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Sample records for cscl computer supported

  1. Internal and External Regulation to Support Knowledge Construction and Convergence in Computer Supported Collaborative Learning (CSCL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Margarida; Lambropoulos, Niki

    2011-01-01

    Computer Supported Collaborative Learning (CSCL) activities aim to promote collaborative knowledge construction and convergence. During the CSCL activity, the students should regulate their learning activity, at the individual and collective level. This implies an organisation cost related to the coordination of the activity with the team-mates…

  2. Assessing Learners' Perceived Readiness for Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning (CSCL): A Study on Initial Development and Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Yao; So, Hyo-Jeong; Toh, Yancy

    2015-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to develop an instrument that assesses university students' perceived readiness for computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL). Assessment in CSCL research had predominantly focused on measuring "after-collaboration" outcomes and "during-collaboration" behaviors while…

  3. The quality and impact of computer supported collaborative learning (CSCL) in radiology case-based learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourdioukova, Elena V; Verstraete, Koenraad L; Valcke, Martin

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this research was to explore (1) clinical years students' perceptions about radiology case-based learning within a computer supported collaborative learning (CSCL) setting, (2) an analysis of the collaborative learning process, and (3) the learning impact of collaborative work on the radiology cases. The first part of this study focuses on a more detailed analysis of a survey study about CSCL based case-based learning, set up in the context of a broader radiology curriculum innovation. The second part centers on a qualitative and quantitative analysis of 52 online collaborative learning discussions from 5th year and nearly graduating medical students. The collaborative work was based on 26 radiology cases regarding musculoskeletal radiology. The analysis of perceptions about collaborative learning on radiology cases reflects a rather neutral attitude that also does not differ significantly in students of different grade levels. Less advanced students are more positive about CSCL as compared to last year students. Outcome evaluation shows a significantly higher level of accuracy in identification of radiology key structures and in radiology diagnosis as well as in linking the radiological signs with available clinical information in nearly graduated students. No significant differences between different grade levels were found in accuracy of using medical terminology. Students appreciate computer supported collaborative learning settings when tackling radiology case-based learning. Scripted computer supported collaborative learning groups proved to be useful for both 5th and 7th year students in view of developing components of their radiology diagnostic approaches. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Examining the Roles of Blended Learning Approaches in Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning (CSCL) Environments: A Delphi Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Hyo-Jeong; Bonk, Curtis J.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, a Delphi method was used to identify and predict the roles of blended learning approaches in computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) environments. The Delphi panel consisted of experts in online learning from different geographic regions of the world. This study discusses findings related to (a) pros and cons of blended…

  5. Identifying Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning (CSCL) Research in Selected Journals Published from 2003 to 2012: A Content Analysis of Research Topics and Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Lanqin; Huang, Ronghuai; Yu, Junhui

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to identity the emerging research trends in the field of computed-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) so as to provide insights for researchers and educators into research topics and issues for further exploration. This paper analyzed the research topics, methods and technology adoption of CSCL from 2003 to 2012. A total of 706…

  6. The Role of Collective Efficacy, Cognitive Quality, and Task Cohesion in Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning (CSCL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shu-Ling; Hwang, Gwo-Jen

    2012-01-01

    Research has suggested that CSCL environments contain fewer social context clues, resulting in various group processes, performance or motivation. This study thus attempts to explore the relationship among collective efficacy, group processes (i.e. task cohesion, cognitive quality) and collaborative performance in a CSCL environment. A total of 75…

  7. Teacher regulation of CSCL: Exploring the complexity of teacher regulation and the supporting role of learning analytics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwen, A. van

    2015-01-01

    During computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL), students collaboratively solve tasks while being supported by computers. CSCL is beneficial for collaboration because it offers students a platform for communication and a joint working space for solving tasks. All student activities are

  8. Teacher regulation of CSCL: Exploring the complexity of teacher regulation and the supporting role of learning analytics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwen, A. van

    2015-01-01

    During computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL), students collaboratively solve tasks while being supported by computers. CSCL is beneficial for collaboration because it offers students a platform for communication and a joint working space for solving tasks. All student activities are autom

  9. Teacher regulation of CSCL: Exploring the complexity of teacher regulation and the supporting role of learning analytics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwen, A. van

    2015-01-01

    During computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL), students collaboratively solve tasks while being supported by computers. CSCL is beneficial for collaboration because it offers students a platform for communication and a joint working space for solving tasks. All student activities are autom

  10. Model for supporting awareness in the CSCL ALLEGRO environment through a blackboard architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demetrio Arturo Ovalle Carranza

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper is aimed at describing collaborative activities, the awareness process and blackboard architecture used within the ALLEGRO system, a multi-agent learning and teaching environment which has included artificial intelligence mechanisms (instructional planning (IP, cased-based reasoning (CBR, multi-agent systems (MAS, intelligent tutoring systems (ITS and computer supported collaborative learning (CSCL. The proposed model of awareness promotes communication, collaboration and coordination in CSCL ALLEGRO. MAS-CommonKADS methodology was applied for building the Multi-Agent system. ALLEGRO based its instructional approach on the following three pedagogical paradigms: conductive behaviour, cognitive mechanisms (distributed cognition and problem-based learning and social-historical theory. The system was validated via several case studies regarding the graphical digital domain for postgraduate architectural studies. The proposed awareness model lets students develop important skills such as conscious behaviour, communication, collaboration and coordination in the CSCL component of the ALLEGRO system. This model facilitates students acquiring a perception of what others are doing inside the CSCL, thereby using such knowledge for interacting with the environment and developing leading to expressing and exchanging ideas and opinions with other students, transforming the class into an open virtual forum for reflection, proactive interaction and a critical space for exchanging ideas. The proposed instructional model is a valuable resource from the technological and pedagogical point of view as different theories are integrated, some of them conflicting with others.

  11. Making meaning through joint activity in Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning (CSCL settings: the interplay between content-related and activity-related talk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesar Coll

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In the recent literature on CSCL which places the spotlight on participants' talk, there is a clear dichotomy between studies that focus on content-related talk and those that focus on off-topic or activity-related talk. In the approach adopted in this paper, based on the notion of educational influence, the guiding hypothesis is that both forms of talk are closely linked in the collaborative dynamics and that activity-related talk, far from being irrelevant, has an essential role to play in promoting the collaborative construction of knowledge. The paper empirically examines this hypothesis in four online collaborative learning situations. The results show that participants in small group situations requiring the preparation of a written product devote a major part of their discursive activity to negotiating the form of organization of their joint activity and to making sure that all members are familiar with it. In contrast, the technological tools used in the collaborative situation do not seem to have an impact on the relative weight of the type of participants' talk, either content-related or activity-related.

  12. External representation of argumentation in CSCL and the management of cognitive load

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruggen, J.M.; Kirschner, P.A.; Jochems, W.

    2002-01-01

    Computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) environments, particularly environments where students share external representations, are discussed as an interesting area for the application of cognitive load theory (CLT). CSCL environments share a number of characteristics that will induce consid

  13. Instructional Design for Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning in Primary and Secondary School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gros, Begona

    2001-01-01

    Discussion of computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) focuses on the way in which current instructional design theories can be used to design collaborative learning environments in primary and secondary schools. Highlights include definitions of CSCL; CSCL research, including cognitive approach, systems design, and curricular…

  14. Awareness of Cognitive and Social Behaviour in a CSCL Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschner, P. A.; Kreijns, K.; Phielix, C.; Fransen, J.

    2015-01-01

    Most distributed and virtual online environments for and pedagogies of computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) neglect the social and social-emotional aspects underlying the group dynamics of learning and working in a CSCL group. These group dynamics often determine whether the group will develop into a well-performing team and whether a…

  15. Using Representational Tools to Support Historical Reasoning in Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Drie, Jannet; Van Boxtel, Carla; Erkens, Gijsbert; Kanselaar, Gellof

    2005-01-01

    In this article the authors focus on how features of a computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) environment can elicit and support domain-specific reasoning and more specifically historical reasoning. The CSCL environment enables students to collaborate on a historical inquiry task and in writing an argumentative essay. In order to support…

  16. Team Effectiveness and Team Development in CSCL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fransen, Jos; Weinberger, Armin; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    There is a wealth of research on computer-supported cooperative work (CSCW) that is neglected in computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) research. CSCW research is concerned with contextual factors, however, that may strongly influence collaborative learning processes as well, such as task characteristics, team formation, team members'…

  17. Using visualizations to support collaboration and coordination during computer-supported collaborative learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, J.J.H.M.

    2008-01-01

    This thesis addresses the topic of computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL in short). In a CSCL-environment, students work in small groups on complex and challenging tasks. Although the teacher guides this process at a distance, students have to regulate and monitor their own learning proces

  18. Facilitating Learning in Multidisciplinary Groups with Transactive CSCL Scripts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noroozi, O.; Teasley, S.D.; Biemans, H.J.A.; Weinberger, A.; Mulder, M.

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge sharing and transfer are essential for learning in groups, especially when group members have different disciplinary expertise and collaborate online. Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning (CSCL) environments have been designed to facilitate transactive knowledge sharing and transfer i

  19. Scripting intercultural computer-supported collaborative learning in higher education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Popov, V.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction of computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL), specifically in an intercultural learning environment, creates both challenges and benefits. Among the challenges are the coordination of different attitudes, styles of communication, and patterns of behaving. Among the benefits are t

  20. Scripting intercultural computer-supported collaborative learning in higher education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Popov, V.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction of computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL), specifically in an intercultural learning environment, creates both challenges and benefits. Among the challenges are the coordination of different attitudes, styles of communication, and patterns of behaving. Among the benefits are

  1. A Two-Dimension Process in Explaining Learners' Collaborative Behaviors in CSCL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Jung-Lung; Chou, Huey-Wen; Hwang, Wu-Yuin; Chou, Shyan-Bin

    2008-01-01

    Computer supported collaborative learning (CSCL) has captured many educators and researchers to contribute their efforts on this domain. This study proposed a two-dimension concept to explain learners' collaboration behaviors in a CSCL laboratory setting. A two-dimension process, namely perceptual dimensions and supportive dimensions, is useful to…

  2. Potential of Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning for Learners with Different Learning Styles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X. Christine; Hinn, D. Michelle; Kanfer, Alaina G.

    2001-01-01

    Investigates the effects of computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) on learning style changes, learning outcomes, and learner satisfaction in a study conducted at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Results based on Kolb's Learning Style Theory and Learning Style Inventory showed CSCL supports diverse learning styles.…

  3. The influence of learner characteristics on degree and type of participation in a CSCL environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prinsen, F.R.; Volman, M.L.L.; Terwel, J.

    2006-01-01

    Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning (CSCL) is often presented as a promising learning method. However, it is also facing some new challenges. Apart from answering the question of whether or not working with CSCL generates satisfying learning outcomes, it is important to determine whether or no

  4. The Dialectical Potential of Cultural Historical Activity Theory for Researching Sustainable CSCL Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmis, Sue

    2014-01-01

    This article explores conceptual and methodological challenges in researching sustainable computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) within authentic educational settings. It argues that to investigate the sustainability of CSCL in such settings, we need to understand how new innovations become enculturated as part of educational communities…

  5. Enhancing socially shared regulation in collaborative learning groups: designing for CSCL regulation tools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Järvelä, Sanna; Kirschner, Paul A.; Panadero, Ernesto; Malmberg, Jonna; Phielix, Chris; Jaspers, Jos; Koivuniemi, Marieke; Järvenoja, Hanna

    2016-01-01

    For effective computer supported collaborative learning (CSCL), socially shared regulation of learning (SSRL) is necessary. To this end, this article extends the idea first posited by Ja¨rvela¨ and Hadwin (Educ Psychol 48(1):25–39, 2013) that successful collaboration in CSCL contexts requires target

  6. Enhancing socially shared regulation in collaborative learning groups: Designing for CSCL regulation tools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Järvelä, Sanna; Kirschner, Paul; Panadero, Ernesto; Malmberg, Jonna; Phielix, Chris; Jaspers, Jos; Koivuniemi, Marika; Järvenoja, Hanna

    2014-01-01

    For effective computer supported collaborative learning (CSCL), socially shared regulation of learning (SSRL) is necessary. To this end, this article extends the idea first posited by Järvelä and Hadwin (Educ Psychol 48(1):25–39, 2013) that successful collaboration in CSCL contexts requires targeted

  7. Enhancing socially shared regulation in collaborative learning groups: Designing for CSCL regulation tools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Järvelä, Sanna; Kirschner, Paul|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/079457037; Panadero, Ernesto; Malmberg, Jonna; Phielix, Chris|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304833738; Jaspers, Jos|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304825220; Koivuniemi, Marika; Järvenoja, Hanna

    2014-01-01

    For effective computer supported collaborative learning (CSCL), socially shared regulation of learning (SSRL) is necessary. To this end, this article extends the idea first posited by Järvelä and Hadwin (Educ Psychol 48(1):25–39, 2013) that successful collaboration in CSCL contexts requires targeted

  8. Assessment of (Computer-Supported) Collaborative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strijbos, J. -W.

    2011-01-01

    Within the (Computer-Supported) Collaborative Learning (CS)CL research community, there has been an extensive dialogue on theories and perspectives on learning from collaboration, approaches to scaffold (script) the collaborative process, and most recently research methodology. In contrast, the issue of assessment of collaborative learning has…

  9. Toward a Script Theory of Guidance in Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Frank; Kollar, Ingo; Stegmann, Karsten; Wecker, Christof

    2013-01-01

    This article presents an outline of a script theory of guidance for computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL). With its 4 types of components of internal and external scripts (play, scene, role, and scriptlet) and 7 principles, this theory addresses the question of how CSCL practices are shaped by dynamically reconfigured internal…

  10. Visualization of agreement and discussion processes during computer-supported collaborative learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, J.J.H.M.; Erkens, G.; Kanselaar, G.

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the effects of the shared space (SS) on students’ behaviors in a computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) environment. The SS visualizes discussion and agreement during online discussions. It was hypothesized the SS would increase the media richness of the CSCL-environmen

  11. Web-based Learning and Computer Supported Collaborative Learning for psychomotor skill acquisition: perspectives of medical undergraduate students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Jansen; Cheung, Jeffrey J H; Mackinnon, Kim; Brett, Clare; Kapralos, Bill; Dubrowski, Adam

    2013-01-01

    There is a lack of evidence for the use of Web-based Learning (WBL) and Computer Supported Collaborative Learning (CSCL) for acquiring psychomotor skills in medical education. In this study, we surveyed medical undergraduate students attending a simulation based training session for central line insertion on their perspectives and utilization of WBL and CSCL for acquisition of a complex psychomotor skill.

  12. Formative peer assessment in a CSCL environment: A case study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, Frans; Sluijsmans, Dominique; Kirschner, Paul A.; Strijbos, Jan Willem

    2007-01-01

    In this case study our aim was to gain more insight in the possibilities of qualitative formative peer assessment in a computer supported collaborative learning (CSCL) environment. An approach was chosen in which peer assessment was operationalized in assessment assignments and assessment tools that

  13. Formative peer assessment in a CSCL environment: A case study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, Frans; Sluijsmans, Dominique; Kirschner, Paul A.; Strijbos, Jan Willem

    2007-01-01

    In this case study our aim was to gain more insight in the possibilities of qualitative formative peer assessment in a computer supported collaborative learning (CSCL) environment. An approach was chosen in which peer assessment was operationalized in assessment assignments and assessment tools that

  14. Determining Core Components of Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning Within Educational Managerial Game Context

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    The exploratory factor analysis has been used to determine which selected inner components of computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) should be considered as the core components. The research itself builds on three models of group learning, namely cooperative learning elements, the “Big Five” in the teamwork model and the theoretical framework of CSCL. The analysis of data collected from university students participating in a managerial group game suggests that future research in the...

  15. Learning Analytics to Support Teachers during Synchronous CSCL: Balancing between Overview and Overload

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Leeuwen, Anouschka

    2015-01-01

    Learning analytics (LA) are summaries, visualizations, and analyses of student data that could improve learning in multiple ways, for example by supporting teachers. However, not much research is available yet concerning how LA may support teachers to diagnose student progress and to intervene during student learning activities. There is evidence…

  16. Computer-supported collaborative learning in the medical workplace: Students' experiences on formative peer feedback of a critical appraisal of a topic paper.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koops, W.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der; Leng, B. De; Oei, S.G.; Snoeckx, L.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Medical workplace learning consists largely of individual activities, since workplace settings do not lend themselves readily to group learning. An electronic Learning Management with System Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning (CSCL) could enable learners at different workplace

  17. Perceptions and experiences of, and outcomes for, university students in culturally diversified dyads in a computer-supported collaborative learning environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Popov, V.; Noroozi, O.; Barrett, J.B.; Biemans, H.J.A.; Teasley, S.D.; Slof, B.; Mulder, M.

    2014-01-01

    The introduction of computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL), specifically into intercultural learning environments, mirrors the largely internet-based and intercultural workplace of many professionals. This paper utilized a mixed methods approach to examine differences between students’ per

  18. Visualization of polyphonic voices inter-animation in CSCL chats

    OpenAIRE

    Stefan TRAUSAN-MATU; Dascalu, Mihai

    2016-01-01

    Trausan-Matu, S., & Dascalu, M. (2015). Visualization of Polyphonic Voices Inter-animation in CSCL Chats. Revista Romana de Interactiune Om-Calculator, 8(4), 305–322. Instant messenger (chat) is one of the means of Computer Supported Collaborative Learning, which may foster students' inter-animation towards joint knowledge construction. However, the analysis and grading of such chats is an extremely time-consuming activity, therefore (semi-)automatic analytics tools are needed. Discourse t...

  19. Seven Affordances of Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning: How to Support Collaborative Learning? How Can Technologies Help?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Heisawn; Hmelo-Silver, Cindy E.

    2016-01-01

    This article proposes 7 core affordances of technology for collaborative learning based on theories of collaborative learning and CSCL (Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning) practices. Technology affords learner opportunities to (1) engage in a joint task, (2) communicate, (3) share resources, (4) engage in productive collaborative learning…

  20. Connecting agents and artifacts in CSCL: Towards a rationale of mutual shaping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overdijk, Maarten; Van Diggelen, Wouter; Kirschner, Paul A.; Baker, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Overdijk, M., Van Diggelen, W., Kirschner, P. A., & Baker, M. (2012). Connecting agents and artifacts in CSCL: Towards a rationale of mutual shaping. International Journal of Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning, 7, 193-210. doi:10.1007/s11412-012-9143-2

  1. Connecting Agents and Artifacts in CSCL: Towards a Rationale of Mutual Shaping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overdijk, Maarten; van Diggelen, Wouter; Kirschner, Paul A.; Baker, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Studying how collaborative activity takes shape interactionally in the context of technological settings is one of the main challenges in the field of Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning (CSCL). It requires us, amongst other things, to look into the "black box" of how technical artifacts are brought into use, or rather, how they are attuned…

  2. Finnish Upper Secondary Students' Collaborative Processes in Learning Statistics in a CSCL Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oikarinen, Juho Kaleva; Järvelä, Sanna; Kaasila, Raimo

    2014-01-01

    This design-based research project focuses on documenting statistical learning among 16-17-year-old Finnish upper secondary school students (N = 78) in a computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) environment. One novel value of this study is in reporting the shift from teacher-led mathematical teaching to autonomous small-group learning in…

  3. Social Networks, Communication Styles, and Learning Performance in a CSCL Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hichang; Gay, Geri; Davidson, Barry; Ingraffea, Anthony

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study is to empirically investigate the relationships between communication styles, social networks, and learning performance in a computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) community. Using social network analysis (SNA) and longitudinal survey data, we analyzed how 31 distributed learners developed collaborative learning…

  4. From Handheld Collaborative Tool to Effective Classroom Module: Embedding CSCL in a Broader Design Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roschelle, Jeremy; Rafanan, Ken; Estrella, Gucci; Nussbaum, Miguel; Claro, Susana

    2010-01-01

    The field of Computer Supported Collaborative Learning (CSCL) includes designers who emphasize effectiveness, measured via experiments, as well as designers who emphasize context and conduct qualitative research on teaching and learning practices. We conjectured that these two different emphases could be fruitful combined in a research and…

  5. A Collaborative Multimedia Annotation Tool for Enhancing Knowledge Sharing in CSCL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Stephen J. H.; Zhang, Jia; Su, Addison Y. S.; Tsai, Jeffrey J. P.

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge sharing in computer supported collaborative learning (CSCL) requires intensive social interactions among participants, typically in the form of annotations. An annotation refers to an explicit expression of knowledge that is attached to a document to reveal the conceptual meanings of an annotator's implicit thoughts. In this research, we…

  6. From Handheld Collaborative Tool to Effective Classroom Module: Embedding CSCL in a Broader Design Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roschelle, Jeremy; Rafanan, Ken; Estrella, Gucci; Nussbaum, Miguel; Claro, Susana

    2010-01-01

    The field of Computer Supported Collaborative Learning (CSCL) includes designers who emphasize effectiveness, measured via experiments, as well as designers who emphasize context and conduct qualitative research on teaching and learning practices. We conjectured that these two different emphases could be fruitful combined in a research and…

  7. Scripting for Construction of a Transactive Memory System in Multidisciplinary CSCL Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noroozi, Omid; Biemans, Harm J. A.; Weinberger, Armin; Mulder, Martin; Chizari, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Establishing a Transactive Memory System (TMS) is essential for groups of learners, when they are multidisciplinary and collaborate online. Environments for Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning (CSCL) could be designed to facilitate the TMS. This study investigates how various aspects of a TMS (i.e., specialization, coordination, and trust)…

  8. Facilitating Argumentative Knowledge Construction through a Transactive Discussion Script in CSCL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noroozi, Omid; Weinberger, Armin; Biemans, Harm J. A.; Mulder, Martin; Chizari, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Learning to argue is prerequisite to solving complex problems in groups, especially when they are multidisciplinary and collaborate online. Environments for Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning (CSCL) can be designed to facilitate argumentative knowledge construction. This study investigates how argumentative knowledge construction in…

  9. Technology Affordances for Intersubjective Meaning Making: A Research Agenda for CSCL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suthers, Daniel D.

    2006-01-01

    Now well into its second decade, the field of Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning (CSCL) appears healthy, encompassing a diversity of topics of study, methodologies, and representatives of various research communities. It is an appropriate time to ask: what central questions can integrate our work into a coherent field? This paper proposes…

  10. The Role of Group Interaction in Collective Efficacy and CSCL Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shu-Ling; Hsu, Hsien-Yuan; Lin, Sunny S. J.; Hwang, Gwo-Jen

    2014-01-01

    Although research has identified the importance of interaction behaviors in computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL), very few attempts have been made to carry out in-depth analysis of interaction behaviors. This study thus applies both qualitative (e.g., content analyses, interviews) and quantitative methods in an attempt to investigate…

  11. Managing CSCL Activity through networking models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Casillas

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aims at managing activity carried out in Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning (CSCL environments. We apply an approach that gathers and manages the knowledge underlying huge data structures, resulting from collaborative interaction among participants and stored as activity logs. Our method comprises a variety of important issues and aspects, such as: deep understanding of collaboration among participants in workgroups, definition of an ontology for providing meaning to isolated data manifestations, discovering of knowledge structures built in huge amounts of data stored in log files, and development of high-semantic indicators to describe diverse primitive collaborative acts, and binding these indicators to formal descriptions defined in the collaboration ontology; besides our method includes gathering collaboration indicators from web forums using natural language processing (NLP techniques.

  12. Exploring Students' Language Awareness through Intercultural Communication in Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yu-Fen

    2013-01-01

    Students seldom think about language unless they are instructed to do so or are made to do so during learning activities. To arouse students' awareness while learning English for Specific Purposes (ESP), this study formed a computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) community to engage teachers and students from different domains and…

  13. Exploring Students' Language Awareness through Intercultural Communication in Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yu-Fen

    2013-01-01

    Students seldom think about language unless they are instructed to do so or are made to do so during learning activities. To arouse students' awareness while learning English for Specific Purposes (ESP), this study formed a computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) community to engage teachers and students from different domains and…

  14. Exploring Students' Language Awareness through Intercultural Communication in Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yu-Fen

    2013-01-01

    Students seldom think about language unless they are instructed to do so or are made to do so during learning activities. To arouse students' awareness while learning English for Specific Purposes (ESP), this study formed a computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) community to engage teachers and students from different domains and…

  15. Computer-supported collaborative learning in the medical workplace: Students' experiences on formative peer feedback of a critical appraisal of a topic paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koops, W; Van der Vleuten, C; De Leng, B; Oei, S G; Snoeckx, L

    2011-01-01

    Medical workplace learning consists largely of individual activities, since workplace settings do not lend themselves readily to group learning. An electronic Learning Management with System Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning (CSCL) could enable learners at different workplace locations to discuss personal clinical experiences at a distance to enhance learning. To explore whether CSCL-enabled structured asynchronous discussions on an authentic task has additional value for learning in the medical workplace. Between January 2008 and June 2010, we conducted an exploratory evaluation study among senior medical students that were engaged in clinical electives. Students wrote a Critical Appraisal of a Topic paper about a clinical problem they had encountered and discussed it in discipline homogeneous subgroups on an asynchronous forum in a CSCL environment. A mixed method design was used to explore students' perceptions of the CSCL arrangement with respect to their preparation and participation, the design and knowledge gains. We analysed the messages recorded during the discussions to investigate which types of interactions occurred. Students perceived knowledge improvement of their papers. The discussions were mostly task-focused. The students considered an instruction session and a manual necessary to prepare for CSCL. A high amount of sent messages and a high activity in discussion seem to influence scores on perceptions: 'participation' and 'knowledge gain' positively. CSCL appears to offer a suitable environment for peers to provide formative feedback on a Critical Appraisal of a Topic paper during workplace learning. The CSCL environment enabled students to collaborate in asynchronous discussions, which positively influenced their learning.

  16. Design Experiments in Japanese Elementary Science Education with Computer Support for Collaborative Learning: Hypothesis Testing and Collaborative Construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshima, Jun; Oshima, Ritsuko; Murayama, Isao; Inagaki, Shigenori; Takenaka, Makiko; Nakayama, Hayashi; Yamaguchi, Etsuji

    2004-01-01

    This paper reports design experiments on two Japanese elementary science lesson units in a sixth-grade classroom supported by computer support for collaborative learning (CSCL) technology as a collaborative reflection tool. We took different approaches in the experiments depending on their instructional goals. In the unit 'air and how things…

  17. Peer-Monitoring vs. Micro-Script Fading for Enhancing Knowledge Acquisition when Learning in Computer-Supported Argumentation Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouyias, Yannis; Demetriadis, Stavros

    2012-01-01

    Research on computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) has strongly emphasized the value of providing student support with micro-scripts, which should withdraw (fade-out) allowing students to practice the acquired skills. However, research on fading shows conflicting results and some researchers suggest that the impact of fading is enhanced…

  18. Impact of Communication Patterns, Network Positions and Social Dynamics Factors on Learning among Students in a CSCL Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundararajan, Binod

    2009-01-01

    At present, it is difficult to assess the quality of learning in Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning (CSCL) environments, because standard pretest and posttest measures do not capture the differences in the learner's ability to engage in the material, pose interesting new questions, engage others in learning and work collaboratively. This…

  19. Multilevel analysis in CSCL research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, J.J.H.M.; Erkens, G.; Kirschner, P.A.; Kanselaar, G.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this chapter is to explain why multilevel analysis (MLA) is often necessary to correctly answer the questions CSCL researchers address. Although CSCL researchers continue to use statistical techniques such as analysis of vari-ance or regression analysis, their datasets are often not suite

  20. The effect of functional roles on perceived group efficiency during computer-supported collaborative learning : a matter of triangulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strijbos, Jan-Willem; Martens, Rob L.; Jochems, Wim M. G.; Broers, Nick J.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the effect of functional roles on group performance and collaboration during computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) is investigated. Especially the need for triangulating multiple methods is emphasised: Likert-scale evaluation questions, quantitative content analysis of e-

  1. The effect of functional roles on perceived group efficiency during computer-supported collaborative learning : a matter of triangulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strijbos, Jan-Willem; Martens, Rob L.; Jochems, Wim M. G.; Broers, Nick J.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the effect of functional roles on group performance and collaboration during computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) is investigated. Especially the need for triangulating multiple methods is emphasised: Likert-scale evaluation questions, quantitative content analysis of e-

  2. Exploring Gender and Gender Pairing in the Knowledge Elaboration Processes of Students Using Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, N.; Bosker, R. J.; Harskamp, E. G.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study is to investigate the influence of gender and gender pairing on students' learning performances and knowledge elaboration processes in Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning (CSCL). A sample of ninety-six secondary school students, participated in a two-week experiment. Students were randomly paired and asked to solve…

  3. Facilitation of computer-supported collaborative learning in mixed- versus same-culture dyads: Does a collaboration script help?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Popov, V.; Biemans, H.J.A.; Brinkman, B.; Kuznetsov, A.N.; Mulder, M.

    2013-01-01

    To foster collaboration and improve the quality of students' discussions in mixed- and same- culture learner groups engaged in computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL), a collaboration script was introduced. A 2 × 2-factorial design was used to examine the effects of using this collaboration

  4. Applying Activity Theory to Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning and Work-Based Activities in Corporate Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collis, Betty; Margaryan, Anoush

    2004-01-01

    Business needs in many corporations call for learning outcomes that involve problem solutions, and creating and sharing new knowledge within workplace situations that may involve collaboration among members of a team. We argue that work-based activities (WBA) and computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) are appropriate components for…

  5. En retorisk forståelsesramme for Computer Supported Collaborative Learning (A Rhetorical Theory on Computer Supported Collaborative Learning)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harlung, Asger

    2003-01-01

    The dissertation explores the potential of rhetorical theories for understanding, analyzing, or planning communication and learning processes, and for integrating the digitized contexts and human interaction and communication proccesses in a single theoretical framework. Based on Cicero's rhetori...... applied to two empirical case studies of Master programs, the dissertation develops and presents a new theory on Computer Supported Collaborative Learning (CSCL).......The dissertation explores the potential of rhetorical theories for understanding, analyzing, or planning communication and learning processes, and for integrating the digitized contexts and human interaction and communication proccesses in a single theoretical framework. Based on Cicero's rhetoric...

  6. En retorisk forståelsesramme for Computer Supported Collaborative Learning (A Rhetorical Theory on Computer Supported Collaborative Learning)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harlung, Asger

    2003-01-01

    The dissertation explores the potential of rhetorical theories for understanding, analyzing, or planning communication and learning processes, and for integrating the digitized contexts and human interaction and communication proccesses in a single theoretical framework. Based on Cicero's rhetori...... applied to two empirical case studies of Master programs, the dissertation develops and presents a new theory on Computer Supported Collaborative Learning (CSCL).......The dissertation explores the potential of rhetorical theories for understanding, analyzing, or planning communication and learning processes, and for integrating the digitized contexts and human interaction and communication proccesses in a single theoretical framework. Based on Cicero's rhetoric...

  7. COMPUTER SUPPORT MANAGEMENT PRODUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Trajković

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The modern age in which we live today, modern and highly advanced technology that follows us all, gives great importance in the management of production within the computer support of management. Computer applications in production, the organization of production systems, in the organization of management and business, is gaining in importance. We live in a time when more and more uses computer technology and thus gives the opportunity for a broad and important area of application of computer systems in production, as well as some methods that enable us to successful implementation of a computer, such as in the management of production. Computer technology speeds up the processing and transfer of Information By needed in decision-making at various levels of management. Computer applications in production management and organizational management business production system gets more and more. New generation of computers caused the first technological revolution in industry. On these solutions the industry has been able to use all the modern technology of computers in manufacturing, automation and production management .

  8. Differences in Learning Processes between Successful and Less Successful Students in Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning in the Field of Human Nutrition and Health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noroozi, O.; Biemans, H.J.A.; Busstra, M.C.; Mulder, M.; Chizari, M.

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the differences in learning processes between successful and less successful pairs of students in computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) in the field of human nutrition and health. As part of their regular MSc (and optional BSc) course “Exposure assessment

  9. Differences in Learning Processes between Successful and Less Successful Students in Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning in the Field of Human Nutrition and Health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noroozi, O.; Biemans, H.J.A.; Busstra, M.C.; Mulder, M.; Chizari, M.

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the differences in learning processes between successful and less successful pairs of students in computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) in the field of human nutrition and health. As part of their regular MSc (and optional BSc) course “Exposure assessment i

  10. Effects of Computer Support, Collaboration, and Time Lag on Performance Self-Efficacy and Transfer of Training: A Longitudinal Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gegenfurtner, Andreas; Veermans, Koen; Vauras, Marja

    2013-01-01

    This meta-analysis (29 studies, k = 33, N = 4158) examined the longitudinal development of the relationship between performance self-efficacy and transfer before and after training. A specific focus was on training programs that afforded varying degrees of computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL). Consistent with social cognitive theory,…

  11. Effects of Computer Support, Collaboration, and Time Lag on Performance Self-Efficacy and Transfer of Training: A Longitudinal Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gegenfurtner, Andreas; Veermans, Koen; Vauras, Marja

    2013-01-01

    This meta-analysis (29 studies, k = 33, N = 4158) examined the longitudinal development of the relationship between performance self-efficacy and transfer before and after training. A specific focus was on training programs that afforded varying degrees of computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL). Consistent with social cognitive theory,…

  12. Bodily-material resources in CSCL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Jacob; Ryberg, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Within CSCL language is often perceived as the primary vehicle for knowledge building and collaboration, whereas bodily-material resources are explored to a lesser extent. In this data session we explore the importance of gestures and body movements as bodily-material resources in relation...... and methodologically from focusing on bodily-material resources in CSCL....

  13. The effect of functional roles on group efficiency: Using multilevel modeling and content analysis to investigate computer-supported collaboration in small groups

    OpenAIRE

    Strijbos, Jan Willem; Martens, Rob; Jochems, Wim; Broers, Nick

    2004-01-01

    The usefulness of ‘roles’ as a pedagogical approach to support small group performance can be often read, however, their effect is rarely empirically assessed. Roles promote cohesion and responsibility and decrease so-called ‘process losses’ caused by coordination demands. In addition, roles can increase awareness of intra-group interaction. In this article, the effect of functional roles on group performance, efficiency and collaboration during computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL...

  14. The importance of task appropriateness in computer-supported collaborative learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathy Buckner

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available The study of learning in collaborative electronic environments is becoming established as Computer Supported Collaborative Learning (CSCL - an emergent sub-discipline of the more established Computer Supported Co-operative Work (CSCW discipline (Webb, 1995. Using computers for the development of shared understanding through collaboration has been explored by Crook who suggests that success may depend partly on having a clearly specified purpose or goal (Crook, 1994. It is our view that the appropriateness of the task given to the student is central to the success or otherwise of the learning experience. However, the tasks that are given to facilitate collaborative learning in face-toface situations are not always suitable for direct transfer to the electronic medium. It may be necessary to consider redesigning these tasks in relation to the medium in which they are to be undertaken and the functionality of the electronic conferencing software used.

  15. Supporting collaborative computing and interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwal, Deborah [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); McParland, Charles [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Perry, Marcia [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2002-05-22

    To enable collaboration on the daily tasks involved in scientific research, collaborative frameworks should provide lightweight and ubiquitous components that support a wide variety of interaction modes. We envision a collaborative environment as one that provides a persistent space within which participants can locate each other, exchange synchronous and asynchronous messages, share documents and applications, share workflow, and hold videoconferences. We are developing the Pervasive Collaborative Computing Environment (PCCE) as such an environment. The PCCE will provide integrated tools to support shared computing and task control and monitoring. This paper describes the PCCE and the rationale for its design.

  16. CSCL合作问题解决过程中情感支持框架探析%Analysis of the Emotional Supporting Framework for Computer-Supported Collaborative Problem Solving

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    单美贤

    2015-01-01

    CSCL合作问题解决活动发生在协商和共享的内容空间和关系空间中,情感维度的研究有助于更好地推动CSCL环境中的有效合作互动。在梳理情感、学习中的情感等概念的基础上,文章探讨了CSCL合作问题解决中的情感维度,认为团队成员之间的亲和力、共享心智模型/共享理解和情感管理是CSCL环境中合作问题解决的关键,其中团队成员间的亲和力是营造良好关系空间的基础,心智模型的共享促使合作过程中的交流真正开放,情感管理过程则致力于维持团队的共识和稳定的情感以推动有效的合作互动。文章最后从情感感知和情感反馈两个方面分析学习者的合作情感行为,以期为CSCL合作问题解决提供更好的情感支持。%The way that students try to solve problems together in Computer-supported Collaborative Learning ( CSCL) environments depends on the relationships between three collective activity dimensions: cognitive dimension, socio-relational dimension and affective dimension. The cognitive, socio-relational and affective dimensions of CSCL are interconnected components that mutually support one another. Cognitive aspects in collaborative learning research have been considered to be primary. However, in recent years, more and more researchers realized that the importance of affective aspects in CSCL environments. In order to understand the importance of students’ affective interpretation in computer-supported collaborative problem solving environment, Section one of this paper reviews the concept about emo-tion, affect, and emotion in learning. Section two discusses the influence from students’ affective awareness on collab-orative problem solving processes and the outcomes from three key factors to CSCL cooperative problem solving:the af-finity between team members, shared mental models and emotion management. Effective collaborative problem solving in CSCL depends on

  17. SUPPORT FROM A DISTANCE: PERCEPTIONS OF MALAYSIAN STUDENTS ON COMPUTER MEDIATED COLLABORATIVE LEARNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Hamin STAPA

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to report findings from an on-going research using Computer-supported Collaborative Learning in an ESL classroom in Malaysia. Collaboration is the act of working together to produce a piece of work. Collaborative learning deals with instructional methods that seek to promote learning through collaborative efforts among students working on a given task. Class based CL fits well with the philosophy of teaching: working together, building together, learning together, changing together and improving together. Computer-supported CL (CSCL has an impact on the development of deep thinking about ideas as students are engaged in writing rather than talking. By doing so, they have more time to think about the responses; able to engage in developing arguments; have time to follow up references and read literature, etc. Selected students from Malaysia were asked to work collaboratively (through e-mail with students from the USA. At the end of the collaborative activities they were expected to complete written projects. The students were interviewed on their perceptions on this innovative way of learning. The findings indicate that the students have responded positively towards computer supported collaborative learning.

  18. Computational Support for Creative Design

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Han

    2015-12-09

    rooms, and fabrication considerations (i.e., economic construction cost). Secondly, we introduce replaceable substructures as arrangements of shape components that can be interchanged while ensuring boundary consistency. Based on the shape graphs that encode the structures of input models, we propose new automatic operations to discover replaceable substructures across models or within a model. We enforce a pair of subgraphs matching along their boundaries so that switching two subgraphs results in topological variations. Thirdly, we develop an interactive system that supports a freeform design by interpreting user sketches. 3D contents can be extracted from input strokes with or without user annotations. Our system accepts user strokes, analyzes their contacts and vanishing directions with respect to an anchored image, and projects 2D strokes to 3D space via a multi- stage optimization on spatial canvas selection. We demonstrate the computational approaches on a range of example models and design studies.

  19. Computer-Based Interaction Analysis with DEGREE Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, B.; Verdejo, M. F.

    2016-01-01

    We review our research with "DEGREE" and analyse how our work has impacted the collaborative learning community since 2000. Our research is framed within the context of computer-based interaction analysis and the development of computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) tools. We identify some aspects of our work which have been…

  20. Operationalizing Macro-Scripts in CSCL Technological Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchounikine, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a conceptual analysis of the technological dimensions related to the operationalization of CSCL macro-scripts. CSCL scripts are activity models that aim at enhancing the probability that knowledge generative interactions such as conflict resolution, explanation or mutual regulation occur during the collaboration process. We…

  1. Computing support for High Energy Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avery, P.; Yelton, J. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    1996-12-01

    This computing proposal (Task S) is submitted separately but in support of the High Energy Experiment (CLEO, Fermilab, CMS) and Theory tasks. The authors have built a very strong computing base at Florida over the past 8 years. In fact, computing has been one of the main contributions to their experimental collaborations, involving not just computing capacity for running Monte Carlos and data reduction, but participation in many computing initiatives, industrial partnerships, computing committees and collaborations. These facts justify the submission of a separate computing proposal.

  2. Coordination processes in computer supported collaborative writing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kanselaar, G.; Erkens, Gijsbert; Jaspers, Jos; Prangsma, M.E.

    2005-01-01

    In the COSAR-project a computer-supported collaborative learning environment enables students to collaborate in writing an argumentative essay. The TC3 groupware environment (TC3: Text Composer, Computer supported and Collaborative) offers access to relevant information sources, a private notepad, a

  3. Emotion understanding during computer-supported collaboration

    OpenAIRE

    Xolocotzin Eligio, Ulises

    2010-01-01

    Affect has been neglected in computer-supported collaborative learning, which is unfortunate because emotions play important roles in collaborative learning and human-computer interaction. This thesis investigated affect in co-located and remote remote-synchronous collaboration, answering the question: How does the task environment and interaction with a partner influence people’s emotions during computer-supported collaboration? In Study 1, the collaborative tasks and affective features o...

  4. An Orchestrating Evaluation of Complex Educational Technologies: a Case Study of a CSCL System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis P. Prieto

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available As digital technologies permeate every aspect of our lives, the complexity of the educational settings, and of the technological support we use within them, unceasingly rises. This increased complexity, along with the need for educational practitioners to apply such technologies within multi-constraint authentic settings, has given rise to the notion of technology-enhanced learning practice as “orchestration of learning”. However, at the same time, the complexity involved in evaluating the benefits of such educational technologies has also increased, prompting questions about the way evaluators can cope with the different places, technologies, informants and issues involved in their evaluation activity. By proposing the notion of “orchestrating evaluation”, this paper tries to reconcile the often disparate “front office accounts” of research publications and the “shop floor practice” of evaluation of educational technology, through the case study of evaluating a system to help teachers in coordinating computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL scenarios. We reuse an internationally-evaluated conceptual framework of “orchestration aspects” (design, management, adaptation, pragmatism, etc. to structure the case‟s narrative, showing how the original evaluation questions and methods were modulated in the face of the multiple (authentic evaluation setting constraints.

  5. Emerging and scripted roles in computer-supported collaborative learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strijbos, Jan-Willem; Weinberger, Armin

    2010-01-01

    Emerging and scripted roles pose an intriguing approach to analysing and facilitating CSCL. The concept of emerging roles provides a perspective on how learners structure and self-regulate their CSCL processes. Emerging roles appear to be dynamic over longer periods of time in relation to learners'

  6. The Effects of constructing domain-specific representations on coordination processes and learning in a CSCL-environment

    OpenAIRE

    Slof, Bert; Erkens, Gijsbert; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    Slof, B., Erkens, G., & Kirschner, P. A. (2012). The effects of constructing domain-specific representations on coordination processes and learning in a CSCL-environment. Computers in Human Behavior, 28, 1478-1489. doi:10.1016/j.chb.2012.03.011

  7. Group awareness of social and cognitive performance in a CSCL environment: Effects of a peer feedback and reflection tool

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Phielix, Chris; Prins, Frans; Kirschner, Paul A.; Erkens, Gijsbert; Jaspers, Jos

    2010-01-01

    Phielix, C., Prins, F. J., Kirschner, P. A., Erkens, G., & Jaspers, J. (2011). Group awareness of social and cognitive performance in a CSCL environment: Effects of a peer feedback and reflection tool. Computers in Human Behavior, 27(3), 1087-1102. doi:10.1016/j.chb.2010.06.024

  8. Intelligent Adaptation and Personalization Techniques in Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning

    CERN Document Server

    Demetriadis, Stavros; Xhafa, Fatos

    2012-01-01

    Adaptation and personalization have been extensively studied in CSCL research community aiming to design intelligent systems that adaptively support eLearning processes and collaboration. Yet, with the fast development in Internet technologies, especially with the emergence of new data technologies and the mobile technologies, new opportunities and perspectives are opened for advanced adaptive and personalized systems. Adaptation and personalization are posing new research and development challenges to nowadays CSCL systems. In particular, adaptation should be focused in a multi-dimensional way (cognitive, technological, context-aware and personal). Moreover, it should address the particularities of both individual learners and group collaboration. As a consequence, the aim of this book is twofold. On the one hand, it discusses the latest advances and findings in the area of intelligent adaptive and personalized learning systems. On the other hand it analyzes the new implementation perspectives for intelligen...

  9. Using Wikis as a Support and Assessment Tool in Collaborative Digital Game-Based Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samur, Yavuz

    2011-01-01

    In computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) environments, there are many researches done on collaborative learning activities; however, in game-based learning environments, more research and literature on collaborative learning activities are required. Actually, both game-based learning environments and wikis enable us to use new chances…

  10. Distributed Collaborative Learning in a Telematic Context: Telematic Learning Support and its Potential for Collaborative Learning with New Paradigms and Conceptual Mapping Tools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kommers, Petrus A.M.; van der Veer, Gerrit C.; Lenting, Bert

    1998-01-01

    CSCL (Computer Supported Co‐operative Learning), better called TSCL, Telematic (and IT) Supported Co‐operative Learning, seems to be driven by both social dynamics (like the tendency to reduce the formal training component in industrial settings, and have it replaced by training on the job, handling

  11. Assessment of (Computer-Supported) Collaborative Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strijbos, Jan-Willem

    2011-01-01

    Within the (Computer-Supported) Collaborative Learning (CS) CL research community, there has been an extensive dialogue on theories and perspectives on learning from collaboration, approaches to scaffold (script) the collaborative process, and most recently research methodology. In contrast, the iss

  12. Assessment of (Computer-Supported) Collaborative Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strijbos, Jan-Willem

    2011-01-01

    Within the (Computer-Supported) Collaborative Learning (CS) CL research community, there has been an extensive dialogue on theories and perspectives on learning from collaboration, approaches to scaffold (script) the collaborative process, and most recently research methodology. In contrast, the iss

  13. Computer support for learners of spoken English

    OpenAIRE

    Hincks, Rebecca

    2005-01-01

    This thesis concerns the use of speech technology to support the process of learning the English language. It applies theories of computer-assisted language learning and second language acquisition to address the needs of beginning, intermediate and advanced students of English for specific purposes. The thesis includes an evaluation of speech-recognition-based pronunciation software, based on a controlled study of a group of immigrant engineers. The study finds that while the weaker students...

  14. DISTRIBUTED COMPUTING SUPPORT SERVICE USER SURVEY

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    IT Division operates a Distributed Computing Support Service, which offers support to owners and users of all variety of desktops throughout CERN as well as more dedicated services for certain groups, divisions and experiments. It also provides the staff who operate the central and satellite Computing Helpdesks, it supports printers throughout the site and it provides the installation activities of the IT Division PC Service. We have published a questionnaire, which seeks to gather your feedback on how the services are seen, how they are progressing and how they can be improved. Please take a few minutes to fill in this questionnaire. Replies will be treated in confidence if desired although you may also request an opportunity to be contacted by CERN's service management directly. Please tell us if you met problems but also if you had a successful conclusion to your request for assistance. You will find the questionnaire at the web site http://wwwinfo/support/survey/desktop-contract There will also be a link...

  15. DISTRIBUTED COMPUTING SUPPORT CONTRACT USER SURVEY

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    IT Division operates a Distributed Computing Support Service, which offers support to owners and users of all variety of desktops throughout CERN as well as more dedicated services for certain groups, divisions and experiments. It also provides the staff who operate the central and satellite Computing Helpdesks, it supports printers throughout the site and it provides the installation activities of the IT Division PC Service. We have published a questionnaire which seeks to gather your feedback on how the services are seen, how they are progressing and how they can be improved. Please take a few minutes to fill in this questionnaire. Replies will be treated in confidence if desired although you may also request an opportunity to be contacted by CERN's service management directly. Please tell us if you met problems but also if you had a successful conclusion to your request for assistance. You will find the questionnaire at the web site http://wwwinfo/support/survey/desktop-contract There will also be a link ...

  16. CSCL Script理论研究与系统设计%CSCL Script Theory Research and System Design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林斌

    2006-01-01

    CSCL Script的研究成为当前CSCL领域中新的研究热点.为了更好的支持协同学习过程的设计,文章在综述和研究CSCL Script相关理论的基础上,重点设计了模型基本框架、主要功能和各模块之间关系,最后采用"面向行为流"方法基于树型结构设计实现该系统.

  17. Computer Supported Collaborative Processes in Virtual Organizations

    CERN Document Server

    Paszkiewicz, Zbigniew

    2012-01-01

    In global economy, turbulent organization environment strongly influences organization's operation. Organizations must constantly adapt to changing circumstances and search for new possibilities of gaining competitive advantage. To face this challenge, small organizations base their operation on collaboration within Virtual Organizations (VOs). VO operation is based on collaborative processes. Due to dynamism and required flexibility of collaborative processes, existing business information systems are insufficient to efficiently support them. In this paper a novel method for supporting collaborative processes based on process mining techniques is proposed. The method allows activity patterns in various instances of collaborative processes to be identified and used for recommendation of activities. This provides an opportunity for better computer support of collaborative processes leading to more efficient and effective realization of business goals.

  18. Can peers rate reliably as experts in small CSCL groups?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnisalis, Ioannis; Demetriadis, Stavros; Papadopoulos, Pantelis M.

    2016-01-01

    of objective anonymous peer rating through a rubric, and (b) provision of peer rating summary information during collaboration. The case study utilized an asynchronous CSCL tool with the two aforementioned capabilities. Initial results showed that peer rating, when anonymous, and guided, can be as reliable...

  19. Quality of collaborative interactions in different CSCL-environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kanselaar, G.; Munneke, E.L.; Andriessen, J.E.B.

    2003-01-01

    In the Twins project we study the quality of interactions during collaborative learning in different CSCL-environments. The aim of the research is investigating the effects of synchronous and asynchronous systems and different collaborative tasks on interactions between students. Two experiments

  20. Embedded systems for supporting computer accessibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulfari, Davide; Celesti, Antonio; Fazio, Maria; Villari, Massimo; Puliafito, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, customized AT software solutions allow their users to interact with various kinds of computer systems. Such tools are generally available on personal devices (e.g., smartphones, laptops and so on) commonly used by a person with a disability. In this paper, we investigate a way of using the aforementioned AT equipments in order to access many different devices without assistive preferences. The solution takes advantage of open source hardware and its core component consists of an affordable Linux embedded system: it grabs data coming from the assistive software, which runs on the user's personal device, then, after processing, it generates native keyboard and mouse HID commands for the target computing device controlled by the end user. This process supports any operating system available on the target machine and it requires no specialized software installation; therefore the user with a disability can rely on a single assistive tool to control a wide range of computing platforms, including conventional computers and many kinds of mobile devices, which receive input commands through the USB HID protocol.

  1. Operator support system using computational intelligence techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bueno, Elaine Inacio, E-mail: ebueno@ifsp.edu.br [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia de Sao Paulo (IFSP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Pereira, Iraci Martinez, E-mail: martinez@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Computational Intelligence Systems have been widely applied in Monitoring and Fault Detection Systems in several processes and in different kinds of applications. These systems use interdependent components ordered in modules. It is a typical behavior of such systems to ensure early detection and diagnosis of faults. Monitoring and Fault Detection Techniques can be divided into two categories: estimative and pattern recognition methods. The estimative methods use a mathematical model, which describes the process behavior. The pattern recognition methods use a database to describe the process. In this work, an operator support system using Computational Intelligence Techniques was developed. This system will show the information obtained by different CI techniques in order to help operators to take decision in real time and guide them in the fault diagnosis before the normal alarm limits are reached. (author)

  2. Supporting large-scale computational science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musick, R

    1998-10-01

    A study has been carried out to determine the feasibility of using commercial database management systems (DBMSs) to support large-scale computational science. Conventional wisdom in the past has been that DBMSs are too slow for such data. Several events over the past few years have muddied the clarity of this mindset: 1. 2. 3. 4. Several commercial DBMS systems have demonstrated storage and ad-hoc quer access to Terabyte data sets. Several large-scale science teams, such as EOSDIS [NAS91], high energy physics [MM97] and human genome [Kin93] have adopted (or make frequent use of) commercial DBMS systems as the central part of their data management scheme. Several major DBMS vendors have introduced their first object-relational products (ORDBMSs), which have the potential to support large, array-oriented data. In some cases, performance is a moot issue. This is true in particular if the performance of legacy applications is not reduced while new, albeit slow, capabilities are added to the system. The basic assessment is still that DBMSs do not scale to large computational data. However, many of the reasons have changed, and there is an expiration date attached to that prognosis. This document expands on this conclusion, identifies the advantages and disadvantages of various commercial approaches, and describes the studies carried out in exploring this area. The document is meant to be brief, technical and informative, rather than a motivational pitch. The conclusions within are very likely to become outdated within the next 5-7 years, as market forces will have a significant impact on the state of the art in scientific data management over the next decade.

  3. Gender issues in computer-supported learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cathy Gunn

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary research identifies significant gender-related differences in performance and interaction style in computer-supported learning (CSL environments. Evidence suggests that initial perceptions of these environments as democratic and offering equal opportunities to all students were flawed because interactions that take place through electronic channels lose none of the sociocultural complexity or gender imbalance that already exists within society. This paper presents a summary of gender-related issues identified by international research and academic practice together with the opinions expressed by participants in a discussion forum staged at ALT-C in 2001. Two main questions were addressed during the conference forum. Firstly, if computer access and literacy levels are assumed to be equalizing as the literature suggests, how can educational designers using CSL technologies best serve all student groups? Secondly, does the existence of gender-based differences in behaviour and interaction style in CSL environments mean that any student group is disadvantaged? The paper concludes with suggestions about how educational designers might increase the flexibility of CSL courses to offer equal opportunities to all students. A number of issues for further research are also identified.

  4. Blueprinting Approach in Support of Cloud Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willem-Jan van den Heuvel

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Current cloud service offerings, i.e., Software-as-a-service (SaaS, Platform-as-a-service (PaaS and Infrastructure-as-a-service (IaaS offerings are often provided as monolithic, one-size-fits-all solutions and give little or no room for customization. This limits the ability of Service-based Application (SBA developers to configure and syndicate offerings from multiple SaaS, PaaS, and IaaS providers to address their application requirements. Furthermore, combining different independent cloud services necessitates a uniform description format that facilitates the design, customization, and composition. Cloud Blueprinting is a novel approach that allows SBA developers to easily design, configure and deploy virtual SBA payloads on virtual machines and resource pools on the cloud. We propose the Blueprint concept as a uniform abstract description for cloud service offerings that may cross different cloud computing layers, i.e., SaaS, PaaS and IaaS. To support developers with the SBA design and development in the cloud, this paper introduces a formal Blueprint Template for unambiguously describing a blueprint, as well as a Blueprint Lifecycle that guides developers through the manipulation, composition and deployment of different blueprints for an SBA. Finally, the empirical evaluation of the blueprinting approach within an EC’s FP7 project is reported and an associated blueprint prototype implementation is presented.

  5. Supporting localized activities in ubiquitous computing environments

    OpenAIRE

    Pinto, Helder

    2004-01-01

    The design of pervasive and ubiquitous computing systems must be centered on users' activity in order to bring computing systems closer to people. Adopting an activity-centered approach to the design of pervasive and ubiquitous computing systems leads us to seek to understand: a) how humans naturally accomplish an activity; and b) how computing artifacts from both the environmental and personal domains may contribute to the accomplishment of an activity. This work particularly focuses o...

  6. Attitudes to Technology, Perceived Computer Self-Efficacy and Computer Anxiety as Predictors of Computer Supported Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, Vehbi; Yesilyurt, Etem

    2013-01-01

    There is a large body of research regarding computer supported education, perceptions of computer self-efficacy, computer anxiety and the technological attitudes of teachers and teacher candidates. However, no study has been conducted on the correlation between and effect of computer supported education, perceived computer self-efficacy, computer…

  7. Attitudes to Technology, Perceived Computer Self-Efficacy and Computer Anxiety as Predictors of Computer Supported Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, Vehbi; Yesilyurt, Etem

    2013-01-01

    There is a large body of research regarding computer supported education, perceptions of computer self-efficacy, computer anxiety and the technological attitudes of teachers and teacher candidates. However, no study has been conducted on the correlation between and effect of computer supported education, perceived computer self-efficacy, computer…

  8. The Spartan attitude control system - Ground support computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnurr, R. G., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The Spartan Attitude Control System (ACS) contains a command and control computer. This computer is optimized for the activities of the flight and contains very little human interface hardware and software. The computer system provides the technicians testing of Spartan ACS with a convenient command-oriented interface to the flight ACS computer. The system also decodes and time tags data automatically sent out by the flight computer as key events occur. The duration and magnitude of all system maneuvers is also derived and displayed by this system. The Ground Support Computer is also the primary Ground Support Equipment for the flight sequencer which controls all payload maneuvers, and long term program timing.

  9. A Computing Infrastructure for Supporting Climate Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, C.; Bambacus, M.; Freeman, S. M.; Huang, Q.; Li, J.; Sun, M.; Xu, C.; Wojcik, G. S.; Cahalan, R. F.; NASA Climate @ Home Project Team

    2011-12-01

    Climate change is one of the major challenges facing us on the Earth planet in the 21st century. Scientists build many models to simulate the past and predict the climate change for the next decades or century. Most of the models are at a low resolution with some targeting high resolution in linkage to practical climate change preparedness. To calibrate and validate the models, millions of model runs are needed to find the best simulation and configuration. This paper introduces the NASA effort on Climate@Home project to build a supercomputer based-on advanced computing technologies, such as cloud computing, grid computing, and others. Climate@Home computing infrastructure includes several aspects: 1) a cloud computing platform is utilized to manage the potential spike access to the centralized components, such as grid computing server for dispatching and collecting models runs results; 2) a grid computing engine is developed based on MapReduce to dispatch models, model configuration, and collect simulation results and contributing statistics; 3) a portal serves as the entry point for the project to provide the management, sharing, and data exploration for end users; 4) scientists can access customized tools to configure model runs and visualize model results; 5) the public can access twitter and facebook to get the latest about the project. This paper will introduce the latest progress of the project and demonstrate the operational system during the AGU fall meeting. It will also discuss how this technology can become a trailblazer for other climate studies and relevant sciences. It will share how the challenges in computation and software integration were solved.

  10. Time Is Precious: Variable- and Event-Centred Approaches to Process Analysis in CSCL Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimann, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Although temporality is a key characteristic of the core concepts of CSCL--interaction, communication, learning, knowledge building, technology use--and although CSCL researchers have privileged access to process data, the theoretical constructs and methods employed in research practice frequently neglect to make full use of information relating…

  11. Using epistemic synchronization index (ESI) to measure students’ knowledge elaboration process in CSCL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ding, Ning; Wei, Jieqiang; Wolfensberger, Marca

    2015-01-01

    Researchers in CSCL have used a wide range of qualitative and quantitative methods to track students' cognitive involvement during collaboration. However, neither individual method suffices the need to capture the dynamic evolvement of students' epistemic engagement in CSCL. We developed Epistemic S

  12. Using Epistemic Synchronization Index (ESI) to measure students' knowledge elaboration process in CSCL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ding, Ning; Wei, Jieqiang; Wolfensberger, Marca

    2014-01-01

    Researchers in CSCL have used a wide range of qualitative and quantitative methods to track students' cognitive involvement during collaboration. However, neither individual method suffices the need to capture the dynamic evolvement of students' epistemic engagement in CSCL. We developed Epistemic S

  13. Computer support for mechatronic control system design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Amerongen, J.; Coelingh, H.J.; de Vries, Theodorus J.A.

    2000-01-01

    This paper discusses the demands for proper tools for computer aided control system design of mechatronic systems and identifies a number of tasks in this design process. Real mechatronic design, involving input from specialists from varying disciplines, requires that the system can be represented

  14. Attitudes of pre-service teachers about computer supported education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serkan Yıldırım

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available A lot of technologies can be used in education environment. Computer has an important place in these technologies. The aim of this study is to investigate the attitude of the students of Computer and Instructional Technologies Education Department towards computer supported education in terms of class level, income level, and gender. 120 pre-service teachers from the Department of Computer and Instructional Technologies Education at Kazim Karabekir Educational Faculty participated in the survey. The results showed that the participants have a high level positive attitude about Computer Supported Education (CSE. No significant differences obtained depending on class level, income level, and gender. However, differences among groups obtained in terms of the questionnaire items which are creativity skills, preferring traditional teaching CSE, encouraging computer usage, using computer actively, reconciled computer with education, educational addition of CSE according to spent work; and enjoying.

  15. Infrastructure Support for Collaborative Pervasive Computing Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard Mogensen, Martin

    -blown implementation of the proposed concepts. Finally, we contribute to the Distribution Mechanisms researching epidemic protocols or gossiping as distribution protocols for pervasive environments. Presenting these four contributions to the area of infrastructure support for CPCS, this research contributes to an area...

  16. Computer-Mediated Social Support, Older Adults, and Coping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Kevin

    2000-01-01

    Investigates social support for older adults in the computer-mediated environment. Finds that: satisfaction with Internet providers of social support was significantly higher for high Internet users than for low Internet users, whereas low Internet users were more satisfied with their non-Internet support networks than high Internet users; and…

  17. Computer-supported collaborative decision-making

    CERN Document Server

    Filip, Florin Gheorghe; Ciurea, Cristian

    2017-01-01

    This is a book about how management and control decisions are made by persons who collaborate and possibly use the support of an information system. The decision is the result of human conscious activities aiming at choosing a course of action for attaining a certain objective (or a set of objectives). The act of collaboration implies that several entities who work together and share responsibilities to jointly plan, implement and evaluate a program of activities to achieve the common goals. The book is intended to present a balanced view of the domain to include both well-established concepts and a selection of new results in the domains of methods and key technologies. It is meant to answer several questions, such as: a) “How are evolving the business models towards the ever more collaborative schemes?”; b) “What is the role of the decision-maker in the new context?” c) “What are the basic attributes and trends in the domain of decision-supporting information systems?”; d) “Which are the basic...

  18. Analysis and Assessment of Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning Conversations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trausan-Matu, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    Trausan-Matu, S. (2008). Analysis and Assessment of Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning Conversations. Workshop presentation at the symposium Learning networks for professional. November, 14, 2008, Heerlen, Nederland: Open Universiteit Nederland.

  19. Computer-Supported Cooperative Learning in a Virtual University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, S.; Yazdani, M.

    1999-01-01

    Discusses computer-supported learning, cooperative learning, and virtual universities and links them in a way that reflects a vision of the future. Conclusions are based on results of student questionnaires and interviews with students and instructors involved in cooperative learning taking place at the University of Exeter's Computer Science…

  20. Intelligent decision support systems for sustainable computing paradigms and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Abraham, Ajith; Siarry, Patrick; Sheng, Michael

    2017-01-01

    This unique book dicusses the latest research, innovative ideas, challenges and computational intelligence (CI) solutions in sustainable computing. It presents novel, in-depth fundamental research on achieving a sustainable lifestyle for society, either from a methodological or from an application perspective. Sustainable computing has expanded to become a significant research area covering the fields of computer science and engineering, electrical engineering and other engineering disciplines, and there has been an increase in the amount of literature on aspects sustainable computing such as energy efficiency and natural resources conservation that emphasizes the role of ICT (information and communications technology) in achieving system design and operation objectives. The energy impact/design of more efficient IT infrastructures is a key challenge in realizing new computing paradigms. The book explores the uses of computational intelligence (CI) techniques for intelligent decision support that can be explo...

  1. Distributed Computing with Centralized Support Works at Brigham Young.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Kelly; Stone, Brad

    1992-01-01

    Brigham Young University (Utah) has addressed the need for maintenance and support of distributed computing systems on campus by implementing a program patterned after a national business franchise, providing the support and training of a centralized administration but allowing each unit to operate much as an independent small business.…

  2. Designing a Versatile Dedicated Computing Lab to Support Computer Network Courses: Insights from a Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gercek, Gokhan; Saleem, Naveed

    2006-01-01

    Providing adequate computing lab support for Management Information Systems (MIS) and Computer Science (CS) programs is a perennial challenge for most academic institutions in the US and abroad. Factors, such as lack of physical space, budgetary constraints, conflicting needs of different courses, and rapid obsolescence of computing technology,…

  3. Towards Process Support for Migrating Applications to Cloud Computing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chauhan, Muhammad Aufeef; Babar, Muhammad Ali

    2012-01-01

    Cloud computing is an active area of research for industry and academia. There are a large number of organizations providing cloud computing infrastructure and services. In order to utilize these infrastructure resources and services, existing applications need to be migrated to clouds. However...... for supporting migration to cloud computing based on our experiences from migrating an Open Source System (OSS), Hackystat, to two different cloud computing platforms. We explained the process by performing a comparative analysis of our efforts to migrate Hackystate to Amazon Web Services and Google App Engine....... We also report the potential challenges, suitable solutions, and lesson learned to support the presented process framework. We expect that the reported experiences can serve guidelines for those who intend to migrate software applications to cloud computing....

  4. How can computers support, enrich, and transform collaborative creativity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Peter; Inie, Nanna; Hansen, Nicolai Brodersen

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the workshop is to examine and discuss how computers can support, enrich, and transform collaborative creative processes. By exploring and combining methodological, theoretical, and design- oriented perspectives, we wish to examine the implications, potentials, and limitations of diffe......The aim of the workshop is to examine and discuss how computers can support, enrich, and transform collaborative creative processes. By exploring and combining methodological, theoretical, and design- oriented perspectives, we wish to examine the implications, potentials, and limitations...... of different approaches to providing digital support for collaborative creativity. Participation in the workshop requires participants to actively document and identify salient themes in one or more examples of computer- supported collaborative creativity, and the resulting material will serve as the empirical...

  5. Luminescence and scintillation properties of Tl- and In-doped CsCl crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Takumi; Koshimizu, Masanori; Fujimoto, Yutaka; Nakauchi, Daisuke; Yanagida, Takayuki; Asai, Keisuke

    2017-06-01

    Optical and scintillation properties of CsCl:Tl and CsCl:In single crystals were investigated. Ions Tl+ and In+ were selected as dopants to enhance the light yield of CsCl crystals. Luminescence and scintillation spectra of CsCl:Tl and CsCl:In could be attributed to the relaxed excited state (RES) originating from each dopant ion. The decay-time constants of the fast component had values of 5.4 ns for CsCl:Tl and 2.2 ns for CsCl:In, and can be ascribed to the overlapping of on-center STE and auger-free luminescence (AFL) for CsCl:Tl and only AFL for CsCl:In, respectively. Decay-time constants of the slow component were relatively long (220 ns for CsCl:Tl and 240 ns for CsCl:In), possibly owing to their low energy transfer rate from host to each dopant ion. The light yields of CsCl:1%Tl and CsCl:0.5%Tl were estimated to be 2800 and 2200 photons/MeV, respectively. The light yield of CsCl:0.5%In crystals was estimated to be 2200 photons/MeV. In conclusion, the light yield of pure CsCl (several ten photons/MeV) can be enhanced by doping Tl+ and In+ while maintaining the fast component of the CsCl crystal.

  6. Computer support system for residential environment evaluation for citizen participation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GE Jian; TEKNOMO Kardi; LU Jiang; HOKAO Kazunori

    2005-01-01

    Though the method of citizen participation in urban planning is quite well established, for a specific segment of residential environment, however, existing participation system has not coped adequately with the issue. The specific residential environment has detailed aspects that need positive and high level involvement of the citizens in participating in all stages and every field of the plan. One of the best and systematic methods to obtain a more involved citizen is through a citizen workshop. To get a more "educated" citizen who participates in the workshop, a special session to inform the citizen on what was previously gathered through a survey was revealed to be prerequisite before the workshop. The computer support system is one of the best tools for this purpose. This paper describes the development of the computer support system for residential environment evaluation system, which is an essential tool to give more information to the citizens before their participation in public workshop. The significant contribution of this paper is the educational system framework involved in the workshop on the public participation system through computer support, especially for residential environment. The framework, development and application of the computer support system are described. The application of a workshop on the computer support system was commented on as very valuable and helpful by the audience as it resulted in greater benefit to have wider range of participation, and deeper level of citizen understanding.

  7. Faculty of Education Students' Computer Self-Efficacy Beliefs and Their Attitudes towards Computers and Implementing Computer Supported Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkant, Hasan Güner

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates faculty of education students' computer self-efficacy beliefs and their attitudes towards computers and implementing computer supported education. This study is descriptive and based on a correlational survey model. The final sample consisted of 414 students studying in the faculty of education of a Turkish university. The…

  8. Computational intelligence for decision support in cyber-physical systems

    CERN Document Server

    Ali, A; Riaz, Zahid

    2014-01-01

    This book is dedicated to applied computational intelligence and soft computing techniques with special reference to decision support in Cyber Physical Systems (CPS), where the physical as well as the communication segment of the networked entities interact with each other. The joint dynamics of such systems result in a complex combination of computers, software, networks and physical processes all combined to establish a process flow at system level. This volume provides the audience with an in-depth vision about how to ensure dependability, safety, security and efficiency in real time by making use of computational intelligence in various CPS applications ranging from the nano-world to large scale wide area systems of systems. Key application areas include healthcare, transportation, energy, process control and robotics where intelligent decision support has key significance in establishing dynamic, ever-changing and high confidence future technologies. A recommended text for graduate students and researche...

  9. CSCL Script研究进展及其对协作学习系统设计理念的启示%Advance in CSCL Scripts and its Enlightenment of Design Idea of Collaborative Learning System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晶

    2007-01-01

    Script来源于认知心理学的图式理论,其与CSCL相融合形成的CSCL Script成为CSCL领域新的研究热点之一.本文介绍了CSCL Script的理论基础、发展历史和一个具体实例,分析了CSCL Script当前研究热点及现状,并尝试从CSCL Script的视角对协作学习系统设计理念进行重新审视和探讨.

  10. A distributed computing approach to mission operations support. [for spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, R. L.

    1975-01-01

    Computing mission operation support includes orbit determination, attitude processing, maneuver computation, resource scheduling, etc. The large-scale third-generation distributed computer network discussed is capable of fulfilling these dynamic requirements. It is shown that distribution of resources and control leads to increased reliability, and exhibits potential for incremental growth. Through functional specialization, a distributed system may be tuned to very specific operational requirements. Fundamental to the approach is the notion of process-to-process communication, which is effected through a high-bandwidth communications network. Both resource-sharing and load-sharing may be realized in the system.

  11. LaRC local area networks to support distributed computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riddle, E. P.

    1984-01-01

    The Langley Research Center's (LaRC) Local Area Network (LAN) effort is discussed. LaRC initiated the development of a LAN to support a growing distributed computing environment at the Center. The purpose of the network is to provide an improved capability (over inteactive and RJE terminal access) for sharing multivendor computer resources. Specifically, the network will provide a data highway for the transfer of files between mainframe computers, minicomputers, work stations, and personal computers. An important influence on the overall network design was the vital need of LaRC researchers to efficiently utilize the large CDC mainframe computers in the central scientific computing facility. Although there was a steady migration from a centralized to a distributed computing environment at LaRC in recent years, the work load on the central resources increased. Major emphasis in the network design was on communication with the central resources within the distributed environment. The network to be implemented will allow researchers to utilize the central resources, distributed minicomputers, work stations, and personal computers to obtain the proper level of computing power to efficiently perform their jobs.

  12. Computer Supported Control Education from a Linköping Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Gunnarsson, Svante; Millnert, Mille

    1997-01-01

    The development of computer supported control education at Linköping University is presented. A review of the different phases of development of computer support is given. The experiences from the introduction of computer supported exams are discussed.

  13. Aprendizaje Colaborativo Presencial, Aprendizaje Colaborativo Mediado por Computador e Interacción: aclaraciones, aportes y evidencias Collaborative Learning, Computer Supported Collaborative Learning and Interaction: Explanations, contributions and evidences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Londoño Monroy Gloria

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo intenta responder las siguientes inquietudes: ¿Aprender colaborativamente es lo mismo que aprender trabajando en grupo?, ¿Hay diferencias sustanciales entre el aprendizaje logrado colaborativamente en la presencialidad y el conseguido con la mediación de herramientas informáticas?, ¿Qué papel juega la interacción en este último caso, qué aporta y cómo se lo facilita el software educativo? Para ello se realizó una revisión bibliográfica con dos propósitos. El primero, esclarecer los conceptos Aprendizaje Colaborativo y Aprendizaje Colaborativo Mediado por Computador para encontrar diferencias y similitudes entre ellos, reconocer sus orígenes y hacer una síntesis de las referencias teóricas constructivistas y socioculturales que los sustentan. Y el segundo, para intentar comprender el concepto interacción y vislumbrar de qué manera incide en el ACMC en el diseño de software educativo y en el aprendizaje. This article tries to respond the following questions: is collaborative learning the same that learning in a workgroup?, is there any substantial differences between presential collaborative learning and learning in an informatics tools mediated educative process?, In this last case, what is the interaction role, what it contributes to, and how it is facilitated by educative software? Looking for answers, a bibliographical revision with two intentions was made. First, to clarify the concepts Collaborative Learning and Computer Supported Collaborative Learning (CSCL in order to find the differences and similarities among them, to recognize its origins and to make a synthesis of the Constructivist and Sociocultural theoretical references that sustain them. And second, to try to understand the concept Interaction and to glimpse how it affects the CSCL in educative software desing and in learning.

  14. Computer System Reliability Allocation Method and Supporting Tool

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents a computer system reliability allocationmethod that is based on the theory of statistic and Markovian chain,which can be used to allocate reliability to subsystem, to hybrid system and software modules. Arele vant supporting tool built by us is introduced.

  15. Coordinated computer-supported collaborative learning: Awareness and awareness tools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, J.J.H.M.; Bodermer, D.

    2013-01-01

    Traditionally, research on awareness during online collaboration focused on topics such as the effects of spatial information about group members’ activities on the collaborative process. When the concept of awareness was introduced to computer-supported collaborative learning, this focus shifted to

  16. Supporting Executive Functions during Children's Preliteracy Learning with the Computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Sande, E.; Segers, E.; Verhoeven, L.

    2016-01-01

    The present study examined how embedded activities to support executive functions helped children to benefit from a computer intervention that targeted preliteracy skills. Three intervention groups were compared on their preliteracy gains in a randomized controlled trial design: an experimental group that worked with software to stimulate early…

  17. PERKAM: Personalized Knowledge Awareness Map for Computer Supported Ubiquitous Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Bishouty, Moushir M.; Ogata, Hiroaki; Yano, Yoneo

    2007-01-01

    This paper introduces a ubiquitous computing environment in order to support the learners while doing tasks; this environment is called PERKAM (PERsonalized Knowledge Awareness Map). PERKAM allows the learners to share knowledge, interact, collaborate, and exchange individual experiences. It utilizes the RFID ubiquities technology to detect the…

  18. Interrogative Model of Inquiry and Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakkarainen, Kai; Sintonen, Matti

    2002-01-01

    Examines how the Interrogative Model of Inquiry (I-Model), developed for the purposes of epistemology and philosophy of science, could be applied to analyze elementary school students' process of inquiry in computer-supported learning. Suggests that the interrogative approach to inquiry can be productively applied for conceptualizing inquiry in…

  19. Health-related Support Groups on the Internet: Linking Empirical Findings to Social Support and Computer-mediated Communication Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Kevin B; Bell, Sally B; Wright, Kevin B; Bell, Sally B

    2003-01-01

    This literature review of research on health-related computer-mediated support groups links features of these groups to existing theory from the areas of social support and computer-mediated communication research. The article exams computer-mediated support groups as weak tie networks, focuses on how these support groups facilitate participant similarity and empathic support and identifies changes in supportive communication due to characteristics of the medium.

  20. A computer tool to support in design of industrial Ethernet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugli, Alexandre Baratella; Santos, Max Mauro Dias; Franco, Lucia Regina Horta Rodrigues

    2009-04-01

    This paper presents a computer tool to support in the project and development of an industrial Ethernet network, verifying the physical layer (cables-resistance and capacitance, scan time, network power supply-POE's concept "Power Over Ethernet" and wireless), and occupation rate (amount of information transmitted to the network versus the controller network scan time). These functions are accomplished without a single physical element installed in the network, using only simulation. The computer tool has a software that presents a detailed vision of the network to the user, besides showing some possible problems in the network, and having an extremely friendly environment.

  1. Computer-supported experiential learning (Phase One - staff development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Staley

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent years the University of Central England in Birmingham has made considerable investments in developing computer networks. Developments have been technology-led, and the major use of the network has been for administration. The Computer-Supported Experiential Learning Project has been designed to refocus upon the curriculum, and to encourage academic staff to use the network technologies for teaching and learning. The broad aim of the project is to investigate and systematically evaluate the appropriate use of technology to improve the quality of learning.

  2. Emergence of Bulk CsCl Structure in $(CsCl)_{n}Cs^{+}$ Cluster Ions

    CERN Document Server

    Aguado, A

    2000-01-01

    The emergence of CsCl bulk structure in (CsCl)nCs+ cluster ions is investigated using a mixed quantum-mechanical/semiempirical theoretical approach. We find that rhombic dodecahedral fragments (with bulk CsCl symmetry) are more stable than rock-salt fragments after the completion of the fifth rhombic dodecahedral atomic shell. From this size (n=184) on, a new set of magic numbers should appear in the experimental mass spectra. We also propose another experimental test for this transition, which explicitely involves the electronic structure of the cluster. Finally, we perform more detailed calculations in the size range n=31--33, where recent experimental investigations have found indications of the presence of rhombic dodecahedral (CsCl)32Cs+ isomers in the cluster beams.

  3. Towards a Tool for Computer Supported Structuring of Products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Claus Thorp

    1997-01-01

    . However, a product possesses not only a component structure but also various organ structures which are superimposed on the component structure. The organ structures carry behaviour and make the product suited for its life phases.Our long-term research goal is to develop a computer-based system...... that is capable of supporting synthesis activities in engineering design, and thereby also support handling of various organ structures. Such a system must contain a product model, in which it is possible to describe and manipulate both various organ structures and the component structure.In this paper we focus...

  4. Using High Performance Computing to Support Water Resource Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groves, David G. [RAND Corporation, Santa Monica, CA (United States); Lembert, Robert J. [RAND Corporation, Santa Monica, CA (United States); May, Deborah W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Leek, James R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Syme, James [RAND Corporation, Santa Monica, CA (United States)

    2015-10-22

    In recent years, decision support modeling has embraced deliberation-withanalysis— an iterative process in which decisionmakers come together with experts to evaluate a complex problem and alternative solutions in a scientifically rigorous and transparent manner. Simulation modeling supports decisionmaking throughout this process; visualizations enable decisionmakers to assess how proposed strategies stand up over time in uncertain conditions. But running these simulation models over standard computers can be slow. This, in turn, can slow the entire decisionmaking process, interrupting valuable interaction between decisionmakers and analytics.

  5. Advanced intelligent computational technologies and decision support systems

    CERN Document Server

    Kountchev, Roumen

    2014-01-01

    This book offers a state of the art collection covering themes related to Advanced Intelligent Computational Technologies and Decision Support Systems which can be applied to fields like healthcare assisting the humans in solving problems. The book brings forward a wealth of ideas, algorithms and case studies in themes like: intelligent predictive diagnosis; intelligent analyzing of medical images; new format for coding of single and sequences of medical images; Medical Decision Support Systems; diagnosis of Down’s syndrome; computational perspectives for electronic fetal monitoring; efficient compression of CT Images; adaptive interpolation and halftoning for medical images; applications of artificial neural networks for real-life problems solving; present and perspectives for Electronic Healthcare Record Systems; adaptive approaches for noise reduction in sequences of CT images etc.

  6. DOC-a file system cache to support mobile computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huizinga, D. M.; Heflinger, K.

    1995-09-01

    This paper identifies design requirements of system-level support for mobile computing in small form-factor battery-powered portable computers and describes their implementation in DOC (Disconnected Operation Cache). DOC is a three-level client caching system designed and implemented to allow mobile clients to transition between connected, partially disconnected and fully disconnected modes of operation with minimal user involvement. Implemented for notebook computers, DOC addresses not only typical issues of mobile elements such as resource scarcity and fluctuations in service quality but also deals with the pitfalls of MS-DOS, the operating system which prevails in the commercial notebook market. Our experiments performed in the software engineering environment of AST Research indicate not only considerable performance gains for connected and partially disconnected modes of DOC, but also the successful operation of the disconnected mode.

  7. Computing connection coefficients of compactly supported wavelets on bounded intervals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romine, C.H.; Peyton, B.W.

    1997-04-01

    Daubechies wavelet basis functions have many properties that make them desirable as a basis for a Galerkin approach to solving PDEs: they are orthogonal, with compact support, and their connection coefficients can be computed. The method developed by Latto et al. to compute connection coefficients does not provide the correct inner product near the endpoints of a bounded interval, making the implementation of boundary conditions problematic. Moreover, the highly oscillatory nature of the wavelet basis functions makes standard numerical quadrature of integrals near the boundary impractical. The authors extend the method of Latto et al. to construct and solve a linear system of equations whose solution provides the exact computation of the integrals at the boundaries. As a consequence, they provide the correct inner product for wavelet basis functions on a bounded interval.

  8. Computer-supported collaborative inquiry learning and classroom scripts

    OpenAIRE

    Mäkitalo-Siegl, Kati; Kohnle, Carmen; Fischer, Frank

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the influence of classroom-script structure (high vs. low) during computer-supported collaborative inquiry learning on help-seeking processes and learning gains in 54 student pairs in secondary science education. Screen- and audio-capturing videos were analysed according to a model of the help-seeking process. Results show that the structure of the classroom script substantially affects patterns of student help seeking and learning gain in the classroom. Overall, students ...

  9. Supporting Human Activities - Exploring Activity-Centered Computing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Henrik Bærbak; Bardram, Jakob

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we explore an activity-centered computing paradigm that is aimed at supporting work processes that are radically different from the ones known from office work. Our main inspiration is healthcare work that is characterized by an extreme degree of mobility, many interruptions, ad...... objects. We also present an exploratory prototype design and first implementation and present some initial results from evaluations in a healthcare environment....

  10. Sandia`s computer support units: The first three years

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, R.N. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Labs. Computing Dept.

    1997-11-01

    This paper describes the method by which Sandia National Laboratories has deployed information technology to the line organizations and to the desktop as part of the integrated information services organization under the direction of the Chief Information officer. This deployment has been done by the Computer Support Unit (CSU) Department. The CSU approach is based on the principle of providing local customer service with a corporate perspective. Success required an approach that was both customer compelled at times and market or corporate focused in most cases. Above all, a complete solution was required that included a comprehensive method of technology choices and development, process development, technology implementation, and support. It is the authors hope that this information will be useful in the development of a customer-focused business strategy for information technology deployment and support. Descriptions of current status reflect the status as of May 1997.

  11. Trajectories of collaborative scientific conceptual change: Middle school students learning about ecosystems in a CSCL environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lei

    The dissertation aims to achieve two goals. First, it attempts to establish a new theoretical framework---the collaborative scientific conceptual change model, which explicitly attends to social factor and epistemic practices of science, to understand conceptual change. Second, it report the findings of a classroom study to investigate how to apply this theoretical framework to examine the trajectories of collaborative scientific conceptual change in a CSCL environment and provide pedagogical implications. Two simulations were designed to help students make connections between the macroscopic substances and the aperceptual microscopic entities and underlying processes. The reported study was focused on analyzing the aggregated data from all participants and the video and audio data from twenty focal groups' collaborative activities and the process of their conceptual development in two classroom settings. Mixed quantitative and qualitative analyses were applied to analyze the video/audio data. The results found that, overall participants showed significant improvements from pretest to posttest on system understanding. Group and teacher effect as well as group variability were detected in both students' posttest performance and their collaborative activities, and variability emerged in group interaction. Multiple data analyses found that attributes of collaborative discourse and epistemic practices made a difference in student learning. Generating warranted claims in discourse as well as the predicting, coordinating theory-evidence, and modifying knowledge in epistemic practices had an impact on student's conceptual understanding. However, modifying knowledge was found negatively related to students' learning effect. The case studies show how groups differed in using the computer tools as a medium to conduct collaborative discourse and epistemic practices. Only with certain combination of discourse features and epistemic practices can the group interaction lead to

  12. Tavaxy: integrating Taverna and Galaxy workflows with cloud computing support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abouelhoda, Mohamed; Issa, Shadi Alaa; Ghanem, Moustafa

    2012-05-04

    Over the past decade the workflow system paradigm has evolved as an efficient and user-friendly approach for developing complex bioinformatics applications. Two popular workflow systems that have gained acceptance by the bioinformatics community are Taverna and Galaxy. Each system has a large user-base and supports an ever-growing repository of application workflows. However, workflows developed for one system cannot be imported and executed easily on the other. The lack of interoperability is due to differences in the models of computation, workflow languages, and architectures of both systems. This lack of interoperability limits sharing of workflows between the user communities and leads to duplication of development efforts. In this paper, we present Tavaxy, a stand-alone system for creating and executing workflows based on using an extensible set of re-usable workflow patterns. Tavaxy offers a set of new features that simplify and enhance the development of sequence analysis applications: It allows the integration of existing Taverna and Galaxy workflows in a single environment, and supports the use of cloud computing capabilities. The integration of existing Taverna and Galaxy workflows is supported seamlessly at both run-time and design-time levels, based on the concepts of hierarchical workflows and workflow patterns. The use of cloud computing in Tavaxy is flexible, where the users can either instantiate the whole system on the cloud, or delegate the execution of certain sub-workflows to the cloud infrastructure. Tavaxy reduces the workflow development cycle by introducing the use of workflow patterns to simplify workflow creation. It enables the re-use and integration of existing (sub-) workflows from Taverna and Galaxy, and allows the creation of hybrid workflows. Its additional features exploit recent advances in high performance cloud computing to cope with the increasing data size and complexity of analysis.The system can be accessed either through a

  13. Tavaxy: Integrating Taverna and Galaxy workflows with cloud computing support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abouelhoda Mohamed

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over the past decade the workflow system paradigm has evolved as an efficient and user-friendly approach for developing complex bioinformatics applications. Two popular workflow systems that have gained acceptance by the bioinformatics community are Taverna and Galaxy. Each system has a large user-base and supports an ever-growing repository of application workflows. However, workflows developed for one system cannot be imported and executed easily on the other. The lack of interoperability is due to differences in the models of computation, workflow languages, and architectures of both systems. This lack of interoperability limits sharing of workflows between the user communities and leads to duplication of development efforts. Results In this paper, we present Tavaxy, a stand-alone system for creating and executing workflows based on using an extensible set of re-usable workflow patterns. Tavaxy offers a set of new features that simplify and enhance the development of sequence analysis applications: It allows the integration of existing Taverna and Galaxy workflows in a single environment, and supports the use of cloud computing capabilities. The integration of existing Taverna and Galaxy workflows is supported seamlessly at both run-time and design-time levels, based on the concepts of hierarchical workflows and workflow patterns. The use of cloud computing in Tavaxy is flexible, where the users can either instantiate the whole system on the cloud, or delegate the execution of certain sub-workflows to the cloud infrastructure. Conclusions Tavaxy reduces the workflow development cycle by introducing the use of workflow patterns to simplify workflow creation. It enables the re-use and integration of existing (sub- workflows from Taverna and Galaxy, and allows the creation of hybrid workflows. Its additional features exploit recent advances in high performance cloud computing to cope with the increasing data size and

  14. Epistemology of scientific inquiry and computer-supported collaborative learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakkarainen, Kai Pekka Juhani

    1998-12-01

    The problem addressed in the study was whether 10- and 11-year-old children, collaborating within a computer-supported classroom, could learn a process of inquiry that represented certain principal features of scientific inquiry, namely (1) engagement in increasingly deep levels of explanation, (2) progressive generation of subordinate questions, and (3) collaborative effort to advance explanations. Technical infrastructure for the study was provided by the Computer-Supported Intentional Learning Environments, CSILE. The study was entirely based on qualitative content analysis of students' written productions posted to CSILE's database. Five studies were carried out to analyze CSILE students' process of inquiry. The first two studies aimed at analyzing changes in CSILE students' culture of inquiry in two CSILE classrooms across a three-year period. The results of the studies indicate that the classroom culture changed over three years following the introduction of CSILE. The explanatory level of knowledge produced by the students became increasingly deeper in tracking from the first to third year representing the first principal feature of scientific inquiry. Moreover, between-student communication increasingly focused on facilitating advancement of explanation (the third principal feature). These effects were substantial only in one classroom; the teacher of this class provided strong pedagogical support and epistemological guidance for the students. Detailed analysis of this classroom's inquiry, carried out in the last three studies, indicated that with teacher's guidance the students were able to produce meaningful intuitive explanations as well as go beyond the functional and empirical nature of their intuitive explanations and appropriate theoretical scientific explanations (the first principal feature). Advancement of the students' inquiry appeared to be closely associated with generation of new subordinate questions (the second principal feature) and peer

  15. Managing to Change: The Wharton School's Distributed Staff Model for Computing Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eleey, Michael

    1993-01-01

    The University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School introduced a "distributed" organization for managing computing support services. The hybrid structure combined elements of centralized computing and departmental computing by placing computing personnel in the departments, under central management. The program covers a wide range of support services…

  16. DISTRIBUTED LEADERSHIP COLLABORATION FACTORS TO SUPPORT IDEA GENERATION IN COMPUTER-SUPPORTED COLLABORATIVE e-LEARNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niki Lambropoulos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to identify, discuss and analyze students’ collaboration factors related to distributed leadership (DL, which correlates with interaction quality evident in idea generation. Scripting computer-supported collaborative e-learning (CSCeL activities based on DL can scaffold students’ interactions that support collaboration and promote idea generation. Furthermore, the associated tools can facilitate collaboration via scripting and shed light on students’ interactions and dialogical sequences. Such detailed planning can result in effective short e-courses. In this case study, 21 MSc students’ teams worked on a DL project within a 2-day e-course at the IT Institute (ITIN, France. The research methods involved a self-reported questionnaire; the Non-Negative Matrix Factorization (NNMF algorithm with qualitative analysis; and outcomes from the Social Network Analysis (SNA tools implemented within the forums. The results indicated that scripting DL based on the identified distributed leadership attributes can support values such as collaboration and can be useful in supporting idea generation in short e-courses.

  17. Modelo de awareness en el cscl allegro utilizando la arquitectura blackboard

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    En este artículo se describen las actividades colaborativas, el awareness y la arquitectura blackboard propuesta en el ambiente multi-agente de enseñanza/aprendizaje ALLEGRO. ALLEGRO es un ambiente inteligente que integra las bondades de diferentes campos de investigación de la inteligencia artificial como la planificación instruccional (IP), razonamiento basado en casos (CBR), sistemas multiagente (MAS), sistemas tutoriales inteligentes (ITS) y CSCL. Para lograr construir lo anterior se uti...

  18. The interaction of CsCl with films of solid water

    CERN Document Server

    Borodin, A; Krischok, S; Kempter, V

    2003-01-01

    The interaction of CsCl molecules with films of solid water (three layers thick, typically), deposited on a tungsten crystal at 130 K, was studied. Metastable impact electron spectroscopy (MIES) and UPS(HeI) were applied to study the emission from Cl3p and Cs5p and the highest occupied states 1b sub 1 , 3a sub 1 and 1b sub 2 of molecular water. Below a critical stoichiometry of about CsCl centre dot nH sub 2 O with n=6 the UPS spectra are quite similar to those from chlorides solvated in liquid water in as much as the relative positions and intensities of the water and salt features are concerned; very little emission from the ionization of Cl3p and Cs5p is observed with MIES. We conclude that the CsCl molecules become solvated in the water film. As long as n>6, the water spectrum remains characteristic for condensed water; at n6, water molecules not involved directly into the hydration of the salt molecules desorb around 140 K. Around 160 K all water has disappeared from the surface. Above this temperature o...

  19. A Conceptual Framework Based on Activity Theory for Mobile CSCL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurita, Gustavo; Nussbaum, Miguel

    2007-01-01

    There is a need for collaborative group activities that promote student social interaction in the classroom. Handheld computers interconnected by a wireless network allow people who work on a common task to interact face to face while maintaining the mediation afforded by a technology-based system. Wirelessly interconnected handhelds open up new…

  20. To What Degree Are Undergraduate Students Using Their Personal Computers to Support Their Daily Study Practices?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, KwongNui; Butson, Russell

    2014-01-01

    This scoping study examines the degree to which twenty two undergraduate students used their personal computers to support their academic study. The students were selected based on their responses to a questionnaire aimed at gauging their degree of computer skill. Computer activity data was harvested from the personal computers of eighteen…

  1. Students experiences with collaborative learning in asynchronous computer-supported collaborative learning environments.

    OpenAIRE

    Dewiyanti, Silvia; Brand-Gruwel, Saskia; Jochems, Wim; Broers, Nick

    2008-01-01

    Dewiyanti, S., Brand-Gruwel, S., Jochems, W., & Broers, N. (2007). Students experiences with collaborative learning in asynchronous computer-supported collaborative learning environments. Computers in Human Behavior, 23, 496-514.

  2. Students experiences with collaborative learning in asynchronous computer-supported collaborative learning environments.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dewiyanti, Silvia; Brand-Gruwel, Saskia; Jochems, Wim; Broers, Nick

    2008-01-01

    Dewiyanti, S., Brand-Gruwel, S., Jochems, W., & Broers, N. (2007). Students experiences with collaborative learning in asynchronous computer-supported collaborative learning environments. Computers in Human Behavior, 23, 496-514.

  3. Fostering complex learning-task performance through scripting student use of computer supported representational tools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slof, Bert; Erkens, Gijs; Kirschner, Paul A.; Janssen, Jeroen; Phielix, Chris

    2010-01-01

    Slof, B., Erkens, G., Kirschner, P. A., Janssen, J., & Phielix, C. (2010). Fostering complex learning-task performance through scripting student use of computer supported representational tools. Computers & Education, 55(4), 1707-1720.

  4. Quantitative Investigation of the Technologies That Support Cloud Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wenjin

    2014-01-01

    Cloud computing is dramatically shaping modern IT infrastructure. It virtualizes computing resources, provides elastic scalability, serves as a pay-as-you-use utility, simplifies the IT administrators' daily tasks, enhances the mobility and collaboration of data, and increases user productivity. We focus on providing generalized black-box…

  5. Quantitative Investigation of the Technologies That Support Cloud Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wenjin

    2014-01-01

    Cloud computing is dramatically shaping modern IT infrastructure. It virtualizes computing resources, provides elastic scalability, serves as a pay-as-you-use utility, simplifies the IT administrators' daily tasks, enhances the mobility and collaboration of data, and increases user productivity. We focus on providing generalized black-box…

  6. The Use of Computer Tools to Support Meaningful Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keengwe, Jared; Onchwari, Grace; Wachira, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    This article attempts to provide a review of literature pertaining to computer technology use in education. The authors discuss the benefits of learning with technology tools when integrated into teaching. The argument that introducing computer technology into schools will neither improve nor change the quality of classroom instruction unless…

  7. Ubiquitous CSCL 的概念模型与关键技术要素%The Conceptual Model and Key Technical Elements of Ubiquitous CSCL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    付道明; 徐福荫

    2009-01-01

    以自然、和谐的学习交互环境为主要特征的计算机支持的泛在协作学习(Ubiquitous CSCL)是近年来国内外CSCL研究领域关注的热点.本文通过文献研究、内容分析和归纳演绎等过程,探讨了Ubiquitous CSCL的概念模型、关键交互技术、普适终端技术、协作知识建构的基本过程和基于智能空阅的交点模型.

  8. Constructing the Mode of Computer Supported Collaborative Learning in Food Science of Agriculture Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-juan Chu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we makes an attempt to find out the effect of applying Computer Supported Collaborative Learning to food science of agriculture research based on the Collaborative Learning Theory and the support of computer network technology. The mode of computer supported collaborative Learning in food science of agriculture research takes on far more advantages than the Product writing Approach, being beneficial to the development of students’ writing competence.

  9. Computer aided decision support system for cervical cancer classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmadwati, Rahmadwati; Naghdy, Golshah; Ros, Montserrat; Todd, Catherine

    2012-10-01

    Conventional analysis of a cervical histology image, such a pap smear or a biopsy sample, is performed by an expert pathologist manually. This involves inspecting the sample for cellular level abnormalities and determining the spread of the abnormalities. Cancer is graded based on the spread of the abnormal cells. This is a tedious, subjective and time-consuming process with considerable variations in diagnosis between the experts. This paper presents a computer aided decision support system (CADSS) tool to help the pathologists in their examination of the cervical cancer biopsies. The main aim of the proposed CADSS system is to identify abnormalities and quantify cancer grading in a systematic and repeatable manner. The paper proposes three different methods which presents and compares the results using 475 images of cervical biopsies which include normal, three stages of pre cancer, and malignant cases. This paper will explore various components of an effective CADSS; image acquisition, pre-processing, segmentation, feature extraction, classification, grading and disease identification. Cervical histological images are captured using a digital microscope. The images are captured in sufficient resolution to retain enough information for effective classification. Histology images of cervical biopsies consist of three major sections; background, stroma and squamous epithelium. Most diagnostic information are contained within the epithelium region. This paper will present two levels of segmentations; global (macro) and local (micro). At the global level the squamous epithelium is separated from the background and stroma. At the local or cellular level, the nuclei and cytoplasm are segmented for further analysis. Image features that influence the pathologists' decision during the analysis and classification of a cervical biopsy are the nuclei's shape and spread; the ratio of the areas of nuclei and cytoplasm as well as the texture and spread of the abnormalities

  10. Building an Advanced Computing Environment with SAN Support

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DajianYANG; MeiMA; 等

    2001-01-01

    The current computing environment of our Computing Center in IHEP uses a SAS (server Attached Storage)architecture,attaching all the storage devices directly to the machines.This kind of storage strategy can't meet the requirement of our BEPC II/BESⅢ project properly.Thus we design and implement a SAN-based computing environment,which consists of several computing farms,a three-level storage pool,a set of storage management software and a web-based data management system.The feature of ours system includes cross-platform data sharing,fast data access,high scalability,convenient storage management and data management.

  11. Technology Support for Discussion Based Learning: From Computer Supported Collaborative Learning to the Future of Massive Open Online Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosé, Carolyn Penstein; Ferschke, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    This article offers a vision for technology supported collaborative and discussion-based learning at scale. It begins with historical work in the area of tutorial dialogue systems. It traces the history of that area of the field of Artificial Intelligence in Education as it has made an impact on the field of Computer-Supported Collaborative…

  12. Technology Support for Discussion Based Learning: From Computer Supported Collaborative Learning to the Future of Massive Open Online Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosé, Carolyn Penstein; Ferschke, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    This article offers a vision for technology supported collaborative and discussion-based learning at scale. It begins with historical work in the area of tutorial dialogue systems. It traces the history of that area of the field of Artificial Intelligence in Education as it has made an impact on the field of Computer-Supported Collaborative…

  13. Commentary on: "Toward Computer-Based Support of Metacognitive Skills: A Computational Framework to Coach Self Explanation"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conati, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    This paper is a commentary on "Toward Computer-Based Support of Meta-Cognitive Skills: a Computational Framework to Coach Self-Explanation", by Cristina Conati and Kurt Vanlehn, published in the "IJAED" in 2000 (Conati and VanLehn 2010). This work was one of the first examples of Intelligent Learning Environments (ILE) that…

  14. Social Knowledge Awareness Map for Computer Supported Ubiquitous Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Bishouty, Moushir M.; Ogata, Hiroaki; Rahman, Samia; Yano, Yoneo

    2010-01-01

    Social networks are helpful for people to solve problems by providing useful information. Therefore, the importance of mobile social software for learning has been supported by many researches. In this research, a model of personalized collaborative ubiquitous learning environment is designed and implemented in order to support learners doing…

  15. Social Knowledge Awareness Map for Computer Supported Ubiquitous Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Bishouty, Moushir M.; Ogata, Hiroaki; Rahman, Samia; Yano, Yoneo

    2010-01-01

    Social networks are helpful for people to solve problems by providing useful information. Therefore, the importance of mobile social software for learning has been supported by many researches. In this research, a model of personalized collaborative ubiquitous learning environment is designed and implemented in order to support learners doing…

  16. Computational Support for Alternative Confinement Concepts Basic Plasma Science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalton D. Schnack

    2002-12-09

    This is the final report for contract DE-FG03-99ER54528, ''Computational Support for Alternative Confinement Concepts''. Progress was made in the following areas of investigation: (1) Extensive studies of the confinement properties of conventional Reversed-field Pinch (RFP) configurations (i.e., without current profile control) were performed in collaboration with the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) in Stockholm, Sweden. These studies were carried out using the full 3-dimensional, finite-{beta}, resistive MHD model in the DEBS code, including ohmic heating and anisotropic heat conduction, and thus for the first time included the self-consistent effects of the dynamo magnetic fluctuations on the confinement properties of the RFP. By using multi-variant regression analysis of these results, scaling laws for various properties characterizing the conventional RFP were obtained. In particular, it was found that the, for constant ratio of I/N (where I is the current and N = na{sup 2} is the line density), and over a range of Lundquist numbers S that approaches 10{sup 6}, the fluctuations scale as {delta}B/B {approx} S{sup -0.14}, the temperature scales as T {approx} I{sup 0.56}, the poloidal beta scales as {beta}{sub {theta}} {approx} I{sup -0.4}, and the energy confinement time scales as {tau}{sub E} {approx} I{sup 0.34}. The degradation of poloidal beta with current is a result of the weak scaling of the fluctuation level with the Lundquist number, and leads to the unfavorable scaling laws for temperature and energy confinement time. These results compare reasonably well with experimental data, and emphasize the need for external control of the dynamo fluctuations in the RFP. (2) Studies of feedback stabilization of resistive wall modes in the RFP were performed with the DEBS code in collaboration with the CNR/RFX group in Padua, Italy. The ideal growth rates are ''passively'' reduced by the presence of a resistive wall

  17. Effect of Non-specific HCN1 Blocker CsCl on Spatial Learning and Memory in Mouse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Xin; GUO Lianjun; YIN Guangfu; ZONG Xiangang; AI Yongxun

    2006-01-01

    It has been suggested that HCN1 is primarily expressed in hippocampus, however little is known about its effects on spatial learning and memory. In the present study, we investigated the effects of non-specific HCN1 blocker CsCl on spatial learning and memory by using Morris water maze and in situ hybridization in mice. The results showed CsCl 160 mg/kg ip for 4 days, and the mean escape latency was 34 s longer than that of normal control (P<0.01). In hippocampal tissues, staining for the HCN1 mRNA was stronger in the DG and CA1 region of the hippocampus (P <0.05, P<0.05, when CsCl-administration group was compared with normal group). Our results suggested that CsCl could significantly affect the spatial learning and memory in mice, and HCN channel is involved in the process of learning and memory.

  18. Supporting Privacy of Computations in Mobile Big Data Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sriram Nandha Premnath

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Cloud computing systems enable clients to rent and share computing resources of third party platforms, and have gained widespread use in recent years. Numerous varieties of mobile, small-scale devices such as smartphones, red e-health devices, etc., across users, are connected to one another through the massive internetwork of vastly powerful servers on the cloud. While mobile devices store “private information” of users such as location, payment, health data, etc., they may also contribute “semi-public information” (which may include crowdsourced data such as transit, traffic, nearby points of interests, etc. for data analytics. In such a scenario, a mobile device may seek to obtain the result of a computation, which may depend on its private inputs, crowdsourced data from other mobile devices, and/or any “public inputs” from other servers on the Internet. We demonstrate a new method of delegating real-world computations of resource-constrained mobile clients using an encrypted program known as the garbled circuit. Using the garbled version of a mobile client’s inputs, a server in the cloud executes the garbled circuit and returns the resulting garbled outputs. Our system assures privacy of the mobile client’s input data and output of the computation, and also enables the client to verify that the evaluator actually performed the computation. We analyze the complexity of our system. We measure the time taken to construct the garbled circuit as well as evaluate it for varying number of servers. Using real-world data, we evaluate our system for a practical, privacy preserving search application that locates the nearest point of interest for the mobile client to demonstrate feasibility.

  19. Research on message resource optimization in computer supported collaborative design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张敬谊; 张申生; 陈纯; 王波

    2004-01-01

    An adaptive mechanism is presented to reduce bandwidth usage and to optimize the use of computing resources of heterogeneous computer mixes utilized in CSCD to reach the goal of collaborative design in distributed-synchronous mode.The mechanism is realized on a C/S architecture based on operation information sharing. Firstly, messages are aggregated into packets on the client. Secondly, an outgoing-message weight priority queue with traffic adjusting technique is cached on the server. Thirdly, an incoming-message queue is cached on the client. At last, the results of implementing the proposed scheme in a simple collaborative design environment are presented.

  20. Brain-computer interface supported collaborative work: Implications for rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, C S; Lee, J; Bahn, S

    2013-01-01

    Working together and collaborating in a group can provide greater benefits for people with severe motor disability. However, it is still not clear how collaboration should be supported by BCI systems. The present study explored BCI-supported collaborative work by investigating differences in performance and brain activity between when a pair of users performs a task jointly with each other and when they do alone only through means of their brain activity. We found differences in performance and brain activity between different work conditions. The results of this research should provide fundamental knowledge of BCI-supported cooperative work.

  1. Erwinia chrysanthemi分离株CSCL006 hrpN基因的克隆与高效表达%Molecular Characterization and Overexpression of Erwinia chrysanthemi Strain CSCL006 hrpNCSCL006 Gene, which Encodes An Elicitor of the Hyperdensitive Reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汤承; 崔亚亚; 吴伯骥; 李名扬

    2006-01-01

    通过构建Erwinia chrysanthemi分离株CSCL006的DNA文库,克隆出hrpN CSCL006基因,测序结果显示该基因编码区长1 020 bp;推导的harpinCSCL006与Erwinia chrysanthemi ECl6和3937编码的harpin蛋白同源性高,但与其它软腐菌的harpin蛋白同源性较低;在大肠杆菌中(Escherichia coli)高效表达了hrpN CSCL006基因,重组harpinCSCL006蛋白分子量为34kD.以抗harpinEOC的抗体为探针,Western blot证实该蛋白确为harpin;纯化的harpinCSCL006,能引起烟叶的过敏反应.

  2. Propulsion Test Support Analysis with GPU Computing Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The design, development and staging of tests to certify liquid rocket engines usually require high-fidelity structural, fluid and thermal support analysis. These...

  3. Computing support for advanced medical data analysis and imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Wiślicki, W; Białas, P; Czerwiński, E; Kapłon, Ł; Kochanowski, A; Korcyl, G; Kowal, J; Kowalski, P; Kozik, T; Krzemień, W; Molenda, M; Moskal, P; Niedźwiecki, S; Pałka, M; Pawlik, M; Raczyński, L; Rudy, Z; Salabura, P; Sharma, N G; Silarski, M; Słomski, A; Smyrski, J; Strzelecki, A; Wieczorek, A; Zieliński, M; Zoń, N

    2014-01-01

    We discuss computing issues for data analysis and image reconstruction of PET-TOF medical scanner or other medical scanning devices producing large volumes of data. Service architecture based on the grid and cloud concepts for distributed processing is proposed and critically discussed.

  4. Computational Modeling in Support of the National Ignition Facilty Operations

    CERN Document Server

    Shaw, M J; Haynam, C A; Williams, W H

    2001-01-01

    Numerical simulation of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser performance and automated control of the laser setup process are crucial to the project's success. These functions will be performed by two closely coupled computer code: the virtual beamline (VBL) and the laser performance operations model (LPOM).

  5. Computational Modeling in Support of National Ignition Facility Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, M J; Sacks, R A; Haynam, C A; Williams, W H

    2001-10-23

    Numerical simulation of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser performance and automated control of laser setup process are crucial to the project's success. These functions will be performed by two closely coupled computer codes: the virtual beamline (VBL) and the laser operations performance model (LPOM).

  6. Stakeholder interactions to support service creation in cloud computing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Lei; Ferreira Pires, Luis; Wombacher, Andreas; Sinderen, van Marten J.; Chi, Chihung

    2010-01-01

    Cloud computing is already a major trend in IT. Cloud services are being offered at application (software), platform and infrastructure levels. This paper presents our initial modeling efforts towards service creation at the infrastructure level. The purpose of these modeling efforts is to understan

  7. Computer decision support system for the stomach cancer diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyakov, E. V.; Sukhova, O. G.; Korenevskaya, P. Y.; Ovcharova, V. S.; Kudryavtseva, I. O.; Vlasova, S. V.; Grebennikova, O. P.; Burov, D. A.; Yemelyanova, G. S.; Selchuk, V. Y.

    2017-01-01

    The paper considers the creation of the computer knowledge base containing the data of histological, cytologic, and clinical researches. The system is focused on improvement of diagnostics quality of stomach cancer - one of the most frequent death causes among oncologic patients.

  8. Beyond Computer Literacy: Supporting Youth's Positive Development through Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bers, Marina Umaschi

    2010-01-01

    In a digital era in which technology plays a role in most aspects of a child's life, having the competence and confidence to use computers might be a necessary step, but not a goal in itself. Developing character traits that will serve children to use technology in a safe way to communicate and connect with others, and providing opportunities for…

  9. Beyond Computer Literacy: Supporting Youth's Positive Development through Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bers, Marina Umaschi

    2010-01-01

    In a digital era in which technology plays a role in most aspects of a child's life, having the competence and confidence to use computers might be a necessary step, but not a goal in itself. Developing character traits that will serve children to use technology in a safe way to communicate and connect with others, and providing opportunities for…

  10. Evoking Knowledge and Information Awareness for Enhancing Computer-Supported Collaborative Problem Solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelmann, Tanja; Tergan, Sigmar-Olaf; Hesse, Friedrich W.

    2010-01-01

    Computer-supported collaboration by spatially distributed group members still involves interaction problems within the group. This article presents an empirical study investigating the question of whether computer-supported collaborative problem solving by spatially distributed group members can be fostered by evoking knowledge and information…

  11. A Meta-Analysis of Effectiveness Studies on Computer Technology-Supported Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grgurovic, Maja; Chapelle, Carol A.; Shelley, Mack C.

    2013-01-01

    With the aim of summarizing years of research comparing pedagogies for second/foreign language teaching supported with computer technology and pedagogy not-supported by computer technology, a meta-analysis was conducted of empirical research investigating language outcomes. Thirty-seven studies yielding 52 effect sizes were included, following a…

  12. Patterns of Female and Male Students' Participation in Peer Interaction in Computer-Supported Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakkarainen, Kai; Palonen, Tuire

    2003-01-01

    Describes a study of fifth and sixth grade students that analyzed how intensively female and male students participated in discourse interaction within two computer-supported classrooms. Explains the use of the Computer-Supported Intentional Learning Environments and concludes that new technology should be subsumed under pedagogical goals to…

  13. Research on the Computer Supported Cooperative Shipbuilding System Based on PDM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUE Weihong; WANG Chengfang; ZHANG Qingying

    2006-01-01

    Shipbuilding is becoming more complex and requires many different enterprises and plants to work cooperatively to strive for the maximum profit. Supported by the computer technology, information technology, and internet technology etc., CSCW (Computer Supported Cooperative Work) plays a very crucial role in the multi-team, multi-subject, multi-layer field. According to shipbuilding characters and market requirements, the computer supported cooperative shipbuilding technology is researched actually. Key technologies to realize it are analyzed, and construction of the computer supported cooperative manufacturing environment is deeply discussed. On the base of them, scheme of the computer supported cooperative shipbuilding system based on PDM (Product Data Management) is put forward, which is useful to improve and develop the shipbuilding industry.

  14. Effective Use of Human Computer Interaction in Digital Academic Supportive Devices

    OpenAIRE

    Thuseethan, S.; Kuhanesan, S.

    2015-01-01

    In this research, a literature in human-computer interaction is reviewed and the technology aspect of human computer interaction related with digital academic supportive devices is also analyzed. According to all these concerns, recommendations to design good human-computer digital academic supportive devices are analyzed and proposed. Due to improvements in both hardware and software, digital devices have unveiled continuous advances in efficiency and processing capacity. However, many of th...

  15. A brain-computer interface to support functional recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjaer, Troels W; Sørensen, Helge B

    2013-01-01

    Brain-computer interfaces (BCI) register changes in brain activity and utilize this to control computers. The most widely used method is based on registration of electrical signals from the cerebral cortex using extracranially placed electrodes also called electroencephalography (EEG). The features extracted from the EEG may, besides controlling the computer, also be fed back to the patient for instance as visual input. This facilitates a learning process. BCI allow us to utilize brain activity in the rehabilitation of patients after stroke. The activity of the cerebral cortex varies with the type of movement we imagine, and by letting the patient know the type of brain activity best associated with the intended movement the rehabilitation process may be faster and more efficient. The focus of BCI utilization in medicine has changed in recent years. While we previously focused on devices facilitating communication in the rather few patients with locked-in syndrome, much interest is now devoted to the therapeutic use of BCI in rehabilitation. For this latter group of patients, the device is not intended to be a lifelong assistive companion but rather a 'teacher' during the rehabilitation period. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Towards a Tool for Computer Supported Structuring of Products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Claus Thorp

    1997-01-01

    that is capable of supporting synthesis activities in engineering design, and thereby also support handling of various organ structures. Such a system must contain a product model, in which it is possible to describe and manipulate both various organ structures and the component structure.In this paper we focus...... on the relationships between organ structures and the component structure. By an analysis of an existing product it is shown that a component may contribute to more than one organ. A set of organ structures is identified and their influence on the component strucute is illustrated....

  17. A support architecture for reliable distributed computing systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Partha; Leblanc, Richard J., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The Clouds project is well underway to its goal of building a unified distributed operating system supporting the object model. The operating system design uses the object concept of structuring software at all levels of the system. The basic operating system was developed and work is under progress to build a usable system.

  18. Intellectual Amplification through Reflection and Didactic Change in Distributed Collaborative Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Elsebeth K.

    Presented at the Conference on Computer Supported Collaborative Learning, CSCL99, Stanford University, California, December 11-18, 1999 Presented at the Conference on Computer Supported Collaborative Learning, CSCL99, Stanford University, California, December 11-18, 1999...

  19. Intellectual Amplification through Reflection and Didactic Change in Distributed Collaborative Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Elsebeth K.

    Presented at the Conference on Computer Supported Collaborative Learning, CSCL99, Stanford University, California, December 11-18, 1999 Presented at the Conference on Computer Supported Collaborative Learning, CSCL99, Stanford University, California, December 11-18, 1999...

  20. Computer Support for Document Management in the Danish Central Government

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten

    1995-01-01

    Document management systems are generally assumed to hold a potential for delegating the recording and retrieval of documents to professionals such as civil servants and for supporting the coordination and control of work, so-called workflow management. This study investigates the use and organiz......Document management systems are generally assumed to hold a potential for delegating the recording and retrieval of documents to professionals such as civil servants and for supporting the coordination and control of work, so-called workflow management. This study investigates the use...... and organizational impact of document management systems in the Danish central government. The currently used systems unfold around the recording of incoming and outgoing paper mail and have typically not been accompanied by organizational changes. Rather, document management tends to remain an appendix...

  1. Computer-Aided Design Models to Support Ergonomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-12-01

    LABORATORY 4 WILLIAM B. ASKREN AIR FORCE HUMAN RESOURCES LABORA7IJRY LEC OCT 2 2 DECEMBER 1985 Apprw. edfor public release, distributionz is...SUPPORT ERGONOMICS (U) .__ _ _ _ _ 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) McDaniel, Joe W. and Askren, William B.* ". k % 13.. TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME COVERED 14...technician which the designer can effectively use for maintainability analyses. ,% 4,1’ 12.. 6- - p *. **, . k % ... APPROACH v There are three elements to

  2. Computational Efforts in Support of Advanced Coal Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suljo Linic

    2006-08-17

    The focus in this project was to employ first principles computational methods to study the underlying molecular elementary processes that govern hydrogen diffusion through Pd membranes as well as the elementary processes that govern the CO- and S-poisoning of these membranes. Our computational methodology integrated a multiscale hierarchical modeling approach, wherein a molecular understanding of the interactions between various species is gained from ab-initio quantum chemical Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations, while a mesoscopic statistical mechanical model like Kinetic Monte Carlo is employed to predict the key macroscopic membrane properties such as permeability. The key developments are: (1) We have coupled systematically the ab initio calculations with Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations to model hydrogen diffusion through the Pd based-membranes. The predicted tracer diffusivity of hydrogen atoms through the bulk of Pd lattice from KMC simulations are in excellent agreement with experiments. (2) The KMC simulations of dissociative adsorption of H{sub 2} over Pd(111) surface indicates that for thin membranes (less than 10{micro} thick), the diffusion of hydrogen from surface to the first subsurface layer is rate limiting. (3) Sulfur poisons the Pd surface by altering the electronic structure of the Pd atoms in the vicinity of the S atom. The KMC simulations indicate that increasing sulfur coverage drastically reduces the hydrogen coverage on the Pd surface and hence the driving force for diffusion through the membrane.

  3. Neuro computing in knowledge-based decision support systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sirola, Miki; Lampi, Golan; Parviainen, Jukka

    2004-07-01

    Knowledge-based decision support systems of today are due to development of many decades. More and more methodologies and application areas have been involved during this time. In this paper neural methods are combined with knowledge-based methodologies. Self-Organizing Map (SOM) is used together with rule-based reasoning, and realized in a prototype of a decision support system. This system, which can be used e.g. in fault diagnosis, is based on an earlier study including compatibility analysis. A Matlab-based tool is capable of doing tasks in fault detection and identification. We show with an example how SOM analysis can help decision making in a computerized decision support system. Quantisation error between normal data and error data is one important methodological tool in this analysis. This kind of decision making is needed for instance in control room in state monitoring of a safety critical process in industry. A scenario about a leak in the primary circuit of a BWR nuclear power plant is also shortly demonstrated. (Author)

  4. Computer Modelling of a Tank Battle with Helicopter Support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chatter Singh

    1986-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper attempts to model a tank versus tank battle scenario in which the defender is provided an armed helicopter unit support, against surprise advance of the attacker towards an important place. The stochastic and dynamic nature of the battle system has been handled by means of Monte Carlo simulation. In that activities like move, search, fire, hit and kill are simulated and their effects generated in the model. The game has been repeated for parameters relating to (i fire power (ii mobility (iii intervisibility (iv blind shooting (v defender/attacker force ratio and (vi helicopter unit support with the defender. Then, average numerical effects in each case have been analysed.Although the results are based on tentative data, the. trend seems to suggest that a battalion of Centurion tanks or 2 coys with a helicopter unit support stand fairly good chance to defeat the attack by M-47/48 tanks equivalent to 4 coys. Neyertheless, the methodology provides an effective basis to systematically approach realistic situations and quantitatively assess weapon systems effectiveness under tactical alternatives and battle field environments.

  5. 47 CFR 54.709 - Computations of required contributions to universal service support mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... universal service support mechanisms. 54.709 Section 54.709 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS... Computations of required contributions to universal service support mechanisms. (a) Prior to April 1, 2003, contributions to the universal service support mechanisms shall be based on contributors'...

  6. Computer-Supported Modelling of Multi modal Transportation Networks Rationalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratko Zelenika

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with issues of shaping and functioning ofcomputer programs in the modelling and solving of multimoda Itransportation network problems. A methodology of an integrateduse of a programming language for mathematical modellingis defined, as well as spreadsheets for the solving of complexmultimodal transportation network problems. The papercontains a comparison of the partial and integral methods ofsolving multimodal transportation networks. The basic hypothesisset forth in this paper is that the integral method results inbetter multimodal transportation network rationalization effects,whereas a multimodal transportation network modelbased on the integral method, once built, can be used as the basisfor all kinds of transportation problems within multimodaltransport. As opposed to linear transport problems, multimodaltransport network can assume very complex shapes. This papercontains a comparison of the partial and integral approach totransp01tation network solving. In the partial approach, astraightforward model of a transp01tation network, which canbe solved through the use of the Solver computer tool within theExcel spreadsheet inteiface, is quite sufficient. In the solving ofa multimodal transportation problem through the integralmethod, it is necessmy to apply sophisticated mathematicalmodelling programming languages which supp01t the use ofcomplex matrix functions and the processing of a vast amountof variables and limitations. The LINGO programming languageis more abstract than the Excel spreadsheet, and it requiresa certain programming knowledge. The definition andpresentation of a problem logic within Excel, in a manner whichis acceptable to computer software, is an ideal basis for modellingin the LINGO programming language, as well as a fasterand more effective implementation of the mathematical model.This paper provides proof for the fact that it is more rational tosolve the problem of multimodal transportation networks by

  7. The computer revolution in science: steps towards the realization of computer-supported discovery environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, de Hidde; Rip, Arie

    1997-01-01

    The tools that scientists use in their search processes together form so-called discovery environments. The promise of artificial intelligence and other branches of computer science is to radically transform conventional discovery environments by equipping scientists with a range of powerful compute

  8. Hospitals of the Future - Ubiquitous Computing support for Medical Work in Hospitals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bardram, Jakob Eyvind

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the visions and on-going research within creating ubiquitous computing support for medical work in the hospitals of the future. Today, clinical computer systems seldom play any role in the execution of clinical work as such. Electronic Patient Records (EPR) are more often...... while operating a patient. Research within UbiComp provides a range of new conceptual and technological possibilities, which enable us to move clinical computer support closer to the clinical work setting. An important barnce of the research at the Danish Center for Pervasive Healthcare is to design...... and develop such new ubicomp computer technologies for clinical work....

  9. A simplified CsCL protocol for lambda DNA purification: no enzymatic treatment/one phenol extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santelli Roberto V.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available A modification of the CsCl gradient centrifugation method for DNA phage purification is presented. It avoids the enzymatic steps as well the need for a preliminary phage titration, a tedious process proposed in the majority of the protocols in use. The quality of the DNA obtained makes it amenable for additional manipulations like digestions, ligations, labelling, subcloning, etc.

  10. Development of training support system based on three-dimensional computer graphics technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kude, Akizumi; Hanafusa, Hidemitsu; Matsuoka, Yoshinori; Shirute, Ikuo [Institute of Nuclear Safety System Inc., Seika, Kyoto (Japan); Ogura, Kazuhide

    1998-09-01

    Recently, Virtual Reality (VR) technology has developed quickly, together with research conducted on various elemental and related technologies and research in various fields of its application. In particular, the development of computer graphics (CG) technology at the same pace as the progress in computer performance is remarkable. We have developed a new type of training support system using three-dimensional (3D) CG technology. It is the training support system for disassembling and assembling a motor-operated gate valve. The training support system proposed is based on a personal computer and can be used easily by anyone. The system configuration is outlined herein. (author)

  11. Supporting and structuring "contributing student pedagogy" in Computer Science curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkner, Katrina; Falkner, Nickolas J. G.

    2012-12-01

    Contributing student pedagogy (CSP) builds upon social constructivist and community-based learning principles to create engaging and productive learning experiences. What makes CSP different from other, related, learning approaches is that it involves students both learning from and also explicitly valuing the contributions of other students. The creation of such a learning community builds upon established educational psychology that encourages deep learning, reflection and engagement. Our school has recently completed a review and update of its curriculum, incorporating student content-creation and collaboration into the design of key courses across the curriculum. Our experiences, based on several years of experimentation and development, support CSP-based curriculum design to reinforce the value of the student perspective, the clear description of their own transformative pathway to knowledge and the importance of establishing student-to-student networks in which students are active and willing participants. In this paper, we discuss the tools and approaches that we have employed to guide, support and structure student collaboration across a range of courses and year levels. By providing an account of our intentions, our approaches and tools, we hope to provide useful and transferrable knowledge that can be readily used by other academics who are considering this approach.

  12. Computer support for social awareness in flexible work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, S.; Christiansen, Ellen

    2006-01-01

     How do we conceptualize social awareness, and what support is needed to develop and maintain social awareness in flexible work settings? The paper begins by arguing the relevance of designing for social awareness in flexible work. It points out how social awareness is suspended in the field...... of tension that exists between the ephemerality and continuity of social encounters, exploring ways to construct identity through relationships by means of social encounters - notably those that are accidental and unforced. We probe into this issue through design research: In particular, we present three...... exploratory prototyping processes in an open office setting (examining the concepts of a shared calendar, personal panels, and ambient awareness cues). Field studies, conducted in parallel, have contributed to a conceptual deconstruction of CSCW concepts, resulting in a focus on cues to relatedness...

  13. Computer support for social awareness in flexible work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, S.; Christiansen, Ellen

    2006-01-01

    on which to base further design. We present these analyses and suggest that the metaphors work because of their ability to map experiences from the physical space into conceptual experiences. We conclude that social awareness in flexible work must be constructed indirectly, presenting itself as an option...... How do we conceptualize social awareness, and what support is needed to develop and maintain social awareness in flexible work settings? The paper begins by arguing the relevance of designing for social awareness in flexible work. It points out how social awareness is suspended in the field...... of tension that exists between the ephemerality and continuity of social encounters, exploring ways to construct identity through relationships by means of social encounters - notably those that are accidental and unforced. We probe into this issue through design research: In particular, we present three...

  14. Computer-Supported Collaborative Inquiry on Buoyancy: A Discourse Analysis Supporting the "Pieces" Position on Conceptual Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turcotte, Sandrine

    2012-01-01

    This article describes in detail a conversation analysis of conceptual change in a computer-supported collaborative learning environment. Conceptual change is an essential learning process in science education that has yet to be fully understood. While many models and theories have been developed over the last three decades, empirical data to…

  15. Computational support for ITS and PHERMEX. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, T.P.; Clark, R.E. [Mission Research Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Allison, P.W.; Moir, D.C.; Kauppila, T.J.; Watson, S.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1994-03-01

    This report describes calculations carried out over the past year in support of the ITS and PHERMEX radiographic machines. The forces produced by nonaxisymmetric structures in the ITS linac were calculated using 3-D simulations. The quadrupole magnetic field produced by the drive rods in the accelerating cell was obtained. This force can be corrected by a weak static magnetic quadrupole provided the current in the drive rods is constant. The octopole force produced by a 4-hole diagnostic section was also obtained. A new recessed cathode design was modeled using PBGUNS. For a 2 mm recess, the electrostatic focusing due to the recess is sufficient to stop current loss on the anode. The emitted and transported currents are in good agreement with the measured values. The LAMDA code was compared in detail to the LLNL code BREAKUP. The codes are in close agreement. To get the results to overlay identically, however, the beam voltages have to differ by about 100 kV (out of 3 MV). The source of this discrepancy has not yet been identified. A plotting utility for LAMDA was written in the IDL{reg_sign} language. This allows LAMDA output to be viewed on any platform supported by IDL. Experiments on the flat-cathode injector were modeled. Beam radius as a function of magnet strength was compared in detail with measurements, and good agreement was obtained. The effect of the trim coil on reducing beam emittance was investigated further. The trim coil allows one to correct emittance growth due to spherical aberration in the focusing magnet and nonlinear self forces. The measured calibrations for the bucking, focus and trim coils are now in good agreement with the calculated values. A code which optimizes the transport magnet settings was developed. The code iterates on the magnet settings to obtain a beam envelope with some user-specified properties. This procedure may be useful in tuning the ITS or DARHT linacs.

  16. Algorithmic support for commodity-based parallel computing systems.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leung, Vitus Joseph; Bender, Michael A. (State University of New York, Stony Brook, NY); Bunde, David P. (University of Illinois, Urbna, IL); Phillips, Cynthia Ann

    2003-10-01

    The Computational Plant or Cplant is a commodity-based distributed-memory supercomputer under development at Sandia National Laboratories. Distributed-memory supercomputers run many parallel programs simultaneously. Users submit their programs to a job queue. When a job is scheduled to run, it is assigned to a set of available processors. Job runtime depends not only on the number of processors but also on the particular set of processors assigned to it. Jobs should be allocated to localized clusters of processors to minimize communication costs and to avoid bandwidth contention caused by overlapping jobs. This report introduces new allocation strategies and performance metrics based on space-filling curves and one dimensional allocation strategies. These algorithms are general and simple. Preliminary simulations and Cplant experiments indicate that both space-filling curves and one-dimensional packing improve processor locality compared to the sorted free list strategy previously used on Cplant. These new allocation strategies are implemented in Release 2.0 of the Cplant System Software that was phased into the Cplant systems at Sandia by May 2002. Experimental results then demonstrated that the average number of communication hops between the processors allocated to a job strongly correlates with the job's completion time. This report also gives processor-allocation algorithms for minimizing the average number of communication hops between the assigned processors for grid architectures. The associated clustering problem is as follows: Given n points in {Re}d, find k points that minimize their average pairwise L{sub 1} distance. Exact and approximate algorithms are given for these optimization problems. One of these algorithms has been implemented on Cplant and will be included in Cplant System Software, Version 2.1, to be released. In more preliminary work, we suggest improvements to the scheduler separate from the allocator.

  17. Computer-Tailored Student Support in Introductory Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huberth, Madeline; Chen, Patricia; Tritz, Jared; McKay, Timothy A

    2015-01-01

    Large introductory courses are at a disadvantage in providing personalized guidance and advice for students during the semester. We introduce E2Coach (an Expert Electronic Coaching system), which allows instructors to personalize their communication with thousands of students. We describe the E2Coach system, the nature of the personalized support it provides, and the features of the students who did (and did not) opt-in to using it during the first three terms of its use in four introductory physics courses at the University of Michigan. Defining a 'better-than-expected' measure of performance, we compare outcomes for students who used E2Coach to those who did not. We found that moderate and high E2Coach usage was associated with improved performance. This performance boost was prominent among high users, who improved by 0.18 letter grades on average when compared to nonusers with similar incoming GPAs. This improvement in performance was comparable across both genders. E2Coach represents one way to use technology to personalize education at scale, contributing to the move towards individualized learning that is becoming more attainable in the 21st century.

  18. Learning to Summarize and Summarizing for Learning: Some Computer-Based Supports

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dessus, Philippe

    2008-01-01

    Dessus, P. (2008). Learning to Summarize and Summarizing for Learning: Some Computer-Based Supports. Workshop presentation at the symposium Learning networks for professional. November, 14, 2008, Heerlen, Nederland: Open Universiteit Nederland.

  19. A computer-supported method to reveal and assess Personal Professional Theories in vocational education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bogaart, Antoine C.M.; Bilderbeek, Richardus; Schaap, Harmen; Hummel, Hans G.K.; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    This article introduces a dedicated, computer-supported method to construct and formatively assess open, annotated concept maps of Personal Professional Theories (PPTs). These theories are internalised, personal bodies of formal and practical knowledge, values, norms and convictions that professiona

  20. Reduction behavior of cerium(Ⅲ) ions in NaCl-2CsCl melt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QI Xue; ZHU Hongmin

    2005-01-01

    The cathodic process of cerium(Ⅲ) ions in NaCl-2CsCl melt was studied by cyclic voltammetry and square wave voltammetry with tungsten and gold electrodes at 873 K. The two electroanalytical methods yield similar results. The cathodic process of cerium(Ⅲ) ions consists of two reversible steps: Ce3+ + e-= Ce2+ and Ce2+ + 2e-= Ce. The half wave potentials of Ce3+/Ce2+ and Ce2+/Ce were determined as -2.525 V vs. Cl2/Cl- and -2.975 V vs. Cl2/Cl-, respectively. The diffusion coefficient of Ce3+ was also determined as 5.5 × 10-5 cm2·s-1.

  1. Supporting Real-Time Computer Vision Workloads using OpenVX on Multicore+GPU Platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    workloads specified using OpenVX to be supported in a predictable way. I. INTRODUCTION In the automotive industry today, vision-based sensing through cameras...Supporting Real-Time Computer Vision Workloads using OpenVX on Multicore+GPU Platforms Glenn A. Elliott, Kecheng Yang, and James H. Anderson...Department of Computer Science, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Abstract—In the automotive industry, there is currently great interest in

  2. Using Heterogeneous High Performance Computing Cluster for Supporting Fine-Grained Parallel Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-10-01

    Beowulf cluster made of COTS PCs (featuring dual processor Xeon’s) interconnected via a Gigabit Ethernet Network and a Myrinet network [Boden 1995...AFRL-IF-RS-TR-2006-313 Final Technical Report October 2006 USING HETEROGENEOUS HIGH PERFORMANCE COMPUTING CLUSTER FOR SUPPORTING...GRANT NUMBER FA8750-05-1-0130 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE USING HETEROGENEOUS HIGH PERFORMANCE COMPUTING CLUSTER FOR SUPPORTING FINE-GRAINED PARALLEL

  3. How to design and establish a computer bulletin board to support inventors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-01-01

    This booklet is a how-to handbook'' to demonstrate the development of an interactive electronic bulletin board as a support network for independent inventors and small business inventors. This will explain step-by-step, how Linking Alaskan Minds{trademark}, the Alaskan model of an interactive computer bulletin board system, was developed and designed to serve as a successfully working, interactive computer bulletin board that links and supports independent inventors in Alaska.

  4. How to design and establish a computer bulletin board to support inventors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-12-31

    This booklet is a ``how-to handbook`` to demonstrate the development of an interactive electronic bulletin board as a support network for independent inventors and small business inventors. This will explain step-by-step, how Linking Alaskan Minds{trademark}, the Alaskan model of an interactive computer bulletin board system, was developed and designed to serve as a successfully working, interactive computer bulletin board that links and supports independent inventors in Alaska.

  5. Computer Simulations to Support Science Instruction and Learning: A Critical Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smetana, Lara Kathleen; Bell, Randy L.

    2012-01-01

    Researchers have explored the effectiveness of computer simulations for supporting science teaching and learning during the past four decades. The purpose of this paper is to provide a comprehensive, critical review of the literature on the impact of computer simulations on science teaching and learning, with the goal of summarizing what is…

  6. Using Animation to Support the Teaching of Computer Game Development Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Mark John; Pountney, David C.; Baskett, M.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we examine the potential use of animation for supporting the teaching of some of the mathematical concepts that underlie computer games development activities, such as vector and matrix algebra. An experiment was conducted with a group of UK undergraduate computing students to compare the perceived usefulness of animated and static…

  7. Computer-Based Support for Curriculum Designers: A Case of Developmental Research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McKenney, Susan; Akker, van den Jan

    2005-01-01

    In this article, we explore the potential of the computer to support curriculum materials development within the context of secondary level science and mathematics education in southern Africa. During the four-year course of the study, a computer program was developed named CASCADE-SEA, which stands

  8. Teaching and Learning Methodologies Supported by ICT Applied in Computer Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capacho, Jose

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of this paper is to show a set of new methodologies applied in the teaching of Computer Science using ICT. The methodologies are framed in the conceptual basis of the following sciences: Psychology, Education and Computer Science. The theoretical framework of the research is supported by Behavioral Theory, Gestalt Theory.…

  9. Computer-Assisted Diagnostic Decision Support: History, Challenges, and Possible Paths Forward

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Randolph A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a brief history of computer-assisted diagnosis, including challenges and future directions. Some ideas presented in this article on computer-assisted diagnostic decision support systems (CDDSS) derive from prior work by the author and his colleagues (see list in Acknowledgments) on the INTERNIST-1 and QMR projects. References…

  10. Activity-Based Support for Mobility and Collaboration in Ubiquitous Computing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bardram, Jacob Eyvind

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents the design philosophy of activity-based computing (ABC), which addresses mobility and cooperation in human work activities. Furthermore, it presents the ABC framework, which is a ubiquitous computing infrastructure supporting ABC. The idea of ABC and the aim of the ABC framework...

  11. Hospitals of the Future - Ubiquitous Computing support for Medical Work in Hospitals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bardram, Jakob Eyvind

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the visions and on-going research within creating ubiquitous computing support for medical work in the hospitals of the future. Today, clinical computer systems seldom play any role in the execution of clinical work as such. Electronic Patient Records (EPR) are more often...

  12. Effectiveness of an Electronic Performance Support System on Computer Ethics and Ethical Decision-Making Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kert, Serhat Bahadir; Uz, Cigdem; Gecu, Zeynep

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of an electronic performance support system (EPSS) on computer ethics education and the ethical decision-making processes. There were five different phases to this ten month study: (1) Writing computer ethics scenarios, (2) Designing a decision-making framework (3) Developing EPSS software (4) Using EPSS in a…

  13. Using Educational Computer Games in the Classroom: Science Teachers' Experiences, Attitudes, Perceptions, Concerns, and Support Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Yun-Jo; Haynes, Linda; D'Alba, Adriana; Chumney, Frances

    2016-01-01

    Science teachers' experiences, attitudes, perceptions, concerns, and support needs related to the use of educational computer games were investigated in this study. Data were collected from an online survey, which was completed by 111 science teachers. The results showed that 73% of participants had used computer games in teaching. Participants…

  14. Computer-Assisted Diagnostic Decision Support: History, Challenges, and Possible Paths Forward

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Randolph A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a brief history of computer-assisted diagnosis, including challenges and future directions. Some ideas presented in this article on computer-assisted diagnostic decision support systems (CDDSS) derive from prior work by the author and his colleagues (see list in Acknowledgments) on the INTERNIST-1 and QMR projects. References…

  15. Fuzzy model of the computer integrated decision support and management system in mineral processing

    OpenAIRE

    Miljanović Igor; Vujić Slobodan

    2008-01-01

    During the research on the subject of computer integrated systems for decision making and management support in mineral processing based on fuzzy logic, realized at the Department of Applied Computing and System Engineering of the Faculty of Mining and Geology, University of Belgrade, for the needs of doctoral thesis of the first author, and wider demands of the mineral industry, the incompleteness of the developed and contemporary computer integrated systems fuzzy models was noticed. The pap...

  16. Computed Tomography Support for Microgravity Materials Science Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillies, Donald C.; Engel, H. Peter; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The accurate measurement of density in both liquid and solid samples is of considerable interest to Principal Investigators with materials science experiments slated for the ISS. The work to be described is an innovative application of a conventional industrial nondestructive evaluation instrument. Traditional applications of industrial computed tomography (CT) rely on reconstructing cross sections of large structures to provide two-dimensional planar views which can identify defects such as porosity, or other material anomalies. This has been done on microgravity materials science experiments to check the integrity of ampoule-cartridge assemblies for safety purposes. With a substantially monoenergetic flux, as can be obtained with a radioactive cobalt source, there will be a direct correlation between absorption and density. Under such conditions it then becomes possible to make accurate measurements of density throughout a sample, and even when the sample itself is enclosed within a furnace and a safety required cartridge. Such a system has been installed at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and is available to PIs to examine samples before and after flight. The CT system is being used to provide density information for two purposes. Firstly, the determination of density changes from liquid to solid is vital information to the PI for purposes of modeling the solidification behavior of his sample, and to engineers who have to design containment ampoules and must allow for shrinkage and other volume changes that may occur during processing. While such information can be obtained by pycnometric measurements, the possibility of using a furnace installed on the CT system enables one to examine potentially dangerous materials having high vapor pressures, while not needing visible access to the material. In addition, uniform temperature can readily be obtained, and the system can be controlled to ramp up, hold, and ramp down while collecting data over a wide range of

  17. Computed Tomography Support for Microgravity Materials Science Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillies, Donald C.; Engel, H. Peter; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The accurate measurement of density in both liquid and solid samples is of considerable interest to Principal Investigators with materials science experiments slated for the ISS. The work to be described is an innovative application of a conventional industrial nondestructive evaluation instrument. Traditional applications of industrial computed tomography (CT) rely on reconstructing cross sections of large structures to provide two-dimensional planar views which can identify defects such as porosity, or other material anomalies. This has been done on microgravity materials science experiments to check the integrity of ampoule-cartridge assemblies for safety purposes. With a substantially monoenergetic flux, as can be obtained with a radioactive cobalt source, there will be a direct correlation between absorption and density. Under such conditions it then becomes possible to make accurate measurements of density throughout a sample, and even when the sample itself is enclosed within a furnace and a safety required cartridge. Such a system has been installed at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and is available to PIs to examine samples before and after flight. The CT system is being used to provide density information for two purposes. Firstly, the determination of density changes from liquid to solid is vital information to the PI for purposes of modeling the solidification behavior of his sample, and to engineers who have to design containment ampoules and must allow for shrinkage and other volume changes that may occur during processing. While such information can be obtained by pycnometric measurements, the possibility of using a furnace installed on the CT system enables one to examine potentially dangerous materials having high vapor pressures, while not needing visible access to the material. In addition, uniform temperature can readily be obtained, and the system can be controlled to ramp up, hold, and ramp down while collecting data over a wide range of

  18. Identifying the pitfalls for social interaction in computer-supported collaborative learning environments: a review of the research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kreijns, K.; Kirschner, P.A.; Jochems, W.

    2003-01-01

    Computer-mediated world-wide networks have enabled a shift from contiguous learning groups to asynchronous distributed learning groups utilizing computer-supported collaborative learning environments. Although these environments can support communication and collaboration, both research and field ob

  19. Arguing to learn: Supporting interactive argumentation through Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Munneke-de Vries, E.L.

    2008-01-01

    Interactive argumentation gives students the opportunity to learn because it allows them to produce, explicate, articulate, verbalise their opinions and arguments, and construct and/or reconstruct knowledge through disagreement. However, argumentation can also be very difficult and needs support at

  20. Cognitive Support for Learning Computer-Based Tasks Using Animated Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chun-Ying

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of cognitive support for learning computer-based tasks using animated demonstration (AD) on instructional efficiency. Cognitive support included (1) segmentation and learner control introducing interactive devices that allow content sequencing through a navigational menu, and content pacing through stop and…

  1. Technology Trends in Mobile Computer Supported Collaborative Learning in Elementary Education from 2009 to 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carapina, Mia; Boticki, Ivica

    2015-01-01

    This paper analyses mobile computer supported collaborative learning in elementary education worldwide focusing on technology trends for the period from 2009 to 2014. The results present representation of device types used to support collaborative activities, their distribution per users (1:1 or 1:m) and if students are learning through or around…

  2. Data Management Standards in Computer-aided Acquisition and Logistic Support (CALS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefferson, David K.

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs and discussion on data management standards in computer-aided acquisition and logistic support (CALS) are presented. CALS is intended to reduce cost, increase quality, and improve timeliness of weapon system acquisition and support by greatly improving the flow of technical information. The phase 2 standards, industrial environment, are discussed. The information resource dictionary system (IRDS) is described.

  3. Solving Human Performance Problems with Computers. A Case Study: Building an Electronic Performance Support System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raybould, Barry

    1990-01-01

    Describes the design of an electronic performance support system (PSS) that was developed to help sales and support personnel access relevant information needed for good job performance. Highlights include expert systems, databases, interactive video discs, formatting information online, information retrieval techniques, HyperCard, computer-based…

  4. Problems and Issues in Using Computer- Based Support Tools to Enhance 'Soft' Systems Methodologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Stansfield

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the issue of whether computer-based support tools can enhance the use of 'soft' systems methodologies as applied to real-world problem situations. Although work has been carried out by a number of researchers in applying computer-based technology to concepts and methodologies relating to 'soft' systems thinking such as Soft Systems Methodology (SSM, such attempts appear to be still in their infancy and have not been applied widely to real-world problem situations. This paper will highlight some of the problems that may be encountered in attempting to develop computer-based support tools for 'soft' systems methodologies. Particular attention will be paid to an attempt by the author to develop a computer-based support tool for a particular 'soft' systems method of inquiry known as the Appreciative Inquiry Method that is based upon Vickers' notion of 'appreciation' (Vickers, 196S and Checkland's SSM (Checkland, 1981. The final part of the paper will explore some of the lessons learnt from developing and applying the computer-based support tool to a real world problem situation, as well as considering the feasibility of developing computer-based support tools for 'soft' systems methodologies. This paper will put forward the point that a mixture of manual and computer-based tools should be employed to allow a methodology to be used in an unconstrained manner, but the benefits provided by computer-based technology should be utilised in supporting and enhancing the more mundane and structured tasks.

  5. CSCL for Intellectually Disabled Pupils: Stimulating Interaction by Using a Floor Control Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cress, Ulrike; Wodzicki, Katrin; Bientzle, Martina; Lingnau, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Computer-supported collaborative learning has an unexploited potential of becoming an effective learning method for pupils with intellectual disabilities. This paper aims at showing how some specific requirements of this target group may be met by structuring a learning situation with the help of "floor control," which restricts the opportunities…

  6. Space and Earth Sciences, Computer Systems, and Scientific Data Analysis Support, Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estes, Ronald H. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    This Final Progress Report covers the specific technical activities of Hughes STX Corporation for the last contract triannual period of 1 June through 30 Sep. 1993, in support of assigned task activities at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). It also provides a brief summary of work throughout the contract period of performance on each active task. Technical activity is presented in Volume 1, while financial and level-of-effort data is presented in Volume 2. Technical support was provided to all Division and Laboratories of Goddard's Space Sciences and Earth Sciences Directorates. Types of support include: scientific programming, systems programming, computer management, mission planning, scientific investigation, data analysis, data processing, data base creation and maintenance, instrumentation development, and management services. Mission and instruments supported include: ROSAT, Astro-D, BBXRT, XTE, AXAF, GRO, COBE, WIND, UIT, SMM, STIS, HEIDI, DE, URAP, CRRES, Voyagers, ISEE, San Marco, LAGEOS, TOPEX/Poseidon, Pioneer-Venus, Galileo, Cassini, Nimbus-7/TOMS, Meteor-3/TOMS, FIFE, BOREAS, TRMM, AVHRR, and Landsat. Accomplishments include: development of computing programs for mission science and data analysis, supercomputer applications support, computer network support, computational upgrades for data archival and analysis centers, end-to-end management for mission data flow, scientific modeling and results in the fields of space and Earth physics, planning and design of GSFC VO DAAC and VO IMS, fabrication, assembly, and testing of mission instrumentation, and design of mission operations center.

  7. Using Infrastructure Awareness to Support the Recruitment of Volunteer Computing Participants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramos, Juan David Hincapie

    ), and argues that participative computational infrastructures face a fundamental recruitment challenge derived from their being “invisible” computational systems. To counter this challenge this dissertation proposes the notion of Infrastructure Awareness: a feedback mechanism on the state of, and changes in......, the properties of computational infrastructures provided in the periphery of the user’s attention, and supporting gradual disclosure of detailed information on user’s request. Working with users of the Mini-Grid, this thesis shows the design process of two infrastructure awareness systems aimed at supporting...... the recruitment of participants, the implementation of one possible technical strategy, and an in-the-wild evaluation. The thesis finalizes with a discussion of the results and implications of infrastructure awareness for participative and other computational infrastructures....

  8. The Interrogative Model of Inquiry and Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakkarainen, Kai; Sintonen, Matti

    The purpose of the study was to examine how the Interrogative Modelof Inquiry (I-Model), developed by Jaakko Hintikka and Matti Sintonenfor the purposes of epistemology and philosophy of science, could be applied to analyze elementary schoolstudents'' process of inquiry in computer-supported learning. We review the basic assumptions of I-Model,report results of empirical investigation of the model in the context of computer-supportedcollaborative learning, and discuss pedagogical implications of the model. The results of the studyfurnished evidence that elementary school students were able to transform initially vagueexplanation-seeking question to a series of more specific subordinate questions while pursuing theirknowledge-seeking inquiry. The evidence presented indicates that, in an appropriate environment, it is entirelypossible for young students, with computer-supportfor collaborative learning, to engage in sophisticatedknowledge seeking analogous to scientific inquiry. We argue that the interrogative approach to inquiry canproductively be applied for conceptualizing inquiry in the context of computer-supported learning.

  9. A case study on support for students' thinking through computer-mediated communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sannomiya, M; Kawaguchi, A

    2000-08-01

    This is a case study on support for thinking through computer-mediated communication. Two graduate students were supervised in their research using computer-mediated communication, which was asynchronous and written; the supervisor was not present. The students' reports pointed out there was more planning and editing and low interactivity in this approach relative to face-to-face communication. These attributes were confirmed by their supervisor's report. The students also suggested that the latter was effective in support of a production stage of thinking in research, while the former approach was effective in support of examination of thinking. For distance education to be successful, an appropriate combination of communication media must consider students' thinking stages. Finally, transient and permanent effects should be discriminated in computer-mediated communication.

  10. Modern data-driven decision support systems: the role of computing with words and computational linguistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kacprzyk, Janusz; Zadrożny, Sławomir

    2010-05-01

    We present how the conceptually and numerically simple concept of a fuzzy linguistic database summary can be a very powerful tool for gaining much insight into the very essence of data. The use of linguistic summaries provides tools for the verbalisation of data analysis (mining) results which, in addition to the more commonly used visualisation, e.g. via a graphical user interface, can contribute to an increased human consistency and ease of use, notably for supporting decision makers via the data-driven decision support system paradigm. Two new relevant aspects of the analysis are also outlined which were first initiated by the authors. First, following Kacprzyk and Zadrożny, it is further considered how linguistic data summarisation is closely related to some types of solutions used in natural language generation (NLG). This can make it possible to use more and more effective and efficient tools and techniques developed in NLG. Second, similar remarks are given on relations to systemic functional linguistics. Moreover, following Kacprzyk and Zadrożny, comments are given on an extremely relevant aspect of scalability of linguistic summarisation of data, using a new concept of a conceptual scalability.

  11. TEACHING AND LEARNING METHODOLOGIES SUPPORTED BY ICT APPLIED IN COMPUTER SCIENCE

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of this paper is to show a set of new methodologies applied in the teaching of Computer Science using ICT. The methodologies are framed in the conceptual basis of the following sciences: Psychology, Education and Computer Science. The theoretical framework of the research is supported by Behavioral Theory, Gestalt Theory. Genetic-Cognitive Psychology Theory and Dialectics Psychology. Based on the theoretical framework the following methodologies were developed: Game Theory,...

  12. A Framework for Evaluating Computer Architectures to Support Systems with Security Requirements, with Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-11-05

    develops a set of criteria for evaluating computer architectures that are to support sy’stemns v% ith securit % requirements. Central to these criteria is the...M.. u Fu ’VMR Appendix B DEC VAX-11/780 OVERVIEW The VAX-I1/780 is a 32-bit computer with a virtual memory space of up to 4G -bytes IBI]. The

  13. Enabling Water Quality Management Decision Support and Public Outreach Using Cloud-Computing Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, A. Y.; Scanlon, B. R.; Uhlman, K.

    2013-12-01

    Watershed management is a participatory process that requires collaboration among multiple groups of people. Environmental decision support systems (EDSS) have long been used to support such co-management and co-learning processes in watershed management. However, implementing and maintaining EDSS in-house can be a significant burden to many water agencies because of budget, technical, and policy constraints. Basing on experiences from several web-GIS environmental management projects in Texas, we showcase how cloud-computing services can help shift the design and hosting of EDSS from the traditional client-server-based platforms to be simple clients of cloud-computing services.

  14. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Kasemann

    Overview During the past three months activities were focused on data operations, testing and re-enforcing shift and operational procedures for data production and transfer, MC production and on user support. Planning of the computing resources in view of the new LHC calendar in ongoing. Two new task forces were created for supporting the integration work: Site Commissioning, which develops tools helping distributed sites to monitor job and data workflows, and Analysis Support, collecting the user experience and feedback during analysis activities and developing tools to increase efficiency. The development plan for DMWM for 2009/2011 was developed at the beginning of the year, based on the requirements from the Physics, Computing and Offline groups (see Offline section). The Computing management meeting at FermiLab on February 19th and 20th was an excellent opportunity discussing the impact and for addressing issues and solutions to the main challenges facing CMS computing. The lack of manpower is particul...

  15. Fuzzy model of the computer integrated decision support and management system in mineral processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miljanović Igor

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available During the research on the subject of computer integrated systems for decision making and management support in mineral processing based on fuzzy logic, realized at the Department of Applied Computing and System Engineering of the Faculty of Mining and Geology, University of Belgrade, for the needs of doctoral thesis of the first author, and wider demands of the mineral industry, the incompleteness of the developed and contemporary computer integrated systems fuzzy models was noticed. The paper presents an original model with the seven staged hierarchical monitoring-management structure, in which the shortcomings of the models utilized today were eliminated.

  16. Computer-Based Decision Support for Railroad Transportation Systems: an Investment Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luminita DUTA

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade the development of the economical and social life increased the complexity of transportation systems. In this context, the role of Decision Support Systems (DSS became more and more important. The paper presents the characteristics, necessity, and usage of DSS in transportation and describes a practical application in the railroad field. To compute the optimal transportation capacity and flow on a certain railroad, specialized decision-support software which is available on the market was used.

  17. Scintillation properties of Eu-doped CsCl and CsBr crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeki, Keiichiro; Koshimizu, Masanori; Fujimoto, Yutaka; Yanagida, Takayuki; Okada, Go; Yahaba, Takuma; Tanaka, Hironori; Asai, Keisuke

    2016-11-01

    Eu-doped CsCl and CsBr crystals were grown by the vertical Bridgman-Stockbarger method and the scintillation properties of the crystals were investigated. The radioluminescence (RL) bands of CsCl:Eu were observed at 245-270 nm and 450 nm. The former bands are attributed to Auger-free luminescence, and the latter band is attributed to Eu2+ 5d-4f transitions. CsBr:Eu showed an RL band at 435 nm, and this broad band is attributed to Eu2+ 5d-4f transitions. The scintillation decay-time constants of the slow components for CsCl:Eu and CsBr:Eu were 0.38 and 2.8 μs, respectively. Based on the pulse-height spectra for 662 keV gamma ray from 137Cs, the light yield of CsCl:Eu and CsBr:Eu are estimated to be 1700 and 2500 photons/MeV, respectively.

  18. Extension of research data repository system to support direct compute access to biomedical datasets: enhancing Dataverse to support large datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinney, Bill; Meyer, Peter A; Crosas, Mercè; Sliz, Piotr

    2017-01-01

    Access to experimental X-ray diffraction image data is important for validation and reproduction of macromolecular models and indispensable for the development of structural biology processing methods. In response to the evolving needs of the structural biology community, we recently established a diffraction data publication system, the Structural Biology Data Grid (SBDG, data.sbgrid.org), to preserve primary experimental datasets supporting scientific publications. All datasets published through the SBDG are freely available to the research community under a public domain dedication license, with metadata compliant with the DataCite Schema (schema.datacite.org). A proof-of-concept study demonstrated community interest and utility. Publication of large datasets is a challenge shared by several fields, and the SBDG has begun collaborating with the Institute for Quantitative Social Science at Harvard University to extend the Dataverse (dataverse.org) open-source data repository system to structural biology datasets. Several extensions are necessary to support the size and metadata requirements for structural biology datasets. In this paper, we describe one such extension-functionality supporting preservation of file system structure within Dataverse-which is essential for both in-place computation and supporting non-HTTP data transfers.

  19. Computer-Supported Resolution of Measurement Conflicts: A Case-Study in Materials Science

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, de Hidde; Mars, Nicolaas; Vet, van der Paul

    1999-01-01

    Resolving conflicts between different measurements ofa property of a physical system may be a key step in a discoveryprocess. With the emergence of large-scale databases and knowledgebases with property measurements, computer support for the task ofconflict resolution has become highly desirable. We

  20. Learning about the past with new technologies : Fostering historical reasoning in computer-supported collaborative learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drie, J.P. van

    2005-01-01

    Recent technological developments have provided new environments for learning, giving rise to the question of how characteristics of such new learning environments can facilitate the process of learning in specific domains. The focus of this thesis is on computer-supported collaborative learning (CS

  1. Memory management and compiler support for rapid recovery from failures in computer systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, W. K.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes recent developments in the use of memory management and compiler technology to support rapid recovery from failures in computer systems. The techniques described include cache coherence protocols for user transparent checkpointing in multiprocessor systems, compiler-based checkpoint placement, compiler-based code modification for multiple instruction retry, and forward recovery in distributed systems utilizing optimistic execution.

  2. Computer-Supported Cooperative Prewriting for Enhancing Young EFL Learners' Writing Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Yu-Ju; Sung, Yao-Ting; Cheng, Chia-Chun; Chang, Kuo-En

    2015-01-01

    The current study investigated the effects of different computer-supported cooperative prewriting strategies (text-based brainstorming, drawing, and mind mapping) on the writing performance of elementary-school EFL (English as a foreign language) learners in Taiwan. Three intact classes of fifth graders (N = 81 students; 27 per prewriting strategy…

  3. Role of the Teacher in Computer-supported Collaborative Inquiry Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urhahne, Detlef; Schanze, Sascha; Bell, Thorsten; Mansfield, Amie; Holmes, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    The article presents an analysis of practices in teaching with computer-supported collaborative inquiry learning environments. We describe the role of the teacher in computer-supported collaborative inquiry learning by five principles that span the whole instructional process, from the preparation of the lesson up to the assessment of learning achievement. For successful implementation of computer-supported projects, the teacher has to (1) envision the lesson, (2) enable collaboration, (3) encourage students, (4) ensure learning, and (5) evaluate achievement. We analyse classroom scenarios provided by eight teachers or mentors who implemented one of four different approaches developed by multimedia researchers: Web-based Inquiry Science Environment, Modeling Across the Curriculum, Collaborative Laboratories across Europe, or Resources for Collaborative Inquiry Learning. Teachers or mentors responded to a semi-structured questionnaire about their experiences in implementing the inquiry lesson. A comparison of different classroom scenarios according to the mentioned five principles informed our analysis of teacher activities that contribute to the success of student inquiry while using such technology-enhanced approaches. We conclude with a discussion of the often neglected role of the teacher in computer-supported learning.

  4. Effectiveness of Multimedia Elements in Computer Supported Instruction: Analysis of Personalization Effects, Students' Performances and Costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidel, Mark; Luo, XiaoHui

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the efficiency of multimedia instruction at the college level by comparing the effectiveness of multimedia elements used in the computer supported learning with the cost of their preparation. Among the various technologies that advance learning, instructors and students generally identify interactive multimedia elements as…

  5. A Grid Middleware for Distributed Java Computing with MPI Binding and Process Migration Supports

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Lin(陈琳); WANG ChoLi(王卓立); Francis C.M.Lau

    2003-01-01

    "Grid" computing has emerged as an important new research field. With years of efforts, grid researchers have successfully developed grid technologies including security solutions,resource management protocols, information query protocols, and data management services. However, as the ultimate goal of grid computing is to design an infrastructure which supports dynamic,cross-organizational resource sharing, there is a need of solutions for efficient and transparent task re-scheduling in the grid.In this research, a new grid middleware is proposed, called G-JavaMPI. This middleware adds the parallel computing capability of Java to the grid with the support of a Grid-enabled message passing interface (MPI) for inter-process communication between Java processes executed at different grid points. A special feature of the proposed G-JavaMPI is the support of Java process migration with post-migration message redirection. With these supports, it is possible to migrate executing Java process from site to site for continuous computation, if some site is scheduled to be turned down for system reconfiguration. Moreover, the proposed G-JavaMPI middleware is very portable since it requires no modification of underlying OS, Java virtual machine, and MPI package. Preliminary performance tests have been conducted. The proposed mechanisms have shown good migration efficiency in a simulated grid environment.

  6. The Role of Computer-Supported Discussion for Language Teacher Education: What Do the Students Say?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, E. Marcia

    2002-01-01

    Reports findings from a study on the use of computer-mediated communication to support postgraduate second language teacher education. Findings are reported according to organizing categories of social interaction and different tasks that can effect online communicative exchanges.(Author/VWL)

  7. Effectiveness of Multimedia Elements in Computer Supported Instruction: Analysis of Personalization Effects, Students' Performances and Costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidel, Mark; Luo, XiaoHui

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the efficiency of multimedia instruction at the college level by comparing the effectiveness of multimedia elements used in the computer supported learning with the cost of their preparation. Among the various technologies that advance learning, instructors and students generally identify interactive multimedia elements as…

  8. CO methanation over supported bimetallic Ni-Fe catalysts: From computational studies towards catalyst optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kustov, Arkadii; Frey, Anne Mette; Larsen, Kasper Emil

    2007-01-01

    DFT calculations combined with a computational screening method have previously shown that bimetallic Ni-Fe alloys should be more active than the traditional Ni-based catalyst for CO methanation. That was confirmed experimentally for a number of bimetallic Ni-Fe catalysts supported on MgAl2O4. He...

  9. Computer Decision Support to Improve Autism Screening and Care in Community Pediatric Clinics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Nerissa S.; Sturm, Lynne A.; Carroll, Aaron E.; Downs, Stephen M.

    2013-01-01

    An autism module was added to an existing computer decision support system (CDSS) to facilitate adherence to recommended guidelines for screening for autism spectrum disorders in primary care pediatric clinics. User satisfaction was assessed by survey and informal feedback at monthly meetings between clinical staff and the software team. To assess…

  10. Detecting and Understanding the Impact of Cognitive and Interpersonal Conflict in Computer Supported Collaborative Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prata, David Nadler; Baker, Ryan S. J. d.; Costa, Evandro d. B.; Rose, Carolyn P.; Cui, Yue; de Carvalho, Adriana M. J. B.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a model which can automatically detect a variety of student speech acts as students collaborate within a computer supported collaborative learning environment. In addition, an analysis is presented which gives substantial insight as to how students' learning is associated with students' speech acts, knowledge that will…

  11. The Effects of Computer Supported Problem Based Learning on Students' Approaches to Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ak, Serife

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effects of computer supported problem based learning on students' approaches to learning. The research was conducted as a pre-test and posttest one-grouped design used to achieve the objectives of the study. The experimental process of study lasted 5 weeks and was carried out on 78 university…

  12. Personalized, Adaptive and Intelligent Support for Online Assignments Based on Proactive Computing

    OpenAIRE

    Marques Dias, Sergio; Reis, Sandro; Zampunieris, Denis

    2012-01-01

    We designed and implemented a prototype software system based on proactive computing, as an add-on to existing technology enhanced learning platforms. In this paper, we show how our proactive engine augmented with the adequate proactive scenarios enhances the assignments sub-system of the Moodle™ learning management system by providing personalized, adaptive and intelligent support to both online learners and teachers.

  13. A Computer Supported Teamwork Project for People with a Visual Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Greg

    2000-01-01

    Discussion of the use of computer supported teamwork (CSTW) in team-based organizations focuses on problems that visually impaired people have reading graphical user interface software via screen reader software. Describes a project that successfully used email for CSTW, and suggests issues needing further research. (LRW)

  14. Computer-aided decision support systems for endoscopy in the gastrointestinal tract: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liedlgruber, Michael; Uhl, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Today, medical endoscopy is a widely used procedure to inspect the inner cavities of the human body. The advent of endoscopic imaging techniques-allowing the acquisition of images or videos-created the possibility for the development of the whole new branch of computer-aided decision support systems. Such systems aim at helping physicians to identify possibly malignant abnormalities more accurately. At the beginning of this paper, we give a brief introduction to the history of endoscopy, followed by introducing the main types of endoscopes which emerged so far (flexible endoscope, wireless capsule endoscope, and confocal laser endomicroscope). We then give a brief introduction to computer-aided decision support systems specifically targeted at endoscopy in the gastrointestinal tract. Then we present general facts and figures concerning computer-aided decision support systems and summarize work specifically targeted at computer-aided decision support in the gastrointestinal tract. This summary is followed by a discussion of some common issues concerning the approaches reviewed and suggestions of possible ways to resolve them.

  15. Group Formation in Mobile Computer Supported Collaborative Learning Contexts: A Systematic Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amara, Sofiane; Macedo, Joaquim; Bendella, Fatima; Santos, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Learners are becoming increasingly divers. They may have much personal, social, cultural, psychological, and cognitive diversity. Forming suitable learning groups represents, therefore, a hard and time-consuming task. In Mobile Computer Supported Collaborative Learning (MCSCL) environments, this task is more difficult. Instructors need to consider…

  16. Designing scheduling concept and computer support in the food processing industries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Donk, DP; van Wezel, W; Gaalman, G; Bititci, US; Carrie, AS

    1998-01-01

    Food processing industries cope with a specific production process and a dynamic market. Scheduling the production process is thus important in being competitive. This paper proposes a hierarchical concept for structuring the scheduling and describes the (computer) support needed for this concept.

  17. Computer-Supported Cooperative Prewriting for Enhancing Young EFL Learners' Writing Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Yu-Ju; Sung, Yao-Ting; Cheng, Chia-Chun; Chang, Kuo-En

    2015-01-01

    The current study investigated the effects of different computer-supported cooperative prewriting strategies (text-based brainstorming, drawing, and mind mapping) on the writing performance of elementary-school EFL (English as a foreign language) learners in Taiwan. Three intact classes of fifth graders (N = 81 students; 27 per prewriting strategy…

  18. Person-Centered Emotional Support and Gender Attributions in Computer-Mediated Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spottswood, Erin L.; Walther, Joseph B.; Holmstrom, Amanda J.; Ellison, Nicole B.

    2013-01-01

    Without physical appearance, identification in computer-mediated communication is relatively ambiguous and may depend on verbal cues such as usernames, content, and/or style. This is important when gender-linked differences exist in the effects of messages, as in emotional support. This study examined gender attribution for online support…

  19. Computer-Supported Instructional Communication: A Multidisciplinary Account of Relevant Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rummel, Nikol; Kramer, Nicole

    2010-01-01

    The papers in the present special issue summarize research that aims at compiling and understanding variables associated with successful communication in computer-supported instructional settings. Secondly, the papers add to the question of how adaptiveness of instructional communication may be achieved. A particular strength of the special issue…

  20. Issues on the Development and Application of Computer Tools to Support Product Structuring and Configuring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Claus Thorp; Riitahuhta, A.

    2001-01-01

    that there are large positive effects to be gained for industrial companies by conscious implementing computer tools based on the results of design science. The positive effects will be measured by e.g. predictable product quality, reduced lead time, and reuse of design solutions.......The aim of this article is to make a balance on the results and challenges in the efforts to develop computer tools to support product structuring and configuring in product development projects. The balance will be made in two dimensions, a design science and an industrial dimension. The design...... science dimension focuses on our understanding of product structure and product configuration. The industrial dimension presents findings from a number of projects regarding the implementation of computer tools to support engineering designers in industrial practice. The article concludes...

  1. Computer Simulations to Support Science Instruction and Learning: A critical review of the literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smetana, Lara Kathleen; Bell, Randy L.

    2012-06-01

    Researchers have explored the effectiveness of computer simulations for supporting science teaching and learning during the past four decades. The purpose of this paper is to provide a comprehensive, critical review of the literature on the impact of computer simulations on science teaching and learning, with the goal of summarizing what is currently known and providing guidance for future research. We report on the outcomes of 61 empirical studies dealing with the efficacy of, and implications for, computer simulations in science instruction. The overall findings suggest that simulations can be as effective, and in many ways more effective, than traditional (i.e. lecture-based, textbook-based and/or physical hands-on) instructional practices in promoting science content knowledge, developing process skills, and facilitating conceptual change. As with any other educational tool, the effectiveness of computer simulations is dependent upon the ways in which they are used. Thus, we outline specific research-based guidelines for best practice. Computer simulations are most effective when they (a) are used as supplements; (b) incorporate high-quality support structures; (c) encourage student reflection; and (d) promote cognitive dissonance. Used appropriately, computer simulations involve students in inquiry-based, authentic science explorations. Additionally, as educational technologies continue to evolve, advantages such as flexibility, safety, and efficiency deserve attention.

  2. Computer-based tools for decision support at the Hanford Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doctor, P.G.; Mahaffey, J.A.; Cowley, P.J.; Freshley, M.D.; Hassig, N.L.; Brothers, J.W.; Glantz, C.S.; Strachan, D.M.

    1992-11-01

    To help integrate activities in the environmental restoration and waste management mission of the Hanford Site, the Hanford Integrated Planning Project (HIPP) was established and funded by the US Department of Energy. The project is divided into three key program elements, the first focusing on an explicit, defensible and comprehensive method for evaluating technical options. Based on the premise that computer technology can be used to support the decision-making process and facilitate integration among programs and activities, the Decision Support Tools Task was charged with assessing the status of computer technology for those purposes at the Site. The task addressed two types of tools: tools need to provide technical information and management support tools. Technical tools include performance and risk assessment models, information management systems, data and the computer infrastructure to supports models, data, and information management systems. Management decision support tools are used to synthesize information at a high` level to assist with making decisions. The major conclusions resulting from the assessment are that there is much technical information available, but it is not reaching the decision-makers in a form to be used. Many existing tools provide components that are needed to integrate site activities; however, some components are missing and, more importantly, the ``glue`` or connections to tie the components together to answer decision-makers questions is largely absent. Top priority should be given to decision support tools that support activities given in the TPA. Other decision tools are needed to facilitate and support the environmental restoration and waste management mission.

  3. Computer-based tools for decision support at the Hanford Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doctor, P.G.; Mahaffey, J.A.; Cowley, P.J.; Freshley, M.D.; Hassig, N.L.; Brothers, J.W.; Glantz, C.S.; Strachan, D.M.

    1992-11-01

    To help integrate activities in the environmental restoration and waste management mission of the Hanford Site, the Hanford Integrated Planning Project (HIPP) was established and funded by the US Department of Energy. The project is divided into three key program elements, the first focusing on an explicit, defensible and comprehensive method for evaluating technical options. Based on the premise that computer technology can be used to support the decision-making process and facilitate integration among programs and activities, the Decision Support Tools Task was charged with assessing the status of computer technology for those purposes at the Site. The task addressed two types of tools: tools need to provide technical information and management support tools. Technical tools include performance and risk assessment models, information management systems, data and the computer infrastructure to supports models, data, and information management systems. Management decision support tools are used to synthesize information at a high' level to assist with making decisions. The major conclusions resulting from the assessment are that there is much technical information available, but it is not reaching the decision-makers in a form to be used. Many existing tools provide components that are needed to integrate site activities; however, some components are missing and, more importantly, the glue'' or connections to tie the components together to answer decision-makers questions is largely absent. Top priority should be given to decision support tools that support activities given in the TPA. Other decision tools are needed to facilitate and support the environmental restoration and waste management mission.

  4. USING WIKIS AS A SUPPORT AND ASSESSMENT TOOL IN COLLABORATIVE DIGITAL GAME-BASED LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yavuz SAMUR

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL environments, there are many researches done on collaborative learning activities; however, in game-based learning environments, more research and literature on collaborative learning activities are required. Actually, both game-based learning environments and wikis enable us to use new chances for learning, especially in collaborative learning activities. Therefore, in this paper, related literature on wikis and how game & instructional designers can leverage from wikis in game-based learning settings for enhancing students’ collaborative learning activities are examined. Based on the reviewed literature, two main suggestions are given in this paper with their underlying reasons. First, using wikis as a support tool for enhancing collaboration in digital game-based learning (DGBL environments, and second using wikis as an assessment tool in DGBL are suggested.

  5. Building professional identity as computer science teachers: Supporting high school computer science teachers through reflection and community building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Lijun

    Computing education requires qualified computing teachers. The reality is that too few high schools in the U.S. have computing/computer science teachers with formal computer science (CS) training, and many schools do not have CS teacher at all. Moreover, teacher retention rate is often low. Beginning teacher attrition rate is particularly high in secondary education. Therefore, in addition to the need for preparing new CS teachers, we also need to support those teachers we have recruited and trained to become better teachers and continue to teach CS. Teacher education literature, especially teacher identity theory, suggests that a strong sense of teacher identity is a major indicator or feature of committed, qualified teachers. However, under the current educational system in the U.S., it could be challenging to establish teacher identity for high school (HS) CS teachers, e.g., due to a lack of teacher certification for CS. This thesis work centers upon understanding the sense of identity HS CS teachers hold and exploring ways of supporting their identity development through a professional development program: the Disciplinary Commons for Computing Educators (DCCE). DCCE has a major focus on promoting reflection on teaching practice and community building. With scaffolded activities such as course portfolio creation, peer review and peer observation among a group of HS CS teachers, it offers opportunities for CS teachers to explicitly reflect on and narrate their teaching, which is a central process of identity building through their participation within the community. In this thesis research, I explore the development of CS teacher identity through professional development programs. I first conducted an interview study with local HS CS teachers to understand their sense of identity and factors influencing their identity formation. I designed and enacted the professional program (DCCE) and conducted case studies with DCCE participants to understand how their

  6. Manyscale Computing for Sensor Processing in Support of Space Situational Awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmalz, M.; Chapman, W.; Hayden, E.; Sahni, S.; Ranka, S.

    2014-09-01

    Increasing image and signal data burden associated with sensor data processing in support of space situational awareness implies continuing computational throughput growth beyond the petascale regime. In addition to growing applications data burden and diversity, the breadth, diversity and scalability of high performance computing architectures and their various organizations challenge the development of a single, unifying, practicable model of parallel computation. Therefore, models for scalable parallel processing have exploited architectural and structural idiosyncrasies, yielding potential misapplications when legacy programs are ported among such architectures. In response to this challenge, we have developed a concise, efficient computational paradigm and software called Manyscale Computing to facilitate efficient mapping of annotated application codes to heterogeneous parallel architectures. Our theory, algorithms, software, and experimental results support partitioning and scheduling of application codes for envisioned parallel architectures, in terms of work atoms that are mapped (for example) to threads or thread blocks on computational hardware. Because of the rigor, completeness, conciseness, and layered design of our manyscale approach, application-to-architecture mapping is feasible and scalable for architectures at petascales, exascales, and above. Further, our methodology is simple, relying primarily on a small set of primitive mapping operations and support routines that are readily implemented on modern parallel processors such as graphics processing units (GPUs) and hybrid multi-processors (HMPs). In this paper, we overview the opportunities and challenges of manyscale computing for image and signal processing in support of space situational awareness applications. We discuss applications in terms of a layered hardware architecture (laboratory > supercomputer > rack > processor > component hierarchy). Demonstration applications include

  7. TEACHING AND LEARNING METHODOLOGIES SUPPORTED BY ICT APPLIED IN COMPUTER SCIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose CAPACHO

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this paper is to show a set of new methodologies applied in the teaching of Computer Science using ICT. The methodologies are framed in the conceptual basis of the following sciences: Psychology, Education and Computer Science. The theoretical framework of the research is supported by Behavioral Theory, Gestalt Theory. Genetic-Cognitive Psychology Theory and Dialectics Psychology. Based on the theoretical framework the following methodologies were developed: Game Theory, Constructivist Approach, Personalized Teaching, Problem Solving, Cooperative Collaborative learning, Learning projects using ICT. These methodologies were applied to the teaching learning process during the Algorithms and Complexity – A&C course, which belongs to the area of ​​Computer Science. The course develops the concepts of Computers, Complexity and Intractability, Recurrence Equations, Divide and Conquer, Greedy Algorithms, Dynamic Programming, Shortest Path Problem and Graph Theory. The main value of the research is the theoretical support of the methodologies and their application supported by ICT using learning objects. The course aforementioned was built on the Blackboard platform evaluating the operation of methodologies. The results of the evaluation are presented for each of them, showing the learning outcomes achieved by students, which verifies that methodologies are functional.

  8. Psychological and pedagogical support of the information and computer activities of students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Нина Львовна Сунгурова

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the theoretical foundations of psychological researches of the process of informatization in education, is denoted the problem information and computer activity of students. Information-computer activity of students means a qualitatively special kind of activity. In the interaction of with the modern technologies there are changes and development the indicative and operational and technical components of the activity, the spatial and temporal boundaries are transformed, the motivation of applications is formed. Information-computer environment as the context activity of the subject becomes the new source of the psychic neoplasms. The article discusses the psychological effects of using of information technologies, the conditions for ensuring the success of information and computer activity of students are allocated. The author offers a program of psycho-pedagogical support of training of students in the information and educational environment. The technology includes the following areas: the diagnostic, consultative work of the teacher and students' own activity. The organization of student support enhances knowledge about the socio-psychological aspects of the of information technology, social valuable motivation is formed, skills of the avoidance negative consequences of informatization are developed. In the process of work monitoring is conducted, individual-typological features of personality of students in interaction with technology are studied, correction of deviations is held, the psychological readiness of the subject to a productive application of information and computer technology is formed, information competence develops.

  9. Portable tongue-supported human computer interaction system design and implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quain, Rohan; Khan, Masood Mehmood

    2014-01-01

    Tongue supported human-computer interaction (TSHCI) systems can help critically ill patients interact with both computers and people. These systems can be particularly useful for patients suffering injuries above C7 on their spinal vertebrae. Despite recent successes in their application, several limitations restrict performance of existing TSHCI systems and discourage their use in real life situations. This paper proposes a low-cost, less-intrusive, portable and easy to use design for implementing a TSHCI system. Two applications of the proposed system are reported. Design considerations and performance of the proposed system are also presented.

  10. A computer-based decision support system aids distribution in planning and control of foodservices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Z R; Matthews, M E; Norback, J P

    1986-09-01

    Three scenarios, developed from typical situations in the foodservice, were stimulated on the Sperry 1100/80 computer to illustrate how the decision support system assisted dietitians. The scenarios included an analysis of price changes and discounts from a potential vendor; menu planning and pricing for a holiday dinner for 800 to 900 employees; and a comparison of costs between 1 day of meals for a patient on a general and a diabetic diet. In the analysis of price discounts, 1.5 hours were required for finding an acceptable solution using the decision support system. Prices were changed on 349 ingredients; then matrix multiplication within the decision support system resulted in recosting all menu items with those ingredients and provided new prices for cost per meals. Eight new ingredients, 13 menu items, and 2 menu plans for two different holiday meals were entered into the computer; precise amounts and prices for menu items and meals were obtained in 1 hour. Twelve hours was the minimum time estimated for finding a solution by hand calculations. Time to calculate costs of 27 different menu items for one patient day was estimated to be 9 hours manually. With the decision support system, cost comparisons were available in 1 hour. Both the usefulness and the potential of the decision support system were demonstrated.

  11. Support-Intuitionistic Fuzzy Set: A New Concept for Soft Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuan Thao Nguyen

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Today, soft computing is a field that is used a lot in solving real-world problems, such as problems in economics, finance, banking... With the aim to serve for solving the real problem, many new theories and/or tools which were proposed, improved to help soft computing used more efficiently. We can mention some theories as fuzzy sets theory (L. Zadeh, 1965, intuitionistic fuzzy set (K Atanasov, 1986. In this paper, we introduce a new notion of support-intuitionistic fuzzy (SIF set, which is the combination a intuitionistic fuzzy set with a fuzzy set. So, SIF set is a directly extension of fuzzy set and intuitionistic fuzzy sets (Atanassov. Then, we define some operators on support-intuitionistic fuzzy sets, and investigate some properties of these operators.

  12. Practical usage of computer-supported outbreak detection in five European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulth, A; Andrews, N; Ethelberg, S; Dreesman, J; Faensen, D; van Pelt, W; Schnitzler, J

    2010-09-09

    This paper discusses computer-supported outbreak detection using routine surveillance data, as implemented at six institutes for infectious disease control in five European countries. We give an overview of the systems used at the Statens Serum Institut (Denmark), Health Protection Agency (England, Wales and Northern Ireland), Robert Koch Institute (Germany), Governmental Institute of Public Health of Lower Saxony (Germany), National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (the Netherlands) and Swedish Institute for Infectious Disease Control (Sweden). Despite the usefulness of the algorithms or the outbreak detection procedure itself, all institutes have experienced certain limitations of the systems. The paper therefore concludes with a list of recommendations for institutes planning to introduce computer-supported outbreak detection, based on experiences on the practical usage of the systems. This list--which concerns usability, standard operating procedures and evaluation--might also inspire improvements of systems in use today.

  13. BRAIN-COMPUTER-INTERFACE – SUPPORTED MOTOR IMAGERY TRAININTG FOR PATIENTS WITH HEMIPARESIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Mokienko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of study was to assess the feasibility of motor imagery supported brain-computer interface in patients with hemiparesis. 13 patients with central paresis of the hand and 15 healthy volunteers were learning to control EEG-based interface with feedback. No differences on interface control quality were found between patients and healthy subjects. The trainings were accompanied by the desynchronization of sensorimotor rhythm. In patients with cortical damage the source of EEG-activity was dislocated.

  14. Digging into data using new collaborative infrastructures supporting humanities-based computer science research

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores infrastructure supporting humanities–computer science research in large–scale image data by asking: Why is collaboration a requirement for work within digital humanities projects? What is required for fruitful interdisciplinary collaboration? What are the technical and intellectual approaches to constructing such an infrastructure? What are the challenges associated with digital humanities collaborative work? We reveal that digital humanities collaboration requ...

  15. Improving Mobility in eXtreme Programming Methods through Computer Support Cooperative Work

    OpenAIRE

    Ridi Ferdiana; Paulus Insap Santosa

    2012-01-01

    One of the most challenging in eXtreme Programming is composing the entire team member and customer onsite. This problem will become seriously when the entire team member unavailable in the same place or the customer cannot give representation person for the development team. This situation will make information imperfectly for both customer and team member. In this research, we solve the problem by implementing computer support cooperative work (CSCW) as a tool to improve eXtreme Programming...

  16. Incorporating learning styles in a computer-supported collaborative learning model

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Shuangyan; Joy, Mike; Griffiths, Nathan

    2008-01-01

    Collaborative learning enables individual learners to combine their own expertise, experience and ability to accomplish a mutual learning goal. The grouping of learners, and learning from social interactions with peer-learners, are two basic characteristics of collaborative learning. For individual learners to benefit from collaborative learning, individual learners with different characteristics must be grouped together. In this paper, we propose a computer-supported collaborative learning m...

  17. A distributed computing environment with support for constraint-based task scheduling and scientific experimentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahrens, J.P.; Shapiro, L.G.; Tanimoto, S.L. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States). Dept. of Computer Science and Engineering

    1997-04-01

    This paper describes a computing environment which supports computer-based scientific research work. Key features include support for automatic distributed scheduling and execution and computer-based scientific experimentation. A new flexible and extensible scheduling technique that is responsive to a user`s scheduling constraints, such as the ordering of program results and the specification of task assignments and processor utilization levels, is presented. An easy-to-use constraint language for specifying scheduling constraints, based on the relational database query language SQL, is described along with a search-based algorithm for fulfilling these constraints. A set of performance studies show that the environment can schedule and execute program graphs on a network of workstations as the user requests. A method for automatically generating computer-based scientific experiments is described. Experiments provide a concise method of specifying a large collection of parameterized program executions. The environment achieved significant speedups when executing experiments; for a large collection of scientific experiments an average speedup of 3.4 on an average of 5.5 scheduled processors was obtained.

  18. Final report for Conference Support Grant "From Computational Biophysics to Systems Biology - CBSB12"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansmann, Ulrich H.E.

    2012-07-02

    This report summarizes the outcome of the international workshop From Computational Biophysics to Systems Biology (CBSB12) which was held June 3-5, 2012, at the University of Tennessee Conference Center in Knoxville, TN, and supported by DOE through the Conference Support Grant 120174. The purpose of CBSB12 was to provide a forum for the interaction between a data-mining interested systems biology community and a simulation and first-principle oriented computational biophysics/biochemistry community. CBSB12 was the sixth in a series of workshops of the same name organized in recent years, and the second that has been held in the USA. As in previous years, it gave researchers from physics, biology, and computer science an opportunity to acquaint each other with current trends in computational biophysics and systems biology, to explore venues of cooperation, and to establish together a detailed understanding of cells at a molecular level. The conference grant of $10,000 was used to cover registration fees and provide travel fellowships to selected students and postdoctoral scientists. By educating graduate students and providing a forum for young scientists to perform research into the working of cells at a molecular level, the workshop adds to DOE's mission of paving the way to exploit the abilities of living systems to capture, store and utilize energy.

  19. Application of Computational-Experimental Methods for Designing Optimized Semitrailer Axle Supports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Valladares

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Computational and experimental methods were applied to the design and optimization of a semitrailer axle support subjected to fatigue loads. Numerical results based on the finite element method (FEM were correlated with extensometric tests to assess the accuracy of the computational method. This paper is focused on the “minimum radius manoeuvre.” This situation represents the highly critical load case occurring in a semitrailer operation where the tractor vehicle pulls the semitrailer's kingpin at approximately 90° with respect to its longitudinal axis, and high stress and strain phenomena take place in the axle supports’ structure. Loads and boundary conditions that correspond to this load case were first adjusted by means of experimental tests and could be later applied to each semitrailer axle support in the numerical model. In this analysis, the stress-strain elastic-plastic curves of the base material, the welding, and the HAZ have been incorporated to the numerical models. Fatigue S-N curves combined with the maximum Von Mises equivalent stresses obtained in the computational analysis provided a maximum number of cycles that the semitrailer axle support could reach in case of the minimum radius manoeuvre being applied to the vehicle in a repeated manner. The initial design could then be optimized to improve its fatigue life.

  20. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    P. McBride

    The Computing Project is preparing for a busy year where the primary emphasis of the project moves towards steady operations. Following the very successful completion of Computing Software and Analysis challenge, CSA06, last fall, we have reorganized and established four groups in computing area: Commissioning, User Support, Facility/Infrastructure Operations and Data Operations. These groups work closely together with groups from the Offline Project in planning for data processing and operations. Monte Carlo production has continued since CSA06, with about 30M events produced each month to be used for HLT studies and physics validation. Monte Carlo production will continue throughout the year in the preparation of large samples for physics and detector studies ramping to 50 M events/month for CSA07. Commissioning of the full CMS computing system is a major goal for 2007. Site monitoring is an important commissioning component and work is ongoing to devise CMS specific tests to be included in Service Availa...

  1. HapHop-Physio: a computer game to support cognitive therapies in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rico-Olarte, Carolina; López, Diego M; Narváez, Santiago; Farinango, Charic D; Pharow, Peter S

    2017-01-01

    Care and support of children with physical or mental disabilities are accompanied with serious concerns for parents, families, healthcare institutions, schools, and their communities. Recent studies and technological innovations have demonstrated the feasibility of providing therapy and rehabilitation services to children supported by computer games. The aim of this paper is to present HapHop-Physio, an innovative computer game that combines exercise with fun and learning, developed to support cognitive therapies in children. Conventional software engineering methods such as the Scrum methodology, a functionality test and a related usability test, were part of the comprehensive methodology adapted to develop HapHop-Physio. The game supports visual and auditory attention therapies, as well as visual and auditory memory activities. The game was developed by a multidisciplinary team, which was based on the Hopscotch(®) platform provided by Fraunhofer Institute for Digital Media Technology IDMT Institute in Germany, and designed in collaboration with a rehabilitation clinic in Colombia. HapHop-Physio was tested and evaluated to probe its functionality and user satisfaction. The results show the development of an easy-to-use and funny game by a multidisciplinary team using state-of-the-art videogame technologies and software methodologies. Children testing the game concluded that they would like to play again while undergoing rehabilitation therapies.

  2. Teachers' Support in Using Computers for Developing Students' Listening and Speaking Skills in Pre-Sessional English Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Bin

    2013-01-01

    Many computer-assisted language learning (CALL) studies have found that teacher direction can help learners develop language skills at their own pace on computers. However, many teachers still do not know how to provide support for students to use computers to reinforce the development of their language skills. Hence, more examples of CALL…

  3. HapHop-Physio: a computer game to support cognitive therapies in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rico-Olarte C

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Carolina Rico-Olarte,1 Diego M López,1 Santiago Narváez,1 Charic D Farinango,1 Peter S Pharow2 1Faculty of Electronics and Telecommunications Engineering, Universidad del Cauca, Telematics Engineering Research Group, Popayán, Colombia; 2Fraunhofer Institute of Digital Media and Technology IDMT, Ilmenau, Germany Background: Care and support of children with physical or mental disabilities are accompanied with serious concerns for parents, families, healthcare institutions, schools, and their communities. Recent studies and technological innovations have demonstrated the feasibility of providing therapy and rehabilitation services to children supported by computer games. Objective: The aim of this paper is to present HapHop-Physio, an innovative computer game that combines exercise with fun and learning, developed to support cognitive therapies in children. Methods: Conventional software engineering methods such as the Scrum methodology, a functionality test and a related usability test, were part of the comprehensive methodology adapted to develop HapHop-Physio. Results: The game supports visual and auditory attention therapies, as well as visual and auditory memory activities. The game was developed by a multidisciplinary team, which was based on the Hopscotch® platform provided by Fraunhofer Institute for Digital Media Technology IDMT Institute in Germany, and designed in collaboration with a rehabilitation clinic in Colombia. HapHop-Physio was tested and evaluated to probe its functionality and user satisfaction. Conclusion: The results show the development of an easy-to-use and funny game by a multidisciplinary team using state-of-the-art videogame technologies and software methodologies. Children testing the game concluded that they would like to play again while undergoing rehabilitation therapies. Keywords: computer game, exer-games, cognitive therapies, rehabilitation

  4. The affect of computer and internet supported chess instruction on university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramiz Arabacı

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to teach subjects of "The King and Rook Checkmate" and "Two Bishops Checkmate" in chess with a computer program on a web page and compare the computer - internet supported instruction method with traditional instruction method.  For this reason, an experimental group (n=33, mean age=22.1 years and a control group (n=35, mean age=22.6 years were set up from participants of non-major Elective Chess course (VIII taught in Uludag University, Faculty of Education, Department of Physical Education and Sports.  As subjects of application, the fundamental chess topics of "The King and Rook Checkmate" and "Two Bishops Checkmate" were selected.  After chess instruction of 2 hours every 5 weeks, the topics of "The King and Rook Checkmate" and "Two Bishops Checkmate" were taught to both groups in 6th and 7th weeks respectively.  While traditional instruction methods were applied to control group, internet and computer supported education was given to experimental group. After the lessons, the students of both groups were asked to make "The King and Rook Checkmate" and "Two Bishops Checkmate". The analysis of the obtained data were made on SPSS 12 statistic program and evaluated with Chi - Square test.  Significance level was accepted as p

  5. Computational model for supporting SHM systems design: Damage identification via numerical analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartorato, Murilo; de Medeiros, Ricardo; Vandepitte, Dirk; Tita, Volnei

    2017-02-01

    This work presents a computational model to simulate thin structures monitored by piezoelectric sensors in order to support the design of SHM systems, which use vibration based methods. Thus, a new shell finite element model was proposed and implemented via a User ELement subroutine (UEL) into the commercial package ABAQUS™. This model was based on a modified First Order Shear Theory (FOST) for piezoelectric composite laminates. After that, damaged cantilever beams with two piezoelectric sensors in different positions were investigated by using experimental analyses and the proposed computational model. A maximum difference in the magnitude of the FRFs between numerical and experimental analyses of 7.45% was found near the resonance regions. For damage identification, different levels of damage severity were evaluated by seven damage metrics, including one proposed by the present authors. Numerical and experimental damage metrics values were compared, showing a good correlation in terms of tendency. Finally, based on comparisons of numerical and experimental results, it is shown a discussion about the potentials and limitations of the proposed computational model to be used for supporting SHM systems design.

  6. Opportunities and Needs for Mobile-Computing Technology to Support U.S. Geological Survey Fieldwork

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Nathan J.; Halsing, David L.

    2006-01-01

    To assess the opportunities and needs for mobile-computing technology at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), we conducted an internal, Internet-based survey of bureau scientists whose research includes fieldwork. In summer 2005, 144 survey participants answered 65 questions about fieldwork activities and conditions, technology to support field research, and postfieldwork data processing and analysis. Results suggest that some types of mobile-computing technology are already commonplace, such as digital cameras and Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers, whereas others are not, such as personal digital assistants (PDAs) and tablet-based personal computers (tablet PCs). The potential for PDA use in the USGS is high: 97 percent of respondents record field observations (primarily environmental conditions and water-quality data), and 87 percent take field samples (primarily water-quality data, water samples, and sediment/soil samples). The potential for tablet PC use in the USGS is also high: 59 percent of respondents map environmental features in the field, primarily by sketching in field notebooks, on aerial photographs, or on topographic-map sheets. Results also suggest that efficient mobile-computing-technology solutions could benefit many USGS scientists because most respondents spend at least 1 week per year in the field, conduct field sessions that are least 1 week in duration, have field crews of one to three people, and typically travel on foot about 1 mi from their field vehicles. By allowing researchers to enter data directly into digital databases while in the field, mobile-computing technology could also minimize postfieldwork data processing: 93 percent of respondents enter collected field data into their office computers, and more than 50 percent spend at least 1 week per year on postfieldwork data processing. Reducing postfieldwork data processing could free up additional time for researchers and result in cost savings for the bureau. Generally

  7. ENHANCING STUDENTS’ MOTIVATION IN LEARNING ENGLISH GRAMMAR THROUGH A COMPUTER-SUPPORTED LEARNING CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahruddin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This research is to examine the students‘ motivational factors and attitude towards the learning of English grammar in a Computer-supported Learning System. Twenty-nine students were taught with a student-centered approach and three grammar learning web sites were used frequently for classroom and individual English grammar practice, whereas another twenty-nine were taught with the traditional teachercentered approach. Both groups were given grammar correction and explanation tests before and after the study. After comparing the results of the pre-test and post-test with those of the control group, it was found that the experimental group excelled over the control group in both grammar correction and grammar explanation. It proved that students‘ implicit and explicit knowledge on English grammar was greatly improved by the computer-supported teaching methods and environment. Further interviews with the students also revealed that the new pedagogical practice had provided many positive motivational factors in supporting students‘ learning process.

  8. Finnish physicians' experiences with computer-supported patient information exchange and communication in clinical work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viitanen, Johanna; Nieminen, Marko; Hypponen, Hannele; Laaveri, Tinja

    2011-01-01

    Several researchers share the concern of healthcare information systems failing to support communication and collaboration in clinical practices. The objective of this paper is to investigate the current state of computer-supported patient information exchange and associated communication between clinicians. We report findings from a national survey on Finnish physicians? experiences with their currently used clinical information systems with regard to patient information documentation, retrieval, management and exchange-related tasks. The questionnaire study with 3929 physicians indicated the main concern being cross-organisational patient information delivery. In addition, physicians argued computer usage increasingly steals time and attention from caring activities and even disturbs physician?nurse collaboration. Problems in information management were particularly emphasised among those physicians working in hospitals and wards. The survey findings indicated that collaborative applications and mobile or wireless solutions have not been widely adapted in Finnish healthcare and suggested an urgent need for adopting appropriate information and communication technology applications to support information exchange and communication between physicians, and physicians and nurses.

  9. Multigrid iterative method with adaptive spatial support for computed tomography reconstruction from few-view data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ping-Chang

    2014-03-01

    Computed tomography (CT) plays a key role in modern medical system, whether it be for diagnosis or therapy. As an increased risk of cancer development is associated with exposure to radiation, reducing radiation exposure in CT becomes an essential issue. Based on the compressive sensing (CS) theory, iterative based method with total variation (TV) minimization is proven to be a powerful framework for few-view tomographic image reconstruction. Multigrid method is an iterative method for solving both linear and nonlinear systems, especially when the system contains a huge number of components. In medical imaging, image background is often defined by zero intensity, thus attaining spatial support of the image, which is helpful for iterative reconstruction. In the proposed method, the image support is not considered as a priori knowledge. Rather, it evolves during the reconstruction process. Based on the CS framework, we proposed a multigrid method with adaptive spatial support constraint. The simultaneous algebraic reconstruction (SART) with TV minimization is implemented for comparison purpose. The numerical result shows: 1. Multigrid method has better performance while less than 60 views of projection data were used, 2. Spatial support highly improves the CS reconstruction, and 3. When few views of projection data were measured, our method performs better than the SART+TV method with spatial support constraint.

  10. Issues in ATM Support of High-Performance, Geographically Distributed Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claus, Russell W.; Dowd, Patrick W.; Srinidhi, Saragur M.; Blade, Eric D.G

    1995-01-01

    This report experimentally assesses the effect of the underlying network in a cluster-based computing environment. The assessment is quantified by application-level benchmarking, process-level communication, and network file input/output. Two testbeds were considered, one small cluster of Sun workstations and another large cluster composed of 32 high-end IBM RS/6000 platforms. The clusters had Ethernet, fiber distributed data interface (FDDI), Fibre Channel, and asynchronous transfer mode (ATM) network interface cards installed, providing the same processors and operating system for the entire suite of experiments. The primary goal of this report is to assess the suitability of an ATM-based, local-area network to support interprocess communication and remote file input/output systems for distributed computing.

  11. Initial Flight Test of the Production Support Flight Control Computers at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, John; Stephenson, Mark

    1999-01-01

    The NASA Dryden Flight Research Center has completed the initial flight test of a modified set of F/A-18 flight control computers that gives the aircraft a research control law capability. The production support flight control computers (PSFCC) provide an increased capability for flight research in the control law, handling qualities, and flight systems areas. The PSFCC feature a research flight control processor that is "piggybacked" onto the baseline F/A-18 flight control system. This research processor allows for pilot selection of research control law operation in flight. To validate flight operation, a replication of a standard F/A-18 control law was programmed into the research processor and flight-tested over a limited envelope. This paper provides a brief description of the system, summarizes the initial flight test of the PSFCC, and describes future experiments for the PSFCC.

  12. Computer models used to support cleanup decision-making at hazardous and radioactive waste sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moskowitz, P.D.; Pardi, R.; DePhillips, M.P.; Meinhold, A.F.

    1992-07-01

    Massive efforts are underway to cleanup hazardous and radioactive waste sites located throughout the US To help determine cleanup priorities, computer models are being used to characterize the source, transport, fate and effects of hazardous chemicals and radioactive materials found at these sites. Although, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the US Department of Energy (DOE), and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) have provided preliminary guidance to promote the use of computer models for remediation purposes, no Agency has produced directed guidance on models that must be used in these efforts. To identify what models are actually being used to support decision-making at hazardous and radioactive waste sites, a project jointly funded by EPA, DOE and NRC was initiated. The purpose of this project was to: (1) Identify models being used for hazardous and radioactive waste site assessment purposes; and (2) describe and classify these models. This report presents the results of this study.

  13. Computer models used to support cleanup decision-making at hazardous and radioactive waste sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moskowitz, P.D.; Pardi, R.; DePhillips, M.P.; Meinhold, A.F.

    1992-07-01

    Massive efforts are underway to cleanup hazardous and radioactive waste sites located throughout the US To help determine cleanup priorities, computer models are being used to characterize the source, transport, fate and effects of hazardous chemicals and radioactive materials found at these sites. Although, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the US Department of Energy (DOE), and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) have provided preliminary guidance to promote the use of computer models for remediation purposes, no Agency has produced directed guidance on models that must be used in these efforts. To identify what models are actually being used to support decision-making at hazardous and radioactive waste sites, a project jointly funded by EPA, DOE and NRC was initiated. The purpose of this project was to: (1) Identify models being used for hazardous and radioactive waste site assessment purposes; and (2) describe and classify these models. This report presents the results of this study.

  14. High-resolution arthrosonography of the temporomandibular joint with video and computer support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sader, Robert; Zeilhofer, Hans-Florian U.; Deppe, Herbert; Horch, Hans-Henning; Kling, Bettina

    1995-05-01

    Ultrasound imaging of the temporomandibular joint has been problematic due to the lower frequency of the transducers used up to the present time. Imaging of temporomandibular joint structures being utilizable for diagnosis and therapy was only possible through time-consuming and expensive radiological image yielding procedures (computertomography, magnetic resonance imaging). 84 temporomandibular joints in 42 patients were examined clinically, radiologically, by axiographic tracing, magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound imaging. An ultrasound unit was used with a high- frequency 13MHz transducer. The temporomandibular joint was examined preauricularily; by this the lateral section of the joint could be represented. The image sequences in functional condylus movements were taped via a video output into a film recorder. Selected ultrasound images from the beginning to the end of the movement could then be digitalized and read into a personal computer to be evaluated. The computer then calculated a line of movement and the angle of the joint's course. By ultrasound imaging the joint space could be represented and measured clearly. Compared with the space measured in the magnetic resonance image the value determined by ultrasonography was a tenth power more exact. The computer-supported image analysis of the condylus movements led to an exact presentation of the condylus course. The sonographically determined condylar guidance corresponded to the value traced by axiography with high significance within a range of 3 degrees. The temporomandibular joint's disc could be localized just as exactly as with the magnetic resonance imaging. The use of a 13MHz transducer offers a new low-cost method of noninvasive dynamic imaging of important temporomandibular joint structures. The possibility of video and computer support enables movement analysis and opens new possibilities in the morphological and functional evaluation of the temporomandibular joint.

  15. Construction of Urban Design Support System using Cloud Computing Type Virtual Reality and Case Study

    OpenAIRE

    Zhenhan, Lei; Shunta, Shimizu; Natuska, Ota; Yuji, Ito; Yuesong, Zhang

    2017-01-01

    This paper contributes a design support system based on cloud-computing type virtual reality (cloud-based VR) for urban planning and urban design. A platform for Cloud-based VR technology, i.e. a VR-Cloud server, is used to open a VR dataset to public collaboration over the Internet. The digital attributes representing the design scheme of design concepts includes the land use zone, building regulations, urban design style, and other design details of architectural design, landscape, and traf...

  16. Improving Mobility in eXtreme Programming Methods through Computer Support Cooperative Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ridi Ferdiana

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available One of the most challenging in eXtreme Programming is composing the entire team member and customer onsite. This problem will become seriously when the entire team member unavailable in the same place or the customer cannot give representation person for the development team. This situation will make information imperfectly for both customer and team member. In this research, we solve the problem by implementing computer support cooperative work (CSCW as a tool to improve eXtreme Programming method. By joining these two concepts, we get 15% productivity improvement as a ratio between XP projects with CSCW and without CSCW.

  17. Designing for interaction: Six steps to designing computer-supported group-based learning

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    At present, the design of computer-supported group-based learning (CS)GBL) is often based on subjective decisions regarding tasks, pedagogy and technology, or concepts such as ‘cooperative learning’ and ‘collaborative learning’. Critical review reveals these concepts as insufficiently substantial to serve as a basis for (CS)GBL design. Furthermore, the relationship between outcome and group interaction is rarely specified a priori. Thus, there is a need for a more systematic approach to desig...

  18. Cloud Computing Applications in Support of Earth Science Activities at Marshall Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molthan, Andrew L.; Limaye, Ashutosh S.; Srikishen, Jayanthi

    2011-01-01

    Currently, the NASA Nebula Cloud Computing Platform is available to Agency personnel in a pre-release status as the system undergoes a formal operational readiness review. Over the past year, two projects within the Earth Science Office at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center have been investigating the performance and value of Nebula s "Infrastructure as a Service", or "IaaS" concept and applying cloud computing concepts to advance their respective mission goals. The Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center focuses on the transition of unique NASA satellite observations and weather forecasting capabilities for use within the operational forecasting community through partnerships with NOAA s National Weather Service (NWS). SPoRT has evaluated the performance of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model on virtual machines deployed within Nebula and used Nebula instances to simulate local forecasts in support of regional forecast studies of interest to select NWS forecast offices. In addition to weather forecasting applications, rapidly deployable Nebula virtual machines have supported the processing of high resolution NASA satellite imagery to support disaster assessment following the historic severe weather and tornado outbreak of April 27, 2011. Other modeling and satellite analysis activities are underway in support of NASA s SERVIR program, which integrates satellite observations, ground-based data and forecast models to monitor environmental change and improve disaster response in Central America, the Caribbean, Africa, and the Himalayas. Leveraging SPoRT s experience, SERVIR is working to establish a real-time weather forecasting model for Central America. Other modeling efforts include hydrologic forecasts for Kenya, driven by NASA satellite observations and reanalysis data sets provided by the broader meteorological community. Forecast modeling efforts are supplemented by short-term forecasts of convective initiation, determined by

  19. FORMATION OF PUPILS BASIC SCHOOL COGNITIVE INTEREST TO STUDY OF NATURAL SCIENCES AND MATHEMATICAL SUBJECTS WITH COMPUTER SUPPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyudmyla I. Bilousova

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The article is dedicated to the problem of the formation of the teens’ cognitive interest to the subjects of natural sciences and mathematical cycle by means of computer support. The paper analyzes the literature on the problems of using information and communication technologies in education and describes in detail the essence of the concept of "computer support", different types of basic (information, software, communications, the functions of computer support in the learning process (information, tools, simulation, visualization, automation, communication, analytical, identifies the main modes of application which include: independent, indirect, subsidiary, and analyzes the problems of studying the phenomenon of cognitive interest, finds ways for its development.

  20. Generalized environmental control and life support system computer program (G189A) configuration control. [computer subroutine libraries for shuttle orbiter analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakely, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    A G189A simulation of the shuttle orbiter EC/lSS was prepared and used to study payload support capabilities. Two master program libraries of the G189A computer program were prepared for the NASA/JSC computer system. Several new component subroutines were added to the G189A program library and many existing subroutines were revised to improve their capabilities. A number of special analyses were performed in support of a NASA/JSC shuttle orbiter EC/LSS payload support capability study.

  1. The FORCE: A portable parallel programming language supporting computational structural mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Harry F.; Benten, Muhammad S.; Brehm, Juergen; Ramanan, Aruna

    1989-01-01

    This project supports the conversion of codes in Computational Structural Mechanics (CSM) to a parallel form which will efficiently exploit the computational power available from multiprocessors. The work is a part of a comprehensive, FORTRAN-based system to form a basis for a parallel version of the NICE/SPAR combination which will form the CSM Testbed. The software is macro-based and rests on the force methodology developed by the principal investigator in connection with an early scientific multiprocessor. Machine independence is an important characteristic of the system so that retargeting it to the Flex/32, or any other multiprocessor on which NICE/SPAR might be imnplemented, is well supported. The principal investigator has experience in producing parallel software for both full and sparse systems of linear equations using the force macros. Other researchers have used the Force in finite element programs. It has been possible to rapidly develop software which performs at maximum efficiency on a multiprocessor. The inherent machine independence of the system also means that the parallelization will not be limited to a specific multiprocessor.

  2. Computer Supported Indexing: A History and Evaluation of NASA's MAI System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvester, June P.

    1997-01-01

    Computer supported or machine aided indexing (MAI) can be categorized in multiple ways. The system used by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Center for AeroSpace Information (CASI) is described as semantic and computational. It's based on the co-occurrence of domain-specific terminology in parts of a sentence, and the probability that an indexer will assign a particular index term when a given word or phrase is encountered in text. The NASA CASI system is run on demand by the indexer and responds in 3 to 9 seconds with a list of suggested, authorized terms. The system was originally based on a syntactic system used in the late 1970's by the Defense Technical Information Center (DTIC). The NASA mainframe-supported system consists of three components: two programs and a knowledge base (KB). The evolution of the system is described and flow charts illustrate the MAI procedures. Tests used to evaluate NASA's MAI system were limited to those that would not slow production. A very early test indicated that MAI saved about 3 minutes and provided several additional terms for each document indexed. It also was determined that time and other resources spent in careful construction of the KB pay off with high-quality output and indexer acceptance of MAI results.

  3. An Open Environment to Support the Development of Computational Chemistry Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejarano, Bernardo Palacios; Ruiz, Irene Luque; Gómez-Nieto, Miguel Ángel

    2009-08-01

    In this paper we present an open software environment devoted to support the investigations in computational chemistry. The software, named CoChiSE (Computational Chimica Software Environment) is fully developed in Java using Eclipse as IDE; in this way, the system is integrated by different perspectives oriented to solve different aspects of the computational chemistry research. CoChiSE is able to manage large chemical databases, maintaining information about molecules and properties as well; this information can be exported and imported to/from the most popular standard file formats. The system also allows the user to perform the calculation of different type of isomorphism and molecular similarity. Besides, CoChiSE incorporates a perspective in charge of the calculation of molecular descriptors, considering more than four hundred descriptors of different categories. All the information and system perspectives are integrated in the same environment, so a huge amount of information is managed by the user. The characteristics of the developed system permit the easy integration of either user, proprietary and free software.

  4. A Computing Environment to Support Repeatable Scientific Big Data Experimentation of World-Wide Scientific Literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlicher, Bob G [ORNL; Kulesz, James J [ORNL; Abercrombie, Robert K [ORNL; Kruse, Kara L [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    A principal tenant of the scientific method is that experiments must be repeatable and relies on ceteris paribus (i.e., all other things being equal). As a scientific community, involved in data sciences, we must investigate ways to establish an environment where experiments can be repeated. We can no longer allude to where the data comes from, we must add rigor to the data collection and management process from which our analysis is conducted. This paper describes a computing environment to support repeatable scientific big data experimentation of world-wide scientific literature, and recommends a system that is housed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in order to provide value to investigators from government agencies, academic institutions, and industry entities. The described computing environment also adheres to the recently instituted digital data management plan mandated by multiple US government agencies, which involves all stages of the digital data life cycle including capture, analysis, sharing, and preservation. It particularly focuses on the sharing and preservation of digital research data. The details of this computing environment are explained within the context of cloud services by the three layer classification of Software as a Service , Platform as a Service , and Infrastructure as a Service .

  5. Binary Color Classification For Brain Computer Interface Using Neural Networks And Support Vector Machines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charmi Sunil Mehta

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available As the power of modern computers grows alongside our understanding of the human brain, we move a step closer in transforming some pretty spectacular science fiction into reality. The advent of Brain Computer Interface (BCI is indeed leading us to a burgeoning era of complete automation empowering our interaction with computer not only with robustness but with also a gift of intelligence. For the fraction of our society suffering from severe motor disabilities BCI has offered a novel solution of overcoming the problems faced in communicating and environment control. Thus the purpose of our current research is to harness the brain‟s ability to generate Visually Evoked Potentials (VEPs by capturing the response of the brain to the transitions of color from grey to green and grey to red. Our prime focus is to explore EEG-based signal processing techniques in order to classify two colors; which can be further deployed in future by coupling the actuators so as to perform few basic tasks. The extracted EEG features are classified using Support Vector Machines (SVM and Artificial Neural Networks (ANN. We recorded 100% accuracy on testing the model after training and validation process. Moreover, we obtained 90% accuracy on re-testing the model with all samples acquired for the task using Quadratic SVM classifier.

  6. An effective support system of emergency medical services with tablet computers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Kosuke C; Inoue, Satoshi; Sakamoto, Yuichiro

    2015-02-27

    There were over 5,000,000 ambulance dispatches during 2010 in Japan, and the time for transportation has been increasing, it took over 37 minutes from dispatch to the hospitals. A way to reduce transportation time by ambulance is to shorten the time of searching for an appropriate facility/hospital during the prehospital phase. Although the information system of medical institutions and emergency medical service (EMS) was established in 2003 in Saga Prefecture, Japan, it has not been utilized efficiently. The Saga Prefectural Government renewed the previous system in an effort to make it the real-time support system that can efficiently manage emergency demand and acceptance for the first time in Japan in April 2011. The objective of this study was to evaluate if the new system promotes efficient emergency transportation for critically ill patients and provides valuable epidemiological data. The new system has provided both emergency personnel in the ambulance, or at the scene, and the medical staff in each hospital to be able to share up-to-date information about available hospitals by means of cloud computing. All 55 ambulances in Saga are equipped with tablet computers through third generation/long term evolution networks. When the emergency personnel arrive on the scene and discern the type of patient's illness, they can search for an appropriate facility/hospital with their tablet computer based on the patient's symptoms and available medical specialists. Data were collected prospectively over a three-year period from April 1, 2011 to March 31, 2013. The transportation time by ambulance in Saga was shortened for the first time since the statistics were first kept in 1999; the mean time was 34.3 minutes in 2010 (based on administrative statistics) and 33.9 minutes (95% CI 33.6-34.1) in 2011. The ratio of transportation to the tertiary care facilities in Saga has decreased by 3.12% from the year before, 32.7% in 2010 (regional average) and 29.58% (9085

  7. COLLAGE: A Collaborative Learning Design Editor Based on Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Leo, Davinia; Villasclaras-Fernandez, Eloy D.; Asensio-Perez, Juan I.; Dimitriadis, Yannis; Jorrin-Abellan, Ivan M.; Ruiz-Requies, Ines; Rubia-Avi, Bartolome

    2006-01-01

    This paper introduces "Collage", a high-level IMS-LD compliant authoring tool that is specialized for CSCL (Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning). Nowadays CSCL is a key trend in e-learning since it highlights the importance of social interactions as an essential element of learning. CSCL is an interdisciplinary domain, which…

  8. Proceedings of the Workshop on Methods & Tools for Computer Supported Collaborative Creativity Process: Linking creativity & informal learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Retalis, Symeon; Sloep, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Retalis, S., & Sloep, P. B. (Eds.) (2009). Collection of 4 symposium papers at EC-TEL 2009. Proceedings of the Workshop on Methods & Tools for Computer Supported Collaborative Creativity Process: Linking creativity & informal learning. September, 30, 2009, Nice,

  9. Computer Support for Knowledge Management within R&D and the Teaching of Bachelor Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Svetsky

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract—Knowledge plays a key role within research, development and education. One of the major challenges for knowledge management is to select the right knowledge from numerous sources, including know - how of individuals, and to transform it into useful, practicable knowledge. The focus should always be on supporting strategic organisational goals. In this context, from the organisation’s strategic point of view, it is very important to link an institutional knowledge management system with the knowledge management systems of individuals. This paper presents personalised IT - support for knowledge management within industrial R&D and especially for teaching and learning. The support is based on the use of a long term developed in - house software that enables individuals (managers and teachers to process and manage knowledge on their desktop computers in a user friendly way. Within the implementation of “Technology - enhanced learning” at the Faculty of Materials Science and Technology, a pre - programmed work environment called BIKE (Batch Information and Knowledge Editor was developed. However, this desktop environment works also as a teacher’s personalized knowledge management system. It is programmed by the lead author of this paper who is a teacher; therefore the outcomes into teaching bachelor students are implemented directly into the classroom. The paper also presents how such IT - support complements, at a personalized level, the existing organizational knowledge management tool known as the university’s Academic Information System. Some examples from teaching are presented, communication channels (teacher - student forums were also mentioned as a part of the teacher’s knowledge management personalised system. In this case, the BIKE environment is demonstrated as an alternative to learning management systems based on the so called WEB 2.0 technologies.

  10. The role delegation authorization model of a computer-supported cooperative design system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Hongxue; LIU Yongxian; GUO Xiuying; SHENG Zhongqi

    2007-01-01

    According to the specific characteristics of a computer-supported cooperative design(CSCD)system,the characteristics of role delegation authorization(RDA)are analyzed and deduced,and a set of fitful status is arrived at.Because of the diversified characteristics of RDA features in different systems,the RDA model has multi-varying status.On the basis of the basic model of role-based access control (RBAC),some basic characteristics of RDA are summed up.Then,according to the specific characteristics of CSCD system,the characteristics of RDA are recombined to develop a RDA model that is suitable for the CSCD system.It is different from the conventional role authorization models of RBAC,that is,it adopts the decentralized authorization management instead of the centralized one in CSCD system,which makes the management more flexible.This model is verified through a specific case of CSCD system.

  11. Application of mobile computers in a measuring system supporting examination of posture diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piekarski, Jacek; Klimiec, Ewa; Zaraska, Wiesław

    2013-07-01

    Measuring system designed and manufactured by the authors and based on mobile computers (smartphones and tablets) working as data recorders has been invented to support diagnosis of orthopedic, especially feet, diseases. The basic idea is to examine a patient in his natural environment, during the usual activities (such as walking or running). The paper describes the proposed system with sensors manufactured from piezoelectric film (PVDF film) and placed in the shoe insole. The mechanical reliability of PVDF film is excellent, though elimination of the pyroelectric effect is required. A possible solution of the problem and the test results are presented in the paper. Data recording is based on wireless transmission to a mobile device used as a data logger.

  12. Bio-signal analysis system design with support vector machines based on cloud computing service architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chia-Ping; Chen, Wei-Hsin; Chen, Jia-Ming; Hsu, Kai-Ping; Lin, Jeng-Wei; Chiu, Ming-Jang; Chen, Chi-Huang; Lai, Feipei

    2010-01-01

    Today, many bio-signals such as Electroencephalography (EEG) are recorded in digital format. It is an emerging research area of analyzing these digital bio-signals to extract useful health information in biomedical engineering. In this paper, a bio-signal analyzing cloud computing architecture, called BACCA, is proposed. The system has been designed with the purpose of seamless integration into the National Taiwan University Health Information System. Based on the concept of. NET Service Oriented Architecture, the system integrates heterogeneous platforms, protocols, as well as applications. In this system, we add modern analytic functions such as approximated entropy and adaptive support vector machine (SVM). It is shown that the overall accuracy of EEG bio-signal analysis has increased to nearly 98% for different data sets, including open-source and clinical data sets.

  13. Categorisation of visualisation methods to support the design of Human-Computer Interaction Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Katie; Tiwari, Ashutosh; Alcock, Jeffrey; Bermell-Garcia, Pablo

    2016-07-01

    During the design of Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) systems, the creation of visual artefacts forms an important part of design. On one hand producing a visual artefact has a number of advantages: it helps designers to externalise their thought and acts as a common language between different stakeholders. On the other hand, if an inappropriate visualisation method is employed it could hinder the design process. To support the design of HCI systems, this paper reviews the categorisation of visualisation methods used in HCI. A keyword search is conducted to identify a) current HCI design methods, b) approaches of selecting these methods. The resulting design methods are filtered to create a list of just visualisation methods. These are then categorised using the approaches identified in (b). As a result 23 HCI visualisation methods are identified and categorised in 5 selection approaches (The Recipient, Primary Purpose, Visual Archetype, Interaction Type, and The Design Process).

  14. Solution based on Case-Based Reasoning for supporting a computer auditing database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasser Azán-Basallo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In the Security Department Computing ETECSA through diagnostic matrices or checklists, the audit process is performed to Database Management Systems. After completing the monitoring of DBMS, experts determine the risk level of information security in terms of High, Medium and Low. The use of artificial intelligence technique Reasoning Case-Based, for use in the analysis phase of evaluation of the risk of security of the information to take advantage of the experience gained in previous audits of this type is proposed. He leaned on ETECSA specialists in determining the features that make the vector cases. The incorporation of Reasoning Case-Based technique to support the analysis of information security audits managers’ database, streamlines the process and helps in the analysis of risks to information security auditors.

  15. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The Computing Team successfully completed the storage, initial processing, and distribution for analysis of proton-proton data in 2011. There are still a variety of activities ongoing to support winter conference activities and preparations for 2012. Heavy ions The heavy-ion run for 2011 started in early November and has already demonstrated good machine performance and success of some of the more advanced workflows planned for 2011. Data collection will continue until early December. Facilities and Infrastructure Operations Operational and deployment support for WMAgent and WorkQueue+Request Manager components, routinely used in production by Data Operations, are provided. The GlideInWMS and components installation are now deployed at CERN, which is added to the GlideInWMS factory placed in the US. There has been new operational collaboration between the CERN team and the UCSD GlideIn factory operators, covering each others time zones by monitoring/debugging pilot jobs sent from the facto...

  16. Efficient Support for Matrix Computations on Heterogeneous Multi-core and Multi-GPU Architectures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Fengguang [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Tomov, Stanimire [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Dongarra, Jack [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2011-06-01

    We present a new methodology for utilizing all CPU cores and all GPUs on a heterogeneous multicore and multi-GPU system to support matrix computations e ciently. Our approach is able to achieve the objectives of a high degree of parallelism, minimized synchronization, minimized communication, and load balancing. Our main idea is to treat the heterogeneous system as a distributed-memory machine, and to use a heterogeneous 1-D block cyclic distribution to allocate data to the host system and GPUs to minimize communication. We have designed heterogeneous algorithms with two di erent tile sizes (one for CPU cores and the other for GPUs) to cope with processor heterogeneity. We propose an auto-tuning method to determine the best tile sizes to attain both high performance and load balancing. We have also implemented a new runtime system and applied it to the Cholesky and QR factorizations. Our experiments on a compute node with two Intel Westmere hexa-core CPUs and three Nvidia Fermi GPUs demonstrate good weak scalability, strong scalability, load balance, and e ciency of our approach.

  17. Comparative Structural and Computational Analysis Supports Eighteen Cellulose Synthases in the Plant Cellulose Synthesis Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, B Tracy; Mansouri, Katayoun; Singh, Abhishek; Du, Juan; Davis, Jonathan K; Lee, Jung-Goo; Slabaugh, Erin; Vandavasi, Venu Gopal; O'Neill, Hugh; Roberts, Eric M; Roberts, Alison W; Yingling, Yaroslava G; Haigler, Candace H

    2016-06-27

    A six-lobed membrane spanning cellulose synthesis complex (CSC) containing multiple cellulose synthase (CESA) glycosyltransferases mediates cellulose microfibril formation. The number of CESAs in the CSC has been debated for decades in light of changing estimates of the diameter of the smallest microfibril formed from the β-1,4 glucan chains synthesized by one CSC. We obtained more direct evidence through generating improved transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images and image averages of the rosette-type CSC, revealing the frequent triangularity and average cross-sectional area in the plasma membrane of its individual lobes. Trimeric oligomers of two alternative CESA computational models corresponded well with individual lobe geometry. A six-fold assembly of the trimeric computational oligomer had the lowest potential energy per monomer and was consistent with rosette CSC morphology. Negative stain TEM and image averaging showed the triangularity of a recombinant CESA cytosolic domain, consistent with previous modeling of its trimeric nature from small angle scattering (SAXS) data. Six trimeric SAXS models nearly filled the space below an average FF-TEM image of the rosette CSC. In summary, the multifaceted data support a rosette CSC with 18 CESAs that mediates the synthesis of a fundamental microfibril composed of 18 glucan chains.

  18. Computational wing design in support of an NLF variable sweep transition flight experiment. [Natural Laminar Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waggoner, E. G.; Campbell, R. L.; Phillips, P. S.

    1985-01-01

    A natural laminar flow outer panel wing glove has been designed for a variable sweep fighter aircraft using state-of-the-art computational techniques. Testing of the design will yield wing pressure and boundary-layer data under actual flight conditions and environment. These data will be used to enhance the understanding of the interaction between crossflow and Tollmien-Schlichting disturbances on boundary-layer transition. The outer wing panel was contoured such that a wide range of favorable pressure gradients could be obtained on the wing upper surface. Extensive computations were performed to support the design effort which relied on two- and three-dimensional transonic design and analysis techniques. A detailed description of the design procedure that evolved during this study is presented. Results on intermediate designs at various stages in the design process demonstrate how the various physical and aerodynamic constraints were integrated into the design. Final results of the glove design analyzed as part of the complete aircraft configuration with a full-potential wing/body analysis code indicate that the aerodynamic design objectives were met.

  19. The influence of audio communications technology on computer-supported collaborative learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Whitelock

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent years there has been an appreciation of the benefits that can be obtained by students working in groups or teams using computers (Eraut and Hoyles, 1988. But there is a difference in opinion as to how a partner enhances learning, and in particular how well adult learners do in the collaborative setting. In order to capitalize on the opportunities offered by new technologies, we need to understand more fully how the process of collaboration is effected by different communication technologies, and how the technologies themselves might be used to best advantage for the benefit of distance learners. However, another factor, apart from the technology itself, which is thought to influence computer-supported collaborative learning is in the gender distribution of the group. A number of classroom studies have shown gender differences when children work together with computers, and these have been reported from a number of subject-domains including science (Scanlon et al, 1993; Littleton et al, 1992. Since our own expertise is in the area of science learning, we selected a non-trivial physics task for the subjects to work with, and that is in the area of elastic collisions. Previous studies (Villani and Pacca, 1990; Whitelock et al, 1993 have shown that both adults and school-children have difficulty in predicting the subsequent motion of balls or ice pucks after they collide. Villani's study stresses that even postgraduate students tend to revert to their informal commonsense notions unless they are cued to use formal representations of these types of problem. These studies have demonstrated that the topic of elastic collisions is a complex yet fruitful one in which to engage students in group work.

  20. Effect of a suspension seat support chair on the trunk flexion angle and gluteal pressure during computer work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Won-Gyu

    2015-09-01

    [Purpose] We assessed the effects of a suspension seat support chair on the trunk flexion angle and gluteal pressure during computer work. [Subjects] Ten males were recruited. [Methods] The suspension seat support was developed to prevent abnormal gluteal pressure and a slumped sitting posture during computer work. The gluteal pressure was measured with a TekScan system and the trunk flexion angle was measured with a video camera, to compare the differences between a general chair and the suspension seat support. [Results] The gluteal peak pressures were decreased significantly in the suspension seat support versus the general chair. The trunk flexion angle was also decreased significantly in the suspension seat support compared with the general chair. [Conclusions] This study suggests that the suspension seat support chair contributes to preventing abnormal gluteal pressure and a slumped sitting posture.

  1. Group Decision Support Systems and Group Communication: A Comparison of Decision Making in Computer-Supported and Nonsupported Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Marshall Scott; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Explores the effects of Group Decision Support Systems (GDSS) on small group communication and decision-making processes. Finds that comparing GDSS, manual, and baseline conditions enables separation of effects resulting from procedural structures from those resulting from computerization. Results support some aspects of the research model and…

  2. Supporting Teachers in Designing CSCL Activities: A Case Study of Principle-based Pedagogical Patterns in Networked Second Language Classrooms

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yun Wen; Chee-Kit Looi; Wenli Chen

    2012-01-01

      This paper proposes the identification and use of principle-based pedagogical patterns to help teachers to translate design principles into actionable teaching activities, and to scaffold student...

  3. Supporting Collaborative Learning and Problem-Solving in a Constraint-Based CSCL Environment for UML Class Diagrams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghaei, Nilufar; Mitrovic, Antonija; Irwin, Warwick

    2007-01-01

    We present COLLECT-UML, a constraint-based intelligent tutoring system (ITS) that teaches object-oriented analysis and design using Unified Modelling Language (UML). UML is easily the most popular object-oriented modelling technology in current practice. While teaching how to design UML class diagrams, COLLECT-UML also provides feedback on…

  4. Supporting Teachers in Designing CSCL Activities: A Case Study of Principle-Based Pedagogical Patterns in Networked Second Language Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Yun; Looi, Chee-Kit; Chen, Wenli

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes the identification and use of principle-based pedagogical patterns to help teachers to translate design principles into actionable teaching activities, and to scaffold student learning with sufficient flexibility and creativity. A set of pedagogical patterns for networked Second language (L2) learning, categorized and…

  5. Supporting Collaborative Learning and Problem-Solving in a Constraint-Based CSCL Environment for UML Class Diagrams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghaei, Nilufar; Mitrovic, Antonija; Irwin, Warwick

    2007-01-01

    We present COLLECT-UML, a constraint-based intelligent tutoring system (ITS) that teaches object-oriented analysis and design using Unified Modelling Language (UML). UML is easily the most popular object-oriented modelling technology in current practice. While teaching how to design UML class diagrams, COLLECT-UML also provides feedback on…

  6. From Theory Use to Theory Building in Learning Analytics: A Commentary on "Learning Analytics to Support Teachers during Synchronous CSCL"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bodong

    2015-01-01

    In this commentary on Van Leeuwen (2015, this issue), I explore the relation between theory and practice in learning analytics. Specifically, I caution against adhering to one specific theoretical doctrine while ignoring others, suggest deeper applications of cognitive load theory to understanding teaching with analytics tools, and comment on…

  7. ELASTO-KINEMATIC COMPUTATIONAL MODEL OF SUSPENSION WITH FLEXIBLE SUPPORTING ELEMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomáš Vrána

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the impact of flexibility of individual supporting elements of independent suspension on its elasto-kinematic characteristics. The toe and camber angle are the geometric parameters of the suspension, which waveforms and their changes under the action of vertical, longitudinal and transverse forces affect the stability of the vehicle. To study these dependencies, the computational multibody system (MBS model of axle suspension in the system HyperWorks is created. There are implemented Finite-Element-Method (FEM models reflecting the flexibility of the main supporting elements. These are subframe, the longitudinal arms, transverse arms and knuckle. Flexible models are developed using Component Mode Synthesis (CMS by Craig-Bampton. The model further comprises force elements, such as helical springs, shock absorbers with a stop of the wheel and the anti-roll bar. Rubber-metal bushings are modeled flexibly, using nonlinear deformation characteristics. Simulation results are validated by experimental measurements of geometric parameters of real suspension.

  8. Can the Outputs of LGN Y-Cells Support Emotion Recognition? A Computational Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea De Cesarei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been suggested that emotional visual input is processed along both a slower cortical pathway and a faster subcortical pathway which comprises the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN, the superior colliculus, the pulvinar, and finally the amygdala. However, anatomical as well as functional evidence concerning the subcortical route is lacking. Here, we adopt a computational approach in order to investigate whether the visual representation that is achieved in the LGN may support emotion recognition and emotional response along the subcortical route. In four experiments, we show that the outputs of LGN Y-cells support neither facial expression categorization nor the same/different expression matching by an artificial classificator. However, the same classificator is able to perform at an above chance level in a statistics-based categorization of scenes containing animals and scenes containing people and of light and dark patterns. It is concluded that the visual representation achieved in the LGN is insufficient to allow for the recognition of emotional facial expression.

  9. Support for the Core Research Activities and Studies of the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board (CSTB)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jon Eisenberg, Director, CSTB

    2008-05-13

    The Computer Science and Telecommunications Board of the National Research Council considers technical and policy issues pertaining to computer science (CS), telecommunications, and information technology (IT). The functions of the board include: (1) monitoring and promoting the health of the CS, IT, and telecommunications fields, including attention as appropriate to issues of human resources and funding levels and program structures for research; (2) initiating studies involving CS, IT, and telecommunications as critical resources and sources of national economic strength; (3) responding to requests from the government, non-profit organizations, and private industry for expert advice on CS, IT, and telecommunications issues; and to requests from the government for expert advice on computer and telecommunications systems planning, utilization, and modernization; (4) fostering interaction among CS, IT, and telecommunications researchers and practitioners, and with other disciplines; and providing a base of expertise in the National Research Council in the areas of CS, IT, and telecommunications. This award has supported the overall operation of CSTB. Reports resulting from the Board's efforts have been widely disseminated in both electronic and print form, and all CSTB reports are available at its World Wide Web home page at cstb.org. The following reports, resulting from projects that were separately funded by a wide array of sponsors, were completed and released during the award period: 2007: * Summary of a Workshop on Software-Intensive Systems and Uncertainty at Scale * Social Security Administration Electronic Service Provision: A Strategic Assessment * Toward a Safer and More Secure Cyberspace * Software for Dependable Systems: Sufficient Evidence? * Engaging Privacy and Information Technology in a Digital Age * Improving Disaster Management: The Role of IT in Mitigation, Preparedness, Response, and Recovery 2006: * Renewing U.S. Telecommunications

  10. Mississippi Curriculum Framework for Computer Information Systems Technology. Computer Information Systems Technology (Program CIP: 52.1201--Management Information Systems & Business Data). Computer Programming (Program CIP: 52.1201). Network Support (Program CIP: 52.1290--Computer Network Support Technology). Postsecondary Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mississippi Research and Curriculum Unit for Vocational and Technical Education, State College.

    This document, which is intended for use by community and junior colleges throughout Mississippi, contains curriculum frameworks for two programs in the state's postsecondary-level computer information systems technology cluster: computer programming and network support. Presented in the introduction are program descriptions and suggested course…

  11. LHC Computing Grid Project Launches intAction with International Support. A thousand times more computing power by 2006

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The first phase of the LHC Computing Grid project was approved at an extraordinary meeting of the Council on 20 September 2001. CERN is preparing for the unprecedented avalanche of data that will be produced by the Large Hadron Collider experiments. A thousand times more computer power will be needed by 2006! CERN's need for a dramatic advance in computing capacity is urgent. As from 2006, the four giant detectors observing trillions of elementary particle collisions at the LHC will accumulate over ten million Gigabytes of data, equivalent to the contents of about 20 million CD-ROMs, each year of its operation. A thousand times more computing power will be needed than is available to CERN today. The strategy the collabortations have adopted to analyse and store this unprecedented amount of data is the coordinated deployment of Grid technologies at hundreds of institutes which will be able to search out and analyse information from an interconnected worldwide grid of tens of thousands of computers and storag...

  12. Supporting Negotiation Behavior with Haptics-Enabled Human-Computer Interfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Küçükyılmaz, Ayşe; Sezgin, Tevfik Metin; Başdoğan, Çağatay

    2012-01-01

    An active research goal for human-computer interaction is to allow humans to communicate with computers in an intuitive and natural fashion, especially in real-life interaction scenarios. One approach that has been advocated to achieve this has been to build computer systems with human-like qualities and capabilities. In this paper, we present insight on how human-computer interaction can be enriched by employing the computers with behavioral patterns that naturally appear in human-human nego...

  13. Improving Computational Efficiency of Model Predictive Control Genetic Algorithms for Real-Time Decision Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minsker, B. S.; Zimmer, A. L.; Ostfeld, A.; Schmidt, A.

    2014-12-01

    Enabling real-time decision support, particularly under conditions of uncertainty, requires computationally efficient algorithms that can rapidly generate recommendations. In this paper, a suite of model predictive control (MPC) genetic algorithms are developed and tested offline to explore their value for reducing CSOs during real-time use in a deep-tunnel sewer system. MPC approaches include the micro-GA, the probability-based compact GA, and domain-specific GA methods that reduce the number of decision variable values analyzed within the sewer hydraulic model, thus reducing algorithm search space. Minimum fitness and constraint values achieved by all GA approaches, as well as computational times required to reach the minimum values, are compared to large population sizes with long convergence times. Optimization results for a subset of the Chicago combined sewer system indicate that genetic algorithm variations with coarse decision variable representation, eventually transitioning to the entire range of decision variable values, are most efficient at addressing the CSO control problem. Although diversity-enhancing micro-GAs evaluate a larger search space and exhibit shorter convergence times, these representations do not reach minimum fitness and constraint values. The domain-specific GAs prove to be the most efficient and are used to test CSO sensitivity to energy costs, CSO penalties, and pressurization constraint values. The results show that CSO volumes are highly dependent on the tunnel pressurization constraint, with reductions of 13% to 77% possible with less conservative operational strategies. Because current management practices may not account for varying costs at CSO locations and electricity rate changes in the summer and winter, the sensitivity of the results is evaluated for variable seasonal and diurnal CSO penalty costs and electricity-related system maintenance costs, as well as different sluice gate constraint levels. These findings indicate

  14. Learning support assessment study of a computer simulation for the development of microbial identification strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, T E; Gedney, C

    2001-05-01

    This paper describes a study that examined how microbiology students construct knowledge of bacterial identification while using a computer simulation. The purpose of this study was to understand how the simulation affects the cognitive processing of students during thinking, problem solving, and learning about bacterial identification and to determine how the simulation facilitates the learning of a domain-specific problem-solving strategy. As part of an upper-division microbiology course, five students participated in several simulation assignments. The data were collected using think-aloud protocol and video action logs as the students used the simulation. The analysis revealed two major themes that determined the performance of the students: Simulation Usage-how the students used the software features and Problem-Solving Strategy Development-the strategy level students started with and the skill level they achieved when they completed their use of the simulation. SEVERAL CONCLUSIONS EMERGED FROM THE ANALYSIS OF THE DATA: (i) The simulation affects various aspects of cognitive processing by creating an environment that makes it possible to practice the application of a problem-solving strategy. The simulation was used as an environment that allowed students to practice the cognitive skills required to solve an unknown. (ii) Identibacter (the computer simulation) may be considered to be a cognitive tool to facilitate the learning of a bacterial identification problem-solving strategy. (iii) The simulation characteristics did support student learning of a problem-solving strategy. (iv) Students demonstrated problem-solving strategy development specific to bacterial identification. (v) Participants demonstrated an improved performance from their repeated use of the simulation.

  15. Learning Support Assessment Study of a Computer Simulation for the Development of Microbial Identification Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tristan E. Johnson

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a study that examined how microbiology students construct knowledge of bacterial identification while using a computer simulation. The purpose of this study was to understand how the simulation affects the cognitive processing of students during thinking, problem solving, and learning about bacterial identification and to determine how the simulation facilitates the learning of a domain-specific problem-solving strategy. As part of an upper-division microbiology course, five students participated in several simulation assignments. The data were collected using think-aloud protocol and video action logs as the students used the simulation. The analysis revealed two major themes that determined the performance of the students: Simulation Usage—how the students used the software features and Problem-Solving Strategy Development—the strategy level students started with and the skill level they achieved when they completed their use of the simulation. Several conclusions emerged from the analysis of the data: (i The simulation affects various aspects of cognitive processing by creating an environment that makes it possible to practice the application of a problem-solving strategy. The simulation was used as an environment that allowed students to practice the cognitive skills required to solve an unknown. (ii Identibacter (the computer simulation may be considered to be a cognitive tool to facilitate the learning of a bacterial identification problem-solving strategy. (iii The simulation characteristics did support student learning of a problem-solving strategy. (iv Students demonstrated problem-solving strategy development specific to bacterial identification. (v Participants demonstrated an improved performance from their repeated use of the simulation.

  16. Computer Supported Indexing: A History and Evaluation of NASA's MAI System. Supplement 24

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvester, June P.

    1997-01-01

    Computer supported indexing systems may be categorized in several ways. One classification scheme refers to them as statistical, syntactic, semantic or knowledge-based. While a system may emphasize one of these aspects, most systems actually combine two or more of these mechanisms to maximize system efficiency. Statistical systems can be based on counts of words or word stems, statistical association, and correlation techniques that assign weights to word locations or provide lexical disambiguation, calculations regarding the likelihood of word co-occurrences, clustering of word stems and transformations, or any other computational method used to identify pertinent terms. If words are counted, the ones of median frequency become candidate index terms. Syntactical systems stress grammar and identify parts of speech. Concepts found in designated grammatical combinations, such as noun phrases, generate the suggested terms. Semantic systems are concerned with the context sensitivity of words in text. The primary goal of this type of indexing is to identify without regard to syntax the subject matter and the context-bearing words in the text being indexed. Knowledge-based systems provide a conceptual network that goes past thesaurus or equivalent relationships to knowing (e.g., in the National Library of Medicine (NLM) system) that because the tibia is part of the leg, a document relating to injuries to the tibia should he indexed to LEG INJURIES, not the broader MeSH term INJURIES, or knowing that the term FEMALE should automatically be added when the term PREGNANCY is assigned, and also that the indexer should be prompted to add either HUMAN or ANIMAL. Another way of categorizing indexing systems is to identify them as producing either assigned- or derived-term indexes.

  17. Effects of a computer feedback treatment and behavioral support protocol on drop out from a newly initiated exercise program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annesi, James J

    2007-08-01

    Drop out from newly initiated exercise regimens is problematic. Three treatments intended to support new exercise programs (standard exercise counseling, computer feedback, and behavioral support) were tested to estimate their association with drop out over the initial 3 and 6 mo. Data from a total of 1,336 adults (44% men; M(age) = 41.9 yrs., SD = 9.8) initiating exercise programs at 18 community exercise facilities (six in each of the three treatment groups) were aggregated by facility on a measure of drop out and were then contrasted both within and between groups. After a mixed model repeated-measures analysis of variance was significant overall, planned contrasts were conducted using the Tukey-Kramer test. Significantly less drop out was found at Month 3 for both the computer support (27%) and behavioral support (17%) groups, when contrasted with the standard exercise counseling group (38%). Behavioral support had significantly less drop out than computer feedback at Month 3. The behavioral support group showed significantly less drop out at Month 6 (33%) when contrasted with both the standard exercise counseling (58%) and computer feedback (52%) groups, which did not significantly differ from one another. Limitations and the need to evaluate and extend research on interventions for reducing drop out from exercise programs were discussed.

  18. Computational mechanics research and support for aerodynamics and hydraulics at TFHRC, year 2 quarter 1 progress report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lottes, S.A.; Bojanowski, C.; Shen, J.; Xie, Z.; Zhai, Y. (Energy Systems); (Turner-Fairbank Highway Research Center)

    2012-04-09

    The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and computational structural mechanics (CSM) focus areas at Argonne's Transportation Research and Analysis Computing Center (TRACC) initiated a project to support and compliment the experimental programs at the Turner-Fairbank Highway Research Center (TFHRC) with high performance computing based analysis capabilities in August 2010. The project was established with a new interagency agreement between the Department of Energy and the Department of Transportation to provide collaborative research, development, and benchmarking of advanced three-dimensional computational mechanics analysis methods to the aerodynamics and hydraulics laboratories at TFHRC for a period of five years, beginning in October 2010. The analysis methods employ well-benchmarked and supported commercial computational mechanics software. Computational mechanics encompasses the areas of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), Computational Wind Engineering (CWE), Computational Structural Mechanics (CSM), and Computational Multiphysics Mechanics (CMM) applied in Fluid-Structure Interaction (FSI) problems. The major areas of focus of the project are wind and water effects on bridges - superstructure, deck, cables, and substructure (including soil), primarily during storms and flood events - and the risks that these loads pose to structural failure. For flood events at bridges, another major focus of the work is assessment of the risk to bridges caused by scour of stream and riverbed material away from the foundations of a bridge. Other areas of current research include modeling of flow through culverts to improve design allowing for fish passage, modeling of the salt spray transport into bridge girders to address suitability of using weathering steel in bridges, CFD analysis of the operation of the wind tunnel in the TFHRC wind engineering laboratory. This quarterly report documents technical progress on the project tasks for the period of October through

  19. Computational mechanics research and support for aerodynamics and hydraulics at TFHRC, year 2 quarter 2 progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lottes, S.A.; Bojanowski, C.; Shen, J.; Xie, Z.; Zhai, Y. (Energy Systems); (Turner-Fairbank Highway Research Center)

    2012-06-28

    The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and computational structural mechanics (CSM) focus areas at Argonne's Transportation Research and Analysis Computing Center (TRACC) initiated a project to support and compliment the experimental programs at the Turner-Fairbank Highway Research Center (TFHRC) with high performance computing based analysis capabilities in August 2010. The project was established with a new interagency agreement between the Department of Energy and the Department of Transportation to provide collaborative research, development, and benchmarking of advanced three-dimensional computational mechanics analysis methods to the aerodynamics and hydraulics laboratories at TFHRC for a period of five years, beginning in October 2010. The analysis methods employ well benchmarked and supported commercial computational mechanics software. Computational mechanics encompasses the areas of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), Computational Wind Engineering (CWE), Computational Structural Mechanics (CSM), and Computational Multiphysics Mechanics (CMM) applied in Fluid-Structure Interaction (FSI) problems. The major areas of focus of the project are wind and water effects on bridges - superstructure, deck, cables, and substructure (including soil), primarily during storms and flood events - and the risks that these loads pose to structural failure. For flood events at bridges, another major focus of the work is assessment of the risk to bridges caused by scour of stream and riverbed material away from the foundations of a bridge. Other areas of current research include modeling of flow through culverts to improve design allowing for fish passage, modeling of the salt spray transport into bridge girders to address suitability of using weathering steel in bridges, CFD analysis of the operation of the wind tunnel in the TFHRC wind engineering laboratory. This quarterly report documents technical progress on the project tasks for the period of January through

  20. Computational mechanics research and support for aerodynamics and hydraulics at TFHRC year 1 quarter 4 progress report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lottes, S.A.; Kulak, R.F.; Bojanowski, C. (Energy Systems)

    2011-12-09

    The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and computational structural mechanics (CSM) focus areas at Argonne's Transportation Research and Analysis Computing Center (TRACC) initiated a project to support and compliment the experimental programs at the Turner-Fairbank Highway Research Center (TFHRC) with high performance computing based analysis capabilities in August 2010. The project was established with a new interagency agreement between the Department of Energy and the Department of Transportation to provide collaborative research, development, and benchmarking of advanced three-dimensional computational mechanics analysis methods to the aerodynamics and hydraulics laboratories at TFHRC for a period of five years, beginning in October 2010. The analysis methods employ well-benchmarked and supported commercial computational mechanics software. Computational mechanics encompasses the areas of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), Computational Wind Engineering (CWE), Computational Structural Mechanics (CSM), and Computational Multiphysics Mechanics (CMM) applied in Fluid-Structure Interaction (FSI) problems. The major areas of focus of the project are wind and water effects on bridges - superstructure, deck, cables, and substructure (including soil), primarily during storms and flood events - and the risks that these loads pose to structural failure. For flood events at bridges, another major focus of the work is assessment of the risk to bridges caused by scour of stream and riverbed material away from the foundations of a bridge. Other areas of current research include modeling of flow through culverts to assess them for fish passage, modeling of the salt spray transport into bridge girders to address suitability of using weathering steel in bridges, CFD analysis of the operation of the wind tunnel in the TFCHR wind engineering laboratory, vehicle stability under high wind loading, and the use of electromagnetic shock absorbers to improve vehicle stability

  1. Computational mechanics research and support for aerodynamics and hydraulics at TFHRC, year 1 quarter 3 progress report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lottes, S.A.; Kulak, R.F.; Bojanowski, C. (Energy Systems)

    2011-08-26

    The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and computational structural mechanics (CSM) focus areas at Argonne's Transportation Research and Analysis Computing Center (TRACC) initiated a project to support and compliment the experimental programs at the Turner-Fairbank Highway Research Center (TFHRC) with high performance computing based analysis capabilities in August 2010. The project was established with a new interagency agreement between the Department of Energy and the Department of Transportation to provide collaborative research, development, and benchmarking of advanced three-dimensional computational mechanics analysis methods to the aerodynamics and hydraulics laboratories at TFHRC for a period of five years, beginning in October 2010. The analysis methods employ well-benchmarked and supported commercial computational mechanics software. Computational mechanics encompasses the areas of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), Computational Wind Engineering (CWE), Computational Structural Mechanics (CSM), and Computational Multiphysics Mechanics (CMM) applied in Fluid-Structure Interaction (FSI) problems. The major areas of focus of the project are wind and water loads on bridges - superstructure, deck, cables, and substructure (including soil), primarily during storms and flood events - and the risks that these loads pose to structural failure. For flood events at bridges, another major focus of the work is assessment of the risk to bridges caused by scour of stream and riverbed material away from the foundations of a bridge. Other areas of current research include modeling of flow through culverts to assess them for fish passage, modeling of the salt spray transport into bridge girders to address suitability of using weathering steel in bridges, vehicle stability under high wind loading, and the use of electromagnetic shock absorbers to improve vehicle stability under high wind conditions. This quarterly report documents technical progress on the project

  2. Support for the Core Research Activities and Studies of the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board (CSTB)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jon Eisenberg, Director, CSTB

    2008-05-13

    The Computer Science and Telecommunications Board of the National Research Council considers technical and policy issues pertaining to computer science (CS), telecommunications, and information technology (IT). The functions of the board include: (1) monitoring and promoting the health of the CS, IT, and telecommunications fields, including attention as appropriate to issues of human resources and funding levels and program structures for research; (2) initiating studies involving CS, IT, and telecommunications as critical resources and sources of national economic strength; (3) responding to requests from the government, non-profit organizations, and private industry for expert advice on CS, IT, and telecommunications issues; and to requests from the government for expert advice on computer and telecommunications systems planning, utilization, and modernization; (4) fostering interaction among CS, IT, and telecommunications researchers and practitioners, and with other disciplines; and providing a base of expertise in the National Research Council in the areas of CS, IT, and telecommunications. This award has supported the overall operation of CSTB. Reports resulting from the Board's efforts have been widely disseminated in both electronic and print form, and all CSTB reports are available at its World Wide Web home page at cstb.org. The following reports, resulting from projects that were separately funded by a wide array of sponsors, were completed and released during the award period: 2007: * Summary of a Workshop on Software-Intensive Systems and Uncertainty at Scale * Social Security Administration Electronic Service Provision: A Strategic Assessment * Toward a Safer and More Secure Cyberspace * Software for Dependable Systems: Sufficient Evidence? * Engaging Privacy and Information Technology in a Digital Age * Improving Disaster Management: The Role of IT in Mitigation, Preparedness, Response, and Recovery 2006: * Renewing U.S. Telecommunications

  3. sw-SVM: sensor weighting support vector machines for EEG-based brain-computer interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jrad, N; Congedo, M; Phlypo, R; Rousseau, S; Flamary, R; Yger, F; Rakotomamonjy, A

    2011-10-01

    In many machine learning applications, like brain-computer interfaces (BCI), high-dimensional sensor array data are available. Sensor measurements are often highly correlated and signal-to-noise ratio is not homogeneously spread across sensors. Thus, collected data are highly variable and discrimination tasks are challenging. In this work, we focus on sensor weighting as an efficient tool to improve the classification procedure. We present an approach integrating sensor weighting in the classification framework. Sensor weights are considered as hyper-parameters to be learned by a support vector machine (SVM). The resulting sensor weighting SVM (sw-SVM) is designed to satisfy a margin criterion, that is, the generalization error. Experimental studies on two data sets are presented, a P300 data set and an error-related potential (ErrP) data set. For the P300 data set (BCI competition III), for which a large number of trials is available, the sw-SVM proves to perform equivalently with respect to the ensemble SVM strategy that won the competition. For the ErrP data set, for which a small number of trials are available, the sw-SVM shows superior performances as compared to three state-of-the art approaches. Results suggest that the sw-SVM promises to be useful in event-related potentials classification, even with a small number of training trials.

  4. Computer-supported games and role plays in teaching water management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Y. Hoekstra

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available There is an increasing demand for an interdisciplinary approach in teaching water management. Computer-supported games and role plays offer the potential of creating an environment in which different disciplines come together and in which students are challenged to develop integrated understanding. Two examples are discussed. The River Basin Game is a common-pool resource game in which participants experience the risk of over-abstractions of water in a river basin and learn how this risk relates to the complexity of the system, the conflict between individual and group optimums and the difficulty in achieving good cooperation. The Globalization of Water Role Play makes participants familiar with the global dimension of water management by letting them experience how national governments can integrate considerations of water scarcity and domestic water productivities into decisions on international trade in commodities like food, cotton and bio-energy. The two examples illustrate that play sessions inspire participants to think about the functioning of systems as a whole and to develop good cooperative courses of action, whereby both uncertainties about the system and the presence of different values and perspectives among participants play a role.

  5. Computer-supported games and role plays in teaching water management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Y. Hoekstra

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available There is an increasing demand for an interdisciplinary approach in teaching water management. Computer-supported games and role plays offer the potential of creating an environment in which different disciplines come together and in which students are challenged to develop integrated understanding. Two examples are discussed. The River Basin Game is a common-pool resource game in which participants experience the risk of over-abstractions of water in a river basin and learn how this risk relates to the complexity of the system, the conflict between individual and group optimum and the difficulty to come to good cooperation. The Globalization of Water Role Play makes participants familiar with the global dimension of water management by letting them experience how national governments can integrate considerations of water scarcity and domestic water productivities into decisions on international trade in commodities like food, cotton and bio-energy. The two examples illustrate that plays inspire participants to think about the functioning of systems as a whole and to develop good cooperative courses of action, whereby both uncertainties about the system and the presence of different values and perspectives among participants play a role.

  6. Computer Supported Collaborative Rocketry: Teaching students to distinguish good and bad data like expert physicists

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Alessio, Matthew; Lundquist, Loraine

    2013-10-01

    Each year our physical science class for pre-service elementary teachers launches water-powered rockets based on the activity from NASA. We analyze the rocket flight using data from frame-by-frame video analysis of the launches. Before developing the methods presented in this paper, we noticed our students were mired in calculation details while losing sight of physical concepts. Sloppy measurements and calculations (even when using spreadsheets with formulas provided) sometimes led to such poor results that physical concepts could not be reliably taught from the data, but students were unmotivated to either notice or correct their errors. We adopted a collaborative, computer supported approach using simple and easily available functions in Google Spreadsheets to pool observations, provide instant feedback, and publicly display results from all teams side-by-side in real time. These instant comparisons promote student accountability and engagement, inspiring them to think more carefully about why answers may be different and notice sloppy data or unlikely outcomes—in short, to facilitate and motivate expert thinking about data.

  7. Image analysis and pattern recognition for computer supported skin tumor diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handels, H; Ross, T; Kreusch, J; Wolff, H H; Pöppl, S J

    1998-01-01

    A new approach to computer supported recognition of melanoma and naevocytic naevi based on high resolution skin surface profiles is presented. Profiles are generated by sampling an area of 4 x 4 mm2 at a resolution of 125 sample points per mm with a laser profilometer at a vertical resolution of 0.1 micron. With image analysis algorithms Haralick's texture parameters, Fourier features and features based on fractal analysis are extracted. Genetic algorithms are employed successfully to select good feature subsets for the following classification process. As quality measure for feature subsets, the error rate of the nearest neighbor classifier estimated with the leaving-one-out method is used. Classification is performed with feed forward back-propagation network and the nearest neighbor classifier. Classification performance of the neural classifier is optimized using different topologies, learning parameters and pruning algorithms. The best neural classifier achieved an error rate of 4.5% and was found after network pruning. The best result with an error rate of 2.3% was obtained with the nearest neighbor classifier.

  8. Computer-Supported Feedback Message Tailoring for Healthcare Providers in Malawi: Proof-of-Concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis-Lewis, Zach; Douglas, Gerald P; Hochheiser, Harry; Kam, Matthew; Gadabu, Oliver; Bwanali, Mwatha; Jacobson, Rebecca S

    2015-01-01

    Although performance feedback has the potential to help clinicians improve the quality and safety of care, healthcare organizations generally lack knowledge about how this guidance is best provided. In low-resource settings, tools for theory-informed feedback tailoring may enhance limited clinical supervision resources. Our objectives were to establish proof-of-concept for computer-supported feedback message tailoring in Malawi, Africa. We conducted this research in five stages: clinical performance measurement, modeling the influence of feedback on antiretroviral therapy (ART) performance, creating a rule-based message tailoring process, generating tailored messages for recipients, and finally analysis of performance and message tailoring data. We retrospectively generated tailored messages for 7,448 monthly performance reports from 11 ART clinics. We found that tailored feedback could be routinely generated for four guideline-based performance indicators, with 35% of reports having messages prioritized to optimize the effect of feedback. This research establishes proof-of-concept for a novel approach to improving the use of clinical performance feedback in low-resource settings and suggests possible directions for prospective evaluations comparing alternative designs of feedback messages.

  9. Consumers' Views Regarding Health Claims on Food Packages. Contextual Analysis by Means of Computer Support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Gunilla Svederberg

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have shown consumers to generally have only a limited understanding of the nutritional information on packaged-food labels. This suggests it is difficult for them to select properly between different foods on the basis of such information. As a basis for information on the requirements of groups of consumers, the present study aimed at investigating how, when presented with health claims and other nutritional information on the labels of food products, consumers' thinking about foods is affected by various background factors as well as by various types of food-related experiences. Semi-structured interviews of 30 consumers in Sweden—men and women aged 25 to 64, with and without food-related health problems—were carried out. The interviews were tape-recorded and were transcribed word-for-word. In the analysis of the interview data, the qualitative methodology of contextual analysis was utilised. For the purpose of method development, the computer programme Atlas.ti was used to support the analysis. The objective of this article is to show step by step how the analysis was carried out. In connection with the analysis, some results are presented. However, the focus in the article is on methodology. The conclusion drawn is that Atlas.ti has qualities that can facilitate the contextual analysis of the interview data. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs0201109

  10. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    Matthias Kasemann

    Overview The main focus during the summer was to handle data coming from the detector and to perform Monte Carlo production. The lessons learned during the CCRC and CSA08 challenges in May were addressed by dedicated PADA campaigns lead by the Integration team. Big improvements were achieved in the stability and reliability of the CMS Tier1 and Tier2 centres by regular and systematic follow-up of faults and errors with the help of the Savannah bug tracking system. In preparation for data taking the roles of a Computing Run Coordinator and regular computing shifts monitoring the services and infrastructure as well as interfacing to the data operations tasks are being defined. The shift plan until the end of 2008 is being put together. User support worked on documentation and organized several training sessions. The ECoM task force delivered the report on “Use Cases for Start-up of pp Data-Taking” with recommendations and a set of tests to be performed for trigger rates much higher than the ...

  11. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    Contributions from I. Fisk

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The start of the 2012 run has been busy for Computing. We have reconstructed, archived, and served a larger sample of new data than in 2011, and we are in the process of producing an even larger new sample of simulations at 8 TeV. The running conditions and system performance are largely what was anticipated in the plan, thanks to the hard work and preparation of many people. Heavy ions Heavy Ions has been actively analysing data and preparing for conferences.  Operations Office Figure 6: Transfers from all sites in the last 90 days For ICHEP and the Upgrade efforts, we needed to produce and process record amounts of MC samples while supporting the very successful data-taking. This was a large burden, especially on the team members. Nevertheless the last three months were very successful and the total output was phenomenal, thanks to our dedicated site admins who keep the sites operational and the computing project members who spend countless hours nursing the...

  12. User-centered support to localized activities in ubiquitous computing environments

    OpenAIRE

    Pinto, Helder; José, Rui

    2004-01-01

    The design of pervasive and ubiquitous computing systems must be centered on users’ activity in order to bring computing systems closer to people. The adoption of an activity-centered approach to the design of pervasive and ubiquitous computing systems should consider: a) how humans naturally accomplish an activity; and b) how computing artifacts from both the local and personal domains should contribute to the accomplishment of an activity. This work particularly focuses on localized a...

  13. The Computing Alliance of Hispanic-Serving Institutions: Supporting Hispanics at Critical Transition Points

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, Ann Quiroz; Hug, Sarah; Thiry, Heather; Alo, Richard; Beheshti, Mohsen; Fernandez, John; Rodriguez, Nestor; Adjouadi, Malek

    2011-01-01

    Hispanics have the highest growth rates among all groups in the U.S., yet they remain considerably underrepresented in computing careers and in the numbers who obtain advanced degrees. Hispanics constituted about 7% of undergraduate computer science and computer engineering graduates and 1% of doctoral graduates in 2007-2008. The small number of…

  14. The Computing Alliance of Hispanic-Serving Institutions: Supporting Hispanics at Critical Transition Points

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, Ann Quiroz; Hug, Sarah; Thiry, Heather; Alo, Richard; Beheshti, Mohsen; Fernandez, John; Rodriguez, Nestor; Adjouadi, Malek

    2011-01-01

    Hispanics have the highest growth rates among all groups in the U.S., yet they remain considerably underrepresented in computing careers and in the numbers who obtain advanced degrees. Hispanics constituted about 7% of undergraduate computer science and computer engineering graduates and 1% of doctoral graduates in 2007-2008. The small number of…

  15. Evidence supporting the use of cone-beam computed tomography in orthodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vlijmen, Olivier J C; Kuijpers, Mette A R; Bergé, Stefaan J; Schols, Jan G J H; Maal, Thomas J J; Breuning, Hero; Kuijpers-Jagtman, Anne Marie

    2012-03-01

    The authors conducted a systematic review of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) applications in orthodontics and evaluated the level of evidence to determine whether the use of CBCT is justified in orthodontics. The authors identified articles by searching the Cochrane Library, PubMed, MEDLINE, Embase, Scopus and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature databases. They searched the articles' reference lists manually for additional articles and had no language limitations. They did not search the gray literature. Inclusion criteria were CBCT use in orthodontics and that the participants be human. The lowest level of evidence accepted for inclusion was a case series with five or more participants. The authors evaluated the studies' methodological quality according to 13 criteria related to study design, measurements and statistical analysis. The authors identified 550 articles, and 50 met the inclusion criteria. Study topics included temporary anchorage devices, cephalometry, combined orthodontic and surgical treatment, airway measurements, root resorption and tooth impactions, and cleft lip and palate. The methodological quality averaged 53 percent (range, 15-77 percent) of the maximum score. The authors found no high-quality evidence regarding the benefits of CBCT use in orthodontics. Limited evidence shows that CBCT offers better diagnostic potential, leads to better treatment planning or results in better treatment outcome than do conventional imaging modalities. Only the results of studies on airway diagnostics provided sound scientific data suggesting that CBCT use has added value. The additional radiation exposure should be weighed against possible benefits of CBCT, which have not been supported in the literature. In future studies, investigators should evaluate the effects of CBCT on treatment procedures, progression and outcome quantitatively.

  16. Computational Spectroscopy of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons In Support of Laboratory Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xiaofeng; Salama, Farid

    2006-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are strong candidates for the molecular carriers of the unidentified infrared bands (UIR) and the diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs). In order to test the PAH hypothesis, we have systematically measured the vibronic spectra of a number of jet-cooled neutral and ionized PAHs in the near ultraviolet (UV) to visible spectral ranges using the cavity ring-down spectroscopy. To support this experimental effort, we have carried out theoretical studies of the spectra obtained in our measurements. Ab initio and (time-dependent) density.functiona1 theory calculations are performed to obtain the geometries, energetics, vibrational frequencies, transition dipole moments, and normal coordinates of these PAH molecules. Franck-Condon (FC) calculations and/or vibronic calculations are then performed using the calculated normal coordinates and vibrational frequencies to simulate the vibronic spectra. It is found that vibronic interactions in these conjugated pi electron systems are often strong enough to cause significant deviations from the Born-Oppenheimer (BO) approximation. For vibronic transitions that are well described by the BO approximation, the vibronic band profiles are simulated by calculating the rotational structure of the vibronic transitions. Vibronic oscillator strength factors are calculated in the frame of the FC approximation from the electronic transition dipole moments and the FC factors. This computational effort together with our experimental measurements provides, for the first time, powerful tools for comparison with space-based data and, hence, a powerful approach to understand the spectroscopy of interstellar PAH analogs and the nature of the UIR and DIBs.

  17. Computer Supported Argument Visualisation: Modelling in Consultative Democracy Around Wicked Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohl, Ricky

    In this case study, computer supported argument visualisation has been applied to the analysis and representation of the draft South East Queensland Regional Plan Consultation discourse, demonstrating how argument mapping can help deliver the transparency and accountability required in participatory democracy. Consultative democracy for regional planning falls into a category of problems known as “wicked problems”. Inherent in this environment is heterogeneous viewpoints, agendas and voices, built on disparate and often contradictory logic. An argument ontology and notation that was designed specifically to deal with consultative urban planning around wicked problems is the Issue Based Information System (IBIS) and IBIS notation (Rittel & Webber, 1984). The software used for argument visualisation in this case was Compendium, a derivative of IBIS. The high volume of stakeholders and discourse heterogeneity in this environment calls for a unique approach to argument mapping. The map design model developed from this research has been titled a “Consultation Map”. The design incorporates the IBIS ontology within a hybrid of mapping approaches, amalgamating elements from concept, dialogue, argument, debate, thematic and tree-mapping. The consultation maps developed from the draft South East Queensland Regional Plan Consultation provide a transparent visual record to give evidence of the themes of citizen issues within the consultation discourse. The consultation maps also link the elicited discourse themes to related policies from the SEQ Regional Plan providing explicit evidence of SEQ Regional Plan policy-decisions matching citizen concerns. The final consultation map in the series provides explicit links between SEQ Regional Plan policy items and monitoring activities reporting on the ongoing implementation of the SEQ Regional Plan. This map provides updatable evidence of and accountability for SEQ Regional Plan policy implementation and developments.

  18. Colorless chalco-halide Ga2S3-GeS2-CsCl glasses as new optical material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledemi, Yannick; El-Amraoui, Mohammed; Calvez, Laurent; Zhang, Xiang-Hua; Bureau, Bruno; Messaddeq, Younès.

    2013-09-01

    Colorless sulfide glasses can be obtained by selecting appropriately the composition within the Ga2S3-GeS2-CsCl pseudo-ternary glass system. The addition of electronegative chlorine ions into the sulfide glassy network results in a widening of its optical bandgap without altering its infrared transparency. Glasses transparent from the near UV (380 nm) up to the middle infrared (11.5 μm) are thus achievable. Such extended infrared transmission for a colorless glass is the widest among the known heavy metal oxide and fluoride glasses, e.g. fluoroindate glasses are transparent from 350 nm up to 8-9 μm. We present in this work our recent progress on the preparation of this chloro-sulfide glass of high optical quality. Efforts have been devoted in a first step to reduce the content of extrinsic impurities such as OH, SH and H2O. In a second step, protective coatings have been deposited on polished glass samples to improve their chemical durability and assess their potential for practical applications. Large improvement of both optical quality, in terms of transmission spectrum flattening, and chemical durability were achieved. Finally, the high thermal stability against crystallization of this glass shows a high potential for lens molding and applications in multispectral imaging.

  19. Absorbance of UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} ion in NaCl-2CsCl molten salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Fuminori; Tayama, Toshimitsu [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Tokai Works, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan); Nagai, Takayuki [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Innovative Research Promotion Office, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2003-06-01

    In Feasibility Studies (FS) for the commercialized fast breeder reactor (FBR) cycle system, the oxide electrowinning process is being developed by Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC). In the oxide electrowinning process, spent nuclear fuel is dissolved into molten salt and U and Pu are recovered as MOX by MOX-electrolysis. MOX-electrolysis has many requirements such as U/Pu ratio controls and separation from FP of U-Pu. Therefore, it is necessary to analyze the amounts of nuclear material (U and Pu) in the molten salt and control MOX-electrolysis based on this analysis result. This report considers the optical method as one candidate for process analysis technology. Absorbance of UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} ion, the basic data for optical analysis, was measured in NaCl-2CsCl molten salt. Although Khokhryakov reported on UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} absorbance using the Reflection-Absorption method no detailed report exists on the relation between absorbance and UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} concentration. Therefore, necessary spectral data for the process analysis technology were collected by the experiment. (author)

  20. Using Primary Language Support via Computer to Improve Reading Comprehension Skills of First-Grade English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Cathi Draper; Filler, John; Higgins, Kyle

    2012-01-01

    Through this exploratory study the authors investigated the effects of primary language support delivered via computer on the English reading comprehension skills of English language learners. Participants were 28 First-grade students identified as Limited English Proficient. The primary language of all participants was Spanish. Students were…

  1. 'Light and Wires in a Box': The Computer-Oriented Information Age in Support of Effective Higher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindenau, Suzanne E.

    1984-01-01

    Describes the computer-oriented information age, skills workers will need to keep pace, and how information technologies (microcomputers, communications satellites, and cable systems) can be utilized to support effective higher education. Obstacles to information technology use in education and how schools fail learners if technology is not…

  2. COMPUTER SUPPORT IN NON-VERBAL COMMUNICATION SYSTEMS WITH USING GRAPHIC SINGS IN EDUCATION OF PEOPLE WITH INTELLECTUAL DISABILITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konrad Gauda

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the possibility of using a computer with specialized software to support education of students with communication disorders. It also presents the results of preliminary tests based on the original program developed for students with intellectual disabilities in moderate and significant degree of disability in the field of alternative communication with using pictograms and pcs.

  3. How Digital Concept Maps about the Collaborators' Knowledge and Information Influence Computer-Supported Collaborative Problem Solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelmann, Tanja; Hesse, Friedrich W.

    2010-01-01

    For collaboration in learning situations, it is important to know what the collaborators know. However, developing such knowledge is difficult, especially for newly formed groups participating in a computer-supported collaboration. The solution for this problem described in this paper is to provide to group members access to the knowledge…

  4. Applying activity theory to computer-supported collaborative learning and work-based activities in corporate settings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collis, Betty; Margaryan, Anoush

    2004-01-01

    Business needs in many corporations call for learning outcomes that involve problem solutions, and creating and sharing new knowledge within worksplace situation that may involve collaboration among members of a team. We argue that work-based activities (WBA) and computer-supported collaborative lea

  5. Paraprofessionals' Perceptions on Delivering Infant Feeding Lessons to Disadvantaged Mothers via a Self-Directed Computer-Supported Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singleterry, Lisa R.; Horodynski, Mildred A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To ascertain paraprofessionals' perceptions regarding a self-directed computer-supported nutrition educational intervention to disadvantaged mothers of infants. Design: Qualitative focus group study. Setting: Three county extension programs in a Midwestern state, which serve disadvantaged families. Method: Sixteen paraprofessional…

  6. A Practitioner Model of the Use of Computer-Based Tools and Resources to Support Mathematics Teaching and Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruthven, Kenneth; Hennessy, Sara

    2002-01-01

    Analyzes the pedagogical ideas underpinning teachers' accounts of the successful use of computer-based tools and resources to support the teaching and learning of mathematics. Organizes central themes to form a pedagogical model capable of informing the use of such technologies in classroom teaching and generating theoretical conjectures for…

  7. Computer-Supported Collaborative Inquiry Learning and Classroom Scripts: Effects on Help-Seeking Processes and Learning Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makitalo-Siegl, Kati; Kohnle, Carmen; Fischer, Frank

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the influence of classroom-script structure (high vs. low) during computer-supported collaborative inquiry learning on help-seeking processes and learning gains in 54 student pairs in secondary science education. Screen- and audio-capturing videos were analysed according to a model of the help-seeking process. The results…

  8. Using Primary Language Support via Computer to Improve Reading Comprehension Skills of First-Grade English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Cathi Draper; Filler, John; Higgins, Kyle

    2012-01-01

    Through this exploratory study the authors investigated the effects of primary language support delivered via computer on the English reading comprehension skills of English language learners. Participants were 28 First-grade students identified as Limited English Proficient. The primary language of all participants was Spanish. Students were…

  9. The use of computer decision-making support systems to justify address rehabilitation of the Semipalatinsk test site area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktoria V. Zaets

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the development of a range of optimal protective measures for remediation of the territory of the Semipalatinsk Test Site. The computer system for decision-making support, ReSCA, was employed for the estimations. Costs and radiological effectiveness of countermeasures were evaluated.

  10. How Children Can Support Their Learning to Write and Read by Computer in the Early Years of School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurmilaakso, Marja

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decades the nature and form of what children can choose to read has changed radically, partly as a consequence of rapid technological advances and the increasing dominance of the image. The research questions were: (1) "How do children learn to read and write by computer?"; (2) "How can one support children's learning…

  11. Teachers' Instructional Planning for Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning: Macro-Scripts as a Pedagogical Method to Facilitate Collaborative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamalainen, Raija; Hakkinen, Paivi

    2010-01-01

    Technological tools challenge teachers' pedagogical activities. The use of information and communication technologies (ICT) in education should help teachers integrate new pedagogical methods into their work. This study explores macro-level computer-supported collaborative learning scripts as a pedagogical method to facilitate collaboration.…

  12. Proceedings of the Workshop on Methods & Tools for Computer Supported Collaborative Creativity Process: Linking creativity & informal learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Retalis, Symeon; Sloep, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Retalis, S., & Sloep, P. B. (Eds.) (2009). Collection of 4 symposium papers at EC-TEL 2009. Proceedings of the Workshop on Methods & Tools for Computer Supported Collaborative Creativity Process: Linking creativity & informal learning. September, 30, 2009, Nice, France. http://sunsite.informatik.rwt

  13. Using Cloud-Computing Applications to Support Collaborative Scientific Inquiry: Examining Pre-Service Teachers' Perceived Barriers to Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donna, Joel D.; Miller, Brant G.

    2013-01-01

    Technology plays a crucial role in facilitating collaboration within the scientific community. Cloud-computing applications, such as Google Drive, can be used to model such collaboration and support inquiry within the secondary science classroom. Little is known about pre-service teachers' beliefs related to the envisioned use of collaborative,…

  14. Proceedings of the Workshop on Methods & Tools for Computer Supported Collaborative Creativity Process: Linking creativity & informal learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Retalis, Symeon; Sloep, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Retalis, S., & Sloep, P. B. (Eds.) (2009). Collection of 4 symposium papers at EC-TEL 2009. Proceedings of the Workshop on Methods & Tools for Computer Supported Collaborative Creativity Process: Linking creativity & informal learning. September, 30, 2009, Nice, France. http://sunsite.informatik.rwt

  15. Social Support and "Playing Around": An Examination of How Older Adults Acquire Digital Literacy With Tablet Computers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Hsin-Yi Sandy; Shillair, Ruth; Cotten, Shelia R

    2017-01-01

    This study examines how older adults learn to use tablet computers. Learning to use new technologies can help older adults to be included in today's digital society. However, learning to use new technologies is not always easy, especially for older adults. This study focuses on how older adults learn to use a specific technology, tablet computers, and the role that social support plays in this process. Data for this project are from 21 in-depth interviews with individuals who own tablet computers. We examine how older adults engage with tablet devices and increase their digital literacy. The findings suggest that, for older adults to start to use tablets, social support plays an important role. In addition, a key way that many participants report gaining expertise with the technology is through "playing around" with the tablets. Suggestions for how to help older adults learn to use new technologies are detailed. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. Social Support and “Playing Around”: An Examination of How Older Adults Acquire Digital Literacy With Tablet Computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Hsin-yi Sandy; Shillair, Ruth; Cotten, Shelia R.

    2017-01-01

    This study examines how older adults learn to use tablet computers. Learning to use new technologies can help older adults to be included in today’s digital society. However, learning to use new technologies is not always easy, especially for older adults. This study focuses on how older adults learn to use a specific technology, tablet computers, and the role that social support plays in this process. Data for this project are from 21 in-depth interviews with individuals who own tablet computers. We examine how older adults engage with tablet devices and increase their digital literacy. The findings suggest that, for older adults to start to use tablets, social support plays an important role. In addition, a key way that many participants report gaining expertise with the technology is through “playing around” with the tablets. Suggestions for how to help older adults learn to use new technologies are detailed. PMID:26491029

  17. Improving outcomes in radiology: bringing computer-based decision support and education to the point of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Charles E

    2005-04-01

    Many computer applications have been developed in radiology and other medical disciplines to help physicians make decisions. Artificial intelligence (AI)--an approach to computer-based manipulation of symbols to simulate human reasoning--forms the basis of many of these systems. This article's goals are to: acquaint the reader with the motivations and opportunities for computer-based medical decision support systems; identify AI techniques and applications in radiology decision making; assess the impact of these technologies; and consider new directions and opportunities for AI in radiology. Among the exciting new directions is the use of AI to integrate radiology reporting, online decision support, and just-in-time learning to provide useful information and continuing education that is embedded within a radiologist's daily workflow.

  18. Optimizing Performance of Scientific Visualization Software to Support Frontier-Class Computations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    assistance with accessing graphics processing unit ( GPU )- enabled nodes on the HPC utility server systems via the Portable Batch System (PBS) batch job... graphics processing unit ( GPU )-enabled and large memory compute nodes. The EnSight client will run on the first allocated node (which is the graphics ...Defense DR Clients distributed rendering clients GPU graphics processing unit HPC high-performance computing HPCMDC High-Performance Computing

  19. Management and Analysis of Biological and Clinical Data: How Computer Science May Support Biomedical and Clinical Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veltri, Pierangelo

    The use of computer based solutions for data management in biology and clinical science has contributed to improve life-quality and also to gather research results in shorter time. Indeed, new algorithms and high performance computation have been using in proteomics and genomics studies for curing chronic diseases (e.g., drug designing) as well as supporting clinicians both in diagnosis (e.g., images-based diagnosis) and patient curing (e.g., computer based information analysis on information gathered from patient). In this paper we survey on examples of computer based techniques applied in both biology and clinical contexts. The reported applications are also results of experiences in real case applications at University Medical School of Catanzaro and also part of experiences of the National project Staywell SH 2.0 involving many research centers and companies aiming to study and improve citizen wellness.

  20. Linking Computer Algebra Systems and Paper-and-Pencil Techniques To Support the Teaching of Mathematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Herwaarden, Onno A.; Gielen, Joseph L. W.

    2002-01-01

    Focuses on students showing a lack of conceptual insight while using computer algebra systems (CAS) in the setting of an elementary calculus and linear algebra course for first year university students in social sciences. The use of a computer algebra environment has been incorporated into a more traditional course but with special attention on…

  1. Diversity or Difference? New Research Supports the Case for a Cultural Perspective on Women in Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frieze, Carol; Quesenberry, Jeria L.; Kemp, Elizabeth; Velazquez, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Gender difference approaches to the participation of women in computing have not provided adequate explanations for women's declining interest in computer science (CS) and related technical fields. Indeed, the search for gender differences can work against diversity which we define as a cross-gender spectrum of characteristics, interests,…

  2. Supporting Undergraduate Computer Architecture Students Using a Visual MIPS64 CPU Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patti, D.; Spadaccini, A.; Palesi, M.; Fazzino, F.; Catania, V.

    2012-01-01

    The topics of computer architecture are always taught using an Assembly dialect as an example. The most commonly used textbooks in this field use the MIPS64 Instruction Set Architecture (ISA) to help students in learning the fundamentals of computer architecture because of its orthogonality and its suitability for real-world applications. This…

  3. Broadening Participation Not Border Protection: How Universities Can Support Women in Computer Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michell, Dee; Szorenyi, Anna; Falkner, Katrina; Szabo, Claudia

    2017-01-01

    Computer science, like technology in general, is seen as a masculine field and the under-representation of women an intransigent problem. In this paper, we argue that the cultural belief in Australia that computer science is a domain for men results in many girls and women being chased away from that field as part of a border protection campaign…

  4. Comparing Virtual and Physical Robotics Environments for Supporting Complex Systems and Computational Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berland, Matthew; Wilensky, Uri

    2015-01-01

    Both complex systems methods (such as agent-based modeling) and computational methods (such as programming) provide powerful ways for students to understand new phenomena. To understand how to effectively teach complex systems and computational content to younger students, we conducted a study in four urban middle school classrooms comparing…

  5. Using Application-Domain Knowledge in the Runtime Support of Multi-Experiment Computational Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Ewa Deelman, Yolanda Gil, Carl Kesselman, Amit Agarwal, Gaurang Mehta, and Karan Vahi. The role of planning in grid computing. In Proceedings of the...Congress on Computational Intelligence, pages 82–87, 1994. [48] Ken Brodlie Jason Wood and Jeremy Walton. Gviz - visualization and steering for the grid

  6. Supporting Undergraduate Computer Architecture Students Using a Visual MIPS64 CPU Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patti, D.; Spadaccini, A.; Palesi, M.; Fazzino, F.; Catania, V.

    2012-01-01

    The topics of computer architecture are always taught using an Assembly dialect as an example. The most commonly used textbooks in this field use the MIPS64 Instruction Set Architecture (ISA) to help students in learning the fundamentals of computer architecture because of its orthogonality and its suitability for real-world applications. This…

  7. Computer-based support for science education materials developers in Africa : exploring potentials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McKenney-Jensh, Susan E.

    2001-01-01

    CASCADE-SEA stands for Computer Assisted Curriculum Analysis, Design and Evaluation for Science (and mathematics) Education in Africa; and is the name of a computer program that was developed during the course of the study described in this book. This research was initiated to explore the potential

  8. Diversity or Difference? New Research Supports the Case for a Cultural Perspective on Women in Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frieze, Carol; Quesenberry, Jeria L.; Kemp, Elizabeth; Velazquez, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Gender difference approaches to the participation of women in computing have not provided adequate explanations for women's declining interest in computer science (CS) and related technical fields. Indeed, the search for gender differences can work against diversity which we define as a cross-gender spectrum of characteristics, interests,…

  9. Cloud Computing for the Grid: GridControl: A Software Platform to Support the Smart Grid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2012-02-08

    GENI Project: Cornell University is creating a new software platform for grid operators called GridControl that will utilize cloud computing to more efficiently control the grid. In a cloud computing system, there are minimal hardware and software demands on users. The user can tap into a network of computers that is housed elsewhere (the cloud) and the network runs computer applications for the user. The user only needs interface software to access all of the cloud’s data resources, which can be as simple as a web browser. Cloud computing can reduce costs, facilitate innovation through sharing, empower users, and improve the overall reliability of a dispersed system. Cornell’s GridControl will focus on 4 elements: delivering the state of the grid to users quickly and reliably; building networked, scalable grid-control software; tailoring services to emerging smart grid uses; and simulating smart grid behavior under various conditions.

  10. Orchestrating Evaluation of Complex Educational Technologies: A Case Study of a CSCL System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, Luis P.; Dimitriadis, Yannis; Asensio-Pérez, Juan I.

    2014-01-01

    As digital technologies permeate every aspect of our lives, the complexity of the educational settings, and of the technological support we use within them, unceasingly rises. This increased complexity, along with the need for educational practitioners to apply such technologies within multi-constraint authentic settings, has given rise to the…

  11. Computer-assisted lip diagnosis on traditional Chinese medicine using multi-class support vector machines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li FuFeng

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM, the lip diagnosis is an important diagnostic method which has a long history and is applied widely. The lip color of a person is considered as a symptom to reflect the physical conditions of organs in the body. However, the traditional diagnostic approach is mainly based on observation by doctor’s nude eyes, which is non-quantitative and subjective. The non-quantitative approach largely depends on the doctor’s experience and influences accurate the diagnosis and treatment in TCM. Developing new quantification methods to identify the exact syndrome based on the lip diagnosis of TCM becomes urgent and important. In this paper, we design a computer-assisted classification model to provide an automatic and quantitative approach for the diagnosis of TCM based on the lip images. Methods A computer-assisted classification method is designed and applied for syndrome diagnosis based on the lip images. Our purpose is to classify the lip images into four groups: deep-red, red, purple and pale. The proposed scheme consists of four steps including the lip image preprocessing, image feature extraction, feature selection and classification. The extracted 84 features contain the lip color space component, texture and moment features. Feature subset selection is performed by using SVM-RFE (Support Vector Machine with recursive feature elimination, mRMR (minimum Redundancy Maximum Relevance and IG (information gain. Classification model is constructed based on the collected lip image features using multi-class SVM and Weighted multi-class SVM (WSVM. In addition, we compare SVM with k-nearest neighbor (kNN algorithm, Multiple Asymmetric Partial Least Squares Classifier (MAPLSC and Naïve Bayes for the diagnosis performance comparison. All displayed faces image have obtained consent from the participants. Results A total of 257 lip images are collected for the modeling of lip diagnosis in TCM. The

  12. Supporting Problem Solving with Case-Stories Learning Scenario and Video-based Collaborative Learning Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun Hu

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we suggest that case-based resources, which are used for assisting cognition during problem solving, can be structured around the work of narratives in social cultural psychology. Theories and other research methods have proposed structures within narratives and stories which may be useful to the design of case-based resources. Moreover, embedded within cases are stories which are contextually rich, supporting the epistemological groundings of situated cognition. Therefore the purposes of this paper are to discuss possible frameworks of case-stories; derive design principles as to “what” constitutes a good case story or narrative; and suggest how technology can support story-based learning. We adopt video-based Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning (CSCL technology to support problem solving with case-stories learning scenarios. Our hypothesis in this paper is that well-designed case-based resources are able to aid in the cognitive processes undergirding problem solving and meaning making. We also suggest the use of an emerging video-based collaborative learning technology to support such an instructional strategy.

  13. Wiring Role Taking in Collaborative Learning Environments. SNA and Semantic Web can improve CSCL script?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Capuano

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Over the past years the concept of role in distance education has become a promising construct for analysing and facilitating collaborative processes and outcomes. Designing effective collaborative learning processes is a complex task that can be supported by existing good practices formulated as pedagogical patterns or scripts. Over the past years, the research on technology enhanced learning has shown that collaborative scripts for learning act as mediating artefacts not only designing educational scenarios but also structuring and prescribing roles and activities. Conversely, existing learning systems are not able to provide dynamic role management in the definition and execution of collaborative scripts. This work proposes the application of Social Network Analysis in order to evaluate the expertise level of a learner when he/she is acting, with an assigned role, within the execution of a collaborative script. Semantic extensions to both IMS Learning Design and Information Packaging specifications are also proposed to support roles management.

  14. The Construction of a Web-Based Learning Platform from the Perspective of Computer Support for Collaborative Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Mei

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to construct a web-based learning platform of Computer Support for Collaborative Design (CSCD based on theories related to a constructivist learning environment model, mind mapping and computer-supported collaborative learning. The platform conforms to the needs of design students and provides effective tools for interaction and collaborative learning by integrating the tools of mind mapping into a learning environment that utilizes CSCD, a computer-assisted support system that can support and enhance group collaboration. The establishment of the CSCD learning platform represents a significant advance from the fixed functions and existing models of current online learning platforms and is the only learning platform in the world that focuses on learners in design departments. The platform is outstanding for its excellence, user-friendly functions, and innovative technology. In terms of funding, technical ability, human resources, organizational strategies, and risk analysis and evaluations, the learning platform is also worthy of expansion and implementation.

  15. Computing and Systems Applied in Support of Coordinated Energy, Environmental, and Climate Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    This talk focuses on how Dr. Loughlin is applying Computing and Systems models, tools and methods to more fully understand the linkages among energy systems, environmental quality, and climate change. Dr. Loughlin will highlight recent and ongoing research activities, including: ...

  16. Cloud Computing for Science Data Processing in Support of Emergency Response Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Software for processing time series of satellite remote sensing data was packaged together with a computer code that uses web services to download the data sets from...

  17. New Intelligent Computer Intrusion Detection Method Using Hessian Local Linear Embedding and Multi-Kernel Support Vector Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Hu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Computer networks frequently collapse under the destructive intrusions. It is crucial to detection hidden intrusions to protect the computer networks. However, a computer intrusion often distributes high dimensional characteristic signals, which increases the difficulty of intrusion detection. Literature review indicates that limited work has been done to address the nonlinear dimension reduction problem in computer intrusion detection. Hence, this study has proposed a new intrusion detection method based on the Hessian Local Linear Embedding (HLLE and multi-kernel Support Vector Machine (SVM. The HLLE was firstly used to reduce the dimension of the original intrusion date in a nonlinear manner. Then the SVM with multiply kernels was employed to detect the intrusions. A real computer network experimental system has been established to evaluate the proposed method. Four typical intrusions have been tested. The test results show high effectiveness of the new detection method. In addition, the new method has been compared with the single-kernel SVM with Local Linear Embedding (LLE or Principal Component Analysis (PCA. The comparison results demonstrate that the proposed HLLE plus multi-kernel SVM can provide the best computer intrusion detection rate of 97.1%.

  18. Supporting Negotiation Behavior with Haptics-Enabled Human-Computer Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguz, S O; Kucukyilmaz, A; Sezgin, Tevfik Metin; Basdogan, C

    2012-01-01

    An active research goal for human-computer interaction is to allow humans to communicate with computers in an intuitive and natural fashion, especially in real-life interaction scenarios. One approach that has been advocated to achieve this has been to build computer systems with human-like qualities and capabilities. In this paper, we present insight on how human-computer interaction can be enriched by employing the computers with behavioral patterns that naturally appear in human-human negotiation scenarios. For this purpose, we introduce a two-party negotiation game specifically built for studying the effectiveness of haptic and audio-visual cues in conveying negotiation related behaviors. The game is centered around a real-time continuous two-party negotiation scenario based on the existing game-theory and negotiation literature. During the game, humans are confronted with a computer opponent, which can display different behaviors, such as concession, competition, and negotiation. Through a user study, we show that the behaviors that are associated with human negotiation can be incorporated into human-computer interaction, and the addition of haptic cues provides a statistically significant increase in the human-recognition accuracy of machine-displayed behaviors. In addition to aspects of conveying these negotiation-related behaviors, we also focus on and report game-theoretical aspects of the overall interaction experience. In particular, we show that, as reported in the game-theory literature, certain negotiation strategies such as tit-for-tat may generate maximum combined utility for the negotiating parties, providing an excellent balance between the energy spent by the user and the combined utility of the negotiating parties.

  19. The Effects of Instructional Support and Learner Interests when Learning Using Computer Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaman, Melek; Nerdel, Claudia; Bayrhuber, Horst

    2008-01-01

    Within the scope of this study, the effectiveness of two kinds of instructional support was evaluated with regard to the learner's interests. Two versions of a simulation program about the respiratory chain were developed, differing only in the kind of tasks provided for instructional support: One version contained problem-solving tasks, the other…

  20. An Energy-Based Method for Computing Radial Stiffness of Single Archimedes Spiral Plane Supporting Spring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Enlai; Jia, Fang; Lu, Changhui; Chen, He; Ji, Xin

    With space-based adaptive performance of lower stiffness and greater deformation energy, the plane supporting spring finds its wide application in fields like aeronautics, astronautics, etc. In the current study, the radial stiffness formula of a single Archimedes spiral plane supporting spring is derived by means of energy approach, with three key parameters of the supporting spring as independent variables. A series of the supporting spring FEA models are established via APDL speedy modeling. According to the isolation requirements of electronic equipment for a fighter, an example is presented in the form of finite element analysis. The theoretical calculation and analysis data are studied and fitted by MATLAB using the least-square method to obtain the discipline of the radial stiffness of single spiral plane supporting spring with the changes of its three key parameters. The validity of energy-based radial stiffness formula of the spring is confirmed by the comparison between the theoretical calculation and finite element analysis results.

  1. Supporting medical communication for older patients with a shared touch-screen computer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, Anne Marie; Hollan, James D

    2013-11-01

    Increasingly health care facilities are adopting electronic medical record systems and installing computer workstations in patient exam rooms. The introduction of computer workstations into the medical interview process makes it important to consider the impact of such technology on older patients as well as new types of interfaces that may better suit the needs of older adults. While many older adults are comfortable with a traditional computer workstation with a keyboard and mouse, this article explores how a large horizontal touch-screen (i.e., a surface computer) may suit the needs of older patients and facilitates the doctor-patient interview process. Twenty older adults (age 60 to 88) used a prototype multiuser, multitouch system in our research laboratory to examine seven health care scenarios. Behavioral observations as well as results from questionnaires and a structured interview were analyzed. The older adults quickly adapted to the prototype system and reported that it was easy to use. Participants also suggested that having a shared view of one's medical records, especially charts and images, would enhance communication with their doctor and aid understanding. While this study is exploratory and some areas of interaction with a surface computer need to be refined, the technology is promising for sharing electronic patient information during medical interviews involving older adults. Future work must examine doctors' and nurses' interaction with the technology as well as logistical issues of installing such a system in a real world medical setting. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Gender issues in computer-supported learning: what we can learn from the gender; science and technology literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gwyneth Hughes

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a response to the article, 'Gender issues in computer-supported learning', in ALT-J 10 (1. I argue that the studies presented in the original paper could be enhanced by a more rigorous approach to gender that avoids universalizing identity, recognizes gender as a construction and which builds on previous research from gender, science and technology studies.

  3. ODL STUDENTS’ PERCEIVED COMPUTER LITERACY COMPETENCIES, EXPECTATIONS OF SUPPORT INTENTION TO USE AND PERSEVERANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendrik D. ESTERHUIZEN,(Corresponding author

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on disadvantaged South African practising teachers’ perceptions on computer literacy competencies while studying to improve their teaching qualifications. During the process of developing a learning technology integration framework for the School of Continuing Teacher Education at North-West University, South Africa, an initial exploratory survey identified issues and themes for systemic inquiry, in order to provide substance to the integration framework. The purposive sample related to a criterion-based selection of N=338 teacher-students attending supplementary computer literacy training sessions. Queues from the Technology Acceptance Model supplemented the questions intended to investigate enablers and barriers to learning technology adoption. The pragmatic approach was towards discovering which possible interventions could be introduced to enable adoption of technology in interaction and learning. Descriptive statistics and structural equation modelling produce a suggested parsimonious model relating to self-confidence, trust and perseverance in acquiring computer literacy.

  4. A Web-based computer system supporting information access, exchange and management during building processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lars Schiøtt

    1998-01-01

    During the last two decades, a number of research efforts have been made in the field of computing systmes related to the building construction industry. Most of the projects have focused on a part of the entire design process and have typically been limited to a specific domain. This paper prese...... presents a newly developed computer system based on the World Wide Web on the Internet. The focus is on the simplicity of the systems structure and on an intuitive and user friendly interface...

  5. Notebook computer use on a desk, lap and lap support: effects on posture, performance and comfort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asundi, Krishna; Odell, Dan; Luce, Adam; Dennerlein, Jack T

    2010-01-01

    This study quantified postures of users working on a notebook computer situated in their lap and tested the effect of using a device designed to increase the height of the notebook when placed on the lap. A motion analysis system measured head, neck and upper extremity postures of 15 adults as they worked on a notebook computer placed on a desk (DESK), the lap (LAP) and a commercially available lapdesk (LAPDESK). Compared with the DESK, the LAP increased downwards head tilt 6 degrees and wrist extension 8 degrees . Shoulder flexion and ulnar deviation decreased 13 degrees and 9 degrees , respectively. Compared with the LAP, the LAPDESK decreased downwards head tilt 4 degrees , neck flexion 2 degrees , and wrist extension 9 degrees. Users reported less discomfort and difficulty in the DESK configuration. Use of the lapdesk improved postures compared with the lap; however, all configurations resulted in high values of wrist extension, wrist deviation and downwards head tilt. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: This study quantifies postures of users working with a notebook computer in typical portable configurations. A better understanding of the postures assumed during notebook computer use can improve usage guidelines to reduce the risk of musculoskeletal injuries.

  6. Measuring and Supporting Pre-Service Teachers' Self-Efficacy towards Computers, Teaching, and Technology Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killi, Carita; Kauppinen, Merja; Coiro, Julie; Utriainen, Jukka

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on two studies designed to examine pre-service teachers' self-efficacy beliefs. Study I investigated the measurement properties of a self-efficacy beliefs questionnaire comprising scales for computer self-efficacy, teacher self-efficacy, and self-efficacy towards technology integration. In Study I, 200 pre-service teachers…

  7. Using a Cloud-Based Computing Environment to Support Teacher Training on Common Core Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Cory

    2013-01-01

    A cloud-based computing environment, Google Apps for Education (GAFE), has provided the Anaheim City School District (ACSD) a comprehensive and collaborative avenue for creating, sharing, and editing documents, calendars, and social networking communities. With this environment, teachers and district staff at ACSD are able to utilize the deep…

  8. Multi-Agent System Supporting Automated Large-Scale Photometric Computations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Sȩdziwy

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The technologies related to green energy, smart cities and similar areas being dynamically developed in recent years, face frequently problems of a computational nature rather than a technological one. The example is the ability of accurately predicting the weather conditions for PV farms or wind turbines. Another group of issues is related to the complexity of the computations required to obtain an optimal setup of a solution being designed. In this article, we present the case representing the latter group of problems, namely designing large-scale power-saving lighting installations. The term “large-scale” refers to an entire city area, containing tens of thousands of luminaires. Although a simple power reduction for a single street, giving limited savings, is relatively easy, it becomes infeasible for tasks covering thousands of luminaires described by precise coordinates (instead of simplified layouts. To overcome this critical issue, we propose introducing a formal representation of a computing problem and applying a multi-agent system to perform design-related computations in parallel. The important measure introduced in the article indicating optimization progress is entropy. It also allows for terminating optimization when the solution is satisfying. The article contains the results of real-life calculations being made with the help of the presented approach.

  9. Supporting Pervasive Computing Applications with Active Context Fusion and Semantic Context Delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roy, Nirmalya; Gu, Tao; Das, Sajal

    2010-01-01

    Future pervasive computing applications are envisioned to adapt the applications’ behaviors by utilizing various contexts of an environment and its users. Such context information may often be ambiguous and also heterogeneous, which make the delivery of unambiguous context information to real app...

  10. Pedagogy for the Connected Science Classroom: Computer Supported Collaborative Science and the Next Generation Science Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Brian J.; Reveles, John M.

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of computers in the classroom is compelling teachers to develop new instructional skills. This paper provides a theoretical perspective on an innovative pedagogical approach to science teaching that takes advantage of technology to create a connected classroom. In the connected classroom, students collaborate and share ideas in…

  11. Developing Online Learning Resources: Big Data, Social Networks, and Cloud Computing to Support Pervasive Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anshari, Muhammad; Alas, Yabit; Guan, Lim Sei

    2016-01-01

    Utilizing online learning resources (OLR) from multi channels in learning activities promise extended benefits from traditional based learning-centred to a collaborative based learning-centred that emphasises pervasive learning anywhere and anytime. While compiling big data, cloud computing, and semantic web into OLR offer a broader spectrum of…

  12. Evidence supporting the use of cone-beam computed tomography in orthodontics.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlijmen, O.J.C. van; Kuijpers, M.A.R.; Berge, S.J.; Schols, J.G.J.H.; Maal, T.J.J.; Breuning, H.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The authors conducted a systematic review of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) applications in orthodontics and evaluated the level of evidence to determine whether the use of CBCT is justified in orthodontics. TYPES OF STUDIES REVIEWED: The authors identified articles by searching th

  13. Creating a Supportive Environment to Enhance Computer Based Learning for Underrepresented Minorities in College Algebra Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendricks, Kimberly D.

    2011-01-01

    Significant research in K-12 education has shown that computer based learning in mathematics positively impacts students' attitudes toward mathematics and greatly increases academic performance. Little research has shown, however, how this success can be replicated in a postsecondary classroom for minority students. This paper is a case study that…

  14. Comparative evaluation of support vector machine classification for computer aided detection of breast masses in mammography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lesniak, J.M.; Hupse, R.; Blanc, R.; Karssemeijer, N.; Sz\\'ekely, G.

    2012-01-01

    False positive (FP) marks represent an obstacle for effective use of computer-aided detection (CADe) of breast masses in mammography. Typically, the problem can be approached either by developing more discriminative features or by employing different classifier designs. In this paper, the usage of s

  15. Using a Cloud-Based Computing Environment to Support Teacher Training on Common Core Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Cory

    2013-01-01

    A cloud-based computing environment, Google Apps for Education (GAFE), has provided the Anaheim City School District (ACSD) a comprehensive and collaborative avenue for creating, sharing, and editing documents, calendars, and social networking communities. With this environment, teachers and district staff at ACSD are able to utilize the deep…

  16. Computer simulation to support policy making in the control of pseudorabies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buijtels, J.A.A.M.; Huirne, R.B.M.; Dijkhuizen, A.A.; Jong, de M.C.M.; Nes, van A.

    1997-01-01

    A further integration of international markets makes a coordinated policy against contagious animal infections increasingly important. In the future, stricter demands are to be expected concerning the control and eradication of such infections. To anticipate these demands, a computer simulation mode

  17. Using Peer Computer-Mediated Corrective Feedback to Support EFL Learners' Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    AbuSeileek, Ali; Abualsha'r, Awatif

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of using computer-mediated corrective feedback on EFL learners' performance in writing. Sixty-four intermediate-level learners were randomly assigned to either a no-feedback control condition or a corrective feedback, including three treatment conditions. The first is the "track changes" feature of…

  18. Computer-Supported Aids to Making Sense of Scientific Articles: Cognitive, Motivational, and Attitudinal Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gegner, Julie A.; Mackay, Donald H. J.; Mayer, Richard E.

    2009-01-01

    High school students can access original scientific research articles on the Internet, but may have trouble understanding them. To address this problem of online literacy, the authors developed a computer-based prototype for guiding students' comprehension of scientific articles. High school students were asked to read an original scientific…

  19. Evidence supporting the use of cone-beam computed tomography in orthodontics.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlijmen, O.J.C. van; Kuijpers, M.A.R.; Berge, S.J.; Schols, J.G.J.H.; Maal, T.J.J.; Breuning, H.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The authors conducted a systematic review of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) applications in orthodontics and evaluated the level of evidence to determine whether the use of CBCT is justified in orthodontics. TYPES OF STUDIES REVIEWED: The authors identified articles by searching

  20. A Web-based computer system supporting information access, exchange and management during building processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lars Schiøtt

    1998-01-01

    During the last two decades, a number of research efforts have been made in the field of computing systmes related to the building construction industry. Most of the projects have focused on a part of the entire design process and have typically been limited to a specific domain. This paper...

  1. Supporting the Collaborative Learning of Practical Skills with Computer-Mediated Communications Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A. Edwards

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on a collaborative approach to learning, a student cohort taking an introductory level University course in computing was provided with information and asynchronous communications technology (including learning resources, e-mail, bulletin board and FAQ, as a means of enhancing their collaborative efforts on a web authoring exercise within a flexible learning environment. The qualitative investigative paradigm used was ‘action research’. By use of ethnographic techniques (questionnaires and focus group interviews, evidence was gained indicating that while a collaborative approach promoted improved learning, usage of computer-mediated communication technology and its contribution to collaboration was limited in an activity that was skills-oriented, requiring practical experience. Reasons for this are then discussed and a number of barriers to the take-up of communications technology are identified, and implications for educators are drawn from these.

  2. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Kasemann

    Overview In autumn the main focus was to process and handle CRAFT data and to perform the Summer08 MC production. The operational aspects were well covered by regular Computing Shifts, experts on duty and Computing Run Coordination. At the Computing Resource Board (CRB) in October a model to account for service work at Tier 2s was approved. The computing resources for 2009 were reviewed for presentation at the C-RRB. The quarterly resource monitoring is continuing. Facilities/Infrastructure operations Operations during CRAFT data taking ran fine. This proved to be a very valuable experience for T0 workflows and operations. The transfers of custodial data to most T1s went smoothly. A first round of reprocessing started at the Tier-1 centers end of November; it will take about two weeks. The Computing Shifts procedure was tested full scale during this period and proved to be very efficient: 30 Computing Shifts Persons (CSP) and 10 Computing Resources Coordinators (CRC). The shift program for the shut down w...

  3. Stabilizability of oscillatory systems: a classical approach supported by symbolic computation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Bacciotti

    1990-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we study the stabilization of planar single-input non-linear systems, whose linearization at the origin has purely immaginary eigenvalues. A classical recursive procedure based on polar coordinates transformation is applied to obtain some sufficient conditions. Then we focus on bilinear systems; a complete solution of the problem is given in this case. Explicit statements of the conditions are possible thanks to the use of symbolic computation packages.

  4. Trends in Human-Computer Interaction to Support Future Intelligence Analysis Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    strategies including (DARPA, 2011a): • Intelligent interruption to improve limited working memory ; • Attention management to improve focus during...complex tasks; • Cued memory retrieval to improve situational awareness and context recovery; • Modality switching (i.e., audio, visual) to increase...www.biometry.com www.handresearch.com Vein pattern palm reading by Fujitsu www.dealspwn.com 16 Augmented Cognition / Brain Computer Interfaces NeuroSky MindSet OCZ

  5. Measuring and Supporting Pre-Service Teachers’ Self-Efficacy Towards Computers, Teaching, and Technology Integration

    OpenAIRE

    Kiili, Carita; Kauppinen, Merja; Coiro, Julie; Utriainen, Jukka

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on two studies designed to examine pre-service teachers’ self-efficacy beliefs. Study I investigated the measurement properties of a self-efficacy beliefs questionnaire comprising scales for computer self-efficacy, teacher self-efficacy, and self-efficacy towards technology integration. In Study I, 200 pre-service teachers completed the self-efficacy questionnaire. Confirmatory factor analyses resulted in a modified measurement model consisting of the three hypothesized sel...

  6. Cloud Computing Solutions for the Marine Corps: An Architecture to Support Expeditionary Logistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    control, and communications IPv6 Internet protocol version 6 ISR intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance IT information technology JIE...these two models, which merge to form a system of systems comprised of power, communications, and a mobile EOC, this approach added significant... mobility , and flexibility (Geelan, 2008). Cloud computing has been used in the private IT sector for many years and has benefited organizations with

  7. Fast, computer supported experimental determination of absolute zero temperature at school

    OpenAIRE

    Pędziwiatr, Antoni T.; Bogacz, Bogdan

    2014-01-01

    A concept of absolute temperature is discussed and a simple method of determining absolute zero temperature is presented - based on gas thermometer coupled with pressure sensor and computer data acquisition system Coach. By constructing a pressure vs temperature plot for air and extrapolating it to zero pressure it is possible to obtain a reasonable value of absolute zero temperature. It is a convincing and straightforward method to enhance understanding the concept of temperature and suppor...

  8. Market Survey and Analysis in Support of ASAS Computer-Based Training System Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-11-01

    response. 10. CBT Can Be Made Adaptive. Just as a good instructor adapts his teaching technique, pace, and content to the abilities and perceived...Figure 4-2. A PAWS is converted to training mode by unplugging or switching off the standard terminals and connecting the Matrox EIDS stations. The...LANGUAGE TenCORE Language Authoring System and TenCORE Assistant Computer Teaching Corporation 1713 South Neil Street Champaign, IL 61820 (217)352-6363

  9. Computer Aided Diagnostic Support System for Skin Cancer: A Review of Techniques and Algorithms

    OpenAIRE

    Ammara Masood; Adel Ali Al-Jumaily

    2013-01-01

    Image-based computer aided diagnosis systems have significant potential for screening and early detection of malignant melanoma. We review the state of the art in these systems and examine current practices, problems, and prospects of image acquisition, pre-processing, segmentation, feature extraction and selection, and classification of dermoscopic images. This paper reports statistics and results from the most important implementations reported to date. We compared the performance of severa...

  10. Implications of Using Computer-Based Training on System Readiness and Operating & Support Costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-18

    Policy - 8 - Naval Postgraduate School Program Executive Office Integrated warfare System 5 ( PEO IWS5) provided a list of ships equipped with the AN/SQQ...on board both before and after implementation of CBT were considered. The initial list provided by PEO IWS5 included all ships of the CG-47, DD-963...Ownership Cost (TOC) Guidebook. Dhanjal, R., & Calis, G. (1999). Computer Based Training in the Steel Industry. Steel Times Vol. 227 No. 4, 130-131

  11. A prototype computer-aided modelling tool for life-support system models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preisig, H. A.; Lee, Tae-Yeong; Little, Frank

    1990-01-01

    Based on the canonical decomposition of physical-chemical-biological systems, a prototype kernel has been developed to efficiently model alternative life-support systems. It supports (1) the work in an interdisciplinary group through an easy-to-use mostly graphical interface, (2) modularized object-oriented model representation, (3) reuse of models, (4) inheritance of structures from model object to model object, and (5) model data base. The kernel is implemented in Modula-II and presently operates on an IBM PC.

  12. Further Evidence in Support of the Universal Nilpotent Grammatical Computational Paradigm of Quantum Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcer, Peter J.; Rowlands, Peter

    2010-12-01

    Further evidence is presented in favour of the computational paradigm, conceived and constructed by Rowlands and Diaz, as detailed in Rowlands' book Zero to Infinity (2007) [2], and in particular the authors' paper `The Grammatical Universe: the Laws of Thermodynamics and Quantum Entanglement' [1]. The paradigm, which has isomorphic group and algebraic quantum mechanical language interpretations, not only predicts the well-established facts of quantum physics, the periodic table, chemistry / valence and of molecular biology, whose understanding it extends; it also provides an elegant, simple solution to the unresolved quantum measurement problem. In this fundamental paradigm, all the computational constructs / predictions that emerge, follow from the simple fact, that, as in quantum mechanics, the wave function is defined only up to an arbitrary fixed phase. This fixed phase provides a simple physical understanding of the quantum vacuum in quantum field theory, where only relative phases, known to be able to encode 3+1 relativistic space-time geometries, can be measured. It is the arbitrary fixed measurement standard, against which everything that follows is to be measured, even though the standard itself cannot be, since nothing exists against which to measure it. The standard, as an arbitrary fixed reference phase, functions as the holographic basis for a self-organized universal quantum process of emergent novel fermion states of matter where, following each emergence, the arbitrary standard is re-fixed anew so as to provide a complete history / holographic record or hologram of the current fixed past, advancing an unending irreversible evolution, such as is the evidence of our senses. The fermion states, in accord with the Pauli exclusion principle, each correspond to a unique nilpotent symbol in the infinite alphabet (which specifies the grammar in this nilpotent universal computational rewrite system (NUCRS) paradigm); and the alphabet, as Hill and Rowlands

  13. Preventive Support for Kindergarteners Most At-Risk for Mathematics Difficulties: Computer-Assisted Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salminen, Jonna; Koponen, Tuire; Räsänen, Pekka; Aro, Mikko

    2015-01-01

    Weaknesses in early number skills have been found to be a risk factor for later difficulties in mathematical performance. Nevertheless, only a few intervention studies with young children have been published. In this study, the responsiveness to early support in kindergarteners with most severe difficulties was examined with two different computer…

  14. Gaby: a computer-based support system for integrated pest management in Dutch apple orchards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ende, van den E.; Blommers, L.; Trapman, M.

    1996-01-01

    In The Netherlands, a computerized advisory system (called Gaby) for integrated pest management (IPM) in apple has been developed to support the decision making of individual fruit growers. Gaby provides clear monitoring recommendations when this is appropriate for a particular pest in (a defined ar

  15. Investigation of Organizational Interaction and Support in an NGO through Computer-Mediated Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yao-Jen; Chang, Yao-Sheng

    2011-01-01

    Discussion forums have been used to support organizational communication and they have become a candidate for study of organizational behaviors. However, online behaviors of NGOs have been insufficiently studied compared to those studies conducted in education and industries. Our empirical study examined how social workers in one NGO used an…

  16. Pre-Service Teachers' Experiences of Scaffolded Learning in Science through a Computer Supported Collaborative Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukkonen, Jari; Dillon, Patrick; Kärkkäinen, Sirpa; Hartikainen-Ahia, Anu; Keinonen, Tuula

    2016-01-01

    Scaffolding helps the novice to accomplish a task goal or solve a problem that otherwise would be beyond unassisted efforts. Scaffolding firstly aims to support the learner in accomplishing the task and secondly in learning from the task and improving future performance. This study has examined pre-service teachers' experiences of…

  17. LSQuiz: A Collaborative Classroom Response System to Support Active Learning through Ubiquitous Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caceffo, Ricardo; Azevedo, Rodolfo

    2014-01-01

    The constructivist theory indicates that knowledge is not something finished and complete. However, the individuals must construct it through the interaction with the physical and social environment. The Active Learning is a methodology designed to support the constructivism through the involvement of students in their learning process, allowing…

  18. Scaffold Seeking: A Reverse Design of Scaffolding in Computer-Supported Word Problem Solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hercy N. H.; Yang, Euphony F. Y.; Liao, Calvin C. Y.; Chang, Ben; Huang, Yana C. Y.; Chan, Tak-Wai

    2015-01-01

    Although well-designed scaffolding may assist students to accomplish learning tasks, its insufficient capability to dynamically assess students' abilities and to adaptively support them may result in the problem of overscaffolding. Our previous project has also shown that students using scaffolds to solve mathematical word problems for a long time…

  19. "Tree Investigators": Supporting Families' Scientific Talk in an Arboretum with Mobile Computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Heather Toomey; Land, Susan M.; McClain, Lucy R.; Mohney, Michael R.; Choi, Gi Woong; Salman, Fariha H.

    2015-01-01

    This research examines the "Tree Investigators" project to support science learning with mobile devices during family public programmes in an arboretum. Using a case study methodology, researchers analysed video records of 10 families (25 people) using mobile technologies with naturalists at an arboretum to understand how mobile devices…

  20. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2011-01-01

    Introduction CMS distributed computing system performed well during the 2011 start-up. The events in 2011 have more pile-up and are more complex than last year; this results in longer reconstruction times and harder events to simulate. Significant increases in computing capacity were delivered in April for all computing tiers, and the utilisation and load is close to the planning predictions. All computing centre tiers performed their expected functionalities. Heavy-Ion Programme The CMS Heavy-Ion Programme had a very strong showing at the Quark Matter conference. A large number of analyses were shown. The dedicated heavy-ion reconstruction facility at the Vanderbilt Tier-2 is still involved in some commissioning activities, but is available for processing and analysis. Facilities and Infrastructure Operations Facility and Infrastructure operations have been active with operations and several important deployment tasks. Facilities participated in the testing and deployment of WMAgent and WorkQueue+Request...

  1. Design of computer integrated manufacturing and educational system using decision support system, and case base reasoning in concurrent engineering environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this paper is to address the concept and design of a computerintegrated manufacturing (CIM and intelligent educational system in concurrent engineeringenvironment for Saipa Automotive Industry in Iran. In order to increase speed of design andprocess planning and manufacturing, a feature based approach and case base reasoning technicfor acquiring design specification and compare with previously designed 'features and retrieverelated process planed and modify for new parts. In order to design and plan effectively, onemust have a view of how the enterprise works in CIM environment, and what informationneeds. In this paper we will discuss a general model, in terms of its functions, what each areadoes, and how each area interacts with the others. we will also discuss the support functions,administration, application development and decision support functions that are common toalmost every enterprise. We will also describe the architectural requirements for implementinga computer integrated manufacturing strategy in computer based concurrent engineeringenvironment and how this architecture can support the entire enterprise in terms of itsfunctional, information resource and organizational needs.

  2. Intra- and Inter-Cultural Usability in Computer-Supported Collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vatrapu, Ravi; Suthers, Dan

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we argue for an increased scope of universal design to encompass usability and accessibility for not only users with physical disabilities but also for users from different cultures. Towards this end, we present an empirical evaluation of cultural usability in computer......-Chinese, and Chinese-Chinese) appropriated affordances and produced technological intersubjectivity. Cultural usability was analyzed through the use of performance and satisfaction measures. The results show a systemic variation in efficiency, effectiveness, and satisfaction between the two cultural groups....... Implications of these findings for the research and practice of usability, in general, and cultural usability, in particular, are discussed in this paper....

  3. An Architecture of Computer Aided Process Planning System Integrated with Scheduling Using Decision Support System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Manish; Kumar; Sunil; Rajotia

    2002-01-01

    Process planning and scheduling are two major plann in g and control activities that consume significant part of the lead-time, theref ore all attempts are being made to reduce lead-time by automating them. Compute r Aided Process Planning (CAPP) is a step in this direction. Most of the existin g CAPP systems do not consider scheduling while generating a process plan. Sched uling is done separately after the process plan has been generated and therefore , it is possible that a process plan so generated is e...

  4. A mobile computer system to support first responders to a radiological emergency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Antonio J.D. da, E-mail: antoniojoseds@gmail.com [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Informatica; Santos, Joao R. dos; Pereira, Claudio M.N.A.; Carvalho, Paulo V.R., E-mail: paulov@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Decision-making in emergency situations is characterized by its speed, pressure, and especially the uncertainty of information. Uninformed decisions or decisions based on unreliable data may lead to inappropriate actions. Although several studies that aim to combine different databases and provide full information to emergency response operation commanders can be found, only few of them are dedicated to radiological emergencies situations and even less are those that aim to provide support for the emergency first responder. We developed a system to support first responders to deal with radiological emergencies using cognitive task analysis techniques to elicit the tacitly knowledge of practitioners to grasp what information is really needed during radiological emergency response. (author)

  5. Preferance of computer technology for analytical support of large database of medical information systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biryukov А.P.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to study the use of intelligent technologies for analytical support of large databases of medical information systems. Material and methods. We used the techniques of object-oriented software design and database design. Results. Based on expert review of models and algorithms for analysis of clinical and epidemiological data and principles of knowledge representation in large-scale health information systems, data mining schema were implemented in the software package of the register of Research Center n.a. A. I. Burnazyan of Russia. Identified areas for effective implementation of abstract data model of EAV and procedures Data Maning for the design of database of biomedical registers. Conclusions. Using intelligent software platform that supports different sets of APIs and object models for different operations in different software environments, allows you to build and maintain an information system through the procedures of data biomedical processing.

  6. Computer-based Monitoring for Decision Support Systems and Disaster Preparedness in Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Vinh

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The operation of modern buildings can support a vast amount of static and real-time data. Static information such as building schematics is vital for security and rescue purposes. There is a need for building managers and for first responders to be notified of designated building alerts in real-time so that actions can be performed promptly. The capability to monitor building devices and to keep the first responder community updated with the latest building information during emergency situations, as well as the ability to remotely control certain building devices and processes, can be realized today. This paper describes the various challenges encountered in the research area of building interoperability and proposes methods and insights for developing a standards framework to enable communication between building information systems and first responder information systems. Having a standards framework in place will assist in the development and deployment of commercial products in support of building interoperability.

  7. Designing Computer-Supported Complex Systems Curricula for the Next Generation Science Standards in High School Science Classrooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan A. Yoon

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We present a curriculum and instruction framework for computer-supported teaching and learning about complex systems in high school science classrooms. This work responds to a need in K-12 science education research and practice for the articulation of design features for classroom instruction that can address the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS recently launched in the USA. We outline the features of the framework, including curricular relevance, cognitively rich pedagogies, computational tools for teaching and learning, and the development of content expertise, and provide examples of how the framework is translated into practice. We follow this up with evidence from a preliminary study conducted with 10 teachers and 361 students, aimed at understanding the extent to which students learned from the activities. Results demonstrated gains in students’ complex systems understanding and biology content knowledge. In interviews, students identified influences of various aspects of the curriculum and instruction framework on their learning.

  8. Computer Support for Knowledge Management within R&D and the Teaching of Bachelor Students

    OpenAIRE

    Stefan Svetsky; Oliver Moravcik; Jana Stefankova; Peter Schreiber

    2013-01-01

    Abstract—Knowledge plays a key role within research, development and education. One of the major challenges for knowledge management is to select the right knowledge from numerous sources, including know - how of individuals, and to transform it into useful, practicable knowledge. The focus should always be on supporting strategic organisational goals. In this context, from the organisation’s strategic point of view, it is very important to link an institutional knowledge management system wi...

  9. An integrated computational pipeline and database to support whole-genome sequence annotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mungall, C J; Misra, S; Berman, B P; Carlson, J; Frise, E; Harris, N; Marshall, B; Shu, S; Kaminker, J S; Prochnik, S E; Smith, C D; Smith, E; Tupy, J L; Wiel, C; Rubin, G M; Lewis, S E

    2002-01-01

    We describe here our experience in annotating the Drosophila melanogaster genome sequence, in the course of which we developed several new open-source software tools and a database schema to support large-scale genome annotation. We have developed these into an integrated and reusable software system for whole-genome annotation. The key contributions to overall annotation quality are the marshalling of high-quality sequences for alignments and the design of a system with an adaptable and expandable flexible architecture.

  10. DockScreen: A Database of In Silico Biomolecular Interactions to Support Computational Toxicology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael-Rock Goldsmith

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We have developed DockScreen, a database of in silico biomolecular interactions designed to enable rational molecular toxicological insight within a computational toxicology framework. This database is composed of chemical/target (receptor and enzyme binding scores calculated by molecular docking of more than 1000 chemicals into 150 protein targets and contains nearly 135 thousand unique ligand/target binding scores. Obtaining this dataset was achieved using eHiTS (Simbiosys Inc., a fragment-based molecular docking approach with an exhaustive search algorithm, on a heterogeneous distributed high-performance computing framework. The chemical landscape covered in DockScreen comprises selected environmental and therapeutic chemicals. The target landscape covered in DockScreen was selected based on the availability of high-quality crystal structures that covered the assay space of phase I ToxCast in vitro assays. This in silico data provides continuous information that establishes a means for quantitatively comparing, on a structural biophysical basis, a chemical’s profile of biomolecular interactions. The combined minimum-score chemical/target matrix is provided.

  11. The Role of Context-Aware Computing in Support of People with Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgarten, Matthias; Mulvenna, Maurice D.

    There is a strong motivation, in particular in the domain of healthcare, for new perspectives on context-driven research and computing in order to provide next-generation services to people that are tailored to individual needs rather than generalised assumptions that could potentially endanger human life. For that, context awareness is a key requirement in order to reach a better understanding of human-centric computing systems and environments, and subsequently, the deployment of dedicated services that are specifically adapted to the context to which they are applied. Such context-driven services would be able to provide the means of delivering situation-aware and person-centric services that ultimately may even anticipate future behaviour and problems of the user itself and the context in which the user finds themselves. However, the perpetual provision of contextual data in pervasive environments is far from being easy and includes major challenges that vary between environments. The reason for this is not only the sensor diversity within the environments themselves but also the contextual scope to be analysed and the amount of data to be collected and correlated to actually reach a minimum degree of contextual understanding. For that reason, in this chapter, contextual environments have been categorised as well as their interaction into different groups that reflect individual contextual levels of interest of which contextual understanding is required and consequently to which services can be applied.

  12. Learning in Educational Computer Games for Novices: The Impact of Support Provision Types on Virtual Presence, Cognitive Load, and Learning Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrader, Claudia; Bastiaens, Theo

    2012-01-01

    Embedding support devices in educational computer games has been asserted to positively affect learning outcomes. However, there is only limited direct empirical evidence on which design variations of support provision influence learning. In order to better understand the impact of support design on novices' learning, the current study…

  13. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2013-01-01

    Computing activity had ramped down after the completion of the reprocessing of the 2012 data and parked data, but is increasing with new simulation samples for analysis and upgrade studies. Much of the Computing effort is currently involved in activities to improve the computing system in preparation for 2015. Operations Office Since the beginning of 2013, the Computing Operations team successfully re-processed the 2012 data in record time, not only by using opportunistic resources like the San Diego Supercomputer Center which was accessible, to re-process the primary datasets HTMHT and MultiJet in Run2012D much earlier than planned. The Heavy-Ion data-taking period was successfully concluded in February collecting almost 500 T. Figure 3: Number of events per month (data) In LS1, our emphasis is to increase efficiency and flexibility of the infrastructure and operation. Computing Operations is working on separating disk and tape at the Tier-1 sites and the full implementation of the xrootd federation ...

  14. DEVELOPMENT OF A COMPUTER PROGRAM TO SUPPORT AN EFFICIENT NON-REGRESSION TEST OF A THERMAL-HYDRAULIC SYSTEM CODE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JUN YEOB LEE

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available During the development process of a thermal-hydraulic system code, a non-regression test (NRT must be performed repeatedly in order to prevent software regression. The NRT process, however, is time-consuming and labor-intensive. Thus, automation of this process is an ideal solution. In this study, we have developed a program to support an efficient NRT for the SPACE code and demonstrated its usability. This results in a high degree of efficiency for code development. The program was developed using the Visual Basic for Applications and designed so that it can be easily customized for the NRT of other computer codes.

  15. Computer

    CERN Document Server

    Atkinson, Paul

    2011-01-01

    The pixelated rectangle we spend most of our day staring at in silence is not the television as many long feared, but the computer-the ubiquitous portal of work and personal lives. At this point, the computer is almost so common we don't notice it in our view. It's difficult to envision that not that long ago it was a gigantic, room-sized structure only to be accessed by a few inspiring as much awe and respect as fear and mystery. Now that the machine has decreased in size and increased in popular use, the computer has become a prosaic appliance, little-more noted than a toaster. These dramati

  16. Computer Aided Diagnostic Support System for Skin Cancer: A Review of Techniques and Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ammara Masood

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Image-based computer aided diagnosis systems have significant potential for screening and early detection of malignant melanoma. We review the state of the art in these systems and examine current practices, problems, and prospects of image acquisition, pre-processing, segmentation, feature extraction and selection, and classification of dermoscopic images. This paper reports statistics and results from the most important implementations reported to date. We compared the performance of several classifiers specifically developed for skin lesion diagnosis and discussed the corresponding findings. Whenever available, indication of various conditions that affect the technique’s performance is reported. We suggest a framework for comparative assessment of skin cancer diagnostic models and review the results based on these models. The deficiencies in some of the existing studies are highlighted and suggestions for future research are provided.

  17. Computer Aided Diagnostic Support System for Skin Cancer: A Review of Techniques and Algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masood, Ammara; Al-Jumaily, Adel Ali

    2013-01-01

    Image-based computer aided diagnosis systems have significant potential for screening and early detection of malignant melanoma. We review the state of the art in these systems and examine current practices, problems, and prospects of image acquisition, pre-processing, segmentation, feature extraction and selection, and classification of dermoscopic images. This paper reports statistics and results from the most important implementations reported to date. We compared the performance of several classifiers specifically developed for skin lesion diagnosis and discussed the corresponding findings. Whenever available, indication of various conditions that affect the technique's performance is reported. We suggest a framework for comparative assessment of skin cancer diagnostic models and review the results based on these models. The deficiencies in some of the existing studies are highlighted and suggestions for future research are provided. PMID:24575126

  18. The effect of computer-mediated social support in online communities on patient empowerment and doctor-patient communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Hyun Jung; Lee, Byoungkwan

    2012-01-01

    In the context of diabetes, this study tested a mechanism through which Korean diabetes patients' exchange of computer-mediated social support (CMSS) in diabetes online communities influences their sense of empowerment and intention to actively communicate with the doctor. Analysis of data from 464 Korean diabetes patients indicates significant relationships among diabetes patients' online community activities, perceived CMSS, sense of empowerment, and their intention to actively communicate with the doctor. Diabetes patients who have engaged more in online community activities perceived greater social support from other members of the community. Perceived CMSS significantly predicted their intention to actively communicate with the doctor through sense of empowerment. Sense of empowerment was a valid underlying mechanism that explains how patients' perceived CMSS influences their intention to actively communicate with the doctor. The implications for health communication research and practice are discussed.

  19. The Role of the Family Environment and Computer-Mediated Social Support on Breast Cancer Patients' Coping Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Woohyun; Shah, Dhavan V.; Shaw, Bret R.; Kim, Eunkyung; Smaglik, Paul; Roberts, Linda J.; Hawkins, Robert P.; Pingree, Suzanne; Mcdowell, Helene; Gustafson, David H.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the importance of family environment and computer-mediated social support (CMSS) for women with breast cancer, little is known about the interplay of these sources of care and assistance on patients' coping strategies. To understand this relation, the authors examined the effect of family environment as a predictor of the use of CMSS groups as well as a moderator of the relation between group participation and forms of coping. Data were collected from 111 patients in CMSS groups in the Comprehensive Health Enhancement Support System “Living with Breast Cancer” intervention. Results indicate that family environment plays a crucial role in (a) predicting breast cancer patient's participation in CMSS groups and (b) moderating the effects of use of CMSS groups on breast cancer patients' coping strategies such as problem-focused coping and emotion-focused coping. PMID:24511907

  20. Computer-aided acquisition and logistics support (CALS): Concept of Operations for Depot Maintenance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourgeois, N.C.; Greer, D.K.

    1993-04-01

    This CALS Concept of Operations for Depot Maintenance provides the foundation strategy and the near term tactical plan for CALS implementation in the depot maintenance environment. The user requirements enumerated and the overarching architecture outlined serve as the primary framework for implementation planning. The seamless integration of depot maintenance business processes and supporting information systems with the emerging global CALS environment will be critical to the efficient realization of depot user's information requirements, and as, such will be a fundamental theme in depot implementations.

  1. Computer-Based Support of Decision Making Processes during Biological Incidents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karel Antos

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes contextual analysis of a general system that should provide a computerized support of decision making processes related to response operations in case of a biological incident. This analysis is focused on information systems and information resources perspective and their integration using appropriate tools and technology. In the contextual design the basic modules of BioDSS system are suggested and further elaborated. The modules deal with incident description, scenarios development and recommendation of appropriate countermeasures. Proposals for further research are also included.

  2. A Methodology for Decision Support for Implementation of Cloud Computing IT Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adela Tušanová

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the decision of small and medium-sized software companies in transition to SaaS model. The goal of the research is to design a comprehensive methodic to support decision making based on actual data of the company itself. Based on a careful analysis, taxonomy of costs, revenue streams and decision-making criteria are proposed in the paper. On the basis of multi-criteria decision-making methods, each alternative is evaluated and the alternative with the highest score is identified as the most appropriate. The proposed methodic is implemented as a web application and verified through  case studies.

  3. Computer-supported detection of M-components and evaluation of immunoglobulins after capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonsson, M; Carlson, J; Jeppsson, J O; Simonsson, P

    2001-01-01

    Electrophoresis of serum samples allows detection of monoclonal gammopathies indicative of multiple myeloma, Waldenström macroglobulinemia, monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance, and amyloidosis. Present methods of high-resolution agarose gel electrophoresis (HRAGE) and immunofixation electrophoresis (IFE) are manual and labor-intensive. Capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) allows rapid automated protein separation and produces digital absorbance data, appropriate as input for a computerized decision support system. Using the Beckman Paragon CZE 2000 instrument, we analyzed 711 routine clinical samples, including 95 monoclonal components (MCs) and 9 cases of Bence Jones myeloma, in both the CZE and HRAGE systems. Mathematical algorithms developed for the detection of monoclonal immunoglobulins (MCs) in the gamma- and ss-regions of the electropherogram were tested on the entire material. Additional algorithms evaluating oligoclonality and polyclonal concentrations of immunoglobulins were also tested. CZE electropherograms corresponded well with HRAGE. Only one IgG MC of 1 g/L, visible on HRAGE, was not visible after CZE. Algorithms detected 94 of 95 MCs (98.9%) and 100% of those visible after CZE. Of 607 samples lacking an MC on HRAGE, only 3 were identified by the algorithms (specificity, 99%). Algorithms evaluating total gammaglobulinemia and oligoclonality also identified several cases of Bence Jones myeloma. The use of capillary electrophoresis provides a modern, rapid, and cost-effective method of analyzing serum proteins. The additional option of computerized decision support, which provides rapid and standardized interpretations, should increase the clinical availability and usefulness of protein analyses in the future.

  4. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2010-01-01

    Introduction It has been a very active quarter in Computing with interesting progress in all areas. The activity level at the computing facilities, driven by both organised processing from data operations and user analysis, has been steadily increasing. The large-scale production of simulated events that has been progressing throughout the fall is wrapping-up and reprocessing with pile-up will continue. A large reprocessing of all the proton-proton data has just been released and another will follow shortly. The number of analysis jobs by users each day, that was already hitting the computing model expectations at the time of ICHEP, is now 33% higher. We are expecting a busy holiday break to ensure samples are ready in time for the winter conferences. Heavy Ion An activity that is still in progress is computing for the heavy-ion program. The heavy-ion events are collected without zero suppression, so the event size is much large at roughly 11 MB per event of RAW. The central collisions are more complex and...

  5. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Kasemann P. McBride Edited by M-C. Sawley with contributions from: P. Kreuzer D. Bonacorsi S. Belforte F. Wuerthwein L. Bauerdick K. Lassila-Perini M-C. Sawley

    Introduction More than seventy CMS collaborators attended the Computing and Offline Workshop in San Diego, California, April 20-24th to discuss the state of readiness of software and computing for collisions. Focus and priority were given to preparations for data taking and providing room for ample dialog between groups involved in Commissioning, Data Operations, Analysis and MC Production. Throughout the workshop, aspects of software, operating procedures and issues addressing all parts of the computing model were discussed. Plans for the CMS participation in STEP’09, the combined scale testing for all four experiments due in June 2009, were refined. The article in CMS Times by Frank Wuerthwein gave a good recap of the highly collaborative atmosphere of the workshop. Many thanks to UCSD and to the organizers for taking care of this workshop, which resulted in a long list of action items and was definitely a success. A considerable amount of effort and care is invested in the estimate of the comput...

  6. An Innovative Solution Based on Human-Computer Interaction to Support Cognitive Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José M. Cogollor

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This contribution focuses its objective in describing the design and implementation of an innovative system to provide cognitive rehabilitation. People who will take advantage of this platform suffer from a post-stroke disease called Apraxia and Action Disorganisation Syndrome (AADS. The platform has been integrated at Universidad Politécnica de Madrid and tries to reduce the stay in hospital or rehabilitation center by supporting self-rehabilitation at home. So, the system acts as an intelligent machine which guides patients while executing Activities of Daily Living (ADL, such as preparing a simple tea, by informing them about the errors committed and possible actions to correct them. A short introduction to other works related to stroke, patients to work with, how the system works and how it is implemented are provided in the document. Finally, some relevant information from experiment made with healthy people for technical validation is also shown.

  7. IONIO Project: Computer-mediated Decision Support System and Communication in Ocean Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oddo, Paolo; Acierno, Arianna; Cuna, Daniela; Federico, Ivan; Galati, Maria Barbara; Awad, Esam; Korres, Gerasimos; Lecci, Rita; Manzella, Giuseppe M. R.; Merico, Walter; Perivoliotis, Leonidas; Pinardi, Nadia; Shchekinova, Elena; Mannarini, Gianandrea; Vamvakaki, Chrysa; Pecci, Leda; Reseghetti, Franco

    2013-04-01

    A decision Support System is composed by four main steps. The first one is the definition of the problem, the issue to be covered, decisions to be taken. Different causes can provoke different problems, for each of the causes or its effects it is necessary to define a list of information and/or data that are required in order to take the better decision. The second step is the determination of sources from where information/data needed for decision-making can be obtained and who has that information. Furthermore it must be possible to evaluate the quality of the sources to see which of them can provide the best information, and identify the mode and format in which the information is presented. The third step is relying on the processing of knowledge, i.e. if the information/data are fitting for purposes. It has to be decided which parts of the information/data need to be used, what additional data or information is necessary to access, how can information be best presented to be able to understand the situation and take decisions. Finally, the decision making process is an interactive and inclusive process involving all concerned parties, whose different views must be taken into consideration. A knowledge based discussion forum is necessary to reach a consensus. A decision making process need to be examined closely and refined, and modified to meet differing needs over time. The report is presenting legal framework and knowledge base for a scientific based decision support system and a brief exploration of some of the skills that enhances the quality of decisions taken.

  8. Review. Supporting problem structuring with computer-based tools in participatory forest planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hujala, T.; Khadka, C.; Wolfslehner, B.; Vacik, H.

    2013-09-01

    Aim of study: This review presents the state-of-art of using computerized techniques for problem structuring (PS) in participatory forest planning. Frequency and modes of using different computerized tool types and their contribution for planning processes as well as critical observations are described, followed by recommendations on how to better integrate PS with the use of forest decision support systems. Area of study: The reviewed research cases are from Asia, Europe, North-America, Africa and Australia. Material and methods: Via Scopus search and screening of abstracts, 32 research articles from years 2002-2011 were selected for review. Explicit and implicit evidence of using computerized tools for PS was recorded and assessed with content-driven qualitative analysis. Main results: GIS and forest-specific simulation tools were the most prevalent software types whereas cognitive modelling software and spreadsheet and calculation tools were less frequently used, followed by multi-criteria and interactive tools. The typical use type was to provide outputs of simulation–optimization or spatial analysis to negotiation situations or to compile summaries or illustrations afterwards; using software during group negotiation to foster interaction was observed only in a few cases. Research highlights: Expertise in both decision support systems and group learning is needed to better integrate PS and computerized decision analysis. From the knowledge management perspective, it is recommended to consider how the results of PS —e.g. conceptual models— could be stored into a problem perception database, and how PS and decision making could be streamlined by retrievals from such systems. (Author)

  9. Computer-controlled microcirculatory support system for endothelial cell culture and shearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jonathan W; Gu, Wei; Futai, Nobuyuki; Warner, Kristy A; Nor, Jacques E; Takayama, Shuichi

    2005-07-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) lining the inner lumen of blood vessels are continuously subjected to hemodynamic shear stress, which is known to modify EC morphology and biological activity. This paper describes a self-contained microcirculatory EC culture system that efficiently studies such effects of shear stress on EC alignment and elongation in vitro. The culture system is composed of elastomeric microfluidic cell shearing chambers interfaced with computer-controlled movement of piezoelectric pins on a refreshable Braille display. The flow rate is varied by design of channels that allow for movement of different volumes of fluid per variable-speed pump stroke. The integrated microfluidic valving and pumping system allowed primary EC seeding and differential shearing in multiple compartments to be performed on a single chip. The microfluidic flows caused ECs to align and elongate significantly in the direction of flow according to their exposed levels of shear stress. This microfluidic system overcomes the small flow rates and the inefficiencies of previously described microfluidic and macroscopic systems respectively to conveniently perform parallel studies of EC response to shear stress.

  10. PROTEGE-II: computer support for development of intelligent systems from libraries of components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musen, M A; Gennari, J H; Eriksson, H; Tu, S W; Puerta, A R

    1995-01-01

    PROTEGE-II is a suite of tools that facilitates the development of intelligent systems. A tool called MAiTRE allows system builders to create and refine abstract models (ontologies) of application domains. A tool called DASH takes as input a modified domain ontology and generates automatically a knowledge-acquisition tool that application specialists can use to enter the detailed content knowledge required to define particular applications. The domain-dependent knowledge entered into the knowledge-acquisition tool is used by assemblies of domain-independent problem-solving methods that provide the computational strategies required to solve particular application tasks. The result is an architecture that offers a divide-and-conquer approach that separates system-building tasks that require skill in domain analysis and modeling from those that require simple entry of content knowledge. At the same time, applications can be constructed from libraries of component--of both domain ontologies and domain-independent problem-solving methods--allowing the reuse of knowledge and facilitating ongoing system maintenance. We have used PROTEGE-II to construct a number of knowledge-based systems, including the reasoning components of T-Helper, which assists physicians in the protocol-based care of patients who have HIV infection.

  11. Computer-Aided Diagnosis of Micro-Malignant Melanoma Lesions Applying Support Vector Machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworek-Korjakowska, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Background. One of the fatal disorders causing death is malignant melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer. The aim of the modern dermatology is the early detection of skin cancer, which usually results in reducing the mortality rate and less extensive treatment. This paper presents a study on classification of melanoma in the early stage of development using SVMs as a useful technique for data classification. Method. In this paper an automatic algorithm for the classification of melanomas in their early stage, with a diameter under 5 mm, has been presented. The system contains the following steps: image enhancement, lesion segmentation, feature calculation and selection, and classification stage using SVMs. Results. The algorithm has been tested on 200 images including 70 melanomas and 130 benign lesions. The SVM classifier achieved sensitivity of 90% and specificity of 96%. The results indicate that the proposed approach captured most of the malignant cases and could provide reliable information for effective skin mole examination. Conclusions. Micro-melanomas due to the small size and low advancement of development create enormous difficulties during the diagnosis even for experts. The use of advanced equipment and sophisticated computer systems can help in the early diagnosis of skin lesions.

  12. Computer Simulations Support a Morphological Contribution to BDNF Enhancement of Action Potential Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico F Galati

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF regulates both action potential (AP generation and neuron morphology. However, whether BDNF-induced changes in neuron morphology directly impact AP generation is unclear. We quantified BDNF’s effect on cultured cortical neuron morphological parameters and found that BDNF stimulates dendrite growth and addition of dendrites while increasing both excitatory and inhibitory presynaptic inputs in a spatially restricted manner. To gain insight into how these combined changes in neuron structure and synaptic input impact AP generation, we used the morphological parameters we gathered to generate computational models. Simulations suggest that BDNF-induced neuron morphologies generate more APs under a wide variety of conditions. Synapse and dendrite addition have the greatest impact on AP generation. However, subtle alterations in excitatory/inhibitory synapse ratio and strength have a significant impact on AP generation when synaptic activity is low. Consistent with these simulations, BDNF rapidly enhances spontaneous activity in cortical cultures. We propose that BDNF promotes neuron morphologies that are intrinsically more efficient at translating barrages of synaptic activity into APs, which is a previously unexplored aspect of BDNF’s function.

  13. Computer-Aided Diagnosis of Micro-Malignant Melanoma Lesions Applying Support Vector Machines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Jaworek-Korjakowska

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. One of the fatal disorders causing death is malignant melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer. The aim of the modern dermatology is the early detection of skin cancer, which usually results in reducing the mortality rate and less extensive treatment. This paper presents a study on classification of melanoma in the early stage of development using SVMs as a useful technique for data classification. Method. In this paper an automatic algorithm for the classification of melanomas in their early stage, with a diameter under 5 mm, has been presented. The system contains the following steps: image enhancement, lesion segmentation, feature calculation and selection, and classification stage using SVMs. Results. The algorithm has been tested on 200 images including 70 melanomas and 130 benign lesions. The SVM classifier achieved sensitivity of 90% and specificity of 96%. The results indicate that the proposed approach captured most of the malignant cases and could provide reliable information for effective skin mole examination. Conclusions. Micro-melanomas due to the small size and low advancement of development create enormous difficulties during the diagnosis even for experts. The use of advanced equipment and sophisticated computer systems can help in the early diagnosis of skin lesions.

  14. Computational Fluid Dynamics and Visualisation of Coastal Flows in Tidal Channels Supporting Ocean Energy Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enayatollah Zangiabadi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Flow characteristics in coastal regions are strongly influenced by the topography of the seabed and understanding the fluid dynamics is necessary before installation of tidal stream turbines (TST. In this paper, the bathymetry of a potential TST deployment site is used in the development of the a CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics model. The steady state k-ϵ and transient Large Eddy Simulation (LES turbulence methods are employed and compared. The simulations are conducted with a fixed representation of the ocean surface, i.e., a rigid lid representation. In the vicinity of Horse Rock a study of the pressure difference shows that the small change in height of the water column is negligible, providing confidence in the simulation results. The stream surface method employed to visualise the results has important inherent characteristics that can enhance the visual perception of complex flow structures. The results of all cases are compared with the flow data transect gathered by an Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP. It has been understood that the k-ϵ method can predict the flow pattern relatively well near the main features of the domain and the LES model has the ability to simulate some important flow patterns caused by the bathymetry.

  15. SUPPORTING THE INDUSTRY BY DEVELOPING A DESIGN GUIDANCE FOR COMPUTER-BASED PROCEDURES FOR FIELD WORKERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oxstrand, Johanna; LeBlanc, Katya

    2017-06-01

    The paper-based procedures currently used for nearly all activities in the commercial nuclear power industry have a long history of ensuring safe operation of the plants. However, there is potential to greatly increase efficiency and safety by improving how the human interacts with the procedures, which can be achieved through the use of computer-based procedures (CBPs). A CBP system offers a vast variety of improvements, such as context driven job aids, integrated human performance tools and dynamic step presentation. As a step toward the goal of improving procedure use performance, the U.S. Department of Energy Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program researchers, together with the nuclear industry, have been investigating the possibility and feasibility of replacing current paper-based procedures with CBPs. The main purpose of the CBP research conducted at the Idaho National Laboratory was to provide design guidance to the nuclear industry to be used by both utilities and vendors. After studying existing design guidance for CBP systems, the researchers concluded that the majority of the existing guidance is intended for control room CBP systems, and does not necessarily address the challenges of designing CBP systems for instructions carried out in the field. Further, the guidance is often presented on a high level, which leaves the designer to interpret what is meant by the guidance and how to specifically implement it. The authors developed a design guidance to provide guidance specifically tailored to instructions that are carried out in the field based.

  16. Human versus Computer Controlled Selection of Ventilator Settings: An Evaluation of Adaptive Support Ventilation and Mid-Frequency Ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Mireles-Cabodevila

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. There are modes of mechanical ventilation that can select ventilator settings with computer controlled algorithms (targeting schemes. Two examples are adaptive support ventilation (ASV and mid-frequency ventilation (MFV. We studied how different clinician-chosen ventilator settings are from these computer algorithms under different scenarios. Methods. A survey of critical care clinicians provided reference ventilator settings for a 70 kg paralyzed patient in five clinical/physiological scenarios. The survey-derived values for minute ventilation and minute alveolar ventilation were used as goals for ASV and MFV, respectively. A lung simulator programmed with each scenario’s respiratory system characteristics was ventilated using the clinician, ASV, and MFV settings. Results. Tidal volumes ranged from 6.1 to 8.3 mL/kg for the clinician, 6.7 to 11.9 mL/kg for ASV, and 3.5 to 9.9 mL/kg for MFV. Inspiratory pressures were lower for ASV and MFV. Clinician-selected tidal volumes were similar to the ASV settings for all scenarios except for asthma, in which the tidal volumes were larger for ASV and MFV. MFV delivered the same alveolar minute ventilation with higher end expiratory and lower end inspiratory volumes. Conclusions. There are differences and similarities among initial ventilator settings selected by humans and computers for various clinical scenarios. The ventilation outcomes are the result of the lung physiological characteristics and their interaction with the targeting scheme.

  17. Explanation-aware computing of the prognosis for breast cancer supported by IK-DCBRC: Technical innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khelassi, Abdeldjalil

    2014-01-01

    Active research is being conducted to determine the prognosis for breast cancer. However, the uncertainty is a major obstacle in this domain of medical research. In that context, explanation-aware computing has the potential for providing meaningful interactions between complex medical applications and users, which would ensure a significant reduction of uncertainty and risks. This paper presents an explanation-aware agent, supported by Intensive Knowledge-Distributed Case-Based Reasoning Classifier (IK-DCBRC), to reduce the uncertainty and risks associated with the diagnosis of breast cancer. A meaningful explanation is generated by inferring from a rule-based system according to the level of abstraction and the reasoning traces. The computer-aided detection is conducted by IK-DCBRC, which is a multi-agent system that applies the case-based reasoning paradigm and a fuzzy similarity function for the automatic prognosis by the class of breast tumors, i.e. malignant or benign, from a pattern of cytological images. A meaningful interaction between the physician and the computer-aided diagnosis system, IK-DCBRC, is achieved via an intelligent agent. The physician can observe the trace of reasoning, terms, justifications, and the strategy to be used to decrease the risks and doubts associated with the automatic diagnosis. The capability of the system we have developed was proven by an example in which conflicts were clarified and transparency was ensured. The explanation agent ensures the transparency of the automatic diagnosis of breast cancer supported by IK-DCBRC, which decreases uncertainty and risks and detects some conflicts.

  18. Changes in student approaches to learning with the introduction of computer-supported problem-based learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strømsø, Helge I; Grøttum, Per; Hofgaard Lycke, Kirsten

    2004-04-01

    To study changes in student approaches to learning following the introduction of computer-supported, problem-based learning. Medical students at the University of Oslo undertake a 12-week period of clinical placement during their 10th term. In this period they continue to undertake problem-based learning (PBL) in the form of distributed problem-based learning (DPBL) in a computer-supported learning environment. A questionnaire focusing on learning styles, PBL, and information and communication technology (ICT) was distributed before and after the DPBL period. All students in their 10th term at the University of Oslo (n = 61). The introduction of DPBL did not seem to affect the participants' use of regulating strategies or their mental models of learning. After the DPBL period, group discussion and tutor input were reported to have less influence on students' self-study, while the students perceived themselves as being less active in groups and as expecting less from tutors. There was a relationship between perceived tutor influence and students' familiarity with ICT. The DPBL period seemed to increase students' task-related web accesses and use of experts, and to decrease their task-related use of textbooks and discussions with students outside the group. Students' general approaches to learning were not affected by the introduction of DPBL. However, there was a decrease in students' expectations concerning activity in the group and the importance of the tutor. These changes were related to students' familiarity with the use of computers. Web-based resources and experts became more important resources to the students during the DPBL period.

  19. Computational study of silica-supported transition metal fragments for Kubas-type hydrogen storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skipper, Claire V J; Hamaed, Ahmad; Antonelli, David M; Kaltsoyannis, Nikolas

    2010-12-08

    To verify the role of the Kubas interaction in transition metal grafted mesoporous silicas, and to rationalize unusual rising enthalpy trends with surface coverage by hydrogen in these systems, computational studies have been performed. Thus, the interaction of H2 with the titanium centers in molecular models for experimentally characterized mesoporous silica-based H2 absorption materials has been studied quantum chemically using gradient corrected density functional theory. The interaction between the titanium and the H2 molecules is found to be of a synergic, Kubas type, and a maximum of four H2 molecules can be bound to each titanium, in good agreement with previous experiments. The average Ti-H2 interaction energies in molecules incorporating benzyl ancillary ligands (models of the experimental systems) increase as the number of bound H2 units increases from two to four, in agreement with the experimental observation that the H2 adsorption enthalpy increases as the number of adsorbed H2 molecules increases. The Ti-H2 interaction is shown to be greater when the titanium is bound to ancillary ligands, which are poor π-acceptors, and when the ancillary ligand causes the least steric hindrance to the metal. Extension of the target systems to vanadium and chromium shows that, for molecules containing hydride ancillary ligands, a good relationship is found between the energies of the frontier molecular orbitals of the molecular fragments, which interact with incoming H2 molecules, and the strength of the M-H2 interaction. For the benzyl systems, both the differences in M-H2 interaction energies and the energy differences in frontier orbital energies are smaller than those in the hydrides, such that conclusions based on frontier orbital energies are less robust than for the hydride systems. Because of the high enthalpies predicted for organometallic fragments containing hydride ligands, and the low affinity of Cr(III) for hydrogen in this study, these features may

  20. Hard Disk/Solid State Drive Synergy in Support of Data-Intensive Computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu,Ke [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jiang, Song [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Davis, Kei [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-19

    Data-intensive applications are becoming increasingly common in high-performance computing. Examples include combustion simulation, human genome analysis, and satellite image processing. Efficient access of data sets is critical to the performance of these applications. Because of the size of the data today's economically feasible approach is to store the data files on an array of hard disks or data servers equipped with hard disks and managed by a parallel file system such as PVFS or Lustre wherein the data is striped over a (large) number of disks for high aggregate I/O throughout. With file striping, a request for a segment of logically contiguous file space is decomposed into multiple sub-requests, each to a different server. While the data unit for this striping is usually reasonably large to benefit disk efficiency, the first and/or last sub-requests can be much smaller than the striping unit if the request does not align with the striping pattern, severely compromising hard disk efficiency and thus application performance. We propose to exploit solid state drives (SSD), whose efficiency is much less sensitive to small random accesses, to enable the alignment of requests to disk with the data striping pattern. In this scheme hard disks mainly serve large, aligned, sequential requests, with SSDs serving small or unaligned requests, thus respecting the relative cost, performance, and durability characteristics of the two media, and thereby achieving synergy in performance/cost. We will describe the design of the proposed scheme, its implementation on CCS-7's Darwin cluster, and performance results.