 李杰; 蔡天星

    2012-01-01

    采用CFD/CSD耦合方法,建立了气动弹性仿真系统.基于系统辨识的方法,使用Volterra级数建立了降阶模型(ROM),实现了颤振边界的快速求解,分别使用CFD/CSD全耦合方法与ROM完成了AGARD 445.6标模的颤振分析,计算结果与实验相符较好.使用ROM完成了带边条平直翼的颤振分析.使用CFD/CSD耦合方法计算了此机翼在飞行动压下的气弹响应,结果表明即使在颤振边界内,仍然有可能出现极限环振荡(LCO).对此,分析了其气弹响应中的动载情况.结果表明基于CFD/CSD耦合的方法可以真实地仿真气弹响应过程,准确地分析气弹响应中的动态载荷情况.%CFD/CSD ( computational fluid dynamics/computational solid dynamics) coupling algorithm was concerned, and CFD based nonlinear aeroelastic simulation code was developed for complex aeroelastic system analysis. In order to meet the demand of rapid analysis, a reduced-order model based on Volterra series for nonlinear unsteady aerodynamics analysis was developed. The model was validated on AGARD 445. 6 wing, which is a standard aeroelastic configuration, and used in the flutter analysis of a plate wing with regula. CFD/CSD coupling method was employed to calculate the aeroelastic response under flight dynamic pressure. The result shows that even when the flight dynamic pressure is below the flutter boundary, the aeroelastic response also has the possibility to go into limit cycle oscillation ( LCO). Then the dynamic load was analyzed in this case. The result shows that CFD/CSD coupling method can credibly simulate the aeroelastic response, and give accurate information about dynamic load correspomding to such response.

  5. Structure of a NifS homologue: X-ray structure analysis of CsdB, an Escherichia coli counterpart of mammalian selenocysteine lyase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, T; Maeda, M; Mihara, H; Kurihara, T; Esaki, N; Hata, Y

    2000-02-15

    Escherichia coli CsdB, a NifS homologue with a high specificity for L-selenocysteine, is a pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent dimeric enzyme that belongs to aminotransferases class V in fold-type I of PLP enzymes and catalyzes the decomposition of L-selenocysteine into selenium and L-alanine. The crystal structure of the enzyme has been determined by the X-ray crystallographic method of multiple isomorphous replacement and refined to an R-factor of 18.7% at 2.8 A resolution. The subunit structure consists of three parts: a large domain of an alpha/beta-fold containing a seven-stranded beta-sheet flanked by seven helices, a small domain containing a four-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet flanked by three alpha-helices, and an N-terminal segment containing two alpha-helices. The overall fold of the subunit is similar to those of the enzymes belonging to the fold-type I family represented by aspartate aminotransferase. However, CsdB has several structural features that are not observed in other families of the enzymes. A remarkable feature is that an alpha-helix in the lobe extending from the small domain to the large domain in one subunit of the dimer interacts with a beta-hairpin loop protruding from the large domain of the other subunit. The extended lobe and the protruded beta-hairpin loop form one side of a limb of each active site in the enzyme. The most striking structural feature of CsdB lies in the location of a putative catalytic residue; the side chain of Cys364 on the extended lobe of one subunit is close enough to interact with the gamma-atom of a modeled substrate in the active site of the subunit. Moreover, His55 from the other subunit is positioned so that it interacts with the gamma- or beta-atom of the substrate and may be involved in the catalytic reaction. This is the first report on three-dimensional structures of NifS homologues.

  6. Conflict and memory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagoner, Brady; Brescó, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    This introduction to the special issue on conflict and memory aims to underscore the importance of memory (whether individual and collective) in relation to intergroup conflicts. We argue that the way in which societies reconstruct and bring the past into the present—especially, the historical past......—is crucial when it comes to the study of intergroup conflict dynamics. In this regard, we also highlight the growing importance of memory studies within the area of social sciences as well as the multiple ways of approaching memory. Drawing from this wide theoretical framework, we introduce the articles...... of this issue, eight articles that tackle the role of memory in different conflicts, whether currently under way, in progress of being resolved, in postwar settings, or in contexts conflicts expected to happen do not arise....

  7. Parental Conflict and its Effects on Youth Self Esteem (A Study At University of Punjab)

    OpenAIRE

    Salma Nazir; Sidra Saeed; Malik Muhammad Sohail; Falak Sher; Zarqa Azhar; Muhammad Rizwan Safdar

    2012-01-01

    This research was conducted to probe the effects of parental conflict on youth self esteem. Objective of study was to explore reasons behind parental conflict, to measure the level of parental conflict on behavior of children, to find out change in the behavior of children, to identify the role of parents in the self esteem of children, to know how parent conflict and self esteem of children are related. Some 200 students from different departments of university of Punjab were selected by usi...

  8. Interpersonal Conflicts and Styles of Managing Conflicts among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    conflict, conflict management, student experience, diversity, ethnicity, gender, undergraduate studies, ... it causes disagreements, stress, social chaos, destruction and violence between groups. ... to constructive in the mode of interaction.

  9. CONFLICTS PREVENTION IN TEAM- WORK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean de PERSON

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Building a trust atmosphere and mobilization in a team or an organizationremains the dream of every manager. This article analyses the internalmechanism of a conflict through life positions diagram in which direction anddominance diagrams appear. The first diagonal, the dominance one, revealsan animal behavior, the latter including both positive aspirations (++ quarter,and also deceptions (-- quarter.Passing over crisis situations requires from managers to outrun, through theirstyle and actions the dominance diagonal and pass to a game with reciprocalgaining (++ quarter, based on trust, that color relations between people andrelease their energy.

  10. Research of Evolutionary Game Behaviors of Multilateral Conflict Participants in Network Mass Incidents%网络多方冲突演化博弈行为策略研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨尊琦; 张琳

    2016-01-01

    [目的/意义]网络多方冲突的产生受参与主体的非理性化情绪和利益支配影响,利用演化博弈论方法可以从根本上探究冲突的成因和演化动力。[方法/过程]以“百度血友病吧被卖”事件为例,通过构建网媒—网络公司—网民、政府—网民的博弈模型来探究该事件影响下的网络群体性事件与多方冲突演化博弈行为,利用复制动态方程分析参与主体的策略选择,再利用雅克比矩阵对平衡点进行稳定性分析。[结果/结论]根据博弈结果可知:当网媒、网络公司与网民分别采取推动、解释与参与冲突时三方的利益得到最大的满足,为演化稳定策略。此时,政府对网络冲突的有效疏导可以合理控制网络群体性事件的负面影响,进而提出具有针对性、合理性的应对策略。%Purpose/Significance]Network of multilateral conflict is influenced by participant's irrational emotion and interest control, the causes of conflict and the evolution of the power can be fundamentally explored through the evolutionary game theory method. [ Meth-od/Process] The "Baidu hemophilia sales' events" is given as an example, based on the idea of evolutionary game theory, the network mass incidents and various evolutionary game behaviors of conflict participants under the influence of events are further studied. Network media, network companies and users as well as the government and Internet users of the game model are established, replicated dynamics equation analysis is used to select the participation strategy of each participant, and the stability analysis is used to measure the equilibrium point by the Jacobi matrix. [ Result/Conclusion] According to the result of the game theory analysis, when the conflict is promoted by the media, network companies and Internet users, the interests of these three parties reach the maximum and the participants are practicing the evolutionary stable strategy. At

  11. Managing conflicts between users in Wikipedia

    CERN Document Server

    Jacquemin, Bernard; Poudat, Céline; Hurault-Plantet, Martine; Auray, Nicolas

    2008-01-01

    Wikipedia is nowadays a widely used encyclopedia, and one of the most visible sites on the Internet. Its strong principle of collaborative work and free editing sometimes generates disputes due to disagreements between users. In this article we study how the wikipedian community resolves the conflicts and which roles do wikipedian choose in this process. We observed the users behavior both in the article talk pages, and in the Arbitration Committee pages specifically dedicated to serious disputes. We first set up a users typology according to their involvement in conflicts and their publishing and management activity in the encyclopedia. We then used those user types to describe users behavior in contributing to articles that are tagged by the wikipedian community as being in conflict with the official guidelines of Wikipedia, or conversely as being well featured.

  12. INFLUENCE OF PARENT-ADOLESCENT CONFLICT FREQUENCY ON ADOLESCENT FAMILY SATISFACTION AND SELF-SATISFACTION IN CHINA: CONFLICT COPING TACTICS AS MODERATORS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hongyu; Xu, Yan; Wang, Fang; Jiang, Jiang; Zhang, Xiaohui

    2015-12-01

    Existing studies have found that parent-adolescent conflict frequency and conflict coping tactics influence adolescent family satisfaction and self-satisfaction under the background of Western culture. However, due to differences between Eastern and Western cultures, it is unknown whether previous results of the Western population can be extended to Chinese adolescents. The present study investigated grade differences in parent-adolescent conflict frequency and conflict coping tactics and examined the moderating effects of conflict coping tactics on the relationships between conflict frequency and adolescent family satisfaction and between conflict frequency and adolescent self-satisfaction. Chinese adolescents in Grades 7, 8, 10, and 11 (N = 524) completed measures on conflict frequency, conflict coping tactics, family satisfaction, and self-satisfaction. An analysis of variance (ANOVA) and structural equation model analyses found, first, that conflict frequency decreased with grade level. For coping tactics, conciliation, avoidance, and assertion behaviors increased with grade level. Second, conflict frequency was negatively related to family satisfaction regardless of conciliation and avoidance tactics. By contrast, conflict frequency was negatively related to self-satisfaction when high conciliation and high avoidance behaviors were practiced. In addition, at low conflict frequency conciliation was positively associated with self-satisfaction and was not significant at high conflict frequency.

  13. Parent-Adolescent Conflict in African American Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Olivenne D; McHale, Susan M

    2016-10-01

    Parent-adolescent conflict is frequent in families and has implications for youth adjustment and family relationships. Drawing on a family systems perspective, we examined mothers', fathers', and two adolescent-aged siblings' (50.5 % females) reports of parent-adolescent conflict in 187 African American families. Using latent profile analysis in the context of an ethnic homogeneous design, we identified three family types based on levels of and differences between parent and youth conflict reports: low conflict, father high conflict, and younger sibling high conflict. Compared to low conflict families, youth in younger sibling high conflict families reported more depressive symptoms and risky behaviors. The results for parents' acceptance revealed that, in comparison to low conflict families, older siblings in father high conflict families reported lower acceptance from mothers, and mothers in these families reported lower acceptance of their children; further, older siblings in younger sibling high conflict families reported less acceptance from fathers, and fathers in these families reported less acceptance of their children. Results underscore the significance of levels of and both differences between and direction of differences in parents' and youth's reports of their "shared" experiences, as well as the importance of examining the larger family contexts of dyadic parent-relationships.

  14. Behavioral vs. molecular sources of conflict between nuclear and mitochondrial DNA: The role of male-biased dispersal in a Holarctic sea duck

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Jeffrey L.; Bolender, Kimberly A.; Pearce, John M.

    2012-01-01

    Genetic studies of waterfowl (Anatidae) have observed the full spectrum of mitochondrial (mt) DNA population divergence, from apparent panmixia to deep, reciprocally monophyletic lineages. Yet, these studies often found weak or no nuclear (nu) DNA structure, which was often attributed to male-biased gene flow, a common behaviour within this family. An alternative explanation for this ‘conflict’ is that the smaller effective population size and faster sorting rate of mtDNA relative to nuDNA lead to different signals of population structure. We tested these alternatives by sequencing 12 nuDNA introns for a Holarctic pair of waterfowl subspecies, the European goosander (Mergus merganser merganser) and the North American common merganser (M. m. americanus), which exhibit strong population structure in mtDNA. We inferred effective population sizes, gene flow and divergence times from published mtDNA sequences and simulated expected differentiation for nuDNA based on those histories. Between Europe and North America, nuDNA ФST was 3.4-fold lower than mtDNA ФST, a result consistent with differences in sorting rates. However, despite geographically structured and monophyletic mtDNA lineages within continents, nuDNA ФST values were generally zero and significantly lower than predicted. This between- and within-continent contrast held when comparing mtDNA and nuDNA among published studies of ducks. Thus, male-mediated gene flow is a better explanation than slower sorting rates for limited nuDNA differentiation within continents, which is also supported by nonmolecular data. This study illustrates the value of quantitatively testing discrepancies between mtDNA and nuDNA to reject the null hypothesis that conflict simply reflects different sorting rates.

  15. ¿Qué veo yo? ¿qué vieron ellos?; Unidades Didácticas sobre Patrimonio Cultural CSD-TCP

    OpenAIRE

    Orejas Saco del Valle, Almudena; Rodríguez Ovejero, Ana Delia; Colegio Zazuar (Madrid). Departamento de Ciencias Sociales

    2013-01-01

    Ciencias Sociales, Geografía e Historia, 3º E.S.O.-- Actividad desarrollada dentro del programa de Investigación para la Conservación y Revalorización del Patrimonio Cultural (TCP) (CSD2007-0058) CONSOLIDER-INGENIO 2010.-- Contiene: guía del profesor, cuadernillo del alumno y póster. Guía de uso de la colección y Presentación y justificación.-- El video está sujeto a una licencia de Creative Commons Reconocimiento-NoComercial-CompartirIgual 4.0 Internacional.-- La colección consta de las sig...

  16. Large critical current densities and pinning forces in CSD-grown superconducting GdBa2Cu3O7-x -BaHfO3 nanocomposite films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cayado, Pablo; Erbe, Manuela; Kauffmann-Weiss, Sandra; Bühler, Carl; Jung, Alexandra; Hänisch, Jens; Holzapfel, Bernhard

    2017-09-01

    GdBa2Cu3O7-x -BaHfO3 (GdBCO-BHO) nanocomposite (NC) films containing 12 mol% BHO nanoparticles were prepared by chemical solution deposition (CSD) following the TFA route on SrTiO3 (STO) single crystals and buffered metallic tapes supplied by two different companies: Deutsche Nanoschicht GmbH and SuperOx. We optimized the preparation of our GdBCO-BHO solutions with acetylacetone making the film synthesis very robust and reproducible, and obtained 220 nm films with excellent superconducting properties. We show the structural, morphological and superconducting properties of the films after a careful optimization of the processing parameters (growth temperature, oxygen partial pressure and heating ramp). The films reach critical temperatures (T c) of ˜94 K, self-field critical current densities (J c) of >7 MA cm- 2 and maximum pinning force densities (F p) of ˜16 GN m- 3 at 77 K on STO and T c of ˜94.5 K and J c > 1.5 MA cm- 2 on buffered metallic tapes. The transport properties under applied magnetic fields are significantly improved with respect to the pristine GdBCO films. The GdBCO-BHO NC films on STO present epitaxial c-axis orientation with excellent out-of-plane and in-plane texture. The films are, in general, very dense with a low amount of pores and only superficial indentations. On the other hand, we present, for the first time, a systematic study of CSD-grown GdBCO-BHO NC films on buffered metallic tapes. We have used the optimized growth conditions for STO as a reference and identified some limitations on the film synthesis that should be overcome for further improvement of the films’ superconducting properties.

  17. On the escalation and de-escalation of conflict

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Lacomba; F. Lagos; E. Reuben; F. van Winden

    2014-01-01

    We introduce three extensions of the Hirshleifer-Skaperdas conflict game to study experimentally the effects of post-conflict behavior and repeated interaction on the allocation of effort between production and appropriation. Without repeated interaction, destruction of resources by defeated players

  18. On the escalation and de-escalation of conflict

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Lacomba; F. Lagos; E. Reuben; F. van Winden

    2013-01-01

    We introduce three variations of the Hirshleifer-Skaperdas conflict game to study experimentally the effects of post-conflict behavior and repeated interaction on the allocation of effort between production and appropriation. Without repeated interaction, destruction of resources by defeated players

  19. On the escalation and de-escalation of conflict

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lacomba, J.A.; Lagos, F.; Reuben, E.; van Winden, F.

    2014-01-01

    We introduce three extensions of the Hirshleifer-Skaperdas conflict game to study experimentally the effects of post-conflict behavior and repeated interaction on the allocation of effort between production and appropriation. Without repeated interaction, destruction of resources by defeated players

  20. On the escalation and de-escalation of conflict

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lacomba, J.A.; Lagos, F.; Reuben, E.; van Winden, F.

    2013-01-01

    We introduce three variations of the Hirshleifer-Skaperdas conflict game to study experimentally the effects of post-conflict behavior and repeated interaction on the allocation of effort between production and appropriation. Without repeated interaction, destruction of resources by defeated players

  1. Mother-Adolescent Conflict: Stability, Change, and Relations with Externalizing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofer, Claire; Eisenberg, Nancy; Spinrad, Tracy L.; Morris, Amanda S.; Gershoff, Elizabeth; Valiente, Carlos; Kupfer, Anne; Eggum, Natalie D.

    2013-01-01

    Stability and change in mother-adolescent conflict reactions (CRs) and the prediction of CRs from adolescents' earlier behavior problems (and vice versa) were examined with 131 mothers and their adolescents (63 boys). Dyads engaged in a 6-min conflict discussion twice, 2 years apart ["M" age was 13 at Time 1 (T1)]. Non-verbal expressive…

  2. Conflict and Democracy Education in Palestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashweh, Maher Z.

    2002-01-01

    Describes Palestinian teachers' and students' emotional and cognitive conflicts when introduced to a problem- and case-based approach to democracy education. Observation and case study data indicated that participants sometimes held initial beliefs about democracy, student-teacher interactions, and appropriate classroom behaviors reflecting an…

  3. Neighborhood conflicts: the role of social categorization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ufkes, E.G.; Otten, S.; Zee, van der K. I.; Giebels, E.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose – In a multicultural context, this study aims to investigate the effect of ingroup versus outgroup categorization and stereotypes on residents' emotional and behavioral reactions in neighbor-to-neighbor conflicts. Based on the literature on the “black sheep effect”, the authors predicted tha

  4. If -Then Contingencies in Children's Sibling Conflicts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlman, Michal; Ross, Hildy S.

    2005-01-01

    Two-step (if -then) behavioral contingencies in the naturally occurring conflicts of 2- and 4-year-old siblings were identified and described. Children's crying, compliance, ignoring, opposition, power, and reasoning strategies were examined to determine how they were used immediately following opposition, power, and reasoning from siblings and…

  5. Ombud's corner: Zen and conflict resolution

    CERN Multimedia

    Vincent Vuillemin

    2012-01-01

    “In order to reduce conflict in our lives we must first address our inner battles. To stop our reactive behavior, we need to make peace with ourselves. This is where conflict resolution truly begins.”*   Most of the people coming to the Ombuds sincerely believe that the conflict they are in is due to the other party. They do not see that they play a key role in creating the external circumstances which lead to such a conflict. Thus, paying attention early on to your emotions and your body language, as well as recording your thoughts (positive and negative), can be very interesting. In other words, observe yourself. A close, intuitive and clear understanding of who we are will help us to avoid projecting our own feelings onto others or feeling too soon as though we may be under attack. In such positive circumstances, we can then face conflicts in an open way, instead of reacting with fight or flight. Each conflict can give us an opportunity to ga...

  6. Ethnic Conflicts and Governmental Conflict Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-12-01

    manipulation by ethnic leaders. Thus, there are bidirectional relationships between hegemonic aspirations and ethnic leaders. Most of the time ethnic...perhaps the strongest and clearest statement of national identity. In essence, they serve as modern totems that bear a special relationship to the...Assessment of Interracial /Interethnic Conflict in Los Angeles,” 2002, Center for Research in Society and Politics, University of California. Serwer, Daniel

  7. Dysfunctional health service conflict: causes and accelerants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, H Wayne

    2012-01-01

    This article examines the causes and accelerants of dysfunctional health service conflict and how it emerges from the health system's core hierarchical structures, specialized roles, participant psychodynamics, culture, and values. This article sets out to answer whether health care conflict is more widespread and intense than in other settings and if it is, why? To this end, health care power, gender, and educational status gaps are examined with an eye to how they undermine open communication, teamwork, and collaborative forms of conflict and spark a range of dysfunctions, including a pervasive culture of fear; the deny-and-defend lawsuit response; widespread patterns of hierarchical, generational, and lateral bullying; overly avoidant conflict styles among non-elite groups; and a range of other behaviors that lead to numerous human resource problems, including burnout, higher staff turnover, increased errors, poor employee citizenship behavior, patient dissatisfaction, increased patient complaints, and lawsuits. Bad patient outcomes include decreased compliance and increased morbidity and mortality. Health care managers must understand the root causes of these problems to treat them at the source and implement solutions that avoid negative conflict spirals that undermine organizational morale and efficiency.

  8. Conflict management styles in the health professions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sportsman, Susan; Hamilton, Patti

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine prevalent conflict management styles chosen by students in nursing and to contrast these styles with those chosen by students in allied health professions. The associations among the level of professional health care education and the style chosen were also determined. A convenience sample of 126 students in a comprehensive university completed the Thomas-Kilmann Conflict Mode Instrument (TKI), which requires respondents to choose behaviors most characteristic of their response to conflict and classifies these behaviors as one of five styles. There was no significant difference between the prevalent conflict management styles chosen by graduate and undergraduate nursing students and those in allied health. Some of the students were already licensed in their discipline; others had not yet taken a licensing exam. Licensure and educational level were not associated with choice of styles. Women and men had similar preferences. The prevalent style for nursing students was compromise, followed by avoidance. In contrast, avoidance, followed by compromise and accommodation, was the prevalent style for allied health students. When compared to the TKI norms, slightly more than one half of all participants chose two or more conflict management styles, commonly avoidance and accommodation at the 75th percentile or above. Only 9.8% of the participants chose collaboration at that level. Implications for nurse educators, researchers, and administrators are discussed.

  9. Conflicts and social impacts: EIA of renewable energy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Sanne Vammen; Hansen, Anne Merrild; Nielsen, Helle

    2017-01-01

    The transition to renewable energy is currently in many places challenged by conflicts over specific projects. For example siting of onshore wind turbines often causes conflicts with local communities, sometimes leading to abandonment of the project or plan. This paper presents an analysis...... of such conflicts, and the role social impacts play. The paper analyses in depth four cases of renewable energy projects, utilizing a conceptualization of conflict constituted by three elements: Attitude, behavior and contradictions. Through analysis of EIA reports and hearing responses as well as interviews...

  10. Approaches to Conflict and Conflict Resolution in Toddler Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashby, Nicole; Neilsen-Hewett, Cathrine

    2012-01-01

    The importance of conflict and its resolution for children's short- and long-term adjustment has been well established within the research literature. Conflict and conflict resolution differs according to a number of constructs, including age, gender and relationship status. The purpose of this study was to explore conflict origins, resolution…

  11. Conflicts and Negotiations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Israel adopts a two-pronged strategy to dominate the Middle East situation Recently, Israel has had several conflicts with its Middle East neighbors. At the same time, however, it has prepared to begin direct negotiations with the Palestinians.

  12. Managing conflicts of interest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sade, Robert M; Akins, Cary W; Weisel, Richard D

    2015-04-01

    The more extensive conflict of interest information will permit reviewers and editors to ensure the accuracy, balance,and lack of bias of papers accepted for publication.Therefore, a brief conflict statement will be published on the cover page and a more extensive description will be published at the end of the paper to allow concerned readers to make their own judgments about the quality of the information reported.

  13. Human Hippocampus Arbitrates Approach-Avoidance Conflict

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, Dominik R.; Guitart-Masip, Marc; Packard, Pau A.; Miró, Júlia; Falip, Mercè; Fuentemilla, Lluís; Dolan, Raymond J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Animal models of human anxiety often invoke a conflict between approach and avoidance [1, 2]. In these, a key behavioral assay comprises passive avoidance of potential threat and inhibition, both thought to be controlled by ventral hippocampus [2–6]. Efforts to translate these approaches to clinical contexts [7, 8] are hampered by the fact that it is not known whether humans manifest analogous approach-avoidance dispositions and, if so, whether they share a homologous neurobiological substrate [9]. Here, we developed a paradigm to investigate the role of human hippocampus in arbitrating an approach-avoidance conflict under varying levels of potential threat. Across four experiments, subjects showed analogous behavior by adapting both passive avoidance behavior and behavioral inhibition to threat level. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we observe that threat level engages the anterior hippocampus, the human homolog of rodent ventral hippocampus [10]. Testing patients with selective hippocampal lesions, we demonstrate a causal role for the hippocampus with patients showing reduced passive avoidance behavior and inhibition across all threat levels. Our data provide the first human assay for approach-avoidance conflict akin to that of animal anxiety models. The findings bridge rodent and human research on passive avoidance and behavioral inhibition and furnish a framework for addressing the neuronal underpinnings of human anxiety disorders, where our data indicate a major role for the hippocampus. PMID:24560572

  14. Conflict, Space and Architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Schoonderbeek

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Footprint 19 focuses on the more recent roles of architecture in the contemporary spaces of conflict. Departing from a spatial understanding of geopolitical, climatological and economical conflicts, the various contributions highlight the large scale and phenomenal transitions in the physical world and in society by extrapolating, through examples, the abundance of relations that can be traced between conflict, territory and architecture. Conflict areas often prove to be fertile grounds for innovation and for the emergence of new spatial forms. The issue reports on the state of perpetual global unrest in architecture through a series of articles and case studies that highlight the consequences of conflicts in the places and spaces that we inhabit. In the introduction, these are discussed as an interlinked global reality rather than as isolated incidents. In doing so, the contemporary spaces of conflict are positioned in the context of emerging global trends, conditions, and discourses in the attempt to address their indicative symptoms while reflecting on their underlying causes.

  15. [Relationship of perception conflict and assertiveness in nurses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojčić, Živko; Perković, Lada; Stašević, Ina; Stojčić, Nevena; Ropac, Darko

    2014-06-01

    At their workplace, nurses are exposed to a number of conflict situations. On dealing with such situations, a significant role is played by assertiveness skills. Assertiveness is the necessity of efficient communication between nurses and patients. Thus, development of these skills can enhance patient confidence in the nursing profession. The aim of the study was to determine whether there are differences in assertiveness with respect to age and sex, and whether there is and what is the connection between assertiveness, potential sources of conflict at work, conflicts due to the behavior of associates, resolving conflicts and self-assessment in resolving conflicts. The survey included 87 hospital nurses. The questionnaire included assessment of assertiveness. On processing the results, we calculated the indicators of descriptive statistics, carried out the variance analysis and t-test, and calculated Pearson's correlation coefficients. It was found that the majority of subjects expressed a medium level of assertiveness, i.e. they could be considered as relatively assertive persons. There were significant differences in assertiveness according to age of the subjects and length of service, where the oldest age group was significantly less assertive. More assertive subjects frequently observed behaviors that may be a source of conflict and problems in the organization of work. At the same time, they often had conflicts because of such behavior, which indicated that more assertive subjects were bolder and more secure. More assertive subjects believed that they were more successful in resolving conflicts than non-assertive subjects.

  16. Associations between Social Understanding, Sibling Relationship Quality, and Siblings' Conflict Strategies and Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recchia, Holly E.; Howe, Nina

    2009-01-01

    Sibling relationship quality and social understanding (second-order false belief, conflict interpretation, and narrative conflict perspective references) were examined as unique and interactive correlates of sibling conflict behavior in 62 dyads (older M age = 8.39 years and younger M age = 6.06 years). High-quality relationships were associated…

  17. Siblings' Power and Influence in Polyadic Family Conflict during Early Childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Porta, Sandra; Howe, Nina

    2017-01-01

    This study examined sibling behavior during polyadic family conflicts (involving three or more family members) by identifying operational conflict elements (i.e., roles, topic), power strategies, effective influence of power, and social domain argumentation. Polyadic conflict sequences (n = 210) were identified in 35/39 families with two siblings…

  18. Associations between Social Understanding, Sibling Relationship Quality, and Siblings' Conflict Strategies and Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recchia, Holly E.; Howe, Nina

    2009-01-01

    Sibling relationship quality and social understanding (second-order false belief, conflict interpretation, and narrative conflict perspective references) were examined as unique and interactive correlates of sibling conflict behavior in 62 dyads (older M age = 8.39 years and younger M age = 6.06 years). High-quality relationships were associated…

  19. Siding and other reactions to a conflict: A theory of escalation toward outsiders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van de Vliert, E

    1981-01-01

    Siding in a dyadic conflict is important because it precipitates escalation. Nevertheless, little is known about how and why a nonprofessional outsider (P) reacts when a conflict party puts him under pressure to take sides. Coalition and role conflict theories suggest four behavior alternatives (tak

  20. Reputation and the evolution of conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElreath, Richard

    2003-02-01

    The outcomes of conflicts in many human societies generate reputation effects that influence the nature of later conflicts. Those willing to escalate over even trivial offenses are considered honorable whereas those who do not are considered dishonorable (Nisbett & Cohen, 1996). Here I extend Maynard Smith's hawk-dove model of animal conflict to explore the logic of a strategy which uses reputation about its opponents to regulate its behavior. I show that a reputation-based strategy does well when (1) the value of the resource is large relative to the cost of losing a fight, (2) communities are stable, and (3) reputations are well known but subject to some amount of error. Reputation-based strategies may thus result in greater willingness to fight, but less fighting at equilibrium, depending upon the nature of the contests and the local socioecology. Additionally, this strategy is robust in the presence of poor knowledge about reputation.

  1. Understanding conflict-resolution taskload: Implementing advisory conflict-detection and resolution algorithms in an airspace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vela, Adan Ernesto

    2011-12-01

    of the research is to understand how the formulation, capabilities, and implementation of conflict-detection and resolution tools affect the controller taskload (system demands) associated with the conflict-resolution process, and implicitly the controller workload (physical and psychological demands). Furthermore this thesis seeks to establish best practices for the design of future conflict-detection and resolution systems. To generalize conclusions on the conflict-resolution taskload and best design practices of conflict-detection and resolution systems, this thesis focuses on abstracting and parameterizing the behaviors and capabilities of the advisory tools. Ideally, this abstraction of advisory decision-support tools serves as an alternative to exhaustively designing tools, implementing them in high-fidelity simulations, and analyzing their conflict-resolution taskload. Such an approach of simulating specific conflict-detection and resolution systems limits the type of conclusions that can be drawn concerning the design of more generic algorithms. In the process of understanding conflict-detection and resolution systems, evidence in the thesis reveals that the most effective approach to reducing conflict-resolution taskload is to improve conflict-detection systems. Furthermore, studies in the this thesis indicate that there is significant exibility in the design of conflict-resolution algorithms.

  2. Conflict in Cyber Space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Karsten; Ringsmose, Jens

    hostility from theoretical, political, strategic and legal perspectives. In doing so, and in contrast to current literature, cyber-security is analysed through a multidimensional lens, as opposed to being treated solely as a military or criminal issues, for example. The individual chapters map out...... the different scholarly and political positions associated with various key aspects of cyber conflict and seek to answer the following questions: do existing theories provide sufficient answers to the current challenges posed by conflict in cyberspace, and, if not, could alternative approaches be developed......?; how do states and non-state actors make use of cyber-weapons when pursuing strategic and political aims?; and, how does the advent of conflict in cyberspace challenge our established legal framework? By asking important strategic questions on the theoretical, strategic, ethical and legal implications...

  3. The NPD team conflict

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Zheng; Lin, Chih-Cheng; Tanev, Stoyan

    2012-01-01

    The complexities of new product development (NPD) teams present both opportunities and challenges to organizations. Very few researches have examined the combined effect of culture and geographical dispersion on teams. Especially, the role of distance still remains an open question. This paper...... elaborates on the role of culture diversity and geographical dispersion in NPD team conflict. A simulation is conducted where organizations may be regarded as complex systems to affect the team conflict with a variety of influences. The results firstly indicate that there are two dimensions of NPD team...... conflict: stable and unstable dimensions with four elements: task characteristics, group members’ relationship, cultural diversity and geographical dispersion; secondly, there are two phenomena whereby the geographical dispersion influences the NPD team interaction, and the influence between cultural...

  4. Education in conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, I

    1999-11-01

    The provision of education is affected in many different ways by political and civil unrest and armed conflict. During armed conflict, the lack of adequate financial support for the maintenance of school buildings, supplies and teacher's salaries becomes particularly acute. Other factors include the destruction of school buildings and other infrastructures in time of war, and the targeting of teachers by acts of violence. This paper explores the impact of conflict on the educational opportunities of men and women. Interventions to address the educational needs of children are also discussed. Among these programs are the Oxfam programs in Bhutan, Sri Lanka, Nicaragua, Bosnia, and Eritrea which have provided psychosocial support and human rights education to refugee and displaced women and children through the provision of educational material and by training teachers.

  5. Behaviorism

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moore, J

    2011-01-01

    .... Watson proposed an alternative: classical S-R behaviorism. According to Watson, behavior was a subject matter in its own right, to be studied by the observational methods common to all sciences...

  6. Activation of self-knowledge reduces conflict during occupational choice: an ERP study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, Takashi; Takezawa, Tomohiro; Shiraishi, Maiko; Miyatani, Makoto

    2009-01-01

    We investigated whether the activation of self-knowledge reduces conflict during occupational choice, which can elicit many correct answers. Conflict was measured via event-related brain potentials (ERPs). Results of this study showed that activation of self-knowledge reduces conflict during occupational choice. Our results suggest that, in a situation in which two or more possible correct answers exist, people use self-knowledge as a benchmark to reduce conflict by biasing either choice of behavior.

  7. Conflict of Internal Logical Relationship in Corporate Governance from the Perspective of Board of Directors' Behavior%公司治理内在逻辑关系冲突:董事会行为的视角

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郝云宏

    2012-01-01

    从行为治理的角度看,基于治理主体还是治理对象的视角.其基本的逻辑关系和行为方式会有很大的不同。传统的公司治理及其研究基于治理主体的视角。从一开始就是股东权利导向。假定股东利益与公司利益相一致,并以解决代理问题为核心,但其内含的股东所有权与公司法人所有权的逻辑复合与现实冲突会使得代理问题复杂化.诱发公司治理内在逻辑关系的冲突。这在实践中引发的困惑就是.以董事会为核心的代理人向股东负责.还是向公司以及法人财产负责?向全体股东负责还是向大股东或者推荐自己的股东负责?现实中的董事会行为通常是一种治理法规约束下的相机抉择和伦理决策。关注公司法人所有权导向,公司治理应该是基于公司的治理,代表问题与代理问题同等重要。董事会作为公司代表和重要的战略决策者。应当坚持公司法人所有权导向.关注公司成长战略决策.其相对独立性至关重要。%From the perspective of behavioral governance, the essential logical relationship and behavior will have great difference if the research perspectives are different, e.g. from the viewpoint of governance subject or object. The traditional corporate governance research is from the perspective of the governance subject, which is shareholder-oriented initially and assumed the benefit consistence between the shareholders, so the corporate in order to solve the agency problems. However, the logical overlaps of and practical conflicts between the shareholder ownership and corporation ownership may cause the complexity of agency under the relationship of shareholder ownership, which may therefore trigger the conflict among the internal logical relationships of corporate governance. It is argued in practice whether the agent represented by the board should be responsible for shareholders or the corporation and

  8. Communication that builds teams: assessing a nursing conflict intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicotera, Anne Maydan; Mahon, Margaret M; Wright, Kevin B

    2014-01-01

    Quality communication is essential for building strong nursing teams. Structurational divergence (SD) theory explains how institutional factors can result in poor communication and conflict cycles; the theory has been developed in nursing context, although it is applicable to all organizational settings. We describe the design, implementation, and evaluation of an intervention to reduce SD and improve nurses' work life and team-member relationships. An intensive 9-hour course provided training in conflict/SD analysis and dialogic conflict/SD management to 36 working nurses from a variety of settings. Quantitative pre- and posttests were administered, with a comparison sample. The course reduced measures of negative conflict attitudes and behaviors: direct personalization, persecution feelings, negative relational effects, ambiguity intolerance, and triangulation (gossiping and complaining to uninvolved third parties). The course also increased important attitudes necessary for productive dialogue and conflict management: perceptions of positive relational effects, conflict liking, and positive beliefs about arguing. As compared with nonparticipants, participant posttests showed lower conflict persecution; higher recognition of positive relational effects; lower perceptions of negative relational effects; higher conflict liking; lower ambiguity intolerance; and lower tendency to triangulate. Qualitatively, participants perceived better understanding of, and felt more empowered to manage, workplace conflicts and to sustain healthier workplace relationships. This intervention can help nurses develop tools to improve system-level function and build productive team relationships.

  9. Tipping points in adolescent adjustment: predicting social functioning from adolescents' conflict with parents and friends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrlich, Katherine B; Dykas, Matthew J; Cassidy, Jude

    2012-10-01

    Despite widespread interest in examining the role of conflict for adolescent development, researchers only rarely have examined adolescents' experiences of conflict across relationships. The present study examined how adolescents' experiences of conflict with parents and friends were linked to their social functioning. Adolescents (n = 189) and their mothers and fathers participated in semistructured discussions about areas of parent-adolescent conflict in the laboratory. In addition, adolescents reported about conflict in their best friendships, and peers reported about adolescents' social acceptance and behavior in social settings. Parent-adolescent conflict was associated with peer-reported aggression and delinquency, and friendship conflict was associated with delinquency and prosocial behavior. In addition, significant Parent-Adolescent Conflict × Friend-Adolescent Conflict interactions revealed that parent-adolescent conflict was associated with poor social functioning only when conflict with best friends was also high. The findings suggest that consideration of conflict across relationships may yield insight into the specific contexts in which conflict is associated with negative outcomes for adolescents.

  10. [Types of conflicts and conflict management among Hungarian healthcare workers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csupor, Éva; Kuna, Ágnes; Pintér, Judit Nóra; Kaló, Zsuzsa; Csabai, Márta

    2017-04-01

    Efficient communication, conflict management and cooperation are the key factors of a successful patient care. This study is part of an international comparative research. The aim of this study is to unfold conflicts among healthcare workers. 73 healthcare workers were interviewed using a standardized interview protocol. The in-person interviews used the critical incident method. 30 interviews (15 doctors, 15 nurses) were analysed with the Atlas.ti 7 content analysis software. The sources, types, effects of conflicts and conflict management strategies were investigated. The content analysis unfolded the specificities of conflicts in healthcare based on personal experiences. Organizational hierarchy was a substantial source of conflict, especially among physicians, which originates from implicit rules. As a result of the avoiding conflict management the conflicts remain partly unresolved which has negative individual and group effect. Our conceptual framework helps to develop a proper intervention specific to healthcare. Orv. Hetil., 2017, 158(16), 625-632.

  11. Trust, conflict, and cooperation: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balliet, Daniel; Van Lange, Paul A M

    2013-09-01

    Many theories of trust emphasize that trust is most relevant to behavior in situations involving a conflict of interests. However, it is not clear how trust relates to behavior across situations that differ in the degree of conflicting interest: Does trust matter more when the conflict of interest is small or large? According to an interdependence perspective, trust becomes an especially important determinant of behavior in situations involving larger, compared to smaller, degrees of conflicting interests. To examine this perspective, we conducted a meta-analysis involving 212 effect sizes on the relation between trust (both state and dispositional trust in others) and cooperation in social dilemmas-situations that involve varying degrees of conflict between self-interest and collective interest. Results revealed that the positive relation between trust and cooperation is stronger when there is a larger, compared to smaller, degree of conflict. We also examined several other possible moderators of the relation between trust and cooperation. The relation between trust and cooperation was stronger during individual, compared to intergroup, interactions but did not vary as a function of the situation being either a one-shot or repeated interaction. We also find differences across countries in the extent that people condition their own cooperation based on their trust in others. We discuss how the results support an emerging consensus about trust being limited to situations of conflict and address some theoretical and societal implications for our understanding of how and why trust is so important to social interactions and relationships.

  12. Reward and punishment effects on error processing and conflict control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgit eStürmer

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Recently, positive mood has been shown to reduce cognitive conflicts and adaptation related to conflict control. Van Steenbergen et al. (2009 proposed that short-term adaptation after conflict is driven by the aversive quality of the conflict. They reasoned that monetary gain and its positive emotional consequences might counteract the aversive quality of the preceding conflict and hence reduce subsequent conflict-driven adaptation processes. According to Ashby et al. (1999, however, positive affect increases cognitive flexibility and might, therefore, support cognitive conflict control.In two experiments, we combined Simon-type conflicts with monetary gains and losses in between trials and analyzed event-related brain potentials (ERPs. In Experiment 1 gains and losses were applied randomly as a lottery in between two Simon trials whereas in the second experiment gains and losses were related to behavioral performance. Either the 25 % fastest responses were rewarded or the 25 % slowest responses were penalized. In Experiment 1 conflict adaptation was not at all modulated by gains and losses and in Experiment 2 conflict adaptation increased after a gain. In addition we analyzed the error-related negativity (ERN in Experiment 2 – a brain signal proposed to be related to the reward prediction error and response conflicts. The ERN and post-error slowing were enlarged in the context of reward. We conclude that a context of reward increases the subjective value of an error, thus, enhancing error adaptation. However, modulatory effects of affective states on cognitive conflict control are much more limited as previously asserted.

  13. Islamophobia, Conflict and Citizenship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inman, Sally; Mc Cormack, Pip; Walker, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses some preliminary findings of the English part of a European Commission Fundamental Rights and Citizenship funded project "Children's Voices" (2011-2013) concerned with exploring and understanding children and young people's experiences of interethnic conflict and violence in primary and secondary schools. This is a…

  14. Conflict Resolution Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busselle, Tish

    This 7-day unit, intended for use with secondary students, contains a statement of rationale and objectives, lesson plans, class assignments, teacher and student bibliographies, and suggestions for instructional materials on conflict resolution between individuals, groups, and nations. Among the six objectives listed for the unit are: 1) explain…

  15. Spousal Conflicts of Interest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Shana R.

    2005-01-01

    Romantic relationships bud and sometimes bloom in the school district workplace. When those relationships involve a sitting member of a school board or an administrator with responsibility for managing other employees, questions about a conflict of interest will be raised. Most states have laws prohibiting a public official from taking official…

  16. Conflicts in interpretation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouma, G.; Hendriks, P.; Hoop, H. de; Krämer, I.; Swart, Henriëtte de; Zwarts, J.

    2007-01-01

    The leading hypothesis of this paper is that interpretation is a process of constraint satisfaction, conflict resolution, and optimization, along the lines of Optimality Theory. Support for this view is drawn from very different domains, and based on both experimental and theoretical research. We di

  17. Interpretation as conflict resolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swart, Henriëtte de; Zwart, J.

    Semantic interpretation is not a simple process. When we want to know what a given sentence means, more is needed than just a simple ‘adding up’ of the meanings of the component words. Not only can the words in a sentence interact and conflict with each other, but also with the linguistic and

  18. Conflict among Testing Procedures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-04-01

    AM4ONG TESTING PROCEDURES? Daniel F . Kohler April 1982 ( i’ 4:3 rpis tsnlb u lailtsd P-6765 8 8 O1 V 068 The Rand Paper Series Papers are issued by...TESTING PROCEDURES? Daniel F . Kohler April 1982 : i ! ,I I CONFLICT AMONG TESTING PROCEDURES? 1. Introduction "- Savin [1976] and Berndt and Savin [19771

  19. Conflict in organizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kesting, Peter; Smolinski, Remigiusz; Speakman, Ian

    2012-01-01

    : the repetitive character of routine, disagreement over the “validity” of the existing routines, disagreement concerning the definition of new targets, and resistance towards change processes. Further the authors point to the inherent tendency to routinize conflict management strategies and the risks...

  20. Neonatal taurine and alanine modulate anxiety-like behavior and decelerate cortical spreading depression in rats previously suckled under different litter sizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francisco, Elian da Silva; Guedes, Rubem Carlos Araújo

    2015-11-01

    The amino acids taurine and alanine play a role in several physiological processes, including behavior and the electrical activity of the brain. In this study, we investigated the effect of treatment with taurine or alanine on anxiety-like behavior and the excitability-dependent phenomenon known as cortical spreading depression (CSD), using rats suckled in litters with 9 and 15 pups (groups L9 and L15). From postnatal days 7 to 27, the animals received per gavage 300 mg/kg/day of taurine or alanine or both. At 28 days, we tested the animals in the elevated plus maze, and at 33-35 days, we recorded CSD and analyzed its velocity of propagation, amplitude, and duration. Compared with water-treated controls, the L9 groups treated with taurine or alanine displayed anxiolytic behavior (higher number of entries in the open arms; p taurine, alanine, or both) treated at adulthood (90-110 days). The L15 condition resulted in smaller durations and higher CSD velocities compared with the L9 condition. Besides reinforcing previous evidence of behavioral modulation by taurine and alanine, our data are the first confirmation that treatment with these amino acids decelerates CSD regardless of lactation conditions (normal versus unfavorable lactation) or age at amino acid administration (young versus adult). The results suggest a modulating role for both amino acids on anxiety behavior and neuronal electrical activity.

  1. Conflict management, Part 1. Conflict management checklist: a diagnostic tool for assessing conflict in organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siders, C T; Aschenbrener, C A

    1999-01-01

    Complex interpersonal conflicts are inevitable in the high speed, high stakes, pressured work of health care. Poorly managed, conflict saps productivity, erodes trust, and spawns additional disputes. Well managed, conflict can enhance the self-confidence and self-esteem of the parties, build relationships, and engender creative solutions beyond expectations. Just as thoughtful differential diagnosis precedes optimum treatment in the doctor-patient relationship, management of conflict is greatly enhanced when preceded by careful assessment. In the first of two articles, the authors present a diagnostic approach, the Conflict Management Checklist, to increase self-awareness and decrease anxiety around conflict.

  2. A nifS-like gene, csdB, encodes an Escherichia coli counterpart of mammalian selenocysteine lyase. Gene cloning, purification, characterization and preliminary x-ray crystallographic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihara, H; Maeda, M; Fujii, T; Kurihara, T; Hata, Y; Esaki, N

    1999-05-21

    Selenocysteine lyase is a pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the exclusive decomposition of L-selenocysteine to L-alanine and elemental selenium. An open reading frame, named csdB, from Escherichia coli encodes a putative protein that is similar to selenocysteine lyase of pig liver and cysteine desulfurase (NifS) of Azotobacter vinelandii. In this study, the csdB gene was cloned and expressed in E. coli cells. The gene product was a homodimer with the subunit Mr of 44,439, contained 1 mol of PLP as a cofactor per mol of subunit, and catalyzed the release of Se, SO2, and S from L-selenocysteine, L-cysteine sulfinic acid, and L-cysteine, respectively, to yield L-alanine; the reactivity of the substrates decreased in this order. Although the enzyme was not specific for L-selenocysteine, the high specific activity for L-selenocysteine (5.5 units/mg compared with 0.019 units/mg for L-cysteine) supports the view that the enzyme can be regarded as an E. coli counterpart of mammalian selenocysteine lyase. We crystallized CsdB, the csdB gene product, by the hanging drop vapor diffusion method. The crystals were of suitable quality for x-ray crystallography and belonged to the tetragonal space group P43212 with unit cell dimensions of a = b = 128.1 A and c = 137.0 A. Consideration of the Matthews parameter Vm (3.19 A3/Da) accounts for the presence of a single dimer in the crystallographic asymmetric unit. A native diffraction dataset up to 2.8 A resolution was collected. This is the first crystallographic analysis of a protein of NifS/selenocysteine lyase family.

  3. Armed conflict and child health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieder, Michael; Choonara, Imti

    2012-01-01

    Armed conflict has a major impact on child health throughout the world. One in six children worldwide lives in an area of armed conflict and civilians are more likely to die than soldiers as a result of the conflict. In stark contrast to the effect on children, the international arms trade results in huge profits for the large corporations involved in producing arms, weapons and munitions. Armed conflict is not inevitable but is an important health issue that should be prevented.

  4. Power effects on cognitive control: Turning conflict into action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Petra C; Kleiman, Tali; Amodio, David M

    2015-06-01

    Power is known to promote effective goal pursuit, especially when it requires one to overcome distractions or bias. We proposed that this effect involves the ability to engage and implement cognitive control. In Study 1, we demonstrated that power enhances behavioral performance on a response conflict task and that it does so by enhancing controlled processing rather than by reducing automatic processing. In Study 2, we used an event-related potential index of anterior cingulate activity to test whether power effects on control were due to enhanced conflict sensitivity or action implementation. Power did not significantly affect neural sensitivity to conflict; rather, high power was associated with a stronger link between conflict processing and intended action, relative to low power. These findings suggest a new perspective on how social factors can affect controlled processing and offer new evidence regarding the transition between conflict detection and the implementation of action control.

  5. Conflict prevention, conflict mitigation, and manifestations of conflict during emergency department consultations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Teresa; Bakewell, Francis; Orlich, Donika; Sherbino, Jonathan

    2014-03-01

    The objective was to determine the causes of and mitigating factors for conflict between emergency physicians and other colleagues during consultations. From March to September 2010, a total of 61 physicians (31 residents and 30 attendings from emergency medicine [EM], internal medicine, and general surgery) were interviewed about how junior learners should be taught about emergency department (ED) consultations. During these interviews, they were asked if and how conflict manifests during the ED consultation process. Two investigators reviewed the transcripts independently to generate themes related to conflict until saturation was reached. Disagreements were resolved by consensus. The trustworthiness of the analysis was ensured by generating an audit trail, which was subsequently audited by an investigator not involved with the initial analysis. This analysis was compared to previously proposed models of trust and conflict from the sociology and business literature. All participants recalled some manifestation of conflict. There were 12 negative conflict-producing themes and 10 protective conflict-mitigating themes. When comparing these themes to a previously developed model of the domains of trust, each theme mapped to domains of the model. Conflict affects the ED consultation process. Areas that lead to conflict are identified that map to previous models of trust and conflict. This work extends the current understanding about intradisciplinary conflict in the clinical realm. These new findings may improve the understanding of the nature of conflicts that occur and form the foundation for interventions that may decrease conflict during ED consultations. © 2014 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  6. Family conflicts and conflict resolution regarding food choices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Maria; Brunsø, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies on family decision‐making show that not only parents but also children participate actively in and achieve influence on the decision process, for instance during food buying. When decision‐making includes several active participants, conflicts may occur, but not much research deals...... with food‐related conflicts, conflict resolutions or specific influence techniques with a focus on parents and tweens in family decision‐making. This article focuses on parents and tweens’ joint decision processes in evaluation and choice of food, specifically conflicts and conflict resolution. Assumptions...

  7. Organizational Conflict: Causes and Manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacks, Eugene

    1979-01-01

    No group (within an organization) can be entirely harmonious, but conflict is not an altogether disruptive factor. A delicate balance is required to obtain the advantages and restrict the disadvantages of organizational conflict. The causes and forms of organizational conflict are examined. (JMD)

  8. 75 FR 80947 - Conflict Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-23

    ... violence in the eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, particularly sexual- and gender-based violence... conflict free,'' the facilities used to process the conflict minerals, the country of origin of the conflict minerals, and ``the efforts to determine the mine or location of origin with the greatest...

  9. Behaviorism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, J.

    2011-01-01

    Early forms of psychology assumed that mental life was the appropriate subject matter for psychology, and introspection was an appropriate method to engage that subject matter. In 1913, John B. Watson proposed an alternative: classical S-R behaviorism. According to Watson, behavior was a subject matter in its own right, to be studied by the…

  10. Behaviorism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, J.

    2011-01-01

    Early forms of psychology assumed that mental life was the appropriate subject matter for psychology, and introspection was an appropriate method to engage that subject matter. In 1913, John B. Watson proposed an alternative: classical S-R behaviorism. According to Watson, behavior was a subject matter in its own right, to be studied by the…

  11. Overview of studies on the conflict method.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hondel, M. van de & Kraay, J.H.

    1978-01-01

    The conflict method is a method which observes those types of (serious) conflict behaviours by road users that are considered related to unsafe traffic behaviour. This international overview on the conflict method has collected several conflict techniques actually in use.

  12. Review of EU Conflict Management in DRC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandrup, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The report present the backdrop on EU's involvement in the DRC conflict, its history, the nature of the conflict......The report present the backdrop on EU's involvement in the DRC conflict, its history, the nature of the conflict...

  13. The Effect of Conflict Goals on Avoidance Strategies: What Does Not Communicating Communicate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi; Fink, Edward L.; Cai, Deborah A.

    2012-01-01

    Avoidance is proposed to be a goal-directed behavior rather than a behavior that reflects passivity or inaction. To evaluate this proposition, a typology of conflict goals and a typology of conflict avoidance strategies are created, and the relationship between nonavoidance strategies and the elements of these 2 typologies are evaluated within a…

  14. Double Dose: High Family Conflict Enhances the Effect of Media Violence Exposure on Adolescents’ Aggression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patti M. Valkenburg

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We investigated how exposure to media violence and family conflict affects adolescents’ subsequent aggressive behavior. We expected a double dose effect, meaning that high media violence exposure would lead to higher levels of aggression for adolescents in high conflict families compared to low conflict families. A total of 499 adolescents (aged 10 to 14, 48% girls participated in a two-wave longitudinal survey (4-month interval. Survey questions assessed their exposure to violence on television and in electronic games, family conflict, and aggressive behavior. Analyses revealed a significant interaction between media violence and family conflict. In families with higher conflict, higher media violence exposure was related to increased subsequent aggression. This study is the first to show a double dose effect of media violence and family conflict on adolescents’ aggression. These findings underscore the important role of the family in shaping the effects of adolescents’ media use on their social development.

  15. Abacus of Frozen Conflicts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    Italy in 275 BC, the Gallic, Gothic , and Heruli invasions of the Roman Empire in the third century AD, and the Muslim conquest of Persia in 636 AD.4...war. A. THE SPIRAL MODEL The theoretical literature of interstate conflict is dominated by two conceptual models, classical Deterrence Theory...large body of literature on the causes of war, there is a stark contrast in the ways in which political scientists and historians view the concept

  16. Conflict engagement: workplace dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerardi, Debra

    2015-04-01

    This article is one in a series on conflict. It is part of an ongoing series on leadership coordinated by the American Organization of Nurse Executives (AONE), highlighting topics of interest to nurse managers and emerging nurse leaders. The AONE provides leadership, professional development, advocacy, and research to advance nursing practice and patient care, promote nursing leadership excellence, and shape public policy for health care.

  17. Email Adaptation for Conflict Handling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Joyce Yi‐Hui; Panteli, Niki; Bülow, Anne Marie

    2017-01-01

    This paper explores the context of email‐based communication in anestablished but fragile, inter‐organisational partnership, which wasoften overlain with conflict. Drawing upon adaptation theory, thisstudy explores how participants adapt to the use of email to handleconflict. Extensive data were...... the leanness of email in managing conflict, we found that underthe described conflict situation the very leanness of emailwas appreciated and thus, exploited by those concerned tomanage the conflict situation. Specifically, we identified 4 keyconflict‐triggered adaptation strategies, namely......, interactionavoidance, disempowering, blame‐protection, and image‐shelteringthat drove the ways in which email was adapted to maintainorganisational partnerships under conflict....

  18. Timing of cyber conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelrod, Robert; Iliev, Rumen

    2014-01-28

    Nations are accumulating cyber resources in the form of stockpiles of zero-day exploits as well as other novel methods of engaging in future cyber conflict against selected targets. This paper analyzes the optimal timing for the use of such cyber resources. A simple mathematical model is offered to clarify how the timing of such a choice can depend on the stakes involved in the present situation, as well as the characteristics of the resource for exploitation. The model deals with the question of when the resource should be used given that its use today may well prevent it from being available for use later. The analysis provides concepts, theory, applications, and distinctions to promote the understanding strategy aspects of cyber conflict. Case studies include the Stuxnet attack on Iran's nuclear program, the Iranian cyber attack on the energy firm Saudi Aramco, the persistent cyber espionage carried out by the Chinese military, and an analogous case of economic coercion by China in a dispute with Japan. The effects of the rapidly expanding market for zero-day exploits are also analyzed. The goal of the paper is to promote the understanding of this domain of cyber conflict to mitigate the harm it can do, and harness the capabilities it can provide.

  19. Functional imaging of decision conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pochon, Jean-Baptiste; Riis, Jason; Sanfey, Alan G; Nystrom, Leigh E; Cohen, Jonathan D

    2008-03-26

    Decision conflict occurs when people feel uncertain as to which option to choose from a set of similarly attractive (or unattractive) options, with many studies demonstrating that this conflict can lead to suboptimal decision making. In this article, we investigate the neurobiological underpinnings of decision conflict, in particular, the involvement of the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). Previous studies have implicated the ACC in conflict monitoring during perceptual tasks, but there is considerable controversy as to whether the ACC actually indexes conflict related to choice, or merely conflict related to selection of competing motor responses. In a functional magnetic resonance imaging study, we dissociate the decision and response phases of a decision task, and show that the ACC does indeed index conflict at the decision stage. Furthermore, we show that it does so for a complex decision task, one that requires the integration of beliefs and preferences and not just perceptual judgments.

  20. Conflict management: importance and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKibben, Laurie

    2017-01-26

    Conflict is a consistent and unavoidable issue within healthcare teams. Despite training of nurse leaders and managers around areas of conflict resolution, the problem of staff relations, stress, sickness and retention remain. Conflict arises from issues with interpersonal relationships, change and poor leadership. New members of staff entering an already established healthcare team should be supported and integrated, to encourage mutual role respect between all team members and establish positive working relationships, in order to maximise patient care. This paper explores the concept of conflict, the importance of addressing causes of conflict, effective management, and the relevance of positive approaches to conflict resolution. Good leadership, nurturing positive team dynamics and communication, encourages shared problem solving and acceptance of change. Furthermore mutual respect fosters a more positive working environment for those in healthcare teams. As conflict has direct implications for patients, positive resolution is essential, to promote safe and effective delivery of care, whilst encouraging therapeutic relationships between colleagues and managers.

  1. Fluid intelligence and neural mechanisms of conflict adaptation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Tongran; Jiannong, Shi; Xiao, Tong

    2016-01-01

    The current study investigated whether adolescents with different intellectual levels have different conflict adaptation processes. Adolescents with high and average IQ abilities were enrolled, and their behavioral responses and event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded during a modified Erik...... adaptation control processing with smaller SP amplitude-CAE values. In conclusion, the present study revealed the essential association between fluid intelligence and conflict adaptation processes....

  2. The Kenyan political conflict and children's adjustment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kithakye, Mumbe; Morris, Amanda Sheffield; Terranova, Andrew M; Myers, Sonya S

    2010-01-01

    This study examined pre- and postconflict data from 84 children, ages 3-7 years, living in Kibera, Kenya, during the December 2007 political conflict. Results indicate that children's disaster experiences (home destruction, death of a parent, parent and child harm) are associated with adjustment difficulties and that emotion regulation is an important protective factor postdisaster. Specifically, severity of the disaster experience was associated with increased aggression and decreased prosocial behavior. Emotion regulation was associated with less aggression and more prosocial behavior postconflict. Findings are discussed in the context of a developmental, systems-oriented perspective of the impact of disasters on child adjustment.

  3. Cognitive conflict in human-automation interactions: a psychophysiological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehais, Frédéric; Causse, Mickaël; Vachon, François; Tremblay, Sébastien

    2012-05-01

    The review of literature in sociology and distributed artificial intelligence reveals that the occurrence of conflict is a remarkable precursor to the disruption of multi-agent systems. The study of this concept could be applied to human factors concerns, as man-system conflict appears to provoke perseveration behavior and to degrade attentional abilities with a trend to excessive focus. Once entangled in such conflicts, the human operator will do anything to succeed in his current goal even if it jeopardizes the mission. In order to confirm these findings, an experimental setup, composed of a real unmanned ground vehicle, a ground station is developed. A scenario involving an authority conflict between the participants and the robot is proposed. Analysis of the effects of the conflict on the participants' cognition and arousal is assessed through heart-rate measurement (reflecting stress level) and eye-tracking techniques (index of attentional focus). Our results clearly show that the occurrence of the conflict leads to perseveration behavior and can induce higher heart rate as well as excessive attentional focus. These results are discussed in terms of task commitment issues and increased arousal. Moreover, our results suggest that individual differences may predict susceptibility to perseveration behavior.

  4. Teacher Collaboration Praxis: Conflicts, Borders, and Ideologies From a Micropolitical Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy Keranen

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper looks at a feature of teacher collaboration within Achinstein’s (2002 micropolitics of collaboration but from an intrapersonal perspective. Results discussed feature issues of conflict, borders, and ideologies within each participating teacher rather than between teachers. Unresolved or unacknowledged intrapersonal conflict might lead to interpersonal conflict of the type that does not enrich collaborative efforts. Findings from this study reveal that participating teachers did experience intrapersonal conflicts that fit within Achinstein’s micropolitical framework. These intrapersonal conflicts were not regarded as aberrant or pathological behavior, but as a natural effect of collaboration and growth.

  5. Person-environment fit: everyday conflict and coparenting conflict in Mexican-origin teen mother families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derlan, Chelsea L; Umaña-Taylor, Adriana J; Toomey, Russell B; Updegraff, Kimberly A; Jahromi, Laudan B

    2015-01-01

    The current study examined whether a match or mismatch between teen mothers' cultural orientation and the cultural context of the family (i.e., familial ethnic socialization) predicted mother-daughter everyday and coparenting conflict, and in turn, teen mothers' adjustment. Participants were 204 Mexican-origin teen mothers (M age = 16.81 years; SD = 1.00). Consistent with a person-environment fit perspective, findings indicated that a mismatch between teen mothers' cultural orientation (i.e., high mainstream cultural involvement) and the cultural context of the family (i.e., higher levels of familial ethnic socialization) predicted greater mother-daughter everyday conflict and coparenting conflict 1 year later. However, when there was a match (i.e., high levels of familial ethnic socialization for teen mothers with high Mexican orientation), familial ethnic socialization was not associated with mother-daughter conflict. In addition, mother-daughter conflict was positively associated with depressive symptoms and engagement in risky behaviors 1 year later among all teen mothers. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  6. Moral dimensions of human-wildlife conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lute, Michelle L; Navarrete, Carlos David; Nelson, Michael Paul; Gore, Meredith L

    2016-12-01

    Despite increasing support for conservation globally, controversy over specific conservation policies persists among diverse stakeholders. Investigating the links between morals in relation to conservation can help increase understanding about why humans support or oppose policy, especially related to human-wildlife conflict or human conflict over wildlife. Yet the moral dimension of human-wildlife conflict has mostly gone unconsidered and unmeasured; thus, policy and programmatic efforts to reduce controversy may be missing a key part of the equation. We conducted a web-based survey (n = 1239 respondents) in Michigan (U.S.A.) to investigate cognitive and emotional influences on the value-behavior relationship. Respondents were identified by their interest and involvement in Michigan wolf management. The survey consisted of questions about values, emotions, cognitions, and behaviors relative to wolves in Michigan. We used path analysis to explore whether emotions and cognitions mediated the relationship between value and behavior. Most respondents attributed intrinsic value to wolves (n = 734) and all life (n = 773) and engaged in behaviors that benefited wolf populations and ecosystems regardless of stakeholder group (e.g., environmentalist, farmer). Attributing intrinsic value to wolves was positively related to favorable emotions toward wolves and cognitive assessments that hunting and trapping of wolves is unacceptable. Despite similarities in attribution of intrinsic value, groups differed in emotions and cognitions about wolf hunting. These differences provide a useful way to predict stakeholder behavior. Our findings may inform interventions aimed at increasing support for wolf management policies and positive interactions among stakeholders and wildlife. Leveraging agreement over intrinsic value may foster cooperation among stakeholders and garner support for controversial conservation policy. © 2016 Society for Conservation Biology.

  7. Conflict resolution in healthcare management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipcamon, James D; Mainwaring, Brian A

    2004-01-01

    Conflict causes decided tension in the workplace and often produces poor professional outcomes. A manager dealing with conflict can experience a crisis of confidence and often ends up second-guessing himself or herself, regardless of how a situation has been handled. In some organizations, conflict is not viewed positively or as an opportunity for improvement. In these organizations, most individuals will see conflict as being unproductive, unpleasant, and a waste of time and energy. Yet, conflict provides employees with critical feedback on how things are going. When viewed in a positive context, even personality conflicts may provide information to the healthcare manager about what is not working in the organization. If conflict is not directed and controlled, it can have damaging effects in the workplace, stifling the growth of departments and deflating employee morale. Our job as healthcare managers is to deal with conflict so that it does not decrease productivity or detract from the provision of patient-centered care. There are 4 general sources for interpersonal conflict: personal differences, informational deficiency, role incompatibility, and environmental stress. There are 5 common responses used in dealing with conflict: forcing, accommodating, avoiding, compromising, and collaborating. Healthcare managers should become comfortable with using all of these approaches.

  8. 大股东控制下的内部资本转移与利益冲突%The behavior of internal capital transfers and interest conflicting under the control of major shareholders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    龚志文; 陈金龙

    2012-01-01

    This paper constructs a model to illustrate the optimization of capital transfers within an enterprise group which was controlled by major shareholders. The capital transfers behavior is investigate by means of the model, which gives the equilibrium results, benefits of all parties involved and the influencing factors under three circumstances. The results show that capital allocation optimization and social welfare maximization may result in the ideal internal capital transactions, in a "win-win" situation for all parties, and the achievement of the group's financial goals. While the internal capital transactions can be kept and financial goals can be met in the internal capital transactions with conflicting costs, insufficient capital transfers may result. An excessive capital transfer may result in the infringed internal capital transactions, where the internal capital allocation was not sustainable, and the financial goals can only be achieved by pursuing shareholder wealth maximization at the expense of stakeholders.%构建了大股东控制下的企业集团内部资本转移优化模型,定量地推导了三种情景下的均衡结果、参与各方福利和影响因素,以此对大股东控制下的内部资本交易行为进行研究.研究发现,理想型内部资本交易实现了资本配置的最优化和社会福利的最大化,形成参与各方“共赢”的局面,实现了集团公司财务目标;附加冲突成本的内部资本交易存在资本转移不足行为,资本交易仍可以持续维持,基本实现集团公司财务目标;侵害型内部资本交易存在过度转移资本行为,资本交易不可持续,实现的财务目标只能是在损害利益相关者的前提下,追求控股股东财富最大化.

  9. The Communication of "Pure" Group-Based Anger Reduces Tendencies Toward Intergroup Conflict Because It Increases Out-Group Empathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vos, Bart; van Zomeren, Martijn; Gordijn, Ernestine H.; Postmes, Tom

    2013-01-01

    The communication of group-based anger in intergroup conflict is often associated with destructive conflict behavior. However, we show that communicating group-based anger toward the out-group can evoke empathy and thus reduce intergroup conflict. This is because it stresses the value of maintaining

  10. The Communication of "Pure" Group-Based Anger Reduces Tendencies Toward Intergroup Conflict Because It Increases Out-Group Empathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vos, Bart; van Zomeren, Martijn; Gordijn, Ernestine H.; Postmes, Tom

    2013-01-01

    The communication of group-based anger in intergroup conflict is often associated with destructive conflict behavior. However, we show that communicating group-based anger toward the out-group can evoke empathy and thus reduce intergroup conflict. This is because it stresses the value of maintaining

  11. Conflict across organizational boundaries: managed care organizations versus health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callister, R R; Wall, J A

    2001-08-01

    This research examined conflicts that occur across organizational boundaries, specifically between managed care organizations and health care providers. Using boundary spanning theory as a framework, the authors identified 3 factors in the 1st study (30 interviews) that influence this conflict: (a) organizational power, (b) personal status differences of the individuals handling the conflict, and (c) their previous interactions. These factors affected the individuals' behavioral responses or emotions, specifically anger. After developing hypotheses, the authors tested them in a 2nd study using 109 conflict incidents drawn from 9 different managed care organizations. The results revealed that organizational power affects behavioral responses, whereas status differences and previous negative interactions affect emotions.

  12. Extension agents and conflict narratives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bond, Jennifer Lauren

    2016-01-01

    conflict. Originality: This work contributes to a growing body of literature interested in the role of extension agents in conflict management. By applying Q methodology, this work has shown that while extension agents are involved in conflict management, their perceptions of these conflicts are subjective......Purpose: This work investigated the narratives of development extensionists in relation to natural resource conflict, in order to understand the competing discourses surrounding the wicked problems of natural resource management in Laikipia County, Kenya. Methodology: Q methodology was used...... to elicit the conflict narratives present among extension professionals. A concourse of 221 statements were devised from interviews and group discussions with key informants and a final sample of 49 statements was used for the sorting. Thirteen Q-sorts were undertaken with among rural extension...

  13. Estilos parentais autoritário e democrático-recíproco intergeracionais, conflito conjugal e comportamentos de externalização e internalização Intergenerational authoritarian and authoritative parenting styles, marital conflict, and externalizing and internalizing behaviors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebenézer A. de Oliveira

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Modelos mediativos de risco e proteção foram testados, para prever longitudinalmente comportamentos de externalização e internalização infantis, a partir de uma atitude conjugal conflituosa e de estilos parentais intergeracionais autoritário vs. democrático-recíproco. Proveniente de duas escolas particulares e uma pública, a amostra contou com 25 meninas e 25 meninos de 4 e 5 anos, e suas respectivas mães. Correlações bivariadas de Pearson e regressões múltiplas indicaram a presença de transmissão intergeracional do estilo autoritário, mas não do democrático-recíproco, mediada por uma atitude conjugal conflituosa. O estilo autoritário materno previu tanto externalização como internalização, enquanto a atitude conjugal conflituosa previu apenas externalização. Embora significativo, o modelo aditivo não gerou efeitos longitudinais significativos de cada fator sobre externalização. Mas, ao se levar em conta a relação entre o estilo autoritário e a atitude conjugal conflituosa, efeitos principais foram encontrados para ambos os fatores. A obtenção de resultados significativos apenas no modelo de risco é considerada sob os pontos de vista teórico e metodológico.Mediational models of risk and protection were tested to predict longitudinally both externalizing and internalizing behaviors in young children, with conflicted marital attitude and transgenerational, authoritarian vs. authoritative parenting as predictors. Drawn from two private and one public schools, the sample consisted of 25 boys and 25 girls with 4 and 5 years of age, and their respective mothers. Bivariate Pearson correlations and multiple regressions showed intergenerational transmission for the authoritarian style, but not for the authoritative style, mediated by a conflicted attitude toward marriage. The maternal authoritarian style predicted both externalizing and internalizing behaviors, whereas the conflicted marital attitude predicted only

  14. Tools for productively managing conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucker, Deborah

    2012-06-01

    In scientific teams as in life, conflicts arise. This paper aims to provide an introduction to tools and skills to help in managing conflicts in practice. Using a structured approach enables the concerns and interests of all involved to be identified and clarified. It also permits a better understanding of yourself and others and will help empower those in conflict to find acceptable and workable resolutions.

  15. Armed conflict and child health

    OpenAIRE

    Rieder, Michael; Choonara, Imti

    2012-01-01

    Armed conflict has a major impact on child health\\ud throughout the world. One in six children worldwide lives\\ud in an area of armed conflict and civilians are more likely\\ud to die than soldiers as a result of the conflict. In stark\\ud contrast to the effect on children, the international arms\\ud trade results in huge profits for the large corporations\\ud involved in producing arms, weapons and munitions.\\ud Armed conflict is not inevitable but is an important\\ud health issue that should be...

  16. The cultural contagion of conflict

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelfand, Michele; Shteynberg, Garriy; Lee, Tiane; Lun, Janetta; Lyons, Sarah; Bell, Chris; Chiao, Joan Y.; Bruss, C. Bayan; Al Dabbagh, May; Aycan, Zeynep; Abdel-Latif, Abdel-Hamid; Dagher, Munqith; Khashan, Hilal; Soomro, Nazar

    2012-01-01

    Anecdotal evidence abounds that conflicts between two individuals can spread across networks to involve a multitude of others. We advance a cultural transmission model of intergroup conflict where conflict contagion is seen as a consequence of universal human traits (ingroup preference, outgroup hostility; i.e. parochial altruism) which give their strongest expression in particular cultural contexts. Qualitative interviews conducted in the Middle East, USA and Canada suggest that parochial altruism processes vary across cultural groups and are most likely to occur in collectivistic cultural contexts that have high ingroup loyalty. Implications for future neuroscience and computational research needed to understand the emergence of intergroup conflict are discussed. PMID:22271785

  17. Sustained attention ability in schizophrenia: Investigation of conflict monitoring mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoonakker, Marc; Doignon-Camus, Nadège; Marques-Carneiro, José Eduardo; Bonnefond, Anne

    2017-09-01

    The main goal of the current study was to assess, with a time-on-task approach, sustained attention ability in schizophrenia, and to investigate conflict monitoring underlying this ability. Behavioral and event-related potentials data (N2 and P3a amplitudes) were recorded in a long-lasting sustained attention Go/NoGo task (sustained attention to response task, SART), over a period of 30min, in 29 patients with schizophrenia and 29 pair-matched healthy subjects. Our results revealed spared sustained attention ability in patients throughout the task. Impairment of conflict detection (N2) in patients was particularly significant at the end of the task. Furthermore, both schizophrenia and healthy subjects exhibited a decline in conflict detection from the beginning to the middle of the task. Whereas controls' conflict detection recovered in the last part of the task, patients' did not, suggesting a deficit in recovery processes reflecting a lack of additional resources sustained attention Go/NoGo task. Conflict resolution (P3a) was preserved throughout the task in both groups. Conflict monitoring processes are increasingly impaired in schizophrenia during a long-lasting sustained attention Go/NoGo task. This impairment at the end of the task may rely on deficit in recovery processes, rather than a deficit in conflict detection per se in schizophrenia. Copyright © 2017 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Conflict and conflict resolution in Africa: Engaging the colonial factor

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    economic institutions on the various African conflicts, may not provide the ... regional diversities, and rendered conflictual by gross inequities in power relations ..... 1 East Timor formerly in Indonesia, and Tibet in China appear to belong to this .... urgency concerning the conflict in Burundi, the focus was mainly on diplomatic.

  19. Analysis of the relationship between the application of negotiation style and conflict management strategies physical education's experts in Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Hassannejad, Mojtaba; Zarei, Ali; Ashrafganjouei, Farideh

    2017-01-01

    The conflict is a major behavioral complication of groups. The manager who knows the basic principles of conflict and negotiation will be ready to deal successfully with these inevitable situations. However, this study aimed to explain the role of negotiation in conflict management among physical education experts in Education and Training System of Iran. This study applied analytical- correlation study. The sample consisted of 217 physical education experts. The Robbins' Conflict Manage...

  20. Environment-friendly type energy and coordinated community development project. Feasibility study for industrialization of high efficiency waste-fired power generation system using CSD and other wastes; Kankyo chowagata energy community keisei sokushin. Kokoritsu haikibutsu hatsuden (CSD nado haikibutsu riyo) jigyoka FS chosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    This report presents the feasibility of enterprise on power generation by thermal recycle and selling power together with volume reduction, de-harming (de-toxification) and stabilization of the shredder dust. Contents of the study include the investigation of generation amount of car shredder dust (CSD) and its properties, trial design of high efficiency power generation facilities, selection of boiler tube materials, incineration test with a melting kiln test plant, disposal and effective use of melted slag and fly ash, and environmental impact assessment. The capacity of waste disposal in the trial design contains 1,140 ton/day of shredder dust, 60 ton/day of waste plastics, sludge and waste paper, and 130 ton/day of waste oil. Melting kiln with secondary combustion chamber was adopted as the incineration type. The high temperature and high pressure waste heat boiler with an extraction condensing turbine was adopted as the waste heat recovery and power generation type. Stable combustion was confirmed from the results using a test plant. According to the consideration of cost and unit cost results for wholesale power supply, if it is postulated that income for waste disposal is 12,000 yen/ton, power generation costs in excess power selling and wholesales are 6.4 yen/kWh and 9.1 yen/kWh, respectively. 67 figs., 48 tabs.

  1. Mental models at work: cognitive causes and consequences of conflict in organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halevy, Nir; Cohen, Taya R; Chou, Eileen Y; Katz, James J; Panter, A T

    2014-01-01

    This research investigated the reciprocal relationship between mental models of conflict and various forms of dysfunctional social relations in organizations, including experiences of task and relationship conflicts, interpersonal hostility, workplace ostracism, and abusive supervision. We conceptualize individual differences in conflict construals as reflecting variation in people's belief structures about conflict and explore how different elements in people's associative networks-in particular, their beliefs about their best and worst strategy in conflict-relate to their personality, shape their experiences of workplace conflict, and influence others' behavioral intentions toward them. Five studies using a variety of methods (including cross-sectional surveys, a 12-week longitudinal diary study, and an experiment) show that the best strategy beliefs relate in theoretically meaningful ways to individuals' personality, shape social interactions and relationships significantly more than the worst strategy beliefs, and are updated over time as a result of individuals' ongoing experiences of conflict.

  2. Bilingualism tunes the anterior cingulate cortex for conflict monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abutalebi, Jubin; Della Rosa, Pasquale Anthony; Green, David W; Hernandez, Mireia; Scifo, Paola; Keim, Roland; Cappa, Stefano F; Costa, Albert

    2012-09-01

    Monitoring and controlling 2 language systems is fundamental to language use in bilinguals. Here, we reveal in a combined functional (event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging) and structural neuroimaging (voxel-based morphometry) study that dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), a structure tightly bound to domain-general executive control functions, is a common locus for language control and resolving nonverbal conflict. We also show an experience-dependent effect in the same region: Bilinguals use this structure more efficiently than monolinguals to monitor nonlinguistic cognitive conflicts. They adapted better to conflicting situations showing less ACC activity while outperforming monolinguals. Importantly, for bilinguals, brain activity in the ACC, as well as behavioral measures, also correlated positively with local gray matter volume. These results suggest that early learning and lifelong practice of 2 languages exert a strong impact upon human neocortical development. The bilingual brain adapts better to resolve cognitive conflicts in domain-general cognitive tasks.

  3. Trivariate Modeling of Interparental Conflict and Adolescent Emotional Security: An Examination of Mother-Father-Child Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Rebecca Y M; Cummings, E Mark; Zhang, Zhiyong; Davies, Patrick T

    2016-11-01

    Recognizing the significance of interacting family subsystems, the present study addresses how interparental conflict is linked to adolescent emotional security as a function of parental gender. A total of 272 families with a child at 12.60 years of age (133 boys, 139 girls) were invited to participate each year for three consecutive years. A multi-informant method was used, along with trivariate models to test the associations among mothers, fathers, and their adolescent children's behaviors. The findings from separate models of destructive and constructive interparental conflict revealed intricate linkages among family members. In the model of destructive interparental conflict, mothers and fathers predicted each other's conflict behaviors over time. Moreover, adolescents' exposure to negativity expressed by either parent dampened their emotional security. Consistent with child effects models, adolescent emotional insecurity predicted fathers' destructive conflict behaviors. As for the model of constructive interparental conflict, fathers predicted mothers' conflict behaviors over time. Adolescents' exposure to fathers' constructive conflict behaviors also enhanced their sense of emotional security. Consistent with child effects models, adolescent emotional security predicted mothers' and fathers' constructive conflict behaviors. These findings extended the family and the adolescent literature by indicating that family processes are multiidirectional, involving multiple dyads in the study of parents' and adolescents' functioning. Contributions of these findings to the understanding of interparental conflict and emotional security in adolescence are discussed.

  4. Negative and positive externalities in intergroup conflict: exposure to the opportunity to help the outgroup reduces the inclination to harm it

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Weisel, Ori

    2015-01-01

    ... for individual participation in intergroup conflict. The current work uses a within-subject design to examine the behavior of the same individuals in intergroup conflict with negative and positive externalities on the outgroup...

  5. MATERIAL ASSIMILATION IN A SHALLOW DIAPIRIC FORCEFUL INTRUSION: EVIDENCE FROM MICROSTRUCTURES AND CSD ANALYSIS IN A PORPHYRITIC INTRUSIVE BODY, “LA LÍNEA” TUNNEL, CENTRAL CORDILLERA, COLOMBIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rayo Lorena

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The contact between the unit Porphyry Andesite and the Cajamarca Group is observed in the "Túnel de la Linea" section. The integration of petrographic, geochemical and textural (crystal size distribution, CSD analysis allows description of physical and chemical processes that took place in the contact zone in order to propose a model for the intrusion. Material assimilation produced quartz enrichment towards pluton's boundaries associated to a simple process of melt injection. The difference between host rock and hot melt rheologies causedshear stress that produced crystal breaking, folding and foliation rotation.

  6. Secure Attachment Conceptualizations: The Influence of General and Specific Relational Models on Conflict Beliefs and Conflict Resolution Styles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheryl C. Woolley

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Attachment theory focuses on the cognitive models that underlie our interactions with attachment figures. Global or generalized mental models are thought to develop on the basis of attachment models with parents and might form the initial basis of internal working models in novel relationships. However, as discrepant information presents itself in a new relationship, it is thought that specific relational models develop. When conflict arises it can threaten the attachment bonds of the relationship. An Internet survey of 134 individuals in couple relationships was conducted to test the influence of secure parental and partner attachment conceptualizations on romantic relationship variables (conflict beliefs and conflict resolution styles. Results indicated that for the most part relationship variables were influenced by current secure romantic attachment conceptualizations. Analyses also indicated differential gender results for positive problem solving in terms of secure parental and partner attachment. Secure parental attachment was also found to impact on the report of compliant behavior during conflict resolution. Lastly, the belief that arguing is threatening was found to be impacted by an interaction effect between parental and partner attachment. In general secure partner attachment was more predictive of conflict resolution behavior and conflict beliefs, than a global attachment model. However, it would appear that the global attachment model can be activated in the context of the current relationship under certain conditions. This research lends support to the notion that generalized and specific attachment representations impacts differently on close relationship functioning, and encourages a further mapping of relationship functions in this regard.

  7. Resolving environmental disputes: from conflict to consensus

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sidaway, Roger

    2005-01-01

    ... The Function of Social Conflict Conflicts Spiralling out of Control Dynamic Analyses of Natural Resource Conflicts and Cooperation in Natural Resource Management Dynamic Analysis of the Conflict over the Designation of the Pentland Hills Regional Park, 1983- 1985 Dynamic Analysis of Moorland Access in the Peak District Ways of Dealing with Conflict ...

  8. Conflict Management Strategies in Workplace

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄玉霞

    2011-01-01

    As we all know, it is inevitable to be confronted with verbal aggressiveness by employees, peers, and supervisors in the workplace. In order to avoid these conflict with others in the future workplace, this paper is to discuss about the management strategies dealing with these conflicts.

  9. Social networks and intergroup conflict

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Takács, Károly

    2002-01-01

    Conflicts between groups are among the most challenging problems of mankind. They arise as groups compete for the possession of certain scarce resources. Under what conditions does such competition lead to conflict or to a peaceful coexistence? Why do individual group members, despite the likelihood

  10. Functional imaging of decision conflict

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pochon, J.B.; Riis, J.; Sanfey, A.G.; Nystrom, L.E.; Cohen, J.D.

    2008-01-01

    Decision conflict occurs when people feel uncertain as to which option to choose from a set of similarly attractive ( or unattractive) options, with many studies demonstrating that this conflict can lead to suboptimal decision making. In this article, we investigate the neurobiological underpinnings

  11. Climate Change, Conflict, and Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akresh, Richard

    2016-01-01

    We have good reason to predict that a warming climate will produce more conflict and violence. A growing contingent of researchers has been examining the relationship in recent years, and they've found that hotter temperatures and reduced rainfall are linked to increases in conflict at all scales, from interpersonal violence to war. Children are…

  12. Conflict-Induced Perceptual Filtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendt, Mike; Luna-Rodriguez, Aquiles; Jacobsen, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    In a variety of conflict paradigms, target and distractor stimuli are defined in terms of perceptual features. Interference evoked by distractor stimuli tends to be reduced when the ratio of congruent to incongruent trials is decreased, suggesting conflict-induced perceptual filtering (i.e., adjusting the processing weights assigned to stimuli…

  13. International Dimensions of Internal Conflict

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.W. Metternich; K.S. Gleditsch; H. Dorussen; A. Ruggeri

    2012-01-01

    Civil wars are by definition violent conflicts between a state and some form of non-state actors (Sambanis 2004b). Perhaps not surprisingly, most scholars have looked for features within countries to account for why such conflicts break out and how they evolve (Blattman and Miguel 2010). However, it

  14. New Approaches to Conflict Resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford Foundation, New York, NY.

    This paper addresses the future role of the Ford Foundation in helping to improve society's capacity to resolve conflicts. Part I discusses the problem. In recent years America has had many sorts of conflicts and disputes. Examples are racial equality, energy allocation, environmental protection, consumer rights, and equal educational opportunity.…

  15. Structural embeddedness and intergroup conflict

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Takacs, K

    2001-01-01

    Social structure affects the likelihood of group conflicts, although it has been disregarded by previous explanations. This study extends the intergroup public goods game model and integrates the influence of structural embeddedness and social incentives in the analysis of harmful group conflict. Th

  16. 旅游遗产地政府与居民利益冲突处理合作行为意向模型研究%Collaborative Behavior Intention Model of Resident and Government Interest Conflict Management in Natural Heritage Tourism Areas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘焱; 郑焱

    2014-01-01

    Based on the construction of collaborative behavior intention model of resident -government interest conflict management , three different natural heritage tourism areas in Hunan , China were selected and SEM was used to validate the proposed research framework .The findings show that residents′perceived interest distribution justice and procedure justice of local tourism development will not only positively influence the residents ′conflict-handling intention to cooper-ate with government , but also mediate the influence of resident′s pro-social orientation on their conflict -handling in-tention to cooperate with the government .Procedural justice and procedural implementation justice rather than economic means significantly provoked the resident′s conflict-handling intention to cooperate positively with the government .%在构建自然遗产旅游地政府-居民利益冲突处理的合作行为意向模型基础上,本文采用结构方程模型方法,以湖南张家界、崀山和紫鹊界三大自然遗产旅游地为研究对象,对模型进行实证检验。研究发现居民亲社会取向正向影响旅游发展公正感知和冲突处理的合作行为意向;经济手段并不是显著促进居民积极与政府合作的因素;旅游发展的程序公正和符合程序正义的制度执行方式,是促进居民与政府合作行为意向的重要保障。

  17. Optimizing Negotiation Conflict in the Cloud Service Negotiation Framework Using Probabilistic Decision Making Model

    OpenAIRE

    Rajkumar Rajavel; Mala Thangarathinam

    2015-01-01

    Optimization of negotiation conflict in the cloud service negotiation framework is identified as one of the major challenging issues. This negotiation conflict occurs during the bilateral negotiation process between the participants due to the misperception, aggressive behavior, and uncertain preferences and goals about their opponents. Existing research work focuses on the prerequest context of negotiation conflict optimization by grouping similar negotiation pairs using distance, binary, co...

  18. Double Dose: High Family Conflict Enhances the Effect of Media Violence Exposure on Adolescents’ Aggression

    OpenAIRE

    Valkenburg, Patti M.; Vossen, Helen G.M.; Weeda, Wouter D.; Jessica Taylor Piotrowski; Karin M. Fikkers

    2013-01-01

    We investigated how exposure to media violence and family conflict affects adolescents’ subsequent aggressive behavior. We expected a double dose effect, meaning that high media violence exposure would lead to higher levels of aggression for adolescents in high conflict families compared to low conflict families. A total of 499 adolescents (aged 10 to 14, 48% girls) participated in a two-wave longitudinal survey (4-month interval). Survey questions assessed their exposure to violence on telev...

  19. The Effects of Conflicts Handling In Teamwork of Hotel Industry Located In Northern Region of Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Bibi Noraini Bt Mohd Yusuf; Siti Norsyafawani Bt Shamsul Anuar

    2014-01-01

    Conflict is part and parcel of people?s awareness in all aspects of life. There are few key factors affecting conflict handling in any teamwork, such as leadership effectiveness, employee satisfaction, behavior/ personality, communication and lastly, the role of the gender. The paper?s primary contribution in conducting this study are firstly to find out factors that influence conflicts handling in teamwork of hotel industry in northern areas and secondly to examine the parties responsible be...

  20. Conflict in a changing climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carleton, T.; Hsiang, S. M.; Burke, M.

    2016-05-01

    A growing body of research illuminates the role that changes in climate have had on violent conflict and social instability in the recent past. Across a diversity of contexts, high temperatures and irregular rainfall have been causally linked to a range of conflict outcomes. These findings can be paired with climate model output to generate projections of the impact future climate change may have on conflicts such as crime and civil war. However, there are large degrees of uncertainty in such projections, arising from (i) the statistical uncertainty involved in regression analysis, (ii) divergent climate model predictions, and (iii) the unknown ability of human societies to adapt to future climate change. In this article, we review the empirical evidence of the climate-conflict relationship, provide insight into the likely extent and feasibility of adaptation to climate change as it pertains to human conflict, and discuss new methods that can be used to provide projections that capture these three sources of uncertainty.

  1. INTELLIGENT RESOLUTION OF COOPERATIVE CONFLICT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    First, the concept of cooperative conflict is presented, and the characteristic of cooperative air combat is researched. Then, four methods of conflict resolution are designed by way of the first order predicate logic, I.e., link-up, coordination, accommodation and integration, and corresponding examples are given. A 2 vs 2 air combat simulation was carried out; after conflict resolution, the loss ratio is dropped to 0.54 from the original 1.32, so the enhancement of effectiveness is notable. The present research findings are that the wide conflicts discover the essence of multi-fighter cooperation, I.e., to as fully as possible enhance the effectiveness of each fighter to attain global optimization, and that the possibility of conflict resolution shows the application prospect. The proposed method in this paper is a helpful try to the application of the Fifth Generation Computer in the new generation of C3I system.

  2. APPROACH TO TEAM CONFLICT RESOLUTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enes Huseinagić

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This work includes research of team conflict resolution styles in sports by basketball coaches. This research was conducted at the European Junior Basketball Championship B Division held from July 23 to August 2, 2009 in Sarajevo. Research tasks were created with the goal to establish styles for resolving team conflict by coaches in basketball, to determine dominating styles and with the help of a questionnaire to analyze opinion about correlation of the offered styles and their effectiveness. The questionnaire created by Kreitner and Kinicki (1998, has given answers on these hypotheses. Sample was comprised of 14 coaches from 24 basketball teams which took part in competition. The research was conducted through the questionnaire which covered five different conflict resolution styles: bonding, reconciling, imposing, avoiding and compromise. Coaches of tested teams who have dominating styles for resolving team conflicts caused by certain reasons, have shown that hypothesis relating to coach’s different adaptational styles of conflict resolution is completely confirmed.

  3. Building a Successful School Conflict Resolution Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbus, Judith

    1994-01-01

    Looks at components of conflict resolution programs in Toronto elementary schools. Describes how curriculum, peer resolution, and management work interdependently to support conflict resolution. Discusses establishing a program and lists key components of successful conflict resolution programs. (SR)

  4. Intergenerational Conflicts among Latinos in Early Adulthood: Separating Values Conflicts with Parents from Acculturation Conflicts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Jessica; Basanez, Tatiana; Farahmand, Anahita

    2010-01-01

    An investigation of Latino and non-Latino college students sought to examine the ways in which perceived intergenerational conflicts with parents are related to acculturation, family dynamics, and psychosocial functioning. Participants reported the extent to which they experienced two types of intergenerational conflicts with parents:…

  5. How do conflict and communication patterns between fathers and daughters contribute to or offset eating disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botta, Renée A; Dumlao, Rebecca

    2002-01-01

    As many as 22% of young women regularly engage in eating disordered behaviors. Research indicates eating disorders are a result of a complex set of factors, including family environment. This survey research with 210 undergraduate women at 2 universities tests the possibility that father-daughter communication and conflict resolution are related to eating disordered behaviors. Results indicate skilled conflict resolution and open communication between father and daughter may offset eating disorders. A lack of those skills or attempting to resolve conflict in ways that do not offer long-term resolution for both father and daughter can lead to increased eating disordered behaviors. Implications are discussed.

  6. Climate change, conflict and health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowles, Devin C; Butler, Colin D; Morisetti, Neil

    2015-10-01

    Future climate change is predicted to diminish essential natural resource availability in many regions and perhaps globally. The resulting scarcity of water, food and livelihoods could lead to increasingly desperate populations that challenge governments, enhancing the risk of intra- and interstate conflict. Defence establishments and some political scientists view climate change as a potential threat to peace. While the medical literature increasingly recognises climate change as a fundamental health risk, the dimension of climate change-associated conflict has so far received little attention, despite its profound health implications. Many analysts link climate change with a heightened risk of conflict via causal pathways which involve diminishing or changing resource availability. Plausible consequences include: increased frequency of civil conflict in developing countries; terrorism, asymmetric warfare, state failure; and major regional conflicts. The medical understanding of these threats is inadequate, given the scale of health implications. The medical and public health communities have often been reluctant to interpret conflict as a health issue. However, at times, medical workers have proven powerful and effective peace advocates, most notably with regard to nuclear disarmament. The public is more motivated to mitigate climate change when it is framed as a health issue. Improved medical understanding of the association between climate change and conflict could strengthen mitigation efforts and increase cooperation to cope with the climate change that is now inevitable. © The Royal Society of Medicine.

  7. Managing Workplace Incivility: The Role of Conflict Management Styles--Antecedent or Antidote?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trudel, Jeannie; Reio, Thomas G., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    The workforce of the 21st century is dealing with rapid changes and increased competition across industries. Such changes place stress on management and workers alike, increasing the potential for workplace conflict and deviant workplace behaviors, including incivility. The importance of effective conflict management in the workplace has been…

  8. Effects of Role Conflict on Counselor Trainees' Self-Statements, Anxiety Level, and Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedlander, Myrna L.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Investigated if and how role conflict affects counselor trainees' self-statements, anxiety level, and performance. Results suggested role conflict may produce few adverse effects on beginning trainees' self-evaluations, affect, or behavior. Trainee performance was inversely related to anxiety level, and anxiety was inversely related to strength of…

  9. Double dose: High family conflict enhances the effect of media violence exposure on adolescents’ aggression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fikkers, K.M.; Piotrowski, J.T.; Weeda, W.D.; Vossen, H.G.M.; Valkenburg, P.M.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated how exposure to media violence and family conflict affects adolescents’ subsequent aggressive behavior. We expected a double dose effect, meaning that high media violence exposure would lead to higher levels of aggression for adolescents in high conflict families compared to low

  10. Managing Workplace Incivility: The Role of Conflict Management Styles--Antecedent or Antidote?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trudel, Jeannie; Reio, Thomas G., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    The workforce of the 21st century is dealing with rapid changes and increased competition across industries. Such changes place stress on management and workers alike, increasing the potential for workplace conflict and deviant workplace behaviors, including incivility. The importance of effective conflict management in the workplace has been…

  11. The Influence of Reward Associations on Conflict Processing in the Stroop Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs, Ruth M.; Boehler, Carsten N.; Woldorff, Marty G.

    2010-01-01

    Performance in a behavioral task can be facilitated by associating stimulus properties with reward. In contrast, conflicting information is known to impede task performance. Here we investigated how reward associations influence the within-trial processing of conflicting information using a color-naming Stroop task in which a subset of ink colors…

  12. Women as Mothers and Wives in Paternally Incestuous Families: Coping with Role Conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    deYoung, Mary

    1994-01-01

    Interviews with 20 women from paternally incestuous families revealed that they felt a moderate degree of conflict between their roles as mother and wife. Strategies for coping with the conflict are categorized (social role redefinition, interpersonal role redefinition, intrapersonal role redefinition, or reactive role behavior) and evaluated in…

  13. Pain and Defense versus Grace and Justice: The Relational Conflict and Restoration Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sells, James N.; Beckenbach, John; Patrick, Shawn

    2009-01-01

    The article presents an integrated theoretical perspective on the origin, maintenance and alteration of relational conflict. It suggests that relational conflict and reconciliation can be understood as two behavioral alternatives that couples respond with during the experience of pain or other negative emotion. The presence of pain elicits a…

  14. Double dose: High family conflict enhances the effect of media violence exposure on adolescents’ aggression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fikkers, K.M.; Piotrowski, J.T.; Weeda, W.D.; Vossen, H.G.M.; Valkenburg, P.M.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated how exposure to media violence and family conflict affects adolescents’ subsequent aggressive behavior. We expected a double dose effect, meaning that high media violence exposure would lead to higher levels of aggression for adolescents in high conflict families compared to low conf

  15. Double dose: High family conflict enhances the effect of media violence exposure on adolescents’ aggression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fikkers, K.M.; Piotrowski, J.T.; Weeda, W.D.; Vossen, H.G.M.; Valkenburg, P.M.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated how exposure to media violence and family conflict affects adolescents’ subsequent aggressive behavior. We expected a double dose effect, meaning that high media violence exposure would lead to higher levels of aggression for adolescents in high conflict families compared to low conf

  16. Responses to Conflict and Cooperation in Adolescents with Anxiety and Mood Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure, Erin B.; Parrish, Jessica M.; Nelson, Eric E.; Easter, Joshua; Thorne, John F.; Rilling, James K.; Ernst, Monique; Pine, Daniel S.

    2007-01-01

    This study examined patterns of behavioral and emotional responses to conflict and cooperation in adolescents with anxiety/mood disorders and healthy peers. We compared performance on and emotional responses to the Prisoner's Dilemma (PD) game, an economic exchange task involving conflict and cooperation, between adolescents with…

  17. Conflict and human African trypanosomiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrang-Ford, Lea; Lundine, Jamie; Breau, Sebastien

    2011-02-01

    Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT) has reemerged in sub-Saharan Africa as a disease of major public health importance. The success of HAT elimination in sub-Saharan Africa is subject to the feasibility of controlling, eliminating, or mitigating the determinants of incidence in affected countries. Conflict has been widely recognized and cited as a contributing factor to the resurgence of HAT in many countries, as well as to continuing HAT incidence in politically unstable and resource-poor regions. Despite extensive anecdotal and qualitative recognition of the role of conflict, there has been no quantitative research of this topic at the population level in affected African countries. We characterize the qualitative and quantitative associations between HAT incidence and conflict-related processes in HAT-affected African countries over the past 30 years. HAT and conflict-related data were collected for 35 affected countries in sub-Saharan Africa for the years 1976-2004. Descriptive and univariate inferential statistics, as well as negative binomial regression modeling, are used to assess the associations between HAT and conflict. A space-time scan statistic is used to identify significant incidence clusters. Clusters of HAT incidence over the past 30 years have predominantly coincided with periods of conflict or socio-political instability. HAT cases occurred significantly more often in countries and during years with conflict, high political terror, and internationalized civil war. The results indicate a lag period between the start of conflict events and a peak in incidence of approximately 10 years. We recommend explicit consideration and quantification of socio-political measures such as conflict and terror indices in GIS (Geographic Information Systems)-based risk assessments for HAT policy and intervention.

  18. Conflict at work: basic principles and applied issues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Dreu, C.K.W.; Zedeck, S.

    2011-01-01

    Conflict at work is quickly classified as a "darkside" construct that has primarily negative, destructive, and aversive consequences to individual employees’ well-being and task performance, to citizenship behavior and performance in work teams, and to organizational fitness and survival chances. In

  19. Conflict at work: Basic principles and applied issues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.K.W. de Dreu

    2011-01-01

    Conflict at work is quickly classified as a "darkside" construct that has primarily negative, destructive, and aversive consequences to individual employees’ well-being and task performance, to citizenship behavior and performance in work teams, and to organizational fitness and survival chances. In

  20. A Cultural Analysis of Harmony and Conflict: Towards an Integrated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ike Odimegwu

    Social harmony is now a major national policy in China and in .... core component of communication competence in Chinese culture .... frameworks for a full understanding of the conflict behavior of ..... situation and cultural attitudes, people are motivated to resolve .... confirmatory factor analysis of these data showed that the.

  1. Self-concept clarity and the management of social conflict.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bechtoldt, M.N.; de Dreu, C.K.W.; Nijstad, B.A.

    2010-01-01

    In 4 studies we examined the relationship between selfconcept clarity and conflict management. Individuals with higher selfconcept clarity were overall more active and showed more cooperative problem-solving behavior than people with low self-concept clarity. There were no relationships with

  2. Self-Concept Clarity and the Management of Social Conflict

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bechtoldt, Myriam N.; De Dreu, Carsten K. W.; Nijstad, Bernard A.; Zapf, Dieter

    In 4 studies we examined the relationship between self-concept clarity and conflict management. Individuals with higher self-concept clarity were overall more active and showed more cooperative problem-solving behavior than people with low self-concept clarity. There were no relationships with

  3. Self-Concept Clarity and the Management of Social Conflict

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bechtoldt, Myriam N.; De Dreu, Carsten K. W.; Nijstad, Bernard A.; Zapf, Dieter

    2010-01-01

    In 4 studies we examined the relationship between self-concept clarity and conflict management. Individuals with higher self-concept clarity were overall more active and showed more cooperative problem-solving behavior than people with low self-concept clarity. There were no relationships with conte

  4. Self-Concept Clarity and the Management of Social Conflict

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bechtoldt, Myriam N.; De Dreu, Carsten K. W.; Nijstad, Bernard A.; Zapf, Dieter

    2010-01-01

    In 4 studies we examined the relationship between self-concept clarity and conflict management. Individuals with higher self-concept clarity were overall more active and showed more cooperative problem-solving behavior than people with low self-concept clarity. There were no relationships with conte

  5. TRIZ based Interface Conflict Resolving Strategies for Modular Product Architectures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wits, Wessel W.; Vaneker, Tom H.J.

    2010-01-01

    In product development, the chosen product architecture often possesses characteristics of both modular and integral design. Within a modular architecture, a Function-Behavior-Structure (FBS) model has been applied to describe modules and their interfaces. To resolve emerging interface conflicts, se

  6. The immuno-dynamics of conflict intervention in social systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David C Krakauer

    Full Text Available We present statistical evidence and dynamical models for the management of conflict and a division of labor (task specialization in a primate society. Two broad intervention strategy classes are observed--a dyadic strategy--pacifying interventions, and a triadic strategy--policing interventions. These strategies, their respective degrees of specialization, and their consequences for conflict dynamics can be captured through empirically-grounded mathematical models inspired by immuno-dynamics. The spread of aggression, analogous to the proliferation of pathogens, is an epidemiological problem. We show analytically and computationally that policing is an efficient strategy as it requires only a small proportion of a population to police to reduce conflict contagion. Policing, but not pacifying, is capable of effectively eliminating conflict. These results suggest that despite implementation differences there might be universal features of conflict management mechanisms for reducing contagion-like dynamics that apply across biological and social levels. Our analyses further suggest that it can be profitable to conceive of conflict management strategies at the behavioral level as mechanisms of social immunity.

  7. A catastrophe theory model of the conflict helix, with tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rummel, R J

    1987-10-01

    Macro social field theory has undergone extensive development and testing since the 1960s. One of these has been the articulation of an appropriate conceptual micro model--called the conflict helix--for understanding the process from conflict to cooperation and vice versa. Conflict and cooperation are viewed as distinct equilibria of forces in a social field; the movement between these equilibria is a jump, energized by a gap between social expectations and power, and triggered by some minor event. Quite independently, there also has been much recent application of catastrophe theory to social behavior, but usually without a clear substantive theory and lacking empirical testing. This paper uses catastrophe theory--namely, the butterfly model--mathematically to structure the conflict helix. The social field framework and helix provide the substantive interpretation for the catastrophe theory; and catastrophe theory provides a suitable mathematical model for the conflict helix. The model is tested on the annual conflict and cooperation between India and Pakistan, 1948 to 1973. The results are generally positive and encouraging.

  8. Basolateral amygdala encodes upcoming errors but not response conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashtelyan, Vadim; Tobia, Steven C; Burton, Amanda C; Bryden, Daniel W; Roesch, Matthew R

    2012-03-01

    Adaptive behavior depends on the detection of potential errors so that ongoing behavior might be corrected. Here, we ask whether basolateral amygdala (ABL) might serve this function by examining activity in rats performing a task in which errors were induced by pitting two behavioral responses against each other. This response competition or conflict was created by forcing rats to respond away from the direction in which they were freely choosing on the majority of trials. Rats were slower and less accurate on these incongruent trial types. We found that activity in ABL fired more strongly prior to errant responses, but did not signal the potential for errors on correctly performed incongruent trials. These data support a role for ABL in processing errors prior to their occurrence and suggest that ABL is not involved in monitoring conflict so that ongoing behavior might be corrected. © 2012 The Authors. European Journal of Neuroscience © 2012 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. Human-Wildlife Conflict and Environmental Education: Evaluating a Community Program to Protect the Andean Bear in Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa, Santiago; Jacobson, Susan K.

    2012-01-01

    Environmental education is a widespread, yet relatively unexamined strategy to reduce human-wildlife conflicts. We evaluated knowledge, attitudes and behavioral intentions toward bear conservation after five years of environmental education in a Quichua community. Conflicts with livestock predation created mixed attitudes and behaviors toward bear…

  10. Consumer financial behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Raaij, W.F.

    2014-01-01

    Consumer financial behavior is a domain between micro-economics, behavioral finance, and marketing. It is based on insights and behavioral theories from cognitive, economic, and social psychology (biases, heuristics, social influences), in the context of and sometimes in conflict with micro-economic

  11. Information system conflicts: causes and types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Boonstra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Conflicts are an inherent part of organizational life and managers deal with confrontations and conflicts on an almost daily basis. Information Systems (IS implementations are a type of change that often leads to open or hidden conflicts. Managers and others involved can only deal with such conflicts effectively if they understand the nature and causes of information system conflicts (IS conflicts. To contribute to such an understanding, this study focuses on the analysis of IS conflicts. In so doing, it aims to identify various types of IS conflicts and to develop a framework that can be helpful in assessing these conflicts. To this end, we have conducted a meta-ethnographic study – that is, we synthesized earlier case studies in which IS conflicts are described. We purposefully selected 11 descriptions of IS conflicts and we analyzed the topics, contexts, and processes of these conflicts. Based on this analysis, we propose a two-dimensional framework of IS conflicts that leads to a categorization involving four IS conflict types: task; implementation process; structure; and value conflicts. Based on the conflicts that were studied, this paper also reveals that, in reality, many IS conflicts have a hybrid form and develop from one type to another over time.

  12. Impact of conflict in Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn Touré

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Since independence, few African countries have beenspared violence and armed conflict. Two West Africanresearch networks recently organised an internationalcolloquium to assess the impact and develop linkagesbetween education, peace and democracy.

  13. Conflicted Pasts and National Identities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    With reference to current theories of cultural memory, the book explores how memories of war and conflict are passed from generation to generation, how these complex processes have transformed and shaped collective identities, and how they still inform national "conversations"....

  14. Advanced communication skills: conflict management and persuasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, Marigene

    2002-11-01

    principles used in persuasion. Each student had the opportunity to make a five-to-ten-minute persuasive speech, the topic to be applicable to the student's specialty, which was reviewed by his peers. Feedback was tailored specifically to the different principles of persuasion. The curriculum was judged to be effective in changing confidence and attitudes as evidenced by pre- and post-course evaluations that students filled out during the last session of the class. Six things contributed to its success: (1) the class was offered as a fourth-year seminar; students could see its relevance and therefore were motivated to learn. (2) Activities were designed to build on learning in ways that graduated from passive to active. In such a way the theoretical was made practical. (3) Feedback was immediate and congruent. For example, the evaluators and patient-actors were all trained in the conflict management principles taught. (4) Feedback done by peer review allowed students to internalize strategies. (5) Concrete steps were given for behavioral change. (6) Small-group sessions invited camaraderie and allowed for individualized attention. Future activities include integrating this curriculum into residency teaching; the course is a continuation of a first-year course on interviewing skills taken by every student.

  15. A micro-level event-centered approach to investigating armed conflict and population responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Nathalie E; Ghimire, Dirgha J; Axinn, William G; Jennings, Elyse A; Pradhan, Meeta S

    2012-11-01

    In this article, we construct and test a micro-level event-centered approach to the study of armed conflict and behavioral responses in the general population. Event-centered approaches have been successfully used in the macro-political study of armed conflict but have not yet been adopted in micro-behavioral studies. The micro-level event-centered approach that we advocate here includes decomposition of a conflict into discrete political and violent events, examination of the mechanisms through which they affect behavior, and consideration of differential risks within the population. We focus on two mechanisms: instability and threat of harm. We test this approach empirically in the context of the recent decade-long armed conflict in Nepal, using detailed measurements of conflict-related events and a longitudinal study of first migration, first marriage, and first contraceptive use. Results demonstrate that different conflict-related events independently shaped migration, marriage, and childbearing and that they can simultaneously influence behaviors in opposing directions. We find that violent events increased migration, but political events slowed migration. Both violent and political events increased marriage and contraceptive use net of migration. Overall, this micro-level event-centered approach yields a significant advance for the study of how armed conflict affects civilian behavioral responses.

  16. Conflicts Over "Conflict": Preventing Fragmentation of International Law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adarsh Ramanujan

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Public international law does not envisage a single source of law; nor does it contemplate a single supreme law-creating body. Conflict between various norms, whatever be their nature, is therefore an inevitability. Such conflicts are one of the many causes that affect the ability of the legal system to maintain stability and accountability. Resolving such conflicts is essential to ensure that any system does not fall under its own weight. The importance of resolving conflicts is amplified in the context of the public international law regime, which consists of a number of sub-systems, thereby resulting in a higher probability of conflicts. Equally important to the issue of resolving conflict is identifying when the solution is to be applied. After all, what good is any “ultimate answer” without identifying the “ultimate question”! In other words, one must first identify the existence of a conflict to resolve it. Very few publicists of international repute have, however, dealt with this issue, in particular, in sufficient substantive detail. Despite the limited number of opinions, there is, unfortunately, no consensus on this topic. The present comment portrays the author’s view on this issue. In this comment, the question has been analyzed with a very simple policy objective: avoiding fragmentation of international law. The author’s views are presented by way of critically examining the opinion of Joost Pauwelyn, a noted scholar in this field, who has most recently dealt with this issue in a comprehensive manner. Moulded into this crtique are three hypothetical scenarios that would allow the reader to grasp the significance of the question.

  17. Team negotiation: social, epistemic, economic, and psychological consequences of subgroup conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halevy, Nir

    2008-12-01

    Large collectives (e.g., organizations, political parties, nations) are seldom unitary players. Rather, they consist of different subgroups that often have conflicting interests. Nonetheless, negotiation research consistently regards negotiating teams, who represent these collectives, as monolithic parties with uniform interests. This article integrates concepts from social psychology, management, political science, and behavioral game theory to explore the effects of subgroup conflict on team negotiation. Specifically, the present research introduced a conflict of interests within negotiating teams and investigated how this internal conflict affects the outcome of the negotiation between teams. An experiment with 80 four-person teams found that conflict between subgroups had a detrimental effect on the performance of negotiating teams. This research also employed a recent model of motivated information processing in groups to investigate possible processes underlying the effect of subgroup conflict on team negotiation.

  18. Pupil dilation in the Simon task as a marker of conflict processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Steenbergen, Henk; Band, Guido P H

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive demands in response conflict paradigms trigger negative affect and avoidance behavior. However, not all response conflict studies show increases in physiological indices of emotional arousal, such as pupil diameter. In contrast to earlier null-results, this study shows for the first time that small (about 0.02 mm) conflict-related pupil dilation can be observed in a Simon task when stimuli do not introduce a light reflex. Results show that response-conflict in Simon trials induces both pupil dilation and reaction-time costs. Moreover, sequential analyses reveal that pupil dilation mirrors the conflict-adaptation pattern observed in reaction time (RT). Although single-trial regression analyses indicated that pupil dilation is likely to reflect more than one process at the same time, in general our findings imply that pupil dilation can be used as an indirect marker of conflict processing.

  19. Pupil Dilation in the Simon Task as a Marker of Conflict Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henk eVan Steenbergen

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive demands in response conflict paradigms trigger negative affect and avoidance behavior. However, not all response conflict studies show increases in physiological indices of emotional arousal, such as pupil diameter. In contrast to earlier null-results, this study shows for the first time that small (about 0.02 mm conflict-related pupil dilation can be observed in a Simon task when stimuli do not introduce a light reflex. Results show that response-conflict in Simon trials induces both pupil dilation and reaction-time costs. Moreover, sequential analyses reveal that pupil dilation mirrors the conflict-adaptation pattern observed in reaction time. Although single-trial regression analyses indicated that pupil dilation is likely to reflect more than one process at the same time, in general our findings imply that pupil dilation can be used as an indirect marker of conflict processing.

  20. Perceiving interpersonal conflict and reacting to it: the case for agreeableness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graziano, W G; Jensen-Campbell, L A; Hair, E C

    1996-04-01

    Two converging, multimethod studies probed the hypothesis that individual differences in Agreeableness are related to patterns of interpersonal conflict. In Study 1, participants (N = 263) evaluated the efficacy of 11 modes of conflict resolution within the context of 5 different interpersonal relationships. Across all relationships, high- and low-agreeable participants rated negotiation and disengagement tactics as better choices that power assertion tactics. However, low-agreeable participants rated power assertion as a better choice than did high-agreeable participants. In Study 2, participants (N = 124) were assigned partners and were asked to resolve jointly 2 social conflict problems. Partners were videotaped, and observers coded behaviors. Participants also completed ratings of perceived conflict, partner perception, and liking of their partner. Agreeableness differences, sex of participant, and type of dyad partner were related to patterns of interpersonal conflict. Results were discussed in terms of personality and social influences during interpersonal conflict.

  1. A holistic approach to natural resource conflict

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bond, Jennifer Lauren

    2014-01-01

    and institutional factors which impact on the conflict complex. The critical features of the conflict from the perspective of pastoralists and farmers in Laikipia were found to be related to trust, communication, security, governance, marginalisation and violence. By conducting a thorough conflict context analysis...... incorporating social, ecological and institutional elements, valuable insights can be gleaned, leading to a more holistic conflict management approach....

  2. Information system conflicts : causes and types

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonstra, Albert; de Vries, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Conflicts are an inherent part of organizational life and managers deal with confrontations and conflicts on an almost daily basis. IS implementations are a type of change that often leads to open or hidden conflicts. Managers and others involved can only deal with such conflicts effectively if they

  3. Handling Conflict in the Work Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Ernest W.

    1997-01-01

    Discussion of workplace conflict management examines erroneous assumptions inherent in traditional reaction patterns, considers key elements of planning for conflict prevention, and some workplace strategies to help minimize conflicts. Several approaches to conflict management, and their outcomes, are highlighted, and stages of the…

  4. Information system conflicts : causes and types

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonstra, Albert; de Vries, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Conflicts are an inherent part of organizational life and managers deal with confrontations and conflicts on an almost daily basis. IS implementations are a type of change that often leads to open or hidden conflicts. Managers and others involved can only deal with such conflicts effectively if they

  5. Responses of medial and ventrolateral prefrontal cortex to interpersonal conflict for resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koban, Leonie; Pichon, Swann; Vuilleumier, Patrik

    2014-05-01

    Little is known about brain mechanisms recruited during the monitoring and appraisal of social conflicts--for instance, when individuals compete with each other for the same resources. We designed a novel experimental task inducing resource conflicts between two individuals. In an event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) design, participants played with another human participant or against a computer, who across trials chose either different (no-conflict) or the same tokens (conflict trials) in order to obtain monetary gains. In conflict trials, the participants could decide whether they would share the token, and the resulting gain, with the other person or instead keep all points for themselves. Behaviorally, participants shared much more often when playing with a human partner than with a computer. fMRI results demonstrated that the dorsal mediofrontal cortex was selectively activated during human conflicts. This region might play a key role in detecting situations in which self- and social interest are incompatible and require behavioral adjustment. In addition, we found a conflict-related response in the right ventrolateral prefrontal cortex that correlated with measures of social relationship and individual sharing behavior. Taken together, these findings reveal a key role of these prefrontal areas for the appraisal and resolution of interpersonal resource conflicts.

  6. Conflict and Change Across Generations: The Khoy Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza LOTFİ

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This work focuses on cultural corporation of the family members of the different generations. There is dissimilitude in complete and incomplete survey between periodical generations. Both type of survey may end to a lot of questions. The relationship processes of values, norms, and quality of capacities between new generations of Iranian society is the main problem. This survey have conducted at 2012 in Khoy city about values behaviors and normative corporation between adults and youths. According to findings of survey there are conflicts at the area of culture and social values. But this conflict did not elapses social and economic values.

  7. When Christianity and homosexuality collide: understanding the potential intrapersonal conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subhi, Nasrudin; Geelan, David

    2012-01-01

    Reconciling sexual orientation with religious and spiritual beliefs can be challenging for Christian homosexuals, since many Christian churches teach that homosexual behavior is sinful. A qualitative study of 10 male and 10 female Christian homosexuals was conducted via semistructured interviews. This article seeks to explore the potential conflict between Christianity and homosexuality faced by the respondents. Participants' life stories and experiences varied widely. A few respondents were unaffected by the potential conflict between Christianity and homosexuality, however, the majority were affected. Effects included depression, guilt, anxiety, suicidal ideation, and alienation. Implications of the findings for support personnel are included.

  8. Sovereignty in Conflict

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha Besson

    2004-09-01

    implied by constitutional pluralism, while also enhancing the legitimacy of the European polity. This can be observed in the context of difficult issues such as constitutional conflicts, legislative cooperation and, finally, multi-level constitutionalism.

  9. How to Preempt Team Conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toegel, Ginka; Barsoux, Jean-Louis

    2016-06-01

    Team conflict can add value or destroy it. Good conflict fosters respectful debate and yields mutually agreed-upon solutions that are often far superior to those first offered. Bad conflict occurs when team members simply can't get past their differences, killing productivity and stifling innovation. Destructive conflict typically stems not from differences of opinion but from a perceived incompatibility between the way certain team members think and act. The conventional approach to working through such conflict is to respond to clashes as they arise. But this approach routinely fails because it allows frustrations to build for too long, making it difficult to reset negative impressions and restore trust. In their research on team dynamics and experience working with executive teams, Toegel and Barsoux have found a proactive approach to be much more effective. In this article, they introduce a methodology that focuses on how people look, act, speak, think, and feel. Team leaders facilitate five conversations--one focused on each category--before the team gets under way, to build a shared understanding of the process, rather than the content, of work and lay the foundation for effective collaboration.

  10. Conflicting professional values in social work and medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, C S

    1989-08-01

    The professional relationship between social workers and physicians historically has been somewhat strained. Social workers have been quick to blame the medical model for problems in health care and consequently have overlooked useful lessons from this model that could improve social work practice. To work effectively with physicians, social workers must be aware of physicians' professional values and be able to identify conflicts with social work values. Conflicting values in social work and medicine are identified in five areas: (1) saving life versus quality of life, (2) patient autonomy in setting treatment goals, (3) attitudes toward objective versus subjective data, (4) responses to patients with emotional problems, and (5) differing perspectives on interdisciplinary team roles. Case illustrations based on the author's experiences as director of behavioral science training for resident family practice physicians are included. Although different value orientations may produce conflict, the differences also can catalyze successful collaboration between the two professions, which ultimately will benefit patients who receive care.

  11. Fetal programming by maternal stress: Insights from a conflict perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Giudice, Marco

    2012-10-01

    Maternal stress during pregnancy has pervasive effects on the offspring's physiology and behavior, including the development of anxious, reactive temperament and increased stress responsivity. These outcomes can be seen as the result of adaptive developmental plasticity: maternal stress hormones carry useful information about the state of the external world, which can be used by the developing fetus to match its phenotype to the predicted environment. This account, however, neglects the inherent conflict of interest between mother and fetus about the outcomes of fetal programming. The aim of this paper is to extend the adaptive model of prenatal stress by framing mother-fetus interactions in an evolutionary conflict perspective. In the paper, I show how a conflict perspective provides many new insights in the functions and mechanisms of fetal programming, with particular emphasis on human pregnancy. I then take advantage of those insights to make sense of some puzzling features of maternal and fetal physiology and generate novel empirical predictions.

  12. Evolution, Psychology, and a Conflict Theory of Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin MacDonald

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available This article develops an evolutionary theory of conflict over the construction of culture that is informed by current knowledge of psychological mechanisms. Psychological mechanisms important for the production of culture include (1 general intelligence (including the ability to engender hypothetical scenarios and means-end reasoning necessary for constructing tools and other exemplars of technology; (2 explicit processing mechanisms (e.g., symbolic representations of the world. Explicit processing allows humans to regulate modular mechanisms in accordance with culturally constructed norms and culturally constructed cost/benefit payoff schedules. It also enables active attempts to construct culture in accordance with explicit perceptions of possible costs and benefits. Because people have different construals of the costs and benefits of particular forms of culture, there is conflict over the construction of culture. Social controls and ideologies are introduced as general cultural categories that are enabled by explicit processing and which are able to regulate and motivate behavior within particular historical contexts, at times in ways that conflict with evolved predispositions. Ideologies are often intimately intertwined with various social controls but are logically and psychologically independent from social controls. Ideologies typically rationalize extant social controls but they also benefit from the power of social controls to enforce ideological conformity in schools or in religious institutions. Because of the control of explicit processing over behavior, this theory predicts that conflicts over culture will often be intense. Discussion deals with the implications of this model for group selection, cultural transmission, gene-culture co-evolution, and the various types of conflicts of interest apparent in conflicts over the construction of culture.

  13. Revisiting peace and conflict studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagmann, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    In this article, I will first draw attention to the surprising, but ultimately problematic trajectory of peace studies from the period of the Cold War to the present day. This is a trajectory from ‘peace’ as a critique of dominant geopolitics to one of ‘peace’ that has become part of the very...... the broad variety of existing units of analysis, motivations, theories and methodologies of peace and conflict studies. Thirdly, I will propose a number of suggestions for a research attitude that, in absence of a better word, I subsume under the heading of ‘critical peace and conflict research’, striving...... to understand peace and conflict as concomitantly subjective and objective, as critique and hegemony, as normative and value-free, as local and global....

  14. Conflict Management Training in China: The Value of Cooperative Conflict Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjosvold, Dean; Ding, Daniel

    2001-01-01

    Asserts the value of a theory for conflict management training and summarizes the theory of cooperative and competitive conflict and its empirical base. Outlines the theory's specific implications for conflict management training in China. (EV)

  15. Agreeableness as a moderator of interpersonal conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen-Campbell, L A; Graziano, W G

    2001-04-01

    This multimethod research linked the Big Five personality dimensions to interpersonal conflicts. Agreeableness was the focus because this dimension is associated with motives to maintain positive interpersonal relations. Converging responses to both hypothetical conflicts and to diary records of actual daily interpersonal conflicts across a two-week period were assessed. Agreeableness was expected to moderate affective responses and tactical choices during conflicts. Patterns of daily conflict were related to self-reported reactions to hypothetical conflicts and to teacher-rated adjustment in adolescents. As predicted, Agreeableness was related to responsiveness to conflict. Agreeableness differences and use of destructive tactics in conflict were significantly related to evaluations of the individual's adjustment by knowledgeable raters. Among the Big Five dimensions, Agreeableness was most closely associated with processes and outcomes during interpersonal conflict.

  16. Modeling and Controlling Interstate Conflict

    CERN Document Server

    Marwala, Tshilidzi

    2007-01-01

    Bayesian neural networks were used to model the relationship between input parameters, Democracy, Allies, Contingency, Distance, Capability, Dependency and Major Power, and the output parameter which is either peace or conflict. The automatic relevance determination was used to rank the importance of input variables. Control theory approach was used to identify input variables that would give a peaceful outcome. It was found that using all four controllable variables Democracy, Allies, Capability and Dependency; or using only Dependency or only Capabilities avoids all the predicted conflicts.

  17. Conflict Resolution in Sentence Processing by Bilinguals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Sylvain; Bialystok, Ellen; Wodniecka, Zofia; Alain, Claude

    2010-01-01

    The present study pursues findings from earlier behavioral research with children showing the superior ability of bilinguals to make grammaticality judgments in the context of misleading semantic information. The advantage in this task was attributed to the greater executive control of bilinguals, but this impact on linguistic processing has not been demonstrated in adults. Here, we recorded event-related potentials in young adults who were either English monolinguals or bilinguals as they performed two different language judgment tasks. In the acceptability task, participants indicated whether or not the sentence contained an error in either grammar or meaning; in the grammaticality task, participants indicated only whether the sentence contained an error in grammar, in spite of possible conflicting information from meaning. In both groups, sentence violations generated N400 and P600 waves. In the acceptability task, bilinguals were less accurate than monolinguals, but in the grammaticality task which requires more executive control, bilingual and monolingual groups showed a comparable level of accuracy. Importantly, bilinguals generated smaller P600 amplitude and a more bilateral distribution of activation than monolinguals in the grammaticality task requiring more executive control. Our results show that bilinguals use their enhanced executive control for linguistic processing involving conflict in spite of no apparent advantage in linguistic processing under simpler conditions. PMID:21057658

  18. Decentralized Planning for Pre-Conflict and Post-Conflict ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-10-02

    Oct 2, 2012 ... of “The Cost of Armed Conflicts in Developing Countries,” indicated that ... where children (potential marriage partners) are discouraged from ..... To assess the impact made so far by the Bawku Municipal Assembly and ...

  19. Women in conflict and indigenous conflict resolution among the Issa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. This article tries to show the impacts of conflict on women, the role of women in ..... to raiding, they are not armed and are not able to defend themselves when they are ... Mothers instruct and bless their children in the following ways:.

  20. Developmental Family Processes and Interparental Conflict: Patterns of Micro-level Influences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schermerhorn, Alice C.; Chow, Sy-Miin; Cummings, E. Mark

    2010-01-01

    Although frequent calls are made for the study of effects of children on families and mutual influence processes within families, little empirical progress has been made. We address these questions at the level of micro processes during marital conflict, including children’s influence on marital conflict and parents’ influence on each other. Participants were 111 cohabiting couples with a child (55 males, 56 females) aged 8 – 16 years. Data were drawn from parents’ diary reports of interparental conflict over 15 days, analyzed using dynamic systems modeling tools. Child emotions and behavior during conflicts were associated with interparental positivity, negativity, and resolution at the end of the same conflicts. For example, children’s agentic behavior was associated with more marital conflict resolution whereas child negativity was linked with more marital negativity. Regarding parents’ influence on each other, among the findings, husbands’ and wives’ influence on themselves from one conflict to the next was indicated, and total number of conflicts predicted greater influence of wives’ positivity on husbands’ positivity. Contributions of these findings to the understanding of developmental family processes are discussed, including implications for advanced understanding of interrelations between child and adult functioning and development. PMID:20604608

  1. Neural correlates of rules and conflict in medial prefrontal cortex during decision and feedback epochs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissonette, Gregory B; Roesch, Matthew R

    2015-01-01

    The ability to properly adjust behavioral responses to cues in a changing environment is crucial for survival. Activity in the medial Prefrontal Cortex (mPFC) is thought to both represent rules to guide behavior as well as detect and resolve conflicts between rules in changing contingencies. However, while lesion and pharmacological studies have supported a crucial role for mPFC in this type of set-shifting, an understanding of how mPFC represents current rules or detects and resolves conflict between different rules is unclear. Here, we directly address the role of rat mPFC in shifting rule based behavioral strategies using a novel behavioral task designed to tease apart neural signatures of rules, conflict and direction. We demonstrate that activity of single neurons in rat mPFC represent distinct rules. Further, we show increased firing on high conflict trials in a separate population of mPFC neurons. Reduced firing in both populations of neurons was associated with poor performance. Moreover, activity in both populations increased and decreased firing during the outcome epoch when reward was and was not delivered on correct and incorrect trials, respectively. In addition, outcome firing was modulated by the current rule and the degree of conflict associated with the previous decision. These results promote a greater understanding of the role that mPFC plays in switching between rules, signaling both rule and conflict to promote improved behavioral performance.

  2. Sexual conflict and life histories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wedell, N.; Kvarnemo, C.; Lessells, C.M.; Tregenza, T.

    2006-01-01

    There is burgeoning interest in the costs of mating and in how this leads to sex differences in the optimal mating rate. Here, we attempt to look beyond an exclusive focus on matings to examine the fundamental conflicts that arise out of the fact that sexual reproduction involves investment in offsp

  3. 77 FR 56273 - Conflict Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-12

    ... opportunity to improve a company's existing risk management and supply chain management, stimulating... Minerals Already in the Supply Chain a. Proposed Rules b. Comments on the Proposed Rules c. Final Rule 6... Content and Supply Chain Due Diligence 1. Content of the Conflict Minerals Report a. Proposed Rules...

  4. Email Adaptation for Conflict Handling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Joyce Yi‐Hui; Panteli, Niki; Bülow, Anne Marie

    2017-01-01

    This paper explores the context of email‐based communication in anestablished but fragile, inter‐organisational partnership, which wasoften overlain with conflict. Drawing upon adaptation theory, thisstudy explores how participants adapt to the use of email to handleconflict. Extensive data were ...

  5. Sexual conflict and life histories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wedell, N.; Kvarnemo, C.; Lessells, C.M.; Tregenza, T.

    2006-01-01

    There is burgeoning interest in the costs of mating and in how this leads to sex differences in the optimal mating rate. Here, we attempt to look beyond an exclusive focus on matings to examine the fundamental conflicts that arise out of the fact that sexual reproduction involves investment in

  6. Games, the Socialization of Conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton-Smith, Brian

    The function of games in a society is discussed in this paper. An earlier definition of games as a concretistic way of processing information of cultural antitheses is enlarged to include a more bio-adaptive definition: the game is also a socialization of conflict. This view is compared and contrasted with those of Sigmund Freud and G. H. Mead.…

  7. The Danish Muhammad Cartoon Conflict

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hervik, Peter

    story. It will do so by situating the conflict more firmly in its proper socio-historical context by drawing on the author’s basic research on the Danish news media’s coverage of ethnic and religious minorities since the mid 1990s. The author uses thick contextualization to analyze this very current...

  8. The paradox of intragroup conflict

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wit, Franciscus Remendus Cornelis de

    2013-01-01

    During group decision making, people often experience disagreements in which they need to choose between their own viewpoint and the viewpoint of another group member, for example, when cabinet members disagree about the best decision to tackle a crisis. These intragroup conflicts often pose a parad

  9. Discussing Conflict in Contemporary China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miletic, Tania; Bretherton, Diane

    2016-01-01

    The research suggests there is a gap in the peace studies and conflict resolution literature, with little representation or understanding of Chinese perspectives. In a project to address this gap, the researchers conducted interviews individually with 30 participants identified as "emerging leaders," who came from diverse universities…

  10. Sexual conflict and life histories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wedell, N.; Kvarnemo, C.; Lessells, C.M.; Tregenza, T.

    2006-01-01

    There is burgeoning interest in the costs of mating and in how this leads to sex differences in the optimal mating rate. Here, we attempt to look beyond an exclusive focus on matings to examine the fundamental conflicts that arise out of the fact that sexual reproduction involves investment in offsp

  11. Intragroup Conflict during Study Abroad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodycott, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Co-national groups of individuals from the same country can provide members with psychological and sociocultural support when coping with the stresses of studying abroad. This article examines intragroup task and relationship conflict that occurred in one co-national group during a 14-week short-term study abroad program. Findings reveal the…

  12. Group conflict and faculty engagement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selmer, Jan; Jonasson, Charlotte; Lauring, Jakob

    2013-01-01

    engagement has been argued to lead to more satisfied, more productive and healthier staff. In this study, based on a sample consisting of 489 members of multicultural university departments, we set out to investigate the relationship between trust, conflict and academic staff engagement. More specifically we...

  13. Internal Conflicts in Muslim Societies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashiq Ali Shah

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available An analysis of psychological theories and the social dynamics of the society help identify salient attributes and processes relevant to conflict among Muslims. The psychodynamic concept of personality and frustration-aggression hypothesis account for the socialization practices in the Muslim societies, emotional instability, unfavorable evaluation of those holding a different viewpoint and venting out one's aggression on the weaker. The tendency of the Muslims to praise their sect/tribe/religious group leads to a groupthink situation that polarizes intergroup relationships. The acts of categorization in group and out group, as postulated by the social identity theory, contribute towards the distorted perception of each other. The Islamic notions of brotherhood, unity and ethnic identity as means of personal identification and social interaction seems to have been forgotten by the Muslims. Though the Western social-psychological constructs are helpful in understanding the causes of conflict among Muslims, they are not germane to Muslim societies. The group belongingness and group favouritism is not necessarily a tool of discrimination and conflict but is an essential component of one's survival in a collectivist society. The Western theories also do not address the economic and political circumstances responsible for the multitude of conflicts among Muslims.

  14. Games, the Socialization of Conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton-Smith, Brian

    The function of games in a society is discussed in this paper. An earlier definition of games as a concretistic way of processing information of cultural antitheses is enlarged to include a more bio-adaptive definition: the game is also a socialization of conflict. This view is compared and contrasted with those of Sigmund Freud and G. H. Mead.…

  15. Authority, Conflict, and Teacher Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spady, William G.

    1973-01-01

    An analysis which attempts to link all three of the sources of conflict in schools, which appear to reside in three overlapping arenas: the goals and functions of public schools, the nature of the roles that are defined by these functions, and the manner or style in which these roles are played out. (Author/JM)

  16. Unveiling the Hidden Curriculum in Conflict Resolution and Peace Education: Future Directions toward a Critical Conflict Education and "Conflict" Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, R. Michael

    2000-01-01

    This report offers a brief summary of a master thesis that had the purpose to study the way conflict management educators write and think about "conflict." Using a critical discourse analysis (a la Foucault) of 22 conflict resolution manuals for adults and children (U.S., Canadian, Australian), and using a selected sample of those most available…

  17. Environmental conflicts: Key issues and management implications

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    growth and movement, international markets, insecure property rights and legislation .... Twyman (2005:115) identify the implications of climate change for equity and ..... Environmental conflicts and/or threats of conflicts are emerging as critical.

  18. Conflict interaction management as a cultural phenomenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Е L Ryabova

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The article provides the definition for the concept of conflict interaction culture, reveals its functions as well as the structure of its elements and components. Conflict interactions are also examined in the paper.

  19. Resolving conflicts of duty in fiduciary relationships

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Laby, Arthur B

    2004-01-01

    While duties of loyalty generally do not conflict with other duties of loyalty, and while conflicting duties of care typically only raise issues of competing resources, the fiduciary's duty of loyalty...

  20. Sensory Conflict Disrupts Activity of the Drosophila Circadian Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross E.F. Harper

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Periodic changes in light and temperature synchronize the Drosophila circadian clock, but the question of how the fly brain integrates these two input pathways to set circadian time remains unanswered. We explore multisensory cue combination by testing the resilience of the circadian network to conflicting environmental inputs. We show that misaligned light and temperature cycles can lead to dramatic changes in the daily locomotor activities of wild-type flies during and after exposure to sensory conflict. This altered behavior is associated with a drastic reduction in the amplitude of PERIOD (PER oscillations in brain clock neurons and desynchronization between light- and temperature-sensitive neuronal subgroups. The behavioral disruption depends heavily on the phase relationship between light and temperature signals. Our results represent a systematic quantification of multisensory integration in the Drosophila circadian system and lend further support to the view of the clock as a network of coupled oscillatory subunits.

  1. Self-Employment and Conflict in Colombia

    OpenAIRE

    Bozzoli, Carlos; Brück, Tilman; Wald, Nina

    2011-01-01

    Many Colombians are confronted with the ongoing conflict which influences their decision making in everyday life, including their behaviour on labour markets. This study focuses on the impact of violent conflict on self-employment, enlarging the usual determinants by a set of conflict variables. In order to estimate the effect of conflict on selfemployment, we employ fixed effects estimation. Three datasets are combined for estimation: the Familias en Acción dataset delivers information about...

  2. On the Controller Synthesis for Markov Decision Process of Conflict Tolerant Specification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junhua; Huang, Zhiqiu; Cao, Zining

    For an embedded control system, different requirements often need be satisfied at same time, and some of them make the system to act conflicted. Conflict tolerant specification is provided to denote this situation. In such a system, there often exist probabilistic and non-deterministic behaviors. We use Markov Decision Process (MDP) to denote these features. We study the controller synthesis for MDP over conflict tolerant specification. We extend PCTL star by adding past operator to denote the conflict tolerant specification succinctly. We use CT-PLTL to denote conflicted actions and PCTL to denote the specification for probability demand. We first synthesize a controller on a base system over CT-PLTL and then use it to prune the corresponding MDP of the system model. We use the resulting sub-MDP as the model to further synthesis a controller over PCTL. The whole controller for MDP is a conjunction of the two controllers obtained.

  3. Developmental trajectories of African American adolescents' family conflict: differences in mental health problems in young adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, Daniel Ewon; Stoddard, Sarah A; Zimmerman, Marc A

    2014-04-01

    Family conflict is a salient risk factor for African American adolescents' mental health problems. No study we are aware of has estimated trajectories of their family conflict and whether groups differ in internalizing and externalizing problems during the transition to young adulthood, a critical antecedent in adult mental health and psychopathology. As hypothesized, latent class growth analysis approximated 4 developmental trajectories of family conflict during high school for 681 African American adolescents (49% boys). Trajectory classes differed in anxiety, depressive symptoms, and violent behavior at age 20, supporting expectations that adolescents demonstrating elevated levels and atypical trajectories of family conflict in high school would report greater mental health problems as young adults. Family conflict jeopardizes African American adolescents' transition to young adulthood by contributing to mental health problems. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  4. 负债代理冲突下企业投融资互动行为的实物期权分析%REAL OPTION ANALYSIS ON INVESTMENT AND FINANCING INTERACTIVE BEHAVIOR OF CORPORATIONS UNDER AGENCY CONFLICT OF DEBT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王治; 张新华

    2012-01-01

    The correct analysis on interactive relationship between investment and financing in corporations and the cooperation of two decisions can contribute to improve decision efficiency and project value for the corporations.We get the thresholds of investment and financing decision and option value through incorporating project financing decision into real options model of investment decision and establishing the interactive model of investment and financing decision based on shareholder value maximization and enterprise value maximization,and analyze the effect of agency conflict of debt on corporation investment and financing by numerical analysis.The results indicate that debt financing may cause overinvestment or underinvestment of shareholders.Therefore,this inefficient investment will raise the cost of debt financing accordingly,and restrain the debt financing of corporations.%准确分析企业投融资之间的互动关系,实现两种决策的协同,有助于提高企业决策效率和项目价值.通过把项目融资政策内生到投资决策的实物期权模型中,构建基于股东价值最大化和企业价值最大化的投融资决策互动模型,得到两种情形下的投融资决策临界点和期权价值,并借助数值分析负债代理冲突对企业投融资行为的影响.研究结果表明,负债融资既可能引发过度投资问题,也可能抑制投资.这种非效率投资将相应地提高负债融资的成本,对企业的负债融资产生抑制作用.

  5. Conflict Management: Difficult Conversations with Difficult People

    OpenAIRE

    Overton, Amy R.; Lowry, Ann C.

    2013-01-01

    Conflict occurs frequently in any workplace; health care is not an exception. The negative consequences include dysfunctional team work, decreased patient satisfaction, and increased employee turnover. Research demonstrates that training in conflict resolution skills can result in improved teamwork, productivity, and patient and employee satisfaction. Strategies to address a disruptive physician, a particularly difficult conflict situation in healthcare, are addressed.

  6. Conflict Between Economic Growth and Environmental Protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czech, Bryan

    2012-01-09

    The conflict between economic growth and environmental protection may not be reconciled via technological progress. The fundamentality of the conflict ultimately boils down to laws of thermodynamics. Physicists and other scholars from the physical sciences are urgently needed for helping the public and policy makers grasp the conflict between growth and environmental protection.

  7. Conflict management: difficult conversations with difficult people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overton, Amy R; Lowry, Ann C

    2013-12-01

    Conflict occurs frequently in any workplace; health care is not an exception. The negative consequences include dysfunctional team work, decreased patient satisfaction, and increased employee turnover. Research demonstrates that training in conflict resolution skills can result in improved teamwork, productivity, and patient and employee satisfaction. Strategies to address a disruptive physician, a particularly difficult conflict situation in healthcare, are addressed.

  8. Marital Conflict in Stepfamilies: Effects on Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Marilyn; Ganong, Lawrence

    1987-01-01

    Clinical research shows that children have emotional investments in stepfamilies and are negatively affected by marital conflict, which can actually be greater than between couples without stepchildren. Stepchildren's perceptions of conflict heightens their need for affection. Views of parents and children about conflict do not necessarily…

  9. Conflict in medical teams: opportunity or danger?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.L. Greer; O. Saygi; H. Aaldering; C.K.W. de Dreu

    2012-01-01

    Objectives  Intragroup conflicts often occur when people are called upon to collaborate in the accomplishment of a task. For example, when surgeons and nurses work together during an operation, conflicts may emerge because of differences in functional understanding. Whether these conflicts are benef

  10. Theorizing the Land-Violent Conflict Nexus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwen, Van Mathijs; Haar, Van Der G.

    2016-01-01

    While disputes over land are prominent in many situations of protracted violent conflict, questions remain about the precise relationships between land and violent conflict. Political ecology and legal anthropology have rightly questioned dominant approaches in theorizing land-related conflict

  11. Theorizing the Land - Violent Conflict Nexus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwen, M. van; Haar, G. van der

    2016-01-01

    While disputes over land are prominent in many situations of protracted violent conflict, questions remain about the precise relationships between land and violent conflict. Political ecology and legal anthropology have rightly questioned dominant approaches in theorizing land-related conflict that

  12. Conflict Resolution Practices of Arctic Aboriginal Peoples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Gendron; C. Hille

    2013-01-01

    This article presents an overview of the conflict resolution practices of indigenous populations in the Arctic. Among the aboriginal groups discussed are the Inuit, the Aleut, and the Saami. Having presented the conflict resolution methods, the authors discuss the types of conflicts that are current

  13. Conflict Management Styles of Turkish Managers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkalp, Enver; Sungur, Zerrin; Ozdemir, Aytul Ayse

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to determine Turkish managers conflict styles in different sectors, namely durable consumer goods, aviation, automotive and banking. Design/methodology/approach: A total of 130 managers conflict management styles were assessed by applying the Rahim's 1983 Organizational Conflict Inventory-II. Findings: First,…

  14. Marital Conflict in Stepfamilies: Effects on Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Marilyn; Ganong, Lawrence

    1987-01-01

    Clinical research shows that children have emotional investments in stepfamilies and are negatively affected by marital conflict, which can actually be greater than between couples without stepchildren. Stepchildren's perceptions of conflict heightens their need for affection. Views of parents and children about conflict do not necessarily…

  15. Parent-Adolescent Conflict: An Empirical Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, James A.

    1987-01-01

    Compares psychoanalytic, systems, and social learning theories to determine the empirical support for each theoretical orientation in treating problematic conflict between parents and adolescents. Discusses parent-adolescent conflict, including developmental stage theory, parenting styles, peer pressures, communication skills, marital conflict,…

  16. Transforming Negative Emotions: A Case Study of Intergroup Conflict among Conflict Resolution Practitioners of Color.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Millicent

    2003-01-01

    Examined how conflict affected internalized oppression and conflict-handling methods utilized during a facilitated meeting that attempted to resolve or manage intergroup conflict. Data on diverse conflict-resolution practitioners and mentors at a training session on how to overcome the effects of oppression in the writing process illuminated how…

  17. Interpersonal Conflicts and Styles of Managing Conflicts among Students at Bahir Dar University, Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazezew, Arega; Neka, Mulugeta

    2017-01-01

    Interpersonal conflict happens everywhere and at any time and is inherent in all societies. However, the methods of managing such conflict are quite different from one organisation to the other. The general objective of the study was to assess interpersonal conflicts and styles of managing conflicts among students at Bahir Dar University.…

  18. Parental Dysphoria and Children's Adjustment: Marital Conflict Styles, Children's Emotional Security, and Parenting as Mediators of Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du Rocher Schudlich, Tina D.; Cummings, E. Mark

    2007-01-01

    Dimensions of martial conflict, children's emotional security regarding interparental conflict, and parenting style were examined as mediators between parental dysphoria and child adjustment. A community sample of 262 children, ages 8-16, participated with their parents. Behavioral observations were made of parents' interactions during marital…

  19. Local Water Conflict and Cooperation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermann, Roberto Rivas; Hooper, Catherine; Munk Ravnborg, Helle

    2011-01-01

    In 2007 the Danish Institute for International Studies (DIIS) launched the research programme “Competing for Water: Understanding conflict and cooperation in local water governance”. Along with partners in five developing countries (Bolivia, Mali, Nicaragua, Vietnam and Zambia), the programme aims...... to contribute to “sustainable local water governance in support of the rural poor and otherwise disadvantaged groups in developing countries by improving the knowledge among researchers and practitioners of the nature, extent and intensity of local water conflict and cooperation and their social, economic...... and political impacts, and how this may change with increased competition for water” (DIIS 2007). The country research teams developed an overview of the national water governance frameworks at an early stage of the Competing for Water programme period (Bustamante and Cossio, 2007; Djiré et al., 2007; Gómez et...

  20. Local Water Conflict and Cooperation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermann, Roberto Rivas; Hooper, Catherine; Munk Ravnborg, Helle

    2011-01-01

    to contribute to “sustainable local water governance in support of the rural poor and otherwise disadvantaged groups in developing countries by improving the knowledge among researchers and practitioners of the nature, extent and intensity of local water conflict and cooperation and their social, economic......In 2007 the Danish Institute for International Studies (DIIS) launched the research programme “Competing for Water: Understanding conflict and cooperation in local water governance”. Along with partners in five developing countries (Bolivia, Mali, Nicaragua, Vietnam and Zambia), the programme aims...... and political impacts, and how this may change with increased competition for water” (DIIS 2007). The country research teams developed an overview of the national water governance frameworks at an early stage of the Competing for Water programme period (Bustamante and Cossio, 2007; Djiré et al., 2007; Gómez et...

  1. Poverty - A Source of Conflict,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-08-25

    contend that poor coun- tries are likely to attack richer ones for the spoils of war, but rather that poverty is a breeding ground for instability. He...Studies Institute v POVERTY - A SOURCE OF CONFLICT The rich get richer; the poor get poorer. As this rule has applied to individuals, it has apparently...problems. These problems resulting from poverty create a dangerous threat to the stability of the world. This does not mean that poor countries will

  2. EVELOPMENT OF EDUCATIONAL SPECIALIST’S CREATIVITY IN THE PROCESS OF CONFLICT RESOLUTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darya N. Sergeeva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article is to present creativity in the process of pedagogical conflict resolution. The results of psychological research conducted among secondary school teachers are given. The article summarizes the results of the study of personality and creativity highlighted its main components. Methods. The methods involve theoretical analysis of the problem and the subject of investigation, philosophical, psychological, pedagogical, sociological literature research; empirical methods (school teacher’s psychological testing by means of hand-picked procedures; methods stimulating educational specialists to take initiative in the process of conflict situations› constructive resolution (training methods group discussion, role-playing and business games, specific situations analysis; quantitative and qualitative analysis of empirical results (computer data processing, data design in the form of tables, schemes, illustrations, diagrams, bar charts, methods of mathematical statistics (The Spearman's Rank Correlation Coefficient, φ-Fisher. Data processing procedure is actualized by means of MS Excel package and statistical manipulation program «Statistica 8.0». Results and scientific novelty. The scientific belief of the following concepts content is concretized: «educational specialist’s creativity in the process of conflict resolution», «pedagogical conflict»; psycho-pedagogical conditions of creativity development in the process of conflict resolution are determined. Personal and behavioral features of various creativity level pedagogues are elicited. The correlation of educational specialist’s creativity with peculiarities of their behavior in conflict situations is revealed. It is stated that creativity appears to be one of the determinant of individual’s action, which is oriented on constructive conflict resolution. The program schemed by us promoted the extension of the teachers creative potential, which, in return

  3. Conflicting Interpretations of Scientific Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galamba, Arthur

    2016-05-01

    Not surprisingly historical studies have suggested that there is a distance between concepts of teaching methods, their interpretations and their actual use in the classroom. This issue, however, is not always pitched to the personal level in historical studies, which may provide an alternative insight on how teachers conceptualise and engage with concepts of teaching methods. This article provides a case study on this level of conceptualisation by telling the story of Rómulo de Carvalho, an educator from mid-twentieth century Portugal, who for over 40 years engaged with the heuristic and Socratic methods. The overall argument is that concepts of teaching methods are open to different interpretations and are conceptualised within the melting pot of external social pressures and personal teaching preferences. The practice and thoughts of Carvalho about teaching methods are scrutinised to unveil his conflicting stances: Carvalho was a man able to question the tenets of heurism, but who publicly praised the heurism-like "discovery learning" method years later. The first part of the article contextualises the arrival of heurism in Portugal and how Carvalho attacked its philosophical tenets. In the second part, it dwells on his conflicting positions in relation to pupil-centred approaches. The article concludes with an appreciation of the embedded conflicting nature of the appropriation of concepts of teaching methods, and of Carvalho's contribution to the development of the philosophy of practical work in school science.

  4. Beyond territory and scarcity - exploring conflicts over natural resource management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ressources management, enviromental degradation, natural resources, conflicts, boundaries, Africa......Ressources management, enviromental degradation, natural resources, conflicts, boundaries, Africa...

  5. Conflict Resolution in Organization through Strategic Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Zafar

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This study reveals the conflict Resolution in organization through Strategic management. There are different causes of conflicts within Organization and impact of conflicts on organization performance. The past decade researches identify the negative relation of conflict with employee performance. The research methodology was case study approach of different National and Multinational companies. The aim of study is to alleviate conflicts in organization through strategic management for enhancing organizational performance and managing change in order to attain competitive edge in this dynamic era. This paper covers the role of strategic management in resolving and minimizing conflict that brings positive impact on organization. Conflict in the workplace just seems to be a fact of life. The fact that conflict exists, however, is not necessarily a bad thing: As long as it is resolved effectively, it can lead to personal and professional growth. Conflict in the workplace is a painful reality and a key reason for poor productivity and frustration. Conflict does not magically go away and only gets worse when ignored. So to resolve conflicts strategic management is important.

  6. CROSS CULTURAL CONFLICT RESOLUTION STYLES: DATA REVISITED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuray ALAGÖZLÜ

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The way conflicts are solved is thought to be culturally learned (Hammer, 2005; therefore, this is reflected through language use. Conflicts, as inevitable parts of communication, naturally mirror cultural differences. Intercultural conflict styles have been studied so far by various researchers. How conflicts are initiated, maintained and escalated or terminated are all culture bound (Leung, 2002 and all the related stages vary from one culture to another. In the related literature, there have been attempts to describe different conflict handling classifications. Using Hammer’s (2005 categorization that was found to be more refined and summative, conflict resolution styles of Turkish and American College students were explored using Discourse Completion Tests (DCT with eight conflict situations where the respondents were required to write verbal solutions to overcome the conflicts described in the test. Those utterances were categorized according to Directness/Indirectness Scale modified from Hammer’s (2005 “International Conflict Style Inventory (ICSI” that classifies intercultural conflict resolution styles as high/low level of directness and high/low level of emotional expressiveness. It is believed that the study provides insight into intercultural communication as there are culturally generalizable (etic and learned patterns of conflict resolution styles pertinent to different cultures (Hammer, 2009, p. 223; Ting-Toomey, 1994.

  7. Geography and Communal Conflict in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujarwoto Sujarwoto

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The determinants of communal conflicts in Indonesia have been widely documented. However, most of them ignore geographical aspects of communal conflicts. This paper examines geographical determinants of communal conflicts in Indonesia. Data comes from the 2008 Village Potential Census (Podes and official statistics which consist of communal conflict information across all Indonesia’s districts (N districts = 465. Results from spatial dependent model show that communal conflict to be spatially dependent through latent determinants, meaning that communal conflict clusters because of clustering of latent determinants within district. Rather than religious and ethnic heterogeneity, communal conflict is positively associated with poverty, economic inequality, elite capture, and weak capacity of districts to manage fiscal resources.

  8. The influence of reward associations on conflict processing in the Stroop task

    OpenAIRE

    Ruth M Krebs; Boehler, Carsten N.; Woldorff, Marty G.

    2010-01-01

    Performance in a behavioral task can be facilitated by associating stimulus properties with reward. In contrast, conflicting information is known to impede task performance. Here we investigated how reward associations influence the within-trial processing of conflicting information using a color-naming Stroop task in which a subset of ink colors (task-relevant dimension) was associated with monetary incentives. We found that color-naming performance was enhanced on trials with potential rewa...

  9. Seas of trouble: enduring territorial conflicts in East and Southeast Asia

    OpenAIRE

    Heiduk, Felix; Michael, Paul

    2015-01-01

    In the last five years, tensions have increased between China and a number of neighboring states over territorial disputes in the East and South China Sea. In some cases, there have even been threats of armed conflicts. China’s increasingly aggressive behavior has stoked fears that long-simmering conflicts could escalate. This dismal picture began to brighten considerably, however, in the last half of 2014. In November, in the run-up to several important international summit meetings in the r...

  10. Acute khat use reduces response conflict in habitual users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colzato, Lorenza S; Sellaro, Roberta; Ruiz, Manuel J; Sikora, Katarzyna; Hommel, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    Khat consumption has become a worldwide phenomenon broadening from Eastern Africa and the south west of the Arabian Peninsula to ethnic communities in the rest of the world. So far, the cognitive effects of khat use are poorly understood and no studies have looked into the relation between acute khat use and cognitive control functions, the way we control our thoughts and goal directed behavior. We studied how acute khat use affects the emergence and the resolution of response conflict, a central cognitive control function. Khat users (n = 11) and khat-free controls (n = 18) were matched in terms of education, sex, alcohol, and cannabis consumption. Groups were tested on response conflict, as measured by the Simon task. In one single session, participants worked through two task blocks: the khat group chewed exclusively khat whereas the khat-free group chewed solely a gum. Results showed that in the second block, which reflects the acute impact of khat, the khat group was better than controls in resolving stimulus-induced response conflict as indexed by a smaller Simon effect. These results suggest that the acute intake of khat may improve participants' ability of handling response conflict.

  11. Conflict

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pad ma rin chen

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A myes Bya khyung, dignified and magnificent, towers among its shorter peers behind the capital city of Reb gong. Frequently, Heaven seems to scatter white flowers on the mountain peak, making it splendidly picturesque. The mid slopes of the mountain were once covered with dense forest where countless animals thrived. Locals dared not go there alone or without weapons, in fear of being attacked by animals. However, they often did go there in small groups, as the forest was the main source of fuel for local people. At the foot of the mountain is an immense grassland full of valuable herbs and diverse flowers, which emit an overpowering fragrance. Babbling brooks flow from springs on the grassland, and quench the thirst of both people and livestock. From their ancestors, the people of Reb gong had inherited the belief that the mountain is a deity called A myes Bya khyung. This deity has the most exalted position among local deities in Reb gong. People respectfully burn juniper and offer sweet food to this deity before they themselves eat anything. While doing this, they also express their innermost feelings to the deity, and ask for whatever they want. Some religious devotees read scriptures in meditation caves on this mountain. Since early times, generations of smiling nomads had happily shared this pastureland, herding together and helping one another. Every year, they all gathered together to celebrate various sacred rituals. Marriage relationships between the tribes were also established. Consequently, other communities admired them and hoped their life would one day be as pleasant. In this way, Blon che Village was established, its reputation grew, and it became known throughout Reb gong. Years passed swiftly and social transformations occurred one after another. The number of nomads increased. Household requirements increased and greed ended that once happy life.

  12. Career involvement and family involvement as moderators of relationships between work-family conflict and withdrawal from a profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhaus, J H; Parasuraman, S; Collins, K M

    2001-04-01

    This study extended prior analyses by J. H. Greenhaus, K. M. Collins, R. Singh, and S. Parasuraman (1997) by examining relationships between 2 directions of work-family conflict (work-to-family conflict and family-to-work conflict) and withdrawal from public accounting. The sample consisted of 199 members of the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (135 men and 64 women) who were married or in a long-term relationship and who had 1 or more children. It was found that work-to-family conflict (but not family-to-work conflict) was positively related to withdrawal intentions. In addition, relationships of work-to-family conflict with withdrawal intentions and withdrawal behavior were stronger for individuals who were relatively uninvolved in their careers than for those who were highly involved in their careers. The implications of the findings for future research are discussed.

  13. 基于CFD/CSD方法的蜻蜓柔性翼气动特性分析%Analysis of aerodynamic characteristics of flexible wing of dragonfly based on CFD/CSD method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟令兵; 昂海松; 肖天航

    2014-01-01

    给出了一种基于计算流体力学/计算结构力学(CFD/CSD)的双向流固耦合方法.通过交替数字二叉树(ADT)搜索技术识别流固网格之间的宿主-受体关系.采用局部插值算法完成两套网格系统之间的数据交换,并使用Delaunay图映射方法来完成气动网格的移动.将自编的非线性结构有限元程序、接口程序与南京航空航天大学(NUAA)微型飞行器中心的流体计算程序3D2MUFS相连接,应用于蜻蜓柔性翼拍动飞行的气动计算中.计算结果表明:柔性变形使得蜻蜓翼的时均举力系数从0.31提高到0.53,时均推力系数从0.07提高到0.13,证实了柔性变形能改善扑翼的气动性能.

  14. A Mathematical Analysis of Conflict Prevention Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddalon, Jeffrey M.; Butler, Ricky W.; Munoz, Cesar A.; Dowek, Gilles

    2009-01-01

    In air traffic management, conflict prevention information refers to the guidance maneuvers, which if taken, ensure that an aircraft's path is conflict-free. These guidance maneuvers take the form of changes to track angle or ground speed. Conflict prevention information may be assembled into prevention bands that advise the crew on maneuvers that should not be taken. Unlike conflict resolution systems, which presume that the aircraft already has a conflict, conflict prevention systems show conflicts for any maneuver, giving the pilot confidence that if a maneuver is made, then no near-term conflicts will result. Because near-term conflicts can lead to safety concerns, strong verification of information correctness is required. This paper presents a mathematical framework to analyze the correctness of algorithms that produce conflict prevention information incorporating an arbitrary number of traffic aircraft and with both a near-term and intermediate-term lookahead times. The framework is illustrated with a formally verified algorithm for 2-dimensional track angle prevention bands.

  15. Intragroup conflicts and efficiency of production group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidorenkov A.V.

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Analysis results of relationships of three levels of the conflict (interpersonal, microgroup and group on two types (the job and subject with indicators of subjectively perceived performance and social effectiveness of small groups and informal subgroups are provided. On selection of 42 work groups (N=334 employees it is established that performance efficiency of group according to the experts has inverse relation from all levels and types of the conflict, and by estimates of members of group — from two types of the microgroup conflict. The same type of effectiveness of informal subgroups on one indicator has inverse relation from the group conflict, and on another — from the interpersonal and microgroup conflict. Social effectiveness of group is connected with the interpersonal and group conflict, and informal subgroups are connected with the interpersonal and microgroup conflict. Levels and types of the conflict cause efficiency of group and subgroup not only separately, but also in a combination with each other. Six regression models, four of which display relationships at the same time of several levels and types of the conflict with performance effectiveness of group, and two — with social effectiveness of subgroup are revealed. Mediated and direct relationships of levels and types of the conflict with efficiency of group and subgroup are established.

  16. The organizational costs of ethical conflicts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, William A; Weeks, William B; Campfield, Justin M

    2008-01-01

    Ethical conflicts are a common phenomenon in today's healthcare settings. As healthcare executives focus on balancing quality care and cost containment, recognizing the costs associated with ethical conflicts is only logical. In this article, we present five case vignettes to identify several general cost categories related to ethical conflicts, including operational costs, legal costs, and marketing and public relations costs. In each of these cost categories, the associated direct, indirect, and long-term costs of the ethical conflict are explored as well. Our analysis suggests that organizations have, in addition to philosophical reasons, financial incentives to focus on decreasing the occurrence of ethical conflicts. The cost categories affected by ethical conflicts are not insignificant. Such conflicts can affect staff morale and lower the organization's overall culture and profit margin. Therefore, organizations should develop mechanisms and strategies for decreasing and possibly preventing ethical conflicts. The strategies suggested in this article seek to shift the organization's focus when dealing with conflicts, from just reacting to moving upstream-that is, understanding the root causes of ethical conflicts and employing approaches designed to reduce their occurrence and associated costs. Such an effort has the potential to enhance the organization's overall culture and ultimately lead to organizational success.

  17. Hypothetical conflict situations with friends and peers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrović Danijela S.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with age and sex differences in preferred strategies of conflict resolution in friendship and peer relationships. The study was conducted on the sample of 286 adolescents. Conflict resolution strategies have been investigated by the method of hypothetical conflict situations. For the purposes of this research, we have created an instrument consisting of 20 hypothetical situations, with the following subjects of conflict: breaking the agreement, non-compliance with opinion differences, provocations, dishonesty and stubbornness. Conflict resolution strategies we examined were giving in, withdrawal, competition and problem solving. The results have shown that problem solving is the dominant strategy of adolescents in conflict with friends, while in peer conflicts they more often opt for competition. Age differences are reflected in the fact that older adolescents are more likely to choose problem solving than younger, whereas younger adolescents are more likely to choose a retreat (withdrawal strategy than older. Girls are more prone to choosing problem solving than boys, who, on the other hand, tend to withdraw more than girls. Also, gender of the other person in the conflict is proved to be important - in conflict with male peers, adolescents choose competition to a greater extent and withdraw to a minor extent, compared to when they are in conflict with female peers. The results have practical implications as well. In programs for teaching constructive conflict resolution that are designed for younger adolescents there should be more emphasis on empowerment and training for assertive behaviour. In addition, when teaching about constructive conflict resolution strategies, it is important to consider the gender of adolescents as well as the gender of the person with whom they are in conflict.

  18. Correlates of Adolescent-reported and Parent-reported Family Conflict Among Canadian Adolescents With Bipolar Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmins, Vanessa; Swampillai, Brenda; Hatch, Jessica; Scavone, Antonette; Collinger, Katelyn; Boulos, Carolyn; Goldstein, Benjamin I

    2016-01-01

    Family conflict exacerbates the course of bipolar disorder (BP) among adults. However, few studies have examined family conflict among adolescents with BP, and fewer have looked at adolescent-reported and parent-reported family conflict separately. Subjects were 89 adolescents, aged 13 to 19 years, with a diagnosis of BP on the basis of the Kiddie Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children-Present and Lifetime Version (KSADS-PL). Subjects were divided into high-conflict and low-conflict groups using a median split on the Conflict Behavior Questionnaire (child report and parent report). The χ(2) analyses and independent samples t tests were performed for univariate analyses. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed on variables with Padolescent-reported Conflict Behavior Questionnaire scores were significantly correlated (r=0.50, Padolescent-reported family conflict was positively associated with recent manic symptoms and emotional dysregulation, and negatively associated with socioeconomic status and lifetime psychiatric hospitalization. Bipolar subtype was significantly associated with high versus low family conflict. The limitations of this study included being a cross-sectional study, use of a medium-sized sample, and lack of a control group. Despite substantial agreement between adolescents and parents regarding the amount of family conflict, there were meaningful differences in the factors associated with adolescent-reported and parent-reported conflict. These findings demonstrate the importance of ascertaining family conflict from adolescents as well as from parents. Moreover, these findings can potentially inform family therapy, which is known to be effective for adolescents with BP.

  19. Conflict Resolution in Computer Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. P. Mojarov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A conflict situation in computer systems CS is the phenomenon arising when the processes have multi-access to the shared resources and none of the involved processes can proceed because of their waiting for the certain resources locked by the other processes which, in turn, are in a similar position. The conflict situation is also called a deadlock that has quite clear impact on the CS state.To find the reduced to practice algorithms to resolve the impasses is of significant applied importance for ensuring information security of computing process and thereupon the presented article is aimed at solving a relevant problem.The gravity of situation depends on the types of processes in a deadlock, types of used resources, number of processes, and a lot of other factors.A disadvantage of the method for preventing the impasses used in many modern operating systems and based on the preliminary planning resources required for the process is obvious - waiting time can be overlong. The preventing method with the process interruption and deallocation of its resources is very specific and a little effective, when there is a set of the polytypic resources requested dynamically. The drawback of another method, to prevent a deadlock by ordering resources, consists in restriction of possible sequences of resource requests.A different way of "struggle" against deadlocks is a prevention of impasses. In the future a prediction of appearing impasses is supposed. There are known methods [1,4,5] to define and prevent conditions under which deadlocks may occur. Thus the preliminary information on what resources a running process can request is used. Before allocating a free resource to the process, a test for a state “safety” condition is provided. The state is "safe" if in the future impasses cannot occur as a result of resource allocation to the process. Otherwise the state is considered to be " hazardous ", and resource allocation is postponed. The obvious

  20. Models of conflict and cooperation

    CERN Document Server

    Gillman, Rick

    2009-01-01

    Models of Conflict and Cooperation is a comprehensive, introductory, game theory text for general undergraduate students. As a textbook, it provides a new and distinctive experience for students working to become quantitatively literate. Each chapter begins with a "dialogue" that models quantitative discourse while previewing the topics presented in the rest of the chapter. Subsequent sections develop the key ideas starting with basic models and ending with deep concepts and results. Throughout all of the sections, attention is given to promoting student engagement with the material through re

  1. Genetic Conflict in Human Pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    1993-01-01

    Pregnancy has commonly been viewed as a cooperative interaction between a mother and her fetus. The effects of natural selection on genes expressed in fetuses, however, may be opposed by the effects of natural selection on genes expressed in mothers. In this sense, a genetic conflict can be said to exist between maternal and fetal genes. Fetal genes will be selected to increase the transfer of nutrients to their fetus, and maternal genes will be selected to limit transfers in excess of Soma m...

  2. Conflict Termination : A Selected Bibliography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    Science 55, no. 1 (January 2011): 149-169. JSTOR Findley, Michael G. "Bargaining and the Interdependent Stages of Civil War Resolution." Journal of...Library print holdings begin with 1957. Also available online 1957-2010 in JSTOR ; 1999-present from Sage Journal of Peace Research. Library print...holdings begin with 2000. Also available online 1964- 2010 in JSTOR ; 1999-present from Sage Studies in Conflict and Terrorism. Library print holdings begin with 1992. Also available online 1997-present from Taylor & Francis

  3. How do working-memory-related demand, reasoning ability and aversive reinforcement modulate conflict monitoring?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja eLeue

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Conflict monitoring is a process of stimulus evaluation and a pre-requisite for subsequent recruitment of cognitive control and behavioral adaptations. This study investigated how experimentally manipulated working-memory-related cognitive demand and aversive reinforcement modulate individual differences of conflict monitoring intensity and behavioral adjustments. Individual differences were assessed by means of an anxiety-related trait dimension (trait-BIS and by means of reasoning abilities–a core determinant of intelligence. Moreover, we investigated the special role of verbal reasoning ability and figural reasoning ability for the modulation of the conflict monitoring intensity. Ninety participants performed a go/nogo task with four conditions each comprising a combination of low vs. high working-memory-related cognitive demand and low vs. high aversive reinforcement. No effect of aversive reinforcement was observed for the N2 amplitude. The fronto-central nogo N2 amplitude was more pronounced for high demand vs. low demand suggesting that cognitive demand served as an aversive costly event. Higher total reasoning abilities were associated with more intense conflict monitoring and shorter response times with increasing aversive reinforcement (defined as verbal error-feedback vs. monetary loss. Individuals with higher trait-BIS scores demonstrated a more intense conflict monitoring even in conditions with low aversive reinforcement and also a more cautious responding (i.e., response times slowing with increasing aversive reinforcement indicating a focus on negative feedback prevention. The findings provide evidence for the conflict-monitoring theory and suggest that working-memory-related demand overrules the impact of aversive reinforcement on conflict monitoring intensity. Reasoning abilities and anxiety-related traits go along with an intensification of conflict monitoring but differences in the flexibility of behavioral adjustment.

  4. Conflict and error processing in an extended cingulo-opercular and cerebellar network in schizophrenia☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerril, Karla E.; Barch, Deanna M.

    2013-01-01

    The loss of cognitive control is a prominent feature of schizophrenia. Relevant for adaptive control, individuals with schizophrenia often show impairments in their ability to monitor their ongoing behavior, and to adjust their responses based on advance information or feedback. By conducting a systematic examination of the behavioral adjustments after error and conflict and of activity within and between brain regions sensitive to the need to increase control (i.e. error commission, conflict presentation) in individuals with schizophrenia (n = 38) compared to healthy controls, we aimed to 1) shed light on the role of diverse brain regions previously associated with adaptive cognitive control, and 2) contribute to our understanding of the nature of the cognitive deficits present in individuals with schizophrenia. Our results show that error- and conflict-related behavioral adjustments are relatively intact during the performance of a change-signal task. Similarly, individuals with schizophrenia demonstrated intact error- and conflict-related effects in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, as well as in a number of other key regions including the bilateral anterior prefrontal cortex (PFC), bilateral insula, right inferior parietal lobule during error processing, and bilateral inferior parietal lobule and thalamus, right anterior PFC, left insula, and left lateral and inferior cerebellum during conflict processing. Given that a critical characteristic of our experimental design was the use of tasks that explicitly provide information about errors and conflict, we interpret our results as suggesting that the error- and conflict-detection systems are still somewhat functional in individuals with schizophrenia, but that a compromise in the ability to represent task relevant information that allow for the generation of an error representation may lead to the alterations in error- and conflict-processing documented in the schizophrenia literature. PMID:24273729

  5. Conflict and error processing in an extended cingulo-opercular and cerebellar network in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerril, Karla E; Barch, Deanna M

    2013-01-01

    The loss of cognitive control is a prominent feature of schizophrenia. Relevant for adaptive control, individuals with schizophrenia often show impairments in their ability to monitor their ongoing behavior, and to adjust their responses based on advance information or feedback. By conducting a systematic examination of the behavioral adjustments after error and conflict and of activity within and between brain regions sensitive to the need to increase control (i.e. error commission, conflict presentation) in individuals with schizophrenia (n = 38) compared to healthy controls, we aimed to 1) shed light on the role of diverse brain regions previously associated with adaptive cognitive control, and 2) contribute to our understanding of the nature of the cognitive deficits present in individuals with schizophrenia. Our results show that error- and conflict-related behavioral adjustments are relatively intact during the performance of a change-signal task. Similarly, individuals with schizophrenia demonstrated intact error- and conflict-related effects in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, as well as in a number of other key regions including the bilateral anterior prefrontal cortex (PFC), bilateral insula, right inferior parietal lobule during error processing, and bilateral inferior parietal lobule and thalamus, right anterior PFC, left insula, and left lateral and inferior cerebellum during conflict processing. Given that a critical characteristic of our experimental design was the use of tasks that explicitly provide information about errors and conflict, we interpret our results as suggesting that the error- and conflict-detection systems are still somewhat functional in individuals with schizophrenia, but that a compromise in the ability to represent task relevant information that allow for the generation of an error representation may lead to the alterations in error- and conflict-processing documented in the schizophrenia literature.

  6. How do working-memory-related demand, reasoning ability and aversive reinforcement modulate conflict monitoring?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leue, Anja; Weber, Bernd; Beauducel, André

    2014-01-01

    Conflict monitoring is a process of stimulus evaluation and a pre-requisite for subsequent recruitment of cognitive control and behavioral adaptations. This study investigated how experimentally manipulated working-memory-related cognitive demand and aversive reinforcement modulate individual differences of conflict monitoring intensity and behavioral adjustments. Individual differences were assessed by means of an anxiety-related trait dimension (trait-BIS) and by means of reasoning abilities-a core determinant of intelligence. Moreover, we investigated the special role of verbal reasoning ability and figural reasoning ability for the modulation of the conflict monitoring intensity. Ninety participants performed a go/nogo task with four conditions each comprising a combination of low vs. high working-memory-related cognitive demand and low vs. high aversive reinforcement. No effect of aversive reinforcement was observed for the N2 amplitude. The fronto-central nogo N2 amplitude was more pronounced for high demand vs. low demand suggesting that cognitive demand served as an aversive costly event. Higher total reasoning abilities were associated with more intense conflict monitoring and shorter response times with increasing aversive reinforcement (defined as verbal error-feedback vs. monetary loss). Individuals with higher trait-BIS scores demonstrated a more intense conflict monitoring even in conditions with low aversive reinforcement and also a more cautious responding (i.e., response times slowing) with increasing aversive reinforcement indicating a focus on negative feedback prevention. The findings provide evidence for the conflict monitoring theory and suggest that working-memory-related demand overrules the impact of aversive reinforcement on conflict monitoring intensity. Reasoning abilities and anxiety-related traits go along with an intensification of conflict monitoring but differences in the flexibility of behavioral adjustment.

  7. Measuring teamwork and conflict among Emergency Medical Technician personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, P. Daniel; Weaver, Matthew D.; Weaver, Sallie J.; Rosen, Michael A.; Todorova, Gergana; Weingart, Laurie R.; Krackhardt, David; Lave, Judith R.; Arnold, Robert M.; Yealy, Donald M.; Salas, Eduardo

    2011-01-01

    Objective We sought to develop a reliable and valid tool for measuring teamwork among Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) partnerships. Methods We adapted existing scales and developed new items to measure components of teamwork. After recruiting a convenience sample of 39 agencies, we tested a 122-item draft survey tool. We performed a series of Exploratory Factor Analyses (EFA) and Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) to test reliability and construct validity, describing variation in domain and global scores using descriptive statistics. Results We received 687 completed surveys. The EFA analyses identified a 9-factor solution. We labeled these factors [1] Team Orientation, [2] Team Structure & Leadership, [3] Partner Communication, Team Support, & Monitoring, [4] Partner Trust and Shared Mental Models, [5] Partner Adaptability & Back-Up Behavior, [6] Process Conflict, [7] Strong Task Conflict, [8] Mild Task Conflict, and [9] Interpersonal Conflict. We tested a short form (30-item SF) and long form (45-item LF) version. The CFA analyses determined that both the SF and LF versions possess positive psychometric properties of reliability and construct validity. The EMT-TEAMWORK-SF has positive internal consistency properties with a mean Cronbach’s alpha coefficient ≥0.70 across all 9-factors (mean=0.84; min=0.78, max=0.94). The mean Cronbach’s alpha coefficient for the EMT-TEAMWORK-LF version was 0.87 (min=0.79, max=0.94). There was wide variation in weighted scores across all 9 factors and the global score for the SF and LF versions. Mean scores were lowest for the Team Orientation factor (48.1, SD 21.5 SF; 49.3 SD 19.8 LF) and highest (more positive) for the Interpersonal Conflict factor (87.7 SD 18.1 for both SF and LF). Conclusions We developed a reliable and valid survey to evaluate teamwork between EMT partners. PMID:22128909

  8. Burdens of non-conformity: Motor execution reveals cognitive conflict during deliberate rule violations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfister, Roland; Wirth, Robert; Schwarz, Katharina A; Steinhauser, Marco; Kunde, Wilfried

    2016-02-01

    Rule compliance is pivotal for the regulation of social behavior. Still, humans deliberately violate rules at times - be it for personal reasons or for a higher good. Whereas previous research has studied the preconditions and consequences of rule violations, essentially nothing is known about the cognitive processes right at the moment a rule violation takes place. Here we show that merely labeling an action as rule violation induces substantial conflict between rule violation and compliance, as revealed by participants' bias towards rule-complying motor actions. Moreover, conflict that comes with violating a rule was much stronger than conflict that comes with following an alternative rule, even if both decisions result in the same observable behavior. These observations open a new theoretical perspective on rule violation behavior, shifting the focus toward the cognitive processes operating during the very act of rule violation.

  9. Cyber Conflicts as a New Global Threat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Kosenkov

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an attempt is made to analyze the potential threats and consequences of cyber conflicts and, in particular, the risks of a global cyber conflict. The material is based on a comprehensive analysis of the nature of cyber conflict and its elements from both technical and societal points of view. The approach used in the paper considers the societal component as an essential part of cyber conflicts, allowing basics of cyber conflicts often disregarded by researchers and the public to be highlighted. Finally, the conclusion offers an opportunity to consider cyber conflict as the most advanced form of modern warfare, which imposes the most serious threat and whose effect could be comparable to weapons of mass destruction.

  10. Conflict of interest in clinical research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravindra B Ghooi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Increased focus on ethical review of research demands a number of improvements in the existing system. Although these are being implemented, some factors that have received less attention in the past could be examined. One of these is conflict of interest. Such conflicts could exist for investigators, ethics committee (EC members, and even the regulators. Guidance for identification and management of conflicts has been issued by many countries and Indian rules also speak about these conflicts. Greater clarity would help investigators and ECs manage conflicts more effectively. It is admitted that conflicts cannot be done away with, but their timely identification, disclosure, and management can reduce their impact and bring more transparency and accountability to trials in this country.

  11. AIRCRAFT CONFLICTS RESOLUTION BY COURSE MANEUVERING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    В. Харченко

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Enhancement of requirements for air traffic efficiency at increasing of flights intensity determines the necessity of development of new optimization methods for aircraft conflict resolutions. The statement of problem of optimal conflict resolutions at Cooperative Air Traffic Management was done. The method for optimal aircraft conflict  resolution by course maneuvering has been  developed. The method using dynamic programming provides planning of aircraft conflict-free trajectory with minimum length. The decomposition of conflict resolution process on phases and stages, definition of states, controls and recursive  equations for generation of optimal course control program were done. Computer modeling of aircraft conflict resolution by developed method was done

  12. The Value of Conflict in Stable Social Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Pramukkul, Pensri; West, Bruce J; Grigolini, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    A cooperative network model of sociological interest is examined to determine the sensitivity of the global dynamics to having a fraction of the members behaving uncooperatively, that is, being in conflict with the majority. We study a condition where in the absence of these uncooperative individuals, the contrarians, the control parameter exceeds a critical value and the network is frozen in a state of consensus. The network dynamics change with variations in the percentage of contrarians, resulting in a balance between the value of the control parameter and the percentage of those in conflict with the majority. We show that the transmission of information from a network $B$ to a network $A$, with a small fraction of lookout members in $A$ who adopt the behavior of $B$, becomes maximal when both networks are assigned the same critical percentage of contrarians.

  13. The value of conflict in stable social networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramukkul, Pensri; Svenkeson, Adam; West, Bruce J.; Grigolini, Paolo

    2015-09-01

    A cooperative network model of sociological interest is examined to determine the sensitivity of the global dynamics to having a fraction of the members behaving uncooperatively, that is, being in conflict with the majority. We study a condition where in the absence of these uncooperative individuals, the contrarians, the control parameter exceeds a critical value and the network is frozen in a state of consensus. The network dynamics change with variations in the percentage of contrarians, resulting in a balance between the value of the control parameter and the percentage of those in conflict with the majority. We show that, as a finite-size effect, the transmission of information from a network B to a network A, with a small fraction of lookout members in A who adopt the behavior of B, becomes maximal when both networks are assigned the same critical percentage of contrarians.

  14. Four Levels of Moral Conflict in ISD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vartiainen, Tero

    This study introduces a literature-based classification of moral conflicts in information systems development (ISD). The classification describes what moral conflicts an IS professional confronts in ISD as a whole and includes intentional, functional, managerial, and societal levels. The internal structure of moral conflicts is exemplified by means of a philosophical and a business ethics theory. The limitations of the study are considered and practical implications for the teaching of computer ethics are discussed.

  15. Socioeconomic perspectives on violent conflict in Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    M. Zulfan Tadjoeddin; Anis Chowdhury

    2009-01-01

    Focused around the greed and/or grievance theses, a large part of the economics of conflict literature concerns itself with civil war. This article provides socioeconomic perspectives on contemporary conflict in Indonesia. Three categories of violent conflict in the country are separatist violence, ethnic/sectarian violence, and routine violence. We argue that two elements of the grievance argument, namely relative deprivation and horizontal inequality, are particularly useful for analyzing t...

  16. [Conflict management in the workplace].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mola Sanna, Bruna; Igual Ayerbe, Blanca

    2010-02-01

    Our sanitary system and our health organizations have to confront the conflicts which have derived from the successive social and sanitary changes which have developed over the most recent decades. These new realities in the health fields oblige the professionals dedicated to them, the administrators of our organizations, the politicians, and society in general, as those who make use of the health services provided, to search for strategies and resources for the prevention, and transformation of those conflicts which can develop due to these situations, having as their final objective to preserve the basic principle of universal health care which is included in our Constitution. For this reason, the authors propose a profile for mediators in the health field, understanding that for mediation to really be useful, and to avoid or reduce improper litigation in our health system, values which belong to the culture of peace should be introduced into the culture of our health organizations. To that end, it is essential to count on not only professional mediators but also on an elenchus of natural mediators and informal mediators.

  17. Conflicts in libraries: a basic element?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoko Inoue, Mary

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The article specifically detaches the main kinds and causes of conflicts in organizations and in libraries. It presents a conceptual vision of conflict, the types of conflicts, the sources and the techniques of conflict resolution.

    El artículo separa específicamente los clases y las causas principales de conflictos en organizaciones y en bibliotecas. Presenta una visión conceptual del conflicto, de los tipos de conflictos, de las fuentes y de las técnicas de la resolución del conflicto.

  18. Conflict Resolution at Work for Dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Scott, Vivian

    2010-01-01

    A practical workplace guide to handling conflict effectively. Managing employees and encouraging them to work together toward a common goal is an essential skill that all leaders should possess. Conflict Resolution at Work For Dummies provides the tools and advice you need to restore peace, train your colleagues to get along better with others, prevent conflicts from ever starting, and maintain better productivity while boosting morale.: One of the only trade publications that takes the manager's perspective on how to address conflicts, resolve disputes, and restore peace and productivity to t

  19. Appropriateness and Effectiveness Perceptions of Conflict Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canary, Daniel J.; Spitzberg, Brian H.

    1987-01-01

    Investigates how conflict strategies and communicator gender affect two properties of communicative competence, appropriateness and effectiveness, and how these properties are associated with interpersonal attraction. (SR)

  20. Ethical conflicts in the prehospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, J G; Arnold, R; Siminoff, L; Wolfson, A B

    1992-10-01

    To assess the range of ethical conflicts that confront prehospital care providers. Convenience sample, from October 1989 to January 1990. An urban advanced life support emergency medical service that transports approximately 3,000 patients per month. Six hundred seven paramedic responses were analyzed by a single observer. An ethical conflict was identified when the paramedic faced a dilemma about what "ought to be done" and the paramedic's values conflicted or potentially conflicted with the patient's. Cases with potential ethical consequence were brought to experts in medical ethics and epidemiology for further analysis and classification. Ethical conflicts arose in 14.4% of paramedic responses (88 of 607 cases). Twenty-seven percent of the conflicts involved issues of informed consent, such as refusal of treatment or transport, conflicts of hospital destination, treatment of minors, and consent for research. Difficulties regarding the duty of the paramedics, usually under threatening circumstances, accounted for 19% of the dilemmas encountered. Requests for limitation of resuscitation accounted for 14%. Other circumstances that presented ethical conflicts involved questions of patient competence (17%), resource allocation (10%), confidentiality (8%), truth telling (3%), and training (1%). The data demonstrate a range of ethical conflicts in the prehospital setting and point to areas in which policy needs to be developed. The data also can be used in a prehospital ethics curriculum for paramedics and physicians. Because case sampling was not strictly random, absolute conclusions should not be drawn regarding the frequency of the dilemmas.

  1. Significance of Conflict Talk in interpersonal Relationships

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柯建华; 罗丹

    2016-01-01

    Conflict talks occur in almost every field of human life such as medicine, school, court, and some other social organizations where the interaction results are of much significance to the conversationalists, or in others words, to their status in the organization and honor in the society. A lot of conflicts go unresolved. Oppositional exchanges in a conflict may be used by participants to achieve certain goals, for instance, exploring and developing verbal skills as candidates in a debate competition do, and maintaining social hierarchies within groups or organizations such as leaders giving orders in an institution. Dealing with conflict helps to promote interpersonal relationships.

  2. Intergroup conflict and rational decision making.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicente Martínez-Tur

    Full Text Available The literature has been relatively silent about post-conflict processes. However, understanding the way humans deal with post-conflict situations is a challenge in our societies. With this in mind, we focus the present study on the rationality of cooperative decision making after an intergroup conflict, i.e., the extent to which groups take advantage of post-conflict situations to obtain benefits from collaborating with the other group involved in the conflict. Based on dual-process theories of thinking and affect heuristic, we propose that intergroup conflict hinders the rationality of cooperative decision making. We also hypothesize that this rationality improves when groups are involved in an in-group deliberative discussion. Results of a laboratory experiment support the idea that intergroup conflict -associated with indicators of the activation of negative feelings (negative affect state and heart rate- has a negative effect on the aforementioned rationality over time and on both group and individual decision making. Although intergroup conflict leads to sub-optimal decision making, rationality improves when groups and individuals subjected to intergroup conflict make decisions after an in-group deliberative discussion. Additionally, the increased rationality of the group decision making after the deliberative discussion is transferred to subsequent individual decision making.

  3. Conflict Resolution in Headquarters-Subsidiary Relationships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumar, Rajesh; Gammelgaard, Jens

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate the role of regulatory fit and moral emotions, that is, contempt and anger, in influencing conflict resolution between the headquarters and subsidiary boundary spanners. We develop a theoretical framework, which integrates literature on international business and headquarters......-subsidiary relationships with regulatory focus, moral emotions, and conflict resolution. The chapter outlines the relationships between the regulatory focus of a headquarters’ boundary spanner, and his or her manner of engagement, conflict sensitivity, violation of code, moral emotions, and the way conflicts are resolved...

  4. Globalization and Conflict Management in Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Ilker Gumuseli

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Globalization has brought many changes on the education systems and schools. These changes will be exemplified from thebasis of school finance, employee rights, curriculum, administration, and school-environment relations in this study. The studyalso reviews common types of conflicts experienced at schools as a result of globalization and the ways in which conflict couldbe managed. Following topics were discussed in the article: ‘Conflicts emerged from perspectives towards globalization,conflicts emerged from cross cultural differences, conflicts sourced from changes in the teaching and learning processes,conflicts sourced from the standardization efforts, conflicts sourced from the change in school-parents relations, conflictssourced from the process of finance related activities and conflicts sourced from information, communication andeducational technologies’. This article argues that schools cannot be isolated from the effects of globalization. Therefore sinceconflict is a normal occurrence in schools, school administrators should discover constructive approaches through carefuldiagnosis and an approach that transforms the conflicting situations into constructive experiences for the school and theeducation.

  5. Intergroup conflict and rational decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Tur, Vicente; Peñarroja, Vicente; Serrano, Miguel A; Hidalgo, Vanesa; Moliner, Carolina; Salvador, Alicia; Alacreu-Crespo, Adrián; Gracia, Esther; Molina, Agustín

    2014-01-01

    The literature has been relatively silent about post-conflict processes. However, understanding the way humans deal with post-conflict situations is a challenge in our societies. With this in mind, we focus the present study on the rationality of cooperative decision making after an intergroup conflict, i.e., the extent to which groups take advantage of post-conflict situations to obtain benefits from collaborating with the other group involved in the conflict. Based on dual-process theories of thinking and affect heuristic, we propose that intergroup conflict hinders the rationality of cooperative decision making. We also hypothesize that this rationality improves when groups are involved in an in-group deliberative discussion. Results of a laboratory experiment support the idea that intergroup conflict -associated with indicators of the activation of negative feelings (negative affect state and heart rate)- has a negative effect on the aforementioned rationality over time and on both group and individual decision making. Although intergroup conflict leads to sub-optimal decision making, rationality improves when groups and individuals subjected to intergroup conflict make decisions after an in-group deliberative discussion. Additionally, the increased rationality of the group decision making after the deliberative discussion is transferred to subsequent individual decision making.

  6. Conflict Transformation: a multi-dimensional task

    OpenAIRE

    Miall, Hugh

    2004-01-01

    What is the state-of-the-art in conflict transformation theory? Does a theory of conflict transformation already exist, and if so, what are its main foundations? Can practitioners rely on this theory to guide their practice? Can analysts make use of it to understand the dynamics of conflict and to assess the effects of intervention?\\ud \\ud This paper aims to identify what is distinctive about conflict transformation theory and practice, as well as to identify its key dimensions. We need such ...

  7. The Conflicts of Farmland-acquisition:Behavior Mechanism of Local Government and Land-lost Peasants and Its Empirical Evidence%征地利益冲突:地方政府与失地农民的行为选择机制及其实证证据

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鲍海君; 方妍; 雷佩

    2016-01-01

    研究目的:构建地方政府与失地农民在征地中的行为选择机制,为征地利益冲突的缓解提供规制策略。研究方法:博弈论、案例分析法。研究结果:理论分析和实证证据表明,提高失地农民维权意识,降低失地农民维权成本,构建合理有效的违法征地行为处罚机制,能有效增加失地农民的征地收益,控制地方政府的违法征地冲动。研究结论:(1)在全面依法治国过程中,普及相关征地法律知识,提高失地农民组织化程度,畅通失地农民利益表达机制,能降低失地农民的维权成本;(2)完善现有土地督察制度,构建事前预防、事中监控、事后追惩的一体化惩罚体系,能加强对地方政府违法征地的整体性约束。%The purpose of this study is to establish a behavior mechanism of local government and land-lost peasants during farmland-acquisition. Suggestions are provided to counter the conflicts of farmland-acquisition. The method of the game theory and case analysis were employed.The results from theoretical analysis and empirical evidence indicate that improving consciousness, reducing cost of peasants’ rights protection and strengthening punishment of local government’s illegal behaviors in farmland-acquisition can improve land-lost peasants’ income and control local governments’ illegal acquisition behaviors effectively. It concludes that propagating legal knowledge of land acquisition to land-lost peasants, establishing land-lost peasants’ organization and building their interest claiming mechanism can reduce the rights protection cost; building land supervised system which includes ex-ante prevention, mid-stage monitoring and ex-post punishment can reinforce comprehensive constraint of local governments’ behaviors in farmland-acquisition.

  8. Women (Do Not Belong Here: Gender-Work Identity Conflict among Female Police Officers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Veldman

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The current paper examines antecedents and consequences of perceiving conflict between gender and work identities in male-dominated professions. In a study among 657 employees working in 85 teams in the police force, we investigated the effect of being different from team members in terms of gender on employees’ perception that their team members see their gender identity as conflicting with their work identity. As expected in the police force as a male-dominated field, the results showed that gender-dissimilarity in the team was related to perceived gender-work identity conflict for women, and not for men. In turn, perceiving gender-work identity conflict was related to lower team identification for men and women. Although lowering team identification might enable employees to cope with conflicting social identities and hence protect the self, this may also have its costs, as lower team identification predicted higher turnover intentions, more burn-out symptoms, less extra role behavior, lower job satisfaction, lower work motivation, and lower perceived performance. Additionally, for women, experiencing support from their team members and team leader showed a trend to mitigate the relationship between gender-dissimilarity and perceived gender-work identity conflict, and a positive diversity climate was marginally related to less perceived gender-work identity conflict. The results show the importance of the team context in shaping a climate of (incompatible identities for numerically underrepresented and historically undervalued social group members in order to hinder or protect their work outcomes.

  9. Examining behavioural coping strategies as mediators between work-family conflict and psychological distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aazami, Sanaz; Shamsuddin, Khadijah; Akmal, Syaqirah

    2015-01-01

    We examined the mediating role of behavioral coping strategies in the association between work-family conflict and psychological distress. In particular, we examined the two directions of work-family conflict, namely, work interference into family and family interference into work. Furthermore, two coping styles in this study were adaptive and maladaptive coping strategies. This cross-sectional study was conducted among 429 Malaysian working women using self-reported data. The results of mediational analysis in the present study showed that adaptive coping strategy does not significantly mediate the effect of work-family conflict on psychological distress. However, maladaptive coping strategies significantly mediate the effect of work-family conflict on psychological distress. These results show that adaptive coping strategies, which aimed to improve the stressful situation, are not effective in managing stressor such as work-family conflict. We found that experiencing interrole conflict steers employees toward frequent use of maladaptive coping strategies which in turn lead to psychological distress. Interventions targeted at improvement of coping skills which are according to individual's needs and expectation may help working women to balance work and family demands. The important issue is to keep in mind that effective coping strategies are to control the situations not to eliminate work-family conflict.

  10. Ageing differentially affects neural processing of different conflict types – an fMRI study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarethe eKorsch

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Interference control and conflict resolution is affected by ageing. There is increasing evidence that ageing does not compromise interference control in general but rather shows distinctive effects on different components of interference control. Different conflict types, (e.g. stimulus-stimulus (S-S or stimulus-response (S-R conflicts trigger different cognitive processes and thus activate different neural networks. In the present functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI study, we used a combined Flanker and Stimulus Response Conflict (SRC task to investigate the effect of ageing on S-S and S-R conflicts. Behavioral data analysis revealed larger SRC effects in elderly. fMRI Results show that both age groups recruited similar regions (caudate nucleus, cingulate gyrus and middle occipital gyrus during Flanker conflict processing. Furthermore, elderly show an additional activation pattern in parietal and frontal areas. In contrast, no common activation of both age groups was found in response to the SRC. These data suggest that ageing has distinctive effects on S-S and S-R conflicts.

  11. Women (Do Not) Belong Here: Gender-Work Identity Conflict among Female Police Officers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veldman, Jenny; Meeussen, Loes; Van Laar, Colette; Phalet, Karen

    2017-01-01

    The current paper examines antecedents and consequences of perceiving conflict between gender and work identities in male-dominated professions. In a study among 657 employees working in 85 teams in the police force, we investigated the effect of being different from team members in terms of gender on employees' perception that their team members see their gender identity as conflicting with their work identity. As expected in the police force as a male-dominated field, the results showed that gender-dissimilarity in the team was related to perceived gender-work identity conflict for women, and not for men. In turn, perceiving gender-work identity conflict was related to lower team identification for men and women. Although lowering team identification might enable employees to cope with conflicting social identities and hence protect the self, this may also have its costs, as lower team identification predicted higher turnover intentions, more burn-out symptoms, less extra role behavior, lower job satisfaction, lower work motivation, and lower perceived performance. Additionally, for women, experiencing support from their team members and team leader showed a trend to mitigate the relationship between gender-dissimilarity and perceived gender-work identity conflict, and a positive diversity climate was marginally related to less perceived gender-work identity conflict. The results show the importance of the team context in shaping a climate of (in)compatible identities for numerically underrepresented and historically undervalued social group members in order to hinder or protect their work outcomes.

  12. Women (Do Not) Belong Here: Gender-Work Identity Conflict among Female Police Officers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veldman, Jenny; Meeussen, Loes; Van Laar, Colette; Phalet, Karen

    2017-01-01

    The current paper examines antecedents and consequences of perceiving conflict between gender and work identities in male-dominated professions. In a study among 657 employees working in 85 teams in the police force, we investigated the effect of being different from team members in terms of gender on employees’ perception that their team members see their gender identity as conflicting with their work identity. As expected in the police force as a male-dominated field, the results showed that gender-dissimilarity in the team was related to perceived gender-work identity conflict for women, and not for men. In turn, perceiving gender-work identity conflict was related to lower team identification for men and women. Although lowering team identification might enable employees to cope with conflicting social identities and hence protect the self, this may also have its costs, as lower team identification predicted higher turnover intentions, more burn-out symptoms, less extra role behavior, lower job satisfaction, lower work motivation, and lower perceived performance. Additionally, for women, experiencing support from their team members and team leader showed a trend to mitigate the relationship between gender-dissimilarity and perceived gender-work identity conflict, and a positive diversity climate was marginally related to less perceived gender-work identity conflict. The results show the importance of the team context in shaping a climate of (in)compatible identities for numerically underrepresented and historically undervalued social group members in order to hinder or protect their work outcomes. PMID:28220097

  13. Inhibition conflict and alcohol expectancy as moderators of alcohol's relationship to condom use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dermen, K H; Cooper, M L

    2000-05-01

    Inhibition conflict theory predicts that alcohol will decrease condom use only among individuals who are highly conflicted about using a condom, whereas expectancy theory predicts such an effect only among individuals who hold strong beliefs about alcohol's effects on sexual risk taking. In Study 1, the first of these two theories was tested using a newly developed measure of conflict. Data from 308 college students who reported on the first time they had sexual intercourse with their most recent partner (FMRP) supported the utility of this measure and showed that quantity of alcohol consumed was negatively associated with condom use only among high-conflict individuals. In Study 2, 17- to 25-year-old respondents reported on their first sexual intercourse, FMRP, and last intercourse (ns = 465, 1136, and 984, respectively). In a simultaneous test of both inhibition conflict theory and expectancy theory, amount of alcohol consumed was found to be negatively associated with condom use at first intercourse among individuals high in both conflict and expectancy, at FMRP among high-expectancy individuals, and at last intercourse among high-conflict individuals. These results lend partial support to both theories of alcohol's effects and suggest that an integration of these two perspectives will ultimately be required if researchers are to model adequately alcohol's effects on human social behavior.

  14. Examining Behavioural Coping Strategies as Mediators between Work-Family Conflict and Psychological Distress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanaz Aazami

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We examined the mediating role of behavioral coping strategies in the association between work-family conflict and psychological distress. In particular, we examined the two directions of work-family conflict, namely, work interference into family and family interference into work. Furthermore, two coping styles in this study were adaptive and maladaptive coping strategies. This cross-sectional study was conducted among 429 Malaysian working women using self-reported data. The results of mediational analysis in the present study showed that adaptive coping strategy does not significantly mediate the effect of work-family conflict on psychological distress. However, maladaptive coping strategies significantly mediate the effect of work-family conflict on psychological distress. These results show that adaptive coping strategies, which aimed to improve the stressful situation, are not effective in managing stressor such as work-family conflict. We found that experiencing interrole conflict steers employees toward frequent use of maladaptive coping strategies which in turn lead to psychological distress. Interventions targeted at improvement of coping skills which are according to individual’s needs and expectation may help working women to balance work and family demands. The important issue is to keep in mind that effective coping strategies are to control the situations not to eliminate work-family conflict.

  15. In-vehicle stereo vision system for identification of traffic conflicts between bus and pedestrian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Cafiso

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The traffic conflict technique (TCT was developed as “surrogate measure of road safety” to identify near-crash events by using measures of the spatial and temporal proximity of road users. Traditionally applications of TCT focus on a specific site by the way of manually or automated supervision. Nowadays the development of in-vehicle (IV technologies provides new opportunities for monitoring driver behavior and interaction with other road users directly into the traffic stream. In the paper a stereo vision and GPS system for traffic conflict investigation is presented for detecting conflicts between vehicle and pedestrian. The system is able to acquire geo-referenced sequences of stereo frames that are used to provide real time information related to conflict occurrence and severity. As case study, an urban bus was equipped with a prototype of the system and a trial in the city of Catania (Italy was carried out analyzing conflicts with pedestrian crossing in front of the bus. Experimental results pointed out the potentialities of the system for collection of data that can be used to get suitable traffic conflict measures. Specifically, a risk index of the conflict between pedestrians and vehicles is proposed to classify collision probability and severity using data collected by the system. This information may be used to develop in-vehicle warning systems and urban network risk assessment.

  16. African American Children At-Risk of Increasingly Conflicted Teacher-Student Relationships in Elementary School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spilt, Jantine; Hughes, Jan N

    Previous studies found different trajectories of conflicted relationships with teachers predictive of academic underachievement. However, little is known about what places children at risk for atypical conflict trajectories. This follow-up study examines whether African American ethnicity, IQ, and SES are unique predictors of teacher-student conflict trajectories taking into account sociobehavioral predictors, including aggression and prosocial behavior. The study included the same ethnically diverse sample of 657 academically at-risk children in which previously four latent growth classes of conflict trajectories (grades 1-5) predictive of underachievement were identified. In this follow-up study, 6 predictors were examined: African American ethnicity, SES, IQ (independent assessment), Inhibitory control (performance measure), and Aggression and Prosocial behavior (peer assessment). The results demonstrated that African American ethnicity, but not IQ and SES, uniquely predicted atypical conflict trajectories, while controlling for sociobehavioral predictors. African American children were at risk of increasingly conflicted relationships with elementary school teachers, which has been found to increase the risk of academic underachievement in middle school.

  17. Development of neural mechanisms of conflict and error processing during childhood: implications for self-regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Checa, Purificación; Castellanos, M. C.; Abundis-Gutiérrez, Alicia; Rosario Rueda, M.

    2014-01-01

    Regulation of thoughts and behavior requires attention, particularly when there is conflict between alternative responses or when errors are to be prevented or corrected. Conflict monitoring and error processing are functions of the executive attention network, a neurocognitive system that greatly matures during childhood. In this study, we examined the development of brain mechanisms underlying conflict and error processing with event-related potentials (ERPs), and explored the relationship between brain function and individual differences in the ability to self-regulate behavior. Three groups of children aged 4–6, 7–9, and 10–13 years, and a group of adults performed a child-friendly version of the flanker task while ERPs were registered. Marked developmental changes were observed in both conflict processing and brain reactions to errors. After controlling by age, higher self-regulation skills are associated with smaller amplitude of the conflict effect but greater amplitude of the error-related negativity. Additionally, we found that electrophysiological measures of conflict and error monitoring predict individual differences in impulsivity and the capacity to delay gratification. These findings inform of brain mechanisms underlying the development of cognitive control and self-regulation. PMID:24795676

  18. Computational Analysis of Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egnor, S E Roian; Branson, Kristin

    2016-07-01

    In this review, we discuss the emerging field of computational behavioral analysis-the use of modern methods from computer science and engineering to quantitatively measure animal behavior. We discuss aspects of experiment design important to both obtaining biologically relevant behavioral data and enabling the use of machine vision and learning techniques for automation. These two goals are often in conflict. Restraining or restricting the environment of the animal can simplify automatic behavior quantification, but it can also degrade the quality or alter important aspects of behavior. To enable biologists to design experiments to obtain better behavioral measurements, and computer scientists to pinpoint fruitful directions for algorithm improvement, we review known effects of artificial manipulation of the animal on behavior. We also review machine vision and learning techniques for tracking, feature extraction, automated behavior classification, and automated behavior discovery, the assumptions they make, and the types of data they work best with.

  19. A Review of Kenya´s Post-Conflict Peace Building and Conflict Management Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owiso, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Conflict management and peacebuilding demands a deep understanding and analysis of the conflict and the circumstances surrounding it. This is because the causes may be complex, nuanced and may involve both short term and long term issues. Kenya is characterized by different forms of conflict rang...

  20. The Relationship of Interpersonal Conflict Handling Styles and Marital Conflicts Among Iranian Divorcing Couples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navidian, Ali; Bahari, Farshad; Kermansaravi, Fatihe

    2014-01-01

    Background: Various research studies have suggested that among other variables that couples remain married if they successfully manage their interactions (marital communication based on acceptance of individual differences, problem solving skills, forgiveness, collaborative decision making, empathy and active listening) and constructively manage conflict. Purpose: The study was aimed at examining the relation of conflict handling styles and marital conflicts among divorcing couples. Methods: As a descriptive–comparative study 60 couples out of 440 couples referred to the Crisis Intervention Center of the Isfahan Well-being Organization have selected. The tools implemented were Marital Conflicts (Barati & Sanaei, 1996) and Interpersonal Conflict Handling Styles Questionnaires (Thomas-Kilman, 1975). Their total reliabilities were, respectively, 0.74 and 0.87. Results: Findings showed that there are no significant differences among their conflict handling styles and marital conflicts. Also, there was positive correlation between avoidance and competition styles and negative one between compromise, accommodation, and cooperation styles with marital conflicts. That is, these styles reduced couples’ conflicts. Finally, wives had tendency to apply accommodation style and husbands tended to use accommodation and cooperation styles to handle their conflicts. Conclusions: It is suggested to be studied couples’ views toward their own styles to handle marital conflicts and holding training courses to orient couples with advantages and disadvantages of marital conflict handling styles. PMID:25363128